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         association  of

         clinicians for the

         underserved

 Though 50% of deaths in the United States are linked to
 preventable conditions, less than one cent of the nation's
 healthcare dollar is spent on prevention research. Prevention
 research is the essential first step in protecting every
 American from avoidable disease, disability, and injury.

 On America's continuum of health care, preventing health
 problems  is an indisputably practical first step to saving lives
 and health care costs. ResearchlAmerica public opinion polls
 show that Americans rank prevention research almost as high
 a priority as education or the creation of jobs even in times
 of economic constraint and uncertainty. Prevention research
 helps Americans close to home—from fluoridating drinking
 water to showing how exercise  and  a healthy diet helps
 prevent high blood pressure and lowers risk of developing
 diabetes, obesity and death from heart disease or stroke.
    All members of society should have access to affordable,
    quality health care.
    ACU values and supports transdisclplinary care.
    Health care should be delivered by culturally competent,
    community-responsive health cure professionals.
    Clinicians who care for undersorved populations need to
    be nurtured and supported in their efforts, because oJf the
    unique stresses and personal challenges involved in their
    work.
    Competent clinical practice requires a specialized body
    of knowledge and skills not traditionally addressed in
    professional schools.
    Population based research is essential for the improve-
    ment of the health status of underserved populations.
   To improve the health of underserved population by
   enhancing the development and support of health care
   clinicians serving these populations.
ACU Goals
•  To identify and promote the sharing of specialized
   knowledge unique to providing health care to underserved
   populations.
«  To provide opportunities for increased communications
   and collaborations between clinicians.
•  To encourage research directed to improving the health
   status and delivery of services to the underserved.
•  To recognize those who have contributed to the health
   care of the underserved.
•  To raise public awareness of issues impacting the health
   of underserved populations and to heighten visibility, for
   successful models addressing these issues.

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     To develop clinical leaders and advocates.
     To develop relationships and work with other organiza-
     tions to accomplish ACU's mission.
     To advocate for the inclusion of cultural and social compe-
     tencies in the continuum of education for all clinicians.
     To promote the interdisciplinary approach to improving the
     health status of the individual, family, and community.
  ACU is a non-profit, transdisciplinary membership
  organization established in 1996 to provide specialized
  support for and national representation of clinicians in
  medically underserved practice. ACU recognizes that the
  obstacles to providing care for our nation's underserved
  populations  are numerous, hindering the availability of
  accessible, quality care for  those most in need. To carry
  out its mission, ACU developed its program areas of
  research, public awareness, advocacy, education, and
  communication around the needs of the clinician on the
  "front line" of medically underserved practice. ACU
  hopes that by addressing the clinician's professional
  needs, advocating for their patients, and decreasing the
  sense of professional and persona! isolation, clinicians
  will more likely be retained  and underserved populations
  better served.
 Individual ($50)—Advocacy calendar and posters, Clinician ,
    & Community newsletters, discounted bulk purchases of
    resources, broadcast E-mail updates, access to Members'
    Only section of Web site, clinician enhancement tools (cue
    cards, booklets, etc.), and all ACU publications.
 Student ($15)—All the benefits of the individual member-
    ship listed above with all publications available at cost.
 Organizational ($40.0)—Pour individual memberships
    (described above), plus 25 additional advocacy calendars
    and recognition within ACU's. Clinician & Community
    newsletters, advocacy calendar, and Web site.
 Clinic ($150)—Three individual memberships (described
    above), plus 10 additional advocacy calendars and posters
    with recognition within the advocacy calendar.
 Sponsor ($2500)—four individual memberships (described
    above), plus 250 additional  advocacy calendars, and
    special recognition and promotion within ihe advocacy
    calendar, newsletters and Web site.
 Every year, ACU produces an advocacy calendar highlighting
 issues relevant to medically underserved populations. We
 hope you have found our 2003 edition informative, attractive.
 and applicable toward your own advocacy efforts. As a
 national association dedicated to supporting those in med-
 ically underserved practice,  we hope you will consider joining
 ACU. There are a number of ways to join in our mission and
 to lake advantage of our services and network of profession-
 als with a passion for eliminating barriers to affordable,
 accessible health care. Simply fill out and return the mem-
 bership card included with this calendar or contact ACU at
 the address below.

ACU  National Office:
 1420 Spring Hill Road. Suite GOO
Tysons Corner, VA 22102
E-mail: acu@clinicians.org
Web: www.clinicians.org

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   Clinicians can screen
prenatal patients for risk factors
associated with premature birth
   and educate their patients
      3n steps to prevent
        premature birth.
The cost of caring for jpremature infants in the United, .
States exceeds $4 billjon each year.
Prematurity/ low birthj weight is the leading cause of death
in the first month of life and is a major determinant of ill-
ness and disability anjong infants.
The rate of preterm birth in the United States is highest tor African
Americans, followed by Native Americans. Infants born to mothers
less than 20  years old are more likely to be born premature com-
pared to infants born to mothers ages 20-35.
'(Peristals, June  2002)     |

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                Birth
             .
March of Dimes Birth Defects Prevention Month • National Volunteer Blood Donor Month


   Sunday      Monday
     For more information on premature birth
     prevention, visit www.marchofdimes.com
        Tuesday    Wednesday   Thursday     Friday
                                Saturday
                                                                       3
                                              8
                                       9
                         10
 11
       12
 13
15
                                21
                                     23
                        24
25
               Martin Luther
               King, Jr. Day
       26
27
                        31
                            the proportion of pregnant, women who receive early and adequate
                    prenatal care to 90%.

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                                                           Clinicians can familiarize
                                                          themselves with simple oral
                                                        health preventive measures and
                                                          educate parents  about being
                                                            active in their  children's
                                                                  oral health.
• Dental decay is one of ^;he most common chronic infec-
 " tious diseases among U.S. children. This preventable
  health problem begins parly: 17% of children aged 2-4
  years have already had,decay.
                        I
° Among low-income children, almost 50% of tooth decay
  remains untreated, and may result in pain,  dysfunction, being
  underweight, and poor appearance—problems that can greatly reduce
  a child's capacity to succeed in the educational environment.
Fewer than 1 in 5 Medipaid-covered children received at least one preven-
tive dental service in a [recent year; many states provide only emergency
de"ntal services to Medipaid-eligible adults. Pain and suffering.due to
untreated tooth decay c|an lead to problems in eating, speaking, and
attending to learning. ;                      ,
(Center for Disease Control arid Prevention, 2002).

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Children's  Oral  Hjealth
American Heart Month • National Children's Dental Health Month

                         !
                         I

   Sunday      Monday   i  Tuesday   Wednesday   Thursday
Friday     Saturday




For more information qn Children's Oral Health,
visit www.jchildent.org
2
• 9
National Child P
16

23
--
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—Abraham Lincoln
  Youth who face prejudice anq discrimination by virtue of their
  identity, life experience,  or family circumstances dispropor-
  tionately experience teen pregnancy and HIV/STD infection.
  Research often focuses on the socioeconomic factors—such as
  poverty, family distress, and Access to health care—which con-
  tribute to teenage sexual risfe. However, researchers focus little •
  attention on the effects of discrimination that is based on age, race,
  gender, class, and sexual orientation.
  While adolescents with high self-esteem are more likely to protect
  themselves from pregnancy ajnd HIV/ STDs, teens with lessened self-
  esteem-may be less effective |at negotiating safer sex, communicating
  with peers and partners, and; accessing health care.
  Health promoting behaviors tjiat include acquiring accurate information,
  clarifying personal values, arid developing peer support for safer behav-
  ior all affect whether an adolescent will experience an STD infection.
  (Advocates for Youth, 2002}       ;
 clinicians can offer materials
 (geared to all understanding
levels) about the sexual health,
   of children, adolescents,
         and adults.

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Adolescents and Reproductive Health
National Nutrition Month .
Sunday


"2
9
Cover the Uninsu
16
National Poison F
23,
^30

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

For more information on youth and reproductive health
please visit, www.advocatesforyouth.org
3
10
•ed Week
17
reversion Week
^
tSfer*^
4
11

18

• 25
t
5
12

I 9

26

6
13

20

27

Friday


7
14

21
First Day of Spring
'J Q.
Zo

Saturday
1

8
15

22

29

/** ' \HEALTHYPEOPLE2010:
J / Increase the proportion of young adults who have receiver! formal instruction
W before.! turning age 18 years on reproductive health issues from 64%-90%
.

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-Maya Angelou
                                                                    cians can screen patients
                                                                 for sign of alcohol abuse by
Urging one of several simple
   screening instruments .
 j,,',  readily available.
 Ctfe
     9 There are more deaths and disabilities each year in the
       U.S. from substance abuse than from any other cause.
       About 18 million Americans have alcohol problems
                            |
     • Binge alcohol use wasj least likely to be reported by Asians
       and most likely to be Deported by American Indians/Alaska
       Natives and whites,   i
     • More than nine (9) million children live with a parent dependent
       on alcohol and/or illicit drugs.
     • Alcohol and drug abus,e costs the American economy an estimated
       $276 billion per year in lost productivity, health care expenditures,
       crime, motor vehicle crashes and other conditions. Untreated
       addiction is more expensive than heart disease, diabetes and
       cancer combined.     r
       (National Council on Alcohol land Drug Dependence, 2002)

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Cancer Control Month • Alcohol Awareness Month • National Child Abuse Prevention Month
   Sunday      Monday     Tuesday    Wednesday    Thursday      Friday      Saturday
                                                  2
          6
   7
Public Health Week

Daylight Saving Time
    Begins
9
10
11
12
                                  National Alcohol
                                  Screening Day
National infant immunization Week
                                  15
       20
21
          24
       27
                                                       For more information on alcohol abuse and treat-
                                                            ment, visit www.recoverymonth.gov

                                                                  I             I
                           i

                     HEALTHY PEOPLE 2010:

                     Reduce [the proportion of adults who exceed guidelines for low-risk drinking
                     from 72% to 50%.

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                                                             Clinicians can incorporate
                                                             environmental management
                                                            of indoor asthma triggers into
                                                                clinical practice and
                                                                 standards of care.
Costs associated with asthma are estimated to rank
among the highest, due! to frequent emergency room
visits, hospitalizationsjand doctor's office visits.
Asthmatic adults loose-$850 million in wages per year, and
more than 10 million school days per year are lost to asthma
related illnesses.  (National Center tor Health siaiisiics. 20021
• Asthmatic episodes car) be prevented by eliminating triggers in
  the environment such sjs tobacco smoke or second hand smoke,
  animal dander, cockroaches, mold, and dust mites. (BPA. 2002)

« Asthma Is a potential danger to the health of all children and adults
  .who have it; however, asthma occurs in disproportionate rates
  among people of different ethnic and cultural backgrounds.
  (American Lung Association, 2002)

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National Allergy and Asthma Awareneks Month • National Arthritis Month » National High Blood Pressure Education Month
Sunday

Monday

For more information on asth
• http://www.epa
. 4

11
Mother's Day
Women's Health 1
18
Buckle Up Amerii
25

5

12
fesk
19
a! Week
n f
26
Memorial Day
Tuesday

Wednesday

ma management, please visit,
gov/iaq/asthma/
6
World Asthma
Day
13

20

•27

7

14

'21

28

Thursday
1

8

15

22

29'

Friday Saturday
2

9

16

23

30

3

10

17

24

31
World No
Tobacco Day
 Environmental quality plays a major role in the respiratory health or individuals.
 The overall death rate from asthma has increased by 57%. The quality of.
environment is one of ten health indicators.

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other Theresa
                                                            Clinicians can enhance care
                                                          of HIV/AIDS patients by including
                                                              the caregiver in the care
                                                                  of the patient.
Taking care of someone with HIV/AIDS can be emotion-
ally and physically draining. As a result, many caregivers
are faced with significant physical, emotional and finan-
cial burdens that impacjt their quality of life and the person
they are caring for.    '

HIV clinics, care centers and healthcare insurers are discovering
the value of caregiving tod are making significant strides to
include caregivers in thjp continuum of care.
A caregiver can provide! support and care to patients living with
HIV disease fay helping jthem deal with many challenges associated
within the entire spectrum of HIV disease, from diagnosis until
severe compromise.    I
(Strength for Caring Program, i2002)

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Caregiver Support
National Fresh Fruit and Vegetable IV <

   Sunday    Monday
      onth <> National Safety Month
        Tuesday   Wednesday    Thursday     Friday     Saturday
I
8
National Men's H
15
Father's Day
22
29

2
9
salth Week
16

23'
30

3
i 10

17

24

4
11

18

25

5
12

19

26

6
13

20

27

For more information on caregiver support, please visit,
http://www.strengthforcaring.com/
7
14

21
First Day of Summer
2©
0


HEALTHY PEOPLE 2010:
Increase the number of public health surveillance and health promotion
programs for people who act as caregivers.

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                                                       you cam,  fey all'the

                                                                                 9
                                                               as
                                                         John Wesley
                                                          Clinicians can help people
                                                            gain access to care by
                                                       familiarizing themselves with the
                                                        services offered at the federal,
                                                       state, and community levels that
                                                         are designed to provide care
                                                          to those who do not have
                                                              health insurance.
Even though we have become more global in our thinking
and more interdisciplinary in our approaches to health
care delivery, our natloA still faces the problem of 42
million uninsured peopljj. (Association or Academic Health Centers)
Insure Kids Now! is a national campaign to link the nation's
10 million uninsured children—from birth to age 18—to free and
low-cost health insurance. Many families simply don't know  their
children are eligible, (injure Kids NOW!. 2002)
Uninsured adults were tpree times as likely as insured adults to
have gone without a needed doctor visit, not filled a prescription,
or not followed up on a recommended medical test or treatment  in
the past year because of an inability to pay. (Alliance for Healthcare
Reform, 2002)            I

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Access  to Care
Fireworks Safety Month
Sunday .

Monday

For more information on access
to health insurance for children,
visit, www.insurekidsnow.gov
6
: 13
20
,27
^fl
7
14
21
• 28

Tuesday
1

8
.15
• . 22
29
ruv pFflPi F 2
nn a irc,ujriLE, &,
Wednesday
2

9
1-6
23
30
010:
Thursday
3

10
17
24
31

Friday Saturday
• . .4
Independence Day
. 11
18
25


5

12
19
26


                      Increase llio proportion of insured persons wllh coverage for clinical
                      preventive services.

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                                                          ; Clinicians can review with
                                                           their patients the over the'
                                                            counter medications and
                                                          supplements they are taking
                                                          :    and why patients are
                                                                 taking them. .  .,
Over the Counter (OTCJ) drug safety involves: reading
product labels, being aware of potential drug interac-
tions, proper drug storpge, keeping children safe, and
protecting against tampering.
                     i
The elderly use betweejn 40 and 50 percent of. all OTCs
consumed to relieve cojmplaints such as arthritis pain, insomnia,
constipation, indigestion, and headaches.
Most consumers do noj consult a medical practitioner before using
OTCs to treat medical problems. Regulation standards  cannot ensure
that consumers will make appropriate decisions.
Self-Misdiagnosis can be serious if unrecognized. Heart attacks,
ulcers, and esophageal' cancer have been mistakenly treated as
heartburn.
(Administration on
                 ;. 2002)

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                                 g Safety  and
lance
National Eye Examination Month

   Sunday      Monday      Tuesday    Wednesday   Thursday      Friday
                  Saturday

For more
3
10
• 17
2^
31

nformation on ove
visit www.bem
4
11
18
25

r the counter drug
edwise.org
\ 5
12
•' . 19
26

safety,
6
13
20
27


7
• 14
21
28
1

8
15-
22
29
• 2 ,

9
16
23
30
                       Increase the proportion of primary care providers, pharmacists, and other
                       health!care professionals who routinely review with ihelr patients aged Go
                       years and older and patients with chronic illnesses or disabilities all new
                      prescribed and over-the-counter medicines.

-------



^S^^^-^i^^i-Ffi^KX^^^VnM-M^''1**!'"-^---'' '-r- ""-i^p- '-''---'-
      The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (GDC)
      released the first national health interview survey to include
      questions on the prevalence of diagnosed attention deficit
      disorder. Nearly 7% of children aged 6-11 were reported to
      have been diagnosed with ADHD.
      Clinicians have the
    responsibility to provide
    individualized treatment,
including education about ADHD
  treatment options that meet
    particular needs of each
      patient and his/her
      ADHD is real. The nation's most prestigious medical organizations
      agree that ADHD is a mental disorder with symptoms which include
      distractibility, inattention, inability to plan and follow through, overreacting,
      and restlessness.
            family.
      A growing body of scientific data indicates thai children who are not treated for
      ADHD may be at higher risk for substance abuse and criminal behavior.
                               • i
      Research is showing that minority students are less likely lo be diagnosed than
      their white classmates and that treatment rates are lower for girls, minorities and
      children in families that are( receiving public assistance.
      (National Consumers League, 2002)                  .

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       ojr^ficjtflyperacti¥ity Disorder (ADHD)
y Safety Month « National Cholesterol Education Month »  Prostate Health Month

Sunday     Monday   ;  Tuesday    Wednesday   Thursday    Friday     Saturday


7
14
21.

•• 28

I
Labor Oay
8
15
22

29

2

9
16
•' 23
First Day of Autumn
30

3

10
17
24


4

11
18
25


5

12
19
26


• 6

13
20
27'.


For more information on children's mental
health, visit www.healthinschools.org
                Increase the proportion of children wilh menial health problems who
                receive [treatment.

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   Clinicians can encourage
their female patients to prevent
  CHD by eating a high fiber,
   low-fat diet; engaging in
     regular exercise; and
       reducing stress.
 Coronary heart disease (CtiD) is the number one cause of .
 death among U.S. women. The survival rate following a heart
 attack is lower among wonien than men.
                         |
 Medications recommended by the American Heart Association
 for treating heart disease are underused in elderly patients and
 women. Women are less lively than men to be treated with aspirin,
 thrombolytic agents, beta-blockers, or lidocaine.
 There are unique aspects to the risk factors, symptoms, presentation,
 disease course, and testing of cardiovascular disease in women. The
 role of female hormones on the heart is unique to women as well.
                         i
 African-American women have the greatest risk of heart disease of
 any gender or ethnic group, with heart disease their number one
 cause of death after age 35.
' (Agency for Healthcare Quality gn(l Research (AHRQ), 2002)

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              Heart  Disease (CHD) and  Women
National Breast Cancer Awareness Month « Healthy Babies Month » Healthy Lung Month » National AIDS Awareness Month


   Sunday      Monday   ',  Tuesday    Wednesday    Thursday     Friday     Saturday


1
For more information on
heart disease, please visit,
http://www. 5aday.com
i
5
Fire Prevention V!
12
. 19

26
Daylight-Saving
Time Ends
^-sSTI
6
feek
Columbus Day
20

27
SS2*v.
1
, 7
I
i
I
! 14'
1
'"' 21
. j&j s.
i
2O
O
i
1

8

15
22,

29

2

9
National
Depression
Screening Day
16
23

30

3

•• 10

17
24

31

4

11

' 18
25



                   HEALTHY PEOPLE 2010:
                   Increas'e the proportion of adults with high blood-pressure who are taking
                   action (for example, losing weight, increasing physical activity, or reducing
                   sodium intake) to help control their blood pressure.

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   Clinicians can offer every
   tobacco user intervention
  options; even brier tobacco
   dependence, treatment is
effective, and every patient who
    uses tobacco should be
     offered at least brief
          treatment.
In America today, tobacco stands out as the agent most
responsible for avoidable illness and death. Millions of
Americans consume thjs toxin on a daily basis. Its use
brings premature death to almost half a million Americans
each year, and it contributes to profound disability and pain
in many others.        ;                            ;
Despite high, sustained tobacco use  prevalence, the response of
both clinicians and the^U.S. health care delivery system is disap-
pointing. Studies show^that most smokers present at primary care
settings, and they are not offered effective assistance in quitting.
Current treatments for jtobacco dependence offers the healthcare
system its greatest single opportunity to staunch the loss of life,
health, and happiness caused by this chronic condition.
(Office of the Surgeon Genera . 2002)

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Smoking Cessation               .

Natfonal Alzheimer's Disease Awarenqss Month ° Child Safety and Protection Month ° Diabetes Month
                          !                  '

   Sunday.    Monday   •  Tuesday •  Wednesday   Thursday      Friday      .Saturday


. ' 2

' 9

16

23,
^0
*, —
-••


i
For more information on effective smoking cessation
http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/tobacco/smoke
i
3

10

. 17

24

] ' 4
Election Day
i . 11
Veteran's Day
/' 18

25

5

12

19

26


treatment, visit
sum.htm
' 6

13

2O
^i \j
Great American
Smokeout
27
Thanksgiving


7

14

21

28

I

8
>
15

•' 22

29

                     Increase the proportion of physicians and dentists who counsel their at-risk

                     patients about tobacco use cessation, physical activity, and cancer screening
                    from 50%-85%.

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Clinicians can screen
  patients for cancer,
   regardless of age.
At least a third of deaths due .to cancer could be prevent-
ed if people 50 years and older are screened regularly.
Reducing the nation's cancer burden requires reducing the
prevalence of behavioral and environmental factors thai
increase people's cancer risk, as well as ensuring that screen-
ing services and high-quality treatments are available and acces-
sible to everyone in America.
The most common types of cancer which cause death in the elderly
are cancers of the lung, colon, prostate, and breast. Fortunately,
clinicians have resources at their disposal to screen elderly
patients  for these cancers.
(Centers for Disease Control Bnd Prevention. 2002)

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                              Screening
                                        .  ®
National Drunk and Drugged Driving Prevention Month

   Sunday      Monday   j  Tuesday   Wednesday   Thursday      Friday      Saturday


7
14
21
28
^ —
1
. World AIDS Day
8
••15
22
First Day of Winter
29
~>-^
* 2

', 9
: 16
.-• 23
i
; 30

3

10
. 17
24
31

4

11;
18
25

5

12
19
26

6

13
20
27

For more information on cancer and
screening options, visit: http://www.cancer.com
                    HEALTHY PEOPLE 2010:
                    Increase the proportion of adults who receive a colorectal cancer screening
                    examiriation from 35%-50%

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     association  of
     clinicians  for the
     underserved
 Johnson & Johnson
 AIIEC @ Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR
 American Academy of Family Physicians, Leawoocl, KB
 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, Austin, TX
 American College of Nurse Practitioners, Washington, DC
 Asian Pacific l-leallii Care Venture. Los Angeles, CA
 California Primary Care Association. Sacramento, CA
 Clinica Monsenor Oscar Romero. Los Angck'K. CA
 Community Campus Partnership for Health. Seattle, WA
 Connecticut AHRC @ UConn  School of Medicine,
 Farmington, CT
 Contemporary Learning Systems. Inc.. Qakdale, MN
 Florida AIIEC Program @ University of South Florida,
 Tampa, FL
 Florida State University College of Medicine,
 Tallahassee, FL
 Georgetown University Medical Center-Community Health
 Center Director, Development Fellowship, Washington, DC
 Golden Valley Health Centers, Merced, GA
 Illinois AHEC Program, Quincy, 1L
 Illinois Primary Health Care Association, Chicago, 1L
 [nova Health System—Community Health Division,
 Falls  Church, VA
 Kentucky Primary Care Association, Frankfort, KY
 King/Drew Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA
 Maryland Dept. of Health & Mental Hygiene—Office of
 Primary Care & Rural Health, Baltimore, MD
 Meclpin: Medicine for People  in Need, Oakland, CA
 Midwest Clinicians Network,  Okemos, MI
National Center for  Cultural Competence, Washington, DC
National Center for  Primary Care-Morehouse,  Atlanta, GA
Navajo Health Foundation—Sage Memorial Hospital,
Ganado, AZ
Nevada Dept. of Human Resources Health Division,
Carson City. NV
New Jersey Primary Care Association.Princeton Jct.,NJ

-------

New York Children's Health Project, New York, MY
North Carolina Primary Health Care Association, Gary, NC
Northeast PA AHEC Keystone College, La Plume, PA
Northwest Regional Primary Care Association, Seattle. WA
Peninsula Institute for Community Health,
Newport News, VA
Penn State University-AHEC Program, Hershey, PA
Reach Out and Read, Inc., Somervilie, MA
South Carolina Primary Health Care Association,
Columbia, SC
Southern Illinois University School of Medicine,
Springfield, IL
Southern Jersey Family Medical Centers, Hammonton, NJ
Southern Ohio Health Systems Network, Milford, OH
Temple University School of Dentistry, Philadelphia,. PA
Unity Health Care, Inc., Washington, DC
Virginia AHEC Program, Richmond, VA
Virginia Primary Care Association, Richmond, VA
Volunteers in Health Care, Pawtucket, RI
WeilSpan Health, York, PA
West Virginia Primary Care Association, Charleston, WV
Black Oak Ranch Free Medical Clinic, Laytonville, CA
Health Resource Alliance of Pasco, Dade City, FL  .  .
Carltas Clinics. Inc. Leavenworth. KS
Lewis County Primary Care, Inc.. Vanceburg, KY
DFD Russell Medical  Center, Leeds. ME
Lee Memorial Medical Group. Dowagiac. Ml
Community Family Health Center, Ann Arbor. Ml
Greater Baden Medical Services. Inc.. Upper Marlboro. MD
Whitney M. Young ,IR Health Ctr.. Albany. NY
Davidson Medical Ministries Clinic. Lexington. NC
Wilson Community Health Center. Wilson. NC
Ross County Health Disl. Primary Care Center.
ChillicoUie. OH                '.   .      .
East Liberty Family Health Care Center. Pittsburgh, PA
Pohnpel Community Health Center. Kolonia. Pohnpei
Rural Medical Services. Inc.. Newport. TN
Springer Memorial Free Clinic.  Rhinclander, Wl
Cross Timbers Community Health Center, De.Leon. TX

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                              The| Center "for Health and Health Care in Schools
                              http://www.healthinschools.org/liaine.fflsp     _    ......

                              The Center for Health and Health Care in Schools (CHHS) is a'noripartisan policy and program
                              resource center located at The George Washington University. It is .co-sponsored by the School
                              of Public Health and Health Services and the Graduate School of Education and Human
                              Development. The Center was established to explore ways to strengthen the well being of chil-
                              dren and youth through effective health programs and health care services in schools.
                              Environmental Protection Agency
                              lillp://www.epa.gov

                              Mission of EPA's Indoor Environments Division: Reduce the public's health risks of indoor envi-
                              ronmental pollutants.

                              GPRA:Asthma Program Goals: Children with asthma will have reduced exposure to indoor asth-
                              ma triggers. Low income adults with asthma arid people with asthma overall will have reduced
                              exposures to indoor asthma triggers.
Answers That Matter.
Eli Lilly and Company
http://www.HWy.com

We provide customers "Answers That Matter.".through innovative medicines, information, and
exceptional customer service to enable people to live longer, healthier, and more active lives.

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                                Office of Minority Health    '   -..

                                http://www.omhrc.org

                                The.Office of Minority Health (OMH) was created by the U.S. Department of Health and Human
                                Services (HHS) in 1985 as a result of the Report of the Secretary's Task Force on Black and
                                Mmprity Health. Under the direction of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Minority Health  OMH
                              •  advises the Secretary and the Office of Public Health and Science (OPHS) on public health
                                issues affecting American Indians and Alaska Natives, Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and
                                Other Pacific Islanders, Blacks/African Americans, and Hispanics/Latinos.

                               Thejmission of the Office of Minority Health (OMH) is to improve the health of racial and ethnic
                                populations through  the development of effective  health policies and programs that help to
                               eliminate disparities in health.
ORTHO BIOTECH
    strength    .
       forearm
 Ortho Biotech Products LP        ".                                 •   • •.'

 littp://www.orthobiotech.com/worldwidc/worldwi(le.html
 Orthp Biotech was established in 1990 as the first biotechnology subsidiary of Johnson &  :
 Johnson, a major healthcare company. Supported by-the financial and international resources of
 John,son & Johnson, Ortho Biotech and its affiliates have established a worldwide reputation for
 manufacturing and marketing biotechnology products.
     i       /          '                   •
 "At Ortho Biotech Products, L.P., we're in the business of helping seriously ill people get better
 and feel stronger. We have products that may help extend and enhance people's lives   We con- •
 tinuajlly seek new ways of meeting the needs of the health care community through new prod-
 ucts and technologies, and  new programs that help professionals derive greater benefit from   •
 what; we have to offer."
                              The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America
                              httpt//www.phrma.org/

                              The Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) represents the country's
                              leadipg research-based pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, which are devoted to
                              inventing medicines that allow patients to live longer, healthier, happier, and more productive
                              lives.; Investing more than $26 billion in 2000 in discovering and developing new medicines
                              PhRMA companies are leading the way in the search for new cures.
                                   I             ...
Research. \America
 Res:earch!Araerica
 hUp://www.researchamerica.org/

 ReseaYchiAmerica is the nation's leading non-profit, non-partisan voice for making medical and
.health research a higher national priority. Its membership represents more than 400 academic
 institutions, independent research laboratories, teaching hospitals, private industries profes-
 siorral, societies, voluntary health agencies and philanthropies. ResearchlAmerica's mission is to
 make;medical, and health research a much higher national priority.
                                    For more information on ACU's programs, please contact us:
       association  of
       clinicians for the
       underserved
      1420 Spring Hill Road, Suite 600
      Tysons Corner,  VA 22102

      Phone: 703.442.5318             E-mail:
      Fax: 703.749.5348               acu@clinicians.org
                                       Website:
                                       www.clinicians.org


      ACU's 2003 calendar was designed by JC Creative Services-juliecdesigns@lycos.com.

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 ACD Board of Directors
 PRESIDENT                '
 Ellis Frazier, MD
 Ross County Health District  • j
 Primary Care Center          !
 Chillicothe, OH              :
 mrdatafrazier@yahoo.com     ;
 VICE-PRESIDENT
 Kyu Rhee, MD, MPP
 Unity Health Care, Inc.-     .  •
 Washington, DC              •<
 kbakrhee@yahoo.com         '
 TREASURER                !
 Megan Eagle, RN, MSN, FNP
•'Community Family Health Center.
 Ann Arbor, Ml               •'
 texeagle@worldnet.att.net     '•
 SECRETARY                !
 Matthew Breeze, MD
 Oregon Health Sciences University
 School of Public Health
 Portland, OR
 breezem@ohsu.edu
IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT
Carl Toney, PA
 UNE College of Health Professions
Portland, ME
ctoney@une.edu
 Sheron Finister, PhD
 SRF Consulting
 Franklin, LA
 revsherbn@aol.com
 John E. King Jr., MBA, CRFE, FAHP
 St. Michael Indian School
 St. Michaels, AZ
.jekingfr@citlink.net
 Susan Moscou, FNP, MSN, MPH
 Brandeis University
 Arlington, MA
 smoscou@brandeis.edu
 Cynthia Robertson, MD
 Bingham Area Health Center
 Bingham, ME
 bobmcl@airolink.net
 association of
 clinicians  for the
 underserved
 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
 Kathie Westpheling, 'MPH, RD
 kathiew@clinicians.org
 PROJECT ASSOCIATE
 Andrea J. Douglas, MPH
 adouglas@clinicians.org
 EARLY CHILDHOOD CARIES
 PREVENTION PROJECT
 PROJECT MANAGER
 Lois Wessel, RN, FNP
 lwessel@igc.org
 DENTAL CONSULTANT
 Scott Wolpin, DMD
 wolpin@choptankhealth.com

ACU National Office .
 1420 Spring Hill Road, ,
 Suite 600,  ;,
Tysons Corner, VA 22102 .
Phone: 703.442,5318  .
Fax: 703.749.5348  •'
E-mail:,   .' ••''...   .  •..•'•

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Individual ($50)—Advocacy calendar and posters. Clinician & Community
   newsletters, discounted bulk purchases of resources, broadcast E-mail
   updates, access to Members' Only section ol' Web site, clinician
   enhancement tools (cue cards, booklets, etc.). and all ACU publications.
Student ($15)—All the benefits of the individual membership listed above
   with all publications available at cost.
Organizational ($400)—Four individual  memberships (described above).
   plus 25 additional advocacy calendars  and recognition within AC Li's
   Clinician & Community newsletters, advocacy calendar, and Web site.
dlinic  ($150)—Three individual memberships (described above),  plus 10
   additional  advocacy calendars and posters with recognition within the
   advocacy calendar.
Sponsor ($2500)—Four individual memberships (described above), plus
   250 additional advocacy calendars, and
   special recognition and promotion  within the advocacy
   calendar, newsletters and Web site.

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"*:
                                                                 O New Member
    O Renewal      O Contribution
                                             Preferred Contact information
                                             Name:
                                                                                                 Suffix:
                                             Organisation:
                                                  I
                                             Address:
                                             Phone:!	
Fax:
                                             E-mailj  	 	

                                             r'aymbm: Options    ,,.     .   '  •  .                          .  ,.  .
                                             OChepk   QVISA    O MasterCard " O American Express   O Please send invoice
                                             CreditjCard_#:_
                                             Signature:
                                             Name bn Card:	
                                             Total Ehctosed/Charge:   $
    Membership Type
—  O Sponsor: $2,500
	  O Organization: $400
    O Clinic: $150
    O Individual: $50
    O Student: $15
       (with proof of full time student status)
  . . O Contribution: ___;	__.
                                                                                             Please make checks payable to: ACU
                                           association of
                                           clinicians for the
                                           underserved
                                            1420 Spring Hill  Road
                                          '  Suite 600
                                            Tysons Corner, VA 22102

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                     association of
                     clinicians for the
                     underserved

                     1420 Spring Hill Road
                     Suite 600
                     Tysons Corner, VA  2.2102
                     703.749.5348

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