&EPA
         United States/
         Environmental Protection
         Agency
            Science and Technology
            (4305)
EPA-823-R-97-008
September 1997
The Incidence And Severity
Of Sediment Contamination
In Surface Waters Of the
United States
         VolumeS:
         National Sediment
         Contaminant Point
         Source Inventory

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    The Incidence And
  Severity Of Sediment
Contamination In Surface
  Waters Of The United
          States:

          VolumeS:
      National Sediment
      Containment Point
      Source Inventory
         September 1997
      Office of Science and Technology
  United States Environmental Protection Agency
         401 M Street, SW
        Washington, DC 20460

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      The National Sediment Contaminant Point Source Inventory is a database of point source
      pollutant discharges that may result in sediment contamination, and a screening-level analy-
      sis of chemicals, geographic areas, and industries based on potential to cause sediment con-
tamination.  The data and information contained in this document could be used in various EPA
regulatory programs  for priority setting or other purposes after further evaluation using program-
specific criteria. However, this document has no immediate or direct regulatory consequence.  It
does not in itself establish any legally binding requirements, establish or affect legal rights or obliga-
tions, or represent a determination of any party's liability.

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                                    National Sediment Contaminant I^oint'Spur'cfe Inventory
Contents
                                                                                 Page

             Acknowledgments	»	v"

             Executive Summary	»	»x

              ~j     Introduction	.»	1-1
                    Objectives of Point Source Inventory and Analysis	1-2
                    Anticipated Uses.,	1-3

             O     Development of the Point Source Inventory	2-1
                    Identification of Point Source Releases of Sediment Contaminants	2-1
                    Determination of Chemical Loads	2-3
                        Toxic Release Inventory Data	2-3
                        Permit Compliance System Data	2-4
                    Assignment of Geographic Location and Industrial Category	2-5
                    Inventory Limitations	2-5

              O     Development of Chemical Load Scores	3-1
                    Chemical-Specific Toxicity Score	3-3
                        Aquatic Life Screening Values	3-4
                        Human Health Screening Values	3-5
                        Chemical-Specific Toxicity Scores	3-5
                    Chemical-Specifk: Fate Score	3-6
                        Air-Water Partitioning Subfactor	3-6
                        Sediment Adsorption Subfactor	,	3-7
                        Aqueous Biodegradation Subfactor	3-8
                    Functions of Chemical Load Score Components	3-9

                    Results of Screening-Level Analyses	4-1
                    Preparation of Data for Loading Analysis	4-1
                    Analysis by Chemical	4-2
                    Analysis by Watershed	4-12
                    Analysis by Industrial  Category	4-15
                    Conclusions	4-18

             References	Ref-1

             Appendices
                    A.  Chemical Load Scores and Supporting Data	,	...— A-l
                    B.  Watershed Priority Groups	B-l
                    C.  Detailed Analyses of Industrial Categories	C-l
                                                                                   Hi

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 Tables                                                              Page

 Table 3-1    Assignment of Load Score	3-2

 Table 4-1    Analysis of TRI Data by Chemical (Sorted by Descending
             Load Score)	4.3

 Table 4-2    Analysis of PCS Data by Chemical (Sorted by Descending
             Load Score)	4_6

 Table 4-3    Analysis of TRI Data by Chemical Class	4-12

 Table 4-4    Analysis of PCS Data by Chemical Class	4-12

 Table 4-5    Number of Watersheds in Each Priority Group by EPA Region	4-15

 Table 4-6    Analysis of TRI Data by Industrial Category (Sorted by
             Descending Load Score)	4-18

 Table 4-7    Analysis of PCS Data by Industrial Category (Sorted by
             Descending Load Score)	4-19
 Tables in Appendices

 Table A-l   Chemical Load Scores (Sorted by Chemical Name)	A-3

 Table A-2   Sediment Chemistry Screening Values (Sorted by Chemical Name)	A-7

 Table A-3   Physical and Chemical Properties (Sorted by Chemical Name)	A-13

 Table B-l   Priority Group 1 Watersheds (load score greater than 80)	B-3

 Table B-2   Priority Group 2 Watersheds (load score range: 61-80)	B-5

 Table B-3   Priority Group 3 Watersheds (load score range: 41-60)	B-7

 Table B-4   Priority Group 4 Watersheds (load score range: 21-40)	B-9

 Table B-5   Priority Group 5 Watersheds (load score range: 1-20)	B-15

 Table C-l   Load Scores from TRI by Industrial Category and Chemical
            (for Load Scores greater than 0)	C-3

Table C-2   Load Scores from PCS by Industrial Category and Chemical
            (for Load Scores greater than 0)	C-ll
IV

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                          Nalio'iji 1 Sediment Conhuniiuml lN>inl Source Invenlon
Figures                                                               page

Figure 3-1  Chemical Load Score—Parameter sensitivity	3-11

Figure 3-2  Chemical Load Score—K^. sensitivity	3-12

Figure 4-1  Load Score by watershed	4-14

Figure 4-2  Comparison of Survey evaluation to Load Score by
            watershed: percent of stations classified as Tier 1 or 2 as a function of
            Load Score	4-16

Figure 4-3  Comparison of Survey evaluation to Load Score by watershed:
            (a) percent of stations classified as Tier 1 or 2 as a function of Load
            Score, (b) percent of watersheds that contain APCs by
            priority group	4-17

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vi

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                                  Nation;}! Sediment Contaminant Point Source Inventory
Acknowledgments
                The United States Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Science and Technol-
            ogy produced this report with technical assistance from Terra Tech, Inc., under EPA Con-
            tract Number 68-C3-0374 and Versar, Inc., under EPA Contract Number 68-C3-0013. Several
            staff people from EPA regional offices and other headquarters program offices reviewed
            previous drafts of this document, and we greatly appreciate their efforts and helpful com-
            ments. We wish to thank Anthony Pait of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminis-
            tration (NOAA) for his review of the original hazard analysis methodology and Ruth Hull
            of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for providing many measures of the physical-chemi-
            cal properties for specific chemicals. We also wish to acknowledge the following persons,
            who provided external peer review of a previous working draft report employing the hazard
            analysis methodology on 1992 facility release data:  William J. Adams, formerly of Ana-
            lytical Bio-Chemistry Laboratories, Inc., in Columbia, Missouri; Robert Huggett, formerly
            of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science in Norfolk, Virginia; Richard Kimerle of the
            Monsanto Company in St. Louis, Missouri; and Keith Phillips of the State of Washington
            Department of Ecology in; Olympia, Washington.  We greatly appreciate their insightful
            comments.            '
                                                                             vii

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  Acknnicnts
viii

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                                      National Sediment Contaminant Point Sourcle Inventory
Executive  Summary
                    During the past two decades, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has
                    focused its water pollution control efforts on protecting water quality within the
                    water column. This has been accomplished primarily by controlling municipal and
              industrial point sources. More recently, EPA has begun to direct its efforts toward identify-
              ing and controlling other threats to the aquatic environment, including the accumulation of
              toxic chemicals in sediment. The Water Resources Development Act of 1992 (WRDA)
              directed EPA, in consultation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
              and the Army Corps of Engineers, to conduct a comprehensive national survey of data
              regarding aquatic sediment.quality in the United States. The Act required EPA to compile
              all existing information on the quantity, chemical and physical composition, and geographic
              location of pollutants in aquatic sediment, including the probable source of such pollutants
              and identification of those sediments which are contaminated.  The Act further required
              EPA to report to the Congress the findings, conclusions, and recommendations of such
              survey, including recommendations for actions necessary to prevent contamination of aquatic
              sediments and to control sources of contamination. Volume 3 of this report (this volume)
              addresses point sources.  Vplume 4 of this report, when completed, will address nonpoint
              sources. Chapter 4 of Volume 1 of this report describes all probable source categories.

                 EPA's Office of Science and Technology (OST) has led the Agency's efforts to compile
              and analyze data for the National Sediment Contaminant Point Source Inventory. The screen-
              ing-level sediment contaminant load analysis developed for and applied to this study cannot
              be used alone to predict sediment contamination or to indicate where contaminated sedi-
              ment problems have occurred or who is responsible. The major objectives of the inventory
              and the analysis presented in this report are as follows:

                  •   Generate a relative ranking of chemicals and industrial categories based on 1993
                     Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) and 1994 Permit Compliance System (PCS) chemi-
                     cal release data.

                  •   Prioritize watersheds for collection of additional information that might lead to
                     the identification of additional monitoring needs or pollution prevention oppor-
                     tunities.

                  •   Establish a baseline to which additional or future inventories can be compared.

                  The inventory includes more than 25,500 individual TRI and PCS records of point
              source pollutant releases of 111 different chemicals. Approximately 1,020 individual wa-
              tersheds and 31  distinct industrial categories  are represented.  In general, areas that are
              population centers and are associated with industrial activity receive the greatest amount of
              potential sediment contaminants from point sources. Direct releases of potential sediment
              contaminants from 4,869 facilities in PCS totaled nearly 19 million Ib/yr in 1994.  From
              1993 TRI data, direct releases and transfers to POTWs of potential sediment contaminants
                                                                                       IX

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   Executivfe Summary
 from 3,432 manufacturing facilities totaled 7.3 million Ib/yr.  The inventory is limited by
 the quality, quantity, coverage, and bias of the release data in TRI and PCS.

      EPA developed and employed a screening-level load analysis procedure to achieve the
 objectives of this study. The "Load Score" is a unitless index of the magnitude of potential
 sediment contamination based on chemical/facility-specific releases, physical and chemical prop-
 erties, and potential environmental risk. The loading analysis is limited by the lack of consider-
 ation of site-specific information, the lack of pollutant transport analysis, and the uncertainty
 associated with the components of the chemical-specific sediment hazard scores.  For these
 reasons, the results of the loading analysis should be used for screening purposes only, not as a
 definitive judgment regarding the most significant sediment  contaminants, the most affected
 watersheds, or the most important industrial categories.

      This analysis indicates that metals and organic chemicals that can cause or contribute
 to contamination of sediment continue to be released from point sources. Although impor-
 tant in some instances, releases of PAHs, pesticides, and PCBs appear to be less prevalent
 than releases of metals and other organic compounds. The loading analysis relies on cor-
 relative, statistically based threshold values to evaluate the potential adverse effects of met-
 als in sediment. Although these correlative thresholds are useful, they are limited in their
 application because they do not directly address the bioavailability of metals in sediment.
 This report further emphasizes the need for the development of practical assessment tools to
 evaluate the bioavailability and toxicity of metals in sediment.

     The data analysis based on release data from TRI and PCS indicates that certain indus-
 trial categories have a high potential for contributing to sediment contamination. Sewerage
 systems, with nearly 2,000 facilities in PCS, represent more than one-half of the total Load
 Score of all the data analyzed in PCS and TRI together.  Sixty-one percent of the Load
 Score for sewerage systems is from the five divalent metals. The Metal Products and Fin-
 ishing, Primary Metal Industries, and Industrial Organic Chemicals categories were ranked
 in the top five industrial categories in terms of Load Score for both PCS and TRI.  Other
 industrial categories ranked in the top five for either TRI or PCS include Public Utilities
 (other than sewerage  systems), Petroleum Refining, and Other Chemical Product's.  Al-
 though TRI and PCS contain extensive records from most of the large dischargers, these
 data represent a limited, and somewhat biased, segment of the overall discharger commu-
 nity. Some industrial categories are not well represented in either PCS or TRI.  Thus, these
 results reflect data availability as much as relative sediment hazard potential.

     Total Load Scores at the watershed level ranged from 0 to 312. Of the 1,020 water-
 sheds evaluated, 17 watersheds were placed in priority group 1 (Load Score greater than
 80), 19 watersheds were placed in priority group 2 (Load Score range 61-80), 29 water-
 sheds were placed in priority group 3 (Load Score range 41-60), 87 watersheds were placed
 in priority group 4 (Load Score range 21-40), and 672 watersheds were placed in priority
 group 5 (Load Score range 1-20). One hundred ninety-six watersheds had a Load Score of
 zero and were not assigned to  a priority group. Figure ES-1 shows the location of water-
 sheds in priority groups 1,2,3, and 4.

     The watersheds identified in  this analysis represent areas where sediment contami-
nants are discharged; they do not necessarily represent locations where sediment contami-
nation has occurred or will occur. As defined by the U.S. Geological Survey 8-digit cataloging
unit, watersheds can represent large areas  that vary greatly in  size, shape, and physical/

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National!Sediment Contaminant Point Source Inventor.v
                                                  1
                                                  I
                                                   u
                                                  CO
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                                                   DC
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   Kxeeulivei tS'tmimarv
 characteristics encompassing large mainstem rivers and small tributary streams. Transport,
 sediment partitioning, and sediment accumulation—whether in locations very close to the
 point of discharge or far downstream—depend on many factors, including streamflow, stream
 velocity, geomorphology, particle size distribution, organic carbon content, suspended sedi-
 ment load, temperature, pH, and salinity. However, comparison with existing sediment moni-
 toring data provides further means of screening watersheds where point sources are more
 likely to contribute to contamination.

      The general relationship between annual point source releases and results reported in Vol-
 ume 1: National Sediment Quality Survey demonstrates a co-occurrence of active discharges of
 sediment contaminants and evidence of sediment contamination. A watershed with a high Load
 Score is more likely to contain one of the 96 areas of probable concern for sediment contamina-
 tion (APCs) in the National Sediment Quality Survey. For priority group 1,75 percent of the
 watersheds  contain APCs. For priority groups 2 and 3, 37 and 35 percent of the watersheds
 contain APCs, respectively.  For priority group 4,21 percent of the watersheds contain APCs.
 Finally, for priority group 5, 8 percent of the watersheds contain APCs. Less than 1 percent of
 the watersheds with a zero Load Score contain APCs.

      While this analysis does not imply that point sources caused the in-place contamina-
 tion, it emphasizes the potential significance of contaminant releases in areas already con-
 taminated. There are many sources of sediment contaminants in watersheds, both active and
 historical, point and nonpoint.  This assessment identifies specific watersheds where active
 point sources might play an important role.  To promote natural recovery of contaminated
 areas, active dischargers must be adequately controlled to ensure that their releases do not
 perpetuate contamination problems.

      The draft EPA report Environmental Goals for America With Milestones for 2005
 (USEPA, 1996a) proposes that the Agency, together with its state partners, adequately con-
 trol point sources of contamination over the next 10 years in 10 percent of the watersheds
 where sediment contamination is widespread.  Specifically, major facility discharge limits
 need to be evaluated and appropriately revised in watersheds at greatest risk from active
 discharges.  The objective of these evaluations should be to determine whether existing tech-
 nology-based controls or water quality-based discharge limits protect downstream sediment
 quality to the degree necessary for natural recovery of contaminated sites. EPA is currently
 developing the methodology to relate point source contributions to sediment contaminant
 concentrations. This methodology is needed before developing permit limits protective of
 sediment quality. This report identifies 29 watersheds that both contain APCs based on the
 National Sediment Quality Survey and are in Load Score priority group 1,2, or 3 based on
 this analysis. These watersheds should be considered for further evaluation and necessary
 action to achieve the milestone in EPA's Goals Report.
xii

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                                       National Sediment Contaminant Pf>int Sourcb Inventory-.
Chapter 1
Introduction
                     D:ring the past two decades, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has
                     ocused its water pollution control efforts on protecting water quality within the
                     /ater column. This has been accomplished primarily by controlling municipal and
              industrial point sources. More recently, EPA has begun to direct its efforts toward identify-
              ing and controlling other threats to the aquatic environment, including the accumulation of
              toxic chemicals in sediment. Because many different Agency program offices are involved
              in addressing the nationwide problem of contaminated sediments, EPA established an Agency-
              wide steering committee in 1989 to oversee the development of a Contaminated Sediment
              Management Strategy (CSMS). The purpose of the proposed CSMS is to coordinate the
              Agency's efforts to assess, prevent, and remediate contaminated sediment that poses envi-
              ronmental and human health risks.

                 The Water Resources Development Act of 1992 (WRDA) directed EPA, in consulta-
              tion with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Army  Corps of
              Engineers, to conduct a comprehensive national survey of data regarding aquatic  sediment
              quality in the United States. The Act required EPA to compile all existing information on
              the quantity, chemical and physical composition, and geographic location of pollutants in
              aquatic sediment, including the probable source of such pollutants  and identification of
              those sediments which are contaminated.  The Act further required EPA to report to the
              Congress the findings, conclusions, and recommendations of such survey, including rec-
              ommendations for actions necessary to prevent contamination of aquatic sediments and to
              control sources of contamination. Volume 3 of this report (this volume) addresses point
              sources. Volume 4 of this report, when completed, will address nonpoint sources. Chapter
              4 of Volume 1 of this report describes all probable source categories.

                 EPA's Office of Science and Technology (OST) initiated work several years ago on the
              development of a Nationalsediment Inventory (NSI) through a series of pilot inventories,
              planning meetings, and national workshops. Recently, various data indicative of sediment
              quality have been compiled into an integrated data set.  The evaluation of the  sediment
              quality data was documented in Volume 1: National Sediment Quality Survey (hereafter
              referred to as the Survey),  The Survey evaluation serves as a  means of screening and
              targeting, and it identifies 96 watersheds containing areas of probable concern for sediment
              contamination (APCs). OST's Survey and the Office of Policy, Planning, and Evaluation's
              (OPPE's) draft National Goals Report both call for further evaluation of these watersheds.
              Further evaluation entails performing additional site characterization based on  sediment
              chemistry and related biological data, determining temporal and spatial trends, assessing
              human health and ecological risks, identifying potential sources of sediment contamination,
              and determining whether potential sources are adequately controlled. The end result of these
              efforts should be a judgment whether natural recovery is a feasible option for risk reduction.

                 To proceed with the identification of potential sources of sediment contaminants, OST
              initiated two related efforts to identify, characterize, and evaluate the potential importance
              of nonpoint and point source discharges of pollutants that might contribute to  sediment
                                     i
                                                                                       1-1

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   Introduction
 of nonpoint and point source discharges of pollutants that might contribute to sediment
 contamination. The nonpoint source assessment effort focuses on collecting information
 on contributions primarily from agricultural lands, inactive and abandoned mine sites, ur-
 ban areas, and atmospheric deposition. The corresponding effort to assess active point
 source releases and to identify watersheds where such releases might contribute to sedi-
 ment contamination is the focus of this volume.

    OST is leading EPA's efforts to complete a National Sediment Contaminant Point Source
 Inventory. Collection and analysis of data describing sources of contaminated sediment
 will help provide an understanding of the potential magnitude and extent of contamination
 problems in the Nation's freshwater and estuarine sediments. The inventory will be useful
 to help locate potentially contaminated sites for additional monitoring and to integrate
 sediment  sampling into existing  water quality monitoring programs. The Point Source
 Inventory will also be a useful source of information for identifying pollution prevention
 opportunities and other source control efforts.


 Objectives of  Point Source Inventory and Analysis

    Identifying, locating, and assessing all potential sources of sediment contamination on
 a nationwide basis is a major undertaking. Potentially significant sources of sediment
 contamination include municipal sewage treatment facilities, storm water discharges and
 combined sewer overflows, urban and agricultural runoff, industrial discharges of process
 wastewater, leachate from hazardous waste sites, and atmospheric deposition from point
 and mobile source emissions. Industrial dischargers that are no longer active, poor-quality
 effluent in years prior to effective treatment, and spills are important historical sources of
 existing sediment contamination that are difficult to identify. The Point Source Inventory
 is a compilation of the most recent available documented releases of known sediment con-
 taminants from active municipal, industrial, and federal facilities. The major objectives of
 this inventory and the analysis presented in this report are as follows:

    •  Generate a relative ranking of chemicals and industrial categories based on 1993
       Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) and 1994 Permit Compliance System (PCS) chemi-
       cal release data.

    •  Prioritize watersheds for collection of additional information that might lead to the
       identification of additional monitoring needs or pollution prevention opportuni-
       ties.

    •  Establish a baseline to which additional or future inventories can be compared.

    Chapter 2 of this report describes the data sources used to develop the Point Source
Inventory. Chapter 3 describes the data sources, assumptions, and algorithms used to de-
velop the screening-level chemical load scores.  Chapter 4 presents a summary of the re-
sults in relationship to chemicals and chemical classes, watersheds, and industrial categories.
Appendix A contains the data used to develop chemical load scores for individual chemi-
cals. Appendix B presents the results of the watershed priority groupings, and Appendix C
includes detailed results of the analysis by industrial category.
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                          Natioiial:Sedinient Contaminant Point Source inventory
Anticipated Uses

    EPA's proposed Contaminated Sediment Management Strategy (CSMS) calls for the
Agency to compile data, perform analyses, and develop tools that will allow integration of
sediment contamination concerns into existing EPA program office activities, including:

    •   Targeting further evaluations

    •   Evaluating alternative control options

    •   Enhancing current assessment approaches

    •   Evaluating environmental benefits.

    This evaluation has identified watersheds where point sources could contribute to sedi-
ment contamination. It is anticipated that states, in cooperation with EPA and other federal
agencies, will proceed with further evaluations of the top-priority watersheds. This effort is
especially important for those watersheds also identified from the Survey as containing
areas of probable concern for sediment contamination (APCs). The purpose of additional
evaluation should be to determine whether existing technology-based controls or water qual-
ity-based discharge limits adequately protect downstream sediment quality and do not com-
promise natural recovery of contaminated areas.

    The sediment contaminant loading analysis described in this report is currently the most
comprehensive assessment of national point source releases of sediment contaminants. The
Load Score analysis and data compiled for this report can be powerful tools for water re-
source managers at the national, regional, state, and watershed levels. This report provides
a wealth of information that can be integrated with other data characterizing the quality of
aquatic  sediment and other contaminant sources.  For example, point source release data
and analysis results could be incorporated into the Agency's recently developed PC-based
geographic information system (GIS) for watershed modeling and assessment. This system,
called BASINS (Better Assessment Science for Integrating Point and Nonpoint Sources),
provides the framework to integrate and analyze spatially related data, such as land use,
stream hydrography, ambient contaminant levels in water and sediment, and discharger lo-
cations and release amounts.: This system also allows the user to augment or replace data
with additional or more appropriate information at the regional or local  level.  This is an
important feature when contemplating use of PCS or TRI data, which cover a limited seg-
ment of all dischargers and might contain erroneous data, for specific local analyses.

    The Point Source Inventory can be used to track risk reduction achieved through re-
duced surface water loadings. This supports activities such as the EPA  Office of Policy,
Planning, and Evaluation's National Goals Report, which is an effort to develop and track
progress toward the Clean Water Act and other environmental legislation goals. Although
not a direct measure of environmental quality, the Point Source Inventory provides a mecha-
nism to track discharges of sediment contaminants.
                                                                              1-3

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   Introduction
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                                  National Sediment Contaminant Point Source Inventory
Chapter 2
Development  of the
Point  Source  Inventory
             fTlhe methodology employed in developing the Point Source Inventory had three basic
               I steps. First, a master list of chemicals of interest was compiled. The chemicals
              A selected were those with available sediment chemistry screening values that were
             used to evaluate Survey data. These chemicals are frequently detected in sediment and
             have been studied for their potential adverse effects on aquatic life or human health. Sec-
             ond, annual loading amounts were determined for the chemicals of interest. Two EPA
             computer databases were used as the primary sources of release information: the Toxic
             Release Inventory (TRI) and the Permit Compliance System (PCS). Releases were then
             assigned to watersheds, chemical classes, and industrial categories.

             Identification of Point Source Releases of
             Sediment Contaminants

                For the Survey, EPA compiled sediment chemistry and fish tissue residue data for more
             than 230 chemicals whose detected levels in these media could be evaluated for potential
             adverse effects to aquatic 'life or human health. The Survey evaluation of potential adverse
             effects to aquatic life was based on comparing sediment chemistry measurements to levels
             associated with adverse effects. The evaluation of adverse human health effects was based
             on comparing direct fish tissue measures, or predicted levels based on sediment concentra-
             tions, to EPA risk levels or Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidance. Evaluating
             the potential threat to sediment quality posed by a point source chemical release requires
             knowledge of the level in sediment associated with an adverse effect. EPA could not evalu-
             ate sediment chemistry measurements for approximately 100 of the more than 230 chemi-
             cals because the Agency lacked either information regarding adverse effects to aquatic life
             or the means to predict fish tissue concentrations resulting from exposures to sediment
             contaminant concentrations (i.e., a biota-sediment accumulation factor (BSAF), available
             for nonionic organic compounds only). Other chemicals lacked the necessary information
             to evaluate the chemicalfate or intermedia partitioning upon discharge to surface water.
             These factors limited the inventory to 111 individual sediment contaminants.

                The data requirements of the Point Source Inventory limited  the number of useful
             databases containing information about the release of those 111 chemicals from point sources.
             The requirements include (1) classification of the type of discharger (industrial category or
             Standard Industrial Classification [SIC] code); (2) pollutant-specific release data (e.g., mea-
             sured or estimated load tp the environment in mass per time) for individual facilities; and
             (3) location information for pollutant releases.  TRI and PCS are the  only national data-
             bases that meet these data requirements.
                                                                              2-1

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   Development of" the Point Source Inventory
     Toxic Release Inventory (TRI). TRI is a consistent, comprehensive national database
 of toxic chemical releases to all environmental media. Congress mandated its creation to
 fulfill the community right-to-know provision (section 313) of Title in of the Superfund
 Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA). This section requires the owner/
 operator of an industrial facility to report environmental releases of more than 300 speci-
 fied toxic chemicals to EPA if the facility meets certain criteria. EPA's Office of Pollution
 Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) manages the information on releases submitted by industry.

     Reports submitted by industry are the sole source of data in TRI. TRI contains release
 information from approximately 27,000 facilities. An owner/operator must file a report for
 a facility when it meets the following criteria:

      •  It employs the equivalent of 10 or more full-time employees.

      •  It engages in manufacturing (SIC Codes 20 through 39).

      •  It manufactures, imports, or  processes more than 25,000 pounds of any listed
         chemical, or otherwise uses more than 10,000 pounds of any listed chemical.

     For each listed chemical (currently over 300 specific chemicals and 20 chemical groups),
 the facility must submit a "Toxic Chemical Release Reporting Form," which contains the
 following:

      •  Facility identification information such as facility name, parent company, loca-
         tion (street address and latitude/longitude), type of business (based on SIC codes),
         key identifiers (such as Dun and Bradstreet ID, and NPDES numbers), and name
         of receiving water body.

      •   Offsite transfer locations for toxic chemicals, such as publicly owned treatment
         works (name and address of  POTW) or waste disposal and treatment facilities
         (name, address, and EPA identification number).

      •   Chemical-specific information such as chemical identification (name and Chemi-
         cal Abstract Service [CAS] number); use of the chemical at the facility; quanti-
         ties released to air (fugitive and stack), water (including storm water), under-
         ground injection, and land; quantities transferred to offsite locations; and waste
         treatment methods and efficiencies. The quantities are reported either as a range
         for levels below 1,000 Ib/year (i.e., 0-10, 11-499, and 500-999) or as a total an-
        nual release. The facility also reports the methods used in determining the re-
        lease quantities (e.g., actual monitoring data, mass balance calculations, or emis-
        sion factors).

    Permit Compliance System (PCS). PCS is the national information management sys-
tem  for tracking compliance, enforcement, and permit status for the National Pollutant
Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program under the Clean Water Act. The NPDES
program requires permits for all point source pollutant discharges to navigable U.S. water-
ways (other than dredged  or fill material regulated under section 404 of the Clean Water
Act). Specific discharge limits or monitoring requirements have been set for  over 200
individual chemicals.
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                          National StedimentContammant Point Source jliiventory
    EPA's Office of Wastewater Management oversees the NPDES program on a national
 level.  EPA has authorized 43 states and the Virgin Islands to administer the NPDES pro-
 gram.  EPA regional offices administer the program in nonauthorized states.  More than
 65,000 active NPDES permits have been issued to facilities throughout the Nation. PCS
 has extensive records on approximately 7,000 permits that are classified as "major." Fa-
 cilities are classified as "major" based on consideration of many factors, including effluent
 design flow, physical  and chemical characteristics of the waste stream, and location of
 discharge. Each permit record in PCS may contain information that:

     •   Identifies and describes the facility (including a primary SIC code) to which the
         permit has been issued.

     •   Specifies the pollutant discharge limits for that facility.

     •   Records the  actual amounts of pollutants and flows measured in the facility's
         wastewater discharges.

     •   Tracks the facility's history of compliance with construction requirements, pol-
         lutant limits, and reporting requirements.

    Major facilities must report compliance with NPDES permit limits, usually on a monthly
 basis, via Discharge Monitoring Reports (DMRs). DMRs provide detailed information on
 measured concentrations, including those which are in violation of established limits for
 the permit.  DMR data entered into PCS include the type of violation (if any), concentra-
 tion and quantity values, and monitoring period. The PCS database is updated twice weekly.

 Determination of Chemical Loads

    The Point Source Inventory consists of two distinct sets of chemical loading data: one
 based on TRI records and one based on PCS records. For this evaluation, data from TRI
 and PCS were extracted for the calendar years 1993 and 1994, respectively.  Together, TRI
 and PCS form the most comprehensive national chemical loading database.  Facilities cov-
 ered by both TRI and PCS cannot be readily  identified, however, because no common,
 quality-controlled facility identification data elements are available in these databases. TRI
 contains  a field for NPDES number, but its quality control is poor.  Both TRI and PCS
 contain a field for EPA identification number, but these numbers, too, are unreliable. There-
 fore, there is a potential for double records of releases for chemicals reported in both TRI
 and PCS. As a result, the data in TRI and PCS are evaluated independently.

 Toxic Release Inventory Data

   For each TRI facility, total amounts of the chemicals of interest reported to be dis-
charged to surface water and POTWs in  calendar year 1993 were retrieved. For each
chemical, the total release to surface water and an adjusted release to POTWs were summed
to yield a total facility discharge. Some characteristics of the TRI database might introduce
uncertainty into the release estimates. For example, manufacturers required to report to
TRI might estimate chemical releases using ranges (e.g., 10 to 499 Ib/yr).  In the TRI
database, the ranges are converted to a single value represented by the  midpoint of the
range (e.g., 250 Ib/yr). Use of these midpoint values may overestimate or underestimate
the actual releases of TRI chemicals.
                                                                           2-3

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  Development of the Point Source Inventory
    The reported amounts of releases to POTWs were adjusted by assuming that typical
secondary treatments, such as activated sludge and aeration lagoons, remove a portion of
the chemical load.  Review of chemical-specific data from the Office of Research and
Development's Treatability Database (USEPA, 1991) indicated that removal rates can be
highly variable and dependent on conditions at the POTW.  Based on peer review com-
ments received on a draft version of this methodology (Adams, 1994), all pollutants were
assigned a removal rate of 75 percent.  This removal rate does not tend to  significantly
overestimate or underestimate actual loading values.  In a secondary treatment system,
such as an activated sludge system, chemicals that are readily biodegraded are usually, but
not always,  removed at rates equal to or in excess  of 90 percent, and adsorption often
removes 80 to 85 percent of the mass of chemicals that do not biodegrade (Adams, 1994).

Permit Compliance System Data

    It is important to recognize that, unlike TRI, PCS is a permit tracking system, not a
repository of pollutant release amounts. However, an option in PCS called Effluent Data
Statistics (EDS) can process PCS data to calculate loading values (USEPA, 1992a). EDS
uses the following hierarchy to assign a loading for each pollutant: (1)  reported chemical
mass  loading and (2) chemical loadings estimated based on discharge flow and concentra-
tion measurement.  Depending on the monitoring requirements imposed by the permit,
concentrations may be reported in many different ways. EDS selects concentration mea-
surements from PCS in the following order of preference for inclusion in the inventory:

      •   Average concentration

      •   Maximum concentration

      •   Minimum concentration.

    Loadings were estimated only for records with  valid concentrations (as defined by
EDS) and corresponding flow data assuming 30 operating days per month for each facility.
Loadings were estimated using the following general equation:
                   Load = Flow * Cone * Conversion Factors         Equation 1
  where:

    load               =  specific pollutant load from a facility per unit time;

    flow               =  facility effluent flow per unit time;

    cone               =  concentration of a pollutant; and

    conversion factors  =  appropriate factors to convert reported units to standard units.
    Total release amounts of the chemicals of interest were calculated for each PCS facil-
ity. Data were retrieved at the discharge pipe level from PCS for every NPDES discharger
where the requisite data were available.  Concentration data for each chemical were con-
verted into annual loadings using Equation 1 above.  The calculated  loads for a given
chemical from each discharge pipe at a facility were summed to yield the total facility load.
In addition, multiple parameters sometimes exist for the same pollutant.  For example, zinc
concentrations might be reported as total zinc and dissolved zinc.  In these cases, the larg-

2-4

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                          Natiouali&cdimcirt •Contaminant Point Source Inventory
est calculated load (usually the "total" load) was selected for inclusion in the Point Source
Inventory.

    Concentration measurements for the chemicals of interest are often recorded in PCS as
below the detection limit. In some cases, these measurements might reflect a low chemical
concentration that available analytical instrumentation cannot recognize.  In other cases,
the chemical might not be present in the effluent.  Measurements reported below a detec-
tion limit most commonly occur for highly toxic pollutants. Monitoring requirements for
these chemicals might exist as a "safeguard" to alert managers to the presence of a particu-
lar chemical in effluent, or might be part of a large set of chemical measurements required
by an effluent guideline rule covering a particular industrial category. In any case, a mea-
surement reported below detection in PCS monitoring data does not establish the presence
of the chemical in effluent. Therefore, values below the detection limit are set to zero in
this inventory.

Assignment of Geographic Location and
Industrial Category

    Stream reach numbers (from EPA River Reach File 1) were assigned to each facility in
the Point Source Inventory to place chemical discharges into watersheds. Because the
reach number was frequently missing from both PCS and TRI, reach numbers were added
electronically by linking PCS and TRI facility identification codes to the EPA Industrial
Facilities Discharge File (IFD). If the reach number was not available in IFD, a computer-
ized routine that starts with the facility latitude/longitude and searches the EPA Reach File
for the nearest reach, up to a maximum distance of 10 miles, was employed. If the facility
latitude and longitude coordinates were missing, the centroid of the county was used as the
discharge location.        '

    Industrial categories are groupings based on SIC codes. An industrial category can be
based on a single 4-digit SIC code (e.g., Petroleum Refining) or a large and variable range
of SIC codes (e.g., Metal Products and Finishing).  Each facility in the Point Source Inven-
tory was assigned a single SIC code based on the designated primary SIC code in PCS and
TRI. However, because many large industrial facilities are involved in multiple activities
that could correspond to different SIC codes, industrial category groupings are only ap-
proximate. There were 31 industrial categories overall. PCS  data were grouped into 27
industrial categories, and TRI data were grouped into 21 industrial categories.

Inventory Limitations

    The Point Source Inventory contains various limitations that should be considered when
using this information in environmental decision-making. These limitations do not, how-
ever, preclude its use as a targeting tool to prioritize watersheds, chemicals, and industries
for further evaluation. In some instances, the limitations might affect small-scale analyses
(i.e., individual stream or lake water body segments) while large-scale analyses, such as
the ones presented in this report, are affected to a lesser degree. Conclusions presented in
this report are made with consideration of the following factors.

    This  analysis is primarily limited by the quality and quantity of existing data in na-
tional EPA databases. The broad scope of the inventory has prohibited collection of large
amounts of data from numerous site-specific information sources at this time. Therefore,

                                                                            2-5

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   Development of the Point Source Inventory
 the inventory relies on data available in national electronic databases such as TRI and PCS.
 Although a considerable volume of information is contained in these databases, many im-
 portant parameters are not available. In particular, no national electronic database accu-
 rately, consistently, or completely stores information concerning the characteristics of
 water bodies, such as underlying sediment type. Furthermore, data quality assurance/qual-
 ity control is an important issue when using data from large national databases that receive
 input from a variety of sources. The amount of data contained hi these national databases
 is too large to conduct comprehensive verification procedures. In addition, it should be
 noted that the number of facilities discharging chemicals of interest may vary from year to
 year based on such factors as regulatory changes (e.g., increased chemical reporting or SIC
 coverage in TRI, or increases in the number of recorded storm water permits in PCS) or
 economic conditions. Given these qualifications, the three major limitations of the inven-
 tory as it is now structured are:

     •   The inability to predict whether a point source release could contribute to a sedi-
         ment contamination problem.

     •   The inability to predict where point source releases might contribute to sediment
         contamination (i.e., the geographic analyses are limited to identifying areas or
         watersheds where point source releases occur).

     •   The inability to assess contributions from nonpoint source inputs (including de-
         liberate introduction of toxic substances, such as pesticides and household chemi-
         cals, to the environment) and from point source inputs not represented in the PCS
         or TRI databases (e.g., facilities that do not meet a TRI reporting criterion and for
         which NPDES permits do not require monthly monitoring).

    Conclusions based on the Point Source Inventory should take into consideration the
 inherent limitations of the databases and the assumptions used in developing the inventory.
 Factors associated with database limitations that should be considered include the possibil-
 ity of erroneous data in TRI and PCS, the limited coverage of TRI and PCS, and inherent
 database biases. Neither PCS nor TRI accurately reflects the full extent of toxic chemical
 releases from point sources, and the data contained in both may be inherently biased.  Al-
 though several hundred individual chemicals are represented in each database, as many as
 5 to 10 times more chemicals might be discharged (Adams, 1994). In addition, the number
 of chemicals addressed in PCS permits is highly variable. Because the types and number
 of chemicals included are partly a function of the policies and practices of the state or
 regional permitting authority, and of the industrial activities  conducted at the facility, the
 data might be biased toward some geographic regions and industrial categories. Further-
 more, only approximately 10 percent of permitted dischargers are classified as "major" and
 have extensive records from which chemical loads can be derived.  Facilities subject to
TRI reporting represent a relatively narrow range of commercial activities (manufacturing
 only). Although the TRI database is based on a standard set of chemicals, many highly
toxic chemicals that tend to accumulate in  sediment are not included.  Therefore, TRI
captures only a portion of chemical releases to the environment. Future enhancements to
TRI might overcome some of these limitations and the biases they create.

    Other potential sources of error are associated with the assumptions used in the assign-
ment of geographic location and industrial category.  In many cases, geographic location
assignment was made using latitude and longitude coordinates of the facility and the near-
2-6

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                          National pediment Contaminant Point Source Inventory
est stream reach. However, the nearest stream might not be the receiving stream for some
facilities.  Also, for TRI data, POTW receiving streams could not be identified. Conse-
quently, chemical loadings derived from POTW transfers for TRI data were assigned to the
stream reach associated with the reporting facility. Industrial category assignment was
made on the basis of primary SIC code; however, many facilities are engaged in a wide
range of commercial activities.  As a result, chemical wastes generated from non-primary
SIC code activities are included with those from the primary SIC code in the Point Source
Inventory.
                                                                            2-7

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  Development of the Point Source Inventory
2-8

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                                  National Sediment Contaminant Point Source; Inventory
Chapter 3
Development  of  Chemical
Load  Scores
                   a; major objective of the Point Source Inventory was to develop and employ a
                   reening-level loading analysis procedure to identify and prioritize watersheds where
                   ;tive point sources may contribute to sediment contamination, and to generate a
            relative ranking of chemicals and industrial source categories that are potential contribu-
            tors. To enable screening-level analyses, chemical-specific chemical loading scores (CLSs)
            were developed and used to normalize the annual chemical loads (ACLs) in the Point
            Source Inventory. In the screening-level analysis (described in Section 4), ACLs were
            multiplied by chemical-specific CLSs to produce adjusted loads:
                                   Adjusted Load = CLS * ACL
Equation 2
                where:
                  CLS  = Chemical load score, a product of the FATE and TOX scores as
                         described below, and

                  ACL = Annual chemical load, the annual release amount (Ib/yr) of a specific
                         chemical from individual industrial or municipal treatment facilities.
               CLSs are intended to represent both the potential of a particular chemical to accumu-
            late in sediment upon discharge to surface water (independent of the characteristics of the
            site) and the potential ecological and human health risk posed by the chemical. The CLS is
            the product of the chemical-specific toxicity (TOX) score and chemical-specific fate (FATE)
            score. The TOX score is intended to represent the potential for adverse effects to human
            health and aquatic life from chemicals in sediment. The FATE score is intended to repre-
            sent the potential for a chemical to partition to and persist in sediment. Four previous
            works were examined to assjst in the development of the screening-level methodology:

                •  National Sediment Quality Survey (peer-reviewed draft, USEPA, 1996b);

                •  Established methods of determining sediment toxicity (USEPA, 1992b);

                •  Superfund's Hazard Ranking System, Final Rule (USEPA, 1990a); and

                •  NOAA's pesticide hazard rating system (Pait et al., 1992).

            Calculated CLSs, TOX scores, and FATE scores, along with the information required to
            calculate them (i.e., sediment chemistry screening values and physical/chemical proper-
            ties), are presented in Appendix A of this report.
                                                                             3-1

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  Development of Chemical Load Scores
    The adjusted load computed for a facility's discharge of a specific chemical is assigned
a Load Score.  The Load Score is a unitless index of the magnitude of potential sediment
contamination based on chemical/facility-specific releases, physical and chemical proper-
ties, and potential environmental risk.  The mathematical relationship of adjusted load
scores to Load Score is given by the folio whig equation:
                 Load Score = INT (login (adjusted load)) + 1
Equation 3
    Values less than zero or greater than 5 are set to zero and 5, respectively. Load Scores
indicate the potential contribution to sediment contamination in the absence of any knowl-
edge of historical or nonpoint source inputs and site-specific conditions (e.g., stream ve-
locity, organic carbon content of underlying sediment) affecting chemical fate and intermedia
partitioning. Load Scores may be used to rank and compare potential sediment contamina-
tion sources.  Once the Load Scores were calculated for each chemical-facility combina-
tion, a number of data aggregations were performed to evaluate chemical classes and
industrial categories for their relative potential risk of causing sediment contamination,
and to identify watersheds where the risk of contamination from active point sources might
be the greatest.

    Table 3-1 illustrates the assignment of Load Scores. In general, the Load Score repre-
sents the magnitude of the adjusted load (product of CLS times ACL). However, if the
adjusted load is less than 1, the release is assigned a Load Score of zero.  This assumes that
these releases are not significant potential contributors to sediment contamination, and is
intended to focus attention on larger releases with greater hazard potential. The column
headings of Table 3-1 provide chemicals representative of each CLS range as a reference.
For example, the sediment hazard posed by mercury is approximately 10 times the hazard
posed by pyrene. This scoring system allows comparison of annual loads of chemicals that
vary in their hazard potential.  For example, an annual load of 1,000 pounds of zinc is
approximately equivalent to an annual load of 100 pounds of fluorene or 10 pounds of
Table 3-1. Assignment of Load Score
Annual
Chemical Load
(lb/yr)
<0.01
0.1
1
10
100
1,000
10,000
100,000
Chemical Load Score (TOX Score * FATE Score)
0.001
(e.g., phenol)
0
0
0
0
0
1
2
3
0.01
(e.g., zinc)
0
0
0
0
1
2
3
4
0.1
(e.g., fluorene)
0
0
0
1
2
3
4
5
1
(e.g., pyrene)
0
0
1
2
3
4
5

10
(e.g., mercury)
0
1
2
3
4
5


>100
(e.g., PCBs)
1
2
3
4
5



3-2

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                          National Sediment Contaminant Point Soured Inventory
 pyrene or 10,000 pounds of phenol:  each receives a Load Score of 2. These scores can
 also be summed across aggregate units.  For example, 20 facilities  each releasing 100
 pounds of mercury per year (Load Score = 4) in a given watershed would yield a watershed
 Load Score of 80 (20 times 4).


 Chemical-Specific Toxicity Score

    Sediment contamination is a function of the mixture and concentration of toxic pollut-
 ants in the sediment and the physical and chemical characteristics of the site. To assess
 potential sediment toxicity, sediment chemistry data must be related to adverse biological
 effects. Numerical effects-based, chemical-specific sediment chemistry screening values
 have been used to assist analysts and managers in the evaluation of sediment chemistry
 data and to identify and prioritize problem areas (Di Toro et al., 1991). The TOX score is
 one component of the CLS. This chemical-specific value was calculated by taking the
 inverse of the chemical's derived sediment chemistry screening value reported in milli-
 grams per kilogram (mg/kg). Because the inverse of the sediment chemistry screening
 value is used, the TOX score increases in direct proportion to the toxicity of the chemical.

    Several methods are currently available for developing sediment quality screening val-
 ues (USEPA, 1992b).  Most of these methods require information on  site-specific condi-
 tions (field data) and chemical-specific properties. However, because field data are not
 available for each point source discharge location, screening values for use in this analysis
 must be based on empirical methods that make use of available data from a variety of sites,
 or mechanistic methods where the site-specific components can be reasonably assumed.
 The NOAA National Status and Trends program's effects range approach and the State of
 Washington's apparent effect threshold approach use existing sediment chemistry and bio-
 logical effects data from a variety of sites, and EPA's equilibrium partitioning approach has
 a site-specific component that can be reasonably assumed.  The preferred approach for
 screening value estimation depends on  the properties and expected chemical partitioning
 associated with the released chemical.

    In this study, a combination of the  equilibrium partitioning (EqP) approach and bio-
 logical effects correlation approaches was used to estimate sediment chemistry screening
 values for the protection of aquatic life.  The theoretical bioaccumulation (TBP) approach
 was used to estimate sediment chemistry screening values for human health assessments.
 Appendix A contains a listing of all the calculated sediment chemistry screening values for
 the chemicals of interest contained in the Point Source Inventory.

    It is important to note that the certainty with which sediment toxicity can be predicted
for each chemical varies significantly based on the quality of the available data and the
appropriateness of exposure assumptions. Estimated sediment chemistry screening values
are to be used for screening purposes only.  Their purpose is to obtain a relative ranking of
potential hazard for  aquatic bottom sediments from point source pollutant discharges to
surface waters. The following limitations of the estimated sediment chemistry screening
values  should be noted:

     •   Values may be overprotective or underprotective of actual site-specific sediment
        because methodological and exposure conditions vary considerably.
                                                                            3-3

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  Development of Chemical Load Scojrcs
     •   Values are general approximations of concentrations potentially leading to ad-
         verse effects because data and assessment methods are continually being com-
         piled and developed.

     •   Values are based on a composite of several different sediment assessment ap-
         proaches and a variety of data sources, the application of which EPA has not
         adopted or endorsed for use outside this and other screening-level analyses.

    EPA has proposed sediment quality criteria (SQCs) for five chemicals based on exten-
sive data quality and quantity requirements and methodologies  that have gone through
extensive peer review. The other estimated sediment chemistry screening values for addi-
tional chemicals presented in Appendix A of this report do not represent proposed SQCs.
The sediment chemistry screening values were developed or compiled for the evaluation of
Survey data (Volume 1  of this report).  The remainder of this section provides a brief
overview of the  screening values. The interested reader should consult Volume 1 of this
report and appendices for detailed descriptions and explanations.

Aquatic Life Screening Values

    The sediment chemistry screening values used to evaluate potential adverse effects to
aquatic life include theoretically and empirically based values.  The theoretically based
values rely on demonstrated laboratory toxicity and physical/chemical properties of sedi-
ment to predict a concentration level that protects the benthic community from chronic
adverse reproductive or growth effects. The empirically based, or correlative, threshold
values rely on paired field and laboratory data to relate incidence of observed adverse
biological effects to the dry-weight sediment concentration of a specific chemical.

    The theoretically based screening values, limited to nonionic organic compounds, in-
clude the following parameters:

     •   Sediment Quality Criteria (SQCs): EPA (1993a, b, c, d, e) has developed draft
         SQCs for five chemicals using the equilibrium partitioning (EqP) approach, which
         involves predicting a dry-weight  sediment concentration that is  in equilibrium
         with a  threshold pore water concentration using the  chemical-specific organic
         carbon/water partition coefficient (K(x.) and the site-specific organic carbon con-
         tent. The EqP approach is described in detail in Appendix B of the Survey. Draft
         SQCs are based on the highest-quality data available, which have been reviewed
         extensively.

     •   Sediment Quality Advisory Levels (SQALs): SQALs were also developed us-
         ing the EqP approach, but have fewer aquatic toxicity data requirements.

    For purposes of calculating sediment hazard scores for the chemicals with available
SQCs and SQALs, a default organic carbon content of 1 percent was used because of lack
of site-specific sediment information in PCS and TRI. In practical application, the organic
carbon content can vary a great deal, as can important other binding phases at any given
sampling station.

    The empirically based, correlative approaches used for the Point Source Inventory in-
clude the following upper screening values. Each of these parameters has a corresponding
lower (more stringent) screening value that was not used in the development of TOX scores

3-4

-------
                           Nations)! Sediment Contaminant P
-------
  Development of Chemical Load Scores
for a chemical-specific loading analysis such as this. As previously stated, the inverse of
the sediment chemistry screening value serves as the TOX score to produce a positive
relationship between screening values and TOX scores. In other words, the more stringent
the screening value, the greater the TOX score.


Chemical-Specific Fate Score

   The second component of the Chemical Load Score (CLS) is the FATE score.  The
FATE score is the product of the air/water partitioning subfactor (HLC score), sediment
adsorption subfactor (KOC score), and biodegradation subfactor (BIODEG score).  The
potential for a chemical to accumulate in the underlying sediment upon discharge to sur-
face water depends greatly on site-specific characteristics such as sediment organic matter
content, temperature, suspended particulate matter, and the lotic or lentic nature of the
receiving water body.  The physical/chemical properties of the pollutants also affect their
transport and persistence in the aquatic environment. The chemicals of interest in the Point
Source Inventory differ widely in their physical/chemical properties. Some chemicals are
very likely to partition to and to persist in the sediment, some will likely volatilize, and
others will rapidly degrade. Therefore, a FATE score with sediment adsorption, air/water
partitioning, and aqueous degradation subfactors was used. Three physical/chemical prop-
erties for organic sediment contaminants were obtained for the chemicals in the inventory:
the sediment adsorption coefficient or K(K, the Henry's Law constant (HLC), and the aero-
bic aqueous biodegradation half-life.

   The two transport subfactors, air-water partitioning and sediment adsorption, are rep-
resented by chemical-specific HLC and K^, values, respectively. These subfactors were
treated in a manner similar to that used in the pesticide hazard rating system devised by Pait
et al. (1992). Individual HLC and K^. values were assigned scores ranging from 0.1 to 1.
These values were then multiplied to produce a score that represents  the likelihood of
transport to the sediment.

   The aqueous degradation subfactor is represented by chemical-specific aerobic bio-
degradation half-lives. Because the sediment hazard score was applied to annual release
amounts, the half-life was converted to an annual loss rate constant and multiplied by the
transport value (i.e., the product of the two transport subfactor scores) to arrive at the final
FATE score.

Air-Water Partitioning Subfactor

   The Henry's Law constant (HLC) is the ratio of vapor pressure to solubility and is
indicative of the propensity of a chemical to volatilize from surface water (Lyman et al.,
1982).  The larger the HLC, the more likely the chemical will volatilize. Lyman et al.
(1982) state that a chemical with an HLC less than 3 x 10'7 (atm-mVmole) is essentially
nonvolatile, and a chemical with an HLC greater than 10'3 (atm-mVmole) will volatilize
rapidly from surface water. HLC scores were calculated according to the following steps:
3-6

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                          National SedinrcntiContaminantjPpint Source Inventory
      1.  All values > 10'3 were assigned a score of 0.1.

      2.  All values < 3 x 10'7 were assigned a score of 1.0.

      3.  All other values were assigned a score using Equation 4 to evenly distribute
         scores across the range of values:
_T log(10-3)-log(gLC)
  |_log(10-3)-log(3xlO-7)
                                           *  0.9
                                       + 0.1
    where:
HLCs

HLC
                  = air-water partitioning subfactor and

                  = Henry's Law constant (atm-mVmole).
Equation 4
Sediment Adsorption Subfactor

    KX= is a chemical-specific adsorption parameter that is largely independent of the prop-
erties of soil or sediment and can be used as a relative indicator of adsorption to such
media. Although a high K^, value indicates that a chemical is more likely to partition to
sediment, it also indicates ;that a chemical may be less bioavailable. K^ is highly inversely
correlated with solubility and fairly well correlated with BSAF.     °°

    U.S.  EPA (1993b) recommends using the following regression equation to calculate
the organic carbon-water partition coefficient (K  ) from the octanol-water partition coeffi-
cient (Kow):
                      loglvKoc = 0.00028 + 0.983 * logwKm
                                                        Equation 5
Where available, K^ values were calculated from the latest EPA-recommended octanol-
water coefficient (Kow) (Karickhoff and Long, 1995). Other Kow values used included those
derived from the slow-stir flask method, which were selected preferentially over other labo-
ratory values reported in literature (USEPA, 1993f).

    KOC scores were calculated according to the following steps:
                                                                           3-7

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  Development of Chemical Load Scores
     1.  All values > 10s were assigned a score of 1.0.

     2.  All values < 102 were assigned a score of 0.1.

     3.  All other values were assigned a score using Equation 6 to evenly distribute
         scores across the range of values:
                                                  0
    where:
         KOCS,
         K.
                             Iog(106)-Iog(102)      J
    sediment adsorption subfactor and
    organic carbon-water partition coefficient (L/kg).
                                                  Equation 6
Aqueous Biodegradation Subfactor

    Although many physical and chemical processes can contribute to degradation (e.g.,
hydrolysis, photolysis, biological degradation), aerobic biodegradation half-life was se-
lected as the sole indicator of environmental persistence of a chemical released to the water
column. Ignoring other removal mechanisms is a conservative approach because it can
only overestimate rather than underestimate a chemical's persistence potential. Aerobic
aqueous biodegradation half-lives are empirically derived time periods when half of a chemi-
cal load released to water is degraded by microbial action in the presence of oxygen. Al-
though  the degradation products may be equal in toxicity to or even more toxic than the
parent, evaluation of chemical metabolites was not considered in the hazard analysis. Aero-
bic biodegradation half-lives for the current set of potential sediment contaminants range
from 4 hours to 16 years.

    Half-lives in days were converted to loss rate constants in (years)'1 using the following
equation:
    where:
        ln(2)
        t*
        365
                                   ln(2) * 365
loss rate constant (year)"1;

natural log of 2;

aqueous aerobic biodegradation half-life (days); and

conversion factor (days per year).
                                                                   Equation 7
    Because other factors, such as deep burial, might become important over time, chemi-
cals with reported half-lives greater than 7 years were assigned a half-life of 7 years. This
results in the largest BIODEG score of 10. The BIODEG score was calculated by taking
 3-8

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                         National'Sediment Contaminant Point Source .Inventory
the inverse of the loss rate constant so that more persistent compounds would have higher
values:
                             BIODEGscore=-
                        Equation 8
   The FATE score was calculated by combining the HLC, KOC, and BIODEG scores
according the following formula:
              FATEscore =(BIODEGSCOJ * (HLCSCOJ * (KOCSCOJ     Equation 9
    Metals, which will not degrade or volatilize, were assigned a BIODEG score of 10 and
an HLC score of 1. The relative partitioning of dissolved metal between the water column
and the underlying sediment is a function of site-specific conditions, not inherent proper-
ties of the metal. Therefore, metals were assigned a KOC score of 0.5, representing the
midpoint of all possible values.
Functions of Chemical Load Score Components

   The overall general equation for the CLS is:
                         CLS = TOXscorf* FATEscore
                       Equation 10
    where:
FATEs<

CLS

SCV


KOC
    SO
HLC
                   = (SCV)-1;
                   = KOC    * HLC
BIODEG
                   = chemical load score (unitless);
                   = sediment chemistry screening value (based on screening
                     values in units of mg/kg);
                   = sediment adsorption subfactor (unitless);
                   = air-water partitioning subfactor (unitless); and
       BIODEG    = aqueous.biodegradation subfactor (unitless).
   The function of the sediment chemistry screening value in the CLS is to increase or
decrease the adjusted load relative to the annual chemical load (ACL) based on the toxicity
exhibited by the chemical. Ignoring the effects of the FATE score components, a chemical
with a sediment chemistry screening value less than 1 mg/kg has an CLS greater than 1 and
higher adjusted loads than ACLs. On the other hand, a chemical with a sediment chemistry
screening value greater than 1 mg/kg has an CLS less than 1 and lower adjusted loads than
                                                                          3-9

-------
   Development of Chemical Load Scores
 ACLs. The magnitude of the effect on the adjusted load is in direct proportion to the
 magnitude of the sediment chemistry screening value versus a value of 1 mg/kg.  The
 "standard" of 1 mg/kg is arbitrary and does not have any physical or biochemical signifi-
 cance.

    The function of the BIODEG score is to adjust the ACL based on a chemical's persis-
 tence  in the aquatic environment.  Half-life values in days were converted to a loss rate
 constant in (years)'1.  The BIODEG score, which is the inverse annual loss rate constant,
 has the mathematical effect of converting  an annual surface water load to a steady-state
 mass of chemical in the water column.  Chemicals with a half-life greater than 253 days
 (ln(2) * 365 days/yr)  have a BIODEG score greater than 1, which increases the adjusted
 load.  This indicates  that the steady-state  mass is greater than the annual load (i.e., net
 accumulation). Conversely, chemicals with a half-life less than 253 days have a BIODEG
 score less than 1, which decreases the adjusted load. This indicates that the steady-state
 mass is less than the annual load (i.e., net loss).  The magnitude of the effect on adjusted
 load is in direct proportion to the magnitude of the half-life versus a value of 253.

    The functions of the KOC score and HLC score are to decrease the adjusted load de-
 pending on the chemical's propensity to partition to sediment or volatilize from the water
 column.  If a chemical is hydrophilic and has little propensity to bind  to sediment, the
 adjusted load will decrease by as much as one order of magnitude. Likewise, if a chemical
 has a strong tendency to volatilize, the adjusted load will also decrease by as much as one
 order of magnitude. This relatively small adjustment was made because of the many miti-
 gating site-specific factors that affect intermedia partitioning.

    The sediment chemistry screening values and ACLs  for the chemicals of concern in
 this analysis vary over more orders of magnitude than do biodegrcdation half-lives, KOC
 scores, and HLC scores. Therefore, adjusted loads are primarily driven by ACLs and chemi-
 cal toxicity.

    The sensitivity of the parameters used  in CLS calculation, with the exception of K ,,
 are depicted in Figure 3-1. Note that the x-axis labels represent l.he factor by which the
 original values are multiplied  (i.e., the effect of doubling a given parameter on the CLS is
 read from the point labeled "2" on the x-axis).  Likewise, the y-axis labels represent the
 change in CLS values resulting from altering input parameters.  For example, if the per-
 cent OC  is  halved ("0.5" on the x-axis), the CLS would be doubled ("2" on the y-axis).
 The sensitivity of K^  is depicted in Figure 3-2 in three parts: one for the effect based on
 KOC score (increase in K^. means greater propensity to partition to sediment and higher
 CLS),  one for the effect based on the equilibrium partitioning approach (increase in K
 means less bioavailability and lower CLS),  and one for the overall K^ effect.

    The overall uncertainty in the CLS precludes their use in analyses that require a high
degree of accuracy.  However, this level of uncertainty is acceptable for meeting the objec-
tive of performing a screening-level loading analysis.
3-10

-------
                                       National Sediment Contaminant Point Soiirire Inventory
                                    Freshwater Chronic Aquatic Toxicity Value
                                    %OC
                                    RfD
                                    Body Weight
                                    Cancer Risk Level
                    Henry's Law Constant
                                          BCF
                                          Fish Ingestion Rate
                                          Cancer Slope Factor
                                          Biodeg. Half-Life
         0.1
                                    0.5         1          2
                                    :  Parameter Change
Figure 3-1.  Chemical Load Score (CLS)—Parameter sensitivity.
                                                                                    3-11

-------
 Development of Chemical Load Scorejs
     0)
     01
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     O
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             0.1
                             Koc in Equilibrium Partitioning Calculation
                        in Kr,,- Score Calculation
0.2   0.3     0.5         1          23
                    KOC Change
      KOC = Organic Carbon-Water Partition Coefficient
Figure 3-2. Chemical Load Score (CLS)—Koc sensitivity.
3-12

-------
                                  Natioiial&edimeiit Contamination Point Sourcie Inventory
Chapter 4
Results  of  Screening-
Level Analyses
                  The screening-level loading analysis of Point Source Inventory data from the 1993
                  Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) and the 1994 Permit Compliance System (PCS) can
                  be used to evaluate the release of sediment contaminants and to identify the chemical
            classes, watersheds, and industrial categories that may be associated with potential sediment
            quality problems arising from point sources. The analysis does not necessarily indicate
            where contaminated sediment problems have occurred or who is responsible. Further infor-
            mation to screen watersheds can be obtained when the release data are compared to the
            Survey data evaluation (Volume 1 of this report).

                This chapter describes how the Point Source Inventory data were prepared for the load-
            ing analysis and highlights the results by chemical, watershed, and industrial category. Tables
            and figures of summary information are presented within the body of the text. Longer tables
            that contain more detailed information are presented in Appendices B and C. Appendix B
            contains a listing of watersheds (defined by 8-digit U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) catalog-
            ing units) grouped by specific ranges of Load Scores. These groups are referred to as
            priority groups in this report. Appendix C contains detailed information on chemicals asso-
            ciated with the industrial categories evaluated in this analysis.

            Preparation of Data for Loading Analysis

                The first step in conducting the screening-level loading analysis was to qualitatively
            examine the Point Source Inventory data for validity and prepare the data for analysis. Of
            the original 233 potential sediment contaminants analyzed as part of the Survey, 122 were
            excluded from the loading analysis because a CLS could not be calculated or no data were
            available for analysis. Table Al in Appendix A contains a complete list of the remaining
            111 sediment contaminants participating in the loading analysis.

               Although the PCS and TRI data were not systematically checked for errors when the
            inventory was developed, an attempt was made to eliminate highly suspect records from the
            loading analysis. Several loading records from PCS were excluded from the loading analy-
            sis because they were highly suspect and would bias the results. For this analysis, EPA
            defined a highly suspect record as the release of any chemical in excess of one-half million
            pounds per year. While feasible at large municipal treatment works such as Chicago Main
            or Blue Plains in Washington, DC, experience in examining PCS records indicates that these
            extremely large surface water releases can be traced back to incorrectly reported concentra-
            tion or flow measurements. Because incorrect flow measurements would have an impact on
            all loadings reported for that facility, all data for 21 facilities from PCS were removed from
            further analysis. Based on examining monitoring data reported for dioxin in PCS, all dioxin
            data were also excluded from the analysis. Many dioxin records were listed as below detec-
                                                                               4-1

-------
  Results of Screening-Level Analyses
tion, and thus treated as zero discharge. EPA had little confidence in the remaining detect-
able levels because of problems with measurement units and other concerns. No facilities
from TRI were removed from the analysis.

    More than 25,500 individual records of direct or indirect pollutant releases to surface
water from point sources were examined in the screening-level loading analysis for their
potential to contribute to sediment contamination. Releases of 111 different chemicals in-
cluding divalent metals (i.e., cadmium, copper, lead, nickel, and zinc); mercury; other met-
als; polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); pesticides; polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs);
and other organic compounds were analyzed. The 1993 TRI data have release records for
60 of these chemicals, and the 1994 PCS data have release records for 108 of these chemi-
cals.

    PCS records show that direct releases of sediment contaminants from 4,869 facilities
totaled nearly  19 million Ib/yr in 1994. Based on 1993 TRI data, direct releases and trans-
fers to POTWs (multiplied by 0.25 to account for removal during treatment) from 3,432
manufacturing facilities totaled 7.3 million Ib/yr. Facilities with chemical release records in
PCS and/or TRI were located in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the
Virgin Islands. Over 1,000 individual watersheds, as defined by USGS 8-digit cataloging
units, receive loads of potential sediment contaminants as reported by PCS and TRI. This
corresponds to approximately one-half of all watersheds in the United States.  Individual
facilities are placed into 31 distinct industrial categories. These categories represent a broad
range of activities (e.g., POTWs, chemical manufacturers, textile mills, coal mines).

Analysis  by Chemical

    Table 4-1 presents the annual release, adjusted load, and Load Score for each of the 60
chemicals included in the loading analysis for TRI data. The CLS and the number of facili-
ties reporting surface water releases or POTW transfers for each chemical are also included
in Table 4-1. Based on TRI data, xylene, nickel, and copper have the largest aggregate Load
Scores. Together with the next seven chemicals listed in Table 4-1 (lead, toluene, phenol,
chromium, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloromethane, and benzene), all with Load Scores greater
than 80, the top 10 chemicals represent more than 69 percent of the aggregate Load Score
for data from TRI.

    Table 4-2 shows the corresponding information for the 108 chemicals included in the
loading analysis for PCS data. Based on PCS data, zinc, copper, and nickel have the largest
aggregate Load Scores. Together with the next 10 chemicals listed in Table 4-2 (cadmium,
silver, mercury, lead, chromium, arsenic, PCBs, benzo(a)pyrene, antimony, and
tetrachloroethene), all with Load Scores greater than 80, the top 13 represent more than 86
percent of the aggregate Load Score for data from PCS.

    Several chemicals have large aggregate national raw loads and are released from a large
number of facilities (i.e., zinc and copper), whereas other chemicals (e.g., chlordane) appear
to represent a few isolated releases. Tables 4-1 and 4-2 also  present the distribution of
records by Load Score. The Load Score distribution is skewed to the right for most chemi-
cals. That is, most records indicate a low Load Score (i.e., less than 3); substantially fewer
records have large Load Scores.  This assessment transforms  the adjusted load for each
analyzed record to a Load Score from zero to five representing the magnitude of the CLS *
ACL product.  This approach minimizes the impact of a small number of very large release
records that account for the majority of adjusted load and appropriately focuses attention on
4-2

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                         National pediment Contamination Point Source Inventory
 chemicals with a large number of potentially significant releases. The results for the DDT
 metabolite DDE illustrates this point.  The adjusted load is very large, yet appears to be
 caused by a single release record. Although not ignoring the potential local importance of
 this individual release, the total Load Score reflects the overall national significance of point
 source DDE discharge.

    Aggregate raw loads and Load Scores for individual chemicals are grouped by chemical
 class to determine which types of chemicals cause the greatest potential sediment hazard.
 Chemical classes are assigned in the following manner:

      Divalent Metal: This group comprises five metal species (cadmium, copper, nickel,
      lead, and zinc) that are typically associated with acid-volatile sulfide (AVS).  These
      metals have sulfide solubilities smaller than that of iron sulfide, making them less
      bioavailable as long as the AVS molar concentration (reservoir of sulfide anions in
      anoxic sediment) exceeds the sum of the molar concentrations of the simultaneously
      extracted metals.   '

      Mercury: Mercury also has a sulfide solubility less than that of iron sulfide; however,
      mercury was not included with the other AVS metals because of the complicating
      factors of methylatioh in sediment and subsequent bioaccumulation. Unfortunately,
      the  sediment chemistry screening value does not account for the effects of this
      bioaccumulation potential.

      Other Metal: This group includes the remaining metals evaluated: antimony, arsenic,
      chromium, and silver,

      Pesticide: This group includes chemicals that are usually large, complex, and manu-
      factured to be biological inhibitors.

      Polynuclear  Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH): This group includes all polynuclear
      aromatic hydrocarbons, including those which are halogenated.

      Polychlorinated Biphenyl (PCB): This group includes all measured PCBs whether
      reported as total PCBs or as one of seven aroclors. PCBs are  highly toxic, highly
      bioaccumulative, and highly persistent.

      Other Organic: This;group includes the remaining organic chemicals not classified as
     pesticides, PAHs, or PCBs.

    Table 4-3 depicts raw loads, adjusted load, and Load Scores by chemical class for TRI
data.  The TRI data show that other organic and divalent metal categories represent about 95
and 4 percent of the annual release, respectively.  These same categories represent 54 and 36
percent of the Load Score. 'Metals (antimony, arsenic, chromium, and silver) account for 6
percent of the Load Score while less than 1 percent of the annual release. All other chemical
groups account for less than 3 percent of the total Load Score for TRI data.  Table 4-4
depicts raw loads,  adjusted loads, and Load Scores by chemical class for PCS data. In
contrast to the TRI data, divalent metals dominate the raw load and Load Score for PCS.
The PCS data show that the divalent metal, other organic, and other metal categories repre-
sent 80, 10, and 10 percent of the annual release, respectively. These same categories rep-
resent 60, 7, and 16 percent of the Load Score.  Mercury also contributes 7 percent to the
aggregate Load Score. Contributions to the Load Score from pesticides, PAHs-, and PCBs
range from 3 to 5 percent. :

                        !                                                    4-11

-------
  Results of Screening-Level Analyses
Table 4-3.  Analysis of TRI Data by Chemical Class
Chemical Class
Divalent Metal
Mercury
Metal
Pesticide
PAH
PCS
Other Organic
Annual Release
(Ib/yr)
268,723
271
63,887
47
37,952
66
6,955,304
Adjusted
Load
l.OE+04
1.9E+03
2.3E+03
1.5E+04
9.3E+02
1.9E+04
6.7E+04
Distribution of Load Score*
0
1,403
-
560
-
87
-
2,785
1
704
3
114
-
37
-
554
2
117
5
22
2
13
-
332
3
16
6
4
2
2
-
74
4
-
-
-
-
-
-
15
5
•
-
-
1
-
1
-
Load
Score
986
31
170
15
69
5
1,500
•Facilities are counted more than once since facilities may report loadings for more than one chemical per chemical class.
Table 4-4. Analysis of PCS Data by Chemical Class
Chemical Class
Divalent Metal
Mercury
Metal
Pesticide
PAH
PCB
Other Organic
Annual Release
(Ib/yr)
15,176,965
28,592
1,821,078
3,646
36,419
1,641
1,920,606
Adjusted
Load
3.9E+05
2.0E+05
8.0E+05
1.2E+06
4.6E+04
4.8E+05
4.7E+04
Distribution of Load Score*
0
5,611
269
1,583
103
323
27
3,381
1
2,896
233
673
32
134
32
386
2
1,368
172
390
54
84
36
126
3
329
62
94
33
56
38
31
4
68
9
24
11
11
14
4
5
2
4
3
7
-
4
1
Load '
Score
6,901
819
1,846
318
514
294
752
•Facilities are counted more than once since facilities may report loadings for more than one chemical per chemical class.


Analysis by Watershed

    To evaluate watersheds, Load Scores are grouped by USGS hydrologic unit codes.
The 8-digit hydrologic unit code is one of several ways to define a watershed, and it repre-
sents four levels of organization. The first two digits represent the region. USGS divides
the contiguous United States into 18 distinct hydrologic regions based on river drainage.
Alaska, Hawaii, and the Caribbean are regions 19,20, and 21, respectively. Each region is
divided into as many as 30 subregions, but typically  regions contain approximately 10
subregions.  Subregions are represented by the first 4 digits in the 8-digit code. Subregions
can be further subdivided into as many as four accounting units, represented by the first 6
digits of the 8-digit code. Accounting units, in turn, can be subdivided into as many as 10
cataloging units, represented by the full 8-digit code. For the purposes of this study, Load
Scores are summed according to USGS cataloging units (8-digit code).  There are more
than 2,100 cataloging units (watersheds) in the United  States.

    Based on the data from TRI and PCS, a total Load Score was computed for 733 and 861
watersheds,  respectively.  For watersheds represented by both TRI and PCS the higher of the
two scores was applied. This approach resulted in a total Load Score for 1,020 watersheds.
Selecting the maximum Load Score, rather than adding the results, eliminates problems asso-
 4-12

-------
                         National Sediment Contamination Point Source Inventory
elated with double-counting releases; however, this approach may underestimate total releases
and the "true" Load Score. Total Load Scores at the watershed level ranged from 0 to 312,
although few were above 100, To divide individual watersheds into groups based on releases
of sediment contaminants, EPA simply created quintiles within the 0 to 100 range. Watersheds
with a total Load Score from 81 to 100 were assigned to priority group 1, or the first quintile.
All watersheds with total Load Scores greater than 100 were also placed in the first quintile.
Priority group 2 watersheds have a Load Score of 61 to 80. Priority group 3 watersheds have
a Load Score of 41 to 60, and priority group 4 watersheds have a Load Score from 21 to 40.
Priority group 5 watersheds have a Load Score from 1 to 20. Watersheds with no data or a
Load Score of zero were not assigned to a priority group.  Figure 4-1 presents the watersheds
in the contiguous United States based on Load Score for priority groups 1 through 4.

    Table 4-5 summarizes this information for each EPA region. The majority of priority
group 1, 2, and 3 watersheds are in EPA Regions 2 and 5.  Of the 1,020 watersheds evalu-
ated, 17 watersheds were placed in priority group 1, 19 watersheds were placed in priority
group 2,29 watersheds were placed in priority group 3,87 watersheds were placed in prior-
ity group 4, and 672 watersheds were placed in priority group 5. The remaining 196 water-
sheds had a Load Score of zero and were not assigned to a priority group. Appendix B
contains a detailed table listing all of the 824 watersheds assigned to the 5 priority groups
and includes information on the predominant chemical class and predominant industrial
category associated with that chemical class.  The following is a list of the 17 watersheds
assigned to priority group 1:
    Watershed Name
    Narragansett
    Lower Hudson
    Hackensack-Passaic
    Sandy Hook-Staten Island
    Northern Long Island
    Southern Long Island
    Middle Delaware Musconetcong
    Lower Delaware
    Schuylkill
    Delaware Bay
    Detroit
    Niagara               !
    Seneca
    Upper Ohio            ;
    Lower Mississippi-Baton Rouge
    Buffalo-San Jacinto
    San Francisco Bay
State Location
MA,RI
NY, CT, NJ
NY,NJ
NY.NJ
NY
NY
PA,NJ
PA,NJ
PA
NJ
MI
NY
NY
WV, PA, OH
LA
TX
CA
    The general relationship between annual point source releases and results of the Survey
evaluation demonstrate a co-occurrence of active discharge of sediment contaminants and
evidence of sediment contamination.  Figure 4-2 depicts this relationship by plotting the
percent of monitoring stations with a high (Tier 1) or intermediate (Tier 2) probability of
contamination in a watershed, as ascribed in the Survey, versus the watershed Load Score.
Only those watersheds with at least one Tier 1 or Tier 2 station from the Survey evaluation
and a Load Score above zero are plotted. In watersheds with Load Scores greater than 50,
                                                                            4-13

-------
  Results WScreeninsj-Level Analyses'
                                                                                              I
                                                                                              03
                                                                                              1!
4-14

-------
                                           i  ' ! '''i '' .    '':   i:  •   « '       ' l '•        '
                                        Nahohiil Sediment Contamination Point Source 1
nventory
Table 4-5. Number of Watersheds in Eath Priority Group by EPA Region"*
Priority
Group
1
2
3
4
5
TOTAL

1
2
0
2
7
27
38

2
10
2
7
9
29
57
EPA Region
3
4
1
5
11
69
90
4
0
4
4
24
182
214
5
2
11
10
28
134
185
6
2
0
2
5
111
120
7
0
0
2
2
75
79
8
0
1
0
3
47
51
9
1
4
4
5
32
46
10
0
0
0
6
29
35
Total Watersheds'
17
19
29
87
672
824
'Watersheds may be reported in more man one EPA Region.
"Watersheds with no reported data or a Load Score equal to 0 are not reported.
Total watersheds will not equal the sum of the Regional values because watersheds may be located in more than one EPA Region.

               at least 70 percent of all monitoring stations within the watershed exhibit some degree of
               contamination. Watersheds with relatively low Load Scores vary greatly in the extent of
               contamination, demonstrating the importance of contaminant sources not documented in this
               study,  such as historical releases and nonpoint sources.

                  Watersheds with high Load Scores are more likely to contain areas of probable concern
               for sediment contamination (APCs) in the Survey evaluation. In Figure 4-2, watersheds
               containing APCs are plotted as dark circles, whereas all other watersheds are plotted as
               cross marks. Overall, approximately 10 percent of watersheds receiving point source dis-
               charges contain APCs. However, it is apparent that the fraction of watersheds containing
              APCs increases as the Load Score increases. In fact, watersheds containing APCs consti-
              tute 75 percent (12 of 16) of priority group 1 watersheds. Figure 4-3 further illustrates this
              relationship.  For priority groups 2 and 3, 37 and 35 percent of the watersheds contain
              APCs, respectively. For priority group 4,21 percent of the watersheds contain APCs. For
              priority group 5, only 8 percent of the watersheds contain APCs. Less than 1 percent of the
              watersheds with a Load Score of zero contain APCs.

                  While this analysis does not imply that point sources caused the in-place contamination,
              it emphasizes the potential significance of contaminant releases in areas already contami-
              nated.  There are many sources of sediment contaminants in watersheds, both active and
              historical, point and nonpoint. This assessment identifies specific watersheds where active
              point sources might play an important role. To promote natural recovery of contaminated
              areas, active dischargers must be adequately controlled to ensure that their releases do not
              perpetuate contamination problems.


              Analysis by Industrial Category

                  Facility-level Load Scores for chemical releases were summed by  industrial categories,
              as assigned based on the primary SIC code reported in PCS or TRI. There are 31 industrial
              categories overall,  covering a broad range of activities.  Table 4-6  lists these industrial
              categories by descending Load Score for TRI data. Table 4-7 presents the same information
              for PCS data. For TRI data; metal products and finishing,  primary metal industries, petro-
              leum refining, and industrial organic chemicals account for 67 percent of the Load Score.
             For PCS data, sewerage systems (i.e., POTWs), other public utilities, metal products and
                                                                                          4-15

-------
                                  100
                                             150
                                                         200
                                                                    250
                                                                                300
                                                                                           350
                                      HAZARD SCORE BY WATERSHED
                                      (Largest of PCS or TRI Hazard Score)
                                    1 ARC Watersheds  + Other Watersheds
Figure 4-2. Comparison of Survey evaluation to Load Score by watershed: percent of stations
classified as Tier 1 or 2 as a function of Load Score.
finishing, and industrial organic chemicals account for 80 percent of the Load Score. POTWs
alone account for 62 percent of the Load Score. It should be noted that public utilities
include steam electric power generators, and EPA did not attempt to account for pollutants
in the intake water used by the industry.  For PCS, the dominant industrial categories are
also the ones required to perform the most monitoring.  Thus, these results reflect data
availability as much as relative sediment hazard potential.  Only five TRI facilities, but a
significant number of PCS facilities (198), do not fall into the defined industrial categories
or do not report a primary SIC code. These facilities are listed as "Nonclassifiable."

    Tables Cl and C2 in Appendix C present Load Scores  grouped by chemical for each
industrial category for TRI and PCS, respectively.  The number of facilities within the
industrial category discharging each chemical, the raw load (Ib/yr), and adjusted load are
also presented. These tables are not comprehensive lists of all chemicals discharged from all
facilities, but are limited to industrial category-chemical combinations where the Load Scores
exceed 0. Tables 4-6 and 4-7 also present the number of facilities in each industrial cat-
egory. Most of the PCS facilities (38 percent) included in the loading analysis are POTWs,
with other public utilities, other trade and services, metal products and finishing, and pri-
mary metal industries also well represented.

    Most of the TRI facilities (44 percent) are metal products and finishing operations.
Primary metal industries, industrial organic chemicals, and other chemical products repre-
sent another 14,7, and 6 percent of the represented facilities, respectively.  Some industrial
categories are not well represented in either PCS or TRI. This limited representation could
be a result of many facilities within the industry not qualifying for major NPDES permits
(which require monthly  discharge monitoring for specific chemicals), not meeting the re-
porting requirements for TRI, or not having release records for pollutants retained in the
loading analysis.

4-16

-------
                                      Niilioiwi'Sbdinicnl Couhmvinnlion I'binl Source Inventory
Q
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There are four watersheds
with Load Scores greater
than 160, of which two are
APC watersheds.






-





0 60 80 100 120 140 160
LOAD SCORE BY WATERSHED
(Largest of PCS or TRI HAZREL Score)
• APC Watersheds + Other Watersheds





        100
  (b)
None(O)      5(1-20)      4(21-40)     3(41-60)      2(61-80)

                PRIORITY GROUP (Load Score Range)
                                                                              1 (>80)
Figure 4-3. Comparison of Survey evaluation to Load Score by watershed:  (a) percent of stations
classified as Tier 1 or 2 as a function of Load Score, (b) percent of watersheds that contain APCs by
priority group.
                                                                                      4-17

-------
  Results of:Sereemni»-LeveI Analyses
Table 4-6.  Analysis of TRI Data by Industrial Category Sorted by Descending Load Score)
Industrial Category
Metal Products and Finishing
Primary Metal Industries
Petroleum Refinkig
Industrial Organic Chemicals
Other Chemical Products
Industrial Inorganic Chemicals
Paper and Affied Products
Plastic Materials and Synthetics
Textile Products
Pharmaceuticals
Lumber and Wood Products
Pesticides
Rubber and Plastics Products
Food and Kindred Products
Furniture and Fixtures
Stone, Clay, and Glass Prod.
Leather and Leather Products
Petroleum and Coal Products
Printing and Publishing
NoncIassiSable
Other Trade and Services
Tobacco Products
Number
ofFacil.
1,501
488
128
244
215
61
170
140
70
84
52
24
86
21
20
44
19
13
37
5
9
1
Annual
Release
Qb/yr)
508,725
289,375
755,797
1,747,680
82,406
98,805
1,515,980
385,059
272,467
1,368,481
10,766
7,466
97,542
23,427
10,452
21,619
5,257
119,502
3,323
1,150
922
51
Adjusted
Load
1.3E+04
2.4E+04
1.8E+04
2.9E+04
4.5E+03
6.2E+03
1.1E+03
2.4E+03
7.1E+03
5.1E+03
2.4E+03
9.6E+02
9.9E+02
2.4E+02
1.6E+02
2.4E+02
8.6E+01
7.1E+01
3.2E+01
3.6E+01
2.3E+01
2.0E-01
Distribution of Load Score1
0
1,838
608
333
454
386
85
299
232
33
139
63
43
99
8
38
46
14
28
54
7
24
4
1
565
269
127
90
63
25
83
35
18
31
23
13
20
10
7
10
6
3
6
3
5
-
2
99
56
92
50
34
34
22
31
23
13
8
4
3
5
6
2
3
3
1
2
-
-
3
13
10
16
13
4
14
1
4
8
8
8
3
1
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
1
-
8
2
1
-
-
-
2
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5
-
1
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Load
Score
806
416
391
242
147
135
130
109
96
85
' 63
30
29
20
19
17
12
9
8
7
5
0
"Facilities are counted more than once since facilities may report loadings for more than one chemical.


Conclusions

    EPA conducted the screening-level sediment loading analysis of the Point Source In-
ventory data to obtain more information about potential sediment contamination and its
sources, and to prioritize chemicals, watersheds, and industries for further evaluation. The
inventory is limited by the quality, quantity, coverage, and bias of the release data in TRI
and PCS.  The loading analysis  is limited by the lack of consideration of site-specific
information, the lack of pollutant transport analysis, and the uncertainty associated with
the components of the chemical-specific chemical load scores.  For these reasons, the
results should be used for screening purposes only, not as a definitive judgment regarding
the most significant sediment contaminants, the  most affected watersheds, or the most
important industrial categories.

    This study  indicates that  point source releases of sediment contaminants to surface
water are ongoing and, in many cases, coincident with areas where there is evidence of
contamination.  TRI and PCS contain records of approximately 25,500 individual point
4-18

-------
                                        National Sfccliment Contamination Point Soured Inventory
Table 4-7. Analysis of PCS Data by Industrial Category (Sorted by Descending Load Score)
Industrial Category
Sewerage Systems
Public Utilities
Metal Products and Finishing
Industrial Organic Chemicals
Primary Metal Industries
Plastic Materials and Synthetics
Industrial Inorganic Chemicals
Other Trade and Services
Petroleum Refining
Metal Mining
Paper and Allied Products
National Security
Nonclassifiable
Other Chemical Products
Textile Products
Food and Kindred Products
Rubber and Plastics Products
Pharmaceuticals
Pesticides
Nonmetallic Mineral Mining
Lumber and Wood Products
Stone, Clay, and Glass Products
Furniture and Fixtures
Leather and Leather Products
Printing and Publishing
Coal Mining
Petroleum and Coal Products
Construction
Oil and Gas Extraction
Grain Production
Number
of Facil.
1,854
542
443
140
268
108
101
479
132
65
109
32
198
57
61
51
48
36
16
15
23
38
7
10
5
5
11
3
11
1
Annual
Release
(Ib/yr)
9,633,326
2,323,268
1,703,481
1,533,573
463,543
258,689
341,325
99,958
648,506
310,246
519,868
138,848
50,066
33,154
608,873
40,327
124,606
104,286
11,916
4,456
7,494
5,970
957
5,678
840
603
14,712
104
213
62
Adjusted
Load
2.4E+06
1.3E+05
3.4E+05
6.6E+04
2.5E+04
1.1E+04
1.7E+04
9.6E+03
8.5E+03
4.7E+03
7.4E+03
6.2E+04
1.2E+03
1.6E+03.
9.8E+03
5.7E+02
3.3E+04
7.9E+02
2.5E+02
1.1E+03
8.7E+02
2.0E+02
8.6E+01
8.0E+01
8.4E+01
5.3E+01
1.5E+03
5.7E+00
4.9E+00
7.6E-01
Distribution of Load Score*
0
3,957
1,064
1,303
747
545
406
224
1,326
186
150
124
88
482
108
84
73
100
86
22
23
38
67
22
13
8
7
16
9
17
2
1
2,584
220
298
259
215
152
87
95
85
69
67
36
43
39
. 35
16
11
22
9
10
7
7
5
3
6
4
-
1
1
-
2
1,425
155
104
100
94
58
52
25
36
39
32
25
16
16
6
14
6
4
7
3
2
3
2
3
1
1
1
-
-
-
3
416
71
25
35
30
17
16
5
1
1
4
3
4
4
3
1
3
2
-
1
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4
79
16
13
10
5
2
5
2
2
1
1
1
-
-
2
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
5
15
2
1
1
-
-
•-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-

Score
7,073
817
638
609
513
327
259
168
168
154
147
104
87
83
64
47
41
36
23
19
14
13
9
9
8
6
6
1
1
0
"Facilities are counted more than once since facilities may report loadings for more than one chemical.
               source releases of 111 different sediment contaminants into over 1,000 watersheds across
               the country from 31 distinct industrial categories. Direct releases from 4,869 facilities in
               PCS totaled nearly 19 million pounds per year in 1994.  Based on 1993 TRI data, direct
               releases and transfers to POTWs (multiplied by 0.25 to account for removal during treat-
               ment) from 3,432 manufacturing facilities totaled 7.3 million Ib/yr. Assuming that there is
               some overlap between TRI and PCS, these databases together indicate that major munici-
               pal and industrial facilities release about 20-25 million pounds of sediment contaminants
               annually.
                                                                                            4-19

-------
  Results'of Screening-Level Analyses
    This analysis indicates that metals and organic chemicals other than pesticides, PAHs,
and PCBs constitute the most extensive potential sediment hazard from point sources.
Although important in some instances, releases of PAHs, pesticides, and PCBs appear to
be less prevalent. Survey evaluation results (Volume 1) indicate that other organic chemi-
cals, as a class of pollutants, are not as significant as other classes. The potential sediment
hazard posed by metals represents the most substantial area of agreement between the Point
Source Inventory loading assessment and the Survey evaluation, on both an individual chemi-
cal basis and a watershed basis.  The Point Source Inventory and Survey both rely on
correlative, statistically based threshold values to evaluate the potential adverse effects of
metals in sediment. Although these correlative thresholds are useful, they are limited in their
application because they do not directly address the bioavailability of metals in sediment.
This report further emphasizes the need for the development of practical assessment tools to
evaluate the bioavailability and toxicity of metals in sediment.

    The watersheds identified in this analysis represent  areas where sediment contami-
nants are discharged; they do not necessarily represent locations where sediment contami-
nation has occurred or will occur.  Watersheds, as defined by the USGS 8-digit cataloging
unit, can represent large areas encompassing large mainstem rivers and small tributary
streams that vary greatly in size, shape, and physical/chemical characteristics. Transport,
sediment partitioning, and sediment accumulation—whether in locations very close to the
point of discharge or far downstream—depend on many factors, including streamflow,
stream velocity, geomorphology, particle size distribution, organic carbon content, sus-
pended sediment load, temperature, pH, and salinity. However, comparison with existing
sediment monitoring  data provides further means of screening watersheds where  point
sources are more likely to contribute to contamination.

    A watershed with a high Load Score is more likely to contain one of the 96 areas of
probable concern for sediment contamination (APCs) in the Survey evaluation.  The
draft EPA report Environmental Goals for America With Milestones for 2005 (USEPA,
1996a) proposes that the Agency, together with its state partners, adequately control
point sources  of contamination over the next 10 years in  10 percent of the watersheds
where sediment contamination is of probable concern.  Specifically,  major facility dis-
charge limits need  to be evaluated and appropriately revised in watersheds at greatest
risk from  active discharges.  The objective of these evaluations should be to  determine
whether existing technology-based controls or water quality-based discharge limits protect
downstream sediment quality to the degree  necessary for natural recovery of contami-
nated sites.  EPA is currently developing the methodology to relate point  source contri-
butions to sediment contaminant concentrations.  This  methodology is needed before
developing permit limits protective of sediment quality.  This report identifies 29 water-
sheds that both contain APCs from the Survey and are in Load Score priority group  1, 2,
or 3 from this analysis.  These watersheds should be considered for further evaluation
and  necessary action  to achieve the milestone in EPA's Goals Report.
4-20

-------
                                          i ; i1;.  • ,\        \\  •    -'  -    [         i
                                      National Sediment Contaminant Pbint Source Inventory
References
             Adams, W.J. 1994. Director, Environmental Toxicology, Analytical Bio-Chemistry Labo-
                  ratories, Inc., Columbia, MO.  Letter to Catherine Fox, U.S. Environmental Protec-
                  tion Agency, Washington, DC. April 30.  Subject:  Review of March 9, 1994, Draft
                  National Sediment Contaminant Point Source Inventory.

             Barrick, R., S. Becker, L. Brown, H. Seller, and R. Pastorok. 1988. Volume 1. Sediment
                  quality values refinement:  1988 update and evaluation of Puget Sound AET.  EPA
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                  sediment quality criteria for nonionic organic chemicals using equilibrium partition-
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                  Columbia.          '.

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                  Risk Assessment and Management Branch, Standards and Applied Sciences Division,
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                  biological effects within ranges of chemical concentrations in marine and estuarine
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                  U.S. Department of Commerce.
                                                                                  Ref-1

-------
   Referenc.es
 SRC.  1993. CHEMFATE database retrieval. Syracuse Research Corporation.

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 USEPA.  1990a.  Hazard Ranking System, Final Rule.  U.S. Environmental  Protection
     Agency.  Fed. Regist., December 14, 1990, 55:241.

 USEPA. 1990b.  The Environmental Fate/Groundwater Branch Office of Pesticide Pro-
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 USEPA. 1991. Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL) Treatability Database.
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 USEPA. 1992a. Permit Compliance System generalized retrieval manual. Washington,
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 USEPA. 1993b. Sediment quality criteria for the protection of benthic organisms: Dield-
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 USEPA. 1993c. Sediment quality criteria for the protection of benthic organisms: Endrin.
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 USEPA. 1993d.  Sediment quality criteria for the protection of benthic organisms:
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USEPA. 1993e. Sediment quality criteria for the protection of benthic organisms: Phenan-
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USEPA. 1993f. Technical basis for deriving sediment quality criteria for nonionic organic
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USEPA.  1993g. Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR). Duluth,MN: U.S.
     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Water. EPA-822-R-93-014.
Ref-2

-------
                          Natiohjal Sediment Contiiiiiin;in(;I^<)iii( Soinfcc Inventory
USEPA. 1993h. Superfund Chemical Data Matrix (SCDM). Washington, DC: U.S. Envi-
     ronmental Protection Agency, Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response.

USEPA. 1996a. Environmental goals for America, with milestones for 2005. Draft. Wash-
     ington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Policy, Planning, and
     Evaluation.

USEPA. 1996b. The national sediment quality survey: A report to Congress on the extent
     and severity of sediment contamination in surface waters of the United States. Draft.
     Washington, DC:  UtS. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Science and Tech-
     nology.

Verschueren, K. 1983. Handbook of environmental data on organic chemicals.  2nd ed.
     New York, NY: Van Nostrand Reinhold and Co.

Worthing, C.R., and RJ. Hance. 1991. The pesticide manual: A world compendium. 9th
     ed. Farnham, Surry, United Kingdom: The British Crop Protection Council.
                                                                         Ref-3

-------
  References
Ref-4

-------
           National Sctlimti
Appendix A
Chemical Load Scores
and Supporting Data
                         A-l

-------
Appendix A

-------
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-------
                                       Natju>nal Sediment Contaminant Point Source Inventory
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-------
 Appendix :A
A-20

-------
               Nalibria Sediment Contaminant Point SouiTt Inventory
Appendix B
Watershed Priority
Groups
                                 B-l

-------
  Appendix B
B-2

-------
                                          .National Sediment• Coiitaiiiiiianjt Point Soui'co Inventory
Table B-1. Priority Group 1 Watersheds (Load Score greater than 80)
Cataloging Watershed Name/
Unit          EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
  Dominant Industrial Class    Source
01090004
(APC)
02030101
02030103
(APC)
02030104
(APC)
02030201
02030202
(APC)
02040105
(APC)
02040202
(APC)
02040203
(APC)
02040204
04090004
(APC)
04120104
(APC)
04140201
05030101
(APC)
08070100
12040104
(APC)
18050004
(APC)

Narragansett
Region(s): 1 State(s): MA, Rl
Lower Hudson
Region(s): 2, 1 State(s): NY, CT, NJ
Hackensack-Passaic :
Region(s): 2 State(s): NY, NJ
Sandy Hook-Staten Island i
Region(s): 2 State(s): NY, NJ
Northern Long Island '
Region(s): 2 State(s): NY
Southern Long Island
Region(s): 2 State(s): NY.
Middle Delaware-Musconetcong
Region(s): 3,2 State(s): PA, NJ
Lower Delaware !
Region(s): 3,2 State(s): PA, NJ
Schuylkill '
Region(s): 3 State(s): PA
Delaware Bay
Region(s): 2 State(s): NJ;
Detroit
Reg ion (s): 5 State(s): Ml
Niagara
Region(s): 2 State(s): NY
Seneca '
Region(s): 2 State(s): NY
Upper Ohio
Region(s): 3, 5 State(s): WV, PA, OH
Lower Mississippi-Baton Rouge
Region(s): 6 State(s): LAj
Buffalo-San Jacinto i
Region(s): 6 State(s): TX|
San Francisco Bay
Region(s): 9 State(s): CA
' i
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Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Pesticide
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Pesticide
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Primary Metal Industries
Divalent Metal
Industrial Organic Chemicals
PAH
Industrial Organic Chemicals
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems

PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
B-3

-------
  AplHMUliY B
B-4

-------
                                           National Sediment Contaminant1 Point Source Inventory
Table B-2. Priority Group 2 Watersheds (Load Score range: 61-80)
Cataloging  Watershed Name/
Unit	EPA Reqion(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
02030105   Raritan
(APC)         Region(s):  2 State(s): NJ •

03160204   Mobile - Tensaw
              Region(s):  4 State(s): AL '
04040001    Little Calumet-Galien
(APC)         Region(s):  5 State(s): IL, IN, Ml

04110001    Black-Rocky
(APC)         Region(s):  5 State(s): OH

04110003   Ashtabula-Chagrin
(APC)         Region(s):  5 State(s): OH!
05030103   Mahoning
              Region(s):  5, 3 State(s): 6H, PA

05040001    Tuscarawas
(APC)         Region(s):  5 State(s): OH
05060001    Upper Scioto              [
              Region(s):  5 State(s): OH
                                     i
05080002   Lower Great Miami
              Region(s):  5 State(s): OH,:IN
05090203   Middle Ohio-Laughery
              Region(s):  4, 5 State(s): KY, IN, OH

05140101    Silver-Little Kentucky      ;
              Region(s):  4, 5 State(s): KY, IN

05140201    Lower Ohio-Little Pigeon
              Region(s):  5, 4 State(s): IN, KY
07120004   DesPlaines
(APC)         Region(s):  5 State(s): Wl, |L
16020204   Jordan
              Region(s):  8 State(s): UT
                                     !
18050001    Suisun Bay               ;
              Region(s):  9 State(s): CA
18050002    San Pablo Bay            '
              Region(s):  9 State(s): CA !

18070104    Santa Monica Bay         :
(APC)         Region(s):  9 State(s): CA :
PAH
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal
   Public Utilities
PCS


PCS


PCS


PCS


PCS

PCS


PCS


PCS

PCS

PCS


PCS
PAH                          PCS
  Plastic Materials and Synthetics
Divalent Metal
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal
  Sewerage Systems

Other
  Sewerage Systems
Other
  Petroleum Refining
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
                                                                                   TRI
                                                                                       B-5,

-------
  Appendix B
Table B-2. (Continued)
 Cataloging  Watershed Name/
 Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
  Dominant Industrial Class    Source
 18070203   Santa Ana
              Region(s):  9 State(s): CA

 21010005   Eastern Puerto Rico
              Region(s):  2 State(s): PR
Divalent Metal
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal
  Sewerage Systems
PCS


PCS
B-6

-------
Table B-3. Priority Group 3 Watersheds (Load Score range: 41-60)
Cataloging Watershed Name/        i
Unit          EPA Regionfs) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
  Dominant Industrial Class    Source
02020003   Hudson-Hoosic
              Region(s): 1,2 State(s): VT, NY, MA

02020004   Mohawk
              Region(s): 2 State(s): NY

02020006   Middle Hudson
              Region(s): 2,1 State(s): NY, MA

02020008   Hudson-Wappinger      i
              Region(s): 2 State(s): NY

02040201   Crosswicks-Neshaminy
              Region(s): 3,2 State(s): PA, NJ

02040206   Cohansey-Maurice
              Region(s): 3, 2 State(s): DE, NJ

02060003   Gunpowder-Patapsco
(ARC)         Region(s): 3 State(s): MD, PA

02080206   Lower James
              Region(s): 3 State(s): VA
03050103   Lower Catawba
              Region(s): 4 State(s): NC, SC
03050105   Upper Broad
              Region(s): 4 State(s): NC, SC
03160111   Locust                 . |
              Region(s): 4 State(s): All

04030204   Lower Fox
(APC)         Region(s): 5 State(s): Wl

04040002   Pike-Root               i
(APC)         Region(s): 5 State(s): WI, !L

04050001   St. Joseph
(APC)         Region(s): 5 State(s): INJ  Ml

04110002   Cuyahoga
              Region(s): 5 State(s): OH

05090101   Raccoon-Symmes
              Region(s): 3, 5 State(s): WV, OH
05120201   Upper White             ',
              Region(s): 5 State(s): IN!

06040006   Lower Tennessee
              Region(s): 4 State(s): KY..TN
Divalent Metal                 PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                 PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                 PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                 PCS
  Sewerage Systems

PCB                         PCS
  Sewerage Systems

PCB                         PCS
  Other Trade and Services

Divalent Metal                 PCS
  Industrial Organic Chemicals

PAH                         PCS
  Plastic Materials and Synthetics
PAH                         PCS
  Industrial Organic Chemicals
PAH                         PCS
  Plastic Materials and Synthetics
PAH                         PCS
  Primary Metal Industries

Divalent Metal                 PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                 PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                 PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                 PCS
  Sewerage Systems
PAH                         PCS
  Industrial Organic Chemicals

Divalent Metal                 PCS
  Sewerage Systems

PAH                         PCS
  Industrial Inorganic Chemicals
                                                                                      B-7

-------
  Anpemlivili
 Table B-3. (Continued)
 Cataloging Watershed Name/
 Unit	EPA Reqion(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
 07010206   Twin Cities
 (APC)         Region(s): 5  State(s): Wl, MN
 07110009   Peruque-Piasa
               Region(s): 7, 5  State(s): MO, IL
 07120003   Chicago
 (APC)         Region(s): 5  State(s): IN, IL

 07140101   Cahokia-Joachim
 (APC)         Region(s): 7, 5  State(s): MO, IL
 08080206   Lower Calcasieu
 (APC)         Region(s): 6 State(s):  LA
 08090100   Lower Mississippi-New Orleans
 (APC)         Region(s): 6 State(s):  LA
 15060106   Lower Salt
               Region(s): 9 State(s):  AZ
 18050006   San Francisco Coastal South
               Region(s): 9 State(s):  CA
 18070105   Los Angeles
 (APC)         Region(s): 9 State(s):  CA
 18070106   San Gabriel
               Region(s): 9 State(s):  CA
 21010004   Southern Puerto Rico
               Region(s): 2 State(s):  PR
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Primary Metal Industries

Other                         TRI
   Petroleum Refining

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
   Industrial Organic Chemicals
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Industrial Organic Chemicals
PAH                          PCS
   Industrial Organic Chemicals
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Public Utilities
B-8

-------
                                           :Ni:i
-------
   Appendix B
 Table B-4. (Continued)
 Cataloging Watershed Name/
 Unit	EPA Reqion(s) and State(s)
 Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
 03130001   Upper Chattahoochee
               Region(s): 4 State(s):  GA
 03130002   Middle Chattahoochee-Lake Harding
 (APC)         Region(s): 4 State(s):  GA, AL
 03150106   Middle Coosa
               Region(s): 4 State(s):  AL
 03150201   Upper Alabama
               Region(s): 4 State(s):  AL
 03160205   Mobile Bay
 (APC)         Region(s): 4 State(s):  AL

 04030101   Manitowoc-Sheboygan
               Region(s): 5 State(s):  Wl
 04050004   Upper Grand
               Region(s): 5 State(s):  Ml
 04050006   Lower Grand
               Region(s): 5 State(s):  Ml
 04100009   Lower Maumee
               Region(s): 5 State(s):  OH
 04100011   Sandusky
               Region(s): 5 State(s):  OH
 04130001   Oak Orchard-Twelvemile
 (APC)         Region(s): 2 State(s):  NY
 04140101   Irondequoit-Ninemile
               Region(s): 2 State(s):  NY
04140202   Oneida
              Region(s): 2 State(s): NY
04150301   Upper St. Lawrence
(APC)         Region(s): 2 State(s): NY
05020005   Lower Monongahela
              Region(s): 3 State(s): PA, WV
05030106   Upper Ohio-Wheeling
              Region(s): 3,5 State(s): WV;OH, PA

05030201   Little Muskingum-Middle Island
              Region(s): 3,5 State(s): WV, OH
 Pesticide                      PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Other         ,                TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Primary Metal Industries
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Public Utilities

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Plastic Materials and Synthetics
B-10

-------
                                             National Sediment'.Contaminanf Point Soured Inventory
Table 13-4. (Continued)
Cataloging
Unit

05030202

05030204

05040002

05040004

05060002

05080001

05080003

05090103

05090202

05100205

05110003


05120101

05120108

05120206

05130202

05140102

05140202

05140206

Watershed Name/
EPA Region(s) and State(s)
i
Upper Ohio-Shade
Region(s): 3, 5 State(s): WV, OH
Hocking
Region(s): 5 State(s): OH
Mohican
Region(s): 5 State(s): OH
Muskingum
Region(s): 5 State(s): OH ;
Lower Scioto
Region(s): 5 State(s): OH ;
Upper Great Miami
Region(s): 5 State(s): OH, IN
Whitewater j
Region(s): 5 State(s): IN, OH
Little Scioto-Tygarts
Region(s): 3, 4, 5 State(s): yVV, KY, OH
Little Miami i
Region(s): 5 State(s): OH j
Lower Kentucky
Region(s): 4 State(s): KY '
Middle Green
Region(s): 4 State(s): KY |
•• i
Upper Wabash '
Region(s): 5 State(s): IN, O'H
Middle Wabash-Little Vermilion
Region(s): 5 State(s): IN, 111
Upper East Fork White !
Region(s): 5 State(s): IN i
Lower Cumberland-Sycamore
Region(s): 4 State(s): TN i
Salt '
Region(s): 4 State(s): KY [
Highland-Pigeon
Region(s): 4, 5 State(s): KY, IN
I
Lower Ohio
Region(s): 4, 5 State(s): KY, IL
i
Dominant Chemical Class/
Dominant Industrial Class

Divalent Metal
Public Utilities
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Public Utilities

Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Pharmaceuticals
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Public Utilities
Data
Source

PCS

PCS

PCS

PCS

PCS

PCS

PCS

PCS

PCS

PCS

PCS


PCS

PCS

PCS

PCS

PCS

PCS

PCS

! B-ll

-------
I Appendix B i ;, ;

Table B-4.
Cataloging
Unit
06010102
06010104
(APC)
06010201
(APC)
06010207
(APC)
06020001
(APC)
06030002
06030005
(APC)
07020012
07080101
(APC)
07090001
07090005
07120001
07120006
(APC)
07130001
(APC)
08070201
10190003
10230006
12020003
(Continued)
Watershed Name/
EPA Region(s) and State(s)
South Fork Holston
Region(s): 4,3 State(s): TN, VA
Holston
Region(s): 4 State(s): TN
Watts Bar Lake
Region(s): 4 State(s): TN
Lower Clinch
Region(s): 4 State(s): TN
Middle Tennessee-Chickamauga
Region(s): 4 State(s): GA, TN, AL
Wheeler Lake
Region(s): 4 State(s): AL, TN
Pickwick Lake
Region(s): 4 State(s): TN, AL, MS
Lower Minnesota
Region(s): 5 State(s): MN
Copperas-Duck
Region(s): 5, 7 State(s): IL, IA
Upper Rock
Region(s): 5 State(s): IL, Wl
Lower Rock
Region(s): 5 State(s): IL, Wl
Kankakee
Region(s): 5 State(s): IN, IL, Ml
Upper Fox
Region(s): 5 State(s): Wl, IL
Lower Illinois-Senachwine Lake
Reg ion (s): 5 State(s): IL
Bayou Sara-Thompson
Region(s): 6, 4 State(s): LA, MS
Middle South Platte-Cherry Creek
Region(s): 8 State(s): CO
Big Papillion-Mosquito
Region(s): 7 State(s): I A, NE
Lower Neches
Region(s): 6 State(s): TX

Dominant Chemical Class/
Dominant Industrial Class
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Metal Mining
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
National Security
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Industrial Organic Chemicals
Divalent Metal
Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Public Utilities
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Industrial Organic Chemicals
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
Industrial Organic Chemicals

Data
Source
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
PCS
B-12

-------
                                           National Sediment Contaminant Point Source Inventory
Table B-4. (Continued)
Cataloging Watershed Name/         ;
Unit          EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/     Data
  Dominant Industrial Class    Source
12040204   West Galveston Bay
              Region(s): 6 State(s):  TX
12070104   Lower Brazos
              Region(s):  6 State(s):  TX

12110202   South Corpus Christ! Bay
              Reg ion (s):  6 State(s):  TX;

15050301   Upper Santa Cruz
              Region(s):  9 State(s):  AZ

16020201   Utah Lake
              Region(s):  8 State(s):  UT;

16020203   Provo
              Region(s):  8 State(s):  UT
17080001   Lower Columbia-Sandy    j
              Regiqn(s):  10  State(s): WA, OR
17090003   Upper Willamette
              Region(s):  10  State(s): OR
17090007   Middle Willamette
              Region(s):  10  State(s): OR
17090012   Lower Willamette         !
(APC)         Region(s):  10  State(s): OR
17110019   Puget Sound
(APC)         Region(s):  10  State(s):
18050003   Coyote
(APC)         Region(s):  9 State(s):  CA
18070103   Calleguas
              Region(s):  9 State(s):  CA

18070303   San Luis Rey-Escondido  '
              Region(s):  9 State(s):  CA

19050002   Cook Inlet                i
              Region(s):  10  State(s): AK

20060000   Oahu
              Region(s):  9 State(s):  HI ;
Divalent Metal                 PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Other                        TRI
  Other Chemical Products

Other                        TRI
  Industrial Inorganic Chemicals

Divalent Metal                 PCS
  Primary Metal Industries

Divalent Metal                 PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                 PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                 PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                 PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                 PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                 PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                 PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                 PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                 PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                 PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                 PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                 PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Other                        PCS
  Sewerage Systems
                                                                                     B-13

-------
  Appendix,B
B-14

-------
                                           N:iiij>nal Sediment Contaminant iPoinl Source Inventory
Table B-5. Priority Group 5 Watersheds (Load Score range: 1-20)
Cataloging Watershed Name/
Unit	EPA Reglon(s) and Statefe)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
  Dominant Industrial Class    Source
01020001   West Branch Penobscot
              Region(s):  1  State(s): ME

01020005   Lower Penobscot
              Region(s):  1  State(s): ME :
01030003    Lower Kennebec           ;
              Region(s):  1  State(s): ME '.
01040002    Lower Androscoggin
              Region(s):  1  State(s): ME,;NH
01050002    Maine Coastal              !
              Region(s):  1  State(s): ME ,

01050003    St. George-Sheepscot
              Region(s):  1  State(s): ME
01060002    Saco
              Region(s):  1  State(s): ME,:NH
01060003    Plscataqua-Salmon Falls
              Region(s):  i  State(s): MA.lME, NH

01070001    Pemigewasset
              Region(s):  1  State(s): NH '
01070002    Merrlmack
              Region(s):  1  State(s): NH, MA
01070005    Concord
              Region(s):  \  State(s): MA
                                      i
01080104    Upper Connecticut-Mascoma
              Region(s):  1  State(s): NH.VT
01080107   West
              Region(s):  1  State(s): VT
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Paper and Allied Products

Divalent Metal    .              PCS
  Paper and Allied Products
Mercury                       TRI
  Industrial Inorganic Chemicals
Metal                         PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
  Paper and Allied Products

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Textile Products
Other                         TRI
  Paper and Allied Products

Metal                         PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing
Metal                         PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  National Security

Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Other Chemical Products
Other                         TRI
  Textile Products

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Metal                         PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
  Other Chemical Products

Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing
                                                                                      B-15

-------
  Appendix JJ
 Table B-5. (Continued)
 Cataloging  Watershed Name/
 Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
 01080201   Middle Connecticut
               Region(s):  1  State(s): MA, NH, VT
 01080202   Miller
               Region(s):  1  State(s): MA, NH
01080203   Deerfield
               Region(s):  1  State(s): MA, VT
01080204   Chicopee
               Region(s):  1  State(s): MA
01080205   Lower Connecticut
               Region(s): 1  State(s): MA, CT
01080206   Westfield
              Region(s): 1  State(s): MA, CT
01080207   Farmington
              Region(s): 1 State(s): CT, MA
01090002   Cape Cod
(ARC)         Region(s): 1 State(s): MA, Rl
01090005   Pawcatuck-Wood
              Region(s): 1 State(s): Rl, CT
01100001   Quinebaug
              Region(s): 1 State(s): CT, MA, Rl
01100002   Shetucket
              Region(s): 1 State(s):  CT, MA
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Primary Metal Industries
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Public Utilities
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Furniture and Fixtures

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

PCB                          PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
Metal                          PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Metal Products and Finishing
Metal                          TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Paper and Allied Products
B-16

-------
Table B-5. (Continued)
Cataloging  Watershed Name/
Unit  	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
  Dominant Industrial Class    Source
01100006   Saugatuck
              Region(s): 1,2 State(s):  CT, NY
02010001   Lake George
              Region(s): 1,2 State(s): VT, NY

02010003   Winooski
              Region(s): 1 State(s): VT

02010006   Great Chazy-Saranac
              Region(s): 2 State(s): NY

02040103   Lackawaxen
              Region(s): 3 State(s): PA j
02040104   Middle Delaware-Mongaup-Brodhead
              Region(s): 2, 3 State(s): NJ, PA, NY

02040205   Brandywine-Christina
              Region(s): 2, 3 State(s): NJ, PA, DE, MD
02040207   Broadkill-Smyrna
              Region(s): 3 State(s):  DE ,
 02040301   Mullica-Toms
 (APC)         Region(s): 2  State(s): NJ j

 02040302   Great Egg Harbor
               Region(s): 2  State(s): NJ ;
 02050101   Upper Susquehanna
               Region(s): 2, 3  State(s): NY, PA
 02050102   Chenango
               Region(s): 2  State(s): NY ;
 02050106   Upper Susquehanna-Tunkhannock
               Region(s): 3  State(s): PA j
Metal                          PCS
  Primary Metal Industries
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Other Trade and Services

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Primary Metal Industries
Other                         TRI
  Petroleum Refining
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
  Plastic Materials and Synthetics

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Metal                         PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Nonclassifiable
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Primary Metal Industries
Metal                       .  TRI
  Primary Metal Industries
                                                                                        B-17

-------
 Table B-5. (Continued)
 Cataloging  Watershed Name/
 Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
 Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
 02050202   Sinnemahoning
               Region(s): 3 State(s): PA
 02050204   Bald Eagle
               Region(s): 3 State(s): PA
 02050205   Pine
               Region(s): 3 State(s): PA
 02050206   Lower West Branch Susquehanna
               Region(s): 3 State(s): PA
 02050301    Lower Susquehanna-Penns
               Region(s): 3 State(s): PA
 02050302   Upper Juniata
               Region(s): 3 State(s): PA
 02050304   Lower Juniata
               Region(s):  3  State(s): PA
 02050305   Lower Susquehanna-Swatara
               Region(s): 3  State(s): PA
 02060002   Chester-Sassafras
               Region(s): 3 State(s):  PA, DE, MD
02060004   Severn
              Region(s): 3 State(s):  MD
02060006   Patuxent
              Region(s): 3 State(s):  MD
02060007   Blackwater-Wicomico
              Region(s): 3 State(s):  MD, DE
02060010   Chincoteague
              Region(s): 3 State(s):  MD, VA, DE
 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Primary Metal Industries
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Paper and Allied Products
 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Primary Metal Industries

 Other                          PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Public Utilities
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                 TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Divalent Metal                 PCS
   Primary Metal Industries
 Other                         TRI
   Rubber and Plastics Products
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Mercury                      PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Other                         TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Public Utilities
B-18

-------
                                           ISa'ti'onul Sedimenf C'onfaniiiianfiPoint Source Inventory
Table B-5. (Continued)
Cataloging Watershed Name/
Unit	EPA Reqion(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
  Dominant Industrial Class    Source
02070002    North Branch Potomac
              Region(s):  3  State(s): PA, VW, MD
02070004    Conococheague-Opequon
(APC)         Region(s):  3 State(s): WV, VA, MD, PA

02070005    South Fork Shenandoah
              Region(s):  3 State(s): VA
02070006   North Fork Shenandoah
              Region(s):  3 State(s): VA,|WV
02070008   Middle Potomac-Catoctin
              Region(s):  3 State(s): MD,;VA, DC
02070009   Monocacy                '•
              Region(s):  3 State(s): MD, PA

02070010   Middle Potomac-Anacostia-Occoquan
              Region(s):  3 State(s): DC, MD, VA
02070011   Lower Potomac
              Region(s):  3 State(s): MD, VA
02080104   Lower Rappahannock      I
              Region(s):  3 State(s): VA |

02080106   Pamunkey
              Region(s):  3 State(s): VA [

02080107   York                     ;
              Region(s):  3 State(s): VA !

02080201   Upper James
              Region(s):  3 State(s): VA.JWV
Metal                         PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRl
  Paper and Allied Products

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Mercury                       PCS
  Plastic Materials and Synthetics
Other                         TRl
  Pharmaceuticals
Metal                         PCS
  Textile Products
Divalent Metal                  TRl
  Primary Metal Industries

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Primary Metal Industries
Divalent Metal                  TRl
  Metal Products and Finishing
Metal                         PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRl
  Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Public Utilities
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Other                         TRl
  Paper and Allied Products

Mercury                       PCS
  Public Utilities

PCB                          PCS
  Rubber and Plastics Products
Other                         TRl
  Paper and Allied Products
                                                                                      B-19

-------
  Appendix. B
Table B-5. (Continued)
Cataloging  Watershed Name/
Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
02080202   Maury
              Region(s): 3 State(s):  VA
02080203   Middle James-Buffalo
              Region(s): 3 State(s):  VA
02080204   Rivanna
              Region(s): 3 State(s):  VA
02080205   Middle James-Willis
              Region(s): 3 State(s):  VA
02080207   Appomattox
              Region(s): 3 State(s):  VA
02080208   Hampton Roads
              Region(s): 3 State(s):  VA
03010101   Upper Roanoke
              Region(s): 3 State(s):  VA
03010102   Middle Roanoke
              Region(s): 4,3 State(s):  NC.VA
03010103   Upper Dan
              Region(s): 4,3 State(s):  NC, VA

03010104   Lower Dan
              Region(s): 3,4 State(s):  VA, NC

03010107   Lower Roanoke
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  NC

03010201   Nottoway
              Region(s): 3, 4 State(s):  VA, NC
03020101   Upper Tar
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  NC
03020201   Upper Neuse
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  NC

03030003   Deep
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  NC
Mercury                       PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Metal                         TRI
   Lumber and Wood Products
Metal                         PCS
   Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
Metal                         PCS
   Metal Products and Finishing
Other                         TRI
   Other Chemical Products
Other                         TRI
   Pharmaceuticals
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   National Security
Metal                         PCS
   Textile Products
Other                         TRI
   Furniture and Fixtures
Metal                         PCS
   Textile Products
Other                         TRI
   Textile Products
Other                         TRI
  Stone, Clay, and Glass Products
Metal
  Textile Products
Other
  Textile Products
TRI

TRI


TRI
Other
  Industrial Organic Chemicals
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal
  Metal Products and Finishing

Other
  Other Chemical Products
TRI
TRI
B-20

-------
                                            Natiojiial Sediment Contaminant j'oint Source Inventory
Table B-5. (Continued)
Cataloging  Watershed Name/
Unit          EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
  Dominant Industrial Class    Source
03030004   Upper Cape Fear
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  NC

03030005   Lower Cape Fear
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  NC

03030006   Black
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  NC

03030007   Northeast Cape Fear
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  NC

03040101   Upper Yadkin
              Region(s): 3,4 State(s):  VA, NC
03040103   Lower Yadkin
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  NC

03040105   Rocky
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  NC, SC
03040201   Lower Pee Dee
(APC)         Region(s): 4 State(s):  NC, SC
03040202   Lynches
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  SC, NC
03040204   Little Pee Dee
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  NC, SC

03040205   Black                     \
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  SC i
03040206   Waccamaw
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  NC, SC
03040207   Carolina Coastal-Sampit
              Reg ion (s): 4 State(s):  NC, SC
03050101    Upper Catawba
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  SC, NC
03050102    South Fork Catawba
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  NC
Divalent Metal
   Metal Products and Finishing

Mercury
   industrial Inorganic Chemicals

Divalent Metal
   Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal
   Industrial Inorganic Chemicals

Divalent Metal
   Metal Products and Finishing

Other
   Other Chemical Products

Other
   Textile Products

Divalent Metal
   Sewerage Systems
Other
   Textile Products
Divalent Metal
   Textile Products
Divalent Metal
   Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal
   Sewerage Systems
Other
   Textile Products

Divalent Metal
   Sewerage Systems

PAH
   Industrial Organic Chemicals
Divalent Metal
   Primary Metal Industries

Other
   Textile Products

Other
   Textile Products
TRI


TRI


TRI


TRI


TRI


TRI


TRI


PCS

TRI


PCS

TRI


PCS


PCS

TRI


PCS


PCS

TRI


TRI


TRI
                                                                                        B-21

-------
Table B-5. (Continued)
Cataloging  Watershed Name/
Unit	EPA Reglon(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
  Dominant Industrial Class    Source
03050104   Wateree
              Region(s): 4 State(s): SC
03050106   Lower Broad
              Region(s): 4 State(s): SC
03050108   Enoree
              Region(s): 4 State(s): SC
03050109   Saluda
              Region(s): 4 State(s): SC
03050110   Congaree
              Reg ion (s): 4 State(s): SC
03050201   Cooper
              Region(s): 4 State(s): SC
03050202   South Carolina Coastal
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  SC
03050203   North Fork Edisto
              Reg ion (s): 4 State(s): SC
03050205   Edisto
              Region(s): 4 State(s): SC

03050206   Four Hole Swamp
              Region(s): 4 State(s): SC

03050207   Salkehatchie
              Region(s): 4 State(s): SC
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Plastic Materials and Synthetics
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Industrial Organic Chemicals

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Metal                         TRI
  Lumber and Wood Products
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
  Other Chemical Products
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
  Plastic Materials and Synthetics

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Industrial Organic Chemicals
Metal                         TR!
  Primary Metal Industries

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Textile Products

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
  Industrial Organic Chemicals

Metal                         PCS
  Public Utilities

Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
B-22

-------
                                            \;ilional .Sediment C'ontnniiiiiii'it Point Source )nventor\
Table B-5. (Continued)
Cataloging  Watershed Name/
Unit	EPA Reqion(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
03050208   Broad-St. Helena
              Region(s): 4 State(s): SG
03060101   Seneca
(ARC)         Region(s): 4 State(s): NC, SC
03060102   Tugaloo
              Region(s): 4 State(s): SC, GA, NC

03060103   Upper Savannah
              Region(s): 4 State(s): GA, SC
03060105   Little
              Region(s): 4 State(s): GA
03060106   Middle Savannah         :
(APC)         Region(s): 4 State(s): GA, SC
03060107   Stevens                 j
              Region(s): 4 State(s): SC
03060108   Brier                    i
              Region(s): 4 State(s): GA
03060109   Lower Savannah
              Region(s): 4 State(s): SC, GA
03060201    Upper Ogeechee
              Region(s): 4 State(s): GA
                                    {
03060202    Lower Ogeechee
              Region(s): 4 State(s): GA
03060203   Canoochee
              Reg ion (s):  4 State(s): GA

03060204   Ogeechee Coastal
              Region(s):  4 State(s): SC, GA
03070101    Upper Oconee            '
              Region(s):  4 State(s): GA
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Industrial Organic Chemicals

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
   Other Chemical Products
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Textile Products

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
   Textile Products
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
   Textile Products
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
   Paper and Allied Products

Metal                         PCS
   Textile Products

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Textile Products
Divalent Metal                  TRi
   Primary Metal Industries

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
                                                                                      B-23

-------
  Append ixJJ
Table B-5. (Continued)
Cataloging  Watershed Name/
Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
03070102   Lower Oconee
              Region(s): 4 State(s): GA
03070104   Lower Ocmulgee
              Region(s): 4 State(s): GA
03070105   Little Ocmulgee
              Region(s): 4 State(s): GA
03070106   Altamaha
              Region(s): 4 State(s): GA
03070201   Satilla
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  GA
03070203   Cumberland-St. Simons
              Region(s): 4 State(s): FL, GA
03070204   St. Marys
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  GA, FL
03080101    Upper St. Johns
              Reg ion (s): 4  State(s):  FL

03080102    Oklawaha
              Region(s): 4  State(s):  FL

03080203    Vero Beach
              Region(s): 4  State(s):  FL
03090202    Everglades
              Region(s): 4  State(s):  FL
03090204   Big Cypress Swamp
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  FL
03100202   Manatee
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  FL
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
PAH                          TRI
   Paper and Allied Products
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Primary Metal Industries
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
   Paper and Allied Products
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
Pesticide                      PCS
   Industrial Organic Chemicals
Other                         TRI
   Industrial Organic Chemicals
Metal                         PCS
   Paper and Allied Products
Other                         TRI
   Paper and Allied Products

Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing

Mercury                       PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Mercury                       PCS
   Public Utilities

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Public Utilities
Other                         TRI
   Textile Products
Metal                         PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Public Utilities
B-24

-------
                                             National Sediment Contaminant [Point Source Inventory
 Table B-5. (Continued)
 Cataloging Watershed Name/
 Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
 Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
 03100206   Tampa Bay
               Region(s):  4 State(s): FL
 03100208   Withlacoochee
               Region(s):  4 State(s): FL  I
 03110201   Upper Suwannee           ;
               Region(s):  4 State(s): FL, GA
 03110202   Alapaha
               Region(s):  4 State(s): GA, FL
 03110203   Withlacoochee
               Region(s): 4 State(s): FL, GA

 03120001   Apalachee Bay-St. Marks
               Region(s): 4 State(s): FL, GA

 03120002   Upper Ochlockonee
               Region(s): 4 State(s): GA

 03130003   Middle Chattahoochee-Walter F. George Res.
               Region(s): 4 State(s): GA, AL
03130004   Lower Chattahoochee       i
              Region(s): 4 State(s): AL, FL, GA
03130005   Upper Flint                 j
              Region(s): 4 State(s): GA  \
03130006   Middle Flint
              Region(s): 4 State(s): GA
03130008   Lower Flint
              Region(s): 4 State(s): GA
03130010   Spring
              Region(s): 4 State(s): GA  ;
03130012   Chipola                    \
              Region(s): 4 State(s): AL, FL
 Divalent Metal
   Other Trade and Services
 Divalent Metal
   Primary Metal Industries
 Divalent Metal
   Public Utilities
PCS

TRI


PCS

PCS
 Divalent Metal
   Sewerage Systems
 Other                          TRI
   Plastic Materials and Synthetics
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Public Utilities
 Pesticide                       PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Other                          TRI
   Paper and Allied Products
 Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Public Utilities
 Metal                          PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Primary Metal Industries
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
   Pharmaceuticals
Other                         PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Public Utilities
                                                                                       B-25

-------
 Appendix 15
Table B-5. (Continued)
Cataloging  Watershed Name/
Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
  Dominant Industrial Class    Source
03140101    St. Andrew-St. Joseph Bays
              Region(s): 4 State(s): FL
03140105   Pensacola Bay
              Region(s): 4 State(s): FL
03140106   Perdido
              Region(s): 4 State(s): FL, AL
03140107   Perdido Bay
(APC)         Region(s): 4 State(s): FL, AL

03140201   Upper Choctawhatchee
              Region(s): 4 State(s): AL

03140301   Upper Conecuh
              Reg ion (s): 4 State(s): AL

03140304   Lower Conecuh
              Region(s): 4 State(s): AL, FL
03140305   Escambia
              Region(s): 4 State(s): FL, AL
03150101   Conasauga
              Region(s): 4 State(s): GA, TN

03150102   Coosawattee
              Region(s): 4 State(s): GA

03150103   Oostanaula
              Region(s): 4 State(s): GA
03150104   Etowah
              Region(s): 4 State(s): GA
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
  Industrial Organic Chemicals
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Public Utilities
Other                         TRI
  Plastic Materials and Synthetics
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
  Lumber and Wood Products
Mercury                       PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Metal                         PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Metal                         TRI
  Primary Metal Industries
Other                .,        PCS
  Lumber and Wood Products
Other                         TRI
  Lumber and Wood Products
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Industrial Organic Chemicals
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Plastic Materials and Synthetics
Other                         TRI
  Textile Products
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
PCB                          PCS
  Metal Products and Finishing
Other                         TRI
  Textile Products
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
  Other Chemical Products
B-26

-------
                                            Niifional 'Sediment Contaminant Point Sou'rce Invon'torv
 Table B-5. (Continued)
 Cataloging  Watershed Name/
 Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
 Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
03150105   Upper Coosa
               Region(s): 4  State(s): ALj GA
03150107   Lower Coosa
               Region(s): 4  State(s): AL;
03150108   Upper Tallapoosa
              Region(s): 4  State(s): GA, AL
03150109   Middle Tallapoosa
              Region(s): 4  State(s): AL;
03150202   Cahaba
              Region(s): 4 State(s): AL

03150204   Lower Alabama
              Region(s): 4 State(s): AL

03160101   Upper Tombigbee
              Region(s): 4 State(s): MS, AL
03160103   Buttahatchee
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  AL, MS
03160104   Tibbee                   >
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  MS
03160105   Luxapallila               J
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  AL,;MS
03160106   Middle Tombigbee-Lubbub :
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  MS;AL
03160107   Sipsey                   ;
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  AL;
03160108   Noxubee
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  MS, AL
03160109   Mulberry                 j
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  AL ;
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Textile Products
 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Primary Metal Industries
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Other                          TRI
   Textile Products
 Other                          TRI
   Stone, Clay, and Glass Products
 Other                          TRI
   Lumber and Wood  Products
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Metal Products and Finishing
 PAH                           TRI
   Industrial Inorganic Chemicals
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Metal                          TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Divalent Metal
   Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal
   Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal
   Paper and Allied Products
Metal
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
   Primary Metal Industries
Other
   Other Chemical Products
PCS
TRI
PCS
PCS
TRI
TRI
                                                                                       B-27

-------
Table B-5. (Continued)
Cataloging  Watershed Name/
Unit          EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
  Dominant Industrial Class    Source
03160112   Upper Black Warrior
              Region(s): 4 State(s): AL
03160113   Lower Black Warrior
              Region(s): 4 State(s): AL

03160201   Middle Tombigbee-Chickasaw
              Region(s): 4 State(s): AL, MS

03160203   Lower Tambigbee
              Region(s): 4 State(s): AL
03170002   Upper Chickasawhay
              Region(s): 4 State(s): MS, AL

03170004   Upper Leaf
              Region(s): 4 State(s): MS
03170005   Lower Leaf
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  MS
03170006   Pascagoula
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  MS

03170007   Black
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  MS

03170008   Escatawpa
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  MS, AL

03170009   Mississippi Coastal
              Region(s): 6,4 State(s):  LA, AL, MS
03180003   Middle Pearl-Silver
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  MS
04010102   Beaver-Lester
              Region(s): 5 State(s):  MN, Wl
PAH                          PCS
  Primary Metal Industries
Other                         TRI
  Petroleum Refining

Mercury                       PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Other                         TRI
  Paper and Allied Products

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Industrial Organic Chemicals
Other                         TRI
  Paper and Allied Products

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Textile Products

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Public Utilities
Other                         TRI
  Industrial Organic Chemicals

Other                         TRI
  Plastic Materials and Synthetics
Metal                         PCS
  Other Chemical Products

Other
  Lumber and Wood Products
TRI
Other                         TRI
   Paper and Allied Products

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Industrial Inorganic Chemicals
PAH                          TRI
   Plastic Materials and Synthetics

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Paper and Allied Products
Other                         TRI
   Paper and Allied Products

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
B-28

-------
                                            National Sedimi'nt Contaminant Point Soui'co Inventory
Table B-5. (Continued)
Cataloging  Watershed Name/
Unit	EPA Reglonfe) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
04010201   St. Louis
              Region(s): 5 State(s):  Wl, MN
04010301   Beartrap-Nemadji
              Region(s): 5 State(s):  MN, Wl
04020101   Black-Presque Isle
              Region(s): 5 State(s):  MI..WI
04020102   Ontonagon               !
              Region(s): 5 State(s):  MIJWI
04020103   Keweenaw Peninsula
              Region(s): 5 State(s):  Ml
04020105   Dead-Kelsey
              Region(s): 5 State(s):  Ml;
04020201   Betsy-Chocolay
              Region(s): 5 State(s):  Ml
04030102   Door-Kewaunee
(APC)         Region(s): 5 State(s):  Wl
04030105   Peshtigo
              Region(s): 5 State(s): Wl
04030108   Menominee
(APC)         Region(s): 5 State(s): MI.JWI
04030109   Cedar-Ford
              Region(s): 5 State(s): Ml!
04030110   Escanaba                '
              Region(s): 5 State(s): Ml |
04030201   Upper FOx
              Region(s): 5 State(s): Wl!

04030202   Wolf                     ;
              Region(s): 5 State(s): Wl;
04030203   Lake Winnebago
              Region(s): 5 'State(s): Wl;
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Metal Mining
Other                         TRI
   Paper and Allied Products

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Metal Mining

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Paper and Allied Products

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Paper and Allied Products

Mercury                       PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Coal Mining

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Primary Metal Industries
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
                                                                                       B-29

-------
 Appendix li
Table B-5. (Continued)
Cataloging  Watershed Name/
Unit          EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
  Dominant Industrial Class    Source
04040003   Milwaukee
(APC)         Region(s): 5 State(s): Wl
04050002   Black-Macatawa
              Region(s): 5 State(s): Ml
04050003   Kalamazoo
              Region(s): 5 State(s): Ml
04050005   Maple
              Region(s): 5 State(s): Ml
04060101   Pere Marquette-White
              Region(s): 5 State(s): Ml
04060102   Muskegon
              Region(s): 5 State(s): Ml
04060103   Manistee
(APC)         Region(s): 5 State(s): Ml

04060105   Boardman-Charlevoix
              Region(s): 5 State(s): Ml

04060106   Manistique
              Region(s): 5 State(s): Ml

04070001   St. Marys
              Region(s): 5 State(s): Ml

04070002   Carp-Pine
              Region(s): 5 State(s): Ml
04070004   Cheboygan
              Region(s): 5 State(s): Ml

04070006   Thunder Bay
              Region(s): 5 State(s): Ml
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing
Other                         PCS
  Petroleum Refining

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
  Industrial Organic Chemicals
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
  Paper and Allied Products

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Paper and Allied Products

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Other                         PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Lumber and Wood Products
Other                         TRI
  Lumber and Wood Products
B-30

-------
                                             National Sediment Contaminant Point Soiiircp inventory
Table B-5. (Continued)
Cataloging  Watershed Name/
Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
04080201   Tittabawassee
               Region(s): 5  State(s): Ml
04080202   Pine
               Region(s): 5  State(s): Ml
04080203   Shiawassee
               Region(s): 5  State(s): Ml;
04080204   Flint                      i
              Region(s): 5  State(s): Ml
04080206   Saginaw
              Region(s): 5  State(s): Ml
04090001   St. Clair
              Region(s): 5  State(s): Ml;
04090002   Lake St. Clair
(ARC)         Region(s): 5  State(s): Ml,
04090003   Clinton
              Region(s): 5  State(s): Mlj
04090005   Huron
              Region(s): 5  State(s): Ml
04100001    Ottawa-Stony
(APC)         Region(s): 5 State(s): OH, Ml
04100002   Raisin
(APC)         Region(s): 5 State(s): Ml,'OH
Other                          PCS
   Plastic Materials and Synthetics
Other                          TRI
   Other Chemical Products

Metal                          PCS
   Petroleum Refining
Divalent Metal                   TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                   TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                   TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                   TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                   TRI
   Primary Metal Industries

Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Primary Metal Industries
Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                   TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                   TRI
   Primary Metal Industries

Metal                          PCS
   Public Utilities
Other                          TRI
   Other Chemical Products
Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Sewerage Systems
                                                                                         B-31

-------
  Appendix B
Table B-5. (Continued)
Cataloging  Watershed Name/
Unit          EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
  Dominant Industrial Class    Source
04100003   St. Joseph
              Region(s): 5 State(s):  Ml, OH, IN
04100004   St. Marys
              Region(s): 5 State(s):  IN, OH
04100005   Upper Maumee
              Region(s): 5 State(s):  IN, OH
04100006   Tiffin
              Region(s): 5 State(s):  Ml, OH
04100007   Auglaize
              Region(s): 5 State(s): OH, IN
04100008   Blanchard
              Region(s): 5 State(s):  OH
04100010   Cedar-Portage
(ARC)         Region(s): 5 State(s):  Ml, OH
04100012   Huron-Vermilion
(ARC)         Region(s): 5 State(s):  OH

04110004   Grand
              Region(s): 5 State(s):  OH
04120101    Chautauqua-Conneaut
(ARC)         Region(s): 2, 3, 5 State(s):  NY, PA, OH
04120102   Cattaraugus
              Region(s): 2 State(s):  NY
Divalent Metal
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
  Primary Metal Industries

Divalent Metal
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal
  Food and Kindred Products
                              PCS
                                                                                    TRI
                              PCS
                                                                                    TRI
                              PCS
Divalent Metal
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
  Petroleum Refining

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
  Plastic Materials and Synthetics

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Public Utilities
B-32

-------
                                             N;iiion:il Soili.mt*n.t Contaminant'iPoint Source Inventory
Table B-5. (Continued)
Cataloging  Watershed Name/
Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/     Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
04120103   Buffalo-Eighteenmile
(APC)         Region(s): 2  State(s): NY
04120200   Lake Erie
              Region(s): 5,2, 3 State(s): ;MI, NY, OH, PA

04130003   Lower Genesee
              Region(s): 2 State(s): NY !
04140102   Salmon-Sandy
              Region(s): 2  State(s): NY !
04140203   Oswego
              Region(s): 2  State(s): NY

04150101   Black
              Region(s): 2  State(s): NY ;

04150200   Lake Ontario
              Region(s): 2  State(s): NY '

04150302   Oswegatchie
              Region(s): 2  State(s): NY !
04150303   Indian
              Region(s): 2  State(s): NY j
04150304   Grass                      '
              Region(s): 2  State(s): NY ''
04150305   Raquette
              Region(s): 2 State(s): NY  l
04150307   English-Salmon
              Region(s): 2 State(s): NY  |
05010001   Upper Allegheny
              Region(s): 3, 2 State(s): PA, NY
Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Nonclassifiable
Divalent Metal                   TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                   PCS
Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                   TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Public Utilities
Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Paper and Allied Products

Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Metal Mining
Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Nonmetallic Mineral Mining

Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Primary Metal Industries
Divalent Metal                   TRI
   Primary Metal Industries

Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Paper and Allied Products
Divalent Metal                   TRI
   Primary Metal Industries

Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                   TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
                                                                                         B-33

-------
  Appendix B
 Table B-5. (Continued)
 Cataloging Watershed Name/
 Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
 05010002   Conewango
               Region(s):  2, 3 State(s): NY, PA
 05010003   Middle Allegheny-Tionesta
               Region(s):  3 State(s): PA
 05010004   French
               Region(s): 3, 2 State(s): PA, NY
 05010005   Clarion
               Region(s): 3  State(s): PA
05010006   Middle AIlegheny-Redbank
               Region(s): 3  State(s): PA
05010007   Conemaugh
               Region(s): 3  State(s): PA
05010008   Kiskiminetas
               Region(s): 3  State(s): PA
05010009   Lower Allegheny
               Region(s): 3 State(s): PA
05020001   Tygart Valley
              Region(s): 3 State(s):  WV
05020002   West Fork
              Region(s): 3 State(s):  WV
05020003   Upper Monongahela
              Region(s): 3 State(s):  WV, PA
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
Metal                         PCS
   Petroleum Refining
Other                         TRI
   Petroleum and Coal Products
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
   Other Chemical Products
Metal                         PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
   Paper and Allied Products
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Primary Metal Industries
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Primary Metal Industries

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Primary Metal Industries
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Primary Metal Industries

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Public Utilities
Other                         TRI
   Petroleum Refining

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

PAH                          PCS
   Industrial Organic Chemicals
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
B-34

-------
                                            National Sediment Contaminant Point Source Inventory
Table B-5. (Continued)
Cataloging  Watershed Name/
Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
  Dominant Industrial Class    Source
05020006   Youghiogheny
              Region(s): 3 State(s):  MD, PA, WV
05030102   Shenango
(ARC)         Region(s): 5, 3 State(s): OH, PA
05030104   Beaver
              Region(s): 3 State(s):  PA;
05030105   Connoquenessing
              Region(s): 3 State(s):  PA
05040003   Walhonding               :
              Region(s): 5 State(s):  OH;

05040005   Wills
              Region(s): 5 State(s):  OH;

05040006   Licking
              Region(s): 5 State(s):  OH!
05050001    Upper New
              Region(s): 4,3 State(s): NC, VA

05050002    Middle New
              Region(s): 3 State(s):  WV, VA
05050003    Greenbrier
              Region(s): 3 State(s):  WV
05050004    Lower New
              Region(s): 3 State(s):  Wy

05050006    Upper Kanawha
              Region(s): 3 State(s):  WV
05050008   Lower Kanawha
              Region(s): 3 State(s):  WV,
05060003   Paint
              Region(s): 5 State(s):
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Primary Metal Industries

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Public Utilities

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Primary Metal Industries

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Industrial Inorganic Chemicals

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Plastic Materials and Synthetics
Metal                         PCS
  Leather and Leather Products

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Other                         PCS
  Industrial Organic Chemicals
Other                         TRI
  Industrial Organic Chemicals

Pesticide                      PCS
  Industrial Inorganic Chemicals
Pesticide                      TRI
  Pesticides
Divalent Metal
  Sewerage Systems
PCS
                                                                                        B-35

-------
 Table B-5. (Continued)
 Cataloging  Watershed Name/
 Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
 Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
 05070203   Lower Levisa
               Region(s): 4 State(s): KY
 05070204   Big Sandy
               Region(s): 4, 3  State(s): KY, VW
 05090104   Little Sandy
               Region(s): 4 State(s): KY
 05090201   Ohio Brush-Whiteoak
               Region(s): 4, 5 State(s): KY, OH
 05100101   Licking
               Region(s): 4 State(s): KY
 05100102   South Fork Licking
               Region(s): 4 State(s):  KY
 05110001    Upper Green
               Region(s): 4 State(s):  KY
 05110002    Barren
               Region(s): 4 State(s): KY, TN
 05110004   Rough
               Region(s): 4 State(s): KY
 05110005   Lower Green
               Region(s): 4 State(s): KY
05110006   Pond
               Region(s):  4 State(s): KY
05120103   Mlssisslnewa
               Region(s):  5 State(s): IN, OH
05120105   Middle Wabash-Deer
               Region(s):  5 State(s): IN
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Petroleum Refining
 Other                         TRI
   Petroleum Refining

 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Primary Metal Industries
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Public Utilities

 PCB                           PCS
   Public Utilities
 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Primary Metal Industries
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Stone, Clay, and Glass Products
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Other Trade and Services

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Public Utilities
 Other                          TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                   TRI
   Primary Metal Industries

Other                          TRI
   Furniture and Fixtures
B-36

-------
                                            Na
05120207   Muscatatuck
              Region(s): 5 State(s): IN  ;
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
  Printing and Publishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Metal                         PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
  Industrial Organic Chemicals

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
PAH                          TRI
  Industrial Organic Chemicals

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Metal                         TRI
  Petroleum Refining

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Mercury                       PCS
  Sewerage Systems

PCB                          PCS
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Primary Metal Industries

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
                                                                                       B-37

-------
  Appeiuliv B
 Table B-5. (Continued)
 Cataloging Watershed Name/
 Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
 Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
 05120208   Lower East Fork White
               Region(s):  5 State(s): IN
 05120209   Patoka
               Region(s): 5  State(s): IN
 05130101   Upper Cumberland
               Region(s): 4  State(s): TN, KY
 05130102   Rockcastle
               Region(s): 4 State(s): KY
 05130103   Upper Cumberland-Lake Cumberland
               Region(s): 4 State(s): KY, TN
 05130106   Upper Cumberland-Cordell Hull Reservoir
              Region(s): 4 State(s): TN
 05130107   Collins
              Region(s): 4 State(s): TN
 05130201   Lower Cumberland-Old Hickory Lake
              Region(s): 4 State(s): TN
05130203   Stones
              Region (s): 4 State (s):  TN
05130204   Harpeth
              Region(s): 4 State(s): TN
05130205   Lower Cumberland
              Region(s): 4 State(s): TN, KY
05130206   Red
              Region(s): 4 State(s): TN, KY
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   National Security
 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Other                         TRI
   Rubber and Plastics Products
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Metal                          TRI
   Leather and Leather Products
 Other                         PCS
   Other Trade and Services
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Other                         TRI
   Petroleum Refining
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Primary Metal Industries
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                 TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Other                         TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Divalent Metal                 TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing

'Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Primary Metal Industries
 Other                         TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
B-38

-------
                                            National Sediment Contaminant Point Source, Inventory
Table EJ-5. (Continued)
Cataloging  Watershed Name/
Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
   Dominant Industrial Class     Source
05140103   Rolling Fork
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  KY   i
05140104   Blue-Sinking                 ;
              Region(s): 4, 5 State(s): KY, IN
05140203   Lower Ohio-Bay
              Region(s): 4, 5 State(s): KYj IL
05140205   Tradewater
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  KY   ;
06010103   Watauga                    '
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  NC, TN
06010105   Upper French Broad
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  NC, TN

06010106   Pigeon
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  TN, NC
06010107   Lower French Broad          j
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  TN   !

06010108   Nolichucky
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  TN, NC
06010202   Upper Little Tennessee
              Region(s): 4 State(s): GA, NC
                                        i
06010204   Lower Little Tennessee       ;
              Region(s): 4 State(s): NC, TN
06010205   Upper Clinch
              Region(s): 4,3 State(s): TN,;VA
06010208   Emory
              Region(s): 4 State(s): TN   j
Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Industrial Organic Chemicals
Divalent Metal                   TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Other                          TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                   TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Paper and Allied Products
Other                          TRI
   Paper and Allied Products
Divalent Metal         .          PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Plastic Materials and Synthetics
Divalent Metal                   TRI
   Primary Metal Industries
Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Textile Products
Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Primary Metal Industries
Divalent Metal                   TRI
   Primary Metal Industries
Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Public Utilities
Metal                          PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
                                                                                        B-39

-------
  Appendix B
 Table B-5. (Continued)
 Cataloging  Watershed Name/
 Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
 Dominant Chemical Class/     Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
 06020002    Hiwassee
 (ARC)         Region(s): 4 State(s): GA, NC, TN
 06020003   Ocoee
               Region(s): 4 State(s): GA, TN, NC
 06030001   Guntersville Lake
 (ARC)         Region(s): 4 State(s): TN, AL, GA
 06030003   Upper Elk
               Region(s): 4 State(s): TN, AL
 06030004   Lower Elk
               Region(s): 4 State(s): AL.TN
 06030006   Bear
               Region(s):  4 State(s): AL, MS
 06040001   Lower Tennessee-Beech
 (APC)         Region(s): 4 State(s): TN, MS
 06040002   Upper Duck
               Region(s): 4 State(s): TN
06040003   Lower Duck
               Region(s): 4  State(s): TN
06040004   Buffalo
               Region(s): 4  State(s): TN
06040005   Kentucky Lake
(APC)          Region(s): 4  State(s): KY, TN
07010103   Prairie-Willow
              Region(s): 5 State(s):  MN
07010104   Elk-Nokasippi
              Region(s): 5 State(s):  MN
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Mercury                       TRI
   Industrial Inorganic Chemicals
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Industrial Inorganic Chemicals
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Metal                         PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Metal                         TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Metal                         PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Other                         TRI
   Rubber and Plastics Products
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Other                         TRI
   Paper and Allied Products
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
Metal                         PCS
   Public Utilities
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Public Utilities

Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
B-40

-------
                                           National Sediment Contaminant Point Source Inventory
Table B-5. (Continued)
Cataloging  Watershed Name/
Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
  Dominant Industrial Class    Source
07010108   Long Prairie              '
              Region(s):  5 State(s): MN

07010202   Sauk
              Region(s):  5 State(s): MN

07010203   Clearwater-Elk
              Region(s):  5 State(s): MN

07010205   South Fork Crow
              Region(s):  5 State(s): MN
07010207   Rum                    .
              Region(s):  5 State(s): MN

07020004   Hawk-Yellow Medicine
              Region(s):  5 State(s): MN

07020007   Middle Minnesota
              Region(s):  5 State(s): MN
07020009   Blue Earth               ,
              Region(s):  5,7 State(s): MN, IA

07020010   Watonwan               ,
              Region(s):  5 State(s): MN

07020011   Le Sueur                j
              Region(s):  5 State(s): MN

07030005   Lower St. Croix
              Region(s):  5 State(s): MN, Wl
07040001    Rush-Vermillion
(ARC)         Region(s):  5 State(s): Wl, MN
07040002    Cannon
              Region(s):  5 State(s): MN

07040003    Buffalo-Whitewater       ,
(ARC)         Region(s):  5 State(s): WJ, MN

07040004    Zumbro
              Region(s):  5 State(s): MN
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

PAH                          PCS
  Other Trade and Services
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Metal                         PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Mercury                       PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
  Lumber and Wood Products

Metal                         PCS
  Leather and Leather Products
Other                         TRI
  Leather and Leather Products
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
                                                                                       B-41

-------
   Appendix B
 Table B-5. (Continued)
 Cataloging  Watershed Name/
 Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
 Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
 07040005   Trempealeau
               Region(s): 5 State(s): Wl
 07040006   La Crosse-Pine
               Region(s): 5 State(s): Wl, MN
 07040007   Black
               Region(s): 5 State(s): Wl
 07050003   South Fork Flambeau
               Region(s): 5 State(s): Wl
 07050005   Lower Chippewa
               Region(s): 5 State(s): Wl
 07050007   Red Cedar
               Region(s): 5 State(s): Wl
 07060001    Coon-Yellow
               Region(s): 7, 5 State(s): IA, MN, Wl
 07060003   Grant-Little Maquoketa
               Region(s): 5, 7 State(s): Wl, IA
 07060005   Apple-Plum
               Region(s): 7, 5 State(s): IA, Wl, IL
 07070001   Upper Wisconsin
               Region(s): 5  State(s): Wl, Ml     I
 07070002   Lake Dubay
              Region(s): 5 State(s): Wl
07070003   Castle Rock
(APC)         Region(s): 5 State(s):  Wl
07070004   Baraboo
              Region(s): 5 State(s): Wl
07070005   Lower Wisconsin
              Region(s): 5 State(s): Wl
 Metal                          PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Other                         TRI
   Stone, Clay, and Glass Products

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Metal                         PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Paper and Allied Products
 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
   Other Chemical Products

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Paper and Allied Products
Other                         TRI
   Paper and Allied Products

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Plastic Materials and Synthetics

Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
B-42

-------
                                            National Sediment Contaminant Point Sourcp Inventory
Table B-5. (Continued)
Cataloging  Watershed Name/
Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
  Dominant Industrial Class    Source
07080104   Flint-Henderson
              Region(s): 7, 5 State(s):  IA, IL
07080105   South Skunk
              Region(s): 7 State(s):  IA  j

07080201   Upper Cedar
              Region(s): 7, 5 State(s):  IA, MN
07080202   Shell Rock
              Region(s): 5, 7 State(s): MN, IA
07080203   Winnebago
              Region(s): 7, 5  State(s): IA, MN

07080205   Middle Cedar
              Region(s): 7 State(s): IA •
07080206   Lower Cedar
               Region(s): 7  State(s): IA

07080208   Middle Iowa
               Region(s): 7  State(s): IA
 07080209   Lower Iowa
               Region(s): 7  State(s): IA

 07090003   Pecatonica
               Region(s): 5  State(s): Wl, IL

 07090007   Green
               Region(s): 5  State(s): IL ;

 07100003   East Fork Des Moines
               Region(s): 7,5 State(s): lA, MN

 07100005   Boone
               Region(s): 7  State(s): IA

 07100007   South Raccoon           I
               Region(s): 7  State(s): IA j
Metal                          PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Metal Products and Finishing

Metal                          PCS
  Pharmaceuticals
Other                         TRI
  Industrial Organic Chemicals

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Other                         TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Metal Products and Finishing
Other                         TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Mercury                       PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Mercury                       PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Metal                         PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
                                                                                        B-43

-------
  Table B-5. (Continued)
  Cataloging  Watershed Name/
  Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
 Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
 07100008   Lake Red Rock
                Region(s): 7  State(s): IA
 07100009   Lower Des Moines
               Region(s): 7  State(s): MO, IA  I
 07110004   TheSny
               Region(s): 7, 5  State(s): MO, IL
 07110006   South Fork Salt
               Region(s): 7  State(s): MO     !
 07120002   Iroquois
               Region(s): 5  State(s): IL, IN
 07120005   Upper Illinois
               Region(s): 5 State(s):  IL
 07120007   Lower Fox
               Region(s): 5 State(s):  IL
 07130002    Vermilion
               Region(s): 5 State(s):  IL
 07130003    Lower Illinois-Lake Chautauqua
               Region(s): 5 State(s):  IL
 07130005   Spoon
               Region(s):  5 State(s): IL
 07130006   Upper Sangamon
               Region(s):  5 State(s): IL
07130007   South Fork Sangamon
               Region(s): 5  State(s): IL
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing

 Metal                          PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Other               ,           TRI
   Pesticides                      '

 Other                          TRI
   Primary Metal Industries
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Primary Metal Industries
 Metal                          PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Mercury                       PCS
   Rubber and Plastics Products
 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Other                          TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Pesticide                       TRI
   Pesticides

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Lumber and Wood Products
Other                         TRI
   Rubber and Plastics Products
Mercury                       PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Food and Kindred Products
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Public Utilities
B-44

-------
                                            !Na(j<)nal Sediment Contaminant point Source Inventory
Table B-5. (Continued)
Cataloging  Watershed Name/
Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
  Dominant Industrial Class    Source
07130009   Salt
              Region(s): 5 State(s): IL
07130010   LaMoine
              Region(s): 5 State(s): IL
07130011    Lower Illinois
              Region(s): 5 State(s): IL
07130012   Macoupin
              Region(s): 5 State(s): IL
Metal                         PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Metal                         PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Public Utilities
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Food and Kindred Products

Metal                         PCS
  Sewerage Systems
07140102   Meramec
              Region(s): 7 State(s): MO
07140106   Big Muddy
(APC)         Region(s): 5 State(s): IL
07140107   Whitewater
              Region(s): 7 State(s): MO

07140201    Upper Kaskaskia
(APC)         Region(s): 5 State(s): IL
07140202    Middle Kaskaskia          I
(APC)         Region(s): 5 State(s): IL  ;

07140203    Shoal
              Region(s): 5 State(s): IL

07140204    Lower Kaskaskia
              Region(s): 5 State(s): IL
08010100    Lower Mississippi-Memphis i
(APC)         Reg!on(s): 6, 4, 7 State(s): AR, MS, KY, MO, TN
08010202    Obion
              Region(s): 4 State(s): KY.TN
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Metal Mining
Metal                         PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing
Metal                         PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Food and Kindred Products
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Metal                         PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Pesticide                      PCS
Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
  Other Chemical Products
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Rubber and Plastics Products
                                                                                       B-45

-------
  Append i\ B
 Table B-5. (Continued)
 Cataloging  Watershed Name/
 Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
 Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
 08010203    South Fork Obion
               Region(s): 4 State(s): TN
 08010204    North Fork Forked Deer
               Region(s): 4 State(s): TN
 08010205    South Fork Forked Deer
               Region(s): 4 State(s): TN
 08010207    Upper Hatchie
               Region(s): 4 State(s):  TN, MS
 08010208    Lower Hatchie
               Region(s): 4 State(s):  TN, MS  !
 08010209    Loosahatchie
               Region(s): 4 State(s):  TN
 08010210    Wolf
               Region(s): 4 State(s):  TN, MS
 08010211    Horn Lake-Nonconnah
               Region(s): 4 State(s):  TN, MS
08020100   Lower Mississippi-Helena
               Region(s): 6, 4 State(s):  AR, MS
08020202   Upper St. Francis
               Region(s): 7 State(s):  MO
08020203   Lower St. Francis
               Region(s): 7,6 State(s):  MO, AR
08020204   Little River Ditches
               Region(s):  6, 7 State(s): AR, MO
08020205   L'Anguille
               Region(s):  6 State(s): AR
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Metal                          PCS
   Rubber and Plastics Products
 Other                          TRI
   Stone, Clay, and Glass Products
 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
 PAH                           TRI
   Industrial Inorganic Chemicals
 Pesticide                       TRI
   Industrial Organic Chemicals
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Public Utilities
 Other                          TRI
   Petroleum Refining
 Other                          TRI
   Industrial Organic Chemicals
 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Primary Metal Industries
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Furniture and Fixtures
 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Printing and Publishing

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Primary Metal Industries
 Divalent Metal                   TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                   TRI
   Primary Metal Industries
B-46

-------
                                            National Sediment Contaminant Point Source Inventory
Table B-5. (Continued)
 Cataloging  Watershed Name/
 Unit           EPA Region(s) and State(s)
 Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
08020303   Lower White
               Region(s): 6  State(s): AR
08020402   Bayou Meto
               Region(s): 6  State(s): AR
08030201   Little Tallahatchie
              Region(s): 4  State(s): MS ,'

08030204   Coldwater
              Region(s): 4  State(s): MS, TN

08030205   Yalobusha
              Region(s): 4  State(s): MS •

08030206   Upper Yazoo
              Region(s): 4  State(s): MS

08030207   Big Sunflower              !
              Region(s): 4  State(s): MS ,
08030208   Lower Yazoo               |
              Region(s): 4, 6  State(s): MS, LA
08030209   Deer-Steele
(ARC)         Region(s): 4, 6 State(s):  MS, LA
08040102   Upper Ouachita
              Reg ion (s): 6 State(s):  AR  j

08040202   Lower Ouachita-Bayou De Loutre
              Region(s): 6 State(s):  LA, AR
08040203   Upper Saline
              Region(s): 6 State(s): AR  ;
08040206   Bayou D'Arbonne           '
              Region(s): 6 State(s): AR, LA
08040207   Lower Ouachita
(APC)         Region(s): 6 State(s): LA  ;
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Metal Products and Finishing

 Pesticide                       PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Furniture and Fixtures
 Metal                          PCS
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Metal                          PCS
   Other Chemical Products

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Primary Metal Industries

 Divalent Metal                '"  PCS
   Paper and Allied Products
 Other                          TRI
   Paper and Allied Products

 Metal                          PCS
   Pesticides
 Other                          TRI
   Pesticides

 Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Public Utilities

 PCB                           PCS
   Other Trade and Services
 Other                          TRI
   Paper and Allied Products

 Divalent Metal                   TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing

 Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Other                          TRI
   Paper and Allied Products
                                                                                        B-47

-------
  Appendix R
Table B-5. (Continued)
Cataloging  Watershed Name/
Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
  Dominant Industrial Class    Source
08040301    Lower Red
              Region(s): 6 State(s):  LA
08040304    Little
              Region(s): 6 State(s):  LA
08050001    Boeuf
              Region(s): 6 State(s): AR, LA
08060100   Lower Mississippi-Natchez
              Region(s): 4, 6 State(s): MS, LA

08060201   Upper Big Black
              Region(s): 4 State(s):  MS

08070202   Amite
              Region(s): 6, 4 State(s): LA, MS

08070203   Tickfaw
              Region(s): 6, 4 State(s): LA, MS

08070204   Lake Maurepas
              Region(s): 6 State(s):  LA
08070300   Lower Grand
              Region(s): 6 State(s):  LA
08080102   Bayou Teche
              Region(s): 6 State(s):  LA
08080103   Vermilion
              Region(s): 6 State(s):  LA
08080201   Mermentau Headwaters
              Reg ion (s): 6 State(s):  LA
08080205   West Fork Calcasieu
              Reg ion (s): 6 State(s):  LA
08090201   Liberty Bayou-Tchefuncta
              Region(s): 6 State(s):  LA
08090202   Lake Pontchartrain
              Region(s): 6 State(s):  LA
Other                         TRI
  Lumber and Wood Products
Mercury                       PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
  Lumber and Wood Products

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
  Other Chemical Products
Other                         TRI
  Paper and Allied Products
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Metal                         TRI
  Industrial Organic Chemicals
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Pharmaceuticals
Mercury                       PCS
  Public Utilities
Other                         TRI
  Industrial Organic Chemicals
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Public Utilities
Divalent Metal         .         PCS
  Industrial Inorganic Chemicals
Other                         TRI
  Industrial Organic Chemicals      ;

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Pharmaceuticals
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
PAH                          PCS
  Plastic Materials and Synthetics
B-48

-------
                                           :NatjioiiaI Sediment Confamiiiaiit.Pomf Souiicc fnvenfory
Table B-5. (Continued)
Cataloging  Watershed Name/
Unit   	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
08090203   Eastern Louisiana Coastal '
              Region(s): 4, 6 State(s): MS, LA
08090301    East Central Louisiana Coastal
              Region(s): 6 State(s): LA
08090302    West Central Louisiana Coastal
              Region(s): 6 State(s): LA;
09020104    Upper Red
              Region(s): 5,8 State(s):  lyiN, ND
09030004   Upper Rainy
              Region(s): 5 State(s): MN
10120110   Rapid                    :
              Region(s): 8 State(s): SD;
10120201   Upper Belle Fourche
              Region(s): 8 State(s): WY, SD

10120202   Lower Belle Fourche
              Region(s): 8 State(s): SD;MT,WY
10120203   Redwater
              Region(s): 8 State(s): SD^WY

10130101   Painted Woods-Square Butte
              Region(s): 8 State(s): NDi
10130102   Upper Lake Oahe
              Region(s): 8 State(s): NDJ SD
10130203   Lower Heart              !
              Region(s): 8 State(s): ND!
10140101   Fort Randall Reservoir
              Region(s): 8 State(s): SD;

10150004   Middle Niobrara
              Region(s): 7,8 State(s): NE, SD

10170102   Vermillion                 j
              Region(s): 8 State(s): SD;
Metal                         PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Petroleum Refining

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Other Chemical Products

Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Stone, Clay, and Glass Products

Other                         PCS
   Other Trade and Services
Metal                         TRI
   Lumber and Wood Products
Other                         TRI
   Paper and Allied Products

Metal                         PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Metal Mining

Metal                         PCS
   Metal Mining

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Public Utilities
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Metal                         PCS
   Petroleum Refining
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
                                                                                       B-49

-------
  Appendix B
 Table B-5. (Continued)
 Cataloging  Watershed Name/
 Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
 10170203   Lower Big Sioux
               Region(s): 5, 7, 8 State(s): MM, IA, SD
 10180007   Middle North Platte-Casper
               Region(s):  8  State(s): WY
 10180009   Middle North Platte-Scotts Bluff
               Region(s):  8, 7 State(s): WY, NE
 10180014   Lower North Platte
               Region(s):  7  State(s): NE
 10190001   South Platte Headwaters
               Region(s):  8  State(s): CO

 10190002   Upper South Platte
               Region(s):  8  State(s): CO
 10190004   Clear
               Region(s):  8  State(s): CO
10190005   St. Vrain
              Region(s): 8 State(s): CO
10190006   Big Thompson
              Region(s): 8 State(s):  CO
10190007   Cache La Poudre
              Region(s): 8 State(s):  CO, WY
10190009   Crow
              Region(s): 8 State(s):  CO, WY
10190012   Middle South Platte-Sterling
              Region(s): 8, 7 State(s):  CO, NE
10190016   Lower Lodgepole
              Region(s): 7, 8 State(s):  NE, CO, WY

10200101   Middle Platte-Buffalo
              Region(s): 7 State(s):  NE
10200102   Wood
              Region(s): 7 State(s):  NE
Metal                         PCS
   Other Trade and Services
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Public Utilities
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Other Trade and Services
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Metal Mining

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Food and Kindred Products
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Metal                         PCS
   Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
B-50

-------
 Table B-5. (Continued)
 Cataloging Watershed Name/         :
 Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
 Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
 10200103   Middle Platte-Prairie       ;
               Region(s):  7 State(s): NE;
 10200201   Lower Platte-Shell         ;
               Region(s):  7 State(s): NE'
 10200202   Lower Platte
               Region(s):  7 State(s): NE
 10200203   Salt
               Region(s): 7 State(s): NE
10210007   Lower North Loup
              Region(s): 7  State(s): NE ,
10210009   Loup
              Region(s): 7  State(s): NE '
10220001   Upper Elkhorn             ;
              Region(s): 7  State(s): NE ;
10220002   North Fork Elkhorn
              Region(s): 7  State(s): NE \
10220003   Lower Elkhorn
              Region(s): 7  State(s): NE j
10220004   Logan
              Region(s): 7  State(s): NE |
10230001   Blackbird-Soldier
              Region(s): 7  State(s): IA, ^E
10240001   Keg-Weeping Water
              Region(s): 7  State(s): NE, |A, MO

10240003   East Nishnabptna          !
              Region(s): 7  State(s): IA  !
10240005   Tarkio-Wolf                ;
              Region(s): 7 State(s):  KS, NE, IA, MO
10240009   WestNodaway
              Region(s): 7 State(s):  IA  i
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Metal Products and Finishing

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Metal Products and Finishing

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Food and Kindred Products
 Divalent Metal         .         PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
 •  Sewerage Systems

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Other                          PCS
   Other Trade and Services
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Primary Metal Industries

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
                                                                                       B-51

-------
 Appendix B
Table B-5. (Continued)
Cataloging  Watershed Name/
Unit          EPA Reglon(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
  Dominant Industrial Class    Source
10240011    Independence-Sugar
              Region(s): 7 State(s): KS, MO
10250004   Upper Republican
              Region(s): 7, 8 State(s):  NE, CO, KS

10250016   Middle Republican
              Region(s): 7 State(s): KS, NE

10260008   Lower Smoky Hill
              Region(s): 7 State(s): KS

10270102   Middle Kansas
              Region(s): 7 State(s): KS
10270104   Lower Kansas
(ARC)         Region(s): 7 State(s): MO, KS
10270202   Middle Big Blue
              Region(s): 7 State(s): NE
10270203   West Fork Big Blue
              Region(s): 7 State(s):  NE

10270206   Upper Little Blue
              Region(s): 7 State(s):  NE, KS

10290106   Sac
              Region(s): 7 State(s):  MO

10290108   South Grand
              Region(s): 7 State(s):  MO, KS

10300101   Lower Missouri-Crooked
              Region(s): 7 State(s):  KS, MO
10300102   Lower Missouri-Moreau
              Region(s): 7 State(s):  MO

10300104   Blackwater
             , Region(s): 7 State(s):  MO

10300200   Lower Missouri
              Region(s): 7 State(s):  MO
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
  Stone, Clay, and Glass Products

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Metal                         PCS
  National Security
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Other Trade and Services
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Primary Metal Industries
B-52

-------
                                             National Soliim-nl C\>iilaiiiin:inj -Point Source Inventory
 Table B-5. (Continued)
 Cataloging Watershed Name/
 Unit	EPA Reglon(s) and State(s)
 Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
 11010002   James
               Region(s): 7 State(s): MO,
 11010004   Middle White
               Region(s): 6 State(s): AFT
 11010013   Upper White-Village
               Region(s): 6 State(s): ARl
 11010014   Little Red
               Region(s): 6 State(s): AR
 11020001   Arkansas Headwaters
               Region(s):  8 State(s): CO'
 11020002   Upper Arkansas
               Region(s):  8 State(s): CO
 11020003   Fountain
               Region(s):  8 State(s): CO;
 11020009   Upper Arkansas-John Martin Reservoir
               Region(s):  8, 7 State(s): CO, KS
 11030010   Gar-Peace
               Region(s):  7 State(s): KS
 11030013   Middle Arkansas-Slate
               Region(s):  7 State(s): KS
 11030017   Upper Walnut River
               Region(s):  7 State(s): KS
11030018   Lower Walnut River
              Region(s):  7 State(s): KS
11050002   Lower Cimarron-Skeleton
              Region(s):  6 State(s): OK
11050003   Lower Cimarron
              Region(s):  6 State(s): OK I
11060001   KawLake
              Region(s):  7,6 State(s):  KS, OK
11060004   Lower Salt Fork Arkansas
              Region(s):  6, 7 State(s):  OK, KS
 Divalent Metal
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Divalent Metal
   Industrial Organic Chemicals
 Divalent Metal
   Primary Metal Industries
 Metal
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Divalent Metal
   Metal Mining
 Divalent Metal
   Primary Metal Industries
 Divalent Metal
 •  Sewerage Systems
 Other
   Public Utilities
 Divalent Metal
   National Security
 Other
   Petroleum Refining
 Metal
   Petroleum Refining
 Other
   Petroleum Refining
 Divalent Metal
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Metal
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal
   Primary Metal Industries
Metal
   Petroleum Refining
Other
   Petroleum Refining
 TRI


 PCS


 TRI


 PCS

 TRI


 PCS


 PCS


 PCS


 PCS


 PCS


 TRI


 PCS

 TRI


 TRI


 PCS


TRI


 PCS


TRI
                                                                                        B-53

-------
 AnncmliS B
Table B-5. (Continued)
Cataloging  Watershed Name/
Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
  Dominant Industrial Class    Source
11070104   Elk
              Region(s): 7 State{s):  KS

11070105   Lower Verdigris
              Region(s): 6 State(s):  OK

11070107   Bird
              Region(s): 6 State(s):  OK

11070204   Upper Neosho
              Region(s): 7 State(s):  KS

11070207   Spring
(ARC)         Region(s): 6, 7 State(s):  OK, MO, KS

11070209   Lower Neosho                '<
(APC)         Region(s): 6 State(s):  OK, AR

11090106   Middle Canadian-Spring
              Region(s): 6 State(s):  TX

11090201   Lower Canadian-Deer
              Region(s): 6 State(s):  OK.TX

11090203   Little
              Region(s): 6 State(s):  OK

11100302   Lower North Canad ian
              Region(s): 6 State(s):  OK
11100303   Deep Fork
              Region(s): 6 State(s):  OK

11110101   Polecat-Snake
              Region(s): 6 State(s):  OK
11110103   Illinois
              Region(s): 6 State(s):  OK, AR
11110104   Robert S. Kerr Reservoir
              Region(s): 6 State(s): AR, OK

11110105   Poteau
              Region(s): 6 State(s): AR, OK
Other                         TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Other Chemical Products

Mercury                       PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Primary Metal Industries

Pesticide                      PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Other                         TRI
  Petroleum Refining
Metal                         PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Pesticide                      PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Metal                         PCS
  Sewerage Systems

PCB                          PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Metal                         TRI
  Petroleum Refining

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Primary Metal Industries

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Public Utilities
B-54

-------
                                             National Sediment Contaminant Point Source Inventory
 Table B-5. (Continued)
 Cataloging Watershed Name/
 Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
 Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
 11110201   Frog-Mulberry
               Region(s):  6  State(s): AR
 11110202   Dardanelle Reservoir
               Region(s):  6  State(s): AR
 11110207   Lower Arkansas-Maumelle
               Region(s):  6  State(s): AR
 11120103   Upper Prairie Dog Town Fork red
               Region(s): 6  State(s): TX
 11130202   Cache
               Region(s): 6  State(s): OK
 11130206   Wichita                  !
               Region(s): 6  State(s): TX
 11130208   Northern Beaver
               Region(s): 6  State(s): OK
 11130303   Middle Washita
               Region(s): 6  State(s): OK
 11140101   Bois D'Arc-lsland
               Region(s): 6  State(s): TX, OK
 11140107   Upper Little
               Region(s): 6  State(s): OK
 11140108   Mountain Fork
               Region(s): 6  State(s): AR, OK
 11140109   Lower Little              !
               Region(s): 6  State(s): AR, OK
 11140203   Loggy Bayou             i
               Region(s): 6 State(s): LA, AR
11140204   Red Chute                j
               Region(s): 6 State(s): LA
11140205   Bodcau Bayou
              Region(s): 6 State(s):  AR, LA
11140206   Bayou Pierre
              Region(s): 6 State(s):  LA
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Public Utilities

 Mercury                       PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Primary Metal Industries
 Other                          TRI
   Stone, Clay, and Glass Products
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Mercury                       PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Other                          TRI
   Paper and Allied Products
 Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Other                          PCS
   Lumber and Wood  Products
 Other                          TRI
   Lumber and Wood  Products
 Divalent Metal                   PCS
   Metal Products and Finishing
 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Primary Metal Industries
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Public Utilities
Other                         TRI
   Petroleum Refining
                                                                                       B-55-

-------
 Appendix ft
Table B-5. (Continued)
Cataloging  Watershed Name/
Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
  Dominant Industrial Class    Source
11140302   Lower Sulphur
              Region(s): 6 State(s):  AR, TX
11140304   Cross Bayou
              Region(s): 6 State(s):  AR, TX, LA

11140305   Lake OThe Pines
              Region(s): 6 State(s):  TX

11140307   Little Cypress
              Region(s): 6 State(s):  TX

12010002   Middle Sabine
              Region(s): 6 State(s):  TX, LA
12010005   Lower Sabine
               Region(s):  6  State(s): LA, TX
12020001   Upper Neches
               Region(s): 6  State(s): TX
12020002   Middle Neches
               Region(s): 6 State(s): TX

12020004   Upper Angelina
               Region(s): 6 State(s): TX

12020005   Lower Angelina
               Region(s): 6 State(s): TX

12030102   Lower West Fork Trinity
               Region(s): 6 State(s): TX

12030103   Elm Fork Trinity
               Region(s): 6 State(s): TX
12030105   Upper Trinity
               Region(s): 6  State(s): TX
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Metal Products and Finishing
Other                         TRI
  Paper and Allied Products

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Primary Metal Industries

Pesticide                      PCS
  Other Trade and Services

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Industrial Organic Chemicals
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Industrial Organic Chemicals
Other                         TRI
  Paper and Allied Products

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Petroleum Refining
Other                         TRI
  Petroleum Refining

Metal                         PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Metal                         PCS
  Sewerage Systems               '

Other                         TRI
  Paper and Allied Products

Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Industrial Organic Chemicals

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Other                         TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing
B-56

-------
                                            Natjdnal Sediment Contaminant ljoint Source Inventory
Table 13-5. (Continued)
Cataloging  Watershed Name/
Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
 Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
12030106   East Fork Trinity
              Region(s): 6 State(s): TX
12030107   Cedar
              Reg ion (s): 6 State(s): TX
12030203   Lower Trinity
              Region(s): 6 State(s): TX
12040101   West Fork San Jacinto
              Region(s): 6 State(s): TX
12040102   Spring
              Region(s): 6 State(s): TX  '
12040201   Sabine Lake
              Region(s): 6 State(s): LA, TX
12040203   North Galveston Bay
              Region(s): 6 State(s): TX
12040205   Austin-Oyster
              Reg ion (s): 6 State(s): TX
12050001   Yellow House Draw
              Region(s): 6 State(s): TX, NM
12050003   North Fork Double Mountain Fork brazos
              Region(s): 6 State(s): TX
12060102   Upper Clear Fork Brazos
              Region(s): 6 State(s): TX   i
12070101   Lower Brazos-Little Brazos
              Reg ion (s): 6 State(s): TX   i
12070204   Little                       ;
              Region(s): 6 State(s): TX   i

12080002   Colorado Headwaters
              Region(s): 6 State(s): TX   :
12080003   Monument-Seminole Draws
              Region(s): 6 State(s): NM, f X
Metal                         PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
   Other Chemical Products

Metal                         PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Mercury                      PCS
   Sewerage Systems

PAH                          PCS
   Industrial Organic Chemicals
Metal                         TRI
   Lumber and Wood Products
Metal                         PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Pesticide                      PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
   Petroleum Refining
PAH                          PCS
   Other Trade and Services
Other                         TRI
   Petroleum Refining

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Industrial Inorganic Chemicals
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing

Other                         TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
Other                         TRI
   Petroleum Refining
Metal                         PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Furniture and Fixtures

Mercury                       PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
   Other Chemical Products
                                                                                       B-57

-------
 Appendix B
Table B-5. (Continued)
Cataloging  Watershed Name/
Unit          EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
  Dominant Industrial Class    Source
12090205   Austin-Travis Lakes
              Region(s): 6 State(s): TX
12090302   Lower Colorado
              Region(s): 6 State(s): TX
12090402   East Matagorda Bay
              Region(s): 6 Staje(s): TX
12100204   Lower Guadalupe
              Region(s): 6 State(s): TX

12100302   Medina
              Region(s): 6 State(s): TX
12100303   Lower San Antonio
              Region(s): 6 State(s): TX
12100401   Central Matagorda Bay
              Region(s): 6 State(s): TX
12100402   West Matagorda Bay
              Region(s): 6 State(s): TX
12110201   North Corpus Christ! Bay
              Region(s): 6 State(s): TX
12110204   San Fernando
              Region(s): 6 State(s): TX

12110208   South Laguna Madre
              Region(s): 6 State(s): TX
13020101   Upper Rio Grande
              Region(s): 6,8 State(s):  NM, CO

13020203   Rio Grande-Albuquerque
              Region(s): 6 State(s): NM
13040100   Rio Grande-Fort Quitman
              Reg ion (s): 6 State(s):  TX

14010002   Blue
              Region(s): 8 State(s):  CO
Other
  Pharmaceuticals
                              TRI
                              PCS
Divalent Metal
  Industrial Organic Chemicals
Metal                         PCS
  Petroleum Refining
Other                         TRI
  Petroleum Refining
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Plastic Materials and Synthetics
Divalent Metal
  Metal Products and Finishing
Other
  Petroleum and Coal Products
                              PCS
                              TRI
                              PCS
Divalent Metal
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Industrial Organic Chemicals
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Plastic Materials and Synthetics
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Industrial Organic Chemicals
Other                         TRI
  Industrial Organic Chemicals

Pesticide                      PCS
  Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Metal                         PCS
  Metal Mining

Metal                         PCS
  Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
  Metal Products and Finishing

Other                         TRI
  Petroleum Refining
Divalent Metal                  PCS
  Metal Mining
B-58

-------
                                            National Sediment Contaminant Point Source Inventory
 Table B-5. (Continued)
 Cataloging Watershed Name/
 Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
 Dominant Chemical Class/     Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
 14010003   Eagle
               Region(s): 8  State(s): CO;

 14010004   Roaring Fork
               Region(s): 8  State(s): CO;

 14010005   Colorado Headwaters-Plateau
               Region(s): 8  State(s): UT, CO
 14030002   Upper Dolores
               Region(s): 8  State(s): CO,, UT
 14030003   San Miguel
               Region(s): 8  State(s): CO;
 14050001   Upper Yampa
               Region(s): 8  State(s): COi
 14060003   Duchesne
               Region(s): 8  State(s): UT :
 14060007   Price
               Region(s): 8  State(s): UT
 14080104   Animas
               Region(s): 6,8 State(s):  MM, CO
 15010015   Las Vegas Wash
               Region(s): 9  State(s): NV
 15020015   Canyon Diablo             ,
               Region(s): 9 State(s): AZ ;
 15050100   Middle Gila
               Region(s): 9 State(s):  AZ ;
15060103   Upper Salt
              Region(s): 9 State(s): AZ :
15060105   Tonto
              Region(s): 9 State(s): AZ
15070101    Lower Gila-Painted Rock Reservoir
              Reg ion (s): 9 State(s): AZ |
15070102   Agua Fria                  :
              Region(s): 9 State(s): AZ ]
16020101    Upper Weber               !
              Region(s): 8 State(s): UT, yVY
 Divalent Metal                 PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Divalent Metal                 PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Divalent Metal                 PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Divalent Metal                 PCS
   Metal Mining

 Divalent Metal                 PCS
   Metal Mining

 Mercury                      PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Other                         TRI
   Petroleum Refining

 Divalent Metal                 PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                 PCS
   Metal Mining

 Divalent Metal                 PCS
   Primary Metal Industries
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Metal Mining
 Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing

 Metal                         PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

 Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   National Security

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
                                                                                      B-59

-------
  A|)|H'n
-------
                                           National Sediment Contaminant Point Source Inventory
Table B-5. (Continued)
Cataloging  Watershed Name/
Unit          EPA Reqion(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
17060306   Clearwater               ,
              Region(s):  10 State(s): ID, WA
17070101    Middle Columbia-Lake Wallula
              Region(s):  10 State(s): WA, OR
17070105   Middle Columbia-Hood
              Region(s):  10 State(s): QR.WA
17080003   Lower Columbia-Clatskanie
              Region(s):  10 State(s): WA, OR
17090008  Yamhill
              Region(s):  10 State(s): OR
17090009   Molalia-Pudding
              Reg ion (s):  10 State(s): QR
17090010   Tualatin
              Region(s):  10 State(s): C5R
17090011    Ciackamas
              Region(s):  10 State(s): QR
17100207    Siitcoos
              Region(s):  10 State(s): OR
17100308    Middle Rogue
              Region(s):  10 State(s): OR
17110002    Strait Of Georgia
(ARC)         Region(s):  10 State(s): WA
17110011   Snohomish              ;
              Region(s):  10  State(s): WA

17110012   Lake Washington
              Region(s):  10  State(s): WA
17110013   Duwamish
(APC)         Region(s):  10  State(s): WA
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Other                         TRI
   Paper and Allied Products

PAH                          PCS
   Primary Metal Industries

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
   Paper and Allied Products

Metal                         PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
   Lumber and Wood Products

Metal                         PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
Metal                         TRI
   Primary Metal Industries

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Paper and Allied Products
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
Mercury                       PCS
   Paper and Allied Products
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Petroleum Refining

Metal                         PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal            •      PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
                                                                                      B-61

-------
  Appendix 15
 Table B-5. (Continued)
 Cataloging Watershed Name/
 Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
   Dominant Industrial Class    Source
 17110014   Puyallup
 (APC)         Region(s): 10  State(s): WA
 17110020   Dungeness-Elwha
              Region(s): 10 State(s):  WA
 18010101   Smith
              Region(s): 9,10  State(s): CA, OR
 18010102   Mad-Redwood
              Region(s): 9 State(s): CA
 18020103   Sacramento-Lower Thomes
              Region(s): 9 State(s): CA
 18020106   Lower Feather
              Region(s): 9 State(s): CA
 18020109   Lower Sacramento
              Region(s): 9 State(s): CA
 18020111   Lower American
              Region(s): 9 State(s): CA
 18030012   Tulare-Buena Vista Lakes
 (APC)         Region(s): 9 State(s): CA
 18040001   Middle San Joaquin-Lower Chowchilla
              Region(s): 9 State(s): CA
 18040003   San Joaquin Delta
              Region(s): 9 State(s): CA
18060002   Pajaro
              Region(s): 9 State(s): CA
18060010   Santa Ynez
              Region(s): 9 State(s): CA
18060011   Alisal-Elkhorn Sloughs
              Region(s): 9 State(s): CA
18060012   Carmel
              Region(s): 9 State(s): CA
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
   Paper and Allied Products
Other                         TRI
   Paper and Allied Products
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
   Paper and Allied Products
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Other                         PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Metal                         TRI
   Lumber and Wood Products
Other                         TRI
   Plastic Materials and Synthetics

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Metal                         PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Metal                         PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Industrial Organic Chemicals
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing

Metal                         PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Public Utilities
Divalent Metal
  Sewerage Systems
PCS
B-62

-------
                                           . fsjjational Sediment Contaminant Point Source Inventory
Table B-5. (Continued)
Cataloging  Watershed Name/
Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/      Data
  Dominant Industrial Class    Source
18060013   Santa Barbara Coastal
              Region(s): 9 State(s):  CA

18070101   Ventura
              Region(s): 9 State(s):  CA

18070102   Santa Clara
              Region(s): 9 State(s):  CA
18070201    Seal Beach              ;
(ARC)         Region(s): 9 State(s): CA
18070202    San Jacinto
              Reg ion (s): 9 State(s): CA

18070204    Newport Bay            !
(APC)         Region(s): 9 State(s): CA
18070301    Aliso-San Onofre
(APC)         Region(s): 9 State(s): CA
18070304    San Diego               i
(APC)         Region(s): 9 State(s): CA

18080003    Honey-Eagle Lakes       ;
              Region(s): 9 State(s): N\/, CA
18090102    CrowleyLake
              Region(s): 9 State(s): CA, NV
18100200    SaltonSea
              Region(s): 9 State(s): CA
19020001    Kotzebue Sound
              Region(s): 10 State(s): AK
19060000    Southeast Alaska
              Region(s): 10 State(s): AK
21010002    Cibuco-Guajataca        ,
              Region(s): 2 State(s): PR
21010003    Culebrinas-Guanajibo
              Region(s): 2 State(s): PR
Divalent Metal
  Sewerage Systems

Mercury
  Sewerage Systems
                              PCS
                              PCS
                              PCS
Divalent Metal
   Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
   Plastic Materials and Synthetics

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Public Utilities

Other                         PCS
   Sewerage Systems

Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing

Metal                         PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Metal Mining

Pesticide                      PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Metal Mining

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Other                         TRI
   Paper and Allied Products
Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Sewerage Systems
Metal                         TRI
   Metal Products and Finishing

Divalent Metal                  PCS
   Food and Kindred Products
                                                                                       B-63

-------
  Appendix 15
 Table B-5. (Continued)
 Cataloging  Watershed Name/
 Unit	EPA Region(s) and State(s)
Dominant Chemical Class/     Data
  Dominant Industrial Class    Source
 21020000   St. John-St. Thomas. U.S. Virgin Islands
              Region(s): 2 State(s): VI
Metal                         PCS
  Industrial Organic Chemicals
Other                         TRI
  Petroleum Refining
B-64

-------
              National:Sediment Contaminant Point Sourct Inventory
Appendix C
Detailed Analyses of
Industrial Categories
                               c-i

-------
   Appendix C
C-2

-------
1 !-!..-: I. : ! '1 ••!!!• ' j
1 ; ; , U jNailioiial Sediment Contaminant Point Soinice Inventory
i
Table C-1. Load Scores from TRI by Industrial Category and Chemical (for Load Scores
greater than 0}
Industrial Category/
Chemical Name

Food and Kindred Products
Dichloroethane, 1,2-
Lead
Nickel
Furniture and Fixtures
Nickel
Toluene
Xylenes
Industrial Inorganic Chemicals
Acrylonitrile
Anthracene
Antimony
Benzene
Chlorobenzene
Chromium
Dichlorobenzene, 1,2-
Dichlorobenzene, 1,3-
Dichlorobenzene, 1,4-
Dichloroethane, 1,2-
Dichloropropane, 1,2-
Hexachlorobenzene
Hexachlorobutadiene
Hexachloroethane
Mercury
Naphthalene
Nickel
Silver
Tetrachloroethane, 1,1,2,2-
Tetrachloroethene
Tetrachloromethane
Trichloroethane, 1,1,1-
Trichloroethane, 1,1,2-
Trichloroethene
Trichloromethane
Xylenes
Zinc
Industrial Organic Chemicals
Acrylonitrile
Anthracene
Antimony
Benzene
~
I
Number of
Facilities
I

i 1
, 1
! 14
I
; 7
! 9
11

3
I 2
2
' 6
! 5
3
3
'• 1
1
6
; 2
2
3
1
12
i 7.
i 7
• 1
3
: 5
i 7
! 3
5
! 3
11
2
! 2

j 11
7
1
• 47

Raw Load
(Ib/yr)


1,804
875
1,909

439
942
725

382
172
2,385
1,082
2,922
364
1,129
117
1,080
4,244
940
390
1,174
290
268
3,035
592
85
2,927
8,306
937
58
680
2,925
20,092
271
313

33,140
138
2,089
2,268

Adjusted
Load


3.2E + 01
2.0E + 01
1.9E + 02

4.3E + 01
2.4E + 00
1.2E + 02

1.8E + 01
9.5E + 01
6.0E + 01
1.4E + 01
5.8E + 01
5.1E + 00
9.7E + 01
2.2E + 00
9.0E + 01
7.6E + 01
2.1E + 02
1.3E + 03
2.2E + 02
1.7E + 01
1.9E + 03
4.2E + 01
5.7E + 01
1.2E + 02
8.8E + 02
5.4E + 02
1.2E + 02
7.5E + 00
1.4E + 02
5.0E + 01
2.4E + 01
4.3E + 01
3.8E + 00

1.6E + 03
7.6E + 01
5.2E + 01
2.9E + 01

Load
Score


2
2
16

6
1
12

3
4
2
2
3
2
5
1
2
9
5
6
5
2
29
6
6
3
7
10
6
2
7
2
3
2
1

11
6
2
4
C-3

-------
I Appendix C , , ; i i i

Table C-1. (Continued)
Industrial Category/
Chemical Name
Biphenyl
Bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate
Chlordane
Chlorobenzene
Chromium
Copper
Cresol, m-
Cresol, o-
Cresol, p-
Cresols
Dichlorobenzene, 1,2-
Dichlorobenzene, 1,4-
Dichloroethane, 1,2-
Dichloropropane, 1,2-
Diethyl phthalate
Dimethyl phthalate
Dimethylphenol, 2,4-
Heptachlor
Hexachlorobenzene
Hexachlorobutadiene
Naphthalene
Nickel
Phenol
Silver
Tetrachloroethene
Tetrachloromethane
Toluene
Trichloroethane, 1,1,1-
Trichloroethane, 1,1,2-
Trichloromethane
Xylene, o-
Xylenes
Leather and Leather Products
Chromium
Xylenes
Lumber and Wood Products
Arsenic
Chromium
Copper
Pentachlorophenol
Phenol
Xylenes
Metal Products and Finishing
Number of
Facilities
9
6
1
15
3
8
7
3
8
10
6
3
11
, 2
2
6
1
1
1
1
16
8
62
1
10
10
74
4
5
14
11
53

10
2

22
|20
!20
22
4
4

Raw Load
(Ib/yr)
72,524
648
28
901
915
5,474
2,820
10,235
217,405
575
957
259
1,023
72
64
29,903
80
13
80
30
1,286
9,161
359,287
62
599
668
51,751
41
449
2,745
3,594
59,284

3,009
263

1,455
1,781
1,201
2,813
3,288
21

Adjusted
Load
1.9E + 02
1.7E + 01
1.4E + 04
1.8E + 01
1.3E + 01
1.0E + 02
3.9E + 01
3.6E + 01
1.4E + 01
8.1E + 00
8.2E + 01
2.1E + 01
1.8E + 01
1.6E + 01
4.5E + 00
5.1E + 02
1.6E + 00
7.3E + 01
2.7E + 02
5.7E + 00
1.8E + 01
8.9E + 02
4.0E + 02
8.7E + 01
3.9E + 01
8.7E + 01
1.3E + 02
5.3E + 00
9.0E + 01
3.3E + 00
5.4E + 02
9.5E + 03

4.2E + 01
4.2E + 01

1.0E + 02
2.5E + 01
2.3E + 01
2.2E + 03
3.6E + 00
3.3E + 00

Load
Score
7
2
5
8
2
10
4
2
2
2
8
4
5
3
1
6
1
2
3
1
3
14
21
2
7
9
12
1
5
1
10
56

8
4

12
6
4
38
1
2

C-4

-------
Table C-1. (Continued)
Industrial Category/
Chemical Name
Acrylonitrile
Antimony
Arsenic
Bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate
Cadmium
Chromium
Copper
Cresol, m-
Cresols
Di-n-butyl phthalate
Dichloroethane, 1,2-
Dichloromethane
Dichloropropane, 1,2-
Diethyl phthalate
Dimethyl phthalate
Lead
Mercury
Naphthalene
Nickel
Silver
Tetrachloroethene
Toluene
Trichlorobenzene, 1,2,4-
Trichloroethane, 1,1,1-
Trichloroethane, 1,1,2-
Trichloroethene
Xylene, p-
Xylenes
Zinc
Nonclassifiable
Anthracene
Benzene
Copper
Silver
Xylenes
Other Chemical Products
Acrylonitrile
Antimony
Biphenyl
Bis<2-ethylhexyl) phthalate
Chromium
Copper
Di-n-butyl phthalate
i
Number of
Facilities
: i
21
2
8
i 17
i 376
694
1
1
i 2
2
i 43
: 1
5
; 3
i 171
: 2
; 1
i 462
14
33
80
' i 1
! 115
I 1
90
! 1
! 95
:| 59
i
i 1
i 1
; 3
' 1
i 1
I
• 4
1
"• 12
| 2
- . | 4
6
! 14
Raw Load
(Ib/yr)
250
1,436
79
1,363
568
21,284
41,748
220
800
3,488
450
26,702
3,500
60,500
131
7,531
3
255
23,005
142
997
27,477
353
10,690
1,300
6,633
200
12,155
25,009

25
394
253
1
63

142
63
1,647
88
169
192
768
Adjusted
Load
1.2E + 01
3.6E + 01
5.6E + 00
3.7E + 01
3.0E + 02
3.0E + 02
7.9E + 02
3.1E + 00
1.1E + 01
1.9E + 01
8.1E + 00
6.4E + 00
7.7E + 02
4.3E + 03
2.2E + 00
1.7E + 02
1.8E + 01
3.6E + 00
2.2E + 03
2.0E + 02
6.5E + 01
6.9E + 01
1.5E + 00
1.4E + 03
2.6E + 02
1.1E + 02
3.2E + 01
1.9E + 03
3.0E + 02

1.3E + 01
5.1E + 00
4.8E + 00
1.8E + 00
1.0E + 01

6.7E + 00
1.6E + 00
4.3E + 00
2.4E + 00
2.4E + 00
3.6E + 00
4.2E + 00
Load
Score
2
5
1
6
15
38
241
1
2
2
2
2
3
9
2
43
2
1
242
12
13
7
1
39
3
26
2
68
16

2
1
1
1
2

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
                                                                                    C-5

-------
l_Ap|>pii(IK 0 1

Table C-1 . (Continued)
tr j
Industrial Category/
Chemical Name
Dichlorobenzene, 1,2-
Dichlorobenzene, 1,4-
Dichloroethane, 1,2-
Diethyl phthalate
Dimethyl phthalate
Dimethylphenol, 2,4-
Naphthalene
Nickel
Tetrachloroethene
Toluene
Trichlorobenzene, 1 ,2,4-
Trichloroethane, 1,1,1-
Trichloroethene
Xylenes
Other Trade and Services
Copper
Nickel
Xylene, m-
Xylene, o-
Xylene, p-
Paper and Allied Products
Biphenyl
Butyl benzyl phthalate
Copper
Diethyl phthalate
Naphthalene
Phenol
Toluene
Trichloroethane, 1,1,1-
Trichloroethene
Trichloromethane
Xylenes
Pesticides
Arsenic
BHC, gamma- \ Lindane
Copper
Dichloroethane, 1,2-
Hexachlorobenzene
Methoxychlor
Naphthalene
Pentachlorophenol
Tetrachloromethane
Toluene
Number of
Facilities
i
3
2
3
21
3
1
19
7
14
59
4
45
4
70

2
2
1
1
1

2
3
3
, 1
4
!53
16
2
1
i98
i15

1
2
1
I 3
2
1
4
1
2
5
Raw Load
(Ib/yr)
129
833
733
770
66
63
1,105
163
272
9,507
893
7,598
66
20,364

68
68
33
16
33

680
1,846
64
128
2,933
102,227
4,815
68
158
519,845
1,781

63
2
100
394
69
5
374
11
15
1,146
Adjusted
Load
1.1E + 01
6.9E + 01
1.3E + 01
5.5E + 01
1.1E + 00
1.3E + 00
1.5E + 01
1.6E + 01
1.8E + 01
2.4E + 01
3.7E + 00
9.9E + 02
1.1E + 00
3.3E + 03

1.3E + 00
6.5E + 00
5.2E + 00
2.3E + 00
5.2E + 00

1.8E + 00
2.8E + 00
1.2E + 00
9.1E + 00
4.1E + 01
1.1E + 02
1.2E + 01
8.8E + 00
2.7E + 00
6.2E + 02
2.9E + 02

4.4E + 00
3.2E + 02
1.9E + 00
7.1E + 00
2.3E + 02
2.9E + 02
5.2E + 00
8.7E + 00
2.0E + 00
2.9E + 00
Load
Score
2
2
2
14
1
1
2
4
4
4
2
26
1
75

1
1
1
1
1

1
1
1
1
4
16
5
1
1
81
18

1
5
1
2
5
3
1
1
1
1
C-6

-------
__ 	 1 	 ; 	 , 	 1 ^ - n T —. , |
| If :,-..- .1 National Sediment Contaminant Pofot Source Inventory |
^^^^^^^^^™IH«I™^^^^^^^™W^^^^^^^^^^™^^^^"^^^^^^^^^^^— ^^^^^^~
Table C-1. (Continued)
Industrial Category/
Chemical Name
Xylene, m-
Xylene, o-
Xylenes
Petroleum and Coal Products
Toluene
Xylene, m-
Xylenes
Petroleum Refining
Anthracene
Arsenic
Benzene
Chromium
Copper
Cresols
Dichloropropane, 1,2-
Dimethylphenol, 2,4-
Lead
Naphthalene
Nickel
Phenol
Tetrachloromethane
Toluene
Trichloroethane, 1,1,1-
Xylene, m-
Xylene, o-
Xylene, p-
Xylenes
Pharmaceuticals
Benzene
Bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate
Chlorobenzene
Dichlorobenzene, 1,2-
Dichlorobenzene, 1,3-
Dichloroethane, 1 ,2-
Dichloromethane
Diethyl phthalate
Dimethyl phthalate
Ethylbenzene
Nickel
Phenol
Tetrachloroethane, 1,1,2,2-
Toluene
Trichloroethene

Number of
Facilities
: 1
2
6
i
8
; 1
4
;
5
2
106
10
'' 3
11
1
2
2
>: 40
7
I 54
• i 4
1 101
! 10
! 7
8
7
i 89

1 1
2
2
i 2
1
' 4
45
1
1
: 3
1
1 3
i 1
38
1 1

Raw Load
(Ib/yr)
17
258
277

18,322
9
137

147
68
71,266
4,737
447
12,308
211
1,363
299
10,252
5,775
313,317
170
101,336
540
9,178
2,646
8,443
74,029

18,750
135
1,641
7,626
375
1,381
237,342
2,834
290
4,146
5,600
2,523
38
131,816
63

Adjusted
Load
2.7E + 00
3.9E + 01
4.4E + 01

4.6E + 01
1.4E + 00
2.2E + 01

8.1E + 01
4.8E + 00
9.3E + 02
6.6E + 01
8.5E + 00
1.7E + 02
4.6E + 01
2.7E + 01
6.9E + 00
1.4E + 02
5.6E + 02
3.4E + 02
2.2E + 01
2.5E + 02
7.0E + 01
1.5E + 03
4.0E + 02
1.4E + 03
1.2E + 04

2.4E + 02
3.6E + 00
3.3E + 01
6.6E + 02
7.1E + 00
2.5E + 01
5.7E+01
2.0E + 02
4.9E + 00
1.2E + 00
5.4E + 02
2.8E + 00
1.1E + 01
3.3E + 02
1.1E + 00

Load
Score
1
3
5

4
1
4

6
1
65
9
1
11
2
3
2
19
14
27
5
33
11
15
15
15
137

3
2
3
6
1
5
9
3
1
1
3
1
2
20
1
C-7

-------
1 Appendix C '''!,•' 1

Table C-1. (Continued)
Industrial Category/
Chemical Name
Trichloromethane
Xylene, m-
Xylenes
Plastic Materials and Synthetics
Acrylonitrile
Anthracene
Antimony
Benzene
Biphenyl
Bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate
Cadmium
Chlorobenzene
Chromium
Copper
Dichlorobenzene, 1,2-
Dichloroethane, 1,2-
Dichloropropane, 1,2-
Diethyl phthalate
Dimethyl phthalate
Naphthalene
Nickel
Phenol
Tetrachloroethene
Tetrachloromethane
Toluene
Trichloroethane, 1,1,1-
Xylene, o-
Xylenes
Primary Metal Industries
Anthracene
Antimony
Arsenic
Benzene
Cadmium
Chromium
Copper
Cresols
Lead
Naphthalene
Nickel
Phenol
Polychlorinated biphenyls
Silver
Number of
Facilities
10
1
g

25
1
1
8
12
3
1
4
2
4
1
2
2
1
3
12
4
27
1
3
' 44
4
5
35

1
20
13
: 11
11
141
310
5
118
14
-147
40
1
13
Raw Load
(Ib/yr)
58,289
1,900
16,318

19,634
250
250
601
2,249
382
59
92
204
1,690
29
243
90
63
732
402
780
150,761
26
82
19,144
4,851
229
1,644

9
6,479
66
1,305
324
10,695
27,911
573
21,956
2,538
15,016
124,478
66
512
Adjusted
Load
7.0E + 01
3.0E + 02
2.6E + 03

9.2E + 02
1.4E + 02
6.3E + 00
7.8E + 00
5.8E + 00
1.0E + 01
3.1E + 01
1.8E + 00
2.9E + 00
3.2E + 01
2.5E + 00
4.4E + 00
2.0E + 01
4.5E + 00
1.2E + 01
5.6E + 00
7.6E + 01
1.7E + 02
1.7E + 00
1.1E + 01
4.8E + 01
6.3E + 02
3.4E + 01
2.6E + 02

5.0E + 00
1.6E + 02
4.7E + 00
1.7E + 01
1.7E + 02
1.5E + 02
5.3E + 02
8.0E + 00
5.0E + 02
3.6E + 01
1.5E + 03
1.4E + 02
1.9E + 04
7.2E + 02
Load
Score
5
3
16

20
3
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
5
1
1
3
1
2
1
7
10
1
2
5
6
5
27

1
11
1
5
10
29
112
,2
58
7
98
16
5
14
C-8

-------
I - i ^^ ~ j , i .'!:!''. .1 f
i i i i ; ! i ' Nlaiional Sediment Contaminant Point Source Inventory

Table C-1. (Continued)
Industrial Category/
Chemical Name
Tetrachloroethene
Trichloroethane, 1,1,1-
Trichloroethene
Xylenes
Zinc
Printing and Publishing
Copper
Toluene
Xylenes
Rubber and Plastics Products
Bis<2-ethylhexyl) phthalate
Di-n-butyl phthalate
Diethyl phthalate
Dimethyl phthalate
Toluene
Trichloroethane, 1,1,1-
Xylenes
Zinc
Stone, Clay, and Glass Products
Bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate
Copper
Lead
Nickel
Phenol
Xylenes
Zinc
Textile Products
Antimony
Biphenyl
Bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate
Copper
Lead
Naphthalene
Nickel
Tetrachloroethene
Trichlorobenzene, 1,2,4-
Trichloroethane, 1,1,1-
Xylenes
• Number of
Facilities
2
12
'< 4
6
; 55

i 17
26
' 10

: 28
: 4
i 2
! 2
16
3
6
3

2
! 7
1 13
4
! 21
• 4
! • 2
1
2
22
; 2
3
2
2
! i
9
14
1
5
Raw Load
(Ib/yr)
541
1,846
6,776
652
66,313

327
2,847
115

3,609
1,382
11,508
1,978
3,823
70
63
449

265
283
104
102
18,931
1,205
183

5,161
125,681
1,327
950
751
15,006
323
27,152
42,232
250
27,058
Adjusted
Load
3.5E+01
2.4E + 02
1.2E + 02
1.0E + 02
8.0E + 02

6.2E + 00
7.1E + 00
1.8E + 01

9.7E + 01
7.6E + 00
8.2E + 02
3.4E + 01
9.6E + 00
9.0E + 00
1.0E + 01
5.4E + 00

7.2E + 00
. 5.4E + 00
2.4E + 00
9.9E + 00
2.1E + 01
1.9E + 02
2.2E + 00

1.3E + 02
3.3E + 02
3.6E + 01
1.8E + 01
1.7E + 01
2.1E + 02
3.1E + 01
1.8E + 03
1.8E + 02
3.3E + 01
4.3E + 03
Load
Score
2
5
3
' 7
30

4
2
2

14
1
3
3
3
1
2
2

2
1
1
2
' 4
6
1

4
28
2
3
2
3
2
21
14
2
15
C-9

-------
   Appendix ('
C-10

-------
                                        National Sediment Contaminant iPoint Source Inventory
Table C-2.    Load Scores from PCS by Industrial Category and Chemical (for Load Scores
             greater than 0)
Industrial Category/
   Chemical Name
Number of
Facilities
Raw Load
(Ib/yr)
Adjusted
Load  .
Load
Score
Coal Mining
   Cadmium
   Mercury
   Nickel
   Silver
   Zinc
Construction
   Xylenes
Food and Kindred Products
   Cadmium
   Chromium
   Copper
   Dichloromethane
   Lead
   Mercury
   Nickel
   Silver
   Tetrachloroethene
   Trichloroethene
   Trichloromethane
   Zinc
Furniture and Fixtures
   Cadmium
   Chromium
   Copper
   Nickel
   Silver
Industrial Inorganic Chemicals
   Acenaphthene
   Acenaphthylene
   Anthracene
   Antimony
   Arsenic
   Benzo(a)anthracene
   Benzo(a)pyrene
   Benzo(b)fluoranthene
   Benzo(k)fluoranthene
   Cadmium
   Chromium
   Chrysene
   Copper
       1
       2
       1
       2
       2
       5
      14
      18
       1
       9
       4
       3
       3
       1
       2
       3
      38

       3
       3
       7
       6
       1

       1
       1
       1
       3
      14
       1
       1
       1
       1
      15
      38
       1
      56
       5
    <0.5
     401
       4
     150

      31

      31
     191
   4,751
   6,993
     578
       9
   1,757
       3
      21
   2,011
  10,244
  13,731

       5
     127
     168
     486
      21


      59
     105
      47
     933
   2,176
      12
       3
       4
       2
     341
  21,080
       9
  113,341
  2.4E + 00
  2.8E + 00
  3.9E + 01
  6.0E + 00
  1.8E + 00

  5.0E + 00

  1.6E + 01
  2.7E + 00
  9.0E + 01
  1.7E + 00
  1.3E + 01
  6.2E + 01
  1.7E + 02
  4.7E + 00
  1.3E + 00
  3.4E + 01
  1.2E + 01
  1.6E + 02

  2.8E + 00
  1.8E + 00
  3.2E + 00
  4.7E + 01
  2.9E + 01


  2.9E + 00
  1.3E + 01
  2.6E + 01
  2.3E + 01
  1.5E + 02
  1.3E + 02
  1.1E + 02
  1.9E+01
  8.0E + 00
  1.8E + 02
  3.0E + 02
  9.5E + 00
  2.2E + 03
     1
     1
     2
     1
     1
     2
     1
     7
     1
     2
     6
     5
     1
     1
     2
     2
    17


     1
     1
     2
     3
     2


     1
     2
     2
     2
     7
     3
     3
     2
     1
     9
    20
     1
    26
                                                                                   C-ll

-------
  Table C-2. (Continued)
Industrial Category/
Chemical Name
Dichloroethane, 1,2-
Dichloromethane
Fluoranthene
Fluorene
Hexachlorobenzene
Lead
Mercury
Methoxychlor
Nickel
Phenanthrene
Polychlorinated biphenyls
Pyrene
Qtlwar
Oliver
Tetrachloroethene
Tetrachloromethane
Trichloroethane, 1,1,1-
Trichloromethane
Zinc
Industrial Organic Chemicals
Acenaphthene
Acenaphthylene
Acrylonitrile
Anthracene
Antimony
Arsenic
Benzene
Benzo(a)anthracene
Benzo(a)pyrene
Benzo(b)fluoranthene
Benzo(k)fluoranthene
Bis{2-ethylhexyl) phthalate
Cadmium
Chlorobenzene
Chromium
Chrysene
Copper
Diazinon \ Spectracide
Dichlorobenzene, 1,2-
Dlchlorobenzene, 1,4-
Dlchlorobenzenes
Dichloroethane, 1,2-
Dichloropropane, 1,2-
Diethyl phthalate
DImethylphenol, 2,4-
Number of
Facilities
4
4
1
1
3
33
21
! 1
! 42
! 1 .- '
1
1

6
4
4
4
10
' 61

: 12
10
13
! 11
8
9
i33
12
; 12
12
: 12
:26
i 6
121
52
! 12
74
1
18
; 1
'32
117
13
12
Raw Load
(Ib/yr)
787
18,041
28
105
8
1,914
763
99
11,516
72
<0.5
81

9
28
2,150
72
39,034
127,119

168
151
786
145
175,245
278
3,670
175
143
187
147
784
312
733
4,988
147
44,151
6
1,027
274
81
4,786
915
163
204
Adjusted
Load
1.4E + 01
4.3E + 00
3.3E + 00
1.3E + 01
2.7E + 01
4.4E + 01
5.3E + 03
5.7E + 03
1.1E + 03
1.1E + Q1
6.8E + 01
1.1E + 02

1.3E + 01
1.8E + 00
2.8E + 02
9.3E + 00
4.7E + 01
1.5E + 03

8.2E + 00
1 .8E + 01
3.7E + 01
8.0E + 01
4.4E + 03
2.0E + 01
4.8E + 01
1.9E + 03
6.0E + 03
9.0E + 02
6.9E + 02
2.1E + 01
1.6E + 02
1.5E + 01
7.0E + 01
1.5E + 02
8.4E + 02
5.6E + 03
8.8E + 01
2.3E + 01
7.2E + 00
8.6E + 01
2.0E + 02
1 .2E + 01
4.1E + 00
Load
Score
2
1
1
2
3
11
43
4
51
2
2
3

2
1
6
1
2
43

3
4
5
10
11
4
3
21
27
21
1 6
1 W
7
5
V
3
17
9
57
4
T^
1 0
1 \J
6
i
1
12
1 5
•a
*j
1
C-12

-------
' ' 1 i '• ' ' ,' i • i
| ! ' ; ; .| National Sediment Contaminant Point Sourcj? Inventory1 ;

Table C-2. (Continued)
Industrial Category/
Chemical Name
Fluoranthene
Fluorene
Hexachloro benzene
Hexachlorobutadiene
Hexachloroethane
Lead
Mercury
Naphthalene
Nickel
Pentachlorophenol
Phenanthrene
Phenol
Polychlorinated biphenyls
Pyrene
Silver
Tetrachloroethane, 1,1,2,2-
Tetrachloroethene
Tetrachloromethane
Toxaphene
"Tribromomethane
Trichloroethane, 1,1,1-
Trichloroethane, 1,1,2-
Trichloroethene
Trichloromethane
Zinc

Leather and Leather Products
Chromium
Lead
Lumber and Wood Products
Acenaphthene
Arsenic
Cadmium
Copper
Dimethylphenol, 2,4-
Fluorene
Pentachlorophenol
Zinc
Metal Mining
Antimony
Arsenic
Cadmium
Copper
Lead
Number of
Facilities
12
12
j 16
13
14
41
15
; 18
; 49
' 1
15
33
1
13
8
2
24
; 24
2
» 2
i 20
20
22
j 55
! 88
i
>
9
; 4

2
7
1
8
', 1
1
' 8
7

; 3
; 18
41
> 51
' 40
Raw Load
(Ib/yr)
153
153
191
314
176
9,546
66
264
19,682.
1
163
2,544
<0.5
152
38
235
90,654
172,606
80
4,444
9,666
367
464
390,662
584,485


5,484
86

421
108
8
172
287
18
959
5,439

509
1,161
990
10,885
6,609
Adjusted
Load
1.8E + 01
1.8E + 01
6.5E + 02
6.0E + 01
1.0E + 01
2.2E + 02
4.6E + 02
3.7E + 00
1.9E + 03
1.0E + 00
2.5E + 01
2.8E + 00
4.8E + 00
2.1E + 02
5.4E + 01
7.0E + 01
5.9E + 03
2.2E + 04
3.7E + 03
1.3E + 02
1.3E + 03
7.3E + 01
7.9E + 00
4.7E + 02
7.0E + 03


7.7E + 01
2.0E + 00

2.1E + 01
7.7E + 00
4.3E + 00
3.3E + 00
5.7E + 00
2.2E + 00
7.6E + 02
6.5E + 01

1.3E + 01
8.2E-I-01
5.2E + 02
2.1E + 02
1.5E + 02
Load
Score
4
3
20
6
3
20
20
1
67
1
5
1
1
11
6
3
12
17
7
3
12
14
2
7
87


8
1

2
1
1
1
1
1
4
3

2
10
31
18
17
C-13

-------
• Appendix C i M ;i 1

Table C-2. (Continued)
Industrial Category/
Chemical Name
Mercury
Nickel
Silver
Zinc
Metal Products and Finishing
Antimony
Arsenic
Benzene
Bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate
Cadmium
Chromium
Copper
Dichloropropane, 1,2-
Lead
Mercury
Nickel
Phenol
Polychlorinated biphenyls
PCB-1016
PCB-1221
PCB-1232
PCB-1242
PCB-1248
PCB-1254
PCB-1260
Silver
Tetrachloroethene
Tetrachloromethane
Toluene
Trichloroethane, 1,1,1-
Trichloroethene
Xylenes
Zinc
National Security
Arsenic
Cadmium
Chromium
Copper
DDT
Lead
Mercury
Nickel
Pentachlorophenol
Number of
Facilities
24
8
12
57

9
19
9
6
124
218
306
: .1
> 187
15
212
7
8
1
1
1
1 2
2
1
1
87
18
1
17
23
52
8
330

7
14
11
20
1
19
9
12
1
Raw Load
(Ib/yr)
23
412
36
289,600

24,174
3,911
2,773
80
968
214,819
276,786
2,190
35,222
5
41,971
1,465
1,028
<0.5
<0.5
<0.5
3
8
<0.5
<0.5
9,607
949
24
2,708
318
13,803
3,584
1063404

3,021
290
5,760
5,551
<0.5
3,284
97
490
10
Adjusted
Load
1.6E + 02
4.0E + 01
5.0E + 01
3.5E + 03

6.0E + 02
2.8E + 02
3.6E + 01
2.2E + 00
5.0E + 02
3.0E + 03
5.3E + 03
4.8E + 02
8.1E + 02
3.3E + 01
4.1E + 03
1.6E + 00
3.0E + 05
7.9E + 01
7.9E + 01
7.9E + 01
7.6E + 02
2.4E + 03
7.9E + 01
7.9E + 01
1.3E + 04
6.2E + 01
3.1E + 00
6.8E + 00
4.1E + 01
2.3E + 02
5.7E + 02
1.3E + 04

2.1E + 02
1.5E + 02
8.1E + 01
1.1E + 02
1.0E + 01
7.6E + 01
6.8E + 02
4.8E + 01
7.6E + 00
Load
Score
13
5
6
52

5
12
2
1
34
40
86
3
38
5
150
1
21
2
2
2
5
6
2
2
62
7
1
1
5
11
5
127

8
13
7
11
2
10
9
1 1
1
C-14

-------
1 ! : [ i - ; i 1 Natioii^il Sediment Contaminant Point Source inventory j
^^^^^^^^^^••I^^^B^^^MW^^^^^^^^^""^^^^^^^^™^^^^^-^^^^^^ 	
Table C-2. (Continued)
Industrial Category/
Chemical Name

Polychlorinated biphenyls
Silver
Trichloroethene
Zinc
Non classifiable
Antimony
Arsenic
Benzene
Cadmium
Chromium
Copper
Hexachlorobutadiene
Lead
Mercury
Nickel
Polychlorinated biphenyls
Silver
Toluene
Trichloroethene
Xylenes
Zinc
Nonmetallic Mineral Mining
Arsenic
Cadmium
Copper
Lead
Mercury
Nickel
Xylenes
Zinc
Oil and Gas Extraction
Nickel

Other Chemical Products
Antimony
Arsenic
Benzene
Cadmium
Chromium
Copper
Dichlpropropane, 1 ,2-
DDT
Lead
Number of
Facilities
i
1
11
3
19

! 3
: 12
' 63
24
! 27
; 50
1
65
13
23
1
10
33
34
', 28
I 61

2
i 3
3
; 3
5
! 1
1
:! 7

1
I

2
7
3
•i 13
12
22
1
i 1
' 20
Raw Load
(Ib/yr)

202
31
625
118,295

59
186
1,368
253
425
1,694
15
2,970
5
614
1
27
8,203
11,986
216
21,495

29
191
431
267
137
26
14
3,311

16


331
514
710
980
808
960
57
1
1,314
Adjusted
Load

5.9E + 04
4.3E + 01
1.1E + 01
1.4E + 03

1.5E + 00
1.3E + 01
1.8E + 01
1.3E + 02
5.9E + 00
3.2E + 01
2.8E + 00
6.8E + 01
3.2E + 01
6.0E + 01
2.9E + 02
3.7E + 01
2.1E + 01
2.0E + 02
3.5E + 01
2.6E + 02

2.0E + 00
9.9E + 01
8.2E + 00
6.1E + 00
9.6E + 02
2.5E + 00
2.3E + 00
4.0E + 01

1.6E + 00


8.3E + 00
3.6E + 01
9.2E + 00
5.1E + 02
1.1E + 01
1.8E + 01
1.3E + 01
2.0E + 02
3.0E + 01
Load
Score

5
8
2
17

1
3
4
10
2
7
1
7
4
8
3
6
2
8
5
16

1
5
2
2
3
1
1
4

1


1
5
1
11
4
8
2
3
4
C-15

-------
I Appendix C | I j : • I

Table C-2. (Continued)
Industrial Category/
Chemical Name
Mercury
Nickel
Silver
Tetrachloroethene
Toluene
Trichloroethene
Xylenes
Zinc
Other Trade and Services
Anthracene
Arsenic
Benzene
Benzo(a)anthracene
Benzo(a)pyrene
Benzo(b)fluoranthene
Benzo{k)fluoranthene
Cadmium
Chromium
Copper
Dibenzo(a,h)anthracene
Dieldrin
Endosulfan, alpha-
Hexachlorobenzene
Indenod ,2,3-cd)pyrene
Lead
Mercury
Nickel
Pentachlorophenol
Polychlorinated biphenyls
Pyrene
PCB-1016
PCB-1221
PCB-1232
PCB-1242
PCB-1248
PCB-1254
PCB-1260
Silver
Toluene
Trichloroethane, 1,1,1-
Xylenes
Zinc
Paper and Allied Products
r
Number of
Facilities
! 8
9
4
2
9
3
2
35

4
; 14
234
2
! 2
2
2
30
, 30
1 70
1
2
f 2
2
1
184
14
24
2
4
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
15
183
12
173
98

Raw Load
(Ib/yr)
6
3,134
88
260
1,250
175
8
20,321

3
89
58,579
1
1
1
1
6,669
786
1,878
<0.5
<0.5
1
1
<0.5
2,954
4
288
9
14
J8
<0.5
<0.5
<0.5
<0.5
<0.5
<0.5
<0.5
107
8,023
21
3,220
15,363

Adjusted
Load
4.5E + 01
3.0E + 02
1.2E + 02
1.7E + 01
3.1E + 00
3.0E + 00
1.2E + 00
2.4E + 02

1.6E + 00
6.3E + 00
7.6E + 02
6.3E + 00
2.3E + 01
3.9E + 00
3.5E + 00
3.5E + 03
1.1E + 01
3.6E + 01
2.0E + 01
1.1E + 02
3.9E + 01
2.0E + 00
1.1E + 00
6.8E + 01
2.8E + 01
2.8E + 01
6.9E + 00
4.0E + 03
2.5E + 01
3.8E + 00
5.8E + 00
3.8E + 00
3.8E + 00
3.8E + 00
3.8E + 00
2.9E + 00
1.5E + 02
2.0E + 01
2.7E + 00
5.2E + 02
1.8E + 02

Load
Score
5
9
5
2
1
1
1
20
: •
1
3
11
1
2
2
,1
11
3
9
2
4
2
1
1
10
5
8
1
9
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
8
4
i
36
22

C-16

-------
Table C-2. (Continued)
Industrial Category/
   Chemical Name
Number of
Facilities
Raw Load
(Ib/yr)
            Adjusted
            Load
             Load
             Score
   Antimony
   Arsenic
   Bis{2-ethylhexyl) phthalate
   Cadmium
   Chromium
   Copper
   Dichloropropane,  1,2-
   Lead
   Mercury
   Nickel
   Pentachlorophenol
   Polychlorinated biphenyls
   PCB-1242
   Silver
   Toluene
   Trichloromethane
   Zinc
Pesticides
   Arsenic
   Chromium
   Copper
   DCPA/Dacthal
   Mercury
   Nickel
   Zinc
Petroleum and Coal Products
   Toluene
   Xylenes
Petroleum Refining
      2
      4
      2
     11
     10
     50
      1
     22
      6
      7
      2
      1
      2
      5
      4
     15
     65


      4
      5
      4
      1
      1
      3
      9


      3
      2
   1,
     65
    199
    158
    232
   ,432
 11,322
      5
    953
    132
     70
      2
   <0.5
   <0.5
     30
  3,095
  7,047
491,774

     86
    652
    737
    286
      8
    479
  9,491

  4,997
  9,528
               1
               1
1.6E + 00
1.4E + 01
4.3E + 00
  2E + 02
2.0E + 01
2.2E + 02
  OE + 00
2.2E + 01
9.2E + 02
6.8E + 00
1.3E + 00
1.3E + 02
1.0E + 01
4.2E + 01
7.7E + 00
8.5E + 00
5.9E + 03
               6.1E + 00
               9.1E + 00
               1.4E + 01
               2.6E + 00
               5.7E + 01
               4.7E + 01
               1.1 E+ 02


               1.2E + 01
               1.5E + 03
 1
 2
 1
 9
 4
35
 1
 5
 6
 4
 1
 3
 2
 5
 1
 1
66


 2
 2
 2
 1
 2
 5
 9

 2
 4
Arsenic '
Benzene [
Bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate ;
Cadmium
Chromium
Copper
Lead
Mercury i
Naphthalene !
Nickel
Silver
Toluene
Trichloroethane, 1,1,2-
Triehloroethene
. . _ . ,!
16
19
2
10
92
22
22
12
2
13
7
11
1
1

4,459
2,011
77
75
15,045
6,979
1,537
15
4,299
2,806
20
3,014
5
1,457

3.2E + 02
2.6E + 01
2.1E + 00
3.9E + 01
2.1E + 02
1.3E + 02
3.5E + 01
1.0E + 02
6.0E + 01
2.7E + 02
2.8E + 01
7.5E + 00
1.0E + 00
2.5E + 01

17
4
1
10
41
7
5
16
2
18
5
1
1
2
C-17

-------
I Appendix C . ! . '. ! ! ; 1 !

Table C-2. (Continued)
Industrial Category/
Chemical Name
Xylenes
Zinc
Pharmaceuticals
Arsenic
Benzene
Cadmium
Copper
Dichloromethane
Lead
Mercury
Nickel
Silver
Toluene
Trichloroethane, 1,1,2-
Trichloromethane
Zinc
Plastic Materials and Synthetics
Acenaphthene
Acenaphthylene
Acrylonitrile
Anthracene
Antimony
Arsenic
Benzene
Benzo(a)anthracene
Benzo{a)pyrene
Benzo(b)fluoranthene
Benzo(k)fluoranthene
Bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate
Cadmium
Chromium
Chrysene
Copper
Dichlorobenzene, 1,2-
Dichlorobenzene, 1,4-
Dichloroethane, 1,2-
Dichloromethane
Dichloropropane, 1,2-
Diethyl phthalate
Fluoranthene
Fluorene
Hexachloro benzene
Hexachlorobutadiene
Number of
Facilities
12
34

5
1
5
19
8
8
8
4
3
2
1
8
27

5
5
14
5
6
12
15
6
6
6
6
22
6
38
6
48
9
9
11
20
\ 7
6
6
6
7
6
Raw Load
(Ib/yr)
169
604,273

1,179
273
10
606
28,385
4,904
1
475
1
29,927
98
4,336
33,673

65
74
678
65
454
243
428
91
77
85
75
2,977
148
5,889
75
14,056
236
105
303
9,838
341
73
63
61
73
70
Adjusted
Load
2.7E + 01
7.3E + 03

8.4E + 01
3.5E + 00
5.0E + 00
1.2E + 01
6.8E + 00
1.1E + 02
9.3E + 00
4.6E + 01
2.0E + 00
7.5E + 01
2.0E + 01
5.2E + 00
4.0E + 02

3.2E + 00
8.9E + 00
3.2E + 01
3.6E + 01
1.1E + 01
1.7E + 01
5.6E + 00
1.0E + 03
3.2E + 03
4.1E + 02
3.5E + 02
8.0E + 01
7.7E + 01
8.2E + 01
7.5E + 01
2.7E + 02
2.0E + 01
8.7E + 00
5.5E + 00
2.4E + 00
7.5E + 01
5.2E + 00
7.5E + 00
7.4E + 00
2.5E + 02
1.3E + 01
Load
Score
4
34

2
1
1
3
1
3
4
4
; 1
2
2
1
: 11

1
3
4
6
4
.. 5
1
15
18
12
12
9
6
13
9
24
5
4
1
1
5
2
3
2
13
5
C-18

-------
1 i - i •; . i : ;li • ' ' •.'' I ' : !
j||i i 1 :| Natjicjnal SecHnient Contaminant Point Source Inventory |

Table C-2. (Continued)
Industrial Category/
Chemical Name
Hexachloroethane
Lead
Mercury
Nickel
Pentachlorophenol
Phenanthrene
Polychlorinated biphenyls
Pyrene
Silver
Tetrachloroethene
Tetrachloromethane
Toluene
Trichloroethane, 1,1,1-
Trichloroethane, 1,1,2-
Xylenes
Zinc
'rimary Metal Industries
Anthracene
Antimony
Arsenic
Benzo(a)anthracene
Benzo(a)pyrene
Benzo(b)fluoranthene
Bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate
Cadmium
Chromium
Chrysene
Copper
Fiuoranthene
Fluorene
Lead
Mercury
Naphthalene
Nickel
Phenanthrene
Polychlorinated biphenyls
Pyrene
PCB-1242
PCB-1248
PCS- 1260
Silver
Tetrachloroethene
Zinc
Number of
Facilities
; e
! 24
7
19
1
6
: 1
6
3
8
9
23
9
8
6
69

2
16
22
2
23
2
4
50
; 91
2
i 133
4
2
I 144
8
15
'! 81
4
1 6
2
1 1
1
1
< 18
i 8
197
Raw Load
(Ib/yr)
142
868
6
9,642
24
88
3
68
38
139
66
16,582
153
125
1,916
187,467

23
588
210
7
196
8
1,894
1,003
12,579
6
63,414
63
9
29,201
439
230
13,925
25,929
7
23
<0.5
<0.5
<0.5
59
314
312,772
Adjusted
Load
8.4E + 00
2.0E + 01
4.2E + 01
9.4E + 02
1.9E + 01
1.3E + 01
8.3E + 02
9.6E + 01
5.3E + 01
9.0E + 00
8.6E + 00
4.1E + 01
2.0E + 01
2.5E + 01
3.1E + 02
2.2E + 03

1.3E + 01
1.5E + 01
1.5E + 01
7.6E + 01
8.2E + 03
4.1E + 01
5.1E + 01
5.2E + 02
1.8E + 02
6.1E + 00
1.2E + 03
7.6E + 00
1.1E + 00
6.7E + 02
3.1E + 03
3.2E + 00
1.4E + 03
3.9E + 03
2.0E + 03
3.2E + 01
1.1E + 00
5.4E + 00
1.4E + 00
8.2E + 01
2.0E + 01
3.8E + 03
Load
Score
2
5
9
21
2
3
3
9
3
5
4
5
6
5
7
55

2
4
5
2
50
2
3
32
27
1
57
2
1
55
7
1
81
5
13
2
1
1
1
11
4
143
C-19

-------
I Appendix C J ' ' .\ \ ! i Ml

Table C-2. (Continued) '<
i
Industrial Category/
Chemical Name
Printing and Publishing
Chromium
Copper
Lead
Silver
Zinc
Public Utilities
Antimony
Arsenic
Cadmium
Chromium
Copper
Lead
Mercury
Nickel
Pentachlorophenol
Polychlorinated biphenyls
PCB-1254
Silver
Tetrachloroethene
Tetrachloromethane
Trichloromethane
Xylenes
Zinc
Rubber and Plastics Products
Antimony
Arsenic
Cadmium
Copper
Dichloromethane
Lead
Mercury
Nickel
Poiychlorinated biphenyls
Pyrene
PCB-1242
PCB-1248
Silver
Zinc
Sewerage Systems
Acenaphthene
Acenaphthylene
i
Number of
Facilities
i
2
3
2
3
3

L 11
89
62
96
351
204
42
98
1
14
1
26
10
2
7
29
309

1
3
5
17
3
11
3
4
2
1
1
1
1
28
|
11
10
Raw Load
(Ib/yr)

104
426
46
50
208

1,458
41,356
9,389
11,924
645,527
61,056
9,980
75,896
3
16
<0.5
3,081
42
15,857
1,993
101
1445177

4,363
32
18
1,320
89,604
255
4,167
29
10
1
1
<0.5
8
18,044

57
55
Adjusted
Load

1.4E + 00
8.1E + 00
1.1E + 00
7.0E + 01
2.5E + 00

3.6E + 01
2.9E + 03
4.9E + 03
1.7E + 02
1.2E + 04
1.4E + 03
7.0E + 04
7.4E + 03
2.6E + 00
4.5E + 03
5.1E + 01
4.3E + 03
2.7E + 00
2.1E + 03
2.4E + 00
1.6E + 01
1.7E + 04

1.1E + 02
2.3E + 00
9.5E + 00
2.5E + 01
2.2E + 01
5.9E + 00
2.9E + 04
2.8E + 00
2.8E + 03
1.1E + 00
1.8E + 02
2.6E + 01
1.1E + 01
2.2E + 02

2.8E + 00
6.6E + 00
Load
Score

1
2
1
3
1

6
77
46
23
198
72
45
92
1
21
2
22
1
4
1
3
203

3
1
1
3
2
1
6
1
4
1
3
2
2
11

1
3
C-20

-------
i - | i ! i • i .1 i;r \i i
; , I • ; ; ,,i Natibnal Sediinenl Coiilaniinaiif|P6in< Sourt
•
-------
1. • .-••;. r [ j .
Appendix C . ; : • 1 i
i
Table C-2. (Continued)
Industrial Category/
Chemical Name
Hexachlorobenzene
Hexachlorobutadiene
Hexachloroethane
IndenoCI ,2,3-cd)pyrene
Lead
Mercury
Naphthalene
Nickel
Nitrosodiphenylamine, N-
Pentachlorophenol
Phenanthrene
Phenol
Polychlorinated biphenyls
Pyrene
PCB-1016
PCB-1221
PCB-1232
PCB-1242
PCB-1248
PCB-1254
PCB-1260
Silver
Tetrachloroethane, 1,1,2,2-
Tetrachloroethene
Tetrachloromethane
Toluene
Toxaphene
Tribromomethane
Trichloroethane, 1,1,1-
Trichloroethane, 1,1,2-
Trichloroethene
Trichloromethane
Xylenes
Zinc
Stone, Clay, and Glass Products
Arsenic
Cadmium
Chromium
Copper
Lead
Silver
Zinc
Textile Products
Number of
Facilities
: n
10
10
11
[ 940
531
11
690
11
16
12
25
21
13
9
i, 8
, 8
8
8
1 8
8
, 446
11
59
15
58
! 12
16
33
: 11
28
154
7
1415

3
3
10
13
13
2
17

Raw Load
(Ib/yr)
54
55
58
61
486,751
12,730
279
830,784
2,329
387
103
5,247
330
107
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
522,139
379
24,566
162
76,290
16
167
1,816
100
2,418
547,417
24
4576125

354
3
200
177
4,114
39
926

Adjusted
Load
1.8E + 02
1.0E + 01
3.4E + 00
8.0E + 02
1.1 E + 04
8.9E + 04
3.9E + 00
8.1E + 04
1.0E + 03
3.1E + 02
1.5E + 01
5.8E + 00
9.6E + 04
1.5E + 02
7.4E + 02
8.8E + 02
6.3E + 02
6.3E + 02
6.3E + 02
6.3E + 02
6.3E + 02
7.3E + 05
1.1E + 02
1.6E + 03
2.1E + 01
1.9E + 02
7.4E + 02
5.0E + 00
2.4E + 02
2.0E + 01
4.1E + 01
6.6E + 02
3.8E + 00
5.5E + 04

2.5E + 01
1.3E + 00
2.8E + 00
3.4E + 00
9.5E + 01
5.4E + 01
1.1E + 01

Load
Score
11
' 4
1
20
429
609
1
855
9
16
5
1
61
12
18
15
15
15
15
15
15
742
7
55
5
11
22
1
18
5
:6
31
1
1349

2
1
1
1
3
2
3

C-22

-------
                                          National Sediment Contaminant Point Source Inventory
Table C-2. (Continued)
Industrial Category/
   Chemical Name
Number of
Facilities
Raw Load
db/yr)
Adjusted
Load
Load
Score
   Arsenic
   Bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate
   Cadmium
   Chromium
   Copper
   Lead
   Mercury
   Nickel
   Silver
   Trichloroethene
   Zinc
3
1
3
52
16
10
1
3
2
2
20
641
47
13
5,391
350,047
334
<0.5
33
1
88
251,331
4.6E + 01
1.3E + 00
6.6E + 00
7.5E + 01
6.7E + 03
7.7E + 00
1.9E + 00
3.2E + 00
2.1E + 00
1.5E+00
3.0E + 03
2
1
2
18
16
2
1
2
1
1
18
                                                                                    C-23

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   Appendix C
ftu.s.  GOVEmaffiOT PRINTING OFFICE:
 C-24

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