United States
       Environmental Protection
       Agency
Office of Water (4303)
Washington, DC 20460
EPA-821-R-01-018
January 2001
v>EPA Cost Methodology Report for
       Swine and Poultry Sectors

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              Final
  Cost Methodology Report
for Swine and Poultry Sectors
    Engineering and Analysis Division
     Office of Science and Technology
   U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
        Washington, D.C. 20460
            January 2001

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             ACKNOWLEDGMENTS AND DISCLAIMER
This report has been reviewed and approved for publication by the Engineering and Analysis
Division, Office of Science and Technology.  This report was prepared by Tetra Tech, Inc., under
the direction and review of Paul Shriner at the Office of Science and Technology.

Neither the United States government nor any of its employees, contractors, subcontractors, or
other employees makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or
responsibility for any third party's use of, or the results of such use of, any information,
apparatus, product, or process discussed in this report, or represents that its use by such a third
party would not infringe on privately owned rights.

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                                       Contents

1.0    Overview of Cost Methodology
2.0    Data Sources
3.0    Estimated Counts of Impacted Facilities and Corresponding Animal Counts
4.0    Summary of Development of Model Farms/Cost Model
       4.1    Development of Model Farms
       4.2    Land Availability Methodology
             4.2.1  Computation of Nitrogen and Phosphorus Generation
             4.2.2  Plant Nutrient Requirements
             4.2.3  Sum of Nutrients Generated and Application Rates in a County
             4.2.4  Categorization of Land Availability Options
       4.3    Effluent Limitation Guidelines (ELG) Options
             4.3.1  Existing Sources
             4.3.2  New Source Performance Standards
                    4.3.2.1 Assumptions on Behavior of New Sources
                    4.3.2.2 Options Considered for NSPS
5.0    On-Farm Costs
       5.1    Cost Categories
       5.2    Frequency Factors
       5.3    Regional Factors
       5.4    Key Regions
       5.5    Nutrient Management Planning
             5.5.1  Fixed, One-Time Costs
                    5.5.1.1 Training and Certification for Manure Application
                    5.5.1.2 Owner/Operator Permit Nutrient Management Planning (PNMP)
                           Training
                    5.5.1.3 Ground Water Well Installation and Initial Sampling
                    5.5.1.4 Surface Water Monitoring
                    5.5.1.5 Soil Augers, Manure Samplers, and Scales for Calibrating Manure
                           Spreaders
             5.5.2  Nonannual, Reoccurring Costs
                    5.5.2.1 On-Farm Nutrient Management Plan (NMP) Development
                    5.5.2.2 On-Farm Soil Testing
                    5.5.2.3 Assessment of Feedlot/Ground Water Link to Surface Water
             5.5.3  Annual Costs
                    5.5.3.1 Manure Testing
                    5.5.3.2 Record Keeping and Reporting
                    5.5.3.3 Calibration of Manure  Spreader
                    5.5.3.4 Operation and Maintenance for Ground Water Monitoring
                    5.5.3.5 Operation and Maintenance for Surface Water Monitoring
       5.6    Facility Upgrades
             5.6.1  Fixed Costs

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                     5.6.1.1 Mortality Composting Facility
                     5.6.1.2 Manure Storage (for Poultry Litter)
                     5.6.1.3 Lagoon Liners
                     5.6.1.4 Lagoon Covers
                     5.6.1.5 Lagoon Depth Marker
                     5.6.1.6 Anaerobic Digesters
                     5.6.1.7 High Rise Hog Facility Upgrades
                     5.6.1.8 Storm Water Diversions
                     5.6.1.9 Field Runoff Control
              5.6.2   Annual and Reoccurring Costs
                     5.6.2.1 Visual Inspection
                     5.6.2.2 Mortality Composting Facility
                     5.6.2.3 Lagoon Liners
                     5.6.2.4 Lagoon Covers
                     5.6.2.5 Anaerobic Digesters
                     5.6.2.6 High Rise Hog Facility Upgrade
                     5.6.2.7 Field Runoff Control
       5.7    Land Application
              5.7.1   Surface Application with Incorporation
              5.7.2   Injection of Semisolid or Liquid Manure
              5.7.3   Irrigation of Liquid Manure
       5.8    Feeding Strategies that Reduce Excess Nutrients on the Farm
              5.8.1   Poultry
              5.8.2   Swine
       5.9    Manure Hauling and Strategies to Make Manure More Transportable
              5.9.1   Composting and  Solid-Liquid Separation
              5.9.2   Retrofit and Water Recycle
                     5.9.2.1 Use of Dilution Factors in the Cost Model
                     5.9.2.2 Reduced Costs by Recycling Flush Water
                     5.9.2.3 Retrofit to Scraper System
                     5.9.2.4 High Rise Houses
                     5.9.2.5 Digester and Recycle Flush Treatment for Option 5
              5.9.3   Transportation of Excess Manure
                     5.9.3.1 Quantity of Manure to be Hauled
                     5.9.3.2 Manure Hauling Distances
                     5.9.3.3 Manure Hauling Costs
6.0    Energy Costs
7.0    Cost Model Structure
       7.1    Program Code
              7.1.1   "Main" Program
              7.1.2   Subroutines
              7.1.3   Data Files
       7.2    Applications
       7.3    Outputs

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8.0    References

Appendix A - Differentiating Breeding, Slaughter, and Integrated Operations
Appendix B - Crop Nutrient Requirements
Appendix C - Draft Methodology for Estimating Storage Requirements for Option 7
Appendix D - Frequency Factors of Compliance for Cost Items
Appendix E - Revised Transportation Distances for Category 2 and 3 Type Operations
Appendix F - Transportation Distance for Category 2 and 3 Type Operations
Appendix G - Equations Used in Model Feedlot Costs Program
Appendix H - Variable Names Used in Model Feedlot Costs Program
Appendix I  - Regulatory Compliance Costs

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                                        Figures

4-1    Animal Unit Calculations and Subsector Classification for Swine
4-2    Animal Unit Calculations and Subsector Classification for Chickens
4-3    Animal Unit Calculations and Subsector Classification for Turkeys
7-1    Flow Chart for Swine and Poultry Cost Model
                                           VI

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                                        Tables

3-1    Economics Model Matrix: Summary of Swine and Poultry Farms by Size Class
3-2    Comparison of EPA and USDA Animal Unit Definitions
4-1    Selected Census of Agriculture Variables for Swine
4-2    Selected Census of Agriculture Variables for Chickens
4-3    Selected Census of Agriculture Variables for Turkeys
4-4    Economics Model Matrix:  Definition of Size Groups and Key Regions
4-5    Manure Characteristics Used to Calculate Nutrient Production
4-6    Regional Recovery Factors for Manure
4-7    Example of Weighted Averaging Method for Manure Recovery Factor
4-8    Percentages of Operations Classified as Category 1, 2, and 3
4-9    Retail Cost of Nitrogen Fertilizer
4-10   AFO Nutrient Management Planning Basis by Animal Sector and Region Based on
       Percentage of Agricultural Soils Analyzed by Soil Test Laboratories in 1997 That Tested
       High or Above for Phosphorus
4-11   Summary of Practices and Technologies for ELG Options
4-12   Summary of Practices and Technologies Costed under Baseline (B) and each NSPS
       Option
5-1    Illustration of Method to Calculate Frequency Factors from Weighted Averages
5-2    Detailed Estimate of Initial Costs for Surface Water Sampling
5-3    Detailed Estimate of Annual Costs for Surface Water Sampling
5-4    Mortality Rate, Mortality Weight and Time to Maturity for Various Swine and Poultry
       Operations
5-5    Acreage with Potential for Ground Water Contamination
5-6    Manufacturer-Suggested Costs of Lagoon Liners and Covers for Va-Acre Lagoons
5-7    Pollutant Removal Efficiencies for Vegetated Buffers
5-8    Crop Yields, Nutrient Removal and  Application Rates (Ibs/ac) from the Ag Waste
       Management Field Handbook  (AWMFH) for Typical Crops used on Swine and Poultry
       Operations in the Various Regions
5-9    Comparison of Nutrient Removal  and Application Rates (Ibs/ac) from the 1997 Census of
       Agriculture with County Extension Values or using 24 Crops and Pastureland
       Information in the Census
5-10   Number of Production Cycles  per Year for Each Animal Operation
5-11   Animal and Manure Mass and Manure Quantity Values Used to Calculate the Total
       Amount of Manure and Litter Produced by Each  Operation
5-12   Recoverable Manure Correction Factors for  Different Operation Types in Different
       Regions
5-13   In-County Transport Distances and Out-of-County Transport Distances for the Various
       Regions in the United States
5-14   Transportation Distances for Category 2 and 3 Operations for the Various Regions in the
       United States
5-15   Costs for Hauling Manure Off-Site for Solid and Liquid Manure
6-1    Data Read by Subroutine Constants.f90

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6-2   Data Read by Subroutine Facupg.f90
6-3   Data Read by Subroutine Nutred.f90
6-4   Number of Model Facilities by Animal Type
                                         Vlll

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 1.0    OVERVIEW OF COST METHODOLOGY

 The Clean Water Act authorizes the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to
 develop technology-based effluent limitations guidelines and standards (ELGs) for the control of
 pollutant discharges from point source categories.  Certain animal feeding operations (AFOs) are
 defined as point sources. The existing ELG for the Feedlots Point Source Category (40 CFR Part
 412) covers these point sources.  Section 301(d) of the Clean Water Act directs EPA to
 periodically review existing ELGs and revise them when necessary. As part of the EPA-U.S.
 Department of Agriculture (USD A) national unified strategy to minimize the water quality and
 public health impacts of AFOs, EPA is reviewing the Feedlots ELG and expects to revise the
 existing effluent guidelines covering AFOs. This overview addresses the methodology for
 estimating potential compliance costs for the swine and poultry (turkey, laying hen, and broiler)
 sectors of AFOs.

 The initial steps in the process of estimating potential  compliance costs for the swine and poultry
 sectors include gathering and analyzing data on swine and poultry AFOs to establish a baseline
 picture. The baseline includes the amount of manure and wastewater produced, the pollution
 control and management practices in place, current land application practices, and current state
 requirements. Based on these data, EPA identifies possible new regulatory requirements that
 may be imposed through revision  of the ELGs. These new requirements are typically grouped
 into several  possible regulatory options.  These regulatory options sometimes specify a limit on
 process wastewater discharges (e.g., zero discharge) and might also require specific best
 management practices, or BMPs (e.g., development of a nutrient management plan).

 For each regulatory option considered, EPA analyzes the technical and economic  feasibility for
 the industry. To complete the economic analysis, EPA estimates the costs to install, operate, and
 maintain specific techniques and practices that serve as the basis for the effluent limitations and
 standards in each regulatory option. EPA traditionally develops either facility-specific or model
facility costs. It must be noted that the Clean Water Act and the proposed regulations require only
 that effluent limitations and standards be achieved. These proposed regulations do not require
 that facilities install any specific technologies.

 EPA first collects detailed process information and data about many, if not all, facilities in the
 industry in order to estimate facility-specific costs if appropriate. EPA has authority to collect
 information necessary to develop regulations.  EPA then may use this site-specific information to
 determine how the potential regulatory options will affect facilities in an industrial category and
 to estimate the costs of compliance.

 When facility-specific data are not available for all facilities, EPA develops model facilities
 based on available data to  provide a reasonable representation of the industry. Model facilities
 reflect the different characteristics found in the industry, such as the size or capacity of an
 operation, type of operation, geographic location, mode of operation, and type of waste
 management options.  Data from engineering site visits, information provided by  the industry,
 and other available information forms the basis of these models.  EPA estimates the number of

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facilities represented by each model, assesses cost and financial impacts for each model facility,
and calculates industry-level costs by multiplying model facility costs by the number of facilities
represented by each particular model.

Given the type of information that is available for the swine and poultry industries, as well as the
large number of facilities in the industries, EPA has chosen a model facility approach to estimate
compliance costs. Such an approach is consistent with the USDA representative farm approach.
EPA's cost methodology is summarized in Chapter 11 of the Development Document.

2.0    DATA SOURCES

EPA collected data from a number of sources, including more than 50 site visits to swine and
poultry facilities [Docket W-00-27, section 5], industry  trade associations (e.g., the National Pork
Producers Council, United Egg Producers and United Egg Association,  National Turkey
Federation, and National Chicken Council), environmental groups (Clean Water Network and
Natural Resources Defense Council), USDA-Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS),
Economic Research Service (ERS), National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), Animal and
Plant Inspection Service  (APHIS), universities, state cooperatives and Extension Services, and
the literature. These various sources have been used to  compile information that presents a
detailed profile of the industry and can be used to estimate the costs associated with potential
new pollution control requirements for swine and poultry AFOs. Several data sources that were
particularly useful include National Animal Health Monitoring Systems (NAHMS) surveys, the
1997 Census of Agriculture, and USDA's analysis of the Census.  These data sources are briefly
described below. EPA's range of data collection activities are described in detail in Chapter 3 of
the Development Document.

One of the main responsibilities of USDA's APHIS is to enhance the care of animals. APHIS
initiated the NAHMS as  a program to collect, analyze, and disseminate  information on animal
health, management, and productivity. NAHMS conducts national studies to gather data and
generate descriptive statistics and information from data collected by other industry sources.
EPA gathered information from several NAHMS reports such as the Swine '95 and Layer '99
reports.  EPA also requested additional analysis of the data presented in these reports that would
help EPA better characterize swine and poultry operations by region and farm size.

USDA's Census of Agriculture is a complete accounting of United States agricultural production
and is the only source of uniform, comprehensive agricultural data for every county in the nation.
The most recent Census reflects calendar year 1997 conditions. USDA periodically publishes
aggregated data from these databases and also compiles customized analyses of the data to
members of the public and other government agencies.  In providing such analyses, USDA
maintains a sufficient level of aggregation to ensure the confidentiality of any individual
operation's activities or holdings. These data were used to identify the total number of animal
feeding operations (AFO) and their general geographical distributions.  USDA also compiles and
performs analysis on Census data that EPA used for its analyses. These analyses indicate the
amount of cropland  available to land apply animal manure, the potential for nitrogen and

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phosphorus excesses relative to crop needs, and the potential for geographical areas to have
nutrient excesses relative to all cropland in the area.

3.0    ESTIMATED COUNTS OF IMPACTED FACILITIES AND CORRESPONDING ANIMAL
       COUNTS

National estimates of the number of swine and poultry AFOs in 1997 are shown in Table 3-1.
Animal sectors were determined based upon the methodology described in Appendix A. To
generate these farm count estimates, summary statistics were computed and forwarded to EPA by
NASS.  Due to NASS non-disclosure practices for analysis of the 1997 Census of Agriculture
data, it was necessary for EPA to adjust the desired size classes and regions to develop tables that
could be published by NASS and used in future analysis. In some cases only national results
could be developed.  The results of this iterative process are presented in Table 3-1. Not every
facility presented in Table 3-1 is an AFO, and even fewer are subject to the revised regulations.
However the cost models were developed assuming all swine and poultry farms greater than 300
AU are potentially impacted by the proposed revisions. One alternative in the proposed
regulation would consider middle tier AFOs (300-1,000 AU) to be CAFOs if more than 12 tons
of manure is transported off-site to a single recipient annually,  unless the recipient certifies that
the manure will be properly managed.  This condition is not explicitly addressed in the cost
model since it is assumed that middle tier AFOs will take such appropriate action as needed to
avoid CAFO designation.

Farm counts in Table 3-1 are summarized by the number of animal units (AU) in inventory at
the farm. Table 3-2 compares the number of animals that would constitute 1,000 AU for five
different animal types, based on two frequently used agency definitions.  Note that most animal
unit definitions use a 1,000 Ib beef cow as the standard reference, but for other animal sectors the
definition is not consistent, and it is important to distinguish between the different AU
definitions in common use. EPA defines animal units  in 40 CFR Part 122 Appendix B. This is
the animal unit definition used by EPA when developing costs. USDA defines animal units on a
liveweight basis, which  is cited in most NRCS publications referenced in this document.
Additional information may be found in Chapter 4 of the Development Document and in the
Record.

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            Table 3-1. Summary of Swine and Poultry Farms by Size Class
Sector
Modeled
Swine: Mature
Swine: Nursery
Layer: Wet
Layer: Dry
Broiler
Turkey
Size Class (AU = EPA Animal Units)
<300AU
103,512
0
1,950
70,368
20,716
11,617
300-1000 AU
10,191
83
800
1,334
10,203
1,732
>1000 AU
4,092
0
360
360
3,940
369
All Model
Farms
117,795
83
3,110
72,062
34,859
13,718
Source: Swine and poultry counts from analysis of 1997 Census of Agriculture tabulated by NASS.
   Table 3-2.  Comparison of EPA and USDA Definitions of Number of Animals in 1,000
                                  Animal Units
Animal Type
Beef cow
Dairy cow
Swine
Layer (wet)
Layer (dry)
Broiler
Turkey
Animal Unit
(EPA definition)
1,000
750
2,500
30,000
100,000
100,000
55,000
Animal Unit
(USDA definition)
1,000
740
9,090
250,000
250,000
455,000
67,000
4.0   SUMMARY OF DEVELOPMENT OF MODEL FARMS/COST MODEL

EPA developed model farms to describe the types of swine and poultry operations that will incur
compliance cost for various regulatory options under consideration. Chapter 11 of the Technical
Development Document provides a summary of this process. This section provides additional
details.

4.1   Development of Model Farms

EPA developed base models that capture those characteristics that usually vary from farm to
farm.  The base model is described by the following:
Animal type - Swine, layers, broilers, and turkeys.

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Subsector - The subsectors considered for swine are slaughter (grow-finish and wean-finish
operations), breeding, farrow to wean (farrowing), and farrow-to-finish (both swine for slaughter
and sows). The subsectors considered for chickens are layers only, pullets only, both layers and
pullets, hatcheries, breeders, and broilers.  The subsectors considered for turkeys are slaughter
(grow-out), breeders, and both breeders and grow-out.

Breeding operations are generally smaller than both EPA thresholds of 300 and 1,000 animal
units, thus they are not subject to effluent limitations guidelines and standards (ELG). Further
discussion with industry indicated many breeding farms, especially turkey and  swine breeders,
are sited away from other facilities. This helps these facilities to minimize losses that might
occur due to a breach in biosecurity. On the basis of smaller farm size and typically separate
siting, the breeders and hatcheries subsectors were not analyzed further.

In addition to breeding operations, sometimes immature  swine (termed feeder pigs or weaners)
are also housed at separate locations.  Analysis of 1997 census data indicated no pig nurseries
larger than 2500  head were independently sited.  Subsequent conversations with industry and
EPA regions indicated increases in current and planned construction of new pig nurseries.  In the
absence of information necessary to develop a separate nursery model to represent newly
constructed nurseries, nurseries were included in the facility counts of swine: farrow-to-finish.

Pullets are housed in cages similar to layers, or on bedded floors such as broilers and turkeys.
Therefore no separate model was developed for pullets. Though there are many pullet farms
located apart from the laying farms or broiler breeder farms, the production and manure
management at these operations is very similar to broiler and caged layer operations.  Therefore
no separate model was developed for pullet farms.

Industry communications and  site visits indicated turkey breeders and turkeys for grow-out are
not located on the same farm.  As with chickens and swine, breeding farms are generally smaller
farms (Mauplin;  Frankelton, 1999). Therefore EPA decided to conservatively model  all turkey
farms as grow-out farms.

The subsectors for which cost models were ultimately developed are swine finishing,  swine
farrow-to-finish, layers, broilers, and turkeys. The farrow-to-finish model accounts for costs to
nursery and farrowing operations, and the layer model accounts for costs to pullet only
operations.

Manure Handling Method
All broiler and turkey operations were assumed to use litter based houses.  Layer facilities were
modeled as employing either high-rise houses ("dry") or flush to lagoon systems ("wet").  The
use of wet systems was assumed to be predominantly in the south, and usually for older and
smaller laying hen operations  (United Egg Producers, 1999, and USD A  APHIS, 1999).

A 1995 survey of swine operations shows that both  lagoons and deep pits are commonly used
for waste storage in the Midwest region (USDA APHIS, 1996). However, other than a general

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increase in the use of deep pits in the northern areas, the extent of the use for each system could
not determined. EPA intended to model the Mid Atlantic region as having lagoons, and the
Midwest region as having under house pits.  However, the retrofits required for lagoon systems
are more expensive than those for deep pit systems.  Therefore, EPA decided to assume that all
facilities use lagoon systems to avoid undercosting retrofit requirements. This is also consistent
with the concept that the Midwest region model represents the Midwest region plus a portion of
all other regions except the Mid Atlantic region.  In other words, the Midwest region model
reflects parts of the South, Central,  and Pacific regions, because census data could not be
obtained for all  desired regions and size groups (USDA NASS, 1999). A discussion of other
housing and manure management systems and their frequency of use is described in the
Development Document.

Region - The regions include the South, Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, West, and Central, as defined in
the profiles.  Originally, ten regions were developed by the Economic Research Service of USDA
(ERS) for use in grouping economic information.  These regions were condensed into the
following five AFO regions because of similarities in animal production and manure handling
techniques. States included in each of the five AFO regions include: Pacific (CA, WA, OR, AK,
HI); Central (MT, WY, ID, CO, UT, NV, AZ, NM, TX, OK); Midwest (IA, IL, IN, KS, MI, MN,
MO, ND, NE, OH,  SD, WI); South (AL, AR, FL, GA, LA, MS, SC); and Mid-Atlantic (CT, DE,
KY, MA, MD, ME, NC, NH, NJ, NY, PA, RI, TN, VA, VT, WV).

Because the various animal sectors  tend to be concentrated in particular geographical regions,
data are lacking for those regions where a particular sector has a lesser presence. EPA developed
"key" regions to focus cost modeling efforts on those areas in which the various animal sectors
are concentrated. The key regions chosen for swine operations are the Mid-Atlantic and
Midwest; 78 percent of U.S. hog operations are located in those two regions. To account for all
potentially regulated operations in the cost model, those operations in regions other than the key
regions were distributed evenly among the two key regions that were modeled.  For example, the
Midwest region is actually a combination of operations from the Midwest with a portion of the
operations from the "non-key" Pacific, Central, and South regions that are assumed to have
similar production and manure management practices. Similarly, the Mid-Atlantic region
includes operations from the Mid-Atlantic, as well as a portion of the operations from the Pacific,
Central, and South regions.

The key regions for broilers are the Mid-Atlantic and South  ( 86% of larger farms), while the
Mid-Atlantic and Midwest are the key regions for turkeys (67 % of larger farms).  Layer farms
with wet manure systems are located primarily in the South  and Texas, where approximately half
of all layer farms use wet manure handling systems.  Industry reports and NAHMS data were
used to estimate the number of layer farms with wet manure systems in the rest of the U.S.
(USDA APHIS, 1999). The South  and Midwest are the key regions for all other layer farms,
capturing 53% of larger layer farms in addition to the 12% layers with wet manure systems.
Operations from "non-key" regions were folded into the key regions for these animal types in the
same manner as described above for swine operations.

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The key region determines the amount of precipitation that will need to be managed and the
typical evaporation rate. The region also defines typical crop yields, soil types, housing types,
and manure management practices that vary across the nation.  In practice, a given state may
have many soil types and climatic variations; this approach was adopted to account for typical
geographical variations without producing an impractical number of model farms.

Size class - Size class refers to the capacity or maximum inventory of the facility.  Only swine
weighing more than 55 pounds (including sows and finishing pigs) are counted for purposes of
size classification of the farm, but all manure generated by animals on the farm is considered and
included in the costs estimated for proper utilization or disposal rationale of manure. All turkeys
and chickens regardless of age are counted as part of the respective facility.

The size class  is a combination of (1) animals in inventory and (2) total sales divided by the
number of turnovers/life cycles/herds/flocks produced per year. This is because the Census of
Agriculture animal counts do not represent an average inventory of livestock, but instead reflect
the inventory on December 31st of the census year.  For this  analysis, the average livestock
numbers were  derived from a combination of sales over the year and end-of-year inventory (if
both numbers were available), or from either sales or inventory if only one value was available.
This allowed for estimates on farms that raise livestock sporadically during the year but have no
inventory on December 31st, or farms that ceased production during the census year. Sales data
were divided by the average number of turnovers typical operations are expected to have over an
entire year, thus operations that ceased production may be counted as having a smaller capacity
than they actually had.

The swine sector models include slaughter (finishing operations) and farrow-to-finish (including
all farms with  breeding or farrowing) operations. The variables identified in Table 4-1 are used
together with the algorithms in Figure 4-1 to compute the number of animal units (liveweight
basis) at a swine facility. The classification  of swine operations is based on the percent (i.e.
ratio) of animal units on the operation that are of a given type (swine for slaughter, hogs for
breeding, or feeder pigs). Figure 4-1 also presents the equations used to classify swine operations
as finishing, farrowing, or farrow-to-finish operations.

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               Table 4-1.  Selected Census of Agriculture Variables for Swine
Questionnaire Brief Description
Census Variable Symbol
Inventory (Number
on this place
12/31/1997)
Number Sold
(in 1997)
Section 14: Hogs or Pigs
1
La
l.b
o
5
3.a
Hogs and pigs
Hogs and pigs for breeding
Other hogs and pigs
Hogs and pigs sold
Feeder pigs
K815
K816
K817





K820
K822
 Animal Unit Calculations
     Hogs for Breeding (assume 2.67 sows per animal unit, 365 days on feed)
        K816/2.67

     Hogs on Feed3 (assume 9.09 hogs per animal unit, 180 days on feed, 2.8 cycles per year)
        K817/9.09                            for K817 > 0 and (K820 - K822) = 0
        (K820 - K822)/(2.8 * 9.09)              for K817 = 0 and (K820 - K822) > 0
        (K817 + (K820 - K822)/2.8)/(2 * 9.09)     for K817 > 0 and (K820 - K822) > 0

 Subsector Classification (based on animal units)
     Hog Inventory = Hogs for Breeding + Hogs on Feed

     Swine/Finishing Operations: If Hogs for Breeding is less than 5 percent of Hog Inventory and Hogs for
     Breeding is less than 25.

     Swine/Farrowing Operations: If Hogs on Feed is less than 5 percent of Hog Inventory and Hogs on Feed
     is less than 25.

     Swine/Farrow-to-Finish Operations: Operations not classified as Swine/Finishing Operations or as
     Swine/Farrowing Operations.
 aThe number of cycles per year for Hogs on Feed represents the field frm the Ag Census database developed by EPA for this
 analysis.
        Figure 4-1. Animal Unit Calculations and Subsector Classification for Swine
The chicken sector includes broilers and layers (broilers, layers, pullets, and layer/pullets).  The
variables identified in Table 4-2 are used together with the algorithms in Figure 4-2 to compute
the number of animal units (liveweight basis).  Figure 4-2 also presents the equations and logic
used to classify operations where more than 75 percent of the animal units (liveweight basis) on
the operation are layers or pullets into layer, pullet, or layer/pullet operations. Operations where

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more than 75 percent of the animal units on the operation are broilers are classified as broiler
operations.

The turkey sector includes subsectors for slaughter (grow out), breeder, and integrated
(breeders/grow out) operations. The variables identified in Table 4-3 are used together with the
algorithms in Figure 4-3 to compute the number of animal units.  Figure 4-3 also presents the
equations and logic used to classify operations where more than 75 percent of the animal units on
the operation are turkeys into grow out, breeder, or integrated operations.

In addition to operation size, EPA needed to determine which AFOs meet the confinement
component of the CAFO definition. Though some smaller chicken and turkey operations may
use range or pasture, EPA conservatively assumed all poultry operations represented by the costs
models were confinement operations.  EPA used NAHMS Swine '95 data to estimate the percent
of swine operations that were pasture operations, and to distinguish which swine confinement
operations maintained open lots or outside animal access.  Generally, the larger swine operations
represented by EPA's cost models may be considered to use total confinement housing; EPA
believes there are very few swine open lots and pastured operations in the size range of the cost
models. For more information refer to Chapter 4: Profiles in the Development Document.

Turnovers

EPA needed to determine which animal feeding operations could potentially be  defined as
CAFOs based on operation size. EPA generally estimated the size of an animal feeding
operation by counting the average number of animals in inventory. In many cases where animals
are sold intermittently throughout the year, the number of animals sold in a year were converted
to the number of animals likely to be in inventory at any given time by dividing sales by the
number of turnovers, groups, or flocks of animals or birds produced in a year. USDA identified
turnover values that were likely to represent the average operation turnover.  EPA supplemented
this information with data obtained from NAHMS and industry trade organizations to obtain the
turnovers used in the cost models. EPA determined these turnovers were more likely to depict
production at the larger operations represented by the cost models.

EPA realized the use of different turnover values could alter the size classification of feeding
operations. EPA choose to evaluate the effects of fluctuating turnovers for the turkey sector
because the turkey  industry experiences a wider range of turnovers than in other animal sectors.
For example, a facility may produce just two groups of toms each year, or up to 5 flocks of hens
in a partitioned poultry house. EPA found most animal feeding operations maintained enough
animals such that changes in turnovers resulted in very small changes in the number of
operations classified as AFOs or CAFOs. Data supporting EPA's calculation of turnovers may
be found in Chapter 4: Profiles in the Development Document.

Manure, litter, and waste generation - Oftentimes manure is not handled or stored as a
concentrated manure solid. EPA defined a "dilution factor" to account for the concentration of
manure nutrients in manure as stored. This factor includes the volume of manure generated,

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water use (flush water, process water, wash water, and precipitation), bedding use, and nutrient
generation by all confined animals at the facility.  See Section 5.9 for more information on how
dilution factors are used in the cost models.  Section 4.2 describes EPA's approach to
determining manure excesses that ultimately need to be hauled or disposed of. Section 4.2.1
describes the method for determination of manure generation and nutrient content of manure and
litter.  Other waste generation may include wasted feed, spilled drinking water, and animal
mortalities.

Acres - Total acres available on the farm to receive manure.  The model reduces total available
acres to account for stream bank buffers and setbacks.

Table 4-4 shows the key regions and size class definitions for swine and poultry operations.
 Animal Unit Calculations
     Layers/Hens (assume 250 layers per animal unit, 365 days on feed)
        K892/250                                   for K892 > 0 and K893 = 0
        K893/250                                   for K892 = 0 and K893 > 0
        (K892 + K893)/(2 * 250)                       for K892 > 0 and K893 > 0

     Layers/Pullets (assume 455 pullets under 3 months old per animal unit/250 pullets over 3 months old per
     animal unit [or 404 pullets per animal unit], 120 days on feed, 2 cycles per year)
        (K894/250 + K896/455 + K895/(2 * 404))/2       for K894 > 0 and K896 > 0 and K895 > 0
        K894/250 + K896/455                         for (K894 > 0 or K896 > 0) and K895 = 0
        (K896/455 + K895/(2 * 404))/2                  for K894 = 0 and K896 > 0 and K895 > 0
        (K894/250 + K895/(2 * 404))/2                  for K894 > 0 and K896 = 0 and K895 > 0
        K895/(2 * 404)                               for K894 = 0 and K896 = 0 and K895 > 0

     Broilers3 (assume 455 broilers per animal unit, 60 days on feed, 5.5 cycles per year)
        K898/455                                   for K898 > 0 and K899 = 0
        K899/(5.5 * 455)                             for K898 = 0 and K899 > 0
        (K898 + K899/5.5)/(2 * 455)                    for K898 > 0 and K899 > 0

 Subsector Classification (based on animal units)
     Layer Inventory = Layers/Hens + Layers/Pullets

     Chicken/Layer Operations: If Layers/Hens is greater than 95 percent of Layer Inventory and
     Layers/Pullets is less than 25.

     Chicken/Pullet Operations: If Layers/Hens is less than 5 percent of Layer Inventory and Layers/Hens is
     less than 25.

     Chicken/Layer/Pullet Operations:  Operations not classified as Chicken/Layer Operations and not
     classified as Chicken/Pullet Operations.
 aThe number of cycles per year for Broilers was developed by EPA for this analysis.
      Figure 4-2. Animal Unit Calculations and Subsector Classification for Chickens
                                               10

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            Table 4-2. Selected Census of Agriculture Variables for Chickens
Questionnaire Brief Description
Census Variable Symbol
Inventory (Number
on this place
12/31/1997)
Number Sold
(in 1997)
Section 16: Poultry
1
2
2.a
2.b
o
J
Layers
Pullets
Pullets (13-19 weeks)
Pullets (<13 weeks)
Broilers
K892

K894
K896
K898
K893
K895


K899
Animal Unit Calculations
    Turkeys/Breeding (assume 50 hens per animal unit, continuous replacement, 1 cycle per year)
       K902/50                              for K902 > 0 and K903 = 0
       K903/50                              for K902 = 0 and K903 > 0
       (K902 + K903)/(2 * 50)                  for K902 > 0 and K903 > 0

    Turkeys/Slaughter (assume 67 turkeys per animal unit, 180 days on feed, 3 cycles per year)
       K900/67                              for K900 > 0 and K901 = 0
       K901/(3 * 67)                          for K900 = 0 and K901 > 0
       (K900 + K901/3)/(2 * 67)        for K900 > 0 and K901 > 0

Subsector Classification (based on animal units)
    Turkey Inventory = Turkeys/Breeding + Turkeys/Slaughter

    Turkey/Grow Out Operations: If Turkeys/Slaughter is greater than 95 percent of Turkey Inventory and
    Turkey/Breeding is less than 25.

    Turkey/Breeder Operations: If Turkeys/Slaughter is less than 5 percent of Turkey Inventory and
    Turkey/Slaughter is less than 25.

    Turkey/Integrated Operations:  Operations not classified as Turkey/Grow Out Operations or as
    Turkey/Breeding Operations.
aThe number of cycles per year for Turkeys/Slaughter was developed by EPA for this analysis.

     Figure 4-3. Animal Unit Calculations and Subsector Classification for Turkeys
                                              11

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              Table 4-3.  Selected Census of Agriculture Variables for Turkeys

Questionnaire
Brief Description
Census Variable Symbol
Inventory (Number
on this place
12/31/1997)
Number Sold
(in 1997)
Section 16: Poultry
4.a
4.b
Turkeys/Slaughter
Turkeys/Hens


K900
K902
K901
K903
Table 4-4. Economics Model Matrix: Definition of Size Groups and Key Regions
Sector
Modeled
Swine: FF
Swine: GF
Layer: Wet
Layer: Dry
Broiler
Turkey
Key
Regions a
MA, MW
MA,MW
SO
MW, SO
MA, SO
MA, MW
Small
(# head)
<750
<750
<9,000
<30,000
<30,000
<16,500
Mediuml
(# head)
750-1875
750-1875
XXX
30,000-62,500
30,000-60,000
16,500-38,500
Medium2
(# head)
1875-2500
1875-2500
9,000-30,000
62,500-180,000
60,000-90,000
38,500-55,000
Largel
(# head)
2500-5000
2500-5000
> 30,000
180,000-
600,000
90,000-180,000
>55,000
Large2
(# head)
>5,000
>5,000
XXX
>600,000
>180,000
XXX
 a Region descriptions:
 1) Midwest (MW) - production as typical in the primary producing region of Midwest; actually is a combination
 of Midwest and a portion of Central, Pacific, and South for turkeys and swine. For dry layers, MW is a
 combination of Midwest with a portion of Central, Mid-Atlantic, and Pacific.
 2) Mid-Atlantic (MA) - production as typical in the primary producing region of Mid-Atlantic; farm counts are
 actually a combination of MA with a portion of Central, Pacific, and South for turkeys and swine. For broilers,
 MA is a combination of MA with a portion of Central, Midwest, and Pacific.
 3) South (SO) - production as typical in the primary producing region of South; farm counts are actually a
 combination of SO with a portion of Central, Mid-Atlantic, and Pacific for dry layers; a combination  of SO with
 a portion of Central, Midwest, and Pacific for broilers; and SO with all other regions for wet layers.
4.2    Land Availability Methodology

The purpose of the methodology is to classify animal operations within each subsector, region,
and operation class by one of three land availability categories. For purposes of the cost model,
each operation was categorized by whether the operation had sufficient land to apply the
generated animal waste using agronomic rates.  The  agronomic rates are based on census year
crop yields for all farms in the same county. Farms are then labeled as either:
       Category 1 - farms with sufficient crop or pasture land
       Category 2 - farms with some land, but not enough land to assimilate all manure nutrients
                                               12

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       Category 3 - farms with none of the 24 major crop types identified by NRCS

Since the category 3 farms may have crop types other than the 24 major crop types identified by
NRCS, and since the analysis does not account for manure that may be used or sold for
alternative uses, the approach is expected to provide an upper bound estimate of farms with
insufficient crop land to assimilate all manure nutrients. The number of category 1 and category 2
farms will also vary when changing from a nitrogen based application rate to a phosphorus based
application rate.  Nitrogen-based and phosphorus-based nutrient management have different
costs, some of which may be significantly different, such as hauling costs for off-farm (or out-of-
county) manure use or disposal.

The base methodology for determining land availability is generally derived from Nutrients
Available from Live stock Manure Relative to Crop  Growth Requirements (USDANRCS, 1998).
The method and analysis were revised in Manure Nutrients Relative to the Capacity of Cropland
and Pastw-eland to Assimilate Nutrients (Kellogg et al., 2000).  The latter was used to estimate
the number of farms in each of the three categories  described above, the results of which are
presented in Table 4-8.

4.2.1   Computation of Nitrogen and Phosphorus Generation

The amount of nitrogen and phosphorus generated for each operation is estimated based on the
number and types of animals on the operation. Because different animal sectors might compete
for the same land to apply animal waste off-farm, it is necessary to include all major animal
operations (swine, beef, poultry, dairy) in the analysis.

A procedure for the calculation of on-farm nutrient production was outlined in a report by USDA
NRCS (1998). Total nutrient availability was estimated for each livestock type by first
multiplying the average confined livestock population (in animal units) by the number of tons of
manure produced (i.e. manure as-excreted) by each type of livestock,  and then multiplying by the
recovery factor.  The recovery factor reflects that portion of manure that can be collected from
the confinement areas and land applied. The recovery factor considers not all nutrients may be
recovered and reflects typical nutrient losses due to volatilization, nutrients taken up by plants in
grazing areas, accumulation in confinement area soils, feedlot runoff, or leaching into
groundwater.  This result, tons of recoverable manure, was multiplied by the number of pounds
of nitrogen or phosphorus contained in one ton of manure to compute the total pounds of
recoverable nutrients.  The resulting value was further adjusted for typical nutrient losses that
occur during  storage and handling to generate an estimate of total  available nitrogen and
phosphorus from confined livestock manure.  Details  of manure and animal characteristics are
given in Table 4-5 for swine and poultry.

Regional Recovery Factors
EPA used regional  recovery factors proposed by USDA.  USDA obtained recovery factors for
each state to develop the regional recovery factors shown in Table 4-6. The regional factor was
calculated by  weighting the  state recovery factor with the number of animals of each type in a

                                           13

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given state. Table 4-7 gives an example for the calculation of weighting factors. In Table 4-7,
the number of broilers (NB) is multiplied by the state recovery factor (RF) to produce the
weighting factor. The weighting factor (RF x NB) is summed and divided by the total number of
broilers in a region to obtain the regional recovery factor.

Nutrient Losses
The values for nitrogen and phosphorus content after losses were estimated to provide the
amount of nutrients that would be present in land applied manure and effluent.  There is no
"national" or even regional perspective on what these values should be. These estimates are
based on a three part
assumption:

•      Nitrogen losses will exceed (greatly exceed) those of phosphorus primarily due to
       volatilization of nitrogen compounds
•      As the quality (from an automation view) and numbers of manure management systems
       improve, the losses of nutrients, particularly nitrogen, may increase.  In other words, as
       the manure management system becomes more automated, nitrogen losses through
       volatilization also increase.
•      Phosphorus amounts are present within the bottom sludge of lagoons and ponds, and even
       though the sludge is not removed on a regular basis, the phosphorus content must be
       considered in an application strategy. In other words, effluent composition may not
       reflect actual nitrogen and phosphorus contents in the lagoon or holding pond.

Numerous individuals from USD A, universities, and industry groups were consulted to arrive at
the "national" values for nutrient content after losses. The discussions focused on the types of
manure systems typically used by the industry in different parts of the country, the losses
typically associated with these systems (see Chapter 11, Agricultural Waste Management Field
Handbook, USD A, 1992), and the portion of the nation's livestock raised in different parts of the
country.

4.2.2   Plant Nutrient Requirements
Extension personnel from counties with the most dense populations of animals were consulted to
determine the common cropping practices for the all regions and sectors (refer to Appendix B for
details). County Extension personnel identified the typical crop rotation for each sector, and crop
yields were determined by dividing the harvested quantity by the acreage obtained in the  1997
Census of Agriculture  (USDA NASS, 1999a).  Occasionally, yields were far below expected
yields and were changed to reflect expected yields found in the Agricultural Waste Management
Field Handbook (USDA, 1992). Crop nutrient removal was based on the nutrient content values
for major crops in Appendix I, Table A-l from USDA NRCS (1998). Nitrogen application  rates
were increased to reflect the 30 percent loss of nitrogen due to volatilization of ammonia after
land application of manure (Sutton et al., 1985). The average annual nitrogen and phosphorus
crop removal and application rates were calculated by dividing the sum of crop requirements for
a complete crop rotation by the number of years per rotation.
                                           14

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        Table 4-5.  Manure Characteristics Used to Calculate Nutrient Production
Animal
Swine
Swine
Chicken
Chicken
Chicken
Chicken
Turkey
Operation
Integrated
Slaughter
Broiler
Layer
Pullet
Integrated
Layer

Animal
Turnover
#
2.1
2.5
5.5
1.0
2.0
1.0
3
Average
Animal
Weight
Ib
110.0
135.0
2.5
3.7
2.0
3.7
11.3
Animal Unit
Conversion
#animals/AU
(USDA AU)
9.09
7.41
400
270
500
270
88.5
Manure
Production
tons/AU/yr
(USDAAU)
14.69
11.97
14.97
11.45
8.32
11.45
8.96
Nutrient Content
N
P
Ib/ton of manure
2.82
2.82
16.10
18.46
13.60
16.10
12.40
2.80
2.80
6.61
8.50
8.95
6.61
10.60
Source: USDANRCS, 1998.
                   Table 4-6.  Regional Recovery Factors for Manure
Region
Central
Mid Atlantic
Midwest
Pacific
Southern
Recoverable Manure Correction Factor
Swine
Chicken
Turkey
percent
0.75
0.87
0.76
0.76
0.54
0.95
0.97
0.94
0.90
0.96
0.75
0.97
0.62
0.94
0.72
Table 4-7. Example of Weighted Averaging Method for Manure Recovery Factor
State
Alabama
Arkansas
Florida
Georgia
Louisiana
Mississippi
South Carolina


Number of Broilers (NB)a
134,027,304
172,617,806
19,973,361
149,740,420
20,538,744
26,313,171
617,762,696
SumofNB
523,210,806
Recovery Factor (RF)b
0.98
0.95
0.95
0.95
1.00
0.95
1.00
Sum of (Nb x RF)/sum of NB
Weighted mean = 0.960
RFxNB
131,346,758
163,986,916
18,974,693
142,253,399
20,538,744
24,997,512
617,762,696
Sum of (NB x RF)
502,098,022
a U.S. Department of Commerce, 1999.
b USDANRCS, 1998.

Example
Box 1 illustrates the procedure used by USDA NRCS (1998) and the costing model for
calculation of nutrient loading and land application for a typical 1,000-hog operation in the
Midwest region. The animal unit (AU) conversion factor in Box 1 and Table 4-5 represents the
number of animals having a combined weight of 1,000 pounds.  For this example, for integrated
swine operations, the average weight of a hog is 110 Ib and the concomitant AU factor is 9.09
(1000 Ib of animals/110 Ib average hog weight). Each hog AU produces 14.69 tons of manure
per year with a concentration after losses of 2.8 Ib P/ton manure and 2.82 Ib N/ton manure. For
                                          15

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this example, a regional recovery factor of 0.8 and nutrient uptake of 25 Ib P/acre are used. The
result is an acreage of 145 acres for application of all of the waste at agronomic phosphorus rates
for a 1,000-swine farrow-to-finish operation.

        Box 1. USDA's Method for Calculation of Nutrient Production and Land
                                       Application.
   To calculate annual nutrient production:
                  Ib                             no. head   tonsmanure                  Ib
   Nutrient produced (—) = no. head I animal units conversion (	) *	* nutrient concentation	
                  yr                               A U      yr • A U                   ton


   Substituting AWMFH values:
              Ib                         IbP
   P produced (—) = 1000 / 9.09 * 14.69 * 2.8 = 4,525	
              yr                          yr


   To calculate land required:
               ac             Ib                                     Ib
   Land required (—) = P produced (—) * regional recovery factor (%) / nutrient uptake (—)
               yr             yr                                     ac


   Substituting values from average of MPS -18, USDA, and NCSU data:
   Land required (acres) = 4,525 * 0.80 / 25 = 145 acres

4.2.3  Sum of Nutrients Generated and Application Rates in a County

One of the key aspects of this methodology is characterizing whether an operation has enough
land to apply at agronomic rates all of the animal waste generated on the operation, or whether
there is enough nearby land (within the county) to apply the waste at agronomic rates. The
nutrients generated from all swine, chicken, turkey, beef, and dairy operations were summed and
compared to the nutrient application rate for all farms with cropland (including those without
animals).  This accounts for the potential competition for available cropland by all. animal
feeding operations in the area. For greater detail regarding the procedures applied, see USDA
NRCS (1998).

4.2.4  Categorization of Land Availability Options

One of the key factors in determining the costs of compliance with the permitting alternatives is
whether a model facility has enough land available to apply the manure generated at the facility
at agronomic application rates. Three categories of model facilities were developed to
characterize distinct situations based  on the land available to apply manure. The manure
handling methods and costs associated with these three categories of facilities vary considerably
and are presented below.

                                             16

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Category 1
Category 1 model facilities have the acreage needed to apply agronomically the nutrients in the
manure generated at the facility using regional estimates of crop uptake and yield goals.  This
acreage does not include the area of the buffer strip. Costs for nutrient management planning,
establishment of buffer strips1, and soil sampling are based on the acreage needed to apply
agronomically the manure generated.

Category 2
Category 2 model facilities do not have the acreage needed to apply agronomically the nutrients
in the manure generated at the facility using regional estimates of crop uptake and yield goals.
Costs for nutrient management planning, establishment of buffer strips, and soil sampling are
based on the average acreage of the particular model facility.  These facilities incur additional
costs to reduce the quantity of excess nutrient at the facility.  Technologies and practices used to
reduce excess nutrients at the  model facility include feeding practices and manure hauling offsite.
In addition, several technologies were evaluated to determine if their use would reduce the costs
of hauling excess manure. In  general, these technologies reduce the liquid content of the waste
and result in a more concentrated waste being hauled.  The distance each model facility would
have to haul manure was determined by the facility's geographic region and whether it is located
in a county that has an excess  of the nutrient of concern. The national percentage of operations
by size that are located in counties with excess nutrients was based on the 1997 Census of
Agriculture obtained from USDA (Kellog et al., 2000).  See Section 5.9.3.2 for manure hauling
distances.

Category 3
Category 3 facilities do not have land used to grow any of the 24 major crops identified in the
1997 Census of Agriculture. No costs are assumed for nutrient management planning,
establishment of buffer strips, and soil sampling.  Some costs are assumed for manure testing,
facility upgrades, and record keeping  It is assumed that the facilities already haul their manure
and that there are no additional costs for hauling their manure on a nitrogen basis.

Distribution of Category 1, 2, and 3
The distribution of category 1, 2, and 3 facilities by animal sector and nutrient basis (N or P) is
presented in Table 4-8. To generate the percentages, EPA divided the number of farms meeting
each of the category definitions by the total number of confinement operations.  EPA obtained
farm counts  from the USDA analysis of the land availability method  summarized in Section 4.2
as applied to facility-level data collected for the 1997 Census  of Agriculture (USDA NASS,
             that fully vegetated buffers were costed, including annual maintenance and rental
value of the land, but the proposed requirements are for 100 foot manure application setbacks.
Cost share and subsidized practices were not included.  EPA expects the higher costs of buffers
would be used as a dollar allowance for field management practices to reduce field runoff. See
Section 5.6 for more details.

                                            17

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1999b). Animal feeding operations were uniquely assigned to animal sectors based upon the
methodology described in Appendix A.
Table 4-8. Percentages of Operations Nationally Classified as Category 1, 2, and 3
Animal
Sector
Swine-GF
Swine-FF
Layer-wet
Layer-dry
Broiler
Turkey
Size3
Medium
Large
Medium
Large
Medium
Large
Medium
Large
Medium
Large
Medium
Large
Catl
N
74.40
52.46
83.82
63.64
10.43
0.83
6.60
0.83
5.77
4.39
6.24
3.25
P
58.60
23.59
66.49
32.41
6.55
0.00
0.60
0.00
2.59
0.94
0.23
0.00
Cat 2
N
9.92
28.20
6.26
16.72
52.58
46.67
56.97
46.67
54.97
64.39
65.36
57.99
P
25.72
57.07
23.59
47.65
56.47
47.5
62.97
47.5
58.16
67.84
71.36
61.25
Cat3
Both N & P
15.71
19.40
9.93
19.94
36.98
52.5
36.43
52.5
39.24
31.22
28.41
38.75
a Medium is 300-1,000 Animal Units. Large is greater than 1,000 Animal Units.
Source: USDANASS, 1999b
4.3    Effluent Limitation Guidelines Options

4.3.1   Existing Sources

Many options were analyzed as part of the effluent limitation guidelines (ELG) development
process. For existing sources this analysis was done to identify the best available technology
(BAT) that is economically achievable. The options were organized in a manner to incrementally
add practices that would result in reduced pollutant effluent concentrations. The final options
considered for BAT are presented below and summarized in Table 4-9.

Frequency factors were assigned to each practice to account for facilities that already
implemented the practice (see Section 5.2 for a discussion of frequency factors).
                                           18

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           Table 4-9. Summary of Practices and Technologies for ELG Options
Practice or Technology
Feedlot BMPs
Mortality handling
Nutrient management planning
Record keeping
Sample soils once every 3 years
Sample manure twice per year
Covered storage for dry poultry litter
Land application N-based
Land application P-based where necessary
100-foot stream buff er/no manure application within 100 feet
of surface water, tile drain inlets, and sinkholes
Assess hydrologic link
Ground water monitoring wells
Ground water sampling
Impermeable pads under manure storage areas
Construct new lagoon and add impermeable lagoon/pond
liners
Upstream/downstream monitoring
Drier technologies (scrape system, solid/liquid separation)
Retrofit to high-rise houses for swine and layers
Anaerobic digester
Increased storage for swine
Option
1
X
X
X
X

X
X
X

X










2
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

X
X










3
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

X
X
X
X
X
X
X





4
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X




5
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

X
X






X
X
X

5b
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

X
X







X


6
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

X
X








X

7
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

X
X









X
Option 1 - Nitrogen-Based Application of Manure
Practices factored into the analysis of this option were:
                                          19

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•      Feedlot BMPs (storm water diversions, lagoon/pond depth markers, periodic inspections,
       record keeping)
•      Mortality handling (e.g., rendering, composting)
•      Nutrient management planning
•      Record keeping
•      Sample soils once every 3 years
•      Sample manure twice per year
•      Covered storage for dry poultry litter
•      Land application limited to N-based agronomic application rates
•      100-foot setback required (costed as a stream buffer), and do not allow manure
       application within 100 feet of surface water, tile drain inlets, and sinkholes

Option 2 - Phosphorus-Based Application of Manure
Practices factored into the analysis of this option were:

•      Feedlot BMPs (storm water diversions, lagoon/pond depth markers, periodic inspections,
       record keeping)
•      Mortality handling (e.g., rendering, composting)
•      Nutrient management planning
•      Record keeping
•      Sample soils once every 3 years
•      Sample manure twice per year
•      100-foot setback required, and do not allow manure application within 100 feet of surface
       water, tile drain inlets, and sinkholes
•      Land application limited to P-based agronomic application rates where dictated by site-
       specific conditions, N-based applications elsewhere

Nitrogen- Versus Phosphorus-Based Application Rates
The nitrogen-to-phosphorus ratio in manure is typically much lower (approximately 2:1) than
harvested crop nutrient removal ratios (approximately 6:1). Therefore, facilities that must land-
apply their manure on a phosphorus basis rather than a nitrogen basis incur additional costs in
two areas.  First, a commercial source of nitrogen must be applied to their fields (termed
sidedressing) to compensate for the nitrogen not supplied through manure application. A cost  of
12.30 per pound of additional nitrogen required was used in the cost model.  This was based
upon the cost data shown in Table 4-10.  Second, facilities that do not have enough land to apply
all their manure at a phosphorus-based rate have to remove manure phosphorus produced at the
facility through implementation of feeding strategies, hauling of excess manure, or both. The
costs model performs a cost test to determine which of the three  methods is the least expensive.
The cost test compares the annual costs of each method where the annual costs are approximated
by the sum of: the fixed costs, the annual costs, 14% of the capital costs (based on 10-year
amortization), and one-third of the three-year recurring costs.
                                           20

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                       Table 4-10.  Retail Cost of Nitrogen Fertilizer
Fertilizer
Anhydrous Ammonia
Urea
Ammonium Nitrate
US Average
Retail Cost Per Pound of Nitrogen
140
120
110
12.30
              Source: The Fertilizer Institute, 1999

EPA estimated the number of facilities that will have to land-apply their manure on a phosphorus
basis by using state soil test data (Sharpley et al.,  1999).  Consistent with EPA acknowledgment
of site-specific differences, these data clearly show that high soil phosphorus levels are a regional
problem. Distinct areas of general phosphorus deficit and surplus exist within states and regions
and can be correlated to areas of intensive animal production.  To develop the percentage of
agricultural soils testing high in phosphorus on a regional basis, the percentage of soils testing
high or above in phosphorus was weighted with the number of facilities in each state.  The
procedure used was similar to that used to develop the example in Table 4-7.  Table 4-11  shows
the results of the facility-weighted soil test values by region and animal type.  The label "P"
indicates that more than half of the facility-weighted soils tested high or above for phosphorus.
An "N" indicates  that less than half of the facility-weighted soil tests in the region were high in
phosphorus.  If the facility weighted soil test values indicated that more than half of the soils in
the region tested high for phosphorus, it was assumed that 60 percent of the facilities will require
a phosphorus-based manure application rate and 40 percent can use a nitrogen-based rate. If the
facility-weighted  soil test values indicated that less than half of the soils in the region tested high
for phosphorus, it was assumed that 40 percent of the facilities will require a phosphorus-based
manure application rate and 60 percent can use a nitrogen-based rate.  This approach reflects the
potential fluctuations in phosphorus soil tests in a given state.

Option 3 - Ground Water Protection
Practices factored into the analysis of this option were:

•      All technologies and practices in Option 2
•      Ground water requirements
       >•      Assess hydrologic link - Under this option, all facilities would have to assess the
              hydrologic link between surface water and ground water for their
              feedlot/production areas but not the land where manure is applied.  See Section
              5.5.2.3 for a description of the assessment process and  costing features.
       >•      Additional practices -  Only a portion of the facilities would need to implement
              additional practices. The portion of facilities required to implement additional
              practices was based on an assessment of ground water risk produced using USGS
              data (Sobecki and Clipper, 1999), and it is estimated as follows:
                                            21

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              - Mid-Atlantic = 23.9 percent
              - South = 22.4 percent
              - Midwest = 27.5 percent
              - Central = 12.6 percent
              - Pacific = 12.3 percent
The additional practices costed where a hydrologic link is identified are:
       - Install monitoring wells (4 costed per facility: one up gradient and three down gradient)
       (See Section 5.5.1.3)
       - Perform ground water sampling twice per year (See Section 5.5.3.4.)
       - Install impermeable pads under manure storage areas
       - Old lagoon cleanout, construct new lagoon and add impermeable lagoon/pond liners.
Retrofit of a lagoon with liners is not typical of the industry (Tetra Tech,  1999). Note that
cleanout was costed, but closure according to NRCS specifications was not specifically costed.
Additional information obtained on the costs of lagoon closure indicates  lagoon cleanout
constitutes the greatest portion of closure costs (NCDENR,  1999).
                                           22

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   Table 4-11. AFO Nutrient Management Planning Basis by Animal Sector and Region
Based on Percentage of Agricultural Soils Analyzed by Soil Test Laboratories in 1997 That
                         Tested High or Above for Phosphorus
Sector
Industry
Broilers
Cattle (beef)
Dairy
Layers (dry)
Layer (wet)
Swine
Turkey
Broilers
Cattle (beef)
Dairy
Layers (dry)
Layers (wet)
Swine
Turkey
Farm Size
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Medium
Large
Large
Large
Large
Large
Large
Large
Regions
Central
P
N
P
P
N
N
N
P
N
P
P
P
N
N
Mid-
Atlantic
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
Midwest
P
N
P
P
P
P
P
P
N
P
P
P
P
P
Pacific
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
South
N
N
N
N
N
P
P
N
P
N
N
N
P
P
Key: N = less than half of the facility-weighted soil tests in the region were high in phosphorus.
P = more than half of the facility-weighted soils tested high or above for phosphorus.
Option 4 - Surface Water Monitoring
Practices factored into the analysis of this option were:

•      All technologies and practices in Option 3
•      Surface water monitoring requirements See Sections 5.5.1.4 and 5.5.3.5 for a description
       of the surface water monitoring costing.
             *      Analyze samples upstream and downstream of both feedlot and land
                    application areas (4 grab samples)
             *      One annual sampling event in the absence of precipitation events to
                    provide background conditions.
             *      Sampling 12 times per year (triggered by > !/2-inch precipitation within 24
                    hours of manure application; limited to no more than 12 times per year.
                                          23

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              >•     Parameters to be monitored: total N, total P, total suspended solids (TSS).
                    Other parameters considered for monitoring included metals, biochemical
                    oxygen demand (BOD), and fecal coliform bacteria (FC), but these
                    parameters were dropped due to cost (e.g., metals) and sampling holding
                    and preservation concerns (eg., BOD and FC).

Option 5 - Drier Manure
Practices factored into the analysis of this option were:

•      All technologies and practices in Option 2
•      The lowest cost option from the following technologies to handle manure on a drier basis:
       *•      Retrofit  scraper with above ground tank for manure storage (replacing flush
              systems  with scraper systems to use less water)
       *•      Solid/liquid separation, covers over open impoundments, above ground tank for
              solids
       *•      High-rise housing

Storage was assumed to be constructed or modified in such a way as to prevent any discharge
from the production areas (generally the animal confinement and manure storage areas).  For
most facilities this means covers for liquids impoundments or storage sheds for solid materials.
Complete mix (heated) anaerobic digesters were also costed as a technology to meet Option 5 for
swine operations, but the technology could not be implemented for all sizes of farms and is not
considered appropriate  for all existing manure management trains. The complete mix (heated)
anaerobic digester is only likely to be the lowest cost technology for the largest model facilities
(i.e. farm size "large 2").  For further information on digester technologies see the Rulemaking
Record. High rise housing is described in section 5.6.

Option 5b - Dry Manure
Practices factored into the analysis of this option were:

•      All technologies and practices in Option 2
•      High-rise housing for all operations

Option 6 - Anaerobic Digester
Practices factored into the analysis of this option were:

•      All technologies and practices in Option 2
•      Anaerobic digesters

Anaerobic digesters may take the form of covered lagoons, methane recovery lagoons, or
complete mix heated (mesophilic) digesters.

Option 7 - Increased Storage - No Application to  Frozen Soil
Practices factored into the analysis of this option were:

                                           24

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•      All technologies and practices in Option 2
•      Additional storage for swine due to a restriction from applying manure and manure
       effluent to ground that is frozen or covered with snow. The duration of the "freeze-free"
       period is determined using data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric
       Administration's National Climatic Data Center (NOAA/NCDC).  See Appendix C for
       details regarding the methodology used. The need for extra days of storage for swine
       operations is based on the following information (NPPC, 1998):
       *•      49% of medium-sized operations (300-1,000 AU) do not have  adequate storage.
       >•      32% of large operations (>1,000 AU) do not have adequate storage.

4.3.2   New Source Performance Standards

Options for new source performance standards (NSPS) were evaluated to determine if the costs
of implementing the standards would be a barrier to entry for new operations.  A new source is
defined as "any source, the construction of which is commenced after the publication of proposed
regulations prescribing a standard of performance." Technology to be utilized for new sources is
evaluated by considering the best in-process and end-of-process control technology identified as
BAT and considering the utilization of alternative production processes and operating methods.

The baseline assumption for new facilities is that there are no federal or state/local regulations
requiring controls based on protecting water quality. It is assumed that new facilities will use the
most advanced technology and operating methods currently in use. It is also assumed that
operators of new facilities will be knowledgeable of environmentally sound practices.  The NSPS
model facilities match the ELG model facilities (i.e., the existing model farms) in  terms of
location, size, and land area.

4.3.2.1 Assumptions on Behavior of New Sources

It is assumed that the behavior of new facilities will be different than existing  facilities. This is
based on EPA site visits to newer facilities where new technology was demonstrated, the belief
that new facilities will be more aware of innovations and new methods, and the believe that  new
facilities will have plans in place to address certain emerging issues before they begin
construction. In areas where no  assumption is presented, it is assumed that new facilities will
operate under the same conditions as existing facilities.

General Assumptions Applied to New Sources

All new facilities will perform proper facility management such as installation of storm water
diversion and performing periodic visual inspections and record keeping.

All new facilities will have handle their manure in a dry manner (see discussion on swine high-
rise facilities and layer facilities  below). New facilities will have advanced drinking water
systems that detect and minimize leaks.  These two factors will minimize the need for ground
water well installation and testing.

                                           25

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All new facilities will handle mortality in an acceptable manner.

All new facilities will have plans in place to properly dispose of the waste (manure or litter)
produced using nitrogen-based land application and hauling. The costs of land application and
hauling are thus not attributable to the new standards except for the options that require
phosphorus-based land application rates.

All new facilities will have nutrient management plans for their cropland. The facilities will
follow these plans including manure spreader calibration and soil and manure testing to ensure
crop requirements are met.

All new facilities will use feeding strategies to reduce the amount of excess nutrients in the
waste.

Sector-Specific Assumptions

The available information indicates that the NSPS for new hog facilities should be high-rise
buildings based on the total lower cost of this technology. The cost of the facility is estimated to
be 10% more per pig space, with a modest increase in ventilation requirements. However, this
cost is offset by increased production, the fact that no lagoon or equipment is required to handle
liquid wastes, and the ease in handling the dry manure produced.  Thus it was assumed that there
are no additional costs associated with the use and management of swine high-rise facilities as
the NSPS.  See the Rulemaking Record for additional information on swine high-rise facilities.

New poultry facilities will have covered storage.

Wet layer facilities were not included in the analysis because most of the industry is already dry
or converting to dry manure systems; the advantages  of handling manure dry should result in
new facilities being constructed as dry  systems.

4.3.2.2 Options Considered for NSPS

All of the options considered for BAT were also evaluated for NSPS.  See previous section for a
list of practices included under each option. Two additional options were also considered. The
first combined options 3 and 5  and the  second required additional treatment to reduce BOD,
pathogens,  and volatile solids.  The NSPS options analyzed and any difference with the
corresponding BAT option are  presented below. Table 4-12 provides a summary of the practices
and technologies specified for each of the options.

The same frequency factors were used  for NSPS options as were used for the ELG BAT options
for record keeping  and reporting, manure applicator training, groundwater assessment (options 3
and 4), surface water monitoring (option 4), and field buffers. All other options considered under
NSPS were assumed to have no frequency factor of compliance (e.g., frequency equals zero).
                                           26

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              Table 4-12. Summary of Practices and Technologies Costed
                 Under Baseline (B) Conditions and Each NSPS Options
Practice or Technology
Feedlot BMPs
Training and certification of manure applicator every 3
years
Mortality handling
Nutrient management planning
Training for owner/operators in permit nutrient planning
(PNP)
Record keeping and reporting
Sample soils once every 3 years
Sample manure twice per year
Covered storage for dry poultry litter
Land application N-based
Land application P-based - partial
100-foot stream buffer/no manure application within 100
feet of surface water, tile drain inlets, and sinkholes
Assess hydrologic link between cropland and groundwater
Impermeable pads under manure storage areas
Upstream/downstream surface water monitoring
Drier technologies (scrape system, solid/liquid separation,
or high-rise houses)
Anaerobic digester for swine
Adequate storage
Additional treatment
Option
B
X

X
X


X
X
X
X



X

X

X

1

X


X
X





X







2

X


X
X




X
X







3

X


X
X




X
X
X






4

X


X
X




X
X
X

X




5

X


X
X




X
X







6

X


X
X




X
X




X


7

X


X
X




X
X







8

X


X
X




X
X






X
9

X


X
X




X
X
X






NSPS Option 1 - Nitrogen-Based Application of Manure

As discussed previously, EPA assume that new facilities will use the most advanced technology
and operating methods currently in use. It is also assumed that operators of new facilities will be
knowledgeable of environmentally sound practices. Thus, additional costs were not included
under any NSPS option for feedlot BMPs, mortality handling, nutrient management planning,
                                         27

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soil and manure sampling, covered storage for poultry, nitrogen-based manure application,
impermeable pads under manure storage areas, drier technologies, and additional storage. Cost
were included under NSPS option 1 for training and certification of manure applicators every 3
years, training for owner/operators in permit nutrient planning, record keeping and reporting, and
the establishment and maintenance of a 100 foot stream buffer.

NSPS Option 2 - Phosphorus-Based Application of Manure

Costs were included for all the practices in NSPS option 1 and for phosphorus-based application
of manure as described in sections 4.2 and 4.3.1.

NSPS Option 3 - Ground Water Protection

All costs for NSPS option 2 were included. Most of the costs for BAT option 3 were not
included because the NSPS baseline results in waste being handled in a dry manner, and retrofit
costs for existing liquid impoundments would not be necessary. If manure is handled in a dry
manner only minimal ground water protection practices would be needed to meet requirements.

NSPS Option 4 - Surface Water Monitoring

All costs for NSPS option 3 were included as was the surface monitoring costs described in
sections 5.5.1.5 and 5.5.3.5.

NSPS Option 5 - Drier Manure

The costs for NSPS option  5 was considered to be equal to those for NSPS option 2 because the
NSPS baseline for both swine and poultry results in manure being handled in a dry manner.

NSPS Option 6 - Anaerobic Digester

The costs for NSPS option  6 was considered to be equal to NSPS option 2 with the addition of
the construction and operation of an anaerobic digester as described in sections 5.6.1.6 and
5.6.2.5.

NSPS Option 7 - Increased Storage - No Application to Frozen Soil

The costs for NSPS option  6 was considered to be equal to NSPS option 2. No costs were
associated with the additional storage requirement. This is based on the assumption that all new
poultry facilities will have covered storage, full house cleanout generally occurs annually, and
that all new layer and swine high-rise facilities will have one year of storage in the bottom level.

NSPS Option 8 - Additional Treatment to Reduce BOD, Pathogens,  and Volatile Solids
Practices factored into the analysis of this option were:
                                          28

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•      All technologies and practices in NSPS option 2.
•      Additional treatments include the addition of lime to reduce pollutants and composting.

As stated previously, it is assumed that all new facilities handle their manure in a dry manner
including practices to prevent contact with rain and to eliminate production area runoff.
Therefore the costs for additional treatment are assumed to be associated with composting the
wastes.

Capital costs for composting animal waste were based on estimates from the Minnesota
Department of Agriculture (1995). Composting equipment costs for starting an on-farm
composting operation can range from $20,000 to  $125,000 and higher, depending on the size of
the operation and the level of technology selected. For the purpose of this analysis, it was
assumed that a structure was available to house the compost material. Thus, only a blower and
pipe for air distribution were required to compost material in a static pile. The costs for piping
and a blower was estimated at $10,000.  Larger facilities require a dual pipe/blower set-up with
an estimated cost of $20,000. It was assumed that swine operations are high rise facilities that
already have pipe/blower systems in place.

Aerated static piles for composting were selected as the desired method for composting poultry
wastes.  Annual costs for aerated static pile systems were estimated by the Minnesota
Department of Agriculture (1995) to range from $20 to $50 per ton of incoming material. The
less expensive cost of $20 per ton was selected because much of the material needed for
composting was assumed to already be at the new facilities. The incoming mass of wastes was
estimated using USDA NRCS (1992) values for characterizing poultry waste litter. Additional
bedding costs for layers was added because layer  operations typically do  not use bedding
materials.  The average size  of a layer facility was estimated at 5,623 cubic feet per 100,000 bird
spaces.  Assuming a cost of $3 per straw bale, a volume of 12 cubic feet per bale, and a bedding
thickness of 3 inches, the net cost of bedding is $0.014 per bird space per year.  The capitol and
annual costs for NSPS option 8 were applied to all facility types and all animal  sectors.

NSPS Option 9 - Ground Water Protection and No Overflow

The costs for NSPS option 9 was considered to be equal to those for NSPS option 3 because the
NSPS baseline for both swine and poultry results  in manure being handled in a dry manner with
no possibility of an overflow.
                                           29

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5.0    ON-FARM COSTS

A cost model was developed to determine the average facility costs and total industry costs of the
proposed regulation revisions to the swine and poultry animal feeding industries. The cost model
is used to assess different regulatory options and the costs to the regulated community. Costs are
developed for multiple model operations based on their size, region, operation type (e.g., type of
animal raised), and nutrient used in nutrient planning. The total national cost of the proposed
regulation is then estimated by multiplying model facility costs by the number of facilities
represented by each particular model. The rest of this section describes the approach to
developing facility level costs.

5.1    Cost Categories

The costs are divided into four broad categories of costs:

    •   Nutrient Management Planning
    •   Facility Upgrades
    •   Land Application
    •   Practices That Reduce Excess Nutrients on the Farm

Costs include capital costs; fixed, one-time costs; non-annual but reoccurring costs; and annual
costs. All costs are expressed in terms of 1997 dollars.

5.2    Frequency Factors

EPA recognizes that most individual farms have already implemented certain waste management
techniques or practices that are called for in the regulatory options considered.  Only costs that
are the direct result of the proposed regulation are included in the cost model. Costs already
routinely incurred by operations are not attributed to the proposed regulation. For example, costs
incurred by facilities to meet current state requirements are not included.

To reflect baseline industry conditions, EPA has developed frequency factors to describe the
percentage of the industry that already implements particular operations, techniques, or practices
required by the proposed rule. Thus, frequency factors address those who need to implement an
operation, technique, or practice in order to meet proposed requirements (e.g., ground water
monitoring), and excludes those who already have the technology in place (e.g., storage).
Frequency factors are based on geographic location, type and size of operation, existing
regulatory requirements, and overall status of the industry. For example, all broiler feeding
operations are assumed to own or have access to tractors  with front-end loaders for use in
cleaning out the broiler houses (frequency factor is 100 percent), and thus no costs are assumed
for cleaning out the houses. Many operations, on the other hand, do not have storage sheds for
their litter, and building the storage is costed in the model (frequency factor is less than 100
percent).
                                            30

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5.2.1   Development of Frequency Factors to Estimate Industry Level Costs

Data used to determine frequency factors varied depends upon the sector and component or
practice.  Industry and USD A data were used as the basis for most of the frequency factors for
layers and swine, whereas analysis of state and federal regulations was used primarily for broilers
and turkeys.  EPA's States Compendium was also referred to for all animal sectors. Costs were
not attributed to model facilities when state regulations specified standards equal to or more
stringent than the proposed technology options. The source for each frequency factor is
identified in Sections 5.5 through 5.8. Frequency factors are summarized in Appendix D.

EPA then applied these frequency factors to model farms to develop a weighted-average cost for
each model farm.  For example, if a practice costs $100 and 60 percent (the frequency factor) of
the operations in the model category already implement the practice, the average cost to facilities
represented by that model farm is $40.  Each of these weighted-average costs is then multiplied
by the number of facilities represented by the particular model farm to estimate industry-level
costs.

Literature and industry data for the broiler and turkey sectors was generally not detailed enough
to generate frequency factors. Instead, EPA reviewed the specific regulatory language and
summaries of regulations for 12 major poultry-producing states regarding requirements for
nutrient management plans (NMPs) at broiler and turkey facilities (Tetra Tech, 2000a).
Requirements were considered for facilities in two size groups: 300-1,000 animal units and
greater than 1,000 animal units.  All broiler and turkey facilities were assumed to use dry waste
management systems.

From the analysis of state and federal regulations, EPA determined that a few states already
require broiler and  turkey facilities to implement some of the components of a NMP.  Except as
specified for ground water and surface water requirements, and in cases where select frequency
factors could be based on available industry data, the analysis from these 12 states were used to
calculate regional frequency factors. These state regulation based frequency factors approximate
the number of facilities that are currently required to implement NMP components and,
therefore, must already incur costs for these components.  Weighted averages were used to
estimate frequency factors for each NMP component (for 300-1,000 AU and > 1,000 AU), as
illustrated in the example in Table 5-1.
                                           31

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Table 5-1. Illustration of Method to Calculate Frequency Factors from Weighted Averages
State
A
B
C
D
Regional Total
Number of Facilities
in the State a
10
40
20
20
100
NMP Component
Required by State?"
Yes
No
Yes
No

Weight
10
0
20
0
(30/100) = 0.30
a The number of facilities for broilers and turkeys differs within each state, so the overall regional frequency
factors may be different for broilers versus turkeys. 1997 Census of Agriculture data (USDA-NASS, 1999) were
used to determine the number of facilities in each state within the two size ranges, 300-1,000 AU and >1,000
AU.
Components were assumed to not be required for states other than the 12 reviewed.
In the above example, the frequency factor for the region that includes the four states "A", "B",
"C", and "D" is 0.30.

5.2.2  Sensitivity Analysis of Weighted Farm Costs

The model-farm approach which was used in the cost model provides the average cost a facility
is projected to incur under the proposed regulatory options. EPA recognizes that this approach
may underestimate or overestimate the projected costs for facilities that are on the extreme ends
of applicability. For example, some facilities may already meet the proposed regulatory
requirements; therefore, those facility  costs will be zero. Alternatively, some facilities may
currently meet very few of the proposed regulatory requirements; therefore, these operations will
incur costs that are much higher than the average model facility cost. Technologies and practices
with large capital costs or annual costs and low frequency factors are those most likely to result
in weighted costs that are substantially different from the true costs to a facility.

To evaluate the significance of these modeling limitations, EPA performed sensitivity analyses
on the cost model to evaluate the major drivers for the model farm costs and to compare the
average model farm cost to the maximum cost a farm may incur for the proposed regulatory
options. EPA performed two sensitivity runs: the first to compare the effects of nitrogen-based
nutrient management verses phosphorus-based nutrient management on the costs; the second to
compare the effects of groundwater monitoring requirements on the costs. This was done by
running the model both with and without frequency factors.  This allowed EPA to identify the
costs of those technologies and practices that are most sensitive to EPA's modeling assumptions.
EPA was then able to identify the model elements and cost components that were cost drivers
and thus merit further analysis: the availability of cropland for manure utilization, the
incremental costs of phosphorus based application over nitrogen based application, the costs of
groundwater controls, and the costs of incremental storage for timing constraints.
                                           32

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EPA has already developed separate cost models to reflect nitrogen and phosphorus based
requirements, and developed three categories of land availability to capture the wide range of
land application and hauling costs.  EPA's sensitivity analysis concluded the costs generated by
the refined cost models were stable over a wide range of modeling assumptions (See
Development Document).  To further examine the cost impacts under different financial
assumptions such as varying revenue, farm performance, and net returns, EPA conducted
sensitivity analyses (See Economic Analysis, Appendix D).

Nutrient Application Basis Analysis:

Under the proposed regulatory options, a facility will be required to follow either nitrogen-based
nutrient management or phosphorus-based nutrient management.  More cropland is required to
land apply manure waste at agronomic phosphorus-based rates than nitrogen-based rates;
therefore, phosphorus-based nutrient management incurs more costs for land application,
irrigation, nutrient management planning, supplemental nitrogen fertilizer, and off-site
transportation of manure and wastes.

To evaluate the significance of the nutrient application basis on the costs, a sensitivity analysis
was performed on Option 2. Option 2 costs are based on a combination of nitrogen-based and
phosphorus-based nutrient management, and are  also the basis for the costs in Options 3 through
8.  To perform this analysis, the frequency of facilities that would be located in a phosphorus-
based nutrient management area was set to 100 percent (no facilities were costed under  the
nitrogen-based management scenario.)

Because more cropland is required for phosphorus-based application, operations that are
Category 1 operations under nitrogen-based  nutrient management may be reclassified as a
Category 2 operation under phosphorus-based nutrient management. That is, a facility with
enough land to apply all of the manure waste on site under nitrogen-based  application may not
have enough land to apply all of their manure waste  on site under phosphorus-based nutrient
management. Because of this, the most dramatic comparison of the effects of changing the
agronomic basis from nitrogen to phosphorus is seen by comparing the results of Option 1 (N-
Based Application), Category 1 facilities to the sensitivity run Option 2A (P-based Application),
Category 2 facilities.

Comparing these results shows a general  70%  increase in the industry level costs. This  increase
is due to the following factors:

•      Shift of facilities from Category 1 to  Category 2 (thereby incurring transportation costs);
•      A portion of Category 2 facilities  under N-based application are assumed to not  incur
       transportation costs, while they do incur these costs under P-based application; and
•      Larger acreage for phosphorus-based facilities, requiring more irrigation costs, soil
       sampling; and nutrient management planning.
                                           33

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Groundwater Protection Option Analysis

Under the proposed regulatory Options 3 and 4, facilities will be required to assess if they are
located in hydro-geologically sensitive areas and to implement groundwater protection if manure
waste is stored or land applied on soil that has a hydrologic link to groundwater. If the facility has
such a link, then the facility must take measures to ensure groundwater protection, including
synthetically lining surface impoundments (e.g., lagoons and ponds), providing an impervious
surface upon which to store dry manure, installing groundwater wells, and performing annual
monitoring of these wells. If the facility is not located in a hydro-geologically sensitive area, then
the facility does not incur any of these groundwater protection costs other than the hydro-
geologic evaluation.

To evaluate the significance of the groundwater protection requirement on the costs for Options 3
and 4, a sensitivity analysis was performed on Option 3. Option 3 was selected to perform this
evaluation because the basis for the costs in Option 3 is identical to the Option 2 costs
(phosphorus-based application), with the addition of the groundwater protection costs; therefore,
a direct comparison can be made between the costs for a facility with no groundwater protection
requirements and a facility with these requirements by setting the groundwater frequency factors
to 100%.

Facilities costed for Option 3 A are those facilities where the groundwater assessment was found
to be positive (all groundwater protection costs are included), and facilities costed for Option 3B
are those where the groundwater assessment was found to be negative (no groundwater
protection costs are included). The results show that a facility that incurs 100% of the
groundwater protection costs incurs capital and annual O&M costs 67% higher than those
facilities that do not incur groundwater protection costs. This increase is due to the following
factors:

•  installation and monitoring of four groundwater wells
•  installation and maintenance of impermeable pad for dry manure storage
•  installation and maintenance of composting facilities for poultry operations
•  installation and maintenance of synthetic and clay lining for lagoons and ponds.

5.3    Regional Factors

The cost model addresses variations between operations in different regions of the country.  For
example, the crop nutrient removal rates, which are used to set manure application rates, vary
among regions of the country based on average crop yields in each region.  Many of the costs in
the model rely on the manure and associated nutrient production of the animals at an operation,
and is affected by regional differences such as climate and rainfall.  Some frequency factors  may
also vary by region when data was available to differentiate the "key regions" (see Section 5.4).

5.4    Key Regions
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As described in Section 4.1, model farms were developed based upon animal and operation type,
size of operation, and location.  The five regions identified by EPA are the Central, Mid-Atlantic,
Midwest, Pacific, and South regions, but EPA developed key regions to focus cost modeling
efforts on areas where the various animal industries are concentrated. The key regions chosen for
swine operations are the Mid-Atlantic and Midwest because 78 percent of the hog operations are
located in those two regions.  To provide  coverage of all relevant operations in the cost model,
however, those operations in regions other than the key regions were divided evenly among the
two key regions. For example, the Midwest region is actually a combination of operations from
the Midwest with a portion of the operations from the Pacific, Central, and South regions.
Similarly, the Mid-Atlantic region includes operations from the Mid-Atlantic, as well as a
portion of the operations from the Pacific, Central, and South regions. In this manner all facilities
are counted and costed. This approach assumes operations in areas outside of the key regions
produce animals and handle manure similarly to those operations in the key regions.

The key regions for poultry are those regions with the largest number of AFOs.  Thus the key
regions for broilers are the Mid-Atlantic and South, while the Mid-Atlantic and Midwest are the
key regions for turkeys. Wet layers are predominantly located in the South, while the South and
Midwest are the key regions for dry layers. Operations from the other regions were folded into
the key regions for these animal types in the same manner as described above for swine
operations.

5.5     Nutrient Management Planning

The Nutrient Management Plan2 costs are divided into three sections—fixed, one-time costs;
non-annual, reoccurring costs; and annual costs.  The following subsections  focus on the
following generally recognized components of a NMP:

•      Training and certification for manure application
•      Development of NMP
•      On-farm NMP development every 3 years3
•      Assessment of crop field/ground water link to surface water
•      Ground water monitoring well installation, and operation and maintenance
•      Surface water monitoring
•      Soil auger
       2  EPA is using the term Permit Nutrient Plan (PNP) to describe those elements of a
Nutrient Management Plan that would be required under the proposed regulations.

       3  Non-capital costs are grouped as either: fixed first year (one time only) costs, annual
(recurring) costs, or 3 year recurring costs. Costs that are not  annual or 3 year recurring were
adjusted to reflect the costs as if the costs were 3 year recurring  costs. For example, a six year
recurring cost was attributed to the model facility as a three year recurring cost paid half in year
three and half in year six.

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       Soil testing every 3 years
       Manure sampler
       Manure testing
       Scales for manure spreader calibration
       Calibration of manure spreader
       Record keeping (e.g., recording animal inventories, manure generation, field application
       of manure dates and rates, manure and soil analysis compilation, crop yields, etc.)
       Hauling of excess manure or litter
       Storage (usually storage sheds for poultry litter)
       Mortality composting facility, and operation and maintenance
       Storm water diversion, and operation and maintenance
       Lagoon depth marker for liquid impoundments
       Lagoon liner, and operation and maintenance for liquid impoundments
       Buffer (or application setbacks) establishment
       Visual inspections
       Feeding strategies
5.5.1   Fixed, One-Time Costs

5.5.1.1 Training and Certification for Manure Application

The cost of training and certifying personnel who apply manure is assumed to be $117 and
includes a course fee of $25,4 labor lost for missed work (1 day at $10/hr), and other direct costs
such as travel to attend the course, which is assumed to be 15 percent of labor costs. It is
assumed this 3-year recurring cost due to applicator turnover.

The frequency factors for training and certification at layer (United Egg Producers /United Egg
Association, 1999) and swine (USDA APHIS, 1995) facilities were based upon industry data,
while the frequency factors for broiler and turkey facilities were derived from an analysis of state
regulations (Tetra Tech, 2000a).
       4 Training costs based on state pesticide certification testing costs determined from various state extension
services.

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Frequency Factors: Certification of Manure Applicators
            Region/Size
 Mi d-Atl anti c/medium
 For swine, Midwest/medium <2,500 head, and MW/large >2,500 head; MA/medium <2,500 head, and MA/large >2,500
 head.
 For broilers, MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000 AU; SO/medium = 300-1,000 AU and SO/large > 1,000
 AU.
 For layers, no distinction is made between medium and large.
 For turkeys, MW/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MW/large > 1,000 AU; MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000
 AU.
5.5.1.2 Owner/Operator Permit Nutrient Management Planning (PNMP) Training

It was assumed that the owner/operator would incur costs to be properly trained on the permit
requirements related to nutrient management planning. It was also assumed that owner/operators
are knowledgeable of nutrient management planning in general and thus the PNMP training
would not be extensive.  The costs were estimated based on 16 hours of training, eight hours of
home study, and a $100 course fee. The labor rate of the owner operator was estimated at
$20/hour. The fixed non-amortizable total costs of $580 is attributable to all category 1 and 2
facilities for all animal sectors.

5.5.1.3 Ground Water Well Installation and Initial Sampling

The cost for monitoring well installation ($5,735) is based on installing four 50-foot-deep wells,
one up-gradient and three down-gradient from the manure storage facility.  The cost includes
well drilling at $21/ft, well casing at $2/ft for the upper 30 feet, well screening of the lower 20
feet at $3/ft, and gravel for the entire 50 feet at $l/ft. A protective casing for each well head is
valued at $120. A bailer, which samples water from the well, costs $35 and can be used to test
all the wells on the farm. Ground water well installation data were compiled from two sources
(A.C. Schultes, Inc., 1999,  and USEPA, 1998).  An initial  ground water sample is required for
each well in the first year after installation to determine baseline concentrations ($85 per well,
including 1 hour of labor at $10/hr and $75 for laboratory analysis of the water sample).
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Analysis of samples includes total coliform (TC), fecal coliform (FC), nitrate-nitrogen,
ammonia-nitrogen, chloride, and total dissolved solids (IDS).  Subsequent ground water
monitoring costs are incurred as annual costs (two samples per year, with two samples taken in
the first year in addition to the initial samples).

It was assumed that no broiler and turkey facilities are currently required to install ground water
monitoring wells, and only those facilities on agricultural land with a potential for ground water
contamination would actually be subject to this requirement if imposed by EPA. EPA assumed
the lack of water to serve as the transport mechanism for discharge to groundwater makes it
highly unlikely for a facility with dry manure systems to discharge to groundwater. This is
reflected by the absence of liner costs for poultry facilities as described in section 5.6.1.3.

As described in Section 5.2, the frequency factors for well installation and initial sampling for all
sectors were calculated as 100 minus the percentage of acreage with potential for ground water
contamination (see Section 5.6.1.3) since this percentage would not be subject to ground water
monitoring requirements if imposed. The percentage of acreage in each region with the potential
for ground water contamination was provided by Sobecki and Clipper (1999).

Frequency Factors: Ground Water Well Installation and Initial Sampling
           Region/Size
 MidAtlantic/medium
 For swine, Midwest/medium <2,500 head, and MW/large >2,500 head; MA/medium <2,500 head, and MA/large >2,500
 head.
 For broilers, MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000 AU; SO/medium = 300-1,000 AU and SO/large > 1,000
 AU.
 For layers, no distinction is made between medium and large.
 For turkeys, MW/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MW/large > 1,000 AU; MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000
 AU.
5.5.1.4 Surface Water Monitoring
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Table 5-2 provides a detailed estimate of initial costs for surface water sampling. Initial costs
include a training course (4-hour course, 4-hour preparation, course fee, and miscellaneous other
costs); two coolers for sample storage and shipping; and sampling supplies, including a pipette
and waders. The initial one-time cost is $392.  Analytical costs and parameters monitored are
described in Section 5.5.3.5.

         Table 5-2. Detailed Estimate of Initial Costs for Surface Water Sampling
Description
Training (8 hr)
Course fee
Misc. other costs (15% of labor)
Coolers (2)
Sampling equipment (pipette, etc.)
Unit Cost
($)
10.00
40.00
—
30.00
200.00
TOTAL INITIAL COST
Initial Cost
($)
80.00
40.00
12.00
60.00
200.00
392.00
The frequency factors for surface water monitoring at layer facilities were assumed to be zero
based on site visits, those for swine were based upon industry data (USDA APHIS, 1995), and
those for broiler and turkey facilities were derived from an analysis of state regulations (Tetra
Tech, 2000a).
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Frequency Factors: Surface Water Monitoring
           Region/Size
 MidAtlantic/medium
 For swine, Midwest/medium <2,500 head, and MW/large >2,500 head; MA/medium <2,500 head, and MA/large >2,500
 head.
 For broilers, MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000 AU; SO/medium = 300-1,000 AU and SO/large > 1,000
 AU.
 For layers, no distinction is made between medium and large.
 For turkeys, MW/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MW/large > 1,000 AU; MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000
 AU.
5.5.1.5 Soil and Manure Sampling and Calibration of Equipment

The manure sampler ($30) consists of a hollow conduit long enough to extend to the bottom of
the lagoon,  pit, or other storage structure. In the case of solid manure, a shovel or similar device
is sufficient to obtain a representative sample and no cost is assumed. Additional fixed, one-time
costs include the purchase of a soil auger at $25 (ASC Scientific,  1999), and two scales for
calibration of the manure spreader (one under each wheel at $250 each).

The frequency factors for soil augers at layer (UEP/UEA) and swine (NPPC,  1998) facilities
were based  upon industry data, while the frequency factors for broiler and turkey facilities were
derived from an analysis of state regulations (Tetra Tech, 2000a). In cases where states require
soil testing at broiler and turkey facilities, it was assumed that soil augers (or an equivalent
technology) are also required or otherwise available to the facility, and thus not costed.
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Frequency Factors: Soil Auger
            Region/Size
 MidAtlantic/medium
 For swine, Midwest/medium <2,500 head, and MW/large >2,500 head; MA/medium <2,500 head, and MA/large >2,500
 head.
 For broilers, MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000 AU; SO/medium = 300-1,000 AU and SO/large > 1,000
 AU.
 For layers, no distinction is made between medium and large.
 For turkeys, MW/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MW/large > 1,000 AU; MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000
 AU.
The frequency factors for manure samplers at layer (UEP/UEA) and swine (NPPC, 1998)
facilities were based upon industry data, while the frequency factors for broiler and turkey
facilities were derived from an analysis of state regulations (Tetra Tech, 2000a). In cases where
states require manure testing at broiler and turkey facilities, it was assumed that manure samplers
(or an equivalent technology) are also required or otherwise available to the facility, and thus not
costed.
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Frequency Factors: Manure Sampler and Calibration of Equipment
           Region/Size
 MidAtlantic/medium
 For swine, Midwest/medium <2,500 head, and MW/large >2,500 head; MA/medium <2,500 head, and MA/large >2,500
 head.
 For broilers, MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000 AU; SO/medium = 300-1,000 AU and SO/large > 1,000
 AU.
 For layers, no distinction is made between medium and large.
 For turkeys, MW/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MW/large > 1,000 AU; MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000
 AU.
The frequency factors for calibration scales at layer (UEP/UEA, 1999) and swine (NPPC, 1998)
facilities were based upon industry data, while the frequency factors for broiler and turkey
facilities were derived from an analysis of state regulations (Tetra Tech, 2000a). In cases where
states require calibration of manure spreaders at broiler and turkey facilities, it was assumed that
calibration scales (or an equivalent calibration technology or method) are also required or
otherwise available to the facility, and thus not costed. Calibration of solid manure spreaders can
be performed in a number of ways, some of which are based on volume instead of weight, and
liquid-based systems can also be calibrated in terms of volume.  Methods for calibration of
manure spreaders are described in greater detail in Chapter 8 of the Technical Development
Document.

Weighing the  spreader before and after application provides accurate results. It is the ideal
methodology for wet or dry manure calibration because it is relatively quick and produces
accurate results. This approach is unsuitable for manure application devices such as umbilical
applicators. Instead, the volume of manure injected must be first be determined.  The procedure
includes collection of pumped material into a bucket to determine the flow rate, which decreases
initial calibration costs.  Some operations that handle their manure in a drier form may elect a
less expensive calibration method. By spreading manure on a tarp and weighing it on a less
expensive hanging balance, initial calibration costs would be reduced.  Refer to section 5.5.3.3
for details on assumptions of annual calibration costs.
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Frequency Factors: Scales for Calibration of Manure Spreader
           Region/Size
 MidAtlantic/medium
 For swine, Midwest/medium <2,500 head, and MW/large >2,500 head; MA/medium <2,500 head, and MA/large >2,500
 head.
 For broilers, MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000 AU; SO/medium = 300-1,000 AU and SO/large > 1,000
 AU.
 For layers, no distinction is made between medium and large.
 For turkeys, MW/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MW/large > 1,000 AU; MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000
 AU.
5.5.2  Non-annual, Reoccurring Costs

Nonannual, reoccurring costs are the costs for activities done repeatedly but not annually. These
costs are divided by the number of years between their occurrence to obtain an annualized cost.

5.5.2.1 On-Farm Nutrient Management Plan (NMP) Development

The cost for development of an on-farm NMP is the product of the farm size (number of tillable
acres) and a NMP rate in dollars per acre.  NMP rates vary depending on the level of services
(e.g., soil sampling, manure sampling, and analysis).  The NMP rate selected was $5 per tillable
acre. This value was selected because soil and manure testing were costed separately from NMP
and the higher costs for NMP development are usually attributed to testing costs. Revision and a
complete rewrite of an on-farm NMP is costed to occur every 3 years.  Annual review of the
NMP is costed under recordkeeping. While the proposed regulation would require that PNPs are
rewritten at a minimum of once every 5 years, a revision frequency of once every 3 years was
assumed in cost modeling to cover additional costs for PNP modifications (and notification of
modifications) that could be necessary any year due to changes in crops, animal production, or
soil measurements.

The frequency factors for development of an on-farm NMP at layer (UEP/UEA, 1999) and swine
(USDA APHIS, 1995) facilities were based upon industry data, while the frequency factors for
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broiler and turkey facilities were derived from an analysis of state regulations (Tetra Tech,
2000a). Revision of plans at broiler and turkey facilities was considered to occur only if
explicitly mentioned in the state regulations.

Frequency Factors:  Initial Nutrient Management Plan Development
            Region/Size
 MidAtlantic/medium
 For swine, Midwest/medium <2,500 head, and MW/large >2,500 head; MA/medium <2,500 head, and MA/large >2,500
 head.
 For broilers, MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000 AU; SO/medium = 300-1,000 AU and SO/large > 1,000
 AU.
 For layers, no distinction is made between medium and large.
 For turkeys, MW/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MW/large > 1,000 AU; MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000
 AU.
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Frequency Factors:  Nutrient Management Plan On-Farm Recurring (Revisions to Plans)
           Region/Size
 MidAtlantic/medium
 For swine, Midwest/medium <2,500 head, and MW/large >2,500 head; MA/medium <2,500 head, and MA/large >2,500
 head.
 For broilers, MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000 AU; SO/medium = 300-1,000 AU and SO/large > 1,000
 AU.
 For layers, no distinction is made between medium and large.
 For turkeys, MW/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MW/large > 1,000 AU; MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000
 AU.
5.5.2.2 On-Farm Soil Testing

On-farm soil testing should be carried out at least once every 3 years. A soil sampling rate of one
composite sample per 10 tillable acres was selected for use in this model, based upon a review of
federal and state soil sampling recommendations.  A composite soil sample was estimated to take
1 hour because of the distance between samples, and labor costs for soil sampling were assumed
to be $10/hr. Costs for soil analysis for major nutrients and important soil  characteristics were
estimated at $10 per sample based on a review of costs by state NRCS labs.

The frequency factors for soil testing at layer (UEP/UEA, 1999) and swine (NPPC, 1998)
facilities were based upon industry data, while the frequency factors for broiler and turkey
facilities were derived from an analysis of state regulations (Tetra Tech, 2000a).
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Frequency Factors:  Soil Testing
           Region/Size
 MidAtlantic/medium
 For swine, Midwest/medium <2,500 head, and MW/large >2,500 head; MA/medium <2,500 head, and MA/large >2,500
 head.
 For broilers, MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000 AU; SO/medium = 300-1,000 AU and SO/large > 1,000
 AU.
 For layers, no distinction is made between medium and large.
 For turkeys, MW/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MW/large > 1,000 AU; MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000
 AU.
5.5.2.3 Assessment of Feedlot/Ground Water Link to Surface Water

An assessment of the ground water link to surface water at the production areas every 5 years
requires technical expertise; therefore, a professional pay rate5 ($55/hr) was used. Activities
include a limited review of local geohydrology, topography, proximity to surface waters, and
current animal waste management practices. It was assumed that the professional assessor
requires 16 hours of on-farm time, 16 hours of in-office time, and 16 hours for compiling
existing data into a final report (48 hours total). Four hours were allotted for the farm operator at
$10/hr to collect and present relevant information to the assessor.  Miscellaneous expenses
(assumed to be 15 percent of labor costs) included travel time, photocopying, purchasing maps,
report generation, and other direct costs, yielding a total estimated cost of $3,082 to assess
groundwater links to surface water.

The frequency factors for these assessments at layer and swine facilities were based upon
industry (UEP/UEA,  1999) or USD A (USD A, 1995) data, while the frequency factors for broiler
and turkey facilities were conservatively assumed to be zero.
        Professional pay rate for hydrologist based upon contractor experience with similar work.

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Frequency Factors:  Already Assess Ground Water Links to Surface Water
           Region/Size
 MidAtlantic/medium
 For swine, Midwest/medium <2,500 head, and MW/large >2,500 head; MA/medium <2,500 head, and MA/large >2,500
 head.
 For broilers, MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000 AU; SO/medium = 300-1,000 AU and SO/large > 1,000
 AU.
 For layers, no distinction is made between medium and large.
 For turkeys, MW/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MW/large > 1,000 AU; MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000
 AU.
5.5.3  Annual Costs

5.5.3.1 Manure Testing

Manure testing costs are based on sampling twice per year to reflect the requirement in the
proposed rule that manure be sampled at least once per year. The cost of manure sampling
includes the labor required and the manure nutrient analysis. For all poultry and swine facilities,
one hour is required to sample the main storage area. For dry poultry, an additional 0.25 hours
per house is required to acquire a composite sample from each house. Labor rates are $10/hr.
Manure analysis was estimated at $40 per sample based on a review of costs by state soil
conservation service labs.

The frequency factors for manure testing at layer (UEP/UEA, 1999) and swine (USDA APHIS,
1995) facilities were based upon industry data, while the frequency factors for broiler and turkey
facilities were derived from an analysis of state regulations (Tetra Tech,  2000a).
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Frequency Factors: Manure Testing
           Region/Size
 MidAtlantic/medium
 For swine, Midwest/medium <2,500 head, and MW/large >2,500 head; MA/medium <2,500 head, and MA/large >2,500
 head.
 For broilers, MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000 AU; SO/medium = 300-1,000 AU and SO/large > 1,000
 AU.
 For layers, no distinction is made between medium and large.
 For turkeys, MW/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MW/large > 1,000 AU; MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000
 AU.
5.5.3.2 Record Keeping and Reporting

Record keeping costs ($880) include the cost of recording animal inventories, manure generation,
field application of manure and other nutrients (amount, rate, method, incorporation, dates),
manure and soil analysis compilation, crop yield goals and harvested yields, crop rotations,
tillage practices, rainfall and irrigation, lime applications, findings from visual inspections of
feedlot areas and fields, lagoon emptying, and other activities on a monthly basis.  Records may
include manure spreader calibration worksheets, manure application worksheets, maintenance
logs, soil and manure test results, and documentation of corrective actions taken in response to
findings from visual inspections.  Eight hours were assumed to be needed to prepare an annual
report on animal inventories, manure generation, and overall manure application.  Three hours
each (72 hours annually) are assumed necessary for monthly write-ups and monthly field
observations. Thus, a total of 80 hours annually was estimated for record keeping at $10/hour.
Other costs associated with record keeping, including obtainment of signed certifications of
proper manure application from off-site manure recipients, were estimated at  10 percent of labor
costs. It was assumed that off-site recipients of manure incurred no cost to certify proper manure
application due to economic benefits derived from the manure.

The frequency factors for record keeping at layer (UEP/UEA) and swine (USDA APHIS, 1995)
facilities were based upon industry data, while the frequency factors for broiler and turkey
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facilities were derived from an analysis of state regulations (Tetra Tech, 2000a). Note the high
occurrence of recordkeeping at swine and layer operations does not mean these operations
already record all pertinent information, but rather the time and effort necessary to maintain the
records is already expended by the operator.
Frequency Factors: Record Keeping
           Region/Size
 MidAtlantic/medium
 For swine, Midwest/medium <2,500 head, and MW/large >2,500 head; MA/medium <2,500 head, and MA/large >2,500
 head.
 For broilers, MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000 AU; SO/medium = 300-1,000 AU and SO/large > 1,000
 AU.
 For layers, no distinction is made between medium and large.
 For turkeys, MW/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MW/large > 1,000 AU; MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000
 AU.
5.5.3.3 Calibration of Manure Spreader

The cost for manure spreader calibration was estimated at $100 based on 4 hours of labor, at $10
per hour, for both wet and dry applicators and 2 hours of tractor time at $30 per hour. It was
assumed that the time required for calibration included gathering required equipment, loading
manure, weighing the spreader before and after land application,  and applying manure to a
known area of cropland. Additional time was required to perform calculations on manure
application rates.

The frequency factors for spreader calibration at layer facilities were based upon industry data
(UEP/UEA), those for swine facilities were based upon data from the AFO Strategy (USEPA,
1999b), and those for broiler and turkey facilities were derived from an analysis of state
regulations (Tetra Tech, 2000a).
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Frequency Factors: Calibration of Manure Spreader
           Region/Size
 MidAtlantic/medium
 For swine, Midwest/medium <2,500 head, and MW/large >2,500 head; MA/medium <2,500 head, and MA/large >2,500
 head.
 For broilers, MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000 AU; SO/medium = 300-1,000 AU and SO/large > 1,000
 AU.
 For layers, no distinction is made between medium and large.
 For turkeys, MW/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MW/large > 1,000 AU; MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000
 AU.
5.5.3.4 Operation and Maintenance for Ground Water Monitoring

Ground water monitoring operation and maintenance costs were estimated at 2 percent of initial
costs ($57.70). Additional costs include two samples per year for each well, with 1 hour of labor
required for each sample (at $10/hr) and $75 per sample for laboratory analysis of total coliform
(TC), fecal coliform (FC), nitrate-nitrogen, ammonia-nitrogen, chloride, and total dissolved
solids  (TDS). Therefore,  the total annual cost for ground water monitoring is $231.

As described in Section 5.2, the frequency factors for the operation and maintenance of ground
water monitoring for all sectors were calculated as 100 minus the percentage of acreage with
potential for ground water contamination (see Section 5.6.1.3) since this percentage would not be
subject to ground water monitoring requirements if imposed.  The percentage of acreage in each
region with the potential for ground water contamination was provided by Sobecki and Clipper
(1999).
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Frequency Factors:  Ground Water Monitoring Operation and Maintenance
           Region/Size
 MidAtlantic/medium
 For swine, Midwest/medium <2,500 head, and MW/large >2,500 head; MA/medium <2,500 head, and MA/large >2,500
 head.
 For broilers, MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000 AU; SO/medium = 300-1,000 AU and SO/large > 1,000
 AU.
 For layers, no distinction is made between medium and large.
 For turkeys, MW/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MW/large > 1,000 AU; MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000
 AU.
5.5.3.5 Operation and Maintenance for Surface Water Monitoring

The initial assumptions used in developing cost estimates for surface water monitoring include 4
grab samples per sampling event, 12 sampling events per year, and analysis of each sample for
nutrients, BOD5, total suspended solids (TSS), and fecal coliform (FC). It is assumed that
nutrient analyses would include nitrite+nitrate (NO2 and NO3), total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN),
and total phosphorus (TP) and that each sampling event would include one additional quality
assurance (QA) sample. The typical holding time for FC is 6 hours and the holding time for
BOD5 is 48 hours. Because it was assumed that sampling events would coincide with rain events
rather than scheduling the sampling in advance, it was deemed unlikely that the results from FC
and BOD5 analysis would meet QA requirements unless provisions are made for rapid (and
expensive) delivery of samples to a lab.  Therefore, analysis for FC and BOD5 was dropped from
the monitoring requirements.

The estimated cost assumes that the operation would (1) purchase new containers for each
sampling event, (2) take the samples, and (3)  ship the samples to a laboratory for processing.
Purchasing new (sterile) containers reduces the potential for sample contamination. Operator
sampling is necessary because of the difficulty that a state agency or contractor would have in
mobilizing for rain-based sampling events. Given the low annual laboratory through-put and the
costs associated with certification and quality assurance, sending the samples to a laboratory
                                            51

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(rather than performing analysis on-site) for analysis appeared to be the most logistically viable
alternative.

Sampling and analysis would follow typical surface water monitoring Standard Operating
Procedures (SOPs), including appropriate chain of custody. Below are references and key
highlights extracted from typical SOPs that affect applicability, logistics, and costs.  The use of
these SOPs provides the basis for cost calculations.

TSS  http://www.epa.gov/reg5ocrl/sop/sopdoc/gcl8.htm (STANDARD OPERATING
      PROCEDURE FOR THE ANALYSIS OF RESIDUE, NON-FILTERABLE
      (SUSPENDED SOLIDS) IN WATER METHOD 160.2 NS (GRAVIMETRIC, 103 - 105
•  The method is approved for NPDES requirements for a range of 2 to 2000 mg/L (when a
   100-mL sample is used).
•  Samples are stored at 4ฐC.
•  Samples are collected in glass or high-density polyethylene containers.
•  The holding time is 7 days.

TKN & TP   http://www.epa.gov/reg5ocrl/sop/sopdoc/gc032.htm (STANDARD OPERATING
             PROCEDURE FOR THE ANALYSIS OF TOTAL KJELDAHL NITROGEN
             AND TOTAL PHOSPHORUS IN WATER METHOD 351.2 *NS AND
             METHOD 365.4 *NS (COLORIMETRIC, SEMI AUTOMATED, BLOCK
             DIGESTOR, AA H)

•  Analysis for these chemicals is normally run simultaneously.  It is an approved alternate test
   procedure for NPDES. However, the approval applies only to analyses performed at the
   Central Regional Laboratory.
•  The working range for TKN is approximately 0.1 to 10 mg N/L and for TP is approximately
   0.05to5.0mgP/L.
•  Samples are collected in new 500-mL high-density polyethylene containers. Flexidome and
   phenolic resin (black) caps or  caps with glued plastic liners might contaminate the samples
   and are not acceptable.
•  Samples are preserved by acidification to pH < 2 with the addition of approximately 1 mL of
   concentrated H2SO4 per liter of sample.
•  Samples are stored at 4ฐC.
•  Samples are stable for at least 28 days.

Based on these SOPs, each grab sample would require one 500 mL sample for nitrate-nitrogen,
total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), and total phosphorus (TP) acidified with 1 mL concentrated
sulfuric acid (H2SO4); and one 250 mL sample for TSS (unacidified). Analytical costs were
obtained from New Mexico State  University's Soil, Water, and Air Testing Laboratory
(http://swatlab.nmsu.edu/wtrlist.htm and http://swatlab.nmsu.edu/bactlist.htm). The costs for
NO23, TKN, TP, and TSS were $16.50, $33.50, $5.00, and $16.00 per analysis, respectively.

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(The sample for nutrients could also be used for NH4 for an additional $20 per analysis, which is
not included in this exercise.) This yields a total of $71.00 per sample.

In addition to analytical costs, annual costs include sample bottles, shipping, supplies and
transportation, and labor for sample collection and data review.  Sample bottle costs were
obtained from the 1998 HACH Products for Analysis; overnight shipping was based on a typical
Federal Express standard overnight delivery of a 30-lb package; miscellaneous supplies include
sterile pipet tips and H2SO4 for acidifying a portion of the samples; and transportation includes
travel to readily accessible stream locations. It is assumed that the 4 grab samples and 1 QA
sample can be collected within a 2-hour time period per sampling event and that all appropriate
chain-of-custody, data review, and data recording can be completed within  1 hour per sampling
event.

Table 5-3 provides a detailed estimate of annual  costs for surface water sampling without BOD5
and FC. The total annual cost for surface water sampling is $6,252 per year without BOD5 and
FC.
        Table 5-3. Detailed Estimate of Annual Costs for Surface Water Sampling
Description
250-mL - bottles (2 bottles per sample)
500-mL - bottles (1 bottle per sample)
Overnight shipping (30 Ib cooler)
Misc. supplies and transportation
Laboratory costs
Sample collection (2 hrs/sampling event)
QA & record keeping (1 hr/sampling event)
Unit Cost
($)
2.00
2.70
60.00
30.00
79.00
10.00
10.00
TOTAL ANNUAL COST
Annual Cost
($)
240.00
162.00
720.00
30.00
4,740.00
240.00
120.00
6,252.00
Note: Assumes 12 sampling events per year, 4 grab plus 1 QA samples per event, for a total of 60 samples per year.
The frequency factors for surface water monitoring at layer facilities were assumed to be zero,
those for swine were based upon industry data (USDA APHIS, 1995), and those for broiler and
turkey facilities were derived from an analysis of state regulations (Tetra Tech, 2000a). Refer to
Section 5.5.1.4. for the table of frequency factors.

5.6    Facility Upgrades

Existing animal feeding operations might require special structures to be built or plans to be
developed to reduce the potential for the introduction of nutrients or other harmful compounds
into surface and ground water.  This section describes the facility upgrades associated with swine
and poultry operations and the estimates of their initial capital costs and any operation and
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maintenance costs that were used to develop the costing model.  Major facility upgrades consist
of developing suitable storage for manure and disposal of animal mortalities and clean water
diversions around storage structures, particularly as the upgrades are needed to control land
application.

5.6.1   Fixed Costs

5.6.1.1 Mortality Composting Facility

Costs of constructing animal mortality facilities are related to the mortality rate of the various
animals. Table 5-4 gives a summary of the mortality rate, average mortality weight, and the
average length of animal confinement for different types of swine and poultry.

 Table 5-4. Mortality Rate, Mortality Weight and Time to Maturity for Various Swine and
                                   Poultry Operations
Animal
Swine
Swine
Chicken
Chicken
Chicken
Chicken
Turkey
Turkey
Operation
Farrow to Finish
Finisher
Layer
Pullet
Broiler
Integrated Layer
Hen
Tom
Mortality Rate
(percent)
5
5
14
5
5
13
6
9
Average Mortality
Weight (pounds)
123
110
4
4.3
4.5
4
16
25
Time to Maturity
(days)
160
123
440
140
45
395.5
98
133
Adapted from Carter et al., 1993, and USDA NRCS, 1998.
Note: Average mortality weight for broilers, hens, and toms do not reflect chick mortality.
The peak daily mortality was calculated by the equation:

     DAILY MORTALITY WEIGHT = NUMBER OF ANIMALS x MORTALITY RATE x MORTALITY WEIGHT/TIME TO MATURITY

For example, a 25,000-bird torn turkey operation with a 9 percent mortality that markets 25-
pound toms in 133 days (25,000 x 0.09 x 25/133) produces 423 pounds per day peak mortality.
Carter et al. (1993) assumed that 2.0 ft3 of composting space is required for each pound of dead
animal.  Thus the area required to compost the peak mortality of the flock (423 Ib x 2.0 ft3/lb) is
846 ft3.

A safety factor  (50 percent extra composting bin  space) was included to account for additional
mortalities. The safety factor effectively increases the composting space for each pound of dead
animal to 3.0 ft3 which compares favorably with the 2.5 ft3 recommended by the Poultry Water
Quality  Consortium (1998a). In addition, the Poultry Water Quality Consortium recommends
that composting of catastrophic event mortalities can be accomplished in the bedding or litter
where the poultry were housed if the whole population is involved and adequate space and time
are available. Using the example above (i.e., 846 ft3 required  at a peak mortality rate), the total
volume  for composting bins required (846 ft3 x 1.50 safety factor) is 1,296 ft3. Bins of
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approximately 200 ft3 in capacity (5 feet by 8 feet by 5 feet high) are suitable for animals
weighing less than 300 pounds and allow entrance with a front-end loader (Brodie and Carr,
1997). Therefore, the number of bins required (1,296 ft3 total/200 ft3 bin size) is 6.48 (rounded
to 6) bins.

According to Carter et al.  (1993), the cost of a 25,000-bird torn turkey mortality composting
facility is $3,500.  Farm equipment is usually needed to carry dead animals and compost
ingredients to the compost facility and to remove finished compost (Poultry Water Quality
Consortium, 1998a). For  this reason, a 20-foot concrete apron at the front end and bin side of the
shed were added to accommodate mechanical turning and loading/unloading of the compost and
litter. This increased the cost from $4.14/square foot to $7.50/square foot (NCSU, 1998). This
$7.50/square foot cost was used for swine and poultry composting facilities assuming a 5-foot
bin height.  The cost of the composting facility can thus be summarized as follows:

        Cost of compost facility = daily mortality weight x 2 x 1.5 x unit storage cost

EPA assumed all operations have adequate mortality handling practices to prevent mortality from
being discharged directly  into surface water. However, some handling methods may cause
pollutants to discharge to  groundwater, such as burial in areas with a high water table. These
handling methods would need to be prevented if the operation has a direct hydrologic connection
between the groundwater  and surface water. For purposes of costing, EPA assumed mortality
composting in covered and lined composting bins would be adopted as the mortality handling
practice at those operations with the hydrologic connection. The frequency factors for mortality
composting facilities were assumed to be the same as those calculated for facilities incurring the
operation and maintenance of ground water monitoring (see Section 5.5).Thus, for all sectors the
frequency factors are based on the percentage of acreage with potential for ground water
contamination (see Table  5-5).
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Frequency Factors: Mortality Composting and Operation and Maintenance
           Region/Size
 MidAtlantic/medium
 For swine, Midwest/medium <2,500 head, and MW/large >2,500 head; MA/medium <2,500 head, and MA/large >2,500
 head.
 For broilers, MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000 AU; SO/medium = 300-1,000 AU and SO/large > 1,000
 AU.
 For layers, no distinction is made between medium and large.
 For turkeys, MW/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MW/large > 1,000 AU; MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000
 AU.
5.6.1.2 Manure Storage (for Poultry Litter)

Requirements for poultry litter storage structures are similar to those for mortality composting
facilities in that they require a roof, foundation and floor, and suitable building materials for side
walls.  The construction of poultry litter storage facilities includes a roof with a 0.75 pitch, a
concrete floor 16 feet wide, and a 12-foot height from floor to roof (NCSU, 1998).  The width
and height were designed for piling manure to its angle of repose to minimize space. The length
of the structure is variable.

The birds are reared on a floor that is covered with a bedding source, one to four inches deep,
which can be wood shavings, rice hulls, chopped straw, peanut hulls, or other product depending
upon geographical availability (NCSU, 1998).  The bedding absorbs moisture and dilutes the
manure produced by birds when it mixes.

The litter mixture is either removed after each flock or is used for a second flock with the
exception that a small amount of litter as cake (compacted  and concentrated manure/litter mix) is
removed and the remaining litter is top dressed with an inch or so of new bedding material.
When the house is totally cleaned out the litter is pushed to the center of the house and a front
loader will place in it a litter spreader to be used as a nutrient source for crops.  Complete
cleaning of the house is one of the procedures followed to minimize transmission of diseases.
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The size of a poultry manure storage facility was calculated based on the volume of both manure
and litter produced from the various poultry operations. Manure production for all poultry types,
when designing manure storage facilities, was assigned a value of 0.00169 ft3 per bird per day (or
0.6169 ft3 per bird per year) (NCSU, 1998).

Litter production was calculated as the number of houses (25,000 chickens or 6,250 turkeys per
house) multiplied by the shaving material application depth (3.0  inches), multiplied by the area of
the house (16,000 ft2), adjusted for the amount of house floor area to receive shavings (zero
percent for layers, 33 percent for pullets, and 100 percent for the remaining poultry types), and
multiplied by the frequency of litter storage emptying (no more than two times per year).

The volumes of manure and litter production were summed to arrive at the total volume required
for the manure storage facility.  The square footage of the storage facility was calculated based on
a 4-foot waste depth and multiplied by $7.50 per square foot (the NCSU rate for construction of a
litter storage shed) to develop a capital cost estimate for a poultry litter storage shed.  The 4-foot
waste depth is consistent with recommendations that stacks should not exceed 5 to 8 feet in
height to prevent excessive heating and spontaneous combustion of wastes (Poultry Water
Quality Consortium, 1998b).  The following is an example demonstrating these calculations:

       A 25,000-bird torn turkey operation would produce 8,000 ft3 of litter every 6
       months (25,000 birds x 0.25 ft of litter depth x 16,000 ft2 per house - 6,250 birds
       per house x  100 percent of the housing floor covered + 2  storage periods per year).
       It would also produce 7,711 ft3 of manure every 6 months (25,000 birds x 0.00169
       ft3 of manure per bird per day x 365 days per year H- 2 storage periods per year).
       Therefore, the storage facility would require a total of 15,711 ft3 of waste storage
       capacity, or  3,928 ft2 of storage structure (at an average storage depth of 4 ft).  The
       total cost of the storage structure for this facility is $29,457 per 6-month storage
       facility (3,928 ft2 x $7.50 per ft2).

The frequency factors for spreader  calibration at layer facilities were based upon industry data
(UEP/UEA, 1999) and those for broiler and turkey facilities were derived from an analysis of
state regulations (Tetra Tech, 2000a).
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Frequency Factors:  Manure Storage
               Region/Size
 MidWest/medium
 MidWest/large
            Sector
                                                              Layers
                                                                  30
 Mi d Atl anti c/medium
 Mid Atlantic/large
 South/medium
 South/large
30
30
30
30
                                                                  30
                           Turkeys
                                  25
                                  25
75
                                                                  30
 For broilers, MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000 AU; SO/medium = 300-1,000 AU and SO/large > 1,000
 AU.
 For layers, no distinction is made between medium and large.
 For turkeys, MW/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MW/large > 1,000 AU; MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000
 AU.
5.6.1.3 Lagoon Liners

Only those operations with a positive assessment of the feedlot/groundwater link to surface
water, as described in 5.5.1.3, will need lagoon liners. First it is necessary to estimate the
percentage of operations likely to have a positive determination of this hydrologic link to
groundwater. Positive hydrologic links were assumed to exist at all operations sited on land with
a high potential for groundwater discharges to surface water.  The acreage in each region with
potential limitations regarding ground water contamination was provided by Sobecki and Clipper
(1999).  This percentage was calculated in the following manner:

1.     The acreage with potential for siting animal waste treatment, storage, or handling
       facilities in each region (Central, Mid-Atlantic, Midwest, Pacific, and South) was
       determined for each region using 1992 National Resources Inventory (NRI) data.
2.     The potential siting acreage was further characterized by the existence of physical soil
       and landscape factors that impart a potential for ground water contamination.  These
       factors are sandy soils, high ground water table (within 6 feet of surface), and karst
       topography. The acreage characterized by any combination of these factors was summed
       for each region.
3.     The total acreage for each region from step 2 was divided by the acreage in step 1 and
       then multiplied by 100 to calculate the percentage of acreage with potential for ground
       water contamination in each region.
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The frequency factor for ground water monitoring wells and their operation and maintenance was
calculated as 100 minus the percentage of acreage with potential for ground water contamination
(Table 5-5) because this percentage would not be subject to ground water monitoring
requirements if imposed.  Frequency factors for lagoon liners and for mortality composting
facilities and their operation and maintenance were set equal to the ground water monitoring
frequencies because they apply only to the ground water costing option.  Assessment of the
ground water link to surface water would have to be performed by all facilities, however, so that
frequency was set at zero.

           Table 5-5. Acreage with Potential for Ground Water Contamination
CAFO Region
Mid- Atlantic
South
Midwest
Central
Pacific
Total (U.S.)
Percentage
23.91
22.45
27.46
12.60
12.28
22.86
100-Percentage
76.09
77.55
72.54
87.40
87.72
77.14
Source: Sobecki and Clipper, 1999

According to the American Society of Agricultural Engineers standards (ASAE, 1998), a
minimum lagoon depth of 5 feet is necessary for construction of anaerobic lagoons. Midwest
Plan Service (MWPS , 1993) used a range of lagoon depths from 8 to 25 feet. With the large
variability in lagoon depths, a value of 12 feet was selected for this analysis to represent all
lagoons.  The side slopes for lagoons were assumed to be 2:1 (horizontal:vertical) (MWPS, 1993,
and ASAE, 1998), and the lagoon shape was assumed to be square.  The interior square footage,
including the side slopes, was used to calculate the required liner area for the earthen lagoon.

Several lagoon liner manufacturers were contacted to identify costs of purchasing and installing
lagoon liners. The results of the survey are shown in Table 5-6. The top two costs in Table 5-10
reflect differences in materials and do not include installation. Installed lagoon liners range from
$1.28 to $4.00 per square foot, with lower costs per square foot expected at larger installations.
Thus, to develop costs for installation of lagoon liners, a cost of $1.50 per square foot was
assumed. The clay used to develop the  original lagoon would be used to line the walls and
bottom in addition to the synthetic liner. This is expected to help protect the synthetic  liner from
accidental tearing by heavy equipment  during lagoon cleanouts.

Industry communications indicate old lagoons are typically not retrofit with liners (Tetra Tech,
1999). Instead,  the old lagoon is cleaned out and closed at a cost of $0.31 per gallon (NCDENR,
1999), a new lagoon is constructed, and is fit with a liner. EPA chose to cost for the construction
of a new lagoon to comply with the requirements of Option 3.  EPA believes the cost of a new
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and properly constructed lagoon with a liner is not likely to cost more than emptying an existing
lagoon to retrofit the liner.

             Table 5-6. Manufacturer-Suggested Costs of Lagoon Liners and
                               Covers for  /4-Acre Lagoons
Dealer
Environmental
Protection, Inc.
Environmental
Fabrics, Inc
Lange Containment
Systems, Inc.
CW Neal
Environmental
Fabrics, Inc.
Reef Industries
Geomembrane
Technologies, Inc.
Environmental
Protection Inc.
Description
30-mil PVC liner
!/2 acre lagoon, 40-mil HDPE liner
30 mil PVC liner, 36 mil reinforced Hypalon cover system
installation
!/2-acre lagoon, 32-mil polypropylene, installed
!/2-acre lagoon, 40 mil HDPE uninsulated cover,
collection
gas, and rain
!/2-acre lagoon, 40 mil HPDE R-6 insulated cover, gas, and
rain collection
Permalonฎ, ply X-210 reinforced floating cover
including foam float logs)
!/2-acre cover system installed, 30 mil reinforced
PVC layer (XR-5) and '/2-inch sublayer
system (not
modified
36 mil reinforced cover
Cost
$0.25/ft2
$0.55/ft2
$1.28/ft2
$34,665
$3-4/ft2
$0.85/ft2
$2.25/ft2
$0.40/ft2
$105,000
$0.45 - $0.50/ft2
The frequency factors for lagoon liners for all sectors were assumed to be the same as those
calculated for the operation and maintenance of ground water monitoring (see Section 5.5), and
were calculated as 100 minus the percentage of acreage with potential for ground water
contamination (see Table 5-5).  The percentage of acreage in each region with the potential for
ground water contamination was provided by Sobecki and Clipper (1999).
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Frequency Factors:  Lagoon Liners and Operation and Maintenance (Wet Systems)
                   Region/Size
   Sector
                                                        Swine
             Layers
 MidWest/medium
72.54
 MidWest/large
                                                                                 72.54
72.54
 MidAtlantic/medium
76.09
 MidAtlantic/large
                                                                                 76.09
76.09
 South/medium
 South/large
 For swine, Midwest/medium <2,500 head, and MW/large >2,500 head; MA/medium <2,500 head, and MA/large >2,500
 head.
 For layers, no distinction is made between medium and large.
5.6.1.4 Lagoon Covers

According to the American Society of Agricultural Engineers standards (ASAE, 1998), a
minimum lagoon depth of 5 feet is necessary for construction of anaerobic lagoons.
Approximately 20 feet is considered the maximum depth to ensure proper biological activity.
For this analysis 12 feet was selected as the maximum depth of all lagoons. The side slopes for
lagoons were assumed to be 2:1 (horizontal to vertical) (MWPS, 1993, and ASAE, 1998), and
the lagoon shape was assumed to be square.  The surface square footage was then calculated to
determine the costs of a lagoon cover.

Several lagoon cover manufacturers were contacted to identify costs of purchasing and installing
lagoon covers. The results of the survey are shown in Table 5-6. Installed lagoon covers range
from $1.20 to $4.81 per square foot, with lower costs per square foot expected at larger
installations and depending whether insulation is required.  Thus, to develop costs for installation
of insulated lagoon covers, a cost of $4.00 per square foot was assumed.

Frequency Factors: According to USDA NAHMS (1999)  few swine lagoon have covers.
Frequency factors for covering lagoons was thus conservatively set at zero.

5.6.1.5 Lagoon Depth Marker

All facilities require some sort of gauge to measure the depth of the liquid impoundments.  A
lagoon depth marker can be manufactured by purchasing PVC pipe, fittings, and cement to
construct a length of incrementally marked pipe long enough to reach the bottom of the lagoon
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and extend above the freeboard. A cost of $30 was used as the estimated cost of building and
installing a lagoon depth marker.

The frequency factors for lagoon depth markers at swine facilities were based upon the AFO
Strategy (USEPA, 1999b). It was  assumed that no layer facilities had lagoon depth markers, and
dry manure facilities do not need depth markers.

Frequency Factors:  Lagoon Depth Marker
                   Region/Size
   Sector
                                                         Swine
             Layers
 MidWest/medium
 MidWest/large
99
 Mi d Atl anti c/medium
 Mi d Atl anti c/1 arge
 South/medium
 South/large
 For swine, Midwest/medium <2,500 head, and MW/large >2,500 head; MA/medium <2,500 head, and MA/large >2,500
 head.
 For layers, no distinction is made between medium and large.
5.6.1.6 Anaerobic Digesters

Many livestock facilities handle manure as liquids and slurries.  Anaerobic decomposition of the
stored manure produces large volumes of biogas, which contains 60-80% methane.  The digesters
capital costs are usually high, but the overall costs of digesters should  consider the potential for
biogas generation to offset on-farm costs. The digester reduces offensive odors (volatile organic
acids), BOD (biochemical oxygen demand), surface and groundwater contamination, greenhouse
gases, and produces a stabilized biomass. Changes to the form of nutrients may occur, but the
mass of nitrogen and phosphorus is assumed to be conserved. Additionally, total coliform
reductions of up to 90% occur in the selective environment of an anaerobic digester (AgSTAR).
Though odor complaints from neighbors are likely to be reduced, EPA did not cost the value of
reduced odors and subsequent reduced complaints to the facility.

The covered lagoon / methane recovery system has reduced effectiveness in the colder/northern
climates. Experience shows it is unlikely a covered lagoon digester will pay for itself in the
northern part of the country.  However, there are other effective forms of digestion more
appropriate for the north such as complete mix and plug flow type designs, especially when heat
recovery is used to maintain digester temperatures.  These alternate designs are also more
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appropriate for facilities with higher total solids manure contents such as pull plug pits and
certain under house pit facilities.  In addition to covered anaerobic lagoons, which are the costs
presented in the cost model outputs, EPA evaluated costs for a newly constructed methane
recovery lagoon, both with and without covers on the second lagoon (for effluent storage), and
both with and without liners. EPA also evaluated complete mix heated (mesophilic) digesters,
with and without pasteurization after digestion. EPA did

Farmware and the AgSTAR program was designed as a decision making tool to encourage
biogas recovery system development at livestock facilities. Feasability assessment is performed
by inputting site specific parameters in the Farmware program.  The costs were obtained from
Farmware (AgSTAR), site visits (see record), the literature, and through personal
communications (K. Roos; M. Moser).  Biogas production, equipment design and sizing, and
respective costs were obtained using the Farmware program (Agstar) using the following
parameters to represent the model farm:

       - use Sampson County, North Carolina as the representative MidAtlantic farm, and Blue
Earth, Minnesota as the Midwest farm. Boone, Iowa parameters were also used as the Midwest
farm, but the higher costs obtained using Minnesota as the representative farm was kept as the
more conservative cost estimate
       - assume "flush everything" as the existing manure management system
       - reduce flush water to twice per day where appropriate to reduce digester size and costs
(33% reduction in flush water use)
       - additional fresh process water results from cleaning and spilled drinking water only;
precipitation is diverted away from the digester, but not the effluent storage lagoon
       - use model default of $.06 per kWh (1999 U.S. average of 4.5 cents industrial use, 7.43
cents commercial, and 8.27 cents residential)
       - assume engine overhaul every 5 years at $5000
       - assume 0.005 ft3/lb VS sludge buildup every 5 years is removed from the treatment cell
       - EPA used the more current lagoon construction and cover costs data described in
       section 5.6.1.4.
       - assume 15% of capital in contingency for site specific  factors related to engineering and
design

The Farmware program estimates electrical and propane uses that may be offset by biogas
recovery and use. No sales of excess power produced during peak times was considered in this
analysis. The generator was oversized by -10 kW to reduce equipment corrosion occurring  due
to sulfide production.  Modern heat boilers can replace the generator / engine costs specified by
the program, and cost $7000 less. Engine overhaul was assumed to occur every 5 years as a
preventative maintenance. Engineering costs of $25 thousand (Farmware model default) was
used for grow-fmish facilities. Engineering costs for farrow-to-finish operations were increased
to $40 thousand to account for the increased complexity of the site that could affect digester
construction and design.
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Based on 20% P concentration in the digester, fewer truck trips will be needed to haul excess
phosphorus. The biomass has 37% TS, thus hauling costs were assumed to be reduced by 63% to
account for fewer truck trips.  All sludge hauling was costed as a every five year expense, though
in practice hauling may occur anywhere from every seven years to more than 20 years between
lagoon cleanouts. This provided a quick estimate of the offset hauling costs, and is reflected by
reduced hauling costs in the cost model.  Lagoon water is assumed to be used for flush water,
though some facilities may elect to irrigate cropland with the water.

Where appropriate, the existing lagoon at a facility was assumed to be used as the storage cell for
recycled flush water. Deep pit housing systems do not use a storage lagoon, so additional capital
costs will be on the order of $30-50 thousand, for an additional estimated $4500 annual expense.
Such facilities may benefit from biogas collection, but biogas collection will not be economically
viable at these sites in the form of a covered lagoon digester.

The costs developed for the representative farm were compared to progress reports developed for
the AgStar program. EPA's Office of Air and Radiation  has additional data concerning
performance and costs for liners, covers, and lagoon construction. These costs are comparable to
the default costs in Farmware, but may not address all costs needed at a given farm. For
purposes of determining economic viability, the parameters driving annualized costs are the
operational costs and cost offsets; it is therefore unlikely the capital cost estimates will have any
noticeable affect on annual costs calculated by the cost model.

As  an alternative to covered lagoon digesters, costs were developed for a complete mix digester
for all "large" swine model farms. A complete mix digester is a heated, constant volume,
mechanically-mixed tank with a gas-tight collection cover.  Manure waste is preheated in a small
mix tank, and added daily to feed the digester, where it is intermittently mixed to prevent
formation of a crust and to keep solids in suspension.  Average manure retention times range
from 15 to 20 days. The gas-tight cover maintains anaerobic conditions inside the tank and
collects the biogas  through attached pipes.  The heat generated by burning the collected biogas is
used to heat the digester. EPA analysis indicates this form of digesters is likely to result in
overall negative annualized costs (i.e. the facility earns profits) for the largest facilities, but
success of the digester depends heavily on proper engineering design, digester management, and
management of process water to maintain at least 2% total solids in the digester feedstream.
Reduction of HRT to 15 days and water management reduce the capital costs of the digester
considerably.

Frequency Factors:
In 1998 there were about 94 digesters that were installed or were planned for working dairy,
swine, and caged-layer poultry operations in the United States (Lusk, 1998). Of these 94
digesters, more than 60% of plug flow and complete mix digesters and 12% of the covered
lagoon digesters have failed (Lusk,  1998). Many of these failures were of systems constructed
prior to 1984; since that time,  more simplified digester designs have been implemented which
have greatly improved reliability. For purposes of costing Option 6, it is assumed that no large
swine facilities currently operate a digester with energy recovery. For Option 6, the largest swine

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farms were assessed the incremental costs of designing, installing, and operating a covered
lagoon type digester as described above. Digesters are also costed for medium sized swine
operations for use in Option 5.

5.6.1.7 High Rise Hog Facility Upgrades

Menke et al. (2000) evaluated the construction costs for a two-story confinement housing design.
The animals are kept on slatted floors in the upper level, similar to a traditional flush house. The
lower level is a concrete floored pit where the manure falls onto drying material such as
shavings, peanut hulls, or corn stalks.  Air is blown up through the bottom floor to assist drying
the manure, and ventilation is pulled down over the animals.  Higher building costs, operation
costs, and ventilation costs are reportedly offset by improved animal health, increased animal
performance, decreased hauling costs, and the savings of not needing a lagoon or other liquid
impoundment.

A highrise house for 1,000 head of finishing pigs is approximately 44 ft x 190 ft.  On a per pig
basis, a traditional deep pit house in Indiana/Ohio costs $155-160 per animal; a lagoon style flush
house costs $145 per animal (plus lagoon costs); the highrise building costs $185 per animal.
The highrise building costs include professional engineering design that meets NRCS design
standards.  Building a deep pit house to these standard was estimated to increase the construction
cost of a deep pit house by $15,000 ($15 per animal).

Frequency Factors: Only a few highrise hog facilities are in the testing, evaluation, and
demonstration status phases.  Thus, the frequency of compliance for highrise facilities is zero.

5.6.1.8 Storm Water Diversions

Runoff can enter lagoons and poultry storage facilities if it is not diverted. To prevent runoff
from entering manure storage facilities, storm water can be diverted by constructing berms on
two sides up-gradient of the storage facility or lagoon.  ASAE (1998) specifies a berm with a 1-
foot top width that is 3 feet high and has a 2:1 slope. Costs of land moving to establish a berm
around two sides of the manure storage structure were derived from North Carolina agricultural
cost share information as $2.60 per cubic foot.  The cross-sectional area was calculated based on
the berm characteristics and then multiplied by the length of the storage structure (plus on
additional 10 feet on each side as  a margin of safety) to obtain the cubic yardage for construction.

The frequency factors for storm water diversions at layer facilities (UEP/UEA) were based upon
industry data, those  for swine facilities were based upon site visits, and those for broiler and
turkey facilities were derived from an analysis of state regulations (Tetra Tech, 2000a).
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Frequency Factors:   Storm Water Diversions and Operation and Maintenance
           Region/Size
 MidAtlantic/medium
 For swine, Midwest/medium <2,500 head, and MW/large >2,500 head; MA/medium <2,500 head, and MA/large >2,500
 head.
 For broilers, MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000 AU; SO/medium = 300-1,000 AU and SO/large > 1,000
 AU.
 For layers, no distinction is made between medium and large.
 For turkeys, MW/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MW/large > 1,000 AU; MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000
 AU.
5.6.1.9 Field Runoff Control

Runoff control for fields used for manure application can be achieved by creating buffer strips
along the fields adjacent to streams.  The ratio of stream length to land area was calculated based
on national estimates of land area (3 million square miles of land in the contiguous United States
[ESRI,1998]) and stream miles (3.5 million miles of streams [USEPA, 2000]). This ratio was
converted to miles per acre (0.00144 mile of stream per acre of land). The amount of land
needed for buffer construction was then calculated by multiplying the average acres of cropland
for each model farm by the ratio of stream miles per acre of land. This produced the length of
stream on each farm. It was further assumed that the farm was square and the stream ran down
the middle of the farm. The width of the buffer (on both sides of the stream) was assumed to be
100 feet. The costs of 100 feet buffers was based on information collected from a total of 914
filter strip projects in 28 states with an average cost of $106.62/ac (1999 dollars; USEPA, 1993).
The net loss of tillable land for establishment of a buffer was estimated at 3.5 percent of the
cropland (0.00144 mile of stream per acre x 5,280  feet per mile,  x 200 ft2 of buffer per foot of
stream length H- 43,560 ft2/ac).  Thus, the cost for field erosion control was estimated at
approximately $3.72/ac of total cropland.

In lieu of the buffer, EPA also considered: 1) establishing a 100 foot setback instead of the
buffer, and 2) using the costs of the buffer as an allowance for the CAFO to implement site
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specific field control practices such as conservation management. In other words, controls other
than buffer strips may be more effective in certain situations (Sims, 2000), and the $3.72/ac cost
basis is considered an allowance that can be used to implement other runoff control practices. A
sensitivity analysis of the assumptions used to estimate stream length to land  area ratios and the
amount of land costed to be taken out of production is in the record (Tetra Tech, 2000b).
Pollutant removal efficiencies are presented in Table 5-7.

The frequency factors for stream buffers at layer facilities were based upon industry data
(UEP/UEA, 1999), those for swine facilities were based upon site visits and state regulations,
and those for broiler and turkey facilities were derived from an analysis of state regulations
(Tetra Tech, 2000a).

             Table 5-7. Pollutant Removal Efficiencies for Vegetated Buffers
Buffer Width
3 5 -Foot Buffer
65 -Foot Buffer
100-Foot Buffer
Sediment Removal (%)
80
85
88
Phosphorus Removal (%)f
80
85
88
Nitrogen Removal (%)f
75
80
85
|Decrease by 10 percent for slopes greater than 3.5%

Frequency Factors:  Stream Buffer and Operation and Maintenance
           Region/Size
 Mi d Atl anti c/medium
 For swine, Midwest/medium <2,500 head, and MW/large >2,500 head; MA/medium <2,500 head, and MA/large >2,500
 head.
 For broilers, MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000 AU; SO/medium = 300-1,000 AU and SO/large > 1,000
 AU.
 For layers, no distinction is made between medium and large.
 For turkeys, MW/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MW/large > 1,000 AU; MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000
 AU.
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5.6.2  Annual and Reoccurring Costs
All of the fixed costs mentioned previously are associated with annual costs for operation and
maintenance. Standard operation and maintenance is about 2 percent of the capital cost of each
facility (NCSU, 1998).

5.6.2.1 Visual Inspection

Weekly visual inspections ensure that the facility components likely to contribute to surface or
ground water quality impairments are all functioning properly. This includes routine inspections
around the production area to ensure that automated watering lines are functioning properly and
inspection of manure level for liquid systems to ensure that there is no threat of potential
discharge. Visual inspection requires only a short time to walk around the building and storage
facilities. It was assumed that there would be no cost for daily inspection of automated systems
providing water to the animals since it is part of routine facility management and operations.
Fifteen minutes weekly was assumed sufficient to accomplish this task. At a labor rate of $10/hr,
the cost of annual visual inspections was estimated at $130/yr.

The frequency factors for visual inspection at layer and swine facilities were based upon the AFO
Strategy (USEPA, 1999b), while the frequency factors for broiler and turkey facilities were
derived from an analysis of state regulations (Tetra Tech, 2000a).

Frequency Factors: Visual Inspection
           Region/Size
 Mi d Atl anti c/medium
 For swine, Midwest/medium <2,500 head, and MW/large >2,500 head; MA/medium <2,500 head, and MA/large >2,500
 head.
 For broilers, MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000 AU; SO/medium = 300-1,000 AU and SO/large > 1,000
 AU.
 For layers, no distinction is made between medium and large.
 For turkeys, MW/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MW/large > 1,000 AU; MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000
 AU.
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5.6.2.2 Mortality Composting Facility

Mortality composting facilities have annual charges for standard operation and maintenance,
including a cost for carbon sources for layer and hog operations. It was assumed that litter
provide sufficient quantities of carbon, so no cost was added for carbon sources at broiler and
turkey facilities. Mortality composting facilities also require other activities such as mortality
transportation, loading into compost bins, and turning the partially composted materials. The
annual labor requirement is estimated at 90 hours (1.75 hr/wk) for a single worker with a tractor
($10/hr for labor and $30/hr for the tractor) (NCSU,  1998).  The rental value for land taken out of
production to construct the mortality  facility was not assessed.  Facilities were assumed to be
constructed adjacent to storage areas.

Frequency Factors:
The frequency factors for operation and maintenance of mortality composting facilities were
assumed to be equal to those for construction of the facilities.  See Section 5.6.1.2 for details.

5.6.2.3 Lagoon Liners

Lagoon liners may require higher operation and maintenance than the standard 2 percent of initial
cost used for other practices.  One problem includes tearing of the plastic liner during sludge
cleanout.  Thus, the operation and maintenance of a lagoon liner was set at 5 percent of initial
costs.

Frequency Factors:
The frequency factors for operation and maintenance of lagoon liners were assumed to be equal
to those for initial implementation of the controls.  See Section 5.6.1.3 for details.

5.6.2.4 Lagoon Covers

Operation and maintenance costs for  lagoon liners were estimated at 2 percent of initial costs.

Frequency Factors:
According to USD A NAHMS (1999), few swine lagoon have covers. The frequency factors for
covered lagoons was thus conservatively set to zero.

5.6.2.5 Anaerobic Digesters

Operation and maintenance costs are  calculated by the Farmware program as a function of the
generator size (i.e. dollars per kW).  These costs may be partially offset by savings of electricity
and propane. Costs are also incurred for periodic engine overhaul, and for sludge cleanout.

Frequency Factors:
As  described in 5.6.1.6, few digesters were assumed to exist, and the frequency factor is zero.
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5.6.2.6 High Rise Hog Facility

Operation and maintenance costs for a highrise hog facility were estimated at 2 percent of initial
costs. Additional costs include energy costs and drying agents.  Energy costs for a traditional
confinement building are estimated at $2,500 to $2,800 per year. The highrise building has
average monthly costs of approximately $400 or $4,800 annually.  Drying agents evaluated
include wheat straw, corn stalks, and wood shavings.  Around 50 to 60 tons of wood shavings are
needed to start the house with two feet depth of material at an annual  cost of $4,000 to $5,000
per year. In contrast, five feet of straw or corn stalk material are needed to absorb  similar
amounts of moisture. Even at a lower costs of $9 to $10 per 1,200 pound bale of corn stalks, the
higher volumes to be handled offset the cost savings.  Straw and corn materials also tend to
degrade and compost more rapidly than wood requiring more frequent addition of drying material
to the house.

Frequency Factors:
Only one highrise hog facility exists and is in the testing and evaluation state.  Thus, the
frequency of compliance for highrise facilities is zero.

5.6.2.7 Field Runoff Control

For field runoff control, the land taken out of production for installation of buffer strips was
assumed to have been previously farmed.  The rental value for land taken out of production was
added to standard operation and maintenance charges.  The rental value for cropland was
estimated at $64.00/ac/yr based on analysis by North Carolina State University (NCSU,  1998).

Frequency Factors:
The frequency factors for operation and maintenance of field runoff controls were  assumed to be
equal to those for initial implementation of the controls. See Section 5.6.1.8 for details.

5.7    Land Application

This section describes the basis for costs of the land application component of nutrient
management. The costs described in this section only address the costs for irrigation of liquids,
and the incremental costs of incorporation or injection. Note these costs were not included in the
final model facility costs as there are no standards in the proposed regulatory options that would
require injection or incorporation. Hauling costs are addressed in Section 5.8.

Crop nitrogen and phosphorus requirements were calculated to depict conditions of each model
farm. Extension personnel from counties with the densest populations of animals were consulted
to determine the common cropping practices for all regions and sectors.  Although the cost model
is only run on  two principle regions for each sector, all regions are presented in the analysis of
crop nutrient requirements.
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County Extension personnel identified the typical crop rotation for each sector (Table 5-8).  Crop
yields were determined by dividing the harvested quantity by the acreage obtained in the 1997
Census of Agriculture (USDA NASS, 1999).  Occasionally, yields were far below expected
yields and were changed to reflect expected yields found in the Ag Waste Management Field
Handbook (AWMFH, USDA, 1992). Crop nutrient removal was based on Appendix I, Table A-
1, Nutrient Content Values, for the major crops (USDA NRCS,  1998). The nitrogen application
rates was increased to reflect a 30 percent loss of nitrogen after land application of manure
(Sutton et al., 1985) primarily due to volatilization of ammonia.

 Table 5-8. Crop Yields, Nutrient Removal and Application Rates (Ibs/ac) from the Ag Waste Management
    Field Handbook (AWMFH) for Typical Crops used on Swine and Poultry Operations in the various
                                          Regions.
Sector
Swine
Poultry
Region
CE
MA
MW
PA
SO
CE
MA
MW
PA
SO
Crop
Com
Corn
Soybean
Rye
Corn
Soybean
Com chop
Oats
Alfalfa
Bermuda
Bermuda
Corn
Soybean
Wheat
Fescue
Com chop
Oats
Alfalfa
Fescue
Yieldt
162
83
28
25
135
48
23
90
7
8
8
123
27
63
5
23
102
7
5
Census
Yield
162
83
28
25
135
48
23
90
7
3
4
123
27
63
3
23
102
7
4
Yield Unit
Bushels/acre
Bushels/acre
Bushels/acre
Bushels/acre
Bushels/acre
Bushels/acre
Tons/acre
Bushels/acre
Tons/acre
Tons/acre
Tons/acre
Bushels/acre
Bushels/acre
Bushels/acre
Tons/acre
Tons/acre
Bushels/acre
Tons/acre
Tons/acre
Nitrogen
Removal
129
67
100
26
108
170
160
53
356
150
150
98
94
64
99
165
60
352
99
Phosphorus
Removal
24
12
10
4
20
17
24
10
33
15
15
18
10
13
10
24
11
33
10
Nitrogen
Application
185
95
143
38
154
242
228
76
509
215
215
140
135
91
141
236
86
503
141
Phosphorus
Application
24
12
10
4
20
17
24
10
33
15
15
18
10
13
10
24
11
33
10
f Yields were taken from the 1997 Census of Agriculture. The census combined information for the specific grass
varieties (e.g. fescue and bermudagrass) occasionally resulting in lower yields when compared to AWMFH. Where
sizeable discrepancies were identified (Swine, SO; Poultry, CE, MW, SO) AWMFH yields were used instead of
census yields.
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The average annual nitrogen and phosphorus crop removal and application rates were calculated
by dividing the total crop requirements over the time to complete a full crop rotation (Table 5.9).

    Table 5-9. Comparison of Nutrient Removal and Application Rates (Ibs/ac) from the 1997 Census of
 Agriculture with County Extension Values or using 24 Crops and Pastureland Information in the Census.
Sector
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Poultry
Poultry
Poultry
Poultry
Poultry
Cropsf
corn
c/sb/rye
c/sb
c/o/al
bermuda
bermuda
c/sb/wt
fescue
c/o/al
fescue
Region
CE
MA
MW
PA
SO
CE
MA
MW
PA
SO
Nitrogen
Removal
129
97
139
178
150
150
128
99
141
99
Phosphorus
Removal
24
14
19
18
15
15
20
10
14
10
Nitrogen
Application
185
138
198
407
215
215
183
141
412
141
Phosphorus
Application
24
14
19
34
15
15
20
10
34
10
t Cropping system abbreviations: c, corn; sb, soybean; wt, wheat; o, oats; al, alfalfa. Bermuda
and fescue refer to the typical hay crop.

It was assumed that the costs of transportation for land application of manure on the farm's crop
land were already incurred by the operation. Thus, no costs were added for transporting manure
from storage to the field for land application. It was also assumed category 3 farms (i.e. farms
with no major cropland or pastureland, see Section 4.2.4) already haul manure to offsite
recipients. Hauling distances and costs are derived in Section 5.9.3 and Appendix E.

5.7.1  Surface Application with Incorporation

Because it was assumed that animal feeding operations already have a mechanism to surface-
apply manure, the only additional costs they would incur would be for incorporation. Disk
harrows used for incorporation range in price from $5,600 to $34,000 (Lazarus, 1999) depending
on their size and functionality. The average capital cost for disk harrows was assumed to be
$20,000 (rounded up from $19,800) for the purpose of this model. Operating costs  were
calculated by Lazarus (1999) and assume that operations already have  a tractor to pull the disk
harrow. Annual operation and maintenance costs were estimated to be 2 percent of the capital
cost ($400 annually) plus an additional $30/hr for tractor operation and $10/hr for labor. It is
estimated that disking requires an additional 15 minutes/ac (0.25 hour  more than surface
application), yielding an operating cost of $10/ac of tillable land.

Incorporation by disking is the only option for land application of dry poultry manure.
Incorporating semisolid  or liquid manure with a disk was costed in the model, but it was always
found to be more expensive than injection.
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5.7.2   Injection of Semisolid or Liquid Manure

The assumptions used in preparation for developing costs of injection of nonsolid manure
include the availability of a tank or suitable spreader and a tractor with sufficient power to pull it.
USEPA (1998) reported that the cost of a 4,200-gallon tank with injectors had a capital cost of
about $20,000. Wright (1997) reported that tanker spreaders without injectors cost between
$9,000 and $18,500, depending on the size; a 4,500-gallon tanker costs $14,000. Using the
difference between Wright ($14,000) and USEPA ($20,000), equipping a tanker with suitable
connections for manure injection would cost approximately $6,000.  Additionally, 2 percent of
the capital cost is estimated for annual operation and maintenance costs ($120). No additional
labor is required  for manure injection because it is similar in level of effort to manure spraying.

5.7.3   Irrigation of Liquid Manure

Irrigation of liquid manure is the  most costly application method in terms of initial capital costs.
USEPA (1998) reported that the cost of a center pivot irrigation device capable of manure
application on 150 acres was nearly $65,000.  Two percent of this capital cost is estimated for
annual operation and maintenance ($1,300). However, many operations already have the
capability to apply manure through a center pivot or other irrigation device. For these operations
there would be no additional cost.

Large operations producing liquid manure might require more than one center pivot irrigation
device.  For these operations, the amount of land available for land application (tillable acreage)
was divided by 150 acres per center pivot to calculate the required number of center pivots.

5.8    Feeding  Strategies to Reduce Excess Nutrients

Reducing the nutrients that are produced at the facility allows more manure to be applied to the
land.  This results in a decrease in the amount of nutrients and money required to transport excess
manure off-farm. Reducing phosphorus in manure makes it a more balanced fertilizer in terms of
plant requirements, which reduces excess application rates and their  associated runoff into
surface waters.

One way to reduce nitrogen and phosphorus is to reduce the quantity of nutrients in the excreta.
Dietary strategies designed to reduce nitrogen and phosphorus include enhancing the digestibility
of feed ingredients, genetic enhancement of cereal grains and other ingredients that results in
increased feed digestibility, more precise diet formulation, and improved quality control.
Although nitrogen and phosphorus are currently the focus of attention,  these strategies also have
the potential to decrease other nutrients.

The cost for feeding strategy implementation  is  based on the nutrient management basis
(phosphorus- or nitrogen-based),  which determines the implementation cost per animal. These
costs are derived below. To obtain an  annual cost for feeding strategy implementation, the cost
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per animal was multiplied by the number of animals on the farm and the number of production
cycles per year (Table 5-10).
Table 5-10. Number of Production Cycles per Year for Each Animal Operation
Type of Animal
Grower-Finisher
Farrow-to-Finish
Breeder
Layer
Broiler
Integrated Layer
Turkey Hen
Turkey for Slaughter
Integrated Turkey
Production Cycles
per Year
2.8
2.1
2.1
1.0
5.5
1.0
3.1
2.5
3.0
The frequency factors for feeding strategies at swine facilities were based upon USDA data
(USDA APHIS, 1995), while the frequency factors for broiler and turkey facilities were provided
by site visits and conversations with industry.  Most broiler facilities have phase diets, and an
increasing number of broiler operations utilize feed additives such as phytase. All broiler
operations were all assumed to have phytase additions to their diet, thus no benefit is observed.
Phytase use is less common in turkey production where debates exist that the skeletal  structure of
poults is affected by phytase interactions with  calcium. EPA assumed few if any layer facilities
incorporated phased diets or feeding strategies beyond nutritional requirements of the birds and
molting (if any), and assumed the frequency factor was zero.
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Frequency Factors:  Feeding Strategies
           Region/Size
 MidAtlantic/medium
 For swine, Midwest/medium <2,500 head, and MW/large >2,500 head; MA/medium <2,500 head, and MA/large >2,500
 head.
 For broilers, MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000 AU; SO/medium = 300-1,000 AU and SO/large > 1,000
 AU.
 For layers, no distinction is made between medium and large.
 For turkeys, MW/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MW/large > 1,000 AU; MA/medium = 300-1,000 AU and MA/large > 1,000
 AU.
5.8.1  Poultry

Phosphorus
The cost of adding phytase enzyme to feed ranges from $0.75 to $1 per ton of feed. For example,
given that it costs $1 per ton of feed for phytase addition and that 11 pounds of feed are required
to raise a broiler to market weight (5.5 pounds), the extra cost for phytase addition is $0.0055 per
bird ($ I/ton of feed divided by 2,000 Ib/ton multiplied by 11 Ib of feed per broiler). This is
expected to achieve a reduction in phosphorus excretion of 20 to 60 percent depending on
phosphorus form and concentration in the diet (NCSU, 1999).  Protein content, calcium other
mineral content, vitamin B, as well as other factors identified in the literature influence the
effectiveness of phytase use in feed, but a 40 percent reduction was selected as a reasonable level
of reduction when both phytase and precision feeding are utilized.

Nutrient content of the manure can also be reduced by precision feeding and phased feeding.
One way to reduce nitrogen and phosphorus is to reduce the quantity of nutrients in the excreta of
the animal. Dietary concepts designed to accomplish nitrogen and phosphorus reduction include
enhancing the digestibility of fee ingredients;  genetic enhancement of cereal grains and other
ingredients that result in nutrients in feed ingredients being more digestible; more precise diet
formulation; and improved quality control.  While nitrogen and phosphorus are the focus of
attention, these strategies also have the potential to decrease other nutrient excesses.
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Nitrogen
The cost of reducing nitrogen in feed was estimated by assuming that a 20 percent reduction in
nitrogen can be achieved with a 5 percent increase in feed cost.  For example, reducing nitrogen
in a $200/ton broiler feed would cost $10 per ton or $0.005 per pound of feed. If a broiler
requires 11 pounds of feed to reach market weight, the additional cost would be $0.055 per bird.
For a nitrogen management-based, 100,000-bird broiler operation with 5.5 production cycles per
year, the implementation cost for feeding strategies is $30,250 per year (100,000 birds per
production cycle x 5.5 cycles per year x $0.055 per bird). The implementation costs for turkeys
are assumed to be the same as those for chickens.

5.8.2   Swine

Phosphorus
Adding phytase to a swine diet costs approximately $2.20/ton of feed. However,  phytase
replaces inorganic phosphorus as well as a small portion of protein.  Similar to poultry in section
5.8.1.1, the increase in feed cost required to reduce phosphorus excretion by 40 percent is
expected to be less than 1 percent. The nutrient content of the manure can also be reduced by
precision feeding, split-sex feeding, and phased feeding. In practical terms, phosphorus excretion
may be reduced by 0.6 kg per pig finished (a 40 percent reduction) with an investment of $0.36
in extra feed cost per pig finished. For example, a phosphorus management-based, 2,500-head
farrow-to-finish operation with 2.1 production cycles per year would incur $l,890/yr to
implement feeding strategies.

Nitrogen
The increase in feed costs attributed to reducing nitrogen excretion through precision nutrition or
use of synthetic amino acids is expected to be less than 5  percent for a 20 percent reduction in
nitrogen excretion. A larger decrease in nitrogen excretion is achievable, but only at a very high
cost. In practical terms, nitrogen excretion may be reduced by 1.34 kg per pig finished (or 20
percent) with an investment of $2.70 in extra feed cost per pig finished (for a farrow-to-finish
operation). The  same 2,500-head farrow-to-finish operation would incur $14,175/yr for feeding
strategy implementation. As the costs of synthetic amino  acids comes down,  the Amino Acid
Council foresees an increased use of synthetic amino acids as a method of reducing nitrogen
excretion as well as improving animal performance and decreasing feeding costs.

If the model farm is under an N-based regimen, costs with and without feeding strategies were
compared.  Nutrient reduction was calculated by subtracting 20 percent of the nitrogen produced
after losses as calculated by USDA (1998). If the costs with feeding strategies led to an overall
cost reduction, it was selected as one of the cost effective practices. However, because of the
high cost of reducing nitrogen (a limiting nutrient in manure), it was often not the cost effective
alternative. Feeding strategies under a P-based manure application system, on the other hand,
were often cost effective.

Example of Excess Nutrient Calculations after Feeding Strategies Implementation
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The cost model includes a calculation of the amount of land required for application of the
nutrient of concern after feeding strategies implementation.  In the 100,000-head broiler example,
it was estimated that feeding strategies reduced phosphorus in manure by 40 percent, thereby
reducing the land required for phosphorus application by 40 percent (from 1,054 acres to 633
acres). A new percentage can be calculated from the ratio between the area available for land
application on-site (119 acres) and the land required for phosphorus application (633 acres),
yielding a percentage of available land of 19 percent. This means that only 81 percent of the
manure needs to be hauled off-site instead of 89 percent, which reduces the cost for manure
transport.

5.9    Manure Hauling and Strategies to Make Manure More Transportable

The costs for transportation are dependent on the volume and mass of manure generated on farm.
Reducing either the volume or the mass of the manure will decrease the cost of transportation.
Little can be done with dry manure (e.g. broiler manure) because it is difficult and expensive to
decrease its volume or mass. For liquid systems, the key factor in limiting transportation costs
revolve around decreasing the water content of the wastes.  This section provides details of how
costs were developed for strategies that make manure more transportable.

5.9.1   Composting and Solid-Liquid Separation

Composting and solid-liquid separation are also used to manage waste. However only solid-
liquid separation for swine was costed in this model. The frequency factors for solid-liquid
separation by swine facilities were based upon industry data (USDA APHIS, 1995).

Frequency Factors:  Solid-Liquid Separator -  Swine Only
Region/Size
MidWest/medium
MidWest/large
Mi d Atl anti c/medium
Mi d Atl anti c/1 arge
Swine
7.7
0
2.3
1.5
For swine, Midwest/medium <2,500 head, and MW/large >2,500 head; MA/medium
<2,500 head, andMA/large >2,500 head.
5.9.2   Dilution factors, Retrofit and Water Recycle

The dilution factor is a value multiplied by the as-excreted manure to provide the volume of
manure as stored. The dilution factor has a value of one to three.  A value of one means the
stored manure has roughly the same volume as the excreted manure, such as with layer manure.
Even though broiler and turkey manure is usually handled as litter, fresh manure is 75-80 %
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moisture.  The loss of moisture during storage is approximately replaced by the bedding material.
 A value of three means the manure is flushed and treated as a liquid. This was obtained by
adding typical slatted floor flush volumes (MWPS) to typical precipitation plus the volume of a
25 year 24 hour storm event, with a 15% safety margin and freeboard.  A value of slightly less
than three reflects reductions in waste water volumes due to recycling of flush water and a
reduction in fresh water consumption. Reductions in dilution factors are also obtained by
reducing or eliminating precipitation from the liquid impoundments. The reduction of the
dilution factor results in large reductions in volumes of liquid manures that must be hauled, with
a corresponding reduction in hauling costs.

For example, a broiler house 40 ft x 400 ft with 25,000 birds has 4 inches of bedding to start,
with an additional inch of bedding added after every flock:
       (40 ft) x (400 ft) x (4 inches + 1 inch x 5.5 flocks) = 12, 670 cubic feet of litter
Fresh manure production from the single house is:
       25,000 broilers x . 14 Ib manure/day x 49 days/flock x 5.5 flocks per year =
       943,250 Ibs manure
The density of broiler manure is 63 Ibs per cubic foot, thus the  house produces 14,972 cubic feet
manure. Roughly 80 percent of the manure (or 12,000 cubic feet) is moisture, which is replaced
the bedding.

5.9.2.1 Use of Dilution Factors in the Cost Model

Liquid manure is flushed from swine and poultry houses with varying amounts of water. To
ensure that manure and water volumes not be underestimated a dilution factor of 3 was  selected
as baseline (see above). This value is multiplied by the manure production in an approach
similar to USDA NRCS (1998). Thus, an operation that produces 1,000 gallons of manure "as
excreted" actually produces 3,000 gallons of material after flushing. The resulting volume is thus
the estimated annual pumpdown volume.

As a comparison, the University of Missouri estimates annual pumpdown volumes based on
contributions from manure, daily fresh water inputs, net rainfall, and runoff. Though pumpdown
will vary by rainfall and climate, the Missouri model predicts the dilution factor used by EPA
may overestimate the volume of effluent associated with lagoon operations. EPA decided to
maintain the value of 3 as a conservative dilution factor.

Lagoon Construction:  Characteristics of a successfully operating animal waste lagoon vary
throughout the U.S.  Anaerobic lagoons for treatment of animal waste are designed on the basis
of waste load added per unit volume of lagoon capacity. Total  design volume equals the
minimum design volume plus annual volume of livestock wastes produced plus the volume
runoff plus the washdown water volume between pump out periods. Total design volume was
calculated from the volume of manure as excreted times a dilution factor. The dilution  factor for
swine lagoons was set to three to account for flush water. An additional 15 percent was added as
a safety factor for freeboard. For anaerobic lagoons, the design depth should be as deep as
practical depending on site conditions. Where soil and groundwater conditions permit, depths of

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20 feet may be used (ASAE, 1998).  To account for unsuitable soil or groundwater conditions, a
depth of 12 feet was selected for lagoon construction.

Lagoons were assumed to be square. Side slopes were set to a ratio of 2:1 based on MWPS
(1993).  The cost of constructing a lagoon was calculated by multiplying the total volume of soil
to be excavated by the cost to excavate. NCSU determined that the all-inclusive cost for
excavation was $2.60 per cubic yard.

5.9.2.2 Reduced Costs by Recycling Flush Water

Settling Basin Construction andRecirculating Pump: For operations with inadequate land to
apply manure (Category 2 type operations), costs for a settling basin and a recirculating pump
were estimated to reduce overall water use.  Once the solids settle in the settling basin, the water
is directed to the original lagoon where it is further cleaned.  It is  assumed that this cleaner water
will  suffice for recycling to flush the swine house.  This resulted in a decrease in the dilution
factor from 3 to 2 for Category 2 type operations.  The excavation costs for the settling basin is
the same as for lagoon construction (see previous section).  The settling basin was sized to hold
20 days of the waste material.  This amount  of time allows for solids to settle (ICF, 1999) and
some anaerobic digestion to occur.  Additional costs include 250  feet of 6-inch pipe that cost
$2.13 per foot (Tetra Tech, 1999 memo "Costs of Storage, Transportation, and Land Application
of Manure") plus four hours of labor ($10 per hour) to install the  pipe. A pump to recycle water
from the original lagoon was assumed suitable to recycle the cleaner water for flushing.
Cleanout and hauling of the sludge from the settling basin was assumed to be cost neutral even
though the frequency would have to increase compared to cleanout and hauling of sludge  from
the original lagoon.  Operation and maintenance of the settling basin was 2 percent of the total
initial cost.

5.9.2.3 Retrofit to Scraper System

When facilities  are retrofit to a scraper system, the dilution factor is 1. No additional water is
added and scraped material is moved to a covered steel tank to limit dilution by rain.  Scraper
systems were applied to both swine and wet-layer facilities.  One  retrofit unit was required for
each 1,250 hogs or 25,000 layers. Initial costs include the retrofit setup including motor, blade,
steel tank, and closure of the old lagoon. Annual operation and maintenance include labor,
electricity, replacement blades  and the standard 2 percent of initial costs.

The  initial retrofit setup costs are $36,000 for the installation and $200 for the motor for each
retrofit device.  Annual costs include motor usage (897 kWh @ $0.095 per kWh), replacement
blades ($30), labor (52 hours @ $10 per hour), and 2 percent of initial costs ($724). A steel tank
for storage of scraped materials was sized based on manure production by USDA NRCS (1998)
at a cost of $0.18 per gallon.

Lagoon Cleanout: USDA NRCS developed an interim standard for closure of lagoons used in
North Carolina. NCDENR (1999) prepared  a list of all the lagoon closures that have been cost-

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shared by the North Carolina Agriculture Cost Share Program. In a collection 65 dairy, beef,
poultry, and primarily swine lagoons, the average cost to clean out the lagoon was $0.031 per
gallon.  This value was used to estimate the cost of lagoon cleanout nationally.

5.9.2.4 High Rise Houses

Menke et al. (2000) evaluated the construction costs for a two-story confinement housing design.
Material falls through open slots onto the first floor where it is composted with carbon-rich
material. A highrise house for 1,000 head of finishing pigs is 44 ft x 190 ft. On a per pig basis,
a traditional deep pit house in Indiana/Ohio costs $155-160 per animal; a lagoon style flush
house costs $145 per animal; the highrise building costs $185 per animal. The highrise building
costs include  professional engineering design that meets NRCS design standards. Building a
deep pit house to these standard was estimated to increase a the construction cost of a deep pit
house by $15,000 ($15 per animal).

Operation and maintenance costs for a highrise hog facility were estimated at 2 percent of initial
costs. Additional costs include energy costs and drying agents.  Energy costs for a traditional
confinement building are estimated at $2,500 to $2,800 per year. The highrise building has
average monthly costs of approximately $400 or $4,800 annually. Drying agents evaluated
include wheat straw, corn stalks, and wood shavings.  Around 50 to 60 tons of wood shavings are
needed to start the house with two feet depth of material at an annual cost of $4,000 to $5,000
per year. In contrast, five feet of straw or corn stalk material are needed to absorb similar
amounts of moisture. Even at a lower costs of $9 to $10 per 1,200 pound bale of corn stalks, the
higher volumes to be handled offset the  cost savings.  Straw and corn materials also tend to
degrade and compost more rapidly than  wood requiring more frequent addition of drying material
to the house.

5.9.2.5 Digesters and Recycle Flush Treatment for Option 5

Digesters or recycle flush treatments both reduce the amount of water added to manure. For
digesters, a covered lagoon eliminates rain from entering the lagoon.  Lagoon cover costs are
described below. Recycle or recirculating flush treatments limit additional water additions from
rain. Both digesters and recycle flush practices allow cleaner, treated water to be re-used for
flushing manure.

Lagoon Covers: According to the American Society of Agricultural Engineers standards (ASAE,
1998), a minimum lagoon depth of 5 feet is necessary for construction of anaerobic lagoons.
Approximately 20 feet is considered the maximum depth to ensure proper biological activity.
For this analysis 12 feet was selected as  the maximum depth of all lagoons.  The side slopes for
lagoons were assumed to be 2:1 (horizontal to vertical) (MWPS, 1993, and ASAE,  1998),  and
the lagoon shape was assumed to be square.  The surface square  footage was then calculated to
determine the costs of a lagoon cover.
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Several lagoon cover manufacturers were contacted to identify costs of purchasing and installing
lagoon liners. The results of the survey are shown in Table 5-10. Installed lagoon covers range
from $1.20 to $4.81 per square foot, with lower costs per square foot expected at larger
installations and depending whether insulation is required.  Thus, to develop costs for installation
of insulated lagoon covers, a cost of $4.00 per square foot was assumed.

Operation and maintenance costs for lagoon liners were estimated at 2 percent of initial costs.

5.9.3   Transportation of Excess Manure

Category 2 type facilities do not have enough land to apply all their manure and must transport
some off-farm.  Category  1 type operations have enough land to apply manure and Category 3
type operations already pay to transport their manure.  The number of Category 1, 2, and 3 type
operations was identified in an analysis conducted by USDA's Kellog et al. (2000). In their
analysis, Kellog et al. used the 1997 Census of Agriculture on a county by county basis to
determine how many operations have enough land, do not have enough land, or have no land to
apply manure on land. Facilities with "no land" did not raise any of the 24 major crops identified
in the 1997 Census.  Results were presented nationally and were applied to the various model
farms.  Dilution factors for Category 2 type wet manure operations were reduced to 2 due to
addition of a settling basin and a recirculating pump (see section 5.9.2.2).

5.9.3.1 Quantity of Manure to Be Hauled

To calculate the costs of hauling solid manure off-site, the mass of manure (including bedding)
was calculated using the tons of waste produced per animal per year (Table 5-11) and the number
of animals in the facility.  For example, a 100,000-head  broiler operation produces 1,597 tons of
manure per year (100,000 birds x 31.93 Ib/animal/yr + 2,000 Ib/ton).

Table 5-11. Animal and Manure Mass and Manure Quantity Values Used to Calculate the
            Total Amount of Manure and Litter Produced by Each Operation
Manure Consistency
Liquid (gal/animal/yr)
Solid (Ib/animal/yr)
Type of Animal
Grower-Finisher
Farrow-to-Finish
Breeder
Layer
Broiler
Integrated Layer
Turkey Hen
Turkey for Slaughter
Integrated Turkey
Animal Mass (Ib)
110.0
123.0
374.5
3.7
2.5
3.7
8.8
13.8
11.3
Quantity of Manure
300.36
335.86
1,022.60
9.40
31.93 (includes litter)
3 1.60 (includes litter)
78.05 (includes litter)
122.40 (includes litter)
100.23 (includes litter)
To determine the quantity of manure to be hauled off-site, a percentage can be calculated from
the ratio of available acres for land application versus the amount of land needed to apply all of
the nutrient of concern. For example, in the 100,000-head broiler operation mentioned above
with phosphorus-based nutrient management,  119 acres are available for land application on-site,
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but 1,054 acres are needed to apply all of the phosphorus in the manure. Therefore, only 11
percent of the land required for manure application is available on-site, and 89 percent of the
manure needs to be transported off-site.  To determine the mass of manure to be hauled, the total
mass of manure produced per year was multiplied by this percentage.  For the 100,000-head
broiler operation,  1,416 tons of manure required transport (1,596 tons of manure produced x 89
percent).

For liquid manure, the quantity of manure to be disposed of (in gallons) was calculated from the
amount of manure excreted (see Table 5-11) multiplied by a weighted recoverable manure
correction factor (shown in Table 5-12) and a dilution factor of 2 or 3  (see discussion above).
The ratio of land available for application vs. land needed for application can be used to derive
the number of gallons of manure that need to be hauled.

  Table 5-12.  Recoverable Manure Correction Factors for Different Operation Types in
                                   Different Regions
Operation Type
Swine
Chicken
Turkey
Region
Central
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Pacific
Southern
Central
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Pacific
Southern
Central
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Pacific
Southern
Recoverable Manure Correction Factor
0.95
0.97
0.94
0.90
0.96
0.99
0.94
0.98
0.88
0.90
0.75
0.97
0.62
0.94
0.72
5.9.3.2 Manure Hauling Distances

Due to lack of information on specific county manure excesses and deficits from the 1997
Census of Agriculture data, the following approach was used by EPA to develop transportation
distances for one-way hauling of excess manure from category 2 and 3 operations (Appendix E).

Category 2 operations (see Section 4.2.4 for a discussion of categories), determined by manure
generation and nutrient application (based on 1997 Census of Agriculture Queries), have
different transportation distances depending on whether manure is applied on a nitrogen-based or
phosphorus-based application scenario.  In the event that an operation has insufficient land to
apply manure on a nitrogen basis, Equation 1 was used to estimate transportation distance:
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where Ndistance is the transportation distance (miles) for category 2 operations with manure applied
at agronomic N rates and ICD is the in-county transportation distance (miles) from Table 5-13.
The procedure used to calculate values in Table 5-13 is described in Appendix F and G, but the
values in Table 5-13 resulted from the combination of regions (e.g., Southern and Delta) for
which distances are given in Appendix F.

Transportation distance for category 2 operations with manure applied on an agronomic
phosphorus basis is determined by Equation 2:
                                            (OCD-ICD)
                              r distance 1^LJ^                                         (2)
where Pdistance is the transportation distance (miles) for category 2 operations with manure applied
at agronomic P rates (miles), OCD is the out-of-county transportation distance (miles) from
Table 5-13, and Vs is a factor that takes into account that some operations may have to transport
out of county while  others may not.

Category 3 operations have no land, and it is assumed that all are already incurring costs for
transportation on an agronomic nitrogen basis.  Offsite recipients are most commonly crop
farmers that will accept and apply manure based on the nitrogen requirements of the crops. The
incremental transportation distance for switching to an agronomic phosphorus basis is depicted in
Equation 3:


                               p3     _(OCD-ICD)
                                  distance       0                                   (•')
where P3distance is the transportation distance (miles).  This distance is used to determine
incremental hauling costs for Category 3 operations under technology options 2 through 8 (i.e.
where manure application rates may be limited to phosphorus based applications).
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Table 5-13 In-County Transport Distances and Out-of-County Transport Distances for the
                          Various Regions in the United States
Region
Northeast, Appalachian
Southern, Delta
Northern Plains, Lake States, Corn
Belt
Pacific
Mountain, Southern Plains
In-County Transport (mi)
5.5
6.0
6.5
12.5
11.0
Out-of-County Transport (mi)
81
32
17
39
27
These equations have been used to calculate regional transportation distances. The results of the
equations are shown in Table 5-14.

         Table 5-14. Transportation Distances for Category 2 and 3 Operations
                       for the Various Regions in the United States
Region

Northeast, Appalachian
Southern, Delta
Northern Plains, Lake States, Corn
Belt
Pacific
Mountain, Southern Plains
Category 2
N Basis
5.5
6.0
6.5
12.5
11.0
P Basis
30.5
14.5
10.0
21.5
16.5
Category 3
N Basis
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
P Basis
25.0
8.5
3.5
9.0
5.5
Note: All values rounded to the nearest 1A mile.
5.8.3.3 Manure Hauling Costs

For solid manure, hauling costs were based on the amount of manure to be hauled multiplied by a
dollar per ton rate that varied depending on the transport distance (which is an operation-specific
input parameter). For liquid manure, a baseline per gallon rate was assigned, with an additional
per mile charge for transport. Table 5-15 shows the rates that were used to estimate the costs of
hauling and applying solid and liquid manure over different distances.
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Table 5-15. Costs for Hauling Manure Off-Site for Solid and Liquid Manure
Manure Consistency
Solid
Liquid
Distance
1-90 miles
90-180 miles
More than 180 miles
Less than 1 mile
Additional cost per mile
Cost ($/ton)
$0.10 per ton
$0.23 per ton
$0.1 8 per ton
$0.10 per gallon
$0.001 per mile
6.0    ENERGY COSTS

Technologies with high energy input tend toward high investment costs and high operating costs.
With the exception of some runoff control situations, every nonpolluting waste management
technology uses energy from electric power or consumption of a common fuel. For technologies
such as land utilization of manure, the energy is used mainly for transferring or transporting the
waste material.  For others, energy provides the mixing or aeration needed for efficient biological
treatment of the waste. For still other technologies, such as dehydration and pyrolysis, energy
input forces rapid physical or chemical changes in the waste material.

Energy costs are addressed indirectly in the cost model by adding 2 percent to all capital costs for
operation and maintenance.  Operation and maintenance includes, but is not limited to, energy
costs.

7.0    COST MODEL STRUCTURE

The core of the cost model is the "Main" program that draws upon several subroutines and data
files to calculate costs associated with nearly one-thousand model feedlots.  The Main program
and its subroutines input data files with model feedlot information, constants associated with
manure characteristics and cropping systems,  frequency factors, numbers of farms represented by
each model, technology costs, and various other variables essential to the cost modeling effort.
Outputs include fixed, fixed amortized, and annual non-amortized costs for facility upgrades,
land application, and nutrient management.

The basic organization of the cost model for swine and poultry operations is depicted in Figure 6-
1.
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                     Fortran Cost Model Flow Diagram
                                      Model Farms
                              based on preset characteristics
                                •  sector, size, region, land
                                   • regulatory option
                               Pre-processor Sub-Routines
                               • get number of model farms
                           • manure and nutrient characteristics
                                • nutrient application rates
Other data files that
provide constants and
costs for the various
regions, sizes, and
sectors
     Basic Calculations
    •Manure Production
    •Nutrient Production
•Nutrients Required on Farm
 •Excess Nutrient Production
                             Cost Sub-Routines for Practices
              Region/Sector Specific Costs
              • Frequency of Compliance
              • Nutrient Management Planning
              • Facility Upgrades
              • Nutrient Reduction Strategies
                 Region/Sector Non-specific
                 • Constants [ground water
                 monitoring, labor rates, etc.]
                                     Model Outputs
                                  • one page per model
                                   • one line per model
                                for the 7 regulatory options
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7.1    Program Code

The cost model for swine and poultry is written using DIGITAL FORTRAN 90, Version 6. The
Main program, subroutines, and data files are described below.

7.1.1   "Main" Program

Purpose: The Main program (file name = Main category option (000117).f90) calculates
practice-specific and total costs for each model facility.

Data Called: This program draws on data files with model facility information, frequency
factors, constants associated with manure characteristics and cropping systems, labor rates,
numbers of farms represented by each model, technology costs, the effectiveness of technologies
and management strategies, and other cost and technical data.  Subroutines are used by the
program to read data files and perform some calculations, as illustrated in Figure 6-1.

Sample Code: Code using compliance subroutine to read in frequency factors:

       call compliance(animal,nohead,opertype,region,pswmon,ptrain,passess,pgwinst,&
             pauger,pmansamp,pcalib,pbuff,pcnmp,pmantest,psoiltest,&
             preckeep,pcaleqp,pgwmon,peros,pmortfac,pstor,pdep,pswdiv,pliner,&
             pinsp,pmort,pswmom,plinerom,pdisk,pincorp,pinject,pinjom,pcp,pcpom,&
             pfs,pfsep,psell,pgive,compliancefac)

Code to calculate volume of manure, and phosphorus and nitrogen in the manure:

       manvol=nohead*animwt*mcvolume/1000*365*7.481 lvalue in gallons
       manwt=nohead*animwt/1000*mcweight*2000*RMCF 12000 is conv. tons to Ibs.
       dilmanwt=mcwtdil*nohead*animwt/1000*365     !not converted into tons
       mann=nohead*animwt/1000*mcweight*mcn*RMCF
       manp=nohead*animwt/1000*mcweight*mcp*RMCF

Key Calculations: The basic equations used in the cost model are provided in Appendix G, and
variable names are defined in Appendix H.

Outputs: Outputs include fixed, fixed amortized, and annual non-amortized costs for facility
upgrades, land application, and nutrient management for each of the nearly one-thousand model
facilities for swine and poultry. See Section 6.3 for a sample output.

7.1.2   Subroutines

7.1.2.1 constants.f90
Purpose: Subroutine will input into memory constants to be used in various calculations
throughout the cost model program.

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Data Called: Reads from the file, NutManDat.dat, the data shown in Table 7-1.
                  Table 7-1. Data Read by Subroutine Constants.f90
Data [variable name] (units)
Installing Groundwater Monitoring Well [gwinst] ($ initial cost)
Time to Sample Groundwater Monitoring Well [gwtime] (hours per year)
Cost of water sample analysis [wateranal ] ($)
Assessment of crop field/groundwater link to surface water [assess] ($ per sample)
Record Keeping and Reporting [reckeep] ($ per year)
Training and certification to land apply manure [train] ($ per 3 years)
Purchase a manure sampler [mansamp] ($, initial cost)
Manure nutrient analysis [mananal] ($ per sample)
Setup and time required to take first manure sample [manfirstsamp] (hours per sample)
Time required for additional samples [manaddsamp] (hours per sample)
Soil sampling frequency-low end [soilsampfreqlow] (acres/sample)
Soil sampling frequency-site specific approach [soilsampfreqhi] (acres/sample)
Purchase a soil auger [soilauger] ($, initial cost)
Time required to take sample-low end [soilsamptimelow] (hours per sample)
Time required to take sample-site specific approach [soilsampfreqhi] (hours per sample)
Cost of soil analysis ($ per sample)
Rate for obtaining a certified NMP [nmprate] ($/acre)
Purchase scale to calibrate manure spreader [calibinit] ($, initial cost)
Time required to calibrate manure spreader [calibann] (hours/year)
Tarp to calibrate manure spreader [tarp] ($/year)
Tractor cost ($/hour)
General labor rate [labor] ($/hour)
Professional labor rate [plabor] ($/hour)
Amortization rate [amort] (percent)
Property tax [ptax] (percent)
Standard maintenance [maint]
Value
2885
1
75
3082
880
117
30
40
1
0.25
10
2.5
25
1
0.1
10.0
5
250
4
15
30
10
55
0.08
0.01
0.02

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7.1.2.2facupg.f90
Purpose: Reads into memory various constants used for facility upgrades.

Data Called: Reads from the file, FacUpg.dat, the data shown in Table 7-2.

                    Table 7-2.  Data Read by Subroutine Facupg.f90
Data [variable name] (units)
Shaving material application depth [shavdep] (inches per year)
Rate of litter storage cleaning [litfreq] (per year)
Length of Litter Storage (months)
Time allowance for litter transfer to storage [stortrans] (hours)
Time allowance for litter storage cleaning [litclean] (hours)
Area of house [housarea] (square feet)
Bulk price for wood shavings [shavcost] ($/cf)
Squarefoot cost of 4'high litter storage facility [storfaccost] ($ per square foot)
Lagoon Depth Marker [lagdepmark] ($, initial cost)
Diverstion berm top width [divtop] (feet)
Diversion berm height [divhei] (feet)
Diversion berm side slope [divslp]
Cost to move earth [earthmov] ($/cu.yd)
Time required for weekly visual inspection [visinsptime] (hours)
Cost of liner material [linercost] ($ per sq.ft)
Cost of insulated lagoon cover [covercost] ($ per sq. ft)
Value
3.0
1.0
6.0
30.0
30.0
16000
0.10
7.50
30.00
1.0
3.0
2.0
2.60
0.25
1.60
4.00
7.1.2.3 getnumber.f90
Purpose: To read the number of model facilities to determine the number of iterations to run in
the Main program.

Data Called: Reads the number of records from the file, ModelFac.csv.

Outputs: The number of iterations that the cost model must run.

7.1.2.4 readmodel cost.f90
Purpose: To read in model feedlot information

Data Called: Reads from the file ModelFac.CSV, the following data for each model facility:
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Animal type [animal]
Operation type [opertype]
Region [region]
Nutrient management basis (N or P) [nmbase]
Land application category [icat]
Transport distance [transport]
Number of facilities [nofac]
Average farm size [farmszorig]
Number of head [nohead]
Manure type [mantype]
Operation size ID [sizeid]

7.1.2.5 Readregion Cost.f90
Purpose: Reads Regional data for use in Main program.

Data Called: Reads from the file, Region.dat, the following data:

Animal type [animal]
Operation type [OperType]
Region [Region]
Recoverable manure correction factor [RMCF]
Nitrogen uptake [nuptake]
Phosphorus uptake [puptake]

7.1.2.6nutdatacost.f90
Purpose: To read in the manure characteristic data and cropping system data.

Data Called: Reads from the file, ManChar.dat, the following data:

Type of operation [Opertype]
Animal turnover rate [turns]
Average weight of animal [animwt]
Manure characteristics, weight of manure produced (Ibs/day/lOOOlbs) [mcweight]
Manure characteristics, [mcwtdil]
Manure characteristics, volume of manure produced (cubic feet/day/1000#) [mcvolume]
Manure characteristics, moisture content of fresh manure [mcmoist]
Manure characteristics, nitrogen in manure (lbs/day/1000#) [men]
Manure characteristics, efficiency of nitrogen application to field [mcneff]
Manure characteristics, phosphorus in manure (lbs/day/1000#) [mcp]
Manure characteristics, efficiency of phosphorus application to field [mcpeff]
Manure characteristics, potassium in manure (lbs/day/1000#) [mck]
Manure characteristics, efficiency of potassium application to field [mckeff]
Dilution factor [dilfac]
Percent of birds that die in  one turnover of animals [pctdead]

                                           90

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Average weight of animals at death [deadwt]
Length of animal life [deadlen]

7.1.2.7 compliance.f90
Purpose: To read data on frequencies at which practices are currently implemented on model
facilities..

Data Called: Reads from the file, Compliance.csv, the following:

Animal type [animal]
Number of head [nohead]
Operation type [opertype]
Region  [region]
Surface water monitoring, including operation & maintenance [pswmon]
Training and certification of manure applicators [ptrain]
Assessment of ground water linkage to surface water [passess]
Ground water monitoring well installation [pgwinst]
Soil sampling auger [pauger]
Manure sampler [pmansamp]
Scales (two) for manure spreader calibration [pcalib]
Stream buffer and O&M [peros]
Initial development of comprehensive nutrient management plan [pcnmp]
Manure testing [pmantest] or [pmtest]
Soil testing [psoiltest] or [pstest]
Record keeping [preckeep] or [preckp]
Calibration of manure spreader [pcaleqp] or [pca!2]
Ground water sampling [pgwmon]
Mortality composting/rendering facility [pmortfac]
Adequate storage [pstor]
Lagoon depth marker [pdep]
Storm water diversion & operation and maintenance [pswdiv]
Lagoon liner [pliner]
Visual inspection [pinsp]
Mortality compost facility operation and maintenance [pmort]
Lagoon liner operation & maintenance [plinerom] and [plinOM]
Feeding strategies [pfs]
Solid-liquid  separator [pfsep]

7.1.2.8nutred.f90
Purpose: To read in constant data regarding feeding strategies, solid/liquid separator costs, etc.,
to reduce excess nutrients.

Data Called: Reads from the file, NutRed.dat, the data shown in Table 7-3.
                                           91

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Table 7-3. Data Read by Subroutine Nutred.f90
Data [variable name] (units)
N reduction in manure from feeding strategies
P reduction in manure from feeding strategies
Feeding strategy for P costs per pig
Feeding strategy for P costs per chicken
Feeding strategy for N costs per pig
Feeding strategy for N costs per chicken
Costs of hauling and applying liquid manure <1 mi($/gal)
Additional costs for liquid ($/mile)
Costs of hauling and applying solid manure l-90mi ($/ton)
Costs of hauling and applying solid manure 90-180mi ($/ton)
Costs of hauling and applying solid manure >180mi ($/ton)
Cost of separation device
Separation safety factor (additional storage)
Separator efficiency
Solids content of separated manure
Pipe length to connect lagoon to separator (feet)
Cost of pipe ($/foot)
Cost of installing a steel storage tank ($/gallon)
Time required to install pipe and set up separator (hours)
Amount of P transferred after separation (XI 000)
Amount of N transferred after separation (XI 000)
Retrofit initial investment per 1,250 swine
Retrofit 1/4 HP Motor per 1,250 swine
Retrofit motor usage per day kWh
Electricity Cost per kWh ($)
Retrofit labor required per year (hours)
Retrofit blades required per year
HighRise Construction ($/pig space) [confconst]
Value
0.20
0.40
0.36
0.0055
2.70
0.055
0.10
0.001
0.10
0.23
0.18
5000.00
0.15
0.30
0.23
250.00
2.13
0.18
4.00
58.00
58.19
36000.00
200.00
897.00
0.095
52.00
30.00
185.00
                    92

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HighRise Fuel, Repairs, and Utilities ($/pig space) [confmisc]
Hoop Structure Construction ($/pig space) [hoopconst]
Hoop Feed and Manure Equip ($/pig space) [hoopfm]
Hoop Bedding ($/pig space) [hoopbed]
Hoop Fuel, Repairs, and Utilities ($/pig space) [hoopmisc]
Hoop labor (hours/pig space) [hooplab]
3.22
55.00
36.00
4.20
1.40
1.12
7.1.2.9sort.f90
Purpose: To select the least-cost alternative for each option.

Outputs: Least-cost alternative for each option for each model farm.

7.1.3   Data Files

Two types of data file structures are used: fixed-format files (*.dat) and variable-format files
(*.csv) where data elements are separated by commas.

7.1.3.1 ModelFac.csv
This file contains the following data elements regarding the model feedlots:

Animal type (e.g., swine, chickens)[AnimalType]
Operation type (e.g., farrow-to-feeder, broiler) [OperType]
Region (e.g., Mid-Atlantic, Midwest) [Region]
Nutrient management basis (P-based or N-based) [NMBase]
Land application category (1, 2, or 3) [Category]
Option [option]
Number of facilities in this category [facility]
Farm size: average acres of cropland available for nutrient management planning [farmsz]
Number of head [head]
Manure management system (liquid or solid)[mantype]
Facility size (large 1, Iarge2, medium 1, medium2) [sizeid]

Sample Records
Swin,GF,MA,N, 1,1,291,0,1242,liq,medium 1,1 ,,#REF! „
Swin,GF,MA,N, 1,1,122,0,2184,liq,medium2,1 ,,#REF !„
Swin,GF,MA,P,3,2,36,l,1242,liq,mediuml,0.6
Swin,GF,MA,P,3,2,17,l,2184,liq,medium2,0.6

7.1.3.2 Region.csv
This file contains region-specific constants regarding manure and crop uptake of nutrients.
                                           93

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Animal type [animal]
Operation type [Opertype]
Region [Region]
Recoverable manure correction factor [RMCF]
Nitrogen uptake [Nuptake]
Phosphorus uptake [Puptake]

Sample Records
BR,CE,0.95,215,15
BR,MA,0.97,183,20

7.1.3.3 Compliance.csv
This file contains data elements regarding the extent to which practices are currently
implemented on model facilities.  See Section 6.1.2.7 for a list of data elements contained in this
file.  Section 5.1 contains the frequency factor values found in this file.

Sample Records
BR,CE,100000,0,0,0,87.4,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,87.4,0,87.4,30,0,0,87.4,0,87.4,0,87.4,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,,
BR,MA,100000,0,12.1,0,76.09,0,12.1,12.1,0,12.1,12.1,12.1,12.1,12.1,76.09,0,76.09,30,12.1,0,76
.09,0,76.09,0,76.09,0,0,0,0,0,0,85,0,,

7.1.3.4ManChar.dat
This file contains data regarding manure characteristics and cropping systems. See Section
7.1.2.6 for a list of data elements contained in this file.

Sample Records:
GF  2.8  110.0  14.6914.69  1.00  0.90  2.82 1.00 2.80  1.00  7.16 1.00 3.00 0.05110.0
123.0
FF 2.1   110.0  14.6914.69 1.00 0.90  2.82 1.00 2.80 1.00 7.16  1.00  3.00  0.05 110.0
123.0
FX  1.72  110.0 14.6914.69  1.00 0.90 2.82  1.00 2.80 1.00 7.16 1.00  3.00 0.05 110.0
123.0

7.1.3.5NutManDat.dat
This file contains constant data regarding nutrient management. See Section 6.1.2.1  for a listing
of all data elements and values contained in this file.

7.1.3.6FacUpg.dat
This file contains constant data regarding facility upgrades.  See Section 6.1.2.2 for a listing of all
data elements and values contained in this file.

7.1.3.7NutRed.dat
                                            94

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This file contains constant data regarding feeding strategies, solid/liquid separator costs, etc., to
reduce excess nutrients.  See Section 6.1.2.8 for a listing of all data elements and values
contained in this file.

7.2    Applications

Separate costs were developed for 960 model facilities for swine and poultry, as shown in Table
7-4.  The total cost of each option for a specific animal type is then determined by multiplying
the costs of each model facility for that animal type by the number of facilities the model
represents,  and then summing the costs.

                  Table 7-4. Number of Model Facilities by Animal Type
Animal
Type
Broilers
Layers - Wet
Layers - Dry
Turkeys
Swine - GF
Swine - FF
Total
Required
for ELGa
Options
8
8
8
8
8
8

Categories
3
3
o
J
3
3
3

Regions
2
1
2
2
2
2

Size Classes
4
2
4
3
4
4

Total
192
48
192
144
192
192
960
a See Section 4.3 for a discussion of options
7.3    Outputs

Both formatted and unformatted outputs are created by the cost model. The following is a sample
formatted output for one model facility.
                                           95

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MODEL FACILITY Wed Mar 22
Chicken Broilers, litter on floor Mid-Atlantic
Size of Operation
Nutrient Management Basis
Cattegory/Option
05:48:382000
Region
44193 head
Nitrogen
I/ 1





Number of miles excess manure must be transported 0 miles
Number of facilities in this category
Acres of cropland only available on farm
CALCULATIONS
Mass of fresh manure
Mass of waste litter
Nitrogen produced
Phosphorus produced
Number of acres needed to apply Nitrogen
Amount of N required on farm
Amount of P required on farm
Tillable acres (less buffer)
Manure Given Away (%)
NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT PLAN

l)Fixed one-time costs
Training and certification for manure appl.
Assessment of crop field/GW link to SW GW
Ground water monitoring well installation GW
Surface water monitoring
Cost of soil auger
Cost of manure sampler
Cost of 2 scales for manure spreader calibration
Cost to develop initial NMP
2)Nonannual reoccuring costs
On-farm NMP development (every 3 years)
On-farm soil testing (every 3 years)
3)Annual Costs
Record keeping
Calibrate manure spreader
Manure testing (twice per year)
O&M for ground water monitoring GW
O&M for surface water monitoring
Total (after including frequency)
FACILITY UPGRADES
l)Fixed one-time costs
Mortality composting facility GW
Storage (for poultry litter)
Lagoon depth marker
Divert storm water around structures
Field runoff control — Establish buffer
2)Annual Reoccurring Costs
158 facilities
0 acres

1604.305 tons
705 tons
25829 Ibs.
4241 Ibs.
141 acres
26087 Ibs.
285 libs.
142 acres
0
FIXED FIXED ANNUAL
AMORT NON-AMORT

$ 117.
$ 0.
$ 0.
$ 0.
$25.
$30.
$500.
$ 739.

$
$

$ 880.
$ 40.
$ 185.
$ 0.
$ 0.
$467. 714. 922.


$ 0.
$32186.
$ 0.
$ 1443.
$ 531.













3 Years FREQUENCY TOTAL


16.60 98.
0.00 0.
76.09 0.
0.00 0.
0.00 25.
16.60 25.
16.60 417.
16.60 616.

739. 16.60 616.
19. 16.60 16.

16.60 734.
16.60 33.
16.60 154.
76.09 0.
0.00 0.
632. 2734.


76.09 0.
30.00 22530.
16.60 0.
0.00 1443.
5.00 504.

96

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Visual inspection
Mortality composting operation and maint. GW
Storm water diversion operation and maint.
Field runoff control (O&M & land rental value)
Total (after including frequency)
LAND APPLICATION
l)Solid Manure Application
a) Solid manure application already practiced
b)Incorporation
Initial cost of disk harrow
Annual O&M for incorporation
Total
Total (NMP, facility, land app)
CONTINGENCY (1% CAPITAL COSTS)
REDUCING EXCESS NUTRIENTS
No nutrient reduction scenarios required. Category
$ 130.
$ 0.
$ 29.
$ 329.
$24477. 0. 488.




$0.
$ 0.
$0. 0. 0.
$24944. 714. 1410.
245.

1 farm.
0.00 130.
76.09 0.
0.00 29.
0.00 329.
0. 24965.




0.00 0.
0.00 0.
0. 0.
632. 5002.



97

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8.0    REFERENCES

A.C. Schultes, Inc., Woodbury, New Jersey.  Personal communication, February 1999.

ASAE. 1998. ASAE Standards 1998, 45th edition. American Society of Agricultural Engineers,
       St. Joseph, MI.

ASC Scientific.  1999. ASC Scientific: Soil Augers and Sampling Tools.
       . Accessed September 30, 1999.

Brodie, H.L., and L.E. Carr. 1997. "Composting Animal Mortalities on the Farm." Fact Sheet
       717. Maryland Cooperative Extension Service, University of Maryland.

Carter, T.A., KE.  Anderson, J. Arends, J.C. Barker, S.S. Bunton, B. Hawkins, J. Parsons, D.V.
       Rives, SE. Scheideler, S.M. Stringham, andM.J. Wineland.  1993.  Composting Poultry
      Mortality:  Poultry Science and Technology Guide.  North Carolina Cooperative
       Extension Service, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina. December
       1993.

EPA (Tables 5-3 and 5-4) - Need to know how to cite this.

ESRI.  1998.  ESRI Data & Maps CD No. 2: United States (Detailed).  Environmental Systems
       Research Institute, Inc., Redlands, CA.

Lander, C.H., D. Moffitt, and K. Alt. 1998. Nutrients available from livestock manure relative to
       crop growth requirements., USDA-Natural Resources Conservation  Service, Washington,
       DC.

Lazarus, W.F. 1999. Farm Machinery Economic Costs for 1999: Minnesota Estimates with
       Adjustments for Use in Canada. Staff Paper P99-5. University of Minnesota,
       Department of Applied Economics, St. Paul, Minnesota.

Menke, T, H. Keener, and G. Lefevre.  2000. Highrise Hog Housing Cost Information. Emailed
       on to Tetra Tech on April 25, 2000.

MWPS. 1993. Livestock Waste Facilities Handbook, 3rd edition. Midwest Plan Service, Iowa
       State University, Ames, IA.

NCDENR. 1999. Lagoon Closure Information. Memorandum to Mike Clipper, March 29, 1999.
      North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Division of Soil and
       Water Conservation.
                                          98

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NCSU. 1998. Draft of Swine and Poultry Industry Characterization,  Waste Management
      Practices and Modeled Detailed Analysis of Predominantly Used Systems. North
      Carolina State University, September 30.

NPPC. 1998. Environmental Assurance Program Survey. National Pork Producer Council.

Poultry Water Quality Consortium. 1998a. Composting -A Disposal Method for Dead Birds,
      PMM/4 - 9/98, IN: Poultry Water Quality Handbook - Second Edition Expanded. Poultry
      Water Quality Consortium, Chattanooga, TN.

Poultry Water Quality Consortium. 1998b. Dry Waste Management, PWM/3 - 9/98, IN: Poultry
      Water Quality Handbook - Second Edition Expanded. Poultry Water Quality Consortium,
      Chattanooga, TN.

Sharpley, A.N., T. Daniel, T. Sims, J. Lemunyon, R. Stevens, and R.  Perry. 1999. Agricultural
      Phosphorus and Eutrophication.  USDA-Agricultural  Research Service, ARS-149.

Sims, J., A. Leytem, F. Coale. 2000. Implementing a Phosphorus Site Index: The Delmarva
      Experience. In Proceedings of 2000 National Poultry Waste Management Symposium.

Sobecki, T.M., and M. Clipper. 1999. Identification of Acreage of U.S. Agricultural Land with a
      Significant Potential for Siting of Animal Waste Facilities and Associated Limitations
      from Potential of Groundwater Contamination-draft 12/15/99, U.S. Environmental
      Protection Agency, Office of Water, Washington, DC.

Sutton, A.L., D.W. Nelson, D.D. Jones.  1985. Utilization of animal manure as fertilizer.
      University of Minnesota Agricultural Extension Service. AG-FO-2613.

Tetra Tech. 1999. Phone Conversations on Lagoon Liners with J. Barker, NCSU and P. Wright,
      Cornell University.

Tetra Tech. 2000a. Frequency Factors for Broiler and Turkey Facilities, Memorandum from
      Tetra Tech, Inc., to Paul Shriner, Work Assignment Manager, U.S.  Environmental
      Protection Agency, March 3,  2000. EPA Contract 68-C-99-263, Work Assignment B-04.

Tetra Tech. 2000b. Memorandum to the record on Stream Density.

United Egg Producers/United Egg Association and Capitolink.  1999. Data submission to EPA.

USD A. 1992. National Engineering Handbook: Agricultural Waste Management Field
      Handbook. U.S. Department of Commerce, National Technical Information Service,
      Springfield, VA.
                                          99

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USDA APHIS. 1995.  Swine '95. Part 1. Reference of 1995 Swine Management Practices.
       USD A, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, National Animal Health Monitoring
       System.

USDA APHIS. 1999.  Part 1: Reference of 1999 Table Egg Layer Management in the U.S.
       USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, National Animal Health Monitoring
       System. Fort Collins, Colorado.

USDA NAHMS.  1999. Data summaries of NAHMS Swine '95, prepared at request of EPA.
       U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal Plant Health Inspection Service, National
       Animal Health Monitoring System. Washington, DC.

USDA NAHMS.  2000. Data summaries of NAHMS Layer '99, prepared at request of EPA.
       U.S. Department of Agriculture, Animal Plant Health Inspection Service, National
       Animal Health Monitoring System. Washington, DC.

USDANASS.  1999a.  1997 Census of Agriculture. U.S. Department of Agriculture, National
       Agricultural Statistics Service, Washington, DC.

USDA NASS. 1999b. Queries run for EPA on the 1997 Census of Agriculture.  U.S. Department
       of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, Washington, DC.

USDA NRCS. 2000. Manure Nutrients Relative to the Capacity of Cropland and Pastur eland to
       Assimilate Nutrients: Spatial and Temporal Trends for the U.S. by Kellogg, Lander,
       Moffitt, and Gollehon. USDA-Natural Resources Conservation Service, Washington, DC.

USEPA. 1993. Guidance Specifying Management Measures for Sources of Nonpoint Pollution
       in Coastal Waters.  EPA840-B-92-002. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office
       of Water, Washington, DC. January 1993.

USEPA. 1998. Site Visit Report to Iowa and Minnesota. Prepared by P. Shriner.  May 1998.

USEPA. 1999b. Unified National Strategy for Animal Feeding Operations,
       http://www.epa.gov/owm/fmafost.htm. Accessed on September 23, 1999.

USEPA. 2000. Water Quality Conditions in the United States.  U.S. Environmental Protection
       Agency, Office of Water. EPA841-F-00-006.

Wright, P. 1997. Survey of Manure Spreading Costs Around York, New York. ASAE Paper No.
       972040. Presented at the ASAE Annual International Meeting, American Society of
       Agricultural Engineers, Minneapolis, Minnesota, August 10-14, 1997.
                                         100

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Appendices
  Appendices-1

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                                          Appendix A

                 Differentiating Breeding, Slaughter, and Integrated Operations

To:        Jan Goodwin
F ro m:     Jon Harcum
Subject:  Differentiating breeding, slaughter, and integrated operations
Date:      December 14, 1998
This memo documents the approach used to distinguish between categories of animal sectors. Several
animal sectors (swine, chickens, turkeys, beef) have tended to specialize into operations that primarily (a)
grow out animals for slaughter (or egg production), (b) provide breeding or replacement stock, or (c) a
combination of breeding and grow out.  In reality, animal operations do not easily fit into one of these
three categories, but are more likely to stretch across a spectrum. Nevertheless, EPA has  determined to
model these specializations and it is now necessary to  characterize the number of operations in each
specialization using data from the Census of Agriculture. Below are the specializations that EPA has
selected. Note, that broilers will be modeled but no specialization was selected, and that decisions about
modeling beef and dairy have not been made at this time.

Swine                                               Chickens (excluding broilers)
ป•   Slaughter (finishing)                              ป•  Layers (egg production)
ป•   Breeding (farrowing)                             ป•  Pullets (replacement)
ป•   Integrated  (farrow-to-finish)                       ป•  Integrated  (layers and pullets)

Turkeys                                            Beef
ป•   Slaughter                                        ป•  Cow-calf
ป•   Breeding                                        ป•  Slaughter
ป•   Integrated

Using professional judgement it was determined for a  given animal sector that if 95 percent of the
animals (in animal units) on an operation were breeding stock and less than 25 animal units were for
slaughter, then that operation is classified as an operation growing animals for breeding.  Similarly if for
a given animal sector that if 95 percent of the animals  (in animal units) on an operation were grown out
for slaughter and less than 25 animal units were breeding stock, then that operation is classified as an
operation for growing animals for slaughter.  The remaining operations  would be classified as integrated.

Ultimately, the values of 95 percent and 25 animal units were heuristically chosen; however, the
following issues were considered:

ป•   If 95 percent of the operation is dedicated to a specialty (e.g., breeding or grow out) then most of the
    manure can be attributed to the specialty. It is also likely that this specialty accounts  for a large
    portion of the revenues associated for that animal  sector.

ป•   It is not uncommon for animal operations to have  a few animals for show (at county or state fairs),
    for personal  slaughter, for 4-H or FFA projects, or out of tradition.  (Granted 25 animal units of
    layers is quite a lot of animals for showing at a county fair.)

ป•   In a farrow-to-finish operation about 15 percent of the head are breeding stock.

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                                      Appendix B

                              Crop Nutrient Requirements

To:         Paul Shriner
From:      Jed Waddell, George Townsend & Steve Dressing
Subject:   Updated Crop Nutrient Requirements
Date:       February 16, 2000
Contract:  EPA Contract 68-C-99-263, Work Assignment B-04

Updated crop nitrogen and phosphorus requirements were refined to more adequately depict
conditions of the Model Farm. Extension personnel from counties with the densest populations
of animals were consulted to determine the common cropping practices for the all regions and
sectors.  Although the Cost Model is only run on two principle regions for each sector, all regions
are presented in this analysis for their use in the Nutrient Loading Analysis.

County Extension personnel identified the typical crop rotation for each sector (Table 1). Crop
yields were determined by dividing the harvested quantity by the acreage obtained in the 1997
Census of Agriculture (USDA:NASS, 1999). Occasionally, yields were far below expected
yields and were changed to reflect expected yields found in the Ag Waste Management Field
Handbook (AWMFH, USD A, 1992).  Crop nutrient removal was based on Appendix I, Table
A-l, Nutrient Content Values, for the major crops (Lander et al., 1998). The nitrogen application
rates was increased to reflect the 30 percent loss of nitrogen after land application of manure
(Sutton et al., 1985) due to volatilization of ammonia.
                                      Appendices-3

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     Table 1. Crop Yields, Nutrient Removal and Application Rates from the Ag Waste
  Management Field Handbook (AWMFH) for Typical Crops used on Swine and Poultry
o
Sector
Swine
Poultry
Region
CE
MA
MW
PA
SO
CE
MA
MW
PA
SO
Crop
Corn
Com
Soybean
Rye
Com
Soybean
Corn chop
Oats
Alfalfa
Bermuda
Bermuda
Com
Soybean
Wheat
Fescue
Corn chop
Oats
Alfalfa
Fescue
Yieldf
162
83
28
25
135
48
23
90
7
8
8
123
27
63
5
23
102
7
5
aerations in the various Regions.
Census
Yield
162
83
28
25
135
48
23
90
7
3
4
123
27
63
3
23
102
7
4
Yield Unit
Bushels/acre
Bushels/acre
Bushels/acre
Bushels/acre
Bushels/acre
Bushels/acre
Tons/acre
Bushels/acre
Tons/acre
Tons/acre
Tons/acre
Bushels/acre
Bushels/acre
Bushels/acre
Tons/acre
Tons/acre
Bushels/acre
Tons/acre
Tons/acre
Nitrogen
Removal
129
67
100
26
108
170
160
53
356
150
150
98
94
64
99
165
60
352
99
Phosphorus
Removal
24
12
10
4
20
17
24
10
33
15
15
18
10
13
10
24
11
33
10
Nitrogen
Application
185
95
143
38
154
242
228
76
509
215
215
140
135
91
141
236
86
503
141
Phosphorus
Application
24
12
10
4
20
17
24
10
33
15
15
18
10
13
10
24
11
33
10
f Yields were taken from the 1997 Census of Agriculture. The census combined information for the specific grass
varieties (e.g. fescue and bermudagrass) occasionally resulting in lower yields when compared to AWMFH. Where
sizeable discrepancies were identified (Swine, SO; Poultry, CE, MW, SO) AWMFH yields were used instead of
census yields.

The average annual nitrogen and phosphorus crop removal and application rates were calculated
by dividing the total crop requirements over the time to complete a full crop rotation (Table 2).
Also given in Table 2 are other estimates of regional nitrogen requirements by Clipper and
Shriner for comparison. Clipper's estimates were derived after conversation with county
extension agents. Shriner's estimates were based on averaging all 24 crops and pastureland
presented in the 1997 Census of Agriculture (USDA:NASS, 1999).  There is no clear pattern in
the estimates (one estimation method is neither consistently higher or lower than the others).
                                       Appendices-4

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        Table 2. Comparison of Nutrient Removal and Application Rates from the
               1997 Census of Agriculture with County Extension Values or
               Using 24 Crops and Pastureland Information in the Census.
Sector
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Poultry
Poultry
Poultry
Poultry
Poultry
Cropsf
corn
c/sb/rye
c/sb
c/o/al
bermuda
bermuda
c/sb/wt
fescue
c/o/al
fescue
Region
CE
MA
MW
PA
SO
CE
MA
MW
PA
SO
Nitrogen
Removal
129
97
139
178
150
150
128
99
141
99
Phosphorus
Removal
24
14
19
18
15
15
20
10
14
10
Nitrogen
Applicatio
n
185
138
198
407
215
215
183
141
412
141
Phosphorus
Application
24
14
19
34
15
15
20
10
34
10
Extension
Values for
Nitrogen*
185
130
155
300
300
250
130
130
300
175
24 Crops and
Pasture for
Nitrogen1
110
137
159
129
141
110
137
159
129
141
f Cropping system abbreviations: c, corn; sb, soybean; wt, wheat; o, oats; al, alfalfa. Bermuda and fescue refer to
the typical hay crop.
{ Values developed from Mike Clipper's contact with county extension agents.
If Values developed by Paul Shriner using 1997 Census of Agriculture and AWMFH.
Bibliography

Lander, C.H., D. Moffitt, and K. Alt.  1988. Nutrients available from livestock manure relative to
crop growth requirements. USD A, NRCS, Resource Assessment and Strategic Planning
Working Paper 98-1.

Sutton, A.L., D.W. Nelson, D.D. Jones. 1985. Utilization of animal manure as
fertilizer.University of Minnesota Agricultural Extension Service. AG-FO-2613.

USDA:NASS. 1999. 1997 Census of Agriculture.
                                       Appendices-5

-------
                                        Appendix C

           Draft Methodology for Estimating Storage Requirements for Option 7


MEMORANDUM


TO:           Ron Jordan, EPA

FROM:        Deb Bartram, ERG

DATE:        23 January 2001

SUBJECT:    Draft Methodology for Estimating Storage Requirements for Option 7
This memorandum presents a draft methodology for the estimation of storage requirements for
concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) under Option 7. Option 7 includes all requirements of
Option 2 (phosphorus-based application), plus additional restrictions on when manure and manure
effluent may be applied.

I              Background

Under Option 7, CAFOs would be restricted from applying manure and manure effluent to ground that is
frozen or covered with snow. Therefore, these operations would need sufficient capacity in their storage
systems to retain the manure and manure effluent that is generated during periods of the year when it
cannot be applied.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Climatic Data Center (NOAA/NCDC)
has published freeze/frost data for over 3,100 observation sites in the United States (1).  Freezing
temperatures are classified  based  on their effect on plants:

              Light Freeze (29 -  32ฐF) - tender plants killed, with little destructive effect on other
              vegetation.

              Moderate Freeze (25 - 28ฐF) - widely destructive effect on most vegetation with heavy
              damage to fruit blossoms, tender, and semi-hardy plants.

              Severe Freeze (24ฐF and less) - heavy damage to most plants. At these temperatures,
              the ground freezes solid, with the depth of the frozen ground dependent on the duration
              and severity of the freeze, soil moisture, and soil type.

The NOAA/NCDC publication contains probability tables for the probable first and last occurrence of
freeze-related temperatures for three different freeze temperatures (36ฐF, 32ฐF, and 28ฐF), as well as
the probable duration of the freeze-free period occurring between the last spring freeze and the first fall
freeze. The temperature data used in their analysis covers 1951 through 1980.

II             Determination of  Storage Requirements for Option 7

The NOAA/NCDC data can  be used to determine the amount of storage capacity that CAFOs would
need under Option 7. For this analysis, it was assumed that CAFOs would only be able to apply manure
and manure effluent between the time of the last spring frost and the first fall frost (referred to as the
"freeze free period"). The freeze free period for the 28ฐF temperature threshold with a 90% probability
                                        Appendices-6

-------
level can be used to estimate the duration of this freeze free period.6  This assumption is somewhat
conservative, since it is possible for temperatures to thaw the ground sufficiently prior to the last frost of
the season.

Table 1  presents the duration of the freeze free period for each model farm. The freeze free period was
determined for an observation site located within or closest to each model farm county. In addition, the
average duration of the freeze free period was calculated for the state in which each model farm is
located. The more conservative (i.e., shorter) freeze free period between these two values is bolded in
the table and was used to determine storage requirements for that model farm.

Table 2  presents the recommended storage required for each model farm under Option 7. These
storage  requirements equal 365 days minus the bolded  freeze free period from Table 1, and  are
rounded up to the nearest 45-day increment.

Ill             References

1.             U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,
               National Climatic Data Center, Freeze/Frost Data.  Climatography of the U.S. No. 20,
               Supplement No. 1, January 1988.  http://www.ncdc.noaa.qov/ol/documentlibrary/
               freezefrost/freezefrost.pdf. Accessed April  13, 2000.
        The 90% probability level for the freeze free period means there is a 90% chance that the freeze free
period may actually extend longer (thereby reducing storage requirements).

                                         Appendices-7

-------
               Table 1. Summary of Freeze Free Period for Model Farm Locations1
Animal Type
Beef
Dairy
Swine
Poultry
Region
Pacific
Central
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
South
Pacific
Central
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
South
Pacific
Central
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
South
Pacific
Central
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
South
Model Farm
County (State)
Imperial (CA)
Deaf Smith (TX)
Scott (KS)
Lancaster (PA)
Okeechobee (FL)
Tulare (CA)
Erath (TX)
Marathon (Wl)
Wyoming (NY)
Okeechobee (FL)
Tulare (CA)
Yuma (CO)
Sioux (IA)
Duplin(NC)
Oglethorpe (GA)
Fresno (CA)
Shelby (TX)
Barry (MO)
Wicomico (MD)
Benton (AR)
Weather
Station
Imperial
Amarillo
Scott
York
Avon Park
Hanford
Hico
Wausau
Batavia
Avon Park
Hanford
Wray
Hawarden
Goldsboro
Athens WSO
Fresno WSO
Henderson
Seligman
Salisbury
Benton
Freeze Free
Period
351
191
171
167
340
256
226
144
164
340
256
147
148
218
226
289
241
187
201
204
Avg. Freeze Free
Period for State
257
243
180
161
320
257
243
141
153
320
257
118
161
196
229
257
243
184
190
212
 The freeze free period used in the analysis is defined as the period of time when temperatures will stay above 28ฐF
with a 90% probability that the warm temperature period will actually be longer than what is stated.

                  Table 2. Required Storage Days by Animal Type and Region1
Animal
Type
Beef
Dairy
Swine
Poultry
Region
Pacific
135
135
135
135
Central
180
180
270
135
Midwest
225
225
225
180
Mid-Atlantic
225
225
180
180
South
45
45
180
180
 Required storage days are calculated as 365 days minus the freeze free period shown in Table 1, rounded up to the
nearest 45-day increment.
                                          Appendices-8

-------
               Appendix D: Frequency Factors of Compliance for Cost Items

                   Broilers: Percent of Facilities That Already Incur Costs
Component
Certification of manure
applicators
Already assess GW link to SW
GW well installation
SW monitoring; O&M
Soil auger
Manure sampler
Scales (2) for spreader
calibration
Initial NMP development
NMP on-farm recurring
Soil testing
Record keeping
Calibration of manure spreader
Manure testing
GW sampling
Mortality - composting and
O&M
Adequate storage
Storm water diversions and
O&M
Stream buffer and O&M
Visual inspection
Feeding strategies
Mid-Atlantic
300-1,000
AU
16.6
0
76.09*
0
16.6
16.6
16.6
16.6
16.6
16.6
16.6
16.6
16.6
76.09*
76.09*
30
0
0
0
100
>1,OOOAU
12.1
0
76.09*
0
12.1
12.1
12.1
12.1
12.1
12.1
12.1
12.1
12.1
76.09*
76.09*
30
0
0
0
100
South
300-1, 000 AU
0
0
77.55*
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
77.55*
77.55*
30
0
0
0
100
>1,OOOAU
0
0
77.55*
0
23.1
0
0
23.1
0
23.1
23.1
0
0
77.55*
77.55*
30
23.1
0
23.1
100
Source
State Regs
EPA
Sobecki and
Clipper, 1999
State Regs
State Regs
State Regs
State Regs
State Regs
State Regs
State Regs
State Regs
State Regs
State Regs
Sobecki and
Clipper, 1999
Sobecki and
Clipper, 1999
EPA
State Regs
State Regs
State Regs
EPA
Note:  GW = ground water, SW = surface water, NMP = nutrient management planning, O&M = operation and
maintenance.
* Represents the percentage of facilities that will not incur this cost due to their location.
                                         Appendices-9

-------
                   Turkeys: Percent of Facilities That Already Incur Costs
Component
Certification of manure applicators
Already assess GW link to SW
GW well installation
SW monitoring; O&M
Soil auger
Manure sampler
Scales (2) for spreader calibration
Initial NMP development
NMP on-farm recurring
Soil testing
Record keeping
Calibration of manure spreader
Manure testing
GW sampling
Mortality - composting and O&M
Adequate storage
Storm water diversions and O&M
Stream buffer and O&M
Visual inspection
Feeding Strategies
Mid-Atlantic
300-1,000
AU
0.4
0
76.09*
0
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
76.09*
76.09*
75
0
0
0
5
>1,OOOAU
1.3
0
76.09*
0
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
76.09*
76.09*
75
0
0
0
5
Midwest
300-1, 000 AU
0
0
72.54*
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
72.54*
72.54*
25
0
0
0
5
>1,OOOAU
0
0
72.54*
0
10.1
10.1
0
0
0
10.1
10.1
0
10.1
72.54*
72.54*
25
0
0
0
5
Source
State Regs
EPA
Sobecki and
Clipper, 1999
State Regs
State Regs
State Regs
State Regs
State Regs
State Regs
State Regs
State Regs
State Regs
State Regs
Sobecki and
Clipper, 1999
Sobecki and
Clipper, 1999
EPA
State Regs
State Regs
State Regs
EPA
Note: GW = ground water,  SW = surface water, NMP = nutrient management planning, O&M = operation and
maintenance.
* Represents the percentage of facilities that will not incur this cost due to their location.
                                          Appendices-10

-------
      Layers (Wet and Dry-All Sizes): Percent of Facilities That Already Incur Costs
Component
Certification of manure
applicators
Already assess GW link to SW
GW well installation
SW monitoring; O&M
Soil auger
Manure sampler
Scales (2) for spreader calibration
Initial NMP development
NMP on-farm recurring
Soil testing
Record keeping
Calibration of manure spreader
Manure testing
GW sampling
Mortality composting and O&M
Adequate storage
Storm water diversions and O&M
Stream buffer and O&M
Visual inspection
Lagoon liner and O&M/wet layers
Lagoon depth marker/wet layers
Feeding strategies
Midwest
5
10.9
72.54*
0
34.3
70.6
61.8
69.4
69.4
34.3
99
61.8
70.6
72.54*
72.54*
72.54*
80.9
80.9
25
72.54*
0
0
Mid-Atlantic
5
12.7
76.09*
0
63.2
56.2
29.6
56.7
56.7
63.2
99
64
56.2
76.09*
76.09*
76.09*
69.3
69.3
25
76.09*
0
0
South
5
40
77.55*
0
50
75
50
75
75
50
99
50
75
77.55*
77.55*
77.5*5
70
70
25
77.55*
0
0
Source
UEP/UEA
UEP/UEA
Sobecki and Clipper, 1999

UEP/UEA
UEP/UEA
UEP/UEA
UEP/UEA
UEP/UEA
UEP/UEA
UEP/UEA
UEP/UEA
UEP/UEA
Sobecki and Clipper, 1999
Sobecki and Clipper, 1999
Sobecki and Clipper, 1999
UEP/UEA
UEP/UEA
AFO strategy
Sobecki and Clipper, 1999


Note:  GW = ground water, SW = surface water, NMP = nutrient management planning, O&M = operation and
maintenance.
* Represents the percentage of facilities that will not incur this cost due to their location.
                                          Appendices-11

-------
                    Swine: Percent of Facilities That Already Incur Costs
Component
Certification of manure applicators
Already assess GW link to SW
GW well installation
SW monitoring
Soil auger
Manure sampler
Scales (2) for spreader calibration
Initial NMP development
NMP on-farm recurring
Soil testing
Record keeping
Calibration of manure spreader
Manure testing
GW sampling
Mortality - composting and O&M
Adequate storage
Storm water diversions and O&M
Stream buffer and O&M
Visual inspection
Lagoon liner and O&M
Lagoon depth marker
Feeding strategies (4 diets)
Solid - liquid separator
Midwest
< 2500 head
0
1.1
72.54*
4.6
0
0
0
10.7
10.7
90
71.0
0
2.1
72.54*
72.54*
72.54*
0
0
0
72.54*
0
14.9
7.7
>2500 head
27.5
23.1
72.54*
27.9
94.0
71.9
71.9
46.9
46.9
94.0
98.9
99.0
38.3
72.54*
72.54*
72.54*
50.0
99.0
25.0
72.54*
99.0
67.7
0
Mid-Atlantic
< 2500 head
0
7.4
76.09*
5.7
0
0
0
24.9
24.9
90
93.1
0
6.1
76.09*
76.09*
76.09*
0
0
0
76.09*
0
17.8
2.3
>2500 head
27.1
12.3
76.09*
17.9
94.0
71.9
71.9
69.4
69.4
94.0
99.9
99.0
29.9
76.09*
76.09*
76.09*
50.0
99.0
25.0
76.09*
99.0
72.7
1.5
Source
NAHMS
NAHMS
Sobecki and
Clipper, 1999
NAHMS
NPPC, 1998
NPPC, 1998
NPPC, 1998
NAHMS
NAHMS
NPPC, 1998
NAHMS
AFO strategy
NAHMS
Sobecki and
Clipper, 1999
Sobecki and
Clipper, 1999
Sobecki and
Clipper, 1999


AFO strategy
Sobecki and
Clipper, 1999
AFO strategy
NAHMS
NAHMS
Note: GW = ground water,  SW = surface water, NMP = nutrient management planning, O&M = operation and
maintenance.
* Represents the percentage of facilities that will not incur this cost due to their location.
                                           Appendices-12

-------
                                            Appendix E

          Revised Transportation Distances for Category 2 and 3 Type Operations

To:           Paul Shriner, EPA
From:        Jed Waddell, Jon Harcum, & George Townsend, Tetra Tech, Inc.
Subject:      Revised—Revised Transportation Distances for Category 2 and 3 Type Operations
Date:         January 7, 2000
This memo revises the memo from July 8, 1999 for transportation distances for category 2 and 3 type operations.
Due to lack of information from the manure program on county manure excesses and deficits from the 1997 Census
of Agriculture data, a new approach was identified during the January 7, 2000 meeting with EPA OST and OWM,
Tetra Tech, and ERG.

Category 2 type operations, determined by manure generation and nutrient application (based on 1997 Census of
Agriculture Queries), have different transportation distances depending on whether manure is applied on a nitrogen
or phosphorus based application scenario. In the event that an operation has insufficient land to apply manure on an
agronomic nitrogen basis, equation 1 was used to estimate transportation distance:


                        N distance = ICD                                   [1]

where N^^ is the transportation distance for category 2 type operation with manure applied at agronomic N rates
(miles) and ICD is the in-county transportation distance (miles) from table 2.

Transportation distances for category 2 type operations with manure applied on an agronomic phosphorus basis is
shown in equation 2:

              Pdlstance=ICD+i^D_ICD)                                   [2]
where PdKtance is the transportation distance for category 2 type operations with manure applied at agronomic P rates
(miles), OCD is the out-of county transportation distance (miles) from table 2, and Vs is a factor that takes into
account that some operations may have to transport out of county while others may not.

Category 3 type operations have no land and it is assumed that all are already incurring costs for transportation on
an agronomic nitrogen basis. The incremental transportation distance for switching to an agronomic phosphorus
basis is depicted in equation 3 :

                               (OCD -ICD)
                   P3distance = -                                   [3J
where PS^^^ is the transportation distance (miles).

These equations have been used to calculate regional transportation distances. The results of the equations are
shown in table 1. The variables OCD and ICD were obtained from the previous memo and are shown in Table 2.
                                           Appendices-13

-------
                 Table 1. Transportation Distances for Category 2 and 3 type Operations
                              for the Various Regions in the United States.
Region

Northeast, Appalachian
Southern, Delta
Northern Plains, Lake States, Corn
Belt
Pacific
Mountain, Southern Plains
Category 2
N Basis
5.5
6.0
6.5
12.5
11.0
P Basis
30.5
14.5
10.0
21.5
16.5
Category 3
N Basis
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
P Basis
25.0
8.5
3.5
9.0
5.5
All values rounded to the nearest 1A mile.

Previous Memo "Revised Transportation for Category 2 and 3 Type Operations" June 1,1999

This memo revises the information for Category 2 and Category 3 type farms regarding the distance needed to
transport manure by grouping various regions.  Category 2 type operations require transportation of excess manure
inside the current county boundaries while Category 3 operations require transportation outside of the county. The
procedure was identical to that provided in a Terra Tech memo (April 21, 1999, revised June 1, 1999). Note that in-
county and out-of-county distances are rounded to the nearest 0.5 and 1.0 mile, respectively.

                              Table 2.  In-County Transport Distances and
             Out-of-County Transport Distances for the Various Regions in the United States.
Region
Northeast, Appalachian
Southern, Delta
Northern Plains, Lake States, Corn
Belt
Pacific
Mountain, Southern Plains
In-County Transport (mi)
5.5
6.0
6.5
12.5*
11.0
Out of County Transport (mi)
81
32
17*
39*
27 **
* no changes
** not previously estimated since poultry and swine were not modeled in Mountain or Southern Plains states.
                                            Appendices-14

-------
To:
From:
Subject:
Date:
Contract:
                         Appendix F

Transportation Distance for Category 2 and 3 Type Operations

Paul Shriner. EPA
George Townsend, Jon Harcum, and Jed Waddell, Tetra Tech, Inc.
Transportation Distance for Category 2 and 3 Type Operations
April 21, 1999, revised June 1, 1999
EPA Contract 68-C7-0014, Work Assignment 27
This memo summarizes information for Category 2 and Category 3 type farms about the distance
needed to transport manure. Category 2 type operations require transportation of excess manure
                                                County Area, 410 mi"2
                                                Length of one side, 20.25 mi
                                                Transport Distance, ~5 mi
                                           (S
                                           o
                                           (N
                      20.25 mi
                Figure 1. Example calculation of In-County Transport Distances.


inside the current county boundaries while Category 3 operations require transportation outside
of the county.  Distances for in-county and out-county transport were calculated based on an
average county size for each region (see table 1). To further simplify transportation distance, a
square county was assumed. For in-county (off-farm) transport,  it was assumed that transport
distance was 25 percent of the square root of the average area of the county (see figure). The
range of in-county transportation distances are shown in the table.
Out of county transportation distances were calculated using a two-thirds centroid-to-centroid
distance. The two-thirds centroid was arbitrarily chosen since several surrounding counties may
be able to accept manure; transportation is not limited to the nearest county (for which a unit
centroid-to-centroid distance would be applied).

The distance for out-of-county export assumed a phosphorus based application using Lander's
results for manure production. In review of Lander's nitrogen based analysis, the only region
with manure excesses was in the Southern region. Thus, to simplify calculation of transportation
distances, the phosphorus based transport distance was applied only to the Southern region for
                                      Appendices-15

-------
nitrogen based manure application.  Lander's phosphorus excess map was used to calculate
distances for the key areas of manure production. For example, in the Northeast, the key areas
are Delmarva and Southeastern Pennsylvania. In Delmarva, the distance from the centroid of
manure generation to the centroid of the furthest county is 114 miles and the manure excess is
9.6 million Ibs of phosphorus. In Southeastern Pennsylvania, Lancaster county is the worst case
with an estimated distance of 56 miles and manure excess of 5.1 million pounds of phosphorus.
In other counties the distance is between 12 and 30 miles with a manure excess of 0.6 million Ibs
of P. Using a weighted average, the worst case transport distance for the three regions in
Delmarva and Southeastern Pennsylvania was 91 miles.  Using two-thirds of this value, the
transportation distance for the Northeast became 61 miles.  Thus, in regions with several  smaller
adjacent counties with out-of-county transportation requirements, the distance is actually greater
than regions with larger counties (those without adjacent counties with  excess manure).

           Table 1. Average County Size, In-County Transport Distances, and
     Out-of-County Transport Distances for the Various Regions in the United States
Region

Northeast
Appalachian
Southern
Delta
Northern Plains
Lake States
Corn Belt
Pacific
Mountain
Southern Plains
Average County
Size
mi2 [A]
689
410
567
662
970
820
524
2422
3073
1010
In-County
Transport
mi
6.5
5.0
6.0
6.5
8.0
7.0
5.5
12.5
14.0
8.0
Out of County
Transport
mi
61
88
37
17
17
17
17
39
*
*
* No out-of-county transport required in these regions.
                                      Appendices-16

-------
                                          Appendix G

                      Equations Used in Model Feedlot Costs Program
   MODEL FACILITY
Swine   Farrow-to-Finish
Appachalian
Size of Operation
Nutrient Management Basis
Number of miles excess manure must be transported
Number of facilities in this category
Average acres of cropland available on farm
Average number of head per facility

CALCULATIONS
Volume  of fresh Manure
Mass of fresh Manure
Nitrogen produced
Phosphorus produced
Number of acres needed to apply Phosphorus
Amount of N required on farm
Amount of P required on farm

NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT PLAN
 l)Fixed one time costs
  Training and certification for manure appl.
  Assessment of crop field/GW link to S W
  Groundwater monitoring well installation
  Soil Auger
  Manure Sampler
  Scale to calibrate manure spreader
 2)Non-annual reoccuring costs
  CNMP development (every 5 years)

  Manure testing (every 3 years)
                       Constant read from input file
                       Constant read from input file
                       Constant read from input file
                       Constant read from input file
                       Constant read from input file
                       Constant read from input file
                       manvol=nohead*animwt*mcvolume/1000*365
                       manwt=nohead*animwt*mcweight/1000*365
                       mann=nohead*animwt*mcn/1000*365
                       manp=nohead*animwt*mcp/1000*365.
                       if(NMBase.eq.'  P')then
                              totac=manp/(cornyld*cornpup)*mcpeff
                       else
                              totac=mann/(cornyld*cornnup)*mcneff

                       farmn=cornyld*cornnup*farmsz
                       farmp=cornyld*cornpup*farmsz

                       FIXED   ANNUAL

                       Constant read from input file
                       Constant read from input file
                       Constant read from input file
                       Constant read from input file
                       Constant read from input file
                       Constant read from input file

                       cnmp=totac*nmprate
                                             if (animal.eq.'Swin') then
                                                            numhouse=0
                                             else if (animal.eq.'Chic ')then
                                                            if (nohead.le.25000) then
                                                                   numhouse= 1
                                                            else
                                                                   numhouse=aint(nohead/25000.)
                                                            endif
                                                    else
                                                            numhouse=aint(0.00016*nohead)
                                                    endif

                                          mantest=(l+0.25*numhouse)*labor+(l+numhouse)*mananal
                                          Appendices-17

-------
  Soil testing   (every 3 years)                          Soiltest=(totac/soilsampfreqlow*soilsamptimelow*la
                                                      bor)+&
                                                          (totac* soilsampfreqlow * soilanal)
 3)Annual Costs
  Record keeping                                      Constant read from input file
  Calibrate manure spreader                             caribrate=caribann*labor+tarp
  O&M for groundwater monitoring                      gwmon=2*(gwtime*labor +
                                                      wateranal)+gwinst*maint

FACILITY UPGRADES
 l)Fixed one-time costs
  Mortality composting facility           mortfac=nohead/deadlen*deadwt*pctdead*2.*storfaccost*1.5
  Storage (for poultry litter)                          if (animal.ne.'Swin') then
                                                      shawol=(shavdep/12*housarea*litfreq*numhouse)
                                                      dilman=shawol+manvol
                                                      storage=dilman/4 * storfaccost
                                           else
                                                      storage=0
                                                   endif
  Lagoon depth marker                      if (animal.ne. 'Swin') then
                                                              lagdep=0
                                                        else
                                                              lagdep=lagdepmark
                                                        endif
  Divert storm water around structures                 if (animal.eq. 'Swin') then
                                                      dilman=manvol*3.
                                                      endif
                               swdivert=lagoon(animal,dilman,divslop,divtop,earthmov,& nohead,animwt)

                                       Function
                                       lagoon(animal,dilman,divslop,divtop,earthmov,nohead,animwt)
                                                      realdilman,divslop,divtop,earthmov,a,b,c,&
                                                              topwidth,depth,volume,sides,animwt
                                                      integer nohead
                                                      character* 5 animal

                                                      sides=2. 2 sides forberming
                                                      if (animal.eq.'Swin') then
                                                              volume=2.5*nohead*animwt
                                                      else
                                                              volume=dilman
                                                      endif
                                                      a=l. a is the ratio of top length to top width
                                                      depth= 11. lagoon depth of 11 feet

                                                      b= -l*(divslop*depth+a*divslop*depth)
                                                      c= divslop**2. * depth**2. - volume/depth

                                                      topwidth=(-b+(b**2-4*a*c)**.5)/(2.*a)
                                                      lagoon=21./27. *(sides*(topwidth+20.))*earthmov
                                       End Function lagoon

 2)Annual Reoccurring Costs
  Visual inspection                             visinsp=visinsptime*52*labor
  Mortality operation and maintenance            mortann=90.*(tractor+labor)+maint*morrfac
  Moving manure out of house to storage         moveman=((stortrans*labor+stortrans*tractor)*numhouse)
                                                                      +maint* storage

                                           Appendices-18

-------
 LAND APPLICATION
   Erosion Control
     Calculate the miles of stream (0.976 miles of stream/square mile of land in US)
     Cost to take land out of production
     Note that the value "2" assumes river running through middle of farm

                                               erosinit=farmsz*landriver/1000*vegcover*2
                                               erosann=farmsz*landriver/1000*(landrent+maint*erosinit)*2

  ^Incorporation
   Initial costs to purchase disk harrow             Constant read from input file
   Annual O&M for manure incorporation          LandApp= disktime*(labor+tractor)*totac.+diskharrow*maint

 REDUCING EXCESS NUTRIENTS
  Sl)Feeding Strategies
   N produced after feeding strategy implementation        (mann*(l-fsnred))
   N remaining                                        FSNremain= (mann)-farmn -(mann*FSNred)
   P produced after feeding strategy implementation        (manp*(l-fspred))
   P remaining                                        FSPremain= (manp)-farmp -(manp*FSPred)
   Acreage required  for Phosphorus disposal       if (nmbase.eq.1  P')then

FSacre=(manp*(l-fspred))/(cornyld*cornpup)*mcpeff
                                               else
                                                      FSacre=(mann*(l-fsnred))/(cornyld*cornnup)*mcne
                                                      ff
                                                                endif
   Cost of implementing feeding strategies          if (animal.eq.'Swin') then
                                                      FScost=nohead*FScostpig
                                               else
                                                      FScost=nohead*FScostchi
                                               endif

 S2)Hauling with Feeding Strategies
   Amount of manure to haul                     1241405.  gallons
   Cost of hauling                               $ 16596.
                               if (FSacre.le.farmsz) then
                                Haul=0
                                haulamount=0
                               else
                                if (animal.eq.'Swin') then
                                       haulpct= 1 -real(farmsz)/real(fsacre)
                                       haulamount=dilman*haulpct
                                       Haul=(haulamOUNT/7.48)*HAULLIQ+haulliqadd*(transport-l)
                                else
                                       haulpct= 1 -real(farmsz)/real(fsacre)
                                       haulamount=manwt*haurpct
                                       if (transport. It. 90) then
                                               haul= HAULAMOUNT/2000*haulS 1 transport
                                       elseif (transport, gt. 180) then
                                               haul=haulamount/2000*haulS3*transport
                                       else
                                               haul=haulamount/2000*haulS2*transport
                                       endif
                                endif
                               endif
                                           Appendices-19

-------
  S3)Hauling without Feeding Strategies
   Amount of manure to haul                      1336111. gallons
   Cost of hauling                                $ 17863.
                        if (totac.le.farmsz) then
                                Haulnofs=0
                                haulamountnofs=0
                        else
                                if (animal.eq.'Swin') then
                                        haulpct= 1 -real(farmsz)/real(totac)
                                        haulamountnofs=dilman*haulpct

Haulnofs=(haulamountnofs/7.48) *H AULLIQ+haulliqadd* (transport-1)
                                else
                                        haulpct= 1 -real(farmsz)/real(totac)
                                        haulamountnofs=manwt*HAULPCT
                                        if (transport. It. 90) then
                                                haulnofs= HAULAMOUNTnofs/2000*haulS 1 *transport
                                        elseif (transport, gt. 180) then
                                                haulnofs=haulamountnofs/2000*haulS3*transport
                                        else
                                                haulnofs=haulamountnofs/2000*haulS2*transport
                                        endif
                                endif
                        endif
  S4) Separation and Hauling with Feeding Strategies
   Initial cost to install and set-up separator  sepinit=shfsamttot*(l+sepsaffac)*tankcost+separator &
                                                       +pipelen*pipecost+seplabor*labor
   Amount of N in separated material                shf sN=mann* sepn* (1 -fsnred)
   Amount of P in separated material                shfsP=manp*sepp*(l-fspred)
   Amount of manure to haul             if (nmbase.eq.1  P ')then
                                               SHFSacre=shfsP/(cornyld*cornPup)*mcpeff
                                       else
                                               SHFSacre=shfsN/(cornyld*cornNup)*mcneff
                                       endif
                                        shfsamttot=manvol* (1 -mcmoist) * sepeff/sepsolid
                                                sephaulfsamt=shfsamttot* (1 -farmsz/shfsacre)
   Cost to haul separated manure     sephaulfs=(sephaulfsamt)/7.48*HAULLIQ+haulliqadd*(transport-l)

  S5)Separation and Hauling without Feeding Strategies
   Initial cost to install and set-up separator  sepinit=shfsamttot*(l+sepsaffac)*tankcost+separator &
                                                       +pipelen*pipecost+seplabor*labor
   Amount of N in separated material               shn=mann*sepn
   Amount of P in separated material               shP=manp*sepp
   Amount of manure to haul            if (nmbase.eq.' P ')then
                                               SHacre=shP/(cornyld*cornPup)*mcpeff
                                       else
                                               SHacre=shN/(cornyld*cornNup)*mcneff
                                       endif
                                               if (SHacre.le.farmsz) then
                                                       sephaul=0
                                               else
                                                       sephaulamt=shfsamttot*(l-farmsz/shacre)
   Cost to haul separated manure        sephaul=(sephaulamt)/7.48*HAULLIQ+haulliqadd*(transport-l)
                                            Appendices-20

-------
                  Appendix H




Variable Names Used in Model Feedlot Costs Program
Variable Name
amort
Animal
animwt
assess
calibann
calibinit
calibrate
centerpivot
cnmp
cornyld
cornnup
cornpup
cpann
cpinit
deadlen
deadwt
dilman
diskharrow
disktime
divtop
divhei
divslp
earthmov
farmac
farnesc
farmp
farmn
Variable Represents
Amortization rate, percent
Type of animal (e.g., swine, chicken, or turkey)
Average weight of animal
Assessment of crop field/ground water link to surface water ($)
Time required annually to calibrate a manure applicator
Initial costs for manure calibration (i.e., scale)
Calibrating manure spreader ($)
Cost to set up a center pivot irrigation device
Obtaining a certified CNMP every 5 years ($)
Corn yield (bushels/acre)
Corn nitrogen uptake (Ib/bushel)
Corn phosphorus uptake (Ib/bushel)
Annual costs to operate center pivot irrigation device
Initial costs to set up center pivot irrigation device
Length of animal life
Average weight of animals at mortality
Volume of manure diluted with water (swine) or wood shavings (poultry)
Cost to purchase a new disk harrow
Time required to disk one acre
Storm water diversion berm top width
Storm water diversion berm height
Storm water diversion berm side slope
Cost to move one cubic yard of earth
Farm size minus buildings and non-arable land (acres)
Arable acres on farm (farm size minus buildings and erosion and sediment
controls)
Amount of P required on farm
Amount of N required on farm
                  Appendices-21

-------
farmsz
fsacre
fscost
fscostpig
fsnremain
fsnred
fspremain
fspred
fstotac
gwinst
gwmon
gwtime
haul
haulamount
haulliq
haulliqadd
haulnosep
haulamountnosep
hauls 1
hauls2
haulsS
housearea
incorp
labor
lagdepmark
lagdepth
landapp
landrent
landriver
litclean
litfreq
average acres of cropland available for nutrient management planning
Off-farm acreage required for land application of remaining nutrients
Cost of feeding strategies
Cost per animal required to implement feeding strategy
N remaining after feeding strategy implementation
Feeding strategy N reduction efficiency
P remaining after feeding strategy implementation
Feeding strategy P reduction efficiency
Total acres required to land apply manure after imposing feeding strategies
Installation of ground water monitoring wells ($)
O&M for ground water monitoring
Time required for ground water monitoring well sampling (hours)
Cost to haul manure influenced by feeding strategies
Amount of manure to apply off-farm in gallons (swine) or tons (poultry)
Cost to haul and apply liquid manure less than 1 mile
Additional cost to haul liquid manure
Cost to haul manure without imposing feeding strategies
Amount of manure to apply off-farm without feeding strategies
Cost to haul solid manure less than 90 miles
Cost to haul manure 90 to 180 miles
Cost to haul manure more than 180 miles
Area of house
Incorporation of manure
General labor rate ($/hour)
Cost of lagoon depth marker
Construction and installation of lagoon depth marker
Cost to disk land required for land application of manure
Cost for taking land for erosion and sediment control out of production
Ration of stream length to land area (/1000)
Time allowance for litter storage cleaning
Rate of litter storage cleaning
Appendices-22

-------
maint
manaddsamp
mananal
manappcap
manappinj
manapptank
maninjann
maninjinit
manfirstsamp
manp
mann
mansamp
mansurfmit
mansurfann
mantankapp
mantankhaul
mantankload
mantest
manvol
manwt
mck
mckeff
mcmoist
men
mcneff
mcp
mcpeff
mcvolume
mcweight
mortann
mortfac
Standard maintenance and repairs, percent
Time required for additional manure samples
Cost of manure nutrient analysis
Capacity of manure application tank (gallons)
Cost of injectors for manure application tank
Cost of tank for manure application
Annual cost for injection of manure
Initial cost for injection of manure
Time required to set up and sample manure
Phosphorus produced in manure annually (Ib P)
Nitrogen produced in manure annually (Ib N)
Cost required to purchase and fabricate a manure sampler
Initial cost for surface application of manure
Annual costs for surface application of manure
Time required to apply manure (hours)
Time required to haul liquid manure (hours/mile)
Time required to load manure application tank (hours)
Manure testing every 3 years
Volume of manure produced annually (ft3)
Annual weight of manure
Manure characteristics, potassium in manure (lb/day/1000#)
Manure characteristics, efficiency of potassium application to field
Manure characteristics, moisture content of fresh manure
Manure characteristics, nitrogen in manure (lb/day/1000#)
Manure characteristics, efficiency of nitrogen application to field
Manure characteristics, phosphorus in manure (lb/day/1000#)
Manure characteristics, efficiency of phosphorus application to field
Manure characteristics, volume of manure produced (ft3/day/1000#)
Manure characteristics, weight of manure produced (lb/day/1000#)
Annual operating and maintenance costs for mortality composting facility
Cost of building a mortality composting facility
Appendices-23

-------
moveman
NMBase
nmprate
nofac
nohead
numhouse
Opertype
pctdead
pipcost
pipelen
plabor
ptax
reckeep
Region
RMCF
separator
sepeff
sepinit
sephaul
sephaulamt
sephaulfs
sephaulfsamt
seplabor
sepn
sepp
sepsaffac
sepsol
shavcost
shavdep
shawol
shfsacre
Cost of moving manure to storage (for poultry litter)
Basis for nutrient management (i.e., nitrogen or phosphorus)
Rate charged by certified CNMP provider ($/acre)
Number of facilities in a given region
Number of head
Number of houses
Type of operation (e.g. farrow-to-finish, turkeys with fresh litter)
Percentage of birds that die in one turnover of animals
Cost of pipe
Length of pipe to connect lagoon to separator
Professional labor rate ($/hour)
Property tax, percent
Record keeping and reporting ($)
Region containing the model feedlot (e.g., Southeast, Corn Belt)
Recoverable manure correction factor
Cost of solids separation unit (e.g., static inclined screen)
Solid-liquid separation removal efficiency
Initial costs to construct and set up liquid-solid separator
Cost to separate and haul manure without imposing feeding strategies
Amount of manure to haul without imposing feeding strategies
Cost to separate and haul manure after imposing feeding strategies
Amount of manure to haul off-farm after separation and feeding strategies
Time required to set up separation facility
Amount of N transferred to storage after separation
Amount of P transferred to storage after separation
Safety factor to increase size for solids storage facility
Solids content of separated manure
Cost of bulk wood shavings
Depth of shavings applied to poultry houses
Volume of shavings
Acreage required to apply separate manure after imposing feeding strategies
Appendices-24

-------
soilauger
soilsampfreqlow
soilsampfreqhi
soilsamptimelow
soilsamptimehi
soiltest
storage
storfaccost
stortrans
swdivert
tankcost
tarp
totac
train
transport
turns
vegcover
visinsp
visinsptime
wateranal
Cost to purchase a soil auger
Frequency of soil sampling - low end (acres/sample)
Frequency of soil sampling - site-specific farming (acres/sample)
Time required to take soil sample - low end
Time required to take soil sample - site-specific farming
Soil testing every 3 years ($)
Construction of extra storage (for poultry manure) ($)
Square foot cost of 4 foot high litter storage facility for poultry waste
Time allowance for litter transfer to storage
Clean water diversion from storage facilities
Cost to build a steel storage tank for separated manure
Tarp to calibrate manure applicator
Acreage required for disposal of "as is" manure
Training/certification for land application of manure ($)
number of miles excess manure will need to be transported
Animal turnover rate
Cost to establish permanent vegetative cover ($/acre)
Visual inspection of facilities
Time required to visually inspect waste storage, storm water diversion, etc..
Cost of water sample testing
Appendices-25

-------
        Appendix I




Regulatory Compliance Costs
        Appendices-26

-------
Regulatory Compliance Costs for Swine (FF, farrow-to-finish; GF, grower-finisher) Industry
Option

















1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operatior
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
i Region (
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Category
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
o
J
1
1
2
2
ft Facilities
187
868
31
145
35
163
144
306
69
147
86
182
304
2731
22
194
34
310
203
1821
14
129
23
207
135
696
13
68
Size ID
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Capital
640
635
11,597
11,495
118,315
116,232
1,139
1,040
394,727
24,943
554,131
448,511
1,242
1,196
7,500
7,419
33,260
32,228
1,449
1,370
8,999
8,883
54,889
53,024
1,621
1,526
10,285
10,266
Fixed
736
742
668
739
580
580
1,340
1,228
808
976
580
580
672
644
689
709
580
580
745
695
685
709
580
580
816
750
720
752
O&M 3
181
180
397
395
22,431
22,021
200
192
8,613
664
108,310
87,492
392
567
526
723
5,745
5,742
440
596
554
752
9,988
9,820
485
627
600
801
yrrec
253
254
181
251
0
0
905
762
331
498
0
0
214
184
232
252
0
0
291
237
227
252
0
0
365
294
264
297
5 yr rec
0
0
153,926
979
0
0
0
0
0
547,498
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
55,197
0
0
0
0
0
89,706
0
                                    Appendices - 27

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
1

















1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
FF
FF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
1
1
2
2
3
o
J
1
1
2
20
104
288
356
89
110
81
101
154
78
180
92
94
48
247
1432
30
171
51
294
44
256
5
30
9
53
122
314
24
Size ID
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Capital
75,688
75,270
643
634
11,666
11,452
119,757
115,367
883
920
19,006
20,421
290,778
327,157
1,281
1,222
7,735
7,586
37,029
34,999
1,449
1,360
41,311
8,755
54,985
51,801
1,626
1,520
10,311
Fixed
580
580
738
740
648
699
580
580
975
1,050
760
892
580
580
685
651
639
653
580
580
746
692
639
651
580
580
818
748
709
O&M 3
14,073
14,189
181
180
398
394
29,432
28,308
189
188
545
573
73,215
82,531
401
571
502
698
8,304
7,986
440
595
1,327
720
12,882
12,268
487
625
594
yrrec
0
0
255
252
159
209
0
0
511
576
279
410
0
0
227
191
180
194
0
0
292
234
180
191
0
0
368
292
253
5 yr rec
0
0
0
0
207,255
85,939
0
0
0
0
498,323
342,942
0
0
0
0
41,347
0
0
0
0
0
0
50,244
0
0
0
0
100,722
Appendices - 28

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
GF
GF
GF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
5
o
3
i
i
62
29
74
112
521
19
87
21
98
86
184
41
88
52
109
182
1639
13
116
20
186
122
1093
8
77
14
124
81
418
Size ID
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Medium2
Medium2
Capital
10,199
76,299
74,370
674
657
85,724
11,507
118,315
116,232
1,303
1,126
394,750
319,864
554,131
448,511
2,053
1,701
7,939
7,858
33,260
32,228
2,904
2,276
41,731
9,322
54,889
53,024
3,696
2,862
Fixed
734
580
580
2,105
2,251
1,134
1,541
580
580
8,018
7,286
1,724
2,566
580
580
1,482
1,244
1,127
1,231
580
580
2,199
1,771
1,127
1,231
580
580
2,889
2,336
O&M 3 yr rec
790
18,320
18,027
202
193
14,957
10,272
5,187
5,097
300
245
71,313
51,436
24,192
19,586
890
878
1,435
993
1,588
1,742
1,334
1,153
7,184
9,843
2,529
2,646
1,760
1,447
278
0
0
1,729
1,832
682
1,089
0
0
8,106
7,094
1,319
2,160
0
0
1,067
811
693
797
0
0
1,822
1,362
693
797
0
0
2,549
1,952
5 yr rec
15,133
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
731
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 29

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
FF
FF
FF
FF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
8
41
12
62
173
214
53
66
49
61
92
47
108
55
56
29
148
859
18
103
31
176
26
154
3
18
5
32
73
Size ID
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Medium2
Capital
56,904
11,086
75,688
75,270
677
655
86,744
83,631
119,757
115,367
968
982
208,015
233,808
290,778
327,157
2,204
1,780
28,955
7,971
37,029
34,999
2,907
2,243
41,698
39,438
54,985
51,801
3,719
Fixed
1,544
1,726
580
580
2,124
2,238
1,041
1,379
580
580
4,444
5,447
1,219
1,689
580
580
1,607
1,314
1,026
1,110
580
580
2,202
1,740
1,026
1,110
580
580
2,909
O&M 3 yr rec 5 yr rec
10,128
2,931
3,434
3,614
202
193
16,038
13,896
6,146
5,920
241
227
39,504
39,975
14,948
16,821
968
914
5,056
1,842
1,995
2,089
1,336
1,137
7,518
6,639
2,916
2,951
1,772
1,132
1,315
0
0
1,750
1,818
582
920
0
0
4,252
5,172
775
1,244
0
0
1,198
884
586
671
0
0
1,825
1,329
586
671
0
0
2,570
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 30

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
o
6
3
3
o
J
3
3
3
3
o
3
3
3
o
J
3
3
3
3
o
3
3
3
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
1
2
2
o
6
o
6
i
i
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
188
14
37
17
44
18
95
3
16
3
18
27
143
4
24
5
27
14
34
7
16
8
20
21
50
10
24
12
30
Size ID
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Capital
2,839
57,112
55,744
76,299
74,370
24,532
27,640
28,915
31,082
142,206
143,237
24,565
27,661
103,041
31,094
142,206
143,237
101,273
95,118
464,669
90,865
654,265
542,589
101,437
95,203
464,692
385,787
654,265
542,589
Fixed
2,313
1,319
1,459
580
580
736
742
668
739
580
580
2,105
2,251
1,134
1,541
580
580
1,340
1,228
808
976
580
580
8,018
7,286
1,724
2,566
580
580
O&M 3 yr rec
1,435
10,619
9,597
4,011
4,110
2,240
2,524
2,130
2,372
24,489
24,364
2,260
2,537
16,690
12,248
7,246
7,440
5,934
5,770
12,853
4,848
114,045
93,070
6,035
5,823
75,553
55,620
29,927
25,164
1,928
896
1,035
0
0
253
254
181
251
0
0
1,729
1,832
682
1,089
0
0
905
762
331
498
0
0
8,106
7,094
1,319
2,160
0
0
5 yr rec
0
0
0
0
0
2,703
2,370
156,629
3,349
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
549,868
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
Appendices - 31

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
o
6
3
3
o
J
3
3
3
3
o
3
3
3
o
J
3
3
3
3
o
3
3
3
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
29
300
2
21
3
34
44
450
3
32
5
51
19
200
1
14
2
23
29
300
2
21
3
34
13
76
1
7
2
Size ID
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Capital
9,170
10,066
13,667
14,336
41,187
41,098
9,981
10,572
14,106
14,775
41,187
41,098
13,551
14,864
18,100
19,050
66,992
66,517
15,006
15,770
50,832
19,489
66,992
66,517
17,618
19,809
22,108
23,782
91,685
Fixed
672
644
689
709
580
580
1,482
1,244
1,127
1,231
580
580
745
695
685
709
580
580
2,199
1,771
1,127
1,231
580
580
816
750
720
752
580
O&M 3 yr rec
1,680
2,035
1,727
2,094
7,033
7,209
2,178
2,345
2,636
2,364
2,876
3,209
1,930
2,287
1,895
2,278
11,478
11,512
2,823
2,844
8,525
11,369
4,018
4,337
2,163
2,549
2,071
2,487
15,750
214
184
232
252
0
0
1,067
811
693
797
0
0
291
237
227
252
0
0
1,822
1,362
693
797
0
0
365
294
264
297
0
5 yr rec
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,779
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
58,051
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
92,560
3,048
2,854
Appendices - 32

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
o
6
3
3
o
J
3
3
3
3
o
3
3
3
o
J
3
3
3
3
o
3
3
3
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
o
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
11
19
115
2
11
3
17
28
39
9
12
8
11
41
59
13
18
12
17
15
9
17
10
9
5
22
13
26
15
Size ID
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Capital
93,553
19,693
21,145
68,727
24,602
91,685
93,553
24,796
27,458
29,165
30,914
143,910
142,191
24,830
27,479
104,243
103,093
143,910
142,191
55,373
70,800
57,498
69,666
345,269
397,037
55,459
70,862
246,507
283,053
Fixed
580
2,889
2,336
1,544
1,726
580
580
738
740
648
699
580
580
2,124
2,238
1,041
1,379
580
580
975
1,050
760
892
580
580
4,444
5,447
1,219
1,689
O&M 3 yr rec
16,111
3,437
3,369
11,599
4,618
5,111
5,536
2,252
2,515
2,140
2,364
31,503
30,643
2,273
2,528
17,780
15,866
8,217
8,255
3,724
4,600
3,288
3,963
76,750
86,942
3,776
4,638
42,247
43,365
0
2,549
1,952
1,132
1,315
0
0
255
252
159
209
0
0
1,750
1,818
582
920
0
0
511
576
279
410
0
0
4,252
5,172
775
1,244
5 yr rec
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,703
2,370
209,958
88,309
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
501,026
345,312
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
Appendices - 33

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
3
3
3
o
J
o
J
3
3
o
J
o
J
3
3
o
J
o
J
3
3
o
J
o
J
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
1
1
2
2
3
o
J
1
1
2
13
8
24
157
o
6
19
5
32
35
236
4
28
7
48
4
28
0
3
1
6
6
42
1
5
1
9
12
34
2
Size ID
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Capital
345,269
397,037
9,951
10,721
14,425
14,947
45,698
44,498
10,874
11,279
35,645
15,332
45,698
44,498
13,570
14,587
50,425
18,735
67,106
65,028
15,028
15,470
50,812
49,418
67,106
65,028
17,737
19,612
22,212
Fixed
580
580
685
651
639
653
580
580
1,607
1,314
1,026
1,110
580
580
746
692
639
651
580
580
2,202
1,740
1,026
1,110
580
580
818
748
709
O&M 3 yr rec
18,483
21,232
1,724
2,069
1,727
2,091
9,628
9,484
2,291
2,412
6,282
3,234
3,318
3,587
1,931
2,273
2,669
2,238
14,372
13,946
2,826
2,815
8,859
8,157
4,407
4,629
2,170
2,539
2,069
0
0
227
191
180
194
0
0
1,198
884
586
671
0
0
292
234
180
191
0
0
1,825
1,329
586
671
0
0
368
292
253
5 yr rec
2,703
2,370
2,854
3,048
44,201
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
53,292
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
103,576
Appendices - 34

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
3
3
3
o
J
o
J
3
3
o
3
o
3
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
o
3
1
1
7
3
8
18
52
3
10
4
12
57
252
9
42
11
47
85
378
14
63
16
71
44
89
21
43
26
53
66
133
Size ID
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Capital
23,581
92,409
92,462
19,830
20,930
69,013
69,126
92,409
92,462
640
635
11,597
11,495
118,315
116,232
674
657
85,724
11,507
118,315
116,232
1,139
1,040
394,727
24,943
554,131
448,511
1,303
1,126
Fixed
734
580
580
2,909
2,313
1,319
1,459
580
580
736
742
668
739
580
580
2,105
2,251
1,134
1,541
580
580
1,340
1,228
808
976
580
580
8,018
7,286
O&M 3 yr rec
2,471
20,003
19,940
3,455
3,348
12,094
11,277
5,694
6,023
181
180
397
395
22,431
22,021
202
193
14,957
10,272
5,187
5,097
200
192
8,613
664
108,310
87,492
300
245
278
0
0
2,570
1,928
896
1,035
0
0
253
254
181
251
0
0
1,729
1,832
682
1,089
0
0
905
762
331
498
0
0
8,106
7,094
5 yr rec
18,181
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,703
2,370
156,629
3,349
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
549,868
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
Appendices - 35

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
3.1
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
6
3
1
1
2
2
3
o
J
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
32
64
39
79
93
792
7
56
10
90
139
1189
10
84
16
135
62
528
4
37
7
60
93
793
6
56
11
90
41
Size ID
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Medium2
Capital
394,750
319,864
554,131
448,511
1,242
1,196
7,500
7,419
33,260
32,228
2,053
1,701
7,939
7,858
33,260
32,228
1,449
1,370
8,999
8,883
54,889
53,024
2,904
2,276
41,731
9,322
54,889
53,024
1,621
Fixed
1,724
2,566
580
580
672
644
689
709
580
580
1,482
1,244
1,127
1,231
580
580
745
695
685
709
580
580
2,199
1,771
1,127
1,231
580
580
816
O&M 3 yr rec
71,313
51,436
24,192
19,586
392
567
526
723
5,745
5,742
890
878
1,435
993
1,588
1,742
440
596
554
752
9,988
9,820
1,334
1,153
7,184
9,843
2,529
2,646
485
1,319
2,160
0
0
214
184
232
252
0
0
1,067
811
693
797
0
0
291
237
227
252
0
0
1,822
1,362
693
797
0
0
365
5 yr rec
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,779
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
58,051
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
Appendices - 36

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
3.1
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
o
5
i
i
2
2
3
3
202
4
20
6
30
62
303
6
30
9
45
88
103
27
32
25
29
131
155
41
48
37
44
47
23
55
27
29
14
Size ID
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Capital
1,526
10,285
10,266
75,688
75,270
3,696
2,862
56,904
11,086
75,688
75,270
643
634
11,666
11,452
119,757
115,367
677
655
86,744
83,631
119,757
115,367
883
920
19,006
20,421
290,778
327,157
Fixed
750
720
752
580
580
2,889
2,336
1,544
1,726
580
580
738
740
648
699
580
580
2,124
2,238
1,041
1,379
580
580
975
1,050
760
892
580
580
O&M 3 yr rec
627
600
801
14,073
14,189
1,760
1,447
10,128
2,931
3,434
3,614
181
180
398
394
29,432
28,308
202
193
16,038
13,896
6,146
5,920
189
188
545
573
73,215
82,531
294
264
297
0
0
2,549
1,952
1,132
1,315
0
0
255
252
159
209
0
0
1,750
1,818
582
920
0
0
511
576
279
410
0
0
5 yr rec
3,048
92,560
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,703
2,370
209,958
88,309
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
501,026
345,312
2,703
2,370
Appendices - 37

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
3.1
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
70
34
82
40
43
21
75
416
9
50
16
85
113
623
14
74
23
128
13
74
2
9
3
15
20
111
2
13
4
Size ID
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Capital
968
982
208,015
233,808
290,778
327,157
1,281
1,222
7,735
7,586
37,029
34,999
2,204
1,780
28,955
7,971
37,029
34,999
1,449
1,360
41,311
8,755
54,985
51,801
2,907
2,243
41,698
39,438
54,985
Fixed
4,444
5,447
1,219
1,689
580
580
685
651
639
653
580
580
1,607
1,314
1,026
1,110
580
580
746
692
639
651
580
580
2,202
1,740
1,026
1,110
580
O&M 3 yr rec
241
227
39,504
39,975
14,948
16,821
401
571
502
698
8,304
7,986
968
914
5,056
1,842
1,995
2,089
440
595
1,327
720
12,882
12,268
1,336
1,137
7,518
6,639
2,916
4,252
5,172
775
1,244
0
0
227
191
180
194
0
0
1,198
884
586
671
0
0
292
234
180
191
0
0
1,825
1,329
586
671
0
5 yr rec
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,854
3,048
44,201
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
53,292
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
Appendices - 38

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
o
6
i
i
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
23
37
91
7
18
9
21
56
137
11
27
13
32
18
95
o
J
16
3
18
27
143
4
24
5
27
14
34
7
16
Size ID
Mediumlb
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Capital
51,801
1,626
1,520
10,311
10,199
76,299
74,370
3,719
2,839
57,112
55,744
76,299
74,370
24,532
27,640
28,915
31,082
142,206
143,237
24,565
27,661
103,041
31,094
142,206
143,237
101,273
95,118
464,669
90,865
Fixed
580
818
748
709
734
580
580
2,909
2,313
1,319
1,459
580
580
1,128
1,134
1,060
1,131
972
972
2,497
2,643
1,526
1,933
972
972
1,732
1,620
1,200
1,368
O&M 3 yr rec
2,951
487
625
594
790
18,320
18,027
1,772
1,435
10,619
9,597
4,011
4,110
7,373
7,031
7,263
6,879
29,622
28,872
7,393
7,045
21,823
16,756
12,379
11,948
11,067
10,278
17,986
9,355
0
368
292
253
278
0
0
2,570
1,928
896
1,035
0
0
253
254
181
251
0
0
1,729
1,832
682
1,089
0
0
905
762
331
498
5 yr rec
3,048
2,854
3,048
103,576
18,181
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,703
2,370
156,629
3,349
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
549,868
Appendices - 39

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
o
6
3
1
1
2
2
3
o
J
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
8
20
21
50
10
24
12
30
29
300
2
21
o
3
34
44
450
o
3
32
5
51
19
200
1
14
2
23
29
300
2
Size ID
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Capital
654,265
542,589
101,437
95,203
464,692
385,787
654,265
542,589
9,170
10,066
13,667
14,336
41,187
41,098
9,981
10,572
14,106
14,775
41,187
41,098
13,551
14,864
18,100
19,050
66,992
66,517
15,006
15,770
50,832
Fixed
972
972
8,410
7,678
2,116
2,958
972
972
1,064
1,036
1,081
1,101
972
972
1,874
1,636
1,519
1,623
972
972
1,137
1,087
1,077
1,101
972
972
2,591
2,163
1,519
O&M 3 yr rec
119,178
97,578
11,168
10,331
80,686
60,127
35,060
29,672
7,576
5,373
7,622
5,433
12,929
10,548
8,074
5,684
8,532
5,702
8,771
6,548
7,825
5,626
7,790
5,617
17,373
14,850
8,719
6,182
14,421
0
0
8,106
7,094
1,319
2,160
0
0
214
184
232
252
0
0
1,067
811
693
797
0
0
291
237
227
252
0
0
1,822
1,362
693
5 yr rec
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,779
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
58,051
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
Appendices - 40

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
6
o
6
i
i
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
21
3
34
13
76
1
7
2
11
19
115
2
11
3
17
28
39
9
12
8
11
41
59
13
18
12
17
15
9
Size ID
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Capital
19,489
66,992
66,517
17,618
19,809
22,108
23,782
91,685
93,553
19,693
21,145
68,727
24,602
91,685
93,553
24,796
27,458
29,165
30,914
143,910
142,191
24,830
27,479
104,243
103,093
143,910
142,191
55,373
70,800
Fixed
1,623
972
972
1,208
1,142
1,112
1,144
972
972
3,281
2,728
1,936
2,118
972
972
1,130
1,132
1,040
1,091
972
972
2,516
2,630
1,433
1,771
972
972
1,367
1,442
O&M 3 yr rec
14,708
9,914
7,676
8,059
5,888
7,967
5,826
21,646
19,450
9,333
6,708
17,495
7,956
11,007
8,875
7,385
7,023
7,273
6,872
36,636
35,151
7,406
7,036
22,912
20,374
13,350
12,763
8,857
9,108
797
0
0
365
294
264
297
0
0
2,549
1,952
1,132
1,315
0
0
255
252
159
209
0
0
1,750
1,818
582
920
0
0
511
576
5 yr rec
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
92,560
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,703
2,370
209,958
88,309
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
Appendices -41

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
2
2
3
o
J
1
1
2
2
o
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
17
10
9
5
22
13
26
15
13
8
24
157
o
3
19
5
32
35
236
4
28
7
48
4
28
0
3
1
6
6
Size ID
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Capital
57,498
69,666
345,269
397,037
55,459
70,862
246,507
283,053
345,269
397,037
9,951
10,721
14,425
14,947
45,698
44,498
10,874
11,279
35,645
15,332
45,698
44,498
13,570
14,587
50,425
18,735
67,106
65,028
15,028
Fixed
1,152
1,284
972
972
4,836
5,839
1,611
2,081
972
972
1,077
1,043
1,031
1,045
972
972
1,999
1,706
1,418
1,502
972
972
1,138
1,084
1,031
1,043
972
972
2,594
O&M 3 yr rec
8,421
8,471
81,882
91,450
8,909
9,146
47,380
47,873
23,615
25,740
7,620
5,408
7,623
5,429
15,523
12,822
8,187
5,751
12,178
6,572
9,214
6,925
7,826
5,611
8,564
5,576
20,268
17,285
8,722
279
410
0
0
4,252
5,172
775
1,244
0
0
227
191
180
194
0
0
1,198
884
586
671
0
0
292
234
180
191
0
0
1,825
5 yr rec
501,026
345,312
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,854
3,048
44,201
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
53,292
2,854
3,048
2,854
Appendices - 42

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
1
2
2
o
6
o
6
i
i
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
42
1
5
1
9
12
34
2
7
3
8
18
52
3
10
4
12
57
252
9
42
11
47
85
378
14
63
16
71
Size ID
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Capital
15,470
50,812
49,418
67,106
65,028
17,737
19,612
22,212
23,581
92,409
92,462
19,830
20,930
69,013
69,126
92,409
92,462
640
635
11,597
11,495
118,315
116,232
674
657
85,724
11,507
118,315
116,232
Fixed
2,132
1,418
1,502
972
972
1,210
1,140
1,101
1,126
972
972
3,301
2,705
1,711
1,851
972
972
1,128
1,134
1,060
1,131
972
972
2,497
2,643
1,526
1,933
972
972
O&M 3 yr rec
6,153
14,755
11,495
10,302
7,968
8,066
5,877
7,965
5,809
25,899
23,278
9,351
6,687
17,990
14,615
11,589
9,362
5,314
4,688
5,530
4,903
27,563
26,528
5,334
4,701
20,090
14,779
10,320
9,605
1,329
586
671
0
0
368
292
253
278
0
0
2,570
1,928
896
1,035
0
0
253
254
181
251
0
0
1,729
1,832
682
1,089
0
0
5 yr rec
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
103,576
18,181
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,703
2,370
156,629
3,349
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
Appendices - 43

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
6
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
J
44
89
21
43
26
53
66
133
32
64
39
79
93
792
7
56
10
90
139
1189
10
84
16
135
62
528
4
37
7
Size ID
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Capital
1,139
1,040
394,727
24,943
554,131
448,511
1,303
1,126
394,750
319,864
554,131
448,511
1,242
1,196
7,500
7,419
33,260
32,228
2,053
1,701
7,939
7,858
33,260
32,228
1,449
1,370
8,999
8,883
54,889
Fixed
1,732
1,620
1,200
1,368
972
972
8,410
7,678
2,116
2,958
972
972
1,064
1,036
1,081
1,101
972
972
1,874
1,636
1,519
1,623
972
972
1,137
1,087
1,077
1,101
972
O&M 3 yr rec
5,332
4,700
13,746
5,171
113,443
92,000
5,433
4,753
76,446
55,943
29,325
24,094
6,288
3,906
6,422
4,062
11,641
9,080
6,786
4,216
7,331
4,331
7,484
5,080
6,336
3,935
6,449
4,091
15,884
905
762
331
498
0
0
8,106
7,094
1,319
2,160
0
0
214
184
232
252
0
0
1,067
811
693
797
0
0
291
237
227
252
0
5 yr rec
2,703
2,370
2,703
549,868
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,779
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
58,051
3,048
2,854
Appendices - 44

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
o
6
i
i
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
1
1
2
2
60
93
793
6
56
11
90
41
202
4
20
6
30
62
303
6
30
9
45
88
103
27
32
25
29
131
155
41
48
Size ID
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Capital
53,024
2,904
2,276
41,731
9,322
54,889
53,024
1,621
1,526
10,285
10,266
75,688
75,270
3,696
2,862
56,904
11,086
75,688
75,270
643
634
11,666
11,452
119,757
115,367
677
655
86,744
83,631
Fixed
972
2,591
2,163
1,519
1,623
972
972
1,208
1,142
1,112
1,144
972
972
3,281
2,728
1,936
2,118
972
972
1,130
1,132
1,040
1,091
972
972
2,516
2,630
1,433
1,771
O&M 3 yr rec
13,159
7,229
4,491
13,080
13,182
8,424
5,985
6,381
3,965
6,496
4,140
19,968
17,528
7,655
4,785
16,024
6,270
9,329
6,953
5,314
4,688
5,531
4,902
34,564
32,816
5,335
4,701
21,170
18,404
0
1,822
1,362
693
797
0
0
365
294
264
297
0
0
2,549
1,952
1,132
1,315
0
0
255
252
159
209
0
0
1,750
1,818
582
920
5 yr rec
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
92,560
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,703
2,370
209,958
88,309
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
Appendices - 45

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
4.1
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
6
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
o
J
1
1
2
37
44
47
23
55
27
29
14
70
34
82
40
43
21
75
416
9
50
16
85
113
623
14
74
23
128
13
74
2
Size ID
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Capital
119,757
115,367
883
920
19,006
20,421
290,778
327,157
968
982
208,015
233,808
290,778
327,157
1,281
1,222
7,735
7,586
37,029
34,999
2,204
1,780
28,955
7,971
37,029
34,999
1,449
1,360
41,311
Fixed
972
972
1,367
1,442
1,152
1,284
972
972
4,836
5,839
1,611
2,081
972
972
1,077
1,043
1,031
1,045
972
972
1,999
1,706
1,418
1,502
972
972
1,138
1,084
1,031
O&M 3 yr rec
11,279
10,428
5,322
4,696
5,678
5,081
78,348
87,039
5,374
4,734
44,637
44,483
20,081
21,329
6,296
3,910
6,397
4,037
14,200
11,324
6,863
4,253
10,952
5,180
7,890
5,428
6,336
3,933
7,223
0
0
511
576
279
410
0
0
4,252
5,172
775
1,244
0
0
227
191
180
194
0
0
1,198
884
586
671
0
0
292
234
180
5 yr rec
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
501,026
345,312
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,703
2,370
2,854
3,048
44,201
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
Appendices - 46

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
o
6
i
i
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
9
3
15
20
111
2
13
4
23
37
91
7
18
9
21
56
137
11
27
13
32
75
347
12
58
14
65
112
521
Size ID
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Capital
8,755
54,985
51,801
2,907
2,243
41,698
39,438
54,985
51,801
1,626
1,520
10,311
10,199
76,299
74,370
3,719
2,839
57,112
55,744
76,299
74,370
118,461
116,376
85,713
84,236
118,315
116,232
118,494
116,398
Fixed
1,043
972
972
2,594
2,132
1,418
1,502
972
972
1,210
1,140
1,101
1,126
972
972
3,301
2,705
1,711
1,851
972
972
736
742
668
739
580
580
2,105
2,251
O&M 3 yr rec
4,059
18,777
15,607
7,231
4,475
13,413
9,978
8,812
6,290
6,382
3,964
6,490
4,129
24,216
21,365
7,668
4,774
16,515
12,935
9,906
7,449
2,537
2,495
29,998
21,380
22,431
22,021
2,558
2,508
191
0
0
1,825
1,329
586
671
0
0
368
292
253
278
0
0
2,570
1,928
896
1,035
0
0
253
254
181
251
0
0
1,729
1,832
5 yr rec
53,292
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
103,576
18,181
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
2,854
3,048
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 47

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
2
2
3
o
J
1
1
2
2
o
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
19
87
21
98
58
122
28
59
34
73
86
184
41
88
52
109
122
1092
9
78
14
124
182
1639
13
116
20
186
81
Size ID
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Capital
85,724
84,247
118,315
116,232
554,292
448,663
394,727
319,841
554,131
448,511
554,456
448,748
394,750
319,864
554,131
448,511
33,877
32,807
25,944
25,212
33,260
32,228
34,688
33,312
26,383
25,651
33,260
32,228
55,580
Fixed
1,134
1,541
580
580
1,340
1,228
808
976
580
580
8,018
7,286
1,724
2,566
580
580
672
644
689
709
580
580
1,482
1,244
1,127
1,231
580
580
745
O&M 3 yr rec 5 yr rec
14,738
9,166
5,187
5,097
11,263
9,145
8,064
117,607
108,310
87,492
11,363
9,197
70,764
50,959
24,192
19,586
1,045
1,200
896
1,080
5,745
5,742
1,543
,510
,806
,965
,588
,742
,523
682
1,089
0
0
905
762
331
498
0
0
8,106
7,094
1,319
2,160
0
0
214
184
232
252
0
0
1,067
811
693
797
0
0
291
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 48

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
6
o
5
i
i
2
2
3
3
728
6
52
9
83
122
1093
8
77
14
124
54
278
5
27
8
42
81
418
8
41
12
62
115
142
36
44
32
40
Size ID
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Capital
53,646
41,288
39,968
54,889
53,024
57,035
54,552
41,731
40,407
54,889
53,024
76,449
75,938
56,079
55,787
75,688
75,270
78,524
77,274
56,904
56,607
75,688
75,270
119,903
115,511
86,735
83,621
119,757
115,367
Fixed
695
685
709
580
580
2,199
1,771
1,127
1,231
580
580
816
750
720
752
580
580
2,889
2,336
1,544
1,726
580
580
738
740
648
699
580
580
O&M 3 yr rec 5 yr rec
1,642
13,364
1,375
9,988
9,820
2,416
2,198
7,032
6,334
2,529
2,646
1,982
2,115
18,865
1,713
14,073
14,189
3,256
2,935
9,952
3,844
3,434
3,614
2,566
2,478
37,096
6,641
29,432
28,308
237
227
252
0
0
1,822
1,362
693
797
0
0
365
294
264
297
0
0
2,549
1,952
1,132
1,315
0
0
255
252
159
209
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 49

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
1
1
2
2
3
173
214
53
66
49
61
62
31
72
37
38
19
92
47
108
55
56
29
99
573
12
68
20
118
148
859
18
103
31
Size ID
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Capital
119,937
115,532
86,744
83,631
119,757
115,367
290,930
327,306
208,003
233,797
290,778
327,157
291,015
327,368
208,015
233,808
290,778
327,157
37,659
35,584
28,569
27,131
37,029
34,999
38,581
36,142
28,955
27,516
37,029
Fixed
2,124
2,238
1,041
1,379
580
580
975
1,050
760
892
580
580
4,444
5,447
1,219
1,689
580
580
685
651
639
653
580
580
1,607
1,314
1,026
1,110
580
O&M 3 yr rec 5 yr rec
2,587
2,491
15,818
13,680
6,146
5,920
5,990
6,716
37,346
24,071
73,215
82,531
6,042
6,754
39,143
39,587
14,948
16,821
1,128
1,258
10,456
1,091
8,304
7,986
1,695
1,601
4,926
2,234
1,995
1,750
1,818
582
920
0
0
511
576
279
410
0
0
4,252
5,172
775
1,244
0
0
227
191
180
194
0
0
1,198
884
586
671
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 50

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5a
5a
5a
5a
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
FF
FF
FF
FF
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
o
6
i
i
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
176
18
102
2
12
4
21
26
154
3
18
5
32
49
126
10
25
12
30
73
188
14
37
17
44
75
347
12
58
Size ID
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Capital
34,999
55,676
52,421
41,311
39,051
54,985
51,801
57,134
53,303
41,698
39,438
54,985
51,801
77,062
75,036
56,501
55,134
76,299
74,370
79,155
76,355
57,112
55,744
76,299
74,370
747,825
733,979
649,731
637,703
Fixed
580
746
692
639
651
580
580
2,202
1,740
1,026
1,110
580
580
818
748
709
734
580
580
2,909
2,313
1,319
1,459
580
580
736
742
668
739
O&M 3 yr rec 5 yr rec
2,089
1,525
1,616
1,174
15,442
12,882
12,268
2,420
2,158
7,365
6,490
2,916
2,951
1,996
2,096
23,148
17,748
18,320
18,027
3,281
2,905
10,443
9,422
4,011
4,110
24,463
24,013
25,565
24,234
0
292
234
180
191
0
0
1,825
1,329
586
671
0
0
368
292
253
278
0
0
2,570
1,928
896
1,035
0
0
253
254
181
251
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 51

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
o
J
1
1
2
2
o
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
3
3
1
1
2
14
65
112
521
19
87
21
98
58
122
28
59
34
73
86
184
41
88
52
109
122
1092
9
78
14
124
182
1639
13
Size ID
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Capital
649,660
637,631
747,858
734,000
649,742
637,714
649,660
637,631
3,646,138
2,943,571
3,167,794
2,557,406
3,167,808
2,557,404
3,646,302
2,943,657
3,167,816
2,557,428
3,167,808
2,557,404
181,384
174,524
173,451
166,929
157,135
151,207
182,195
175,029
158,135
Fixed
580
580
2,105
2,251
1,134
1,541
580
580
1,340
1,228
808
976
580
580
8,018
7,286
1,724
2,566
580
580
672
644
689
709
580
580
1,482
1,244
1,127
O&M 3 yr rec 5 yr rec
24,460
24,011
24,484
24,026
32,648
25,741
24,460
24,011
118,656
95,820
126,318
99,594
118,644
95,814
118,757
95,873
171,037
106,414
118,644
95,814
6,247
6,200
6,381
6,356
6,150
6,127
6,745
6,510
7,818
0
0
1,729
1,832
682
1,089
0
0
905
762
331
498
0
0
8,106
7,094
1,319
2,160
0
0
214
184
232
252
0
0
1,067
811
693
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 52

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
GF
GF
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
o
6
i
i
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
116
20
186
81
728
6
52
9
83
122
1093
8
77
14
124
54
278
5
27
8
42
81
418
8
41
12
62
115
142
Size ID
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Capital
152,209
157,135
151,207
324,682
312,253
282,121
298,576
281,588
270,848
326,137
313,159
282,564
271,826
281,588
270,848
462,623
459,759
401,935
439,609
401,385
398,978
464,698
461,095
402,760
400,353
401,385
398,978
757,409
728,228
Fixed
1,231
580
580
745
695
685
709
580
580
2,199
1,771
1,127
1,231
580
580
816
750
720
752
580
580
2,889
2,336
1,544
1,726
580
580
738
740
O&M 3 yr rec 5 yr rec
6,633
6,150
6,127
10,945
10,699
11,376
10,855
10,803
10,600
11,838
11,256
14,910
11,808
10,803
10,600
15,467
15,518
16,098
15,693
15,282
15,391
16,742
16,339
20,573
16,960
15,282
15,391
24,775
23,826
797
0
0
291
237
227
252
0
0
1,822
1,362
693
797
0
0
365
294
264
297
0
0
2,549
1,952
1,132
1,315
0
0
255
252
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 53

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
2
2
3
o
J
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
36
44
32
40
173
214
53
66
49
61
62
31
72
37
38
19
92
47
108
55
56
29
99
573
12
68
20
118
148
Size ID
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Capital
658,057
632,705
657,987
632,635
757,443
728,249
658,067
632,715
657,987
632,635
1,894,502
2,136,432
1,645,966
1,856,159
1,645,936
1,856,136
1,894,588
2,136,494
1,645,978
1,856,170
1,645,936
1,856,136
206,336
192,862
179,313
184,409
178,806
167,137
207,259
Fixed
648
699
580
580
2,124
2,238
1,041
1,379
580
580
975
1,050
760
892
580
580
4,444
5,447
1,219
1,689
580
580
685
651
639
653
580
580
1,607
O&M 3 yr rec 5 yr rec
26,184
24,558
24,772
23,824
24,796
23,839
33,898
25,875
24,772
23,824
61,729
69,589
64,952
72,043
61,722
69,585
61,781
69,627
88,643
78,040
61,722
69,585
7,065
6,799
7,404
6,926
6,960
6,723
7,632
159
209
0
0
1,750
1,818
582
920
0
0
511
576
279
410
0
0
4,252
5,172
775
1,244
0
0
227
191
180
194
0
0
1,198
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 54

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
1
2
2
3
o
6
i
i
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
859
18
103
31
176
18
102
2
12
4
21
26
154
3
18
5
32
49
126
10
25
12
30
73
188
14
37
17
44
Size ID
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Capital
193,421
179,700
168,034
178,806
167,137
325,321
304,152
282,632
264,302
282,143
263,811
326,779
305,035
283,019
264,688
282,143
263,811
466,674
453,791
405,442
394,335
404,903
393,794
468,767
455,110
406,052
394,945
404,903
393,794
Fixed
1,314
1,026
1,110
580
580
746
692
639
651
580
580
2,202
1,740
1,026
1,110
580
580
818
748
709
734
580
580
2,909
2,313
1,319
1,459
580
580
O&M 3 yr rec 5 yr rec
7,142
9,337
7,414
6,960
6,723
10,966
10,435
11,625
10,864
10,824
10,337
11,861
10,977
15,225
11,597
10,824
10,337
15,600
15,324
16,287
15,580
15,414
15,197
16,885
16,133
21,401
16,944
15,414
15,197
884
586
671
0
0
292
234
180
191
0
0
1,825
1,329
586
671
0
0
368
292
253
278
0
0
2,570
1,928
896
1,035
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 55

-------
Option

6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
7
7
7
7
Animal

Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type

Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Cost for Swine Operations
Operation Region Category # Facilities

FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
FF
FF
FF
FF

Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest

1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2

112
521
19
87
21
98
86
184
41
88
52
109
173
214
53
66
49
61
92
47
108
55
56
29
75
347
12
58
(Continued)
Size ID Capital

Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1

98,256
155,263
183,306
168,426
215,897
273,151
286,501
362,915
679,948
795,452
839,329
924,099
98,039
155,261
184,106
238,237
217,119
269,973
173,966
362,771
381,013
595,597
463,776
688,946
640
635
15,128
14,994
Fixed

42,105
42,251
41,134
41,541
40,580
40,580
48,018
47,286
41,724
42,566
40,580
40,580
27,124
27,238
26,041
26,379
25,580
25,580
29,444
30,447
26,219
26,689
25,580
25,580
736
742
668
739
O&M 3 yr rec 5 yr rec

-8,314
-15
-3,580
-5,311
-3,329
-3,604
-32,752
-43,278
-9,519
-12,322
-8,860
-9,710
-17,555
-15,110
-12,464
-10,717
-11,611
-9,383
-42,722
-43,296
-29,927
-30,331
-28,015
-26,702
181
180
11,320
11,220
0
1,729
1,832
682
1,089
0
0
8,106
7,094
1,319
2,160
0
0
1,750
1,818
582
920
0
0
4,252
5,172
775
1,244
0
0
253
254
181
251

5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
5,000
6
6
6
6
Appendices - 56

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
1
1
2
2
3
o
J
1
1
2
14
65
112
521
19
87
21
98
58
122
28
59
34
73
86
184
41
88
52
109
122
1092
9
78
14
124
182
1639
13
Size ID
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Capital
118,315
116,232
674
657
89,254
15,005
118,315
116,232
1,139
1,040
403,602
32,639
554,131
448,511
1,303
1,126
403,625
327,560
554,131
448,511
1,242
1,196
10,594
10,476
33,260
32,228
2,053
1,701
11,033
Fixed
580
580
2,105
2,251
1,134
1,541
580
580
1,340
1,228
808
976
580
580
8,018
7,286
1,724
2,566
580
580
672
644
689
709
580
580
1,482
1,244
1,127
O&M 3 yr rec 5 yr rec
22,431
22,021
202
193
25,880
21,096
5,187
5,097
200
192
36,073
24,477
108,310
87,492
300
245
98,773
75,249
24,192
19,586
392
567
6,778
6,900
5,745
5,742
890
878
7,687
0
0
1,729
1,832
682
1,089
0
0
905
762
331
498
0
0
8,106
7,094
1,319
2,160
0
0
214
184
232
252
0
0
1,067
811
693
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6
6





























0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 57

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
FF
GF
GF
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
6
o
6
i
i
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
116
20
186
81
728
6
52
9
83
122
1093
8
77
14
124
54
278
5
27
8
42
81
418
8
41
12
62
115
142
Size ID
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Capital
10,915
33,260
32,228
1,449
1,370
12,776
12,605
54,889
53,024
2,904
2,276
45,508
13,044
54,889
53,024
1,621
1,526
14,634
14,604
75,688
75,270
3,696
2,862
61,253
15,424
75,688
75,270
643
634
Fixed
1,231
580
580
745
695
685
709
580
580
2,199
1,771
1,127
1,231
580
580
816
750
720
752
580
580
2,889
2,336
1,544
1,726
580
580
738
740
O&M 3 yr rec
7,170
1,588
1,742
440
596
8,185
8,273
9,988
9,820
1,334
1,153
14,816
17,364
2,529
2,646
485
627
9,387
9,566
14,073
14,189
1,760
1,447
18,916
11,697
3,434
3,614
181
180
797
0
0
291
237
227
252
0
0
1,822
1,362
693
797
0
0
365
294
264
297
0
0
2,549
1,952
1,132
1,315
0
0
255
252
5 yr rec
731
0
0
0
0
55,197
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
89,706
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 58

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
o
J
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
1
36
44
32
40
173
214
53
66
49
61
62
31
72
37
38
19
92
47
108
55
56
29
99
573
12
68
20
118
148
Size ID
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Capital
15,218
14,937
119,757
115,367
677
655
90,296
87,116
119,757
115,367
883
920
24,844
26,702
290,778
327,157
968
982
213,853
240,089
290,778
327,157
1,281
1,222
10,958
10,740
37,029
34,999
2,204
Fixed
648
699
580
580
2,124
2,238
1,041
1,379
580
580
975
1,050
760
892
580
580
4,444
5,447
1,219
1,689
580
580
685
651
639
653
580
580
1,607
O&M 3 yr rec
11,387
11,178
29,432
28,308
202
193
27,027
24,680
6,146
5,920
189
188
18,609
20,006
73,215
82,531
241
227
57,568
59,408
14,948
16,821
401
571
7,014
7,072
8,304
7,986
968
159
209
0
0
1,750
1,818
582
920
0
0
511
576
279
410
0
0
4,252
5,172
775
1,244
0
0
227
191
180
194
0
0
1,198
5 yr rec
207,255
85,939
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
498,323
342,942
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
41,347
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 59

-------
Cost for Swine Operations (Continued)
Option
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
Animal
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Swine
Type
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
GF
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
6
o
5
i
i
2
2
3
3
859
18
103
31
176
18
102
2
12
4
21
26
154
3
18
5
32
49
126
10
25
12
30
73
188
14
37
17
44
Size ID
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium!
Capital
1,780
32,178
11,125
37,029
34,999
1,449
1,360
45,091
12,441
54,985
51,801
2,907
2,243
45,478
43,124
54,985
51,801
1,626
1,520
14,676
14,513
76,299
74,370
3,719
2,839
61,477
60,058
76,299
74370
Fixed
1,314
1,026
1,110
580
580
746
692
639
651
580
580
2,202
1,740
1,026
1,110
580
580
818
748
709
734
580
580
2,909
2,313
1,319
1,459
580
580
O&M 3 yr rec
914
11,569
8,215
1,995
2,089
440
595
8,964
8,169
12,882
12,268
1,336
1,137
15,155
14,088
2,916
2,951
487
625
9,415
9,508
18,320
18,027
1,772
1,435
19,440
18,314
4,011
4.110
884
586
671
0
0
292
234
180
191
0
0
1,825
1,329
586
671
0
0
368
292
253
278
0
0
2,570
1,928
896
1,035
0
0
5 yr rec
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
50,244
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
100,722
15,133
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 60

-------
Appendices - 61

-------
Regulatory Compliance Costs for the Poultry (BR, broiler; LA, dry layers; LW, wet layers) Operations
Option









1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Operation
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
Region
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Category
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
# Facilities
47
98
687
1,417
336
694
7
21
132
301
53
147
108
170
904
1,430
677
1,072
50
78
415
656
311
491
61
122
737
1,467
Size ID
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Capital
64,538
65,498
63,405
63,932
62,675
63,142
168,396
155,678
165,119
151,693
164,255
150,769
21,127
20,967
20,831
20,547
20,239
19,872
29,305
29,076
28,830
28,427
28,237
27,751
41,467
41,417
40,767
40,467
Fixed
2,214
2,453
890
851
580
580
4,878
5,064
1,047
988
580
580
1,075
1,172
747
736
580
580
1,274
1,410
747
736
580
580
1,570
1,772
794
787
O&M
2,249
2,432
2,289
2,158
1,355
1,268
4,342
4,659
3,439
3,248
2,049
1,927
1,351
1,383
1,362
1,382
1,043
992
1,539
1,614
1,559
1,614
1,122
1,083
1,714
1,838
1,744
1,772
Syr. rec.
2,391
2,740
536
496
0
0
6,120
6,395
756
688
0
0
791
946
331
336
0
0
1,069
1,279
331
336
0
0
1,483
1,786
397
407
Syr. rec.
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
                                        Appendices - 62

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Operation
BR
BR
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
Region
Mid-Atlantic
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
Category
o
J
3
1
1
2
2
3
o
J
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
1
1
2
2
3
o
J
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
1
1
2
# Facilities
486
967
2
4
102
127
115
144
0
0
23
40
26
45
10
9
84
78
46
43
6
6
55
52
30
29
18
20
146
Size ID
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Capital
40,132
39,743
59,137
52,774
58,186
51,323
57,840
50,843
259,389
158,261
254,878
153,681
254,386
152,971
8,268
6,146
8,187
6,067
7,913
5,700
11,362
8,384
11,224
8,234
10,950
7,867
20,828
17,759
20,582
Fixed
580
580
2,901
2,430
875
821
580
580
10,799
6,153
1,187
1,076
580
580
895
784
722
696
580
580
1,017
863
722
696
580
580
1,390
1,194
865
O&M
1,133
1,092
1,123
1,457
1,235
1,315
439
412
4,442
4,120
3,101
2,848
1,481
1,012
272
292
317
307
166
159
333
338
412
368
192
161
470
572
610
Syr. rec.
0
0
4,426
3,441
660
545
0
0
19,106
10,143
1,239
1,004
0
0
697
478
376
321
0
0
924
621
376
321
0
0
1,618
1,216
641
5yr. rec.
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 63

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option









2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type Operation Region Category # Facilities
Solid
Solid
Solid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
LA
LA
LA
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
South
Midwest
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
2
o
6
o
6
i
2
o
J
1
2
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
176
117
142
24
217
119
97
393
310
28
39
412
567
202
278
4
8
79
120
32
59
65
68
542
572
406
429
30
31
Size ID
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Capital
17,415
20,240
16,943
1,053
107,287
106,827
415
10,221
9,949
65,240
67,908
63,427
63,964
62,675
63,142
170,244
161,445
165,162
151,736
164,255
150,769
21,351
21,717
20,856
20,571
20,239
19,872
29,619
30,128
Fixed
813
580
580
1,128
799
580
603
590
580
3,036
4,917
916
884
580
580
7,038
10,963
1,097
1,033
580
580
1,324
1,950
774
761
580
580
1,623
2,501
O&M 3yr. rec. 5yr. rec.
640
221
212
460
23,262
7,046
166
1,232
530
2,680
3,912
6,327
3,538
1,355
1,268
5,476
8,201
10,330
5,286
2,049
1,927
1,488
1,844
2,481
1,849
1,043
992
1,732
2,261
530
0
0
1,097
505
0
153
130
0
3,541
6,189
573
543
0
0
9,144
14,653
827
751
0
0
1,139
2,036
369
371
0
0
1,557
2,807
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 64

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type Operation Region Category # Facilities Size ID
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
2
2
o
J
3
1
1
2
2
3
o
J
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
249 Mediumlb
262 Mediumlb
187 Mediumlb
196 Mediumlb
37 Medium2
49 Medium2
442 Medium2
587 Medium2
292 Medium2
387 Medium2
1 Large 1
2 Large 1
61 Large 1
51 Large 1
69 Large 1
58 Large 1
0 Large2
0 Large2
14 Large2
16 Large2
16 Large2
18 Large2
6 Mediumla
4 Mediumla
50 Mediumla
31 Mediumla
28 Mediumla
17 Mediumla
4 Mediumlb
Capital
28,854
28,451
28,237
27,751
41,915
42,929
40,791
40,485
40,132
39,743
65,120
61,940
58,227
51,387
57,840
50,843
285,727
185,877
254,898
153,712
254,386
152,971
9,081
7,157
8,203
6,092
7,913
5,700
12,489
Fixed
774
761
580
580
2,067
3,340
821
805
580
580
15,651
12,589
962
892
580
580
66,923
36,762
1,230
1,111
580
580
2,626
1,905
757
724
580
580
3,418
O&M
3,268
2,269
1,122
1,083
1,990
2,766
4,249
2,779
1,133
1,092
4,798
7,086
2,370
3,330
439
412
20,617
21,080
4,751
5,955
1,481
1,012
771
913
499
571
166
159
1,025
Syr. rec. 5yr. rec.
369
371
0
0
2,180
3,982
435
432
0
0
28,125
21,728
822
674
0
0
123,431
65,239
1,319
1,067
0
0
3,914
2,495
439
371
0
0
5,387
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 65

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
o
3
o
3
3
3
o
J
o
J
3
3
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type Operation Region Category # Facilities Size ID
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
J
o
J
2 Mediumlb
33 Mediumlb
21 Mediumlb
18 Mediumlb
12 Mediumlb
1 1 Medium2
8 Medium2
88 Medium2
70 Medium2
70 Medium2
57 Medium2
10 Largel
87 Largel
48 Largel
39 Medium2
157 Medium2
124 Medium2
4 Largel
13 Largel
66 Largel
191 Largel
32 Largel
93 Largel
7 Largel
9 Largel
99 Largel
127 Largel
48 Largel
62 Largel
Capital
9,787
11,240
8,259
10,950
7,867
22,917
20,801
20,621
17,477
20,240
16,943
3,767
107,325
106,827
529
10,259
9,949
69,049
69,793
67,916
68,226
67,187
67,437
69,752
72,202
67,938
68,259
67,187
67,437
Fixed
2,417
757
724
580
580
5,842
4,566
949
881
580
580
4,135
841
580
729
632
580
2,214
2,453
890
851
580
580
3,036
4,917
916
884
580
580
O&M Syr. rec. 5yr. rec.
1,199
639
709
192
161
1,753
2,440
1,043
1,373
221
212
2,126
20,209
2,745
236
1,126
350
3,281
3,402
3,321
3,128
2,387
2,238
3,712
4,882
7,359
4,508
2,387
2,238
3,419
439
371
0
0
9,892
7,285
797
654
0
0
6,511
580
0
380
205
0
2,391
2,740
536
496
0
0
3,541
6,189
573
543
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
Appendices - 66

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
o
6
o
6
3
3
o
J
o
J
3
3
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type Operation Region Category # Facilities Size ID
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
o
J
1
1
2
2
o
J
1 Large2
3 Large2
13 Large2
41 Large2
5 Large2
20 Large2
1 Large2
2 Large2
19 Large2
27 Large2
8 Large2
13 Large2
10 Mediumla
23 Mediumla
86 Mediumla
193 Mediumla
65 Mediumla
144 Mediumla
15 Mediumla
15 Mediumla
130 Mediumla
128 Mediumla
97 Mediumla
96 Mediumla
5 Mediumlb
1 1 Mediumlb
40 Mediumlb
88 Mediumlb
30 Mediumlb
Capital
178,012
164,153
174,735
160,168
173,871
159,244
179,859
169,920
174,778
160,211
173,871
159,244
23,506
23,197
23,210
22,777
22,618
22,101
23,730
23,947
23,235
22,801
22,618
22,101
32,086
31,682
31,611
31,032
31,019
Fixed
4,878
5,064
1,047
988
580
580
7,038
10,963
1,097
1,033
580
580
1,075
1,172
747
736
580
580
1,324
1,950
774
761
580
580
1,274
1,410
747
736
580
O&M Syr. rec. 5yr. rec.
5,475
5,712
4,572
4,301
3,182
2,980
6,609
9,254
11,463
6,338
3,182
2,980
2,340
2,312
2,352
2,311
2,033
1,921
2,478
2,772
3,470
2,778
2,033
1,921
2,537
2,551
2,556
2,550
2,119
6,120
6,395
756
688
0
0
9,144
14,653
827
751
0
0
791
946
331
336
0
0
1,139
2,036
369
371
0
0
1,069
1,279
331
336
0
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
Appendices - 67

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
o
6
o
6
3
3
o
J
o
J
3
3
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type Operation Region Category # Facilities Size ID
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
o
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
J
o
3
1
1
2
2
66 Mediumlb
7 Mediumlb
7 Mediumlb
60 Mediumlb
59 Mediumlb
45 Mediumlb
44 Mediumlb
6 Medium2
16 Medium2
70 Medium2
198 Medium2
46 Medium2
130 Medium2
9 Medium2
1 1 Medium2
106 Medium2
132 Medium2
70 Medium2
87 Medium2
0 Large 1
1 Large 1
11 Large 1
17 Large 1
13 Large 1
19 Large 1
0 Large 1
0 Large 1
17 Large 1
11 Large 1
Capital
30,357
32,400
32,734
31,636
31,057
31,019
30,357
44,846
44,594
44,146
43,645
43,511
42,920
45,294
46,106
44,170
43,662
43,511
42,920
62,939
55,975
61,988
54,524
61,642
54,044
68,922
65,141
62,029
54,588
Fixed
580
1,623
2,501
774
761
580
580
1,570
1,772
794
787
580
580
2,067
3,340
821
805
580
580
2,901
2,430
875
821
580
580
15,651
12,589
962
892
O&M Syr. rec. 5yr. rec.
2,020
2,730
3,197
4,266
3,206
2,119
2,020
2,724
2,786
2,753
2,720
2,142
2,040
2,999
3,714
5,258
3,726
2,142
2,040
2,281
2,405
2,393
2,263
1,597
1,360
5,955
8,034
3,528
4,278
0
1,557
2,807
369
371
0
0
1,483
1,786
397
407
0
0
2,180
3,982
435
432
0
0
4,426
3,441
660
545
0
0
28,125
21,728
822
674
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
Appendices - 68

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
o
J
3
3
o
J
o
J
3
3
o
J
o
J
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Operation
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
Region
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
Category
3
o
J
1
1
2
2
o
6
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
# Facilities
19
13
0
0
3
5
o
6
6
0
0
4
4
4
4
1
1
9
11
5
6
2
1
14
7
8
4
1
1
6
Size ID
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Capital
61,642
54,044
270,735
165,299
266,224
160,718
265,732
160,008
297,074
192,914
266,244
160,749
265,732
160,008
10,154
7,652
10,073
7,573
9,798
7,205
10,966
8,663
10,089
7,598
9,798
7,205
13,364
9,971
13,226
Fixed
580
580
10,799
6,153
1,187
1,076
580
580
66,923
36,762
1,230
1,111
580
580
895
784
722
696
580
580
2,626
1,905
757
724
580
580
1,017
863
722
O&M
1,597
1,360
5,748
5,144
4,408
3,872
2,788
2,036
21,924
22,104
6,058
6,979
2,788
2,036
1,391
1,207
1,437
1,222
1,285
1,074
1,890
1,828
1,619
1,486
1,285
1,074
1,455
1,254
1,534
Syr. rec.
0
0
19,106
10,143
1,239
1,004
0
0
123,431
65,239
1,319
1,067
0
0
697
478
376
321
0
0
3,914
2,495
439
371
0
0
924
621
376
5yr. rec.
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
Appendices - 69

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
o
J
3
3
o
J
o
J
3
3
o
J
o
J
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
Region
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
Category
2
o
6
o
6
i
i
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
2
# Facilities Size ID
7 Mediumlb
3 Mediumlb
4 Mediumlb
1 Mediumlb
1 Mediumlb
9 Mediumlb
5 Mediumlb
5 Mediumlb
3 Mediumlb
2 Medium2
3 Medium2
16 Medium2
24 Medium2
13 Medium2
19 Medium2
3 Medium2
2 Medium2
24 Medium2
16 Medium2
19 Medium2
13 Medium2
3 Large 1
29 Large 1
16 Large 1
2 Large 1
19 Large 1
11 Large 1
13 Medium2
53 Medium2
Capital
9,821
12,952
9,453
14,491
11,374
13,242
9,846
12,952
9,453
23,187
19,687
22,940
19,343
22,599
18,871
25,276
22,729
22,980
19,405
22,599
18,871
18,612
124,846
124,386
21,326
124,884
124,386
3,095
12,901
Fixed
696
580
580
3,418
2,417
757
724
580
580
1,390
1,194
865
813
580
580
5,842
4,566
949
881
580
580
1,128
799
580
4,135
841
580
603
590
O&M
1,284
1,314
1,078
2,147
2,116
1,761
1,625
1,314
1,078
1,599
1,495
1,739
1,563
1,350
1,135
2,882
3,363
2,172
2,296
1,350
1,135
2,159
24,961
8,745
3,825
21,907
4,444
1,144
2,210
Syr. rec.
321
0
0
5,387
3,419
439
371
0
0
1,618
1,216
641
530
0
0
9,892
7,285
797
654
0
0
1,097
505
0
6,511
580
0
153
130
5yr. rec.
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
Appendices - 70

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
3
3
3
3
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type Operation Region Category # Facilities
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
LW
LW
LW
LW
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
South
South
South
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
o
6
i
2
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
1
1
2
2
3
o
J
1
42
9
35
28
14
46
209
659
102
323
21
30
314
440
153
215
2
10
40
140
16
68
o
3
7
60
93
24
46
33
Size ID
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Capital
12,629
3,209
12,939
12,629
64,538
65,498
63,405
63,932
62,675
63,142
65,240
67,908
63,427
63,964
62,675
63,142
168,396
155,678
165,119
151,693
164,255
150,769
170,244
161,445
165,162
151,736
164,255
150,769
21,127
Fixed
580
729
632
580
2,214
2,453
890
851
580
580
3,036
4,917
916
884
580
580
4,878
5,064
1,047
988
580
580
7,038
10,963
1,097
1,033
580
580
1,075
O&M Syr. rec. 5yr. rec.
1,509
1,214
2,104
1,328
2,249
2,432
2,289
2,158
1,355
1,268
2,680
3,912
6,327
3,538
1,355
1,268
4,342
4,659
3,439
3,248
2,049
1,927
5,476
8,201
10,330
5,286
2,049
1,927
1,351
0
380
205
0
2,391
2,740
536
496
0
0
3,541
6,189
573
543
0
0
6,120
6,395
756
688
0
0
9,144
14,653
827
751
0
0
791
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
Appendices - 71

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type Operation Region Category # Facilities Size ID
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
o
6
i
i
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
79 Mediumla
275 Mediumla
665 Mediumla
206 Mediumla
499 Mediumla
49 Mediumla
53 Mediumla
413 Mediumla
444 Mediumla
309 Mediumla
333 Mediumla
15 Mediumlb
36 Mediumlb
126 Mediumlb
305 Mediumlb
95 Mediumlb
228 Mediumlb
23 Mediumlb
24 Mediumlb
189 Mediumlb
203 Mediumlb
142 Mediumlb
152 Mediumlb
19 Medium2
57 Medium2
224 Medium2
683 Medium2
148 Medium2
450 Medium2
Capital
20,967
20,831
20,547
20,239
19,872
21,351
21,717
20,856
20,571
20,239
19,872
29,305
29,076
28,830
28,427
28,237
27,751
29,619
30,128
28,854
28,451
28,237
27,751
41,467
41,417
40,767
40,467
40,132
39,743
Fixed
1,172
747
736
580
580
1,324
1,950
774
761
580
580
1,274
1,410
747
736
580
580
1,623
2,501
774
761
580
580
1,570
1,772
794
787
580
580
O&M 3yr. rec. 5yr. rec.
1,383
1,362
1,382
1,043
992
1,488
1,844
2,481
1,849
1,043
992
1,539
1,614
1,559
1,614
1,122
1,083
1,732
2,261
3,268
2,269
1,122
1,083
1,714
1,838
1,744
1,772
1,133
1,092
946
331
336
0
0
1,139
2,036
369
371
0
0
1,069
1,279
331
336
0
0
1,557
2,807
369
371
0
0
1,483
1,786
397
407
0
0
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
Appendices - 72

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Operation
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
Region
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
Category
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
1
1
2
2
3
o
J
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
1
1
2
2
3
o
J
1
1
2
2
o
J
# Facilities
28
38
336
455
222
300
1
2
30
59
33
67
1
1
44
39
50
45
0
0
7
19
8
21
0
0
10
12
11
Size ID
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Capital
41,915
42,929
40,791
40,485
40,132
39,743
59,137
52,774
58,186
51,323
57,840
50,843
65,120
61,940
58,227
51,387
57,840
50,843
259,389
158,261
254,878
153,681
254,386
152,971
285,727
185,877
254,898
153,712
254,386
Fixed
2,067
3,340
821
805
580
580
2,901
2,430
875
821
580
580
15,651
12,589
962
892
580
580
10,799
6,153
1,187
1,076
580
580
66,923
36,762
1,230
1,111
580
O&M
1,990
2,766
4,249
2,779
1,133
1,092
1,123
1,457
1,235
1,315
439
412
4,798
7,086
2,370
3,330
439
412
4,442
4,120
3,101
2,848
1,481
1,012
20,617
21,080
4,751
5,955
1,481
Syr. rec.
2,180
3,982
435
432
0
0
4,426
3,441
660
545
0
0
28,125
21,728
822
674
0
0
19,106
10,143
1,239
1,004
0
0
123,431
65,239
1,319
1,067
0
5yr. rec.
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
Appendices - 73

-------

Option
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.

Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic

Type
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid

Operation
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
Co
Region
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
stfo
Categ
o
6
i
i
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
5
o
3
i
i
2
2
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
   Category  # Facilities   Size ID
                  14  Large2
                   3 Mediumla
                   4 Mediumla
                  24 Mediumla
                  36 Mediumla
                  13 Mediumla
                  20 Mediumla
                   4 Mediumla
                   3 Mediumla
                  37 Mediumla
                  24 Mediumla
                  20 Mediumla
                  13 Mediumla
                   2 Mediumlb
                   3 Mediumlb
                  16 Mediumlb
                  24 Mediumlb
                   9 Mediumlb
                  13 Mediumlb
                   3 Mediumlb
                   2 Mediumlb
                  24 Mediumlb
                  16 Mediumlb
                  13 Mediumlb
                   9 Mediumlb
                   5 Medium2
                   9 Medium2
                  42 Medium2
                  82 Medium2
tinued)
Capital
152,971
8,268
6,146
8,187
6,067
7,913
5,700
9,081
7,157
8,203
6,092
7,913
5,700
11,362
8,384
11,224
8,234
10,950
7,867
12,489
9,787
11,240
8,259
10,950
7,867
20,828
17,759
20,582
17,415
Fixed
580
895
784
722
696
580
580
2,626
1,905
757
724
580
580
1,017
863
722
696
580
580
3,418
2,417
757
724
580
580
1,390
1,194
865
813
O&M
1,012
272
292
317
307
166
159
771
913
499
571
166
159
333
338
412
368
192
161
1,025
1,199
639
709
192
161
470
572
610
640
Syr. rec.
0
697
478
376
321
0
0
3,914
2,495
439
371
0
0
924
621
376
321
0
0
5,387
3,419
439
371
0
0
1,618
1,216
641
530
5yr. rec.
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
             Appendices - 74

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type Operation Region Category # Facilities
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
o
6
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
2
o
J
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
1
1
2
34
66
8
6
64
55
51
44
11
101
55
7
67
37
45
183
144
30
122
96
4
13
66
191
32
93
7
9
99
Size ID
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Capital
20,240
16,943
22,917
20,801
20,621
17,477
20,240
16,943
1,053
107,287
106,827
3,767
107,325
106,827
415
10,221
9,949
529
10,259
9,949
69,049
69,793
67,916
68,226
67,187
67,437
69,752
72,202
67,938
Fixed
580
580
5,842
4,566
949
881
580
580
1,128
799
580
4,135
841
580
603
590
580
729
632
580
2,606
2,845
1,282
1,243
972
972
3,428
5,309
1,308
O&M Syr. rec. 5yr. rec.
221
212
1,753
2,440
1,043
1,373
221
212
460
23,262
7,046
2,126
20,209
2,745
166
1,232
530
236
1,126
350
9,533
9,654
9,573
9,380
8,639
8,490
9,964
11,134
13,611
0
0
9,892
7,285
797
654
0
0
1,097
505
0
6,511
580
0
153
130
0
380
205
0
2,391
2,740
536
496
0
0
3,541
6,189
573
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
Appendices - 75

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type Operation Region Category # Facilities
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
2
o
6
o
6
i
i
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
127
48
62
1
3
13
41
5
20
1
2
19
27
8
13
10
23
86
193
65
144
15
15
130
128
97
96
5
11
Size ID
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Capital
68,259
67,187
67,437
178,012
164,153
174,735
160,168
173,871
159,244
179,859
169,920
174,778
160,211
173,871
159,244
23,506
23,197
23,210
22,777
22,618
22,101
23,730
23,947
23,235
22,801
22,618
22,101
32,086
31,682
Fixed
1,276
972
972
5,270
5,456
1,439
1,380
972
972
7,430
11,355
1,489
1,425
972
972
1,467
1,564
1,139
1,128
972
972
1,716
2,342
1,166
1,153
972
972
1,666
1,802
O&M 3yr. rec. 5yr. rec.
10,760
8,639
8,490
11,727
11,964
10,824
10,553
9,434
9,232
12,861
15,506
17,715
12,590
9,434
9,232
8,592
8,564
8,604
8,563
8,285
8,173
8,730
9,024
9,722
9,030
8,285
8,173
8,789
8,803
543
0
0
6,120
6,395
756
688
0
0
9,144
14,653
827
751
0
0
791
946
331
336
0
0
1,139
2,036
369
371
0
0
1,069
1,279
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
Appendices - 76

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type Operation Region Category # Facilities Size ID
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
2
2
o
J
3
1
1
2
2
3
o
J
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
40 Mediumlb
88 Mediumlb
30 Mediumlb
66 Mediumlb
7 Mediumlb
7 Mediumlb
60 Mediumlb
59 Mediumlb
45 Mediumlb
44 Mediumlb
6 Medium2
16 Medium2
70 Medium2
198 Medium2
46 Medium2
130 Medium2
9 Medium2
1 1 Medium2
106 Medium2
132 Medium2
70 Medium2
87 Medium2
0 Large 1
1 Large 1
11 Large 1
17 Large 1
13 Large 1
19 Large 1
0 Large 1
Capital
31,611
31,032
31,019
30,357
32,400
32,734
31,636
31,057
31,019
30,357
44,846
44,594
44,146
43,645
43,511
42,920
45,294
46,106
44,170
43,662
43,511
42,920
62,939
55,975
61,988
54,524
61,642
54,044
68,922
Fixed
1,139
1,128
972
972
2,015
2,893
1,166
1,153
972
972
1,962
2,164
1,186
1,179
972
972
2,459
3,732
1,213
1,197
972
972
3,293
2,822
1,267
1,213
972
972
16,043
O&M 3yr. rec. 5yr. rec.
8,808
8,802
8,371
8,272
8,982
9,449
10,518
9,458
8,371
8,272
8,976
9,038
9,005
8,972
8,394
8,292
9,251
9,966
11,510
9,978
8,394
8,292
8,533
8,657
8,645
8,515
7,849
7,612
12,207
331
336
0
0
1,557
2,807
369
371
0
0
1,483
1,786
397
407
0
0
2,180
3,982
435
432
0
0
4,426
3,441
660
545
0
0
28,125
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
Appendices - 77

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Operation
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
Region
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Category
1
2
2
o
6
o
3
i
i
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
5
o
3
i
i
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
J
o
J
# Facilities
0
17
11
19
13
0
0
o
J
5
3
6
0
0
4
4
4
4
1
1
9
11
5
6
2
1
14
7
8
4
Size ID
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Capital
65,141
62,029
54,588
61,642
54,044
270,735
165,299
266,224
160,718
265,732
160,008
297,074
192,914
266,244
160,749
265,732
160,008
10,154
7,652
10,073
7,573
9,798
7,205
10,966
8,663
10,089
7,598
9,798
7,205
Fixed
12,981
1,354
1,284
972
972
11,191
6,545
1,579
1,468
972
972
67,315
37,154
1,622
1,503
972
972
1,287
1,176
1,114
1,088
972
972
3,018
2,297
1,149
1,116
972
972
O&M
14,286
9,780
10,530
7,849
7,612
12,000
11,396
10,660
10,124
9,040
8,288
28,176
28,356
12,310
13,231
9,040
8,288
7,643
7,459
7,689
7,474
7,537
7,326
8,142
8,080
7,871
7,738
7,537
7,326
Syr. rec.
21,728
822
674
0
0
19,106
10,143
1,239
1,004
0
0
123,431
65,239
1,319
1,067
0
0
697
478
376
321
0
0
3,914
2,495
439
371
0
0
5yr. rec.
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
Appendices - 78

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
Region
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
South
South
South
South
South
Category
1
1
2
2
3
o
J
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
2
3
1
2
# Facilities Size ID
1 Mediumlb
1 Mediumlb
6 Mediumlb
7 Mediumlb
3 Mediumlb
4 Mediumlb
1 Mediumlb
1 Mediumlb
9 Mediumlb
5 Mediumlb
5 Mediumlb
3 Mediumlb
2 Medium2
3 Medium2
16 Medium2
24 Medium2
13 Medium2
19 Medium2
3 Medium2
2 Medium2
24 Medium2
16 Medium2
19 Medium2
13 Medium2
3 Large 1
29 Large 1
16 Large 1
2 Large 1
19 Large 1
Capital
13,364
9,971
13,226
9,821
12,952
9,453
14,491
11,374
13,242
9,846
12,952
9,453
23,187
19,687
22,940
19,343
22,599
18,871
25,276
22,729
22,980
19,405
22,599
18,871
18,612
124,846
124,386
21,326
124,884
Fixed
1,409
1,255
1,114
1,088
972
972
3,810
2,809
1,149
1,116
972
972
1,782
1,586
1,257
1,205
972
972
6,234
4,958
1,341
1,273
972
972
1,520
1,191
972
4,527
1,233
O&M
7,707
7,506
7,786
7,536
7,566
7,330
8,399
8,368
8,013
7,877
7,566
7,330
7,851
7,747
7,991
7,815
7,602
7,387
9,134
9,615
8,424
8,548
7,602
7,387
8,411
31,213
14,997
10,077
28,159
Syr. rec.
924
621
376
321
0
0
5,387
3,419
439
371
0
0
1,618
1,216
641
530
0
0
9,892
7,285
797
654
0
0
1,097
505
0
6,511
580
5yr. rec.
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
Appendices - 79

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type Operation Region Category # Facilities
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
3
1
2
3
1
2
o
6
i
i
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
11
13
53
42
9
35
28
14
46
209
659
102
323
21
30
314
440
153
215
2
10
40
140
16
68
3
7
60
93
Size ID
Large 1
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Capital
124,386
3,095
12,901
12,629
3,209
12,939
12,629
64,538
65,498
63,405
63,932
62,675
63,142
65,240
67,908
63,427
63,964
62,675
63,142
168,396
155,678
165,119
151,693
164,255
150,769
170,244
161,445
165,162
151,736
Fixed
972
995
982
972
1,121
1,024
972
2,606
2,845
1,282
1,243
972
972
3,428
5,309
1,308
1,276
972
972
5,270
5,456
1,439
1,380
972
972
7,430
11,355
1,489
1,425
O&M 3yr. rec. 5yr. rec.
10,696
7,396
8,462
7,761
7,466
8,356
7,580
8,501
8,684
8,541
8,410
7,607
7,520
8,932
10,164
12,579
9,790
7,607
7,520
10,594
10,911
9,691
9,500
8,301
8,179
11,728
14,453
16,582
11,538
0
153
130
0
380
205
0
2,391
2,740
536
496
0
0
3,541
6,189
573
543
0
0
6,120
6,395
756
688
0
0
9,144
14,653
827
751
,849
,849
,849
,849
,849
1,849
1,849
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
Appendices - 80

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type Operation Region Category # Facilities
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
3
o
J
1
1
2
2
o
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
24
46
33
79
275
665
206
499
49
53
413
444
309
333
15
36
126
305
95
228
23
24
189
203
142
152
19
57
224
Size ID
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Capital
164,255
150,769
21,127
20,967
20,831
20,547
20,239
19,872
21,351
21,717
20,856
20,571
20,239
19,872
29,305
29,076
28,830
28,427
28,237
27,751
29,619
30,128
28,854
28,451
28,237
27,751
41,467
41,417
40,767
Fixed
972
972
1,467
1,564
1,139
1,128
972
972
1,716
2,342
1,166
1,153
972
972
1,666
1,802
1,139
1,128
972
972
2,015
2,893
1,166
1,153
972
972
1,962
2,164
1,186
O&M 3yr. rec. 5yr. rec.
8,301
8,179
7,603
7,635
7,614
7,634
7,295
7,244
7,740
8,096
8,733
8,101
7,295
7,244
7,791
7,866
7,811
7,866
7,374
7,335
7,984
8,513
9,520
8,521
7,374
7,335
7,966
8,090
7,996
0
0
791
946
331
336
0
0
1,139
2,036
369
371
0
0
1,069
1,279
331
336
0
0
1,557
2,807
369
371
0
0
1,483
1,786
397
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
Appendices - 81

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type Operation Region Category # Facilities
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
5
o
3
i
i
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
3
o
5
i
i
2
2
3
3
1
1
683
148
450
28
38
336
455
222
300
1
2
30
59
33
67
1
1
44
39
50
45
0
0
7
19
8
21
0
0
Size ID
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Capital
40,467
40,132
39,743
41,915
42,929
40,791
40,485
40,132
39,743
59,137
52,774
58,186
51,323
57,840
50,843
65,120
61,940
58,227
51,387
57,840
50,843
259,389
158,261
254,878
153,681
254,386
152,971
285,727
185,877
Fixed
1,179
972
972
2,459
3,732
1,213
1,197
972
972
3,293
2,822
1,267
1,213
972
972
16,043
12,981
1,354
1,284
972
972
11,191
6,545
1,579
1,468
972
972
67,315
37,154
O&M
8,024
7,385
7,344
8,242
9,018
10,501
9,031
7,385
7,344
7,375
7,709
7,487
7,567
6,691
6,664
11,050
13,338
8,622
9,582
6,691
6,664
10,694
10,372
9,353
9,100
7,733
7,264
26,869
27,332
Syr. rec. 5yr. rec.
407
0
0
2,180
3,982
435
432
0
0
4,426
3,441
660
545
0
0
28,125
21,728
822
674
0
0
19,106
10,143
1,239
1,004
0
0
123,431
65,239
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
Appendices - 82

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Operation
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
Region
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
Category
2
2
3
o
J
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
1
1
2
2
3
o
J
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
1
1
2
2
3
o
J
1
# Facilities Size ID
10 Large2
12 Large2
1 1 Large2
14 Large2
3 Mediumla
4 Mediumla
24 Mediumla
36 Mediumla
13 Mediumla
20 Mediumla
4 Mediumla
3 Mediumla
37 Mediumla
24 Mediumla
20 Mediumla
13 Mediumla
2 Mediumlb
3 Mediumlb
16 Mediumlb
24 Mediumlb
9 Mediumlb
13 Mediumlb
3 Mediumlb
2 Mediumlb
24 Mediumlb
16 Mediumlb
13 Mediumlb
9 Mediumlb
5 Medium2
Capital
254,898
153,712
254,386
152,971
8,268
6,146
8,187
6,067
7,913
5,700
9,081
7,157
8,203
6,092
7,913
5,700
11,362
8,384
11,224
8,234
10,950
7,867
12,489
9,787
11,240
8,259
10,950
7,867
20,828
Fixed
1,622
1,503
972
972
1,287
1,176
1,114
1,088
972
972
3,018
2,297
1,149
1,116
972
972
1,409
1,255
1,114
1,088
972
972
3,810
2,809
1,149
1,116
972
972
1,782
O&M
11,003
12,207
7,733
7,264
6,524
6,544
6,569
6,559
6,418
6,411
7,023
7,165
6,751
6,823
6,418
6,411
6,585
6,590
6,664
6,620
6,444
6,413
7,277
7,451
6,891
6,961
6,444
6,413
6,722
Syr. rec.
1,319
1,067
0
0
697
478
376
321
0
0
3,914
2,495
439
371
0
0
924
621
376
321
0
0
5,387
3,419
439
371
0
0
1,618
5yr. rec.
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
Appendices - 83

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
4.1
5
5
5
5
5
5
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type Operation Region Category # Facilities
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
9
42
82
34
66
8
6
64
55
51
44
11
101
55
7
67
37
45
183
144
30
122
96
19
59
275
850
134
416
Size ID
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Capital
17,759
20,582
17,415
20,240
16,943
22,917
20,801
20,621
17,477
20,240
16,943
1,053
107,287
106,827
3,767
107,325
106,827
415
10,221
9,949
529
10,259
9,949
64,538
65,498
63,405
63,932
62,675
63,142
Fixed
1,586
1,257
1,205
972
972
6,234
4,958
1,341
1,273
972
972
1,520
1,191
972
4,527
1,233
972
995
982
972
1,121
1,024
972
2,214
2,453
890
851
580
580
O&M 3yr. rec. 5yr. rec.
6,824
6,862
6,892
6,473
6,464
8,005
8,692
7,295
7,625
6,473
6,464
6,712
29,514
13,298
8,378
26,461
8,997
6,418
7,484
6,782
6,488
7,378
6,602
2,249
2,432
2,289
2,158
1,355
1,268
1,216
641
530
0
0
9,892
7,285
797
654
0
0
1,097
505
0
6,511
580
0
153
130
0
380
205
0
2,391
2,740
536
496
0
0
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
2,746
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
1,849
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 84

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type Operation Region Category # Facilities
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
o
J
1
1
2
2
o
5
28
39
412
567
202
278
3
13
53
181
21
88
4
8
79
120
32
59
43
102
362
858
271
643
65
68
542
572
406
Size ID
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Capital
65,240
67,908
63,427
63,964
62,675
63,142
168,396
155,678
165,119
151,693
164,255
150,769
170,244
161,445
165,162
151,736
164,255
150,769
21,127
20,967
20,831
20,547
20,239
19,872
21,351
21,717
20,856
20,571
20,239
Fixed
3,036
4,917
916
884
580
580
4,878
5,064
1,047
988
580
580
7,038
10,963
1,097
1,033
580
580
1,075
1,172
747
736
580
580
1,324
1,950
774
761
580
O&M Syr. rec. 5yr. rec.
2,680
3,912
6,327
3,538
1,355
1,268
4,342
4,659
3,439
3,248
2,049
1,927
5,476
8,201
10,330
5,286
2,049
1,927
1,351
1,383
1,362
1,382
1,043
992
1,488
1,844
2,481
1,849
1,043
3,541
6,189
573
543
0
0
6,120
6,395
756
688
0
0
9,144
14,653
827
751
0
0
791
946
331
336
0
0
1,139
2,036
369
371
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 85

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type Operation Region Category # Facilities Size ID
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
LA
LA
LA
LA
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
o
6
i
i
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
5
o
3
i
i
2
2
429 Mediumla
20 Mediumlb
47 Mediumlb
166 Mediumlb
394 Mediumlb
124 Mediumlb
295 Mediumlb
30 Mediumlb
3 1 Mediumlb
249 Mediumlb
262 Mediumlb
187 Mediumlb
196 Mediumlb
24 Medium2
73 Medium2
295 Medium2
880 Medium2
194 Medium2
580 Medium2
37 Medium2
49 Medium2
442 Medium2
587 Medium2
292 Medium2
387 Medium2
1 Large 1
2 Large 1
41 Large 1
76 Large 1
Capital
19,872
29,305
29,076
28,830
28,427
28,237
27,751
29,619
30,128
28,854
28,451
28,237
27,751
41,467
41,417
40,767
40,467
40,132
39,743
41,915
42,929
40,791
40,485
40,132
39,743
59,137
52,774
58,186
51,323
Fixed
580
1,274
1,410
747
736
580
580
1,623
2,501
774
761
580
580
1,570
1,772
794
787
580
580
2,067
3,340
821
805
580
580
2,901
2,430
875
821
O&M Syr. rec. 5yr. rec.
992
1,539
1,614
1,559
1,614
1,122
1,083
1,732
2,261
3,268
2,269
1,122
1,083
1,714
1,838
1,744
1,772
1,133
1,092
1,990
2,766
4,249
2,779
1,133
1,092
1,123
1,457
1,235
1,315
0
1,069
1,279
331
336
0
0
1,557
2,807
369
371
0
0
1,483
1,786
397
407
0
0
2,180
3,982
435
432
0
0
4,426
3,441
660
545
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 86

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Operation
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
Region
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
Category
3
o
J
1
1
2
2
o
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
# Facilities
46
86
1
2
61
51
69
58
0
0
9
24
10
27
0
0
14
16
16
18
4
5
34
47
18
26
6
4
50
Size ID
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Capital
57,840
50,843
65,120
61,940
58,227
51,387
57,840
50,843
259,389
158,261
254,878
153,681
254,386
152,971
285,727
185,877
254,898
153,712
254,386
152,971
8,268
6,146
8,187
6,067
7,913
5,700
9,081
7,157
8,203
Fixed
580
580
15,651
12,589
962
892
580
580
10,799
6,153
1,187
1,076
580
580
66,923
36,762
1,230
1,111
580
580
895
784
722
696
580
580
2,626
1,905
757
O&M
439
412
4,798
7,086
2,370
3,330
439
412
4,442
4,120
3,101
2,848
1,481
1,012
20,617
21,080
4,751
5,955
1,481
1,012
272
292
317
307
166
159
771
913
499
Syr. rec.
0
0
28,125
21,728
822
674
0
0
19,106
10,143
1,239
1,004
0
0
123,431
65,239
1,319
1,067
0
0
697
478
376
321
0
0
3,914
2,495
439
5yr. rec.
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 87

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LW
LW
Region
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
South
South
Category
2
o
6
o
6
i
i
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
2
# Facilities Size ID
31 Mediumla
28 Mediumla
17 Mediumla
2 Mediumlb
4 Mediumlb
22 Mediumlb
3 1 Mediumlb
12 Mediumlb
17 Mediumlb
4 Mediumlb
2 Mediumlb
33 Mediumlb
21 Mediumlb
18 Mediumlb
12 Mediumlb
7 Medium2
12 Medium2
58 Medium2
106 Medium2
47 Medium2
85 Medium2
1 1 Medium2
8 Medium2
88 Medium2
70 Medium2
70 Medium2
57 Medium2
14 Large 1
130 Largel
Capital
6,092
7,913
5,700
11,362
8,384
11,224
8,234
10,950
7,867
12,489
9,787
11,240
8,259
10,950
7,867
20,828
17,759
20,582
17,415
20,240
16,943
22,917
20,801
20,621
17,477
20,240
16,943
107,584
107,287
Fixed
724
580
580
1,017
863
722
696
580
580
3,418
2,417
757
724
580
580
1,390
1,194
865
813
580
580
5,842
4,566
949
881
580
580
1,128
799
O&M
571
166
159
333
338
412
368
192
161
1,025
1,199
639
709
192
161
470
572
610
640
221
212
1,753
2,440
1,043
1,373
221
212
2,590
23,262
Syr. rec.
371
0
0
924
621
376
321
0
0
5,387
3,419
439
371
0
0
1,618
1,216
641
530
0
0
9,892
7,285
797
654
0
0
1,097
505
5yr. rec.
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 88

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type Operation Region Category # Facilities
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
o
6
i
2
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
1
1
2
2
3
o
J
1
71
10
87
48
58
236
186
39
157
124
19
59
275
850
134
416
28
39
412
567
202
278
o
3
13
53
181
21
88
4
Size ID
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Capital
106,827
110,298
107,325
106,827
10,233
10,221
9,949
10,347
10,259
9,949
64,538
65,498
63,405
63,932
62,675
63,142
65,240
67,908
63,427
63,964
62,675
63,142
168,396
155,678
165,119
151,693
164,255
150,769
170,244
Fixed
580
4,135
841
580
603
590
580
729
632
580
2,214
2,453
890
851
580
580
3,036
4,917
916
884
580
580
4,878
5,064
1,047
988
580
580
7,038
O&M Syr. rec. 5yr. rec.
7,046
4,257
20,209
2,745
362
1,232
530
432
1,126
350
2,249
2,432
2,289
2,158
1,355
1,268
2,680
3,912
6,327
3,538
1,355
1,268
4,342
4,659
3,439
3,248
2,049
1,927
5,476
0
6,511
580
0
153
130
0
380
205
0
2,391
2,740
536
496
0
0
3,541
6,189
573
543
0
0
6,120
6,395
756
688
0
0
9,144
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 89

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type Operation Region Category # Facilities
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
8
79
120
32
59
43
102
362
858
271
643
65
68
542
572
406
429
20
47
166
394
124
295
30
31
249
262
187
196
Size ID
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Capital
161,445
165,162
151,736
164,255
150,769
21,127
20,967
20,831
20,547
20,239
19,872
21,351
21,717
20,856
20,571
20,239
19,872
29,305
29,076
28,830
28,427
28,237
27,751
29,619
30,128
28,854
28,451
28,237
27,751
Fixed
10,963
1,097
1,033
580
580
1,075
1,172
747
736
580
580
1,324
1,950
774
761
580
580
1,274
1,410
747
736
580
580
1,623
2,501
774
761
580
580
O&M 3yr. rec. 5yr. rec.
8,201
10,330
5,286
2,049
1,927
,351
,383
,362
,382
,043
992
1,488
1,844
2,481
1,849
1,043
992
1,539
1,614
1,559
1,614
1,122
1,083
1,732
2,261
3,268
2,269
1,122
1,083
14,653
827
751
0
0
791
946
331
336
0
0
1,139
2,036
369
371
0
0
1,069
1,279
331
336
0
0
1,557
2,807
369
371
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 90

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type Operation Region Category # Facilities
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
1
1
2
2
3
o
J
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
24
73
295
880
194
580
37
49
442
587
292
387
1
2
41
76
46
86
1
2
61
51
69
58
0
0
9
24
10
Size ID
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Capital
41,467
41,417
40,767
40,467
40,132
39,743
41,915
42,929
40,791
40,485
40,132
39,743
59,137
52,774
58,186
51,323
57,840
50,843
65,120
61,940
58,227
51,387
57,840
50,843
259,389
158,261
254,878
153,681
254,386
Fixed
1,570
1,772
794
787
580
580
2,067
3,340
821
805
580
580
2,901
2,430
875
821
580
580
15,651
12,589
962
892
580
580
10,799
6,153
1,187
1,076
580
O&M 3yr. rec. 5yr. rec.
,714
,838
,744
,772
,133
1,092
1,990
2,766
4,249
2,779
1,133
,092
,123
,457
,235
,315
439
412
4,798
7,086
2,370
3,330
439
412
4,442
4,120
3,101
2,848
1,481
1,483
1,786
397
407
0
0
2,180
3,982
435
432
0
0
4,426
3,441
660
545
0
0
28,125
21,728
822
674
0
0
19,106
10,143
1,239
1,004
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 91

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Operation
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
Region
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Category
o
6
i
i
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
6
o
5
i
i
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
5
o
3
i
i
2
2
# Facilities Size ID
27 Large2
0 Large2
0 Large2
14 Large2
16 Large2
16 Large2
18 Large2
4 Mediumla
5 Mediumla
34 Mediumla
47 Mediumla
18 Mediumla
26 Mediumla
6 Mediumla
4 Mediumla
50 Mediumla
31 Mediumla
28 Mediumla
17 Mediumla
2 Mediumlb
4 Mediumlb
22 Mediumlb
3 1 Mediumlb
12 Mediumlb
17 Mediumlb
4 Mediumlb
2 Mediumlb
33 Mediumlb
21 Mediumlb
Capital
152,971
285,727
185,877
254,898
153,712
254,386
152,971
8,268
6,146
8,187
6,067
7,913
5,700
9,081
7,157
8,203
6,092
7,913
5,700
11,362
8,384
11,224
8,234
10,950
7,867
12,489
9,787
11,240
8,259
Fixed
580
66,923
36,762
1,230
1,111
580
580
895
784
722
696
580
580
2,626
1,905
757
724
580
580
1,017
863
722
696
580
580
3,418
2,417
757
724
O&M
1,012
20,617
21,080
4,751
5,955
1,481
1,012
272
292
317
307
166
159
771
913
499
571
166
159
333
338
412
368
192
161
1,025
1,199
639
709
Syr. rec.
0
123,431
65,239
1,319
1,067
0
0
697
478
376
321
0
0
3,914
2,495
439
371
0
0
924
621
376
321
0
0
5,387
3,419
439
371
5yr. rec.
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 92

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
7
7
7
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type Operation Region Category # Facilities
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Solid
Solid
Solid
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
BR
BR
BR
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
3
o
J
1
1
2
2
o
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
1
2
18
12
7
12
58
106
47
85
11
8
88
70
70
57
14
130
71
10
87
48
58
236
186
39
157
124
19
59
275
Size ID
Mediumlb
Mediumlb
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Capital
10,950
7,867
20,828
17,759
20,582
17,415
20,240
16,943
22,917
20,801
20,621
17,477
20,240
16,943
1,053
107,287
106,827
3,767
107,325
106,827
415
10,221
9,949
529
10,259
9,949
64,538
65,498
63,405
Fixed
580
580
1,390
1,194
865
813
580
580
5,842
4,566
949
881
580
580
1,128
799
580
4,135
841
580
603
590
580
729
632
580
2,214
2,453
890
O&M 3yr. rec. 5yr. rec.
192
161
470
572
610
640
221
212
1,753
2,440
1,043
1,373
221
212
460
23,262
136
2,126
20,209
136
166
1,232
133
236
1,126
133
2,249
2,432
2,289
0
0
1,618
1,216
641
530
0
0
9,892
7,285
797
654
0
0
1,097
505
0
6,511
580
0
153
130
0
380
205
0
2,391
2,740
536
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 93

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type Operation Region Category # Facilities
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
6
o
5
i
i
2
2
3
3
1
1
850
134
416
28
39
412
567
202
278
3
13
53
181
21
88
4
8
79
120
32
59
43
102
362
858
271
643
65
68
Size ID
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Capital
63,932
62,675
63,142
65,240
67,908
63,427
63,964
62,675
63,142
168,396
155,678
165,119
151,693
164,255
150,769
170,244
161,445
165,162
151,736
164,255
150,769
21,127
20,967
20,831
20,547
20,239
19,872
21,351
21,717
Fixed
851
580
580
3,036
4,917
916
884
580
580
4,878
5,064
1,047
988
580
580
7,038
10,963
1,097
1,033
580
580
1,075
1,172
747
736
580
580
1,324
1,950
O&M Syr. rec. 5yr. rec.
2,158
1,355
1,268
2,680
3,912
6,327
3,538
1,355
1,268
4,342
4,659
3,439
3,248
2,049
1,927
5,476
8,201
10,330
5,286
2,049
1,927
1,351
1,383
1,362
1,382
1,043
992
1,488
1,844
496
0
0
3,541
6,189
573
543
0
0
6,120
6,395
756
688
0
0
9,144
14,653
827
751
0
0
791
946
331
336
0
0
1,139
2,036
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 94

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type Operation Region Category # Facilities Size ID
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
BR
LA
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Mid-Atlantic
South
Midwest
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
1
1
2
2
3
o
J
1
542 Mediumla
572 Mediumla
406 Mediumla
429 Mediumla
20 Mediumlb
47 Mediumlb
166 Mediumlb
394 Mediumlb
124 Mediumlb
295 Mediumlb
30 Mediumlb
3 1 Mediumlb
249 Mediumlb
262 Mediumlb
187 Mediumlb
196 Mediumlb
24 Medium2
73 Medium2
295 Medium2
880 Medium2
194 Medium2
580 Medium2
37 Medium2
49 Medium2
442 Medium2
587 Medium2
292 Medium2
387 Medium2
1 Large 1
Capital
20,856
20,571
20,239
19,872
29,305
29,076
28,830
28,427
28,237
27,751
29,619
30,128
28,854
28,451
28,237
27,751
41,467
41,417
40,767
40,467
40,132
39,743
41,915
42,929
40,791
40,485
40,132
39,743
59,137
Fixed
774
761
580
580
1,274
1,410
747
736
580
580
1,623
2,501
774
761
580
580
1,570
1,772
794
787
580
580
2,067
3,340
821
805
580
580
2,901
O&M Syr. rec. 5yr. rec.
2,481
1,849
1,043
992
1,539
1,614
1,559
1,614
1,122
1,083
1,732
2,261
3,268
2,269
1,122
1,083
1,714
1,838
1,744
1,772
1,133
1,092
1,990
2,766
4,249
2,779
1,133
1,092
1,123
369
371
0
0
1,069
1,279
331
336
0
0
1,557
2,807
369
371
0
0
1,483
1,786
397
407
0
0
2,180
3,982
435
432
0
0
4,426
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 95

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Operation
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
Region
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Category
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
o
J
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
# Facilities
2
41
76
46
86
1
2
61
51
69
58
0
0
9
24
10
27
0
0
14
16
16
18
4
5
34
47
18
26
Size ID
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Large2
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Mediumla
Capital
52,774
58,186
51,323
57,840
50,843
65,120
61,940
58,227
51,387
57,840
50,843
259,389
158,261
254,878
153,681
254,386
152,971
285,727
185,877
254,898
153,712
254,386
152,971
8,268
6,146
8,187
6,067
7,913
5,700
Fixed
2,430
875
821
580
580
15,651
12,589
962
892
580
580
10,799
6,153
1,187
1,076
580
580
66,923
36,762
1,230
1,111
580
580
895
784
722
696
580
580
O&M
1,457
1,235
1,315
439
412
4,798
7,086
2,370
3,330
439
412
4,442
4,120
3,101
2,848
1,481
1,012
20,617
21,080
4,751
5,955
1,481
1,012
272
292
317
307
166
159
Syr. rec.
3,441
660
545
0
0
28,125
21,728
822
674
0
0
19,106
10,143
1,239
1,004
0
0
123,431
65,239
1,319
1,067
0
0
697
478
376
321
0
0
5yr. rec.
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 96

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Operation
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
LA
Region
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
South
Midwest
Category
1
1
2
2
3
o
J
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
# Facilities Size ID
6 Mediumla
4 Mediumla
50 Mediumla
31 Mediumla
28 Mediumla
17 Mediumla
2 Mediumlb
4 Mediumlb
22 Mediumlb
3 1 Mediumlb
12 Mediumlb
17 Mediumlb
4 Mediumlb
2 Mediumlb
33 Mediumlb
21 Mediumlb
18 Mediumlb
12 Mediumlb
7 Medium2
12 Medium2
58 Medium2
106 Medium2
47 Medium2
85 Medium2
1 1 Medium2
8 Medium2
88 Medium2
70 Medium2
70 Medium2
Capital
9,081
7,157
8,203
6,092
7,913
5,700
11,362
8,384
11,224
8,234
10,950
7,867
12,489
9,787
11,240
8,259
10,950
7,867
20,828
17,759
20,582
17,415
20,240
16,943
22,917
20,801
20,621
17,477
20,240
Fixed
2,626
1,905
757
724
580
580
1,017
863
722
696
580
580
3,418
2,417
757
724
580
580
1,390
1,194
865
813
580
580
5,842
4,566
949
881
580
O&M
771
913
499
571
166
159
333
338
412
368
192
161
1,025
1,199
639
709
192
161
470
572
610
640
221
212
1,753
2,440
1,043
1,373
221
Syr. rec.
3,914
2,495
439
371
0
0
924
621
376
321
0
0
5,387
3,419
439
371
0
0
1,618
1,216
641
530
0
0
9,892
7,285
797
654
0
5yr. rec.
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 97

-------
Cost for Poultry Operations (Continued)
Option
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
Animal
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Chic
Type
Solid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Liquid
Operation
LA
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
LW
Region
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
South
Category
o
6
i
2
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
1
2
3
# Facilities
57
14
130
71
10
87
48
58
236
186
39
157
124
Size ID
Medium2
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Large 1
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium2
Medium!
Capital
16,943
1,053
107,287
106,827
3,767
107,325
106,827
415
10,221
9,949
529
10,259
9949
Fixed
580
1,128
799
580
4,135
841
580
603
590
580
729
632
580
O&M
212
460
23,262
7,046
2,126
20,209
2,745
166
1,232
530
236
1,126
350
Syr. rec.
0
1,097
505
0
6,511
580
0
153
130
0
380
205
0
5yr. rec.
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Appendices - 98

-------
Regulatory Compliance Costs for the Turkey (SL, slaughter) Operations
Option








1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
Animal
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Type
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Operation
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
Region
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Category
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
1
# Facilities
30
20
8
5
26
17
7
7
288
192
127
90
247
165
113
124
123
82
59
60
106
70
52
83
18
12
5
3
Size ID
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Capital
7,842
12,627
17,863
37,378
18,125
30,109
44,537
153,603
7,780
12,098
16,986
35,073
18,215
29,798
43,935
150,038
6,637
10,955
15,679
33,290
17,240
28,845
42,817
148,300
11,037
18,016
25,653
54,117
Fixed
1,483
2,103
2,781
5,266
1,314
1,818
2,424
7,003
1,401
1,401
1,619
2,239
1,434
1,404
1,623
2,261
580
580
580
580
580
580
580
580
5,716
9,242
13,100
27,239
O&M
1,755
2,307
2,802
4,674
1,224
1,572
2,022
6,060
1,762
2,416
2,986
5,167
1,280
1,748
2,367
8,147
1,297
1,562
1,742
2,442
861
976
1,146
3,058
3,718
5,617
7,586
14,953
3yrrec
1,380
2,248
3,197
6,676
1,032
1,660
2,416
8,850
1,266
1,266
1,571
2,439
1,182
1,145
1,418
2,403
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
7,306
12,243
17,644
37,438
5yrrec
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
                          Appendices - 99

-------
Cost for Turkey Operations (Continued)
Option
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
o
J
o
J
3
3
o
J
o
J
3
3
Animal
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Type
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
o
J
o
J
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
16
10
4
4
173
115
76
54
148
99
68
74
74
49
35
36
64
42
31
50
3
2
1
0
3
2
1
1
28
Size ID
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Capital
22,410
37,336
55,305
191,109
7,929
12,220
17,116
35,423
18,342
29,921
44,064
150,389
6,637
10,955
15,679
33,290
17,240
28,845
42,817
148,300
10,925
16,881
23,397
47,685
21,619
34,915
50,922
171,906
10,864
Fixed
7,013
11,429
16,747
56,888
1,599
1,563
1,790
2,699
1,603
1,567
1,795
2,727
580
580
580
580
580
580
580
580
1,483
2,103
2,781
5,266
1,314
1,818
2,424
7,003
1,401
O&M
3,856
6,010
8,635
29,093
4,331
7,131
9,830
19,871
2,287
3,152
4,303
13,404
1,297
1,562
1,742
2,442
861
976
1,146
3,058
2,759
3,334
3,854
5,820
2,376
2,749
3,230
7,505
2,766
3yrrec
8,137
13,644
20,273
76,673
1,543
1,493
1,811
3,082
1,392
1,347
1,632
3,036
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1,380
2,248
3,197
6,676
1,032
1,660
2,416
8,850
1,266
5yrrec
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
          Appendices - 100

-------
Cost for Turkey Operations (Continued)
Option
3
o
J
o
J
3
3
o
J
o
J
3
3
o
J
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Animal
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Type
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Operation Region Category #
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
Facilities
18
12
9
27
18
12
14
12
8
6
6
12
8
6
9
4
o
3
1
1
4
3
1
1
41
28
18
13
41
27
Size ID
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Capital
16,351
22,520
45,379
21,710
34,604
50,319
168,341
9,721
15,209
21,213
43,597
20,734
33,651
49,202
166,603
14,121
22,270
31,186
64,423
25,904
42,142
61,690
209,412
11,013
16,474
22,649
45,729
21,837
34,726
Fixed
1,401
1,619
2,239
1,434
1,404
1,623
2,261
580
580
580
580
580
580
580
580
5,716
9,242
13,100
27,239
7,013
11,429
16,747
56,888
1,599
1,563
1,790
2,699
1,603
1,567
O&M
3,443
4,038
6,313
2,431
2,925
3,576
9,592
2,300
2,588
2,794
3,589
2,012
2,153
2,354
4,503
4,721
6,643
8,638
16,099
5,007
7,187
9,843
30,538
5,334
8,157
10,882
21,017
3,439
4,330
3yrrec
1,266
1,571
2,439
1,182
1,145
1,418
2,403
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
7,306
12,243
17,644
37,438
8,137
13,644
20,273
76,673
1,543
1,493
1,811
3,082
1,392
1,347
5yrrec
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
          Appendices - 101

-------
Cost for Turkey Operations (Continued)
Option
3
o
J
o
J
3
3
o
J
o
J
3
3
o
J
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
Animal
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Type
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Operation Region Category #
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
o
3
o
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
o
J
o
J
Facilities
19
20
18
12
8
9
17
12
9
14
9
6
2
2
8
5
2
2
88
58
39
27
72
48
33
36
37
25
18
Size ID
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Capital
50,449
168,691
9,721
15,209
21,213
43,597
20,734
33,651
49,202
166,603
7,842
12,627
17,863
37,378
18,125
30,109
44,537
153,603
7,780
12,098
16,986
35,073
18,215
29,798
43,935
150,038
6,637
10,955
15,679
Fixed
1,795
2,727
580
580
580
580
580
580
580
580
1,483
2,103
2,781
5,266
1,314
1,818
2,424
7,003
1,401
1,401
1,619
2,239
1,434
1,404
1,623
2,261
580
580
580
O&M
5,511
14,849
2,300
2,588
2,794
3,589
2,012
2,153
2,354
4,503
1,755
2,307
2,802
4,674
1,224
1,572
2,022
6,060
1,762
2,416
2,986
5,167
1,280
1,748
2,367
8,147
1,297
1,562
1,742
3yrrec
1,632
3,036
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1,380
2,248
3,197
6,676
1,032
1,660
2,416
8,850
1,266
1,266
1,571
2,439
1,182
1,145
1,418
2,403
0
0
0
5yrrec
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
          Appendices - 102

-------
Cost for Turkey Operations (Continued)
Option
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
3.1
Animal
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Type
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Operation
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
Region
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Category
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
# Facilities
18
31
20
15
24
14
9
4
2
11
7
3
3
131
88
58
41
108
72
49
54
56
37
27
27
46
30
23
36
Size ID
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Capital
33,290
17,240
28,845
42,817
148,300
11,037
18,016
25,653
54,117
22,410
37,336
55,305
191,109
7,929
12,220
17,116
35,423
18,342
29,921
44,064
150,389
6,637
10,955
15,679
33,290
17,240
28,845
42,817
148,300
Fixed
580
580
580
580
580
5,716
9,242
13,100
27,239
7,013
11,429
16,747
56,888
1,599
1,563
1,790
2,699
1,603
1,567
1,795
2,727
580
580
580
580
580
580
580
580
O&M
2,442
861
976
1,146
3,058
3,718
5,617
7,586
14,953
3,856
6,010
8,635
29,093
4,331
7,131
9,830
19,871
2,287
3,152
4,303
13,404
1,297
1,562
1,742
2,442
861
976
1,146
3,058
3yrrec
0
0
0
0
0
7,306
12,243
17,644
37,438
8,137
13,644
20,273
76,673
1,543
1,493
1,811
3,082
1,392
1,347
1,632
3,036
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
5yrrec
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
          Appendices - 103

-------
Cost for Turkey Operations (Continued)
Option
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Animal
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Type
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Operation Region Category #
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
o
J
3
3
o
J
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
Facilities
3
2
1
0
o
3
2
1
1
28
18
12
9
27
18
12
14
12
8
6
6
12
8
6
9
4
3
1
1
4
Size ID
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Capital
10,925
16,881
23,397
47,685
21,619
34,915
50,922
171,906
10,864
16,351
22,520
45,379
21,710
34,604
50,319
168,341
9,721
15,209
21,213
43,597
20,734
33,651
49,202
166,603
14,121
22,270
31,186
64,423
25,904
Fixed
1,875
2,495
3,173
5,658
1,706
2,210
2,816
7,395
1,793
1,793
2,011
2,631
1,826
1,796
2,015
2,653
972
972
972
972
972
972
972
972
6,108
9,634
13,492
27,631
7,405
O&M
9,011
9,586
10,106
12,072
8,628
9,001
9,482
13,757
9,018
9,695
10,290
12,565
8,683
9,177
9,828
15,844
8,552
8,840
9,046
9,841
8,264
8,405
8,606
10,755
10,973
12,895
14,890
22,351
11,259
3yrrec
1,380
2,248
3,197
6,676
1,032
1,660
2,416
8,850
1,266
1,266
1,571
2,439
1,182
1,145
1,418
2,403
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
7,306
12,243
17,644
37,438
8,137
5yrrec
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
          Appendices - 104

-------
Cost for Turkey Operations (Continued)
Option
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
Animal
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Type
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Operation
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
i Region
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Category #
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
o
6
o
5
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
2
2
Facilities
3
1
1
41
28
18
13
41
27
19
20
18
12
8
9
17
12
9
14
9
6
2
2
8
5
2
2
88
58
Size ID
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Capital
42,142
61,690
209,412
11,013
16,474
22,649
45,729
21,837
34,726
50,449
168,691
9,721
15,209
21,213
43,597
20,734
33,651
49,202
166,603
7,842
12,627
17,863
37,378
18,125
30,109
44,537
153,603
7,780
12,098
Fixed
11,821
17,139
57,280
1,991
1,955
2,182
3,091
1,995
1,959
2,187
3,119
972
972
972
972
972
972
972
972
1,875
2,495
3,173
5,658
1,706
2,210
2,816
7,395
1,793
1,793
O&M
13,439
16,095
36,790
11,586
14,409
17,134
27,269
9,691
10,582
11,763
21,101
8,552
8,840
9,046
9,841
8,264
8,405
8,606
10,755
8,007
8,559
9,054
10,926
7,476
7,824
8,274
12,312
8,014
8,668
3yrrec
13,644
20,273
76,673
1,543
1,493
1,811
3,082
1,392
1,347
1,632
3,036
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1,380
2,248
3,197
6,676
1,032
1,660
2,416
8,850
1,266
1,266
5yrrec
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
          Appendices - 105

-------
Cost for Turkey Operations (Continued)
Option
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
Animal
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Type
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Operation
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
i Region
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Category it
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
o
J
3
3
o
J
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
Facilities
39
27
72
48
33
36
37
25
18
18
31
20
15
24
14
9
4
2
11
7
3
o
J
131
88
58
41
108
72
49
Size ID
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Capital
16,986
35,073
18,215
29,798
43,935
150,038
6,637
10,955
15,679
33,290
17,240
28,845
42,817
148,300
11,037
18,016
25,653
54,117
22,410
37,336
55,305
191,109
7,929
12,220
17,116
35,423
18,342
29,921
44,064
Fixed
2,011
2,631
1,826
1,796
2,015
2,653
972
972
972
972
972
972
972
972
6,108
9,634
13,492
27,631
7,405
11,821
17,139
57,280
1,991
1,955
2,182
3,091
1,995
1,959
2,187
O&M
9,238
11,419
7,532
8,000
8,619
14,399
7,549
7,814
7,994
8,694
7,113
7,228
7,398
9,310
9,970
11,869
13,838
21,205
10,108
12,262
14,887
35,345
10,583
13,383
16,082
26,123
8,539
9,404
10,555
3yrrec
1,571
2,439
1,182
1,145
1,418
2,403
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
7,306
12,243
17,644
37,438
8,137
13,644
20,273
76,673
1,543
1,493
1,811
3,082
1,392
1,347
1,632
5yrrec
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
          Appendices - 106

-------
Cost for Turkey Operations (Continued)
Option
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
Animal
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Type
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Operation
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
i Region (
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Category it
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
o
6
o
6
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
o
J
o
J
Facilities
54
56
37
27
27
46
30
23
36
12
8
o
J
2
10
7
3
3
115
77
51
36
99
66
45
50
49
33
24
24
Size ID
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Capital
150,389
6,637
10,955
15,679
33,290
17,240
28,845
42,817
148,300
7,842
12,627
17,863
37,378
18,125
30,109
44,537
153,603
7,780
12,098
16,986
35,073
18,215
29,798
43,935
150,038
6,637
10,955
15,679
33,290
Fixed
3,119
972
972
972
972
972
972
972
972
1,483
2,103
2,781
5,266
1,314
1,818
2,424
7,003
1,401
1,401
1,619
2,239
1,434
1,404
1,623
2,261
580
580
580
580
O&M
19,656
7,549
7,814
7,994
8,694
7,113
7,228
7,398
9,310
1,755
2,307
2,802
4,674
1,224
1,572
2,022
6,060
1,762
2,416
2,986
5,167
1,280
1,748
2,367
8,147
1,297
1,562
1,742
2,442
3yrrec
3,036
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1,380
2,248
3,197
6,676
1,032
1,660
2,416
8,850
1,266
1,266
1,571
2,439
1,182
1,145
1,418
2,403
0
0
0
0
5yrrec
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
3,082
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
          Appendices - 107

-------
Cost for Turkey Operations (Continued)
Option
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5a
Animal
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Type
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
3
o
J
o
J
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
o
J
o
J
3
1
42
28
21
33
18
12
5
3
16
10
4
4
173
115
76
54
148
99
68
74
74
49
35
36
64
42
31
50
12
Size ID
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Capital
17,240
28,845
42,817
148,300
11,037
18,016
25,653
54,117
22,410
37,336
55,305
191,109
7,929
12,220
17,116
35,423
18,342
29,921
44,064
150,389
6,637
10,955
15,679
33,290
17,240
28,845
42,817
148,300
7,842
Fixed
580
580
580
580
5,716
9,242
13,100
27,239
7,013
11,429
16,747
56,888
1,599
1,563
1,790
2,699
1,603
1,567
1,795
2,727
580
580
580
580
580
580
580
580
1,483
O&M
861
976
1,146
3,058
3,718
5,617
7,586
14,953
3,856
6,010
8,635
29,093
4,331
7,131
9,830
19,871
2,287
3,152
4,303
13,404
1,297
1,562
1,742
2,442
861
976
1,146
3,058
1,755
3yrrec 5yrrec
0
0
0
0
7,306
12,243
17,644
37,438
8,137
13,644
20,273
76,673
1,543
1,493
1,811
3,082
1,392
1,347
1,632
3,036
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1,380
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
          Appendices - 108

-------
Cost for Turkey Operations (Continued)
Option
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
Animal
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Type
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
o
J
o
J
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
8
3
2
10
7
3
3
115
77
51
36
99
66
45
50
49
33
24
24
42
28
21
33
18
12
5
3
16
10
Size ID
Medium Ib
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Capital
12,627
17,863
37,378
18,125
30,109
44,537
153,603
7,780
12,098
16,986
35,073
18,215
29,798
43,935
150,038
6,637
10,955
15,679
33,290
17,240
28,845
42,817
148,300
11,037
18,016
25,653
54,117
22,410
37,336
Fixed
2,103
2,781
5,266
1,314
1,818
2,424
7,003
1,401
1,401
1,619
2,239
1,434
1,404
1,623
2,261
580
580
580
580
580
580
580
580
5,716
9,242
13,100
27,239
7,013
11,429
O&M
2,307
2,802
4,674
1,224
1,572
2,022
6,060
1,762
2,416
2,986
5,167
1,280
1,748
2,367
8,147
1,297
1,562
1,742
2,442
861
976
1,146
3,058
3,718
5,617
7,586
14,953
3,856
6,010
3yrrec 5yrrec
2,248
3,197
6,676
1,032
1,660
2,416
8,850
1,266
1,266
1,571
2,439
1,182
1,145
1,418
2,403
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
7,306
12,243
17,644
37,438
8,137
13,644
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
          Appendices - 109

-------
Cost for Turkey Operations (Continued)
Option
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
5a
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
Animal
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Type
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
o
J
3
3
o
J
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
4
4
173
115
76
54
148
99
68
74
74
49
35
36
64
42
31
50
12
8
3
2
10
7
3
o
J
115
77
51
Size ID
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Capital
55,305
191,109
7,929
12,220
17,116
35,423
18,342
29,921
44,064
150,389
6,637
10,955
15,679
33,290
17,240
28,845
42,817
148,300
7,842
12,627
17,863
37,378
18,125
30,109
44,537
153,603
7,780
12,098
16,986
Fixed
16,747
56,888
1,599
1,563
1,790
2,699
1,603
1,567
1,795
2,727
580
580
580
580
580
580
580
580
1,483
2,103
2,781
5,266
1,314
1,818
2,424
7,003
1,401
1,401
1,619
O&M
8,635
29,093
4,331
7,131
9,830
19,871
2,287
3,152
4,303
13,404
1,297
1,562
1,742
2,442
861
976
1,146
3,058
1,755
2,307
2,802
4,674
1,224
1,572
2,022
6,060
1,762
2,416
2,986
3yrrec 5yrrec
20,273
76,673
1,543
1,493
1,811
3,082
1,392
1,347
1,632
3,036
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1,380
2,248
3,197
6,676
1,032
1,660
2,416
8,850
1,266
1,266
1,571
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
          Appendices - 110

-------
Cost for Turkey Operations (Continued)
Option
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
Animal
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Type
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Operation Region Category # Facilities
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
2
2
2
2
2
3
3
3
3
o
J
o
J
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
36
99
66
45
50
49
33
24
24
42
28
21
33
18
12
5
3
16
10
4
4
173
115
76
54
148
99
68
74
Size ID
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Capital
35,073
18,215
29,798
43,935
150,038
6,637
10,955
15,679
33,290
17,240
28,845
42,817
148,300
11,037
18,016
25,653
54,117
22,410
37,336
55,305
191,109
7,929
12,220
17,116
35,423
18,342
29,921
44,064
150,389
Fixed
2,239
1,434
1,404
1,623
2,261
580
580
580
580
580
580
580
580
5,716
9,242
13,100
27,239
7,013
11,429
16,747
56,888
1,599
1,563
1,790
2,699
1,603
1,567
1,795
2,727
O&M
5,167
1,280
1,748
2,367
8,147
1,297
1,562
1,742
2,442
861
976
1,146
3,058
3,718
5,617
7,586
14,953
3,856
6,010
8,635
29,093
4,331
7,131
9,830
19,871
2,287
3,152
4,303
13,404
3yrrec 5yrrec
2,439
1,182
1,145
1,418
2,403
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
7,306
12,243
17,644
37,438
8,137
13,644
20,273
76,673
1,543
1,493
1,811
3,082
1,392
1,347
1,632
3,036
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
          Appendices - 111

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Cost for Turkey Operations (Continued)
Option
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
Animal
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Turk
Type
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Solid
Operation Region Category #
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
SL
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Mid-Atlantic
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
Midwest
3
3
3
3
3
o
J
o
J
3
Facilities
74
49
35
36
64
42
31
50
Size ID
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Large 1
Mediumla
Mediumlb
Medium2
Laree 1
Capital Fixed
6,637
10,955
15,679
33,290
17,240
28,845
42,817
148.300
580
580
580
580
580
580
580
580
O&M 3yrrec 5yrrec
1,297
1,562
1,742
2,442
861
976
1,146
3.058
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
          Appendices - 112

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