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<pubnumber>740R88101</pubnumber>
<title>The Emergency Planning And Community Right To Know Act Of 1986 Extremely Hazardous Substances Listed Under Title 3 Section 302 Chemical Profiles</title>
<pages>1804</pages>
<pubyear>1988</pubyear>
<provider>NEPIS</provider>
<access>online</access>
<operator>LAI</operator>
<scandate>20061213</scandate>
<origin>hardcopy</origin>
<type>single page tiff</type>
<keyword>section registry emergency fire cas chemical breathing material avoid water exposure sax number pressure skin information dot page merck guide</keyword>

                                     740R88101
       EPA Chemical Profiles




                for




   Extremely Hazardous Substances
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency




            June, 1988

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                            EPA CHEMICAL PROFILES
                  INTRODUCTORY INFORMATION AND FULL PROFILES

                              TABLE OF CONTENTS
BACKGROUND     1

DISCUSSION OF SECTIONS OF PROFILES     2

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT      5

ABBREVIATIONS     11

GLOSSARY      13

REFERENCES    23

PROFILES     BY CAS NUMBER*
                                  June 1988
* Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number.

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               EPA CHEMICAL PROFILES:   INTRODUCTORY INFORMATION

                                  BACKGROUND
     The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has developed & set of chemical
profile reference documents for use in dealing with Section 302 of Title III
of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA).  These EPA
profiles contain a summary of publicly available documented information for
chemicals on the EPA list of extremely hazardous substances listed in the
Federal Register, Vol. 52, No. 77, April 22, 1987.

     The profiles were originally developed in 1985 for the 402 chemicals
then called "acutely toxic chemicals" under the Chemical Emergency
Preparedness Program.  When the list went into law as the list of extremely
hazardous substances, four additional chemicals were included.  Forty of the
406 chemicals were subsequently deleted from the list.  Profiles are provided
for the 366 chemicals listed in February, 1988, as extremely hazardous
substances.  Other chemicals may be added or deleted in the future.  The  .
profile format was revised and the data were reviewed, augmented, and revised
as appropriate in 1987.   The profiles have been reviewed for accuracy and
completeness.  However,  an exhaustive literature search was not performed for
each chemical, and a review of original citations has not been made.  •

     A profile is provided for each chemical on the list of extremely
hazardous substances.  Profiles are presented in ascending order of Chemical
Abstract Service (CAS) registry numbers.  One chemical (generic name:
organorhodium complex) is identified by a premanufacture review notice (PMN)
number and appears first.

     The CAS number was used to search the automated Toxicology Data Base
(TDB) or Hazardous Substance Data Bank (HSDB) from the National Library of
Medicine (NLM).   If available, TDB/HSDB files were retrieved.  Approximately
65 percent of the chemicals were listed in the TDB/HSDB files.  For these
chemicals,  the TDB/HSDB files provided the main source of information for the
profiles.  All data obtained from the TDB/HSDB were indicated by an asterisk
(*) followed by a reference to the TDB/HSDB citation, (e.g., (*Merck 1976)).
For those chemicals without a TDB/HSDB file, a limited number of standard
reference materials was searched.  Such references are cited by author, year,
and page number.  A master list of references, including the secondary
references cited in TDB/HSDB, has been prepared and may be found in the
Reference Section of this document.  The abbreviations used in the profiles
have been defined in a master list and may be found in the Abbreviation
Section.  Medical terms not commonly used have been included in a Glossary
Section.  Dorland's Medical Dictionary (1974) was used to provide most of the
definitions in the Glossary.

     If information was not available for a specific compound but the
chemical could be categorized, then general information about the chemical
category was included.  Such information is indicated, for example, by the
notation "Non-Specific -- Organophosphorus Pesticide" or "Non-Specific --
Poisonous Solid, n.o.s.".

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                                     -2-

                      DISCUSSION OF SECTIONS  OF PROFILES
     Each profile includes chemical identity information and eight sections
containing information on regulations, properties, hazards, uses, and
precautions.  Comments on the elements of the profiles are presented below.

     Chemical Identity.  The name given on the profile is the name used on
the list of extremely hazardous substances (Section 302 of SARA Title III)
and is one of the most common names.

     CAS Registry Number.  The number is identical to the number listed in
the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Registry of
Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS).

     Synonyms.   Synonyms from TDB/HSDB files are listed without citation.
Synonyms from NIOSH/RTECS (1983) or the Structure and Nomenclature Search
System (SANSS)  (1983) ,  or other sources are referenced.  The 9th Collective
Index (CI) name from the SANSS 1983 database was added to each profile when
the 9th CI name was different from the 8th CI name.

     Chemical Formula and Molecular Weight.  Data from TDB/HSDB or
NIOSH/RTECS (1983) are not cited.  Formulas or molecular weights found in
other sources are cited.

     Section I -- Regulatory Information.  The toxicity value that placed the
chemicals on the list has been included in this section.  These toxicity data
were obtained from a screen of the NIOSH/RTECS on-line computer file and are
also cited with an asterisk (*) (e.g., *NIOSH/RTECS 1985).  Toxicity data
were not included for chemicals listed on the basis of high production volume
and known toxicity ("Other" chemicals).

     Also included are Threshold Planning Quantities (TPQs) and Reportable
Quantities (RQs), as listed in the Final Rule (Federal Register, Volume 52,
Number 77, April 22, 1987).

     An indication of whether the chemical is listed under Section 313 of
Title III of SARA is included; if the chemical falls into a chemical category
listed in Section 313, the category is given.

     Section II -- Physical/Chemical Characteristics.  Physical state (solid,
liquid, or gas) at ambient conditions is listed, as given in the Interim
Final Rule (Federal Register, Vol. 51, No. 221, November 17, 1986); no
reference is cited on the profiles.  Other properties are included with
references.

     Section III -- Health Hazard Data.  Generally, only human data are
reported in the Health Hazard Data section.  The following exposure limits
are included, if available:

     •    Occupational Safety and Health Administration  (OSHA)
          Permissible Exposure Limits (PELs);

     •    American Council of Governmental Industrial Hygienists  (ACGIH)
          Threshold Limit J/alues  (TLVs); and

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                                     -3-
     •    Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health (IDLH) levels
          developed by N10SH.

     The following limits may be listed under Other Limits Recommended, if
available:

     •    NIOSH recommendations;
     •    EEGLs (emergency exposure guidance levels);
     •    SPEGLs (short-term public emergency guidance levels);
     •    Human carcinogens or suspect carcinogens listed by the ACGIH;
     •    OSHA carcinogens;  and
     •    NIOSH potential occupational carcinogens.

EEGLs and SPEGLs, developed by the National Research Council of the National
Academy of Sciences, are discussed in more detail in Appendix D of the
Technical Guidance for Hazards Analysis (EPA 1987).  An EEGL is defined as an
acceptable concentration for unpredicted, single, short-term emergency
exposure of a defined occupational group (EEGLs have been developed for
military personnel).  A SPEGL is defined as an acceptable concentration for
unpredicted, single, short-term, exposure of the general public in
emergencies.

     Information on the route of exposure and health hazards often was not
available or only partially available for specific chemicals.  Health hazard
data often were not found specific to dose, route of entry or exposure type
(acute, delayed, or chronic).  Generic information on the chemical category
was provided, wherever possible, in the absence of information on the
specific chemical.

     Section IV -- Fire and Explosion Hazard Data.  In the absence of
chemical-specific information, generic information is provided whenever the
chemical could be categorized.  National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)
flammability ratings from the NFPA Fire Protection Guide on Hazardous
Materials are included if available.

     Section V --  Reactivity Data.  In the absence of chemical-specific
information, generic information is provided whenever the chemical could be
categorized.

     Section VI -- Use Information.  This section includes uses of the
chemical as reported in HSDB or other sources.

     Section VII -- Precautions for Safe Handling and Use.  Chemical-
specific information often was not available; therefore, generic information
for the chemical category often is presented.

     Section VIII -- Protective Equipment for Emergency Situations.  This
section contains recommendations for the type of personal protective
equipment to be used.  See page 5 for a detailed discussion of personal
protective equipment.

     Section IX -- Emergency Treatment Information.  This section contains
information on signs and symptoms of poisoning and emergency treatment
information for first responders.  Emergency planners may be especially

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                                     -4-

interested in references to medical equipment and supplies that could be
useful in case of the accidental release of the extremely hazardous
substance.

     Approximately 120 of the revised chemical profiles contain complete
revisions of the emergency treatment information section and have been
retitled the Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide (EFATG).   This new section
has been reformatted and contains more detailed guidance for emergency
treatment based on information obtained from the Rocky Mountain Poison
Center's proprietary data base, Poisindex.  The order of completion of
EFATG's is being carried out by priority based on considerations of toxicity,
production volume, and availability of specific emergency treatment
information.  Revisions of the emergency treatment information sections for
the remaining profiles is underway and will be published as soon as they are
completed.  In the meantime, these profiles contain the emergency treatment
information that was originally published in 1986.

     Because the emergency treatment information is designed for use by first
responders, references to signs and symptoms of exposure as well as
procedural guidance avoid the use of highly technical medical language.
Signs and symptoms are not distinguished by route of exposure.  Emergency
treatment procedures, on the other hand, are presented according to route of
exposure, with emphasis on the inhalation and dermal routes.  References to
invasive treatments are limited, since the emergency treatment information is
directed to first responders rather than medical practitioners.  First
responders must be aware of particular state and local regulations which
govern the extent of invasive treatment that they may perform.

     The Agency for Toxic substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) has
provided general review of the EFATf-'s for format and content.

     Comments.  This section is provided, in some cases, to list the sources
that were checked for information in cases of chemicals for which few data
were available.  In general, this section pertains to chemicals without
TDB/HSDB files.

     Not Found.  This statement on the profile can mean that:

     •    The value or information was not found in the references used;

     •    The value or information probably does not exist for this
          chemical; or

     •    The value is meaningless or not applicable for this chemical.

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                                     -5-

                        PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
     Personal protective equipment (PPE) for emergency response situations
involving extremely hazardous substances must be selected carefully and used
properly.  The PPE should protect the respiratory system, skin, eyes, face,
hands, feet and body from chemical, physical and biological hazards that may
be encountered during an emergency response action.  Selection of the proper
personal protective equipment must consider the specific hazards responders
are likely to encounter at a particular site.  Selection is a complex task
and should be performed only by individuals with proper training and
experience.

     Regulatory Requirements and Other Standards.  Selection, use, training
and programs for PPE for emergency response situations may be covered by
regulations and standards under the Occupational Safety and Health
Administration (OSHA) 29 CFR 1910, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
regulations and recommendations, Department of Transportation (DOT)
regulations, or National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) standards.

     Personal Protective Equipment for Emergencies.  During an emergency
involving extremely hazardous substances, a wide variety of conditions may
occur.  Therefore, response personnel should wear maximum protection
initially until actual conditions at the site are evaluated.  Maximum
protection is designed to provide the highest available level of respiratory,
skin and eye protection.  Recommended equipment consists of a positive
pressure, pressure-demand full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus
(SCBA) or full facepiece supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a
fully-encapsulating chemical-resistant suit.  In addition, other equipment
such as inner chemical-resistant gloves, chemical-resistant safety
boots/shoes, and two-way radio communications, a cooling unit, coveralls,
long cotton underwear, hard hat, disposable gloves and boot covers may be
worn as needed.

     Figure 1 gives an example of a worker outfitted in a fully-
encapsulating suit with respiratory protection.  Note that if the fully-
encapsulating suit does not have integral gloves and boots, then glove/suit
and boot/suit joints should be sealed with tape.

     Respiratory Protection.  Positive pressure self-contained breathing
apparatus (SCBA) should be worn by employees engaged in emergency response
and exposed to hazardous substances until it is determined that a decreased
level of respiratory protection will not result in hazardous exposures to
employees (See OSHA 29 CFR 1910.120 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency
Response).

     Chemical Protective Clothing and Equipment.  The selection of chemical
protective clothing is a complex process and many factors must be considered
such as:  the nature of the hazard; the potential route of exposure;  the
tasks to be accomplished; and the performance of the protective equipment
materials in forming a barrier to the chemical substances encountered at a
site.  No protective equipment material protects against all chemicals and
combinations of chemicals.  In many cases, the chemical substance may
permeate or break through the protective equipment;material, exposing the
wearer to the chemical.  It is important to note that the information

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                          -6-
       Figure  1.   FULLY  ENCAPSULATING  CHEMICAL-RESISTANT  SUI
     Respiratory  Protection Must be Worn with this  Type of S

From "Guidelines  for the Selection of Chemical Protective C!
                            3rd Edition.

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                                     -7-

presented for an individual chemical may not be applicable when that chemical
is present in a mixture, as the ability of a chemical in a mixture to
permeate a material may differ from that of the pure chemical.  Further
studies are needed to evaluate the characteristics of mixtures of chemicals
in relation to materials for personal protective equipment.

     The chemical profiles give general information on the chemical
resistance of various suit materials to provide a basis for a decision on
whether suit materials are adequate.  This information is available for about
half of the chemicals on the list of extremely hazardous substances.  The
chemical resistance information for each suit material is indicated on the
profiles by the entries shown below.  Explanations of their meanings follow
the entries.

     •    Excellent Resistance/Many Data means there is quantitative
          information indicating that the material demonstrates
          excellent chemical resistance to the substance.

     •    Good Resistance/Limited Data means there is quantitative
          information indicating that the material demonstrates good
          chemical resistance to the substance.

     •    Poor Resistance/Many Data means there is quantitative
          information indicating that the material demonstrates poor
          chemical resistance to the substance.

     •    Poor Resistance/Limited Data means there is quantitative
          information indicating that the material demonstrates poor
          chemical resistance to the substance.

     •    Good Resistance/Limited Data* means there is qualitative
          information indicating that the material demonstrates good
          chemical resistance to the substance.  Most of this
          information is based on qualitative ratings from glove
          material manufacturers and may or may not be based on actual
          testing.  This entry on the profile is intended to provide
          general guidance in selecting chemical protective clothing.

     •    Poor Resistance/Limited Data* means there is qualitative
          information indicating that the material demonstrates poor
          chemical resistance to the substance.  Most of this
          information is based on qualitative ratings from glove
          material manufacturers and may or may not be based on actual
          testing.  This entry on the profile is intended to provide
          general guidance in selecting chemical protective clothing.

     •    Good Resistance/Limited Data** means there is qualitative or
          quantitative information indicating that the material
          demonstrates good chemical resistance based on the generic
          family of chemicals to which the substance belongs.  Most of
          this information is not based on testing done on the substance
          itself.  This entry on the profile is intended to provide
          general guidance to the initial selection of chemical
          protective clothing and to narrow the scope of alternative
          materials.

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                                     -8-
     •    Poor Resistance/Limited Data** means there is qualitative or
          quantitative information indicating that the material
          demonstrates poor chemical resistance based on the generic
          family of chemicals to which the substance belongs.  Most of
          this information is not based on testing done on the substance
          itself.  This entry on the profile is intended to provide
          general guidance to the initial selection of chemical
          protective clothing and to narrow the scope of alternative
          materials.

     Remember that this information provides guidance only and is not a
guarantee that the suit will protect an individual from prolonged or repeated
exposure and may not provide adequate protection for mixtures of chemicals.
Consult reference 1 for more information.  Also, be sure to consult with
facility representatives for additional information.  Other considerations
include durability and flexibility of the chemical protective clothing, and
heat stress.  Table 1 lists the fully-encapsulating suit materials available
on the market as of February, 1987.  (See non-mandatory Appendix B of OSHA 29
CFR 1910.120 for more information).

     Special Use Considerations.  Fire, heat, explosion and radiation require
special-protective equipment.  It is important to provide protection from
these hazards in addition to chemical hazards.  Section IV of the profiles
entitled Fire and Explosion Hazard Data should be consulted for further
information.  (See OSHA 29 CFR 1910.156, DOT and NFPA standards and
recommendations for more information.)

     Decontamination.  Decontamination of personal protective equipment
should be tailored to the specific conditions at the site and will vary
accordingly.  (See non-mandatory Appendix D of OSHA 29 CFR 1910.120 for
additional information).

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                                     -9-

            TABLE 1.   AVAILABLE FULLY-ENCAPSULATING SUIT  MATERIALS
                            AS OF FEBRUARY, 1987*
1.   Butyl Rubber/Nylon (BUTYL)
2.   Butyl Rubber, Sheet (BUTYL)
3.   Butyl/Fabric/Butyl (BUTYL)
4.   Butyl/Nylon/Butyl (BUTYL)
5.   Butyl/Polyester/Chloroprene Rubber (BUTYL/NEOPRENE)
6.   Chlorinated Polyethylene (CPE)
7.   Chlorobutyl Rubber/Nomex (CHLOROBUTYL)
8.   Chlorobutyl/Nomex/Chlorobutyl (CHLOROBUTYL)
9.   Chloroprene Rubber/Nylon (NEOPRENE)
10.  Chloroprene Rubber,  Sheet (NEOPRENE)
11.  Fluoroelastomer/Butyl/Nylon/Butyl (VITON/BUTYL)
12.  Fluoroelastomer/Fabric/Fluoroelastomer (VITON)
13.  Fluoroelastomer/Nylon/Chloroprene (VITON/NEOPRENE)
14.  Fluoroelastomer/Polyester/Chlorobutyl (VITON/CHLOROBUTYL)
15.  Fluoroelastomer, Sheet (VITON)
16.  Nitrile/Fabric (NITRILE)
17.  PE/Polyvinylidenechloride/PE/Tyvek (SARANEX)
18.  Polyethylene/Tyvek (PE)
19.  Polyvinyl Chloride/Fabric (PVC)
20.  Polyvinyl Chloride/Fabric/Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC)
21.  Polyvinyl Chloride/Nylon (PVC)
22.  Polyvinyl Chloride/Nylon/Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC)
23.  Polyvinyl Chloride,  Sheet (PVC)
24.  Sontara (NONWOVEN FABRIC)
25.  TFE/Fiberglass/TFE (TEFLON)
26.  TFE/Nomex/TFE (TEFLON)
27.  Tyvek (NONWOVEN PE)
     Schwope,  A.D.,  et al.   Guidelines for the Selection of Chemical
     Protective Clothing,  3rd Edition.  Cincinnati:  American Conference of
     Governmental Industrial Hygienists,  Inc., 1987.

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                                     -10-

                   PERSONAL  PROTECTIVE  EQUIPMENT REFERENCES
1.1   Schwope, A.D. ;  P.P. Costas; J.O. Jackson; J.O.  Stull;  and D.J.  Weitzman.
     Guidelines for the Selection of Chemical Protective Clothing.   3rd
     Edition.  Cincinnati:  American Conference of Governmental Industrial
     Hygienists, Inc., 1987.

2.   Certified Equipment List as of October 1, 1986.  DHHS  (NIOSH)  No.  87-
     102.  Cincinnati:  National Institute for Occupational Safety and
     Health, 1986.

3.   Criteria for a Recommended Standard ... Occupational Exposure to Hot
     Environments Revised Criteria 1986.  DHHS (NIOSH) No.  86-113.
     Cincinnati:  National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health,
     1986.

4.   National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health; Occupational
     Safety and Health Administration; U.S. Coast Guard; U.S. Environmental
     Protection Agency.  Occupational Safety and Health Guidance Manual for
     Hazardous Waste Site Activities.  DHHS Occupational Safety and Health,
     1985.

5.   Occupational Safety and Health Administration 29 CFR 1910 Occupational
     Safety and Health Standards, especially 29 CFR 1910.120 Hazardous Waste
     Operations and Emergency Response.

6.   National Fire Protection Association standards and recommendations, such
     as NFPA 704M, 1500 and 1981.

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                                     -11-

                                ABBREVIATIONS
ACGIH

ADI

AIHA

BAL

GAS

CC

CNS

EEC

EEGL


EKG

EPA

IARC

ID1H

1m

LCLO


LC50


LDLO

LD50


T,ET,

m3

mg/Kg

nnnHg

NIOSH

n.o.s.
American Conference of Government and Industrial Hygienists

Acceptable Daily Intake

American Industrial Health Association

Dimercaprol  (British anti-lewisite)

Chemical Abstracts Service

Closed cup

Central Nervous System

Electroencephalogram

Emergency Exposure Guidance Level developed by the National
Research Council (NRC)

Electrocardiogram

Environmental Protection Agency

International Agency for Research on Cancer

Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health

intramuscularly

Lethal Concentration Low; the lowest concentration at which
death occurred

Lethal Concentration 50; the concentration at which 50% of the
animals died; a calculated value

Lethal Dose Low; the lowest dose at which death occurred

Lethal Dose 50; the dose at which 50% of the animals died; a
calculated value

Lower Explosive Limit

Cubic meter

milligrams per kilogram

millimeters of mercury; a measure of pressure

National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health

Not otherwise specified

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NRG

NTP

OC

OSHA

PEL

ppb

ppm

RBC

RTECS

SANSS

SPEGL

STEL

TCC


TOG


TDLO

TLV

TWA

DEL

ug

2-PAM
                      -12-

            ABBREVIATIONS  (Confd)


National Research Council,  National Academy of Sciences

National Toxicology Program

open cup

Occupational Safety and Health Administration

Permissible Exposure Level

parts per billion

parts per million

Red blood cell(s)

Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances

Structure and Nomenclature Search System

Short-term Public Exposure Guidance Level developed by the NRC

Short-term exposure limit

Tagliabue Closed Cup, a standard method of determining flash
point

Tagliabue Open Cup, a standard method of determining flash
point

Toxic Dose Low; the lowest dose at which toxicity occurred

Threshold Limit Value

Time Weighted Average

Upper Explosive Limit

microgram

pralidoxime

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                                     -13-

                                   GLOSSARY
Acaricide

Acidosis



Acneform

Albuminuria

Alopecia


Amorphous

Anaphylactoid



Anorexia

Anoxia



Anthelmintic


Anticoagulant:

Antilewisite


Antimetabolite


Antipyretic

Aphasia



Aplasia
Ar gyrosis
an agent that destroys mites

pathologic condition resulting from
accumulation of acid in, or loss of base
from, the blood or body tissues

resembling acne

presence of serum albumin in the urine

baldness; absence of hair from skin areas
where it is usually present

without definite form, not crystallized

resembling an unusual or exaggerated
allergic reaction to foreign protein or
other substances

lack or loss of appetite for food

absence of lack of oxygen; reduction of
oxygen in the body tissues below
physiologic levels

an agent that is destructive to worms
especially of the intestine

an agent that prevents blood clotting

dimercaprol; also called British anti-
lewisite, or BAL

a substance that interferes with
utilization of an essential metabolite

an agent that relieves or reduces fever

defect or loss of power of expression by
or comprehension of speech, writing, or
signs

lack of development of an organ or tissue,
or the cellular products from an organ or
tissue; germinal aplasia -- complete
failure of gonad development

poisoning by silver or a silver salt,
evidenced by ashen-gray discoloration of
skin

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                                     -14-

                              GLOSSARY (Cont'd)
Arrhythmia


Arteriosclerosis


Asthenia

Astringent


Ataxis


Avicide

Bioaccumulation



Bradycardia


Bronchoconstriction

Calcification



Carcinogenic

Cardiac

Cathartic

Cheyne -Stokes respiration



Chloracne


Clonic



Conj unct ivitis

Contraindication
any variation from the normal rhythm of
the heart beat

hardening and thickening of the walls of
the smaller arteries

lack or loss of strength; weakness

causing contraction, usually locally after
surface application

failure of muscular coordination;
irregularity of muscular action

an agent that kills birds

increased concentrations of a chemical in
an organism compared to the surrounding•
environment

slowness of the heart beat, as evidenced
by slowing of pulse rate to less than 60

narrowing of the air passages of the lungs

process by which organic tissue becomes
hardened by a deposit of calcium salts
within its substance

producing or inciting cancer

pertaining to the heart

causing evacuation of the bowels; laxative

respiratory distress related to posture
(especially reclining at night) that
occurs in association with heart disease

acne-like eruption caused by exposure to
chlorine compounds

pertaining to alternate muscular
contraction and relaxation in rapid
succession

inflammation of the lining of the eyelids

any condition which renders some
particular line of treatment improper or
undesirable

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                                     -15-

                              GLOSSARY (Cont'd)
Cryogenic


Cyanosis



Decoction

Demulcent

Dermal

Dermatitis

Desiccant

Diluent

Diuresis

Diuretic

DS2
Ductile


Dyspnea

Ectoparasiticide


Edema



Ernesis

Enteritis

Epigastric


Epileptiform

Epithelium
pertaining to or causing the production of
low temperatures

bluish discoloration,  especially of the
skin and mucous membranes and fingernail
beds

substance prepared by boiling

soothing

pertaining to the skin

inflammation of the skin

a drying agent

a diluting agent

increased secretion of urine

agent that increases urine production

standard decontaminant for chemical
warfare agents; contains 70% diethylene
triamine, 28% ethylene glycol monomethyl
ether, and 2% sodium hydroxide

capable of being drawn out or hammered
thin

difficult or labored breathing

an agent that kills parasites living on
the exterior of its host

presence of abnormally large amounts of
fluid in intercellular spaces of body
tissues

vomiting

inflammation of the intestine

pertaining to the upper-middle region of
the abdomen

occurring in severe or sudden spasms

cells covering the internal and external
surfaces of the body

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                                     -16-

                              GLOSSARY (Cont'd)
Erythema


Exothermic


Explosive
Flammable


Gastrointestinal

Germinalaplasia

Glomerular


Half-life


Halon


Health Hazard

     Acute
     Chronic
     Delayed


Hematoma
Hematuria

Hemoglohinuria

Hemolysis


Hemolytic


Hepatic
redness of the skin produced by congestion
of the capillaries

characterized by or formed with evolution
of heat

characterized by or relating to bursting
forth with sudden violence or noise from
internal energy; relating to a rapid
reaction with production of noise,  heat,
and violent expansion of gases

capable of being easily ignited and
supporting combustion

pertaining to the stomach and intestine

lack of development of egg and sperm cells

pertaining to a tuft or cluster, as of
blood vessels or nerve fibers

the time in which the concentration of a
substance will be reduced by half

halogenated hydrocarbon (e.g., carbon
tetrachloride)
immediate toxic effects
persistent or prolonged injury
toxic effect occurring after a lapse of
time

localized collection of blood, usually
clotted, in an organ, space, or tissue,
due to a break in the wall of the blood
vessel

blood in the urine

presence of free hemoglobin in the urine

separation of hemoglobin from red blood
cells and its appearance in the plasma

pertaining to or characterized by
hemolysis

pertaining to the liver

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                                     -17-

                              GLOSSARY (Cont'd)
Humectant

Hydrolysis


Hygroscopic


Hyperactivity

Hyperalimentation


Hyperbilirubinemia

Hypercalcemia

Hyperparathyroidism



Hyperpyrexia

Hyperreflexia

Hypersalivation

Hypertens ion

Hypervitaminosis


Hypobilirubinemia


Hypocalcemia

Hypovolemic



Hypoxemia

Hypoxia


Interstitial Pneumonia
moistening or diluent substance

decomposition reaction involving the
splitting of a chemical substance by water

readily taking up and retaining moisture
(water)

abnormally increased activity

ingestion or administration of a greater
than optimal amount of nutrients

an excess of bilirubin in the blood

excess of calcium in the blood

abnormally increased activity of the
parathyroid glands which affects and is
affected by serum calcium levels

a highly elevated body temperature

exaggeration of reflexes

excessive secretion of saliva

persistently high arterial blood pressure

condition due to ingestion of an excess of
one or more vitamins

abnormally low levels of bilirubin in the
blood

abnormal reduction of blood calcium levels

pertaining to an abnormally decreased
volume of circulating fluid (plasma) in
the body

deficient oxygenation of the blood

low oxygen content or tension; deficiency
of oxygen in the inspired air

a chronic form of pneumonia with increase
of the interstitial tissue and decrease of
the proper lung tissue

 image: 






                                     -18-

                              GLOSSARY (Cont'd)
Isotonia
Jaundice
Lachrymator (or lacrimator)


Lacrimation

Laryngospasm

Larynx
Lassitude

Latency

Lesion


Lethal

Leukopenia


Lewisite


Malaise

Mania
Metastatic



Methemoglobinemia


Miosis  (or myosis)
a solution having the same effective
osmotic pressure as the body fluid to
which it is compared

syndrome characterized by
hyperbilirubinemia and deposition of bile
pigment in the skin, resulting in yellow
appearance of the patient

a substance which increases the flow of
tears

secretion and discharge of tears

spasmodic, closure of the larynx

the muscular and cartilage structure
situated at the top of the trachea
(windpipe) and below the root of the
tongue, functioning as sphincter into the
trachea and as the organ of voice

weakness; exhaustion

a state of seeming inactivity

a pathological or traumatic discontinuity
of tissue or loss of function of a part

deadly; fatal

reduction in the number of leukocytes in
the blood

a lethal war gas which is a vesicant,
lacrimator and lung irritant

a vague feeling of bodily discomfort

a phase of mental disorder characterized
by an expansive emotional state, elation,
overtalkativeness, and increased motor
activity

pertaining to the transfer of disease from
one organ or part to another not directly
connected with it

presence of methemoglobin (oxidized
hemoglobin) in the blood

contraction of the pupil

 image: 






                                     -19-

                               GLDSSARY (Cont'd)
 Miscible


 Mordant



 Mutagenic

 Mydriasis

 Myelosuppression


 Narcotic


 Necrosis



 Nephritis

 Neural

 Neuropathy



 Neurotoxicity


Nocturia

 Ocular

Oliguria


Ophthalmic

Osteosclerosis

Palpitation



Parasympathomimetic
 capable of mixing in any ratio without
. separation of two phases

 a chemical that fixes a dye in or on a
 substance by combining with the dye to
 form an insoluble compound

 inducing genetic mutation

 extreme dilation of the pupil

 suppression of the formation of bone
 marrow

 an agent that produces insensibility or
 stupor

 death of tissue,  usually as individual
 cells,  group of cells, or in localized
 areas

 inflammation of the kidney

 pertaining to a nerve or to the nerves

 functional disturbances and/or
 pathological changes in the peripheral
 nervous system

 exerting a destructive or poisonous  effect
 en nerve tissue

 excessive urination at night

 pertaining to or  affecting the eye

 secretion of a diminished amount  of  urine
 in relation to fluid intake

pertaining to the eye

hardening or  abnormal  density  of  bone

unduly  rapid  heart beat which  is  noted by
the patient;  it may be regular or
 irregular

producing  effects resembling time of
stimulation of the parasympathetic nerve
supply  to  a part; called  also  cholinergic

 image: 






                                     -20-

                              GLOSSARY (Cont'd)
Parenteral
Paresthesia


Perfusion


Pharynx


Photophobia

Photosens itize


Phytotoxic


Polydipsia


Precordial


Proteinuria


Psychosis



Psychotropic


Pulmonary

Rales


Recumbent

Renal

Scotoma
not through the alimentary canal but
rather by injection through some other
route,  such as subcutaneous,
intramuscular, intravenous, etc.

an abnormal sensation, as burning or
prickling

liquid poured over or through an organ or
tissue

the muscular membrane sac between the
mouth and nostrils and the esophagus

abnormal visual intolerance of light

to induce a state of abnormal
responsiveness to the influence of light

poisonous to plants; inhibiting plant
growth

excessive thirst persisting for long
periods of time

pertaining to the region over the heart
and lower part of the thorax

an excess of serum proteins in the urine;
also called albuminuria

any major mental disorder characterized by
derangement of the personality and loss of
contact with reality

exerting an effect upon the mind; capable
of modifying mental activity

pertaining to the lungs

abnormal respiratory sound heard when
listening for sounds within the body

lying down

pertaining to the kidney

an area of depressed vision within the
visual field, surrounded by an area of
less depressed or normal vision

 image: 






                                     -21-

                              GLOSSARY  (Cont'd)
Supertropical Bleach



Systemic


Tachycardia

Tepid

Teratogenic


Tetanic


Thrombocytopenia

Tidal volume


Tinnitus


Toxic


Triglyceridemia

Urticaria
Vasodilation
Ventrictilar fibrillation
Vertigo
bleaching agent containing calcium
hypochlorite (a powerful oxidizer) and
calcium oxide (a corrosive material)

pertaining to or affecting the body or
organism as a whole

excessively rapid heart beat

moderately warm; lukewarm

tending to produce anomalies of formation
or development

pertaining to or of the nature of tetanus,
a disease characterized by muscle spasm

decrease in the number of blood platelets

amount of gas that is inhaled and exhaled
during one respiratory cycle

a noise in the ears, such as ringing,
buzzing, roaring, clicking

pertaining to, due to, or of the nature of
a poison

excess of triglycerides in the blood

a vascular reaction of the skin marked by
the transient appearance of smooth,
slightly elevated patches (wheals) which
are redder or paler than the surrounding
skin and often attended by severe itching

dilation (expansion of a vessel,
especially of arterioles leading to
increased blood flow to a part

irregular heart beat characterized by
uncoordinated contractions of the
ventricle

dizziness;  an illusion of movement as if
the external world were revolving around
an individual or as if the individual were
revolving in space
Vesicant
causing blisters

 image: 






                                     -22-

                              GLOSSARY (Conf d)
Volatile                      --   readily vaporizable at a relatively low
                                   temperature

 image: 






                                     -23-

                                  REFERENCES
               *   Cited in TDB/HSDB file
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 image: 






                                -24-

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*    Brzozowski.  1985.  J. Med. Pract 5:89.

/-   Buchel KH.  1983.  Chemistry of pesticides.  New York:  John Wiley and
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                                     -26-

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*/-  CHRIS.   1978.  U.S. Coast  Guard,  Department  of Transportation.  Cl
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/-   CHRIS.   1987.  Chemical Hazard Response  Information System  on-lin
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*/-  Clayton GD, Clayton FE, eds.  1981,  1982.  Patty's industrial hygiene
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*    Cole RJ,  Cox RH.  1981.  Handbook of toxic fungal metabolites.  New
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/-   Dagani R.   1985.  Data on MIC's toxicity are scant, leave much to be
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/-   DASE.  1980.  Dutch Association of Safety Experts.  Handling chemicals
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                                     -28-

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*    Duffy, JI, ed.  1983.  Treatment, recovery, and disposal processes
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/-   DuPont.  1985.  Material Safety Data Sheet.

*/-  Encyc Occupat Health and Safety.   1983.  Encyclopedia of occupat
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/-   Friel JP, ed.  1974.  Dorland's  illustrated medical dictiona
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 image: 






                                     -29-

                             REFERENCES (Cont'd)


*    Furia TE, Bellanca N, eds.  1971.  Fenaroli's handbook of flavor
     ingredients.  Cleveland:  The Chemical Rubber Co.

*    Fuscaldo A, Erlick BJ,  Hindman B, eds.  1980.  Laboratory safety-theory
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*    General Electric Co.  1978.  MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheets).
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Marmion DM.  1984.  Handbook of U.S. colorants for foods, drugs, and
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                                     -32-

                             REFERENCES (Cont'd)
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*    Menzie CM.  1974.   Metabolism of pesticides,  an update.   U.S.  Department
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*    Menzie CM.  1969.   Metabolism of pesticides.   U.S.  Department of the
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*/-  Merck Index.  1983.  An encyclopedia of chemicals,  drugs, and
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*    Merory J.  1968.  Food flavorings:  composition, manufacture,  and use.
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*/-  NFPA.  1984.  National Fire Protection Association.   Fire protection
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 image: 






                                -33-

                        REFERENCES (Cont'd)


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                                     -34-

                             REFERENCES (Cont'd)
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*    NIOSH/OSHA.  1980.  National Institute for Occupational Safety and
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                                     -35-

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 image: 






                                     -36-

                             REFERENCES (Cont'd)


*    NRC.  1983.  National Research Council.   Polycyclic aromatic
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*    Parr JF, Marsh PB, Kla JM, eds.  1983.  Land treatment of hazardous
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                                -37-

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Rodricks JV, Hesseltine CW, Mehlman MA, eds.  1977.  Mycotoxins in human
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New York:  Van Nostrand Reinhold Co.

Sax NI.   1984.  Dangerous properties of industrial materials.  6th ed.
New York:  Van Nostrand Reinhold.

Sax NI.   1979.  Dangerous properties of industrial materials.  5th ed.
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Searle CE, ed.  1976.  Chemical carcinogens.  Washington, D.C.:
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                                -38-

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Sorahan T. et al.  1983.  Ann Occup Hyg 27(2):173-182.

Spencer EY.  1973.  Guide to the chemicals used in crop protection, 6th
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Spencer EY.  1982.  Guide to the chemicals used in crop protection 7th
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                                     -39-

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*    USEPA.  1983.  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.  Tolerances for
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*    USEPA.  1980.  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.  Ambient Water
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*    USEPA/ECAO.  1980.  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency/Environmental
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*    USEPA/ODW.  1983.  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.  Office of
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/-   USEPA/Pesticide Index.  1985.  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
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*    USFWS.  1984.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the
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*    USFWS.  1980.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the
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*    USFWS.  1975.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the
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*    USFWS.  1972.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the
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*    Venugopal B, Luckey TD.  1978.  Metal toxicity in mammals,  2.   New York:
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*/-  Verschueren K.  1983.  Handbook of environmental data on organic
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*    Weast RC, ed.   1974.  Handbook of chemistry and physics.  55th ed.   Boca
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*    Weast RC, ed.   1972.  Handbook of chemistry and physics.  53th ed.  Boca
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*    Weed Science Society of America.  1979.  Herbicide handbook.  4th ed.
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*    Weed Science Society of America.  1974.  Herbicide handbook.  3rd ed.
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/-   Weiss G,  ed.  1986.  Hazardous chemicals data book.  2nd ed.  Park
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*.   Worthing CR, ed.  1979.  Pesticide manual.  6th ed.  Worcestershire,
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/-   Worthy-W. 1985.  Methyl isocyanate:  the chemistry of a hazard.  Chem
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                                        CAS Registry Number: 50-00-0
                                        Page 5 of 5

                             FORMALDEHYDE

SECTION VIII  (continued)

    SUIT MATERIAL.PERFORMANCE (Based on EPA/USCG "Guidelines", 1987)
                      (Chemical Resistance/Amount of Data)

          Butyl                EXCELLENT/MANY
          Butyl/Neoprene       GOOD/LIMITED*
          CPE                 GOOD/LIMITED
          Neoprene            POOR/MANY
          Nitrile               POOR/MANY
          PE                  EXCELLENT/MANY
          PVC                 POOR/MANY
          Teflon               POOR/LIMITED
          Viton                EXCELLENT/MANY
          Viton/Neoprene       GOOD/LIMITED*

     *Based on qualitative performance information.
    **Based on a chemical analog.

 NOTES: For concentrations  <37% formaldehyde


SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    See Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide

 image: 






                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  50-00-0
                                             Page 1 of 3
                        Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide
                                        for
                                 FORMALDEHYDE

                                     (50-00-0)
     This guide should not be construed to authorize emergency personnel to
perform the procedures or activities indicated or implied.  Care of persons
exposed to toxic chemicals must be directed by a physician or other recognized
authority.
Substance Characteristics:

Pure Forms - Colorless gas or liquid below -20 degrees C (-6 degrees F).

Odor - Strong, pungent.

Commercial Form - Aqueous solution containing approximately 40% formaldehyde
and 15% methanol.

Uses -  Disinfectant, preservative, embalming fluid, treatment of grain smut,
hardening agent, reducing agent, corrosion inhibitor, gold and silver recovery,
textile manufacture.
Other Names - Formalin, formic aldehyde, Formol, Karsan, Lysoform, methanal,
methyl aldehyde, methylene oxide, Morbicid, oxomethane, oxymethylene.
Personal Protective Equipment:  See Chemical Profile Section VIII.
Emergency Life-Support Equipment and Supplies That May Be Required:

Compressed oxygen, forced-oxygen mask, soap, water, milk, syrup of Ipecac,
activated charcoal, saline cathartic or sorbitol, normal saline, D5W, Ringer's
lactate, sodium bicarbonate, dopamine, norepinephrine, levarterenol.

 image: 






                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  50-00-0
                                             Page 2 of 3

                                 FORMALDEHYDE

Signs and Symptoms of Acute Formaldehyde Exposure:

Acute exposure to formaldehyde may result in irritation or burns to the skin,
eyes, and mucous membranes; lacrimation (tearing); nausea; vomiting (may be
bloody); abdominal  pain; and diarrhea.  Difficulty in breathing, cough,
pneumonia, and  pulmonary edema may occur.  Sensitized people may experience
asthmatic reactions, even when  exposed briefly.  Hypotension (low blood
pressure) and hypothermia (reduced body temperature) may precede cardiovascular
collapse.  Lethargy, dizziness, convulsions, and coma may be noted.  Nephritis
(inflammation of the kidneys),  hematuria (bloody urine), and liver toxicity
have been reported.


Emergency Life-Support Procedures:

Acute exposure to formaldehyde may require decontamination and life support for
the victims.  Emergency personnel should wear protective clothing appropriate
to the type and degree of contamination. Air-purifying or supplied-air
respiratory equipment should also be worn, as necessary.  Rescue vehicles
should carry supplies such as plastic sheeting and disposable plastic bags to
assist in preventing spread of contamination.


Inhalation Exposure:

1.   Move victims to fresh air.   Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure
     to formaldehyde.

2.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma. If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.  If breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.   Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration of  an antidote or performance of other invasive
     procedures.

4.   Transport to a health care facility.
Dermal/Eye Exposure:

1.  Remove victims from exposure. Emergency personnel should avoid self-
     exposure to formaldehyde.

2.  Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and  note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.  If breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.  Remove contaminated clothing as soon as possible.

4.  If eye exposure has occurred, eyes must  be flushed with lukewarm water for
     at least IS  minutes.

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                                              EFATG
                                              CAS Registry Number:  50-00-0
                                              Page 3 of 3

                                 FORMALDEHYDE

5.   Wash exposed skin areas twice with soap and water,

6.   Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive
     procedures.

7.   Transport to a health care facility.


Ingestion Exposure:

1.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.  If breathing  is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

2.   Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive
     procedures.

3.   Give the victims water or milk:  children  up to 1 year old, 125 mL (4 oz
     or 1/2 cup); children  1 to 12 years old, 200 mL (6 oz or 3/4 cup); adults,
     250 mL (8  oz or 1 cup). Water or milk should be given only if victims
     are conscious and alert.

4.   Vomiting  may be induced with syrup of Ipecac.  If elapsed time since
     ingestion of formaldehyde is unknown or suspected  to be greater than
     30 minutes, do  not induce vomiting and  proceed to Step 5.  Ipecac  should
     not be administered to children under 6  months of age.

     Warning: Ingestion of formaldehyde may result in sudden onset of seizures
     or loss of consciousness. Syrup of Ipecac  should be administered only if
     victims are alert, have  an active gag-reflex, and show no signs of
     impending seizure or coma.  If ANY uncertainty exists, proceed to Step 5.

     The following dosages of Ipecac are recommended:  children up  to 1  year
     old, 10 mL (1/3 oz); children 1 to 12 years old, 15 mL (1/2 oz); adults,
     30 mL (1 oz).  Ambulate (walk) the victims and give large quantities'of
     water. If vomiting has not occurred after 15 minutes, Ipecac may  be
     readministered.  Continue to ambulate and give water to the victims.  If
     vomiting has not occurred within 15 minutes after second administration of
     Ipecac, administer activated charcoal.

5.   Activated charcoal may be administered if victims are conscious and alert.
     Use 15 to 30 g (1/2 to 1 oz) for children, 50 to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz)
     for adults, with 125 to 250 mL (1/2 to 1  cup) of water.

6.   Promote excretion  by administering a saline cathartic or sorbitol to
     conscious and alert victims. Children  require 15 to  30 g (1/2 to  1 oz) of
     cathartic; 50 to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz) is recommended  for adults.

7.   Transport to a health care facility.

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  50-07-7
                                           Page 1 of 3
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31,  1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY -- MITOMYCIN C

CAS Registry Number:  50-07-7

Synonyms:  Ametycine; Mutamycin; NSC-26980; Azirino[2',3':3,4]pyrrolo
[l,2-a]indole-4,7-dione, 6-amino-8-[[(aminocarbonyl)oxy]methyl]-l,la,2,8,8a,8b-
hexahydro-8a-methoxy-5-methyl-,[laR-(la.alpha.,8.beta.,8a.alpha.,8b.alpha.)]-

Chemical Formula: C15H18N4O5

Molecular Weight: 334.37


SECTION I -- REGULATORY  INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA)  1986:

           Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302: LD50 oral (rat)
           14 rag/kg (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

           TPQ: 500/10,000 (pounds)

           RQ: 1  (pounds) (statutory);  10 (pounds) (proposed)

           Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II -- PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Solid

    Boiling Point: Not Found

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1):  Not Found

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  Not Found

    Melting Point: Above 680°F, 360°C (*Merck 1983)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  Soluble (*Merck  1983)

    Appearance and Odor:  Blue-violet  crystals (*Merck 1983)

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 50-07-7
                                           Page 2 of 3

                               MITOMYCIN C
                                                       i
SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV: Not Found

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended:  Not Found

    Routes of Entry:  Inhalation:  Not Found
                    Skin:  Not Found
                    Ingestion: Not Found

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic): Toxic doses as low as 750
    rag/kg have been reported in  humans (*NIOSH  1979).  The major toxic effect
    is myelosuppression, characterized by marked leukopenia and
    thrombocytopenia; this may be delayed and cumulative.  Interstitial
    pneumonia and glomerular damage resulting in kidney failure are unusual but
    well documented  complications (Oilman 1985, p. 1289).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure:  Lung conditions —
    administration of mitomycin has been recognized  as causing pneumonitis,
    alveolitis and pulmonary fibrosis (*Weiss 1980). Kidney conditions --
    administration of mitomycin can cause kidney damage (Oilman 1985, p. 1289).
    Kidney toxicity was observed in 1-5 percent of patients. Depressed immune
    conditions (*AMA 1977).


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): Not Found
  -  Flammable Limits:
        LEL: Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods:  Not Found

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  Not Found

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  Not Found

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  Not Found


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable: Not Found
               Stable: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 50-07-7
                                            Page 3 of 3

                               MITOMYCIN C

SECTION V   (continued)

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid): Not Found

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts: Not Found

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur: Not Found
                             May Not Occur:  Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not  Found


SECTION VI -- USE INFORMATION

    Anti-tumor antibiotic complex (*Merck 1976). This drug is usually injected
    intravenously (*AMA 1977).
SECTION VII -- PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to  be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Avoid inhalation and skin contact.
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA  and a  fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at the
    beginning  of the profiles for additional information.
SECTION IX -- EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure:  Headaches, blurred vision, confusion,
    drowsiness, fatigue, diarrhea, and pain have been occasionally noted.
    These do not appear to be dose related by intravenous administration.
    Fever and anorexia occur in 15 percent of patients.  Hair loss, sloughing
    of skin, and loss of feeling occur in approximately 4 percent of patients.
    Labored breathing, cough and pneumonia occur in some cases.  Renal toxicity
    is sometimes observed  (*AMA  1977).

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures:  Seek immediate medical care.  Skin
    decontamination should be thorough, with water and soap. Eye exposure can
    be followed by irrigation of eyes with  plain tap water (*Rumack 1975 to
    Present). (Non-Specific - Medicines, n.o.s.)  If not breathing, give
    artificial respiration.  If breathing is difficult, give oxygen.  Remove
    and isolate contaminated clothing and  shoes at the site. Keep victim quiet
    and maintain normal body temperature (DOT 1984, Guide  11).

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                                             CAS Registry Number:  50-14-6
                                             Page 1 of 4
                           EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                    Date: October 31, 1985
                                                    Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY -- ERGOCALCIFEROL

CAS Registry Number: 50-14-6

Synonyms: 9,10-Secoergosta-5,7,10(19),22-Tetraen-3-beta-ol;
9,10-Secoergosta-5,7,10( 19),22-Tetraen-3-ol,(3-beta,5Z,7E,22E)-; Activated
Ergosterol; Buco-D; Calciferol; Calciferon 2; Condacaps; Condocaps; Condol;
Crtron; Crystallina; D-Arthin;  D-Tracetten; Daral; Davitamon D; Davitin; De-Rat
Concentrate; Decaps; Dee-Osterol; Dee-Ron; Dee-Ronal; Dee-Roual; Deltalin;
Deratol; Detalup; Diactol; Divit Urto; Doral; Drisdol;
Ergorone; Ergosterol Activated; Ergosterol, Irradiated; Ertron; Fortodyl;
Geltabs; Hi-Deratol; Infron; Irradiated Ergosta-5,7,22-Trien-
3-Beta-ol; Irradiated Ergosterol; Metadee; Mina D2; Mulsiferol; Mykostin;
Oleovitamin D; Oleovitamin D2; Ostelin; Radiostol; Radsterin; Shock-Ferol;
Vitamin D2

Chemical  Formula:  C28H44O

Molecular Weight: 396.63


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:  LDlow oral (dog)
           4 mg/kg (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

           TPQ: 1,000/10,000  (pounds)

           RQ:  1 (pounds)
               (statutory, for  notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

           Section 313 Listed  (Yes or No): No
SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Solid

    Boiling Point:  Not Found

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1):  Not Found

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  Not Found

    Melting Point: 239-244°F, 115-118°C (*Merck 1976)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  Not Found

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 50-14-6
                                            Page 2 of 4

                               ERGOCALCIFEROL

SECTION II   (continued)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  Insoluble in water (*Merck 1976)

    Appearance and Odor:  White crystals, odorless (*Osol 1975)


SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV:  Not Found

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended:  Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Not Found
                     Skin:  Not Found
                     Ingestion:  Yes (*Rumack 1975 to Present)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic): Ergocalciferol poisoning
    disturbs calcium metabolism and causes  kidney damage (Buchel 1983, p. 224).
    Ergocalcif erol  in a single acute ingestion presents no toxic hazards.
    Daily ingestion in excess of 5000 units/day in children or 7500 units/day
    in adults will produce toxic symptoms associated with hypervitaminosis D
    (*Rumack  1975 to Present).

    Medical  Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure:  Those with
    hypercalcemia are at a  greater risk (Physicians' Desk Reference 1985, p.
    1748)


SECTION IV ~ FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used):  Not Found
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL:  Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing  Methods:  (Non-Specific — Medicines, n.o.s.) Extinguish
    with dry chemical, carbon dioxide, water spray, fog, or foam (DOT 1984,
    Guide 11).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  (Non-Specific — Medicines, n.o.s.)
    Move container from fire area if you can do  so without risk. Spray cooling
    water on containers that are exposed to  flames until well after fire is out
    (DOT 1984, Guide 11).

    Unusual Fire and  Explosion Hazards: Not  Found

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  Not Found

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  50-14-6
                                            Page 3 of 4

                               ERGOCALCIFEROL

SECTION V -- REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:  Yes (*Furia 1972)
               Stable:

        Conditions to Avoid:  Shows signs of decomposition when stored for a
        few days at room temperature (*Furia  1972).

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Not Found

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts: Not Found

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:  Not Found
                              May Not Occur: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Nutrient and/or dietary supplement food additive (*Sax 1975).
SECTION VII -- PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    (Non-Specific -- Medicines, n.o.s.)  Keep unnecessary people away; isolate
    hazard area and deny entry.  Stay upwind; keep out of low areas.
    Shut off ignition sources; no flares, smoking or flames in hazard
    area.  Keep combustibles (wood, paper, oil, etc.) away from
    spilled material.  Do  not touch spilled material. Small spills:
    absorb with sand or other noncombustible absorbent material and  place into
    containers for later disposal.  Large spills:  dike far ahead of spill for
    later disposal (DOT 1984, Guide 11).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.
SECTION IX -- EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure:   Initial symptoms of ergocalciferol
    poisoning include anorexia, nausea and vomiting. It often mimics
    hyperparathyroidism with thirst, muscular weakness, nervousness, kidney
    impairment, hypertension (*Gosselin 1976), and excessive urination (*Gilman
    1980).

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                                             CAS Registry Number: 50-14-6
                                             Page 4 of 4

                                ERGOCALCIFEROL

SECTION IX   (continued)

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures:  (Non-Specific — Medicines, n.o.s.)
    Move victim to fresh air; call emergency medical care. If not breathing,
    give artificial respiration.  If breathing is difficult, give oxygen.  In
    case of contact with material, immediately flush skin or eyes with running
    water for at least 15 minutes.  Remove and isolate contaminated clothing
    and shoes at the site.  Keep victim quiet and maintain normal body
    temperature (DOT 1984, Guide  11).

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                                             CAS Registry Number:  50-00-0
                                             Page 3 of 5

                                FORMALDEHYDE

SECTION IV   (continued)

        UEL:  73% (*Sax 1975)

    Extinguishing  Methods: Small fires:  dry chemical, carbon dioxide, water
    spray or foam. Large fires:  water spray, fog or foam.  Move container
    from fire area if you can do so without risk.  Do not get water inside
    container. Spray cooling water on containers exposed to flames until well
    after fire is out.  Withdraw immediately in case of rising sound from
    venting safety device or any discoloration of  tank due to fire (DOT 1984,
    Guide 29).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures: Keep unnecessary people away; stay
    upwind; keep  out of low  areas. Isolate for  1/2 mile in all directions if
    tank car or truck is involved in fire (*DOT 1984).  Wear self-contained
    breathing apparatus; wear goggles if eye protection not provided.  Shut off
    flow of gas or liquid and keep cooling water  streams on exposed tanks or
    containers.  Use water  spray carefully in vicinity of dusts so as not to
    create dust clouds (*NFPA 1978).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  Toxic vapors such as carbon dioxide
    and carbon monoxide are generated during combustion  (*Environment Canada
    1982).  Explosion hazard: when aqueous formaldehyde  solutions are heated
    above their flash points, a potential for explosion hazard exists. High
    formaldehyde  concentration or methanol content lowers flash point.  Reacts
    with nitrogen  oxides at about  180; the reaction  becomes explosive. Also
    reacts violently with perchloric acid-aniline, performic acid,
    nitromethane,  magnesium carbonate, and hydrogen peroxide (Sax 1984, p.
    1452).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  4 (gas); 2 (37% solution)
SECTION V -- REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:  Yes, aqueous solutions (*Lefaux 1968)
               Stable: Yes, commercial formaldehyde-alcohol solutions
                         (*Kirk-Othmer 1978); gas is stable in absence of
                         water (*HeaIth and Safety Executive Monograph 1981)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Oxidizing and alkaline materials (*NFPA 1978)

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid): Reacts with peroxide, nitrogen
    oxide, and performic acid causing explosions (*Environment Canada 1982).
    Can react with hydrogen chloride or other inorganic chlorides to form
    bis-chloromethylether (BCME), a known carcinogen (*General Electric Co.
    1981, MSDS 360).  Very reactive, combines readily with many substances, 40%
    solution is powerful reducing agent (*Merck  1976). Incompatible with
    amines, azo compounds, dithiocarbamates, alkali and alkaline earth metals,
    nitrides, nitro compounds, unsaturated aliphatics and sulfides, organic
    peroxides, oxidizing agents, and reducing agents (*Environment  Canada
    1982).

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  When heated, irritant  formaldehyde
    gas evolved from solution (Sax 1984, p. 1452).  The main products of

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  50-00-0
                                            Page 4 of 5

                                FORMALDEHYDE

SECTION V   (continued)

    decomposition are carbon monoxide and hydrogen.  Metals such as platinum,
    copper, chromia, and alumina also catalyze the formation of methanol,
    methylformate, formic acid, carbon dioxide,  and methane (*Kirk- Othmer
    1978).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:  Yes (*Environment Canada 1982)
                              May Not Occur:

        Conditions to Avoid: Compound will polymerize with active  organic
        materials such as phenol (*General Electric Co. 1981, MSDS 360). Will
        polymerize violently in the presence of caustics and nitrides; (amines)
        exothermic reaction, (Azo compound) exothermic reaction giving off
        nitrogen gas, (caustics) heat generation and violent polymerization,
        (dithiocarbamates) formation of flammable gases and toxic fumes,
        formation of carbon disulfide may result, (alkali and alkaline earth
        metals) heat generation and formation of a flammable hydrogen gas
        (*Environment Canada 1982).


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Urea and melamine resins; polyacetal resins;  phenolic resins; ethylene
    glycol; pentaerythritol; hexamethylenetetramine; fertilizer; dyes, medicine
    (disinfectant, germicide); embalming fluids; preservative; hardening agent;
    reducing agent, as in recovery of gold and silver; corrosion inhibitor in
    oil wells; durable-press treatment of textile fabrics; possible
    condensation to sugars and other carbohydrates for food use (experimental);
    industrial sterilant;  treatment of grain smut  (Hawley 1977, p. 395).
SECTION VII -- PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Shut off  ignition sources; no flares, smoking or flames in hazard area.  Do
    not touch spilled material; stop leak if you can  do so without risk.  Use
    water spray to reduce vapors; do not get water inside container.  Small
    spills:  absorb with sand or other noncombustible absorbent material and
    place into containers for later disposal.  Large spills: dike far ahead of
    spill for  later disposal (DOT 1984, Guide 29). Use fluorocarbon water
    spray, Cellosize, and Hycar to diminish vapors.  Use sodium carbonate,
    ammonium hydroxide or sodium sulfite to neutralize spill. Use universal
    gel, fly/ash, universal sorbent material, or cement powder to absorb the
    spill  (*Environment Canada  1982).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See  the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  50-00-0
                                           Page 1 of 5
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY -- FORMALDEHYDE

CAS Registry Number:  50-00-0

Synonyms:  BFV; FA; Fannoform; Formaldehyde solution; Formaldehyde, as
Formalin solution (DOT); Formaldehyde, gas; Formalin; Formalin 40; Formalith;
Formic Aldehyde; Formol; Fyde; Hoch; Ivalon; Karsan; Lysoform; Methanal; Methyl
Aldehyde; Methylene Glycol; Methylene Oxide; Morbicid; NCI-C02799; Oxomethane;
Oxymethylene; Superlysoform

Chemical Formula: CH2O

Molecular Weight:  30.03


SECTION I -- REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:

               Chemical does not meet the toxicity criteria but because of its
               high production volume and recognized toxicity it is considered
               a chemical of concern.

           TPQ: 500 (pounds)

           RQ: 1,000 (pounds) (statutory); 100 (pounds) (proposed)

           Section 313  Listed (Yes or No): Yes


SECTION II -- PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Gas

    Boiling Point:  -3.1°F, -19.5°C at 760 mmHg (*Merck 1976); commercial
    aqueous formaldehyde boils at 205°F, 96°C (Merck 1983, p. 604)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1): 1.067 (*Merck 1976); 0.815 at -20°C/4°C for
    anhydrous form (Merck 1983, p. 604)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg): 10 at -88°C (*Patty 1963), for anhydrous form

    Melting Point:  -134°F,-92°C (*Merck 1976),  for anhydrous form

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  1.03 for aqueous solution; 1.075 for gas
    (*Environment Canada 1982), 1.067 for gas (Merck 1983, p. 604)

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 50-00-0
                                            Page 2 of 5

                               FORMALDEHYDE

SECTION II   (continued)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  Very soluble in water, up to 55% (*Merck 1976)

    Appearance and Odor:  Gas or liquid,  strong, pungent odor, clear,
    water-white (Sax 1984, p. 145).


SECTION III -- HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  TWA 3 ppm; Ceiling Concentration 5 ppm;  Peak Concentration 10
    ppm/30 minutes/8 hours (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

    ACGIH TLV: TWA 1.5 mg/ms (1 ppm) (*ACGIH 1980); STEL 3 mg/ms (2 ppm)
    (ACGIH 1986-87, p.19)

    IDLH: 100 ppm (NIOSH/OSHA 1978, p. 104)

    Other Limits Recommended:  Occupational exposure to formaldehyde
    recommended standard  -- air ceiling concentration 1.2 mg/m3/30 minutes
    (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985). Industrial substance suspect of  carcinogenic
    potential for humans recommended standard 1 ppm (ACGIH 1984, p. 42)

    Routes of Entry:  Inhalation:  Yes  (Proctor and Hughes 1978,
                                  pp. 272-273)
                    Skin: Yes  (Environment Canada 1982)
                    Ingestion:  Yes (*Gosselin 1976)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and  Chronic): The probable oral lethal
    dose for humans is 0.5-5 g/kg, or between 1 ounce and 1 pint for a 150
    pound person (*Gosselin 1976). Acute -- below  1 ppm, odor perceptible to
    most. 2-3 ppm, mild tingling of eyes.  4-5 ppm, increased discomfort,  mild
    lacrimation.  10 ppm, profuse lacrimation; can be withstood only  for few
    minutes.  10-20 ppm, breathing difficult, cough, severe burning of nose and
    throat. 50-100 ppm, acute  irritation of respiratory tract, very serious
    injury likely.  Skin — primary irritation from strong solutions, gas.
    Delayed — sensitization dermatitis (Proctor and Hughes  1978, pp. 272-273).
    Suspected carcinogen (*Kirk-Othmer 1978). Effects  in women include
    menstrual disorders and secondary sterility (*IARC 1972-1985). Solutions
    splashed in eyes have caused injuries ranging from severe,  permanent
    corneal opacification and loss of vision to minor discomfort (*Grant 1974).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure:   In  people sensitized
    to formaldehyde, late asthmatic reactions may be provoked by brief
    exposures at approximately 3 ppm (*Hendrick  1982).


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): 60°C/40% solution (*Merck  1976)
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL:  7% (*Sax  1975)

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  Not Found
                                            Page 3 of 3
                                ORGANORHODIUM COMPLEX

SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:  Not Found
               Stable: Not  Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Not Found

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  Not Found

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur: Not Found
                              May Not Occur:  Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found


SECTION VI -- USE INFORMATION

    Catalyst (PMN-82-147).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    (Non-Specific — Poisonous Solid, n.o.s.)  Keep unnecessary people away;
    isolate hazard area and deny entry. Stay upwind; keep out of low areas.
    Do not touch spilled material; stop leak if you can do it
    without risk.  Small spills: take up with sand or other
    non-combustible absorbent material and place into containers for later
    disposal.  Small dry spills: with clean shovel place material into clean,
    dry container and cover; move containers from  spill area. Large spills:
    dike far ahead of spill for later disposal (DOT  1984, Guide  53).
SECTION VIII -- PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a  fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at the
    beginning  of the profiles for additional information.
SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure:  Not Found

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures:  (Non-Specific -- Poisonous Solid,
    n.o.s.)  Move victim to  fresh air; call emergency medical care.  Remove and
    isolate contaminated clothing and shoes at the site. In case of contact
    with material, immediately flush skin or  eyes with running water for at
    least 15 minutes (DOT 1984, Guide  55).

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                                 CAS Registry Number:  Not Found
                                 Premanufacture Notice  Number: PMN-82-147
                                 Page 1 of 3
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                  Date: October 31, 1985
                                                  Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY -- GENERIC NAME: ORGANORHODIUM COMPLEX

    (This chemical was identified from a Premanufacture Review Notice (PMN)
    submitted to EPA.  The submitter has claimed certain information on the
    submission to be confidential, including specific chemical identity,
    chemical formula, and  molecular weight.)

CAS Registry Number:  Not Found

Synonyms: Not Found

Chemical Formula: Not Found

Molecular Weight: Not Found


SECTION I -- REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

          Toxicity Value  Used for Listing Under Section 302:  LC50 inhalation
          (rat) 0.08 mg/liter (submitter's estimate)  (PMN-82-147)

          TPQ: 10/10,000 (pounds)

          RQ: 1  (pounds)
              (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

          Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Solid

    Boiling Point: Not Found

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1):  Not Found

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  Not Found

    Melting Point:  Not Found

    Vapor Density (AIR=1): Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l):  Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  Insoluble (PMN-82-147)

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  Not Found
                                           Page 2 of 3

                               ORGANORHODIUM COMPLEX

SECTION II   (continued)

    Appearance and Odor: Green crystals (PMN-82-147)


SECTION III -- HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  (Rhodium metal fume dust) 0.1  mg/ms, as rhodium (NIOSH 1987,
    p. 204)

    ACGIH TLV: (Insoluble Rhodium Compounds) TWA 1 mg/m3, as rhodium (A(
    1984, p. 29)

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended: Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation: Not Found
                    Skin: Not Found
                    Ingestion: Not Found

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  (Non-Specific —
    Organometals)  Organometals may be highly  toxic orally. They are
    irritating to skin, eyes, and mucous membranes.  They can damage lung
    tissue and the liver (Sax  1984, p. 2095).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by  Exposure:  Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used):  Not Found
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL:  Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods: (Non-Specific — Poisonous Solid, n.o.s.) Small
    fires:  dry chemical, carbon dioxide,  water spray, or  foam.  Large fires:
    water spray, fog or foam. Move container from fire area if you can do it
    without risk (DOT  1984, Guide 53).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures: (Non-Specific « Poisonous  Solid,
    n.o.s.) Stay upwind; keep out of low  areas.  Wear self-contained (positive
    pressure if available) breathing apparatus and full protective clothing
    (DOT 1984, Guide 53).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  (Non-Specific -- Poisonous Solid,
    n.o.s.) Fire may produce irritating or poisonous gases (DOT 1984, Guide
    53).

    NFPA Flammability Rating: Not Found

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 51-21-8
                                            Page  1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY -- FLUOROURACIL

CAS Registry Number:  51-21-8

Synonyms:  Uracil, 5-Fluoro-; 5-Fluorouracil; Efudex; Fluoroplex;
2,4-Dioxo-5-Fluoropyrimidine; 5-Fluoro-2,4( 1 H,3H)-Pyrimidinedione; 5-Fluoro-
2,4-Pyrimidinedione; 5-Fluoropyrimidine-2,4-Dione; 5-Fluoropyrimidine-
2,4-Dione; Fluoro Uracil; Fluracil; Fluril; FU; 5-FU; NSC 19893; RO 2-9757;
U-8953; 2,4(1 H,3H)-Pyrimidinedione, 5-Fluoro-

Chemical Formula: C4H3FN2O2

Molecular Weight:  130.08


SECTION I -- REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

      Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:  LD50 oral (rabbit)
      18.9 mg/kg (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

      TPQ: 500/10,000 (pounds)

      RQ:  1 (pounds)
          (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

      Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

      Physical State: Solid

      Boiling Point: Not Found

      Specific Gravity (H2O=1): Not Found

      Vapor Pressure (mmHg): Not Found

      Melting Point:  Decomposes at 540-541°F, 282-283°C (*Merck  1976)

      Vapor Density (AIR=1): Not Found

      Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

      Solubility in Water:  1  g in 80 mL of water (*Osol 1975)

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 51-21-8
                                            Page 2 of 4

                                FLUOROURACIL

SECTION II    (continued)

      Appearance and Odor:  White to practically white crystalline powder;
      practically odorless (*Osol 1975)


SECTION III -- HEALTH HAZARD DATA

      OSHA PEL: Not Found

      ACGIH TLV:  Not Found

      IDLH:  Not Found

      Other Limits Recommended: Not Found

      Routes of Entry: Inhalation: Not Found
                       Skin:  Yes (Physicians' Desk Reference 1980, p. 1452)
                       Ingestion: Yes (*Goodman 1975)

      Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  Minimum toxic dose in
      humans is approximately 450 mg/kg (total  dose) over 30 days for the
      ingested drug.  Intravenous minimum toxic dose in humans is a total dose
      of 6 mg/kg over three days. Depression of white blood cells occurred
      after intravenous administrative of a total dose  of  480 mg/kg  over 32
      days (*NIOSH/RTECS  1978).

      Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure: Occasional
      neuropathy and cardiac toxicity have been reported (Oilman 1985, pp.
      1270-1271). Do not use during pregnancy (Physicians' Desk Reference  1980,
      p. 1455). Patients with impaired hepatic or renal function, with a
      history of high-dose pelvic irradiation or previous use  of alkylating
      agents should be treated with extreme caution (Physicians' Desk Reference
      1980, p. 1455). Patients with nutritional deficiencies and protein deple-
      tion have a reduced tolerance to fluorouracil (Oilman  1985, p. 1270).


SECTION IV -- FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

      Flash Point (Method Used):  Not Found
      Flammable Limits:
        LEL:  Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

      Extinguishing  Methods: (Non-Specific -- Drugs  or Medicines, n.o.s.
      (Solid) Poison  B)  Extinguish fire using agent suitable  for type of
      surrounding fire (material itself burns  with difficulty).  Use water in
      flooding quantities as fog.  Use "alcohol" foam,  carbon dioxide or dry
      chemical (Student  1981, p. 215).

      Special Fire Fighting Procedures: (Non-Specific ~ Drugs or Medicines,
      n.o.s. (Solid) Poison B)  Avoid breathing dusts, and fumes from burning
      material.  Keep upwind. Avoid bodily contact with the material.  Wear

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  51-21-8
                                            Page 3 of 4

                               FLUOROURACIL

SECTION IV   (continued)

      boots, protective gloves, and goggles.  Wear self-contained breathing
      apparatus (Student 1981, p.-215).

      Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  Not Found

      NFPA Flammability Rating:  Not Found


SECTION V -  REACTIVITY DATA

      Stability:  Unstable:
                 Stable: Yes (*Osol  1975)

          Conditions to Avoid:  Decomposing heat (*Merck 1976)

      Incompatibility  (Materials to Avoid):  Not Found

      Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  Emits  very toxic fumes of
      flourides and nitrogen oxides when heated to decomposition (Sax 1984, p.
      1450).

      Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:  Not Found
                               May Not Occur: Not Found

          Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found


SECTION VI -- USE INFORMATION

      Antineoplastic drug (*Merck 1976); chemosterilant  for insects
      (*White-Stevens  1976).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

      (Non-Specific -- Drugs)  Keep unnecessary people away; isolate hazard
      area and deny entry. Stay upwind; keep out of low areas.  If water
      pollution occurs, notify appropriate authorities.  Spill or leak:
      shut off ignition sources; no flares, smoking or flames in hazard
      area.  Keep combustibles (wood, paper, oil etc.) away from spilled
      material. Do not touch spilled material.  Small spills:  absorb with sand
      or other noncombustible absorbent material and place into containers for
      later disposal.  Large spills: dike far ahead of spill for later disposal
      (DOT 1984, Guide 11).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 51-21-8
                                            Page 4 of 4
                                FLUOROURACIL
SECTION VIII   (continued)

      demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
      chemical resistant suit. See the introductory information section at the
      beginning of the profiles for additional information.
SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

      Signs and Symptoms of Exposure: Loss of appetite and nausea are earliest
      symptoms, with other symptoms of diarrhea, inflammation or sores in the
      mouth, gastric burning, and intestinal discomfort. More serious symptoms
      are due to the suppression of  bone marrow, with decrease of white cell
      count and blood platelets, and anemia.  Hair loss, nail changes,
      dermatitis,  and pigmentation  and atrophy of skin also occur (*Goodman
      1975).

      Emergency  and First Aid Procedures:  (Non-Specific -- Drugs)   Move victim
      to fresh air; call emergency medical care.  If not breathing, give
      artificial respiration.  If  breathing is difficult, give oxygen. In case
      of contact with material, immediately flush skin or  eyes with  running
      water for at least 15 minutes. Remove and isolate contaminated clothing
      and shoes at the site.  Keep victim quiet and maintain normal body
      temperature (DOT 1984, Guide  11).

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  51-75-2
                                            Page 1 of 4
                           EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                    Date: October 31, 1985
                                                    Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY -- MECHLORETHAMINE

CAS Registry Number:  51-75-2

Synonyms:  2,2'-Dichloro-N-Methyldiethylamine; 2-Chloro-N-(2-Chloroethyl)-
N-Methylethanamine; Beta,Beta'-Dichlorodiethyl-N-Methylamine; Bis(2-Chloro-
ethyl)Methylamine; Bis(Beta-Chloroethyl)Methylamine; Caryolysin; Chloramine
(the nitrogen mustard); Chlorethazine; Chlormethine; Di(2-Chloroethyl)
Methylamine; Dichlor Amine; Diethylamine, 2,2'-Dichloro-N-Methyl-; Embichin;
ENT-25294; Ethanamine, 2-Chloro-N-(2-Chloroethyl)-N-Methyl-; HN2; MBA;
Methylbis(2-Chloroethyl)Amine; Methylbis(Beta-Chloroethyl)Amine; Methylbis
(Chloroethylamine); Methyldi(2-Chloroethyl)Amine; Mustargen; Mustine;
N,N-Bis(2-Chloroethyl)methylamine; N,N-Di(Chloroethyl)Methylamine;
N-Methyl-2,2'-Dichlorodiethylamine; N-Methyl-bis(2-Chloroethyl)Amine;
N-Methyl-Bis(Beta-Chloroethyl)Amine; N-Methylbis(2-Chloroethyl)Amine;
N-Methylbis(Beta-Chloroethyl)Amine; Nitrogen Mustard; NSC 762; TL 146

Chemical Formula:  C5HUC12N

Molecular Weight:  156.07


SECTION I --  REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302: LD50 skin (rat)
           14  mg/kg (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

           TPQ: 10 (pounds)

           RQ: 1 (pounds)
               (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

           Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): Yes
SECTION II -- PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point:  189°F, 87°C at 18 mmHg (*Merck 1976)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1):  1.118 at  25°C/4°C (*Merck 1976)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg): Not Found

    Melting Point:  -76°F, -60°C (*Merck 1976)

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  51-75-2
                                            Page 2 of 4

                               MECHLORETHAMINE

SECTION II   (continued)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l):  Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  Very slightly soluble (*Merck 1976)

    Appearance and Odor:  Mobile liquid; faint odor of herring (*Merck 1976).


SECTION III -- HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV:  Not Found

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended: Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Yes (*Gilman 1980)
                     Skin:  Yes (*Gilman 1980)
                     Ingestion:  Yes (*Gilman  1980)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  Toxic doses as low as 400
    mg/kg have been reported in humans (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985). Blood clots may
    occur at site of intravenous injection and tissue damage if outside vein.
    Powerful vesicant (causes blisters) when it contacts skin, mucous
    membranes, or eyes.   Delayed toxicity ~ missed menstrual periods, alopecia
    (hair loss), hearing loss, tinnitus (ringing in ears), jaundice, impaired
    spermatogenesis and germinal aplasia, swelling, and hypersensitivity
    (*Gilman 1980).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure:  May damage fetus in
    pregnant women (*Gilman  1980).


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method  Used): Not Found
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL:  Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods:  (Non-Specific -- Poisonous Liquid,  n.o.s.)  Small
    fires: dry chemical, carbon dioxide, water spray, or foam.  Large fires:
    water spray, fog, or  foam (DOT 1984, Guide 55).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  (Non-Specific — Poisonous Liquid,
    n.o.s.) Stay upwind; keep out of low areas.  Ventilate closed spaces
    before entering them. Wear positive pressure breathing  apparatus and
    special protective clothing.  Move  container from fire area  if you can do
    so without risk. Fight fire from maximum distance. Dike  fire control
    water for later disposal; do not scatter the material (DOT 1984, Guide 55).

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 51-75-2
                                            Page 3 of 4

                               MECHLORETHAMINE

SECTION IV   (continued)

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  Not Found

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  Not Found


SECTION V -- REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:  Yes (*Merck 1976)
               Stable:

        Conditions to Avoid:  Undiluted liquid decomposes on standing (*Merck
        1976)

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Not Found

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts: Not Found

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur: Not Found
                             May Not Occur: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found


SECTION VI « USE INFORMATION

    Drug used in treatment of cancer (*Gilman 1980). Formerly used as  a gas
    warfare agent (*Merck 1976).
SECTION VII -- PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    (Non-Specific — Poisonous Liquid, n.o.s.)  Keep unnecessary people away;
    isolate hazard area and deny entry. Stay upwind; keep out of low areas.
    Ventilate closed spaces before entering them. Remove and isolate
    contaminated clothing at the site.  Do not  touch spilled material; stop
    leak if you can do so without risk.  Use water spray to reduce vapors.
    Small  spills: absorb with sand or other noncombustible absorbent material
    and place into containers  for later disposal.  Large spills:  dike far
    ahead of spill for later disposal (DOT 1984,  Guide 55).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA  and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at the
    beginning  of the profiles for additional information.

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  51-75-2
                                           Page 4 of 4

                               MECHLORETHAMINE

SECTION VIII  (continued)

    SUIT MATERIAL PERFORMANCE (Based on EPA/USCG "Guidelines", 1987)
                 Chemical Resistance/Amount of Data)

           Viton                GOOD/LIMITED**

     *Based on qualitative performance information.
    **Based on a chemical analog.


SECTION IX ~ EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure: Nausea and vomiting; bleeding; skin
    lesions; menstrual irregularities (*Gilman 1980).

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures: Treat symptoms using procedures for
    general poison (*Rumack 1975 to Present).  (Non-Specific -- Poisonous
    Liquid, n.o.s.) Move victim to fresh air; call emergency  medical care.  If
    not breathing, give artificial respiration. If breathing is difficult,
    give oxygen. In case of contact with material, immediately flush skin or
    eyes with running water  for at least 15 minutes. Speed  in removing
    material from skin is of extreme importance.  Remove and isolate
    contaminated clothing and shoes at the site. Keep victim quiet and
    maintain normal body temperature.  Effects may be delayed; keep victim
    under observation (DOT  1984, Guide 55).

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  51-83-2
                                           Page 1 of 3
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY -- CARBACHOL CHLORIDE

CAS Registry Number:  51-83-2

Synonyms:  (NIOSH/RTECS 1983 Synonyms, Volume 1, p. 917) Choline, Chloride,
Carbamate; Carbachol; Carbacholin; Carbacholine; Carbacholine Chloride;
Carbacolina; Carbamic Acid, Ester with  Choline Chloride; Carbaminocholine
Chloride; Carbaminoylcholine Chloride; Carbamiotin; Carbamoylcholine Chloride;
gamma-Carbamoyl Choline Chloride; Carbamoylcholine-Hydrochloride;
Carbamylcholine Chloride; Carbochol; Carbocholin; Carbocholine; Carbyl;
Carcholin; Choline Carbamate Chloride;  Choline, Chloride Carbamate(Ester);
Choline Chloride, Carbamoyl-; Choline Chlorine Carbamate; Coletyl; Doryl; Doryl
(Pharmaceutical); Ethanaminium, 2-((Aminocarbonyl)oxy)-N,N,N-Trimethyl-,
Chloride; (2-Hydroxyethyl)Trimethyl Ammonium Chloride Carbamate; Isopto
Carbachol; Jestryl; Lentin; Miostat; Mistura C; Moryl; P.V. Carbachol; TL 457;
Vasoperif

Chemical Formula:  C6H15N2O2C1

Molecular Weight: 182.68


SECTION I -- REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA  (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity  Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:  LD50 oral
           (mouse) 15 mg/kg (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

           TPQ: 500/10,000 (pounds)

           RQ: 1 (pounds)
              (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

           Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): No
SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Solid

    Boiling Point:  Not Found

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1): Not Found

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  Not Found

    Melting Point:  392-401°F, 200-205°C (Merck 1983, p. 245)

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 51-83-2
                                           Page 2 of 3

                               CARBACHOL CHLORIDE

SECTION II   (continued)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1): Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l):  Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  1 g/mL (Merck 1983, p. 245)

    Appearance and Odor:  Crystalline, odorless, but on standing in an open
    container, develops a faint odor resembling that of an aliphatic amine
    (Merck 1983, p. 245); hygroscopic prisms or powder (Weast 1979, p. C-246)


SECTION III -- HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV:  Not Found

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended: Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation: Not Found
                    Skin: Yes (Sax  1984, p. 631)
                    Ingestion: Yes (Sax 1984, p. 631)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic): Highly toxic by mouth (Sax
    1984, p. 631).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure: Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used):  Not Found
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL: Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods: Not Found

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  Not Found

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  Not Found

    NFPA Flammability  Rating: Not Found


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:
               Stable: The aqueous solution is stable even when heated
                       (Merck 1983, p. 245).

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 51-83-2
                                           Page 3 of 3

                               CARBACHOL CHLORIDE

SECTION V   (continued)

        Conditions to Avoid: Not Found

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Not Found

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  When heated to decomposition, it
    emits very toxic fumes of chloride and nitrogen oxides (Sax 1984, p. 631).

    Hazardous Polymerization: May Occur: Not Found
                             May Not Occur: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid: Not Found

SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Cholinergic; parasympathomimetic, used chiefly in large animals, especially
    for colic in the horse (Merck 1983, p.  245)
SECTION VII -- PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Avoid skin contact (see Section III above).
SECTION VIII -- PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency  situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit. See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles foi additional information.
SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure:  Not Found

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures:  Not Found

COMMENTS

    Sources searched but no information found:
        DOT 1984
        Farm Chemicals Handbook 1984
        Oilman 1985
        Hayes  1982
        Gosselin 1984
        Buchel 1983
        Clayton and Clayton 1981-82
        Hawley 1981

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  54-11-5
                                            Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                    Date: October 31, 1985
                                                    Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY -- NICOTINE

CAS Registry Number:  54-11-5

Synonyms:  (-)-3-(l-Methyl-2-Pyrrolidyl)Pyridine;  l-Methyl-2-(3-Pyridyl)
Pyrrolidine; beta-Pyridyl-alpha-N-Methylpyrrolidine; Destruxol Orchid Spray;
EMO-NIK;  ENT 3,424;  Flux Maag; Fumetobac; L-3-(l-Methyl-2-Pyrrolidyl)Pyridine;
L-Nicotine; Mach-Nic; Niagara PA Dust; Nic-Sal;  Nico-Dust; Nico-Fume; Nicocide;
Nicotin; Nicotine Alkaloid; Ortho N-4 Dust; Ortho N-5 Dust; Pyridine,
3-(l-Methyl-2-Pyrrolidinyl)-, (S)-; Pyridine, 3-(Tetrahydro-
l-Methylpyrrol-2-yl); Pyrrolidine, l-Methyl-2-(3-Pyridyl)-; Tendust;
Tetrahydronicotyrine, DL-

Chemical Formula:  C10H14N2

Molecular Weight:  162.23


SECTION I -- REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302: Not Found

           TPQ: 100 (pounds)

           RQ: 100 (pounds)

           Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II -- PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point:  476.1°F, 246.7°C at 745 mmHg (*Weast 1979)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1):  1.0097 at 20°C/4°C (*Merck 1983)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):   1 at 61.8°C (Sax 1984, p. 1997)

    Melting Point: -110°F, -79°C (*Weast 1979)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  5.61 (Sax 1984, p. 1997)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l):  Not Found

    Solubility in Water: Miscible below 60°C (*Merck 1983)

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  54-11-5
                                            Page 2 of 4

                               NICOTINE

SECTION II   (continued)

    Appearance and Odor:  Colorless to pale yellow, oily liquid (*Merck 1983).
    Slight, fishy odor when warm (NIOSH/OSHA 1978, pp. 138-139).


SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  TWA 0.5 mg/ms (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

    ACGIH TLV:  TWA 0.5 mg/ms (skin) (*ACGIH 1983)

    IDLH: 35 mg/ms (NIOSH/OSHA 1978, p.  138-139)

    Other Limits Recommended:  Not Found

    Routes of Entry:  Inhalation:  Yes (Sax 1984, p. 1997)
                     Skin:  Yes (Merck 1983, p. 935)
                     Ingestion:  Yes (Sax 1984, p. 1997)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  It is classified as super
    toxic. Probable oral lethal dose in humans is less than 5 mg/kg or  a taste
    (less than 7 drops) for a 70 kg (150 Ibs.) person (*Gosselin  1976). It may
    be assumed that ingestion of 40-60 mg of nicotine is lethal to humans.
    There is fundamental  difference between  acute toxicity from use of nicotine
    as insecticide or from ingestion, and chronic toxicity that  may be caused
    by prolonged exposure to small doses as occurs in smoking (*Encyc Occupat
    Health and Safety 1983).  Maternal smoking during pregnancy is associated
    with increased risk of spontaneous abortion, low birth weight and
    still-birth (*The Chemical Society 1975).  Nicotine was found as a
    co-carcinogen in animals (*NRC 1977).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated  by Exposure: Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used):  Not Found
    Flammable Limits: Low fire hazard when exposed to heat or flame (Sax
    1984, p. 1997)
        LEL:  0.75% (Sax  1984, p. 1997)
        UEL:  4.0% (Sax  1984, p. 1997)

    Extinguishing Methods:  Extinguish with alcohol foam, dry chemical, or
    carbon dioxide (Sax 1984, p. 1997).  Water may cause frothing if it gets
    below surface  of liquid and  turns to steam.  However, water fog gently
    applied to surface will cause frothing which will extinguish the fire
    (*NFPA 1978).

    Special Fire Fighting  Procedures:  Material too dangerous  to health to
    expose firefighters.  A few whiffs of the  vapor could cause death; vapor or
    liquid could be fatal on penetrating firefighter's normal full protective
    clothing.  Normal full protective clothing and breathing apparatus
    available to the average fire department will not provide adequate
    protection against inhalation or skin  contact (*NFPA 1978).

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  54-11-5
                                            Page 3 of 4

                                NICOTINE

SECTION IV   (continued)

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards: There is a moderate explosion hazard
    when exposed to heat or flame (.Sax 1984, p. 1997).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  1


SECTION V -- REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:
               Stable: Yes (normal conditions) (*NFPA 1978)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Heat or flames (*Sax 1975)

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid): Avoid oxidizing materials (Sax
    1984, p. 1997).

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  When heated to decomposition, it
    emits nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide and other highly toxic fumes (Sax
    1984, p. 1997).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:  Not Found
                             May Not Occur: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found
SECTION VI -- USE INFORMATION

    It is used as an insecticide, fumigant and in veterinary matters as an
    ectoparasiticide and anthelmintic (*Merck 1983).  Also, used in  tanning
    (*NRC 1977).
SECTION VII -- PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    The normal full protective clothing and breathing apparatus available to
    the average fire department will  not provide adequate protection against
    inhalation or skin contact with this material (*NFPA 1978). Do not touch
    spilled material; stop leak; reduce vapors with water spray.  Small Spills:
    take up with sand or other noncombustible absorbent material and  place
    into containers for later disposal.  Small  Dry Spills: with clean shovel
    place material into clean, dry container and cover; move containers from
    spill area. Large Spills:  dike far ahead of spill for later disposal (DOT
    1984, Guide 55).
SECTION VIII -- PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  54-11-5
                                           Page 4 of 4

                               NICOTINE

SECTION VIII   (continued)

    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for  additional information.

SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    See Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  54-11-5
                                             Page 1 of 3
                        Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide
                                        for
                                     NICOTINE

                                      (54-11-5)
     This guide  should not  be construed  to authorize  emergency personnel to
perform the procedures or  activities indicated  or implied.   Care of persons
exposed to toxic chemicals must be directed by a physician or other recognized
authority.
Substance Characteristics:

Pure Form - Colorless to pale yellow oily liquid; brown on exposure to air.

Odor - Slightly fishy odor when warm.

Commercial Forms - 93  to 98% pure liquid; 3 to 5% dust.

Uses -  Insecticide, fumigant, veterinary medicine, tanning.

Other Names - Black Leaf  40,  Destruxol  Orchid  Spray;  Futemobac; Nico-dust;
Nico-Fume; Ortho  N-4 Dust;  Ortho  N-5 Dust; (S)-3-(l-methyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)
pyridine; Tendust.


Personal Protective Equipment: See Chemical Profile Section VIII.


Emergency Life-Support Equipment and Supplies That May Be Required:

Compressed oxygen, forced-oxygen mask,  soap, water, milk, activated charcoal,
saline cathartic  or sorbitol, normal saline, D5W, Ringer's lactate, diazepam,
phenytoin, phenobarbital, atropine.


Signs and Symptoms of  Acute Nicotine Exposure:

Warning:  Seizures may  be rapid in onset. Caution is advised.

Acute exposure  to  nicotine  may result  in   headache,  dizziness, confusion,
agitation, restlessness, lethargy, seizures, and coma.  Victims may experience
hypertension  (high blood  pressure), tachycardia  (rapid  heart  rate), and
tachypnea (rapid respirations), followed  by  hypotension (low blood pressure),
bradycardia (slow heart rate), and respiratory depression. Cardiac arrhythmias
may also occur.

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  54-11-5
                                             Page 2 of 3

                                     NICOTINE

Gastrointestinal effects include nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain or burning
sensation, and diarrhea.  Increased  salivation, lacrimation (tearing), and
sweating may be noted.
Emergency Life-Support Procedures:

Acute exposure to nicotine may require decontamination and life support for the
victims.  Emergency personnel  should wear  protective clothing  appropriate to
the type   and  degree   of contamination.   Air-purifying or  supplied-air
respiratory equipment should also be  worn,  as  necessary.   Rescue vehicles
should carry supplies such  as plastic  sheeting and disposable plastic bags to
assist  in preventing spread of  contamination.
Inhalation Exposure:

1.   Move victims to fresh air.  Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure
     to nicotine.

2.   Evaluate vital  signs including pulse and  respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not  breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.    If  breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.   Obtain authorization and/or further  instructions from the local hospital
     for  administration  of an  antidote or  performance of  other invasive
     procedures.

4.   RUSH to a health care facility.
Dermal/Eye Exposure:

1.  Remove victims from exposure.   Emergency  personnel should  avoid self-
     exposure to nicotine.

2.  Evaluate vital  signs including pulse and  respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not  breathing, provide
     artificial   respiration.   If  breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.  Remove contaminated clothing as soon as possible.

4.  If  eye exposure has occurred,  eyes must be flushed with lukewarm water for
     at least 15 minutes.

5.  THOROUGHLY wash exposed skin areas with soap  and water.

6.  Obtain authorization   and/or  further  instructions from the local hospital
     for  administration  of  an   antidote or  performance  of other invasive
     procedures.

7.  RUSH to a health care facility.

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                                              EFATG
                                              CAS Registry Number:  54-11-5
                                              Page 3 of 3

                                     NICOTINE

Ingestion Exposure:

1.   Evaluate vital  signs including pulse and  respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.   If  breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

2.   DO NOT induce vomiting or attempt to neutralize!

3.   Obtain authorization and/or  further  instructions from  the local hospital
     for administration  of an  antidote or  performance  of other invasive
     procedures.

4.   Give the victims water or milk:  children up to  1 year old, 125  mL (4 oz
     or 1/2 cup); children  1 to 12 years old, 200 mL (6 oz or 3/4 cup); adults,
     250 mL (8 oz or 1 cup).  Water or milk  should  be given only if  victims are
     conscious and alert.

5.   Activated charcoal may be administered if victims are conscious and alert.
     Use 15 to 30 g (1/2 to 1 oz) for children, 50 to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz)
     for adults,  with 125 to 250 mL (1/2 to 1 cup) of water.

6.   Promote  excretion by  administering a  saline  cathartic or  sorbitol to
     conscious and alert victims.  Children require  15 to 30 g (1/2 to 1  oz)
     of cathartic; 50 to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz) is recommended  for adults.

7.   RUSH  to a health  care facility.

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  54-62-6
                                           Page 1 of 3
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                Date: October 31, 1985
                                                Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY -- AMINOPTERIN

CAS Registry Number:  54-62-6

Synonyms:  (NIOSH/RTECS 1983, Synonyms, Volume 2, p. 375)  Glutamic Acid,
N-(p-(((2,4-Diamino-6-Pteridinyl)Methyl)Amino)Benzoyl)-, L-;
4-Amino-4-Deoxypteroylglutamate; 4-Amino-PGA; Aminopteridine;
4-Aminopteroylglutamic Acid; A-Ninopterin; APGA; N-(4-((2,4-Diamino-6-
Pteridinyl)Methyl)Amino)Benzoyl)-L-Glutamic Acid; ENT-26079; Folic Acid,
4-Amino-; NSC 739; L-GIutamic Acid, N-[4-[(Diamino-6-Pteridinyl)Methyl]
Amino]Benzoyl]-

Chemical Formula: C19H2oN8O5

Molecular Weight: 440.47


SECTION I -- REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA  (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity  Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:  LD,0 oral (rat)
           2.5 mg/kg (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

           TPQ: 500/10,000 (pounds)

           RQ:  1  (pounds)
              (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

           Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Solid

    Boiling Point: Not Found

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1): Not Found

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  Not Found

    Melting Point: Not Found

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l):  Not Found

    Solubility in Water: Not  Found

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                                          CAS Registry Number: 54-62-6
                                          Page 2 of 3

                              AMINOPTERIN

SECTION II   (continued)

    Appearance and Odor:  Clusters of yellow needles (Hawley 1981, p. 55)


SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV: Not Found

    IDLH:  Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended:  Not Found

    Routes of Entry:  Inhalation:  Not Found
                    Skin:  Not Found
                    Ingestion:  Yes (Hawley  1981, p. 55)

    Health  Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  An antimetabolite;
    antagonizes the utilization of folic acid by the body.  Highly toxic by
    ingestion (Hawley 1981, p. 55).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure: Not Found


SECTION IV -- FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method  Used): Not Found
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL: Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods:  Not Found

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  Not Found

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards: Not Found

    NFPA Flammability  Rating:  Not Found


SECTION V -- REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:  Not Found
              Stable: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid: Not Found

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Not  Found

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  Not Found

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  54-62-6
                                            Page 3 of 3

                                AMINOPTERIN

SECTION V   (continued)

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:  Not Found
                              May Not Occur:  Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found


SECTION VI -- USE INFORMATION

    Rodenticide (Merck 1983, pp. 70-71); medicine and rodenticide (Hawley
    1981, p. 55). Not registered as a rodenticide in the U.S. (USEPA/Active
    Ingredients 1985).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    (Non-Specific — Pesticide, Solid, n.o.s.)  Do not touch spilled material;
    stop leak if you can do so without risk.  Use water spray to reduce vapors.
    Small spills:  absorb with sand or other noncombustible absorbent  material
    and place into containers for later disposal. Small dry spills:  with
    clean shovel place material into clean, dry container and cover; move
    containers from spill area.  Large  spills:  dike far ahead of spill for
    later disposal (DOT 1984, Guide 55).
SECTION VIII -- PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit. See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.
SECTION IX -- EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure:  Not Found

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures: (Non-Specific -- Pesticide, Solid,
    n.o.s.) Move victim to fresh air; call emergency medical care. Remove
    and isolate contaminated clothing  and shoes at the site.  In case of
    contact with material, immediately flush eyes with running water for at
    least 15 minutes (DOT 1984, Guide 53).

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 55-91-4
                                            Page 1 of 4
                           EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                    Date: October 31,  1985
                                                    Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY -- ISOFLUORPHATE

CAS Registry Number:  55-91-4

Synonyms:  Diisopropyl Fluorophosphate; DFP; Diflupyl; Diflurphate;
Diisopropoxyphosphoryl Fluoride; Diisopropyl Fluorophosphonate; Diisopropyl
Phosphofluoridate; Diisopropyl Phosphorofluoridate; Diisopropylfluoro-
phosphate; Diisopropylfluorophosphoric Acid Ester; Diisopropylphosphoro-
fluoridate; Dyflos; Dyphlos; Floropryl; Fluophosphoric Acid, Diisopropyl Ester;
Fluorodiisopropyl Phosphate; Fluostigmine; Fluropryl; Isofluro- phosphate;
Isopropyl Fluophosphate;  Isopropyl Phosphorofluoridate; Neoglaucit;
O,O'-Diisopropyl Phosphoryl Fluoride; O,O,-Diisopropyl Fluorophosphate; PF-3;
Phosphorofluoridic Acid, Bis(l-Methylethyl) Ester; Phosphorofluoridic Acid,
Diisopropyl Ester; T-1703; TL 466; Fluorophosphoric Acid, Diisopropyl Ester;
Fluoropryl; Isofluorophate; Isoflurophate

Chemical Formula: C6H14FO3P

Molecular Weight:  184.15


SECTION I -- REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302: LC50 inhalation
           (rat) 0.36 mg/liter/10 minutes (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

           TPQ: 100 (pounds)

           RQ: 100 (pounds)

           Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point:  144°F, 62°C at 9 mmHg (*Merck 1983)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1):  1.055 (*Merck 1983)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg): 0.579 at 20°C (*Merck 1983)

    Melting Point:  -116°F, -82°C (*Merck 1983)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  Not Found

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  55-91-4
                                            Page 2 of 4

                               ISOFLUORPHATE

SECTION II   (continued)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l):  Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  1.54% by weight at 25°C (*Merck 1983)

    Appearance and Odor:  Oily liquid ("Hawley 1981). Clear, colorless or
    faintly yellow liquid (*Osol 1980).


SECTION III -- HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV:  Not Found

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits  Recommended:  Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Yes (*Merck 1983)
                     Skin:  Yes (Sax 1984, p. 1667)
                     Ingestion:  Yes (*Gosselin 1984)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  This is an organophosphate
    pesticide (*Morgan 1982). Extremely toxic:  probable oral lethal dose in
    humans is 5-50 mg/kg, between 7 drops and 1 teaspoonful for 70 kg person
    (150 Ib.) (*Gosselin 1984). The material is a cholinesterase inactivator.
    Even traces of the vapor cause pinpoint pupils (*Merck 1983).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure: Not Found


SECTION IV -- FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): Not Found
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL:  Not Found
    • '   UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing  Methods:  (Non-Specific -- Organophosphorous Pesticide,
    n.o.s.) Dry chemical, carbon dioxide, water spray, or foam. For large
    fires, water spray, fog,  or foam.  Fight fire from maximum distance. Dike
    fire control water for later disposal  (DOT  1984, Guide 55).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  Stay upwind;  keep out of low areas.
    Wear positive pressure breathing apparatus and special protective clothing
    (DOT 1984, Guide 55).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards: May burn but will not ignite readily.
    Container may explode in heat of fire.  Fire and runoff from fire  control
    water may produce irritating or poisonous gases (DOT 1984, Guide 55).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  Not Found

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 55-91-4
                                            Page 3 of 4

                                ISOFLUORPHATE

SECTION V ~ REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:
               Stable: Yes (*Merck 1983)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Forms hydrofluoric acid in presence of moisture
        (*Merck 1983). Keep away from sources of heat (*Farm Chemicals
        Handbook 1984).  Anhydrous compounds or oil  solutions are stable in
        glass containers at room temperature (*Merck 1983).

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid): Not Found

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  Forms hydrogen fluoride in
    presence of moisture; decomposes in water at pH about 2.5 (*Merck 1983).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:  Not Found
                              May Not Occur:  Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found
SECTION VI -- USE INFORMATION

    Research tool in neuroscience for its ability to inhibit cholinesterase (by
    phosphorylation) on an acute/sub-acute basis and to produce a delayed
    neuropathy (*Peer Review Committee).  An insecticide.  Used in Germany as a
    basis for "nerve gases" (Sax 1984, p. 1667).
SECTION VII -- PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    When handling in open containers, protect the eyes, nose, and mouth with a
    suitable mask, and avoid contact with skin (*Osol 1980).

    (Non-Specific — Organophosphorus Pesticide, n.o.s.)  Stay upwind; keep out
    of low areas.  Ventilate closed spaces before entering  them.  Remove and
    isolate contaminated clothing at the site.  Do not touch spilled material.
    Use water spray to reduce vapors.  Take up small spills with sand or other
    noncombustible absorbent material and  place in containers for later
    disposal.  Dike far ahead of  large spills for later disposal (DOT 1984,
    Guide 55).
SECTION VIII -- PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit. See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  55-91-4
                                           Page 4 of 4

                               ISOFLUORPHATE

SECTION VIII  (continued)

    SUIT MATERIAL PERFORMANCE (Based on EPA/USCG "Guidelines", 1987)
                       (Chemical Resistance/Amount of Data)

           Butyl/Neoprene       GOOD/LIMITED**
           Viton/Neoprene       GOOD/LIMITED**

     *Based on qualitative performance information.
    **Based on a chemical analog.


SECTION IX -- EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure: Respiration depression, muscle weakness,
    twitching, and convulsions.  Sweating, visual disturbances, vomiting,
    diarrhea, chest and abdominal distress, and sometimes pulmonary edema
    (*Morgan 1982).

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures:  Do not inhale vapors; avoid contact
    with skin (*Merck 1983). (Non-Specific — Organophosphorous Pesticide,
    n.o.s.) Move victim to fresh air; call emergency medical care. If not
    breathing, give artificial respiration.  If breathing is difficult, give
    oxygen. In case of contact with material, immediately flush skin or eyes
    with running water for at least 15 minutes. Speed in removing material
    from skin is of extreme importance.  Remove and isolate contaminated
    clothing and shoes at the site. Keep victim quiet and maintain normal boc
    temperature. Effects may be delayed; keep victim under observation (DO'
    1984, Guide 55).

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 56-25-7
                                            Page 1 of 3
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY -- CANTHARIDIN

CAS Registry Number:  56-25-7

Synonyms:  7-Oxabicyclo[2.2.1 ]Heptane-2,3-Dicarboxylic Anhydride,
2,3-Dimethyl-; l,2-Dimethyl-3,6-Epoxyperhydrophthalic Anhydride;
4,7-Epoxyisobenzofuran-l,3-Dione, Hexahydro-3a,7a-Dimethyl-, (3a alpha, 4 beta,
7 beta, 7a alpha)-; 2,3-Dimethyl-7-Oxabicyclo[2.2.1]Heptane-2,3- Dicarboxylic
Anhydride; CAN; Cantharides Camphor; Cantharidine; Cantharone;
Exo-l,2-cis-Dimethyl-3,6-Epoxyhexahydrophthalic Anhydride; Hexahydro-3a alpha,
7a alpha-Dimethyl-4 beta, 7 beta-Epoxyisobenzofuran-l,3-dione; Kantaridin

Chemical Formula: C10H12O4

Molecular Weight:  196.21


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302: LDlo oral (hu-
           man) 0.428 mg/kg (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

           TPQ: 100/10,000 (pounds)

           RQ: 1 (pounds)
               (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

           Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Solid

    Boiling Point:  Sublimes at 230°F, 110°C (Merck 1983, p. 242)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1):  Not Found

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg): Not Found

    Melting Point: 424°F, 218°C (*Weast  1979)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  Insoluble  in cold water (*Merck 1976); somewhat

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 56-25-7
                                           Page 2 of 3

                               CANTHARIDIN

SECTION II   (continued)

    soluble in hot water (*Merck 1976).

    Appearance and Odor:  Brown to black powder (Sax 1984, p. 627);
    orthorhombic plates, scales (Merck 1983, p. 242).


SECTION III -- HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV: Not Found

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended: Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Yes (*Sax 1979)
                    Skin:  Yes (*Rumack 1975 to  Present)
                    Ingestion: Yes (*Arena  1979)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic): It is classified as super
    toxic. Probable oral lethal dose in humans is less  than 5 mg/kg or a taste
    of less than 7 drops for a 70 kg (150 Ib.) person (*Gosselin  1976).  It is
    very toxic by absorption through skin (*Merck 1976).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated  by Exposure:  Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): Not Found
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL:  Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods:  Not Found

    Special Fire  Fighting Procedures:  Not Found

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards: Not Found

    NFPA Flammability Rating: Not Found


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable: Not Found
              Stable: Not Found

        Conditions to  Avoid: Not Found

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  56-25-7
                                            Page 3 of 3

                               CANTHARIDIN

SECTION V   (continued)

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Not Found

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  When heated  to decomposition it
    emits acrid smoke and irritating fumes (*Sax 1979).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:  Not Found
                              May Not Occur: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found


SECTION VI -- USE INFORMATION

    Formerly used as a counter-irritant and vesicant (*IARC 1972-1985).  Also
    used for the removal of benign epithelial growth, e.g., warts (*Gilman
    1980).  Used as an experimental antitumor agent.  Active ingredient in
    Spanish fly, a reputed aphrodisiac  (*Peer Review Committee).
SECTION VII -- PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Avoid inhalation and skin contact (see Section III above).
SECTION VIII -- PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at  the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.
SECTION IX -- EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure:  Symptoms from ingestion include vomiting,
    abdominal pain, shock, bloody diarrhea, pain in throat and stomach,
    swelling and blistering of tongue, difficulty swallowing, salivation, slow
    and painful urination, and thirst.  There may be delirium, fainting, and
    tetanic convulsions (*Goodman 1975, *Rumack 1975 to Present, *Arena 1979,
    *Gosselin 1976).  Eye contact results in irritation with much swelling of
    the lids (*Grant 1974).  Initial tissue reaction upon contact with the skin
    is swelling followed by blister formation within 24 hours (*Doull 1980).

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures:  For ingestion, induce vomiting with
    syrup of ipecac.  For skin contact thoroughly wash contaminated area with
    soap  and  water.  Eyes  should be irrigated with plain tap water (*Rumack
    1975  to Present).

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  56-38-2
                                            Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                    Date: October 31, 1985
                                                    Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY -- PARATHION

CAS Registry Number:  56-38-2

Synonyms:  Phosphorothioic Acid, O,O-DiethyI O-(p-Nitrophenyl) Ester (Liquid
Mixture); Parathion liquid; Alkron; Aileron; American Cyanamid 3422; Aphamite;
Bayer E-605; Bladan; Diethyl 4-Nitrophenyl Phosphorothionate; Diethyl
p-Nitrophenyl Thionophosphate; Diethyl Parathion; Diethyl-p-Nitrophenyl
Monothiophosphate; DNTP; E 605; ENT 15,108; Ethyl Parathion; Etilon; Folidol;
Fosferno; Fostox; Genithion;  NA 2783 (DOT); NCI-C00226; Niran; Nitrostigmine;
O,O-Diethyl O-(p-Nitrophenyl) Phosphorothioate; O,O-Diethyl O-(p-nitrophenyl)
Thionophosphate; O,O-Diethyl O-4-Nitrophenyl Thiophosphate; O,O-Diethyl O-p-
Nitrophenyl Phosphorothioate; Oleoparathion; Panthion; Paraflow; Paramar;
Paraphos; Parawet; Phenphos; Phoskil; Phosphenol; Phosphorothioic Acid
O,O-Diethyl O-(4-Nitrophenyl) Ester; Rhodiatox; SNP; Stathion; Sulphos;
Thiophos; Vapophos

Chemical Formula:  C10H14NO5PS

Molecular Weight:  291.27


SECTION I -- REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:  LC50 inhalation
           (rat) 0.084 mg/liter/4 hours  (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

           TPQ: 100 (pounds)

           RQ: 1 (pounds) (statutory); 10 (pounds) (proposed)

           Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): Yes


SECTION II --  PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point:  707°F, 375°C (*Merck 1983)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1): 1.26 (*Merck 1983)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  0.0000378  at 20°C (*Worthing 1979)

    Melting Point:  43°F, 6°C (*Merck 1983)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  Not Found

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  56-38-2
                                            Page 2 of 4

                               PARATHION

SECTION II   (continued)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l):  Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  Practically insoluble; 12.4 mg/liter at 20°C
    (*Bowman 1979)

    Appearance and Odor:  Pale yellow liquid;  technical grade is brown and has
    a garlic-like odor (*Worthing 1979).


SECTION III -- HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL: TWA 0.1 mg/m3 (NIOSH  1978, p. 148)

    ACGIH TLV:  TWA 0.1 mg/ms (skin) (ACGIH 1986-87, p.26)

    IDLH: 20 mg/m3 (*Encyc of Occupat Health and Safety  1983)

    Other Limits Recommended:  NIOSH: 0.05 mg/m3,  10 hour TWA (NIOSH 1987,
    p. 184)

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Yes (*Gosselin  1976)
                    Skin:  Yes (*Gosselin 1976)
                    Ingestion:  Yes (*Gosselin 1976)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  This material is extremely
    toxic; the probable oral lethal dose is 5-50 mg/kg, or between 7 drops and
    1 teaspoonful for a 150-lb. person.  As  little as 1 drop can endanger life
    if splashed in the eye.  Toxicity is highest  by inhalation (*Gosselin
    1976).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure: People at special
    risk are those with a history of glaucoma, cardiovascular disease, hepatic
    disease, renal disease, or central nervous system abnormalities (*Encyc
    Occupat Health and Safety 1983).


SECTION IV -- FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method  Used):  248-320°F, 120-160°C  (Method not given)
    (*Clayton and Clayton 1981-82)
    Flammable Limits:  Not highly flammable (*Encyc Occupat Health and Safety
    1971)
        LEL:  Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods:  Use water spray, dry chemical, foam, or carbon
    dioxide (*NFPA 1978).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  Use water spray to keep fire-exposed

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 56-38-2
                                            Page 3 of 4

                                PARATHION

SECTION IV   (continued)

    containers cool.  If a leak or spill has not ignited, use water spray to
    disperse vapors and to provide protection for firefighters.  Water spray
    may be used to flush spills away from exposures.  Fight advanced or massive
    fires from a safe distance or from a protected location. Special
    protective clothing should be worn; normal protective clothing may be
    penetrated (*NFPA 1978).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards: When heated to decomposition, it can
    emit toxic fumes of oxides of nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur. High
    pressure hoses  may scatter material from broken containers (*NFPA 1978).
    Containers may explode when heated (*CHRIS  1978).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  1


SECTION V -- REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:
               Stable:  Yes, in distilled water and  in acid solution
                        (*Hawley 1981)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Store below 25-30°C (*Farm Chemicals Handbook
        1983). It slowly decomposes in air and hydrolyzes in the presence of
        alkaline material (*Hawley  1981).  Containers may explode when heated
        (*CHRIS 1978).

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Not Found

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  When heated to decomposition,  the
    material can emit toxic fumes of oxides of nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur
    (*NFPA 1978).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:  Not Found
                             May Not Occur: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found
SECTION VI « USE INFORMATION

    This material is used as an insecticide (*SRI) and is used almost
    exclusively in agriculture (Hayes 1982, p. 379).
SECTION VII -- PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    In case of leaks or spills, special protective clothing should be worn.
    Use water spray to disperse vapors and flush spills away (*NFPA  1978).
    Ventilate area of spill or leak. Spills may be absorbed in vermiculite,
    dry sand, earth, or a similar material (*NIOSH/OSHA 1981).

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  56-38-2
                                           Page 4 of 4

                              PARATHION

SECTION VIII -- PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape  SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit. See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.

    SUIT MATERIAL PERFORMANCE (Based on EPA/USCG "Guidelines", 1987)
                       (Chemical Resistance/Amount of Data)

          Butyl/Neoprene       GOOD/LIMITED**
          Viton/Neoprene       GOOD/LIMITED**

     *Based on qualitative performance information.
    **Based on a chemical analog.


SECTION IX -- EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    See Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  56-38-2
                                             Page 1 of 3
                        Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide
                                        for
                                   PARATHION

                                      (56-38-2)
    This guide should not be construed to authorize emergency personnel to
perform the procedures or activities indicated or implied. Care of persons
exposed to toxic chemicals must be directed by a physician or other recognized
authority.
Substance Characteristics:

Pure Form - Pale yellow or brown liquid.

Odor - Garliclike (commercial form).

Commercial Form - Deep brown liquid in  tins and steel drums.

Use - Pesticide.

Materials to Avoid - Alkali, strong oxidizers.

Other Names - Alkron; Aileron; DNTP; ethyl parathion; Etilon; Folidol;
Fosferno; Fostex; Genithion; Niran; Nitrostigmine; Oleoparathion; Paraflow;
Paramar; Paraphos; Parawet; Phoskil;  Phosphenol; phosphorothioic acid, O,O-
diethyl O-(p-nitrophenyl) ester; Rhodiatox; Stathion; Thiophos; Vapophos.


Personal Protective Equipment:  See Chemical Profile Section VIII.


Emergency Life-Support Equipment and Supplies That May Be Required:

Compressed oxygen, forced-oxygen mask, soap, water, syrup of Ipecac, activated
charcoal, saline cathartic or sorbitol, normal saline, D5W, Ringer's lactate,
atropine, pralidoxime, diazepam, phenytoin, phenobarbital.


Signs and Symptoms of  Acute  Parathion Exposure:

Caution: Parathion  is a cholinestorase inhibitor. It has been reported that
as little as one drop of parathion can endanger life if splashed in the eye.
Toxicity is highest by inhalation.

Acute exposure to parathion may produce the following signs and symptoms:
pinpoint pupils, blurred vision, headache,  dizziness, muscle spasms, and
profound weakness.  Vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, seizures, and coma may
also occur.

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  56-38-2
                                             Page 2 of 3

                                   PARATHION

The heart rate may decrease following oral exposure or increase following
dermal exposure.  Hypotension (low blood pressure) is not uncommon.
Respiratory symptoms include dyspnea (shortness of breath), respiratory
depression, and respiratory paralysis.  Psychosis may occur.
Emergency Life-Support Procedures:

Acute exposure to parathion may require decontamination and life support for
the victims. Emergency personnel should wear protective clothing appropriate
to the type and degree of  contamination.  Air-purifying or supplied-air
respiratory equipment should also be worn, as necessary.  Rescue vehicles
should carry supplies such as plastic sheeting and disposable plastic bags to
assist in preventing spread of contamination.
Inhalation Exposure:

1.   Move  victims to fresh air.  Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure
     to parathion.

2.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration. If breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.   Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive
     procedures.

4.   Transport to a health care facility.
Dermal/Eye Exposure:

1.   Remove victims from exposure.  Emergency personnel should avoid self-
     exposure to parathion.

2.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration. If breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.   Remove contaminated clothing as soon as possible.

4.   If  eye exposure has occurred, eyes must be flushed with lukewarm water for
     at least 15  minutes.

5.   Wash exposed skin areas  three times with soap and water.

6.   Obtain authorization  and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive
     procedures.

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                                              EFATG
                                              CAS Registry Number:  56-38-2
                                              Page 3 of 3

                                    PARATHION

7.   Transport to a health care facility.


Ingestion Exposure:

1.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration. If breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

2.   Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive
     procedures.

3.   Vomiting  may be induced with syrup of Ipecac.  If elapsed time since
     ingestion of parathion is unknown  or suspected to be greater than
     30 minutes, do not induce vomiting and  proceed to Step 4.  Ipecac  should
     not be administered to children under 6  months of age.

     Warning: Ingestion of parathion may result in sudden onset of seizures or
     loss of consciousness.  Syrup of Ipecac should be administered only if
     victims are alert, have an active gag-reflex, and show no signs of
     impending seizure or coma.  If ANY uncertainty exists,  proceed to Step 4.

     The following dosages of Ipecac are recommended: children up to 1 year
     old, 10 mL (1/3  oz); children 1 to 12 years old,  15 mL (1/2 oz); adults,
     30 mL (1 oz).  Ambulate (walk) the victims and give large quantities of
     water. If vomiting has not occurred after 15 minutes, Ipecac may  be
     readministered.  Continue to ambulate and  give water to  the victims.  If
     vomiting has not occurred within 15 minutes after second administration of
     Ipecac, administer activated charcoal.

4.   Activated charcoal may be administered if victims are conscious and alert.
     Use 15 to 30 g (1/2 to 1 oz) for children, 50 to 100 g  (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz)
     for adults, with  125 to 250 mL (1/2 to 1  cup) of water.

5.   Promote excretion by administering a saline  cathartic or sorbitol to
     conscious and alert victims. Children  require 15 to 30 g (1/2 to 1 oz)
     of cathartic; 50  to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz) is recommended  for adults.

6.   Transport to a health care facility.

 image: 






                                            CAS Registry Number:  56-72-4
                                            Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                    Date: October 31, 1985
                                                    Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY -- COUMAPHOS

CAS Registry Number:  56-72-4

Synonyms:  3-Chloro-4-Methyl-7-Coumarinyl Diethyl Phosphorothioate;
3-Chloro-4-Methyl-7-Hydroxycoumarin Diethyl Thiophosphoric Acid Ester;
3-Chloro-4-Methylumbelliferone O-Ester with O,O-Diethyl Phosphorothioate;
3-Chloro-7-Hydroxy-4-Methyl-Coumarin O,O-Diethyl Phosphorothioate; 3-Chloro-
7-Hydroxy-4-Methyl-Coumarin O-Ester with O,O-Diethyl  Phosphorothioate; Agridip;
Asunthol; Asuntol; Azunthol; Bay 21/199; Bayer 21/199; Baymix; Baymix 50;
Co-Ral; Coumafos; Coumarin, 3-Chloro-7-Hydroxy-4-Methyl-, O-Ester with
O,O-Diethyl Phosphorothioate; Diethyl 3-Chloro-4-Methylumbelliferyl
Thionophosphate; Diethyl Thiophosphoric Acid Ester of 3-Chloro-4-Methyl-
7-Hydroxycoumarin; Diolice; ENT 17,957; Meldane, Meldone, Muscatox, NCI-C08662;
O,O-Diethyl 3-Chloro-4-Methyl-7-Umbelliferone Thiophosphate; O,O-Diethyl
O-(3-Chloro-4-Methyl-2-Oxo-2H-Benzopyran-7-yl) Phosphorothioate; O,O-Diethyl
O-(3-Chloro-4-Methyl-7-Coumarinyl) Phosphorothioate; O,O-Diethyl
O-(3-Chloro-4-Methylcoumarinyl-7) Thiophosphate; O,O-Diethyl
O-(3-Chloro-4-Methylumbelliferone) Thiophosphate; O,O-Diethyl O-(3-Chloro-4-
Methylumbelliferyl) Phosphorothioate; O-3-Chloro-4-Methyl-7-Coumarinyl
O,O-Diethyl Phosphorothioate; Phosphorothioic Acid, O,O-Diethyl Ester, O-Ester
with 3-Chloro-7-Hydroxy-4-Methylcoumarin; Phosphorothioic Acid, O-(3-Chloro-
4-Methyl-2-Oxo-2H-l-Benzopyran-7-yl) O,O-Diethyl Ester; Resistox; Resitox;
Suntol; Umbethion

Chemical Formula: C14H16C1O5PS

Molecular Weight:  362.78


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302: LC50 inhalation
           (rat)  0.303 mg/liter (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

           TPQ: 100/10,000 (pounds)

           RQ: 10 (pounds)

           Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II -- PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Solid

    Boiling Point:  Not Found

 image: 






                                            CAS Registry Number: 56-72-4
                                            Page 2 of 4

                               COUMAPHOS

SECTION II   (continued)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1):  1.31 at 25°C (*Spencer 1973)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg): 0.0000001 at 20°C (*Spencer 1973)

    Melting Point:  196°F; 91°C (*Merck 1983)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  Insoluble (*Merck 1983)

    Appearance and Odor:  Slightly brownish crystals (*Merck 1983).  Slight
    odor of sulfur compound (*CHRIS 1978)


SECTION III -- HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV: Not Found

    IDLH:  Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended:  Not Found

    Routes of Entry:  Inhalation:  Yes (*DOT 1984)
                    Skin:  Yes (*DOT 1984)
                    Ingestion:  Yes (*Gosselin 1976)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and  Chronic): Very toxic, probable oral
    lethal dose is 50-500 mg/kg, or between 1 teaspoonful and 1 oz. for a 70 kg
    (150 Ib.) person (*Gosselin 1976).  May be fatal if inhaled, swallowed, or
    absorbed through skin.  Contact may cause burns to skin and eyes (*DOT
    1984).

    Medical  Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure:  Not Found


SECTION IV -- FIRE .AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): Not Found
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL: Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods:  This material may burn but does not ignite easily
    (*DOT 1984). Extinguish with water, foam, carbon dioxide, or dry chemicals
    (*CHRIS 1978)

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures: Use organic vapor respirator, rubber
    gloves, and goggles (*CHRIS 1978).  Dike fire control water for disposal
    later (*DOT  1984).

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 56-72-4
                                            Page 3 of 4

                                COUMAPHOS

SECTION IV   (continued)

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards: Toxic and irritating oxides of sulfur
    and phosphorus may form in fire (*CHRIS 1978).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  Not Found


SECTION V -- REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:
               Stable:  Stable in water (*Merck 1983)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid): Incompatible with piperonyl
    butoxide (*Farm Chemicals Handbook 1983)

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  When heated to decomposition, it
    emits very toxic fumes of sulfur oxides, phosphorus oxides, and chlorides
    (Sax 1984, p. 726)

    Hazardous Polymerization: May Occur:  Not Found
                              May  Not Occur: Not  Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found
SECTION VI -- USE INFORMATION

    For control of a wide variety of livestock insects including cattle grubs,
    lice, scabies, flies, and ticks; the common ectoparasites of sheep, goats,
    horse, swine, and poultry as well as for screwworms in all these animals
    (Farm Chemicals Handbook 1983, p. C61).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Do not touch spilled material; stop leak if you can do it without risk.
    Use water spray to reduce vapors.  Small spills:  take up with sand or
    other noncombustible absorbent material and place into containers for later
    disposal.  Small dry spills: with clean shovel, place material into clean,
    dry container and cover;  move containers from spill area.  Large spills:
    dike far ahead of spill for later disposal (*DOT 1984).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit. See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.

 image: 






                                         CAS Registry Number:  56-72-4
                                         Page 4 of 4

                             COUMAPHOS
  *
SECTION VIII   (continued)

    SUIT MATERIAL PERFORMANCE (Based on EPA/USCG "Guidelines", 1987)
                      (Chemical Resistance/Amount of Data)

          Butyl/Neoprene       GOOD/LIMITED**
          Viton/Neoprene       GOOD/LIMITED**

     *Based on qualitative performance information.
    **Based on a chemical analog.


SECTION IX -- EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    See Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide

 image: 






                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  56-72-4
                                             Page 1 of 3
                        Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide
                                        for
                                  COUMAPHOS

                                     (56-72-4)
   This guide should not be construed to authorize emergency personnel to
perform the procedures or activities indicated or implied.  Care of persons
exposed to toxic chemicals must be directed by a physician or other recognized
authority.
Substance Characteristics:

Pure Form - White crystals.

Odor - Slightly sulfurous.

Commercial  Forms -  1 and 5% pure dusts, 3% pure spray foam, 5 to 50% pure
slightly brownish crystals, 25% pure wettable powder.

Use - Veterinary insecticide.

Other Names - Agridip; Asuntol; 3-chloro-4-methyl-7-coumarinyl diethyl
phosphorothioate; Co-Ral; Coumafos; Meldane; Muscatox; Negasunt; Resistox;
Suntol; Umbethion.


Personal Protective Equipment: See Chemical Profile Section VIII.


Emergency Life-Support Equipment and Supplies That May Be  Required:

Compressed  oxygen, forced-oxygen mask, soap, water, syrup of Ipecac, activated
charcoal, saline cathartic or sorbitol, normal saline, D5W, Ringer's lactate,
atropine, pralidoxime, diazepam, phenytoin,  phenobarbital.


Signs and Symptoms  of Acute Coumaphos Exposure:

Note:  Coumaphos is  a cholinesterase inhibitor.

Acute exposure to coumaphos may produce the following signs and symptoms:
pinpoint pupils, blurred vision, headache, dizziness, muscle spasms, and
profound weakness.  Vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, seizures, and coma may
also occur. The heart rate may decrease following oral exposure or increase
following dermal exposure. Hypotension (low blood pressure) and chest pain may
be noted.  Hypertension (high blood pressure) is not uncommon.  Respiratory
effects include dyspnea (shortness of breath), respiratory depression, and
respiratory paralysis.  Psychosis may  occur.

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  56-72-4
                                             Page 2 of 3

                                   COUMAPHOS

Emergency Life-Support Procedures:

Acute exposure to coumaphos may require decontamination and life support for
the victims. Emergency personnel should wear protective clothing appropriate
to the type and degree of contamination.  Air-purifying or supplied-air
respiratory equipment should also be worn, as necessary.  Rescue vehicles
should carry supplies such as plastic sheeting and disposable plastic bags to
assist in preventing spread of contamination.


Inhalation Exposure:

1.  Move  victims to fresh air.  Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure
     to coumaphos.

2.  Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration. If breathing  is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.  Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local  hospital
     for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive
     procedures.

4.  Transport  to a health care facility.
Dermal/Eye Exposure:

1.   Remove victims from exposure.  Emergency personnel should avoid self-
     exposure to coumaphos.

2.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration. If breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.   Remove contaminated clothing as soon as possible.

4.   If eye exposure has occurred, eyes must be flushed with lukewarm water for
     at least IS  minutes.

5.   Wash exposed skin areas three times with soap and water.

6.   Obtain authorization  and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive
     procedures.

7.   Transport to a health care facility.

 image: 






                                              EFATG
                                              CAS Registry Number: 56-72-4
                                              Page 3 of 3

                                   COUMAPHOS

Ingestion Exposure:

1.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration. If breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

2.   Obtain authorization and/or  further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive
     procedures.

3.   Vomiting  may be induced with syrup of Ipecac.  If elapsed time since
     ingestion of coumaphos is unknown or suspected to be greater than
     30 minutes,  do not induce vomiting and  proceed to Step 4.  Ipecac should
     not be administered  to children under 6  months of age.

     Warning: Ingestion of coumaphos  may result in sudden onset  of seizures or
     loss of consciousness.  Syrup of Ipecac should be administered only if
     victims are alert, have an active gag-reflex, and show no signs of
     impending seizure or coma.   If ANY uncertainly exists, proceed to Step 4.

     The following dosages of Ipecac are recommended: children up to 1 year
     old, 10 mL (1/3 oz);  children  1 to  12 years old, 15 mL (1/2  oz); adults,
     30 mL (1 oz).  Ambulate (walk) the victims and give large quantities of
     water. If vomiting has not  occurred after 15 minutes, Ipecac may be
     readministered.  Continue to ambulate and give water to  the victims.  If
     vomiting has not occurred within  15 minutes after  second administration of
     Ipecac, administer activated charcoal.

4.   Activated charcoal may be administered if victims are conscious and alert.
     Use 15 to 30 g (1/2 to 1 oz) for children, 50 to 100 g (1-3/4 to
     3-1/2 oz) for adults, with 125 to 250 mL (1/2 to 1 cup) of water.

5.   Promote excretion by  administering a saline cathartic or sorbitol to
     conscious and alert victims. Children require 15 to 30 g (1/2 to 1 oz)
     of cathartic; 50  to 100 g (1-3/4 to  3-1/2 oz) is recommended for adults.

6.   Transport to a health  care facility.

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 57-14-7
                                           Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY ~ DIMETHYLHYDRAZINE

CAS Registry Number:  57-14-7

Synonyms:  As-Dimethylhydrazine; Asym Dimethylhydrazine; Asymmetric
Dimethylhydrazine; Dimazin; Dimazine; 1,1-Dimethylhydrazine; Dimethylhydrazine
Unsymmetrical; DMH; Hydrazine, 1,1-Dimethyl; N,N-Dimethylhydrazine;
U-Dimethylhydrazine; UDMH; Uns-Dimethylhydrazine; Unsym-Dimethylhydrazine;
Unsymmetrical-Dimethylhydrazine

Chemical Formula: C2H8N2

Molecular Weight: 60.10


SECTION I ~ REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA  (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity Value  Used for Listing Under Section 302:  LC60 inhalation
           (mus) 0.422 mg/liter/4 hours (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

           TPQ: 1,000 (pounds)

           RQ: 1  (pounds)  (statutory); 10 (pounds) (proposed)

           Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): Yes


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point: 147°F, 63.9°C at 760 mmHg (*Merck 1983)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1): 0.7914 at 220C/4°C (*IARC 1972-1985)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  157 mmHg at 25°C (Sax, 1986, p.65)

    Melting Point:  -72°F, -58°C (*Merck 1983)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  1.94 (*Sax  1979)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l):  Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  Very soluble (*Encyc Occupat Health and Safety 1983)

    Appearance and Odor:  Clear, colorless liquid with characteristic
    ammonia-like  fish odor (*IARC 1972-1985).       ;:

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 57-14-7
                                            Page 2 of 4

                               DIMETHYLHYDRAZINE

SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  TWA 1 mg/m8, (0.5 ppm) (NIOSH 1987, p.108)

    ACGIH TLV: TWA 1 mg/ms, (0.5 ppm) (skin) (ACGIH 1986-87, p.17)

    IDLH: 50 ppm (NIOSH/OSHA  1978, p. 88)

    Other Limits Recommended:  NIOSH: 0.15  mg/ms, 120 minute ceiling (NIOSH
    1987, p.108). Industrial substance suspect of carcinogenic potential for
    humans (ACGIH 1983, p. 43). SPEGL 0.24 ppm (60 minutes) (NRC 1985b, pp.
    37-48).

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation: Yes (*Sax 1975)
                    Skin: Yes (*Sax 1975)
                    Ingestion:  Yes (*Sax 1975)

   .Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  This compound exhibits high
    acute  toxicity as a result of exposure by all routes.  Death or permanent
    injury may result after very short exposure to small quantities (*Sax
    1975). Chronic exposure may cause pneumonia, liver damage, and kidney
    damage (*Rumack 1975 to Present).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure:  Not Found


SECTION IV -- FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): 5°F, -15°C (CC) (*NFPA 1978)
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL:  2% (*Sax 1979)
        UEL:  95% (*Sax 1979)

    Extinguishing Methods: Use dry chemical, carbon dioxide, water  spray, or
    foam  for small fires (*DOT 1984).  In large fires water fog, carbon
    dioxide, and bicarbonate agents may allow flashback and explosive
    re-ignition (*CHRIS 1978).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures: Move containers from fire area if it
    can be done without risk.  Dike fire control water for later disposal, do
    not scatter the material.  Cool containers that are exposed to flames with
    water until well  after fire is out, wear positive pressure breathing
    apparatus and special protective clothing.  Isolate for one-half mile in
    all directions if tank car or truck is involved in fire (*DOT 1984).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards: Vapor may explode if ignited in an
    enclosed area (*CHRIS 1978).  Vapors may travel to a  source of ignition and
    flashback. Runoff to sewer may create fire or explosion hazard (*DOT
    1984).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  3

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 57-14-7
                                            Page 3 of 4

                                DIMETHYLHYDRAZINE

SECTION V ~ REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:
               Stable: Yes (NFPA .1984, p. 325M-43)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Dangerous when exposed to heat, flame, or
        oxidizers (*Sax 1979).

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Dissolves, swells, and
    disintegrates many plastics (*CHRIS 1978).

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  When it decomposes,
    1,1-dimethylhydrazine gives off toxic nitrogen  compound fumes (*Rumack 1975
    to Present).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:
                             May Not Occur: Yes (Weiss 1980, p. 364)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found


SECTION VI -- USE INFORMATION

    Major uses include: chemical synthesis; stabilizer for organic peroxide
    fuel additives; absorbent for acid gases; photography (*Hawley  1977); base
    in rocket fuel formulations (*Merck 1983); stabilizer for plant growth
    regulator (*Clayton and Clayton 1981-82).
SECTION VII -- PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Shut off ignition sources.  Do not touch spilled material. Stop leak if
    this can be done without risk.  Use water spray to reduce vapors.  Take up
    small spills with sand or other non-combustible absorbent material and
    place into containers for later disposal. Dike far ahead of  large spills
    for later disposal (*DOT 1984).  Spills  also may be removed with an
    aspirator.  Transfer to glass container  and neutralize with dilute sulfuric
    acid.  Drain with copious amounts of water (*Rumack 1975 to Present).
SECTION VIII -- PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit. See the introductory information section at the
    beginning  of the profiles for additional information.

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                                        CAS Registry Number:  57-14-7
                                        Page 4 of 4

                            DIMETHYLHYDRAZINE

SECTION VIII   (continued)

    SUIT MATERIAL PERFORMANCE (Based on EPA/USCG "Guidelines", 1987)
                     (Chemical Resistance/Amount of Data)

          Butyl               EXCELLENT/MANY
          Butyl/Neoprene      POOR/LIMITED*
          CPE                POOR/LIMITED
          Chlorobutyl          GOOD/LIMITED
          Neoprene            POOR/MANY
          Nitrile              POOR/MANY
          PVC                POOR/MANY
          Teflon              POOR/LIMITED
          Viton               POOR/LIMITED
          Viton/Neoprene      POOR/LIMITED*

    *Based on qualitative performance information.
    **Based on a chemical analog.


SECTION IX -- EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    See Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number: 57-14-7
                                             Page 1 of 3
                        Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide
                                        for
                              DIMETHYLHYDRAZINE

                                     (57-14-7)
   This guide should not  be construed  to authorize emergency personnel to
perform the procedures or  activities indicated  or implied.  Care of persons
exposed to toxic chemicals must be directed by a physician or other recognized
authority.
Substance Characteristics:

Pure Form - Clear, colorless liquid.

Odor - Ammonialike.

Commercial  Form - 98% pure liquid in drums or tank cars.

Uses  -  Chemical  synthesis, stabilizer for organic  peroxide rocket  fuel
formulations, acid gas absorbent, plant growth regulator, photography.

Materials  to Avoid - Oxidizers.

Caution:  Highly  flammable.   Avoid sources  of extreme  heat or ignition
including sparks or fire.  Dimethylhydrazine will emit toxic nitrogen compounds
when heated  to decomposition.

Other Names - Asym dimethylhydrazine, Dimazin, 1,1-dimethylhydrazine, UDMH.


Personal Protective Equipment:  See Chemical Profile Section VIII.


Emergency Life-Support Equipment and Supplies That May Be Required:

Compressed  oxygen,  forced-oxygen mask, soap, water, syrup of Ipecac, activated
charcoal, saline cathartic or sorbitol, normal  saline,  D5W,  Ringer's lactate,
diazepam, phenytoin, phenobarbital, pyridoxine.

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number: 57-14-7
                                             Page 2 of 3

                             DIMETHYLHYDRAZINE

Signs and Symptoms of Acute Dimethylhydrazine Exposure:

Warning:  Effects may be delayed for hours to days.  Caution is advised.

Signs and symptoms of  acute  exposure  to dimethylhydrazine may include  eye
irritation, facial numbness,  facial  swelling,  and  increased  salivation.
Headache, twitching,  seizures, convulsions,  and  coma   may  also  occur.
Gastrointestinal  effects include anorexia,  nausea, and  vomiting.   Pulmonary
edema and hypotension (low blood pressure) are common.  Dimethylhydrazine is
toxic to  the liver,  ruptures red  blood cells, and may  cause kidney damage.
Dermal contact may result in strong skin and mucous membrane irritation.


Emergency Life-Support Procedures:

Acute exposure  to  dimethylhydrazine may  require  decontamination  and life
support for the victims.  Emergency  personnel should  wear protective clothing
appropriate  to  the  type  and  degree of contamination.   Air-purifying or
supplied-air respiratory equipment should also be  worn, as  necessary. Rescue
vehicles should carry supplies such as dimethylhydrazine-resistant sheeting and
disposable bags to assist in preventing spread of contamination.


Inhalation Exposure:

1.  Move victims to fresh air.  Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure
      to dimethylhydrazine.

2.  Evaluate vital  signs including  pulse  and respiratory rate, and note any
      trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
      artificial respiration.   If breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
      other respiratory support.

3.  Obtain authorization and/or further   instructions from  the local hospital
      for  administration  of  an antidote  or performance  of other invasive
      procedures.

4.  Transport to a health care facility.


Dermal/Eye Exposure:

1.  Remove victims from exposure.   Emergency  personnel  should  avoid self-
      exposure to dimethylhydrazine.

2.  Evaluate vital  signs including  pulse  and  respiratory rate, and note any
      trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not  breathing, provide
      artificial respiration.   If breathing  is labored, administer oxygen or
      other respiratory support.

3.  Remove contaminated clothing as soon as possible.

4.  If eye exposure has occurred, eyes must be flushed with lukewarm water for
      at least 15 minutes.

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  57-14-7
                                             Page 3 of 3

                              DIMETHYLHYDRAZINE

5.   Wash exposed skin areas THOROUGHLY with soap and water.

6.   Obtain authorization  and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration  of  an  antidote  or performance of other invasive
     procedures.

7.   Transport to a health care facility.


Ingestion Exposure:

1.   Evaluate vital signs including  pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not  breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.   If  breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

2.   Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from  the local hospital
     for administration  of  an  antidote  or performance of other invasive
     procedures.

3.   Vomiting  may be induced with syrup of  Ipecac.   If  elapsed  time since
     ingestion of  dimethylhydrazine is unknown or suspected to  be greater than
     30 minutes, do not induce vomiting and  proceed to Step  4.   Ipecac should
     not be administered to children under 6 months of age.

     Warning:  Ingestion of  dimethylhydrazine may result in  sudden onset of
     seizures  or loss  of  consciousness.   Syrup  of   Ipecac should be
     administered only if victims are alert,  have  an active gag-reflex, and
     show no signs of impending seizure or coma.   If  ANY  uncertainty exists,
     proceed to Step 4.

     The following  dosages of  Ipecac are  recommended:  children up to 1 year
     old, 10 mL (1/3 oz); children 1 to 12 years old, 15 mL (1/2  oz); adults,
     30 mL (1 oz).  Ambulate  (walk) the victims and give large quantities of
     water. If vomiting has not  occurred after  15 minutes, Ipecac  may be
     readministered.   Continue to  ambulate  and give water to the victims. If
     vomiting has not occurred within 15 minutes after second administration of
     Ipecac, administer activated charcoal.

4.   Activated charcoal may be administered if victims are conscious and alert.
     Use 15 to 30 g (1/2 to 1 oz) for children, 50 to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz)
     for adults, with 125 to 250 mL (1/2 to  1  cup) of water.

5.   Promote  excretion  by administering  a   saline cathartic or sorbitol to
     conscious and alert victims. Children require 15  to 30 g (1/2 to 1 oz)
     of cathartic; 50 to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz) is recommended for adults.

6.   Transport to a health care facility.

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  57-24-9
                                           Page 1 of 3
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                  Date: October 31, 1985
                                                  Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - STRYCHNINE


CAS Registry Number: 57-24-9

Synonyms: Certox; Dolco Mouse Cereal; Kwik-Kil; Mole Death; Mouse-Nots;
Mouse-Rid; Mouse-Tox; Pied Piper Mouse Seed; Ro-Dex; Sanaseed; Strychnos;
Strychnidin-10-one; Strychnin

Chemical Formula: C21H22N2O2

Molecular Weight: 334.40


SECTION I -- REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

          Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302: LD60 oral (mus)
          2 mg/kg (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

          TPQ: 100/10,000 (pounds)

          RQ: 10 (pounds)

          Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS


    Physical State: Solid

    Boiling Point: 518°F, 270°C at SmmHg (*Merck  1983)

    Specific  Gravity (H2O=1):  1.36 at 20°C/4°C (*Merck  1983)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg): Not  Found

    Melting Point:  514-554°F, 268-290°C (*Merck  1983)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

    Solubility in Water: 1 g in 6400 ml (*Merck 1983).

    Appearance and Odor:  Colorless, transparent crystals or white crystalline
    powder; odorless (*Osol 1980).

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 57-24-9
                                            Page 2 of 3

                               STRYCHNINE
                      *
SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL: 0.15 mg/ms (NIOSH 1987, p. 210)

    ACGIH TLV: TWA 0.15 mg/ms (ACGIH 1986-87, p. 29)

    IDLH: 3 mg/ms (NIOSH/OSHA 1978, p. 168)

    Other Limits Recommended:  Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Yes (*DOT 1984)
                    Skin: Not Found
                    Ingestion:  Yes  (*Gosselin 1976)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed,  and Chronic): Super toxic; probable oral
    lethal dose in humans is less than 5 mg/kg, a taste (less than 7 drops) for
    a 70 kg (150 Ib.) person.  It causes violent generalized convulsions.
    Death results from  respiratory arrest as the respiratory muscles are in
    sustained spasm (*Gosselin 1976).  The lowest lethal oral dose reported for
    humans is 30 mg/kg (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure: Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): Not Found
    Flammable Limits:  Material may burn but does not ignite readily (*DOT
    1984).
        LEL: Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods: Extinguish fire using agent suitable for type of
    surrounding fire; material itself does not burn  or burns with difficulty.
    Use water in flooding quantities as fog. Use alcohol foam, carbon dioxide,
    or dry chemical (Student  1981, p. 482).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures: Not Found                     >

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  When heated, emits highly  toxic fumes
    (*Sax 1979).  Fire may produce irritating or poisonous gases.  Runoff from
    fire control or dilution water may cause pollution (*DOT  1984).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  Not Found


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:
               Stable:  Yes (*Osol 1980)

        Conditions  to Avoid:  Protect from light (*Merck 1983)

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 57-24-9
                                            Page 3 of 3

                               STRYCHNINE

SECTION V   (continued)

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid): Not Found

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  Not Found

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:  Not Found
                             May Not Occur:  Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not  Found


SECTION VI -- USE INFORMATION

    Material (and its salts) is used for destroying rodents and predatory
    animals and for trapping fur-bearing animals (*Merck 1983).
SECTION VII -- PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Do not touch spilled material; stop leak if you can do so without risk.
    Small spills:  absorb with sand or other noncombustible absorbent material
    and place into containers for later disposal.  Small dry spills: with
    clean shovel place material into clean, dry container and cover; move
    containers from spill area.  Large spills: dike far ahead of spill  for
    later disposal (DOT 1984, Guide 53). Avoid breathing dusts, and fumes from
    burning materials.  Keep upwind.  Avoid bodily contact with the material.
    Do not handle broken packages without protective equipment. Wash away
    any material which may have contacted the body with copious amounts
    of water or soap and water (Student 1981, p. 482).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See  the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.
SECTION IX -- EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    See Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  57-24-9
                                             Page 1 of 3
                      Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide
                                      for
                                  STRYCHNINE

                                   (57-24-9)
     This guide  should not  be construed  to authorize  emergency personnel to
perform the procedures or  activities indicated or implied.   Care of persons
exposed to toxic chemicals must be directed by a physician or other recognized
authority.
Substance. Characteristics:

Pure Forms - Colorless, transparent crystals or white crystalline powder.

Odor - None; bitter taste.

Commercial Form - Poisoned baits, usually as colored grain.

Uses -  Rodenticide, sedatives, veterinary products.

Other  Names - Certox, Kwik-Kil, Mouse-Rid, Mouse-Tox, Ro-Dex, Sanaseed,
Strychinos, strychnidin-10-one.


Personal Protective Equipment:  See Chemical Profile Section VIII.


Emergency Life-Support  Equipment and Supplies That May Be  Required:

Compressed oxygen,  forced-oxygen mask, soap, water, activated charcoal, saline
cathartic  or  sorbitol, normal saline,  D5W,  Ringer's  lactate,  diazepam,
phenytoin, phenobarbital,  sodium bicarbonate, pancuronium  bromide or curare,
succinylcholine.


Signs and Symptoms of Acute Strychnine Exposure:

Warning:  Strychnine may induce convulsions within 15  to 60  minutes following
exposure.  Caution is  advised.

Respiratory paralysis and arrest are likely to occur following severe exposure
to strychnine.   Signs and  symptoms  of acute  exposure generally involve
excitation  of all  portions  of  the central nervous  system.  Convulsions,
bilateral horizontal nystagmus (rapid, synchronous, horizontal  oscillations  of
the eyeballs), agitation, restlessness,  apprehension,  and  abrupt, jerking
movements of the extremities may occur.

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  57-24-9
                                             Page 2 of 3

                                   STRYCHNINE

Victims may also experience stiffness, painful  muscle cramping  (especially in
the legs),  and opisthotonos (spasm in which the spine and extremities are bent
with convexity forward, the body resting on the head and heels).  Vomiting and
renal failure,  as well  as cyanosis  (blue tint  to skin and mucous membranes)
and rhabdomyolysis (destruction of skeletal muscle), may be found.
Emergency Life-Support Procedures:

Acute exposure to strychnine may require  decontamination and  life support for
the victims.  Emergency  personnel should wear protective clothing appropriate
to the  type and  degree  of contamination.   Air-purifying or supplied-air
respiratory  equipment  should also  be  worn,  as necessary. Rescue vehicles
should carry supplies such as plastic sheeting and  disposable plastic  bags to
assist in preventing spread of contamination.
Inhalation Exposure:

1.   Move  victims to fresh air.  Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure
     to strychnine.

     Warning:  Any unnecessary sensory input may induce seizures.   Isolate the
     victims from any avoidable distractions.

2.   RUSH to a health care facility!

3.   Evaluate vital  signs including  pulse and  respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not  breathing, provide
     artificial  respiration.    If  breathing  is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

4.   Obtain authorization and/or further  instructions from the local hospital
     for  administration  of an  antidote or  performance  of  other invasive
     procedures.
Dermal/Eye Exposure:

1.  Remove victims from exposure.   Emergency  personnel should  avoid self-
     exposure to strychnine.

     Warning:   Any unnecessary sensory input may induce seizures.  Isolate the
     victims from any avoidable distractions.

2.  RUSH to a health care facility!.

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                                              EFATG
                                              CAS Registry Number: 57-24-9
                                              Page 3 of 3

                                   STRYCHNINE

3.  Evaluate vital signs including  pulse and  respiratory rate,  and note any
     trauma.   If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.  If breathing is labored,  administer  oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

4.  Remove contaminated clothing as soon as possible.

5.  If eye exposure has occurred, eyes must be flushed with lukewarm water for
     at least IS minutes.

6.  Wash exposed skin areas THOROUGHLY with soap and water.

7.  Obtain authorization  and/or further  instructions from  the local  hospital
     for administration  of an antidote  or  performance  of other invasive
     procedures.
Ingestion Exposure:

1.   Evaluate vital signs including  pulse and  respiratory rate,  and note any
     trauma.   If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial  respiration.  If breathing is labored, administer  oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

     Warning:   Any unnecessary sensory input may induce seizures.  Isolate the
     victims from any avoidable  distractions.

2.   RUSH  to a health  care facility!

3.   DO NOT induce vomiting or attempt to neutralize.

4.   Obtain authorization  and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration  of an antidote  or  performance  of other invasive
     procedures.

5.   Activated charcoal may be administered if victims are conscious and alert.
     Use 15 to  30 g (1/2 to 1 oz) for children, 50 to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz)
     for adults, with 125 to 250 mL (1/2 to 1  cup) of water.

6.   Promote excretion  by administereing  a saline cathartic  or  sorbitol to
     conscious  and alert victims.  Children require 15 to 30 g (1/2 to 1 oz)
     of cathartic; 50 to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz) is recommended for adults.

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  57-47-6
                                           Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY -- PHYSOSTIGMINE

CAS Registry Number:  57-47-6

Synonyms:  Calabarine; Carbamic Acid, Methyl-, Ester with Eseroline; Erserine;
Eserine; Eserolein, Methylcarbamate (Ester); Esromiotin; Ezerin; Physostol;
Pyrrolo(2,3-b)indol-5-ol, l,2,3,3a,8,8a-Hexahydro-l,3a,8-Trimethyl-,
Methylcarbamate (Ester), (3aS-cis)-

Chemical Formula: C15H21NSO2

Molecular Weight: 275.34


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302: LD50 oral (mus)
           4.5 mg/kg (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

           TPQ: 100/10,000 (pounds)

           RQ: 1 (pounds)
               (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

           Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II -- PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Solid

    Boiling Point: Not Found

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1):  Not Found

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  Not Found

    Melting Point:  221-223°F, 105-106°C (*Merck 1976)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1): Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l):  Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  Slightly soluble (*Merck 1976)

    Appearance and Odor: White, odorless, microcrystalline powder (*Osol
    1980)

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  57-47-6
                                            Page 2 of 4

                               PHYSOSTIGMINE

SECTION III -- HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL: Not Found

    ACGIH TLV:  Not Found

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended: Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Yes (*Gilman 1980)
                     Skin:  Yes (*Gilman 1980)
                     Ingestion: Yes (*Gilman 1980)

    Health Hazards (Acute,  Delayed, and Chronic):  Super toxic.  Probable oral
    lethal dose  is less than 5 mg/kg for a 70 kg (150 Ib.) person (*Gosselin
    1984).  Material is a cholinesterase inhibitor.  Effects of exposure may
    involve the respiratory, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular and central
    nervous systems. Death  occurs due to respiratory paralysis or impaired
    cardiac function. Time  to death may vary from 5 minutes to 24 hours, in
    severely poisoned patients, depending on factors such as the  dose and route
    (*Goodman 1980).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure: Persons with asthma
    and/or persons that require drugs containing choline esters are at risk
    (*Osol 1975).


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): Not Found
    Flammable  Limits:
         LEL:  Not Found
         UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing  Methods:  This is a carbamate pesticide (Hayes 1982, p.
    436).  As for carbamate  pesticides, extinguish fire  using agent suitable
    for type of surrounding fire (material itself burns with difficulty). Use
    water in flooding quantities as fog.  Use alcohol foam, carbon dioxide or
    dry chemical (Student 1981, p.  104).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  This is a carbamate pesticide (Hayes
    1982, p. 436).   As for carbamate pesticides, wear self-contained breathing
    apparatus when fighting fires (Student 1981, p. 104).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  It is a slight fire hazard (Sax 1984,
    p. 2228).

    NFPA Flammability Rating: Not Found


SECTION V -  REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable: Not Found
               Stable:  Not Found

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  57-47-6
                                            Page 3 of 4

                               PHYSOSTIGMINE

SECTION V   (continued)

         Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Keep from light and heat (*Merck
    1976).

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts: When heated  to decomposition it
    emits toxic fumes of nitrogen oxides (Sax 1984, p. 2228).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:  Not Found
                              May Not Occur:  Not Found

         Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found


SECTION VI -- USE INFORMATION

    Physostigmine is a carbamate pesticide (Hayes 1982, p. 436).  Material is
    used as a cholinergic (anticholinesterase) agent and as a veterinary
    medication (*Merck 1976).  Listed as a carbamate pesticide in Sections III
    and VII, however, physostigmine is not registered in the U.S. as such
    (USEPA/Pesticide Index 1985).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is  Released or Spilled)

    This is a carbamate pesticide (Hayes 1982, p. 436).  As for other carbamate
    pesticides, avoid breathing dusts, and fumes from burning materials.  Keep
    upwind.  Avoid bodily contact with the material. Wash away any material
    which may have contacted the body with copious amounts of water or soap and
    water (*Student 1981).
SECTION VIII -- PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.
SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure:  General symptoms include: increased
    secretions, fatigability and generalized weakness, involuntary twitching,
    severe weakness of skeletal muscles.  Symptoms of exposure to material by
    major organ system: gastrointestinal: lack of appetite, nausea and
    vomiting, abdominal cramps and diarrhea.  Central nervous system:
    confusion, uncoordination, slurred speech, loss of reflexes, rapid,
    irregular breathing, generalized convulsions, and coma.  Cardiovascular:
    slowed heart beat resulting in hypotension and  fall in cardiac output
    (*Goodman 1980).                             .-

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 57-47-6
                                            Page 4 of 4

                               PHYSOSTIGMINE

SECTION IX   (continued)

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures:  Administer artificial respiration and
    oxygen if needed (Sax 1984, p. 2228).  If the victim's skin and hair are
    contaminated, bathe with soap and water.  If the material  was ingested, the
    stomach must be emptied  (*Morgan 1976).

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 57-57-8
                                            Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - PROPIOLACTONE, beta-

CAS Registry Number:  57-57-8

Synonyms:  beta-Propiolactone; 2-Oxetanone; 3-Hydroxypropionic Acid Lactone;
3-Hydroxypropionic Acid, beta-Lactone; 3-Propanolide; 3-Propiolactone;
beta-Propionolactone; beta-Proprolactone; Betaprone; BPL; Hydracrylic Acid
Beta-Lactone; Hydracrylic Acid, beta Lactone; Propanoic Acid,
3-Hydroxy-,beta-Lactone;  Propanolide; Propiolactone; Propionic Acid
3-Hydroxy-beta-Lactone; Propionic Acid, 3-Hydroxy-, beta-Lactone

Chemical Formula: CSH4O2

Molecular Weight:  72.06


SECTION I ~ REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity Value Used for  Listing Under Section 302:  LC50 inhalation
           (rat) 0.074 mg/liter (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

           TPQ: 500 (pounds)

           RQ: 1  (pounds)
              (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

           Section 313  Listed (Yes or No): Yes


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point:  324°F, 162°C, decomposes (*Merck 1976)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1):  1.146  at 20°C/4°C (*Merck 1976)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg): 3.4 at 25°C (*IARC 1972-1985)

    Melting Point: -27°F, -33°C (*Merck  1976)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l):  Not Found

    Solubility in Water: 37% by volume (*Merck 1976)

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  57-57-8
                                           Page 2 of 4

                               PROPIOLACTONE, beta-

SECTION II   (continued)

    Appearance and Odor: A colorless liquid with a slightly sweetish, pungent
    odor (*Encyc Occupat Health and Safety  1971; *IARC 1972-1985)


SECTION III -- HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV: TWA 1.5 mg/ms, (0.5 ppm); STEL 3 mg/ms,(l ppm) (ACGIH, 19i
    30)

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended:  Industrial substance suspect of carcinogenic
    potential for humans (ACGIH 1984, p. 41).

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Yes (*Sax 1968)
                    Skin: Yes (Weiss 1980, p. 776)
                    Ingestion:  Yes (*Sax 1968)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  The toxicity potential of
    this material via inhalation or ingestion is high; may  cause death or
    permanent injury after very short exposures to small  quantities (*Sax
    1968). It is a carcinogen (Weiss 1980, p. 776).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure:  Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): 70°C (158°F) (no  method given) (*Merck 1976)
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL: 2.9% (*NFPA 1979)
        UEL: Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods: Alcohol foam (*Sax 1979).  Extinguish with water,
    dry chemical, foam, or carbon dioxide (Weiss  1980, p. 776).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures: Wear air mask, goggles or face shield,
    rubber gloves, and protective clothing to  prevent all skin contact. Cool
    exposed containers with water (Weiss 1980, p. 776).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  Containers may explode (Weiss 1980,
    p. 776).  When heated to decomposition, it emits acrid smoke and fumes (Sax
    1984, p. 2102).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  2
SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unftable:
               Stable: Yes, stable when stored at 5°C (*Merck 1983)

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 57-57-8
                                           Page 3 of 4

                               PROPIOLACTONE, beta-

SECTION V   (continued)

        Conditions to Avoid: Avoid storing in areas of exposure to the direct
        rays of the sun and in areas of high fire hazard (*Sax 1968). Tends to
        polymerize on storage (*IARC 1972-1985).

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Not Found

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  When heated to decomposition, it
    emits acrid smoke and fumes (Sax 1984, p. 2102).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:  Not Found
                             May Not Occur: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid: Avoid elevated temperatures (Weiss 1980, p.
        776).


SECTION VI -- USE INFORMATION

    Intermediate in organic synthesis; disinfectant (*Merck 1976); sterilant
    for blood plasma, tissue grafts, vaccines, enzymes and surgical instruments
    (*SRI).
SECTION VII -- PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Avoid contact with liquid.  Keep people away.  Stop discharge (Weiss 1980,
    p. 776).  Avoid inhalation (see Section III above).
SECTION VIII -- PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.

    SUIT MATERIAL PERFORMANCE (Based on EPA/USCG "Guidelines", 1987)
                       (Chemical Resistance/Amount of Data)

           Butyl                 GOOD/LIMITED
           Neoprene             POOR/LIMITED
           Nitrile               POOR/LIMITED
           PE                   POOR/MANY
           PVC                  POOR/LIMITED
           Viton                 POOR/LIMITED

     *Based on qualitative performance information.
    **Based on a chemical analog.

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                                              CAS Registry Number: 57-57-8
                                               Page 4 of 4

                                 PROPIOLACTONE, beta-

SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure: Inhalation causes irritation of  nose,
    throat, and respiratory tract.  Contact of liquid with eyes causes
    irritation and tears.  Contact with skin causes irritation and blistering;
    fluid from blisters may cause additional blistering of adjacent skin.
    Ingestion causes burns of mouth and stomach (Weiss 1980, p. 776).

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures:  Get medical attention following all
    exposures to this compound.  In case of inhalation, move victim to fresh
    air; if breathing has stopped,  give artificial respiration.  If there  has
    been eye contact, flush eyes with water for at least 15 minutes. In case
    of skin  contact, flush with water (Weiss 1980, p. 776).

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 57-64-7
                                           Page 1 of 3
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                  Date: October 31, 1985
                                                  Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY -- PHYSOSTIGMINE, SALICYLATE (1:1)

CAS Registry Number: 57-64-7

Synonyms: (SANSS 1983 Synonyms):  Eserine Salicylate; Physostol Salicylate;
Salicylic Acid, compound with Physostigmine; Benzoic Acid, 2-Hydroxy-, compound
with (3aS-cis)-l,2,3,3a,8,8a-Hexahydro-l,3a,8-
Trimethylpyrrolo[2,3-b]indol-5-yl Methylcarbamate (1:1)

Chemical Formula:  C15H21NSO2-C7H6O3

Molecular Weight: 413.52


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA  (SARA) 1986:

          Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:  LD50 oral
          (mouse) 2.5 mg/kg (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

          TPQ: 100/10,000 (pounds)

          RQ: 1 (pounds)
              (statutory, for  notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

          Section  313 Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II -- PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State:  Solid

    Boiling Point: Not Found

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1):  Not Found

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg): Not Found

    Melting Point:  365-369°F,  185-187°C (Merck 1983, p. 1065)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

    Solubility in Water: 1 gram/75 mL at 25°C (Merck 1983, p. 1065)

    Appearance and Odor: Crystal form that turns red on exposure to heat or
    light (Merck 1983, p. 1065).                    ;

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  57-64-7
                                           Page 2 of 3

                               PHYSOSTIGMINE, SALICYLATE (1:1)

SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV: Not Found

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended: Not Found

    Routes of Entry:  Inhalation:  Not Found
                    Skin:  Not Found
                    Ingestion: Yes (Sax  1984, p. 2228)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic): This compound is similar to
    physostigmine. It is classified as super toxic. The probable oral lethal
    dose (humans) is less than 5 mg/kg or a taste for a  150 Ib. person. It is
    a cholinesterase inhibitor (Gosselin 1984, p. 11-245).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure: Not Found


SECTION IV -- FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): Not Found
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL: Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods:  Not Found

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  Not Found

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  Not Found

    NFPA Flammability Rating: Not Found


SECTION V -- REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable: Not Found
              Stable:  Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid): Not Found

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts: When heated to decomposition, it
    emits toxic fumes of nitrogen oxides (Sax 1984, p. 2228).

    Hazardous Polymerization: May Occur:  Not Found
                             May Not Occur: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  57-64-7
                                            Page 3 of 3

                               PHYSOSTIGMINE, SALICYLATE (1:1)

SECTION VI -- USE INFORMATION

    Not Found
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Not Found
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA  and a  fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.
SECTION IX -- EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure:  This compound is similar to physostigmine
    (Gosselin 1984, p. H-245). Symptoms include nausea, vomiting, abdominal
    cramps, diarrhea, excessive salivation, sweating, lassitude, weakness,
    tightness in chest, vision disorders, tearing, ciliary muscle spasm, loss
    of muscle coordination, slurring of speech, twitching of muscle, difficulty
    in breathing, bluing of skin, convulsions, coma and death (Gosselin 1984,
    p. 111-89).

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures:  This compound is similar to
    physostigmine (Gosselin 1984, p. 11-245).  Give oxygen and artificial
    respiration as needed.  Wash contaminated areas of the skin with soap and
    water.  Irrigate the eyes with water or  saline. Keep patient under
    constant observation for at least 24 hours (Gosselin 1984, p. 111-89).

COMMENTS

    Sources with no information:
        Doull 1980
        Clayton and Clayton 1981-82
        NFPA 1984

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  57-74-9
                                            Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                    Date: October 31, 1985
                                                    Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY -- CHLORDANE

CAS Registry Number:  57-74-9

Synonyms:  l,2,4,5,6,7,8,8-Octachloro-2,3,3a,4,7,7a-Hexahydro-4,7-
Methanoindene; l,2,4,5,6,7,8,8-Octachloro-3a,4,7,7a-Hexahydro-4,7-Methylene
Indane; 4,7-Methano-lH-Indene, l,2,4,5,6,7,8,8-Octachloro-2,3,3a,4,7,7a-
Hexahydro-; 4,7-Methanoindan, 1,2,4,5,6,7,8,8-Octachloro-3a,4,7,7a-Tetrahydro-;
1068; Aspon-Chlordane; CD 68; Chlor Kil; Chlordane, Liquid (DOT); Chlorindan;
Corodan; Dowchlor; ENT 9,932; ENT-9932; HCS 3260; Kypchlor; M 140; M 410;
NCI-C00099; Niran; Octa-Klor; Octachloro-4,7-Methanohydroindane; Octachloro-
4,7-Methanotetrahydroindane; Octachlorodihydrodicyclopentadiene; Oktaterr;
Ortho-Klor; Synklor; TAT Chlor 4; Topiclor; Toxichlor; Velsicol 1068; Belt

Chemical Formula:  C10H6C18

Molecular Weight:  409.80


SECTION I « REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity Value Used for  Listing Under Section 302:  LC60 inhalation
           (cat) 0.1 mg/liter/4 hours (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

           TPQ: 1,000  (pounds)

           RQ: 1  (pounds) (statutory); 1 (pounds) (proposed)

           Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): Yes


SECTION II » PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point:  347°F,  175°C at 2 mmHg ('Sunshine 1969)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1):  1.56-1.57 at 25°C/0°C (*Merck 1983)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg): 0.00001 at 25°C (*Sunshine 1969)

    Melting Point:  Not Found

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  57-74-9
                                            Page 2 of 4

                               CHLORDANE

SECTION II   (continued)

    Solubility in Water: Insoluble (*Merck 1983)

    Appearance and Odor:  Amber viscous liquid  with an aromatic, slightly
    pungent odor (*Merck 1983, *CHRIS 1978)

SECTION III -- HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Air: TWA 0.5 mg/ms (skin) (NIOSH 1987)

    ACGIH TLV:  0.5 mg/m3 (ACGIH 1986-87)

    IDLH: 500 mg/ms (*Clayton and Clayton 1981-82)

    Other Limits Recommended: Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Yes (Gosselin 1984, pp. III-108-109)
                    Skin:  Yes — More toxic to  humans than by oral
                           administration (Gosselin 1984,  pp. III-108-109)
                    Ingestion:  Yes (Gosselin 1984, pp.  III-108-109)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  Fatal oral dose to adult
    humans is between 6 and 60 g with onset of symptoms within 45 minutes to
    several hours after ingestion, although symptoms have occurred following
    very small doses either orally or by skin exposure.  Some reports of
    delayed development of liver disease, blood disorders and upset stomach.
    Chlordane is considered to be borderline between a moderately and highly
    toxic substance (Gosselin 1984, pp. III-108-109).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by  Exposure:  Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): Not Found
    Flammable Limits:  Flammable/combustible (*DOT 1984)
        LEL: Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods:  Small fires:  dry chemical, carbon dioxide, water
    spray, and foam. Large fires:  water spray, fog, or foam.  Move containers
    from fire area if it can be done without risk. Cool containers that are
    exposed to flames with water from the side until well after fire is out
    (*DOT 1984).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  Isolate hazard area and deny entry.
    Stay upwind. Wear positive pressure breathing apparatus and  special
    protective clothing. Isolate for 1/2-mile in all directions if tank car or
    truck is involved in the fire (*DOT  1984).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards: Flammable/combustible material; may
    be ignited by heat, sparks or flames.  Vapors  may travel to a source of
    ignition and flash back. Run-off  to sewers may create fire or explosion
    hazard.  Containers may explode in heat of fire. Vapors are toxic indoors

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  57-74-9
                                            Page 3 of 4

                               CHLORDANE

SECTION IV   (continued)

    and outdoors (*DOT 1984).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  Not Found


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:
               Stable: Yes (Verschueren 1983, pp. 380-381)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Loses chlorine in presence of
    alkaline reagents; should not be formulated with any solvent, carrier,
    diluent or emulsifier which has alkaline reaction (*Merck 1983).

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts: Chlordane degrades under natural
    environmental conditions to photoisomers, such as photo-cis- chlordane,
    which are more toxic to certain animals than chlordane and also showed
    higher bioaccumulation (*Khan et al.  1970).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur: Not Found
                             May Not Occur:  Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    As of 1983, the only use in USA is for termite control (*IARC  1972-1985).
    Previously used as agricultural home and garden pesticide or insecticide
    (*SRI).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Avoid breathing vapors (see Section III above). Shut off ignition sources.
    Eliminate all smoking or flames in hazard area.  Do not touch spilled
    material.  Use water spray to reduce vapors.  Stay upwind. Small spills:
    take up with sand or other noncombustible absorbent material, place into
    containers for later disposal. Large spills:  dike far ahead of spill for
    later disposal (*DOT  1984).
SECTION VIII -- PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 57-74-9
                                           Page 4 of 4

                               CHLORDANE

SECTION VIII   (continued)

    SUIT MATERIAL PERFORMANCE (Based on EPA/USCG "Guidelines", 1987)
                       (Chemical Resistance/Amount of Data)

           Neoprene             GOOD/LIMITED**
           Nitrile                POOR/LIMITED**
           PVC                  POOR/LIMITED**
           Viton                 GOOD/LIMITED**

     *Based on qualitative performance information.
    **Based on a chemical analog.


SECTION IX  - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure: Increased sensitivity to stimuli,
    tremors, muscular incoordination, and convulsions with or without coma
    (Gosselin  1984, pp. 111-108-109).

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures: Move victim to fresh air and give
    artificial  respiration if indicated. Remove and isolate contaminated
    clothing and shoes at site. If exposure to skin or eyes, flush with
    running water for at least 15 minutes. Try to keep victim quiet.  Effects
    may  be delayed so keep victim under observation (*DOT 1984).

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  58-36-6
                                           Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY -- PHENOXARSINE, 10,10'-OXYDI-

CAS Registry Number:  58-36-6

Synonyms: (SANSS 1983 Synonyms)  lOH-Phenoxarsine, 10,10'-oxybis;
Bis(Phenoxarsin-10-yl)Ether; Bis(lO-Phenoxarsinyl) Oxide; Bis(lO-Phenoxarsyl)
Oxide; Estabex ABF; OBPA; SA 546; DID 47

Chemical Formula: C24H16As2O3 (Merck 1983, p. 998)

Molecular Weight: 502.23 (Merck  1983, p. 998)


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

          Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302: LD50 oral
          (guinea pig) 24 mg/kg (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

          TPQ: 500/10,000 (pounds)

          RQ: 1  (pounds)
              (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

          Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): In Arsenic Compounds category


SECTION II -- PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Solid

    Boiling Point: Not Found

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1): Not Found

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  Not Found

    Melting Point: 363-365°F, 184-185°C (Merck 1983, p. 998)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):   Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  Practically insoluble (5 ppm at 20°C) (Merck 1983,
    p. 998)

    Appearance and Odor:  Colorless crystals (Merck  1983, p. 998)

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 58-36-6
                                            Page 2 of 4

                               PHENOXARSINE, 10,10'-OXYDI-

SECTION III -- HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  0.010 mg/m3 (Arsenic and Compounds) (NIOSH 1984, p. 661)

    ACGIH TLV:  Air: TWA 0.2 mg (Arsenic)/m3 (ACGIH 1984, p. 10)

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended:  Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Yes (Non-Specific - Arsenic Compounds)
                                (Sax 1984, p. 320)
                    Skin:  Yes (Non-Specific -- Arsenic Compounds)
                           (Sax 1984, p. 320)
                    Ingestion:  Yes (Non-Specific -- Arsenic Compounds)
                               (Sax 1984, p. 320)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic): (Non-Specific -- Arsenic
    Compounds) Arsenic compounds are acutely poisonous by ingestion.
    Ingestion or inhalation may result in chronic poisoning.  Arsenic compounds
    are recognized carcinogens of the skin, lungs, and liver (Sax 1984, p.
    320).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated  by Exposure: Not Found


SECTION IV -- FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used):  Not Found
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL: Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods:  (Non-Specific — Arsenic Compound, Solid, n.o.s.)
    Small fires:  dry chemical, carbon dioxide, water spray, or foam.  Large
    fires: water spray, fog, or foam. Move container from fire area if you
    can do so without risk (DOT 1984, Guide  53).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  (Non-Specific ~  Arsenic Compound,
    Solid, n.o.s.)  Stay upwind; keep out of low areas.  Wear self-contained
    (positive pressure if available) breathing apparatus and full protective
    clothing (DOT 1984, Guide 53).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards: (Non-Specific -- Arsenic Compounds)
    When heated to decomposition, it emits highly toxic fumes of arsenic (Sax
    1984, p. 320).

    NFPA Flammability Rating: Not Found


SECTION V -- REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:  Not Found
               Stable: Not Found

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  58-36-6
                                            Page 3 of 4

                               PHENOXARSINE, 10,10'-OXYDI-

SECTION V   (continued)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Not Found

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  Not Found

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:  Not Found
                              May Not Occur: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    This material is used primarily for fungicidal and bactericidal protection
    of plastics (Merck 1983, p. 998).
SECTION VII -- PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    (Non-Specific — Arsenic Compound, Solid, n.o.s.)  Keep unnecessary people
    away; isolate hazard area and deny entry. Stay upwind; keep out of low
    areas. Do not  touch spilled material; stop leak if you can do so without
    risk. Small spills: absorb with sand or other noncombustible
    absorbent material and place into containers for later disposal.
    Small dry spills:  with clean shovel place material into clean,
    dry container and cover; move containers from spill area.  Large
    spills: dike far ahead of spill for later disposal (DOT 1984, Guide 53).
SECTION VIII -- PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at  the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.
SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure:  (Non-Specific -- Arsenic Compounds)
    Ingestion causes nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. In severe cases, there
    may  be bloody vomitus and stools  and the victim may suffer collapse and
    shock with weak, rapid pulse, cold sweats, coma, and death.  Symptoms of
    chronic poisoning may include loss of appetite, cramps, nausea,
    constipation or diarrhea, jaundice, itching and pigmentation of the skin
    (Sax  1984, p. 320).

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  58-36-6
                                           Page 4 of 4

                               PHENOXARSINE, 10,10'-OXYDI-

SECTION IX   (continued)

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures: (Non-Specific — Arsenic Compound,
    Solid, n.o.s.)  Move victim to fresh air; call emergency medical care.
    Remove and isolate contaminated clothing and shoes at the site.  In case of
    contact with material, immediately flush skin or eyes with running water
    for at least 15 minutes (DOT 1984, Guide 53).

COMMENTS

    Sources searched but no information found:
        ACGIH 1983
        NIOSH/OSHA 1978
        Hawley 1981
        Weast 1979
        NFPA 1984
        Student 1981
        Weiss 1980
        CHRIS 1978
        Doull 1980
        Clayton and Clayton 1981-82
        Arena 1979
        Gosselin 1984
        Encyc Occupat Health and Safety 1983
        Buchel 1983
        Farm Chemicals Handbook 1984
        Hayes 1982
        Physicians'  Desk Reference 1985
        Oilman 1985

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 58-89-9
                                           Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - LINDANE

CAS Registry Number:  58-89-9

Synonyms (NIOSH/RTECS 1983 Synonyms, Volume 1, p. 1,000):  Cyclohexane,
1,2,3,4,5,6-Hexachloro-, Gamma-Isomer; Aalindan; Aficide; Agrisol G-20;
Agrocide; Agrocide 2; Agrocide 7; Agrocide 6G; Agrocide III; Agrocide WP;
Agronexit; Ameisenatod; Ameisenmittel Merck; Aparasin; Aphtiria; Aplidal;
Arbitex; BBH; Ben-Hex; Bentox 10; Benzene Hexachloride-gamma-isomer;
gamma-Benzene Hexachloride; Bexol; BHC; gamma-BHC; Celanex; Chloresene;
Codechine; DBH; Detmol-Extrakt; Detox 25; Devoran; Dol Granule; Drill
Tox-Spezial Aglukon; Ent 7,796; Entomoxan; Exagama; Forlin; Gallogama; Gamacid;
Gamaphex; Gamene; Gammahexa; Gammahexane; Gammalin; Gammalin 20; Gammaterr;
Gammex; Gammexane; Gammopaz; Gexane; HCCH; HCH; gamma-HCH; Heclotox; Hexa;
Hexachloran;  gamma-Hexachloran; Hexachlorane; gamma- Hexachlorane;
gamma-Hexachlorobenzene; l-alpha,2-alpha,3-beta,4-alpha,
5-alpha,6-beta-Hexachlorocyclohexane; gamma-Hexachlorocyclohexane; gamma-
1,2,3,4,5,6-Hexachlorocyclohexane; Hexachlorocyclohexane, gamma-Isomer;
1,2,3,4,5,6-Hexachlorocyclohexane, gamma-Isomer; Hexatox; Hexaverm; Hexicide;
Hexyclan; HGI; Hortex; Inexit; Isotox; Jacutin; Kokotine; Kwell; Lendine;
Lentox; Lidenal; Lindafor; Lindagam; Lindagrain; Lindagranox; gamma-Lindane;
Lindane (DOT); Lindapoudre; Lindatox;  Lindosep; Lintox; Lorexane; Milbol 49;
Mszychol; NCI-C00204; NEO-Scabicidol;  Nexen FB; Nexit; Nexit-Stark; Nexol-E;
Nicochloran; Novigam; Omnitox; Ovadziak; Owadzlak; Pedraczak; Pflanzol;
Quellada; Sang gamma; Silvanol; Spritz-Rapidin; Spruehpflanzol; Streunex; Tap
85; TRI-6; Viton

Chemical Formula: C6H6C16 (Weast 1979, p. C-262)

Molecular Weight: 290.83 (Weast 1979, p. C-262)


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA  (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:  LD50 oral (cat)
           25 mg/kg (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

           TPQ: 1,000/10,000 (pounds)

           RQ: 1  (pounds) (statutory); 1  (pounds) (proposed)

           Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): Yes


SECTION II -- PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL  CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Solid

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  58-89-9
                                           Page 2 of 4

                               LINDANE

SECTION II   (continued)

    Boiling Point: 614°F, 323.4°C (Weast 1979, p. C-262); Decomposes
    (NIOSH/OSHA 1978, p. 120)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1): 1.9 (DASE 1980, p. 529)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg): 0.0000094 at 20°C (Merck 1983, p. 789)

    Melting Point:  234.5°F, 112.5°C (Weast 1979,  p. C-262)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1): Not  Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l):  Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  Insoluble (Weast 1979, p. C-262)

    Appearance and Odor: Colorless solid with a musty odor; pure material is
    odorless (NIOSH/OSHA 1978, p. 120).


SECTION III -- HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  0.5 mg/m3 (NIOSH/OSHA 1978, p. 120)

    ACGIH TLV: TWA 0.5 mg/m3 (ACGIH 1986)

    IDLH: 1,000 mg/m3 (NIOSH/OSHA 1978,  p.  120)

    Other Limits Recommended:  Not Found

    Routes of Entry:  Inhalation:  Yes (Gosselin  1984, p. III-240)
                    Skin: Yes (Gosselin 1984,  p. III-240)
                    Ingestion:  Yes  (Gosselin 1984, p. IH-240)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed,  and Chronic): Lindane is a stimulant of
    the nervous system, causing violent convulsions that are rapid in onset and
    generally followed by death or recovery within 24 hours (Hayes 1982, p.218).
    The probable human oral lethal dose is 50-500 mg/kg, or between 1 teaspoon
    and 1 ounce for a 150-lb (70 kg) person (Gosselin 1984, p. 11-286).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure:  Not Found


SECTION IV -- FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): Not Found
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL: Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods: Use dry chemical, carbon dioxide, water spray, or
    foam for small fires.  Use water spray, fog, or foam for large fires. Move
    container from fire area if this can be done  without risk.  Use water to

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  58-89-9
                                            Page 3 of 4

                               LINDANE

SECTION IV   (continued)

    keep fire-exposed containers cool (DOT 1984, Guide 55).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  Isolate hazard area and deny entry.
    Stay upwind and keep out of low areas. Ventilate closed spaces before
    entering. Wear positive pressure breathing apparatus and special
    protective clothing.  Fight fire from maximum distance, dike fire control
    water for later disposal (DOT 1984, Guide 55).

    Unusual Fire and  Explosion Hazards: When heated to decomposition, this
    compound emits toxic fumes of chlorine, hydrochloric acid, and phosgene
    (Sax 1984, p. 366).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  1  (solution); 0 (dry)


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:  Not Found
               Stable: Not Found

       Conditions  to Avoid:  Not Found

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Not Found

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  Thermal decomposition products may
    include chlorine, hydrochloric acid, and phosgene (Sax  1984, p. 366).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur: Not Found
                             May Not Occur: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid: Not Found


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Pesticide (Hawley 1981, p. 617) and scabicide (Hayes 1982, p. 221).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is  Released or Spilled)

    Do not touch spilled material. Sweep or shovel material into a clean, dry
    container. Carefully collect remainder (DASE 1980, p. 529; DOT 1984,
    Guide 55).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at the
    beginning  of the profiles for additional information.

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  58-89-9
                                           Page 4 of 4

                               LINDANE

SECTION VIII   (continued)

    SUIT MATERIAL PERFORMANCE (Based on EPA/USCG "Guidelines", 1987)
                       (Chemical Resistance/Amount of Data)

           Butyl                 POOR/LIMITED**
           Butyl/Neoprene        POOR/LIMITED**
           CPE                  POOR/LIMITED**
           Neoprene             POOR/LIMITED**
           Nitrile                POOR/LIMITED**
           PE                   POOR/LIMITED**
           PVC                  POOR/LIMITED**
           Viton/Neoprene        GOOD/LIMITED**

     *Based on qualitative performance information.
    **Based on a chemical analog.


SECTION IX  - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure: Contact with eyes or skin may produce
    irritation (DASE 1980, p. 529).  Vomiting, faintness, tremor, restlessness,
    muscle spasms, unsteady gait, and convulsions may occur as a result of
    exposure. Elevated body temperature and pulmonary edema have been reported
    in children. Coma, respiratory failure and death can result.  Exposure to
    vapors of this compound or its thermal decomposition products may lead to
    headache, nausea, vomiting, and irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat
    (Gosselin  1984, pp. IH-240, 241).

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures: Move victim to fresh air and call
    emergency medical care.  If not breathing, give artificial respiration.  If
    breathing is difficult, give oxygen.  In case of contact with material,
    immediately flush skin or eyes with running water for at least 15 minutes,
    speed in removing material from the skin is of extreme importance. Remove
    and isolate contaminated clothing and shoes at the site.  Keep victim quiet
    and maintain normal body temperature.  Effect may be delayed; keep victim
    under observation (DOT  1984, Guide 55).

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 59-88-1
                                           Page 1 of 3
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY -- PHENYLHYDRAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE

CAS Registry Number:  59-88-1

Synonyms (NIOSH/RTECS  1983 Synonyms, Volume 2, p. 457): Hydrazine, Phenyl-,
Hydrochloride; Hydrazine, Phenyl-, Monohydrochloride; Phenylhydrazine
Monohydrochloride; Phenylhydrazinium Chloride

Chemical Formula: C6H8N2-HC1

Molecular Weight:  144.62


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA  (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:  LDlow oral
           (rabbit) 25 mg/kg (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985).

           TPQ: 1,000/10,000 (pounds)

           RQ: 1  (pounds)
              (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

           Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Solid

    Boiling Point: Not pertinent; it decomposes (Weiss 1980, p. 744)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1): Greater than 1 at 20°C (Weiss 1980, p. 744)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  Not Found

    Melting Point:  469-475°F, 243-246°C (Merck 1983, p. 1051)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  Freely soluble (Merck 1983,  p. 1051)

    Appearance and Odor:  White to tan solid; weak aromatic odor (Weiss 1980,
    p. 744).

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 59-88-1
                                            Page 2 of 3

                               PHENYLHYDRAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE
        r
SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV:  Not Found

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended:  Occupational exposure to hydrazines recommended
    standard:  ceiling 0.6 mg/ms/2 hours (Air) (Sax 1984, p. 2190).

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Yes (Weiss 1980, p. 744)
                    Skin: Yes  (Weiss  1980, p. 744)
                    Ingestion:  Yes (Weiss 1980, p. 744)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic): This material is poisonous
    if swallowed or if fumes are inhaled. Dust is irritating to eyes, nose,
    and throat. Phenylhydrazine is a chronic poison (Weiss 1980, p. 744).
    Phenylhydrazine is an industrial substance suspect of carcinogenic
    potential for humans (ACGIH 1983, p. 43).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure:  Not Found


SECTION IV « FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): Not Found
    Flammable Limits:  Combustible (Weiss 1980, p. 744)
        LEL:  Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods: Use  water,  foam, dry chemical, or carbon dioxide
    (Weiss 1980, p. 744).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures: Wear goggles and self-contained
    breathing apparatus (Weiss 1980, p.  744).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards: Toxic and irritating hydrogen
    chloride and oxides of nitrogen may be produced in fire (Weiss 1980, p.
    744).

    NFPA Flammabiiity Rating:  Not Found


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:
              Stable:  Yes (Weiss 1980, p. 744)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  May be corrosive to metals  (Weiss
    1980,  p. 744).

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 59-88-1
                                            Page 3 of 3

                               PHENYLHYDRAZINE HYDROCHLORIDE

SECTION V   (continued)

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  Hydrogen chloride and oxides of
    nitrogen (Weiss 1980, p. 744).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:
                              May Not Occur: Yes (Weiss 1980, p. 744)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found


SECTION VI -- USE INFORMATION

    Hemolytic (Merck 1983, p. 1051).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Avoid contact with solid and dust. Restrict access. Disperse and flush
    (Weiss 1980, p. 744). (Non-Specific -- Phenylhy^drazine) Keep
    unnecessary people away; isolate  hazard area a*nd deny entry.  Stay
    upwind; keep out of low areas. Do not touch spilled material; stop leak if
    you can do it without risk.  Small spills:  take up with sand or other
    noncombustible absorbent material and place into containers for later
    disposal.  Small dry spills:  with clean shovel place material into clean,
    dry container and cover; move containers from spill area. Large spills:
    dike far ahead of spill for later disposal (DOT 1984, Guide  53).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit. See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.
SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure:  Ingestion or inhalation of fumes can
    cause nausea, jaundice, anorexia, and blood clots.  It may also  cause
    anemia and liver injury.  Contact with eyes causes irritation.  Contact
    with skin causes irritation and dermatitis.  Inhalation of dust  can cause
    coughing and difficult breathing (Weiss 1980, p. 744).

    Emergency and First Aid  Procedures: Move victim to fresh air.  Remove
    contaminated clothing and shoes. For ingestion, give a large amount of
    water; induce vomiting.  If eyes are  exposed,  flush with water for at least
    15 minutes.  If skin is exposed, flush with water (Weiss 1980, p. 744).

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  60-34-4
                                           Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - METHYL HYDRAZINE

CAS Registry Number: 60-34-4

Synonyms:  1-Methylhydrazine; Hydrazine, Methyl-; Hydrazomethane; MMH;
Monomethylhydrazine; UN 1244

Chemical Formula:  CH6N2

Molecular Weight: 46.07


SECTION I -- REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

          Toxicity Value Used  for Listing Under Section 302: LC50  inhalation
          (mouse) 0.105 mg/liter/4 hours (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

          TPQ: 500 (pounds)

          RQ: 10 (pounds)

          Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): Yes


SECTION II -- PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point:  190°F, 87.5°C (*Merck 1983)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1): 0.874 at 25°C (*Merck 1983)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  49.6 at 25°C (*Sunshine 1969)

    Melting Point:  -62.3°F, -52.4°C (*Merck 1983)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  1.6  (*Sax 1979)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

    Solubility in Water: Miscible with water (*Merck 1983)

    Appearance and Odor: It is  a colorless liquid (*Sax 1979) with an odor
    characteristic of short-chain, organic amines, or ammonia-like (*Merck
    1983, *Clayton and Clayton  1981-82).

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  60-34-4
                                            Page 2 of 4

                               METHYL HYDRAZINE

SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Ceiling 0.35 mg/m3 (skin) (*NIOSH/RTECS  1985)

    ACGIH  TLV:  Ceiling 0.35 mg/m3 (skin) (*ACGIH 1983)

    IDLH: 5 ppm  (*Encyc Occupat Safety and Health 1983)

    Other Limits Recommended:  Methyl hydrazine is a suspected human carcinogen
    with a NIOSH recommended ceiling concentration of 0.08 mg/m3/2 hour (*ACGIH
    1984 and *NIOSH 1985).  SPEGL 0.24 ppm (60 minutes) (NRC 1985b, pp. 23-36).

    Routes of Entry:  Inhalation:  Yes (*Clayton and Clayton 1981-82)
                     Skin:  Yes (*Clayton and Clayton 1981-82)
                     Ingestion:  Yes (*Clayton and Clayton 1981-82)

    Health Hazards (Acute,  Delayed, and Chronic):  Methyl hydrazine  vapors are
    extremely toxic and the  liquid is corrosive to skin.  Methyl  hydrazine is
    the strongest convulsant and the most toxic of methyl-substituted hydrazine
    derivatives (*Clayton and Clayton 1981-82). It is more toxic than
    hydrazine (*NFPA 1978). At high doses, it is a strong central nervous
    system poison  that can lead to convulsions and death (*Encyc Occupat Health
    and Safety 1971)

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure: Skin rash may be
    aggravated by skin exposure (*Encyc Occupat  Health and Safety 1971).


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): 70°C (OC) (*Merck 1983)
    Flammable Limits:
         LEL: 2.5% (Sax 1984, p. 1858)
         UEL:  97% (Sax 1984, p. 1858)

    Extinguishing  Methods:  For small fires, use dry chemical, carbon dioxide,
    water spray, and foam.  For large fires, use water spray,  fog, or foam.
    Keep unnecessary people away and isolate the hazardous area. Stay upwind
    and keep out of low-lying areas (DOT 1984, Guide 28).  Fire exposed
    containers should be kept cool with water. Use water spray to disperse
    vapors and protect men  attempting to stop a leak which has not ignited
    (*NFPA 1978). Move container from fire area if it can be  done without risk
    (*DOT 1984).

    Special  Fire Fighting Procedures: Wear positive pressure breathing
    apparatus and special (full) protective clothing.  No skin surface should
    be exposed (*NFPA 1978). Isolate area for 1/2-mile in all directions if a
    tank car or truck is involved in a fire (DOT 1984, Guide 28).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  Extremely flammable; ignites
    spontaneously under almost all normal temperature conditions (*NFPA 1978).
    Water used to  extinguish a fire may cause pollution and  should be  diked for

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 60-34-4
                                            Page 3 of 4

                                METHYL HYDRAZINE

SECTION IV   (continued)

    later disposal (DOT 1984, Guide 28).  Water may be ineffective in
    extinguishing fires due to the chemical's low flash point.  Because of the
    wide flammability limits, low flash point, and reignition hazard, dry
    chemicals, carbon dioxide, water spray, and foam may not be as effective as
    water dilution of fire area.  The vapor is heavier than air; thus it may
    accumulate sufficiently to flash back (*NFPA 1978).

    NFPA Flammability Rating: 3


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:  Yes (*NFPA 1978)
               Stable:

         Conditions to Avoid:  Heat or flame should be avoided because
         chemical is extremely flammable and explosive (*Sax  1979).

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Ignites spontaneously in air when
    in contact with porous materials (e.g., earth, asbestos, wood, or  cloth)
    (*NFPA 1978).  Also ignites spontaneously on contact with strong oxidizing
    agents (e.g., fluorine, chlorine trifluoride, fuming nitric acid, and
    nitrogen tetroxide) (*Merck 1983).

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  Methylhydrazine fires produce
    irritating nitrogen oxides (*NFPA 1978).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:  Not Found
                              May Not Occur: Not Found

         Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found
SECTION VI ~ USE INFORMATION

    Used as a chemical intermediate and solvent (*ACGIH 1980).  Also used as a
    component of rocket propellants (*SRI).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    In the case of a spill or leak, shut off ignition sources, and extinguish
    or disallow flares, smoking, or flames in the hazard area.  Do not touch
    the spilled material, and stop leak if  it can be done without risk. Use
    water spray to reduce vapors.  For small spills, take up the chemical with
    sand or other noncombustible absorbent material and  place it in containers
    for later disposal. For large spills, dike far ahead for later disposal
    (*DOT 1984).

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                                          CAS Registry Number: 60-34-4
                                          Page 4 of 4

                              METHYL HYDRAZINE

SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a  fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.

    SUIT MATERIAL PERFORMANCE (Based on EPA/USCG "Guidelines", 1987)
                      (Chemical Resistance/Amount of Data)

          Butyl                POOR/MANY
          CPE                 POOR/LIMITED
          Chlorobutyl           GOOD/LIMITED
          PVC                 POOR/LIMITED
          Teflon               POOR/MANY
          Viton                GOOD/LIMITED

     *Based on qualitative performance information.
    **Based on a chemical analog.


SECTION IX -- EMERGENCY TREATMENT  INFORMATION

    See Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  60-34-4
                                             Page 1 of 3
                        Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide
                                        for
                              METHYL HYDRAZINE

                                     (60-34-4)
   This guide should not be construed to authorize  emergency personnel to
perform the procedures or  activities indicated  or implied.  Care  of persons
exposed to toxic chemicals must be directed by a physician or other recognized
authority.
Substance Characteristics:

Pure Forms - Colorless liquid.

Odor - Ammonialike.

Uses -  Chemical intermediate, solvent, rocket propellant.

Materials to Avoid - Porous materials, acids, oxidizers.

Caution: Extremely flammable.   Avoid sources  of extreme  heat  or ignition
including sparks or fire. Methyl hydrazine may spontaneously self-ignite.

Other Names -  Hydrazomethane, 1-methylhydrazine, MMH, monomethylhydrazine,
UN 1244.


Personal Protective Equipment:  See Chemical Profile Section VIII.


Emergency Life-Support Equipment and Supplies That May Be  Required:

Compressed oxygen,  forced-oxygen mask, soap, water, milk, activated charcoal,
saline cathartic or sorbitol, normal saline, D5W, Ringer's  lactate, diazepam,
phenytoin, phenobarbital, pyridoxine.


Signs and Symptoms of Acute Methyl Hydrazine Exposure:

Warning:  Symptoms may be delayed from hours to days. Caution is advised.

Symptoms of  acute exposure to methyl  hydrazine may  include facial numbness,
facial swelling, and  increased salivation.   Headache,  twitching, seizure,
convulsions,  and  coma may  also  occur.  Gastrointestinal signs and symptoms
include anorexia, nausea, and vomiting.   Pulmonary edema  and hypotension (low
blood pressure) are common.

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  60-34-4
                                             Page 2 of 3

                               METHYL HYDRAZINE

Methyl  hydrazine  is  toxic  to  the liver, ruptures red blood cells, and may
cause kidney damage.  Contact with  the skin, eyes, or  mucous membranes may
result in severe irritation and permanent damage.
Emergency Life-Support Procedures:

Acute exposure to methyl hydrazine may require decontamination and life support
for the  victims.   Emergency  personnel  should wear  protective  clothing
appropriate to  the  type and degree  of contamination.   Air-purifying or
supplied-air respiratory equipment should also be  worn, as  necessary.  Rescue
vehicles should  carry supplies such as plastic sheeting and disposable plastic
bags to assist in preventing spread of contamination.
Inhalation Exposure:

1.   Move victims to fresh air.  Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure
     to methyl hydrazine.

2.   Evaluate vital  signs including  pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not  breathing, provide
     artificial  respiration.    If  breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.   Obtain authorization and/or further  instructions from  the local hospital
     for  administration of an  antidote or performance of  other invasive
     procedures.

4.   RUSH to a health care facility.
Dermal/Eye Exposure:

1.   Remove victims from exposure.   Emergency  personnel  should  avoid self-
     exposure to methyl hydrazine.

2.   Evaluate vital  signs including pulse and  respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.   If  breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.   Remove contaminated clothing as soon as possible.

4.   If eye exposure has occurred, eyes must be flushed with lukewarm water for
     at least 15 minutes.

5.   Wash exposed skin areas THOROUGHLY with soap and water.

6.   Obtain authorization and/or further  instructions from the local hospital
     for  administration  of  an  antidote or  performance of  other invasive
     procedures.

7.   RUSH to a health care facility.

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                                              EFATG
                                              CAS Registry Number: 60-34-4
                                              Page 3 of 3

                               METHYL HYDRAZINE

Ingestion Exposure:

1.  Evaluate vital  signs including .pulse and  respiratory rate, and note  any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not  breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.   If  breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

2.  Obtain authorization and/or further  instructions from  the local hospital
     for administration  of an  antidote or  performance  of other invasive
     procedures.

3.  Give the victims water or milk:  children up to  1 year old, 125  mL (4 oz
     or 1/2 cup); children 1 to 12 years old, 200 mL (6 oz or 3/4 cup); adults,
     250 mL (8 oz or 1 cup).  Water or milk should  be given only if  victims are
     conscious and alert.

4.  Activated charcoal may be administered if victims are conscious and alert.
     Use 15 to 30 g (1/2 to 1 oz) for children, 50 to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz)
     for adults, with 125 to 250 mL (1/2  to  1 cup) of water.

5.  Promote excretion by administering  a  saline   cathartic  or  sorbitol to
     conscious and alert victims.  Children require  15 to  30 g (1/2 to 1 oz)
     of cathartic; 50  to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz) is recommended  for adults.

6.  RUSH  to a health care facility.

 image: 






                                           CAS Registry Number:  60-41-3
                                           Page 1 of 3
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY -- STRYCHNINE, SULFATE

CAS Registry Number: 60-41-3

Synonyms:  (NIOSH/RTECS Synonyms 1983, Volume 3, p. 650) Strychnine, Sulfate
(2:1); Strychnine Sulfate; Strychnidin-10-one, Sulfate (2:1)

Chemical Formula: C21H22N2O2- 1/2 H2O4S

Molecular Weight: 383.49


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity Value  Used for Listing Under Section 302: LD50 oral (rat)
           5  mg/kg (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985).

           TPQ: 100/10,000 (pounds)

           RQ: 1  (pounds)
              (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

           Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Solid

    Boiling Point: Not Found

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1): Not Found

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  Not Found

    Melting Point:  392°F, 200°C with decomposition (Merck 1983, p. 1269)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1): Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l):  Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  1 g dissolves in 35 mL, 7 mL boiling water (Merck
    1983, p. 1269)

    Appearance and Odor:  Colorless, odorless, very bitter crystals; white
    crystalline powder (Merck 1983, p. 1269).

 image: 






                                           CAS Registry Number:  60-41-3
                                           Page 2 of 3

                               STRYCHNINE, SULFATE
  •
SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV: Not Found

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended: Not Found

    Routes of Entry:  Inhalation: Yes (Weiss 1980, p. 1156)
                    Skin: Not Found
                    Ingestion: Yes (Sax 1984, p. 2473)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  Violent poison! (Merck
    1983, p. 1269).  Lowest published lethal dose orally in humans is 30 mg/kg
    (Weiss 1980, p.  1156).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure: Not Found


SECTION IV ~ FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used):  Not Found
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL: Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods: (Non-Specific — Strychnine  and Salts)  Small
    fires:  dry chemical, carbon dioxide, water spray, or  foam.  Large fires:
    water spray, fog, or foam.  Move container from fire area if you can do it
    without risk (DOT 1984, Guide 53).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures: (Non-Specific -- Strychnine and Salts)
    Keep  unnecessary people away; isolate hazard area and deny entry.  Stay
    upwind; keep out of low areas.  Wear self-contained  (positive pressure if
    available) breathing apparatus and full protective clothing (DOT  1984,
    Guide 53).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  When heated to decomposition, it
    emits very toxic fumes of sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides (Sax  1984, p.
    2473).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  Not Found


SECTION V -- REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable: Not Found
               Stable: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Protect from light (Merck  1983, p. 1269).

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid): Alkalies, alkali carbonates and

 image: 






                                            CAS Registry Number:  60-41-3
                                            Page 3 of 3

                                STRYCHNINE, SULFATE

SECTION V   (continued)

    bicarbonates, benzoates, dichromates, bromides, iodides, tannic and picric
    acids, salicylates, borax, gold  chloride and other alkaloid precipitants,
    piperazine, potassium-mercuric iodide (Merck 1983, p. 1269).

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts: Emits very toxic fumes of sulfur
    oxides and nitrogen oxides when heated to decomposition (Sax 1984, p.
    2473).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur: Not Found
                              May Not Occur: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid: Not Found


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Has been used as a tonic and  stimulant in veterinary medicine (Merck 1983,
    p. 1269).  Registered as a rodenticide in the U.S. (USEPA/Pesticide Index
    1985).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    (Non-Specific -- Strychnine and Salts) Do not touch spilled material;
    stop leak if you can do it without risk.  Small spills: take up with sand
    or other noncombustible absorbent material and place into containers
    for later  disposal.  Small dry spills:  with clean shovel place material
    into clean, dry container and  cover; move containers from spill area.
    Large spills: dike far ahead of spill for  later disposal
    (DOT 1984, Guide  53).
SECTION VIII -- PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit. See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.

SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    See Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide

 image: 






                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  60-41-3
                                             Page 1 of 3
                        Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide
                                        for
                              STRYCHNINE SULFATE

                                      (60-41-3)
   This guide  should not  be construed  to authorize  emergency personnel to
perform the procedures or activities indicated  or implied.   Care  of persons
exposed to toxic chemicals must be  directed by a physician or other recognized
authority.
Substance Characteristics:

Pure Forms - Colorless crystals or white, crystalline powder.

Odor - None; bitter taste.

Uses -  Rodenticide, tonic and stimulant in veterinary medicine.

Other Names - Kilmice; Mole-Nots; Mouse-Nots; strychnidin-10-one, sulfate.


Personal Protective Equipment:  See Chemical Profile Section VIII.


Emergency Life-Support  Equipment and Supplies That May Be  Required:

Compressed oxygen, forced-oxygen  mask, soap, water,  milk, activated charcoal,
saline cathartic or sorbitol,  normal saline, D5W, Ringer's lactate, diazepam,
phenytoin, phenobarbital, sodium bicarbonate,  pancuronium bromide or curare,
succinylcholine.


Signs and Symptoms of Acute Strychnine Sulfate Exposure:

Warning:   Strychnine  sulfate  may induce  convulsions within  15 to  60 minutes
following exposure.  Caution is advised.    Vital signs  should  be monitored
closely.

Signs and  symptoms of  acute exposure  to strychnine sulfate generally involve
excitation of  all portions  of  the  central nervous  system.   Convulsions,
bilateral horizontal nystagmus (rapid, synchronous, horizontal  oscillations of
the eyeballs),  agitation, restlessness,  apprehension,  and  abrupt, jerking
movements of the extremities may occur.

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                                              EFATG
                                              CAS Registry Number:  60-41-3
                                              Page 2 of 3

                              STRYCHNINE SULFATE

Victims may also experience  stiffness, painful muscle cramping (especially in
the legs), opisthotonos (spasm in which  the spine  and  extremities are bent
with convexity forward, the body resting on  the head and heels), and vomiting.
Respiratory paralysis and arrest are likely to occur  following severe exposure
to strychnine  sulfate.   Cyanosis  (blue  tint  to skin and mucous membranes),
rhabdomyolysis (destruction of skeletal muscle), and renal failure   may also be
found.
Emergency Life-Support Procedures:

Acute  exposure  to  strychnine sulfate  may require decontamination and life
support for the victims. Emergency personnel should  wear protective clothing
appropriate to  the  type  and degree  of contamination.   Air-purifying or
supplied-air respiratory equipment should also be worn, as  necessary. Rescue
vehicles should  carry supplies such as plastic sheeting and  disposable plastic
bags to assist in preventing spread of contamination.
Inhalation Exposure:

1.   Move  victims to fresh air.  Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure
     to strychnine sulfate.

     Warning:   Any unnecessary sensory input may induce seizures.  Isolate the
     victims from any avoidable distractions.

2.   RUSH to a health care facility!

3.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and  respiratory rate,  and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.  If breathing  is labored, administer  oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

4.   Obtain authorization  and/or further  instructions from the local hospital
     for  administration  of an  antidote or  performance  of other invasive
     procedures.
Dermal/Eye Exposure:

1.   Remove  victims  from  exposure.   Emergency personnel should avoid self-
     exposure to strychnine sulfate.

     Warning:  Any unnecessary sensory input may induce seizures.   Isolate the
     victims from any avoidable distractions.

2.   RUSH to a health care facility!

3.   Evaluate vital  signs including pulse and  respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide
     artificial   respiration.    If  breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

 image: 






                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  60-41-3
                                             Page 3 of 3

                              STRYCHNINE SULFATE

4.   Remove contaminated clothing as soon as possible.

5.   If eye exposure has occurred, eyes must be flushed with lukewarm water for
     at least 15 minutes.

6.   THOROUGHLY wash exposed skin areas with soap and water.

7.   Obtain authorization  and/or further  instructions from the local hospital
     for administration of  an  antidote  or  performance of  other invasive
     procedures.


Ingestion Exposure:

1.   Evaluate vital signs including  pulse and  respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide
     artificial  respiration.   If  breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

     Warning:  Any unnecessary sensory input may induce seizures.  Isolate the
     victims from any avoidable distractions.

2.   RUSH to a health care facility!

3.   DO NOT induce vomiting or attempt to neutralize.

4.   Obtain authorization  and/or further  instructions from the local hospital
     for administration of  an  antidote  or  performance of  other invasive
     procedures.

5.   Activated charcoal may be  administered if victims are conscious and alert.
     Use 15 to 30 g (1/2 to 1 oz) for children, 50 to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz)
     for adults, with 125 to 250 mL  (1/2 to 1 cup) of water.

6.   Promote  excretion  by administering  a saline  cathartic or sorbitol to
     conscious and alert victims. Children require 15 to 30 g (1/2 to 1  oz)
     of cathartic; 50 to 100 g (1-3/4  to 3-1/2 oz) is recommended for adults.

 image: 






                                           CAS Registry Number: 60-51-5
                                           Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY -- DIMETHOATE

CAS Registry Number: 60-51-5

Synonyms:  8014 Bis HC; Acetic Acid, O,O-DimethyldithiophosphoryI-, N-Mono-
methylamide Salt; American Cyanamid 12,880; BI 58; CL 12880; Cygon; Cygon 4E;
Cygon Insecticide; Daphene; De-Fend; Demos-L40; Dimethogen; Dimeton; Dimevur;
ENT 24650; Experimental Insecticide 12,880; FIP; Fosfotox; Fosfotox R; Fosfotox
R 35; Fostion MM; Lurgo; NCI-COO 135; O,O-Dimethyl S-(N-Methyl- carbamoylmethyl)
Dithiophosphate; O.O-Dimethyl S-(N-Methylcarbamoylmethyl) Phosphorodithioate;
O,O-Dimethyl S-Methylcarbamoylmethyl Phosphorodithioate;
O,O-Dimethyldithiophosphorylacetic Acid, N-Monomethylamide Salt; PEI 75;
Perfecthion; Perfekthion; Phosphamid; Phosphamide; Phosphorodithioic Acid
O,O-Dimethyl Ester, Ester With 2-Mercapto-N-Methylacetamide; Phosphor-
odithioic Acid, O,O-Dimethyl S-(2-(Methylamino)-2-Oxoethyl) Ester; Racusan;
Rogor; Rogor 20L; Rogor 40; Rogor L; Rogor P; Roxion; S-Methylcarbamoylmethyl
O,O-Dimethyl Phosphorodithioate; Sinoratox; Systoate

Chemical Formula:  C5H12NO3PS2

Molecular Weight: 229.28


SECTION I -- REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:  LDBO oral
           (mammal) 15 mg/kg (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985).

           TPQ: 500/10,000 (pounds)

           RQ: 10 (pounds)

           Section 313 Listed  (Yes or No): No


SECTION II -- PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Solid

    Boiling Point: Not Found

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1):  1.277 at 65°C (*Merck 1983)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg): 0.0000085 at 77°F ('Worthing 1979)

    Melting Point:  125°F, 52°C (*Merck-1983), 113-117°F, 45-47°C for
    technical  product (Worthing 1983)              .

 image: 






                                            CAS Registry Number: 60-51-5
                                            Page 2 of 4

                               DIMETHOATE

SECTION II   (continued)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  2-3 g/100 ml (*Spencer  1982)

    Appearance and Odor:  A white crystalline solid (*Spencer 1982) with a
    camphor-like odor (*Worthing 1979); white to greyish crystals for technical
    product (Worthing 1983)


SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV: Not Found

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended:  ADI 0.02 mg/kg (*Hayes 1975).

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Yes (*Encyc Occupat Health and
                                Safety  1983)
                    Skin:  Yes (*Encyc Occupat Health and Safety  1983)
                    Ingestion:  Yes (*Encyc  Occupat Health and
                                Safety  1983)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and  Chronic): Very toxic; the probable
    oral lethal dose  in humans is between 50-500 mg/kg, or between 1 teaspoon
    and 1 ounce for a 70 kg (150 Ib.) person. Dimethoate is a cholinesterase
    inhibitor, meaning it affects the central nervous system. Death is due to
    respiratory arrest arising from failure of respiratory  center, paralysis of
    respiratory muscles,  intense bronchoconstriction or all three (*Gosselin
    1976).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated  by Exposure:  Not Found


SECTION IV ~ FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used):  124°F (CC) (*NFPA 1978)
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL:  Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods:  This material is an  organophosphate insecticide
    (*White-Stevens 1971; *Worthing 1979).  Methods for organophosphorus
    pesticides are as follows. Small  fires: dry chemical, carbon dioxide,
    water spray, and foam.  Large fires: water spray, fog, or foam (DOT 1984,
    Guide 55).

 image: 






                                            CAS Registry Number:  60-51-5
                                            Page 3 of 4

                               DIMETHOATE

SECTION IV   (continued)

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  Procedures for organophosphorus
    pesticides are as follows.  Dike fire control water for later disposal, do
    not scatter the material.  Wear positive pressure breathing apparatus and
    protective clothing.  Fight fire from maximum distance (DOT 1984, Guide
    55).

    Unusual Fire and  Explosion Hazards: As with other organophosphorus
    pesticides, container may explode in heat of fire (DOT 1984, Guide 55).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  Not Found


SECTION V -- REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:
               Stable: Yes (*Spencer 1973)

        Conditions to Avoid:  The temperature of storage should not exceed
        70-80°F. Keep away from sources of heat, flames, or spark-generating
        equipment (*Farm Chemicals Handbook 1983).  Unstable in alkaline
        solution. Hydrolyzed by aqueous alkali.  Stable in aqueous solutions.
        The compound is stable for 2 years under environmental conditions if
        stored in undamaged, original containers (*Spencer 1973).

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Not Found

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  Not Found

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur: Not Found
                             May Not Occur: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found
SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Dimethoate is a contact and systemic organophosphate insecticide effective
    against a broad range of insects and mites when applied on a wide range of
    crops (* Worthing 1979; *SRI; * White-Stevens 1971). It has not been
    produced in the U.S.  since 1982 (*SRI).
SECTION VII -- PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Dimethoate is an organophosphate insecticide (*White-Stevens 1971;
    * Worthing 1979). Precautions for organophosphorus pesticides
    include the following. Keep unnecessary people away;
    isolate hazard area and deny entry.  Stay upwind; keep out of low
    areas. Ventilate closed spaces before entering them.  Remove and
    isolate contaminated clothing at the site. Do not touch spilled material;
    stop leak if you can do so without risk.  Use water spray to reduce vapors.
    Small  spills:  absorb with sand or other noncombustible absorbent material

 image: 






                                            CAS Registry Number: 60-51-5
                                            Page 4 of 4

                                DIMETHOATE

SECTION VII   (continued)

    and place into containers for later disposal. Small dry spills:  with
    clean shovel place material into clean, dry container and cover; move
    containers from spill area.  Large spills: dike far ahead of spill for
    later disposal (DOT 1984, Guide  55).


SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit. See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for  additional information.

SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT  INFORMATION

    See Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide

 image: 






                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  60-51-5
                                             Page 1 of 3
                        Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide
                                        for
                                  DIMETHOATE

                                     (60-51-5)
     This guide should not be construed to authorize emergency personnel to
perform the procedures or activities indicated or implied.  Care of persons
exposed to toxic chemicals must be directed by a physician or other recognized
authority.
Substance Characteristics:

Pure Form - White crystalline solid.

Odor - Camphorlike (familiar, fragrant, penetrating).

Commercial  Form - White to greyish crystals.

Use - Systemic insecticide-acaricide.

Material to Avoid - Alkali.

Other Names - American Cyanamid 12,880; Cygon; Daphene; Dimet, Dimethogen,
O,O-dimethyl S-methylcarbamoylmethyl phosphorodithioate; Dimeton, Dimevur,
FIP, Fosfotox, Fostion MM, Lurgo, Perfekthion, Phosphamide, Racusan, Rogor,
Roxion, Sinoratox, Systoate.


Personal Protective Equipment:  See Chemical Profile Section VIII.


Emergency Life-Support Equipment and Supplies That May Be Required:

Compressed  oxygen, forced-oxygen mask, soap, water, activated charcoal, saline
cathartic or  sorbitol,  normal saline, D5W, Ringer's lactate, atropine,
pralidoxime, diazepam, phenytoin, phenobarbital.


Signs and  Symptoms  of Acute Dimethoate Exposure:

Note:  Dimethoate  is  a cholinesterase inhibitor.

Acute exposure to dimethoate may produce the following signs and symptoms:
pinpoint pupils, blurred vision, headache, dizziness, muscle spasms,  and
profound weakness.  Vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, seizures, and coma may
also occur.

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  60-51-5
                                             Page 2 of 3

                                   DIMETHOATE

The heart rate may decrease following oral exposure or increase following
dermal exposure. Hypotension (low blood pressure) and chest pain may be noted.
Hypertension (high blood pressure) is not uncommon.  Respiratory effects may
include dyspnea (shortness of  breath), respiratory depression, and respiratory
paralysis. Psychosis may occur.
Emergency Life-Support Procedures:

Acute exposure to dimethoate may require decontamination and life support for
the victims. Emergency personnel should wear protective clothing appropriate
to the type and degree of contamination.  Air-purifying or supplied-air
respiratory equipment should also be worn, as necessary.  Rescue vehicles
should carry supplies such as plastic sheeting and disposable plastic bags to
assist in preventing spread of contamination.
Inhalation Exposure:

1.   Move victims to fresh air.  Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure
     to dimethoate.

2.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration. If breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.   Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive
     procedures.

4.   Transport to a health care facility.
Dermal/Eye Exposure:

1.   Remove victims from exposure.  Emergency personnel should avoid self-
     exposure to dimethoate.

2.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration. If breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.   Remove contaminated clothing as soon as possible.

4.   If eye exposure has occurred, eyes must be flushed with lukewarm water for
     at least 15 minutes.

5.   Wash exposed skin areas three times with soap and water.

6.   Obtain authorization  and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive
     procedures.

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                                              EFATG
                                              CAS Registry Number:  60-51-5
                                              Page 3 of 3

                                   DIMETHOATE

7.   Transport to a health care facility.


Ingestion Exposure:

1.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration. If breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

2.   Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive
     procedures.

3.   Activated charcoal may be administered if victims are conscious and
     alert. Use 15 to 30 g (1/2 to 1 oz) for children, 50 to 100 g (1-3/4
     to 3-1/2  oz) for adults, with 125 to 250 mL (1/2 to 1 cup) of water.

4.   Promote excretion  by administering a saline cathartic or sorbitol to
     conscious and alert victims.  Children require 15 to 30  g (1/2 to 1 oz)
     of cathartic; 50 to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz) is recommended for adults.

5.   Transport to a health care facility.

 image: 






                                           CAS Registry Number: 62-38-4
                                           Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                  Date: October 31, 1985
                                                  Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY -- PHENYLMERCURY ACETATE

CAS Registry Number: 62-38-4

Synonyms:  (Acetoxymercuri)Benzene; Acetic Acid, Phenylmercury Deriv;
Acetoxyphenylmercury; Agrosan GN 5; Algimycin; Antimucin WDR; Bufen; Ceresan
Universal; Contra Creme; Dyanacide; Femma; FMA; Fungitox OR; Gallotox; HL-331;
Hostaquick; Kwiksan; Leytosan; Liquiphene; Mercury(II) Acetate, Phenyl-;
Mercury, (Acetato)Phenyl-; Mersolite; Mersolite 8; Metasol 30; Norforms;
Phenmad; Phenomercuric Acetate; Phenylmercuriacetate; Phenylmercuric Acetate;
Phix; PMA; PMAC; PMacetate; PMAL; PMAS; Programing Purasan-SC-10; Puraturf  10;
Quicksan 20; Sanitized SPG; SC-110; Shimmerex; Spor-Kil; TAG; Trigosan;
Ziarnik; Mercury,(Acetato-O)Phenyl-

Chemical Formula: C8H8HgO2

Molecular Weight:  336.75


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA  (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:  LD50 oral (rat)
           22 mg/kg (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985).


           TPQ: 500/10,000 (pounds)

           RQ: 100 (pounds)

           Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): In Mercury Compounds category


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Solid

    Boiling Point:  Not Found

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1): Not Found

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  0.000009 at 35°C (*Worthing 1979)

    Melting Point:  300°F, 149°C (*Merck 1983)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  62-38-4
                                           Page 2 of 4
                               PHENYLMERCURY ACETATE

SECTION II   (continued)
    Solubility in Water:  1 g/180 ml (*Osol 1980); soluble in about 600 parts
    water (Merck 1983, p. 1052)

    Appearance and Odor:  White to creamy  white crystalline powder or small
    white prisms or leaflets.  Odorless (*Osol 1980).
SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV: TWA 0.1  mg/m3 (skin) (*ACGIH 1983)

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended: Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Yes (*Hawley 1977)
                    Skin:  Yes (*Hawley 1977)
                    Ingestion: Yes (*Hawley 1977)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  Extremely toxic.  The
    probable oral lethal dose for humans is 5-50 mg/kg, between 7 drops and 1
    teaspoonful for  a 70 kg (150 Ib.) person (Gosselin 1984, p. 11-137).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure: Not Found


SECTION IV ~ FIRE AND  EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used):  Above 100°F (OC) (*NFPA 1978)
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL: Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods:  Use dry chemical, foam, or carbon dioxide on
    solution.  Use water as necessary, but run-off  should be limited and
    controlled to prevent  it  from entering streams or water supplies (*NFPA
    1978).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures: Materials are extremely hazardous to
    health, but areas may be entered with extreme care.  Full protective
    clothing, including self-contained breathing apparatus, rubber gloves,
    boots and bands around legs, arms, and waist should be provided.  No skin
    should be exposed (*NFPA 1978).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  Fire may produce irritating or
    poisonous gases  (*DOT 1984).

    NFPA Flammability Rating: 1 (powder); 2 (solution)

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  62-38-4
                                            Page 3 of 4

                               PHENYLMERCURY ACETATE

SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:
               Stable: Yes (*NFPA 1978)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Phenylmercuric ion is incompatible
    with halides, with which precipitates  are formed (*Osol  1980).

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts: When heated to decomposition, very
    toxic mercuric fumes may be given off (Sax 1984, p. 100).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur: Not Found
                              May Not Occur: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Used as an antiseptic, fungicide, herbicide; mildewcide for paints;
    slimicide in paper mills (*Hawley 1977).  It was also used in contraceptive
    gels and foams (*Osol 1980).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is  Released or Spilled)

    Do not touch spilled material; stop leak if you can do it without
    risk. Use water spray to reduce vapors. Small spills:  take up
    with sand or other noncombustible absorbent material and place into
    containers for later disposal. Small dry spills: with clean shovel place
    material into clean, dry container  and cover; move containers from spill
    area.  Large spills: dike far ahead of spill for later disposal (*DOT
    1984).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.
SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure:  Symptoms arising from acute exposure may
    occur at varying intervals up to several weeks  following exposure.
    Ingestion of mercurial fungicide treated grain  resulted in gastro-intestinal
    irritation with nausea, vomiting, abdominal  pain, and  diarrhea.
    Alkylmercurials produce severe neurologic toxicity, such as loss  of feeling

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                                         CAS Registry Number:  62-38-4
                                         Page 4 of 4

                            PHENYLMERCURY ACETATE

in lips, tongue, and extremities, confusion, hallucinations, irritability,
sleep disturbances, staggering walk, memory loss, slurred speech, auditory
defects, emotional instability, and inability to concentrate.  It is also a
strong skin irritant; erythema and blistering may result 6-12 hours after
exposure (*Rumack 1975 to Present).  Phenylmercury acetate, at sufficient
concentration, is expected to be injurious to the eye externally (*Grant
1974).

Emergency and First Aid Procedures: Move victim to fresh air; call
emergency medical care. If not breathing, give artificial respiration. If
breathing is difficult, give oxygen. In case of  contact with material,
immediately flush skin  and eyes with running  water for at least 15 minute
Speed in removing material from the skin is of extreme importance. Remo'
and isolate contaminated clothing and shoes at the site.  Keep victim quiet
and maintain normal body temperature.  Effects may be delayed; keep vict
under observation (DOT 1984, Guide 55).

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 62-53-3
                                           Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY -- ANILINE

CAS Registry Number:  62-53-3

Synonyms:  Aminobenzene; Aminophen; Aniline Oil; Anyvim; Benzenamine; Benzene,
Amino-; Benzidam; Blue Oil; CI 76000; CI Oxidation Base 1; Cyanol; Krystallin;
Kyanol; NCI-C03736; Phenylamine

Chemical Formula: C6H7N

Molecular Weight:  93.12


SECTION I -- REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA  (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:

               Chemical does not meet the toxicity criteria but because of its
               high production volume and recognized toxicity it is considered
               a chemical of concern.

           TPQ: 1,000 (pounds)

           RQ: 5,000 (pounds)

           Section 313  Listed (Yes or No): Yes


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point:  363-367°F, 184-186°C (*Merck 1976)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1): 1.022 at 20°C/20°C (*Merck 1976)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  0.67 at 25°C (*IARC 1972-85)

    Melting Point:  21°F, -6.3°C (*Weast 1979)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  3.22 (*Clayton and Clayton 1981-82)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l):  Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  1 gram in 28.6 mL water (*Merck 1976)

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 62-53-3
                                            Page 2 of 4

                               ANILINE

SECTION II   (continued)

    Appearance and Odor: Brown oily liquid (*Student 1981) with an aromatic
    amine-like odor ("CHRIS 1978); colorless when freshly distilled (Merck
    1983, p. 96)


SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Air:  TWA 5 ppm (19 mg/ms) (skin) (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

    ACGIH TLV:  TWA 2 ppm (10 mg/ms) (skin); STEL 5 ppm (20 mg/ms) (skin)
    ("ACGIH 1982)

    IDLH: 100 ppm (NIOSH/OSHA  1978, p. 46)

    Other Limits Recommended:  Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Yes (*Merck  1976)
                    Skin: Yes (*Merck  1976)
                    Ingestion: Yes (*Merck 1976)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic): It is classified as very
    toxic. Probable oral lethal dose in humans  is 50-500 mg/kg for a 150 Ib.
    person. Aniline poisoning is characterized by methemoglobin formation in
    the blood and resulting cyanosis or blue skin (*Gosselin 1976).  The
    formation of methemoglobin interferes with the oxygen-carrying capacity of
    the blood (Doull 1980, p. 319). The approximate minimum lethal dose for a
    150 Ib. human  is 10 grams (*Arena 1979). Serious poisoning may result from
    ingestion of 0.25 mL (*Merck 1976).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure:  People  at special
  ,  risk-include individuals with glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase deficiency
    (*Arena 1979) and those with liver and kidney disorders, blood diseases, or
    a history of alcoholism ("General Electric Co. 1978, MSDS #407).


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): 158°F, 70°C (CC) (*NFPA 1978)
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL:  1.3% (*NFPA 1978)
        UEL:  20-25% (*Sax 1975)

    Extinguishing Methods: Use water spray, dry chemical, foam or carbon
    dioxide.  Use water to keep fire-exposed containers cool (*NFPA 1984).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures: Fight fire from maximum distance.  Dike
    fire control water for later disposal and do not scatter material (*DOT
    1984).  If a leak or spill has not  ignited, use water spray to control
    vapors (*NFPA 1978). Wear self-contained breathing apparatus with a full
    face  piece operated in pressure-demand or other positive pressure mode
    ("NIOSH/OSHA 1981) and special protective clothing ("DOT 1984).

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  62-53-3
                                            Page 3 of 4

                               ANILINE

SECTION IV   (continued)

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards: Combustion can produce toxic fumes
    including nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide (*General Electric Co. 1978,
    MSDS #407).  Aniline vapor forms explosive mixtures with air (*ITI 1982).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  2


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:
               Stable:  Yes (*NFPA 1978)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Heating (*Sax 1975)

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  It is incompatible with strong
    oxidizers and strong acids (NIOSH/OSHA 1978, p. 46) and a number of other
    materials (*Bretherick 1979; *ITI  1982; *Sax 1984).

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts: When heated to decomposition, it
    emits highly toxic fumes (*Sax 1975). These fumes may include nitrogen
    oxides and carbon monoxide (General Electric Co. 1978, MSDS #407).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur: Yes (*IARC 1972-85)
                             May Not Occur:

        Conditions to Avoid:  Polymerizes to a resinous mass (*IARC 1972-85).


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Manufacture of dyes, resins, varnishes, perfumes, shoe blacks, vulcanizing
    rubber; solvent (*Merck 1976); inks, paint removers (*Dreisbach  1977);
    herbicides, fungicides, explosives, photographic chemicals (*Hawley 1977);
    isocyanates (*SRI); and rigid polyurethanes (*NIOSH/OSHA 1981).  It is a
    chemical intermediate for dyes and pigments and a number of other materials
    (*SRI).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Keep unnecessary people away; isolate hazard area and deny entry.  Stay
    upwind; keep out of low areas. Ventilate closed spaces before entering
    them.  Shut off  ignition sources; no flares, smoking or flames in
    hazard area.  Do not touch spilled material; stop leak if you can do it
    without risk.  Use water spray to reduce vapors. Small spills: take up
    with sand or other non-combustible absorbent material and place into
    containers for later disposal. Large spills: dike far ahead of spill for
    later disposal (*DOT 1984).

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                                          CAS Registry Number:  62-53-3
                                          Page 4 of 4

                              ANILINE

SECTION VIII -- PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.

    SUIT MATERIAL PERFORMANCE (Based on EPA/USCG "Guidelines", 1987)
                      (Chemical Resistance/Amount of Data)

          Butyl                EXCELLENT/MANY
          Butyl/Neoprene       GOOD/LIMITED
          CPE                 GOOD/LIMITED*
          Neoprene             POOR/MANY
          Nitrile               POOR/LIMITED
          PE                  POOR/MANY
          PVC                 POOR/MANY
          Saranex              GOOD/LIMITED
          Teflon               GOOD/LIMITED
          Viton                POOR/MANY
          Viton/Neoprene       GOOD/LIMITED

     *Based on qualitative performance information.
    **Based on a chemical analog.


SECTION IX -- EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    See Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number: 62-53-3
                                             Page 1 of 3
                        Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide
                                        for
                                     ANILINE

                                     (62-53-3)
     This guide should not be construed to authorize emergency personnel to
perform the procedures or activities indicated or implied. Care of persons
exposed to toxic chemicals must be  directed by a physician or other recognized
authority.
Substance Characteristics:

Pure Forms - Colorless, oily liquid, or solid below -6 degrees C (21  degrees
F).

Odor - Aromatic, aminelike.

Commercial Form - Brown, oily liquid.

Uses - Manufacture of resins, rigid polyurethane, varnish, perfume, ink, paint
remover, shoe blacks, artificial sweeteners, pesticides, Pharmaceuticals,
photographic chemicals, and optical whitening agents; solvent; analytical
reagent.

Other Names - Aminobenzene, Aminophen, Anyvim, Benzidam, Cyanol, Krystallin,
Kyanol, phenylamine.


Personal Protective Equipment: See Chemical Profile Section VIII.


Emergency Life-Support Equipment and Supplies That May Be Required:

Compressed oxygen, forced-oxygen mask, soap, water, syrup of Ipecac, activated
charcoal, saline cathartic or sorbitol, diazepam, phenytoin, dopamine,
levarterenol,  methylene blue.


Signs and Symptoms of Acute Aniline Exposure:

Signs and symptoms of acute exposure to aniline may be severe and include
dyspnea (shortness of breath), respiratory paralysis, cardiac arrhythmias, and
cardiovascular collapse. Victims may experience headache, irritability,
disorientation, lethargy, weakness, incoordination, dizziness, and drowsiness.
Delerium, shock, convulsions, and coma may also  be observed.

Gastrointestinal effects include dryness of throat, nausea, and vomiting.
Painful urination, oliguria  (scanty urination), and hematuria (bloody urine)
may occur. Aniline may irritate the  skin, eyes, and mucous membranes; cyanosis
(blue tint to skin  and mucous membranes) is a common finding.

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                                              EFATG
                                              CAS Registry Number:  62-53-3
                                              Page 2 of 3 v  -

                                      ANILINE

Emergency Life-Support Procedures:

Note: Victims at special risk include individuals with glucose-6-phosphate-
dehydrogenase deficiency, those with liver and kidney disorders, blood
diseases, or a history of alcoholism.

Acute exposure to aniline may  require decontamination and life support for the
victims.  Emergency personnel should wear protective  clothing appropriate to
the type and degree of contamination.  Air-purifying or supplied-air
respiratory equipment should also be worn, as necessary.  Rescue vehicles
should carry supplies such as plastic sheeting and disposable plastic bags to
assist in preventing spread of contamination.


Inhalation Exposure:

1.   Move victims to fresh air.  Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure
     to aniline.

2.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma. If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration. If breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.   Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive
     procedures.

4.   RUSH to a health care facility.
Dermal/Eye Exposure:

1.   Remove victims from exposure.  Emergency personnel should avoid self-
     exposure to aniline.

2.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration. If breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.   Remove contaminated clothing as soon as possible.

4.   If eye exposure has occurred, eyes must be flushed with lukewarm water for
     at least 15 minutes.

5.   Wash exposed skin areas  twice with soap and water.

6.   Obtain authorization  and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive
     procedures.

7.   RUSH to a health care facility.

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                                              EFATG
                                              CAS Registry Number: 62-53-3
                                              Page 3 of 3

                                      ANILINE

Ingestion Exposure:

1.  Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration. If breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

2.  Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive
     procedures.

3.  Vomiting may be induced with syrup of Ipecac.  If elapsed time since
     ingestion of aniline is unknown or suspected to be greater than
     30 minutes, do not induce  vomiting and proceed to Step 4.  Ipecac should
     not be administered to children under 6 months of age.

     Warning: Ingestion of aniline may result in sudden onset of seizures or
     loss of consciousness.  Syrup of Ipecac should be administered only if
     victims are alert, have an active gag-reflex, and show no signs of
     impending seizure or coma.  If ANY uncertainty exists, proceed to Step 4.

     The following dosages of Ipecac are recommended:  children up to  1 year
     old, 10 mL (1/3 oz); children 1 to 12 years old, 15 mL (1/2 oz); adults,
     30 mL (1 oz).  Ambulate (walk) the victims and give large quantities of
     water. If vomiting has not occurred after 15 minutes,  Ipecac may be
     readministered.  Continue  to ambulate and  give water to the victims.  If
     vomiting has not occurred  within 15 minutes after second administration of
     Ipecac, administer activated charcoal.

4.  Activated charcoal may be administered if victims are conscious and alert.
     Use 15 to 30 g (1/2 to 1 oz) for children, 50 to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz)
     for adults, with 125 to 250 mL (1/2 to 1 cup) of water.

5.  Promote excretion by administering a saline  cathartic or sorbitol to
     conscious and alert victims. Children  require 15 to 30  g (1/2 to 1 oz)
     of cathartic; 50  to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz) is recommended  for adults.

6.  RUSH  to a health care facility.

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  62-73-7
                                           Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - DICHLORVOS

CAS Registry Number:  62-73-7

Synonyms:  O,O-Dimethyl O-2,2-Dichlorovinyl Phosphate; 2,2-Dichloroethenyl
Phosphoric Acid Dimethyl Ester; 2,2-Dichlorovinyl Dimethyl Phosphate; Atgard;
Bay-19149; Bibesol; Brevinyl; Brevinyl E50; Canogard; Cekusan; Chlorvinphos;
Cyanophos; DDVF; DDVP; DEDEVAP; Deriban; Derribante; Dichlorman; Dichlorovas;
Dichlorovos; Dichlorphos; Dimethyl 2,2-Dichloroethenyl Phosphate; Dimethyl
2,2-Dichlorovinyl Phosphate; Divipan; ENT 20738; Equigard; Equigel; Estrosel;
Ethenol, 2,2-Dichloro-, Dimethyl Phosphate; Fecama; Herkal; Herkol; Krecalvin;
Mafu; Marvex; NCI-COO 113; Nerkol; No-Pest Strip; Nogos; Nuva; O,O-Dimethyl
Dichlorovinyl Phosphate; OMS 14; Phosphoric Acid, 2,2-Dichlorovinyl Dimethyl
Ester; Phosphoric Acid, 2,2-Dichloroethenyl Dimethyl Ester; Phosvit;
Szklarniak; Task; Vapona; Vaponite; 2,2-Dichloroethenyl phosphate; Atgard V;
Brevinyl Weedat 0002; Celcusan; Dichlorophos; Dimethyl dichlorovinyl  phosphate;
Nuvan 100 EC; Unifos; Vapona insecticide; Astrobot; Estrosol; Nuvan; SD1750;
Fly fighter; Fly-die; Mopari UN NA 2783; Nogos 50; Nogos G; NSC-6738; OKO; Tap
9vp; Task Tabs; Tenac; UDVF; Unifos 50 EC; Vapona II; Verdican; Verdipor; Vinyl
alcohol, 2,2-Dichloro-, Dimethyl Phosphate; Vinylophos

Chemical Formula: C4H7C12O4P

Molecular Weight: 220.98


SECTION  I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:  LC60 inhalation
           (mouse) 0.013 mg/liter/4 hours (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985).

           TPQ: 1,000 (pounds)

           RQ: 10 (pounds)

           Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): Yes


SECTION  II -- PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point: 284°F, 140°C at 20 mmHg (*Merck 1976)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1): 1.415 at 25°C/4°C (*Merck 1976)

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 62-73-7
                                           Page 2 of 4

                               DICHLORVOS

SECTION I   (continued)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg): 0.01 at 30°C (*Sunshine 1969)

    Melting Point:  Not Found

    Vapor Density (AIR=1): Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l):  Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  Approximately 1 g/100 ml (*Merck 1976)

    Appearance and Odor:  Oily colorless to amber liquid with an aromatic
    chemical odor (*Patty 1963; *NIOSH/OSHA 1981)


SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  TWA 1 mg/ms (skin) (NIOSH/OSHA 1978, p. 84)

    ACGIH TLV: TWA 0.1 ppm, 1 mg/ms; STEL 0.3 ppm, 3 mg/ms (*AGGIH 1

    IDLH:  200 mg/ms (NIOSH/OSHA 1978, p. 84)

    Other Limits Recommended: Not  Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation: Yes (*DOT 1984)
                    Skin: Yes (*DOT 1984)
                    Ingestion: Yes (*DOT 1984)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  Dichlorvos is a very tox
    compound with  a probable  lethal oral dose in humans between 50 and 50
    mg/kg, or between 1 teaspoonful and 1 oz. for a 70 kg (150 Ib.) person.
    However, brief exposure (30-60 minutes) to vapor concentrations as high
    6.9 mg/liter did not result in clinical signs or depressed serum
    cholinesterase levels. Toxic changes are typical of organophosphate
    insecticide poisoning with progression to respiratory distress, respirator?
    paralysis, and death if there is no clinical  intervention (Gosselin 1984,
    pp. 11-291 and III-336, 337).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure: Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): Greater than 175°F  (no method given) (*>
    1978)
    Flammable Limits:  Moderately  flammable  (NIOSH/OSHA 1978, p. 84:
    ignite easily (*DOT  1984)
        LEL:  Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods: Water in  flooding quantities as fog, alcohol
    dry chemical, or carbon dioxide (NIOSH/OSHA  1978, p. 84). Do not
    the material (*DOT  1984).

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  62-73-7
                                            Page 3 of 4

                                DICHLORVOS

SECTION IV   (continued)

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  Use self-contained breathing apparatus
    with a full face piece operated on pressure-demand or other positive
    pressure mode.  Prevent skin contact with protective clothing (*NIOSH/OSHA
    1978). Isolate area and deny entry.  Fight fire from maximum distance.
    Dike fire control water for future disposal (*DOT 1984).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards: Highly  toxic chloride fumes or
    phosgene may be released when this product burns.  Firefighters should take
    precautions noted above (*Sax 1979).

    NFPA Flammability Rating: Not Found


SECTION V -- REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:  Yes (*Encyc Occupat Health and Safety  1971)
               Stable:

        Conditions  to Avoid:  Hydrolyzes in water (*Sunshine 1969).

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Corrosive to iron and mild steel
    (*Worthing 1979); acids or acid fumes (*Sax 1979).

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  Toxic chloride fumes and phosgene
    formed if heated to decomposition or on contact with acid or  acid fumes
    (*Sax  1979).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:  Not Found
                              May Not Occur: Not  Found

        Conditions  to Avoid:  Not Found
SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Agricultural insecticide for use on crops, stored products, animals, and
    premises; insecticide for slow release on pest-strips for pest control in
    homes and aircraft; anthelmintic for dogs, swine, and horses; botacide for
    horses; flea collars for dogs (*Gosselin 1976; *Rossoff 1974; *Worthing
    1979; *SRI).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Prevent access to area from public by isolating area and denying entry.
    Ventilate closed spaces before entering them.  Remove and
    isolate contaminated clothing at the site.  Do not touch spilled material;
    stop leaks if you can do it without risk.  Reduce vapors with water spray.
    Take up small spills with sand or other noncombustible absorbent material
    for later disposal in cannisters.  Dike large spills far ahead of spill for
    later disposal (*DOT 1984).

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  62-73-7
                                            Page 4 of 4

                               DICHLORVOS

SECTION VIII -- PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit. See the introductory information section at  the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.

    SUIT MATERIAL PERFORMANCE (Based on EPA/USCG "Guidelines", 1987)
                       (Chemical Resistance/Amount of Data)

           Butyl/Neoprene       GOOD/LIMITED**
           Viton/Neoprene       GOOD/LIMITED**

     *Based on qualitative performance information.
    **Based on a chemical analog.


SECTION IX -- EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure: Sweating, twitching, contracted pupils,
    respiratory distress (tightness in the chest and wheezing),  salivation
    (drooling), lacrimation (tearing),  nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps,
    diarrhea, involuntary  defecation  and urination, slurred speech, coma, apnea
    (cessation of breathing), and death (Doull 1980, pp. 367-368).

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures: Call emergency medical care.  If
    victim  was exposed by inhalation, move to fresh air.  If not breathing,
    give artificial  respiration;  if breathing is difficult, give oxygen.  If
    exposure was by contact, flush skin or eyes with running water for  at least
    15 minutes; it is critical to remove the material from the skin as quickly
    as possible. Also remove contaminated clothing and shoes.  Victim should
    be kept quiet,  warm, and observed for delayed effects (*DOT 1984).

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  62-74-8
                                           Page 1 of 3
                           EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                  Date: October 31, 1985
                                                  Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - SODIUM FLUOROACETATE

CAS Registry Number: 62-74-8

Synonyms: Acetic Acid, Fluoro-, Sodium Salt; 1080; Compd 1080; Compound No.
1080; Fluoroacetic Acid, Sodium Salt; Fratol; Furatol; Ratbane 1080; SMFA;
Sodium Fluoacetate; Sodium Fluoacetic Acid; Sodium Fluoracetate; Sodium
Monofluoroacetate; Ten-Eighty; TL 869; Yasoknock

Chemical Formula:  C2H2FO2Na

Molecular Weight: 100.02


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

          Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:  LC50 inhalation
          (guinea pig) 0.1 mg/liter/10 minutes (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985).

          TPQ: 10/10,000 (pounds)

          RQ: 10 (pounds)

          Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Solid

    Boiling Point: Not Found

    Specific  Gravity (H2O=1):  Not Found

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg): 0.0 at 20°C (*ACGIH 1980)

    Melting Point: 392°F, 200°C  (*Weast 1979); decomposes at 392°F, 200°C
    (*Hawley 1981)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1): Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate** 1): Not Found

    Solubility in Water: 1110 g/liter at 25°C (*Weast 1979)

    Appearance and Odor:  White powder (*Weast 1979); odorless (*Hawley 1981).

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 62-74-8
                                           Page 2 of 3

                              SODIUM FLUOROACETATE

SECTION II   (continued)

    Usually marketed as water solution containing 0.5 percent Nigrosine as
    black warning color (*Spencer 1982).


SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  TWA 0.05 mg/m3 (skin) (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

    ACGIH TLV: TWA 0.05 mg/m3 (skin); STEL 0.15 mg/m3 (skin) (*ACGIH 1983)

    IDLH:  5 mg/m3 (NIOSH/OSHA 1978, p.  166)

    Other Limits Recommended: Not Found

    Routes of Entry:  Inhalation:  Yes (*Rumack 1975 to Present)
                    Skin:  Yes (*Rumack 1975 to Present)
                    Ingestion: Yes (*Gosselin 1976)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  This material is super
    toxic. The probable oral lethal dose in humans is less than 5 rag/kg, or a
    taste (less than 7 drops) for a 150-lb. person (*Gosselin 1976).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure:  Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): Not Found
    Flammable Limits:  Not combustible (NIOSH/OSHA 1978, p. 166)
        LEL: Not Found
        UEL: Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods:  Use dry chemical,  carbon dioxide, water spray, or
    foam. For large fires, use water spray, fog, or foam (*DOT 1984).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  Stay upwind; keep out of low areas.
    Wear self-contained, positive pressure breathing apparatus and full
    protective clothing (*DOT 1984).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards*' When heated to decomposition, it
    emits highly toxic fumes of sodium oxide and fluorides (*Sax 1984).

    NFPA Flammability Rating: Not Found


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability: Unstable:
              Stable: Yes (*NIOSH/OSHA 1978)
                                                            *
        Conditions to  Avoid:  Decomposing heat (*Sax  1984)

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  62-74-8
                                           Page 3 of 3

                               SODIUM FLUOROACETATE

SECTION V   (continued)

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid): None hazardous (NIOSH/OSHA 1978,
                                         p. 166)

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  When heated to decomposition, it
    emits fumes of sodium oxide and fluorides (*Sax  1984).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:  Not Found
                             May Not Occur:  Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    This material is used for control of predatory animals, coyotes, and
    rodents (*Farm Chemicals Handbook 1984).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Do not touch spilled material.  Stay upwind; keep out of low areas
    (*DOT 1984).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See  the introductory information section at the
    beginning  of the profiles for additional information.
SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure: Symptoms include nausea, vomiting,
    diarrhea, hyperactive behavior, convulsions, coma, and ventricular
    fibrillation.  Symptoms are usually seen  within one-half hour of exposure,
    but severe effects may be delayed as long as 20 hours (*Rumack 1975 to
    Present).

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures: There is no known specific  treatment
    for fluoroacetate exposure, but generally symptomatic support should be
    provided (*Rumack 1975 to Present). Move victim to fresh air.  Call
    emergency medical care.  Remove and isolate contaminated clothing and shoes
    at  the site.  In case of  contact with material, immediately flush skin or
    eyes with running water  for at least 15 minutes (*DOT 1984).

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  62-75-9
                                           Page 1 of 4
                         EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                  Date: October 31, 1985
                                                  Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - NITROSODIMETHYLAMINE

CAS Registry Number: 62-75-9

Synonyms: N-Nitrosodimethylamine; Dimethyl Nitrosamine; Dimethylamine,
N-Nitroso-; Dimethylnitrosamine; Dimethylnitrosoamine; DMN; DMNA; Methanamine,
N-Methyl-N-Nitroso-; N,N-Dimethylnitrosamine; N-Methyl-N-Nitrosomethanamine;
N-Nitroso-N,N-Dimethylamine; NDMA

Chemical Formula:  C2H6N2O

Molecular Weight: 74.08


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

          Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302: LC50 inhalation
          (mouse) 0.173 mg/liter/4 hours (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985).

          TPQ: 1,000 (pounds)

          RQ: 1 (pounds) (statutory); 10 (pounds) (proposed)

          Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): Yes


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point: 304-307°F, 151-153°C (*Merck 1983)

    Specific  Gravity (H20=l):  1.0048 at 20°C/4°C (*Merck 1983)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg): Not Found

    Melting Point:  Not Found

    Vapor Density (AIR-1):  Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

    Solubility in Water: Very soluble (*Merck 1983)

    Appearance and Odor: Yellow  oily liquid (*IARC 1972-1985); faint
    characteristic odor (*Clayton and Clayton 1982)

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 62-75-9
                                           Page 2 of 4

                              NITROSODIMETHYLAMINE

SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV: TWA and STEL:  Industrial substance suspected of carcinogenic
    potential in humans (*ACGIH 1984)

    IDLH:  Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended: Exposures should be avoided, in so far as
    possible, or otherwise be kept to an absolute minimum; suspected of
    carcinogenic potential in humans (*ACGIH 1984).

    Routes of Entry:  Inhalation: Yes ('Sunshine 1969)
                    Skin:  Yes (*Sunshine 1969)
                    Ingestion: Yes (*Sunshine 1969)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic): Extremely high toxicity
    (*Sunshine 1969). It is a suspected human carcinogen. The lowest lethal
    oral dose in humans has been reported at 10 mg/kg/80 week intermittent
    exposure (*NIOSH/RTECS  1985).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure: Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used):  Not Found
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL:  Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods:  Not Found

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  Not Found

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  Not Found

    NFPA Flammability Rating: Not Found


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:
              Stable:  Yes (Clayton and Clayton 1981, p. 3119)

        Conditions to Avoid: Exposure to ultraviolet light (Clayton and
        Clayton  1981, p. 3119).

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid): Not Found

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  When heated to decomposition, it
    emits toxic fumes of nitrogen oxides (Sax 1984, pp. 1180-1181).

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 62-75-9
                                           Page 3 of 4

                               NITROSODIMETHYLAMINE
                                                                    •
SECTION V   (continued)

    Hazardous Polymerization: May Occur:  Not Found
                             May Not Occur:  Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid: Not Found


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Nitrosodimethylamine was formerly used in the production of rocket fuels.
    Presently used as an antioxidant, as an additive for lubricants and as  a
    softener of copolymers (Merck 1983, p. 952).  It is an intermediate for
    1,1-dimethylhydrazine (*SRI).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Avoid inhalation and skin contact (see Section III above). Spills can be
    absorbed by celite or commercial spill absorbent. After absorbent
    containing major share of nitrosamine has been picked-up (avoid dusts; do
    not sweep), surface should be thoroughly cleaned with strong detergent
    solution.  If major spill occurs outside of ventilated area, room should be
    evacuated and cleanup operation should be carried out by persons equipped
    with self-contained breathing apparatus (*NRC 1981).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at the
    beginning  of the profiles for additional information.

    SUIT MATERIAL PERFORMANCE (Based on EPA/USCG "Guidelines", 1987)
                       (Chemical Resistance/Amount of Data)

           CPE                  POOR/LIMITED

     *Based on qualitative performance information.
    **Based on a chemical analog.
SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure: Symptoms include nausea, vomiting and
    malaise (*Cooper 1980). Chronic exposure  may cause liver disease with
    jaundice and swelling (*Hamilton 1984) with low platelet count ("Cooper
    1980).

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures:  Establish respiration; prevent
    absorption; decontaminate with soap and water; for eye exposure, flush with
    water (*Rumack 1975 to Present). (Poisonous Liquid or Gas, n.o.s.) Move

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 62-75-9
                                            Page 4 of 4

                                NITROSODIMETHYLAMINE

SECTION IX   (continued)

    victim to fresh air; call emergency medical care.  If not breathing, give
    artificial respiration.  If breathing is difficult, give oxygen.  Remove
    and isolate contaminated clothing and shoes at the site. In case of
    contact with material, immediately flush skin or eyes with running water '*
    for at least 15 minutes.  Keep victim quiet and maintain normal body
    temperature.  Effects may be delayed; keep victim under observation (DOT
    1984, Guide 15).

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                                          CAS Registry Number: 64-00-6
                                          Page 1 of 4
                         EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                  Date: October 31, 1985
                                                  Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - PHENOL, 3-(l-METHYLETHYL)-, METHYLCARBAMATE

CAS Registry Number: 64-00-6

Synonyms (NIOSH/RTECS, 1983, Volume I, p. 832): Carbamic Acid, Methyl-,
m-Cumenyl Ester; Carbamic Acid, N-Methyl-, 3-Isopropylphenyl Ester; Compound
10854; m-Cumenol Methylcarbamate; m-Cumenyl Methylcarbamate; ENT 25,500; ENT
25,543; H 5727; H 8757; HER. 5727; Hercules 5727; Hercules AC 5727; HIP;
m-Isopropylphenol N-Methylcarbamate; m-Isopropylphenyl Methylcarbamate;
m-Isopropylphenyl N-Methylcarbamate; 3-Isopropylphenyl Methylcarbamate;
N-Methyl m-Isopropylphenyl Carbamate; N-Methyl 3-Isopropylphenyl Carbamatc; QMS
162; 1PC; Phenol, m-Isopropyl-, Methylcarbamate; UC  10854; Union Carbide 10854;
Union Carbide UC-10,854

Chemical Formula:  CUH16NO2

Molecular Weight:  193.27


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

          Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:  LD50 oral
          (guinea pig) 10 mg/kg (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985).

          TPQ: 500/10,000 (pounds)

          RQ: 1 (pounds)
              (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

          Section 313 Listed (Yes  or No): No


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Solid

    Boiling Point:  Not Found

    Specific  Gravity (H2O»1):  Not  Found

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg): Not Found

    Melting Point: 162-165°F, 72-74°C (Hayes 1982, p. 450)

    Vapor Density (AIR-1):  Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate-1):  Not Found

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 64-00-6
                         .  „               Page 2 of 4

             PHENOL, 3-(l-METHYLETHYL)-, METHYLCARBAMATE

SECTION II   (continued)

    Solubility in Water:  85 ppm at 30°C (Hayes 1982, p. 450)

    Appearance and Odor: Pure white solid without appreciable odor (Hayes
    1982, p. 450).


SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV: Not Found

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended:  Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Yes (Non-Specific — Carbamate Pesticide,
                                Solid, n.o.s.) (DOT 1984, Guide  55)
                    Skin: Yes (Sax 1984, p. 820)
                    Ingestion: Yes (Sax 1984, p. 820)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  It is a cholinesterase
    inhibitor (Hayes 1982, p. 450).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure: Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE  AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): Not Found
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL: Not Found
        UEL: Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods: (Non-Specific — Carbamate Pesticide, Solid,
    n.o.s.)  Extinguish  with dry chemical, carbon dioxide, water spray, fog, or
    foam (DOT 1984, Guide 55).

    Special Fire  Fighting Procedures: (Non-Specific — Carbamate Pesticide,
    Solid, n.o.s.)  Wear positive pressure breathing apparatus and special
    protective clothing.  Move  container from fire area if  you can do it
    without risk. Dike fire control water for later disposal; do not scatter
    the material.  Fight fire from maximum distance (DOT 1984, Guide  55).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  (Non-Specific — Carbamate Pesticide,
    Solid, n.o.s.)  Container may explode in heat of fire  (DOT 1984, Guide 55).

    NFPA  Flammability Rating:  Not Found

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  64-00-6
                                            Page 3 of 4

             PHENOL, 3-(l-METHYLETHYL)-, METHYLCARBAMATE

SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:
               Stable: Yes  (Hayes 1982, p. 450)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Decomposing heat (Sax 1984, p. 820)

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Incompatible with alkalis (Hayes
    1982, p. 450).

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts: When heated to decomposition, it
    emits toxic fumes of nitrogen oxides (Sax 1984, p. 820).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur: Not Found
                              May Not Occur: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    It is used as an insecticide to protect cotton, fruit, vegetables and field
    crops (Farm Chemicals Handbook 1984, p. C-236). Not registered as a
    pesticide in the U.S. (USEPA/Pesticide Index 1985).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    (Non-Specific — Carbamate Pesticide, Solid, n.o.s.) Keep unnecessary
    people away and stay upwind.  Do not touch  the material or handle broken
    packages without protective clothing. Use water spray to reduce vapors.
    Take up spills with non-combustible  absorbent material.  For small dry
    spills, place material in a clean dry container with a clean shovel and
    cover; remove from site of spill. For large  spills dike far ahead
    for later disposal (DOT 1984, Guide  55; Student 1981, p. 104).


SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT  FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with  escape SCBA and a  fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of  the profiles  for additional information.
SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure:  Exposure may result in weakness,
    dizziness, tightness in the chest, headache, pinpoint pupils, profuse
    sweating, blurred vision, stomach pain, vomiting, skin rashes, and
    giddiness (Hayes 1982, p. 451).

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 64-00-6
                                            Page 4 of 4

             PHENOL, 3-(l-METHYLETHYL)-, METHYLCARBAMATE

SECTION IX   (continued)

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures: (Non-Specific — Carbamate Pesticide,
    Solid, n.o.s.)  Move victim to fresh air; call emergency medical care.  If
    not breathing, give artificial respiration.  If breathing is difficult,
    give oxygen.  Remove  and isolate contaminated clothing  and shoes at the
    site. In case of contact with material, immediately flush skin  or eyes
    with running water for at least IS minutes. Keep victim quiet and maintain
    normal body temperature.  Effects may be delayed; keep victim under
    observation (DOT 1984, Guide 55).


    COMMENTS:

        Sources searched but no information found:
            Weiss 1980
            Buchel 1983
            Gosselin 1984
            Merck 1983
            Weast 1979

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 64-86-8
                                           Page 1 of 3
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - COLCHICINE

CAS Registry Number:  64-86-8

Synonyms:  7-alpha-H-Colchicine; Acetamide, N-(5,6,7,9-Tetrahydro-1,2,3,10-
Tetramethoxy-9-oxobenzo[a]heptalen-7-yl); Benzo[a]heptalen-9(5H)-one,
7-acetamido-6,7-dihydro-l,2,3,10-tetramethoxy-; Colchicenos; Colchisol; Colcin;
Colsaloid; Condylon; N-Acetyl Trimethylcolchicinic acid, Methyl Ether; NSC 757

Chemical Formula: C22H25NO6

Molecular Weight:  399.43


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302: LDlo oral (dog,
           cat) 0.125 mg/kg (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985).

           TPQ: 10/10,000 (pounds)

           RQ: 1  (pounds)
               (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

           Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Solid

    Boiling Point:  Not Found

    Specific Gravity (H2O»1): Not Found

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  Not Found

    Melting Point: 288-302°F, 142-150°C (*Merck 1976)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1): Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  1 g dissolves in 22 ml (*Merck 1976)

    Appearance and Odor: Odorless or nearly so (*Hawlcy 1977); pale yellow
    needles or powder;  darkens on exposure to light (*Merck 1976).

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 64-86-8
                                            Page 2 of 3

                               COLCHICINE

SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIHTLV:  Not Found

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended:  Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Not Found
                    Skin:  Not Found
                    Ingestion:  Yes (*Gosselin 1976)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  It is classified as super
    toxic. Probable oral lethal dose in humans is less than 5 mg/kg, i.e. less
    than 7 drops for a 70 kg (150 Ib.) person (*Gosselin  1976).  Death results
    from respiratory arrest.  The fatal dose varies considerably; as little as
    7 mg of  colchicine has proved fatal (*Goodman 1975).

    Medical  Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure:  Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE  AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): Not Found
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL: Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods:  Slight fire potential (*Sax 1979). Material is a
    drug (*SRI), with the following procedures for fires. Extinguish fire
    using agent suitable for  type of surrounding fire. Use water in flooding
    quantities as fog.  Use alcohol foam, carbon dioxide or dry chemical
    (Student 1981, p. 215).

    Special  Fire Fighting Procedures:  For drugs, solid, n.o.s., avoid
    breathing dusts and fumes from burning material. Keep upwind.  Wear boots,
    protective gloves, and goggles (Student 1981, p. 215).

    Unusual Fire  and Explosion Hazards: Not Found

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  Not Found


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:
               Stable: Yes (*Clarke 1975)

        Conditions to Avoid: Not Found

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Not Found

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  Not Found

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                                           • CAS Registry Number:  64-86-8
                                            Page 3 of 3

                               COLCHICINE

SECTION V   (continued)

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur: Not Found
                              May Not Occur:  Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Colchicine is a drug used to treat gouty arthritis, pseudogout, sarcoidal
    arthritis and calcific tendinitis (*SRI).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Precautions for drugs, solid, n.o.s., include the following.  Avoid
    breathing dusts, and fumes from burning materials.  Keep upwind.
    Avoid bodily contact with the material. Wear full protective clothing.
    Wash away any material which may have contacted  the body with
    copious amounts of water or  soap and water (Student 1981, p. 215).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS
                           >
    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA  and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.
SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure:  Burning of throat and skin are prominent
    symptoms. Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain may occur several
    hours after exposure. Shock occurs because of extensive vascular damage.
    Kidney damage resulting in bloody urine and diminished urine output may
    occur (*Goodman 1975).

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures:  This material is an alkaloid (Merck
    1983, p. 352); first aid for alkaloid exposure is as follows:  move victim
    to fresh air;  call emergency medical care.  If not breathing, give
    artificial respiration. If breathing is difficult, give oxygen. In case
    of contact with material, immediately flush skin or eyes with running water
    for at least 15 minutes. Speed in removing material from skin is of
    extreme importance.  Remove and isolate contaminated clothing and shoes at
    the site.   Keep victim quiet and  maintain normal body temperature.  Effects
    may  be delayed; keep victim under observation (DOT 1984, Guide 55).

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  65-30-5
                                            Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                    Date: October 31, 1985
                                                    Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - NICOTINE SULFATE

CAS Registry Number:  65-30-5

Synonyms:  (S)-3-(l-Methyl-2-Pyrrolidinyl)Pyridine Sulfate (2:1); L-l-
Methyl-2-(3-Pyridyl)-Pyrrolidine Sulfate; L-3-( 1 -Methyl-2-Pyrrolidyl)Pyridine
Sulfate; Black Leaf 40; Nicotine Sulfate, Solid; Nicotine, Sulfate (2:1);
Pyridine, 3-(l-Methyl-2-Pyrrolidinyl)-, (S)-, Sulfate (2:1); Pyrrolidine,
l-Methyl-2-(3-Pyridyl)-, Sulfate

Chemical Formula: (C10H14N2)2.H2SO4

Molecular Weight: 422.56


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:  LD50 oral
           (mice) 8.55 mg/kg (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

           TPQ: 100/10,000  (pounds)

           RQ: 1  (pounds)
               (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

           Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II -  PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Solid

    Boiling Point: Not Found

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1):  1.15 at 20°C (solid) (*CHRIS 1978)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  Not Found

    Melting Point: Not Found

    Vapor Density (AIR-1):  Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl  acetate=l):  Not  Found

    Solubility in Water:  Soluble in water (*Merck 1976)

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  65-30-5
                                            Page 2 of 4

                               NICOTINE SULFATE

SECTION II   Continued)

    Appearance and Odor: A six-sided tablet (*Merck 1976) or white crystals;
    (40% solution - Black Leaf Forty) (Hawley 1981, p. 727).


SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL;  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV:  TWA 0.5 mg (nicotineVm3; STEL 1.5 mg (nicotine)/m3 (skin)
    (*ACGIH 1982)

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended:  TWA for nicotine:  0.5 mg/ms (skin) (OSHA 1984,
    p. 663).

    Routes of Entry:  Inhalation:  Yes (*Sax 1975)
                    Skin:  Yes  (*Sax 1975)
                    Ingestion:  Yes (*Sax 1975)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic): It is classified as super
    toxic. Probable oral lethal dose in humans is less than 5 mg/kg (less than
    7 drops) for a 70 kg (150 Ib.) person (*Gosselin 1976).  Death is possible
    from respiratory  failure caused by paralysis of the respiratory muscles
    (*Goodman 1980).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure: Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used):  Not Found
    Flammable Limits:
         LEL: Not Found
         UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods:  As for nicotine, extinguish  with alcohol  foam, dry
    chemical, or carbon dioxide (Sax 1984, p. 1997).  Large fires can be
    extinguished with water spray, fog, or foam (*DOT  1984).

    Special Fire  Fighting Procedures: Wear positive pressure breathing
    apparatus and special protective clothing.  Dike fire control water; do not
    scatter the material (*DOT 1984).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards: As for nicotine, moderate explosion
    hazard when exposed to heat or  flame (*Sax 1975).

    NFPA Flammability Rating: Not Found

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  65-30-5
                                            Page 3 of 4

                               NICOTINE SULFATE

SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:
               Stable: Yes (*Menzie 1969)

         Conditions to Avoid:  Decomposing heat (Sax  1984, p. 1998)

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  (Non-Specific — Nicotine)  Avoid
    oxidizing materials (Sax 1984, p. 1997).

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts: When heated to decomposition,
    emits highly toxic fumes of sulfur oxides and organic fumes (Sax 1984, p.
    1998).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur: Not Found
                              May Not Occur: Not Found

         Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    It is  used as an insecticide (*Merck 1976) and in veterinary medicine as an
    anthelmintic and external parasiticide (*Garner 1967).


SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to  be Taken in Case Material is  Released or Spilled)

    To clean up, do not touch spilled material;  stop leak if possible.  Use
    water spray to reduce vapors. Small spills:   take up with sand or other
    noncombustible absorbent material and place into containers for  disposal.
    Small dry spill: with clean  shovel  place material into clean, dry
    container and cover; move containers from spill area.  Large spills: dike
    far ahead of spill for  later disposal (*DOT 1984).


SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with  escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit. See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.


SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure:  Onset of acute poisoning is rapid.
    Symptoms include nausea, salivation, abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea,
    cold  sweat, headache, dizziness, disturbed hearing and vision, mental
    confusion, marked weakness, faintness and prostration, lowered blood
    pressure, difficult breathing, and weak, rapid and  irregular pulse
    (*Goodman 1980). Inhalation irritates nose and throat. The liquid form
    irritates the eyes and (on prolonged contact) skin (*CHRIS 1978).

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  65-30-5
                                            Page 4 of 4

                                NICOTINE SULFATE

SECTION IX   (continued)

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures: Move victim to fresh air; call
    emergency medical care.  If not breathing, give artificial respiration. If
    breathing  is difficult, give oxygen.  In case of contact with material,
    immediately flush skin or eyes with running water for at least 15 minutes.
    Speed in removing material from skin is of extreme  importance.  Remove and
    isolate contaminated clothing and shoes at the site.  Keep victim  under
    observation (*DOT 1984).

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  66-81-9
                                           Page 1 of 3
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - CYCLOHEXIMIDE

CAS Registry Number:  66-81-9

Synonyms:  Glutarimide, 3-(2-(3,5-Dimethyl-2-Oxocyclohexyl)-2- Hydroxycthyl)-;
2,6-Piperidinedione, 4-(2-(3,5-Dimethyl-2-Oxocyclohexyl)- 2-Hydroxyethyl)-
(1S-(1 alpha(S*), 3 alpha, 5 beta))-; Acti-aid; Acti-Dione-PM (-RZ, -BR, & -S);
Actidion; Actidione; Actidione PM; Actispray; beta-(2-(3,5-
Dimethyl-2-Oxocyclohexyl)-2-Hydroxyethyl)Glutarimide; Hizarocin; Kaken;
Naramycin; Naramycin A; Neocycloheximide; NSC-185; TZA; U 4527

Chemical Formula: C15H2SNO4

Molecular Weight:  281.34


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA)  1986:

           Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302: LD50 oral
           (rat) 2 mg/kg (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985).

           TPQ: 100/10,000 (pounds)
                                                               •*
           RQ: 1  (pounds)
              (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

           Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Solid

    Boiling Point:  Not Found

    Specific Gravity (H2O»1): Not Found

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  Not Found

    Melting Point: 247-250°F, 119.5-121 °C (*Merck 1976)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  Moderately soluble (Sax 1984, p. 833); 21 g/liter at
    36°F, 2°C (*Merck 1976)

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 66-81-9
                                           Page 2 of 3

                               CYCLOHEXIMIDE

SECTION II   (continued)

    Appearance and Odor: Colorless crystals (*Spencer  1973).


SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV: Not Found

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended:  Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation: Not Found
                    Skin: Yes (*Rumack 1975  to Present)
                    Ingestion: Yes (*Gosselin 1976)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  This material is extremely
    toxic; the probable oral lethal dose in humans is 5-50 mg/kg, or 7 drops to
    1 teaspoonful for a 150-lb. person (*Gosselin  1976).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by  Exposure:  Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): Not Found
    Flammable Limits:
        LELr Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods: (Non-Specific — Fungicides, Poison B Solid) Use
    agent suitable for surrounding fire. Use alcohol foam, carbon dioxide, or
    dry chemical. Use water in flooding quantities as fog (Student 1981, p.
    259).

    Special Fire  Fighting Procedures: (Non-Specific — Fungicides, Poison B
    Solid) Avoid breathing dusts and fumes from burning material.  Keep
    upwind.  Wear self-contained breathing apparatus.  Avoid bodily  contact
    with the material. Wear full protective clothing (Student  1981, p. 259).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  When exposed to heat, it emits toxic
    fumes, including nitrogen oxides (Sax 1984, p. 833).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  Not Found


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:
               Stable: Yes (*Merck 1976)

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 66-81-9
                                           Page 3 of 3

                               CYCLOHEXIMIDE

SECTION V   (continued)

        Conditions to Avoid: Not Found

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Not Found

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  When exposed to heat, it emits
    toxic fumes, including nitrogen oxides (Sax 1984, p. 833).

    Hazardous Polymerization: May Occur: Not Found
                              May Not Occur:  Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid: Not Found


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    This material  is used as a fungicide (*Merck 1976), and as a medication in
    cancer therapy (*Rumack 1975 to Present).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    (Non-Specific — Fungicides, Poison B Solid) Avoid breathing dusts.  Keep
    upwind.  Avoid  bodily contact with the material (Student 1981, p. 259).
    Material is rapidly inactivated at room temperature by dilute alkali
    (*Merck 1976).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit. See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.

SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    See Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number: 66-81-9
                                             Page 1 of 3
                      Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide
                                      for
                                 CYCLOHEXIMIDE

                                   (66-81-9)
     This guide should not be construed to authorize  emergency personnel to
perform the procedures or  activities indicated  or implied.  Care  of persons
exposed to toxic chemicals must be directed by a physician or other recognized
authority.
Substance Characteristics:

Pure Form - Colorless crystals.

Commercial  Forms - Oil solution, wettable powder, water-soluble tablets.

Uses - Chemotherapy, turf disease control, plant growth regulation, fungicide.

Other Names - Acti-aid, Actidione, Actispray,  glutarimide, 3-(2-(3,5-dimethyl-
2-oxocyclohexyl)-2-hydroxyethyl)-; Hizarocin, Kaken, Naramycin A.


Personal Protective Equipment: See Chemical Profile Section VIII.


Emergency Life-Support Equipment and Supplies That May Be Required:

Compressed  oxygen, forced-oxygen mask, soap, water, syrup of Ipecac, activated
charcoal, saline cathartic or sorbitol, normal saline, D5W,  Ringer's lactate,
hydrocortisone, atropine.


Signs and Symptoms of Acute Cycloheximide Exposure:

Warning:  Effects may be delayed for 6 to 24 hours. Caution is advised.

Signs and symptoms of acute exposure to cycloheximide  may include increased
salivation, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and dark, bloodstained stools.   Dermal
effects may  range from erythema (redness) to sloughing.  Central nervous system
excitement, including  tremor, may be noted. Liver and kidney damage, coma, and
cardiovascular collapse are also possible.

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  66-81-9
                                             Page 2 of 3

                                 CYCLOHEXIMIDE

Emergency Life-Support Procedures:

Acute exposure  to cycloheximide  may require  decontamination and life support
for the  victims.   Emergency  personnel  should wear   protective  clothing
appropriate to  the  type and  degree  of contamination.   Air-purifying or
supplied-air respiratory equipment should also be  worn, as necessary.  Rescue
vehicles should  carry supplies such as plastic sheeting and disposable plastic
bags to assist in preventing spread of contamination.


Inhalation Exposure:

1.   Move victims to fresh air. Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure
     to cycloheximide.

2.   Evaluate vital signs including  pulse and respiratory  rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not  breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.    If  breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.   Obtain authorization and/or further  instructions from the local hospital
     for  administration  of  an antidote or performance  of  other invasive
     procedures.

4.   Transport to a health care facility.
Dermal/Eye Exposure:

1.   Remove victims from exposure.   Emergency  personnel  should  avoid self-
     exposure to cycloheximide.

2.   Evaluate vital signs including  pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.    If  breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.   Remove contaminated clothing as soon as possible.

4.   If eye exposure has occurred, eyes must be flushed with lukewarm water for
     at least 15 minutes.

5.   Wash exposed skin areas THOROUGHLY with soap and water.

6.   Obtain authorization  and/or further  instructions from the local hospital
     for  administration  of an  antidote or performance of  other invasive
     procedures.

7.   Transport to a health care facility.

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                                              EFATG
                                              CAS Registry Number: 66-81-9
                                              Page 3 of 3

                                 CYCLOHEXIMIDE

Ingestion Exposure:

1.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and  respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not  breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.    If  breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

2.   Obtain authorization and/or further  instructions from  the local hospital
     for administration  of an  antidote or  performance  of other invasive
     procedures.

3.   Vomiting may be induced with syrup  of  Ipecac.   If elapsed  time since
     ingestion of cycloheximide is unknown or suspected to be greater than
     30 minutes, do  not induce vomiting and proceed to Step 4. Ipecac should
     not be administered to children under 6 months of age.

     Warning:   Ingestion  of cycloheximide may  result in  sudden onset of
     seizures  or  loss  of  consciousness.    Syrup  of   Ipecac  should be
     administered only if victims  are alert, have an active gag-reflex, and
     show no signs of impending seizure or coma.  If  ANY uncertainty exists,
     proceed to Step 4.

     The following  dosages of  Ipecac are recommended: children up to 1 year
     old, 10 mL (1/3 oz); children 1 to  12 years old, 15  mL (1/2  oz); adults,
     30 mL (1 oz).   Ambulate  (walk) the victims and give large quantities of
     water. If vomiting has not  occurred  after  15 minutes,  Ipecac  may be
     readministered.   Continue to ambulate and give water to the  victims. If
     vomiting has not occurred within  15 minutes after second administration of
     Ipecac, administer activated charcoal.

4.   Activated charcoal may be administered if victims are conscious and alert.
     Use 15 to 30 g (1/2 to  1 oz) for children,  50 to 100 g (1-3/4 to  3-1/2 oz)
     for adults, with 125 to 250 mL (1/2 to 1 cup) of water.

5.   Promote  excretion  by  administering a saline cathartic  or sorbitol to
     conscious and alert victims.  Children require 15  to 30 g (1/2 to 1 oz)
     of cathartic; 50  to 100 g (1-3/4 to  3-1/2 oz) is recommended for adults.

6.   Transport to a health care facility.

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 67-66-3
                                            Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30,  1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - CHLOROFORM

CAS Registry Number:  67-66-3

Synonyms:  Formyl Trichloride; Freon 20; Methane, Trichloro-; Methane
Trichloride; Methenyl Chloride; Methenyl Trichloride; Methyl Trichloride;
NCI-CO2686; R-20; R 20 (Refrigerant); TCM; Trichloroform; Trichloromethane

Chemical Formula: CHC13

Molecular Weight:  119.39


SECTION I -  REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:

                Chemical does not meet the toxicity criteria but because of its
                high production volume and recognized toxicity it is considered
                a chemical of concern.

           TPQ: 10,000 (pounds)

           RQ: 5000 (pounds) (statutory); 10 (pounds) (proposed)

           Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): Yes


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point:  143°F, 61.7°C (*Weast 1979)

    Specific Gravity  (H2O=1):  1.4832 at 20°C/4°C (*Weast  1979)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg): 100 at 10.4°C (*Sax 1979)

    Melting Point:  -82.3°F,  -63.5°C (*Weast 1979)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  4.12 (*Sax 1979)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): (Carbon Tetrachloride = 1) 1.18
    ('General Electric Co. 1979, MSDS #315)

    Solubility in Water:  1 mL/200 mL at 25°C (*Merck 1976)

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  67-66-3
                                            Page 2 of 4

                                 CHLOROFORM

SECTION II   (continued)

    Appearance and Odor: A clear, colorless and mobile liquid with a
    characteristic odor (*IARC 1972-1985).


SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Ceiling 50 ppm (240 mg/m3) (NIOSH 1987, p. 80)

    ACGIH TLV: TWA 10 ppm (50 mg/m8) (ACGIH 1986-87, p. 13)

    IDLH: 1,000 ppm (NIOSH/OSHA 1978, p. 68)

    Other Limits Recommended:  NIOSH: 2 ppm 60-minute ceiling; potential
    occupational carcinogen (NIOSH 1897, p. 80 and Appendix A).  Industrial
    substance suspect of carcinogenic potential for humans (ACGIH 1985, p. 42).
    EEGL 100.0 ppm (60 minutes) (NRC 1984a, pp. 57-76).

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Yes (*NIOSH 1974)
                    Skin: Yes (*DOT  1984)
                    Ingestion: Yes (*ITI 1982)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  It is classified as
    moderately toxic.  Probable  oral lethal dose for humans is 0.5 to 5 g/kg
    (between 1 ounce and 1 pint) for a  150 Ib. person.  The mean lethal dose is
    probably near 1 fluid ounce (44  g) (*Gosselin 1976). It is a human
    suspected carcinogen (*IARC 1972-1985). Also, it is a central nervous
    system depressant and a gastrointestinal irritant (*Challen PS et al. 1958.
    Br J Ind Med 15:243). It has caused  rapid death attributable to cardiac
    arrest and delayed death from liver  and kidney damage (*IARC 1972-1985).

    Medical  Conditions Generally  Aggravated by Exposure:  Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used):  None (*General Electric Co. 1979, MSDS #315)
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL:  None ('General Electric Co. 1979, MSDS #315)
        UEL:  None ('General Electric  Co. 1979, MSDS #315)

    Extinguishing Methods: Extinguish with dry chemical, carbon  dioxide,
    water spray, fog or foam  (*DOT 1984).

    Special Fire  Fighting Procedures: Wear self-contained breathing  apparatus
    and special protective clothing.  Move  container from fire area. Fight
    fire from maximum distance.  Dike fire control water for later disposal; do
    not scatter the material (*DOT 1984).

    Unusual Fire and  Explosion Hazards:  Container may explode in  the heat of
    fire (*DOT 1984). When heated it liberates phosgene (*ITI 1982); hydrogen
    chloride, chlorine and toxic and corrosive oxides of carbon and chlorine
    ('General Electric Co. 1979, MSDS #315).

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 67-66-3
                                            Page 3 of 4

                                 CHLOROFORM

SECTION IV   (continued)

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  0


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:
               Stable: Yes (*CHRIS 1978)

        Conditions to Avoid:  It develops acidity from prolonged exposure to
        air and light (*General Electric  Co. 1979, MSDS #315).

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid): Chloroform explodes when in contact
    with aluminum powder or magnesium powder or with alkali metals (e.g.,
    lithium, sodium, and potassium) (*NFPA 1978) and dinitrogen tetroxide. It
    reacts vigorously with acetone in the presence of potassium hydroxide or
    calcium hydroxide (*Bretherick 1975).  It is oxidized by strong oxidizers
    such as chromic acid forming phosgene and chlorine (*IARC 1972-1985). It
    reacts vigorously with triisopropylphosphine (*Bretherick 1975).

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts: When heated, it emits hydrogen
    chloride, chlorine, toxic and  corrosive oxides of carbon and chlorine
    (*General  Electric Co. 1979, MSDS #315) and phosgene (*ITI 1982).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur: Not Found
                               May Not Occur: Not  Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    It is used as a grain fumigant; solvent for pesticides, adhesives (*IARC
    1972-1985) fats, oils,  rubbers, alkaloids, waxes (*Merck 1976); chemical
    intermediate for dyes and  pesticides; and a component of cough syrups,
    toothpastes, and linaments (*SRI). Not registered as a pesticide in the
    U.S. (USEPA/Pesticide Index 1985).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING .AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Keep unnecessary people away; isolate hazard area and deny entry.  Stay
    upwind; keep out of low areas. Ventilate closed spaces before entering
    them. Remote and isolate contaminated clothing at the site.  Do not
    touch spilled material; stop leak if you can do it without risk. Use water
    spray to reduce vapors. Small spills:  take up with sand or other
    non-combustible absorbent materal and place into containers for later
    disposal.  Large spills: dike far ahead of spill for later disposal (*DOT
    1984).

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  67-66-3
                                           Page 4 of 4

                                 CHLOROFORM

SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit. See the  introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.

    SUIT MATERIAL PERFORMANCE (Based on EPA/USCG "Guidelines", 1987)
                       (Chemical  Resistance/Amount of Data)

          Butyl                POOR/LIMITED*
          Butyl/Neoprene       POOR/LIMITED*
          CPE                 POOR/MANY
          Neoprene            POOR/MANY
          Nitrile               POOR/MANY
          PE                  POOR/MANY
          PVC                 POOR/MANY
          Saranex             POOR/MANY
          Teflon               GOOD/LIMITED
          Viton               GOOD/LIMITED
          Viton/Chlorobutyl    GOOD/LIMITED
          Viton/Neoprene       GOOD/LIMITED*

     *Based on qualitative performance information.
    "Based on a chemical analog.


SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure: Symptoms of acute exposure include
    fainting sensation, vomiting, dizziness, salivation, nausea, fatigue, and
    headache (*ACGIH  1971-1979).  Other symptoms are  respiratory depression,
    coma, kidney damage, and liver damage  (*IARC 1972-1985).  Liquid in the eye
    causes tearing and conjunctivitis (*Grant 1974). Symptoms of chronic
    exposure include loss of appetite, hallucinations, moodiness and physical
    and mental sluggishness (*NIOSH 1974.   Criteria for  a recommended standard
    occupational exposure to chloroform. DHEW Pub NIOSH 75-114).

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures: Move victim to fresh air; call
    emergency medical  care.  If not breathing, give artificial respiration. If
    breathing is difficult, give oxygen.  In case of  contact with material,
    immediately flush skin or eyes with running water for at least 15 minutes.
    Speed in removing material from skin is of extreme importance.  Remove and
    isolate contaminated clothing and shoes at the site.  Keep victim quiet and
    maintain normal body temperature. Effects may be  delayed; if0^> victim
    under observation (*DOT 1984).

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                                          CAS Registry Number: 70-69-9
                                          Page 1 of 3
                         EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                  Date: June 22, 1987
                                                  Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - PROPIOPHENONE, 4'-AMINO-

CAS Registry Number: 70-69-9

Synonyms: l-(4-Aminophenyl)-l-Propanone; p-Aminopropiophenone; PAPP;
Paraminopropiophenone; USAF UCTL-1856

Chemical Formula:  C9HUNO

Molecular Weight: 149.21


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

          Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:  LD50 oral (cat)
          5.6 mg/kg (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

          TPQ: 100/10,000 (pounds)

          RQ:  1 (pounds)
              (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

          Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Solid

    Boiling Point: Not Found

    Specific Gravity (H2O»1):  Not Found

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg): Not Found

    Melting Point: 284°F, 140°C (Merck 1983, p. 70)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l):  Not Found

    Solubility in Water: Soluble (Merck 1983, p. 70)

    Appearance and Odor:  Yellow needles (Merck 1983, p. 70)

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                                         CAS Registry Number: 70-69-9
                                         Page 2 of 3
                         PROPIOPHENONE, 4'-AMTNO-

SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL: Not Found

    ACGIH TLV:  Not Found

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended: Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Not Found
                   Skin: Not Found
                   Ingestion: Yes (Sax 1984, p. 245)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used):  Not Found

    Flammable Limits:
        LEL: Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods: Not Found

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  Not Found

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  Not Found

    NFPA Flammability Rating: Not Found


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable: Not Found
              Stable: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid): Not Found

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  Not Found

    Hazardous Polymerization: May Occur: Not Found
                            May Not Occur: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found

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                                          CAS Registry Number: 70-69-9
                                          Page 3 of 3
                         PROPIOPHENONE, 4'-AMINO-

SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Not Found
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Not Found
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.
SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure: Ingestion of large doses can cause
    cyanosis (Sax 1984, p. 245)

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures: Not Found
COMMENTS
    Sources searched but no information found:
       Farm Chemicals Handbook 1984
       Hayes 1982
       Worthing 1979
       Verschueren 1983
       Clayton and Clayton 1981-1982
       Weiss 1980
       Goodman and Oilman 1985
       Gosselin 1984
       Hawley 1981

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  71-63-6
                                            Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                    Date: October 31, 1985
                                                    Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - DIGITOXIN

CAS Registry Number:  71-63-6

Synonyms:  Acedoxin; Card-20(22)-Enolide, 3-((O-2,6-Dideoxy-beta-D-Ribo-
Hexopyranosyl-(Hexopyranosyl-(l-4)-2,6-Dideoxy-beta-D-Ribo-Hexopyranosyl)oxy)
-14-Hydroxy-, (3beta, 5beta)-; Cardigin; Carditoxin; Cristapurat; Crystalline
Digitalin; Crystodigin; Digilong; Digimed; Digimerck; Digisidin; Digitalin;
Digitaline Cristallisee; Digitaline Nativelle; Digitoksim; Digitophyllin;
Digitoxigenin Tridigitoxoside; Ditaven; Glucodigin; Lanatoxin; Myodigin;
Purodigin; Purpurid; Unidigin

Chemical Formula:  C41H64O13

Molecular Weight:  764.92


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:  LD50 oral  (cat)
           0.18 mg/kg  (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

           TPQ: 100/10,000 (pounds)

           RQ: 1  (pounds)
               (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

           Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II -  PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Solid

    Boiling Point:  Not Found

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1):  Not Found

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg): Not Found

    Melting Point:  493-495°F, 256-257°C (when anhydrous) (*Merck 1976)

    Vapor Density (AIR=»1):  Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate-1): Not Found

    Solubility in Water: 1 g in 100 liters at 20°C (*Merck 1976)

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 71-63-6
                                            Page 2 of 4

                                   DIGITOXIN

SECTION II   (continued)

    Appearance and Odor:  White or pale buff microcrystalline powder (*Osol
    1975); odorless (Merck 1983, p. 353)


SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV:  Not Found

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended:  Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Not Found
                     Skin:  Not Found
                     Ingestion:  Yes (*Gosselin 1976)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  Material is bioactive and
    capable of causing cardiac arrythmias and electrolyte imbalances that may
    be fatal.  Death is due to ventricular fibrillation or cardiac standstill
    (*Gosselin 1976). Material has a high toxicity hazard rating; it may cause
    death or permanent injury after a very short exposure (*Sax 1979).  It is
    classified as super toxic; an estimated single lethal dose is 3-10 mg
    (Gosselin 1984, p. 11-252).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure:  Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): Not Found
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL:  Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing  Methods:  (Non-Specific — Drugs or Medicines, Solid,
    n.o.s.) Extinguish fire using agent suitable for type of surrounding fire
    (material itself burns with difficulty.)  Use water  in flooding  quantities
    as fog. Use alcohol foam, carbon dioxide or dry chemical (Student  1981,
    p. 215).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  (Non-Specific — Drugs or Medicines,
    Solid, n.o.s.)  Avoid breathing dusts and fumes from burning material.
    Keep upwind.  Wear boots, protective gloves, and goggles (Student 1981, p.
    216).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  When heated to decomposition, it
    emits acrid smoke and  irritating fumes (Sax 1984,  p. 1035).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  Not Found

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  71-63-6
                                            Page 3 of 4
                                   DIGITOXIN

SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:  Not Found
              Stable: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Not Found

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  Not Found

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur: Not Found
                              May Not Occur: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found
SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION
    Material is a cardiotonic drug (*Goodman 1975).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    (Non-Specific — Drugs or Medicines, Solids, n.o.s.)  Keep upwind.
    Avoid bodily contact with the material. Wear full protective clothing.
    Wash away any material which may  have contacted the body with copious
    amounts of water or soap and water  (Student 1981, p. 216).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit. See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.
SECTION IX -- EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure:  Nausea and vomiting,  headache, malaise,
    fatigue, weakness, drowsiness, abdominal discomfort are symptomatic of
    toxicity.  Visual disturbances (reduction in visual acuity, illusions of
    flickering or shimmering lights, abnormal color vision) and emotional
    disorders (including confusion, disorientation, aphasia, delirium,
    hallucinations, and rarely convulsions) are also possible toxic effects
    (*Gosselin 1976; *Grant 1974).

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures:  (Non-Specific -- Medicines, n.o.s.)
    Move victim to fresh air; call emergency medical care.  If not breathing,
    give artificial  respiration. If breathing is difficult, give  oxygen. In
    case of contact with material, immediately flush skin or eyes with running
    water for at least IS minutes.  Remove and isolate contaminated clothing

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                                          CAS Registry Number:  71-63-6
                                          Page 4 of 4

                                  DIGITOXIN

SECTION IX   (continued)

    and shoes at the site. Keep victim quiet and maintain normal body
    temperature (DOT 1984, Guide 11).

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  72-20-8
                                            Page 1 of 4
                            EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                    Date: October 31, 1985
                                                    Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY -- ENDRIN

CAS Registry Number: 72-20-8

Synonyms:  1,4:5,8-Dimethanonaphthalene, 1,2,3,4,10,10-Hexachloro-6,7-Epoxy-
l,4,4a,5,6,7,8,8a-Octahydro-,endo,endo-; Compound 269; Endrex; Endricol; ENT
17,251; Experimental Insecticide 269; Hexachloroepoxyoctahydro-endo,endo-
Dimethanonaphthalene; Hexadrin; Mendrin; NCI-C00157; SD 3419; Oktanex; EN 57;
2,7:3,6-Dimethanonaphth[2,3-b]Oxirene, 3,4,5,6,9,9-Hexachloro-1 a,2,2a,
3,6,6a,7,7a-Octahydro-, (la.alpha., 2.beta., 2a.beta., 3.alpha., 6.alpha.,
6a.beta., 7.beta., 7a.alpha.)-; Nendrin;  1,2,3,4,10,10-Hexachloro-6,7-epoxy-
l,4,4a,5,6,7,8,8a-octahydro-endo,endo-l,4:5,8-dimethanonaphthalene; 1,2,3,4,
10,10-Hexachloro-6,7-epoxy-1,4,4a,5,6,7,8,8a-octahydro-endo-1,4-endo-5,8-
dimethanonaphthalene; 1,2,3,4,10,10-Hexachloro-6,7-epoxy-1,4,4a,5,6,7,8,8a-
octahydro-l,4:5,8-endo,endo-dimethanonaphthalene; NCI 01565; C00157; Isodrin
Epoxide; Endrical

Chemical Formula:  C12H8C16O

Molecular Weight:  380.90


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302: LD50 oral
           (mouse) 1.37 mg/kg (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

           TPQ: 500/10,000 (pounds)

           RQ: 1 (pounds)

           Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Solid

    Boiling Point:  Not Found

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1):  1.7 at 68°F, 20°C (*USEPA 1980)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg): 0.0000002 at 77°F, 25°C (*Worthing 1979)

    Melting Point: Decomposes at 473°F, 245°C (Merck 1983,  p. 517)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1): Not Found

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  72-20-8
                                           Page 2 of 4

                                    ENDRIN

SECTION II   (continued)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate-1): Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  Practically insoluble (*IARC 1972-1985)

    Appearance and Odor: White, crystalline solid; light tan color for
    technical grade (*NFPA 1978).  Odorless ("CHRIS 1978) or mild chemical odor
    for technical grade (*IARC 1972-1985).


SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  TWA 0.1 mg/m3 (skin) (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

    ACGIH TLV: TWA 0.1 mg/m3 (skin) (ACGIH 1986-87, p.18)

    IDLH: 200 mg/m3 (*NIH EPA,  OHM/TADS 1984)

    Other Limits Recommended:  STEL 0.5 mg/m3 for 30 minutes (Weiss 1980, p.
    402)

    Routes of Entry:  Inhalation: Yes  ("USEPA 1980)
                    Skin:  Yes (*NFPA 1978)
                    Ingestion:  Yes (*Gosselin 1976)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  This material is extremely
    toxic (*Gosselin 1976). It is rapidly absorbed through the skin (*NFPA
    1978). Symptoms appear between 20 minutes and 12 hours after exposure
    (*Gosselin  1976).  There is evidence that this material may cause
    chromosomal damage (*USEPA  1980).  Doses of 1 mg/kg can cause symptoms (Sax
    1984,  p.  1278).  It is a suspected carcinogen (Hawley 1981, p. 410).  Also,
    it is a central nervous system depressant and hepatotoxin (Farm Chemicals
    Handbook 1984, p. C-93).

    Medical  Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure: Pregnant women are
    considered to be at special risk  (*USEPA 1980).


SECTION IV -- FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used):  Commercial product may contain flammable
    liquid with flashpoint 80°F, 27°C (*NIH EPA, OHM/TADS  1984)
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL:  1.1% (commercial product) (Weiss 1980, p. 402)
        UEL:  7.0% (commercial product) (Weiss 1980, p. 402)

    Extinguishing Methods:  Use dry chemical, foam, carbon dioxide ("CHRIS
    1978), water spray for solution  (*NFPA 1978).  Small fires:  dry chemical,
    carbon dioxide, water spray, or foam. Large fires:  water spray, fog, or
    foam  (DOT 1984, Guide 55).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  Use water to keep fire-exposed
    containers cool (*NFPA 1978).  Keep unnecessary people away; isolate hazard
    area and deny entry. Stay upwind; keep out of low areas.  Ventilate closed

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 72-20-8
                                            Page 3 of 4

                                     ENDRIN

SECTION IV   (continued)

    spaces before entering them. Wear positive pressure breathing apparatus
    and special protective clothing.  Remove and isolate contaminated clothing
    at the site.  Move container from fire area if you can do it without risk.
    Fight fire from maximum distance.  Dike fire control water for later
    disposal; do not scatter the material (DOT 1984, Guide 55).

    Unusual Fire  and Explosion Hazards: Toxic hydrogen chloride and phosgene
    may  be generated when solution burns (*CHRIS 1978).

    NFPA Flammability Rating: 1 (solution); 0 (dry)


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:
               Stable:  Yes (*USEPA 1980)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Strong oxidizers, strong acids
    (*NIH EPA, OHM/TADS  1984),  and parathion (Sax 1984, p.  1279)

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  Toxic hydrogen chloride and
    phosgene may be generated when solutions burn (*CHRIS  1978).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:  Not Found
                              May Not Occur:  Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not found
SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    This material is used primarily as an insecticide for field crops
    (*Worthing 1979). Only cotton and bird perch uses  registered in the U.S.
    (USEPA/Pesticide Index 1985).
SECTION VII ~ PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    For leaks or spills, use water spray to disperse vapor and to flush spills
    (*NFPA 1978).  Liquid containing this material should be absorbed in
    vermiculite, dry sand, earth (*NIOSH/OSHA  1981). Do not touch spilled
    material; stop leak if you can do it without risk.  Small dry spills:  with
    clean shovel place material into clean, dry container and cover; move con-
    tainers from spill  area.  Large spills:  dike far ahead of spill for later
    disposal.  Keep unnecessary people away; isolate hazard area and deny
    entry.  Ventilate closed spaces before entering them. Remove and
    isolate contaminated clothing at the site  (DOT 1984, Guide 55).

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 72-20-8
                                            Page 4 of 4

                                     ENDRIN

SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.


SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure: It can cause death  by respiratory arrest.
    Symptoms include headache, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, tremors,
    convulsions, loss of consciousness, rise in blood pressure, fever, frothing
    of the mouth, deafness, coma, and death (*Gosselin  1976, Gosselin 1984, pp.
    11-285, III-143).

    Emergency and  First Aid Procedures: Move victim to fresh air; call
    emergency medical care. If not breathing, give artificial respiration.  If
    breathing is difficult, give oxygen.  In case  of contact with material,
    immediately flush skin or eyes with running water for at least 15 minutes.
    Speed in removing material from skin is of extreme importance.  Remove and
    isolate contaminated clothing and shoes at the site.  Keep victim quiet and
    maintain normal body temperature.  Effects may be delayed; keep victim
    under observation (DOT 1984, Guide 55).

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                                          CAS Registry Number: 74-83-9
                                          Page 1 of 4
                         EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                  Date: October 31, 1985
                                                  Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - METHYL BROMIDE

CAS Registry Number: 74-83-9

Synonyms: Brom-o-gas; Bromomethane; Curafume; Dowfume MC-2 Soil Fumigant;
Dowfume MC-33; Edco; Embafume; Halon 1001; Haltox; Iscobrome; Kayafume; MB;
MBX; MEBR; Metaf ume; Methane, Bromo-; Methogas; Monobromomethane; Pestmaster;
Prof ume; R 40B1; Rotox; Terabol; Terr-o-gas 100; Zytox

Chemical Formula: CH3Br

Molecular Weight:  94.95


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

          Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:

               Chemical does not meet  the toxicity criteria but because of its
               high production volume  and recognized toxicity it is considered
               a chemical of concern.

          TPQ: 1,000 (pounds)

          RQ:  1,000 (pounds)

          Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): Yes


SECTION II  - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical  State: Gas

    Boiling Point:  38.4°F, 3.56°C (*Weast 1979)

    Specific  Gravity  (H2O=1):  Liquid: 1.730 at 0°C/4°C (*Merck 1976)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  1420 at 20°C (*Merck 1976)

    Melting Point: -136°F, -93.6°C (*Merck 1976)

    Vapor Density (AIR»1):  3.27 (*NFPA 1978)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=»l):  Not Found

    Solubility in Water: 1.34 g/100 g at 25°C (*Worthing 1979)

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 74-83-9
                                            Page 2 of 4

                               METHYL BROMIDE

SECTION II   (continued)

    Appearance and Odor: Colorless gas; usually odorless, but has a sweetish
    chloroform-like odor at high concentrations (*Merck 1976).


SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Ceiling Concentration 80 mg/ms (20 ppm) (NIOSH 1987,p.  158)

    ACGIH TLV:  TWA 20 mg/ms (5 ppm) (ACGIH 1986-87, p.23)

    IDLH: 2,000 ppm (NIOSH/OSHA 1978, p. 126)

    Other Limits Recommended:  Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation: Yes (*Gosselin 1976)
                    Skin:  Yes (*Gosselin 1976)
                    Ingestion:  Not Found

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic): Methyl bromide is a
    dangerous cumulative poison with delayed symptoms of central nervous system
    intoxication that may appear as long as several months after exposure
    (*White-Stevens 1971). High concentrations can produce fatal pulmonary
    edema. Chronic exposure can cause central nervous system depression and
    kidney injury (*Merck 1976). It may cause severe and permanent brain
    damage. Severe neurological signs may appear when there is a sudden
    exposure to high concentrations following continuous slight  exposure
    (*Encyc Occupat Health  and Safety 1971). Methyl bromide has practically no
    odor or irritating effects and therefore no warning, even at hazardous
    concentrations (*Clayton and Clayton 1981-82).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure: Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): None (*Sax 1979)
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL:  10% (*Sax 1979)
        UEL:  16% (*Sax 1979)

    Extinguishing Methods:  Non-flammable in air; burns in oxygen (*Merck
    1976). Use water spray,  foam, carbon dioxide, or dry chemical (*NFPA
    1978).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures: Full protective clothing, including
    self-contained breathing apparatus, coat, pants, gloves, boots, and bands
    around legs, arms, and waist should be provided.  No skin surface should  be
    exposed (*NFPA 1978).   Move container from fire area if you can do it
    without risk.  Fight fire from maximum distance. Dike fire control water
    for later disposal; do not scatter the material (DOT 1984, Guide 55).

    Unusual Fire  and Explosion Hazards: When heated to decomposition, it
    emits toxic fumes of bromides (*Sax 1979).

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                                           CAS Registry Number. 74-83-9
                                           Page 3 of 4

                              METHYL BROMIDE

SECTION IV   (continued)

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  1


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability: Unstable:
              Stable: Yes (*NFPA 1978)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Not Found

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  When heated to decomposition, it
    emits toxic fumes of bromides (*Sax 1979).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:
                            May Not Occur: Yes (Weiss 1980, p. 603)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    This material is used as an insecticide, rodenticide, fumigant, and
    nematocide; as a chemical intermediate (*SRI); and as a fire extinguishing
    agent (""Clayton and Clayton 1981-82).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Remove all  ignition sources. Ventilate area of spill or leak,
    stop flow of gas or remove leaking cylinder to open air and
    repair leak or allow cylinder to empty.  If material is in the
    liquid form, allow it to vaporize  (*NIOSH/OSHA 1981).  Stay
    upwind, keep out of low areas. Use  water spray to reduce vapors
    (DOT 1984, Guide 55).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA  and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit. See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.

    SUIT MATERIAL PERFORMANCE (Based on EPA/USCG "Guidelines",  1987)
                       (Chemical Resistance/Amount of Data)

           Butyl                POOR/LIMITED*
           Neoprene            GOOD/LIMITED*

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                                        CAS Registry Number:  74-83-9
                                        Page 4 of 4
                            METHYL BROMIDE

SECTION VIII   (continued)

          Nitrile          GOOD/LIMITED*
          PE             POOR/LIMITED
          PVC            POOR/LIMITED*
          Saranex         GOOD/LIMITED
          Viton           GOOD/LIMITED*

    *Based on qualitative performance information.
    "Based on a chemical analog.


SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    See Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide

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                                            EFATG
                                            CAS Registry Number: 74-83-9
                                            Page 1 of 3
                      Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide
                                     for
                               METHYL BROMIDE

                                  (74-83-9)
     This guide  should not  be construed  to authorize  emergency personnel to
perform the procedures or activities indicated or implied.   Care of persons
exposed to toxic chemicals must be directed by a physician or other recognized
authority.
Substance Characteristics:

Pure Forms - Colorless, transparent, easily liquefied gas, or volatile liquid.

Odor - Usually odorless, chloroformlike odor at higher concentrations.

Commercial  Forms - 98% pure liquid  or gas in steel cylinders.

Uses - Organic synthesis, fumigation, fire  extinguishing, oil  extraction from
organic matter, pesticides, ionization  chambers.

Materials to  Avoid - Metals, oxidizers.

Other  Names -  Bromomethane,  Curafume, Dowfume, Embafume, Haltox, Iscobrome,
Kayafume,  Metafume,  Methogas, Monobromomethane, Pestmaste,  Profume, Rotox,
Terabol, Zytox.


Personal Protective Equipment:  See Chemical Profile Section VIII.


Emergency Life-Support Equipment and Supplies That May Be Required:

Compressed  oxygen, forced-oxygen  mask, soap,  water, normal saline, D5W,
Ringer's   lactate,   dimercaprol,   diazepam,   phenytoin,  phenobarbital,
aminophylline, furosemide.

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number: 74-83-9
                                             Page 2 of 3

                                METHYL BROMIDE

Signs and Symptoms of Acute Methyl Bromide Exposure:

Warning:  Effects may be delayed for hours to days.  Caution is advised.

Signs and symptoms  of  acute  exposure  to methyl bromide may be severe and
include tremors, convulsions, brain hemorrhage, paralysis, coma, and permanent
brain damage.  Respiratory effects include cough, tachypnea (rapid respiratory
rate), pulmonary edema, and respiratory collapse. Cyanosis  (blue tint to the
skin and  mucous membranes),  pallor, ventricular fibrillation, and circulatory
collapse may also occur.  Lethargy,  profound  weakness, headache, dizziness,
mental confusion,  slurring of  speech, staggering gait,  and blurred or double
vision are often found.

Gastrointestinal signs and symptoms include nausea,  vomiting,  abdominal pain,
and anorexia.  Oliguria  (scanty  urination), anuria  (lack of urine formation),
kidney hemorrhage, and kidney failure may occur.   Contact with  methyl bromide
may  cause  dermatitis (red, inflamed skin) and conjunctivitis (red, inflamed
eyes).


Emergency Life-Support Procedures:

Acute exposure to methyl bromide may require decontamination and life support
for  the   victims.    Emergency  personnel should  wear  protective  clothing
appropriate  to  the  type and  degree of  contamination.  Air-purifying or
supplied-air respiratory equipment should also be  worn, as necessary. Rescue
vehicles should carry supplies such as plastic sheeting  and disposable plastic
bags to assist in preventing spread of contamination.


Inhalation Exposure:

1.  Move victims to fresh air.  Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure
      to methyl bromide.

2.  Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate,  and note any
      trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide
      artificial respiration.  If breathing  is  labored,  administer oxygen or
      other respiratory support.

3.  Obtain authorization  and/or further  instructions from the  local hospital
      for  administration of an  antidote  or performance  of  other, invasive
      procedures.

4.  Transport to a health care facility.

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number: 74-83-9
                                             Page 3 of 3

                                METHYL BROMIDE
Dermal/Eye Exposure:

1.   Remove victims from  exposure.   Emergency personnel should avoid self-
     exposure to methyl bromide.

2.   Evaluate vital  signs including  pulse and  respiratory rate,  and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.  If breathing  is labored,  administer  oxygen or
     other respiratory support

3.   Remove contaminated clothing as soon as possible.

4.   If eye exposure has occurred, eyes must be flushed with lukewarm water for
     at least 15 minutes.

5.   Wash exposed skin areas twice with soap and water.

6.   Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from  the local hospital
     for administration  of  an antidote or  performance  of other invasive
     procedures.

7.   Transport to a health care facility.


Ingestion Exposure:  No information is available.

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 74-90-8
                                           Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                  Date: October 31, 1985
                                                  Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - HYDROCYANIC ACID

CAS Registry Number:  74-90-8

Synonyms: Hydrogen Cyanide; Prussic Acid; Aero Liquid HCN; Cyclon; Cyclone
B; Evercyn; Formic Anammonide; Formonitrile; Zaclondiscoids

Chemical Formula: HCN

Molecular Weight: 27.03


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

          Toxicity Value Used  for Listing Under Section 302:  LC50 inhalation
          (mouse) 0.357 mg/liter/5 minutes (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

          TPQ: 100 (pounds)

          RQ: 10 (pounds)

          Section 313  Listed (Yes or No): Yes


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL  CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Gas

    Boiling Point: 78.1°F, 25.6°C (*Merck 1976)

    Specific Gravity (H2O«1): 0.699 (liquid) (*Weast.l983)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  630 (*White-Stevens 1971)

    Melting Point:  7.9°F, -13.4°C (*Merck 1983)

    Vapor Density (AIR-1):  0.901 g/1 (*Weast 1983)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=»l):  Not Found

    Solubility in Water: Miscible with water (*Merck 1976)

    Appearance and Odor: Colorless gas or liquid; bitter almond odor (*Merck
    1976; *CHRIS 1978)

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  74-90-8
                                            Page 2 of 4

                               HYDROCYANIC ACID

SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL: 10 ppm (11 mg/m3), as cyanide (NIOSH  1987 p. 138)

    ACGIH TLV: Ceiling 10 mg/m3 (10 ppm) (skin) (ACGIH 1986-87 p. 20)

    IDLH: 50 ppm, as cyanide (NIOSH 1987, p.  138)

    Other Limits Recommended:  NIOSH: 5 mg/m3 (4.7 ppm) (CN) 10 minute ceiling
    (NIOSH 1987, p.  138)

    Routes of Entry:  Inhalation:  Yes (*Goodman 1975)
                     Skin:  Yes  (*Encyc Occupat Health and Safety 1983)
                     Ingestion:  Yes (*Gosselin  1976)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  It is super toxic.
    Breathing in a small amount  of the gas or swallowing a very small  amount
    may be fatal (*NFPA 1978; *Gosselin 1976).  Average fatal dose is 50-60 mg.
    A few minutes of exposure to 300 ppm may  result in death.  Exposure to 150
    ppm for 1/2 to 1 hour may endanger life (Merck 1983, p. 696).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure:  Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used):  0°F, -18°C (CC) (*NFPA 1978)
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL:  5.6% (*NFPA  1978)
        UEL:  40.0% (*NFPA 1978)

    Extinguishing Methods:  Use  dry chemicals, alcohol foam, or carbon dioxide
    (*NFPA 1978). Small fires:  let burn unless leak can be stopped
    immediately.  Large fires:  water spray, fog or foam. Move container from
    fire area if you can do it without risk. Stay away from ends of tanks.
    Withdraw immediately in case of rising sound from venting safety  device or
    any discoloration of tank due to  fire.  Cool container with water using
    unmanned device until well after fire is out. Isolate area until gas has
    dispersed (*DOT 1984).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  Firefighting should be done from a safe
    distance. A few whiffs of gas, or liquid penetrating firefighter's
    protective clothing, could be fatal.  Only special protective clothing
    should be worn.  Water spray should be used  to keep containers cool (*NFPA
    1978).  Keep unnecessary people away; isolate hazard area and deny entry.
    Stay upwind; keep out of low areas.  Ventilate closed spaces before
    entering them. Wear positive pressure breathing apparatus and special
    protective clothing.  Evacuate area endangered by gas.  Isolate for  1/2
    mile in all  directions if tank car or truck is involved in fire (*DOT
    1984).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  Unstabilized hydrocyanic acid may
    polymerize spontaneously with explosive violence (*Hawley 1981).  Flashback
    along vapor trail may occur (*CHRIS  1978).  The explosion hazard  is severe
    when this material is exposed to  heat, flame, or oxidizers (*Sax 1975). It

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  74-90-8
                                            Page 3 of 4

                                HYDROCYANIC ACID

SECTION IV   (continued)

    forms explosive mixtures with air, and will react with water, steam, acid,
    or acid fumes to produce highly toxic fumes of cyanides. It may decompose
    explosively upon contact with alkaline material (Sax 1984, p. 1548).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  4


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:  Yes (*Hawley 1981)
               Stable:

        Conditions to Avoid: Hydrocyanic acid solution is sensitive to light
        (*Hawley 1977).  It may become unstable and subject to explosion if
        stored for an extended time or exposed to high temperature and pressure
        ("CHRIS 1978). Avoid heat, flame or oxidizers (Sax 1984, p. 1548).

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Acetylaldehyde, alkaline  materials,
    oxidizers,  water, steam, acid, and acid fumes (Sax 1984, p. 1548)

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  Toxic cyanide fumes (Sax 1984, p.
    1548)

    Hazardous Polymerization: May Occur:  Yes (*Hawley 1981)
                             May Not Occur:

        Conditions to Avoid: Unstabilized hydrocyanic acid may polymerize
        spontaneously with explosive violence  (*Hawley 1981). Can polymerize
        at 50-60°C or when catalyzed with traces of alkali (Sax 1984, p.
        1548).


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

   j Hydrogen  cyanide is used as a rodent poison and as a fumigant (*Rossoff
   *1974). It is a chemical intermediate in the manufacture  of acrylates,
    methacrylates, hexamethylenediamine, nitriles,  and other materials (*Patty
    1963). It is also used in  metal polishes, electroplating solutions, and
    metallurgical and photographic processes (*Gosselin 1976).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Stay upwind; keep out of low areas. Ventilate closed spaces before
    entering. Use water spray to reduce vapors.  Do not touch spilled
    material; stop leak if you can do it without risk.  Shut off ignition;
    no flares, smoking, or flames in hazard area.  Isolate area until gas
    dispersed (*DOT 1984)

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                                          .CAS Registry Number:  74-90-8
                                          Page 4 of 4

                              HYDROCYANIC ACID

SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.

    SUIT MATERIAL PERFORMANCE (Based on EPA/USCG "Guidelines", 1987)
                      (Chemical Resistance/Amount of Data)

          Butyl                GOOD/LIMITED
          Neoprene             GOOD/LIMITED*
          PE                  GOOD/LIMITED
          PVC                 POOR/LIMITED
          Viton                GOOD/LIMITED*

     *Based on qualitative performance information.
    **Based on a chemical analog.


SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    See Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  74-90-8
                                             Page 1 of 4
                      Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide
                                      for
                      HYDROCYANIC ACID (HYDROGEN CYANIDE)

                                   (74-90-8)
     This guide should not  be construed  to authorize  emergency personnel to
perform the procedures or  activities indicated or implied.   Care of persons
exposed to toxic chemicals must be directed by a physician or other recognized
authority.

Caution:    Hydrocyanic acid  toxicity  can occur via ingestion, dermal/eye
contact, or inhalation; death  may occur within minutes.  IMMEDIATELY begin
administering 100% oxygen and RUSH victims to a health care facility.
Substance Characteristics:

Pure Forms - Colorless gas or water-white liquid below -13 degrees C
(8 degrees F).

Odor - Bitter, almondlike.

Commercial Forms - 96 to 99% pure in 2, 5, and 10% solutions with  a stabilizer
in bottles, steel cylinders, and tank cars.

Uses  -  Rodenticide,  fumigant, . chemical  intermediate,  metallurgy  and
photography, constituent in metal polishes and electroplating solutions.

Other Names - Cyclon, formonitrile, hydrogen cyanide, prussic acid.


Personal Protective Equipment:   See Chemical Profile Section VIII.


Emergency Life-Support Equipment and Supplies That May Be Required:

Compressed oxygen,  forced-oxygen mask, soap, water, activated charcoal, saline
cathartic or sorbitol, normal saline, D5W, Ringer's lactate, cyanide  antidote
kit (amyl  nitrite ampule,  sodium  nitrite,  sodium  thiosulfate),   sodium
bicarbonate, diazepam, phenytoin.

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  74-90-8
                                             Page 2 of 4

                      HYDROCYANIC ACID (HYDROGEN CYANIDE)

Signs and Symptoms of Acute Hydrocyanic Acid Exposure:

Warning:   Hydrocyanic  acid  may  be fatal if inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed
through skin or mucous  membranes.- Caution is advised.

Signs and symptoms  of acute exposure  to hydrocyanic  acid may include
hypertension (high blood pressure) and tachycardia (rapid heart rate), followed
by hypotension (low blood pressure) and bradycardia (slow heart rate).  Cherry
red mucous  membranes and  blood may be noted.   Cardiac arrhythmias  and other
cardiac abnormalities are common. Cyanosis (blue tint  to the  skin and mucous
membranes) may be observed.

Weakness,  headache, vertigo  (dizziness),  agitation,  giddiness, salivation,
nausea, and vomiting,  may  be  followed  by combative  behavior, convulsions,
paralysis, protruding  eyeballs,  dilated and  unreactive  pupils,  and coma.
Tachypnea (rapid, shallow respirations) or  hyperpnea (rapid, deep respirations)
may be followed by respiratory depression.  Lung hemorrhage and pulmonary edema
may also occur.

Hydrocyanic acid is may be irritating to the skin, eyes, and mucous membranes.
Lacrimation  (tearing)  and  a  burning  sensation  of the mouth and throat are
common.


Emergency Life-Support  Procedures:

Acute exposure to hydrocyanic acid may require decontamination and life support
for the  victims.   All exposed  persons  should be transported to a health care
facility as quickly as  possible.  Emergency personnel should wear protective
clothing  appropriate to the type and  degree of contamination. Air-purifying or
supplied-air respiratory equipment should also be  worn, as necessary.  Rescue
vehicles should  carry  supplies such as plastic sheeting and disposable plastic
bags to assist in preventing spread of contamination.


Inhalation Exposure:

1.  Move victims to fresh air. Emergency  personnel should avoid self-exposure
      to hydrocyanic acid.

2.  Evaluate vital  signs including  pulse and respiratory rate,  and note any
      trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not  breathing, provide
      artificial respiration.   IMMEDIATELY  begin administering  100% oxygen to
      all  victims.  Monitor victims for respiratory distress.

      Warning:  To prevent self-poisoning, avoid mouth-to-mouth breathing; use
      a  forced-oxygen  mask.   Direct  oral contact  with  hydrocyanic  acid-
      contaminated  persons or  their  gastric  contents can  result in self-
      poisoning.

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                                              EFATG
                                              CAS Registry Number:  74-90-8
                                              Page 3 of 4

                      HYDROCYANIC ACID (HYDROGEN CYANIDE)

3.    RUSH  to a health care facility!

4.    Obtain authorization and/or further  instructions from   the  local hospital
     for  administration   of  an  antidote  or  performance   of   other invasive
     procedures.


Dermal/Eye Exposure:

1.   Remove victims from exposure.    Emergency personnel should avoid self-
     exposure to hydrocyanic acid.

2.   Evaluate vital  signs including pulse and  respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not  breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.  IMMEDIATELY  begin administering  100% oxygen to
     all victims.  Monitor victims for respiratory distress.

     Warning:  To prevent self-poisoning, avoid mouth-to-mouth breathing;  use
     a  forced-oxygen  mask.   Direct oral contact  with hydrocyanic acid-
     contaminated   persons or  their  gastric  contents  can result  in self-
     poisoning.

3.   RUSH to a health  care facility!

4.   Remove contaminated clothing as soon as possible.

5.   If eye exposure has occurred, eyes must be flushed with lukewarm water for
     at least 15 minutes.

6.   Wash exposed skin areas  twice with soap and water.

7.   Obtain authorization  and/or further  instructions from the local hospital
     for  administration  of  an  antidote or  performance  of  other invasive
     procedures.


Ingestion Exposure:

1.   Evaluate vital  signs including pulse and  respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not  breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.  IMMEDIATELY  begin administering  100% oxygen to
     all victims.  Monitor victims for respiratory distress.

     Warning:  To prevent self-poisoning, avoid mouth-to-mouth breathing;  use a
     forced-oxygen mask.   Direct  oral contact   with  hydrocyanic acid-
     contaminated   persons or  their  gastric  contents  can result  in self-
     poisoning.

2.   RUSH to a health  care facility!

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number: 74-90-8
                                             Page 4 of 4

                      HYDROCYANIC ACID (HYDROGEN CYANIDE)

3.   DO NOT induce vomiting or attempt to neutralize!

4.   Obtain authorization  and/or further  instructions from the local hospital
     for administration  of  an  antidote  or  performance  of other invasive
     procedures.

5.   Activated charcoal may be administered if victims are conscious and alert.
     Use 15 to 30 g (1/2 to 1 oz) for children, 50 to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz)
     for adults, with 125 to 250 mL (1/2 to 1 cup) of water.

6.   Promote  excretion  by administering  a  saline  cathartic or sorbitol to
     conscious and alert victims.  Children require 15 to 30  g (1/2 to 1 oz)  of
     cathartic; 50 to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz) is recommended for adults.

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 74-93-1
                                           Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                  Date: October 31,  1985
                                                  Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - METHYL MERCAPTAN

CAS Registry Number: 74-93-1

Synonyms: Mercaptomethane; Methanethiol; Methyl Sulfhydrate; Thiomethanol;
Thiomethyl Alcohol

Chemical Formula:  CH4S

Molecular Weight: 48.11


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

          Toxicity  Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:  LCSO inhalation
          (mouse) 0.0065 mg/liter/2 hours (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

          TPQ: 500 (pounds)

          RQ: 100  (pounds)

          Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Gas

    Boiling Point: 42.7°F, 5.95°C (*Merck 1983)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1):  0.8665 at 20°C/4°C (*Merck 1983)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  1 at -90.7°C;  10 at -67.5°C; 40 at -49.2°C; 100 at
    -34.8°C; 400 at -7.9°C; 760 at 6.8°C (*Weast 1979)

    Melting Point: -189.4°F, -123°C (*Merck 1983)

    Vapor Density (AIR-1):  1.66 (*Sax 1984)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetates!): Not Found

    Solubility in Water: 23.30 g/liter (*Merck 1983)

    Appearance and  Odor:  Water-white liquid when below boiling point, or
    colorless gas (*Hawley 1981); odor of rotten cabbage (*Merck 1983)

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  74-93-1
                                            Page 2 of 4

                               METHYL MERCAPTAN

SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Ceiling 20 mg/ms (10 ppm) 15 minute (NIOSH/OSHA 1978, p.
    130)

    ACGIH  TLV:  TWA 1 mg/m3 (0.5 ppm) (*ACGIH 1983)

    IDLH: 400 ppm (*Encyc Occupat Health and Safety 1983)

    Other Limits Recommended:  Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Yes (Weiss 1980, p. 618)
                    Skin: Yes (*Rumack 1975 to Present)
                    Ingestion:  Not Found

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  Can cause death by
    respiratory paralysis (*ACGIH  1980).  It is an eye and respiratory tract
    irritant. Exposure  results in pulmonary edema and hepatic and renal damage
    (Clayton and Clayton 1981-82, p. 2067).

    Medical  Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure:  Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): 0°F, -18°C (*Sunshine 1969)
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL:  3.9% (Weiss 1980, p. 618)
        UEL:  21.8% (Weiss 1980, p. 618)

    Extinguishing Methods: Small fires: let burn unless  leak can be stopped
    immediately.  Large fires:  water spray, fog, or foam. Move container from
    fire area if you can do so without risk. Stay away from ends of tanks.
    Withdraw immediately in case of rising sound from venting safety device or
    any discoloration of tank due to fire.  Cool container with water using
    unmanned device until well after fire  is out. Isolate area until gas has
    dispersed (DOT 1984, Guide  13).  Preferably let fire  burn, stop  gas flow.
    Fires  may be extinguished with dry chemical, foam,  or carbon dioxide (Weiss
    1980,  p.  618).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  Keep unnecessary people away; isolate
    hazard area and deny entry. Stay upwind; keep out  of low areas. Ventilate
    closed spaces before entering them. Wear positive pressure  breathing
    apparatus and special protective clothing. Evacuate  area endangered by
    gas.  Isolate for 1/2 mile in all directions if tank car or truck is
    involved in fire (DOT 1984, Guide 13).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  Combustion produces irritating sulfur
    dioxide.  Flash back along vapor track may occur (*CHRIS 1978), Very
    dangerous when exposed to heat, flame, or oxidizers.  On decomposition it
    emits highly toxic fumes of sulfur oxides.  It will react with water, steam
    or acids to produce toxic and flammable vapors; and can react vigorously
    with oxidizing materials (Sax 1984, p.  1764).

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  74-93-1
                                            Page 3 of 4

                               METHYL MERCAPTAN

SECTION IV   (continued)

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  4


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability: Unstable:
               Stable: Yes (*CHRIS 1978)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Direct sunlight, and areas of high fire hazards
        (*Sax 1968)

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Incompatible with mercuric oxide
    and oxidizing materials (Sax 1984, p.  1764).

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  Irritating sulfur dioxide is
    produced upon combustion (Weiss 1980, p. 618). When heated  to
    decomposition, it emits highly toxic fumes and flammable vapors (Sax 1984,
    p. 1764).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:
                             May Not Occur:  Yes (Weiss 1980,  p. 618)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Manufacturing of pesticides (*Merck  1983); chemical intermediate for
    Pharmaceuticals; dimethyl sulfide; fungicides; methionine; in  jet fuels; in
    preparation of plastics (*SRI); and as a gas odorant to serve as a warning
    property for odorless but hazardous gases (*Clayton and Clayton 1981-82).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is  Released or Spilled)

    Keep unnecessary people away; isolate hazard area and deny entry.  Stay
    upwind; keep out of low areas. Ventilate closed spaces before entering
    them. Do not touch spilled material; stop leak if you can do so
    without risk.  Shut off ignition sources; no flares, smoking, or flames in
    hazard area.  Use water spray to reduce vapors.  Isolate, area until gas has
    dispersed (DOT 1984, Guide  13).  Avoid breathing vapors (see Section III
    above).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at the
    beginning  of the profiles for additional information.

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                                      CAS Registry Number: 74-93-1
                                      Page 4 of 4
                           METHYL MERCAPTAN

SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

   See Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide

 image: 






                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  74-93-1
                                             Page 1 of 4
                      Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide
                                      for
                               METHYL MERCAPTAN

                                   (74-93-1)
     This guide should not  be construed  to authorize  emergency personnel to
perform the procedures or  activities indicated or implied.   Care of persons
exposed to toxic chemicals must be directed by a physician or other recognized
authority.
Substance Characteristics:

Pure Forms - Colorless gas, or water-white liquid below 6 degrees C
(43 degrees F) or under pressure.

Odor - Similar to rotten cabbage.

Commercial Form - 98% pure liquefied gas in 180-lb cylinders or tank cars.

Uses -  Manufacture  of  pesticides,  fungicides,  Pharmaceuticals, methionine,
dimethyl sulfide, plastics, jet fuels, gas odorant for odorless but hazardous
gases.

Materials to Avoid - Mercuric oxide, oxidizers, bleaches.

Caution: Highly  flammable.   Cylinders  may  explode  when  exposed to high
temperatures  or  fire.   Avoid sources of extreme heat or ignition including
sparks or fire. Combustion produces irritating sulfur oxides.

Other Names - Mercaptomethane, methanethiol, methyl  sulfhydrate, thiomethanol,
thiomethyl alcohol.


Personal Protective  Equipment:  See Chemical Profile Section VIII.


Emergency Life-Support Equipment and Supplies That May Be Required:

Compressed oxygen,  forced-oxygen mask, soap, water, syrup of Ipecac, activated
charcoal, saline cathartic or sorbitol, normal  saline, D5W,  Ringer's lactate,
diazepam, phenytoin, dopamine, amyl nitrite, sodium nitrite, atropine.

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number: 74-93-1
                                             Page 2 of 4

                               METHYL MERCAPTAN

Signs and Symptoms of Acute Methyl Mercaptan Exposure:

Warning:  Effects may be delayed.  Caution is advised.

Signs and symptoms of acute exposure to methyl  mercaptan may include fever,
cough, shortness of  breath, a feeling of tightness and burning in the chest,
pulmonary edema,  respiratory distress,  respiratory paralysis, and respiratory
failure/collapse.

Headache,  loss  of  the sense of  smell, dizziness,  staggering gait, and
heightened emotions may occur.   Memory loss,  damage  to the central and
peripheral nervous systems,  tremor, convulsions, and coma  may  also occur.
Gastrointestinal symptoms include  difficulty swallowing, redness of the tongue
and  pharynx,  nausea,  vomiting,  abdominal  pain,  and diarrhea.   Urinary
disturbances may also be found.   Methyl mercaptan  may irritate the eyes and
mucous membranes.


Emergency Life-Support Procedures:

Acute exposure to methyl mercaptan may require decontamination and life support
for  the   victims.   Emergency  personnel  should  wear protective clothing
appropriate  to  the  type and  degree of  contamination.   Air-purifying or
supplied-air respiratory equipment should  also be worn, as  necessary. Rescue
vehicles should carry supplies such  as plastic sheeting  and disposable plastic
bags to assist in preventing spread  of contamination.


Inhalation Exposure:

1.   Move victims to fresh air.  Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure
     to methyl mercaptan.

2.   Evaluate vital signs including  pulse and  respiratory rate,  and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration. If breathing  is labored,  administer  oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.   Obtain authorization  and/or further instructions from  the local hospital
     for  administration  of  an antidote or  performance  of other invasive
     procedures.

4.   RUSH to a health care facility.
Dermal/Eye Exposure:

1.  Remove  victims  from  exposure.   Emergency personnel should avoid self-
     exposure to methyl mercaptan.

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  74-93-1
                                             Page 3 of 4

                               METHYL MERCAPTAN
             ,*

2.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and  respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.  If breathing is  labored,  administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.   Remove contaminated clothing as soon as  possible.

4.   If eye exposure has occurred, eyes must be flushed with lukewarm water for
     at least 15 minutes.

5.   Wash exposed skin areas THOROUGHLY  with soap and water.

6.   Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration of  an  antidote  or  performance of other invasive
     procedures.

7.   RUSH  to a health care facility.


Ingestion Exposure:

1.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and  respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.  If breathing is  labored,  administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

2.   Obtain authorization  and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration of  an  antidote  or  performance of other invasive
     procedures.

3.   Vomiting may be induced  with  syrup  of Ipecac. If elapsed time since
     ingestion of methyl mercaptan  is unknown or suspected to be greater than
     30 minutes, do not induce vomiting and  proceed to Step  4.   Ipecac should
     not be administered to children under 6  months  of age.

     Warning:   Ingestion  of methyl  mercaptan  may result in sudden onset of
     seizures or  loss  of   consciousness.    Syrup  of   Ipecac  should be
     administered only  if victims  are alert,  have  an active gag-reflex, and
     show no signs of impending seizure or coma.   If ANY uncertainty exists,
     proceed to Step 4.

     The following  dosages  of  Ipecac are  recommended:   children up to 1 year
     old, 10 mL (1/3  oz); children 1  to 12 years old, 15  mL (1/2 oz); adults,
     30 mL  (1 oz).   Ambulate  (walk) the victims and give large quantities of
     water.  If vomiting has  not  occurred  after  15  minutes, Ipecac  may be
     readministered.   Continue to ambulate  and give water to the victims. If
     vomiting has not occurred within 15 minutes after second administration of
     Ipecac,  administer activated charcoal.

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number: 74-93-1
                                             Page 4 of 4
          *
                               METHYL MERCAPTAN

4.   Activated charcoal may be administered if victims are conscious and alert.
     Use 15 to  30 g (1/2 to  1 oz) for children, 50 to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz)
     for adults, with  125 to 250 mL (1/2 to 1 cup) of water.

5.   Promote  excretion  by  administering  a saline  cathartic or sorbitol to
     conscious  and alert victims.  Children require 15 to 30 g (1/2 to 1 oz)
     of cathartic; 50 to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz) is recommended for adults.

6.   RUSH to a  health care facility.

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 75-15-0
                                           Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY -- CARBON DISULFIDE

CAS Registry Number: 75-15-0

Synonyms: Carbon Bisulfide; Carbon Bisulphide; Carbon Disulphide; Carbon
Sulfide; Dithiocarbonic Anhydride; NCI-C04591; Sulphocarbonic Anhydride;
Sulphuret of Carbon; Weeviltox

Chemical Formula: CS2

Molecular Weight: 76.13


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

          Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:

               Chemical does not meet the toxicity criteria but because of its
               high production volume and recognized toxicity it is considered
               a chemical of concern.

          TPQ: 10,000 (pounds)

          RQ: 100  (pounds)

          Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): Yes


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point: 116°F, 46.5°C (*Merck  1983)

    Specific  Gravity (H2O-1): 1.2632 at 20°C/4°C (*Merck 1983)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  360 at 25°C (*Sunshine 1969)

    Melting Point:  -167°F, -110.8°C (*Weast 1979)

    Vapor Density (AIR-1):  2.67 (*Merck 1983)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  0.294% at 20°C (*Merck 1983)

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 75-15-0
                                           Page 2 of 4

                               CARBON DISULFIDE

SECTION II   (continued)

    Appearance and Odor: Mobile clear or faintly yellow liquid; reagent and
    commercial grades are foul smelling. Pure distillates have sweet, pleasing
    ethereal odor (*Merck 1983)


SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL: TWA 20  ppm; Ceiling Concentration 30 ppm; Peak
    Concentration 100 ppm/30 minutes/8 hours (*NIOSH 1985)

    ACGIH TLV: 30 mg/ms (lOppm) (skin) (*ACGIH 1980)

    IDLH: 500 ppm (NIOSH/OSHA 1978, p. 60)

    Other Limits Recommended:  NIOSH: 10 hour TWA 1  ppm; Ceiling Concentration
    10 ppm/15 minutes (NIOSH  1987 p.72); EEGL 50.0 ppm (60 minutes) (NRC 1984a,
    pp. 41-56)

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation: Yes (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)
                    Skin: Yes (*Gosselin 1976)
                    Ingestion: Yes (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic): The material affects the
    central nervous  system, cardiovascular system, eyes, kidneys, liver, and
    skin.  It may be absorbed through the skin as a vapor or liquid, inhaled or
    ingested.  The probable oral lethal dose for a human is between 0.5 and 5
    g/kg or between 1 ounce and 1  pint (or 1 pound) for a 70 kg (150 Ib.)
    person (*Gosselin 1976).  In  chronic exposures, the central nervous system
    is damaged and  results in the disturbance of vision and sensory changes as
    the most common early symptoms (Sax 1984,  p. 641).  Lowest lethal dose for
    humans has been reported at 14 mg/kg or 0.98 grams for  a 70 kg person
    (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985).

    Medical  Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure: Alcoholics and those
    suffering from neuropsychic trouble are at special risk (*LeFaux  1968).


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used):  -22°F, -30°C (CC) (Merck 1983,  p. 251)
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL:  1.3%  (*Merck 1983);  1% (*Sunshine 1969)
        UEL:  50% (*Merck 1983); 44% (*Sunshine 1969)

    Extinguishing Methods: Use dry chemical, carbon dioxide or other inert
    gas.  Cooling and blanketing with water spray is effective in case of fires
    in metal containers or tanks to  help prevent  reignition by hot surfaces.
    Foam is ineffective (NFPA  1984, p. 49-27).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures: If the vapor concentration exceeds 2
    percent by volume  or is unknown, self-contained breathing mask with.full
    face should be used by all persons entering contaminated area ("CHRIS

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 75-15-0
                                            Page 3 of 4

                               CARBON BISULFIDE

SECTION IV   (continued)

    1978).  Wear special protective clothing.  Isolate for 1/2 mile in all
    directions if tank car or truck is involved in fire (DOT 1984, Guide 28).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards: Ignition temperature dangerously low:
    212°F,  100°C (Merck 1983, p. 251).  Vapors may be ignited by contact with
    ordinary light  bulb (*NPFA 1978);  when heated to decomposition, it emits
    highly  toxic fumes of oxides of sulfur (*Sax  1979).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  3


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable: Yes (Merck 1983, p. 251)
               Stable:

        Conditions to Avoid:  Decomposes on standing for a long time (Merck
        1983,  p. 251)

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid): Air, rust, halogens, metal azides,
    metals, oxidants; when exposed to heat or flame reacts violently with
    aluminum, chlorine, azides, hypochlorite, ethylamine diamine, ethylene
    imine,  fluorine, metallic azides of lithium, potassium, cesium, rubidium
    and sodium, nitrogen oxides, potassium, zinc  and (sulfuric acid plus
    permanganate) (Sax 1984, p. 641).

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  When heated to decomposition,
    emits highly toxic fumes of sulfur  oxides and can react vigorously with
    oxidizing  materials (Sax 1984, p. 642).

    Hazardous Polymerization: May Occur:  Not Found
                              May Not Occur:  Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found
SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Carbon disulfide is used in the manufacture of soil disinfectants and
    vacuum tubes and is used as a solvent for cleaning and extractions,
    especially in metal treatment and plating.  It is a fumigant for
    commodities, a corrosion inhibitor, and a polymerization inhibitor for
    vinyl chloride (*SRI).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    In case of a spill: (1) remove all ignition sources, (2) ventilate area of
    spill or leak, and (3) for small quantities, absorb on paper towels.
    Evaporate the spills in a safe place, such as a fume hood. Large
    quantities can be reclaimed or collected and atomized in a suitable
    combustion chamber equipped with an appropriate effluent  gas-cleaning

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  75-15-0
                                           Page 4 of 4

                              CARBON DISULFIDE

SECTION VII   (continued)

    device (*NIOSH/OSHA 1981). If carbon disulfide is spilled in water,
    neutralize with agricultural lime, crushed limestone, or sodium
    bicarbonate.  If dissolved, apply activated carbon at ten times the spilled
    amount. Use mechanical dredges or lifts to remove immobilized masses of
    pollutants and precipitates (Student 1981, p. 106).  Do not touch spilled
    material; stop leak if you can do it without risk. Use water spray to
    reduce vapors (DOT 1984, Guide 28).


SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape  SCBA and  a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit. See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.

    SUIT MATERIAL  PERFORMANCE (Based  on EPA/USCG  "Guidelines", 1987)
                       (Chemical Resistance/Amount of Data)

           Butyl                POOR/MANY
           CPE                 POOR/MANY
           Neoprene             POOR/LIMITED*
           Nitrile               POOR/MANY
           PE                  POOR/MANY
           PVC                 POOR/LIMITED*
           Teflon               POOR/LIMITED
           Viton                EXCELLENT/MANY
           Viton/Chlorobutyl    POOR/MANY

     *Based on qualitative performance information.
    **Based on a chemical analog.


SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    See Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  75-15-0
                                             Page 1 of 3
                      Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide
                                      for
                               CARBON BISULFIDE

                                   (75-15-0)
     This guide should not  be construed  to authorize  emergency personnel to
perform the procedures or  activities indicated or implied.   Care of persons
exposed to toxic chemicals must be directed by a physician or other recognized
authority.
Substance Characteristics:

Pure Form - Clear, colorless, or faintly yellow, mobile liquid.

Odor - Slight, sweetly pleasant, ethereal (commercial form is foul smelling).

Commercial Form - Azeotrope with water  containing  97.2%  carbon disulfide in
drums  or tank cars.

Uses - Solvent,  chemical  intermediate;  polymerization inhibitor; corrosion
inhibitor; agent in metal  treatment; anthelmintic; fumigant;  manufacture of
soil disinfectants, vacuum tubes, and flotation devices.

Caution:   Flammable  liquid.   Avoid  sources of extreme  heat or ignition
including sparks or fire.

Other Names  -  Carbon  bisulfide,  carbon  sulfide,  dithiocarbonic anhydride,
sulphocarbonic anhydride, Weeviltox.


Personal Protective Equipment: See  Chemical Profile Section VIII.


Emergency Life-Support Equipment and Supplies That May Be Required:

Compressed oxygen, forced-oxygen mask,  soap, alcohol, water, milk, activated
charcoal, saline cathartic or sorbitol, normal  saline, D5W,  Ringer's lactate,
diazepam, phenytoin, phenobarbitol, Vitamin B6, urea.

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  75-15-0
                                             Page 2 of 3

                              , CARBON DISULFIDE

Signs and Symptoms of Acute Carbon Disulfide Exposure:

Warning:  Effects may be delayed.  Caution is advised.

Acute exposure to  carbon  disulfide primarily  affects  the central nervous
system producing signs and  symptoms that may  include headache, dizziness,
difficulty  swallowing, nervousness,  tremors,  mental depression, delirium,
psychosis, convulsions, paralysis, and coma. Nausea, vomiting, cyanosis (blue
tint to skin and  mucous membranes), hypothermia (low  body temperature), and
peripheral vascular collapse may also occur.

Respiratory effects include  coughing,  dyspnea  (shortness of  breath), and
respiratory  failure.    Carbon  disulfide  is  a  strong skin irritant; dermal
exposure may result in severe burns.   Eye exposure may  cause degeneration of
the retina and optic nerve.  Pupils may be dilated.


Emergency Life-Support Procedures:

Acute exposure to  carbon disulfide may require decontamination and life support
for the  victims.   Emergency personnel  should wear   protective  clothing
appropriate to  the  type  and degree  of contamination.   Air-purifying  or
supplied-air respiratory equipment should also be  worn, as necessary.  Rescue
vehicles should  carry supplies such as plastic sheeting and disposable plastic
bags to assist in preventing spread of contamination.


Inhalation Exposure:

1.   Move victims to fresh air.  Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure
      to carbon disulfide.

2.   Evaluate vital signs including  pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
      trauma. If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not  breathing, provide
      artificial  respiration.    If  breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
      other respiratory support.

3.   Obtain authorization and/or further  instructions from the local hospital
      for  administration of an  antidote or performance  of  other invasive
      procedures.

4.   Transport to a health care  facility.
Dermal/Eye Exposure:

1.  Remove victims from exposure.   Emergency  personnel should  avoid self-
     exposure to carbon disulfide.

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                                              EFATG
                                           '   CAS Registry Number: 75-15-0
                                              Page 3 of 3
             t
                                CARBON DISULFIDE

2.   Evaluate vital  signs including pulse and  respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not  breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.   If  breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.   Remove contaminated clothing as soon as possible.

4.   If eye exposure has occurred, eyes must be flushed with lukewarm water for
     at least IS minutes.

5.   Wash exposed  skin areas  three times. Wash initially with soap and water
     follow with an alcohol wash, then wash again with soap and water.

6.   Obtain authorization and/or  further  instructions from  the local hospital
     for administration  of an  antidote or  performance  of other invasive
     procedures.

7.   Transport to a health care facility.
Ingestion Exposure:

1.   Evaluate vital signs including  pulse and  respiratory rate,  and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.  If breathing is labored, administer  oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

2.   Obtain authorization  and/or further  instructions from the local hospital
     for administration  of an  antidote  or  performance  of other invasive
     procedures.

3.   Give the victims water  or milk:  Children up to 1 year old, 125 mL (4 oz
     or 1/2 cup); children 1 to 12 years old, 200 mL (6 oz or 3/4 cup); adults,
     250 mL (8  oz or 1 cup). Water or milk should be given only if victims are
     conscious and alert.

4.   Activated charcoal may be administered if victims are conscious and alert.
     Use 15 to 30 g (1/2 to  1 oz) for children, 50  to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz)
     for adults,  with 125  to 250 mL (1/2 to 1  cup) of water.

5.   Promote excretion by  administering a saline cathartic  or  sorbitol to
     conscious and alert victims.  Children require 15 to  30 g (1/2 to 1 oz)
     of cathartic; 50  to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz) is recommended  for adults.

6.   Transport to a health  care facility.

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  75-18-3
                                           Page 1 of 3
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - DIMETHYL SULFIDE

CAS Registry Number:  75-18-3

Synonyms: 2-Thiapropane; 2-Thiopropane; Dimethyl Monosulfide; Dimethyl
Sulphide; Dimethyl Thioether; DMS, Exact-S; Methane, Thiobis-;
Methanethiomethane; Methyl Monosulfide; Methyl Sulphide; Methylthiomethane;
Thiobismethane

Chemical Formula: C2H6S

Molecular Weight: 62.13


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

          Toxicity Value  Used for Listing Under Section 302:  LC50 inhalation
          (mouse) 0.031 mg/liter (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

          TPQ: 100 (pounds)

          RQ: 1  (pounds)
              (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

          Section 313  Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point: 99.7°F, 37.3°C (*Weast 1979)

    Specific  Gravity (H2O»1): 0.8483 at 20°C/4°C (*Weast 1979)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  400 mmHg at 18.7°C (Perry, 1984, p. 3-55)

    Melting Point:  -144.9°F, -98.27°C (*Weast 1979)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1): 2.14 (*Sax 1979)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

    Solubility in Water: Insoluble (*Weast 1979)

    Appearance and Odor:  Colorless liquid with an unpleasant, wild radish,
    cabbage-like odor (*Fenaroli 1975).

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  75-18-3
                                            Page 2 of 3

                               DIMETHYL SULFIDE

SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL: Not Found

    ACGIH TLV:  Not Found

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended:  Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Yes (*Clayton and Clayton 1981-82)
                     Skin:  Yes (*Clayton and Clayton 1981-82)
                     Ingestion:  Yes (*Sax  1975)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  Dimethyl sulfide causes
    softening and irritation of the skin.  Orally it is an irritant (*Sax
    1975). It is a moderate eye irritant (*Clayton and Clayton 1981-82). It
    is an eye, nose, throat and skin irritant (*CHRIS 1978).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure: Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): -55°F (*Clayton and Clayton 1981-82)
    Flammable  Limits:
        LEL: 2.2% (*Sax 1979)
        UEL:   19.7% (*Sax 1979)

    Extinguishing Methods:  Extinguish with dry chemical, carbon dioxide,
    water spray, fog or foam (*DOT 1984).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  Wear self-contained breathing apparatus
    and full protective clothing.  Move container from fire area.  Cool
    containers  that are exposed to flames with water from the side until well
    after  the fire is out.  For massive  fire in cargo area, used unmanned hose
    holder or monitor nozzles; if this is impossible withdraw  from area and let
    fire burn.  Withdraw immediately in case of rising sound from venting
    safety device or any discoloration of tank due to fire.  Isolate for 1/2
    mile in all  directions if tank car or truck is involved in fire (*DOT
    1984).

    Unusual Fire  and Explosion Hazards: Flammable/combustible material, may
    be ignited by heat, sparks or flames.  Vapors may travel to a  source of
    ignition and flash  back.  Container may explode in heat of fire.  Vapor
    explosion hazard indoors, outdoors or in sewers (*DOT 1984).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  4


SECTION V ~  REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:  Not Found
               Stable: Not Found

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  75-18-3
                                            Page 3 of 3

                               DIMETHYL SULFIDE

SECTION V   (continued)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Reacts vigorously with oxidizing
    materials (*Sax 1979).  Incompatible with dibenzoyl peroxide (Sax 1984, p.
    1201).

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts: Combustion products include toxic
    and irritating fumes of sulfur dioxide (Weiss 1980, p. 367).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:
                              May Not Occur: Yes (Weiss 1980, p. 367)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    It is a gas odorant, catalyst  impregn'ator, solvent for anhydrous mineral
    salts, flavoring ingredient in foods and beverages, chemical intermediate
    for solvents and dimethyl sulfoxide (*SRI).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is  Released or Spilled)

    Keep unnecessary people away; isolate hazard area and deny entry.  Stay
    upwind.  Shut off ignition sources; no flares, smoking or flames in
    hazard area.  Stop leak. Use water spray to reduce vapors.  Take up spills
    with noncombustible absorbent material (*DOT 1984).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.
SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure:  Not Found

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures:  Move victim to fresh air; call
    emergency medical care. If not breathing,  give artificial respiration. If
    breathing is difficult,  give oxygen. In case of contact with material,
    immediately flush eyes with running water for at least 15 minutes.  Wash
    skin with soap and water.  Remove and isolate contaminated clothing and
    shoes at the site (*DOT 1984).

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 75-21-8
                                           Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                  Date: October 31, 1985
                                                  Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - ETHYLENE OXIDE

CAS Registry Number: 75-21-8

Synonyms: alpha, beta-Oxidoethane; Anprolene; Dihydrooxirene; Dimethylene
Oxide; E O; ETO; NCI-C50088; Oxacyclopropane; Oxane; Oxidoethane;
1,2-Epoxyethane; Oxiran; Oxirane; Oxirene, Dihydro-; Oxyfume; Oxyfume 12; T-Gas

Chemical Formula:  C2H4O

Molecular Weight: 44.06


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

          Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:

                Chemical does not meet the toxicity criteria but because of its
                high production volume and recognized toxicity it is considered
                a chemical of concern.

          TPQ: 1,000 (pounds)

          RQ: 1 (pounds) (statutory); 10 (pounds) (proposed)

          Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): Yes


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Gas

    Boiling Point: 51.3°F, 10.7°C (*Sunshine 1969)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1): 0.8222 at 10°C/10°C (*Sunshine 1969)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  1095 at 20°C (NIOSH/OSHA 1978, p. 100)

    Melting Point:  -170.5°F.-112.5°C (*Sunshine 1969)  '

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):   1.49 (*Environment Canada 1982)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

    Solubility in Water: Soluble (*Merck 1976)

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 75-21-8
                                            Page 2 of 4

                               ETHYLENE OXIDE

SECTION II   (continued)

    Appearance and Odor: Colorless gas at room temperature but a mobile
    liquid below 12°C (54°F) and has a sweet odor (*Merck 1976; "CHRIS  1978)


SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL: TWA 1 ppm (NIOSH 1987, p. 122)

    ACGIH TLV: 2 mg/m3 (1 ppm) (*ACGIH 1984)

    IDLH: 800 ppm (*NIOSH/OSHA 1981)

    Other Limits Recommended: NIOSH: <0.1 ppm, 8 hour TWA; 5 ppm, 10 minute
    ceiling (NIOSH 1987 p. 122). Industrial substance suspect of carcinogenic
    potential for humans - recommended TLV 1 ppm   (ACGIH 1984, p. 42).
    EEGL 20.0 ppm (60 minutes) (NRC  1986, pp. 35-68).

    Routes of Entry:  Inhalation:  Yes (*Gilman 1980)
                    Skin:  Yes (Sax 1984, p. 1348)
                    Ingestion:  Yes (Sax 1984, p. 1348)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  It can cause death. Lowest
    inhalation concentration causing toxic effects is 12500 ppm/10 seconds
    (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985).  It is a strong skin irritant (*CHRIS 1978).  Neuro-
    logical disorders and even death have been reported (*Gilman  1980).

    Medical  Conditions Generally  Aggravated by Exposure: Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): Greater than -18°C (*Sunshine  1969); but  less
    than 0°F (OC) (*CHRIS 1978)
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL:  3.0% (*Sax 1975)
        UEL: 100% (*Sax 1975)

    Extinguishing Methods:  Extinguish with alcohol foam, carbon dioxide, dry
    chemical or water spray, fog,  or foam. Let burn unless leak can be stopped
    immediately (*DOT 1984).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures: Move container from fire area if you
    can do so without risk. Stay away from ends of tanks. Fight  fire from
    maximum distance.  For massive fire in-cargo area, use unmanned hose holder
    or monitor nozzles; if this is impossible, withdraw from area and let fire
    burn. Withdraw immediately  in case of rising sound from venting safety
    device or any discoloration of tank due to  fire. Isolate for 1 mile in all
    directions if tank car or truck is involved in fire. Keep unnecessary
    people away; isolate hazard area and deny  entry.  Stay upwind; keep out of
    low areas. Wear positive pressure breathing apparatus and full protective
    clothing. Evacuate area endangered by gas (*DOT 1984).

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                                             CAS Registry Number:  75-21-8
                                             Page 3 of 4
                                ETHYLENE OXIDE

SECTION IV   (continued)
    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  Severe explosion hazard when exposed
    to heat or flame (Sax 1984, p. 1348).  Irritating vapors are generated when
    heated.  Vapor is heavier than air and may travel considerable distance to
    a source of ignition and flash back (*CHRIS 1978).  Vapor forms explosive
    mixtures with air over a wide range (*NFPA 1978).  Liquid is not detonable
    but the vapor may be readily initiated into explosive decomposition
    (*Bretherick 1979).

    NFPA Flammability Rating: 4
SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:  Yes (*NFPA 1978)
               Stable:

        Conditions to Avoid:  Air, heat, acids and bases (Sax 1984,
        p. 1348); metal or metal chloride catalysts (*NFPA 1978)

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid): Metal fittings containing copper,
    silver, mercury or magnesium; ammonia (*Bretherick 1979);
    oxidizing agents; acids, organic bases; amines; certain salts; alcohols;
    mercaptans (*General Electric Co. 1980, MSDS #433); ferric chloride;
    magnesium perchlorate; m-nitroaniline; trimethylamine (*ITI 1982);
    potassium, tin chlorides; alkanethiols; bromoethane; aluminum
    chloride; aluminum oxide; iron chlorides; and iron  oxides (Sax  1984, p.
    1348).

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  Decomposition products are
    explosive (*ITI 1982).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur: Yes (*Sax  1975)
                              May Not Occur:

        Conditions to Avoid:  Acids; covalent halides such as chlorides of
        aluminum, iron (III), tin (IV); basic materials like alkali hydrides,
        ammonia, amines, and potassium; catalytically  active solids such  as
        aluminum or iron oxides  or rust (*Bretherick 1975); chlorides of  boron,
        aluminum, tin, and iron; some carbonates; and  metals such as copper and
        copper alloys (*Patty 1963)
SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Ethylene oxide is a chemical intermediate for ethylene glycol, nonionic
    surfactants, glycol ethers, ethanolamines, triethylene glycol, and
    polyethylene glycol (*SRI).  Used as a fumigant for foodstuffs and
    textiles, for sterilizing surgical instruments, and as an agricultural
    fungicide (Merck 1983, p. 550).  Registered as a pesticide in the U.S.
    (USEPA/Active Ingredients 1985).

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 75-21-8
                                           Page 4 of 4

                              ETHYLENE OXIDE

SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Avoid inhalation and skin contact (see Section III above). Shut off
    ignition sources; do not allow flares, smoking or flames in the hazard area.
    Stop leak if you can do so without risk. Use water spray to reduce
    vapors; do not get water inside container.  For small spills flush area
    with flooding amounts of water.  For large spills dike spill for later
    disposal. (*DOT  1984).
SECTION VIII ~ PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA  and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit. See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.

    SUIT MATERIAL PERFORMANCE (Based on EPA/USCG "Guidelines",  1987)
                       (Chemical Resistance/Amount of Data)

           Butyl                GOOD/LIMITED*
           CPE                 GOOD/LIMITED*
           Neoprene            POOR/LIMITED*
           Nitrile               POOR/MANY
           PVC                 POOR/LIMITED*
           Viton               POOR/LIMITED*

     *Based on qualitative performance information.
    **Based on a chemical analog.
SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    See Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  75-21-8
                                             Page 1 of 3
                      Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide
                                      for
                                ETHYLENE OXIDE

                                   (75-21-8)
     This guide should not  be construed  to authorize emergency personnel to
perform the procedures or  activities indicated or implied.   Care of persons
exposed to toxic chemicals must be directed by a physician or other recognized
authority.
Substance Characteristics:

Pure Form - Colorless gas; mobile liquid below 12 degrees C (54  degrees F) or
under pressure.

Odor - Sweet, etherlike.

Commercial Forms - Mixtures with carbon dioxide or fluorocarbon 12.

Uses -  Chemical intermediate for ethylene glycol, nonionic  surfactants, glycol
ethers, ethanolamines,  triethylene  glycol,  polyethylene  glycol; fumigant,
fungicide, ripening agent for fruits; sterilizing surgical instruments.

Materials  to Avoid -  Acids,  alcohols,  amines,  ammonia,  oxidizers, metal
catalysts.

Caution:  Explosion potential is high.  Avoid all heat sources including fire.

Other  Names  - Anprolene,  dihydrooxirene,  1,2-epoxyethane, oxacyclopropane,
oxane, oxidoethane, oxirane, oxyfume.


Personal  Protective Equipment:  See Chemical Profile Section VIII.


Emergency Life-Support Equipment and Supplies That May Be Required:

Compressed oxygen, forced-oxygen mask, soap, water, milk, activated charcoal,
saline cathartic or sorbitol, normal saline, D5W, Ringer's lactate.

Signs and Symptoms of Acute Ethylene Oxide Exposure:

Warning:  Ethylene oxide is corrosive to moist tissues.  Caution is advised.

Signs and symptoms of acute exposure to ethylene  oxide may  be  severe, and
include dyspnea (shortness of  breath), cough, pulmonary edema, pneumonia, and
respiratory failure.  Lethargy,  headache,  dizziness,  twitching, convulsions,
paralysis, and  coma may be observed. Cardiac arrhythmias and cardiovascular
collapse may also occur.

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number: 75-21-8
                                             Page 2 of 3

                                ETHYLENE OXIDE

Gastrointestinal effects of acute  exposure may  include nausea, vomiting, and
abdominal pain.  Ethylene oxide may severely irritate or burn mucous membranes
and moist skin. Eye contact may result in conjunctivitis  (red, inflamed eyes)
and erosion  of the cornea.
Emergency Life-Support Procedures:

Acute exposure  to ethylene oxide may require decontamination and life support
for the  victims.   Emergency personnel  should  wear   protective clothing
appropriate to  the  type and degree  of  contamination.   Air-purifying or
supplied-air respiratory equipment should also be  worn,  as  necessary. Rescue
vehicles should  carry supplies such as plastic sheeting and disposable plastic
bags to assist in preventing spread of contamination.
Inhalation Exposure:

1.   Move victims to fresh air. Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure
     to ethylene oxide.

2.   Evaluate vital signs including  pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.   If  breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.   Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for  administration  of an  antidote  or performance of  other invasive
     procedures.

4.   Transport to a health care facility.


Dermal/Eye Exposure:

1.   Remove victims from exposure.   Emergency  personnel  should  avoid self-
     exposure to ethylene oxide.

2.   Evaluate vital signs including  pulse and respiratory  rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.   If  breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.   Remove contaminated clothing  as soon as possible.

4.   If eye exposure  has  occurred,  eyes must  be IMMEDIATELY  flushed with
     lukewarm water for AT LEAST 15 minutes.

5.   If liquid  is spilled  on the skin, allow ethylene oxide to vaporize  before
     washing THOROUGHLY with soap and water.

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                                              EFATG
                                              CAS Registry Number: 75-21-8
                                              Page 3 of 3

                                 ETHYLENE OXIDE

6.   Obtain authorization and/or further  instructions from  the local hospital
     for  administration  of an antidote or  performance  of other invasive
     procedures.

7.   Transport to a health care facility.
Ingestion Exposure:

1.   Evaluate vital signs including  pulse and  respiratory rate,  and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration. If breathing is labored, administer  oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

2.   Obtain authorization  and/or further  instructions from the local hospital
     for administration  of an  antidote  or  performance  of other invasive
     procedures.

3.   Give the victims water or milk: children  up 1 year old, 125 mL (4 oz or
     1/2 cup); children 1 to 12 years old 200 mL (6  oz or 3/4 cup); adults,
     250 mL (8 oz or 1 cup).  Water or milk should be given only if victims are
     conscious and alert.

4.   Activated charcoal may be administered if victims are conscious and alert.
     Use 15 to 30 g (1/2 to  1 oz) for children, 50 to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz)
     for adults, with 125 to 250 mL (1/2 to 1  cup) of water.

5.   Ethylene oxide generally acts  as its  own cathartic;  however, if  deemed
     necessary, excretion  may be  promoted by administering a saline cathartic
     or sorbitol to conscious and alert victims.  Children require 15 to 30 g
     (1/2 to  1  oz)  of cathartic;  50 to  100 g (1-3/4  to 3-1/2  oz) is
     recommended for adults.

6.   Transport to a health care facility.

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  75-44-5
                                           Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - PHOSGENE

CAS Registry Number: 75-44-5

Synonyms:  Carbon Oxychloride; Carbonyl Chloride; CG; Chloroformyl Chloride;
NCI-C60219; Carbon Bichloride Oxide; Carbonic Acid Dichloride; Carbonic
Bichloride; Carbonyl Bichloride; Phosgen

Chemical Formula: CC12O

Molecular Weight: 98.92


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity Value  Used for Listing Under Section 302:

               Chemical does not meet the toxicity criteria but because of its
               high production volume and recognized toxicity it is considered
               a chemical of concern.

           TPQ: 10 (pounds)

           RQ: 10 (pounds)

           Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): Yes


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Gas

    Boiling Point: 47°F, 8.2°C (*Merck 1976)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=»1): 1.432 at 0°C/4°C (*Merck 1976)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg): 1215 at 20°C (*Merck 1976)

    Melting Point:  -180°F, -118°C  (*Merck 1976)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  3.4 (*NFPA 1975)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  Slightly soluble (*Merck 1976)

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  75-44-5
                                            Page 2 of 4

                               PHOSGENE

SECTION II   (continued)

    Appearance and Odor: Colorless gas; colorless, fuming liquid; suffocating
    odor reminiscent of moldy hay (*Merck 1976). In dilute concentration has
    odor of green corn (*Arena 1974); odor similar to decaying fruit at room
    temperature (*Encyc Occupat Health and Safety 1971).


SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  TWA 0.4 mg/ms (0.1 ppm) (NIOSH 1987, p. 192).

    ACGIH TLV: TWA 0.4 mg/m3 (0.1 ppm) (ACGIH 1986-87, p. 27).

    IDLH: 2 ppm (NIOSH 1987, p. 192)                    \

    Other Limits Recommended: NIOSH: 0.1 ppm (10 hour TWA); Ceiling 0.2 ppm for
    15 minutes (NIOSH 1987, p. 192). EEGL 0.2 ppm (60 minutes) (NRC 1984b, pp.
    69-86).

    Routes of Entry:  Inhalation:  Yes (*Sax 1975)
                     Skin:  Yes (*DOT 1984)
                     Ingestion: Not Found

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic): Phosgene is a lung toxicant
    that causes damage to the capillaries,  bronchioles and. alveoli of the lungs
    (U.S. Army  1975, p. 3-1) by decomposition to hydrochloric acid.  There is
    little immediate irritant  effect upon the respiratory tract, and the
    warning properties of the gas  are therefore very slight.  Pulmonary edema,
    bronchopneumonia and occasionally lung abscesses develop.  Degenerative
    changes  in the nerves have been reported as later developments. A
    concentration of 25 ppm is dangerous for exposures lasting  30-60 minutes
    and 50 ppm is rapidly fatal after even short exposure (Sax  1984, p. 2210).

    Medical  Conditions Generally  Aggravated by Exposure:   Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION  HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): Not Found
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL: Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods:  Nonflammable (NFPA 1984, p. 49-73). For small
    fires, use dry chemical or  carbon dioxide. Use water spray, fog, or foam
    for larger fires.  Do not  get water inside containers.  Move  container from
    fire area if you can do so without risk. Stay away from the ends of tanks,
    and cool exposed  containers with water until well after the fire is out.
    Isolate the area until gas has dispersed (*DOT 1984).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures: If necessary to stop flow of gas, use
    water spray to protect the personnel effecting shutoff.  Sodium hydroxide
    or anhydrous ammonia have been used to neutralize phosgene (*NFPA 1975).

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  75-44-5
                                            Page 3 of 4

                               PHOSGENE

SECTION IV   (continued)

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  When heated to decomposition or on
    contact with water or steam, it will react to produce toxic and corrosive
    fumes (*Sax 1975).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  0


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:
               Stable: Yes, in steel containers if dry (U.S. Army 1975,
                        P. 3-1)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Moisture (*Sax 1975)

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Reacts violently with aluminum;
    tert-butyl azido formate; 2,4-hexadiyn-l,6-diol; isopropyl alcohol;
    potassium; sodium; hexafluoro isopropylidene; amino lithium; lithium (Sax
    1984, p. 2211).

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts: When heated  to decomposition or on
    contact with water or steam, it will react to produce toxic and corrosive
    fumes (*Sax 1975).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur: Not Found
                             May Not Occur: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found
SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Delayed-action military chemical agent (U.S. Army 1975, p. 3-1).  Chemical
    intermediate for toluene diisocyanate, methyl isocyanate, acyl chlorides,
    diphenylmethane-4,4'-diisocyanate, chloroformate esters, diethyl carbonate,
    dimethyl carbamoyl chloride, polymethylene polyphenylisocyanate,
    polycarbonate resins (*SRI); aniline dyes (*Hamilton 1974); pesticides,
    herbicides, dyes (Hawley 1981, p. 807).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Keep unnecessary people away; isolate hazard area and deny entry.
    Stay upwind and keep out of low areas. Ventilate closed spaces before
    entering.
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,

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                                          CAS Registry Number: 75-44-5
                                          Page 4 of 4

                              PHOSGENE

SECTION VIII   (continued)

    chemical resistant suit. See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.

SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT  INFORMATION

    See Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  75-44-5
                                             Page 1 of 3
                      Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide
                                      for
                                   PHOSGENE

                                   (75-44-5)
     This guide should not  be construed  to authorize  emergency personnel to
perform the procedures or  activities indicated or implied.   Care of persons
exposed to toxic chemicals must be directed by a physician or other recognized
authority.
Substance Characteristics:

Pure Forms - Easily  liquefied  colorless gas  or  colorless to  light yellow
liquid.

Odor - Strong and stifling when concentrated, haylike in dilute form.

Commercial Form - 99% pure liquefied gas.

Uses  -   Organic  synthesis;  chemical intermediate  for  isocyanates, acid
chlorides,  and  polycarbonates;  pesticides;   herbicides;  dye  manufacture;
chemical warfare agent.

Materials to Avoid - Active metals, aluminum, alcohol, water (except for use in
emergency  life support).
Caution: Hydrochloric acid will be liberated upon  contact with  water, steam,
or alcohols. A violent reaction will occur following contact with aluminum and
active metals.  Phosgene will produce toxic and corrosive fumes when heated to
decomposition; avoid sources of extreme heat.

Other Names  - Carbon oxychloride, carbonic acid dichloride, carbonyl chloride,
chloroformyl chloride, diphosgene.
Personal Protective Equipment: See Chemical Profile Section VIII.


Emergency Life-Support Equipment and Supplies That May Be Required:

Compressed oxygen,  forced-oxygen  mask, soap,  water, normal  saline,  D5W,
Ringer's lactate, dimercaprol.

Signs and Symptoms of Acute Phosgene Exposure:

Warning:  Effects may be delayed up to 24 hours. Caution is advised.

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number: 75-44-5
                                             Page 2 of 3

                                    PHOSGENE

Acute exposure  to phosgene  may result in severe  irritation and burns of the
skin,  eyes,  mucous  membranes, and respiratory  passages.   Cough, dyspnea
(shortness of breath), pain  in the chest, and severe pulmonary edema may also
occur.  Cyanosis (blue tint to the skin and mucous  membranes) and  anxiety may
be observed.
Emergency Life-Support Procedures:

Acute exposure to phosgene may require decontamination and life support for the
victims.  Emergency personnel  should wear protective clothing appropriate to
the type   and degree   of contamination.   Air-purifying  or supplied-air
respiratory equipment should also  be  worn, as  necessary.   Rescue vehicles
should carry supplies such  as  plastic sheeting and disposable plastic bags to
assist in preventing spread of contamination.
Inhalation Exposure:

1.   Move victims to fresh air. Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure
     to phosgene.

2.   Evaluate vital signs including  pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.   If  breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.   Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from  the local hospital
     for  administration  of an  antidote  or performance of  other invasive
     procedures.

4.   RUSH to a health care facility.
Dermal/Eye Exposure:

1.   Remove victims from exposure.   Emergency  personnel  should avoid self-
     exposure to phosgene.

2.   Evaluate vital signs including  pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.    If  breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.   Remove contaminated clothing  as soon as possible.

4.   If  eye exposure has occurred, eyes must be flushed with lukewarm water for
     at least 15 minutes.

5.   Wash exposed skin areas THOROUGHLY with soap and water.

6.   Obtain authorization and/or further  instructions from the local hospital
     for  administration  of  an  antidote or performance of  other invasive
     procedures.

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                                           EFATG
                                           CAS Registry Number:  75-44-5
                                           Page 3 of 3
                                  PHOSGENE

7.   RUSH to a health care facility.


Ingestion Exposure:  No information is available.

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 75-55-8
                                           Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - PROPYLENEIMINE

CAS Registry Number:  75-55-8

Synonyms: Aziridine, 2-Methyl-; 2-Methylazacyclopropane; 2-Methylaziridine;
2-Methylethylenimine; Methylethylenimine; Propylenimine; Propylene Imine

Chemical Formula: C3H7N

Molecular Weight: 57.11


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

          Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:  LD50 oral (rat)
          19 mg/kg (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

          TPQ: 10,000 (pounds)

          RQ: 1  (pounds) (statutory)

          Section 313  Listed (Yes or No): Yes


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point:  151-153°F, 66-67°C (*Encyc Occupat Health and Safety 1983)

    Specific Gravity  (H2O»1): 0.8039-0.8070 at 25°C/25°C (Hawley 1981, p.
    865)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  112 at 20°C (*IARC 1972-1985)

    Melting Point: -85°F, -65°C (*IARC 1972-1985)

    Vapor Density (AIR-1):   2.0 (*Encyc Occupat Health  and  Safety 1983)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate** 1): Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  Miscible (*IARC 1972-1985)

    Appearance and Odor: Colorless, oily liquid with an  odor similar to
    aliphatic amines  (i.e., fishy) (*IARC 1972-1985)

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 75-55-8
                                           Page 2 of 4

                               PROPYLENEIMINE

SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  5 mg/m3 (2 ppm) (NIOSH 1987, p. 200)

    ACGIH TLV:  TWA 5 mg/ms (2 ppm) (skin) (ACGIH  1986-1987, p. 28)

    IDLH: 500 ppm (NIOSH 1987, p. 200)

    Other Limits Recommended:  Industrial substance suspect of carcinogenic
    potential to man (*ACGIH 1983)

    Routes of Entry:  Inhalation: Yes (Hawley 1981, p. 865)
                    Skin: Yes (Hawley 1981, p. 865)
                    Ingestion: Yes (Hawley 1981, p. 865)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  Toxic after acute exposure.
    Can severely irritate eyes, skin, and lungs (*Encyc Occupat Health and
    Safety 1983).

    Medical  Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure: Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): 25°F (CC) (*ACGIH 1980)
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL:  Not Found
        UEL: Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods: If material is on fire, use foam, carbon dioxide,
    or dry chemical (Student 1981, p. 433).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures: If material is on fire, do not
    extinguish fire unless flow can be stopped. Use water in flooding
    quantities as a "fog" and use to cool all affected containers. Keep
    material out of water sources and sewers.  Build dikes to contain  flow as
    necessary (Student  1981, p. 433). Isolate for  1/2 mile in all directions
    if tank car or truck is involved in fire (DOT 1984, Guide 30).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards: Chemical is extremely flammable;
    vapors are heavier  than air (Student 1981, pp. 433).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  Not Found


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability: Unstable:  Thermally unstable (Student 1981, p. 433)
               Stable:

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 75-55-8
                                            Page 3 of 4

                                PROPYLENEIMINE

SECTION V   (continued)

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Acids, strong oxidizers (NIOSH/
    OSHA 1978, p. 160)

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  Toxic oxides of nitrogen are
    produced during combustion (Student 1981, p. 433).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:  Yes (Student 1981, p. 433)
                              May Not Occur:

        Conditions to Avoid:  Contact with acid promotes violent
        polymerization (Student 1981, p. 433)


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Propyleneimine is used as a chemical intermediate in the modification of
    latex surface coating resins, polymers in textile and paper industries,
    dyes, photography, gelatins, oil additives and organic synthesis.  It is a
    comonomer for polymers  with methacrylic acid and esters (*SRI).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Avoid  breathing vapors; avoid bodily contact with the material. Do not
    handle broken packages without protective equipment.  Wash away any
    material which may have contacted the body with copious amounts of water or
    soap with water. Use water spray to disperse vapors and  dilute standing
    pools of liquid. Keep sparks and flames away.  Attempt to stop leak if it
    can be done without hazard. (Student 1981, p. 433).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA  and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit. See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.
SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    'Signs and Symptoms of Exposure: Inflammation and blistering of the skin,
    eye and upper respiratory tract; irritation, nausea, itching, and periodic
    vomiting.  Headache, dizziness, and pain in the  temple. Shortness of
    breath, and increased nasal and laryngeal secretion are seen (*Encyc
    Occupat Health and Safety 1983).

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures: Move victim to fresh air; call
    emergency medical care.  If victim is not breathing, give artificial
    respiration; if breathing is labored, give oxygen. In case of eye/skin
    contact, immediately flush with water for  at least 15 minutes (DOT 1984,

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 75-55-8
                                            Page 4 of 4

                               PROPYLENEIMINE

SECTION IX   (continued)

    Guide 30).  Neutralization with acids (e.g., vinegar, fruit juices) is
    contraindicated.  Avoid vomiting (*Rumack 1975 to Present).

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 75-56-9
                                           Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - PROPYLENE OXIDE

CAS Registry Number: 75-56-9

Synonyms:  1,2-Epoxypropane; Epoxypropane; Ethylene Oxide, Methyl-; Methyl
Ethylene Oxide; Methyl Oxirane; Methyloxirane; NCI-C50099; Oxirane, Methyl-;
Propane, 1,2-Epoxy-; Propane, Epoxy; Propene Oxide; Propylene Epoxide;
Propyleneoxide; 1,2-Propylene Oxide

Chemical Formula:  C3H6O

Molecular Weight: 58.08


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

          Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:

               Chemical does not meet the toxicity criteria but because of its
               high production volume and recognized toxicity it is considered
               a chemical of concern.

          TPQ: 10,000 (pounds)

          RQ: 100  (pounds)

          Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): Yes


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point: 93.61°F, 34.23°C (*Merck 1976)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1): 0.859 at 0°C/4°C (*Merck 1976)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  445 at 20°C (*Sunshine 1969)

    Melting Point:  -169.83°F, -112.13°C (*Merck  1976)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  2.0 (*Clayton and Clayton 1981-82)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l):  Not Found

    Solubility in Water: 40.5% by weight at 20°C (*Merck 1976)

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 75-56-9
                                            Page 2 of 4

                               PROPYLENE OXIDE

SECTION II   (continued)

    Appearance and Odor:  Colorless liquid (*Merck 1976) with sweet, alcoholic
    odor like natural gas, ether, or benzene (*Clayton and Clayton 1981-82)


SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  TWA 240 mg/m3 (100 ppm) (NIOSH 1987, p. 200)

    ACGIH TLV:  TWA 50 mg/ms  (20 ppm) (*ACGIH 1983)

    IDLH: 2000 ppm (NIOSH/OSHA 1978, p. 160)

    Other Limits Recommended:  Not Found

    Routes of Entry:  Inhalation:  Yes (*Sax 1975)
                     Skin: Yes (*Clayton and Clayton 1981-82)
                     Ingestion:  Yes (*Sax 1975)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  This material is
    moderately toxic by inhalation and ingestion.  It may cause irreversible
    and reversible changes (*Sax 1975).  Skin contact with the material or
    solutions of the material cause irritation; diluted solutions are more
    irritating than undiluted materials (*Encyc Occupat Health and Safety
    1971).  Exposure may cause mild depression of the central nervous system
    and eye, nasal, and lung irritation (*Rumack 1975 to Present). Contact
    with the liquid can cause blindness and death.  Pulmonary  edema may recur
    up to 2 weeks after exposure (*Morgan 1982).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure:  Not Found


SECTION IV — FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): -35°F, -37°C (CC) (*Sunshine 1969)
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL:  2.8% (*Sax 1979)
        UEL: 37% (*Sax 1979)

    Extinguishing Methods: Extinguish with dry chemical, carbon dioxide, water
    spray, fog or foam (DOT 1984, Guide  26).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures: Firefighting should be done from a
    safe distance  or from  a protected location  (*NFPA 1978).  Wear self-
    contained (positive pressure if available) breathing apparatus and full
    protective clothing. Isolate for 1/2 mile in all directions if tank car
    or truck is involved in fire.  Move container from area  if you can do  so
    without risk.  Spray cooling water on containers that are exposed to
    flames until well after fire is out.  For massive fire in cargo area, use
    unmanned hose holder or monitor nozzles; if this is impossible, withdraw
    from area and let fire  burn. Withdraw immediately in case of rising  sound
    from venting safety device or any discoloration of tank due to fire (DOT
    1984, Guide 26).

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  75-56-9
                                            Page 3 of 4

                               PROPYLENE OXIDE

SECTION IV   (continued)

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards: Vapor  is heavier than air and may
    travel considerable distance to source of ignition and flash back.  Vapors
    form explosive mixture with air. If polymerization takes place in
    container, there may be a violent rupture of container (*NFPA 1978).
    Explosion hazard is severe when exposed to flame (*Sax 1979).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  4


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:
               Stable:  Yes (Weiss 1980, p. 787)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid): Violently reacts with acetylide-
    forming metals such as copper or copper alloys (*Clayton and Clayton
    1981-82); ammonium hydroxide; chlorosulfonic acid; hydrochloric acid;
    hydrofluoric acid; nitric acid; oleum and sulfuric acid (Sax 1984, p.
    1289).

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  Not Found

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:  Yes  (*Clayton and Clayton
                                           1981-82)
                             May Not Occur:

        Conditions to Avoid:  Active catalytic surfaces such as anhydrous
        chlorides of iron,  tin, and aluminum; peroxides of iron and aluminum;
        and alkali metal hydroxides (*NFPA 1987); high temperatures; alkalies;
        aqueous acids; amines and acidic alcohols (Weiss 1980, p. 787).
SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    This material is used primarily as a chemical intermediate for
    polyurethane polyols, propylene glycol, and dipropylene glycol (*SRI). It
    is also used for sterilization of packaged foods (*Farm Chemicals Handbook
    1983), as a herbicide (*Clayton and Clayton 1981-82), in the preparation
    of lubricants, surfactants, and oil demulcifiers, and as  a fumigant and
    soil sterilant (*Merck 1976).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Ventilate area of spill or leak. Do not allow the material to enter
    confined space, such as a sewer, because of the possibility of an
    explosion (*NIOSH/OSHA  1981).  Stop discharge if possible. Stay upwind
    and use water spray to knock down vapor.  Avoid  contact with liquid and
    vapor (Weiss 1980, p. 787).  Water spray may be used to flush spills
    away from exposure and to dilute spills to nonflammable mixture (*NFPA

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                                          CAS Registry Number: 75-56-9
                                          Page 4 of 4

                              PROPYLENE OXIDE

SECTION VII   (continued)

    1978). Shut off ignition sources; no flares, smoking, or flames in
    hazard area.  Stop leak if you can do so without risk.  Use water spray
    to reduce vapors.  Small spills:  absorb with sand or other noncombustible
    absorbent material and place into containers for later disposal.
    Large spills:  dike far ahead of spill for later disposal (DOT 1984,
    Guide 26).


SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator  with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.

    SUIT MATERIAL PERFORMANCE (Based on EPA/USCG "Guidelines", 1987)
                       (Chemical Resistance/Amount of Data)

          Butyl                GOOD/LIMITED
          Butyl/Neoprene       POOR/LIMITED*
          Neoprcne             POOR/LIMITED*
          Nitrile               POOR/LIMITED*
          PE                  POOR/MANY
          PVC                 POOR/LIMITED*
          Teflon               GOOD/LIMITED
          Viton                POOR/MANY
          Viton/Neoprene      POOR/LIMITED*

     *Based on qualitative performance information.
    **Based on a chemical analog.


SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT  INFORMATION

    See Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  75-56-9
                                             Page 1 of 3
                      Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide
                                      for
                                PROPYLENE OXIDE

                                   (75-56-9)


     This guide should not be construed to authorize emergency personnel to
perform the procedures or activities indicated or implied.  Care of persons
exposed to toxic chemicals must be directed by a physician or other recognized
authority.


Substance Characteristics:

Pure Forms - Colorless liquid or gas above 34 degrees C (94 degrees F).

Odor - Sweet, alcohollike.

Commercial Form - Mixed with carbon dioxide.

Uses - Manufacturer of polyurethane, polyols, propylene glycol, and dipropylene
glycol; fumigant; solvent.

Materials to Avoid - Acids, alkali, oxidizers, metals.

Caution:  Flammable liquid.  Avoid sources of extreme heat or ignition
including sparks or fire.

Other Names - Epoxypropane, methyl ethylene oxide, methyl oxirane, propene
oxide, propylene epoxide.


Personal  Protective Equipment: See Chemical Profile Section VIII.


Emergency Life-Support Equipment and Supplies That May Be  Required:

Compressed  oxygen, forced-oxygen mask, soap, water, activated charcoal, saline
cathartic or sorbitol, normal saline, D5W, Ringer's lactate, diazepam,
aminophylline,  morphine, furosemide, epinephrine, atropine.

Signs and Symptoms of Acute Propylene Oxide Exposure:

Propylene oxide may irritate or burn the skin, eyes, and respiratory tract.
Pulmonary edema may occur up to 2 weeks after exposure. Dermatitis (red,
inflamed skin) is common.  Other signs and symptoms of acute exposure may
include headache, nausea, vomiting, and unconsciousness.  Victims may appear as
if they are in a drunken  stupor.

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  75-56-9
                                             Page 2 of 3

                                PROPYLENE OXIDE

Emergency Life-Support Procedures:

Acute exposure to propylene oxide may require decontamination and life support
for the victims.  Emergency personnel should wear protective clothing
appropriate to the type and degree of contamination.  Air-purifying or
supplied-air respiratory equipment should also  be worn, as necessary. Rescue
vehicles should carry supplies such as plastic sheeting and  disposable plastic
bags to assist in preventing spread of contamination.


Inhalation Exposure:

1.   Move victims to fresh air. Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure
     to propylene oxide.

2.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma. If no pulse  is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration. If breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.   Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive
     procedures.

4.   Transport to a health  care facility.
Dermal/Eye Exposure:

1.   Remove victims from exposure.  Emergency personnel should avoid self-
     exposure to propylene oxide.

2.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration. If breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.   Remove contaminated clothing as soon as possible.

4.   If eye exposure has occurred, eyes must be flushed with lukewarm water for
     at least 15  minutes.

5.   Wash exposed skin areas THOROUGHLY with soap and water.

6.   Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive
     procedures.

7.   Transport to a health care facility.

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                                              EFATG
                                              CAS Registry Number: 75-56-9
                                              Page 3 of 3

                                PROPYLENE OXIDE

Ingestion Exposure:

1.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration. If breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

2.   DO NOT induce vomiting or attempt  to neutralize!

3.   Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive
     procedures.

4.   Activated charcoal may be administered if victims are conscious and alert.
     Use 15 to 30 g (1/2 to 1 oz) for children, 50 to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz)
     for adults, with 125 to 250 mL (1/2  to 1  cup) of water.

5.   Promote excretion by administering a saline cathartic or sorbitol to
     conscious and alert victims. Children require 15 to 30 g (1/2  to 1 oz)
     of cathartic; 50  to 100 g (1-3/4 to  3-1/2 oz) is recommended for adults.

6.   Transport to a health care facility.

 image: 






                                           CAS Registry Number: 75-74-1
                                           Page 1 of 3
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                  Date: October 31, 1985
                                                  Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - TETRAMETHYLLEAD

CAS Registry Number: 75-74-1

Synonyms: Lead Tetramethyl; Methylplumbane; TML; Tetramethyl Lead

Chemical Formula:  C4H12Pb

Molecular Weight: 267.33


SECTION I -- REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

          Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:

               Chemical does not meet the toxicity criteria but because of its
               high production volume and recognized toxicity it is considered
               a chemical of concern.

          TPQ: 100 (pounds)

          RQ: 1 (pounds)
              (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

          Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): In Lead Compounds category


SECTION II -- PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point: 230°F, 110°C at 10 mmHg (*IARC 1972-1985); decomposes
    above 212°F, 100°C (*NFPA 1975)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1): 1.995 (*Weast 1976)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  22 at 20°C (NIOSH/OSHA 1978, p. 176)

    Melting Point:  -17.5°F, -27.5°C (*Weast 1976)

    Vapor Density (AIR-1):  6.5 (NFPA 1984, p. 325M-87)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

    Solubility in Water: Insoluble (*IARC 1972-1985)

 image: 






                                           CAS Registry Number:  75-74-1
                                           Page 2 of 3

                               TETRAMETHYLLEAD

SECTION II   (continued)

    Appearance and Odor: Colorless liquid (*Encyc Occupat Health and Safety
    1971); dyed red, orange or blue with a slight musty odor (NIOSH/OSHA 1978,
    p. 176).


SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:   TWA 0.075 mg (Lead)/m3  (OSHA 1984, p. 663)

    ACGIH TLV: TWA 0.15 mg (Lead)/m3 (skin) (ACGIH 1986-87, p.30)

    IDLH: 40 mg(Lead)/m3 (NIOSH 1987, p. 222)

    Other Limits Recommended: Maximum air concentration:  0.15 mg/m3 (skin)
    (*Casarett 1975)

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Yes (*NFPA 1975)
                    Skin: Yes (*NFPA 1975)
                    Ingestion: Yes (*NFPA 1975)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic): Vapors are very toxic.
    Fatal lead poisoning may occur by ingestion, vapor inhalation or skin
    absorption (*NFPA 1975). Several cases of acute toxicity,  usually in  the
    form of degenerative brain disease, have been described following
    occupational exposure (*IARC 1972-1985).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure:  Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used):  38°C (*IARC 1972-1985)
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL:  Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods: On fires in which containers are not exposed, use
    water spray, dry chemical, foam or carbon dioxide (*NFPA 1975).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures: Use water to keep fire exposed
    containers cool.  If leak or spill has not ignited, use water spray to
    disperse vapors  or flush spill (*NFPA  1975).  For massive fire in cargo
    area, use unmanned hose holder or monitor nozzle; if this  is impossible
    withdraw  from  area and let fire burn (*DOT 1984).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  Thermal decomposition is likely  to
    take the form of vapors at the surface.  Rapid decomposition will cause
    container to explode (*NFPA 1975). Dangerous fire hazard when exposed to
    heat, flame, or oxidizers (Sax  1984, p. 2546).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  3

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 75-74-1
                                            Page 3 of 3

                               TETRAMETHYLLEAD

SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability: Unstable:
              Stable: Yes (Weiss 1980, p. 865)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Fire, heat, physical damage, and strong
        oxidizers (*NFPA 1975).  Starts to decompose at about 212°F (100°C).
        If confined, may explode or detonate at high temperatures (Weiss 1980,
        p. 865).

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Strong oxidizers such as sulfuryl
    chloride or potassium permanganate (NIOSH/OSHA  1978, p. 176).

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  Toxic gases are generated in fire
    (Weiss 1980, p. 865).

    Hazardous Polymerization: May Occur:
                             May  Not Occur: Yes (Weiss 1980, p. 865)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found
SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Antiknock additive for gasolines; component of mixed alkyl leads for
    gasoline additives (*SRI).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Do not touch spilled material; stop leak if you can do it without risk.
    Use water spray to reduce vapors.  Small  spills:  take up with sand or
    other non-combustible absorbent material and place into containers for
    later disposal.  Large spills:  dike far ahead of spill for later disposal
    (*DOT 1984).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at the
    beginning  of the profiles for additional information.
SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    See Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide

 image: 






                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  75-74-1
                                             Page 1 of 3
                      Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide
                                      for
                                TETRAMETHYLLEAD

                                   (75-74-1)
     This guide should not be construed  to authorize  emergency personnel to
perform the procedures or  activities indicated  or implied.  Care  of persons
exposed to toxic chemicals must be directed by a physician or other  recognized
authority.
Substance Characteristics:

Pure Form - Colorless liquid.

Odor - Musty or fruity.

Commercial Form - Red, orange, or blue liquid.

Use - Gasoline additive.

Materials to Avoid - Oxidizers.

Caution:  Flammable liquid.   Avoid  sources  of extreme  heat  or ignition
including  sparks  or fire.   When  burned, toxic fumes of lead oxide will be
emitted.

Other Names - Tetramethylplumbane, TML.


Personal Protective Equipment: See Chemical Profile Section VIII.


Emergency Life-Support Equipment and Supplies That May Be Required:

Compressed oxygen, forced-oxygen mask,  soap, water,  milk, activated charcoal,
saline cathartic  or sorbitol, normal saline, D5W, Ringer's lactate, diazepam,
phenytoin, phenobarbitol, mannitol, dexamethasone.


Signs and Symptoms of Acute  Tetramethyllead Exposure:

Warning:  Effects may be delayed for hours to days.  Caution is advised.

Signs and  symptoms of acute  exposure  to tetramethyllead may be  severe and
include   anxiety,   irritability,    headache,   insomnia,   disorientation,
violent/frightening dreams, hyperexcitability,  delusions,  and hallucinations.
Muscular  weakness,  tremor,  incoordination,  convulsions, cerebral edema, and
coma may occur.   A metallic  taste may  be noted.  Sneezing,  bronchitis, and
pneumonia may be noted.  Bradycardia (slow heart rate), hypotension (low blood

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  75-74-1
                                             Page 2 of 3

                                TETRAMETHYLLEAD-

pressure), hypothermia, and pallor may also occur.  Gastrointestinal symptoms
include vomiting and  diarrhea.  Tetramethyllead may irritate moist skin, eyes,
and mucous membranes.
Emergency Life-Support Procedures:

Acute exposure to tetramethyllead may require decontamination and  life support
for the   victims.   Emergency  personnel should  wear  protective  clothing
appropriate to the  type  and  degree of contamination.   Air-purifying or
supplied-air respiratory equipment should also be worn,  as necessary.  Rescue
vehicles should carry supplies such as plastic sheeting  and disposable plastic
bags to assist in preventing spread of contamination.
Inhalation Exposure:

1.   Move  victims to fresh air. Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure
     to tetramethyllead.

2.   Evaluate vital signs including  pulse and respiratory rate,  and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.  If breathing is  labored,  administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.   Obtain authorization  and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for  administration of  an  antidote  or performance of  other invasive
     procedures.

4.   RUSH to a health care facility.
Dermal/Eye Exposure:

1.  Remove  victims  from  exposure.   Emergency personnel should avoid self-
     exposure to tetramethyllead.

2.  Evaluate vital signs including  pulse and  respiratory rate, and  note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.  If breathing is  labored,  administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.  Remove contaminated clothing as soon as  possible.

4.  If eye exposure has occurred, eyes must be flushed with lukewarm water for
     at least 15  minutes.

5.  Wash exposed skin areas THOROUGHLY  with soap and water.

6.  Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration of an  antidote  or performance of  other invasive
     procedures.

7.  RUSH  to a health care facility.

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                                              EFATG
                                              CAS Registry Number: 75-74-1
                                              Page 3 of 3

                                 TETRAMETHYLLEAD

Ingestion Exposure:

1.   Evaluate vital signs including  pulse and  respiratory rate,  and note  any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.  If breathing is labored, administer  oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

2.   Obtain authorization  and/or further  instructions from  the local  hospital
     for administration  of an  antidote  or  performance  of other invasive
     procedures.

3.   Give the victims water  or milk:  Children up to 1 year  old, 125 mL  (4 oz
     or 1/2 cup); children 1  to 12 years old, 200 mL (6 oz or 3/4 cup); adults,
     250 mL (8 oz  or 1  cup).   Water or  milk should be given only if victims
     are conscious and alert.

4.   Activated charcoal may be administered if victims are conscious and alert.
     Use 15 to  30 g  (1/2 to  1 oz) for children, 50  to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz)
     for adults, with 125 to  250 mL (1/2 to 1  cup) of water.

5.   Promote excretion by administering a saline cathartic  or  sorbitol to
     conscious  and alert victims.  Children require 15 to 30 g (1/2 to  1 oz)
     of cathartic; 50. to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz) is recommended  for adults.

6.   RUSH  to a health care facility.

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  75-77-4
                                           Page 1 of 3
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - TRIMETHYLCHLOROSILANE

CAS Registry Number: 75-77-4

Synonyms: Chlorotrimethylsilane; Monochlorotrimethylsilicon; Silane,
Chlorotrimethyl-; Silane, Trimethylchloro-; Silicane, Chlorotrimethyl;
Silylium, Trimethyl-, Chloride; Trimethyl Chlorosilane; Trimethylsilyl Chloride

Chemical Formula: C3H9ClSi

Molecular Weight:  108.66


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

          Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302: LCiow inhalation
          (mouse) 0.5 mg/liter/10 minute (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

          TPQ: 1,000 (pounds)

          RQ: 1  (pounds)
              (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

          Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point:  135°F, 57°C (*Hawley 1977)

    Specific Gravity (H2O-1): 0.854 at 25°C (*Hawley 1977)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  Not Found

    Melting Point: -72°F, -57.7°C (*Weast 1984)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  3.7  (*CHRIS 1978)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l):  Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  Decomposes in water (*Hawley 1977)

    Appearance and Odor:  Colorless liquid (*Hawley 1977), with a sharp
    hydrochloric acid-like odor (*CHRIS  1978).

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  75-77-4
                                            Page 2 of 3

                               TRIMETHYLCHLOROSILANE

SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV: Not Found

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended:  Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation: Yes (*Rumack 1975 to Present)
                     Skin:  Yes  (*Hawley 1977; *Rumack 1975 to Present)
                     Ingestion:  Yes (*Sax  1975)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  Similar to other silanes.
    Toxicity is rated high for inhalation, ingestion and local irritation. May
    cause death or permanent injury after a very short exposure to small
    quantities (*Sax 1975).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure:  Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): -18°F (*Hawley 1977); 0°F  (OC) (*CHRIS 1978)
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL: 1.8% (*CHRIS 1978)
        UEL: Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods:  Extinguish with dry chemicals or carbon dioxide.
    Do not use water or foam. Cool exposed containers with water (*CHRIS
    1978). Water spray, fog, or foam may be required to fight large fires.
    However, trimethylchlorosilane may react violently with water.  Do not get
    water inside containers (*DOT  1984).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  Use acid-vapor-type  respirator, rubber
    gloves, chemical worker's goggles, and other protective  equipment as
    necessary to protect skin and eyes ("CHRIS 1978).

    Unusual Fire and  Explosion Hazards: Violent reaction  with water (Sax
    1984, p. 2665).  Toxic and irritating hydrogen chloride and phosgene may be
    formed in fires.  Difficult to extinguish, re-ignition may occur.
    Flashback along vapor trail may occur. Containers may explode in fire.
    Vapor may explode if ignited in enclosed area (CHRIS  1987).

    NFPA Flammability Rating: 3


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability: Unstable:
               Stable: Yes (Weiss  1980, p.  895, *CHRIS 1978)

        Conditions to Avoid: Avoid contact with water; it  readily hydrolyzes,
        liberating hydrochloric acid ("Hawley  1977).

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  75-77-4
                                            Page 3 of 3

                               TRIMETHYLCHLOROSILANE

SECTION V   (continued)

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Reacts with surface moisture,
    releasing hydrogen chloride, which will corrode common metals and form
    flammable hydrogen gas ("CHRIS  1978).

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts: When heated to decomposition or on
    contact with acids or acid fumes, chloride fumes are emitted (*Sax 1979).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:
                              May Not Occur: Yes (Weiss 1980, p. 895)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Chemical intermediate for silicone fluids, silylating agent, and a component
    of a catalyst for  propylene oxide (*SRI).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Avoid breathing vapors (see Section III above).  In case of spill or leak,
    shut off ignition sources; no  flares, smoking or flames in hazard area. Do
    not touch spilled material.  Stop leak if you can do it without risk. Do
    not get water inside container.  For small spills, take up with sand or
    other non-combustible absorbent material and place into container for later
    disposal.  For large spills, dike far ahead of spill for later disposal
    (*DOT 1984).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive  pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.
SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    See Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide

 image: 






                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number  75-77-4
                                             Page 1 of 3
                      Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide
                                      for
                          TRIMETHYLCHLOROSILANE

                                   (75-77-4)
     This guide should not  be construed  to authorize  emergency personnel to
perform the procedures or  activities indicated or implied.   Care of persons
exposed to toxic chemicals must be directed by a physician or other recognized
authority.
Substance Characteristics:

Pure Form - Colorless liquid.

Odor - Sharp, acrid.

Commercial Form - 98% pure liquid.

Uses - Catalyst, solvent, silylating agent, manufacture of silicone fluids.

Material to Avoid - Water (except for use in emergency life support).

Caution:  Highly flammable.   Avoid  sources  of extreme  heat  or ignition
including sparks or fire.

Other Names - Chlorotrimethylsilane, trimethylsilyl chloride.


Personal Protective Equipment: See Chemical Profile Section VIII.


Emergency Life-Support Equipment and Supplies  That May Be Required:

Compressed oxygen,  forced-oxygen mask,  soap, water, milk, normal saline, D5W,
Ringer's lactate.


Signs and Symptoms of Acute Trimethylchlorosilane Exposure:

Warning:   In the  presence  of  water,  trimethylchlorosilane  liberates
hydrochloric acid, which is extremely corrosive.  Caution is advised.

Signs  and  symptoms of  acute   trimethylchlorosilane exposure may include
increased salivation, intense thirst, difficulty swallowing, chills, pain, and
shock.   Oral, esophageal, and stomach burns are  common.  Vomitus generally has
a coffee-ground  appearance.

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number: 75-77-4
                                             Page 2 of 3

                             TRIMETHYLCHLOROSILANE

Acute inhalation exposure may  result in  hoarseness, laryngitis,  a feeling of
suffocation,  dyspnea  (shortness  of  breath),  choking, respiratory tract
irritation, chest pain, and pulmonary edema.  The  potential for circulatory
collapse  is  high following  ingestion  of trimethylchlorosilane. Sneezing,
bleeding of  the nose and gums, and ulceration of the nasal and oral mucosa may
also occur.  Renal toxicity has been observed in animals.

If the  eyes come  in contact  with trimethylchlorosilane, irritation, pain,
swelling, corneal erosion,  and  blindness  may result.   Dermal  exposure is
generally followed  by dermatitis (red, inflamed skin), severe burns, pain, and
shock.
Emergency Life-Support Procedures:

Acute exposure  to trimethylchlorosilane  may require  decontamination and life
support for the victims.  Emergency personnel should wear protective clothing
appropriate to  the  type and degree  of  contamination.   Air-purifying or
supplied-air respiratory equipment should  also be worn, as necessary. Rescue
vehicles should carry supplies such as plastic sheeting and  disposable plastic
bags to assist in preventing spread of contamination.
Inhalation Exposure:

1.  Move victims to fresh air.  Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure
     to trimethylchlorosilane.

2.  Evaluate vital signs including  pulse and  respiratory rate,  and note any
     trauma.   If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.  If breathing  is labored, administer  oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.  Obtain authorization  and/or further  instructions from the local hospital
     for  administration  of an  antidote or  performance  of other invasive
     procedures.

4.  RUSH to  a health care  facility.
Dermal/Eye Exposure:

1.  Remove  victims from exposure.   Emergency personnel should avoid self-
     exposure to trimethylchlorosilane.

2.  Evaluate vital signs including  pulse and  respiratory rate,  and note any
     trauma.   If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.  If breathing  is labored,  administer  oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.  Remove contaminated clothing as soon as possible.

4.  If eye exposure has occurred, eyes must be flushed with lukewarm water for
     at least 15 minutes.

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number: 75-77-4
                                             Page 3 of 3

                             TRIMETHYLCHLOROSILANE

5.   Wash exposed skin areas THOROUGHLY with soap and water.

6.   Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from  the local  hospital
     for administration of  an  antidote  or  performance of other invasive
     procedures.

7.   RUSH to a health care facility.


Ingestion Exposure:

1.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate,  and note  any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.  If breathing  is  labored,  administer  oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

2.   Rinse mouth  with large  amounts of  water.  Inform victims not to swallow
     this water.

3.   DO NOT induce vomiting or  attempt to neutralize!

4   Obtain authorization and/or  further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration of  an  antidote  or  performance of other invasive
     procedures.

5.   Activated charcoal is of no value.

6.   Give the victims water or milk:  Children up  to 1  year old, 125  mL  (4 oz
     or 1/2  cup); children 1 to 12 years old, 200 mL (6 oz or 3/4 cup); adults,
     250 mL (8 oz or 1 cup).   Water or milk should be given only if victims are
     conscious and alert.

7.   RUSH to a health care facility.

 image: 






                                           CAS Registry Number:  75-78-5
                                           Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                  Date: October 31, 1985
                                                  Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - DIMETHYLDICHLOROSILANE

CAS Registry Number: 75-78-5

Synonyms: Dichlorodimethylsilane; Dichlorodimethylsilicon; Inerton AW-DMCS;
Silane, Dichlorodimethyl-

Chemical Formula:  C2H6Cl2Si

Molecular Weight: 129.07


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

          Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302: LC50 inhalation:
          (mouse) 0.0003 mg/liter/2 hour (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

          TPQ: 500 (pounds)

          RQ: 1 (pounds)
              (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

          Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point: 158°F, 70°C (NFPA 1984, p. 325M-42)

    Specific  Gravity (H2O=1):  1.1 (NFPA 1984, p. 325M-42)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg): 100 at 17.5°C (Weast 1984, p. D-200)

    Melting Point: -123°F, -86°C (*CHRIS  1978)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  4.45 (NFPA 1984, p. 352M-42)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

    Solubility in Water: Decomposes (NFPA 1984, p. 325M-42)

    Appearance and Odor:  Colorless liquid with sharp  irritating odor (*CHRIS
    1978).

 image: 






                                            CAS Registry Number: 75-78-5
                                            Page 2 of 4

                               DIMETHYLDICHLOROSILANE

SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV: Not Found

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended:  Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation: Yes (*CHRIS 1978)
                    Skin: Yes  (*CHRIS 1978)
                    Ingestion:  Yes (*Rumack 1975 to Present)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic): Inhalation irritates mucous
    membranes.  Severe gastrointestinal damage may occur. Vapors cause severe
    eye and lung injury.  Upon short contact, second and third degree burns may
    occur (*CHRIS 1978).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure: Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used):   16°F (OC) (*Hawley 1977)
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL: 3.4% (*Sax 1975)
        UEL:  9.5% (*Sax 1975)

    Extinguishing Methods: Extinguish with dry chemical, carbon dioxide,
    water spray, fog, or foam.  Move container from fire area if it can be done
    without risk.  Do not get water inside container. Cool containers that are
    exposed to fire from outside  until well after fire is out.  Withdraw
    immediately in case of rising sound from venting safety device or
    discoloration of tank due to  fire (DOT 1984, Guide 29).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  Avoid contact with skin, eyes, or
    clothing.  Wear acid-vapor respirator, rubber gloves, chemical worker's
    goggles, other protective and corrosive-resistant equipment as needed
    (*CHRIS  1978; *Encyc Occupat Health and Safety 1971).  Runoff from fire
    control or dilution water may cause pollution.  Isolate for one-half mile
    in all directions if tank car or truck involved  in fire (DOT 1984, Guide
    29).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards: Vapor may explode if ignited in an
    enclosed area; reacts with water to produce irritating and toxic gases.
    Toxic and irritating hydrogen chloride and phosgene may form in fire
    (CHRIS  1987). Runoff to sewer may create fire or explosion hazard (DOT
    1984, Guide  29).

SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:
               Stable: Yes (Weiss  1980)

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  75-78-5
                                           Page 3 of 4

                               DIMETHYLDICHLOROSILANE

SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA   (continued)

        Conditions to Avoid: Not Found

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid): Reacts vigorously with water to
    generate hydrogen chloride ("CHRIS 1978).

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts: Reacts with water; irritating gas
    is produced.  Hydrogen chloride and phosgene gases may be formed upon
    heating (CHRIS 1987).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:  Not Found
                             May Not Occur: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid: Not Found


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Chemical intermediate for silicone fluids and in ethchlorvynol assays
    (*SRI; *AOAC 1965).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Avoid inhalation and skin contact (see Section III above).  Shut off
    ignition sources; no flares, smoking or flames in hazard area.  Do not
    touch spilled materials; stop leak if you can do so without risk. Use
    water spray to reduce vapors; however do not get water inside containers.
    Small spills:  absorb with sand or other non-combustible absorbent material
    and place into containers for  later disposal.  Large spills:  dike far
    ahead of spill for later disposal (DOT 1984, Guide 29).  Use effective fume
    removal device (*AOAC 1965).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit. See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.

    SUIT MATERIAL PERFORMANCE (Based on EPA/USCG "Guidelines", 1987)
                       (Chemical Resistance/Amount of Data)

           Neoprene            GOOD/LIMITED**
           Nitrile               POOR/LIMITED**
           PVC                 POOR/LIMITED**
           Viton               GOOD/LIMITED**

     *Based on qualitative performance information.
    **Based on a chemical analog.

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                                       CAS Registry Number: 75-78-5
                                       Page 4 of 4
                            DIMETHYLDICHLOROSILANE

SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

   See Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide

 image: 






                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  75-78-5
                                             Page 1 of 3
                      Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide
                                      for
                         DIMETHYLDICHLOROSILANE

                                   (75-78-5)
     This guide should not  be construed  to authorize emergency personnel to
perform the procedures or  activities indicated  or implied.   Care of persons
exposed to toxic chemicals must be directed by a physician or other recognized
authority.
Substance Characteristics:

Pure Form - Colorless liquid.

Odor - Sharp, irritating.

Commercial Form - Liquid in steel drums.

Use - Manufacture of silicone products.

Material to Avoid - Water (except for use in emergency life support).

Caution:  Flammable liquid.   Avoid sources  of extreme  heat or ignition
including sparks or fire.  Dimethylchlorosilane will liberate hydrochloric acid
upon contact with water.

Other Names - Dichlorodimethylsilane, dichlorodimethylsilicon, Inerton AW-DMCS.


Personal Protective Equipment:  See Chemical Profile Section VIII.


Emergency Life-Support Equipment and Supplies That May Be Required:

Compressed oxygen, forced-oxygen mask, soap, water,  milk, normal saline, D5W,
Ringer's lactate.


Signs and Symptoms of Acute Dimethyldichlorosilane Exposure:

Signs and  symptoms of acute ingestion of dimethyldichlorosilane may be severe
and  include increased  salivation, intense thirst,  difficulty  swallowing,
chills,  pain, and  shock.    Oral,  esophageal, and stomach burns are common.
Vomitus generally  has a  coffee-ground  appearance.   The   potential  for
circulatory collapse is high following ingestion of dimethyldichlorosilane.

 image: 






                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  75-78-5
                                             Page 2 of 3

                            DIMETHYLDICHL.OROSILANE

Acute inhalation  exposure may result in sneezing, choking, laryngitis, dyspnea
(shortness of breath), respiratory tract irritation, and chest  pain.  Bleeding
of nose and gums,  ulceration of  the nasal and oral mucosa, pulmonary edema,
chronic bronchitis, and pneumonia may also occur.

If the eyes  have  come in  contact  with  dimethyldichlorosilane, irritation,
pain, swelling,  corneal erosion,  and blindness may result  Dermatitis (red,
inflamed skin), severe bu.rns, pain, and shock generally follow dermal exposure.
Emergency Life-Support Procedures:

Acute exposure to dimethyldichlorosilane may require  decontamination and life
support for the victims.   Emergency personnel should wear protective clothing
appropriate to  the  type and degree  of contamination.   Air-purifying or
supplied-air respiratory equipment should also be worn, as necessary.  Rescue
vehicles should carry supplies such as plastic sheeting  and disposable plastic
bags to assist in preventing spread of contamination.
Inhalation Exposure:

1.   Move victims to fresh air. Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure
     to dimethyldichlorosilane.

2.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and  respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.  If breathing is  labored,  administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.   Obtain authorization  and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for  administration of an  antidote  or performance of  other invasive
     procedures.

4.   RUSH to a health care facility.
Dermal/Eye Exposure:

1.  Remove  victims  from  exposure.   Emergency personnel should avoid self-
     exposure to dimethyldichlorosilane.

2.  Evaluate vital signs including pulse and  respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.   If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial  respiration.  If breathing is labored,  administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.  Remove contaminated clothing as soon as possible.

4.  If eye exposure has occurred, eyes must be flushed with lukewarm water for
     at least 15 minutes.

5.  Wash exposed skin areas THOROUGHLY with soap and water.

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  75-78-5
                                             Page 3 of 3

                            DIMETHYLDICHLOROSILANE

6.   Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from  the local hospital
     for administration  of  an  antidote  or performance of  other invasive
     procedures.

7.   RUSH to a health care facility.
Ingestion Exposure:

1.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and  respiratory rate,  and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.  If breathing is  labored,  administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

2.   DO NOT induce vomiting or attempt to neutralize!

3.   Rinse mouth  with large amounts of water.  Inform victims not  to swallow
     this water.

4.   Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for  administration of an  antidote  or performance of  other invasive
     procedures.

5.   Activated charcoal is of no value.

6.   Give the victims water or milk:  Children up to 1 year old, 125  mL (4 oz
     or 1/2 cup); children 1 to 12 years old, 200 mL (6 oz or 3/4 cup); adults,
     250 mL (8 oz or 1 cup).  Water  or milk should be given only if victims are
     conscious and alert.

7.   RUSH  to a health care facility.

 image: 






                                           CAS Registry Number:  75-79-6
                                           Page 1 of 3
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - METHYLTRICHLOROSILANE

CAS Registry Number:  75-79-6

Synonyms: Methylsilyl Trichloride; Silane, Methyltrichloro-; Silane,
Trichloromethyl-; Trichloromethylsilane; Trichloromethylsilicon

Chemical Formula:  CH3Cl3Si

Molecular Weight:  149.48


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

          Toxicity Value  Used for Listing Under Section 302:  LC50 inhalation
          (mouse) 0.00018 mg/liter/2 hour (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

          TPQ: 500 (pounds)

          RQ: 1 (pounds)
              (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

          Section 313  Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point:  152°F, 66.5°C (*Clayton and Clayton 1981-82)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1): 1.27 at 25°C (*CHRIS 1978)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  Not Found

    Melting Point:  -108°F,  -77.8°C (Weast 1983, p. C-515)

    Vapor Density fAIR=l):  5.17 (*Clayton and Clayton 1981-82)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l):  Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  Not Found

    Appearance and Odor:  Acrid odor, sharp like hydrochloric acid, colorless
    liquid (*CHRIS 1978).

 image: 






                                            CAS Registry Number: 75-79-6
                                            Page 2 of 3

                               METHYLTRICHLOROSILANE

SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV: Not Found

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended:  Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Yes (*Sax 1975)
                     Skin:  Yes  (*Sax 1975)
                     Ingestion:  Yes (*Rumack 1975 to  Present)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic): As  with other
    chlorosilanes, acute exposures may be highly toxic and may cause death or
    permanent injury  after  very  short exposures to small quantitites.  Chronic
    exposures may be  moderately toxic and involve irreversible and reversible
    changes (*Sax 1975).  Skin contact may produce severe burns with pain and
    risk of secondary  infections.  Ingestion may produce oral, esophageal, and
    stomach burns, intensity will vary from mild to very severe,
    gastrointestinal  damage is rare but may occur (*Rumack 1975 to Present).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure:  Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND  EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used):   45°F (OC); 15°F (CC) (*CHRIS 1978)
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL: 7.6%  (*NFPA  1978)
        UEL:  20%  (*NFPA  1978)

    Extinguishing Methods:  Dry chemical or carbon dioxide may be used for
    small fires. Water may  be used for large fires if firefighters are
    protected from  violent reaction of methyltrichlorosilane with water. Water
    may be used to  keep containers cool (*NFPA  1978).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  Self-contained  breathing apparatus is
    required as combustion/decomposition yields  acid gases/pulmonary  irritants.*
    Corrosion-resistant protective clothing, as well as  appropriate foot,
    hand, arm, head, eye, and face protection are required where contact is
    possible (*Encyc Occupat Health and Safety 1971).

    Unusual Fire and  Explosion Hazards: Toxic hydrogen chloride and phosgene
    gases may form in fires. Reacts with water to form hydrochloric acid
    (CHRIS 1987).   Vapor forms  flammable mixture with air (*NFPA 1978).  May
    form explosive  mixture in air (*Hawley 1977).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  3

SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:  Yes (*Hawley 1977; 'CHRIS 1978)
               Stable:

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  75-79-6
                                           Page 3 of 3

                               METHYLTRICHLOROSILANE

SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA   (continued)

        Conditions to Avoid: Contact with water or moist air (*NFPA  1978,
        *Sax 1979).

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid): Reacts with water or  steam to form
    hydrochloric acid ("CHRIS 1978).

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  Hydrogen chloride and phosgene
    formed in fires (*CHRIS 1978).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:  Not Found
                             May Not Occur: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid: Not Found


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Monomer for silicone resins (*SRI).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Spills  can be neutralized by flushing with large quantities of water
    followed by treatment with sodium bicarbonate. Provide adequate protection
    against generated hydrogen chloride. Do not allow water to  get into
    container since resulting pressure could cause container to rupture (*NFPA
    1978). Protect against potentially violent reaction  with water (see
    Section III above). Avoid  breathing vapors and contact with skin
    (see Section III above).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.
SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    See Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide

 image: 






                                              EFATG
                                              CAS Registry Number:  75-79-6
                                              Page 1 of 3
                      Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide
                                      for
                          METHYLTRICHLOROSILANE

                                   (75-79-6)
     This guide  should not  be construed  to authorize  emergency personnel to
perform the procedures or activities indicated  or implied.  Care  of persons
exposed to toxic chemicals must be directed by a physician or other  recognized
authority.
Substance Characteristics:

Pure Form - Colorless liquid.

Odor - Sharp, acrid.

Commercial Form - Liquid in 55-gallon drums or 1-gallon glass bottles.

Use - Manufacture of silicones.

Material to Avoid - Water (except for use in emergency life support).

Caution:  Flammable liquid.   Avoid sources  of  extreme heat or ignition
including sparks or fire.

Other Names     -     Methylsilyltrichloride, trichloromethylsilane,
trichloromethylsilicon.


Personal Protective Equipment:  See Chemical  Profile Section VIII.


Emergency Life-Support Equipment and Supplies That May Be Required:

Compressed oxygen, forced-oxygen mask, soap, water,  milk, normal saline, D5W,
Ringer's lactate.

Signs and Symptoms of  Acute Methyltrichlorosilane Exposure:

Warning:     In  the presence  of water,  methyltrichlorosilane  liberates
hydrochloric acid, which  is extremely corrosive.  Caution is advised.

Signs and symptoms of  acute ingestion of methyltrichlorosilane may include
excessive salivation, intense thirst,  difficulty in swallowing, chills, pain,
and shock. Oral, esophageal, and stomach burns are common.  Vomitus generally
has a coffee-ground appearance.  The potential for circulatory collapse is high
following ingestion of methyltrichlorosilane.

 image: 






                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  75-79-6
                                             Page 2 of 3

                             METHYLTRICHLOROSILANE

Acute inhalation exposure may result in  hoarseness, laryngitis,  a feeling of
suffocation,  dyspnea  (shortness  of  breath),  choking,  respiratory  tract
irritation, chest pain, and pulmonary edema.   Sneezing,  bleeding of  the nose
and gums,  and ulceration  of the  nasal and oral mucosa may also occur. Renal
toxicity has been observed in animals.

If the eyes have come in  contact with methyltrichlorosilane, then irritation,
pain, swelling,  corneal erosion,  and blindness may result  Dermatitis (red,
inflamed skin), severe burns, pain, and shock generally follow dermal exposure.
Emergency Life-Support Procedures:

Acute exposure  to methyltrichlorosilane may require decontamination and life
support for the victims.  Emergency personnel should wear protective clothing
appropriate to  the  type and degree  of  contamination.   Air-purifying  or
supplied-air respiratory equipment should  also be worn, as necessary. Rescue
vehicles should carry supplies such  as plastic sheeting  and disposable plastic
bags to assist in preventing spread of contamination.
Inhalation Exposure:

1.   Move victims to fresh air. Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure
     to methyltrichlorosilane.

2.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and  respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration. If breathing is  labored,  administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.   Obtain authorization  and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for  administration  of an  antidote  or performance of  other invasive
     procedures.

4.   RUSH to a health care facility.
Dermal/Eye Exposure:

1.  Remove  victims  from  exposure.    Emergency personnel should avoid self-
     exposure to methyltrichlorosilane.

2.  Evaluate vital signs including pulse and  respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.   If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.  If breathing is labored,  administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.  Remove contaminated clothing as soon as possible.

4.  If eye exposure has occurred, eyes must be flushed with lukewarm water for
     at least 15 minutes.
           r

5.  Wash exposed skin areas THOROUGHLY with soap and water.

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  75-79-6
                                             Page 3 of 3

                             METHYLTRICHLOROSILANE

6.   Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from  the local hospital
     for administration  of  an  antidote  or performance  of  other invasive
     procedures.

7.   RUSH to a health care facility.
Ingestion Exposure:

1.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and  respiratory rate,  and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.  If breathing is  labored,  administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

2.   Rinse mouth  with large  amounts of water.  Inform victims not  to swallow
     this water.

3.   DO NOT induce vomiting or attempt to neutralize!

4.   Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration of  an  antidote  or performance of  other invasive
     procedures.

5.   Activated charcoal is of no value.

6.   Give the victims water or milk:  children up to 1 year  old, 125  mL (4 oz
     or 1/2 cup); children 1 to 12 years old, 200 mL (6 oz or 3/4 cup); adults,
     250 mL (8 oz or 1 cup).  Water  or milk should be given only if victims are
     conscious and alert.

7.   RUSH  to a health care facility.

 image: 






                                           CAS Registry Number: 75-86-5
                                           Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - ACETONE CYANOHYDRIN

CAS Registry Number:  75-86-5

Synonyms: 2-Cyano-2-Propanol; 2-Hydroxy-2-Methylpropionitrile;
2-Hydroxyisobutyronitrile; 2-Methyllactonitrile; 2-Propanone, Cyanohydrin;
alpha-Hydroxyisobutyronitrile; Lactonitrile, 2-Methyl-; Propanenitrile,
2-Hydroxy-2-Methyl-; USAF RH-8

Chemical Formula: C4H7NO

Molecular Weight: 85.10


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

          Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:  LD50 oral
          (Guinea Pig) 9 mg/kg  (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

          TPQ: 1,000 (pounds)

          RQ: 10 (pounds)

          Section 313  Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point:  180°F, 82°C at 23 mmHg (Weast 1983, p. C-209)

    Specific  Gravity (H2O=1): 0.9267 at 25°C/4°C (*Merck 1976)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  0.8 at 20°C (*Clayton and Clayton 1981-82)

    Melting Point:  -2.2°F, -19°C (*Merck 1976)

    Vapor Density (AIR-1): 2.93 (*Clayton and Clayton 1981-82)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

    Solubility in Water: Freely soluble  in water (*Merck 1976)

    Appearance and Odon  Colorless liquid (*Hawley 1977); distinct strong
    cyanide odor (*Lefaux  1968)

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 75-86-5
                                            Page 2 of 4

                               ACETONE CYANOHYDRIN

SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV: Not Found

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended:  Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Yes (*Patty 1963)
                    Skin: Yes (*Patty 1963)
                    Ingestion:  Yes (*Rumack 1975 to  Present)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic): This material is considered
    very hazardous and should only be handled under conditions that prevent any
    inhalation of vapor or skin contact (*Patty 1963). May be slightly
    irritating to skin and mucous membranes (*Merck 1976).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure: Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used):  165°F, 74°C (CC) (*NFPA 1978)
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL:  2.2% (*NFPA 1978)
        UEL:  12% (*NFPA 1978)

    Extinguishing Methods: Water may cause frothing if it gets below surface
    of liquid and turns to steam.  Water fog gently applied to surface will
    cause frothing which will extinguish fire.  Use water spray, dry chemical,
    alcohol foam, or carbon dioxide.  Use water to keep fire-exposed containers
    cool, from a safe distance (*NFPA 1978).

    Special Fire  Fighting Procedures:  Wear air-supplied mask with canister
    approved for use with acrylonitrile in less  than 2 percent concentration,
    rubber or plastic gloves, cover goggles or face  mask, rubber boots, slicker
    suit, safety helmet (*CHRIS 1978).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards: Too  dangerous to health to expose
    fire fighters; a few whiffs of vapor could cause death; vapor or liquid
    could be fatal on penetrating normal protective clothing. Vapor forms
    explosive mixture with air (*NFPA 1978).  On contact with sulfuric  acid, it
    may explode (*Sax 1979).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  1


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:  Yes (*NFPA 1978)
               Stable:

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 75-86-5
                                            Page 3 of 4

                                ACETONE CYANOHYDRIN

SECTION V   (continued)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Vapor forms explosive mixtures with air (*NFPA
                                            1978)

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  May react violently with water
    (*NFPA 1978). Contact with sulfuric acid may cause it to explode (*Sax
    1979).

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  Decomposes when heated to 248°F or
    at lower temperature under alkaline conditions, emitting highly toxic
    hydrogen cyanide (*NFPA 1978).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:  Not Found
                              May Not Occur:  Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Used in the manufacture of insecticides  (*Hawley  1977) and as a chemical
    intermediate (*SRI).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Do  not touch spilled material.  Use water spray to reduce vapors. Small
    spills: take up with sand or other noncombustible absorbent material and
    place into containers for later disposal.  Large spills:  dike far ahead of
    spill for later disposal (DOT 1984, Guide 55).  Prevent any inhalation
    of vapor or skin contact (*Patty 1963).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA  and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit. See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.
SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure: Nausea, loss of consciousness,
    convulsions (*Clayton and Clayton 1982); irregular heart beat, headache,
    vomiting (*Patty 1963).  Slightly irritating  to the skin (*Merck 1976).

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures: Move victim to fresh air; call
    emergency medical care.  If not breathing, give artificial respiration
    (avoid mouth to mouth resuscitation).  If breathing is difficult, give
    oxygen. In case of contact with material, immediately flush skin or eyes
    with running water for at least 15 minutes. Speed in removing material

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  75-86-5
                                           Page 4 of 4

                               ACETONE CYANOHYDRIN

SECTION IX   (continued)

    from skin is of extreme importance.  Remove and isolate contaminated
    clothing and shoes at the site.  Keep victim quiet and maintain normal body
    temperature.  Effects may be delayed; keep victim under observation.  Avoid
    contact with contaminated skin (DOT 1984, Guide 55; *Rumack 1975 to
    Present).

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                                          CAS Registry Number: 76-02-8
                                          Page 1 of 4
                         EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                  Date: October 31, 1985
                                                  Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY ~ TRICHLOROACETYL CHLORIDE

CAS Registry Number: 76-02-8

Synonyms: (NIOSH/RTECS 1985 Synonyms On-Line File) Acetyl Chloride,
Trichloro-; Trichloroacetic Acid Chloride; Trichloroacetochloride

Chemical Formula:  CC13COC1

Molecular Weight:  181.83


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

          Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:

            LC50 inhalation  (mouse) 0.445 mg/liter (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

          TPQ: 500 (pounds)

          RQ: 1 (pounds) (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

          Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point:  244°F, 118°C (Hawley 1981, p. 1040)

    Specific  Gravity (H2O=1):  1.654 at 0°C/4°C (Hawley 1981, p. 1040)

    Vapor Pressure  (mmHg):  Not Found

    Melting Point: Not Found

    Vapor Density (AIR=1): Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

    Solubility in Water: Decomposes (Weast 1979, p. C-98)

    Appearance and Odor: Liquid (Hawley 1981, p.  1040)

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  76-02-8
                                           Page 2 of 4

                               TRICHLOROACETYL CHLORIDE

SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIHTLV: Not Found

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended:  Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation: Yes (Hawley 1981, p. 1040)
                     Skin: Yes (Hawley 1981, p. 1040)
                     Ingestion: Yes (Hawley 1981, p. 1040)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  Highly toxic by ingestion
    and inhalation; strong Irritant to skin and tissues (Hawley 1981, p.  1040).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by  Exposure: Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used):  Not Found
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL: Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods: Material may react violently with water.
    Extinguish with dry chemical, carbon dioxide, water spray, fog, or foam
    (DOT 1984, Guide 59).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures: Move container from fire area if you
    can do so without risk.  Spray cooling water  on containers that are exposed
    to flames until well after fire is out. Keep unnecessary people away;
    isolate hazard area and deny entry. Stay upwind; keep out of low  areas.
    Wear positive pressure breathing apparatus and special protective clothing
    (DOT 1984, Guide 59).

    Unusual Fire  and Explosion Hazards:  Material may  burn but does  not ignite
    readily. Poisonous if inhaled or swallowed; skin contact poisonous.
    Contact may cause burns to skin and eyes (DOT 1984, Guide 59).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  Not Found


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable: Not Found
               Stable: Not Found

         Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid): Not Found

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 76-02-8
                                            Page 3 of 4

                               TRICHLOROACETYL CHLORIDE

SECTION V   (continued)

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts: Not Found

    Hazardous Polymerization: May Occur: Not Found
                             May Not Occur:  Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Not Found
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Avoid breathing vapors (see Section III above).  Do not touch spilled
    material; stop leak if you can do so without risk.  Use water spray to
    reduce vapors. Small spills: absorb with sand or other noncombustible
    absorbent material and place into containers for later disposal.  Large
    spills: dike far ahead of spill for later disposal. Keep unnecessary
    people away; isolate hazard area and deny entry.  Stay upwind; keep out of
    low areas (DOT 1984, Guide 59).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA  and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at the
    beginning  of the profiles for additional information.
SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure:  Contact may cause burns to skin and eyes
    (DOT 1984, Guide 59).

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures:  Move victim to fresh air; call
    emergency medical care. If not breathing, give artificial respiration.  If
    breathing is difficult, give oxygen.  In case of contact with material,
    immediately flush skin  or eyes with running water for at least 15 minutes.
    Remove and isolate contaminated clothing and shoes at the site.  Keep
    victim quiet and maintain normal body temperature.  Effects may be  delayed;
    keep victim under observation (DOT 1984, Guide 59).

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                                         CAS Registry Number: 76-02-8
                                         Page 4 of 4

                             TRICHLOROACETYL CHLORIDE

COMMENTS

    Sources searched but no information found:

       NIOSH/RTECS 1983
       ACGIH 1983
       NIOSH/OSHA 1978
       Merck  1983
       Sax 1984
       NFPA  1984
       Student 1981
       Weiss 1980
       CHRIS 1978
       Doull 1980
       Clayton and Clayton 1981-82
       Arena  1979
       Gosselin 1984
       Encyc Occupat Health and Safety 1983
       Buchel 1983
       Farm Chemicals Handbook 1984
       Hayes  1982
       Oilman 1985

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 77-47-4
                                           Page 1 of 4
                          EPA' CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                  Date: October 31, 1985
                                                  Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - HEXACHLOROCYCLOPENTADIENE

CAS Registry Number: 77-47-4

Synonyms:  1,3-Cyclopentadiene, 1,2,3,4,5,5-Hexachloro-; C 56; Graphlox;
HCCPD; Hexachlorocyclopentadien; Hexachloropentadiene; HRS 1655; NCI-C55607;
PCL; Perchlorocyclopentadiene

Chemical Formula:  CSC16

Molecular Weight: 272.77


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

          Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:

                 LC50 inhalation (rat) 0.018 mg/liter/4 hours (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

          TPQ: 100 (pounds)

          RQ: 1 (pounds) (statutory); 100 (pounds) (proposed)

          Section  313 Listed (Yes or No): Yes


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State:  Liquid

    Boiling Point: 462°F, 239°C at 753 mmHg (*Weast 1984)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1): 1.7019 at 25°C/4°C (*Weast 1984)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  0.080 at 25°C (*Clayton and Clayton 1981-82)

    Melting Point:  16°F, -9°C (*Weast 1984)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  9.4 (*Clayton and Clayton 1981-82)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  800 ppb (*Clayton and Clayton 1981-82)

    Appearance and Odor:  Yellow-green liquid (*Weast 1984) with a pungent
    odor (*Hawley  1981)

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 77-47-4
                                           Page 2 of 4

                               HEXACHLOROCYCLOPENTADIENE

SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV: TWA 0.1 mg/ms (0.01 ppm) (ACGIH 1986-87, p.20)

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended:  Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation: Yes (*Hawley 1981)
                    Skin:  Yes (*Hawley 1981)
                    Ingestion: Yes (*Hawley 1981)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  This compound is very toxic
    and may be fatal if inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through the skin. The
    probable human lethal dose is 50-500 mg/kg, or between 1 teaspoon and 1
    ounce for a 150 Ib.  (70 kg) person. Severe exposure induces pulmonary
    hyperemia and edema, degenerative and necrotic changes in brain, heart and
    adrenal glands and  necrosis of liver and kidney tubules (*DOT 1984;
    Gosselin 1984, p. 11-169).

    Medical Conditions  Generally Aggravated by Exposure:  Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): Non-flammable (*Hawley 1981)
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL: Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods:  Use dry chemical, carbon dioxide, water  spray or
    foam for small fires.  For large fires, use water spray, fog, or  foam.
    Move hexachlorocyclopentadiene from fire area if this can be  done without
    risk (*DOT 1984).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures: Isolate hazard area and deny entry.
    Wear positive pressure breathing apparatus and special protective clothing.
    Fight fire from maximum distance. Dike fire control water for later
    disposal (*DOT 1984).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  Toxic hydrogen chloride, chlorine,
    and phosgene gases may form in fires.  In presence of moisture, will
    corrode iron and other materials; flammable and explosive hydrogen  gas may
    collect in enclosed space (Weiss 1980, p. 498).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  Not Found

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 77-47-4
                                            Page 3 of 4

                               HEXACHLOROCYCLOPENTADIENE

SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable: Not Found
               Stable:  Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Reacts slowly with water to form hydrochloric
        acid; however, the reaction is not hazardous (Weiss  1980, p. 498).

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Will corrode iron  and other metals
    in the presence of moisture (Weiss  1980, p. 498).

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  Not Found

    Hazardous Polymerization: May Occur:
                             May Not Occur:  Yes (Weiss 1980, p. 498)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not  Found


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Major uses of hexachlorocyclopentadiene  include applications as a chemical
    intermediate for  insecticides and flame retardants (*SRI).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Keep unnecessary people away; isolate hazard and deny entry.  Stay upwind
    and keep out  of low areas. Ventilate closed spaces before entering. Do
    not touch spilled material; stop leak if this can be done without risk.
    Use water spray to reduce vapors.  Absorb small spills with sand or other
    noncombustible absorbent material and place into  containers for later
    disposal.  Dike far ahead  of large spills for later disposal (*DOT 1984).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA  and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.

    SUIT MATERIAL PERFORMANCE (Based on EPA/USCG "Guidelines",  1987)
    (Chemical Resistance/Amount of Data)

           Butyl                 POOR/LIMITED
           Nitrile               POOR/LIMITED
           Viton                 GOOD/LIMITED

     *Based on qualitative performance information.
    **Based on a chemical analog.

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  77-47-4
                                            Page 4 of 4

                               HEXACHLOROCYCLOPENTADIENE
      *
SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure:  Inhalation of mist is highly irritating
    to mucous membranes, causing tearing, sneezing, and salivation.  Eye
    contact may result in severe irritation.  Contact of liquid with the skin
    may cause blistering and burning (*CHRIS 1978). Headaches and throat
    irritation have also been reported as a result of exposure to this compound
    (Clayton  and Clayton 1981, p. 3751).

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures: Move victim to fresh air and call
    emergency medical care. If not breathing, give artificial respiration. If
    breathing is difficult, give oxygen.  Remove and isolate contaminated
    clothing and shoes at the site. In case of contact with the material,
    immediately flush skin  or eyes with running water for at least 15 minutes.
    Speed in  removing material from the skin is of extreme importance.  Keep
    victim quiet and maintain normal body temperature.  Since effects may be
    delayed, keep victim under observation (*DOT 1984).

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 77-78-1
                                           Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - DIMETHYL SULFATE

CAS Registry Number: 77-78-1

Synonyms: Dimethyl Monosulfate; Dimethyl Sulphate; DMS; DMS (Methyl Sulfate);
Methyl Sulfate; Sulfuric Acid, Dimethyl Ester; Dimethylsulfate

Chemical Formula: C2H6O4S

Molecular Weight:  126.14


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

          Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:

                 LC50 inhalation (mouse) 0.28 mg/liter  (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

          TPQ: 500 (pounds)

          RQ: 1  (pounds) (statutory); 100 (pounds) (proposed)

          Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): Yes


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point:  About 370°F, 188°C (with decomposition) (*Merck 1983)

    Specific  Gravity (H2O=1): 1.3283 at 20°C (*Weast 1979)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg): 0.1 at room temperature (*IARC 1972-1985); 0.5 at
    20°C (NIOSH/OSHA 1978, p. 90)

    Melting Point:  -25.15°F, -31.75°C (*Weast 1979)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  4.35 (*Clayton  and Clayton 1981-82)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l):  Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  2.8  g/100 mL at 18°C (*Merck 1983)

    Appearance and Odor:  It is a colorless oily liquid (*Merck 1983) with a
    faint, onion-like odor (*NFPA  1978)

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  77-78-1
                                           Page 2 of 4

                               DIMETHYL SULFATE

SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  TWA 5 mg/ms (1 ppm) (NIOSH 1987, p. 110)

    ACGIH TLV: TWA 0.5 mg/m3 (0.1 ppm) (skin) (ACGIH 1985, p. 17)

    IDLH: 10 ppm (NIOSH/OSHA 1978, p. 90)

    Other Limits Recommended:  Industrial substance suspect of carcinogenic
    potential for man (ACGIH 1985, p. 42).

    Routes of Entry:  Inhalation: Yes (*Sax 1975)
                    Skin: Yes (*Sax 1975)
                    Ingestion:  Yes (*Sax 1975)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  Acute:  extremely toxic
    vapors and liquid — a few whiffs or contact on skin could be fatal (*NFPA
    1978). Also acutely  toxic  if ingested.  Delayed effects which are
    ultimately fatal may also  occur (*Merck 1983). Lethal concentrations as
    low as 97 ppm/10 min have been reported in humans. DNA inhibition and
    damage to human somatic cells, and sister chromatid exchange in human
    fibroblast cells were observed (*NIOSH/RTECS  1985).  Delayed appearance of
    symptoms may permit unnoticed exposure to lethal quantities (Merck 1983, p.
    475).

    Medical  Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure:  Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): 182°F (CC) (*Hawley 1977)
    Flammable Limits:  Moderate fire potential  when exposed to heat or flame
    (*Sax 1975)

        LEL:  Not Found
        UEL: Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods: To extinguish small fires use water, foam, carbon
    dioxide, and dry chemicals (*Sax 1975).  For large fires use water spray,
    fog, or foam. Move container from fire area if you can do it without risk.
    Cool containers exposed to flames with water. Fight fire from a maximum
    distance (DOT 1984, Guide 57).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures: Wear positive pressure breathing
    apparatus and special protective clothing.  Dike fire control water for
    later disposal.  Do not  scatter material (DOT 1984, Guide 57).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards: Not Found

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  2

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  77-78-1
                                           Page 3 of 4

                               DIMETHYL SULFATE

SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability: Unstable:
              Stable:  Yes (*IARC 1972-1985)

        Conditions to Avoid: Not Found

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid): Material is normally stable even
    under fire exposure conditions and is not hazardously reactive with water
    (*NFPA 1978). It is incompatible with strong oxidizers and strong ammonia
    solutions (NIOSH/OSHA 1978, p. 90).

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  Not Found

    Hazardous Polymerization: May Occur:  Not Found
                             May Not Occur:  Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid: Not Found


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Used as a chemical intermediate for quaternary ammonium salts and for
    alkylation of phenols  and thiols ("'SRI), and as a methylating agent in the
    manufacture of many organic chemicals (*Merck 1983).  Formerly, dimethyl
    sulfate was used as a  war gas. It is also used in the manufacture of dyes,
    perfumes, for the separation of mineral oils,  and for the analysis of auto
    fluids (*Browning 1965).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    If spilled in a building, the building must be evacuated  and the agent
    decomposed by hosing with water or spraying with 5 percent sodium hydroxide
    (caustic soda) (*Dreisbach 1977). For large spills, evaporating
    vapors can be collected in a chamber with a gas cleaning device
    (*NIOSH/OSHA 1981).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at  the
    beginning  of the profiles for additional information.
SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure: Immediate effects of vapor exposure are
    eye irritation, cough, swelling of tongue, lips, and larynx, and lungs

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  77-78-1
                                            Page 4 of 4

                                DIMETHYL SULFATE

SECTION IX   (continued)

    (later). Ingestion or direct contact with mucous membranes causes
    corrosion. Once absorbed, lung damage and liver and kidney injury will
    occur (*Dreisbach 1977).  Liquid  dermal exposure causes blistering,
    followed by convulsions, delirium, coma, and death in severe cases (*Merck
    1983).

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures: Move victim to fresh air and call
    emergency medical care.  If not breathing, start artificial respiration; if
    breathing is difficult, give oxygen.  If dermal contact occurs, immediately
    flush with water for 15 minutes.   It is very important to quickly remove
    material from skin.  Remove and isolate contaminated clothing and shoes at
    the site.  Keep victim quiet and maintain normal body temperature.  Since
    effects may  be delayed, keep  a close watch on the victim (DOT 1984, Guide
    57).

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  77-81-6
                                           Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                  Date: October 31, 1985
                                                  Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - TABUN

CAS Registry Number: 77-81-6

Synonyms: (NIOSH/RTECS 1983 Synonyms, Volume 3, p. 127)  Phosphoramido-
cyanidic Acid, Dimethyl-, Ethyl Ester; Dimethylamidoethoxyphosphoryl Cyanide;
Dimethylphosphoramidocyanidic Acid, Ethyl Ester; Ethyl Dimethylamidocyano-
phosphate; Ethyl N,N-Dimethylphosphoramidocyanidate;  Ethyl N,N-Dimethylamino
Cyanophosphate; GA; LE-100; MCE; T-2104; TL 1578

Chemical Formula:  C5H11N2O2p

Molecular Weight:  162.15


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

       Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:

             LD50 skin (mouse) 1  mg/kg (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

       TPQ: 10 (pounds)

       RQ: 1 (pounds) (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

       Section 313 Listed  (Yes or No): No


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point:  464°F, 240°C (Merck 1983, p. 1297)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1):  1.073 (U.S. Army 1975, p.  3-2)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg): 0.07  at 25°C (U.S. Army  1975, p. 3-2)

    Melting Point: -58°F, -50°C (Merck 1983, p. 1297)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1): 5.63 (U.S. Army  1975, p. 3-2)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  Miscible (Merck 1976, p.  1297).

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  77-81-6
                                            Page 2 of 4

                               TABUN

SECTION II   (continued)

    Appearance and Odor: Colorless to brown liquid; faint fruity odor (U.S.
                         Army 1975, p.3-2)


SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV: Not Found

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended:  Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Yes (U.S. Army 1975,  p. 3-2)
                    Skin:  Yes (U.S. Army 1975, p. 3-2)
                    Ingestion:  Yes (U.S. Army 1975, p. 3-2)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic): This material is toxic by
    inhalation and by absorption through skin and eyes.  The lethal dose for
    humans may be as low as 0.01 mg/kg (Merck 1983, p. 1297). Tabun is a nerve
    agent; it acts as a cholinesterase inhibitor.  The median lethal dosage
    (respiratory) is 400 mg-minute/m3 for humans; the median incapacitating
    dosage is 300 mg-minute/m3.  Respiratory lethal dosages kill in 1 to 10
    minutes; liquid in the eye kills nearly as rapidly.  Skin absorption great
    enough to cause death may occur in 1 to 2 minutes,  but may be  delayed for 1
    to 2 hours (U.S. Army 1975, p. 3-3).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure: Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method  Used): 172°F (Sax 1984, p. 1335)
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL:  Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods:  (Non-Specific - Poison A, Liquid) Extinguish
    with alcohol foam, carbon dioxide, or dry chemical  (Student 1981, p. 56)

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  Complete protection required; have
    available decontaminants (bleach, alkali) and atropine (U.S. Army 1975, p.
    3-2).  Bleaching powder (chlorinated line) destroys Tabun but gives rise to
    cyanogen chloride (Merck 1983, p. 1297).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards: Extremely  poisonous (Merck 1983, p.
    1297). (Non-Specific — Poison A, Liquid)  Keep away from sparks, flames,
    and sources of ignition.  Keep  out of water sources  and sewers (Student
    1981, p. 56).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  Not Found

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 77-81-6
                                           Page 3 of 4

                               TABUN

SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability: Unstable:
              Stable:  Yes (U.S. Army 1975, p. 3-3)

        Conditions to Avoid: Not Found

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Avoid water and acids (U.S. Army
    1975, p. 3-2). Can react with oxidizing materials (Sax  1984, p. 1335).

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts: Hydrolysis forms hydrogen cyanide
    (U.S. Army 1975, p. 3-2). When heated to decomposition, it emits very
    toxic fumes of oxides of phosphorus and nitrogen (Sax 1984, p. 1335).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur: Not Found
                             May Not Occur: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid: Not Found
SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    This material is a chemical warfare agent (Merck 1983, p. 1297).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    (Non-Specific — Poison A, Liquid)  When handling, avoid breathing vapors,
    keep  upwind, avoid bodily contact with the material, and upon skin contact
    wash with soap and water (Student 1981, p. 56).  Speed in removing material
    from skin is of extreme importance. Remove and isolate contaminated
    clothing and shoes (DOT 1984, Guide 55).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit. See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.

    SUIT MATERIAL PERFORMANCE (Based on EPA/USCG "Guidelines",  1987)
    (Chemical Resistance/Amount of Data)

           Butyl/Neoprene       GOOD/LIMITED**
           Viton/Neoprene       GOOD/LIMITED**

     *Based on qualitative performance information.
    **Based on a chemical analog.

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                                             CAS Registry Number:  77-81-6
                                             Page 4 of 4

                                TABUN

SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure: Nerve agent symptoms include difficulty
    in breathing, drooling, nausea, vomiting, cramps, involuntary defecation
    and urination, twitching, jerking, staggering, headache, confusion,
    drowsiness, coma, and convulsion. Inhalation causes dimness of vision and
    pinpointing of the pupils (U.S. Army 1975, p. 3-2).

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures:  The toxic effects of tabun are
    similar to parathion (Sax 1984, p. 1335). First aid for parathion is as
    follows:  move victim to fresh air; call emergency  medical care. If not
    breathing, give artificial respiration.  If breathing is difficult, give
    oxygen. In case of contact with  material, immediately flush skin or eyes
    with running water for at least 15 minutes. Speed in removing material
    from skin is of extreme  importance.  Remove and  isolate contaminated
    clothing and shoes at the site.  Keep victim quiet and maintain normal body
    temperature.  Effects may be delayed; keep victim under observation (DOT
    1984, Guide 55).

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  78-00-2
                                           Page 1 of 3
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                  Date: October 31, 1985
                                                  Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - TETRAETHYLLEAD

CAS Registry Number: 78-00-2

Synonyms: Lead, Tetraethyl-; NCI-C54988; Plumbane, Tetraethyl-; TEL;
Tetraethyl Lead, Liquid; Tetraethyl Lead; Tetraethylplumbane

Chemical Formula:  C8H20Pb

Molecular Weight:  323.45


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

        Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:

             LD50 oral (rat) 12.3 mg/kg

        TPQ: 100 (pounds)

        RQ: 10  (pounds)

        Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): In Lead Compounds category


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point:  About  392°F, 200°C (*Merck 1983); decomposes between 110
    and 200°C (Verschueren 1983, p. 1085)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1):  1.653 at 20°C (*Merck 1983)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg): 0.2 at 20°C (*IARC 1972-1985)

    Melting Point: -202°F, -130°C (*IARC 1972-1985)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1):  8.6 (NFPA 1984, p. 325M-86)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

    Solubility in Water: Insoluble (*IARC 1972-1985)

    Appearance and Odor:  Colorless liquid with a  pleasant odor (Hawley 1981,
    p. 1006)

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  78-00-2
        •                                   Page 2 of 3

                               TETRAETHYLLEAD

SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  0.075 mg (lead)/m3 (NIOSH 1987, p.220)

    ACGIH TLV: 0.100 mg (lead)/m3 (skin) (ACGIH 1986-87, p.30)

    IDLH: 40 mg (lead)/m3 (NIOSH 1987, p. 220)

    Other Limits Recommended:  Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation: Yes (*Venugopal 1978)
                    Skin: Yes (*Venugopal 1978)
                    Ingestion:  Yes (*Venugopal 1978)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic): Extremely poisonous; may be
    fatal if inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed from the skin. Contact may cause
    burns to skin and eyes (*DOT 1984).  Most symptoms-of poisoning are due to
    the effects of tetraethyllead on the nervous system (*Gilman 1980).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure: Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): 200°F (no method given) (NFPA 1984, p. 325M-86)
    Flammable Limits:

        LEL:  1.8 percent by volume (NFPA 1984, p. 325M-86)
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods: Water spray may be used because the material can
    be cooled below its flash point (*NFPA 1978).

    Special Fire  Fighting Procedures: Fire fighting should be done from an
    explosive-resistant location. Use water from unmanned monitors and
    hose-holders  to keep fire-exposed containers cool.  When stopping leak, use
    water spray to protect  firefighters (*NFPA 1978).  Runoff from fire control
    or dilution water may  cause pollution (*DOT 1984).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  May explode in fires (*CHRIS 1978).

    NFPA Flammability  Rating:  2


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable: Yes (*IARC 1972-1985)
              Stable:

        Conditions to Avoid:   Decomposes slowly at room temperature and more
        rapidly at elevated temperatures (*IARC 1972-1985).

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Not Found

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 78-00-2.
                                           Page 3 of 3

                              TETRAETHYLLEAD

SECTION V   (continued)

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts: Not Found

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur: Not Found
                             May Not Occur:  Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Virtually all of the tetraethyllead produced in the USA is used as an
    antiknock additive for gasolines (*IARC 1972-1985).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Tetraethyllead is hazardous, but areas may be entered with extreme care.
    No skin surface  should be exposed. Use water spray to disperse vapors
    (*NFPA 1978).  Outdoors, stay upwind and keep out of low areas.
    Isolate hazard area (*DOT 1984).
SECTION VIII -- PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA  and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit. See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.
SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    See Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide

 image: 






                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number: 78-00-2
                                             Page 1 of 3
                      Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide
                                      for
                                TETRAETHYLLEAD

                                   (78-00-2)
     This guide should not  be construed  to authorize emergency personnel to
perform the procedures or  activities indicated  or implied.  Care of persons
exposed to toxic chemicals must be directed by a physician or other recognized
authority.
Substance Characteristics:

Pure Form - Colorless, oily liquid.

Odor - Pleasant, sweet odor.

Commercial Form - 98% pure liquid dyed red or other distinctive color.

Uses - Aviation gasoline, antiknock agent, ethylating agent.

Materials to Avoid - Oxidizers.

Caution: Flammable liquid.  When  burned, toxic  fumes of lead oxide  will be
emitted. Avoid sources of extreme heat or ignition including sparks or fire.

Other Names - Lead tetraethyl, tetraethylplumbane, TEL.


Personal Protective Equipment: See Chemical Profile  Section VIII.


Emergency Life-Support Equipment and Supplies That May Be Required:

Compressed  oxygen,  forced-oxygen mask,  soap, water, milk, activated charcoal,
saline cathartic or sorbitol, normal saline,  D5W, Ringer's  lactate, diazepam,
phenytoin, phenobarbitol, mannitol, dexamethasone.


Signs and Symptoms of Acute  Tetraethyllead Exposure:

Warning:  Effects may be delayed for hours to days.  Caution is advised.

Signs and symptoms of  acute  exposure  to  tetraethyllead may be severe and
include anxiety, irritability, insomnia, violent/frightening dreams,  headache,
disorientation,  hyperexcitability,  delusions, and  hallucinations.  Muscular
weakness, ataxia, tremors, convulsions, cerebral edema, and coma  may occur.
A metallic taste may be noted.  Sneezing, bronchitis, and  pneumonia may be
observed.    Bradycardia  (slow heart rate), hypotension (low blood pressure),
hypothermia, and pallor may  also occur.   Gastrointestinal  symptoms include
vomiting  and  diarrhea.    Tetraethyllead  may  irritate moist skin, eyes, and
mucous membranes.

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  78-00-2
                                             Page 2 of 3

                                TETRAETHYLLEAD

Emergency Life-Support Procedures:

Acute exposure to tetraethyllead may require  decontamination and  life support
for the   victims.   Emergency personnel  should  wear  protective  clothing
appropriate to  the  type and degree  of contamination.   Air-purifying or
supplied-air respiratory  equipment should  also be  worn,  as necessary.  Rescue
vehicles should carry supplies such  as plastic sheeting  and disposable plastic
bags to assist in preventing spread of contamination.


Inhalation Exposure:

1.   Move  victims to fresh air.  Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure
     to tetraethyllead.

2.   Evaluate vital signs including  pulse and  respiratory  rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is  detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.  If breathing is  labored,  administer  oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.   Obtain authorization  and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for  administration of  an  antidote or performance  of  other invasive
     procedures.

4.   RUSH to a health care facility.
Dermal/Eye Exposure:

1.  Remove  victims  from  exposure.    Emergency personnel should avoid self-
     exposure to tetraethyllead.

2.  Evaluate vital signs including pulse and  respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.   If breathing  is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.  Remove contaminated clothing as soon as possible.

4.  If eye exposure has occurred, eyes must be flushed with lukewarm water for
     at least 15 minutes.

5.  Wash exposed skin areas THOROUGHLY with soap and water.

6.  Obtain authorization  and/or further  instructions from the local hospital
     for  administration  of an  antidote or performance of other invasive
     procedures.

7.  RUSH to a health care facility.

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  78-00-2
                                             Page 3 of 3

                                TETRAETHYLLEAD

Ingestion Exposure:

1.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and  respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration. If breathing is labored,  administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support

2.   Obtain authorization  and/or further  instructions from the local hospital
     for administration  of an  antidote  or performance  of other invasive
     procedures.

3.   Give the victims water  or milk:  children up to 1 year old, 125 mL (4  oz
     or 1/2 cup); children 1 to 12 years old, 200 mL (6 oz or 3/4 cup); adults,
     250 mL (8 oz  or 1  cup).   Water or  milk should be given only if victims
     are conscious and alert.

4.   Activated charcoal may be administered if victims are conscious and alert.
     Use 15 to 30 g  (1/2 to  1 oz) for children, 50 to 100  g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz)
     for adults, with 125  to 250 mL (1/2 to 1  cup) of water.

5.   Promote excretion by  administering a saline  cathartic  or sorbitol to
     conscious and alert victims. Children require 15  to 30 g (1/2 to 1 oz)
     of cathartic; 50 to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz) is recommended for adults.

6.   RUSH  to a health care facility.

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 78-34-2
                                            Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                    Date: October 31, 1985
                                                    Revision: November 30,  1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - DIOXATHION

CAS Registry Number:  78-34-2

Synonyms:  l,4-Dioxan-2,3-diyl Bis(O,O-Diethyl Phosphorothiolothionate);
l,4-Dioxan-2,3-Diyl O,O,O',0'-Tetraethyl Di(Phosphorodithioate); 1,4-Dioxane-
2,3-S,S'-Bis(O,O-Diethyl Dithiophosphate); 2,3-Bis(Diethoxyphosphinothioylthio)-
1,4-Dioxane; 2,3-Dioxane S,S-Bis(O,O-Diethylphosphorodithioate); 2,3-
Dioxanedithiol S,S-Bis(O,O-Diethyl Phosphorodithioate); AC 528; Bercotox;
Delnatex; Delnav; Dioxation; Dioxothion; ENT 22,897; Hercules 528; Hercules
AC528; Kavadel; Navadel; NCI-C00395; p-Dioxane-2,3-Dithiol, S,S-Diester with
O,O-Diethyl Phosphorodithioate; p-Dioxane-2,3-diyl Ethyl Phosphorodithioate;
Phosphorodithioic Acid, S,SM,4-Dioxane-2,3-diyl O,O,O',O'-Tetraethyl Ester;
Phosphorodithioic Acid, S,S'-p-Dioxane-2,3-diyl O,O,O',O'-Tetraethyl Ester;
Ruphos

Chemical Formula: C12H26O6P2S4

Molecular Weight: 456.54


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

        Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:

             LC50 inhalation (mouse) 0.34 mg/liter/1 hour (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985).

        TPQ: 500 (pounds)

        RQ: 1 (pounds) (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

        Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point:  Not Found

    Specific Gravity  (H2O=1):  1.257 at 26°C/4°C (*Merck 1976)

    Vapor  Pressure (mmHg):  Not Found

    Melting Point: -4°F, -20°C (*Merck 1983)

    Vapor  Density (AIR=»1):  Not Found

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  78-34-2
                                            Page 2 of 4

                               DIOXATHION

SECTION II   (continued)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l):  Not Found

    Solubility in Water: Practically insoluble (*Merck  1983)

    Appearance and Odor:  Tan liquid (*Merck 1983).  (Technical) Brown liquid
    (*Martin  1974).


SECTION III -- HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV: 0.2 mg/m3 (skin) (ACGIH 1985, p. 17)

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended: ADI 0.0015 mg/kg (*Hayes  1975).

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Yes (*Hawley 1977)
                    Skin:  Yes (Farm Chemicals Handbook 1984, p. C-82)
                    Ingestion: Yes (*Hawley 1977)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  Very toxic. Probable oral
    lethal dose for humans is 50-500 mg/kg or between 1 teaspoonful and  1 oz.
    for a 70 kg (150 Ib.) person (*Gosselin 1976). It is  a cholinesterase
    inhibitor (*Hawley 1977).  Death is primarily due to respiratory arrest
    arising from failure of the respiratory center, paralysis  of respiratory
    muscles, intense bronchoconstriction, or all three (*Gosselin 1976).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure:  Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): Not Found
    Flammable Limits:

        LEL: Not Found
        UEL: Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods:  (Non-Specific — Organophosphorus Pesticide,
    Liquid, n.o.s.)  Small fires:  dry chemical, carbon dioxide, water spray,
    or foam. Large fires:  water spray, fog or foam (DOT 1984, Guide 55).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  (Non-Specific — Organophosphorus
    Pesticide, Liquid, n.o.s.) Stay upwind; keep out of low areas. Ventilate
    closed spaces before entering them.  Wear positive  pressure breathing
    apparatus and special protective clothing. Remove and isolate contaminated
    clothing  at the site. Move container from fire area if you can do so
    without risk. Fight fire from maximum distance.  Dike fire control water
    for later disposal; do not scatter the material (DOT 1984, Guide 55).

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  78-34-2
                                            Page 3 of 4

                                DIOXATHION

SECTION IV   (continued)

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards: Shock can shatter  container,
    releasing contents (*Sax  1975). (Non-Specific — Organophosphorus
    Pesticide, Liquid, n.o.s.)  Container may explode in heat of fire. Fire
    may produce irritating or poisonous gases. Runoff from fire control water
    may give off poisonous gases.  Runoff from fire control  or dilution water
    may cause pollution (DOT 1984, Guide 55).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  Not Found


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:
               Stabler Yes  (*ACGIH 1979)

        Conditions to Avoid: Avoid alkali materials and heat.  It is unstable
        to iron or tin surfaces and when mixed with certain carriers (*Martin
        1974).

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid): Avoid alkali materials (*Martin
    1974)

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  When heated to decomposition, it
    emits highly toxic fumes of oxides of nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur
    (*Sax 1975).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:  Not Found
                             May Not Occur: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid: Not Found
SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Dioxathion is used for control of insects and mites on grapes, citrus,
    walnuts, ornamentals, apples, pears, and quince. Also used as a spray or
    dip for the control of ticks, lice, hornfly, and sheep ked on cattle,
    goats, sheep, and hogs (Farm Chemicals Handbook 1984, p. C-82).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    (Non-Specific - Organophosphorus Pesticide, Liquid, n.o.s.)  Keep
    unnecessary people away; isolate hazard area and deny entry. Stay upwind;
    keep out  of low areas.  Ventilate closed spaces before entering them.
    Remove and isolate contaminated clothing at the site.  Do not touch spilled
    material; stop leak if you can do so without risk. Use water spray to
    reduce vapors. Small spills:  absorb with sand or other noncombustible
    absorbent material and place into containers for later disposal. Large
    spills: dike far ahead of spill for later disposal (DOT 1984, Guide 55).

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                                          CAS Registry Number: 78-34-2
                                          Page 4 of 4

                              DIOXATHION

SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit. See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.

    SUIT MATERIAL PERFORMANCE (Based on EPA/USCG "Guidelines", 1987)
    (Chemical Resistance/Amount of Data)

          Butyl/Neoprene       GOOD/LIMITED**
          Viton/Neoprene       GOOD/LIMITED**

     *Based on qualitative performance information.
    **Based on a chemical analog.


SECTION IX -- EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    See Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide

 image: 






                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  78-34-2
                                             Page 1 of 3
                      Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide
                                      for
                                  DIOXATHION

                                   (78-34-2)
     This guide should not be construed to authorize emergency personnel to
perform the procedures or activities indicated or implied.  Care of persons
exposed to toxic chemicals must be directed by a physician or other recognized
authority.
Substance Characteristics:

Pure Form - Tan liquid.

Commercial  Forms - Brown emulsifiable concentrate or wettable powder.

Use - Pesticide.

Other Names - Delnatex; Delnav; Deltic; l,4-dioxan-2,3-diyl bis(O,O-diethyl
phosphorothiolothionate); Dioxation; Kavadel; Navadel.


Personal Protective Equipment: See Chemical Profile Section VIII.


Emergency Life-Support Equipment and Supplies That May Be Required:

Compressed  oxygen, forced-oxygen mask, soap, water, syrup of Ipecac, activated
charcoal, saline cathartic or sorbitol, normal saline, D5W, Ringer's lactate,
atropine, pralidoxime, diazepam, phenytoin, phenobarbital.


Signs and Symptoms of Acute  Dioxathion Exposure:

Note: Dioxathion is a cholinesterase inhibitor.

Acute exposure to dioxathion may  produce the following signs and symptoms:
pinpoint pupils, blurred vision, headache, dizziness, muscle spasms, and
profound weakness. Vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, seizures, and coma may
also occur. The heart rate may decrease following oral exposure or increase
following dermal exposure. Hypotension (low blood pressure) may occur
although hypertension (high blood  pressure) is not uncommon. Chest pain may be
noted.  Respiratory symptoms include dyspnea (shortness of breath),
respiratory depression, and respiratory  paralysis.  Psychosis may occur.

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  78-34-2
                                             Page 2 of 3

                                   DIOXATHION

Emergency Life-Support Procedures:

Acute exposure to dioxathion may require decontamination and life support for
the victims. Emergency personnel should wear protective clothing appropriate
to the type and degree of  contamination.  Air-purifying or supplied-air
respiratory equipment should also be worn, as necessary.  Rescue vehicles
should carry supplies such as plastic sheeting and disposable plastic  bags to
assist in preventing spread of contamination.


Inhalation Exposure:

1.  Move  victims to fresh air. Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure
     to dioxathion.

2.  Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse  is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration. If breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.  Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive
     procedures.

4.  Transport to a health  care facility.
Dermal/Eye Exposure:

1.   Remove victims from exposure.  Emergency personnel should avoid self-
     exposure to dioxathion.

2.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.  If breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

3.   Remove contaminated clothing as soon as possible.

4.   If eye exposure has occurred, eyes must be flushed with lukewarm water for
     at least 15 minutes.

5.   Wash exposed skin area three times with soap and water.

6.   Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration  of an antidote or performance of other invasive
     procedures.

7.   Transport to a health care facility.

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                                              EFATG
                                              CAS Registry Number: 78-34-2
                                              Page 3 of 3

                                   DIOXATHION

Ingestion Exposure:

1.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration. If breathing is labored, administer oxygen or
     other respiratory support.

2.   Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive
     procedures.

3.   Vomiting  may be induced with syrup of Ipecac.  If elapsed time since
     ingestion of dioxathion is unknown or suspected to be greater than
     30 minutes, do not induce vomiting and proceed to Step  4.  Ipecac should
     not be administered to children under 6 months of age.

     Warning: Ingestion of dioxathion may result in sudden onset of seizures
     or loss of consciousness.  Syrup of Ipecac should be administered only  if
     victims are alert, have an active gag-reflex, and show no signs of
     impending seizure or coma.  If ANY uncertainty exists, proceed to Step 4.

     The following dosages of Ipecac are recommended: children up to 1 year
     old, 10 mL (1/3 oz); children 1 to 12 years old, 15 mL (1/2 oz); adults,
     30 mL (1 oz).  Ambulate (walk) the victims and give large quantities of
     water. If vomiting has not occurred after 15 minutes, Ipecac may be
     readministered.  Continue to ambulate and give water to  the victims.  If
     vomiting has not occurred  within 15 minutes after second administration of
     Ipecac, administer activated charcoal.

4.   Activated charcoal may be administered if victims are conscious and alert.
     Use 15 to 30  g (1/2 to 1 oz) for children, 50 to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz)
     for adults, with 125 to 250 mL (1/2 to 1 cup) of water.

5.   Promote excretion by administering a saline cathartic or sorbitol to
     conscious and alert victims.  Children  require 15 to 30 g (1/2 to 1 oz)
     of cathartic;  50  to 100 g  (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz) is recommended  for adults.

6.   Transport to a health care facility.

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  78-53-5
                                           Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - AMITON

CAS Registry Number:  78-53-5

Synonyms: (NIOSH/RTECS SYNONYMS 1983, Volume 3, p. 150)  Phosphorothioic
Acid, S-(2-(Diethylamino)Ethyl) O,0-Diethyl Ester; Chipman 6200; Citram;
S-(Diethylaminoethyl) O,O-Diethyl Phosphorothioate; Diethyl
S-2-Diethylaminoethyl Phosphorothioate; (2-Diethylamino)Ethylphosphorothioic
Acid O,O-Diethyl Ester; O,O-Diethyl S-2-Diethylaminoethyl Phosphorothioate;
O,O-Diethyl S-Diethylaminoethyl Phosphorothiolate; O,O-Diethyl S-2-Diethyl-
aminoethyl Phosphorothiolate; O,O-Diethyl S-(beta-Diethylamino)Ethyl
Phosphorothiolate; O,O-Diethyl S-(2-Diethylaminoethyl) Thiophosphate; DSDP; ENT
24,980-X; Inferno; Metramac; Metramak; R-5,158; Rhodia-6200; Tetram

Chemical Formula:  C10H24NO3PS

Molecular Weight: 269.38


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

          Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:

             LD50 oral  (rat) 3.3 mg/kg (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

          TPQ: 500 (pounds)

          RQ: 1 (pounds) (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

          Section 313  Listed (Yes or  No): No


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point: 230°F, 110°C at 0.2 mm (Sax 1984, p. 1008)

    Specific  Gravity (H2O=»1):  Not Found

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  Not Found

    Melting Point:  Not  Found

    Vapor Density (AIR=»1):  Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l):  Not Found

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  78-53-5
                                            Page 2 of 4

                               AMITON

SECTION II   (continued)

    Solubility in Water: Not Found

    Appearance and Odor:  Liquid  (Merck 1983, p. 73)


SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV:  Not Found

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended: Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Yes (Hawley 1981, p. 1009)
                    Skin:  Not Found
                    Ingestion: Yes (Sax 1984, p. 1009)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  This material is highly
    toxic orally. It is a cholinesterase inhibitor (Sax  1984, p. 1009).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure:  Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): Not Found
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL:  Not Found
        UEL: Not Found

    Extinguishing  Methods:  (Non-Specific — Organophosphorus Pesticide,
    Liquid, n.o.s.)  Small fires:  dry chemical, carbon dioxide, water spray,
    or foam. Large fires:  water spray, fog, or foam (DOT 1984, Guide 55).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  (Non-Specific — Organophosphorus
    Pesticide, Liquid, n.o.s.) Stay upwind; keep out of low areas.  Ventilate
    closed spaces before entering them.  Wear positive pressure breathing
    apparatus and special protective clothing.  Remove and isolate contaminated
    clothing at the site. Move container from fire area if you can do so
    without risk.  Fight fire from maximum distance. Dike fire control water
    for later disposal; do not scatter the material (DOT 1984, Guide 55).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  When heated to decomposition, can
    emit toxic fumes of oxides of nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur (Sax 1984,
    p. 1009). (Non-Specific —  Organophosphorus Pesticide, Liquid, n.o.s.)
    Container may explode in heat of fire. Fire may produce irritating or
    poisonous gases. Runoff from fire control water may give off poisonous
    gases.  Runoff from fire control or dilution water may  cause pollution (DOT
    1984, Guide 55).

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  78-53-5
                                            Page 3 of 4

                               AMITON

SECTION IV   (continued)

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  Not Found


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:  Not Found
               Stable: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Extreme heat (Sax 1984, p. 1009)

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid):  Not Found

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  Very toxic nitrogen oxides,
    phosphorus oxides, and sulfur oxides when heated to decomposition (Sax
    1984, p. 1009).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur: Not Found
                             May Not Occur: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    This material is used as an acaricide and insecticide (Farm Chemicals
    Handbook 1984, p. C222).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    (Non-Specific — Organophosphorus Pesticide, Liquid, n.o.s.) Keep
    unnecessary people away; isolate hazard area and deny entry. Stay upwind;
    keep out of low areas. Ventilate closed spaces before entering them.
    Remove and isolate contaminated clothing at the site. Do not touch spilled
    material; stop leak  if you can do so without risk.  Use water spray to
    reduce vapors. Small spills:  absorb with sand or other noncombustible
    absorbent material  and place into containers for later disposal.  Large
    spills: dike far ahead of spill for later disposal (DOT 1984, Guide 55).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  78-53-5
                                            Page 4 of 4

                               AMITON

SECTION VIII   (continued)

   SUIT MATERIAL PERFORMANCE (Based on EPA/USCG "Guidelines", 1987)
   (Chemical Resistance/Amount of Data)

           Butyl/Neoprene       GOOD/LIMITED**
           Viton/Neoprene       GOOD/LIMITED**

     *Based on qualitative performance information.
    **Based on a chemical analog.


SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure:  The toxic effects are similar to
    parathion (Sax 1984, p. 1009). Symptoms of parathion poisoning include
    anorexia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, excessive salivation, pupillary
    constriction, bronchoconstriction, muscle twitching, convulsions, coma,
    respiratory failure. Effects are cumulative (Sax 1984, p. 2119).

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures:  Effects are similar to those of
    parathion (Sax 1984, p. 1009). First aid procedures for parathion are as
    follows:  move victim to fresh air; call emergency medical care. If not
    breathing, perform artificial respiration.  If breathing is difficult, give
    oxygen. In case of contact with material, immediately  flush skin or eyes
    with running water for at least  15 minutes.  Speed in removing  material
    from skin is of extreme importance.  Remove and isolate contaminated
    clothing and shoes  at the site. Keep victim quiet and maintain  normal body
    temperature.  Effects may be delayed; keep victim under observation (DOT
    1984, Guide 55).

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                                          CAS Registry Number: 78-71-7
                                          Page 1 of 3
                         EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                  Date: October 31, 1985
                                                  Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - OXETANE, 3,3-BIS(CHLOROMETHYL)-

CAS Registry Number: 78-71-7

Synonyms: (NIOSH/RTECS 1985 Synonyms On-Line File) 3,3-Bis
(Chloromethyl)Oxetane; Penton; 3,3-bis(Chloromethyl)-1 -Oxacyclobutane

Chemical Formula:  C5H8C120

Molecular Weight: 155


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

        Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:

            LC60 inhalation (mouse) 0.2 mg/liter/2 hours (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

        TPQ: 500 (pounds)

        RQ: 1 (pounds) (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

        Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II -- PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point: 217°F, 103°C at 30 mmHg (Beilstein 1974, Volume 17/1,
    p. 68)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1):  Not Found

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  Not Found

    Melting Point: 66°F, 19°C (Beilstein 1974,  Volume 17/1, p. 68)

    Vapor Density (AIR=«1):  Not Found

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

    Solubility in Water: Not Found

    Appearance and Odor: Not Found

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                                         CAS Registry Number: 78-71-7
                                         Page 2 of 3

                     OXETANE, 3,3-BIS(CHLOROMETHYL)

SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL: Not Found

    ACGIH TLV:  Not Found

    IDLH:  Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended: Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Not Found
                    Skin: Not Found
                    Ingestion: Not Found

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  Not Found

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure: Not Found


SECTION IV -- FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): Not Found
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL: Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods: Not Found

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  Not Found

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards: Not Found

    NFPA Flammability Rating: Not Found


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable: Not Found
               Stable: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid): Not Found

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts: Not Found

    Hazardous Polymerization: May  Occur: Not Found
                            May Not Occur:  Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  78-71-7
                                           Page 3 of 3

                      OXETANE, 3,3-BIS(CHLOROMETHYL)

SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Penton is the trademark for a thermoplastic resin derived from
    3,3-bis(chloromethyl)oxetane.  Penton is a linear polymer used for solid and
    lined valves, pumps, pipe and fittings,  and a monofilament for filter
    supports and column packing (Hawley  1981, p. 785).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Not Found
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA  and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit. See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.
SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and Symptoms of Exposure:  Not Found

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures:  Not Found


COMMENTS:

    Sources searched but no information found:

        Weast 1979
        Merck 1983
        Sax  1984
        DOT 1984
        NFPA 1984
        Student 1981
        Weiss 1980
        Doull 1980
        Clayton and Clayton 1981-82
        Encyc Occupat Health and Safety 1983
        CHRIS  1978
        Hayes 1982

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 78-82-0
                                           Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - ISOBUTYRONITRILE

CAS Registry Number:  78-82-0

Synonyms: 2-Methylpropanenitrile; 1-Cyano-l-Methylethane; 2-Cyanoprbpane;
2-Methylpropane Nitrile; 2-Methylpropionitrile; Dimethylacetonitrile; Isopropyl
Cyanide; Isopropyl Nitrile; Isopropylcyanide; Propanenitrile, 2-Methyl-;
Propanoic Acid, 2-Methyl-, Nitrile

Chemical Formula: C4H7N

Molecular Weight: 69.1


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

        Toxicity Value  Used for Listing Under Section 302:

             LD50 oral  (mouse) 25 mg/kg (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

        TPQ: 1,000 (pounds)

        RQ: 1 (pounds)  (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

        Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point: 219°F, 103.8°C (*Weast 1979)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1): 0.7608 at 30°C/4°C (*Weast 1979);  0.733 at 20°C
    (*Hawley 1977)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  Not Found

    Melting Point: -96.7°F, -71.5°C (*Weast 1979)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1): 2.38 (*NFPA 1978)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l):  Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  Slightly (*Weast 1979)

    Appearance and Odor: Colorless liquid (*Hawley 1977)

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  78-82-0
                                            Page 2 of 4

                               ISOBUTYRONITRILE

SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV:  Not Found

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended:  Occupational exposure to nitriles —
    recommended standard in air: TWA 22 mg/ms (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985).

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Yes (Hawley 1981, p. 577)
                     Skin:  Yes (Hawley 1981, p. 577)
                     Ingestion:  Yes (Hawley 1981, p. 577)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  Poisonous; may be fatal if
    inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through skin. Contact may cause burns to
    skin and eyes (DOT 1984, Guide 28).  (Non-Specific - Nitriles)  Primarily,
    they are skin and eye irritants.  Large doses cause collapse and stop
    breathing (Clayton and Clayton 1981-82, p. 4846).

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated  by  Exposure: Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method  Used): 47°F, 8°C (*NFPA 1978)
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL:  Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods:  Extinguish with dry chemical, carbon dioxide,
    water spray, foam, or fog (DOT 1984, Guide  28).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  Keep unnecessary people away; isolate
    hazard area and deny entry. Stay upwind; keep out of low areas. Wear
    positive pressure breathing apparatus and special protective clothing.
    Isolate for 1/2 mile in all directions if tank car  or truck  is involved in
    fire.  Move container from fire area if you can do so without risk. Dike
    fire control water for later disposal; do not scatter the material. Spray
    cooling water on containers that are exposed to flames until well after
    fire is out. Withdraw immediately in case of rising sound from venting
    safety device or any  discoloration of tank due to fire (DOT  1984, Guide
    28).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  Vapor may explode if ignited in an
    enclosed area (Weiss  1980, p. 531). Toxic oxides of nitrogen are produced
    during combustion (Student 1981, p. 297).  It is a flammable/combustible
    material and may be ignited by heat, sparks, or flames.  Vapors may travel
    to a source of ignition and flash back. Container may explode in heat of
    fire.  Vapor explosion and poison hazard  indoors, outdoors or in sewers.
    Runoff to sewer may create fire or explosion hazard (DOT 1984, Guide 28).

    NFPA Flammability  Rating: 3

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                                            CAS Registry Number: 78-82-0
                                            Page 3 of 4

                               ISOBUTYRONITRILE

SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:
               Stable: Yes (Weiss  1980, p. 531)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid): Not Found

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts:  When heated to decomposition, it
    emits toxic fumes of oxides of  nitrogen (Sax  1984, p. 1639).

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur:
                              May Not Occur:  Yes (Weiss  1980, p. 531)

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    It is used in organic synthesis (*Patty 1963); as an intermediate for
    insecticides (Hawley 1981, p. 577); and as a gasoline additive (Clayton and
    Clayton 1981-82, p. 4873).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Keep sparks, flames, and other sources of ignition away. Keep material out
    of water sources and sewers.  Build dikes to control flow as necessary.
    Attempt to stop leak if this can be done  without hazard. Use water spray
    to disperse vapors and dilute standing pools of liquid.  Avoid breathing
    vapors. Keep upwind.  Avoid bodily  contact with the material. Do not
    handle broken packages without protective equipment. Wash away any
    material which may have contacted the body with copious amounts
    of water or soap and water (Student,  1981, p. 297).  Wear positive
    pressure breathing apparatus and special protective clothing. Shut
    off ignition sources; no flares, smoking, or flames in hazard area.
    Do not touch  spilled material.  Use water spray to reduce vapors.
    Small spills: absorb with sand or other noncombustible absorbent
    material and place into containers for later disposal.  Large spills:
    dike far ahead of spill for later disposal (DOT 19^4, Guide 28).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit. See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.

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                                        CAS Registry Number:  78-82-0
                                        Page 4 of 4

                            ISOBUTYRONITRILE

SECTION VIII   (continued)

   SUIT MATERIAL PERFORMANCE (Based on EPA/USCG "Guidelines", 1987)
   (Chemical Resistance/Amount of Data)

          Butyl               GOOD/LIMITED**
          PE                 POOR/LIMITED**
          PVC                POOR/LIMITED**
          Viton               GOOD/LIMITED**

    *Based on qualitative performance information.
    **Based on a chemical analog.


SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    See Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide

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                                              EFATG
                                              CAS Registry Number: 78-82-0
                                              Page 1 of 3
                      Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide
                                      for
                                ISOBUTYRONITRILE

                                    (78-82-0)
     This guide should not be construed to authorize emergency personnel to
perform the procedures or activities indicated or implied. Care of persons
exposed to toxic chemicals must be directed by a physician or other recognized
authority.
Caution: Isobutyronitrile toxicity can occur via ingestion, dermal/eye
contact, or inhalation; death may occur within minutes.  IMMEDIATELY begin
administering 100% oxygen and RUSH victims to a health care facility!
Substance Characteristics:

Pure Form - Colorless liquid.

Commercial Form - Liquid in tank cars.

Uses - Chemical intermediate, pesticide intermediate, gasoline additive.

Caution: Flammable liquid.  Avoid sources of extreme heat or ignition
including sparks or fire. Isobutyronitrile will liberate  toxic nitrogen oxide
fumes  when heated to decomposition.

Other  Names - 1-Cyano-l-methylethane, isopropyl cyanide, isopropyl nitrile,
2-methylpropane nitrile.


Personal Protective Equipment:  See Chemical Profile Section VIII.


Emergency Life-Support Equipment and Supplies That May Be Required:

Compressed oxygen, forced-oxygen mask, soap, water, saline cathartic or
sorbitol, normal saline,  D5W, Ringer's lactate, cyanide antidote kit (amyl
nitrite ampule, sodium nitrite, sodium thiosulfate), sodium bicarbonate,
diazepam, phenytoin.


Signs and Symptoms of Acute Isobutyronitrile Exposure:

Warning:  Heart palpitation may occur within minutes after exposure.  High
doses can stop breathing. Vital signs should be monitored closely.  Caution  is
advised.

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  78-82-0
                                             Page 2 of 3

                               ISOBUTYRONITRILE

Signs and symptoms of acute exposure to isobutyronitrile may include
hypertension (high blood pressure) and tachycardia (rapid heart rate),
followed by hypotension (low blood pressure) and bradycardia (slow heart rate).
Cherry-red (and potentially bloody) mucous membranes,  cardiac arrhythmias, and
other cardiac abnormalities are common. Cyanosis (blue tint to  skin and mucous
membranes) may also be found.

Tachypnea (rapid respiratory rate) may be followed by respiratory depression.
Lung hemorrhage and pulmonary edema may occur.  Headache,  vertigo (dizziness),
agitation, giddiness, salivation, nausea, and vomiting may be followed by
combative behavior, convulsions, and coma.

Isobutyronitrile is irritating to the skin and mucous membranes.  Lacrimation
(tearing) and a burning sensation of the mouth and throat are common.
Emergency Life-Support Procedures:

Acute exposure to isobutyronitrile may require decontamination and life support
for the victims.  All exposed persons should be transported to a health care
facility as quickly as possible.  Emergency personnel should wear protective
clothing appropriate to  the type and degree of contamination.  Air-purifying or
supplied-air respiratory equipment should also be worn, as necessary. Rescue
vehicles should carry supplies such as plastic sheeting and disposable plastic
bags to assist in preventing spread of contamination.
Inhalation Exposure:

1.  Move victims to fresh air.  Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure
     to isobutyronitrile.

2.  Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration. IMMEDIATELY begin administering 100% oxygen to
     all victims.  Monitor victims for respiratory distress.

     Warning: To prevent self-poisoning, avoid mouth-to-mouth breathing; use a
     forced-oxygen mask. Direct oral contact with isobutyronitrile-
     contaminated persons or their gastric contents may result in  self-
     poisoning.

3.  RUSH to  a health care facility!

4.  Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the  local hospital
     for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive
     procedures.
Dermal/Eye Exposure:

1.  Remove victims from exposure.  Emergency personnel should avoid self-
     exposure to isobutyronitrile.

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                                              EFATG
                                              CAS Registry Number:  78-82-0
                                              Page 3 of 3

                                ISOBUTYRONITRILE

2.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.  IMMEDIATELY begin administering 100% oxygen  to
     all victims.  Monitor victims for respiratory distress.

     Warning: To prevent self-poisoning, avoid mouth-to-mouth breathing; use a
     forced-oxygen mask. Direct oral contact with isobutyronitrile-
     contaminated persons or their gastric contents may result in self-
     poisoning.

3.   RUSH to a health care facility!

4.   If eye exposure has occurred, eyes must be flushed with lukewarm water for
     at least 15 minutes.

5.   Remove contaminated clothing as soon as possible.

6.   Wash exposed skin areas twice with soap and water.

7.   Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration of an antidote or  performance of other invasive
     procedures.
Ingestion Exposure:

1.   Evaluate vital signs including pulse and respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.  IMMEDIATELY begin administering 100% oxygen to
     all  victims.  Monitor victims for respiratory distress.

     Warning: To prevent self-poisoning, avoid mouth-to-mouth breathing; use a
     forced-oxygen mask. Direct oral contact with isobutyronitrile-
     contaminated persons or their gastric contents may result in self-
     poisoning.

2.   RUSH  to a health care facility!

3.   DO NOT induce vomiting or attempt to neutralize!

4.   Obtain authorization and/or further instructions from the local hospital
     for administration of an antidote or performance of other invasive
     procedures.

5.   Activated charcoal is of no value.

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                                           CAS Registry Number: 78-94-4
                                           Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30,  1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - METHYL VINYL KETONE

CAS Registry Number:  78-94-4

Synonyms:  l-Buten-3-one; 2-Butenone; 3-Buten-2-one; 3-Butene-2-one; Acetone,
Methylene-; Acetyl Ethylene; Butenone; Delta(3)-2-Butenone; Gamma-Oxo-
Alpha-Butylene; Ketone, Methyl Vinyl; Methylene Acetone; Methylvinyl Ketone;
Vinyl Methyl Ketone

Chemical Formula:  C4H6O

Molecular Weight: 70.09


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

        Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:

             LC50 inhalation (rat) 0.007 mg/liter/4 hours (*NIOSH/RTECS 1985)

        TPQ: 10 (pounds)

        RQ: 1 (pounds) (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

        Section 313  Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point: 179°F, 81.4°C (*Merck 1983)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1):  0.8636 at 20°C/4°C; 0.8407 at 25°C/4°C (*Merck
    1983)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  Not Found

    Melting Point: 20°F, -7°C (*CHRIS 1978)

    Vapor Density (AIR=«1):  2.41 (*Sax 1979)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l):  Not Found

    Solubility in Water: Soluble (*Merck 1983)

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  78-94-4
                                            Page 2 of 4

                               METHYL VINYL KETONE

SECTION II   (continued)

    Appearance and Odor: Colorless liquid (*Hawley 1981) with pungent odor
                         (*Merck 1983)


SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV:  Not Found

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended:  Not Found

    Routes of Entry: Inhalation:  Yes (Similar to other ketones) (*Rumack
                                    1975 to Present)
                    Skin:  Yes (*Merck 1983)
                    Ingestion: Yes (*DOT 1984)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  This material is readily
    absorbed through the skin, causing general poisoning (*Merck 1983) similar
    to other ketones; inhalation has central nervous system depressant  effects
    (*Rumack  1975 to Present). It is irritating to mucous membranes and
    respiratory tract (*Merck 1983) and to the skin; it is a lachrymator and
    can cause eye injury (*Grant 1974).

    Medical  Conditions Generally Aggravated  by Exposure: Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE  AND EXPLOSION HAZARD DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used): 20°F, -6.6°C (CC) (*Hawley 1981);
                               30°F, -U°C (OC) (*CHRIS 1978)
    Flammable Limits:
        LEL:  2.1% (*NFPA  1978)
        UEL:  15.6% (*NFPA 1978)

    Extinguishing Methods:  Use dry chemical, alcohol foam, 'or carbon dioxide.
    Water spray may be ineffective as an extinguishing  agent (*NFPA 1978).
    Small fires:  dry chemical, carbon dioxide, and foam.  Large fires:  fog or
    foam. Move container from fire area if you can do so without risk. Dike
    fire control water for later disposal; do not scatter the material. Spray
    cooling water on containers that are exposed to flames until well after
    fire is out. Withdraw immediately in case of rising sound from venting
    safety device or any discoloration of tank due to fire (DOT 1984,  Guide
    28).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  Use water to keep fire-exposed
    containers cool (*NFPA  1978).  Keep unnecessary people away; isolate  hazard
    area and deny entry.  Stay upwind; keep out of low areas.  Wear positive
    pressure breathing apparatus and special protective  clothing. Isolate for

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                                            CAS Registry Number:  78-94-4
                                            Page 3 of 4

                               METHYL VINYL KETONE

SECTION IV   (continued)

    1/2 mile in all directions if tank car or truck is involved in fire (DOT
    1984, Guide 28).

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  Vapors form flammable mixtures with
    air, and may travel a considerable distance to a source of ignition and
    flash back. Polymerization may take place in containers, possibly with
    violent rupture of containers (*NFPA 1978). Upon exposure to heat or
    flame, it emits toxic and irritating fumes (*Sax 1979). Container may
    explode in heat of fire. Vapor explosion and poison hazard indoors,
    outdoors, or in sewers (DOT 1984, Guide 28).

    NFPA Flammability Rating:  3


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable:  Yes (*NFPA 1978)
               Stable:

        Conditions to  Avoid:  Polymerizes on standing (*Merck 1983)

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid): Not Found

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts: Not Found

    Hazardous Polymerization:  May Occur: Yes (*NFPA 1978)
                              May Not Occur:

        Conditions to  Avoid:  Heat or sunlight  (*NFPA 1978)


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    This material is used as an alkylating agent, a starting material  for
    plastics, and an intermediate in the synthesis of steroids and Vitamin A
    (*Merck 1983).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is  Released or Spilled)

    Avoid breathing vapors (see Section III above).  Isolate area.  Stay upwind;
    keep out of low areas.  Shut off ignition sources; no flares,
    smoking, or flames in hazard area. Do not touch spilled material; stop
    leak if you can do so without risk. Use water spray to reduce vapors.
    Absorb small  spills with sand or other noncombustible absorbent material
    and place  into containers  for later disposal.  For large spills, dike  far
    ahead for  later disposal (*DOT 1984).

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  78-94-4
                                           Page 4 of 4

                               METHYL VINYL KETONE

SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at the
    beginning  of the profiles for additional information.

    SUIT MATERIAL PERFORMANCE (Based on EPA/USCG "Guidelines", 1987)
    (Chemical  Resistance/Amount of Data)

           CPE                  POOR/LIMITED**
           Neoprene             POOR/LIMITED**
           PE                   POOR/LIMITED**
           PVC                  POOR/LIMITED**
           Viton                POOR/LIMITED**
           Viton/Neoprene       POOR/LIMITED**

     *Based on qualitative performance information.
    **Based on a chemical analog.


SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    Signs and  Symptoms of Exposure:  Liquid or high concentration of vapors
    causes blistering of the skin (*NFPA 1978).  Similar to other ketones; can
    cause sore  throat, sneezing, coughing, and salivation. Inhalation may
    cause nausea and vomiting; inhalation of high concentrations can cause
    headache,  dizziness, fainting, tremor, uncoordination, lowered body
    temperature, depressed respiratory and heart rate, gasping, coma, and
    death. Direct aspiration of liquid into lungs can cause chemical
    pneumonia.  (*Rumack  1975 to Present)

    Emergency and First Aid Procedures: Move victim to fresh air; call
    emergency medical care. If not breathing, give artificial respiration.  If
    breathing  is difficult, give oxygen. Remove and isolate contaminated
    clothing and shoes at site. In case of contact with material, immediately
    flush skin  or eyes with running water for at least 15 minutes. Keep victim
    quiet and  maintain normal body temperature. Effects may be delayed; keep
    victim under observation (*DOT 1984).

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  78-97-7
                                           Page 1 of 3
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY - LACTONITRILE

CAS Registry Number:  78-97-7

Synonyms:  2-Hydroxypropanenitrile; 2-Hydroxypropionitrile; Acetaldehyde
Cyanohydrin; Acetocyanohydrin; alpha-Hydroxypropionitrile; Ethylidene
Cyanohydrin; Propanenitrile, 2-Hydroxy-; Propanoic Acid, 2-Hydroxy-, Nitrile

Chemical Formula: C3H5NO

Molecular Weight: 71


SECTION I - REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity Value  Used for Listing Under Section 302: LD50 skin
           (rabbit) 20 mg/kg

           TPQ: 1,000 (pounds)

           RQ: 1  (pounds)
              (statutory, for notification under SARA Section 304(a)(2))

           Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): No


SECTION II - PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Liquid

    Boiling Point: 360-363°F, 182-184°C; slight decomposition  (Weast 1979, p.
    C-456)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1): 0.9877 at 20°C/4°C (*Weast 1979)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  10 at 74°C (*Patty 1963)

    Melting Point: -40°F, -40°C (*Weast 1979)

    Vapor Density (AIR-1): 2.45 (*NFPA 1978)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l): Not Found

    Solubility in Water:  Soluble in all proportions (*Weast 1979)

    Appearance and Odor:  Straw colored liquid (*Patty 1963)

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  78-97-7
                                           Page 2 of 3

                              LACTONITRILE

SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Not Found

    ACGIH TLV: Not Found

    IDLH: Not Found

    Other Limits Recommended: Not Found

    Routes of Entry:  Inhalation:  Yes (*Encyc Occupat Health and Safety
                                 1971)
                    Skin:  Yes (*Encyc Occupat Health and Safety 1971)
                    Ingestion: Yes (*Encyc Occupat Health and Safety
                                 1971)

    Health Hazards (Acute,  Delayed, and Chronic):  Extremely toxic by oral,
    skin, or eye contact (*Patty 1963)

    Medical Conditions Generally Aggravated by Exposure:  Not Found


SECTION IV - FIRE AND EXPLOSION HAZARD  DATA

    Flash Point (Method Used):  170°F (TCC) (Sax 1984, p. 1683)
    Flammable Limits: Moderate when exposed to heat or flame (*Encyc Occupat
    Health and Safety 1971)
        LEL: Not Found
        UEL:  Not Found

    Extinguishing Methods:  Foam, carbon dioxide, dry chemical (Sax 1984, p.
    1683).

    Special Fire Fighting Procedures:  Not Found

    Unusual Fire and Explosion Hazards:  Cyanide fumes released when heated to
    decomposition (*Encyc Occupat Health and Safety 1971).

    NFPA Flammability  Rating: 2


SECTION V - REACTIVITY DATA

    Stability:  Unstable: Not Found
              Stable:  Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid: Not Found

    Incompatibility (Materials to Avoid): Alkali (*Hawley 1977); oxidizing
    material (Sax 1984, p. 1683).

    Hazardous Decomposition or Byproducts: Cyanide fumes when heated to
    decomposition (*Encyc Occupat Health and Safety 1971); hydrocyanic acid in
    presence of alkali (*Hawley 1977).

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                                          CAS Registry Number:  78-97-7
                                          Page 3 of 3

                              LACTONITRILE

SECTION V   (continued)

    Hazardous Polymerization: May Occur:  Not Found
                            May Not Occur: Not Found

        Conditions to Avoid:  Not Found


SECTION VI - USE INFORMATION

    Solvent — intermediate in production of ethyl  lactate and lactic acid
    (*Hawley  1977).
SECTION VII - PRECAUTIONS FOR SAFE HANDLING AND USE
(Steps to be Taken in Case Material is Released or Spilled)

    Do not breathe vapors or touch spilled material (see Section III above).
SECTION VIII - PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT FOR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS

    For emergency situations, wear a positive pressure, pressure-demand,
    full facepiece self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) or pressure-
    demand supplied air respirator with escape SCBA and a fully-encapsulating,
    chemical resistant suit.  See the introductory information section at the
    beginning of the profiles for additional information.

    SUIT MATERIAL PERFORMANCE (Based on EPA/USCG "Guidelines", 1987)
                      (Chemical Resistance/Amount of Data)

          Butyl                GOOD/LIMITED**
          PE                  POOR/LIMITED**
          PVC                 POOR/LIMITED**
          Viton                GOOD/LIMITED**

     *Based on qualitative performance information.
    **Based on a chemical analog.
SECTION IX - EMERGENCY TREATMENT INFORMATION

    See Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  78-97-7
                                             Page 1 of 3
                      Emergency First Aid Treatment Guide
                                      for
                                 LACTONITRILE

                                   (78-97-7)
     This guide should not  be construed  to authorize emergency personnel to
perform the procedures or  activities indicated  or implied.   Care of persons
exposed to toxic chemicals must be directed by a physician or other recognized
authority.

Caution: Lactonitrile toxicity can occur via ingestion, dermal/eye contact, or
ingestion; death may occur within minutes. IMMEDIATELY begin administering
100% oxygen and rush victims to a health care facility.
Substance Characteristics:

Pure Form - Straw-colored  liquid.

Commercial Form - 95 to 97% pure liquid in carboys.

Uses - Chemical intermediate, solvent.

Materials to Avoid - Alkali, oxidizers.

Caution:  Toxic hydrogen  cyanide gas may be  released upon contact with alkali
or when heated to decomposition.

Other Names - Acetaldehyde cyanohydrin, ethylidene cyanohydrin,
2-hydroxypropanenitrile, 2-hydroxypropionitrile.


Personal Protective Equipment: See Chemical  Profile Section VIII.


Emergency Life-Support Equipment and Supplies That May be Required:

Compressed oxygen, forced-oxygen mask, soap, water,  activated charcoal, saline
cathartic or sorbitol, normal  saline, D5W, Ringer's lactate, cyanide antidote
kit (amyl  nitrite  ampule,   sodium nitrite,  sodium thiosulfate),  sodium
bicarbonate, diazepam, phenytoin.

Signs and  Symptoms of Acute Lactonitrile Exposure:

Warning:   Heart palpitations may occur within minutes after exposure.  Caution
is advised.  Vital signs should be monitored closely.  Symptoms may be delayed.

Signs and  symptoms of acute exposure  to lactonitrile  may include hypertension
(high blood  pressure) and  tachycardia (rapid heart  rate), followed  by
hypotension (low blood pressure) and bradycardia (slow heart rate). Cherry-red
mucous  membranes   and   blood,  cardiac   arrhythmias, and  other cardiac
abnormalities  are  common."7  Cyanosis  (blue tint  to the  skin  and mucous

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                                             EFATG
                                             CAS Registry Number:  78-97-7
                                             Page 2 of 3

                                 LACTONITRILE

membranes)  may  be  present  following  exposure to lactonitrile. Salivation,
nausea, and vomiting may also occur.

Tachypnea (rapid respiratory rate) may be followed by  respiratory depression.
Lung hemorrhage  and pulmonary edema may occur.  Headache, vertigo (dizziness),
agitation, and giddiness may be followed  by combative  behavior, convulsions,
paralysis, protruding eyeballs, dilated and unreactive pupils, and coma.

Lactonitrile  is  irritating to  the skin and mucous membranes.  Lacrimation
(tearing) and a burning sensation of the mouth and throat are common.
Emergency Life-Support Procedures:

Acute exposure to lactonitrile may require decontamination and life support for
the victims.   All exposed  persons  should  be transported to a health care
facility as quickly as possible.  Emergency personnel should wear protective
clothing appropriate to  the type and degree of contamination. Air-purifying or
supplied-air respiratory equipment should also be  worn, as necessary.  Rescue
vehicles should  carry supplies such as plastic sheeting and disposable plastic
bags to  assist in preventing spread of contamination.
Inhalation Exposure:

1.   Move victims to fresh air.  Emergency personnel should avoid self-exposure
     to lactonitrile.

2.   Evaluate vital  signs including pulse and  respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not  breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.  IMMEDIATELY  begin administering  100% oxygen to
     all victims.  Monitor victims for respiratory distress.

     Warning: To prevent self-poisoning, avoid mouth-to-mouth breathing; use a
     forced-oxygen mask.   Direct oral contact with lactonitrile-contaminated
     persons or their gastric contents may result in self-poisoning.

3.   RUSH to a health care facility!

4.   Obtain authorization and/or further  instructions from the local hospital
     for  administration of an antidote or  performance  of  other invasive
     procedures.
Dermal/Eye Exposure:

1.  Remove victims from exposure.    Emergency  personnel should  avoid self-
     exposure to lactonitriie.

2.  Evaluate vital  signs including pulse and  respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR.  If not breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.   IMMEDIATELY begin administering 100% oxygen to
     all victims. Monitor victims for  respiratory distress.

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                                              EFATG
                                              CAS Registry Number:  78-97-7
                                              Page 3 of 3

                                  LACTONITRILE

     Warning:  To prevent self-poisoning, avoid mouth-to-mouth breathing; use a
     forced-oxygen  mask.   Direct oral contact with lactonitrile-contaminated
     persons or their gastric contents may result in self-poisoning.

3.   RUSH to a health care facility!

4.   Remove contaminated clothing as soon as possible.

5.   If eye exposure has occurred, eyes must be flushed with lukewarm water for
     at least 15 minutes.

6.   Wash  exposed skin areas twice with soap and water.

7.   Obtain authorization  and/or further  instructions from the local hospital
     for  administration  of  an  antidote  or  performance  of  other invasive
     procedures.


Ingestion  Exposure:

1.   Evaluate vital  signs including  pulse and  respiratory rate, and note any
     trauma.  If no pulse is detected, provide CPR. If not  breathing, provide
     artificial respiration.  IMMEDIATELY  begin administering  100% oxygen to
     all victims. Monitor victims for respiratory distress.

     Warning:  To prevent self-poisoning, avoid mouth-to-mouth breathing; use a
     forced-oxygen  mask.   Direct oral contact with lactonitrile-contaminated
     persons or their gastric contents may result in self-poisoning.

2.   RUSH to a health care facility!

3.   Obtain authorization and/or further  instructions from  the local hospital
     for  administration  of  an  antidote  or  performance  of  other invasive
     procedures.

4.   DO NOT induce vomiting.   Ipecac is  not recommended for ingestion of
     lactonitrile.

5.   Activated charcoal may be administered if victims are conscious and alert.
     Use  15  to 30 g (1/2 to 1  oz) for children, 50 to 100 g (1-3/4 to 3-1/2 oz)
     for adults, with 125 to 250 mL  (1/2 to 1 cup) of water.

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  79-06-1
                                           Page 1 of 4
                          EPA CHEMICAL PROFILE
                                                   Date: October 31, 1985
                                                   Revision: November 30, 1987
CHEMICAL IDENTITY -- ACRYLAMIDE

CAS Registry Number:  79-06-1

Synonyms:  2-Propenamide; Acrylic Amide; Ethylene Carboxamide; Propenamide;
Propenoic Acid, Amide

Chemical Formula: CSH5NO

Molecular Weight:  71.08


SECTION I -- REGULATORY INFORMATION

    CERCLA (SARA) 1986:

           Toxicity Value Used for Listing Under Section 302:

               Chemical does not meet the toxicity criteria but because of its
               high production volume and recognized toxicity it is considered
               a chemical of concern.

           TPQ: 1,000/10,000 (pounds)

           RQ: 5000 (pounds)

           Section 313 Listed (Yes or No): Yes


SECTION II -- PHYSICAL/CHEMICAL CHARACTERISTICS

    Physical State: Solid

    Boiling Point:  189°F, 87°C at 2 mmHg (*Merck 1976)

    Specific Gravity (H2O=1): 1.122 at 30°C/4°C (*Merck 1976)

    Vapor Pressure (mmHg):  0.007 at 20°C (*ACGIH 1980)

    Melting Point:  184°F, 84.5°C (*Merck 1976)

    Vapor Density (AIR=1): 2.45 (*Sax 1975)

    Evaporation Rate (Butyl acetate=l):  Not Found

    Solubility in Water: 215.5 g/100 mL water at 30°C (*Merck 1976)

    Appearance and Odor: Odorless (*Grant 1974) white, crystalline solid
    (*Sax 1975).

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                                           CAS Registry Number:  79-06-1
                                           Page 2 of 4

                               ACRYLAMIDE

SECTION III - HEALTH HAZARD DATA

    OSHA PEL:  Air:  TWA 0.3 mg/ms (skin) (OSHA 1984, p. 660)

    ACGIH TLV: TWA 0.3 mg/ms; STEL 0.6 mg/ms (skin) (*ACGIH 1981)

    IDLH: Not Found

Other Limits Recommended:  NIOSH:  0.3 mg/ms 10 hr TWA (NIOSH 1987, p.46).
It is recommended that no more than 0.05 mg/kg/day be absorbed by workers
(*ACGIH  1980).  Suspected of carcinogenic potential in humans; notice of
intent to change to 0.03 mg/ms for 1985-86 (ACGIH 1985, p.  42).

    Routes of Entry:  Inhalation: Yes (NIOSH/OSHA  1978,  p. 43)
                    Skin: Yes (*Hamilton 1974)
                    Ingestion:  Yes (NIOSH/OSHA 1978, p. 43)

    Health Hazards (Acute, Delayed, and Chronic):  Classified as very toxic;
    probable oral lethal human dose is between 50 and 500 mg/kg or between. 1
    teaspoon and 1 ounce for a 150 Ib. person (Gosselin 1984, p. 11-409).
    Polymerized  acrylamide is not toxic, but the  monomer can cause peripheral
    nerve damage (*Doull 1980).  It is a cumulative neurotoxin and  repeated
    exposure to small amounts may cause serious injury t