U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
          GULF OF MEXICO PROGRAM
      FRESHWATER INFLOW SUBCOMMITTEE
 STATUS OF THE GULF OF MEXICO: PRELIMINARY
      REPORT ON INFLOW FROM STREAMS
AUTHOR: Raymond M. Slade, Jr., U.S. Geological Survey

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                                 TABLE OF CONTENTS


                                                                                  Page
 Introduction	
                      	      1
 Survey of available data ..
                                  	:	•••	      2

    Quantity and water quality of streamflow to the Gulf of Mexico 	             2

    Salinity in bays and estuaries
                               "	'	•	      3
    Factors related to changes in streamflow to the Gulf

 Regulations affecting streamflow to the Gulf ..	.

 Coastline segments for  the Gulf
                             	'	       6
 Historical streamflow to the Gulf
                              ""•		•.       7
 Temporal changes  in streamflow to the Gulf
                                        	       9
   Annual-mean streamflow
                           	       9
   Annual-maximum and -minimum streamflow
                                            	•			     10
Appendix A, Exhibits	
                           	'	•	     11

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                                LIST OF EXHIBITS
                                                                                  Page
1   Questionnaire for the EPA's Gulf of Mexico Program on the nature and availability
    of dataConcerning the salinity of the Gulf of Mexico and the quantity and             ^
    salinity of streamflow to the Gulf			
2.  Mailing list for Gulf of Mexico Program questionnaire	

3.  Table showing summary of responses to selected questions, by types of                ^
    agencies	
4.  Table showing summary of responses to selected questions from the                   ^
    questionnaire	•	
5   Table showing identified major streams that discharge directly into the Gulf of
    Mexico and periods of record for daily values of streamflow and water quality         ^
     in the lower reaches of those streams	
 6.   Table showing drainage areas and gaged drainage areas of streams that                ^
     discharge directly into the Gulf of Mexico	
 7   Table showing selected characteristics of the U.S. Geological Survey data base for
     daily values of streamflow and dissolved solids for streamflow-gagmg stations
     located within 200 miles of the Gulf of Mexico 	•	
 8.   Table showing selected characteristics of data bases  for salinity data in bays and        ^
     estuaries	
 9.   Map showing location of coastline segment areas and «*^Z*£™«^
     either with long-term data, or located on major streams that discharge directly      ^^
     into the  Gulf of Mexico	•	
10   Table showing selected characteristics for long-term streamflow-gaging stations
     on streams discharging directly into the Gulf of Mexico	
 11.  Table showing annual-mean streamflow for long-term streamflow-gaging stations       ^
      in Texas, 1947-86	
 12.   Table showing annual-mean streamflow for long-term streamflow-gaging stations in    ^
      Louisiana, Mississippi, and  Alabama, 1947-86 	•	• • •	
 13.   Table showing annual-mean streamflow for long-term streamflow-gaging stations in    ^
      Florida, 1947-86	
 14.   Table showing annual-mean streamflow, prior to 1947, for the 12 longest-term         ^
      streamflow-gaging stations	>	
                                            11

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 15.   Graphs of annual-mean streamflow for the 12 longest-term gages	

 16.   Graphs of total gaged annual-mean streamflow into each coastline segment

 17.   Table showing selected statistics for two periods of annual-mean streamflow
      for the coastline segments, 1947-86	
18.   Table showing selected statistics for two periods of annual-mean streamflow for
      the periods of record of the long-term streamflow-gaging stations
19.   Table showing selected statistics for two periods of annual-maximum daily-mean
      streamflow for the periods of record of the long-term streamflow-gaging
      stations	

20.   Table showing selected statistics for two periods of annual-minimum daily-mean
      streamflow for the periods of record of the long-term streamflow-gaging
      stations	
37

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                    U. S ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
                             GULF OF MEXICO PROGRAM
                        FRESHWATER INFLOW SUBCOMMITTEE
Dr. Susan I. Rees (Federal Co-Chair)
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Mobile District
Planning Division
P.O. Box 2288
Mobile, Alabama  36628-0001

Mr. Bruce A. Moulton (State Co-Chair)
Environmental Systems Section
Texas Water Commission
P.O. Box 13087 Capitol Station
Austin, Texas 78711-3087

Mr. Randall L. Armstrong
Division of Water Management
Florida Department of Environmental
 Regulation
2600 Blair Stone Road
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2400

Mr. Len Bahr
Office o the Governor
P.O. Box 94004
Baton Rouge, Louisiana  70804

Dr. Joan A. Browder
NOAA/National Marine Fisheries Service
Southeast Fisheries Center
75 Virginia Beach Drive
Miami, Florida 33149

Dr. Fred Deegen
Mississippi Department of Wildlife
  Conservation
Bureau of Marine Resources
2620 West Beach Boulevard
Biloxi, Mississippi 39531

Mr. Richard Eckenrod
Tampa Bay National Estuary Program
111 7th Avenue South
St. Petersburg, Florida  33701
Dr. Ernest D. Estevez
Mote Marine Lab
1600 City Island Park
Sarasota, Florida 33577

Mr. David Fruge
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
825 Kaliste Saloom Road, II
Suite 102
Lafayette, Louisiana 70508

Mr. David Hankla
Field Supervisor
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
17629 El Camino Real, Suite 211
Houston, Texas 77058

Mr. David M. Smith (Alternate)
(U.S. Fish and  Wildlife Service)
Gulf of Mexico Program
Building 1103, Room 202
Stennis Space Center, Mississippi
39529
Mr. John Klein
NOAA/National Ocean Service
Office Oceanography and Marine Assessment
6001 Executive Boulevard, Room 220
Rockville, Maryland  20852

Mr. Larry F. Land
U.S. Geological Survey
Water Resources Division
8011A Cameron Road
Austin, Texas  78753-6717

Ms. Fritzi G. Pikes (CAC Representative)
Texas Water Commission
P.O. Box 13087
Austin, Texas  78711-3087

Mr. Don Waller (Alternate)
Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation
P.O. Box 1972
Jackson, Mississippi  39215-1972
                                           IV

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Ms. Janet Starnes
Northwest Florida Water Management
District
Route 1, Box 3100
Havana, Florida 32333

Mr. Walter B. Stevenson, Jr.
Natural Resources Development Section
Alabama Department of Economic
 and Community Affairs
3465 Norman Bridge Road
Montgomery, Alabama 36125-0347
Mr. Lon Strong
U.S. Soil Conservation Service
Federal Building, Suite 1321
100 West Capitol Street
Jackson, Mississippi 39269

Mr. John C. Weber ,
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
New Orleans District, CELMN-PD-R
Environmental Analysis Branch
P.O. Box 60267
New Orleans, Louisiana 70160-0267

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                                        PREFACE

     This report was prepared for the Freshwater Inflow Subcommittee of the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency's Gulf of Mexico Program by the united States Geological Survey.  Much of
the data on water quality and  quantity of streamflow come from the U.S. Geological Survey.
Additional data and information contained in this review comes from responses to questionnaires
coordinated by the Freshwater Inflow Subcommittee.  These questionnaires were provided to
agencies involved with water  resources within the five states bordering the Gulf of Mexico; 48 out
of 71 agencies responded to the questionnaire.

     This report is not intended to be comprehensive in nature. It is the first phase of a multi-
year study that will include the  gathering of additional data, as well as supplemental data synthesis
and interpretation.  Additional phases of the study will provide a more detailed examination of
freshwater inflow into the Gulf of Mexico.
                                             VI

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                                        Introduction
     The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency initiated the Gulf of Mexico Program with the
purpose of developing and implementing a comprehensive strategy to protect and enhance the
environmental quality of the Gulf of Mexico. The program has three committees including the
Technical Steering Committee, which has eight subcommittees.  The subcommittees are developing
approaches and tasks for accomplishing the program's more specific objectives. The Freshwater
Inflow Subcommittee prepared this report to characterize streamflow to the Gulf.
     The major objectives of this report are to:
     1.   Identify the extent and availability of data that may be useful for the following:
         a.  Characterizing the quantity and water quality of streamflow to the Gulf of Mexico;
         b.  Characterizing the current and historical salinity of water in bays and estuaries; and
         c.  Identifying factors related to changes in streamflow to the Gulf
     2.   Identify existing State, regional, and Federal regulations that affect streamflow to the
         Gulf.
     3.   Divide the Gulf of Mexico coastline into segments for purposes of characterizing
         streamflow to the Gulf and the salinity of receiving bays and estuaries.
     4.   Present current and historical data concerning  the quantity of streamflow to the Gulf.

     The text and tables for this report (exhibits 1-8, 10-14, and 17-20) are written onto diskettes
designed to be used with personal computers.

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                                  Survey of Available Data

     A questionnaire (exhibit 1) was prepared by the Freshwater Inflow Subcommittee and mailed
to 71 offices of local, State, Federal, and International agencies and colleges (exhibit 2) associated
with water resources within the 5 States bordering the Gulf of Mexico. The purpose of the
questionnaire was to identify: the extent and availability of salinity data in bays and estuaries; the
nature and availability of streamflow data relevant to streamflow to the Gulf; and the  extent of
regulations that affect streamflow to the Gulf.  Responses to the questionnaire were received from
48 offices and colleges. Summaries of the responses to trie questionnaires are presented in exhibits
3 and 4.

Quantity and Water Quality of Streamflow to the Gulf of Mexico

     Long-term continuous streamflow records exist for almost all major streams that discharge
directly into the Gulf of Mexico. Fifty-four streams that discharge directly into the Gulf and
have drainage areas larger  than 200 square miles are identified and classified as major streams
(exhibit 5). The total drainage area for these streams is almost 1.812 million square miles, which
represents about 95 percent of the total drainage area to the Gulf along the United States coastline
(1.901 million square miles).  The periods of streamflow record for these streams range from 17 to
69 years and average 45 years.  Some gages were inactive during parts of the period of record.  A
compilation of drainage areas to the Gulf and drainage areas gaged for long-term streamflow is
presented in exhibit 6.  Selected characteristics for  data available from streamflow gages located
within 200 miles of the Gulf are presented by State in exhibit 7.

      Daily values for dissolved solids are available  at streamflow-gaging stations on 44 of the
major streams. The periods  of record for these data range from 2 to 47 years and average  17 years
(exhibit 5). The total drainage area of these gages, about 1.804 million square miles,  represents
about 95 percent of the total drainage to the Gulf.  Daily values of dissolved solids are available
for all but one of the identified major streams with drainage areas larger than 1,000 square miles.
Selected characteristics of the dissolved-solids data base for streamflow gages within  200 miles of
the Gulf are presented in exhibit 7.

      Daily values for water  temperature are available for most of the major streams (exhibit 5),
 while daily values for suspended sediment, dissolved oxygen, and pH are available for only a few

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  of the major streams.  Periodic values for nutrients, physical organics and inorganics, indicator
  bacteria, inorganic-chemical constituents, minor elements, insecticides, and herbicides are
  available at many streamflow gages within 200 miles of the Gulf.  These data are collected
  infrequently, commonly about 4 to 8 samples per year, and thus .would be difficult to use in
  quantitative analyses for water-quality loads or trends without the use of advanced statistical
  models.

      Almost all of the data concerning the quantity and water quality of streamflow to the Gulf
  are being collected by  the U.S. Geological Survey and are available from computer storage.

 Salinity in Bavs and  Estuaries
      More than 1 million measurements of salinity at about 2,400 sites in bays and estuaries were
 identified by 20 respondents to the questionnaire. Data bases were identified for each of the five
 States bordering the Gulf. The periods of record and frequency of measurements for the data,
 however, vary considerably. Some agencies maintain reconnaissance networks for collection of
 salinity data, with coordinated site selections, periods of record, and frequencies of data
 collection.  Much of the identified data, however, have been collected as part of short-term
 specific projects, and less than 2 years of data are available for most of these sites.

      Aggregated totals for the numerical answers to questions concerning salinity data are
 presented in exhibit 3  by agency type. The responses to selected questions concerning the data are
 identified for each agency in exhibit 4. The salinity data for 13 of the 20 agencies, including most
 of the larger data bases, are stored in computer systems.  Fourteen of the agencies have prepared
 reports that present the data, summaries, or conclusions based on the data.  It is beyond the scope
 of this report to provide a list of the numerous data reports available. A summary of the general
 data-base characteristics for  each of the agencies is presented in exhibit 8.

 Factors Related to Changes in Streamflow to the Gulf

     Temporal changes in streamflow are related to changes in precipitation, land cover,  land use,
and water-management activities such as impoundments, diversions,  water use, and other factors.
Numerous data relevant to these factors are available. Precipitation and other meteorological data
are available in computer  storage for thousands of sites in the watersheds of streams discharging to

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the Gulf.  Current and historical land-cover and land-use maps and information are available
from many local, State, and Federal agencies.  Data and information regarding impoundments are
available from State water-resources agencies and Federal agencies such as the U.S. Army, Corps
of Engineers; the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation; and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Soil     ;
Conservation Service. Data and information for diversions and water use are available from State
and local agencies. Water-use data also are available from the Water Resources Division of the
U.S. Geological Survey.

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                         Regulations Affecting Streamflow to the Gulf

      Four agencies that develop or enforce regulations affecting streamflow to the Gulf were
 identified from the returned questionnaires: The Texas Water Commission, the Alabama
 Department of Environmental Management, the Florida Department of Environmental
 Regulation, and the International Boundary and Water Commission.  Texas regulations are in
 Chapters 11.147 and 11.152 of the Texas Water Code.  Alabama regulations were not presented in
 the questionnaire responses. Florida regulations are in Florida State Statutes 373 and 403. The
 International Boundary and Water Commission authority is from treaties between Mexico and the
 United States.  The extent and authority for these regulations were presented in the questionnaires
 returned by the agencies.  Although not identified in the responses, the Rio Grande Compact in
 the States of Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas regulates streamflow in the Rio Grande.

     Based on written agreements with the previously identified agencies, the Angelina and
 Neches River Authority and Lower Colorado River Authority in Texas, and the U.S. Fish and
 Wildlife Service reported several regulations that probably have 'minimal effects on streamflow to
 the Gulf. The regulations generally involve River Management Plans,  Reservoir Operation Plans,
 and sewage-treatment facilities.  The authorities for these regulations are included in Certificates
 of Adjudications, Water Appropriations Permits, Orders, and Resolutions of the Texas Water
 Commission. Details for these regulations are in the questionnaire responses from these agencies.

     The only identified Federal legislation that affects inflow to the Gulf involves the
 Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers. Personnel from the New Orleans District of the U.S. Army,
 Corps of Engineers, reported that a modification to the 1928 National Flood Control Act (Public
 Law 780) is used to regulate the streamflow of both rivers. Since 1977, the Corps has regulated
 the streamflow  in the  lower reaches of the rivers so that 70 percent of the total streamflow into
 the Gulf for both rivers is from the Mississippi River and 30 percent is from the Atchafalaya
 River. Other Federal  regulations affecting streamflow into the Gulf could not be identified from
contacts with individuals in State and Federal agencies.

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                               Coastline Segments for the Gulf

     The Gulf of Mexico coastline was divided into 12 segments for purposes of characterizing
streamflow and the salinity of receiving bays and estuaries (exhibit 9). The segments are based on
State and national boundaries, stream drainage divides, and major geographic divides between
receiving bays and estuaries.  Because of the size of the watershed of the receiving bay for the
Mississippi River, the bay was assigned a separate segment.

     The total drainage area and gaged drainage area, in square miles, for the long-term
streamflow gages, and the percentage of total area that is gaged with long-term data for each
coastline segment follow:
Coastline
segment
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Total
drainage
area
(square miles)
347,500
77,670
93,480
8,120
93,470
1,140,329
8,330
20,830
44,650
15,020
37,950
14,150
Total drainage area
for the long-term
streamflow-gaging
stations
(square miles)
335,500
69,526
80,514
2,358
87,570
1,129,810
3,235
13,163
40,811
9,421
29,441
2,802
Percent of area
that is gaged
97
90
86
29
94
99
39
63
91
63
78
20
  Total
1,901,499
1,804,151

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                               Historical Streamflow to the Gulf

      Historical Streamflow data for major streams and segments are based on streamflow data
 from long-term gages operated by the U.S. Geological Survey.  A few years of data are missing
 for eight of the long-term gages; however, these data are estimated for each gage by using
 streamflow from nearby gages on the same streams.  In this report, years are water years.
 September 30 is the last date of each water year; for example, October 1,  1989, to September 30,
 1990, represents the 1990 water  year.

     Almost every identified major stream that discharges directly into the Gulf has been gaged
 for daily values of streamflow by the U.S. Geological Survey. The periods of record for daily
 values for the 54 identified major streams are presented in exhibit 5. The locations of these
 streamflow-gaging stations are presented in exhibit 9. Selected characteristics for the long-term
 streamflow  gaging stations are presented in exhibit 10. Annual-mean streamflow from 1947  to
 1986, the last year for which data were available, are presented in exhibits 11 to 13. Values for
 annual-mean streamflow prior to 1947 for the 12 gages with the longest periods of record are
 presented in exhibit 14.

     Graphs of annual-mean streamflow for the 12 longest-term gages from beginning of record
 to 1986 or 1987 are presented in exhibit 15. The straight line on each graph represents a best fit
 trend determined by linear regression of the streamflow data. The other line represents the best
 fit curvilinear trend using the LOWESS (locally weighted regression and smoothing scatterplots)
 procedure, as identified in the following report: "Cleveland, W.S.,  1979, Robust locally weighted
 regression and smoothing scatterplots: Journal of American Statistics Association, 74, pages 829-
 836." The straight line is indicative of a single long-term trend while the curvilinear line is
 indicative of shorter-term trends. Generally,  the LOWESS trends  indicate that increased
 streamflow occurred in the mid-1940's and mid-1970's at most of the gages. Other general or
 site-specific trends can be inferred from the lines on the graphs.

     Most of the total drainage area to the Gulf is gaged, and long-term streamflow data for each
stream and most coastline segments are available.  Gaged streamflow probably represents most
total streamflow into the coastline segments that have most of their drainage area gaged.
However, gaged streamflow probably does not represent most of the total streamflow into
segments 4,  7, and 12.  Total streamflow can be estimated from the gaged data for all segments.

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Graphs of values for total gaged annual-mean streamflow into each coastline segment are
presented in exhibit 16. These data are based on records obtained at the long-term gages from
1947 to 1986.  The lines on these graphs represent the trends as described in the previous
paragraph. The LOWESS lines on these graphs indicate similar trends as seen in exhibit  15.

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                         Temporal Changes in Streamflow to the Gulf

 Annual-Mean Streamflow

      Temporal changes in streamflow to the Gulf were determined by statistically comparing
 annual-mean streamflow values for early and late periods of the period of record. Values for
 annual-mean streamflow represent annual volumes of streamflow to the Gulf. Changes were
 identified for gaged streamflow to each coastline segment based on 40 years of records at the
 long-term gages on streams discharging to each coastline segment (exhibit 9).  For this analysis,
 the 40-year period was divided into two 20-year periods: 1947-66 and 1967-86.  A second and
 similar analysis was performed for the complete period of record at each of the long-term
 streamflow gages. The mean period of record for the 44 streamflow gages is about 51 years. This
 period was divided in half, and the data from 1961-86 were compared to the data prior to 1961
 for each gage.
     The mean streamflow for each period was calculated and compared for each gage and
 coastline segment to determine changes in streamflow between the two periods. The mean of the
 annual-mean streamflow values is used in this analysis because it represents the total volume of
 streamflow for each period. The standard deviation of the values for each period also was
 calculated for each gage and coastline segment.

     The mean and standard deviation of the gaged annual-mean streamflow values for each of
 the two periods are presented in exhibit 17 for each coastline segment.  Streamflow into each
 segment is greater for the later period, with the exception of segment 12 in Florida.  Segment 12
 had a 38-percent decrease in the later period. The probable cause for the reduction  is discussed
 later in this section, the streamflow is comparable for both periods for segment 11.

     The values for the mean and standard deviation  of the streamflows for each period are
 presented for each of the long-term gages in exhibit 18.  Increases in streamflow for the later
 period occurred at 28 of the gages while decreases occurred at 15 of the gages.  Streamflow at one
 gage was unchanged. Eight of the streams had increases in streamflow that exceeded 25 percent.
 Increases in streamflow for Brays and Whiteoak Bayous in Houston, Texas, probably are related to
 increases in urbanization in  those watersheds (Fred Liscum, U.S. Geological Survey, oral
commun., 1990). The causes for increases at the other gages were not investigated.

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     The largest percentages of decreased streamflow occurred at gage numbers 39 to 44, in
central and southern Florida.  Decreased streamflow in west-central Florida is attributed to
rainfall deficits in that area during the 1960 and 1970 decades based on the following report:
"Palmer, C.E., and Bone, L.P., 1977, Some aspects of rainfall deficits in west central Florida:
Southwest Florida Water Management District Hydrometeorological Report Number 1,  19 pages."
Annual-Maximum and -Minimum Streamflow

     Temporal changes in maximum and minimum streamflow to the Gulf were determined by
comparing annual-maximum and -minimum daily-mean streamflows for early and late periods at
each gage. This analysis is included in the report because maximum and minimum streamflows
might affect marine life in the Gulf as much as annual-mean volumes.  The same statistical
procedure and periods of record used in the analysis of the annual-mean streamflow at the long-
term gages also were used to analyze the maximum and minimum streamflows.

     The values for the mean and standard deviation of the annual-maximum daily-mean
streamflows for each of the two periods are  presented for each of the long-term gages in exhibit
19. Increases in annual-maximum streamflows for the later period occurred at 24 of the gages
while decreases occurred at 19 of the gages.  Annual-maximum daily-mean streamflow at one
gage remained unchanged. Large increases or decreases occurred at many of the gages.  All but
two of the gages with decreased maximum streamflows are in Texas or Florida.  Increases in
maximum streamflows exceeded 50 percent  for the Mission River, Brays Bayou, and Amite and
Tangipahoa Rivers. Decreases exceeded 20  percent for the Rio Grande, the Brazos, Neches, and
Sabine Rivers in Texas, and the Anclote, Hillsborough, Alafia, Little Manatee, Myakka, and Peace
Rivers in Florida. Causes for decreased maximum streamflows to the Gulf from Texas streams
were not investigated; the decreased flow  in Florida streams are discussed in the previous section.

     The values for the mean and standard deviation of the annual-minimum daily-mean
streamflows for each of the two periods are  presented in exhibit 20 for each of the long-term
gages. Increases in annual-minimum streamflows for the later period occurred at 27 of the gages
while decreases occurred at 16 of the gages.  Annual-minimum daily-mean streamflow at one gage
remained unchanged. Large increases occurred at many of the gages.  Decreases exceeding 20
percent occurred for the Colorado River in  Texas, and the Anclote, Hillsborough, and Peace
Rivers in Rorida.

                                           10

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APPENDIX A






 EXHIBITS
    11

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                Exhibit I,—Questionnaire for EPA's Gulf of Mexico Program on
                the Nature and Availability of Data Concerning the Salinity of the
             Gulf of Mexico and the Quantity and Salinity of Stream flow to the Gulf
              Please include an attachment, itemized by number, for answers which
                          cannot be completed on this questionnaire.

                                 I. GENERAL QUESTIONS

A.   Has your agency been directly or indirectly involved in the monitoring of the salinity
     (dissolved solids, conductivity, or major inorganic cations or anions) of water in bays or
     estuaries which discharge to the Gulf?  	yes	no

B.   Has your agency been directly or indirectly involved in the monitoring of the quantity of
     streamflow or diversions of freshwater which  inflow to the Gulf of Mexico for sites in
     Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, or Florida within 200 miles of the Gulf?
     	yes	no

C.   Is your agency responsible for developing or implementing  regulations on freshwater inflows
     or diversions? 	yes	no

IF THE ANSWER TO ANY OF THESE QUESTIONS IS YES, PLEASE PROCEED. IF THE
ANSWER TO EACH QUESTION IS NO, THE QUESTIONNAIRE IS COMPLETED.

D.   Please attach a brief description of the purpose,  scope, objective, and approach for all
     current and historic data-collection programs.

E.   Please provide the name, address, and telephone number for a contact person with overall
     familiarity with these programs.
F.   Please provide references to any regulations relating to freshwater inflow into the Gulf that
     are your agency's responsibility.
                                            12

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                                  Exhibit 1.—(continued)
                   II.  DATA ON SALINITY OF BAYS AND ESTUARIES

A.   Does your agency have a data base on the salinity in bays or estuaries?
     	yes         no   If yes, please answer the following questions regarding those sites.
     If no, please proceed to item III.

     1.  Approximately how many locations have you collected salinity data? ______
     2.  Please provide a list of the salinity constituents for which you commonly have data.
     3.  What is the approximate minimum, average, and maximum period of record, in years,
        for the sites?	,	,	
     4.  How many of the sites have more than 10 years of record?	  More than 20
        years?	  More than 30 years?	
     5.  What is the approximate minimum, average, and maximum number of salinity
        measurements, per site?	,	,	
     6.  If not described in item I.D, please provide a brief description of the geographic
        coverage for the sites.
    7.  Are the data stored in a computerized data base?
_yes
_no  If yes, what is
        the name of the data-base system, the commercial name and model of the system, and
        the media (paper, tape, diskettes, etc.) for the availability of the data?
    8.  Please provide the name, address, and telephone number of a contact person from your
        agency regarding the data.
    9.  Are there any reports which present the data, or summaries, conclusions, or
       recommendations based on this data?         yes 	no  If yes, please present
       bibliographic citations for those reports. If unpublished, please present the name,
       address, and telephone number of a contact person familiar with the reports.
                                           13

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                                 Exhibit 1.—(continued)
                       TTT.  STREAMFLOW AND DIVERSION DATA

A.   Does your agency have a data base of streamflow or diversion-flow data which meets the
     location criteria in item I.B?	yes	no

     If no, please proceed to item IV.  If you have continuous-record flow data, please proceed to
     item 1. If you have partial-record data please proceed to item 2, and if you have
     instantaneous  data please proceed to item 3.

     1.  Continuous records of streamflow or diversion-flows (sites for which daily-mean
        discharges can be determined).
        a.  For how many sites do you have streamflow data?	 Diversion-flow data?

        b.  What is the approximate minimum, average and maximum period of record, in years,
            for the streamflow sites?	,	,	  For the diversion-flow sites?
        c.  How many of the streamflow sites have more than 10 years of record?    -
            More than 20 years?	  More than 30 years?     '       How many of the
            diversion-flow sites?	,	,	
     2.  Partial-record streamflow or diversion flows(flood-hydrograph, low flows only,
        segmented periods, etc.).
        a.  How many streamflow sites?	 How many diversion-flow sites?
        b.  What is the approximate minimum, average, and maximum period of record, in
            years, for the streamflow sites?	,	,	  For the diversion
            sites?	,	,	
        c.  How many of the streamflow sites have more than 10 years of record?	
            More than 20 years?	More than 30 years?	  How many of the
            diversion sites?	,	,	
     3. Discharge measurements only of streamflow or diversions.
        a.  How many streamflow sites?	  How many diversion sites?	
        b.  What is the approximate minimum, average, and maximum period of record, in
            years, for the streamflow sites?	,	,	  For the diversion
            sites?	,	,	
        c.  How many of the streamflow sites have more than 10 years of record?	
            More than 20 years?	  More than 30 years?	  How many of the
            diversion sites?	, _^	,	

 B.   If not described in item I.D, please provide a brief description of the geographic coverage of
     your streamflow and diversion-flow data.
 C.  Are the data stored in a computerized data base?
_yes
no  If yes, what is the
      name of the data-base system, the commercial name and model of the system, and the media
      for the availability of the data?
                                            14

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                                   Exhibit 1.—(continued)
D.   Please provide the name, address, and telephone number of  a contact person from your
     agency regarding your data.
E.   Are there any reports which present the data, or summaries, conclusions, or
     recommendations based on this data?	yes	ho  If yes, please present
     bibliographic citations for those reports.  If unpublished, please present the name, address,
     and telephone number of a contact person familiar with the reports.
                                            15

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                                  Exhibit 1.—(continued)
                             IV.  RULES AND REGULATIONS

A.   Please provide, in chronological order, effective dates and summaries of rules and
     regulations relating to freshwater inflows to the Gulf.
                                             16

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                Exhibit 2.—Gulf of Mexico Program questionnaire mailing list

Numbers referenced with * represent those agencies that responded to the questionnaire
(exhibit 1).
                          LOCAL AGENCIES AND COLLEGES

     1)  Quenton Dokken
         Citizen Advisory Committee
         6921 Dundee
         Corpus Christi, Texas 78413

     2)* James Riley, P.E.
         Water Supply Superintendent
         City of Corpus Christi
         P.O. Box 9277
        . Corpus Christi, Texas 78469

     3)* Hillsborough County Environmental Protection Commission
         1900 9th Avenue
         Tampa, Florida 33605

     4)* Marine Science Program
         University of Alabama
         P.O. Box 369-370
         Dauphin Island, Alabama 36528

     5)* Dr. John W. Tunnell, Jr.
         Director, Center of Coastal Studies
         Corpus Christi State University
         6300 Ocean Drive
         Corpus Christi, Texas 78412

     6)* Gerard Wellington
         University of Houston
         Department of Biology
         4800 Calhoun
         Houston, Texas  77004

     7)* Dr. Peter Mantz
         Lamar University
         Box 10024
         Beaumont, Texas 77710

     8)* Catherine Edwards-Spatley
         Information Services and Archives
         Center for Wetland Resources
         Louisiana State University
         Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803
                                           17

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                              Exhibit 2.---(continued)

 9)* Dr. Frank Judd
     Director, Coastal Studies Laboratory
     Pan American University
     P.O. Box 2591
     South Padre Island, Texas 78597

10)  Frank Fisher
     Biology Department
     Rice University
     P.O. Box 18992
     Houston, Texas 77251

11)* Dr. Robert Shipp
     Coastal Research and Development Institute
     University of South Alabama
     Mobile, Alabama 36688

12)  Neal Armstrong
     University of Texas
     University Station Box X
     Austin, Texas  78713

13)* Dr. Robert Jones,
     Director, Marine Science Institute
     University of Texas
     P.O. Box 1267
     Port Aransas, Texas 78373

14)* Dr. Henry Hildebrand
     Department of Biology
     Texas A&I University
     Kingsville, Texas  78363

15)  Sammy M. Ray
     Department of Marine Biology
     Texas A&M University
     P.O. Box  1675
     Galveston, Texas 77553

16)* Dr. Robert Reid
     Department of Oceanography
     Texas  A&M University
     College Station, Texas  77843

17)  BobNailon
     Texas  A&M University
     Seagrant Program
     P.O. Box 699
     Anahuac, Texas 77514
                                       18

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-------
                                                   r- ..^^"^^".faT"""-"• ^"'^^lFS#w^\/.'  'Wv**T!d


                                 Exhibit 9.-Lqcat|on of Coastline Segment Areas

                                         " "DaTaof Located on Major Streams th
 jftr*M«»;' F    J.JT   . ""    L      Mf**"           ^^VXl 11 wj I I ^^ •  fc«^^^^l** «• *^ • • *^ • ^^ ^*»«i»* •» • • • ^^ ^^ '^ ^y • - - -^ --— —  —

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  _,-:95J_^,-.
                                                     Explanation:


                                                  7  Location and gage number for long-term


                                                     Location for non long-term streamflow-g?


                                                 2)  Segment number for Gulf of Mexico


                                                     Boundary for segment


                                                     Note: Long-term gaging stations represent active
                                                         streams with at least 200 square miles of (
                                            —L.

                                            94'
                                                       93 °
                                                                            91'

-------

-------
            N

       %j
      Q**?'


                                                                 B
Exhibit 9.--Location of Coastline Segment Areas
         - Data or Located on Major Streams the
 <: TOMM ,
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Explanation:
• 7 Location and gage number for long-term i
• Location for non long-term streamflow-ga
(2) Segment number for Gulf of Mexico
^^ Boundary for segment
Note: Long-term gaging stations represent active
streams with at least 200 square miles of dt
":•:••'•• i ' ":\',; 	 '. ;:.",•;" .;;-' 	 :~ ""'?"'•' - 	 •;"".".! 	 --'••'-' ". ,": 	 •> 	 ;.-: 	 .• "
. -, 94° ' - "" " " 93' : • ' ' -": 9Zk • ' 91°. ' '.'


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        it

        c
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Stream!low-Gaging Stations either with Long-Term
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h at least 40 years of record. Major streams represent those identified

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ation on major stream
 at least 40 years of record. Major streams represent those identified

-------
                             Exhibit 2.—(continued)

                               STATE AGENCIES

 18)* Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources
     Marine Resource Division
     P.O. Box 189
     Dauphin Island, Alabama 36528

 19)* JohnCarlton
     Alabama Department of Environmental Management
     2204 Perimeter Road
     Mobile, Alabama 36615

20)* Randy Armstrong (Gary Schaeffer, alternate)
     Florida Department of Environmental Regulation
     Twin Towers Office Building
     2600 Blair Stone Road
     Tallahassee, Florida  32399-2400

21)  Dr. Ernest D. Estevez, Ph. D.
     Senior Scientist
     Mote Marine Laboratory
     1600 City Island Park
     Sarasota, Florida 34236

22)  Rich McWilliams
     Northwest Florida Water Management District
     Rt. 1, Box 3100
     Havana, Florida 32333

23)* Richard M. Eckenrod, P.E.
     Southwest Florida Water Management District
     Engineer, Surface Water Improvement and
     Management (SWIM) Department
     7601 Highway 301 North
     Tampa, Florida  33637

24)* David Oge
     Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality
     Water Pollution Control Division
     P.O. Box 44091
     Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70804

25)* David Chambers (Peter Hawxhurst, alternate)
     Coastal Restoration Division
     Louisiana Department of Natural Resources
     P.O. Box 94396
     Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70804-9396
                                      19

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                              Exhibit 2.--(continued)

26)* Barney Barrett
     Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries
     2000 Quail Drive
     Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70808

27)* Jim Morris
     Mississippi Bureau of Pollution Control
     P.O. Box 10385
     Jackson, Mississippi 39209

28)* Fred Deegen
     Mississippi Department of Wildlife Conservation
     Bureau of Marine Resources
     2620 West Beach Boulevard
     Biloxi, Mississippi 39531

29)  Mr. Charles Branch
     Bureau of Land and Water Resources
     Department of Environmental Quality
     P.O. Box 10631
     Jackson, Mississippi 39289-0631

30)  Dr. Charles Eleuterius
     Gulf Coast Research Lab
     P.O. Box 7000
     Ocean Springs, MS 39564-7000

31)* Charles D. Thomas
     Executive Director
     Angelina & Neches River Authority
     P.O. Box 387
     Lufkin, Texas 75901

32)  Dr. Quenton R. Dokken
     Executive Director
     Texas State Aquarium
     P.O. Box 331307
     Corpus Christi, Texas 78463

33)* Carson Hoge
     General Manager
     Brazos River Authority
     P.O. Box 7555
     Waco, Texas 76714-7555

34)* Jerry Wermund
     Bureau of Economic Geology
     University Station Box X
     Austin, Texas 78713
                                       20

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                              Exhibit 2.~(continued)
 35)  Ms. Deyaun Boudreaux
      Texas Environmental Coalition
      P.O. Box 2859
      South Padre Island, Texas 78597

 36)* Bruce Smith
      General Land Office
      Stephen F. Austin Building
      Austin, Texas  78713

 37)* JohnSpecht
      General Manager
      Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority
      P.O. Box 271
      Seguin, Texas  78156-0271

 38)* EmmettGloyna
      General Manager
      Lavaca-Navidad River Authority
      P.O. Box 429
      Edna, Texas 77957

 39)*  S. D. Freeman
      General Manager
      Lower Colorado River Authority
      P.O. Box 220
      Austin, Texas 78767

 40)* A. T. Herbert, Jr.
     General Manager
     Lower Neches Valley Authority
     P.O. Box 3464
     Beaumont, Texas 77704

 41)  Ms. Mary Lou Campbell
     Conservation Chair
     Lower Rio Grande Valley Group
     Lone Star Chapter Sierra Club
     P.O. Box 2189
     South Padre Island, Texas  78597

42)  Con Mims, III
     Executive Director
     Nueces River Authority
     P.O. Box 349
     Uvalde, Texas 78802-0349
                                      21

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                            , Exhibit 2.—(continued)
43)* Larry McKinney
     Texas Parks & Wildlife Department
     4200 Smith School Road
     Austin, Texas 78744

44)* Sam Collins
     General Manager
     Sabine River Authority
     P.O. Box 579
     Orange, Texas 77630

45)* Fred N. Pfeiffer
     General Manager
     San Antonio River Authority
     100 East Guenther Street
     P.O. Box 9284, Guilbeau Station
     San Antonio, Texas 78204

46)* Jack K. Ayer
     General Manager
     San Jacinto River Authority
     P.O. Box 329
     Conroe, Texas 77305

47)* Danny F. Vance
     General Manager
     Trinity River  Authority
     P.O. Box 60
     Arlington, Texas  76010

48)* David A. Brock
     Texas Water Development Board
     P.O. Box 13231, Capitol Station
     Austin, Texas 78711-3231
                             FEDERAL AGENCIES
49)* Susan Ivester Rees
     U.S. Army Engineers District Mobile
     P.O. Box 228
     Mobile, Alabama 36628-001

50)* John Weber
     U.S. Army Engineer District New Orleans
     P.O. Box 60297
     New Orleans, Louisiana 70160-0267
                                       22

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                              Exhibit 2.—(continued)
 51)  Division Engineer
      U.S. Army Engineer Division,
      Lower Mississippi Valley
      Walnut and Crawford Streets
      P.O. Box 80
      Vicksburg, Mississippi  39180

 52)* Suzanne Sofia
      U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
      CESAJ-EN-HW
      P.O. Box 4970
      Jacksonville, Florida 32232-0019

 53)* U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
      Southwestern Division
      Attention: CESWD-ZA
      1114 Commerce Street
      Dallas, Texas 75242-0216

 54)* Bureau of Reclamation
      714 S. Tyler St.
      Suite 201
      Amarillo, Texas  79101-2386

 55)   Mr.  Bruce Elliott
      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
      Water Management Division
      Water Quality Management Branch
      Mail Code 6W-Q
      1445 Ross Avenue
      Dallas, Texas  75202

 56)  Mr. Tom Cavinder
     U.S.  Environmental Protection Agency
     College Station Road
     Athens, Georgia  30613-7799

 57)* Federal Emergency Management Region VI
     Federal Center
     800 N. Loop 288
     Denton, Texas 76201

58)  Larry Goldman
     U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
     P.O. Drawer 1190
     Daphne, Alabama  36526
                                      23

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                             Exhibit 2.~(continued)
59)  David Gruge
     U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
     825 Kaliste Saloom Road, II Suite 102
     Lafayette, Louisiana 770531

60)* U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
     Regional Director, Region 2
     P.O. Box 1306
     Albuquerque, New Mexico 87103

61)* U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
     Regional Director, Region 4
     75 Spring Street
     Atlanta, Georgia

62)* Raymond Slade, Jr.
     U.S. Geological Survey
     Water Resources Division
     8011 Cameron Road
     Austin, Texas 78753-6716

63)  Minerals Management Service
     Box 418, CCSU
     6300 Ocean Drive
     Corpus Christi, Texas 78412

64)* Minerals Management Service
     Box 418, CCSU
     Gulf of Mexico DCS Region
     1201 Elmwood Park Boulevard
     New Orleans, Louisiana 70123-2394

65)* Mr. Andrew Robertson
     NOAA
     Room 652, N/OMA3
     11400 Rockville Pike
     Rockville, Maryland 20852 .

66)  Regional Director, Southeast Region
     National Park Service
     75 Spring Street, SW
     Atlanta, Georgia 30303

67)  Regional Director, Southwest Region
     National Park Service
     Old Santa Fe Trail
     P.O. Box 728
     Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501
                                       24

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                              Exhibit 2.—(continued)
68)  National Weather Service
     River Forecast Center
     830 NE Loop 410
     North Crown Building, Suite 300
     San Antonio, Texas 78209

69)* L. Pete Heard
     State Conservationist
     Soil Conservation Service
     100 W. Capitol Street, Suite 1321
     Jackson, Mississippi 39269

70)  Mr. Gary Westmoreland
     Department of Agriculture
     Soil Conservation Service
     101 South Main
     Temple, Texas 76501-7682
                          INTERNATIONAL AGENCIES

71)* International Boundary and Water Commission
     Headquarters Office
     The Commons, Building C, Suite 310
     4171 N. Mesa
     El Paso, Texas  79902
                                      25

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Exhibit ^.-Summary of responses to selected questions, by types of agencies

agencies Texas Louisiana Mississippi Alabama Florida
GEMEPAL QUESTIONS
AGENCIES MONITORING 154 2 2 2 1
SALINITY OF GULF
AGENCIES MONITORING 004 00 0 1
FLOW OF FRESHWATERS
AGENCIES RESPONSIBLE 0041001
FOR REGULATIONS
DATA ON SALINITY OF BAYS AND ESTUARIES
SAUNITYSITES 54 1.207 608 150 127 84 100
AVERAGE PERIOD OF 18 14 13 27 4 9 10
RECORD (YEARS)
SALINITY MEASUREMENTS 12 156 142 249 3 5 6
(THOUSANDS)
AGENCIES WITH DATA 1222221
STORED IN COMPUTER
AGENCIES WITH REPORTS 133 2 2 1,1
STREAM^ OW AND DIVERSION-FLOW DATA
DAILY-FLOW SITES 004 0 0 00
AVERAGE PERIOD OF 45 -
RECORD (YEARS)
PARTIAL-RECORD SITES 000 0 0 0 20
AVERAGE PERIOD OF ... - - -'1
RECORD (YEARS)
AGENCIES WITH DATA 0010000
STORED IN COMPUTER
'AGENCIES WITH REPORTS 002 o o 01
Federal International
agencies agencies
3 0
3 1
2 1
96 0
14
473 0
1 0
1 0
1.198 12
20 38
2 1
6 20
2 1
1 1
                                26

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            Exhibit ^.-Summary of responses to selected questions from the questionnaire

[No., questionnaire number from exhibit 2; N. no; Y, yes; -, no response.  Responses to all questions
with yes/no or numerical answers are included in this table. Responses to questions with narrative
answers are not included]
	 _ 	 Question number

A
No.
2 N
3 Y
4 Y
5 Y
6 N
7 Y
8 Y
9 Y
11 N
13 Y
14 Y
16 Y
18 Y
19 Y
20 Y
23 Y
24 Y
25 Y
26 Y
27 Y
28 Y
31 N
33 N
34 N
36 N
37 Y
38 N
39 N
40 Y
43 Y
44 Y
45. N
46 N
47 Y
48 Y
49 Y
50 Y
52 Y
53 Y
54 N
57 N
60 Y
61 N
62 N
64 Y
65 N
69 N
71 N
|
B
Y
N
N
N
N
N
Y
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
N
Y
N
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
N
N
Y

C
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
Y
N
N
Y
N
N
Y
N
N
N
N
N
Y
N
Y
Y
N
N
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
Y

A
Y
Y
N
Y
N
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
N
N
N
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
N
N
N


1
54
1,000
1
50
153
3
60
24
100
25
125
5
122
11
350
7
240
72
10
13


3
18
17
1
2
2
7
9
8
10
12
30
10
4
8
12
3
15
18
1
3
11
A
5
216
20
4,320
29
18
84
45
96
600
144
1,960
60
24
5,000
144
20
150
6.570
3
22


7
Y
N
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
N
Y
N
Y
N
N


9
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
N
N
Y
N
III
A
aba b a b
N — — — — — —
N - — _ _ _ ' _ '
N — — ~ — —
N — —
•N ---___
N
N
N —
N -----
Y - - - - 20 1
N - -
N - - - -
N — —
N --____
N - -
N ______
N - - - -
N - — - - -
Y 1 7
Y o - - - -
Y 2 60 - - - _
N - -
y
Y 1
N -
Y - - -
Y 3 50 - - 300
N - - - -
N -
N — - - — -
Y - - - - 2 6
Y 1.196 20
Y 12 38 1 20

C
N
N
Y
N
N
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y

E
Y
N
Y
Y
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
Y
Y
IV
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
                                          27

-------
Exhibit ^.-Identified major streams that discharge directly into the Gulf of Mexico and periods of record for daily
                 values of strearrrfbw and water quality in the lower reaches of those streams
                          (Stream locations are shown in exhibit 9; (~), daily-values data not collected]
Stream name (State)


Drainage 	
area Streamflow
(square .
miles)
Period of record and number
Dissolved Sediment
solids



of years of data tori
Dissolved pH
oxygen

Water
temperature

RIO GRANDE (Texas)
SAN FERNANDO CREEK (Texas)
NUECES RIVER (Texas)
ARANSAS RIVER (Texas)
MISSION RIVER (Texas)
SAN ANTONIO RIVER (Texas)
GUADALUPE RIVER (Texas)
LAVACA RIVER (Texas)
           RVVER (Texas)
SAN BERNARD RIVER (Texas)
BRAZOS DRIVER (Texas
BUFFALO BAYOU (Texas)
TRINITY RIVER (Texas)
PINE ISLAND BAYOU (Texas)
VILLAGE CREEK (Texas)'
NECHES RIVER (Texas)
SABINE RIVER (Texas)
CALCASIEU RIVER (Louisiana)

BAYOU NEZPIQUE (Louisiana)
VERMILION RIVER (Louisiana)
ATCHAFALAYA RIVER (Louisiana)
MISSISSIPPI RIVER (Louisiana
AMITE RIVER (Louisiana)
TANGIPAHOA RIVER (Louisiana)
BOGUECHITTO (Louisiana)
PEARL RIVER (Mississippi)
WOLF RIVER (Mississippi)

RED CREEK (Mississippi)
BLACK CREEK (Mississippi)
PASCAGOULA RIVER (Mfesissippi)
TOMBIGBEE RIVER (Alabama)
ALABAMA RIVER (Alabama)
PEROIDO RIVER (Alabama)
ESCAMBIA RIVER (Florida)
BIG COLDWATER (Florida)
BLACKWATER RIVER (Florida)
   335,500
      507
    16.660
      247
      690
     3,921
     5,198
      817
    42.240

      727
    45.007
      317
    17.186
      336
      860
     7.951
     9.329
     1.700

      527
UNKNOWN
    87.570
  1.129.810
     1.280
      646
     1.213
     6,573
      308

      441
      701
     6.590
     18.417
     22.000
      394
     3,817
      237
      205
 YELLOW RIVER (Florida)                 624
 SHOAL RIVER (Florida)                  474
 CHOCTAWHATCHEE RIVER (Florida)     4.384
 CHIPOLA RIVER (Florida)                781
 APALACHICOLA RIVER (Florida)        17.200
 OCHLOCKONEE RIVER (Florida)         1,700
 SAINT MARKS RIVER (Florida)            535
 AUCILLA RIVER (Florida)                 747
 STEINHATCHEE RIVER (Florida)          350

 SUWANNEE RIVER (Florida)            9.640
 WACCASASSA RIVER (Florida)           480
 WITHLACOOCHEE RIVER (Florida)       2,020
 HILLSBOROUGH RIVER (Florida)          650
 ALAFIA RIVER (Florida)                  335
 MYAKKA RIVER (Florida)                229
 HORSE CREEK (Florida)                 218
 PEACE RIVER (Florida)                  1.367
CALOOSAHATCHEE RIVER (Florida) UNKNOWN
1934-88 (55)
1965-88 (24)
1940-88 (49)
1965-88 (24)
1940-88 (49)
1925-88 (53)
1936*8(53)
1939-88 (50)
1939*8(50)

1955-88 (34)
1904*8(68)
1964-88(17)
1925-88 (64)
1968-88 (21)
1925-88(51)
1905-88 (69)
1925-88 (64)
1923-88 (52)

1939-88 (50)
1968-88 (21)
1935-88 (54)
1934-88 (55)
1939*8(50)
1939*8 (50)
1938-88(51)
1939-88 (50)
1972*8 (17)

1959*8(30)
1972*8(17)
1931-88 (58)
1929-88 (60)
1931-88 (58)
1942-88 (47)
1935-88 (54)
1938-88 (49)
1951-88(38)

1939*8(50)
1939*8(50)
1931*8 (58)
 1922-88 (53)
 1929*8(60)
 1927*8 (62)
 1957-88 (30)
 1950*8(39)
 1951-88 (38)

 1942*8 (47)
 1964*8(18)
 1970*8(19)
 1939*8(50)
 1933*8(56)
 1937*8(52)
 1951*8 (38)
 1932*8 (57)
 1967*8(22)
                                                      1966-88(19)   1966-83(18)
                                                              -           "
                                                      1942-88(47)   1950-51(2)
                                                     1962-81(20)
                                                     1960-88(29)
                                                     1966-83(18)
                                                     1978-81(4)
                                                     1945-88(44)

                                                     1978-81 ( 4)
                                                     1942-88(47)
                                                     1979*8(6)
                                                     1942-88(43)
                                                     1968-81(14)
                                                     1968-70(3)
                                                     1948-88(41)
                                                     1946-88(42
                                                     1968-87(12)
1958-82 (20)
1952-81 (16)
1950-88 (39)
1968-81 (12)
1963-83 ( 6)
1975-82 ( 8)
1963-85(13)
1978*1 ( 4)

1985-86 ( 2)

1970-81 (12)
1966-88 (21)
1966-87(17)
1979*1 (3)
                                                       1965-72(8)

                                                       1964-83(18)
                                                       1965-72(8)
                                                       1963-79(17)
                                                       1965-72(8)

                                                       1979-81(3)
                                                       1979*2(4)

                                                       1966-77(12)

                                                       1950-83(23)
                                                       1965-82(11)
                                                       1958*6(22)
                                                       1963*1(6)
                                                       1965*7(3
                                                       1962-81(20)
                                                       1965*2(17)
                                                                  1957-73(17)
                                            -   1967-83(11)

                                            -   1948-88(33)

                                            -   1961-81 (21)
                                            -   1959-88 (30)
                                            -   1967-83(17)
                                            -   1978-81 ( 4)
                                            -   1948-88 (36)
                                                                  1966-86(21)

                                                                  1955-71(4)
                        1986-88 (3)
                        1975-88(14)
                                                                              1968-75 ( 8)
                                                                               1968-77(5)
1975-88 (14)
                                    1968-75 ( 8)
                                    1968-77 ( 5)
                                                                           -  1971*2(12)  1976-82 ( 7)
                                                                  1950-75(26)  1967-88(22)  1968-88(21)
                                                                  1967*7(21)  1975-85(11)   1975-85(11)
1978-81 ( 4)
1951*8(35)
1979-88 ( 6)
1950-88 (35)
1968-88(21)
1968-70 ( 3)
1948*8(30)
1948-88 (34)
1968-87 (12)
                                                                                                      1949-82 (25)
                                                                                                      1953-84(12)
                                                                                                      1954-88 (33)
                                                                                                      1968-81(11)
                                                                                                      1963-83 ( 6)
                                                                                                      1975-82 ( 8)
                                                                                                      1963-85 (13)
                                                                                                      1978-81 ( 4)
                                                                                                   -   1985-86 ( 2)

                                                                                                   -   1958-81 (13)
                                                                                                   -   1963-88 (26)
                                                                                                   -   1966-87(17)
                                                                                                   -   1979-81 ( 3)

                                                                                                   -   1960-60 ( 1)
                                                                                                   -   1961-69 ( 3)

                                                                                                   -   1965-72 ( 8)
                                                                               1974-79(6)  1974-78(5)
                                                                                       -  1965-72 ( 8)
                                                                        1965-83(17)
                                                                        1965-72 ( 8)
                                                                        1965-79 (14)
                                                                        1965-72 ( 8)
                                                                                                   -   1979-81 ( 3)
                                                                                                   -   1979-82 ( 4)
                                                                                                   -   1965-77(13)
                                                                                       -   1950-50 ( 1)

                                                                                       -   1964-70 ( 5)
                                                                                       -   1962-70 ( 7)
                                                                         1950-83(21)
                                                                         1965-82(11)
                                                                         1958*6(21)
                                                                         1963*t( 7)
                                                                         1965*7 ( 3)
                                                                         1962-81 (20)
                                                                         1964-83 (20)
                                                      28

-------
                 Exhibit Q.-Drainage areas and gaged drainage areas of streams
                            that discharge directly into the Gulf of Mexico
            AREA DESCRIPTION

           1. Area of the 48 contiguous States
           2. Drainage area to the Gulf along United States coastline,
             including the Rio Grande
           3. Drainage area to the Gulf from the Rio Grande
           4. Drainage area to the Rio Grande from the United States
           5. Drainage area to the Rio Grande from Mexico
           6. Drainage area for the 54 identified major streams that discharge
             to the Gulf
           7. Drainage area for the 44 identified long-term streamflow-gaging
             stations
                                      SQUARE Mil PS

                                          3,022,260

                                          1,901,499
                                           335,500
                                           133,000
                                           202,500

                                          1,811,656

                                          1,804,151
                              DRAINAGE AREAS ALONG STATE COASTLINES
                                AND PERCENTAGES OF TOTAL DRAINAGE
   STATE     TOTAL DRAINAGE
              TO GULF ALONG
             STATE'S BORDER
DRAINAGE FOR IDENTIFIED
    MAJOR STREAMS
DRAINAGE FOR IDENTIFIED
LONG-TERM STREAMFLOW
          GAGES
TEXAS
LOUISIANA
MISSISSIPPI
ALABAMA
FLORIDA
TOTALS
518,650
1,250,249
20,830
44,650
67.120
1,901,499
487,493
1.222,746
14.613
40,811
45,993
1.811,656
94
98
70
91
69
95
485,540
1,9?? 97?
13,163
40,811
41,664
1,804,151
iDBfcann
94
98
63
91
62
95
Note: Three rivers join the Gulf along boundaries between the above States. For purposes of this study, the Sabine River is
assumed to be in Texas, the Pearl River in Mississippi, and the Perdido River In Alabama.

Drainage areas for stream gages are taken from U.S. Geological Survey computer files for individual gages. Other drainage
areas used throughout this report are aggregated from a computer file of hydrotogic unit codes, descriptions, names and
drainage areas maintained by the U.S. Geological Survey. The file is published in: Seaber, P.R., Kapinos, F P  and Knapp
G.L. 1987, Hydrotogic unit maps: U.S. Geological Survey Water Supply Paper 2294,63 p.
                                              29

-------
         Exhibit 7.-Selected characteristics of the U.S. Geological Survey data base for
          daily values of streamflow and dissolved solids for streamflow-gaging statbns
                          located within 200 miles of the Gulfiof Mexico
                                         [DIS., dissolved]
State
TEXAS
LOUISIANA
MISSISSIPPI
ALABAMA
FLORIDA
TEXAS
LOUISIANA
MISSISSIPPI
ALABAMA
FLORIDA
Gaged
constutuent
STREAMFLOW
STREAMFLOW
STREAMFLOW
STREAMFLOW
STREAMFLOW
DIS. SOLIDS
DIS. SOLIDS
DIS. SOLIDS
DIS. SOLIDS
DIS. SOLIDS
Number
of
sites
395
205
93
284
219
77
68
30
70
60

Years
of data
24
19
24
15
17
15
9
4
5
9
Mean value for:
Beginning
year
1956
1957
1950
1955
1964
1968
1969
1975
1977
1969

Ending
year
1981
1979
1975
1973
1982
1982
1977
1978
1982
1977
Maximum
years of
record
92
59
69
70
67
46
56
15
33
33
Minimum
years of
record
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Note' Within about 200 mites of the Gulf, daily values of streamflow exist for 1,196 gages, and daily values for salinity of
streamftow exist for 305 gages in the U.S. Geological Survey data base. Gages for the quantity and quality of streamflow
are numbered in downstream order by the U.S. Geological Survey. The gage numbers included in this summary, by States,
are as follows:
state

Texas

Louisiana
Mississippi
Alabama
Florida
Ranoe of oaqe numbers

08020000-08042500; 08064000-08078000; 08096500-08118000; 08150000-08212000; and
0845100006555555
All gages
02441000-02999999; 07285500-07999999
02000000-02999999
02291000-02310290; 02310900-02313265; 02313700-02370000
                                              30

-------
                  Exhibit ^.-Selected characteristics of data bases for salinity data
                                         in bays and estuaries

[This information identifies generally the major long-term data-collection program for each agency. Specific information is
available on the questionnaires or through individuals referenced on each questionnaire as proprietors for the data Agency
numbers are identified in exhibit 2]
State
Texas
Texas
Texas
Texas
Texas
Texas
Texas
Texas
Texas
Louisiana
Louisiana
Louisiana
Mississippi
Mississippi
Alabama

Alabama
Alabama
Florida
Florida
Florida
Agency
number
' 7
9
13
16
40
43
47
48
S3
24
26
50
27
28
4

18
19
3
20
52
Total
number
of sites
1
50
153
3
11
350
7
240
13
25
125
72
5
122
1,000

60
24
54
100
10
Average
years of
record
1
2
2
7
8
12
3
15
3
12
30
18
10
4
17

9
8
18
10
1
Maximum
years of
record
1
3
6
7
8
15
4
20
3
19
30
57
14
10
18

9
16
18
10
1
Total
number of
measurements
8,760
305
126,000
252
55.000
50,400
140
36,000
286
3,600
245,500
473,000
300 .
2.930
20,400

2.700
2,300
11,700
6,000
200
Summary of
data-collection
frequency
Hourly
Bimonthly-15 sites;
once only-35 sites
Hourly-7 sites;
monthly-146 sites
Monthly
Semidaily
Monthly
Bimonthly
Monthly
Monthly and
bimonthly
Monthly
Daily-25 sites; 30
per year-100 sites
Daily
Bimonthly
Bimonthly
Monthly,
100 sites per year
Monthly, 20-30
sites per year
Monthly
Monthly
Bimonthly
Daily
                                                31

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Exhibit IQ.-Selected characteristics for long-term streamflow -gaging stations on streams discharging
                                directly into the Gulf of Mexico
                             [Gage locations are shown in exhibit 9]
Gage
num-
ber
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26

27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
uses
gage
number
08475000
08211000
08189500
08188500
08176500
08164000
08162500
08114000
08075000
08074500
08066500
08041500
08041000
08030500
08015500
08012000
08010000
07381490
07374000
07378500
07375500
07375000
02492000
02489500
02479000
02469761

02429500
02376500
02375500
02368000
02369000
02366500
02359500
02359000
02358000
02330000
02324500
02323500
02310000
02304500
02301500
02300500
02298830
02296750
Stream name and location
RIO GRANDE NEAR BROWNSVILLE, TEXAS
NUECES RIVER NEAR MATffiS, TEXAS
MISSION RIVER AT REFUGIO. TEXAS
SAN ANTONIO RIVER AT GOLIAD. TEXAS
GUADALUPE RIVER AT VICTORIA, TEXAS
LAVACA RIVER NEAR EDNA, TEXAS
COLORADO RIVER NEAR BAY CITY, TEXAS
BRAZOS RIVER AT RICHMOND, TEXAS
BRAYS BAYOU AT HOUSTON, TEXAS
WHTTEOAK BAYOU AT HOUSTON. TEXAS
TRINITY RIVER AT ROMAYOR, TEXAS
VILLAGE CREEK NEAR KOUNTZE, TEXAS
NECHES RIVER AT EVADALE, TEXAS
SABINE RIVER NEAR RULIEF. TEXAS
CALCASIEU RIVER NEAR KINDER, LOUISIANA
BAYOU NEZPIQUE NEAR BASILE, LOUISIANA
BAYOU DBS CANNES NEAR EUNICE, LOUISIANA
ATCHAFALAYA RIVER AT SIMMESPORT, LOUISIANA
MISSISSIPPI RIVER AT BATON ROUGE. LOUISIANA
AMITE RIVER NEAR DENHAM SPRINGS, LOUISIANA
TANGIPAHOA RIVER AT ROBERT. LOUISIANA
TCHEFUNCTA RIVER NEAR FOLSOM. LOUISIANA
BOGUE CfflTTO NEAR BUSH, LOUISIANA
PEARL RIVER NEAR BOGALUSA. LOUISIANA
PASCAGOULA RIVER AT MERRILL, MISSISSIPPI
TOMBIGBEE RIVER AT COFFEEVIT.I.R L&D NEAR
COFFEEVDLLE, ALABAMA
ALABAMA RIVER AT CLAfflORNE, ALABAMA
PERDIDO RIVER AT BARRINEAU PARK. FLORIDA
ESCAMBIA RIVER NEAR CENTURY, FLORIDA
YELLOW RIVER AT MILLIGAN, FLORIDA
SHOAL RIVER NEAR CRESTVIEW, FLORIDA
CHOCTAWHATCHEE RIVER NEAR BRUCE, FLORIDA
ECONFINA CREEK NEAR BENNETT, FLORIDA
CHIPOLA RIVER NEAR ALTHA, FLORIDA
APALACfflCOLA RIVER AT CHATTAHOOCHEE, FLORIDA
OCHLOCKONEE RIVER NEAR BLOXHAM, FLORIDA
FENHOLLOWAY RIVER AT FOLEY. FLORIDA
SUWANNEE RIVER NEAR WILCOX, FLORIDA
ANCLOTE RIVER NEAR ELFERS. FLORIDA
HILLSBOROUGH RIVER NEAR TAMPA, FLORIDA
ALAFIA RIVER AT LTTHIA, FLORIDA
LITTLE MANATEE RIVER NEAR WIMAUMA, FLORIDA
MYAKKA RIVER NEAR SARASOTA. FLORIDA
PEACE RIVER AT ARCADIA, FLORIDA
Latitude
25°5Z35"
28°02'17"
28°1T30"
28038158"
28°4T34"
28°57'35'
28°58'26"
29°34'56"
29°41'49"
29°46'30"
30°25'30"
30°23'52"
30°21'20" .
30°18'13"
so^ono-
30a2S5Q"
30P29QQ"
30°58'57"
30°29'29"
30°2T50"
30°3QT23"
30°36'57"
30°3T45"
30°4T35"
30°58'40"
3l°45-30"

31°32'48"
30°41'25"
30°5T54"
30°45'10"
30°41'50"
30°2T03"
sensor
30°32'02"
30°42'03"
30°23'10"
30°03'55"
29°3522"
28°12'50"
28°01'25"
27°Sri9"
27°40ri5"
27°14'25"
27°13'19"
Longitude
97°2T15"
97°51'36"
97°16'44"
97°23'04"
97°00r46"
96°41'10"
96000144"
95°45127"
95°24'43"
95°23'49H
94°51'02"
94°15'48"
94°05'35"
93044-37--
92°54'55"
92°3T55 "
92°29'2S"
91°4T54"
' 91°11'50"
9CP5925"
90°21'42"
90°14'55"
89°53'50"
89049115"
88°43'35"
88°OT45"

87030I45"
yi°26'2S"
87°14'03"
86°3T45"
86°34'15"
85°53'54"
85033-24-
85009155"
84°51'33"
84°38'59"
83°34'29"
82°56'12*
82°40fOO"
82°25140"
82°12'4r
82°21'10"
82°1S"50"
81°52'34"
Years Drainage
Period of record of area
record (square miles)
1934-88
1940-88
1940-88
1925-28, 40-88
1936-88
1939-88
1939-88
1904-05, 23-88
1937-88
1937-88
. 1925-88
1925-27, 40-88
1905-06, 22-88
1925-88
1923-24, 39-88
1939-88
1939-88
1935-88
1934-88
1939-88
1939-88
1943-88
1938-88
1939-88
1931-88
1929-88

1931-88
1942-88
1935-88
1939-88
1939-88
1931-88
1936-88
1922-27.30-31,44-88
1929-88
1927-88
1947-88
1942-88
1947-88
1939-88
1933-88
1940-88
1937-88
1932-88
55
49
49
53
53
50
50
68
52
52
64
51
69
64
52
50
50
54
55
50
50
46
51
50
58
60

58
47
54
SO
50
58
53
53
60
62
42
47
42
50
56
49
52
57
335,500
16,660
690
3,921
5,198
817
42,240
45,007
95
86
17,186
860
7,951
9.329
1,700
527
131
' 87^70
1.129,810
1,280
646
96
1,213
6,573
6,590
18,417

22,000
394
3,817
624
474
4,384
122
781
17,200
1,700
120
9,640
72
650
335
149
229
1.367
                                             32

-------
    Exhibit 1 \.--Annual-mean streamftow for long-term streamftow-gaging stations in Texas  1947-86
          [Gage locations are shown in exhibit 9. Amounts shown are in cubic feet per second]
                                          Gage number
 Year
                                                      9   10
                                                           11
                                                           12
                                                            13
                                                             14
 1947
 1948
 1949
 1950
 1951
 1952
 1953
 1954
 1955
 1956

 1957
 1958
 1959
 1960
 1961
 1962
 1963
 1964
 1965
 1966

 1967
 1968
 1969
 1970
 1971
 1972
1973
 1974
1975
1976
 2,480
 2,244
 3,895
 1,368
 1,008
  423
  525
  541
  158
   53

   88
  123
 8,280
  505
  606
  367
  172
  132
  161
 1,137

 4,284
 2,855
  383
  245
 1,216
3,814
2,539
 1,482
3,494
3,333
 1,273 131.
   148   9
 1,225  33
   340   4
   583  38
   244  98
   741   42
   465  19
   135   7
   184   8

 1,962 105
 1,538 146
  829  56
  602   87
  847  198
  111   42
  109   11
  104   14
  787   46
  452  126
      966  2,203
      312   702
      557  1,204
      364  1,061
      306   542
      456   819
      353  1,074
      143   548
      169   374
       98   132

      974 1,973
      974 3,541
      597 1,580
      429 1,764
      994 3,865
      374   914
            565
            568
196
289
      676 1,812
      383 1,551
2,167
1,232
  136
  718
2,139
1,780
  714
1,244
  552
  550
531 1,165
2031,141
 83  538
 80  507
371  354
233  995
2471,505
2791,385
 301,149
190  837
    1,225
    2,921
    1,817
    1,797
      860
    2,410
    2,667
    2,844
    3,506
    2,199
            346 3,090
            157 1,246
            146 1,599
            126 2,119
             47   700
            162   616
            163 1,273
             23   651
            140 1,014
              6   840
 244
 514
 306
 278
 966
 234
 63
 74
 349
 280
5,980
6,200
2,491
4,827
5,743
1,525
  705
  375
2,051
2,081
178   544
516  4,900
440  2,000
289  3,523
221   929
493  1,808
856  2,641
564  3,088
412  5,862
209  1,785
  8,765
  2,687
  4,645
  5,783
  1,418
  1,820
  4,105
  2,727
  2,168
  2,158

 15,288
 11,865
  4,450
  8,869
 16,125
  4,508
  2,759
  1,715
 10,263
  8,791

  1,866
 13,227
 8,219
 6,459
 1,679
 4,374
 9,283
 7,877
13,957
 5,816
 131 114
  47  25
  67  45
 170 129
  17  11
  23  18
  78  57
  44  39
  40  22
  23  13

  51  37
  81  70
 114  90
 138  87
 176 167
  71  55
  96  48
  65  38
  50  28
 146  78

  55  26
 152  75
 120  70
 140  69
 145 71
 146 84
283 178
 186 129
202 142
168 98
  9,681
  6,167
  5,566
 11,075
  2,387
  2,779
  5,511
  1,694
  2,935
  1,211

 12,689
 11,695
  4,909
  6,621
 10,442
  4,469
  3,495
  1,612
  7,333
  8,946

  1,771
 11,519
 10,387
 4,657
   730
 5,377
11,295
 9,970
14,661
 5,317
 1,274
  448
  769
 2,248
  265
  492
 1,058
  309
  402
  258

  458
  967
  447
  524
 1,561
  531
  339
  518
  220
  708

  256
  517
  788
  301
  190
  833
1,790
1,529
1,685
  771
 10,000
  4,802
  5,030
 11,371
  2,042
  3.718
  8,177
  2.114
  3,149
  1,608

  4,607
  8,465
  5,162
  4,728
 10,409
  5,174
  2,153
  2,603
  1.659
  3,354

  1.612
  5,126
 9,378
 2,362
  1,128
 2,461
 9,634
10,396
 9,905
 4,432
 11,783
  8,193
  8,636
 15,944
  4,374
  6,415
 12,335
  4,097
  5,574
  3,421

  9,645
 12,294
  6,723
  6,545
 12,410
  7,500
  2,831
  3,250
  4,081
  7,553

  1,959
 4,560
12,324
 4,132
 2,635
 6,465
13,342
12,099
14,205
 5,941
1977 3,291
1978 381
1979 4,299
1980 378
1981 2,171
1982 1,103
1983 400
1984 246
1985 262
1986 193
Mean 1,516
1,455
307
499
771
1,268
479
146
145
376
395
744
2351,672
78 826
1351,356
118 552
2791,084
241 649
109 470
110 287
77 647
21 740
122 687
3,937
1,461
3,460
1,020
3,028
1,814
1,124
479
1,600
1,827
1,720
573
329
766
175
473
556
409
128
357
195
319
3,974
866
3,056
936
3,012
2,400
1,623
658
1,892
1,896
2,313
10,741
1,893
11,487
4,307
5,053
7,829
5,462
1,403
6,540
8,379
6,419
177 109
150 91
325 161
180 98
220 145
186 95
346 212
173 89
244 156
239 158
137 86
7,977
2,472
9,968
5,611
4,393
11,626
6,818
3,280
8,094
10,401
6,689
683
545
2,013
1,060
688
461
1,415
979
736
1,015
801
4,742
2,325
10,265
7,282
2,342
3,513
8,637
5,417
5,020
6,206
5,313
5,988
3,681
12,058
9,010
2,890
4,251
11,800
6,914
7,069
7,516
7,561
                                           33

-------
   Exhibit 12 -- Annual-mean streamftow for tong-tenv streamflow-gaging stations in Louisiana, Mississippi, and
                                        Alabama, 1947-86
              [Gage locations are shown in exhibit 9.  Ambunts shown are in cubic feet per second]

                                               Gage number"
Year    15    16   17
18
 20    21    22    23
                                                                   24
                                                        26
                                                27
                                                                                                28
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
3,221 1,067
1,788 623
3,822 1,036
3,972 870
1,322 283
1,968 477
4,589 1,169
1,470 330
2,609 1,166
1,463 343
307
213
260
331
103
155
370
87
366
133
194,395
173,563
219,467
278,450
240,881
215,898
158,535
88,910
138,219
131,592
455,981
421,691
552,844
674,326
607,417
538,380
383,458
242,644
364,805
340,694
2,483
2,330
3,469
2,198
1,858
929
2,781
1,202
1,880
1,548
1,515
1,459
1,915
1,212
1,050
604
1,255
902
922
910
234
227
313
169
143
83
194
152
90
119
2,797 11,738
2,356 9,229
3,356 17,926
2,292 11,562
1,760 8,947
995 4,013
2,081 9,801
1,233 4,770
1,468 6,907
1,383 7,734
13,564
12,598
19,408
9,390
8,176
5,428
9,025
6,494
5,061
6,330
34,499
30,221
46,694
30,528
31,638
19.455
24,606
14,209
19,428
20,687
36,744 1,109
34,601 910
53,973 1,059
25,063 753
25,923 600
29,542 552
32,034 579
22,008 550
22,081 554
23,099 496
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
2,098
3,538
1,863
1,363
3,365
2,507
1,220
1,731
1,540
2,249
688
985
778
533
1,280
646
384
769
603
762
255
263
305
149
367
249
165
319
213
276
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1,921
2,230
2,279
788
1,790
2,317
4,517
3,407
3,832
1,963
551
635
916
323
792
958
1,639
1,302
1,222
522
268
196
301
146
317
353
499
361
355
172
                        201,285
                        240,767
                        148,486
                        186,813
                        208,141
                        243,621
                        126,057
                          90,484
                        182,038
                        139,792

                        157,025
                        218,866
                        228,299
                        203,556
                        196,496
                        206,030
                        383,427
                        320,455
                        321,197
                         180,123
      470,781
      537,304
      354,118
      447,678
      460,603
      523,378
      290,290
      341,481
      411,375
      378,115

      361,263
      445,552
      460,280
      414,926
      404,345
       413,271
       729,071
       632,499
       598,943
       403,281
1,146
2,218
1,794
1,405
2,341
2,342
  669
1,813
1,859
2,445

1,485
  965
1,584
  970
1,430
2,224
3,063
2,600
3,158
1,343
 746
1,231
1,035
 914
1,594
1,671
 525
1,062
 949
1,337

 762
  555
 920
  554
1,071
1,335
1,742
1,651
1,708
  718
102
178
138
111
230
253
77
144
123
183
1,172
2,089
1,664
1,630
2,698
2,775
919
1,530
1,621
2,116
5,678
12,340
7,191
8,450
11,288
14,500
3,412
8,462
8,286
9,067
4,647
13,215
8,062
9,760
15,247
13,929
3,718
8,631
8,532
10,571
21,317
36,120
20,447
25,382
33,557
38,543
14,987
32,795
25,548
20,509
28,769
35,393
23,951
28,440
40,831
41,423
28,986
43,428
31,376
30,286
637
670
771
803
990
886
569
771
699
726
102
62
117
75
129
195
230
256
217
93
1,241
1,069
1,425
928
1,684
2,282
3,184
2,954
3,141
1,453
4,278
7,859
7,244
5.035
10,157
10,336
15,322
17,536
16,327
10,774
4,704
6,479
8,349
5,160
10,448
10,148
14,253
15,391
15,842
9,800
14,733
31,112
23,183
23,816
28,774
23,472
42,352
40,672
40,121
33,940
26,548
33,876
26,331
24,235
37,044
34,631
47,626
34,489
48,726
48,006
608
371
726
670
734
446
783
824
1,068
902
1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
,1EAN
1,707 706
2,012 719
3,337 1,302
3,555 1,245
1,052 359
1,145 575
4,979 1,412
2,966 836
2,959 839
2,308 876
2,469 813
254
186
357
344
115
208
523
240
285
271
266
130,951
218,458
287,973
212,046
150,671
212,011
298,373
254,320
243,419
215,477
206,164
312,907
508,030
663,170
489,057
352,923
501,899
678.918
595,650
564,153
501,975
470,737
2,713
2,446
3,104
3,582
1,287
1,387
4,433
1,745
2,074
1,698
2,050
1,281
1,313
1,580
1,775
798
900
2,258
1,000
1,052
812
1,165
191
182
185
193
91
97
291
134
120
66
157
1,943 10,309
2,102 10,698
2,519 16,877
3,081 18,833
1,318 5,603
1,426 6,528
3,697 22,555
1,872 10,661
1,837 8,796
1,490 5,728
1,965 10,069
10,864
9,854
15,432
19,380
6,475
6,746
18,640
9,624
7,436
7,466
10,107
29,818
27,690
40,872
48,712
15,986
23,909
57,425
35,415
21,301
11,842
28,908
35,492 692
33,683 1,064
44,259 960
44,757 1,144
18,773 628
30,859 522
45,112 1,050
43,132 821
21,139 648
14,441 732
33,278 752
                                                   34

-------
       Exhibit 13.- Annual-mean streamftow for long-term streamflow-gagiog stations in Florida  1947-86
             [Gage locations are shown in exhibit 9. Amounts shown are in cubic feet per second]

Year
29
30
31
32
33
34
35 36 37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
 1947
 1948
 1949
 1950
 1951
 1952
 1953
 1954
 1955
 1956

 1957
 1958
 1959
 1960
 1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
 8,588
 7,494
 9,803
 3,630
 3,281
 4,653
 4,509
 5,209
 3,601
 3,055

 5,023
 5,007
 5,532
8,435
7,913
6,156
3,549
6,602
6,758
6,123
 1,675
 1.584
 1,388
  808
  625
  773
  921
 1,308
  608
  725

 1,279
  990
 1,047
 1,388
 1,414
 1,153
1,585
1,108
1,010
 1,372
 1,516
 1,461
  970
  667
  681
  848
 1,155
  551
  703

  880
 1,004
 1,173
 1,545
 1,279
 1,023
  876
1,605
1,325
1,058
  9,869
 11,624
 11,252
  5,600
  3,930
  5,541
  5,656
  7,259
  3,493
  3,454

  6,124
  6,986
  6,338
 8,402
 7,015
 6,216
 5,071
10,982
 8,769
 7,422
 579 2,021
 758 2,977
 674 2,066
 553 1,221
 497  868
 464 1,179
 480 1,157
 525 1,264
      613
      794
379
376
451
673
593
626
525
450
454
634
644
596
    1,048
    1,874
    1,504
    1,822
    1,329
    1,179
    1,159
    2,247
    2,158
    1,597
 23,877
 33,514
 35,510
 16,210
 12,155
 20,279
 20,891
 18,696
 11,283
 12,442

 15,680
 22,529
 20,762
 25,068
 23,674
 22,218
 17,679
34,643
31,061
26,875
 1,797
 4,516
 2,293
 1,001
  651
 1,401
 1,097
 1,019
  315
  640
 52
223
107
 21
 30
 99
144
 82
 51
 60
  948 141
2,626 199
2,109 177
2,522 185
1,810 126
  766  78
1,153 117
2,937 317
4,325 170
2,583 185
  9,856
 24,560
 12,985
  7,600
  6,704
  9,179
  7,496
  9,290
  4,291
  4,640

  6,201
 13,208
 13,989
 12,934
 10,588
  7,142
  7,172
15,045
19,269
15.043
111
 88
 86
 89
 29
 58
113
 71
 32
 20
793
814
452
658
333
371
852
781
264
102
            87   588
           101   601
           228  1,546
           200  1,718
            44   327
            36   484
            67   425
           135   937
            77   614
            57   696
 576 273
 492 229
 441 177
 228 137
 202 144
 188  95
 532 271
 480 220
 236 140
 136  40

 442 171
 424 221
 792 411
 845 319
 270  81
 346 203
 393 ,191
 383 133
350 153
395 124
543  2,403
287  1,678
389  1,759
179   700
 98   999
116   757
390  2,301
294  2,213
160   714
 73   392
                     299
                     332
                    1,455
                    1,482
                     579  2,381
                     546  2,571
                     157  1,014
                     302   910
                     173
                     183
                     276
                     200
                     904
                     972
                     843
                    1,242
1967 4,225 712
1968 2,889 610
1969 3,515 803
1970 6,478 1,363
1971 7,427 1,157
1972 4,467 702
1973 10,348 1,759
1974 6,708 1,004
197511,695 2,206
1976 9,857 1,784
1977 6,146 1,130
1978 8,367 1,746
1979 7,639 1,307
1980 8,504 1,330
1981 3,828 609
1982 5,302 888
1983 8,864 1,355
1984 6,413 1,080
1985 4,394 968
1986 5,001 940

,1
-------
    Exhibit 14 -- Annual-mean streamflow, prior to 1947, for the 12 longest-term streamflow-gaging stations
   [Gage locations are shown in exhibit 9. Amounts shown are in cubic feet per second.  Graphs of discharges
   for these gages are shown in exhibits 15 and 16; (-), data not available for period prior to gage installation]

Year
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
8

5,148
11,505
1,709
12,098
7,684
4,576
8,290
7,207
7,802
11,061
3,542
4,656
10,131
8,308
7,467
9,950
2,716
4,355
22,271
11,770
4,496
10,506
13,543
10,222
11
.
—
-
913
9,792
8,127
4,544
9,572
6,780
5,837
11,777
5,301
4,728
11,058
4,174
5,388
9,328
2,991
4,533
16,933
13,675
5,937
10,453
16,856
11,590
13
9,604
9,158
11,934
994
8,438
7,253
2,590
7,521
5,120
5,453
9,747
5,574
5,790
8,302
3,740
3,971
5,393
3,758
4,572
12,716
8,892
2,412
10,460
10,782
11,786
14
„
—
—
1,760
10,721
,9,563
4,742
8,156
7,157
6,551
12,274
10,185
8,638
10,079
3,701
6,023
9,421
5,859
6,885
17,207
11,410
4,226
12,605
15,994
16,909
18
..
—
-"
•-

~
—
167,329
81,573
152,352
153,478
144,909
86,017
92,978
158,808
163,503
148,855
233,221
211,719
19 25
—
._
™~
""
~—
-
—
277,721
574,348
338,290
527,521
510,066
472,868
290,914
308,879
525,134
568,781
463,344
643,189
524,496
-
"*"
"
™~
"
~
7,768
8,958
13,539
6,026
10,702
8,214
8,579
9,912
8,154
10,685
6,829
8,763
9,510
12,456
9,854
12,400
26
~


" .

—
30,458
28,339
15,759
30,809
42,368
14,833
27,999
24,143
26,753
27,294
28,328
25,645
15,258
16,677
18,007
28,543
26,063
36,885
27
-




-
18,979
29,824
44,449
20,379
30,334
41,373
36,701
33,776
32,238
28,346
19,932
27,629
35,570
37,866
26,967
48,275
ivnAn
32
~




—
6,040
5,208
8,853
4,192
4,434
8,815
8,294
6,973
7,989
7,203
4,711
7,861
7,107
8,689
5,845
11,412
7 m?
35 36
-




669
~ 2 563
35,684 2,002
24,692 1,909
17,125 1,052
16,631 1,442
23,840 2,493
14,408 552
13,867 1,070
28,292 1,615
26,664 2,224
19,144 1,283
20,463 1,210
19,104 1,026
12,256 714
21,961 2,246
24,927 1,609
26,309 1,829
17,492 1,587
29,388 2,328
21 .792 1 .571
MEAN   8,376   8,196   7,038  9,094  149,562
                                                   36

-------
            Exhibit 15.—Graphs of annual-mean stream/low for the 12 longest-term gages
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-------
                                Exhibit 15.--(continued)
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-------
                                Exhibit 15.—(continued)
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                                           39

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-------
Exhibit 17.-- Selected statistics tor two periods of annual-mean streamflow for the coastline segments, 1947-86
  [Streamftow data for the following long-term gages are included for the following segments: segment 1
  gage 1; segment 2, gages 2-7; segment 3- gages 8-14; segment 4, gages 15-17; segment 5.  gage 18-'
  segment 6. gage 19; segment 7, gages 20-23; segment 8, gages 24-25; segment 9, gages 26-28- segment 10
  gages 29-33; segment 11, gages 34-38; segment 12, gages 39-44. Streamflow-gaging station and segment
  locations are shown in exhibit 9. Graphs of total-gaged inflow to each segment are shown in exhibit 16.
  (+) indicates increase in mean discharge; (-), indicates decrease in mean discharge from early to late period]
Segment
number


1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
TOTALS
Annual-mean streamflow for segments, in
1947-1966
Number
of years
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20

Mean
•
1,213
5,003
25,632
3,369
180,370
439,868
5,136
18,654
59.690
17,045
35,066
3,012
794,058
Standard
deviation
1,937
3,721
13,669
1,354
52,268
108,966
1,718
7,406
16,103
5,449
13,008
1,453
™~
Standard
error
433
832
3,056
303
11,687
24,365
384
1,656
3,601
1,218
2,909
325
•"
Number
of years
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20

cubic feet per second
1967-1986
Mean

1,818
6,806
28,377
3,727
231,959
501,606
5,537
21,697
66,185
17,927
35,086
1,881
922,606
Standard
deviation
1,529
2,860
13,536
1,565
63,329
118,221
2,262
9,520
21,368
5,676
9,114
707
~
Standard
error
342
640
3,027
350
14,161
26,435
506
2,129
4,778
1,269
2,038
158
'
Change in
mean flow
between
periods
(percent)
+50
+36
+11
+11
+29
+14
+8
+16
+11
+5
0
-38
+16
                                            61

-------
    Exhibit 18.-- Selected statistics for two periods of annual-mean streamftow for the periods of record of the
                                       long-term streamflow-gaging stations
[Gage locations are shown in exhibit 9 and selected characteristics are presented in exhibit 10.
(-), indicates decrease in mean discharge; (+), indicates increase in mean discharge from early to late period]
Gage
Stream name
number


1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
•|"f
Annual-mean streamflow
Prior to 1961
Number
of vears

RIO GRANDE
NUECES
MISSION
SAN ANTONIO
GUADALUPE
LAVACA
COLORADO
BRAZOS
BRAYS
WHITEOAK
TRINITY
VILLAGE
NECHES
SABINE
CALCASIEU
BAYOU NEZPIQUE
BAYOU DES CANNES
ATCHAFALAYA
MISSISSIPPI
AMITE
TANGIPAHOA
TCHEFUNCTA
BOGUE CHITTO
PEARL
PASCAGOULA
TOMBIGBEE
ALABAMA
PERDIDQ
ESCAMBIA
YELLOW
SHOAL
CHOCTAWHATCHEE
ECONFINA
CHIPOLA
APALACHICOLA
OCHLOCKONEE
FENHOLLOWAY
SUWANNEE
ANCLOTE
HILLSBOROUGH
ALAFIA
LITTLE MANATEE
MYAKKA
PEACE
TOTALS 	

14
21
21
21
25
22
22
38
24
24
36
21
39
36
22
22
22
26
27
22
22
17
23
22
30
32
30
19
26
22
22
30
25
17
32
34
14
19
14
22
28
21
24
29
1,079
Mean Standard
deviation

1,549
864
74
569
1,565
255
2,774
7,310
87
70
7,367
837
6,434
8,779
2,622
789
252
169,692
459,914
1,903
1,085
164
1,857
8,801
9,450
26,231
31,142
756
6,083
1,140
1,064
6,972
534
1,474
21,286
1,599
112
10,273
94
664
390
194
276
1,326
806,673

2,240
597
78
341
1,001
249
2,195
4,510
59
52
4,209
559
3,256
3,974
1,121
322
102
51,477
116,247
591
313
59
583
3,083
3,135
7,894
8,415
195
2,083
367
317
2,265
88
602
6,616
842
66
4,604
59
405
185
92
148
633
~
Number
of years

26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
1,144
1961-1986

Mean Standard
deviation

1,498
749
157
799
1,972
389
2,303
6,924
171
103
7,024
851
5,290
7,172
2,449
853
282
216,512
478,360
2,106
1,189
155
2,012
10,634
10,505
30,042
34,980
771
6,506
1,177
1,107
7,209
535
1,481
23,517
1,883
144
10,868
58
377
313
146
216
879
882.668

1,471
612
123
413
1,038
231
1,515
4,073
75
50
3,720
518
3,182
3,821
1,058
350
99
67,206
117,871
885
453
66
777
4,864
4,277
11,082
9,486
197
2,245
399
320
2,112
74
436
6,100
865
54
3,665
31
209
92
52
72
327
—
Change in
mean flow
between
periods
(percent)
-3
-13
+112
440
+26
+52
-17
-5
+97
+47
-5
+2
-18
-18
-7
+8
+12
+28 \
+4
+11
+10
-5
+8
+21
+11
+15
+12
+2
+7
+3
+4
+3
0
+1
+10
+18
+28
+6
-38
-43
-20
-25
-22
-34
+9
                                                     62

-------
         -~ Selected statists for two periods of annual-maximum dailyw^
                            of the long-term streamfhw-gaging stations
 [Gage locations are shown in exhibit 9 and selected characteristics are presented in exhibit 10
(-), irrigates decrease in mean discharge; (+), indicates increase in mean discharge from early to late period]
Gaj
numt
- ••^^K^^VH
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

je Stream name
>er
-Annual-maximum daily-mean streamflow
Prior to1 961
Number
of years
RIO GRANDE 14
NUECES 21
MISSION 21
SAN ANTONIO 21
GUADALUPE 25
LAVACA 22
COLORADO 22
BRAZOS 38
BRAYS 24
WHITEOAK 24
TRINITY 36
VILLAGE 21
NECHES 39
SABINE 36
CALCASIEU 22
BAYOU NEZPIQUE 22
BAYOU DES CANNES 22
ATCHAFALAYA 26
MISSISSIPPI 27
AMITE 22
TANGIPAHOA 22
TCHEFUNCTA 17
BOGUE CHITTO 23
PEARL 22
PASCAGOULA 30
TOMBIGBEE 32
ALABAMA 30
PERDIDO 19
ESCAMBIA 26
YELLOW 22
SHOAL 22
CHOCTAWHATCHEE 30
ECONFINA 25
CHIPOLA 17
APALACHICOLA 32
OCHLOCKONEE 34
FENHOLLOWAY 14
SUWANNEE 19
ANCLOTE 14
HILLSBOROUGH 22
ALAFIA 28
LITTLE MANATEE 21
MYAKKA 24
PEACE 29
TOTALS 1.079 i


Mean
11,812
15,679
5,639
11,477
24,846
12,108
30,666
61,332
3,151
2,400
43,908
14,637
36,717
45,553
33,699
9,128
4,522
386,577
1,014,667
23,620
12,155
3,488
18,464
40,191
59,897
122,156
133,577
7,325
41,419
10,139
8,150
33,920
1,483
5,798
89,681
11,387
1,002
22,621
1,387
4,711
6,427
3,759
3,014
10,620
\ 444 goo

Standard
deviation
9,304
12,152
7,263
8,655
26,541
1.1,972
25,075
28,961
2,071
1,515
24,249
17,285
23,168
21,768
32,721
8,353
3,013
94,306
233,377
14,629
7,949
2,763
11,918
13,432
28,196
37,245
41,968
6,307
20,501
6,369
4,747
15,900
709
4,223
50,263
11,613
765
17,144
1,044
3,287
8,158
2,676
1,859
7.303

Number
of years
1961-1986
Mean
26 9,020
26 16.798
26 10.856
26 13,369
26 22,777
26 13,798
26 27,541
26 48,954
26 4,817
26 3,519
26 41,834
26 12,051
26 19,270
26 35,542
26 31,082
26 9.102
26 5,178
26 471,231
26 1,042,423
26 36,830
26 18,952
26 4,848
26 25,745
26 53,488
26 68,566
26 151,131
26 150,162
26 8,615
26 42,981
26 9,777
26 8,524
26 34,816
26 1,196
26 5,733
26 98,138
26 15,468
26 832
26 24,568
26 866
26 2,847
26 2,211
26 2,516
26 1,939
26 6.027

Standard
deviation
5,212
26,007
16,253
22,654
20,521
10,311
16,029
26,716
3,191
2,056
19,736
11,148
8.371
19,363
19,377
4,948
2,007
113,537
209,418
24,955
15.707
4,403
24,132
28,540
36,362
56,441
44,078
5,029
16,285
6,623
4,206
13,015
333
2,729
31,310
15,262
963
11,514
606
1,367
1,002
1,975
1,325
3.186

Change in
mean value
between
periods
(percent)
-24
+7
+93
+16
-8
+14
-10
-20
+53
+47
-5
-18
-48
-22
-8
0
+15
+22
+3
+56
+56
+39
+39
+33
+14
+24
+12
+18
+4
-4
+4
+3
-19
-1
+9
+36
-17
+9
-38
-40
-66
-33
-36
_ -43
+7
                                                63

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Exhibit 20.~ Selected statistics for two periods of annual-minimum daily-mean streamflow for the periods of record
                                       of the long-term streamflow-gaging stations
  [Gage locations are shown in exhibit 9 and selected characteristics are presented in exhibit 10.
  (+), indicates increase in mean discharge; (-), indicates decrease in mean discharge from early to late period]
Gaae
\wis*y w
number


1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
a
w
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
W 1
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
Stream name

Annual-minimum daily-mean streamflow

Number
of vears

RIO GRANDE
NUECES
MISSION
SAN ANTONIO
GUADALUPE
LAVACA
COLORADO
BRAZOS
BRAYS
WHITEOAK
TRINITY
VILLAGE
NECHES
SABINE
CALCASIEU
BAYOU NEZPIQUE
BAYOU DES CANNES
ATCHAFALAYA
MISSISSIPPI
AMITE
TANGIPAHOA
TCHEFUNCTA
BOGUE CHITTO
PEARL
PASCAGOULA
TOMBIGBEE
ALABAMA
PERDIDO
ESCAMBIA
YELLOW
SHOAL
CHOCTAWHATCHEE
ECONFINA
CHIPOLA
APALACHICOLA
OCHLOCKONEE
FENHOLLOWAY
SUWANNEE
ANCLOTE
HILLSBOROUGH
ALAF1A
LITTLE MANATEE
MYAKKA
fEACE
TOTALS
*
14
21
21
21
25
22
22
38
24
24
36
21
39
36
22
22
22
26
27
22
22
17
23
22
30
32
30
19
26
22
22
30
25
17
32
34
14
19
14
22
28
21
24
29
1,079
Prior to1 961

Mean Standard
deviation

1.9
27
2.0
117
360
8.8
429
498
3.4
0.9
359
65
292
611
263
1.2
0.7
41,958
133,430
378
352
44
594
1,507
1,298
1,583
7,765
270
1,096
280
402
2,137
415
591
7,414
38
14
5,465
3.8
45
31
7.6
1.0
124
210.283

5.0
13
1.2
66
211
7.9
409
269
3.0
0.9
210
36
168
319
111
1.2
0.8
.15,611
35,276
72
61
6.7
119
343
405
700
1,525
39
290
84
114
471
55
169
1,743
47
13
1,879
3.3
34
26
5.6
2.0
73


Number
of years

26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
26
1.144
1961-1986
Mean

18
63
4.9
171
497
20
97
631
46
12
598
62
959
713
258
6.1
1.7
62,331
176,423
395
368
37
579
1,622
1,308
1,696
6,781
269
1,045
256
396
1,924
407
541
8,948
97
28
4,952
2.2
2.0
66
13
3.6
92
274.740

Standard
deviation


24
4.2
109
284
14
175
292
31
9.5
210
33
820
356
58
5.2
1.7
25,539
28,033
89
70
10
106
339
358
611
1,633
51
282
82
114
463
51
118
1,829
58
4f\
19
1,243
04*
.8
3.3
27
8.6
6.9
50
--
Change in
mean value
between
periods
(percent)
4847
+136
+146
+47
+38
4 nf\
+130
-77
rw
+27
+1,254
+1,163
f*f*
+66
f
-5
+228
+17,
+419
+150
+49
+32
A
+4
A
+4
4 A
-14
Q
+8
+1
"7
+7
-13



.
-10
Q
•S
+21
4 CO
+153
. AC
+95
f\
-9
A4
-41
f\&
-96
444
+111
• -Jrt
+70
f\*+ M
+274
oc
-26
+31
                                                      64
&U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: H93 • 7W-8n/80M3

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