United States
Environmental Protection
Agency
           Office of Water
           (4503F)
EPA 841-B-98-001
February 1998

Training Courses
          Training Materials
Facilitation
   ^31 Internet Training
                      The Watershed Academy
                          Information Transfer Series

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                              EPA.841-B-9S-001
                                 February 1998
    The Watershed Academy
    « Jnformcrffon Transfer Series, No. 12
Watershed Training
     Opportunities
Assessment and Watershed Protection Division
  Office of Wetlands, Oceans and Watersheds
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (4503F)
          401 M Street, SW
        Washington, DC 20460

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Acknowledgments

This booklet was prepared for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's
(EPA's) Office of Water under EPA Contract 68-C7-0018, under the direction of
Anne Weinberg, Doug Norton, and Joan Warren in the Office of Wetlands,
Oceans and Watersheds.

The project managers express appreciation to the many EPA staff, most particu-
larly those in the Office of Science and Technology, the Office of Wastewater
Management, the Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water, and the Office of
Wetlands, Oceans and Watersheds, as well as others who contributed informa-
tion about their watershed-related training activities and participated in docu-
ment review.

This booklet should be cited as:

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.  1998. Watershed Training Opportunities.
EPA 84l-B-98-001. Office of Water (4503F), United States Environmental
Protection Agency, Washington, DC. 28 pp.

Notice

This booklet has been reviewed by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency staff
and has been approved for publication.  Publication does not signify that the
contents necessarily reflect the views and policies of the Environmental Protec-
tion Agency or of any other organizations represented in this document. Men-
tion of trade names or commercial  products does not constitute endorsement or
recommendation for use.

To obtain a copy of this and other Watershed Academy
documents free of charge, contact:
National Center for Environmental Publications and Information (NCEPI)
Phone: (513) 489-8190, (800) 490-9198
Fax:(513)489-8695

This booklet is available on the Internet at:

                                   in

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Contents
Introduction	/
What Is the Watershed Academy?	,	2
Training Courses	3
     Watersheds 101: Applied Watershed Management	3
     Watersheds 102: Statewide Approach to Watershed Management	4
     Watersheds 103: TMDL Training for State Practitioners	4
     Watersheds 104: Executive Overview of the Watershed Approach	5
     Watersheds 105: Watershed Management Tools Primer	5
     Watersheds 106: Watershed Partnership Seminar	5
     V/atersheds 107: Using Internet Resources	6
     Interagency Course on Working at a Watershed Level	7
     Interagency Course on Framework for Stream Corridor Restoration	7
     BASINS: A Powerful Tool for Managing Watersheds	8
     Clean Water Act Section 404 Regulatory Issues Training Course	8
     Getting in Step: A Pathway to Effective Outreach in the Watershed	9
     Izaak Walton League of America Stream Doctor™ Restoration Workshop	9
     Local Government Workshops: Tools for Watershed Protection	10
     HPDES Permit Writers' Course	10
     Source Water Assessment Seminars	/ /
     Source Water GIS Workshops	/ /
     SRF Funding Framework Workshops:
     Integrating the SRF with Statewide or Watershed Goals	12
     Stream Investigation and Stabilization Workshop	13

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    Stream Processes, Assessment and Restoration Workshop	13
    Volunteer Monitoring for Estuaries	14
    Water Quality Standards Academy	15
Training Materials	16
    Information Transfer Series Publications	16
    Videos	//
    Software	18
Watershed Management Facilitation	20
Website/Academy 2000	21
The Watershed Academy Home Page	22
Watershed Training Course Schedule	See blue insert at end of booklet
                                     VI

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Introduction
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Watershed Academy is a
focal point in the Office of Water for providing training and information on
implementing watershed approaches to a variety of audiences. These audiences
include federal, state, tribal, and local officials, as well as private practitioners of
watershed management. The Watershed Academy sponsors its own training
courses and develops training materials; it also publicizes watershed-related
training materials developed by others.

This booklet describes the watershed training opportunities sponsored by EPA's
Office of Water and the Watershed Academy. It includes descriptions of the four
main activities of the Watershed Academy—training courses, publications,
watershed management facilitation services to help states and tribes implement
watershed approaches, and website—and also covers training courses and
educational materials on watersheds produced throughout the EPA Office of Water.

This booklet is a resource guide to the watershed training courses and educa-
tional materials generally available through the Watershed Academy and the
EPA Office of Water. The blue insert lists currently scheduled courses and will
be updated as needed. To obtain the latest schedule and training information, go
to the Watershed Academy website at .

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What Is  the
Watershed
Academy?
EPA's Watershed Academy provides
training and information on implementing watershed
approaches* to local, state, tribal, and federal officials and
private practitioners of watershed management. The Watershed Academy
sponsors its own training courses and develops training materials; it also
publicizes watershed-related training materials developed by others.

The Watershed Academy consists of four key components:

Training Courses on topics ranging from basic watershed management prin-
ciples to the application of more complex technical tools. (A summary of these
courses is provided in this booklet.)

Training Materials, which include an information transfer series with numerous
documents that highlight institutional/organizational and technical aspects of
implementing watershed approaches. These documents, are listed in this
booklet, as well  as additional materials such as videos, CD-ROMs, and software.

Watershed Management Facilitations, in which the Academy assists states
and tribes in reorienting their water resource management programs to imple-
ment watershed  approaches.

Website/Academy 2000, in which EPA makes its publications, course summaries,
and schedules available on the Internet.  The website also includes a distance
learning program of self-paced training modules called Academy 2000 to serve
those who cannot attend the live courses. The address is .
* A watershed approach is a coordinating framework that focuses community
  efforts on addressing priority problems within a watershed.

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Training Courses
The Watershed Academy offers several of its own training courses supporting
watershed approaches and publicizes watershed courses sponsored by others,
including EPA's Office of Water, other federal agencies, and nongovernmental
organizations. Watershed-related training courses that are generally available
through EPA's Watershed Academy and Office of Water are summarized below.
The blue insert provides a listing of the currently scheduled courses and will be
updated periodically. To find the latest information on course schedules, go to
the Academy website at .

For information on watershed-related courses sponsored by other federal
agencies and others, readers may want to obtain a copy of the Watershed
Academy Catalogue of Watershed Training Opportunities, which includes
descriptions of 75 EPA and non-EPA courses (see p.  16 for more information on
this catalogue).  EPA will update this catalogue in 1998.

Watersheds 101: Applied Watershed Management
This 2-day course applies the core principles of watershed management to local
and state watershed management issues. Through a combination of lectures,
exercises, case studies, and interactive sessions, participants work through a
watershed management cycle, review a variety of watershed frameworks,
explore ways to leverage efforts, and improve decision-making skills.  This
course is targeted toward individuals who have some background  knowledge
about watershed management and are interested in learning ways to design or
strengthen their long-term management framework.

This course is sponsored by USEPA Office of Water, Office of Wetlands, Oceans
and Watersheds (OWOW) and is intended for watershed managers, staff, and
program leaders from states, tribes, and territories; local governments; EPA
regional and headquarters staff; watershed associations; and other interested
watershed practitioners.

[For more information, contact Watershed Academy, USEPA (4503F),
401 M Street, SW, Washington, DC 20460;  (202) 260-5368 phone;
(202) 260-1977 fax; wacademy@epamail.epa.gov]

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 Watersheds W2: Statewide Approach to Watershed Management
 This 2-day course provides in-depth, comprehensive training in statewide
 approaches to watershed management. Drawing on experiences from more than
 15 states, the course reviews key elements of statewide management frame-
 works, including but not limited to considerations for designing stakeholder
 forums, strategic monitoring and assessment, priority setting, and development
 and implementation of integrated strategies. Practical tools for implementing
 watershed approaches are introduced.

 This course is sponsored by USEPA Office of Water, Office of Wetlands, Oceans
 and Watersheds (OWOW) and is intended for state water resource managers and
 their potential watershed management partners, including local governments,
 tribes, watershed groups, and others. It may be sponsored for a single-state
 workgroup wanting to learn more about other states' watershed frameworks as it
 begins to design or refine its own approach, or sponsored for a region with
 multiple states that are ready to develop or enhance their watershed approaches.

 [For more information, contact Watershed Academy, USEPA (4503F),
 401 M Street, SW, Washington, DC 20460; (202) 260-5368 phone;
 (202) 260-1977fax; wacademy@epamail.epa.gov]

 Watersheds  103: TMDL Training for State Practitioners
 This 2- to 3-day course reviews the technical components for developing total
 maximum daily loads (TMDLs) under Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act
 (CWA).  Section 303(d) establishes the TMDL program. Under the program,
 states must develop lists of waters that do not meet state water quality standards
 even after the application of technology-based and other required controls, and
 must establish priority rankings for waters on the list. States must then develop
 TMDLs for waters on the list. TMDLs specify the amount of a pollutant that
 needs to be reduced to meet state water quality standards and allocate pollutant
 loadings  among pollution sources in a watershed.  The focus of this training is
 on how to develop TMDLs using a combination of lectures, group exercises,
 and case  studies.

This course is sponsored by USEPA Office of Water, Office of Wetlands, Oceans
and Watersheds (OWOW) and the Office of Science and Technology (OST). It
is a technical course intended for those who will actually be developing TMDLs,
including technical water resources staff and watershed managers from states, tribes,
and territories; local governments; EPA regional and headquarters staff; and other
interested watershed practitioners.  This course is currently under development.

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[For more information, contact Watershed Academy, USEPA (4503F),
401 M Street, SW, Washington, DC 20460; (202) 260-5368 phone;
(202) 260-1977 fax; wacademy@epamail.epa.gov]

Watersheds 104: Executive Overview of the Watershed Approach
This half-day course is intended to help senior managers explore the rationale
for implementing statewide watershed management and provides a conceptual
framework for carrying out the process of integrating natural resource manage-
ment programs on a watershed basis. Participants examine the elements of
watershed-based organizational management and discuss how the approach can
address any difficult challenges facing managers.

This course is sponsored by USEPA Office of Water, Office of Wetlands, Oceans
and Watersheds (OWOW) and is intended for watershed managers, staff, and
program leaders from states, tribes, and territories; local governments; EPA
regional and headquarters staff; and other interested watershed practitioners.

[For more information, contact Watershed Academy, USEPA (4503F),
401 M Street, SW, Washington, DC 20460; (202) 260-5368 phone;
(202) 260-1977 fax; wacademy@epamail.epa.gov]

Watersheds W5: Watershed Management Tools Primer
This 2-day course provides introductions to a number of tools that can help
practitioners carry out the watershed management process.  The tools
overviewed in this course include watershed assessment methods, modeling, risk
assessment, issue prioritization, methods for targeting actions, strategic monitor-
ing, evaluation techniques, and information management. Each session covers
two or three tools selected from this list.

This course is sponsored by USEPA Office of Water, Office of Wetlands, Oceans
and Watersheds (OWOW) and is intended for watershed managers, staff, and
program leaders from states, tribes, and territories; local governments; EPA
regional and headquarters staff; and other interested watershed practitioners.

[For more information, contact Watershed Academy, USEPA (4503F),
401 M Street, SW, Washington, DC 20460; (202) 260-5368 phone;
(202) 260-1977 fax; wacademy@epamail.epa.gov]

 Watersheds 106: Watershed Partnership Seminar
This 2-week course emphasizes  the establishment and maintenance of water-
shed-based partnerships among aquatic resource professionals and citizens

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representing the diversity of interests necessary to build healthy and sustainable
watersheds. It provides an overview of basic ecological principles related to
watershed planning and describes the benefits of watershed management. The
course focuses on personal and group skills useful to all participants in success-
ful watershed projects. The course blends consensus-building skills, technical
knowledge, and ways in which representatives of various interests can work
effectively together.  Topics include negotiation, facilitation, local decision
making, watershed ecology, and team-building skills. Modules are taught by
people involved in cooperative watershed projects.

This course, limited to 40 people, is sponsored by USEPA Office of Water,
Office of Wetlands, Oceans and Watersheds (OWOW) and is intended for EPA
regional and headquarters staff; staff from other federal agencies; state, tribal,
and local agencies; environmental organizations; and other interested parties.

[For more information, contact Watershed Academy, USEPA (4503F),
401 M Street, SW, Washington, DC 20460; (202) 260-6045 phone;
(202) 260-1977fax; wacademy@epamail.epa.gov]

Watersheds 107: Using Internet Resources
What's your watershed address?  Want to know who else is working on similar
issues in your area? Looking for that perfect map of your watershed with the
information layers you need on it?  Several Internet  programs provide tremen-
dous amounts of information,  such  as:

•   Basic hydrologic units in  the contiguous United States
•   Conditions and vulnerability of aquatic resources in those watersheds
•   Information on partnerships at  work to protect and restore those resources
•   Access to government programs and services

Participants will learn how to access these Internet services and make best use of
them to meet their needs.  The course will include a  feedback session designed
to help identify how these Internet services need to be adapted to best help local
communities.

This course is sponsored by USEPA Office of Water, Office of Wetlands, Oceans
and Watersheds (OWOW) and is  intended for those  who want an introduction to
using the Internet to find tools for water resource management.

[For more information, contact Watershed Academy, USEPA (4503F),
401 M Street, SW,  Washington, DC 20460; (202) 260-5368 phone;
(202) 260-1977 fax; wacademy@epamail.epa.gov]

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Interagency Course on Working at a Watershed Level
This week-long training course was designed and developed by a multi-agency
working group with additional input from state, local, and academic institutions.
It provides a basic but very broad foundation of scientific and social principles
useful in guiding watershed management activities.  The six training units move
logically through a discussion of how watersheds work, how change occurs in
watersheds, methods to assess watershed conditions and plan for management,
watershed management practices, and the all-encompassing social and cultural
context for watershed management. The course combines oral presentations
with discussions, exercises, examples, and case studies.

This course is sponsored by USEPA Office of Water, Office of Wetlands, Oceans
and Watersheds (OWOW) in partnership with other agencies and organizations;
sponsors vary with each event and include federal agency training centers and
universities. The broad target audience includes nonscientists without a
watershed science background, technical specialists who seek a broader perspec-
tive, managers or decision-makers, and informed citizens. The course can be
adapted to the specific audience at each session.

[For more information, contact  Watershed Academy, USEPA (4503F),
401 M Street SW, Washington, DC 20460;  (202) 260-5368 phone;
(202) 260-1977 fax; wacademy@epamall.epa.gov]

Interagency Course on Framework for Stream  Corridor Restoration
This week-long training course was designed and developed by a multi-agency
working group with additional input from state, local, and academic institutions.
It provides a framework for supporting an interdisciplinary approach to stream
corridor restoration initiatives.  Lessons begin with an introduction to the
ecological processes, structure, and functions within a stream corridor and
watershed, and follow sequentially through five more main themes: character-
ization and condition analysis, partnerships, planning and implementation,
monitoring, and managing a restoration initiative. The course combines oral
presentations  with discussions, exercises, examples, and case studies.

This course is sponsored by USEPA Office of Water, Office of Wetlands, Oceans
and Watersheds (OWOW) in partnership with other agencies and organizations;
sponsors vary with each event.  The broad target audience includes nonscientists
without a watershed science background, technical specialists who seek a
broader perspective, managers or decision-makers, and informed citizens.  The
course can be adapted to the specific audience at each session.

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[For more information, contact Watershed Academy, USEPA (4503F),
401 M Street SW, Washington, DC  20460; (202) 260-5368 phone;
(202) 260-1977fax; wacademy@epamail.epa.gov]

BASINS: A Powerful Tool for Managing Watersheds
This week-long course is designed to provide technical training and guidance to
states and Indian tribes in using Better Assessment Science Integrating point and
Nonpoint Sources (BASINS) to perform integrated water quality and watershed
analyses. The course covers an introduction to the basic geographic information
system (GIS) operations, BASINS environmental data layers, nonpoint source
modeling, and in-stream water quality assessments. The course includes
extensive hands-on computer applications.

This course is sponsored by USEPA Office of Water, Office of Science and
Technology (OST).  Persons interested in watershed management, development
of total maximum daily loads (TMDLs), coastal zone management, nonpoint
source programs, water quality modeling,  National Pollutant Discharge Elimina-
tion System (NPDES) permitting, and other related programs are urged to
attend. Participants should have a background in water quality modeling, a
basic understanding of GIS applications, and familiarity with the Windows
environment. Familiarity with Arc View (ver. 3) basic operations is a plus.

[For more information, contact Andy Battin, USEPA (4305), 401 M Street, SW,
Washington,  DC  20460; (202) 260-3061 phone; (202) 260-9830 fax;
battin. andrew @ epamail. epa. gov]

Clean Water Act Section 404 Regulatory Issues Training Course
This 2- to 3-day course provides an introduction to issues associated with the
implementation of the Clean Water Act Section 404 regulatory program.  The
course presents information on the^Section 404(b)(l) Guidelines requirements,
the scope of regulated activities, Section 404(f) exemptions, mitigation require-
ments, and procedures for elevating cases under Sections 404 (q) and (c).

This course is sponsored by USEPA Office of Water, Office of Wetlands, Oceans
and Watersheds, Wetlands Division, and is intended for EPA regional and
headquarters staff and  staff from other federal,  state, and tribal  agencies seeking
greater familiarity with the Section 404 program requirements. The course is
taught by EPA regional and headquarters staff with expertise in the subject
areas. Although there is no tuition for the course, course enrollment is limited,
with priority given to EPA wetlands staff.

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[For more information, contact Peter Mali, USEPA Wetlands Division (4502F),
401 M Street, SW*Washington, DC 20460; (202) 260-0044 phone;
(202) 260-7546 fax; mali.peter@epamail.epa.gov]

Getting in Step: A Pathway to Effective Outreach in the Watershed
This course provides participants with a framework to develop and implement
successful outreach programs in their watersheds. Through a combination of
presentations, group exercises, and panel discussions, participants learn the
process for developing an outreach strategy, discover tips and tools to produce
eye-catching materials, and learn ways to effectively distribute their message.

This course is taught by the Council of State Governments and Tetra Tech, Inc.,
with USEPA Office of Wetlands, Oceans and Watersheds (OWOW) funding
support. It is intended for audiences responsible for implementing watershed
protection efforts on a federal, state, tribal, or local level.

[For more information contact Barry Tonning, Council of State Governments,
P.O.  Box 11910, 3560 Iron Works Pike, Lexington, KY 40578-1910;
(606) 244-8228 phone; (606)  244-8239 fax; btonning@csg.org]
Izaak Walton League of America Stream Doctor** Restoration Workshop
The purpose of the Stream Doctor™ Restoration Workshop is to provide volunteers,
government employees, businesses, and others with a chance to learn about
environmentally sound approaches to stream habitat restoration using bioengi-
neering. Bioengineering combines the use of vegetation and natural structures
to stabilize eroding streambanks and to protect habitat.  Participants exchange
ideas about watershed protection and learn about cost-effective restoration
projects.  The workshop includes presentations by stream restoration experts;
hands-on training in stream monitoring, site assessment, and plan design; advice
about project budgeting; and information about post-project maintenance.

This course is taught by the Izaak Walton League of America with funding from
USEPA Office of Water, Office of Wetlands, Oceans and Watersheds (OWOW)
and others. The workshop is designed  to accommodate people of different
backgrounds and knowledge.  Attendees receive a restoration handbook, video,
general information, and much more at this 2-day workshop.

[For more information, contact Julie Vmcentz Middleton, Izaak Walton League
of America, 707 Conservation Lane,  Gaithersburg, MD 20878;
(301) 548-0150 phone; (301) 548-0146 fax]

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Local Governmenl Workshops: Tools for Watershed Protection
This 2-day course assists local officials in protecting aquatic resources by
providing information on both regulatory and nonregulatory tools available to
them for resource protection, including innovative zoning ordinances, land
acquisition techniques, tax incentives, and others.  A watershed framework is
emphasized hi presenting these techniques, and some course time is devoted to
explaining the basic hydrology of, and potential impacts on, a watershed.

Specific areas of focus include identification and evaluation of impacts to
coastal and fresh waters; regulatory techniques for restoring and managing
aquatic resources, including transfer of development rights, overlays and
watershed zoning, health regulations, stormwater management,  and riparian
corridor zoning; nonregulatory techniques, including land acquisition, public
education, conservation easements, and constructed wetlands; financing methods
for protection programs; and case studies of relevant successes and failures.

This course is sponsored by USEPA Office of Wetlands, Oceans and Watersheds,
Oceans and Coastal Protection Division.  The intended audience for this  course
includes local and state government officials, planners, public works and health
officials, scientific and technical personnel, and others involved in land and
water resource management and protection.

[For more information, contact Macara Lousberg, USEPA (4504F),
401 M Street, SW, Washington,  DC 20460; (202)260-9109 phone;
(202)260-9960 fax; lousberg. macara @ epamail. epa.gov]

NPDES Permit Writers' Course
This 5-day training course provides the basic regulatory framework and techni-
cal considerations that support the development of wastewater discharge permits
required under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES).
A multidisciplinary faculty presents the course using a combination of lectures,
case examples, and practical exercises. The course begins with an introduction
to the history of the NPDES program and its relationship to other Clean Water
Act programs. Attention is given to the role of NPDES permitting within a
watershed management approach.  Participants then become acquainted with the
tools and resources available to assist them in writing NPDES permits.

The course is presented by USEPA Office of Wastewater Management (OWM).
It was designed for new permit writers with little or no experience in the
NPDES program. Veteran permit writers, permit holders, and staff from other
environmental programs  also find the course useful and enjoyable and make up
a growing percentage of course participants.

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[For more information, contact Dan Weese or Greg Currey, USEPA (4203),
401 M Street, SW, Washington, DC 20460; (202) 260-6809 or (202) 260-1718
phone; (202) 260-1460 fax; weese.daniel@epamail.epa.gov or
currey.gregory @ epamail. epa. gov]

Source Water Assessment Seminars
American Water Works Association (AWWA) in conjunction with EPA will hold
a series of 2-day seminars around the United States during the late fall of 1998
and early spring of 1999 to equip water suppliers with the tools necessary to
implement source water protection strategies. The training will cover issues
such as how to apply segmentation and risk hierarchy concepts, how to conduct
contaminant inventories, how to make decisions about water supply susceptibil-
ity and vulnerability, and how to effectively use implementation strategies
available, both regulatory and nonregulatory. The seminars will be tailored to
the state source water assessments in each region, and will include panel
discussions with state source  water managers to ensure that public water
suppliers are current with the state's intended source water assessment plan,
their role in the delineation and assessment process, and how they can use the
information to best protection their sources of supply.

The seminars are sponsored by the American Water Works Association in
conjunction with the USEPA  Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water. The
intended audience is water suppliers and local government officials. Informa-
tion concerning the dates, locations, and registration materials for these seminars
will be posted on AWWA's home page under Education Events at
.

[For more information, contact Betsy Henry, USEPA (4606) 401 M Street, SW,
Washington, DC 20460, (202) 260-2399 phone; henry.betsy@epamail.epa.gov;
or Susan Miller, AWWA, 6666 West Quincy Avenue, Denver, CO 80235;
(303) 347-6181 phone; (303) 794-8915 fax; smiller@awwa.org]

Source Water 6IS Workshops
USEPA will sponsor Source Water GIS workshops to provide hands-on GIS
training for state water program managers. The workshops will focus on the
tools available to help managers complete the source water assessments,
particularly susceptibility determinations. EPA Regions 8 and 7 will hold
workshops in Denver, Colorado (February 1998) and Kansas City, Missouri
(March 1998).  Workshops may be held in other locations throughout the year.
                                   11

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The course is sponsored by USEPA Regions 8 and 7 and the USEPA Office of
Ground Water and Drinking Water. The target audience for the course is state
water program managers.

[For more information, contact Steve Ainsworth, USEPA (4606),
401 M Street, SW, Washington, DC 20460; (202) 260-7769 phone;
(202) 260-0732 fax; ainsworth.steve@epamail.epa.gov]

SRF Funding Framework Workshops:
Integrating the SRF with Statewide or Watershed Goals
The 10 regional EPA offices will host workshops on the Clean Water State
Revolving Fund (CWSRF) Funding Framework in 1998.  The CWSRF Funding
Framework promotes the use of watershed-based integrated priority-setting
systems for establishing CWSRF funding priorities. The workshops will provide
members of the SRF community with a foundation in priority setting and a
background on regional water quality issues. The workshops will also provide
members of the watershed community (NFS, estuary, wetlands, ground water,
and watershed planners) at the state level with an understanding of the CWSRF
and how to make use of its vast resources to address water quality problems.
Participants will learn how to develop integrated priority-setting systems and
how to get individual water quality projects listed and funded by the CWSRF.
Case studies of state programs that have developed integrated priority-setting
systems in response to the Funding Framework will be given.  State and local
program managers in the SRF, nonpoint source, estuary, wetlands, ground water,
and watershed communities who are interested in participating in the workshops
should contact their regional CWSRF representative:

Region 1  (CT, ME, MA, NH, RI, VT), Ralph Caruso (617) 565-3617
Region 2  (NJ, NY, PR, VI), Bob Gill (212) 637-3884
Region 3  (DE, DC, MD, PA, VA, WV), Don Niehus (215) 566-5705
Region 4  (AL, FL, GA, KY, MS, NC, SC, TN),
          Sheryl Parson (404) 562-9337
Region 5  (IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI), Gene Wojcik (312) 886-0174
Region 6  (AR, LA, NM, OK, TX), Velma Smith (214) 665-7153
Region 7  (IA, KS, MO, NE), Donna Moore (913) 551-7741
Region 8  (CO, MT, ND, SD, UT, WY), Brian Friel (303) 312-6277
Region 9  (AZ, CA, HI, NV, AS, GU), Juanita Licata (415) 744-1948
Region 10 (AK, ID, OR, WA), Lee Daneker (206) 553-1380
                                   12

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 Stream Investigation and Stabilizatipn Workshop
 Through lectures, case histories, and field site reconnaissance, this 2- to 5-day
 workshop will provide a comprehensive, overall systems approach to stream
 stabilization. The course will cover a wide range of techniques ranging from
 traditional approaches such as bank paving and stone dikes to low-cost innova-
 tive techniques such as bendway (weirs, longitudinal peaked toe, and the
 bioengineering willow pole curtain and post methods. In addition, lectures will
 coyer stream hydraulics and sediment transport, stream stability, field investiga-
 tion equipment and safety, and project monitoring and maintenance. Course
 participants will receive a comprehensive manual containing design criteria and
 photographs of alternative approajch.es  written in layman's language. This course
 is typically 2 days; however, longer or shorter courses can be  arranged to meet
 your specific needs.            \

 This course is taught by the U.S. lArmy Corps of Engineers, Waterways Experi-
 ment Station, with funding support from USEPA Office of Wetlands, Oceans
 and Watersheds, Assessment and [Watershed Protection Division. The broad
 target audience for this course includes nonscientists without science back-
 ground, technical specialists who j seek a broader perspective, managers or
 decision-makers, and informed citizens.  The course can be adapted to the
 specific audience at each session.!
                              i
 [For more information, contact D^avid Derrick, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,
 Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, Mississippi 39180-6199; (601) 634-2651
phone; (601) 634-2823 fax; derricd@mail.wes.army.mil]
Stream Processes, Assessment and Restoration Workshop
This 3-day technology transfer workshop was developed by Ecosystem Recov-
ery Institute to introduce the fundjamental concepts of stream processes, restora-
tion, design, and construction in gjn ecosystem context. The workshop focuses
on the basis of:                 <
                               I
•   Stream processes           j
•   Inventory techniques        j
•   Assessment of stream condition
•   Restoration strategies and applications
•   Design and construction issues
Emphasis is placed on incorporating
etry, stability concepts, and an ecosystem
programs involving streams.
stream mechanics, natural channel geom-
    approach into projects or management
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This 3-day session is offered in a classroom and field review format. It is
designed and taught by instructors with expertise in fluvial geomorphology,
hydrology, stream ecology, forestry, riparian management, watershed planning,
and restoration construction and management.

This workshop is taught by Ecosystem Recovery Institute with funding support
from USEPA, Office of Wetlands, Oceans and Watersheds, Assessment and
Watershed Protection Division. The workshop is designed for conservation
districts, state and local resource agencies, Indian tribes, watershed civic groups,
and others interested in watershed management with a need for technical and
field exposure to stream management and restoration principles.

[For more information, contact Mike Hollins, Ecosystem Recovery Institute,
P.O. Box249, Freeland'MD 21053; (717) 235-8426phone; (717) 227-0484
fax; recins@aol.com]

Volunteer Monitoring for Estuaries
USEPA sponsors  volunteer estuary monitoring workshops nationwide to
encourage volunteer monitoring in estuaries, to enhance networking among
programs, and to improve the quality of volunteer data. In addition, the work-
shops help encourage and assist volunteer monitoring coordinators to be more
effective in all aspects of planning and implementation of volunteer monitoring.
Specific topics include methods, quality assurance, working with the news
media, networking, creative funding, data management, and use of the Internet.

In partnership with the Center for Marine Conservation and with funding
support provided by USEPA Office of Wetlands, Oceans and Watersheds,
Oceans and Coastal Protection Division,  these workshops are conducted in
coastal areas nationwide, particularly in areas where National Estuary Programs
are located. Past workshops have been held in Norwalk, Connecticut; Seattle,
Washington; Wachaprague, Virginia; Tampa, Florida; Galveston, Texas;
New Bedford, Massachusetts; and Richmond, California. Three or more
workshops are being planned for 1998.

The intended audience for these workshops includes volunteer monitoring
coordinators who manage a group of volunteers in monitoring estuarine areas
and is limited to 40 or fewer participants.
                                    14

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[For more information, contact Joe Hall, USEPA (4504F), 401 M Street, SW,
Washington, DC 20460; (202) 260-9082 phone; hall.joe@epamail.epa.gov,
or Heather Green, Center for Marine Conservation, 1432 North Great Neck Rd.,
Suite 103; Virginia Beach, VA 23454; (757) 496-0920 phone; (757) 496-3207 fax]

Wafer Quality Standards Academy
The Water Quality Standards Academy is a 5-day, basic introductory course
designed for those with fewer than 6 months of experience with the water
quality standards and criteria programs.  Others may also benefit, including
veterans of the water quality standards program who want a refresher course.
Water quality standards are adopted by states and Indian tribes as laws or
regulations. Water quality standards are the backbone of the watershed protec-
tion approach to pollution control.

The Water Quality Standards Academy is a comprehensive and highly structured
course that introduces participants to all aspects of the water quality standards
and criteria programs, including the interpretation and application of the water
quality standards regulation; policies and program guidance; the development of
water quality criteria (human health, aquatic life, sediment, and biological); and
all other facets of the program.

This course is sponsored by USEPA Office of Science and Technology (OST).

[For more information contact Micki Treacy, USEPA (4305), 401 M Street, SW,
Washington, DC 20460; (202) 260-7301 phone;  (202) 260-9830 fax;
treacy. micki @ epamail. epa. gov]
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Training Materials
Information Transfer Series Publications
The Watershed Academy has published the following documents on different
aspects of implementing watershed approaches through its Information Transfer
Series. All of these publications are available at no charge from the National
Center for Environmental Publications and Information (NCEPI) at
(800) 490-9198, (513) 489-8190, (513) 489-8695 (fax).  Please include the
document name and number when requesting publications. You may also
download these publications from the Watershed Academy website. The
website address is .

Watershed Protection: A Project Focus (EPA 84l-R-95-003)—provides a
blueprint for designing and implementing local watershed protection programs.

Watershed Protection: A Statewide Approach (EPA 841-R-95-004)—provides
guidance for reorienting statewide water programs to a watershed approach.

Monitoring Consortiums: A Cost-Effective Means to Enhancing Watershed Data
Collection and Analysis (EPA 841-R-97-005)—contains case studies on
effective ways to share monitoring costs and data.

Land Cover Digital Data Directory for the U.S. (EPA 84 l-B-97-005)—helps
watershed managers find geographic information system data on land use/land cover.

Designing An Information Management System for Watersheds
(EPA 841-R-97-005)—provides an introduction to information management for
local watershed managers.

Information Management for the Watershed Approach in the Pacific Northwest
(EPA 841-R-97-004)—describes the state of Washington's experiences and
recommendations for data clearinghouses to help watershed information exchange.

Watershed Academy Catalogue of Watershed Training Opportunities
(EPA 841-D-97-001)—includes descriptions of 75 EPA and non-EPA courses
and dates for the  courses.
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 Statewide Watershed Approach Facilitation (EPA 841-R-97-011)—describes
 how a number of states have created new statewide frameworks to reorient
 existing water programs along watershed lines.

 Watershed Approach Framework (EPA 840-S-96-001)—explains EPA's vision
 for watershed approaches.

 Top 10 Watershed Lessons Learned (EPA 84Q-F-97-001)—highlights lessons
 learned by watershed practitioners implementing the watershed approach.

 Catalog of Federal Funding Sources for Watershed Protection (EPA 841-B-97-
 008)—provides information on 52 federal grant or loan programs.

 Watershed Training Opportunities (EPA 841-B-98-001)—provides information
 on watershed training opportunities sponsored by EPA's Office of Water and its
 Watershed Academy.

 Videos
 EPA has developed a series of 10 videos on various subjects related to water
 quality standards and criteria. The video titles and a short description of each
 appear below.

 Introduction to Water Quality Standards (EPA 823-V-92-001)—provides an
 overview of the water quality standards and criteria programs. Discusses the
 three component parts of state and Indian tribal water quality standards: uses,
 criteria and the antidegradation policy.

 Development of Water Quality Criteria and Its Relationship to Water Quality
 Standards (EPA 823-V-90-002)—provides an overview of water quality criteria
 including how they are developed.

Antidegradation Policy: A Means to Maintain and Protect Existing Uses and
 Water Quality (EPA 823-V-90-003)—discusses the three tiers in EPA's
antidegradation policy.

 Water Quality-Based Approach to Pollution Control (EPA 823-V-91-002)—
provides an overview of the eight interrelated stages in the water quality based-
approach to pollution control.

Water Quality Standards and 401 Certification (EPA 823-V-91-001)—discusses
water quality standards and the 401 certification process.
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Economic Considerations in Water Quality Standards (EPA 823-V-90-001)—
discusses why economics may be considered, describes where in the water
quality standards process economics are considered, and discusses how eco-
nomic considerations are used in the water quality standards process.

Water Quality Standards on Indian Lands (EPA 823-V-92-002)—discusses the
role that water quality standards play in efforts to clean up and to protect the
quality of the nation's waters.  Discusses the criteria that must be met for an
Indian tribe to conduct the water quality standards program on reservation lands
and discusses the issue dispute resolution mechanism that is used to resolve any
unreasonable consequences that may arise when an Indian tribe and a state adopt
differing water quality standards on a common body of water.

Development of Biological Criteria for Use in Water Quality Standards (EPA
823-V-92-003)—discusses biological criteria as they relate to the water quality
standards and criteria programs. Biological criteria are based on direct measures
of the biological integrity of surface waters and thus provide a valuable assess-
ment tool for evaluating the quality of our nation's waters.

Developing Site-Specific Criteria (EPA 823-V-95-001}—discusses the develop-
ment of site-specific numeric criteria for aquatic life and the role they play in the
water quality standards and criteria process.  Focuses on  the indicator species
criteria, one of the procedures that may be used to develop numeric site-specific
criteria.

Wetlands Water Quality Standards (EPA 840-V-96-001)—provides an overview
on how states and Indian tribes can develop water quality standards for wetlands.

Cost:   These  videos are available on loan for a period of 30 days. When
        ordering, use the EPA order numbers referenced above.

[For more information, contact the Water Resource Center (RC-4100),
401 M Street, SW, Washington, DC 20460; (202) 260-7786phone]

Software

BASINS
Better Assessment Science Integrating point and Nonpoint Sources (BASINS) is
a system that can be used to perform integrated water quality and watershed
analyses.  It combines a geographic information system (GIS), national GIS data
                                    18

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 layers, and state-of-the-art environmental assessment and modeling tools into
 one convenient package. The BASINS software allows a user to quickly assess
 large amounts of point source and nonpoint source data in a format that is easy
 to understand. Installed on a personal computer, BASINS allows a user to
 assess water quality at selected stream sites or throughout an entire watershed.

 Contact:  A vast array of information pertaining to BASINS is available on
          EPA's website, including technical support.  The BASINS home page
          is accessible  at .

 Software Available for Environmental Awareness
 USEPA Region 5 and Purdue University have published at least 44 software
 programs that provide information on various topics relating to environmental
 awareness. Sample topics include environmental assessments, public health,
 wetlands, water education, wellhead protection, best management practices  for
 soil erosion, and many others. The software is available on CDROM or on
 3!/2-inch diskettes provided by the requester, or can be downloaded from the
 SEAHOME website. The complete listing of software and the latest informa-
 tion about upcoming releases can be obtained from the SEAHOME website at
 .

 [For more information,  contact Karen Reshkin,  USEPA Region 5, 77 West
 Jackson Blvd., Chicago, IL 60604-3590; (312) 353-6353 phone;  or The
 Farm Building Plan Service, Purdue University, 1146 ABE Building, West
 Lafayette, IN 47907-1146; (765) 494-1173 phone; (765) 494-1356 fax;
fbps@ecn.purdue.edu]
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Watershed
Management Facilitation
As states, tribes, and local governments around the country develop watershed
management frameworks, they often use facilitators to guide them through a
challenging process that includes examining what is possible and beneficial
regarding watershed approaches (scoping), framework design and development,
transition planning, and framework documentation. The Watershed Academy
has supported facilitation efforts in more than 20 states, with services often
including a portion or all of the following:

•   Education on statewide watershed management and experiences in
    other states.
•   Consultation on approaches for organizing and developing a
    statewide framework.
•   Management of the process for designing and developing
    statewide frameworks.
•   Neutral facilitation of discussion and consensus building.
•   Mediation among framework development group members to
    resolve differences.
•   Documentation of the framework to provide a long-term reference
    for a state.
•   Assistance in making the transition to the new framework.

Facilitation services have varied for each state depending on its needs, perspec-
tives, and available resources.  States like Alaska, Nebraska, New Jersey, North
Carolina, Tennessee, and Washington have used facilitation services for specific,
short-term efforts aimed at "getting the ball rolling."  Other states such as
Arizona, Delaware, Georgia, Kentucky, Texas, Utah,  and West Virginia have
used facilitation comprehensively to initiate, design, and establish a manage-
ment framework.  Learn more about facilitation at the Academy website at
. In addition, EPA
provides a variety of assistance to tribes to help enhance  their watershed programs.
Facilitation services are limited, but are available to both states and tribes.
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 Website/Academy 2000
The Internet is a means to provide information and training to large numbers of
people who cannot attend live courses in faraway locations. The Watershed
Academy's website is intended to help EPA's message reach more people. The
Watershed Academy home page (see p. 22) is accessible at



Featured areas on this website parallel the key areas of the Watershed Academy
described in this brochure, including training courses, publications, and water-
shed management facilitation. New additions and newsworthy announcements
are covered in the "What's New?" and "Academy Highlights" areas, respec-
tively.  Links to other watershed websites and joint activities in course develop-
ment are covered under "Partners in Watershed Training."

The area called "Academy 2000 Distance Learning" is being developed to
explore different approaches to Internet-based distance learning.  This part of
the site consists of a set of training modules on a variety of watershed topics
related to watershed science, effective communications, and organizational
management and development. Some of these modules cover materials that
EPA presents in its courses, and others concern topics outside the scope of the
courses. Some example Academy 2000 modules include:

•    Principles of Watershed Management
•    Watershed Restoration
•    Economics of Sustainability
•    Monitoring Consortiums
•    Watershed Modeling
•    Executive Overview of the Watershed Approach
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the Watershed Academy Home Page

                            •&U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1998 -618-473/90625

                                   22

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 Watershed  Training Course Schedule
 Mar. 9-111998 Source Wafer GIS Workshops.
 Kansas City, KS (contact: Jason Clarke, USEPA Region 7, (913) 551-7216).


 Mar. 9-11,1998 Stream Processes, Assessment and Restoration.
 Brownsville, TX (contact: Mike Hollins, Ecosystem Recovery Institute
 (717) 235-8426).


 Mar. 14,1998 Stream Processes, Assessment and Restoration.
 York, PA (contact: Mike Hollins, Ecosystem Recovery Institute,
 (717) 235-8426).


 Mar. 27,1998 Watersheds 104: Executive Overview of the Watershed Approach.
 Lansing, MI (contact: Fred Cowles, MI DEQ, (517) 335-4127
 fax (517) 373-9958).


 Apr. 6,1998 Getting in Step: A Pathway to Effective Outreach in Your Watershed.
 Baton Rouge, LA. (contact: Jan Boydston, LA DEQ, (504) 765-0546).

 Apr. 13-17,1998 BtiOK Training.
 Washington, DC (contact: Hira Biswas, USEPA, (202) 260-7012).

 Apr. 16-17,1998 Watersheds 105: Watershed Management Too!s Primer.
 Montpelier, ID (contact: Craig Thomas, Bear Lake Regional Commission, (208)
 945-2333).


 Apr. 25,1998 Getting in Step: A Pathway to Effective Outreach in Your Watershed.
 Chicago, IL (contact: Bob Kirschner, NIPC (312) 454-0401, ext 303
 fax (312) 454-0411).


Apr. 28-29,1998 Watersheds 101-.Applied Watershed Management.
 Kansas City, MO (contact: Julie Elfving, USEPA Region 7,
fax (913) 551-7765).


May 3, 1998 instant Information: Finding the Resources You Need on the Internet.
Denver,  CO (contact: Nina Maxberry, Water Environment Federation
(703) 684-2400).

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% 18-22,1998 BASIHS Training.
Raleigh, NC (contact: Hira Biswas, USEPA, (202) 260-7012).

Jun. 8-16,1998 Watersheds 106: Watershed Partnership Seminar.
Denver, CO (contact: Phil Oshida, USEPA, fax (202) 260-8000).

Jun. 22-26,1998 Working at a Watershed Level.
Shepherdstown, WV (contact: Doug Norton, USEPA, (202) 260-7017,
fax (202) 260-1977).

July 27-31,1W8 Water Quality Standards Academy Bask Course for EPA Employees.
Washington, DC (contact: Crystall Smith, The Cadmus Group, Inc.,
(703) 998-6862, ext. 170).

Fall 1998 Watersheds 106: Watershed Partnership Seminar.
Denver, CO (contact: Phil Oshida, USEPA, fax (202) 260-8000).

Sept. 27,1998 Getting in Step: A Pathway to Effective Outreach in Your Watershed.
Rapid City, SD (contact: Ron Schierer, NRCS, (303) 236-2903 ext. 246).

Oct. 1-3,1998 Stream Processes, Assessment and Restoration.
Austin, TX (contact: Mike Hollins, Ecosystem Recovery Institute,
(717) 235-8426).

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