oEPA
 (I HUD
                   United States
                   Environmental Protection
                   Agency
                       Prevention. Pesticides.
                       and Toxic Substances
                       (7404)
EPA-747-F-96O03
March 1996
FACT  SHEET
Lead Hazard Prevention in Homes Pamphlet Released
The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
and the Consumer Product Safety Commission
(CPSC) have released for distribution and
reproduction a pamphlet titled Protect Your
Family from Lead in Your Home. This 14-
page pamphlet provides prevention tips on
reducing exposure to lead hazards from paint,
dust, and soil in residential areas. Its
publication was directed by Congress, which
charged EPA with developing a lead hazard
information pamphlet to inform families about
how to reduce exposure to lead hazards in the
home.

EPA developed this pamphlet in cooperation
with the Department of Housing and Urban
Development (HUD), the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention (CDC), CPSC, and 14
other federal agencies involved in the fight to
eliminate lead poisoning. In addition to
supplementing EPA, HUD, and CPSC's public
education programs, the publication will be
distributed under the regulation developed by
EPA and HUD dealing with sales, rentals, and
renovations of older housing.

LEAD HAZARDS IN HOUSING	
Approximately three-quarters of the nation's
housing stock built before 1978 contains lead-,.
based paint. When properly managed and	
maintained, this paint poses little risk. If
improperly managed, however, lead from	
paint can threaten the health of occupants,
especially children under 6 years of age. Over
time, low-level exposure to lead from paint,
dust, soil, and plumbing can cause a range of
                           Simple Steps To Protect Your
                           Family From Lead Hazards
                              If you think your home has
                                 high levels of lead:

                          Get your young children tested for lead,
                          even if they seem healthy.
                          Wash children's hands, bottles, pacifiers,
                          and toys often.
                          Make sure children eat healthy, low-fat
                          foods.
                          Get your home checked for lead hazards.
                          Regularly clean floors, window sills, and
                          other surfaces.
                          Wipe soil off shoes before entering
                          house.
                          Talk to your landlord about fixing
                          surfaces with peeling or chipping paint.
                          Take precautions to avoid exposure to
                          lead dust when remodeling or renovating
                          (call 1-800-424-LEAD for guidelines).
                          Don't use a belt sander, propane torch,
                          dry. scraper, or dry-sandpaper on painted.
                          surfaces that may-contain lead.       :. -
                          Don't try to remove lead-based paint
                          yourself.
                       National Lead Information Clearinghouse at
                       (800) 424-LEAD.

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health problems including permanent damage
to the brain, nervous system, and kidneys. In
sufficient levels, lead can also cause health
problems in adults. Because of its effects on
fetal development, lead exposure is
particularly harmful to pregnant women and
women of child-bearing age. Such exposure is
largely preventable if people take
precautionary measures.

PRIVATE REPRODUCTION	
The final pamphlet is in the public domain and
may be reproduced by individuals or
organizations without permission. Negatives
for printing the color version of the pamphlet
and copy suitable for photocopy reproduction
in black and white are available by calling the
ALTERNATE LANGUAGES	
This pamphlet is available in English and
Spanish. The agencies are also exploring
opportunities for public and private
partnerships to translate the pamphlet into
other languages used within the United States.

Organizations interested in working with EPA
and CPSC to print and distribute the
pamphlet, or to develop new pamphlet
translations should write to:

   Protect Your Family
   Program Development Branch
   U.S. EPA (7404)
   401 M St. S.W.
   Washington, B.C.  20460
                                FOR MORE INFORMATION

    For a copy of Protect Your Family from Lead in Your Home, other fact sheets, or proposed rules, call the
    National Lead Information Clearinghouse (NLIC) at (800) 424-LEAD, or TDD (800) 526-5456 for the
    hearing impaired. You may also send your request by fax to (202) 659-1192 or by Internet E-mail to
    ehc@cais.com. Visit the NLIC on the Internet at http://www.nsc.org/rac/ehc/ehc.html.                 ,

    Bulk copies of the pamphlet are available from the Government Printing Office (GPO) at (202) 512-1800.
    Refer to the complete title or GPO stock number 055-000-00507-9. The price is $26.00 for a pack of 50
    copies. Alternatively, persons may reproduce the pamphlet, for use or distribution, if the text and graphics
    are reproduced in full. Camera-ready copies of the pamphlet are available from the National Lead
    Information Clearinghouse.

    For specific questions about lead-based paint and lead-based paint hazards, call the  National Lead
    Information Clearinghouse at (800) 424-LEAD, or TDD (800) 526-5456 for the hearing impaired.

    The EPA pamphlet and rule are available electronically and may be accessed through the Internet
    Electronic Access:
    Gopher:   gopher.epa.gov:70/l l/Offices/PestPreventToxic/Toxic/lead_pm
    WWW:   http://www.epa.gov/docs/lead_pm
    Dial up:" (919)558-0335
    FTP:      ftp.epa.gov (To login, type "anonymous." Your password is your Internet E-mail address:) ~

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