EPA-905/9-74-017
                 US. BIVIRONMOirAL PROHOION AGBCY
                       REGION V DIOIKEMDIT DIVISION
             GREAT LAKES INmATWE CONTRAQ PROGRAM

                                          JUNE 1975

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Copies of this document are available
      to the public through the
national Technical  Information Service
      Springfield,  Virginia 22161

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WATER POLLUTION INVESTIGATION: LOWER GREEN BAY
              AND LOWER FOX RIVER
                       by

               Dale J.  Patterson
                 Earl  Epstein
                 James McEvoy
    WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES

       DIVISION OF ENVIRONMENTAL STANDARDS
                In fulfillment of

           EPA Contract No.  68-01-1572

                     for the

      U.S.  ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
                     Region  V
             Chicago, Illinois 60604
    Great Lakes Initiative Contract Program
        Report Number: EPA-905/9-74-017
        EPA Project Officer:  Howard Zar
                   June 1975

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This report has been developed under auspices of the Great Lakes
Initiative Contract Program.  The purpose of the Program is to
obtain additional data regarding the present nature and trends in
water quality, aquatic life, and waste loadings in areas of the
Great Lakes with the worst water pollution problems.   The data thus
obtained is being used to assist in the development of waste discharge
permits under provisions of the Federal  Water Pollution Control  Act
Amendments of 1972 and in meeting commitments under the Great Lakes
Water Quality Agreement between the U.S. and Canada for accelerated
effort to abate and control water pollution in the Great Lakes.

This report has been reviewed by the Enforcement Division, Region V,
Environmental Protection Agency and approved for publication.   Approval
does not signify that the contents necessarily reflect the views of
the Environmental Protection Agency, nor does mention of trade names  or
commercial products constitute endorsement or recommendation for use.
                               m

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The authors of this report wish to thank the many people who contributed



their time and energies to the completion of this project.  In particular,



Steve Jaeger and Marc Bryans spent many long hours assembling the data



from past reports and present surveys, Joe Ball headed the field work



operations, James Wiersma (University of Wisconsin-Green Bay) supervised



the water chemistry analysis and finally, Kwang Lee (University of



Wisconsin-Green Bay) developed the hydrodynamic model that made the



development of the Green Bay water quality model possible.

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                                   ABSTRACT




The lower third of Green Bay and the Lower Fox River were intensively studied.  Seven




surveys of the Bay were carried out between September 1973 and September 1974.  Over




40 stations were sampled for 15 different chemical and physical parameters.  In




addition, plankton samples were taken and general groupings and counts were made.




Nearly 5,000 data points were generated and inserted into the STORET system.  The




surveys revealed algae blooms over the entire study area.  Nitrogen forms showed




fluctuations over 3 orders of magnitude that may be relatable to nitrogen-fixing




algae.  Phosphorus concentrations were more stable than nitrogen concentrations,




but appeared to decrease in correspondence to blue-green nitrogen-fixing algae.




Dissolved oxygen concentrations in the Bay were generally acceptable except during




the winter survey.  The February survey revealed critical dissolved oxygen levels




over a 50 sq. mile area north of Point Sable.








Computer models of the Lower Fox River and Green Bay were developed and used to




evaluate the effect of the final limits for the present discharge permits at all




point source discharges on the water quality, specifically dissolved oxygen.  The




most critical dissolved oxygen case was determined by the model to be the summer




low flow and high temperature condition in the river.  The final discharge limits




from the present permits was shown to be inadequate to meet fish and aquatic life




standards with regard to dissolved oxygen (5 mg/1) and may even violate the variance




dissolved oxygen standards now in force.  A proposed "waste load allocation" to




maintain 5 mg/1 of DO was developed.  The WLA calls for a 37%  decrease in BOD and




suspended solids from the final discharge levels on the present permits.
                                       vii

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                                  CONTENTS

                                                                      Page

Introduction	    ^

Scope of the Study.	    5

The Data Base for Green Bay	    7

Water Quality Modelling	   75

   Lower Fox River Modelling.	   76

   Lower Fox River Waste Load Allocation	  101

   Green Bay Modelling	  118

   Winter Modelling of Green Bay	120

   Winter Verifications 	  128

   Winter Prediction Runs 	  141

Discussion and Conclusions	155

Summary and Recommendations	171

Bibliography	177

Appendix A - Planktonic Algae Survey on Green Bay, 1974	183

Appendix B - Description of Methods for Chemical Analysis of
             Water Samples	185

Appendix C - Benthic Oxygen Demand	189

Appendix D - GBQUAL Program Documentation	195

Appendix E - Hydrodynamic Model	293

Appendix F - Green Bay Survey Data	   3Q3
                                       ix

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                                  LIST OF TABLES






                                                                   Page






III-l  Sampling Sites	   11




III-2  Genera of Algae Observed	   68




III-3  Algae Counts	   70




III-4  Average Chlorophyll-a and Average Biomass	   73




IV-1   Lower Fox River Physical Data	   91




1V-2   Fox River Inflow Concentrations for Prediction Runs ....   102




IV-3   Fox River Measured Inflow Concentrations 	   102




IV-4   Percent Suspended Solids Reductions   	   104




IV-5   BPT Discharges for the Fox River	   106




IV-6   WLA Discharges for the Fox River	   112




IV-7   Green Bay Measured Inflow Concentrations 	   131




IV-8   Green Bay Simulation Inflow Concentrations  	   142




V-l    Sensitivity of the QUAL-II Model on the Lower Fox River .  .   162




V-2    Base Conditions for Sensitivity   	   164




C-l    Benthic Demand in Fox River   	   190




D-l    GBQUAL Computing Limits   	   203




D-2    Summary of GBQUAL Equations	   208




D-3    Parameter Values for GBQUAL	   222




D-4    ISWTCH Values for GBQUAL Simulations	   223
                                   xi

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                               LIST OF FIGURES

                                                                      Page

1-1                 Green Bay Region	    2

1-2                 Detail Map of Green Bay	    3

III-l               Green Bay Sampling Stations 	   10

III-2 to 111-20     Survey Data Results	   18

111-21 to 111-25    Distribution of Dominant Algae	   60

IV-1                Fox River Modelling Segments	   77

IV-2 to IV-5        June 1972 Verifications	   87

IV-6                Chlorophyll-a Data	   93

IV-7 to IV-11       July and August 1972 Verifications	   94

IV-12 to IV-13      BPT Prediction Simulation	107

IV-14               BPT Dynamic Simulation for Algae Effect 	  HO

IV-15 to IV-17      Waste Load Allocation Simulation	113

IV-18               WLA Dynamic Simulation for Algae Effect 	  H7

IV-19               Long Term BOD at Fox River Mouth and
                    Fitted Curve	122

IV-20               Temperature Coefficient Correction	127

IV-21               Long Term BOX at 20C and 4C	129

IV-22 to IV-24      Green Bay Model Verification for 1967
                    Winter Data	132

IV-25               Survey Data for 1967	135

IV-26 to IV-29      Green Bay Model Verification for 1974
                    Winter Data	137

IV-30 to IV-37      BPT Prediction Simulation for 2,400 CFS
                    and 912 CFS	144

IV-38               Fifty-day BOD for Green Bay Model
                    Simulation of BPT	152

V-l                 Lower Fox River Hydrograph for Study Period .  .  .  166
                                       xiii

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                        LIST OF FIGURES (Continued)

                                                                      Page

C-l                 Benthic Demand in Green Bay	   192

C-2                 Benthic Demand Measuring Box	   193

D-l                 Green Bay Model Schematization 	   193

D-2                 Green Bay Model Chemical and Biological
                    Pathways	   199

D-3                 Continuously Mixed Element 	   200

D-4                 Functional Data Flow in GBQUAL	   202

D-5                 Solution in T and J Space	   205

D-6                 Normalized Algae Growth Rates  	   213

D-7                 DYNQUA Flow Chart	   224

D-8                 INDATA Flow Chart	   239

D-9                 COEFF Flow Chart	   251

D-10                METDAT Flow Chart	   262

D-ll                QUALEX Flow Chart	   268

D-12                GBQUAL Data Set Up	   273

D-13                Hydrodynamic Plot	   274

E-l                 Space Staggered Scheme for the Hydrodynamic
                    Model	   297

E-2                 Grid Scheme for Green Bay Hydrodynamic Model .  .    299
                                       xiv

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                                      -1-



                                    SECTION  I
 I.    INTRODUCTION









 Green Bay is a long, narrow bay in the northwest  corner of Lake Michigan.  It has  a




 length of about 120 miles and averages about  20 miles in width.  The Bay extends




 over  a generally southwest to northeast axis.  Several rivers  flow  into the Bay




 from  the west and south, none from the east.  Figures 1-1 and  1-2 show Green Bay




 and its setting.









 The most important tributary to Green Bay is  the Lower Fox River, which enters at




 the extreme southern end of the Bay.  The Lower Fox River is approximately 40 miles




 long.  Several dams subdivide the river into  a series of segments and provide




 electrical power for a large population and a heavy concentration of paper and




 pulp mills.  The Lower Fox River provides a source of municipal and industrial waste




which results in pollution problems over a large area of Lower Green Bay.  Locally




 intense but smaller areas of pollution occur  at the mouth of the Oconto, Peshtigo




 and Menominee Rivers.








The water pollution in the Lower Fox River and Green Bay region has caused the U.S.




Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Wisconsin Department of Natural




Resources (WDNR) to initiate a series of enforcement actions which involve industrial




and municipal waste discharges in the area.   Also, the 1972 Amendments to the Federal




Water Pollution Control Act (Public Law 92-500) require that municipalities shall




provide,  as a minimum,  secondary treatment,  and industries shall achieve "Best




Practicable Technology" (BPT) by no later than 1977.  The law also requires that




 the industries shall use "Best Available Technology" (BAT) to control water pollution




by 1983.

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                    - 2-
                 FIGUEE 1-1
                                                               N
29
        SO
                        IOO
                       	I
 SCALE  IN  MILES
                                      GREAT LAKES  8  ILLINOIS
                                       RIVER BASINS PROJECT
                                        GREEN BAY AREA
                                    MICHIGAN  AND WISCONSIN
                                 US DEPT. OF HEALTH. EDUCATION, & WELFARE
                                 FEDERAL WATER POLLUTION CONTROL ADMIN.
                                 REGION                CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

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                                      - 4-



Munlcipal waste treatment plants must apply BPT over the life of the treatment works




by 1983.  New public waste treatment plants must use the best available technology




after 1983.  The Amendments also require that system water quality standards must




be met.








The purpose of this work was to conduct a survey of the Lower Fox River and of' Lower



Green Bay.  Emphasis was placed on those parameters which describe the quality of the




water.  In addition, a goal of the work was to predict future water quality conditions



by means of a mathematical model adapted to the Lower Fox River and to the Bay.








The scope of the study is discussed in Section II.  The results of past studies and



of the data collected in this study which constitute the data base for Green Bay are




presented in Section III.  The data analysis and projection which constitutes the




water quality modelling appear in Section IV.  A discussion of the results appears




in Section V.  Recommendations appear in Section VI.  References are listed in




Section VII.  Appendices appear in Section VIII.

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                                       - 5 -




                                    SECTION II
 II.   SCOPE  OF  THE  STUDY









 Task  I - Historical Data Analysis:  An  evaluation  of  the  existing  and  historical




 conditions  in  Lower Green Bay was carried out  and  the results published  in August




 1974  (Epstein  et al, 1974).  This information  was  contained  in  the reports of




 studies carried out intermittently between 1939 and 1973.  In addition the report




 lists the sources  and quantity of waste discharge  to  Green Bay  from municipalities




 and industries along the Lower Fox, Peshtigo,  Oconto  and  Menominee Rivers.









Task II - Field Sampling;  A sampling program  was  designed to improve  the adequacy




of the water quality data for Lower Green Bay  and  to  provide sets  of data for




verification of the mathematical model.  Seven surveys were  conducted  over the




period September 1973 to September 1974 in the region below  Sturgeon Bay.  One




intensive survey was conducted in February of  1974 when the Bay was ice-covered,




a condition which has led to critical oxygen levels in parts of the region below




Sturgeon Bay.








Task III - Effluent Analysis;   The Lower Fox,  Oconto, Peshtigo and Menominee Rivers




are the major tributaries to Lower Green Bay.  The flow rates and  concentrations




of various dissolved and suspended materials for these rivers indicate that, as




a quantitative source of pollution, the Lower  Fox River exceeds the other rivers




by nearly an order of magnitude.   The sources  and quantity of both municipal and




industrial discharge to these rivers are presented in the Task I report,  Epstein




et al (1974). These data include projections of the waste loadings by industries




of suspended solids and of five-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD^) to the various

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                                       - 6-





rivers for the years 1975, 1976 and 1977.  These projections are based on the




amounts specified in the Wisconsin Pollution Discharge Elimination (WPDES) permits




for these industries.









Task IV - Data Analysis and Projection;  A description of present water quality,




a projection of future conditions and a specification of problem areas has been




made. A water quality model has been prepared for the Lower Fox River and for




Lower Green Bay based in part  on models developed for the coastal estuaries of




San Francisco Bay and Pearl Harbor and partly on programs developed specifically




for this task.  This package of programs is the principal tool for the projections




of water quality that would result if effluent guidelines established by the EPA




administrator under Sections 301(b)(l)A, 301(b)(l)B, 301(b)(2)A and 301(b)(2)B




of the 1972 Amendments to the Federal Water Pollution Control Act are met.  If




stream standards are not met by adherence to the provisions of the law, then




calculations are to be made of those effluent levels which will suffice for the




"protection of fish, shellfish and wildlife and provide for recreation in or on




the water."

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                                     -  7 -




                                  SECTION III
III. THE DATA BASE FOR GREEN BAY









Task I - Historical Data Analysis;  Extensive investigations of Green Bay have




been carried out intermittently since 1939.  A major emphasis in many of these




investigations has been on measurements of the concentration of dissolved oxygen




(DO) and biochemical oxygen demand (BOD).  Measurements of the concentrations




of various nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus containing species) have also been




a significant part of several of these investigations.  However, the effects of




these nutrients on the growth of algae and other species have only recently been




a subject of intensive investigations.  The Sea Grant program at the University




of Wisconsin has generated several studies on Green Bay in recent years.  A summary




of the results of the Green Bay surveys appear in the Task I report, Epstein et




al (1974).  Reference to this report will be made for the purpose of qualitative




comparisons with the results of t'"is investigation.









The following are the major subjects of extensive study in past surveys:









Dissolved Oxygen and Biochemical,Oxygen Demand;  The concentrations of these species




were measured extensively throughout Lower Green Bay in 1939, 1956, 1966 and 1967.




The concentration of dissolved oxygen was generally lower for the period when the




Bay was ice-covered.  The same general pattern of dissolved oxygen concentration




was observed throughout this period.

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                                      - 8 -




During the period of ice-cover (the months of January, February, March and part




of April), water in the Lower Fox River generally was found to have a dissolved




oxygen concentration greater than 5 mg/1.  However, a front of low oxygen




concentration develops in the Bay within Long Tail Point.  This front moves northward




along the eastern half of Lower Green Bay for distances of 20-30 miles by the




end of the period of ice-cover.  In 1939, concentrations of dissolved oxygen dropped




to values of 3-4 mg/1 in the front.  In 1967, no dissolved oxygen was observed




near the bottom of the Bay for a wide portion of the front.  Conditions are less




severe during the period of open water due to reaeration.  During the late summer




the Lower Fox River has very low or no dissolved oxygen.  However, oxygen recovery




in the Bay is rapid, especially north of Long Tail Point.








Biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) has been measured less extensively and intensively




than dissolved oxygen.  As a result, it is not possible to make a generalization




about the pattern of BOD concentrations over the past 35 years.  However, sufficient




data exists to show that loadings of BOD to the Lower Fox River have not changed




significantly when  compared with  those of  20 years ago.  This  is  due to  improved




treatment  by municipalities and industries offsetting a  significant increase




in population and industrial  production.









Nutrients;  The change in concentrations of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus




containing species) over the past 35 years is difficult  to determine because data




from earlier years is spotty or lacking entirely.  The concentration of nitrogen




and phosphorus containing species in Lower Green Bay has been a subject of




considerable interest in the last few years.  In addition to concentration,




the dispersal and diffusion, the release and uptake rates by the sediments and




the effect on algae growth rates of these species have been investigated in




Lower Green Bay in past studies.

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                                       -  9 -




 Flow Distribution;  The flow patterns in  Green Bay have not been  investigated




 directly. Historically, qualitative descriptions of flow patterns have been based




 on observations of oxygen concentrations  or on the concentration  gradients of




 other ions.









 Benthic Fauna;  Several studies since 1939 have measured the populations of bottom




 dwelling species.  These studies show an  increasingly large abiotic area near




 the mouth of  the Lower Fox River.  Throughout the Lower Bay the population of




 pollution intolerant species has fallen in relation to pollution  tolerant species




 in the last twenty years.









 Algae Growth;  The response of the Bay to the various nutrients has been a subject




 of considerable study in recent years.  For the period before about 1968, data




 is limited. Recent investigations have indicated that the total algae population




 may be about  the same each summer but that the distribution may vary widely from




 year to year.









Task II-Field Sampling;   The sampling program included surveys in September




1973,  February, May, June,  July,  August and September 1974.   Nearly seventy station




sites  were designated in that portion of Green Bay below Sturgeon Bay.   Not all




of the stations were visited in the winter survey (February  1974)  and not all




parameters were measured in each  survey.   Several extra sites were visited to measure




DO during the winter survey.   The sampling schedule was designed to provide data




from a variety of temperature,  flow and nutrient  discharge conditions.   The




selections of sites and of  the parameters  to  be measured in  a particular survey were




based  on an analysis of  the results of earlier surveys and the requirements and




capabilities of the mathematical  model.   The  station  sites and the parameters




measured at these sites  are shown in Figure 1II-1 and Table  III-l.

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        - 10 -      FIGURE III-l
Sampling Stations Used for the Green Bay Study Surveys

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                                     -  11-

                                  TABLE III-l
Station

  1
  2
  3
  3a
  4
  5
  5a
  6
  7
  8
  8a
  8b
  8c
  9
  9a
  9b
  9c
 10
 11
 12
 13
 13a
 14
 I4a
 15
 16
 16a
 16b
 16c
 17
 18
 19
Winter*   Summer*
b
a
b
a
b
a
b
b
b
b
a
b
a
b
a 
b
a
b
a
b
b
b
a
b
a
b
b
a
b
x
a
x
b
b
a
x
b
a
x
b
b
a
x
x
b
a
x
b
X
a
a
b
b
a
b
x
a
a
a
x
x
b
c
a
Station

 21
 23
 24
 25
 26
 26a
 27
 27a
 27b
 27c
 28
 29
 30
 31
 31a
 32
 32a
 32b
 32c
 33
 34
 34a
 34b
 35
 36
 38
 39
 40
 41
 42
 43
 44
 45
Winter

  x
  X
  b
  b
  a
  a
  a
  b
  a
  b
  x
  x
  b
  a
  b
  a
  a
  a
  a
  b
  b
  b
  b
  x
  b
  a
  x
  a
  b
  x
  b
  x
  b
Summer

  a
  a
  b
  a
  c
  x
  b
  x
  x
  X
  c
  c
  a
  b
  x
  a
  x
  X
  X
  c
  a
  a
  x
  b
  a
  c
  a
  c
  c
  a
  b
  a
  b
a    DO; temperature;  secchi disk

b    DO; temperature;  secchi disk, plankton samples at 1-1/2 meter depth; water
     samples from the top two meters (if the depth exceeded 25 feet, then a water
     sample was taken at 5-10 feet from the bottom.

c    the same as b except that plankton samples were not taken

x    no sample

*     The winter survey was  taken  on  February  18-20, 1974.   The summer surveys were
      taken  on  September  24-25,  1973, May 20-23, June  3-7, July 8-9, August 12-14,
      and September 4-5,  1974.

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                                       -  12 -




The results of the field sampling program in 1973 and 1974 are summarized in Figures




III-2 to 111-20.  The details of the data obtained and of the techniques employed




are presented in Appendices E and F.









Dissolved Oxygen:  DO concentrations in the summer are generally above 5 mg/1,




through-out the region above Long Tail Point despite the fact that the Lower Fox




River may contain little or no dissolved oxygen.  These concentrations reflect




the rapid oxygen recovery due to reaeration.  There are exceptions to this  generality.




At the end of the summer, when flow rates are relatively low, oxygen concentrations




as low as 3 mg/1 were observed near the bottom.  The region where these concentrations




were observed extended for 20-30 miles north of Long Tail Point.  This region




coresponds to the maximum northward extension of the front of low DO observed




under the ice during the winter months.  The low oxygen concentrations near the




bottom in summer may reflect a combination of effects.  Part of the low DO  may




be due to the continuing effect of sludge deposits which accumulate at this distance




from the mouth of the Lower Fox River.









Indirect evidence also suggests that a substantial oxygen deficit in these  areas




is the result of nitrification activity.  During the July and August surveys the




build-up of nitrate in the bottom waters of these areas is most apparent.   Levels




as high as 1.0 mg/1 NO^-N were measured.  This could account for as much as 4.5




mg/1 of DO deficit.  There are two sources of ammonia for this nitrification.




Dead phytoplankton from surface blooms will settle to the bottom bringing along




organic nitrogen and carbon compounds.  The sediments also contain organic  nitrogen




compounds. These compounds will undergo hydrolysis which results in the release




of ammonia which may nitrify.  Support for this theory is found in the nitrate




levels which most noticeably increased during the period of highest blue-green




algae activity (July and August).

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                                         - 13 -




 In February 1974,  there was  a front of low oxygen concentration (about 3 mg/1)




 near the bottom in the region about 7 miles north of Long Tail Point.   This front,




 its position at the time  of  year and the low oxygen concentration are  generally




 consistent  with observations in other years.   Precise comparisons are  difficult




 because  the flow rates in the years 1939,  1966,  1967 and 1974  differ from one




 another  by  more than 10%  and the length of time  under ice cover is not the same




 for all  the years.   Generally} the  BOD loading in 1974 was  slightly less than




 that in  1967 for the Lower Fox River (230,000 #/day versus  275,000 #/day in 1967).









 The observed higher flows  during the winter of 1974 compared to 1967   creates




 the expectation of  generally higher DO levels in the Inner  Bay and a front of




 low DO further  out  into the  Bay.  In 1967  when the average  winter flow was 3380.




 CFS,  extensive  areas  of zero DO were measured.   Zero DO  was discovered as  close




 to  the mouth of the Fox River as Point Sable.  In 1974 (average winter flow of




 4853 CFS) no zero DO  concentrations were observed.   The  lowest values  observed




 were between 1.5 and  2.0 mg/1 in the Dykesville  area,  nearly 8 miles further north




 than in  1967.









 BOD;  The BOD concentration  within  Lower Green Bay varied considerably with the




 season of the year.   In May  and June,  when temperatures  were still rather  cold,




 concentrations  of about 10 mg/1 were observed within Long Tail and for some distance




 beyond.  These  concentrations  then  fell  rapidly  to values of 2-3 mg/1  beyond Long




 Tail  Point.   Later  in the  summer, values of about  6 mg/1 were  observed within




 Long  Tail Point.  These values  fell rather slowly  to 4-5  mg/1  near Sturgeon Bay.




 The  concentrations  for the spring of  1974  are rather similar to those  observed




 for  the  same  period in 1939.  In June of  1955  values  as high as  15  mg/1 were




observed within Long Tail Point.

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                                        - 14 -




In February 1974, concentrations of BOD at the mouth of the Lower Fox River were




about 6 mg/1.  Well beyond Long Tail Point values of about 2 mg/1 were observed.




However, at about 10-15 miles beyond Long Tail Point an area of high BOD was observed




along the eastern half of the Bay.  Values here were as high as 13.5 mg/1 on the




bottom and 9 mg/1 on the top.  The high BOD corresponded to the position of low




dissolved oxygen.  In 1939 a similar pattern was observed although the concentrations




were higher at the mouth of the river and lower in the region of high BOD beyond




Long Tail Point.









The consumption of BOD is dependent primarily on the temperature dependent reaction




rates.  The observed concentrations of BOD in Green Bay reflect this dependence




quite well.






The surveys of May and June 1974 indicate substantial increases in BOD_




concentration near and slightly beyond the Long Tail Point area.  This pattern




coupled with a measurement in the Fox River in July that exceeded 30.0 mg/1,




suggests the possibility that large slug-loadings of BOD to the river-Bay




system occur.  This effect could be a physical phenomena resulting from seiche




waves in Green Bay that tend to stagnate the river flow from De Pere to the




mouth of the river.  During the period of stagnation, BOD may build up to




high concentrations before being swept out into the Bay by the receding




portion of the seiche wave.  The high BOD may, of course, come from slug loads




from dischargers in the Green Bay area.






The seiche effect in the vicinity of the mouth of the Lower Fox River is important




for this regard only when a northeast wind blows large quantities of water back




up into the river stretch from De Pere to Green Bay.  No attempt was made to




include this effect in the Bay model since the hydrodynamics of the model are steady




state.

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                                         - 15 -




 Nitrate;   Concentrations  of  nitrogen as  nitrate vary widely with the season of




 the  year.   In  February  1974  the  concentration of nitrate ion was approximately




 0.10 mg/1  over a wide region of  the  Inner Bay.   This region corresponded closely




 to the  portion of  the Inner  Bay  which had low oxygen concentrations at the same




 time (the  region within Long Tail  Point  plus the region  outside Long Tail Point




 and  along  the  eastern shore  for  about 20-30  miles).   Beyond this region there




 where large negative gradients in  concentrations of  nitrogen as nitrate and




 background  concentrations of  0.01  mg/1 and less were observed.









 In May,  concentrations of nitrogen  as  nitrate reached values of  0.20-0.40 mg/1 in




 some portions  of the region within Long  Tail Point.   Beyond this pointy concentrations




 fell  slowly to values of 0.02 mg/1 in  areas of  the Central  Bay.  However,




 concentrations near the bottom were often  significantly higher,  reaching




 values of 0.25-0.50 mg/1.








 In June, the concentrations of nitrogen  as nitrate reached  values of 0.7 mg/1




 at some  points within Long Tail Point.   Beyond, concentrations  fell rapidly to




 values of 0.05 mg/1 or less.









 In August,   concentrations were significantly  reduced when compared  with  those




 observed during the period of spring  runoff.  Within Long Tail  Point,  concentrations




 were  generally less than 0.10 mg/1.  Beyond  this  point, concentrations  fell  to




 values less than 0.03 mg/1.  However,  near the  bottom concentrations  in  the range




 0.7  to 1.0 mg/1 Were consistently observed.   Concentrations  in  September were




 not  significantly different from those in  August.  High concentrations near the




bottom may reflect the effect of release of nitrogen containing  compounds by  dead




 algae.  The conversion of  these organic nitrogen  compounds  to nitrate may also

-------
                                         -  16  -




account, in part, for the low oxygen concentrations near the bottom.  The largest




significant increase in nitrate near the bottom corresponds to the period of die-




off of the blue-green algae bloom during late June and early July.  According




to Vanderhoef et al (1972) , a large  fraction of this nitrate may come from nitrogen




fixation.









Ammonia;  Concentrations of nitrogen as ammonia were in the range 0.5-0.7 mg/1




in February 1974 throughout the region of the Bay where low oxygen was observed.




At low temperatures, reduced rates of ammonia decay to nitrite and nitrate cause




high concentrations of ammonia.  Reduced concentrations of oxygen also contributed




to a high ammonia concentration.  In the spring, runoff brings large quantities




of ammonia.  The warmer temperatures and the increased level of oxygen in the Bay




cause the concentration of ammonia to fall rapidly as distance from the mouth




of the Lower Fox River increases.  Ammonia utilization by phytoplankton also




contributes to the nearly complete disappearance of ammonia by August.









Phosphorus ;  The seasonal variation of total phosphorus concentration as phosphorus




was less than the corresponding seasonal variation in nitrogen concentration as




nitrate.  The dramatic rise in nitrogen concentration observed during the spring




runoff was not observed for phosphorus.  During the spring runoff, the area of




the Bay in which the concentration of total phosphorus as P was greater than 0.5




mg/1 approximately doubled in size when compared with concentrations in February,




    the several-fold increase in concentration observed for nitrate was not observed
for the phosphorus species.  The seasonal pattern for orthophosphate paralleled




that of total phosphorus.   The ability of the bottom sediments to hold and release




phosphorus containing ions may account for the more stable levels of phosphorus ions




over the various seasons.  Local fluctuations in time of the concentrations of




phosphorus containing ions have been correlated with the bloom of certain blue-green




algae.  This point will be discussed later.

-------
                                      -  17 -




 Total phosphorus  concentrations  appeared to  reach their minimum values during the




 winter months when  quiesent water  allows particulate phosphorus to settle to the




 sediments.  Total phosphorus  increased between  the February  and May surveys  by about




 5-fold. Between the May  survey and the June  survey the  total phosphorus in the




 Oconto-Sturgeon Bay area nearly  tripled.  It  is  doubtful whether this  increase




 can be totally accounted for  by  spring runoff.   A significant amount of phosphorus




 may be released from sediments that are  resuspended by  wind  and wave action  in




 the shallow areas and along the  shoreline.  The  release of phosphorus   from  the




 sediments may be  enhanced by  the mixing  of the water during  spring (and fall)




 turnover.









 Temperature;  In  May, temperatures varied from 16C at  the mouth of  the Lower




 Fox River to 7-8C  in the central  Bay.  Variations  in temperature from top to




 bottom were rarely  as much as 1C.  As the summer progressed  Say  temperatures




 not only became warmer but the thermal gradients  (top to bottom)  increased




 dramatically.  In August, temperatures near the surface  ranged  from 23C  at the




 mouth  of the Lower Fox River  to  18-19C in the central  Bay.  At  this time, gradients




 as large as 10"C  (top to bottom)  were observed in  the central  Bay.








 Chlorophyll-a;  Chlorophyll-a concentrations generally  increased  throughout  the




 summer.  In May concentrations of chlorophyll-a in  the  Inner Bay  ranged between




 10 and  20 ug/1.   Beyond Long Tail Point, Chlorophyll-a  concentrations were generally




below  10 ug/1.   During the summer the chlorophyll-a increased within  the Inner




Bay at the  rate of about 10 ug/1 per month.   Between July and August  this rate




of increase jumped  dramatically.  The concentration went from 30 and 40 ug/1




 to as high as 100 ug/1.   The  month of August showed the highest  levels of




 chlorophyll-a at  all locations.  Concentrations as high as 70 ug/1 were found in

-------
                                    - 18 -
          FIGURE III-2

    Dissolved Oxygen Contours
       in Lower Green Bay
The dissolved oxygen was found to be
at or above saturation at the one
meter depth except very close to the
mouth of Lower Fox River.  Also dur-
ing the February survey, very low
dissolved oxygen was observed at all
depths in the Red Banks area.
                                                                  D.O. MG./L
                                                                  DEPTH = 1 M.
                                                                SEPTEMBER 24-25
                                                                     1973
                       D.O. MG./L.
                       DEPTH = 1  M.
                        JUNE 3-7
                          1974
D.O. MG./L.
DEPTH = 1  M.
 JULY 8-9
   1974

-------
                - 19 -
  D.O. MG./L.
  DEPTH = T M.
FEBRUARY 18-20
     1974
  D.O. MG./L.
  DEPTH = 1  M.
 AUGUST 12-14
     1974
  D.O.  MG./L.
  DEPTH = 1  M.
   MAY  20-23
     1974
  D.O.  MG./L.
  DEPTH = 1  M.
SEPTEMBER 4-5
     1974

-------
                                    - 20 -
          FIGURE III-3

    Dissolved Oxygen Contours
         in Lover Green Bay
Dissolved oxygen levels at the 3
meter depth vere generally high but
slightly below the measured values
at 1 meter depth.  In addition to
the areas of lov dissolved oxygen
mentioned in Figure III-2, depressed
DO's vere seen at this depth off the
mouth of the Oconto River.
                        D.O.  MG./L.
                        DEPTH =  3 M.
                          JUNE 3-7
                           1974
                                                                  D.O. MG./L.
                                                                  DEPTH = 3 M.
                                                                SEPTEMBER 24-25
                                                                     1973
D.O. MG./L.
DEPTH = 3 M.
  JULY 8-9
   1974

-------
                - 21 -
   D.O. MG./L.
   DEPTH = 3 M.
FEBRUARY 18-20
      1974
   D.O. MG./L.
   DEPTH = 3 M.
     MAY 20-23
      1974
   D.O.  MG./L.
  DEPTH  =  3 M.
  AUGUST 12-14
      1974
  D.O. MG./L.
  DEPTH = 3 M.
SEPTEMBER 4-5
     1974

-------
                                    - 22 -
          FIGURE
    Dissolved Oxygen Contours in
         Lover Green Bay
Dissolved oxygen measurements at the
6 meter depth were slightly lower
than those at 1 and 3 meters.  During
July, there was an area beyond Long
Tail Point at the 6 meter depth that
had low dissolved oxygen levels.
This area of low DO may be a result
of decaying algae cells or BOD from
the Lower Fox River.
                                                                   D.O. MG./L.
                                                                   DEPTH = 6 M.
                                                                 SEPTEMBER 24-25
                                                                      1973
                        D.O.  MG./L.
                        DEPTH = 6 M.
                         JUNE 3-7
                           1974
D.O. MG./L.
DEPTH = 6 M.
  JULY 8-9
   1974

-------
               - 23 -
  D.O. MG./L.
  DEPTH = 6 M.
FEBRUARY 18-20
     1974
  D.O. MG./L.
  DEPTH = 6 M.
   MAY 20-23
      1974
 D.O. MG./L.
 DEPTH = 6 M.
AUGUST 12-14
    1974
  D.O. MG./L.
  DEPTH = 6 M.
SEPTEMBER 4-5
     1974

-------
                                     - 24 -
           FIGURE III-5

     Dissolved Oxygen Contours
        In Lover Green Bay
Only limited areas of the Lover Bay
are deeper than 9 meters.  Dissolved
oxygen at this depth generally
decreased over the course of the
summer.  This probably is a response
to decaying algae cells that sink
belov the thermocline.
                        D.O. MG./L.
                        DEPTH> 9 M.
                          JUNE 3-7
                           1974
                                                                  D.O. MG./L.
                                                                  DEPTH > 9 M.
                                                                SEPTEMBER 24-25
                                                                     1974
D.O. MG./L.
DEPTH> 9 M.
 JULY 8-9
   1974

-------
                - 25 -
  D.O. MG./L.
  DEPTH> 9 M.
FEBRUARY 18-20
     1974
  D.O. MG./L.
  DEPTH> 9 M.
   MAY 20-23
     1974
  D.O.  MG./L.
  DEPTH  9  M.
 AUGUST 12-14
     1974
  D.O. MG./L.
  DEPTH  9 M.
SEPTEMBER 4-5
     1974

-------
                                - 26 -
           FIGUBE III-6

 Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BODj)
        in Lover Green Bay
BODtj was generally less than 5 mg/1
beyond Long Tail Point except in
isolated cases.  During the winter
survey, several samples of high BODj
in the area of low dissolved oxygen
were found.  Samples in the Inner
Bay revealed BOD? concentrations
averaging more than twice those
further north.  Water samples were
taken at the 1 meter depth.  In
deeper areas (when stratification
was apparent from temperature or
DO data) a second water sample was
taken 2 meters off the bottom.  All
drawings show only the surface sam-
ple.
                        5 DAY BOD
                          M6./L.
                         JUNE 3-7
                           1974
  5 DAY BOD
    MG./L.
SEPTEMBER 24-25
    1973
  5 DAY BOD
    MG./L.
   JULY 8-9
     1974

-------
           - 27 -
  5 DAY BOD
    MG./L.
FEBRUARY 18-20
    1974
  5  DAY  BOD
    MG./L.
  MAY  20-23
    1974
  5 DAY BOD
    MG./L.
AUGUST 12-14
    1974
  5 DAY BOD
    MG./L.
SEPTEMBER 4-5
     1974

-------
                                 - 28 -
             FIGURE I1I-7

      Suspended Solids Contours
         in Lover' Green Bay
Suspended solids were the highest in
all areas of the Bay during the Sept.
1973 survey.  Those levels dropped
off dramatically by February 197^.
May shoved a large increase followed
by a general decrease until mid-
summer.  Betveen August and September
of 197^, suspended solids vere again
increasing especially beyond Long
Tail Point.
                      SUSPENDED SOLIDS
                          MG./L.
                         JUNE 3-7
                            1974
                                                                 SUSPENDED SOLIDS
                                                                      MG./L.
                                                                 SEPTEMBER 24-25
                                                                       1973
SUSPENDED SOLIDS
     MG./L.
    JULY 8-9
      1974

-------
           - 29 -
SUSPENDED SOLIDS
    M6./L.
 FEBRUARY 18-20
     1974
SUSPENDED SOLIDS
      MG./L.
  AUGUST 12-14
       1974
SUSPENDED SOLIDS
      MG./L.
    MAY 20-23
       1974
SUSPENDED SOLIDS
      MG./L.
 SEPTEMBER 4-5
       1974

-------
                                  - 30 -
            FIGURE III-8

        Temperature Contours
         in Lover Green Bay
Surface temperatures varied about as
would be expected through the year.
Winter temperatures (not shown) ranged
from 0 C to 3 C.  Highest tempera-
tures vere seen in July when 23.5 C
was observed in several areas.  In
general the water in the Inner Bay
averaged 1 to 2 above that in the
main area of the Bay.
                           TEMP. C.
                          DEPTH  =  1  M.
                           JUNE  3-7
                              1974
                                                                     TEMP. C.
                                                                    DEPTH =  1  M.
                                                                  SEPTEMBER  24-25
                                                                       1973
 TEMP.  UC.
DEPTH = 1  M.
 JULY 8-9
   1974

-------
         - 31 -
                                           TEMP. C.
                                          DEPTH =  1  M.
                                           MAY  20-23
                                             1974
 TEMP. C.
DEPTH = 1 M.
AUGUST 12-14
   1974
  TEMP.  C.
 DEPTH = 1 M.
SEPTEMBER 4-5
    1974

-------
                                 -  32 -
             FIGURE III-9

        Temperature Contours
         in Lover Green Bay
Temperatures at the 3 meter depth did
not vary significantly from those at
the surface.  The difference between
the Inner Bay and the outer area vas
more significant in most surveys
ranging up to as much as 5 C.
                          TEMP. C.
                         DEPTH =  3 M.
                          JUNE 3-7
                             1974
                                                                    TEMP. "C.
                                                                   DEPTH =  3 M.
                                                                 SEPTEMBER  24-25
                                                                       1973
 TEMP.  C.
DEPTH = 3 M.
 JULY 8-9
   1974

-------
         - 33 -
 TEMP. C.
DEPTH = 3 M.
AUGUST 12-14
   1974
                                           TEMP. C.
                                          DEPTH =  3 M.
                                           MAY 20-23
                                             1974
  TEMP. C.
 DEPTH =  3 M.
SEPTEMBER 4-5
     1974

-------
                                 - 34 -
            FIGUBE 111-10

        Temperature Contours
         in Lower Green Bay
The temperature measurements at 6
meters indicated the beginnings of
significant pattern changes from
those at 3 and 1 meters.  Thermal
stratification was evidenced in all
areas of the Bay where the depth was
greater than about 6 meters.  The
thermocline occurred at about a
depth of 6 meters.
                         TEMP. C.
                        DEPTH = 6 M.
                         JUNE 3-7
                           1974
                                                                    TEMP. C.
                                                                   DEPTH  =  6 M.
                                                                 SEPTEMBER  24-25
                                                                      1973
 TEMP.  C.
DEPTH = 6 M.
 JULY 8-9
   1974

-------
         - 35  -
                                          TEMP. C.
                                         DEPTH = 6 M.
                                          MAY 20-23
                                            1974
 TEMP. C.
DEPTH = 6 M.
AUGUST 12-14
   1974
  TEMP.  C.
 DEPTH = 6 M.
SEPTEMBER 4-5
     1974

-------
                                 - 36 -
            FIGURE III-ll

        Temperature Contours
         In Lover Green Bay
Nearly all the measurements taken at
or below 9 meters were below the
thermocllne.  Marked temperature
stratification existed in these
areas.  Vertical gradients as much
as 10 C were observed in some areas.
                          TEMP. C.
                          DEPTH>9 M.
                          JUNE  3-7
                              1974
                                                                   TEMP.  C.
                                                                  DEPTH>9 M.
                                                                 SEPTEMBER 24-25
                                                                      1973
 TEMP.  C.
DEPTH >9 M.
 JULY 8-9
   1974

-------
          -  37 -
                                            TEMP.  C.
                                           DEPTH ^9 M.
                                            MAY 20-23
                                              1974
 TEMP. C.
DEPTH >9 M.
AUGUST 12-14
    1974
  TEMP.  oc.
 DEPTH>9 M.
SEPTEMBER 4-5
     1974

-------
                                - 38 -
             FIGURE 111-12

       Organic Nitrogen Contours
          in Lower Green Bay
Organic nitrogen levels fluctuated
considerably in the Bay, probably in
response to various algae blooms.
During the February survey of 1.97k,
high levels of organic nitrogen were
observed in the Dykesville area indi-
cating a possible winter algal bloom.
Organic nitrogen in the Inner Bay
generally exceeded .75 mg/1 except
for the February and May surveys.
                     ORGANIC  NITROGEN
                       MG./L.  AS  N.
                         JUNE 3-7
                           1974
                                                                ORGANIC NITROGEN
                                                                  MG./L.  AS N.
                                                                 SEPTEMBER 24-25
                                                                       1973
ORGANIC NITROGEN
  MG./L. AS N.
    JULY 8-9
      1974

-------
           - 39 -
ORGANIC NITROGEN
  MG./L. AS N.
 FEBRUARY 18-20
      1974
ORGANIC NITROGEN
  MG./L.  AS N.
 AUGUST 12-14
      1974
ORGANIC NITROGEN
  MG./L. AS N.
    MAY 20-22
      1974
ORGANIC NITROGEN
  MG./L. AS N.
SEPTEMBER 4-5
      1974

-------
                                 - 40 -
             FIGURE 111-13

       Ammonia Nitrogen Contours
          in Lower Green Bay
Ammonia concentrations shoved a
regular pattern of decrease in the
Inner Bay on all summer surveys.
Concentrations between .8 and .2
mg/1 were regularly found in the
Inner Bay.  Only during winter, when
nitrification is slowed by cold
temperatures, did higher ammonia
levels reach as far north as
Dykesville.  Concentrations in
the area north of Long Tail Point
generally fell to a very low level
during the summer.
   AMMONIA NITROGEN
     MG./L.  AS N.
   SEPTEMBER 24-25
         1973
                     AMMONIA NITROGEN
                       MG./L.  AS N.
                         JUNE  3-7
                           1974
.  AMMONIA NITROGEN
)    MG./L. AS N.
      JULY 8-9
        1974

-------
                   - 41 -
       AMMONIA NITROGEN
         MG./L. AS N.
       FEBRUARY 18-20
             1974
    7  AMMONIA NITROGEN |
    J    MG./L.  AS N.
.  K    AUGUST 12-14
5^         1974

r^
AMMONIA NITROGEN
  MG./L. AS N.
   MAY 20-23
      1974
AMMONIA NITROGEN
  MG./L. AS N.
  SEPTEMBER 4-5
      1974

-------
                                    - 42 -
             FIGURE Ill-Ik

       Nitrite Nitrogen Contours
          in Lower Green Bay
Nitrite concentrations were highest
in the Inner Bay.  The winter survey
revealed the highest concentration of
nitrite observed in this study reach-
ing levels of .030 mg/1.  The
concentration in the northern part
of the Bay fluctuated by about one
order of magnitude.  The lowest
observed values were seen on the
September 1973 and July 1971* surveys.
                                                                NITRITE NITROGEN
                                                                  MG./L.  AS N.
                                                                SEPTEMBER 24-25
                                                                      1973
                     NITRITE  NITROGEN
                       MG./L. AS  N.
                         JUNE 3-7
                           1974
NITRITE NITROGEN
  MG./L.  AS N.
    JULY  8-9
      1974

-------
            - A3 -
NITRITE NITROGEN
  MG./L. AS N.
 FEBRUARY 18-20
      1974
NITRITE NITROGEN
   MG./L.  AS N.
   AUGUST 12-14
       1974
NITRITE NITROGEN
  MG./L. AS N.
   MAY 20-23
      1974
NITRITE NITROGEN
  MG./L.  AS N.
 SEPTEMBER 4-5
      1974

-------
                                   - 44 -
             FIGURE 111-15

       Nitrate Nitrogen Contours
          in Lover Green Bay

Nitrate nitrogen shoved dramatic
fluctuations in concentration during
the study period.  The July 1971*
survey revealed an overall level of
nitrate much lover than in any other
survey.  This pattern corresponds to
the bloom of nitrogen-fixing algae.
August and September 197** indicated
significant increases in nitrate in
all locations.  Some of this increase
may be due to nitrogen released by
nitrogen-fixing algae cells that have
died and released their nitrogen.
Vanderhoef, et al (1972, 1973) have
suggested that ^0 percent of the
inorganic nitrogen contributed to
the Bay during the bloom period
(mid-June to mid-August) may come
from nitrogen fixing algae.
NITRATE NITROGEN
  MG./L. AS N.
SEPTEMBER 24-25
      1973
                  // NITRATE NITROGEN
                       MG./L. AS N.
                         JUNE 3-7
                           1974
NITRATE NITROGEN
  MG./L.  AS N.
    JULY  8-9
      1974

-------
               - 45 -
NITRATE NITROGEN
  MS./L. AS N.
 FEBRUARY 18-20
      1974
NITRATE NITROGEN
  MG./L. AS N.
  AUGUST 12-14
      1974
NITRATE NITROGEN
  MG./L.  AS N.
   MAY 20-23
      1974
NITRATE NITROGEN
  MG./L. AS N.
 SEPTEMBER 4-5
      1974

-------
                                  - 46 -
             FIGURE III-16

       Total Phosphorus Contours
          in Lower Green Bay
Total phosphorus did not fluctuate
nearly as much as the nitrogen forms.
The highest concentrations were con-
sistently found in the Inner Bay and
along the eastern half of the Bay.
Significant decreases in total
phosphorus concentrations occurred
between the July and August 1971*
surveys corresponding to the areas
of the blue-green algae bloom during
this period.
                                                                TOTAL PHOSPHATE
                                                                  MG./L. AS P.
                                                                SEPTEMBER 24-25
                                                                      1973
                     TOTAL PHOSPHATE
                       MG./L. AS P.
                        JUNE 3-7
                           1974
TOTAL PHOSPHATE
  MG./L. AS P.
    JULY 8-9
      1974

-------
              - 47 -
TOTAL PHOSPHATE
  MG./L.  AS P.
FEBRUARY  18-20
      1974
TOTAL PHOSPHATE
  MG./L. AS P.
 AUGUST 12-14
      1974
 TOTAL  PHOSPHATE
   MG./L.  AS P.
   MAY  20-23
       1974
TOTAL PHOSPHATE
  MG./L.  AS P.
 SEPTEMBER 4-5
      1974

-------
                                  -  48 -
             FIGURE 111-17

       Ortho Phosphorus Contours
          in Lover Green Bay
Ortho phosphorus concentrations        j
shoved a nearly steady increase from
September 1973 until June 1971* at
nearly all locations.  During the
last three surveys the concentrations
fell slowly to levels comparable to
the September 1973 concentrations.
                                                                 ORTHO PHOSPHATE
                                                                   MG./L.  AS P.
                                                                 SEPTEMBER 24-25
                                                                       1973
                      ORTHO. PHOSPHATE
                        MG./L.  AS P.
                          JUNE  3-7
                            1974
ORTHO PHOSPHATE
  MG./L. AS P.
    JULY 8-9
      1974

-------
               -  49  -
ORTHO PHOSPHATE
  MG./L. AS P.
FEBRUARY 18-20
      1974
ORTHO PHOSPHATE
  MG./L.  AS P.
 AUGUST 12-14
      1974
ORTHO  PHOSPHATE
  MG./L. AS  P.
    MAY 20-23
       1974
ORTHO PHOSPHATE
  MG./L. AS P.
SEPTEMBER 4-5
      1974

-------
                                   -  50 -
             FIGURE 111-18

        Chlorophyll-a Contours
          in Lower Green Bay
Chlorophyll-a fluctuated most markedly I
in the lover one-third of the study    j
area.  Both September surveys shoved   i
fairly uniform gradients of chl-a
ranging from 80 H- g/1 at the mouth
of the Fox River to about 20 /< g/1
around Dykesville.  Betveen June and
August 1971*, concentrations grew
steadily.  Concentrations over
100.0 /< g/1 vere observed near the
Fox River mouth during the August
survey.  Phaeo pigments are listed
in Appendix F.
                         UNCORRECTED
                        CHLOROPHYLL A
                            pG./L.
                          JUNE  3-7
                             1974
  UNCORRECTED
 CHLOROPHYLL A
     yG./L.
SEPTEMBER 24-25
      1973
  UNCORRECTED
 CHLOROPHYLL A
     uG./L.
   JULY 8-9
      1974

-------
              - 51 -
 UNCORRECTED
CHLOROPHYLL A
    nG./L.
 AUGUST 12-14
     1974
                                            UNCORRECTED
                                           CHLOROPHYLL A
                                               uG./L.
                                             MAY 20-23
                                                1974
 UNCORRECTED
CHLOROPHYLL A
    yG./L.
SEPTEMBER 4-5
     1974

-------
                                        - 52 -
             FIGURE 111-19

Secchi Disc Reading in Lover Green Bay
Secchi disc readings generally corres-
ponded to the extent of the algae
activity.  The light penetration was
consistently highest in the areas
furthest from the Fox River.  Light
penetration of only 1 to 3 feet vas
consistently measured in the Inner
Bay.
                                                                  SECCHI DISC
                                                                      FEET
                                                                SEPTEMBER 24-25
                                                                      1973
                        SECCHI DISC
                            FEET
                         JUNE 3-7
                            1974
SECCHI DISC
    FEET
 JULY 8-9
    1974

-------
              - 53 -
SECCHI DISC
    FEET
AUGUST 12-14
    1974
                                         SECCHI  DISC
                                             FEET
                                          MAY 20-23
                                             1974
SECCHI DISC
    FEET
SEPTEMBER 4-5
    1974

-------
                                       FIGURE 111-20
                           Chloride Contours in Lower Green Bay
Chloride concentration appeared to be relatively stable in the Lover Bay.  Concentration
gradients ranging from 25 mg/1  at  the Fox River mouth to less than 10 mg/1 further north
appear in nearly all surveys.
                              CHLORIDES
                               MG./L.
                              JUNE 3-7
                                1974
                                                                                                           I
                                                                                                          Ui
CHLORIDES
 MG./L.
JULY 8-9
  1974

-------
               -  55 -
  CHLORIDES
    MG./L.
FEBRUARY 18-20
     1974
  CHLORIDES
    MG./L.
 AUGUST 12-14
     1974
  CHLORIDES
    MG./L.
  MAY 20-23
     1974
  CHLORIDES
    MG./L.
SEPTEMBER 4-5
     1974

-------
                                        - 56 -





the Red Banks area.  In all surveys  the concentrations dropped off sharply with




distance from the Fox River.  Concentrations  below 20 ug/1 and usually below




10 ug/1 were found north of a line from Dykesville to  the Little Suamico River.









It is interesting to note that the percent of the chlorophyll-a that is phaeo-




pigments (inactive chlorophyll-a from dead algae) increased throughout the summer.




In August for example, in the Inner Bay, phaeo-pigments comprised nearly 50% of the




measured chlorophyll-a.









Algae;  The purpose of the study was to collect a background of information concerning




the principal types of planktonic algae in the lower third of Green Bay, to be




used as a starting point for further studies  and monitoring.  This  includes




a Biomass estimate, a qualitative analysis of algae present and distribution




patterns of dominant algae.









The following is a qualitative report of observations obtained in the spring and




summer surveys and a description of schematic representation of the dominant




algae at each station based on the number of occurrences.   (See Figures 111-21




through 111-25)








Winter 1974 (No figure included)









Limited sampling done through the ice at only two stations in the Lower Bay showed




a predominance of diatoms.  Most common were Asterionella, Cyclotella and




Fragilaria.  Species of Oscillatoria. rotifers and a few Chlorophyta were also




present.  The diatoms constituted about 70-90% of the algae flora.

-------
                                        - 57 -





May 20-23 (Figure 111-21)








A variety of diatoms predominated at most of the sampling stations.   There was a




sizeable increase in numbers compared to the winter sample.   The most common




genera were Asterionella, Cyclotella, Stephanodiscus,  Fragilaria and now Melosira.




These organisms were distributed over the entire lower third of the Bay and may




represent the later stages of a diatom bloom as described by Wiersma 1974 as a




spring peak in April and tapering off in May.









It was interesting to note that Melosira was the dominant organism at the mouth




of the Lower Fox River, a condition that persisted throughout the summer.  Species




of green algae, mostly of the genera Scenedesmus and Ankistrodesmus, predominated




in the Lower Bay along the eastern shoreline.  Ankistrodesmus along  with




Oscillatoria and diatoms predominated at stations, far from the Lower Fox River.




Small concentrations of Microcystis and Anabaena occurred at stations below the




Red River-Little Suamico River transect.  Cyclotella and Stephanodiscus were the




outstanding diatoms in the indicated areas.









June 3-5 (Figure 111-22)









A large increase in the variety of green algae and numbers of Oscillatoria




and diatoms occurred in June.  Melosira and green algae dominated in the region




below Long Tail Point.  Oscillatoria and diatoms dominated above Long Tail Point.




Scenedesmus and several other species of green algae were concentrated along




the eastern shoreline as far as Red Banks.

-------
                                        - 58 -




July 8-9 (Figure 111-23)








A bloom of algae occurred after the first week of June.   The bloom extended over the




entire sampling area of the Bay.  Blue-green algae dominated this bloom.   The




most common genus was Aphanizomenon, except for stations 1 and 2 where Melosira




predominated.  At stations 17, 31 and 43, (above Long Tail Point) species of




Oscillatoria predominated.  The diatoms Cyclotella and Stephanodiscus were common




but not dominant at station A3, the furthest sampling station from the mouth




of the Lower Fox River.  A variety of green algae persisted at some stations in




the Lower Bay and zooplankton concentrations were larger than in prior surveys.









August 12-13 (Figure 111-24)








Bloom conditions continued to persist over the entire sampling area.  The extent




of the bloom beyond Sturgeon Bay was not investigated.  The dominant organism at




all stations beyond Long Tail Point was Oscillatoria with heavy concentrations of




Aphanizomenon near Sturgeon Bay and along the eastern shoreline below Renard




River.  Melosira continued to predominate in the Lower Fox River.  Microcystis




was also abundant in the Lower Fox River.  Heavy concentrations of Melosira




occurred throughout the Lower Bay as far north as the Red River.  Genera of




blue-green algae  (Microcystis, Anabaena, etc.) occurred throughout the entire




Bay.  The heaviest concentrations appeared within the Lower Bay below the Point




Sable-Long Tail Point  barrier and along the eastern shore to Red Banks.  Green




algae appeared most commonly along the eastern shoreline from below Point Sable




to Red Banks.  A  greater number of the Pinoflagellates, most notably Ceratium,




appeared in  the upper  stations.  Greater concentrations of zooplankton than previously




observed occurred at all  stations in the Bay, especially in the  upper most region.

-------
                                        - 59 -





September 4-5 (Figure 111-25)









A second bloom of Aphanizomenon occurred although not as extensively as the bloom




which began in mid-June, lasting through August.  Bloom conditions persisted




throughout the Bay.  In the upper regions of the sampling area Oscillatoria was the




dominant organism.  A noticeable increase in the concentration of the diatom




Asterionella occurred at these upper stations.









Areas of highest concentration of Aphanizomenon occurred in the Inner Bay and above




Long Tail Point on the western side of the Bay up to the Little Suamico River,




where it dominated the community, an area which previously was dominated by




diatoms and Oscillatoria.  The eastern shoreline below the Red River and the




Inner Bay was a massive mixture of many organisms dominated by Aphanizomenon,




Microcystis, Melosira, green algae, Oscillatoria and zooplankton.  This condition




extended beyond the Long Tail Point-Point Sable barrier to a transect from




the Little Suamico River to the Red River.









Summary of Survey Observations








Heavy growths of algae were present in Green Bay when intensive sampling began in




late May.  Large blooms occurred by mid-June and continued through early September




when sampling was discontinued.  By September "pea soup" conditions prevailed in




the Lower Bay and extensive blooms reached the upper regions of the lower third




of the Bay.  Field workers described the Bay as "the worst they've ever seen




it."

-------
                                    - 60 -

                                FIGURE 111-21
                 PESHTIGO RIVER
   MAY 20-23, 1974
OCONTO RIVER
 LITTLE SUAM ICO
    RIVER
     OSCILLATOR IA


     DIATOMS
                                                          GREEN ALGAE
                                                          (ANKISTRODES
                                                          &SCENEDESMUS)
**\  (ANKISTRODESMUS
                                                          CYCLOTELLA &
                                                          STEPHANODISCUS
                                                          MELOSIRA
                       GREEN BAY

-------
                                    - 61 -

                               FIGURE 111-22
                PESHTIGO RIVER
  JUNE 3-5,1974
OCONTO RIVER
   LITTLE SUAMICO
     RIVER
                                                            OSCILLATOR IA


                                                            MELOSIRA
                                                      XXXX GREEN ALGAE
                                                       x XX (SCENEDESMUS)

                                                      A A A. CYCLOTELLA  
                                                      *+   STEPHANODISCUS
                      GREEN BAY

-------
               *
                                             1=^-^;	  :^:-::^':-::-^: vV^^\No
                                             	      ...,..'   ..	;_ ..  _.;..;;_.   /^/^"'.';N ^V  

^

-------

-------
       %/>
          **    V,
           X  X,
o,
                    ^
         ^.   X^
/c^
            Q,
            th
              ^
               
-------
                                        - 65 -




A variety of algae and  zooplankton predominated at different times throughout




the summer.  Host prominent of these were the blue-green algae Aphanizomenon,




Qscillatoria and Microcystis; the diatoms Melosira. Cyclotella. Stephanodiscus




and Asterionella; the green algae Scenedesmus and Ankistrodesmus;  Pinoflagellates,




Ceratium and the zooplankters Cladoceraus, copepods and rotifers.









Discussion









The relationship between the principal algae tabulated in Table III-3 to one




another at each station at a given time is the basis for determining the dominate




algae and the distribution patterns.  This does not imply that the dominant




algae is necessarily the most important in the community, but that it occurred




most frequently.  No attempt was made to determine the total algal community




or standing crop from these counts.  Comparison of the data from May and June




to the July, August, September sampling cannot be done because of  the different




methods of sampling used.  It was not possible at this time to correlate these




two methods.









Wiersma (1974) has shown which algae comprise the plankton of that part of lower




Green Bay within the Long Tail Point-Point Sable barrier.  This survey attempted




to investigate the characteristics of that portion beyond Long Tail Point as far




out as Sturgeon Bay in addition to the Inner Bay.








The distribution patterns assume a continuous distribution at the  1 to 2 meter level,




but do not take into account the vertical distribution.   It is not known at




this time what effect this would have on these patterns, especially the buoyant

-------
                                        - 66 -




blue-green algae.  The effects of wind and currents generally contribute to the




concentrations of algal masses along the eastern shore.  This condition extended




as far as Sturgeon Bay where abundant concentrations of Aphanizomenon were




observed.  Modlin and Beeton (1970) and Sager and Wiersma (1972) observed that




currents from the Fox River flow along the south and eastern shorelines of




the Inner Bay and beyond Point Sable along the eastern shoreline for some distance




causing concentrations of algae in this area.









At all stations sampled on Green Bay Melosira granulata was found in abundant




concentrations at one time or more throughout the season.  It attains a peak in




June and a second, generally lesser, peak in August.  Holland (1968) found this




to be the case at sample stations in the vicinity of our stations 27, 37, 43.




The other diatoms did not appear to demonstrate this characteristic.  Melosira




granulata was found to be very abundant in the mouth of the lower Fox River




(station 1) throughout the entire season.  Here it appears to have gained complete




dominance of the community offering excessive competition thereby contributing




to the exclusion of other algae during periods of bloom.








The distribution of the blue-green algae Aphanizomenon correlates fairly well




with the distribution information reported by Vanderhoef  (1972) except that we




observed abundant Aphanizomenon concentrations farther out into the Bay than he




did.   (See Figure 111-23)  It appears as though this may be an increase in




the abundance and spread of the organism, but it may be  a "normal"  fluctuation




in the population.  Further studies and monitoring will  be needed to determine




if this  is the case.

-------
                                        - 67 -




When the Chlorophyll-A data is segregated according to the zones shown in




Figure III-l, the averages show a correlation to the Chlorophyll-a data of




Wiersma (1974) taken in 1973.  The data shown for the zones above Long Tail




Point generally indicate lower Chlorophyll-a than for the Inner Bay zone (see




Table III-4).  Indications are from this study that the biomass for May and




June show trends that correlates with the trends of Chlorophyll-a









Biomass data for July, August and September are unreliable and cannot be




used.

-------
                                        - 68 -

                                 TABLE III-2


                          Genera of Algae Observed*
CHLOROPHYTA (Green Algae)

Actinastrum Hantzschii
Agmenellum sp.
Ankistrodesmus falcatus
Chlorella ellipsoidea
Closteriopsis sp.
Coelastrum sp.
Crucigenia sp.
Dictyosperium pulchellum
Dictyosperium sp.
Echinosphaerella limnetica
Euglena acus
Euglena elastica
Golenkinia sp.
Hydrodictyon reticulatum
Kirchinella sp.
Micractinium pusillum
Oocystis sp.
Palmella sp.
Pediastrum sp.
Scenedesmus acuminatus
Scenedesmus dimorphus
Schroederia sp.
Selenastrum gracile
Selenastrum sp.
Tetradron trigonum
Tetradron sp.
Tetrastrum sp.
Westella sp.
Zygnema sp.

DESMIDS

Closterium sp.
Staurastrum sp.
Cosmarium reniforme

CYANOPHYTA  (Blue-green Algae)

Anabaena circinalis
Anabaena incenta
Anabaena spiroides
Anabaena flos-aquae
Aphanizomenon flos-aquae
Aphanpcapsa sp.
Chroococcus sp.
Coelospherium sp.
Gomphospheria sp.
Counting Unit

single cell
colony
single cell
single cell
single cell
colony
colony
single cell
single cell
single cell
single cell
single cell
single cell
colony
colony
single cells
single cell
colony
colony
single cells
single cells
single cell
colony
colony
single cell
single cell
single cells
colony
filament
single cell
single cell
single cell
filament
filament
filament
filament
filament
colony
single cell
colony
colony (av.
size 0.1 mm )

-------
                                        - 69 -
Lyngbya bergei
Lyngbya litnnetica
Lyngbya versicolar
Microcystis aeruginosa
Oscillatoria limnetica
Oscillatoria subrevis
Oscillatoria tenuis
Oscillatoria sp.
Fhormidium uncinatum
Phormidium sp.

BACILLARIOPHYCEAE  (diatoms)

Asterionella formosa
Cyclotella glomerata
Cyclotella sp.
Fragilaria crotonensis
Fragilaria sp.
Melosira binderana
Melosira granulata
Melosira sp.
Stephanodiscus  sp.
Synedra sp.
Tabularia fenestrata
Navicula sp.

DINOFLAGELLATES

Ceratium berundinella
Peridinium sp.
Dinobryon sp.

ZOOPLANKTON

Cladocerans
Copepods
Rotifers
filament
filament
filament               ~
colony (av. size 0.7 mm )
filament
filament
filament
filament
filament
filament
frustule
frustule
frustule
frustule
frustule
filament
filament
filament
frustule
frustule
frustule
frustule
single cell
single cell
colony
single cell
single cell
single cell
*This table represents the algal organisms observed and does not necessarily mean
 they were counted as they may have occurred outside of the counting grid.   Where
 possible, identification was tentatively carried out to species.  Single celled
 green algae unable to be identified were tentatively grouped in the Order
 Chlorococcales, and filamentous green algae unable to be identified were
 tentatively grouped in the Order Ulotrichales.

-------
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-------
Melosira     o
Other Diatoms

Anabaena     -^
Aphanizomenon
Oscillatoria2
Other Blue Green
Desmids
Dinoflagellates
Ulotrichales1
Other Green3
Other Diatoms
Anabaena     ,
Aphaniz omenon
Oscillatoria2   ,
Other Blue Green
       3
Desmids        
Dinoflagellates
Ulotrichales1
Other Green3
                               Sta.  9b
                                        TABLE III-3 (continued)

                                                         Sta.  12
Sta. 13
May
136
328
0
0
125
0
0
5
10
142

130
209
5
0
31
26
0
0
0
260
June
73
432
5
0
120
10
62
5
31
162

224
150
0
5
63
0
21
0
26
499
July
6
2
34
158
60
4
5
1
6
5
Sta.
6
1
65
500
18
16
3
0
6
11
Aug.
7
1
3
17
78
3
7
0
4
0
14
142
21
5
87
36
60
2
0
22
120
Sept.
19
19
1
4
68
6
1
0
4
7

40
3
5
181
42
188
12
0
10
16
May
141
230
0
0
16
16
10
0
26
588

125
449
0
0
162
0
0
10
26
114
June
469
573
0
0
222
183
65
39
130
1461

63
208
0
0
334
0
5
10
83
99
July
1
3
19
273
33
13
0
0
6
12
Sta.
2
4
16
24
135
2
13
1
2
4
Aug.
85
8
4
46
33
46
1
0
5
2
17
30
0
2
12
93
5
3
0
2
4
Sept.
22
2
2
122
21
91
2
0
12
24

50
23
2
47
27
8
3
4
4
9
May
115
240
0
0
26
10
16
0
0
129

89
464
0
0
198
52
0
16
21
255
June
282
302
0
0
50
10
21
0
5
395

10
167
0
0
203
0
0
0
10
31
Juljr
12
13
19
267
48
26
2
0
19
60
Sta.
1
5
9
53
47
2
8
1
3
0
Aug.
393
54
20
138
28
38
22
0
12
68
24
24
2
1
35
94
5
2
0
7
1
Sept.
167
6
22
1047
76
313
22
0
28
16

10
13
3
61
45
7
0
1
4
5
1
2
3
4
No. X 10  filaments/liter
    "     frustules/liter
    "     cells/liter
    "     colonies/liter (predominantly Microcystis)
0 Less than 1 X 10  or not observed

-------
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-------
                                      - 75 -




                                   SECTION  IV
IV.  WATER QUALITY MODELLING






Introduction:  Water quality computer models were developed whose purpose was



to establish the capacity of Green Bay to respond to the input of various pollutants



and other chemicals.  The first model to be discussed consists of a version of


the QUAL-II Model developed by Norton et al  WRE, Inc. (1974) under EPA



contract no. 68-01-0713-Upper Mississippi River Basin Model Project.  The
                                                                            *


Wisconsin DNR has modified  and implemented this model for the Lower Fox River



system.






A second model was based on a program by Water Resources Engineers,  Inc., Lee



et al (1974) to simulate two dimensional systems such as Green Bay.   This Dynamic



Estuary Model was modified to fit the Green Bay system and to simulate the major



water quality constituents.  This model and its modifications are discussed in



detail in Appendix D (Green Bay Model Development and Documentation).






The Qual II model (as modified and used by DNR) is capable of simulating 12



constituents under steady or psuedo-dynamic conditions.  BOD and DO are routed as


well as phosphorus,  4 forms of nitrogen, algae, coliforms and up to three


conservative substances.  The model uses one dimensional steady state hydraulics


and waste inputs for both steady and dynamic runs.  Dynamic simulation allows the



insertion of variable light intensity for evaluating the diurnal effect of algae


photosynthesis and respiration.

-------
                                          - 76  -




 NOTE:   In 1973  the Wisconsin  DNR published a Water Quality Model  Study of




 the Lower Fox River,  Patterson  (1973).   This study was  based  on a water quality




 model  developed by Crevensten,  Stoddard  and Vajda  of  EPA.  Since  that  time this




 model  has been  used to produce  a Waste Load Allocation  for the  Oconto  River




 (Wisconsin DNR,  1974).   Since the waste  load allocation for the Oconto River




 has been  completed, no additional simulations  for  the Oconto  River have been




 undertaken.   The results of the Oconto River modeling are  not presented in



 this report.







A.   Fox River Modelling









The Fox River from Lake Winnebago to Green Bay, a distance of about 40 miles,




was simulated by means of the QUAL-II computer model.  The advantage of  the QUAL-




II model is its flexibility and capability of simulating simultaneously many




constituents.  For instance, four forms of nitrogen can be routed while various




chemical or biological reactions  take place.








The QUAL-II model has been extensively modified in  its application to  the Lower




Fox River.  The four most important modifications include:  1)  the ability  to




simulate organic nitrogen,  2)  reformulization of the  algal growth kinetics, 3)




inhibiting nitrification rates at low dissolved oxygen levels and 4) allowing




for denitrification during very low dissolved oxygen  levels.   The  first  two




modifications are essentially similar to the scheme developed for the Bay model




 (Appendix D).  The appropriate theory and equations are discussed in the Green




Bay model documentation.   The third and fourth modifications  are consistent with




observations reported in past literature and commonly accepted  theory.  With the




exception of the above changes,  the model operates  as described by the WRE program




documentation, Norton et al (1974).

-------
    IV-la
r Modelling Segments
                                  STATUTC  MILES	
                      i    i   i   i       '   *  *""*"*

-------
     -  78 -
FIGURE  IV-lb
                    STATUTE  IMi.es

                 i   i    o   .1  .2  .3  jt  .3

-------
         -  79 -
    FIGURE  IV-lc
    CcfJSOL/DlTfO  Ptffts

          AffiTTOU
Rl VFRSlDC

free*. Co
                              STATUTC MltfS
                   '    I	'    I    i   i   I    I   I    I
                   i   t    t    i    "   '   .2  .3       *

-------
    -  80 -
FIGURE IV-ld
                           AffiCTOH PtPFK Co
                  5.TR
                     STATUTE MILES

-------
                                 - 81  -
                            FIGURE IV-le
      *U*J* S I P
fl ruff  SITE f-o*
    OF THC  Vtit-fr
    5.TP
                                                     i    I   i    s    o   i   z  a  i   5

-------
   -  82 -



FIGURE TV-It
                I   4  4  o  i  i  1 S  s

-------
    - 83 -




FIGURE IV-lg
                  STATUTE HMI.es
         i   n   r
0  .1  .2  .3  .1  .5

-------
                                          -  84 -
                                       FIGURE  IV-lh
  MtlPRIHT A/C.

NlCOLFT P^ffK Co
                                                           5TVCTUTE MILfS

-------
    -  85-



FIGURK IV-li
                                 STATUTE- ^An.rs

-------
                                        - 86 -





The QUAL-II model was then applied to the Lower Fox River.  Forty-six river segments




were used to describe the Fox River.  Each segment was further divided into an




integral number (from 1 to 20) of computational elements  (each of these was 0.1




miles in length). In all, 389 computational elements were used.  The waste sources




were located along the system and were used as waste inputs at the appropriate




computational element. The physical schematization is shown in Figure IV-1 and




tabulated in Table IV-1.









QUAL-II was verified using data obtained in the summer of 1972.  This is the same




data used to verify the EPA model.  The results of the verification run for June




20-21, 1972 are presented in Figures IV-2 through IV-5.   Survey data was obtained




during daylight hours only.  Data from the 5 automatic monitors is presented to




indicate the duirnal range of the DO during the survey period.  The profiles for




DO, BOD5, NH3~N, N03-N, Org-N, and Chlorophyll-a are presented along with the




data that is available.  The verification run shows an agreement between the observed




data and the QUAL-II prediction that is very acceptable.  It is particularly




interesting to observe the agreement for the nitrogen forms.  The only area of




significant disagreement is in the NOo-N profile for run  one between mile points




14 and 0.  The QUAL-II model indicates a 100% increase in the NO -N concentration




while the data indicates no substantial change in the NO--N level.  Since the




other forms of nitrogen show good agreement with the data, one of two possible




things is taking place to account for this discrepancy.   Either the DO levels




are low enough near the sediments to stimulate a significant amount of




denitrification at the lower end, or nitrification is not taking place at the




rate used in the model for run one.  The first hypothesis is in direct




disagreement with the observed DO profile.  Mile 14.0 to  3.0 shows DO levels




much too high to allow for significant denitrification (Figure IV-2) unless




there is a very strong vertical stratification which would allow the DO level




to drop sharply near the water sediment interface.  Thus  the first hypothesis




is not very likely.

-------
                                                         FIGUKE IV-2
12
                                                        JUNE 20-21, 1972
                                                        DISSOLVED OXYGEN
                                                        VERIFICATION
                                                        TEMPERATURE  21C
                                                                                                           BOD DECAY   .41
                                                                                                           BOD DEOXY.  .31
 40
             36
                                                                                                                                     00

                                                                                                                                     I
                                                        MILES ABOVE MOUTH

-------
        FIGURE IV-3
           __  T
        JUNE 20-21, 1972
        NITROGEN
        VERIFICATIONS
        RUN ONE
                                           MEASURED VALUES
                                           ORGANIC-N-   D
                                           NH3 -N        
                                           N03 -N        *
                                                                                 oo
                                                                                 00
24           20           16
     MILES ABOVE MOUTH

-------
                                                       FIGURE IV - 4
                                                       JUNE 20-21, 1972
                                                       NITROGEN
                                                       VERIFICATIONS
                                                       RUN TWO
                                                                                   MEASURED VALUES
                                                                                   ORGANIC-N    D
                                                                                   NH3-IM
                                                                                   NO3-N
                                                                                   P04-P (TOTAL)
                                                                                                    QUAL- II
                                                                                                    ORGANIC-N
              REACTION RATES 1/DAY BASE e
                        NH3-N =  035
                        N02-N = 0 07
                        N03-N = 1.00
              MAX:  N03-N N2= .40
              ORG-N SETTLING  = .025
ORG-N
NH3-N
              QUAL-II
              TOT-PO4-P
oo
VO
40
                                                 24           20           16
                                                      MILES ABOVE MOUTH

-------
                                                         FIGURE IV-5
                                                         JUNE 20-21, 1972

                                                    CHLOROPHYLL-A PROFILES
              I-	
                REACTION RATES
30.
20.
10
  40
                                                                                                                               o
                                                                                                                                I








RUN ONE:
GROWTH 1.50
RESPIRATION 20
SETTLING 1.00 ft/DAY
RUN TWO.
GROWTH 1.50
RESPIRATION .20
SETTLING

1.00 ft/DAY



              36
                          32
                                      28
24          20

    MILES ABOVE MOUTH
                                                                          16
                                                                                       12

-------
                           - 91 -
                      TABLE IV-1




Physical Dimensions Used to Describe the Lower Fox River
Reach
Number
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44. -
45.
46.
Cross
Sectional
Area Ft2
967.
4020.
6978.
11660.
14634.
15065.
9837.
10032.
3670.
1676.
1998.
619.
3648.
4194.
4194.
2660.
4556.
6592.
1492.
3484.
2900.
1476.
6514.
4703.
2420.
2912.
2912.
4428.
5055.
8145.
10146.
9301.
9301.
4889.
10824.
8584.
11665.
15204.
12042.
15002.
12978.
16055.
11880.
9945.
14025.
12194.
Depth Ft.
2.
2.5
3.
4.
4.5
5.5
9.
9.6
6.6
4.
4.5
1.6
5.8
6.7
6.7
3.3
6.7
6.5
2.8
6.3
10.0
2.
4.7
7.5
4.
5.8
5.8
7.7
5.5
5.0
5.7
10.3
10.3
3.4
6.6
7.4
5.6
5.6
9.
13.
21.
19.
20.
13.
16.5
13.
Benthic Demand
GR 02/m2/Day
Verification BPT
Runs Conditions
8.0
8.0
8.0
. 8.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
8.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
2.0
4.9
4.9
4.9
4.8
4.8
4.8
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0
3.0

-------
                                        - 92 -






We are therefore left with the conclusion that nitrification rates for NH-j-N are




being overestimated.  If this is the case, we must account  for the fact that the




rate used in the model did in fact predict an ammonia profile that agrees nicely




with the data.  A closer look at the nitrogen balance discloses that organic nitrogen




decreased a total of 1.1 mg/1 while ammonia increased .43 mg/1 and nitrate increased




.11 mg/1.  (Nitrite concentrations are normally insignificant i.e., <.05 mg/1.)




Since the nitrogen forms do not balance we must conclude that nitrogen is leaving




the system in a manner that is unaccounted for.  One could  immediately assume




that algal growth could make up this difference.  A closer  check tells us that




to account for the difference of .55 mg/1 of nitrogen, we would need 6.9 mg/1




of algal biomass (assuming an algae cell is about 8% nitrogen).  Using literature




conversion factors, (QUAL-II documentation), 6.9 mg/1 of algal biomass would contain




350 to 690 ug/1 of chlorophyll-a, an extremely high number.









This is in direct conflict with Sager &Wiersma's measurements of chlorophyll-a.




His measurements indicate maximums of about 150 ug/1 in the Menasha area and




typically a 50% decrease from that level as one travels downstream to Green Bay




(Figure IV-6).  Secondly, nitrogen contained in the algae would be measured as




organic nitrogen (if the sample was not filtered).  We are  therefore forced to




assume that organic nitrogen must be leaving the system by  sedimentation and




not only by transformation to NH -N.  Using this assumption, a second




verification run is displayed in Figure IV-4.   The drawn curves indicate a good




fit for all the nitrogen forms.  For run two,  the observed  and calculated total




phosphorous curve is also shown and again the agreement is  acceptable.




Verification runs for July 5-6, 1972 and August 14, 1972 were also calculated.




Dissolved oxygen data is again for daytime periods except for automatic




monitoring data.   The fits for these dates are  net   as good as the June




20-21, 1972 run.   Data for comparison is not as complete for these simulations.




These runs are diagrammed in Figures IV-7 through IV-11.

-------
140
                                                           FIGURE IV-6
                                                                               CHLOROPHYLL-A   PROFILES
                                                                               SUMMER 1971
                                                                               DATA AFTER SAGER AND WIERSMA
                                                                                                                                 U)
                                                                                                                                 I
                                                   24           20           16
                                                       MILES ABOVE MOUTH

-------
CONCENTRATION MG/l


s|
33 O >
a2 7
%L
|j


f H O
m I >
33 m H
O w >
s
< 3J
m _
-< z
en

g n
00
M :
ai
C/)

,
( 	 uS 	 ,

-------
CONCENTRATION MG/I



  Ko            b>
N
bo

-------
CONCENTRATION MG/I
   O>             CO            O
        - 96  -

-------
CONCENTRATION   MG/I
        - L6  -

-------
CONCENTRATION
         - 86  -

-------
                                        -  99 -





The last constituient to be discussed on  the verification runs concerns  the




chlorophyll-a concentration.  Figure IV-5 shows  the  calculated chlorophyll-a profiles




for run one and two on the June 20-21,  1972 verification.  Unfortunately there




is no data directly available to compare  to the  chlorophyll-a profile.   Thus, no




conclusions about the models capability to simulate  algae in the Lower Fox River




is possible at this time.  The best information  available for this parameter is




a series of chlorophyll-a profiles obtained by Sager and Wiersma during  the summer




of 1971.  The available data is plotted in Figure IV-6.  The most apparent trend




in the plotted data is a lack of consistency.  The profiles were developed from




data taken at 10 stations along the Lower Fox River  on a biweekly basis.  Samples




were taken July 28, August 10, August 25, September  7 and September 21.  The highest




concentrations were obtained on the July  28, 1971 survey.  During this survey




the upper half of the river had chlorophyll-a levels above 100 ug/1 reaching a




peak in  Little Lake Butte Des Morts of 165.1 ug/1.  Only 13 days later, on August




10th the  highest observed value was 81 ug/1.  Nearly all stations had decreased




in concentration by over 50%.  The September 7 profile shows a large peak at mile




18.0nearly 100%  larger than any other value taken on that survey.  The data




represents values of chlorophyll-a in a water sample taken near the surface (1 meter).




The model, of course, considers the "well mixed" average concentration over each




element.  One consistency does'appear in all the fluctuations:  the dramatic changes




in chlorophyll-a concentration in the upper  part of the river are not matched




by such large fluctuations in the lower half.  Thus we  observe chlorophyll-a




levels in the Menasha area that range from 10 ug/1 to 165 ug/1, while at the mouth




of the river the range is from 28 to 51 ug/1.  The data seems to suggest that




the Fox River provides a more stable environment for the phytoplankton.  Whereas




Lake Winnebago is characterized by periodic blooms and dieoffs during the summer,




the entering peaks and troughs of algal activity are distinctly attenuated as the




water proceeds toward Green Bay.  This attentuation leads to a 50% decrease in

-------
                                         - 100 -





 chlorophyll-a  concentration  in general  in  the  downstream direction.   This  pattern




 is violated only by  isolated peaks along the river  and  in the  area near the mouth




 of the river.  The higher values at  the mouth  may be  a  result  of  seiche effects




 bringing algal blooms  from Lower Green Bay into  the river.









 It is therefore apparent that we are on tenuous  ground  in trying  to  predict algal




 activity in the Lower  Fox River.  It appears as  if  the  most  significant factor




 determining the level  of algal activity is the amount of  algae entering the system




 from Lake Winnebago.  We can however, note one interesting point  in  a comparison




 of run one and run two for the June 20-21, 1972  verification.  Figure IV-5  indicates




 a significant change in the  chlorophyll-a concentration between the  two runs.




 The only apparent reason for this decrease in algal activity is the  concentration




 of inorganic nitrogen, particularly N03-N, which was significantly reduced  in




 run two.   It can be concluded from this run that the level of inorganic nitrogen




 in the Lower Fox River may be an important factor in algal activity!   One final




 point along this line needs to be explained.   Denitrification is allowed in QUAL-




 II and is controlled by the dissolved oxygen level in each computational element.




At zero DO, the denitrification rate is maximum at 0.4  day"  (base e).   The allowed




 rate decreased exponentially as the DO rises  from zero.  One would, of  course,




expect higher levels of inorganic nitrogen, particularly N03-N, under high  DO




levels.  As is shown later,  this is in fact what the model predicts.  Thus  the




enthrophication prospects for the Lower Fox River-Green Bay system may be increased,




from an inorganic nitrogen point of view,  under higher DO levels.









In light  of the tremendously wide range of algal activity in the Lower Fox  River,




it does not make sense to develop a waste load allocation with the expectation




that the  algal concentration will be continuously adding to the oxygen  levels in

-------
                                         -  101 -





the stream.  One can, however, attempt  the waste  load  allocation such  that  the




algal activity is a low level component in  the system.  The value of 30 ug/1  of




chlorophyll-a was used to represent a value well  within the range observed  but




toward the lower end.  Under these circumstances, it is reasonable to  expect  the




point source waste loadings to be controlled so no water quality violation  is




encountered.  This is the strategy that was used  to develop the waste  load




allocation for the Lower Fox River that is presented in the next section.









B.   Lower Fox River Waste Load Allocation









The QUAL-II model as developed and presented in the section above has  shown its




usefulness to simulate the Lower Fox River system.  Our remaining task is to  apply




the model under various waste load abatement schemes and evaluate the  response




of the river system as simulated by the model.  The beginning step in  this  process




involves determining the base line conditions that will be used to do  the final




prediction simulations.  This involves determining such parameters as  the 7 day,




10 year low flow (7Q10)j stream temperature and reaction rates etc.









To determine the 7Q10 low flow, data from the USGS gaging station at Rapid  Croche




was analyzed for the years 1918 to 1972.  The value of 912 CFS was used as  a  result




of this analysis.  This flow represents the 7 day low flow that can be expected




statistically in any 10 year period.   For the low-flow simulations,  the flow  of 912




CFS was considered to be constant over the entire length of the river.  Table  IV-




2 lists the various parameters that were chosen at the headwater of the system




(Lake Winnebago).  The value of chlorophyll-a was chosen to reflect a low level




of algal activity (for that area) as  discussed above.   All other values were  chosen




to reflect typical concentrations that have been observed in the Neenah-Menasha




area of Lake Winnebago.  Table IV-3 presents an assortment of data collected  in




this area.

-------
                                       -  102 -
                                  TABLE IV-2

     Lake Winnebago Water Quality Used for the QUAL-II Prediction Simulation
     Runs of the Lower Fox River
Parameter

FLOW
Dissolved Oxygen
BOD (5-day)
Organic-N
NH--N
NO.-N
N03-N
     P04-P
Tot.
Chloroptiyll-a

Temperature
Concentration

912.0 CFS
  8.00 mg/1
  2.00 mg/1
  2.50 mg/1
  0.05 mg/1
  0.001 mg/1
  0.10 mg/1
  0.20 mg/1
 30.0 ug/1

 80F
                                  TABLE IV-3

     Water Quality Parameters Measured in the Neenah-Menasha Area of Lake
     Winnebago on various dates
Parameter    May 4, 1972   June 21, 1972  July 6, 1972  Oct. 23, 1974  Nov. 11, 1974
DO mg/1                        13.0
BOD mg/1
Org-N mg/1         .89
NH3-N mg/1         .02
N02-N mg/1         .002
N03-N mg/1         .1
TOT. P04-P mg/1
Sol. P04-P mg/1
Temperature C                 20.
pH                8.0
Chloride mg/1
Color su
Suspended Solids mg/1          29.0
                                 .5
                                 .04
                                 .010

                                 .22
                                 .01
                                                1.2
                                                 .03
                                                 .004
                                                 .05
                                                 .1
                                                 .02
             11.2
              1.8
               .64
               .29
               .23

               .15
               .092
              8.0
              8.4
              7.0
             15.0
              9.0
10.1
 2.0
  .55
  .15
  .33

  .09
  .07
 7.0
 8.2
 8.0
20.0
 5.0

-------
                                        - 103 -




The design termperature for all prediction runs was 80F.  This temperature was




selected to reflect the data obtained from the five automatic monitoring stations




that have been operated since 1971.  Daily maximum temperatures at all five stations




(Menasha, Appleton, Rapid Croche, De Pere, Green Bay), exceed 80F during July




and August of all years since the monitors have been operated.  Some maximums have




gone as high as 84F.









The benthic oxygen demand used in the simulation runs were calculated on the basis




of suspended solids discharged.  The verification runs for June 20-21, 1972, July




5-6, 1972 and August 14, 1972 all were run with the same benthic oxygen demand




pattern.  The values appear in Table IV-1 along with benthic oxygen demand values




for BPT conditions.  The projected percent reduction in discharged suspended solids




at each point source was used to reduce the benthic oxygen demand in the affected




reaches by an equal percent.  As the BOD5 and suspended solids loads were reduced




in the process of finding a set of discharge conditions that would meet 5.00 mg/1




of oxygen, the benthic demand was again reduced by a corresponding amount in the




appropriate reaches.  Table IV-4 summarizes the projected reduction in suspended




solids in the various segments of the Lower Fox River.








Prediction Simulations








The conditions discussed above were used to generate a simulation run of the Lower




Fox River for Best Practicable Treatment levels and low flow (912 CFS) condition.'-.




Table IV-5 lists inputs for each waste source considered in the model for this




run. Figures IV-12 and 13 display the QUAL-II predicted profiles.   It should also be




made clear that Figure IV-12 represents the daily average dissolved oxygen level




and does not give any information concerning the daily fluctuation from algae activity.

-------
                                        - 104-

                                  TABLE IV-4

          Projected Suspended Solids Reductions Used to Determine Benthic
          Oxygen Demands under "Best Practicable Treatment" Levels


                                         Suspended Solids (Ib.day)
Dischargers	Present	BPT	

     Neenah-Menasha Area (Reaches 1-9)

Neenah-Menasha STP                      22500.                   5000.
K. C. Lakeview                            940.                   1100.
K. C. Neenah                             2037.                   1025.
K. C. Badger Globe                      	
George Whitting                          1635.                    200.
Bergstrom                               18000.           '        3628.
Wisconsin Tissue                        	                     1602.
Menasha Sanitary District #4         	50.	50.

                              TOTAL     45162.                  12623.
                              % Reduction                          72%

                                   *****

     Appleton Area (Reach 10-16)

Riverside Paper                           976.                    830.
Cons. Paper                             10420.                   1200.
Appleton STP                            20000.	4100.

                              TOTAL     31396.                   6130.
                              % Reduction                          81%

                                   *****

     Kimberly Area (Reach 17-18)

K. C. Kimberly                          12246.	3000.

                              % Reduction                          76%

                                   *****

     Combined Locks  (Reach 19-21)

Appleton Papers                          6758.	4130.

                              % Reduction                          39%

                                   *****

-------
                                        - 105 -
                          TABLE IV-4 (continued)

     Kaukauna Area (Reach 22-24)

Thilmany Paper                           9803.	5900.

                              % Reduction                          40%

                                   *****

     (Reaches 25-34 have no significant discharges)

                                   *****

     De Pere Area (Reach 35-38)

Nicloet Paper
De Pere STP

                              TOTAL
                              % Chai

                                   *****

     Green Bay Area (Reach 39-46)

Fort Howard                             20000.                  12900.
Charmin                                 14983.                   4140.
Green Bay Packaging                       343.                   1200.
American Can                             6761.                   8500.
Green Bay STP                           23000.	13100.

                              TOTAL     65087.                  39840.
                              % Reduction                          39%
472.
2160.
2632!
.ee
972.
1185.
2157.
18%

-------
                                        -  106 -


                                   TABLE IV-5

           Final Permit (1977)  Loadings for Lower Fox River Waste Sources
Source
Name

K. C. Neenah &
  Badger Globe
Bergstrom Paper
K. C. Lakeview
Neenah Menasha STP
Wisconsin Tissue
Menasha Sanit. Dist. E. & W.
Riverside Paper
Formost Dairy
Consolidated Appleton
Appleton STP
K. C. Kimberly
Appleton Papers
Heart of the Valley STP
Thilmany Paper
Wrightstown STP
Nicolet Paper
De Pere STP
Fort Howard Paper
Charmin Paper
Green Bay Packaging
American Can
Green Bay STP
       BOD5
 kg/day (Ibs/day)
  Suspended Solids
  kg/day (Ibs/day)
498.9 (1100)
1077.1 (2375)
816.3 (1800)
2043.5 (4506)
536.9 (1184)
W. 359.6 (793)
394.5 (870)
49.0 (108)
1133.8 (2500)
1859.4 (4100)
907.0 (2000)
1655.3 (3650)
601.8 (1327)
2675.7 (5900)
73.5 (162)
589.6 (1300)
1614.0 (3559)
3945.5 (8700)
3460.2 (7630)
725.6 (1600)
839.0 (1850)
5940.9 (13100)
464.8 (1025)
1645.3 (3628)
498.9 (1100)
2043.5 (4506)
726.5 (1602)
359.6 (793)
376.4 (830)
	 NA 	
680.3 (1500)
1859.4 (4100)
1360.5 (3000)
1873.0 (4130)
601.8 (1327)
2675.7 (5900)
73.5 (162)
440.8 (972)
1614.0 (3559)
5850.0 (12900)
3854.8 (8500)
544.2 (1200)
571.4 (1260)
5940.9 (13100)
               TOTAL
31,797.3 (70115.)
34,082.1 (75153)

-------
CONCENTRATION   MG/I
   O)            00
        - iOT -

-------
                                                         FIGURE IV-13
1.41	
                                                                                                                              35
                                                      CHLOROPHYLL-a  AND
                                                        NUTRIENT PROFILES
                                                  24           20           16
                                                       MILES ABOVE MOUTH

-------
                                          -  109  -





As can be seen, significant violations of the 5.00 mg/1 dissolved oxygen  level




for fish and aquatic life occur at 3 locations  along  the river.  In addition all




three DO sag areas will violate the current standard  for dissolved oxygen.  A




dynamic simulation run was also done for  the BPT condition.   (BPT is used in this




report to refer to the discharge levels to be attained by the end of 1977.  In




some cases the permits are slightly lower than BPT but in general they represent




Best Practicable Technology.)  A portion of the results are presented in Figure




IV-14. This run shows that the dissolved oxygen would be expected to vary by as




much as 1.0 mg/1.  In the Menasha, Kaukauna and Green Bay areas this could lower




the DO below 3.0, 2.5 and 1.0 mg/1 respectively during nighttime hours.  Under




such circumstances the applicable variance conditions for DO in these areas would




be violated.  It is clear from these results that the wasteloads under BPT conditions




will generate water quality violations in at least three areas along the river.




If we compare the predicted DO profile to the fish and aquatic life standard of




5.0 mg/1 we find that nearly 15 miles of the river would be below this level on




a daily average basis I  AS mentioned above, nighttime conditions will greatly




enlarge the area and extent of those violations.  On the basis of the above results,




it can be concluded that "best practicable treatment" for all point sources on the




Lower Fox River will not achieve a minimum level of dissolved oxygen necessary to




sustain most fish and aquatic life.








The level of treatment required to meet a DO standard of 5.0 mg/1 was determined




using the model in a fashion similar to that described above.  The steady state




version was applied for this purpose.   Initial conditions were as shown in Table




IV-2.   The procedure followed to generate the waste load allocation consisted




of reducing the appropriate discharges (BOD^ and suspended solids)  from those




sources that were directly upstream from a given sag in the DO (See Figure IV-




12).   Each such discharger was reduced by a flat percentage.  The BOD,- and the

-------
                                            - 110 -
                                          FIGURE IV-14
                                         BELOW THILMANY
                                       RCH 24   LAST ELEMENT
                                          UPPER APPLETON
                                          RCH 9  ELEMENT 1
i  2.7 k
O
Q
                                 DIURNAL DO FLUCTUATIONS AT THREE
                              j   FOX RIVER SAG POINTS FOR BPT LOADS
                                                       I
                              12           18           24          30
                                   HOURS AFTER MIDNIGHT OF DAY 18

-------
                                         - Ill -





 suspended solids were  reduced by equal percentages.   The  percent  reduction in



 the benthic oxygen demand was then recalculated on  the basis of the new  discharges




 and those figures were entered in the model.   The QUAL-II model was then executed



 and the results were screened for any remaining violations.  This  procedure was




 repeated if required.








 In this way, various point source effluents were reduced until a profile was




 obtained that did not violate the 5.0 mg/1 requirement for dissolved oxygen on




 a daily average basis.  The results of this procedure are presented in Table




 IV-6 and Figures IV-15 and 16.  The effluents  for this procedure assumed no




 change in the discharge of nitrogen and phosphorous compounds.  A  second run




 (Run B) was then made assuming nitrification was installed at all  sewage




 treatment plants and phosphorous removel  to 1.00 mg/1 was accomplished for  all




 dischargers.  The effluents under this condition assumed the following



 discharges for all sewage treatment plants:







          Organic N      -    2.00 mg/1




          NH3-N          -    1.00 mg/1



          NO,-N          -    3.00 mg/1



          TOT-P          -    1.00 mg/1








The results for this run are shown in Figures IV-15 and 17.   As can be seen in




Figure IV-15,  ammonia reduction at all STP does not alter the DO profile.  The




DO was changed by about 0.05 mg/1 in most areas.  A comparison of Figures IV-




16 and 17 reveals a definite reduction of NH -N  (by as much as 0.2 mg/1)  and a




corresponding increase in the concentration of NO^-N  (by as  much as 0.1 mg/1).




The concentration of  NH~-N still, however, attains concentrations in the Green Bay

-------
                                        - 112 -
                                   TABLE IV-6

         Waste Load Allocation Loadings for the Lower Fox River Determined by
              QUAL-II Simulation to Maintain 5.0 mg/1 of Dissolved Oxygen
                                        BOD5
Discharger                      kg/day        Ibs/day

Kimberly Clark
  Neenah
  Badger Globe                 424.0          935.
Bergstrom Paper                915.6         2019.
Kimberly Clark
  Lakeview                     693.9         1530.
Neenah Menasha STP            1737.0         3830.
Wisconsin Tissue               456.2         1006.
Menasha Sanitary District
  E. & W.                      305.7          674.
Riverside Paper Co.            268.0          591.
Formost Dairy                   49.0          108.
Consolidated, Appleton         771.0         1700.
Appleton STP                  1237.6         2729.
Kimberly Clark, Kimberly       616.8         1360.
Appleton Papers                983.2         2168.
Heart of the Valley STP        401.3          885.
Thilmany Papers               1546.4         3410.
Wrightstown STP                 49.0          108.
Nicolet Paper                  290.2          640.
De Pere STP                    537.4         1185.
Fort Howard Paper             2040.8         4500.
Charmin Paper                 1632.6         3600.
Green Bay Packaging            580.5         1280.
American Can                   544.2         1200.
Green Bay STP                 3960.4         8733.

     TOTAL                   20040.8        44191.0

     % Below BPT                        37%

*    Based on 20 mg/1 for Design Flow
**   Based on 10 mg/1 for Design Flow
***  Based on 25.5 mg/1 for Design Flow
     Suspended Solids
   kg/day        Ibs/day
395.0
1398.2
424.0
1737.0
617.2
305.7
256.2

462.6
1237.6
925.1
1276.6
401.3
1546.4
49.0
163.3
537.4
2267.5
2176.8
435.4
544.2
3960.4
871.
3083.
935.
3830.***
1361.
674.***
565.
	 **
1020.
2729.*
2040.
2815.
885.*
3410.
108.*
360.
1185.**
5000.
4800.
960.
1200.
8733.*
21116.9
46564.0

-------
                                                          FIGURE IV-15
14
                                                     DISSOLVED OXYGEN PROFILE
                                                     FOR FINAL WASTE LOAD
                                                     ALLOCATION DISCHARGES
                                                                I             I
                                                     T = 80F          FLOW = 912 CFS
                                                     ALL RATE COEFFICIENTS ARE THE
                                                     SAME AS FOR THE JUNE 20-21, 1972
                                                     VERIFICATION RUN
                                                                                       QUAL-M
                                                                                       WLA-DO PROFILE
                                                                                       FOR RUN  A
                                                                                       ANDRUW B
                                                                                          FISH AND
                                                                                          AQUATIC LIFE
                                                                                          STANDARD

                                                                    DUAL -  I I  PROFILE FOR BOD
 40
              36
                                       28
24           20          16
     MILES ABOVE MOUTH
                                                                                         12

-------
CONCENTRATION MG/t   NH3-N, N03-N, TOT-P





4*.             CD             CO             O

-------
1 2
       FIGURE IV- 17

   NUTRIENT PROFILES FOR
 WASTE LOAD ALLOCATION RUN
(REACTION COEFFICIENTS AS FOR
 JUNE VERIFICATION RUN TWO)
                                                      RUN -B
                                                      NH3-N REDUCTION ATSTP
                                                                20
                                                        Ml LES ABOVE MOUTH
                                                                             16
                                                                                         12
                                                                                                                                2.0
                                                                                                                              I
                                                                                                                              o
                                                                                                                             -o-
                                                                                                                              cc
                                                                                                                              o
                                                                                                                                2.4

-------
                                        - 116 -





area as high as 0.72 mg/1.  This would tend to indicate that the most significant




source of NH^-N (according to the model) is the hydrolysis of organic nitrogen.  This




conclusion is supported by the high levels of NH3-N observed on the June 20-21, 1972




survey (Figure IV-4).  An ammonia level of 0.72 mg/1 will be toxic to fish life




if the pH is greater than 8.0 and the temperature is greater than 20C.  Since




the pH of the Fox River frequently exceeds 8.0, ammonia toxicity may be a continuing




water quality problem even if nitrification is accomplished at all sewage treatment




plants.  Further-more, since the DO profile shows little response to nitrification




at the treatment  plants, it appears as if there is little reason to pursue




nitrification as a viable means of improving the water quality of the Lower




Fox River at this time.  If, however, higher DO levels significantly increase




the nitrification potential, a dissolved oxgyen deficit of significance may




occur.  This is not likely though unless the pH of the river experiences a long




term change to a lower level.  According to Srinath (et al 1974) nitrification




ia markedly inhibited at pH's above 8.0.  Typical pH values for the Fox River




range from 8.0 to as high as 9.2.









The model simulations discussed above concerning ammonia must be taken as preliminary




only and no conclusions should be based on them.  In view of the lack of good data




for ammonia both from the sewage treatment plants and in the river (and a few wood




pulping operations) the main source of the ammonia in the Lower Fox River cannot




be definitely determined.  Three sources can be significant contributers:  1) point




source discharges, 2) organic nitrogen entering from Lake Winnebago that hydrolyzes





to ammonia as it travels downstream and 3) sediment release.  It would be




beneficial to monitor anmonia and total organic nitrogen at all sewage treatment




plants and any significant industrial dischargers.  This type of monitoring




could be made a part of each discharger  permit.  Until such data is available




and in light of the modelling results, no allocation of ammonia (or Kjeldahl




nitrogen) can be made.

-------
o
Q
                                        - 117 -

                                          FIGURE IV-18
                                 DIURNAL DO FLUCTUATIONS AT THREE
                                 FOX RIVER SAG POINTS FOR WLA LOADS
                                            GREEN BAY
                                          RCH 46  ELEM 1
                                          BELOW THILMANY
                                         RCH 24  LAST ELEM
                                                       I
                                          UPPER APPLETON
                                           RCH9  ELEM 1
                  STEADY STATE
                              12          18          24          30
                                  HOURS AFTER MIDNIGHT OF DAY 18
                                                                                          42

-------
                                        - 118 -





To answer the question of algae effects a dynamic run was done for the waste




load allocation and reduced NHo-N loading configuration.  A portion of that output




appears in Figure IV-18.  The plots of diurnal DO fluctuations indicate that




the DO will not violate 5.00 mg/1 under the simulated conditions even during




the lowest point on the duirnal cycle.  It should be emphasized, however, that




this does not preclude the possibility of DO standards violations.  A high level




of algae (from a summer bloom) coupled with several consecutive days of very




little sunlight could possibly bring the DO below 5.00 mg/1.









With all of the above in mind, it can be concluded that the waste loadings for




BODc and suspended solids shown in Table IV-6 should be expected to meet 5.0




mg/1 of DO  in the Fox River under low flow (912  CFS) conditions.  Furthermore,




it does not appear to be necessary to require nitrification at sewage treatment




plants as a means of improving the dissolved oxygen.  The concentration of NO^-N




can be expected to rise slightly as a result of higher DO levels which will suppress




denitrification.  Finally, the listed WLA loadings represent an average of 37%




and 38% reduction over "best practicable treatment" levels for BOD_ and suspended




solids respectively.









C.   Green Bay Modelling








As part of this project, a water quality model of Green Bay was developed.  The




purpose of this model was to develop a predictive capability of the water quality




of the lower one-third of Green Bay.  The model chosen for this activity was




based on the Dynamic Estuary Model developed by Water Resources Engineers.




This model was originally developed for San Francisco Bay and was later modified




for use with Pearl Harbor.  The model was obtained by DNR from WRE in February

-------
                                        - 119  _



of 1974.  In the process of fitting the model  to  the Green Bay  situation,  extensive


modifications were made. A complete description of the model as used  in  the  Green


Bay modelling effort is contained in Appendix  D.  Flow charts  and program listings


along with a data set up description are included.






Two main areas of use were intended for the Green Bay model (GBQUAL).  First,


information regarding the response of Green Bay under ice cover was a prime  concern.


Surveys of 1939, 1955, 1967 and 1974 (part of  this project) all showed extensive


areas of low to zero dissolved oxygen during the  ice cover period.  For  Green
                                      r

Bay, the period of ice cover may range from two to three and one half months.


Ice cover usually begins in early January.  The low dissolved oxygen levels  have


hindered commercial fishing operations over as much as 150 square miles  of the


Lower Bay.  This region begins below a line from Long Tail Point to Point  Sable


and can extend along the eastern half of the bay to beyond the Renard River.


A question that has received particular attention in this report is:  what level


of treatment for point source discharges along the Lower Fox River will be required


to eliminate this problem?





The second main emphasis concerns the eutrophic nature of the Lower Bay.  Highly


fertile water from the Lower Fox and other rivers have been contributing vast


quantities of nutrients (particularly nitrogen and phosphorous).  These nutrients


enhance the growth of phytoplankton causing nuisance algae blooms throughout


the summer.  These blooms are unpleasant  from an aesthetic standpoint and serve


to severely limit the recreational uses  of the Lower Bay.   They also may be partly


responsible for taste and odor problems  in water supplies  taken from Bay water


further north.   To remove these effects  requires a significant expense at water


treatment facilities.

-------
                                         - 120  -





Winter Modelling of Green Bay








Winter conditions in Green Bay complicate the water quality problems of the Bay.




Severely cold temperatures in Wisconsin normally serve to form an ice cover on




Green Bay from early January to as late as early April.  The ice cover may grow




to a depth of A feet.  This ice cover effectively shuts off any available reaeration




that would otherwise maintain high dissolved oxygen levels.  If the ice is covered




by an additional layer of opaque snow, any small amount of photosynthesis that




may take place will also be virtually eliminated.  Under these conditions, the




only remaining source of oxygen is the inflowing water from the major tributaries.









The Lower Fox River, during December to April,  enters the bay carrying about




8-14 mg/1 of dissolved oxygen.  Unfortunately,  this river water also carries




with it a high load of organic compounds from  the numerous dischargers along




the Fox River. Nearly all of this organic load  is capable of exerting an oxygen




demand on the Bay water and this oxygen demand  severely strains the limited oxygen




resources of the ice-covered Lower Bay.








The temperature of the ice-covered Bay water ranged from 0.0C to 3.0C.  At




this low temperature, chemical and biological  reactions take place at very decreased




rates; however, the reactions do not stop conpletely.  The long-term BOD of organically




rich water incubated at low temperatures can be significant.  Two important problems




come to the fore at this point.  First, we need to have the ability to predict




the long term effect of organic wastes carried  in the river water.  It is clear




from data obtained from various Green Bay winter surveys that the dissolved oxygen




depletion develops over an extended period of  time.  This analysis reveals that




the customary 5-day BOD test is inadequate to  supply information of oxygen consumption




that may take place over a 60 to 90 day period.  The second important aspect

-------
                                         - 121 -


of  this prpblem  involves  the choice  of  the rate constants  required to properly

describe  the low temperature BOD uptake.   Both of  these problems  have been

investigated by  the author  and  the results are presented below.



Figure IV-19 illustrates  a  curve for a  long term BOD  test  on  a sample taken from

the mouth of the Fox River.  This curve  shows  the  laboratory  oxygen demand as

a. function of time over a 60 day period  (slightly  less  than the length of  time

Green Bay is ice-covered  during a normal winter).  This  curve is  interesting

for several reasons.  First, it shows that the 60  day BOD  is  considerably  greater

than the 20 day  BOD (frequently considered the ultimate) and  is in fact nearly

4 times as great  as the 5-day BOD.   Secondly,  this curve indicates that although

the rate of oxygen consumption is slowing,  it  is clearly not  stopping,  even after

60 days I If we attempt to fit this data to a typical  BOD equation we immediately

discover that it  is nearly an impossible task.   Either we  fit  the data  precisely

for the first 5  to 10 days and severely underestimate the  ultimate BOD  or  we

can fit the ultimate range correctly but we can no longer  follow  the curve exactly.



We are left with  the choice:  To which portion of  the curve can we sacrifice

accuracy? The answer,  of course, is  that we can  fit both ends  by  merely including

more terms in the BOD equation.  If we write the BOD  equation  as:


                            3          -k   t
                        L . Z  L  (1  - e  " )                         m
                           i=l  X                                       k  '


     where:     L    =  BOD mg/1

               Li   = separate ultimate BOD's  for each term

               k. .  =  respective decay rates  day"-'- (base  e)

               t    =  time (days)

-------
          FIGURE IV- 19
LONG TERM BOD AT THE FOX RIVER MOUTH
                 I
          SAMPLE # 27Q40
                                       OBSERVED
                                       BOD CURVE
                                           FITTED CURVE
                                           FOR LONG TERM BOD
                                           FITTED CURVE PARAMETERS
                                           K,, = .350
                                           K12 = 050
                                           K13= .006
                                           L, = 10.
                                             = 22.
                                           L3= 67.
               25
            TIME DAYS

-------
                                        - 123 -





 Each  term  is  assumed  to  start  at  time  zero but  to  proceed  at  a different  rate




 and aim  toward  a different ultimate.   Figure IV-19  shows how  this  curve can be




 fit with a three term equation.   As can be seen, each  term in the  equation reacts




 with  a much slower decay rate  than the preceding terms.  This  in effect extends




 the time over which the  total  ultimate BOD is reached.









 In theory  this  type^ of approach is separating the waste material into three




 individual components and assigning a  different decay rate  to  each.  Each




 component's percent of the total waste strength is  reflected by its ultimate  term.








 The decay  rates for term two and  three are usually  at least an order of magnitude




 lees  than  that  for the first term.  This implies that under normal circumstances




 the last two  terms contribute  so little to the oxygen deficit  that they can be




 effectively ignored.  However, there is an important case when this is not true.




 Under ice conditions,  the reaeration rate is effectively lowered to nearly zero.




As long  as this condition exists,  any  exerted oxygen deficit will accumulate.




 It is obvious that under such  a condition, the effect of the last 2 terms in




 equation IV-1 can be significant.








 The above problems are compounded by the fact that very little long term BOD




 sampling has taken place at the mouth of the Lower Fox River.   There are several




 reasons for this.   First, until recently,  the 5-day BOD measured at the Green Bay




Monthly Monitoring Station was believed to be adequate to characterize the strength




of the waste entering  the Bay.  This is true if the required information is merely




relative strength  of the oxygen demand.  The discussion above  indicates why a




precise long-term  BOD  is required.  Secondly,  a severe sampling problem exists




at the mouth of the Lower Fox River.   The monthly monitoring station in Green Bay

-------
                                        - 124  -





is directly upstream of four large dischargers in the Green Bay area.  Thus, the




effects of their waste on Green Bay is not included in the monthly monitoring data.




This problem will be further complicated by the new Green Bay sewage treatment




plant since the discharge location is actually a few hundred feet into the Bay




directly off the end of the Lower Fox River.  Therefore, any data on pollution




loading to Green Bay from the Lower Fox River will at least be an estimate.








The first attempts to simulate the under-ice DO sag observed in Green Bay used




a single term BOD equation.  It became apparent that not enough oxygen deficit




could be generated for the observed 5-day BOD and a normal conversion to ultimate




(usually 1.6 to 1.).  (A single term BOD equation with a decay rate of 0.20/day




will yield a rate of BOD ult. to BOD5 of 1.58.)  To account for this difference,




the benthic oxygen demand was adjusted until the observed sag was generated.




The result was a set of unrealistically high benthic oxygen demands.  Laboratory




and field data both have  indicated benthic demands at a relatively low level




(see Appendix C-Benthic Oxygen Demand).  All measurements yield numbers in the




range of .05 to 2.0 GR 02/m2/day with a mean of about .2 GR 02/m2/day at 20C.




Faced with this discrepancy, it was concluded that more attention had to be paid




to the "tail end" effects of the long-term BOD data. The three term BOD supplied




the required "tail end" effects.








It should be noted at this point that the effects predicted by the above described




BOD formulation may imply that significant reduction of short term BOD will not




change the long term BOD by a corresponding percentage.  It is very possible




that a treatment system that effectively removes 90% of the 5-day BOD may only




be removing 50% of the ultimate BOD.  In other words a 90% reduction in short




term BOD may yield far less improvement than at first expected.   All is not lost

-------
                                        - 125 -

however.  The slower rates for decay of  the last  terms indicate  that  the  time

in which the sag develops will be greatly increased, thus allowing considerably

more time for natural diffusion and dilution to decrease the strength of  the

waste before severe depletion can occur.  The above discussion reveals that the

effects of "Best Practicable Treatment"  are not at all clear without  some

improvements in the modelling techniques used to  describe-the system interactions.



Faced with the above problems, an attempt was made to model the  system using

a three term BOD equation.  In terms of  the computer model, this addition was

quite simple.   This was done simply by writing parallel equations for each BOD

term.  The difficulty in this approach lies in the fact that we  now are dealing

with six unknowns instead of two (3 K rates and 3 ultimates).  To facilitate

selection of the 6 unknowns, a simple computer program was devised that used

an iterative method to fit a given long  term BOD  curve such as Figure IV-19.

The long term curve fitting program selected the K rates and ultimates shown.

As can be seen,  the fit is quite close to the observed BOD curve.  Kjeldahl nitrogen

in the long term BOD of Figure IV-19 was near 1.0 mg/1.  The nitrogen component

of the BOD was therefore less than 5.00 mg/1.



The second problem mentioned above involves the selection of temperature correction

coefficients.  The BOD decay rates are input to the model assuming 20C.  The

model internally adjusts each decay rate for the simulation temperature.  The

correction equation takes the form:
                                   T-20
                            ~ K20 6                                   (2)

-------
                                        - 126 _






     where:    T    =  temperature C




               K2Q  =  decay rate at 20C




               Kj   =  decay rate at TC




               9    =  correction coefficient









Most water quality models are run for temperature ranges of 15C to 25C.  For




this range  6 is usually assumed to be a constant (about 1.047 for BOD).  Very




little work has been done for temperatures below 10C and even less for temperatures




below 4C.  Zanoni (1969) did some work on temperature effects on laboratory




BOD decay rates.  He presented his work along with a collection of various other




research efforts along this line.  Using the data presented by Zanoni the author




developed a plot of 6  versus T for laboratory BOD rates.  This plot is shown




in Figure IV-20.  As can be seen, the data generally lies along a straight line




with a negative slope.  A linear regression on this data yield the equation:







                         6 = (-0.003856)1 + 1.140098                  (3)





This equation was used in GBQUAL to adjust the BOD decay rates.  There is very




little data available with which to verify equation IV-2.  Hox^ever, a sample




taken from the Petenwell Flowage on the Wisconsin River in 1971 was located.




This sample is  significant for two reasons.  First, the Petenwell Flowage receives




large amounts of paper mill wastes from several sulfite and kraft pulp and paper




mills located within 15 miles upstream.  This is similar to the Fox River-Green




Bay area.  Secondly, the particular sample was split and incubated at two temper-




atures.  The incubation took place at 20C and at 4C and lasted a total of 150 days.



To verify the temperature equation IV-2, the 20C curve was first fit with a three




term BOD equation.  With a close fit obtained for the 20C curve, the decay rates

-------
                              FIGURE IV-20

                       TEMPERATURE VS 0 FOR BOD RATES
D
2
r
D
j_
a
CO
=
00
p
si-
p
CO
rn


, MOORE 1941

A

(
(





SCHROE
/ I
.
/ |
ZANOIMI 1S
	 r
GOT/




364 + 1967
kAS 1948








*

| 	 - ------ - -
I
I
I
I
I
1
1
tan _ -_... 	  .




- - 	 __ - _.







-. 	 	 -_ _H


^FTER - A.E. Z/>
JOURNAL OF W/
\/OL. 41, p. 640, 1
LINEAR REGRE
6 = -.003856

^*
r t

i
1
i 
^NOW
kTER POLLUTIO
969
SSION YIELDS
T+ 1.140098



 (
M CONTROL FEE





I
JERATION





                                                                                                     I

                                                                                                    H*
                                                                                                    to
                                                                                                    ^4


                                                                                                     I
10
            15
20          25          30

      TEMPERATURE - C
                                                             35
                                                                         40

-------
                                        - 128 -






were adjusted by equation IV-2.  The 4C curve was predicted and compared to




the 4C curve actually measured. The results of this procedure are shown in Figure




IV-21.  The closeness of the fit between the observed and predicted 4C curve




is particularly gratifying and lends support to the use of equation IV-3.









A complete list of all parameters used in GBQUAL appears in Table D-3.








Winter Verifications









GBQUAL was verified for two sets of data obtained during the winters of 1967




and 1974. The data for 1967 consists mainly of dissolved oxygen measurements




taken for scattered transects.  Although the data is not complete for a good




modelling attempt, valuable information can be obtained by simulating this case.




Average Lower Fox River inflow for this simulation period was 3381.0 CFS.









During the winter of 1974, a survey of Green Bay was designed and carried out




to gather sufficient data to attempt a proper verification of GBQUAL for ice




cover conditions.  This survey, as described in Section III, obtained samples




over an extensive area of the Bay that was accessible.  Samples for dissolved




oxygen were of primary importance.  Measurements of BOD^, ammonia, nitrate and




phosphorous were also obtained as were various other constituents.  All these




samples were taken in a five-day period in mid-February and served as the data




base for the 1974 verification.








Both verification runs were executed in the same manner.  This consisted of first




developing the hydrodynamic scheme for the given flow rate.  Next, the set of




inflowing water quality conditions was chosen to represent the average water

-------
                                                           FIGURE IV-21
48
                             PETENWELL FLOWAGE BOD
                             SAMPLE NO. 34428
                             SAMPLE TAKEN NOV. 11, 1971
                             SAMPLE WAS SPLIT AND RUN
                             AT 20C AND 4C
              20c CURVE'
              FIT PARAMETERS
         Kn = .2360      L, = 15.0
         K12=.0100      L2 = 25.6
         K13 = .0027      L = 61.0
             MEASURED BOD
             AT 20C
=- BOD CURVE FIT
    USING 3 TERM METHOD
                                                                                             PREDICTED 4C BOD
                                                                                             CURVE USING  0AS
                                                                                             A CONSTANT   Q = 1.047
                                                                                                     PREDICTED 4C BOD
                                                                                                     CURVE USING THE
                                                                                                     TEMPERATURE
                                                                                                     CORRECTION FOR Q
                                                                                                     0 = - .003856T + 1.140098
                                                                                                     T = C
                                                                100
                                                             TIME DAYS
                                                                            120
                                                                                         140
                                                                                                      160
                                                                                                                   180
                                                                                                                                    VO
                                                                                                                                    I
                                                                                                                               200

-------
                                        - 130 -





quality condition of the Fox River mouth over the simulation period  (Jan. 1 to




Mar. 15).  GBQDAL was then executed for a 50 day initializing period to develop




the system status which was stored and used as initial conditions to the ice




cover verification runs.  The initializing run assumed low  temperature (2C)




and no ice cover.  At this point GBQUAL was run for a 70 day simulation with




the ice cover condition imposed.  Prints were obtained at 20 day intervals.









The inflowing water quality for each simulation was determined from measurements




of monthly monitoring data in Green Bay for the appropriate period.  Table IV-7




lists data observations for the winter months of 1967 and 1974.  Also  listed




are the values of various constituents used for the inflow in the model for each




verification run. The three BOD terms in the model (which represent ultimates)




were determined by evaluating the point source discharges of BOD
-------
                                        - 131 -


                                   TABLE IV-7
                    Green Bay Measured Inflow Concentrations
Analysis
       De Pere Dam (Mile 7.2)
        2/1/67      2/28/67	
                  Mason St. Bridge
              1/24/74     2/20/74
                      (Mile 1.3)
                         3/14/74
BOD5
DO
Organic N
NH3-N
N03-N
TOT-P
Temp. C
FLOW CFS
          5.4
         10.6
           .91
           .14
           .20
           .14
           .5
       3330.
   5.4
  10.7
   5.0
4590.
   4.9
  11.0
   1.03
    .20
    .19
    .11
   1.0
2920.
   9.0
   5.8
    .77
    .43
    .11
    .07
   2.0
5230.
   4.1
  11.2
    .84
    .07
    .18
    .07
   3.0
6105.
                   Inflow Concentrations Used for the Simulation Runs
Constituent

BOD ultimate
BOD ultimate
BOD ultimate
DO
Organic N
NH3-N
N03-N
SOL-P
Temp C
FLOW
(1)
(2)
(3)
   1967

   15.0
   20.0
   50.0
   10.0
     .9
     .5
     .2
     .03
    2.0
 3381.5
                                                       1974
           5.0
          20.0
          50.0
          10
                                             0
                                             75
                                             5
                                             15
                                             03
                                           2.0
                                        4852.8

-------
              - 132  -
            FIGURE IV-22
     D.O.
     mg/1
1967 Simulation
     Day 0
     D.O.
     mg/1
1967 Simulation
    Day 20
     D.O.
     mg/1
1967 Simulation
    Day kO
     D.O.
     mg/1
1967 Simulation
    Day 60

-------
              - 133 -
            FIGURE IV-23
       HH3
    mg/1 as N
 1967 Simulation
      Day 0
      NH3
   mg/1 as N
1967 Simulation
    Day 20
      NH3
   mg/1 as N
1967 Simulation
    Day UO
      NH3
   mg/1 as N
1967 Simulation
    Day 60

-------
             -  134  -
            FIGURE IV-2U
      N03
   mg/1 as N
1967 Simulation
     Day 0
       N03
    mg/1 as N
 1967 Simulation
     Day UO
      N03
   mg/1 as N
1967 Simulation
    Day 20

-------
            FIGUBE IV-25
D.O. Stir face
    mg/1
February 8-10
    1967
D.O. Bottom
    mg/1
February 8-10
    1967
D.O. Surface
    mg/1
 March 9-10
    1967
D.O. Bottom
   mg/1
March 9-10
   1967

-------
                                        - 136 -





after 60 days of simulation show concentrations of  1 mg/1  over  approximately




the same area that had zero DO.  A decreasing concentration gradient occurs in




all directions around this area.  The gradients are not nearly  as sharp as those




for the DO.  Dissolved oxygen was measured in Green Bay on February 8-10, 1967




and March 9-10, 1967.  The February survey would  correspond to  approximately




40 days of ice cover.  Direct comparison of this  data  is possible with day 40




of the simulation run.  The model showed a rather linear gradient of DO from




the Fox River mouth to Point Sable.  The DO went  from  8.0  mg/1  to .5 mg/1.  The




measured DO showed levels of 5 and 6 mg/1 in the Bay Beach area and .5 to .1




mg/l near Point Sable.  Beyond Point Sable, a large area near Red Banks showed




0.0 mg/1 DO from the top to the bottom.  Low DO's near the bottom generally covered




a larger area than those measured near the surface.  Measurements during the




March survey only covered areas north of Dykesville.  Low  DO's  were seen in all




areas but only very close to the bottom.  Near the  surface and  at mid depths




the DO's were nearly always above 8.0 mg/1.  This survey would  correspond to




about 70 days after the ice cover began.  The closest  simulation printout is




for day 60.  This printout reveals a pattern similar to the 40  day printout but




with slightly expanded extent.  DO levels above Dykesville generally are above




8.0 mg/1. The Dykesville area is right in the vicinity of  the positive DO gradient.




In general the match for the 1967 DO pattern is quite  acceptable.








The 1974 verification is much more complete.  The data includes measurements




of NH-j-N, NOo-N, organic N, total and soluable phosphate as well as dissolved




oxygen and 8005.  The data for the February 18-20,  1974 survey  is presented in




Section III.  The simulation output for various constituents is shown in Figures




IV-26 through IV-29. Ice cover on Green Bay during  1974 began about January 10th




(private communication, Wiersma 1974).  Therefore the  February  18-20, 1974 survey

-------
 -  137  -
FIGUKE IV-26
                                 D.O.  mg/1
                              19T1* Simulation
                                  Day 60

-------
             - 138  -
            FIGURE IV-27
      NH3
   mg/1 as N
1971* Simulation
     Day 0
           N
     Simulation
   HH3
mg/1 as N
  Simulation
 Day 20
mg/1 as N
  Simulation
 Day 60

-------
             - 139 -
           FIGURE IV-28
   ng/1 as N
197*1 Simulation
     Day 0
                                              mg/1 as N
                                           1971* Simulation
                                               Day 20
                                                N03
                                             mg/1 as N
                                               Simulation
                                              Day 60
   mg/1 as N
19T1* Simulation
    Day

-------
              -  140 -
            FIGURE IV-29
Ortho Phosphate
   mg/1 as P
1971* Simulation
    Day 0-60
                                          Organic Nitrogen
                                              mg/1 as N
                                                Simulation
                                               Day 0-60

-------
                                        -  141 -





would  correspond  to about day 40 of  the ice  cover  simulation.  The  40  day printout




shows  a  5.0 mg/1  contour covering an oblong  area off Red Banks.  This  corresponds




very well with the measured values in this area shown in Section III.  Values




around 3.0 mg/1 DO are indicated in  the data in the Red Banks area.  This corresponds




nicely with the simulation output.









The ammonia profiles from the simulation output at day 40 appear to be slightly




high when compared to the measured data.  The model shows a wide area, from the




center of the bay below Long Tail and Point  Sable extending beyond Dykesville




across to the Big Suamico River, that is above 0.6 mg/1 ammonia.  Inside this




area levels are calculated as high as .85 mg/1.  The survey data shows a long




triangular area centered around Point Sable  and extending to Red Banks that has




0.6 mg/1 ammonia.  The higher level  in the model may well be a result of over




estimating the inflowing concentration of NH^-N in the simulation run.  Measured




values at the Mason St. Bridge (shown in Table IV-7) indicate the inflow concentration




should have been  .3 to .4 mg/1 ammonia instead of- the .5 mg/1 value.  It is worth




noting, however, that the  shape of  the .6 mg/1 area in the simulation output




is roughly correct and is centered over the  same area.








Winter Prediction Runs








Two Green Bay winter prediction runs were made with the model.  Both of these




runs utilized all decay coefficients the same as for the verification runs.  The




only variable was the flow and concentration of BOD (high flow will of course




dilute the discharged BOD).   Table IV-8 lists the inflow conditions used for




these two runs.

-------
                                       -  142 -


                                  TABLE IV-8

                     Green Bay Simulation Inflow Concentrations


                              Run 1               Run 2

BOD-1                          2.0                 5.0
BOD-2                          4.0                10.0
BOD-3                         30.0                50.0
DO                            10.0                 8.0
Organic N                      0.5                 0.6
NH3-N                          0.5                 0.5
N03-N                          0.2                 0.2
Sol-P                          0.03                0.03
Temp C                        2.0                 2.0
FLOW CFS                    2400.                912.

-------
                                         - 143 -




 Critical flow conditions  for  the winter  case were determined by scanning the




 last  15  years of  records.   The  lowest  flow (averaged over January,  February and




 March) for  the winter  period  was found to be 2400 CFS.   This flow was  used along




 with  the flow of  912 CFS,  the 7 day, 10  year low  flow.   The  results of both of




 these runs  are shown in Figures IV-30  to IV-37.   The flow case for 912 CFS was




 run for  comparison purposes only.  A flow this  low over  the  entire  winter period




 is unrealistically low.  The  2400  CFS  flow case more accurately represents the




 "worst case"  condition for the winter  months.








 The 2400 CFS  run  shows that after  60 days of ice  cover the minimum  dissolved




 oxygen level  drops to  6.1  mg/1.  The main difficulty in  accepting this result




 lies  in  our estimation of  the ultimate BOD used for the  inflowing concentration




 at the mouth  of the Fox River.  Figure IV-38 illustrates  two 50 day BOD curves.




 The top  curve is  the   same BOD curve shown in Figure IV-19 and  is described by




 the given 3 term  equation. The bottom  curve  was selected  as  representative of




 the ultimate  BOD  curve under  BPT treatment  conditions and  2400  CFS.  It was assumed




 that  the largest  percent reduction would  be  from  the most  easily oxidizable substances.




 Thus  LI was reduced by 87.5%, 1^ by 75% and  1,3 by  only 40%.   Our results  show




 that  under  the given ultimate BOD inflow,  5  mg/1  of  dissolved oxygen will probably




 be met for  average winter  flows as low as  2400  CFS.  However, the sag  in  DO comes




 so close  to 5.0 mg/1 that we must conclude  that the  given  BOD ultimate curve




 represents  the maximum allowable BOD to maintain  5.0 mg/1  at  all times  under




 ice conditions.   If our assumption concerning the ultimate BOD  curve for  BPT




 underestimates    the actual BOD loading,   then water  quality  violations  of  the




 dissolved oxygen  can be expected to continue.  In the Green  Bay  area,  (De  Pere




 to Green Bay), BPT will represent about a  75% reduction in 5 day BOD loading based




 on present permits.  The curves shown in Figure IV-38  show  a 74% reduction at




 the 5th day.  It  therefore appears that our  estimation is  close  to  the  expected




BPT conditions.

-------
              - 144 -
             FIGURE IV-30
      D.O.
      mg/1
 15-Year Winter
    Low Flow
Pred. BPT Loading
      Day 0
                                                 D.O.
                                                 mg/1
                                           15-Year Winter
                                              Low Flow
                                          Pred.  BPT Loading
                                                 Day 20
      D.O.
      mg/1
 15-Year Winter
    Low Flow
Pred. BPT Loading
     Day
                                                   Winter
                                                  Flow
                                                    Loading

-------
              - 145 -
            FIGURE IV-31
     NH3
  mg/1 as N
15-Year Winter
   Low Plow
 ed. BPT Loading
     Day 0
   mg/1 as K
 15-Year Winter
    Low Flow
Pred. BPT Loading
     Day kO
                                             mg/1
                                           15-Year Winter
                                              Low Flow
                                                BPT Loading
                                               Day 20
                                               NH3
                                            mg/1 as
                                          15-Year Winter
                                             Low Flow
                                               BPT Loading
                                              Day 60

-------
               - 146 -
             FIGURE IV-32
      N03
   mg/1 as N
 15-Year Winter
    Low Flow
Pred. BPT Loading
      Day 0
   mg/1 as N
 15-Year Winter
    Low Flow
Pred. BPT Loading
     Day 20
      N03
   mg/1 as N
   -Year Winter
    Low Flow
Pred. BPT Loading
     Day UO
      N03
   mg/1 as N
 15-Year Winter
    Low Flow
Pred. BPT Loading
     Day 60

-------
               - 147 _
             FIGURE IV-33
        Phosphat
    mg/1 as P
  15-Yar Winter
    Low Flow
Pred. BPT Loading
    Day 0-60
                                                 Nitrogen
                                             mg/1 as N
                                           15-Year Winter
                                             Low Flow
                                         Ted.  BPT Loading
                                             Day 0-60

-------
               - 148 -

             FIGURE IV-3U
      D.O.
      mg/1
     912 cfs
 red. BPT Loading
      Day 0
 D.O.
 mg/1
912 cfs
 BPT Loading
Day 20
      D.O.
      mg/1
     912 cfs
Pred. BPT Loading
     Day UO

-------
               - 149 -
              FIGURE IV-35
       NH3
    mg/1 as N
     912 cfs
 red. BPT Loading
      Day 0
mg/1 as N
 912 cfs
. BPT Loading
 Day 20
    mg/1 as N
     912 cfs
Fred. BPT Loading
     Day
mg/1
 912 cfs
. BPT Loading
 Day 60

-------
              -  150 -
             FIGURE IV-36
       N03
    mg/1 as N
     912 cfs
Fred. BPT Loading
      Day 0
                                                H03
                                             mg/1 as N
                                              912 cfs
                                          Pred. BPT Loading
                                               Day 20
         as N
       NO
    mg/1
     912 cfs
Pred. BPT Loading
     Day UO
   N03
mg/1 as N
 912 cfs
  BPT Loading
 Day 60

-------
               - 151 -
             FIGURE IV-37
  Ortho Phosphate
    mg/1 as P
     912 cfs
Pred. BPT Loading
     Day 0-60
                                          Organic Nitrogen
                                             mg/1 as N
                                              912 cfs
                                           ed. BPT Loading
                                             Day 0-60

-------
                                         FIGURE IV - 38
ALLOWABLE FOX RIVER
LOADING TO GREEN BAY
PRESENT LOADING TO
GREEN BAY
                                                 PRESENT ULTIMATE
                                                 BOD CURVE FOR
                                                 FOX RIVER WATER
                                                 AT THE RIVER MOUTH
                                                 WITH 2400. CFSOF FLOW
                                                 AVAILABLE FOR DILUTION
                                                                   REQUIRED MINIMUM
                                                                   BOD ULTIMATE CURVE
                                                                   TO MAINTAIN 5 MG/I
                                                                   UNDER WINTER
                                                                   CONDITIONS 2400 CFS
Kn = .350
K12= -050
K13 = .006

-------
                                       - 153 -





The final waste load allocation under critical summer flow conditions (developed




earlier) shows an overall 37% reduction in the 5 day BOD loading compared to




BPT loadings.  Under the WLA discharge scheme it would be extremely unlikely




that the dissolved oxygen would drop below 5.0 mg/1 during the ice cover.  On




the basis of the above studies, it can be concluded that the summer critical




condition in the Lower Fox River represents the "worst case condition" for the




Fox River-Green Bay system. If high levels of DO can be maintained in the river




by limiting the BOD discharges, the winter DO sag in the Lower Bay should be




eliminated.

-------

-------
                                      -155  -





                                   SECTION V









V.   DISCUSSION









Dissolved Oxygen









One of the most important objectives of this project consists of determining




the worst case condition for dissolved oxygen in the Lower Fox River-Green Bay




system.  The worst case condition acts as the controlling situation in the




determination of the final "waste load allocation".  For the Bay itself, the




worst case appears to be the winter ice-cover period.  During this time the





dissolved oxygen can go to zero over wide areas of the Bay.   This massive DO




sag disrupts potential commercial and sport fishing in the Lower Bay.  Also




chemical reactions take place in this region that may enhance the eutrophic




nature of Green Bay.









In the Lower Fox River, the critical condition occurs during the high temperature,




low flow season.  During the months of late June to early September, high




temperatures and low flow can cause very low levels of dissolved oxygen over




10 to 20 miles of the Lower Fox River.  Levels of DO below 1 mg/1 are not




unconmon.  This level of dissolved oxygen virtually excludes the possibility of




fish life in these stretches of the river.









An important question that must be asked at this point is which of these conditions




is most critical to the overall dissolved oxygen balance?  The answer to this




question was not at all clear before modelling was undertaken.   If we limit BOD




discharges such that the winter problem for DO is corrected, have we done enough




to correct the summer low DO's in the river also?  Between the two modelling

-------
                                      - 156 -





efforts developed for this study, the answer appears  to be no.  The most  critical




dissolved oxygen condition will occur during the summer months and will affect




water in the Lower Fox River particularly in the Green Bay area.  With all




dischargers limited to "Best Practicable Treatment",  serious oxygen problems




will still be present in the Lower Fox River.  Figure IV-12 diagrams the  expected




result for BPT discharges and the 7 day 10 year (7Q10) low flow. If we study




the expected BPT effect on the ice-covered Bay for low flow conditions, we note




that the DO is expected to drop no lower that about 6 tng/1 (more than enough




for most species of fish). ' We must observe however,  that the winter low  flow




rate is nearly 3 times the statistical 7Q10 low flow.  There are two reasons




for this.  First, since the winter sag occurs over a  three month period, we must




consider a 3 month average  flow.  Naturally, the lowest flow over a 3 month




period for a river such as the Lower  Fox River will be considerably greater




than the 7Q10 flow.  Secondly, the lowest flows  never occur during the winter




months.  Thus the average flow during January, February  and March is considerably




higher than the average flow of July and August.  Therefore it  is not realistic




to use the 7Q10 flow for the winter prediction runs.  The choice of  2400 CFS




was based on the lowest average flow for January through March observed in the




past 15 years of record.  If we assume that 2400 CFS represents a logical choice




for the  winter low flow and all dischargers are limited to "Best Practicable




Treatment", then  based on the Green Bay model, the dissolved oxygen will not




go below 5 mg/1 in Green Bay.








The above conclusion does not guarantee that other conditions will not interact




to lower the DO below 5 mg/1 during the winter months.  If a particular winter




has flows lower than 2400 CFS, DO problems may develop.  The run made with 912




CFS as the average winter inflow generated a DO sag that went down to 2 mg/1.

-------
                                     - 157 -





 Secondly,  all  the  discharge permits  allow for  maximum  levels of  discharge  that




 may  range  from 1.5 to  3  times  the monthly average.   If one or more  large dischargers




 release an effluent  that approaches  their maximum limit  then the DO may be  lowered




 below 5 mg/1 even  if the flow  is greater than  2400  CFS.  Since there is very




 little margin  in meeting the 5 mg/1  DO level under  BPT conditions it is therefore




 manditory  that  dischargers be  regulated very tightly.  Maximum discharges should




 be no greater  than 1.5 times the average.  Vigorous  enforcement  must be maintained




 to discourage  slug load inputs that  could generate  a costly fish kill.  Improving




 water quality  should generate higher populations of  desirable fish  amplifying the




 importance of  tight enforcement.









 At present the Wisconsin Department  of Natural Resources allows  for a dissolved




 oxygen variance in Green Bay.   Chapter NR 103.05 (5) states that waters




 "southeasterly from the navigation channel and southerly from the north line




 of Brown County...shall not be lowered to less than 2 mg/1 at any time" during




 the period January 1 to April 1.  In light of the conclusions presented above,




 Chapter NR 103.05  (5) should be reevaluated.  Under the Wisconsin Pollution




 Discharge Elimination System (WPDES), all discharges should be meeting "Best




Practicable Treatment" levels by the end of 1977.  At  that time  it can be




 concluded that a dissolved oxygen standard of 5 mg/1 should be applied to the




 area of Green Bay  that is specified  in Chapter NR 103.05 (5).  The variance




 condition that now applies over that region of Green Bay will no longer be




necessary except under the extreme conditions mentioned above.    It is most




 likely that any violation of 5 mg/1  that may occur will not be very serious and




will surely not require a 2 mg/1 variance.









 The dissolved oxygen conditions in the Lower Fox River itself is another matter.




Even with BPT conditions met by all  dischargers, violations of the present

-------
                                       -  158 -





variance  conditions  for dissolved oxygen  may occur in at  least  3 places  along




the  river during  the 7Q10 flow and high temperatures.  Thus by  the year  1977,




one  can expect water quality violations to continue in the Lower Fox River.









Table IV-6 presents  the results of the "waste load allocation"  applied to the




Lower Fox E.iver using the QUAL-II simulation model.  This Table lists the amount




of BOD5 and suspended solids that each discharger could release such that 5 mg/1




of dissolved oxygen would still be maintained under the 7Q10 flow and high summer




temperatures. This Table lists the maximum discharges that can  be allowed under




critical  conditions. Figure IV-18 gives useful information as to the size of




the  diurnal fluctuations that can be expected as a result of algae activity.




A range of about  1.0 mg/1 in the dissolved oxygen can be expected if the inflowing




chlorophyll-a concentration is about 30 ug/1.  If larger amounts of algae are




present the fluctuation will be greater and 5 mg/1 may be violated under nightime




or prolonged overcast weather conditions.









It should be emphasized that Table IV-6 represents only one possible scheme for




a "waste  load allocation".  In general most schemes will have to be fairly close




to the one given.  Tradeoffs in BOD loading between dischargers located very




close together would be possible,  however, increasing the discharge at a site



several miles from another that was decreased would not be possible.  Secondly,




it is a matter of public interest as to whether a portion of the WLA should be




saved for future  municipal or industrial  growth.  If a portion  is to be  retained,




a decision will have to be made as to how much each discharger  is to be  reduced




beyond that allowed in Table IV-6. This type of process will require public




participation to weigh all sides of this issue.

-------
                                       - 159 -





Up to this point, no mention has been made of a safety  factor for  the WLA discharge




scheme.  Table IV-6 leaves very little margin of error  to meet  the 5 mg/1 dissolved




oxygen standard under critical conditions.  In light of this fact, a portion




of the WLA. should perhaps be withheld to allow for a reasonable margin of safety.




Again it must be emphasized that a discharge permit that allows a  maximum discharge




of 1.5 to 3.0 times the average discharge will not be permissable  if 5 mg/1 DO




is to be maintained.  Maximum limits must be held as close to the  average limit




as possible. A slug load from two or three dischargers  simultaneously could create




a serious dissolved oxygen situation and may result in  a fish kill.  If part




of the "waste load allocation" were withheld for future growth, then that portion




would be able to act as a safety margin until such time as it is required by




municipal or industrial expansion.








Ammonia reduction at all point sources will not significantly affect the  DO profile.




If nitrification had shown itself to be an important oxygen sink in the Lower




Fox River, then nitrification at all sewage treatment plants would have supplied




a useful safety factor in meeting the 5 mg/1 dissolved oxygen level. Secondly,




the concentration of NH^+ is more readily absorbed by algae so a reduction in




ammonia could work to slightly lower the algae activity along the  river and in




the Bay.  The nitrification rates, however, appear to be very small along  the




Lower Fox River (about 0.07 day"1 base e at 20C).  The low nitrification  rate




in the river may arise from three sources.  First, according to Tuffey et  al




(1974), nitrification generally will be the lowest in moderately large streams.




This result is a conclusion based on the fact that nitrifying bacteria like to




grow attached to a surface.  A small stream supplies an adequate bottom surface




area to volume ratio to affect good nitrification where as a large stream does




not.   In Green Bay itself,  nitrification would be expected to occur, according

-------
                                       - 160 -





to Tuffey, since the retention times are greatly increased and suspended material




provide sufficient medium for nitrifying bacteria.  The second reason for low




nitrification rates results from the high average pH found along the Fox River.




Nitrifying bacteria flourish in a relatively limited pH range.  That range is




usually reported to be between 7.0 and 8.0.  Beyond either end of this range,




the rate of nitrification drops off sharply.  Low dissolved oxygen levels during




the summer months also tend to inhibit nitrification.  Nitrifying bacteria become




inactive if the DO drops below 2.0 mg/1.  All of these conditions reduce the




importance of nitrification in the Lower Fox River, in regard to the oxygen




balance.








The simulation output indicates that ammonia is coming mainly from organic nitrogen




compounds flowing into the Fox River from Lake Winnebago.  These organic nitrogen




forms (particularly dead algae) can hydrolyze to ammonia.  Ammonia can also be




released from nitrogen compounds in the sediments.  Because of the low nitrification




rate, the ammonia tends to accumulate often reaching toxic concentrations.  Ammonia




is toxic to most species of aquatic organisms when it exists in the unionized




form.  The Water Quality Criteria of 1972  (Blue Book) recommends a concentration




of unionized ammonia no greater than 0.02 mg/1.  The toxicity problem is further




amplified by the high pH in the river.  The high pH pushes the ammonia-ammonium




balance toward the unionized ammonia form.  Thus ammonia toxicity appears to




be a problem that may not be adequately correctable by point source controls.








On the other side of this question, nitrification may be partially enhanced by




sufficient point source control of BOD  for  two reasons.  Adequate treatment of




wastes in treatment plants will raise the  dissolved oxygen concentration such




that low DO will no longer be  a nitrification inhibiting factor.  Secondly,

-------
                                       - 161 -





closer control of the industrial dischargers may act to lower the average pH




of the river.  These two effects could be sufficient to stimulate nitrification



to a point where ammonia will not tend to accumulate.  The resulting increased




nitrification could cause a alight lowering of the dissolved oxygen in the river.








At present, the QUAL-II model is capable of responding to the relationship between




dissolved oxygen and nitrification.  The simulation runs that were done for this




project all showed a slightly higher concentration of nitrate when the dissolved




oxygen was increased.  Similarly, the denitrification rate is controlled by the



dissolved oxygen level.   Higher DO's tend to eliminate denitrification as a




significant nitrogen sink in the model.  These effects may combine to increase



the inorganic nitrogen that flows down the Fox River and eventually into Green




Bay.








A rudimentary sensitivity analysis was done with the QUAL-II model for the Lower




Fox River.  The results  of this analysis are presented in Table V-l.  The base




line conditions are those used for the low flow and BPT simulation run.  Table




V-2 lists the base line  headwater and reaction rate conditions.  The most noteable




effect in Table V-l is the extreme sensitivity of the model to the benthic demand.



Algae growth and respiration rates also have a marked affect on the oxygen level.




In general, there is a correlation between oxygen and ammonia (higher oxygen leads



to lower ammonia) and between oxygen and nitrate (lower oxygen means lower nitrate




concentrations).  The rate of organic nitrogen feedback to inorganic forms has a



noticeable affect on the growth of algae.  Oxygen levels respond to this change




also.  Organic nitrogen  settling rate shows almost no effect of this sort.

-------
                   - 162 -

               TABLE V-l

        Sensitivity of the QUAL-II
       Model on The Lower Fox River
(Base Conditions are for Low Flow and BPT)
Parameter
Altered
Base
Condition
No . Change
Benthic
Demand
Times 1.5
Benthic
Demand
Times 0.5
BOD
Decay
Times 2.0
BOD
Decay
Times 0.5
Org-N
Decay
Times 2.0
Org-N
Decay
Times 0.5
Org-N
Settling
Times 2.0
Org-N
Settling
Times 0.5
Ammonia
Decay
Times 2.0
Ammonia
Decay
Times 0.5
Mile
Point
34.5
19.0
0.1
34.5
19.0
0.1
34.5
19.0
0.1
34.5
19.0
0.1
34.5
19.0
0.1
34.5
19.0
0.1
34.5
19.0
0.1
34.5
19.0
0.1
34.5
19.0
0.1
34.5
19.0
0.1
34.5
19.0
0.1
DO
mg/.l
3.56
2.91
1.83
.74
.14
.00
6.40
5.73
5.21
3.00
2.42
1.11
4.40
3.53
2.50
3.62
3.11
2.06
3.52
2.74
1.52
3.56
2.90
1.84
3.56
2.92
1.83
3.44
2.72
1.33
3.63
3.03
2.24
BOD
mg/1
.96
1.58
2.20
.96
1.58
2.20
.96
1.58
2.20
.33
.75
1.62
1.71
2.58
2.86
.96
1.58
2.20
.96
1.58
2.20
.96
1.58
2.20
.96
1.58
2.20
.96
1.58
2.20
.96
1.58
2.20
Org-N
mg/1
1.995
1.492
.786
1.995
1.492
.784
1.995
1.492
.784
1.995
1.492
.786
1.995
1.492
.786
1.733
1.113
.429
2.136
1.723
1.080
1.852
1.276
.556
2.071
1.615
.941
1.995
1.492
.784
1.995
1.492
.787
NH3-N
mg/1
.479
.799
.928
.490
.833
1.030
.476
.789
.901
.481
.804
.935
.477
.795
.922
.729
1.137
1.182
.343
.589
.697
.468
.763
.824
.485
.819
.991
.441
.693
.673
.500
.861
1.112
N03-N
mg/1
.099
.141
.290
.071
.075
.096
.113
.179
.434
.091
.128
.267
.105
.154
.312
.106
.176
.406
.095
.121
.206
.099
.139
.272
.099
.142
.300
.115
.198
.402
.090
.107
.191
Chl-a
mg/1
27.15
28.55
21.46
27.06
28.22
20.89
27.20
28.77
21.90
27.10
28.45
21.37
27.17
28.64
21.56
29.24
33.05
25.69
25.76
25.19
17.50
27.09
28.26
20.71
27.18
28.70
21.85
26.96
28.04
20.72
27.25
28.82
21.86

-------
    - 163 -
TABLE V-l (continued)
Parameter
Altered
Algae
Growth
Times 2.0
Algae
Growth
Times 0.5
Algae
Respiration
Times 2.0
Algae
Respiration
Times 0.5
1500 CFS
Flow
Rate
700 CFS
Flow
Rate
Temperature
84F
Temperature
72F
Temperature
35s]?
100 Lang/Day
Mile
Point
34.5
19.0
0.1
34.5
19.0
0.1
34.5
19.0
0.1
34.5
19.0
0.1
34.5
19.0
0.1
34.5
19.0
0.1
34.5
19.0
0.1
34.5
19.0
0.1
34.5
19.0
0.1
DO
mg/1
4.85
5.55
2.07
2.93
1.54
0.0
2.46
.89
0.0
4.20
4.43
3.15
4.93
4.31
3.56
2.80
2.08
.67
2.74
2.17
1.11
5.11
4.37
3.23
10.47
11.17
9.73
BOD
mg/1
.96
1.58
2.20
.96
1.58
2.20
.96
1.58
2.20
.96
1.58
2.20
1.32
1.66
1.74
.76
1.50
2.50
.86
1.44
2.11
1.19
1.86
2.38
2.12
3.21
3.35
Org-N
mg/1
2.011
1.563
1.079
1.989
1.472
.717
2.005
1.486
.719
1.984
1.481
.816
2.171
1.801
1.162
1.875
1.308
.619
1.968
1.452
.746
2.042
1.566
.865
2.176
1.790
1.159
NHo-N
mg/1
.463
.717
.781
.485
.827
1.093
.485
.835
1.137
.476
.777
.855
.333
.594
.844
.576
.908
.923
.519
.875
1.065
.397
.636
.633
.308
.562
.771
NOa-N
mg/1
.104
.163
.314
.096
.121
.078
.092
.106
.055
.102
.157
.374
.099
.117
.221
.097
.153
.284
.086
.105
.201
.133
.234
.500
.101
.114
.161
Chl-a
54.15
101.02
99.99
18.24
11.27
3.10
12.73
5.86
.65
39.64
59.28
81.95
26.84
26.04
21.00
27.74
31.04
20.96
27.47
29.70
21.81
26.69
26.77
20.69
24.54
20.00
12.39

-------
                                        - 164  -




                                   TABLE V-2




                    Base Line Conditions for Sensitivity Runs *
Inflow Concentrations
Reaction Rates (Base e)
Flow
DO
BOD
Org-N
NH3-N
N03-N
P04-P
Chl-a
Temp.
912 CFS
9.0 mg/1
2.0 mg/1
2.5 mg/1
.04 mg/1
.10 mg/1
.20 mg/1
30 mg/1
80F
BOD Decay
Org-N Decay
Org-N Settling
NH3-N Decay
Algae Growth
Algae
Respiration
Algae Settling
. 306/day
.035/day
.025/day
.07/day
1.0/day

.2/day
1.0 ft /day
* For benthic demands see Table IV-1.

-------
                                       - 165 -





Nutrients and Primary Production









The nutrient balance in Green Bay is controlled by several factors.  The Lower




Fox River is the largest single source of nutrients to Green Bay.  Large quantities




of nitrogen and phosphorus are continually being supplied to the Bay.  Much of




the nutrients that enter the Bay arrive during the spring runoff period.  As




much as 50% of the yearly inflowing nutrients may arrive during the spring period.




Figure V-l illustrates the Lower Fox River hydrograph for the period of this




study.  The peak flows in April, May and June carry high nutrient loads washed




off of partially frozen ground. In addition, to the Lower Fox River other rivers




such as the Oconto, Peshtigo and Menominee supply nutrients.   These nutrients




stimulate extensive algae blooms through out the Lower and Middle area of the




Bay.









The algae growths represent one portion of a complicated nutrient cycling process.




This process is characterized by algae blooms in spring and early summer that




appear to be nitrogen limited.  The nutrients consumed in this phase can be recycled




(particularly in shallow areas) or it can be carried out of the growth zone by




settling of  dead algae cells.  This phase is followed by an extensive bloom of




nitrogen-fixing algae.   The extent of the second bloom appears to be phosphorus




limited.  The nitrogen-fixing algae (Anabaena and Aphanizomenon)  can contribute




significant  quantities of nitrogen to the Bay during their bloom period.  The




input of nitrogen from the nitrogen-fixing algae allows the nitrogen dependent




forms to once again bloom.   The rotation of algae types occurs at least twice




during the summer period.   This pattern was first observed by Vanderhoef et al




(1972, 1974).  The surveys  taken by the Wisconsin DNR during  the summer of 1974

-------
o
o
o
                                                          FIGURE V-l
                                 Lower Fox River  Hydrograph During the Green Bay Study Period

                                                         (Flows in cfs)
o
o
o
CM
O
O
o
o
o
o
o
co
o
o
o
vo
O
O
O
o
o
o
       SEPT  73
OGT 73
NOV 73
DEC 73
                                                                                 JAN 74
                                                                         FEB 74
                                                                    MARCH 74

-------
                                                   FIGURE V-l (Continued)
MARCH 74
APRIL 74
MAY 74
JUNE 74
JULY 74
                                                                                       AUG 74
                                                                                            SEPT 74

-------
                                      -  168 -





support this cyclic nature of the algal types. This pattern is violated in the




Lower Bay only in close to the mouth of the Fox River.  High inorganic nitrogen




concentrations exist in this area all year around. For that reason, nitrogen




fixing algae never predominate.









An important aspect of the nutrient cycles in Green Bay concerns the sediment-




water exchange mechanisms.  These exchange mechanisms tend to stablize the phosphorus




concentration in the Bay.  The 1974 survey data suggests that an important source




of phosphorus  may be the resuspension of phosphorus containing bottom sediments




in the shallow portions and along the shore in the Bay.  The phosphorus released




in this way can become available for primary production if the necessary chemical




reactions take place to transform the phosphorus into soluable forms.  This process




appears to take place faster than algal uptake during the spring and early summer




when growth rates are still low due to cold temperatures.  Later on, the growth




of algae may overtake the resoluabilization process causing phosphorus  limited




primary production.  This explanation is consistent with the observed increase




of phosphorus in May and June, followed by a gradual decrease for  the rest of




the summer.








Phosphorus also settles into the sediments.  Sinking algal cells and chemical




precipitation carries phosphorus into the sediments.  In the deeper areas of




the Bay the sediments usually act as a net  sink for phosphorus.  However, under




anaerobic conditions phosphorus is resoluabilized at a rate that may be 10 times




faster than under aerobic conditions.  Survey data in February 1974 indicated




slight increases in the soluable phosphorus  compounds in the same region where




low dissolved oxygen was detected.

-------
                                        - 169 -





Ammonia levels in Green Bay don't appear to be a problem except  for a  small  area




very  close to the mouth of the Lower Fox River.  When the temperatures are high,




the ammonia level drops to almost unmeasurable levels over the entire Bay.




Nitrification and algae uptake during the summer account for this low level  of




ammonia.  Toxicity from free ammonia in Green Bay occurs only within a few




hundred yards of the mouth of the Fox River where inflowing levels are high.




During colder winter temperatures the higher ammonia levels from the Lower Fox




River penetrate into the Bay for as much as 10 to 20 miles.  Ammonia measurements




near Red Banks showed 0.6 mg/1 during the February survey of 1974.  The higher




levels of ammonia during the winter months do not cause a toxicity problem,




however, due to the low temperatures of the water
It is interesting to observe the rather dramatic increase in nitrate in the deeper




water of the Bay during the summer.  The nitrate can be coming from at least




two sources.  First; ammonia released from the sediments is trapped below the




thermocline. This ammonia eventually undergoes nitrification to nitrate since




there is not enough light in the deeper waters for primary production.   Secondly,




sinking algal cells release nitrogen compounds that will also nitrify.   The




accumulated nitrate, however, will not become available to algae until the fall




turnover when the water mixes.








The results of the Lower Fox River modelling effort indicated that higher dissolved




oxygen levels may result in slightly higher concentrations of inorganic nitrogen




entering Green Bay.  If this is true, then the early summer blooms of nitrogen




fixing  algae may be delayed due to the prolonged predominance of other forms




of phytoplankton. The result would be an upset of the cyclic pattern of algal




species observed by  Vanderhoef et al (1972, 1974)  and the Wisconsin DNR.

-------
                                      -  170-





Improved treatment at municipal sewage plants may reduce the total nitrogen loading




to the Fox River and thereby offset the rise in nitrogen entering Green Bay.



Effective biological treatment, removing combined sewers and ending sewage overflow




bypassing would result in reductions in both total nitrogen and total phosphorous




loading along the Lower Fox River.

-------
                                        - 171-





                                   SECTION VI









VI.  SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS









The following list is a summary of the major findings and recommendations of




this study:









1.   The most critical dissolved oxygen condition in the study area appears to be




the summer low flow period in the Lower Fox River.  Substantial improvements at




point source discharges beyond "Best Practicable Treatment" will be required to




maintain a dissolved oxygen level above 5.0 mg/1 at all times.  BPT levels of




treatment are expected to violate variance dissolved oxygen standards at three




locations along the river during low flow and high temperatures.









2.   The winter ice cover period (January to early April) has caused frequent low




dissolved oxygen problems in Lower Green Bay in the past.  High organic loadings,




together with nearly zero reaeration, have caused as much as 150 square miles of




the Lower Bay to suffer severe DO depletion.  The survey of February 1974, a part




of this study, indicated a 50 square mile area with 5 mg/1 of DO or less along the




eastern half of the Bay from Point Sable to the Renard River.








3.   The methods presented in this report show that dissolved oxygen modelling of




the winter condition in Lower Green Bay can be accomplished with a sufficient




degree of accuracy to allow conclusions to be made for various abatement schedules.









4.   Dissolved oxygen modelling of the winter ice cover period in Lower Green Bay




indicates that "Best Practicable Treatment" at all point sources along the Lower

-------
                                        - 172  -





Fox River will be sufficient to maintain 5.0 mg/1 of dissolved oxygen in Lower




Green Bay during the winter period.  On the basis of this modelling, it is




recommended that the dissolved oxygen variance on Lower Green Bay be removed




effective 1977 when "Best Practicable Treatment" is to be met.









5.   Long term BOD (60 days) monitoring should be considered in the Green Bay area




as a means of determining the changes that will take place in the BOD load to




Green Bay during the compliance period with the present permits.  This is




especially important since the long term BOD is the prime factor in determining




the severity of the winter dissolved oxygen deficit in Green Bay.









6.   Review of the location of the Green Bay monitoring station is highly



recommended.   At present, sampling is done at  the Mason Street Bridge in Green




Bay.   This location is upstream of three large paper mill effluents and the




Green Bay sewage effluent.  The concentrations reported at this station do not




reflect accurate representations of the actual loading to Green Bay.




Unfortunately, it is probably not possible to  obtain a representative sample in




this area because of the Green Bay seiche effects in the River and the location




of the new Green Bay sewage plant effluent.  It may be appropriate to report




concentrations at the mouth of the Fox River (i.e., true loading to Green Bay)




by separately considering the addition from the downstream effluents.









7.   Dissolved oxygen modelling of the Lower Fox River indicates that an average




reduction of the 37% below "Best Practicable Treatment" will be required to




maintain 5.0 mg/1 of dissolved oxygen during the low flow and high temperature



period.  The waste load allocation developed by the model takes into account




the suspended solids reductions at each discharge location.

-------
                                       -173 _





Any future modifications to permits affected by the load allocation should use




the waste load allocation as a basis of the permit.  This discharge scheme has




been developed to maintain 5.0 mg/1 of dissolved oxygen in the Lower Fox River.




Daily maximum discharges allowable in the permits should be less than one and




one-half times the daily average allowed discharge to avoid shock loads that




could cause a substantial fish kill.









8.   The largest single source of nitrogen in the Lower Fox River appears to be




Lake Winnebago.  Ammonia toxicity may continue  to be a problem in the Lower




Fox River during high temperatures, even if treatment plants are required to




remove ammonia from their effluents.  Since nitrification in the river does not




appear to a substantial degree, little dissolved oxygen change will result from




removing ammonia.








9.   Higher dissolved oxygen levels in the Lower Fox River may tend to increase




the concentration of inorganic nitrogen entering Lower Green Bay as a result of




decreased denitrification rates.  This may be offset by improved treatment and




elimination of bypassing from cimbined storm sewers.








Increased monitoring of nitrogen forms should be included in the discharge permits




especially for sewage treatment plants.  Monitoring should include total organic




and ammonia nitrogen forms.  This type of monitoring will allow future evaluation




of nitrification as a means of reducing ammonia levels in the Lower Fox River.









10.  It is difficult to determine what the phosphorus concentration will do in




the future.  All treatment plants serving more than 2,500 people are now required




to remove 85Z of the total phosphorus in the effluent.  Bypassing and poor

-------
                                       -  174-






treatment at temporary add-on facilities  have reduced the effectiveness  of the




phosphorus removal program.   New treatment systems should correct this problem




at sewage treatment plants.   On the other hand,  biological treatment of  pulp




and paper mill wastes may require nutrient additions, including phosphorus.




Proposed regulations will limit these discharges tp a concentration of 1.0 mg/1




or less.  The net effect is  unclear at this time, but will probably not  be




significant compared to the  phosphorus loading from Lake Winnebago.









11.  A monthly monitoring station, similar to other monthly monitoring stations




maintained by the DNR, was begun in the Neenah-Menasha area as a result  of an




early recommendation of this project.  A monitoring station in Green Bay has




been sampled monthly since 1961.  Results from the new station will allow




determination of the net effects of discharges along the Lower Fox River.









12.  Sampling in Green Bay during the summer of 1974 revealed total phosphorus




concentrations not significantly different from those observed in 1973.




Phosphorus concentrations in 1971 were significantly higher in the Inner Bay




than those observed in 1974.  The largest buildup of phosphorus in the Bay occurs




during the spring season, when sediments are stirred by spring storms and high




flows wash large quantities of phosphorus into the Bay.








13.  Nitrogen forms fluctuated widely over the year.  Several fold changes in




nitrate concentration were particularly evident.  Nitrate appears to build up




in the bottom waters of the deep areas over the course of the summer.  The most




significant source of this nitrogen  is probably from sinking algae cells.









14.  Dissolved oxygen concentrations in the Lower Bay recover rapidly from the




low levels of the Fox River during the summer months.  Except for a small area

-------
                                       - 175-




in  the immediate vicinity of the Fox River mouth, the dissolved oxygen level was




not a problem.  Some readings taken near the bottom also had depressed DO's




probably as a result of decaying algae cells.  The extent of this area was limited.









15.  The fluctuations in algae species in the lower third of Green Bay are




dramatic.  Blooms in blue-green algae (Aphanizamenon) predominated in July.




June and August saw most of the Bay dominated by Oscillatoria.  Aphanizamenon are




capable of fixing nitrogen and, therefore, are more competitive when inorganic




nitrogen falls to a low level.  The extent of the Aphanizamenon bloom is




probably controlled by the available phosphorus concentration.  Large quantities




of nitrogen are added to the Bay by nitrogen fixing algae.









16.  The concentration of chlorophyll-a generally increased during the summer;




however, a larger fraction was in phaeo-pigments (inactive or dead chlorophyll-a)




in late summer.









17.  Benthic oxygen uptake in Green Bay above Long Tail Point and Sable Point




will not change significantly as a result of "Best Practicable Treatment".  In




the Inner Bay (near the Fox River mouth), improved treatment at several paper




mills and at the Green Bay sewage treatment plant should have a dramatic effect




on the condition of the Inner Bay in the next few years, particularly in regard




to sludge deposits and benthic fauna.








18.  A follow-up study should be carried out in 1978 to 1980.  The present permits




for "Best Practicable Treatment" will be met by that time.  Emphasis should be




placed on winter dissolved oxygen in the Bay and summer conditions in the river.




Measurements of benthic demands should also be carried out to determine the effect

-------
                                        - 176  -





of reduced loading on existing sludge deposits.   Sufficient information should




be available by then from monthly monitoring data in Neenah-Menasha and Green Bay




to assess the value of increasing nutrient control along the Lower Fox River.

-------
                                        - 177 -




                                      SECTION VII




                                      BIBLIOGRAPHY




Crevensten, Dan, Stoddard, A., Vajda, G.




     1973.  Water Quality Model of the Lower Fox River, Wisconsin.  United States




            Environmental Protection Agency Enforcement Division.






Ditoro, D. M.




     1969.  "Predicting the Dissolved Oxygen Production of Planktonic Algae."




            Notes for Manhattan College Summer Institute in Water Pollution Control,




            Manhattan College, Bronx, New York.






Epstein, E. F., Bryans, M. A., Mezei, D. and Patterson, D. J.




     1974.  Lower Green Bay:  An Evaluation of Existing and Historical Conditions.




            Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.  U.S. Environmental




            Protection Agency.  EPA-905/9-74-006.  August 1974.






Holland, R. E.




     1968.  "Correlation of Melosira Species with Trophic Conditions in Lake




            Michigan."  Limnol. & Oceanog.  13:555-557.






Hutchinson, G. E.




     1957.  A Treatise on Limnology.   John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York.






Lee, A. Genet, Smith, Donald J. and Sonnen, Michael B.




     1974.  "Computer Documentation for the Dynamic Estuary Model."  Water




            Resources Engineers, Inc., Contract No. 68-01-1800.






McKeown, J. J., Benedict, A. H. and Lake, G. M.




     1968.  Studies on the Behavior of Benthal Deposits of Paper Mill Origin,




            National Council Technical Bulletin, No. 219.

-------
                                       -  178-









Modlin, R. F. and Beeton, A. M.




     1970.  "Dispersal of Fox River Water in Green Bay, Lake Michigan" Proc.




            13th Conf. Great Lakes Res. 1970.468-476.








Norton, W. R., Roesner, L. A., Evenson, D. E. and Monser, J. R.




     1974.  Computer Program Documentation for the Stream Quality Model Qual-II.




            Water Resources Engineering.   U.S.  Environmental Protection Agency,




            Contract No. 68-01-0713.









O'Connor, D. J. , Thomann, R. V. , and DiToro, D. M.




     1973.  Mathematical Modelling of Natural Systems, Manhattan College,




            New York, New York.









O'Connor, D. J., Thomann, R. V., DiToro, D. M.




     1973.  Dynamic Water Quality Forecasting and Management, U.S. Environmental




            Protection Agency.  Office of Research and Development.




            EPA 660/3-73-009.








Palmer, C. M.




     1959.  Algae in Water Supplies, U.S. Department of Health, Education and




            Welfare, PHS Publ. No. 657.








Patterson, D. J.




     1973.  Results of a Mathematical Water Quality Model of the Lower Fox River,




            Wisconsin.  Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Water Quality




            Evaluation Section.

-------
                                        _ 179-
Prescott, G.  W.



     1951.  Algae of the Western Great Lakes Area, Cranbrook Press, Cranbrook




            Inst. of Science.









 Quirk, Lawler and Matusky Engineers.



      1969.   Development of a Computerized Mathematical System Model of the Lower




             Fox River  From Lake Winnebago to  Green  Bay.  Wisconsin Department  of




             Natural Resources.










 Riley, G. A.




      1956.   "Oceanography of Long Island Sound 1952-1954.  II Physical




             Oceanography," Bull. Bingham Oceanog. Coll. 15, 15-46.









 Sager, Pauls Wiersma,  Jim




      1971.   University of Wisconsin, Green Bay,  Unpublished Data.
 Sager, P. E. & Wiersma, J. H.




      1972.  "Nutrient Discharges to Green Bay, Lake Michigan from the Lower Fox




             River."  Proc. 15th Conf. Great Lakes Res. 1972, 132-148.











 Smith, Gilbert M.




      1933.  The Fresh-Water Algae of the United States, McGraw-Hill Publ. Co.




             Hew York.

-------
                                        - 180 -





Srinath, E. G., Prakesam, J.B.S.  and Loehr, R. C.




     1974.  A Technique for Estimating Active Nitrifying Mass and Its Application




            in Designing Nitrifying Systems.  29th Purdue Industrial Waste




            Conference, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana.








Thomann, R. V.




     1972.  Systems Analysis and Water Quality Management, Environmental Science




            Services Division, Environmental Research and Applications, Inc.,




            New York.








Tuffey, T. J., Hunter, J. V. and Matulewich, V. A.




     1974.  Zones of Nitrification.  Water Resources Bulletin, American Water




            Resources Association, Vol. 10, No. 3, pp. 555-564.








Vanderhoef, L. N., Dana, B., Emerich, D., and Burris, R. H.




     1972.  Acetylene Reduction in Relation to Levels of Phosphate and Fixed




            Nitrogen in Green Bay.  New Phytol.  71:1097-1105.








Vanderhoef, L. N., Huang, C. Y., and Musil, R.




     1974.  Nitrogen Fixation (acetylene reduction) by Phytoplankton in




            Green Bay, Lake Michigan, in Relation to Nutrient Concentration.




            Limnol and Oceanogr. 19:119-125.









Water  Quality Criteria 1972.




     1973.  A Report of  the Committee  on Water Quality  Criteria, At  the Request  of




             the  Environmental Protection Agency.

-------
                                         -181  -
Weber, C. I.




     1971.  A Guide to the Common Diatoms at Water Pollution Surveillance System




            Stations, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Natl. Environ. Res. Ctr.









Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.




      1974.  Report on the Waste Load Assimilation Capacity of the Oconto  River




            Near Oconto Falls, Wisconsin.  Water Quality Evaluation Section.









Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.




      1973.  State of Wisconsin Surface Water Quality Monitoring  Data 1969-1972.









Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.




      1972.  Summary Report on the Water  Quality and Wastewater Discharges During




            the Summer of 1972.  Water Quality Evaluation Section.









Zanoni,  A.  E.




      1969.  Secondary Effluent Deoxygenation at Different Temperatures.   Journal




            of the Water Pollution  Control Federation, 41:640-659.

-------

-------
                                       -  183 -





                                SECTION VIII









                                 APPENDIX A




                 Planktonic Algae Survey on Green Bay, 1974









The plankton suspended in water were collected in February, May and June,  1974,




in a 2 liter Kenanerer at a depth of 1 to 2 meters,  preserved with Merthiolate




and concentrated by filtration.  Samples taken in July, August and September




were collected in a Clark-Bumpus plankton sampler,  preserved with Formalin




and concentrated by sedimentation.  All samples were counted by a modified




drop-count method.  Biomass estimates and total volatile solids were also




determined.









The water samples for planktonic algae examination were concentrated to 100 ml.




Each sample was stirred and mixed thoroughly;  a calibrated pipette was used to




draw-off and discharge 0.05 ml of sample onto  a microscope slide on which  a 22 mm




square chamber had been constructed and which  gave an even distribution of the




sample when covered with a 22 mm coverslip.  Each sample was examined under 430X




magnification to identify the organisms present and then counts were made  at




100X magnification.  Twenty-five ocular fields were examined in cases of sparse




occurrences and 10 Whipple fields were examined when algae concentrations  were




greater.  A constant pattern of examination was used throughout the study.








Cells touching the top and right side of the Whipple grid were counted while those




touching the bottom and left side were not.  Likewise when the full ocular field




was counted those cells which extended from the right side of the field were




counted, while those which extended beyond the left side were excluded.

-------
                                         - 184 -





Algae were counted as frustules, single cells, filaments or colonies (See Table




III-2, Genera of Algae Observed).   In some cases  the species observed were not




tabulated because they did not occur within the Whipple grid, but were recorded




as having been observed.  Filaments were counted as one regardless of their




length and colonies were counted as one regardless of the size of the colony.




In some cases a colony was considered to have a given size (See Table III-2).   In




the case of Microcystis and Gomphospheria, an average size was determined for




counting purposes.  Therefore, these criteria may have caused a lower count than




would otherwise have been obtained if definite colony and filament sizes had




been previously determined for all species.









For convenience, Euglena, colonial and single cells of green algae which seldom




occurred, and those called Chlorococcales were collectively tabulated as green




algae, while filamentous green algae were collectively tabulated as Ulotrichales.









The techniques used for identification are described in Prescott (1951), Palmer




(1959), Smith (1933), and Weber (1971).

-------
                                        - 185 -





                             SECTION VIII











                              APPENDIX B









      Description of Methods for Chemical Analysis of Water Samples









Ortho-Phosphorus









Water samples were filtered within 12 hours through 0.45u Millipore filters.




The filtrate was analyzed by Technicon Procedure 155-71W using an Autoanalyzer




II System. Results were reported as mg/1 phosphorus.









Total-Phosphorus








Unfiltered samples were digested using the persulfate digestion procedure described




in standard methods (Autoclaved for 30 minutes at 121C).  The digested samples




were then carried through the ortho-phosphorous procedure described above.  Results




were reported as mg/1 total phosphorous.









Suspended Solids









A measured volume of sample was filtered through preweighed 0.45u Millipore Filters.




The filter and the collected material were dried overnight at 90C and then




reweighed.  The quantity of suspended matter in a one liter of water was




calculated from the increase in weight and volume of the sample filtered.




Results were reported as mg/1 suspended solids.

-------
                                        - 186-





Biochemical Oxygen Demand









The BOD, a measure of the amount of dissolved oxygen utilized by micro-organisms




to stablize the organic material in a water, is made under controlled conditions




usually over a 5-day period at 20C with nutrients and without light.  The sample




dilution factor multiplied by the decrease in dissolved oxygen is reported as




the water's BOD.









Chlorides








Determined by titration with silver nitrate solution to the chromate endpoint




(Mohr Method).









Organic Nitrogen (Kjeldahl)









Unfiltered samples (30 ml) were digested according to standard methods using




300 ml flasks.  The digest was made alkaline and the ammonia immediately distilled




off and collected in Boric Acid solution containing a mixed indicator.  The



distillate were back titrated with standardized sulfuric acid.  Organic-nitrogen




values reported were obtained by subtracting ammonia nitrogen values (see below)




from the total ammonia nitrogen In the distillate.  Results were reported as




mg/1 organic nitrogen.









Ammonia Nitrogen









Samples were filtered through 0.45u Milliport Filters.  The filtrate was analyzed




for ammonia content by Technicon Auto Analyzer procedure 98-70W.  Results were




reported as mg/1 ammonia-nitrogen.

-------
                                        - 187 -




Nitrate and Nitrite Nitrogen







Samples were filtered through 0.45u Milliport Filters.  The filtrate was analyzed



for nitrate or nitrite by using Technicon Auto Analyzer II procedure 100-70W.



Results were reported as mg/1 nitrate or nitrite nitrogen.







Chlorophyll-a plus Pigments







An unfiltered sample (400 ml) was filtered and concentrated using 10 u bolting



cloth. The collected algae were then further concentrated by collecting on 0.45



u Millipore Filters.  The filter and the algae were then homogenized in 25 ml



of 90% acetone-10% water solution by grinding the mixture with an air driven



mortar and pestle.   The solution was centrifuged and the absorbance of the resulting



solution was measured at 750 nm and 665 nm.  After these measurements the samples



were acidified with 0.02 ml of concentrated HC1 and the absorbances again measured



at 750 nm and 665 nm.  All absorbances measurements at 750 nm were subtracted



from 665 nm reading to correct for turbidity remaining in the sampler.  Results


                                      *}                         ^
were calculated and reported as mg/1 mj chlorophyll-a and mg/1 m  pheophytin



(physiologically inactive pigments).  Calculations were made using the equations



on p. 749 of standard methods except that the volume of original filtrate is



substituted for A in the given equations.

-------
                                        - 188 -





                       Summary of Analytical Methods Used




                             for DNR Water Samples
Parameter
                                   Method
                                                                    Reference Number
Ortho-phosphorus




Total-phosphorus









Suspended Solids




Organic Nitrogen




Nitrate Nitrogen




Nitrite Nitrogen




Ammonia Nitrogen




Chlorophyll-a
Auto Analyzer AAII   155-71W




Persulfate Digestion-followed by




   Ortho-P procedure




Gravimetric




Semimicro Kjeldahl




Auto Analyzer AAII   100-70W




Auto Analyzer AAII   100-70W




Auto Analyzer AAII   98-70W




Chlorophyll-a in the presence of




   Pheophytin-a
2, 1 P.  526




    2




    2




    1




    1




    1









  2 P.  748
References:









 (1) Technical Publication No. TJ1-0268 - Technicon Auto Analyzer II Systems -




     Technicon Industrial Systems - Technicon Instruments Corporation - Tarrytown,




     New York.
(2)  "Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Waste Water" 13th Edition,




     1971.  APHA-AWWA-WPCF.

-------
                                        -  189 -





                                   APPENDIX C









                              Benthic Oxygen Demand









Considerable effort has been applied recently to  try  to understand  the kinetics




of oxygen consumption and BOD decay.  However, it is  usually impossible  to  account




for the observed deficit by BOD decay alone.  Classical BOD sag equation  (Streeter-




Phelps type) usually do not generate sufficient oxygen deficit.  This is  particularly




true for paper mill wastes when the observed 6005 loading is input  to the equations




with the observed decay rate.  Most researchers have  attempted to explain this




discrepancy by pointing to sludge banks and attributing the missing oxygen  to




benthic consumption.  There is no doubt that paper mill sludge deposits can exert




a considerable oxygen demand on a river.  However, it is extremely  difficult




to estimate the exact extent of the benthic demand.   Several laboratory and field




measuring techniques have been cited in the literature.  All of these methods




are time consuming, costly and the results are subject to considerable error.









For paper mill deposits, oxygen demand from sludges has been estimated to lie




between 2.0 and 10.0 grams of 02 per square meter per day.  (Thomann 1972).




Measurements taken in the Lower Fox River indicate values in and around this




range.  Table C-l lists the benthic demand values at  several locations measured




during the fall of 1972 on the Lower Fox River.   These values represent laboratory




measurements on samples that were extracted from the  river with a Peterson dredge.




The samples were placed in 2.5 liter bottles with a closed circuit water  circulation




system attached.  The flowing water moved past a DO probe which was attached




to a strip chart recorder.  The entire apparatus was  incubated at 20C.   The




samples were allowed to stablize for at least 2 days before a reading was started.

-------
                                 - 190 -




                             TABLE C-I
           Benthic Oxygen Demand in the Lower Fox River
    Location
Neenah-Menasha Area
Below Appleton Dam
Above Kaukauna
Below Kaukauna






Near Wrightstown









Above De Pere Dam




At the Fox River Mouth
Sample
No.
lOa
lOb
lOc
8a
8b
8c
la
Ib
Ic
2a
2b
2c
3a
3b
4a
4b
4c
5a
6a
Benthic Demand
GR-0?/M2/DAY
7.75
11.28
9.59
5.66
5.38
4.21
4.78
3.99
1.98
7.33
9.02
8.78
4.09
6.17
3.96
3.25
2.33
4.68
1.86

-------
                                        -  191 -





A second set of benthic samples was -taken in September, 1974,  These samples




were obtained from 7 locations in the Lower Bay.  The procedure discussed above




was used to evaluate the benthic demand at these locations.  The results are




shown in Figure C-l.  The values shown are considerably below the rates measured




in the Lower Fox River in 1972.  The consistency of the muds varied widely at




the shown locations. Below Grassy Island the samples consisted of non-cohesive




fluid-like silt.  The sample off Red Banks had the characteristics of highly




cohesive clay.  Above Long Tail Point the sample contained a high amount of fine




sand.  The sample off the end of Long Tail Point contained mostly large-grained




sand.








In addition to these laboratory measurements, two attempts were made to measure




the benthic oxygen demand in situ.   A large rectangular metal box was constructed




for this purpose.  The box was 2' x 2' x 1'.  A flange was attached around the




bottom to support the box and prevent it from sinking too deeply into the sediments.




A Yellow Springs DO probe with a mixing device was sealed in the box.  Figure




C-2 is a diagram of the apparatus.   A float was anchored above the location of




the box and the instrumentation was attached to the float.  The instruments




consisted of the DO probe, strip chart recorder and battery for the mixing




device.  The box was lowered from the surface (no diver was used) and left in




place about 12 hours.  The results at the two locations are shown in Figure C-l.




Both values are several times higher than the laboratory measurements.  Since




the test was only run for 12 hours, the unusually high values may be the




result of suspended sediments trapped in the box when it was put in place.




From these results it appears that it would be desirable to allow a day or




two for this condition to clear itself before taking a measurement.  In order




to do this, a method would have to be devised to change the water or raise the




DO before beginning the measurement run.

-------
                 - 192-
               FIGURE C-l
Benthic Oxygen Demand in Lower Green Bay
             in GR 02/m2/Day
                                I    I Values measured with
                                     box device.

-------
                           - 193 -
                        FIGURE C-2
           BENTHIC OXYGEN DEMAND MEASURING DEVICE
   TO SURFACE
   FLOAT
                           PLEXIGLASS
                           WINDOW
CORDS FOR
DO PROBE
AND MIXER
                                                     CABLE ATTACHMENT
                                                     POINTS
   METAL IS 1/8" THICK

   AREA = 3639.11 cm2

   VOLUME ABOVE FLANGE = 109.76 LITERS

-------

-------
                                        - 195 -




                                      APPENDIX D








                               GBQUAL Program Documentation








Program History








GBQUAL as used in the Green Bay study consists of six FORTRAN computer routines.




These six routines are derived from the "Dynamic Estuary Model" documented by




Lee et al., Water Resources Engineers   (WRE) in May 1974 under contract no.




68-01-1800.  The model, as described in WRE's report, has been significantly




altered to fit the Green Bay situation.  Since the program changes have been so




extensive, a relatively intense program description is necessary to benefit future




users.  This descriptipn is not intended to fully replace the documentation




prepared by WRE.  Future users of this model are encouraged to obtain a copy of




WRE's documentation if they plan to do extensive work with the model and especially



if they will require program modifications.  The enclosed descriptions, however,




should be complete enough to:  (1) allow a user to prepare a data deck and run




the model; (2) understand the basic flow of information and know where various




calculations are made; (3) acquaint the user with the capabilities and the




limitations of GBQUAL.  With this in mind, the following sections will present




a general description of the quality model plus a detailed description of each




subroutine.  In addition, a separate section describes the data input setup




required to run GBQUAL.  The last section describes the theoretical




considerations used in formulating the reactions allowed by GBQUAL.  This




section includes a table of estimated parameter ranges for the various




coefficients used in the model.

-------
                                        - 196 -





                   General Description of the Green Bay Model








The water quality model attempts to simulate the significant physical, chemical




and biological reactions that take place in Green Bay.  The quality model was




constructed to route the following constituents through the Bay:








     1.   Coliform




     2.   Carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand




     3.   Dissolved oxygen




     4.   Organic nitrogen (not in phytoplankton)




     5.   Ammonia nitrogen




     6.   Nitrite nitrogen




     7.   Nitrate nitrogen




     8.   Soluable phosphate phosphorus




     9.   Total nitrogen as a conservative (or any conservative)




     10.  Phytoplankton 1 biomass




     11.  Phytoplankton 2 biomass




     12.  Temperature








A network of interconnecting channels (links) and junctions (nodes) is used to




describe the physical system.  The junctions each describe an element of water




(of varying size and shape) which is assumed to be well mixed.  All reactions




take place inside the junctions.  The size and shape of the junctions are chosen




to coincide with the geometry of the system being represented.  Secondly, the




size (volume) of the junctions must be chosen so that a reasonable time step




may be used in the model consistent with channel lengths and velocities.

-------
                                        -197 -





 The  numerical  model  performs  a  mass  balance on  each constituent plus and minus




 any  sources  or sinks of  that  constituent  for each junction or water volume in




 the  Bay.  A  total  of 87  nodes are  used  to describe the  system.   This is  shown




 in Figure D-l.  Each element  or node is described by  its  surface area, average




 depth  and total volume.  Each node is also connected  to  the surrounding  nodes




 by a series  of  channels.  The channels  are described  by  average depth, flow length




 and  surface  area.  In addition  to  the physical  data used  to describe each node




 and  channel, the program requires  a  list  of all channels  entering each node (a




 maximum of 8)  and  the nodes connected by  each channel (maximum of 2).  The flow




 of water in  each channel therefore describes  the advection of water for  a given




 simulation run. Water is also allowed to  diffuse between  nodes  by means  of an




 eddy diffusion coefficient that is variable by  channel.








 Figure D-2 illustrates the possible  chemical  and biological reactions that the




 model  considers.   (Temperature  and coliforms  are not  shown).   These reactions




 are  carried  out in each  node  at each time step.   The  numerical  model assumes




 that an element is continuously mixed and all reactions take  place within the




 element after  advection, diffusion,  inflows and outflows  have been accounted




 for.   Figure D-3 illustrates  the principle of a continuously  mixed element.








 Program DYNQUA is  the master  control program  and it also  contains the main water




 quality routing loop.  As the program executes,  control is passed from DYNQUA




 to   INDATA through which all  necessary data required  for  a given simulation is




 pulled into  the program  and printed  for display.   INDATA  calls  two separate




 subroutines  (COEFF and METDAT) which are  designed  to  read  in  separate blocks  of




 data.  After all necessary data has been  read,  control passes back to DYNQUA




where various system parameters are  initialized.   The main  quality  loop is then




 entered and the program cycles  for the designated  number of iterations.

-------
                         FIGURE  D-l
   N
., 21 "
                               J
                    Shown here is the system of elements  and channels
                    used to describe the  Green  Bay  system in GBQUAL.
vo
00

-------
                             -  199-
A  - Aeration-Deaeration
BO - Oxidation
D  - Decay
0  - Oxygenation During
     Algae Growth
UR - Uptake From Respiration
UD - Uptake From Decay
G  - Uptake From Growth
R  - Resolubilized During
     Respiration
RD - Resolubilized During Decay
S  - Settling
P  - Precipitation
                           FIGURE D-2

        Chemical and Biological Paths Allowed in GBQUAL

-------
                      - 200 -
                     FIGURE D-3
              c,
              c.
A. a continuously stirred tank reactor, CSTR
            Qou   QIN
           VOLUME
TDS
BOD
DO
TEMP
 
 
ALGAE
ZOO
FISH
B.  an  idealized hydraulic  element
     A CONTINUOUSLY STIRRED TANK REACTOR (CSTR)
     AND AN IDEALIZED HYDRAULIC ELEMENT
          (After Water Resources Engineers, Inc.)

-------
                                        - 201 -





If  temperature is being simulated, each quality  cycle  (time  step) will  include




a call to TEMPER (an entry point in METDAT) where  the  heat budget is  calculated




and new temperatures are determined.  After the  proper number of cycles have




been completed, a full or partial print out of the current system status  is made.




If desired the system constituent status is stored for later use in subroutine




QUALEX.  After the requested number of cycles, a second report is generated by




QUALEX giving the minimum, maximum and average concentration of each  constituent




during the number of cycles requested.  After all cycles have been completed,




DYNQUA can transfer the current system status to a storage tape or file so that




the system can be restarted with the same conditions that it ended with during




the last simulation run.  Thus the final conditions become the new initial



conditions.  In this manner, it is possible to route the model through any




simulation period (say a year) in a piece-wise fashion without having to




reinitialize for each run.  Figure D-A illustrates the informational  flow in




the program as described above.









GBOUAL has certain limits that are necessitated by the size and speed of present




day computers.  Table D-l lists the present dimensional limits of the model along




with constituents allowed.  If a user wishes to  extend these limits,  the common




blocks in the program will have to be extended.  Of course, there is  a trade




off in the resolution of the physical system and the length of any computational




time step.  Care must be taken to avoid advecting a significant fraction of any




elements volume during a single time step since  this may lead to instabilities




in the solution.   The hydrodynamics for a given  simulation run must be steady




state over the simulation period.  The program can be  restarted, however, with




a new hydrodynamic solution at any user defined  interval if varying flow conditions




are desired.  With the present set-up for Green Bay, time steps of 3  to 6 hours

-------
0*
I
                            -  202 -
                           FIGURE  D-U
            FUNCTIONAL  DATA FLOW IN  PROGRAM GBQUAL
                                            HYDRODYNAMIC
                                             DATA FILE
                              INDATA
                              METDAT
                                                              COEFF
                                                        RESTART FILE
                               TEMPER
                          PRINTOUT ROUTINE
                               QUALEX
                                                      SUMMARY REPORT
STOP
                              NEW RESTART
                                 FILE

-------
                                 - 203 -


                           TABLE D-l


           GBQUAL Limitations and Routable Constituents




Quality Program:


             Item                                 Maximum Number

Junctions                                               200
Channels                                                400
Channels Per Junction                                     8
Water Quality Constituents                               14
Wastewater Return Units                                  20
Quality Multiplication Factors                           10
Junctions for Printout                                  200
Weather Data Points (per day)                            25




Constituents that can be modelled are:


Constituent                                    Constituent

     1                                   Temperature, C
     2                                   Dissolved Oxygen, mg/1
   3,4,5                                 Biochemical Oxygen Demand, mg/1
     6                                   Organic Nitrogen, mg/1
     7                                   Ammonia Nitrogen, mg/1
     8                                   Nitrite Nitrogen, mg/1
     9                                   Nitrate Nitrogen, mg/1
    10                                   Phosphate phosphorus, mg/1
    11                                   Chlorophyll-a(l) ug/1
    12                                   Chlorophyll-a(2) ug/1
    13                                   Coliforms, MPN/100 ml
    14                                   Total Nitrogen, mg/1

-------
                                         -  204  -





seem reasonable. The computer code which was run on an Univac 1110  computer  requires




approximately 60K words of core for an execution.  With a 6 hour  time  step,  a




run simulating all parameters for 75 days  of actual time requires about  2  1/4




minutes of computer time.  Therefore GBQUAL can simulate an extended real-time




in a very acceptable amount of computational time.









It should be noted that GBQUAL solves for  the  concentration of each constituent




in a step wise fashion through time.  Thus the concentration in any element  at




time t is a function of the concentration  at (t - At) and all reactions  during




At.  This is illustrated in Figure D-5.  The solution is therefore an explicit




algorithm.

-------
                              FIGURE  D-5



Solution of the Green  Bay Model  Differential  Equations  in  T and J Space
                                                                                              o
                                                                                              Ln
                                                         (information from up to  8 other

                                                         (junctions  for each computation.
       J-i
                            Junction  Number
J

-------
                                        - 206-

              Theoretical Considerations of the Water Quality Model
Conservation of mass must be applied at all node points in the numeric scheme.


To account for this conservation, whether it be the water itself or a particular


constituent, we must look at all inflows and outflows.  These consist of advection,


diffusion, any external inflow (such as a waste source) or any external withdrawal


(such as a water supply system) .  If we apply these conditions to a given  element


j we find:

                           Inflow             Outflow

     where: V.       =    volume of j at the end of a time step


            V       =    volume of j at the beginning of a time step
             J

            C .     =    concentration of C at the end of a time step


            C       =    initial concentration


            n       =    number of channels into j


            A       =    area of channel i
             xi

            U.       =    velocity in channel i


            C*       =    1/4 point concentration of C in channel i


            At       =    time step


            K       =    diffusion coefficient
             df

            Ac       =    concentration gradient

            xi
            X       =    channel length
             i

            n       =    inflow
             in

            0       =    outflow
            ^ oi

             C       =    concentration of C in the inflow
              in

-------
                                        - 207 -





             nin    =    number  of  inflows




             noi    =    number  of  outflows









This balance accounts  for the physical  transport  of  any  constituient between




nodes. The mass balance equation is  the most important equation  in  the system.




Equation D-l requires  that a balance between all  inflows and outflows must occur




at all nodes. If this  condition  were not true, the model would be "creating or




losing mass" which is  not physically possible.  Thus care must be taken that




this condition be met  at all points  in  the system.









In addition to this balance, the internal chemical and biological reactions must




be considered.  Exchanges between the sediment and water interface  or the air




water interfaces must  also be accounted for.  Figure D-2 illustrates the basic




paths that the various constituents  simulated may follow.  This  conceptualization




is obviously a simplification of a real system and yet it allows one to mathematically




describe the major reactions that affect the system.  As our understanding of




the phenomena  involved increases we will undoubtably refine our conceptual diagrams




and also the mathematical descriptions of them.








The next sections will describe the mathematical formulas used in the Green Bay




Water Quality Model.   Most  of these reactions have been seen before, however,




some new  considerations have been included and will be elaborated  on.  A summary




of all differential equations solved in GBQUAL is shown in Table D-2.

-------
                                                                                  TABLE  D-2

                                                             Summary of Differential  Equations Solved by the GBQUAL Model
     Description
QUALITY PROGRAM:
                                                                                     E"uat1on
                                      Advectlon       Diffusion        Inflow
                                                                                                                                                         Chemical or
                                                                                                                            Respiration                    Biological  Heat Exchange
                                                                                        Outflow     Decay   Sedimentation   Or Release   Transformation      Uptake    or Reaeration
                      c)f       IT   '   ,  (AxuC)i  +   , (AxKdf }i   +     ((!inCin>J   '    ,  "W'j     ' c^nnels; J - inflows  or outflows  per junction)
  Temperature (T):

  CoUfbn, Bacteria (F):         |VF
A>nia Nitrogen (H,):            l
                                                                                                                                           VH0(1 -  5)  - VA
                                                                                                                                                                                   Kl
                                                                                                                                                                                   O
                                                                                                                                                                                   00
Nitrite Nitrogen (NZ):         !^  .[^  (A^). + j^ (A^^).  +  ^  (Q.^).
                                                                                                                                           VN^l  -  ,)
  Nitrate Nitrogen (N3):              .
Phosphate Phosphorus  (P):
|f-  =[   (A^P),   +j
                                                            ^),   +.   (Q1r,P)j    -.  (QouP)j]
                                                                                                             (1  - S2)
                                                                                                                                                       -VAa(p -
Algae (A):
  A_  .     (AuA}.  +  .
                                                                     .^  (Q1nA)j    -  .   (QOUA).
                                                                                                                                                         VA(P-P-OI)
Organic Nitrogen:
                                3VN0    I
                                                             SN      J                J
                                                            dsr'i+*   (inN0)j   -  '
                                                                     J  I              J  I

-------
                                                                              TABLE D-2  (continued)
     Description
                                                                                     Equation
Advection        Diffusion        Inflow
                                                  Outflow
                                                                                          Respiration
                                                                  Decay   Sedimentation   Or Release   Transformation
                                                                                                                                                            Chemical  or
                                                                                                                                                             Biological   Heat Exchange
                                                                                                                                                               Uptake    or Reaeration
  Dissolved Oxygen (0):          8VO
                                         (Q1nO).
                                                                                                     -VB(1-B4)  -
  Carbonaceous BOD (B):          3VB
Rate coefficient time and
  temperature changes:
                                                            ""k
 2  3 4  5     R(T-20)     e"3.*.6.M.
,^,J.4.b     RN   N  EjD)Fe
                                                                                                            "l
                                                                                                          "
                                                       (1  -  e
                                                                                                                                                                                            o
                                                                                                                                                                                            >>

-------
                                        -  210 -


                                  Phytoplankton
GBQUAL has the capability of routing two seperate algae populations.  The  growth


of both groups of algae are considered to follow Monod kinetics.  The limiting


factors considered are phosphate concentration, inorganic nitrogen  concentration,


light availability and temperature.  The mathematical formula is given by:
      U =
                ,T-20
           MAX
 PO.-P
   4
                                                        NH3-N
                                                                           (2)
     where: K
             MAX
            PO.-P  ,
              4    /
            NO -N  >
             SP

            3
            "SN


              r
maximum growth at 20 C


temperature correction coefficient


temperature C




concentrations




half saturation constant for phosphate


half saturation constant for inorganic nitrogen


fraction of the maximum growth rate as a result of light


intensity
All of the above terms have been discussed in past literature except the term r.  The


factor r is a function of light penetration, depth of the water, and a normalized


growth  function for light intensity.  Figure D-6 presents a diagram from the


EPA publication  Dynamic Water Quality Forecasting and Management (O'Connor,


Thomann, Ditoro, 1973).   This series of graphs illustrates the normalized growth


rate function and its comparison  to three sets of observations.  To elaborate


on this relationship it is necessary to  describe the effects of algal populations

-------
                                        -  211-




 and  the  resultant light penetration.  Light   penetration  is  normally  described



 by an extinction coefficient.  Various  equations   have been  developed to  account



 for  changes in the extinction  coefficient  as  a result  of  changes  in  the  algal



 density.  One such equation is shown below.
                        = kQE +  .00268  (CHL-a) +  .01645  (CHL-a)2/3        (3)
     where:    v    =    actual extinction coefficient  (I/ft)



               k-p  =    extinction coefficient as a result of things other  than



                         algal



               CHL-a=    total concentration of Chl-a in ug/1







This formulation contributes a "self-shading" effect to dense algal populations.



A concentration of 100 ug/1 of Chl-a (frequently observed in Lower Green Bay)



will contribute 0.62/ft to the extinction coefficient.  Light penetration of



between 5 and 10 feet (Secchi Disk) is a typical value if we exclude the algal



self-shading. With a conversion of 1.9/(Secchi depth) we would have a range  of



.38 to .19 fpr Ke. Thus the self-shading effect of algae in Green Bay may be



an important limiting factor in algal growth.  The extinction coefficient may



increase by 200 to 300% as a result of a  dense algae population.







The light intensity at any depth can then be given in terms of Ke as:








                            1(2) =  I  e-(kEZ)                             W
                                   o

-------
                                        - 212 -


     where    e     =    base of natural logs


              I     =    intensity


              2     =    depth (positive  downward)


              I     =    intensity at the surface




Based on the data of Ryther (Figure D-6), Steele has proposed a formulization


for the normalized growth of phytoplankton as a function of light.  The equation


developed by Steele relates the normalized growth rate of algae as a function


of light intensity and a saturated light intensity.  It is given by:
                                                                      (5)
     where:     F   -    normalized rate of growth


                I   =    local light intensity


                I   =    saturated light intensity
                 8



To obtain the average normalized growth rate over a volume element during a given


time step, we must integrate this expression over the depth and time step At.

The intensity of light is, of course, a function of depth as given above and


is also a function of the time of day.  We can assume that I  is constant over


a given time step if we use a sinusoidal light intensity function with time and


evaluate the intensity at half time steps.  Then the fractional growth rate r


is given by:


                  D   .f

                                                      dtdS
            = I  f I  f Iae
              D  1  T  \    I
                'o   Jb

-------
CO
UJ
X
t-

>
CO
o
h-
o
X
0.
Lu
O
UJ

<
o:
Q
LL)
N

_J
                                 - 213 -


                               FIGURE D-6


                (Taken from EPA publication 66013-73-009)
             1.0.-
    (a)  P/Ps  0.5
tb)
             1.0,-
             0.
         1.0



(C)  P/ps  0.5




          0
                                                          10
                                     Chlorophyta
                                                          10
                                                Diatoms
                                                      10
O
    (d)  P/PS  0.5



              0
                                                    Flagellates
                                                          10
                    LIGHT  INTENSITY  (FOOT  CANDLES x I03)

                 Normalized Rate of Photosynthesis vs. Incident
                 Light Intensity: (a) Theoretical Curve after
                 Steele         (b,c,d) Data  after Ryther

-------
                                         -  214 -




     where:    D    =    depth



               T    =    hours in At



               f    =    hours of daylight  in  At



               Ia   =    average light intensity  at  the  surface  over At







We can integrate this fonnulization to obtain:







                    ef    -Al    -Ao)
               r = TT^  (e    - e   '                                  (7
     where:
                    a

              A  = I
               o    s
Now it remains to determine a reasonable range of values for Is.  Steele's  formula



was based on 2000 footcandles as being the average saturated growth intensity.



However, most measurements of sunlight are given in terms of langleys  (g cal/cm^)



which is an energy term.  The conversion from footcandles to langley depends



on the frequency of light you are considering.  For the visible spectrum it appears



that Is will be in the range of 0.05 to 0.15 langleys per minute.  Water Resources



Engineering has suggested a half saturation constant for light as .03  langleys/



minute.  If we set F(I) equal to 0.5 and la to 0.03 and solve for Is we obtain



a value of 0.13 langley per minute.

-------
                                        -  215 -

The death of phytoplankton is  considered  to be  dependent  on  temperature  only.

The death rate is given by:
                                 (1 - a'20 At)                         (8)
     where:   p     =    local death rate
              P2Q   =    death rate at 20C.
Phytoplankton can also leave the water system by settling to the bottom.  Normally

a settling rate of between .5 and 2.0 ft/day is appropriate.  The mass balance

of algae applied to any element j then looks like:


                                 Growth      Death      Settling
               VA..  = VA + VjAj (Pj      -    Pj      -  Oj )          (9)


     where:  A.     =   algae biomass after At

             VA     =   mass balance from equation 1

             a      =   settling rate in ft/DAY/DFPTH


                               Nutrient Cycles


The nutrients considered in GBQUAL consist of 4 forms of nitrogen and soluble

phosphate.  Nitrogen is allowed to transform from organic compounds to ammonia

and then to either be utilized by plankton or to nitrify.  Nitrate is also utilized

by plankton.  In addition,  ammonia may be released from decaying organics in the

sediments.  To complete the cycle, nitrogen associated with plankton can either

leave the system by settling or resolubilize as free organic compounds.  It is

important to realize that the organic nitrogen routed by the model refers only

to the free organic N not bound up in algae.

-------
                                        - 216  -

Phosphate can be released from sediments, precipitate to the sediments, or be

utilized by algae.  The cycle is again completed by resolubillzation from respired

algae or settling to the bottom out of the system.
                                Nitrogen Kinetics



Organic nitrogen is assumed to decompose to ammonia via a first order reaction.

The differential equation for the reaction takes the form:
               dN
                   = a   P A -    N                                  dO)
     where:   NQ    =    Org. -N concentration

              
-------
                                        - 217 -



     where:   N     =    ammonia nitrogen



              Y.,    =    release of NH -N by sediments per surface area per  time



              A     =    surface area
               s

              (3.    =    rate of nitrification of NH^-N  (temperature dependent)


              N
               1    =    fraction of nitrogen used by algae that is NHo-N


            N1+N3




Nitrite nitrogen is allowed to decay to nitrate only.  The only source (other



than inflows) is the end result of NtU-N decay.  The reactions again are first



order:
                   dN-
                         "    -                                     02)
     where:   i^    =    nitrite nitrogen



              3 2    =    rate of N02-N to N03~N






Nitrate nitrogen can only be utilized by algae or created by nitrite decay.  No



other sources or sinks are accounted for aside from inflow and outflow.  The



equation is:



               dH                   / N      \

                 -  - 
               dt
     where:   N^    =    nitrate nitrogen


              N
                         fraction of algae nitrogen that comes from nitrate
A possible addition to the model at this point would be the inclusion of a



denitrification  term that would allow NO.-1J to leave the system (as N gas)



under low dissolved oxygen conditions.  This would insert an additional nonlinearity.

-------
                                        - 218 -



Phosphate  (soluble) is allowed to be both used and  released by  algae.  In  addition,



phosphate  is precipitated to and released from the  sediments.   The  equation  takes



the form:





                 ^ = a3 (p - u ) A -  02 +  Y2  (AS)                   (14)
     where:   p     =    phosphate phosphorus



              e3    =    fraction of algae biomass that is phosphorous



              2    =    rate of phosphorus  precipitation to the sediment



              Y2    =    release rate of phosphorus per area per time



              As    =    area
                                Coliform Bacteria







Coliforms are assumed to decay by a first order reaction that is temperature



dependent.
                               = - kcC
                            dt     kcC
     where:    C    =    coliform (MPN)



                c   =    decay rate

-------
                                        -  219-


                                Carbonaceous BOD



The BOD in the system is represented by an equation consisting of 3 parallel

terms.  This equation is given by:



                         - k, ,t             - k  t             - k  t
            L - Lx (1 - e      ) + L2 (1 - e      ) + L3 (1 - e   J )   (16)
     where        L =    BOD mg/1

         L  , L?, L  =    ultimate BOD for each term

      k    k   > k   =    first order decay rate I/day base e
This equation describes a long term BOD curve that consists of three separate

terms that are exerted simultaneously.  The total ultimate BOD represented by

equation 16 is the sum of L^, 1,2, and Lj.  If L and L-j are zero then equation

16 reduces to the classical BOD equation.  (See discussion of Long Term BOD in

Section IV-C).



The decay of BOD can be represented by the equation:
              f -      kliLi                                         (16a)
Each term also contributes its oxygen deficit to the total oxygen balance.  Of

course, when using the ultimate BOD, care must be taken to remove the nitrogenous

portion either by inhibiting nitrification during the long term BOD test or

measuring the Kjeldahl nitrogen and subtracting its potential oxygen deficit.

-------
                                        - 220 -




                                Dissolved Oxygen







The concentration of dissolved oxygen is a function of reaeration pressure, net



algae production of 02 and the oxidation of BOD and inorganic nitrogen forms.



In addition, oxygen is consumed at the sediment interface as a result of decaying



organics.  This can be represented by the following equation:



                                                                           (17)



            ,     ,   3   ,

      IF =  k2 (s ' 0) - \   ^i - Wl - &2a5N2  + (ra6 " '7) M8 ~Y 3  (As)
     where:   o     =    dissolved oxygen



              0     =    saturation at the given temperature
               3


              k_    =    reaeration rate (temperature dependent)



              a,    =    oxygen required per unit of ammonia oxidized



              a     =    oxygen required per unit of nitrite oxidized



              a,    =    On production per unit of Chl-a
               o          *


              a?    =    Q respiration per unit of Chl-a



              r     =    algal activity factor previously defined



              a.    =    ratio of Chl-a to algal biomass



              Y.    =    02 uptake from bottom sediments per area per time



              A     =    algal biomass







Equation 17 is  straightforward except for the 5th term which determines the algal



contribution.   The formulation used here was developed byRyther and Yentsch and



reported by DiToro (1969).  The relationship predicted maximum  photosynthetic



production as a function of Chl-a concentration.

-------
                                         -  221 -
                 PMAX =  '25  
-------
                                        - 222 -

                                  TABLE D-3
                                           Estimated Parameter Values
Parameter

Decay Rates, Per Day Base E
     BOD-1
     BOD-2
     BOD-3
     Org-N
     NH0-N
     Coliform
Growth Rates
     ALGAE-1
     ALGAE-2
Respiration Rates
     ALGAE-1
     ALGAE-2
Half-Saturation Constants
     ALGAE-1
       (NH -N + NO--N)
       PO -P
       Light  (saturation constant)
     ALGAE-2 - Blue Green N Fixers
       P04-P
       Light  (saturation constant)
Stoichemetric Equivalence
          NH
          NO;?
            (algae
     O2
     CHL-a
     CHL-a (algae 2)
Temperature Coefficients 6 = a^

                       a,
Value Range
0.1 - 0.5
0.01 - 0.1
0.001- 0.5
0.01 - 0.01
0.01 - 0.2
0.2 - 2.0
0.1 - 3.0
0.5 - 3.0
0.5 - 3.0
0.01 - 0.1
0.05 - 0.5
0.02 - 0.4
0.005- 0.05
5.0 -10.0
0.0001 (a small
a zerp
0.005- 0.05
5.0 -10.0
3.5
1.2
.25
.25
Units Reliability
Day"1
Dayli
Day"
Day".
Day"
-1
Day"
Day"1
Day
mg/1
mg/1
langley/hr
Good
Good
Good
Fair
Good
Good
Fair
Fair
Fair
Fair
Fair
Good
Fair
Fair
value is required to avoid
divide)
mg/1 Fair
langley/hr Fair
mg/mg
mg/mg
ug/mg
ug/mg
Very Good
Very Good
Fair
Fair
                                                              Reliability
BOD-1
BOD-2
BOD-3
Org-N
NH--N
NO:-N
Coliforms
ALGAE-1 Growth
ALGAE-2 Growth
Sediment Oxygen
Miscellaneous
1.140098
1.140098
1.140098
1.047
1.2134705
1.2134705
1.047
1.047
1.047
1.100

Ratio CHL-A 1/ALGAE-l Biomass
Ratio CHL-A 2 /ALGAE-2 Biomass
-0.003856
-0.003856
-0.003856
0.0
-0.0107843
-0.0107843
0.0
0.0
0.0
-0.00175

0.025-0.10 mg/mg
0.025-0.10 mg/mg
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0



                                                                   Good
                                                                   Good
                                                                   Good
                                                                   Fair
                                                                   Fair
                                                                   Fair

                                                                   Fair
                                                                   Fair
                                                                   Fair


                                                                   Fair
                                                                   Fair

-------
                                        - 223 -

                             Program Documentation



This section presents the logical flow chart for the main program and each subroutine

in GBOUAL.  This is followed by a complete listing of each subroutine.



                             Main Program DYNQUA



This routine is the master control routine for GBQUAL and contains all the necessary

equations to route all constituents except temperature.  This routine calls in

all data, cycles through the main quality loop and creates a printed report at

desired intervals.  The flow chart is illustrated in Figure D-7 and is followed

by the listing.  The system is controlled by a set of flags called ISWTCH(I).

These values are read in INDATA and determine if a given constituent is to be

calculated. Table D-4 lists the ISWTCH control values.  In addition to the ISWTCH

array there are several other internal flags that determine printing times and

summary intervals.




                                   Table D-4


ISWTCH(I) flags.  Set ISWTCH(I) equal to 1 to simulate a constituent group and set

to 0 to skip.


                    I                                  Constituents

                    1                             Coliforms

                    2
Org-N, NH -N, N02~N, NO -N,
PO.-P, CHL-a-1
                                                    "4
                    3                             CHL-a-2

                    4                             Total Nitrogen  (or any  conservative)

                    5                             BOD and DO

                    6                             Temperature

-------
      START
                                     -  224  -
                                  FIGURE D-7
                            FLOW CHART  FOR  DYNQUA
      CALL
      BLOCK
      DATA
     CALL
    INDATA
  INITIALIZE
     SYSTEM
        v*  ~"
     ENTER
    QUALITY
     LOOP
SET TEMPERATURE
   ADJUSTED
 COEFFICIENTS
                                    CALL
                                   TEMPER
  CALCULATE
  COLIFORM
CONCENTRATION

-------
                  - 225 -
                FIGURE D-7
      DYNQUA FLOW CHART (CONTINUED)
                            CALCULATE SOLAR
                          INTENSITY, ALGAE-1,
                            ORG-N, NH3-N,
                          N02-N, N03-N, POlj-P
                                         (Total nitrogen or any con-
                                 servative is calculated automatically)
   UPDATE
CONCENTRATION
   ARRAYS
   PREVENT
  NEGATIVE
CONCENTRATION

-------
                                    - 226 -
                                  FIGURE D-7
                                 (Continued)
                                    PRINT
                                  DEPLETION
                                 CORRECTION
                                  MESSAGES
      CHECK
 CONCENTRATIONS
AGAINST SPECIFIED
     LIMITS
                                                                   STOP
STORE INFORMATION
    FOR LATER
    AVERAGING
                                    STORE.
                               CONCENTRATIONS
                               FOR RESTARTING

-------
     - 227 -
    FIGURE D-7
   (Continued)
     PRINT
CONCENTRATIONS
                                   STOP

-------
                                        - 228 -
1
2
3
4
b
6
7
B
10
1 1
12
13
14
1 b
16
17
10
10
T
20
21
22
23
24
2b
26
27
2b
29
3U
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
3B
3V
4b
41
M
43
44
45
46
47
4t>
4V
bU
bl
b" 2
C
C
c
c
c
c
L
c
c
c
c
c
c
c
c
c
c
c













c
c




c
c



c
c




c
c
PhOuRAM DYmvUA


ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
DYNAMIC tSTUARY Ai-,U TIDAL TEMPERATURE MODEL
(VRE lb CONSTITUENT ECOLOGIC VERSION


THE PROGRAM LOGIC IN THIS DECK *AS ORIGINALLY DEVELOPED FOR THE
NETi.uRKS REPRESENTING THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY-DELTA AND THE
SAN UIEGO bAY SYSTEMS. ITS PwESENT FORM. A MOD 1 1" I C A T I ON OEvELOpEu
FOR PEArtL HAKflURi INCLUDES CAPABILITY Tu SIMULATE 1H CONSTITUENTS
AND THEIR INTtRACT IU.,5 IN A VERTICALLY MIXED CLOSED BAY OR
ESTUARY. THE DUALITY CONDITIONS AT TH& SE*ARu BOUNDARY MOST
oE SPECIFIED. APPLICATION TO OTHER SY^TEl-lS MAY REQUIRE
SuhE PROGRAM MODIFICATIONS.


CUrthOI\/ijEOM/YNE., (2DU) iVuLwlN(20U) iVOL(2UO) >A50R(2(jOI i g I H ( 2UU ) 
1 NCHANl2uOi8),UlFFK.(400)V(4UO)>!(40L))>AREA(400)
2 d(4UU)iCLEN(4UU),R(4UO)iCN(4U(J),NJUNC(HUUi2)
3 6|NET(2UU),Y(20U),WOUT(2UO)iVOLyOU(20a)
4, YBAK ( 20U) iJbW  JS |NC iNJ
CO|V|HUN/MISC/ALPHA(8U) ,CuIFFK,ClNt 14>1 ) iCLlMlTl 14> iCONST(20f 1MI
A. CTEMp(14)UELl.DTb,EB6CONl4B,l4)EXR.FACTR(l'NJSTRT(lHilO> .NODYNiNOPKT
Ei NwCYCiNPRT,NKSTRfiNSPEC>NSTOP,NTAG>NUMCON,NUNITSNIOiN20
F> uJQiNtOKETFAC(20fl'<)tNEXi&lhTCH(iu)iNAHE(20>iiNAnL(SilH)
la i DELT^.KDONE .MARK1 ,MARK2


COi1hoN/lHFL/TEMPIM2UO)iOXYINt2UO),BODlN(2003)iCORGIN(200)i
S CNH31t4<20P04iN(200)
 ALGlNlt2QU)iALGlN2(200)>COLlN(2uO)>T,MlN(200)i
$ CHAIIiM(2QCl)CHA2iN(2UO)


COiinuN/tONC/TtnPJ2UO) .0AY(20u) iBOU(2ou3) >COR&(2uO) fCNHJ(200) i
4 CN02(20U),CH03(2QO)tP04(2lJO)|ALGl(2Uu)AL(i2(2UO)>
i COL(20U)tTN|2DU)tCHLAl(2QU>tCHLA2(2Uij)


COiiliuN/l')ASS/TEp|pMt2UO) ioXYM(20U) ,BOUM(2003) .CORGM2QO) iCNH3M(2UU)
S iCNU2M(200),CN03i1l20U).P04Ml200)iALGlh(2UO)i
i ALG2M(20U)n:oLM(200)iTNM(20a)iCHLAll20u)t
4 CHLA2M(2UU)


                                                              i) iCNH3PK(20U) .
b4            5             CORGDK(2UD),EXPB02(20U)tAGSNKl(200),AGSNK2(20Q)
b5            S>             CN02DM200) ,POSINKt20U) 0*YBEN(20Q) iCNHBEN<2UO) i
b6            4             StChI (2uU ) ,pMAA I I 2UO ) >PMAX2(2UU) tAGChAlI2UU) 

-------
                                               -  229 -
 b7               5                 AGCMA22UU> .PUHtoEN^UO) PKES1 2UO) iPnES2(2UU) 
 bfci               S                 bFb 101 I 3 ) (DFCOLl 200) uFNH3( 200) 
 S9                                Df- NU2(2uO ) iuFU^IM(2uU) tDFBI02 (2UU) > EXPbEii I 2 00 ) .
 60               4                 tXPBOl ( 20U ) , tXPfaOO ( 2uO , 3 ) .LXPCOL ( 200 )  iEXPNH3 ( 2UO I .
 61               *                 EXPNU2 ( 200) ,EXPOK(j(2UO)  C NBEN I 200 ) iCbAT (200) 
 62               $                 OX6EN(200) ,OXUELT(20U iPOBEN2QO) .CFBOO.ALG1P.
 71                 CUHi10W/TMS/wC(2UU>TAA(2&ilUl
 73               bi        TAilA(25ilU)>APA(2b>10)iCL.OUU(2b>lU)tlt.QTErtlv)iVZONE(102>
 74               Ci        (,KNtT(20u)iAX(S)ibX(M)iALPH(6)iBETAla)Pltii.  bOiQTOK
 7&        C
 76        C
 77                 COMMUN/lCrlECK,/Jl
-------
                            - 230 -
i 1 1
115
116
117
118
11?
12U
121
122
123
121
12S
126
127
12&
129
130
131
132
133
13H
13b
136
137
13b
139
ISO
1 HI
112
1H3
1HH
115
116
117
118
119
150
Ibl
152
153
Ibl
Ibb
156
157
158
1S9
160
161
162
163
161
165
166
167
168
169
170
  3b; KEEP=NJUNC(N, 1 )
      NJUNC(Nil)=NjUNC(Ni!)
      NJUNC(N>2)=KEEP
      
      IF( ISATCHC61 .EU.O) GO To  353
      DU  3b5 J=JStNJ


c
c

c



c
c
c
c
353
353



776

;so

  t  *

CT( J)TEMP(
CONT 1NOE

CALCOLA TE

00 760 Jl i
VOL< J) =ASUR
CO NT I Nut

CALCULATE

J)


JUNC T I ON

Nj
( J)*Y ( J)


INITIAL




ViJLiiMtS AT RFCiINrJlhir OP" QIMIM A T I n M P P tf I fi n
 u *- U I ^ ^ " ' D (- vj i " is t IM (3 u r 3inUL"*^vfii  t f> 1 u u




MASS IN JUNCTIONS

      00 3/6  J I
              K) C(J.K) *
      CHLA 1 M ( J) "CHLA1 ( J) VOL ( J)
      CHLA2MlO)CHLA2 J)*VOLl J)
      COfJTINUE
      CONTINUt
      EUDY  DIFFUSION CONSTANT
                                       STEP
  377
  37b
C
c
C *   *
C
c
c
C
C
(.**
C
  3ba CONTINUE
(.
C . . .  .  .  ..... . ......   STEP  6
c..... STOKE.  INITIAL CONDITIONS  ON  EXTKACT ISUHHARY)  TAPE
C
C******** ************************************************ ******
C                     BEGIN MAJN  WUALITY LOOP
      ORIGINALLY  THE EDDY DIFFUSION  COEFFICIENT  WAS  KEAO IN HERE
      N0rt  THE  DIFFUSION COEFFICIENTS AKE KEAD  IN  IN  SUBKOUTINE COEFF

             .  ...........   STEP  b
       COMPUTE  VOLUMES OF I NFLOrt-OU TFLOW
      DO  308  J=l NJ
      VOLiJIN( J)
                      J)DtLTW
      DO b36  1CYC-INCYC iNWCYC
      NUCYCC  =  ICYC
                                       STEP
                                       STEP

-------
                                            -  231-
171        c**  UETERrtlNE  FLO  DIRECTION  AivO  COMPUTE  1/4  POINT  CONCENTRATION
172        L
1/3                UU416i^=lfNC
174                vOLFLft  =  o|(N)    DEl-Ty
1 7 b                N L  =  N J 0 N C I N i 1 )
176                NH=NJUNCIN,2)
177        C       UX=VIN)DELTQ
17B        C       F=DA/CLEN(N)
179        C       IF(F.GT.O.b) F=u.b
18U                F=025
181                f ACTUK = UUS-F
182                IMSlfO.GE.O.U)  FACTOrt=u.b+F
183
1 8 H           412  DO  M14  K1|NUMCON
ISb                IFlCINiK,1).LT.-9.E+19)  GO Tu  41H
186                yiaKAi) =  C(Nt-iK)  -  CINH.K)
Ifa7                COiMC  =  C(NH>K)  + fACTOK    GKAD
IBS        C
139        C	STEP  10
19U        c** AUVECT10N  AND  li I fFUS I 0,<
191        C
19^                ADMASS    CONC    VOLFLH
19J                olMASS  =  UlFFK(N)   OELTij   AREA(N)    Q&RAU  /CLEwlN)
194                CMASi(Nri,M  =  CMASSlNHiK)  + ADHASb +  DlMASS
19b                CHASbtNLfK)  =  CMASSlNL.Kl  - ADMASS -  OlMASS
196           414  CONTINUE
197           S16  CONTINUE
198        C
199        C	STtp  11
200        (. AUD  WASTE  DISCHARGE  ANu  DIVERSION MASSES TO THE JUNCTIONS
201        C
202                DO  434  J=JSNJ
2U3                JF( VOLQ1NC J) .6E.O.O)  IjO TO H30
201                DO  431  K=1|NUMCON
2Qb           S31  CMASS(JK)=CMASS( J iK )-CSPEC U iM VOL0  Tu  592
219        C
220        C	CALL TEMPERATURE SIMULATION  ROUTINE  FOR  CALCULATION OF
221        C        TEMPERATURES  AT  THE  NU  OF  THE  (jUAHTY  TIME STEP
222        C
223                CALL TEMPER(TEMP,TEMPMiVOUiASOR)
22H        C
22b        C	STEP  13
226        C	 ASSIGN  TEMPERATURE  ADJUSTED  COEFFICIENTS
227        C

-------
                                        -  232 -
228          592 CONTINUE.
229              00  bdU J.JSiNJ
230              TEMPI J)=TEMPMU)/VOL< Jl
231              I T  T  M P ( J J
232              lF(ISttTCril6>.Eg.i)  1 T = C T ( J )
233              JF(lT.LT.l)  IT-l
231              IfllT.GT.SU)  1 T = b 0
23S              DFfaCuiJil)=E.APBODllTil)bGUlJMJil) + 1.
236              OFbOO(ji2)ExPBuD(IT,2)BOOOK.(Ji2) + 1.
237              OFbOa(ji3)=EXPBOOin3)bODOl<.lJ. 31 + 1.
236              OFCOL(J)=EXPCOL11T)COI-OKIJ> + 10
239              UfNH3(J)ExPNH3CIT)CNH3UK(J)+l.U
210              OFN02(J)EXPM02tIT)CNOiUKtJ)+l.U
241              OFOGMJ)*XPORt,(lT)*COR^OK(Jl + l.U
242              oFb 101 ( J)=EXPbOl ( JT )
213              UFBI02 ( J)=EXPB02< I T)
211              OXBN(J)=OXYatlMlJ)*tXpbc.N(IT)ASuh(J)
                 PUbEulJ)=POtblMCJ)tXfbt.MlT)ASllF<(J)
217
218
219
250
2B 1
2S2
253
251
255
256
257
258
259
260
261
262
263
261
265
266
267
26b
269

SBU
C

C


562
b6U
C

f
C



OXDELTl J)=0
CONl INoE



IFIlbnTCH(l).Eoi.l) GO
00 b62 J = J S i N J
COLMIJJ=COLMIJ)*OFCOL
C 0 N 1 1 N U E




IF< lSwTCH<2> .E. 1 ) GO
HOoKS= JCYCOELT
10AYShOoRS/23. 99999





To S60

( Jl



1 f. A E
U ** H C.
To 610


Ti=HOOKS-FLOAT<21*IoArS)





1J=10AYS+1
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.OR. DT

                                                     STtP 11
                                                     SItP  IS
                                                       .QT.  SET) GO  TO 20UO

                  SONETSOAV(1.-COS(2.*3.111S92(UT1ME-SKM1J))/HOL(IJ)))
271               GO  TO 2U10
272         20UU  SONTU.
2.73         2CI1U  CONTINUE
271               DO  6bO  J=JSNJ
27S               ICriECK  =   JIGNOK(J)
276               If- ( 1CHECK.GT.U)    GO TO  600
277        C
276        c .....  ALGAE  ^RO^THI  KESPIKATION AND  SETTLING RATES
27V        C
280               PMU1=0.
281               PMU2=0.
2B2               FKrtAXl0.
283               FfiMAX2'0.
281               IF(SOUET  .LE. 0.)   GO  TO 602

-------
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-------
                                          -  235-


39V         44B  CONTINUE.
400       c
HOI       C .  .  .	STEP 20
402       (.*  PREVENT  NEGATIVE CUNCEu T R AT I ON  AND SUPERS A T OR A T 1 OH
403       C
404              DO 464  K=I.NUMCON
405              IF(C1NIK.1).LT.-9.E+1 V)  GO To  461
406              DO 466  J*JSNJ
407              IF(C(J,M .GE.U.O) &0  TO  466
408              IF(KUCOP.E82)  60 TO  462
109         45a  iVK 1 Tt(6 i460)              J . I C YC . K . C ( J , K )
110         460  FOKMATI39H DEPLETION  COKRtCTION  MADE AT  JUNCTION  I37H  CYCLE  Hi
111               ^1H  FOR  CONSTilUtNT  NO. 1112H. CONC.  ((-AS F102)
112         462  CUiO    0.0
113              CMASS  Li(MC(LH),M=l,NUMCOi\i)
44V         481  FOKMAT(I8>b(I4i&11.4)/Bxi7(4<3ll4)J
450              CALL  EXIT
4 51         48oCONIINOt
45i!              &0 fO 4d<:
453         14B2  CONTINUE
454              DO 14faO J=1NJ
455         1 4BO  C ( JiM=0.0

-------
                                        -  236-


456         4B2 CUNTlNUt
457       C
458       C	   SliP 23
459       C... WRITE  JUNCTION QUALITY  ON  TAPE FOR LATER  AVERAGING
460       C
461             IFIN1U  ..  U)  GO TO 6000
462             IFUCYC  .LT.  IwRITEJGU  TO  6000
46J             KOONTT=KOONTT+1
464             wKITt(NlO)  ICYC,,P04IJ).CHLAllj),CHLA2NJ)
476             WKITb(6iblB>              ICYC,ICYCTF.NTAG
477         518 FOKMATI lHl///47h RESTARi  DECK  TAPE  .AS  LAST WRITTEN  AFTER CYCLEI5/
478                    50H  MYDRAOL1C CYCLE  ON  EXTRACT  TApE FOR RESTARTING  I5/
479                  8H  NTAG   I3///
480             RtrilNON3Q
481         &2u CONTINUE
482       C
483       C	   STtP 2b
t84       c***** PRINT  QUALITY  OUTPUT
48b       C
486             IF I ICYC-IPRT)  424.524,524
487         S24 IPRT=IPKT+NPRT
488         528 HOUKS    DELTQ * FLOAT  (JCYC) / 3600.0
489             KDAYS    HOURS / 23.V99V9
490             HUUKS    HOURS - FLOAT  (^4   KUAYS)
491             KUAYS=KUAYS+1
492             WRITE(6.530) ICYC,KUAYS . HOURS
493         530 FORMATfIOX,'SYSTEM STATUS  AFTER DUALITY CYCLE*.
494             114,5X.tDAY'.13.HOU',F4.1//.
495            2' JUN   TEMP(C)        OxY     OtJODl    Ua002    UBOu3     ORG-N       N
496            3H3       N02      N03       P04   CHLA-1    CHLA-2   COL/MPN    TOT-N1
497            4,/.lax.'MG/L     MG/L      MG/L      MG/L     HG/L      MG/L      MG/L
49B            5      MG/L      MG/L      UG/L     UG/L                MG/L'.//)
499             00  534 I 1 i NOPRT . I H I
500             J=JPKT(I)
501             ARITt(6.b'32) JiTEMP(J)>OXY(J)>BOD(J>l)lDOOtJi2)>bOU(J.3)iCORG(J).
502             1  CNH3(J).CN02(J).CN03(JJ,PU4(J).CHLA1(J),CHLA2(J)COL(J).TN(J)
503         53^ FORHATlIX.13..12F9.3.E9.2.F9.3)
504         534 CONT1NOE
505       C
506       C	STEP 26
507       C.....  PRINT HEAT BUDGET  INFORMATION AT  EACH PRINT INTERVAL IF DESIRED
508       C
5QV             1F( lt-8TtM.E<*.0) GO TO  4*4
510             bT02=QRNET(J)1327.29
511             *M Tt I6i92)
512          92 FORMATl  50HI     RAUUTlOw  TERMS  AND  EQUILIBRIUM  TEMPETATURE

-------
                                                                   ON3             SSS
                                                            11X3  Tim             bSS
                                                                                  ess
                                                                                  zss
                                               11X3  11VD (0f VOt>N ' Jl             TSS
                 HHSI  IV  a313"ldWOD NfHiVTnWts  AlllVftfc HZCliVWNOJ  ZttS        OSS
                                                                                  6hS
                                                           QCN
                                                                     I             9trS
              ONV SNOI1ION03  XinvOB 1VI1INI  JO
                                                                           >      ct-s
 ** it**********************')      ?trS
                              dooi  Ainvnfi NIVW  ON3                       5      t^s
***************************************** **D
                                                                       9C5
                                                                       SfS        qfS
                                                          X3Tvnt)  THO             5CS
                                                           DA3i = ?NNvw  nnns       ires
                                                            scs 01  o"5             rts
                                        01 O1)  (XNIT '^3' llNnOM)-!!             ZCS
                                                 01  o^ (0 *f)?'  niM)ji             ics
                                                            {D3l')snja             CZS
                                                            ir i 3h
                                                                                   PZ5
                                                                                   415
                                                                                   ei?
                    (/  ">  930     HA'I   nifl       TV-iX     HnZ)^yi/q            /. 15
                                                                      t?            9IS
                                                                  o71/e            <5IS
                                                                  niq  ?            his
                                                                    t /T            cic.

-------
                                        - 238 -





                                Subroutine INDATA








This subroutine controls the input of data to the model.  It also writes various




reports detailing the data used in the program.  INDATA calls two other routines




that handle particular blocks of data (COEFF and METDAT).  If the particular




run is the first run in a series, then initial conditions are looked for in the




data input.  If this is a restart run, initial conditions are pulled in from




a seperate restart tape or storage file.  The only exception to this is the temperature.




Temperature initial conditions are input in the data deck for every run unless




it is being simulated.  INDATA also allows the user to alter the restart initial




conditions by a multiplication factor applied over any group of junctions.

-------
                                  -239  -
                               FIGURE  D-8
                         FLOW CHART FOR INDATA
ENTRY CALL
FROM DYNQUA
READ PROBLEM
 DIMENSIONS
                               READ ALL
                             PHYSICAL DATA
                                  _L
                             READ  INTEGER
                             CONTROL  FLAGS
                          AND  CYCLE  NUMBERS
                                READ
                            ISWTCH VALUES
                            READ INTEGER
                            CONTROL FLAGS
                             FOR REPORT
                             GENERATION
                             READ TITLE
                            PRINT PROBLEM
                         DEFINITION REPORTS

-------
     CALL
     COEFF-
                                  - 240 -
                                 FIGURE  D-8
                                 (Continued)
                                   CALL
                                  METDAT
                                READ SOLAR
                                INTENSITIES
                                 FOR ALGAE
                                SIMULATION
 READ LIMITING
CONCENTRATIONS
PRINT PHYSICAL DATA
                                                     YES

-------
       - 241 -
     FIGURE D-8
    (Continued)
   READ INITIAL
    CONDITIONS
                                 READ INITIAL
                                 TEMPERATURES
READ & PRINT INFLOW
    QUALITY BY
     JUNCTION
                                 READ INITIAL
                                  CONDITIONS
                                 FROM RESTART
                                 TAPE OR FILE
   READ INITIAL
 CONDITION FACTORS
     TO ADJUST
INITIAL CONDITIONS
        PRINT
       INITIAL
       QUALITY
     CONDITIONS
   READ AND PRINT
     BOUNDARY
     CONDITIONS
RETURN

-------
                                        - 242 -
 I              SU3KOOTINE  INUATA
 2        C
 3              COMMON/GEOM/YNE<200)iVOLlN(20Q)VOl_<200)ASUR{2CJO)QIN(200)
 4              1              NCHANt 200.6) ,UIFFK(HUO> >V ltOO> M400) .AKEA1400) 
 5              2              b(400).iCLEN(400) ,R(400) CNCHOGJ .NJONC(4U0.2)
 6              3             iQNET (200) .Y (200) yOUTt2GQ) VOUQOU4200>
 7              4,             YfaAK ( 20U ) iJutl ,JS,NC .NJ
 8              COMMON/MISC/ALPHA(80)iCDIFFK.,CIN(l4l).CLlMlTUM ( 2UO I i BOO 1 N ( 200 . 3 ) .CORG1N(200) 
19              S              CNri31N(200) ,CN021N(200) .CM03IN1200) tpOHlNl200) ,
20             S              ALG1N1 (200) i ALG1N2(200) iCOLIN(200)iTNlN(200)>
21              S              CHA1 INI200I ,CHA21N(2UO)
22       C
23       C
2t             CUMMON/CONC/TEMP(200),OXY(2UO)BOD{2Qu3).CORG(2uOICNH32UO)i
25             $              CN02I200) .CN03(200) iPOt(200) ,ALG1(200)>ALG2(200>i
26                           COL<200 ) ,TN(20U>,CHLA1(200) .CHLA2I20u)
27       C
28       C
2V             CO|1MUN/ttASS/TMPM(200)OXYM(20a>>BOUM(200>3)iCOR6M(2aO>iCNH3M(2QO>
3U             S               iC.-JUiM I 2UU ) i CNO JM I 20U ) POMM ( 20U ) i AL& 1 H ( 200 ) >
31             S              ALG2MI2UO) (C.OLMI200) |TNM(200) >CHLA1M( 20U) 
32             *              CHLA2M(200>
33       C
31       C
3b              CUriMUN/KATE/REuX(2(JO)iCOLUK(200)*BODDK(200i3)>CNH3DK(200)i
36             S              COKbDK(200) tEXPb02(2uU)  lAbSNKt(200) >AGSMK2(200I 
37             i>              CN02UK(200) >POS1NK(200)  iOXYBEN(200) iCNHbEN(200) >
38             S              SECHI(200) ,PMAX11200) PMAX2(2UO) AGCnAl (200) .
39             *              AGCHA2(200) ,P04bEN(200)  .PRESJ(200) iPRES2(200)
4U             S              UFBI01 (200) , DFUOD(200t3 ) i UFCOL(200) .UfNH3(200) .
HI             S              DFN02 I 2uU ) ,uFObM 2QU I .L/FB 102 ( 20U) .ExpbENI 20U) .
42             S              EXPbOl (200) ,EXPBOD(2uU ,3) .ExPCOL(200 I iEXPNH3(200) i
H3             S              EXPN021200) ,EXPOKG(200)  .CKBEN1200) .CSAT(200) .
44             $              OXBEN(200)tOXUELT(200)tPObENI200)>CFbOD>ALGlPi
MS             S               AUGlN.PiPl .FSN1 .PSL1 ,ALt2P.AUG2N.PSP2tPSN2PSL2
46             S               OXNH3.0XN02,OXRtSl ,0AhS2iOXFAC 1 OXFAC2DKBODi
47             S              UK.CUL iRAC IN ,RACEX
48       C
4V       C
50              COMMON/bUN/  TLt365) . SR I (36b)  .HDL(36b)
51       C
52       C
53              COHMUN/ATHS/yC(2UO)fQ*l200).U(E(2UU).EyTEMl200).XuNS(200).QTOT(200)
SH             A.      (1|NSI2bl10)i(jNAl25ilQ)tQRNETA(2StlO)iOWlNDA<2510)>TAA(25llU>
5B             Bi      TA^IA (25i 10)  ,APA(2b i 10) fCLOOU(25i 10)  IEQTEM, JWiONE( 10.2)
56             C.      iKNET 1200) .AX 14) BX(4) ,AUPHl 8) iBETA (8) .PI ...bO.DTOK

-------
                                           - 243-
 57
 58
 59
 60
 61
 62
 63
 61
 65
 66
 67
 68
 69
 70
 71
 72
 73
 74
 75
 76
 77
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 81
 82
 83
 84
 85
 86
 87
 88
 8V
 90
 91
 92
 93
 94
 95
 96
 97
 98
 9V
100
101
102
103
10H
105
106
107
108
109
11U
1 1 1
1 12
1 13
       COi-IMON/lCHECK/JIGNOR(20u)

       DIMENSION JUNMb)iJON2CMASS<200.14) iCSPEC(200. 11)
       EQUIVALENCE  (C(ltl)iTEMp(l)),(CMMSS(lil),TEMPM(l))
      S              , (CSPECf lil)  .TEMPlNt 1 ) )
        REAU  CONTROL AND
                            ......  STEP
                            HYDRAULIC  DATA
 10U1
   bd
                            N
      READlSi 1001)  NJiNCuELT
      FORMAT(215iF10.0
      READ(5i88>   (JlbNOR(J)i
      FOKMATI40I2J
      REAO(5i80)  (1 TAPE( 1 ) i 1 = 1 ,5 I
      00 82  1 = 1 >4
      NITAPE< I )
      1FIN.6T.O)  REWIND
  a2  CONTINOE
      NIO'ITAPECI)
      N20=ITAPE12J
      il30*ITAPE<3)
      N401TAPE(4)
  bO  FOKMAT116I5)
      MM1
      READ(5i1002J
1002  FURMAT120A4)
      READ(5t-
                                   J-l.NJ)
                      IALPHA1 I ) * 1 = 1
       RtAU(5.-
       KEAOIb,-
       KEADIbi-
                       RlN)
                                 >MC)
                  ( CLElM IN) >N*
                  ( (NJONCINt 1
      RtAO(5i-   (    Y(J)iJ=
      RtADlSi-   (ASOR(J).J*
      READ(5i-   (INCHANlJiK)
      DO 9003 ME!iNC
9003  Q(N)=0.0
      REAO(bt-)    (Q(N).   N"
      DO 9000 N=liNC
      AKEAIN)   b(N)h(N)
      V IN )  = u(N)/ARtAIN)
      ATIM10=10.06
      DO 9001 J"lNJ
      A50RIJ)  =   IASOR(J))
                                 i J=l i2 )
                                 lUJ)
                                 iN-1 ib) > J=
                                 inC>
                                             >NJ)
 9000
 90U1
                                  ATEN10
C	
(.  RtAU  INUEPENUEin  CONTROL  DATA
                                            STt-P
      3,    lNCrC|N(i|CYCiKZOPiKDCuPiNTA(jiJiiIEXC
    84 FURMAT(7I5)
       REAU(5iHO)  (IStTCH(I)il = li6)
    4u FORMAT(1015)
       REAL)t5i80)   1PRT
                                                   IWRlTE,
                                                                  IftRINTiNOPKT

-------
                                          -  244-


111              KiAOlSil92)ljPr*T(l)I*liNUPKT>
lib          192 FORMAT!11 I b >
116              RlTE(6lOb)   < ALPHA I 1)  1 = 1 t>0)
117          1 0 b F 0 R M A T (     it(20Xi20A4>/   ))
lib              UtLTu( = OELT*36GU.
119              UtLTQlDELT
120              OtuTw2*UELTuil*FLOAT  (NSlpRT)
121              8MTt (6  107 )          1NCYC.NUCYC.         DEL f W2 , uEL T U 1
122          1U/ FuRrtATt10X.INITlAL  QOALITY  CYCLE*  i I b  / i
123             1     10XFINAL  OAL1TY  CYCLE  ibt/
124             2     IQXi'OuTpUT  INTtRvAc  HOORS=  i F 10.3 i / ,
125             3     lUXi'TlME  STEP  rtOURb        ' F1U.3t///)
126              RjTE{6l06MITAPt         4brt      FlLt  CONTAINING  KtSTAKT  DATA                  t!3i///>
132              taKJTE16 i 109)   IPKT
133          109 FOKMAT(31H PhiNTOUT  IS  TO  BtGlN  AT CYCLE  It//)
13H              DTU  *  DELTdil   /  21.
13b              NUMCON=11
136              IF(JS.Lt.O) JS=l
137        C
138        C  .  . .  i	STEP  t
139        C.... PRINT  CONSTITUENT  SELEcTEO  FOR  SIMULATION
ItO        C
1H1              WK1TE(6120)
IH2          120 FORHATI         60H THE FOLLOWING  CONSTITUENTS  ARE BtING  CONSJQERED
143             SIN  THIS  RON        /.  CONSTITUENT ttQ.       CONSTITUENT')
1HH              4*1
lib              IF ( I SvkTCHl 6 ) >Ew>0)  rtK I TE ( 6 t 1 22 )  J I ( I N AME ( K i J ) i K= 1 , 5 )
146              IF( I5ATCM(5) .Et|. I )  bO TO  b2
It/              HKITL(6i 122)   1J I INAME(KiJ) tKI >b ) iJ = 2b)
IH8           b2 CONTINUE
ItV              IF(1SwTCH(2).Ewi)  ^0 To  50
1SU              ftR!TE(6il22)  ( Ji I INAMElKiJ) K=1 ,5) .J6,U)
151           bUCONTlNUt
Ib2              J=12
153              IF ( I SWTCH(3).EUtO)  OR ITt(6i122 )  4  t 1 NAME(K,j) , K=J , 5 )
I5t              IF ( 1 SwTCHl 1 ) .EtJ. I )  00 To  5t
15b              J=13
1 b 6              WKlTt(6>1^2)  Jf(INAi1E(K,j)iK-lib)
157           bH CONTINUE
1&ri              J=1t
159              KITt(6122)  J , I 1 NAME < K , J) |K,= 1 ,b)
160          12^ fURMATI IS i 1UXbAt)
161              JF< I5>*TCH<6 .Ew.l )  uO Tu  125
162        C
163        C	  CALL FOK WEATHER UATA
164        C
16b              CALL METQATlOELTtj)
166        C
167          12b CONTINUE
160              IFI1SATCHI2)  .U.  1) GO TO 802U
169              H = FLUAT I INCYC-UUELT
170               It/U = H/23.V99V

-------
                                              -  245-
172                HeFuOATlNwCYC)L>ELT
173                IUD2=n/^39999
171                DO  8UOO  KK=IDDilUD2
17b         btiOO  REhU(btdOlO)  1L(KK )  Sk 1 (KK ) HDL(KK)
176         aUiU  FOKHAT<3F1U4>
177         8U20  CONTINUE
1 78        C
179        C
180        C	  CALL  SOdROUTlNE  COEFF  TO  READ  AND PKIi-T  bYSTEM  COEFFICIENTS
181        C
182                CALL COEFF
133        C
184        C	STEP   b
Idb        Ct.,..  READ  MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE CONCENTRATIONS
186        C
187           lib  FOR.1AT ( BF10.0)
189                CLIMlT/A  AND  HYU KAUIuS AND  X-SE.C 1 I ON AL  AKEA OF
198               *ChANNELi ****///
179                       aUH** ********     ChANNEt  DATA      *
2QU               ****       /
201                       SUH  CHANt    LENbTH    AlDTH     AREA    MANNING   ^ET  FLOW   HYU.
202               K/iUiUS   JUNC.ATENUS       /)
2U3                l9<4)                (N>CLEN(N)ib(N)lAKeA(N)tCr\(N)iil|NLT(N)i
2QM               * R ( N ) , ( N J U N C ( N , K ) , K = 1 i 2 ) , N = 1 , l-l C )
20S           194  KOKMAT I ISi2F8.0 iF9.UiFd,3 iF12.2iK!U. 1  I V , 16)
206                AK I Tt I 6  1 9b 1
207           19b  FORhATl66H*********   JUNCTION  DATA      *
208               **   /H3H      JUNt.  INFLOW         AREAIFT2)   HEAD    CHANNELS/)
210           1V6  FOWMATlHXi I1* ,F9. 1 ,3X,f U ,U F7.2i Ibi7 If )
211                ArtlTL(6910l)
212                WRITE! 6 19103)     ||J(N),  N1NC>
213          9101  FORhAT(30H   FLOt  Q I S TR 1 tiU T I ON BY  CHANNEL)
214          9103  fURMATl 10Ffa.2)
21b         C
216                IF(NHO.t>T.O>  faU  TO 124
217         C
218         C  ......  .  .....      .    .   STEP   7
219         C ..... KEAu  INITIAL  JUNCTION  DUALITY
220         C
221                UO  126  L=l,Kj
222                RtAOtS,200>   J 1 f J2  1 C TEMp ( K ) . K= 1 
223           2uu  FOKMAT(2I5I/F 10.0/8F10.U)
224                IFiJ^.Ei^.O)   &0  TO 130
22b                DO  129  JJ1   J2
226                DO  1^8  K=1,MUMCUN
227           12b  Ct JK)=CTEMP(K)

-------
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-------
                                             - 248 -

342          230 CONTINUE
343               U0232i=l,NUMCuN
344               IFCNGKOUP  ( 1 ) )231 ,23 1 , 2J2
345          231 ft K I T  216)1
346          232 CONTINUE
347               D0238rt=l,^UMCuN
348               IFItVGROOP  ( M ) ) 238 , 238 , 233
349          233 N fa  =  N G K 0 U P  I M )
35U               uO  236  K=l,N&
351               NJ1  =  NJSTftT  (MiK)
3b2               NJ2 = IMJSTOP(M,K)
353               UO  234  J=NJl,NJ2
354               C(Jr1)C(JM)*pACTRlMiK)
355          234 COrtUNUt.
356          236 CONTINUE
357          23tt CONTINUE
358          23V CONTINUE
35V        c
36U        C	STtp  15
361        C *   > t  PRIivT  INITIAL  I* U A L 1 T  CONDITIONS
362        C
363               NN s: Stj
364               uO  25D  J=JSNJ
365               TEi1P( J)=CT( J)
366               IF(NCHANfJ,I ) .E.OJ  GO TO  2bO
367               NN=NN+1
368               lMNn.LL.50)  GO  TO  252
36V               KN=l
37U               rtHlTLl6,24l)
371          241 FOf{MAT(47Hl       INlllAL CONDITIONS  (MG/L EXCEPT  AS  NOTED)       /
372              $  JUIM   TEMPIC)        OXY     UB001      UB002     UBOD3     OHG-N        N
373              Sh3        N02        N03        P04    CHLA-1    CHLA-2   COL/MPN      TOT-N*
374              $/)
375          252 CONTINUE
376               ttKJ Tt (6 <242 >  J t ( C ( J  K ) f f, = 1 i NOMCON )
377               CHL1(JJ=ALG1(J)
37b               CHLA2 ( J)=Lt.2l J)
37V               ALG1(J)=ALGl(d)/AfaCMA11J)
380               ALG2(J)=ALG2(J)/AGCHA2(J)
381          242 FOKMAT< 1XiJ3,12F9.3E9.^ ,F9.3 )
382          2bO CONTINUE
383        c
384        C	STEP  16
385        <;****  KEAu  ANU  PRINT  bOUHDARy  CONCENTK AT i ONS
386        C
387               KEAUlb,dQ)(KbOPlM),Ml,uuMCUN)
388               DOl87Ml,NUMCON
389          Ibb KtAl)(5,184)  C1N(M,1)
390               IFlClNln.l)  .LT.  0.)  CIMM,1 )--V.9E+I 9
391          104 KORMATiaFlO.O)
392          187 CONTINUE
393               Clul11,1)=CIN(11,1)/RACtX
394               ClNl 12,1 )=C1N( 12, 1 )/RACtX
39b          191CONT1
396        L
397               KETUKN
398

-------
                                      -  249 -
                                Subroutine  COEFF
This subroutine reads in all spatially variant and spatially invariant system
coefficients.  After reading all coefficients, a report is generated listing each
coefficient for each junction.  A second report is generated detailing the
nonvariant coefficients.


Before control leaves COEFF, an array of temperature adjustments for each coefficient
is generated.  These arrays are used in DYNQUA to set the coefficients that are
temperature affected during each time step.  Figure 10 is the flow chart for COEFF.
If the user desires, COEFF will also calculate the reaeration coefficient internally.


All coefficients are input for 20C, and assumes base e.  COEFF adjusts the coefficients
according to the time step used in the simulation.

-------
                                       - 250 -





                                Subroutine COEFF








This subroutine reads in all spatially variant and spatially invariant system




coefficients.  After reading all coefficients, a report is generated listing




each coefficient for each junction.  A second report is generated detailing the




nonvariant coefficients.








Before control leaves COEFF, an array of temperature adjustments for each coefficient




is generated.  These arrays are used in DYNQUA to set the coefficients that are




temperature affected during each time step.  Figure 10 is the flow chart for




COEFF. If the user desires, GOEFF will also calculate the reaeration coefficient




internally.









All coefficients are input for 20C, and assumes base e.  COEFF adjusts the




coefficients according to the time step used in the simulation.

-------
                                     - 251 ~
                                  FIGURE  D-9
                         FLOW CHART FOR COEFF
CALL FROM INDATA
READ REAERATION
 COEFFICIENTS
                                                                CALCULATE
                                                               KEAERATION
                                                              COEFFICIENTS
                               READ REMAINING
                                COEFFICIENTS
                               WRITE SPATIALLY
                            VARYING COEFFICIENTS
                               READ AND WRITE
                             SPATIALLY INVARIENT
                                COEFFICIENTS
                             ADJUST COEFFICIENTS
                                FOR TIME STEP
                                 DETERMINE
                                TEMPERATURE
                                ADJUSTMENT
                                  ARRAYS
                                 RETURN

-------
                                              - 252  -
 1               SUBROUTINE  COEFF
 2       C
 3       C	  THIS  SOOKOUTIIME  READS  v'ALUE-S FOR NUHERuub  COEFFICIENTS  AND CONVERTS
 4       c        irith  AS NECESSARY  ro  EQUIVALENT  VALUES FOK THE  COMPOTATIONAL  TIME
 5       c
 6               CUMHON/tjEOh/YNE(20U)iVOLlM2!JO)iVOL(2UO)ASUR(200) ii>l( 400 )  AKEA( 4UO ) i
 8              2               8(400)|CLEN(400).R(4UO)CN(400)|NJUNC<400.2)
 V              3              t)NET t 200) i Y l 200 ) OOT ( 20Q I  VOLQOUI 200 )
10              4 i              YbAK(2UU)iJk,MJSlN(.iNJ
11               COMMUN/MISC/ALPHA(80).CulFFK>ClN(lSiJ)>CLlMlTllH)iCONSTl20.1M)
12              A,       ClMPllH).DEl-TDTbtEBBCON(Ha,l'|)iEXiFACTK(l'(10)iIEXC
13              B.       INCYCtlNTt>IiiIPRTilT*PEib)cOKblNI200)
22              4               CNH3IN1200J |CN021N(200) CN031N(20Q) ipGHiNt200) 
23              i               AL^lNl(200)>ALGiN2(200)iCOLiN(200)iTl\INl200)i
2H              *               ChAllN(200)tCHA2iN(2uO)
2b       C
26       C
27               COMI10N/CONC/TEnP(20u),OxYl200)iBOU(200j).CORfa(2t.O)CNH3(20u)
2b              S               C(M02(2Ua| ,Cn03(20U) .POH120U) i ALbl 1200) ALCi2(200) 
29              4               COL(200) ,TN(200) .CHLAU200 1 ,CHLA2(2Uu )
3U       c
31       C
32               CUi1l1Ui AliSrvK. 1  ( 200) i AQXYDtN(200) ICNHBENI200) i
41              4              SECH1 (200)  IPMAXH200) PMAX2(20U) . AGChAl (20U) ,
BEN(200 )  i
4b              S              EXPbOl (200) iEXPBOD(2U0.3) EXPCOL(200) tEXPNH3(200) 
46              4              EXPN02I 200) tEXPORGt200) iCNBEN(200) tCSAT(2UO ) t
47              S              OXbEN(200)lOXOELT(200)>POBEN(20U)iCFoODiALG1P>
48              4              ALG1U.PSP1  PSNI .PSL1  , ALG2P .AL&2N|PSP2PbN2>PSL2>
49              4              OXNH3iOXN02,OXESl OXKES2OXFAC 1 . OXFC2iDKBOD
bO              S              DKCOLiRACIN.RACEx
51        C
&2        C
S3               C^i-lMUN/iOlV TL( 36bl >SRl I 36b)
S4        C
b&        C
56

-------
                                      - 253 -
57
5d
b9
60
61
62
63
64
6b
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
33



C
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C



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A, ai10)IETEM,.JW20N(lO,2)
C, t)KNET(20U),AX(4),cX('),ALPri(8)DETAI8),Pl,ftBOUTOK


COMMON/ICHECK/J1GNOK120U)

DIMENSION C(20U,l4)iCMAi>S(2tJO,14)iCSPEC(200,14l
EQUIVALENCE (C(l,l)>TEMp(l)),lCMASS(l,l),TEMPM(l)l
$ , (CSPECl 1,1) ,TEhPlN< 1 ) )





DIMENSION jUNl(b) ,JUN2(b) CQEF(5)
DIMENSION AU10( 10,31


	 REAEKATION 
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                                                                                                                                                              Jl
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-------
                                       - 258 -


 342         362 CONTINUE
 343             GO TO  36U
 3*44         364 CONTINUE
 345         3?u KEAU(SilUQ)  ( JUN1 1 I ) fjUn2( I ) ,COEFU ) ,Ii ,5)
 346             DO 372  1=1,5
 347             J1=JUN1(I)
 348             IF(JI.EH.U)  GO TO 374
 349             J2=JUN2lI)
 3SO             DO 372  J = J1J2
 351             AGCMA2(J)=COtFli)
 352         372 CONTINUE
 3S3             GO Tu  370
 354         374 CONTINUE
 355       C
 356       C     EDDY DIFFUSION CUEFIClENfS  KEAO  HERE  BY  JUNCTIONS
 357       C
 358        1LJUO KEAU(bilOU)   I JUN1 U ) , JulM2< i ) ,COtM 1 )   1 = 1,b)
 359             DU 1UU2  I = lB
 36U             J1=JUN111)
 361             IF (Jl.Etj.U)  GO  TO  1004
 362             J2=JUN2l1)
 363             DO 1UQ2  J = Jl i J2
 364             OIFFM j)  COEFI 1 )
 365        10U2 CONTINUE
 366             GO TO  1000
 367        1DU4 CONTINUE
 368       C
 369       C .  .	STEP  4
 370       C	 IftKiTE  bPATIALLY  VAKYING COEFFICIENTS
 371       C
 372             AKITE(6i14Q)
 373             DO 180  J=l ,Nj
 374             IF(NLHANIJ,1).Ey.U)   GO TO  180
 37*             WR1TE(6>141)  JiKEOX(J).BODUK(J,l).BODOKlJ.2).'BODL
-------
- 259 -
399
4UO
an]
i U *
102
403
104
105
406
107
10t)
409
4 t 0
* i w
111
112
113
4 14
lib
416
117
11 0
119
120
121
122
123
424
125
426
427
428
429
430
431
432
433
431
435
436
437
43b
439
140
411
112
143
144
lib
146
117
lib
449
450
451
452
453
454
455
R E A 0 I S . 1 I 0 ) RAC1N.KACEX
C
C *    . TEN PET A TORE COEFFICIENTS
C
00 913d 1=1,10
913b KEDlb,9l37) tAwlOll.J), J-li3)
* 1 3 / FORMAT(3F10U>
C
C 	 STOICH10METRIC EyU I V ALcMCtS
C
C
(. PRINT SPATIALLY INVARIANT COEFFICIENTS
C
AKlTt.(6i 136)














138 FOrcClAT(lHl,///,45H SPATIALLY 1 N v A K I A N T SYSTEM COEFFICIENT //)
-RITE16.14D ClAG|10{l,J)>J=l3)iI = l,10)
144 FORMAT I // ,40H  1 0 TEMPEnATOKE COEFFICIENTS
4 40H COLUORM DIE OFF
$ 40H bOO-i OECAY
4 40h bOD-2 OECAY
S 4UH bOD-j UECAY
4 40H AMMOMA DECAY
s iuH N j TRI f E DECAY
4 4UH ORGAr, 1C SEDIMENT OECAY
4 4UH ORGANIC iv DECAY
4 4UH ALG-1 GROATH ANo RESPIRATION
S 4CJH ALG-2 GKO.VTH ANO RESPIRATION
H.R1TE16.146) OAN02,OXNH3,OXRES1 ,OXRES2iOXFACl,Ox
146 FORhAT ( // 43h STO I CH I (JME TR i C EQUIVALENCE BETWEEN
S 4UH NITRITE DECAY
S 4UH AMMOlNlAUECAY
4 4L)H ALG-1 RESPlRAlION = OXRSlCHL-
4 IUH ALG-2 RESPlRATIO!i = OXRES2CHL-
4 IUH ALG-1 GROWTH =OXF AC 1 CHL- A
S> IUH ALG-2 GROWTH =OxF AC2CHL- A
K1TE(611&) HSP1 ,PSP2,PSN1 PSN2,PSL1PSL2
14b tuRMAT(//4oH hALF-SATuRATION CONSTANTS FOR ALGAE
i  ALG-1 P , 10X,F lu.3i 10X,  ALG-2 P10X
*  ALG-1 N' , 10A ,Flu .3, lUX,  ALG-2 N'.lOx
4  ALG-1 L  , 10X.F1U.3, 10X  ALG-2 L'.IOX
k>RlTE(t150> ALG1P,ALG2K,ALG1N,ALG2N
150 FURCiAT RACIu,RACEx
155 FOKMAT(//,40H RATIO OF CHLOROPHYLL A TO ALGAE
*" 4Oh FOK ALL lNf-LOS
4 40H FOR EXCHANGE
C

(. AOJOST COEFFICIENTS FOK TIME STEP
C
OK,BOu = BOODK3(FlOi3)/
.31F1U.3) /
,3(F 10.3)/
,3(F lu.3)/
 J(F 10. 3)/
,3(F 10.3)/
>3(F 10.3)/
3(F tO.3)/
i3(F 1U.3)/
,3(F10.3) )
^ AC2
OXYoEN AND /
,F10.3/
,FJ0.3/
A iF10.3/
A ,F10.3/
F10.3/
|F10.3)

 /
,F10.3/ 
.FIU.3,/,
,f 10.3,//)

,/
,3,/ ,
.3,/)

,/
 F 10.2 ,/
F10.2,/ )









-------
                                                                      o  -o  -o
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o_  
-------
                                       - 261 -





                                 Subroutine METDAT








This subroutine consists of two separate sections (METDAT and TEMPER).  The first




section is called from INDATA and is used to input all required meterological




data needed by the simulation run.  (If temperature is not simulated, METDAT




and TEMPER are never called.)  METDAT reads in the number of weather zones, and




the number of observations in the data deck.  It produces a report listing the




information. Before returning to INDATA, METDAT calculates the initial best balance




for the simulation run.  TEMPER (an entry point of METDAT) is called during the




main quality loop.  Its purpose is to calculate the best budget as the simulation




proceeds through time.  Figure 11 provides the flow chart for METDAT.

-------
                                    - 262 -
                                  FIGURE  D-10
                      FLOW CHART FOR METDAT AND TEMPER
    CALL FROM
     IlfDATA
 ENTRY POINT
   TEMPER
 FROM DYNQUA
  READ WEATHER
DATA INFORMATION
CALCULATE NEW
 HEAT BUDGET
 PRINT WEATHER
  DATA REPORTS
  CALCULATE
  NEW WATER
TEMPERATURES
     COMPUTE
    SHORTWAVE
    RADIATION
  CALCULATE
 EQUILIBRIUM
 TEMPERATURE
  IF WANTED
     COMPUTE
    LONGWAVE
    RADIATION
   RETURN
PRINT CALCULATED
  INFORMATION
     RETURN

-------
TOT <200

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-------
                              - 264 -
  b7
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  60
  61
  62
  63
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  66
  67
  68
  69
  70
  71
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  76
  77
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  79
  80
  81
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  83
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  6b
  86
  87
  88
  69
  90
  91
  92
  93
  91
  9b
  96
  97
  98
 99
100
101
102
103
101
lOb
106
107
108
109
du
111
112
113
       HA = PI  *  (  TlMt -  12.0  - DELIS  )  /  12.0
       S 1 N A =  11  +  T2  COM  HA )
       RAU  ,,60  *  blNA
       AI = U.128  - O.bbl    ALuiilOl 1.0  /  A B S <  5 I N A  )  )
       TA = TURB    Al / SlUA
       KAU = RAO  /  EXP( TA  )
       RAD = RAO    (1.0 -  .6b  * CLU2)
       NC= 2.0    (CLD +1.0)
       1FICLU  .Gl.  O.Ob .AND.  CLU  .L T. U.9b)  GO  TO  1 b 0
       NC=1
       1FICLD  .GT,  0.9b) NC = <4
   IbO  ALbEUO  = A(NC)  (  b7.3  * ASIN( blNA  )  ) ** B(NC)
       WNS(NN,L)=RAD*(1.0-ALBEUU)
   131  CONTINUE
   1 30  CONT 1 Nut
       FINT=FLOAT( INT)
C
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....  PRIhiT REMAINING  ft E A T H E R DATA

    AKlTt(6H2)
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                                        CLOUD     DRY  BULB      WET BULB
                                     LONG WAVE                          /
                                        COVER   TEMPERATURE   TEMPERATURE
                                     SOLAR(CALC)                        /
C
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   6       (Mb)    
-------
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-------
                                          - 266
 1               SUBROUTINE DLUCK.
 2        C
 3        C	  THIS bi-OCK. UATA SUPPLIES  SPECIFIC  INVARIANT  INFORMATION
 t        C
 b
 6
 7              b i       mCYClNTbl&lPKTilTAPElS),l*KINTtIWRITE,JOlVl(2U)JDIV2(20)
 8              C.       JPRTl3GU)iJfiEriUu).JHtT2<2U)KBOp(lt).KDCuP,KZOPMMNEXTPR
                 COMMoiWMlSC/ALPHAl&U) >CL>1FF*..CIM Iti 1 )  C11 M i T ( It) ,CUNST(20i It)
                .       CTEMp(lH)iDELIiDTuiEaoCOMtfe>lt)ttXKtFACTK(ltilU)iIEXC
                bi       lriCYClNTbl&lPKTilTAPElS),l*KINTtIWRITEJOlVl(2U)JDIV2
 o              C.       JPRT (300) i JfiET 1 Uu)  JHtT2( 20 ) KBOp( 1 t ) .KDCoPKZOP MMNEX ,
 V              U i       Nit.XT(,KNiiKOuP(lt)>NJSTOP(ltilO)NJSTRl(ltlO)NODYNNOPRT
[0              E,       rNulPKTiNKSTK Ti'* SPEC. NSTOP.N TAG.NUMCON,NUN ITSiMUiN20
12              G,      OELTw
13        C
It        C
Ib               COMMON/ATMS.
16              A i      QNSl2b(10),mNA(2blUltTAAl2S,10>

IB              Ct      i,KNET < 2GU I  At t ) ,ot t >  Ai_PH( 8) bETA I 8) iP I tWBOtDTOR
IV        t
20        (_ COfobTIlUEuT  TITLES
21        C
22               DATA I NAME/ MuTthlP i HHEKAT .HrtURE  >4H      ,th
23              A,             tHDISS i tHOLVc.  tHU OX 11H YO.EN , t H
2t              b,             thCAKdi

26              Vi             thCAKB!
27              C,             tHORuA.thNlC ,tHN1TRHHobEN,tH
28              U,             thAMMU.tnNIA ,tHNITRitHOGEHitH
2V              E,             tHNlTK.thlTE ,tMMTR i tHOfaErt , tH
30              Ki             tHNlTRtHATE ,tMN1TRHHOfaEN.tH
31              b,             tHPHOS.tHpHAI,tHE PH,tHOSPH>tHOROS
32              2,             thCHLOitHKuPMitHYLL  itH*--l,tH
33              1,             tHCriLO,t"ROPotriYLI-  thA  2tH
3t              H,             tHCOLlithKORH ,tH  BACitHTER1,tHA
35              J,             tHTOTA.trtL  N 1 , t HT KOG . t HEil   ,tH
36        C
37        (...  IMI TIALUAT ION  OF  METEKGLOfclC  CONSTANTS
38        C
3V               UATA XUNS/2QOO ,\j/
tO               DATA ALPH/6.0b,b.10,2.6b,-2.0t,-V.9t,-22.2V,-t0.63-66.VO/
11               DATA BETA/0B22.0.710.0.V&t.1.26b.1.6SV,2.Ibl 2.76 1 t3.blI/
t2               DATA A/1.IB(2.20.0.Vb,0.3b/
H3               DATA B/-0.77 ,-0. 97  t-0. 7t,,-0.t&/
tH               DATA PI/3ltlbV/,  hUO/0.3333333/  OTOK/0.017t5/
tb               NtTUKN
t6               EMD

-------
                                       - 267 -





                               Subroutine QUALEX









QUALEX produces a summary of all water quality information that is handled by




the simulation over a specified time.  Information concerning the concentrations




of each constituent  at each junction and time step can be stored on tape or file




during every time step if desired.  At user intervals, QUALEX then produces a




specified summary of all stored data, determining the minimum value, the maximum




value and the mean during the interval for each junction.  A report is generated to




display the calculated summaries.  The flow chart for QUALEX is shown in Figure 13.

-------
         - 268 -
      FIGURE D-ll
FLOW CHART FOR QUALEX
  CALL FROM DYNQUA  ]
   DETERMINE TIME
      OF SUMMARY
  READ STORED DATA
       FOR ALL
    CONSTITUENTS
   DURING SUMMARY
       PERIOD
 DETERMINE MINIMUM,
 MAXIMUM AND MEANS
 IN EACH JUNCTION
  DURING SUMMARY
      PERIOD
   PRINT REPORT
     FOR EACH
     JUNCTION
      RETURN

-------
                                       - 269 -
 1
 2
 3
 4
 5
 6
 7
 8
 9
10
1 1
12
13
14
Ib
16
17
16
19
20
21
22
23
21
2tJ
26
27
26
29
30
31
32
33
34
3S
36
37
38
39
40
HI
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
4V
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
                SUBROUTINE
              WUALLX
                         ,VC|_wiN{200).VUL (200)
               NCHAN(200,8),DlFFK(4JU)iVl4uO).W(400)iAKEAl4UO)
                         QOUT(2UQ)>VOLOU(200)
2              B
3             QNET<200)iY(200)
4i             YBAh(20D)  Jt,V
 COtlMON/MlSC/ALPhA(80liCDlFFKtClNll4il)CLlMIT(14)iLONST(20>14l
A       CTEMPtl4),0El_T,QTu.EBbCONl48,lKDCuP'^20PiMMiNEXTPR
0       NtxT.R|NGROoPU4),NJSTOP<14ilU)iNjSTRT(14ilO)NODYNiNOPRT
E       NliCYC>NQPKT.NRSTRTiNSPECiNbTOPNTA(aNOMCON,NUNITS.N10tN20
F       N3QiN4UiRETFAC(2U>14)NEXilSttTCH(10l,NAME(20liINAME(5tl'(J
5       DELTQ >KOONE iMARK 1 iMARK2
                           ,OXYlN(2UO)iBOuJM2oOf3) i COKfa 1 N I 2UO ) >
               CNH3IN(200),CN021N(200)iCN031N(200)lpO'>TNlN(2UO)(
               CHA1 IM200) ,CHA21N(200)
 COMMON/CONC/TEMP(200),OAY<2bO)i8ULi<2gO,3)iCORG<2oO)iCNH3(200).
S              CN02(200),CN03(200),P04(200)|ALGl(2Uu)ALG2(20a)
S              COL(200)TN(200)iCHLAl(200)CHLA2(200>


 COrtHUN/MASS/TEMPM(200)fUXYH(2UO)tbOOh(2003J iCOR&M(2UO) CNH3(200>
S              CN02Ml200)lCN03M(200)|P04M(200)>AI-Glh(2UO)i
               CHLA2M(200)
               COKt>UK(200>iXP&02(200)tA6SNKl(2QO>tAt>SNK2(200)t
               CNU20K(2UO)iPUSiNK12UO)iOXYBEN(2UO)iCNhbEN(200)>
               SECHl(200)PMAXl(200MPMAX2(200)tAGCHAl(200)i
               AGCMA2l200),p04bEN(2UQ)PKESlt2UO)iPRES2l20U)
               OFbI01(200)lDFbOU(2UU>3)iDFCOL(200)iUFNH3(200)t
               DFN02(200)tUFOt>N(20a>iOFBi02{2GO)EXPBEM200>i
               EXPb01(200)iEXPBODI2UU>3)iXPCUL(200)iEXPNH3(200}
               EXPN02(200)lXPORG(200J>CNBEN(2UU)>CSAT(2UO)i
               OXE>N(200)UXPiLl<200)tPOdEM2oa)tCF80DiAL.l>i
              OXNh3iOXN02,OXKESIfOAKE52.0xFACJ.OXFAC2DKBOD
              UKCOL.RACIN.RACEX
 CUMrtON/SUN/  TLU65) SRl 136S) |HDL(365)
/ ATHS/tjC ( iOO I QA ( iDU ) i(jE(20U) >E<4TEM(200) iXuNS(200) , QTOT (2UO)
uNS(25,10)tQNA(2b>lO)fURNETA(2b>10)iOAlNDA(25lU)iTAA<2&tlD)
TAKA(25ilO)iAPA(2bilO)iCLOuO(25ilO)iIyTEM,JHZONE(10i2)
QKNET<200)iAX(4)ibX(4)lALPH(8)iBETA(e)iPI>ABOiDTOR
 CUririON/ ATHS/tjC ( iOO I
A 
B,
C.

-------
                                          - 270 -


 S7       C
 58              Curtf1uN/lCMCK/JIG!MOK(20u)
 S9       C
 6 U              DIMENSION  C<2UU.14>>CMAbSl2UO>i'n>C:>PEC(2U0.1 1 > >TEKp(1 ))  "DELT-DELT
 7b              HOUKS2=FLOAT(MAKK2>UELT
 76              KUAYSl=HOUKS|/24.9999
 77              Kl/AY:>2 = HOURS2/23.9999
 76              HOUKS1  =  HOUKS1  -  FLOAT  (24    KUAYS1)
 79              HUUb2  =  HOUK52  -  FLOAT  (2t    KDAYS2)
 8U              KDAYS1
 81
 82
 83       C
 8H       C .  .  .	   STEP   2
 8b       C....  PKiNT  bUMMARY  HEAU1N&S
 86       C
 87         111  FOKMAT(IHl////7^H*****     DUALITY SUMMAKY
 88             *********************/
 89                Sbn SUMMAKy  STAKTb  AT                          SUMMARY  ENDS  AT/
 90             i    6M CYCLt15.6H  (UAY iJ3f6H  HOUH  .F5.1.13H)         CYCLE   
 91                  lb,2H (|l3i5H  DAYSiFb.17H  HOUKS)/////)
 92       C
 93       C	  .   STEP   3
 9t       C	  DETERMINE MAXIMUM.  MINIMUM  ANO  AVEKAbE
 9b       C
 96         lit  Rfc.AUU.lU)   ICYCw , ( (CX(J.K)  iK=l .NUMCONi >JsJS.Nj)
 97              IKCICYCW - MARK1 ) 111. Ub. 1  J6
 98         lib  DO 117  Jl(NJ
 99              tic/ i j6  KI .NUMCON
100              CAVE(J.K)  K Q.b  *CX(J.K)
1U1              CMINIJ,K)  BCX(J.K)
102              CflAXU.K)  BCX(J.K)
103         116  CONTlNUfc
tOH         117  CONTINUE
lOb              GO TU 11H
106         11BD012HJ=1,NJ
107              uo .122  K = I .NUMCON
108              CAVE(J,M   CAVt-(J.K)  +CX(dK>
109              IF(CilIMj.K) -CX ( J.K) ) 120  1 19 1  I V
110         1 19  CMMJiM  *Cxt J.K)
111              (.0 TO 122
112         12u  IK ICHAXIJ.K>-CX(J.K))  121(121.122
113         121  CMAX(J .K)CX(J.K)

-------
                                                                                        X
                                                                                      UJ <
                                                                                      > 
                                                                                         Z

                                                                                      <  Z
                                                                                       X
                                                                                     UJ  <
                                                                              II   N,
CM

 I
                                -<  
                                J  t-
                                  <
a.
 u
t
I/I
                    i:  2  2  u 
                    i      *     u
                          II   U
                     I   II   II   
                                                                           II  <  3-
                                                                          !M  Z  <
                       _  ., X Z
                          W 3
            n             n - -5

            j         'jj    x r   
               _J 3-     O  .'N  Z
                                                                                                                                (V
                                                                                                                                z
                                                                                                                        Jl
                                                                                                                         


                                                                                                                        II
                                                                             <
                                                                            
                                                                            ^J ^
                                                                                                                                -) ul
                                                                                                                                _ r->
                                                                                                                                -T 1.
z -     .n      ^      -* x


 n       t-                  -

    ^"^      ^^O^O
                                                               -JlZZh-Z             3 ZZZ    I- i- t-  X  I-  -  3
                                                                   u   H      a:             u       H    ii z  x  -z  ~s  t-  a
                                                               3  -M  -  u.  a:  o             zoj-Z'j.za:oJ:oo-iJiij2
                                                               O.ZZ    ^l-             2u3->Z    ZaSU.JKi:uJ
                                                                                     -  .'M  ''O
                                                                                                                o    fxi ,1  -r
                                                                                                                                       o  r~  33  y-

-------
                                       - 272 -





                           Data Preparation for GBQUAL









GBQUAL requires several blocks of data to be input in the runstream for any given




simulation.  Some of the blocks of data originate from other computer programs.




There are 3 major blocks of data that must be prepared and merged to form the




full input requirements of the model.  There are:  (1) Physical data and quality




simulation parameters and coefficients, (2) The hydrodynamic data that determines




the spatial movement of water during the simulation period, (3) Meterological




information.  Each of these blocks of data originate from a different source




and must be prepared according to GBQUAL formats.  Figure D-12 illustrates the




flow of data required to construct an operationally complete deck.  The next




section describes the formation of these blocks of data.  (Since the formulation




of the hydrodynamics portion is really a separate program, that portion will




not be described.  Figure D-13 illustrates the type of flow data required by




GBQUAL.)  The input format and order will be  described in the same way it is




read by GBQUAL.  A listing of a sample deck will  appear at the end.









                             Input Data Description








This section lists the exact format and order of all data necessary for a simulation




run of GBQUAL.

-------
                            -273  -
                         FIGURE  D-12
FUNCTIONAL DATA FLOW TO CREATE A DATA INPUT SET FOR GBQUAL
                      HYDRODYNAMIC
                   ;   FLOW PATTERN
                   t       FROM
                   \  HYDRODYNAMIC
                          MODEL
                         INTERFACE
                          PROGRAM
                         GBQUAL
                      FLOW PATTERN
                          DATA
                          FILE
/
[' GBQUAL DATA FOB 
I QUALITY RUN \


FILE
MANIPU-
LATION


/METEORO
< 	 	   1 LOGICAL
V DATA
                       DATA FILE
                      WITH QUALITY
                      AND FLOW DATA
                       COMPATIBLE
                       WITH GBQUAL

-------
              FIGURE D-13



Typical Hydrodynamic Input to GBQUAL
           HEAD OF GREEN BUY

-------
                                       - 275 -
System Setup Parameters
Card
Type
1
2


3
4



5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Card
Column

1-5
6-10
11-20
1-80
1-5
6-10
11-15
16-20
1-80
1-80
1-80
1-80
1-80
1-80
1-80
1-80
Format
None
15
15
F10.0
4012
15
15
15
15
Physical
80A4
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
FORTRAN
Name
IIII
NJ
NC
Delt
JIGNOR
ITAPE(l)
ITAPE(2)
ITAPE(3)
ITAPE(4)
Description
Controls print interval. A value of 1 will
print all junctions, 2 will print every
other junction, etc.
Number of system junctions.
Number of channels
Time step (hours)
NJ numbers are read here in 4012 format.
If JIGNOR(I) is set to 1 then that junction
is ignored in the calculations. Set to 0
to keep it in the calculations.
Unit for internal scratch file.
Hydrodynamic extract file.
Unit to store last cycle for future restart.
Unit for reading restart data.
Data to Describe Simulation System
ALPHA(80)
CN(NC)
R(NC)
B(NC)
CLEN(NC)
NJUNC
(NC,1),
NJUNC
(NC.2)
Y(NJ)
ASUR(J)
A four line alpha description.
Mannings N for each channel.
Hydraulic radius for each channel (FT) .
Width of each channel (FT) .
Length for each channel (FT) .
A pair of numbers for each channel. This
describes the junctions that any channel
connects .
Depth of junction (FT)
Surface area of each junction in units of
                                          million sq.  ft.

13       1-80      None        NCHAN      One card is  read here for each junction.  It
                               (NJ,  1...8)lists the channel numbers that touch that
                                          junction.

-------
                            - 276 -
Card
Type
14
Card
Column
1-80
Format
None
FORTRAN
Name
Q(NC)
Description
Flow in each channel (ft /sec). Flows are
positive if they move in the +x or +y
direction.
Simulation Control Options
15







16





1-5
6-10
11-15
16-20
21-25
26-30
31-35
(To
1-5
6-10
11-15
16-20
21-25
26-30
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
simulate a
15
15
15
15
15
15
INCYC
NQCYC
KZOP
KDCOP
NTAG
JS
IEXC
Constituent
Initial quality cycle.
Final quality cycle.
Option to summarize output by zones. (This
is no longer used. Set to 2)
Control option to print depletion correction
messages. Set to 2 to delete messages.
Set equal to 1.
Number of the first junction to be
simulated. Usually set equal to 1
Set equal 0
Selection
given group, set its ISWTCH value to zero)
ISWTCH(l)
ISWTCH (2)
ISWTCH (3)
ISWTCH (4)
ISWTCH (5)
ISWTCH(6)
Coliforms
For the group (Org-N, NH3-N, N02-N, N03-N,
P04-P and Algae 1)
Algae 2
Total nitrogen as a conservative
BOD and DO
Temperature
Print Control Options
17


1-5
6-10
11-15
15
15
15
IPRT
NQPRT
IWRITE
Initial cycle for quality print out.
Number of time steps between prints.
Initial cycle for storage of data for
16-20
21-25
15
15
           quality summary.

IWRINT     Number of time steps for quality summary
           print.

NOPRT      Number of junctions printed in each quality
           print.

-------
                                     - 277 -

Card    Card                   FORTRAN
Type    Column	Format	Name	Description	

                                 Printing Order

18       1-70      1415        JPRT       This array lists the printing order (by
                               (NOPRT)     junction) of the quality print out.

                               Meteorological Data
      (Card Types 19 through 21 contain data required to compute diurnal
       temperature fluctuations.   If temperature is not being simulated,
       card types 19-21 can be deleted.)

19       Data limits, 1 card

         1-5       15          NWZONE     Number of weather zones.

         6-10      15          NPTS       Number of data points used to describe one
                                          day's weather.

         11-15     15          NQCSM      Number of quality time steps between the
                                          start of the quality simulation and
                                          midnight.

         16-20     15          NRCALC     Net radiation calculation switch; if NRCALC
                                          = 1, net radiation will be calculated from
                                          sun angle and cloud cover.

         21-25     15          IEQTEM     Equilibrium temperature calculation switch,
                                          if IEQTEM = 1, the equilibrium temperature
                                          will be calculated.

         26-30     15          IDAY       Day of the year.

        Repeat Card Types 20 and  21 for NWZONE weather zones (one set per
        weather zone).

         Weather zone general data, 2 cards

20       1-5       15          JWZONE(I,l)First junction in weather zone I.

         6-10      15          JWZONE(I,2)Second junction in weather zone I.

         11-20     F10.0       XLAT       Latitude of the study area, degrees.

         21-30     F10.0       XLON       Longitude of the study area, degrees.

         31-40     F10.0       EPS        Site location code:
                                            -1. = West longitude
                                            +1, = East longitude

         41-50     F10.0       TURB       Atmospheric turbidity factor.   Values
                                          range from 2.0 for clear unpolluted
                                          atmosphere to 5.0 for highly polluted
                                          atmosphere.

-------
                                     - 278  -
Card
Type


21







22



Card
Column
51-60
61-70
FORTRAN
Format Name Description
F10.0 AA Evaporation Coefficient "a" (usually 0.0
F10.0 BB Evaporation coefficient "b" (usually 1.5
x 10~9).
Atmospheric data, NPTS cards (one card per weather data point)
1-10
11-20
21-30
31-40
41-50
51-60
(This
for
1-10
11-20
21-30

F10.0 QRNETA Net incoming radiation (leave blank if
NRCALC=1) kcal/sq. Meter/sec.
F10.0 UWINDA Wind speed, meters/sec.
F10.0 CLOUD Cloud cover, fraction.
F10.0 TAA Dry bulb temperature, C.
F10.0 TAWA Wet bulb temperature, C.
F10.0 APA Atmospheric pressure, millibars.
Solar Intensity
is needed only if algae is simulated. There must be 1 card
each day of simulation including partial days.)
F10.0 TL Total amount of incident solar radiation
in langleys.
F10.0 SRI Hour of sunrise
F10.0 HDL Number of hours of day light.
Chemical, Physical and Biologic Coefficients
(Card types 23 through 27 contain the reaction rate constants and
other coefficients for those constituents being modeled.)


Spatially varying coefficients
         (Repeat Card Type 23 as necessary to input spatially varying
          coefficients over the total network.  (5 sets of junction and
          coefficient values per card for each of the listed coefficients.)
          Terminate each set of coefficient data with one blank set of data).

          For each coefficient in the list below:

23       1-4       14          JUN1(1)    First junction for which the coefficient
                                          applies.

         5-8       14          JUN2(1)    Last junction for which the coefficient
                                          applies.

-------
                                      - 279 -
Card
Type


Card
Column
9-16
65-68
69-72
73-80
Format
F8.0
14
14
F8.0
FORTRAN
Name
COEF(l)
e
JUN1(5)~>
JUN1(5) V
COEF(5)J
Description
Coefficient value
Five sets of junctions
and coefficients per
card
         The following coefficients are input in the above manner and in the
         order listed.
FORTRAN
 Name              Coefficient
Data  (Decay rates
Units are all base
       e)
REOX               Reaeration (if reaeration is to be calculated
                   set COEF(l) = -1.)
COLDK(l)           Coliform bacteria dieoff rate
BODDK(l)           Coliform bacteria dieoff rate
BODDK(2)           BOD decay rate
BODDK(3)           BOD decay rate
CNH3DK             Ammonia decay rate
CN02DK             Nitrite decay rate
CORGAK             Organic nitrogen decay rate
AGSNK1             Algae sink rates
AGSNK2             Algae sink rates
PRES1              Algae respiration rate
PRES2              Algae respiration rate
POSINK             Phosphate precipitation rate
P04BEN             Source rate of phosphate
OXYBEN             Benthic uptake of oxygen
CNHBEN             Release of ammonia from sediments
SECHI              Secchi disc depth
PMAX1              Algae max. specific growth rate
PMAX2              Algae max. specific growth rate
AGCHA1             Ratio of chlorophyll a to algae biomass(mg/mg)
AGCHA2             Ratio of chlorophyll a to algae biomass(mg/mg)
DIFFK              Eddy diffusion rate

24       Algae related coefficients, 2 cards.  Repeat Card 24 for the second
         algae type.   Both cards are required.

         1-10      F10.0       ALGIP      Phosphorus content of Algae -1, fraction
                                          of total biomass.

         11-20     F10.0       ALGIN      Nitrogen content of Algae -1, fraction
                                          of total biomass.

         21-30     F10.0       PSP1       Phosphate half-saturation constant, mg/1
                                          as phosphorus.

         31-40     F10.0       PSN1       Nitrogen half-saturation constant, mg/1.

         41-50     F10.0       PSL1       Light saturation constant, langleys/hour.

-------
                                      - 280  -
Card
Type
25











Card
Column
Spatially
1-10

11-20

21-30

31-40

41-50

51-60
Format
invariant
F10.0

F10.0

F10.0

F10.0

F10.0

F10.0
FORTRAN
Name
coefficients
OXN02

OXNH3

OXRES1

OXRES2

OXFAC1

OXFAC2
Description

: stoichiometric equivalences, 1 card
Stoichiometric equivalence between
and nitrite, mg/mg.
Stoichiometric equivalence between
and ammonia, mg/mg.
Stochiometric equivalence between
respiration and Chl-a.
Oxygen produced by photosynthesis
of Chl-a.
Oxygen produced by photosynthesis
of Chl-a.
Oxygen produced by photosynthesis
oxygen

oxygen



per mg

per mg

per mg
                                          of Chl-a.

26       Algae related coefficients, continued, 1 card

         1-10      F10.0       RACIN      Ratio of chlorophyll a_ to algae biomass
                                          in all inflows.

         11-20     F10.0       RACEX      Ratio of chlorophyll  a^ to algae biomass
                                          at the exchange junction.

                          Temperature Correction Coefficients

27       1-10      F10.0       AQ10(lf>>

         11-20     F10.0       AQ10(2) f  Three coeff.  for  temperature  correction  for
                                        r each temperature  adjusted coefficient.

         21-30     F10.0       AQ10(3)__J

         AQ10 1 thru 3 are used in  the following equation:

         - = AQ10(1) + AQ10(2)* T + AQ10(3)* T* T

          where T is the temperature in  C.

         Card 27 is read for each of the  following list in  the given order:

     Decay Coefficient

1.   Coliform decay
2.   BOD-1 decay  .
3.   BOD-2 decay
4.   BOD-3 decay
5.   Ammonia decay

-------
                                      -  281 -

Card    Card                   FORTRAN
Type    Column	Format	Name	Description	

6.   Nitrite decay
7.   Benthic oxygen demand
8.   Organic nitrogen decay
9.   Alg-1 activity
10.  Alg-2 activity

        Input Data cards 28-30 and 32 require data for each of 14 constituents.
        The following data order must be used to insure that the data are stored
        in the correct positions in the storage array.

              Constituent No.                   Constituent

                   1                            Temperature
                   2                            Dissolved oxygen
                   3                            Ultimate biochemical oxygen demand
                                                 (BOD-1)  
                   4                            Ultimate biochemical oxygen demand
                                                 (BOD-2)
                   5                            Ultimate biochemical oxygen demand
                                                 (BOD-3)
                   6                            Organic nitrogen
                   7                            Ammonia nitrogen
                   8                            Nitrite nitrogen
                   9                            Nitrate nitrogen
                   10                           Phosphate phosphorus
                   11                           Algae-1
                   12                           Algae-2
                   13                           Coliforms
                   14                           Total nitrogen

                          Maximum Allowable Concentrations
         Card Type 28 sets maximum concentrations for all constituents.
         Simulation terminates when any of these values are exceeded.

28       Concentrations, 2 cards

         1-10      F10.0       CLIMIT(I)"^ Maximum allowable concentration for  the
                                         / fourteen constituents.  Two cards are
                                         \required with eight values on the first and
         71-80     F10.0       CLIMIT(I+6Msix on the second.

         If this is a restart deck then skip card type 29 and 30.  If
         temperature is not being simulated then do card type 31.  If
         this is not a restart deck then do Card type 29 and 30 and skip
         31.

                             Initial Concentrations
         Repeat Card Types 29 and 30 until all initial quality groups are
         given.  Terminate data with two blank cards.

         Initial quality group concentrations, 1 card.

29       1-5       15          Jl         First junction of an initial quality group.

-------
                                      -  282  -

Card    Card                    FORTRAN
Type    Column	Format	Name	Description	

          6-10      15          J2         Last junction of an initial quality group.

          11-20     F10.0       CTEMP(1)~")  Temporary read array for entering
                                         ?  the initial concentration of the first
          71-80     F10.0       CTEMP(7)J  seven constituents.

 30       Initial quality group concentrations, continued, 1 card
          1-10      F10.0       CTEMP(8)~)  Temporary read array for entering
                                           the initial concentration of the last
          71-80     F10.0       CTEMP(14)J  seven constituents.

                          Initial Temperature for Restart
        (Do only if temperature is not being simulated and this is a restart
         deck.  Use the same format as for card type 23.)

 31       1-4       14          JUNCl(l)    First junction for which the temperature
                                           applies.

          5-8       14          JUNC2(1)    Last junction for which the temperature
                                           applies.

          9-16      F8.0        COEF(l)     Temperatures.


          65-68     14          JUNC1(5)~")  Five sets of junctions and initial
          69-72     14          JUNC1(5K
          73-80     F8.0        COEF(5)   \  temperatures per card

          One blank set should appear to  terminate this input.
                              Inflow/Outflow Quality
          Repeat Card Types 32, 33 and 34 until all junctions with inflow/outflow
          are listed.  Terminate with three blank cards.

 32       Inflow/outflow description,  1 card
          1-80      20A4        NAME       Description of the inflow or outflow

 33       Inflow/outflow rate and concentrations at junction, 1 card
          1-80      18          JJ         Junction number

          9-16      F8.0        QQ         Inflow or outflow rate, inflows are
                                           positive and outflows are negative.

          17-24     F8.0        CTEMP(l)    Temporary read array for entering the inflow
                                           concentration of the first eight constituents.
          73-80     F8.0        CTEMP(8)    Leave blank if this is an outflow.

 34       Inflow concentration, continued,  1 card
          1-16      16X                    Blank

          17-24     F8.0        CTEMP(9)  ~)  Temporary read array for entering the inflow
                                         s.  concentration of the last six constituents.
          65-72     F8.0        CTEMP(15)\ Leave blank if outflow.

-------
                                      - 283 -
Card
Type

Card
Column

FORTRAN
Format Name
Quality Adjustment Factors
Description

       (Card Types 35 and 36 contain initial quality concentration adjustment
        factors by constituent for areas described by given junctions.)

       Repeat Card Types 35 and 36 for each constituent (I).  If a constituent
       is not going to be altered, set NGROUP(I)=0 and card 36 can be omitted.
       If no factors are going to be applied to the remaining constituents, set
       NGROUP=-1 and do not repeat for each constituent.

35     Data limit, 1 card
         1-5       15          NGROUP(I)  The number of groups of junction numbers
                                          for which it is desired to increment the
                                          initial concentrations of constituent I
                                          which was previously read as input.  There
                                          is no limit (up to NJ) to the number of
                                          junctions, comprising a group but the
                                          numbers must be consecutive.  Max.
                                          number of groups = 10.

36     Adjustment factors by constituent and group, NGROUP/5 cards
       (5 groups per card)
         1-5       F5.0        FACTR(I,K)  Multiplication factor to be applied to the
                                          initial concentration of constituent I at
                                          those junctions in group K.

         6-10      15          NJSTRT     The first (lowest)  junction number in the
                               (I,K)       sequence of junctions comprising group K
                                          for constituent I.

         11-15     15          NJSTOP     The final (highest)  junction number in the
                               (I,K)       sequence of junctions comprising group K
                                          for constituent I.

         61-65     F5.0        FACTR  ~~N
                               (I, K+4) /
         66-70     15          NJSTRT  \.  Five junction groups per card for
                               (I, K+4)  j  constituent I.
         71-75     15           NJSTOP
                               (i, K+4y

                            Boundary  Junction Quality
      (Card Types 37 through 38 describe constituent concentrations at the
       seaward boundary of  the system throughout the tidal cycle.)

37       Control options, 1 card
         1-5       15          KBOP(l) "^  Control option for  specifying concentrations
          |_                           C  of each constituent  at the boundary.  If
          f        *                   \  the concentration is constant over all
         71-75     15          KBOP(15) 1  cycles, KBOP=1;  if  variable, leave blank.

-------
                                      - 284 -

Card    Card                   FORTRAN
Type    Column	Format	Name	Description	

          Use  one card with one  concentration  (CIN(I,1))  for  each constituent (I).
          If the constituent is  not  to be  modeled,  set CIN(I,!)=-!.   All fourteen
          constituents must be listed.

 38       Boundary junction concentration
          1-10      F10.0       CIN(I.J) ") Boundary junction  concentration
                                         C at  each  time step  (J)  in  the tidal
          71-80      F10.0       CIN(I,J+6))cycle.
                              Output  Description



 The Quality Program will produce  two types  of  output:   (1)  printed reports,  or

 (2)  a binary (file/tape)  restart  data file.



 Printed Reports



 Printed output  includes:   echo reports of much of  the  input data and a report at

 selected time intervals  of the quality at specified junctions.   The use of various

 printout options  also  allows  printing of  a  summary of  all water quality parameters

 at each junctions over a specified number of cycles.   This  report gives the

 minimum, maximum  and average  value for any  constituent in each  requested junction.

 It is possible  to use  this output form as a check  on the steady state of the

 system.   If a  given run is given steady  hydrodynamics and  steady inflowing quality,

 then a steady state in the system will eventually  be attained.   This can be checked

 by comparing the  maximum versus minimum value  of a constituent  (particularly

 a conservative) during the summary period.   An example input deck and output

 reports for a typical  model run appear in the  next section.

-------
                                     - 285 -





The binary restart file is used to feed the final conditions of a completed run




into the next run as the initial conditions.  In this way, the user can keep




continuity between runs and still have flexibility in updating inflowing quantity




and quality and/or temperature of the system.  Depending on the computer system




the restart file can be written to a tape or a mass storage file.  It is also




possible to direct this output to a card punch and develope the restart information




in the form of punched cards.

-------
        - 286 -
DATA SET FOR GBQUAL
1









o/ 182 6.0
0 O O 0
O O 0 0
0 u 0 o
lo

-------
- 287 -
6572.
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7.91
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59 60
63 64
68 82
76 73
HI 77

6.40
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68 80
73 78
77 63

7.41
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31.50
20.64
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66 69
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9.91
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33.50
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60 65
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60 72
64 69
69 80
72 74
82 80

7.91
25.56
17.91
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7.35
39.24
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14.57
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70 60
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1 .74
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970.30

-------
       -  288  -
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-------
- 289 -
128 12V U 0 0
12b 1US 130 131 0
106 130 132 133 113
114 13J 1 36 1 31 116
121 1 IV 137 1 38 139
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266.846
340.050
242.708
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699.903
257.519
171 .745
626.241
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68.736
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592.609
820.794
268.097
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269,211
180.592
376.787
361.781
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12.562
120.900
185.600
17.129
791 .821
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680.873
876.238
727.059
16.713
13&.775
331 .538
113.135
853.165
-864.871





-------
- 290 -
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- 291  -
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-------
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-------
                                       - 293 -




                                   APPENDIX E









                               HYDRODYNAMIC MODELLING









The circulation patterns used in the water quality simulation in this report were




generated by using a separated hydrodynamic model developed independently.   This




appendix provides a brief presentation of the formulation and the structure used




in the hydrodynamic model.  The broad objective of the model was to investigate




the hydrodynamic response of Green Bay to the meteorological input at the surface,




to the effects at open boundaries in the Bay, and to the river inflows.   The




flow in the Bay is affected by the boundary conditions at the shore and the




bottom as well as the open ends.  The model is designed to calculate Bay-level




disturbance and water circulation generated by wind fields over the region in




a numerically reproduced combined river-shallow sea system.









                          Fundamental Hydrodynamic Equations









The flow in the Bay is basically unsteady and three dimensional.  The equations




which describe the circulation -in the Bay can be written in the form of a set




of nonlinear partial differential equations for conservation of mass and




conservation of momentum in the Eulerian form.  The Cartesian coordinate system




is chosen where X and Y are taken in a horizontal plane of the undisturbed




surface with X eastward and Y northward and Z is vertically upward.  The basic




governing equations for a three dimensional model and two-dimensional model for




an estuary were thoroughly discussed and derived by Pritchard (1971).  Considering




Green Bay, a fresh water estuary, one can assume a two-dimensional model with the




following equations:

-------
                                       - 294 -





                     15                '                                   a>
               |Z + u |X + v |V =  _ 1    >  _   |h _    + 1 (T   - T  )   (3)

               dt     dx     oy      p  dy       3y        H
where the notation is as follows:







     h = elevation of water surface



     f = Coriolis parameter



     P  = surface atmospheric pressure
      a


     p = vertical mean water density



     E = bottoE elevation  (z = -H)



     g = acceleration due  to gravity



     (U,V) = vertical mean horizontal velocity averaged from the water surface to



             the bottom in (x,y) direction



     (T  ,T  ) = surface wind stress in  (x,y) direction
       wx' wy
      (T.,  ,T_ , = bottom frictional stress in  (x,y) direction
       tsx oy)
These equations  are similar to those used by Leendertse  (1970) in his work on  the



Jamaica  Bay  simulation.

-------
                                       - 295 -



                 Surface and Wind Stress and Bottom Frictional Stress
The bottom frictional stress, T   and T_ , is expressed in the form:
                               OK      ay
               TBx  PgU
                              + V
                                             (4)
                By = pgV
/U'+V2
(5)
where C is the Chezy coefficient.  The Chezy coefficient depends on the roughness



of the bottom and the depth of the water.  The Chezy coefficient may be related to



Manning's roughness coefficient, n, by the familiar formula:
                C - (1.49/n) H
                              1/6
                                            (6)
The Chezy coefficient in the formula has the units ft '  /sec and H is in ft.  An



appropriate unit conversion should be made because the model computation is made



in the cgs system.  The value, n, changes as the type of bottom varies.
The wind stress at the water surface is approximated by assuming the validity



of a logrithmic distribution of wind velocity with height.   Therefore:
                T    C  p  U   U
                 wx    w  a  w   w
                                            (7)
                T    C  p  V   V
                 wy    w  a  w   w
                                            (8)

-------
                                       - 296 -


where p& is the air density, U  and V  are the wind velocity compontents measures

at a height 10 meters above the water surface and C   is the wind stress coefficient.

Wu (1969) suggested two approximate formulas for the wind stress coefficient based

upon the compiled data of thirty observations.  C  =0.5 (wind speed)     for

light wind, lm/sec<(wind speed)<15m/sec.  C  = 2.6 x 10   for strong winds
 (>15m/sec).  For breeze, C  = 1.25 x 10~3/(wind speed)/2'
                                Numerical Scheme



A set of finite difference equations are used to replace the governing

differential equations.  The numerical scheme used is a space-staggered scheme where

velocities, water levels, and depths are described at different grid points.

Figure E-l illustrates the scheme.  The water level h is described^at integer

values of j and k, the velocity U is described at integer and one half values of

j and integer values of k, and the velocity V is described at integer values of

j and integer and one half values of k.  The basic scheme is widely used by many

investigators (Platzman, 1959; Heaps, 1969; and Leendertse, 1970).  The scheme

has the advantage that in the equation for the variable operated upon in time,

there is a centrally located spacial derivative for the linear term.  A detailed

mathematical formulation can be found in Lee (1974).  The operation consists of

two successive tiiae intervals.  The first time level is taken from time n to

time n-t-r- and the second time level is taken from time n-br to n+1.  The field
               111
variables h (n+2}, Un+2 and Vn+2 are obtained from h(n), U(n) and V(n).  The

process involves solving h and U implicitly and V explicitly.  In the second

time level, the variables hn+2, Un+2~ and Vn+J are used to compute hn+1, Un+1,

and V   .  The operation is implicit in h and V and explicit in U.

-------
                        - 297 -
  SPACE-STAGGERED  SCHEME
    k-1
1
j -
J +1
                          +Water  Level
                           Depth        (h)
                           U velocity    (u)
                           | V velocity    (v)
  Figure E-l.The Space Staggered Numerical Scheme

-------
                                       - 298 -




                          Finite Difference Grid Network









The finite difference grid for the model covers the lower half of  Green Bay  from the




mouth of the Fox River at its southwest corner to the northeast 10km above Sturgeon




Bay.  There are 55 grids eastward and 53 grids northward.   Each grid is 1016m by




1016m.  The water depth or the elevation is measured at the center of each grid.




Figure E-2 illustrates the grid network used in. the computation.  The land-water




boundary is not a fixed boundary in order to account for the possible flooding




of some area near the shore.









                         Boundary and Boundary Conditions









The boundary of the problem includes a solid boundary at the shore and bottom,




an open boundary at the surface, an open boundary at the River mouth and an  open




boundary at the open Bay.  Because the numerical scheme is designed in accordance




with the type of boundary conditions, the numerical operations in  the two time




levels are postulated differently.  Therefore, an extensive system is developed




for the purpose of tracking the boundary and  boundary conditions  and matching




an appropriate numerical scheme efficiently.  The flooding in the  shallow flat




area around the bay was also considered.








The boundary conditions at the free surface are specified by the atmospheric




pressure, wind speed and direction patterns.  For the case studies made in the




report, seasonal statistical means were sought using the office records of the




U.S. Weather Service at Austin Straubel Field in Green Bay for the years 1968




through 1974.  In each case, a calm sea state was used as the initial condition.




The Chezy roughness coefficients at the bottom of the Bay vary with the depth and the




Manning's n.  The n values varied from 0.036 for sand and gravel bottoms to 0.075




for shallow weed beds.

-------
                   - 299 -

Figure E-2.The Finite  Difference Grid for the
           Hydrodynamic  Model of Green Bay
                                                         O
                                                              f
                                                             I
                                                             I

                                                            c
                                                           -f

-------
                                        - 300 -




The river inflow to Green Bay was calculated by using the data at the Rapide Croche




Dam for the corresponding period.  Since there is no measured physical data to be




used as the boundary condition at the open Bay, a numerical scheme is imposed to




insure the mass balance at the boundary.  Furthermore, the boundary is located




far from the interested region so that the local boundary effect at the open Bay




would be minimal.

-------
                                        -  301-




                                  References









Heaps, N. S.




     1969.  A two-Dimensional Numerical Sea Model, Phil. Trans. R. Soc. Lond.




            A265, 93-137.









Lee, K. K.




     1974.  A Hydrodynandc Model of Green Bay, presented at the Technical




            Conference on the Water Quality of Lower Green Bay and its Drainage




            Basin, Green Bay, Wisconsin, November 1974, (Manuscript in




            preparation).









Leendertse, J. J.




     1970.  A Water-Quality Simulation Model for Well Mixed Estuaries and Coastal




            Seas:  Volume 1, Principles of Computation, MR-6230-RC, Rand Corporation.









Platzman, G. W.




     1959.  A Numerical Computation on the Surge of 26 June on Lake Michigan,




            Geophysics, Vol. 6, No. 3-4, pp. 407-438.








Pritchard, D. W.




     1971.  Hydrodynamic Models, Estuarine Modeling:  An Assessment, Chapter 11,




            pp. 5-33, Water Pollution Research Series, 16070, DZV 02/71,




            Environmental Protection Agency.








Wu, Jin




     1969.  Wind Stress and Surface Roughness at Air-Sea Interface, J. of




            Geophysical Res., V. 74, No. 2, pp. 444-455.

-------

-------
          - 303 -
  APPENDIX   F
STORE! RETRIEVALS OF THE
  DATA GENERATED BY THE
     GREEN BAY STUDY

-------
                                                                                           - 304   ~
o
o
o
o
o
a
                                                                Statistical Analysis  Of  All  Survey Data
                                                               At  All  Stations During The  Period  Of  Study
                                                                                                                              x
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-------
                                                                                                 -  305  -
    a
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                                                   Statistical  Analysis  of  All  Stations  During Each  Survey
333
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-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/04/10
                                                                                                    QOOUQOQO UOOOOOOOOOO

DATE
FROM
TO
71/07/01
MONTH






71/08/00
71/08/01
MONTH






71/09/00
71/09/01
MONTH







TIME DEPTH
OF
DAY FEET

NUMBER
MAX IMUM
MINIMUM
MEAN
VARIANCE
STAND DEV
COEF VAR


NUMBER
MAXIMUM
MINIMUM
MtAN
VARIANCE
STAND DEV
COEF VAR


NUMBER
MAXIMUM
MINIMUM
MEAN
VARIANCE
STAND DE.V
COEF VAR
00010
WATER
TEMP
CENT

136.000
27.5000
9.00000
19.3912
16.8215
1. 10110
.21 1508


161 .000
23.0000
9.00000
la. 0329
1 1 .7553
3.1ZB61
.190130


121 .000
22.0000
13.0000
17.H215
1 .79622
1 .31023
.0769298
00299
00
PROBE
M&/L

133. 0(10
lO.SOnO
1 .50000
7.099 1 7
1.17315
2. 1 15n5
.2979.10


161 .OnO
10.60nO
2.20000
6.86111
3.73171
1 .93176
.281511


121 .000
1 1 .10nO
1. 10000
8.18171
2.69967
1 .61307
. 19371 8
Q007S
TKANSP
SECCHI
M E T E K S

17.0000
2.10000
.300000
1 .35631
.252101
,502097
.370166


17.0000
2.10000
.150000
1 .31212
.306312
.553155
.112373


15.0000
2. 10000
.300000
1 .32355
.300137
.518121
.111129
00310
BOD
5 DAY
MS/L

21.0000
30.0000
2.50000
6.79583
28.7369
5.36069
.788820


31 .0000
7.1QOOO
3.3QOOO
1.9Q322
.976318
.988086
.201518


30.0000
7.10000
2.50000
1.16333
1 .61581
1 .28290
.287132
00312
BOD
6 DAY
MG/L

7 .00000
7. 100UO
3. 1 0000
1. 71285
1 .97292
1 . 10160
.296152


















00910
CHLORIDE
CL
MG/L

31 .UOOO
10.0000
5.00000
10.2903
36.7163
6.06187
.589085


31 .0000
21 .0000
3.UUOUU
10.6152
19.0366
1.36310
.109867


30.0000
28.0000
5.00000
10.7833
30.5161
5.52688
.512539
Q053u
RESIDUE
TOT NFUT
Mfa/L

31 .0000
20.1000
.100000
5. 11838
22. 1092
1.70205
.913306


31 .0000
36.1000
. 1 OOUuO
6. 19351
71 .2052
8.13832
1 .36211


31 .QOQO
71.0000
1 .20000
11.9096
261 .719
16.1787
1 .08512
71/10/00

-------
STORET   RETRIEVAL   DATE   75/06/10
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                OUOOQOOO   UOOOOOOOOOO

DATE*
FROM
TO
73/09/01
MONTH






73/10/00
71/02/01
MONTH






71/03/00
71/05/01
MONTH






71/06/00
71/06/01
MONTH







TIME OEpTH
OF
DAY FEET

NUMBER
MAXIMUM
MINIMUM
MEAN
VARIANCE
STAND OEV
COEF VAR


NUMBER
MAX IMUM
MINIMUM
MEAN
VAR 1 ANCE
STAND DEV
COEF VAR


NUMBER
MAX IMUM
MINIMUM
MEAN
VARIANCE
STAND DEV
COEF VAR


NUMBER
MAX IMUM
M I NIMUM
MEAN
VAR 1 ANCE
STAND DEV
COEF VAR
00671
pHOS-DIS
ORTHO
MG/L P

36.0000
.0110000
.OulOOQO
.0075277
.OU00721
.Q08S103
1 . 130S3


23.0000
.0320000
.OOluOOO
.OU90000
.0000610
.ouaoooo
.888693


26.0000
.0200000
.0010000
.01)91923
.0000265
.0051461
,bS9821


30.0000
.0300000
.0020000
.0090000
.0000305
,005521 1
.613162
U066C,
PHOS-TnT

MG/L p

36.UOOO
.356000
.003UOnO
.0829162
.0081575
.0919615
1 . 10912


23.UOHO
.3D9QnO
0o2oonu
.018QBA8
.0012063
.06185^,6
1 .31872


28.0000
.210000
.0130000
.0629998
.0021718
.0166025
.739771


30.0000
. 1700DO
.0500000
.0863329
.0012376
.0351811
.1075?8
0.06US
ORG N
N
MG/L

36.0000
1 ,00000
.OUOOOoO
.3361 1 1
.U789113
.280970
.835916


2J.OOOO
1 .60000
. 1000UO
.273913
. 1 15652
.310076
1 .21155


28.0000
.500000
. 1 00000
.235711
.U161551
. 128277
.511208


3U.OOJO
1 .10000
. 100000
.533333
. 16781 6
.109653
.768101
006 18
N03-N
D1SS
MG/L

36.0000
 1 13000
.00 10000
.0367199
.0001159
.021 1 152
.571566


23.0000
 122000
.0030000
.0663910
.0017017
.0112862
.62 1891


28.0UOO
.600000
.020UOOO
. 181128
.U205755
.113112
.790625


30.0000
.73QUOO
.0100000
. 1 79666
.0103751
.200936
1 . 1 1839
00613
N02-N
DISS
MG/L

36, DOUG
.0070000
.0000000
.0021911
.0000019
.0013902
.633197


2 3 . 0 0 0 LI
.0350DOU
,0050000
.01 68695
.OQOOB6B
.0093 19 1
.552120


28.000U
.0320000
.0020000
.0123211
.0000126
.0065266
.529699


30.0000
,05700uO
.0020000
.01 iloon
.0001 169
.0108138
.750957
00610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L

36.0000
.571000
.QOOUQOO
. 111172
.0231 131
.152030
1 .07163


23.0000
.716000
.0210000
.380013
,0659876
.256881
.675925


28.000U
.570000
.0000000
.211000
,0166969
. 136737
.638958


30.0000
.72UOOO
.0100000
. 167333
.0339161
.181161
1 . 10058
3221 1
CHLRPHTL
A UG/L
CORRECTS

36.0000
70.0000
3.0UOOCI
23.1*11
110. 101
20.2510
.873U98


3.00000
15.9000
9.7QOOO
12.1333
10.9136
3.3Q81 1
.272617


1 3.0000
11.600U
I .50000
10.0538
17.5111
1. 18162
116221


17.0000
22.800U
5.1QOOO
12.2171
33.1B76
5.7B6B5
.17250*
32218
PtitoPhTN
A
Uu/L

31.0000
26.QOUO
1 .00000
B, 02911
18.3931
6.9s>652
.866379


3.UOOOU
2.10QOO
.OOUOOOO
1 .33333
1 .19333
1 .22202
.'16515


8.00000
l.bUUOO
1 .20000
2.85000
1 .77715
1 .33310
.167753


16.0000
8.8UOOO
.OOUOOOO
 3.63121
5.13829
2.33201
.612208
  71/07/00

-------
STORE! RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/10
                                                                                                     OUOOQUOO OOUOOOOOOOO

DATE
FROM
TO
71/07/01
MONTH






71/08/00
71/08/01
MONTH






71/09/00
71/09/01
MONTH







TIME DEPTH
OF
OAr FEET

NUMBER
MAXIMUM
MINIMUM
MEAN
VARIANCE
STAND DEV
COEF VAR


NUMBER
MAXIMUM
MINIMUM
MEAN
VARIANCE
STAND DEV
COEF VAR


NUMBER
MAXIMUM
MINIMUM
MEAN
VAN I ANCE
STAND UEV
COEF VAR
U0671
pHOS-DIS
OHTHO
MG/L P

31 .0000
.0260000
.0030000
.OUB8709
.QU00217
.00166Q1
.525319


31 .0000
.0360000
.U030DOO
.0131290
.0000722
.OU81999
.617113


31 .0000
.0639V99
.0020000
.0121613
.OuQ2070
.0113877
1 . 18307
G066S
PHOS-TOT

MG/L P

31 .0000
. 1 780(10
.0210000
.0616128
.001 1579
0310566
.5527<;2


31 .00(10
. 123QHO
 01300(10
.039U9A7
.UUU87S2
.0295811
.736690


31 .0000
.331000
.oiioono
.0636771
.OCI8U8R8
.0899376
1 .Q71S2
00*05
ORG N
N
MG/L

3 1 .OUUU
1. 10000
. 100000
.711933
.707182
.810911
1 . 13311


31 .0000
1 . 10000
. 100000
.161290
.1)581517
.21 1 768
.5211 12


31 .0000
1 .90000
. louooo
.116129
. 176731
.120391
1 .01025
00618
N03-N
DlSS
MG/L

31 .0000
1 . 13000
.OObOUOO
. 1 15061
.(J612137
2&3161
1 .71725


31 .UUOO
1 .08000
.0250000
.216119
. 1 18661
311172
1 .3979]


31 .OUUO
.910000
.02UOUOU
. 197096
.0662078
.257309
1 .3Q550
00613
N02-N
DISS
MG/L

3 1 . o o LI e
.137000
.UO lOOuO
.Q2U58ufc
.U007655
.0276680
1 .31137


31 .OOUO
.0230000
UO lOouU
.U0770V ;
.00001 1 B
U061663
. 8 3 8 7 ! H


31 .ooun
.0809999
. U 0 2 0 0 u 0
.01 20001)
.000209 1
.01 1161 1
1 .2051?
00610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L

31 .OUUU
3.57000
.0000000
. 193226
,108996
.639528
3.30975


3 1 .0000
.330000
.0 100000
.0525801
.UOV2331
.0960891
1 .82718


3 1 .0000
1 .01000
.0 1UOOOU
. 137967
.0388730
.197162
1 .12905
3221 1
CHLRPHYL
A UG/L
CONKECTD

1 7.00UU
57.6000
3.60000
19.8117
188. 9u6
13-7113
.6*3711


17.0000
75.20UO
.0000000
1 1 .0112
131.695
20.81V3
1 .B8B33


1 6.UUUO
6 1 .8JuO
.0000000
15.1200
3(5.081
1 ;.7bu5
1.15111
32218
PHEOPHTN
A
UG/L

1 5.QOOU
1 1 .100U
 20CIUOD
1.72666
13. 1993
3*63303
.760635


1 7. OOUO
71.QOOU
3. luooo
33.U11 1
619. 3BU
25.162V
.771219


1 6 .UOUU
69.3UUU
.OOUUOUU
21 .6b62
182. ^72
21 .9653
1 .01127
7t/10/00

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 7S/U4/06
                      72028     72029
  DATE   TIME DEPTH  AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
  FROM    OF        FR SOUTH  FR SOUTH
   TO    DAY  FEET   DEGREES    FEET
73/09/17
73/09/17
73/09/17
73/09/17
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/05/22
7M/05/22
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/OB/ 12
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/09/01
71/09/01
71/09/01
71/09/01
01303
0007
0010
0020
0003
0007
0013
0030
0003
0007
0013
0030
0003
0007
0010
0016
0023
0030
0003
0007
0010
0013
0016
U02CI
0023
0026
0003
0007
0020
0030
                                                                   OS3002           1290AC053002
                                                                  11 32  10. D (JUS  00 30. U
                                                                  GREEN  BAY STUDY  DNR  STA I
                                                                  55      WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN


000 10
IVATER
TEMP
CENT
18.0

1B.O
18.0
15. b

15.5
16.0
18. 0

17.5
14.5
25.0

21,0
22.0
22.0
21.0
23.0
22.0
22.0
21 .0
20.0
19.0
19,0
19.0
22.0

20.0
19.0
21K1S 21 1 1202
2 0026 FiET
00299 00078 00310 00312 00
DO TRANSP BOD BOD CHLO
PROBE SECCHI 5 DAY 6 0X1 c
MG/L METERS Mli/L MG/L Mb
4.0 0.1
1 1 .0
o.Q
6.0
a.B o.s
9.8
8.8
7.6
7.2 0.6
9.8
7.2
6.2
6.2 0.9
30. uL
1.9
3.3
2.9
2.6
b.7 0.6
1.5 1.9
3.6
3.1
3.0
2.9
2.8
2. a
7.2
b.7
6.5
6.0
                                                                                                  DEPTH
  OU53Q
RESIDUE
TOT NFLT
  MWL
                                                                                                            20
                                                                                                            20
                                                                                                             2b
                                                                   053002           129UAC053002
                                                                  11 32  to.ci oae  oo  3o.o
                                                                  6REEN  BAY STUDY  DNR  STA 1
                                                                  55      HIISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
21!S
2

DATE
FROM
TO
73/09/17
71/05/22
71/06/03
71/07/09
71/08/12
71/09/01

TIME DEPTH
OF
DAY FEET
0007
0007
0007
0007
0007
0007
00671
pHOS-OIS
OKTHO
MG/L P
0.011
0.017
0.012
0.026
0.011
O.OQ9
006&C, Q06Q5
PHOS-TOT

MG/L p
0.217
0.210
0.170
0.111
0.076
0.111
ORG
N
N

MG/L
1
0
0
1
0
0
.000
.100
.700
. 100
.600
.800
006 IB
N03-N
DISS
MS/L
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.



03
16
28
07
07
12
00613
N02-N
OISS
MG/L
0.002
0.016
O.Olb
0.015
0.012
0.006
00610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
0.101
U.32U
0.62U
3.5/U
0.28U
0. 110
21 1 1202
OL26 FEET DEI
3221 1
CHLKPHYL
A UG/L
CORRECTD
51 .UO
13. JU
17.10
27.00
75.20
31.20
32218
PHEOPHTN
A
UG/L
26.00
1 .bO
6.1U
7.9U
31.70
11.90

-------
STORE! RETRIEVAL DATE 75/04/06
                      72028     72029
  DATE   TIME DEPTH  AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
  FROM    OF        FR SOUTH  FR SOUTH
   TO    DAT  FEET   DEGREES    FEET
73/09/17
73/09/17
73/09/17
73/09/17
71/05/22
7H/OS/22
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/06/03
74/04/03
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/12
71/06/12
71/08/12
71/09/01
71/09/01
71/09/01
71/09/01
0003
0007
0010
0016
0003
0007
0010
0016
0003
0007
0010
0020
0003
0007
0010
0020
0003
0007
0010
0003
0007
0010
0023
                                                                   053U03          1290AC05300J
                                                                  11 32 25.0 008 00 I1.D
                                                                  GREEN BAY STUDY DNR STA  2
                                                                  55      MSCUNStN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN


00010
,
-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE  75/06/06
                                                                   053001           1290AC0530Q1
                                                                  11  33  08.0  087  SI 53.0
                                                                  GREEN  BAY  OPEN  (VATER DNR STA 3
                                                                  55       WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
                     72028      72029
DATE   TIME DEPTH   AZIMUTH   DISTANCE
FROM    OF         FR  SOUTH   FR SOUTH
 TO    DAY  FEET    DEGREES     FEET
73/09/17
7t/OS/22
7t/OS/22
7M/05/22
7t/06/03
7t/06/03
71/06/03
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/OV/OM
71/09/Ot
71/09/01
0003
0003
0013
0023
0003
0013
0023
0003
0010
0016
0023
0003
0013
0023
0003
0010
0023
                                           00010
TEMP
CENT
                                             IS.5
                                             11.5
                                             1 1 .5
                                             17.5
                                             16.5
                                             IS.O
                                             22.0
                                             21.0
                                             20.0
                                             20.0
                                             20.0
                                             20.0
                                             19.0
                                             1 V .U
                                             le.o
                                             18.0
00299
tiO
PROBE
MG/L
8.8
v.o
10.0
/.U
7.6
8.5
3.5
3.1
3.1
3.5
1.1
1.1
1.6
1.5
6.2
6.5
21H.IS 211 1202
2 OU26 FEET
00078 00310 00312 00
TRANSH 600 600 CHLO
SECCHI 5 DAY 6 DAY C
METERS M&/L MG/L Mb
7. 1
7.0
O.H
o.e
o.a
0.1
                                                                                                  DEPTH
                                                                                                        0053Q
                                                                                                      RESIDUE
                                                                                                      TUT NFLT
                                                                                                        MG/L
                                                                   053UOb           1290AC05300&
                                                                  It 32  55.0  087  58  56.0
                                                                  GREEN  uAY OPEN  WATER UNK STA 3A
                                                                  55       WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
21WIS


DATE
FROM
TO
/02/M


TIME
OF
DAY
>


DEPTH

FEET
0003

72028
AZJMUTH
FR SOUTH
DEGREES


72029
DISTANCE
FR SOUTH
FEET


QOOlO
WATER
TEMP
CENT


00299
DO
PROBE
Mfa/L
9.6
2
00078
TRANSP
SECCHI
METERS


00310
BOD
5 DAY
MG/L

21 1 1202
0026 FEET
00312 00
BOD CHLO
6 DAY C
MG/L Mb

                                                                                                  DEPTH
                                                                                                        0053Q
                                                                                                      RESIDUE
                                                                                                      TUT NFLT
                                                                                                        M6/L

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                      72028     72029
  DATE   TIME DEpTH  AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
  FROM    OF        FR SOUTH  FR SOUTH
   TO    DAr  FEET   DEGREES    FEET
73/09/17
73/09/17
73/09/17
73/09/17
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/09/01
71/09/01
71/09/01
71/09/01
0003
0007
0016
0026
0003
0007
0013
0023
0003
0007
0010
0020
0026
0003
0007
0013
0026
0003
0007
0016
0033
0003
0007
0013
0033
                                                                   0530U6          1290ACQS3006
                                                                  11  33 53.0 087 5* 21.0
                                                                  4REEN BAY OPiN WATER DNR STA 1
                                                                  55       WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN


000,10
ATER
TEMP
CENT
16.0

16.0
16.0
15.0
16. 0
13.0
1 1 .0
17.5

16.0
15.0
11.0
22.0

19.0
18.0
20.0

20,0
18.0
20.0

18.0
18.0


00299
DO
PROaE
MG/L
6.6

6.2
b.O
V.5
9.5
9.2
10.2
7.2

7.6
9.5
9.7
5.1

1.0
3.7
6.9

6.2
1.6
9.1

6.7
6.8
21*15
2
00078 00310
TRANSP BOD
SECCHI 5 DAY
METERS MG/L
0.3
6.1


0.9
7.0


0.6




0.9
6.5


0.8
5.3


0.1
1.9


2111202
0026 FEET DEPTH
00312 OU9SQ 0053U
BOD CHLORIDE RLS1DUE
6 DAY CL TOT NFLT
MG/L MG/L MG/L

17



1U 31



11.0 15 17




9 7



16 21



17 31


                                                                   0530J6          l29UACOb3006
                                                                  11 33 530 087 59 21.0
                                                                  SREEN BAY OPEN WATER DNK STA 1
                                                                  55      WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
21*15
2

DATE
FROM
TO
73/09/17
71/05/22
71/06/03
71/07/09
71/08/12
71/09/01

TIME DEPTH
OF
DAY FEET
0007
0007
0007
0007
01)07
0007
00671
pHOS-DIS
OKTHO
MG/L P
0.008
0.012
0.012
0.006
0.011
0.011
0046=,
PHOS-ToT

MG/L P
0.239
0.095
0. 160
0.073
0.058
0. 168
00605
ORG N
N
M6/L
0.8DO
0.500
1 . 100
0.600
0.70U
1.200
00618
M03-N
D1SS
MG/L
0.02
0.18
U.36
O.I 1
0.12
0.08
00613
N02-N
DISS
MG/L
0.002
0.020
0.025
0.011
0.015
0.012
00610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
0.260
0.260
0.72U
0.200
0.060
U.530
211
0026
3221 1
CHLRPHYL
A UG/L
CORRECTU
19.00

21 .7U
26.60
5.00
5.20
1202
FEET DEI
322|8
PHEUPHTN
A
Uto/L
19.00

1 .20
1 1 .20
71 .UU
69.30

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                                                                   053007          129UAC053U07
                                                                  41 31 H8.0 087 58 37.0
                                                                  (.KEEN BAY OPEN WATER ON* STA b
                                                                  S5      WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
                      72028     72029
  DATE   TIME DEpTH  AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
  FROM    OF        FR SOUTH  FR  SOUTH
   TO    DAT  FEET   DEGREES    FEET
73/OV/17
73/09/J7
73/09/17
7S/05/22
71/05/22
7(/05/22
7S/06/03
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/09/01
71/09/01
71/09/01
0003
0007
0010
0003
0013
0032
0003
0010
0016
0003
0016
0030
0003
0007
0013
0020
0026
0003
0010
0020


000 lQ
WATER
TEMP
CENT
15.0

15.0
12.0
1 1 .0
1U.5
11.5
11.5
11.0
21.0
17.0
17.0
18.5
18.0
17.0
16.0
16.0
19.0
17.0
J7.U


00299
DO
PROBE
MG/L
8.7

8.7
11.6
11.1
1 1 .0
10. b
10.3
10. M
6.7
5. 1
3.1
6.7
5.7
1.8
2.6
2. a
8.7
6.7
6.0
21 A IS 2111202
2 0026 FEET
0007S O0310 00312 00
TRANSp tJOD BOD CHLO
SECCHI 5 DAY 6 DAY C
METERS MC./L M&/L Mt,
0.5
5.5

1 .3


0.9


1 .2


1 ,2




o.t)


                                                                                                 DEPTH
  0053Q
RtSlOUE
TUT NFLT
  MG/L
                                                                   053007          H290ACOb3007
                                                                  11 3H 18.U OB7 5B 37.U
                                                                  GStEN BAY OPtN WATER UNK STA 5
                                                                  55      WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN



DATE
FROM
TO
/09/n



TIME
OF
DAY
r



DEpTW

FEET
0007


00671
PHJS-DIS
OKTHO
MG/L P
0.005


OQ66i;
PHOS-TOT

MG/L P
0.091


Q06Q5
ORG N
N
MG/L
0.6QO


00618
N03-N
DISS
MG/L
0.001
21*1!
2
00613
N02-N
UISS
MG/L
0.001
&

OU610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
0.072
21 1
OU26
32211
CHLRPHYL
A UG/L
COKRECTU
31.00
1202
FEET DL
3221B
PHEOPHlN
A
Ut,/L
12. Ou

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/04/06
                                                                  053008           t290ACOS3008
                                                                 HI 31  M.O  087  57  26.0
                                                                 GREEN  BAY OPEN  WATER  DNR  STA 5A
                                                                 55       WISCONSIN
                                                                 LAKE MICHIGAN
                      72Q28
  DATE   TIME DEPTH  AZIMUTH
  FROM    OF        FR SOUTH
   TO    DAY  FEET   DEGREES
                 72029     OOG10
               DISTANCE   WATER
               FR SOUTH    TEMP
                 FEET      CENT
71/02/19
71/02/19
OU03
0010
 00299
  00
PROBE
 MG/L

    9.2
    7.8
                                                                 21*15
                                                                 2
                                                                        2111202
                                                                       0006  FEET
                                                                                                 DEPTH
 OQ07B     00310     00312     00910     00530
TRANSP     BOD       BOD     CHLORIDE  RESIDUE
SECCHI    5 DAY     6 DAY       CL     TOT NFLT
METERS     MG/L      MG/L      Md/L      MG/L

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                                                                              05,3009            429UAC053009
                                                                             44  3b 46.0 087  59  46.0
                                                                             GREEN BAY  OPEN  WATER ONK  STA 6
                                                                             55        IVISCUNSIN
                                                                             LAKE MICHIGAN
21V, IS 2111202


DATE TIME
FROM OF
TO DAY
73/09/17
73/09/17
74/05/22
74/05/22
74/05/22
74/06/03
74/06/03
74/06/03
74/07/09
74/07/09
74/07/09
74/08/12
74/08/12
74/08/12
74/09/04
74/09/04
74/09/04

72028 72029
DEPTH AZIMUTH DISTANCE
FR SOUTH FR SOUTH
FEET DEGREES FEET
0003
0007
0003
0007
0010
0003
0007
0010
0003
0007
0010
0003
0007
0013
0003
0007
0010

0001Q
HATER
TEMP
CENT
14.5

16.0
16.0
1 1.5
15.0

15.0
23.0

19.0
19.0

19.0
19.0

18. 0

00299
DO
PROBE
MG/L
9.2

11.3
11.3
9.4
1U.U

10.2
a. 2

5.3
7.5

7.7
10.2

7.6
2
0007fi
TRANSP
SECCHI
METERS
0.6

O.V


0.9


0.9


1 .0


1 .U


UU09 FEET DEPTH
OU310 00312 OU9tu UUS30
dOD riOD CHLOK1DE RESIDUE
5 OAY 6 DAY CL TUT NFLT
MG/L MG/L Mb/L MG/L

3.4 11

7.6 7 11


9.4 10 10


7.8 13 4


4.1 14 3


6.5 12 10

                                                                               0&3009             4290AC053009
                                                                              44  35  46.0  Ob7 59  46.0
                                                                              GREEN  BAY OPEN *ATER ONR STA  6
                                                                              55        WISCONSIN
                                                                              LAKE MICHIGAN
2 IV. 1 S
2

DATE TIME
FROM OF
TO DAY
73/09/17
74/05/22
74/06/03
71/07/09
74/08/12
74/09/04

DEPTH

FEET
0007
0007
0001
0007
0007
0007
00671
PHOS-DIS
ORTHO
MG/L P
0.006
O.OQ9
0.013
0.005
0.014
0.010
OU66^
PHOS-TOT

MG/L P
0.071
0.08U
0. 100
0.068
0.028
U.076
Q0605
URS N
N
MG/L
0.7QO
0.300
1 .000
0.600
0.6QO
0.6QQ
00618
N03-N
DlSS
MG/L
0.001
0.03
0.05
0.01
0.06
0.03
00613
N02-N
DlSS
MG/L
0.001
0.014
0.012
0.010
0.007
0.003
00610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
0.025
U. 120
0. 160
0.06U
0.010K
0. 1 1U
21 1
U009
3221 1
CHLRPHYL
A UG/L
CORRECTD
21 .UO
12. bO
B.HU
26.00
o.uo
6.70
1202
FEET DEI
32216
PHEOPHTN
A
UG/L
12.00
4.2CI

7. 60
70. VO
29. 2U

-------
STORE! RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                       72Q28      72029
  DATE   TIME  DEpTH   AZIMUTH   DISTANCE
  FROM    OF         FR  SOUTH   FR  SOUTH
   TO    DAT   FEET    DEGREES     FEET
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/18
71/02/19
71/02/19
71/02/19
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/09/01
71/09/01
74/09/01
71/09/01
0003
0007
0010
0030
0003
0007
0016
0003
0007
0016
0003
0007
0010
0020
0003
0007
0013
0020
0003
0007
0010
0020
0003
0007
0010
0020
                                                                   Q53010          1290AC0530IO
                                                                  It  35 00.0 087 56 SB.O
                                                                  GREEN BAY OPEN ATER DNR 5TA 7
                                                                  55       WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN


00010
ATER
TEMP
CENT
15.0

15.0
15.0

1 .0

13.0
13.0
12.0
13. b

13. 5
13.0
22.0

21 .0
16.0
IV. 0

19.0
18.0
20.0

17.0
17.0


00299
00
PROBE
MG/L
9.0

8.0
7.7
7.3
7.0
7.0
1 1 .7
1 1 .7
10. 1
10.1

10.6
10.0
8.2

7.5
2.7
7.9

7.6
6.2
V.8

7.1
7.1
211S 2111202
2 0009 FEET
00078 00310 00312 00
TRANSP SOD BOD CHLO
SECCH1 5 DAT 6 DAY C
METERS MG/L MG/L MG
o.e
1.0



2.3

1 .0
12.0

1 .2
8.6


1.2
7.0


1.5
1.1


0.9
1.5


      DEPTH

     40     0053Q
CHLORIDE  RESIDUE
          TOT NFLT
            M6/L
                                                                                                            28
                                                                                                            13
                                                                                                           0.1
                                                                   053010          1290AC053010
                                                                  11 3S> 00.0 OH7 56 58-0
                                                                  GREEN BAY OPEN WATER DNR STA  7
                                                                  55      WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
21*15,
2

DATE
FROM
TO
73/09/18
71/02/19
74/05/22
71/06/03
71/07/09
71/08/12
74/09/04

TIME DEPTH
OF
DAY FEET
0007
0007
0007
0007
0007
0007
0007
00671
PHOS-DIS
ORTHO
MS/L P
0.006
0.007
0.010
0.009
0.007
0.018
0.010
0066?
PHOS-ToT

MG/L p
0.101
0.060
0.073
0.060
0.06b
o.oia
O.O'I
00605
ORG N
N
MS/L
Q.IOO
0.100K
0.100
0.800
U.5QO
0.700
0.5UO
OU618
N03-N
oiss
MG/L
0.03
0.12
0. 15
0.10
0.01
U.01
0.02
00613
N02-N
D1SS
MG/L
0.002
0.021
0.01 1
0.010
0.008
0.005
0-003
00610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MS/L
0.126
0.59V
0.360
0.110
0.010K
Q.010K
0-070
21 1 1202
0009 FEET OE
3221 1
CHLRPHYL
A US/L
CORRECTS
27.00

12.30
9.10
17.30
0.80
0-UQ
322|8
PHEOPHTN
A
US/L
10.00

2.10
3.00
U.60
12.50
15-10

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
D-ATE TIME
FROM OF
TO DAY
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/18
71/02/18
71/02/18
71/02/18
71/02/18
71/OS/22
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/09/01
71/09/01
71/09/01
DEPTH

FEET
0003
0007
0010
0020
0030
0003
0007
0010
0020
0003
0013
0030
0003
0013
0029
0003
0013
0016
0020
0003
0010
0020
0003
0010
0023
                       72Q28     72Q29
                      AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
                    FR SOUTH  FR SOUTH
                      DEGREES    FEET
                                             15.0
                                                                  063011          1290ACU53011
                                                                 11 36 16.0 087 55 12.U
                                                                 GREEN BAY OPEN WATER DNR STA  6
                                                                 56      WISCONSIN
                                                                 LAKE MICHIGAN
21*15
2
OOOlO
WATER
TEMP
CENT
00299
00
PROBE
MG/L
00078
TRANSp
SECCH1
METERS
00310
BOD

-------
O O
f 
o*  a:
O 3
O -I
1*1  Q
o  o
O 00
                                                                                          o i/i  i
                                                                                              ^j  o
                                                                                              a:  
                                                                                       3- 
                                                                                      > X
                                                                                      O O
                                                                                      O -I
                                                                                                                                           03 uJ O
                                                                                                                                           13 O_ IJ
                                                                                                                                              O l/l  \
                                                                                                                                       ft  "  03     
                                                                                                                                                                         -O  I   < X
                                                                                                                                                                         o  m  t- ,3
                                                                                                                                                                         O  X  O E
                                                                a:  ji  <     -.         cr  a.    i/)
                                                              '  >3  i/>  _l     (M"M     r*.(/)XQC
                                                                                                                                                                           Z  U1 _J
                                                                                                                                                                         O  I   (/I X
                                                                                                                                                                         O  fM   13
                                                                                                                                                                         o  o  a E
                                                                                                                                                                         o  I   in
                                                                                                                                                                         o  
-------
STORET RETRIEVAL  DATE 75/06/06
                       72028      72029
  DATE    TIME  DEpTH  AZIMUTH   DISTANCE
  FROM     OF         FR SOUTH   FR SOUTH
   TO     DAY   FEET   DEGREES     FEET
71/02/18
71/02/18
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/09/01
71/09/01
0006
0016
0003
0007
0010
0016
0003
0007
0016
0003
0007
0003
0007
                                                                     053011           l290ACOS301't
                                                                    11 37 08.0  087 52 12>0
                                                                    GREEN BAY OPEN WATER ONR  STA  8C
                                                                    55       WISCONSIN
                                                                    LAKE M1CHI.GAN


oooio
ATR
TEMP
CENT
0.8
0.8
15.0

15.0
11.0
21.0
23.5
23.0
21 .0
21.0
18.0
.17.0


00299
00
PROgE
MG/L
1.3
3.H
1Q.8

10. 1
9.2
9.6
9.2
8.6
10.6
10.6
8.6
9.0
21M5
2
0007B 00310
TRANSP BOD
SECCHI 5 OAY
METERS MG/L


1 .0



0.9
7.1

0.6
7.1

H.9
21 1 1202
0019 FEET
00312 00
BOD CHLO
6 DAY C
MG/L Mb



9.8









                                                                                                     DEPTH
  0053Q
RESIDUE
TOT NFLT
  MG/L
                                                                                                     12



                                                                                                     12


                                                                                                     15

                                                                                                      8
       IB

       11
                                                                                                                                              I
                                                                                                                                              u
                                                                      OS3U11           1290ACOS3011
                                                                     11 37 08.0 087  52  12.U
                                                                     GREEN BAY OPEN  WATER  DNK STA 8C
                                                                     55      WISCONSIN
                                                                     LAKE MICHIGAN
2 1 U I S
2

DATE
FROM
TO
7t/06/03
71/07/09
7H/08/I2
7M/09/OM

TIME DEPTH
OF
DAY FEET
0007
0007
0007
0007
00671
PHOS-DIS
ORTHO
MG/L P
O.OOS
0.008
0.015
0.010
0066%
PHOS-TOT

MG/L P
0. 100
U.087
0.095
0.067
00605
ORG N
N
MG/L
0.8QO
0.500
0.700
0.300
00618
N03-N
DISS
MG/L
U.22
0.03
0.01
0.09
00613
N02-N
01SS
MG/L
0.019
0.010
0.007
O.OU3
00610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
0.170
0.210
0.010K
U.090
21 1
OU19
32211
CHLRPHYL
A UG/L
CORRECTD
18.00
21.20
13. 30
2.bO
1202
FEET DEI
32218
PHEOPHTN
A
UG/L
b.50
3.3U
bB.bO
53. SO

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                       72028      72029
  DATE   TIME DEPTH   AZIMUTH   DISTANCE
  FROM    OF        FR SOUTH   FR  SOUTH
   TO    DAY  FEET    DEGREES     FEET
73/09/18
73/09/ 18
73/09/18
73/09/18
71/02/18
7S/02/18
71/02/18
71/02/18
71/02/18
71/02/18
71/0b/20
71/05/20
71/05/20
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/08/ 1 2
71/08/12
71/09/01
71/09/01
71/09/01
0003
0007
0010
U020
0003
0007
0013
0020
0023
0026
0003
0010
0020
0003
0010
0020
0030
0003
0016
U030
0003
0013
0023
0026
0003
0013
0030












OS30I5 129UACU53015
It 39 22.0 087 53 19.D
GREEN BAY OPEN WATER ONR STA 9
55 WISCONSIN
LAKE MICHIGAN
211S 211 1202






2 OU26 FEET DEPTH
Q0010
IATER
TEMP
CENT
15.5

IS.O
15. 0
o.e
.0
.u
.3
.0
.1
9.0
9.0
6.0
12. b
12. &
12. 0
1 1 .0
22,0
2U.U
11.0
I?. 5
IV. b
19.0
Ib.U
19.0
18. D
17.0
00299
DO
PKOBE
MG/L
9.8

9.1
8.6
17.6
lb.0
10.7
a.s
8.0
8.3
1 1 .1
1 1 .3
1 l.B
10.1
1U.2
10.0
9.3
8.b
b.9
b.2
a.t
8.3
8.1
2. a
H.I
7.3
7.2
00078 00310 00312 ODVtO
TRANSP BOD bOO CHLURlOt
SECCHI b OAT 6 DAT CL
METERb MG/L MG/L Mb/L
1 .U
1.3



2. 1 9


3.1 17

1 .2


1 .6



1 .8


1.8



1 .S.


OOb3Q
RESIDUE
TUT NFLT
Mii/L

18



0.5


9


















2IAIS
2

DATE
FROM
TO
73/09/18
71/02/18
71/02/18

TIME DEpTH
OF
DAY FEET
0007
0007
0023
U0671
pHOS-DIS
OKTHO
MG/L P
0.008
0.002
0.007
0066^
PHOS-ToT

MG/L P
U.OS8
0.011
U.017
00605
ORG N
N
MG/L
0.100
0.200
0.1QOK
00616
N03-N
01SS
MG/L
0.05
U.02
U.I1
00613
N02-N
UISS
MG/L
0.003
O.U08
U.026
00610
NH3-N
TOTAL
Mfi/L
0. 126
u.oav
0.611
                                                                   Q53Q15          1290AC053UI5
                                                                  11 39 22.0 087 b3 19.0
                                                                  GREEN BAY OPEN WATER DNK STA  y
                                                                  5b      IIISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
                                                                                       2111202
                                                                                      Uu26 FLtT   DEP

                                                                                   32211      32218
                                                                                 CHLRPHKL  PHEOPHlN
                                                                                  A UG/L       A
                                                                                 COhRECTO     UG/L
                                                                                    5| .00
                                                                                               25.00

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                       72028      72029
  DATE   TIME DEPTH   AZIMUTH   DISTANCE
  FROM    OF        FR  SOUTH   FR SOUTH
   TO    DAY  FEET    DEGREES     FEET
                           00010     00299
                          AATER       DO
                           TEMP     PROBE
                           CENT      MG/L
71/02/18
7H/02/18
7M/02/18
0003
0020
0026
1.0
1.5
1.6
16.t
 8.8
 6.3
                                                                   053016          H290ACQ530I6
                                                                  Ml 10 16.0 087 52 39.0
                                                                  GREEN BAY OPtN WATER DNR STA 9A
                                                                  SB      WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
                                                                  21UIIS
                                                                  2
                                                                        2111202
                                                                       0026  FEET
                                                                                  BEPTH
                 00076     00310     00312
                TRANSp     BOD       BOD
                SECCH1    S DAY     6 DAY
                METERS     MG/L      MG/L
                                      00910      0063Q
                                     CHLORIDE   RESIDUE
                                       CL      TOT  NFLT
                                                 MG/L

-------
STORE! RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                      72028     72029
  DATE   TIME DEpTH  AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
  FROM    OF        pR SOUTH  FR SOUTH
   TO    DAY  FEET   DEGREES    FEET
74/02/1S
71/02/18
71/02/18
71/05/20
71/05/20
71/05/20
71/05/20
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/09/01
71/09/01
71/09/01
71/09/01
0007
0020
0026
0003
0007
0013
0030
0003
OU07
QUIU
0020
0030
0003
0007
0013
0030
0003
0007
0010
0023
0026
0003
0007
0015
0030
                                                                   053017           1290ACOS30I7
                                                                  11  39  11.0  087  51  OS.O
                                                                  GREEN  BAY  OPEN  HATER OUR STA 9u
                                                                  55       WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN


00010
SATER
TEHP
CENT
1 .5
0.9
I .2
B. s
8.5
8.5
8.0
12.0

12.0
12.0
10.5
22.0

21 .0
12.5
20.0

20.0
19.5
16.0
18.0

18.0
18.0


00299
00
PRObE
MG/L
5.7
5.1
3.3
1 1 .8
1 1 .U
1 1 .6
11.8.
9.6

9.6
9.1
7.2
8.5

8.0
1.3
8.1

7.9
7.5
5.9
/.9

7.2
5.9
2 1 f. I S
2
00078 00310
TRANSp 80p
SECCHI b UAY
METERS MG/L
2.1


1 .2



1.6




1.6
1.9


1.8
1.9



1 .5
3.3


21 1 1202
0022 FEET DEPTH,
00312 OQ9io OOS3Q
BOO CHLORIDE RESIDUE
6 DAY CL TOT NFLT
MG/L Mb/L MG/L
17 1



t.S 10 9



8 2




9 I



9 O.IK




6 6


                                                                   053017           4290ACQ53017
                                                                  11  39  11.0  067  51  05.0
                                                                  GREEN  BAY OPEN  HATER  CNR  STA 9e
                                                                  55       WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
21H1S
2

DATE TIME
FROM OF
TO DAY
71/02/18
71/05/20
71/06/01
71/07/09
71/08/13
71/09/01

DEPTH

FEET
0007
0007
0007
0007
0007
0007
00671
PHOS-DIS
ORTHO
MG/L P
0.008
0.001
0.010
0.008
0.010
0.009
006Ai;
PHOS-ToT

MG/L p
0.016
0.077
0.060
0.012
0.011
0,033
00605
ORG N
N
MG/L
O.IOOK
0.300
0.200
0.300
0.30U
0.100
00618
N03-N
D1SS
MG/L
0.10
0.06
O.US
0.03
0.06
0.10
00613
N02-N
DISS
MG/L
0.02C
0.007
0.008
0.008
0.005
0.003
00610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
0.598
0. 160
U.06U
0.1 10
0.01UK
0.020
211
0022
32211
CHLRPHYL
A OG/L
CORRECTD

12.60
9.10
1 1 .30
0.00
3.30
1202
FEET DEPTH
32218
PHEOPHTN
A
OG/L


1.00
1 .80
11.20
18. Ill

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE  75/06/06
                       72Q28      72029      OOQiO
  DATE   TIME DEpTH   AZIMUTH   DISTANCE    ATER
  FROM    OF        FR  SOUTH   FR SOUTH     TEMP
   TO    DAY  FEET    DEGREES     FEET       CENT
7H/02/18
7H/02 '18
0003
0023
 00299
  DO
PROBE
 MG/L

   1B.Q
    H.O
                                                                   053018           H29UAC05301S
                                                                  <4H 38 59.0  087  H9  1t.0
                                                                  GREEN BAY OPEN  WATER  DNR STA 9C
                                                                  55       WISCUNSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
                                                                  2II0IS
                                                                  2
                                                                         2111202
                                                                        0022  FEET
                                                                                   DEPTH
                                                00078     00310     Q0312      009<40     00530
                                               TRANSP     BUD       bOO      CHLOKIOt  RESIDUE
                                               SECCHI    5 DAY     6 DAY        CL     TUT NFLT
                                               METERS     M&/L      MCi/L       MWL      MG/L
                                                                    053019           M290ACO&3019
                                                                   SI  39  06.0 087 S9 &8.0
                                                                   GREEN  BAY  OPEN flATER UNR STA 9tB
                                                                   SB       WISCONSIN
                                                                   LAKE  MICHIGAN
                                                                                                                          u>
                                                                                                                          I


DATE
FROM
TO
71/02/18
7M/02/18
71/02/18


TIME DEPTH
OF
DAY FEET
0003
0013
0020

72028
AZIMUTH
FR SOUTH
DEGREES




72029
DISTANCE
FR SOUTH
FEET




00010
tiATEK
TEMP
CENT
0.7
0.8
1 .5

00299
DO
PROBE
Mb/L
It.Q
10.8
2.6
2 1 V. I S
2
00074 00310
TRANSP SOU
SECCHI 5 DAY
METERS MG/L



21 1 1202
JU19 FEtl
00312 Ou
BOD CHLU
6 DAY C
MG/L MG



                                                                                                  UtpTH
                                                                                                         OOS30
                                                                                                       RESIDUE
                                                                                                       TOT  NFLT
                                                                                                         MG/L

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                      72028
  DATE   TIME DEpTM  AZIMUTH
  FROM    OF        FR SOUTH
   TO    DAY  FEET   DEGREES
73/09/17
73/09/17
71/02/19
71/02/19
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/04/03
71/06/03
71/07/09
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/09/01
0003
0007
0003
0007
0003
0007
0003
0007
UQ03
0003
0010
0003
                                                                   053020           1290ACU53U2U
                                                                  11  32  1U.O  087  59 00.D
                                                                  GREEN  BAY  OPEN  HATER DNK STA I
                                                                  55       WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
2 1 K 1 S

72029
DISTANCE
FR SOUTH
FEET

000 10
ftATER
TEMP
CENT

00299
on
PROBE
MG/L
2
00078
TRANSP
SECCH1
METERS

OU310
BOD
b DAY
MG/L
21 1 12U2
OU06 FEET
00312 00
BOD CHLO
6 OAY C
MG/L MG
                                                                                                 DEPTH
                                             17.5
                                                       5.2
                                                                  0.1

1 .0
Ib.S
lb.0
16. S
16. S
23.0
22. S
22. b
19.0
10
10
8
V
6
6
1
6
6
b
. 1
 1
.8
.3
 2
*2
.2
.9
.7
.S


0

0

0
0

0


.7

.6

.8
.1

.3
                                                                            7.1

                                                                            6.1
                                                                                                 18
                                                                                        OUS3Q
                                                                                      RESIDUE
                                                                                      TOT  NFLT
                                                                                        MG/L
                                                                                            60

                                                                                            bl
                      00671
  DATE   TIME DEpTH  pHOS-DIS
  FROM    OF         ORTHO
   TO    DAY  FEET   MG/L f
73/09/17
71/02/19
0007
0007
0.009
0.032
                                                                   Ob3020          
-------
STORE! RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                       72028      72029
  DATE   TIME DEpTH  AZIMUTH   DISTANCE
  FROM    OF        FR SOUTH   FR  SOUTH
   TO    DAY  FEET   DEGREES     FEET
73/09/17
73/09/17
71/02/19
71/02/19
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/09/01
71/09/01
0003
0007
0003
0007
0003
0010
0003
0010
U003
0010
0003
0010
0003
0007
                                                                   053021           1290ACOS302I
                                                                  11  32  03.U  067 57 05.0
                                                                  GREEN  BAY  OPEN WATER DNK STA
                                                                  55       WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN


QOQlO
dATER
TEMP
CENT
17.0



15.5
lb.0
16.5
16.5
21.0
22.5
22.0
22.0
19.0
18.0


00299
DO
PROBE
MG/L
1.2

9.8
8.9
11.1
10.6
7.1
7.5
8.2
3.2
7.8
7.8
8.1
6.9
21IS 2111202
2 0006 FEET
00078 00310 00312 OU
TRANSP BOD BD CHUU
SECCHI 5 DAY 6 DAY C
METERS MG/L MG/L MG
0.1
1.6


0.9

0.8

0.9

0.6

0.3

                                                                                                 OEPTH
  00530
RESIDUE
TOT NFLT
  MG/L
                                                                                                           32
                                                                   053021           1290ACQ53021
                                                                  11 32 03.0 087 57 05*0
                                                                  GREEN BAY OPEN WATER DNR STA
                                                                  55      WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
                       00671      00661;
  DATE   TIME DEpTH  pHOS-DIS   PHOS-ToT
  FROM    OF          ORTHO
   TO    DAY  FEET    MG/L  P     MG/L  p
2 1 V. I S
2
00605
ORG M
N
MG/L
00618
N03-N
DISS
MG/L
00613
N02-N
DISS
MG/L
00610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
21 1
0006
3221 1
CHLRPHYL
A UG/L
CORRECTD
1202
FEET OE,
32218
PHEOphTN
A
UG/L
73/09/17
               D007
                        0.023
                                  0.251
                                            0.100
                                                       0.01
                                                                0.001
                                                                          0.325
                                                                                    61 .00
                                                                                              1 1 .OU

-------
STORET  RETRIEVAL  DATE  75/06/06
                                                                   053022           1290AC053022
                                                                  11 32 27.0  087  56 02.0
                                                                  GRLEN BAY OPEN  WATER  ONR  STA 12
                                                                  55      WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
                       72028     72029
  DATE    TIME  OEpTH   AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
  FROM     OF         FR SOUTH  FR SOUTH
    TO     DAY   FEET    DECREES    FEET
73/09/17
73/09/17
71/02/19
71/02/19
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/09/01
71/09/01
71/09/01
0003
0007
0003
0007
0003
0007
0010
0003
0007
0010
0003
0007
0010
0003
0007
0010
0003
0007
oni n
                      00671
  DATE   TIME DEPTH pHOS-DIS
  FROM    OF         OKTHO
   TO    DAY  FEET   MG/L P
73/09/17
71/02/19
71/05/22
71/06/03
71/07/09
71/08/12
71/09/01
0007
0007
0007
0007
0007
0007
0007
0.006
0.007
0.016
0.001
0.007
0.022
0.061


00010
MTER
TEMP
CENT


00279
DO
PROSE
MG/L
21V, IS
2
00078
TRANSP
SECCH1
METERS


00310
BOD
5 DAY
M&/L
21 1 1202
OOU9 FEET
00312 OO
SOD CHLO
6 DAY C
MG/L MG
                                             16.0
                                             18.0
                                                                                                  DEPTH
                                                        7.1
0.7
1 .3
Ib.B
15. 5
11.5
17.0
17.0
21.5
23.0
22.0
22.0
19.0
12.8
6.2
11.1
11*1
10.0
10.0
9.8
9.7
9.3
a. 2
8.2
10.0
                                                                  0.9
                                                                  0.9
                                                                  0.6
                                                             1.3

                                                             8.6
                                                                            8. 1
                                                                            6.5
                                                                            5.7
                                                                                       9.8
                                                        7.0
                                                                           18

                                                                           13


                                                                           11


                                                                           15


                                                                           17


                                                                          21
                                                                   CJb3U22          1290ACUS3U22
                                                                  11 32 27.0 0
-------
STORE! RETRIEVAL DATE 75/04/06
                       72028      72029
  DATE   TIME  DEPTH   AZIMUTH   DISTANCE
  FROM    OF         FR  SOUTH   FR SOUTH
   TO    DAr   FEET    DEGREES     FEET
73/09/17
73/09/17
71/02/19
71/02/19
71/02/19
71/05/22
-1/05/22
71/05/22
71/04/03
71/04/03
71/04/03
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/09/01
71/09/01
71/09/01
0003
0007
0003
0007
0010
0003
0007
0010
0003
0007
0010
0003
0007
0010
0003
0007
0010
0003
0007
0010
                                             14.0
                                                                   053023           1290AC053023
                                                                  11 33 01.0 087  57  OB.O
                                                                  GKEEN BAY OPtW  WATER  UNR  STA  13
                                                                  55      WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
21K1S

00010
ATER
TEMP
CENT

00299
DO
PROBE
MG/L
2
00078
TRANSP
SECCHI
METERS

00310
BOD
5 DAY
MG/L
211 1202
OUU9 FEET
00312 UO
BOO CHLO
6 DAY C
MG/L M6U
6I.BU
32216
PHEOPHTN
A
Ub/L
1 1 .00

1 .20
5.2O
b.lU
71. UU
U.UU

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                                                                   053021           4290ACOS3024
                                                                  41  33  26.0  087  55 37.0
                                                                  GREEN  BAY  OPEN  WATER ONR STA 1JA
                                                                  55       WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
  DATE   TIME
  FROM    OF
   TO    DAY
74/02/19
74/02/19
74/02/19
74/05/22
74/05/22
74/06/03
74/06/03
74/07/09
74/07/09
74/08/12
74/08/12
74/09/04
74/09/04
0003
0007
0010
0003
0010
0003
0010
0003
0010
0003
0010
0003
0010


72028 72029
IEPTH AZIMUTH DISTANCE
FR SOUTH FR SOUTH
EET DEGREES FEET
0003
0007
0010
0003
0010
0003
0010
0003
0010
0003
0010
0003
0010


00010
irATER
TEMP
CENT

1 .0

IS. 5
15.0
16.5
16.5
24.0
24.0
22.0
22.0
19.0
18.0


00299
DO
PR08E
MG/L
9.5
9.5
6.8
11 .6
11 .0
9.9
10.0
9.2
9.4
8.1
7.2
9.9
6.1
21*1,5
2
00078 00310
TRANSP BOD
SECCH1 5 DAY
METERS MG/L

3.4

0.9

0.8

0.9

0.8

0.6

21 11202
0009 FEET
00312 00
BOD CHLO
6 DAY C
MG/L MS













                                                                                                 DEPTH
                                                                                                 14
  00530
RESIDUE
TOT NFLT
  MG/L
                                                                                                           1 1
                                                                   053024           4290ACOS3024
                                                                  44  33  26.0  087  55 37.0
                                                                  GREEN  BAY OPEN  WATER  DNR STA 1
                                                                  55       WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
                                  I
                                  ro
                                  to
                                  I
2IIS


DATE
FROM
TO


TIME
OF
DAY

00671
DEPTH pHOS-DIS
ORTHO
FEET MG/L P

0066*
PHOS-ToT

MG/L p

O'OiOS-
ORG N
N
MG/L

00618
N03-N
DI5S
MG/L
 2
00613
N02-N
DISS
MG/L

00610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
21 1
0009
32211
CHLRPHYL
A UG/L
CORRECTD
1202
FEET DEPTH
32218
PHEOPHTN
A
UG/L
74/02/19
               0007
                       0.001
                                 0.051
                                           0.lOOK
                                                      0.12
                                                               0.030
                                                                         0.688

-------
STORE! RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                      72028     72029
  DATE   TIME DEPTH  AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
  FROM    OF        FR SOUTH  FR SOUTH
   TO    DAY  FEET   DEGREES    FEET
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/18
71/02/19
71/02/19
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/09/01
71/09/01
71/09/01
0003
0007
0010
0013
0003
0007
0003
0007
0010
0003
0007
0003
0007
0013
0003
0007
0010
0003
0007
0010
                                                                  053025          1290AC053U25
                                                                 11 31 16.0 087 55 OS0
                                                                 GREEN BAY OPEN WATER DNN STA in
                                                                 55      WISCONSIN
                                                                 LAKE MICHIGAN


00010
WATER
TEMP
CENT
15.5
15.5
15.0


15.0
15.0
13.5
15.5
15.0
25. 0

21.0
21 .5

21 .0
18.0


00299
DO
PROBE
MG/L
B.I
8.3
8.0
8.9
6.3
1 1.2
1 I .1
8.6
9.5
9.6
10. 1

9.8
8.1

8.1
9.6
21KIS 2111202
2 0009 FEET
00078 00310 00312 00
TRANSP 800 SOD CHLO
SECCHI 5 DAY 6 DAY C
METERS MG/L MG/L Mt,
O.S




0.9
11.0

0.9
8.2
0.6
9.1

0.8
6.5

0.6
                                                                                                DEPTH
                                                                           6.5
                                            18.0
                                                                                                 IB



                                                                                                 11

                                                                                                 11


                                                                                                 16


                                                                                                 13
                                                                                       00530
                                                                                     RESIDUE
                                                                                     TOT NFLT
                                                                                       MG/L
                                                                                                           27
                                                                                            11


                                                                                            10

                                                                                            1
                                                                                                           12
                                                       7.2
                                                                   Q5302S           1290ACOS302S
                                                                  11  31  16.0  OB7  55  05.0
                                                                  GREEN  BAY OPEN  WATER  ONR  STA  1M
                                                                  55      WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
                      00671
  DATE   TIME DEPTH pHOS-DIS
  FROM    OF         ORTHO
   TO    DAY  FEET   MG/L P
73/09/18
71/05/22
71/06/03
71/07/09
71/08/12
71/09/01
0007
0007
0007
0007
0007
0007
0.027
0.009
0.008
0.006
0.036
0.015
21*IS

00661
PHOS-TOT

MS/L P
0.182
0.125
0. 130
0.103
0.103
0.12S

00605
ORG N
N
MG/L
O.lQO
0.200
1 .100
0.600
0.600
0.3QO

00618
N03-N
OlSS
MG/L
0.09
0.39
0.12
0.02
0.11
0.08
2
00613
N02-N
DISS
MG/L
0.007
0.013
0.015
0.005
0.023
0.003

00610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
0.264
0.390
0.380
0.110
0. 180
0.050
                                                                                       2111202
                                                                                      0009  FEET
                                                                                                 DEPTH
                                                                   32211     32218
                                                                 CHLRPHYL  PHEOPHTN
                                                                  A UG/L      A
                                                                 CORRECTD    UG/L
31.00
13.OU
13. 10
57.60
 9.20
20. 10
12.00
 1.00
 8.80
 5.60
27.00
25. 10

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                                                                   053027          1290ACOS3027
                                                                  HI 35 H1.0 087 51  16>0
                                                                  CjREE.lv BAY OPEN WATER DNR  STA  1
                                                                  55      WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
                      7202B
  DATE   TIME DEPTH  AZIMUTH
  FROM    OF        FR SOUTH
   TO    DAY  FEET   DEGREES
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/18
71/02/19
71/02/19
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/09/01
71/09/01
0003
0007
0010
0013
0006
0015
0003
0016
0003
0010
U003
OO07
0003
0013
0003
0010


72029 00010
DISTANCE A'ATER
FR SOUTH TEMP
FEET CENT
15.0
15.0
15.0


15.5
11.0
15. U
15.0
23. U
23.0
21 .0
21.0
18.0
17.0


00299
00
PROBE
Mb/L
9.6
9.5
9.1
5.2
5.7
11 1
1U.2
10.8
10. a
9.1
8.5
8.7
8.7
8.7
a. 4
21*15 211 1202
2 001J FEET
00078 00310 00312 00
TRANSp BOD BOD CHLO
SECCHI 5 DAY 6 DAY C
METERS MG/L MG/L MG
0.8




0.8

0.9

0.8

0.6

0.9

                                                                                                  DEPTH
  0053Q
RESIDUE
TOT NFLT
  MG/L
                                                                                                            12
                      00671
  DATE   TIME DEPTH pHOS-DIS
  FROM    OF         ORTHO
   TO    DAY  FEET   MG/L P
                                                                   053027          1290ACU53027
                                                                  11 35 11.0 087 51 16.0
                                                                  GREEN BAY OPEN WATER DNR STA.15
                                                                  55      WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
2 1 ft I S

Q066R
PHOS-TOT

MS/L p

00605
CRG N
N
MG/L

00618
N03-N
OISS
MG/L
2
00613
N02-N
DISS
MG/L

U0610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
21 1
QU13
3221 1
CHLRPHYL
A UG/L
CORRECTS
1202
FtET DE
32218
PHEOPHTN
A
UG/L
73/09/18
               0007
                       0.008
                                            0.5QO
                                                       0.07
                                                                0.003
                                                                                    19.00
                                                                                               8.00

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                      72028     72029
  DATE   TIME DEPTH  AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
  FROM    OF        pR SOUTH  FR SOUTH
   TO    DAY  FEET   DEGREES    FEET
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/18
71/02/18
71/02/18
71/02/18
71/05/20
71/05/20
71/05/20
71/05/20
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/09/01
71/09/01
0003
0007
0010
0020
0003
0007
0013
0003
0007
0013
0023
0003
0010
0020
0003
0010
0023
0003
0010
0023
0003
0023
                                                                  053028           1290ACOS3Q28
                                                                 11  37  34.0  087  SI  02.0
                                                                 GREEN  BAY OPEN  HATER  ONR  STA 16
                                                                 55       WISCONSIN
                                                                 LAKE MICHIGAN


00010
(HATER
TEMP
CENT
IB. 5
15.5
lb.0
0.6

0.8
9.0

9.0
9.U
11.5
11. S
13.0
23.0
22.0
22. a
2U.O
20.0
17.0
18.0
17.0


00299
00
PROBE
MG/L
8.7
8.5
B.I
b.2
5.2
3.7
1 1.2

11*2
1 1 .3
10.8
10. 6
9.0
8.5
7.9
7.6
8.0
7.9
7.8
8.2
8.0
211.IS 211 1202
2 OU1M FEET
00078 00310 QU312 00
TRANSP BOD BOD CHLU
SECCHI 5 DAY 6 DAY C
METERS MG/L MG/L Mb
0.9



2.1

0.9
1.9


1 .0


2.1


1.6


1.3

                                                                                                 DEPTH
                 00530
               RESIDUE
               TOT NFLT
                 MG/L
                                                                                                           20
                                                                                                 18


                                                                                                 18
                                                                                                           10
                                                                   OS3028           1290ACU53028
                                                                  11  37  31.0 OB7 51 02.0
                                                                  GREEN  BAY OPtN WATER DNR STA It,
                                                                  55       WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
                                                                  21*15
                                                                  2
 2111202
0013  FEET
           DEPTH
DATE TIME
FROM OF
TO DAY
73/09/18
71/02/ 18
71/05/20
DEPTH

FEET
0007
0007
0007
00671
pHOS-OIS
ORTHO
MG/L P
0.005
0.020
0.006
0066=1
PHOS-TOT

MG/L p
0.063
0.015
0.086
00605
ORG N
N
MG/L
0.500
0. 1UOK
0.500
00618
N03-N
D1SS
MG/L
0.11
0.10
0.11
00613
N02-N
D1SS
MG/L
0.001
0.011
0.012
00610
NM3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
0.038
0.172
0. 190
3221 1
CHLRPHYL
A UG/L
CORRECTD
50* UO

13.10
32218
PHE.OPHTN
A
UWL
IS. 00



-------
STORE! RETRIEVAL  DATE 75/04/06
                      72a28     7202V
  DATE   TIME DEpTH  AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
  FROM    OF        FR SOUTH  FR SOUTH
   TO    DAT  FEET   DEGREES    FEET
73/09/lfl
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/18
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/05/20
71/05/20
71/05/20
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/09/05
71/09/05
71/09/05
0003
0007
0010
UU20
OOOU
0002
0005
0006
0007
0010
0013
0015
0020
0023
0026
0003
0010
0020
0003
0013
OU23
0003
U010
0020
0003
001U
0020
0003
0010
0023
                        315.0
                        315.0
                        315.0
                                 4000.0
                                4000.0
 CjOUlO
nATER
 TEMP
 CENT

   15.5
 00299
  DO
PROBE
 MG/L

    9.0
15.5
IS. 5
0.0
0.0
u.o
U.2
0.0
0.2
O.I
0.1
1 .0
1 .0
9.0
9.0
9.0
11.0
14.0
14.0
24.0
23.0
24.0
20.0
19.5
19.5
18.0
18.0
18.0
9.0
9.0
9.2
12.1
11.8
12.6
a. 2
5.4
2.5
2.5
1 .8
1 .7
12.4
12.0
12.0
9.5
V.I
9.4
9.2
8.9
8.8
8.4
8.3
a. 3
9.6
9.6
9.5
                                                                   053029           4290ACOS3029
                                                                  MS 39 1 I-0 087  17  12*0
                                                                  GREEN BAY OPEN  WATER  DNR  STA  |6A
                                                                  55      WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
                                                                  21M5
                                                                  2
                                              21 I 1202
                                             0019  FEET
                                                                                                  DEPTH
 00078
TRANSp
SECCHI
METERS

    1 .2
 00310     00312     0094t)      OU530
 800       BOD     CHLORIDE   RESIDUE
5 DAY     6 DAY       CL      TOT  NFLT
 M6/L      MG/L      Mb/L       MG/L
                                                                                                            IS
                                                                                                            21
                                                                   053029          429UACOS3U29
                                                                  11 39 11.0 087 HI  12.0
                                                                  GREEN BAY OPEN WATER ONrt  STA  14 A
                                                                  55      UISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
                                                                  21AIS
                                                                  2
                                              2111202
                                             OU19  FEET
                                                                                                  DEPTH

DATE
FROM
TO
73/09/18
71/02/20
71/02/20

TIME
OF
DAY




OEpTH

FEET
0007
0007
0020
00671
pHOS-DIS
ORTHO
MG/L P
0.005
O.OUS
0.011
00665
PHOS-TOT

MQ/L p
0.046
0.005
0.053
Q0605
ORG N
N
MG/L
0.000
1 .600
0.800
DQ618
N03-N
DISS
MG/L
0.02
0.04
0.10
00613
N02-N
OISS
MG/L
0.002
0.005
0.010
00610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
0.095
0.058
U.609
3221 1
CHLRPHYL
A US/L
CORRECTU
7.UU
9.7U

32214
PHEORHTN
A
UG/L
S.OU
O.OU


-------
STORE! RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                       72Q28      72Q29
  DATE   TIME DEPTH   AZIMUTH   DISTANCE
  FROM    OF        FR  SOUTH   FR  SOUTH
   TO    DAY  FEET    DEGKEES     FEET
7M/02/20
7M/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
0003
0005
0006
0010
0012
0019
0020
0026
0027
                        315.0
                        315.0
                                 1000.0
                                 1000.0
                        315.0     1000.0
                        315.0     HOQO.O
                                                                   053030          
-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE  75/06/06
                                                                       153U01            1290AC153001
                                                                      11 10  51.0 087 SI 56.0
                                                                      GREEN  BAY  OPEN ATER  ONR STA  I6C
                                                                      55       WISCONSIN
                                                                      LAKE MICHIGAN
21. IS 2111202


DATE
FROM
TO
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20


TIME DEpTH
OF
OAr FEET
0002
0003
U001
0005
0006
U007
0010
001 I
0012
0013
0019
0020
0021
0026
0028
0029
0030

72028
AZIMUTH
FR SOUTH
DEGREES
315.0

315.0
315.0
315.0

315.0
315.0

315.0
315.0

315.0

315.0
315.0
315.0

72029
DISTANCE
FR SOUTH
FEET
5000. G

2500.0
10000.0
SUOO.O

5000.0
10000.0

2SOO.O
10000. U

5000.0

2500.0
5000.0
10000.0

0001 0
AATER
TEMP
CENT
0.0
U.O
U.U
0.0
0.0
u.o
0.0
u.o
u.o
0.1
0. 1
u.o
0.0
1 .0
1 .U
1 .0
1.0
2
00299 00078
DO TRANSP
PROSE SECCHI
MG/L METERS
1 1 .5
9.2
9.5
12.2
a. 8
6.8
5.6
9.3
5.7
6.6
5.8
3.8
1.5
1 .7
.1.6
2.6
3.1
UU22 FEET
00310 00312 OU
BOD tlOD CHLO
5 DAY 6 DAY C
MG/L MG/L MG





9.0







13.5



                                                                                                        DEPTH
                                                                                                              00530
                                                                                                            RESIDUE
                                                                                                            TUT NFLT
                                                                                                              MG/L
                                                                                                        13
                                                                                                        19
                                                                                                                  61
                                                                       1S3U01           129UAC153U01
                                                                      11 1l> bl.O  087 51 56.U
                                                                      GRtEN BAY  OPtN OATtR  DNR  STA 1
                                                                      b5       OISCONSIN
                                                                      LAKt rilCHlfaAN
2 1 1 I b
2
DATE TIME
FROM OF
TO DAY
71/02/20
71/02/20
DEPTH
FEET
0007
0026
00671
pHOS-OI S
ONTHO
M&/L P
0.003
0.012
00665
PHOb-TflT
MG/L p
0.011
0.096
00605
URG N
N
MG/L
0.300
0.300
00618
N03-N
D1SS
Mfa/L
0.09
O.U9
00613
N02-N
UISS
MG/L
0.013
U.OI9
U06 10
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
0.217
0.711
                                                                                             21 1 12U2
                                                                                            OU22  FEET
                                                                                                       DEPTH
                                                                                        32211      32218
                                                                                      CHLRPHYL   PHEOPHTN
                                                                                       A U6/L       A
                                                                                      CORRECTD     UG/L

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                      72028     72029
  DATE   TIME DEPTH  AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
  FROM    OF        FR SOUTH  FR SOUTH
   TO    DAr  FEET   DEGREES    FEET
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/18
71/05/20
71/05/20
71/05/20
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/09/01
71/09/01
71/09/01
0003
0007
0010
0003
0007
0013
U003
0007
0013
0003
0007
0010
0016
0003
0007
0013
0016
0003
0007
0010
                                                                  053031          1290ACU53031
                                                                 11 36 13.0 087 58 21.0
                                                                 GREEN bAY OPEN *ATER ONK STA 17
                                                                 55      WISCONSIN
                                                                 LAKE MICHIGAN
00010
AATER
TEMP
CENT
11.5
11.0
1 1 .0
1 1.0
1 1 .0
13.5
13.5
21.0

21 .0
16.0
19.0
19.0
19.0
17.0
18.0
00299
DO
PROBE
MG/L
10.2
10.0
1 1 .2
1 1.2
11.2
10.6
10.7
a. 3

7.8
1.3
7.9
7.9
7.7
1.7
9.3
00078 U0310
TRANSP BOD
SECCHI 5 UAY
METERS MG/L
1.0

1 .2


1 .6

1 .8
1.


1 .8
3.


1 .b
                                                                       2111202
                                                                      OUU9  FEET  OLKTH

                                                                   00312     OU910     00530
                                                                   &QO     CHLORIDE  RESIDUE
                                                                  6 UAr       CL     TUT NFLT
                                                                   MG/L      Md/L      MG/L
                                                                                                           11


                                                                                     H.b        11         11



                                                                                     8.6         9         2
                                                                           5.3
                                            17.0
                                                       7.3
                      00671
  DATE   TIME DEpTw pHOS-DIS
  FROM    OF         OKTHO
   TO    DAY  FEET   MG/L P
73/09/18
71/05/20
71/06/03
71/07/09
71/08/12
71/09/01
0007
0007
OU07
0007
0007
0007
O.U03
O.OOH
O.OU8
o.oos
0.011
0.011
                                                                  OS3031          129UACUS3U31
                                                                 It 36 H3.0 087 5tt 21.0
                                                                 GREEK bAY OPEN WATER UNk bTA  \^
                                                                 55
                                                                 LAKE MICHIGAN
21AIS

0066C,
PHOS-TOT

MG/L p
0.033
0.019
U.U&U
0.011
0.033
U.056

00605
URG N
N
MG/L
0.200
0.100
1 .QUO
U.300
0.600
0. 100

00618
N03-N
OISS
MG/L
a. 01
0.09
O.U6
0.03
O.U6
0.09
2
00613
N02-N
OISS
MG/L
0.002
0.011
0.003
U.001
U.Gil
U.003

OU610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
0.133
U.2bU
u.ulu
0.010
U.U1UK
U.U6U
21 1
UU09
3221 1
CMLKPHYL
A UG/L
COKRECTD
Ib.UU
1 .5U
9.30
10. 1U
U.8U
lu. iu
12U2
FEtT DEI
32218
PHtUPhTN
A
UG/L
l.UQ

1 ,BU
2.UU
2b.OU
19. 2U

-------
5TORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/04
                                                                  053032           1290ACUS303^
                                                                 Ml 38  10*0 087  67  39.0
                                                                 GREEN  8A< OPEN  WATER  DNR  STA  IB
                                                                 55       ISCONSIN
                                                                 LAKE MICHIGAN



DATE
FROM
TO
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/18
71/02/18
71/02/18
71/05/20
71/05/20
71/05/20
71/05/20
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/09/01
71/09/01
71/09/01


72028 72029
TIME DEpTH AZIMUTH DISTANCE
OF FR SOUTH FR SOUTH
DAY FEET DEGREES FEET
0003
0007
0010
0020
0003
0011
0003
0007
0010
0020
0003
OU07
0010
0016
0003
QOU7
U010
0016
0003
0007
0010
0016
0003
0007
0013


00010
WATER
TEMP
CENT
11.5

11.3
11.0
1. 1
2.0
10. 0
1U.O
10.0
IU.O
13.0

13.0
13.0
21. b

21.0
16.0
20.0

20.0
19.0
19.0

17.0
211S 2111202
2 Q(J16 FEET
00299 00078 00310 00312 OU
DO TR/tNSP 800 800 CHLO,
PROBE SECCHI 5 OAY 6 OAY C
MG/L METERS MG/L MG/L He,
9.8 1.3

9.1
9.0
18. 5
16.2
11.3 1 .b
11.3 3.7
11 .b
1 1 .0
10.1 1.8
8.6
10.5
10.1
8.6 1.5
3.3
8.2
b.3
'.5 0.9
1.9
7.3
6.8
8.8 1 ,t
1.1
8.1
                                                                                                 DEPTH
                                                                                                       OOS3Q
                                                                                                     RESIDUE
                                                                                                     TOT  NFLT
                                                                                                       MG/L
                                                                                                 11
                                                                                                           10
                                                                  053U32          129UACOS3U32
                                                                 11 38  10.0 087 57 39.0
                                                                 GREEN  SAT OPEN *ATER OHH  STA  l
                                                                 55       *ISCONSIN
                                                                 LAKE MICHIGAN
21V.1S 2II12Q2
2 OU16 Hit DtPTH

DATE
FROM
TO
73/09/18
71/05/20
71/06/03
71/07/09
71/08/12
71/09/01

TIME DEpTH
OF
DAY FEET
0007
0007
0007
0007
0007
0007
U067I
PH05-DIS
ORTHO
MG/L P
0.001
0.006
0.010
OV006
0.005
0.011
0066S
PHOS-ToT

MS/L P
0.029
0.032
O.U50
0.010
0.037
0.018
00605
ORG N
N
MG/L
0.200
U.100K
0.800
0.300
0.700
0.300
00618
N03-N
DISb.
MG/L
0.01
0.10
0.06
0.03
0.06
O.U7
00613
N02-N
DISs
MG/L
0.002
0.01 1
0.002
O.OU1
0.006
0.002
U0610 32211 32218
NH3-N C>1LRPHYL PHEoPnTN
TOTAL A'UG/L A
Mfa/L COKRECTU UG/L
O.ilb 10. OU 5.0U
U.26C1
U.CI3U
0.03U
O.UIUK
U.01U

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                      72028     72029
  DATE   TIME DEPTH  AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
  FROM    OF        FR SOUTH  FR SOUTH
   TO    DAY  FEET   DEGREES    FEET
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/lB
71/06/03
7H/06/03
71/04/03
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/09/01
71/09/01
0003
0007
0010
0013
0003
0010
0016
0003
OQ07
0013
0003
0007
0013
0003
0010
                                            11.3
                                                                  053Q33           1290ACQ53033
                                                                 11  38  26.0  087  59  07*0
                                                                 GREEN  BAY OPEN  WATER  DNR  STA 19
                                                                 55       WISCONSIN
                                                                 LAKE MICHIGAN
21WIS

OOQlO
fcATER
TEMP
CENT

00299
DO
PROBE
MG/L
2
00078
TRANSP
SECCHI
METERS

00310
BOD
5 DAY
MG/L
21 1 1202
0013 FEET
00312 00
BOD CHLO
6 DAY C
MG/L MG
                                                                                                 DEPTH
  0053Q
RESIDUE
TOT NFUT
  MG/L
                                                       9.6
11.0
13. 5
11.0
11.0
11.0
21 .0
21.0
16.5
21.0
21 .0
20.0
19.0
18.0
9
9
10
1U
1U
8
H
3
8
a
7
9
9
.6
.3
.1
.5
.6
.1
.1
.8
.8
.7
.7
.1
.1
                                                                  1 .0
                                                                  1 .5
                                                                  1.5
                                                                  1 .0
                                                                  1.3
                      0067)
  DATE   TIME DEpTH pHOS-DIS
  FROM    OF         ORTHO
   TO    DAY  FEET   M6/L P
73/09/18
               0007
                       O.OQ5
                                                                   OB3033          1290AC053033
                                                                  11  36  26.0  087 59 07.0
                                                                  GREEN  BAY  OPEN WATER DNK STA 19
                                                                  55       WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE  MICHIGAN
21*15

00665
PHOS-TOT

M6/L P
0.032

00605
ORG N
N
MG/L
0.300

00618
N03-N
DISS
MG/L
0.01
2
OQ6J3
N02-N
DISS
MG/L
0.003

00610
NH3-N
TOTAL
,MG/L
0.133
21 1
OU1 3
32211
CHLRPHYL
A UG/L
CORRECTD
15.00
1202
FEET UE)
322)8
PHEoPhTN
A
UG/L
2. QO

-------
STORE! RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                                                                  053031          1290AC053031
                                                                 11 37  11.0 087 59 21.0
                                                                 GREEN  BAY OPEN WATER ONR STA 21
                                                                 55      WISCONSIN
                                                                 LAKE MICHIGAN
  DATE   TIME
  FROM    OF
   TO    DAY
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/18
71/06/03
71/06/03
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/09/01
71/09/01
0003
U007
0010
0003
0010
0003
0010
0003
0007
0013
0003
0010


72028 72029
lEpTH AZIMUTH DISTANCE
FR SOUTH FR SOUTH
'EET DEGREES FEET
0003
0007
0010
0003
0010
0003
0010
0003
0007
0013
0003
0010


00010
WATER
TEMP
CENT
11.5

11.5
13.0
13.0
21.0
20.0
21 .0
20.5
19.5
18.0
17.0


00299
DO
PROBE
MG/L
10.0

10.0
1 1 .0
10.8
7.3
6.1
8.6
8.3
6.8
9.1
8.3
21KIS
2
00078 00310
TRANSP BOD
SECCHI 5 DAY
METERS MG/L
0.9


1.5

1.5

0.8


1.2

21 1 1202
0009 FEET
Q0312 00
BOD CHLO
6 DAY C
MG/L MG












                                                                                                DEPTH
  0053Q
RESIDUE
TUT NFLT
  MG/L
                                                                                                          20
                                                                                                                                        u
                                                                                                                                        u
                                                                                                                                        00
                                                                                                                                        I
                                                                  053031          1290AC053031
                                                                 11 37 11.0 087 59 21.0
                                                                 GREEN BAY OPEN WATER DNR STA 21
                                                                 55      WISCONSIN
                                                                 LAKE MICHIGAN
  DATE
  FROM
   TO

73/09/18
2 I * 1 S
2
TIME
OF
DAY

DEpTH
FEET
0007
00671
pHOS-DIS
OKTHO
MG/L P
0.005
0066S
PHOS-TOT
MG/L p
0.010
00605
ORG N
N
MG/L
0.1QO
00618
N03-N
DISS
MG/L
0.01
00613
N02-N
OISS
MG/L
0.003
00610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
0.115
21 1
0009
32211
CHLRPHYL
A UG/L
CORRECTD
18.00
1202
FEET DEI
32218
PHEOPHTN
A
U6/L
1.00

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                      72028     72029
  DATE   TIME OEpTH  AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
  FROM    OF        FR SOUTH  FR SOUTH
   TO    DAY  FEET   DEGREES    FEET
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/18
71/05/20
71/05/20
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/09/01
71/09/01
0003
0007
0010
0003
0013
0003
0013
0003
0010
0003
0007
0010
0003
0010
                                             13.7
                                                                   1)33006           1290AC133006
                                                                  11  11  11.0  087  58 29.0
                                                                  GREEN  BAY OPEN  *ATR DNR STA 23
                                                                  55       WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE  MICHIGAN
2 Hi I b

00010
LATER
TEMP
CENT

00299
DO
PROBE
MG/L
2
00078
TRANSP
SECCH1
METERS

00310
BOD
5 DAY
MG/L
21 I 1202
OU06 FEET
00312 00
BOO CHLO
6 DAY C
MG/L MG
                                                                                                 DEPTH
  OUB30
RESIDUE
TOT NFLT
  MG/L
                                                       9.6
                                                                  1 .2
13.7
10.0
9.5
13.5
13.0
19.0
18.0
22.0
22.0
22.0
18.0
17.0
9.1
12.2
1 1.6
10.2
10.2
6.8
5.1
9.1
9.3
9.3
9.3
9.7

1 .8

1 .9

1 .8

0.9


1 .5

                       00671
  DATE   TIME DEPTH  pHOS-DIS   PHOS-ToT
  FROM    OF          ORTHO
   TO    DAY  FEET    MG/L  P     MG/L  p
                                                                                                                                          to
                                                                                                                                          I
                                                                   "433006          1290AC133006
                                                                  11 11 11.0 087 58 29.U
                                                                  GREEN BAY OPEN WATER DNR STA 23
                                                                  55      WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN


00605
ORG N
N
MG/L


00618
NO3-N
DISS
MG/L
21A1S
2
00613
N02-N
DISS
MG/L


00610
NM3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
21 1 1202
0006 FEET DEI
32211 32218
CHLRPHYL PHEOPHTN
A UG/L A
CORRECTD UG/L
73/09/18
                0007
                        0.007
                                  0.031
                                            0.600
                                                       0.03
                                                                0.001
                                                                          0.027
                                                                                     13.OU
                                                                                                1.00

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                      72028     72029
  DATE   TIME DEpTH  AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
  FROM    OF        FR SOUTH  FR SOUTH
   TO    DAY  FEET   DEGREES    FEET
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/18
71/02/18
74/02/18
71/05/20
71/05/20
71/05/20
71/05/20
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/08/12
71/09/01
71/09/01
71/09/01
71/09/01
0003
0007
0010
0020
0007
0016
0003
0007
0010
0020
0003
0007
001 1
0023
0003
0007
0010
0020
0003
0007
0013
0016
0020
0003
0007
0010
0023
                                                                   133007          1290AC13300/
                                                                  Ml 11  06.0 087 56 05'Q
                                                                  GREEN  6Ar OPtN HATER UNR STA 21
                                                                  55      WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN


00010
HATER
TEMP
CENT
11.0
11.0
11. 0'
1 .1
1 .1
9.0
9.0
8.S
8.0
12.0
12.0
12.0
21 .0

20.0
1 1 .0
19.0
19.0
19.0
18.0
15.0
19.0

17.0
17.0
21*15
2
00299 00078 00310
DO TRANSP BOD
PROBE SECCHI 5 DAY
MG/L METERS MG/L
9.5 1 .2
9.5
9.5
18.6 1 .8
18.6
11.8 1.8
1 1 .8
1 1 .8
12.0
10. 1 1 .9
1U.3
10. 1
8.8 1 .6
1.5
8.1
5.8
8.3 1.5
8.3 5.3
7.9
7.1
5.2
8.2 1 .6
1.1
7.8
7.6
21 1 12U2
LlOlV FEET
00312 OU'
tiOD CHLUI
6 DAY LI
MG/L Hu






3.7


















  00530
KLSlDUE
TUT NFLT
  MG/L
                                                                   133007          1290AC133007
                                                                  11 tl 06.0 087  56  05.0
                                                                  GREEN BAY OPtN  *ATER  ONK  STA  2
                                                                  Bb      D1SCUN5IN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
21 IS
2

DATE TIME
FROM OF
TO DAY
73/09/18
71/02/18
71/05/20
71/06/01
71/07/09
71/08/12
71/09/01

DEPTH

FEET
0007
0007
0007
0007
0007
0007
0007
00671
PHOS-DIS
ORTHO
MG/L P
0.005
0.001
0.006
0.005
0.012
0.006
O.U1 1
0066H
PHOS-TOT

MG/L P
0.031
0.011
0.037
0.050
0.011
0.018
0.033
00605
uRG N
N
MG/L
0.200
0.100
0.100
0.300
0.300
0.600
0.300
00618
N03-N
U1SS
MG/L
0.03
0.02
0. 10
0.01
O.U3
0.07
0.06
00^13
N02-N
DISS
MG/L
0.003
0.007
0.012
0.007
0.001
O.OOS
0.002
00610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
0.020
0.131
0.180
0.060
0.010
0.010K
0.010
21 1
0019
3221.1
CHLRPHYL
A UG/L
COKRECTC
15.00

9.90
5.70
6.7U
0.00
16.70
12U2
FEtT DtpTH
32218
PHEOPHTN
A
UG/L
1 .00


2.30
3.80
31.80
0.00

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/04
DATE
FROM
TO
73/09/18
73/09/18
71/05/20
71/05/20
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/07/09
71/08/13
71/08/ 13
71/09/05
71/09/05
TIME DEpTH
OF
DAY FEET
0003
0007
0003
0010
0003
0007
0003
0003
0013
0003
0010
                       72028
                      AZIMUTH
                     FR  SOUTH
                      DEGREES
                                                                     433008           1290AC
-------
STORE! RETRIEVAL DATE  75/06/06

DATE
FROM
TO
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/18
7i/09/18
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/05/20
71/05/20
71/05/20
71/05/20
71/05/20
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/09/05
71/09/05
71/09/05
71/09/05
72028 72029
TIME DEpTH AZIMUTH DISTANCE
OF FR SOUTH FR SOUTH
DAY FEET DEGREES FEET
0003
0007
0010
0020
0030
0003 315.0 5000.0
0006
0010 315.0 5000.0
0012
0020 315.0 5000.0
0025
0030 315.0 5000.0
0033
0036 315.0 5000.0
0003
0007
0010
0020
0039
0003
0007
0013
0023
0033
0003
0007
0010
0020
0026
0033
0003
0007
0013
0026
0030
0033
0003
0007
0013
0033
00010
,.ATER
TEMP
CENT
15.0

15.0
15.0
15.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0. 1
0.3
0. 1
1 .0
1 .2
1 .0
8.0
8.0
8.0
7.0
7.0
12.0

1 1 .5
1 1.5
9.0
22.0

20.0
19.0
15.0
12.0
19.0

19.0
19.0
11.0
1 1.0
17.0

17.0
17.0
00299
DO
PROBE
Mfa/L
9.2

9.2
9.0
8.8
12.8
12.1
12.8
1 1.1
10. 7
8.1
9.5
3.9
7.7
12.5
12.5
12.1
12.0
12.5
1U.3

10.2
9.8
6.6
8.7

8.5
8.0
6.2
5.6
8.6

8.1
8.1
3.5
2.2
9.9

10.0
9.8
                                                                   133009           129UAC133009
                                                                  11  12  t6.0  087  51  OQ.0
                                                                  GREEN  BAY OPEN  WATEK DNK STA 26
                                                                  SS       IUSCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN

                                                                  21ft IS                 2111202
                                                                  2                    0029 FEET  DEPTH

                                                                  378     00310      00312     Ou?<<0     00&3Q
                                                                  MSP     BOD        BOD     CHLORIDE  RtSlDUE
                                                                  CHI     5  DAY      6  DAY       CL     TUT NFLT
                                                                  ERS     Mfa/L       MG/L      M(j/L      M6/L
                                                                   1 .3
                                                                   1 .7
                                                                  2. 1
                                                                   1 .8
                                                                   1 .9
                                                                                       1. 1
                                                                                                  10
3.3



3.7

5.3



1. 1

3.3

1.5
                                                                                                             13
0. 1


  6

0.1



 18

0.1



O.IK

  5

 57

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                                                                   433009           1290AC133009
                                                                  11  12  16.0  087  51  OOiO
                                                                  GREEN  BAY  OPEN  MATER ONR STA 26
                                                                  SB       AISCUNSIN
                                                                  LAKE  MICHIGAN
  DATE
  FROM
   TO

73/09/18
71/05/20
71/06/OH
71/06/01
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/09/05
71/09/05
             00671
TIME DEPTH pHOS-DIS
 OF         OKTHO
DAY  FEET   MG/L P
      0007
      0007
      0007
      0033
      0007
      0033
      0007
      0033
      0007
      0033
0.006
0.006
0.008
0.010
0.010
0.01 1
0.011
0.010
0.005
0.006
21IS

00665
PHOS-TOT

MG/L p
0.037
0.050
0.060
0.080
0.013
"0.019
0.011
0.011
0.022
0.331

00605
ORG N
N
MG/L
0.500
U.2QO
0. 100
0.800
0. 100K
Q.5QO
0.300
0..100
0.7QO
1 .000

00618
N03-N
DISS
MG/L
0.03
0.13
0.03
0.07
0.005
0.51
0.17
0.63
0.02
0.08
2
00613
N02-N
DISS
MG/L
0.002
0.015
0.008
O.OQ8
0.005
0.038
0.003
0.011
0.006
0.008

00610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
0.081
0.210
0.050
0.110
0.010K
0.010
0.010K
O.OIOK
0.010
0.080
                                                                                       2111202
                                                                                      0029  FEET
                                                                                                 DEPTH
                                                           32211     32218
                                                         CHLRPHYL  PHEOPHTN
                                                          A UG/L       A
                                                         CORRECTO    UG/L
                                                                           11.00
                                                                                      1 .00
                                                                                                                                       SS
                                                                                                                                       u>

-------
STORE! RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                                                                   153002           1290ACI53002
                                                                 11 HI 12.0  087  18  30-0
                                                                 GREEN BAY OPEN  WATER  DNK  STA  26A
                                                                 55      WISCONSIN
                                                                 LAKE MICHIGAN


DATE
FROM
TO
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20


TIME DEPTH
OF
DAY FEET
0005
0006
0010
0012
0020
0021
0031
0033

72028
AZIMUTH
FR SOUTH
DEGREES
135.0

13B.O

135.0

135.0


72029
DISTANCE
FR SOUTH
FEET
5000.0

5000.0

5000.0

5000.0


00010
WATER
TEMP
CENT

0.1
0.3
0. 1
0.1
0.0
1.2
1.2
21*IS
2
00299 00078 00310
DO TRANSP SOD
PR08E SECCHI 5 DAY
MG/L METERS MG/L
13.3
1 1 .8
12.8
11.2
9.3
7.6
3.3
1.7
211 1202
0029 FEET
00312 OU
BOD CHLO
6 DAY C
Mfa/L Mfa








                                                                                                 DLPTH
                                                                                                     RESIDUE
                                                                                                     TUT NFLT
                                                                                                       MG/L

-------
STORE! RETRIEVAL CUE 75/06/06
                      72028     72029
  0TE   TIME DEPTH  AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
  FROM    OF        FR SOUTH  FR SOUTH
   TO    DAY  FEET   DEGREES    FEET
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/18
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/05/20
71/US/20
71/05/20
71/05/20
71/06/01
71/04/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/09/05
71/09/05
71/09/05
71/09/OS
0003
OU07
0013
0003
UQ10
0020
0026
UUOJ
U007
0010
0016
0003
0007
0010
0020
0003
0007
0(110
0023
0003
0007
0010
0023
0026
1300)
0007
0010
0025
                                                                   053035           1290AC053CI3S
                                                                  11 10 26.0 087  1b 32.0
                                                                  GREEN BAT OPEN  HATER  ONR STA 27
                                                                  55      WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN


oaoio
HATER
TEMP
CENT
15.5
15,5
0.3
0.5
U.8
1 . 1
.3
9.3
9.0
9.0
11.5
11.0
1 1.0
21.0

23.0

20. U

20.0
2U.O
17.0
16. 0

18. 0
17. U


00299
DO
PROBE
MG/L
9.1
9.6
12.1
12.0
3. 1
3.2
11.6
12.5
1 1 .2
1 1 -b
1U.2
10. 1
9.9
9.7

*!

U. 1

a. i
7.6
5.8
9.6

9.6
7.1
2IKIS 2-1 1 1202
2 OU22 FEET
00076 00310 00312 00
TRANSP BOD BOO CHLO
SECCH1 5 WAY 6 DAY C
METERS MG/L MG/L MG
1 .5





1 .2
1.5


1 .3

5.3
0.9
6.5

6.1
1 .8
5.3


S.7
1 .8
1.9

3.3
                                                                                                  DEPTH
  00530
RESIDUE
TOT NFLT
                                                                                                   5

                                                                                                  IS

                                                                                                  1U

                                                                                                  ID

                                                                                                   9


                                                                                                   9

                                                                                                   9
                                                                                                   6
                                                                   053035           1290AC053U3b
                                                                  11  1U  26.0  087  15 32.0
                                                                  GREEN  bAY OPEN  HATER  DNR STA 27
                                                                  55       HSCUNSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN



DATE TIME
FROM OF
TO DAY
73/09/18
71/05/20
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/09/05
71/09/05



DEPTH

FEET
0007
0007
0007
Q020
Q007
0023
0007
0026
U007
0025


00671
pHOS-DIS
ORTHO
MG/L P
0.006
0.007

O.UI 1
0.01 1
0.011
0.021
0.007
0.008
0.007


0066S
PHOS-ToT

MG/L P
0.030
0.092

0.090
0.055
U.OSI
0.023
0.028
0.031
U.010


00605
ORG N
N
MG/L
0.7QO
0.30U

0.200
0.5UO
0.300
0.300
O.bOO
O.bOO
D.IOOK


QU618
N03-N
DIS5
MG/L
0.03
U.17

0.01
0.02
0.02
o.oi
0.02
0.03
0.08
2IIS
2
00613
N02-N
OISS
MG/L
0*001
0.015

0.01U
0.006
0.005
0.001
0.001K
0.006
u.009


00610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
0.067
U.21U

0.030
U.U2U
U.U1U
O.U3U
0.010K
0.06U
0.150

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/04/06
                                                                   153003           1290ACIS3003
                                                                  14  11  31.0  087  19 12.U
                                                                  GREEN  BAY OPEN  WATER  ONK STA 27A
                                                                  SB       WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
21MS
2

DATE
FROM
TO
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
72Q28 72029
TIME DEpTH AZIMUTH DISTANCE
OF FR SOUTH FR SOUTH
DAy FEET DEGREES FtET
0007
0010
0020
0034
00010
AATER
TEMP
CENT
0.0
0. 1
0.1
1 .0
00299 OOQ76
DO TRANSP
PROBE SECCHI
MG/L METERb
13.2
13.0
12.2
6.7
00310
BOD
5 DAY
MG/L
2.0


9.8
21 1 1202
0036 FEET
00312 00
BOD CHLO
6 DAY C
MG/L MG




                                                                                                 DEPTH
                                                                                                 10
                                                                                                       00530
                                                                                                     RESIDUE
                                                                                                     TOT NFLT
                                                                                                       MG/L
                                                                                                          0.5
                                                                   lb30Cl3           1290AC153003
                                                                 11  11  31.0  087  19 12.0
                                                                 GREEN  BAY OPEN  HATER  DNK  STA  27A
                                                                 55       M1SCUNS1N
                                                                 LAKE MICHIGAN
  DATE
  FROM
   TO

71/02/20
71/02/20
             00671
TIME DEPTH PHOS-DIS
 OF         OKTHO
DAY  FEET   MG/L P
      0007
      0036
0.002
0.005
2 1 ft 1 S
2
OOA6R
PHOS-ToT
MG/L p
0.0(17
0.. 005
00605
ORG N
N
MG/L
0.3QO
U.5QO
00618
N03-N
DISS
MG/L
0.01
o.oi
00*13
N02-N
OISS
MG/L
0 .005
0.007
00610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
O.OB1
0.079
                                                                                       21112U2
                                                                                      OU36  FEET
                                                                                                 DEPTH
                                                           32211     32218
                                                         CHLRPHYL  PHEOPhTN
                                                          A UG/L      A
                                                         CORRECTS    UG/L

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/04/06
                      72028     72029
  DATE   TIME DEpTH  AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
  FROM    OF        FR SOUTH  FR SOUTH
   TO    DAY  FEET   DEGREES    FEET
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
0003
0010
0020
0033
 D0010
nATER
 TErIP
 CENT

    0.1
    0.2
    0.3
    1 .2
 00299
  DO
PROBE
 MG/L

   13.3
   13.1
   12.2
    1.7
                                                                   153U01          1290AC1S3001
                                                                  11 13 21.0 087 16 16.0
                                                                  dKEEN BAY OPEN WATER ONR STA 27B
                                                                  55      WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
                                                                  2 1 (. I S>
                                                                  2
                                                                        21 1 12U2
                                                                       OU29 FEET
                                                                                                  DEPTH
                                                00076      00310     00312
                                               TRANSP      BOD       BOO
                                               SECCHI     5 DAY     6 HAY
                                               METERS      MG/L      M6/L
  00910     005.11J
CHLORIDE  RESIDUE
   CL     TUT NFLT
  MG/L      MG/L
                       72028      72029
  DATE    TIME  DEPTH   AZIMUTH   DISTANCE
  FROM     OF         FR SOUTH   FR  SOUTH
    TO     DAY   FEET    DEGREES     FEET
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
0007
0012
002*
                                                                   153005           l290ACIS300b
                                                                  11 12 35.0 OB7  11  12.0
                                                                  GREEN BAY OPEN  WATER  DNK  STA 27C
                                                                  55      WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
21V IS

00010
nATER
TEMP
CENT
0.0
u.o
.1.1

00299
DO
PROBE
MG/L
12.6
12.2
1.0
2
0007B
TRANSP
SECCHI
METERS




U031Q
BOO
5 DAY
MG/L
2.0

1.9
21 1 1202
OU22 FEET
U0312 Uu
BOD CHLO
6 DAY C
MG/L MG



                                                               00530
                                                             RESIDUE
                                                             TOT  NFLT
                                                               MG/L

                                                                    5

                                                                    8
                                                                    153005           1290ACT53005
                                                                   11  12  35.0  087  11 12-0
                                                                   GREEN  BAY  OPEN  WATER DNR STA 27C
                                                                   55       WISCONSIN
                                                                   LAKE MICHIGAN
21IIIS
2
DATE
FROM
TO
71/02/20
71/02/20
TIME DEpTM
OF
DAY FEET
0007
QU26
00671
pHOS-DIS
OKTHO
MG/L P
0.003
0.008
00666
PHOS-TOT
MG/L P
0.002
0.031
00605
ORG N
N
MG/L
0.300
0.200
00618
N03-N
DISS
MG/L
0.02
0.06
00613
N02-N
DISS
MG/L
0.01U
0.012
006IU
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
0.021
0.501
                                                                                        2111202
                                                                                       0022  FtLT
                                                                                                  DEPTH
                                                                                    32211     32210
                                                                                  CHLRPHYL  PMEOPHTN
                                                                                   A UG/L      A
                                                                                  COKRECTO    UG/L

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/04
                                                                   133010          1290AC133010
                                                                  11 19 20.0 087 51 26*0
                                                                  GREEN BAY STUDY ONR  STA  28
                                                                  S5      *ISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
                       72Q28      72029
  DATE   TIME DEpTH   AZIMUTH   DISTANCE
  FROM    OF        FR  SOUTH   FR SOUTH
   TO    D*Y  FEET    DE6REES     FEET
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/09/05
71/09/05
0003
0007
0003
0007
0003
0007
0003
0007
0003
0007
                           QOOlO     00299
                          1.ATER        DO
                           TEMP      PRObE
                           CENT      MG/L
                                                                  21*15
                                                                  2
 00078
TRANSP
SECCHI
METERS
                                                                        21 1 1202
                                                                       0006 FEET  DEPTH
 OU310
 BOD
5 DAY
 M(a/L
 00312
 BOD
6 DAY
 M6/L
  OU91Q     OOS3Q
CHLORIDE  RESIDUE
   CL     TOT NFLT
                                MG/L
                                          MG/L
IB
16
18
,16
22
16
23
21
17

.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.5
.0

6
6
6
5
5
5
5
1
a

.9
.1
 2
.1
.8
 2
.5
 1
.9

0.

0.

0.

0.

1 

8

9

9

9

2


8

1

9

5

6

.0

. 1

.8

.3

.5
                                     8

                                     9

                                     9

                                    10

                                    10
                                    17

                                     6

                                     9

                                    11

                                    20
2 1 K I S
2

DATE TIME
FROM OF
TO DAY
71/05/22
71/06/01
71/07/09
71/08/13
71/09/05

DEPTH

FEET
0007
0007
0007
0007
0007
00671
PHOS-D1S
ORTHO
MG/L p
0.011
0.030
0.012
o.oza
0.018
Q066<;
PHOS-TOT

MG/L p
0,090
0. 100
0.103
0.061
0.162
Q0605
ORG N
N
MG/L
0.200
0.6QO
0.700
0.6UO
0.700
0061B
N03-N
DISS
MG/L
0.05
0.11
0.20
0.08
0.11
00613
N02-N
OISS
MG/L
0.011
0.031
0.016
0.023
0.022
00610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
0.010
0. 150
O.Q3U
0.010K
0.310
                                                                   133010           129UAC13301U
                                                                  It 19  20.0  087  SI  26.0
                                                                  GREEN  BAY STUDY  ONR  STA  28
                                                                  55       WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
                                                                                        2111202
                                                                                       OUU6  FEET.
                                                                                                  DEPTH
                                                                                    32211      322lB
                                                                                  CHLRPHYL   PHEUPHTN
                                                                                   A UG/L       A
                                                                                  CORRECTD     UG/L

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/04
                                                                   133011           1290AC13301I
                                                                  11  18  15.0 087 52 11.0
                                                                  GREEN  BAY OPEN WATER OUR STA 29
                                                                  55       WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
DATE
FROM
TO
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/U
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/13
71/06/13
71/08/13
71/09/05
71/09/05
71/09/05
TIME DEpTH
OF
0X1 FEET
0003
0007
0010
0003
0007
0010
0016
0003
0007
0010
0016
0003
0007
0010
0003
0007
0010
0003
0007
0010
                      72028     72Q29
                     AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
                    FR SOOTH  FH SOUTH
                     DEGREES    FEET


00010
(,ATER
TEMP
CENT
13.2
13.2
12.0
12.0
10.5
10.0
11.0

13.0
12. S
17. S

13.0
19.0

16.5
17.0


00299
DO
PROBE
MG/L
10.2
1U.2
i i.a
12.2
12.2
12.2
10.1

10.1
10. S
7.6

6.2
8.1

5.9
10.8
21AIS
2
00078
TRANSP
SECCHI
METERS
1.5

1 .9



2. 1



1 .5


1 .3


1 .6


00310
BOD
5 DAY
MG/L



8.0



1.1



5.7


5.3


     2111202
    0013 FEET  DEPTH

 00312     OLI91Q     0053Q
 BOD     CHLORIDE  RESIDUE
6 DAY       (.L     TOT NFLT
 MG/L      MG/L      MG/L
                                                                                                            17


                                                                                                            10
                                                                                                            12
                                                                   133U11           1290AC133UI1
                                                                  Ml  18  IS.U OB7 52 11.U
                                                                  GHEEN  BAY OPEN WATER DNK STA 29
                                                                  bS       WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKt MICHIGAN



DATE
FROM
TO
73/09/18
71/05/22
71/06/01
71/07/09
71/08/13
71/09/05



TIME DEPTH
OF
DAY FEET
0007
0007
0007
0007
0007
0007


00671
pHOS-OIS
ORTHO
MG/L P
0.003
0.001
0.010
0.007
0.003
O.UQ9


0066S
PHOS-TOT

M6/L p
0.027
0.020
0,0*0
0.051
0.018
0.029


U06U&
ORS N
N
MG/L
0.200
0.2QU
0.200
0.100
0.100
0.100K


00618
N03-N
DISS
MG/L
U.01
0>01
O.UJ
0.02
0.12
0.02
2 1 .. 1 S
2
00613
N02-N
DISS
MG/L
0.001
O.OQ2
0.010
0.001K
O.OU9
0.007
21 1 12U2

OU610
NH3-N
TOTAL
M(,/L
u.UBB
0.010
O.OIOK
0.010K
O.OIOK
0.080
Uul3
3221 1
CHLRPHYL
A U6/L
CORRECTB
6.UU





FEET UEPTH
32218
PrtEopnTN
A
UG/L
b.JU






-------
STORET RETRIEVAL  DATE  75/04/06
                       72028      72Q29
  DATE   TIME DEPTH   AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
  FROM    OF         FR  SOUTH  FR  SOuTH
   TO    DAr  FEET    DEGREES     FEET
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/18
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/09/05
71/09/05
71/09/05
71/09/05
71/09/05
0003
0007
0010
0020
0030
0003
0013
0030
0003
0010
0020
0030
0013
0003
0010
0016
0003
0010
0016
0020
0003
0010
0023
0033
0013
                                                                   133012          1290AC1330I*
                                                                  IM 17 01.U 067 SO 12.U
                                                                  GREEN BAT OPEN DATED DNR STA 30
                                                                  55      XiSCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN


ooulo
ATER
TEMP
CENT
11.5
11.5
11.5
11.5
1 1.0
7.5
6.0
12.0
1 1 .5
1 1 .0
1 1 .0
6.0
20.0
18.5
13.5
20.0
19.0
17.5
13.0
17.0
17.0
17.0
17.0
17.0


OU299
DO
PROdE
M(a/L
8.1
8.1
8.1
8.3
12.2
12.3
12.0
1 1 .2
1 1 .2
10.6
10.1
8.2
8.3
8.2
7.2
8.8
8.0
6. 1
1.9
9.7
9.6
8.7
1.9
1.6
2 1 1> 1 S
2
00078 OU3 1 0
TRANSP BOD
SECCHI 5 DAT
METERS MG/L
1 .6



1 .6


2. 1




1 .8


1 .5



1 .9




21 1 1202
0029 FEET OEpTH
00312 00*10 OOS3Q
BOD CHLORIDE RtSIUUE
6 DAT CL TUT NFLT
MG/L M(,/L MG/L

18






















                      00671
  DATE   TIME DEpTH pHOS-DIS
  FROM    OF         ORTHO
   TO    DAY  FEET   MG/L P
73/09/18
               0007
                       0.003
                                 0.023
                                                                   133012           1290AC1J3UI2
                                                                  11  17  Ul.U 087 SO 12.D
                                                                  GRtEN  BAT  OPEN *ATER bNK SIA JQ
                                                                  55       A1SCUNSIN
                                                                  LAKE  MICHIGAN
21015

0066C,
PHOS-TOT

MG/L p

00605
ORG N
N
MG/L

0061B
N03-N
DISS
MG/L
2
00613
N02-N
DISS
MG/L

00610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
21 1
0029
3221 1
CHLRPHTL
A UG/L
CORRECTO
1202
FEET DEPTH
32218
PHEOPHlN
A
Uu/L
                                           0.100
                                                      0.03
                                                               0.001
                                                                          0. I 18
                                                                                     1.UO

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
DATE TIME
FROM OF
TO DAY
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/18
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/ 13
71/08/ 13
71/08/1 3
71/08/1 3
71/08/1 3
71/08/15
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/09/05
71/09/05
71/09/05
71/09/05
DEPTH

FEET
0003
0007
0023
0039
0003
0007
0010
0023
0039
0003
0007
0013
0030
OU33
0013
0003
0007
0010
0020
0030
0039
0003
OU07
0026
0039
0003
0007
0016
0033
0036
0039
0013
0016
0003
0007
0022
00^9
                      72028     72029
                     AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
                    FR SOOTH  FR SOUTH
                     DEGREES    FEET
                                                                  153006          1290AC153006
                                                                 Ml 15 30.0 087 17 35.0
                                                                 GREEN BAY UPEN HATER DNR STA 3)
                                                                 55      WISCONSIN
                                                                 LAKE MICHIGAN


000)0
AATER
TEMP
CENT
15.0
1S.O
Ib.U
0.0
0. 1
0.3
0.7
a.s
a. s
7.5
7.0
6.5
6.0
12.11

1 1 .5
1 l.S
1 1.5
e.o
21 .0

18.0
12.0
20.0

20.0
18. 0
12.0
11.0
1 1 .0
11.0
17.0

17.0
15.0


00299
DO
PROBE
M&/L
8.3
8.3
8.0
13.0
12.8
1 1.2
10.2
12.1
12. 1
12.5
12.2
12" U
11.8
10.6

10.1
10.2
9.9
9.0
a. 7

7.5
6.1
9.0

8.1
7.1
1.6
1.5
1.8
1.8
9.6

9.2
8.3
21MS
2
00078 00310
TRANSP BOD
SECCHl 5 DAY
METERS M&/L
1 .5






2.3
8.6


7.1

1 .6
3.6



3.3
1.8
3.7

2.9
1 .6
1.5





3.3
1 .9
2.9

1.5
     21 1 1202
    OU39  FEET  DEPTH

 00312     00910     0053Q
 80D     CHLORIDE  RESIDUE
6 DAY       CL     TOT NFLT
 H&/L      Mfa/L      M&/L
                                                                                                           13
                                                                                                          0.1



                                                                                                            3

                                                                                                            5

                                                                                                           11

                                                                                                            1
                                                                                                            1

                                                                                                            7

                                                                                                           18

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                      00671
  DATE   TIME DEPTH pHOS-DIS
  FROM    OF         ORTHO
   TO    DAY  FEET   MG/L P
73/09/18
71/02/20
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/06/04
71/06/01
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/09/05
71/09/05
0007
0007
0007
0033
OQ07
0039
0007
0039
0007
0016
0007
0019
0.003
0.006
0.001
0.005
0.012
0.009
0.005
0.003
0.010
0.010
0.008
0.006
                                                                   153006           1290AC153006
                                                                 11 1b 30.0  087  17  35.0
                                                                 GREEN BAY OPEN  WATER  DNR  STA  31
                                                                 5b       WISCONSIN
                                                                 LAKE MICHIGAN
21W1S

0066%
PHOS-TOT

MG/L P
0.031
0.006
0.017
0.017
U.060
0.070
0.018
0.011
0.018
U.02I
0.01H
0. 135

00605
ORG N
N
MG/L
0.000
0. 100K
0.200
0.3QO
0.300
0.200
0.100
0.500
O.BQO
0.200
0.200
0. 100

00618
N03-N
DISS
MG/L
0.01
0.003
0.17
0.21
0.06
0.17
0.03
0.50
0.06
1 .02
0.07
0.16
2
00613
N02-N
DISS
MG/L
0.003
0.010
0.005
0.005
0.011
0.011
0.003
O.U37
0.007
0.01 1
0.011
0.019

00610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
0.118
0.109
0.150
U.030
Q.010K
0.050
0.010K
U.030
0.010K
U.OIOK
0.060
0.06U
211
0039
3221 1
CHLRPHYL
A UG/L
CORRECTO
3.00

1.50

5.10

1.30

1.20

10.80

1202
FEET OE
32218
PHEOPHTN
A
UG/L


3.30

3.10



8.10

1 .60


-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/04/06
                      72028
  DATE   TIME DEpTH   AZIMUTH
  FROM    OF        FR SOUTH
   TO    DAY  FEET    DEGREES
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/-20
71/02/20
0007
0010
0020
0030
0039
                                                                   153007           1290AC153007
                                                                  11  11  17*0 OB7 15 11>0
                                                                  GREEN  BAY  OPEN WATER DNR STA 31A
                                                                  55       WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
ziius

72029
DISTANCE
FR SOUTH
FEET






00010
HATER
TEMP
CENT
0.0
0. 1
0. 1
0.7
1 . 1
2
00299 00078
DO TRANSP
PROBE SECCHI
MG/L METERS
12.7
12.6
12.1
9.2
5.6
21!
1 1202

OU36 FEET DEPTH
00310
BOD
5 DAY
MG/L
2.5



7.0
00312
BOD
6 DAY
MG/L





00910
CHLORIDE
CL
Mfa/L
8



10
OOS3Q
RESIDUE
TOT NFLT
MG/L
3



7
                       00671
  DATE   TIME DEpTM  pHOS-DIS
  FROM    OF          ORTHO
   TO    DAY  FEET    MG/L P
71/02/20
71/02/20
0007
0039
0.005
0.013
                                                                   153007          1290AC153007
                                                                  11 11 17.0 Oti7 15 11.0
                                                                  GREEN BAY OPEN WATER DNK STA
                                                                  55      WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
21*IS
2
0066^
PHOS-TOT
MG/L p
0.005
0.013
00605
ORG N
N
MG/L
0.500
0.100
00618
N03-N
DlSS
MG/L
0.02
U.01
00613
N02-N
DISS
MG/L
0.012
O.Olb
00610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG./L
0.063
0. 181
21 1
0036
3221 1
CHLRRHYL
A UG/L
CORRECTD

1202
FEET Dt
32218
PHEOPHTN
A
UG/L


-------
STORE! RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                                                                   153006           1290C15300b
                                                                  11  S3  Si.Q  087  13 58.0
                                                                  GREEN  BAY OPEN  WATER  DNR STA 32
                                                                  55       *ISCUNSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
                                                                 2IMS
                                                                 2
                                              21112U2
                                            002V  FEET
                                                                                                 DEPTH
                      72028     72029
  DATE   TIME DEpTH  AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
  FROM    OF        FR SOUTH  FR SOUTH
   TO    DAY  FEET   DEGREES    FEET
73/09/18
73/09/18
73/09/21
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/02/20
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/1 3
7-1/08/13
71/08/13
71/09/05
71/09/05
71/09/05
0003
0007
0023
0003
0012
002U
0030
0003
0010
0003
0013
0023
Ou03
0013
0026
0003
0010
0023
0026
0030
0003
0013
OU30
 QOOlO
,,ATER
 TEMP
 CENT

   15.5
 00299
  00
PROBE
 MG/L

    B.6
15.0
0.0
U.O
0.5
1 .2
10.5
10.0
15.0
11.0
11.0
23.0
22. S
21 .0
21 .U
21 .0
19.0
15.0
11.0
18.0
17.0
17.0
8.6
13.0
12.6
1 1.6
1.5
1 1 .6
1 1 .6
lu.o
9.6
9.5
9.1
9.6
8.2
9.0
a. 7
8.3
3.2
3.2
9.6
9.0
9.2
 0007B
THANSP
SECCHI
METERS
                                                                  I .0

                                                                  1 .0


                                                                 0.9
 00310     00312     00910     00530
 BOO       BOD     CHLORIDE  RLSIOUE
5 DAY     6 DAY       CL     TUT NFLT
 MG/L      MG/L      MG/L      MG/L
                                                                                                           12
                      00671
  DATE   TIME DEpTH pHOS-DIS
  FROM    OF         OkTHO
   TO    DAY  FEET   MG/L P
                                                                  1S3UDB           129UACIS3008
                                                                 11 13 SI'0 067  13  58.0
                                                                 GREEN BAY UPtN  HATER  OHK  STA  32
                                                                 55       *ISCUNSIN
                                                                 LAKt MICHIGAN
21A1S

0066=,
PHOS-TOT

MG/L p

OU605
ORG N
N
MG/L

OU618
N03-N
DISS
MG/L
2
00613
N02-N
D1SS
MG/L

UU610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
21 1 1202
JU29
3221 1
CHLKPHYL
A UG/L
CORRECTS
FEET DEPTH
32218
PHLUPHTN
A
UG/L
73/09/18
               0007
                       0.003
                                 0.021
                                           O.OoO
                                                      O.Ob
                                                                         0.103
                                                                                     7.00

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                                                                   153009           t290AC153UQ9
                                                                  tt  t7  16.0  087  tO S3.0
                                                                  GREEN  BAY  OPEN  WATER DNK STA 32A
                                                                  SB       WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE  MICHIGAN



DATE TIME
FROM OF
TO DAY
7H/02/27
7H/02/27
74/02/27
71/02/27
71/02/27
71/02/27
71/02/27
71/02/27



DEpTH

FEET
0003
0006
OU10
0012
0020
0021
002S
0033


72Q28
AZlMOTH
FR SOUTH
DEGREES
315.0

315.0

315.0


315.0


72Q29 000 10
DISTANCE HATER
FR SOOTH TEMP
FEET CENT
5000.0

BOOO.O

5000.0


5000.0
21VHS
2
00299 00078 00310
DO TRANSp 600
PROflE SECCHI 5 DAY
M6/L METERS M6/L
It. 8
IS. 6
It.b
It. 8
It. 2
8.Q
7.8
t.9
21 1 1202
OU29 FEET
1)0312 00
BOD CHLO
6 DAY C
MG/L Mb








                                                                                                 DEPTH
                                                                                                     RESIDUE
                                                                                                     TUT NFLT
                                                                                                       Mfi/L

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                                                                   163010          1290AC153010
                                                                  HI 18 07.0 087 13 19.0
                                                                  GREEN SAY OPEN WATER ONK STA 32B
                                                                  55      WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
                      72028      72029      00010
  DATE   TIME DEPTH  A-ZlMUTH   DISTANCE    AATER
  FROM    OF        F" SOUTH   FR  SOUTH     TEMP
   TO    DAY  FEET   DEGREES     FEET       CENT
71/02/27
71/02/27
71/02/27
71/02/27
71/02/27
71/02/27
71/02/27
71/02/27
71/02/27
71/02/27
0003
0006
0010
0012
0020
0021
0030
0031
OU39
0013
315.. 0

315.0

315.0

315.0


315.0
5000.0

5000.0

5000.0

5000,0


5000.0
                                     00299
                                      DO
                                    PROBE
                                     Mfa/L

                                        15.2
                                        it.a
                                        11.8
                                        11.2
                                        11.6
                                        11.0
                                        12.u
                                        1 1 .2
                                         6.6
                                         6.1
                                                                  21IMS
                                                                  2
                                                                        2111202
                                                                       UU1S  FEET
                                                                                                 DEPTH
 00078     00310     00312      009tU      00530
TRAMSP     BOO       BOO     CHLUKIOE   RESIDUE
SECCHI    $ DAY     6 DAY        CL      TOT  NFLT
METERb     M&/L      MG/L       MG/L       MG/L
                                                                   153U11           1290AC153011
                                                                  1M Ifa 55.0 087 1b 51.U
                                                                  GKEEN BAY OPEN WATER UNK STA 32C
                                                                  S5      WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
                      72028
  DATE   TIME DEPTH  AZIMUTH
  FROM    OF        FR SOUTH
   TO    DAY  FEET   DEGREES
71/02/27
71/02/27
71/02/27
71/02/27
71/02/27
0003
0010
0020
0030
0013
2 1 >. I S 2111202

72029
DISTANCE
FR SOUTH
FEET






QOOIO
WATER
TEMP
CENT






00299
00
PROBE
MG/L
15. 1
ib.O
11.0
12.0
7.6
i
0007B
TRANSP
SECCHI
METERS





OU19 FEET
U0310 U0312 Ou
BOD BOD CHLO
5 DAY 6 DAY C
MG/L MG/L Ml,





                                                                                                 DEPTH
                                                                                        00530
                                                                                      RESIDUE
                                                                                      TUT NFLT
                                                                                        MG/L

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                      72028
  DATE   TIME DEPTH  AZIMUTH
  FROM    OF        F SOUTH
   TO    DAY  FEET   DEGREES

71/05/22       0003
74/05/22       0007
71/06/01       0003
74/06/04       0007
74/07/08       0003
74/07/08       0007
7H/08/13       0003
71/08/13       0007
74/08/13       0010
71/09/05       0005
74/09/05       0007
                                                                  133013           4290AC4330I3
                                                                 14  53  32.0  087  50 07.0
                                                                 GREEN  BAY STUDY DNR  STA  33
                                                                 55       WISCONSIN
                                                                 LAKE MICHIGAN
21*15 21

72029
DISTANCE
FR SOUTH
FEET












00010
HATER
TEMP
CENT
16.0
11.0
18.0
17.0
27.5
22.0
22.0

16.0
19.0


00299
DO
PROBE
MG/L
1.8
6.8
6.Q
6.0
6.S
1.8
6.0

3.9
8.9

2
00078
TRANSP
SECCHI
METERS
0.7

1.2

1.0

1.2


1.2

QUO.
00310 00312
BOD BOD
5 DAY 6 DAY
MG/L MG/L

6.1

3.6

1.3

S.7


3.3
0006 FEET  DEPTH

       00940     0053Q
     CHLORIDE  RESIDUE
        CL     TOT NFLT
       MG/L
                 MG/L
                     13

                      2

                      2

                      5
                                                                  433013          129QAC133013
                                                                 44 53 32.0 067 50 07*0
                                                                 GREEN BAY STUDY ONR STA 33
                                                                 55      WISCONSIN
                                                                 LAKE MICHIGAN
21*15 211
2 0006

DATE TIME
FROM OF
TO DAY
74/05/22
74/06/01
74/07/08
74/08/13
74/09/05

DEPTH

FEET
0007
0007
0007
0007
0007
00671
pHOS-OIS
ORTHO
MG/L P
0.009
0.005
0.013
0.010
0.012
OQfe6S 00&05
PHOS-TOT

M'G/L p
0.062
0.080
0.046
0.013
0.033
ORG
N
N

MG/L
0
0
3
0
0
.300
.400
 100
.300
.100
00618
N03-N
DISS
MG/L
0.
0.
1 .
0.
0.



60
64
13
82
86
00613
N02-N
DISS
MG/L
0.032
0.057
0.137
0.007
0.081
00610 32211
NH3-N CHLRPHYL
TOTAL A UG/L
MG/L CORRECTD
0.410
0.1BU
0.15U
0.010K
0.170
1202
FEET DEI
32218
PHEOPHTN
A
UG/L






-------
STORE!  RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                       72028     72029
  DATE    TIME  DEpTH  AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
  FROM     OF         pR SOUTH  FR SOUTH
    TO     DAT   FEET   DEGREES    FEET
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/06/01
71/07/09
71/07/0?
71/07/09
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/09/05
71/09/05
71/09/05
0003
UOIO
0023
0001
0003
001U
0023
0003
0010
U016
0003
0010
0020
 00010
*ATER
 TEMP
 CENT

   12.5
   1 1 .0
    7.0
   15.5
   20.0
   13. U
   12.5
   17.U
   13.0
   1 I .0
   16.0
   15.0
   15.0
 00299
  00
PROBE
 Mb/I.

   10.1
   I 1 .5
   1 1 .8
   10.2
    8.1
    7.5
    7.5
    7.8
    5.0
    5.0
   IU.6
   10.3
    9.9
                                                                    133011           1290AC133011
                                                                   11  53  15.0 087 IB 56.0
                                                                   GREEN  BAT OPEN WATER ON* STA j
                                                                   55       WISCONSIN
                                                                   LAKE MICHIGAN
                                                                   ZIMS
                                                                   2
                                                                         21 I 1202
                                                                        UQU6  FEET
                                                                                                  OLPTH
                                                00078
                                               TRANSP
                                               5ECCHI
                                               METERS

                                                   1 .3
I .2
I .6
1.2
       00310     00312      00910      OUBJO
       BUD       BOO      CHLuKJDt   RESIDUE
      5 UAT     6 DAY        LL      TOT NFLT
       Mb/L      M6/L       Mb/L       Mb/L
                       72028
  DATE   TIME  DEPTH   AZIMUTH
  FROM    OF         FR  SOUTH
   TO    DAY   FEET    DEGREES
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/06/01
71/07/09
71/08/13
71/09/05
71/09/05
0003
001U
0016
QQU3
0003
0003
0003
0007
                                                                   133015           1290AC1330I5
                                                                  11 bi 11.U 07  " 21.0
                                                                  (SHEEN bAY OPEN  HATER  DI1K STA 31,*
                                                                  55      IIISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN


72029
DISTANCE
FR SOUTH
FEET










00010
ATER
TEMP
'CENT
1 1.5
1 1 .0
10.0
16.0
19.0
18.0
17. U
17.0


00299
DO
PROBE
Mb/L
1 1 .7
1 1 .8
12.2
9.B
8.9
 I
1 1 .0
1 1.1
21US 211 12U2
2 OUU3 FEET
00076 1)0310 00312 00
TRANSP BOD BOD CHLUl
SECCH1 5 DAY 6 DAY Cl
METERS Mb/L Mb/L Mi,
1 . f


1.2
1 .8
1 .8
1 .6

                                                                                                  DEPTH
                                                                                         UUbJQ
                                                                                       RESIDUE
                                                                                       TUT  NFLT
                                                                                         MS/L

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                                                                   -.33017          1290AC1330I7
                                                                  11 52 09.0 OB7 11 28*0
                                                                  GREEN BAY OPEN WATER ONR STA 35
                                                                  SB      WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
21*15 2111202
2 OU1S FEET DEPTH

DATE TIME
FROM OF
TO DAY
71/02/27
71/02/27
71/02/27
71/02/27
71/02/27
71/02/27
71/02/27
71/02/27
71/02/27
71/02/27
71/02/27
71/02/27
71/02/27
71/02/27
71/02/27
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/OB/ 13
71/08/13
71/08/1 3
71/09/05
71/09/05
71/09/05
71/09/05
72028
DEPTH AZIMUTH
FR SOUTH
FEET DEGREES
0005 135.0
0006
0007 135.0
0010 135.0
0011 135.0
0012
0019 135.0
0020 135.0
0021
0029 135.0
0030 135.0
0031
0013 135.0
0011 135.0
001S
0003
0007
0020
0033
0039
0003
0007
0010
OU20
0030
0013
0003
0007
0016
0033
0039
0016
0003
0007
0013
0026
0030
0033
0016
0003
0007
0023
0019
72029
DISTANCE
FR SOUTH
FEET
5000.0

10000.0
5000.0
10000.0

10000.0
5000.0

10000.0
5000.0

5UOO.O
10000.0





























000 1 0
nATEK
TEMP
CENT















9.0
9.0
6.5
6.0
5.0
12.0

12.0
1 1 .0
8.0
7.0
21 .0

19.0
15.5
11.0
11.0
19.5

19.0
16.0
11.0
10.5
9.8
17.0

17.0
15.0
U0299 00078 00310 00312
00 TRANSP SOD BOD
PROBE SECCH1 5 DAY 6 DAY
M6/L METERS Mb/L MG/L
15.8
lb.9
11.6
15.2
11.2
15.5
13.2
13. 0
11.0
11.6
12.2
12.6
9.0
8.8
12.2
12.2 1.9
12.2 5.3
12.2
12. U 1.1
1 1 .8
10.9 2.5
2.0
10.8
1U.8
1 l.U
10.2 1 .6
B.B 1.8
1. 1
a. 3
7.5
7.1
7.8 7.8
9.1 2.1
t.b
D.8
7.1
1.8
1.8
5.0 3.3
9.2 1.9
3./
9.7
9.7 2.5
00910 0053Q
CMLUKIOE RESIDUE
CL TUT NFcT
Mi/L MS/L
















7 t

7 7


8 0.1



6 0.1

8 . b



8 5

8 0.1




7 5

8 6

7 I

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
  DATE
  FROM
   TO

71/05/22
71/05/22
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/09/05
71/09/05
             00671
TIME DEPTH pHOS-OIS
 OF         ORTHO
DAY  FEET   MG/L p
      0007
      0033
      0007
      0013
      0007
      0016
      0007
      0016
      0007
      0019
0.009
0.009
0.005
0.003
0.005
0.010
0.003
0.012
0.007
0.003
211MS

0066S
PHOS-TOT

MG/L p
0.027
0.030
0.040
0.060
0.01Q
0.051
0.037
0.021
0.021
0.020

00605
ORG N
N
MG/L
0.100
0.100
0. 100K
0.200
0. 100K
0.800
0.200
0.200
0.100
O.lOOK

00618
N03-N
DISS
Mfa/L
0.02
0.38
0.01
0.25
0.03
O.S6
0.01
1 .08
0.09
0.91
2
006 13
N02-N
DISS
MG/L
0.003
0.002
0.008
0.013
0.003
0.038
0.002
0.001
0.010
0.020

00610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
0.000
0.002
0.030
0.010
0.010
0.030
0.010K
0.010K
0.020
0.170
                                                                   133017           1290AC133017
                                                                  HI  52  09.0  087  11 28.0
                                                                  GREEN  BAY OPEN  WATER DNR STA 35
                                                                  SS       WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
                                                                21112U2
                                                              0015  FEET   DEPTH

                                                           32211      32218
                                                         CHLRPHYL   PHEOPHTN
                                                          A  UG/L      A
                                                         CORRECTO     UG/L
6.20

3*60

9.10

5.90
0.80

1 .10

9.50

S.90

-------
5TORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                      72028     7202v
  DATE   TIME DEPTH  AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
  FROM    OF        FR SOUTH  FR SOUTH
   TO    DAT  FEET   DEGREES    FEET
7M/02/27
7M/02/27
71/02/27
74/02/27
7M/02/27
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/05/22
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/04
71/06/04
71/U7/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
71/07/09
74/07/09
74/07/09
74/07/09
74/07/09
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
74/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
74/09/05
71/09/05
71/09/OS
U003
0010
0020
0030
0013
0003
0013
0030
OOM3
0003
0010
0020
OU30
OUM3
0003
0016
OU23
0026
0030
0033
0039
0016
0003
0013
UG3U
0033
U036
0039
0043
0003
0023
0019
                                                                   153012          1290ACI53U12
                                                                  MM  50 16.u UH1 Ml 02-U
                                                                  GREEN bAY OPEN HATER DNR STA 36
                                                                  55       HISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN


ooo I o
CATER
TEMP
CENT





7.0
6.5
6.0
6.0
1 1 .5
1 1 .0
10.0
10. U
6.U
21 .0
2U.U
19. a
19.0
1 1 .U
9.0
9.0
9.0
20.5
20. a
17.0
10.5
10. 5
lU.b
10.5
1 7.U
17.0
I 7.0
2 1 1. I b
2
00299 0007d 00310
00 TRANSp SOD
PROBE SECCH1 5 UAY
MG/L METERS MG/L
11.6
14.1
12.7
1U.5
6.2
12.3 2.7
12, M
12.0
12.0
11.5 2.7
1 1 .7
1 1 .1
11 .2
10.7
e. a 1.6
8.2
a. 3
8.M
8.5
6.2
6.2
6.2
9.2 1.5
8.9
8.1
1.9
1.9
M.V
1.9
9.9 1.8
9.6
9.8
21 1 12U2
QUbS FtET
00312 Oir
BOD CHLO
6 UAY LI
MG/L Mb
































                                                                                        0053Q
                                                                                      RESIDUE
                                                                                      TUT NFLT
                                                                                        MG/L
                                                                   153013          129UAC1S3013
                                                                  MM M9 3L.O U87 38 35.0
                                                                  GKEEN BAY OPEN HATER ONR STA 37
                                                                  55      nlSCONSlN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
                      72026     72029
  DATE   TIME DEPTH  AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
  FROM    OF        FR SOUTH  FR SOUTH
   TO    DAY  FEET   DEGREES    FEET
71/02/27
7M/02/27
71/02/27
74/02/27
0003
0010
0020
0033
21HIS

00010
,,ATR
TEMP
CENT





OU299
DO
PSOBt
MG/L
13.1
13.1
13. U
9.1
2
00078
TRANSP
SECCHI
METERS





00310
60D
5 UAY
MG/L




211 1202
OU39 FEET
003.12 00
BOO CHLUI
6 DAY LI
MG/L M




                                                                                                  DEPTH
                                                                                        005JQ
                                                                                      RESIDUE
                                                                                      TUT NFLT
                                                                                        MG/L

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/04/06
                      72028     72029
  DATE   TIME DEPTH  AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
  FROM    OF        F SOUTH  FH SOUTH
   TO    DAY  FEET   DEGREES    FEET
73/09/21
73/09/21
73/09/21
73/09/21
73/09/21
71/05/21
71/05/21
71/05/21
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/07/08
71/07/08
71/07/08
71/07/08
71/07/08
71/07/08
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/09/05
71/09/05
71/09/05
71/09/05
0003
0007
0010
0020
0023
0003
0007
0016
0003
0007
0010
0016
0003
0007
0010
0013
0016
0020
0003
0007
0010
0020
0003
0007
0010
0020
                                                                   133018          129UAC13301B
                                                                  11 !>6 Q2.0 087 HI bl.u
                                                                  GREEN BAY OPEN WATER DNR STA 38
                                                                  55      WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN


00010
[,ATER
TEMP
CENT
13. 5
13.6
13.5
13.5
9.0
9.0
7.0
13. 5

13.0
13.0
2U.5

19.0
18.0
15.0
11.9
17.0

15.0
1 1 .0
14.0

15.0
15.0


00299
DO
PROBE
Mta/L
9.6
9.5
9.5
9.1
12.2
12.2
12.2
10. 6

10.5
IU.5
9.1




7.1
8.0

7.6
5.6
10.6

10.6
10.6
21AIS 211 1202
2 0013 FEET
00078 00310 00312 OO'
TRANSp flOD BOD CHLO
SECCHI 5 DAY 6 DAY Ci
METERb Mfa/L Mb/L M<,
1.5



1 .9
3.3

2. 1
2.5


1.9
1.9




1 .9
1.5


1.9
1.1


                                                                                                 DEPTH
  OOS3Q
RESIDUE
TOT NFLT
  M6/L
                                                                   133018          1290AC1330IB
                                                                  11 56 02.U OB7 11 51.0
                                                                  SHEEN BAY OPEN WATER DNR STA 38
                                                                  55      .11 SCONS IN
                                                                  LAKt MICHIGAN


DATE
FROM
TO
73/09/21
71/05/21
71/06/01
71/07/08
71/08/ 13
71/09/05


TIME DEpTH
OF
DAY FEET
0007
0007
0007
0007
0007
0007

00671
PHOS-DIS
OKTHO
MG/L P
0.002
O.OU3
0.006
0.006
0.012
0.003

0066S
PHOS-ToT

MG/L P
a. oas
0.017
0.06U
0.021
0.028
U.02B

00605
ORG N
N
MG/L
0. 100
0.200
0.200
1 .700
U.3UU
O.JO UK

00618
N03-N
DISS
MG/L
U.QQi
0.02
0.02
0.02
0. 26
0*28
2 1 ft 1 S
2
0061 3
N 0 2 - N
DISS
MG/L
O.OQO
0.005
0 . DOB
0.008
O.OOIK
0.017
21 1 1202
0013 FEET DE
00610 32211
NH3-N CHLRPHYL
TOTAL A UG/L
MG/L COKRECTU
0.030 9.00
0. 170
a. too
0.210
U.OIOK
0.100
32218
PHEOphlN
A
U4/L
3. 00






-------
STORE! RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                      72Q28     72029
  DATE   TIME OEpTH  AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
  FROM    OF        FR SOUTH  FR SOUTH
   TO    DAY  FEET   DEGREES    FEET
73/09/2M
73/09/21
73/09/2M
73/09/21
73/09/21
73/09/2M
73/09/21
71/05/21
71/05/21
71/05/21
7M/OS/21
7M/OS/21
7M/06/01
71/06/01
7M/06/OM
7M/06/OM
7M/06/01
71/07/08
71/07/08
71/07/08
71/08/13
71/08/ 13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/09/U5
71/09/05
71/09/05
0003
0007
0010
0020
0030
0039
OOM9
0003
0010
002U
0030
0013
0003
0010
U020
0030
0013
0003
U023
OUM7
0003
0016
0033
0016
0003
0023
0019
                                                                   153011          M290ACI530I1
                                                                  MM 53 38.Q 067 MO 13.U
                                                                  GREEN BAY OPEN HATER CiNR STA 39
                                                                  55      KISCUNSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN


00010
HATER
TEMP
CENT
11.0
1M.Q
1M.Q
1M.Q
11. Q
13. S
e.o
7.D
6.0
6.0
6.0
12. S
12.0
10. S
10.0
S.O
20. S
17.0
13.0
19.0
16.0
13.0
10.0
17.0
16.0
16.0
21MS 21 1 1202
2 01)62 FEET
00299 0007B 00310 Q03I2 00
DO TRANSP BOD BOO CMLO
PROBE SECCHI 5 DAY 6 DAY C
MS/L METERS MG/L MG/L Mb
V.8 1.9
9.7
9.7
9.7
9.7
9.6
12.0 2.M
12.0
1 1 .6
1 1 .6
1 1 .8
1 1 '0 2.M
1 1 .2
i i.e
1 1 .6
lu.e
H.B 2.M
/6
7.M
9.2 2.M
7.9
6.1
6.0
9.2 2. 1
9.6
9-3
                                                                                                 DEPTH
  OUS30
RESIDUE
TOT NFLT
  MG/L
                      UQ671     0066S
  DATE   TIME DEpTH pHOS-OIS  PHOS-ToT
  FROM    OF         ORTHO
   TO    DAY  FEET   MG/L P    MG/L p
                                                                   153011          1290ACIS30I1
                                                                  MM S3 36.0 087 MU 13.U
                                                                  GREEN BAY OPEN WATER ONR STA  39
                                                                  55      H1SCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN


00605
ORG N
N
MG/L


00618
N03-N
DISS
MG/L
2 1  1 S
2
00613
N02-N
0155
MG/L


0061Q
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
2111202
0062 FEET otPTH
32211 32218
CHLRPHYL PHEOPhTN
A UG/L A
CORRECTO UG/L
               0007
                       0.003
                                 0.0)2
                                            0.100
                                                       0.01

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                      72028     72029
  DATE   TIME DEPTH  AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
  FROM    OF        FR SOUTH  FR SOUTH
   TO'    DAY  FEET   DEGREES    FEET
73/09/21
73/09/21
73/09/21
73/09/21
73/09/21
73/09/21
73/09/21
71/05/21
71/05/21
71/05/21
71/05/21
71/05/21
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/07/08
71/07/08
71/07/08
71/07/08
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/09/05
71/09/05
71/09/05
7^/09/05
71/09/05
0003
0007
0010
0020
0030
0039
0019
0003
0007
0013
0030
0013
0003
0007
0010
0020
0030
0013
0003
0007
0023
0016
0003
0007
0016
0033
0016
0003
0007
0015
UU30
0019
00010
ftATER
TEMP
CENT
11.5
1H.5
11.5
11.0
11. U
11.0
e.o
8.0
6.3
6.3
6.5
11.0
13.0
12.0
12. U
12. U
22.0
19.0
10.0
19.0
IB. 5
11.5
10.0
17.0
17.0
17.0
16.0
00299
DO
PROBE
MG/L
10.7
9.5
9.1
8.7
8.1
8.3
12.2
12.2
12.0
12. 1
1 1 .5
10.5
10.1
10.8
10.8
10.7
9.8
8.1
7.5
9.1
8.6
6.2
1.3
10.1
9.6
9.2
1.8
                                                                   153U15           1290AC153015
                                                                  11  51  1S.O 087 35 55.0
                                                                  GRtEN  BAY  OPEN WATER DNR STA 10
                                                                  55       WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
    21IS
    2

 00078     00310
TRANSP     600
SECCHI    5 DAY
METERS     MG/L

    I .5
                                                                  1.9
                                                                  1 .8
                                                                  1 .2
                                                                 2.1
                                                                  1 .9
                                                                            2.5
                                                                            3.3
              1.9


              3.7

              3.3


              2.5
     21112U2
    0052 FEET  DEPTH

 00312     00910     OQb3Q
 BOD     CHLORIDE  RESIDUE
6 DAY       CL     TUT NFLT
 MG/L      M(,/L      MG/L
                                                                                      3.3
                                                                                      3.7
                                                                                      5.b

                                                                                      3.1
               10


               10

                9



                7

               10

                B

                9


                7

                9
                                               9

                                              26
 1

 6


12

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                      U067|
  DATE   TIME DEpTH pHOS-DIS
  FROM    OF         OKTHO
   TO    DAY  FEET   MG/L P
73/09/21
71/05/21
71/05/21
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/07/08
71/07/08
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/09/05
71/09/05
0007
0007
0013
0007
0013
0007
0016
0007
0016
0007
0019
0.002
0.006
0.020
O.UI2
0.019
O.U09
0.010
0.007
0.007
0.003
0.002


0066s
PHOS-ToT

MG/L P
0.005
0.017
0.021
0.170
0.070
0.017
0.021
0.059
0.017
0.017
0.037


00605
ORG N
N
MG/L
0.100
U.I 00
0.100
1.000
0.200
0.700
1.200
0.300
0.200
0.100K
0. IQOK


00618
N03-N
D1SS
MG/L
0.01
0.11
0.30
0.27
O.U3
U.01
0.36
0.03
1 .05
0.07
0.91
2lIS
2
00613
N02-N
DISS
MG/L
0.002
0.009
0.009
0.013
0.009
0.006
0.038
0.001
0.001K
0.006
0.029


00610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
0.016
Q.21U
0. 100
0. 100
0.250
0.000
0.000
U.010K
0.010K
0.120
0.1 10
                                                                  153015           1290AC15301S
                                                                 14 51  18.0  087  35 55.0
                                                                 GREEN  BAY OPEN  H/ATER  DNK  STA  1Q
                                                                 5&       WISCONSIN
                                                                 LAKE MICHIGAN
                                                                       2111202
                                                                      0052 FEET   DEPTH

                                                                   32211      322)8
                                                                 CHLRpHYL  PHEOPHTN
                                                                  A UG/L      A
                                                                 CORRECTD     UG/L
                                                                                     5.00
                                                                                               1.00

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                      72Q28
  DATE   TIME DEPTH  AZIMUTH
  FROM    OF        fR SOUTH
   TO    DAY  FEET   DEGREES
71/05/21
71/05/21
71/05/21
71/06/01
71/07/08
71/07/08
71/07/08
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/09/05
71/09/05
      0003
      0007
      0010
      0007
      0003
      0007
      0010
      0003
      0007
      0010
      0003
      0007
                                                                  383003          1290AC383003
                                                                 11 58 25.0 087 39 15.0
                                                                 GREEN BAY STUDY DNR STA 11
                                                                 55      WISCONSIN
                                                                 LAKE MICHIGAN


/2029
DISTANCE
FR SOUTH
FEET














00010
V.ATER
TEMP
CENT
15.0
15.0
15.0
17.5
25.0

25.0
22.0

17.0
19.0
18.0


00299
DO
PROBE
MG/L
5.7
5.7
6.0
5.2
1.5

1 .7
3.8

5.7
6.1
6.0
2I*IS 2111202
2 0009 FEET
00078 00310 00312 00
TRANSP BOO BOD CHLO
SECCH1 5 DAY 6 DAY C
METERS MG/L MG/L Mb
0.8
7.0

1.0 1.1
1.2
7.1

1.2
1.1

1.2

                                                                                                DEPTH
                                                                                             0053Q
                                                                                           RtSIUUE
                                                                                           TUT NFLT
                                                                                             MG/L
                                                                                   11
                                                                                    1
                                                                                    2

                                                                                    1

                                                                                    5
                                                                                                                                      i
                                                                                                                                      u
                                                                  383003          1290AC383003
                                                                 11 58 25.0 087 39 15.U
                                                                 GREEN BAY STUDY DNR STA 11
                                                                 55      WISCONSIN
                                                                 LAKE MICHIGAN
  DATE
  FROM
   TO

71/05/21
71/06/01
71/07/08
71/08/13
71/09/05
             00671
TIME DEpTH pHOS-DIS
 OF         ORTHO
DAY  FEET   MG/L P
      0007
      0007
      0007
      0007
      0007
0.005
0.019
0.021
0.005
21*IS

00665
PHOS-TOT

MG/L p
0.026
0.070
0.017
0.032
0.033

00605
CRG N
N
MG/L
O.lOOK
0.100
0.500
0.300
0.300

00618
N03-N
DISS
MG/L
0.03
0.05
0.01
0.13
0.31
2
00613
N02-N
DISS
HG/L
0.018
0.017
0.026
0.001
0.019

00610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
0.260
0.070
0.020
0.010K
0.017
21 1
000?
32211
CHLRPHYL
A UG/L
CORRECTD





1202
FEET DE
32218
PHEOPHTN
A
UG/L






-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                      72028      72029
  DATE   TIME DEpTN  AZIMUTH   DISTANCE
  FROM    OF        FR SOUTH   FR  SOUTH
   TO    DAY  FEET   DEGREES     FEET
73/09/21
73/09/21
73/09/21
73/09/21
73/09/21
71/05/21
71/05/21
71/05/21
71/05/21
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/07/08
71/07/08
71/07/08
71/08/13
7t/08/13
71/08/13
71/09/05
71/09/05
71/09/05
0003
0007
0010
0020
0030
0003
0013
0030
0013
0003
0010
0020
0030
0015
0003
0017
0030
0003
0016
0030
0003
OQ20
0039
                                                                    3B3U01          129UAC383001
                                                                   11 57 QS.O OB7 39 16.0
                                                                   GKEEN BAT OPEN *ATtR ONR  STA  12
                                                                   Sb      KISCONSIN
                                                                   LAKE MICHIGAN


ooolo
LATER
TEMP
CENT
13. S
13.5
13. S
13.5
7.5
5.0
S.O
S.O
13.0
12.0
6.0
S.O
S.O
2U.O
12. 5
1 1 .0
18. 5
16.0
11. S
17.0
IS. 0
11.0


00299
00
PROgE
Mb/L
9.3
9.3
9.3
9.2
12.2
12.0
11.1
11.2
10. B
10,7
10.2
10.1
10.2
10. S
9.5
7.2
9.1
7.7
6.6
10.2
d.8
7.9
21WIS 2111202
2 OU36 FEET
00078 00310 00312 Ou
TRANSP BOD bOD CHLU
bECCHI 5 UAT 6 DAT C
METERb Mb/L MG/L Mb
2.1



2.5



1 .9




1 .8


1 .6


1 .V


                                                                                                   DEPTH
  00530
fitSIUUL
TOT MFLT
  MG/L
                                                                    38JOUM           129UAt3B3UU1
                                                                   11  b7  ub.U C.67 39 16>U
                                                                   &KE.EN  BAT  OPtN AATER u(h bTA  s
                                                                   SB       UlSCUNSIN
                                                                   LAKE MICHIbAN
21Alb


DATE
FROM
TO
/09/2'


TIME
OF
DAY
1


OEpTH

FEET
OOP?

00671
PHOS-DIS
ORTHO
MS/L P
0.002

0066S
PHOS-ToT

M&/L p
0.003

00605
ORG N
N
Mb/L
0. IQO

G061B
N03-N
DISS
Mfa/L
0.03
2
00613
N02-N
OISS
MG/L
0 .Ou 1

U06IQ
NH3-N
TOIAL
MS/L
0.061
21 1
0036
32211
CHLRPHYL
A UG/L
COKKECTL1
1.0U
1202
FtET DE
32218
HHEuphTw
A
Ub/L
i.oo

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                                                                   153016          1290AC153016
                                                                  11  55  08*0 087 35 37.u
                                                                  GREEN  BAY OPEN WATER UNK STA 13
                                                                  55       WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN
                      72Q28      72029
  DATE   TIME DEPTH  AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
  FROM    OF        FR SOUTH  FR  SOUTH
   TO    DAY  FEET   DEGREES     FEET
73/09/21
73/09/21
73/09/21
73/09/21
73/09/21
71/05/21
71/05/21
7H/05/21
71/05/21
71/05/21
71/05/21
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/OH
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/07/08
71/07/08
71/07/08
71/07/08
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/09/05
71/09/05
71/09/05
71/09/05
0003
0007
0020
0039
OOM9
0003
0007
0013
0030
0013
OOB9
0003
0007
0010
0020
0030
0013
0003
0007
0023
0016
0003
0007
0016
0030
0016
0003
0007
002S
0050

00010
AATEK
TEMP
CENT

00299
iiO
PROBE
M6/L
2H IS
2
0007d
TRANSP
SECCHI
METERS

U0310
SOD
5 DAY
Ma/L
                                             11.0
                                                        8.7
11.0
11 .0
13.0
8.0
8.0
6,5
5.0
1.5
1.5
13.0
12. 5
10.0
7.0
6.5
20.0
17.0
12.0
18.0
16.5
12.5
9.0
18.0
16.0
13.0
8
8
a
12
12
12
1 1
1 1
1
1
1
1
1
1
9
7
9
9
8
6
7
9
9
7
 7
.7
.7
 2
.2
.2
.8
>8
.8
.2
.2
3
.2
 2
.0
.1
.5
.0
.)
.7
.6
.5
.5
.5
                                                                  2. 1
                                                                  2.5
                                                                  2.5
                                                                  1 .b
                                                                  2.3
                                                                  2. 1
     2111202
    006b  KEET  DEPTH

 00312     00940     00530
 BOD     CHLORIDE  RESIDUE
6 DAY       CL     TUT NFLT
 MS/L      MC./L      M&/L
                                                                                      2.9
                                                                                      3.7
                                                                            2.9
                                                                            2.5
                                                                            l.b
                                                                            1.9
                                                                                                          U.I

-------
STORET RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                                                                   153016           1290AC153016
                                                                  11  55  08.0  087  3b 37.U
                                                                  GREEN  BAY OPEN  WATER DNK STA H3
                                                                  55       WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE  MICHIGAN


DATE
FROM
TO
73/09/21
71/05/21
71/05/21
71/04/01
71/07/08
71/08/13
71/09/05


TIME DEpTM
OF
DAT FEET
0007
0007
0059
0007
0007
0007
0007

00671
pHOS-DIS
ORTHO
MG/L P
0.003

0.012
O.U02
0.012
0.003
0.003

0066s
PHOS-TOT

MG/L p
0.011
0.013
0.016
0.06Q
0.032
0.031
0.025

00605
ORG N
N
MG/L
0. 100
0. 1QU
0.100
O.lQOK
0.700
0.2QO
O.lOOK

OU618
N03-N
DISS
MG/L
0.01
0.27
0.16
0-OlK
0.03
0.1 1
0.19
21W1S
2
00613
N02-N
DISS
MG/L
0.002
0.017
0.018
0.01)6
0.077
O.Q01K
0.011
21 1 1202
0065 FEET BEpTH
00610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/'L
0.016
0.230
0. 160
0.120
0.05U
0.010K
0.070
3221 1
CHLHpHYL
A UG/L
COKRECTD
6.00
3.60

6.60
1 1 .70
1.10

32218
pHEOphTN
A
UG/L
1 .00


1.60

1.70


-------
STORE! RETRIEVAL  DATE  75/06/06
                       72028      72029
  DATE   TIME  DEPTH   AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
  FROM    OF         FR  SOUTH  FR SOUTH
   TO    DAY   FEET    DEGREES    FEET
73/09/21
73/09/21
73/09/21
73/09/21
73/09/21
73/09/21
71/05/21
71/05/21
71/05/21
71/05/21
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/07/06
71/07/08
71/07/08
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/ 1 3
71/09/05
71/09/05
71/09/05
71/09/05
0003
0007
0010
0020
0030
0039
0003
0013
0030
0013
0003
0010
0020
0030
0013
0003
0023
0016
0003
0016
OU33
0016
0003
0023
0013
0019
                                                                    Ib3U I 7          429UA1.15301 7
                                                                   11  53  02.CJ 07 32 1 3U
                                                                   GREEN  BAY OPtu HATER QMK STA Ml
                                                                   55       H1SCUNSIN
                                                                   LAKE MICHIGAN


OOQ1U
sATER
TEMP
CENT
11.0
11.0
1 1.U
11. U
11.0
8.5
7.0
6.5
6.0
1 J.O
12.0
12.0
1 1 .5
11. b
21 .0
19. a
1 1 .0
19.5
1 8.0
16.0
16.0
ie.o
1 7.0
16. 0
13.0


OU299
IjQ
PROBL
MG/L
9.2
9. 1
9.U
O.B
b.7
12.2
12.3
12. U
12.1
11.1
11.1
1 1 >2
11.2
ll.U
9.0
8.6
7.9
9.1
6.1
7.9
/.B
10.0
9.1
8.0
7.6
21 . IS 211 1^Q2
2 OU6b fttT
00078 00310 UU312 Ou
TRANSP BOO BOD CMLO
SECCHI 5 UAY 6 DAY C
METERb MG/L MS/L MG
2. 1




7. 1



1 .6




2.1


2.3



1 .8



                       Oub-10
                     Rtbiout
                     TUT NFLT
                       MG/L
                       00671
  DATE   TIME  OEpTH  pHOS-DIS
  FROM    OF          OKTHO
   TO    DAY   FEET    MG/L P

73/09/21        0007
21A1S
2
0066<;
PHOS-ToT
MG/L p
0.012
0060S
ORG N
N
MG/L
0. 100
00618
N 0 J - W
D1SS
MG/L
0.03
00613
N02-N
UISS
MG/L
o.oon
00610
NH3-N
TOTAL
MG/L
0.00
                                                                    153017           129QAClb3U 1 /
                                                                   11  S3  02.U 067 32 13.U
                                                                   GREEN  BAY  OPEN IIATEx UNN S1A  <| 1
                                                                   SB       HISCUnbM
                                                                   LAKE MICHIGAN
      21 I 1202
     0065 FEtT   utf

  32211      32218
CHLKpHYL  PHEUPHTN
 A UG/L       A
COKRECTU     Uu/L
                                                                                      5.Ob
                                                                                                  . UU

-------
STORE! RETRIEVAL DATE 75/06/06
                      72028     72029
  DATE   TIME DEPTH  AZIMUTH  DISTANCE
  FROM    OF        FR SOUTH  FR SOUTH
   TO    DAY  FEET   DEGREES    FEET
73/09/21
73/09/21
73/09/21
73/09/21
73/09/21
71/06/01
71/06/01
71/06/C1
71/06/01
71/U6/01
71/06/01
71/07/08
71/07/08
71/07/08
71/07/08
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/08/ 13
71/08/13
71/09/05
71/09/05
71/09/05
71/09/05
0003
UOCJ7
0010
0020
0030
0003
0007
0010
OU20
0030
0015
0003
0007
0023
0016
0003
0007
0013
U026
003U
0033
0016
0003
UOU7
0025
0019
                                                                   153018          1290AC153018
                                                                  11 53 11.0 U87 25 06.0
                                                                  GREEN BAY OPEN WATER ONR  STA  1
                                                                  55      WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN


OOQIO
ATER
TEMP
CENT
11.0

11.0
11.0
1 H.O
12.0

1 1 .5
1 1 .5
1 1 .0
1 1 .0
21 .5

20.0
13.0
IV. 0

18.5
18.0
15.5
13.0
12.0
18. 0

18.0
16.0


00299
DO
PROSE
MG/L
9.1

9.1
9.3
9.2
1 1 .6

11. 5
1 1 .1
1 1 .3
1 1 .2
9.1

8.5
7.5
9.3

8.9
8.2
7.1
5.7
5.7
10. 1

9.8
9.8
21HIS
2
00078 00310
TRANSP BOO
SECCHI 5 DAY
METERS M6/L
2.1




2.3
3.3



2.1
1.5



2. 1
1.9




1.1
1 .6
3.3

3.3
21 1 1202
OU1S FEET DEPTH
00312 00910 OU530
BOD CHLORIDE RESIDUE
6 DAY CL TUT NFLT
MG/L MG/L G/L

1




B U.I



8 U.I

1.3 7 U.I

3.7 8 1

8 3




6 1

a 3

8 1
                                                                   153018           1290AC153UIB
                                                                  11 53 11.0 087  25  U6.0
                                                                  GREEN BAY OPEN  WATER  DNR  STA -1
                                                                  55      WISCONSIN
                                                                  LAKE MICHIGAN



DATE
FROM
TO
73/09/21
71/1)6/01
71/06/01
71/07/08
71/07/08
71/08/13
71/08/13
71/09/05
71/09/05



TIME UEpTH
OF
DAY FEET
0007
0007
U015
0007
0016
QOD7
0016
0007
0019


00671
pHOS-DIS
OKTHO
MG/L p
U.UOl
0.003
0.003
0.006
0.006
O.U12
U.UU3
0.003
O.U02


0066";
PHOS-TOT

MS/L p
0.010
U.OBU
0.080
0.010
0.011
0.011
0.018
0.021
0.017


00605
ORG N
N
MG/L
0.100
0.100K
O.IOUK
0.100
0.500
0.300
U.200
0.100K
0.100K


00618
N03-N
D1SS
MG/L
0.01
U.06
0.32
0.02
0.18
0.01
0.73
0.02
0.30
21( IS
2
00613
N02-N
OISS
MG/L
0.000
0.010
0.012
0.020
0.052
O.OQ1K
0.001
0.006
0.011
21 1 12U2

0061U
NH3-N
TOTAL
Hti/L
0.000
0. 100
o.oso
O.UQU
o.ouo
O.OIUK
0.01UK
0.050
O.ObU
OU1S
32211
CHLHpHYL
A UG/L
CORRECTU
6.00
9.10

5.30

o.uo

3.30

FEET DEPTH
32218
PHEOPHTN
A
UG/L
2.00
U.QU

0.20

9.10

2.bO


-------

-------
                                   TECHNICAL REPORT DATA
                            (Please read Instructions on the reverse before completing)
 1 REPORT NO
  EPA-905/9-74-017
                                                           3 RECIPIENT'S ACCESSIOWNO.
 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE
  Water Pollution Investigation:  Lower Green Bay
  and Lower Fox River
                                                           5. REPORT DATE

                                                                  June 1975
                                                         6. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION CODE
 7 AUTHOR(S)

  D.  J. Patterson, E. Epstein, and  J.  McEvoy
                                                          8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NO
 9. PERFORMING OR'ANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS
  Wisconsin Department of Natural  Resources
  Division of Environmental Standards
  Box 450
  Madison, Wisconsin  53701
                                                           10. PROGRAM ELEMENT NO.
                                                         11. CONTRACT/GRANT NO.
                                                          EPA  No.  68-01-1572
 12 SPONSORING AGENCY NAME AND ADDRESS
  U.S.  Environmental Protection Agency
  Enforcement Division, Region V
  230 S. Dearborn Street
  Chicago, Illinois  60604
                                                           13. TYPE OF REPORT AND PERIOD COVERED
                                                          Final  Report
                                                         14. SPONSORING AGENCY CODE
 15. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES
  EPA Project Officer:  Howard  Zar
 16. ABSTRACT
  The lower third of Green Bay and  the Lower Fox River were intensively  studied.   Seven
  surveys of the Bay were carried out  between September 1973 and September  1974.   Over
  40 stations were sampled for 15 different chemical and physical parameters.   In
  addition, plankton samples were taken and general groupings and counts were made.
  Nearly 5,000 data points were generated and inserted into the STORE! system.   The
  surveys revealed algae blooms over the entire study area.  Nitrogen forms showed
  fluctuations over 3 orders of magnitude that may be relatable to nitrogen-fixing
  algae.  Phosphorus concentrations were more stable than nitrogen concentrations,
  but appeared to decrease in correspondence to blue-green nitrogen-fixing  algae.
  Dissolved oxygen concentrations in the Bay were generally acceptable except during
  the winter survey.  The February  survey revealed critical dissolved oxygen levels
  over a 50 sq. mile area north of  Point Sable.
  Computer models of the Lower Fox  River and Green Bay were developed and used  to
  evaluate the effect of the final  limits for the present discharge permits at  all
  point source discharges on the water quality, specifically dissolved oxygen.   The
most critical dissolved  oxygen  case was determined by the model  tq.be the summer
low flow and high temperature condition in the river.  The final  discharge. limit
                                                   e to meet fish and  aquatic lif
  from the present permits was  shown  to  be inadequat
  standards with regard to dissolved  oxygen (5 mg/1 ) and may even violate  the  variance
  dissolved oxygen standards now  in force.   A proposed "waste load allocation" to
  maintain 5 mg/1 of DO was developed.   The WLA calls for a 37% decrease in  BOD and
  suspended solids from the final  discharge levels on the present permits.
                               KEY WORDS AND DOCUMENT ANALYSIS
                  DESCRIPTORS
  Water Quality
  Aquatic Biology
  Water Pollution
                                             b.IDENTIFIERS/OPEN ENDED TERMS
                                            Green Bay
                                            Lake Michigan
                                            Great Lakes
                                            Fox River
                                            Chemical Parameters
                                            Biological Parameters
                                                                        c.  COSATI Field/Group
 3. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT
  Limited number of copies from  U.S.  EPA,
  Chicago.At cost of publication  from NTIS,
  5285 Port Royal Rd..Springfield,  VA 22161
                                             19 SECURITY CLASS (This Report)
                                                                        21. NO. OF PAGES
                                           20 SECURITY CLASS {Thispage)
EPA Form 2220-1 (9-73)
                                        ou.S.Government Printing Office: 1975  650-478/1101 Region 5-1

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