United States
                 Environmental Protection
                 Agency	
                      Prevention, Pesticides
                      And Toxic Substances
                      (7508W)	
EPA-738-F-97-013
September 1997
                  R.E.D.   FACTS
                 Thiobencarb
     Pesticide
Reregistration
   Use Profile
   Regulatory
       History
     All pesticides sold or distributed in the United States must be
registered by EPA, based on scientific studies showing that they can be
used without posing unreasonable risks to people or the environment.
Because of advances in scientific knowledge, the law requires that
pesticides which were first registered before November 1, 1984, be
reregistered to ensure that they meet today's more stringent standards.
     In evaluating pesticides for reregistration, EPA obtains and reviews a
complete set of studies from pesticide producers, describing the human
health and environmental effects of each pesticide. To implement
provisions of the Food Quality Protection Act of 1996, EPA considers the
special sensitivity of infants and children to pesticides, as well as aggregate
exposure of the public to pesticide residues from all sources, and the
cumulative effects of pesticides and other compounds with common
mechanisms of toxicity. The Agency develops any mitigation measures or
regulatory controls needed to effectively reduce each pesticide's risks.  EPA
then reregisters pesticides that meet the safety standard of the FQPA and
can be used without posing unreasonable risks to human health or the
environment.
     When a pesticide is eligible for reregistration, EPA explains the basis
for its decision in a Reregistration Eligibility Decision (RED) document.
This fact sheet summarizes the information in the RED document for
reregistration case 2665, Thiobencarb.

     Thiobencarb is a systemic, pre-emergence herbicide that acts by
inhibiting shoots of emerging seedlings. It is used to control grasses, sedge
and broadleaf weeds in food crops such as rice (represents 95% of use),
lettuce, celery, and endive. Formulations include a liquid and a granular.
Thiobencarb may be applied using ground spray equipment or by aircraft.

     Thiobencarb was first registered for use on rice in 1982. In 1991,
thiobencarb was issued regional tolerances for use on celery, endives, and
lettuce in the State of Florida.

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                         Currently, there are five products containing thiobencarb registered
                    under Section 3 of the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act.
                    They consist of one technical (manufacturing use) product containing
                    97.4% active ingredient, two emulsifiable concentrate end-use products
                    each containing 84.0% active ingredient,  and two granular end-use products
                    each containing 10.0% active ingredient.
Human Health
  Assessment
Toxicity
     In studies using laboratory animals, thiobencarb generally has been
shown to be of low acute toxicity.  It is slightly toxic by the oral and dermal
route and has been placed in category III for these effects.  It is practically
non-toxic by the inhalation route and for eye irritation, and has been placed
in Toxicity Category IV (the lowest of four categories) for these effects.
Thiobencarb also tested negative for mutagenicity.
Dietary Exposure
     People may be exposed to residues of thiobencarb through the diet.
Tolerances have been established for celery, lettuce, endive (escarole), rice
(grain and straw),  and for animal commodities including milk and eggs, and
the fat, meat, and meat by-products of cattle, hogs, poultry, sheep, goats
and horses (please see 40  CFR 180.401(a) and (b)). EPA has reassessed the
thiobencarb tolerances and found that they are acceptable.
Occupational and Residential Exposure
     Exposure to homeowners is not expected since there are no residential
uses.  Based on current use patterns, handlers (mixers, loaders, and
applicators) may be exposed to thiobencarb during and after normal
agricultural use.
     The risks calculated from intermediate-term exposures to thiobencarb
indicate that risks from exposures to granular formulations (loading and
applying) are lower than those from exposures to the liquid formulation/
spray applications. For the granular formulations, the MOEs exceed 100
for all scenarios (except loading to support aerial application) with the
addition of personal protective equipment. For many of the liquid
formulation/spray application scenarios, the MOEs do not reach 100, even
with engineering controls.
     Granular Formulations: The Agency believes the risks resulting from
intermediate-term exposures to the granular formulation are overestimated
due to the use of a 60.2 percent dermal absorption value for the granular
scenarios.  In general, dermal absorption of granular formulations has been
found to be significantly lower than for liquid formulations. Therefore, the
Agency has determined that risks to handlers of granular formulations will
be adequately mitigated with the addition of personal protective equipment.

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     Liquid Formulations: The Agency believes that risks resulting from
intermediate-term exposures to persons handling liquid formulations are
overestimated due to limitations with the hazard identification and the dose-
response assessment for the intermediate-term endpoint, particularly in light
of the absence of serious effects to these target organs in either the
subchronic neurotoxicity or rat chronic feeding study, which suggest the
lack of a deleterious response to thiobencarb by the kidney and/or liver. The
Agency believes that risks to handlers using liquid formulations will be
adequately mitigated with the used of engineering controls and personal
protective equipment.
Human Risk Assessment
     Thiobencarb generally is of low acute toxicity,  and has been classified
in Group D (not classifiable as to human carcinogenicity). Food crop uses
are  registered including rice, lettuce, endive and escarole.  However,
dietary exposure to thiobencarb residues in foods is extremely low, as is the
cancer risk posed to the general population.
     Of greater concern is the risk posed to thiobencarb handlers,
particularly mixers/loaders/applicators, and field workers who come into
contact with treated crops following application of this pesticide. Exposure
and risk to workers will be mitigated by the use of PPE required by the
WPS, supplemented by engineering  controls as required by this RED.
     For post-application workers, since no dislodgeable foliar residue
studies or concurrent dermal samples were submitted to the EPA for
thiobencarb to measure postapplication reentry, a rough  surrogate
postapplication  assessment was performed as a default.  Only the short-term
endpoint (25 mg/kg/day) was used for the risk assessment, since EPA does
not anticipate that intermediate-term exposures (i.e., 7 days or more of
exposure) are likely to occur for post-application workers for these crops in
early-stage development.  EPA assumed in the surrogate assessment that
dermal absorption would be significantly lower that the 60.2 percent used in
the  handler assessment, since dermal exposure would be to dry residues.
The surrogate postapplication risk assessment indicated that at all
application rates (i.e., 4-8 pounds active ingredient per acre), risks would be
acceptable to post-application workers entering treated areas to perform
tasks such as scouting, thinning, or hoeing, provided  entry is postponed for
24 hours following application.
FQPA Considerations
     The FQPA of 1996 amended the FFDCA by setting a new safety
standard for the establishment of tolerances and directs the EPA to consider
available information concerning the susceptibility of infants and children
to pesticide residues in food. Based on the review of available data and the
absence of incident or epidemiological data for thiobencarb, an additional
safety factor for the protection of children is not necessary.  The FQPA also
requires EPA to consider aggregate exposure to the pesticide residue,

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                     including all anticipated dietary exposure and other exposures for which
                     there is reliable information, as well as cumulative effects from the
                     pesticide and other substances that have a common mechanism of toxicity.
                          EPA has assessed the dietary risk posed by thiobencarb. In assessing
                     chronic dietary risk ,  EPA estimates that thiobencarb residues in food
                     sources account for < 42.9% of the RfD, and include the highest-at-risk
                     subgroup, non-nursing infants. In drinking water thiobencarb residues
                     account for 0.29% of the RfD.  Thus, the aggregate exposures from all
                     sources of thiobencarb (in this case, only dietary and drinking water
                     exposures are relevant) account for 43.2%  of the RfD.  Therefore, the
                     Agency concludes that aggregate risks for the general population resulting
                     from thiobencarb uses are not of concern.
                          EPA estimates that thiobencarb residues in the diet of infants and
                     children account for 42.9% of the RfD (29.5 for children 1-5) and residues
                     in drinking water account for 0.29% of the RfD.  Thus the aggregate
                     exposure from all sources of thiobencarb account for 43.2% of the RfD for
                     infants and children.  Therefore, the Agency concludes that aggregate risks
                     for infants and children resulting  from uses of thiobencarb are not of
                     concern.

Environmental   Environmental Fate
   AsSGSSITIGnt        Thiobencarb is slightly persistent in water,  generally not very mobile,
                     tends to bind to soil organic matter, and doesn't desorb.  Generally,
                     thiobencarb is  stable to degradation by hydrolysis and is stable under
                     anaerobic aquatic conditions.  Thiobencarb meets the persistence and
                     mobility triggers for classification as a restricted-use chemical for ground-
                     water concerns, but not the detections triggers. The Agency believes that
                     ground water concerns do not warrant use restrictions. Furthermore, due to
                     the binding nature of the active ingredient, any thiobencarb that may reach
                     surface water will be predominantly bound with suspended solids and
                     sediments.  Standard coagulation and flocculation processes used in plants
                     are expected to remove most of the suspended solids and sediments from
                     the water, thereby removing most of the potential risk of thiobencarb in
                     drinking water.
                     Ecological Effects
                          Use of liquid formulations of thiobencarb pose some acute risk to
                     mammals. The acute risk to birds is minimal. Use of liquid formulations
                     pose a high chronic risk to birds and mammals.
                          Use of thiobencarb on rice in the southeast US poses a high risk of
                     chronic effects to freshwater and  estuarine aquatic invertebrates, including
                     shrimp and mollusks. There is also likely a high risk of chronic effects to
                     fish, but additional  data are needed to  confirm this. This use of thiobencarb
                     also poses a high risk of acute effects to fish and aquatic invertebrates in

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                      certain high-exposure situations.  Additionally, use of thiobencarb on rice in
                      California poses a risk of causing chronic effects to aquatic organisms in
                      the smaller drains and waterways, but not in the larger rivers. Thiobencarb
                      use poses minimal risk of acute effects to fish and aquatic invertebrates.
                      Minimal risk of both acute and chronic effects is expected for all estuarine
                      organisms in California.  Spray drift from aerial application of liquid
                      thiobencarb on rice poses a high risk to nontarget terrestrial and semiaquatic
                      plants. Drift of granular thiobencarb and spraying of liquid thiobencarb
                      applied with ground equipment pose minimal risk to these plants. All uses
                      of thiobencarb on rice may pose a risk of killing emerging seedlings of
                      aquatic plants, especially aquatic grasses. Use of thiobencarb on rice may
                      pose a risk to  aquatic algae in the southeast US and in smaller drains and
                      waterways in  California.
                           Use of thiobencarb on celery, lettuce, and endive in Florida poses a
                      high risk of causing chronic effects to fish, freshwater invertebrates, and
                      estuarine invertebrates, including shrimp. Additionally, this use poses a
                      high risk of causing acute effects to freshwater and estuarine invertebrates,
                      including oysters and shrimp. Use of thiobencarb on celery, lettuce, and
                      endive in Florida poses a high risk to terrestrial plants, semiaquatic plants,
                      and algae.  It may also pose a risk to emerging seedlings of vascular aquatic
                      plants.
                      Environmental Risk Characterization
                           Of particular concern to the Agency is the high risk of chronic effects
                      to fish and freshwater invertebrates, including shrimp and mollusks, and the
                      high risk of causing acute effects to freshwater and invertebrates, and the
                      water  quality risks posed by the chemical.

Risk Mitigation         To lessen worker risk, and ecological and water quality risks posed by
                      thiobencarb, EPA is requiring the following mitigation measures from
                      registrants of thiobencarb-containing products.
                      To protect handlers:
                      •     For liquid formulations: mixers and loaders must used closed systems
                           in addition to wearing a chemical-resistant apron, chemical-resistant
                           gloves, long-sleeve shirt, long pants, shoes, and socks. Applicators
                           and flaggers must use enclosed cabs or cockpits and wear long-sleeve
                           shirt, long pants, shoes, and socks.
                           For granular formulations:  loaders must wear a chemical-resistant
                           apron, chemical-resistant gloves, long-sleeve shirt, long pants, shoes,
                           and socks.  Applicators and flaggers must wear chemical-resistant
                           gloves, long-sleeve shirt, long pants, shoes, and socks.

                      To protect workers:

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                               A restricted-entry interval of 24 hours is being imposed.  Early entry
                               workers must wear coveralls, chemical-resistant gloves, shoes, and
                               socks.
                          To protect non-target organisms:
                          •      Application restrictions are being mandated in the states of
                                Louisiana and Texas.  In Louisiana, thiobencarb application will not
                                be allowed south of the Intracoastal Waterway.  In Texas,
                                thiobencarb application will not be allowed within two miles inland
                                from the shorelines of Galveston Bay, and not within two miles of
                                Matagorda Bay.
                          •      Include label warnings preventing application to rice fields with
                                catfish/crayfish farming, and preventing application to rice fields
                                adjacent to catfish or crayfish ponds.
                                Where weather conditions permit, it is required that flood waters not
                                be released within 14 days.
                                Require that thiobencarb not be applied within 24 hours of rainfall,
                                or when heavy rain is expected to occur within 24 hours.
                          •      Require that thiobencarb not be mixed/loaded or otherwise handled
                                within 100 feet of aquatic habitat.
                          •      Continue existing label warnings  addressing environmental hazards,
                                such as restricting application aerially within one mile of the St.
                                Francis Floodway where the Fat Pocketbook Pearly Mussel is
                                known to occur. Comparable warnings would be  appropriate where
                                use on rice can expose other threatened and endangered mussels.
                          •      Work with the EPA to reassess in the Fall of 1998 thiobencarb use
                                on leafy vegetables in Florida based on the results of the currently
                                ongoing environmental monitoring  study for muck soils in Florida
                                from the U.S. Geological Survey's National  Water Quality
                                Assessment Program (NAWQA).

    Additional Data          EPA is requiring the following additional generic  studies for
            Required    thiobencarb to confirm its regulatory assessments and conclusions:
                          •      Dermal Penetration Study [GLN 85-2];
                          •      Life-Cycle Freshwater Fish Study [GLN 72-5];
                          •      Avian Subacute Toxicity Study [GLN 71-2(b)];
                          •      Avian Reproduction Study [GLN 71-4(b)];
                          •      Seedling Emergence Testing Study [GLN 123-1 (a)];
                                The Agency also is requiring product-specific data including product
                          chemistry and acute toxicity studies, revised Confidential Statements of
                          Formula (CSFs), and revised labeling for reregi strati on.

Product Labeling          All thiobencarb end-use products must comply with EPA's current

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Changes
Required
pesticide product labeling requirements and with the following
requirements:
Labeling Requirements for Manufacturing-Use Products
      To remain in compliance with FIFRA, manufacturing use product
(MP) labeling must be revised to comply with all current EPA regulations,
PR Notices and applicable policies.  The MP labeling must bear the
following statement under Directions for Use:
      "Only for formulation into an Herbicide for the following use(s):rice
      weed control in California, Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi, Missouri
      and Arkansas, and lettuce, endive and celery weed control in
      Florida."
      An MP registrant may, at his/her discretion, add one of the following
statements to an MP label under "Directions for Use" to permit the
reformulation of the product for a specific use or all additional uses
supported by a formulator or user group:
      (a)     "This product may be used to formulate products for
             specific use(s) not listed on the MP label if the
             formulator, user group, or grower has complied with
             U.S. EPA submission requirements regarding
             support of such  use(s)."
      (b)     "This product may be used to formulate products for
             any additional use(s) not listed on the MP label if the
             formulator, user group, or grower has complied with
             U.S. EPA submission requirements regarding
             support of such  use(s)."
Labeling Requirements for End-Use Products
             The labels and labeling of all products must comply with
      EPA's current regulations and requirements as specified in 40 CFR
      §156.10 and other applicable notices.
PPE and Engineering Control Requirements for Pesticide Handlers
      For sole-active-ingredient end-use products that contain
thiobencarb:
      •      Revise the product labeling to adopt the handler personal
             protective equipment/engineering control requirements set
             forth in this section.
      •      Remove any conflicting PPE requirements on the current
             labeling.
      For multiple-active-ingredient end-use products that contain
thiobencarb:
      •      Compare the handler personal protective
             equipment/engineering control requirements set forth in this
             section to the requirements on the current labeling.

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      •      Retain the more protective requirements. (For guidance on
             which requirements are considered more protective, see PR
             Notice 93-7.)
Active-Ingredient Specific Engineering Control Requirements
      EPA is establishing active-ingredient specific engineering controls for
some occupational uses of thiobencarb end-use products.
      For liquid formulations:
             "Mixers and loaders are required to use closed
             systems. The closed system must be  used in a
             manner that meets the requirements listed in the
             Worker Protection Standard (WPS) for agricultural
             pesticides (40 CFR 170.240(d)(4)."
             "Applicators and flaggers are required to use enclosed cabs
             or enclosed cockpits. The closed system must be used in a
             manner that meets the requirements listed in the Worker
             Protection Standard (WPS) for agricultural pesticides (40
             CFR 170.240(d)(5-6)."
Active-Ingredient Specific Personal Protective Equipment Requirements
             EPA is establishing active-ingredient specific personal
      protective equipment requirements for all occupational uses of
      thiobencarb end-use products.
      For liquid formulations:
               "In addition to using closed systems, mixers and loaders
               must wear:
             — long-sleeved  shirt and long pants,
             —chemical-resistant gloves*,
             —socks plus shoes, and
             —chemical-resistant apron."
             "Applicators and flaggers using enclosed cabs or cockpits
             must wear:
             — long-sleeved  shirt and long pants,  and
             —socks plus shoes."
             "For other handling activities and in  case of a spill or other
             emergency exposure, handlers must wear:
             —coveralls over long-sleeved shirt and long pants,
             —chemical-resistant gloves*,
             —chemical-resistant footwear, and
             —chemical-resistant apron when cleaning equipment."
             *For the glove statement, use the statement established for
             thiobencarb through the  instructions  in Supplement Three of
             PR Notice 93-7.

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      For granular formulations:
              "Applicators and other handlers must wear:
              — long-sleeved shirt and long pants,
              —chemical-resistant gloves*,
              — shoes plus socks
              —chemical-resistant apron when loading formulation into
              equipment or cleaning equipment."
              *For the glove statement, use the statement established for
              thiobencarb through the instructions in Supplement Three of
              PR Notice 93-7.
a.     Entry Restrictions
      For sole-active-ingredient end-use products that contain
thiobencarb:
      •       Revise the product labeling to adopt the entry restrictions set
              forth in this section.
      •       Remove any conflicting entry  restrictions on the current
              labeling.
      For multiple-active-ingredient end-use products that contain
thiobencarb:
      •       Compare the entry restrictions set forth in this section to the
              entry restrictions on the current labeling.
      •       Retain the more protective restrictions. (A specific time
              period in hours or days is considered more protective than
              "sprays have dried" or "dusts have settled.")
Restricted-entry interval: A 24-hour restricted-entry interval (REI) is
required for uses within the scope of the WPS on all thiobencarb end-use
products.
Early-Entry Personal Protective Equipment (PPE):  The PPE required for
early entry is:
      - coveralls,
      - chemical-resistant gloves, and
      - shoes plus socks.

      Other Labeling Requirements
      The Agency is requiring the following labeling statements to be
located on all end-use products containing thiobencarb:
         Application Restrictions

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"Do not apply this product in a way that will contact workers or other
persons, either directly or indirectly or through drift.  Only protected
handlers may be in the area during application."
"Do not apply this product south of the Intracoastal Waterway in
Louisiana."
"Do not apply this product within two (2) miles from the shorelines
of Matagorda Bay in Texas."
"Do not apply this product within two (2) miles from the shorelines
of Galveston Bay  in Texas."
"Do not apply this product to rice fields with catfish/crayfish
farming."
"Do not apply this product on rice fields adjacent to catfish or
crayfish ponds."
"When applying to rice fields, do not release permanent flood water
within 14-days of application of this product (where weather
permits)."
"Avoid application of this product within 24 hours of rainfall, or
when heavy rain is expected to occur within 24 hours."
"Do not mix/load  or otherwise handle this product within 100 feet of
aquatic habitat."

ii.  User Safety Requirements

"Discard clothing or other absorbent materials that have been
drenched or heavily contaminated with this product's concentrate.
Do  not reuse them."
"Follow manufacturer's instructions for cleaning/maintaining PPE.  If
there are not such instructions for washables, use detergent and hot
water. Keep and wash PPE separately from other laundry."

iii.  User Safety Recommendations

"Users should wash hands before eating,  drinking, chewing gum,
using tobacco, or using the toilet."
"Users should remove clothing immediately if pesticide gets inside.
Then wash thoroughly and put on clean clothing."

"Users should remove PPE immediately after handling this product.
Wash the outside  of gloves before removing.  As soon as possible,
wash thoroughly and change into clean clothing."
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iv.  Spray Drift Labeling

The following language must be placed on each product label that
can be applied aerially:
Avoiding spray  drift at the application site is the responsibility of the
applicator.  The interaction of many equipment-and-weather-related
factors determine the potential for spray drift. The applicator and the
grower are responsible for considering all these factors when making
decisions.
The following Aerial Drift Reduction Advisory Information must be
followed to avoid off-target drift movement from aerial applications
to agricultural field crops.  These requirements do not apply to
forestry applications, public health uses or to applications using dry
formulations.
1.       The distance of the outer most nozzles on the boom must not
        exceed  3/4 the length of the wingspan or rotor.
2.       Nozzles must always point backward parallel with the air
        stream and never be pointed downwards more than 45
        degrees.
Where states have more stringent regulations, they should be
observed.
It is recommended that the applicator should be familiar with and
take into account the information covered in the Aerial Drift
Reduction Advisory Information.
The following aerial drift reduction advisory information must be
contained in the product labeling:
[This  section is  advisory in nature and does not supersede the
mandatory label requirements.]
INFORMATION ON DROPLET SIZE: The most effective way to
reduce drift potential is to apply large droplets. The best drift
management strategy is to apply the largest droplets that provide
sufficient coverage and control.  Applying larger droplets reduces
drift potential, but will not prevent drift if applications are made
improperly, or under unfavorable environmental conditions (see
Wind, Temperature and Humidity, and Temperature Inversions).
CONTROLLING DROPLET SIZE
•       Volume - Use high flow rate nozzles to apply the highest
practical spray volume. Nozzles with higher rated flows produce
larger droplets.
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•       Pressure - Do not exceed the nozzle manufacturer's
recommended pressures. For many nozzle types lower pressure
produces larger droplets. When higher flow rates are needed, use
higher flow rate nozzles instead of increasing pressure.
•       Number of nozzles - Use the minimum number of nozzles
that provide uniform coverage.
•       Nozzle Orientation - Orienting nozzles so that the spray is
released parallel to the airstream produces larger droplets than other
orientations and is the recommended practice.  Significant deflection
from horizontal will reduce droplet size and increase drift potential.
•       Nozzle Type - Use a nozzle type that is designed for the
intended application. With most nozzle types, narrower  spray angles
produce larger droplets.  Consider using low-drift nozzles.  Solid
stream nozzles oriented straight back produce the largest droplets and
the lowest drift.
•       Maintenance of Nozzles - periodic inspection and subsequent
replacement of nozzles to ensure proper chemical application is
recommended.
BOOM LENGTH: For some use patterns, reducing the effective
boom length to less than 3/4 of the wingspan or rotor length may
further reduce drift without reducing swath width.
APPLICATION HEIGHT: Applications should not be made at a
height greater than 10 feet above the top of the largest plants unless a
greater height is required for aircraft safety. Making applications at
the lowest height that is safe reduces exposure of droplets to
evaporation and wind.
SWATH ADJUSTMENT: When applications are made with a
crosswind, the swath will be displaced downward. Therefore, on the
up and downwind edges of the field, the applicator must compensate
for this  displacement by adjusting the path of the aircraft upwind.
Swath adjustment distance should increase, with increasing drift
potential (higher wind, smaller drops, etc.)
WIND:   Drift potential is lowest between wind speeds of 2-10 mph.
However, many factors, including droplet size and equipment type
determine drift potential at any given speed.  Application should be
avoided below 2 mph due to variable wind direction and high
inversion potential.  NOTE: Local terrain can influence wind
patterns. Every applicator should be familiar with local wind patterns
and how they affect spray drift.
TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY: When making applications
in low relative humidity, set up equipment to produce larger droplets
to compensate for evaporation. Droplet evaporation is most severe
when conditions are both hot and dry.
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 Regulatory
Conclusion
   For More
Information
      TEMPERATURE INVERSIONS:  Applications should not occur
      during a temperature inversion because drift potential is high.
      Temperature inversions restrict vertical air mixing, which causes
      small suspended droplets to remain in a concentrated cloud.  This
      cloud can move in unpredictable directions due to the light variable
      winds common during inversions.  Temperature inversions are
      characterized by increasing temperatures with altitude and are
      common on nights with limited cloud cover and light to no wind.
      They begin to form as the sun sets and often continue into the
      morning.  Their presence can be indicated by ground fog; however, if
      fog is not present, inversions can also be identified by the movement
      of smoke  from a ground source or an aircraft smoke generator.
      Smoke that layers and moves laterally in a concentrated cloud (under
      low wind  conditions) indicates an inversion, while smoke that moves
      upward and rapidly dissipates indicates good vertical air mixing.
      SENSITIVE AREAS:  The pesticide should only be applied when
      the potential for drift to adjacent sensitive areas (e.g. residential areas,
      bodies of water, known habitat for threatened or endangered species,
      non-target crops) is minimal (e.g. when wind is blowing away from
      the sensitive areas).

      The use of currently registered products containing thiobencarb in
accordance with approved labeling will not pose unreasonable risks or
adverse effects to humans or the environment. Therefore, all uses of these
products are eligible for reregi strati on.
      Thiobencarb products will be reregistered once the required product-
specific data, revised Confidential Statements of Formula, and revised
labeling are received and accepted by EPA.

      EPA is requesting public comments on the Reregi strati on Eligibility
Decision (RED) document for thiobencarb during a 60-day time period, as
announced in a Notice of Availability published in the Federal Register.  To
obtain a copy of the RED document or to submit written comments, please
contact the Pesticide Docket, Public Information and Records Integrity
Branch, Information Resources and Services Division (7502C), Office of
Pesticide Programs (OPP), US EPA, Washington, DC 20460, telephone
703-305-5805.
      Electronic copies of the RED and this fact sheet are available on the
Internet.  See http://www.epa.gov/REDs.
      Printed copies of the RED and fact sheet can be obtained from EPA's
National Center for Environmental Publications and Information
(EPA/NCEPI), PO Box 42419, Cincinnati, OH  45242-2419, telephone 1-
800-490-9198;  fax 513-489-8695.
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     Following the comment period, the thiobencarb RED document also
will be available from the National Technical Information Service (NTIS),
5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161, telephone 703-487-4650.
     For more information about EPA's pesticide reregi strati on program,
thethiobencarb RED, or reregi strati on of individual products containing
thiobencarb], please contact the Special Review and Reregi strati on Division
(7508W), OPP, US EPA, Washington, DC 20460, telephone 703-308-8000.

     For information about the health effects of pesticides, or for
assistance in recognizing and  managing pesticide poisoning symptoms,
please contact the National Pesticides Telecommunications Network
(NPTN). Call toll-free 1-800-858-7378, from 6:30 am to 4:30 pm Pacific
Time, or 9:30 am to 7:30 pm Eastern Standard Time, seven days a week.
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