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<pubnumber>735F03002</pubnumber>
<title>Backyard Activity Book for Kids on Intergrated Pest Management</title>
<pages>33</pages>
<pubyear>2003</pubyear>
<provider>NEPIS</provider>
<access>online</access>
<operator>mja</operator>
<scandate>11/13/08</scandate>
<origin>PDF</origin>
<type>single page tiff</type>
<keyword>insects pests http www kids eat plants page weeds agency protection environmental loosestrife united states pest tke gov soil disease</keyword>
<author>   Minnesota. Dept. of Agriculture.</author>
<publisher>Minnesota Dept. of Agriculture,</publisher>
<subject> Pests--Integrated control--Study and teaching--Activity programs--Minnesota</subject>
<abstract></abstract>

                              •grams
                             (7506C)
:>* '-I
    N--
                      A Backyard
                      Activity Bool
                      'or Kids
                       >n Integrated
                      Management
                     L3c*yfc/^
Beeft
                             ^ f9/;
 image: 








 H
ave you ever been bitten by a flea or mosquito? Treated your dog for fleas? Had head lice? Been
stung by a wasp or bee? Watched weeds overtake your garden? Fought to     cockroaches
out of your school building?
We've all been bugged at one time or another by pests.  For many of us, our first reaction is to reach
for the nearest can of bug spray.  But, pesticides and fertilizers that run off from lawns and other
locations are a significant source of pollution in our environment. There's a better way to solve
problems called Integrated Pest Management (IPM).  IPM is an effective and environmentally sensitive
approach to      management that relies on a combination of common       practices. Teaching
IPM at the  grade school level can provide children with important information about      identity and
biology, and ecology.  It can also help children understand the impact that personal choices — like
whether or not to use chemicals to control      — can have on our environment.

Join Our      Patrol: A Backyard Activity Book on                Management, originally developed
by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture, is for educators of children in grades 1-6. Join Our Pest
Patrol is chock full of fun activities that can easily be incorporated into reading, science, and even
math and art classes. The activities are written  for the 3-5 grade  level, but can be easily adapted for
the lower or upper grades. Each activity includes fun facts in "Did You Know," and "Tips for Grown-
ups." There are also lots of links to interesting web      that allow educators to expand their students'
learning. Answers to all quizzes are located at the end of the book inside the back cover. We've also
included a  Web Resources List on       26 and 27 of all the web links identified in  the activities for
easier reference.

We hope you enjoy Join Our Pest Patrol and invite you to tell us about how you've used this resource
by completing our Customer Feedback  Form on page 28. Good luck, and thanks for your interest in
Integrated  Pest Management!

EPA thanks the following people who contributed to the activity book:
MDA Project Team
Jeanne Ciborowski, IPM Coordinator, Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA); Rick Hansen, Unit Supervisor,
Agronomy and Plant Protection Division; Al Withers, Program Director, Minnesota Agriculture in the Classroom

Cooperators
Bob Mugaas, Extension Educator, University of Minnesota Extension Service, Hennepin County; Jeff Ledermann,
Education Specialist, Minnesota Office of Environmental Assistance; Julianne Jackels, Grade 3 Teacher, Oak Ridge
Elementary, Eagan, MN

Writing/Editing
Kathy Seikel, Jane Duden and Jan Hoppe

Design, Illustration,     Production
Northern Design Group

U.S. EPA Project Coordinator
Katherine Seikel, Office of Pesticide Programs, Communication Services Branch

Adapted for nationwide audience by Abt Associates, Inc., and The COM Group, Inc., under contract with the U.S. EPA.


                            United       Environmental Protection Agency
                                      Office of Pesticide Programs
                                    Field and External Affairs Division
                                    Communication Services Branch
                                1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. (7506C)
                                       Washington, D.C. 20460
                                     http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/
                                           (703)305-5017
 image: 








               a*cj  Ack*ovulecjcjfie*t;  .................................. Inside front cover

Table </ Co*te*t;  [[[ Pages i-ii

Activitie;  [[[ Pages 1-24

l*;ect;:  lA/kat';  a Pert?  [[[ Page 1
A fill-in-the-blank activity that will help kids identify common pests. Also provides information about the
beneficial behaviors of some pests.
l*;ect Pert;  a^  Pal; [[[ Page 2
A bug crossword puzzle that will have your students eager to learn more about both the good and bad
aspects of our insect friends.
          Pert;  vuitk tke  3 P;  ............................................... Page 3
Introduces the basics of fighting pests.
      '; a  lA/eecJ? [[[ Page 4
Describes both the good and bad about weeds, such as poison ivy and milkweed.

0a*cJy...oK Not? [[[ Page 5
Presents information about dandelions, including neat ways to use them, and how to control them.
              * 6Ka;; [[[ Page Q
Teaches kids when it's best to fertilize lawns and how to keep weeds from invading.

Tke  Rjcjkt Pla*t; i* tke  Ricjkt  Place; ......................................... Page 7
Explains how plants thrive under the right conditions. Includes an outdoor component.

P^fple Pla^el  Af-ei-ica';  Mo;t lA/a*tecJ  .................................... Pages 8-9
This two-part activity includes information about Purple Loosestrife, one of America's most persistent and
aggressive invasive species.
                  Pe;t;!  [[[ Page 10
This activity helps kids learn cool ways to keep pests from invading their homes and gardens.

                                                              Ho^;el  ................... Page 11


                                                                                               Page 12
Keep  Pe;t; fro/^ Pe;teKi*cj  Yw  l*;icje  a*cj  0^t;icJe
Teaches kids how to avoid being bitten by                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                             image: 








Joi* tke Tree Hole  Mojito  Patrol1. ......................................... Page 14
Includes cool facts about mosquitoes, as well as information about where they live and what kids can do
to eliminate their breeding grounds and to avoid getting bitten.

Mo^ito-Fatit^  Macki*e; .................................................. Page 15
Presents information about bats, their role in controlling mosquitoes, and how kids can build bat houses.

Pert;  Have l^efie;, Tool  Aphid; a*d  Ladyb^;  ............................... Page 16
Explains how aphids damage plants and how ladybugs can be used to eliminate aphids.

Mat'; ALL the B^zz? [[[ Page 17
Shows  kids how to tell the difference  between bees and wasps and how to avoid being stung.

Mo*;ter Caterpillar [[[ Page 18
After completing this word scramble,  kids will understand the life cycle of the gypsy moth, America's
number one tree pest, and the various tree species it likes to eat.

iA/i;e <;p to iA/orf<; [[[ Page 19
Teaches kids about the importance of earth worms to soil health and the various parts of these fascinating
creatures.

Crazy abo<;t  Comport [[[ Page 20
This activity teaches kids why compost is important, and how to make and use it.

                                                                                             Page 21
   Y Mi;;  M^LcU
Includes a neat outdoor activity on mulch.

The lA/eb of life  [[[ Page 22
Gives instructions to help kids draw one of the creatures they have learned about in this activity book.

Pla* for Pe;ticide Safety1. ................................................. Page 23
Explains the dangers of pesticides and how kids can avoid being exposed to them.
Are y^ GMLi^ecJ  for Pe;t PatfoL?  ......................................... Page 24
This quiz will test your student's knowledge of the concepts presented in this activity book.

6Lo;;aKy  [[[ Page 25
                Li;t  ............                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     image: 








                  V    a    Pert?
                                                                  CD
                                                                  -C
     The world has more insects than all other living
     things combined. We need insects! Many insects
     work for us. They visit flowers and spread pollen
so plants can produce fruits and vegetables. Some      v
insects eat other insects that damage plants. These
"worker" insects are welcome guests.

All insects have a place in the web of life. However
some insects are a nuisance and some can be     ,  , Cn,
                                            Look rof
harmful. We  call insects pests when they hurt,      co^t
damage, destroy, or make us or our animals sick.   YoAL k"
   Pert;
         When are insects pests? And when are they welcome guests?
             In the boxes mark P for pest or G for guest.
O
                  Fill in the blanks below.
                  Ant, bee, cockroach, grub, mosquito, spider, wasp, worm
           O It chews and kills corn
           plants. No corn for us!
  It bites into apples.
                              I
                 O It pollinates
                 flowers and
                 crops.
      © It can
       trigger an
       asthma attack.
                            © It preys on other
                            insects that may harm plants
                          )lts bite can give your
                           dog or cat heartworm
                           disease.
                                    O It shows up at
                                      your picnic.
                            It may sting. Ouch!
book
   sot*e wayf to fi^kt tke pert;
 to tKe eartk
                                                Uaft
United States Environmental Protection Agency  2003
                                         (See answers inside back cover.)
 image: 








             I»;ect
        Some bugs help us. Some bugs pester us.  All bugs are part of the web
            of life. If you think all bugs belong in bug zappers, think again!
             Use words from the word bank below to do this puzzle.
Across:                  ------
  1. Large black ant that nests in wood.
  2. They get on you to suck your blood.
  9. They harm plants by sucking sap.
 10. Beautiful insects that drink nectar.
 12. Outdoor creepy-crawly that eats
    rotten plant matter.
 14. Red and black bugs that eat tree
    leaves and seeds but don't kill trees.
 15. They sting, but also kill harmful
    insects.
    Mat; tke
   eKSwce betv
 a coyote a«o| a Aea?
                                                                       Aphids
                                                                       Bees
                                                                       Boxelder
                                                                       Butterflies
                                                                       Carpenter
                                                                       Cockroaches
                                                                       Fruitflies
                                                                       Gnats
                                                                       Houseflies
                                                                       Mosquitoes
                                                                       Moth
                                                                       Spiders
                                                                       Sowbug
                                                                       Ticks
                                                                       Wasps
Down:
  1. They eat almost anything, they like
    the dark, and they are hard to get
    rid of.
  3. Tiny, flying insects that breed in
    fruits and vegetables.
  4. They have eight legs and eat
    insects.
  5. It eats holes in wool and fur clothing.
  6. They spread germs with their feet.
    Frogs eat them.
  7. Small, flying bugs. The female's bite
    is itchy.
  8. They give itchy bites. Bats eat them.
13. They sting, but also make food that
    humans eat.
                                                                           a./.oAo;>
                                                      United States Environmental Protection Agency 2003
 image: 








Many scientists are
trying to find ways to
fight pests. One way
is to use pests of
pests,  or the
three Ps!
                                                  fke
                                              hunt and kill pests for food.


                                    PcirdSllGS live on or inside pests
                                      and also may kill them.

                           I  cltnOC|GnS cause disease in pests.
                                Pathogens are germs like bacteria or viruses.
*
                         Acti
                                 on
In the examples below, which of
   the 3 Ps is fighting pests?
     OBugs are attacking the plants in your
     school playground. Upon close
    inspection, you find tiny insects
called scales on plant leaves.
Insect killers (insecticides) would
kill the scales,  but might also
harm other creatures in the
playground. Also, school officials
do not want to use insecticides
where kids play. School officials
work with agricultural extension agents
to put tiny stingless wasps to work. These
wasps lay their eggs inside the pesty scales.
Wasp larvae hatch and grow inside the
scales. That kills the scales.
     O
          The brown bat
          can catch 1,200
        mosquito-sized
       insects in just
       one hour.
           P-
O                                                     Japanese beetles have invaded
                                                     America. They eat roots, leaves, flower
                                                    buds and fruit. They
                                                 can kill bushes, trees,
                                                 grasses, and garden
                                                 and field crops. Now
                                                 a germ is on the job.
                                                 It causes a disease
                                                 that kills the
                                                 Japanese beetle.
                                                  P-
                                         Imagine you are
                                         one of the 3 Ps.
                                        Make a poster to
                                       advertise yourself.
United States Environmental Protection Agency  2003
 image: 








Mat;   a
A      weed is a plant growing where you don't want
      it. Weeds steal sunlight, growing space, and
      moisture from grass and
  plants we do want.
  Weeds spread by seeds.
  Pull weeds before they set
  seeds. Then you'll have fewer
  weeds in the future!
                                 Fach letter is something
                                 pfants (including weeds)
                                    -i to survive.
         "feedf
                                Y pLace
                                L li^t
                                 fW
                   —  —

               Tipf

        Take a whack
          at weeds!
          or hoe weed's out
        sure to get every tiny
        of root so the weed
     Doesn't grow back.
                                |
                            x
 "Leave;
of three,
let it be."
Poison ivy is a pest when it grows
where we hike or play. It gives you an
 itchy rash and weepy blisters. Is
*   poison ivy good for anything?
  * ^   Some animals and birds eat
      *^  the leaves and berries.
      ^  *    Bees sip nectar
X.%^OA ^b,    %   from the
      *%_ °'©^   * %   flowers.
      ss/^/0 %.     %
      ^f^ry^O,  <!b    ^
       'Of-, v * '-Yj, "*.
         c/f St A)/  *
          s$/, %.%/, .       ^T
        ' best time to get rid
     o weeds Is when they
     are small          y
                                      •v«
              more easily
         moist soil.
                                         Milkweed can be a pest when it
                                         grows in fields of crops. But what
                                         would happen if it disappeared?
                                         Monarch caterpillars eat milkweed.
                                         Without milkweed, what would
                                         happen to monarchs?
spjiq 0} peq
                                                             ueujM asneoaq
                                                          seiyjennq
                                                                    P!Q
                                               United States Environmental Protection Agency 2003
 image: 








     or  not?
      Many people think dandelions make lawns
      ugly. Dandelions crowd out grass and can
      damage sidewalks and pavements. But
people long ago thought dandelions were
dandy. They used them for medicines. They
made fried flower blossoms and leafy salads.
They boiled and fried roots and made roasted
root tea. Some people still do!
    n   THIJl
   What can you do with
      dandelions?

• Make a bouquet.
• Make a dandelion chain.
 Pick several dandelions
 with long stems. Make a
 small slit in the dandelion
 stems. Poke the end of
 the stem from one
 dandelion through the slit
 on another dandelion.
 Repeat until you have a
 chain of dandelions.
•Tie-dye a t-shirt! The
 dandelion's yellow
 flowers, green leaves,
 and red roots can be
 used to make colorful
 dyes.
                         Color the dandelion. In the blanks, write the name
                          of the plant part and possible uses for the part.
                        •spaas am i&a spjig jspaas
                       uo/iapuep ooe jaAO aonpcud
                              uo/iapuep
                              'S}oasuj jo} jeioau pue uajjod
                                       UOIjapUBQ
                                lui}Li'uojiapuep/uojiapuep/p/f}/uis/6jo'UJUJS'MMM//:d}}Li
                                 ajoLU JQJ -(etosauu/iA/ p umasnj/y
                               LUOJI ABMB sai/ui peas e AJJBO UBO puiM 6uoj)s y -
                               Au/} ay\\\ jdABj} Aaq± 'pu/M aqi Aq paujBO ajB spaas uoijapuBQ
United States Environmental Protection Agency  2003
 image: 










               It's hard for crabgrass and weeds to take over healthy grass.
                 Grass that is healthy should require few, if any, chemical
                weed and insect killers. What times of the year do people
                    feed (fertilize) grass to keep  it strong and healthy?
                        A bear can help your family remember
                            the right times to fertilize grass.
      In winter, a bear sleeps. It eats
      nothing.
      Grass needs
In spring, bears are hungry when
they wake up. They need food.
      In summer, bears get what they
      need without extra help.

      Grass needs	
In fall, a bear pigs out before it
hibernates.
Grass needs
             Dress each bear for the season.
                   Tip for Grown-ups:
Use a mulching mower to put nutrients back without fertilizing.
Mow grass at a height of 2.5 to 4 inches to help screen out light to the soil
surface. This slows growth of weeds like crabgrass that need light to germinate
Grass also grows a deeper root system, which helps it tolerate stress.

       Check with your local agricultural extension service to find the right
       time of year to fertilize your lawn where you live.
                                                          United States Environmental Protection Agency 2003
 image: 








     Placer,
                           /
     you do best in a certain kind of habitat. So
     do plants! To grow and thrive, it's important
     to have the right conditions. Be a friend to
plants.  Notice where  each grows best. Then let
it grow  there!
Walk around your lawn, schoolyard, or
neighborhood  park. Notice where different plants
grow well. What is it like? Is it wet or dry? Shady
or sunny? Are there places where nothing grows?
Use what you  learned on your walk. Draw ferns,
cattails, flowers, and  other plants where each
would grow best.

   Make a path from the cabin to the lake.
    Put the right plants in the right places.
                                                 Habitat  are tke be;t
                                                 Tips for Grown-ups:
United States Environmental Protection Agency  2003
                                                Use native plants in your landscape. Not only are they interesting,
                                            *  but they also result in less water use; less need for pesticides and
                                              fertilizers; and better habitat for butterflies, birds, and other wildlife.
                                             See:
                                             U.S. EPA's Green Landscaping with Native Plants
                                            http://www.epa.gov/greenacres/
      EPA Mid-Atlantic Region Green Landscaping
   *  www.epa.gov/reg3esd1/garden/index.htm

    Audubon at Home
    http://www.audubon.org/bird/at_home/index.html

   National Wildlife Federation Backyard Wildlife Habitat Program
  http://www.nwf.org/backyardwildlifehabitat/

  The Nature Conservancy's Wildland Invasive Species Team Web Site
  http://tncweeds.ucdavis.edu/
 image: 








                                           ica';  Mort
   Purple loosestrife is pretty
   —and pretty dangerous.
   Why? This weed hogs the
land and crowds out native plants
and wildlife. It causes trouble
when it grows in wetlands. The
stems and roots are so tough
that boats and wildlife can't get
through. Other plant life can't
survive where purple loosestrife
takes over. Then wetland animals
lose their food and shelter.

When purple loosestrife was
brought to North America,
its natural enemies  were left
behind. With nothing to stop it,
the plants spread like wildfire.
Now something's bugging purple
loosestrife. Experts  brought
natural insect enemies from
Europe to eat the plants. These
beetles can slow purple
loosestrife's spread.
            tnoA jeeu uepjeB

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   ^FPrr.4   a/ief/ ~seeq AeuoLj
   ^^^   joj. eojnos uenod & se
        ;/ 5iy/sn Xg pu& suepj&6
ui 11 Buijuvid Aq ejuisesooi e/djnd jo
 p&ejds em pes&ejou/ eA&y
                     P!Q
                               WANTED
 be;t voay to -^et K'IO|
loo;e;tnfe i; to p^LL it
 by da^ol i^ Late Jw*e,
     ea^Ly Ay^t,
    tl^e pLa^t l^a;
      to
         Unscramble the words to see the only states where purple loosestrife does NOT grow!

     ORADFIL          AWIIHA
                                           United States Environmental Protection Agency 2003
 image: 








                                      BEWARE
 Stop Purple Loosestrife!




°



    Don't buy them!
• clogs rivers and lakes
[crowds out native plants
                                            n
                                            name of this weed!

S8l|OU| J88J
" ^^i 10 ^n
• ^^T ^ * I


01 dn MOJB uvo ajuisasoo/ e/djnd ^/woi
'uns //n; pue //os ;s/ouy i/;//i/i w


i«i^oA
P!Q

   ^   Tip for Grown-ups:
  *   Pulling purple loosestrife? Thoroughly brush off your clothes and equipment before leaving the site so you don't
      transport the small seeds to new areas. Put all purple loosestrife plant pieces in plastic bags (vegetation rots quickly
     in plastic). Take the bags to a sanitary landfill site. Be sure the landfill site doesn't require bags to be broken open for
     composting. Composting is not advised, as purple loosestrife seeds may not be destroyed and the thick, woody
    stems and roots take a long time to decompose. If facilities exist in your area, incineration is an effective way to
    dispose of plant material.
   United States Environmental Protection Agency 2003
 image: 








N
  CM
X CO
> v>
  (O
</> co
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cr
o J!
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                  ertrl
                          Do pests bug you? Keep
                          them from getting into
                          your home, yard, or
                       garden in the first place.
                       Use the code to fill in the
                       blanks. You'll see ways to
                       outsmart pesty insects,
                       weeds, and  diseases.
                                6    13    21    15   12   4    22    9
                            and plants with berries. These attract birds
                               to feast on insects that harm plants.
                   Welcome	
                              7
                   They eat	
                              8    15   6    20
                   that eat and damage plants.
                                    12
                 26
23
                                                  O
                                                                 O O
                                                      Clean up
                       Take
                                             24    9    6    14   25    8
                                            Wipe up spills. Keep rooms clean.
  0>
          20
O)
- CM


CD N
             26    9    25    26    20
             and recycling outdoors.
                  Put
               22
CO
(O
CM
                       8    24    9    22    22   13   8
                   on doors and windows. Keep insects out!
   Stake up
                  	_to keep
       7    12   14    26    7    12   22    8
  their leaves off the ground. Water them with a can or
bucket, not a spray. Then spores that live in the soil won't
     splash up on the plants and make them sick.
                        United States Environmental Protection Agency 2003
 image: 








    Keep Pests  from  Pestering  You
    Inside  and  Outside  Your  House!
Kitchen pests like
cereal, flour, oatmeal,
crackers, and pancake
mix. Travel the maze to
see which containers
pests can get into.
Weac
                                    clotk/tv=j ;o yo
                                      ca* fee
                                     tke tick;.
                        BeA>fe applyi^ a
                        perficiole, Read fke
                       Lakel FIRM Be ;*ce to
                       follow tke M;tfucti
                          1
                       f  Tip for Grown-ups:
                      ,*>•   Think you've got pests? Identify the pest problem before you decide what to do. Some
                         pests (or signs of them) are easy to spot. But sometimes we are fooled. What looks like a
                     *   plant "disease" may actually be a sign of poor soil or lack of water. To help you identify
                    f   your pest and learn the most effective ways to control it, use free sources from the library or
                        local nurseries. Or contact your local Cooperative Research, Education, and Extension
                    *  Service, (http://www.reeusda.gov/1700/statepartners/usa.htm)
                      United States Environmental Protection Agency 2003
 image: 








      Cockroaches love living with
      people. Homes give them lots of
      food and cozy spaces to rest and
breed. But no one wants cockroaches
in their home. They smell bad. They run
all over at night. They can cause
allergies, too.

To get rid of roaches,  think like a roach.
What would make you leave a cozy
human home?                    ...  ^
             Get
                           to do:
                                     What's yummy to a roach? Search
                                     for the hidden words to find out.
                                     Then make sure the roaches won't
                                     get to these goodies in your home!
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aSfoot the garbage every da,
D?eep food in ciosed container.
O Don't leave dirty dishes in the
   sink overnight.
 D wash food from cans before


 °
                                      Word Bank: peanut butter; fingernail clippings;
                                      crumbs; pet food; glue; bookbindings; grease; soap
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                                                 Nasty! When they eat, cockroaches barf a little
                                                 bit. They also leave poop. These smelly things mark
                                                 the spot so the roaches can find food later.
                                                        United States Environmental Protection Agency  2003
 image: 








        Tcked *  Off.

         Ticks are pests that live off blood. They
         find the blood in people and animals.
         While feasting on their host, ticks can
    pass along sicknesses like Lyme Disease.

    Ticks wait for their food to come to them.
    Ticks can sense body heat and carbon
    dioxide—a gas people and animals breathe
    out—to find prey. When blood sources like
    humans brush against them, ticks hop on.
Ick,  a  Tick1.              ^=*5L_-/
Ticks can be found all over the United States. People
living in the shaded states of the country have a
higher risk of being bitten by ticks carrying the
bacteria that causes Lyme Disease. Mark an "X" on
the state that YOU live in.     ^
                              Pf

                                   *
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                                             Ticks live in the woods and tall grass.

                                             They only eat three times: once as
                                             larvae, once as nymphs, and once as
                                             adults.

                                                                             Photo Courtesy
                                                                         Minnesota Department
                                                                           of Health - Disease
                                                                             Prevention and
                                                                                 Control
                                                               Avoid Tick Bites!
                                                            3- Ask an adult
                                                              <«** off with
      *
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
(http://www.cdc.gov/health/). Cited by the American
Lyme Disease Foundation, Inc.(www.aldf.com/).
For more about Lyme Disease, see:
http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/lyme/
                                                  Tip for Grown-ups:

                                              *  Ticks attach themselves to your body with their
                                                mouths. The best way to remove them is with
                                             *  tweezers, making sure not to leave any tick body
                                            f  parts in your skin.
    United States Environmental Protection Agency 2003
 image: 








 Jo/*  tke  7>ee  Hole
    Patrol!
     Mosquitoes bite
     and make you
     itch. They can
also make you sick.
Some mosquitoes
lay eggs in ponds or
swamps. The tree hole
mosquito can lay eggs
in your yard! It breeds
any place it finds still
or slow-moving water.
That includes tree
holes that hold water.

This mosquito finds
lots of other places to
lay eggs, too. You'll see
10 in the picture. Cross
them out. Then go on a
mosquito patrol in your
own neighborhood.
Turn over empty pots.
Dump water from toys.
Don't grow mosquitoes
in your area!
repellents
avoid over-use of
Pest/c/de products
                                                       sunset when
                                                   mosquitoes are
                                                       active.
                        United Sfafes Environmental Protection Agency
 image: 








                                            Madder
        Mosquitoes have a place
        in the food chain, but not
        on your skin. Bats and
  are mosquito patrols, too. Build
  bat house and you'll have
  fewer mosquitoes!
A bat eats between
                                                   Clues
                                       How many years in a century?
                                       Add a zero.
        Bat
     House!

   • Woodworking for
     Wildlife by Carroll
     Henderson has
     a bat house plan.
     You can build it
     from one piece of
     lumber for $5.00.
    For more, see
    • http://www.batcon.org/bhra/bhcriter.html
     hat does one big brown bat
     eat each night? Use the clues
     to find out!
                                       Multiply times 3.
                     (A)
                        and
                                                     (A)
        mosquitoes and other
          insects each night.
                           (B)
How many pennies in a dollar?

Multiply times the
number of days in  a week.

Add one more zero.
                 (B)
United States Environmental Protection Agency  2003
 image: 








      Aphids are tiny insect pests. They suck
      the sap from plants—vegetables, crops,
      flowers, and trees. They take away the
plant's nutrients, and they can give the plant
viruses.  Aphids attract even more pests to the
plant with the sweet, sticky juices they make.
                                                 Natural enemies that gobble up
                                                 aphids are lacewings, assassin bugs,
                                                 wasps,  spiders, and chickadees.
                                                 But ladybugs (ladybird beetles)
                                                 are the  champion
                                                 aphid eaters.
            Ladybugs look the same on both sides.
              Draw the rest of this ladybug's body.
                                                      ^    F°r fighting aphids
                                                      * Pick off aphids  from thp
                                                        underside of leave™ or

                                                      • Gm? ^ Wlth wat'er.
                                                       Grow plants such as
                                                       mangolds that attract
                                                       aphids'natural enemls
                                                       Buv a bag of ladybugs
                                                           a garden nursery.
       ; voo*'t harr-i a*y of^ yo^K pla*t;> but they eat
        pert; that <W. Let l^ylo^ ci|o their vooKk!

       o* lacilybucj;, vi;it  the National
       ^'; Back YaKcil iviLcilLi^e Habitat  ?
                                                      agricultural extension
                 the
Tip for Grown-ups:
When fighting spider mites or aphids, go for
the least toxic ways. You can buy beneficial
insects (enemies of pests) such as ladybugs.
You can also use insecticidal soaps or wash
aphids off plants with your garden hose.
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                                                       United States Environmental Protection Agency 2003
 image: 








     MatV   all   tke
    Honeybees and wasps sting to defend themselves, NOT to
    attack. For bees and wasps, stings are a good way to keep
    people from bugging them.  Bee stings hurt. They can even
be deadly if someone is allergic.
 Did
  Honeybees collect pollen and carry it in a
  basket of stiff hairs on each hind-leg. When
  they rest, their wings are flat.
  Wasps do not have "pollen baskets" and do not
  collect pollen. When they rest, their wings are
  folded back and look narrower than a bee's
  wings.
    Which  is which? Label and color
  the  wasp  and the honeybee. Circle the
    pollen  baskets on the honeybee.
               Tw
         Prevent Stings!      /
Try not to attract bees. If they come i
around, don't frighten them. Check *
what you should do in areas with bees:

D Avoid using scented products. This
   means hair spray, scented soaps,
   perfume, and lotions.
D Avoid brightly colored clothes,
   especially flowered patterns.
D Keep food and soda cans covered.
D Wear hats, shoes, and long pants.
D If a bee comes around,
   hold very still.
D If a bee lands on you, don't swat
   at it. Don't panic! Just blow at it
   gently. It will move.


            Fi/rt  A)CJI

If you get stung, have an adult
remove the stinger as soon as
possible.
• Wash the sting with soap and water.
• Put ice or cool water on it for
  10 to 30 minutes.
• To ease the pain and itching, try
  putting one of these on the sting:
  alcohol wipes, or a paste made of
k  baking soda and water or meat ^ *
\enderizer and water.      *  #<

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                                                                                *• H
         t pollinators, vuc wouldn't have agrio

United States Environmental Protection Agency 2003
 image: 








    1   ghat's the number one tree pest in the USA? It's the
    \A /gypsy moth caterpillar. These large, hungry pests
    "V eat the leaves of trees in early summer. This is the
   hardest time for trees to repair themselves. Gypsy moth
   caterpillars damage and kill trees.

   Gypsy moth caterpillars also bug humans. In early
   summer, they hang and drop from trees. They mess
   up outdoor areas where humans like to relax. Their
   hair also causes allergic reactions in some people,

   What kinds of trees do gypsy moths like best?
   To find out, unscramble the trees this caterpillar ate.
WORD BANK
apple
aspen
basswood
birch
maple
crabapple
oak
poplar
box elder
willow

£
V
\

^
\
1
:
•J
X

             earn to identify the gypsy moth in every stage of development.
             Number the life cycle stages in right order, from egg to adult.
                         http://www.fs.fed.us/ne/morgantown/4557/ginoth/
•>!  < -•  MJP^%r-Owjwpwip»i "\,  ./  ','»;,    '' "   ,'•',".  '-,•!-*.%
  •' -,  " ;Wher» plahting frees," brtos^ 9ps^i^s that gypsy nioths df ^t,^ Tly A$f>,, Dogwood, %
'*• <"«4" - JuniP^ef'UN«Sy^mpre,:ArboiyMei'Hojf}8yl$C|i4t,Qr,Northern Catalpa^,' ,  ' -'' '•
                                                     -••„ 10. oxb amw
                                                                                 a) =
                                                       United States Environmental Protection Agency 2003
 image: 








           Wise  up  to
   H
ealthy plants more easily resist pests. Good soil grows healthy
plants. And earthworms help make good soil.

   Earthworms are little "soil plows." They move bits of soil and
   make tunnels. This lets in air and water for animals and plants
   in the ground. Worms carry leaf bits and other materials into
   the soil, making it richer for plants. Earthworms eat soil and
   leave castings, little piles or pellets ("worm poop"). Castings
   hold nutrients that passed through the worm, and they
   improve the soil. Way to go, worms!
                                                                          .jcc.
                                                                        o^r
         Worm - a - rama
A cool, moist day or evening is a great
time to find earthworms. Look in
garden soil, vacant lots, lawns, parks,
or pastures.
1. Look at the soil surface.
   Castings are clues.
2. Dig a spadeful of soil. Sort through
   it for earthworms. Look at them
   through a hand lens. Look for:
     Setae (bristles that help
     worms grip soil and crawl)
     Slime coating (keeps skin
     moist so worms  can breathe)
     Front end (usually goes
     forward first)
     Clitellum ("collar" or band
     that's only on adult worms)
3. After you study the worms, put
   them back on the soil, please.
                                             Label the clitellum, setae,
                                                  and front end.
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United States Environmental Protection Agency 2003

                                                      «#3fcv





                                                            s?
                                  P!d
                                  ,*
 image: 








   Oazy
      Composting saves
      landfill space and
      turns garbage to
goodness. Try it at home
or at school!
What do you get from
compost? To find  out, start
at the arrow and write
down every other letter in
the space below.
          roil ^ake; it
t
                 ou
                   t.
     Tip for Grown-ups:
Use compost instead of chemical    *
fertilizers. It's earth-friendly, effective, and
free. Spread compost over the ground at   -
the base of plants to give them needed
nutrients.

For an informative slideshow about
composting for kids, see:
http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/
sustainable/slidesets/kidscompost/cover.html
                                              Make your own compost.
                                                        at least 3 feet wide
                                  or shovel
                                  to stir the
                                  compost
                                                                               wood chips
You need:
   Garbage \1UJ,OR
   and 3 feet deep
   Big plastic garbage bags to line the
   Soil (with earthworms and bugs)
   Twigs or wood
   chips
   Compost ingredients
   A long stick
                <m
                 *3&
                  24.
                23.
Before you start:
Ask an adult to help
you poke 25-30 small
holes in the lid, sides,
and bottom of the can
for air and water.
Step 1. Build up
layers. Each layer is
about 8 inches thick.
Step 2. Pour on
enough water to
moisten the pile.
Step 3. Make more
layers and water them
Step 4. Each time
you add compost
ingredients add
a little soil.
                                          Let *at^KeV KecycleK; cjo to
                                     Use the stick or shovel to mix the pile every two to four days. In
                                     one or two months, your compost will become dark brown and
                                     crumbly. It is ready to use on your lawn, houseplants, or garden!
                                                       United States Environmental Protection Agency  2003
                                                                               Compost
                                                                               ingredients
 image: 








                 , OK a^i/^aL poop
               Cor"po;t.  They vo
           rake it r^ell bacil—
               attract pert;1.1.
                    t
 Fill in the missing vowels.

        C   ff	

       gr       nds)

         O  gr   ss
          cl	pp	ngs
          MULCH is a layer of nonliving materials. People can
          spread it on top of the soil around plants. Why use
          mulch? Mulch shades and cools the soil. It keeps
          moisture in the soil. Mulch protects the soil from
          packing down. Best of all, it stops pesty weeds from
          growing. Mulch can be:
                         • Wood chips   • Dry leaves
                           Grass clippings
                           (with NO weeds or chemical weed killers)
                           Rocks   • Compost
               d scr   ps

                  ng    ^

                  s
                         D)
                         D)
                        O
     O
                   How thick should a mulch
                   layer be? See for yourself!
            First, choose two plants growing in your garden,
            yard, schoolyard, or nearby park. Then...
            1. Put 1 inch of mulch around the
                 base of plant #1.
            2. Put 3 inches of mulch around plant #2.
            3. Check in one month.

            I predict	

            This is what happened:	
           What I want to know now:
                   n
                   n
     60  o*  a  M-Ack
How many places can you find mulch around plants?
Gardens        D   At home            D  Parks
Schoolyard
D   Neighbor's yard
D   Boulevards
                     Place
                        Kind of mulch
                                                                      Any Weeds?
                                                                       Yes
                                                      No
                          7
United States Environmental Protection Agency 2003
             Tip for Grown-ups:
             Avoid "beaver lodge" mulching around trees. Spread the mulch evenly and
             leave a 3-4 inch air space around the base of your tree.
 image: 








THE
                                        of
 FN id you know that there are many more kinds of insects on earth than any other kind of
 I t living creature? It's hard to imagine, but 95% of all the animal species on the earth are
 •^  insects! Millions of insects can exist in a single acre of land! Over one million species
have been discovered by scientists, and they think that there might be ten times that many
that have not been named yet! All of these insects are part of what is called the "web of life."

Draw and color a picture with a critter you
read about in this book.
Show: what it eats
       what eats it
       if it helps something grow

Add other organisms to your picture to make
a web of life.
                                        kar  a  place
                          the
                                                 Tell a friend or parent
                                                   what this means.

                                                  United States Environmental Protection Agency 2003
 image: 








Pla*   far   pert icicle   rafetyi
              Pla*t;> family, a*<^ Pet;
 ^ometimes people buy and use pesticides. Pesticides
 V are chemicals that get rid of pests. They are poisons.
J Pesticides may accidentally get into our bodies and
make us sick. They can get into our bodies if we touch
them, breathe them, or swallow them. Find
pesticides in the picture. Underline words
that warn you that they are poisons.
         BUGBUSltR
            DANGER
Be safer from pesticides!
• Either take your shoes off at
 the door or wipe shoes
 carefully on a rug-type door
 mat. How would this help?
                                                         • Always store pesticides in
                                                          their original container.
                                                          How would this help?
                         Talk with your family:
1. Do lawns and parks really need to be
  totally weed free?
2. How do some insects help your lawn and plants?
  Do you  really need to get rid of ALL insects?
3. Can you put up with fruits and vegetables that aren't
  perfect-when they are grown without pesticides?
   1 Wash fruits and vegetables
   with water. Scrub them
   with a brush. Peel them
   if possible. How would
   this help?
Tip for Grown-ups:
Teach your children that pesticides are poisons, something they should never touch or eat. Pesticides are only for
grown-ups to use. Lock up all household, lawn, and garden chemicals. Store them in original containers with labels.
Remove children, pets, and their toys from any area where pesticides are being applied, indoors or out. For more
information about pesticide safety, visit our Web Site at: http://www.epa.gov/oppfead1/Publications/catalog/ and click
on "Citizen's Guide to Pest Control and Pesticide Safety" and on "Integrated Pest Management (IPM) in Schools"
under "General Consumer Publications." You can obtain free copies of EPA publications by calling the National
Service Center for Environmental Publications at 1-800-490-9198.
United States Environmental Protection Agency 2003
 image: 








        you Qualified  fav
                             Pert   Patrol?
     Match each pest problem with the least toxic way to attack it.
         Then try these ways when you need to pester pests!
Do you know how to prevent each of these pests from becoming a nuisance? Draw a line to
connect each question with the correct answer. Need help? Look throughout this book to find
the answers.
O
    You see purple
    loosestrife. What do
    you do?
     Tuck your pant legs into your socks when
     walking in tall grass or areas where these
     insects may live.
o
    How do you keep
    roaches out of your
    home?
O
Be very still. Don't panic! Just blow at it
gently. It will move.
o
o
    What should you do
    to avoid tick bites?
    How do you keep
    mosquitoes from
    using your yard to lay
    eggs?
O
                                          o
Pull it up right away. Put the pieces in
plastic bags.
  J^ Make sure there are no open containers
     with water, where these biters can breed.
O
    A bee lands on you.
    What do you do?
     Keep food in closed containers, clean up
     crumbs, and take the garbage out every
     day.
With the right information and tools, we can solve our
pest problems... /\/\/P be friends to Earth and nature!

                     TtatV  IPMl
          •BunoA j&m LUOJJ. ABMV SIVILIIUV Buyons
  -pooiq 'Aun deey d/ey yam si&oiiueLjo yo eAiB
siu&id i&oeds miM siseu Jiein du\\ Aeif± ;
         esn spJiqBuos jeijio eiuos pu&
                                                             Tip for Grown-ups:
                                                          For more information on IPM see
                                                              www.ipminstitute.org
                                                     United States Environmental Protection Agency 2003
 image: 








Allergic reaction - Can
include rash, itching, swelling,
sneezing,  runny nose, or
trouble breathing due to
contact with things a person is
allergic to.

Bug - General term for insects.
The term "bug" refers to
insects with two pairs of wings
and "beak" mouthparts for
piercing and sucking plant
juices or other insects.

Castings - "Worm poop" that
forms pellets or small piles.
Earthworm castings put
nutrients back into the soil.

Caterpillar - What a moth  or
butterfly looks  like in the larval
stage of its life cycle.

Compost  - A mixture of
organic leftovers that may
include rotted plant materials,
manure, and eggshells. Added
to your garden, it nourishes
the soil and plants.

Insect - An organism with
three body parts (head, thorax,
abdomen) and three pairs of
jointed legs. Most numerous
type of creatures on earth.

Insecticide - A pesticide that
kills insects.

Integrated Pest Management
(IPM) - Choosing among
various ways to treat pest
problems. The goal is to cause
least harm to the environment.
Larva - The second
developmental stage for an
insect that has a four-stage life
cycle: egg,  larva, pupa, adult.

Lyme Disease - A flu-like
illness caused by the bite of an
infected deer tick.

Mulch - A layer of material
that gardeners place over the
soil to reduce weeds and hold
moisture.

Native - A plant or animal that
is an original inhabitant of
where you live.

Natural Enemy - Something
existing in nature that kills or
eats an organism.

Nutrients - Substances that
organisms need to live and
grow.

Nymph - A young insect that
has not yet developed into its
adult stage. Nymphs look like
adults but lack fully-formed
wings.

Organism - A living plant or
animal.

Parasite - An organism that
lives off another organism in a
way that harms it.

Pathogen - Something that
causes disease or death in an
organism.
Pest - Something that shows
up where you don't want it.
Examples can include weeds,
insects,  mold, rodents, and
bacteria.

Pesticide - A substance used
for keeping pests away, killing
them, or reducing their
numbers. EPA registers — or
licenses — pesticides.

Poison - A substance that
kills, injures, or impairs an
organism through chemical
action.

Predator - An organism  that
kills and eats  other organisms.

Prey - An animal that another
animal hunts for food.

Spore - A single plant or
animal cell that is able to grow
into a new plant or animal.

Toxic - A word that means
"poisonous in certain
amounts."

Weed - An unwanted plant.
United States Environmental Protection Agency  2003
 image: 








Just for Kids

A Roach Prevention Activity Website for Kids (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (ERA))
http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/kids/roaches/english/

Backyard Wildlife Habitat Program (National Wildlife Federation)
http://www.nwf.org/backyardwildlifehabitat/

Bugged by Bugs" (Girl Scouts Mile Hi Council)
http://www.buggedbybugs.girlscoutsmilehi.org/

Criteria for Successful Bat Houses (Bat Conservation International)
http://www.batcon.org/bhra/bhcriter.html

Composting for Kids (Texas A & M University)
http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/sustainable/slidesets/kidscompost/cover.html

Green Squad (National Resource  Defense  Council)
http://www.nrdc.org/greensquad/

Gypsy Moth in North America (USDA Forest Service Northeastern Research Station)
http://www.fs.fed.us/ne/morgantown/4557/gmoth/

Kidzone (The National Wildlife Federation)
http://www.nwf.org/kids/

Thinking Fountain:  Dandelion (Science Museum of Minnesota)
http://www.smm.0rg/sln/tf/d/dandelion/dandelion.html

Vermicomposting Kid's Page (National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, U.S. Department
of Health and Human Services)
http://www.niehs.nih.gov/kids/worms.htm

Who Wants to be an IPM Super Sleuth? (The IPM Institute of North America)
http://www.ipminstitute.org/supersleuth.htm
                                                            United States Environmental Protection Agency  2003
 image: 








For Teachers, Parents, and Other Caregivers
Audubon at Home (National Audubon Society)
http://www.audubon.org/bird/at_home/index.html

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Lyme Disease Home Page (Centers for Disease
Control, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services)
http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/lyme/

Citizen's Guide to Pest Control and Pesticide Safety (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (ERA))
http://www.epa.gov/oppfead1/Publications/Cit_Guide/citguide.pdf

Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service State Partners
(U.S. Department of Agriculture)
http://www.reeusda.gov/1700/statepartners/usa.htm
Green Landscaping: Green Acres (EPA)
http://www.epa.gov/greenacres/
Health Topics A to Z (Centers for Disease Control, U.S. Department
http://www.cdc.gov/health/

How to Use Repellents Safely (EPA)
http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/factsheets/insectrp.htm

Integrated Pest Management in Schools (EPA)
http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/ipm/brochure/index.htm

Mid-Atlantic Region Green  Landscaping (EPA - Region 3)
http://www.epa.gov/reg3esd1/garden/index.htm
Outsmarting Poison Ivy and Its Cousins (U.S. Food and Drug Administration)
http://www.fda.gov/fdac/features/796_ivy.html

The American Lyme Disease Foundation (American Lyme Disease Association)
http://www.aldf.com/

Wildlife Invasive Species Team (The Nature Conservancy)
http://tncweeds.ucdavis.edu/
Services)
United States Environmental Protection Agency 2003
 image: 








1.   How did you find out about this activity book?
1.   If you are a teacher, what grade do you teach?
3.   What activities did you find most useful and why?
4.   Which activities were least useful and why?
5.   Do you have any suggestions for additional activities.Web links, or resources that
     we might include in a revised activity book?
G.   Do you know other people or organizations that might find this book useful?
7.  Do you have any other suggestions?

                     Please send, fax, or e-mail your completed form to:
                        Kathy Seikel, Office of Pesticide Programs
                          U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                          1200 Pennsylvania Ave., NW (7506C)
                                  Fax: (703) 308-5558
                                 seikel.kathy@epa.gov

                              Thanks for your comments!!
United States Environmental Protection Agency 2003
 image: 








PESTS OR GUESTS, p. 1
1. P,  grub      5. G, spider
2. P,  worm     6. P,  mosquito
3. G, bee       7. P,  ants
4. P,  cockroach  8. P, wasp

INSECT PESTS AND PALS, p. 2
THE 3 P'S IN ACTION, p. 3
1. parasite
2. pathogen
3. predators

GREEN. GREEN GRASS, p. 6
1. Grass needs nothing.
2. fertilizer
3. nothing
4. fertilizer

PURPLE PLAGUE, p. 8
Florida, Hawaii
BEWARE, p. 9
Milfoil

OUTSMART THOSE PESTS, p. 10
1. birdhouses, sunflowers
2. toads, slugs
3. garbage
4. crumbs
5. screens
6. tomatoes

MAZE, p.  11
Pests can get into any opened or spilled
containers.

COCKROACH MENU, p. 12
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  UH D OW EQ ¥ D [

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MOSQUITO-EATING
MACHINES, p. 15
3,000 and 7,000 mosquitoes
WHAT'S ALL THE BUZZZ?. p. 17
A. wasp
B.honeybee

GYPSY MOTH, p. 18
 l.oak            A. 2
 2. aspen          B. 4
 3. poplar          C. 1
 4. apple          D. 3
 5. crabapple
 6. birch
 7. maple
 8. willow
 9. basswood
10. box elder

CRAZY ABOUT COMPOST, p. 20
Good soil.

COMPOST INGREDIENTS, p. 21
A. coffee grounds
B. grass clippings
C. food scraps
D. decaying leaves
E. veggie peels
F. eggshells
G. fruit cores

ARE  YOU QUALIFIED FOR
PEST PATROL?, p. 24
1.C
2. E
3. A
4. D
5. B
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