& EPA
          United States
          Environmental Protection
          Agency
             Office of Air Quality
             Planning and Standards
             Research Triangle Park, NC 27711
EPA-456/R-97-005 \S"
September 1997
http://www.epa.gov/ttn/uatw
          Air
WOOD FURNITURE MANUFACTURING
OPERATIONS NESHAP
IMPLEMENTATION DOCUMENT

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 WOOD FURNITURE MANUFACTURING OPERATIONS
       NESHAP IMPLEMENTATION DOCUMENT
                     Prepared for:

Information Transfer and Program Integration Division (ITPID)
        Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards
          U. S. Environmental Protection Agency
            Research Triangle Park, NC 27711

                     Prepared by:

               Midwest Research Institute
               Crossroads Corporate Park
              5520 Dillard Road, Suite 100
                 Gary, NC 27511-9232

                    September 1997

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                             TABLE OF CONTENTS
                                                                  Pa
      CHAPTER 1
          INTRODUCTION	1-1
          1.1 BACKGROUND 	1-1
          1.2 PURPOSE OF GUIDEBOOK 	1-1
          1.3 ORGANIZATION 	1-2

^    CHAPTER 2

SS        OVERVIEW OF THE NESHAP	2-1
N        2.1 WOOD FURNITURE NESHAP - APPLICABILITY AND REQUIREMENTS .. 2-1

      CHAPTER 3
-0
          WORK PRACTICE STANDARDS	3-1
          3.1 APPLICATION EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS	3.1
          3.2 OPERATOR TRAINING PROGRAM 	3.3
          3.3 INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE PLAN 	3.3
          3.4 CLEANING AND WASHOFF SOLVENT ACCOUNTING PROGRAM	3.4
          3.5 ADDITIONAL WORK PRACTICE STANDARDS	3.4
          3.6 WORK PRACTICE IMPLEMENTATION PLAN  	3.5
          3.7 FORMULATION ASSESMENT PLAN FOR FINISHING OPERATIONS	3.5
          3.8 COMPOSITION OF CLEANING AND WASHOFF SOLVENTS	3.7

      CHAPTER 4

          NESHAP COMPLIANCE OPTIONS	4-1
          4.1 NESHAP COMPLIANCE OPTIONS	4-1
          4.2 COMPLIANCE OPTIONS FOR GLUING OPERATIONS	4-8

      CHAPTER 5

          RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING REQUIREMENTS	5-1
          5.1 RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS	5-1
          5.2 NESHAP REPORTING REQUIREMENTS	5.4

      CHAPTER 6

          EXAMPLE INSPECTION CHECKLISTS

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                   TABLE OF CONTENTS (continued)
CHAPTER 7
     QUESTIONS ON THE WOOD FURNITURE NESHAP	7-1
     7.1 APPLICABILITY	7-1
     7.2 DETERMINING MAJOR SOURCE STATUS	7-3
     7.3 DEFINITIONS	7-4
     7.4 COATING EMISSION LIMITS AND COMPLIANCE OPTIONS 	7-6
     7.5 ADHESIVE EMISSION LIMITS AND COMPLIANCE OPTIONS 	7-9
     7.6 WORK PRACTICE STANDARDS 	7-9
APPENDIX A.
APPENDIX B.
APPENDIX C.
APPENDIX D.
APPENDIX E.
APPENDIX F.

APPENDIX G.
ACRONYMS AND DEFINITIONS
LIST OF CONTACTS
DETAILED TABLE OF CONTENTS FOR THE NESHAP
FEDERAL REGISTER NOTICE-WOOD FURNITURE NESHAP
LIST OF VOLATILE HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS
POLLUTANTS EXCLUDED FROM USE IN CLEANING AND
WASHOFF SOLVENTS
SOURCES OF TECHNICAL AND REGULATORY INFORMATION
                                 11

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                          LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 2-1.   Determining the applicability of the NESHAP to a
          facility	     2-3

                          LIST OF TABLES

                                                              Page

TABLE 2-1.  COMPLIANCE DATES FOR THE NESHAP 	     2-5
TABLE 2-2.  SUMMARY OF NESHAP EMISSION LIMITS	     2-6
TABLE 3-1.  WORK PRACTICE STANDARDS FOR THE WOOD FURNITURE
          NESHAP  	     3-2
TABLE 3-2.  VHAP OF POTENTIAL CONCERN IDENTIFIED BY INDUSTRY ..     3-5
TABLE 4-1.  COMPLIANCE METHODS FOR THE NESHAP	     4-1
TABLE 4-2.  COATING PARAMETERS FOR FACILITY USING AVERAGING
          APPROACH TO MEET THE NESHAP EMISSION LIMITS FOR
          FINISHING 	     4-6
TABLE 4-3.  OPERATING PARAMETERS FOR ADD-ON CONTROL
          DEVICES	     4-7
TABLE 4-4.  COMPLIANCE DEMONSTRATION FOR COMPLIANT
          ADHESIVES 	     4-9
TABLE 5-1.  RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE NESHAP	     5-2
TABLE 5-2.  RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS NESHAP WORK PRACTICE
          STANDARDS 	     5-3
TABLE 5-3.  INFORMATION TO BE INCLUDED IN INITIAL COMPLIANCE
          REPORT FOR THE NESHAP  	     5-5
TABLE 5-4.  INFORMATION TO BE INCLUDED IN THE SEMIANNUAL
          COMPLIANCE STATUS REPORT FOR THE NESHAP	     5-6
                                in

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                                   CHAPTER 1

                                  INTRODUCTION

1.1  BACKGROUND
      The Clean Air Act as amended in 1990 (CAA) directs the U. S. Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) to regulate emissions of 189 toxic chemicals (hazardous air pollutants, or HAP)
from a wide range of industrial sources. In 1992, surface coating of wood furniture was listed as
a source category to be regulated under the CAA because many of the coatings, adhesives, and
solvents used in the wood furniture industry contain toxic chemicals such as toluene, xylene,
methanol, methyl ethyl ketone, glycol ethers, and formaldehyde.  Therefore, the EPA is
regulating HAP emissions from wood  furniture manufacturing facilities to meet the requirements
of the CAA.  The EPA estimates that this regulation will reduce nationwide HAP emissions from
wood furniture manufacturing facilities by 32,000 tons per year.
      In December of 1995, the EPA issued national emission standards for hazardous air
pollutants (NESHAP) to control emissions from wood furniture manufacturing operations. The
regulation appeared in the December 7, 1995 edition of the Federal Register [60 FR 62930,] and
was amended in June of 1997  [62 FR 30257; 62 FR 31361]. The level of emissions control
required by the NESHAP is based on the maximum achievable control technology (MACT).
Therefore, these standards are sometimes referred to as MACT standards.
      The NESHAP was developed through a regulatory negotiation process. In a regulatory
negotiation. EPA works with members of industry, State representatives, and representatives
from environmental groups to try to reach an agreement regarding the level of control that should
be required, the format of the standards, compliance options, and recordkeeping and reporting
requirements. The wood furniture regulatory negotiation Committee reached consensus on all
issues.
1.2  PURPOSE OF GUIDEBOOK
      The purpose of this guidebook is to provide assistance to Sate and local agencies who are
responsible for implementing the requirements of the wood furniture NESHAP. This guidebook
is not a complete and full statement of the legal and technical requirements of the regulation. See
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the Federal Register notice (Appendix D of this guidebook) for the complete text of the
regulation.
       This manual also includes summary tables and example calculations that are designed to
assist in implementing the wood furniture NESHAP.
1.3 ORGANIZATION
       Chapter 2 of this guidebook presents an overview of the NESHAP applicability and
requirements. Chapters 3, 4, and 5 discuss the work practice standards, compliance options, and
recordkeeping and reporting requirements, respectively. Chapter 6 presents example inspection
checklists that State and local agency inspection personnel can use in making compliance
inspections at wood furniture  manufacturing facilities. Finally, Chapter 7 is a su  .\mary of
commonly asked questions and answers on the wood furniture NESHAP. The u;pendices
contain acronyms and definitions, contacts, other guidance materials available on the wood
furniture NESHAP, a detailed table of contents for the NESHAP,  and the text of the wood
furniture manufacturing NESHAP.
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                                   CHAPTER 2
                           OVERVIEW OF THE NESHAP

2.1 WOOD FURNITURE NESHAP - APPLICABILITY AND REQUIREMENTS
      The level of control required by the NESHAP is based on MACT. Unlike reasonably
available control technology (RACT), which addresses VOC emissions, MACT is aimed at
reducing emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAP).  While the majority of HAP are VOC, not
all VOC are HAP.  Appendix E contains a list of volatile HAP (VHAP) that will be regulated
under this NESHAP.
      In addition to regulating HAP emissions from finishing and cleaning operations, the
NESHAP will also regulate emissions from some gluing operations. The NESHAP includes
emission limitations for contact adhesives, and many of the work practice standards that are
discussed in Chapter 3 also apply to gluing operations
2.1.1  Applicability of NESHAP
      Figure 2-1 can be used to assist State and local agencies in determining whether a facility
is subject to the NESHAP. The NESHAP is a national standard that applies to facilities that are
engaged in, either in part or in whole, in the manufacture of wood furniture or wood furniture
components and emit or have the potential to emit 10 tons or more of any HAP or 25 tons or
more of any combination of HAP. These sources are known  as major sources.
      Wood furniture component means any part that is used in the manufacture of wood
furniture. Examples include, but are not limited to, drawer sides, cabinet doors, and laminated
tops. However, foam seat cushions manufactured and fabricated at a facility that does not engage
in any other wood furniture or wood furniture component manufacturing operation are excluded
from this definition.  The NESHAP includes a list of SIC codes that should be used as a guide in
determining the applicability of the NESHAP to a particular facility. However, if there is any
question as to whether the NESHAP is applicable to a facility, Mr. Bob Marshall of EPA's
Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance should be contacted.
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IS THE FACILITY AN INCIDENTAL FURNITURE MANUFACTURER USING LESS
THAN 100 GAL/MO OF WOOO FURNITURE COATINGS AND ADHESIVES BUT
          A MAJOR SOURCE DUE TO OTHER OPERATIONS'
YES
 FACILITY IS NOT SUBJECT TO NESHAP BUT
  MUST MAINTAIN COATING AND ADHESIVE
    PURCHASE OR USAGE RECORDS
                             NO
DOES THE FACILITY USE MORE THAN 250 GAL/MO (3.000 GAL PER ROLLING
  12-MONTH PERIOD) OF FINISHING. GLUING. CLEANING. AND WASHOFF
 MATERIALS (INCLUDING MATERIALS USED IN PROCESSES OTHER THAN
              WOOO FURNITURE MANUFACTURING)'

                           OH

               DOES THE FACILrTY EMIT MORE THAN
    5 TONS OF ANY ONE HAP PER ROLLING 12 MONTH PERIOD
   (AND AT LEAST 90% OF EMISSIONS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH THE
             MANUFACTURE OF WOOO FURNITURE)'
             FACILITY IS AN AREA SOURCE AND IS NOT
            SUBJECT TO THE NESHAP IF 90 PERCENT OF
              TOTAL EMISSIONS FROM THE SITE ARE
                FROM MATERIALS USED FOR WOOO
            FURNCTURE MANUFACTURING OPERATIONS
            THE FACI.ITY MUST MAINTAIN RECORDS OF
              THE AMOUNT OF MATERIALS USED AND
                  CPDS FOR THOSE MATERIALS
                              YES
             DOES THE FACIUTY EMIT MORE THAN
12.5 TONS OF ANY COMBINATION OF HAP PER ROLLING 12 MONTH PERIOD
    (AND AT LEAST 90% OF EMISSIONS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH THE
             MANUFACTURE OF WOOO FURNITURE)'
 NO
                              YES
 FAOUTY IS AN AREA SOURCE AND IS NOT
SUBJECT TO THE NESHAP IF 90 PERCENT OF
  TOTAL EMISSIONS FROM THE SITE ARE
   FROM MATERIALS USED FOR WOOO
FURNITURE MANUFACTURING OPERATIONS.
THE FACILITY MUST MAINTAIN RECORDS OF
  THE AMOUNT OF MATERIALS USED AND
     CPDS FOR THOSE MATERIALS
   DOES THE FACILrTY EMIT OR HAVE THE POTENTIAL TO EMIT 10 TONS
   OF ANY ONE HAP OR 25 TONS OF A COMBINATION OF HAPj PER YEAR
     (INCLUDING EMISSIONS FROM PROCESSES OTHER THAN WOOD
                 FURNITURE MANUFACTURING)''
                                                                NO
                              YES
              FACILrTY IS NOT SUBJECT TO THE NESHAP.
                 BUT THEY MAY HAVE TO OBTAIN A
              FEDERALLY ENFORCEABLE LIMIT ON THEIR
               POTENTIAL TO EMIT BY LIMITING THEIR
              OPERATING HOURS. COATING USAGE. ETC
              FACILITY IS SUBJECT TO THE NESHAP
DID CONSTBUCnON OR RECONSTRUCTION OF THE FACILITY BEGIN AFTER
                     DECEMBER 8. 1994
              FACILITY IS A NEW SOURCE AND IS SUBJECT
                  TO THE EMISSION LIMITS FOR NEW
                           SOURCES
                             NO
FACLITY IS AN EXISTING SOURCE AND IS SUBJECT TO THE EMISSION LIMITS
                   FOR EXISTING SOURCES
  Figure 2-1.  Determining the applicability of the NESHAP to a Wood Furniture facility.

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       In determining whether or not a source is major, HAP emissions from all sources at the
facility must be accounted for. For example, a facility may manufacture metal and wood
furniture.  Although the NESHAP will only apply to the wood furniture manufacturing
operations, emissions from the metal furniture manufacturing operations must be included when
determining whether or not the source is major.
       However, if a facility only performs incidental wood furniture manufacturing but is a
major source due to other unrelated activities, the facility is not subject to the regulation if no
more than 100 gallons per month of wood furniture coatings and adhesives are used. This
exemption would include operations such as hobby shops on military bases or maintenance shops
at chemical plants that manufacture wood furniture items such as bookshelves for on site use.
These facilities must maintain records to demonstrate that their usage of wood furniture coatings
and adhesives is no more than 100 gallons per month.
       Sources using less than 250 gallons per month, or 3,000 gallons per rolling 12-month
period, of coating,  gluing, cleaning, and washoff materials, including materials used for
operations other than wood furniture manufacturing,  are area sources and are not subject to the
NESHAP if the finishing materials, adhesives, cleaning solvents, and washoff solvents  account
for at least 90 percent of annual emissions at the plant site. These sources must also maintain
records that demonstrate their material usage is below these levels.  A rolling 12 month period
includes the previous 12 months of operation at the facility. Facilities should note that this
limitation includes all coating, gluing, cleaning, and washoff materials, whether those materials
contain HAP or not.
       Sources that emit no more  than 5 tons per rolling 12 month period of any one HAP and
no more than 12.5  tons per rolling 12 month period of any combination of HAP, and at  least 90
percent of the plantwide emissions are associated with the manufacture of wood furniture or
wood furniture components,  are also considered area sources under the NESHAP.  These
facilities will be required to maintain records demonstrating that their actual emissions  are less
than these cutoffs.
2.1.2 Compliance  Dates
       Table 2-1 presents the compliance dates for existing facilities subject to the NESHAP.
An existing facility's compliance date is determined by its actual emissions for the year 1996.

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New sources must comply with the provisions of the NESHAP upon promulgation of the
NESHAP or upon startup, or reconstruction, whichever is later. For this rule, facilities are
considered new sources if construction commenced on or after December 6, 1994.
            TABLE 2-1. COMPLIANCE DATES FOR THE NESHAP
                          FOR EXISTING SOURCES
1996 Emissions
>50 tons of HAP/yr
<50 tons of HAP/yr
Compliance date
November 21, 1997
December?, 1998
2.1.3  NESHAP Emission Limitations
       A summary of the NESHAP emission limitations is presented in Table 2-2. These
include limitations on the VHAP content of both finishing materials and contact adhesives and a
limit on the VOC content of strippable spray booth coating.  Note that the NESHAP includes
emission  limitations for both existing and new sources. Wood furniture manufacturing facilities
that begin construction or reconstruction after the proposal date, that is, after December 6, 1994,
are considered new sources. Reconstruction is the replacement of components of a source to the
extent that the fixed capital cost of the new components exceeds 50 percent of the fixed capital
cost that would be required to construct a comparable new source.
       There are several options a facility may use to comply with the emission limits for
finishing  operations. Chapter 4 provides additional detail on each of the compliance methods,
including examples of the calculations to be used to demonstrate compliance.
       The standards for finishing operations limit the pounds of VHAP per pound of solids for
selected coatings or as an average across all coatings used at the facility. Because many facilities
formulate their washcoats, basecoats, and enamels onsite by thinning other types of finishing
materials (for example, many facilities thin their sealers to use as washcoats) the regulation
contains guidance that is aimed at reducing the recordkeeping burden on these facilities.  If the
facility does formulate one of these coatings onsite, the coating will be deemed compliant if the
finishing  material that is thinned is compliant and thinners with a HAP content of no more than
3.0 percent are used to thin the coating. For example, if a facility thins its sealer to make
washcoat, the facility does not have to maintain records of the VHAP content of the washcoat as

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                TABLE 2-2.  SUMMARY OF NESHAP EMISSION LIMITS
Emission point
Finishine ooerations
(a) Achieve a weighted average VHAP content across all coatings (Ib
VHAP/lb solids, as applied);
(b) Use compliant finishing materials (Ib VHAP/lb solids, as applied)
-stains
-washcoats
-sealers
-topcoats
-basecoats
-enamels
-thinners (maximum %HAP allowable); or
(c) Use a control device or
(d) Use a combination of (a), (b), and (c)
Cleaning operations
Strippable spray booth coating (Ib VOC/lb solids, as applied)
Gluing operations
(a) Use compliant contact adhesives (Ib VHAP/lb solids, as applied)
based on the following criteria:
I. For aerosol adhesives, and for contact adhesives applied to
nonporous substrates
ii. For foam adhesive used in products subject to flammability
testing;
iii. For all other contact adhesives (including foam adhesives
used in products not subject to flammability testing but
excluding aerosol adhesives and excluding contact adhesives
used on nonporous substrates); or
ib) Use a control device
Existing source3
1.0

1.0
1.0b
1.0
1.0
1.0b
1.0b
10.0
1.0C
1.0
0.8

NAd
1.8
1.0
1.0e
New
source3
O.a

1.0
0.8b
0.8
0.8
0.8b
0.8b
10.0
0.8*
0.8
0.8

NAd
0.2
0.2
0.2e
aThe limits refer to the maximum VHAP/VOC content, as applied.
''Washcoats, basecoats, and enamels must comply with the limits presented in this table if they are purchased
 premade, that is, if they are not formulated onsite by thinning other finishing materials. If they are formulated
 onsite, they must be formulated using compliant finishing matenals (i.e., those that meet the limits specified in
 this table) and thinners containing no more than 3.0 percent VHAP by weight.
cThe control device must operate at an efficiency that is equivalent to no greater than 1.0 pound of VHAP (0.8
 for new sources) being emitted per pound of solids used.
dThere is no limit on the VHAP content of these adhesives.
^e control device must operate at an efficiency that is equivalent to no greater than 1.0 pound of VHAP (0.2
 for new sources) being emitted per pound of solids used.
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long as the sealer has a VHAP content of no more than 1.0 Ib VHAP/lb solids (0.8 for new
sources) and the thinner has a HAP content no greater than 3.0 percent by weight.  If the facility
purchases washcoat, however, it must demonstrate that the washcoat is compliant.
       Contact adhesives are the only type of adhesive regulated by the standard. In the
regulation, foam adhesives are considered a subset of contact adhesives, and they have a different
emission limitation depending upon whether the product in which they are used is subject to
flammability testing.  Foam adhesives used in products subject to flammability testing, which is
often required for office and institutional furniture, have a less stringent emission limit because
testing has shown that products made with waterborne adhesives may not pass the flammability
tests. However, foam adhesives used by new sources must meet the same emission limit as all
other contact adhesives, regardless of any flammability testing that may be required. Note that
aerosol adhesives and contact adhesives used on nonporous substrates (rubber, metal, rigid
plastic, and flexible vinyl) are not subject to emission  limits under this rule.
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                                    CHAPTER 3
                          WORK PRACTICE STANDARDS

       Work practice standards are an integral part the NESHAP. In general, the work practice
standards are aimed at reducing coating, cleaning solvent, and washoff solvent usage.  Many
facilities will have already implemented a number of these work practices because, in addition to
reducing emissions, they also reduce worker exposure to solvents and, in many cases, operating
costs.
       A summary of the work practice standards that are required by the NESHAP is presented
in Table 3-1. The work practice standards are discussed in detail in the following sections.
Chapter 5 includes a discussion of recordkeeping and reporting requirements associated with the
work practice standards.
3.1  APPLICATION EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS
       The NESHAP limits the use of conventional air spray guns.  Facilities are allowed to use
these guns only under any of the following conditions:
       1. If they are using the guns to apply coatings that have a VOC content no greater than
1.0 lb VOC/lb solids, as applied;
       2. If they are using the gun for touchup and repair that occurs either after the completion
of the finishing operation or after the  application of stain and before the application of other types
of finishing materials. In addition, any materials used for touchup and repair after the stain
application  must be applied from a container with a volume of no more than 2.0  gallons.
       3. If the guns are automatic;
       4. If the guns are used in a spray booth or other application station where emissions are
directed to a control device;
       5. If the guns are only used for applying small quantities of finishing material. The total
amount of finishing material applied with the conventional air spray gun must be no more than
5.0 percent  of the total amount of finishing material used in that semiannual period; or
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           TABLE 3-1.  WORK PRACTICE STANDARDS FOR THE WOOD
                                  FURNITURE NESHAP3
Emission source
Work practice
Finishing operations
Equipment leaks
Storage containers, including
mixing equipment
Application equipment
Develop a written inspection and maintenance plan to address
and prevent leaks. Inspections must be made once per month.
Keep containers used for storing or mixing HAP, or materials
containing HAP, covered when not in use.
Discontinue use of conventional air spray guns.b
Cleaning and washoff operations
Gun/line cleaning
Spray booth cleaning
Washoff/general cleaning
Collect solvent into a closed container.
- Cover all containers associated with cleaning when not in
use.
Use solvents for cleaning spray booths only under certain
conditions.0
Keep washoff tank covered when not in use.
- Minimize dripping by tilting and/or rotating the part to
drain as much solvent as possible. Allow sufficient dry
time for the part.
- Maintain a log of the number of parts washed off and the
reason for the washoff.
- Maintain a log of the quantity and type of solvent used for
washoff and cleaning, as well as the quantity of solvent
reused for other operations at the facility and the quantity
of solvent sent offsite for disposal.
Miscellaneous
Operator training
Implementation plan
All operators shall be given annual training on proper
application methods, cleaning procedures, and equipment use.
Develop a plan to implement these work practice standards
and maintain onsite.
aThe work practice standards apply to both existing and new major sources.
bConventional air spray guns will be allowed only in any of the following instances:
  - when they are used to apply finishing materials that emit less than 1.0 Ib VOC/lb solids;
  - touchup and repair under limited conditions;
  - when spray is automated;
  - when add-on controls are employed;
  - if the cumulative application is no more than 5.0 percent of the total gallons of finishing material applied; or
  - if the permitting agency determines that it is economically or technologically infeasible to use other
  application technologies.
cSolvents can be used for cleaning conveyors and their enclosures and metal filters. Limited quantities, no more
  than 1.0 gallon, can also be used for spot cleaning when the spray booth coating is being replaced.
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        6. If the gun is used to apply stain and the facility can demonstrate that it is technically or
  economically infeasible to use another spray application technology.
        To qualify for exemption (6), the facility must submit a videotape, a technical report, or
.  some other type of documentation to the permitting agency that supports the facility's claim of
  technical or economic infeasibility.  There are two factors that the facility can use either singly or
  in combination to support their claim.  These are:
*.         1. The production speed is too high or the part shape is too complex for one operator to
5  finish the part and the spray booth is not large enough for an additional operator; or
        2. The part has an excessively large vertical spray area, making it difficult to avoid
  sagging or runs  in the stain.
        A final determination of whether the facility may use the conventional air spray gun under
  exemption (6) will be made by the permitting authority.
  3.2 OPERATOR TRAINING PROGRAM
        Each facility subject to the NESHAP must conduct  annual training of all employees who
  are involved in finishing, gluing, cleaning, or washoff operations. All personnel hired before the
  effective date of the standard, which will vary according to the size of the facility, must be
  trained within 6 months of the effective date.  Personnel who are hired after the effective date of
  the standard must be trained upon hiring. All personnel must be retrained annually.
         Operator training should include instruction in application techniques, cleaning and
  washoff procedures, equipment setup and adjustment, and management of waste solvent from
  cleaning and washoff operations. The facility must develop a training program that includes a
  list of current personnel that must be trained, an outline of the subjects covered in the initial and
  refresher training, and a description of how the facility will document that personnel have
  successfully completed the training program.
  3.3 INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE PLAN
         Each facility must also develop an inspection and maintenance plan that addresses
  equipment leaks.  Facilities are required to visually check all equipment used to transfer or apply
  finishing materials or organic solvents at least once a month to ensure there are no equipment
  leaks. The  inspection and maintenance plan should include a schedule for inspections  and a way
  to document the date of each inspection as well as any repairs that were  made.  After identifying

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the leak, the facility must attempt to repair the leak within 5 days and make final repairs within
15 days, unless the leaking equipment has to be replaced, in which case the facility is allowed
3 months to complete repairs.
3.4 CLEANING AND WASHOFF SOLVENT ACCOUNTING PROGRAM
       Facilities are required to develop a program for tracking the amount and type of organic
solvent used for cleaning and washoff each month. They must also track the amount of spent
solvent that is generated from each cleaning operation each month, the amount of spent solvent
that is reused in-house for operations other than cleaning or washoff, and the amount that is sent
offsite  for disposal. Finally, the program should provide a mechanism for tracking the number of
pieces that are washed off and the reason for the washoff.
3.5 ADDITIONAL WORK PRACTICE STANDARDS
3.5.1 Spray Booth Cleaning
       The NESHAP limits the types of cleaners that can be used for spray booth cleaning.
Unless operators are cleaning conveyors, continuous coalers and their enclosures, or metal filters,
they may not use cleaning compounds containing more than 8.0 percent of VOC by weight. The
8.0 percent limit should still allow facilities to use many commercial cleaners, but it precludes
the use of organic solvent. Facilities may, however, use organic solvents in small quantities, no
more than 1.0 gallon per booth, if they are replacing the strippable spray booth coating or other
protective material used to cover the booth.
3.5.2 Storage Containers
        All containers that are used to store finishing, cleaning, gluing, or washoff materials
must be closed unless an operator is emptying or filling the container.  This includes drums that
are used to  hold wiping rags.
3.5.3 Gun and Line Cleaning
       Organic solvent used to clean spray guns and  lines must be collected in a container that is
kept closed except when an operator is emptying or filling the container.
3.5.4 Washoff Operations
       Tanks used for washoff must be kept closed when they are not being used. Operators
should also try to minimize dripping from the part that has been  washed off by tilting or rotating
the part so that the solvent can drain back into the tank.

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3.6 WORK PRACTICE IMPLEMENTATION PLAN
       Each facility must develop a work practice implementation plan that documents how they
will ensure that all of the work practice standards are being followed.  The operator training
program, the inspection and maintenance plan, and the solvent accounting program should be
included in the work practice implementation plan along with examples of record forms or
checklists developed by the facility as a part of these plans.
3.7 FORMULATION ASSESSMENT PLAN FOR FINISHING OPERATIONS
       Table 3-2 presents a partial list of VHAP of potential concern. These VHAP of potential
concern were identified by several coating suppliers as being present in some coating formula-
tions used by the wood furniture industry. The first step for the facility in developing their
formulation assessment plan is to identify any chemicals from this list that are used in their
finishing materials or thinners.  The facility must then determine how much of the chemical they
used in 1994, 1995, and 1996. The highest value from those 3 years is considered the baseline
level of usage for that chemical. Note that VHAP of potential concern used in adhesives should
not be included in the baseline level.  The formulation assessment plan only applies to VHAP of
potential concern used in finishing materials.
       TABLE 3-2. VHAP OF POTENTIAL CONCERN IDENTIFIED BY INDUSTRY
Chemical
Dimethyl formamide
Formaldehyde
Methylene chloride
2-Nitropropane
Isophorone
Styrene monomer
Phenol
Diethanolamine
2-Methoxyethanol
2-Ethoxyethyl acetate
CAS No.
68122
50000
75092
79469
78591
100425
108952
11422
109864
111159
EPA de minimis, tons/yr
1.0
0.2
4.0
1.0
0.7
1.0
0.1
5.0
10.0
5.0
       Sources using a control device to reduce emissions should adjust their usage based on the
overall control efficiency of the control system. Because some portion of the formaldehyde and
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styrene in a coating becomes part of the cured resin, the regulation provides guidance on how to
calculate usage of these chemicals.  For formaldehyde, usage is based on the amount of free
formaldehyde present in the finishing material when it is applied. For styrene monomer, usage is
calculated by multiplying the amount of styrene monomer in the finishing material when it is
applied by a factor of 0.16.
       Facilities must continue to track their usage of each VHAP of potential concern.
However, they only have to track usage of those VHAP that are present in a finishing material in
a large enough quantity that it must be reported on the material safety data sheet (MSDS).  If,
after November 1998, a facility's usage of the VHAP exceeds the baseline usage level for that
VHAP, the facility must notify the permitting authority in writing that they have exceeded their
baseline level, the amount by which they have exceeded the baseline, and the reasons why. If the
facility has exceeded the baseline for any of the reasons cited below, and they are  in compliance
with any State regulations or requirements for that VHAP, the facility does not have to take any
further action. They  may also exceed the baseline level for any of the following reasons:
       1. The exceedance is no more than 15.0 percent above the baseline level;
       2. The facility's usage of the VHAP is less than the de minimis value for that VHAP as
presented in Table 3-2;
       3. The facility is in compliance with its State's air toxics regulations or guidelines for that
VHAP; or
       4. The VHAP is being used in a finishing material with a VOC content of no more than
1.0 Ib VOC/lb solids, as applied.
       If the increase above the baseline level is due to some reason other than those listed
above, the facility must then refer to their permitting authority to discuss the reason for the
increase and whether or not there are practical and reasonable technology-based solutions for
reducing the usage. Cost, quality, and marketability of the product, as well as successful usage of
the technology by other wood furniture manufacturers, may all be considered in determining
whether a solution exists. The facility and the permitting authority may also agree upon other
factors that should be used for such an evaluation. If there are no practical and reasonable
solutions, the facility would not have to take any further action.  If there are solutions, the facility
must develop a plan to reduce usage of the VHAP to the extent feasible. The plan should address

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the approach the facility will use to reduce usage, a timetable for reducing usage, and a schedule
for reporting progress to the permitting authority.
       There may be cases in which a facility begins using a VHAP of potential concern for
which a baseline level has not been previously established. In those cases, the baseline level is
equal to the de minimis level, based on 70 year exposure levels and data provided in the
proposed rulemaking pursuant to section 112(g) of the Clean Air Act, for that VHAP. A
complete listing of all VHAP of potential concern is presented in Appendix A, Table A-1. If
usage of the VHAP is greater than the de minimis level, then the facility must follow the same
procedures as those in the previous paragraphs for exceeding an established baseline level.  Any
of the reasons listed in (1) through (4) will excuse the facility from further action.
3.8 COMPOSITION OF CLEANING AND WASHOFF SOLVENTS
       The NESHAP also prohibits the use of solvents containing any of the chemicals listed in
Appendix F for cleaning and washoff operations. However, the restriction is only limited to
chemicals that are present in the solvent at a level high enough that they have to be reported on
the MSDS.
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                                   CHAPTER 4
                         NESHAP COMPLIANCE OPTIONS

       The NESHAP includes four options that a facility can use to comply with the regulations.
Table 4-1 summarizes these options.  Each of these options has advantages and disadvantages.
In general, the more flexibility the option provides the facility, the greater the recordkeeping
requirements associated with the option.
               TABLE 4-1.  COMPLIANCE  METHODS FOR THE NESHAP
Compliance method
Compliant coatings
Averaging
Add-on control device
Combination
NESHAP
Yes
Yes, finishing only
Yes
Yes
       In this chapter, we will discuss each of these options in more detail for the NESHAP and
present example calculations that a facility can use to demonstrate they are complying with each
option. A detailed discussion of the recordkeeping and reporting requirements associated with
each option is presented in Chapter 5.
4.1 COMPLIANCE OPTIONS FOR FINISHING OPERATIONS
4.1.1  Compliant Coatings
       Table 2-2 presents the NESHAP emission limits for coatings for both existing and new
sources. As shown in the table, the standard limits the VHAP content of all stains, washcoats,
sealers, topcoats, basecoats, enamels, and thinners used by a facility.  There is no limit on the
VHAP content of coatings typically used in smaller amounts, such as fillers and glazes.  With the
exception of the emission limit for stains, the emission limits for coatings used by new sources
are more stringent than those used by existing sources.
       To demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP emission limits for coatings, facilities
have to maintain copies of certified product data sheets for each coating, and thinners added to
those coatings, subject to an emission limit. If a facility thins the coatings before application,  the
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NESHAP does not require the facility to maintain data sheets showing the amount of thinner
added to each batch and the VHAP content of that batch after thinning. However, the emission
limits are on an as applied basis so facilities do need to make sure that they are not thinning the
coating to the point that the emission limit is exceeded. If an inspector comes in and takes a
sample of the coating and it exceeds the limit, the facility will be in violation of the standard
even though the CPDS shows the VHAP content of the coating is no greater than the emission
limit established for that coating and the thinner the facility used had a HAP content less than
10.0 percent by weight. Therefore, it is in the best interest of the facility to maintain data sheets
for calculating the as-applied VHAP content even though it is not required by the NESHAP.
       Setting up a system to determine the VHAP content of coatings as they are applied can be
straightforward.  Example 1 demonstrates how to calculate the VHAP content of a coating after
thinning.
       In summary, facilities using a compliant coatings approach to comply with the NESHAP
limits for finishing operations are required to maintain certified product data sheets for each
coating subject to an emission limit and any thinners that are added to those coatings.
       4.1.1.1 Compliant coatings and continuous coaters. The NESHAP contains special
compliance provisions for facilities that are using a compliant coatings approach to comply with
the coating emission limits and are applying those coatings with a continuous coater. Facilities
may choose between the following two options.
        1. Option 1 for demonstrating compliance is basically the same as it is for coatings that
are not applied with continuous coaters.  Facilities must maintain copies of the CPDS for each
coating subject to an emission limit, and, if the coating is subsequently thinned, they must
maintain records that demonstrate the VHAP content of the as applied coating does not exceed
the emission limit for that coating. If an inspector takes a sample of the coating in the reservoir
and performs a Method 311 (40 CFR Part 60, Appendix A) analysis of the sample, the coating
must have a VHAP content no greater than the emission limit for the coating.
        2. Under option 2, the facility must monitor the viscosity of the coating in the reservoir.
The viscosity of the initial coating in the reservoir must be measured.  The facility may then
either  monitor the viscosity of the coating in  the reservoir continuously with a viscosity meter, or
they may measure the viscosity each time solvent is added. If, at any time, the viscosity of the

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Example 1 • Calculating the As-Applied VHAP Content of a Coating
VHAP content of topcoat     - 0.8 Ib VHAP/lb solids, as supplied
Emission limit               - 1.0 Ib VHAP/lb solids, as applied
Coating density              - 8.0 Ib/gal
Coating solids content        - 0.4 (40 percent)
Coating usage               -1,000 gal
Solids used = Density x Gals used x percent solids
           = 8.0x1,000x0.4
           = 3,200 Ib solids
VHAP from as-supplied coating
           = 0.8 Ib VHAP/lb solids x 3,200 Ib solids
           = 2,560 Ib VHAP

Thinner VHAP content       - 0.6 Ib/gal
Thinner usage               - 100 gal
VHAP from thinner
       0.6 x 100 = 60 Ib VHAP
VHAP from thinner and as supplied coating 2,560 + 60 = 2,620 Ib
       Solids from as-supplied coating (also equal to solids of as-applied coating because
thinner contains no solids) = 3,200 Ib
       VHAP content of as applied coating = 2,620 lbVHAP/3,200 Ib solids = 0.82 Ib
VHAP/lb solids, as applied.
       In this case, the as-applied coating is still compliant, that is, it has a VHAP content
no greater than 1.0 Ib VHAP/lb solids, as applied. However, if this facility were a new
source, it would not be in compliance.
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coating in the reservoir is less than the viscosity of the initial coating, the facility is out of
compliance. The facility must also maintain a record of all solvent and coating additions to the
reservoir. As with option 1, if an inspector takes a sample of the coating in the reservoir, the
VHAP content must not exceed the emission limit for that coating. However, the VHAP content
as calculated from the facility's records may exceed the emission limit.
4.1.2 Averaging
       The NESHAP also provides facilities the option of averaging their coatings to meet the
standard. The NESHAP gives facilities the flexibility of meeting a monthly average. For
existing sources, the average VHAP content for all finishing materials used at the facility during
the month must be no greater than  1 .0 Ib VHAP/lb solids, as applied. For new sources, the limit
is '   Ib VHAP/lb solids, as applied. Note that although the compliant coatings approach only
requires specific coatings to meet the emission limits, all coatings used at the facility during the
month must be included  in the averaging equation for the NESHAP.
       Both existing and new sources must use the following equation to demonstrate
compliance when using an averaging approach:
       E = (MclCcl + Mc2Cc2 + ... + McnCcn + S^, + S2W2 + ...
                                      Equation (3)
 where:
        E =  average VHAP content of finishing materials (Ib VHAP/lb solids);
      Mcn =  the mass of solids in finishing material (c) used monthly (Ib solids/month);
      Ccn =  the VHAP content of finishing material (c) in Ib VHAP/lb solids;
        Sn =  the VHAP content, expressed as a weight fraction, of any thinners added to the
             finishing materials participating in the averaging equation; and
       Wn =  the amount of Sn, in pounds,  added to the finishing materials during the monthly
             averaging period.
 For existing sources, E must be no greater than 1.0 Ib VHAP/lb solids. For new sources, E must
 be no greater than 0.8.
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       To demonstrate compliance using an averaging approach, a facility must:
       1.  Maintain certified product data sheets for each finishing material;
       2.  Maintain records of the amount of each finishing material used each month and
the percent solids of that finishing material in order to determine the pounds of solids of each
finishing material used;
       3.  Maintain certified product data sheets for all thinners added to the finishing materials
used each month; and
       4.  Maintain records of the amount of thinners, in pounds, added to the finishing materials
during the month.
       Example 2 illustrates a facility that has chosen to use an averaging approach to meet the
NESHAP emission limits for finishing operations.
4.1.3 Add-On Controls
       Facilities may also use an add-on control device to meet the NESHAP emission limits for
finishing operations.  It is anticipated that only a few facilities will choose this option, but it is
available. Currently, add-on control devices are being used by only a few facilities, and those are
primarily large kitchen cabinet and business furniture manufacturers  with automated flatline
finishing systems. Controlling traditional wood furniture manufacturing exhaust streams, which
are typically high volume, low concentration streams, with add-on control devices is technically
feasible but generally not cost effective.
       The NESHAP also recognizes that the overall control efficiency of a control system is a
product of the destruction/removal efficiency of the control device and the capture efficiency.
The  capture efficiency is the ratio of the quantity of pollutants entering the control device to the
quantity of pollutants emitted from the emission source. The NESHAP identifies the methods to
be used to determine the capture efficiency initially.  Because these methods are somewhat
complicated and apply to only a few facilities, they will not be discussed in detail here.
       Facilities using add-on control devices must conduct a performance test to demonstrate
the overall control efficiency of the system. During the performance test, they need to establish
operating parameter(s) they can monitor that will demonstrate that the control device is
continually achieving the required control efficiency. If they cannot  establish an operating
parameter, they may  have to continually monitor HAP emissions at the inlet and outlet of the

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Example 2 • Calculations to Demonstrate Compliance for a Facility Using an
Averaging Approach to Meet the NESHAP Emission Limits
       Facility Description - The facility is a medium sized kitchen cabinet plant using
about 60,000 gallons of coating per year, with a basic finishing sequence of stain, sealer,
and topcoat.  The facility is an existing source, so they must achieve an average emission
limit of no more than 1.0 Ib VHAP/lb solids, as applied. In order to meet the NESHAP
emission limits, they have decided to use sealers and topcoats with slightly higher solids
contents, that is, about 35 percent. They have also worked with their coating supplier to
try and lower the HAP content of these coatings by using non-HAP solvents. The facility
has had little success reformulating their stains, however, so they must use an averaging
approach to meet the standard.  The facility also uses small amounts of thinner, typically
lacquer thinner, for their sealers and topcoats. Table 4-2 presents the coating usage and
parameters for the facility.
    TABLE 4-2.  COATING PARAMETERS FOR FACILITY USING AVERAGING
     APPROACH TO MEET THE NESHAP EMISSION LIMITS FOR FINISHING
Parameters
Usage (gal/month)
Density (Ib/gal)
% Solids (by weight)
Usage (Ib solids/month)
VHAP content (Ib/gal)
VHAP content (Ib VHAP/lb
solids)
Stain
925
6.7
1.5
93
0.1
45
Sealer
2,000
7.8
35
5,460
2.0
0.7
Topcoat
2.075
7.9
35
5,737
1.5
0.5
Thinner
60
6.8
0
0
3.4
N/A
       Using Table 4-2:
E = ((93)(45) + (5,460)(0.7) + (5,737)(0.5) + (60)(6.8)(0.5))/(93 + 5,460 + 5,737) =
0.98 Ib VHAP/lb solids
       Because E is less than 1.0 the facility is in compliance.
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control device. Table 4-3 presents operating parameters to be monitored for facilities using
thermal oxidizers, catalytic oxidizers, and carbon adsorbers.  To demonstrate continuous
compliance with the standard using a control device, the facility must continuously monitor the
operating parameter(s) to demonstrate that the operating parameter(s) are in the range established
during the initial performance test.

      TABLE 4-3. OPERATING PARAMETERS FOR ADD-ON CONTROL DEVICES
Control device
Thermal oxidizer
Catalytic oxidizer with fixed
catalyst bed
Catalytic oxidizer with fluidized
catalyst bed
Carbon adsorber
Operating parameter(s)
Minimum combustion temperature
Minimum gas temperature upstream and
downstream of the catalyst bed
1 . Minimum gas temperature upstream of the catalyst
bed; and
2. Pressure drop across the catalyst bed.
1 . Total regeneration mass stream for each
regeneration cycle; and
2. Carbon bed temperature after each regeneration.
       4.1.4 Combination of Compliance Options
       The NESHAP allows facilities to use any combination of the three options to meet the
emission limits for finishing operations.  If using a combination of options, the facility must meet
the compliance demonstration requirements associated with each option.
4.2 COMPLIANCE OPTIONS FOR GLUING OPERATIONS
       As discussed in Chapter 2, the NESHAP also establishes emission limits for contact
adhesives.  Facilities using contact adhesives have two options for demonstrating
compliance-using compliant contact adhesives, that is, those that meet the emission limits
presented in Table 2-2, or using an add-on control device.
4.2.1  Compliant Contact Adhesives
       Table 2-4 presents the emission limits for contact adhesives for both existing and new
sources.  There are two categories of contact adhesives for the purposes of this rule: foam
                                          t
adhesives and all other contact adhesives (excluding aerosol adhesives and excluding contact
adhesives used on nonporous substrates such as metal, rubber, rigid plastic, or flexible vinyl).
For existing sources, the limit is less stringent for foam adhesives due to problems encountered in
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formulating foam adhesives that pass flammability tests.  The compliance demonstration

requirements for facilities using compliant contact adhesives are the same as those for facilities
using compliant coatings to meet the finishing limits.

       If a facility does not thin their contact adhesives onsite, the only requirement for

demonstrating compliance is to maintain a certified product data sheet for each contact adhesive.
However, if the facility thins their adhesives onsite, they must also maintain data sheets that

demonstrate the as-applied VHAP content of the contact adhesive does not exceed the allowable
level. Because the limit for contact adhesives varies according to the use of the adhesive, the

facility should also maintain a record of how the contact adhesive was used. Table 4-4

summarizes the compliance demonstration requirements for facilities using contact adhesives.

           TABLE 4-4.  COMPLIANCE DEMONSTRATION FOR COMPLIANT
                                CONTACT ADHESIVES
 Adhesive usage scenario
Compliance demonstration requirements
 Contact adhesives are used as supplied,
 that is, no additives or thinners are added
 to the contact adhesive.
1.  Maintain copies of certified product data
   sheets; and
2.  Maintain record of operation for which contact
   adhesive was used.
 Contact adhesives are thinned before
 application
1.  Maintain copies of certified product data
   sheets;
2.  Maintain data sheets showing contact adhesive
   and thinner usage and calculation of as-applied
   VHAP content; and
3.  Maintain record of operation for which
   adhesive was used.
4.2.2  Add-On Control Devices
       The compliance demonstration requirements for facilities using an add-on control device

to reduce emissions from the use of contact adhesives are the same as those discussed in 4.1.3.
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                                    CHAPTER 5
              RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

       This section presents the recordkeeping and reporting requirements for facilities subject
to the NESHAP.  In general, these requirements will vary according to the method the facility
chooses to use to demonstrate compliance.
5.1  RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS
       Because many facilities are expected to use a compliant coatings and/or contact adhesives
approach to meet the requirements of the NESHAP, maintaining complete records is particularly
important because they allow these facilities to demonstrate compliance.  Therefore, many of the
recordkeeping requirements discussed in this chapter were also discussed in Chapter 4.
However, in addition to the recordkeeping requirements associated with the emission limits and
compliance options presented in Chapters 2 and 4, this chapter will also discuss recordkeeping
requirements associated with the work practice standards.
5.1.1 NESHAP Recordkeeping Requirements
       The recordkeeping requirements for the NESHAP are dependent upon the option the
facility is using to demonstrate compliance. Table 5-1 summarizes the recordkeeping
requirements by compliance option for both finishing and gluing operations.
5.1.2 Recordkeeping Requirements for the NESHAP Work Practice Standards
       EPA has included recordkeeping requirements to ensure facilities are implementing these
standards, because the work practice standards are considered a critical element of the NESHAP.
A summary of the recordkeeping requirements associated with the work practice standards is
included in Table 5-2.
       Facilities are also required to maintain a copy  of the work practice implementation plan
onsite.  The work practice implementation plan should include a copy of the operator training
program, the inspection and maintenance plan, the cleaning and washoff solvent accounting
system, and the formulation assessment plan for finishing operations.
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5.2 NESHAP REPORTING REQUIREMENTS
       Each wood furniture manufacturing facility should have already submitted an initial
notification report.  Each facility must also submit an initial compliance status report and
semiannual continuous compliance status reports. Table 5-3 summarizes the information that
should be included in the initial compliance status report. The initial compliance status report
must be submitted no later than 60 days after the compliance date.
       The first semiannual compliance status report must be submitted no later than 30 calendar
days after the end of the first 6-month period following the facility's compliance date.
Subsequent reports must be submitted no later than 30 calendar days after the end of each
6-month period.  Table 5-4 summarizes the information to be included in the semiannual
compliance status reports for the NESHAP.
       The semiannual continuous compliance status report must be signed by a responsible
official of the company that owns or operates the facility.
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TABLE 5-1. RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE NESHAP
Compliance option
Recordkeeping requirements
Finishing operations
Compliant coatings
Compliant coatings with continuous
coalers
Averaging
Add-on control device
Compliant coatings and control device
or averaging and control device
Certified product data sheets for each coating and thinner subject to
the emission limits presented in Chapter 2; and
The VHAP content, in Ib VHAP/lb solids, as applied, for each coating
subject to the emission limits presented in Chapter 2.
Option 1
• Same as requirements for compliant coatings. Records must
demonstrate that the VHAP content does not exceed the applicable
emission limit.
Option 2
1 . Certified product data sheet for each coating and thinner;
2. Record of all solvent and coating additions to the reservoir; and
3. All viscosity measurements.
1 . Certified product data sheets for each coating participating in
averaging;
2. Records of the amount of coating and thinner used each month;
3. Copies of the averaging calculation.
1 . Certified product data sheets for each coating;
2. Copies of calculations demonstrating equivalency of using a
control system;
3. Records of the daily average value of each continuously monitored
parameter; and
4. For facilities using a fluidized bed catalytic incinerator, records of
the pressure drop across the catalyst bed.
Maintain all records required by each individual option.
Gluing Operations
Compliant contact adhesives
Add-on control device
1 . Certified product data sheet for each contact adhesive subject to
the emission limits presented in Chapter 2;
2. If adhesives are thinned, data sheets showing contact adhesive and
thinner usage and calculation of the as applied VHAP content; and
3. Records documenting the process in which the contact adhesive
was used.
1 . Certified product data sheet for each contact adhesive subject to
the emission limits presented in Chapter 2;
2. Copies of calculations demonstrating the equivalency of using a
control system;
3. Records of the daily average value of each continuously monitored
parameter; and
4. For facilities using a fluidized bed catalytic incinerator, records of
the pressure drop across the catalyst bed.
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TABLE 5-2 RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE NESHAP WORK
                  PRACTICE STANDARDS
Work practice standard
Operator training program
Inspection and maintenance plan
Cleaning and washoff solvent accounting
system
Spray booth cleaning
Application equipment requirements
Formulation assessment plan for finishing
operations
Limitation on chemical composition of
cleaning/washoff solvents
Recordkeeping requirements
1 . Copy of program, including:
- a list of personnel required to be trained;
- an outline of the subjects to be covered;
- lesson plans for training courses;
2. Records documenting successful completion of the
training program for each individual; and
3. Date each individual was trained.
1 . Copies of checklists documenting visual monthly
inspection of equipment; and
2. Records demonstrating timeframe for making repairs.
1 . Record of the quantity and type of organic solvent
used each month for washoff and cleaning;
2. Record of the number of pieces washed off and the
reason why; and
3. Record of the quantity of spent solvent generated
each month by operation and whether it is recycled
onsite or disposed offsite.
VOC content of material used for cleaning spray booths.
Documentation that conventional air spray guns are only
being used as allowed, including:
• if used for applying low VOC coatings, records
showing that the VOC content is no greater than
l.OlbVOC/lb solids;
• if used for applying small quantities of finishing
materials, other than for touchup and repair, records
of total finishing materials usage and quantity applied
with air spray gun.
1 . Maintain MSDS for coatings containing VHAP of
potential concern; and
2. Maintain usage records for coatings containing
VHAP of potential concern.
Maintain MSDS for all solvents used for cleaning and/or
washoff.
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      TABLE 5-3. INFORMATION TO BE INCLUDED EN ENITIAL COMPLIANCE
                            REPORT FOR THE NESHAP
Compliance method
Information to be included in report
Compliant coatings/contact
adhesives
Statement that the facility is using compliant coatings,
thinners, and/or contact adhesives.
Compliant coatings with
continuous coaters
1.  Statement that the facility is using compliant coatings,
   as determined by the VHAP content of the coating in
   the reservoir and the VHAP content as calculated
   from records, and compliant thinners; or
2.  Statement that the facility is using compliant coatings,
   as determined by the VHAP content of the coating in
   the reservoir, and compliant thinners and that they are
   monitoring the viscosity of the coating in the
   reservoir; and
3.  Data demonstrating relationship between the viscosity
   of the coating in the reservoir and the VHAP content
   of the coating.
Averaging (coatings only)
Results of averaging calculation for the first month,
starting the first day of the month following the
compliance date.
Add-on control device
1.  Monitoring plan that identifies each operating
   parameter to be monitored for the capture device; and
2.  Results from initial performance test.
Compliance with work practice
standards
Statement that the facility has developed a work practice
implementation plan and has established procedures for
implementing the provisions of the plan.
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        TABLE 5-4.  INFORMATION TO BE INCLUDED IN THE SEMIANNUAL
                COMPLIANCE STATUS REPORT FOR THE NESHAP
Compliance with emission limits
for coatings/contact adhesives
Information to be included in report
Compliant coatings and/or contact
adhesives
Statement that the facility has used compliant coatings,
thinners, and/or contact adhesives each day during the
reporting period.  If noncompliant coatings, thinners, or
contact adhesives have been used during the reporting
period, the facility should identify when the
coatings/thinners/adhesives were used and the reasons
why.	
Compliant coatings with
continuous coaters
1. Statement that the facility has used compliant coatings,
   as determined by the VHAP content of the coating in
   the reservoir and the VHAP content of the coating as
   calculated from records, and compliant thinners each
   day during the reporting period; or
2. Statement that the facility has used compliant coatings,
   as determined by the VHAP content of the coating in
   the reservoir, and compliant thinners each day in the
   reporting period and that the viscosity of the coating in
   the reservoir has not been less than the viscosity of the
   initial coating.	
Averaging (coatings only)
Results of the averaging equation for each month within
that semiannual period.	
Add-on control device
Statement that the facility has not operated the capture or
control device at a daily average value greater than or less
than (as appropriate) each operating parameter value.
 Compliance with work practice
 standards
Statement that the work practice implementation plan is
being followed, or, if any provisions of the plan have not
been followed during the reporting period, a description
of the violation and the time period during which it
occurred.
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                                      CHAPTER 6

                        EXAMPLE INSPECTION CHECKLISTS

       This chapter contains example checklists that the state or local agency inspectors may use in
determining a facility's compliance status. The checklists include a summary form for recording
background information on the facility and its compliance status, a checklist for the work practice
standards, and a checklist for recording the facility's recordkeeping practices.

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                              NESHAP INSPECTION CHECKLIST
Applicable Rule:   40 CFR Part 63, Subpart JJ—National Emission Standards for Wood
                  Furniture Manufacturing Operations
Plant Name 	
Plant Address
City	    State	    Zip Code.
Plant Contact/Title	
Plant Phone number
Owner/Operator/Title	
Street Address (if different than plant's)
City	    Sate	   Zip Code
Inspection Date:    /   /                Time:.
Indicate whether a facility is a new or existing source:
    Q  New source
    G   Existing source
Indicate the facility's compliance date: __/__/	
Process Description:	
INCOMPLIANCE: Y  N
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NOTICE TO CORRECT:
Source signature/Title:	  Date:
Investigator/Title:	  Date:

Indicate the facility's compliance approach:
       Q  Compliant Coatings/ Adhesives 	
           Compliant Coatings with continuous coalers
           Averaging 	
           Control Device
       Q  Combination of methods
Facility is in compliance with:
       Q  Emission limitations (Emission Limitation Checklist and appropriate records are enclosed)
       G  Work Practice Standards (Work Practice Standards and appropriate records are enclosed)
       Q  Recordkeeping (Recordkeeping Requirements Checklist and appropriate records are enclosed)
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               WORK PRACTICE STANDARDS CHECKLIST

Application Equipment Requirement
    Q   The facility does not use conventional air spray guns.
    Q   The facility operates conventional air spray guns, but are only used:
        1.  If they are using the guns to apply coatings that have a VOC content no greater than 1.0 Ib
           VOC/lb solids, as applied;
        2.  If they are using the gun for touchup and repair that occurs either after the completion of the
           finishing operation or after the application of stain and before the application of other types of
           finishing materials. In addition, any materials used for touchup and repair after the stain
           application must be applied from a container with a volume of no more than 2.0 gallons.
        3.  If the guns are automatic;
        4.  If the guns are used in a spray booth or other application station where emission are directed to
           a control device;
        5.  If the guns are only used for applying small quantities of finishing materials. The total amount
           of finishing material applied with the conventional air spray gun must be no more than 5.0
           percent of the total amount of finishing material used in that semiannual period; or
        6.  If the gun is used to apply stain and the facility has demonstrated that it is technically or
           economically infeasible to use another spray application technology.

Operator Training Program
    Q   The facility has developed an operator training program that contains:
        •   A list of job descriptions and current personnel that must be trained;
        •   An outline of the subjects to be covered for each job description;
        •   An initial and refresher training program; and
        •   A description how the facility will document personnel's successful completion of the
           program.

Inspection and Maintenance Plan
    Q   The facility has developed an inspection and maintenance plan that:
        •   Addresses equipment leaks;
        •   Includes a monthly visual inspection to ensure there are no equipment leaks of all equipment
           used to transfer or apply finishing materials or organic solvents;
        •   Specifies how a facility will document date, result, and repairs of an inspection; and
        •   Assures first attempt at leak repair within 5 days and final repair within 15 days, unless repair
           requires replacement of the equipment in which case the facility is allowed 3 months to
           complete repairs.

Cleaning and Washoff Solvent Accounting Program
    Q   The facility has developed a program that tracks:
        •   the amount of organic solvent used for cleaning and washoff each month;
        •   the quantity of spent solvent generated from each cleaning or washoff operation each month;
        •   the amount of spent solvent that is reused or disposed; and
        •   the number of pieces washed off and the reason for the washoff.

Cleaning and Washoff Solvent Composition
    Q   The facility has discontinued the use of solvents that contains known or probable human
        carcinogens. (See Appendix F for list of solvents)
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Spray Booth Cleaning
   Q  The facility does not use cleaning compounds that contain more than 8.0 percent VOC by weight,
       unless operators are cleaning conveyors, continuous coalers and there enclosures, or metal filters.
   Q  The facility's solvent use is limited to 1.0 gallon per booth for preparation of booth surface for
       coating/protection.

Storage Containers
   Q  Containers that are used for storing finishing, cleaning, adhesive, or washoff materials are closed
       when not in use.

Gun and Line Cleaning
   Q  Gun and line cleaning solvent is collected into a closed container.
   L)  Containers associated with cleaning are covered when not in use.

Washoff Operations
   Q  Washoff tank is covered when not in use.
   Q  The facility minimizes dripping by tilting and/or rotating the part to drain as much solvent as
       possible.
   Q  The facility is allowing sufficient dry time for the part.

Work Practice and Implementation Plan
   G  The facility has developed a plan to implement these work practice standards and maintain onsite.

Formulation Assessment Plan for Finishing Operations
   Q  The facility has:
       •    Establish a baseline level for each VHAP of potential concern
       •    Track annual usage VHAP of potential of concern ; and
       •    Reported all exceedences of baseline level, if any.
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         RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS CHECKLIST

Finishing operations (Check one compliance method and attach all relevant records)

   Q  Compliant coatings
       •  Certified product data sheets for each coating and thinner subject to the emission limits
          presented in Chapter 2; and
       •  The VHAP content, in Ib VHAP/lb solids, as applied, for each coating subject to the emission
          limits presented in Chapter 2.

   Q  Compliant coatings with continuous coalers
       Option 1
       •  Same as requirements for compliant coatings.  Records must demonstrate that the VHAP
          content does not exceed the applicable emission limit.
       Option 2
       1. Certified product data sheets for each coating and thinner;
       2. Record of all solvent and coating additions to the reservoir; and
       3. All viscosity measurements.

   Q  Averaging
       1. Certified product data sheets for each coating participating in averaging;
       2. Records of the amount of coating and thinner used each month;
       3. Copies of the averaging calculation.

   G  Add-on control device
       1. Certified product data sheets for each coating;
       2. Copies of the calculations demonstrating equivalency of using a control system;
       3. Records of the daily average value of each continuously monitored parameter; and
       4. For facilities using a fluidized bed catalytic incinerator, records of the pressure drop across the
          catalyst bed.

   Q  Compliant coatings and control device or averaging and control device
       Maintain all records required by each individual option.
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Gluing Operations
   Q  Compliant contact adhesives
        1.  Certified product data sheets for each contact adhesive subject to the emission limits presented
           in Chapter 2;
       2.  If adhesives are thinned, data sheets showing contact adhesive and thinner usage and
           calculation of the as applied VHAP content; and
       3.  Records documenting the process in which the contact adhesive was used.

   Q  Add-on control devices
        1.  Certified product data sheet for each contact adhesive subject to the  emission limits presented
           in Chapter 2;
       2.  Copies of calculations demonstrating the equivalency of using a control system;
       3.  Records of the daily average value of each continuously monitored parameter; and
       4.  For facilities using a fluidized bed catalytic incinerator, records of the pressure drop across the
           catalyst bed.

Work Practice Recordkeeping Requirements

   Q  Operator training program
        1.  Copy of program, including:
           •   a list of personnel required to be trained;
           •   an outline of the subjects to be covered;
           •   lesson  plans for training courses;
        2.  Records documenting successful completion of the training program for each individual; and
        3.  Records of date each individual was trained.

   Q   Inspection and maintenance plan
        1.  Copies of checklists documenting visual monthly inspection of equipment; and
        2.  Records demonstrating timeframe  for making repairs.

   3   Cleaning and washoff solvent accounting system
        1.  Record of the quantity and type of organic solvent used each month for washoff and cleaning;
        2.  Record of the number of pieces washed off and the reason why; and
        3.  Record of the quantity of spent solvent generated each month by operation and whether it is
           recycled onsite or disposed offsite.

   Q   Spray booth cleaning
        Records of VOC content of material used for cleaning spray booths

   G   Application equipment requirements
           Records documenting that conventional air spray guns are only being used as allowed,
           including:
                if used for applying low VOC coatings, records showing that the VOC content is no
                greater than 1.0 Ib  VOC/lb solids;
                if used for applying small quantities of finishing materials, other than for touchup and
                repair, records of total finishing materials  usage and quantity applied with air spray gun.
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Formulation assessment plan for finishing operations
1.  The facility has maintained MSDS for coatings containing VHAP of potential concern; and
2.  The facility has maintained usage records for coatings containing VHAP of potential concern.

Limitation on chemical composition of cleaning/washoff solvents
The facility has maintained MSDS for all solvents used for cleaning and/or washoff.
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                                       CHAPTER 7
                   QUESTIONS ON THE WOOD FURNITURE NESHAP

         Since the NESHAP was promulgated in December of 1995, both the EPA and State and
   local agencies have received numerous questions concerning the applicability and requirements
 '  of the NESHAP.  Following is a summary of those questions, and their answers, by topic area.

   7.1  APPLICABILITY

         To date, this topic has elicited the most questions.  In general, the wood furniture
   NESHAP covers facilities manufacturing residential furniture, office furniture, kitchen and
   bathroom cabinets, store fixtures, contract furniture (furniture for hotels and motels), and
£  furniture for schools, churches, restaurants, and other public facilities. The NESHAP is also
   applicable to facilities manufacturing component parts for these products. For example, a facility
   may only manufacture drawers that they sell to residential furniture manufacturers.  If the source
„  is a major source, it is subject  to the requirements of the wood furniture NESHAP.

         Following is a list of questions received concerning the applicability of the NESHAP and
   the responses to those questions.  If you have a question on applicability that is not covered here,
   you should contact Bob Marshall of the Office of Enforcement and Compliance  Assurance.

         1. The Federal Register notice for the wood furniture NESHAP includes a list of SIC
   codes that represent wood furniture manufacturers.  My facility is not included under one of
   those SIC codes.  Are we subject to the NESHAP requirements?
         The list of SIC codes in the wood furniture rule is intended only for guidance.  A facility
   that only manufactures component parts that are then used by a wood furniture manufacturing
  facility may not operate under one of the listed SIC codes. However, they are still subject to the
   wood furniture NESHAP if they are a major source.  Applicability determinations are based on
   the products manufactured at the facility and the facility's total HAP emissions, not on the
  -facility's SIC code.
         Conversely, a facility may operate under one of the SIC codes and still not be subject to
   the NESHAP. For example, SIC code 2531 includes facilities manufacturing seating for planes,

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cars, and buses. Even though facilities manufacturing these products are operating under one of
the listed SIC codes, they are not subject to the requirements of the wood furniture NESHAP
because they are not manufacturing wood furniture.

       2.  Are facilities manufacturing hardwood flooring covered under the wood furniture
NESHAP?

       No. These facilities are not subject to the wood furniture NESHAP. However, they may
be covered under the NESHAP for flatwood paneling that is currently being developed by the
EPA.

       3.  Are facilities manufacturing ping pong and pool tables subject to the wood furniture
NESHAP?

       No. These facilities are not subject to the wood furniture NESHAP.

       4.  Are facilities manufacturing dowels and wood toys subject to the wood furniture
NESHAP?

       No. These facilities are not subject to the wood furniture NESHAP.

       5.  Are facilities manufacturing caskets subject to the wood furniture NESHAP?

       No. These facilities are not subject to the wood furniture NESHAP.

       6.  Are area sources subject to the wood furniture NESHAP?

       No. Only major sources, that is, sources that emit or have the potential to emit more than
10 tons of any one HAP or 25 tons of a combination of HAP are subject to the NESHAP.

       1.  Are facilities that refmish furniture subject to the wood furniture NESHAP?

       No. Only furniture manufacturers are subject to the wood furniture NESHAP.  Facilities
that only refinish furniture are not subject to the NESHAP.

       8.  Are facilities that manufacture musical instruments subject to the wood furniture
NESHAP?

       No. However, a few facilities manufacture pianos and residential furniture at the same
facility. If these facilities are major sources, including emissions from the piano manufacturing
process, they are subject to the NESHAP.

       9.  Are facilities that manufacture shutters and doors subject to the wood furniture
NESHAP?
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       No. These facilities are not subject to the wood furniture NESHAP, but they may be
subject to the NESHAP for flatwood paneling manufacturers that the EPA is currently working
on.

       10. Are facilities that manufacture seat cushions subject to the wood furniture NESHAP?
       The EPA recently amended the wood furniture NESHAP to address this issue
(62 FR 31405). Facilities that only manufacture seat cushions are not subject to the wood
furniture NESHAP.  The EPA has developed a foam fabrication NESHAP that will regulate
emissions from these facilities.  However, wood furniture manufacturing facilities that
manufacture their own seat cushions, including laminating fabric to the foam base, are subject to
the NESHAP.  The contact adhesives used to assemble the seat cushions are subject to an
emission limit.
       11. Are facilities that manufacture kitchen cabinets subject to the wood furniture
NESHAP?
       Yes. Kitchen cabinet manufacturers are subject to the wood furniture NESHAP if they
are major sources.
7.2 DETERMINING MAJOR SOURCE STATUS

       The wood furniture NESHAP only applies to major sources. It does not apply to area
sources.  However, because the definition of a major source is based on potential to emit it is
often difficult to determine the major source status of a facilities.  According to the Census of
Manufactures, there are more than 11,000 facilities manufacturing wood furniture. The EPA
estimates there are only 750 major sources based on actual emission estimates. This means that
there are a significant number of area sources and major sources that are only major based on
their potential to emit. Taken literally, the definition of potential to emit could mean that a five
person kitchen cabinet shop could be a major source. Any facility with a spray gun has the
potential to emit 10 tons of any one HAP or 25 tons of a combination of HAP. In order to lessen
the burden on these small sources that would otherwise have to go through at least some minimal
permitting process to limit their potential to emit, the EPA included material usage and emission
limits in the NESHAP.  Facilities below those limits are designated by rule as area sources and
are therefore not subject to the NESHAP.  These cutoff levels are  presented in Chapter 1.
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       Even with the cutoff levels in the NESHAP, the EPA and State and local regulatory

agencies have received numerous questions on how a facility can determine its major source

status. These questions, and the responses, are summarized below.


       1.  If a facility uses materials at a rate above the cutoff level established in the NESHAP
are they automatically a major source and subject to the NESHAP?

       No. A facility may use more material than the cutoff levels established in the NESHAP
and still not be subject to  the NESHAP.  The material usage cutoff level includes all materials,
not just those containing HAP.  Some or all of the materials used by a facility may not contain
HAP so the facility's actual emissions may be significantly less than 10/25 tons/year.  The
material cutoff limit is a conservative limit to reduce the burden on very small facilities.
However, many facilities may use more than this and still not be subject to the NESHAP. In
some cases, the facility may have to obtain a federally enforceable limit on their potential to emit
to avoid major source status.

       2.  If a facility emits more than 5 tons of any one HAP or 12.5 tons of a combination of
HAP, that is, if they emit HAP at a greater rate than the cutoff level included in the NESHAP, are
they automatically a major source and subject to the NESHAP.

       No. Again, the cutoff levels are included in the NESHAP to automatically exempt the
very small facilities. Other facilities may also be exempted from the requirements of the
NESHAP, but they may nave to obtain a federally enforceable limit on their potential to emit to
avoid major source status and be exempted from the NESHAP.

       3.  If a facility is a major source as defined under Part 70, that is, Title V, are they subject
to the wood furniture NESHAP?

       Most wood furniture facilities that are required to obtain a Title V permit will also be
major sources of HAP and will therefore be subject to the NESHAP.  However, some sources are
major sources under Title V because of their VOC emissions, not their HAP emissions. If a
facility only used non-HAP VOC's, they would not be a major source of HAP emissions and
therefore would not be subject to the NESHAP. This is more likely for facilities located in severe
and extreme ozone nonattainment areas where the major source cutoff for VOC's is as low or
lower than the major source cutoff for HAP.
7.3 DEFINITIONS

       It is important that both wood furniture manufacturing facilities and State and local
enforcement agencies familiarize themselves with the definitions included in the rule. For
facilities using a compliant coatings approach to comply with the rule, the definitions are

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particularly important.  All coatings are not subject to an emission limit under the compliant

coatings compliance option, so the definitions are key to determining what coatings are subject to

a limit. A facility or a facility's coating supplier may have always referred to a particular coating

as a stain, but if the coating does not fit the definition of stain included in the rule it may not be
subject to an emission limit.  Following is a clarification of definitions that the EPA and State
and local enforcement agencies  have reported receiving questions on.


       1.  Are wiping stains regulated as stains under the NESHAP?

       One of the major problems in determining if a particular coating is a stain as defined in
the wood furniture NESHAP is that there is inconsistency among wood furniture manufacturers
and wood furniture coating suppliers in how  they have identified coatings in the past. In the
traditional long finishing sequence, used primarily by residential furniture manufacturers, the
wiping stain is applied after the washcoat and before the sealer. Typically the wiping stain is a
higher solids stain that is used in relatively small quantities.  These stains are not subject to an
emission limit under the NESHAP because (1) they typically have a higher solids content than
the 8.0 percent limit specified in the NESHAP for stains, and (2) they are not applied directly to
the substrate. However, some facilities and some coating suppliers refer to the initial stain that
is applied to the substrate as a wiping stain or a wipe stain.  This seems to be particularly
common in the kitchen cabinet industry. In these cases, the wiping or wipe stain is subject to an
emission limit if the solids content of the coating is no more than 8.0 percent by weight.  In
general, any stain not covered by the definition of stain in the NESHAP should not be a major
source of emissions, particularly when compared to the emissions from the major coatings,  that
is, stain, washcoat, sealer, topcoat, primer, and enamel.

       2.  Are highlight stains regulated as stains under the NESHAP?

       No. Highlight stains are typically applied after the washcoat. They do meet part of the
definition of stain because they usually have a fairly low solids content, but they are not applied
directly to the substrate. Again, usage of highlight stains and emissions from these stains should
be minimal in comparison to the primary coatings used by the facility.

       3.  What is a certified product data sheet? Is it the same as a material safety data sheet?

       The certified product data sheet (CPDS) is the primary method of demonstrating
compliance with the coating and adhesive emission limits included in the rule. For facilities
using a compliant coatings approach to comply with the rule, the CPDS are the .only
recordkeeping requirement. The CPDS will typically be supplied by your coating or adhesive
supplier. The CPDS must include the total VHAP content of the material, by percent weight, the
solids content, by percent weight, and the density of the coating. The material safety data sheet
(MSDS) is required by OSHA, so that facility employees will know what compounds they are
being exposed to and the quantities of those compounds.  Unlike a material safety data sheet

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(MSDS), the CPDS does not have to list the components in the coating. The CPDS only has to
provide the total VHAP content.  Facilities cannot use a MSDS to demonstrate compliance with
the emission limits.  They must have a CPDS for each coating.

       4.  What is the difference between a conventional air spray gun and a high volume low
pressure spray (HVLP) spray gun?

       A conventional air spray gun uses high pressure air to deliver the coating to the
substrate. An HVLP gun also uses pressure to deliver the coating to the substrate, but the
pressure is regulated to Wpsi or less. If a facility is operating an HVLP gun at greater than 10
psi, they are effectively using an HVLP gun as a conventional air spray gun and are likely in
violation of the work practice standards limiting the use of HVLP guns.

7.4 COATING EMISSION LIMITS AND COMPLIANCE OPTIONS


       Most facilities are expected to meet the coating emission limits using either compliant

coatings or an averaging approach. The  emission limits are based on the pounds of volatile HAP

emitted/pound of solids used (Ib VHAP/lb solids), as applied. Example calculations for

determining the Ib VHAP/lb solids of a coating are included in an earlier chapter.  As discussed

earlier, the NESHAP only limits the VHAP content of the primary coatings for facilities using a

compliant coatings approach. Low usage coatings such as fillers and highlight stains are not

subject to an emission limit.  Facilities using an averaging approach must include all of the

coatings they use in the averaging equation.


        1. How does a facility demonstrate compliance if they are using the compliant coatings
compliance option?

       The facility must maintain a certified product data sheet for each coating subject to an
emission limit. The facility should also maintain a CPDS for each  thinner that is added to any of
these coatings. The thinners cannot contain more than 10.0 percent HAP by weight.  The facility
does not have to maintain records of thinner usage, however. Any  coating sample taken by State
or local agency enforcement personnel should have a VHAP content of no more than 1.0 Ib
 VHAP/lb solids (0.8 for new sources) and any thinner sample should have a VHAP content of no
more than 10.0percent by weight.

       2. What does "as applied" mean?

        The NESHAP limits the VHAP content of the coating as applied. For facilities using a
 compliant coatings approach, this means that the VHAP content of the coating should not exceed
 1.0 Ib/lb solids (0.8 for new sources) after thinners, catalysts, drying agents,  etc. have been


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added.  The coating that is leaving the spray gun and being applied to the substrate should not
exceed 1.0 (0.8). For facilities using an averaging approach, this means that the VHAP
contribution from all thinners, catalysts, etc. should be included in the averaging equation.

       3.  How does a facility demonstrate compliance if they are using an averaging approach?

       The facility must maintain certified product data sheets for every coating and thinner
they use. They must also maintain usage records for each coating and thinner. Using the Ib
VHAP/lb solids value for each coating, the VHAP content for each thinner, and the usage values,
the facility should use the averaging equation presented in the rule to calculate the average Ib
VHAP/lb solids each month.  This should be no more than 1.0 for existing sources or 0.8 for new
sources.

       4.  Is there a limit on the VHAP content of the thinners if the facility is using an averaging
approach to comply with the rule?

       No. The facility can use any thinners they wish if they are using an averaging approach
to comply with the rule.  There is no limit on the VHAP content of the thinners.

       5.  What about washcoats?

       The NESHAP includes two compliance options for facilities that use washcoats and a
compliant coatings approach to comply with the rule. These options were included to minimize
the recordkeeping burden on  the industry.  The first compliance option is the same as that for the
other coatings in a compliant coatings approach. The facility must use a washcoat that emits no
more than 1.0 Ib VHAP/lb solids (0.8 for new sources), as applied, and any thinners used to thin
the washcoat must have a VHAP content of no more than 10.0 percent by weight.  If enforcement
personnel take a sample of the washcoat for analysis, the VHAP content of the washcoat should
be no more than 1.0 Ib VHAP/lb solids (0.8 for new sources).  If the analysis indicates the VHAP
content is greater than 1.0 (0.8), the facility is out of compliance.

       The first compliance option applies to facilities that purchase their washcoats from a
supplier. However, many wood furniture manufacturing facilities formulate their washcoat
onsite by diluting their sealer. These facilities can demonstrate compliance with the washcoat
emission limit by using a sealer that emits no more than 1.0 Ib VHAP/lb solids, maintaining a
CPDSfor the sealer, using a  thinner to dilute the sealer than contains no more than 3.0 percent
VHAP by weight, and maintaining  a CPDSfor the thinner. The washcoat is automatically
deemed compliant if the sealer has a VHAP content of no more than 1.0 (0.8) and the thinner
used to dilute the sealer has a VHAP content of no more than 3.0 percent by weight.  Even if an
analysis of the sample reveals that the actual VHAP content of the washcoat is greater than 1.0
(0.8), the washcoat is still considered compliant because it was formulated with a  compliant
sealer and a compliant (less than 3.0 percent VHAP by weight) thinner.

       6.  Are aerosol spray paints used for touchup and repair subject to an emission limit?
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       No.  There is no emission limit for aerosol spray paints that are used for touchup and
repair.

       1.  Are inks subject to an emission limit under the wood furniture NESHAP?

       Inks are considered coatings under the wood furniture NESHAP. However, they are not
one of the primary coatings used by the industry,  so they are not subject to an emission limit for
facilities using a compliant coatings approach. However, facilities using an averaging approach
to comply with the rule must include the inks in the averaging equation.

       8. If inks are applied to the wood furniture over the topcoat (that is, after completion of
the coating operation) do they fall under the VHAP restrictions for coatings?

       As discussed in the previous question, inks are considered coatings. However, there is no
limit on the VHAP content of the inks for facilities using a compliant coatings approach no
matter where the ink is applied in the finishing process. If the facility is using an averaging
approach to comply with the rule, the inks must be included in the averaging equation even if
they are applied over the topcoat.

       9. According to 40 CFR 63.804(g)(i), a facility using a continuous coater can comply
with the regulations by using compliant coatings, as determined by the VHAP content of the
coating in the reservoir and the VHAP content determined from records. Can this method be
used to comply if additional solvent is added to the coating in the reservoir to replace the solvent
lost due to evaporation, or must the facility use viscosity measurements to comply as outlined in
63.804(g)(ii)?  Would this also pertain to coatings not used in continuous coaters, that is, dip
tanks or pressure pots?

       If a facility adds solvent to the continuous coater to replace that lost by evaporation, the
facility can use one of two methods to determine compliance. For both compliance options, the
 VHAP content of the coating in the reservoir should never exceed 1.0 Ib VHAP/lb solids, even
after solvent additions. In addition, the facility must demonstrate one of two things. The facility
must always maintain records, including the records showing solvent additions, that demonstrate
that the coating has a VHAP content of no more than 1.0 Ib VHAP/lb solids, as applied; or the
facility must measure the viscosity of the initial coating in the reservoir and each time solvent  is
added to the reservoir. The facility must maintain records of the viscosity measurements. If the
viscosity of the coating falls below the viscosity of the initial viscosity of the coating, the facility
is out of compliance.

        These two compliance options do not apply to coatings used in dip tanks or pressure pots.
 The VHAP content of these coatings, as determined by a sample of the coating, should not
exceed 1.0 Ib  VHAP/lb solids, and the records, including records of solvent additions, should
demonstrate that the VHAP content of the coating never exceeded 1.0 Ib VHAP/lb solids.  There
 is no option in this case of monitoring the viscosity of the coating in lieu of having the records
demonstrate compliance with the emission limit.
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7.5 ADHESIVE EMISSION LIMITS AND COMPLIANCE OPTIONS

       1. Is there an emission limit on adhesives other than contact adhesives?

       No.  The only adhesives subject to an emission limit are contact adhesives.  The industry
also uses urea-formaldehyde, polyvinyl acetate, and hot melt adhesives, but none of these
adhesive types are subject to an emission limit. Hot melt adhesives are 100 percent solids
adhesives so they do not emit VHAP.  Polyvinyl acetate adhesives do emit small quantities of the
HAP vinyl acetate, but they are lower emitting than the other types of adhesives so the EPA did
not want to discourage their usage by placing an emission limit on them.  Urea-formaldehyde
emissions do emit formaldehyde, but they are primarily used for veneering and plywood
manufacturing.  These operations will be covered under the particleboard/plywood
manufacturing NESHAP.

       2. Can a facility average among their contact adhesives to meet the emission limit?

       No.  All contact adhesives must be compliant. A facility cannot average among their
contact adhesives to meet the limit.

7.6 WORK PRACTICE STANDARDS

       The wood furniture NESHAP includes work practice standards for reducing emissions
from cleaning, washoff, finishing, and gluing operations.  These work practice standards are an
important part of the rule. For the most part, the work practice standards are straightforward, but
the EPA has received  a few questions concerning the requirements.  Following is a summary of
these questions and their responses.

       1. Does the limitation on conventional air spray guns also apply to spray guns used to
apply adhesives?

       No.  The limitation only applies to spray guns used to apply finishing materials. Any type
of spray gun may be used to apply adhesives.

       2. What is a normally closed container?

       The NESHAP requires all containers used to store solvent or solvent containing
materials to be closed when not in use.  These containers are referred to as normally closed
containers.  They are containers that should be closed during most periods, but they may be open
if an operator is filling or emptying the container.

       3. How do I determine the de minimis levels for the VHAP of potential concern included
in Table 6?

       In developing the formulation assessment plan, the EPA worked with the coating
suppliers to identify VHAP of potential concern that are currently used by industry. The EPA

                                          7-9

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then developed de minimis values for these VHAP based on 70-year exposure levels. These
VHAP and their de minimis values are included in Table 5. However, industry may use VHAP of
potential concern that are identified in Table 6 but are not listed in Table 5.  If a facility uses any
of these pollutant after November of 1998, the baseline level is equivalent to the de minimis level.
The rule states that the de minimis level should be based on 70 year exposure levels and data
provided in the rulemaking pursuant to Section 112(g). However, the final Section 112(g)
rulemaking did not include these de minimis values.  The EPA is currently addressing litigation
issues related to the formulation assessment plan. A Federal Register notice addressing any
changes in the formulation assessment plan resulting from the litigation is expected in late fall of
1997.  The EPA will include de minimis levels for the pollutants in Table 6 in that notice.

       4. Do the VHAP of potential concern found in inks fall under the formulation assessment
plan requirements?

       Yes. The inks are considered coatings so any VHAP of potential concern that are in the
inks must be tracked under the formulation  assessment plan.

       5. Section 63.803(b)(4) dictates that a facility maintain  a description of the methods used
to demonstrate successful completion of the operator training course. What will be the definition
of successful completion?

        Whether or not an operator has successfully completed  the training course will be up to
the facility for the most part. If an operator is still not applying coatings correctly after training,
the facility is the one that will pay in extra coating costs.  However^ the facility should maintain
records documenting that the operator has  completed  the training.  For example, the facility may
present each operator with a certificate that is signed  by both the facility and the operator upon
the completion of training. An inspector may ask to see the records and may also observe the
operator to ensure he or she is following the work practice standards and is using proper
application techniques.
                                            7-10

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                                    APPENDIX A

                           ACRONYMS AND DEFINITIONS

A.I LIST OF ACRONYMS

       Following is a list of acronyms that are used throughout the manual. Many of these terms
are included in the definitions in A.2, but the list presented here is intended to serve as a handy
reference if you come across an acronym you are not familiar with.  Some of these acronyms are
not used in this manual, but you may come across  them when studying other material related to
the control of VOC and/or HAP emissions.

Acronym     Meaning

BACT       Best available control technology
CFR         Code of Federal Regulations
CPDS        Certified product data sheet
CTG         Control Techniques Guideline
EPA         Environmental Protection Agency
FAP         Formulation assessment plan
HAP         Hazardous air pollutant
HVLP       High volume low pressure
LAER       Lowest achievable emission rate
MACT       Maximum Achievable Control Technology
MSDS       Material safety data sheet
NESHAP    National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants
NSPS        New Source Performance Standards
NSR         New Source Review
RACT       Reasonably Available Control Technology
SIP          State implementation plan
VHAP       Volatile hazardous air pollutant
VOC         Volatile organic compound

A.2 DEFINITIONS

       These definitions are from commonly used terms in this document.  However, it is not an
exhaustive list. The list is limited to terms that are used in this implementation manual. Note
that these definitions are based on EPA's definitions, which may not always be consistent with
the industry's definitions. Because the standards are based on EPA's definitions, however, those
are the definitions included here.

       Adhesive means any chemical substance that is applied for the purpose of bonding two
surfaces together other than by mechanical means. For the purposes of the wood furniture
NESHAP, adhesives are not considered coatings or finishing materials.  Products used on
numans and animals, adhesive tape,  contact paper, or any other product with an adhesive

                                         A-l

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incorporated onto or in an inert substance are not considered adhesives under the wood furniture
NESHAP.

       Aerosol adhesive means a contact adhesive that is dispensed from a pressurized container
as a suspension of fine solid or liquid particles in gas.

       As applied means the VOC, VHAP, and solids content of the coating or contact adhesive
that is actually used for coating or gluing the substrate. It includes the contribution of materials
used for in-house dilution of the coating or contact adhesive.

       Basecoat means a coat of colored material, usually opaque, that is applied before graining
inks, glazing coats, or other opaque finishing materials, and is usually topcoated for protection.

       Capture device means a hood, enclosed room, floor sweep, or other means of collecting
solvent emissions or other pollutants into a duct so that the pollutant can be directed to a
pollution control device such as an oxidizer or carbon adsorber.

       Capture efficiency means the fraction of all organic vapors generated by a process that are
directed to a control device.

       Certified product data sheet (CPDS) means documentation furnished by coating or
adhesive suppliers or an outside laboratory that provides the VHAP content, VOC content, solids
content, and density of a finishing material, contact adhesive, or solvent. The VHAP content
should be measured by EPA Method 311, an equivalent or alternative method, or formulation
data if all HAP present in the coating or contact adhesive is solvent.  The reportable HAP content
should represent the maximum aggregate emissions potential of the finishing material, contact
adhesive or solvent in concentrations greater than or equal to 1.0 percent by weight or 0.1 percent
for HAP that are carcinogens, as defined by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration
Hazard Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910), as formulated. The VOC content, solids
content, and density of the coating or contact adhesive should be measured by EPA Method 24,
an alternative or equivalent method, or formulation data if all of the VOC present in the coating
or contact adhesive is solvent.  The purpose of the CPDS is to assist the facility in demonstrating
compliance with the NESHAP emission limits.

       (Note: Because the optimum analytical conditions under EPA Method 311 vary by
coating, the coating or adhesive supplier may also choose to include on the CPDS the optimum
analytical conditions for analysis of the coating, adhesive, or solvent using EPA Method 311.
Such information may include, but not be limited to, separation column, oven temperature,
carrier gas, injection port temperature, extraction  solvent, and internal standard.)

       Cleaning operations means operations in which organic solvent is used to remove coating
materials or adhesives from equipment used in wood furniture manufacturing operations.

       Coating means a protective, decorative, or functional film applied in a thin layer to a
surface.  Such materials include, but are not limited to, paints, topcoats, varnishes, sealers, stains,

                                           A-2

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washcoats. basecoats, enamels, inks, and temporary protective coatings. Aerosol spray paints
used for touch-up and repair are not considered coatings under the NESHAP.

       Coating solids (or solids) means the part of the coating which remains after the coating is
dried or cured; solids content is determined using data from EPA Method 24.

       Compliant coating/contact adhesive means  a finishing material, contact adhesive, or
strippable booth coating that meets the CTG and/or NESHAP emission limits specified in Tables
2-2 and 2-4 of this manual.

       Contact adhesive means an adhesive that is applied to two substrates, dried, and mated
under only enough pressure to result in good contact. The bond is immediate and is sufficiently
strong to hold pieces together without further clamping, pressure, or airing.

       Continuous coater means a finishing system that continuously applies finishing materials
onto furniture parts moving along a conveyor. Finishing materials that are not transferred to the
part are recycled to a reservoir.  Several types of application methods can be used with a
continuous coater including spraying, curtain coating, roll coating, dip coating, and flow coating.

       Control device (also referred to as an add-on control device in this manual) means any
equipment that reduces the quantity of a pollutant that is emitted to the air. The device may
destroy or secure the pollutant for subsequent recovery. Includes, but is not limited to, oxidizers,
carbon adsorbers, and condensers.

       Control device efficiency means the ratio of the pollution released by a control device to
the pollution introduced to the  control device.

       Control system means the combination of capture and control devices used to reduce
emissions to the atmosphere.

       Conventional air spray  means a spray coating method in which the coating is atomized by
mixing it with compressed air and applied at an air pressure greater than 10 pounds per square
inch (gauge) at the point of atomization. Airless and air assisted airless spray technologies  are
not conventional air spray because the coating is not atomized by mixing it with compressed air.
Electrostatic spray technology  is also not considered conventional air spray because an
electrostatic charge is employed to attract the coating to the workpiece.

       Emission means the release or discharge, whether directly or indirectly, of HAP into the
ambient air.

       Enamel means a coat of colored material, usually opaque, that is applied as a protective
topcoat over a basecoat, primer, or previously applied enamel coats. In some cases, another
finishing material may be applied as a topcoat over the enamel.
                                           A-3

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       Equipment leak means emissions of VHAP from pumps, valves, flanges, or other
equipment used to transfer or apply coatings, adhesives, or organic solvents.

       Finishing material means a coating used in the wood furniture industry. Such materials
include, but are not limited to, stains, basecoats, washcoats, enamels, sealers, and topcoats.

       Finishing operation means those operations in which finishing material is applied to a
substrate and is subsequently air-dried, cured in an oven, or cured by radiation.

       Foam adhesive means a contact adhesive used for gluing foam to fabric, foam to foam,
and fabric to wood.

       Gluing operation means  those operations in which contact adhesives are used to join
components, for example, to apply a laminate to a wood substrate or foam to fabric.

       Incidental wood furniture manufacturer means a major source that is primarily engaged in
the manufacture of products other than wood furniture or wood furniture components and uses no
more than 100 gallons per month of finishing material or adhesives in the manufacture of wood
furniture or wood furniture components.

       Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) means the documentation required for hazardous
chemicals by the Occupational Safety and Health Adminstration (OS HA) Hazard
Communication Standard (29 CFR 1910) for a solvent, cleaning material, contact adhesive,
coating, or other material that identifies select reportable hazardous ingredients of the material,
safety and health considerations, and handling procedures.

       Nonporous substrate means a surface that is impermeable to liquids.  Examples include
metal, rigid plastic, flexible vinyl, and rubber.

       Organic solvent means a volatile organic liquid that is used for  dissolving or dispersing
constituents in a coating, adjusting the viscosity of a coating or adhesive, or cleaning equipment.
When used in a coating or adhesive, the organic solvent evaporates during drying and does not
become a part of the dried film.

       Overall control efficiency means the efficiency of a control system, calculated as the
product of the capture and control device efficiencies, expressed as a percentage.

       Potential to emit means  the maximum capacity of a stationary source to emit a pollutant
under its physical and operational design.

       Research or laboratory facility means any stationary source whose primary purpose is to
conduct research and development to develop new processes and products where such source is
 operated under the chose supervision of technically trained personnel and is not engaged in the
 manufacture of products for commercial sale in commerce, except in a de minimis manner.
                                           A-4

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       Sealer means a finishing material used to seal the pores of a wood substrate before
additional coats of finishing material are applied. Special purpose finishing materials that are
used in some finishing systems to optimize aesthetics are not sealers.

       Solvent means a liquid used in a coating or contact adhesive to dissolve or disperse
constituents and/or to adjust viscosity.  It evaporates during drying and does not become a part of
the dried film.

       Stain means any color coat having a solids content by weight of no more than 8.0 percent
that is applied in single or multiple coats directly to the substrate. Includes, but is not limited to,
nongrain raising stains, equalizer stains, prestains, sap stains, body stains, no-wipe stains,
penetrating stains, and toners.

       Strippable spray booth coating means a coating that (1) is applied to a spray booth wall to
provide a protective film to receive overspray during the finishing operations; (2) that is
subsequently peeled off and disposed; and (3) by achieving (1) and (2) reduces  or eliminates the
need to use organic solvents to clean spray booth walls.

       Substrate means the surface onto which a coating or contact adhesive is applied (or into
which a coating or contact adhesive is impregnated).

       Thinner means a volatile liquid that is used to dilute coatings or contact adhesives (to
reduce viscosity, color strength, and solids, or to modify drying conditions).

       Topcoat means the last film-building  finishing material that is applied in a finishing
system.

       Touch-up and repair means the application of finishing materials to cover minor finishing
imperfections.

       VHAP means any hazardous air pollutant listed in Table E-1.

       VHAP of potential concern means any VHAP from the list presented in Table A-1.

       Volatile organic compound (VOC) means any organic compound that participates in
atmospheric photochemical reactions, that is, any organic compound other than those that the
Administrator designates as having negligible photochemical reactivity. A VOC may be
measured by a reference method, an equivalent method, an alternative method,  or by procedures
specified in any rule.  However, these  methods may also measure nonreactive organic
compounds.  In such cases, the owner or operator may exclude the nonreactive  organic
compounds when determining compliance with a standard.  For a list of compounds  that the
-Administrator has designated as having negligible photochemical reactivity, refer to  40 CFR
51.00.
                                           A-5

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       Washcoat means a transparent special purpose finishing material having a solids content
by weight of 12.0 percent or less. Washcoats are applied over initial stains to protect, to control
color, and to stiffen the wood fibers in order to aid sanding.

       Washoff operations means those operations in which organic solvent is used to remove
coating from wood furniture or a wood furniture component.

       Wood furniture means any product made of wood, a wood product such as rattan or
wicker, or an engineered wood product such as particleboard that is manufactured under any of
the following standard industrial classification codes: 2434, 2511, 2512, 2517, 2519, 2521
2531, 2541, 2599, or 5712.

       Wood furniture component means any part that is used in the manufacture  of wood
furniture. Examples include, but are not limited to, drawer sides, cabinet doors, seat cushions,
and laminated tops. However, foam seat cushions manufactured and fabricated at a facility that
does not  engage in any other wood furniture or wood furniture component manufacturing
operation are excluded from this definition.

       Wood furniture manufacturing operations means the finishing, gluing, cleaning, and
washoff operations associated with the production of wood furniture or wood furniture
components.
                                           A-6

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TABLE A-1. VHAP OF POTENTIAL CONCERN
CAS No.
Chemical name
"NONTHRESHOLD" POLLUTANTS
92671
96093
64675
59892
68122
80319
60355
101779
90040
1746016
92875
684935
542881
79447
75558
57147
96128
62759
50328
1336363
76448
119937
79061
118741
57749
1120714
106990
53963
53963
58899
95807
111444
122667
8001352
121142
119904
50000
4-Aminobiphenyl
Styrene oxide
Diethyl sulfate
N-Nitrosomorpholine
Dimethyl formamide
Hexamethy Iphosphoramide
Acetamide
4,4'- Methylenediani line
o-Anisidine
2,3,7. 8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxm
Benzidine
N-Nitroso-N-methylurea
Bis(chloromethyl)ether
Dimethyl carbamoyl chloride
1 ,2-Propylenimine (2-Methyl aziridine)
1 , 1 -Dimethyl hydrazine
1 ,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane
N-Nitrosodimethylamine
Benzo (a) pyrene
Polychlorinated biphenyls (Aroclors)
Heptachlor
3.3'-Dimethyl benzidine
Acrylamide
Hexachlorobenzene
Chlordane
1 ,3-Propane sultone
1 ,3-Butadiene
2-Acetylaminoflourine
3,3'-Dichlorobenzidine
Lindane (hexachlorcyclohexane, gamma)
2,4-Toluene diamine
Dichloroethyl ether (Bis(2-chloroethyl)ether)
1 ,2 - Diphenylhydrazine
Toxaphene (chlorinated camphene)
2,4-Dinitrotoluene
3,3'-Dimethoxybenzidine
Formaldehyde
                A-7

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TABLE A-1. (continued)
CAS No.
101144
107131
106934
72559
510156
62737
75014
75218
96457
593602
67663
87865
51796
107062
78875
56235
71432
140885
75569
62533
106467
88062
117817
95534
114261
79016
123911
75070
75252
133062
106898
75092
127184
53703
218019
60117
56553
205992
Chemical name
4,4'-Methylene bis(2-chloroaniline)
Acrylonitrile
Ethylene dibromide( 1 ,2-Dibromoethane)
DDE (1,1-p-chlorophenyl 1-2 dichloroethylene)
Chlorobenzilate
Dichlorvos
Vinyl chloride
Ethylene oxide
Ethylene thiourea
Vinyl bromide (bromoethene)
Chloroform
Pentachlorophenol
Ethyl carbamate (Urethane)
Ethylene dichloride (1,2-Dichloroethane)
Propylene dichloride ( 1 ,2-Dichloropropane)
Carbon tetrachloride
Benzene
Ethyl acrylate
Propylene oxide
Aniline
l,4-Dichlorobenzene(p)
2,4.6-Trichlorophenol
Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP)
o-Toluidine
Propoxur
Trichloroethylene
1,4-Dioxane (1,4-Diethyleneoxide)
Acetaldehyde
Bromoform
Captan
Epichlorohydrin
Methylene chloride (Dichloromethane)
Tetrachloroethylene(Perchloroethylene)
Dibenz (ah) anthracene
Chrysene
Dimethyl aminoazobenzene
Benzo (a) anthracene
Benzo (b) fluoranthene
         A-8

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TABLE A-1. (continued)
CAS No.
79469
542756
57976
225514
193395
189559
79345
91225
75354
87683
82688
78591
79005
74873
67721
1582098
1319773
108394
75343
95487
106445
74884
100425
107051
334883
95954
133904
106887
108054
126998
123319
92933
Chemical name
2-Nitropropane
1 ,3-Dichloropropene
7, 12-Dimethylbenz(a)anthracene
Benz(c)acridine
Indeno( 1 ,2.3-cd)pyrene
l,2:7,8-Dibenzopyrene
1 , 1 ,2,2-Tetrachloroethane
Quinoline
Vinylidene chloride (1,1-Dichloroethylene)
Hexachlorobutadiene
Pentachloronitrobenzene (Quintobenzene)
Isophorone
1 , 1 ,2-Trichloroethane
Methyl chloride (Chloromethane)
Hexachloroethane
Trifluralin
Cresols/Cresylic acid (isomers and mixture)
m-Cresol
Ethylidene dichloride (1,1-Dichloroethane)
o-Cresol
p-Cresol
Methyl iodide (lodomethane)
Styrenea
Allyl chloride
Diazomethane
2,4,5 - Trichlorophenol
Chloramben
1,2 - Epoxybutane
Vinyl acetate
Chloroprene
Hydroqumone
4-Nitrobiphenyl
         A-9

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TABLEA-1.  (continued)
CAS No.
Chemical name
"HIGH-CONCERN" POLLUTANTS
56382
13463393
60344
75218
151564
77781
107302
57578
100447
98077
107028
584849
75741
78002
12108133
624839
77474
62207765
10210681
79118
534521
101688
108952
62384
98862
108316
532274
51285
108864
98953
74839
75150
121697
Parathion
Nickel Carbonyl
Methyl hydrazine
Ethylene oxide
Ethylene imine
Dimethyl sulfate
Chloromethyl methyl ether
beta-Propiolactone
Benzyl chloride
Benzotrichloride
Acrolein
2,4 - Toluene diisocyanate
Tetramethyl lead
Tetraethyl lead
Methylcyclopentadienyl manganese
Methyl isocyanate
Hexachlorocyclopentadiene
Fluomine
Cobalt carbonyl
Chloroacetic acid
4.6-Dinitro-o-cresol, and salts
Methylene diphenyl diisocyanate
Phenol
Mercury, (acetato-o) phenyl
Acetophenone
Maleic anhvdnde
2-Chloroacetophenone
2,4-Dinitrophenol
2-Methyoxy ethanol
Nitrobenzene
Methyl bromide (Bromomethane)
Carbon disulfide
N.N-Dimethylaniline
         A-10

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                         TABLE A-1.  (continued)
CAS No.
Chemical name
"UNRANKABLE" POLLUTANTS
106514
123386
120809
85449
463581
132649
100027
540841
11422
822060
-
-
Quinone
Propionaldehyde
Catechol
Phthalic anhydride
Carbonyl sulfide
Dibenzofurans
4-Nitrophenol
2,2,4-Trimethylpentane
Diethanolamine
Hexamethylene- 1 ,6-diisocyanate
Glycol ethersb
Polycyclic organic matter0
* = Currently an EPA weight of evidence classification is under review
aThe EPA does not currently have an official weight-of-evidence classification for
 styrene.  For purposes of this rule, styrene is treated as a "nonthreshold"
 pollutant. (See data report form in appendix A of the hazard ranking technical
 background document.)
^Except for 2-ethoxy ethanol, ethylene glycol monobutyl ether, and 2-methoxy
 ethanol.
°Except for benzo(b)fluoranthene, benzo(a)anthracene, benzo(a)pyrene,
 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, benz(c)acridine, chrysene, dibenz(ah)
 anthracene,  l,2:7,8-dibenzopyrene, indeno(l,2,3-cd)pyrene, but including dioxins
 and furans.
                                    A-ll

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                                  APPENDIX B.
                               LIST OF CONTACTS
      This appendix includes a listing of State, EPA, and industry contacts.

B.I STATE CONTACTS

      Table B-1 is a list of State agencies. In some cases, you may need to work with a local
agency, but the State agency will be able to refer you to the local agency if necessary.  If you are
a small business, they can also refer you to the State's Small Business Ombudsman and/or the
State Small Business Assistance Program.

                    TABLE B-l. LISTING OF STATE AGENCIES
State
Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Name of Agency
Alabama Department of Environmental Management, Air Division
Department of Environmental Conservation
Office of Air Quality
Department of Pollution Control and Ecology
Air Resources Board
Department of Health, Air Pollution Control Division
Air Management Bureau
Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control,
Division of Air and Waste Management
Department of Environmental Protection
Air Protection Branch
Clean Air Branch
Department of Health and Welfare, Division of Environmental
Quality
Environmental Protection Agency, Division of Air Pollution Control
Department of Environmental Management
Department of Natural Resources
Bureau of Air and Radiation
Division for Air Quality
Department of Environmental Quality, Office of Air Quality and
Radiation Protection
Bureau of Air Quality Control, Department of Environmental
Protection
Air & Radiation Management Administration
Division of Air Quality Control
Air Quality Division, Department of Natural Resources
Phone No.
(205)271-7861
(907)465-5100
(602) 207-2308
(501)562-7444
(916)322-2990
(303)692-3100
(203) 566-2690
(302) 739-4764
(904)488-0114
(404) 363-7000
(808) 586-4200
(208) 334-0502
(217)782-7326
(317)232-8222
(515)281-5145
(913)296-1593
(502) 564-3382
(504)765-0219
(207) 289-2437
(410)631-3255
(617)292-5593
(517)373-7023
                                        B-l

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State
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming
Name of Agency
Air Pollution Control. Pollution Control Agency
Department of Environmental Quality
Department of Natural Resources/Air Pollution Control Program
State Department of Health and Environmental Sciences
Air Quality Program, Department of Environmental Quality
Bureau of Air Quality/Division of Environmental Protection
Department of Environmental Services, Air Resources Division
Department of Environmental Protection and Energy, Air Pollution
Control Program
Environmental Department/ Air Quality Bureau
Department of Environmental Conservation, Division of Air
Resources
Division of Environmental Management
State Department of Health
Ohio Environmental Protection Agency
Department Environmental Quality/ Air Quality Division
Air Quality Division, Department of Environmental Quality
Department of Environmental Resources, Bureau of Air Quality
Division of Air Resources
Department of Health and Environmental Control, Bureau of Air
Quality
Department of Environment and Natural Resources, Division of
Environmental Regulation
Tennessee Division of Air Pollution Control
Texas Natural Resources Conservation Commission
Division of Air Quality, Department of Environmental Quality
Air Pollution Control Division, Agency of Natural Resources
Department of Air Pollution Control
State Department of Ecology
Air Pollution Control Commission
Department of Natural Resources, Bureau of Air Management
Air Quality Division, Department of Environmental Quality
Phone No.
(612)296-7331
(601)961-5171
(314)751-4817
(406) 444-3454
(402)471-2189
(702) 687-4670
(603)271-1370
(609) 292-6704
(505) 827-2850
(518)457-7230
(919)733-3340
(701)221-5188
(614) 644-2270
(405)271-5220
(503) 229-5359
(717)787-9702
(401)277-2808
(803) 734-4750
(605)773-3351
(615)532-0554
(512)451-5711
(801)536-4000
(802)244-8731
(804) 786-2378
(206) 459-6256
(304) 348-4022
(608)266-7718
(307)777-7391
B.2 EPA CONTACTS

      If you have questions for EPA, the best place to start is the EPA regional office for your
State. They will either be able to answer your questions or refer you to someone who can. Table
                                        B-2

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B-2 includes a list of the EPA regions, the States they cover, and their telephone number and
location.
                            TABLE B-2. EPA REGIONS
Region
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Phone No.
(617) 565-3595
(212)637-4023
(215)566-2114
(404)562-9131
(312)886-6793
(214)665-2156
(913)551-7566
(303)312-6971
States covered
CT, ME, MA, NH, RI,
VT
NJ,NY
DE, MD, PA, VA, WV
& District of Columbia
AL, FL, GA, KY, MS,
NC, SC, TN
IL, IN, MI, WI, MN &
OH
AR, LA, NM, OK, &
TX
IA, KS, MO, NE
CO, MT, ND, SD, UT,
WY
Address
Janet Bowen
Air Toxics Coordinator
J.F.K. Federal Bldg.
One Congress Street
Boston, MA 02203
Umesh Dholakia
Air Toxics Coordinator
290 Broadway Street
New York, NY 10007-1866
Dianne Walker
Air Toxics Coordinator
841 Chestnut Bldg.
Philadelphia, PA 19107
Lee Page
Air Toxics Coordinator
Atlanta Federal Center
61 Forsyth Street SW
Atlanta, GA 30303-3 104
Bruce Varner
Air Toxics Coordinator
77 West Jackson Blvd.
Chicago, IL 60604-3507
Robert Todd
Air Toxics Coordinator
1445 Ross Avenue
12th Floor, Suite 1200
Dallas, TX 75202-2733
Richard Tripp
Air Toxics Coordinator
726 Minnesota Avenue
Kansas City, KS 66 101
Heather Rooney
Air Toxics Coordinator
999 18th Street
Suite 500
Denver, CO 80202-2466
                                       B-3

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Region
9
10
Phone No.
(415)744-1200
(206) 553-8760
States covered
AZ, CA, HI, NV
AK, ID, WA, OR
Address
Air Division
75 Hawthorne Street
San Francisco, CA 94105
Andrea Longhouse
Air Toxics Coordinator
Atlanta Federal Center
1200 Sixth Avenue
Seattle, W A 98 101
B-4

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B.3 TRADE ASSOCIATIONS

       Following is a list of contacts from the major trade associations representing the wood
furniture industry and wood furniture coating suppliers.

American Furniture Manufacturers Association
P.O. Box HP-7
High Point, NC 27261
Phone:(910)884-5000
Business and Institutional Furniture Manufacturers Association
2680 Horizon Drive S.E.
Grand Rapids, MI 49546
Phone:(616)285-3963

Grand Rapids Area Furniture Manufacturers Association
4362 Cascade Road, S.E., Suite 113
Grand Rapids, MI 49506
Phone: (616) 942-6225             Fax: (616) 942-1730

Kitchen Cabinet Manufacturers Association
1899 Preston White Drive
Reston, VA 22091-4326
Phone: (703) 264-1690

National Paint and Coatings Association
1500 Rhode Island Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: (202) 462-6272
                                        B-5

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              APPENDIX C.




DETAILED TABLE OF CONTENTS FOR THE NESHAP

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      Although we hope that this manual will answer most of the your questions concerning the
NESHAP, there may still be times when you will have to go directly to the regulation for the
answer to specific questions.  Hopefully, the table of contents presented in Table C-1 will make
the search easier.
                    TABLE C-1. NESHAP TABLE OF CONTENTS
Requirement
Location in Regulation
Applicability
Applicability of the regulation
Sources specifically exempted from the regulation
Exemption for research and laboratory facilities
List of sections of EPA's General Provisions regulation (subpart N)
that apply to sources covered under this regulation
Compliance dates for existing sources
Compliance date for new sources
Guidance for determining if source is reconstructed
63.800(a)
63.800(b)
63.800(c)
63.800(d)
63.800(e)
63.800(f)
63.800(g)
Definitions and Nomenclature
Definitions used in the regulation
Definitions of terms used in equations in the regulation
63.801(a)
63.801(b)
Emission Limits
Emission limits for existing sources
Emission limits for new sources
63.802(a)
63.802(b)
Work Practice Standards
Work practice implementation plan
Operator training requirements
Inspection and maintenance plan
Cleaning and washoff solvent accounting system
Chemical composition of cleaning and washoff solvents
Spray booth cleaning restrictions
Storage requirements
Application equipment requirements
Gun and line cleaning
Washoff operations
Formulation assessment plan
63.803(a)
63.803(b)
63.803(c)
63.803(d)
63.803(e)
63.803(f)
63.803(g)
63.803(h)
63.803(I)&Q
63.803(k)
63.803(1)
Compliance Provisions
                                        C-1

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TABLEC-1. (continued)
Requirement
Compliance options for finishing operations
Compliance options for gluing operations
Methods to demonstrate initial compliance
Methods to demonstrate continuous compliance
Location in Regulation
63.804(a)&(d)
63.804(b),(c) & (e)
63.804(f)
63.804(g)
Performance Test Methods
Test methods for determining the HAP content of coatings and
adhesives (cited here, but actual methods will be in 40 CFR part 60,
Appendix A)
Test methods for sources using control device to comply with the
regulation
63.805(a)
63.805(b),(c),
(d),&(e)
Recordkeeping Requirements
Recordkeeping requirements for sources using compliant coatings
and/or averaging to comply with the regulation
Recordkeeping requirements associated with work practice standards
Recordkeeping requirements for sources using control system to
comply with the regulation
Miscellaneous recordkeeping requirements
63.806(b),(c) & (d)
63.806(e)
63.806(f)&(g)
63.806(h),(D
&(i)
Reporting Requirements
Initial notification requirements
Ongoing compliance status reports
Reporting requirements for sources using a control system
Reporting requirements associated with the formulation assessment
plan
63.807(b)
63.807(c)
63.807(d)
63.807(e)
         C-2

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                 APPENDIX D.




FEDERAL REGISTER NOTICE-WOOD FURNITURE NESHAP

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          G293G  Federal Register  '  Vol.  60, No.  235 / Thursday. Doccmbcr 7, 1005  '  R-lcs  ar.d  Reg-la'..or.s
          Taoics to Subpart II

          Subpart JJ—National Emission
          Standards for Wood Furniture
          Manufacturing Operations

          § 63.800  Applicability.
            ,ai The affected source to which this
          s-bo art applies is each facility that is
        -  engaged, either in part or in whole, in
          the manufacture of wood furniture or
          wood furniture components and that is
          located at a plant sue that is a major
          source as denned in 40 CFR part 63 2.
          The owner or operator of a source  that
          meets the criteria for an incidental
          furniture manufacturer shall maintain
          purchase or usage records
          demonstrating the source meets the
          criteria specified in § 63.801 of this
          subpart. but the source shall not be
          subject to any other provisions of this
          subpart.
            fb) A source that complies with the
          limits and criteria specified in
          paragraphs (b)(l). (b)(2). or fb)(3) of this
          section is an area source for the
          purposes of this subpart and is not
          subject to any other provision of this
          rule, provided that: In the case of
        * parargraphs (b)(l) and fb)(2). Finishing
          materials, adhesives, cleaning solvents
          and washoff solvents account for at ieast
          9C percent of annual HAP emissions at
          the plant site, and if the plant site has
          HAP emissions that do not originate
          frcrn trie listed materials, the owner or
          operator keeps any records necessary to
          demonstrate that the 30 percent
          cr.ter.on is met. A source mat initially
          relies on the limits and criteria specified
          :.-. paragraphs fold, (bi(2). and (bi(3) to
          Decome an area source, but
          subsequently exceeds the relevant  limit
          Iw.tnout first obtaining and complying
          w.tn otner units that keep its potential
          :c err..t hazardous air pollutants below
          T.a:cr source levels), becomes a major
          source ar.d must comply thereafter with
          all ;:p.icaoi9 provisions of tins subpart
          starting or. the applicable compliance
          aate in §63 800. Nothing in this
          sa.-csraph fb) is intended to preclude a
          scurce from limiting its potential to emit
          '..-.rough other appropriate mechanisms
          tr.at may be available through the
          permitting authority
            (1) The owner or operator of the
          source uses no more than 250 gallons
          per month, for every month, of coating,
          jluir.g. cleaning, ar.c washoff materials
          at the source, including materials used
          for source categories other than wood
          furniture (surface coating),  but
          cxr./ding materials used in routine
          D.'v'cTiai or facihly grounds
          maintenance, personal uses by
          umslovccs or other persons, the use of
          products for the purpose of maintain::!).;
motor vehicles operntnd by the facility,
or the use of toxic chemicals contained
in intake water (used for processing or
noncontact cooling) or intake air (used
either as compressed air or for
combustion) The owner or operator
shall maintain records of the total
gallons of coating, gluing, cleaning, ar.d
washoff materials used each month, and
upon request submit such  records to the
Administrator. These records shall be
maintained  for five years.
  12} The owner or operator of the
source uses  no more than 3,000 gallons
per rolling 12-month period, for every
12-month period, of coating, gluing,
cleaning, and washoff materials at the
source, including materials used for
source categories other than wood
furniture (surface coating), but
excluding materials used in routine
janitorial or facility  grounds
maintenance, personal uses by
employees or other persons, the use of
products for the purpose of maintaining
motor vehicles operated by the facility.
or the use of toxic chemicals contained
in .ntake water (used for processing or
noncontact cooling) or intake air (used
either as compressed air or for
combustion). A rolling 12-month period
includes the previous  12 months of
operation. The owner or operator of the
source shall maintain records of the
total gallons of coating, gluing, cleaning.
and washoff materials used each month
and the total gallons used each previous
month, and  upon request submit  such
records to the Administrator. Because
records are needed over the previous set
of 12 months, the owner or operator
shall keep monthly records beginning
no less than one year before the
compliance  date specified  in
§63.800(e). Records shall be maintained
for five years.
  (3) The source uses matenais
containing no more  than 4.5 Mg (5 tons)
of any one HA? per  rolling 12-month
period or no more than 114 Mg (12.5
tons;  of any  combination of HAP  per
rolling 12-month period, inducing
materials from source categories other
than wood furniture; and at least  90
percent of the plantwide emissions per
rolling 12-month period are associated
with the manufacture of wood furniture
or wood furniture components.  The
owner or operator shall maintain
records that  demonstrate that annual
emissions do not exceed these levels,
including monthly usage records for all
:.rushing, gluing, cleaning, and washoff
tnntcnnls. certified product data sheets
for muse materials, and any other
"u( orris necessary to document
(.•missions from sourc.c categories  other
t.'inn u ood furnitun: and apon ruqurst
 submit such records to the
 Adm.nistrnicr  These records shall -,
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         Federal Register  /  Vol.  GO, No. 235 / Thursday, December 7. 1905  /  Rules and Rcgula'.ior.s  629:17
of bonding two surfaces together other
thnn by mechanical means. Under this
subpart. adhesives shall not be
considered coatings or finishing
materials. Products used on humans and
animnls. adhesive tape, contact paper,
or any othet product with an adhesive
incorporated onto or in an inert
suDStrate shall not be considered
adhesives under this subpart.
  Administrator means the
Administrator of the United States
Environmental Protection Agency or his
or her authorized representative.
  Aerosol adhesive means an adhesive
that is dispensed from  a pressurized
container as a  suspension of fine solid
or liquid particles Ln gas.
  Affected source means a wood
furniture manufacturing facility that is
engaged, either in part or in whole, in
the manufacture of wood furniture or
wood furniture components and that  is
located at a plant site that is a major
source as  defined in 40 CFR part 63.2,
excluding sources that, meet the criteria
established in § 63 800(a). (b) and (c) of
this subpart.
  Alternative method means any
method of sampling and analyzing for
an air pollutant that is  not a reference
or equivalent method but has been
demonstrated  to the Administrator's
satisfaction to. in specific cases,
produce results adequate for a
determination of compliance.
  As applied means the HAP and solids
content of the coating or contact
adhesive that :s actually used for
coating or gluing the substrate. It
includes the contribution of materials
used for in-house dilution of the coating
or contact adhesive.
  Basecoat means a coat of colored
matenal.  usually opaque, that is applied
before graining inks, glazing coats, or
other opaque finishing materials, and is
usually topcoated for protection.
  Baseline conditions means the
conditions that exist prior to an affected
source implementing controls, such as a
ccr.tro! system.
  Bdi'.ding enclosure means a building
mousing a process that meets the
requirements of a temporary total
enclosure. The EPA Method 204E is
used to identify all emission points from
tne bunding enclosure and to determine
which emission  points must be tested.
For additional information see
Guidelines for Determining Capture
Efficiency. January 1994. Docket No. A-
93-10. Item No  IV-B-1.
   Capture device means a hood,
unclosed  room, floor sweep, or other
 means of collecting solvent emissions or
other pollutants into a duct so that iho
 pollutant can  bo directed to a pollution
control device such as an incinerator or
carbon adsorber.
  Capture efficiency means the fraction
of all organic-vapors generated by a
process that are directed to a control
device.
  Certified product data sheet (CPDSj
means documentation furnished by
coating or adhesive suppliers or an
outside laboratory that provides the
HAP content of a finishing matenal,
contact adhesive, or solvent, by percent
weight, measured using the EPA
Method 311 (as promulgated in this
subpart),  or an equivalent or alternative
method (or formulation data if the
coating meets the criteria specified in
§ 63.805(a)); the solids content of a
finishing  material or contact adhesive
by percent weight, determined using
data from the EPA Method 24. or an
alternative or equivalent method (or
formulation data if the coating meets the
criteria specified in § 63.80S(a)); and  the
density, measured by EPA Method 24 or
an alternative or equivalent method.
Therefore, the reportable HAP content
should represent the maximum
aggregate emissions potential of the
finishing  material, adhesive, or solvent
in concentrations greater than or equal
to 1.0 percent by weight or 0.1 percent
for HAP that are carcinogens, as defined
by the Occupational Safety and Health
Administration Hazard Communication
Standard (29 CFR part 1910). as
formulated. The purpose of the CPDS is
to assist the affected source in
demonstrating compliance with the
emission  limitations presented in
§63.802.
  (Note: Because the optimum analytical
conditions under EPA Method 311 vary by
coating, the coating or adhesive supplier may
also choose to include on the CPDS the
optimum analytical conditions for analysis of
the coating, adhesive, or solvent using EPA
Method 311. Such information may include.
but not be  limited to, separation column,
oven temperature, earner gas, miecnon port
temperature, extraction  solvent, and internal
standard.)
  Cleaning operations means operations
in which  organic solvent is used to
remove coating materials or adhesives
from equipment used in wood furniture
manufacturing operations.
  Coating means a protective.
decorative, or functional film applied in
a thin layer to a surface. Such materials
include, but are not limited to, paints,
topcoats, varnishes, sealers, stains,
washcoats, basecoats, enamels, inks,
and temporary protective coatings.
  Coating application station means the
part of a coating operation  where the
coating is applied, u.g . a spray booth.
  Canting operation means those
activities in which a coating is applied
to a substrntt' and is subsequently a;r-
(Inud, cured in an oven, or cured rv,
radiation
  Coating solids (or solids) means the
port of iho coating which remains after
the coating is dried or cured, solids
content is determined using data from
the EPA Method 24. or an equivalent or
alternative method.
  Compliant coating.'contact adhesive
means  a finishing matenal, contact
adhesive, or strippable booth coating
that meets the emission limits specified
in Table 3 of this subpart.
  Contact adhesive means an adhesive
that is applied to two substrates, dned.
and mated under only enough pressure
to result in good contact. The bond is
immediate and sufficiently strong to
hold pieces together without further
clamping, pressure, or ainng.
  Continuous coater means a finishing
system that continuously applies
finishing materials onto furniture parts
moving along a conveyor. Finishing
materials that are not transferred to the
part are recycled to a reservoir. Several
types of application methods can be
used with a continuous coater including
spraying, curtain coating, roll coating.
dip coating, and flow coating.
  Continuous compliance means that
the affected source is meeting the
emission limitations and other
requirements of the rule at all times and
is fulfilling all monitoring and
recordkeeping provisions of the rule in
order to demonstrate compliance.
  Control device means any equipment
that reduces die quantity of a pollutant
dial is emitted to die air. The device
may destroy or secure die pollutant for
subsequent recovery  Includes, but is
not limited to. incinerators, carbon
adsorbers, and condensers.
  Control device efficiency means the
ratio of die pollutant released by a
control device and the pollutant-
introduced to die control device.
  Control system means the
combination of capture  and control
devices used to  reduce emissions to the
atmosphere.
  Conventional air spray means a spray
coating method  in which the coating is
atomized by mixing it with compressed
-11 r and applied at an air pressure greater
than 10 pounds per square inch (gauge)
at the point of atomization. Airless and
air assisted airless spray technologies
are not conventional air spray because
the coating is not atomized by mixing it
with compressed air Electrostatic spray
technology is also not considered
conventional air spray because an
electrostatic charge is employed to
attract  the coating to the workpiui u.
  Data quality ob/cctivc (DQOl
approach means a set of approvni

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 02930   I>dorn!  Registrr '  Vol. GO. No. 235  /  Thursday.  December  7.  1995  /  Rules and Regulations
 rr.',.j";n 'ha! must ho met so that data
 from an alternative test method cnn be
 used .n determining thu cnpturu
 efficiency of 2 control system  For
 ,idii''ional information, see Cuidc/incs
 for Determining Caoturr Efficiency.
 lar.uar, 1994 IDocket No A-93-10.
 Item \'o  IV-B-1).
   Dnv means a period of 24 consecutive
 hours beginning at midnight iocal time,
 or beginning at a time consistent with a
 fac:i.;v's  operating schedule.
   D'.^oosed offsite means sending used
 organic solvent or coatings outside of
 the facility boundaries for disposal.
   Emission means the release or
s discharge, whether directly or
 indirectly, of HAP into  the ambient air.
   Enamel means a coat of colored
 material,  usually opaque, thai  is applied
 as a protective topcoat over a basecoat,
 primer, or previously applied enamel
 coats. In some cases, another finishing
 material may be applied as a topcoat
 over the enamel.
   Equipment leak means emissions of
 volatile hazardous air pollutants from
; pumps, valves, flanges, or other
'jequ.prnent used to transfer or apply
 coatings,  adhesives, or organic solvents.
   Equivalent method m.eans any method
 of sampling and analyzing for an air
 pollutant that has been  demonstrated to
 tne Administrator's satisfaction to have
 a consistent anc quantitatively known
 relationship to the reference method,
 ur.de: spec.fic conditions.
   Finishing material means a coating
 usec .r. the wood furniture industry.
 Such materials include, but are not
 l.r-.itec to. stains, basecoats, washcoats.
 er.arneis.  seaiers, and topcoats.
   r xisning operation means those
 operations in which a finishing material
 is appued to a substrate and is
 subsequently air-dned. cured in an
 o\ en or cured by radiation.
   roam adhesive means a contact
 aches.', e  used for gluing foam  to fabric.
 foam to foam, and fabric to wood.
   Gi'-:ng  operation means those
 operations .n which adhesives are used
 ',o ;om components, for example, to
 a-:p.y a laminate to a wood substrate or
 foam to fabric.
   Incidental wood furniture
 manufacturer means a major source that
 is primarily engaged in the manufacture
 of products other than  wood furniture or
 wood furniture components and that
 uses no more than 100 gallons per
 mon'.i:  of finishing material or adhesives
 .:'. the manufacture of wood furniture or
 wood furniture components.
   Incinerator means, for the purposes of
 ;,'i.b .ndiistry. an enclosed combustion
 uev.ce  ll'.at '.herm.iliy oxidizes volatile
 ur«,mic compounds to  CO and CO;  Tins
term does not include devices thnt burn
municipal or hnzanious waste material
  Janitorial mointenanct: means the
upkeep of equipment or building
str.iLJturcs that ;s not directly reUted to
:he manufacturing process, for example.
cleaning of restroom facilities.
  Lo^ur confidence limit fLCL)
approach means a set of approval
cr:!er.a that must be met so that data
from an alternative test method can be
used in determining the capture
efficiency of a control system. For
additional information, see Gu;de/ines
for Determining Capture Efficiency,
January 1994. [Docket No. A-93-10.
Item No. rV-B-1).
  Material safety data sheet (MSDS)
means the documentation required for
hazardous chemicals by the
Occupational Safety and Health
Administration (OSHA) Hazard
Communication Standard (29 CFR Part
1910} for a solvent, cleaning material,
contact adhesive, coating, or other
material that identifies select reportable
hazardous ingredients of the material,
safety and health considerations, and
hand'ling procedures.
  iVoncomp/i'anf coating/contact
adhesive means a finishing material,
contact adhesive, or stnppable booth
coating that has a VHAP content (VOC
content for the stnppable booth coating)
greater than the emission limitation
presented in Table 3 of this subpart._
  .Vonporous substrate means a surface
tnat is impermeable to liquids.
Examples include metal, ngid plastic.
flexible vinyl, and rubber.
  formally closed container means a
container that is closed unless an
operator is actively engaged in activities
such as emptying or filling the
container.
  Operating parameter value means  a
minimum or maximum value
established for a control  device or
process parameter that, if achieved by
iise;f or in combination with one or
more other operating  parameter values.
determines that an owner or operator
has complied with an applicable
emission limit.
  Organic solvent means a volatile
organic liquid that is used for dissolving
or dispersing constituents in a coating
or contact adhesive, adjusting the
viscosity of a coating or contact
adhesive, or cleaning equipment. When
used in a coating or contact adhesive,
the organic solvent evaporates during
drying and does not become a part of
the dried film.
  Ovrrnll control efficiency means the
efficiency of a control system,
calculated as the product of the capture
und control devicu efficiencies.
expressed .is n pcre.unt.iije
  Prr.7ione.Tf total "ic.'osurp means n
permanently installed enclosure "ha!
i.cmpletely surrounds a source of
emissions such that all emiss.ons are
raptured and contained for discharge
through a control device. For add.uor.a!
information, see Guidelines for
Determining Capture Efficiency. January
ISO-i  [Docket No. A-93-10. Item No.
IV-B-11.
  Rccvcled onsite means '.he reuse of an
organic solvent in a process other than
cleaning  or washoff.
  Reference method means any method
of sampling and analyzing for an air
pollutant that is published in Appendix
A of 40 CFR part 60.
  Research or laboratory facility means
any stationary source whose primary
purpose is to conduct research and
development to develop new processes
and products where such source is
operated under the close supervision of
technically trained personneLand is not
engaged in the manufacture of products
for commercial sale in commerce.
except in a de minimis manner.
  Responsible official has the meaning
given to it in 40 CFR part 70. State
Operating Permit Programs (Title V
permits).
  Sealer means a finishing material
used :o seal the pores of a wood
substrate before additional coats of
finishing material are applied Special
purpose finishing materials that are
used in some finishing systems to
optimize aesthetics are not seaiers,
  So/Vent means a liquid ased in a
coating or contact adhesive to dissolve
or disperse constituents and.'or to aa:ust
viscosity. It evaporates during drying
and does not become a part of the dried
film.
  Stan means any color coat having a
soLds content by weight of no more
than 3.0 percent that is applied in single
or multiple coats direct'.y to the
substrate It includes, but is not limited
to, nongram raising stains, equalizer
stains, prestams. sap stains, body stains
no-wipe stains, penetrating stains, ana
toners
  Storage containers means vessels or
tanks, .ncluding mix equipment, used to
hold finishing, gluing, cleaning, or
washoff materials
  Stnppable spray booth matenai
means a coating that:
  (1) is applied to a spray booth wail to
provide a protective film to receive
overspray during finishing operations.
  (2) That ii subsequently peeled off
and disposed, and
  (31 By achieving (1) and (-). reduc.es
or eliminates (ho need to use origan.t.
solvents to clean sprav booth wuils
  Siib.sfrntc Miiiaiis  tl.e surf.ic i- onto
wlm ti a Luatini; 01 ( ont.K '. ,iu!ii">iie  ^

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         Federal Register / Vol. 60. No.  235  /  Thursday.  December 7. 1095  /  Rules and Regulations   62939
anphcd (or into which a coating or
contact adhesive is impregnated).
  Temporary total enclosure moons an
enclosure that meets the requirements of
§ 63.805(e)(l) (i) through (iv) and is not
permanent, but constructed only to
measure the capture efficiency of
pollutants emitted from a given source.
Additionally, any exhaust point from
the enclosure shall be at least four
equivalent duct or hood diameters  from
each natural draft opening. For
additional information, see Guidelines
for Determining Capture Efficiency.
'lanuary 1994. (Docket No. A-93-10,
Item No. IV-B-1).
  Thinner means a volatile liquid'that is
used to dilute coatings or contact
adhesives (to reduce viscosity, color
strength, and solids, or to modify drying
conditions).
  Topcoat means the last film-building
finishing material that is applied in a
finishing system.
  Touchup and repair means the
application of finishing'materials to
cover minor finishing imperfections.
  VHAP means any volatile hazardous
air pollutant listed in Table 2 to Sub part
JJ.
  VHAP of potential concern means any
VHAP from the nonthreshold, high
concern, or unrankable list in Table b of
this subpart.
  Volatile organic compound (VOC)
means any organic compound which
participates in atmospheric
photochemical reactions, that is, any
organic compound other than those
which the Administrator designates as
having negligible photochemical
reactivity. A VOC may be measured by
a reference method, an equivalent
method, an alternative method, or by
procedures specified under any rule. A
reference method, an equivalent
method, or an alternative method.
however, may also measure nonreactive
organic compounds. In such cases,  the
owner or operator may exclude the
nonxeactive organic compounds when
determining compliance with a
standard. For a list of compounds that
the Administrator has designated as
having negligible photochemical
reactivity, refer to 40 CFR part 51.10.
  Washcoat means a transparent special
purpose finishing material having a
solids content by weight of 12.0 percent
by weight or less. Washcoats are  applied
over initial stains to protect, to control
color, and to stiffen the wood fibers in
order to aid sanding.
  Washoff operations means  those
operations in which organic solvent is
usud to remove coating from wood
furniture or a wood furniture
component.
   Wood furniture moons any product
 made of wood, a wood product such as
 rattan or wicker, or an engineered wood
 product such as particleboord that is
 manufactured under any of the
 following standard industrial
 classification codes: 2434, 2511. 2512,
 2517. 2519. 2521. 2531. 2541. 2599. or
 5712.
   Wood furniture component means any
 part that is used in the manufacture of
 wood furniture. Examples include, but
 are not limited to, drawer sides, cabinet
 doors, seat cushions, and laminated
 tops.
   Wood furniture manufacturing
 operations means the finishing, gluing,
 cleaning, and washoff operations
 associated with the production of wood
 furniture or wood himiture  '
 components.
   (b) The nomenclature used in this
 subpart has the following meaning:
   (1) Ak = the area of each natural draft
 opening (k) in a total enclosure, in
 square meters.
   (2) Co=the VHAP content of a
 finishing material (c), in kilograms of
 volatile hazardous air pollutants per
 kilogram of coating solids (kg VHAP/kg
 solids), as supplied.  Also given in
 pounds of volatile hazardous air
 pollutants per pound of coating solids
 (Ib VHAP/lb solids).
   (3) CtJ=the concentration of VHAP in
 gas stream (j) exiting the control device,
 in parts per million by volume.
   (4) Ce,=the concentration of VHAP in
 gas stream (i) entering the control
 device, in parts per million bv volume.
   (5) Ca,=the concentration of VHAP in
 gas stream (i) entering the control device
 from the affected source, in parts per
 million by volume.
  (6) Cnc='the concentration of VHAP in
 uncontrolled gas  stream (k) emitted
 directly to the atmosphere from the
affected source, in parts per million by
 volume.
  (7) E=the emission limit achieved by
an emission point or a set of emission
 points, in kg VHAP/kg solids (Ib VHAP/
 Ib solids).
  (8) F=the control device efficiency,
expressed as a fraction.
  (9) FV=the average inward face
velocity across all natural draft openings
in a total enclosure, in meters per hour.
  (10) G=the VHAP content of a contact
adhesive, in kg VHAP/kg solids (Ib
VHAP/lb solids), as applied.
  (11) M=the mass of solids in finishing
material used monthly, kg solids/month
(Ib solids/month).
  (12) N=the capture efficiency.
expressed as a fraction.
  (13) Q,j=the volumetric flow rate of
gas stream (j) exiting the control device.
in dry standard cubic meturs pur hour.
   (14) Qhl=tho volumetric How rntc of
 gas stream (i) entering the control
 device, in dry standard cubic meters per
 hour.
   (151 Qj,=the volumetric flow rate of
 gas stream (i) entering the control device
 from the emission point, in dry standard
 cubic meters per hour.
   (16) Ojv=the volumetric flow rate of
 uncontrolled gas stream (k) emitted
 directly to the atmosphere from the
 emission point, in dry standard cubic
 meters per hour.
   (17) Q,r,=the volumetric flow rate of
 gas stream (i) entering the total
 enclosure through a forced makeup air
 duct, in standard cubic meters per hour
 (wet basis).
   (18) Qoij=the volumetric flow rate of
 gas stream (j) exiting the total enclosure
 through an exhaust duct or hood, in
 standard cubic meters per hour (wet
 basis).
   (19) R=the overall efficiency of the
 control system, expressed as  a
 percentage.
   (20)  S=the VHAP content of a solvent,
 expressed as a weight fraction, added to
 finishing materials.
   (21)  W=the amount of solvent, in
 kilograms (pounds), added to finishing
 matenals during the monthly averaging
 period.
   (22)  ac=after the control system is
 installed and operated.
   (23)  bc=before control.

 § 53.802 Emission limits.
   (a) Each owner or operator  of an
 existing affected source subject to this
 subpart shall:
  (1) Limit VHAP emissions from
 finishing operations by meeting the
 emission limitations for existing sources
 presented in Table 3 of this subpart,
 using any of the compliance methods m
 § 63.804('a). To determine  VHAP
 emissions from a finishing material
 containing formaldehyde or styrene, the
 owner or operator of the affected source
 shall use the methods presented in
 § 63.803(0(2) for determining styrene
and formaldehyde usage.
  (2) Limit VHAP emissions from
contact adhesives by achieving a VHAP
 limit for contact adhesives based on the
 following criteria:
  (i) For foam adhesives (contact
adhesives used for upholstery
operations) used in products  that meet
the upholstered seating flammabihty
 requirements of California Technical
Bulletin 116. 117, or 133, the  Business
and Institutional Furniture
Manufacturers Association's (BIFMA's)
 X5.7. UFAC flammabihty  testing, or any
similar requirements from local. State.
or  Federal fire regulatory agencies,  tha
VHAP  content  of the adhesive stiall not

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02940  Federal Register   Voi  60, No.  235  /  Thursday.  December  7, 1905 .  R^.os  ar.a  3egti.-.t;or.s
ox reed 1.8 kg VHAP'kc; so i ids \\ 8 !b
V'HAP !h solids), as applied, or
  (11)  For nil other contact adhcsivcs
(including foam ndhesivus used in
products that do not meet the standard
presented in paragraph (a)(2!(i) of tins
section, but excluding aerosol adhesi\es
and excluding contact adhesives
applied to nonporous substrates, the
V'HAP content of the adhesive shall not
exceed 1 0 kg VHAP'kg solids t'l 0 !h
VHAP/lb solids), as applied.
  (3) Limit HAP emissions from
strippable spray booth coatings by using
coatings that contain no more than 0.8
kg VOC'kg solids (0.8 Ib VOC'lb solids).
as applied.
  (b) bach owner or operator of a new
affected source subject to  this subpan
shall:
  (1) Limit VHAP emissions from
finishing operations by meeting the
emission limitations for new sources
presented in Table 3 of this subpart
using any of the compliance methods in
§ 63.804('d). To determine V'HAP
emissions from a finishing material
containing formaldehyde  or styrene, the
owner or operator of the affected source
shall use the methods presented in
§ 53.803(1)(2) for determining styrene
and formaldehyde usage.
  (2} Limit VHA? emissions from
contact adhesives by achieving a VHA?
ii.-r.it for contact adhesives. excluding
aerosol adhesives and excluding contact
adhesives applied to nonporous
  .sstrates, of no greater than 0 2 kg
'. HA? 'kg solics fo.2 Ib  VHAP-'.b solids!.
as applied, using either of the
:orr'pliance methods in §63 304(e)
  !3) Limit HAP emissions from
strippable spray booth coatings by using
coatings that contain no more than 0 &
kg VOC'kg solids (0.8 Ib VOC'lb solids'),
as applied

§ S3.803  Work practice standards.
  (a)  r.ciiir cj'. s.
after tha leak is detected  ind
  (ii) Final repairs shall ~e made w.•.-..-
15 calendar days after ±e leak is
detected, unless the  lenk;ng oquipme-.t
is to be replaced by a new purchase ..-.
which case repairs shall be complete.
within three mor.ths.
  (d) Cleaning and washoff solver.:
accounting svs.'e.Ti Eoci owner or
operator of an affected source shall
develop an organic solvent account.r.g
form to record:
  (1) The quantity and type of orga...c
solvent used each month for washoff
and cleaning, as defined  in § 63.801 zt
this subpart;
  (2) The number of pieces washed off.
and the reason for the washoff; and
  (3) The quantity of spent solvent
generated from each washoff and
cleaning operation each month, and
whether it is recycled onsite or disposed
offsite.
  (e) Chemical composition ofcleanir.g
and washoff solvents. Each owner or
operator of an affected source shall not
use cleaning or washoff solvents that
contain any of the pollutants listed in
Table 4 to this subpart. in
concentrations subject tc MSDS
reporting as required by OSHA.
  if) Spray booth cleaning Eacric-.v—er
or operator of an affected source sha.l
not use cnmpounds containing mere
than 8.0 percent by weignt o:'. OC for
cleaning spray cccth corr.pcr.er.ts :'—?'
than conveyors, continuous coaters ar.-
tneu enclosures, or metal filters, 'jr-ess
the spray booth is being refurbished Lf
the spray booth is being refuroishec
that is the spray booth coating or other
protective material used to cover tze
booth is being replaced, lie affected
source shall use no more than l 3 za..c~
of organic solvent per booth to prepare
the surface of tie booth prior to
apolying the booth coa:.ng.
 ' (g)'Storcge requirement Each owner
or operator of an affected source sr.a..
use normal!v ciosec ccntair.ers for
storing Snisning, gluing, c.eaning. -".-
washoff materials.
  (h) Application equipment
requirements  Each owner or iperatcr z:
an affected source shall use
conventional air spray guns to apply
finishing materials only under ar.y of
the following circumstances:
  (1) To app:y finishing materials ih-t
have a VOC content no greater than : .
Ib V'OC/lb solids, as aopi.ed.
  (2) For touchup and repair under -.•-'
following conditions-
  ii) Thu toucliup and repair occ-J-s
nhur Lomplt'ti'jn of ti'.o ;".i.ih.:ii;
ODcraticn. or

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                Federal  Register
60. No  235   Thurseav  December
                                                                         62041
         (11) The touchup and repair occurs
       after the application of slam and before
       Lho application of any other typo of
       finishing material, and the materials
       used for touchup and repair arc applied
       from a container that has a volume of no
       more than 2.0 gallons
         (3) When spray is automated, that is.
       the spray gun is aimed and triggered
       automatically, not manually;
         (4) When e'missions from the finishing
       application station are directed to a
       control device;
         (5) The conventional air gun is used
       to apply finishing materials and the
       cumulative total usage of that finishing
       material is no more than 5.0 percent of
       the total gallons of finishing material
       used during that semiannual period; or
         (6) The conventional air gun is used
       to apply stain on a part for which it is
       technically or economically infeasible to
       use any other spray application
       technology.
         The affected source shall demonstrate
       technical or economic infeasibility by
       submitting to the Administrator a
       videotape, a technical report, or other
       documentation that supports the
       affected source's claim of technical or
       economic infeasibility. The following
       criteria shall be used, either
       independently or in combination, to
       support the affected source's claim of
       technical or economic infeasibilitv;
         (i) The production speed is too high
       or the part shape is too complex for one
       operator to coat the part and the
       application station is not large enough
       to accommodate an additional operator;
       or
         (ii) The excessively large vertical
       spray area of the part makes it difficult
       to avoid sagging or runs in the stain.
         (i) Line cleaning. Each owner or
       operator of an affected source shall
       pump or drain all organic solvent used
       for line cleaning into a normally closed
       container.
         (j) Gun cleaning. Each owner or
       operator of an affected source shall
       collect all organic solvent used to clean
       spray guns into a normally closed
       container.
          (k) Washoff operations. Each owner or
       operator of an affected source shall
       control emissions from washoff
       operations by:
          (1) Using normally closed tanks for
       washoff; and
          (2) Minimizing dripping by tilting or
       rotating the part to drain as much
       solvent as possible.
          (1) Formulation assessment plan for
       finishing operations Each owner or
       operator of an affected source shall
       prepare and maintain with the work
       practice implementation plan a
       formulation assessment plan that:
       (1) Identifies VHAP from the list
     presented in Table 5 of this subpart that
     are being used in finishing operations
     by the affected source;
       (2) Establishes a baseline level of
     usage by the affected source, for each
     VHAP identified in paragraph (DC) of
     this section. The baseline usage level
     shall be the highest annual usage from
     1994, 1995. or 1996, for each VHAP
     identified in paragraph (1)(1) of this
     section. For formaldehyde, the baseline
     level of usage shall be based on the
     amount of free formaldehyde present in
     the finishing material when it is
     applied. For styrene. the baseline level
     of usage shall be an estimate of
     unreacted styrene, which shall be
     calculated by multiplying the amount of
     styrene monomer in the finishing
     material, when it is applied, by a factor
     of 0.16. Sources using a control device
     to reduce emissions may adjust their
     usage based on the overall control
     efficiency of the control system, which
     is determined using the equation in
     § 63.805 (d) or (e).
       (3) Tracks the annual usage of each
     VHAP identified in (1)(1) by the affected
     source that is present in amounts
     subject to MSDS reporting as required
     by OSHA.
       (4) If. after November 1998, the
     annual usage of the VHAP identified in
     paragraph (1)(1) exceeds its baseline
     level, then the owner or operator of the
     affected source shall provide a written
     notification to the permitting authority
     that describes the amount of the
     increase and explains the reasons for
     exceedance of the baseline level. The
     following explanations would relieve
     the owner or operator from further
     action, unless the affected source is not
     in compliance with any State
     regulations or requirements for that
     VHAP:
       (i) The exceedance is no more than
     15.0 percent above the baseline level;
       (ii) Usage of the VHAP is below the
     de minimis level presented in Table 5
     of this subpart for that VHAP (sources
     using a control device to reduce
     emissions may ad)ust their usage based
     on the overall control efficiency of the
     control system, which is determined
     using the procedures in § 63.805 (d)  or
     (e);
       (iii) The affected source is in
     compliance with its State's air toxic
     regulations or guidelines for the VHAP:
     or
       (iv) The source of the pollutant is  a
     finishing material with a VQC content of
     no more than  1.0 kg VOC/kg solids (1.0
     Ib VOC/lb solids), as applied.
       (5) If none of the above explanations
     ore  tho reuson for the increase, the
     owner or operator shall confer with  tho
permitting authority to discuss the
reason for tho increase and whether
'hero are practical and reasonable
technology-based solutions for rucur.r.i;
the usage The evaluation of whether a
technology is reasonable and practical
shall be based on cost, quality, and
marketability of the product, whether
the technology is being used
successfully by other wood furniture
manufacturing operations, or other
criteria mutually agreed upon by the
permitting authority and owner or
operator. If there are no practical and
reasonable solutions, the facility need
take no further action. If there are
solutions, the owner or operator shall
develop a plan to reduce usage of the
pollutant to the extent feasible. The plan
shall address the approach to be used to
reduce emissions, a timetable for
implementing the plan, and a schedule
for submitting notification of progress.
  (6) If after November 1998, an affected
source uses a VHAP of potential
concern for which a baseline level has
not been previously established, then
the baseline level shall be established as
the de minimis level, based on 70 year
exposure levels and data provided in
the proposed rulemaking pursuant to
Section 11 2 (g) of the CAA, for that
pollutant. A list of VHAP of potential
concern is provided in Table 6 of this
subpart. If usage  of the VHAP of
potential concern exceeds the de
rmmmis level, then the affected source
shall provide an  explanation to the
permitting authority that documents the
reason for exceedance of the de minirnis
level. If the explanation is not one of
those listed in paragraphs (l)(4)(i)
through (l)(4)(iv). the affected source
shall follow the procedures established
in (1)(5).
§ 63.804  Compliance procedures and
monitoring requirements.
  (a) The owner  or operator of an
existing affected  source subject to
§ 63.802(a)(l) shall comply with those
provisions using any of the methods
presented in §63.804 (a)(l) through
     .
  (1) Calculate the average VHAP
content for all finishing materials used
at the facility using Equation l. and
maintain a value of E no greater than
1.0;
    S,W, -K SjW2 + '  *  ' Sn
    M<.2 f •  • • 1- NO     Equation 1
  (2} Use compliant finishing materials
according to the following criteria.
  (i) Demonstrate that each stain, sealer
and topcoat has a VHAP content of no
more than 1.0 kg VHAP/kg solids (1 0 Ib
VHAP/lb solids), as applied, and each
thinner contains no more than 10 Q
i.

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 f)2942   Federal Rrqistor    Vol  60. No  235
pore.:". '-liAP hv wo1?".; bv mruiitainin!?
ojrt.iipc: product data s;iuets for ead
• rrnt.r.c anc :;i,nner;
  •.in Demonstrate that each wash;,oat.
basucoot. and enamel that is purchased
pro-mace, tr.at is. it is not formulated
onsitc 3v tmn.iint; another fir.is;ung
material, has a VHAP content of no
more tnan  : 0 Kg VHAP kg solids (1 3 Ib
V HA? ib solids1,, as applied, ar.c each
:."i:::ner contains no more than 10 0
percent VHAP bv weigh: by maintaining
certified product data sheets for each
coat:nc and tninner xnd
  iiui Demonstrate that each washcoat.
basecoat. and enamel that is formulated
at the affected source is fonr.ulated
using a finishing material containing no
more than 1.0 kg VHAP'kg solids (1 0 Ib
VHAP/lb solids) and a thinner
containing no more than 3.0 percent
VHAP by weight.
  (3) Use a control system with an
overall control efficiency (R) such that
tne value of E*  in Equation 2  is no
greater than. 1.0.
R=:(EBC-E1K)/E«x](100)    Equation:
  The value of £<* in Equation 2 snail
be calculated using Equation 1. or
  (4) Use any combination of an
averaging approach, as described in
paragraph [a,'il] of this section.
compliant finishing materials, as
described :n paragraph iaj(2! of tnis
section, and a control system, as
described in paragraph (aM3) cf tr.is
section.
  'bl The owner or operator of an
affected source subject to
§ 63 802,aj(2](i) shall comply  with the
p-ovisicr.s by using compliant foam
achesives w.th a VHAP content r.o
greater than 1.3 kg VHAP'kg solids (I 8
.0 VHAP/'.b solids), as applied.
  'c) The owner or operator of cr.
affected source subject to
§ 53.3C2;aj(2!(:i) shall comply with
tnose provisions by using either of the
methods presented in § 63.304 (c)(l) and
ic.,2!
  ill Use compliant contact adhesives
%\ ;tn a VHAP content no greater than 1.0
kg VKA?;kg solids, (1 0 Ib VHAP.'lb
solicsi. as appi.ed. or
  12! Use a control system with an
overall control efficiency (R) such that
tr.e value of G*. is no greater than 1.0.
R=i(Gb(.-G».)''Gbe! UOO)    Equation 3
  (d) Tlit' owner or operator of a new
affected source subject to §63 802!b)(l)
rnc\ ccmpK with  those provisions by
us.nt> anv of the following methods
  I'D Ca.C'jljte the average \'H.AJ>
content across all  finishing materials
used at the  facility using Equation  1.
and  maintain a value of E no greater
than C 3
  ;_; Use compliant finishing  materials
aci-oriiuig to tin- iolluwir.j; criteria
  (i) Demonstrate thai earn sealer and
topcoat has j VHAP content of no rnnrc
tlian n ,'i ki} \'H.\p  k,; solids in '] Ib
VK.'.r1 !b solids;,  is anol.t'd, cm i'. s:ain
r.as .1 \'HAP content of no more th in  1 0
Krf VHAP/kg soiicsil 'J ,b VHAP I'D
sonds). TS apaLed. ami each thinner
contains no more than  10 0 percent
VHAP by weight.
  (n) Demonstrate that each •Aabhcoct.
basecoat. and enamel that is purchased
pre-made. that is. it is not formulated
onsite by thinning another finishing
material, has a VHAP content of no
more than O.S kg VHAP/kg solids JO 3 Ib
VHAP/lb solids), as applied, and each
thinner contains r.o more than 100
percent VHAP by weignt; and
  (lii) Demonstrate that each washcoat.
basecoat. and enamel that is formulated
onsite is formulated using a finishing
material containing no more than 0.8 kg
VHAP/kg solids (0.8 Ib VHAP/lb solids)
and a thinner containing no more than
3.0 percent HAP by weight.
  (3)  Use a control system with an
overall control efficiency (R) such that
'he value of E^. in Equation 4 is no
greater than 0.8.
R=i(Eoc-E»e)/EbJ(100)    Equation 4
  The value of E^  in Equation 4 snail
be calculated using Equation 1; or
  (4) Use any combination of an
averaging approach, as described in
(d!(l), compliant finishing materials,  as
described in (d)(2), and a control
system, as described in (d)(3)
  (e> The owner or operator of a new
affected source subject  to § 63 802;'b!(2)
snail comply with the provisions us.ng
either of the following methods
  (1; Use compliant contact adhesives
w.th a VHAP content no greater '.nan  0.2
kg VHAP/kg solids (0.2 !b VHAP.'lb
solids), as applied, or
  (2) Use a  control system with an
overall control efficiency (R] such that
the value of Cx m Equation 3 is no
greater than 0.2.
  (f)  Initial compliance 'l!  Owners or
operators of an affected source surrec: to
the provisions of § 63 302 tal(l) or ioU:)
that comply through the procedures
established in §63.804  ialUj or idlll)
shall submit the results of the averr.gmg
calculation (Equation 1) for 'he iirit
month with the initial compliance
status report required by § G3 807(b)
The first month's calculation shall
include data for the entire month in
which the compliance date  fa lib. For
example, if the source's compliance djie
is November 21, 1997, '.lie averaging
calculation  shall include data from
November 1, 1997 to November 3D.
I'JH"
  (2) Owners or operators of nn afferted
source subject to the provisions of
 ^r,T 302 ,'.i;;:; or  :>!U, t:;at -CT.P.-
 ttinumh thp procedures osntj..vt- i   .
 §03 304 ;.i)!2; or 'dl,2; shall v..•-,.-. : •-.
 initial corr.piinni o status rcrior  .-•
 rnquirt'd by (JO3 OOribl. stn'.ina t1 '.'
 compliant stains.  wasncn,its. SO.T.-.--S
 topcoats, basecoats. enameii, TIC
 tmnners. is anpiicable. are beinc ..=e-
 by :::e affectea source
  (3) Owners or ooerntors of an affer-.-d
 source subject to tne provisions cf
 §63 802 (a)(l) ortbiC', that are
 complying through the proceaures
 estaolished in §63 804 ia)(2; or ta',,2.
 and are applying coatings using
 continuous coaters shall dernonstrre
 initial compliance by
  (i) Submitting an initial compliance
 status report, as required by § 5." 3C""b!
 stating that compliant coatings, as
 determined by the VHAP content cf tr.e
 coating  in the reservoir and the VHA?
 content as calculated from records: ;r.d
 compliant thinners are being used, or
  (u) Submitting an initial compliance
 status report, as required by § S3.30r;bi.
 stating '.hat compliant coatings, as
 determined by the VHAP content cf the
 coating  in the reservoir, are being used.
 the viscosity of the coating in the
 reservoir is being monitored: and
 compliant th.nners are being used Tr.e
 affected source shall also submit  -cti
 tnat demonstrate thit viscosity .s ar.
 appropriate parameter for cemcr.sratir.j
 compliance
  (4) Owners or operators of an affgctez
 source subject to the provisions of
 §63.802 (a)(l) or (b;(l; that comoiy
 througn the procedures establ.shed .r.
 § 53.304 (a)(3) or (d)(2) shall
 aemonstrate initial compliance (?\
  (.] Suomnting a monitoring plan thr.
 identifies each operating parameter t;
be monitored for tne capture device ;.-.d
discusses why each parameter .s
appropriate for demonstrating
continuous compliance.
  (u) Conducting an initial perfcrrr.inzs
 test as required under § 53.7 using tr.e
 procedures and test methods l.stec  r.
 ^53 ~ and §63 805 icj and id) or  e.
  (iii) Calculating the overaa control
efficiency (R) following the procedures
 in § 63 805 (d) or (e): and
  (iv) Determining those operating
conditions critical to determining
compliance and estabhsning one  or
 more operating parameters that will
ensure compliance with the stance's
  (A) For compliance wit.'i a thermal
 incinerator, minimum combust.or.
temperature shall  be the operating
parameter.
  (D) For compliance with a cutalv: t
incinerator oquippoti with ,1 li
-------
         Federal  Roqistcr
GO. No   233 I Thurscinv.  December  ". 1005 /
     Ruins jnu r\ot;'..ci!.or.s
.lowustrcMin of t'so catalyst bud shall bo
'ho oi-erntint; parameter
  iC) for Compliance with a catalytic
•r.c.:iera:cr equipped with a fluidizod
catalvst bed. the minimum gas
•,e:v.perriturc upstream of the catalyst
bee and t.U- pressure drop across the
ca'.r.'.yst uea shall  be the operating
oanmeters
   (Dl For compliance with a carbon
adsorber, the operating parameters shall
be the total regeneration mass stream
fiow for each regeneration cycle and the
carbon bed temperature after each
regeneration, or the concentration level
of organic compounds exiting the
adsorber, unless the owner or operator
requests and receives approval from the
Administrator to establish other
operating parameters.
   (E) For compliance with a control
device not  listed in this section, one or
more operating parameter values shall
be established using the procedures
identified in § 63.804(g)(4)(vi).
   [v] Owners or operators complying
with § 63.804(f)(4) shall calculate each
site-specific operating parameter value
as the' arithmetic average  of the
maximum  or minimum operating
parameter values, as appropriate, that
demonstrate compliance  with the
standards,  during the three test runs
required by §63.805(c)(l).
   (5) Owners or operators of an affected
source suoiect to the provisions of
§ 63 302 (aj(2) or fb)(2) that comply
through the procedures established in
§ 53 804 (b),~(c;U). or (ej(l), shall submit
an initial compliance status report, as
required by § 63 807fb), stating that
compliant contact adhesives are  being
used by the affected  source.
   {6} Owners or operators of an affected
source subject to  the provisions of
§  63 802 ia)(2)(ii) or fb)(2) that comply
through the procedures established in
§53 804 !c)(2)or(e)(2), shall
demonstrate initial compliance by:
   !i) Suomitting a monitoring plan that
identifies each operating parameter to
be monitored for  the capture device and
 d.scusses why each parameter is
 appropriate for demonstrating
 continuous compliance;
   Jn) Conducting an initial performance
 test as required under § 63.7 using the
 procedures and test  methods listed in
 § 63.7 and § 63.805 (c) and !d) or (e);
   (nil Calculating the overall control
 efficiency (R) following the procedures
 m §G3 80S (d) or (e). and
   (iv) Determining those operating
 conditions critical to determining
 compliance and establishing one or
 more operating parameters that will
 ensure compliance with  the standard
   (A) For  compliance with a thermal
 incinerator, minimum combustion
     temperature stiaii be the operating
     parameter
       [3) For compliance with a catalytic
     incinerator equipped with a fixed
     catalyst bed. ihe minimi.m gas
     temperature both upstream and
     downstream of the catalyst shall be the
     operating parameter
       (C) For compliance with a catalytic
     incinerator equipped with a fluidned
     catalyst bed. the minimum gas
     temperature upstream of the catalyst
     bed and  the pressure drop across the
     catalyst bed shall be the operating
     parameters.
       (v) Owners or operators complying
     with § 63.804(0(6) shall calculate' each
     site-specific operating parameter value
     as the arithmetic average of the
     maximum or minimum operating values
     as appropriate, that demonstrate
     compliance with the standards, during
     the three test runs required by
     §63.805(c)(l).
       (7) Owners or operators of an affected
     source subject to the provisions of
     §63.802 (a)(3) or fb)(3) shall submit an
     initial compliance status report, as
     required by § 63.807fb). stating that
     compliant stnppable spray booth
     coatings are being used by the affected
     source.
       (8) Owners or operators of an affected
     source subject to the work practice
     standards in § 63.803 shall submit an
     initial compliance status report, as
     required by § 63.807(b), stating that the
     work practice implementation plan has
     been developed and procedures have
     been established for implementing the
     provisions of the plan.
       (g) Continuous compliance
     demonstrations. (1)  Owners or operators
     of an affected source subject to the
     provisions of § 63.802 (a)(l) or (b)(l)
     that comply through the procedures
     established in § 63.804 (a)(l) or (d)(l)
     shall demonstrate continuous
     compliance by submitting the results of
     the averaging calculation (Equation 1)
     for each month within that semiannual
     period and submitting a compliance
     certification with the semiannual report
     required by §63.807(c).
       U) The compliance certification shall
     state that the value of (E), as calculated
     by Equation 1. is no greater than 1.0 for
     existing sources or 0.8 for new sources.
     An affected source is in violation of the
     standard if E is greater than 1.0 for
     existing sources or 0.8 for new sources
     for any month. A violation of the
     monthly average is a separate violation
     of the standard for each day of operation
     during the month, unless the affected
     source can demonstrate through records
     that the violation of the monthly avernye
     can be attributed to a particular day or
     davs during the ponod.
  (ii! The
lie sigr.ed in .1 ri.'spons.Dn: oi'.i' .n z\  .,!•
company thai owns or operates :.,e
affected source
  (2) Owners or operators of an a:"fe: !f:
source subject to the previsions cf
§63 802 ;a)C; or ^bHD that comply
through the procedures esiabhsnec .n
§63.804 (a)(2) or!d)Ci shall
demonstrate continuous compliance c>
using compliant coatings and thinners.
maintaining records that demonstrate
the coatings and thinners are compliant.
and submitting a compliance
certification with the semiannual report
required by § 63.807(c;.
  (i) The compliance certification shau
state that compliant stains, washcoats.
sealers, topcoats, basecoats, enamels.
and thinners, as applicable, have beer.
used each day m the semiannual
reporting period or should otherwise
identify the periods of noncomphance
and the reasons for noncompliance. An
affected source is in violation of the
standard whenever a noncompliant
coating, as demonstrated by records or
by a sample of the coating, is used.
 '(ii) The  compliance certification shall
be signed  by a responsible official of the
company that owns or operates the
affected source.
  (3) Owners or operators of an affected
source subject to the provisions  of
§ 63.802 (a)(l) or (b)(l) that are
complying through the procedures
established in §61.804  (a)(2) or(d;(2]
and are applying coatings using
continuous coaters shall demonstrate
continuous compliance by following tr.e
procedures in paragraph (gj(3) (i) or m)
of this section.
  (i) Using compliant coatings, as
determined by the VHAP content of the
coating in the reservoir and the VKA?
content as calculated from records.
using compliant thinners. and
submitting a compliance certification
with the semiannual report requirec by
§63.807(c).
   (A) The compliance certification snail
state that  compliant coatings have been
used each day in the semiannual
reporting  period, or should otherwise
identify the days of noncomphance ana
the reasons for noncomphance  An
affected source is m violation of the
standard whenever a noncompliant
coating, as determined by records or by
a sample of the coating, is used  Use of
a noncompliant coating is a separate
violation  for each day tho noncomphant
coating is used.
   (B) the compliance certification shall
be signed by a responsible official of the
company  that owns or operates  the
affected source
   (11) Using compliant coatings, as
determined by tho VHAP content of the

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02944   rcdrr.il  Rncistnr / Vol.  GO.  No. 235  /  Thursday, December 7. 1995  /  Rules  ar.d R-JC-
coating ;n the reservoir, us.ng compliant
thinners. mnintninmg n viscosity of the
co.itmg in tho reservoir that is no less
•.nan the viscosity of the initial coating
bv monitoring the viscosity with a
Mscosity meter or by testing the
viscosity of the initial coating and
retesting the coating in the reservoir
each time solvent is added, maintaining
records of solvent additions, ar.d
submitting a compliance certification
with the semiannual report required by
§5380:;c).
  (A) The compliance certification shall
state that compliant coatings, as
determined by die VHAP content of the
coating in the reservoir, have been used
each day in the semiannual reporting
period. Additionally, the certification
shall state that the viscosity of the
coating in the reservoir has not been less
than the viscosity of the initial coating,
that is. the coating that is .nitially mixed
and placed in the reservoir, for any day
:n the semiannual reporting penod.
  (B) The compliance certification shall
be signed by a responsible official of the
company that owns or operates trie
affected source.
  (C) An affected source is in violation
of the standard when a sample of the as-
applied coating exceeds the applicable
limit established in §63.804 (a)(2) or
(d}(2). as determined using EPA Method
311, or the viscosity of the coating in the
reservoir is less than the viscosity of the
.r.-.t.ai coating
  '4< Owners or operators of an affected
source suoiect to the provisions o:
§ 63.802 (a)(l) or (b)(i)  that comply
through the procedures established in
§53 B04(a',(3) or(d)(3) snail
demonstrate continuous compliance by
installing, calibrating, maintaining, and
operating the appropriate monitoring
equipment according to manufacturer's
specifications. The owner  or operator
shall also submit  the excess emissions
and continuous monitoring system
performance report and summary report
required by § 63.807(dj and § 63 'lO(e) of
suooart A.
   (i'l Where a capture/control device is
used, a device to monitor each site-
specific operating parameter estaolished
in accordance with § 63.804(f](6)[i) is
recuired.
   f;i) Where an incinerator is used, a
temperature monitoring device
equipped with a continuous recorder is
required
  (A) Where a thermal incinerator ,s
used, a temperature monitoring dcv .r.o
shall be installed in the firebox or :n the
ductwork immediately downstream of
tne firebox in a position before any
suostantial heat exchange occurs.
  (B) Where a catalytic incinerator
equipped with a fixed catalyst bed is
used, temperature monitoring devices
shall be installed in the gas stream
immediately before and after the
catalyst bed.
  (C) Where a catalytic incinerator
equipped with a fluidized catalyst bed
is used, a temperature monitoring
device shall be installed in the gas
stream immediately before the bed. In
addition, a pressure monitoring device
shall be installed to determine the
pressure drop across the catalyst bed.
The pressure drop  shall be measured
monthly at a constant flow rate.
  (iii) Where a carbon adsorber is used
one of the following is required:
  (A) An integrating stream flow
monitoring device  having an accuracy of
±10 percent, capable of recording the
total regeneration stream mass flow for
each regeneration cycle: and a carbon
bed temperature monitoring device.
having an accuracy of ±1 percent  of the
temperature being  monitored or ±0 5 'C,
whichever is greater,  and capable of
recording the carbon  bed temperature
after each regeneration and within 15
minutes of completing any cooling
cycle:
 ' (B) An  organic monitoring device
equipped with a continuous recorder, to
indicate the concentration level of
organic compounds exiting the carbon
adsorber: or
  (C) Any other monitoring device that
has been  approved by the Administrator
in accordance with §63.804(f)(4)(iv)(D).
  (ivj Owners or operators of an affected
source shall not operate the capture or
control device at a  daily average value
greater than or less than (as appropriate)
the operating parameter values. The
daily average value shall be calculated
as the average of all values for a
monitored parameter recorded during
the operating day.
  (v) Owners or operators of an affected
source that are complying through the
usfl of a C3',ily..c incinor.Tor ocuipo:
with a  fluiciizuc cata'.y.t b^ii sha ',
maintain 3 ror.sta?.! pressure 2r~u
measured rr.onthiv, icross trie cat:,.- *:
bod.
  (vi) An owner or operator :v:\z c.^-s -
control device not listed .n § 6j-r     4,
shall submit, for the Administrate.
approval, a description of tne device.
test data  verifying performance, inc
appropriate site-specific operating
parameters that will be monncrec '3
demonstrate continuous compiiar.ee
with the  standard
  (5) Owners or operators of an affectec
source subiect to the provisions of
§ 63.802  (a)(2) (i) or (n) or fb)Cj that
comply through the procedures
established in §63.804 (b). (c)(l). or
(e)(l). shall submit a compliance
certification with the semiannual repcr.
required by § 63.807(c).
  (i) The compliance certification shall
state that compliant contact and/or fcarn
adhesives have been used each day  in
the semiannual reporting period, or
should otherwise identify each day
noncomphant contact and/or foam
adhesives were used. Each day a
noncompliant contact or foam adhesive
is used is a single violation of the
standard.
  (n) The compliance aerification shall
be signed by a responsible official of tr.e
company that owns or operates the
affected source.
  (6) Owners or operators of an affectec
source subject to the provisions of
§63 802  !a)(2)(i:) or (b)l2; that corr.p'.y
through the procedures estaons.-.ec  ."
§63.804  (c)(2) or iel(2),shau
demonstrate continuous compliance b>
installing, calibrating, maintain.r.g ar.c.
operating tne appropriate monitoring
equipment according to the
manufacturer's specifications The
owner or operator shall also sub TV. .'.  -.r.t;
excess emissions and continuous
monitoring system performance -epcr
and summary report required by
§63 807(d) and §63.10(e! of sucpar: \
of this pan.
  (i) Where a capture/control device ,s
used, a device to monitor each site-
specific operating parameter esta5ii?".cd
in accordance with § 63 804;f;i6;U,  .3
required.

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         Federal  Register •'  Vol. GO. No  235 / Thursday. Doccmbnr 7, 1005  /  Rules a::d
                                                                    0204')
  (n) Where an incinerator is used, a
temperature monitoring device
equipped with a continuous recorder is
required.
  (A) Where a thermal incinerntor is
used, a temperature monitoring device
shall be installed in the firebox or in the
ductwork immediately downstream of
the firebox  in a position before any
substantial  heat exchange occurs.
  (B) Where a catalytic incinerator
equipped with a fixed catalyst bed is
used, temperature monitoring devices
shall be installed in the gas stream
immediately before and after the
catalyst bed.
  (C) Where a catalytic incinerator
equipped with a fluidized catalyst bed
is used, a temperature monitoring
device shall be installed in the gas
stream immediately before the bed.  In
addition, a  pressure monitonng device
shall be installed to measure the
pressure drop across the catalyst bed.
The pressure drop  shall be measured
monthly at  a constant flow rate.
  (iii) Where a carbon adsorber is used
one of the following is required:
  (A) An integrating stream flow
monitoring device  having an accuracy of
±10 percent, capable of recording the
total regeneration stream mass flow for
each regeneration cycle: and a carbon
bed temperature monitoring device.
having an accuracy of ±1 percent of the
temperature being  monitored or ±0.5 °C,
whichever  is greater, and capable of
recording the carbon bed temperature
after each regeneration and within 15
minutes of completing any cooling
cycle;
  ' (B) An organic monitonng device.
equipped with a continuous recorder, to
 indicate the concentration level of
organic compounds exiting the carbon
adsorber or
   (C) Any  other monitoring device that
has been approved by the Administrator
in accordance with §63.804(f)(4)(iv)(D).
   (iv) Owners or operators of an affected
source shall not operate the capture or
control device at a daily average  value
 greater than or less than (as appropriate)
 the operating parameter values. The
 daily average value shall be calculated
 as  the average of all values for a
 monitored parameter recorded during
 the operating day
   (v) Owners or operators of an affected
 source  trial are complying through  the
 use of a catalytic incinerator equipped
 with a  fluidized catalyst bed shall
 maintain a constant pressure drop.
 measured  monthly, across the catalyst
 hud
   (•. i) An owner or operator using a
 control uevice not listed in this section
 snail submit to the Administrator J
 description of the device, test data
verifying thu performance of tlin device.
mid appropriate operating parameter
values that will bo monitored lo
demonstrate continuous compliance!
with tho standard. Compliance using
this device is subject to the
Administrator's approval.
  (7) Owners or operators of an  affected
source subject to the provisions of
§63 802 (a)(3) or (b)(3) shall submit a
compliance certification with the
semiannual report required by
§63807(c).
  (i) The •compliance certification shall
state that compliant strippable spray
booth coatings have been used each day
in the semiannual reporting period, or
should otherwise identify each  day
noncompliant materials were used. Each
day a noncompliant strippable booth
coating is used is a single violation of
the standard.
  (ii) The compliance certification shall
be signed by a responsible official of the
company that owns or operates the
affected source.
  (8) Owners or operators of an affected
source subject to the work practice
standards in § 63.803 shall submit  a
compliance certificalion with the
semiannual report required by
§63.807(c).
  (i) The compliance certification shall
state that the work practice
implementation plan is being followed,
or should otherwise identify the
provisions of the plan  that have not
been implemented and each day the
provisions were not implemented.
During any period of time that an owner
or operator is required to  implement the
provisions of the plan, each failure to
implement an obligation under the plan
dunna any particular day is a violation.
  (ii) The compliance  certification shall
be signed by a responsible official  of the
company that owns or operates the
affected source.
§ 63.805  Performance test methods.
  (a) The EPA Method 311 of Appendix
A of part 63 shall be used in
conjunction with formulation data to
determine the VHAP content of the
liquid coating. Formulation data shall
be used to identify VHAP present  in the
coating. The EPA  Method 311 shall then
be  used to quantify those VHAP
identified through formulation data. The
EPA Method 311 shall not be used to
quantify HAP  such as styrene and
formaldehyde that are emitted  during
the cure The EPA Method 24 (40 CFR
pan 60. Appendix A)  shall be used to
determine the solids content by weight
and the density of coatings. If it is
demonstrated to the satisfaction of Uie
 Administrator that a coating does  nut
 release VOC or HAT byproducts during
the cure for uxamplc. a.! VOC im: i'.AP
present in the coaling is solvent, thfn
batch formulation information sh.ul »e
accepted. The owner or operator of ..n
affected source may request approval
from the Administrator to use an
alternative method for determining ;he
VHAP content of the coating  In the
event of any inconsistency between the
EPA Method 24 or Method 311 test data
and a facility's formulation data, that is.
if the EPA Method 24/311 value is
higher, the EPA Method 24/311 test
shall govern unless after consultation, a
regulated source could demonstrate to
the satisfaction of the enforcement
agency that the formulation data were
correct. Sampling procedures shall
follow the guidelines presented in
"Standard Procedures for Collection of
Coating and Ink Samples for VOC
Content Analysis by Reference Method
24 and Reference Method 24A," EPA-
340/1-91-010. (Docket No. A-93-10.
Item No. IV-A-1).
  (b) Owners or operators
demonstrating compliance in
accordance with § 63.804 (fl(4) or (f)(6)
and § 63.804 (g)(4) or (g)(6). or
complying with any of the other
emission limits of § 63.802 by operating
a capture or control device shall
determine the overall control efficiency
of the control system (R) as the product
of the capture and control device
efficiency, using the test methods cited
in § 63.805(c) and the procedures :n
§63.805 (d)or(e).
  (c) When an initial compliance
demonstration is required by § 63 804
(f)(4) or (f)(6)  of this subpart. the
procedures in paragraphs (c)(l) through
(c)(6) of this section shall be used in
determining initial compliance with the
provisions of this subpart.
  (1) The EPA Method 18 (40 CFR pan
60. Appendix A) shall be used to
determine the HAP concentration of
gaseous air streams. The test  shall
consist of three separate runs, each
lasting a minimum of 30 minutes.
   (2) The EPA Method 1 or 1A (40 CFR
part 60. Appendix A) shall bs used for
sample and velocity traverses.
   (3) The EPA Method 2. 2A. 2C. or 2D
(40 CFR part  60. Appendix A) shall he
used to measure velocity and volumetric
flow rates.
   (4) The EPA Method 3 (40  CFR part
60. appendix A) shall bu used to analyze
the exhaust gases.
   (5) The EPA Method 4 (40  CFR part
GO. Appendix A) shall be used to
 measure the moisture in the stock gab
   (G) The EPA Methods  2. 2A. 1C. -1.0,
 3. and 4 shall be por'.onued. as
 applicable, at leas! twice during eacii
 test period

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f>294()  Federal Rcc;ister
60. No.  235 / Thursday.  December 7,  1095 / Rales  nr.d  Ree'ilaticr.s
  Iri; C.ic.h owner or operator ol an
nfrt/r:ed source demonstrating
compliance in accordance with §63 804
 f!'4, or (0(6)  shall perform a gaseous
emission test using the following
procedures'
   II Construct the overall HA?
emission reduction system so that all
volumetric flow  rates and  total HAP
emissions can be accurately determined
by the applicable test methods specified
in § 63 805(c) (1) through (6);
  (2j Determine capture efficiency from
the affected emission point(s) by
capturing, venting, and measuring all
HAP emissions from the affected
emission point(s). Dunng a performance
test, the owner or operator shall isolate
     affected emission poinl(s) located in an
     area with otncr nonaffectcd qnsoous
     emission sources from all other gnscous
     emission potnl(s) hv any of the
     foiiow ;r.g methods.
       (i: 3u.:d a temporary1 total enclosure
     (see 5 53 301) around''.he affected
     emission pomt;s). or
       (11) Use the building that houses the
     process as the enclosure (see §63 801).
       (iii) Use any alternative protocol and
     test method provided they meet either
     the requirements of the data quality
     obiective (DQO) approach or the  lower
     confidence level (LCL) approach (see
     §63 801);
       (iv) Shut down all nonaffected HAP
     emission point(s) and continue to
     exhaust fugitive emissions from the
affected emission poi-.t's  T-rcu^" ;-,•.
building v'ef.tiint.ori v.sier". ar.vl ?;:•,'"•
room exMausts snr:\ as cr. .re OVP.-S  \'.\
ex.'iatis; air musi be •.er.tcc: "iro'.j",
stacks suitable for testing  or
  (v] Use anotre' met.h.ocologv
approved bv the Administrator prcv..:e:..
ii compiles with the EPA criteria for
acceptance under part 63. appendix A.
Method 301.
  (3) Operate the control device with :'.!
affected emission points that will
subsequently be delivered to the cor.'.rc:
device connected and operating at
maximum production rate;
  (4) Determine the efficiency (F) of the
control aevice  using the following
equation:
  F -

                                                                    (Equation 5)
  (5) Determine the efficiency (N) of the
capture system using the following
equation.
                                    N =
                                 (Equation 6)
  (6) For each affected source
complying with § 63.802(a)(i) in
accordance with §63.804(a)(3).
compliance is demonstrated if the
product of (FxN)dOO) yields a value (R)
such that the value of EK in Equation 2
is no greater than 1.0.
  [~] For each new affected source
complying with § 63.802fb)(l) in
accordance with §63.804(d)(3),
compliance is demonstrated if the
product of (FxN)dOO) yields a value (R)
suca mat the value of E,* in Equation 4
is no greater than 0.8.
  (3) For each affected source
complying with § 63 802(a)(2)(ii) in
accordance with § 63.804(c)(2),
compliance is demonstrated if the
product of (FxN)(100) yields a value (R)
such mat the value of G* in Equation
3 is  no greater than 1.0.
  (9) For each new affected source
complying with § 63.802(b)(2) in
accordance with § 63.804(e)(2).
compliance is demonstrated if (he
product of (FxN)dOO) yields a value (R)
     such that the value of GK in Equation
     3 is no greater than 0.2.
       (e) An alternative method to the
     compliance method in §63.805(d) is the
     installation of a permanent total
     enclosure around the affected emission
     pomt(s). A permanent total enclosure
     presents prima facia evidence that all
     HAP emissions from the affected
     emission point(s) are directed :o the
     control device. Each affected source that
     complies using a permanent total
     enclosure shall:
       (1) Demonstrate that the total
     enclosure meets the requirements in
     paragraphs (e)(l) (i) through (iv). The
     owner or operator of an enclosure that
     does not meet these requirements may
     apply to the Administrator for approval
     of the enclosure as a total enclosure on
     a case-by-case basis. The enclosure shall
     be considered a total enclosure if it is
     demonstrated to the satisfaction of the
     Administrator that all HAP emissions
     from the affected emission  point(s) are
     contained and vented to the control
device. The requirements for automatic
approval are as follows:
  (i) The total area of all natural draft
openings shall not exceed 5 percent of
the total surface area of the total
enclosure's walls, floor, and ceiling:
  (n) All sources of emissions within
the enclosure shall be a minirr.um of
four equivalent diameters away from
each natural draft opening;
  (in) The average inward face velocity
(FV) across all natural draft openings
shall be a minimum of 3.600 meters per
hour as determined by the following
procedures.
  (A) All forced makeup air ducts and
all exhaust ducts are constructed so that
the volumetric flow rate  in each can be
accurately determined by the test
methods specified in § 63.805 (c)(2) and
(3). Volumetric flow rates shall be
calculated without the adfustment
normally made for moisture content.
and
  (D) Determine FV by the following
equation:

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         Federal  Register   Vol.  60,  No. 235  / Thursday, December 7.  1095  /  R.iirs .inc. K^'.;.v.:-;s   r>2947
FV = —
                                                                  (Equation 7)
  (iv) All access doors and windows
\vhose areas are not included as natural
draft openings and are not included in
the calculation of FV shall be closed
during rouune operation of the process.
  (2) Determine the control device
efficiency using Equation (5), and the
test methods and procedures specified
in §63.805 (c)(l) through (6).
  (3) For each affected source
complying with § 63.802(a)(l) in
accordance with §63.804(a)(3),
compliance is demonstrated if:
  (i) The installation of a permanent
total enclosure is dsmonstrated {N=l};
  (ii) The value of F is determined from
Equation 15); and
  lui) The product of (FxN)dOO) yields
a value (R! such that the value of Eac in
Equation 2 is no greater than 1 0.
  (4) For each new affected source
complying with §63.802fb)(l) in
accordance with § 63.304(d)(3),
compliance is demonstrated if-
  (i) The installation of a permanent
total enclosure is demonstrated (N = 1),
  (11) The value of F is determined from
Equation [5;; and
  <:u) The product of [F*N)(iOO! yields
a value tRJ such that the value of E« iri
Equation 4 :s no greater than 0.8
  ,5) For each affectec source
complying with §63 802;a)(2)(ii) in
accordance with §63 804v'c)(2j.
compliance :s demonstrated if.
  (ii The installation of a permanent
total enc.osare is demonstrated (N=l).
  In) The value of F is determined from
Zcuation (5)  and
  ';..:, The product of (FxNKlOO) yields
a \ alue (RJ such that tne value of Gac in
Equation 3 is no greater than 1.0.
  '6) For each new affected source
complying with § 63.802(b)(2) in
accordance with § 63.804(e](2).
compliance is demonstrated if:
  (i) The installation of a permanent
total enclosure is demonstrated (N=l);
   In) The value of F is determined from
Equation J5). and
  Uii) The product of (FxNJ(lOO) yields
a value (R) such that the value of Cx in
Equation 3 is no greater than 0.2.

§ 63.805  Recordfceeplng requirements.
   (n) The owner or operator of an
affected source sublet to this subpart
sriol! fulfil! all recordkueping
requirements of §63 10 of subpnrt A.
according to the applicability cnturia in
§ GT 8GU(«! of this subpnrt
   fb) The owner or operator of an
 affected source subject to the emission
 limits in § 63.802 of this subpart shall
 maintain records of the following:
   (1) A certified product data sheet for
 each finishing material, thinner, contact
 adhesive, and strippable spray booth
 coating subject to the emission limits in
 §63.802; and
   (2) The VHAP content, in kg VHAP/
 kg solids (Ib VHAP/lb solids), as
 applied, of each finishing material and
 contact adhesive sub)ect to the emission
 limits in §63.802; and
   (3) The VOC content, in kg VOC/kg
 solids (Ib VOC/lb solids), as applied, of
 each stnppable booth coating subject to
 the emission limits m § 63.802 (a)(3) or
 fb)(3).
   (c) The owner or operator of an
 affected source following the
 compliance method in § 63.804 (a)(l) or
 (d)(l) shall maintain copies of the
 averaging calculation for each month
 following the compliance date, as well
 as the data on the quantity  of coatings
 and thinners used that is necessary to
 support the calculation of E in Equation
 \.
   [d] The owner or operator of an
 affected source following the
 compliance procedures of §63 804
 (0(3)(ii) and (g)(3)(ii)  shall maintain the
 records required by § 63 806(b! as well
 as records of the following:
   (1) Solvent and coating additions to
 the continuous coater reservoir;
   (2) Viscosity measurements; and
   (3) Data demonstrating that viscosity
 is an appropriate parameter for
 demonstrating compliance.
   (e) The owner or operator of an
 affected source subject to the work
 practice standards in § 63.803 of this
 subpart shall maintain onsite the work
 practice implementation plan and all
 records associated with fulfilling the
 requirements of thai plan, including, but
 not limned to-
   ll) Records demonstrating that the
 operator training program required by
 §63 803(b) is in place;
   (2) Records collected in accordance
 with the inspection and maintenance
 plan required by § 63 803(c);
   (3) Records associated with the
 cleaning solvent accounting system
 required by §ri3.Q03(d);
   (4) Records assocmtud with the
 limitation on the use of conventional air
spray guns showing total
material usage and the oercer.tage of
finishing materials applied with
conventional air spray guns for each
semiannual period as required bv
§63.803(h)(5)
  (5} Records associated with the
formulation assessment plan recaired
by §63.803(1); and
  (6) Copies of documentation such as
logs developed to  demonstrate mat tne
other provisions of the work pract.ce
implementation plan are followed.
  (f) The owner or operator of an
affected source following the
compliance method of §63.804 (fi(4) or
(g)(4) shall maintain copies of tke
calculations demonstrating that the
overall control efficiency (R) of the
control system results in the value of E.C
required by Equations 2 or 4, records o;
the operating parameter values, and
copies of the semiannual compliance
reports required by § 63.807(d).
  (g) The owner or operator of an
affected source following the
compliance method of §63 8C4 'f!(o! or
(gK6), shall maintain copies of T.e
calculations demonstrating that :~e
overall control efficiency  R) of :he
control system results in tne appucoo.e
value of Gac calculated using Equation 2,
records of the operating parameter
values, and copies of the semiannual
compliance reports required bv
§63307(d).
  fh) The owner or operator of an
affected source subject to the emission
limits in §63  802  and following the
compliance provisions of § 63 834!f; (1).
(21. (3), (5). 17> and (8) and  §53  304'.gj
(;), (2), (3), (5). (7), and (8)  shall
maintain records of the ccrr.oharce
certifications submitted in  acccrciuce
with § 63 607(c) for each semiannual
period following the compliance date
  (i) The owner or operator of an
affected source shall maintain records of
ail other information submitted with the
compliance status report required by
§63.9(h)and§63.807(b) and the
semiannual reports required by
§63.807(c)
  (j) The owner or operator of an
affected source shall maintain ail
records in accordance with the
requirements of §  63.lO(b)(l).

§63.807  Reporting requirements.
  (a) The owner or opurator of an
affuctud sourcu subject to this subpart

-------
G2940  Federal Register
                                  60.  No  235  /  Thursdav, December 7  100=5
sh.ii'i rj.fi!! n;l reporting roqu'.rerrun's of
5 -'i3 : through § 63 1.0 of suopar. A
; General Provisions) according '.o the
applicability criteria ;.n § 63 OOOjd; cf
this suopart
  !'b', The owner or operator of an
affected source demonstrating
corr.~'..ar.ce in accsraance with
§63 304if)  ill. (-!, (3i. (5). (7) and (8)'
snail submit trie compliance status
report required oy §53 9(hj of subpart A
(General Provisions) no later than 60
days after the compliance  date The
report shai! inciuae me .nformation
required by §63.804:0 !H. (-],  t3i, ',5).
(7). and (8) of this subpan.
  (c) The owner or operator of an
affected source demonstrating
compliance m accordance with
§53 804(g) (i;. CU3U5), (7),  and (8)
shall submit a report covering the
previous 6  months of wood furniture
manufacturing operations:
  ;*.) The first report shall be submitted
30 calender days after tne end of tne
first 6-month period following the
compliance date
  (2) Subsequent reports shall  be
submitted 30 calendar days after the end
of each 6-month period following the
first report.
                                         I3i The semiannual reports shrill
                                       include the information recuircd by
                                       § 63 804'g) ill. (:;. (3!. i'5i, ;-]. ir.d''F .
                                       i statement cf whether '.he affected
                                       scurr.c '.vas in compliance or
                                       noncompliancG. and. if the affected
                                       source was in noncompiiance the
                                       measures taxen to bring the  affected
                                       source into compliance.
                                         (4) The frequency of the reports
                                       required by paragraph (c)  of tnis section
                                       shall not be reduced from semiannual!)'
                                       regardless of the history of the owner s
                                       or operator's compliance status
                                         (d) The owner or operator of an
                                       affected source demonstrating
                                       compliance in accordance with
                                       § 63.804(g) (4) and (6) of this subpart
                                       shall submit the excess emissions and
                                       continuous monitoring system
                                       performance report and summary report
                                       required by § 63.10(e) of subpart A. The
                                       report shall include the monitored
                                       operating parameter values required by
                                       § 63.804(g] (4) and (6). If the source
                                       experiences excess emissions, the report
                                       shall be submitted quarterly for at least
                                       1 year after the excess emissions occur
                                       and until a request to reduce reporting
                                       frequency is approved, as indicated in
                                       § 63.10(e')(3)(C'i. If no excess emissions
ocrur :;ie report 3r.a.. ~e ^i.~~ '.:o-u
semiannuallv
  'i.') The owner or J"IT;;C: cf ar.
affected source  requeue to p-~  ! 3C3 1, -
sr.a.l inciuco .p. the notification  one cr
norc statements that explains the
reasons for the usage  increase The
notification sha.l be submitted no later
than 30 csiencar da> s after the end of
the annual per.od in wmch tr.e usage
increase occurred.

§63.308  Delegation of authority.

  (a) In delegating implementation and
enforcement authority to a State under
§ 112(d) of the Clean Air Act. the
authorities contained in paragraph (hi cf
this section shall be retained DV the
Administrator and not transferred to a
State.
  fb) The authority conferred in
§63.804(f)(4)(iv)(D)and(E).
§63 804(g)(4!(iii)(C), §63.804(g)(4)(va
§63.804(g)(6)(vi).§63803(a),
§53.3CVd!C!(V;.and § 63.8Q5(e](l)
shall not be delegated to any State.

§§63.809-63.319  [Reserved]
Tables to Subpart H to Part 63
                           TABLE i.—GENERAL PROVISIONS APPLICABILITY TO SUBPA" JJ
Reference
«''a. 	
63 ' 0)C 1
52 ',£:,?'
63 '(tJ),3) 	
63 Kc'1' '
63 t(c'i9)
63 tic, i-t)
63Kc,i5)
63 Me) 	
632
53 3
534 	
S3 5 	
63 Sia) 	
63 5(t)(1) 	
52 5ibi'2) 	
53 SiC:i3) 	
53 5(bh('i}
63 5(Ci(e)
53 5(6i(7) ...,. 	
63 6(c)(') 	
63 6(0(2'
53610(5) 	
535(e;(') 	
536(e)(2) 	
536(e!i3) 	
635(f)C) . .
Applies to
sucoart .J
Yes
MO
Ves
Yes
No
NO
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes 	
Yes 	
Yes
•^es
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
NO 	
Comment
Sufcpart jj specifies applicability.


Subcart JJ specifies applicability.
Area sources a/e not sub|ect to suopart JJ

Additional terms are defined m 63. 301 (a) of subpart JJ. When overlap Between suocars A and jj occurs.
subpart JJ takes precedence.
Other units used in subpan JJ are defined in 63.801 (6)
Mav apply when standards are proposed under Section 1 12(0 of the CAA



Applies oniv to affected sources using a control device to comply with the rule
AHected sources complying through the procedures specified in 6330- ;a)C), ia)(2), ib). tc)|i). ISM"".
63 6(0(2!
536(0(3)
53 5(g)
53 5th)
535 (ni-;-
63 6d;'-i ('
                  Yes
                  Yes
                 , Yes
                 ! so
                 i Yes
                 ! Yes
                               (OH2), (e)(i), and (e)(2) are suDiect to the emission standards ai ail times, including periods of startup
                               snutcown. and malfunction.

-------
Federal Register -' Vol 00. No. 235 / Thursday. December 7, 1995 / Rules and Kea'.i.at.o;^ G2049
TABLE 1 — GENERAL PROVISIONS APPLICABILITY TO SUBPART jj — Continued
Reference
53 5(i)(4)(u)
63.6 (i)(5)-(i)(l4) ..
535(i)M6)
63 5(j) 	
53 7 	
63 3 	
63 9(a) 	
63 9(b) . . ..
639(c) 	
63 9(d) 	
63 9(e)
63 9(f) 	
63 9(a) .. ..
63 9(h) .. .
639(i) 	
639(j) 	
63 10(3) 	
S3 10(b)(1)
5310fb)(2) ...
63 I0(b)(3)
63 10(C)
63 10(d)(1) 	
53 I0(d)(2) .. . .
63 10(d)(3)
63 10(d)(4) 	
63 I0(d)(5) 	
63 10(6)
63 10(0 	
6311 	
63 12-63 15

Applies to
subpart JJ
NO.
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes .
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes 	
NO
Yes
Yes 	
Yes
Yes
NO
Yes
Comment
Applies only to affected sources using a control device to comply with the ruie.
Applies only to affected sources using a control device to comply with the rule
Existing sources are required to suDmit initial notification report within 270 days ot the effective date.
Applies only to affected sources using a control device to comply with the rule.
Applies only to affected sources using a control device to comply with trie rule.
63.9(h)(2)(u) applies only to affected sources using a control device to comply with the rule.
Applies only to affected sources using a control device to comply with the rule.
Applies only to affected sources using a control device to comply with trie rule.
Applies only to affected sources using a control device to comply with the rule.
Applies only to affected sources using a control device to comply with the rule.
TABLE 2.— LST OF VOLATILE TABLE 2.— LIST OF VOLATILE HAZARD- TABLE 2.— LIST OF VOLATILE HAZARD-
HAZARCOUS AIR POLLUTANTS ous AIR POLLUTANTS — Continued ous AIR POLLUTANTS — Continued
Chemical name
Acetaide^yCe

Acetonitnie 	
Acetophenone 	
2-Acetylamincfluorme
Acrolein


Ac."y!amice
Acrviic acid 	






3enz:dine



Bis(2-ethyihexyl) phthaiate
(OEHP)
Btsfcriiorometnyi) em
SromofQfrn




Carbon disuifide ..
Carbon tetracnionde


Catecnoi 	
Chioroacetic acid 	
2-Chioroacetccnenone . . .
Chlorobenzene . . .
Chloroform
CMoromelhyl melhyl ether
CAS No. Chemical name
75070 Cresols (isomers and mixture) 	
50355 o-Cresol 	
75058 rrvCresol
98862 p-Cresol
5^963 Cumene
10702S 2,4-0 (2,4-Dicf • -ophenoxyacetic
79061 ac:d. including oalts and esters)
79107 DDE (i,i-Dichloro-2.2-bis (p-
107131 chloropnenyl) etriylene)
107051 D'azom*i*i3n* 	 	 	 —
92671 Dibenzofuran 	
62533 1 ,2-Qibromo-3
-------
02050   Federal  Register  -  Vol.  60, No.  235  /  Thursday, December 7.  ijQS  / Rules  and
T*BL= 2.—LIST OF VOLATILE  HAZARD-
  OUS A;R POLLUTANTS—Continued

        Chemical name          j CAS No

Methyihycrazine 	 |    6C344
Met*vi occe ilodomethanei  	     74834
Mei^yi sooutyi Ke'.one (Hexone)  .    '08'01
Methyl socyanate  	    624S39
Methyl -nethacryiaie   	 j    30625
Methyl tert-Dutyl ether  	   16340-4
-.4 -Methyienebis ;2-cnioroanihne)    101 '44
Methylene   chloride   (Dichloro-
  metnane)  	     75092
4,4'-Methyieneciiphenyl
  dnsocyanate  (MDI) 	    101638
4,4'-MetTiyienedianiline 	    101779
Naphthalene 	     91203
Nitrobenzene 	     98953
4-Nitrobiphenyl	 '    92933
4-Nitropnenol 	    100027
2-Nitroprooane  	     79469
N-Nitroso-N-methyiurea 	    684935
N-Nitrosodimethyiamine 	     62759
N-Nitrosomorphonne  	     59892
Phenol 	    1C8952
p-Phenyienediamine  	    106503
Phosgene 	     75445
Phthaiic anhydnde 	     85449
Poiychlcnnated        biphenyls
  (Arociors) 	   1336363
                                           TABLE  2.—L;ST OF VOLATILE  HAZARD-  TABLE  2 —LIST c= VCLA"LE  HA:A=;
                                              Cus  AIP POLLUTANTS—Continued       Cus  AIR PCLL-'ANTS—Con: ^ec
                                                            -ame
                                           Poiycycnc Organic Matter*  	
                                           1.3-P'Opane sultone  	
                                           beta-Prcoioiactone  	
                                           Propionaioehyde   	
                                           P'opoxur (Baygon)  	
                                           Propyiene   dichionde    C.2-Oi-
                                             chloropropanei  	
                                           Propyiene oxide  	
                                           1.2-?ropyienimine (2-Methy! azin-
                                             dine)  	
                                           Qumone  	
                                           Styrene 	
                                           Styrene oxide 	
                                           2,3,7,8-Teupachiorodibenzo-p-
                                             dioxin  	
                                           1,' ,2.2-Teu-achioroethane  	
                                           TetrachtoroetMylene
                                             (Perchloroethyiene) 	
                                           Toluene	
                                           2.4-Toluenediamme  	
                                           Toiuene-2,4-dnsocyanate 	
                                           o-Toluidine  	
                                           1.2.4-Tnchlorobenzene	
                                           1,1.2-Tnchloroethane	
                                           Tnchloroetrryiene 	
                                                                            CAS NO
  57573
 •23336
 114251

  78875
  75569

  75558
 106514
 100425
  96093

1746016
  79345

 127184
 108883
  95807
 584849
  95534
 120821
  79005
  79016
2,4 5-Trichloropr.enci  .
2.4.5-Tnchioropner.ci
"nethylamine    . .          .  .
Tflluraiin  . .          .      .  .
2 2.4-Tnmethvipentare    	
Vinyl acetate	
Vinyl bromiGe    	
Vinyl chlonoe	    ...
Vinyhdene  chionce (' .'Ochiorc-
  etfiyiene)  	
Xylenes (isomers ana mixture)  	
o-Xylene	
m-Xylene  	
p-Xylene	
  aece;
 •2-443
'582053
 54CS4'
 ' C8C54
 5936C2
  750^4

  75354
133C2C7
  95475
 'C83S3
 '06423
  'Includes mono- anc ci-ethers  of ethyiene
glycol.  dietnylene  glycols and  triethyiene giy-
coi: R-(OCH^CH-)Rfi-OR wnere-
  n - 1. 2, or 3,
  R » allcyl or aryl  groups
  R' »  R. H, or groups which, when removed.
yield  glycol  ethers with  the  structure:  R-
(OCH;CH;)r-CH. Polymers  are excluded from
the glycol category.
  0 Includes  organic  compounds  with more
than one benzene  'Tig, and wmcn  have a boil-
ing point greater than or equal to 100*0.
                                          TABLE 3.—SUMMARY OF EMISSION LIMITS
                                            Emission point
                                                                                                         Existing
                                                                                                         source
                                                                                                                    New source
                                                                                                             1.3 *

                                                                                                             4.3 '

                                                                                                              •0
                                                                                                                           >~ 3
                                              '0 3
                                              •C 3
                                             «-°C 3
                                             "C 3
                                              1C 2
                                              ere is ro nmit on the VHAP content of these adhesives
  ''he control device must operate at an  efficiency that is equivalent to no greater than 1 0 kilogram (or 0.2 kaogrami ol VHAP being emitted
from the aflec'.ea emission source per kilogram o( solids used.
                                                                                                                            u ~
                                                                                                                           '02

-------
        rodcral Register /  Vol  60. No. 235 / Thursday. December  7. 1905 /  Rules ar.cl Reculat;ons  02951
Taste  4.—POLLUTANTS   EXCLUDED  TABLE  4.—POLLUTANTS   EXCLUDED
  FROM   USE  IN   CLEANING  AND    FHOM   USE   IN   CLEANING   AND
  WASHCFF SOLVENTS                 WASHOFF SOLVENTS—Continued
  TABLE 6 —VHAP OF POTEN~AL
      CONCERN—Continued

CAS No  I       Chemical name
Chemical name
4-Aminobipfienyi 	
Styrene oxide 	
Diethyl suttate 	
N-Nitrosomorpnolme ....
Dimethyl lormamide 	
Hexamethyiphospnoramide
Acetamide
4 4'-Methyienedianiline
o-Anisidme 	
2.3.7,3-Tetrachiorodibenzo-p-
dioxin .. 	
Beryllium salts 	
Benzidine ,.. 	 	 	 	
N-Nitroso-N-methylurea 	
Bis(chloromethyl)etrier 	
Dimethyl carbamoyl chloride . ..
Chromium compounds
(hexavaient) 	
1 ,2-Propyienimine (2-Methyi
azindine} . . 	
Arsenic and inorganic \arsenic
Hydrazine 	
• •-Dimethyl hydraztne 	
Beryllium compounds 	
1 ,2-Oibromo-3chlorophenyl 1-2
dichloroethyiene) 	

QicnlOfvos
Vinyl chlonde 	
Coke Oven Emiss.ons 	
E'.hylene oxide 	
Einyiene thiourea 	
Vinyl bromide (brcmoethene) . .
Seienium sultiOe (mono and di)
Chioiolorm
Pentachiorophenoi
E'.nyi caroamale (Ureihane)
CAS No Cfwmwj cun*
92671
96093
64675
59892
68122
680319
50355
101779
90040
1746016
92875
684935
542881
79447
75558
99999904
302012
57147
7440417
96123
62759
5C32S
1 336363
75448
119937
12035722
79061
113741
57749
1120714
106990
53963
53963
58899
1 1 1444
122567
8001352
121142
119904
50000
101144
107131
106934
72559
510156
62737
75014
99999908
75218
96457
593602
7488564
67663
87865
51796
Ethyiene dichtonde (1,2-
O'Chloroethane) 	
Propylene aicnlord* (1,2-
Dichloropropane)
Carbon tetrachioride 	
Benzene ....
Methyl hydrazine . .
E'hyi ac'yiate
Propylene oxide 	
Aniline 	
i 4-Dichlorob*nzeneryethyl acetate 1 1 1 1 59
EPA de 72559 	
mintmis,
tons/yr 510156 ....
62 /'S/ . ..
' ° 75014 	
°-2 75218 	
4 ° 96457 	
1 ° 593602 ....
0 7 67563 	
1 ° 87865 	
l\ 51796 	
50 107062 	
100
5-0 78fl75 	
TABLE 6 —VHAP OF POTENTIAL 7^32 ";;;;;
CONCERN 140885 ....
7cccn
CAS No Chemical name 62533 . .
•If 4fi't
"Nonthreshold" Pollutants 88062 ....
92671 	 4-Ammobiphenyl.
96093 	 Slyrene oxide 95534
64675 .. Dieihyl suKaie 114251
N-Nitrosomorpholine
Dimethyl (ormamide
Hexamethy'phospnoramide
Acetamide.
J ,4'-Methyienedianiline
c-Anisidme
2.3,7.8-Tetrachlorodibenzc-D-
dioxmdioxin
Benzidine
N-Nitroso-N-methylurea.
Bis(chloromethyl)ether
Dimethyl carbamoyl chloride.
1 ,2-Propylenimme (2-Methyl
azindine)
1,1 -Dimethyl hydrazme.
1 ,2-Oibromc-3-cnioropropane.
N-Nitrosodimethytamme.
Benzo (a) pyrene.
Poiychlormated biphenyts
(Aroctors).
Heptacnior.
3,3'-Oimethyl benzidine.
Acryiamtde.
hexachlorobenzene.
Chiordane.
1 ,3-Propane suitone.
1 ,3-8utadiene.
2-Acetyiammoflounne.
3.3'-Oichiorobenzidine.
Undane (hexachlorcyciohexane.
gamma).
2, 4- Toluene diamme.
Dichloroethyt ather (Bis(2-
chloroethyl)ether).
1 .2 - Oipftenylhydrazine.
Toxapnene \chlonnated
camphene)
2.4-Omitrotoluene.
3.3'-Dimethoxybenzidine.
Formaldehyde.
4.4'-Methylene bis!2-
cnloroaniline).
Acryionitrile.
Ethyiene dibromide(i ,2-
Oibromoethane).
DDE (1,1-p-chlorophenyl i-2
dichloroethylene)
Chlorobenzilate.
Dichlorvos
Vinyl chlonde
Ethyiene oxioe.
Ethyiene thiourea.
Vinyl bromide (bromoethene!
Chloroform
Pentachiorophenoi.
Ethyl carbamate (Urethane)
Ethyiene dichionde (V2-
Dichioroethane).
Propylene dichlonde ( 1 .2-
Dichioropropane)
Carbon tetrachioride
Benzene
Elhyl acrylate
Propylene oxide
Aniline
1 .4-DichloroDen:eneip!
2.4 6-Tncniorophenol
8is(2-elhyihexyl)pniriaiate
(DEHP)
o-Toiuidme
Propoxur

-------
()2932   Federal Register  '  V->1   60. No.  235  / Thursday.  Dncnnibcr 7.  1915  / Rules  nr.a :<°c;..;v
   TAB.E 6.—VHAP OF POTENTIAL
         CONCERN—Continued

           j         Chemicai -
TABLE 5.—VHAP OF POTENTIAL
     CONCERN—Continued
~C-C'5 ....
•O-l^i .

75C70 ....
75:52 	
•33C5C ...
•C6398 ..:..
75C92

',27134 	

53703
218019 	
50117
56553 	
205992 	
79469 	
542756 	
5T9 / 6

225514 	
193395 ....
189559 	
73345
51225 	
75354

S7583 	
32538

7359' 	
'9005 	
74873 	

£ £ * 	
•532:93 ..
1319773 ..

•C3394 ...
75343 ...

95437 	
•35445 ..
74384 	
I00-i25 ....
i _< / ^5 ...
334533 	
S5954 	
•33904 ..."
•35387 .. .
•33054 	
•25398 ...
'23319 ....
3-2933 	
T'ic.iloroethyiene
1,4-Oioxane ('
Oiethyleneoxide)
AcetaiCenyde.
Bromotorm.
Captan
Esichiorohydnn

4-





Metnyiene cnicnde
i_Dichioromethane)
Tetracnioroethyiene
(Percnioroethyiene).
Oibenz (ah) antnracene.
Chrysene.
Dimemyl ammoazobenzene.
Benzo (a) antnracene.
Benzo (b) fluoranthene.
2-Nitrooropane.
1 ,3-Dicnioropropene.
7, '
Oimetnyiber.z(a!anthracene.
Benz(c)acridine.
Indenon ,2.3-cd)pyrene.
1 .2:7.8-Dibenzopyrene
1 .1 ,2.2-Tetrachicroethane.
Guinoline.
Vinyiidene chlonde ('
Oicnloroetriylene).
Hexacfiiorcbutadiene.
Pentachioronitrobenzene
(Qumtobenzenej.
Isoonorone.
' ,1 ,2-Tnchloroethane










2-






• .






Methyl cfilonde
fChioromethape!.
nexacnioroetnane
Tnfluralm



CresciaCresylic acid (isomers
and mixture).
rn-Cresol
E'.hvncene dicMonde (i
Oichloroe thane;
o-Cresoi.
c-Cresol.
Methyl iodide (lodomethane).
Styrene1
Ailvl Chloride.
Diazomethane.
2.4.5 - Tnchloropnenoi
ChicramPen.
i ,2 - Epoxybutane
vmyi acetate.
Chloroorene
nyaroquinone.
4-Nitrobipnenyl


1-














"High-Concern" Pollutants
56332 	
•,3453393
5C344 . .
75218 ..
'5 '554 ....
77731 ...
'373C2 .
5-573 .
•30447 ..
9 "377
. ~ -*1OQ
*- ' o«_O
5M849
'574'
'2CC2
3arathion.
N.cxei Carbonyl
Methyl hycrazine
E'.hyiene oxide
Elhyiene immc
D, methyl suliute
Chioromethyl methyl ether
Dcta-°ropiciac;one
Benz>i chlonde
Senzotricnionde
Acroicm
2.ead
Tetrae'.rwi ieac














                                            '2'08'33  • Mettiylcyclcpemaaienyl    mar>-
                                                       [   ganese
                                            624839   ... i Methyl isocyanate
                                            7~474  	  Hexacnlorocycicpentadiene.
                                            52207765   Fluomme
                                            1C2'0681   Cobalt carbonyi.
                                            791'8 	  Chloroacetic acd.
                                            534521  ....  4,5-Dimtro-o-cresol, and salts.
                                            101533  ....  Methylene             dipheryl
                                                          diisocyanate.
                                            108952  ....  Phenol.
                                            62354 	  Mercury, (acetatc-o) phenyl.
                                            98862	  Acetophenone.
                                            108316	  Maleic anhydride.
                                            532274  	  2-Chloroacetophenone.
                                            51235 	  2.4-Oinrtroprtenol.
                                            108364  	  2-Methyoxy ethanol.
                                            989-3 	  Nitrobenzene.
                                            74839	  Metnyl                bromide
                                                          (Bromome thane).
                                            75150  	  Carbon disulfide.
                                            121697  	  N,N-Oimethylaniline.
                                                                                        4n:7-q.i or ASTM
                                                                                        D 1-n:-8'J  Metiioci
                                                                                        volntilc HAP's wnic
                                                     "Unrankable" Pollutants
                                            106514 	  Quinone.
                                            123386 	  Propionaldehyde.
                                            12CS09	  Catechol.
                                            35443  	! Phthalic anhydride.
                                            453581 	 | Carbonyl sulfide.
                                            '32649 .... ! Oibenzofurans.
                                            10CC27 	  4-Nitrophenol.
                                            540841 ... [ 2,2.4-Tnmethyipentane
                                            • '422	 ! Diethanolamine.
                                            S22C50  .. 1 riexamethylene-1.5-diisocvanate
                                                       j Giycol ethers0
                                                       i Polycyclic organic rnanef

                                              '  -  Currency  an EPA weight of evioence
                                            classification is under review
                                              •The EPA does not currently have an offi-
                                            cial weigfit-o(-«vicence classification  lor sry-
                                            rene.  For purposes  of  tnis rule,  styrene  >s
                                            treated  as  a  "nonthreshoid"  pollutant (See
                                            aata 'eporr form m appendix A of the  hazard
                                            ranking technical background document)
                                              n Except lor  2-ethoxy ethanol. ethyiene giy-
                                            col monobutyl ether, and 2-methoxy etnanci
                                              ' Except      lor     Denzofblfluoranthene.
                                            ber.zoiaianthracene,  benzo(a)pyrene.  7 12-
                                            dimethyioenz(a)anthracene.   Denz(c)ac.-iC.re.
                                            cnrvsene.   diDenz(an)  anthracene.  1 2.7.8-
                                            c.cer.zopyrene. mdeno(l ,2.3-cd)pyrene. but in-
                                            cluding dioxms and (urans
                                              3  Appendix A of part 63 is amended
                                            by adding Method 311 to read as
                                            follows:
                                            Appendix A  to Part 63—Test Methods

                                            Method 311—Analysis of Hazardous Air
                                            Poltuta::; Compounds in Paints and Coalings
                                            bv Direct In/ection Into n Cns Chromatogrnph

                                            I Scope and Application
                                              1 1   Applicability This method  is
                                            .iiipiiL.iuic for  dutcrminjtion nf most
                                            c-jinnounds deiigrutcd bv the U S
                                            C.-H'itunrnrrr.jl Protection  Agcnrv us voi.it.lc
                                            iiniariious riir pollutants (HAI''s) (Sir
                                            Rffcrciiro 1) (hot arc contained ir. p.iinib .i:u!
                                            < i,.i',,!ii^ Sivrrnr. ethyl nrryl.ilo  am! inethvl
                                            iiu'tiMLi'vi.iti; c.iii be nirasurcd bv A.STM 'J
                                        contms when it is rr.iin'.ifacturo':  -.0; '3 •„-.". :
                                        w'lich mav form .TS nc contir/,; r.ir'.'s
                                        (rcoction products or cure vola:. cs,  \
                                        scpjrnto or rr.ociif.ec 'cst  proc-ij -T ^L,S; ;«•
                                        used to miMii.rr '.no?e rcact.cn prouucts 3r
                                        c-ru volr'.^.^s in oracr to  Setorrr >::e .r.e '€'.„.
                                        vointile hAi' cm;si'.crs ~cr~. : -sa: "~.g C-r:
                                        \oiar.les arf a sign.f.car:  corr.rcr.c-.'. ;f T.»
                                        total HAP content ofscmc ccat.r.gs ~-.s :c-rr.
                                        "coating" used in this rr.etncc sr.ai! oe"
                                        understood to mean paints ar.c coatings.
                                          1.2  Principle  The rr.et.1oc uses :r.e
                                        principle of gas chromatograpnic separation
                                        and quantification using  a detector tr.a:
                                        responds to concentration differences
                                        Because there are many potential analytical
                                        systems or sets of operating cond.tiocs tnc:
                                        may represent useabie memoes for
                                        determining the concentrations of the
                                        compounds cited in Section 1.1 m the
                                        applicable matrices, ail systems tnat employ
                                        this principle, but. differ only m details of
                                        equipment and operation, may be used as
                                        alternative methods, provided that the
                                        prescribed quality control, calibration, and
                                        method performance requirements are met.
                                        Certified product data sheets 'CPDS1 may
                                        also include information  relevant to the
                                        analysis of the coating sample ncl'.ding. 5_t
                                        not limited to, separation column. . -en
                                        temperature, earner gas  injection pert
                                        temperature, extraction solvent, anc .r.'err.a.
                                        standard.

                                        2. Summery sf Method
                                          Who.e coating •* acded 'o
                                        dimethylforrr.amide ana a suuaoie :r.:err.a.
                                        standard compound is acced. An aiicuc: ;f
                                        the sample mixture is .mectaa or.tc a
                                        chromatographic column contair.ir.g 3
                                        stationary pnase tnat separates '.he anai>
                                        from eacn other and rrorr. ot.-er vo!at..e
                                        compounds contamec .n  the sample Th
                                        concentrations of the analytes are deierm;.-';;
                                        by ccrr.oanr.g tnc aetector responses for trie
                                        sample to tne responses octamea us. r.g
                                        i\ik ii mav ui1
                                        nccosbjry !u nnalyzi1 'lie  vinipif  .''U1^ '
                                        ilifffrcnt CC i :,!umr. or  !iff.-:i':i:  C,C
                                        npui iitin^ ' unii itit ais

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          FViWnl Register  ,' Vol   GO.  Vo.  235 /  T!uirs,!ny,  December 7,  ;00r)  /  Rules  nnd  R.'yi.h!;cr.s   020"lj
  •4 3   Crnsi-cnnlnninntion mny or cur
wiiinrvnr :mir- anuivses specified in Section 11 7 is
,;csiv;ncd to minimize this problem
  4 -I   Cross-rontnrr.inntion mny also occur .f
:iu' Devices used to transfer contmg curing
•no snmpic preparation process or for
 IT.-ting t.nc «ampiu m:o tho GC arc not
.iii'-quaicly cleaned between uses. Ail such
devices should  oe cleaned with acetone or
other suitadie solvent and cneckec for plugs
or craciu before and after eac.1 use.

5  Safety
  5 1   Many solvents used in coatings are
hazardous  Precautions should be taken to
avoid unnc.cssary inhalation  and skin or eye
contact. Thjs method may involve hazardous
materials, operations, and equipment. This
test method does not purport to address all
of '.he safery problems associated with its use.
It is the responsibility of the user of this test
method to establish appropriate safery and
health practices and to determine the
applicability of regulatory limitations in
regards  to the performance of this test
method.
  5.2   Dimethylfonnamide is harmful if
inhaled or absorbed through the skin. The
user should obtain relevant health and safety
information from the manufacturer.
Dunethylformarn.de should be used only
with adequate ventilation. Avoid contact
with skin. eyes, and clothing.  In case of
contact, immediately flush skin or eyes with
2ienry  of water for at least 15  minutes  If eyes
are affected, consult a physician. Remove and
wasc cor.tarr.-.nated clothing before reuse.
   5 3   User's manuals for the gas
ch.-c —atograar.  and other related equipment
snculc be consulted for specific precautions
to 3e 'ai;en related to their use.

6  Equiomen: snd Supplies
   \'ote. Certified proouct data sheets (CPDS)
~.a> a.sc ,nc:ude information relevant to the
anaivsis of tr.e coating sample including, but
net li.T.itea to. separation column, oven
•cmperature carrier gas. injection port
•eT.perature. extraction solvent, and internal
standard.
   5 :   Sample  Collection.
  511   Sarr.Dimg Containers Dual-seal
53r~.2  .-.g conta.ners. four to eight fluid ounce
c:~ar.!'. s.-.ou.d be used to coiled the
sn.r.c-ies G.ass  sample oottles or plastic
c--'a.~crs Ai-Ji volatile organic compound
 VCC  irr.perrT.eaole walls must be used for
corrosive substances [eg . etch primers and
certain  coating  cstaiysts such  as methyl ethyl
KL-one !MEK1 peroxide). Sample  containers.
caos and ,nner seal liners must be inert  to
trie compouncs in the sample and must be
seiectca on a c 1, 4  D.i'i "jcnn! nq fnr-ns nnri IniiHs
 needed include" r.o.umg imtn sheets and
 sample "an labels
   N'olc' The actual requirement will  Irprr.d
 upon 'he conditions cx.jt.ng ,it '.hi: sourr."
 sampled
   6 2  Laboratory Equipment and Supnl.i-b
   6 2 1  Gas Chromatogr.ipn !CC! Any
 instrument equipped with a flame lonization
 detector and  capable of being temperature
 programmed may be used. Optionally, other
 types of detectors (e g . a mass spectrometer).
 and any necessary interfaces, may be used
 provided trial ihe detector system yields an
 appropriate and reproducible response to the
 anaiytes m tne injected sample. Autosampier
 injection may be used, if available.
   6.;.2  Recorder If available, an electronic
 data station or integrator may be used to
 record the gas chromatogram and associated
 data. If a stnp chart recorder is used, it must
 meet the following criteria: A 1 to 10
 millivolt (mV) linear response with a full
 scale response time of 2 seconds or less and
 a matximum noise level of ±0.03 percent of
 full scale  Other types of recorders may be
 used as appropriate to die specific detector
 installed provided that the recorder has a.full
 scale response tune of 2 seconds or less and
 a maximum noise level of ±0.03 percent of
 full scale.
   6 2.3  Column. The column must be
 constructed of materials that do not react
 with components of the sample (e g.. fused
 silica,  stainless steel, glass).  The column
 should be of  appropriate physical
 dimensions (e.g., length, internal diameter]
 and contain sufficient suitable stationary
 phase  to allow separation of the anaiytes.
 DB-5. DB-Wax. and F7AP columns a're
 commonly used for paint analysis, however.
 it :s the responsibility of each analyst to
 select appropriate columns ana stationary
 phases.
   6.2 4  Tube and Tube Fittings. Supplies to
 connect tne GC and gas cylinders.
   6.2.5  Pressure Regulators. Devices used to
 regulate th» pressure between gas cylinders
 and the GC
   6.2.6  Flow Meter. A device used to
 determine the carrier gas flow rate through
 the GC Either a digital flow meter or a soap
 film bubble meter may be used  to measure
 gas flow rates.
   6 2.7  Septa Seals on  the GC injection
 port through which liquid or gas samples can
 be injected using a syr.ngc.
   6.2.8  Liquid Charging Devices Devices
 used in inject samples  ,nto the CC such as
 clean and graduated 1. 5 and 10 microhtcr
 (jil) capacity  svrmgcs
   6.2 9  Vials Containers that can be sealed
•with 3 septum m which samples may be
 prepared or stored  The recommended size is
 25 ml  capacity Minincrr*" valves have been
 found satisfactory  and are available from
 Pierce Chemical Company. Rockford. Illinois
   6210  Balance  Device used to determine
 the weights of standards  and samples An
 analytical balance capable of accurately
 weighing tu 0 OOm g is required

 7 netigents and Stunrfurds
   7 1   Purity of UiMgenf! Kcayent gruili:
 clicmtc.ilb ih.ill bo usuil in all It-sts Unless
 otherwise specified, all rc.igcrUi iUal!
conform !o the snrr:;Tica:ions of 'in1
Committm on Aninvtic.i,  Re,iij''-.-s <•:' •'."
Amoricnn  CIiomiLai 5or,riv  wlicrn siu ;i
••p'Tification1; arc .ivai.,iti|p Ot.Vr gnu!'1* ~i.,.
be used provided it is- :".-•>: j-icurt.nneei rn,ii
the rcngcnt is of -iufftc:'"V. •mr.ty :o pen;.:
its use without iebscni;'^  "he nccur.icv of
tjcicrmin.ition
  11   Cirr.er Gas Helium carrier ^as sr.,ul
have ,1 purity of 99 90S percent or h;g!ier
H.gh puritv nitrogen Tiav also be used OtMor
carrier gases that arc appropriate for the
column system ,md analyte may also be used
Ultra-high purity grade hydrogen jns and
zero-grade air shall be used lor the fiarne
lonization detector.
  7 3   Dimethyifonr.amide 'DMFl. Solvent
for all standards  and sampics  Some ot.-.cr
suitable solvent may be used if DMF is not
compatible with  the sample or coeiutes wirr.
a target analyte.
  Note: DMF may coelute with ethylbenrene
or p-xylene under the conditions descrisea
m the note under Section 6 2.3.
  7 4   Internal Standard  Materials. The
internal standard material is used m the
quantitation of the anaiytes for this method.
It shall be  gas chroraatography
spectrophotometric quality or. if this grade is
not available, the highest  quality available
Obtain the assay for the internal standard
material and maintain at  that purity during
use. The recommended internal standard
material is 1-propanol. however, selection  of
an appropriate internal standard matenal for
the particular coating and GC conditions
used is the responsibility  of cacr. analyst
  75   Reference Standard Materials The
reference standard materials are the
chemicals cited in  Section 1 1 which are of
known identity and purity and which are
used to assist in tne identification and
quantification of the anaiytes of this method
Thev shall be the highest  quality available
Obtain the assays for the reference standard
materials and maintain at those purities
during use
  7 6   Stock Reference Standards StocK
reference stanuards are dilutions of the
reference standard material' that may be
used on a daily basis to prepare calibration
standards, calibration check standards, and
riuaiitv control check standards Stock
reference standards may oe prepared from
the reference standard  materials or purchased
as certified solutions
  ~ 6  1  Stocx reference  standards shoul'i  ue
prctured in dimethvlformamice for each
anaivtc expected m the coating samples to  oe
analyzed The concentrations of anaiytes ,p.
the stock reference stand,irds are not
specified but must be adequate to prepare :k.e
calibration standards required in the niutlioc;
A stock reference1 standard mny contain rr.urc
than one analyte provided all annlytes arc
chemically compatible and no analvtcs
coeiute The actual concentrations prepared
must be known to within 0 1 pcrren! (e 3
0 1000 ± U D001 g/g solution)  The lollowiim
procedure is suggested Place nljoul  .15 ml nl
dimethylforniamide into  a t;ired ground-cj.iv,
stoppered 50 nil  volumetric flask Weigh the
flask to the nearest 0.1  my Add 1 2  5 g of tlic
reference stand.ird material and rcweigti the
flask  Dilute to volume with
ilmirthylforro.imuli: iiml  reweigh Stoppe"':'

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fi20"4    Frill-nil
                                       GO,
                                                 235  /  Thurs
•". '-». M".i-r.i. '.:nes C...C . .i'i; '.lie
  -r.;.""'ration .a gr ii-> per grnm .::' s.-,, .• * n
-cm 'he -.c-'^in n .v.jjhts. -r^ct.n^ '-r
•  e iss.-1 ed p.iri'y oi 'he rci'jrcnc.j stnn<:ar,':

  Note' \.!:'.ougn i  juss-stjpoercd
. ;,_—.Mtr'C t'.as*. ,s coi'Aemen; ar.'. s'u.'.ari'i:
.j.ass ccr.ta.ner ma', oe user! because ;:OCK
-"fe-ence standards are nreparcd b1.  we:.; "it
  "52  Transfer v.e stocK reference
standard so.ution  ntc one or more Tef.o".-
sra.ed screw-cap jott.es  Siore  with minima:
-endsracc  at  - '.0°C  to 0°C  and protect from

  ""63  Prcoare fresh stock reference
standards every six months, or sooner it
ana'.vsis results from daily caiibrat.on checu
standards indicate a prooiem. Fresn stocx
reference standards for very volatile HAP's
may have to be prepared more frequently.
   77  Calibration Standards. Cahoration
standards are used to determine tne response
of the detector to known amounts of
reference material 'Calibration standards
must :e prepared at a minimum of three
concentration leveis from the stock  reference
standards (see Section 7 6).  Prepare the
calibration standards in dimethyiformamide
•('see Section 7.3). The lowest concentration
standard should contain a concentration of
anaiyte equivalent either to  a concentration
of no more than 0 01% of the analvte in a
coating or to a concentration that s lower
 -.nan the actual concentration of the anaiyte
 .n the coating, whichever concentration is
 nigher The highest concentration standard
 shou.d contain a concentration of anaiye
 equiva.ent to slightlv more  than the highest
 concentration exoec'ed for  the  analvte in a
 coatm? The remain.ng calibration standard
 sr.o-.d cor.tam a concentration of anar.te
 roi.zh.% at the midpoint of the range defined
 b'. the .owes:  and highest concentration
 ca..'oration standards The concentration
 -cr.^e of the standards snould thus
 correspond to the exoected  range of anaiyte
 concentrations .n the prepared coating
 saxnt3.es !see Section 11 5)  Each calibration
 standard should contain each anaiyte tor
 ce'ect.on by this .method expected  in the
 actua coating sarr.oies ,e g  . some or all of
 '..-.e comoounds '..sted in Section 1 1 mav be
 .-c.udecl  Each calibration standard should
 a.so contain an appropriate amount of
 .-.te-r.a! standard'material (response for the
 :-:err.a  standard material is w.th.r. 25  to 75
 percent of full scale on the  attenuation
 se"...-.g for the  particular reference standard
 concentration level)  Calibration Standaras
 sr.ou.a oe stored for  1 week only in sealed
 •. :ais with minimal headspace. If the stock
 -eferencc standards were prepared  as
 snec.f.'-'d in Section 7 6, the calibration
 standards  may be prepared by  either
 •AGic-'ng eacn add.:.on of the S;CCK reference
 standard or bv adding known volumes of the
 s'ocn reference standard and calculating the
 mass o; the standard reference material
 ,i:.'.ud Alte.-r.at.'.c 1 .'Section 7 7 ',) specifies
 • .u oroi "ii^-rc 'o DC followed when tho stock
  -"te'encc standard i> added by volume
  A.ternnlive 2  Sec'ion 772) specif L'S '.he
  :>r"ct".','..re to  ue fui'uwed when '.lie stock
  - ten'..LL' v.aniiarcl  - milled bv  weii;'!'.
  NolC' T-i ,!ss,^: wit:i Irlo-rninini; 'he

 it: is -ecu.-".: "ITI- ind ,r. other se'',,•;:-,
 : t';.s rr.i't '.nil. tr.r inalvsi mav :.;i:i .',
ul1. if.'.'i:0'",.'. :o pr-T.are a ".ir.e siiown^ 'ri-


     '.  i'-nrjiiration \'.ternative 1
3e:orm.re '.lie amount of each s:oc\ retcrrinc1:
standard and -iimcthv.formamide solvent
ri-fdei! to prepare approximately 25 m.i ot :r\<:
stiec fie calibration concentration level
desired  To a tared 25 ml nal that can be
sec.ed win a crimp-on or Minmert*1 vaive.
idd the  total amount of d:methv;formamidc
calculated to oe needed. As quickly as
practical add the calculated amount of each
stocK reference standard using new pipets for
p.pet tins) for each stock reference standard.
Reweign the vial and seal it Using the
^riown weights of the standard reference
materials per ml in the stock reference
standards, the volumes added, and the total
weight of ail reagents added to the vial.
calculate the weight percent of each standard
reference material in the calibration standard
prepared Repeat this process for each
calibration standard to be prepared.
  "72  Preparation Alternative 2.
Determine the amount of eacn stock reference
standard and dimethyiformamide solvent
needed  to prepare approximately 25 ml of the
specific calibration concentration level
desired. To a tared 25 ml vial that can be
sealed with a  crirnp-on or Mininerr" valve.
add tne total amount of dirnethylformamide
ca.culated to be needed. As quickly as
practical, add the calculated amount of a
SIOCK reference standard using a new pipet
lor piset tip) and reweigh the vial. Repeat
this r/rocess for each stock reference standard
•o be" added  Seal the vial after obtaining  the
final weignt  Using the known weignt
percents of the standard reference materials
in the stock reference standards, the weights
of the stock reference standards added, and
•he total weight of all reagents added to the
v.al. calculate the weight percent of each
standard reference material in the calibration
standard prepared. Repeat this process for
each cal.bration standard to be prepared.

 8 Sample Collection. Preservation.
 Transport, and Storage
   8 i   Copies of material safety data sheets
 ,'MSOS's) for each sampie snould be ootained
 prior to sampling  The MSDS's contain
 information on the ingredients, and physical
 and chemical properties data The MSDS's
 also contain recommendations for proper
 uir.dhng or required safety precautions
 Certified product data sheets (CPDS) may
 also include information relevant to the
 analysis of the coating sampie including, but
 not limited to. separation column, oven
 temperature,  carrier gas. miection port
 temperature, extraction solvent, and internal
 standard
   82   A copy of the blender s worksheet can
 DC requested  to obtain data on the exact
 coat.rig ticmg sampled. A blank coaling d.ita
 sneet form (sec Section 18) mny also be used
 The manufacturer's formulation information
 from the product data sheet snould also  be
 obtained
   H J   Prior 'o sample collection, thoroughly
 :n,x t.'ic coating '•<> ensure that a
                                                                                          ii  "rr.nMs;:i".  i*>..'.^ a co i' ni^   :  -  ,iv "r
                                                                                          -.m/ar  ii'vc."  ::owevrr '.v;;i- .  •  ' •,•,,,-•,
                                                                                          "'.s :r.,prr>rrM'<'
                                                                                           sllippine, procedures should  -<•• It.;,  weti

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Federal  Rnc;istt:r
fiO.  No.  235 /  Thursday,  December  ~.  l°'i"
                                                                                       UPS  nncj
                                                                                                          ,cr. s
                                                                                                                            02055
 ' ^u.intv Cr>n[.-r>!
  ') '   Laboratories us.n^ '.his mr'.hor!
sriou'd operate u formal qunhtv control
program  Tin: minimum requirements of the
Dro^ram should consist of an initial
vlcnicnbtrntion of 'laboratory capability and an
cnnoing anaivsis of blanks and quah'v
control sjrnpies to evaluate and document
nutiu'.v data The laooratory must maint.nn
records' '.o document the quality of the data
gneraied When results indicate atypical
motnod performance, a quality control check
standard (see Section 9 4) must be ana.vied
:u cor.firm that the measurements were
performed in an  m-conirol mode of
operation.
  92  Before processing any samples, the
analyst must demonstrate, through analysis
of a reagent  blank, that there are no
 interferences from the analytical system.
glassware, and reagents that would bias the
sample analysis results. Each time a set of
analytical samples is processed or there is a
change in reagents, a reagent blank should be
 processed as a safeguard against chronic
 laboratory contamination. The blank samples
should be earned through all stages of the
sample preparation and measurement steps.
  9.3  Required instrument quality control
 parameters are found in the following
sections:
  9.3.1   Baseline stability must be
 demonstrated to be te m the calibration standards
                                                  Calculate the response factor  for t.le internal
                                                  standard ,RF,.l and the rcs-ponse factor for
                                                  c.icn compound  relative to the internal
                                                  standard IRRFj for each  concentration !evf!
                                                  using Equations  5 and 6. Section 12
                                                     10224  L'smg the RRF's from the
                                                  calibration, calculate the percent relative
                                                  standard deviation (percent RSD) for each
                                                  anaivtc in the calibration standard usinn
                                                  Cquatior. 7. Section 12  The percent RSD  !oi
                                                  each individual calibration analyte  must  be
                                                  /fiv than IS percent  This criterion must be
                                                  met m order for  the calibration to be val.il
                                                  If the criterion is met. the mean RRF s
                                                  determined aDove arc to be used until  the
                                                  next calibration
                                                     10J   Daily Calibration  Checks  The
                                                  L.ihiir.ition curve (Section  11) 2.21 must be
                                                  (.heckru and verified .it  least  mite each .lav
                                                   th.it samples arc analyzed Tins is

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 62956   Federal  Register  /  Vol.  60, No. 235  /  Thursday. December 7,  1905  / Rules  and Regulations
 accorr.phsnoc bv analyzing a calibration
 standard that .3 at a concentration near the
 midpoint of :ho working rouge and
 performing Lbo chocks in Sections 10 3 1.
 10 3 Z. ind 10 3  3.
   10 2 '.   For each analyto in the calibration
 standard, calculate the percent difference  m
 •..IB RR? from ihc last calibration using
 Equation 3. Section 12. If the percent
 difference for each calibration anaiyte is less
. than 10 percent, the last calibration curve is
 assi-mea to be valid, if the percent difference
 for any anaiyte is greater than 5 percent, the
 analyst sr.ould consider this a warning limit.
 if the  percent difference for any one
 calibration anaiyte exceeds 10 percent,
 corrective action must be taken. If no source
 of the problem can be determined after
 corrective action has been taken, a new  three-
 point (minimum) calibration must be
 generated This criterion must be met before
 quantitative analysis begins.
   10.3.2   If the RF,, for the internal standard
 changes by more than ±20 percent from the
 last daily calibration check, the system most
 be inspected for malfunctions and
 correct.ons made as appropriate.
   10 3 3   The retention times for the internal
 standard and ail calibration check analytes
 must be evaluated. If the retention time  for
 the internal standard or for any calibration
 check anaiyte changes by more than 0.10 mm
 from the last calibration, the system must be
 inspected  for malfunctions and corrections
 made as required.

 11 Procedure
   11 1  All samples and standards must be
 allowed to warm to room temperature before
 analysis. Observe the given order of
 ingredient acdition to minimize loss of
 voiat.les
   112  Br.ng the GC system to the
 determined ::erat.r.g conditions and
 condition  tr.e column as described in Section
 10 1
   Note- The temperar-ire of the  injection port
 may re an especially cr.tical parameter
 Information ascut the proper temperature
 rr.av Be tOur.C on the CPDS
                       11.3  Perform the daily calibration checks
                     as described m Section 10 3. Snmplos are not
                     to be analyzed until tho criteria in Section
                     10 3 arc met.
                       11  4  Place the as-received coating snmple
                     on ,\ paint shaker, or similar device, nnd
                     shakn tho sample for a minimum of 5
                     minutes to achieve hornogemzation.
                       11.5  Note: Tho steps m this section must
                     be performed rapidly and without
                     interruption to avoid loss of volatile organic:.
                     These steps must be performed in a
                     laboratory hood free from solvent vapors. All
                     weights must bo recorded to the nearest 0.1
                     mg
                       11.5.1  Add 16 g of dimethylformamide to
                     each of two tared vials (A and B) capaole of
                     being septum scaled.
                       115.2  To each vial add  a weight of
                     coating that will result in the response for the
                     maioc constituent being in the  upper half of
                     the linear range of the calibration curve.
                       Note: The magnitude of the response
                     obviously depends on the amount of sample
                     iniected into the GC as specified  m Section
                     118. This volume must be the same as used
                     for preparation of the calibration curve.
                     otherwise shifts in compound retention times
                     may occur. If a sample is prepared that
                     results  in a response outside the  limits of the
                     calibration curve, new samples must be
                     prepared: changing the volume injected to
                     bring the  response within the calibration
                     curve limits is not permitted.
                       1153  Adda weight of internal standard
                     to each vial (A and B) that will result in the
                     response  for the internal standard being
                     between 25 percent and 75  percent of the
                     linear range of the calibration curve
                       115.4  Seal the vials with cnmp-on or
                     Minmert* septum seals.
                       11 6  Shake the vials containing ihe
                     prepared  coating samples for 60 seconds
                     Allow the vials to stand undisturbed for ten
                     minutes.  If solids have not settled out on the
                     bottom after 10 minutes, then centrifuge at
                     1.000 rpm for 5 minutes. The analyst also has
                     the option of miecting the sample without
                     allowing  the solids to settle.
  117   Analyses should bo contacted ,n ;n»
foilow.ng oraer doily calibration cnei.k
iarr.r)li\ Tielhod ulnnk. up to '.3 .nioctions
from s.implo vmis (i e . one ir. octicr. eacn
from up to fivo pairs of vials, wnicn
corresponds to analysis of 5 coating ^ar-.rles,
  11 8   Iniect the prescribed volume it
supernatant  from inn calibration cr.ocx
samnle. tae method blank, and :::e iarnpio
v.als onto the chromatographic colur-.n ar.d
record  the c.irornatograms while opcrnt.r.g
the  system under tho spec.fied operat.r.g
conditions
  Note: The  analyst has the option of
meeting the uaseparated sampie.

12  Data Analysis and Calculations
  12.1  Qualitative Analysis. An anaiyte 'e 5 .
those cited in Section 1.1) is considered
tentatively identified  if two cnteria are
satisfied: ;l! eiution of the sample acalyti
within ±0 05 min of the average GC reter.ncn
time of the same anaiyte in the calibration
standard: and (2} either (a)  confirmation of
the  identity of the compound by spectral
matching on a gas chromatograph equipped
with a  mass  selective detector or fb) eiution
of the sampie anaiyte within rO.OS rnm of the
average GC retention time of the same anaiyte
m the calibration standard  analyzed on a
dissimilar GC column.
  12.1  1 The RT of the sample anaiyte must
meet the cntena specified in Section 9.3.3
  12.1  2 When doubt exists as to the
identification of a peak or the resolution of
two or more components possibly com-rsir.g
one peak, additional confirmatory -echn.cues
(listed  in Section 12.1) must be usec
  12.2  Quantitative Analysis. VVaes in
anaiyte has been  ident'f ec. the
quantification of that  ;orr.pour.d w:l. re
oased on the internal  standard tecnn.que
  12 2.1 A single analysis consists  of ons
injection from each of rwo sampie v^.a.s  A
and 3)  prepared using me same coa::t:g
Calculate tne concentration  of eacr. .ce-t.f.;-
anaivte in the samsie as follows
HAPwl%=!OOx-
                 i
where:
                                                              Eq. (1)
                                 = weight percent of the anaiyte in coating.
                              At = Area response of the anaiyte m the sample.
                             Ws = Weight of internal standard added to sample, g.
                              A', = Area response of the internal standard in the sample.
                                 = Mean relative response factor for the anaiyte in the calibration standards.
                                 = Weight of coating added to the sample solution,  g.
   1222 Report results for duplicate analysis
 (sampie vm.s A and B) without correction.
   12 2  Precision Data. Calculate the percent
 difference ue'.ween the measured
 concentrations of each analyto in vials A and
 B as follows
                       1231 Calculate the weigh! percent of the
                     onuiytc in each of thu two sampie viais as
                     described in Section 12.2.1.
                       12.J.2 Calculato the percent difference for
                     ench anulyte as:
  %Dif, = !00x-
Eq.  .:••
                                                                where; A, and 3, are tho measured
                                                                concentration-; of the anaiyte in vu.s A ano
                                                                B

-------
            ...  '»•.-/-    .                    /. . .' *:.?. j/;.                ji*.'.-^"".'    ••  -
        ''Federal Register ./  Vol.'60r.Nd;(235^{j'harsday,  lWii)&yi7(U995../  Rules and. Regulations  G2957
follows:
                                  or '
                           on9.4)as
                                          .                                      .   calibration standards fSoe Section 10222!
                                          is the known truo value of the inWyte in tho    as follows-
                                          ocrs.yu^f.'j.v,.-  ,-.:•• 7i,. u,.-.'   "
                                           •'! i.5 'Obtain' retention times (RT's) from
                                          data st^anon or.mtegrntoror, for
  % Accuracy ' = 100 X--     Eq (3)     aa st^anon or.me                 _
             ' x        -j.         '' v '    chromalograms from a^ chart recorder,
                         *                 calculate tie RT's for analytes hi iho
                                 RT =
                                       Distance from injection to peak maximum
                                                 Recorder chart speed
                                                                                   Eq.  (4)
  126 Calculate the response factor for the
internal standard (See Section 10.2.2.3) as
follows:
where:           -            •  - -  -
  A* = Area response of the internal
standard.
  C» = Weight percent of the internal
standard.
  12.7 Calculate the relative response factors
for analvtes in the calibration standards (See
Section 10.2.2.3) as follows:
                                         wherer -
                                                       RF..
                                                                     Eq. (6)
                                           RRF, = Relative response factor for an
                                         individual analyte.
  A. = Area response of the analyte being
measured.
  C. * Weight percent of the analyte being
measured.
  12.8 Calculate the percent relative standard
deviation of the relative response factors for
analyte* in the calibration standards (See
Section 10.2.2.4) as follows:
                         %RSD = 100x-

                         where:
                                                    n-l
                                                  RRF
                                                                       Eq. (7)
                              n - Number of calibration concentration levels used for an analytc.
                         RRFX = Individual RRF for an analyte.
                         R_RFX = Mean of all RRF's for an analyte.
  '.29 Calculate the percent difference in the   calibration curve and the daily calibration
relative response factors oetween the          cnecks (See Section 10.3) as follows:
                                             ; RRF -RRF'
                             % Difference  = •

                             where:
                                                  RRF.
                                                            -xlOO     Eq. (8)
                                 RRF = mean relative response factor from last calibration.
                                 RRF = relative response factor from calibration  check standard.
  13 Measurement of Reaction Byproducts
That are HAP. [Reserved!
  14 Method Performance. [Reserved]
  15 Pollution Prevention. [Reserved!
  16. Waste Management
                                           10.1 The coating samples and laboratory
                                         standards and reagents may contain
                                         compounds which require management as
                                         hazardous waste. It is the laboratory's
                                         responsibility to onsura all wastes arc
managed in accordance with all applicable
laws and regulations
  16.2 To ovoid Excessive laboratory waste,
obtain only enough sample for laboratory
analysis.

-------
,62950   Federal  Register  '  Vol  60,  No.  235  / Thursday, December  7,
                                                                                Rules  nr.d
   Ifi 3 !t ,s recommended thn' h.,cardod
 waste coating bonds, used rags  jsccl pnprr
 'oweis. and other nongiass or non.snarp wnstc
 materials be placed T\ a plastic  Dng before
 Giscosai  A separate container, designated
 Tor Sharp Ob:cc:s Only," is recommended
 fc: collection of discarded glassware and
 DLT.er sharp-edge items usea in the
 Ijocratorv !t is -^commended that unused or
 excess sarr.Dies and reagents be  p.aced in a
 soiver.t-reSiStant piastic or mete, container
 with a lid or cover designed for f.arr.rr.riDio
 liquids This container should net oe stored
 .n tne area where analytical work ,s
 performed  It .s recommendea that a record
 be kept of all compounds placed in the
 container for identification of the contents
 upon disposal.

 :r References
   \  Clean Air Act Amendments. Public Lav,
 101-549. Titles  I-X1. November. 1990.
   2.  Standard Test  Method for Water Content
 of Water-Reducible Paints by Direct Iniection
                               in'.o a G,is Chromntogrnph ASTM
                               Designation D3702-79
                                 3 Standard Practice for Sampans L.qu. I
                               p-iir.ts and Related Pigment Co,it.:ig^ \STM
                               Ors.'^n.r'on D3925-31
                                 •4 Standard Test Mcthoc fcr Dt'tcrrr.i:ia:.o:;
                               of D.cnloromethar.e and '..'•  '--
                               Trier,.oroethune in Paints ar.c; Codtinjb b*.
                               Direct iniection into a Gas Chrornatograpn.
                               ASTM Designation D4457-3S
                                 5. Standard Test Method for Determining
                               the Unreacted Monomer Cor.tent of Latexes
                               Lsing Capillary Column Gas
                               Chromatography ASTM Des.gnation D48C7-
                               93
                                 6 Standard Test Method for Determining
                               Unreacted Monomer Cor.tent of Latexes
                               Using Gas-Liquid Chromatography  ASTM
                               Designation D 4747-87
                                 7 Method 301—"Field Validation of
                               Pollutant Measurement Methods from
                               Various Waste Media." 40 CFR 62. Appendix
                               A.                       _
                                 3 "Reagent Chemicals. American Cherr.icai
                               Society  Specifications." American Chemical


',MO :c- t.r.y o! ran5"'"3 -. ;: ••>'•'
\Tirr'.cnn Chnm Ci.  ~"'C >:'*'  src
Cl'.Tr.icaib nnc: S;.,nd.iri;> "n>  :
D  V in N'nstrar J Co  !i r.  Ni1 v
the 'L'ni'cd Siatfs Pharrr.aco?"

   ~      ~)lC?r:,T75
ir.snector  	
Date. T.me   	
S.irr.ple :D»  	
Source ID   	
Coating Same/Type
Plant Witness  	
Tvpe Analysis Required
Special Handling  	
Sampie Container Lacei

Coating Data
Date: 	
Source  	
                                                Data
                                                                                                     Sampie ID No.
                                                                                                                    Samole ID No
 Coating-
     Supplier Name  	
     Name and Color of Coating  	
     Type of Coating (primer, ciearcoat. etc.)  	
     identification Number lor Coating  	
     Coating Density (!bs/gal)  	-	
     Total  ^olatiles Content (wi percent)  	
     Water Content (wt percent)  	
     Exe-not Solvents Content  (wt percent)  	
     VCC Content 'wt percent)  	
     Sonds Content tvol percent)   	    	
 D'luent °-ccerties
     Nan-e.
     'de1": f caticr Number	
     D'luent Sci'vent  Dens.ty  ilb&gai)  	
     VCC Content v^t percent)  	
     7, ater Content (wt pe'cent)  	
     ExeTt Solve"; Conte1"! 'wt percent)  	
     C i-e'". Scivert  =atic gai  diluent soivent/gai coating)
Stock Re''erer.ce Standari

v.arr.e cfReferer.ee Mater.a.
S-sp..er Name   	
LotNjrr.Der   	
P^r.ty   	
N'arre
of
  Supplier Name
  Lot \umoer
  Pujitv  __
  Date Prepared
  Prepared 3v
  Sotebocc page r.c
                      Solvent
                                   Material
     pqcpARATION INFORMATION—
               Continued
3 Weight =!us Reference    	,g
  Material
A Weignt After Made to     	,g
  Volume
5 Weight DMF  lines 2-     	.3
  -.3-1)
6 Weight Re!. Material      	,3
  Mines 3-2)
7 Corrected Weight  of Ret-  	,9
  erence Material (line 6
  times purity)
8 c-action Reference Ma-   	,3/g
  tenal m Standard (Line  7
  - Line 5)  SOln
9 Total Volume of Sland-   	.  rn1
  ard Solution
:0  height Re'erence Ma-   	,g/mi
  tenal per  mi of Solution
  (L.ne 7 -  Line 3)
                 CN  INFC=MA~;CN—
                Continued
 Laooratory ID No :or this    	
   Standard
 Expiration Date 'or this      	
   Standard.
 CALIBRATION STANDARD
 Date Prepared	
 Date Expires  	
 Preparec By	
 Notebook, oage
                                                                           Calibration Stancarc idcnt.fication No
                                                                           Final Weignt Flask Plus
                                                                             Reagents
                                                                           Weight Empry F'ask
                                                                           Total Weight Of Reagents

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         Federal Register '  Vol.  60, No.  235  /  Thursday,  December 7, 1995 /  Rules and Resulnnons   G2050
    Anaiyte name1
  StocK ref-
erence stand-
 ard ID No.
                                       Amount of stock reference standard added (by volume or oy
                                                             weight)
                                        Volume
                                       added, ml
                              Amount in
                             standard, g/ml
Weight added,
      9
                                                                                 Amount
                                                                                    soin
  Calculated
weight anaiyte
       I. 9
 We'r    er-
cent     ,;e n
  calc _: on
  starjird"
                                                                              i





  • include internal standard(s).
  »Weight percent * weight anaiyte added - total weight of reagents.                                       	s


Quality Control Check Standard              Notebook/page:  	        PREPARATION  INFORMATION
Date Prepared:	Quality Control Check Standard              Final Weight Flask Plus	g
    _                                        Identification No.:                        Reagents.
 a e  pves.  	  ^^	  Weight Empty Flask	  	,g
Prepared By  	                                           Total Weight Ol Reagents  .  	,g


                                        Amount of stock reference standara added (by volume or  oy
                        Stock ref-   |	1	w*fhl)	I   Calculated

                                                     Amount in     Weight added,    ctanaard nin
                                       added, ml    standard, g/ml        g         stanoaro, g/g







                                                   :;::.:::izz:   ii~— \




  ' include internal Standard(s).
  »Weignt percent.weignt anaiyte added - total weight of reagents.


 Quality Control Check Standard Analysis       Analyst   	.—.	
 Sate OCCS Analyzed:	QCC Expiration Date:  	
 OCCS icentification No.	

                                                   ANALYSIS RESULTS

                               Weight percent determined                                             Mee!s cntena in Section
                                                               Mean Wt     Percent      Percent
         Anaiyte                                                 percent      accuracx
                            Run 1       Run 2       "uh 3

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620GO  Federal Register / Vol.  60.  No. 235 / Thursday, December 7, 1995 /  Ruies and Regula-.cr.s
Calibration cf GJS Chromatcgraph
Calibration Date 	
   Calibrated Bv
                                PART  1.—RETENTION TIMES FOR INDIVIDUAL ANALYTES
              Analyte
Stock stand-
 ard. ID No
                                                     Recorder chart speed
                                                I
                                                  Incnes/min.
                                                                 cm/mm.
Distance !rom 'niection point :o
      peak -Maximum        i
                                                                                                          =eteit,on
                                                                                Inches
                                                                                            Centimeters
                                                                                                       i



  	i	 i






  •Retention time-distance to peak maxima-'criart speed.


C\L:3RATIONOFGASCHROMATOGRAPH  Calibrated By 	

Calibration Date:	

                                  PART 2.—ANALYSIS OF CALIBRATION STANDARDS

                                  .  ,                                        Cahb. STD ID   Canb. STD ID   Caiib. STD ID
                                  Analyte                                         No.           No.           No.

Name:
    Cone, in STD ...
    Area Response
    RT 	
Name:
    Cone, in STD ...
    Area Response
    RT 	
Name:
    Cone, in ST2  ..
    Area Response 	 !
    RT 	
Name-
    Cone, in STD ...
    Area Respor.se
    RT 	_	
Name.
    Cone, in STD   .
    Area Response
    RT 	
Name
    Cone m STD
    Area Response
    RT 	
Name.                                                                                    ,
    Cone. :n STD  	 I
    Area Response 	
    RT 	
Name.
    Cone, in STD  	
    Area Response 	
    RT 	
internal Standard Name
    Cone, m STD      	 |
    Area Response   	 i
    FT         .        	 j
Calibration of Gas Chrorr.atograph
CjliOration Da:n 	.
   Calibrated By

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         Federal Register  /  Vol. 60. No. 235" / Thursday.  December 7.  1995 / Rules  and  Regu.at.ons  G2QC
                               PART 3.—DATA ANALYSIS FOR CALIBRATION STANDARDS
Anaryte
Name:
RT
Rr
Name:
RT
RF
Name:
RT
RF
Name:
RT
RF
Name:
RT
RF
Name:
RT
RF
Name:
RT
RF 	
Calib. STD ID




-"









Calib. STD ID














Calib STD ID














Mean














percent RSD
ol RF














IS RT within
±0 05 mm ol
RT for slock?
(Y'N)














Is percent
RSD <30% iY'
N)














Daily Calibration Check
Date: 	
Analyst:  	
Calibration Check Standard ID No-:
                                        Expiration Date:
Analyte











Retention Time (RT)
Last











This











Difference •











Resoonse Factor (RF)
Last










	
This











Difference "











  • Retention time (RT) change (difference) must be less than ±0.10 minutes.
  "Response factor (RF) cnange (difference) must be less than 20 percent tor each analyte and for the internal standard.
Sample Analysis
Vial A ID No.. 	
Vial B ID No.. 	
Analyzed By
Date:  	
Sample preparation information
Measured'




Calculated.

wt internal standard 	

Vial A ($)









v:ai 8 ig)










-------
        '  "             "   "• • V"-7-  '       - ' .  ' •'•J'v£SiWl«X. < •
62962-  Federal• Register ./, Vol. 60. No.;235 /•Th'urs.day;,December  7. 1995 / Rules and Regulations
. > • • • • - - - fSriifJ' -••
. -. ANALYSIS JBESUL£S:,.DuPLiCATE SAMPLES
Analyte .



-









Internal Standard 	 - 	
• - Area response '
Vial A

Vial B
-
\. *t

Wt percent ,n sampie
Vial A

Vial B
-~
Average

[FR Dot 95-29358 Filed 12-&-95: 8:45 am]

BILLING COOE U40-M-P

-------

-------
               APPENDIX E




LIST OF VOLATILE HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS

-------

-------
       Table E-l includes a list of volatile hazardous air pollutants.  The NESHAP emission
limits are based only on the VHAP content of the coatings and adhesives, not the total HAP
content. Some coatings, particularly the stains, may contain small amounts of metals that are
also HAP, but the emission limit does not include these compounds. Therefore, the list
presented here is only for VHAP. For a listing of all 189 hazardous air pollutants, see Section
112 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments^
          TABLE E-l. LIST OF VOLATILE HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS
 Chemical name
                                                                     CAS No.
 Acetaldehyde
 Acetamide
 Acetonitrile
 Acetophenone
 2-Acetylaminofluorine
 Acrolem
 Acrylamide
 Acrylic acid
 Acrylonitrile
 Allyl chloride
 4-Aminobiphenyl
 Aniline
 o-Amsidme
 Benzene
 Benzidine
 Benzotrichloride
 Benzyl chloride
 Biphenyl
 Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP)
 Bis(chloromethyl)ether
 Bromoform
 1,3-Butadiene
 Carbon disulfide
 Carbon tetrachloride
75070
60355
75058
98862
53963
107028
79061
79107
107131
107051
92671
62533
90040
71432
92875
98077
100447
92524
117817
542881
75252
106990
75150
56235
 Carbonyl sulfide
463581
                                         E-l

-------
                             TABLE  E-l.     (continued)
Chemical name
                                                                            CAS No.
Catechol
Chloroacetic acid
2-Chloroacetophenone
Chlorobenzene
Chloroform
Chloromethyl methyl ether
Chloroprene
Cresols (isomers and mixture)
o-Cresol
m-Cresol
p-Cresol
Cumene
2,4-D (2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, including salts and esters)
DDE (1,1 -Dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene)
Diazome thane
Dibenzofuran
1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane
Dibutylphthalate
1,4-Dichlorobenzene
3,3'-Dichlorobenzidine
Dichloroethyl ether (Bis(2-chloroethyl)ether)
1,3-Dichloropropene
Diethanolamine
N,N-Dimethylaniline
Diethyl sulfate
3,3'-Dimethoxybenzidine
4-Dimethylaminoazobenzene
3,3'-Dimethylbenzidine
120809
79118
532274
108907
67663
107302
126998
1319773
95487
108394
106445
98828
94757
72559
334883
132649
96128
84742
106467
91941
111444
542756
111422
121697
64675
119904
60117
119937
Dimethyicarbamoyl chloride
79447
                                             E-2

-------
                            TABLE  E-l.    (continued)
Chemical name
CAS No.
N.N-Dimethylformamide
1,1 -Dimethylhydrazine
Dimethyl phthalate
Dimethyl sulfate
4,6-Dinitro-o-cresol, and salts
2,4-Dinitrophenol
2,4-Dinitrotoluene
1,4-Dioxane (1,4-Diethyleneoxide)
1,2-Diphenylhydrazine
Epichlorohydrin (l-Chloro-2,3-epoxypropane)
1,2-Epoxybutane
Ethyl acrylate
Ethylbenzene
Ethyl carbamate (Urethane)
Ethyl chloride (Chloroethane)
Ethylene dibromide (Dlbromoethane)
Ethylene dichloride (1,2-Dichloroethane)
Ethylene glycol
Ethylene oxide
Ethylenethiourea
Ethylidene dichloride (1,1-Dichloroethane)
Formaldehyde
Glycol ethers
Hexachlorobenzene
Hexachloro-1,3-butadiene
Hexachloroe thane
Hexamethylene-1,6-diisocyanate
Hexamethylphosphoramide          	
68122
57147
131113
77781

51285
121142
123911
122667
106898
106887
140885
100414
51796
75003
106934
107062
107211
75218
96457
75343
50000
0
118741
87683
67721
822060
680319
Hexane
110543
                                            E-3

-------
                            TABLE  E-l
[continued)
Chemical name
                                                                           CAS No.
Hydrazine
Hydroquinone
Isophorone
Maleic anhydride
Methanol
Methyl bromide (Bromomethane)
Methyl chloride (Chloromethane)
Methyl chloroform (1,1,1 -Trichloroethane)
Methyl ethyl ketone (2-Butanone)
Methylhydrazine
Methyl iodide (lodomethane)
Methyl isobutyl ketone (Hexone)
Methyl isocyanate
Methyl methacrylate
Methyl tert-butyl ether
4,4'-Methylenebis(2-chloroaniline)
Methylene chloride (Dichloromethane)
4,4'-Methylenediphenyl diisocyanate (MDI)
4,4'-Methylenedianiline
Naphthalene
Nitrobenzene
4-Nitrobiphenyl
4-Nitrophenol
2-Nitropropane
N-Nitroso-N-methylurea
N-Nitrosodimethylamine
N-Nitrosomorpholine
Phenol
                            302012
                            123319
                            78591
                            108316
                            67561
                            74839
                            74873
                            71556
                            78933
                            60344
                            74884
                            108101
                            624839
                            80626
                            1634044
                            101144
                            75092
                            101688
                            101779
                            91203
                            98953
                            92933
                            100027
                            79469
                            684935
                            62759
                            59892
                            108952
p-Phenylenediamme
                            106503
                                            E-4

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                             TABLE  E-l
[continued)
Chemical name
                            CAS No.
Phosgene
Phthalic anhydride
Polychlorinated biphenyls (Aroclors)
Polycyclic Organic Matterb
1,3-Propane sultone
beta-Propiolactone
Propionaldehyde
Propoxur (Baygon)
Propylene dichloride (1,2-Dichloropropane)
Propylene oxide
1,2-PropyIenimine (2-Methyl aziridine)
Quinone
Styrene
Styrene oxide
2,3,7,8-TetrachIorodibenzo-p-dioxin
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane
Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene)
Toluene
2,4-Toluenediamme
Toluene-2,4-diisocyanate
o-Toluidine
1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene
1,1,2-Trichloroe thane
Trichloroethylene
2,4,5-Tnchlorophenol
2,4,6-Trichlorophenol
Triethylamine
Trifluralin
                            75445
                            85449
                            1336363
                            0
                            1120714
                            57578
                            123386
                            114261
                            78875
                            75569
                            75558
                            106514
                            100425
                            96093
                            1746016
                            79345
                            127184
                            108883
                            95807
                            584849
                            95534
                            120821
                            79005
                            79016
                            95954
                            88062
                            121448
                            1582098
2.2,4-Tnmethylpentane
                                                                            540841
                                             E-5

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                            TABLE  E-l.    (continued)
Chemical name
Vinyl acetate
Vinyl bromide
Vinyl chloride
Vinylidene chloride ( 1 , 1 -Dichloroethylene)
Xylenes (isomers and mixture)
o-Xylene
m-Xylene
p-Xylene
CAS No.
108054
593602
75014
75354
1330207
95476
108383
106423
Includes mono- and di-ethers of ethylene glycol, diethylene glycols and triethylene
 glycol; R-(OCH2CH2)RR-OR where: n = 1, 2, or 3; R = alkyl or aryl groups; R' = R, H, or groups which, when
 removed, yield glycol ethers with the structure: R-(OCH2CH2)n - OH. Polymers are excluded from the glycol
 category.
Includes organic compounds with more than one benzene ring, and which have a boiling
 point greater than or equal to 100°C.
                                            E-6

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          APPENDIX F

POLLUTANTS EXCLUDED FROM USE IN
 CLEANING AND WASHOFF SOLVENTS

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POLLUTANTS EXCLUDED FROM USE IN CLEANING AND WASHOFF SOLVENTS
   Chemical Name
 :AS NO.
   4-Aminobiphenyl
   Styrene oxide
   Diethyl sulfate
    ^-Nitrosomorpholine
    Dimethyl formamide
   Hexamethylphosphoramide
   Acetamide
   4,4'-Methylenedianiline
   o-Anisidine
   2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin
   Beryllium salts
   Benzidine
   N-Nitroso-N-methylurea
   Bis(chloromethyl)ether
    Dimethyl carbamoyl chloride
    Chromium compounds (hexavalent)
    1,2-Propylenimine (2-Methyl aziridine)
    Arsenic and inorganic arsenic compounds
    Hydrazine
    1,1 -Dimethyl hydrazine
    Beryllium compounds
    1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane
    N-Nitrosodimethylamine
    Cadmium compounds
    Benzo (a) pyrene
    Polychlorinated biphenyls (Aroclors)
    HeptachJor
    3,3'-Dimethyl benzidine
    Nickel subsulfide
    Acrylamide
    Hexachlorobenzene
    Chlordane
    1,3-Propane sultone
92671
96093
64675
59892
68122
680319
60355
101779
90040
1746016

92875
684935
542881
79447

75558
99999904
302012
57147
7440417
96128
62759

50328
 1336363
76448
 119937
 12035722
79061
 118741
57749
 1120714
 106990
                                     F-l

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Chemical Name
CAS No.
Nickel refinery dust
2-Acetylaminoflourine
3,3 '-Dichlorobenzidine
Lindane (hexachlorcyclohexane, gamma)
2,4-Toluene diamine
Dichloroethyl ether (Bis(2-chloroethyl)ether)
1,2 - Diphenylhydrazine
Toxaphene (chlorinated camphene)
2,4-Dinitrotoluene
3,3'-Dimethoxybenzidine
Formaldehyde
4,4'-Methylenebis(2-chloroaniline)
Acrylonitrile
Ethylene dibromide( 1,2-Dibromoethane)
DDE (1,1-p-chlorophenyl 1-2 dichloroethylene)
Chlorobenzilate
Dichlorvos
Vinyl chloride
Coke Oven Emissions
Ethylene oxide
Ethylene thiourea
Vinyl bromide (bromoethene)
Selenium sulfide (mono and di)
Chloroform
Pentachlorophenol
Ethyl carbamate (Urethane)
Ethylene dichloride (1,2-Dichloroethane)
Propylene dichloride (1,2-Dichloropropane)
Carbon tetrachloride
Benzene
Methyl hydrazine
Ethyl acrylate
53963
53963
58899
95807
111444
122667
8001352
121142
119904
50000
101144
107131
106934
72559
510156
62737
75014
99999908
75218
96457
593602
7488564
67663
87865
51796
 107062
78875
56235
71432
60344
 140885
75569
                                   F-2

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Chemical Name
CAS No.
Aniline
1,4-Dichlorobenzene(p)
2,4,6-Trichlorophenol
Bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP)
o-Toluidine
Propoxur
Trichloroethylene
1,4-Dioxane (1,4-Diethyleneoxide)
Acetaldehyde
Bromoform
Captan
Epichlorohydrin
Methylene chloride (Dichloromethane)
Tetrachloroethylene (Perchloroethylene)
Dibenz (ah) anthracene
Chrysene
Dimethyl aminoazobenzene
Benzo (a) anthracene
Benzo (b) fluoranthene
Antimony trioxide
2-Nitropropane
1,3-Dichloropropene
7, 12-Dimethylbenz(a)anthracene
Benz(c)acridine
Indeno( 1,2,3-cd)pyrene
1,2:7,8-Dibenzopyrene	
62533
106467
88062
117817
95534
114261
79016
123911
75070
75252
133062
106898
75092
127184
53703
218019
60117
56553
205992
1309644
79469
542756
57976
225514
193395
189559
                                   F-3

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                                     APPENDIX G
         SOURCES OF TECHNICAL AND REGULATORY INFORMATION

Applicability Determination Index (ADI) (http://134.67.104.12/cfdocs/adiwww/adiwww.html-ssi)
The ADI is a database that contains memoranda that have been issued by the EPA on applicability
associated with compliance issues.  It is made available through the Office of Air Quality Planning and
Standards (OAQPS) Technology Transfer Network (TTN) Bulletin Board System (BBS).

Clean Air Compliance for Wood Furniture Manufacturers
(http://funnelweb.utcc.utk.edu/-cis/announce/wfmanual.pdf)
This site provides a compliance document, developed by the EPA and University of Tennessee. This
guide, which can be downloaded, details the issues related to compliance with the Wood Furniture
Manufacturers NESHAP.

Do Your Process Materials Contain Regulated Chemicals? How to Read a Material Safety Data
Sheet (MSDS) to Find Out.
http://pprc.pnl.gov:80/pprc/sbapAvood.html
Pacific Northwest Pollution Prevention Resource Center (PPRC)
1326 Fifth Ave., Suite 650
Seattle, WA 98101
The PPRC is a nonprofit organization that supports projects that result in pollution prevention, toxic use
elimination and reduction. PPRC Website offers regulatory fact sheets, pollution prevention
opportunities, and compliance guidance.

Emission Estimation Worksheet
http://pprc.pnl. gov:80/pprc/sbap/wood.html
Pacific Northwest Pollution Prevention Resource Center (PPRC)
1326 Fifth Ave., Suite 650
Seattle, WA 98101
PPRC provides a worksheet to assist in calculating mass-balances and annual emissions.

Enviro$en$e (http://es.inel.gov)
EnviroSenSe is a large repository of information dealing with: pollution prevention, compliance
assurance, enforcement information, and databases.

Facts About Wood Furniture Manufacturing Operations MACT
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR)
Bureau of Air Management
P.O. Box 7921
101 South Webster Street
Madison, Wisconsin 53707-7921
Phone: (608) 267-6897
This fact sheet, developed by Wisconsin DNR's Small Business Clean Air Assistance Program,
summarizes the emission, work  practice, and recordkeeping requirements of the NESHAP.
                                         G-l

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Fact Sheet: NESHAP for Wood Furniture Manufacturing Operations
http://www.deq.state.la.us/oarp/sbap/forms.htm
Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality (LA DEQ)
Office of Air Quality and Radiation Protection
P.O. Box 82135
Baton Rouge, LA 70884-2135
Phone:(504)765-0219
This fact sheet, developed LA DEQ, summarizes the emission, work practice, and recordkeeping
requirements of the NESHAP.

Fact Sheet for Wood Furniture NESHAP
South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD)
21865 East Copley Drive
Diamond Bar, CA 91765-4182
Phone: (909) 396-2000
This fact sheet, developed SCAQMD, summarizes the emission, work practice, and recordkeeping
requirements of the NESHAP.

Furniture/Wood Manufacturing and Reflnishing, U.S. EPA, RCRA Fact Sheet. (EPA/530-SW-90-
027c) This document is an overview of the wood furniture manufacturing industry and the hazardous
waste in produces.

New York Department of Environmental Conservation
Division of Air Resources
50 Wolf Road
Albany, NY  12233-3250
Phone:(518)457-7230
NY DEC is planning to publish a wood furniture NESHAP guidance document in 1998. The document
will include regulatory summaries, compliance checklists, and commonly asked questions.

North  Carolina Department of Environment, Health, and Natural Resources (NC DEHNR)
Division of Air Quality
P.O. Box 29580
Raleigh, NC 27626-0580
Phone:(919)715-6232
NC DEHNR Division of Pollution Prevention and Environmental Assistance offers a web page
http:www.owr.ehnr.state.nc.us/ref/00017.htm that provides information on regulatory incentives,
emission reduction, and pollution prevention opportunities. The Division of Air Quality  is also
developing a wood furniture NESHAP fact sheet.

Pollution Prevention Options in Wood Furniture Manufacturing, A Bibliographic Report, U.S.
EPA, Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics, February 1992. (EPA/560/8-92/001C)
                                         G-2

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Wood Furniture Manufacturing Industry Compliance and Pollution Prevention Workbook
http://pprc.pnl. gov:80/pprc/sbap/wood.html
Pacific Northwest Pollution Prevention Resource Center (PPRC)
1326 Fifth Ave., Suite 650
Seattle, WA 98101
The workbook is scheduled to be completed in the spring of 1997 and will contain information on
waste inventories, emission estimation, and pollution prevention opportunities.

Wood Furniture: The Clean Air Act and Pollution Prevention Opportunities
Northeast Waste Management Official Association (NEWMOA)
129 Portland Street
Boston, MA 02114
(617)367-8558
This guidance document, developed by NEWMOA and the Northeast States for Coordinating Air Use
Management, focuses on pollution prevention guidance, but also contains an overview of the CTG and
NESHAP requirements.

Wood Furniture and Fixtures Industry Sector Notebook
(http://es.inel.gov/comply/sector/index.htmlfwood)
Superintendent of Documents
U.S. Government Printing Office
Washington, DC 20402
Telephone orders: (202) 512-1800
The notebook provides a overview of the industries classified as 25 in the SIC code and includes: a
comprehensive environmental profile; industrial process information; pollution prevention techniques;
pollutant release data; regulatory requirements; compliance/enforcement history; innovative programs;
and contact names.

Wood Furniture MACT Implementation Strategy
Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA)
Bureau of Air
2200 Churchill Road
P.O. Box 19276
Springfield, IL 62794-9276
Phone:(217)785-4140
IEPA is in the process of developing a wood furniture implementation document that will contain
applicability flowcharts, compliance schedule, and compliance assurance. As of yet there is no set
publication date.
                                          G-3

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Wood Furniture Manufacturing Fact Sheet
Virginia Department of Environmental Quality
Office of Small Business Assistance
629 East Main Street
Richmond, Virginia 23219
Phone: (804) 698-4394
This fact sheet summarizes the requirements of the NESHAP and is available at
http:\v\vw.deq.state.va.us/osba/smallbiz.html on the world wide web or contact Richard Rasmussen,
Director of Small Business Assistance.
                                           G-4

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TECHNICAL REPORT DATA
1 REPORT NO 2
EPA 456/R-97-005
4 TITLE AND SUBTITLE
Wood Furniture Manufacturing Operations NESHAP
Implementation Document
7 AUTHOR! S)
Susan A. Rasor
9 PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS
Midwest Research Institute
5520 Dillard Road, Suite 100
Gary, NC 27511
12. SPONSORING AGENCY NAME AND ADDRESS
Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards
Office of Air and Radiation
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Research Triangle Park, NC 277 1 1
3 RECIPIENT'S ACCESSION NO
5 REPORT DATE
September 1997 ;
6 PERFORMING ORGANIZATION CODE
8 PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NO
4203-30-02
10 PROGRAM ELEMENT NO
11 CONTRACT/GRANT NO
68-D3-0031,WA30
1 3. TYPE OF REPORT AND PERIOD COVERED
Final
14 SPONSORING AGENCY CODE
EPA/200/04
15 SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES
Project Officer is Gilbert Wood, Mail Drop 12, (919) 541-5272
16 ABSTRACT
National emissions standards to control emissions of HAP from new and existing wood furniture
manufacturing operations were promulgated in 1995. This document contains information to assist State and
local air pollution control agencies as well as the regulated community in the implementation of these ;
standards. This document provides a common sense summary of the NESHAP requirements and provides
answers to commonly asked questions on the NESHAP. Sample inspection sheets are also provided as is a !
bibliography of Federal, State and private sources of additional information related to these standards.
17 KEY WORDS AND DOCUMENT ANALYSIS
a DESCRIPTORS
Air pollution
Air pollution control
National emissions standards
Hazardous air pollutants
Wood furniture industry
Implementation guidance
18 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT
Unlimited
b IDENTIFIERS/OPEN ENDED TERMS
Air pollution control
Wood furniture
Stationary sources
19 SECURITY CLASS 
Unclassified
20. SECURITY CLASS (Page)
Unclassified
c COSAT1 field/Group
13B
21 NO OF PAGES
22 PRICE
EPA Form 2220-1 (Rev. 4-7T)

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