Chapter  I
General  Discussions
of the  1980
Needs  Survey
Introduction

This report is a part of the 1980 Needs
Survey report and is a supplement to the
cost estimate report to Congress (FRD-19),
dated February 10, 1981. It provides
detailed summaries of the technical data
collected during the Survey for Categories
I through VI. A description of the 1980
Survey methodology is presented in
Appendix A for Categories I through IV
and Appendix B for Categories V and VI.
  The Needs Survey was performed in-
compliance with the provision of Sections
205(a) and 516(b)(2) of the Clean Water
Act of 1977, PL 95-217. The Environ-
mental Protection Agency (EPA) submitted
the cost estimates for municipal waste-
water, combined sewer overflow, and
stormwater runoff, collection, and treat-
ment needs to Congress on February 10,
1981.
  The 1980 Needs Survey is the fifth such
Survey performed by the Agency. After
the first two Surveys had  been completed,
a need became apparent for the tabulation
of the great amount of technical data
accumulated. The 1976 and 1978 Surveys
responded to this need by publishing
reports similar to this one which
summarized the technical data acquired
during the Surveys.
   Costs of facilities have historically held
the primary focus for these Surveys
because they have  been  used by Congress
to provide relative allocations of Construc-
tion Grant funds among the States.
Besides the cost data, large amounts of
technical data are accumulated during
each Survey. These technical data are
 used in many of the cost breakdowns, but
 Ipave been found to be very useful to
 hnany levels of government and quasi-
 government officials and to industrial
organizations. EPA receives a  large
 number of  requests annually from these
 sources for data summaries. One of the
 purposes of this report is to reduce the
 number of  such requests for special
 summaries by publishing the commonly
 asked for information. In addition, the
 transfer of this material to the total user
 community working in the field of
 municipal wastewater treatment and
 collection, planning, and engineering is
 considered important to the management
 and operation of the EPA Grants program.
 EPA foresees these data can be useful in
 the facilities planning process, both by the
 Federal government and the State and
 local governments.
  Only data reported to, or accumulated
during, the Survey are summarized herein.
The data collection process is described in
Appendix A for Categories I through IV
and Appendix B for Categories V and VI.
  EPA feels the completeness and
accuracy of this data base is the best and
most up-to-date ever available. In an
attempt to make it better or more useful
to the user community, comments,
discussion, or suggestions for
improvements are welcomed.


Description of
Categories  Reported

The 1980 Needs Survey was conducted
on a facility-by-facility basis for Categories
I through IV and  on an area-by-area basis
for Categories V  and VI, Appendix C
presents a copy of the EPA-1 form
(Figures C-1 and C-2) which was used to
collect information for Categories  I
through IV for the 32,000 existing and
planned facilities in the country. Appendix
D presents a copy of the combined sewer
overflow worksheet (Figure D-1) which
was used to collect information for
Category V for the 1,100 combined sewer
areas in the country. Appendices C and D
also present an explanation of all  items
and codes associated with both forms.
  Cost estimates for Categories I through
IV are presented in "1980 Needs
 Survey—Cost Estimates for Construction
of Publicly-Owned Wastewater Treatment
 Facilities," (FRD-19).
  The 1980 Survey used the same cost
 estimate categories as were used in 1978,
 with  the exceptions of Categories I and II.
The definitions of the treatment categories
 (I and II) were changed from 1978 to 1980
 to more accurately reflect the incremental
 cost of advanced secondary and advanced
 wastewater treatment projects, relative to
 secondary costs. This change affected the
 split  of these costs only, and did not result
 in the reported of more or less needs.
   The categories reported in the 1980
 Survey are defined, as follows:

 Category, I—Secondary Treatment
 This included costs for facilities to achieve
 secondary levels of treatment, regardless of
 the treatment levels required at the facility
 site. Incremental costs for treatment levels
 above secondary were  reported in Cate-
 gories HA and MB. Costs for systems
 designed to serve individual residences are
 reported in Category I.  For purposes of the
                                                                                Survey, "best practicable wastewater treat-
                                                                                ment technology (BPWTT)" and secondary
                                                                                treatment were considered synonymous.

                                                                                Category 11 A—Advanced Secondary
                                                                                Treatment (AST)
                                                                                Reported are incremental costs above
                                                                                secondary treatment levels to achieve
                                                                                advanced secondary levels of treatment
                                                                                for those facilities that must achieve such
                                                                                levels. This requirement generally exists
                                                                                where water quality standards require
                                                                                removal of standard pollutants at higher
                                                                                levels than 85 percent or 30/30; but less
                                                                                than 95 percent removal, or 10/10.

                                                                                Reported are incremental costs above
                                                                                secondary treatment levels to achieve
                                                                                advanced secondary levels of treatment for
                                                                                those facilities that must achieve such
                                                                                levels. This requirement generally exists
                                                                                where water quality standards require
                                                                                removal of standard pollutants at higher
                                                                                levels than 85 percent or 30/30; but less
                                                                                than 95 percent removal, or 10/10. Stand-
                                                                                ard pollutants are defined as five day
                                                                                biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and
                                                                                suspended solids (Solids).

                                                                                Category I IB—Advanced Wastewater
                                                                                Treatment (AWT)
                                                                                Incremental costs above AST are reported
                                                                                for those facilities which require advanced
                                                                                levels of treatmen. This requirement gen-
                                                                                erally exists where water quality standards
                                                                                require removal of such pollutants as phos-
                                                                                phorus, ammonia, nitrates, or organic and
                                                                                other substances. In addition, this require-
                                                                                ment exists where removal for conventional
                                                                                pollutants (BOD, Solids) exceeds 95 percent,
                                                                                or 10/10. The terms advanced wastewater
                                                                                treatment, AWT, and tertiary treatment are
                                                                                considered synonymous and are used inter-
                                                                                changeably throughout this report.

                                                                                Category MIA—Correction of Infiltration/
                                                                                Inflow
                                                                                Included in this category are costs for
                                                                                correction of sewer system infiltration/
                                                                                inflow (I/I) problems. Costs could also  be
                                                                                reported for a preliminary sewer system
                                                                                analysis and for a detailed Sewer System
                                                                                Evaluation Survey (SSES).

                                                                                Category NIB—Major Rehabilitation
                                                                                of Sewers
                                                                                Requirements for replacement and/or
                                                                                major rehabilitation of existing sewer
                                                                                systems were reported in this category.
                                                                                Costs were reported if the corrective actions
                                                                                were necessary to insure the total integrity

-------
                                                                             Chapter  II	

                                                                             Summaries  of
                                                                             Treatment  Facilities
                                                                             Technical Data
                                                                             (Categories  I, HA, MB)
of the system. Major rehabilitation is con-
sidered to be extensive repair of existing
sewers beyond the scope of normal main-
tenance programs, where sewers are
collapsing or structurally unsound.

Category IVA—New Collector Sewers
This category included costs of construction
of new collector sewer systems and
appurtenances designed to correct viola-
tions caused by raw discharges, seepage to
waters from septic tanks and the like, and/
or to comply with Federal, State or local
actions.

Category IVB—New Interceptor Sewers
Included in this category were new inter-
ceptor sewers and transmission pumping
stations necessary for the bulk transport of
wastewaters. Outfall sewers were also
include in this category.

Category V—Control of Combined/Sewer
Overflow (CSO)
This category includes projects designed to
prevent and/or control periodic bypassing of
untreated wastes from combined sewer
systems. Combined sewers are designed to
convey both sewage and stormwater.

Category VI—Treatment and/or Control
of Stormwaters
This category includes projects designed to
abate pollution in urbanized areas from
stormwater  runoff channeled through
sewers and other conveyances used only for
such runoff. Stormwater channeled through
combined sewers which also carry sewage
are  not included in Category VI.

Facilities
Reported

The 1980 Needs Survey contains the most
complete inventory of all known and
identified publicly owned wastewater treat-
ment facilities. The 1980 Survey continued
towards the 100 percent inventory goal set
during the 1978 Survey. While the 1978
Survey came very close to achieving the 100
percent inventory, several facilities, mostly
small facilities, were identified for the first
time during 1980 Survey.

Present and
Future Needs
Two time periods pervade Needs Survey
reporting. These are the present, meaning
January 1, 1980, and the future, which
means the year 2000. When dollars are
used in this report, they represent January
1980 dollars. This is true for both present
and future needs. Present populations used
are July 1, 1979.

Metric
Measure

All units shown in the technical summaries
are in metric units. Where space permits,
English units are shown in parentheses. The
following are the most common metric units
used in this report, along with the factors
used to convert to English units.
                 By
                0.3937
                2.7410
                3,281
To Obtain
  Inches
  Acres
   Feet
                0.2642 Gallon/Capita/Day

                3.281        Feet
                0.9072    Short Tons
                0.2642 Millions of Gallons
                          per Day
    Multiply
Centimeters
Hectares
Kilometers
Liters/Capita/Day
Meters
Metric Tons
Thousands of Cubic
Meters per Day

Presentation
of Data

The reporter's format has been structured in
such a way that a discussion of each table is
presented immediately adjacent to the table.
The reader is also referred to Appendices C
and D where explanations are given for all
items on the data collection forms.
  The tables are arranged in the following
general sequence:
Chapter II—Categories I, HA, IIB
  All Levels of Treatments
  Raw Discharge
  Less Than Secondary
  Secondary
  Advanced Secondary
  Tertiary

  hapter Ill-Categories MIA, IIIB, IVA, IVB
  Lengths of New Pipe Needed
  New Pump Stations Needed
  Improvements to Existing Sewers

  hapter IV—Categories V and VI
  Combined Sewer Overflow Control
  Stormwater Runoff Control
Please refer to the Table of Contents for a
listing of all tables.
 Technical data on the municipal sewage
 treatment facilities in the nation were
 compiled in the course of the 1980 Needs
 Survey. The data were collected using the
 EPA-1 form which is decribed in detail in
 Appendix C.
   The technical data for each treatment
 facility were collected at the same time the
 dollar need data were collected. The data
 were obtained from several sources,
 including the 1978 Needs Survey data,
. NPDES permit files, EPA Construction Grant
 files, and various engineering plans and
 reports. A further description of the sources
 and methods used in collecting data for the
 1980 Needs Survey is presented in
 Appendix A.
   The technical data collected for all
 treatment facilities have been compiled and
 are presented in the 41 tables which follow.
 These technical tables are structured such
 that a discussion of each table is presented
 immediately before the table.

-------
Table 1	
Number of Existing Facilities
by Nature  of Facility

Table 1  is a summary, by State, of the
facilities in operation in 1980. Excluded are
facilities proposed to be built between 1980
and 2000 and  new facilities under
construction in 1980.
  The nature of a facility is recorded using a
numerical code. The various codes are
defined as follows:
Code 1: A complete wastewater treatment
system consisting of a treatment plant,
associated collector  and/or interceptor
sewers, and methods for disposal of effluent
and sludge. All components are under the
control of a single treatment authority. The
collection system associated with a Code 1
facility is composed  of Combined Sewers.
Code 2: A complete wastewater treatment
system having all the components listed
under Code 1.  The collection system
associated with a Code 2 facility is com-
posed of Separate Sanitary Sewers.
   Code 3: A separate treatment plant. The
   collection  systems which discharge to a
   Code 3 facility are undjer the control of one or
   more other authorities.
   Code 4: A municipal wastewater collection
   system composed of Separate Sanitary
   Sewers. This system would consist of
   collector sewers and/or interceptor sewers,
   force mains, and pumping stations, which
   either discharge without treatment  or
   discharge to a facility controlled by a
   different authority. Code 4 systems handle
   only sanitary waste waters.
   Code 5: A municipal wastewater collection
   system composed of Combined Sewers.
   This system would consist of collector
   sewers adn/or interceptor sewers,  force
   mains, and pumping stations, which either
   discharge without treatment or discharge to
   a facility controlled by a different authority.
   Code 5 systems handle sanitary waste-
   waters and stormwaters.
   Code 6: Other types of systems; for
   example, operator training facilities.
                      Code 7: A system for the bulk transmission
                      of wastewater with or without pumping
                      stations, and with or without interceptor
                      sewers.

                      Code 8: A facility which provides handling,
                      treatment and disposal of sludge generated
                      by other facilities. Included are vehicles and
                      vehicle fleets used to transport sludge.

                      Code 9: This refers to communities where
                      the primary method of wastewater disposal
                      is by means of individual onsite systems,
                      usually septic tank systems.

                      Facilities in operation in 1,980, but planned
                      to be abandone dprior to 2000, are included
                      in this summary.
                        As used in this report, combined sewers
                      are defined as sewers which carry both
                      storm and sanitary wasteWaters. Separate
                      sewers carry only sanitary wastes. Storm
                      sewers convey only storm runoff.
  STATE
                TOTAL
ALABAMA
ALASKA
ARIZONA
ARKANSAS
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO
CONNECTICUT
DELAWARE
DIST. OF COLUM,
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
HAWAII
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
IOWA
KANSAS
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
MAINE
MARYLAND
MASSACHUSETTS
MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA
MISSISSIPPI
MISSOURI
MONTANA
NEBRASKA
NEVADA
NEW HAMPSHIRE
NEW JERSEY
NEW MEXICO
NEW YORK
NORTH CAROLINA
NORTH DAKOTA
OHIO
OKLAHOMA
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
RHODE ISLAND
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH DAKOTA
TENNESSEE
TEXAS
UTAH
VERMONT
VIRGINIA
WASHINGTON
WEST VIRGINIA
WISCONSIN
WYOMING
AMERICAN SAMOA
GUAM
N, MARIANAS
PUIRTO RICO
PAC. TR. TfcRR,
VIRGIN ISLANDS
S19
238
391
768
1,636
369
201
46
1
495
793
51
238
1,454
705
1,005
695
473
545
268
449
263
1 ,068
898
660
1,011
184
547
89
185
661
211
2,061
860
374
1,207
772
300
2,295
40
450
342
369
2,514
280
118
769
450
647
974
139
6
7
*>
34
34
4
                           (COPE 1)

                               0
                               2
                               0
                               0
                               3
                               5
                              13
                               4
                               1
                               t
                               8
                               0
                              13
                              90
                             117
                              19
                               3
                              16
                               0
                              32
                               9
                              21
                              63
                              13
                               0
                              13
                              16
                               3
                               .0
                              14
                              14
                               0
                              50
                               1
                               8
                             105
                               0
                              10
                              66
                               1
                               0
                              10
                               3
                               I
                               1
                              24
                               9
                              30
                              41
                              10
                               1
                               0
                               0
                               0
                               1
                               0
                               0
(CODE 2

   233
    44
   in
   287
   566
   271
    66
    16
    0
   231
   376
    33
   125
   609
   231
   619
   550
   209
   315
    51
   126
    79
   285
   469
   32«
   538
   136
   437
    46
    43
   198
   102
   369
   497
   266
   601
   493
   1<»6
   516
    16
   238
   244
   232
 1,276
    60
    50
   237
   195
    83
   517
   106
    2
    7
    2
    31
    6
    3
                                                 (CODE  3)
(CODE a)

    38
    14
    16
    23
   187
    50
    21
    11
    0
    66
    94
    1
    10
   261
    32
    23
    5
    45
    24
    «4
    30
    73
   226
   136
    12
    33
    2
    6
    5
    24
   230
    7
   312
    71
    0
   129
    t2
    28
   446
    10
    68
    1
    21
   258
    47
    4
    56
    65
    41
   115
    6
    0
    0
    0
     1
    0
     I
(CODE 5)

    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    1
    1
    0
    0
    0
    0
    1
    13
    10
    0
    0
    1
    0
    28
    2
    12
    16
    3
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    8
    13
    0
    20
    0
    0
    9
    0
    1
    31
    1
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    7
    3
    0
    7
    2
    0
    0
     0
     0
     0
     0
     0
                                                                                   (CODE
14S
  n
  4
  1
  1
  0
  4
  *
  fl
  0
 It
  «?
  1
  0
  3
  0
  s
  t
 ?4
  S
  0
  3
  t
                                                                                              (CODE 7)
                                                                                                         (CODE  6)
(CODE 9)

   234
    33
   261
   455
   830
    37
    78
    10
    0
   190
   306
    17
    88
   436
   308
   313
   137
   196
   204
   101
   266
    66
   451
   25b
   322
   426
    30
   101
    36
    91
   176
   101
 1 ,246
   273
   100
   356
   263
    59
 1,190
    11
   144
    ft/
   110
   94«
   151
    ii
                                  47 J
                                  311
                                   2S
                                    4
                                    0
                                    3
                                    1
                                   28
                                    0
 U.S. TOTALS
               32,166
                             867
                                      14,043
                                                    341
                                                             3,441
                                                                           190
                                                                                      309
                                                                                                  28
                                                                                                                     12,944

-------
   Table 2        	
   Number of Facilities in the
   Year 2000
   by Nature of Facility

   Table 2 lists the total number of facilities, by
   State, required to satisfy discharge require-
   ments in the year 2000.' Included are
   facilities that are optional in 1980 and will
   remain in operation through the year 2000,
   those facilities under construction in 1980,
   and those facilities proposed to be built
   before 2000.  Excluded are facilities that are
   operational in 1980 but are projected to be
   abandoned prior to the year 2000.
    The nature of a facility is recorded using a
   numberical code. The various codes are
   defined as follows:
   Code 1:  A complete wastewater treatment
   system consisting of a treatment plant,
   associated collector and/or interceptor
   sewers, and methods for disposal of effluent
   and sludge. All components are under the
   control of a single treatment authority. The
   collection system associated with a Code 1
   facility is composed of Combined Sewers.
                          Code 2: A complete wastewater treatment
                          system having all the components listed
                          under Code 1. The collection system
                          associated with a Code 2 facility is com-
                          posed of Separate Sanitary Sewers.

                          Code 3: A separate tretment plant. The
                          collection systems which discharge to a
                          Code 3 facility are under the control of one or
                          more other authorities.

                          Code 4: A municipal wastewater  collection
                          system composed of Separate Sanitary
                          Sewers. This system would consist of
                          collector sewers and/or interceptor sewers,
                          force mains and pumping stations, which
                          either discharge without treatment or
                          discharge to a facility controlled by a
                          different authority- Code 4 systems handle
                          only sanitary wastewaters.

                          Code 5: A municipal wastewater collection
                          system composed of Combined Sewers.
                          This system would consist of collector
                          sewers and/or  interceptor sewers, force
                          mains, and pumping stations, which either
                                              discharge without treatment or discharge to
                                              a facility controlled by a different authority.
                                              Code 5 systems handle sanitary waste-
                                              waters and stormwaters.
                                              Code 6: Other types of systems: for example
                                              training facilities.
                                              Code 7: A system for the bulk transmission
                                              of wastewater with or without pumping
                                              stations, and with or without interceptor
                                              sewers.
                                              Code 8: A facility which provides handling,
                                              treatment, and disposal of sludge generated
                                              by other facilities. Included are vehicles and
                                              vehicle fleets used to transport sludge.
                                              Code 9: This refers to communities where
                                              the primary method of wastewater disposal
                                              is by means of individual onsite systems,
                                              usually septic tank systems.
                                                As used  in this report, combined sewers
                                              are defined as sewers which carry both
                                              storm and  sanitary wastewaters. Separate
                                              sewers carry only sanitary wastes. Storm
                                              sewers convey only storm runoff.
  sim
                TOTAL
ALABAMA
ALASKA
ARIZONA
ARKANSAS
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO
CONNECTICUT
DELAWARE
OIST, OF COLUM.
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
HAWAII
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
IOWA
KANSAS
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
MAINE
MARYLAND
MASSACHUSETTS
MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA
MISSISSIPPI
MISSOURI
MONTANA
NEBRASKA
NEVADA
NEW HAMPSHIRE
NEW JERSFY
NEW MFXICU
NEW YllRK
NORTH CAROLINA
NORTH DAKOTA
OHIO
OKLAHOMA
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
RHODE ISLAND
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH DAKOTA
TENNESSEE
TEXAS
UTAH
VERMONT
V INC, INI A
525
238
490
764
1,652
4e9
197
45
1
496
/95
b2
238
1,424
703
9RS
o82
474
S21
265
442
263
1 ,066
894
66b
930
184
S46
«9
183
657
210
2, (>SO
»6S
373
1,192
759
299
2,291
40
45S
442
471
2.S28
2PO
1 1 M
737
WF.ST  VIRGINIA
WISCONSIN
AMERICAN SAhOA
GUAM
N, MARIANAS
fHIKRTO  RICO
PAC. TR. TERR,
VIRGIN  ISLANDS
•4 SO
t>46
972
13S
  S
  t>
  4
 34
 3«
  It
                               0
                               2
                               0
                               0
                               3
                               4
                              12
                               a
                               1
                               1
                               8
                               0
                              14
                              86
                             114
                              18
                               3
                              IS
                               0
                              49
                               9
                              2S
                              62
                              14
                               0
                              12
                              16
                               3
                               0
                              19
                               9
                               0
                              52
                               1
                               «
                             107
                               0
                    (CODE 2)

                      326
                      123
                      1«7
                      621
                      922
                      290
                       75
                       19
                        0
                      318
                      828
                      604
                      382
                      44S
                      1«7
                      332
                      103
                      U39
                      556
                      Sib
                      682
                      160
                      461
                        71
                      123
                      127
                      172
                      727
                      633
   24
  267
  277
  283
2,137
  196
   73
  283
  30o
  487
  606
  1»»
    b,
    b
    i
   10
   23
    a
(CODE  3)

    15
    0
    5
    2
    21
    3
    2
    0
    0
    7
    13
    0
    0
    35
    4
    0
    0
    2
    2
    8
    6
    9
    12
    IS
    5
    2
    0
    0
    2
    1
    ?6
    0
    49
    22
    0
    5
    3
    4
    37
    1
    15
    0
    5
    38
    1
    0
    16
    5
    1
    IS
    0
    0
    0
    p
    0
    0
    0
(CODE  4)

    93
    0
    27
    47
   274
    61
    48
    19
    0
   159
   174
    11
    21
   329
    9b
    46
    21
    72
    6b
    39
    83
   114
   382
   168
   111
    97
    4
    7
    11
    3b
   424
    11
   672
   196
    0
   321
    36
    S2
   830
    13
   161
    0
    79
   343
    73
    11
   177
    94
   103
   226
    12
    0
    0
    0
    3
    0
    0
(CODE 5)

    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    1
    1
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    18
    14
    0
    0
    2
    0
    1)
    2
    8
    17
    2
    0
    u
    o
    0
    I)
    2
    18
    0
    19
    0
    0
    9
    0
    2
    22
    1
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    1
    4
    2
    2
    2
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
                                            (CODE  61

                                                 0
                                               110
                                                 1
                                                 t
                                                3*
(CODE  7)

    0
    0
    0
    0
    10
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    1
    4
    0
    0
    11
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    s
    n
    n
    o
    o
    0
    b
    0
    0
    0
    0
    4
    n
    0
    2
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
                                                                                                         (CODE B)
(CODE 9)

    91
    3
   210
    93
   383
    8
    58
    0
    0
    8
   185
    1
    16
   230
    7
    92
    54
    1
    7
    7
    8
    3
   142
   139
    34
   136
    4
    75
    4
    1
    52
    27
   522
    13
    61
                                                                                                                        170
                                                                                                                         0
                                                                                                                         12
                                                                                                                         S5>
                                                                                                                         1
                                                                                                                         \
   JO*
     U
     0
     0
     t
     c
    It
     0
U.S. TOTALS
                                      20,329
                                                    414
                                           6,452
                                                                          160
                                                                                                  42
                                                                                                    3,450

-------
Table 3	

Number and Nature of
Wastewater Facilities
(Existing and Planned)
United States Totals

Table 3 is a two part table. The upper table is
condensation of Tables 1 and 2 into a
national summary. A facility is included in
the existing category if it was operational in
1980. A facility listed as To Be Abandoned
was operational in 1980 and is expected to
be phased out be 2000. A facility listed as
Under Construction was in the process of
being built in 1980. A facility in the To Be
Built category was not in operation or under
construction in 1980 but is projected to be
operational by 2000. The Projected 2000
row lists the total numbers of facilities
expected to be in operatoin in the year 2000.
  The lower table summarizes the nature of
projected changes to existing wastewater
treatment plants. Only  treatment plants in
operation in 1980 are included. A brief
explanation of the projected change
categories follows:
         Enlarge: The hydraulic capacity of a plant
         will be increased while the degree of
         treatment the plant is capable of achieving
         will remain the same.

         Upgrade: The degree of treatment that a
         plant is capable of achieving will be
         improved but the hydraulic capacity will
         remain the same.

         Enlarge and Upgrade: This means a plant's
         hydraulic capacity will be increased and the
         degree of treatment the plant is capable of
         achieving will be improved.

         Replace: This describes the situation when
         an existing plant is demolished and a
         completely new plant is constructed on the
         same site.

         Abandon: This change is indicated when an
         authority relinquishes its responsibility for
         the collection and treatment of wastewater.
         Usually the treatment plant is taken out of
         operation and the sewage is diverted  to
         another  facility for treatment. The
                                    responsibility for operating the collection
                                    system (if one is involved) is passed to a new
                                    authority.

                                    No Change: This category is for plants that
                                    will remain essentially unchanged through
                                    the year 2000.

                                    Other: A number of situations are covered
                                    by this category. One common situation is a
                                    treatment plant which will require a capital
                                    expenditure, such as for a new sludge
                                    digester, but the degree of treatment and
                                    hydraulic capacity will not be changed.

                                    Abandon,  Retain Sewers: This change is
                                    indicated when an authority that operates a
                                    treatment plant and a collection system
                                    takes the treatment plant out of operation
                                    and continues to operate the collection
                                    system. The sewage is diverted to a treat-
                                    ment plant operated by a different authority
                                    This situation usually occurs when a
                                    regional treatment plant is constructed to
                                    serve several communities.
               EXISTING!

       TO BE  ABANDONEDt

   UNDER CONSTRUCTION!

           TO BE BUILT!

        PROJECTED  20001
32,166

11,323

    365

 9,736

31,935
15,251

 1,667

   229

 7,808

21,639
                                                    NUMBER OF  FACILITIES
            OTHER

               309

               156

                 1

               112

               163
                                                                                         8LUD6t
                                                                             TRUNK     HANDLING    SEPTIC
                                                                             SEWERS  FACILITIES   SYSTEMS
16,541

   367

   307

 9,498

27,637
   26

    0

    2

   14

   42
        12,944

         9,496

              0

              0

         3,450
                   ENLARGE

                    1,710
                                                 NATURE OF  PROJECTED CHANGE
                                                      (EXISTING PLANTS)
UPGRADE

  2,567
ENLARGE
   AND
UPGRADE

 2,401
REPLACE

 1,403
            ABANDON

               421
  NO
CHANGE

5,272
                                                                                                     ABANDON,
                                                                                                      RETAIN
                                                                                           OTHER     SEWERS
211
1,246

-------
Table 4	
Number and Flow by State of
Treatment Plants by
Design Capacity (Existing)
Table 4 is a flow summary of all treatments
plants  in operation in 1980. Excluded are
treatment plants projected to be built and
treatment plants under construction in
1980. A summary is provided for each State
and U.S. Territory. National totals are
summarized at the bottom of the table.
  In the first column the total number of
existing treatment plants in each State is
reported along with the total wastewater
treatment capacity represented by the
plants. The Present Design Flow for each
plant was used to calculate the total
treatment capacity value. The present
design flow may be equal to, greater, or less
than the Extting Flow for any particular
plant.
  Subsequent columns provide a break-
down  of the State totals into five flow
ranges. The ranges are specified in the
column headings and are reported in
thousands of cubic  meters per day and, in
parentheses under the headings, in millions
of gallons per day. Reported for each  flow
range are the number of plants in the range
and their total treatment capacity (MVday x
1,000). Also reported is the percentage of
total State treatment capacity that is
accounted for by each flow range.
  These data are for all types of treatment
plants regardless of level of treatment.
Numerous other tables follow which provide
summaries by level of treatment for both
existing plants and projected plants.
  The data indicate nearly 80 percent of the
treatment plants in operation in 1980 have a
design capacity less than or equal to
1.05 mgd (4 x 106 MVday). These small
plants account for 8.4 percent of the total
U.S. wastewater treatment capacity. The
data also indicate 0.6 percent of the treat-
ment plants in operation in 1980 have a
design capacity greater than or equal to
50.2 mgd (1.9 x 108 MVday). These large
plants account for almost 39 percent of the
total U.S. wastewater treatment capacity.
CUBIC METERS PER DAY X 1000! 0».40 ,40I»«,0 «, 001-40 40. 001-190 190*
(MILLION GALLONS PER DAY)I (0»,105) (,106-1,05) (1,06-10.5) (10.57*50.2) (50.2*)
TOTAL
# OF TOTAL
STATE PLANTS FLOW
ALABAMA 245 1,726
ALASKA 46 220
ARIZONA 114 1,043
ARKANSAS 288 1,015
CALIFORNIA 589 11,909
COLORADO 278 1,619
CONNECTICUT 100 2,067
DELAWARE 22 425
OIST. OF COLUM. 1 1,169
FLORIDA 235 4,053
GEORGIA 390 3,140
HAWAII 33 547
IDAHO 139 541
ILLINOIS 731 9,655
INDIANA 350 3,853
IOWA 668 1,447
KANSAS 553 1,226
KENTUCKY 226 1,307
LOUISIANA 315 1,914
MAINE 90 525
MARYLAND 146 2,007
MASSACHUSETTS 108 3.94Z
MICHIGAN 359 6,782
MINNESOTA 500 2,052
MISSISSIPPI 325 1,139
MISSOURI 551 3,430
MONTANA 152 399
NEBRASKA 440 987
NEVADA 48 709
NEW HAMPSHIRE 59 509
NEW JERSEY 232 4,793
NEW MEXICO 102 524
NEW YORK 456 11,473
NORTH CAROLINA 511 2,570
NORTH DAKOTA 274 156
OHIO 710 7,104
OKLAHOMA 496 1,308
OREGON 209 1,646
PENNSYLVANIA 620 6,531
RHODE ISLAND 18 640
SOUTH CAROLINA 246 1,400
SOUTH DAKOTA 254 268
TENNESSEE 236 2,559
TEXAS 1*518 7,186
UTAH 82 1,024
VERMONT 74 217
VIRGINIA 258 2,458
WASHINGTON 230 2,212
WEST VIRGINIA 124 611
WISCONSIN 541 3,461
WYOMING 107 170
AMERICAN SAMOA 2 4
GUAM 7 98
N, MARIANAS 2 4
PUERTO RICO 32 412
PAC, TR. TERR. 6 12
VIRGIN ISLANDS 3 32
U.S. TOTALS 15,251 130,260
X OF
* OF TOTAL STATE
PLANTS FLOW FLOW
28 7 0.4
25 3 1.6
38 6 0.*
78 20 2,0
129 25 0,2
119 25 1,5
6 1 0.0
6 0 0.1
0 0 0,0
15 3 0,0
88 18 0,6
5 1 0.2
60 12 2,3
175 45 0,4
54 16 0,4
368 74 5.1
313 61 5.0
38 8 0,6
64 12 0,6
12 2 0,4
44 8 0,4
6 1 0.0
61 17 0.2
231 48 2.3
99 24 2.1
243 49 1,4
77 12 3.2
307 43 4,4
15 2 0.3
7 1 0.2
15 3 0,0
39 7 1.3
62 13 0.1
237 21 0.8
225 27 17.4
198 38 0,5
244 46 3,5
41 9 0.5
110 20 0,3
0 0 0.0
42 10 0,7
173 28 10.7
31 * 0.2
429 85 1.)
15 3 0.3
18 3 1.7
82 16 0,6
43 10 0.4
24 5 0.9
217 48 1.4
62 9 5.4
0 0 0.0
1 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
2 0 6,2
0 0 0.0
5,021 979 0,7
X OF
« OF TOTAL STATE
PLANTS FLOW FLOW
148 214 13.5
14 1* 8,*
54 »* 8,2
1*0 213 21.0
242 376 3.1
115 176 10.9
32 69 3,3
12 23 5,5
0 0 0,0
95 1*8 4.6
214 3)7 10.7
11 ?0 3.7
57 60 14,8
398 528 5.4
216 292 7.5
250 258 17.8
201 241 19,6
143 178 13,6
175 273 14.2
43 65 12,4
66 93 4.6
36 74 1,8
200 293 4.3
225 264 12,8
183 242 21.2
247 354 10.3
62 72 18.0
111 122 12,3
20 29 4.2
32 52 10,3
98 198 4.1
41 67 12.8
225 359 3,1
168 266 10,3
41 16 23,6
348 497 6.9
201 254 19.4
120 112 11,0
313 507 7,7
5 5 0,8
137 204 14,6
70 73 27.4
135 209 8,1
664 993 13.8
36 50 4,9
39 62 28.5
122 166 6,7
117 179 8.0
74 104 17.0
252 336 9.7
33 42 24.9
2 4 99.9
4 7 7.5
2 4 99.9
20 11 7.7
4 11 93.7
0 0 0.0
7,033 10,l«4 7.7
X OF
* OF TOTAL STATE
PLANTS FLOW FLOW
62 796 46.1
6 68 31,2
17 189 18.1
46 527 51.9
170 2,421 20.3
38 406 25.0
49 837 40.5
3 60 14.1
0 0 0.0
108 1,585 39,1
70 883 28.1
16 215 39.3
18 224 41.5
130 1,556 16.1
59 737 19,1
42 490 33.8
34 450 36.6
40 449 34,3
68 720 37.6
32 298 56.7
28 422 21.0
51 628 15.9
76 769 11,3
37 428 20.8
40 476 41.8
53 590 17.2
11 155 38.8
19 242 24.5
9 75 10.6
18 164 36.2
99 1,308 27.3
20 216 41.7
134 1,761 15.3
94 1,376 53.6
8 92 56.9
136 1,748 24.6
46 589 45.0
X OF
* OF TOTAL STATE
PLANTS FLOW FLOW
7 667 39.7
1 126 58.4
4 420 40.2
4 253 24.9
36 3,016 25,3
5 367 22.6
12 931 45.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
14 1,385 34.1
17 1,446 46.0
0 0 0.0
4 223 41.2
23 1,649 17,0
17 1,425 36,9
6 624 43.1
5 475 36.6
4 272 20.6
7 446 23,3
3 159 30.3
6 422 21.0
10 864 21.9
18 1,760 25.9
6 485 23.6
3 395 34.7
5 505 14,7
2 158 39,7
2 302 30.6
3 348 49.0
I 73 14,4
17 1,775 37,0
2 230 44.0
21 2,120 16.4
12 903 35.1
0 0 0.0
19 1,447 20.3
5 418 31.9
40 494 30,0 7 561 35.3
160 2,212 33,6 12 1,069 16.3
9 171 26.7 3 221 34.5
61 747 53.3 6 436 31.2
11 165 61.7
63 732 28,6
196 2,135 29.7
24 315 30.8
17 151 69,7
37 447 18,2
61 804 36,3
22 212 34.7
56 641 18,5
12 118 69.5
0 0 0.0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
7 66 16,0
0 0 0,0
3 32 99,9
2,686 33,444 25.6
0 0 0.0
4 452 17.6
24 1,795 24.9
7 654 63.9
0 0 0.0
15 1,357 55.2
8 745 33,6
4 266 47.2
13 1,024 29.6
0 0 0.0
0 0 0,0
2 90 92.3
0 0 0.0
5 314 76.2
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
415 35,164 26,9
X OF
• OF TOTAL STATE
PLANTS FLOW FLOW
0 0 0,0
0 0 9,0
1 340 32.6
0 0 0,0
10 6,066 50.9
1 643 39.7
1 227 10.9
1 340 80.0
1 1,1*9 99,9
3 669 21.9
1 454 14.4
1 310 56.6
0 0 0.0
5 5,675 60,8
4 1,361 35.6
0 0 0,0
0 0 0.0
1 397 30.4
1 461 24.1
0 0 0.0
2 1,059 52.8
5 2,373 60.2
4 3,940 58.1
1 625 40,2
0 0 0,0
3 1,930 56.2
0 0 0.0
1 27* 27.9
1 253 35.7
1 19* 36.6
3 1,50* 31,4
0 0 0.0
14 7,218 62.9
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
9 3,372 47.4
0 0 0.0
1 376 22.9
5 2.721 41.6
1 242 37.6
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
3 1,156 45.2
5 2,17* 10,2
0 0 0,0
0 0 0.0
2 4*9 |9,0
} 473 21.3
0 0 0.0
3 1,410 40,7
0 0 0.0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
9* 50,545 36,6

-------
Table 5	
Number Flow by State of
Treatment Plants by
Design Capacity (Year 2000)
Table 5 is a flow summary of all treatment
plants projected to be in operation in the
year 2000. Excluded are plants that are
operational in 1980 and are projected to be
abandoned by 2000.
  The Projected Design Flow was used to
calculate the total treatment capacity value.
All other computations used to prepare this
table are directly comparable to the methods
used to prepare Table 4.
  AH flows are reported in thousands of
cubic meters per day.
  The tteta indicate nearly 83 percent of the
treatment plants projected to be operational
in 2000 will hove a design capacity less than
or equal to 1.06 mgd (4 x 106 MVday). These
small plants will account  for 8.2 percent of
the total U.S. wastewater treatment
capacity. The data  also  indicate 0.6 percent
of the treatment plants projected to be
operational  in 2000 will have a design
capacity greater than or equal to 50.2 mgd
(1.9 x 108 MVday). These large plants will
account for almost 40 percent of the total
U.S. wastewater treatment capacity.
CUBIC METERS PER DAY X 1000!
(MILLION GALLONS PER DAY)!
TOTAL
» OF TOTAL
STATE PLANTS FLOW
ALABAMA 34i 1,998
ALASKA 125 363
ARIZONA 152 1,416
ARKANSAS 623 1,246
CALIFORNIA 946 12,aoa
COLORADO 297 1,951
CONNECTICUT 89 2,084
DELAWARE 23 595
DIST. OF COLUM. 1 1,169
FLORIDA 326 7,038
GEORGIA 436 3,668
HAWAII 40 7S7
IDAHO 19^ 664
ILLINOIS 846 11,086
INDIANA 586 4,156
IOWA 846 1,697
KANSAS 607 1,383
KENTUCKY 399 2,107
LOUISIANA 447 2,390
MAINE 204 660
MARYLAND 347 2,536
MASSACHUSETTS 137 4,79a
MICHIGAN 513 8,359
MINNESOTA 585 2,435
MISSISSIPPI 520 1,341
MISSOURI 696 3,419
MONTANA 176 446
NEBRASKA 464 1,070
NEVADA 73 873
NEW HAMPSHIRE 143 804
NEW JERSEY 162 5,639
NEW MEXICO 172 686
NEW YORK 828 13,813
NORTH CAROLINA 656 3,278
NORTH DAKOTA 312 216
OHIO 795 8,293
OKLAHOMA 664 1,658
OREGON 236 1,938
PENNSYLVANIA 1,262 8,113
RHODE ISLAND 26 831
SOUTH CAROLINA 282 1,788
SOUTH DAKOTA 287 316
TENNESSEE 291 3,329
TEXAS 2,176 9,110
UTAH 198 1,088
VERMONT 103 245
VIRGINIA 306 3,162
WASHINGTON 340 3,033
WEST VIRGINIA 534 1,065
WISCONSIN 631 3,738
WYOMING 119 285
AMERICAN SAMOA 5 24
GUAM 6 07
N, MARIANAS 3 21
PUERTO RICH 31 1,344
PAC. TR, TERM. 23 37
VIRGIN ISLANDS 4 43
U.S. TOTALS 21,639 158,540
0-.40
(0-.105)
X Of
« OF TOTAL STATE
PLANTS FLOW FLOW
78 19 0.9
91 8 2.3
33 6 0.4
377 52 4.2
372 70 0.5
109 22 l.i
2 0 0.0
6 1 0.2
0 0 0*0
28 6 0.0
102 24 0,6
2 0 0.0
97 20 2,9
277 64 0,5
256 47 1.1
536 91 5,4
365 61 4.4
169 37 1,7
162 31 1.)
79 16 2,5
200 29 1,1
10 1 0.0
119 29 0.3
328 59 2.4
290 48 3,6
378 64 1.8
90 14 3.3
317 48 4,5
35 6 0,7
40 9 1,2
4 1 0.0
93 17 2,5
258 54 0.3
349 40 ),2
250 30 13,9
279 58 0,7
376 64 3.8
6b 14 0.7
437 89 1,1
4 0 0,1
76 14 0.8
206 31 9,7
65 IS 0.4
1,110 177 1,9
110 19 1,8
36 7 3.1
93 18 0.5
104 24 0.7
209 43 4.1
267 51 1.3
71 8 2.9
2 0 1.9
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
4 0 2.6
0 0 0.0
9,416 1,686 1.0
,401««»,0
(.106.1. OS)
% or
* OF TOTAL STATE
PLANTS FLOW FLOW
183 262 13.1
16 27 7.6
84 135 9.5
162 225 18,0
349 481 1.7
150 194 9,9
20 42 2.0
11 25 4,2
0 0 0,0
145 231 3,2
226 321 6.7
16 14 4.4
74 96 14,1
403 536 4.8
232 2«3 6,8
2S2 2*3 16.7
190 218 15. 7
165 196 9,3
192 268 11.2
65 107 16.2
108 141 5.S
44 "6 1,7
269 373 4,4
208 268 11,0
182 222 16,5
243 309 10.2
70 "6 19,3
120 113 12.4
22 26 2.9
71 96 12.2
40 "2 1.4
53 78 11,4
375 534 3,8
189 277 8,4
52 43 20.1
328 452 5,4
225 267 16,1
120 1«1 9,3
582 644 10,4
4 6 0,7
123 1*1 10.1
67 67 21.2
144 210 6.3
792 1,117 12,7
61 75 6,9
51 73 29,6
149 203 6,4
163 217 7,1
264 381 35.7
278 381 10.1
34 44 15.7
2 0 3.9
3 4 5.3
1 1 7.1
7 19 1.4
17 21 57,0
1 0 2,0
8,441 11,571 7.2
4,001-40
(1, 06*10, 5)
X OF
* OF TOTAL STATE
PLANTS FLOW FLOW
69 779 39,0
15 170 46,9
29 320 22.6
58 592 47.5
J73 2,613 20,4
51 604 30,9
54 909 41, 6
1 34 5,7
0 0 0,0
115 1,716 24,3
86 1,134 30,9
18 231 30,5
22 246 35,9
135 1,662 15,1
75 865 21,3
49 542 31,9
48 636 46,1
56 614 29.1
83 912 38.1
36 333 50,5
28 473 18,6
65 893 16.6
102 1,076 12,9
42 499 20,5
44 539 40,2
62 652 19.0
14 186 41,6
23 265 24,7
12 144 16,5
28 320 39.8
68 1,210 21.4
25 300 43,7
147 2,070 14,9
99 1,543 47,0
10 142 65,8
155 2,081 25.0
57 667 40,2
42 586 30,3
224 2,572 31,7
12 170 20,4
76 1,032 57,7
12 110 34.9
71 846 25.4
237 2,779 30,5
21 247 22,7
16 164 67.0
41 501 15,8
63 914 30.1
37 351 33,0
69 792 21,1
13 163 57,4
1 23 94,0
2 37 42.5
2 19 92.8
14 200 14,9
2 15 40.3
3 42 97.9
3,134 39,609 24.9
40. 001*190
(10.57-50,2)
X OF
* OF TOTAL STATE
PLANTS FLOW FLOW
11 937 46,9
1 156 43.0
5 499 35,2
6 375 30.1
39 3,176 24.8
6 454 23.2
12 904 43,4
2 149 25.0
0 0 0.0
31 2,358 33.5
16 1,622 44.2
3 160 23.8
6 321 46,9
26 1,931 17.4
19 1,557 37.4
779 45.9
266 19,4
540 25.6
516 21.6
202 30.6
604 23.8
13 1,155 24.1
18 1,940 23.2
6 510 20.9
2 127 9.5
10 1,056 30.9
2 156 35,5
3 358 33.4
3 442 50,6
3 176 22.2
25 1,864 33.4
0 0 0,0
30 2,483 17.9
19 1,416 43.1
0 0 0.0
24 1,779 21.4
5 432 26.0
6 774 39.9
13 1,063 13.1
5 351 42.2
7 559 31.2
2 107 34,0
7 535 16.0
31 2,468 27.1
6 745 68.5
0 0 0.0
20 1,758 55.5
6 646 21.3
4 268 27.1
14 1,103 29.5
1 68 23,6
0 0 0.0
1 45 52,1
0 0 0.0
9 851 63.3
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
S23 42,836 27.0
190 +
(50.2*)
X OF
* OF TOTAL STATE
PLANTS FLOW FLOW
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
1 454 32,0
0 0 0,0
13 6,461 50,4
1 676 34,6
1 227 10,8
1 364 64.5
1 1,169 99,9
7 2,725 38,7
2 565 15.4
1 310 40.9
0 0 0,0
5 6,870 61.9
4 1,381 33.2
0 0 0,0
1 196 14.2
2 719 34,1
2 660 27,6
0 0 0,0
3 1,287 50,7
5 2,657 55,4
5 4,937 59,0
1 1,097 45.0
2 402 30.0
3 1,294 37.8
Q 0 0.0
1 264 24,7
1 253 29,0
1 196 24.4
5 2,460 43,6
1 289 42,2
18 8,670 62.7
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
9 3,921 47.2
1 227 13.6
1 376 19.5
6 3,542 43.6
1 302 36.4
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
4 1,722 51.7
6 2,526 27.7
0 0 0.0
0 0 0,0
3 660 21.5
2 1,230 40.5
0 0 0,0
3 1,410 37,7
0 0 0.0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0,0
1 272 20,2
0 0 0,0
0 00,0
125 62,833 39.6

-------
Table 6	

Average Domestic Flows by
State - Present, Projected,  and
Percent Change
(Thousands of Cubic Meters per Day)

Table 6 summarizes the present (-1980) and
projected (2000) quantity of flow treated by
publicly owned treatment plants that isfrom
domestic sources. A similar summary
dealing with flow from industrial sources is
presented in Table 7.
  A further explanation of these summaries
is presented below:
Actual: All flows reported in this  category
are compiled from the Actual Average Daily
Flow received at treatment works during the
most recent  12 month period for which
information is available. Flows reported in
this category were compiled from records
collected between late 1978 and early 1980.
The major source of flow information was
the self-monitoring reports that are
completed by every facility with an NPDES
permit.

Present Design: All flows reported in this
category are compiled from the average
daily flow a treatment plant is designed to
handle. The design capacity reported was
capacity in place in 1980.

Projected Design: All flows reported in this
category are compiled from the average
daily flow that a treatment plant will be
designed to handle in the year 2000.

Total Flow: The total flow is expressed in
thousands of cubic meters per day. Total
flow is defined as  all wastewaters moving
through the treatment plant from all
sources; including domestic, commerical,
industrial,  and  infiltration/inflow.
Domestic Flow: The domestic flow is
expressed in thousands of cubic meters per
day. Domestic flow is defined as all waste-
waters moving through the treatment plant
from all sources except industrial sources.

Liters/Capita/Day: These values are
calculated using the Domestic Flow and the
total resident and  nonresident population.
The actual number of residents  and non-
residents receiving treatment in 1980 was
used in the Actual and Present  Design
categories. The number of residents and
nonresidents a treatment plant will be
capable of serving in the year 2000 was
used in the Projected Design category

Percent Change: This category  presnts a
comparison between the present situation
(2000). The change in each parameter
between the Present Design and the
Projected Design is expressed as an
increase or decrease using the Present
Design as the base.
                          ACTUAL
                                                PRESENT DESIGN
                                                                       PROJECTED DESIGN
                                                                                                 PERCENT  CHANGE

STATE
ALABAMA
ALASKA
ARIZONA
ARKANSAS
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO
CONNECTICUT
DELAWARE
DIST. OF COLUM.
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
HAWAII
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
IOWA
KANSAS
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
MAINE
MARYLAND
MASSACHUSETTS
MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA
MISSISSIPPI
MISSOURI
MONTANA
NEBRASKA
NEVADA
NEW HAMPSHIRE
NEW JERSEY
NEW MEXICO
NEW YORK
NORTH CAROLINA
NORTH DAKOTA
OHIO
OKLAHOMA
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
RHODE ISLAND
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH DAKOTA
TENNESSEE
TEXAS
UTAH
VERMONT
VIRGINIA
WASHINGTON
WEST VIRGINIA
WISCONSIN
WYOMING
AMERICAN SAMOA
GUAM
N, MARIANAS
PUERTO RICO
PAC, TR, TERR,
VIRGIN ISLANDS
U.S. TOTALS
TOTAL
FLOW
1,262
135
755
631
8,739
1,168
1,358
317
1,128
2,343
1,933
363
143
7,745
2,723
1,161
644
990
1,304
418
1,347
3,235
5,332
1,586
9S2
2,199
246
658
576
284
3,959
388
9,396
1,681
149
5,439
927
1,052
5,368
458
945
209
1,709
5,596
SOB
168
1,635
1,604
387
2,406
172
1
24
2
517
1
14
97,117
DOM.
FLOW
1,032
121
728
512
7,233
974
1,123
176
1,128
2,137
1,489
325
281
6,235
2,152
963
720
755
1,263
323
1,136
2,475
4,176
1,121
834
1,798
239
513
575
207
3,124
364
8,508
1,077
136
4,398
847
807
4,600
302
686
180
1,226
5,080
743
150
1,466
1,401
326
1,806
171
1
24
2
468
1
14
80,679
LITERS /
CAP, /DAY
490
595
389
413
361
371
588
324
429
386
469
480
570
62b
582
444
392
433
438
570
442
652
607
382
576
417
464
375
827
494
477
346
573
422
314
527
396
549
496
474
449
386
550
447
629
552
405
500
422
508
496
967
326
1,452
266
54
214
479
TOTAL
FLOW
1,726
220
1,043
1,015
11,909
1,619
2,067
425
1,169
4,053
3,140
547
541
9,655
3,853
1,447
1,228
1,307
1,914
525
2.007
3,942
6,782
2.052
1,139
3,430
399
987
709
509
4,793
524
11,473
2,570
156
7,104
1,308
1,646
6,531
640
1,400
268
2,559
7,186
1,024
217
2,458
2,212
611
3,461
170
4
98
4
412
12
32
130,260
DOM,
FLOW
1,486
201
994
900
9,«2S
1,389
1,625
281
1,169
3,775
2,524
515
45'
7,777
3,04«
1,?0*
1,03*
900
1,861
«!?-
1,794
2,969
6,068
1,521
1»0«9
2,706
J9n
8H
709
401
4,316
*00
10,28?
1,83?
14i
5,686
1,210
1,^40
5,641
4S«
1,092
M«
1,907
6,610
912
200
2,02o
1.96ft
*41
2,48'
169
4
9«
4
36?
1?
3?.
109,981
LITERS /
CAP, /DAY
705
990
531
726
490
530
852
517
445
682
795
759
925
780
824
5S6
563
563
645
725
698
782
882
519
725
627
758
597
1,018
956
659
476
692
718
328
682
568
912
609
719
716
509
656
582
772
738
561
701
700
700
492
2.481
1,294
2,660
206
525
463
654
TOTAL DOM.
FLOW FLOH
1,998 1,668
3*3 344
1,416 1,392
1,246 1,092
12,804 10,566
1,951 1,712
2,084 1,686
595 436
1,169 1,169
7,038 6,612
3,668 2,885
757 703
664 599
11,066 6,874
4, 15* 3,215
1,697 1,365
1,363 1,174
2,107 1,563
2,390 2,266
6*0 539
2,53* 2,179
4,794 3,592
8,35* 6,558
2,435 1,773
1,341 1,205
3,419 2,640
44* 432
1,070 805
673 854
804 623
5,639 4,296
66* 659
13,613 12,191
3,276 2,255
21* 19*
6,293 6,366
1,656 1,534
1,936 1,648
8,113 7,037
831 576
1,766 1,287
314 279
3,329 2,369
9,tl« 6,321
1,066 993
245 216
3,162 2,592
3,033 2,656
1,0*5 942
3,736 2,672
265 275
24 13
87 87
21 21
1,344 1,102
37 37
43 43
158,540 131,234
LITFRS /
CAP./DAY
462
513
344
430
399
366
578
354
371
442
472
435
531
737
591
458
459
455
«79
502
412
600
708
475
493
397
5*1
426
595
542
428
395
5*9
458
340
535
431
541
529
540
390
414
5A9
442
578
467
415
521
453
492
441
375
397
629
340
333
394
TOTAL
FLOW
+ 15,7
+ 64,9
+ 35.7
+22,7
»7.5
+ 20,4
+ 0,7
+40.0
+ 0.0
+ 73.6
+ 16.8
+ 38,3
+ 26,5
+ 14.8
+ 7.8
+ 17.2
+ 12.6
+61.2
+24.6
+25,5
+26.3
+21.6
+23,2
+ 16,6
+ 17.7
•0.3
+ 11.6
+8.3
+23.1
+57.7
+ 17.6
+ 30.6
*20.4
+27.5
+36.5
+ 16.7
+26.7
+ 17.6
+24.2
+29.6
+27.6
+ 17.9
+30.0
+26.7
+6.2
+ 12.9
+26.6
+37,1
+ 74.3
+8.0
+67.6
+456.4
-11.4
+330.7
+226.3
+209,6
+ 35.0
490 +21.7
DOM.
FLOW
+ 12.2
+ 70.5
+ 40.0
+ 21,3
*7.S
+23,2
+ 3.7
+ 54.9
+ 0,0
+ 75.1
+ 14.3
+ 37.0
+ 30.9
+ 14.1
+5.4
+ 13.2
+ 13.4
+59.3
+21.7
+ 30.9
+ 21.4
+ 20.9
+8.0
+ 16.3
+ 14.8
•2.4
+ 10.6
-1.5
+ 20.5
+55.0
•0.4
+ 31.7
+ 18.5
+ 23.0
+ 37.5
+ 11.9
+ 26.3
+ 22.9
+24.7
+ 25.6
+ 17.8
+ 17.2
+ 25.2
+25.6
+ 6.8
+8.5
+ 27.7
+ 35.4
+ 73.9
*7.4
+62.4
+212.7
-U.4
+330.7
+203.5
+211.0
+ 35.0
+ 19.3
LITERS /
CAP./DAY
-34,4
•48.1
• 35.2
•40.7
•18,5
•30,6
-32,1
•31.4
•16,5
•35,1
• 40.6
•42,5
-42.6
-5.4
-28,2
-17,7
-18,4
-19.2
•25.6
-30,7
-40,9
•23.2
•19,7
-8,5
•31.9
-36,6
-26.0
-28.3
•41,4
•43.2
•34.9
•17,0
• 17,7
-36.1
+ 3.6
-21.5
-24.1
-40.7
•13,1
-24.8
-45,4
-18,7
-35,8
-23,9
-25,1
-36,6
-25,9
-25,6
-35,3
-29,6
-10,3
-84,8
•69,2
-76,3
+ 64,5
•36,5
•14,9
• 25,0
                                         SUM OF ENTRIES MAY NOT EQUAL  TOTALS DUE TO  ROUNDOFFS

-------
Table 7
Average Industrial Flows by
State - Present, Projected, and
Percent Change
(Thousands of Cubic Meters per Day)


Table 7 summarizes the present (1980) and
projected (2000) quantity of flow treated by
publicly owned treatment plants that is of
industrial origin. This summary is an
extension of the summary presented in
Table 6.
  A further explanation of these summaries
is presented below:

Actual: All flows reported in this category
are compiled from the Actual Average Daiy
Flow received at treatment works during the
most recent 12 month period for which
information is available. Flows reported in
this category were compiled from records
collected between late 1978 and early 1980.
The major source of flow information was
the self-monitoring reports that are
completed by every facility with an NPDES
permit.
Present Design:  All flows reported in this
category are compiled from the average
daily flow a treatment plant is designed to
handle. The design capacity reported was
the capacity in place in 1980.

Projected Design: All flows in this category
are compiled from the average daily flow
that a treatment plant will be designed to
handle in the year 2000.

Total Flow: The total fow is expressed in
thousands of cubic meters per day. Total
flow is defined as all wastewaters moving
through the treatment plant from all
sources; including domestic, commercial,
industrial,  and  infiltration/inflow.
Industrial Flow: This includes only waste-
water generated by industry. Excluded are
flows originating from domestic sources,
commercial users, and) ifrfiltration/inflow.

Percent Change: This category presents a
comparison between the present situation
(1980) and the projected situation (2000).
The 6hange hve'ach parameter between the
Present  Design and the Projected Design is
expressed as an increase or decrease using
the Present Design as the base.

  All flows are reported in thousands of
cubic meters per day.
                           ACTUAL
                                              PRESENT DESIGN
                                                                       PROJECTED BMIGN
                                                                                              PERCENT CHANGE

STATt
ALABAMA
ALASKA
ARIZONA
ARKANSAS
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO
CONNECTICUT
DELAWARE
01ST, OF COLUM.
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
HAWAII
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
I OKA
KANSAS
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
MAINE
MARYLAND
MASSACHUSETTS
MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA
MISSISSIPPI
MISSOURI
MONTANA
Nt bKASK A
Nfc VAOA
HI* HAMPSHIRE
NE* JERSEY
NEW MEXICO
NEW YORK
NORTH CAROLINA
NORTH DAKOTA
OHIO
OKLAHOMA
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
RHODE ISLAND
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH DAKOTA
TENNESSEE
TEXAS
UTAH
VERMONT
VIRGINIA
WASHINGTON
WEST VIRGINIA
WISCONSIN
WYOMING
AMERICAN SAMOA
GUAM
N. MAklANAS
PUERTO RICO
PAC, TR, TERR,
VIRGIN ISLANDS
U.S. TOTALS
NOTES! t. FLOWS
TOTAL
FLOW
1,262
135
755
631
8,739
1,168
1,358
317
1,128
2,343
1,933
363
343
7,745
2,723
1,161
eaa
990
t,3oa
418
I,3a7
3,235
5,332
1,586
952
2,199
?46
658
576
284
3,959
388
9,39fc
l,68i
149
5,439
927
1 ,052
5,368
458
945
209
1,709
5,596
808
168
1,635
1 ,604
387
2,406
172
1
24
2
517
1
14
97,117
IN CUBIC
IND.
FLOW
230
14
26
119
1,506
194
235
140
0
206
443
38
61
1,509
570
198
124
235
41
94
210
759
1,156
465
118
400
7
144
0
76
834
24
887
604
12
1,040
80
244
767
155
259
29
483
515
65
17
168
203
61
599
1
0
0
0
48
0
0
16,438
METERS x
1ND,
X
10,2
10,6
3.5
18,8
17.2
16,6
17.3
44,3
0,0
6.8
22.9
10,5
16,0
19,4
20,9
17.0
14,6
23.7
3.1
22.5
15,6
23,4
21.6
29.3
12,4
18.2
2.9
21.9
0.0
27,0
21.0
6,3
9,4
35.9
8.3
19.1
8.6
23.2
1«.3
33.9
27.4
13.8
28.2
9.2
8.0
10.4
10. <>
12.6
15.8
24.9
0.7
0.0
0.0
0.0
9.4
0.0
0.0
16,9
TOTAL
FLOW
1.726
220
1,043
1,015
11,909
1,619
2,067
425
1,169
4,053
3,140
547
541
9,655
3,853
1,447
1,226
1,307
1,914
525
2,007
3,942
6,782
2,052
1,139
3,430
399
987
709
509
4,793
524
11,473
2,570
156
7,104
1,308
1,646
6,531
640
1,400
268
2,559
7,186
1,024
217
2,458
2,212
611
3,461
170
4
98
4
412
12
32
130,260
TND.
FLOW
240
18
49
114
2,064
230
442
143
0
276
616
34
83
1,878
605
242
193
326
53
113
213
972
713
526
89
723
9
169
0
107
476
24
1.190
737
13
1,417
94
306
889
161
307
30
652
576
111
16
429
252
69
974
0
0
0
0
48
0
0
?0,278
1000 2. SUM OF ENTRIES MAY
IND.
X
13.9
0.3
«.7
11.2
17.5
1«.2
21.3
33.8
0.0
6.6
19.6
6.2
IS. 4
19.4
20.6
16.7
15.7
24.9
2.7
21.5
10.6
24.6
10.5
25,7
7.6
21.0
2.2
17.1
0.0
21.1
9.9
«.5
10.3
26.6
8.4
19.9
7.2
16.5
13.6
28.3
21.9
11.3
25.4
8.0
10.9
7.6
17.4
11.4
11.3
28.1
0.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
11.8
0,6
0.0
15.5
TOTAL
FLOW
1,998
363
1.416
1,246
12,604
1,951
2,084
595
1,169
7,036
3,668
757
684
11,086
4,156
1,697
1,383
2,107
2,390
660
2,536
4,794
8,359
2,435
1.341
3,419
446
1,070
873
80*4
5,639
666
13,813
3,278
216
6,293
1,658
1,938
8,113
831
1,788
316
3,329
9,110
1,088
245
3,162
3,033
1,065
3,738
285
24
87
21
1.344
37
43
156,540
IND,
FLOW
330
19
24
153
2,230
238
39T
159
0
425
785
53
85
2,212
941
331
209
544
123
120
356
1,202
1,800
66?
136
778
14
264
19
160
1,343
27
1,622
1,023
19
1,926
123
289
1,075
255
500
37
940
769
94
27
570
377
123
1,065
9
10
0
0
241
0
0
27,305
NOT EQUAL TOTALS DUE TO
IND.
X
16.5
5.2
1.7
12.3
17.4
12,2
19.0
26.8
0.0
6.0
21.3
7.0
12.5
19.9
22.6
19.5
15,1
25.8
5.1
16.2
14.0
25.0
21.5
27.2
10.1
22.7
3.2
24.7
2.2
22.4
23.8
3.9
11.7
31.2
9.1
2S.2
7.4
14.9
13.2
30.6
27,9
11,8
28.2
8.6
8.6
11.2
16.0
12.4
11.5
28.5
3.3
44.0
0.0
» 9 v
0,0
17.9
0.2
0.0
17.2
TOTAL
PLOW
+ 15.7
• 64.9
• 35.7
• 22.7
*7.S
• 20.4
+ 0.7
+ 40.0
•o.o
• 73.6
• 16.8
• 38.3
• 26.5
• 14.8
+ 7,8
+ 17.2
+ 12.6
+61.2
+24.8
+ 25.5
+26.3
+21.6
+ 23.2
+ 18.6
+ 17.7
-0.3
+ 11.6
+8.3
+ 23.1
+57.7
+ 17,6
+ 30.8
+20.4
+27,5
+ 38.5
+ 16.7
•26.7
+ 17.6
+24.2
+29.8
+27.6
+ 17.9
• 30.0
• 26,7
•6,2
• 12.9
+ 28.6
+ 37,1
• 74.3
• 8.0
• 67.6
•458.4
•11.4
•330.7
•226.3
•209.6
+ 35.0
+21.7
ROUND. OFFS
IND,
FLOW
+ 37,4
+ 3.4
•49.6
• 33,8
+ 7,3
+ 3.6
•10.2
+ 11.0
+ 0.0
•53,0
+27,1
+56,6
+2.2
• 17,7
• 16,9
• 16,8
• 8.1
• 66.9
•130,8
+5,9
• 67,1
• 23.6
•152.5
•25.4
• 52.3
+ 7,5
+60.9
+56.4
+5000.0
+67.7
•161.6
+ 13,5
+ 36,2
• 36,7
•50,0
• 35,8
• 31.3
•5,4
• 20,6
• 40,4
• 62.4
•23,2
•44,1
+ 36,8
•15,3
+65,4
• 32.8
+ 49.6
+ 77.4
+9.3
•2429.9
+ 0.0
+ 0,0
+0.0
T v 9 w
+396,3
+ 0.0
V V . V
+ 0.0
+ 34.6


-------
TableS	
Projected Industrial Flow to
Municipal Treatment Plants by
Number,  Flow, and Percent of
Total Flow
Table 8 summarizes the industrial flows
expected at municipal plants in the year
2000. A summary is provided for each State
and U.S. Territory. National totals are
summarized at the bottom of the table. Table
8 is an extension of the Projected Design
portion of Table 7.
  In the first column the total number of
projected treatment plants in each State is
reported along with the total wastewater
treatment capacity they will represent. The
Projected Design Flow for each plant was
used to calculate the total treatment
capacity value.
  Subsequent columns provide a break-
down of the plants that will be receiving
industrial flows into five flow ranges. The
ranges are specified in the column headings
and are reported in thousands of cubic
meters per day and, in parentheses under
the headings, in millions of gallons per day.
  Reported for each flow range are the
number of plants in the range that will be
receiving industrial flows and the total
amount of industrial flow expected. Also
reported is the percentage of the total State
treatment capacity that is accounted for by
the industrial flow.
  All flows in  the columns are given in
thousands of cubic meters per day.
  The data indicate that the largest
percentage of industrial flows will be treated
by plants in the 1 to 50 mgd ranges.
CUBIC METERS/DAY X 1000
(MILLION GALLONS PER DAY)
NUMBER AND
FLOW OF
TREATMENT
STATE FACILITIES
ALABAMA 341 i,998
ALASKA 125 363
ARIZONA 152 1,416
ARKANSAS 625 1,246
CALIF. 946 12,804
COLORADO 297 1,951
CONN, 89 2,084
DELAWARE 23 595
WASH, D.C. 1 1,169
FLORIDA 326 7,038
GEORGIA 436 3,668
HAWAII 40 757
IDAHO 199 684
ILLINOIS 846 ll,08b
INDIANA 586 4,156
IOWA 846 1 ,697
KANSAS 607 1,383
KENTUCKY 399 2,107
LOUISIANA 447 2,590
MAINE 204 66<»
MARYLAND 347 2,536
MASS. 157 4, 794
MICHIGAN si 5 8,359
MINNESOTA SMS 2,435
MISS. S20 1,341
MISSOURI 696 3,4)9
MONTANA 1 76 446
NEBRASKA 4t>4 1,070
NEVADA 73 87}
iMEw HAMP, 14< 804
NEW .HRSFY 162 S,6i9
NEW MEXICO 1 /2 686
NEW YORK H^8 15,8)5
N CAROLINA 6S6 5,278
N DAKOTA 312 2)6
OHIO 795 8,295
OKLAHOMA 664 1,658
OREGON 2 56 1 ,9 *h
PENN. i ,262 8, n 5
WHODE IS 2b 851
S CAROLINA 282 1 ,788
S DAKOTA 287 516
TENNESSEF 291 5,529
TEXAS 2,176 9,110
UTAH 198 1,088
VERMONT 105 245
VIRGINIA 306 3,162
WASHINGTON 540 5,033
w VIRGINIA 534 1 ,065
WISCONSIN 631 3,738
WYOMING 119 285
AMER SAMOA 5 24
GUAM 6 87
N MARIANAS 3 21
PUER. RICO 31 1,544
PAC TR TER 25 37
VIRGIN is 4 43
US TOTAL 21,639 158,540
NUMHFH
OF
PLANTS
113
3
1
1 7
SO
9
12
5
0
106
112
1
B
67
59
23
21
136
16
17
SO
13
60
72
83
64
to
14
1
16
21
4
155
149
S
UM
1 1
9
225
1
102
9
90
69
S3
14
Sb
17
220
1 55
3
0
0
0
8
I
0
254?
0-.40
(0-.105)
TOTAL
INDUS
FLOw
9
0
0
2
9
1
f>
0
0
11
10
0
1
12
7
3
2
10
2
2
4
2
8
10
6
8
1
2
0
3
4
0
f\
16
1
9
1
1
23
0
11
1
8
11
3
1
6
3
22
19
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
317

X OF
TOTAL
FLOW
0,49
0,19
0,00
0,19
0.07
0.07
0.11
0.16
0.00
0.16
0.29
0.01
0.1B
0.11
0.17
0,19
0.21
0.51
0.09
0.42
0,16
0.05
0.10
0,42
0,49
i>. ?b
0,35
0,22
0.04
0.47
0.07
0.13
n.15
n.SO
0.64
0,10
0,10
0,08
0.29
0.03
0,64
0.33
0,26
0.12
0,31
0,75
0,21
0.12
2,08
0,52
0,14
0.00
0.00
0,00
0,12
0.20
0,00
0.19

NUMBER
OF
PLANTS
35
I
4
22
69
13
35
3
0
11
51
3
9
86
41
20
22
3b
b
19
14
42
35
54
27
58
4
17
0
19
43
5
71
67
4
60
20
13
92
9
56
12
SO
70
7
13
52
14
19
85
2
0
0
0
10
0
0
1,510
401-4.
TOTAL
INDUS
FLOW
57
0
7
39
106
19
64
3
P
20
74
b
14
156
73
30
34
52
12
32
1 6
73
59
/2
38
77
8
25
0
40
72
9
103
100
7
12''
36
16
125
20
84
t«
82
107
15
19
41
20
25
127
1
0
0
0
9
0
0
2,J87
0 4
05) (1
1 OF NUMBER
TOTAL OF
FLHW PLANTS
2.88 20
0.26 1
0.51 2
3.17 15
0.83 45
1,01 7
3.11 20
0.66 1
0.00 0
0.29 13
2.02 30
0.80 0
2,06 4
1.40 31
1.76 35
1.77 20
2.50 5
2.46 8
0.52 7
4.85 13
0.64 9
1.52 23
0.71 18
2.98 10
2.89 10
2.27 15
1.98 1
2. 54 7
0.00 1
5.00 8
1.28 26
1.35 1
0.74 55
3.07 58
3.23 1
1 .49 42
2.17 4
O.B7 3
1.55 35
2.48 3
4.71 29
5.72 1
2,48 16
1,17 24
1.41 5
7,91 1
1.42 19
0.66 11
2.34 4
3,39 22
0.35 1
0.00 > 1
0.00 0
0.00 0
0.70 9
0.00 0
o.oo ; o
1.50 750
.001-40
.06*10.5)
TOTAL * OF
INDUS TOTAL
FLOW FLOW
262 13.14
17 'i,79
17 1.23
HI 8.94
699 5.46
46 2.40
21? 10,20
9 1,52
0 0.00
177 2,52
367 10,00
0 0.00
70 10. ?S
464 4.18
596 14.33
254 14,97
51 3.73
79 3.77
108 4,55
85 12.94
124 4.91
286 5.97
263 3.15
112 4.62
90 6,77
164 4,80
4 0,93
87 8.15
18 2.16
90 11.27
2B7 5,09
17 2. SO
654 4.59
754 22.39
11 5.24
463 5.58
86 5.19
59 3,05
330 4.07
37 4.55
347 19,41
18 5.78
200 6.02
270 2.97
75 6,97
6 2,54
192 6.07
153 5,04
76 7,13
342 9.15
a 2.8S
10 44.00
0 0.00
0 0,00
182 13.54
0 0,00
0 0,00
9,421 5,94
40
no
NUMQFP
OF"
PLANT*
n
ft
ft
n
1 o
1
?
1
ft
?
5
1
0
A
3
1
?
3
ft
0
3
n
P
?
ft
?
ft
?
ft
1
6
ft
7
3
ft
1?
f!
?
7
3
1
0
3
n
ft
ft
4
?
ft
/I
ft
ft
ft
ft
1
ft
ft
1?"
.001-190
.57-50.2)
TOTAL X OF
INDUS TOTAL
FLOW FLOW
0 0.00
o o.oo
0 0,00
0 0.00
984 7.69
170 6. 72
117 5.63
145 24.45
0 0.00
215 3.06
1 .3 3 3.6*
47 6.24
P 0,00
595 5.5S
264 6,57
44 2.60
120 8,6'»
402 19,08
0 0,00
0 0,00
211 8,32
44Q 9.18
541 6,47
105 4,26
0 0,00
116 3.41
0 0,00
149 14.00
0 0.00
46 5.74
411 7.28
0 0.00
560 4.05
171 5.22
0 0.00
1,329 16,05
0 0,00
211 in. 93
595 7.33
196 25.61
57 3.19
0 0,00
370 11.11
19* 2.18
0 0.00
0 0.00
329 10.42
200 6.61
0 0.00
274 7.33
0 0.00
0 0.00
0 0.00
0 0,00
48 3.61
0 0,00
0 0,00
9,804 6.18

NUMHEK
OF
PL ANTS
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
n
i)
1
0
0
f
0
n
0
0
0
0
0
1
I
1
0
2
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
o
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
n
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
; is
190*
(50.2*)
TOTAL X OF
INDUS TOTAL
FLO* FLOW
0 0.00
0 0.00
o o.oo
0 0.00
437 5.42
0 0.00
0 0.00
0 0.00
0 0,0 0
0 u.Oii
1^7 S . 5 7
<; ii.oo
0 fs . n o

-------
Table 9
Percent of Flows at
all Treatment Levels -
Existing and Planned -
National Summary
Table 9 summarizes the degree of treatment
received by all wastewater collected in the
U.S. at present (1980) and projected (2000).
  Explanations of the categories and
definitions of terms follow:

Existing Facilities: Pertains to treatment
plants that were operational in 1980. New
treatment plants under construction in
1980 and plants planned to be constructed
by 2000 are not included in this category.
Actual 1980 Flow: Compiled from the
actual average daily flow received at a treat-
ment plant during the most recent 12 month
period for which information was available.

Present Design: Refers to the average flow
that a treatment plant is currently (1980)
designed to accommodate.

Projected Design: Refers to the average
daily flow that a treatment plant will be
designed to accomodate in the year 2000.

Planned Facilities: Treatment plants that
were not operational in 1980 but are
expected to be operational by the year 2000.
Included are newtreatment plants that were
under construction in 1980.

All Facilities (2000): Includes all treatment
plants that will be operational in 2000. This
includes facilities presently on line that will
remain operational through 2000, new
facilities under construction in 1980, and
new facilities planned to be built by 2000.
Excluded are facilities that are presently on
line but are to be taken out of service by
2000.

  All flows are reported in thousands of
cubic meters per day.
  Definitions of the levels of treatment; no
discharge, primary, secondary, etc., are
given in subsequent tables that summarizes
information for each level of treatment.
  Communities that discharge untreated or
raw sewage are not included in this
summary.
EXISTING FACILITIES

FACILITIES:
ACTUAL 1980 FLO*!
PRESENT DESIGN!
PROJECTED DESIGN:


FACILITIES:
PROJECTED DESIGN!

COUNT
X OF TOTAL
CUBIC METERS/1000
MGD
X OF TOTAL
CUBIC METERS/1000
MGD
X OF TOTAL
CUBIC METERS/1000
MGD
X OF TOTAL


COUNT
X OF TOTAL
CUBIC METERS/1000
MGD
X OF TOTAL
NO
DISCHARGE
1,361
8.9
1,659
438
1.7
2,415
638
1.8
3,582
946
2,4
PLANNED
NO
DISCHARGE
863
10.7
744
196
5,0
PRIMARY
1,043
6,8
11,489
3,035
11.8
13,521
3,571
10,3
0
0
0.0
FACILITIES
PRIMARY
0
0,0
0
0
0.0
ADVANCED
PRIMARY
2,300
15.0
10,958
2,894
11.2
13,015
3,438
9,9
0
0
0.0

ADVANCED
PRIMARY
0
0.0
0
0
0.0
SECONDARY
7,852
51.4
37,404
9,881
38.5
51,809
13,686
39.7
58,744
15,518
40.8

SECONDARY
4,719
56.5
7,85?
2,074
53.6
ADVANCED
SECONDARY
2,443
16.0
32,75*
e,bS4
33,7
44,962
11 ,877
34. b
66,74/4
17,632
46.3

ADVANCED
SECONDARY
2,?99
28. b
5,249
1,386
35,6
AhT
TERTIAKY
1,6
7bl
2.9
1,197
A,**
14, Bib
3,91V
10,5

AKVl
1H4
790
5,«
TOTAL
lb,<.'SC<

-------
Table 10	

Plant Loadings, Removal
Efficiencies, and  Discharge
Rates for Facilities
Existing in 1980
(Metric Tons per Day)

Table 10 is the first of a number of related
tables found in this report. It is designed to
estimate the average daily pollutant load
received  by all treatment plants and to
estimate the amount of pollutants in the
effluent. A total is estimated for each State
and U.S.  Territory. A national total is
provided  at the bottom of the table.
  Quantities of pollutant in the influent and
effluent are estimated for the BOD and
Solids. Quantities are given in metric tons
per day. The quantities are calculated using
the average daily flow and the average BOD
and Solids concentrations, along with
appropriate conversion factors. The average
values are compiled from the most recent 12
month period for which information is
available. The major source of flow and
concentration information was the self-
monitoring reports that are completed by
every facility with an 'NPCJES perhiit.
  Plants With Removal  Capabilities are
facilities with a specific requirement  to
remove  the listed nutrient. For instance,
some phosphorus is removed jn all treat-
ment plants. However, only plants specifi-
cally designed to remove phosphorus are
reported in this category. Reported for each
nutrient are the total riafjiber of plants with
removal capabilities and the total average
daily flow received by tKefce plarvte. Alto
given is the percentage of th

4 200 10.3 0 0 0.0 2 42 12.6 36 4,679 60,4 9 748 27.4 7 42 3.6 0 0 0.0 40 137 13.8 1 5 0,4 0 0 0,0 4 69 6.6 5 62 1.9 19 561 10. 9 0 0 0,0 14 25 2,6 1 66 3,0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0.0 1 66 18.3 1 0 0,2 7 91 2.3 0 0 0.0 14 56 0.6 51 452 26.9 0 0 0,0 89 572 10.5 4 73 8.1 1 19 1.8 91 368 6.8 0 0 0.0 ?0 149 15,6 1 3 1.6 37 475 27,6 *6 145 2.7 0 0 0.0 1 9 5.8 4 192 11.7 2 5 0,3 7 29 7.6 31 116 4,8 0 0 0,0 0 0 0,0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0,0 0 0 0.0 609 12.003 12.5 TOTAL N * X TOT. PLANTS FLOW FLOW 0 0 0.0 0 0 0,0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0.0 4 131 1.6 0 0 0.0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0.0 5 193 8.3 1 2 0.1 0 0 0.0 0 0 0.0 5 54 0.6 0 0 0.0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0,0 0 0 0.0 1 5 0.4 0 0 0,0 t « 0.3 1 10 0.3 t 11 0.2 0 0 0.0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0,0 0 0 0,0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0,0 1 22 0.5 0 0 0.0 6 99 1.0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0.0 2 7 0.1 0 0 0.0 0 0 0,0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0.0 1 1 0.0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0.0 1 2 0.1 1 0 0.0 4 28 7.2 0 0 0.0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0,0 0 0 0,0 0 0 0.0 0 0 0.0 35 574 0,6 NOTES! 1. FLOWS IN CUBIC METERS X 1000 2. METRIC TONS X .9072 • SHORT TONS 3, SUM OF ENTRIES MAY NOT EQUAL TOTALS DUE TO ROUNDOFFS 4. FACILITIES WITH ZERO DISCHARGE OR RAW DISCHARGE ARE NOT INCLUDED


-------
Table 11	
Plant Loadings, Removal
Efficiencies and  Discharge
Rates tor Facilities Projected
for 2000
(Metric Tons per Day)
Table 11 is a companion to the summary
provided in Table 10. This table
summmarizes the year 2000 situation
with regard to flows, pollutant loadings,
and removal efficiencies. All flows and
quantities are estimated using the
Projected Design Flow and the Projected
Level of Treatment for treatment plants
expected to be operational in the year
2000.
  Quantities of pollutant in the influent
and effluent are estimated for the BOD
and Solids. Quantities! are given in metric
tons per day. The quantities are calculated
using the average daily flow and the
average daily BOD and  Solids concentra-
tions, along with appropriate conversion
factors. The average values used for this
summary represent the projected year
2000 situation.
  Plants With Removal  Capabilities are
facilities with a specific requirement to
remove the listed nutrient. For instance,
some phosphorus  is removed in all treat-
ment plants. However, only plants
specifically designed to remove
phosphorus are reported in this category.
Reported for each  nutrient are the total
number of plants with removal capabilities
and the total average daily flow to be
received by these plants in the year 2000.
Also given is the percentage of the total
State flow these plants will represent. All
flows are reported in thousands of cubic
meters per day.
  Total Flow is the sum of the actual
average daily flows treated by all facilities
within the State, regardless of the degree
of treatment.
  Excluded from this summary are
facilities with no discharge to surface
waters and communities discharging raw
sewage. For this reason the total flow
listed on this table does not match the
total projected design flows listed on
Tables 6 and 7.


TOT«L
STATE FLOW
ALABAMA 1,998
ALASKA 363
ARIZONA t,17U
ARKANSAS 1 ,244
CALIFORNIA 11,170
COLORADO 1,927
CONNECTICUT 2.083
DELAWARE 595
DIST, OF COLUM, 1,169
FLORIDA 6,286
GEORGIA 3,663
HAWAII 717
IDAHO 602
ILLINOIS 11,082
INDIANA a, 156
IOWA 1,694
KANSAS 1,329
KENTUCKY 2,107
LOUISIANA 2,387
MAINE 650
MARYLAND 2,536
MASSACHUSETTS 4,789
MICHIGAN 8,265
MINNESOTA 2,423
MISSISSIPPI 1,341
MISSOURI 3,417
MONTANA 430
NEBRASKA 1,022
NEVADA 495
NEW HAMPSHIRE 773
NEW JERSEY 5,639
NEW MEXICO 563
NEW YORK 13,809
NORTH CAROLINA 3,278
NORTH DAKOTA 212
OHIO 8,291
OKLAHOMA 1 ,565
OREGON 1,887
PENNSYLVANIA 8,113
RHODE ISLAND 831
SOUTH CAROLINA 1,787
SOUTH DAKOTA 306
TENNESSEE 3,329
TEXAS 8,652
UTAH 1,047
VERMONT 243
VIRGINIA 3,161
WASHINGTON 2,999
WEST VIRGINIA 1,065
WISCONSIN 3,686
WYOMING 283
AMERICAN SAMOA 24
GUAM 82
N, MARIANAS 21
PUERTO RICO 1,344
PAC. TR. TERR. 36
VIRGIN ISLANDS 43
U.S. TOTALS 154,213
REMOVAL EFFICIENCIES
BOD5
X
INF. EFF, R£M.
428 46 99.0
62 10 83,1
269 35 86.9
294 22 92,3
3,274 251 92.3
461 48 89.4
406 55 86.4
140 8 94.2
280 5 97,9
1,304 133 89.7
778 72 90,6
187 21 88.6
141 14 89,4
1,806 129 92.8
831 62 92.5
523 40 92.3
327 37 88.4
444 46 89,4
536 66 87.6
157 18 88.1
607 36 93.9
976 126 87.0
1,570 190 87.8
666 41 93.7
277 28 89.6
789 99 87.4
78 12 83,8
364 30 91.5
103 10 89.7
230 21 90.5
1,641 139 91.5
119 16 86,0
2,630 367 86.0
858 55 93.5
54 5 90.2
1,769 126 92.8
352 26 92,4
466 32 93.1
1,706 175 89,7
213 21 89.7
481 46 90.2
87 6 92.0
1,014 72 92,8
2,055 119 94,1
206 11 94,2
51 5 89.2
724 58 91,9
689 79 88.4
243 25 89,3
894 93 89,5
61 8 86.0
8 0 90,7
16 2 85.1
2 0 85,2
372 39 89,2
7 0 87,0
10 1 87.3
35,063 3,270 90.6
SOLIDS
«
1 INF. EFF. REM,
435 59 86.3
72 10 84.9
262 36 86,1
276 27 90.0
3,430 252 92.6
460 4* 89,4
409 53 86,9
137 11 9|,5
280 8 97.0
1,378 140 89.7
736 100 86.1
151 21 85.9
136 16 87.8
2,490 155 93,7
938 62 93,3
454 54 88.0
352 41 88.2
485 57 88.0
546 73 86.5
155 18 87.9
548 36 93.4
1,082 126 88.3
2,230 204 90.8
707 45 93.5
273 39 85,5
808 109 86.4
82 14 82.1
360 33 90.5
99 10 89.2
204 21 89.4
1,676 141 91. 5
119 17 85.6
2,834 374 86.7
745 94 87.2
53 6 88.2
1,972 141 92.8
385 34 91.1
454 36 92.0
1,892 20? 89.2
190 2? 88.2
389 52 86.6
83 7 91.3
871 83 90.1
2,067 148 92.8
224 10 95.3
49 5 88.6
719 57 92,0
737 87 88.1
241 26 89.1
915 94 89,6
63 9 85.6
3 0 80.3
18 2 86.8
2 0 85.2
336 39 88.1
7 0 87.0
11 1 88.7
37.062 3,596 90.2
PLANTS WITH REMOVAL CAPABILITY
PHOSPHORUS
* . * TOT,
PLANTS FLOW FLOW
0 0 0,0
0 0 0.0
1 0 0,0
1 47 3.8
10 683 6.1
7 63 3.3
12 299 14.3
6 74 12,5
1 1,169 100.0
35 1,355 21,5
28 502 13.7
0 0 0.0
3 15 2.5
51 695 6.2
79 1,692 40,7
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
2 5 0.2
0 0 0.0
13 27 4.1
23 1,873 73.8
27 714 14,9
190 7,88? 95.3
67 365 15.0
2 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
6 459 92.5
8 59 7.6
16 242 4,3
6 25 4.5
77 2,952 21,3
12 53 1.6
0 0 0,0
200 6,258 75,4
4 148 9.5
2 132 7.0
225 1,722 21,2
2 6 0.7
17 69 3,9
0 0 0,0
12 3 0.0
23 165 1.9
0 0 0.0
25 79 32.7
21 874 27,6
4 216 7.2
3 13 1.2
86 2,563 69.5
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
1 1* 1,1
0 0 0.0
0 0 0,0
1,308 33,536 21.7
NM1 NITROGEN
0 X TOT.
PLANT* FLOW FLOW
118 800 40.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
16 1,387 12.4
?5 979 50.7
9 243 11.6
1 11 1.9
1 1,169 100.0
117 839 13,3
148 2,050 55.9
0 0 0.0
9 218 36,2
93 7,918 71.4
?7 2,233 53.7
104 759 44.8
0 0 0.0
290 739 35.1
1 7 0.3
0 0 0,0
13 1.541 60.7
?0 425 8.8
81 1,315 15.9
9 1,368 56.4
2*6 813 60.6
1 113 3.3
2 41 9.6
0 0 0.0
3 182 36.8
13 82 10,7
42 1,076 19.0
1 0 0.1
104 693 5.0
314 2,040 62.2
0 0 0.0
395 5,308 64.0
32 634 40.5
i 56 3.0
354 2,627 32.3
4 168 20.2
75 482 27.0
14 169 55.4
US 2.122 63.7
38 2,295 26.5
0 0 0.0
14 64 26.5
11 488 15.4
4 586 19,5
10 182 17.1
!A9 640 17.3
4 86 30.3
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0.0
3 18 1.3
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
3,069 44,988 29.1
TOTAL N
* X TOT,
PLANTS FLOW FLOW
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
4 362 3.2
0 0 0,9
1 16 0.6
0 0 0,0
1 1,169 100,9
10 639 tO.t
3 41 1.1
0 0 0,9
3 67 11,1
10 135 1,2
1 227 5,4
0 0 0,0
0 0 0.9
1 1 0.0
1 7 0.3
0 0 0.0
2 105 4.1
1 17 0.3
2 22 0.2
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
4 54 10.9
0 0 0.0
10 238 4.2
0 0 0,0
25 286 2.0
2 0 0.0
0 0 0.9
4 47 0.5
0 0 0,9
0 0 0.9
11 75 0.9
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
1 22 0.6
1 2 0.9
0 0 0,9
0 0 0.0
9 292 9.2
2 3 0.1
8 43 4.1
1 2 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.9
0 0 9,9
0 0 0.9
0 0 0.9
116 3,886 2.5
        NOTES!   1. FLOWS IN CUBIC METERS  X 1000   2.  METRIC TONS X  .9072 • SHORT  TONS

                3. SUM OF  ENTRIES MAY NOT EQUAL TOTALS DUE TO ROUND-OFF8

                4. FACILITIES WITH ZERO DISCHARGE OR  RAW DISCHARGE  ARE NOT INCLUDED

-------
Table 12
Treatment  Populations-
Present and Projected,
Resident and Nonresident
(In Thousands)

Table 12 summarizes the populations, by
State, for 1980 and 2000 which are now
or will be receiving treatment of their
wastewaters.
  The values listed for the 1980 and 2000
State ceiling populations were obtained
from data provided by the Department of
Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis
(BEA). The 1980 total is the BEA estimate
of the number of current State residents.
The year 2000 total is the population
expected to be  resident in each State, as
predicted by the BEA. The projections
were produced by  BEA after extensive
analysis which included review and
comment by State agencies responsible
for population projections.
  Resident Populations (RES) are
permanent residents within the service
area of an established sewerage authority.
Nonresident populations (NONRES)
include commuters living in one service
area and working in another, as well as
temporary residents at resort areas and
similar locations.
  Persons are included in the Receiving
Treatment category if the wastewater they
generate is treated at a facility operated by
an established sewerage authority.
Persons are included in the Not Receiving
Treatment category if they reside in the
service area of an established sewerage
authority, but the wastewater they
generate is not treated at a facility
operated by the authority. Theoretically
the sum of the populations receiving
treatment and not receiving treatment
should equal the State's tbtal population.
This is not the case because many rural
residents who are counted as part of the
State's total do not reside in the service
area of any established sewerage
authority and, therefore, are not included
in any Receiving or Not Receiving Treat-
ment categories.
  All levels of treatment are included
under Receiving Treatment. Similar
summaries are presented in subsequent
tables that provide information for each
specific level of treatment.
  The Percent Served values are based
upon a comparison between the resident
population receiving treatment and the
total State population figures provided by
BEA.
  A similar summary dealing with collec-
tion populations is presented in Table 42.

I960 CEILING
STATE POPULATION
ALABAMA
ALASKA
ARIZONA
ARKANSAS
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO
CONNECTICUT
DELAWARE
DIST. OF COLUM.
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
HAWAII
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
IOWA
KANSAS
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
MAINE
MARYLAND
MASSACHUSETTS
MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA
MISSISSIPPI
MISSOURI
MONTANA
NEBRASKA
NEVADA
NEW HAMPSHIRE
NEW JERSEY
NEW MEXICO
NEW YORK
NORTH CAROLINA
NORTH DAKOTA
OHIO
OKLAHOMA
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
RHODE ISLAND
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH DAKOTA
TENNESSEE
TEXAS
UTAH
VERMONT
VIRGINIA
WASHINGTON
NEST VIRGINIA
WISCONSIN
WYOMING
AMERICAN SAMOA
GUAM
N. MARIANAS
PUERTO RICO
PAC. TR. TERR.
VIRGIN ISLANDS
3,7*9
40*
2,450
2,180
22,696
2,772
3,115
582
656
8,660
5,116
915
905
11,230
5,400
2,903
2,369
3,527
4,026
1,097
4,149
5,769
9,208
4,060
2,406
4,866
786
1,574
702
887
7,332
1,241
17,649
5,606
657
10,731
2,892
2,527
11,731
929
2,932
669
4,360
13,385
1,367
493
5,197
3,926
1,878
4,720
450
31
114
17
3,358
111
96
U.S. TOTALS 223,824
2000 CEILING
POPULATION
4,140
667
4,149
2,970
26,786
4,371
3,741
641
661
15,049
7,053
1,366
1,183

1960
RES.
2,002
201
1,802
1,215
19,451
2,455
1,665
4*3
729
4,717
3,037
565
460
12,356 9,940
6,059 3,473
3,101
2,517
4,224
4,659
1,222
5,583
6,614
10,314
4,505
2,740
5,225
938
1,734
1,312
1,306
8,747
1,781
18,922
7,419
690
12,031
3,702
3,209
12,365
1,033
3,700
730
5,573
18,069
1,666
607
6,755
4,659
2,003
5,553
464
40
275
31
4.700
HA
116
272,644
2,095
1,822
1,660
2,615
465
2,441
3,745
6,778
2,908
t,«*9
3,432
462
1.351
605
362
5,7*0
1.034
12,457
2,373
434
6,297
2,135
1,443
6,735
5*9
1,291
454
2,1*3
11,042
1,1**
225
3,315
2,3*0
7*1
3,479
326
1
72
1
1.757
"K
**
156,673
RECEIVING
2000
RES.
3,400
678
3,844
2,489
26,067
«*141
2,667
821
811
13,185
5,662
1,359
1,047
11,961
4,937
2,835
2,535
3,336
4,621
941
4,805
5,767
9,001
3,689
2,423
5,205
731
1,655
1,243
951
8,460
1,637
17,324
4,474
576
11,804
3,549
2,972
12,032
994
2,600
663
4,203
16,144
1*661
368
5,761
4,292
2,052
5,256
596
36
215
31
3,242
108
10*
TREATMENT
I960
NONRES,
105
1
66
21
1,044
16*
30
80
1,89*
819
135
90
11
3?
?4?
69
11
60
6*)
8?
12'
50
125
21
15
87«
3?
17
90
57
»0 3
16
2,36«
179
0
66
2
39
52*
48
233
13
6H
311
}3
46
29'
43'
16
72
16
0
1
0
0
0
1
24*, 913 12,070
2000
NONRES,
204
19
200
47
1,451
52*

40*
2,339
1,7*0
227
255
79
46
501
147
19
97
103
133
48*
211
253
40
17
1,435
36
2*
190
19*
1,537
30
4,0*5
441
0
92
11
73
1,2*3
71
495
10
145
648
38
78
470
801
24
1**
27
1
3
2
0
4
3
22,02*

1980
RES.
533
121
174
220
1,421
34
1,17*
79
0
2,23*
753
212
99
265
412
146
171
760
448
431
507
1,793
1,426
206
485
297
32
57
46
417
1,1*7
122
5,309
1,415
7
985
183
338
2,538
304
639
17
930
1,045
67
126
1,135
562
1,053
338
2
30
16
17
1,184
95
20
34,696
NOT RECEIVING
TREATMENT
2000 I960 2000
RE8. NONRES. NONRES.
75
15
122
6
226
1
656
18
0
405
315
11
15
96
24
9
4
254
1
206
131
647
580
61
121
It
0
19
0
247
204
41
2,130
8*1
*4
14
1
551
126
105
4
2*1
0
0
80
545
109
21
14*
0
2
22
1
771
64
7
10,647 1,
4 0
3 0
14 2
0 0
43 6
0 0
0 0
31 0
0 0
57 2
4 0
9 0
23 3
0 0
54 0
26 0
1 o
0 0
6 0
7 0
127 0
82 55
36 17
6 0
1 0
5 0
1 0
0 0
0 0
60 26
141 60
6 0
405 6
103 |4
0 0
3 0
7 0
3 0
232 11
0 0
51 0
0 0
1 0
38 0
* 0
16 7
6 0
28 19
3 0
21 7
1 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
*9* 247
PERCENT
1960
53,1
49.7
^ * f *
ni
• **
8s!r
M&
, V
*0.5
W V . ,*
79,7
m.2
,*
51.2
59,4
64,0
«<
. i
88,5
64,3
72.2
1 K. C
76.9
47.6
-» • . w
69.9
44.3
58.6
64,9
73.6
71.6
60.3
70 5
• V . 3
M.x
• J
85,6
86,3
40,6
76.6
r w , v
83,4
70,6
«2,3
66,2
77.3
73,8
57 1
j * . i
74.5
• ^ , ~
t*\ u
c* j , •*
65,9
49,4
62,5
65,3
UH J
•"• '
63.8
60. 1
W f •
40.*
73.7
72.9
1 C , ^
4*5
63.9
w* , r
81
, *
52.3
*• • »
20.*
66.8
70,0
SERVED
2000
Ml
• *
101,6
92 7
•»«, I
Mm
*•
97.4
94 7
74*7
r w . r
97 7
122 7
67.6
63 4
99,6
ft A fc
vO , D
97 0
~ f , V
61.5
w A , ^
91 4
~ \ . •*
I An 7
1 W . r
79.0
1 T , V
99 ?
TT.C
77,0
86.1
87,2
67 1
0 I . 3
61 9
86,4
99 6
78 )o
107.0

72!9
r c . ~w
97.0
T r , v
91 9
91.6
60,3
83,6
98 1
'»* • •
95,9

97.1
Tf , J
75 7
f 3. 1
90.9
75,4
100,4
99 k
•»"»*
65,3
88,3
102,5
94.7
123.2
90.5
w * J
78,5
mo
. V
69.0
«* ' , V
62,2
91.9
90,*

-------
Table 13	

Septic Tank Population,
Present and Projected,
Resident and Nonresident
(In Thousands)


Table 13 summarizes the populations, by
State, for 1980 and 2000 which are now
or will be disposing of their wastewaters
by means of individual onsite systems, the
majority being of the septic tank/leachfield
type.
  The values  listed for the 1980 and 2000
State ceiling populations were obtained
from data provided by BEA.
  All the populations are listed under the
Not Receiving Treatment category only
because they are not being served by
centralized collection and treatment
facilities. None of the populations listed
on this table live within the service district
of a sewerage authority with a central
collection and treatment system.
  Resident Populations (RES) are
permanent residents within the
boundaries of an incorporated area.
Nonresident Populations (NONRES)
include commuters living in one service
area and working in another, as well as
temporary residents at resort areas and
similar locations.
  The Percent Served values are based
upon a comparison between the resident
population not receiving treatment and
the total State population figures provided
by BEA.
-
1980
CEILING
STATE POPULATION
ALABAMA
ALASKA
ARIZONA
ARKANSAS
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO
CONNECTICUT
DELAWARE
DIST. OF COLUM,
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
HAWAII
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
IOWA
KANSAS
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
MAINE
MARYLAND
MASSACHUSETTS
MICHIGAN
JilNNESOTA
MISSISSIPPI"
MISSOURI
MONTANA
NEBRASKA
NEVADA
NEW HAMPSHIRE
NEW JERSEY
NEW MEXICO
NEW YORK
NORTH CAROLINA
NORTH DAKOTA
OHIO
OKLAHOMA
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
RHODE ISLAND
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH DAKOTA
TENNESSEE
TEXAS
UTAH
VERMONT
VIRGINIA
WASHINGTON
WEST VIRGINIA
WISCONSIN
WYOMING
AMERICAN SAMOA
GUAM
N. MARIANAS
PUERTO RICO
PAC. TR. TERR.
VIRGIN ISLANDS
U.S. TOTALS
3,769
406
2,450
3,160
22,696
2,772
3,115
582
656
8,860
5,118
9J5
905
11,230
5,400
2,903
2,369
3,527
4,026
1,097
4,149
5,769
9.208
4,060
-2VU">
4,866
786
1,574
702
8fl7
7,332
1,241
17,649
5,606
657
10,731
2,892
2,527
11,731
929
2,932
689
4,380
13,385
1,367
493
5,197
3,926
1,878
4,720
450
31
114
17
3,358
111
96
223,824
2000 CEILING
POPULATION
4,140
667
4,149
2,970
26,786
4,371
3,741
841
661
15,049
7,053
1.366
1,183
12,358
6,059
3,101
2,517
4,224
4,659
1,222
5,583
6,614
10,314
4,505
2,740
5,225
938
1,734
1,312
1,306
8,747
1,781
18,922
7,419
690
12,031
3,702
3,209
12,365
1,033
3,700
730
5,573
18,069
1,688
607
6,755
4,859
2,003
5,553
484
40
275
31
4,7*0
174
116
272,644
RECEIVING TREATMENT NOT RECEIVING TREATMENT PERCENT SERVED
1980 2000 1900 2000 1960 200ft 1980 2000
RES. RES. NONRE4. NONRES. RES. RES. NONRES. NONRES. I960 2000
0000 207 29 2 0 5,5 0,7
QOOO 35 030 8,8 0,1
0090 148 101 9 2 6.1 2.5
0 0 0 0 142 6 0 0 6.6 0.2
0 0 A 0 489 90 36 6 2.2 .3
0000 21 000 0.8 .0
0000 341 354 0 0 11,0 .5
0000 16 0 31 0 2.8 ,0
0000 0000 0.0 ,0
0 0 n 0 722 18 11 1 8.1 ,1
0000 210 69 2 0 4.1 ,0
0000 98 13 9 0 10,7 .0
0000 45 5 18 0 5.0 .5
0000 178 85 0 0 1.6 .7
0000 146 1 31 0 2.7 .0
0000 83 9 27 0 2,9 .3
0 0 o 0 57 3 0 0 2,4 .2
0000 225 0 0 0 6.4 ,0
0000 275 040 6.8 ,0
0000 104 530 9.5 .5
0000 174 33 124 0 4.2 ,6
0000 327 17 IB 0 5.7 .3
0000 499 318 34 11 5.4 ,1
0000 66 30 6 0 1,6 .7
0000 143 1 0 0 6,0 .1
0 0 0 0 98 11 5 0 2.0 .2
0 00 0 10 0 1 0 1.3 .0
0 0 0 0 18 19 0 0 1.2 .1
0000 39 A 0 0 5.6 ,0
00 0 0 138 A 48 0 15,6 ,0
0 0 A 0 280 143 36 0 3.8 .6
0 0 0 0 44 86 0 3.6 .5
0 0 0 0 2,217 1,357 9 3 12.6 7.2
0000 384 20 99 0 6.9 0.3
0000 7200 1,2 0,3
0000 314 37 3 0 2.9 0,3
0000 82 770 2.8 0,2
0000 35 1 1 0 1,4 0.1
0000 1,176 308 226 10 10,0 2.5
0000 71 000 7,7 0,0
0000 205 2 48 0 7.0 0.1
0000 14 « 0 0 2,1 0,6
0 0 0 0 133 0 0 0 3,1 0,0
0000 424 0 23 0 3.2 0.0
0000 80 0 5 0 5*9 0,0
0000 4}?60 8.5 0.4
00 o 0 794 488 6 0 15.3 7.2
0000 271 10 12 19 6.9 0.2
0 0 0 0 721, A 3 0 38,4 0.0
0000 177 124 20 7 3.8 2.2
00 A 0 2 0 1 0 0.5 0,0
0000 3000 10.0 0,0
0000 0000 0*0 0«0
0000 9100 56.9 4.8
QOOO 5AOO 0.2 0.0
0000 49 38 0 0 44.9 22.4
0000 0000 0.0 0.0
0 0 0 0 1 12,618 3,794 954 65 5.6 1.4

-------
Table  14	

Populations Served by
Treatment with No Discharge-
Present and Projected,
Resident and Nonresident
(Population in Thousands)

Table 14 summarizes the populations, by
State, for 1980 and  2000 which are now
or will be receiving treatment of their
wastewaters at facilities that do not
discharge to surface waters. The majority
of the facilities are lagoon systems
designed for evaporation and/or infiltra-
tion of the total flow. Also included are
facilities that dispose of their effluent by
recycling, reuse, spray irrigation, or
groundwater recharge.
  Also summarized for each State and the
nation is the number of no discharge
facilities in operation in 1980 and the
number expected to be operational in
2000.
  The terms total population, resident,
nonresident, receiving treatment, not
receiving treatment, and percent served
are defined  in Table 12.
POPULATION

STATE
ALABAMA
ALASKA
ARIZONA
ARKANSAS
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO
CONNECTICUT
DELAWARE
DIST. OF COLUM,
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
HAWAII
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
IOWA
KANSAS
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
MAINt
MARYLAND
MASSACHUSETTS
MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA
MISSISSIPPI
MISSOURI
MONTANA
NEBRASKA
NEVADA
NEW HAMPSHIRE
NEW JERSEY
NEW MEXICO
NEW YORK
NORTH CAROLINA
NORTH DAKOTA
OHIO
OKLAHOMA
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
RHODE ISLAND
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH DAKOTA
TENNESSEE
TEXAS
UTAH
VERMONT
VIRGINIA
WASHINGTON
WEST VIRGINIA
WISCONSIN
WYOMING
AMERICAN SAMOA
6UAM
N. MARIANAS
PUERTO RICO
PAC. TR. TERR.
VIRGIN ISLANDS
U.S. TOTAL
1980
TOTAL
3,769
406
2,450
2,180
22,696
2»772
3,115
582
656
8,860
5,118
915
905
11,230
5,400
2,903
2,369
3,527
4,026
1,097
4,149
5,769
9,208
4,06(/
2,406
4,868
786
1,574
702
887
7,332
1.241
17,649
5,606
657
10,731
2,892
2,527
11,731
929
2,932
689
4.380
13,385
1,367
493
5,197
3,926
1,878
4,720
450
31
114
17
3,358
111
96
223,824
2000
TOTAL
4,140
667
4,149
2,970
26,786
4,371
3,741
841
661
15,049
7,053
1,366
1,183
12,358
6,059
3,101
2,517
4,224
4,659
1,222
5,583
6,614
10,314
4,505
2,740
5,225
938
1,734
1,312
1,306
8,747
1,781
18,922
7,419
690
12,031
3,702
3,209
12,365
1,033
3,700
730
5,573
18,069
1,688
607
6,755
4,859
2,003
5,553
484
40
275
31
4,700
174
116
272,644
RECEIVING
1980
RES.
0
0
194
3
1,528
12
1
0
0
81
0
0
22
0
0
0
73
0
2
2
0
0
73
6
0
0
16
47
368
0
0
186
0
0
6
0
91
18
0
0
0
10
0
737
47
0
0
13
0
37
6
0
3
0
0
o»
0
3,599
2000
RES.
0
0
633
5
3,058
57
0
0
0
1,579
7
81
158
11
0
2
123
0
4
26
0
7
204
24
0
4
33
108
704
57
0
293
10
0
8
3
238
94
0
0
2
18
0
1.137
79
1
3
37
0
82
3
0
12
0
0
4
0
9,009
TREATMENT
1900
NONRES
0
0
17
0
154
2
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
0
0
0
t
2
32
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
3
0
0
0
0
0
59
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
290

2000
NONRES
0
0
146
0
419
4
0
0
0
162
0
14
15
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
11
33
0
0
0
2
5
71
38
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
5
0
108
0
5
0
5
0
32
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1 ,008
NOT RECEIVING
1900 2000
RES. RES.
0 0
0 0
39 4
0 0
255 27
0 0
6 0
0 0
0 0
6 30
0 1
3 0
1 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 14
0 0
0 0
25 6
1 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 0
4 0
2 34
0 0
9 0
0 4
0 1
0 0
0 0
7 0
16 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
27 0
0 0
1 2
0 0
1 0
0 0
1 0
0 0
0 0
3 3
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
416 131
TREATMENT
1960 96

>0
NONRES NONRES
0
0
0
0
6
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
10
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
10
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
16
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
o
PERCENT
SERVED

1900 2000
0.0 0.0
0.0 0.0
7.9 15.2
0.1 0.2
6.7 11.4
0.4 1.3
0.0 0.0
0.0 0.0
0.0 0.0
TREATMENT
PLANTS

1980 2000
0 0
0 0
60 04
5 7
287 621
30 26
3 1
0 0
0 0
0,9 10.4 9 25
0.0 0.1 2 1
0.1 5.9
2.5 13.3
0.0 0.0
0.0 0.0
0.0 0.0
3,1 4.9
0.0 0.0
0.0 0.1
0.1 2.1
0(0 0,0
0,0 0.1
0.0 1.9
0.1 0.5
0.0 0.0
0,0 0.0
2.1 3.5
3.0 6.2
52. S 59.7
0.0 4.3
0.0 0.0
15.0 16,4
0.0 0.0
0.0 0.0
1.0 1.1
0.0 0.0
3.1 6.4
0.7 2.9
0.0 0.0
0.0 0,0
0.0 0.0
1.4 2.5
0,0 0.0
5.5 6.2
3.4 4.7
0.1 0.2
0.0 0.0
0,3 0.7
0.0 0.0
3 7
26 58
1 5
0 0
t 3
148 221
0 0
7 10
2 31
0 1
0 2
44 75
5 13
0 0
• 16
27 47
107 198
24 46
1 40
0 0
52 95
2 5
0 3
15 24
0 1
132 287
14 17
0 0
0 0
0 1
22 28
0 0
219 220
23 22
2 5
0 1
21 28
0 0
0,7 1.4 I 47 74
1.4 0,0 ' 13 12
0,0 0.0 I 0 0
3.1 4.6 ; 3 1
0.0 0.0
0.0 0,0
0.0 2.0
0.0 0.0
19 1.6 3.3
0 0
0 0
0 2
0 0
1,361 2,366

-------
Table 15       	

Populations Served by Raw
Discharge—Present and
Projected, Resident and
Nonresident
(Population in Thousands)

Table 15 summarizes populations served
by sewerage authorities that collect
wastewater and discharge the wastewater
to the environment as a raw waste. The
wastewater is not subjected to any
treatment beyond what is considered
preliminary treatment. Preliminary treat-
ment would include comminution,
screening, grit removal, etc., but not
primary sedimentation.
  All the populations are listed under the
Not Receiving Treatment category because
the wastewater collected is discharged in
the same form as when it was collected.
  Also summarized, for each State and
the nation, is the number of sewerage
authorities utilizing raw discharge as a
method of wastewater disposal. In 1980
there were 272 communities discharging
raw waste. By the year 2000 all these
communities will have built treatment
facilities or interceptors to neighboring
facilities to eliminate the raw discharge.
POPULATION

STATE
ALABAMA
ALASKA
ARIZONA
ARKANSAS
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO
CONNECTICUT
DELAWARE
DIST. OF COLUM.
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
HAWAII
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
IOWA
KANSAS
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
MAINE
MARYLAND
MASSACHUSETTS
MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA
MISSISSIPPI
MISSOURI
MONTANA
NEBRASKA
NEVADA
NEW HAMPSHIRE
NEW JERSEY
NEW MEXICO
NEW YORK
NORTH CAROLINA
NORTH DAKOTA
OHIO
OKLAHOMA
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
RHODE ISLAND
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH DAKOTA
TENNESSEE
TEXAS
UTAH
VERMONT
VIRGINIA
WASHINGTON
WEST VIRGINIA
WISCONSIN
WYOMING
AMERICAN SAMOA
GUAM
N. MARIANAS
PUERTO RICO
PAC. TR. TERR.
VIRGIN ISLANDS
U.S. TOTAL
1980
TOTAL
3,769
a06
2,450
2,180
22,696
2,77?
3,115
582
656
8,860
5,118
915
905
11,230
5,400
2,903
2,369
3,527
a, 026
1,097
4, 109
5,769
9,208
4,060
2,406
4,868
786
1,574
702
887
7,332
1,241
17,649
5,606
657
10,731
2,892
2,527
11,731
929
2,932
689
4,380
13,385
1,367
493
5,197
3,926
1,878
4,720
450
31
114
17
3,358
111
96
223,824
2000
TOTAL
4,140
667
4,149
2,970
26,786
4,371
3,7«1
841
661
15,049
7,053
1,366
1,183
12,358
6,059
3,101
2,517
4,224
4,659
1,222
5,583
6,614
10,314
4,505
2,740
5,225
938
1,734
1,312
1,306
8,747
1,781
18,922
7,419
690
12,031
3,702
3,209
12,365
1,033
3,700
730
5,573
18,069
1,688
607
6,755
4,859
2,003
5,553
484
40
275
31
4,700
174
116
272,644
RECEIVING
I960 2000
RES. RES.
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
TREATMENT
1980
NONRES
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0

2000
NONRES
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
NOT
1*80
RES.
4
19
0
8
0
0
0
0
0
296
7
3
0
3
0
0
0
201
37
113
0
208
0
4
3
0
0
0
0
100
12
0
910
2
0
0
0
0
137
10
4
0
0
0
0
19
1
0
100
0
0
0
0
0
86
0
2
2,307
RECEIVING
2000
RES.
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
TREATMENT
1980
NONRES
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
46
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
0
28
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
0
0
344
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
432
7000
NONRES
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
c
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
PERCENT
SERVED

1980 2000
0.1 0.0
4.7 0.0
0,0 0.0
0.3 0.0
0.0 0.0
0,0 0.0
0.0 0.0
0.0 0.0
0.0 0.0
1.3 0.0
0.1 0.0
0.3 0.0
0.0 0.0
0.0 0.0
0.0 0.0
0.0 0.0
0.0 0.0
5.7 0.0
0.9 0.0
10.3 0.0
0.0 0.0
3.6 0.0
0.0 0.0
0.1 0.0
0.1 0.0
0.0 0.0
0.0 0.0
0.0 0.0
0.0 0.0
11.3 0.0
0,1 0.0
0.0 0.0
5.1 0.0
0.0 0.0
0.0 0.0
0.0 0.0
0.0 0.0
0.0 0,0
1.1 0.0
1.1 0.0
0.1 0.0
0.0 0.0
0.0 0.0
0,0 0,0
0.0 0.0
3.9 0.0
0.0 0.0
0,0 0.0
5.3 0,0
0.0 0.0
0,0 0.0
0.0 0.0
0.0 0,0
0,0 0,0
2,5 0.0
0.0 0.0
2.3 0.0
1.0 0.0
TREATMENT
PLANTS

1980 2000
3 0
13 0
0 0
1 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
a o
7 0
1 0
1 0
5 0
0 0
2 0
0 0
4 0
7 0
S3 0
0 0
17 0
1 0
10 0
2 0
2 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
22 0
1 0
0 0
19 0
2 0
0 0
2 0
0 0
0 0
42 0
3 0
3 0
1 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
10 0
2 0
1 0
29 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 0
o o
1 0
272 0

-------
Table 16
Populations Served by Facilities
Designed for Less than
Secondary Treatment—Present
and Projected, Resident and
Nonresident
(Population in Thousands)
Table 16 summarizes 1980 populations
served by facilities that treat the collected
wastes to a degree less than what is
defined as secondary treatment. The
treated wastes are discharged to surface
waters.
  Facilities  included in  this summary
provide primary or advanced primary
treatment. Primary treatment facilities
generally provide preliminary treatment
(comminution, screening, grit removal.
etc.) plus primary sedimentation. Chlorina-
tion may or may not be a unit process.
Advanced primary treatment facilities
generally provide some biological treat-
ment, but are at present unable to treat
wastewater to the degree necessary to
comply with EPA's definition of secondary
treatment.
  Also summarized, for each State and
the nation, is the number of facilities
providing less than secondary treatment.
  The terms, total population, resident,
nonresident, receiving treatment, not
receiving treatment, and percent served
are defined in Table 12.
POPULATION

STATE
ALABAMA
ALASKA
ARIZONA
ARKANSAS
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO
CONNECTICUT
DELAWARE
DIST. OF COLUM,
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
HAWAII
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
IOWA
KANSAS
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
MAINE
MARYLAND
MASSACHUSETTS
MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA
MISSISSIPPI
MISSOURI
MONTANA
NEBRASKA
NEVADA
NEW HAMPSHIRE
NEW JERSEY
NEW MEXICO
NEW YORK
NORTH CAROLINA
NORTH DAKOTA
OHIO
OKLAHOMA
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
RHODE ISLAND
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH DAKOTA
TENNESSEE
TEXAS
UTAH
VERMONT
VIRGINIA
WASHINGTON
WEST VIRGINIA
WISCONSIN
WYOMING
AMERICAN SAMOA
GUAM
N. MARIANAS
PUERTO RICO
PAC. TR, TERR.
VIRGIN ISLANDS
U.S. TOTAL
1980
TOTAL
3,769
406
2.450
2.180
22,696
2,772
3,115
582
656
8.860
5,118
915
905
11,230
5,400
2,903
2,369
3,527
4,026
1,097
4,149
5,769
9,208
4,060
2,406
4,868
786
1,574
702
887
7,332
1,241
17,649
5,606
657
10,731
2,892
2,527
11,731
929
2,932
669
4,360
13,385
1,367
493
5,197
3,926
1,878
4,720
450
31
114
17
3,358
111
96
223,624
2000
TOTAL
4,140
667
4,149
2,970
26,786
4,371
3,741
841
661
15,049
7,053
1,366
1,183
12,356
6,059
3,101
2,517
4,224
4,659
1,222
5,583
6,614
10,314
4,505
2,740
5,225
938
1,734
1,312
1,306
8,747
1,781
18,922
7,419
690
12,031
3,702
3,209
12,365
1,033
3,700
730
5,573
18,069
1,688
607
6,755
4,859
2,003
5,553
464
40
275
31
4,700
174
116
272,644
RECEIVING
1960 2000
RES. RES.
101
130
426
502
9,385
270
321
6
0
86
138
469
137
347
60
862
900
73
«78
89
65
2,326
415
172
116
1,984
85
679
20
166
1,792
197
4,188
260
32
954
493
34
2,724
279
167
153
100
347
5
106
955
1,340
236
164
111
1
61
1
1,661
1
53
37,316
TREATMENT
1960
NONRES
0 11
0 0
0 0
0 2
0 537
0 1
0 1
0 16
0 0
0 22
0 5
0 41
0 3
0 1
0 0
0 37
0 1
0 0
0 3
0 27
0 91
0 41
0 2
0 2
0 0
0 739
0 6
0 1
0 0
0 19
0 457
0 1
0 954
0 2
0 0
0 17
0 0
0 0
0 207
0 39
0 2
0 2
0 0
0 5
0 2
0 17
0 40
0 340
0 0
0 27
0 0
0 0
0 2
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 3
0 3,749

2000
NDNRES
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
NOT RECEIVING
1960
RES.
4
45
4
36
264
1
54
0
0
7
22
74
11
1
0
19
71
22
49
60
14
466
76
6
12
57
6
9
0
65
126
9
262
49
0
46
12
4
159
15
46
0
24
6
0
10
82
154
122
6
0
27
11
6
916
1
8
3,724
2000
^RES.
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
TREATMENT
1960
NONRES
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
16
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
2
0





0
0
0
0
16
2000
YDNRES
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
PERCENT
SERVED

1960 2000
2.6 0.0
32.2 0.0
17.4 0.0
21.0 0.0
41.3 0.0
9,7 0.0
10,3 0,0
1.1 0.0
0.0 0.0
0.9 0.0
2.7 0.0
51.5 0.0
15.2 0,0
3.0 0.0
1.1 0.0
10.1 0.0
18.0 0.0
2.0 0.0
11,6 0.0
6.1 0,0
2.0 0.0
40.1 0.0
4.5 0.0
4.2 0.0
4.6 0.0
40.7 0.0
10,6 0.0
41,1 0.0
2,9 0,0
16,9 0,0
24,4 0,0
15.9 0.0
21.7 0.0
4,6 0,0
4,9 0.0
6,6 0.0
17.0 0.0
1.1 0.0
21.2 0.0
10.0 0.0
5.7 0.0
22.2 0.0
2.1 0.0
2.5 0.0
0.4 0.0
21.9 0.0
16.3 0.0
14.1 0.0
12.6 0.0
1.4 0.0
24,7 0.0
4.5 0.0
54.2 0.0
6.1 0,0
49,5 0.0
1.6 0.0
55.2 0.0
16.6 0.0
TREATMENT
PLANTS

1960 2000
22 0
6 0
14 0
174 0
61 0
17 0
6 0
4 0
0 0
6 0
42 0
10 0
66 0
127 0
15 0
159 0
206 0
14 0
66 0
14 0
21 0
21 0
42 0
124 0
66 0
256 0
29 0
72 0
5 0
t» 6
69 0
11 0
117 0
12 0
41 0
66 0
221 0
6 0
55 0
6 0
72 0
136 0
29 0
67 0
2 0
22 0
122 0
60 0
46 0
110 0
IS 0
2 0
2 0
2 0
27 0
1 0
2 0
1,141 0

-------
Table  17  	
Plant Loadings,  Removal
Efficiencies and Discharge
Rates from  Facilities Existing
in  1980—Facilities  Designed
for Less Than Secondary
Treatment
(Metric Tons per Day)
Table 17 summarizes the performance of
all treatment facilities designed to provide
less than secondary treatment.
Information is provided for all States and
U.S. Territories, with a national total at
the bottom of the table.
  This table is designed to estimate the
quantities of various pollutants accepted
by a treatment plant and the quantities of
these same pollutants in the effluent.
Quantities are given in metric tons per
day for all parameters. EtOD and Solids
are summarized in this table. No informa-
tion is given for nutrient removal  because
none is removed by this degree of
treatment.
  These data are derived from the daily
average flow, daily average influent
concentrations, and the daily average
effluent concentrations. The averages are
based on the actual performance  of each
individual treatment plant for the most
recent 12 month period from which
information could be obtained. The values
calculated for each  plant are summed into
State and national totals. The main  source
of information for flow and concentration
values was the self-monitoring reports
submitted by every facility with a  NPDES
permit.
  Included in this summary are plants
designed to provide primary or advanced
primary treatment. Excluded are facilities
designed to consistently provide secondary
or better degrees of treatment, as well as
all those with efficiencies less than
primary.
  All flows are reported in thousands of
cubic meters per day.
  A similar table for the projected year
2000 plant loadings is not relevant  since
this treatment and disposal method does
not meet the requirements of the Clean
Water Act and is planned to be eliminated
by that date.
                                                                              REMOVAL EFFICIENCIES
                                                                           BODS                   SOLTOS

STATE
ALABAMA
ALASKA
ARIZONA
ARKANSAS
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO
CONNECTICUT
DELAWARE
DIST. OF COLUM,
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
HAWAII
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
IOWA
KANSAS
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
MAINE
MARYLAND
MASSACHUSETTS
MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA
MISSISSIPPI
MISSOURI
MONTANA
NEBRASKA
NEVADA
NEW HAMPSHIRE
NEW JERSEY
NEW MEXICO
NEW YORK
NORTH CAROLINA
NORTH DAKOTA
OHIO
OKLAHOMA
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
RHODE ISLAND
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH DAKOTA
TENNESSEE
TEXAS
UTAH
VERMONT
VIRGINIA
WASHINGTON
WEST VIRGINIA
WISCONSIN
WYOMING
AMERICAN SAMOA
GUAM
N, MARIANAS
PUERTO RICO
PAC. TR. TERR.
VIRGIN ISLANDS
U.S. TOTALS

FLOW
67
93
123
229
4,126
106
233
7
0
42
75
314
134
185
32
511
441
47
202
69
148
2,202
275
88
87
1,334
49
346
12
136
1,227
80
3,441
189
9
524
215
18
2,026
267
109
59
63
128
2
96
475
970
118
66
65
1
21
2
475
0
11
22,448

NFLUENT
10
14
30
59
1,205
28
35
1
0
9
14
67
31
4?
5
193
117
I?
39
29
44
348
71
30
17
272

114
2
30
253
17
463
53
2
93
45
3
31?
20
2?
16

34
0
18
68
177
33
20
13
0
5
0
124
0
2
4,700

EFFLUENT
5
7
8
10
634
5
19
0
0
2
3
61
7
17
2
53
30
7
13
17
9
239
25
6
3
165
3
67
1
16
176
8
227
6
0
37
8
0
147
12
8
3
5
6
0
11
38
102
14
6
4
0
5
0
52
0
1
2,316
.-41
RF.M,
52,1
46.7
72.4
82.5
47.4
63.2
46.9
70.6
0.0
72.8
80,7
9.0
78,3
59,4
56.7
72.3
74.1
45.0
67.1
42.3
80,0
31.4
64,4
80,7
79,6
39.1
66,3
40,7
74,9
39,6
30,3
52.5
50,9
64,6
89,1
59,9
82,0
64.1
52.9
40,7
61,2
79.5
61.0
82.7
61.9
39,8
56,3
42.1
56,7
66,9
66,6
3.1
0.0
66,7
57.7
60.0
13.6
50.7
NFLUENT
9
19
30
54
1,426
23
37
2
0
6
15
56
27
47
5
163
122
14
46
29
54
366
56
24
18
342
7
117
2
32
198
15
440
44
2
101
47
3
428
33
23
15
14
30
0
15
82
197
30
17
14
0
5
0
105
A
3
5,034

FFFLUENT
u
7
5
26
522
3
10
0
0
2
3
49
6
31
2
41
30
7
13
12
11
168
21
5
7
121
2
60
1
11
102
6
183
10
0
32
11
1
167
13
8
a
a
5
0
6
26
65
10
5
4
0
5
0
31
0
2
1,901
%
REM.
56.5
62.?
83,3
52,1
63.3
86,9
71,8
75,4
0.0
71,7
77.7
15.3
76,3
33.2
67,0
77,7
75,5
53.9
71.8
60.0
79.3
49,0
63.2
79,0
59,2
64,7
66,3
48.7
71.7
64.0
46,3
57,8
58,5
76,0
76.5
66,0
77,5
75,3
61.0
59.8
65,9
72.8
68.6
83,4
77.4
58,6
68.0
66,6
67.1
71.9
66,5
*«7
0,0
41,6
70.2
60,0
13.0
62.2
                                           NOTFSI    1.  FLO* IN CUBIC  MFTERS X 100* PER DAY.
                                                     2.  SHORT TONS * METRIC TONS X 0,9072,
                                                     3,  SUM OF ENTRIES MAY NOY EQUAL TOTALS DUE. TO ROUND-OFFS.

-------
Table 18	
Populations Served by
Secondary Treatment—Present
and Projected,  Resident and
Nonresident
(Population in Thousands)
Table 18 summarizes the 1980 popula-
tions served and the 2000 populations to
be served by facilities designed to provide
secondary treatment. In general, this type
of facility includes some type of prelimi-
nary treatment process followed by a
biological process—trickling filter,
activated sludge, rotating biological
contactors, etc.—with no additional
processes except disinfection.
  The 1980 and 2000 total State
population values reported are from
estimates obtained from the BEA. The
Percent Served is a function of the
residents receiving treatment  in relation
to the total State population estimated by
BEA.
  The total population within the service
area of an authority is the sum of persons
Receiving Treatment and Not Receiving
Treatment. Those Not Receiving
Treatment reside in the service area but
do not contribute to the treatment facility
because they are not on a sewer system.
  Resident populations are permanent
residents in the service area of a
sewerage authority. Nonresident popula-
tions include commuters living in one
area and working in another, as well as
temporary residents at resort areas and
similar locations.
  Also summarized  for each State and
the nation is the number of secondary
facilities in  operation in 1980 and the
number expected to be operational in 2000.


STATE
ALABAMA
ALASKA
ARIZONA
ARKANSAS
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO
CONNECTICUT
DELAWARE
DIST. OF COLUM.
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
HAWAII
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
IOMA
KANSAS
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
MAINE
MARYLAND
MASSACHUSETTS
MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA
MISSISSIPPI
MISSOURI
MONTANA
NEBRASKA
NEVADA
NEM HAMPSHIRE
NEW JERSEY
NEW MEXICO
NEW YORK
NORTH CAROLINA
NORTH DAKOTA
OHIO
OKLAHOMA
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
RHODE ISLAND
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH DAKOTA
TENNESSEE
TEXAS
UTAH
VERMONT
VIRGINIA
WASHINGTON
WEST VIRGINIA
WISCONSIN
WYOMING
AMERICAN SAMOA
GUAM
N, MARIANAS
PUERTO RICO
PAC. TR. TERR.
VIRGIN ISLANDS
U.S. TOTAL
POPULATION
I960
TOTAL
3,769
406
2,450
2,180
22,696
2,772
3,115
582
656
8,860
5,118
915
90S
11,230
5,400
2,903
2,369
3,527
4,026
1,097
4,149
5,769
9,208
4,060
2,406
4,868
786
1,574
702
887
7,332
1,241
17,649
5,606
657
10,731
2,892
2,527
11,731
929
2,932
689
4,380
13,385
1,367
493
5,197
3,926
1,878
4,720
450
31
114
17
3,358
111
96
223,824
2000
TOTAL
4,140
667
4,149
2,970
26,786
4,371
3,741
841
661
15,049
7,053
1,366
1,183
12,358
6,059
3,101
2,517
4,224
4,659
1,222
5,583
6,614
10,314
4,505
2,740
5,225
938
1,734
1,312
1,306
8,747
1,781
18,922
7,419
690
12,031
3,702
3,209
12,365
1,033
3,700
730
5,573
18,069
1,688
607
6,755
4,859
2,003
5,S53
484
40
275
31
4,700
174
116
272,644
RECEIVING TREATMENT
1980 2000
RES. RESt
1,462 1,885
62 623
1,172 3,187
510 1,095
3,758 11,564
926 1,732
1,438 2,159
15 10
0 0
2,211 4,470
2,174 1,609
66 1,267
230 494
1,537 626
1,193 773
1,133 1,508
846 2,244
1,275 1,452
2,142 3,939
378 876
474 207
1,024 4,471
427 602
2,486 795
1,244 731
1,320 4,835
379 609
623 1,746
29 59
192 762
3,115 5,372
639 1,260
6,489 12,364
1,175 1,302
395 568
2,762 1,437
824 385
397 209
3,169 3,804
307 716
873 2,019
279 320
1,411 1,447
6,156 6,057
914 0
100 144
780 2,086
569 3,210
288 1,393
942 867
210 429
0 36
7 203
0 2
94 3,137
20 75
13 106
62,680 107,508
1960
NONRE8
64
2
46
5
1«7
72
12
25
0
433
102
45
9
6
11
31
11
40
65
55
4
9
4
20
12
126
24
13
4
34
323
3
1,297
166
0
4
0
16
118
6
140
7
29
106
11
20
54
43
10
26
15
0
0
0
0
0
0
3,672
2000
NONRES
160
16
50
2
552
123
38
43
0
591
70
236
55
4
26
43
19
50
96
128
323
155
22
17
7
1,412
33
21
5
151
1,284
9
3,151
247
0
1
0
17
699
67
391
3
13
269
0
29
133
622
13
55
26
1
3
0
0
2
3
11.515
NOT RECEIVING
i960
RES.
213
16
161
24
199
6
684
5
0
651
3«7
32
22
17
119
41
42
239
65
146
146
597
214
124
297
65
13
27
0
106
594
56
1,446
622
0
227
23
57
457
178
314
1
450
396
7
33
109
43
56
63
0
0
1
0
175
36
10
10,292
2000
RES.
36
14
14
0
5
0
397
0
0
197
68
0
5
0
0
0
0
93
0
176
12
515
35
3
41
0
0
0
0
152
38
0
459
327
0
1
0
0
63
60
62
0
37
0
0
50
19
27
3
13
0
2
18
0
745
26
7
3,780
TREATMENT
I960
NONRE8
1
0
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
1
1
0
33
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
4
65
0
46
4
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
202
2000
NONRfS
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
52
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
12
60
0
0
14
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
146
PERCENT
SERVED

1960 2000
36.6 45.5
15.5 93.4
47,8 76.8
23.4 36.8
16,5 43.1
33.4 39.6
46.1 57.7
2.6 1.2
0,0 0.0
24.9 29.7
42.4 25.6
7.2 92.7
25.4 41.6
13.6 5.0
22.1 12.7
39,0 46.6
35.7 69.1
96.1 34.3
53.2 64.5
34.4 71.7
M.« 3.7
17.7 67.6
4.6 5.8
61.2 17.6
51.7 26.6
27.1 92.5
48.3 64.9
39.6 100.7
4.1 4.5
21.7 56.3
42.4 61.4
51.4 70.7
36.7 65.3
20.9 17.5
60.2 82.4
25.7 11.9
28,5 10.4
15.7 6.5
27,0 30.7
33.0 69.5
29,8 54.5
40.5 43.9
32.2 25.9
45.9 44.5
66.6 0.0
20.3 23.7
15.0 30.6
14.5 66.0
15.3 69,5
19,9 15.6
46,7 88,6
0.0 90.4
6.5 73.8
0.0 7.4
2.8 66.7
16.1 43.1
13.5 91.9
28,0 39.4
TREATMENT
PLANTS

1960 2000
202 211
37 122
37 64
61 146
163 246
216 234
68 62
12 5
0 0
103 62
300 255
14 31
43 129
303 437
178 128
299 732
195 360
162 151
209 398
72 158
67 74
71 96
146 235
341 428
234 196
261 650
96 125
261 266
11 19
37 88
129 78
35 66
196 518
404 278
216 288
261 141
52 36
91 90
324 737
11 19
150 159
91 241
158 96
821 1,567
48 0
45 62
70 196
124 302
60 428
254 293
59 103
0 5
2 3
0 1
5 26
4 18
1 4
7,852 11,903

-------
Table 19
Plant Loadings, Removal
Efficiencies and Discharge
Rates from Facilities Existing in
1 980— Facilities Designed to
Provide Secondary Treatment
(Metric Tons per Day)


Table 19 summarizes the performance of
all treatment facilities designed to provide
secondary treatment. Information is
provided for all States and U.S. Territories,
with a national total at the bottom of the
table.
This table is designed to estimate the
quantities of various pollutants accepted
by a treatment plant and the quantities of
these same pollutants in the effluent.
Quantities are given in metric tons per
day for all parameters. BOD and Solids
are summarized in this table. Nutrient
removal capabilities are not summarized
in this table because, by definition,
secondary treatment plants do not have
these capabilities.
These data are derived from the daily
average flow, daily average influent, and
the daily average effluent concentrations.
The averages are based on the actual
performances of each individual treatment
plant during the most recent 12 month
period from which information could be
obtained. The values calculated for each
plant are summed into State and national
totals. The main source of information for
flow and concentration values was the
self-monitoring reports submitted by every
facility with an NPDES permit.
Included in this summary are plants
designed to provide secondary treatment.
Excluded are facilities designed to
consistently provide less than or better
than secondary treatment.
Table 19 is an extension of Table 18. A
summary of the projected year 2000
performance of secondary facilities is
given in Table 20.
All flows are reported in thousands of
cubic meters per day.







REMOVAL EFFICIENCIES
BODS SOU IDS

STATE
ALABAMA
ALASKA
ARIZONA
ARKANSAS
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO
CONNECTICUT
DELAWARE
DIST, OF COLUM,
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
HAWAII
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
, IOWA
KANSAS
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
MAINE
™w A ™fc
MARYLAND
MASSACHUSETTS
MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA
MISSISSIPPI
MISSOURI
MONTANA
NEBRASKA
NEVADA
NEW HAMPSHIRE
NEW JERSEY
NEW MEXICO
NEW YORK
NORTH CAROLINA
NORTH DAKOTA
OHIO
OKLAHOMA
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
RHODE ISLAND
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH DAKOTA
TENNESSEE
TEXAS
UTAH
VERMONT
VIRGINIA
WASHINGTON
WEST VIRGINIA
WISCONSIN
WYOMING
AMERICAN SAMOA
GUAM
N, MARIANAS
PUERTO RICO
PAC. TR. TERR,
VIRGIN ISLANDS
U.S. TOTALS
ACTUAL
FLOW
883
37
570
302
1,674
4)3
1,058
11
,0
1,109
1,473
38
137
1,077
881
606
374
768
1,017
314
279
746
289
1,320
808
778
190
291
15
143
2,276
245
4,746
811
137
1,662
339
381
1,665
189
675
141
1,135
3,042
628
57
346
372
159
617
104
0
2
0
41
0
3
37,404

INFLUENT
170
6
107
85
49?
97
151
4
0
201
282
10
3?
164
165
188
7«
195
196
66
65
134
63
339
15?
193
36
81
3
15
551
50
619
169
3?
341
75
94
290
4«
197
37
415
617
91
10
85
91
33
13*
21
0
0
0
1?
0
1
7,810

EFFLUENT
24
1
16
11
58
10
2«
0
0
26
41
3
4
21
17
25
10
56
33
8
26
28
11
44
21
22
5
10
1
4
327
11
205
24
2
58
10
14
39
6
32
5
46
56
13
3
9
10
10
20
4
0
0
0
2
0
0
1,469
%
REM,
85.6
77,5
84,8
66,5
88,1
90,0
63,9
66,1
o.o
85.9
65,4
66,7
86.6
67,5
69.4
66.5
66.9
71,3
63,2
67,2
60.0
79.1
83,1
87.1
66,5
66,6
84,9
68,1
81,1
66.2
40,7
77.2
66.9
66.0
94.1
82.6
86.7
85,6
66,4
67.3
63.9
66.7
86,3
90.9
66.2
70,6
89.1
68.9
71.0
65.4
60.3
0.0
92.5
0,0
85,9
67,2
64,9
81.1

INFLUENT
195
7
121
109
545
90
150
3
0
220
261
10
29
203
174
161
85
249
204
63
59
141
62
406
176
196
30
83
3
26
609
53
661
149
30
375
64
94
320
35
146
33
402
617
93
9
76
86
34
125
22
0
0
0
12
0
1
6,129

EFFLUENT
33
2
24
17
63
10
25
1
0
29
76
3
3
24
22
28
12
51
32
8
23
29
1«
45
29
25
6
12
1
3
180
8
203
27
3
63
12
18
41
7
33
4
68
77
!«
3
11
13
7
16
5
0
0
0
2
0
0
1,463
X
REM,
82.9
76.8
60.2
64.7
86,5
88.8
83.1
79.8
0.0
66,9
70.8
65.6
68,7
87,9
C7.3
82,5
66,3
79,4
84,5
86,6
60,3
79,4
76.7
66,9
83.7
87,3
61.6
69.6
77.0
67,6
70.5
63.8
69.2
62.1
88.6
83.1
85.7
81,0
67.1
eo,o
77.5
87,5
76,1
87.4
64.4
66.0
•6,2
84,9
61.0
87,2
76.2
0.0
96.0
0.0
87,2
62.0
64,9
61.7
NOTESt   1. FLOW IN CUBIC METERS X 100A PER DAY.
         2. SHORT TONS • METRTC TONS X 0.9072.
         3. SUM OF ENTRIES MAY NOY EQUAL TOTALS DUE TO ROUND-OFFS.

-------
 Table 20
 Plant Loadings, Removal
 Efficiencies, and Discharge
 Rates for Facilities Projected
 for 2000—Facilities Designed
 to Provide Secondary
 Treatment
 (Metric Tons per Day)
Table 20 summarizes the expected
performance, in the year 2000, of all
treatment facilities designed to provide
secondary treatment. Information is
provided for all States and U.S. Territories,
with a national total  at the bottom of the
table.
  This table is designed to estimate the
quantities of various pollutants that will
be received by a treatment plant and the
quantities of these same pollutants that
will be in the effluent in 2000. Quantities
are given in metric tons per day for all
parameters. BOD and Solids are
summarized in this table. Nutrient
removal capabilities are not summarized
in this table because, by definition,
secondary treatment plants do not have
these capabilities.
  These data are derived from the daily
average flow, daily average influent
concentrations, and the daily average
effluent concentrations. The averages are
based on the predicted year 2000
situation. The values calculated for each
plant are summed into State and national
totals.
  Included in this summary are plants
designed to provide secondary treatment.
Excluded are facilities designed to consis-
tently provide less than secondary
treatment.
  Table 20 is an extension of Tables 18
and 19.
  All flows are reported in thousands of
cubic meters per day.

STATE
ALABAMA
ALASKA
ARIZONA
ARKANSAS
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO
CONNECTICUT
DELAWARE
DIST. OF COLUM
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
HAWAII
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
IOWA
KANSAS
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
MAINE
MARYLAND
MASSACHUSETTS
MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA
MISSISSIPPI
MISSOURI
MONTANA
NEBRASKA
NEVADA
NEW HAMPSHIRE
NEW JERSEY
NEW MEXICO
NEW YORK
NORTH CAROLINA
NORTH DAKOTA
OHIO
OKLAHOMA
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
RHODE ISLAND
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH DAKOTA
TENNESSEE
TEXAS
UTAH
VERMONT
VIRGINIA
WASHINGTON
WEST VIRGINIA
WISCONSIN
WYOMING
AMERICAN SAMQA
GUAM
N. MARIANAS
PUERTO RICO
PAC. TR. TERR.
VIRGIN ISLANDS
U.S. TOTALS
ACTUAL
FLOW
1,136
347
1,163
509
6,157
807
1,697
13
0
2,607
1,329
705
311
299
606
879
1,228
959
2,101
622
247
3,647
347
517
395
3,241
381
1,022
29
688
4,006
52b
9,593
968
212
895
186
274
2,334
649
1,263
125
1,193
3,774
0
105
1,297
2,133
721
541
197
24
82
1
1,306
27
43
66,593

INFLUENT
25S
60
261
121
1,765
$9*
325
3
0
551
277
184
76
60
124
251
304
203
476
149
58
779
71
139
60
740
70
365
6
211
1,260
111
1,735
251
54
248
4?
85
471
165
325
31
424
805
0
2?.
261
493
147
123
4?
A
17
0
363
7
10
15,701

EFFLUENT
34
10
35
15
183
24
49
0
0
78
37
21
9
9
18
26
37
29
63
18
7
114
to
13
12
97
11
31
1
21
116
16
284
29
5
26
6
6
70
19
36
4
36
79
0
3
39
64
22
16
6
1
2
0
39
1
1
1,946
%
REM.
86,6
82,9
86,9
87,3
69.6
87,7
84,9
87,8
0,0
85,8
66,7
88,5
87,6
65.3
85.3
89,4
87,8
85.8
66,7
87,7
87,3
65.3
85,5
90.7
85,2
86,6
63,6
91.5
65,3
90.2
90,6
85,8
63,6
86,5
90,2
89,5
86,8
90,3
85.1
86,0
68,3
87,9
91.5
90,1
0.0
85.3
86,4
87.0
85,3
86,7
85.9
90.7
85.1
85.7
89,2
87,3
87,3
87.6

INFLUENT
262
70
261
116
1,744
187
334
3
0
599
242
149
70
71
131
227
335
208
487
146
58
872
71
136
82
773
74
360
6
164
1,262
lit
1,898
231
54
280
43
85
504
143
282
30
393
805
0
21
289
501
148
141
42
4
19
0
328
7
12
15,909

FFFLUENT
35
11
36
16
182
24
48
0
0
78
39
21
10
9
18
34
40
29
67
18
9
114
10
16
13
106
14
34
1
21
118
16
284
29
6
28
6
12
69
19
36
4
36
90
0
3
39
66
22
16
7
1
2
0
39
1
1
2,007
X
REM.
86.6
84,6
86.0
85.6
89,5
87,0
85.4
87,8
0.0
66.9
84,0
85,7
86.3
67.6
86.0
65,1
87,9
86,1
86.2
87.5
85.2
86.8
85,5
68.5
64,4
66,0
81,7
90,5
61,0
69,8
90,7
65,6
65,0
87,2
88,2
90,0
86.4
85.3
86.2
86.3
86.5
87,1
90,7
88.6
0.0
85.2
86,5
86,9
85.4
88.7
64,1
80,3
66,6
85,7
88,0
67,1
88,7
87,3
                                          NOTESI   1, FLOW  IN CUBIC METERS  X  1000 PER DAY,
                                                   2, SHORT TONS » METRIC TONS X 0,9072,

                                                   3. SUM OF  ENTRIES MAY NOY  EOU«L TOTALS DUE TO  ROUND-OFFS.

-------
   Table 21
   Number of Plants Projected for
   Secondary Treatment by Year
   2000—by  Total  Projected
   Design Flow
  Table 21 is a flow summary for all secondary
  treatment plants projected to be in operation
  by the year 2000.  In general, this type of
  treatment plant includes some type of
  preliminary treatment process followed by
  a biological process—trickling filter,
  activated sludge, rotating biological
  contactors, etc.—with no additional
  processes except disinfection. A summary
  is provided for each State and U.S. Terri-
tory. National totals are summarized at
the bottom of the table.
  In the first column the total number of
projected secondary treatment plants in
each State is reported along with the total
wastewater treatment capacity
represented by those plants. The Projected
Design Flow for each plant was used to
calculate the total treatment capacity
value. The total State flows are reported
in thousands of cubic meters per day.
  Subsequent columns provide a
breakdown of the State totals into seven
flow ranges. The ranges are specified in
the column headings and are reported in
thousands of cubic meters per day and, in
parentheses beneath that heading, in
million gallons per day. Reported for each
flow range are the number of plant* in
the range and the percentage of the total
State secondary treatment capacity that is
accounted for by each flow range.
  Included in this summary are all
secondary plants in operation in 1980
which will not be abandoned or upgraded
between  1980 and 2000, primary and
advanced primary plants which will be
upgraded to secondary before 2000, and
new secondary plants which will be
constructed prior to 2000.
                                                         PLANTS AND PERCENT OF  FLON BY PLHM RANGE

TOTAL
TOTAL DESIGN
STATE PLANTS FLO*
ALABAMA 211 1,136
ALASKA 122 347
ARIZONA 64 1,163
ARKANSAS 146 509
CALIFORNIA 246 6,157
COLORADO 234 807
CONNECTICUT 62 1,697
DELAWARE 5 13
DIST. OF COLUM. 0 0
FLORIDA 62 2,607
GEORGIA 2bS 1,229
HAWAII 31 70S
IDAHO 129 311
ILLINOIS 437 299
INDIANA 128 606
IOWA 732 879
KANSAS 360 1,228
KENTUCKY 1S1 959
LOUISIANA 398 2,101
MAINE 156 622
MARYLAND 74 247
MASSACHUSETTS 96 3,847
MICHIGAN 235 347
MINNESOTA 42» 517
MISSISSIPPI 196 395
MISSOURI 650 3,241
MONTANA 125 381
NEBRASKA ?66 1,022
NEVADA 19 29
NEW HAMPSHIRE 88 668
NEW JERSEY 78 4,006
NEW MEXICO 66 525
NEW YORK 518 9,593
NORTH CAROLINA 278 966
NORTH DAKOTA 288 212
OHIO 141 895
OKLAHOMA 36 186
OREGON 90 274
ȣNNSYLVANIA 737 2,334
3HODE ISLAND 19 649
SOUTH CAROLINA 159 1,263
SOUTH DAKOTA 241 125
TENNESSEE 96 1,193
/EXAS 1,587 3,774
UTAH 0 0
VERMONT 62 105
VIRGINIA 196 1,297
WASHINGTON 302 ?,133
WEST VIRGINIA 428 721
WISCONSIN 29} 541
WYOMING 103 197
AMERICAN SAMOA 5 24
GUAM 3 82
N, MARIANAS 1 1
PUERTO RICO 26 1,306
PAC. TR, TERR. 18 27
VIRGIN ISLANDS 4 43
U.S. TOTALS 11,903 66,593
0-.4
(0-.10)
X
PLANTS FLOW
50 1.0
91 2.4
9 0.1
71 2.4
59 0.1
85 2.2
1 0.0
4 7,4
0 0.0
7 0,0
74 1.4
2 0,0
59 4.0
238 18,2
54 1.7
521 10.0
168 2.6
64 1.4
146 1.3
47 1.7
41 2.6
9 0.0
94 6.5
276 9,2
91 4.1
350 1.8
56 2.6
139 2.5
8 7,6
17 0.5
1 0.0
31 0.9
174 0.3
135 1.7
230 13.3
47 1.1
13 1.3
44 3.3
329 2.8
3 0.0
22 0,3
181 21.8
22 0,4
915 3.7
0 0.0
27 6.0
70 1,1
91 1.0
165 4,9
161 5.2
60 3.5
2 1.9
0 0.0
0 0,0
o o.o
« 3.5
0 0,0
5,558 1,5
.401-1.9
(.11-. 50)
X
PLANTS FLOW
93 7.6
11 2,7
27 2,1
44 7,5
68 1.0
85 9,8
6 0.4
0 0.0
0 0.0
20 0.6
112 8.9
5 0.9
44 13.6
182 48.8
48 7.2
172 16,1
139 10.2
58 5.2
138 6.1
56 8.5
23 7,1
20 0.6
117 27,8
112 19.5
65 14.1
170 5.0
44 11,0
84 6,8
8 28.7
36 5.3
11 0,2
14 2.7
188 1.7
76 7,5
44 14,1
57 6,4
16 7,3
30 10.1
?47 9,5
3 0,5
56 4.3
53 33.4
40 3,2
386 9.7
0 0.0
22 19.6
82 6.2
111 4.8
195 26.3
91 16.0
23 11.1
2 3.9
0 0.0
1 99.9
1 0,0
10 24.0
1 2.0
3,747 5,1
1.901-4
(.51-1.05)
X
PLANTS FLOW
29 7.7
6 4,0
9 2.2
13 6.6
26 1.2
32 11.2
5 0.9
0 0.0
0 O.o
4 0,4
32 7.5
6 2,1
11 10,7
12 12.
7 3.
14 4.
26 5.
9 2,
42 5.7
17 7.2
3 3,3
15 1,2
11 9,2
22 11.4
21 13.9
61 5.3
12 6.4
17 4.6
0 0.0
9 3.5
6 0,4
5 2,9
55 1,6
26 7.6
« 5,2
13 4.0
3 4,8
8 8.2
73 8,8
1 0.4
22 4.8
2 3,5
11 2,8
124 9.2
0 0.0
6 15.0
14 3.2
35 4,3
46 17,7
15 6.8
8 10.7
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
5 1,1
3 38,5
0 0.0
956 4,0
4.001-19
(1.06*5.01)
X
PLANTS FLOW
28 23.9
11 25.2
10 7,2
11 16.8
49 7.3
24 23,6
27 15,9
1 92,5
0 0,0
14 6.1
29 22.3
12 17.4
13 41.1
4 7.0
12 17.1
15 11.8
34 25.1
11 9,5
55 23,5
32 40,7
5 18.3
34 8.9
11 19.8
12 17.5
15 28.2
51 13.5
6 14.2
19 15.4
3 63.6
20 26.8
29 7.2
11 16.5
51 4,9
29 28.8
7 27,6
10 18,2
2 8.1
7 23.1
76 27.1
7 11,8
42 27.8
5 41.1
16 10.8
123 28.2
0 0.0
7 59,2
17 9.4
48 23.7
17 14.1
22 39,3
11 62,5
0 0.0
1 4.9
0 0.0
6 3.2
1 33.9
2 47.9
1*125 14.9
19.001-40
P. 02-10. 56)
X
PLANTS FCCW
3 7,3
2 19.6
3 6.2
4 22.7
17 7.8
4 14.9
13 25.3
0 0.0
0 0.0
5 5.1
2 3.8
2 9,6
1 ».7
1 13,2
1 5,6
5 15,7
10 24,7
3 8,9
8 9,)
2 9.2
0 0.0
6 4.3
1 10.4
4 21.5
3 20.3
6 5.1
3 21.8
3 9,6
0 0.0
2 9.1
10 7,4
4 21.6
'0 5.8
8 23.7
3 39,5
3 8.4
1 14.2
0 0.0
8 8.8
1 6,0
11 26.4
0 0.0
4 10.0
?4 17.4
0 0.0
0 0,0
3 5,5
9 11.6
3 11.1
2 13.0
1 11.9
I 94.0
1 40.0
0 0,0
4 9.4
0 0,0
1 50,0
216 10,1
40.001-190
(tO. 57-50. 19)
X
PLANTS FLOW
8 52.1
1 45.0
5 42,6
3 43.7
20 22.6
4 37.9
9 43.9
0 0.0
0 0.0
7 16.9
5 38,9
3 25,6
1 20.6
0 0,0
6 64,9
5 41,8
2 15,7
5 30,5
7 22,4
4 32.4
2 68,4
8 21.2
1 26.1
2 20.6
1 19.1
9 29.1
2 41.7
3 35.0
0 0.0
3 25.9
18 37,3
0 0.0
15 11.5
4 30.4
0 0,0
2 10.9
1 64,0
1 55,1
3 10,2
3 34,4
6 36.1
0 0,0
1 4,4
15 31,4
0 0.0
0 0.0
10 74.3
7 23,2
2 25,7
2 23.3
0 0.0
0 0.0
1 55.0
0 0,0
9 65.2
0 0,0
0 0.0
226 27.0
190.001*
(50.2*)
X
PLANTS FLOW
0 0,0
9 0,0
1 39.0
0 0.0
7 59,5
0 0,0
1 13.3
0 0,0
0 0,0
5 70.5
1 16.9
t 43,9
0 0.0
0 9.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
1 16,0
1 41,4
2 31.4
0 0.0
0 0.0
4 63,5
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
3 39,9
0 0,0
1 25,9
0 0,0
1 28,5
3 47,2
1 55,1
15 73,8
0 0,0
0 0,0
1 50,7
0 0.0
0 0.0
1 32,4
1 46,6
0 0.0
0 0.0
2 68.1
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
1 31,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
W V g W
0 0,0
0 0,9
0 0.0
w v § v
t 20,8
0 0.0
w w • v
0 0.0
55 J7.«
NOTESI  1. FLOW RANGE VALUES IN CUBIC METERS PfcR DAY X 1000, (APPROXIMATE MGD IN  PARENTHESES).

       2. TOTAL STATE FLOW IN CUBIC METERS PER DAY X 1000.

-------
Table 22	
Number of New Secondary
Treatment Plants to be Built
Between 1980 and 2000—by
Total Projected  Design Flow
Table 22 is a flow summary for all new
secondary treatment pjants which will be
constructed between  1980 and 2000. In
general,  this  type  of treatment  plant
includes some type of preliminary treatment
process followed by a biological process—
trickling filter,  activated sludge, rotating
biological  contactors,  etc.—with  no
additional processes except disinfection. A
summary is provided for each State and U.S.
Territory. National totals are summarized at
the bottom of the table.
  In the first column the total number of
new secondary treatment plants to be
constructed in each State is reported
along with the total wastewater treatment
capacity represented by the plants. The
Projected Design Flow for each plant was
used to calculate the total treatment
capacity value. The total State flows are
reported in thousands of cubic meters per
day.
   Subsequent columns provide a
 breakdown of the  State totals into seven
 flow ranges. The ranges are specified in
 the column headings and are reported  in
thousands of cubic meters per day and, in
parentheses beneath that, as million
gallons per day. Reported for each flow
range are the number of plants in the
range and the percentage of the State
secondary capacity that is accounted for
by each flow range.
  Included in this summary are entirely
new secondary plants which are planned
to be constructed by the year 2000.
Excluded are secondary plants that were
operational in 1980, primary plants
planned to be upgraded to secondary
treatment, and advanced primary plants
planned to be upgraded to secondary
treatment.

TOTAL
TOTAL DESIGN
STATE PLANTS FLOW
ALABAMA 96 131
ALASKA 79 62
ARIZONA 28 60
ARKANSAS 55 74
CALIFORNIA 76 706
COLORADO 28 95
CONNECTICUT 7 60
DELAWARE 4 13
DI3T. OF COLUM. 0 0
FLORIDA 32 566
6CORCIA 77 60
HANAII 17 171
IDAHO 32 20
ILLINOIS 139 36
INDIANA 49 76
IOWA 211 38
KANSAS 20 110
KENTUCKY 82 102
LOUISIANA 178 465
MAINE 80 72
MARYLAND 41 37
MASSACHUSETTS 27 103
MICHIGAN 120 64
MINNESOTA 97 21
MISSISSIPPI 82 57
MISSOURI *42 483
MONTANA 5 0
NEBRASKA 1 0
NEVADA 9 4
NEW HAMPSHIRE 43 WS
NEW JERSEY 10 44 /
NIW MEXICO 30 10
NfW YORK 324 1,507
NORTH CAROLINA 103 197
NORTH DAKOTA 33 1
OHIO 40 56
OKLAHOMA 5 0
OREGON 22 4
PENNSYLVANIA 526 493
RHODE ISLAND 6 18
SOUTH CAROLINA 47 178
SOUTH DAKOTA 32 4
TENNESSEE 36 66
TEXAS 851 368
UTAH 0 0
VERMONT 22 1 1
VIRGINIA 9 99.9
29 iO.O
5 94.9
20 12 A-
297 12.1
3 3.2
16 1.7
29 45.5
15 3.9
736 26.3
0 0.0
14 28.3
45 2.4
59 6.2
151 9.7
71 2*.!
16 9.7
2 33.3
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
4 10.6
0 0.0
3,173 6.5
.401*1.9
(.11*. SO) '
X
PLANTS FLOW
41 22.7
5 4.5
15 16.9
4 5.0
23 2.5
3 1.6
2 3,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
16 2.1
27 33.6
3 2,4
8 37,4
22 39,3
a 7,2
3 6.3
3 1.6
23 16.6
45 7,9
32 38,0
5 7,7
9 8,1
51 62,1
6 23.6
16 19,2
19 2,9
0 0,0
0 0.0
4 72.7
23 16.4
4 10.8
3 17.5
126 6,6
17 6.6
0 0.0
9 10.3
0 0,0
2 27,7
173 26.9
0 0.0
20 11.0
3 54.4
16 16.7
^1 18.8
0 0.0
8 71,6
36 6.9
40 23, 1
156 44r7
14 43iS
0 0.0
2 66.6
0 0.0
1 99.9
0 0.0
8 47.9
1 100.0
1,146 12.1
1.901M
(.51-1.05)
X
PLANTS FLOW
7 15.
1 2*
2 T,
1 «t
4 1.
2 4.
1 *.
0 0.
0 0,
0 0.
5 21.
4 6.
1 14,
0 0,
0 0,
0 0,
0 0,
1 2.
10 5.
4 16,
1 7.
3 9.
4 14.
3 26,
1 *.
4 1*
0 0,
0 0.
0 0.
3 *.
J 7.
2 47,
17 3,
3 4,
0 0,
0 0.
0 0,
0 0.
30 U.
1 14,
3 4.
0 0.
2 6.
11 7,
0 0.
0 0,
4 2.
5 t.
32 27.
1 ».
0 0,
0 0,
0 0,
0 0.
1 9.























































1 41,3
0- 0,0
176 6.0
4. 001-19
( 1.06.5. 01)
X
PLANTS FLOW
7 54,0
5 41.
4 SO,
o o.
4 3.
1 9.
1 40.
I tl.
0 0.
* It.
2 IT,
7 M,
1 31.
0 0.
0 0,
2 -M.
1 19.
0 0,
10 20,
4 12.
2 71,
7 54,
0 0,
0 0.
2 20.
* 11.
0 0,
0 0,
0 0.
3 11.
5 61,
0 0,
10 5,
6 23.
0 0,
1 «.
0 0,
0 0.
29 IS.
2 St.
5 27,
o o.
2 12,
10 20.
0 0,
o o|
4 9.
5 12,
6 11.
1 17.
1 90.
0 0.
0 0.
0 0.
0 0.
0 0.
0 0,
























































163 16,9
1 9,. 001-40
(5.02-10.9*)
•• «x
PLANTS FLOW

























































o.o
«f.7
24,0
o.o
5.2
19,7
90,2
0,0
o.o
•.9
0,0
0,0
0.0
0.0
0.0
o.
an
is.
4.
0.
0.
36.
f.
0.
36.
9,
o.
o.
0,
e*:
0.
0.
10*
o.
o.
o.
o.
o.
4,
o«
59.
0,
o.
12.
o.
o.
It*
o*
6.
0.
0,
o.
o.
0.
•«•«
0,
o.










































30 tO. 5
40.001-190
(10.97*90,19)
X
PLANTS FLOW
o o.
o o.
0 0,
1 •!.
i 11.
1 49,
0 0.
o o.
0 0,
1 '.
0 0.
1 59,
0 0.
o o.
1 84,
0 0.
1 91.
1 44,
1 14.
0 0.
0 0,
0 0,
0 0,
0 0.
0 0.
3 72.
0 0.
0 0.
0 0,
1 33|
0 0.
0 0.
4 14.
2 -0.
0 0.
1 69.
0 0.
0 0.
0 0.
0 0,
0 0,
0 0,
I 5fJ
1 14.
o o.
0 0,
1 *9,
1 29,
o o.
0 0.
0 0.
0 0.
0 0,
0 0,
0 0,
0 0,
o o.

























































26 22.2
190.001*
(50,2*)
X
PLANTS FLOW

























































0.0
0.0


7




6








4













5
























.0
.0
.9
.0
.0
.0
.0
.8
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
,0
.*
.0
*o
.0
,0
.0
.0
,0
.0
.0
,0
.0
.0
.0
,7
.0
.0
.0
,0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
,0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
9 25.4
NOTESI 1. FLON RANGE VALUES IN CUBIC METERS PER DAY X 1000, (APPROXIMATE MOD IN PARENTHESES).
       2. TOTAL STATE FLOW IN CUBIC METERS PER DAY X 1000.

-------
Table 23
Dollar Needs for Construction
of New Secondary Treatment
Facilities by plant Size
(Thousands of 1980 Dollars)
facilities. The State totals are broken
down into dollar needs by flow range. An
individual plant's dollar need is included
in the total for the flow range of that
plant's projected design capacity.
Table 23 summarizes the projected cost,
reported as January 1980 dollars, for the
construction of new secondary treatment
plants to be built between 1980 and
2000. Table 23 is a direct extension of
Table 22.
  The summary indicates a total dollar
need per State for new secondary
                                                                TOTAL PROJECTED DEtUN FLOW
CUBIC METERS PER DAY X tOOOt
(MILLION GALLONS PER DAY)
« OF
STATE PLANTS
ALABAMA 96
ALASKA 79
ARIZONA 28
ARKANSAS 55
CALIFORNIA 76
COLORADO 26
CONNECTICUT 7
DELAWARE 4
01 ST. OF COLUM. 0
FLORIDA 32
GEORGIA 77
HAWAII 17
IDAHO 32
ILLINOIS 139
INDIANA 49
IONA 211
KANSAS 20
KENTUCKY 82
LOUISIANA 178
MAINE 60
MARYLAND 01
MASSACHUSETTS 27
MICHIGAN 120
MINNESOTA 97
MISSISSIPPI 62
MISSOURI 242
MONTANA 5
NEBRASKA 1
NEVADA 9
NEN HAMPSHIRE 4}
NEN JERSEY 10
NEW MEXICO 30
NEM YORK 324
NORTH CAROLINA 103
NORTH DAKOTA 33
OHIO 40
OKLAHOMA 5
OREGON 22
PENNSYLVANIA 526
RHODE ISLAND 6
SOUTH CAROLINA 47
SOUTH DAKOTA 32
TENNESSEE 36
TEXAS 851
UTAH 0
VERMONT 22
VIRGINIA 94
WASHINGTON 110
WEST VIRGINIA 346
WISCONSIN 87
WYOMING 17
AMERICAN SAMOA 4
GUAM o
Nf MARIANAS 1
PUERTO RICO 2
PAC. TR. TERM, 13
VIRGIN ISLANDS 1
U.S. TOTALS 4,719
STATE
NEEDS
74,608
76*842
47,546
16,264
409,600
69,920
45,591
6,660
0
191,034
36,215
94,884
21,662
52,625
36,720
45,165
57,025
51,592
225,286
59,202
14,069
77,126
79,743
32,710
26,509
261,051
712
55
5,321
54,769
35,712
6,679
1,212,345
69,265
1,900
36,882
593
6,737
430,100
11,549
78,662
5,089
46,732
270,017
0
9,162
134,951
99,443
221,1)80
34, (22
4,134
2,942
0
2,753
2,634
15,252
992
4,940,753
0-.40 .401-1.9 1. 901*4.0 4,001-19 19.001-40 40,001-190 190.001*
(0-.10) (.11-. SO) (.51-1.05) (1.06-5.01) (I.6t*IO.f6) (10,17-50.19) (51. 2+)

NEEDS
8,993
19,019
1,404
6,065
13,261
2,672
0
870
0
1.140
6,793
1,510
6,110
37,561
12,445
39,771
2,233
11,490
16,463
16,359
5,566
2,636
23,754
21,346
8,597
29,717
712
55
1,508
4,663
0
3,604
43,074
10,363
1,900
9,381
593
S,468
69,034
1,272
3,522
3,322
5,076
119,672
0
4,143
11,548
15,719
36,652
15,060
1,476
1.123
0
0
0
2,267
0
691,050

NEEDS
18,563
7,846
11,304
2,991
21,419
1,461
2,166
0
0
10,505
11,877
6,406
12,040
19.042
6, 360
1,9«9
2,611
12,4*9
21.237
33,204
1,517
7,645
49,0«9
4,844
6,920
10,923
0
0
3,813
25,722
5,403
1,523
101,916
13,2*4
0
6,094
0
1,269
144,691
0
11,671
1,767
14,046
60,611
0
5,019
29,771
40,084
109,941
11,202
0
1.619
0
2,7«
0
6,903
99«
696,254

NEED8
11,112
0
4,411
1,195
10,211
1,147
3,462
0
0
0
7,776
U.429
2,286
0
0
0
0
•44
16,666
5,924
1,676
6,131
6,960
6,516
716
4,226
0
0
0
7,116
1,110
3,552
33,017
5,110
0
0
0
0
76,719
0
6,251
0
1,529
18,268
0
0
5,175
12,117
55,606
2,012
0
0
0
0
2,634
4,062
0
151,712

NEEDS
36,120
33,526
21,621
0
13,639
3,296
21,692
6,010
0
41,029
7,767
53,196
1,226
0
0
3,405
8,610
0
44,692
3,715
3,218
47,733
0
0
3,095
22,943
0
0
0
13,761
26,999
0
57,460
19,106
0
3,027
0
0
112,673
10,277
14,606
0
6,717
15,911
0
0
11,979
20,058
20,779
3,626
2,656
0
0
0
0
0
0
740,864

NEEDS
0
16,451
6,806
0
5,628
13,096
16,251
0
0
39,703
0
0
0
0
0
0
13,275
6,634
9,232
0
0
10,579
0
0
7,161
11,146
0
0
0
0
0
0
64,041
0
0
0
0
0
6,963
0
40,412
0
0
16,241
0
0
21,590
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
311,431

NEEDS
0
0
0
8,453
134,994
46,948
0
0
0
47,335
0
15,543
0
0
17,915
0
10,076
20,165
21,519
0
0
0
0
0
0
161,694
0
0
0
3,307
0
0
122,011
41,402
0
16,360
0
0
0
0
0
0
17,324
17,290
0
0
12,686
11,245
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
605,769

NEED8
0
0
0
0
210,246
0
0
0
0
51,322
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
91,257
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
790,766
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1,141,613

-------
Table 24
Number of Facilities and
Reasons for Treatment More
Stringent than Secondary
(Facilities in the Year 2000)
Table 24 is a summary of the numbers of
treatment facilities required to have
treatment levels more stringent than
secondary treatment. This summary
includes all those plants existent in 1980
treating wastes to these levels plus those
required to be constructed or upgraded to
this level between 1980 and 2000.
  The first column lists, by State, the total
number of treatment plants that will be
operational in 2000. The second column
lists the number of plants that will have to
provide treatment more stringent than
secondary. The remaining columns
describe the reasons these plants must
provide treatment more stringent than
secondary. The headings for these
remaining columns are self-explanatory.
  It is to be noted that more than  one
reason is possible for any single treatment
plant being  required to provide treatment
more stringent than secondary. Therefore,
the number of reasons does not equal the
number of more stringent plants for all
States.



STATE
ALABAMA
ALASKA
ARIZONA
ARKANSAS
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO
CONNECTICUT
DELAWARE
DIST. OF COLUM.
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
HAWAII
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
IONA
KANSAS
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
MAINE
MARYLAND
MASSACHUSETTS
MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA
MISSISSIPPI
MISSOURI
MONTANA
NEBRASKA
NEVADA
NEW HAMPSHIRE
NEW JERSEY
NEW MEXICO
NEW YORK
NORTH CAROLINA
NORTH DAKOTA
OHIO
OKLAHOMA
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
RHODE ISLAND
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH DAKOTA
TENNESSEE
TEXAS
UTAH
VERMONT
VIRGINIA
WASHINGTON
WEST VIRGINIA
WISCONSIN
WYOMING
AMERICAN SAMOA
GUAM
N. MARIANAS
PUERTO RICO
PAC. TH. TERR.
VIRGIN ISLANDS
U.S. TOTALS
TOTAL
NUMBER OF
TREATMENT
FACILITIES
341
125
152
623
946
297
69
23
1
326
436
40
199
846
586
846
607
399
447
204
347
137
513
585
520
696
176
464
73
143
162
172
828
656
312
795
664
236
1,262
26
282
287
291
2,176
198
103
306
340
534
631
119
5
6
3
31
23
4
21,639
NUMBER
REQUIRING
MORE STRINGENT
TREATMENT
130
3
4
470
79
37
26
18
1
239
180
2
12
404
458
111
6
248
39
15
272
39
203
144
324
30
4
0
8
15
84
11
305
375
0
653
341
129
525
7
122
18
195
368
176
36
109
10
106
264
4
0
0
2
5
3
0
7,369
REASONS

EPA-APPROVED
NATER QUALITY
PLAN
6
1
1
5
2
22
6
15
0
23
31
1
3
2
71
7
0
18
1
0
249
18
27
36
4
0
0
0
2
1
1
0
8
36
0
169
74
114
127
2
21
2
20
3
2
2
71
2
66
13
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1,286

STATE
COURT
ORDER
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
6
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
0
11
1
2
0
0
0
0
0
13
0
5
29
0
12
0
0
55
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
138
FOR TREATMENT LEVEL

FEDERAL
COURT
ORDER
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
19
0
5
0
0
1
0
0
10
0
5
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
46

DISCHARGE
PERMIT
CONDITIONS
72
2
3
54
73
11
11
15
1
80
99
1
6
359
294
21
2
100
12
1
103
16
t67
154
85
8
1
0
6
5
6
4
20
120
0
485
179
83
312
2
44
14
126
309
150
14
32
7
33
160
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
3,863
BEING MQRE STRINGENT THAN SECONDARY

STATE OR FEDERAL
ENFORCEMENT
ORDFR
I)
A
0
1
*
A
1
A
A
A
1
A
A
A
7?
1
A
A
A
A
*
?
14
0
1
1
A
A
A
A
31
0
26
0
0
it
A
A
30
A
1
A
1
A
A
A
1
4
?
*
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
20?


VOLUNTARY
COMPLIANCE
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
2
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
17


STATE
CERTIFICATE
64
0
0
419
5
5
7
1
0
141
105
0
3
159
32
86
4
188
31
13
6
11
24
9
251
21
2
0
1
9
14
8
238
276
0
37
91
0
106
3
73
3
79
290
21
19
12
0
15
132
3
0
0
2
2
3
0
3,024


OTHER
0
0
0
9
o
0
0
0
0
22
0
0
1
2
3
1
0
0
0
A
Q
o
0
0
3
o
0
o
o
0
1
0
1
2
o
1
0
0
1
o
3
o
4
2
3
1
1
0
0
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
55

-------
Table 26        	
Population* Served by
Advanced Secondary
Treatment—Present and
Projected, Resident and
Nonresident
(Population in Thousands)
Table 25 summarizes the 1980 popula-
tions served and the 2000 populations to
be served by facilities designed to provide
advanced secondary treatment, the treat-
ment levels attained by advanced
secondary plants are define^ in terms of
the effluent BOD concentration and/or
the removal of nutrients, phosphorus (as
P04), and/or ammonia (NHa). A plant is
considered to be advanced secondary in
design if it is capable of consistently
provuding an effluent with a BOD concen-
tration in the range of 24 to 10 mg/l;
and/or, it has specific processes which
remove phosphorus and/or ammonia in
excess of the amounts normally removed
by secondary treatment.
  The 1980 and 2000 total State popula-
tion values reported are from estimates
obtained from the BEA. The percent
served is a function of the residents
receiving treatment in relation to the total
State population estimated by BEA.
  The total population within the service
area of an authority is the sum of persons
Receiving Treatment and Not Receiving
Treatment. Those Mot deceiving Treat-
ment reside in the service area but do not
contribute to the treatment facility
because they are not on a sewer system.
  Resident populations are permanent
residents in the service area of a
sewerage authority. Nonresident popula-
tions include commuters living in one
area and working in another, as well as
temporary residents at resort areas and
similar locations.
POPULATION RECEIVING

STATE
ALABAMA
ALASKA
ARIZONA
ARKANSAS
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO
CONNECTICUT
DELAWARE
OI8T. OF COLUM,
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
HAWAII
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
IOWA
KANSAS
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
MAINE
MARYLAND
MASSACHUSETTS
MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA
MISSISSIPPI
MISSOURI
MONTANA
NEBRASKA
NEVADA
NEW HAMPSHIRE
NEW JERSEY
NEW MEXICO
NEW YORK
NORTH CAROLINA
NORTH DAKOTA
OHIO
OKLAHOMA
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
RHODE ISLAND
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH DAKOTA
TENNESSEE
TEXAS
UTAH
VERMONT
VIRGINIA
WASHINGTON
WEST VIRGINIA
WISCONSIN
WYOMING
AMERICAN SAMOA
GUAM
N. MARIANAS
PUERTO RICO
PAC. TR. TERR.
VIRGIN ISLANDS
U.S. TOTAL
1980
TOTAL
3,769
406
2,450
2.1AO
22,696
2,,772
3,115
582
656
8,860
5,118
915
905
11,230
5,400
2,903
2,369
3,527
4 , 026
1,097
4 , 1 49
5,769
9,208
4,060
2 ,.406
4 ,868
786
1,574
702
887
7,332
1,241
1 7 ,649
5,606
657
10,731
2.892
2,527
11,731
929
2,932
689
4,380
is, ins
1 .367
49 J
5, 197
3,936
1.878
4 ,720
450
It
114
17
3,358
111
96
223, 8?4
2000
TOTAL
4,140
667
4,149
2,970
26,786
4,371
3,741
841
661
15,049
7,053
1,366
1,183
12,358
6,059
3,101
2,517
4,224
4,659
1,222
5,583
6,614
10,314
4,505
2,740
5,225
938
1,734
1,312
1,306
8,747
1,781
18,922
7,419
690
12,031
3,702
3,209
12,365
1,0)3
3,700
730
5,573
18,069
1,688
607
6,755
4,859
2,003
5,553
484
40
275
31
4,700
174
116
1980
RES,
438
6
9
194
3,533
1,243
83
437
729
1,694
689
28
81
7,729
2,045
80
0
329
110
15
1,758
346
5,445
197
71
108
0
0
186
1
698
10
1,605
594
0
4,046
725
910
2,707
2
246
11
629
3,666
199
16
936
436
148
2,327
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
272,644 47,518
2000
RES,
1,421
26
23
1,129
7,497
2,230
614
804
0
4,825
3,924
11
271
10,931
3,568
1,323
166
1,878
495
11
2,731
758
7,358
2,519
1,664
297
89
0
307
69
1,706
83
4,233
1,675
0
6,773
2,923
2,522
7,518
276
757
301
2,504
5,702
1,601
204
1,529
1,043
464
4,279
163
0
0
29
105
28
0
103,383
TREATMENT
1980
NONRES
7
0
2
15
100
82
16
39
1,898
278
24
2
0
24
231
0
0
19
0
0
32
0
79
0
2
12
0
0
53
0
23
12
119
2
0
20
0
19
196
0
89
3
37
58
1
5
202
SO
5
16
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3,790
NOT
2000
NONRES
40
1
4
38
346
390
9
364
0
701
153
4
1
41
472
103
0
46
6
1
160
42
157
21
8
19
2
0
45
0
160
21
724
142
0
45
10
50
540
4
104
1
130
138
37
38
328
160
11
78
0
0
0
2
0
2
0
5,917
1980
RES,
103
0
0
7
180
i
80
57
0
283
164
0
16
77
135
2
0
69
0
3
172
135
527
5
7
53
0
0
2
0
98
0
398
183
0
276
38
220
571
7
67
0
309
182
0
0
134
110
35
67
0
0
0
0
0
8
0
4,800
RECEIVING
2000
RES.
7
0
1
0
103
0
93
17
0
94
144
0
0
12
23
0
0
160
0
4
57
143
208
26
75
0
0
0
0
17
13
34
229
290
0
7
6
0
152
46
40
0
202
0
0
24
30
70
18
10
0
0
0
0
26
0
0
2,398
TREATMENT PERCENT TREATMENT
SERVED PLANTS
1980
NONRES
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
17
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
5
0
0
0
0
0
5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
34
9000
NnNRES 1980 2000 1980
0 11.6 34.3 21
0 1,6 4.0 3
0 0.3 0.5 3
0 8,9 38.0 44
0 15,5 27.9 63
0 44.8 51.0 14
0 2,6 16.4 19
0 75.1 95.6 5
0 111.2 0.0 1
0 19.1 32.0 101
0 13.4 55.6 44
0 3.1 0.8 6
0 9,0 22.9 3
0 68,8 88.4 282
0 37,8 58,8 148
0 2.7 42.6 9
0 0.0 6.6 2
0 9,3 44.4 49
0 2.7 10. 10
0 1.4 0. 2
0 42.3 48. 51
3 6.0 11. 13
4 59.1 71. 119
0 4.8 55. 18
0 2.9 60. 23
0 2.2 5. $
0 0.0 9. 0
0 0,0 0.0 0
0 26.5 23.4 8
0 0.1 5.3 1
0 9.5 19.5 29
0 I 0.8 4.7 4
0 9.0 22.3 96
0 10.6 22.5 46
0 0.0 0.0 0
0 37.7 56.2 304
0 25.0 78.9 89
0 36,0 78,6 97
0 23.0 60.8 229
0 0.2 26.7 1
0 8.3 20,4 23
0 1.6 41.2 3
0 14.3 44.9 45
0 27.3 31.5 192
0 14.5 94,8 9
3 3.3 33.7 5
0 18.0 22.6 61
0 11.1 21.4 4
0 7.9 23.2 10
0 49.3 77.0 128
0 0.0 33.7 0
0 0.0 0.0 0
0 0.0 0.0 0
0 0.0 93.5 0
0 0.0 2.2 0
0 0.9 16.1 1
0 0.0 0.0 0
12 21.2 37.9 2,443

2000
127
3
4
438
66
35
23
17
0
199
175
2
6
391
438
111
6
245
34
11
260
2/
187
58
321
12
4
0
4
9
65
11
212
230
0
524
340
125^
^•9*
'- 7
116
17
182
341
176
35
81
8
92
261
4
0
0
2
5
3
0
6,543

-------
 Table 26	
 Plant Loadings, Removal
 Efficiencies, and Discharge
 Rate* for Fecilitie* in Operation
 in 1980- Facilities Designed to
 Provide Advanced Secondary
 Treatment
 (Metric Tons per Day)
Table 26 summarizes the performance of
all treatment facilities designed to provide
advanced secondary treatment.
Information is provided for all States and
U.S. Territories, with a national total at
the bottom of the table.
  This table is designed to estimate the
quantities of various pollutants accepted
by a treatment plant and the quantities of
these same pollutants in the effluent.
Quantities are given in metric tons per
day for all parameters. BOD and Solids
are summarized in this table. Information
is also provided on nutrient removal
capabilities.
  Plants with Removal Capabilities are
facilities with a specific requirement to
remove  the listed nutrient. For instance,
some phosphorus is removed in all
treatment plants. However, only plants
specifically designed to remove
phosphorus are reported in this category.
Reported for each nutrient are the total
number of plants with removal capabilities
and the  total average daily flow received
by these plants. Afcc given is the
percentage of the total State flow the
plants represent.
  These data are derived from the daily
average flow, daily average influent
concentrations, and the daily average
effluent  concentrations. The averages are
based on the actual performance of each
individual treatment plant during the most
recent 12 month pericKHrom whicn infor-
mation could be obtained. th% values
calculated for each p*«nt are summed into
State and national totaJe. The main source
of information for flow and concentration
values was the setf-monrtoring reports
submitted by every facility with an NPDES
permit.
  Table 26  is an extension of Table 25. A
summary of the projected year 2000
performance of ait advanced secondary
facilities is given  in Table 27.
  Total Flow is the sum of the actual
average daffy flows treated by all facilities
within the State designed to provide
advanced secondary treatment.
  All flows are reported in thousands of
cubic meters per day.


TOTAL
STATE FLOW
ALABAMA 311
ALASKA 4
ARIZONA 3
ARKANSAS 96
CALIFORNIA 1,775
COLORADO 640
CONNECTICUT 56
DELAWARE 297
DIST, Qf COLUM. 1,128
FLORIDA 854
GEORGIA 367
HAWAII 8
IDAHO 52
ILLINOIS 6,301
INDIANA 1,695
IOWA 44
KANSAS 0
KENTUCKY 173
LOUISIANA 43
MAINE 14
MARYLAND 870
MASSACHUSETTS 247
MICHIGAN 4,385
MINNESOTA \ut>
MISSISSIPPI 57
MISSOURI 77
NEVADA 347
NEW HAMPSHIRE 0
NEW JERSEY 368
NEW MEXICO 7
NEW YORK 1,085
NORTH CAROLINA 469
OHIO 2,872
OKLAHOMA 343
OREGON 614
PENNSYLVANIA 1,627
RHODE ISLAND 1
SOUTH CAROLINA 157
SOUTH DAKOTA 4
TENNESSEE 494
TEXAS 2,029
UTAH IS?
VERMONT 13
VIRGINIA 522
WASHINGTON 244
WEST VIRGINIA 72
WISCONSIN 1,67^
PAC. TR. TE»R, o
U.S. TOTALS 32,759
RfMOVAL EFFICIENCIES
F>005
X
INF. EFF. REM,
32 10 67.7
0 0 85.0
0 0 87.1
21 1 94.6
503 44 91.1
135 11 91,6
9 1 87.6
51 7 84.9
168 32 80.5
141 11 92,2
71 10 84.6
1 0 93.0
13 0 93.8
867 60 92.9
280 35 87.4
18 0 97.3
0 0 93,8
28 2 90.2
9 0 93,6
3 0 91,9
214 36 83.0
32 4 85.6
1,229 123 89,9
35 3 91,3
10 1 90.5
18 0 95.5
24 3 87.5
0 0 89,4
70 13 80.6
1 0 86.6
182 28 84.5
115 12 89.0
499 68 86.3
68 7 89.4
107 8 91.8
325 54 83.3
0 0 68.4
39 5 86.3
0 0 94,|
95 31 67.1
503 56 88.8
18 2 84.8
1 0 95.9
SOLIDS
t
INF, EFF, RFM,
34 8 74.5
0 0 85.7
0 0 82.7
19 1 91.6
497 38 92.2
156 11 92.6
10 t 85.6
56 IS 73.3
181 33 81.3
138 24 82.2
63 10 83,1
1 0 90,3
14 1 91.0
1,135 66 94.1
346 39 88.4
20 0 96.5
0 0 93.2
PLANTS WITH REMOVAL CAPABILITY
PHOSPHORUS
* X TOT,
PLANTS FLOW FLO*
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
o o 0,0
0 0 0,0
5 292 16.4
4 50.9
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
1 1,128 100.0
9 113 13.2
12 112 30.5
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
26 201 3.1
43 847 49,9
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
26 ? 89,4 ! 0 6 0^0
8 0 90,7 0 0 0.0
3 0 90.0
177 25 85.3
48 « 91,8
2,316 223 90,3
25 J 85.4
11 3 68.5
16 0 94,9
28 1 94,1
0 0 89,4
79 1? 84,0
1 0 87,6
162 26 83.6
71 14 79.5
683 10? 84.9
73 8 88.1
116 11 89.8
356 9? 73,9
0 0 76.9
27 4 82.5
1 0 95.0
96 24 74.3
539 104 80.6
20 ? 88,6
1 0 94.8
»7 7 91.8 84 7 90,5
43 3 90.8 48 4 91.1
15 2 83,8 15 2 84.8
396 44 88.7 434 67 84.5
0 0 0,0 ; 0 0 30.7
6,498 752 88,4 8,157 1,011 87.6
1 0 3.1
4 677 77.8
2 5 2,3
104 4,312 98.3
14 137 93.6
t 0 0.2
0 0 0.0
2 322 92.8
0 0 0,0
2 4 i , a
1 5 75.0
17 417 38.4
2 6 1.3
42 505 17.5
4 73 21,3
1 18 2,9
69 620 38.1
0 0 0.0
2 5 3.5
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
2 24 1.2
0 0 0.0
2 1 8.1
9 12 2,4
1 102 41,8
1 4 6, ft
57 1,506 89.9
0 0 0.0
440 11,464 34.9
NH1 NITROGEN
* X TOT.
PLANT* FLOW FLOW
14 278 89.6
0 0 0,0
0 00,0
0 00,0
10 786 44.2
3 11 1.8
0 00,0
0 0 0,0
1 1,128 iOO.O
10 113 13.2
?2 183 49.9
0 0 0,0
1 38 74,1
?9 4,591 72,8
9 748 44,1
7 42 96.2
0 00.0
X9 136 78.5
o o o.o
0 0 0.0
3 78 8.9
2 24 9.9
15 384 8.7
0 0 0.0
14 25 43.9
1 66 86.1
1 68 19.8
0 0 0.0
? 413
r. «* | . j
0 0 0,0
7 27 2.5
>4 256 54.5
72 351 12.2
4 73 21,3
1 19 3.1
*7 341 20,9
0 00,0
19 146 93.0
1 3 72.0
13 459 93.0
*4 65 3.2
0 0 0.0
1 9 75.5
1 5 1,1
1 4 2.0
4 19 26.8
11 116 6.9
0 0 0.0
493 10,613 32.3
TOTAL N
• % TOT.
PLANTS FLOW FLOW
0 00,0
0 0 0,0
0 000
0 0 0.0
0 0 0,0
OA A A
V V . V
0 0 0,0
0 000
o o o!o
0 00,0
0 0 0,0
0 000
0 00,0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 000
0 0 0.0
0 o o.O
OA n n
V V , V
OA An
v v , v
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
OA A A
V v , V
OA A A
V V , v
0 000
o o 0)0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
OA A A
V V , V
0 0 0,0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0,0
0 000

00 A A
V V , V
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0.0
NOTES: i. FLOWS IN CUBIC METERS x 1000 2. METRIC TONS x ,9072 • SHORT TONS
                3. SUM UF  ENTRIES MAY  NOT EQUAL  TOTALS DUE  TO ROUND-OFFS

                4. FACILITIES WITH 7ERO DISCHARGE OR RAH* DISCHARGE ARE NOT INCLUDED

-------
Table 27	
Plant Loadings,  Removal
Efficiencies, and Discharge
Rates for Facilities to be in
Operation m 2000—Facilities
Designed to Provide Advanced
Secondary Treatment
(Metric Tons per Day)
Table 27 summarizes the expected
performance, in the year 2000, of all
treatment facilities designed to provide
advanced secondary treatment.
Information is provided for all States and
U.S. Territories, with a  national total at
the bottom of the table.
  This table is designed to estimate the
quantities of various pollutants that will
be received by a treatment plant and the
quantities of these same pollutants that
will be in the effluent. Quantities are
given in metric tons per day for all
parameters. BOD and Solids are
summarized in this table. Information is
also provided on nutrient removal
capabilities.
  Plants with Removal Capabilities are
facilities with a specific requirement to
remove the listed nutrient For instance,
some phosphorus is removed  in all treat-
ment plants.  However, only plants
specifically designed to remove
phosphorus are reported in this category.
Reported for each nutrient are the total
number of plants with removal capabilities
and the total average daily flow received
by these plants. Also given is the
percentage of the total State flow the
plants represent.
  These data are derived from the daily
average flow, daily average influent
concentrations, and the daily average
effluent concentrations. The averages are
based on the predicted year 2000 situa-
tion. The values calculated for each plant
are summed into State and national totals.
  Table 27 is an extension of Tables 25
and 26.
  Total Flow is the sum of the average
daily flows to be treated in the year 2000
by all facilities within the State that will
be designed to provide advanced
secondary treatment.
  All flows are reported in thousands of
cubic meters per day.


TOTAL
STATE FLOW
ALABAMA 788
ALASKA is
ARIZONA tO
ARKANSAS 577
CALIFORNIA 3,605
COLORADO 1,0*4
CONNICTICUT 341
DELAWARE 580
FLORIDA 2,474
GEORGIA 2,352
HAWAII 12
IDAHO 160
ILLINOIS 10,508
INDIANA 3,032
IOWA 814
KANSAS 101
KENTUCKY 1,144
LOUISIANA 206
MAINE 9
MARYLAND 1,252
MASSACHUSETTS 609
MICHIGAN 7,326
MINNESOTA i,67?
MISSISSIPPI 921
MISSOURI i4t
MONTANA 49
NEVADA 4U
NEW HAMPSHIRE 50
NEW JERSEY 953
NEW MEXICO 38
NEW YORK 3,719
NORTH CAROLINA 1,389
OHIO 4,622
OKLAHOMA 1,378
OREGON 1,531
PENNSYLVANIA 5,430
RHODE ISLAND 182
SOUTH CAROLINA 512
SOUTH DAKOTA 169
TENNESSEE 1,994
TEXAS 3.29S
UTAH 1,047
VERMONT 114
VIRGINIA 929
WASHINGTON 863
WEST VIRGINIA 271
WISCONSIN 3,132
WYOMING 86
N. MARIANAS 19
PUERTO RICH 38
PAC. TR. TtRR. 8
U.S. TOTALS 71,993
REMOVAL EFFICIENCIES
BOD5
X
INF, EFF, R£M,
157 12 92,2
? 0 88,8
2 0 91,6
138 6 95.4
1,106 57 9«,7
249 23 90,4
71 5 91.9
136 7 94.3
507 48 90,4
484 35 92.7
2 0 91.8
33 3 90.4
1,693 118 92.9
612 40 93.4
272 13 94.8
23 1 95,0
240 18 92.4
43 2 93.7
3 0 94.1
301 23 92.1
125 9 92.1
1,376 178 87,0
462 27 94,0
191 16 91.3
41 1 96.0
8 1 85. 2
82 9 88.7
10 0 91.6
215 16 92,3
8 1 88,1
792 78 90,1
372 20 94.4
961 75 92.1
309 21 93,1
365 23 93.5
1,152 102 91.1
50 2 95.1
154 9 94.0
52 3 94,1
557 36 93.4
843 33 96.0
206 11 94.2
24 2 91.0
220 15 92.7
195 15 91,8
80 3 95.8
769 77 89.9
18 2 86.3
2 0 85.1
9 0 91.9
1 0 85.5
15,749 1,218 92.2
SOLIDS

INF, EFF.
159 2?
2 0
2 0
127 8
1,233 59
264 23
66 4
134 11
532 54
477 59
3 0
35 4
2,355 143
699 40
227 20
18 1
276 29
42 5
3 0
281 22
132 9
2,034 188
510 2«
186 26
27 1
8 t
82 9
11 0
213 18
7 1
835 85
314 39
1,044 85
341 28
350 23
1,317 129
47 ?
105 13
50 1
447 46
847 49
224 10
23 ?
205 15
236 21
77 3
772 78
22 2
2 0
8 0
1 0
17,434 1,44?
*
RFM,
as. 8
87.2
90. «
93.0
95.1
90.9
93.1
91.6
89.8
87.5
92.1
87,7
93.9
94.2
90.9
93.7
89.5
87.8
93.7
92.1
92.6
90.7
94.3
85.9
94.2
85.2
88.7
93.1
91,3
87.0
89,7
87.5
91.8
91.6
93.2
90.1
93.9
86.7
93.4
89,5
94.1
95.3
90.5
92.2
90.7
95.4
89,7
88.2
85.1
90.9
85.5
91.7
PLANTS
PHOSPHORUS
« X TOT.
PLANTS FLOW FLOW
0 0 0,0
0 0 0.0
1 0 0.3
0 6 0.0
4 273 7.5
6 50 5.3
10 267 78.4
6 74 12.9
9 300 12.1
28 502 21,3
0 0 0.0
1 4 2.7
46 599 5.7
73 1,337 44.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
2 5 0.4
0 0 0.0
9 9 96.1
18 856 68.4
16 383 62.9
174 7,290 99,5
46 307 18.3
2 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
2 405 98.3
4 34 67.8
10 127 13.3
6 25 67.2
58 2,776 74.6
9 53 3.8
133 3,760 81.3
4 148 10,7
1 56 3.7
209 1,490 27.4
2 6 3.2
16 69 13.5
0 0 0.0
12 3 0.1
4 65 1,9
0 0 0.0
25 79 69.3
9 65 6,9
3 217 25.2
2 8 3.1
84 2,552 81.4
0 0 0.0
0 0 0,0
1 16 HI. 9
0 0 0.0
1,045 24,234 33,6
WITH REMOVAL CAPABILITY
NH1 NITROGEN
« X TOT,
PLANT* FLOW FLOW
115 726 92.1
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
11 430 11.9
>4 948 87.5
9 243 71.3
1 11 1.9
94 487 19,7
143 1,968 83.6
0 0 0.0
4 130 80.9
*3 7,773 73.9
?3 1,888 62.2
104 759 93,1
0 0 0.0
217 736 64.3
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
11 655 52.3
9 94 15.5
10 914 12.4
6 1,328 79.1
285 794 86.2
1 113 80.1
2 41 83.9
1 151 36.7
7 48 96.4
?6 413 43.4
1 0 1.5
44 364 9.8
200 1,171 84.3
290 2,845 61,5
11 633 45.9
1 56 3.7
312 2,412 44.4
4 168 92.0
70 471 92,0
13 158 93.7
170 1,980 99.3
16 751 22.8
0 0 0.0
13 41 36.4
5 43 4.6
2 583 67.5
?4 151 55. 8
107 636 20.3
4 86 100.0
0 0 0.0
3 18 47.2
0 0 0.0
2,976 33.241 46.1
TOTAL N
* X TOT.
PLANTS FLOW FLOW
0 0 0.0
o o o.o
0 0 0,0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.9
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0,0
o o o.o
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0.0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
0 0 0,0
NOTES! 1. FLOWS IN CUBIC METfcRS X 1000 2. METRIC TONS X .9072 • SHORT TONS
3. SUM OF ENTRIES MAY NOT EQUAL TOTALS DUE TO ROUNDOFFS
4, FACILITIES WITH ZERO DISCHARGE OR RAW DISCHARGE ARE NOT INCLUDED

-------
 Table 28
Number of Plants Projected for
Advanced Secondary
Treatment by Year 2000—by
Total Projected Design Flow
Table 28 is a flow summary for all
advanced secondary treatment plants
projected to be in operation by the year
2000. The treatment levels attained by
advanced secondary plants are defined in
terms of the effluent BOD concentration
and/or the removal of nutrients,
phosphorus (as PO-O, and/or ammonia
(NHa). A plant is considered to be
advanced secondary in design if it is
capable of consistently producing an
effluent with a BOD concentration in the
range of 24 to 10 mg/l; and/or, it has
specific processes which remove
phosphorus and/or ammonia in excess of
the amounts normally removed by
secondary treatment. A summary is
provided for each State and U.S. Territory.
National totals are summarized at the
bottom of the table.
  In the first column the total number of
projected advanced secondary treatment
plants in each State is reported along with
the total waste\i/ater treatment capacity
represented by the plants, the Projected
Design Flow for each plant was used to
calculate the total treatment capacity
value. The totalState flows are reported
in thousands of cubic melers per day.
  Subsequent columns provide  a
breakdown of the State totals into seven
flow ranges, The ranges are specified in
the column headings and are reported in
thousands of cubic meters per day arid, in
parentheses beneath that heading as
million gallons pef day. Reported for each
flow f ange are tbp ftuinbsr of ptafctsjfi
the range and the pepcemage of the total
State advanced secondary treatment
capacity that is accounted for by each
flow range.
  Included in this summary are all
advanced secondary  plants in operation in
1980 which will not  be abandoned or
upgraded betwee/i 1980 and 2000;
primary, advanced primary, and secondary
plants which will bp  upgraded to
advanced secondary  levels before 20QO;
and new advanced secondary plants
which will be constructed prior to 2000.
                                                      PLANTS  AND PERCENT OF FLOW BY FLOW RANGE

TOTAL
TOTAL OtSIGN
STATE PLANTS FLOW
ALABAMA 127 788
ALASKA 3 is
ARIZONA 4 10
ARKANSAS Uifl 577
CALIFORNIA 06 3,605
COLORADO 35 l,08tt
CONNECTICUT 25 341
DELAWARE 17 S80
OIST, OF CULUM, 0 0
FLORIDA 199 2,474
GEORGIA 17S 2,352
HAWAII 2 1?
IDAHO 6 160
ILLINOIS 391 10,50B
INDIANA 438 3,032
IOWA 111 814
KANSAS 6 101
KENTUCKY 245 1,144
LOUISIANA 34 206
MAINE 11 9
MARYLAND 260 1,252
MASSACHUSETTS 27 609
MICHIGAN 187 7,326
MINNESOTA 58 1,677
MISSISSIPPI 321 921
MISSOURI 12 141
MONTANA 4 49
NEBRASKA 0 0
NEVADA 4 411
NEW HAMPSHIRE 9 50
NEW JERSEY 65 953
NEW MEXICO 11 38
NEW YORK 212 3,719
NORTH CAROLINA 230 1,389
NORTH DAKOTA 0 0
OHIO 524 4,622
OKLAHOMA 340 1,378
OREGON 125 1,531
PENNSYLVANIA 493 5,430
RHODE ISLAND 7 182
SOUTH CAROLINA 116 512
SOUTH DAKOTA 17 169
TENNESSEE 182 1,994
TEXAS 341 3,295
UTAH 176 1,047
VERMONT 35 114
VIRGINIA 81 929
WASHINGTON 8 863
WEST VIRGINIA 92 271
WISCONSIN 261 3,132
WYOMING 4 86
AMERICAN SAMOA 0 0
GUAM 0 0
N, MARIANAS 2 19
PUERTO RICO 5 38
PAC. TR, TERR. 3 8
VIRGIN ISLANDS 0 0
u.s, TOTALS 6,543 71,993
0-.4
(0-.10)
X
PLANTS FLOW
28 0,8
0 0.0
1 0.3
295 6.4
0 0.0
3 C.O
0 0.0
2 0.0
0 0,0
21 0.2
28 0.2
0 0.0
0 0.0
36 0,0
20? 1.2
14 0,4
0 0,0
105 2.0
7 0.6
7 10,3
154 1.7
0 0.0
6 0.0
1) 0.1
198 3,5
6 0.8
0 0.0
0 0.0
.401-1.9
(.11-. 50)
X
PLANTS FLOW
46 5.5
t 7.2
0 0.0
87 11.3
11 0.3
5 0.5
4 1.4
3 0.7
0 0.0
73 2.9
60 2.2
1 6.2
0 0.0
130 1.3
148 4.4
47 6.2
1 0,5
75 5.7
6 3.1
2 12.2
63 4.9
5 0.9
41 0.6
1.901-4
(.51-1,05)
X
PLANTS FLOW
14 5,3
0 0.0
2 60.4
21 10,8
5 0.3
« 1.1
5 4.1
7 3.3
0 0.0
31 3.6
24 2.8
0 0.0
1 l.«
71 1.8
27 2.6
17 5.9
1 3.7
20 4,2
3 3,6
1 20.3
16 3,7
3 1.3
43 1.6
20 1.1 7 1,0
79 6.7 17 5.3
2 1.3
1 2.2
0 0.0
0 0.0 1 0.3
2 0.9 3 6.6
3 0.1 10 1.4
0 0,0 3 4,4
51 0,2 57 1.7
131 0.9 36 2.2
0 0,0
198 0,8
128 1.8
16 0.2
107 0,4
1 0.1
52 1.8
3 0.4
42 0.5
83 0.5
102 1.7
5 0.7
18 0.2
0 0,0
44 3.1
63 0.4
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
2,175 0,5
0 0,0
173 3.2
126 8.4
48 3.4
178 3.5
0 0,0
32 6,4
3 1.6
64 2.9
123 4,1
42 3.6
16 13.8
30 3.3
1 0.1
29 10.8
97 3.0
2 1.5
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
2 31.8
0 0,0
1,987 2,6
1 1,6
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
1 4,6
12 3,8
5 41,2
29 2,1
14 2,9
4.001-19
(1.06-5.01)
X
PLANTS FLOW
33 36.5
2 92.7
1 39,1
31 4<|,7
19 5,2
17 14,8
7 16.4
2 3.8
0 0.0
47 19.2
34 13,4
1 93.7
2 10.2
105 9.0
41 13.1
25 23.9
3 21.3
40 34,2
15 57,0
1 57,0
13 11,9
13 19.0
67 7,7
11 5.3
20 21.7
2 16,0
2 34.3
0 0.0
19.001-40
(*. 02-10. 56)
X
PLANTS FLOW
4 15.7
0 0.0
0 0.0
2 8.1
14 10,8
3 7.4
4 31.3
0 0.0
0 0.0
14 16.4
15 17.3
0 0,0
1 17,6
?t 5.7
5 4.5
4 12,9
0 0,0
2 3,9
3 35.4
0 0,0
8 19.8
2 8.6
12 4.4
2 2.7
a 13.3
0 0.0
1 63.3
40.001-190
(10.57-50,19)
X
PLANTS FLO*
2 35.9
0 0.0
0 0.0
2 18.3
14 35.7
2 13.6
3 46.6
2 25.7
0 0.0
12 39.1
13 48.6
0 0.0
2 70.6
23 16,5
12 35.8
4 50,4
1 74,3
2 21.6
0 0.0
0 0,0
4 18.4
190.001+
(SO. 2*)
X
PLANTS FLOW
0 0,0
o o.o
0 0.0
0 0,0
3 47,4
1 62.3
0 0,0
1 66.2
0 0,0
1 18.3
1 15,1
0 0,0
0 0,0
5 65,3
3 38.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
1 28,1
0 0,0
0 0.0
•» ^ f »
2 39.3
3 35.1 ! I ML,!
13 18.0 5 67.3
4 24,0 1 65,4
1 5.6 2 43.7
1 80,1
0 0.0
0 0.0 0 0.0
1 1.3 0 0.0
2 27.1 1 60.5
33 37,6 3 8.3
3 54.2 0 0.0
45 id, 5 14 10.5
26 20.1 13 26.6
0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0,0
39 2,4 70, 14.8 ?2 12.5
28 5.8 45 29,9 8 14,6
20 3.8 26 16.4 8 15.6
68 3,5
0 0,0
9 5,2
3 5.8
25 3.4
54 4.6
8 2.2
6 16,1
11 3.6
0 0.0
7 7,9
104 17.5 ?2 10.3
2 7.7
15 26.2
2 22.0
7 40.1
6 28.3 0 9,0
39 17.7 4 5.5
55 15.0 10 7.1
15 12.4 3 8.8
8 69,2
12 12.0
1 1.7
9 32.8
43 3,9 37 11,6
0 0,0 1 19.3
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
1 9.8
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
4 12.1
4 14.6
1 7,0
6 4.6
0 0.0
0 0,0 ; 0 0.0
0 0.0
2 100.0
4 90.1
1 68.1
0 0.0
724 2.8 1,116 14.3
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
253 9.6
1 36.7
0 0,0
3 18.9
0 0.0
13 31.9
10 46.9
0 0,0
18 30.0
4 22.7
6 35.7
9 13.1
2 70.0
1 19,9
2 63.6
6 24.1
13 28.3
6 71,2
0 0.0
5 39.9
1 17,5
2 38.0
12 31.1
1 79.1
" ' t *
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
235 27.1
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
i 61.5
0 0,0
1 29,7
0 0.0
3 42,7
0 0,0
0 0,0
4 35.7
1 16.4
1 24.7
5 51,2
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
2 45,5
3 40,1
0 0.0
0 0.0
1 28,5
1 65,7
0 0.0
3 45,0
0 0.0
W V f V

-------
 Table 29
 Number of New Advanced
 Secondary Treatment Plants to
 be Built Between 1980 and
 2000—by Total Projected Flow
Table 29 is a flow summary for all new
advanced secondary treatment plants
which will be constructed between 1980
and 2000. The treatment levels attained
by advanced secondary plants are defined
in terms of the effluent BOD concentration
and/or the removal of nutrients, phos-
phorus (as P04), and/or ammonia (NHa).
A plant is considered to be advanced
secondary in  design if it is capable of
consistently producing an effluent with  a
BOD concentration in the range of 24 to
 10 mg/l; and/or, it has specific processes
 which remove phosphorus and/or
 ammonia in excess of the amounts
 normally removed by secondary treatment.
 A summary is provided for each State and
 U.S. Territory. National totals are
 summarized at the bottom of the table.
  In the first column the total number of
 new advanced secondary treatment plants
 to be constructed in each State is reported
 along with the total wastewater treatment
 capacity represented by the plants. The
 Projected Design Flow for each plant was
 used to calculate the total treatment
capacity value. The total State flows are
reported in thousands of cubic meters per
day.
  Subsequent columns provide a
breakdown of the State totals into seven
flow ranges. The ranges are specified in
the column headings and are reported in
thousands of cubic meters per day and in
parentheses beneath that, as million
gallons per day. Reported for each flow
range are the number of plants in the
range and the percentage of the State
advanced secondary  treatment capacity
that is accounted for by each flow range.
  Included in this summary are entirely
new advanced secondary plants which are
planned to be constructed by the year
2000. Excluded are advanced secondary
plants that were operational in 1980; and
primary, advanced primary,  and secondary
plants planned to be  upgraded to
advanced secondary treatment by the year
2000.
                                                          PLANTS AND PERCENT OF FLOW §Y FLO* MANGE
TOTAL
TOTAL DESIGN
STATE PLANTS FLOW
ALABAMA 38 40
ALASKA 0 0
ARIZONA 0 0
ARKANSAS 284 77
CALIFORNIA 3 457
COLORADO 1 0
CONNECTICUT 0 0
DELAWARE 1 11
OIST, OF COLUM. 0 0
FLORIDA 108 480
GEORGIA 54 177
HAWAII 0 0
IDAHO 0 0
ILLINOIS 31 180
INDIANA 197 77
IOWA 1 7
KANSAS 3 21
KENTUCKY 111 413
LOUISIANA 10 36
MAINE 8 3
MARYLAND 176 96
MASSACHUSETTS 7 139
MICHIGAN 22 216
MINNESOTA 4 27
MISSISSIPPI 210 135
MISSOURI 5 3
MONTANA 0 0
NEBRASKA 0 0
NEVADA 0 0
NEW HAMPSHIRE 5 15
NEW JERSEY 14 104
NEW MEXICO 0 o
NEW YORK 93 33$
NORTH CAROLINA 65 225
NORTH DAKOTA 0 0
OHIO 149 196
OKLAHOMA 57 293
OREGON 19 82
PENNSYLVANIA 171 224
RHODE ISLAND 2 26
SOUTH CAROLINA 67 73
SOUTH DAKOTA ] n
TENNESSEE 49 43
TEXAS 88 637
UTAH 121 42
VERMONT 9 11
VIRGINIA 22 165
WASHINGTON 2 66
WEST VIRGINIA 69 57
WISCONSIN 17 IB
WYOMING 0 0
AMERICAN SAMOA 0 0
CUAM 0 o
N. MARIANAS 1 9
PUERTO RICO 0 0
PAC. TR. TERR. 22
VIRGIN ISLANDS 0 0
U.S. TOTALS 2,299 5,249
oy.4
(0*,10)
X
PLANTS FLOW
23 13.8
0 0.0
0 0.0
266 36.5
0 0.0
1 99.9
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
21 1.0
IT 2.3
0 0,0
0 0,0
13 1.6
166 33.8
0 0.0
0 0.0
76 3.6
5 2.5
6 21,9
137 20.2
0 0,0
5 0.5
1 0.9
179 20.4
3 9.4
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
1 0.7
0 0.0
0 0.0
44 2.5
37 3.1
0 0.0
104 11.8
43 2.5
10 2.7
65 6,7
0 0.0
49 12,3
0 0,0
26 13.3
57 1.9
94 37.4
3 5.0
6 0.8
0 0.0
43 14.3
10 8.9
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
1,513 4.9
.401.1.9
(.11-, SO)
X
PLANTS FLOW
12 21.9
0 0.0
0 0.0
14 11.9
1 0.1
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
55 11,1
24 8.9
0 0,0
0 0,0
6 3.3
26 26.4
0 0.0
0 0.0
26 4.6
1 1.3
1 19,7
32 29.6
2 1.6
10 4.5
2 12.1
25 12.0
1 20,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
2 12.4
6 8.3
0 0.0
29 8.6
IB 5.6
0 0.0
36 12.6
8 2.1
4 4.7
75 36.7
0 0.0
13 16.4
0 0.0
19 28.0
23 3.4
25 46.2
4 29,8
9 5.1
0 0.0
20 33.1
4 24.6
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
2 99,9
0 0,0
537 8,9
1.901*4
(.51*1.05)
X
PLANTS FLOW
1 4.7
0 0.0
0 0.0
1 4.8
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
15 8.5
3 3.7
0 0,0
0 0,0
6 9,1
2 7.8
0 0,0
1 16,0
2 i.i
1 6,4
1 58,2
5 15,0
0 0.0
4 4.8
0 0.0
2 3,6
1 70,5
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
3 10.1
0 0.0
10 6.2
2 2,6
0 0.0
1 1.9
1 1.2
1 2.5
21 23,8
0 0.0
2 8.8
0 0.0
2 13.5
6 2.4
1 5.8
1 20.1
3 5,2
0 0.0
3 16.0
2 33.4
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
104 5.4
4.001*19
(1.06*5.01)
g
PLANTS FLOW
2 59.3
0 0.0
0 0.0
3 44.7
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
1 99.9
0 0.0
11 21.0
7 34.6
0 0.0
0 0.0
2 11,1
3 31.6
1 99.9
2 81.9
3 7.1
2 26.8
0 0.0
4 35,0
3 12.9
2 8.7
0 0.0
3 25.2
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
2 66.7
4 52.8
0 0.0
6 10.5
4 16.9
0 0.0
5 21.0
* 9.1
2 16.1
9 23.7
1 21.4
2 23.6
1 99.9
2 45.0
1 0.6
1 10.5
1 44.9
2 10.6
0 0.0
3 36,5
1 32.6
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
1 99.9
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
100 16.1
I9.-001.40
(*.02ol0.5t>)
V
PLANTS FLOW
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
2 14.1
3 50.1
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
1 5.J
1 62.8
0 0.0
0 0.0
1 15.2
0 0.0
1 86.6
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
1 26.7
0 0,0
1 6,7
3 38.0
0 0.0
2 29.4
1 7.4
2 73.6
1 8.9
1 78.5
1 36.6
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
1 12.6
2 99.9
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
35 12.9
40.001*190
(10.57*50.19)
•f
PLANTS FLOW
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
1 29,5
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
4 44.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
2 74.6
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
t 70.1
1 61.2
0 0.0
1 38.*
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
3 63,2
1 33.5
0 0,0
1 23.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
1 65,3
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
16 23.7
190.001*
(50. 2t)
PLANTS FLOW
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
1 70,3
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
W V f V
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
t 77.7
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 .0
0 ,0
0 .0
• .0
0 .0
0 .0
0 .0
0 ,0
0 .0
0 .0
0 .0
0 ,0
0 ,0
0 .0
1 7 ,3
0 ,0
0 .0
0 .0
0 0.0
0 .0
0 .0
1 * .4
0 ,0
0 ,0
• .0
0 ,0
0 .0
0 ,0
0 .0
0 ,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
4 27,6
 NOTESI   1. FLOW RANGE VALUES IN CUBIC METERS PER DAY X  1000, APPROXIMATE MGD IN PARENTHESES).

         2. TOTAL STATE FLOW IN CUBIC METERS PER DAY X 1000.

-------
Table 30	
Dollar Needs for Construction
of New Advanced Secondary
Facilities—By Plant Size
(Thousands of 1980 Dollars)
Table 30 summarizes the projected costs,
reported in January 1980 dollars, for the
construction of new advanced secondary
treatment plants to be built between 1980
and 2000. Table 30 is a direct extension
of Table 29.
  The summary indicates a total dollar
need per State for new advanced
secondary facilities. The State totals are
broken down into dollar needs by flow
range. An individual plant's dollar need is
included in the total for the flow range
which encompasses its projected design
capacity.
                                                               TOTAL PROJECTED DESIGN FLON
CUBIC METERS PER DAY X 1C
(MILLION GALLONS PER DAY)
i OF
STATE PLANTS
ALABAMA 38
ALASKA o
ARIZONA 0
ARKANSAS 284
CALIFORNIA 3
COLORADO 1
CONNECTICUT 0
DELAMARE 1
DIST. OF COLUM. 0
FLORIDA 108
GEORGIA 54
HAWAII 0
IDAHO 0
ILLINOIS 31
INDIANA 197
IOWA 1
KANSAS 3
KENTUCKY 111
LOUISIANA 10
MAINE 8
MARYLAND 178
MASSACHUSETTS 7
MICHIGAN 22
MINNESOTA 4
MISSISSIPPI 210
MISSOURI s
MONTANA 0
NEBRASKA 0
NEVADA 0
NEN HAMPSHIRE 5
NEM JERSEY 14
NEW MEXICO 0
NEN YORK 91
NORTH CAROLINA 65 ,
NORTH DAKOTA 0
OHIO 149
OKLAHOMA 57
OREGON 19
PENNSYLVANIA 171
RHODE ISLAND 2
SOUTH CAROLINA 67
SOUTH DAKOTA 1
TENNESSEE 49
TEXAS 88
UTAH 121
VERMONT 9
VIRGINIA 22
WASHINGTON 2
MEST VIRGINIA 69
WISCONSIN 17
WYOMING 0
AMERICAN SAMOA 0
GUAM 0
N. MARIANAS 1
PUERTO RICO o
PAC. TR. TERR. 2
VIRGIN ISLANDS 0
U.S. TOTALS 2,299
001
STATE
NEEDS
22,858
0
0
55,607
171,356
259
0
7,3|2
0
301,596
72,694
0
0
78,846
103,385
10,587
9,280
174,140
18,625
4,773
75,114
63,443
108,723
11,083
71,024
2,783
0
0
0
9.913
73,016
0
161,173
123,817
0
154,472
71,923
30,735
189,416
23,127
34,513
0
3Z,514
115,451
40,539
9,473
90,215
30,171
35,806
16,516
0
0
0
6,622
0
3,443
0
2,618,543
0-.40
(ft»«10)

HEEDS
5,637
0
0
33,092
0
259
0
0
0
6,274
3,835
0
0
4,770
55,766
0
0
24,838
944
1,976
31,984
0
2,090
315
27,780
361
0
0
0
264
0
0
1*,*97
9,028
0
46,325
7,098
3,335
26,257
0
11,872
0
9,761
14*591
20,656
974
1,798
0
8,926
2,37*
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
376,180
,401-1,9
(.11-. 50)

NEEDS
6,8<}5
0
0
6,897
710
0
0
0
0
44,6*0
12,1*5
0
0
6,514
30,297
0
0
19,267
6?1
441
16,600
3,725
8,8"2
4,OflO
11,576
607
0
0
0
4,717
6,1*5
0
36,223
11,4*1
0
29,856
4,4*9
4,4*0
77,7*0
0
10,895
0
11,772
16,972
16,126
178
4,814
0
12,486
4,2)4
0
0
0
0
0
3,443
0
432,398
1.901-4,0
(.51-1.05)

NEEDS
697
0
0
176
0
0
0
0
0
29,536
1,657
0
0
13,522
6,276
0
2,050
2,867
1,957
2,356
5,746
0
5,265
0
2,425
1,815
0
0
0
0
6,535
0
26,028
4,058
0
3,387
946
641
16,657
0
2,776
0
1,100
10,659
1,261
1.565
5,767
0
6,276
5,000
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
195.001
4.001-19
(1.06-5,01)

NEEDS
9,669
0
0
15,442
0
0
0
7,112
0
71,917
31,534
0
0
7,288
11,046
10,587
7,230
9,275
7,065
0
20,784
5,408
14,201
0
14,165
0
0
0
0
4,912
43,022
0
25,208
25,038
0
11,770
13,850
0
16,226
75
4,828
0
9,881
2,651
296
4,556
9,158
0
8,116
6,907
0
0
0
6,622
0
0
0
478,261
19.001-40
(5.02-10.56)

NEEDS
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
47,104
21,111
0
0
0
0
0
0
12,587
8,018
0
0
0
0
6,688
0
0
0
0
0
0
17,104
0
17,754
28,402
0
19,579
8,729
22,309
11,116
21,052
4,142
0
0
0
0
0
17,107
10,171
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
107,005
40,001-190
(10.57-50.19)

NEEDS
0
0
0
0
54,112
0
0
0
0
100,095
0
0
0
46,752
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
54,110
78,165
0
15,078
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
42,9*1
41,840
0
13,555
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
51,171
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
500,261
190.001*
(50.2*)

NEEDS
0
0
0
0
116,514












16SrlO


















16,84






70,77










0
0
0
129,417

-------
Table 31	
Populations Served by Tertiary
Treatment—Present and
Projected, Resident and
Nonresident
(Population in Thousands)
Table 31 summarizes the 1980 popula-
tions served and the 2000 populations to
be served by facilities designed to provide
tertiary treatment. The treatment levels
attained by tertiary plants are defined in
terms of the effluent BOD concentration
and/or the removal of nitrogen. A plant is
considered to be tertiary in design if it is
capable of consistently producing an
effluent with a BOD ooncentmion less
than 10 mg/l; and/or, it has specific
processes which can remove more than
50 percent of the total nitrogen present in
the ptent  influent.    >              -
  The 1980 erwt 2000 total State
population values reported are from
estimates obtained from th» BEA. The
percent served is a function of the
residents receiving treatment in relation
to the total State population estimated by
BEA.
  The total population within the service
 area of an authority is-tlw s|*m of persons
< Receiving Treatment an^Not|"Receiving
 Treatment. Tr*j&e not receiving treatment
 resfdtfitfJtfit service wee. but do not
 contribute *b th« treatment facility ;
 because they are not on a sewer (System.
   Resident populations*aje permanent
 residents in the service area of a sewer-
 age authority. Nonresident populations
 include commuters  living in one area and
 working in another, as well as temporary
 residents at resort areas and; similar
 locations.


STATE
ALABAMA
ALASKA
ARIZONA
ARKANSAS
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO
CONNECTICUT
DELAWARE
DIST. Of COLUM.
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
HANAII
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
IOWA
KANSAS
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
MAINE
MARYLAND
MASSACHUSETTS
MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA
MISSISSIPPI
MISSOURI
MONTANA
NEBRASKA
NEVADA
NEN HAMPSHIRE
MEN JERSEY
NEN MEXICO
NEW YORK
NORTH CAROLINA
NORTH DAKOTA
OHIO
OKLAHOMA
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
RHODE ISLAND
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH DAKOTA
TENNESSEE
TEXAS
UTAH
VERMONT
VIRGINIA
WASHINGTON
WEST VIRGINIA
WISCONSIN
WYOMING
AMERICAN SAMOA
GUAM
N. MARIANAS
PUERTO RICO
PAC. TR. TERR.
VIRGIN ISLANDS
U.S. TOTAL
POPULATION
1900 2000
TOTAL TOTAL
3,769 4,140
406 667
2,450 4,149
2,180 2,970
22,696 26,786
2,772 4,371
3,115 3,741
582 841
656 661
8,860 15,049
5,118 7,053
915 1,366
905 1,183
11,230 12,358
5,400 6,059
2,903 3,101
2,369 2,517
3,527 4,224
4,026 4,659
1,097 1,222
4,149 5,583
5,769 6,614
9.208 10,314
4,060 4,505
2,406 2,740
4,868 5,225
786 938
1,574 1,734
702 1,312
887 1,306
7,332 8,747
1,241 1,761
17,649 18,922
5,606 7,419
657 690
10.731 12,031
2,892 3,702
2,527 3,209
11,731 12,365
929 1,033
2,932 3,700
689 730
4,380 5,573
13,385 18,069
1,367 1,688
493 607
5,197 6,755
3,926 4,859
1,878 2,003
4,720 5,553
450 484
31 40
114 275
17 31
3,358 4.700
111 174
96 116
223,824 272,644
RECEIVING TREATMENT
1*80 Z999 1*60 2000
RES. RES, NONRE8 NONRES
0 94 0 3
0 0 00
0000
3 257 06
767 2,861 102 133
2 120 6 10
31 95 00
3600
0 811 0 2,539
640 2,309 84 305
35 141 1 4
0000
7 123 08
322 411 0 0
155 595 0 0
0000
0000
1500
82 181 0 0
0 26 00
122 1,863 0 2
47 529 0 2
388 835 30 40
44 350 0 1
0 27 02
18 67 03
0000
0000
0 93 0 68
0 63 2 5
135 1,401 0 92
0000
173 715 16 187
341 1,495 8 51
oooo
505 3,589 23 45
0200
67 144 0 6
129 709 6 24
0000
3 21 00
0 23 0 0
1* 251 0 1
135 3,237 80 132
0 0 00
0 37 OS
643 2,14} 0 9
003 12
83 194 0 0
7 26 1 0
0000
0000
oooo
0000
oooo
oooo
oooo
4,917 25,867 367 1,505
NOT RECEIVING TREATMENT
1*00 <000 1VBO 7000
RE8. RES. NONRES NfJNRES
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
00 00
00 00
* 0 00
OOOO
9 13 00
00 00
0 0.0 0
70 65 00
0 11 1 0
00 0 0
0300
4000
11 0 00
00 00
00 00
00 00
0 0 0 0
0 7 00
0 28 00
36 171 0 0
81 12 0 0
01 00
0 2 0 0
0 0 00
00 00
0 00 0
0 00 0
0 42 0 0
55 8 0 0
0 0 0 0
70 78 02
173 222 0 0
0 00 0
119 17 0 0
00 00
3 0 . 0 . 0
30 26 0 0
0 0 0 0
00 00
0 0 00
12 20 0 6
6 0 15 0
OOOO
01 00
12 7 0 0
OOOO
17 0 0 0
oooo
OOOO
0 0 00
00 00
00 00
00 00
00 00
00 00
722 742 16 3
PERCENT
SERVED

1980 2000
0.0 2.2
••*•- o.o o.o
0,0 0.0
0.1 8.6
3.3 10.6
0.0 2.7
0. 2.5
0. 0.7
0. 122.6
7. 15.3
0. 2.0
0. 0.0
0* 10.4
2. 3.3
2. 9.8
0. 0.0
0, 0.0
0. 0.1
2* 3.8
0. 2,1
2. 33,3
0. 8.0
4» 8.1
1. 7.7
0. 1.0
0, 1.2
0. 0.0
o. o.o
0. 7.0
0. 4.8
1. 16.0
0. 0.0
0, 3.7
6,0 20.1
0.0 0.0
4.7 29.8
0.0 0.0
2.6 4.5
1.0 5.7
0.0 0.0
0.1 0.5
0.0 3.1
0.3 4.5
1.0 17.9
6.0 0.0
0.0 6.1
12.3 31.7
0.0 0.0
4.4 9.7
0.1 0.4
0.0 0.0
0.0 0.0
0.0 0.0
0.0 0,0
0.0 0.0
0.0 0.0
0.0 0.0
2.1 9.4
TREATMENT
PLANTS

1980 2000
0 3
0 0
0 0
4 32
15 13
1 2
2 3
1 1
0 1
14 40
2 5
0 0
1 6
18 13
9 20
0 0
0 0
i 3
3 5
0 4
T 12
3 12
8 16
11 86
0 3
3 18
0 0
0 0
0 4
1 6
5 19
0 0
25 93
29 14S
0 0
37 129
0 1
1 4
12 32
0 0
1 6
0 1
4 13
19 27
0 0
0 1
5 28
1 2
6 14
2 3
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
251 826

-------
Table 32
Plant Loadings, Ramovaf
E
Operation in 1 MO-FacUitie»
Deaignadto ProvMa Tertiary
Table 32 summarizes the performance of
all treatment facilities designed to provide
tertiary treatment. Information is provided
for all States and U.S. Territories which
have tertiary treatment facilities with a
national total at the bottom of the table,
The table is designed to estimate the
quantities of various pollutants accepted
by a treatment plant and the quantities of
these same pollutants in the effluent.
Quantities are given in metric tons per
day for all parameters. BOD and Solids
are summarized in this table* Information
is also provided on nutrient removal
capabilities.
  Plants with Removal Capabilities are
facilities with a specific requirement to
remove the listed nutrient, for instance,
some phosphorus i$ removed in all treat-
ment plants. However, only plants
specifically deserted to remove phos-
phorus are reported in this category.
Reported for each nutrient are the total
number of plants with their removal
capabilities and the total average flow
received by these plants. Also given is the
percentage of the total State flow the
plants represent.
  These data are derived from the daily
average flow, daily average influent
concentrations, and  the daily average
effJuent concentrations. The averages are
based on the actual performance of each
individual treatment plant during the most
recent 12 month period from which
information could be obtained. The values
calculated for each plant are summed into
the State and national totals. The main
source of information for flow and
concentrations values was the self-
monitoring reports submitted by every
facility with an NPQpS permit.
  Table 32 is an extension of Table 31. A
summary of the projected year 2000
percformance of all tertiary facilities is
given in Table 33.
  Total flow is the sum of the actual
average daily flows treated by all facilities
within the State designed to provide
tertiary treatment.
  AH flows are reported in thousands of
cubic meters per day.
                               REMOVAL EFFICItNCIES
                                                                           PLANTS WITH REMOVAL CAPABILITY
I BOOS
TOTAL 1 X
STAU FLOW
ARKANSAS 1
CALIFORNIA A6S
COLORADO 2
CONNECTICUT 9
DELAWARE 0
FLOHIOA »os
GEORGIA 10
IDAHO 1
ILLINOIS ISO
INDIANA 111
KENTUCKY 0
LOUISIANA }9
MARYLAND 49
MASSACHUSETTS 38
MICHIGAN ISO
MINNESOTA 27
MISSOURI *
NEW HAMPSHIRE 0
NEW JERStV 86
NEW YORK 122
NORTH CAROLINA 2tO
OHIO 379
OREGON 29
PENNSYLVANIA 47
SOUTH CAROLINA J
TENNESSEE 16
TEXAS 102
VIRGINIA 291
WASHINGTON 0
WEST VIRGINIA 36
WISCONSIN 4
U.S. TOTALS 2,845
INF, EFF. REM.
0 0 9*.
10? 2 97,
0 0 92.
1 0 87.
0 0 «?.
7S 2ft 62.
3 0 97,
0 0 90.
JO 1 9S.
1* 2 85,
0 0 98,
8 0 92,
« 09%.
6 0 93,
6* « 92.
00 97,
2 0 97,
0 0 97,
18 1 »«.
15 2 81.
54 3 91.
6H 17 7<»,
5 0 96,
M 0 92. V
ft 0 7h,«
* 0 93.6
20 0 97,2
58 4 91. S
0 0 94,9
« t 81. S
1 0 77.2
598 7S 87,5
SOLIDS **•*•
X
IWf. EFF. RFM,
9 * «1.3
106 ? 97. tt
• ft 95. a
1 ft 86.2
0 ft 68,5
6* 1? 81. I
3 0 85.2
0 ft 92.2
«S 1 96.7
18 1 89.7
0 0 98.0
8 n 91,6
« 0 95, 4
7 0 93, H
7? a 93.8
6 0 96.5
2 « 95.3
0 ft 99.5
i» 1 «a.j
12 * 80. «
•5 * 85.2
6] It 82,1
7 0 97.1
4 1 83.6
0 ft 9,0
*** PHOSPHORUS
• « TOT,
PLANTS FLOW FLOW
0 0 0.0
6 166 45.4
1 2 100.0
I 4 50.8
0 0 0,0
10 254 83.2
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
S 41 22,7
2 72 63.6
0 0 0.0
0 0 O.Q
0 2<> 53.8
i 38 00.0
7 344 9»,2
2 11 43.1
WHT NITROGEN
* X TOT.
PLANT* FLOW FLOW
0 0 0.0
3 115 31,5
0 0 0.0
0 0 0,0
TOTAL N
» * TOT,
PLANTS FLOW FLOW
o o 0,0
U 151 35,9
0 0 0,0
A 0 0. ft
0 0 0,0 o 0 0,0
fc 54 17.9 i S 193 63. 
-------
Table 33
Plant Loadings, Removal
Efficiencies and Discharge
Rates for Facilities to be in
Operation in 2000—Facilities
Designed to Provide Tertiary
Treatment
(Metric Tons per Day)
Table 33 summarizes the expected
performance in the year 2000 of all treat-
ment facilities designed to provide tertiary
treatment. Information is provided for all
States and U.S. Territories, which have
tertiary treatment facilities, with a
national total at the bottom of the table.
  This table  is designed to estimate the
quantities of various pollutants that will
be received by a treatment plant and the
quantities of these same pollutants that
will be in the effluent. Quantities are
given in metric tons per day for all
parameters. BOD and Solids are
summarized in this table. Information is
also provided on nutrient removal
capabilities.
  Plants with Removal Capabilities are
facilities with a specific requirement to
remove the listed nutrient. For instance,
some phosphorus is removed in all treat-
ment plants. However, only plants
specifically designed to remove phos-
phorus are reported in this category.
Reported for each nutrient are the total
number of plants with removal capabilities
and the total average daily flow received
by these plants. Also  given is the
percentage of the total State flow the
plants represent.
  These data are derived from the daily
average flow, daily average influent
concentrations, and the daily average
effluent concentrations. The averages are
based on the predicted year 2000
situation. The values calculated for each
plant are summed into State and national
totals.
  Table 33 is an extension of Tables 31
and 32.
  Total Flow is the sum of the average
daily flows to be treated in the year 2000
by all facilities within the  State that will
be designed to provide tertiary treatment.
  All flows are reported in thousands of
cubic meters per day.
                                REMOVAL EFFICIENCIES
                                                                           PLANTS WITH REMOVAL  CAPABILITY

TOTAL
STA1F FLOW
ALABAMA 73
ARKANSAS 157
CALIFORNIA I,a07
COLORADO 35
CONNECTICUT 44
DELAWARE I
DIST, OF COLUM. 1,169
FLORIDA 1,204
GEORGIA 81
IDAHO ISO
ILLINOIS <»73
INDIANA 516
KENTUCKY I
LOUISIANA 79
MAINE 17
MARYLAND 1,036
MASSACHUSETTS 333
MICHIGAN 592
MINNESOTA 228
MISSISSIPPI it
MISSOURI 34
NEVADA 54
NEW HAMPSHIRE 34
NEW JERSEY 680
NEW YORK 495
NORTH CAROLINA 920
OHIO 2,774
OKLAHOMA 1
OREGON 80
PENNSYLVANIA 34fl
SOUTH CAROLINA 11
BOD5
X
INF. fFF, REM.
14 0 97,3
34 0 97,6
403 10 97.3
14 0 97,8
9 0 94.6
0 0 95.7
280 5 97,9
244 7 96,9
17 0 96,2
32 2 92.5
52 2 95,0
95 3 95,9
0 0 96.4
16 0 95,9
3 0 97,5
?48 5 97.7
71 1 97,5
122 2 97,9
64 1 98.2
5 0 97,4
8 0 97.9
IS 0 *6.7
7 0 98,0
166 4 97,1
103 <3 95.0
234 5 97,4
559 24 95,5
0 0 95,9
16 0 97,5
fit 2 96,5
2 0 97,4
SOUTH DAKOTA 10 j 30 96.6
TENNESSEE 141 : 32 0 97.6
TEXAS 1,581 407 7 9fl,0
VERMONT 22
VIRGINIA 934
WASHINGTON 3
WEST VIRGINIA 73
WISCONSIN 11
U.S. TOTALS 15,626
U 0 97.4
216 3 98,3
0 0 95,0
15 0 94,2
2 0 96,9
3,612 105 97.0
SOLIDS
t
INF, EFF. RFM,
14 2 84,9
33 ? 92,8
453 10 97.6
8 0 96,2
9 0 95.8
0 0 9S.7
280 « 97.0
246 « 96,4
17 ? 85,8
31 ? 91.5
63 ? 95.3
107 3 96.4
0 0 92.8
16 1 9Q.7
3 0 97.5
209 S 97,3
77 ? 96.8
126 '• 96.0
61 1 98,1
S 0 87,9
8 0 95.9
12 0 95.9
B 0 98.3
181 5 97.2
101 4 95,0
199 26 86,8
647 2* 95,6
0 0 95,9
19 0 97,9
71 1 93.5
2 0 86.3
3 0 96,6
30 ?. 92.4
4 IS * 97. H
4 n 94.9
PHOSPHORUS
* X TOT.
PLANTS FLOW FLOW
0 0 0,0
1 47 30.0
6 410 29,1
1 5 15.7
2 31 70.4
0 00.0
1 1,169 100,0
26 1,054 87,5
0 0 0,0
2 11 8.5
5 95 34.9
6 355 68.7
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
4 17 100.0
5 1,017 98,1
11 330 99,2
16 592 100.0
21 58 25.5
0 0 0.0
0 00.0
4 54 100.0
4 25 73.7
6 115 17.0
19 176 35.6
3 0 0.0
67 ?,497 90.0
0 0 0,0
1 75 93.8
16 232 66.5
1 0 2.6
0 0 0.0
0 0 0.0
19 99 6,3
0 0 0,0
NH^ NITROGEN
« X TUT.
PLANT* FLO* FLOW
3 73 100.0
0 0 0.0
5 956 67.9
J 30 H4.2
0 00.0
0 0 0.0
1 1,169 100.0
33 351 ?9.1
S 81 100.0
5 88 6R.O
10 144 52,9
4 344 66.7
3 3 100.0
1 / 9,7
0 0 0,0
? H8S 85,4
11 330 99,2
11 400 67.6
3 «0 17.9
1 18 78.0
0 0 0.0
2 31 58.3
6 34 100.0
16 662 97.4

-------
 Table 34	
 Number of Plants Projected for
 Tertiary Treatment by Year
 2000—By Total Projected
 Design Flow
 Table 34 is a flow summary for all tertiary
 treatment plants projected to be in
 operation by the year 2000. The treatment
 levels attained by tertiary plants are
 defined in terms of the effluent BOD
 concentration and/or the removal of
 nitrogen. A plant is considered to be
 tertiary in design if it is capable of
 consistently producing an effluent with a
 BOD concentration less than 10 mg/l;
and/or, it has specific processes which
can remove more than 50 percent of the
total nitrogen present in the plant
influent. A summary is provided for each
State and U.S. Territory. National totals
are summarized at the bottom of the
table.
  In the first column the total number of
projected tertiary treatment plants in each
State is reported along with the total
wastewater treatment capacity
represented by the plants. The Projected
Design Flow for each plant was used to
calculate the total treatment capacity
value. The total  State flows are reported
in thousands of cubic meters per day.
   Subsequent columns provide a break-
down of the State totals into seven flow
ranges. The ranges are specified in the
column headings and are reported in
thousands of cubic meters per day and, in
parentheses beneath that heading,  in
million gallons per day. Reported for each
flow range are the number of plants in
the range and the percentage of the total
State tertiary treatment capacity that is
accounted for by each flow range.
  Included in this  summary are all tertiary
plants in operation in 1980 which will not
be abandoned between 1980 and 2000;
primary, advanced primary, secondary,
and advanced secondary plants which  will
be upgraded to tertiary levels before 2000;
and new tertiary plants which will be
constructed prior to 2000.
                                                         PLANTS  AND PERCENT  OF FLON BY FLIN RANGE

TOTAL
TOTAL DESIGN
STATE PLANTS FLOW
ALABAMA } 73
ALASKA 0 0
ARIZONA 0 0
ARKANSAS 32 157
CALIFORNIA IS 1,407
COLORADO 2 35
CONNECTICUT 3 44
DELAWARE 1 1
DI8T. OF COUJM, 1 1,169
FLORIDA no t,2o«
GEORGIA 5 61
HAWAII 0 0
IDAHO 6 130
ILLINOIS 13 273
INDIANA 20 516
IOWA 0 0
KANSAS 0 0
KENTUCKY 3 3
LOUISIANA S 79
MAINE 4 17
MARYLAND 12 1,036
MASSACHUSETTS 12 333
MICHIGAN 16 592
MINNESOTA 86 228
MISSISSIPPI 3 24
MISSOURI is 34
MONTANA 0 0
NEBRASKA 0 0
NEVADA 4 54
NEW HAMPSHIRE 6 34
NEW JERSEY 19 680
NEW MEXICO 0 0
NEW YORK 93 495
NORTH CAROLINA 145 920
NORTH DAKOTA 0 0
OHIO 129 2,774
OKLAHOMA 1 1
OREGON 4 80
PENNSYLVANIA 32 348
RHODE ISLAND 0 0
SOUTH CAROLINA 6 11
SOUTH DAKOTA I 10
TENNESSEE 13 141
TEXAS 27 1,581
UTAH 0 0
VERMONT 1 22
VIRGINIA 28 934
WASHINGTON 2 3
WEST VIRGINIA 14 73
WISCONSIN 3 11
WYOMING 0 0
AMERICAN SAMOA 0 0
GUAM 0 0
N, MARIANAS 0 0
PUERTO RICO 0 0
PAC. TR, TfcRH, 0 0
VIRGIN ISLANDS 0 0
U.S. TOTALS 826 15,626
0-.4
(0-.10)
X
PLANTS FLOW
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
6 0,8
1 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
2 3.4
4 0.0
0 0,0
1 0,0
33 3.4
1 0.1
7 5.8
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
1 0,9
0 0.0
0 0,0
29 1,2
80 1.0
0 0.0
34 0.2
0 0.0
1 0.4
1 0,0
0 0.0
2 3.6
0 0.0
1 0.2
1 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
5 0.1
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
210 0.2
.401-1.9
(.11*. SO)
X
PLANTS FLOW
1 1.2
0 0.0
0 0.0
11 8.2
1 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
1 99.9
o o.o
4 0,4
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
5 2.0
1 0,1
0 0.0
0 0.0
3 99,9
1 0,9
1 2,5
1 0.0
0 0.0
3 0.8
30 13.4
0 0,0
8 20.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
1 1.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
40 e.i
25 2.7
0 0.0
25 1,0
1 99.9
1 1.0
9 2,8
0 0.0
2 8,9
0 0,0
1 0.4
5 0,4
0 0.0
0 0.0
9 0.8
1 27.3
4 4,9
1 8,2
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
196 1.3
1,901-4
(.51-1.05)
X
PLANTS FLOW
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
4 6.9
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
6 1,7
0 0,0
0 0,0
1 1.5
1 1.3
1 0.3
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
1 4.0
0 0,0
2 0,4
1 0,7
2 0,9
10 12,9
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
2 17,3
1 0.3
0 0.0
5 3,0
12 3.5
0 0.0
20 2.1
0 0.0
1 4.6
7 5.9
0 0.0
1 33,3
0 0,0
3 7,0
1 1.2
0 0,0
0 0,0
2 0.6
1 72.6
3 11.2
1 21.9
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
95 1,7
4.001-19
(1.06-5.01)
X
PLANTS FLOW
1 15.9
0 0.0
0 0.0
10 53.8
1 0,5
1 15,7
3 99,9
0 0.0
0 0,0
17 14.0
4 74.4
0 0.0
3 22.8
3 11.2
13 25.1
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
1 9.7
1 94,0
2 2.9
3 13.8
5 5.4
11 41.6
2 99.8
3 74.1
0 0,0
0 0,0
1 16.3
3 81.6
10 16.1
0 0.0
13 25.7
16 19.2
0 0.0
33 11.8
0 0.0
0 0.0
10 31.1
0 0,0
1 53.9
1 99,9
5 36.6
8 4.7
0 0.0
0 0.0
4 5.4
0 0,0
7 83.8
1 69,8
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
197 12,8
19,001-40
(*. 42-10. 56)
X
PLANTS FLOK
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
4 9.0
1 8«.2
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
4 10.2
1 25.5
0 0.0
0 0.0
1 13.8
3 15.7
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
1 28.4
0 0.0
0 0,0
6 48.7
1 3.8
2 28.5
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
2 82.6
0 0.0
3 tl.l
0 0,0
4 25.1
7 22.5
0 0,0
9 8.7
0 0.0
0 0,0
4 31,7
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
3 55.5
1 1.7
0 0,0
1 99,9
1 3.3
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
S9 10,6
40.001-190
(10. 57-50.1*)
X
PLANTS FLOW
1 82,7
0 0.0
0 0.0
1 30.0
4 29,3
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
8 36,8
0 0.0
0 0.0
2 75.5
3 71.4
1 14.6
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
1 56.8
0 0.0
2 19,7
2 36.7
4 88.8
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
4 30.6
0 0.0
2 36,6
5 50,9
0 0.0
4 10.4
0 0.0
1 93,8
1 28.2
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
2 15.5
0 0.0
0 0,0
5 45.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0 1
0 0,0 |
5S 27.0
190.001*
(50.2*)
X
PLANTS FLON
0 0.0
• 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
2 60.9
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
1 99,9
1 35.8
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
1 43,9
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
1 76,7
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
1 41,7
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
4 65,3
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
3 76.1
0 0,0
0 0,0
2 44.4
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
16 46,0
NOTES!  1. FLOW RANGE VALUES  IN CUBIC METERS PER DAY  X  1000. (APPROXIMATE MCD IN PARENTHESES).

       ?. TOTAL STATE FLOW IN CUBIC METERS HER DAY X 1000.

-------
Table 35	
Tertiary Treatment Facilities
to be Built Between 1980 and
2000—By Total Projected
Design Flow
Table 35 is a flow summary for all new
tertiary treatment plants which will be
constructed between 1980 and 2000. The
treatment  levels attained by tertiary plants
are defined in terms of the effluent BOD
concentration and/or the removal of
nitrogen. A plant is considered to be
tertiary in  design if it is capable of
consistently producing  an effluent with a
BOD concentration less than 10 mg/l;
and/or, it has specific processes which
can remove more than 50 percent of the
total nitrogen present in the plant
influent. A summary is provided for each
State and U.S. Territory. National totals
are summarized at the bottom of the
table.
  In the first column the total number of
new tertiary treatment plants to be
constructed in each State  is reported
along with the total wastewater treatment
capacity represented by the plants. The
Projected Design Flow for  each plant was
used to calculate the total treatment
capacity value. The total State flows are
reported in thousands of cubic meters per
day.
  Subsequent columns provide a break-
down ^f the State totals into seven flow
ranges, The, ranges .are specified in the
column heaAnfls and are-reported in
thousands of cubic meters per day and, in
parentheses beneath that, in million
gallons per day. Reported for each flow
rang* -are the number of plants in the
range and the percentage of the State
tertiary treatment capacity that is
accounted for by each flow range.
  included in this summary are entirely
new tertiary plants which are planned to
be constructed by the year 2000. Excluded
are tertiary plants that were operational in
1980; and primary, advanced primary,
secondary, and advanced secondary plants
planned to be upgraded to tertiary
treatment by the year 2000.
                                                        PLANTS  AND PERCENT OF FLO* BY  FLOW RANGE

TOTAL
TOTAL DESIGN
STAU PLANTS FLO*
ALABAMA 0 0
ALASKA 0 0
ARIZONA 0 0
ARKANSAS 5 1
CALIFORNIA 0 0
COLORADO t 30
CONNECTICUT 0 0
DELAWARE 0 0
DIST. OF COLUM, 0 0
FLORIDA 4 120
GEORGIA 0 0
HANAII 0 0
IDAHO 1 10
ILLINOIS 0 0
INDIANA 0 0
IOWA 0 0
KANSAS 0 0
KENTUCKY 1 0
LOUISIANA 2 23
MAINE 3 1
MARYLAND 1 90
MASSACHUSETTS 2 56
MICHIGAN 1 0
MINNESOTA o o
MISSISSIPPI 1 0
MISSOURI 3 0
MONTANA 0 0
NEBRASKA 0 0
NEVADA 0 0
NEW HAMPSHIRE 4 23
NEW JERSEY 3 41
NEW MEXICO 0 0
NEW YORK SO 101
NORTH CAROLINA 32 71
NORTH DAKOTA 0 0
OHIO 40 62
OKLAHOMA 0 0
OREGON 0 0
PENNSYLVANIA S 6
RHODF ISLAND 0 0
SOUTH CAROLINA 3 0
SOUTH DAKOTA 0 0
TENNESStfc 0 0
TEXAS 1 2
UTAH 0 0
VERMONT 0 0
VIRGINIA 16 135
WASHINGTON 0 0
WEST VIRGINIA 4 7
WISCONSIN 0 0
WYOMING 0 0
AMERICAN SAMOA 0 0
GUAM 0 0
N. MARIANAS 0 0
PUERTO RICO o o
PAC. TR. TERR. 0 0
VIRGIN ISLANDS 0 0
U.S. TOTALS 183 790
0-.4
(0-.10)
X
PLANTS FLOW
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
4 36.1
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
2 57.1
0 0.0
0 0.0
1 99.9
0 0.0
1 99.9
2 39.9
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
1 l.«
0 0.0
0 0.0
23 4.5
26 6,0
0 0,0
25 8.7
0 0,0
0 0,0
1 2.9
0 0,0
2 47.8
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
5 0.8
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
93 2.3
.401-1,9
(.11". 50)
X
PLANTS FLOW
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
1 63.8
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
1 99.9
1 3.0
1 42.8
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
1 59.9
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
20 18.3
3 1.8
0 0,0
8 13,1
0 0,0
0 0,0
3 57,7
0 0.0
1 52. t
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
7 4,2
1,901-4
(.51-1.05)
X
PLANTS FLOW
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0,0
1 4.1
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
1 16.8
0 0,0
0 0.0
1 2.9
1 «.7
0 0,0
4 20.3
0 0,0
0 0,0
1 39.2
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
1 99,9
0 0,0
0 0.0
I 1.6
0 0.0 0 0.0
2 23.6
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
o o.o
0 0.0
49 5,5
2 76.3
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0,0
13 4,8
4.001-19
(1.06-5.01)
X
PLANTS FLOW
• 0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
2 26.8
0 0.0
0 0.0
1 99,9
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
2 81.6
2 52.3
0 0.0
5 40.7
0 0.0
0 0.0
3 57.7
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
1 6,1
o 0,0
0 0.0
o o.o
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
16 21,4
19,001-40
(*. 02-10. 56)
X
PLANTS FLOW
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 - 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
1 99,9
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
40.001-190
(10.57-50.19)
X
PLANTS FLOW
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
190,001*
(50. 2O
X
PLANTS FLOW
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0 0 0,0
0 0,0 ; 0 0,0
2 73.1
0 0,0
0 0.0
o o.o
0 0.0
0 0,0 0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
1 96.9
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
1 47,6
0 0.0
1 33.4
2 87.3
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
- 0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
6 21.4
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
1 99,9
1 95.8
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
? 87.1
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
6 44.4
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
9 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0,0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0.0
0 0,0
NOTESl 1. FLOW RANGE VALUES IN CUBIC METERS PER DAY X 1000. (APPROXIMATE MGO IN PARENTHESES* .
       2. TOTAL STATE FLOW IN CUBIC METERS PER DAY X 1000.

-------
Table 36
Dollar Needs for Construction
of New Tertiary Treatment
F«cilities-By Plant Shte
Table 36 summarizes tht projected costs.
reported in January 18SO dollars, for the
construction of new terttery treatment
plants to be built between 1980 and
2000. Table 36 is a direct extension of
Table 35.
  The summary indicates a total dollar
need per State for new terttery facilities.
The State totals are broken down into
dollar needs ay flow range which
encompasses a plant's projected design
capacity.
                                                                TOTAL PROJECTED DESIGN
CUBIC METERS PER QAV X 101
(MILLION GALLONS PER DAY)
• or
STATE PLANTS
ALABAMA
ALASKA
ARIZONA
ARKANSAS
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO
CONNECTICUT
DELAWARE
DI8T. OF COLUM,
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
HAHAII
IDAHO 1
ILLINOIS 0
INDIANA 0
IONA 0
KANSAS 0
KENTUCKY t
LOUISIANA 2
MAINE 3
MARYLAND 1
MASSACHUSETTS 2
MICHIGAN i
MINNESOTA o
MISSISSIPPI i
MISSOURI 3
MONTANA o
NEBRASKA 0
NEVADA 0
NEW HAMPSHIRE 9
NEN JERSEY 3
NEM MEXICO 0
NEN YORK $0
NORTH CAROLINA 32
NORTH DAKOTA 0
OHIO 40
OKLAHOMA 0
OREGON 0
PENNSYLVANIA s
RHODE ISLAND 0
SOUTH CAROLINA 3
SOUTH DAKOTA 0
TENNESSEE 0
TEXAS 1
UTAH 0
VERMONT 0
VIRGINIA 16
WASHINGTON 0
NEST VIRGINIA «
WISCONSIN 0
WYOMING 0
AMERICAN SAMOA 0
GUAM o
N, MARIANAS 0
PUERTO RICO 0
PAC. TR. TERR. 0
VIRGIN ISLANDS 0
U.S. TOTALS 1*1
>•!
STATE
NEEDS
0
0
0
I.S5J
•
26,3*1
0
0
0
75,711
0
0
*,?•«
0
0
0
0
1,000
IP, 700
i,09i
0
45,ts«
965
0
545
2,126
0
0
0
I9,0«8
91.S4S
0
60,100
«5,00«
0
48,913
6
0
7.475
0
1*021
0
0
l,6|8
0
0
16,161
0
0,466
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
413,594
0»,40
(•-.10)

NEEDS



1,10















1,284
0
0
9*5
0
545
539
0
0
0
70S
0
0
«,222
7,015
0
11,971
0
0
522
0
410
0
0
0
0
0
1,460
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
35,947
.401-1.9
(.11-. SO)

NEED*
0
0
0
«44
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1,000
562
BIO
0
0
0
0
0
1,5*7
0
0
0
0
0
0
10,020
1,749
0
10,2-51
0
0
4,742
0
• 11
0
0
0
0
0
6,264
0
7.5V6
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
53,346
1,901-4.0
(.51-1. 05)

NEEDS
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2,972
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
4,328
0
0
4,736
3,359
0
12,973
0
0
2,211
0
0
0
0
1,618
0
0
2,445
0
960
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
35,602
4.001-19
(1.06-5.01)

NEEDS
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
23,438
0
0
6,784
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
14,065
21,613
0
28,822
0
0
13,718
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
108,440
19.001-40
(5.02-10.56)

NEEDS
0
0
0
0
0
26,361
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
10,138
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
29,932
0
0
32,881
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
o
o
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
99,312
40.001-190
(10.57-50.19)

NEEDS
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
52,273
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
42,482
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
6,192
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
100,9«7
190.001+
(50.2*)

NEEDS
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

-------
Table 37	
National Dollar Needs for
Changes in Existing Treatment
Plants
(Thousands of 1980 Dollars)
Table 37 summarizes the dollar needs for
changes to treatment facilities which are
in operation in 1980.
  The table is divided into three sections.
The first section details the planned
changes and costs by present design level
of treatment for all treatment facilities in
operation in 1980. A detailed explanation
of the changes is given in Table 3.
  A considerable amount of needs are
shown for plants with Other and No
Change types of planned changes. A
number of situations are covered by these
categories. One common situation is a
treatment plant which will require a
capital expenditure, such as for a new
sludge digestor, but the degree of treat-
ment and hydraulic capacity will not be
changed.
  Sections two and three summarize the
costs to upgrade, and enlarge and
upgrade presently operating facilities from
their current level of treatment to the
level they are projected to be in 2000.
  For example, from section one we see
that 7,852 secondary treatment facilities
are in operation currently. The dollar
needs for these facilities between 1980
and 2000 are over $10 billion. In section
two we note 1,067 of the 7,852
secondary treatment facilities in operation
will be upgraded at a cost of $1.6 billion,
and in section three we note 1,022 of the
7,852 will be enlarged and upgraded at a
cost of $3.9 billion.
  The actual number of sites being
upgraded,  and enlarged and upgraded
from one level of treatment to  another is
summarized  in Table 38.
TOTAL
* OF DOLLAR
TYPE PLANTS NEEDS
RAW DISCHARGE 220
LESS THAN SECONDARY 3,343
SECONDARY 7,852
ADVANCED SECONDARY 2,443
TERTIARY 251
NO DISCHARGE 1,361
TOTAL 15,470
1,292,512
8,014,797
10,156,266
6,050,207
335,562
429,651
26,278,995
TOTAL
« OF DOLLAR
TYPE PLANTS NEEDS
RAN DISCHARGE 220
LESS THAN SECONDARY 1,205
SECONDARY 1,067
ADVANCED SECONDARY 256
TERTIARY 16
NO DISCHARGE 43
TOTAL 2,807
1,292,512
2.735,802
1,649,887
824,501
10,314
23,650
6.536,666
TOTAL
* OF DOLLAR
TYPE PLANTS NEEDS
RAW DISCHARGE 0
LESS THAN SECONDARY 1,085
SECONDARY 1,022
ADVANCED SECONDARY 244
TERTIARY 11
NO DISCHARGE 39
TOTAL 2,401
0
3,941,941
3,971,680
2,890,923
49,725
47,853
10.902,126
ENLARGE UPGRADE
0 1,292,M?
7,815 2,735,80?
2,900,290 1,649,887
1,295,965 824, *01
218,178 10,314
216,501 23,650
4,638,749 6,536.66iS
DOLLAR NEEDS BY TYPE OF PLANNED
ENLARGE ft
UPGRADE REPLACE OTHFR
0
3,9«1,941
3,971,684
2,890,923
49,725
47,853
10,902,126
0
1,279,572
1,104,433
69,837
373
125,745
2,579,960
0
2,OA4
26.6S2
0
0
0
28,716
CHANGE
ABANDON,
RETAIN
ABANDON SEWERS
0 0
0 1.378
146,984 263,097
177,429 753,339
36,575 19,291
871 14,851
361,859 1,051,956
NO
CHANGE
0
46,225
93,239
38,213
1,106
180
178,963
DOLLAR NEEDS FOR PLANTS TO RF UPGRADED TO
ADVANCED NO
SECONDARY SECONDARY TFRTIARY DISCHARGE
1,060,172
2.12V, 638
702,069


0
0
135
3,892,014
209,177
551,327
872,576
574,385


0
54
2,207,519
17,848
47,606
49,093
?<|9,8S
1
It, 314

0
374,752
5,315
7,231
26,149
225
0
23,461
62,381







DOLLAR NEEDS FOR PLANTS TO RE ENLARGED AND UPGRADED TO
ADVANCED NO
SECONDARY SECONDARY TFRTIARV DISCHARGE

0
2, 85?, «10
34?, 107


0
0
3,680
3,198,397

0
933,262
3,257,862
2,337,893


0
I4,78»
6,543,806

0 j 0
t3?,525
313,741
523.315
49,725

0
1,049.306
23,744
27,774
29,715
0
29,384
110,617








-------
 Table 38
.I i   i    i                        i
National Summary of       '
Treatment Plant Upgrades for
Plants Operating in 1980
Table 38 summarizes the upgrades, and
enlargement and upgrades projected for
facilities in operation in J980.
  The far left column gives the total  ;
number and total present design flow, by
present level of treatment, of all the
facilities that will undergo some type of
upgrade between 1980 and 2000. The
columns to the right show the situation
after the upgrades, listing for each
projected treatment level the number of
facilities and the flow.
  For example, 220 existing raw
discharge facilities will be upgraded by
the year 2000. The level to which each
will be upgraded is listed to the right of
the present total.
  The costs  involved to accomplish the
various upgrades are summarized in Table
37
  All flows are reported in thousands of
cubic meters per day.
                                                PROJECTED LEVEL OP TREATMENT  FOR  YEAR 2000
PRESENT
LEVEL OF PRESENT NO ADVANCED
TREATMENT TOTALS DISCHARGE SECONDARY SECONDARY TERTIARY
RAM DISCHARGE




TISS THAN SECONDARY




SECONDARY




ADVANCED SECONDARY




TERTIARY




NO DISCHARGE




TOTALS




220 SITES
161 KCMD



2,290 SITES
22,900 KCMD



2,066 SITES
16,027 KCMD



500 SITES
2i,025 KCMD



27 SITES
661 KCMD



62 SITES
229 KCMD



5,207 SITES
63,424 KCMD



6 SITES
0 KC"0
0.1 * ROM
0.0 X COL
o.o x ALL
61 SITES
54 KC«D
0.2 t RON
9.4 X COL
0.0 X ALL
37 SITES
247 KC«D
1.0 X ROM
43.3 X COL
0.3 x ALL
5 SITES
42 KC"D
0.1 X ROM
7.5 X COL
0.0 X ALL
0 SITES
0 KCMD
0.0 X ROM
0.0 X COL
0.0 X ALL
54 SITES
226 KCMD
66.3 X ROM
39.6 X COL
0.3 X ALL
165 SITES
571 KC"D
0.7 X ROM
100.0 X COL
0.7 X ALL
175 SITES
157 KCMD
67.0 X ROM
0,6 X COL
0,2 X ALL
1,638 SITES
16,966 KCMD
67.5 X ROM
74,1 X COL
22.6 X ALL
556 SITES
5,760 KCMD
24,9 X ROM
25.1 X COL
7,7 x ALL
0 SITES
0 KCMD
0,0 X ROM
0,0 X COL
0.0 X ALL
0 SITES
0 KCMD
0.0 X ROM
0.0 X COL
0,0 X ALL
12 SITES
6 KCMD
3,1 X RON
0.0 X COL
0,0 X ALL
2*363 SITES
22,915 KCMD
30,7 X RON
100,0 X COL
30,7 X ALL
33 SITES
21 KCMD
11,7 t ROM
0.0 « COL
0.0 X ALL
506 SITES
7,575 KCMD
30.1 X RON
16.6 « COL
10.1 f ALL
1,267 SITES
15,179 KCMO
65, « X ROM
ST. 7 X COL
20. A X ALL
406 SITES
17,379 KCMD
69,9 X ROM
43.2 X COL
23.) X ALL
0 SITES
0 KCMD
0.0 X ROM
0.0 X COL
0,0 X ALL
16 SITES
27 KCMD
10.4 t RON
0.0 X COL
0.0 t ALL
2,2V SITES
40,1*0 KCMD
53,9 t RON
100.0 t COL
SS.9 t ALL
4 SITES
2 KCMD
1.1 X RON
0.0 X COL
0.0 X ALL
63 SITES
525 KCMD
2.0 X RON
4,6 X COL
0,7 X ALL
206 SITES
1,875 KCMD
8.1 X RON
17.3 X COL
2.5 X ALL
67 SITES
7,471 KCMD
30.0 X RON
69.2 X COL
10,0 x ALL
27 SITES
909 KCMD
100.0 X ROM
6.4 X COL
1,2 x ALL
0 SITES
0 KCMD
0,0 X RON
0,0 X COL
0.0 X ALL
407 SITES
10,764 KCMD
14,4 X ROM
100,0 X COL
14,4 X ALL
     NOTES!   1. PERCENTAGES  ARE  FUNCTION OF FLO* IN RON, COLUMN  AN"  OVERALL(ALL),

              2. FLOW VALUES  ARE  PROJECTED DESIGN FLOWS IN CUBIC  METERS PER DAY X 1000 (KCMD),

-------
 Table 39	
 Analysis of Liquid Effluent
 Disposal
 (Number of Responses)
Table 39 summarizes the methods utilized
by municipal sewerage authorities to
dispose of the liquid effluents generated
by treatment works. The summary
describes the current situation (1980) and
the changes expected to occur. The
changes expected at a treatment facility
are reflected in the changes to the
effluent disposal  method. Below is a brief
explanation of the disposal methods:

Outfall to Surface Waters—Direct
discharge to a body of fresh water.

Ocean Outfall—Direct discharge to an
ocean, estuary, or bay.

Holding Pond—Not a final disposal but an
intermediate step in the disposal process.
In general the holding pond is used for
storing effluent when the final disposal
method is periodic versus continuous  in
nature. Spray irrigation is an example.
    Deepwell—Disposal of effluent by deepwell
    injection.
    Groundwater Recharge—Disposal of
    effluent via deepwell or other methods in
    order to replenish a groundwater aquifer
    for the purpose of municipal, agricultural,
    or industrial reuse, or to control salt water
    intrusion or land subsidence.
    Other Land Disposal—Disposal of effluent
    on public or private land for other than
    agricultural purposes. No effluent recovery
    is practiced. Examples: municipal golf
    course watering, highway right-of-way
    maintenance.
    Recycling and Reuse—Direct reuse of
    effluent for purposes other  than irrigation,
    for example, as cooling or quenching in
    an industrial process.
    Septic Tank Field—Disposal of effluent to
    a septic tank and leachfield or cesspool.

    Other—Any method of disposal not
    described elsewhere in this section.
    No Discharge—No discharge to surface or
    groundwaters.  Example: Complete
    retention in an evaporation  lagoon.
Spray Irrigation—Reuse of treated
effluent in agriculture by spraying.
Ditch Irrigation—Reuse of treated effluent
in agriculture using a ditch, swale, or
other surface flow method.
To Other WWT Plants—Direct transmis-
sion of treated effluent from a treatment
plant or raw wastes from a collection
system to another treatment facility for
further treatment prior to final disposal.
  The totals cannot be directly compared
with other table summaries since many
sewage treatment authorities have more
than one method of effluent disposal in
operation simultaneously. For example,
treated effluent may be going to a holding
pond and from there part may go to
surface waters and part to spray
irrigation. This use of multiple disposal
methods prevents the development of a
one to one correspondence between the
number of treatment facilities and the
number of effluent disposal methods.
UNITED  STATES  TOTAL
         CURHFNT  STATUS                    IN  OPERATION    42,068
                                         UNDER  CONSTRUCTION         604
         REQUIRED,  BUT  NOT  VET APPROVED  OR  FUNDED    12,274
Nature of Projected Change   N           0
                           ,vO           -.
-------
Table 40
Summary of Treatment and
Sludge Handling Processes-
Numbers of Plants and
Associated Row— United
States Totals




Table 40 summarizes the inventory of unit
processes that was compiled during the
1980 Survey. Items 1 through 64 refer to
the liquid line, items 65 through 95 refer
to the sludge line, and items 96 through
AD list miscellaneous processes and types
of controls. Table 41 expands the data
available for each of the 112 items.
Three categories of information are
developed for each item (unit process). For
each process, information is provided as
to whether a process is Now in Use,
Under Construction, or Required But Not
Yet Funded. In each category the total
number of processes is listed along with
an associated total flow. For processes
Now In Use, the total flow was compiled
using the Present Design Flow of the
treatment facility using the process. For
the Under Construction and Required But
Not Yet Funded categories, the total flow
was compiled using the Projected Design

Flow.
A unit process is defined to mean the
complete process. For instance, activated
sludge includes the aeration basin,
associated blowers and other integral
mechanical equipment, and the secondary
clarifier, which is not listed separately.
Multiple or parallel processes are
counted as one process for any single
facility. For example, if a facility has four
aerobic digesters, the number of aerobic
digesters counted in this summary is one,
not four. Therefore, the Number column
denotes the number of plants using that
process.











































TREATMENT P-Riil. ESSES
1 PUMP Nb,RA »ASTE*AIE>J
2 PREL MTNAH TREATMENT - H»U SCREEN
I PHEI MIN»M TREATMENT - <;KII WETIVAI
4 VREl MIM>., TREATMENT . r !«»». IM,TI>PS
5 PREl MINAR T(,EATMfl,1 - ilTMEUS
6 SCUM ME Mliy 1
7 HO* EUUAU/ATI.'N HASIN-,
A PREAERATMN
9 PRI*A*Y SEi'I"!*' T|UN
to. TRKKLINI. MIH - RUCK MEDIA
11. TRICKLING MlU - PlASUC MEDIA
12. TRICKLING MlTt - R( Iminm Si A t S
11, TRICKLING E II TE - UTE.ER ME. EM A
14. ACTIVATED SLurx, - CUNVE NT IONAL
15. ALTIVATEl) SI uDi.l - HIGH RATE
16. ACTIVATED SLulH.E . CONTACT ST AH I L I ZAT 1 UN
17. ACTIVATED MUIX.E - E>TENDED AERATION
18. PURE OXYGEN ACTIVATED SLUDGE
19, HIO-DISC (ROTATING HKHOGICAL FHTER)
20, OXIDATION DITCH USING MECHANICAL AERATORS
21, CLARIFICATION USING TIIHF SETTIERS
22. SECONDARY CLARIFICATION
21. BIOLOGICAL NITRIFICATION - SEPARATE STAGE
24. BIOLOGICAL NITRIFICATION » BOD H NIT.
25. BIOLOGICAL OENITR1EICATION
26. POST AERATION (HEAEHATION)
27. MICRliSTRAINEE.8 - PRIMARY
28. MICROSTRAINERS - SECONDARY
29. SAND FILTERS
30. MIX-MEDIA FILTERS (SAND AND COAL)
31. OTHFR EILTRATIONS
32, ACTIVATED CARHUN - GRANULAR
31. ACTIVATED CARHUN - POWDERED
14. TWO STAGE LIME TREATMENT OF RAH wASTEMATER
15, TWO STAGE TERTIARY LIME. TREATMENT
36. SINGLE STAGE LIME TREATMENT OF RAW WASTEwATER
37, SINGLE STAGE TERTIARY LIME TREATMENT
38, RECARBONAIION
39. NEUTRALIZATION
40. ALUM ADDITION TO PRIMARY
41. ALUM ADDITION TO SECONDARY
42. ALUM ADDITION TO SEPARATE STAGE TERTIARY
43, FERRI-CHLORIDE ADDITION TO PRIMARY
44. FERRI-CHLORIIU ADDITION TO SECONDARY
MM TN
NIIMHEH
" j'ln
*|/*s
*!*•"•
5 '»•
" 1 1
416
S,  ti?
t '1 , I ft < 179
"JlvM
<><>,h/
-------
Table 41	
Projected Change in Treatment
Process   Use—Numbers  of
Plants and Associated Flow
(Flow in Thousands of Cubic Meters per Day)
Table 41 is a national summary of the
number, the flow, and the projected
change information collected pertaining to
unit processes. Table 41 is an expansion
of the summary presented in Table 40.
Each unit process listed in Table 40 is
presented in greater detail herein.
  For easy reference the summaries are
presented in the same sequence as in
Table 40. For instance preaeration. item
number 8 in Table 40, can be found under
Table 41-8, the last number referring to
the Table 40 item number.
  Flows associated with each unit process
are the sum of the total plant flows for all
the facilities using that particular process.
All flows are given in thousands of cubic
meters per day. The Present  Design flow
was  used for processes Now In Use. The
Projected Design flow was used for
processes Under Construction and
Required But Not Yet Funded.
  The information for each unit process is
divided into two general categories, Type
1 and Type 2 estimates. Type 1
information was obtained from actual
preliminary engineering designs. Type 2
information was generally developed
using EPA cost estimating procedures
together with commonly accepted treat-
ment practices for the geographic area.
  The Projected Change Codes are
defined in the narrative accompanying
Table 3.

Process Total
Plants Flow
41*1 PUMPING, RAW WASTEWATfcR
ENLARGE 1,257 17,210
UPGRADE 219 4,110
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 335 5,812
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 4,170 15*57*
REPLACE 322 2,795
ABANDON 799 7,5*4
NO CHANGE 3,579 55,335
OTHER 2 10
TOTAL 10,602100,444
41-2 PRELIMINARY TREATMENT • BAR SCI
ENLARGE 1,461 23,301
UPGRADE 203 4,217
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 429 4,295
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 7,033 15,747
REPLACE 451 5,190
ABANDON 1,091 4,921
NO CHANGE 5,342 72,905
OTHER 2 12
TUTAL 16,092130,671
Type 1 Estimate
J . ,, Undtr Required but
Now in Use Construction Not Funded
Plants Flow Plants Flow Plants Flow

504 U ,2*6
II* M2»
24* *,458
0 0
170 2,362
790 6,701
2,917 49,611
2 10
4,772 79,329
»CCN
549 16 t 123
160 2,967
204 3,741
1 2
217 2,904
1,005 4,915
4,345 64,426
I 12
6,602 95,093
31 792
5 15
11 115
192 1,211
9 161
4 757
1 15
0 0
257 3*070
3* 975
6 709
10 75
224 1,477
n i,94i
t 0
3 0
0 0
294 5,267
1 117
1 0
0 0
900 10,923
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
910 11,041
2 124
0 0
2 79
1,305 9,403
1 0
0 0
1 4
0 0
1,311 9,611
Type 2 Estimate
K. . . . Under Required but
Now in Use Construction Not Funded
Plants Flow Plants Flow Plants Flow

720 4,997
77 207
75 237
0 0
133 260
5 23
650 5,707
0 0
1,660 U,514
036 6,077
117 460
132 390
2 1
219 334
5 5
991 8,551
0 0
2,302 15,830
1 37
0 0
1 0
1 66
1 9
0 0
1 1
0 0
5 III
0 0
0 0
1 0
2 68
1 9
0 0
1 1
0 0
5 81
0 0
0 0
0 0
3,069 3,377
1 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
3,070 3,377
1 1
0 0
0 0
5,«9S «,801
0 0
0 0
1 19
1 0
5,490 4,022

-------
1
Process Total
Plants Flow F
fype 1 Estimate
Under Required but
Mow in Use Construction Not Funded
3lants Flow Plants
41-3 PRELIMINARY THMT«*F'M - G»IT NF»nv4L
ENLARGE 75S 17, 62* 5VS 13,03* 1 ?"<
UPGRADE 14? 3,49? 69 3,«h7 1
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 267 6.SS9 200 4,b«? 1'
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 2,006 is, son 2 i« » *i
REPLACE 19R 3.332 115 3,0?H «.
ABANDON 4?6 3,416 ! 409 3,400 ; 1
NO CHANGE ?,490 62,643 2,114 55, 0

0,077 89.1S6 186
Flow Plants

'-, 1 h ft
1
? , 6 ° 0 0
ft 0
It 0
42 i

Flow

u
IS
1 , OSh
0

a, U80 7u9 U,o86

357
0
7 '4
939
49
0 i
39 :
0
1,460
0
0
0
4
0
0
0
0
a
15
0
26
1,021
31
0
0
0
1,095
66
0
e
453
0
0
0
0
521
278
0
0
646
121
0
0
0
0
2
0
6/3
0
0
2
2
679
0
0
0
9
0
0
0
0
9
0
0
0
39
0
0
0
0
39
0
0
0
296
0
! 0
0
0
298
0
0
0
66
I
0
0
1,048 I 68
557
13
2,021
1,242
1
0
0
525
299 0
0 3
97 0
0 : i

4,231 530

0
5
0
5,258
0
0
4
62
5,330
0
0
0
17
0
0
0
0
17
0
0
0
2,826
0
0
0
0
2,626
0
0
0
9,674
0
0
6
0
9,874
0
0
0
2,247
0
0
0
0
2,247
117
0
0
8,271
Type 2 Estimate
Now in Use
Plafvts • - -PlDW '
•;• .'. •'• '•',.••:<:
4/H /I, Oi* ..i
51 *K«
3 40S
77 ??S
16 16
371 7,269 '
0 0 '

9S1 12,630

315 2,549
64 226
77 539
0 0
35 204
5 3
358 2,787
0 0 ;
854 6,311 i
5 83
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
12 24
8 48
0 0 1
25 157
44 448
2 1
6 16
0 0
1 0
1 0
37 2,467
0 0
91 2,937
36 420
1 2
2 6
0 0
0 0
0 0
28 864
% 0 0
67 1,294
26 1,222
10 225
5 16
0 0
5 42
4 5
32 945
0 0
84 ?,458
! 454 4,643
i 125 840
116 667
', o o
0 39 <41
0 102 461
0
4

8,393
387 6,608
1 11

1,224 »3,495
Under Required but
Construction Not Funded
Plants Flow Plants

1 37 0
0 i) • 0
S rtJ 1,123
n i) •• o
0 0 ' 0
1 21 0
002

S 142
1,12^

1 37
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 37
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 37
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0
0
0
l,19tt
0
0
0
1
1,199
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
27
0
0
0
0
1 37 27
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 74
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 74
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 68
0 0
0 0
0 0
, 0 0
0
0
0
154
0
0
o
0
154
0
0
0
5
0
0
0
0
1 66 i 5
1 37
0 0
0 0
1 68
1
2
0
1,903

0 0 i U
000
0 0 : 1
1
3 115 1,907
Flow

0
0
o
0
0
0
0

,.,«

0
0
0
2,314
0
0
0
0
2,314
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
79
0
0
0
0
79
0
0
0
905
0
0
0
0
905
0
0
0
162
0
0
0
0
162
1
15
0
2,997


0


3,014

-------
Process Total
	 Plants Flow 	
Fype 1 Estimate
Under Required but
Mow in Use Construction Not Funded
3lants Flow Plants Flow Plants Flow
41*10 TRICKLING FILTER • ROCK MEDIA
ENLARGE 193 1,943
UPGRADE 322 3,255
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 210 1,203
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 75 1,099
REPLACE 111 685
ABANDON 960 4,299
NO CHANGE 862 10,441
OTHER 9 a
-------
ENLARGE 264 746
UPGRADE i?5 325
ENLARGE AND UPGRAUF life 549
INSTALL IN NF* PLANT 2,034 3,073
REPLACE 17 11
ABANDON 343 499
NO CHANGE 1,123 3,569
OTHER 1 18
TOTAL 4,023 8,794
41-18 PURE OXYGEN ACTIVATED SLUDGE
ENLARGE 12 1,220
UPGRADE 3 123
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 6 3,916
INSTALL IN NE* PLANT 54 11,648
REPLACE 0 0
ABANDON 5 109
NO CHANGE 42 4,281
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 122 21.299
41-19 BIO-DISC (ROTATING BIOLOGICAL
ENLARGE 15 225
UPGRADE 3 |2
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 2 21
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 421 3,723
REPLACE 1 1
ABANDON 4 37
NO CHANGE 156 1,639
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 602 5,661
41-20 OXIDATION DITCH USING MECHANI
ENLARGE 104 249
UPGRADE 21 54
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 6 14
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 661 1,396
REPLACE 4 1
ABANDON 18 33
NO CHANGE 397 941
OTHER 1 2
TOTAL 1,214 2,693
41-21 CLARIFICATION USING TUBE SETTl
ENLARGE 10 46
UPGRADE 1 7
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 5 64
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 19 232
REPLACE 0 0
ABANDON 4 14
NO CHANGE 24 311
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 63 677
41-22 SECONDARY CLARIFICATION
ENLARGE 228 1,906
UPGRADE 108 752
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 134 1,010
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 796 5,907
«EPLACE 88 253
ABANDON pi? 987
NO CHANGE 862 9,039
OTHER 5 50
TOTAL 2,453 19,888
41-23 BIOLOGICAL M T« IF JC AT ION - SEP
ENLARGE 22 992
UPGRADE 2 85
EN| ARGE AND UPGNAUE 4 152
INSTALL IN NF* PLANT 597 16,725
REPLACE 0 0
ABANDON 13 78
NO CHANGE 112 1,970
"THER 0 0
TOTAL 750 20,005
65 296 4 29
51 2/J7 0 0
53 457 5 23
0 0 99 225
15 80 0
324 487 I 0
1,023 3,449 1 0
1 18 no
1,532 4,965 lOfl 278
9 1,113
2 85
0 0
0 0
6 3,916 ; 0 0
0 0 10 1,757
0 00 0
5 109 ! 0 0
41 4,149 it 0
00 00
63 9,373
FILTER)
9 154
2 1
1 1
0 0
1 1
4 37
154 1,636
0 0
171 1,832
CAL AERATORS
17 73
10 35
4 3
0 0
2 0
10 25
378 908
0 0
10 1,757
0 0
o o
0 0
55 462
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
55 46?
0 0
o o
o o
46 84
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
421 1,047 46 84
_ERS
5 12 13
1700
1 30
0 0
0 0
4 14
20 201
0 0
1 26
1 55
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
33 267 S 86
79 1,120
61 667
82 792
3 6
60 170
179 682
774 7,558
3 17
1,241 11,016
1 0
1 0
a 106
59 765
1 30
0 0
3 29
0 0
69 932
0 0
1 1
0 0
491 1,438
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
492 1,439
0 0
9 0
0 0
42 8,755
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
42 8,755
0 0
1 11
0 0
338 3,123
0 0
o o
o o
o o
339 3,134
0 0
0 0
0 0
335 1,030
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
335 1,030
0 0
0 0
0 0
12 175
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
12 175
0 0
0 0
2 7
402 4,052
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 1
405 4,061
ARATE STAGE
10 170 ! 0 0 00
1 85 0 0 0 0
« 152 0 0 0 0
0 0 ; 45 1,954 275 11,422
0 0 0 00 0
11 7S 1 0 1 o
Ml 1 ,961 0 00 0
0 0-0 o ; 0 0
137 2,4
-------

Process Total
Plants Flow
Type 1 Estimate
Under Required but
Now m Use Construction Not Funded
Plants Flow Plants Flow Plants Flow
41*24 BIOLOGICAL NITRIFICATION • BOO t NIT
ENLARGE 44 961
UPGRADE 6 475
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 1 227
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 614 10,925
REPLACE 5 10
ABANDON 8 9
NO CHANGE 212 3,580
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 1,088 16,091
41*25 BIOLOGICAL DENITRIFICATION
ENLARGE 2 10
UPGRADE 0 0
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 1 6
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 62 862
REPLACE 0 0
ABANDON 0 0
NO CHANGE 21 481
OTHER 1 1,169
TOTAL 87 2,530
41*26 POST AERATION (REAERATION)
ENLARGE 57 1,114
UPGRADE 12 15
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 10 171
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 808 7,946
REPLACE 8 50
ABANDON 61 253
NO CHANGE 419 6,986
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 1,375 16,541
41*27 MICROSTRAINERS • PRIMARY
ENLARGE 6 226
UPGRADE 1 77
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 0 0
INSTALL IN NEN PLANT 24 155
REPLACE 1 264
ABANDON 4 7
NO CHANGE 16 1,938
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 52 2,670
41*28 MICROSTRAINERS • SECONDARY
ENLARGE 1« 159
UPGRADE 3 16
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 2 «
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 54 806
REPLACE 0 0
ABANDON 8 1,291
NO CHANGE 53 844
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 130 3,122
41*29 SAND FILTERS
ENLARGE 132 1,795
UPGRADE 28 129
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 29 466
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 4,064 19,121
REPLACE 12 146
ABANDON 156 267
NO CHANGE 994 7,189
OTHER 3 22
TOTAL 5,418 29,138
4i*3o MIX-MEDIA FILTERS (SAND AND c
ENLARGE 37 1,674
UPGRADE 3 228
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 2 425
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 276 9,455
REPLACE 1 3
ABANDON 15 83
NO CHANGE 172 5,912
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 506 17,783
16 336
3 9
1 227
1 3
0 0
7 7
205 3,525
0 0
233 4,110
0 0
0 0
1 6
0 0
0 0
0 0
19 440
0 0
20 447
26 335
6 9
6 155
1 1
2 6
59 247
364 6,063
0 0
466 6,616
4 221
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
4 7
14 1,935
0 0
22 2,165
5 117
0 0
1 1
0 0
0 0
6 1,291
51 826
0 0
65 2,239
54 1,026
14 70
19 442
1 0
10 144
148 262
800 6,952
0 0
1,046 8,902
OAL)
14 897
2 226
1 376
0 0
1 3
15 63
163 4,935
0 0
196 6,527
0 0
0 0
0 0
49 1,517
0 0
0 0
t 0
0 0
50 1,518
0 0
0 0
0 0
5 100
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
5 100
0 0
0 0
0 0
86 2,333
4 40
1 0
0 0
0 0
91 2,373
0 0
0 0
0 0
3 18
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
3 16
0 0
0 0
0 0
13 227
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
11 227
2 19
0 0
1 1
127 3,309
0 0
2 0
1 5
0 0
133 3,335
0 0
0 0
0 0
26 If851
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
26 1,851
0 0
0 0
0 0
270 7,390
0 0
0 0
00
0 0
270 7,390
0 0
0 0
0 0
26 536
0 0
Type 2 Estimate
, , Under Required but
Now in Use Construction Not Funded
Plants Flow Plants Flow Plants Flow

28 524
3 465
0 0
0 0
3 10
1 2
6 54
0 0
41 1,057
2 10
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
00 00
00 2 41
1 1,169
27 1,705
0 0
1 1
0 0
465 4,875
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
466 4,877
0 0
0 0
0 0
20 135
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
20 135
0 0
0 0
0 0
26 293
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
26 293
0 0
1 0
0 0
1,040 10,272
0 0
1 0
0 0
3 22
1,045 10,295
0 0
0 0
0 0
164 7,106
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
184 7,106
0 0
4 51
29 779
4 3
4 16
0 0
2 3
1 6
55 923
0 0
95 1,732
2 4
1 77
0 0
0 0
1 264
0 0
2 2
0 0
6 346
4 40
3 16
1 3
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 15
0 0
10 76
75 536
11 54
9 22
0 0
2 1
5 4
192 224
0 0
294 843
23 776
1 0
1 47
0 0
0 0
0 0
9 977
0 0
34 1,801
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 63
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 83
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 0
0 0
0 0
1 13
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 14
1 211
0 0
0 0
1 264
0 0
0 0
1 7
0 0
3 483
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
494 2,014
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
494 2,014
0 0
0 0
0 0
31 225
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
31 225
0 0
1 0
0 0
.54 655
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
255 656
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 1
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 1
0 0
0 0
0 0
14 272
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
14 272
0 0
2 3
0 0
2,695 5,277
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2,697 5,281
0 0
0 0
0 0
64 497
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
64 497

-------

Process Total
Plants Flow
Type 1 Estimate
.,„ „ i !„ Under Required but
Now in Use Construction No, Func-d
Plants Flow Plants Flow Pl.mts Flew
ai-ji OTHER FILIATIONS
ENLARGE 6 569 2 l
UPGRADE 00 00
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 00 0 0
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 27 895 0 0
REPLACE o o o o
ABANDON 8 1
-------

Process Total
Plants Flow
41*38 RECARBONATION
ENLARGE 2 19
UPGRADE 0 0
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 0 0
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 25 1,270
REPLACE 0 0
ABANDON 3 6
NO CHANGE 22 1,136
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 52 2,432
41-39 NEUTRALIZATION
ENLARGE 2 24
UPGRADE 0 0
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 0 0
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 16 207
REPLACE o o
ABANDON 4 8
NO CHANGE 10 131
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 32 371
41*40 ALUM ADDITION TO PRIMARY
ENLARGE 6 311
UPGRADE 1 10
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 2 7
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 49 1,462
REPLACE I 5
ABANDON 21 153
NO CHANGE 41 2,507
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 123 4,477
41*41 ALUM ADDITION TO SECONDARY
ENLARGE 32 1,300
UPGRADE 9 83
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 11 616
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 43$ 5,056
REPLACE 1 1
ABANDON 20 131
NO CHANGE 188 4,166
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 698 11,359
41*42 ALUM ADDITION TO SEPARATE STA
ENLARGE 11 175
UPGRADE 0 0
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 0 0
INSTALL IN NEN PLANT 83 1.594
REPLACE 0 0
ABANDON 1 0
NO CHANGE 54 1,602
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 149 3,372
4l*4J FERRI-CHLORIDE ADDITION TO PR
ENLARGE 3 32
UPGRADE 0 0
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 0 0
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 12 291
REPLACE 1 3
ABANDON 12 243
NO CHANGE 26 976
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 54 1,547
41*44 FERRI*CHLORIDE ADDITION TO SE
ENLARGE 10 248
UPGRADE 6 70
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 3 72
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 110 783
REPLACE 1 5
ABANDON 6 92
NO CHANGE 138 4,007
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 276 5,2*0
Type 1 Estimate
Mrt,., ;„ i io« Under Required but
Now m Use Construction Not Funded
Plants Flow Plants Flow Plants Flow

0 0
o o
o o
o o
o o
1 5
21 1,110
o o
22 1,116
2 24
0 0
0 0
0 0
o o
3 7
9 123
o o
14 156
6 46
0 0
1 5
0 0
0 0
20 153
37 2,477
0 0
64 2,682
14 582
4 37
10 596
0 0
0 0
18 122
177 3,367
0 0
223 4,706
BE TERTIARY
5 35
0 0
o o
0 0
o o
1 0
SO t,»83
0 0
5* 1,618
IMARV
2 32
0 0
o o
o o
1 3
12 243
25 971
0 0
40 1,250
CONDARY
3 100
6 70
3 72
0 0
o o
7 92
131 3,978
0 0
150 4,313
0 0
0 0
0 0
5 10
0 0
1 0
0 0
0 0
6 10
0 0
0
0
1 t
0
0
0
0
1 10
o o
o o
0 0
8 701
1 5
0 0
o o
8 0
9 707
0
0
0
3» 48
0
0
o o
o o
38 881
o o
o o
o o
9 178
0 0
« 0
0 0
0 0
9 178
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
o o
o o
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0 i
0 0
0 0
n lie
o o
A 0
o o
0 0
IS 118
0
0
0
950
0
0
0 0
0 0
8 950
0
0
0
1 186
0
0
0
0
12 186
0 0
0 0
0 0
29 585
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
29 585
0 0
0 0
0 0
181 3,155
0 0
1 0
0 0
0 0
182 3,155
0
0
0
4 1,141
0
o
0
0 0
46 1,141
0
0
o
212
A
V
o
0
0 0
* 212
0 0
0 0
0 0
67 557
0 0
1 0
0 0
0 0
68 557
Type 2 Estimate
M~... .„ M~ . Under Required but
Now m Use Construction Not Funded


2 19
0 0
0 0
0 0
o o
1 0
1 26
0 0
4 46
0
o
0
0
0
1
1 7
0 0
2 8
2 265
1 10
1 1
0 0
o o
1 0
4 29
0 0
9 3«7
18 718
5 «5
3 20
0 0
i i
1 8
11 801
0 0
39 1,596
6 140
0
0
0
0
o
4 19
0 0
10 159
1
0
o
0
o
1
0
2 5
7 148
0
0
0
1
0
7 28
0 0
15 183
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 0
8 0
0 0
0 0
3 29
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
3 29
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
OA
V
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0
0

0
0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
00
V
12 309
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
12 309
0 0
0 0
o
to
o
o
o
0
3 10
0
0
0
1 194
0
0
0
0 0
12 194
8 0
0 8
0 0
213 1,391
8 8
0 0
0 0
0 0
213 1,391
0 0
0 0
0 0
28 274
0 0
OA
V
0 0
0 0
28 274
0 0
0 0
OM
V
3 78
OA
0
OA
V
0 0
0 0
3 78
0 0
0 0
0 0
28 107
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
28 107

-------

Process Total
Plants . Flow
Type 1 Estimate
Under Required but
Now in Use Construction Not Funded
Plants Flow Plants Flow Plants Flow
41*45 FERRI-CHLORlDt ADDITION TO SFPAkATE STAGt TtWTIAWV
ENLARGE b 102 2 25
UPGRADE 00 00
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 2 50 2 30
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 25 1.714 0 0
REPLACE 1 51 5
ABANDON 1 0 00
NO CHANGE 23 256
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 57 2,110
41*46 OTHER CHEMICAL ADDITIONS
ENLARGE 11 206
21 254
0 0
26 315
6 60
UPGRADE 3 457 1 454
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 4 48
INSTALL IN NEN PLANT 45 1,655
REPLACE 1 757
ABANDON 17 126
NO CHANGE 53 2,616
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 134 6,069
41-47 ION EXCHANGE
ENLARGE 1 0
UPGRADE 0 0
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 0 0
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 5 47
REPLACE 0 0
ABANDON 0 0
NO CHANGE 1 204
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 7 252
41-48 BREAKPOINT CHLORINATION
ENLARGE 1 65
UPGRADE 1 0
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 1 fO
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 18 530
REPLACE 0 0
ABANDON 0 0
NO CHANGE 8 117
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 29 624
41-49 AMONIA STRIPPING
ENLARGE 0 0
UPGRADE 0 0
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 0 0
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 6 53
REPLACE 0 0
ABANDON 0 0
NO CHANGE 8 302
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 14 356
41*50 DECHLORINATION
ENLARGE 34 664
UPGRADE 1 0
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 1 17
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 291 1*926
REPLACE 1 5
ABANDON 11 276
NO CHANGE 136 1,699
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 475 4,595
2 30
0 0
1 757
16 123
51 2,506
0 0
77 3,932
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 204
0 0
1 204
0 0
1 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
7 114
0 0
6 114
1 43
0 0
0 0
? 1,207
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 1,250
0 0
0 0
0 0
* 1,305
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
6 1,305
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 90
3 132
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
4 223
0 0 I 0 0
0 0 ! 0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
8 302
0 0
6 302
11 257
1 0
1 17
0 0
1 5
11 278
119 1,631
0 0
144 2,191
0 0
ft 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
30 289
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
30 289
0 0
Type 2 Estimate
Under Required but
Now in Use Construction Not Funded
Plants Flow Plants Flow Plants Flow

2 34
00 00
00 00
11 381 0 0
0 00 0
00 1 0
0 0
0 0
11 381
0 0
0 0
0 0
31 500
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
31 500
0 0
0 0
0 0
4 46
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
4 46
0 0
0 0
0 0
9 356
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
9 356
0 0
0 0
0 0
3 42
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
3 42
0 0
0 0
0 0
106 1,195
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
106 1,195
41-51 CHLORINATION FOR DISINFECTION
2 2
o o
5 37
5 147
2 3
2 18
0 0
0 0
1 3
2 110
0 0
12 282
1 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 0
1 65
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 3
0 0
2 68
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
21 3*6
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
17 66
0 0
38 437
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 18
0 0
0 0
1 73
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
3 111
0 0
6 0
0 0
12 124
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
12 124
0 0
0 0
0 0
6 49
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
8 49
0 0
0 0
0 0
I 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
6 41
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
6 41
0 0
0 0
0 0
3 10
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
3 10
0 0
0 0
0 0
154 370
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
154 370

ENLARGE
UPGRADE
ENLARGE
INSTALL
REPLACE
ABANDON


AND UPGRADE
IN NEN PLANT


NO CHANGE
OTHER
TOTAL 	


1,


7.


4,

5,
308
359
491
868
285
961
403
6
14,561
5
9
21
3
4
45

,
,
,
.
.
.

661105,
751
776
562
695
499
413
239
540
500
200
324
0
167
937
3,608
2
S,938
8
5
8

3
4
36

67
,694 1 32
,150
,112
0
.279
,469
.201
11
,939
2
17
272
*
1
S
1
33*
800 I
19
958
2,087
97
0
5
227
4,196
1,761  14,360
772 4
157
149
3
107
18
591 7
2
799 13
,635
561
704
6
292
9
,207
0
,638
2
0
1
5
1
0
0
0
9
                                       336
                                                 1
                                                 0
                                                 0
                                             5,832
                                                 1
                                                 1
                                                 0
                                                 1
    1
    0
    0
5,055
    0
    0
    0
    0
                                             5,636  5,057

-------

Process Total
Plants Flow
Type 1 Estimate t
M ,, Unden i Required but
Now in Use Constrfucjion Not Funded
Plants Flow Plants : Flow Plants Flow
41-52 OZONATION FOB DISINFECTION : : .
ENLARGE 2 15 j I 7
UPGRADE 0 0 •' 0 0
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 0 0:0 0
INSTALL IN NEN PLANT 20 604
REPLACE 0 0
ABANDON 0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
NO CHANGE 21 1,547 19 1,073
OTHER 0 0 i 0 0
TOTAL 43 2,166 j 20 1,081
41-53 OTHER DISINFECTION
ENLARGE 0 0 ! 0 0
UPGRADE 0 0
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 0 0
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 9 13
REPLACE 0 0
ABANDON 1 2
NO CHANGE 5 3,«55
OTHER 0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 2
5 3,455
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
a 7 a
0; 0
0 0
0 0
ft 0
4 74
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 3
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
13 361
0 0
0 0
1 454
0 0
14 615
0 0
0 0
0 0
Type 2 Estimate
NnwmtlQM Under Required but
Now in Use Construction Not Funcieu
Plants Flow Plants Flow Plants Flow

I 7
0 0
o o
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 10
0 0
2 26
0 0
0 0
0 0
6 9 ! 0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 u
0 0
1 73
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 73
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 94
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 94
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
CNlANbt 3 1
UPGRADE 0 0
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 0 0
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 25 42
REPLACE 1 0
ABANDON 63 71
NO CHANGE 10 9
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 102 125
1 1
0 0
o o
0 0
1 0
12 36
9 9
o o
23 49
0 0
0 0
o o
1 2
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
t 2
0 0
0 0
0 0
21 39
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
o o
51 33
1 0
0 0 | 0 0
21 39
41-55 LAND TREATMENT OF SECONDARY EFFLUENT (30/30)
ENLARGE 66 776
UPGRADE 7 77
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 12 274
INSTALL IN NEN PLANT 474 2,886
REPLACE 2 3
ABANDON 25 151
NO CHANGE 362 1,690
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 970 5,663
30 572
5 65
* 59
0 0
1 3
22 148
311 1,364
0 0
375 2,233
0 0
0 0
0 0
11 84
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
It 84
0 0
0 0
0 0
250 1,860
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
250 1,660
54 33
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
Oft
v
3 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
3 0

36 204
2 12
* 215
0 0
1 0
3 3
71 306
0 0
121 741
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
o o
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
213 923
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
213 923
41-56 LAND TREATMENT OF INTERMEDIATE EFFLUENT
ENLARGE 17 55
UPGRADE 5 1 1
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 2 15
INSTALL IN NEN PLANT 102 186
REPLACE 0 0
ABANDON 26 26
NO CHANGE 119 234
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 271 532
41-57 STABILIZATION PONDS
ENLARGE 876 2.623
UPGRADE 600 573
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 364 580
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 3,521 2,597
REPLACE 25i 282
ABANDON |,n<, if604
NO CHANGE 2,460 6,915
OTHER 32 82
TOTAL 9,220 15,262
41-58 AERATED LAGOONS
ENLARGE 169 711
UPGRADE 106 632
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 66 566
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 2,614 2,221
REPLACE 30 73
ABANDON 133 390
NO CHANGE 664 2,536
OTHER U 12
TOTAL 3,786 7,166
3 31
2 6
0 0
0 0
o o
U 20
76 138
0 0
94 199
207 1,482
235 356
199 437
1 0
106 120
798 1,213
2,010 5,728
24 71
3,560 9,414
35 155
50 474
42 366
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 11
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 11
12 18
6 12
11 23
57 169
1 0
0 0
1 0
0 0
8* ?24
1 5
0 0
1 0
6* 24o
11 41 ! 0 0
108 266
599 2,400
3 12
646 3,741
0 0
0 0
0 0
70 25J
0 0
0 0
0 0
56 145
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
56 145
0 0
0 0
0 0
667 1,542
0 0
1 0
0 0
0 0
668 1,542
14 24
3 2
2 15
0 0
0 0
15 6
41 95
0 0
75 144
659 1,122
357 201
153 119
1 0
144 162
315 390
449 1,187
7 9
2,065 3,193
0 0 i 133 550
1 1 55 156
3 11 20 207
527 1,29^
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
531 1.305
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
t 0
1 0
1 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
3 1
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
44 31
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
44 31
0 0
1 0
0 0
2,794 865
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 1
2,796 666
0 0
0 0
0 0
2.019 682
19 31 0 0 ' 0 0
25 102
65 135
1 0
316 1,185
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2,019 662

-------

Process Total
Plants Flow
41-59 OUTFALL PUMPING
ENLARGE 53 2,222
UPGRADE 6 731
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 9 1,047
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 283 5,752
REPLACE 7 1,777
ABANDON 32 390
NO CHANGE 156 7,698
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 546 19,621
41-60 OUTFALL DIFRJSER
ENLARGE 8 668
UPGRADE 2 7
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 3 864
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 50 5,043
REPLACE 3 281
ABANDON 2 329
NO CHANGE 53 3,718
OTHER 1 5
TOTAL 122 10,919
41«61 EFFLUENT TO OTHER PLANTS
ENLARGE 3 51
UPGRADE 0 0
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 0 0
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 18 461
REPLACE 0 0
ABANDON 5 91
NO CHANGE 4 88
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 30 692
41-62 EFFLUENT OUTFALL
ENLARGE 1.149 12,370
UPGRADE 391 3,848
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 412 4,779
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 7,103 13,466
REPLACE 486 3,375
ABANDON 1,552 5,746
NO CHANGE 8,664 81,031
OTHER 48 54
TOTAL 19,805124,673
41-63 OTHER TREATMENT
ENLARGE 21 728
UPGRADE 11 537
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 7 681
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 161 5,333
REPLACE 26 34
ABANDON 310 157
NO CHANGE 163 4,160
OTHER 2 1
TOTAL 701 11,636
41-64 RECALCINATION
ENLARGE 5 475
UPGRADE 3 223
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 1 378
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 13 284
REPLACE 0 0
ABANDON 4 83
NO CHANGE 16 1,239
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 42 2,683
41-65 AEROBIC DIGESTION • AIR
ENLARGE 525 3,681
UPGRADE 119 877
ENLARGE AND UPGPAOE 136 1,035
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 2, BOO 10,440
REPLACE S2 158
ABANDON 554 1,193
NO CHANGE 1,783 11 ,015
OTHFR 5 9
TOTAL 5,774 28,411
Type 1 Estimate
Under Required but
Now in Use Construction Not Funded
Plants Flow Plants Flow Plants Flow

39 1,962
5 722
7 248
0 0
3 322
32 390
143 5,373
0 0
229 9,019
5 655
1 0
1 68
0 0
2 16
2 329
50 3,700
0 0
61 4.769
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
5 91
4 88
0 0
9 180
486 7,353
184 3,414
239 4,401
3 0
268 2,485
1,504 5,619
6,214 70,821
11 33
8,909 94,129
7 679
6 533
5 678
0 0
20 22
126 136
130 3,919
2 1
296 5,971
2 289
3 223
1 378
0 0
0 0
4 83
14 671
0 0
24 1,646
107 1,985
59 7S1
73 752
0 0
30 90
339 1,181
1,568 9,860
3 8
2,239 14,631
0 0
0 0
1 794
13 1,283
t 1,162
0 0
0 0
ft 0
15 3,240
0 0
0 0
1 794
R 247
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
9 1.042
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 10
0 0
0 0
0 0
ft 0
2 10
2? 1,416
3 3
19 92
218 1,339
17 213
2 0
1 0
0 0
28? 3,066
1 24
o o
ft 0
17 1,358
0 0
ft 0
ft 0
0 0
1* 1,383
ft 0
0 0
0 0
1 37
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 37
S 45
n o
? 99
137 2,008
Type 2 Estimate
.. , . Under Required but
Now in Use Construction Not Funded
Plants Flow Plants Flow Plants Flow

0 0 13 223
0 0 ! 1 9
00 13
205 4,325 0 0
00 3 293
0 00 0
00 13 2,324
00 00
205 4,325
0 0
0 0
0 0
25 4,747
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
25 4.747
0 0
0 0
0 0
IS 428
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
15 428
0 0
0 0
0 0
1,241 7,841
0 0
2 15
0 0
0 0
1,243 7,856
0 0
0 0
0 0
131 3,931
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
131 3,931
0 0
0 0
0 0
7 237
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
7 237
0 0
0 0
0 0
740 5,755
ft 0 00
ft 0 ! 0 0
10 10
0 0
14S 2,153
31 2,855
3 13
1 7
1 1
0 0
1 264
0 0
3 17
1 S
10 311
3 51
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
3 51
640 3,563
204 429
153 285
3 2
201 676
43 112
2,448 10.246
35 21
3,727 15,337
13 24
5 4
2 3
0 0
6 12
184 21
33 ?40
0 0
243 306
3 185
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 567
0 0
5 753
351 1.647
60 126
61 183
0 0
22 68
15 11
212 1,153
0 00 0
741 5,755
721 3,190
1 37
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 37
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 37
0 0
1 0
2 6
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
4 44
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 73
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
? 73
0 0
0 0
0 0
65 143
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
65 143
0 0
0 0
0 0
17 46
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
17 48
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 22
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 22
0 0
0 0
0 0
5,636 4,264
0 0
1 0
1 0
2 0
5,640 4,285
0 0
0 0
0 0
13 42
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
13 42
0 0
0 0
0 0
5 9
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
5 9
2 3
0 0
0 0
1,921 2,606
0 0
0 0
1 0
2 0
1.926 2,610

-------


Process
Plants
41-66 AEROBIC DIGESTION
ENLARGE
UPGRADE
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE
INSTALL IN NEN PLANT
REPLACE
ABANDON
NO CHANGE
OTHER
TOTAL
41*67 COMPOSTING
ENLARGE
UPGRADE
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT
REPLACE
ABANDON
NO CHANGE
OTHER
TOTAL
.
9
2
2
27
0
8
26
0
74
2
3
1
25
1
1
9
0
42

Total
Flow
OXYGEN
4«
S7
7
eob
0
55
aa2
0
1.41S
112
2.636
0
1,476
18
1
173
0
4,423
Type 1
Now in
Plants

4
1
1
0
0
6
25
0
3<>
0
2
1
0
1
1
6
0
13
Estimate

Under Required but
Use Construction Not Funded
Flow Plants

39
56
5
0
0
55
427
0
baa
0
1,181
0
0
18
1
168
0
1,369
0
0
1
2
0
0
0
0
3
A
ft
0
?
0
fl
0
ft
?
Flow Plants Flow

0
0
1
30
0
0
0
0
32
0
0
0
107
0
0
0
0
107
0 0
0 0
0 0
21 764
0 0
ft 0
0 0
0 0
21 764
0 0
0 0
0 0
20 735
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
20 735
Type 2 Estimate


.. Under Required but
Now in Use Construction Not Funded
Plants Flow Plants

590
1 0 0
0 A 0
000
00 0
00 0
1 15 | 0
000
7 24 0
1 75 1
1 1,457 0
000
0 0 1
000
000
1 4 0
000
3 1.537 2
Flow Plants

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
37
0
0
9
0
0
0
0
47
0
0
0
4
0

0
0
4
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
2
Flow

0


9




9
0
0
0
625
0
0
0
0
625
41*66 ANAEROBIC DIGESTION
ENLARGE 637 16,394 310 11,591
UPGRADE 274 5,445
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 351 7,733
INSTALL IN NEN PLANT 1,176 10,093
REPLACE 128 1,023
ABANDON 987 12,074
NO CHANGE 1,949 37,775
OTHER 14 917
TOTAL 5,516 91,457
41*69 SLUDGE LAGOONS
ENLARGE 77 1*873
UPGRADE 31 805
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 35 1,580
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 150 2,413
REPLACE 9 71
ABANDON 108 2,167
NO CHANGE 349 6,060
OTHER 2 465
TOTAL 761 17,457
41*70 HEAT TREATMENT
ENLARGE 30 1,510
UPGRADE 6 239
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 6 661
INSTALL IN NEN PLANT 47 6,561
REPLACE 3 20
ABANDON 15 1,244
NO CHANGE 105 9,760
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 212 20,039
•1*71 CHLORINE OXIDATION OF SLUDGE
ENLARGE 4 509
UPGRADE 0 0
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 1 26
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 18 160
REPLACE I 10
ABANDON 3 36 1
NO CHANGE 27 567
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 54 1,695
41*72 LIME STABILIZATION
ENLARGE 6 614
UPGRADE 3 82
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 0 0
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 37 640
REPLACE 0 0
ABANDON 6 234
NO CHANGE 50 2,160
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 104 3,732
175 3,660
249 6,374
I 378
94 631
877 11,745
1,616 33,264
10 155
3,334 66,020
39 1,564
19 162
22 1,071
0 0
6 24
96 2,123
296 7,762
2 465
460 13,174
13 1,202
5 235
3 229
0 0
2 20
12 1,231
95 9,571
0 0
130 12,491
(PURIFAX)
2 466
0 0
1 26
0 0
1 10
3 361
25 512
0 0
32 1,416
3 468
2 73
0 0
0 0
0 0
6 234
44 1,700
0 0
55 2,496
19 455
8 1,205
1? 731
81 946
9 121
0 0
3 72
? 756
134 4,291
2 20
0 0
3 442
10 96
1 31
0 0
A 0
ft 0
16 592
1 43
0 0
1 435
7 2,557
0 0
0 0
0 0
A 0
9 3,035
0 0
0 0
A 0
3 45
A 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
3 45
1 43
0 0
0 0
4 46
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
S 69
0 0 307 4,310
0 0
0 0
368 6,406
0 0
1 0
0 0 '
0 0
389 6,406
0 0
1 0
0 0
114 2,237
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
115 2,237
0 0
0 0
0 0
25 3,756
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
25 3,756
0 0
0 0
0 0
11 133
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
11 133
0 0
0 0
0 0
26 548
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
28 54B
91 559
90 627
2 347
25 70
109 328
327 4,426
1 2
952 10,676
36 2B6
11 642
10 67
0 0
2 15
12 43
53 316
0 0
124 1,375
16 264
1 3
2 16
0 0
1 0
3 13
10 209
0 0
33 507
2 22
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 75
0 0
4 96
3 45
1 9
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
6 460
0 0
10 514
1 37
0 0
0 0
2 77
0 0
0 0
1 10
0 0
4 125
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
I 37
0 0
0 0
1 5
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 42
0 0
0 0
0 0
702 1,937
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 1
703 1,916
0 0
0 0
0 0
26 77
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
26 77
0 0
0 0
0 0
15 245
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
IS 245
0 0
0 0
0 0
4 1
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
4 1
0 0
0 0
0 0
4 40
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
4 40

-------




Process Total
Dlants Flow
Type 1 Estimate

., , , Under Requir
Now m Use Construction K'o; Fu
Plants Flow Plants
Flow Plants

ed but
nded
Flo-.v
Type 2
Now in
Plants
Estimate


• i. Under Required but
Construction Not Funded
Flow Plants
Flow Plants
Flow
41-73 MtT AIR OXIDATION ' " '
ENLARGE
UPGRADE
ENLARGE AND UPGKAUF
INSTALL IN NEw PI ANT
REPLACE
ABANDON
NO CHANGE
OTHER
TOTAL
41-74 AIR DRYING
ENLARGE
UPGRADE
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT
REPLACE
ABANDON
NO CHANGE
OTHER
7 556
1 90
0 4b4
5 361
0 0
5 228
3U 1,842
0 0
56 3,534
1,144 9,822
215 2,998
362 2,775
3,798 9,633
303 1,161
1,110 4,798
3,584 28,126
10 85
TOTAL 10.536 5", 405
3 382
1 90
3 170
0 0
0 0
5 228
31 1,687
0 0
43 2,559
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
0
3
469 6,151 14
114 1,220
240 2,413
2 2
122 855
1,061 4,747
2,955 25,301
5 fe3
4,968 40,756
4
9
13«
3
1
5
1
17S
0 0
0 0
0 0
94 2
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
94 2
274 0
39 0
39 1
400 833
19 0
1 0
28 0
7 2
818 836
0
0
0
266
0
0
0
0
266
0
0
2
5,453
0
0
0
12
5,468
41-75 DEWATERING - MECHANICAL - VACUUM FILTER
4
0
1
0
0
0
3
0
8
661
97
112

178
47
622
0
1,720
174 0
0
283
0
0
0
155
0
613
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3,397 0
1,736
320
372
206
49
2,795
0
8,961
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
2
0 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 0
0
0
11
0
0
0
0
11
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2,820 1.391
0
1
2
2
2,825 3
0
0
1
1
,394

ENLARGE 228 8,538
UPGRADE 49 4,924
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 65 4,774
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 618 12,833
REPLACE 15 489
ABANDON 113 5,620
NO CHANGE 669 28,711
OTHER 2 19
TOTAL 1,759 65,911
41-76 DEMATERING - MECHANICAL - CEN
ENLARGE 46 4,419
UPGRADE 9 345
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 14 614
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 79 10,111
REPLACE 3 52
ABANDON 10 434
NO CHANGE 126 7,037
OTHER 1 0
TOTAL 292 23,216
41-77 DEMATERING - MECHANICAL • FIL
ENLARGE 18 569
UPGRADE 1 5
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 9 191
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT J24 7,660
REPLACE 1 6
ABANDON ? 34
NO CHANGE 74 2,906
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 229 11,374

41-78 DEMATERING - OTHERS
ENLARGE 2 76
UPGRADE 1 5
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 2 1,241
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 19 202
REPLACE 1 1
ABANDON 5 8
NO CHANGE 18 414
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 48 1,950
41-79 GRAVITY THICKENING
ENLARGE 136 7,931
UPGRADE 23 1,658
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 31 3,066
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 438 10,565
REPLACE 7 180
ABANDON t>g 4,791
NO CHANGE 449 22,159
OTHER 1 75
TOTAL 1,154 50,429
104 5,946
31 4,637
44 3,621
0 0
11 436
110 5,604
591 26,554
2 19
893 46,820
TRIFUGE
26 2,053
8 337
9 526
0 0
2 47
10 434
116 6,477
0 0
171 9,877
TER PRESS
13 506
1 5
7 166
0 0
1 6
2 34
67 2,461
0 0
91 3,180
14 504
1 22
? 763
94 2,106
1 31
1 0
4 168
0 0
U7 3,596
1 68
0 0
2 106
17 584
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
20 758
0 0
0 0
0 0
7 2,361
ft 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
7 2,361
2 123
0 0
0 0
236 8,490
0 0
0 0
A 0
0 0
238 8,613
0 0
0 0
0 0
52 8,822
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
52 8,622
0 0
0 0
0 0
103 4,914
0 0
0 0
1 1$
0 0
104 4,930
«
1 75
1 5
1 1,237
0 0
1 1
5 8
17 410
0 0
26 1,740
66 6,087
20 1,625
21 2,194
1 22
6 175
67 4,769
406 20,296
1 75
588 35,245
0 0
0 0
ft 0
1 2
0 0
ft 0
ft 0
ft 0
1 2
4 101
ft 0
? 762
6ft 2,524
ft 0
ft 0
t 41
ft 0
67 3,431
0 0
106 1,964
1 6 2S6
19 389
1 0
3 21
1 is
74 1,986
0 0
222 4,636
21 2,296
1 7
3 182
0 0
1 5
0 0
12 5S9
0 0
36 3,053
4 25
0 0
1 20
0 0
0 0
0 0
6 430
0 0
11 476
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 73
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 73
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 13
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 13
1 37
0 0
0 0
1 264
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 302
0 0
1 6
0 0
285 2,163
OA
V
I A
1 V
0 0
0 0
267 2,169
0 0
0 0
0 0
9 691
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 0
10 691
0 0
00
V
13 118
0 0
Oft
V
0 0
0 0
14 123

1 0
00 00
0 0 1 3
10 72 0 0
0 00 0
00 00
00 13
0 0,0 0
10 72 ;
1 11?
0 0
0 0
3 8
65 1,624
3 32
8 110
210 6,564 0 0
0 0 ! 1 S
0 0
0 0
0 0
211 6,681
2 22
42 1,621
0 0
121 3,617
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
8 127
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
8 127
0 0
0 0
0 0
167 1,454
0 0
0 0
V V
0 0
0 0
167 1,454

-------
ENLARGE 6? 4,327
UPGRADE 21 5,269
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 16 3,066
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 89 7,707
REPLACE 8 1,010
ABANDON 40 1,184
NO CHANGE 166 13,059
OTHER 1 1,169
TOTAL 404 36,794
41*82 INCINERATION - FLUIOIZEO BfcDS
ENLARGE 2 19
UPGRADE 1 124
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 0 0
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 3 287
REPLACE 1 14
ABANDON 0 0
NO CHANGE 15 1,091
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 22 1,537
41-83 INCINERATION . ROTARY KRN
ENLARGE 1 0
UPGRADE 0 0
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 2 140
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 0 0
REPLACE 00
ABANDON 2 12
NO CHANGE 3 83
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 8 236
41*84 INCINERATION * OTHERS
ENLARGE 2 125
UPGRADE 0 0
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 1 511
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 2 223
REPLACE 0 0
ABANDON 0 0
NO CHANGE 10 439
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 15 1,298
41*85 PVROLYSIS
ENLARGE 0 0
UPGRADE 0 0
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 0 0
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 4 121
REPLACE 0 0
ABANDON 0 0
NO CHANGE 2 97
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 6 219
41*86 CO»INCINERATION MITH SOLID MA
ENLARGE 0 0
UPGRADE 0 0
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 0 0
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 3 6
REPLACE 0 0
ABANDON 0 0
NO CHANGE S 140
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 8 146
i2 2,»11
17 4,398
13 2,742
0 0
6 991
37 1,149
143 11,094
0 0
248 23,188
2 19
1 124
0 0
0 0
1 14
0 0
13 1,059
0 0
17 1,216
0 0
0 0
2 UO
0 0
0 0
2 12
3 83
0 0
7 2*6
2 125
0 0
1 Sill
0 0
0 0
0 0
9 415
0 0
12 1,D51
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 97
0 0
2 97
STE
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
5 140
0 0
5 }40
'4 271
t 757
0 0
1* 901
0 0
0 0
1 1
0 0
22 1,931
0 0
0 0
0 0
t 22
o o
0 0
0 0
0 0
t 22
0 0
0 0
0 0
A 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
A 0
0 0
A 0
A 0
A 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
A 0
A 0
A 0
A 0
0 0
A 0
A 0
A 0
A 0
1 227 25 1,016
00 4 113
0 0
53 6,106
0 0
0 0
1 60
1 1,169
56 7,563
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 264
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 264
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
o o
2 223
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 223
0 0
0 0
0 0
4 121
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
4 121
0 0
0 0
0 0
3 6
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
3 6
3 324
0 0
2 18
3 35
21 1,902
0 0
58 3,410
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 31
0 0
2 31
1 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 24
0 0
1 24
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
o o
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 338
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 338
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
e o
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
18 S60
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
18 360
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
o o
0 0
0 0
0 0

-------
!
Process Total
Plants Flow
Type 1 Estimate
., ... Under Required but
Now in Use Construction Not Funded
Plants Flow Plants Flow Plants Flow
41-87 CO-PYROLVSIS MTM SOLID WASTf
ENLARGE 1 1
UPGRADE 0 0
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 0 0
INSTALL IN MEM PLANT 3 276
REPLACE 0 0
ABANDON 0 0
NO CHANGE 5 12
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 9 290
41-88 CO-INCINERATION - OTHERS
ENLARGE 0 0
UPGRADE 0 0
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 0 0
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 0 0
REPLACE 0 0
ABANDON 0 0
NO CHANGE 0 0
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 0 0
41-89 LAND FILL
ENLARGE 605 9,414
UPGRADE 70 1,264
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 94 5,903
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 3,624 13,091
REPLACE 106 475
ABANDON 652 5.161
NO CHANGE 4,208 45,889
OTHER 2 761
TOTAL 9,561 81,961
41*90 LAND SPREADING OF LIQUID SLUD
ENLARGE 74 515
UPGRADE 20 226
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 38 3,597
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 529 1,908
REPLACE 13 93
ABANDON 147 986
NO CHANGE 889 6,155
OTHER 2 19
TOTAL 1,712 13,502
41-91 LAND SPREADING OF THICKENED S
ENLARGE 85 2,194
UPGRADE 15 139
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 40 3,685
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 260 4,625
REPLACE 7 80
ABANDON 101 1,600
NO CHANGE 679 7,856
OTHER 2 471
TOTAL 1,189 20,654
41-92 TRENCHING
ENLARGE i i
UPGRADE 0 0
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE i 50
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 2 7
REPLACE 0 0
ABANDON j Itl69
NO CHANGE 5 26
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL jo 1,255
41-93 OCEAN DUMPING
ENLARGE 1 2
UPGRADE 0 0
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 1 20
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 0 0
REPLACE 0 0
ABANDON 42 11,615
NO CHANGE 5 61
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 49 11,699
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
5 12
0 0
5 12
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
o o
248 4,612
35 1,167
61 5,053
3 127
46 350
828 5,136
3,133 40,260
0 0
4,354 56,709
GE
28 247
13 168
30 3,575
1 1
9 87
139 902
684 4,983
2 19
906 9,986
LUDGE
54 1,897
7 116
26 3,625
1 0
6 80
99 1,599
551 6,787
1 17
745 14,124
t 1
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 1,169
5 26
o o
7 1,197
0 0
0 0
1 20
0 0
0 0
37 11,397
5 61
o o
43 11,480
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
o o
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
o o
o o
0 0
0 0
0 0
6 452
? 9
2 763
171 1,047
1 3
0 0
4 84
0 0
186 2,362
1 7
1 22
2 16
34 365
0 0
0 0
2 14
0 0
40 426
1 24
1 10
1 5
16 231
0 0
0 0
1 18
0 0
20 291
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 7
0 0
ft 0
0 0
0 0
1 7
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
o o
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 275
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 275
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 4
0 0
ata a.502
0 0
0 0
o o
1 757
821 9,264
0 0
0 0
0 0
179 1,244
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
179 1,244
0 0
0 0
0 0
149 4,108
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 454
150 4,562
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
Type 2 Estimate
-..._,. Under Required but
Now in Use Construction Not Funded
Plants Flow Plants Flow ' Plants Flow

1 1
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
o o
0 0
1 1
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
o o
0 0
351 4,349
31 83
31 86
1 3
59 121
20 22
1,070 5,543
1 4
1,564 10,214
45 260
6 35
6 5
0 0
4 5
8 84
203 l,l$7
0 0
272 1,549
30 272
7 12
13 54
0 0
1 0
2 0
127 1,050
0 0
180 1,390
0 0
0 0
1 SO
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 SO
1 2
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
5 217
0 0
0 0
6 219
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 73
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2 73
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 ' 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
2,629 1,141
0 0
4 2
i i
0 0
2,634 3,345
0 0
0 0
0 0
315 296
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
315 296
0 0
0 0
0 0
94 285
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
94 285
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0

-------
! ' ' : ' ! , .
Process Total
Plants Flow
41-94 OTHER SLUDGE HANDLING
ENLARGE 22 503
UPGRADE 10 77«
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 5 3,191
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT JU
-------
Process Total
Plants Flow
41-A2 PACKAGE PLANT
ENLARGE 133 96
UPGRADE 90 65
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 105 146
INSTALL IN NEH PLANT 1,396 671
REPLACE 19 16
ABANDON 436 553
NO CHANGE 942 1,007
OTHER 1 0
TOTAL 3,122 2,759
41-A3 SEMI«PACKAGE PLANT
ENLARGE 209 660
UPGRADE 141 602
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 146 547
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 1,895 1,875
REPLACE 147 369
ABANDON 253 900
NO CHANGE 1,046 3,551
OTHER 10 51
TOTAL 3.847 8,576
41-A4 CUSTOM BUILT PLANT
ENLARGE 816 9,431
UPGRADE 1,259 18,214
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 1,321 26,447
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 5,242 14,201
REPLACE 555 2,049
ABANDON 1,172 * 4,8*6
NO CHANGE 6,206 59,601
OTHER 29 1,461
TOTAL 16,602136,375
4i»A5 IMHOFF TANKS
ENLARGE 1 0
UPGRADE 7 6
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 0 0
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 4 3
REPLACE 5 . 3
ABANDON 22* 253
NO CHANGE 77 64
OTHER 9 0
TOTAL 322 331
41-A6 SEPTIC TANKS
ENLARGE 0 0
UPGRADE 9 4
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 2 0
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 39 14
REPLACE 19
ABANDON 18 4
NO CHANGE 18 1
OTHER 9 0
TOTAL *7 27
*1«A7 ELECTRODIALYSIS
ENLARGE 0 9
UPGRADE 9 9
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 9 9
INSTALL IN NEW PLANT 9 9
REPLACE 0 0
ABANDON 0 0
NO CHANGE 0 0
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 0 0
41-A8 REVERSE OSMOSIS
ENLARGE 00
UPGRADE 0, 9
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 9 0
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 1 37
REPLACE 9 0
ABANDON 0 0
NO CHANGE 0 0
OTHER 9 0
™Ttt 1 37
Type 1 Estimate
Now in Use ,
Plants Flow

.30 30
34 37
49 105
1 0
14 8
413 536
602 933
1 0
1,344 1,654
49 206
52 316
67 324
1 0
47 204
244 660
676 3,241
5 29
1,341 5,203
279 5,999
541 14,126
611 21,739
2 3
296 1,683
1,971 4,742
4,963 53,254
23 641
7,966192,362
9 0
7 6
9 9
9 9
2 9
63 46
*9 46
9 9
131 .191
9
3
2
9
1
3
11
9
22 7
9 9
9 9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9 0
9 9
9 9
9 9
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
00
Under
Construction
Plants

0
0
0
73
1
1
1
0
76
1
0
4
50
1
0
t
0
57
7
10
13
150
10
0
4
0
214
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
9
9
9
5
9
ft
9
9
5
9
9
9
0
0
0
0
9
9






0
0
0
Flow

0
0
0
63
6
0
0
0
90
4
9
49
77
3
9
9
9
135
299
111
2,198
1,415
61
0
33
9
4,929
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
1
9
9
9
9
1








9








0
Required but
Not Funded
Plants

0
0
0
283
0
0
0
0
263
0
0
9
254
9
9
9
9
254
1
9
1
1,149
9
2
9
9
1,153








4
9
9
9
12
9
9
9
9
12








9
9
9
9
1
9
9
9
9
1
Flow

Type 2
Now in
Plants

9 191
0 56
0 56
254 0
0 4
0 • 22
0 139
0 0
254 380
0 156
0 ; 69
0 75
632 i 0
0 : 99
0 9
0 169
0 5
632 604
5*
0
61
9,299
9
9
9
9
9,149
526
787
477

249
99
1,237
6
1,195
o ! l
0 9
0
9
3 ' 9
9
9
9
9
3



1



9
12
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9



3




37
1
1*5
16
9
167
9
*
*
•
9
15
5
9
2*








9








9
Estimate
Use
Flow

66
20
42
9
1
15
74
9
229
411
286
171
9
1*1
19
109
22
1,494
1,985
1,977
2,51*
9
194
146
6,395
629
17,045
0
9
«
9
1
2*7
15
9
22*








5








9








9
Under Required but
Construction Not Funded
Plants Flow Plants Flow

9
0
9
0 1,91 51
9
9
0
0
9 9 1,919 512
17


1.58 96




2 17 1,589 9*1
9 1
1 *
1 6
1 16 1,91* 1,19
9 8
9 9
0 2
0 0
5 169 1,919 1,199








9999
f
9
9
2
9
6
9
•
9929








9 99 9








9 9 99

-------
Process Total
Plants Flow
41«A9 PRESSURE FILTERS
ENLARGE Q 0
UPGRADE 00
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 0 0
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 0 0
REPLACE 0 0
ABANDON 2 22
NO CHANGE 1 5
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 3 28
41«AA SEEPAGE LAGOONS
ENLARGE 39 11
UPGRADE 3 0
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 2 0
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 241 67
REPLACE 2 0
ABANDON 9 4
NO CHANGE 266 60
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 562 166
ai-AB ROCK FILTERS
ENLARGE 0 0
UPGRADE 6 0
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 0 0
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 5 4
REPLACE 0 0
ABANDON 0 0
NO CHANGE 1 0
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 6 5
41«AC POLYMER ADDITION TO LIQUID ST
ENLARGE 2 23
UPGRADE 0 0
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 0 0
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 90 383
REPLACE 0 0
ABANDON 3 357
NO CHANGE 4 572
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 99 1,338
41-AD POLYMER ADDITION TO SLUDGE ST
ENLARGE 2 115
UPGRADE 0 0
ENLARGE AND UPGRADE 1 511
INSTALL IN NEM PLANT 96 757
REPLACE 0 0
ABANDON 0 0
NO CHANGE 5 321
OTHER 0 0
TOTAL 106 1,705
Type 1 Estimate
M ... Under :.•... «*quiredj*if ^
Now in Use Construct^ NoYfuntl^
Plants Flow Plants Flow Plants 'Flow
1 : ''!S&i :*•!•"•?"• . «."!• ^
0 0
» o
o o
0 0
o o
2 22
1 5
0 0
3 26
5 1
1 0
1 0
0 0
1 0
6 4
254 57
0 0
266 64
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1 0
0 0
1 0
REAM
0 0
0 0
0 0
o o
o o
3 357
2 5
0 0
5 363
REAM
1 104
0 0
1 511
0 0
0 0
0 0
4 319
0 0
6 934
0 0
. - 0 * '^>'- '
0 "* o
•-*: ' '•: >•
0 << «
o o ...
0 ' ••'. ;.; »• i
.0 0
0 0
0 0
o o
0 0
36 15
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
36 15
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
9 83
o o
0 0
0 0
o o
9 63
o o
0 0
0 0
7 89
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
7 89
0 , 0
- •••:•>• 9
0 0
•• - •" • "*'
-------
Chapter III	
Summaries of
Conveyance Systems
Technical Data
(Categories  III A,
1MB,  IVA,  IVB)
Technical data on the municipal sewage
conveyance facilities which will be
required by the year 2000 were compiled
ift the course of the 1980 Needs Survey.
The data were collected using the EPA-1
form which is described in detail in
Appendix C.
 The technical data for each conveyance
facility were collected at the same time
the dollar need data were collected. The
data were obtained from several sources,
including the 1978 Needs Survey data,
EPA Construction Grant files, and various
engineering plans and reports. A further
description of the sources and  methods
used in collecting data for the 1980 Needs
Survey is presented in Appendix A.
 The technical data collected for all
conveyance facilities have been compiled
and are presented in the 12 tables which
foHow. The technical tables which follow
are structured such that a discussion of
each table is presented immediately
before the table.

-------
Table 42	
Collection Populations-
Present and  Projected,
Resident and Nonresident
(In Thousands)
Table 42 summarizes the populations, by
State, for 1980 and 2000 which are now
or will be receiving collection of their
wastewaters.
  The values listed for the year 2000
State ceiling populations were obtained
from data provided by the Department of
Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis
(BEA7). The projections were produced by
BEA after extensive analysis which
included review and comment by State
agencies responsible for population
projections.
  Resident Populations (RES) are
permanent residents within the service
area of an established sewerage authority.
Nonresident Populations (NONRES)
include commuters living in one service
area and working in another, as well as
temporary residents at resort areas and
similar locations.
  A person is included in the Receiving
Collection  category if their  residence is
connected to a central collection system
operated by an established sewerage
authority. A person is included in the Mot
Receiving Collection category if they
reside in the service area of an
established sewerage authority but their
residence is not connected to a central
collection system. Theoretically, the sum
of the populations receiving collection and
not receiving collection should equal the
State's total population. This is not always
the case because many rural residents,
who are counted as a part of the State's
total, do not reside in the service area of
any established sewerage authority and,
therefore, are not included in any
receiving collection categories.
  The Percent Served values are based
upon a comparison between the resident
population receiving collection and the
State population ceiling figures provided
by BEA.

2000
CEILING
STATE POPULATION
ALABAMA
ALASKA
ARIZONA
ARKANSAS
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO
CONNECTICUT
DELAWARE
DIST. OF COLUM.
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
HAWAII
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
IOWA
KANSAS
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
MAINE
MARYLAND
MASSACHUSETTS
MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA
MISSISSIPPI
MISSOURI
MONTANA
NEBRASKA
NEVADA
NEW HAMPSHIRE
NEW JERSEY
NEW MEXICO
NEW YORK
NORTH CAROLINA
NORTH DAKOTA
OHIO
OKLAHOMA
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
RHODE ISLAND
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH DAKOTA
TENNESSEE
TEXAS
UTAH
VERMONT
VIRGINIA
WASHINGTON
NEST VIRGINIA
WISCONSIN
WYOMING
AMERICAN SAMOA
GUAM
N, MARIANAS
PUERTO RICO
PAC. TR. TERR.
VIRGIN ISLANDS
U.S. TOTALS
4,140
667
4,149
2,970
26.786
4,371
3,741
841
661
15,049
7,053
1,366
1,183
12,358
6,059
3,101
2,517
4.224
4,659
1.222
5,583
6,614
10,314
4,505
2,740
5,225
938
1,734
1,312
1.306
8,747
1,781
18,922
7,419
690
12,031
3,702
3,209
12,365
1,033
3,700
730
5,573
18,069
1,688
607
6,755
4.859
2,003
5,553
484
40
275
31
4,700
174
116
272,644

1980
RES.
2,012
218
1,759
1,242
19,458
2,189
1,886
479
729
5,?29
3,118
586
485
9,702
3,514
2,090
1,841
1,748
2,846
572
3,156
3,974
7,035
2,940
1,381
3,482
483
1,359
605
442
5,734
861
13,336
2,443
434
8,442
2,131
1,420
8,860
597
1,321
453
2,186
10,970
1,160
233
3,271
2,360
821
3,486
329
1
72
1
1,824
22
66
159,422
RECEIVING
2000
RES.
3,416
679
3,824
2,525
26,121
3,886
2,876
823
811
13,396
6,019
1,359
1,058
11,976
4,961
2.837
2,644
3,345
4,571
952
5,517
5,784
9,077
3,733
2,576
5,251
736
1,853
1,187
943
8,481
1,538
20,011
4,484
576
12,018
3,534
2,986
12,241
1,007
2,798
663
4,112
18,072
1,683
385
5.930
4,326
2,053
5,173
597
36
215
31
3.242
108
106
251,169
COLLECTION
1980
NONRES.
103
3
78
24
1,083
131
30
101
744
944
138
90
13
32
242
75
13
60
68
87
133
65
99
23
15
878
32
17
95
59
826
16
2,737
179
0
76
2
40
524
48
234
13
72
238
6
48
137
440
16
94
16
0
9
0
0
0
3
11,274
2000
NONRES,
204
19
200
47
1,486
527
59
439
913
1,808
233
255
79
42
501
128
18
97
103
132
493
200
246
40
28
1,196
38
26
142
203
1,496
30
3,364
441
0
94
It
73
1,199
71
495
10
151
575
38
78
263
815
24
187
28
1
3
2
0
4
3
19,387

I960
RES.
523
105
310
216
1,524
39
1,202
82
0
2,128
767
211
114
290
390
150
176
692
408
342
538
1,527
1,374
210
403
319
42
48
46
336
1,144
121
4,419
1,499
7
997
186
334
2,553
346
626
16
867
1,042
93
114
1,231
594
934
428
2
30
18
17
1,117
95
19
33,396
NOT RECEIVING
2000
COLLECTION
1980
?000
RES. NONRES. NQMRfS,
81
15
122
6
225
2
864
21
0
405
315
13
15
138
24
9
4
256
1
224
130
863
622
62
121
11
0
6
0
255
204
43
2,128
847
2
79
20
1
549
101
107
u
261
1
3
7«
540
97
23
160
0
2
22
1
771
64
7
10,948 1
2
3
14
0
44
0
0
31
0
7
3
8
23
0
54
20
1
0
10
3
139
68
36
6
1
5
1
0
0
58
146
6
56
103
0
3
7
3
232
0
51
0
1
38
5
15
6
28
3
22
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
.285
0
0
6
0
6
0
0
0
0
3
0
3
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
60
20
0
0
0
0
0
0
33
7
1
6
14
0
0
0
0
13
0
0
0
0
0
0
7
0
19
0
12
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
220
PERCENT SERVfO

1980
53.4
53,9
71.8
57.0
85.7
79.0
60.6
82.4
111.2
59,0
60.9
64.1
53.6
86.4
6S.1
72.0
77.7
49.6
70,7
52,2
76.1
68,9
76.4
72.4
57.4
M.S
61. S
86.4
86.3
49,9
78,2
69. a
75,6
43.6
66,?
78.7
73.7
56.2
7S.S
64.3
45.1
65.8
49.9
82.0
84.9
47.3
62.9
60.1
43,7
73.9
73.3
4.5
63.9
8.1
54.3
20.6
69.6
71.2

2000
82.5
101.8
92.2
85.0
97.5
88.9
76.9-
97.9
l21Ti7_
89,0
85,3
99,6
89.5
96.9
81.9
91.5
105.1
79,2
98.1
77.9
98, 8
87.5
88.0
82.9
94.0
100,5
78,5
106.9
90.5
72.2
97.0
86.4
105.8
60.4
83.6
99.9
95. S
93. 1
99.0
97.5
75.6
90.9
73.8
100.0
99.7
63.5
87.8
89,0
102.5
93.2
123.4
90.5
78.5
101,0
69.0
62.2
91.9
92.1

-------
 Table 43
 Total Pipe Length  Needed by
 Diameter
 (Length in Meters, Diameter in Centimeters)
 Table 43 summarizes, by State, the total
 length of sewer pipe in meters required by
 the year 2000. These figures include
 gravity sewer pipe and force main pipe
 lengths.
   The lengths are separated into two
 categories, Type 1 and Type 2 estimates,
 and five diameter size ranges for each
category. Type 1 information was obtained
from actual preliminary engineering
designs. Type 2 information was generally
developed using EPA cost estimating
procedures. The diameter size ranges are
in centimeters (inches  in parentheses).
  Dollar needs by category and size range
are summarized in Table 45.

STATE
ALAHAMA
ALASKA
ARIZONA
ARKANSAS
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO
CONNECTICUT
DELAWARE
DIST. OF COLUM,
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
HAWAII
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
IOwA
KANSAS
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
MAINE
MARYLAND
MASSACHUSETTS
MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA
MISSISSIPPI
MISSOURI
MONTANA
NEBRASKA
NEVADA
NEW HAMPSHIRE
NEW JERSEY
NEW MEXICO
NEW YORK
MO^TH CAROLINA
NORTH DAKOTA
OH I (J
OKLAHOMA
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
RHODE ISLAND
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH DAKOTA
TENNESSEE
TEXAS
UTAH
VERMONT
VIRGINIA
"4SHINGTON
wtST VIRGINIA
WISCONSIN
WYOMING
AMERICAN SAMOA
GUAM
N. MARIANAS
PUERTO RICH
PAC, TR, TERR.
VIRGIN ISLANDS

0-47
1,099,721
191,799
366,287
400,687
977,749
31,883
534,483
128,020

2,111,672
1,053,942
1 45,80?
254,426
1 ,495,459
1 ,077,492
599,635
7.55,938
2,627,076
2,117,307
1 ,066,337
310,286
5,352,021
3,498,235
499,265
1 ,"42,169
1 ,787,977
218,970
69,480
1 35,419
1 ,190,245
764,052
212,121
2,178,176
3,505,970
33,118
2,349,850
536,800
301,844
1,455,271
296,681
1 ,791,430
149,712
2,542,042
1 ,498,244
328,236
193,419
1 ,945,640
995,584
2,054,223
798, 186
95,348
49,615
8,129
70,469
1 ,068,291
139,875
1,021
TYPE
48-68
U9"-27")
104,697
15,508
94,716
16,535
94,291
24,240
15,270
2,924

542,543
377,057
15,560
12,161
106,602
107,365
66,269
203,940
67,536
196,420
12,761
3,993
392,604
76,013
54,315
124,215
100,220
26,581
28,340
9,052
102,098
83,203
17,862
92,126
377,081
16,628
240,460
24,383
62,147
26,715
12,868
166,995
29,409
204,200
105,975
25,408
435
158,602
309,106
16,885
95,785

1.301

248, S79

2,081
1 ESTIMATES

69-123 124-199
(28"-48") (49"-78"1
60,498
4,147
127,469
34,522
131,652
58,752
23,023


589,050
251,256
10,420
5,333
110,912
58,213
101,953
89,955
196,905
66,293
3,657
822
131,466
141,467
47,774
203,296
89,175
11,021
39,280
4,614
10,568
121,693
31,366
163,415
313,014
2,182
375,769
76,105
60,494
8,397
20,909
108,604

118,950
63,387
237,220
96,786

89,622
8,317
77,504


299,882


26,365
3,9-07
15,288
1,584
62,21?
56,583


95,049
101,124

11,987

5,151
44,439


19,283
64,943
35,478

81,08?
1,219
8,991
2,569

28,346
1,04?
68,519
34,411
9,826
119,780
45,011
3,188

33,863
33,976
18.416
57,424

304



8,606



200*
(79"*)



52,111


24,620
10.S03





TYPE 2 ESTIMATES
0-47
2,537,898
99,806
1,061,996
I ,«91,368
6,075,327
381,497
1,881,553
203,004

7,308,967
2,588,573
717,710
734,098
655,679
1 ,174,288
933,919
651,085
I ,718,198
1.416.794
776,599
1,423,217
1,478 1,557,940
16,818 1,959,823
62,788 1,104,339
775.319


999,400
125.795
; 244J185
240,592
j 1,365,611
21,322 3.885.5»«

386.057
9,832' 6,273,935
3,559,167
22,954
46,024 2,478,256
976,461
864,626
' 8,048,581
815,675
< 2,516,772
: 1P.KAA
20,253
5,882



2,092,379
5,963,631
559,299
371 ,004
2,317.193
2,099,190
3,412,975
1.516.432
j 31,516
20,726


9O.>;i 7
599^354
! 99.0P1

104,078
48-68
(19"-27«)
56,067

IS, SOI
53,688
490,131
102,139
99,2*6
2,814

263, 7S?
44,1*0
27,106
55,312
25,859
33,216
31,555
20,986
1 4,80?
74,212
8,717
1 19,544
55,376
86,3?0
63,763
59,969
26,501

6,635
24 ,039
16,76?
146,972
7,407
112,127
18, 6S?
136,136
154,668
64,347
164, 4?2
41 ,0?6
46,6*6

28,518
446,671
32,975
10 ,903
120,294
93,254
24,2?7
48,754
15,544


10,0?4

3,770
69-123
(28"-48")
34,386

41 ,613
73,151
733,444
141,162
22, 786
63,523

265,535
74,814
120,291
34,259
19,495
16,118
19,777
20,007
65,31 1

244,729
36,935
38,546
25,859
13,556
n, 155
15,48.5


89,840
20,690
209,705
13,161
126,964
55,839
63,927
146,427


418, 089
19,946
133,052
121 ,515
8,800
1 7 ,241
24,266


26,060

8, 569
124-199 200»
(49"-78») (79"»)



157,926
ftS,8l5


181 ,347
37,965



12,953
5,591


21,288








169,416
7 bl9
*
62, 551
29,002


442,769 17, i^o
<>,77S








U'S-  T11TALS       54.859,159  5,310.104  4,877,135   1,099,979    271 ,638 l9t , J5l ,558  3,585,5V  3,672,921  ,, 212,029

NOTE!    I. PIPE CATEGORIES  APE DIAMETER  IN CENTIMETERS (INCHfS  IN PAHATHtSES).

-------
Table 44
Length and Cost of Pipe
Needed by the Year 2000
(Length  in  Kilometers,  Mean  Cost
Dollars/Meter)
in
Table 44 summarizes, by State, the total
length in kilometers of collector (CS),
interceptor (IS), and force main (FM) pipe
required by the year 2000. Also
summarized is the mean cost (dollars per
meter) for each type of pipe.  The mean
cost for interceptor pipe has been sub-
divided into three diameter size ranges.
The ranges are given in centimeters
.(maximum diameter  in inches in
parentheses).
  The data has been separated into two
general categories, Type 1 and Type 2
estimates. Type 1 information was
obtained from actual preliminary
engineering designs. Type 2 information
was generally developed using EPA cost
estimating procedures.
  All costs are in January 1980 dollars.


STATE


ALABAMA
ALASKA
ARIZONA
ARKANSAS
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO
CONNECTICUT
DELAWARE
DIST. OF COLUM,
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
HAWAII
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
IOWA
KANSAS
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
MAINE
MARYLAND
MASSACHUSETTS
MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA
MISSISSIPPI
MISSOURI
MONTANA
NEBRASKA
NEVADA
NEW HAMPSHIRE
NEW JERSEY
NEW MEXICO
NEW YORK
NORTH CAROLINA
NORTH DAKOTA
OHIO
OKLAHOMA
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
RHODE ISLAND
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH DAKOTA
TENNESSEE
TEXAS
UTAH
VERMONT
VIRGINIA
WASHINGTON
WEST VIRGINIA
WISCONSIN
WYOMING
AMERICAN SAMOA
GUAM
N. MARIANAS
PUERTO RICO
PAC, TR. TERR.
VIRGIN ISLANDS
U.S. TOTALS
TYPE 1 ESTIMATES

CS.


355
65
115
196
567
0
35ft
61
0
39
231
57
129
954
665
286
239
1.136
1,214
576
126
2,696
2,513
180
598
623
44
7
103
613
426
123
1,449
1,077
16
1,51ft
276
158
1,026
248
173
15
761
590
102
132
1,059
451
1,412
417
1
49
0
0
646
94
0
26,989
NOTESI 1. PIPE CATEGORIES
LENGTH
IS.


721
145
471
131
666
167
177
17
0
1,529
1,335
81
104
574
405
370
725
1,337
487
299
105
949
926
302
753
1,009
176
111
46
532
399
137
778
2,365
22
1,441
328
244
352
79
1,346
104
1,665
761
244
3S
744
927
409
445
94
77
2
70
766
33
1
28,544

FM,


215
4
16
125
84
3
36
52
0
1,794
206
20
37
193
171
115
64
462
677
206
82
250
357
216
418
425
36
27
0
156
192
1
283
784
22
172
77
21
112
2
547
58
492
356
4
26
553
77
249
120
8
0
6
0
212
12
2
10,864

CS.


122
228
90
63
145
0
237
142
0
135
61
236
108
106
106
90
146
125
111
188
131
219
176
151
00
125
98
83
00
190
209
71
290
100
07
175
54
130
166
267
119
95
98
68
110
194
109
342
120
141
70
123
0
0
180
102
0
159
ARE COLLECTOR (CS,),
MEAN COST
IS.
0-60 69*123 124*
(27") («0"> (49"*)
120 162 1307
520 1724 4676
124 593 656
106 353 424
276 575 7029
271 469 1169
296 679 0
315 0 0
000
261 399 1364
116 395 460
432 1560 0
191 779 0
202 1003 1806
201 640 0
205 653 963
299 666 0
164 534 1731
138 334 0
276 446 0
136 1419 0
316 672 1225
234 798 1073
213 841 2260
120 304 0
207 619 ?251
125 355 971
241 397 924
273 779 779
259 265 0
568 736 6411
141 301 603
321 610 1342
120 329 501
?71 679 293
265 464 542
103 322 438
274 879 0
380 1007 1235
289 351 0
104 220 0
183 0 0
152 444 765
112 430 773
89 0 0
262 0 0
137 417 1598
330 995 997
163 0 0
636 1416 1437
107 277 0
0 325 0
310 0 0
267 0 0
176 392 1656
263 0 0
746 0 0
210 541 1592
INTERCEPTOR (IS.).

FM.


89
836
66
64
172
227
247
91
0
129
125
552
93
114
73
09
112
01
04
125
08
172
99
126
114
308
84
49
0
163
650
114
216
102
176
161
09
230
175
238
73
41
114
42
40
146
108
229
69
101
62
0
340
0
161
217
612
135
TYPE 2 ESTIMATES

CS.


2,401
88
984
1,261
5,509
216
1,761
179
Jfc
7,062
2,407
666
636
524
1,053
744
574
1,509
1,274
697
1,276
1,450
1,035
940
650
016
105
192
216
VI
3,743
336
5.670
3,205
11
2,256
961
779
7,390
770
2,320
19
2,005
5,107
439
122
2,175
1,934
3,212
1,404
9
19
0
99
593
92
90
03,210
AND FORCE MAIN
LENGTH
18.


225
11
174
269
1,886
494
229
02
0
809
316
176
186
168
172
237
117
116
270
73
501
162
249
220
174
196
26
73
46
321
264
77
975
264
11
463
221
274
955
101
207
13
109
2,133
173
38
393
374
226
178
61
1
0
0
41
6
17
15,670
(FM.).

FM.


1
0
o-
46
58
0
12
6
147
19
0
0
7
0
16
3
26
11
14
30
17
0
6
6
24
0
0
0
89
95
0
119
40
0
6
1
0
5
1«
27
0
5
46
0
20
4
4
5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
952
MEAN COST
CS. IS.
0«68 69-123

FM.
124*
(27") C4S») <49"*J
100 221 664
313 375 0
120 179 573
86 160 521
217 359 835
99 216 561
224 376 616
139 279 952
176 260 662
93 167 445
359 706 1340
134 263 660
149 305 653
164 274 742
114 202 650
126 164 624
231 189 0
136 282 560
132 190 0
161 332 769
174 343 661
146 323 576
128 243 0
65 152 621
182 194 697
64 115 355
97 163 662
145 360 0
157 230 0
169 444 722
81 135 175
326 286 1067
65 111 336
79 81 0
169 339 849
126 171 451
302 327 944
151 271 719
276 352 0
93 206 0
76 64 0
157 201 0
109 215 564
97 180 505
136 276 0
100 201 566
173 304 602
105 169 431
136 265 504
79 162 690
202 203 0
000
202 0 0
369 533 1094
202 334 0
140 539 571
165 262 741

0 62
0 0
0 0
0 59
2351 300
1236 0
0 333
0 67
1375 317
1267 261
0 0
0 780
0 204
0 0
1234 75
1645 155
0 36
0 147
0 106
1242 1602
0 136
0 0
0 132
0 15
0 157
0 0
0 87
0 0
0 120
0 796
0 0
2166 161
0 40
0 0
2395 135
0 30
1458 105
0 1124
1406 226
0 96
0 0
0 84
1395 411
0 0
0 102
166 133
0 167
0 164
0 62
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
1614 300

         2.  INTERCEPTOR PIPE CATEGORIES ARE DIAMETER  IN CENTIMETERS (MAXIMUM  INCHES IN  PARATHFSES).

-------
 Dollar Needs for All Pipe Size
 Categories by Diameter
 (Thousands of 1980 Dollars)
 Table 45 summarizes, by State, the total
 dollar needs for all pipe required by the
 year 2000. Dollar needs are included for
 gravity sewer pipe and force main pipe.
 Table 45 is an extension of Table 43.
  The dollar needs are separated into two
 categories. Type 1 and Type 2 estimates,
 and five diameter size ranges for each
 category. Type 1  information was obtained
from actual preliminary engineering
designs. Type 2 information was generally
developed using EPA cost estimating
procedures. The diameter size ranges are
in centimeters (inches in parentheses).
  It is noted that almost 65 percent of the
dollar needs are for pipes with a diameter
less than or equal to 47 centimeters (18
inches).


STATE
ALABAMA
ALASKA
ARIZONA
ARKANSAS
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO
CONNECTICUT
DELAWARE
01ST. OF COLOM,
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
HAWAII
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
IOWA
KANSAS
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
MAINE
MARYLAND
MASSACHUSE TTS
MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA
MISSISSIPPI
MISSOURI
MONTANA
NEBRASKA
NEVADA
Ml- W HAMPSHIRE
Nfcrt JERSEY
Ntw MEXICO
WE* YORK
NORTH CAROLINA
NORTH DAKOTA
OHIO
OKLAHOMA
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
RHODE ISLAND
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH l)AKi.)Th
TfNNESSf f
TEXAS
UTAH
VERMONT
VIRGINIA
WASHINGTON
WEST VIRGINIA
WISCONSIN
WYOMING
AMfRTCAN SAMOA
i.l.lAM
N. MARIANAS
PUERTO RICO
PAC. TR. TERR.
VIRGTN ISLANDS

0-47
(0--1B-)
105,878
78,519
36,490
24,627
1 79,176
6,375
132,436
17,191

299,976
97,236
40,136
30,702
179,408
180,852
72,046
149,284
324,353
206,301
211,636
36,890
719,889
617,276
67,366
121,037
289,908
21.02C
8,357
15,528
236,371
264,903
19,456
600,056
443,053
4,h99
444,506
35, 84?
5?, 517
40?, 64?
79, «3?
15 (79-*)
29,620
16,260
10,074
67)
93.611 138,200
67,29?



143,745 19,487
33,354 7,019


21,651

4,96)

76,940



21,535 3,916
76,637 174,684
31,210 192,932

160.667
1.164
8. 316
2,00)

44,426 150,922
629
209,371 52,496
17,27?
2,886
35,074 54,624
19,755

10,319



16,404 25,037
26,85) 3,983


26,166
57,291

438




15,98)



0*47
(0--18-)
262,442
31,966
129,272
135,044
1,325,416
47,467
434,226
29,512

1,295.705
249.529
265,029
100,405
111,659
198,751
113,543
84,362
365,290
203,479
104,111
239,733
279,087
296,113
147,055
67,455
177,761
11,266
26,056
37,807
229,970
683,626
33,202
1,988,245
306,026
1,844
477,351
105,042
255.264
1,267,701
224,857
236,865
2,643
328,278
667,220
59,175
52,256
235,877
369,296
367,306
215,484
3,562
4,202

20,165
232,669
20,947
16,241

46*68
(19«**7
21,697

5,719
16,346
246,546
32,496
42,002
1,520

97,178
13,447
21,913
25,743
13,414
17,149
14,09ft
6,447
6,345
32,7)5
3,597
53,704
25,561
41,562
28,789
11,269
10,618

2,264
10, 6*4
7,711
95,380
2,015
51,261
5,0*1

70,341
45,3?8
29,299
60,661
16,546
26,993

17,997
153,441
11,281
5,250
34,868
44,351
6,603
24,857
3,279



6,625

2,7«1
TYPE 2 ESTIMATES
69*123 124-199
") (26"*4««) (49--78»)
22,861

46,765
36,157
603.346 371,361
79,302 106,153
14,562
60,495

166,664 249,478
33,040 48,113
161,272
22,615
12,732
13,461
12,670 15,995
12.554 5,911

36,634

189,730 47,336
24,429
22,266

16,066
9,455
2,696
13,663


72,217
7,769
223,210 367,050
4,449

107,916 18,257
24,292
60,349 90,935
103,417
40,601



236,225 616,479
10,066

75,427
97,531
3,801
8,703
16,750



26,515

4,763

200*
(79"*)










































25,539


524










U.S.  TOTALS       !  H,'440,HS3  1.617,338  2.525,342  1,305,024    623.500I15,215,145  1,549,090  2,721,501   1,977,889

MlTtt     1. PIPE  CATEGORIES ARF  OIAMfTER IN CENTIMETERS (INCHES  IN PARATHESES).
                                                                         26,063

-------
Table 46	

Number, Capacity, and Cost of
New lump Stations
(Thousands of 1980 Dollars)
Table 46 summarizes, by State, the pump
station requirements by the year 2000.
The summary presents the number of
pump stations required and the total
average daily pumping capacity
(thousands of cubic meters per day) they
represent. Also summarized  is the total
dollar need and the mean cost per station
(thousands of 1980 dollars).
  The data have been separated into two
general categories, Type 1 and Type 2
estimates. Typ* f Information was
obtained from actual preliminary
engineering designs. Type 2 information
was generally developed using EPA cost
estimating procedures.


STATE

ALABAMA
ALASKA
ARIZONA
ARKANSAS
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO
CONNECTICUT
DELAWARE
OIST. OF COLUM,
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
HAWAII
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
IONA
KANSAS
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
MAINE
MARYLAND
MASSACHUSETTS
MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA
MISSISSIPPI
MISSOURI
MONTANA
NEBRASKA
NEVADA
NEW HAMPSHIRE
NEM JERSEY
NEK MEXICO
NEW YORK
NORTH CAROLINA
NORTH DAKOTA
OHIO
OKLAHOMA
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
RHODE ISLAND
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH DAKOTA
TENNESSEE
TEXAS
UTAH
VERMONT
VIRGINIA
WASHINGTON
WEST VIRGINIA
WISCONSIN
WYOMING
AMERICAN SAMOA
GUAM
N. MARIANAS
PUERTO RICO
PAC, TR. TERR.
VIRGIN ISLANDS
U.S. TOTALS
TYPE I ESTIMATES
NUMBER
OF
STATIONS
191
13
16
109
132
1
74
44
0
1,925
179
17
126
223
229
137
155
913
702
265
161
410
414
311
305
742
20
29
5
163
118
11
392
566
43
313
107
48
142
25
538
67
422
613
13
76
389
136
330
151
9
0
8
3
287
77
6
12,947
TOTAL
CAPACITY
(KCMD)
594
61
31
246
4,472
0
315
21
0
11,393
1,277
456
49
518
138
560
146
1,164
709
123
82
1,801
508
383
995
1,594
35
65
14
310
1,258
85
1,010
1,959
35
696
471
206
151
111
1,481
85
2,462
691
25
28
1,102
718
4,326
216
2
0
79
4
346
8
4
45,653
TOTAL
COST

21,073
1,140
1,0*9
5,646
71,2«3
103
20,226
10,6*0
0
361,396
43, OM
24,029
3,235
25,214
16,778
16,964
11,495
62,477
94,040
35,560
7,036
121,749
41,017
13,790
25,329
110,397
1,946
2,346
699
36,375
93,760
l,6«5l
92,975
76,465
1,824
52,693
12,924
10,625
31,592
10,366
67,979
3,258
66,3flO
21,059
601
7,920
69,722
62,927
25,521
12,466
3B6
0
1,496
6,690
69,440
5,070
565
2,037,025
MEAN
COST

110
67
60
51
539
103
273
247
0
167
240
1,413
25
113
82
138
74
90
133
134
38
296
99
44
63
148
97
80
179
223
794
150
237
130
42
166
120
221
222
414
126
48
157
34
61
104
179
609
77
62
42
0
167
2,230
241
65
94
157
TYPE 2 ESTIMATES
NUMBER
OF
STATIONS
75
0
31
45
387
19
60
12
0
317
44
38
17
16
39
28
11
49
54
33
60
63
62
33
36
36
3
5
4
130
158
6
544
63
1
90
17
64
243
55
41
4
27
168
4
43
208
110
228
106
0
0
0
0
22
2
7
3,9*0
TOTAL
CAPACITY

-------
Table 47	
Number of Facilities Needing
Collector Sewers by Service
Area  Population and Per Capita
Sewer Cost
Table 47 summarizes, for the nation, the
number of communities having collector
sewer needs.
  The summary is presented in matrix
form. The matrix delineates the number of
communities needing collectors by service
area population and dollar needs per
capita. The percentages (%) listed
represent the percent of the national total
number of communities needing collectors
that are contained in each category. Cate-
gories with zero percent represent less
than 0.1 percent of the national total.
  The matrix also lists totals by service
area and dollar neckis per capita
categories.
  There are 14,394 communities in the
nation that  need collector sewers.
Communities with service area population
less than 1,000 account for 51.1  percent
of the national total.
  Communities with per capita needs
between $501 and $600 account for 18.3
percent of the national total.
  All costs are in January 1980 dollars.
  The service area populations were
based on the total  1980 resident popula-
tion in a community.
  The population in a community that met
the qualifications of the "2/3 Rule" was
used to calculate the dollar per cfaptta
value. The 2/3 rule states that two-thirds
of the population requiring collector
sewers in 1980 are required to have been
residents of the service area on October
  A related summary is presented in
Table 48.
COLLKTUR
SEwtR
COST
S/CAPITA
0-100
101-200
201-iOO
301-400
401-500
501-600
601*700
701-800
801-900
901-1000
1001-1 100
1101-1200
1201-1500
lioi-iaoo
iaoi-1500
>1500
TUTAL
TOTAL
NUMBER X
423 2.9
186 1.2
479 J.3
?,307 16.0
2,55* 17.7
2,644 18.1
1,200 8.3
1,897 13.1
859 5.9
500 3.4
168 l.l
»43 0.9
167 1.1
102 0.7
84 0.5
682 4.7
14,394 100.0
0»999
NUMBER
2*2
33
222
1.416
1,518
1,393
603
752
327
192
71
77
95
55
45
346
7,367
I
1.5
0.2
1.5
9.8
10.5
9.6
4.1
5.2
2,2
l.i
0,4
0,5
0.6
0.3
0.3
2.4
51.1
1(000*4,999
NUMBER
109
62
163
612
682
797
356
715
277
166
52
27
44
26
26
231
4,345
X
0.7
0.4
1.1
«.2
4.7
5.5
2.4
4.9
1.9
1.1
0.3
0.1
0.3
0.1
O.I
1.6
30.1
SERVICE-AREA
5,000-9,999
NUMBER x
29 0.2
36 0.2
47 0.3
131 0.9
169 1.1
183 1.2
89 0.6
166 1.1
89 0.6
63 0.4
9 0.0
14 0.0
7 0,0
8 0.0
4 0.0
47 O.i
1,091 7.5
POPULATION
10,000-49,999
NUMBER X
49 0.3
46 0.3
40 0,2
131 0,9
157 1.0
228 1.5
130 0,9
214 1.4
133 0.9
67 0.4
31 0.2
22 0.1
16 0.1
11 0.0
7 0,0
52 0.3
1,334 9.2
50K-100K
NUMBER
7
7
4
11
19
21
10
31
23
6
3
3
2
1
1
4
153
X
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.1
0.1
0.0
0.2
0,1
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0,0
0.0
0.0
1.0
>100K
NUMBER
7
2
3
6
8
22
12
19
10
6
2
0
3
1
1
2
104

X
0.0
0,0
0.0
0.0
0,0
0.1
0.0
0,1
0.0
0,0
0.0
0.0
0.0
o.o
0.0
o.o
0.7

-------
Table 48	
Percent of Dollar Needs for
Collector Sewers by Service
Area Population and Per Capita
Cost
Table 48 summarizes, for the nation, the
distribution of dollar needs for collector
sewers.
  The summary is presented in matrix
form. The matrix delineates the distribu-
tion of the national collector dollar need
by service area population and dollar need
per capita. The matrix also shows what
percent of a population groups' total need
is included in a particular dollar per capita
range.
  Communities with service area popula-
tions less than 1,000 account for 10.9
percent of the total national collector
sewer dollar need.
  Communities with per capita needs
between $701 and $800 account for 17.4
percent of the national total.
  The national dollar need for collector
sewers is approximately $18 billion
(January 1980 dollars).
  The service area populations were
based on the total 1980 resident popula-
tion in  a community.
  The population in a community that met
the qualifications of the "2/3 Rule" was
used to calculate the dollar per capita
value. The 2/3 Rule statet that two-thirds
of the population requiring collector
sewers in 1980 are required to have been
residents of the service area on October
18, 1972.
  Table 48 is an extension of Table 47.
COLLECTOR
SEWER CUST



S/CAPITA
0-100
101-200
201-500
301-400
401-500
501-600
feOl-700
701-800
801-900
901-1000
1001-1100
1101-1200
1201-1)00
1301-1400
1401-1500
>1500
TOTAL
TOTAL
X OF
NATL.
TOTAL
CUST
1.3
1.0
1.4
5,5
8. I
15.5
8.1
17.4
11.0
10.7
2,«
1.9
2.0
1.3
1.0
JO. 7
100.0
0-999
X OF
POP.
GROUP
COST
l.B
0.1
1.)
9.0
13.1
16.1
8.8
13.7
6.8
4.7
1.6
2.1
2.1
1.6
1.5
IS. 2
100,0
I Of
NATL,
TOTAL
COST
0.2
0.0
0.1
0.9
1.4
1.7
0.9
1.5
0.7
0.5
0.1
0.2
0.2
0.1
0.1
1*6
10,9
3ERV
1,000-4,999 5,000
X OF
POP.
GROUP
COST
1.4
0.3
1.1
5.4
«.7
14,9
8.5
20.2
10.0
7.0
2.2
1.0
2.0
i.o
1.1
14, a
100.0
X OF X OF
NATL. POP.
TOTAL GROUP
COST COST
0.3 1.3
0.0 1.1
0.2 1.6
1.3 5.7
2.1 10.0
3.6 16,1
2.0 6.5
4.9 17.0
2.4 12,6
1.7 11.9
0.5 1.2
0.2 1.9
0.4 1.1
0.2 1.5
0,2 0.6
3.5 8.9
24. A 100,0
ICE-ARtA
•9,999
X OF
NATL.
TOTAL
COST
0.1
0.1
0.2
0.7
1.2
2.0
0.8
2.1
1.6
1.5
0.1
0.2
0.1
0.1
0.0
1.1
12.6
POPULA
10,000
X OF
POP.
GROUP
COST
1.0
1.6
1.2
5.8
7.7
15.5
8.2
13,9
10.5
10.3
3.7
3.3
2.9
1.7
1.2
10.6
100.0
TION
•49,999
X OF
NATL.
TOTAL
COST
0.3
0.5
0.3
1.7
2.3
4.6
2.5
4.2
3.1
3.1
1.1
1.0
0.9
0.5
0.3
3.2
30.1
50K-
t OF
POP.
GOOUP
COST
0.5
1.3
3.3
4.2
8.6
16.7
3.2
29,2
tO. 3
10,3
3.2
2,4
0,2
1.1
0.7
4.1
140.0
100K
X OF
NATU.
TOTAL
COST
0.0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.6
1.2
0.2
2.1
0.7
0.7
0.2
0.1
0,0
0.0
0,0
0.3
7.4
>100K
X Of * OF
POP. NATL.
GROUP TOTAL
COST COST
1.5 0.2
1.0 0.1
1.1 0.1
2.6 0.3
I.* 0.2
15.1 2.1
10.5 1.5
17.1 2,4
U.I 2.3
21.6 3.1
1.6 0.2
0.0 0.0
1.2 0.1
0.5 0.0
0.7 0.1
6.6 0.9
100.0 14.3

-------
Table 49	
Total Estimated I/I .Flow to
Treatment Plants—l/f That is
Cost Effective to Remove
Table 49 summarizes, by State, the infil-
tration/inflow (I/I) quantities which are
cost effective to eliminate from
conveyance systems, rather than provide
treatment.
  The number of Plants is a summation of
the plants within a State from which
some I/I flow will be eliminated.
    The total Estimated I/I Flow is the
  summation of I/I flows per State which
  are cost effective to eliminate.
    The Existing Flow is the summation of
  the total average daily flow being received
  at the plants listed in the first column.
    The Present Design Flow (PRES DES
  FLOW) is the summatfo'n of the  1980
  design treatment capacity of the plants
  listed in the first column.
    Only facilities being served by separate
  type sewer systems are included in this
  summary.
    All flows are given  in thousands of
                     cubic meters per day.
                       Tables 50 and 51 present summaries
                     related to Table 49.
STATE
ALABAMA
ALASKA
ARIZONA •
ARKANSAS
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO
CONNECTICUT
DELAWARE
DIST, OF COLUM.
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
HAWAII
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
IOWA
KANSAS
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
MAINE
MARYLAND
MASSACHUSETTS
MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA
MISSISSIPPI
MISSOURI
MONTANA
NEBRASKA
NEVADA
NEW HAMPSHIRE
NEW JERSEY
NEW MEXICO
NEW YORK
NORTH CAROLINA
NORTH DAKOTA
OHIO
OKLAHOMA
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
RHODE ISLAND
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH DAKOTA
TENNESSEE
TEXAS
UTAH
VERMONT
VIRGINIA
WASHINGTON
WEST VIRGINIA
WISCONSIN
PLANTS
113
6
4
39
3d
39
16
3
1
74
1*7
0
35
149
54
179
67
113
59
16
21
24
60
123
109
85
6
25
5
13
44
0
107
171
2
136
36
53
32
5
111
10
142
213
23
7
31
46
10
126
ESTIMATED
I/I FLOW
445.94
69,64
5,07
176.64
567.22
56.32
131,90
3,76
26,23
267,52
346,63
0,00
24.11
672,78
84,82
236,63
128,84
224,63
256,77
45,66
51,36
80,43
131,03
150,30
252,04
281,52
3,44
6,66
5,71
25,88
293,46
0.00
608.85
210,90
0,68
666,27
69.37
157,19
76,72
26,23
346,02
3,21
301,92
909.53
162.32
4.35
94,58
565,16
23,54
1,298,70
EXISTING
FLOW
773, «2
90,99
11,96
195,45
2,267,35
97,57
314,94
289,21
1*127,92
1*151,13
981,82
0,00
92,64
5,937,68
651,09
713,43
281,07
713,05
347.16
140,49
161,92
2,023,60
3,447,49
1,084,74
508,85
625,35
8,51
18,39
9,38
118.05
2,448,70
0,00
2,590,64
1,261,60
4,01
3,431.25
173.23
511.58
1,150.33
281.71
676,68
21,27
1,241,85
2,431,63
527.59
14,23
241,74
728,61
27,81
1,542,99
PRES DES
FLOW
1,001.35
128,87
10,56
236,94
2,919,97
135,42
406,96
379,25
1,169,56
2,056,76
1,429,02
0,00
126,41
6,996,87
1,041,29
813,39
358,36
686,37
498,10
169.75
274,82
2,068,69
4,155,62
1,237,80
616,19
765,28
6,54
14,00
18,09
248,67
2,713,23
0,00
2,961,53
1,646,66
7.04
4,275,87
179,93
782,77
1,153,47
317.59
973,35
27.66
1,782,35
2,823.15
644.69
18.58
346.70
831.56
27,40
2,191.02
    U,S,  TOTALS
2,940
10,620.93
                                                                              43,512,92
                                                              51,684,70

-------
Table 50
Required I/I Correction
Actions—Facilities Where
Correction is Cost Effective
Table 50 summarizes, for those facilities
requiring infiltration/inflow corrective
action, the kind of corrective action
necessary and the basis of estimate for
such action.
  Individual cost estimates made in
Category III are to be accompanied by a
basis of estimate so that the accuracy of
the estimate can be ascertained. EPA has
determined that the quality of the cost
estimates can be ranked from high to low
as follows:
1.  Engineer/Consultant Firm Estimate
2.  Evaluation Survey Completed

3.  Engineer/Consultant  Preliminary
   Estimate
4.  Infiltration/Inflow (I/I) Analysis
   Completed

5.  Cost Effective Analysis

6.  Cost of Previous Comparable
   Construction

7.  EPA Supplied Cost Estimating
   Procedures
8.  State Certification

9.  No Basis Given
  Only separate type sewer systems are
included in this summary. Separate sewer
system! "ere designed to convey
waste>vater from domestic and industrial
sources but not stormwater runoff.
  Table 50 is an expansion of the data
presented in Table 49.
  It is noted that basis of estimates are
given for 3,329 facilities which is slightly
more than the number of facilities listed
on Table 49. This  is because  Table 49
only includes treatment facilities and
Table 50 includes treatment and collection
facilities which have I/I flow that is cost
effective to eliminate.
 Basis of Estimate
                                                    Corrective Actio
                                                    Total
STAT€ C'ftfTlF 1CATI01V 0
I/I ANALYSIS COMPLETED 1,685
EVALUATION SURVFY COMPLETED 291
ENGINE* P/CONSULTANT H«M ESTIMATE 20
COST OF PREVIOUS COMPARAIUE CONSTRUCTION 0
ENGINEER/CONSULTANT PRELIMINARY ESTIMATE 572
EPA • SUPPLIED COST ESTIMATING PROCEDURES 680
COST EFFECTIVE ANALYSIS 81
(NO BASIS GIVEN) 0
TOTALS " 3,329
0
46
8
1
0
41
334
14
0
444
0
1,006
104
3
0
195
206
37
0
1,551
0
567
159
15
0
307
117
?4
0
r,i«9
0
4
1
0
0
1
2
0
0
' 8
0
10
2
0
0
8
0
I
0
21
0
52
17
1
0
20
21
5
0
116

-------
Table 51	

Dollar Needs for I/I
Correction—Facilities Where
Correction  is Cost Effective
(Thousands of 1980 Dollars)
Table 51 summarizes, for the nation, the
dollar needs required for infiltration/
inflow  corrective  actions  by  basis  of
estimate. Table 51  is a direct extension of
Table 50.
  Only dollar needs for I/I correction for
facilities served by separate type sewer
systems are included.
  All needs are given in thousands of
January 1980 dollars.
Table 52
 Facilities Requiring Major
 Rehabilitation—By Basis of
 Estimate
Table 52 summarizes, for the nation, the
number of collection systems requiring
major rehabilitation by type of corrective
action and bests of estimate.
  Individual cost estimates made in
Category III are to be accompanied by a
basis of estimate so that the accuracy of
the estimate can be ascertained. EPA has
determined that the quality of the cost
estimates can be ranked from high to low
as follows:
1.  Engineer/Consultant Firm Estimate

2.  Evaluation Survey Completed

3.  Engineer/Consultant Preliminary
   Estimate

4.  Infiltration/Inflow 0/1) Analysis
   Completed

5.  Cost Effective Analysis

6.  Cost of Previous Comparable
   Construction

7.  EPA Supplied Cost Estimating Procedure

8.  State Certification

9.  No Basis Given
 Table 53
 Dollar Needs for Major
 Rehabilitation—By Basis of
 Estimate
 (Thousands of Dollars)
Table 53 summarizes, for the nation, the
dollar needs for collection systems
requiring major rehabilitation by type of
corrective action and basis of estimate.
  Table 53 is a direct extension of Table
52.

-------
Chapter IV	
t«««»»«""»"—*i^—•—i1 i  •
Summaries for
Combined Sewer
Overflow  and
Stormwater Runoff
Technical  Data
(Categories V and VI)
Technical data collection for Categories V
and VI of the 1980 Needs Survey was
performed using the combined sewer
system worksheet which is described in
Appendix D of this report. As with the
1978 Survey, data collected for Categories
V and VI was done in conjunction with
data collected for Categories I-IV.
  The tecrthfcal data summaries
presented in the 7 tables which follow
were compiled from two sources. The first
source was the National Combined Sewer
System Data File, which represents the
inventory of combined sewer data
identified from readily available sources
during the 1980 Survey. These data  items
include total combined sewer area,
populatipn served, and the types of
receiving waters to which combined
sewer overflow (CSO) is discharged. The
second source was the Urbanized Area
Data Base, which was required to
estimate treatment needs for urban
Stormwater runoff (SWR) as well as  CSO.
In addition, the Urbanized Area Data Base
includes data developed by the Needs
Estimation .Program (NEP-80) utilized for
the Category V and VI portions of the
1980 Survey. These additional data  items
include the estimated number and
capacity of wet-weather treatment plants,
and storage basins required to meet the
selected water quality objectives. A  brief
discussion on the conduct of the Category
V and VI portions of the 1980 Survey is
presented in Appendix B. The discussion
includes the basis for developing Category
V and VI cost estimates.
   The technical tables which follow are
Structured such that a discussion of each
table is presented immediately before the
table. The reader should also consult
Appendices B and D for information
 related to the conduct of the survey, and
the combined sewer data collection
 worksheet, respectively.

-------
Carreqtive Action
Ba,i, of Estimate ' l jiff ^
STATE CERTIFICATION , 0
I/I ANALYSIS COMPLETED 1,044,47*
EVALUATION SURVEY COMPLETED 2416,146
ENGINEER/CONSULTANT *IRM ESTIMATE is\ft83
COST OF PREVIOUS COMPARABLE CONSTRUCTION 0
ENGINEER/CONSULTANT PRELIMINARY ESTIMATE 483,534
EPA » SUPPLIED COST ESTIMATING PROCEDURES 338,496
COST EFFECTIVE ANALYSIS 32,035
(NO BASIS GIVEN) 0
TOTALS 2,200,064
'•yfjyi
,>^*j;v<* 0
i . •. ".' ;>,• •» jj
,V $ttffJ|J?J ^8,696
I-.-, ft&rtfr £7,123
v ••Jtft3?9t*.*,v
0 '0
17,451 159,117
137,168 124,438
7,076 9,514
0 0
188,313)908,809
STATE CERTIFICATION 0 0
I/I ANALYSIS COMPLETED 66 0
EVALUATION SURVEY COMPLETED 40 0
ENGINEER/CONSULTANT FIRM ESTIMATE 13 0
COST OF PREVIOUS COMPARABLE CONSTRUCTION 0 0
ENGINEER/CONSULTANT PRELIMINARY ESTIMATE 273 0
EPA • SUPPLIED COST ESTIMATING PROCEDURES 0 0
COST EFFECTIVE ANALYSIS 49 0
(NO BASIS GIVEN) 0 0
TOTALS 441 0
STATE CERTIFICATION 0
I/I ANALYSIS COMPLETED 45,682
EVALUATION SURVEY COMPLETED 968,135
ENGINEER/CONSULTANT FIRM ESTIMATE 9,678
COST OF PREVIOUS COMPARABLE CONSTRUCTION 0
ENGINEER/CONSULTANT PRELIMINARY ESTIMATE 4,718,693
EPA - SUPPLIED COST ESTIMATING PROCEDURES 0
COST EFFECTIVE ANALYSIS 227,216
(NO BASIS GIVEN) 0
TOTAtS 5,969,404
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
5
0
3
0
10
0
3,830
0
0
0
7,346
0
655
0
11,831
/fft/jff/ff/
ft
213, ^
V'Jt
ft
240,320
69,001
12.68T
ft
982,056
0
47
27
9
fl
208
0
*6
0
327
0
651
38
0
0
609
119
0
0
1,417
0
1
0
0
0
12
0
2
0
15
n
34,200
949,431
4,68?
ft
4,603,36^
ft
204,45ft
ft
5, 796, 12*
0
6,181
828
0
0
12,649
0
27
0
19,685
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
94
0
0
0
10,388
0
144
0
10,626
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
26,429
9,366
96
0
53,386
7,770
2,735
0
99,784
0
16
13
4
0
46
0
6
0
89
0
7,556
18,701
4,996
0
97,596
0
21,967
0
150,818

-------
Table 54	
Summary of Existing
Combined Sewer Systems
(Length in Meters, Area in Hectares)
 Table 54 lists the total number of
 combined sewer systems identified for
 each state by the 1980 Survey. Each
 system identified corresponds to a
 worksheet in the National Combined
 Sewer System Data File. The work-sheet
 is described in Appendix D, and conduct
 of the Categories V and  VI portion of the
 Needs Survey is described in Appendix B.
 Totals by state, for each of the following
 items are contained in Table 54:
Number of  Combined Sewer  System*:
The number of combined sewer systems
in each state corresponds to the  number
of worksheets entered on the combined
sewer system data file for that state. A
separate worksheet was completed for
each combined sewer system/major
receiving water configuration.

Combined Sewer Area: The area, in
hectares, drained directly by the  combined
sewer system which  is tributary to the
subject receiving water.

Population Served: The total number of
people resident to the area drained
directly by  the combined sewer system.
Combined Sewer Length:  The total
length of Combined sewer,  in meters,
tributary to the subject receiving water.

Number of CSO Points: The number of
points at which the combined
wastewater/stormwater is discharged
from the collection system  directly into
the receiving water during  periods of high
flow.
STATE
ALAHA'iA
ALASKA
ARIZONA
ARKANSAS
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO
CONNECTICUT
DELAWARE
DISTRICT OF COLUlMiA
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
GUAM
HAWAI [
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
10* A
KANSAS
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
MAINE
MARYLANu
MASSACHUSe ITb
MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA
MISSISSIPPI
MISSOURI
MONTANA
NEbRASKA
NEVADA
NEW HAMPShlKE
NEw JERSEY
ME* MEXICO
Nt^f YOKK
NORTH CAKOLliMA
NOHTH DAKOTA
OHIO
OKLAHOMA
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
PUERTO RICO
RHODE ISLAND
SA«*OA
SOUTH CARuLiMH
SOUTH DAKOTA
TtNNESSEt
TEXAS
TRUbT TtK*I TORIES
UTA-H
VERMONT
VIRGIN ISLA-Mi'iS
VIRGINIA
wASHlNbTUN
toEST v 1Kb IN 1 >\
Wl SCONS 1 IN
*YOMli\b
->rs Tt"i^>
„
f
•j
)
,1
1
i)
1
31
0
if
J<*
* /
I J
1
CO- "i IntO bCrtCX
MKtA
0
1J1
J
a
1D.4.JU
(*l+l
1 . t>dO
J.«*2-3
0 »->">>
^ :3'J
1 1 «o )r>
u
J
5« ('•<->
it y, o-r;-+
!,•*-+» )-)-+
^» 1 ; /
1 1 . -n-ri
f'  » d i • •
l».l» T^n
11. O.JO
•j
.1 D « i •• >
3» 'Jril
1 U « .} 1 - >
U
3»!) J-*
4 l> • J / -S
U
i i J « 
i 10. ID/
tj
•-) » (O J
^^»'40 J
+ j<;
f » -> U D
;J
U
dl+ I 0
n t ^ 1 3
!»>-*!
'J
Iu3
^«4Ut3
0
1 lJ f <^*3 O
J1* • u / a
S. .1 * ••! o 3
ly 3
4»j7o
t I' J « U 1 H
0
0
fO«U!2
o.o^l » io^
c:»rtUd»^ol
4i>4,£:c,f
'+bf » UOU
rob^^ai1)
0
3*0. / /o
D3»dtib
1 , ooS» 1 t>b
<:»ol4»9c:b
iol » ODO
0
rt /4» JOl
1 JU « "t 1 f>
1^9»4Ub
0
2o3» Ibb
18
12H.312
0
537»3bO
/Ub. o

  • -------
    Table 55	
    
    Receiving Water Types for
    Combined Sewer Overflow
    (Area in Hectares)
    Table 55 identifies the type of major
    receiving water body into which the
    combined sewer system discharges when
    overflow occurs. For the purposes of this
    table, a stream includes all channels with
    a mean annual depth less than 10 feet.
    This includes classification codes 1, 2,
    and 3 from item  No. 20 of the worksheet.
    A river includes all channels with a mean
    annual depth greater than or  equal to 10
    feet. This includes classification codes 4, 5,
    and 6 from item  No. 20 of the worksheet.
    Lakes include classification codes 7 and 8
    of the worksheet, while estuaries include
    codes 9 through  14 of the worksheet. Each
    of these classification codes are defined in
    Appendix D of this report.
      It should be noted that not  all major
    receiving waters have been identified on
    the 1980 data file. Therefore, of the 1,118
    systems on the 1980 data file, 918
    (approximately 82%) are identified as to
    major receiving water type. Table 55
    contains the following items.
    Number of Combined Sewer
    Systems: Same as Table 54.
    Combined Sewer Are*: Same as Table 54.
    Number of Systems Discharging to
    Streams: The total number of combined
    sewer systems, by state, known to
    discharge into strea/ns. The definition of a
    stream is presented above.
    Total Combined Sewer Area Discharging
    to Streams: The total area, in hectares,
    of combined sewer systems, by state,
    known to discharge into streams.
    Number of Systems Discharging to
    Rivers: The total number of combined
    sewer systems, by state, known to
    discharge into rivers.
    
    Total Combined Sewer Area Discharging
    to Rivers:  The total area, in hectares, of
    combined sewer systems, by state, known
    to discharge into rivers.
      ;    ,	.	_
    Numbler of Systems pischarging to Lakes:
    The total number of combined sewer systems,
    by state, known to discharge into lakes.
    Total Combined Sewer Area Discharging
    to Lakes: The total area, in hectares, of
    combined sewer systems, by state, known
    to discharge  into lakes.
    
    Number of Systems Discharging to
    Estuaries: The total number of combined
    sewer systems, by state, known to
    discharge into estuaries.
    
    Total Combined Sewer Area Discharging
    to Estuaries: The total area, in hectares,
    of combined  sewer systems, by state,
    known to discharge into estuaries.
    
    Number of Systems Discharging to
    Oceans: The total number of combined
    sewer systems, by State, known to
    discharge into oceans.
    
    Total Combined Sewer Area Discharging
    to an Ocean: The total area, in hectares,
    of combined sewer systems, by State,
    known to discharge into oceans.
    sTAit * of TOTAL
    sYaTtHi Cs AKC.A
    !
    ALABAMA U U
    ALAbKrt if3i
    |-LU*1"A i £31
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    -------
    Table 56	
    Summary of Present and
    Projected Urbanized Area
    Characteristics
    (Area in Hectares)
    Table 56 provides drainage area and
    population data for both combined and
    separtely sewered Urbanized Areas in the
    U.S. The specific criteria for defining
    Urbanized Areas are given in Appendix B.
    Since the use of combined sewers is no
    longer considered accepted engineering
    practice, it was assumed that present and
    projected combined sewer system
    characteristics would be the same and
    that all/future growth would occur in
    separately sewered areas. The following
    items are contained in Table 56:
    
    Number of Urbanized Areas: The total
    number of Urbanized Areas as defined in
    Appendix B, listed by State.
    Combined Sewer Area in Urbanized
    Areas: The combined sewer area, in
    hectares, located within Urbanized Areas,
    listed by State.
    
    Combined Sewer Population in
    Urbanized Areas: The total population
    residing within the combined sewer area
    in Urbanized Areas, listed by State.
    
    Stormwater Runoff Area (1970): The
    Urbanized Area, in hectares, which
    contributes Stormwater runoff based on
    1970 census data, listed  by State.
    
    Stormwater Runoff Population (1970):
    The estimated 1970 population, based on
    census data, which resides within  the
    Stormwater runoff area for Urbanized
    Areas, listed by State.
    
    Stormwater Runoff Area (2000): The
    Urbanized Area, in hectares, which
    contributes Stormwater runoff based on
    projected year 2000 population estimates
    listed by State.
    
    Stormwater Runoff Population (2000):
    The projected year 2000 population for
    the Stormwater runoff area for Urbanized
    Areas, listed by State.
    STATE
    ALABAMA
    ALASKA
    ARIZONA
    ARKANSAS
    CALIFORNIA
    COLORADO
    CONNECTICUT
    DELAWARE
    DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
    FLORIDA
    GEORGIA
    GUAM
    HAWAII
    IDAHO
    ILLINOIS
    INDIANA
    IOWA
    KANSAS
    KENTUCKY
    LOUISIANA
    MAINE
    MARYLAND
    MASSACHUSETTS
    MICHIGAN
    MINNESOTA
    MISSISSIPPI
    MISSOURI
    MONTANA
    NEBRASKA
    NEVADA
    NEW HAMPSHIRE
    NEW JERSEY
    NEW MEXICO
    NEW YORK
    NORTH CAROLINA
    NORTH DAKOTA
    OHIO
    OKLAHOMA
    OREGON
    PENNSYLVANIA
    PUERTO RICO
    RHODE ISLAND
    SAMOA
    SOUTH CAROLINA
    SOUTH DAKOTA
    TENNESSEE
    TEXAS
    TRUST TERRITORIES
    UTAH
    VERMONT
    VIRGIN ISLANDS
    VIRGINIA
    WASHINGTON
    WEST VIRGINIA
    WISCONSIN
    WYOMING
    U.A. TOTALS
    * OK
    UA S
    9
    1
    2
    4
    18
    4 ->
    12
    1
    1
    15
    1
    0
    1
    1
    13
    10
    7
    4
    6
    7
    2
    2
    11
    13
    6
    3
    5
    2
    3
    2
    3
    7
    1
    9
    11
    1
    17
    4
    3
    14
    4
    2
    0
    b
    2
    6
    28
    0
    3
    0
    0
    8
    6
    5
    9
    0
    320
    COMbINt.0
    HREA
    0
    0
    0
    0
    14.317
    6,400
    t>f221
    2,009
    5.96V
    0
    11*491
    0
    0
    0
    111,307
    02.913
    I,b36
    11,300
    14,003
    0
    b.742
    0
    19,993
    91,353
    9,239
    0
    34,947
    0
    10,206
    0
    2,597
    3ti,710
    0
    97,249
    0
    93
    04,050
    0
    7,501
    63,812
    432
    4,005
    0
    0
    2,160
    5,551
    1,891
    0
    0
    0 '
    0
    0,527
    29,495
    8,601
    9,669
    0
    805,140
    atwtri
    POPULATION
    0
    0
    0
    0
    827,120
    96,800
    294,0.50
    00,370
    409,093
    0
    394,010
    0
    0
    0
    4,998,930
    1,695,82U
    160,000
    459,000
    304,160
    0
    130,500
    0
    1,367,100
    2,251,900
    208,910
    0
    700,620
    0
    191,510
    0
    138,800
    2,063,605
    0
    a, 7oo»067
    0
    2,300
    2,416,560
    0
    305,540
    3,273,776
    16,000
    190,550
    0
    0
    47,700
    116,500
    35,000
    0
    0
    0
    0
    410,100
    629,024
    230,260
    444,000
    0
    34,298,155
    bTOHMWATErt
    AkEA
    198,081
    14,126
    127,578
    46,786
    1,019,762
    104,561
    217,132
    22,359
    9,956
    482,266
    177,029
    U
    29,800
    7,620
    290,204
    182,430
    111,090
    52,123
    69,976
    103.291
    26, £95
    144,530
    332,286
    301,595
    207,847
    36,055
    196,829
    12,623
    32,795
    41.135
    19,435
    562,067
    29,652
    211,614
    162,907
    3,073
    492,695
    146,681
    77,59t>
    426,931
    36,452
    50,301
    0
    84,266
    4,994
    202,223
    806,813
    0
    80,430
    0
    0
    229,989
    158,996
    29,113
    187,115
    0
    8,612,711
    RUNOFF (1970)
    POPULATION
    1,402,102
    110,782
    1.157,541
    378,624
    15,453,993
    1,327,211
    1,946,729
    269,304
    267,417
    4,731,073
    1,485,350
    0
    442.397
    05,187
    2.970.850
    699,313
    682,155
    326,933
    630,329
    1,780,735
    35,311
    2,588,919
    2,767,096
    3,484,865
    1,744,983
    320,592
    1,797,221
    142,102
    396,782
    336,368
    35,143
    4.014,767
    297,451
    5,683.625
    1,367,048
    51,120
    4,233,003
    1,049,072
    598,512
    3,712,003
    1,068.077
    554,688
    0
    723.074
    28,306
    1.519,119
    6,955.930
    0
    733.179
    0
    0
    1,990,982
    1,380,369
    168,175
    1,621,765
    0
    87,547,752
    STURMWATER
    AREA
    244,659
    50,970
    322,597
    84,967
    1,400,742
    204,909
    240,587
    38.011
    26.058
    1.047.544
    295,575
    0
    56,681
    15,599
    407,855
    330,264
    138,001
    304,382
    139,237
    131,642
    62,694
    198,109
    396,891
    356,665
    262,114
    48,402
    257,508
    16,824
    50,995
    96,192
    161,263
    823,732
    49,964
    220,819
    198.900
    5,277
    578,678
    209,548
    162,760
    434,788
    45,550
    47,513
    0
    104.132
    10.391
    275,565
    1.775.360
    0
    96.392
    0
    0
    398,835
    241,715
    32,784
    265.972
    0
    13.374.903
    RUNOFF (2000)
    POPULATION
    1,702,400
    399,781
    2,904,408
    692,603
    21,144,279
    2,559,825
    2,126,455
    457,823
    699,898
    10,774,658
    2.449.033
    0
    841.227
    174.382
    4,077.296
    1.112.244
    841.622
    557.243
    1.056,425
    2,323,091
    93.015
    3.470.905
    3.302.095
    4,161,881
    2,190,700
    446,145
    2,190,148
    187.870
    621.919
    791.692
    195.605
    5.665,879
    501,205
    8,133,133
    1,690,861
    69,658
    4,959,925
    1,477,807
    1.222,103
    3,861,641
    1,313,987
    523,520
    0
    903,647
    58,086
    2,049,263
    14,405,772
    0
    857,675
    0
    0
    2.920.916
    2,070,142
    208,993
    2,327,167
    0
    129,848,136
    

    -------
    Table 57
    Receiving Water Types for
    Urban Stormwater Runoff
    Present Conditions (1970)
    (Areas in Hectares)
    Table 57 identifies the type of major
    receiving water into which urban storm-
    water is discharged, for the 1970
    Urbanized Area data presented in Table
    56. The specific criteria for defining an
    Urbanized Area are given in Appendix B.
    For the purposes of this table, a stream
    includes all channels with a mean annual
    depth less than 10 feet, and a river
    includes all channels with a mean annual
    depth greater than or equal to 10 feet.
    The following items are contained in Table
    57:
    Number of Urbanized Areas: The total
    number of Urbanized Aeas as defined in
    Appendix B, listed by State. This item is
    the same as presented in Table 56.
    
    Stormwater Runoff Area (1970): The
    Urbanized Area, in hectares, which
    contributes Stormwater runoff based on
    1970 census data. This item is the same
    as presented in Table  56.
    
    Stormwater Runoff Area Discharging to
    Streams: The total 1970 Stormwater
    drainage area, in hectares, known to
    discharge into streams as defined above.
    
    Stormwater Runoff Area Discharging to
    Rivers: The total  1970 Stormwater
    drainage area, in hectares, known to
    discharge into rivers as defined above.
    Stormwater Runoff Area Discharging to
    Lakes: The total 1970 Stormwater
    drainage area, in hectares, known to
    discharged into lakes.
    
    Stormwater Runoff Area Discharging to
    Estuaries: The total 1970 Stormwater
    drainage area, in hectares, known to
    discharge into estuaries.
    
    Stormwater Runoff Area Discharging to
    Oceans: The total 1970 Stormwater
    drainage area, in hectares, known to
    discharge into oceans.
    STATE
    ALABAMA
    ALASKA
    ARIZONA
    ARKANSAS
    CALIFORNIA
    COLORADO
    CONNECTICUT
    DELAWARE
    DISTRICT OF COLOMBIA
    FLORIDA
    GEORGIA
    bUAM
    HAWAII
    IDAHO
    ILLINOIS
    INDIANA
    IOWA
    KANSAS
    KENTUCKY
    LOUISIANA
    MAINE
    MARYLAND
    MASSACHUSETTS
    MICHIGAN
    MINNESOTA
    MISSISSIPPI
    MISSOURI
    MONTANA
    NEBRASKA
    NtVAOA
    NEW HAMPSHIRE
    NtW JERSEY
    NEW MEXICO
    NEW YORK
    NORTH CAROLINA
    NORTH DAKOTA
    OHIO
    OKLAHOMA
    ORtGON
    PENNSYLVANIA
    PUERTO RICO
    RHODE ISLAND
    SAMOA
    SOUTH CAROLINA
    SOUTH UAKuTA
    TENNESSEt
    TEAAS
    TRUST TERRITORIES
    UTAH
    VtRMONT
    VIRGIN ISLANDS
    VIRGINIA
    WASHINGTON
    WEST VIRGINIA
    WISCONSIN
    WYOMING
    * OF
    UA S
    9
    1
    2
    4
    18
    4
    12
    1
    1
    Ib
    7
    0
    1
    1
    13
    10
    7
    4
    b
    7
    2
    2
    11
    13
    b
    3
    3
    2
    3
    2
    3
    7
    1
    11
    1
    17
    4
    3
    2
    0
    b
    it
    o
    28
    0
    0
    0
    O
    3
    0
    STORM«ATER
    TOTAL AREA
    196,081
    14,126
    127, b/8
    tb, 7db
    I,019,7b2
    104, bbl
    217,132
    22,339
    9,936
    482, 2b8
    0
    29»a08
    1 , b20
    2*0,204
    14^,430
    111,890
    b«i,123
    09»V/b
    103,291
    »U33
    i*b,rt<:y
    I2»o23
    32,79b
    *i,Ub
    i*»«f3b
    ^bb2
    JiilSi?
    3,8/3
    492, bV3
    l4o,bttl
    / 7,3'»3
    a! 1 301
    0
    "+',*£
    20<;,^23
    0
    0
    u
    6
    133, 40b
    3,940
    0
    tf/,^4*:
    0
    13,304
    41,133
    0
    3o, \.iia
    12b!tl2
    0
    <;^4,3
    
    39»OJ4
    
    0
    148,926
    183,4/8
    19,3H4
    
    12,623
    19,291
    0
    19,43b
    1, 708
    0
    98, /8l
    28,901
    3,8/3
    110,329
    4 7,382
    77,39b
    0
    0
    0
    JO, 019
    20l«<:23
    0
    0
    u
    u
    30,263
    **» 113
    0
    LAKE
    DISCHARGE
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    41,213
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    o
    u
    0
    0
    0
    18*429
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    u
    15*410
    0
    0
    147*891
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
    '0
    0
    o
    o
    18*922
    u
    80*430
    u
    o
    0
    0
    o
    /0*49b
    0
    ESTUARY
    DISCHARGE
    43*649
    14*126
    0 -
    o
    170*733
    0
    72*839
    22*359
    9*956
    358*759
    16*560
    0
    0
    u
    0
    o
    o
    o
    o
    o
    0
    144*530
    191*740
    0
    o
    o
    o
    o
    o
    o
    
    507*558
    32*989
    7*595
    o
    0
    0
    
    168*496
    26*136
    50*301
    Q
    25.713
    '0
    
    33*774
    Q
    0
    
    162*514
    123*288
    (4
    0
    0
    OCEAN
    DISCHARGE
    0
    0
    0
    Q
    559*794
    0
    37*200
    o
    67,055
    0
    0
    29,808
    Q
    o
    Q
    o
    Q
    
    Q
    10*518
    0
    o
    
    16 51 1
    * u
    
    o
    Q
    
    17,392
    0
    Q
    o
    
    Q
    0
    3,707
    0
    
    0
    
    27,268
    0
    
    0
    0
    0
    0
    0
      U.A. TOTALS
                                     -5»ol<:. f 11
                                                    
    -------
    Table 58	
    Receiving Water Types for
    Urban Stormwater Runoff-
    Year  2OOO Conditions
    (Area in Hectares)
    Table 58 identifies the type of major
    receiving water body into which urban
    Stormwater is discharged, for the
    projected year 2000 Urbanized Area
    presented in Table 56. The specific criteria
    for defining an Urbanized Area are given
    in Appendix B. For the purposes of this
    table, a stream includes all channels with
    a mean annual depth less than 10 feet,
    and a river includes all channels with a
    mean annual depth greater than or equal
    to 10 feet. The following items are
    contained in Table 58.
    Number of Urbanized Areas: The total
    number of Urbanized Areas as defined in
    Appendix B, listed by State. This item is
    the same as presented in Table 56.
    
    Stormwater Runoff Area (2000): The
    Urbanized Area, in hectares, which
    contributes Stormwater runoff directly to a
    major receiving water, based on projected
    year 2000 projection estimates. This item
    is the same as presented in Table 56.
    
    Stormwater Runoff Area Discharging to
    Streams:  the total projected year 2000
    Stormwater drainage area, in hectares,
    known to discharge into streams as
    defined above.
    
    Stormwater Runoff Area Discharging to
    Rivers: The total projected year 2000
    Stormwater drainage area, in hectares,
    known to discharge into rivers as defined
    above.
    
    Stormwater Runoff Area Discharging to
    Lakes: The total projected year 2000
    Stormwater drainage area, in  hectares,
    known to discharge into lakes.
    
    Stormwater Runoff Area Discharging to
    Estuaries: The total projected year 2000
    Stormwater drainage area, in  hectares,
    known to discharge into estuaries.
    
    Stormwater Runoff Area Discharging to
    Oceans: "The total projected year 2000
    Stormwater drainage area, in  hectares,
    known to discharge into oceans.
    STATE
    ALABAMA
    ALASKA
    ARIZONA
    ARKANSAS
    CALIFORNIA
    COLORADO
    CONNECTICUT
    DELAWARE
    DISTRICT OF COLUMblA
    FLORIDA
    GEORGIA
    GUAM
    HAWAII
    IDAHO
    ILLINOIS
    INDIANA
    IOWA
    KANSAS
    KENTUCKY
    LOUISIANA
    MAINE
    MARYLAND
    MASSACHUSETTS
    MICHIGAN
    MINNESOTA
    MISSISSIPPI
    MISSOURI
    MONTANA
    NEBRASKA
    NEVADA
    NEW HAMPSHIRE
    NEW JERSEY
    NEW MEXICO
    NEW YORK
    NORTH CAROLINA
    NORTH DAKOTA
    OHIO
    OKLAHOMA
    OREGON
    PENNSYLVANIA
    PUERTO RICO
    RHODE ISLAND
    SAMOA
    SOUTH CAROLINA
    SOUTH DAKOTA
    TENNESSEE
    TEXAS
    TRUST TERRITORIES
    UTAH
    VERMONT
    VIRGIN ISLANDS
    VIRGINIA
    WASHINGTON
    WEST VlN&lAlIA
    WISCONSIN
    WYOMING
    * Oh STOrM«IATER
    UA S TOTAL UNLA
    9 ^44,M39
    1 30,9f«
    d J2c»b*7
    4
    / Utt,Uol
    t J04»J32
    b 13*, £37
    7 1J1»6<»2
    d 0£,OV4
    d l-*o,109
    11 39o»b91
    13 3bo, bob
    b dbdi\.l<*
    J t3»<*0^
    b 2o/,bi)«
    d Ib»o2«f
    J 3U»-<*b
    d *o»194
    9 £2u»rtl9
    11 19b»*00
    1 b , 2 7 7
    If b?o»b/«
    4 £di*»b4ri
    3 lo<:» 7bO
    14 4Jf , Mb
    4  27b,bbb
    da 1,7 /b, Jbu
    0 0
    J 9O,J92
    U U
    0 0
    tt J9f}»«35
    b «:•*!, 71b
    b J£»7o4
    9 do^ivtd
    u o'
    DlSCHAKbt.
    124,026
    U
    322,397
    2*525
    320*962
    204, 9U9
    3d, 723
    0
    0
    13*848
    0
    U
    0
    13*599
    4d*U7l
    1 J / , 1 dd
    79,4d9
    0
    1 I*o2/
    U
    U
    0
    79,318
    161,229
    516
    0
    41 , J21
    0
    19,112
    90,i92
    0
    *a,d09
    49,964
    52,940
    149, J93
    0
    262,910
    l3i ,9<;8
    0
    49,o<:o
    10, 7U9
    0
    0
    26,2t>4
    0
    0
    863, l9/
    0
    0
    u
    0
    13*609
    0,131
    0
    0
    0
    RIVER
    DISCHARGE
    o 7,9 04
    0
    0
    82,443
    96*765
    0
    61,346
    0
    0
    16«3d7
    277,390
    0
    0
    0
    359, 7»3
    193,076
    38,593
    304, 3d2
    1 d f , b 1 1
    131 ,642
    
    -------
    Table 59
    Selected Facilities for CSO
    Control in Urbanized  Areas
    (Area in Hectares, Flow in 1000 mVDay,
    Volume in 10tiO m3)
    
    Table 59 presents information which was
    developed as part of the cost estimating
    procedure for Categories V andIVI of the
    1980 Needs Survey. This CSO control
    data was developed only for Urbanized
    Areas as presented in Table 56. The
    storage and treatment requirements
    presented in fable 59 were estimated
    using the 1980 Needs Estimation Program
    (NEP-80) for the fish and wildlife, and
    recreation water quality objectives. The
    fish and wildlife objective was based on
    eliminating low dissolved oxygen events
    (less than 2.0 mg/l) and ensuring that SS
    concentrations in CSO would be less than
    or equal to background SS concentrations
    in the receiving water. The recreation
    objective was based on scaling up the
    facilities required to meet the fish and
    wildlife objective such that a 95 percent
    removal of fecal coliform organisms would
    be obtained. A brief description of the
    basis for Category V and VI cost estimates
    is presented in Appendix B. The following
    items are contained in Table 59:
    Number of Urbanized Areas: The total
    number of Urbanized Areas as defined in
    Appendix B, listed by State. This item is
    th« same as presented in Table 56.
    Combined Sewer Area In Urbanized Areas:
    The  combined  sewer  area, in hectares,
    located  within Urbanized Areas, listed by
    State. This item is the same as presented in
    Table 56.
    
    Number of CSO Treatment Plants: The
    total estimated number of CSO treatment
    plants required to meet the fish and
    wildlife water quality objective in
    Urbanized Areas, listed by State.
    
    Number of CSO Storage Ba«in«: The
    total estimated number of CSO storage
    basins required to meet the fish and
    wildlife water quality objective in
    Urbanized Areas, listed by State.
    
    Total CSO Treatment Capacity tor Fish
    and Wildlife: The total estimated CSO
    treatment capacity, in  1000 mVday,
    required to meet the fish and wildlife
    water quality objective in Urbanized
    Areas, listed by State.
    
    Average CSO Unit Treatment Capacity
    for Fish and Wildlife:  The estimated
    average CSO unit treatment capacity,  in
    10OO mVday/hectare, required to  meet
    the  fish and wildlife water quality
    objective in Urbanized Areas, listed by State
    Total CSO Treatment Capacity for
    Recreation: The total  estimated CSO
    treatment capacity,  in 1000 mVday,
    required to meet the recreation water
    quality objective in Urbanized Areas, listed
    by State.
    Average CSO Unit Treatment Capacity
    for Recreation: The estimated average
    CSO unit treatment capacity, in 1000
    mVday/hectare, required to meet the
    recreation water quality objective in
    Urbanized Areas, listed by State.
    
    Total CSO Storage Capacity for Fish
    and Wildlife: The total estimated CSO
    storage; capacity, in 1000 m3, required to
    meet the fish and, wildlife water quality
    objective in Urbanized Areas, listed by
    State.
    
    Average CSO Unit Storage Capacity for
    Fish and Wildlife: The estimated average
    CSO unit storage capacity,  in 1000
    m3/heetare, required to meet the fish and
    wildlife water quality objective in
    Urbanized Areas, listed by State.
    
    Total CSO Storage Capacity for
    Recreation:
    The total estimated CSO storage capacity,
    in 1000 m3, required to meet the
    recreation water quality objective in
    Urbanized Areas, listed by State.
    
    Average CSO Unit Storage Capacity for
    Recreation: The estimated  average CSO
    ur.it storage capacity, in 1000 mVhectare,
    required to meet the recreation water
    quality objective in Urbanized Areas, listed
    bv State.
    OA
    ALABAMA
    ALASKA
    
    AKK A;JSAS
    CALlKDKNl A
    COLORADO
    coNNtcricuT
    lltLAMAHt
    UlSTwlCT Oh COLUrtttlA
    (• L OH I L) A
    btOKblA
    MJArt
    rlArfAI 1
    IDAHO
    ILLINOIS
    INDIANA
    
    KANSAS
    KENTUCKY
    LOUISIANA
    
    MAWYLANU
    MASSACHUSETTS
    MICHIGAN
    llNNESOfA
    ilISSlSSIHPI
    MISSOURI
    MONTANA
    NEBKASKA
    NEVADA
    •It* HAMPSHIRE
    <4E« JEHSEY
    NE* MtXICO
    Nt* YOHK
    NOKTH CAKOLlNA
    UOWTH DAKOTA
    OHIO
    OKLAHOMA
    OWEfaON
    PENNSYLVANIA
    PUEHfu K1CO
    KHOOE ISLAND
    SAMOA
    SOUTH CAHOL1NA
    SOOTH DAKOTA
    fENNtSSEE
    IEXAS
    TMUSf TtHKlTOHlES
    UTAH
    
    t/lHbim ISLANDS
    
    •ASHlNurON
    «EST VlKOlNIn
    •IbCOHSlN
    *YOM1^,
    l). A. TOlHLS
    Oh
    s
    9
    1
    d
    4
    10
    4
    12
    1
    1
    13
    1
    a
    l
    i
    13
    lu
    
    4
    6
    7
    2
    I
    11
    1 3
    6
    3
    b
    d
    J
    
    b
    9
    U
    >fd
    FISH & NlLDLIKb HECHEA11ON
    foUU IKEAFMENf STOKAtfE TKtATMENT STOWAGE
    CSO ««tA PL««Mi 3ASH5 rufAL UNIT ToTAL UNIT TOTAL UNIT TOTAL UNIT
    U u 0 0.00 O.OOUO 0.00 O.OOOU 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000
    u o o U.UO 0.0000 0.00 0.0000 O.CO 0.0000 0.00 0.0000
    U u 0 0.00 U.OOOO 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000
    u u u o.oo o.oooo o.oo o.oooo o.oo o.oooo o.oo o.oooo
    i ,jl/ o 10 030.35 0.0<37 1,219.32 0.034b 1,606.67 0.0455 1.287.93 0.0364
    ,400 j 5 39.47 0.0025 516.28 0.0323 39.47 0.002b 78H.64 0.04U9
    f<*21 10 18 400.31 0.0266 009.01 0.0927 839. 9b 0.0b47 2,12b.64 0.1384
    ,009 d 4 108.23 0.02/1 300.07 0.0433 427.79 0.0617 850.33 0.1226
    ,<*V9 . 3 b 399.28 0.0271 b76.0b 0.0392 1,125.23 0.0765 1,661.63 0.1129
    U u 0 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000 0.00 O.OOOU 0.00 0.0000
    U,491 9 16 369.00 0.0201 1,434.20 0.0505 905.86 0.0319 2,592.75 0.0914
    u u o o.oo o.oooo o.oo o.oooo o.oo o.oooo o.oo o.oooo
    0 u o 0.00 0.0000 0.00 U.OOOO 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000
    U U U U.UO U.UOOO 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000
    111.307 21 38 3,o93.3b 0.01O5 7,339.03 0.0267 6,350.21 0.0231 9,6b6.94 0.03bl
    42.913 di 48 2,223.79 0.0109 7,135.bb 0.0349 2,477.06 0.0121 10,182.00 0.0497
    j,3jo d 4 9J.30 0.0147 113.04 0.0290 105.40 0.0278 124.44 0.032H
    H.jeu o 10 443.00 U.olDS 817.27 0.0291 623.92 0.0222 996.23 0.0355
    14.083 0 10 860.17 0.0250 1.526. 80 0.0439 1,910.23 0.0552 4,609.72 0.1326
    0 U U U.UU 0.0000 U.OO U.OOOO 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000
    a,/4<; 3 v J13.13 U.0221 497. 09 0.0351 874.45 0.0617 1./38.17 0.1226
    u u U O.OU 0.0000 0.00 0.0000 0.00 U.OOOO 0.00 0.0000
    19,993 14 24 1,706.19 0.0346 2,263.93 0.0459 3,738.61 0.0757 b, 681.36 O.llbl
    •y,<>3S> 3 9 394.81 U.0173 742.40 0.0325 394.81 0.0173 871.61 0.0381
    0 U U U.UU U.UOOO 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000 0.00 O.UOOO
    34.947 10 17 1,2/7.30 U.0148 2,399.78 0.027O l,91b.9b 0.0222 3,0b9.2b 0.03bb
    u U u U.OU O.OUOO U.OU U.OOOO 0.00 U.OOOO 0.00 0.0000
    Io,2uo 4 7 124. J4 0.0049 070.1b 0.0345 124.34 0.0049 1,372.55 0.054b
    „ u 0 U.OO 0.0000 0.00 0.0000 O.OU 0.0000 0.00 0.0000
    l,5*/ J 6 105.42 U.U209 284.17 0.0443 422.11 0.0658 772. 9« 0.1205
    30,710 v 13 2.91U.14 0.0306 4,4b4.36 U.046O 6,719.35 0.0703 H,lb9.93 0.1168
    0 u 0 0.00 O.OUUO 0.00 0.0000 U.OO 0.0000 0.00 0.0000
    9/,249 2o W 6,761.97 0.0<:02 9,237.47 0.0385 19,053.12 0.0793 27,322.60 0.1138
    00 0 O.OU 0.0000 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000
    VJ i ^ 1.84 0.0123 8.34 0.0363 3.40 0.0148 8.77 0.0381
    M4.05U 33 59 3,324.06 O.U160 3,729.00 0.0276 4,264.67 0.0205 f. 908.33 0.0381
    U u 0 O.UU O.UOOO 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000 0.00 O.OOOU
    /,3Ul 3 9 437.44 O.U247 427.88 0.0231 944.98 0.0510 6bB.09 0.03bb
    4j«- 1 £ 20.96 0.02U bl.21 O.U400 bO.Ol 0.0469 75.22 0.0705
    4IC)03 j 3 321.99 O.Utin 6U4.76 O.OblO 790.34 O.U666 1,413.15 0.1191
    u u 0 0.00 U.OOOO 0.00 0.0000 U.OO U.UOOO 0.00 0.0000
    U u U U.OO 0.0000 0.00 0.0000 0.00 O.OUOO U.OO 0.0000
    ^,lt,U d 4 63.70 O.Ol^J 14b./8 0.0273 • 70.94 0.0140 203.32 0.0381
    3.3^,1 4 7 331.91 U.U242 707.32 0.0bl6 508.09 0.0371 1,100.67 0.0803
    |,O9i 1 4 46. UO O.UU99 19U.52 0.0408 46. U8 0.0099 154.35 0.0545
    U u 0 U.UU O.UOOO 0.00 U.OOOO U.OO O.OOUU U.OO 0.0000
    u u 0 U.UO 0.0000 0.00 U.OOOO 0.00 0.0000 U.OO 0.0000
    0 o u U.UU U.UUOO 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000
    ij o o u.uu u.uuuo o.oo o.oooo o.oo o.oooo o.oo o.oooo
    0,-)<;C 7 12 44^.45 0.0210 1,070.12 0.0508 911.46 O.U433 3,221.13 0..1S30
    24.493 11 . 19 1.177.38 O.U161 2,403.10 0.0330 2.3O4.S4 0.0325 3.917.91 0.0538
    T.fnll d 14 497.31 U.0134 vol. 17 0.0424 1,265.36 0.0590 2,626.26 0.1237
    <*,ob* 7 13 442.15 U.OlOb 730.27 0.0306 530.11 0.0222 846.44 0.0355
    u o D U.OO O.UOOO 0.00 0.0000 U.OO 0.0000 U.OO 0.0000
    niio.1411 Mu ill 3*.<:4o.W OT.112.36 75.b4J.99 137,900.74
    

    -------
    Table 60
    Selected Facilities for Urban
    Stormwater Pollution Control
    in Urbanized Areas
    (Area in Hectares, Flow in  1000 mVDay,
    Volume in 1000m3)
    
    Table 60 presents information which was
    developed as part of the cost estimating
    procedure for Categories V and VI of the
    1980 Needs Survey. This urban
    Stormwater pollution control data was
    developed for projected year 2000
    conditions in Urbanized Areas as
    presented in  Table 56. The storage and
    treatment requirements  presented in
    Table 60 were estimated using the 1980
    Needs Estimation Program (NEP-80) for
    the fish and wildlife, and recreation water
    quality objectives. The fish and wildlife
    objective  was based on eliminating low
    dissolved oxygen events (less than 2.0
    mg/l)  and ensuring that SS
    concentrations in Stormwater would be
    less than or equal to background SS
    concentrations in the receiving water. The
    recreation objective was based on scaling
    up the facilities required to meet the fish
    and wildlife objective such that a 95
    percent removal of fecal coliform
    organisms would be obtained. A brief
    description of the basis for Catego.y V and
    VI cost estimates is presented in Appendix
    B. The following items are contained in
    Table 60:
    Number of Urbanized Areas:  The total
    number of Urbanized Areas as defined in
    Appendix B, listed by State. This item is
    the same as presented in Table 56.
    Stormwater Runoff Area (2000): The
    Urbanized Area, in hectares, which
    contributes Stormwater runoff based on
    projected year 2000 population estimates,
    listed by State. This item is the same as
    presented in Table 56.
    Number of Stormwater Treatment Plants:
    The total estimated number of Stormwater
    treatment plants required to meet the fish.
    and wildlife water quality objective in
    Urbanized ATMs, listed by State.
    Number of Stormwater Storage
    Basins: The total estimated number of
    Stormwater storage basins required to meet
    the fish and wildlife water quality objective
    in Urbanized Areas, listed by State.
    Total Stormwater Treatment Capacity
    for Fish and WMdlife:  The total estimated
    Stormwater treatment  capacity, in 1000
    mVday, required to meet the fish and wild-
    life water quality objective, listed by State.
    Average Stormwater  Unit Treatment
    Capacity for Fish and WildlHe:  The
    estimated average Stormwater unit
    treatment capacity, in  1000mVday/hectare,
    required to meet the fish and wildlife
    water quality objective, listed by State.
    for Recreation: The total estimated
    Stormwater treatment capacity, in 1000
    mYday, required to meet the fish and wild-
    life water quality objective, listed by State.
    
    Average Stormwater Unit Treatment
    Capacity for Recreation: The average
    estimated Stormwater unit treatment
    capacity, in 1000 mVday/hectare,
    required to meet the  recjaation water
    quality objective, listed by State.
    Total Stormwater Storage Capacity for
    Fish and Wildlife: The total estimated
    Stormwater storage capacity, in 1000 m3,
    required to meet the fish and wildlife
    water quality objective, listed by State.
    Average Stormwater Unit Storage
    Capacity for Fish and Wildlife: The
    average estimated Stormwater unit
    storage capacity, in 1000 mVday/hectare,
    required to meet the fish' and wildlife
    water quality objective, listed by State.
    Total Stormwater Storage Capacity for
    Recreation:  The total estimated
    Stormwater storage capacity, in 1000 m3,
    required to meet the recreation water
    quality object, listed by State.
    
    Average Stormwater Unit Storage
    Capacity for Recreation: The average
    estimated Stormwater unit storage
    capacity, in 1000 m3/
    hectare, required to meet the recreation
    water quality objective, listed by State.
    STATE
    
    at ABA* A
    ALASKA
    A** I ^ONA
    AKKANSAS
    CALII-OHNlA
    COLORADO
    CONNECTICUT
    UELAWAKE
    OISMICT OK COLUMBIA
    KLOH1UA
    bEORbIA
    ljUAM
    HAWAII
    IDAHO
    ILLINOIS
    INDIANA
    IOWA
    KANSAS
    KENTUCKY
    LOUISIANA
    *AINt
    MARYLAND
    MASSACHUSETTS
    MICHIGAN
    1INNESOTA
    MISSISSIPPI
    MISSOURI
    MONTANA
    .NlEHKASKA
    NEVADA
    .JEW HAHHSHIHE
    MEW JEHSEY
    NEW MEXICO
    NEW YOHK
    NOKTH CAKOLlNA
    NUKTh DAKOTA
    OHIO
    OKLAHOMA
    OREGON
    PENNSYLVANIA
    HUErtTO HlCu
    WHOUE ISLAND
    SAMOA
    SOUTn CAKOLl'MA
    bOllTH DAKOTA
    TENNESSEE
    TEHAb
    TKUST TErtrtlTOHlts
    UTAH
    VEKMONT
    VlkblN ISLANDS
    VI Kb INI A
    «ASHlNuTON
    ^t-JST Vlrtbl^ilA
    .VI SCONS IN
    WYOMliMb
    •» Oh
    
    V
    I
    
    /
    <;
    <;
    U
    U
    o
    j
    3
    n
    ,1
    «r
    j
    I
    1
    V
    11
    1
    1 1
    4
    J
    It
    4
    t:
    o
    b
    d.
    o
    tb
    ll
    J
    U
    U
    n
    ^
    •3
    V
    0
    USH & wlLULlt-t ~ KtCKtAliON
    T'jlML IntMTnENT SVUKAbt TREATMENT STUMAttfc
    
    t?44 05 y 3J 34 iu.liv.03 O.olbS 27,323.34 0.04b3 ld.44b.dj 0.0305 !>0.9 0.0841
    30 -ilo o U VJl.oO 0.0074 4,700.00 0.037o 2,173.74 0.0173 7.16b.96 0.0b69
    t>4 *of to It 3.174./4 u.Oibl *.bbO./3 0.0466 b, 023. 06 0.0270 17,o47.*2 0.0031
    1,4'jo /4t4 \3i  3/t> <*<; nl 10.aOJ.00 U.0l4d 3<>»lb9.9r 0.0441 21,0b0.y« 0.0200 bO.V4b.b4 O.OOJb
    uoo 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000
    bo oru v 14 1,033.01 0.0074 3t379.74 0.0241 0<>9b 14,490. Ob 0.0144 41.dl4.9b O.U41b
    1 in uei j/ 3V 3.304.49 u.0099 10,Jb6.37 0.0304 4(3b4.42 0.0128 I4,lb4.bb 0.041b
    J04 JMi Ji 44 7,4lb.t>9 0.0099 t211.l9 0.0296 9*2 0.0031
    0£ o** If m i>,274.9b 0.0147 bt074.ttb 0.0320 6.492.36 0.0419 21.777»7b 0.1407
    1-vj iu-y c.t Jt 10.203.3<: 0.0<:09 20t911.12 0.0427 22.273.34 0.04bb 66.201. ttO 0.13b3
    3vo rtvl oo 103 » tr. 43 0,103. DO 0.009b I9.079.bb 0.029b 7.94tt.tt6 0.0123 26.909.40 0.0416
    >»» >»u^ 14 e* I,d34.49 O.Olab 4.023.70 0.0404 3»62<».0li 0.0303 9.O91.49 0.082d
     «c* 1 l9 0.0333
    t0j 30 '^0 7,<• 130 10.bOO.ol O.Ollb J7,43b.34 0.0262 23,dl4.0U 0.0167 b/,490.6b 0.0402
    So~> 34 -j tl 4j b'111.99 0.0099 13,930.90 0.030b 6,3dd.4b 0.0123 21,4dO.&4 0.041S
    lc<: /oo  3/ VO I3.ol3.dl 0.01b9 44,000.39 0.04b6 30,674.31 0.0393 130.703.66 0.1409
    ^41 ll-y JH 60 i, 1/7. 30 0.01b4 16,462.06 0.0309 16,476.09 0.0276 30,966.<:6 0.09)19
    J^ /^>4 13 £3 l,19b.<:^ 0.0l4ti 3,71b.39 0.04b9 2,960.73 0.0367 11,666.30 0.1441
    Co? its. 311 an o,<;oo.lO 0.0093 lo.440.43 0.02bO 9,214.24 0.0140 27*264.49 0.041b
    0 U J 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000
    

    -------
     Appendix A
    The 1 980 Needs Survey
      Spnfiuct of the Survey
      ategories yy
     (Treatment Plants and
     Sewers)
    Background
    
    As in previous Surveys, the goal of
    the 1 980 Needs Survey 'Was to
    identify and quantify all needs on
    a nationally Uniform baste; Further,
    the inverttdry of municipal waste-
    water facilities compiled previously
    would be updated aWe^ftsjnded
    for completeness.
      As in the; 1970 and 1978
    Surveys, the 1980 Survey was
    accomplished with the assistance
    of a  contractor The two main
    purposes for perfornfTing fhe
    Survey with cbntVactor assistance
    were:, ' ' ' '             =!'
    
    1 . To achieve as high a degree of
    national consistency in  the final
    estimates as possible through the
    use  of uniformly applied guidelines
    and  validation  technique*.
          i     . ;
    2. To minimize the time;required
    of State and EPA Regional Con-
    struction Grants staff.
    
      URS Company of Denver,
    Colorado was competitively
    selected to estimate needs in
    Categories  I-IV: CH2M Hill of
    Gainesville, Florida and Sage
    Murphy & Associates, Inc. of
    Denver, Colorado assisted in the
    Survey as subcontractors to URS.
    
    Conduct of the Survey
    
    The  1980 Needs Survey was a
    more centralized effort ^han past
    Surveys. All data analysis was per
    formed in Denver, Colorado to
    assure national consistency in the
    estimation  process. Contractor
    personnel visited EPA Regional
    and State offices as necessary for
    data collection and consultation.
      Survey guidance and,
    methodology were formulated for
    Categories I-IV and circulated to all
    parties involved in the Survey. The
    guidance document was prepared
    as an update, from the guidance
    used in prior Surveys.
      The formal Survey of Categories
    I-IV  began  with orientation
    meetings conducted in  EPA
    Regional pffices where logistics,
    target dates, and individual State
    problems were discussed and
    resolved. States were invited to
    provide as  much investment in
    personnel for the Survey as they
    considered prudent.
      The Survey field work was con-
    ducted in the spring, summer, and
    fall of 1 980. As estimates for
    Categories; I-IV were completed,
    copies of the estimates were
    reviewed by States on e facility-by-
    facility basis. In a few cases,
    separate cost estimates were sub-
    mitted by States when agreement
    beween EPA and State personnel
    could not be reached.
      Population projections from the
    Bureau of Economic Analysis for
    the year 2000 were used as State
    ceilings. State population projec-
    tion totals were not permitted to
    exceed these ceilings.
      Facility estimates were reviewed
    and accepted and/or approved at
    four levels:
    
    1.  Contractor
    2.  State
    3.  EPA Regional Office
    4.  EPA Headquarters
    
      After updating the Needs Survey
    computer data  base with 1980
    Survey information, data for Cate-
    gories I-IV were summarized for
    this report.
    
    Survey Methodology
    
    Participant guidance for the Survey
    was formulated by  EPA, the States,
    and the contractor  to insure
    national uniformity in needs
    assessment while recognizing cost
    and construction differences
    inherent to various sections of the
    country. Set forth in the guidance
    were directives outlining:
    
    1.  Responsibilities  of the
    participants.
    
    2.  Survey chronology,  including
    target dates for project milestones.
    
    3. Descriptions of types of data
    sources.
    
    4. Instructions for review of individ-
    ual facilities by contractor personnel
    and adjustments to the 1978 data of
    record.
    
    5. Provisions for State and Regional
    review of Survey forms.
    
    6.  Definitions  of terms for Survey
    purposes such as levels of treat-
    ment, design year, and per capita
    flows.
    
    7.  Detailed cost estimating proce-
    dures, including procedures for
    estimating backlog needs for all
    categories.
    
    8.  Local construction cost indices.
    
    9. Treatment plant, sewer, and
    pump station sizing and cost
    estimating tables.
    
    The 1980 Needs Survey differed
    from prior Surveys in several
    areas. These include:
    
    1. The needs assessment effort was
    centralized  to  assure   national
    consistency.
    
    2.  The  incremental  cost  for
    achieving treatment levels greater
    than secondary are reported in
    Category H. Advanced secondary
    treatment incremental coat are
    reported in category HA and
    incremental advanced treatment
    cost are reported in Category IIB.
    
    3. More accurate techniques for
    estimating needs in small com-
    munities were provided, including
    the provision for estimating costs
    of individual systems.
    
    4. More attention was placed on
    multi-purpose projects, with
    ineligible or nonpol I ution control
    related costs documented on a
    separate worksheet.
    
    5. Greater use was made of com-
    puters for cost estimating, logging,
    and quality assurance functions.
    
    Basia of cost Estimate for
    Categories I-IV
    
    All  individual cost estimates
    prepared or obtained for
    Categories  I-IV of the Survey were
    assigned a basis that provides an
    indication of the quality of the
    estimate. The quality of coat
    estimates are assigned codes
    which are defined as follows:
    
    1. State Certification - Applicable
    to Category IIIA only, this code
    relates certifications by the State
    that excessive infiltration/inflow
    does or does not exist. It was not
    used in this Survey as a basis of
    estimate.
    
    2. Analysis Completed - For
    Category MIA estimates obtained
    froma cost  analysis in an I/I reort.
    
    3. Evaluation Survey Completed -
    An  estimate of cost based on the
    results of a Sewer System
    Evaluation  Survey (SSES), used
    only for Category MIA or 1MB.
    
    4. Engineer/Consultant Firm
    Estimate - An estimate of cost
    based on detailed engineering
    work such as completed Step II
    plans and specifications.
    
    5. Cost of Previous Comparable
    Construction - This estimate of
    cost is based on the cost of a
    nearby, recently completed project
    which is similar in size and scope,
    and for which detailed
    construction cost are available.
    
    6. Engineer/Consultant Prelim-
    inary Estimate - An estimate of
    coat based  on a completed Step I
    or other facilities plan.
    
    7. EPA-Supplied Cost Estimating
    Procedures - Cost estimated using
    EPA rule of thumb estimating tech
    niquea as described in the Survey
    guidance.
    
    8. Cost Effective Analysis - This is
    an estimate drived from
    comparative economic evaluation
    for which a compiled Step I
    facilities plan is not available, or a
    rough estimate obtained from a
    208 or other areawide plan.
    
    The accuracy of the cost estimates
    can be ranked from high order to
    low, as follows:
    
    Categories I, HA, IIB, IVA, IVB:
    Codes 4, 8, 5, 8, 7,
    Categories IIIA, 1MB:
    Codes 4, 3, 6, 2, 8, 5. 7, 1
    Category I-V Data Collection
    
    Many sources of data were used
    in assessing and updating needs
    for individual facilities. For most of
    these facilities, information was
    obtained concerning present and
    projected population, flows, treat-
    ment plant loading, discharge
    limitations, ad treatment and
    cludge handling methods. The data
    sources include:
    
    1. 1978 Needs Survey
    
    2. NPDES Permit
    
    3. Regional Grant File
    
    4. Engineering Plans and Reports
    
    5. EPA Grants Information and
    Control System (GICS) Data
    
    6. State Water Quality Standards
    
    Survey Preparation
    
    The 1980 Survey form for each
    facility was generated by computer
    showing the  1978 data of record.
    Revised or updated cost estimates
    and related information were
    obtained for each facility as appli-
    cable and entered on the form.
    Copies of updated forms were sent
    to the States and EPA Regional
    offices for review. Upon
    completion of the review, final
    changes were made to the form
    and the information was entered
    into the  1980 Survey data base by
    computer.
       The 1980 Needs Survey was
    noteworthy for its increased level
    of automation, efficiency, and
    accuracy over prior Surveys. The
    Survey data base was expanded
    somewhat by the addition of new
    facilities, and existing data were
    improved and new data entered.
    The final results of the Survey
    reported herein represent a higher
    degree of reliablility and accuracy
    yet achieved, and the
    accumulation of more data on the
    nation's wastewater systems than
    has ever before been known.
    

    -------
    Table 60
    Selected Facilities for Urban
    Stormwater Pollution Control
    in Urbanized Areas
    (Area in Hectares, Flow in  1000 mVDay,
    Volume in 1000m3)
    
    Table 60 presents information which was
    developed as part of the cost estimating
    procedure for Categories V and VI of the
    1980 Needs Survey. This urban
    Stormwater pollution control data was
    developed for projected year 2000
    conditions in Urbanized Areas as
    presented in  Table 56. The storage and
    treatment requirements  presented in
    Table 60 were estimated using the 1980
    Needs Estimation Program (NEP-80) for
    the fish and wildlife, and recreation water
    quality objectives. The fish and wildlife
    objective was based on eliminating low
    dissolved oxygen events (less than 2.0
    mg/l)  and ensuring that SS
    concentrations in Stormwater would  be
    less than or equal to background SS
    concentrations in the receiving water. The
    recreation objective was based on scaling
    up the facilities required to meet the fish
    and wildlife objective such that a 95
    percent removal of fecal col if or m
    organisms would be obtained. A brief
    description of the basis for Catego, y V and
    VI cost estimates is presented in Appendix
    B. The following items are contained in
    Table  60:
    Number of Urbanized Areas:  The total
    number of Urbanized Areas as defined in
    Appendix B, listed by State. This item is
    the same ae presented in Table 56.
    Stormwater Runoff Area (20OO): The
    Urbanized Area, in hectares, which
    contributes Stormwater runoff based on
    projected year 2000 population estimates,
    listed by State. This item is the tame as
    presented In Table 56.
    Number of Storm wafer Treatment Plants:
    The total estimated number of Stormwater
    treatment plant* required to meet the fish.
    and wildlife water quality objective in
    Urbanized Areas, listed by State.
    Number of Stormwater Storage
    Basins: The total estimated number of
    Stormwater storage basins  required to meet
    the fish and wildlife water  quality objective
    in Urbanized Areas, listed by State.
    Total Stormwater Treatment Capacity
    for Fish and Wildlife:  The  total estimated
    Stormwater treatment  capacity, in 1000
    mVday, required to meet the fish and wild-
    life water quality objective, listed by State.
    Average Stormwater  Unit Treatment
    Capacity for fish and Wildlife: The
    estimated average Stormwater unit
    treatment capacity, in  100Qm3/day/hectare,
    required to meet the fish and wildlife
    water quality objective, listed by State.
    for Recreation: The total estimated
    Stormwater treatment capacity, in 1000
    mVday, required to meet the fish and wild-
    life water quality objective, Hated by State.
    
    Average Stormwatar Unit Treatment
    Capacity for Recreation: The average
    estimated Stormwater unit treatment
    capacity, in 1000 mVday/hectare,
    required to meet the reqjpetion water
    quality objective, listed by State.
    Total Stormwater Storage Capacity for
    Rah and Wildlife: The total estimated
    Stormwater storage capacity, in 1000 m3,
    required to meet the fish and wildlife
    water quality objective, Hated by State.
    Average Stormwater Unit Storage
    Capacity for Fieh and WWIIfe: The
    average estimated Stormwater unit
    storage capacity, in 1000 mVday/hectare,
    required to meet the fish  and wildlife
    water quality objective, listed by State.
    Total Stormwater Storage Capacity for
    Recreation: The total estimated
    Stormwater storage capacity, in 1000 m3,
    required to meet the recreation water
    quality object, listed by State.
    
    Average Stormwater Unit Storage
    Capacity for Recreation: The average
    estimated  Stormwater unit storage
    capacity, in 1000 mV
    hectare, required to meet the recreation
    water quality objective, listed by State.
    STATE
    
    ALABAMA
    ALASKA
    A*^ I ZUH A
    ARKANSAS
    CALIFORNIA
    COLORADO
    CONNECTICUT
    DELAWARE
    DISTRICT OK COLUMBIA
    KLOR10A
    bEORolA
    OUAM
    HAWAII
    IDAHO
    ILLINOIS
    INDIANA
    IOWA
    KANSAS
    KENTUCKY
    LOUISIANA
    MAlNt
    MARYLAND
    MASSACHUSETTS
    MICHIGAN
    1INNESOTA
    MISSISSIPPI
    MISSOURI
    MONTANA
    NEhRASKA
    NEVADA
    • IE* HAMPSHIRE
    NEW JERSEY
    NKW MEXICO
    NEW YORK
    NORTH CAROLINA
    NORTH DAKOTA
    OHIO
    OKLAHOMA
    OREGON
    PENNSYLVANIA
    HUERTO RICO
    RHODE ISLAND
    SAMOA
    SOUTri CAROLINA
    SOUTH DAKOTA
    TENNESSEE
    TEXAS
    TRUST TtRRl TORiE-i
    UTAH
    VERMONT
    VlROlN ISLANDS
    VIRGINIA
    .ASHlNOTOH
    *EST VIUblNlA
    WISCONSIN
    WYOMING
    <• ut-
    
    V
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    0
    USH t MlUH-lht •' HtLKtAliON
    pjl-L T«LMr«itNT SloRAfaE TREATMENT STORAGE
    
    dtt on sj »t 10.iiiy.U3 0.016H 27,323.34 0.04Sb Id.4o6.dj 0.0305 bO*211.o9 0.0831
    so -y/a o U VJl.oO 0.0074 4*760. Gt> 0.03?e 2*173.74 0.0173 7*16$.«6 O.OS69
    at vof cO 32 3*174.74 o.Olbl v.bbO.?J 0.04Sb b*o23.0o 0.0270 17*»47.92 0.0031
    1,4'jo ltd iti 221 J/,204.VS 0.0X07 Vo.029.10 0.0276 ttO.S3J.04 0.0232 1*6,022.46 0.0b3b
    20* »uv dl 4J J,.»04.»4 0.0006 l«»,429.9d 0.020S 4*9*2.03 0.0099 l6.V07.12 0.0334
    240 337 Of 102 11.204.33 0.0109  <:0o •*<>, ***.*£ O.U166 lub<0<:<2.31 0.040b 7v.6aJ.64 0.030d ^13.VOl.Ob O.OtHtl
    f-li 3/5 t?? b 9 36V. 10 O.OOVV 1.120.1b 0.0291 476.12 0.0123 1.2B2.43 0.0333
    oo/ 13D 01 lot 10.0t id dj V,177.b2 0.0113 <:2tll9.d3 0.0271 U, 096. 59 0.0141) JJtttbb.Ol 0.041b
    Ijti ubi J/ 3V 3.364.4V O.OOV9 10.J6b.37 0.0304 4.JO4.42 0.0126 l4.lb4.S6 0.04lb
    JUt jHd Jl 4V 7.4le.»V O.OOV9 22i211.1V 0.0296 V,26tt.27 0.0123 31.206.7b 0.041s
    UV fJ/ d* <*-> 3, 220. bo O.Ulb2 14.el9.lv u.0431 13t47u.9H 0.0392 4tt,bJ«.«4 0.1412
    131 o911. 12 0.0427 22.273.34 0.0465 66t20l. HO 0.13b3
    3Vo 4*1 oo IDS 20, 217. £3 0.0206 4UtObt).97 0.040V 4J.bbtt.31 0.044b 13t»*192.4M 0.1380
    333 oo? OM 104 !UtU3J.vtt 0.0114 2iT.62s.71 0.0314 IS, 136. 11 0.0172 3t>»117.«2 0.0399
    dod Lit d<; <»S o.lob.btt O.OOVS IV, 07V. SO 0.02VS 7,V4tt.d6 0.0123 2o.v09.90 0.0416
    -.1 HU2 it d* l.dSH.VV O.Olbb 4,023.70 0.04U4 3,624.00 0.0303 9*t»91«*9 0.0fl2t>
    2s/ -..DO Jo m o.avv.JO 0.0109 19,196.26 0.0302 d,s9V.3V 0.01JS 26,JV6.d« 0.041b
    lo rdt I 12 204. V7 0.0049 1,344. ov 0.0324 409.94 0.0099 1.464.22 0.03!>2
    so vJ-> u di 1.242.S4 O.OOV9 4,Ub4.43 0.0322 1.S47.40 0.0123 S,23 '^0 7» r, M -,<, i3u I6.b00.ol O.Ollb 37.4bb.St 0.0262 23,dl4.0B 0.0167 )>7,490.*b 0.0402
    20V SV? ^7 «J S.lll.wV O.OOV9 1S.9SO.90 O.OJOtt 6,3tttt.4b 0.0123 21.4dO.54 0.0415
    Io2 /oo 2J 3o 0.431.31 0.0160 10, 93d. Ob 0.0272 11,643.03 0.0290 20.36b.39 0.0b07
    tit tn« 7d US 10.101.V2 0.0169 44,460.47 0.0414 43, /7S.dB 0.0426 14ti. fdtf.74 0.1306
    t? sSu lo 20 l.bttJ.VO 0.01*1 4,042.93 0.0431 3.0ttl.33 0.0274 V,330.b9 U.OM47
    tl mi in lo 2.2VO.S1 0.01V6 4,b3J.tti 0.0386 4,Ott2.4b 0.0416 16,bb0.71 0.1411
    o u o 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000 O.«0 0.0000
    i»t iJd dr. td 3.oob.V4 0.014tt 11*704.97 0.04SS 7,236.43 0.0201 21t6dl.23 0.0843
    lo JVl s V lo/.»J 0.0073 76d.bb 0.030U Itt9.tt9 0.0074 1,109.10 0.0463
    27s sos 43 *Q 10,bSB.6tt O.Olbb 30,229.07 0.0444 20*630.33 0.0303 36,216. 16 0.0826
    i,t/o J.Tj d'ii Jlo 41.016. 20 O.OOVS 132*791.40 0.0303 bb.020.03 0.0126 163,37d.b6 0.041H
    ,i ii o 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000 0.90 0.0000
    vo J'2 Id dt 1.174.JS 0.0049 3*013.90 0.0211 2»34tt.69 0.0099 tt*0d0.31 0.0340
    DUO O.UO 0.0000 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000
    u u o 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000 0*00 0.0000
    ,3Vo nj3 s/ VO 13, old. 21 0.0139 44.tt8d.J9 0.04b6 30*674.31 0.0393 130*703.63 0.1409
    2<»1 /is j^ 60 IP. 1/7. SO U.0134 16.462. 06 0.0309 16*476.09 0.0276 30.V66.4t6 0.0519
    32 t*t lr> 2s l.lVb.22 0.014B 3.71S.SV 0.04SV 2,960.73 0.0367 11,666.30 0.1441
    2no iU so a u 0,200.10 O.OOVS 16,440. 4b 0.02SO 9*214.24 0.0140 27*264*49 0.0413
    0 U U 0.00 O.OOUO 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000 0.00 0.0000
    

    -------
    Appendix  A
    The 1980 Needs Survey
    Cpp
    -------
      Appendix  B
     Conduct of The Survey
     Categories V and VI
     (Combined Sewer
     Overflow [CSO] and
     Urban  Storm water
     Runoff [SWR])
    
     Background
    
     Prior to the 1980 Needs Survey,
     the Category V and VI portions of
     the Needs Survey were developed
     under a contract separate from the
     Category I-IV portions. The only
     common ground between the two
     portions of the survey was the
     data collection process. To consoli-
     date all categories of the Needs
     Survey, it was decided that the
     1980 Needs Survey would be
     conducted under one contract. It
     was also decided that Category V
     and VI  estimates would be
     developed on a facility-by-facility
     basis rather than on a state-by-
     state basis as done in past
     surveys.
    
     Basis  of Cost Estimates for
     Categories V and VI
    
     The needs estimation procedure
     utilized for Categories V and VI
     during the 1980 Survey was very
     similar  to procedure utilized during
     the 1978 Survey. Ten combined
     sewer site studies were conducted
     to develop  transferable criteria,
     principles,  and relationships which
     could be applied nationwide to
     esitmate wet-weather POTW
     needs. These included design
     criteria, pollutant removal require-
     ments, and the selection of appro-
     priate pollution control technol-
     ogies. Specific tasks which were
     performed to accomplish these
     general objectives included the
     following:
    
     1. Determine if a particular urban
     area/receiving water system is
     presently experiencing a receiving
     water quality problem.
    
     2. If a problem exists, determine
     how much  of the problem is due to
     CSO and SWR pollution.
    
     3.  Determine the level of pollutant
     removal required to achieve
     selected water quality objectives.
    
     4. Determine an optimum or least
     costly combination of CSO and
     SWR control alternatives to obtain
     the desired pollutant removal.
    
      These tasks were performed
     using a  receiving water simulation
     program called the "Continuous
     Stormwater Pollution simulation
     System" (CSPSS) and an economic
    optimization program called  the
     "Computer  Optimized Stormwater
    Treatment" (COST) program.
      The 10 combined sewer study
      sites selected lor the 1980 Needs
      Survey were located at the same
      cities selected for the  1978
      Survey. In general, these sites
      were selected to provide a wide
      range  in the size of the combined
      sewer system and a representative
      distribution across the U.S.. Since
      Category VI facilities are not
      currently eligible for Federal
      assistance, and since several of
      the combined study sites contain
      both combined and separately
      sewered areas, additional
      separately sewered site studies,
      which  were considered in the
      1978 Survey, were not continued
      for the 1980 Survey.
       Site  study results were analyzed
      to develop specific relationships
      between an urban area with com-
      bined sewers and the CSO
      pollutant removal required to meet
      specific water quality objectives. In
      addition, criteria and specific
      relationships for selecting appro-
      priate wet-weather pollution con-
      trol technologies were  developed
     from site study results. All of these
      relationships and criteria were
      incorporated into a Needs
      Estimation Program (NEP-80) for
     developing estimates of Category V
     and VI  needs for each individual
     Urbanized Area in the United
     States,
       Approximately 27 percent  of the
     total national combined sewer
     area is located in small towns and
     cities outside of census-defined
     urbanized areas. Category V needs
     were estimated for these facilities
     by application of linear regression
     equations derived from population,
     drainage area, and Category V cost
     data developed for the Urbanized
     Areas. That is Category V needs
     were expressed as a linear
     function of combined sewer
     service area and population
     served, and these functions were
     utilized to establish Category V
     needs estimates for combined
     sewer systems located  in non-
     Urbanized Areas.
      As with the 1978 Survey, Cate-
     gory V and VI cost estimates were
     developed for three receiving
     water use objectives: aesthetics,
     fish and wildlife, and recreation.
     For the  1980 Survey, the
     aesthetics objective was based on
     obtaining a 40 percent removal of
     BOD and SS using best manage-
     ment practices. The fish and
     wildlife  objective was based on
     eliminating flow dissolved oxygen
     events (i.e., less than 2.0 mg/l)
     and ensuring that SS
     concentrations in CSO were less
     than or  equal to background SS
     concentrations in receiving water.
    The recreation objective was  based
    on scaling up the facilities
     required to meet the fish and
    wildlife objective such that a 95
    percent  removal of fecal coliform
    organisms would be obtained.
       The major enhancements of the
     1980 category V estimates over
     prior estimates include the
     following items:
    
     1. Economic optimization tech-
     niques were better utilized to
     indentjfy the best mix of wet-
     weather pollution abatement
     alternatives and cost-effective
     design criteria.
    
     2. Site-specific Stormwater storage
     and transmission costs were
     considered.
    
     3. Facility plan cost estimates
     were used where feasible.
    
     Combined Sewer System Data
     File
    
     The inventory of combined  sewer
     systems in the U.S. developed
     during the 1980 Needs Survey
     using the combined sewer system
     worksheet described in Appendix
     D. The combined sewer dta
     collection process was performed
     in  conjunction  with all other data
     collection for the 1980 Survey. A
     total of 1,118 combined sewer
     worksheet were completed  to the
     extent possible with readily
     available data.  Since not all data
     items on the worksheet are readily
     available from published reports,
     the data file is  not complete for
     each' worksheet. The worksheet is
     segmented into 5 major sections
     as follows:
    
     1. Identification and combined
     sewer system data.
    
     2. Receiving water characteristics
    
     3. Status of CSO  abatement
     projects
    
     4. Grant information.
    
     5. Grant-eligible cost estimates
    
      Data from sections 1 and  2 of
     the worksheets for the 1980
     Needs Survey are summarized  in
     Table 54 and 55 of Chapter  4.
    
     Urbanized  Area Data Base
    
     The Urbanized Area Data Base  is a
     subset of the Combined Sewer
     System Data File. In the
     regulations for the application of
     the NPDES Permit Program to
     separate storm  sewers, the term
     "separate  storm sewer" is defined
     as "a  conveyance or system of
     conveyances. . .located in an
     Urbanized Area  and primarily
     operated for the purpose of
     collecting and coveying
     Stormwater runoff (1)." Based on
    this definition, the Urbanized
    Areas, as designted by the U.S.
    Bureau of the Census, are used as
    the geographical areas which
    require control and/or treatment
     of urban Stormwater runoff. There-
     fore, needs estimation for both
     Categories V and VI are required
     within Urbanized Areas.
       The specific criteria for the
     delineation of an Urbanized Area
     are as follows:
    
     1. A central city of 50,000  inhabi-
     tants or more, or twin cities with a
     combined population of at least
     50,000, and with the smaller of
     the twin cities having a population
     of at least 15,000.
    
     2. Surrounding closely settled
     territory, including the following:
       a. Incorporated places of  2,500
       inhabitants or more.
    
       b. Incorporated places with fewer
      than 2,500 inhabitants, providing
      that  each  has a  closely settled
      area of 100 housing units  or more.
    
      c. Small parcels of land normally
      less than one square mile in areas
      having a population density of
      1,000  inhabitants or  more per
      square mile.
    
      d. Other similar small areas in
      unincorporated  terri+ory  with
      lower population density provided
       that they serve to  eliminaiS
      enclaves, or to close indentations
      in the urbanized areas of 1 mile or
      less across the open end, or to line
      outlying enumeration district of
      qualifying density that are not
      more than  1-1 /2 miles from the
      main body of the Urbanized Area.
    
      As of January 1, 1978, there
     were 279 Urbanized  Areas  defined
     in the nation. Thirty-five of  the
     Urbanized Areas defined in  the
     nation. Thirty-five of  the Urbanized
     Areas encompassed area in two
     States. By subdividing by  State the
     Urbanized Areas encompassing
     lands in more than one State, a
     total of 320 Urbanized areas were
     defined for estimation of Category
     V and VI needs.
      The Urbanized Area Data  Base
     consists primarily of the following
     items, some of which were
     obtained from the National
     Combined Sewer System  Data File
     and the remainder from other
     published sources.
    
     1. Demographic data.
    
      a. The items in this category are
      the combined sewer service area
      and the population  served by
      combined sewers the Urbanized
      Area population end size,  the
      year 1970 SMSA populetion, rhe
      year 2000 SMSA population
      estimate, and the cilywide EPA
      construction cost factor.
    
    2. Hydrologic data.
    
     a. The items in this category are
     the number of days with rein per
    

    -------
                                                                        Appendix  C
                                                                                             Figure C-1
       year, the mean annual rainfall,
       the receiving water classification
       the mean annual flow of the
       receiving water, and the natural
       runoff coefficient.
    
     3. Water quality data.
    
       a. The items in this category are
       maximum monthly receiving
       water temperature, background
       BOD, suspended solids, lead,
       hardness, alkalinity, and pH of
       the receiving water.
    
     Sources of Data
    
     Sources of data for  the  National
     Combined Sewer System Data File
     included the following:
    
     1. NPDES files in EPA Regional
     Offices.
    
     2. USGS Water Resources Data
    
     3. Grants file
    
     4. 201 Plans
    
     5. 208 Plans
    
     6. Telephone contact  with
     municipalities
    
      Sources of data for the
     Urbanized Area Data Base are
     given as follows.
    
     1. Demographic data.
    
      a. The combined sewer service
      area and the population served
      by the combined sewers were
      taken  from the National
      Combined Sewer System Data
      File for those systems located
      within Urbanized Areas.
    
      b. Urbanized Area popluation
      and size were reported in the
      supplemen ary report of the
      1970 census of population (2).
    
      c.  1970 SMSA population was
      reported in the "Current Popula-
      tion Reports Series (3)."
    
      d.  Year 2000 SMSA
      population estimates were
      reported from the U.S. Water
      Resources Concil's  OBERS
      Projections (4).
    
      e. City wide EPA construction
      cost factor was taken from EPA
      Municipal Construction Cost
      Index  Map, Wastwater
      Treatment Plants, City
      multipliers.
    
    2. Hydologic data.
    
      a. The number of days with rain
      per year and the mean annual
      rainfall were obtained from the
      National Oceanic and Atmos-
      pheric Administration (5).
       b.  Receiving water data were
       obtained from the National
       Combined Sower System Data
       File and from USGS water
       resources data (6).
    
       c. Natural runoff coefficients
       were obtained from USGS Water
       Supply Paper 1797—"Has the
       United States Enough Water?"
       (7).
    
     3. Water quality data.
    
       a. Background water quality data
       were obtained from the Assess-
       ment of Water Pollution from
       Nonpoint Sources (8).
     References
    
     1  Federal Register, 40 CFR Parts
     124, 125, National Pollutant
     Discharge Elimination System—
     Separate Storm sewers.  Final
     Regulations.   18 March 1976.
    
     2. Supplemental report 1970
     Census of Population, PC (S7)-106.
     Population of Urbanized  areas
     established in the 1970  census for
     the United States.  1970
    
     3. Population estimates and pro-
     jections, P-25, No.  709.  Estimates
     of the population of counties and
     metropolitan areas.  1 July 1974
     and 1975.
    
     4. U.S. Water Resources Council,
     1972, OBERS  Projections of
     Economic Activity in the  U.S ,
     Volume IV—States, Volume V—
     Standard Metropolitan Statistical
     Areas, Washington, D.C.
    
     5. U.S. Department of Interior,
     Geological Survey,  "Water
     Resources Data for the United
     Stales." Published  annually fo
     each State.
    
     7. Piper, A.M. Has the United
     States Enough Water? U.S
     Geological Survey Water Supply
    Paper 1797.  US. Government
     Printing Office Washington, D.C.
    8. Me Elroy, A. D., et al Loading
    Functions for Assessment of Water
    Pollution from Nonpoint Sources
    EPA 600/2-76/151.  May 1976
     The 1980  Needs
     Survey  Descriptions of
     The 1980  Survey Form
     The principal instrument of the 1980
     Needs Survey was the EPA-1 form
     shown in Figure C-1 and C-2. The
     updated 1978 Survey data of record
     were printed on this form and copies
     distributed to cognizant Federal,
     State, and contractor personnel.
     One form was completed for each
     facility identified in the 1978 Needs
     Survey. The data of record were then
     updated in accordance with the
     methodology presented in
     Appendix A.
       The form is designed to allow a
     large quantity of data to be  compiled
     for each sewerage facility This is
     made possible by an elaborate data
     coding system which allows a huge
     quantity of data to be entered in a
     compact form and permits it to be
     easily checked by computer for
     accuracy and completeness. The
     codes used to complete each item on
     the form (Figure C-1) are defined.on
     the reverse side of the form (Figure
     C-2).
       Listed below is a  brief explanation
     of each item on the 1980 Needs
     Survey EPA-1  form:
    
     1  State/Authority/ Facility Number:
     This is a discrete nine digit  number
     assigned to each facility. The first
     two digits designate a particular
     State or  Territory and are obtained
     from the Federal Information
     Processing Standard for designating
     States and outlying areas of the U.S.
     (FIPS-5). The next four numbers
     designate a particular municipal
     sewerage authority and are
     assigned sequentially by each State.
     The last  three digits designate a
     particular sewerage facility  and are
     assigned sequentially by each
     municipal sewerage authority.
    
     2. Facility Name: The official name
     of the facility.
    
     3  Authority Name: The name of the
     authority having responsibility for
     the facility.
    
     4. Zip Code: The official postal
     service zip code of the facility.
    
     5. Submission Code: This is a one
     digit number which indicates
     whether  the need of the facility
     changed since the 1978 Survey, or
     whether  the facility was even
     included  in the 1978 Survey.
    
     6  Grant  Number: The four  digit
     number of the most recent EPA
     construction grant which applies to
     the facility.
    
     7A.Farmers Home Administration
     Eligibility: An "X" in this block
     indicates that the facility is eligible
    for Economic Development Admini-
    stration financial assistance.
     78. Economic Development
     Administration Eligibility: An "X"
     in this block indicates that the
     facility is eligible for Economic
     Development Administration
     financial assistance.
    
     8. NPDES Number(s): The National
     Pollutant Discharge Elimination
     System permit number(s) assigned
     to the facility through the EPA
     permit program.
    
     9. County Number: The three digit
     FIPS-6 number used to identify the
     county in which the facility is
     located.
    
     10. SMSA Number: The number of
     the Standard Metropolitan Statisti-
     cal Area in which a facility is located.
    
     11. Basin Number: The four digit
     number for the river drainage basin
     in which the facility is located
     according to the EPA major/minor
     basin code scheme.
    
     12. Congressional District: The
     number of the Congressional  district
     in which the facility is located.
    
     13. Comment Codes: Three spaces
     are provided for one digit codes
     which represent standardized
     comments used to explain any
     anomalies present in the coding
     convention used to desicribe the
     facility. The standard comments are
     listed on the reverse side of the form.
     Space is also provided on the
     reverse side for listing more exten-
     sive plain language comments.
    
     14. City: The name of the com-
     munity in which the facility is
     located
    
     15. County: The name of the  county
     in which the facility is located.
    
     16A Facility Status: A one digit
     code which indicates whether or not
     a facility  is currently in operation.
    
     16B. Present Nature of Facility: A
     one digit  code which describes the
     present type of facility in operation.
     codes are defined on the reverse
     side of the form.
    
     16C. Projected  Nature of Facility: A
     one digit  code which describes the
     type of facility projected to be  in
     operation in 2000. The codes are
     defined on the reverse side of the
     form.
    
     16D. Projected  Change: A one digit
     code which describes any physical
     changes expected at the facility by
     2000. The codes are defined on the
     reverse side of the form.
    
     16E. Start Up Date: The month and
     year a facility became, or is expected
    to  become, operational.
    
     16F. Abandonment Date: The
    month and year a facility will  be
    abandoned, if applicable.
    

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    Figure C-2
                                                                        Appendix  D
     17. Summary of Category Needs:
     This section"!* used to record the
     costs of Categories I-IVB. Column (A)
     is for the EPA assessment. Column
     (B) is for the State assessment, if
     different from (A}. Column (C) is the
     portion required to satisfy Backlog
     Facility" Requirements: Backlog
     refers to the facility requirements
     based on the 1980* population rather
     than the 2000 population. Column
     (D) is used to record the basis of
     estimation for the dollar amounts
     recorded in Colurnn (A). Column (E)
     is used to record the reason the
     State submitted a separated State
     estimate ih Column (B), if applicable.
     The codes for the basis of estimation
     used in Column (D) and.(E) are
     defined on the reverse side of the
     form.
    
     18. Facility Population: This section J?  FJ°.WS; Concentrations.
     shows the population which         Monthly Average: Th.s section ,s
              MM  ai UM wmin         fo|r compl|ing information on the
                                      present performance and design
                                      values for treatment facilities. This
                                      section lists the monthly averages
                                      for various parameters according to
                                      the existing actual performance, the
                                      present design, and the projected
                                      design. Data are compiled for the
                                      following parameters (if applicable):
                                      Total flow (mgd); total industrial flow
                                      (mgd); domestic flow per capita
                                        25 1972 Collection Population:
                                        The resident population in existence
                                        in which still requires new collector
                                        sewers.
    
                                        26. Effluent Characteristics: A one
                                        digit code indicating the present and
                                        future effluent a facility is
                                        designed to produce.
    
                                        27. Reasons: A one digit  code
                                        indicating the reason for any facility
                                        being designed tp apnieve a greater
                                        than secondary level of treatment.
    
                                        28. Supplemental Sheets:A one
                                        digit code indicating the use of an
                                        additional datja colfectipn sheet to
                                        list specialized information about
                                        the facility.
     receives treatment and/or collec-
     tion by the facility. Collection and
     treatment populations are further
     categorized as follows: present
     residents, present nonresidents,
     projected nonresidents,  projected
     residents, and projected nonresi-
     dents.
     19. Need For New Collectors,
     Interceptors, Force Mains, and
     Pumping Stations: This section
     lists codes for new collectors, inter-
     ceptors, outfalls, force mains, and
     pumping stations and their costs.
     The diameter of the pipe isr in inches, phorus, and ammonia
     The capacity of pumping stations is
     the average daily capacity in million
     gallons, per day (mgd).
                                      (gallons per day); and influent and
                                      effluent concentrations of five day
                                      biochemical oxygen demand (BOD),
                                      suspended solids (SS), phos-
                                      30. Other: A three digit code is used
                                      in this item to indicate the presence
                                      of known toxics in the influent to a
                                      treatment facility. The codes for
                                      toxics are listed in the technical
                                      guidance document.
     20. Disposal of Liquid Effluents: A
     one digit code is entered in each of
     the three Columns-(A), (B), (C)-to
     describe the method(s) of effluent
     disposal used by the facility. The
     code in Column (A) describes the
     method. The code  in Column (B)
     describes the operational status.
     The code in Column (C) describes the emered in'item
     expected physical change. All codes
     ^defined on the reverse side of the 31 B Di8cnarge To: ,f tne facmty
      """                              discharges flow to another facility,
                                      31. Receives Discharge From: If
                                      the facility receives flow from
                                      another facility, the authority/
                                      facility number of the other facilit is
    form.
     21. Required Infiltration/Inflow
     (I/I) Corrective Action: A one digit
     code indicating the required action
     to eliminate excessive I/I, if
     applicable..
    
     22  Estimated I/I Flow: The
     quantity of I/I flow (mgd) to be
     eliminated by the corrective action
     indicated in item 21.
    
     23. Major Rehabilitation/ Replace-
                                      the authority/facility number of the
                                      other facility is entered in item 31-B.
    
                                      32. Treatment and Sludge
                                      Handling: This section is used to
                                      compile information about the unit
                                      processes at the facility. An appro-
                                      priate code is entered in each of the
                                      three columns-(A), (B), (C)-to
                                      describe a particular  unit process.
                                      The code in  Column (A) describes
                                      the process. The code in Column (B)
     ment Required: A one digit code for describes'the operational status of
     the type of corrective action required the process. The code in Column (C)
     to accomplish major rehabilitation   describes the expected physical
     or replacement of a portion of a     change to the process. All codes are
     sewerage system, if applicable.      listed on the reverse side of the form.
    
     24 Do Wastewaters Originate in
     Communities Existing Before
     October 18, 1972?:  This item is
     self-explanatory and is answered
     yes or no.
     Description of The
     Combined Sewer
     System Worksheet
    
     The combined sewer system work-
     sheet is supplemental to the EPA-1
     form described in Appendix C, for
     those facilities known to be served
     by combined sewers. Since com-
     bined sewers provide both urban
     drainage and wastewater convey-
     ance, they may not always be
     defined on an individual facility-
     by-facility basis. For the purposes of
     the Needs Survey, a separate work-
     sheet was completed for each
     combined sewer system/major
     receiving water configuration. Thus,
     a single worksheet may consider
     more than one combined sewer
     network (i.e., facility) if the networks
     are adjacent and discharge to the
     same major receiving water. A
     single worksheet may also consider
     a number of facilities which are
     included in a single comprehensive
     CS'b  planning document.
       The definition of a major receiving
     water is somewhat subjective.
     However, an attempt was made to
     define a receiving water as objec-
     tively as possible. In general, an
     urban receiving stream was
     considered to be a major receiving
     water if it was known to be a
     continuously flowing water body
     which could become fishable and
     swimmable after providing
     adequate control of CSO and/or
     other pollution sources. Streams
     which were wholly within a
     combined sewer watershed were
     not considered major receiving
     waters.  On the other hand, streams
     draining a significant watershed
     area upstream from the combined
     sewer area were considered major
     receiving waters.
      The 1980 combined sewer system
     worksheet is illustrated on Figure
     D-1.  Listed  below  is   a   brief
     explanation of  each item on that
     worksheet.
    
     Section 1—Identification and
     Combined Sewer System Data
    
     Section  1 of the worksheet provides
     identification and descriptive data
     on the combined sewer system.
    
     1  Authority/Facility Number—
     The authority/facility number is
     defined  in the Guidance for Cate-
     gories I-IV. The  number reported in
     this item is for the major facility
     serving the combined sewer system.
     If more than one facility was
     involved, the additional A/F
     numbers are found under Item
     No. 15.
    
     2. Authority Name—The authority
     name is the official name of the
    authority with major responsibility
    for operation of the combined sewer
    system.
     3. State, Country, Place—The
     state, county, place code is defined
     in the Guidance for Categories I-IV.
     This code applies to the facility
     reported in Item No.  1.
    
     4. SMSA Number—Those
     combined sewer systems located at
     least in part within a standard
     metropolitan statisical area (SMSA)
     as defined in the U.S. Census
     Bureau are reported by SMSA
     number in this item.
    
     5. Basin—The basin code is defined
     ip the Guidance for Categories I-IV.
     This code applies to the location of
     the  combined sewer system.
    
     6. Congressional District—The
     number of the congressional
     district(s) (three maximum) which
     are  served by the combined sewer
     system.
    
     7. City Name—The city name is the
     official name of the city or town
     served by the combined sewer
     system.
    
     8. County Name—The county
     name  is the official name of the
     county or county equivalent in
     which the major portion of the
     combined sewer system is located.
    
     9. Drainage Area—The area, in
     acres,  drained directly by the com-
     bined sewer system which is tribu-
     tary to the subject  receiving water.
    
     10. Separate Sewer Area—This is
     the area, in acres,  served by
     separate sanitary sewers which
     discharge directly into the
     combined sewer system. Codes for
     Item No.  10 are as follows:
    
       0  -  No information presently
       available.
    
       1  -  Some separate sanitary
       sewers  are connected; however,
       the area is  unknown.
    
       2  -  Area is known and is
       reported.
       A code of 2 and a reported area of
       0.0 means that no separate
       sanitary sewers discharge directly
       into the combined sewer system.
    
     11. Population Served—The total
     number of resident to the area
     drained directly by  the combined
     sewer system defined in Items No. 9
     and  10.
    
     12. Sewer Length—The total length
     of combined sewer, in feet, tributary
     to the subject receiving water.
    
     13. Number of CSO Points—This is
    the number of points at which the
    combined wastewater/stormwater
     is discharged from  the collection
    system directly into the receiving
    water during periods of high flow.
    

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     14. Population Equivalent—This is
     the dry-weather flow population
     equivalent for the combined sewer
     area defined on a BOO basis and
     includes the resident population
     (Item 11), commercial contribution,
     existing industrial contribution, and
     transient population.
     15. Additional Authority/Facility
     Number(s)—Since combined sewer
     systems may be defined using
     hydrologic or previous planning
     considerations, data for several
     treatment facilities may be reported
     on one worksheet. This item reports
     all authority/facility numbers which
     are associated with the major facility
     serving a combined sewer system.
    
     16. Local Contact—This item
     identifies the name, title, address,
     and phone number of the public
     works official responsible for opera-
     tion of the  combined  sewer facility.
    
     Section 2—Receiving Water
     Characteristics
    
     A single worksheet was completed
     for each combined sewer system/
     major receiving water combination.
     A major receiving water has been
     defined previously. Descriptions of
     each item in Section  2 follow:
    
     17. Name of Receiving Water—The
     common name of the major
     receiving water is identified by this
     item.
    
     18/19. Mean Annual Flow and
     7/Q/10—The average flow rate
     and 7-day, 10-year low flow rate of
     the major receiving water are
     reported in  cubic feet per second
     (cfs) by these two items. In general,
     this information was obtained from
     U.S. Geologica Survey records
     nearest the upstream boundary of
     the combined sewer area. Codes for
     Items 18 and 19  are given as
     follows:
    
      0  -  Flow rate not applicable,
      e.g., lake.
    
      1  -  Flow rate measured at
      USGS gauge.
    
      2  -  Flow rate estimated from
      regional relationship.
    
     20. Receiving Water Classification
     The purpose of the receiving water
     classification  is to describe the
     general characteristics of the
     receiving water. A verbal descrip-
     tion is used to place the receiving
     water in one of 15 separate cate-
     gories. Values and ranges of depth
     and.or velocity are given on the
    following code reference chart.
     Depths and velocities  are mean
    values and apply to mean flow
    conditions.
        Receiving water classification
        codes:
    
        1   -  Creeks and shallow
        streams [depth (d) <2 feet].
    
        2   -  Upstream feeders (2
       1.5fps).
    
        10 - Shallow low tidal velocity
       estuary orbay (depth<10 feet<1.5
       fps).
    
        11  -  Medium depth, high tidal
       velocity estuary or bay (depth 10
       to 30 feet, V 5 1.5 fps).
    
       12  -  Medium depth, low tidal
       velocity estuary or bay (depth = 10
       to 30 feet, V < 1.5 fps).
    
       13  -   Deep, high tidal veolcity
       estuary or bay (depth>30 feet V
       1.5  fps).
    
       14  -  Deep, low tidal velocity
       estuary or bay (depth•> 30 feet V
       1.5 fps).
    
       15  -  Open ocean or beach.
    
     21. Known  Rearation Coefficient-
     If a reaeration rate for the subject
     receiving water has been measured,
     value and the flow rate rate which
     the measurement was made are
     recorded. Units of the reaeration
     rate are per day base e.
    
     22. Channel Slope—This is the
     approximate receiving stream slope,
     reported in feet per mile, and in
     general was estimated from USGS
     topographic maps. This item applies
     only to free-flowing streams
     (receiving water classification  1
     through 5 and is not reported /f Item
     21  is completed.
    
     23. Receiving Water Background
     Quality—These background quality
     data correspond to upstream flow of
     the major receiving water prior to
     impact from the combined sewer
     system. USGS Water Quality
     records may have been a source for
    this information. Data on the
    following parameters are recorded:
    
    Maximum mean monthly tempera-
      ture in °C (generally occurs in July
      or August)
     Average BODS concentration in
       mg/1
     Average SS concentration in mg/1
     Average fecal coliform concentra-
       tion in MPN/100ml
    
     24. USGS Qauge Number—If
     receiving water flow estimates
     reported in items No. 18 and 19
     were derived directly from USGS
     flow records, the station identifica-
     tion number is recorded here.
    
     25. Type of Aquatic Life—The type
     of aquatic life which could reason-
     ably be supported under unpolluted
     or contaminated conditions in the
     receiving water downstream from
     the combined sewer system is
     recorded using codes defined as
     follows:
    
       1   -  Cold freshwater fishery,
      e.g., trout
    
      2   -  Cold freshwater nursery or
      breeding area
    
      3   -  Warm freshwater fishery,
      e.g., black bass
    
      4   •  Warm freshwater nursery
      or breeding area
    
      5   -  Estuary nonshellfish
      waters
    
      6  -  Estuary shellfish waters
    
      7  -  Open ocean
    
    26. Known CSO Problems—Water
    quality problems associated with the
    the receiving water downstream
    from the combined sewer area
    which are known to be caused at
    least in part by combined sewer
    overflow are recorded using the
    following codes:
    
      0  - No known problems
    
      1  - Asthetic degradation
    
      2  - High suspended solids
      levels
    
      3  • Low dissolved oxygen
      levels
    
      4 - Bacteriological contamina-
      tion
    
      5 - Sludge deposits
    
      6 - Toxic conditions
    
      7 - Fishkills
    
      8 -  Eutrophication (nutrients)
    
      9 -  Other, see comments
    
      Up to four known CSO problems
      can  be recorded in decreasing
      order of severity.
     Section 3—Status of CSO
     Abatement Projects
    
     A major emphasis of the 1980
     Needs Survey was to identify those
     municipalities which had conducted
     CSO planning. If C$0 planning was
     completed, the objective was to
     determine compliance with EPA
     Program Requirements Memoranda
     PRM 75-34 and PRM 77-4.
    
     27. Overall Status—The overall
     status of CSO abatement projects
     for the combined sewer system
     described on a given worksheet was
     designated using the following
     codes:
    
       1 - Planning not yet begun
    
       2   -  Ongoing 208
    
       3   -  Draft 208
    
       4   -  Completed 208
    
       5   -  Ongoing 201 (step 1)
    
       6   -  Draft 201
    
       7   -  Completed 201
    
       8   -  Ongoing CSO planning,
       non-EPA-funded
    
       9   -  Draft CSO planning,
       non-EPA-funded
    
       10   -  Completed CSO planning,
       non-EPA funded
    
       11   -  Ongoing design (Step 2)
    
       12   -  Completed design
    
       13   -  Construction in progress
    
       14   -  Construction complete
    
     More than one code may apply to
     any given facility. For example, a
     facility may have been included in a
     completed 208 (Code 4) and is
     currently being studied by an
     ongoing 201 (Code 5).
    
     28. Completion Dates—For each of
     the codes entered above, the actual
     or expected cmpletion dates were
     recorded in a table, as follows:
    
             Completion Date
           Code  Month  Year
    
      In the case where CSO planning
      has not yet begun (Code 1,  Item
      No.  27), the date reported was the
      anticipated  starting date of  CSO
      planning.
    
    29. Planning and PRM 75-34—To
    determine if current  CSO facility
    planning was complete, compre-
    hensive, and consistent with the
    requirements of PRM 75-34 the
    following points were considered
    when  a Code  3, 4, 6, or 7 was
    entered under Item No. 27. If  the
    

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    following items were considered, a
    Code 1 (yes) was entered for each
    point. If it was not considered, a
    Code 2 (no) was entered.
    
      a. Receiving water quality objec-
      tives were defined.
    
      b. Residual water quality
      problems were identified (i.e., the
      existence of a receiving water
      quality problem after achievement
      of the secondary treatment
      requirement was established).1
    
      c. Pollutant removal requirements
      were estimated.
    
      d. Alternate CSO control tech-
      niques were identified.1
    
      e. A cost-effective mix of CSO
      alternative was considered.
    
      f. A cost-effective mix of CSO,
      AST, AWT, and/or other control
      measures was considered.1
    
      g. Marginal costs were deter-
      mined not to be substantially
      greater than marginal benefits for
      the proposed solution.1
    
    30. Multipurpose Projects—The
    objective of Item No. 30 was to
    determine if a CSO project has
    purposes other than pollution
    control (e.g., flood control or
    drainage). The results of Item No. 30
    were reported for the following
    three points by using a Code 1 if the
    point was affirmative (yes) and a
    Code 2 if the point was negative (no).
      a. Does the CSO abatement
      project have purposes other than
      pollution control (e.g., flood
      control or drainage)?
    
      b. Was the cost allocated to CSO
      pollution control determined by
      the alternative justifiable expendi-
      ture (AJE) method?
    
      c. Is the cost allocated to CSO
      pollution control less than or
      equal to the least cost single
      purpose CSO pollution control
      alternative?
    
    31. Proposed Solutions—If Codes
    3, 5, 6, or 7 were entered under
    item No. 27 and if the resulting
    draft or completed documents
    were available for review, the pro-
    posed solutions for control of CSO
    (five maximum) were reported
    using the following codes:
    
      1. Sewer separation.
    
      2. In-system storage with addi-
      tional treatment capacity.
    
    'Criteria which are specifically
    required by PRM 75-34.
      3. In system storage with real-
      time control and additional
      treatment capacity.
    
      4. Earthen basin storage with
      additional treatment capacity.
    
      5. Concrete (uncovered) basin
      storage with additional treatment
      capacity.
    
      6. Concrete (covered) basin
      storage with additional treat-
      ment capacity.
    
      7. Mined storage (e.g., deep
      tunnels) with or without addi-
      tional treatment capacity.
    
      8. High-rate treatment without
      storage (e.g., swirl concentrator,
      screening, etc.).
    
      9. In-system storage without
      additional treatment capacity.
    
      10.  In-system storage with real-
      time control and without addi-
      tional treatment capacity.
    
      11.  Surface-water interception/
      storage/diversion scheme (i.e.,
      runoff diverted before entering a
      combined sewer system).
    
      12.  Sewer flushing.
    
      13.  Catch basin cleaning.
    
      14.  Streetsweeping
    
      1 5.  Other, see comments.
    
      20.  Cost-effective mix of CSO
      alternative.
    
      21.  Cost-effective mix of CSO,
      AST, AWT, and/or other control
      measures.
    
    Section 4—Grant Information
    
    32. Grant Numbers—Grant
    numbers, if any, which provide
    Federal construction grant funds for
    CSO control (i.e.. Category V) were
    entered here.
    
    Section 5—Grant-Eligible Cost
    Estimates
    
    Grant-Eligible  Cost
    Estimates
    
    33. Cost Estimates—For each of the
    proposed CSO solutions identified in
    Item No. 31, a cost estimate was
    entered, when available, along with
    the month and year used to establish
    the value of money when the
    estimate was made.
    
      The following codes were used for
    reporting cost estimates of proposed
    solutions:
    1.  Sewer separation.
    
    2.  In-system storage with
    additional treatment capacity.
    
    3.  In-system storage with real-
    time control and additional
    treatment capacity.
    
    4.  Earthen basin storage with
    additional treatment capacity.
    
    5.  Concrete (uncovered) basin
    storage with additional treatment
    capacity.
    
    6.  Concrete (covered) basin
    storage with additional treatment
    capacity.
    
    7.  Mined storage (e.g., deep
    tunnels) with or without addi-
    tional treatment capacity.
    
    8.  High-rate treatment without
    storage (e.g., swirl concentrator,
    screening, etc.).
    
    9.  In- system storage without
    addition! treatment capacity.
    
    10. In-system storage with real-
    time control and without addi-
    tional treatment capacity.
    
    11. Surface-water interception/
    storage/diversion scheme (i.e.,
    runoff diverted before entering a
    combined sewer system).
    
    12. Sewer flushing.
    
    13. Catch basin cleaning.
    
    14. Streetsweeping.
    
    15. Other, see comments.
    
    19. State-supplied (separate)
    estimate.
    
    20. Cost-effective mix of CSO
    alternatives.
    
    21. Cost-effective mix of CSO,
    AST, AWT, and/or other control
    measures.
    
    22. Aesthetics objective,
    estimated using the 1980 Needs
    Estimation Program (NEP80)
    described  in Appendix II.
    
    23. Fish and wildlife objective,
    estimated using NEP80 described
    in  Appendix II.
    
    24. Recreation objective,
    estimated using NEP80 described
    in  Appendix II.
    
    25. Sewer separation, estimated
    using NEP80 in Appendix II.
    
    26. Needs previously met.
    
    Needs reported to Congress.
    

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