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Strategic Planning:

A Handbook for Small Water
One of the Simple Tools for Effective
Performance (STEP) Guide Series

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Is This Guide for Me?	1
What Will I Learn From this Guide?	2
What is Strategic Planning? 	3
How Will Strategic Planning Benefit My Water System?	4
STEP 1: Developing a Strategic Roadmap	5
   Example Worksheet Defining Your Ideal, Goals, and Values	6
   Worksheet: Defining Your Ideal, Goals, and Values	6
STEP 2: Defining Your Area of Service	7
   Example Worksheet: Current and Future Areas of Service	8
   Worksheet: Current and Future Areas of Service	9
STEPS: Assessing Your System's Technical, Managerial, and Financial Capacity	10
   Example Worksheet: Assessing Your System's Capacity	11
   Worksheet: Assessing Your System's Capacity	11
STEP 4: Identifying Your Options	12
   Worksheet: Identifying Options	13
STEPS: Analyzing and Assessing Your Options	14
   Example Worksheet: Assessing Your Options	15
   Worksheet: Assessing Your Options	16
STEP 6: Implementing Your Options	17
   Example Worksheet: Implementation Action Plan and Challenges	18
   Worksheet: Implementation Action Plan and Challenges	19
STEP 7: Assess and Evaluate	20

Appendix A: Safe Drinking Water Act Primacy Agencies	21
Appendix B: Tribal Contacts	26
Appendix C: Other STEP Guide Documents	27

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This guide is designed to help owners and operators of community water systems (CWSs) and non-transient non-community water systems
(NTNCWSs) serving 3,300 people or fewer learn more about the strategic planning process and begin to develop a strategic plan. CWSs include all
systems (both publicly and privately owned) with at least 25 year-round residential customers or 15 year-round service connections. NTNCWSs
include all systems (both publicly and privately owned) that are not CWSs and that serve at least 25 of the same people for more than six months a
year. Typical systems that may find this guide useful  include:
                   Small Towns                                                 Manufactured housing communities
                   Rural Water Districts                                         Homeowner's associations
                   Tribal Systems                                                Factories, religious institutions, and
                                                                                schools with their own water supplies
This guide presents basic concepts on strategic planning for small water systems and explains how this process can help improve your technical,
managerial, and financial capabilities. It provides background information on the process of strategic planning and a series of worksheets from which
you can begin to develop a written strategic plan. Your State or Regional Tribal Capacity Development Coordinator can provide additional information
and help you tailor your strategic planning process or written strategic plan to your specific circumstances. For a complete list of state and tribal
contacts, see Appendices A and B.
 Additional copies of this guide may be obtained by calling the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791.  You may also download the guide
 from EPA's Safe Drinking Water Website at www.epa.gov/safewater/smallsys/ssinfo.htm.

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What Wil      -earn  From  this  Guide?
The U.S. drinking water industry is facing many key challenges in the 21st
century. These include replacing aging infrastructure, meeting extensive
regulatory requirements, operating in an environment with increased competition   |
and public expectations, and ensuring system security and safety.

To meet these challenges and continue to provide a safe and reliable water
supply, systems will need to be prepared and ensure that technical, managerial,
and financial structures can respond to changing circumstances. Strategic
planning can help prepare your water system to meet challenges and maintain
organizational and financial stability in an uncertain future.

This guide will:
         Explain the concept of strategic planning;
         Explain the benefits of strategic planning for small water systems; and,
         Illustrate the steps you can take to start the planning process and begin to develop a strategic plan
This guide contains a series of worksheets to help guide you through the strategic planning process. Your State or Regional Tribal Capacity
Development Coordinator can help you fill in the worksheets and develop, implement, and maximize the benefits of, strategic planning.

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What  is Strategic  Planning?
The idea of strategic planning is to 'plan today for an uncertain tomorrow.' It
can help you address both problems that you know will arise in the future,
and problems that you can't predict.  It can help your system succeed in a
changing environment.
A written strategic plan can be the end result of the planning process. It is
typically a short document that summarizes what your water system does,
why it does it, what it is trying to accomplish, and how it will meet its goals
and values.1 Systems that do not develop a written plan should still engage
in the strategic planning process.

There are 7 steps to strategic planning:

       1.      Developing a strategic roadmap.
       2.      Defining your area of service.
       3.      Assessing your system's technical, managerial, and
              financial capabilities (i.e., its capacity).

       4.      Identifying your options for fulfilling your area of service.
       5.      Analyzing and assessing your options.
       6.      Implementing your options through an action plan.
       7.      Evaluating your options.
The 7 Steps of Strategic Planning
      Developing a Strategic Roadmap
        Defining your Area of Service
          Assessing TMF Capacity
          Identifying your Options
    Analyzing and Assessing your Options
       Implementing your Action Plan
  Evaluating the Planning Process or Written
                  Plan
To plan strategically or to draw up a written strategic plan, you will need to look at all aspects of your system and develop values and goals. While
this could lead to organizational, financial, or technical changes in the way your system operates, the benefits of strategic planning will make your
efforts worthwhile.
 For more information on strategic planning, see: http://www.allianceonline.org/faqs.html

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How Will  Strategic Planning  Benefit  My Water System?

In general, small water systems draw up formal plans for important capital improvements projects and when such plans are required (e.g., for
permits, licenses, rate review processes, etc.). This kind of long-range planning typically involves developing a goal and a series of milestones that
will be met over a certain period of time. However, it typically does not prepare systems to successfully respond to unknown or changing
conditions, nor does it involve improving operations and management.  Strategic planning on the other hand, will not only guide these infrastructure
improvements, but will also focus the use of limited resources on previously defined priorities, improve decision making, and enhance
responsiveness and performance of a system.

For example, system security has recently become a top priority for systems. Traditional long-range planning can provide a time frame and plan of
action for systems to make needed security-related improvements or otherwise upgrade security measures. Strategic planning will not only provide a
road map for accomplishing these tasks, but will also prepare your system to effectively respond to unexpected events, while accomplishing the
overall goals and objectives of your system.


Strategic planning can:
            Help you understand what services your system currently provides and what services you would like to provide in the future to best
             serve your customers.
            Allow you to concentrate  on making good decisions now so that your system will be successful in the future.
            Focus your energy and resources.
            Ensure that system employees, owners, and managers are all working toward the same goals.


"If it ain't broke, don't fix it" is not a sensible approach to planning. It does not allow your water system to prepare for and adapt to changing
circumstances. Strategic planning will.

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STEP 1:  Developing a Strategic  Roadmap

The first step in learning how to plan strategically and create an effective strategic plan, is developing a strategic roadmap and defining your ideals,
goals, and values. A strategic roadmap will help you determine the purpose of strategic planning for your system, and what you intend to gain from
the process. Ultimately, your answers will provide a guide, or roadmap, by helping you shape your actions to meet your ideals, goals, and values.
Consider the following questions:

                                     1. What is your system trying to accomplish, and why?
                                       Answering this question will help you understand what the day-to-day purpose of your system is,
                                       and the fundamental reasons for its existence.

                                     2. How can this be accomplished?
                                       Answering this question will help you understand how to achieve your purpose (defined by
                                       answering question 1).
Your answers to these questions should address both the practical operation of your system (e.g., achieving delivery of clean water to customers
through proper treatment and storage methods), and the broader goals of which system personnel should be aware (e.g., public health protection).
Your answers to these questions would also serve as a basis for vision and mission statements in a written strategic plan should your water system
decide to do one.  Once you have considered your answers to the above questions, the following worksheet will help you develop your own strategic
roadmap by asking you to address your system's:

       Ideals       An image of what your system should become.

       Goals       The day-to-day and overall operation and management objectives or aspirations for your system.

       Values       The beliefs you would like to guide your system's employees; explain what is most important to your system and your
                    system's employees.
A completed example and a blank worksheet are provided. Once you have defined your goals and values, you will need to assess whether the way
in which your system is currently being maintained, managed, and operated is helping to accomplish these goals or promote these values.

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                                          Example - Strategic Roadmap
       Ideals
                                                                                     /, m&&Civ\fyOY e^ceed^n^-
                        iwdp rov infy wvcw\u&m&v\ cvnd/ ojberattoia^.
       Goals
(according to priority)
To-m&etOv~ exceed/ aZl/vua/ter
      Values
                        T&cowLu&outf\3U4&vww
                                               Strategic Roadmap
       Ideals
       Goals
(according to priority)
       Values

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Defining your area of service involves deciding which functions or roles your
system will or will not be responsible for.  It is important to note that not every
system is suited to provide every service. Defining your area of service will
focus the strategic planning process and allow you to more effectively meet
your goals and fulfill your values.

Water systems can provide a number of services in the areas of source water
development and protection; drinking water treatment; treated water storage,
transmission, and distribution; and retail customer services. Nowadays,
security issues are also a major concern.2 The following worksheet will allow
you to define your area of service including your current roles and functions and
provides space for you to list the services, roles, and functions you would like
to provide in the future.
When filling in the worksheet, consider whether you have been successful in
performing all of your roles or if there are services that you have had trouble
providing effectively.  Ultimately, you may decide to expand or limit your
system's functions.  For example, a system may choose to purchase treated
water from a wholesale provider and concentrate its efforts on distribution and
retail customer services.  Both a completed example and a blank table are
provided. The example is not exhaustive, but gives an  indication of the things
you might want to consider regarding expanding, reducing, or altering your
system's roles.
2 For more information on the measures you can take to assess and improve your system's security see ASDWA/NRWA's "Security Vulnerability Self-
Assessment Guide for Small Drinking Water Systems," November 2002, and other security-related information on ASDWA's Web site
(http://www.asdwa.org/) and EPA's Water Infrastructure Security Web site at http://www.epa.gov/safewater/security/index.html.

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                                                                                         of
                                                    Example
 Area of Service
                 Current Role
                   Future Role
Source water
development &
protection
iMtylem&nt tr&urcesWater protectCorvplan/
Coirttw^e/current role/,
        related wi&GWMrefr,
               a/ new source/to- vn&eZ'future/
demand/
Water treatment
Conduct routine/O&rM,
             alycwwd
             i operator t"
Covtfvnu&' cvwrerit role- but consider cfyWmifyivvfr
tre
or
Treated water
storage &
distribution
            ledh detecttom/a^ui' repcwr;
               ^eCiOY^, repcUA',
              /; corrotvon/ control/
Cowtvnu&cwrrent role/but covwUler c&ntrc&ctvng'
out for (9rM bervice/or c&nbotidjttvng'With/ necwby
Retail customer
service
                            cOYvnectCovw;
                                 meter
Cor(tvnu&' cur rent role/but consider partnenJupy
with/ nearby tytfemfrto-provCde/better retads
customer bervCce},' at a/lower c&it a,nd
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                                      and                            of
 Area of Service
Current Role
Future Role
Source water
development &
protection
Water treatment
Treated water
storage &
distribution
Retail customer
service
Security issues

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STEP 3:  Assessing Your  System's Technical, Managerial,

and  Financial  Capacity

An important part of strategic planning involves assessing your system's capabilities. You
may already have some of this information in the form of self-assessments, sanitary
surveys, and loan and permit application data. Assessing your capabilities includes an
assessment of your:

   Physical infrastructure3 and operational abilities (technicalcapacity). This includes
    deciding whether processes need to be changed or improved upon, and assessing
    the technical knowledge and qualifications of your system's operators. For
    example, consider the number of Continuing Education credits earned by operators,
    their understanding of new and upcoming regulations, and their level of certification.

   Institutional and administrative abilities (managerialcapacity) and deciding whether
    your system's affairs are conducted in a manner that enables you to maintain
    compliance, operate efficiently, and meet customer expectations.
   Ability to acquire and manage financial resources (financial capacity) and deciding whether you will be able to continue current operations,
    make necessary repairs and replacements, and afford upgrades.


Knowing your strengths and weaknesses in these three areas will help you refine your goals to focus on areas that need improvement, and
capitalize on your strengths. The following worksheet provides space for you to note your strengths and weaknesses in the three components of
capacity. Both a completed example and a blank table are provided.
 Assessing your system's capabilities should involve an in-depth inventory of your system's infrastructure. This can be completed through the development
of an asset management plan. Asset management is a planning process that ensures that you get the most value from each your assets, and have the
financial resources to repair and replace them when necessary. Successful asset management depends on knowing about the condition and value your
system's assets and regularly communicating with management and customers about future needs.  This understanding is key to developing a thorough
and useful strategic plan. For more information on Asset Management, see EPA's Asset Management Guide (EPA 816-R-03-016), which can be obtained by
calling the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).

                                                          10

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Capacity
Technical
Managerial
Financial
Strengths
trouble/ vneetin^SVWA mtanda^rdm; bymtewv
operator improperly certified/.
(j&od/ relationship withcwstowierm and/
regulatory operator properly trained/.
'B&okfr and/ record^ are/ wiaintained/ according
budget reviewed/ a4\nu^aUy.
Weaknesses
(Dutdated/a^et inventory a*nd/ no~ a&bet vna/n&gewient
plan/; have/ not addremmed/ needed/ b&cwrity up^rad^em.
Part Wwie/ operator; botwd< member y not trained/ on/
up cowling regulatory rec^ulrevnentm.
La^l^in^ detailed/validation/ of a^mety', reserve/
account not 'fully funded/; ratem'have/notbeen/

Capacity
Technical
Managerial
Financial
Strengths



Weaknesses



4 Remember to consider:
            For technical capacity - the adequacy of your source water, physical infrastructure, operator expertise and knowledge, and overall
            operations  and maintenance.
            For managerial capacity - your system's ownership structure; staffing and organization; and relationships with customers, regulators,
            and technical assistance providers.
            For financial capacity - your system's revenues, credit worthiness,  and fiscal management and controls.

                                                                      11

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STEP 4: Identifying Your Options
At this point in the strategic planning process, you have defined your
current services and roles and decided what services you would like to
provide in the future. You should also have a good understanding of the
strengths and weaknesses in your technical, managerial, and financial
capabilities. This information will allow you to identify a range of options to
best fulfill your goals and values.

One goal of strategic planning is to fully consider the widest possible range
of alternatives over a long-term time frame and not just choose the "quick
fix". This involves thinking about options that can be implemented within
your system's current structures, and options that may require reorganizing
or fundamentally changing your system's ownership, managerial,
operational, and physical structures.

The worksheet on the next page provides space for you to list options for
your system. List as many options as you can think of even if they do not
seem feasible. An option that does not seem feasible in the near term may
be more feasible in the longer term and other options may be more feasible
when implemented in combination. You will assess each option in  Step 5.

Some examples of strategic options appear in the box to the right.  For
additional ideas talk to your State or Regional Tribal Capacity Development
Coordinator. Contact information appears in AppendicesAand B.
...

          Strategic Options Examples
  Purchase wholesale treated water while
  continuing to serve as a distributor

  Build stakeholder involvement and community
  interest in source water protection program

  Physically interconnect with another system

  Develop an asset management plan and
  capital improvement plan, and research
  potential funding sources for infrastructure
  improvements
* Contact local authorities to discuss working
  with system staff to conduct frequent patrols
  of the system and developing an Emergency
  Contact List
                                                       12

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Area of Service
Source water
development and
protection
Water treatment
Treated water
storage and
distribution
Retail customer
services
Security issues
Options















13

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STEP 5: Analyzing and Assessing Your Options

In order to thoroughly assess your options and determine their feasibility, you must consider the long-term economic, regulatory, and implementation
impacts the options will have on your system. Options can impact a technological aspect of your system (source water development and protection,
treatment, storage and distribution) or an organizational aspect (retail customer services, operation and
management, ownership).

Pursuing an option, or combination of options, could result in reorganization or a change to your ownership or
management. Other options may be easily worked into the current structure and operating environment. The
optimal choice is one that will achieve your goals at the lowest possible cost and allow you to succeed in a
dynamic environment.

To fully assess each option, consider the following questions:

          How will this option affect the technical, managerial, and financial capacity of the system?
          Is the option consistent with your system's goals and values?
          Will implementing the option ensure continued compliance with current and future regulatory standards?
          Is the total  cost of choosing and implementing this option within your system's current or potential financial means?
          Will the option be accepted by the governing board, town managers, the community, and regulators?
          Will the option increase the quality or reliability of service and be accepted by customers?
          Will the option positively or negatively impact system security?
          Can this option be practically implemented by water system managers and operators?
The following worksheet provides space for you to consider the pros and cons for each option you identified in the previous step. Remember to
consider future challenges that your system may encounter such as increasing regulatory requirements and customer expectations, replacement and
major rehabilitation of physical assets, and maintaining and upgrading security measures. Both a completed example and a blank table are provided.

Once you have made your choices, you may wish to go a step further and write up a formal strategic plan. Businesses typically develop formal
strategic plans as a management tool to: develop goals towards which all employees can work; ensure that the company is achieving the highest
performance standards possible; and guarantee success and adaptability in a changing business environment.5
 http://www.allianceonline.org/faqs.html
                                                           14

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           II                                                      ^Hrf*                 m
   Area of
   Service
     Options
                Pros
              Cons
      Optimum Solution
Source water
development
     and
  protection
Implement
SOtirce* water
protectConplan
Will/lead/to-a/better
UA^id^rsta^nding^of quality or safety
concerns; ensuressafe* supply
(5ct$veruagp cormnunity/fsystewi*
support coid^be/difficult; c&stly
aj*\d/tiA*ne^consuAwingi unknown/
contamination sources
Develop uave^vtory of 'know
cuad/ potential/ SfOvvrcefrfor
Develop
alternative*
SOtirce* of supply
Will/lead/to-a/better
UA^id^^sta^nding^of quality or safety
concerns; ensure*- safe* supply
System/T^asT^ad* no-significant
water quality issu*esto-date*; up-
front cap (ted/ e^pend^tiM'e^'
cuad/ cowiwiuvuty Lntevett iwv
bounce/ water p rotectu>n/
                                            ive'option; effecG/ve/to-
                                                       May
                                                       cotnjblicuoce/ wtfh/ new
    Water
  treatment
              water
                   Option/for cowiplyLng-wtth/ new
                   regulations; WiH eliminate'
                   treatment coity and* requCved*plant
                                                                     5 LgvufCcant change/to- tyirt
                                                                                    may
                                                                                         Continue/to- iA&e/ d^Cnfectton/
                                                                                         ordy; new irOiwce'Watev
                                                                                         protection/ measures wM/
Treated water
 storage and
 distribution
capacity
Continued* delivery to- cuttowierif-
even/ if stuffily \A> disrupted*
Need/ updated/ aMet
mana^ewientplanto
n&ed/; would/ require* up -front
capital/ expendituveif
Complete* c
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   Area of
   Service
Options
Pros
Cons
Optimum Solution
Source water
development
    and
  protection
   Water
  treatment
Treated water
 storage and
 distribution
    Retail
  customer
  services
  Security
   issues
                                                         16

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STEP 6:  Implementing Your Options

Strategic planning takes time and effort.  It is important to realize however, that implementing the options you have selected will involve additional on-
going commitments. You may need to gather additional technical, managerial, and financial resources which may require additional planning. You
need to make sure that everyone involved in implementing the options (managers, operators, governing board, etc.), and everyone who will be
affected by it (your customers, regulators,  etc.), is committed to its success.


Implementing your options involves identifying challenges that could arise during and after implementation, and developing an action plan to address
these challenges. This can include developing a time line of upcoming regulations; a schedule for monitoring and evaluating your system's
technical, managerial, and financial progress; and plans for continuous improvement.

           To implement your chosen options, you need to develop an action plan. YOU MAY NEED TO:
    Provide special training for technical staff or
    management.
    Make personnel changes.
    Address new regulatory and legal
    requirements.
    Inform relevant parties of changes and garner
    support from regulators, system staff,
    managers, consumers, and the community.
Obtain approvals, permits, and certifications
from relevant authorities (e.g., from a PUC for a
rate change).
Re-examine your system's revenue-raising
mechanisms.
Find outside public or private sources to fund
changes.
The following worksheet is designed to help identify potential challenges and develop an action plan to address obstacles to successful
implementation. It provides space for describing your challenges and your plans for overcoming them. This worksheet will also help you set out a
schedule for implementing your options.  A completed example and a blank worksheet are provided.
                                                          17

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   Chosen
   Option
         Required Actions1
  Proposed
Start/End Date2
      Related Challenges3
Plans to Address Challenges4
              Conduct and/aMeyyreyulty of-
              yource/water inventory
   Develop
source water
  protection
    plan
Identify potential/
c&ntaminanty and/threaty
                                                  11/1/03 to-
                                                    1/1/04
               L i/mited/ ytaff- reyourcey to-
               complete/inventory; limited/
               by pevyonnel/ knowledgeable*
               on/potential/ yecurityf
                                                                                                     reyourcey
                                                                                 (technical/ or financial/ ayyiytance/);
                               program/ or cooperation/wit/ nearby
                               yyytemy
ViycU4*y follow-Up OCtiOny
              Meet with/ regulatory and/
              affected/ land/ownery
                                                  1/1/04 to-
               Gathering^ytakeholder
               interest in/follow ~ up
               action^; U^'iu'ed/financial/
                                                  reyourcey
                                              ce/water protection'
                               effortyto-gtivn/commwvuty yupportfor
                               Cnvolvemewt On'tke/program/,
                                   e}vcjate> available' Utate/
   Develop
    asset
 management
    plan
              TraCwytaff-
Conduct Cvwentory
  1/1/04 to-
    3/1/04
c&mmitment; v\ewproceyyfor
                                                                                                      o-fully
              Meet wttfa/publCc/ utility agency
   Review
 current rates
                                     3/1/04 to-
                                      4/1/04
              Meet w(h/neighbor yyytem/
               Any ratechange^ will/
               require/Pile approval/; rate-
               review proceyy i^y cuw\)yeryowie/
               and/etipen^ive/; rate/
               iv\cveabeb- will/ be/ unpopular
                               Consider alternative^ like/
                               c&n&oldatiov\/ wih/ another yyytem/,
                               further redMCMrufrarea/ofyervlce/, or
                                         tate/ or federal/ a&yiytav\ce>
              Contact local/ authoritiey
    Begin
  frequent
   system
   patrols
Setup meetiru^wttfa/local/
               Lvmited/fvnaw
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         and
Chosen
Opt on




Required Actons1












Proposed
Sta nd Date2




Related Chal enges3




ans to Address Chal enges




'Describe the steps that are required for implementation of each option. These might include key meetings, financing approvals, or any construction projects, for example. If there are multiple
stages to completing your chosen option, you may want to group these actions accordingly.
2Enter the date on which you hope to start and finish the required action. If there is no specific date set, enter in a month or day by which you would like to have this part of the plan set in
motion.
3Summarize any potential problems related to each required action. Think about these before the project begins, and make any changes or updates as the project progresses.
"Enter any ideas for overcoming potential problems or any problems already encountered. As your options are implemented and new or different challenges arise, edit your plans accordingly.
19

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STEP 7: Assess and Evaluate
Strategic planning helps you face an unpredictable future successfully. This does not mean that your current plan will address every circumstance
or provide a solution for every challenge. There may be elements that don't work, or problems that arise that need additional analysis and action.
Or, you may want to make changes if the results are not serving your system's or your customers' best interests.

On-going monitoring and evaluation will help you assess whether your system is operating the way you want it to. The worksheets in this guide
should be reviewed, revised, and updated on no less than an annual basis to reflect any financial, managerial, technical, or strategic changes
affecting your system.

Remember, strategic planning is a continuous process that can result in continuous improvements. The planning process and the values and goals
that define your system should allow you to respond more effectively, quickly, and creatively in the future.

There are numerous tools and resources that can make strategic planning easier. The following Appendices provide a list of State and Regional
Tribal Capacity Development Coordinator contacts and additional EPA resources that will help you navigate through the strategic planning process.
                                                   Plan
                              Revise
Evaluate
                                                        20

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For additional information or to learn more about the laws in your own state, please contact your EPA Regional Coordinator or State Drinking Water Agency.
EPA Region 1
Connecticut
Department of Public Health: Drinking Water Division
Maine
Maine Department of Human Services: Division of Health Engineering
Massachusetts
Department of Environmental Protection: Drinking Water Program
New Hampshire
Department of Environmental Services: Water Supply Engineering Bureau
Rhode Island
Department of Health: Office of Drinking Water Quality
Vermont
Department of Environmental Conservation: Water Supply Division
www.epa.gov/region1/eco/drinkwater/index.html
www.dph.state.ct. us/B RS/water/dwd . htm
www.state . me . us/d hs/e ng/water/i nd ex. htm
www.state.ma.us/dep/brp/dws/dwshome.htm
www.des.state.nh.us/wseb/
www.healthri.org/environment/dwq/Home.htm
www.vermontdrinkingwater.org
(617)918-1584
(860) 509-7333
(207) 287-2070
(617)292-5770
(603)271-2513
(401)222-6867
(802) 241 -3400
EPA Region 2
New Jersey
Department of Environmental Protection: Bureau of Safe Drinking Water
New York
Department of Public Health: Bureau of Public Water Supply Protection
Puerto Rico
Department of Health: Public Water Supply Supervision Program
Virgin Islands
Department of Planning and Natural Resources: Division of Environmental
Protection
www.epa.gov/region02/water/drinkingwater/
www.state. nj.us/dep/watersupply/safedrnk.htm
www.health.state.ny.us/nysdoh/water/main.htm
www.epa.gov/region02/cepd/prlink.htm
www.epa.gov/region02/cepd/vilink.htm
(212)637-3879
(609) 292-5550
(518)402-7650
(787) 977-5870
(340)773-1082
                                                                    21

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EPA Region 3
Delaware
Delaware Health and Social Services: Division of Public Health
District of Columbia
Environmental Health Administration: Water Resources Management Division
Maryland
Department of the Environment: Public Drinking Water Program
Pennsylvania
Department of Environmental Protection: Bureau of Water Supply Management
Virginia
Department of Health: Division of Water Supply Engineering
West Virginia
Bureau for Public Health: Environmental Engineering Department
www.epa.gov/reg3wapd/
www.state.de. us/dhss/dph/hsp. htm
www.dcwasa.com/
www.mde.state.md.us/aboutmde/reports/index.asp
www.dep.state.pa.us/dep/deputate/watermgt/wsm/
wsm.htm
www.vdh.state.va. us/ddw/index.htm
www.wvdhhr.org/oehs/eed/
(215)814-2300
(302)739-5410
(202)535-2190
(410)537-3002
(717)787-5017
(804) 786-5566
(304) 558-2981
EPA Region 4
Alabama
Department of Environmental Management: Water Supply Branch
Florida
Department of Environmental Protection: Drinking Water Section
Georgia
Department of Natural Resources: Water Resources Branch
Kentucky
Department of Environmental Protection: Drinking Water Branch
Mississippi
Department of Health: Division of Water Supply
North Carolina
Department of Environment and Natural Resources: Public Water Supply
Section
South Carolina
Department of Health and Environmental Control: Bureau of Water
Tennessee
Department of Environment and Conservation: Division of Water Supply
www.epa.gov/region4/water/
www.adem.state.al.us/WaterDivision/
WaterDivisionPP.htm
www.dep.state.fl.us/water/drinkingwater/index.htm
www.dnr.state.ga.us/dnr/environ/
wate r. nr.state . ky. us/d w/
www.msdh.state.ms.us/watersupply/index.htm
www.deh.enr.state.nc. us/pws
www.scdhec.net/water/html/dwater.html
www.state.tn.us/envi ronment/dws/
(404) 562-9345
(334)271-7773
(850)487-1762
(404) 656-4087
(502)564-3410
(601)576-7518
(919)733-2321
(803) 898-4300
(615)532-0191
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EPA Region 5
Illinois
Environmental Protection Agency: Division of Public Water Supplies
Indiana
Department of Environmental Management: Drinking Water Branch
Michigan
Department of Environmental Quality: Drinking Water and Radiological
Protection Division
Minnesota
Department of Health: Drinking Water Protection Section
Ohio
Environmental Protection Agency: Division of Drinking and Ground Water
Wisconsin
Department of Natural Resources: Bureau of Water Supply
www.e pa.gov/r5wate r/
www.epa.state.il.us/water/index-pws.html
www.ai .org/idenVowm/dwb/index.html
www.michigan.gov/deq
www.health.state.mn.us/divs/eh/index.html
www.epa.state.oh.us/dsw/
www.dnr.state.wi.us/org/water/dwg/index.htm
(312)886-4239
(217)785-8653
(31 7) 308-3282
(517)335-9216
(651)215-0770
(614)644-2752
(608) 266-2299
EPA Region 6
Arkansas
Department of Health: Division of Engineering
Louisiana
Office of Public Health: Division of Environmental and Health Services
New Mexico
Environment Department: Drinking Water Bureau
Oklahoma
Department of Environmental Quality: Water Quality Division
Texas
Texas Commission on Environmental Quality: Water Supply Division
www.epa.gov/region6/water
www.healthyarkansas.com/eng/index.html
www.dhh.state.la.us/OPH/safewtr.htm
www.nmenv.state.nm.us/dwb/dwbtop.html
www.deq.state.ok.us/WQDnew/index.htm
www.tnrcc.state.tx.us/permitting/waterperm/pdw/
pdwOOO.html
(214)665-2757
(501)661-2623
(225) 765-5038
(505) 827-7536
(405)702-8100
(512)239-6096
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EPA Region 7
Iowa
Department of Natural Resources: Water Supply Section
Kansas
Department of Health and Environment: Public Water Supply Section
Missouri
Department of Natural Resources: Public Drinking Water Program
Nebraska
Department of HHS Regulation and Licensure
www.epa.gov/region7/water/dwgw.htm
www.state.ia.us/epd/wtrsuply/wtrsup.htm
www.kdhe.state.ks.us/pws/
www.dnr.state.mo.us/wpscd/pdwp/homepdwp.htm
www.hhs.state.ne.us/enh/enhindex.htm
(913)551-7030
(515)725-0275
(785)296-5514
(573)751-5331
(402)471-2541
EPA Region 8
Colorado
Department of Public Health and Environment: Drinking Water Program
Montana
Department of Environmental Quality: Public Water Supply Section
North Dakota
Department of Health: Division of Municipal Facilities
South Dakota
Department of Environment and Natural Resources: Drinking Water
Program
Utah
Department of Environmental Quality: Division of Drinking Water
Wyoming
EPA Region VIII: Wyoming Drinking Water Program
www.epa.gov/region08/water/
www.cdphe .state .co. us/wq/wqhom.asp
www.deq.state.mt.us/wqinfo/index.asp
www.ehs.health.state.nd.us/ndhd/environ/mf/index.htm
www.state.sd. us/denr/des/drinking/dwprg. htm
www.deq.state.ut.us/eqdw/lndex.htm
www.epa.gov/region08/water/dwhome/wycon/wycon.html
(303)312-7021
(303) 692-3500
(406) 444-3080
(701)328-5211
(605) 773-3754
(801)536-4200
(303)312-6312
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EPA Region 9
American Samoa
Environmental Protection Agency: American Samoa
Arizona
Department of Environmental Quality: Drinking Water Monitoring and
Assessment Division
California
Department of Health Services: Division of Drinking Water and
Environmental Management
Guam
Guam Environmental Protection Agency
Hawaii
Department of Health: Environmental Management Division
Nevada
Department of Human Resources: Bureau of Health Protection Services
www.epa.gov/region9/water/index.html
www.epa.gov/Region9/cross_pr/islands/samoa.html
www.adeq.state.az.us/environ/water/dw/index.html
www.dhs.cahwnet.gov/org/ps/ddwem/
www.epa.gov/region09/cross_pr/islands/guam.html
www.hawaii.gov/health/eh/sdwb/index.html
www.health2k.state.nv.us/bhps/phe/sdwp.htm
(415)744-1884
(415)744-2170
(602) 207-4644
(916)323-6111
(671)472-8863
(808) 586-4258
(775)687-6615
EPA Region 10
Alaska
Department of Environmental Conservation: Drinking Water and Wastewater
Program
Idaho
Department of Environmental Quality: Water Quality Division
Oregon
Department of Human Resources: Drinking Water Program
Washington
Department of Health: Drinking Water Division
www.epa.gov/region1 01
www.state.ak.us/dec/deh/safewater.htm
www2.state.id.us/deq/water/water1.htm
www.ohd.hr.state.or.us/dwp/index.htm
www.doh.wa.gov/ehp/dw/
(206)553-1389
(907) 269-7653
(208) 373-0502
(503)731-4317
(360) 236-3096
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                      B:
For additional information or to learn more about the laws governing your Tribe, use the contact information provided in this Appendix.
US EPA Headquarters
American Indian Environmental Office
www.epa.gov/indian
(202) 564-0303
US EPA Regional Tribal Capacity Development Coordinators
EPA Region 1
EPA Region 2
EPA Region 4
EPA Region 5
EPA Region 6
EPA Region 7
EPA Region 8
EPA Region 9
EPA Region 10
www.epa.gov/region01/topics/government/tribal.html
www.epa.gov/region02/nations/index.html
www.epa.gov/region04/ead/indian/index.htm
www.epa.gov/region5/water/stpb
www.epa.gov/region06/6xa/tribal.htm
www.epa.gov/region07/governme nt_triba I/index, htm
www.epa.gov/region08/tribes
www.epa.gov/region09/cross_pr/indian/index.html
yosemite.epa.gov/r10/tribal.NSF/webpage/
tribal+office+homepage?opendocument
(888) 372-7341
(212)637-3600
(404) 562-6939
(312)353-2123
(800) 887-6063
(913)551-7030
(303)312-6116
(415)744-1500
(206)553-4011
Other Contacts
Administration for Native Americans
Bureau of Indian Affairs
Indian Health Services
Native American Water Association
www.acf.dhhs.gov/programs/ana/
www.doi.gov/bureau-indian-affairs.html
www.ihs.gov
www.nawainc.org
(877) 922-9262
(202)208-3710
(301)443-3024
(775) 782-6636
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Appendix C:  Other STEP Guide Documents
This brochure is one in a series of Simple Tools for Effective Performance (STEP) documents for small drinking water systems. The STEP documents can
be obtained from EPA by calling the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791 and requesting the document by its publication number. The documents
can also be found at www.epa.gov/safewater/smallsys/ssinfo.htm.
AVAILABLE NOW
A Small Systems Guide to the Total Coliform Rule (TCR)
This workbook is designed to help small systems understand the TCR and
the mandatory monitoring required under the rule. The workbook provides
sample worksheets to help systems organize and track TCR monitoring
data, and provides appropriate follow-up actions should monitoring show a
positive presence of coliform.
Publication number EPA 816-R-01 -017A
Published: June 2001

Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) Regulation Overview Brochure for Small
Systems
This brochure summarizes SDWA regulations that currently exist, are
proposed, or are under development that affect or will affect small water
systems. The brochure emphasizes how the regulations relate to each
other, and explains the multi-barrier approach to microbial and chemical/
radiological risks and how SDWA regulations fit into this type of framework.
Publication number EPA816-R-03-017
Published: September 2003

Complying With the Revised Drinking Water Standard for Arsenic: Small
Entity Compliance Guide
This workbook is designed to help systems understand and achieve
compliance with the Arsenic Rule. The workbook provides sample
worksheets to help systems organize data, and provides guidance for small
systems on their selection of appropriate compliance options.
Publication number EPA816-R-02-008A
Published: August 2002
Asset Management Workbook
This workbook will guide small systems through the process of developing
an asset management plan and includes worksheets on completing a
thorough asset inventory; prioritizing the rehabilitation and replacement
of your assets; developing a simple asset management plan: and carrying
out the plan. The workbook also provides information about how asset
management can help improve your system's financial health and ability
to provide safe drinking water.
Publication number EPA816-R-03-016
UNDER DEVELOPMENT
Disinfectants/Disinfection By-Products (D/DBP)Rule Workbook


Rate-Setting: A Handbook for Small Systems


Restructuring: A Handbook for Small Systems
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