United States
Environmental Protection Agency
Office of Water
Washington, D.C. 20460
EPA816-R-00-018
November 2000
Small Entity Compliance Guide
How The New Motor Vehicle
Waste Disposal Well Rule
Affects Your Business

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            Contents
Chapter                                               Page Number


7.     Who Should Read This Guide?	2

2.     What Is A Motor Vehicle Waste Disposal Well?	3

3.     How Do I Know If I Have A Motor Vehicle Waste Disposal Well? 	4

4.     What Are The New Class V Rule Requirements For Motor Vehicle Waste
      Disposal  Wells?	5

5.     If I'm In One Of These Areas, When Must I Comply?  	6

6.     If I Want To Close My Well, What Are The Federal Requirements?	7

7.     What Are The New Federal Requirements For Keeping Wells Open?	9

8.     Compliance Checklist	TO

9.     Need Help?	77

Attachment A
      Where You Can Get More Information	72

Attachment B
      Best Management Practices	79

Attachment C
      EPA Pre-Closure Notification Form	24

Attachment D
      New Federal Requirements And Compliance Time Lines
      For Owners And Operators Of MVWD Wells  	27

Attachment E
      Glossary 	3O


                                  NOTICE

This guide was prepared pursuant to section 212 of the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act of 1996
("SBREFA"), Pub. L 104-121. The Statements in this document are intended solely as guidance to aid you in complying
with Revisions to the Underground Injection Control Regulations for Class VInjection Wells (Federal Register. Vol. 64, No.
234, pages 68546-68573). In any civil or administrative action against a small business, small government or small non-
profit organization for a violation of the Revisions to the Underground Injection Control Regulations for Class V Injection
Wells, the content of this guide may be considered as evidence of the reasonableness or appropriateness of proposed fines,
penalties or damages. This guide may not apply in a particular situation based upon the circumstances, and EPA retains the
discretion to adopt approaches on a case-by-case basis that differ from this guide where appropriate. Any decisions regard-
ing a particular facility will be made based on the statute and regulations. Therefore, interested parties are free to raise
questions and objections about the substance of this guide and the appropriateness of its application to a particular situa-
tion.  EPA will, and States should, consider whether the recommendations or interpretations in the guide are appropriate in
that situation. EPA may decide to revise this guide without public notice to reflect changes in EPA's approach to implement-
ing Revisions to the Underground Injection Control Regulations for Class VInjection Wells or to clarify and update text.
Copies of this guide may be obtained by contacting EPA's Small Business Division at 800-368-5888.

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Introduction
          In late 1999, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a new rule governing
          motor vehicle waste disposal wells. The rule, entitled Revisions to the Underground
          Injection Control Regulations for Class V Injection Wells, was published in the Federal
          Register. Vol. 64, No. 234, pp. 68546-68573 on December 7,1999. Copies of the rule
          are available from the Office of the Federal Register: 202-523-4534, or the EPA web
          site: http://www.epa.gov/safewater/uic/c5imp.html.

          A motor vehicle waste disposal well is one type of Class V injection well regulated by
          Underground Injection Control (UIC) programs, hereafter referred to as UIC Program
          Agencies or Directors. These wells are typically shallow disposal systems and are locat-
          ed in every State, especially in unsewered areas where the population is also likely to
          depend on ground water as a drinking water source (approximately 86% of America's
          public water systems use ground water).

           During normal vehicle repair and maintenance activities, vehicle fluids may drip or
           spill or otherwise enter floor drains or sinks in service areas. These fluids, which
           can introduce various toxic chemicals into sources of drinking water, may include:
           engine oil, transmission fluid, power steering fluid, brake fluid, hydraulic fluid,
           antifreeze, chlorinated or non-chlorinated parts-cleaning solvents and degreasers.
          This Guide is divided into nine question and answer sections designed to help you:

               figure out if you have a motor vehicle waste disposal well,
               find out if you are affected by EPA's new rule,
               understand how to comply with it if you are affected,
               find additional sources of useful information and Underground Injection Control
               (UIC) Program contacts,
               pick up tips on best management practices that may save you money and
               reduce your record keeping requirements, and
               a glossary of terms.

          A reminder... This Guide outlines the minimum Federal requirements for motor vehicle
          waste disposal wells. Some States and local jurisdictions may have requirements that
          are more stringent than the Federal rules. Contact the appropriate Underground
          Injection Control (UIC) Program Agency to find out about these added requirements
          (see Attachment A).
          PLEASE READ... Where rule requirements are presented, the words "must" or "shall"
          are used followed by the regulatory citation (for example, 40 CFR  144.12). You can look
          up the regulation under Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations at Section 144. Where
          recommendations or guidance are presented, the words "should" or "may" are used.

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                          Who Should Read  This
                          Guide?
   If you are CURRENTLY operating a motor vehicle waste disposal well that receives or
   has received fluids from vehicular repair or maintenance activities -- you should read
   this guide.
   In general, some of the potentially regulated businesses include:


                automotive service stations,

                new and used car dealers,

                auto body shops,

                transmission repair shops,

                muffler repair shops,

                car and truck rental agencies,

                truck stops,

                light airplane maintenance facilities,

                boat yards,

                farm machinery dealers,

                vehicle repair home businesses, and

                railroad maintenance facilities.
    READ THIS... The Class V rule banned new motor vehicle waste disposal wells as of
    April 5, 2000.  You are prohibited from installing floor drains, sinks or septic systems
    that will receive fluids from vehicular repair or maintenance activities and discharge
    them directly into the subsurface.
2

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                        What Is A  Motor  Vehicle
                        Waste  Disposal  Well?
A motor vehicle waste disposal well is a type of Class V injection well. Typically they are
shallow disposal systems that receive or have received fluids from vehicular repair or main-
tenance activities, such as an auto body repair shop, automotive repair shop, new and used
car dealership, specialty repair shop (e.g., transmission and muffler repair shop), or any
area where vehicular repair work is performed.

Generally motor vehicle waste disposal wells are floor drains or sinks in service bays that
are tied into a shallow disposal system. Most commonly these shallow disposal systems
are septic systems or dry wells, but any underground system that receives motor vehicle
waste would be considered a motor vehicle waste disposal well. A variety of names are
used to describe shallow disposal systems including: cesspools, catchbasins, sink holes,
underground vaults, or drain tanks to name a few.
  Definitions:

  Class V refers to one of the five types of injection practices that States and the EPA reg-
  ulate under the UIC Program (40 CFR  144.80).

  A Septic system means a "well" that
  is used to discharge sanitary waste
  below the surface and is typically
  comprised of a septic tank and a sub-
  surface fluid distribution system or
  disposal system.

  A Drywell means a well, other than
  an improved sinkhole or subsurface
  fluid distribution system, completed
  above the water table so that its bot-
  tom and sides are typically dry except when receiving fluids

  For additional definitions see the glossary in Attachment E.
  PLEASE READ... A motor vehicle waste disposal well is classified by the waste it receives
  (fluids from vehicular repair) and NOT by the construction of the shallow disposal system
  that receives the waste.

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                              How  Do  I  Know  If I  Have
                             A  Motor  Vehicle   Waste
                              Disposal  Well?
   Answer the following questions to determine if you have a motor vehicle waste disposal
   well and if the new rule and this guide applies to you.
      Questions:
If Your Answer is Yes.
If Your Answer Is No...
      1. Does your facility service motorvehicles?
      Examples: cars, trucks, buses, motorcycles,
      powerboats, all terrain vehicles, snowmobiles,
      farm tractors, construction machineries,
      trains, helicopters, airplanes, jet skis, and other
      motorized vehicles.
If yes, goto question
number 2.
If no, you are not affected
by the new rule. Stop here.
      2. Does your facility have floor drains or
      sinks in the vehicle service areas?
If yes, goto question
numbers.
If no, you are not affected
by the new rule. Stop here.
      3. Are all of your floor drains and sinks
      connected to a municipal sewer?
      (see note below)
If yes, you are not affected
by the new rule. Stop here.
If no, goto question
number 4.
      4. Are all of your floor drains and sinks
      connected to a holding tank, and is the waste
      in the holding tank disposed of off-site?
      (see note below)
If yes, you are not affected
by the new rule. Stop here.
(However, you may be
subject to other State or
Federal disposal
requirements.)
If no, goto question
numbers.
      5. Are you discharging all of your motor
      vehicle service wastewater directly to surface
      waters or onto land?
      (see note below)
If yes, you are not affected
by the new rule. Stop here.
(However, you may be
subject to other State or
Federal disposal
requirements.)
If no, you may be disposing
of motor vehicle service
wastewater into a shallow
disposal system such as a
septic system or dry well
and thus have a motor vehicle
waste disposal well.
     Note: Any building plans showing wastewater flow may reflect the intent of the architect
     and not necessarily the results of the builder. Also, they probably do not include any
     renovations since your shop was built.  To be sure where your wastewater goes, use dye
     or smoke tests to help locate the discharge points for your floor drains and sinks.  Your
     local health department or a plumber may be able to help you determine where your
     drain goes.
4

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                        What Are  The  New  Class

                        V  Rule  Requirements  for

                        Motor  Vehicle  Waste

                        Disposal  Wells?


New MOTOR VEHICLE WASTE DISPOSAL WELLS are banned nationwide as of April 5, 2000
(Sections () 144.84(b)(2), 144.85(c) and 144.88(b)(2)).

EXISTING MOTOR VEHICLE WASTE DISPOSAL WELLS are banned in ground water protec-
tion areas and other sensitive ground water areas. States or EPA may waive the ban and
allow owners and operators to obtain a permit. ( 144.85(b) and 144.88 (b)(l)).

Ground water protection areas are those areas that currently provide short term recharge of
ground water to: 1) public drinking water wells that serve communities; and 2) other estab-
lishments that serve the same people every day (such as schools). States must conduct
Source Water Assessments to delineate these areas and to identify all potential sources of
contamination within these areas. (144.86).

Other sensitive ground water areas are those areas outside of ground water protection
areas that a State has decided need additional protection from MOTOR VEHICLE WASTE
DISPOSAL WELLS. States will identify these areas based on their sensitivity to ground
water contamination and may include areas with a large number of private drinking water
wells, ground water recharge areas, limestone and volcanic rock formations, or shallow
ground water.

HOW TO FIND OUT IF YOUR MOTOR VEHICLE WASTE DISPOSAL WELL IS  LOCATED IN A
GROUND WATER PROTECTION OR OTHER SENSITIVE GROUND WATER AREA:

     Your State may notify you directly that you are in one of these areas, or
     Your State may announce the location of these areas through newspapers, T.V., the
      Internet, or other means.
     You  can contact your State UIC Program or Drinking Water Source Assessment and
      Protection Program (see State lists in Attachment A).
     You  may also ask EPA for a State list: call the Safe Drinking Water  Hotline at
      1-800-426-4791, or visit EPA's website for the State lists at
      http://www.epa.gov/safewater/uic/c5imp.htmlor
      http://www.epa.gov/safewater/source/contacts.html.
PLEASE READ... Some States may have more stringent requirements for motor vehicle waste disposal wells.
For example: some States may ban motor vehicle waste disposal wells (not allowing owners or operators to
apply for a waiver) while others may decide to apply the new motor vehicle waste disposal well requirements
statewide, in which case, you must close your well or apply for a permit regardless of the location of your
motor vehicle waste disposal well.

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                         If I 'm In  One  Of  These
                         Areas,  When Must I
                         Comply?
        In general, compliance with this new rule will be required between April 2001 and
        January 2005 for motor vehicle waste disposal wells located in ground water protection
        areas.

        For wells located in sensitive ground water areas, the compliance date could range from
        January 2004 to January 2008. Attachment D contains additional information on compli-
        ance schedules.
        The schedule for you to meet the regulatory requirements varies from State to State.
        Contact the Underground Injection Control Program in your State (see the list of
        Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program contacts in Attachment A) to find out
        when you will need to comply with the revised regulation.

        You can also call the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791 to find out whom
        to call in your State for this information.
6

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                       If I  Want  To  Close  My
                       Well,   What Are  The
                       Federal  Requirements?
The Federal minimum requirements for closure are as follows: You must close your motor
vehicle waste disposal well in a ".. .manner that prevents movement of contaminated flu-
ids into underground sources of drinking water, which may cause a violation of national
drinking water standards or other health-based standards, or may adversely affect public
health" (40 CFR 144.12).

YOU MUST:

1. Notify the appropriate State or EPA UIC Director in writing 30 days prior to closure
  ( 144.88(b)(vii)).

  Contact your UIC Program Agency and ask if they want you to fill out a pre-closure notifi-
  cation form or write a letter. Send this notification at least 30 days before physically
  closing the well. The Federal Pre-closure Notification Form is found in Attachment C.

2. Permanently plug or otherwise close the well in a way that ensures underground
  sources of drinking water are protected and is approved by your UIC Director ( 146.10
  (b) and (c)).

3. Dispose or otherwise manage any soil, gravel, sludge, liquids, or other materials
  removed from or adjacent to your well according to all Federal, State, and local regula-
  tions and requirements ( 146.10 (b) and (c)).

It is your responsibility to find out what your UIC Program Agency may require in addition
to the minimum Federal requirements.

Your State's UIC Program Agency may have additional or more specific requirements for the
closure of motor vehicle waste disposal wells. Prior to closing your well, contact your U 1C
Director for guidance (see Attachment A).
  Example: If your floor drains are connected to your septic system, you may be
            required to clean out the drains and the pipes running to the septic tank,
            seal them off using cement and have a licensed or certified septic service
            check the content of your septic tank to see if it needs to be pumped out to
            get rid of any contaminated sludge. You may be required to sample sur-
            rounding soils and ground water to insure there is no contamination. After
            this is done, the septic system can be used to manage wastewater from
            bathrooms.

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   Post-Closure Alternatives
   Following well closure, consider one of the following suggestions for managing motor vehi-
   cle service wastewater:
       The Dry Shop:  Minimize the use of
       water to  clean service bays.  Use
       absorbents and vacuums to pick up
       spills and drips.  Dispose of these
       materials  according  to  State
       guidelines and regulations. Place
       all used vehicle fluids in individual
       containers for proper off-site man-
       agement (see Attachment B).
Holding Tanks:  Store the motor
vehicle  waste in  a service  bay
wastewater holding tank.  The tank
can then be periodically pumped
out for proper disposal.   You may
minimize the amount of wastewater
that has to be stored by separating
out shop wastewater from sanitary
and vehicle washing wastewater ~
and by cutting back on the amount
of water used in your shop.
       Sanitary  Sewer Hookup:  Contact
       the local  sewer authority about the
       possibility of  connecting  floor
       drains to  the sewer system. Often,
       system hook-up may be available
       even though it was not an option
       when the service bays were first
       built. Sewer hookups can be expen-
       sive.  If  connecting  to  a sanitary
       sewer will take time  to complete,
       your  DIG Program Director  may
       extend the well closure deadline for
       up to one year. You are required to
       obtain special permission and prob-
       ably, a temporary operating permit.
Conversion: In limited cases, a UIC
Director may allow you to convert a
motor vehicle waste disposal well
to another type  of Class V well
(144.89(b)).  This option requires
that all motor vehicle fluids be kept
separated from drains using physi-
cal barriers and the  waste prevent-
ed from entering the well. Also,
your  UIC  Program Agency will
examine your shop's compliance
history and waste management
records to determine whether or
not to allow you to convert your
motor vehicle waste disposal well.
    Example:    It has been estimated that a person generates about 25 gallons of sanitary
                  wastewater per an 8-hour workday. This would add up to about 6,000 gal-
                  lons of wastewater per year, per person. Separating sanitary wastewater
                  from shop wastewater can lower hauling and management costs.
8

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                       What  Are  The  New
                       Federal Requirements
                       For Keeping  Wells
                       Open?
Some States may allow you to apply for a waiver from the ban and continue using your well
(144.84(b)(2), 144.87(a) and (c), and 144.88(b)(l)(ii)).  In most cases, a waiver will take
the form of a permit application. To apply for a permit, first contact the appropriate UIC
Program Agency listed in Attachment A. Whether or not a waiver will be granted will
depend on specific State requirements and your particular situation.  Of course, if no waiver
is granted, you must close the well.

If the UIC Program Agency grants you a waiver, you must follow the procedures outlined by
the State or EPA Region. At a minimum, operating permits will require that
(144.88(b)(l)(iv)):

  Waste fluids must meet National Primary Drinking Water Standards (Maximum
   Contaminant Levels (MCLs)) and other health-based standards at point of injection (
   144.3 and 146.3). This means that shop wastewater, before it is discharged into the
   ground, must not exceed any MCL or other health-based standard. See EPA's MCL web
   page: http://www.epa.gov/OGWDW/mcl.html.

  You must implement best management practices, as outlined in your permit, to minimize
   the discharge of contaminants into your shop wastewater (Attachment B).

  You must conduct monitoring to characterize the quality of the injectate (wastewater
   being discharged into the ground) and sludge, both initially and on an ongoing basis,
   to ensure continued compliance with MCLs. Your UIC Program Agency will determine
   the frequency  of monitoring as part of the operating permit.

If your wastewater does not meet drinking water standards, you have two options:

1.  Install new pretreatment equipment. Specific permission from the State or EPA Region
   will be necessary to extend a compliance deadline if it will take extra time to meet this
   requirement.

2.  Close the well in accordance with the requirements and schedule specified by your
   State or EPA Region (see Section 6 above).
PLEASE READ ... Remember, you are responsible for complying with the minimum Federal
requirements for motor vehicle waste disposal wells in the Class V Rule.  Failure to comply,
may result in enforcement action, including penalties.
                                                                           9

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                                Compliance  Checklist
   If you repair or maintain motor vehicles, you should do the following:

              V  Figure out if your facility generates motor vehicle waste (Section 2)

              V  Find out if your floor drain or work sink discharges into a shallow disposal
                 system (Section 3)

              V  Determine if your facility will be affected by the new requirements for
                 motor vehicle waste disposal wells (Section 4)

              V  Learn when you must comply (Section 5)

              V  Make sure you know how to properly close your well (Section 6)

              V  Select alternative management options for motor vehicle wastes (Section 6)

              V  Understand the minimum permit requirements if you keep your well open
                 (Section 7)
70

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                 Need  Help?
Look in the attachments at the end of this Guide for more information:
      Who's your State's UIC Agency, your State's Source Water Assessment Agency? - See
      Attachment A (page 12)

      Where are web sites with helpful information on this subject - See Attachment A
      (page 16-17)
      What best management prac-
      tices can save you time and
      money? - See Attachment B
      (page 19)

      What are you required to tell
      your State's UIC Agency before
      you close your well? - See
      Attachment C (page 25)

      Where can you find the pub-
      lished Federal requirements for
      motor vehicle waste disposal
      wells (the Class V Rule)? - See
      Attachment D (page 27)

      What are the new definitions
      that you should know? - See
      Attachment E (page 30)
                                                                            11

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Attachment   A
 Where  You Can Get More Information
   Where to call to get more information on the motor vehicle
   waste disposal well requirements and other sensitive ground
   water areas -
   UIC Program Agencies
   EPA REGION 1 	(617) 918-1614

   Connecticut Department of
   Environmental Protection 	(860) 424-3018

   Maine Department of
   Environmental Protection 	(207) 287-7814

   Massachusetts Department
   of Environmental Protection 	(617) 574-6855

   New Hampshire Department
   of Environmental Services 	(603) 271-2858

   Rhode Island Department of
   Environmental Management 	(401) 222-6820

   Vermont Department of
   Environmental Conservation 	(802) 241-4455 ext. 7552

   Indian Lands in Region 1
   States - EPA Region 1 	(617) 918-1614
   EPA REGION 2 	(214) 637-4232

   New Jersey Department of
   Environmental Protection 	(609) 292-0443

   New York --
   EPA Region 2 	(214) 637-4232

   Puerto Rico Environmental
   Quality Board	(787) 767-8181

   Virgin Islands --
   EPA Region 2 	(214) 637-4232

   Indian Lands in Region 2
   States - EPA Region 2	(214) 637-4232
Source Water Assessment Agencies
EPA REGION 1  	(617) 918-1578

Connecticut Department of
Public Health	(860) 509-7343

Maine
Bureau of Health 	(207) 287-6196

Massachusetts Department of
Environmental Protection 	(617) 292-5930

New Hampshire Department of
Environmental Services 	(603) 271-1168

Rhode Island Department
of Health 	(401) 222-6867 ext. 2237

Vermont Department of
Environmental Conservation  	(802) 241-3409

Indian Lands in Region 1
States - EPA Region 1 	(617) 918-1578
EPA REGION 2 	(214) 637-3822

New Jersey Department of
Environmental Protection 	(609) 292-5550

New York State Department
of Health	(518) 402-7713

Puerto Rico
Department of Health	(787) 754-6370

Virgin Islands Department of
Environmental Protection 	(340) 773-0565

Indian Lands in Region 2
States - EPA Region 2	(214) 637-3822
12

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USC Program Agencies
               Source Water Assessment Agencies
EPA REGION 3
Delaware Department of Natural
Resources & Env. Control  	
Maryland Department of
Environment  	
Pennsylvania
EPA Region 3
Virginia -- EPA Region 3

West Virginia Division of
Environmental Protection
.(215) 814-5445


.(302) 739-4762


.(410)631-3662


.(215)814-5445

.(215)814-5445
District of Columbia - EPA Region 3

EPA REGION 4  	
Alabama Department of Environmental
Management  	
.(304) 558-2108

.(215)814-5445

.(404) 562-9452


.(334)271-7844
Florida Department of Environmental
Protection  	(850) 921-9417

Georgia Environmental Protection Division  .(404) 657-6130
Kentucky -
EPA Region 4
Mississippi Department of
Environmental Quality
North Carolina Department of
Environment and Nat. Resources
South Carolina Department of Natural
Resources 	
Tennessee --
EPA Region 4 .
.(404) 562-9452


.(601)961-5570


.(919) 715-6166


.(803) 898-3549


.(404) 562-9452
Indian Lands in Region 4 States -
EPA Region 4	
EPA REGION 5  	

Illinois Environmental Protection Agency ..

Indiana -
EPA Region 5	
.(404) 562-9452

.(312) 886-1492

.(217)782-6070


.(312)886-1492
Michigan --
EPA Region 5
Minnesota -- EPA Region 5
.(312)886-1492

.(312)886-1492
EPA REGION 3  	(215) 814-5779

Delaware Department of Natural
Resources & Env. Control	(302) 739-4793

Maryland Water Management
Administration	(410) 631-3714

Pennsylvania Department of
Environmental Protection 	(717) 772-4018

Virginia Office of Water  Programs  	(804) 786-5568

West Virginia Department
of Health	(304) 558-2981

District of Columbia Department of Health (202) 645-6601

EPA REGION 4  	(404) 562-9456

Alabama Department of Environmental
Management  	(334) 271-7773

Florida Department of Environmental
Protection 	(850) 921-9438

Georgia Environmental Protection Division  .(404) 656-0719

Kentucky Natural Resources and
Env. Protection Cabinet	(502) 564-3410

Mississippi Department of
Environmental Quality  	(601) 961-5354

North Carolina Department of
Environment and Nat. Resources  	(919) 733-2321

South Carolina Department of Health
and Env. Control	(803) 898-3798

Tennessee Department  of Environment
and Conservation	(615) 532-0170

Indian Lands in Region  4 States -
EPA Region 4	(404) 562-9456

EPA REGION 5  	(312) 886-9262

Illinois Environmental Protection Agency .. .(217) 785-4787

Indiana Department of
Environmental Management	(317) 308-3319

Michigan Department of
Environmental Quality  	(517) 335-8312

Minnesota Department  of Health	(612) 215-0796
                                                                                                         13

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    USC Program Agencies
                                                   Source Water Assessment Agencies
    Ohio Environmental Protection Agency  ... .(614) 644-2752


                                    	(608) 266-2438
Wisconsin Department of Natural
Resources  	
    Indian Lands in Region 5 States -
    EPA Region 5	
    EPA REGION 6
    Arkansas Department of
    Environmental Quality ..
                                    .(312)886-1492

                                    .(214) 665-7183


                                    .(501) 682-0646
    Louisiana Department of
    Natural Resources	(225) 342-5515

    New Mexico Environment Department	(505) 827-2936
    Oklahoma Department of
    Environmental Quality  ...
    Texas Natural Resource
    Conservation Commission
    Indian Lands in Region 6 States -
    EPA Region 6	
    EPA REGION 7  	

    Iowa - EPA Region 7
                                    .(405) 702-5100


                                    .(512)239-6933


                                    .(214)665-7183

                                    .(913) 551-7030

                                    .(913)551-7030
    Kansas Department of Health and
    Environment  	(785) 296-5560

    Missouri Department of Natural Resources .(573) 368-2170
    Nebraska Department of
    Environmental Quality ..
    Indian Lands in Region 7 States -
    EPA Region 7	
    EPA REGION 8

    Colorado -
    EPA Region 8 .
    Montana --
    EPA Region 8
    North Dakota Department of Health

    South Dakota --
    EPA Region 8	
    Utah Department of
    Environmental Quality
                                    .(402)471-0096


                                    .(913)551-7030

                                    .(303) 312-6242


                                    .(303)312-6242


                                    .(303)312-6242

                                    .(701) 328-5210


                                    .(303)312-6242


                                    .(801) 538-6023
Ohio Environmental Protection Agency  ... .(614) 644-2903

Wisconsin Department of Natural
Resources	(608) 266-5234

Indian Lands in Region 5 States -
EPA Region 5	(312) 886-9262

EPA REGION 6  	(214) 665-7129

Arkansas Department of
Health	(501)661-2623

Louisiana Department of
Environmental Quality  	(225) 765-0578

New Mexico Environment Department ... .(505) 827-1400

Oklahoma Department of
Environmental Quality  	(405) 702-8120

Texas Natural Resource
Conservation Commission  	(512) 239-6020

Indian Lands in Region 6 States -
EPA Region 6	(214) 665-7129

EPA REGION 7  	(913) 551-7030

Iowa Department of Natural Resources ... .(515) 281-8998

Kansas Department of Health and
Environment  	(785) 296-5505

Missouri  Department of Natural Resources .(573) 526-5449

Nebraska Department of
Environmental Quality  	(402) 471-4270

Indian Lands in Region 7 States -
EPA Region 7	(913) 551-7030

EPA REGION 8  	(303) 312-6753

Colorado Department of Public
Health and Environment	(303) 692-3579

Montana  Department of
Environmental Quality  	(406) 444-4806

North Dakota Department of Health	(701) 328-5217

South Dakota Department of
Environment and Nat. Resources  	(605) 773-3296

Utah Department of
Environmental Quality  	(801) 536-4195
14

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USC Program  Agencies
Source  Water Assessment Agencies
Wyoming Department of
Environmental Quality 	(307) 777-7095

Indian Lands in Region 8 States -
EPA Region 8	(303) 312-6242

EPA REGION 9  	(415) 744-1834

Arizona --
EPA Region 9	(415) 744-1834

California - EPA Region 9	(415) 744-1834

Hawaii - EPA Region 9	(415) 744-1834

Nevada Division of
Environmental Protection	(775) 687-4670 ext. 3137

Indian Lands in Region 9 States -
EPA Region 9	(415) 744-1834

EPA REGION 10  	(206) 553-1369

Alaska -
EPA Region 10	(206) 553-1369

Idaho Department of Water Resources	(208) 327-7887

Oregon Department of
Environmental Quality 	(503) 229-5374

Washington
Department of Ecology	(360) 407-6443

Indian Lands in Region 10 States -
EPA Region 10	(206) 553-0226
 Wyoming Department of
 Environmental Quality  	(307) 777-7343

 Indian Lands in Region 8 States -
 EPA Region 8	(303) 312-6753

 EPA REGION 9 	(415) 744-1829

 Arizona Department of
 Environmental Quality  	(602) 207-4425

 California Department of Public Health	(510) 540-2177

 Hawaii Department of Health  	(808) 586-4258 ext. 229

 Nevada Bureau of Health
 Protection Services  	(775) 687-4750

 Indian Lands in Region 9 States -
 EPA Region 9	(415) 744-1829

 EPA REGION 10 	(206) 553-1901

 Alaska Department of
 Environmental Conservation	(907) 269-7514

 Idaho Department of Health and Welfare  ..  .(208) 373-0542

 Oregon Department of
 Environmental Quality  	(503) 229-5413

 Washington
 Department of Health	(360) 236-3149

 Indian Lands in Region 10 States -
 EPA Region 10	(206) 553-0226

                                                                                                       15

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EPA and State  web  sites
(When a site has information related to DIG and/or motor vehicle waste disposal practices, a direct address or link informa-
tion has been provided.)
  EPA REGION 1	www.epa.gov/regionO/eco/drinkwater/prevent.html

  Connecticut	dep.state.ct.us/wst/p2/vehicle/abwaswat.htm

  Maine	www.state.me.us/dep/blwq/docstand/uic/uichome.htm

  Massachusetts	www.magnet.state.ma.us/dep/pubssite.htm

  New Hampshire	www.des.state.nh.us/factsheets/ws/ws-22-4.htm
                                                              www.des.state.nh.usfactsheets/ws//ws-22-9.htm

  Rhode Island	http://www.state.ri.us/dem/org/waterres.htm

  Vermont	www.anr.state.vt.us/dec/ead/eadhome/capubs.htm

  EPA REGION 2	www.epa.gov/region02

  New Jersey 	www.state.nj.us/dep/dwq/gwpp.htm

  Puerto Rico	ortaleza.govpr.org


  EPA REGION 3	www.epa.gov/reg3wapd/uic/uicmain3_old.htm

  Maryland  	www.mde.state.md.us

  West Virginia	www.dep.state.wv.us/wr/OWR_Website/index.htm (click on Groundwater and DIG)


  EPA REGION 4	www.epa.gov/region04/uic/uicmain3_old.htm

  Alabama	www.adem.state.al.us

  Florida  	www2.dep.state.fl.us/water/wf/uic

  Mississippi	www.deq.state.ms.us/newweb/homepages.nsf

  North Carolina	http://gw.ehnr.state.nc.us/uic.htm

  South Carolina	www.scdhec.net/water, click on water program index, then on UIC


  EPA REGION 5  	www.epa.gov/r5water/uic/uic.htm

  Illinois	www.epa.state.il.us/land/regulatory-programs/underground-injection-control.html

  Ohio 	www.epa.state.oh.us/ddagw/uic.html

  Wisconsin  	www.dnr.state.wi.us

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EPA REGION 6	www.epa.gov/earth1r6/6en/w/sdwauic.htm




Arkansas	www.adeq.state.ar.us




Louisiana	www.dnr.state.la.us/cons/conserin/uic.ssi




New Mexico	www.nmenv.state.nm.us




Oklahoma	www.deq.state.ok.us/waste/uic.html




Texas	www.tnrcc.state.tx.us/permitting/wasteperm/uicrw/uic/index.html






EPA REGION 7	www.epa.gov/region07




Kansas	www.kdhe.state.ks.us




Missouri  	www.dnr.state.mo.us




Nebraska  	www.deq.state.ne.us/GroundW.nsf/pages/GWSec
EPA REGION 8  	www.epa.gov/unix0008/lancLwaste/uic/uic.html




North Dakota	www.health.state.nd.us/ndhd/default.asp




Utah   	www.deq.state.ut.us




Wyoming   	deq.state.wy.us/wqd/UIC/uicpage.htm






EPA REGION 9  	www.epa.gov/region09/water




Nevada 	www.state.nv.us/ndep/bwpc/uic01.htm






EPA REGION 10   	www.epa.gov/r10earth/offices/water/webgwpu.htm




Idaho  	www.idwr.state.id.us/




Oregon 	waterquality.deq.state.or.us/wq/groundwa/uichome.htm




Washington	http://198.187.fl.42/ehp/dw
                                                                                                         77

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  Here's some more  web sites related
      to motor  vehicle  waste disposal
                   management:
                 www.epa.gov/epaoswer/hazwaste/sqghand.htm

                       www.ccar-greenlink.org

                      www.smallbiz-enviroweb.org

                        www.westp2net.org

                        www.greentruck.com

              www.epa.gov/region09/cross_pr/p2/autofleet/factauto.html
18

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Attachment   B

             Best  Management  Practices
       Motor vehicle service facilities generate a variety of wastes, some
       classified as hazardous. The following list of best management practices (BMPs)
       offer you ways to reduce the amount of waste you generate and waste disposal options
       more environmentally friendly than motor vehicle waste disposal wells. They
       come from various trade publications, manuals, and State guidance. This list is
       not exhaustive, nor are specific BMPs endorsed by the EPA.  Contact your
       State UIC Program agency for more information.
       What are BMPs?
BMPs are physical, structural, and managerial practices that, when
used singly or in combination, decrease the potential for service
facilities to pollute drinking water.
       What are the benefits of BMPs?
Using best management practices for waste handling will:
 save money by reducing and recycling wastes,
 reduce regulatory record keeping and reporting,
 protect public health and the health and safety of workers,
 enhance public image,
 decrease liability by lowering contamination potential, and
 promote compliance with regulations to protect drinking water.
       TOPICS COVERED:
       Running a Dry Shop
A dry shop is a shop that has sealed all its floor drains. Although a
100% "dry shop" may not be practical in some areas due to melting
snow and ice, use of suggested methods and equipment will
decrease floor wash water volume and contamination.
       Connecting Floor Drains to
       Holding Tanks or Sanitary Sewer
This option allows you to leave floor drains open, but motor vehicle
waste will no longer enter the ground. Instead the drains would
be connected to either (1) an above-ground or underground holding
tank that meets all federal, State, and local requirements, or (2) a
municipal sanitary sewer, with approval from the sewage treatment
plant or a permit from an appropriate agency.
       Training Your Employees and Yourself
A well-tuned shop requires well-trained employees. Good
understanding and use of waste handling practices could stop costly
pollution incidents.
       Effective Communication
Signs and posters are effective tools to remind employees to use
accepted spill control procedures, and to properly handle and
dispose of wastes.
       Keeping Good Records
Good record-keeping of hazardous materials inventory,
waste disposal, and recycling, shows responsible
efforts and satisfies government agencies.
                                                                           19

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   Running a Dry Shop

   When used together, the following practices
   and equipment significantly lower the amount
   of water needed to clean shop floors.
   Minimizing wastewater promotes regulatory
   compliance and reduces environmental liability.

   Prevent spills from ever reaching the floor:

      install drip pans and trays throughout the
      shop (under vehicles and wherever liquids
      are transferred),
      use funnel drum covers to minimize spills when transferring liquids from one container
      to another, and

      install bulk, pressurized, overhead fluid delivery systems (available from all major motor
      oil manufacturers) to reduce spills and increase work efficiency.

   Clean up spills immediately:

      employees should carry rags so that small spills can be wiped dry when they occur,

      clean with reusable cloth rags, rather than paper towels, and address commercial
      laundering concerns,

      make sure spill cleanup equipment is well marked and easily available at all times,

      use absorbent materials (pads, mats, hydrophobic mops, and floor sweeps) to remove
      medium-size or larger spills, and

      wring out absorbed fluid into suitable containers for recycling or disposal, reuse
      absorbents as long as possible, and  properly deal with spent absorbents.

   Keep floor clean and dry:

      sweep floor with a broom every day to prevent unnecessary dirt and contaminant
      buildup,

      use only a damp mop for general cleanups and after sweeping (do not generate
      excessive wash water),

      never hose down work areas (this practice generates large quantities of contaminated
      wash water that must be disposed of properly), and

      consider sealing shop floor with impervious materials such as epoxy or other suitable
      sealant for easier cleanups.
20

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Connecting  Floor Drains  to Holding  Tanks  or Sanitary Sewer

Floor drains must be connected to a holding tank or sanitary sewer if it is not possible to
obtain a permit or eliminate them in vehicle service areas.

Connecting floor drains to a holding tank
(above-ground or underground):

   make sure the holding tank meets all federal, state, and local requirements,

   monitor the fluid level and schedule regular pump-outs using licensed or certified waste
   haulers, and

   check for leaks and drips on a regular basis.

Connecting floor drains to a municipal sanitary sewer:

   make sure the hookup is legal and approved by the local sewage treatment plant,

   do not connect floor drains to a storm drain or storm sewer, and

   discharge only allowable wastewater to the sanitary sewer.

Training Your Employees and
Yourself

Well-trained employees generate less
waste, resulting in a safer and more cost-
effective shop.

Educate employees about the benefits of
preventing pollution on the shop floor.
Provide training on:

   good housekeeping practices (e.g., proper use, transfer, and storage of materials and
   wastes),

   suitable spill prevention measures and correct use of spill cleanup equipment,

   recycling procedures and storage of recyclable materials,

   environmental and public health consequences of improper waste disposal (e.g.,
   contamination of drinking water and creation of hazardous waste sites), and

   how reduction of hazardous waste directly relates to job responsibility, performance
   reviews, and shop success.
                                                                                 27

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   Make sure employees know about Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs):

      indicate where MSDSs are located for products used in the shop (the Occupational
      Safety and Health Administration requires that MSDSs be kept and made available to
      employees),

      instruct employees on the content of MSDSs (fire and explosion potential, reactivity
      with other substances, health hazards, protective measures, spill procedures, and
      special precautions), and

      have manufacturers or sales representatives provide training on the proper use of
      products and equipment.
   Provide "refreshers" to make sure employees keep good practices in
   mind and to inform employees of new regulatory requirements:

   Effective Communication
   Place signs and posters in shop to remind employees about pollu-
   tion prevention, spill avoidance and control procedures, and emer-
   gency response information.
   Stencil or post notices to remind employees:

      to use the right containers or drums to store recyclable wastes,

      to apply proper spill control methods to cleanup spills,

      not to discard motor vehicle fluids into floor drains or work sinks, and
      not to allow motor vehicle fluids or floor wash water to enter storm drains (and pollute
      local waterways and ground water).
          RECYCLABLE
             d
          WASTE ONLY
 PLEASE
PLACE USED
 TOWELS
  IN
CONTAINERS
 PROVIDED
22

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Keeping Good Records

Maintaining good records is important in
order to track pollution prevention efforts
and other benefits of using BMPs.

Update facility plans to reflect:

   current shop design (for example,
   elimination of all open floor drains), and

   location of potential contamination and
   stormwater drainage areas (for use in
   developing a stormwater pollution
   prevention plan).
Update permits to reflect:

   changes in shop operation, and

   changes in applicable federal, State, and local requirements.

Maintain supply inventory, waste disposal, and recycling records to track:

   materials used and savings linked to reduction of wastes, and

   progress of efforts to prevent pollution.

Need More  Information?

For more information, call EPA's Small Business Ombudsman Office at 1-800-368-5888 or
the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791. Also, depending on location, contact
the appropriate State or regional EPA contacts listed in Attachment A of the Small Entity
Compliance Guide. Many State and regional EPA offices have developed BMP guides for
pollution prevention that are available upon request or on associated web sites.
                                                                                 23

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Attachment C
 EPA Pro-Closure Notification Form
              One Form
24

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Type or print all information. See reverse for instructions
Form Approved 12/99 OMB No. 2040-0214
United States Environmental Protection Agency
DIG Federal Reporting System
Class V Well Pre-Closure Notification Form
1. Name of facility:
Address of facility:

Citv/Town: State:
County: Location:
2. Name of Owner/Operator:
Address of Owner/Operator:

Citv/Town: State:
Legal contact: Phone number:
3. Tvpe of well(s):
4. Well construction (check all that apply):
D Drywell Q] Septic tank Q Cesspool
D Improved sinkhole D Drainfield/leachfield D Other
5. Type of discharge:

fi. Average flow (gallons/day): 7. Year of well construction:



Zip Code:
Lat./Long.:



Zip Code:

Number of well(s):



8. Type of well closure (check all that apply):
D Sample fluids/sediments D Clean out well
D Appropiate disposal of remaining fluids/sediments D Install permanent plug
D Remove well & any contaminated soil D Conversion to other well type
D Other (describe):
9. Proposed date of well closure:
1 0. Name of preparer: Date:




Certification
I certify under the penalty of law that I have personally examined and am familiar with the information submitted in this docu-
ment and all attachments and that, based on my inquiry of those individuals immediately responsible for obtaining the infor-
mation, I believe that the information is true, accurate, and complete. I am aware that there are significant penalties for sub-
mitting false information, including the possibility of fine and imprisonment. (Ref. 40 CFR 144.32).
Name and Official Title (Please type or printi Signature
Date Signed
EPA Form 7520-17
                                                                                                                         25

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           INSTRUCTIONS FOR EPA FORM 7520-17

          This form contains the minimum information that you must provide your UIC Program Director if you intend to close your Class V well. This form
          will be used exclusively where the EPA administers the UIC Program:  AK, AS, AZ, CA, CO, DC, DE, HI, IA, IN, KY, Ml, MN, MT, NY, PA, SD, TN, VA, VI,
          and on all Tribal Lands.  If you are located in a different State or jurisdiction, ask the agency that administers the UIC Program in your State for
          the appropriate form.

          If you are closing two or more Class V wells that are of similar construction at your facility (two dry wells, for example) you may use one form. If
          you are closing Class V wells of different construction (a septic system and a dry well, for example) use one form per construction type.

          The numbers below correspond to the numbers on the form.

          1.    Supply the name and street address of the facility where the Class V well(s) is located.  Include the City/Town, State (U.S. Postal Service
               abbreviation) and Zip Code. If there is no street address for the Class V well, provide the route number or locate the well(s) on a map and
               attach it to this form.  Under "Location,"  provide the  Latitude/Longitude of the well, if available.

          2.    Provide the name and mailing address of the owner of the facility, or  if the facility is operated by lease, the operator of the facility.  Include
               the name  and phone number of  the legal contact for  any questions regarding the information provided on this form.

          3.    Indicate the type of Class V well that you intend to close (for example, motor vehicle waste disposal well or cesspool).  Provide the  number
               of wells of this well type at your location that will be closed.

          4.    Mark an "X"  in the appropriate box to indicate the type of well construction.  Mark all that apply to your situation. For example, for a sep-
               tic tank that drains into a drywell, mark both the "septic tank" and "drywell"  boxes. Please provide a generalized sketch or schematic of
               the well construction if available.

          5.    List or describe the types of fluids that enter the Class V well. If available, attach a  copy of the chemical analysis results and/or the
               Material Safety Data Sheets for the fluids that enter the well.

          6.    Estimate the average daily flow  into the well in gallons per day.

          7.    Provide the year that the Class V well was constructed. If unknown, provide the length of time that your business has been at this  location
               and used this well.

          8.    Mark an "X"  in the appropriate box(s) to indicate briefly how the well closure  is expected to  proceed.  Mark all that apply to your situation.
               For example,  all boxes except the  "Remove well & any contaminated  soil" and  "Other" would be marked if: the connection of an automo-
               tive service bay drain leading to a septic tank and drainfield will be closed, but the septic system will continue to be used for washroom
               waste disposal only, and the fluids and sludge throughout the system will be removed for proper disposal, the system cleaned, a cement
               plug placed in the service bay drain and the pipe leading to the  washroom connection, and the septic tank/drainfield remains open for sep-
               tic use only.  In this example, the motor vehicle waste disposal well is being converted to another well type (a large capacity septic sys-
               tem).

          9.    Self explanatory.

          10.  Self explanatory.

          PLEASE READ ...

          The purpose of  this form is to serve as the means for the Class V well owner or operator's notice to the UIC Director of his/her intent to close the
          well in accordance with  Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR) Section  144.12(a). According to 40 CFR 144.86, you must notify the
          UIC Program  Director at least 30 days prior to well closure of your intent to close and abandon your well. Upon receipt of this form, if the
          Director determines that more specific information is required to be submitted to ensure that  the well closure will be conducted in a manner that
          will protect underground sources of drinking water (as defined in 40 CFR 144.3), the Director can require the owner/operator to prepare, submit
          and comply with a  closure plan acceptable to, and approved by the Director.

          Please be advised that this form is intended to satisfy Federal UIC requirements regarding pre-closure notification only.  Other State, Tribal  or
          Local requirements may  also apply.
                                                             Paper Work Reduction Act Notice

               The public reporting and record keeping burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1.5 hours per respondent.
               Burden means the total time, effort, or financial resources expended by persons to generate, maintain, retain, or disclose or provide
               information to or for a Federal agency. This includes the time needed to review instructions, develop, acquire, install, and utilize tech-
               nology and systems for the purposes of collecting, validating, and verifying information, processing and maintaining information, and
               disclosing and providing information, adjust the existing ways to comply with any previously applicable instructions and require-
               ments; train personnel to be able to respond to a collection of information; search data sources; complete and review the collection of
               information; and transmit or otherwise disclose the information.  An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person  is not required
               to respond to, a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid  OMB control number.

               Send comments on the Agency's need  for this information, the accuracy of the provided burden estimates, and any suggested meth-
               ods for minimizing respondent burden, including thorough the use of automated collection techniques to the Director, Regulatory
               information Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (2137), 401 M. Street, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20460. Include the OMB con-
               trol number in any correspondence.  Do not send the completed form to this address.
          EPA Form 7520-17
26

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Attachment   D
    New Federal Requirements For Owners
         And Operators  Of MVWD Wells*
  WELL STATUS
REQUIREMENT
DEADLINE
  If your motor vehicle
  waste disposal well is,
Then...
By...
  Existing (operational
  or under construction
  by April 5,2000),
If your well is in a ground water
protection area, you must close the
well or obtain a permit;
                  If your well is in an other sensitive
                  ground water area, you must close
                  the well or obtain a permit
                  If you plan to seek a waiver from
                  the ban and apply for a permit, you
                  must meet MCLs at the point of
                  injection while your permit
                  application is under review, if you
                  choose to keep operating your well;

                  If you receive a permit, you must
                  comply with all permit conditions
                  if you choose to keep operating your
                  well, including requirements to meet
                  MCLs and other health-based
                  standards at the point of injection,
                  follow best management practices, and
                  monitor your injectate and sludge quality;
Within 1 year of the completion of
your local source water assessment;
your UIC program director may
extend the closure deadline, but not
the permit application deadline, for
up to one year if the most efficient
compliance option is connection to a
sanitary sewer or installation of new
treatment technology.

By January 1,2007, your UIC
Program Director may extend the
closure deadline, but not the permit
application deadline, for up to one
year if the most efficient compliance
option is connection to a sanitary
sewer or installation of new treatment
technology.

The date you submit your permit
application.
                       The date(s) specified in your permit.
                                                             27

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  WELL STATUS
REQUIREMENT
DEADLINE
  If your motor vehicle
  waste disposal well is,
Then...
By...
  Existing (operational
  or under construction
  by April 5,2000),
If your well is in a State that has not
completed all its local assessments by
January 1,2004, or by the extended
date if your State has obtained an
extension as described in 144.87, and
you are outside an area with a
completed assessment you must close
the well or obtain a permit;
                          If your well is in a State that has not
                          delineated other sensitive ground water
                          areas by January 1,2004, and you are
                          outside of an area with a completed
                          assessment you must close the well or
                          obtain a permit regardless of your
                          location;
                          If you plan to close your well, you
                          must notify the U 1C Program
                          director of your intent to close the
                          well (this includes closing your well
                          prior to conversion) Note: this
                          information is requested on the
                          Federal UIC Reporting Form
                          (7520 series) for owners and
                          operators titled "Preclosure
                          Notification for Closure of Injection
                          Wells;"
January 1,2005, unless your State
obtains an extension as described in
144.87(b) in whiccase your
deadline is January 1,2006; your
UIC Program Director may extend
the closure deadline, but not the
permit application deadline, for up to
one year if the most efficient
compliance option is connection to a
sanitary sewer or installation of new
treatment technology.

January 1,2007, unless your State
obtains an extension as described in
144.87 in which case your deadline
is January, 2008.
                                     At least 30 days prior to closure.
  New or converted
  (construction not started
  before April 5,2000),
Are prohibited
April 5,2000.
  *See "Underground Injection Control Regulations for Class Vinjection wells, Revision; Final Rule,"
  Federal Register, Vol. 64, No. 234, page 68546, Tuesday, December/, 1999.
28

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Time  Line for Rule Implementation and Compliance

The following time line outlines the implementation and compliance schedules for States that link
the Class V Rule requirements with Ground Water Protection Areas and Other Sensitive Ground
Water Areas. However, some States may not link the Class V Rule with Ground Water Protection
Areas and  Other Sensitive Ground Water Areas, and will apply the Rule statewide. Owners and
operators should contact their UIC Program Director to determine the implementation and compli-
ance schedule for their State.

A. Ground  Water Protection Areas

States and EPA Regions have until January 1,2004, to complete assessments for their ground
water protection areas, unless they apply and receive an extension of up to one year to complete
the task (by January 1,2005).

When a local assessment of a ground water protection area is completed, it will be made public. If
your motor vehicle waste disposal well is located in such an area, you will have one year from the
assessment completion date to close your motor vehicle waste disposal well or comply with  permit
conditions. You may be able to apply for and receive an extension of up to one year if the most effi-
cient option for you is to connect to a sanitary sewer or install a new treatment technology.

Therefore, depending on your location and the timing of the  completion of the local assessment,
along with the option to extend your compliance date, you must be in compliance with the rule
requirements some time between April 5,2000, and January 1,2007. But, most likely, you will
need to be in compliance by no later than January 1,2005.

In summary, you must meet all applicable rule requirements within one year from the assessment
completion date if your well is located in a ground water protection area, unless you apply for and
receive an  extension of up to one year to comply.

B. Other Sensitive Ground Water Areas

States and EPA Regions have until January 1,2004, to delineate other sensitive ground water
areas, unless they apply and receive an extension of up to one year to complete this task (by
January 1,2005).

When other sensitive ground water areas  have been delineated (January 1,2004, unless the State
has received an extension) it will be made public. If your motor vehicle waste disposal well is
located in such an area, you will have until January 1,2007, to close your motor vehicle waste dis-
posal well or comply with permit conditions. You may be able to apply for and receive an exten-
sion of up to one year if the most efficient option for you is to connect to a sanitary sewer or
install a new treatment technology.

If your State or EPA Region does apply for an extension to complete this task, you must then meet
all applicable rule requirements  by January 1,2008. Because your State or EPA Region applies for
an extension, you may not apply for an extension to implement your compliance option.

Therefore, depending on your location and the timing of the  completion of the delineation, along
with the option to extend your compliance date, you must be in compliance with the rule require-
ments by January 1, 2007, or January 1, 2008, at the latest.
                                                                                      29

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 Attachment    E
                            Glossary
  We have included only those definitions that were added or modified as a result of the
  Class V Rule. Readers seeking additional information or clarification are directed to the pre-
  amble of the final rule and 40 CFR  144.3 and 146.3.

  Cesspool means a "drywell" that receives untreated sanitary waste containing human
  excreta, and which sometimes has an open bottom and/or perforated sides.

  Drywell means a well, other than an improved sinkhole or subsurface fluid distribution sys-
  tem, completed above the water table so that its bottom and sides are typically dry except
  when receiving fluids.

  Ground Water Protection Area(s) is used in this rule to identify areas delineated and
  assessed under Section  1453 of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) for community and
  non-transient non-community water systems that use ground water as a source, and are
  therefore subject to this rule. For many States, these areas will be the same as Wellhead
  Protection Areas that have been  or will be  delineated as defined in Section 1428 of the
  SDWA. In cases where the State delineates zones or areas representing various levels of
  protection, the State would determine which areas correspond to ground water protection
  areas for the purposes of this rule.

  Improved sinkhole means a naturally occurring karst depression or other natural crevice
  found in volcanic terrain or other geologic  settings which have been modified by man for
  the purpose of directing and emplacing fluids into the subsurface.

  Motor Vehicle Waste Disposal Well means a well that receives or has received fluids from
  vehicular repair or maintenance activities,  such as an auto body repair shop, automotive
  repair shop, new and used car dealership,  specialty repair shop (e.g., transmission and
  muffler repair shop), or any facility that does any vehicular repair work.

  Other Sensitive Ground Water Area(s) is used in this rule to identify additional areas in a
  State that fall outside of a Ground Water Protection Area which are vulnerable to contami-
  nation from the well-types regulated by this action. These other sensitive ground water
  areas may include: areas overlying sole-source aquifers; highly productive aquifers supply-
  ing private wells; continuous and highly productive aquifers at points distant from public
  water supply wells; areas where water supply aquifers are recharged; karst aquifers that
  discharge to surface reservoirs serving as  public water supplies; vulnerable or sensitive
  hydrogeologic settings, such as glacial outwash deposits, eolian sands, and fractured vol-
  canic rock; and areas of special concern selected based on a combination of factors, such
  as hydrogeologic sensitivity, depth to ground water, significance as a drinking water source,
  and prevailing land-use practices.
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Point of Injection means the last accessible sampling point prior to waste fluids being
released into the subsurface environment through a Class V injection well. For example, the
point of injection of a Class V septic system might be the distribution box -- the last accessi-
ble sampling point before the waste fluids drain into the underlying soils. For a drywell, it is
likely to be the well bore itself.

Sanitary Waste means liquid or solid wastes originating solely from humans and human
activities, such as wastes collected from toilets, showers, wash basins, sinks used for
cleaning domestic areas, sinks used for food preparation, clothes washing operations, and
sinks or washing machines where food and beverage serving dishes, glasses, and utensils
are cleaned. Sources of these wastes may include single or multiple residences, hotels and
motels, restaurants, bunkhouses, schools, ranger stations, crew quarters, guard stations,
campgrounds, picnic grounds, day-use recreation areas, other commercial facilities, and
industrial facilities provided the waste is  not mixed with industrial waste.

Septic system means a "well" that is used to discharge sanitary waste below the surface
and is typically comprised of a septic tank and subsurface fluid distribution system or dis-
posal system.

Subsurface fluid distribution system means an assemblage of perforated pipes, drain tiles,
or other similar mechanisms intended to  distribute fluids below the surface of the ground.

Well means a bored, drilled, or driven shaft whose depth is greater than the largest surface
dimension; or, a dug hole whose depth is greater than the largest surface dimension; or, an
improved sinkhole; or, a subsurface fluid  distribution system.

Well injection means the subsurface discharge of fluids through a well.
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