BOOKLET FOR fOUltfi PEOPLE. WITH DIABETES
          AND THEJR FAMILIES
                                  Printed on Recycled Paper

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A  NOTE TO ADULTS
 This booklet is for young people with insulin-
 dependent diabetes and for you.

 People living in the United States use more than
 one billion (1,000,000,000) syringes, needles and
 lancets each year to take care of their diabetes.
 This booklet shows you the safe way to handle and
 throw out used insulin syringes and lancets at
 home.                                    ,

 It's simple. The easy directions on the following
 pages show you how to protect your family and
 waste handlers from injury  and help keep the
 environment clean and safe!

 While you are reading this booklet, keep in mind
 that your state, county or town may have special
 rules about how to dispose of syringes and lancets.
 Ask your doctor or diabetes educator how to find
 out about any rules in your area.

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DID you
People with insulin-dependent diabetes know how important syringes
and lancets are for controlling their diabetes and staying healthy.
                    We use lancets
                     to test oar
                  :  blood sugar
                      level/
 Most people with insulin-dependent
 diabetes use syringes and lancets every
 day. But what do you do with them when you're done?

 Like anything else we throw out, lancets and syringes need to be
 disposed of properly. Otherwise they can end up in places they don't
 belong, like beaches. And because they have very sharp, pointy ends,
 they can hurt people by accident, like the person who collects your
 garbage, someone in your family, or even you!

 But there's a simple way you can help protect people AND the
 environment. It's quick and easy!
                    Just follow these TWO steps

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STEP #1:  ?UT IV  LIT) ON  IT!
After you've given yourself an insulin shot, put your syringe directly
into a strong plastic or metal container with a tight cap or lid.

This is the best thing to do! DON'T try to bend,
break, or put the cap back on your needle . . . you
might hurt yourself!

After you use a lancet, put it into the same
container, too.
    0
                   'our container
                   of reach of
                 small children
                                                              .
                                       Keep youi? corifainer in the
                                       same room youxpsually have
                                       ypurAinsuHn shot or telst -your
                                       blood'sugar.' ,..^,
                                           ,,L-?r  *-5t--  /K--r^  

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The best container is
one made of strong
plastic with a tight
screw-on cap, such as:

/ a plastic bleach jug

S a liquid detergent bottle

/ a plastic milk jug, or

/ any other opaque or colored plastic bottle

These containers are all good because they are
very strong (so that needles can't poke through)
and because they have a small opening on top
that can be closed tightly (to prevent any spills).
                                                        ^
                                                         Many household
                                                        items mqUe good
                                                          containers /
                      You can use a coffee can, too.
                      But when it gets full, close the
                      lid tightly and seal it with
                      strong tape.
                  Don't use glass containers (they can break)

                  Don't use any container that will be returned to the store
                  or recycled (syringes and lancets can't be recycled!)

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STEP *2: ?ITCH IN!
When the container is full and tightly sealed,
throw it out in the trash.

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             VORD  SCRAMBLE


    1. Put your syringes and lancets into a strong

      	or	
          (CLIPAST)        (LATME)

      container, and tighten the	.
                             (DLI)

    2. When it gets full, throw your	
                                  (RENTANOIC)

      into the _	!
               (SHART)
    CUT OUT THE BOTTOM OF THIS PAGE AND KEEP IT NEAR YOUR CONTAINER AS A REMINDER.
STEP *t ?UT & UP ON IT!

After you use a syringe or a
lancet, put it directly into a
strong plastic  or metal
container with a tight cap or
lid.
STEP*2:?ITCH
When the container is full and
tightly sealed, throw it out in
the trash.

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Now you know how to handle and throw out used insulin
syringes and lancets safely.
PABBITOkl!
Do you know others with insulin-dependent diabetes?
Tell them what you've learned about handling and safe disposal
of used syringes and lancets. By spreading the word, you can
help others keep the environment clean and safe!

                        This Booklet Is Sponsored By:

                     American Association of Diabetes Educators
                           American Diabetes Association
                           American Medical Association
                Association for Practitioners in Infection Control, Inc.
                      Childhood & Adolescent Diabetes Center
                         Children's National Medical Center
                           Juvenile Diabetes Foundation
                         National Association for Home Care
                    National Diabetes Information. Clearinghouse
   This booklet was prepared by the Environmental Law Institute pursuant to a grant from the
            United States Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Solid Waste.     ;
                        Illustrations were created by Loel Barr.                 :

For additional copies of this booklet, please call the RCRA Hotline Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. EST.
       The national toll-free number is (800) 424-9346; for the hearing impaired it is TDD (800) 553-7672.
               In Washington, DC, the number is (202) 382-3000 or TDD (202) 475-9652,

                           This booklet may be photocopied.
                                 &EPA
                                      United States
                                      Environmental Protection
                                      Agency
Washington, D.C.
EPA/530-SW-90-089

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