OOOD89100
                                          ; :::::.::::;
         PRACTICAL GUIDE FOR ASSESSING AND
           REMEDIATING CONTAMINATED SITES
                           DRAFT
OFFICE OF SOLID WASTE
WASTE MANAGEMENT DIVISION
U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
401 M STREET, S.W.
WASHINGTON, D.C.  20460
                                                    MAY 1989
                        b.S Environmental Protection Agency

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                             CONTENTS

                                                                    Page

  Acknowledgments                                                     iv
  Executive Summary                                                    v

  I.   Topical Guidance Directory                                     1-1

        Overview                                                     1-2

        Preliminary Site Assessment                                  1-2

        Characterization of Contaminant Source(s) and
          Environmental Setting                                      1-3
            Characterization  of Contaminant  Source(s)                1-3
            Characterization  of Environmental  Setting                1-5

        Assessment of Contaminant Fate and Transport                 1-7

        Selection, Design and Implementation of Remedial
          Technologies                                               1-9
            Selection of Remedial Technologies                      1-13
            Design and Implementation of Remedial
              Technologies                                          1-13

        Performance Evaluation of Remedial Technologies             1-15


 II.   Technical  Support Systems  and Data Bases                      II-l

        Commercial Data Bases                                       II-3

        EPA Data Bases                                              II-6

        Other Federal Agency  Data Bases                            11-13

        Models/Applications Software                               11-16

        Technical Support/Reference Systems                        11-18


III.   Annotated  Bibliography                                       Ill-l


 IV.   Compendium of Courses,  Symposia,  Workshops,  and
        Conferences                                                 iv-l

        Corrective Action Technologies, Design,
          and Management                                            IV-3

        Sampling and Analysis                                      IV-30

        Health and Safety                                          IV-34

        Risk Assessment                                            IV-35

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                                                           May 1, 1989
                     CONTENTS  (continued)
V.  Technical Assistance Directory                                 V-l

    1.   Introduction                                               V-2
    2.   Ord Ground-Water  Research  Facility  Descriptions            V-4
           Environmental Monitoring Systems  Laboratory             V-6
           Robert S. Kerr  Environmental  Research Laboratory        V-7
           Environmental Research Laboratory                       V-8
           International Ground Water Modeling Center              V-9
           Environmental Criteria and Assessment Office           V-10
           Exposure Assessment  Group                              V-ll
           Hazardous Waste Engineering Research Laboratory        V-12
           Water Engineering Research Laboratory                  V-13

    3.   Technical Assistance Contacts by Research  Facility       V-14
           Environmental Monitoring Systems  Laboratory
             - Las Vegas                                          V-15
           Robert S. Kerr  Environmental  Research Laboratory       V-16
           Environmental Research Laboratory - Athens             V-l8
           International Ground Water Modeling Center             V-l9
           Environmental Criteria and Assessment Office
             - Cincinnati                                          V-20
           Exposure Assessment  Group                              V-20
           Hazardous Waste Engineering Research Laboratory        V-20
           Water Engineering Research Laboratory                  V-24

    4.   Technical Assistance Contacts by Subject                 V-26

    5.   Program Office  and Regional Office  Contacts               V-34
           Office of Drinking Water                               V-35
           Office of Ground-Water Protection                      V-35
           Office of Solid Waste                                  V-35
           Office of Emergency  and  Remedial  Response               V-35
           Office of Underground Storage Tanks                    v-36
           Office of Waste Programs Enforcement                   V-36
           Office of Pesticide  Programs                            V-36
           Office of Toxic Substances                             V-36
           Region I                                               V-37
           Region II                                               V-37
           Region III                                              V-38
           Region IV                                               V-38
           Region V                                               V-39
           Region VI                                               V-40
           Region vn                                              v-40
           Region VIII                                            V-41
           Region IX                                               V-41
           Region X                                               v-42

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                                ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
         This guide was prepared under the direction of Joseph M. Abe, Waste
Management Division, Office of Solid Waste, United States Environmental
Protection Agency.  Special thanks is given to Vernon B. Myers, Chief of the
Ground-Water Section,  whose technical oversight and flexible management style
enabled the creation of this initial document.  Among the many EPA individuals
who contributed significantly to the development of the guide are Melanie
Barger, Jim Brown, Jon Perry, Paul Schumann, Bill Stelz, Joe Williams, Jim
Cummings, and countless scientists and engineers throughout the Agency.

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                               EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
      This document is intended as a practical guide or pathfinder for
government and industry personnel that are involved with assessing and
remediating contaminated sites.  Successful implementation of environmental
programs is strongly dependent on the availability of technical resources such
as guidance,  technical support systems, data bases, training, and technical
experts.  This guide should help environmental scientists and engineers
address contaminant releases to ground water, soil, surface water, and air by
directing these individuals to appropriate sources of information.

      Several EPA programs deal with assessing and remediating contaminated
sites.  These include the RCRA hazardous waste program, which regulates the
treatment, storage, and disposal of hazardous waste,  the CERCLA program, which
responds to releases from uncontrolled hazardous waste sites, and the UST
program which regulates releases from underground storage tanks.  Although
differences exist among EPA programs, many technical considerations regarding
assessment and remediation activities are shared between them.  This guide
directs the user toward information on assessment and remediation activities
that are common to site contamination problems in general; and therefore,  may
provide technical assistance to a variety of programs.

      It is anticipated that the guide will be available in two forms:  (1)  as
a hard copy,  i.e., in three-ring binder form and (2)  stored on files within
computer networks such as the OSWER Electronic Bulletin Board System  (BBS; see
Section II).   This dual format will provide maximum flexibility to users and
allow timely revision of existing text or the inclusion of supplemental
material as appropriate.  The primary function of the guide is to direct the
user toward references and technical support for detailed information on
program requirements, technical methods, data requirements,  and technologies.

      The guide is divided into five sections:  (I) Topical Guidance
Directory, (II)  Technical Support Systems and Data Bases, (III)  Annotated
Bibliography, (IV) Compendium of Courses, Symposia, Workshops and Conferences,
and (V) Technical Assistance Directory.

      Section I, the Topical Guidance Directory, is subdivided into Overview;
Preliminary Site Assessment; Characterization of Contaminant Source (s) and
Environmental Setting; Assessment of Contaminant Fate and Transport;
Selection, Design and Implementation of Remedial Technologies; and Performance
Evaluation of Remedial Technologies.  Brief discussions precede each
alphabetized list of technical documents to help explain how each of the above
topics fits into the overall, iterative process of collecting and evaluating
site information.  Since many reports appear under more than one topic, only
the titles and reference information are shown.  Brief descriptions of each
document appear individually in Section III, the Annotated Bibliography.

      Section II is an inventory of commercial data bases, EPA data bases,
federal (non-EPA) data bases, and a variety of technical support systems that
may aid in the assessment and remediation of specific sites or assist managers
in long-range planning of environmental programs.   Brief descriptions and
access information are included for each of the entries.

      Section III is an annotated bibliography of guidance documents and
references listed under Section I,  and like Section I, is alphabetized by
title.  Brief summaries of each document are provided to assist the user in
selecting the appropriate technical report.
                                      VI

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      Section IV is a compendium of existing courses, symposia, conferences,
and workshops.  Each entry includes the title, contact, availability, and
description.

      Section V is a technical assistance directory of EPA program, regional,
and research staff that may be contacted to answer specific questions
regarding the assessment and remediation of contaminated sites.  The directory
includes the individual's name, organization within EPA, area of expertise,
mailing address, and phone number.  The directory is intended to foster
communication among scientists and engineers within EPA, other Federal
agencies, industry, and state and local governments.
                                      vii

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         SECTION  I
TOPICAL GUIDANCE DIRECTORY

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                                   OVERVIEW
      The assessment and remediation of a contaminated site involves an
iterative procedure of data collection and analysis until the investigator has
defined and characterized the contamination problem to the extent that a
solution can be implemented under prevailing constraints.  The effectiveness
of selected remedial measures is largely dependent on the quality of site
characterization and problem definition.  In support of these activities, this
topical guidance directory has been developed to help investigators find
reports that relate to the following phases of site assessment and
remediation:

      o   Preliminary Site Assessment,

      o   Characterization of Contaminant Source(s)  and Environmental Setting,

      o   Assessment of Contaminant Fate and Transport,

      o   Selection, Design,  and Implementation of Remedial Technologies, and

      o   Performance Evaluation of Remedial Technologies.

      Guidance documents and references are listed alphabetically by title
under one or more of the above topics as appropriate.  Brief descriptions of
each document appear individually in Section III, the Annotated Bibliography.
General references and introductory material are provided below.

Basic Ground-Water Hydrology, R.C. Heath, U.S.G.S. Water Supply Paper 2220.

Data Quality Objectives:  Development Guidance for Uncontrolled Hazardous
Waste Site Remedial Response Activities, EPA/OERR/HSCD,  October 1986, OSWER
Directive 9355.0-07A.

Data Quality Objectives for Remedial Response Activities, EPA/OERR,
March 1987, OSWER Directive No. 9355.007B.

Field Standard Operating Procedures  (FSOP), EPA/OSW, 1985, OSWER Directive No.
9285.2-01.

Guidance Manual for Research, Development, and Demonstration Permits, EPA/OSW,
July 1986, EPA-530/SW-86/008.

Handbook: Ground Water, Final, EPA/ORD, March 1987,  EPA/625/6-87/016.

Protection of Public Water Supplies from Ground-Water Contamination, EPA/ORD,
September 1985, EPA/625/4-85/016.

Standard Operating Procedures for Conducting Sampling and Sample Bank Audits,
EPA/EMSL, January 1985, PB85-143279.


                          PRELIMINARY SITE ASSESSMENT

      The preliminary assessment of a site provides an early estimation of the
nature and extent of contamination.  The surface configuration of potential
contaminant sources both on and off site may impact assessment and remediation
by contributing to the complexity of contamination.   Well-developed maps
showing the number,  spacing,  and relative positions of contaminant sources are
essential to the planning and implementation of assessment and remediation
activities.   This information, together with existing data on the


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environmental setting and land use, help direct subsequent, more detailed
field studies.  Preliminary assessment activities and tools may include map
and field inspections, remote sensing, surface geophysical methods, and
Geographic Information Systems (GIS).   Important reports for conducting
preliminary assessments are listed below.

Rapid Assessment of Potential Ground-Water Contamination Under Emergency
Response Conditions,  EPA/600/8-83/030, November 1983,  CERI.

RCRA Facility Assessment Guidance, Final, OSW, October 1986,  PB87-107769.


      CHARACTERIZATION OF CONTAMINANT  SOURCE(S)  AND ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING

      Once the preliminary assessment is completed, more detailed information
is obtained regarding the nature and extent of potential contaminant sources,
contaminant pathways, and human and environmental impacts.  A conceptual model
of the site, based on the initial assessment, is often used to direct field
technologies and methods used in describing the types and  amounts of
contaminants present, the characteristics of affected environmental media
(i.e., ground water,  soil, surface water, and air), and when and how much
contamination may reach the accessible biosphere.  Common  activities include
direct and indirect measurement of physical,  chemical, and biological fate and
transport properties, waste or product characterization, and evaluation of
containment systems if present.  These and other technical activities are
discussed in the documents listed below.

Characterization of Hazardous Waste SitesA Methods Manual, EPA/EMSL, April
1985.

Guidance on Remedial Investigations Under CERCLA, EPA/OWPE, June 1985, OSWER
Directive No. 9355.0-06B.

RCRA Facility Investigation  (RFI) Guidance, Draft, OSW, July 1987, OSWER
Directive No. 9502.00-6C, EPA 530/SW-87-001.

Survey of Mobile Laboratory Capabilities and Configurations, EPA/EMSL, 1984,
EPA-600/X-84-170.

Toxicology Handbook:  Principles Related to Hazardous .Waste Site
Investigations, EPA/OWPE, August 1985.

"Underground Storage Tank Monitoring:  Observation Well Based Systems," R.A.
Scheinfeld, J.B. Robertson, and T.G.  Schwendeman, Ground Water Monitoring
Review, 6(4):49-55, Fall 1986.


                   Characterization of Contaminant Source(s)

Assessment of Hazardous  Waste Surface Impoundment Technology Case Studies and
Perspectives of Experts:  Final Report, EPA/ORD, November  1984, PB85-117059.

Assessment of Synthetic Membrane Successes and Failures at Waste Storage and
Disposal Sites, EPA/ORD, January 1985.

Assessment of Techniques for  "In Situ" Repair of Flexible  Membrane Liners,
EPA/ORD, May 1987, PB87-191813.

Avoiding Failure of Leachate Collection Systems at Hazardous Waste Landfills,
EPA/ORD, January 1984, PB84-235100.


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Design, Construction, and Maintenance  of Cover  Systems  for Hazardous Waste:
An Engineering Guidance Document, EPA/ORD, May  1987, PB87-191656.

Development of Chemical Compatibility  Criteria  for Assessing Flexible Membrane
Liners, EPA/ORD, EPA/600/2-87/067.

Effects of Organic Solvents on  the Permeability of Clay Soils,  EPA/ORD,  March
1983, PB83-179978.

Electrical Resistivity Technique  to Assess the  Integrity of  Geomembrane
Liners, EPA/ORD, November 1984, PB85-122414.

Evaluating Cover Systems for Solid and Hazardous Waste,  EPA/ORD/MERL,
September 1980, SW-867.

Evaluation of Geomembrane Seams Exposed to Selected  Environmental  Conditions,
EPA/ORD, January 1984, PB84-166842.

Factors in Assessing  the Compatibility of FMLs  and Waste Liquids,  EPA/ORD,
EPA/600/2-88/017.

Field Studies of Geomembrane Installation Techniques, EPA/ORD,  January 1984,
PB84-190586.

Field Studies of Liner Installation Methods At  Landfills and Surface
Impoundments:  Final  Report, EPA/ORD,  November  1984, PB85-117067.

Geophysical Methods for Locating  Abandoned Wells, EPA/EMSL,  May 1984,
EPA/600/4-84-065.

Geophysical Techniques for Sensing Buried Wastes and Waste Migration,
EPA/EMSL, June 1984,  EPAX 8706-0050.

Geosynthetic Design Guidance for  Hazardous Waste Landfill Cells and Surface
Impoundments, EPA/ORD, EPA/600/2-87/097.

Geotechnical Analysis for Review  of Dike Stability  (CARDS).   Technical Manual,
EPA/ORD, December 1986, PB87-130951.

Innovative Means of Dealing with  Potential Sources of Groundwater
Contamination:  Proceedings of  the National Groundwater Quality Symposium,
EPA/Ada, January 1984, PB85-196947.

Laboratory Studies of Soil Bedding Requirements for  Flexible Membrane Liners,
EPA/ORD, January 1984, PB84-141498.

Landfill and Surface  Impoundment  Performance Evaluation Manual,  EPA/ORD, April
1983, EPAX 8603-0188.

Leachate Characterization and Synthetic Leachate Formulation for Liner
Testing, EPA/ORD,  January 1987, PB87-145983.
Liner Materials Exposed to Hazardous and Toxic  Waste, EPA/ORD,  January 1986,
PB87-176897.

Manual of Procedures  and Criteria for  Inspecting the Installation  of Flexible
Membrane Liners in Hazardous Waste Facilities,  EPA/ORD,  EPA/600/8-87/056.

Nondestructive Testing (NDT) Techniques to Detect Contained  Subsurface
Hazardous Wastes,  EPA/ORD,  EPA/600/2-87/078,  PB88-185269.


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Performance of an Electrical Resistivity Technique for Detecting and Locating
Geomembrane Failures, EPA/ORD, May 1984, PB84-190594.

Permeability of Polymeric Membrane Lining Materials  (Technical Paper),
EPA/ORD, January 1984, PB84-166859.

Permeability of Polymeric Membrane Lining Materials for Waste Management
Facilities, EPA/ORD, May 1985, PB85-231900.

Potential Clogging of Landfill Drainage Systems, EPA/ORD,  October 1983, PB84-
110550.

Prediction/Mitigation of Subsidence Damage to Hazardous Waste Landfill  Covers,
EPA/ORD, March 1987, PB87-175386.

Procedures for Modeling Flow Through Clay Liners to Determine Required  Liner
Thickness, EPA/OSWER, January 1984, PB87-191029.

Settlement and Cover Subsidence of Hazardous Waste Landfills  (Final Report),
EPA/ORD, April 1985, EPAX 8605-0117.

Soi2iner ModelDocumentation and User's Guide  (Version 1)  (Rept. for May  85-
May 96), EPA/ORD, April 86, PB87-100038.

Soiliner Version 1  (for Microcomputers;, EPA/ORD, July 1986, PB87-126033.

Technical Guidance Document:  Construction Quality Assurance for Hazardous
Waste Land Disposal Facilities, EPA/OSWER, July 1986, Directive No. 9472.00-3.

Test Methods for Determining the Chemical Waste Compatibility of Synthetic
Liners, EPA/OSWER, April 1985, EPAX 8605-0116.

Test Methods for Evaluating Solid Waste:  Physical/Chemical Methods, Final,
OSWER, November 1986, SW-846,  (EPA 8704-0107).

Underground Tank Leak Detection Methods:  A State-of-the-Art Review,
EPA/600/2-86-001, PB86 137-155, January 1986.


                   Characterization of Environmental Setting

Analysis and Evaluation of Pumping Test Data, E.P. Kruseman and N.A. De
Ridder, Inter. Inst. Land Reclamation and Improvement, P.O. Box 6700AA,
Wageningen, Netherlands, 1983.

Borehole Sensing Methods for Ground-Water Investigations  at Hazardous Waste
Sites, EPA, December 1986, PB87-132783.

Criteria for Identifying Areas of Vulnerable Hydrogeology Under the Resource
Conservation and Recovery Act:  Appendix A, Technical Methods for Evaluating
Hydrogeology Parameters, EPA/OSW, July 1986.

Criteria for Identifying Areas of Vulnerable Hydrogeology Under the Resource
Conservation and Recovery Act:  Appendix B. Ground-Water  Flow Net/Flow  Line
Construction and Analysis, July 1986, EPA/OSW.

Criteria for Identifying Areas of Vulnerable Hydrogeology Under the Resource
Conservation and Recovery Act:  Appendix C, Technical Methods for Calculating
Time of Travel in the Unsaturated Zone, EPA/OSW, July 1986.


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Criteria for Identifying Areas of Vulnerable Hydrogeology  Under  the Resource
Conservation and Recovery Act:  Appendix D, Development of Vulnerability
Criteria Based on Risk Assessments and Theoretical Modeling, EPA/OSW,  July
1986.

DRASTIC:  A Standardized System for Evaluating Ground Water Pollution
Potential Using Hydrogeologic Settings, National Water Well Association, May
1985.

Ground Water and Wells, E.E. Johnson, Ed.,  Johnson Division, UOP,  Inc.,
Minneapolis, Minnesota, 1982.

Ground-Water Hydraulics, S.W. Lohman, Geological Survey Professional Paper
708, 1972.

Groundwater, R.A. Freeze and J.A. Cherry, Prentica-Hall, Englewood  Cliffs,  NJ,
1979.

Guide to the Selection of Materials for Monitoring Nell Construction and
Ground-Water Sampling, M.J. Barcelona, J.P. Gibb, and R.A. Miller,  Illinois
State Water Survey Contract Report 327, 1983.

Guidelines for Ground-Water Classification Under the EPA Ground-Water
Protection Strategy, EPA/OW/OGWP, December 1986.

Handbook of Applied Hydrology:  A Compendium of Water Resources  Technology,
V.T. Chow, Ed., McGraw-Hill, 1964.

Methods for Determining Permeability, rransmissibility, and Drawdown,  R.
Bentall, Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1536-1, 1963.

"Microbiology of Potable Water and Groundwater," D.J. Reasoner,  J.  Water
Pollution Control Fed.  55 (6):891-895, 1983.

Microwave System for Locating Faults  in Hazardous Materials Dikes:   Final
Report, EPA/ORD, January 1985, PB85-173821.

Practical Guide for Ground Water Sampling, EPA/Ada, September 1985,  EPAX 8706-
0004.

Practical Hydraulics, A.L. Simon, John Wiley & Sons, 1976.

Preparation of Soil Sampling Protocol:  Techniques and Strategies,  EPA/EMSL,
May 1983, PB83-206979.

RCRA Ground-Water Monitoring Technical Enforcement Guidance Document,  Final,
OWPE, September 1986, OSWER Directive No. 9933.1.

Sediment Sampling Quality Assurance User's Guide, EPA/EMSL, July 1985,  EPAX
8706-0003.

Shortcuts and Special Problems in Aquifer Tests, R. Bentall, Ed.,   Geological
Survey Water-Supply Paper 1545-C, 1963.

Soil Sampling Quality Assurance User's Guide, EPA/EMSL, May 1984, EPAX  8706-
0055.

Specific YieldCompilation of Specific Yields for Various Materials, A.I.
Johnson, Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1662-D,  1967.


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"The Effect of Sampling Frequency on Ground Water Quality Characterization,"
R. Rajagopal,  Ground Water Monitoring Review, 6(4):65-73, Fall 1986.

"The Use of Industrial Hygiene Samplers for Soil-Gas Surveying," H.B. Kerfoot
and C.L. Mayer, Ground Water Monitoring Review, 6(4):74-78, Fall 1986.

Theory of Aquifer Tests,  J.G. Ferris, D.B. Knowles, R.H. Brown, and R.W.
Stallman, Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1536-E, 1962.

Water Well Technology, M.D. Campbell and J.H. Lehr,  National Water Well
Association, 1982.


                 ASSESSMENT OF CONTAMINANT FATE AND TRANSPORT

      At this stage, detailed data on potential pathways in ground water,
soil, surface water, and air and the contaminant source(s) characteristics,
such as the types of wastes or products managed over time, the mobility and
toxicity of contaminants, and the degree of containment, are synthesized to
help assess the spatial and temporal distribution of contamination relative to
potential human and environmental receptors.  Models are often used to
facilitate these analyses.  Based on the assessment of potential harm to the
biosphere and the difficulty and expense of remediation, the scope of
remediation, if any, is determined.  The documents listed below provide
technical support for analyzing contaminant fate and transport.

Alternative Concentration Limit Guidance, EPA/OSW, December 1986.

Alternate Concentration Limit Guidance Based  on 264.94 (B) Criteria - Part  II
Case Studies, EPA/OSW, May 1988, PB88-214267.

Ambient Air/Source  Transport and Transformation Relationships  for Selected
Hazardous Air Pollutants, EPA/RTP, November 1986, PB87-129730.

Application of Chemical Fractionation Bioassy Procedure to Hazardous
Waste/Aquatic Site Monitoring, EPA/EMSL, September 1985, PB86-109493.

"Bacteriological Criteria for Ground Water Quality," M.J. Allen and E.E.
Geldreich. Ground Water,  13(l):45-52, Jan.-Feb. 1975.

Chemical, Physical  and Biological Properties  of Compounds Present at Hazardous
Waste Sites, EPA/OWPE, September 1985, OSWER  Directive No. 9850.3.
Effect of Capillarity and Soil Structure on Flow in Low Permeability Saturated
Soils at Disposal Facilities, EPA/ORD, April  1987, PB87-180576.

Endangerment Assessment Handbook, Final, EPA/OWPE, November 1985, OSWER
Directive No. 9850.1.

Enzyme-Based Detection of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Water, EPA/Edison, April
1985, PB85-191716.

"Evolving Concepts  of Subsurface Contaminant  Transport," J.F.  Keely, M.D.
Piwoni, and J.T. Wilson,  J. Water Pollution Control Fed.  58 (5) :349-357, May
1986.

Feasibility of Using Fiber Optics for Monitoring Groundwater Contaminants,
EPA/EMSL, January 1984, PB84-201607.
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Fugitive Particulate Emissions from Hazardous Waste  Sites, EPA/ORD,  EPA/600/2-
 87/066.
Graphite Electrode for the Measurement  of Redox Potential  and Oxygen Diffusion
Rate in Soil, EPA/Ada, January 1985, PB85-236248.

Groundvater Management:   The  Use of Numerical Models (Second Edition),  P.  van
der Heijde, Y. Bachmat, J. Bredehoeft,  B. Andrews, D.  Holtz,  and S.  Sebastian,
Amer. Geophysical Union,  Water Resources Monograph 5,  1985.

Ground Water Modeling Newsletter, International Ground Water Modeling Center,
Holcomb Research Institute, Butler University, 4600  Sunset Avenue,
Indianapolis, Indiana, 46208.

Groundwater Transport:  Handbook of Mathematical Models, I.  Javendel,  C.
Doughty, and C.F. Tsang,  Amer. Geophysical Union, Water  Resources Monograph
10, 1984.

Health Effects Assessment Documents,  (58 chemical profiles),  EPA/ORD,
September  1984, EPA-540/1-86-001 through 058.

"Health Risk Comparison Between Groundwater  Transport  Models and Field Data,"
Environmental Progress, 5(1):66-70, February 1986.

Hydrologic Evaluation of  Landfill Performance  (HELP) Model,  EPA/ORD,  June
1984, PB85-100840.

Impact of  High Chemical Contaminant Concentrations on  Terrestrial and Aquatic
Ecosystems:  A State-of-the-Art Review:  Final Report, EPA/Athens,  July 1984,
PB84-220292.

Integrated Risk Information System, EPA/ORD, March 1987, EPA/600/8-86/032A.

Leaching Evaluation of Agricultural Chemicals  (LEACH)  Handbook,  EPA/600/3-84/
068, PB84  236-413, June 1984, CERI.

Methods for Chemical Analysis of Water  and Waste, EPA/ORD, EPA/600/4-79-020.

MEXAMSThe Metals Exposure Analysis Modeling System,  EPA/600/3-84/031,  PB84
157-155, February 1984.

MINTEQA  Computer Program for Calculating Aqueous Geochemical  Equilibria,
EPA/600/3-84/032, PB84 157-148, February 1984.

Mobility of Organic Compounds from Hazardous Wastes, EPA/EMSL,  February 1983,
PB83-163956.

Mobility of Toxic Compounds from Hazardous Wastes, EPA/EMSL,  July 1984,  PB85-
117034.

Model Based Methodology for Remedial Action  Assessment at  Hazardous  Waste
Sites, EPA/ORD, January 1983, PB84-128990.

Modeling Remedial Actions At  Uncontrolled Hazardous  Waste  Sites,
EPA/ORD/Athens, January 1985, EPAX 8603-0202.

Modified NRC Version of the USGS Solute Transport Model.   Volume 1:
Modifications, EPA/OSWER,  September 1986, PB87-103099.

Modified NRC Version of the USGS Solute Transport Model.   Volume II:
Interactive Preprocessor Program,  EPA/ORD, July 1986, PB87-103107.


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RCRA Ground-Water Monitoring Technical Enforcement Guidance Document, Final,
OWPE, September 1986, OSWER Directive No. 9933.1.

Review and Evaluation of the Influence of Chemicals on the Conductivity  of
Soil Clays, EPA/ORD, EPA 600/2-88/016.

Sampling Approaches for Measuring Emission Rates from Hazardous Waste Disposal
Facilities, EPA/ORD, January 1984, PB84-194083.

SARAH:  A Surface Water Assessment Model for Back Calculating Reductions in
Abiotic Hazardous Wastes, EPA/ORD/Athens, December 1986, EPAX 8705-0106.

Sesoil:  A Seasonal Soil Compartment Model, EPA/OSWER, May 1984, PB86-112406.

Sesoil:  Execution Using the Data Management Supporting System, Sesin and
Sesoilfm.  User's Guide, EPA/OSWER, December 1984, PB86-112414.

Soil, Clay, and Caustic Soda Effects on Solubility, Sorption, and Mobility of
Hexachlorocyclopentadiene, EPA/ORD, January 1983, PB84-116060.

Soil Sampling Quality Assurance User's Guide, EPA/EMSL, May 1984, EPAX 8706-
0055.

Solubility of 2,3,7,8-TCDD  (Tetrachlorodibenzo-P-Dioxin) in Contaminated
Soils, EPA/OSWER, January 1986, PB87-115796.

Sorption of Organic Contaminants to a Low Carbon Subsurface Core, EPA/Ada,
January 1985, PB86-117470.

"Sorption of Organics by Monitoring Well Construction Materials," A.L. Sykes,
R.N. McAllister, and J.B. Homolya.  Ground Water Monitoring Review,  6(4):44-
47, Fall 1986.

Superr"und Exposure Assessment Manual, Draft, EPA/OERROSWER Directive
No. 9285.5- 01.

Superfund Risfc Assessment Information Directory, EPA/OERR, November  1986,
OSWER Directive 9285.6-1.

User's Manual for the Pesticide Zone Model PRZM, EPA/600/3-84/109 December
1984, EPA/CERI.

User's Guide for Wastox, A Framework for Modeling the Fate of Toxic  Chemicals
in Aquatic Environments.  Part 1:  Exposure Concentration, EPA/ORD/Gulf
Breeze, August 1984, EPAX 8607-0087.


        SELECTION, DESIGN, AND IMPLEMENTATION OF REMEDIAL TECHNOLOGIES

      Based on an understanding of the contamination problem and prevailing
constraints at the site, the investigator may select remedial technologies to
mitigate or remove potential harm to humans or  the environment.  If  previous
investigations are properly planned, much of the data on the contaminant
source(s) and affected environmental media will largely support remedial
decisions.  However, there may be additional types of data that are  important
to remedy selection, design, and implementation, that may not be required to
assess contaminant fate and transport.  The following reports contain
technical guidance for selecting, designing, and implementing remedial
technologies.


                                      1-9

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                                                                          DRAFT
                                                                    May 1,  1989


Bromlnation Process for Disposal of Spilled Hazardous Materials,  EPA/ORD,
September 1983, PB83-263806.

Case Studies 1-23:  Remedial Response at Hazardous  Waste  Sites,  EPA/ORD,
January 1984.

Case Studies Addendum:  1-8 Remedial Response at Hazardous  Waste Sites,
EPA/ORD, EPA/540/2-88/001.

Catalytic Dehydrohalogenation:  A Chemical Destruction Method for Halogenated
Organics, EPA/ORD, December 1986, PB87-133104.

Cementing Reactions in the Hazardous Waste Environment, EPA/ORD,  January 1984,
PB84-151299.

Combustion Technologies for Hazardous Waste, EPA/ORD, March 1987,  PBS 7-
167086.

Compendium of  Technologies Used in the  Treatment of Hazardous Wastes,
EPA/ORD/CERI,  September 1987, EPA/625/8-87/014.

Corrective Action Plan, EPA/OWPE, November 1986, OSWER Directive No.  9902.3.

Corrective Measures for Releases to Ground Water From Solid Waste Management
Units, EPA/OSW, Draft Final, PB 88-185251.

Corrective Measures for Releases to Soil from Solid Waste Management  Units,
EPA/OSW, August 1985, PB88-185277

Corrective Measures for Releases to Surface Water,  EPA/OSW,  Draft Final,  PB88-
185251.

Covers for Uncontrolled Hazardous Waste Sites, EPA/ORD, January  1985.
Decontamination Techniques for Mobile Response Equipment  Used at Waste Sites,
EPA/ORD/HWERL, January 1986, EPA-600/2-85-105.

Disposal Methods:  Landfills, Geologic  Formations,  Chemical Stabilization  and
Chemical Treatment, EPA/ORD, August 1986, PB86-231214.

Drum Handling  Practices at Hazardous Waste Sites, EPA/ORD,  August 1985,
EPA/600/S2-86/013.

Dust Control at Hazardous Waste Sites,  EPA/ORD, November  1985, EPAX 8603-0214.

Field Studies  of In Situ Soil Washing,  EPA/ORD, EPA/600-287/110.

Final Waste Soil Treatment Study:  Celtor Chemical  Works  Site, Hoopa,
California,  EPA/OSWER, September 1986,  EPAX 8710-0044.

Floating Cover Systems for Waste Lagoons:  Potential Application at Old Inger
Site, Louisiana.  EPA/ORD, January 1984, PB85-124667.

Geotextiles for Drainage, Gas Venting,  and Erosion  Control  at  Hazardous Waste
Sites, EPA/ORD, September 1986, EPAX 8612-0024.

Guidance Document for Cleanup of Surface Impoundment Sites,  Final,  OERR,
June 1986,  OSWER Directive No. 9380-0.06.
                                     1-10

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                                                                          DRAFT
                                                                   May  1,  1989

Guidance Document for Cleanup of Surface Tank and Drum Sites, Final, OERR,
May 1985, OSWER Directive No. 9380.0-03.
Guidance on Feasibility Studies Under CERCLA, EPA/OWPE, June 1985, OSWER
Directive No. 9355.0-5C.

Guidance on .Remedial Actions for Contaminated Ground Water at Superfund Sites,
EPA/OERR, October 1986, EPA/68-03-3113.

Guide for Decontaminating Buildings, Structures, and Equipment at Superfund
Sites, EPA/ORD/HWERL, March 1985, EPA-600/2-85-028.

Handbook for Evaluating Remedial Action Technology Plans, EPA/ORD/MERL,
August 1983, EPAX 8706-0052.

Handbook for Stabilization/Solidification of Hazardous Waste, EPA/ORD/HWERL,
June 1986.

Handbook on Treatment of Hazardous Waste Leachate, EPA/ORD, February 1987,
PB87-152328.

Handbook, Remedial Action at Hazardous Disposal Sites, EPA/OERR, October  1985,
OSWER Directive No. 9380.0-04.

Handbook:  Responding to Discharges of Sinking Hazardous  Substances,
EPA/ORD/HWERL, September 1987, EPA/540/2-87/001.

Hazardous Waste Treatment Technology, EPA/ORD, January 1986, PB86-145539.

Improved Techniques for Removal of Sediments Contaminated With Hazardous
Materials, EPA/ORD, October 1984, PB85-116093.

"In-Situ Biorestoration as a Ground Water Remediation Technique,"  J.T.
Wilson, L.E. Leach, M. Henson, and J.N. Jones,  Ground Water Monitoring
Review, 6 (4):56-64,  Fall 1986.

In Situ Methods to Control Emissions from Surface Impoundments and Landfills,
EPA/ORD, October 1985, PB86-121365.

In Situ Methods to Control Emissions from Surface Impoundments and Landfills,
Final, EPA/ORD, October 1985, EPA/600/2-85-124.

In Situ Restoration Technique for Aquifers  Contaminated  With Hazardous  Wastes,
EPA/Ada, January 1987, PB87-198396.

Leachate Plume Management, Final, November  1985, OSWER Directive No. 9380.0-
05.

Management of Hazardous Waste Leachate, EPA/OSWER, September 1982, EPAX 8706-
0051.

Methods/Materials Matrix of Ultimate Disposal Techniques  for Spilled Hazardous
Materials, EPA/ORD, October 1984, PB85-116853.

Mobile Treatment Technologies for Superfund Wastes, Final, September 1986,
EPA/540/2-86/003 (f) .

Model Based Methodology for Remedial Action Assessment at Hazardous Waste
Sites, EPA/ORD, January 1983, PB84-128990.
                                      1-11

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                                                                          DRAFT
                                                                    May 1,  1989

Perspectives on Solidification/Stabilization Technology for  Treating Hazardous
Waste, EPA/OSWER, January 1987, PB87-146346.

Reclamation and Redevelopment of Contaminated Land:   Volume  I,  U.S.  Case
Studies, EPA/ORD/HWERL, August 1986, EPA/600/2-86/066.

Remedial Response at Hazardous Waste Sites, EPA/OSWER, October  1985,  OSWER
Directive No. 9380.0-04

Review of In-Place Treatment Techniques for Contaminated Surface  Soils:
Volume 1Technical Evaluation, EPA/ORD/HWERL, July 1984.

Review of In-Place Treatment Techniques for Contaminated Surface  Soils:
Volume 2Background Information for In-Situ Treatment, EPA/ORD/HWERL,
July 1984.

Review of Treatment Technologies for Dioxin Wastes, EPA/ORD, January 1986,
PB87-174959.

Slurry Trench Construction for Pollution Migration Control,  Final,
February 1984, OSWER Directive No.  9380.0-02.

Summary Report:  Remedial Response  at Hazardous  Waste Sites, EPA/ORD/MERL,
March 1984, EPA/S40/2-84, EPA/540/2-84-002a.

Superfund Treatment Technologies:   A Vendor Inventory, EPA/OSWER,  September
1986, EPAX 8703-0116.

Systems to Accelerate  Xn-Situ Stabilization of Waste  Deposits,  EPA/ORD,  HWERL,
September 1986.

Technical Guidance for Corrective Measures:  Determining Appropriate
Technology and Response for Air Releases, EPA/OSW, March 1985,  PB88-185269.

Technical Guidance for Corrective Measures:  Subsurface Gas,  EPA/OSWER/OERR,
March 28, 1985, PB88-185285.

Technical Resource Document:  Treatment Technologies  for Dioxin-Containing
Wastes, EPA/OSWER, October 1986, EPAX 8706-0020.

Technical Resource Document:  Treatment Technologies  for Solvents Containing
Wastes, EPA/ORD, October 1986, EPAX 8706-0022.

Techniques for Treating Hazardous Wastes to Remova Volatile  Organic
Constituents, EPA/ORD, January 1985, PB85-218782.

Technological Approaches to the Cleanup of Radiologically  Contaminated
Superfund Sites, EPAIORD, EPA/540/2-88/002.

Technologies for In-Situ Treatment  of Hazardous  Wastes, EPA/ORD,  January 1987,
PB87-146007.

"The Occurrence and Reduction of Sodium in Drinking Water,"  R.P.  Lauch and
R.J. Sorg. J. Amer. Wtr. Wrks. Assoc. 73 (5) :256-265,  1981.

Treatment Technology Briefs:  Alternatives to Hazardous Waste Landfills,
EPA/ORD/HERL, July 1986.

Treatment of Contaminated Soils with Aqueous Surfactants,   EPA/600/2-85,129/
PB86 122-561, November 1985.


                                     1-12

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                                                                          DRAFT
                                                                   May  1,  1989


Treatment of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water, EPA/600/8-83/019,
PB83 239-434, May 1983.
"Treatment Technology to Meet the Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations
for Inorganics,  (Part 1, Nitrate and Fluoride)," T.J. Sorg, J. Amer. Wtr.
Wrks. Assoc. 70(2):105-112, 1978.

"Treatment Technology to Meet Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations  for
Inorganics,  (Part 2, Arsenic and Selenium)," T.J. Sorg, J. Amer, Wtr. Wrks.
Assoc. 70(7):379-393, 1978.

"Treatment Technology to Meet Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations  for
Inorganics,  (Part 3, Cadmium, Lead, and Silver)," T.J. Sorg, J. Amer. Wtr.
Wrks. Assoc. 70(12)  : 680-691, 1978.

"Treatment Technology to Meet Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations  for
Inorganics,  (Part 4, Chromium and Mercury)," T.J. Sorg, J. Amer. Wtr. Wrks.
Assoc. 71(8):454-466, 1979.

Underground Storage Tank Corrective Action Technologies, EPA/OSWER, January
1987, EPA/625/6-87/015.


                      Selection of Remedial Technologies

Compatibility of Grouts with Hazardous Wastes, ORD/HWERL, January  1984.

Data Requirements for Selecting Remedial Action  Technology, EPA/HWERL,
January 1987, EPA/600/2-87/001.

Oata Requirements for Selecting Remedial Action  Technology, EPA/ORD, January
1987.

Guidance on Differentiating Alternative Technologies, EPA/OSWER/ERD, OSWER
Directive No. 9380.2-05.

Selection Guide  for Volatilization Technologies  for Water  Treatment, EPA/ORD,
EPA/600/2-88/014.


              Design and Implementation of Remedial Technologies

Assessment  of Hazardous Waste Surface Impoundment Technology Case  Studies and
Perspectives of  Experts:   Final Report, EPA/ORD, November  1984, PB85-117059.

Bloc* Displacement  Method  Field Demonstration and Specifications,  EPA/ORD,
March 1987, PB87-170338.

Capture-and-Containment Systems for Hazardous Material Spills  on Land,
EPA/ORD, April 1984, PB84-186089.

Decontamination  of  Hazardous Waste Substances From Spills  and  Uncontrolled
Waste Sites by Radio Frequency In Situ Heating,  EPA/ORD, January 1984,  PB84-
167642.

Description and  Operation  of a Thermal Decomposition  Unit-Gas  Chromatographic
System, EPA/ORD, September 1984, PB84-246362.

Design and  Construction of a Mobile Activated'Carbon  Regenerator System,
EPA/600/2-86/015, PB86 156-486, January 1986.


                                     1-13

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                                                                          DRAFT
                                                                    May 1,  1989


Design, Construction, and Evaluation of Clay Liners for  Waste Management
Facilities, EPA/OSWER, March 1986, PB 86-184496.

Design, Construction, and Maintenance of Cover Systems for Hazardous  Waste:
An Engineering Guidance Document, EPA/ORD, May 1987, PB87-191656.

Field Studies of Geomembrane Installation Techniques, EPA/ORD,  January 1984,
PB84-190586.

Field Studies of Liner Installation Methods At Landfills and Surface
Impoundments:  Final Report, EPA/ORD, November 1984, PB85-117067.

Genetic Engineering and the Development of New Pollution Control  Technologies,
EPA/ORD, January 1984, PB84-148972.

Geosynthetic Design Guidance for Hazardous Waste Landfill Cells and Surface
Impoundments, EPA/ORD, EPA/600/2-87/097.

Geotechnical Analysis for Review of Dike Stability  (CARDS).  Technical Manual,
EPA/ORD, December 1986, PB87-130951.

Laboratory Studies of Soil Bedding Requirements for Flexible Membrane Liners,
EPA/ORD, January 1984, PB84-141498.

Land Disposal of Hexachlorobenzene Wastes:  Controlling  Vapor Movement in
Soil, EPA/ORD, August 1980, EPAX 8603-0004.

Landfill and Surface Impoundment Performance Evaluation  Manual, EPA/ORD, April
1983, EPAX 8603-0188.

Leachate Characterization and Synthetic Leachate Formulation for  Liner
Testing, EPA/ORD, January 1987, PB87-145983.

Manual of Procedures and Criteria for Inspecting the Installation of  Flexible
Membrane Liners in Hazardous Waste Facilities, EPA/ORD,  EPA/600/8-87/056.

RCRA Corrective Action Interim Measures, Interim Final,  OWPE/OSW,  June 1988,
OSWER Directive No. 9902.4.

Reactivity of Various Grouts to Hazardous Wastes and Leachates, EPA/ORD,
EPA/600/2-88/021.

Removal of Hazardous Material Spills from Bottoms of Flowing Waterbodies,
EPA/600/2-81/137, PB81 230-922, July 1981.

Settlement and Cover Subsidence of Hazardous Wasta Landfills  (Final Report),
EPA/ORD, April 1985,  EPAX 8605-0117.

Superfund Remedial Design and Remedial Action Guidance,  Final,  OERR,
February 1985, OSWER Directive No. 9355.0-04A.

Surface Sealing to Minimize Leachate Generation at Uncontrolled Hazardous
Waste Sites, EPA/ORD, January 1981, EPAX 8606-0027.

Technical Guidance Document:  Construction Quality .Assurance for  Hazardous
Waste Land Disposal Facilities, EPA/OSWER, July 1986, Directive No. 9472.00-3.

Test Methods for Determining the Chemical Waste Compatibility of  Synthetic
Liners,  EPA/OSWER,  April 1985,  EPAX 8605-0116.


                                     1-14

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                                                                         DRAFT
                                                                   May 1, 1989


Test Methods for Injectable Barriers, EPA/ORD, January 1984, PB84-183631.

Water Well Technology, M.D. Campbell and J.H. Lehr, National Water Well
Association,  1982.


                PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF REMEDIAL TECHNOLOGIES

      Finally, the effectiveness of the selected remedial technologies in
meeting the anticipated objectives must be evaluated.  Technical guidance for
evaluating the success of remedy selections are covered in the following
reports.

Analysis of Modified Wet-Air Oxidation for Soil Detoxification, EPA/ORD,
EPA/600/2-87/079.
Application of Adsorptive Resins and Membranes for Toxic and Hazardous Waste
Reduction, EPA/ORD, August 1985, PB85-241776.

Assessment of Incineration as a Treatment Method for Liquid Organic Hazardous
Wastes, EPA,  January 1985.

Assessment of Synthetic Membrane Successes and Failures at Waste Storage and
Disposal Sites, EPA/ORD, January 1985.

Assessment of Techniques for "In Situ" Repair of Flexible Membrane Liners,
EPA/ORD, May 1987, PB87-191813.

Avoiding Failure of Leachate Collection Systems at Hazardous Waste Landfills,
EPA/ORD, January 1984, PB84-235100.

Biological Treatment of Aqueous Hazardous Waste, EPA/ORD, June 1987, PB87-
198321.

Biological Treatment of Hazardous Waste, EPA/ORD, June 1987, PB87-198313.

Block Displacement Method Field Demonstration and Specifications, EPA/ORD,
March 1987, PB87-170338.

Construction Quality Control and Post-Construction Performance Verification
for the Gilson Road Hazardous Waste Site Cutoff Wall, EPA/ORD, EPA/600/2-
87/065.

Design, Construction, and Evaluation of Clay Liners for Waste Management
Facilities, EPA/OSWER, March 1986, PB 86-184496.

Destruction of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons by Catalytic Oxidation, EPA/OSWER,
September 1986, PB 87-101234.

Destruction of Dioxin-Contaminated Solids and Liquids by Mobile Incineration,
EPA/ORD, May 1987, PB87-188512.

Destruction of PCB-Contaminated Soils With A High Temperature Fluid-Wall
 (HTFW) Reactor, EPA/ORD, January 1984, PB84-168798.

Development of Chemical Countermeasures for Hazardous Waste Contaminated Soil,
EPA/Edison, January 1984, PB84-148840.

Development of Chemical Compatibility Criteria for Assessing Flexible Membrane
Liners, EPA/ORD, EPA/600/2-87/067.


                                     1-15

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                                                                          DRAFT
                                                                    May 1,  1989


Dewateringr of Dilute Aqueous Hazardous Waste Using Reversible Gel Absorption,
EPA/ORD, March 1987, PB87-168761.
Effects of Organic Solvents on the Permeability of Clay Soils, EPA/ORD, March
1983, PB83-179978.

Electrical Resistivity Technique to Assess the Integrity  of Geomembrane
Liners, EPA/ORD, November 1984, PB85-122414.

Evaluating Cover Systems for Solid and Hazardous  Waste, EPA/ORD/MERL,
September 1980, SW-867.

Evaluation of Geomembrane Seams Exposed to Selected Environmental Conditions,
EPA/ORD, January 1984, PB84-166842.

Factors in Assessing the Compatibility of FMLs and Waste  Liquids, EPA/ORD,
EPA/600/2-88/017.

Feasibility of Commercialized Water Treatment Techniques  for Concentrated
Waste Spills, EPA/600/2-81/213, PB82 108-440, September 1981.

Feasibility of In Situ Solidification/Stabilization of Landfilled Hazardous
Wastes, EPA/ORD, September 1983, PB83-261099.

Field Studies of In Situ Soil Washing, EPA/ORD, EPA/600-287/110.

Floating Cover Systems for Waste Lagoons:  Potential Application at Old Inger
Site, Louisiana.  EPA/ORD, January 1984, PB85-124667.

Geotechnical Analysis for Review of DiJte Stability  (CARDS) .  Technical Manual,
EPA/ORD, December 1986, PB87-130951.

Graphite Electrode for the Measurement of Redox Potential  and Oxygen Diffusion
Rate in Soil, EPA/Ada, January 1985, PB85-236248.

Handbook on Treatment of Hazardous Waste Leachate, EPA/ORD, February 1987,
PB87-152328.

Hazardous Waste Destruction,  EPA/ORD, January 1986, PB86-224540.

Hazardous Waste Treatment Technology, EPA/ORD, January 1986, PB86-145539.

Interim Report on the Feasibility of Using UV  (Ultraviolet) Photolysis and
APEG (Alkali Polyethylene Glycolate) Reagent for  Treatment of Dioxin,  EPA/ORD,
July 1985,  PB85-232619.

Laboratory Studies of Soil Bedding Requirements for Flexible Membrane Liners,
EPA/ORD, January 1984, PB84-141498.

Landfill and Surface Impoundment Performance Evaluation Manual, EPA/ORD, April
1983, EPAX 8603-0188.

Leachate Characterization and Synthetic Leachate  Formulation for Liner
Testing, EPA/ORD,  January 1987, PB87-145983.

Liner Materials Exposed to Hazardous and Toxic Waste,  EPA/ORD, January 1986,
PB87-176897.
                                     1-16

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                                                                         DRAFT
                                                                   May  1,  1989

Microbial Degradation of Selected Hazardous Materials:  Pentachlorophenol,
Hexachlorocyclopentadiene, and Methyl Parathion, EPA/ORD, November 1983, PB84-
123934.

Mobile System for Extracting Spilled Hazardous Materials from Excavated Soils:
Final Report, EPA/ORD, October 1983, PB84-123637.

Model Baaed Methodology for Remedial Action Assessment at Hazardous Waste
Sites, EPA/ORD, January 1983, PB84-128990.

Molten Salt Destruction of HCB  (Hexachlorobenzene) and Chlordane: Bench and
Pilot Scale Tests, EPA/ORD, September 1984, PB84-246354.

Performance of an Electrical Resistivity  Technique for Detecting and  Locating
Geomembrane Failures, EPA/ORD, May 1984,  PB84-190594.

Permeability of Polymeric Membrane Lining Materials  (Technical Paper),
EPA/ORD, January 1984, PB84-166859.

Permeability of Polymeric Membrane Lining Materials  for Waste Management
Facilities, EPA/ORD, May 1985, PB85-231900.

Potential Clogging of Landfill Drainage Systems, EPA/ORD, October 1983, PB84-
110550.

Practical Guide for  Ground Water Sampling, EPA/Ada,  September 1985, EPAX  8706-
0004.

Prediction/Mitigation of Subsidence Damage to Hazardous Waste Landfill  Covers,
EPA/ORD, March 1987, PB87-175386.

Procedures for Modeling Flow  Through Clay Liners to  Determine Required  Liner
Thickness, EPA/OSWER, January 1984, PB87-191029.

Project Summary:  Destruction of Dioxin-Contaminated Solids  and Liquids By
Mobile Incineration, EPA/OSWER, June 1987, EPAX  8605-0010.

Reactivity of Various Grouts  to Hazardous Wastes and Leachates, EPA/ORD,
EPA/600/2-88/021.

.Removal of Hazardous Material Spills from Bottoms of Flowing Waterbodies,
EPA/600/2-81/137, PB81 230-922, July 1981.

"Removal of Radium-226 from Drinking Water by Reverse Osmosis in Sarasota
Florida," T.J. Sorg, R.W. Forbes, and D.S. Chamber,  J. Amer. Wtr. Wrks. Assoc.
72(4):230-237, 1980.

Report on Decontamination of PCB-Bearing  Wastes, EPA/ORD, EPA/600/2-87/093.

Review of Treatment  Technologies for Dioxin Wastes,  EPA/ORD, January  1986,
PB87-174959.

Separation of Dilute Hazardous Organics by Low Pressure Composite Membranes,
EPA/ORD, July 1987,  PB87-214870.

Settlement and Cover Subsidence of Hazardous Waste Landfills (Final Report),
EPA/ORD, April 1985, EPAX 8605-0117.

Soiliner ModelDocumentation and User's  Guide  (Version 1)  (Rept. for May 85-
May  86), EPA/ORD, April 86, PB87-100038.


                                     1-17

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                                                                          DRAFT
                                                                    May 1,  1989


Soiliner Version 1  (for Microcomputers), EPA/ORD, July  1986,  PB87-126033.

Solidification and Thermal Degradation of TNT Waste Sludges  Using Asphalt
Encapsulation, EPA/ORD, August 1986, PB86-2291SO.

Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program, EPA/ORD,  February  1988,
EPA.540/5-88/001.

Superfund Public Health Evaluation Manual, EPA/OERR, October 1986,  OSWER
Directive No. 9285.4-01.

Technical Resource Document:  Treatment Technologies for Solvents Containing
Wastes, EPA/ORD, October 1986, EPAX 8706-0022.

Test Methods for Determining  the Chemical Waste Compatibility of Synthetic
Liners, EPA/OSWER, April 1985, EPAX 8605-0116.

Test Methods for Injectable Barriers, EPA/ORD, January  1984,  PB84-183631.

"Treatment of Drinking Water  Containing Trichloroethylene  and Related
Industrial Solvents," O.T. Love, Jr., and R.G. Eilers,  J. Amer.  Wtr.  Wrks.
Assoc., 74(8):413-425, 1982.

"Treatment of Ground-Water with Granular Activated Carbon,"   P.R. Wood and
J.J. DeMarco, J. Amer. Wtr. Wrks. Assoc.  71(11):674-682,  1979.

Treatment of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water, EPA/600/8-83/019,
PB83 239-434, May 1983.

"Treatment Technology to Meet the Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations
for Inorganics,  (Part 1, Nitrate and Fluoride), T.J. Sorg, J.  Amer.  Wtr.  Wrks.
Assoc. 70 (2) :105-112, 1978.

"Treatment Technology to Meet Interim Primary Drinking  Water Regulations for
Inorganics,   (Part 2, Arsenic  and Selenium)," T.J. Sorg  and G.S.  Logsdon,  J".
Amer. Wtr.  Wrks. Assoc. 70(7):379-393, 1978.

"Treatment Technology to Meet Interim Primary Drinking  Water Regulations for
Inorganics,   (Part 3, Cadmium, Lead, and Silver)," T.J.  Sorg  and  G.S. Logsdon,
J. Amer. Wtr. Wrks. Assoc. 70 (12) :680-691, 1978.

"Treatment Technology to Meet Interim Primary Drinking  Water Regulations for
Inorganics,   (Part 4, Chromium and Mercury)," T.J. Sorg, J. Amer.  Wtr.  Wrks.
Assoc. 71 (8) :454-466, 1979.
                                     1-18

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               SECTION II
TECHNICAL SUPPORT SYSTEMS AND DATA  BASES

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                                                                         DRAFT
                                                                   May 1, 1989

      This section provides descriptions of information sources that should be
of value to individuals involved with site assessment and remediation.  This
initial inventory was prepared under the Superfund Technology Support Project
(TSP).   The inventory is subdivided into Commercial Data Bases, EPA Data
Bases,  Other Federal Agency Data Bases,  Models/Applications Software, and
Technical Support/Reference Systems.
                                     II-2

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                                                                         DRAFT
                                                                   May 1, 1989
                             COMMERCIAL DATA BASES
      Commercial data bases provide bibliographic references, directories,
statistical tables or complete text on a wide range of topics.  Users are
charged according to the amount of time they spend on-line.  Some companies
also charge a membership fee or monthly minimum.  In order to access
commercial data bases, users must first sign a contract with the vendor who
will issue a password.  Commercial data bases selected for their potential
applicability to information resource needs are described below.  Current
prices at the time of the preparation of this report are listed.
NAME:

PROVIDER:

PHONE:

DESCRIPTION:
ACCESS:

COST:
Dialog

Dialog Information Services; Inc.

1-800-3-DIALOG

The nearly 300 Dialog data bases provide general
information  (in various formats, though mostly
bibliographic) concerning energy, environment and
agriculture; chemistry, technology, medicine and
biosciences; law and government; business and
industry; and social sciences.  Some of the data bases
directly addressing EPA concerns contain information
on:  toxic substances and their effects; chemical and
regulatory tracking; geological and petrological
research; environmental and biological research and
planning; and energy research, planning, policy, and
tracking.

Sign contract with Dialog Information Services, Inc.

Connect time averages $85 per hour with a $25
membership fee and no monthly minimum charge.
NAME:

PROVIDER:

PHONE:

DESCRIPTION:
Chemical Information System  (CIS)

Chemical Information Systems, Inc.

 (301) 321-8440 or 1-800-CIS-USER

CIS offers a collection of over 30 data bases related
to chemistry.  Potentially useful data bases are:  CAS
On-line; the Chemical Hazard Response System
 (information needed to deal with emergencies during
transport of chemicals); Aquatic Information Retrieval
 (toxicity of tested chemicals on aquatic life); J.T.
Baker Company Material Safety Data Sheets  (on 1,500
chemicals); Environmental Fate  (information of the
transport and degradation of chemicals released in the
environment); Information System for Hazardous
Organics in Water (water-related properties of 5,000
chemicals); Oil and Hazardous Materials/Technical
Assistance Data System; Plant Toxicity Data; Toxic


             II-3 

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TO ACCESS:

COST:
                                                                         DRAFT
                                                                   May 1, 1989
Substances Control Act Submissions; Hazardous
Chemicals Information and Disposal; and Federal
Register Search System.

Sign contract with CIS, Inc.

On-line charges run about $60 per hour with a $300
annual membership fee.
NAME:

PROVIDER:

PHONE:

CONTACT:

DESCRIPTION:
TO ACCESS:
COST:
Ground Water On-Line

National Water Well Association, Dublin, OH

(614) 761-1771

Janet Bix

Ground Water On-Line is a data base containing
bibliographic citations (with abstracts included for
recent entries) to the Center's collection of over
50,000 documents on ground water.  As a member of the
On-Line Computer Library Center, an international
retrieval system,  the Center can also search 150
additional data bases.  Technical experts are
available to answer questions on request.

Accessible by modem from PC or by calling NWWA and
requesting they do the search.

Free to EPA staff if a search request is made through
the EPA Headquarters Library.  For direct use, there
is a $36 annual membership fee and a $75 per hour on-
line charge.
NAME:

PROVIDER:

PHONE:

DESCRIPTION:





TO ACCESS:

COST:
LEXIS

Mead Data Corporation

(202) 785-3550

LEXIS is a full text legal data base containing
information from the Code of Federal Regulations,
Federal Register, federal and state cases,
administrative decisions, and other sources.

Sign a contract with Mead Data.

$125 monthly charge, connect fee of $32 per hour,
$4 to $32 per search depending on files searched.
and
                                     II-4

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NAME:

ORGANIZATION:



PHONE:

CONTACT:

DESCRIPTION:
TO ACCESS:

COST:
                                                 DRAFT
                                           May 1, 1989

Environmental Technical Information System (ETIS)

University of Illinois, Department of Urban and
Regional Planning, Urbana, IL

(217) 333-1369

Suzanne Coleman

ETIS is a collection of computer-based systems
including:  a hazardous materials management system; a
soil information data base; information on PCBs; a
system that helps predict the environmental impacts of
a proposed activity; and an information bank of
abstracted federal and state environmental regulations
and standards.

Fill out a subscription form from ETIS.

$200 one-time fee and $90 per hour connect time
charge.
NAME:

PROVIDER:

PHONE:

DESCRIPTION:
TO ACCESS:

COST:
BRS Search Service

BRS Information Technologies

1-800-468-0908

BRS offers a collection of data bases similar to that
of Dialog, though less comprehensive.  Useful data
bases include:  hazardous substances information;
abstracts of articles on pollution; Federal Register
abstracts; reports on environmental sciences,
engineering and technology; and a directory of
computerized data bases.

Sign contract with BRS.

Connect time averages $85 per hour and there is a $75
annual membership fee.
                                     II-5

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                                                                         DRAFT
                                                                   May 1, 1989
                                EPA DATA BASES
      Many EPA offices maintain data bases of information on environmental
research and technologies.  Those most likely to be of direct interest to
assessment and remediation activities are listed below.
NAME:                   Superfund Records of Decision System  (RODS)

OFFICE:                 Office of Emergency and Remedial Response, Washington,
                        DC

PHONE:                  (202) 475-9754 or FTS 475-9754

CONTACT:                Caroline Roe

DESCRIPTION:            RODS is an automated data base containing Superfund
                        Records of Decision (ROD), which describe the planned
                        course of action to clean up a site.  The data base,
                        installed on a mainframe at EPA's National Computer
                        Center in Research Triangle Park, NC, allows searching
                        for selected information from ROD documents or NTIS
                        Abstracts.

TO ACCESS:              Access via modem from PC.  Register through the RODS
                        Hotline at (202) 252-0056.

COST:                   Free
NAME:                   Organics Treatability Database

OFFICE:                 Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory, Cincinnati, OH

PHONE:                  (513) 569-7503 or FTS 684-7418

CONTACT:                Ken Dostel

DESCRIPTION:            The Organics Treatability Database contains
                        information about technologies for removing hazardous
                        substances from ground water, surface waters, and
                        water in or near Superfund sites.  Users are referred
                        to basic references for additional information on
                        specific technology applications.

TO ACCESS:              Available on diskette or for download to PC through
                        the OSWER Electronic Bulletin Board.

COST:                   Free
                                     II-6

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NAME:

OFFICE:

PHONE:

CONTACT:

DESCRIPTION:
TO ACCESS:
COST:
                                                 DRAFT
                                           May  1,  1989

Corrective Action Database

Office of Solid Waste, Washington, DC

(202) 382-2231 or FTS 382-2231

Jim Michael

The Corrective Action Database contains over 350
bibliographic references and abstracts concerning
corrective action case studies.  A menu-driven  keyword
search capability is based on:  geology of the  site,
hazardous waste type, technology, media, or location.

The data base is available for on-line searching
through the OSWER Electronic Bulletin Board.

Free
NAME:

OFFICE:

PHONE:

CONTACT:

DESCRIPTION:





TO ACCESS:


COST:
ORD Topical Directory

Office of Research and Development

(513) 569-7391 or FTS 684-7391

Bob Edgar

The on-line Directory lists the areas in which ORD has
technical expertise and gives the name and phone
number of a person active in each area.  It can be
searched by topic, office, or name.

The Directory is available through the OSWER
Electronic Bulletin Board at  (301) or  (202) 589-8366.

Free
NAME:

OFFICE:


PHONE:

CONTACT:

DESCRIPTION:
Computerized On-Line Information System  (COLIS)

Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory  (RREL), Edison,
NJ

(201) 906-6871 or FTS 340-6871

Pacita Tabay

COLIS is a part of RREL's Technical Information
Exchange (TIX).  The two COLIS data bases currently in
operation are listed below.

      Case History File contains information on site
      characteristics,  response methods, costs, and
      cleanup problems related to spills, waste sites,
      and underground storage tank management; and
                                     II-7

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                                                                         DRAFT
                                                                   May 1, 1989

                              Library Search System through which users can
                              view the card catalog of the TIX collection and
                              the EPA Headquarters Library Hazardous Waste
                              Collection.

                        Other data bases are planned for the near future:

                              Countermeasures Selection System (CSS),  a
                              computerized version of the EPA's Manual of
                              Countermeasures for Hazardous Substance Release,
                              will enable users to quickly determine the
                              appropriate response techniques for a particular
                              problem.

                              SITE Performance/Cost Database will provide data
                              from field evaluations of mobile treatment
                              equipment.

                              Personnel Protection Performance File will aid
                              EPA and contractors in making decisions
                              regarding safety during Superfund cleanup
                              operations.

                              Environmental Technology and Engineering
                              Facility Data base will contain technical -data
                              from evaluations of treatment technologies at
                              the Environmental Technology and Engineering
                              Facility in Edison, NJ.

                              Stormwater Research Collection will contain EPA
                              reports and technical papers developed by the
                              Storm and Combined Sewer Overflow Program from
                              1967 to 1982.

TO ACCESS:              COLIS is accessible by modem using most common
                        computers and CrossTalk communications software.  The
                        phone number to dial into the system is  (201)  548-
                        4636.  Contact Ms. Tabay for details on communications
                        software parameter settings.

COST:                   Free
NAME:                   Hazardous Waste Collection Database (HWCD)

OFFICE:                 Office of Information Resources Management,
                        Information Services Branch, Washington, DC

PHONE:                  (202) 382-5922 or FTS 382-5922

CONTACT:                Barbara Roth

DESCRIPTION:            HWCD provides a bibliographic listing of the
                        Headquarters Library collection of EPA reports, policy
                        and guidance directives, legislation,  regulations, and
                        commercial books dealing with hazardous wastes.  The
                        data base gives a reference and an abstract for every
                        volume in the collection.  The many topics include:


                                     II-8

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TO ACCESS:
COST:
                                                  DRAFT
                                           May  1,  1989

analysis, ecological and human health risks,
methodology, liability, emergency response, control
methods, information sources, and waste types.  The
actual documents listed are available in EPA
Headquarters and Regional libraries, the National
Enforcement Investigations Center, and the EPA
laboratory libraries in Cincinnati, Edison, Research
Triangle Park, Ada, and Las Vegas.  The Information
Services Branch has prepared an excellent user's  guide
entitled Hazardous Waste Collection Database
Thesaurus.

The data base is offered on diskette or can be
accessed at EPA libraries.  Quarterly updates are
available through the EPA Headquarters Library  or  can
be downloaded from the OSWER Electronic Bulletin
Board.

Free
NAME:

OFFICE:

PHONE:

CONTACT:

DESCRIPTION:
TO ACCESS:
COST:
STORE! Database

Office of Water, Washington, DC

(202) 382-7220 or FTS 382-7220 or 1-800-424-9067

Phillip Lindenstruth

STORET, located at EPA's National Computer Center in
Research Triangle Park, stores, retrieves, and
analyzes water quality information.  STORET assists
state and EPA officials in making pollution control
decisions.

Contact the National Computer Center for account and
log-on procedures.

Contact RTP at 800-334-2405 for account information.
NAME:

OFFICE:


PHONE:

CONTACT:

DESCRIPTION:
Solid Waste/Ground-Water Monitoring Database  (SWAMP)

Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory,  Las
Vegas, NV

(702) 798-2580 or FTS 545-2580

Steve Gardner

The SWAMP data base (formerly the Hazardous Waste Site
Data base)  contains ground-water data collected from
monitoring stations nationwide.  The results  are
currently being organized by industry (e.g.,  wood
preservative producers,  chrome plating)  and will help
RPMs determine likely chemicals to look for in ground
water at Superfund sites.
                                     II-9

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TO ACCESS:

COST:
                                                 DRAFT
                                           May 1, 1989

Staff at EMSL-LV will search the data base on request.

Free
NAME:

OFFICE:

PHONE:

CONTACT:

DESCRIPTION:


TO ACCESS:


COST:
Aquatic Information Retrieval  (ACQUIRE)

Environmental Research Laboratory, Duluth, MN

(218) 720-5548 or FTS 780-5584

Pat Toland

ACQUIRE contains data on toxicological effects of over
4,000 chemicals on aquatic life.

EPA personnel can access the data directly from their
PC after obtaining log-on information from Duluth.

Free to EPA
NAME:


OFFICE:

PHONE:

CONTACT:

DESCRIPTION:




TO ACCESS:


COST:
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and
Liability Information System  (CERCLIS)

Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response

(202) 475-9336 or FTS 475-9336

Shirley Kheen

CERCLIS contains an inventory of potential hazardous
waste sites listing location, type of action, dates
and information on the stage of cleanup.

Obtain a password from Ms. Kheen and access from PC
via modem.

Free to EPA
NAME:

OFFICE:


PHONE:

CONTACT:
Integrated Risk Information System  (IRIS)

Office of Health Effects Assessment, Critique and
Assessment Office, Cincinnati, OH

(513) 569-7254 or FTS 684-7254

Karen Grissom
DESCRIPTION:
IRIS contains health risk data, bibliographic and
textual information on risk management, water quality
criteria, and drinking water standards.
                                     11-10

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TO ACCESS:

COST:
                                                                          DRAFT
                                                                    May 1,  1989
Available on-line through E-Mail

Free to offices already on the E-Mail system
NAME:

OFFICE:

PHONE:

CONTACT:

DESCRIPTION:
TO ACCESS:
Public Health Risk Evaluation Database  (PBRED)

Office of Emergency and Remedial Response

(202) 382-2201 or FTS 382-2201

Bruce Means

Provides chemical, physical, and toxicological data
and standards useful to Superfund staff and
contractors involved in Superfund site risk
assessments.  Intended to be used in conjunction with
the Superfund Public Health Evaluation Manual.

Available on diskette from OERR
NAME:

OFFICE:



PHONE:

CONTACT:

DESCRIPTION:
TO ACCESS:
COST:
Information Systems Inventory  (ISI)

Office of Information Resources Management,
Information Management and Services Division,
Washington, DC

(202) 382-5235 or FTS 382-5235

Gordon Schisler

ISI contains brief descriptions of over 500 systems,
data bases, and models in use in various EPA offices.
Many of the systems are for administrative use, but
some provide useful data and technical information.
Each description is accompanied by the name and phone
number of a person to contact for more information
about a. system.  Each system requires a particular
type of computer and software.  Therefore, not.all
systems can be run on all equipment.  The Inventory is
due for a thorough update in early 1989.

A copy of the Inventory is available on diskette from
the EPA Headquarters Library for use on IBM PCs and
compatible machines.

Free
NAME:

PROVIDER:

PHONE:
SARA 313 Roadmaps Database

Office of Toxic Substances, Washington, DC

(202)  382-3470 or FTS 382-3470
                                     11-11

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                                                                         DRAFT
                                                                   May 1, 1989
CONTACT:                Jim Darr
DESCRIPTION:            Roadmaps provides sources of information on the
                        chemicals listed in 313 of SARA and helps users
                        perform risk and exposure assessments of these
                        chemicals.  It contains information on the health and
                        environmental effects of the chemicals, applicable
                        federal regulations/ and information on published air
                        and water standards.

TO ACCESS:              Available on diskette for installation on IBM PCs or
                        compatible equipment from the TSCA Assistance Office
                        at (202) 554-1404 or through NTIS.

COST:                   Free to EPA
NAME:                   Geographic Information Systems  (GZS)

PROVIDER:               U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

PHONE:                  (202) 382-7868 or FTS 382-7868

CONTACT:                Joe Sierra

DESCRIPTION:            A GIS is a set of computer programs used to input
                        (including digitize) and store geographically
                        referenced map data.  This data may include soil
                        types, land cover, hydrogeology, topography, roads,
                        demography, surface hydrology, and contaminant
                        sources.  The system can then be used to analyze and
                        model (manipulate, overlay, measure, compute, and
                        retrieve) the digital spatial data and display the new
                        map products and tabular resource information showing
                        the results of the spatial analysis.

ACCESS:                  Several projects are underway in the Regions and
                        States.  Call the above contact for more information.

COST:                   Not available
                                     11-12

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                                                                          DRAFT
                                                                   May  1,  1989
                        OTHER FEDERAL AGENCY DATA BASES
NAME:

ORGANIZATION:

PHONE:

CONTACT:

DESCRIPTION:
TO ACCESS:
COST:
Hazardous Substances Data Bank  (HSDB)

National Library of Medicine, Rockville, MD

1-800-638-8480 or  (301) 496-6193

Service Desk Staff

HSDB is a text-format data base that deals primarily
with the toxicology of potentially hazardous chemicals
but also provides information on substance
identification; chemical and physical properties;
safety and handling; environmental fate and exposure
potential; exposure standards and regulations,
monitoring and analysis methods; and information on
special reports, other data bases, and prior history
of accidents involving specific compounds.

Fill out an application to obtain a password from NLM
and access from PC with modem.

HSDB on-line time averages $26 per hour.
NAME:

ORGANIZATION:

PHONE:

CONTACT:

DESCRIPTION:





TO ACCESS:


COST:
Toxicology Information Online  (TOXLINE)

National Library of Medicine, Rockville, MD

1-800-638-8480 or  (301) 496-6193

Service Desk Staff

TOXLINE is a collection of about 2,000,000
bibliographic references  (most with abstracts) on
published human and animal toxicity studies, and
effects of environmental chemicals and pollutants.

Fill out an application to obtain a password from NLM
and access from PC with modem.

$24 per on-line hour
NAME:

ORGANIZATION:

PHONE:

CONTACT:
Justice Retrieval and Inquiry System  (JURIS)

Department of Justice

(202) 633-4537

Donna Stolbaun
                                     11-13

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DESCRIPTION:




TO ACCESS:


COST:
                                                 DRAFT
                                           May 1, 1989

JURIS is a full text system containing information
from federal and state case materials; federal
statutes and regulatory materials; special litigation
support files; and other sources.

Complete a user contract and receive a user
identification number to access via PC.

$68 per hour connect time
NAME:

ORGANIZATION:


PHONE:

CONTACT:

DESCRIPTION:



TO ACCESS:



COST:



NAME:

ORGANIZATION:

PHONE:

CONTACT:

DESCRIPTION:
TO ACCESS:
COST:
Toxicology Information Response Center

Oak Ridge National Laboratory, National Library of
Medicine, Oak Ridge, TN

(615)  576-1743

Mary Francis

The Center provides toxicological information on
environmental pollutants, industrial chemicals, and
pesticides.

The Center's data bases are not accessed directly, but
one can telephone the center and request that the
staff perform a search on a topic of interest.

Free
National Water Data Exchange (NAWDEX)

U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA

 (703) 648-6848

Don Dolnack

NAWDEX is a computerized data system that acts as a
clearinghouse for sources of water data.  NAWDEX also
has access to actual data through STORET  (an EPA data
base described above) and WATSTORE.  WATSTORE contains
all types of water data from over 700,000 monitored
sites and includes site information, construction
history, and hydrogeologic data.  The NAWDEX Program
Office and a national network of Assistance Centers
provide retrieval and user assistance to organizations
that either collect or seek water data.

Either through direct dial  (after registering as a
user) or by telephoning the NAWDEX program office and
requesting a search.

Users are charged only for connect time with WATSTORE
or STORET, about $10 per hour.
                                     11-14

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                                                                         DRAFT
                                                                   May 1,  1989
NAME:

ORGANIZATION:


PHONE:

CONTACT:

DESCRIPTION:
TO ACCESS:
COST:
NEDRES Database
NOAA/NESDIS, Assessment and Information Services
Center, Washington, DC

(202) 673-5405

Jerry Barton or Betty Roberts

NEDRES offers general environmental data supplemented
by the name, address, and phone number of a contact
person for each subject searched.  The system contains
descriptions of environmental data files, published
data sources, data file documentation references, and
organizations that make environmental data available.

Obtain a password from NOAA/NESDIS and access via PC
with modem.

A password to access the system costs $25 and connect
time runs $45 per hour.
NAME:

ORGANIZATION:


PHONE:

CONTACT:

DESCRIPTION:





TO ACCESS:


COST :
Earth Science Data Directory

U.S. Geological Survey, Information Systems Division,
Washington, DC

(703) 648-7112 or FTS 959-7112

C.R. Baskin

The Directory is an on-line collection of 1,700
references to earth science and natural resource data
bases, systems, and products mainly from state agency
sources.

Access via modem from PC after registration with Mr.
Baskin.

Free
                                     11-15

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                                                                         DRAFT
                                                                   May 1, 1989
                         MODELS/APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE
      Computer models and other applications software are available for
simulating and predicting the transport, environmental fate, and human health
risk of potentially hazardous substances released into the environment or for
estimating the cost of remedial actions.

      Various ground-water transport, geophysical, water quality, and
toxicological models are maintained at the Office of Research and Development
at EPA in the Offices of Monitoring Systems and Quality Assurance,
Environmental Engineering and Technology Demonstration, Environmental
Processes and Effects Research, and Health and Environmental Assessment.
Specific descriptions of the various models can be found in the Information
System Inventory described earlier  (see EPA DATA BASES).  No attempt was made
to list all the individual models in existence, rather, sources for models and
information on their use are provided.
NAME:

ORGANIZATION:


PHONE:

CONTACT:

DESCRIPTION:
TO ACCESS:
Cost of Remedial Action (CORA) Model

EPA, Office of Emergency and Remedial Response,
Washington, DC

(202) 382-4632 or FTS 382-4632

Kirby Biggs

The model estimates site-specific remedial actions
costs for Superfund sites.  It can be used to scope
possible remedial actions and develop order-of-
magnitude cost estimates and is useful to agencies for
developing outyear remedial actions budget estimates.

Available to EPA and other agencies on request through
Mr. Biggs.
NAME:

ORGANIZATION:

PHONE:

CONTACT:

DESCRIPTION:





TO ACCESS:
Center for Exposure Assessment Modeling (CEAM)

EPA, Environmental Research Laboratory, Athens, GA

(404) 546-3134 or FTS 250-3134

Bob Ambrose

CEAM provides model maintenance and distribution
services, technical support, technical training, and
special site-specific demonstrations of available
models.

A CEAM electronic bulletin board has been established
(FTS 250-3402 or  (404) 546-3402) to facilitate
technical information exchange.
                                     11-16

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NAME:



ORGANIZATION:

PHONE:

CONTACT:

DESCRIPTION:
TO ACCESS:
                                                 DRAFT
                                           May 1, 1989

Computer-Aided Management of Emergency Operations
(CAMEO)

NOAA, Hazardous Materials Response Branch, Seattle, WA

(206) 526-6317

Data Base Manager

CAMEO helps emergency planners safely handle chemical
accidents that occur on land.  Release scenarios and
evacuation options can be evaluated by using built-in
air dispersion models and adding digitized maps of a
particular area in question.

Available on diskette through NOAA.  A graphics
version is available for Macintosh computers and a
non-graphics version for IBM PCs and compatibles.
NAME:

ORGANIZATION:


PHONE:

CONTACT:

DESCRIPTION:
International Ground Nater Modeling Center

Holcomb Research Institute, Butler University,
Indianapolis, IN

(317) 283-9458

Margaret Butorac

IGWMC conducts research on and collects and
disseminates information about ground-water modeling
software.  The Center compiles data bases of
descriptions of ground-water models, evaluates model
uses and needs, and offers short courses, workshops,
and seminars on the theory and application of ground-
water models.  The Center has developed a standardized
checklist to match existing software to a user's
specific problem.  The Center also monitors
developments in computer hardware,  software for data
handling, and graphics.
                                     11-17

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                                                                         DRAFT
                                                                   May 1, 1989
                      TECHNICAL SUPPORT/REFERENCE  SYSTEMS
      Listed below are offices, information centers, and laboratories that
have expertise in specific areas.  Except where noted, these facilities
provide general assistance free of charge.
FACILITY:

ORGANIZATION:


PHONE:

CONTACT:

SERVICES:
TO ACCESS:
OSWER Electronic Bulletin Board System (BBS)

EPA, Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response,
Office of Program Management and Technology

(202) 382-4686 or FTS 382-4686

Jim Cummings

The OSWER BBS provides a forum for technical
interchange through messages, bulletins,  data files,
and conferences (mini-bulletin boards for special
interest groups).   Data bases available from the BBS
are:  the Corrective Action Database; quarterly
updates to the Hazardous Waste Collection Database;
the Organics Treatability Database; and the ORD
Topical Directory.  Other data bases, models, and
expert systems are available for downloading to the
user's PC.

Access via modem from PC by calling  (202) 589-8366 or
(301) 589-8366 and completing an on-line registration
questionnaire.  Available to EPA staff and current
contractors and state and federal agency personnel.
FACILITY:

ORGANIZATION:

PHONE:

CONTACT:

SERVICES:





TO ACCESS:
National Technical Information Service  (NTIS)

U.S. Department of Commerce

 (703) 487-4805

Customer Service Staff

NTIS provides access to the results of both U.S. and
foreign government-sponsored research and development
and engineering activities through the sale of
journals, bulletins, catalogs, and directories.

Contact the Customer Service Staff at the number
above.
FACILITY:

ORGANIZATION:
RCRA/CERCLA Hotline

EPA, Office of Solid Haste and Emergency Response,
Washington, DC
                                     11-18

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                                                                         DRAFT
                                                                   May 1, 1989

PHONE:                  1-800-424-9346 or FTS 382-3000

CONTACT:                Information Staff

SERVICES:               Information Specialists provide answers to general
                        questions concerning EPA's RCRA and CERCLA programs
                        and refer callers to EPA offices for detailed or
                        technical information.  The Hotline also provides
                        information on the availability of RCRA and CERCLA
                        documents.

TO ACCESS:              Call the contact phone above between the hours of
                        8:30 am and 7:30 pm EST.
FACILITY:               Center for Environmental Research Information  (CERI)

ORGANIZATION:           EPA, Office of Research and Development, Cincinnati,
                        OH

PHONE:                  (513) 569-7391 OR FTS 684-7391

CONTACT:                Fran Kremer

SERVICES:               CERI develops publications, expert systems, and
                        computer-assisted training, and conducts training
                        seminars in support of EPA programs including
                        Superfund.  Some CERI publications can be ordered on-
                        line through the OSWER Electronic Bulletin Board.
FACILITY:               Hazardous Materials Technical Center  (HMTC)

ORGANIZATION:           Department of the Army, Rockville, MD

PHONE:                  (301) 468-6630

CONTACT:                Rhonda Hearn

SERVICES:               HMTC, serving the Department of the Army, responds to
                        technical inquiries on all aspects of hazardous
                        materials and waste management.  The Center offers a
                        bibliographic search service using over 250 available
                        data bases and publishes a newsletter and quarterly
                        Abstract Bulletin to provide current information on
                        hazardous materials/wastes topics.

COST:                   There is a charge of $50 per inquiry and $95 per hour
                        connect time for bibliographic searches.  There is
                        also a $25 per hour charge for research time
                        associated with all services.
                                     11-19

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                                                                         DRAFT
                                                                   May 1, 1989

FACILITY:               Chemical Transportation Emergency Center (CHEMTREC)

ORGANIZATION:           Chemical Manufacturers Association, Washington, DC

PHONE:                  (202) 887-1100

CONTACT:                J.R. Chezem

SERVICES:               CHEMTREC, a public service of the Chemical
                        Manufacturers Association (CMA),  operates a 24-hour
                        hotline to respond to emergencies involving chemicals.
                        Callers are given immediate advice on how to cope with
                        release, fire, leaks, or exposure to the chemicals
                        involved.  Through another CMA service, CHEMNET,  a
                        chemical expert can quickly be dispatched to the scene
                        of a serious emergency to act as an advisor on safe
                        techniques for controlling the incident.

COST:                   Free
FACILITY:               Hazardous Materials Information Exchange (HMIX)

ORGANIZATION:           Department of Transportation, Chicago, IL

PHONE:                  1-800-367-9592

CONTACT:                Dee Seymore

SERVICES:               HMIX is an information hotline and electronic bulletin
                        board that provides emergency personnel with
                        information on prevention, preparation, and mitigation
                        of hazardous materials emergencies.  The board
                        includes listings of potentially useful on-line data
                        bases and toll free numbers of information sources.
                        DOT's Hazardous Materials Information System maintains
                        statistics on accidents and spills that have occurred
                        during the transport of hazardous materials.

TO ACCESS:              The electronic bulletin board may be accessed via
                        modem from PC by dialing  (312) 972-3275 or FTS 972-
                        3275.  The staffed hotline number is listed above.

COST:                   Free to EPA
                                     11-20

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PUBLICATION:            Catalog of Superfund Program Directives  (OSWER
                        Directive 9200.7-01 - July 1988)
                        Provides a quick reference to the most current policy,
                        procedural, and technical directives governing the
                        Superfund program.  Regular supplements are planned.
                        Publications abstracted must be obtained from the
                        issuing office.  Copies of the Catalog may be obtained
                        from the Superfund Docket at (202)382-6940 or FTS 382-
                        6940.
PUBLICATION:            Hazardous Haste Bibliography (EPA/540/1-87/001)

                        The bibliography lists EPA documents deemed by
                        Headquarters Program Offices to be the most useful
                        technical and procedural documents for those involved
                        in the clean-up of hazardous waste sites.  The
                        documents deal with:  Site Assessment; Fate and
                        Transport; Monitoring and Sampling; Source Control;
                        Ground-water Remediation; Risk Assessment; Personnel
                        Protection; Construction Techniques and Procedures;
                        Program Guidance; Case Studies; and Costs.  Available
                        from CERI  (513) 569-7391 or FTS 684-7391.
                                    11-21

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      SECTION III
ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY

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      EPA documents are cited in the bibliography using both EPA document
number  (e.g., EPA/600/8-86/004) and the National Technical Information Service
(NTIS) number (prefixed by a PB; e.g., PP 81-166-340).  EPA documents may be
consulted in the EPA Headquarters or Regional libraries, though in some
Regional libraries it may be necessary to cross-reference documents from the
EPA or NTIS classification scheme  (e.g., Library of Congress or EPAX).  EPA
documents that are marked CERI are available from ORD Publications,
Cincinnatti, Ohio  (FTS/684-7562, or 513-569-7562).   The rest must be published
from NTIS at 5285 Port Royal, Springfield, Virginia, 22161 (FTS/703-487-4650).

      Publications from the U.S. Geological Survey may be ordered by calling
FTS/703-648-6892.  Handbooks or references from private publishing companies
must be ordered directly from these companies or obtained by loan from
libraries.

Alternative Concentration Limit Guidance Part I ACL Policy and Information
Requirements, EPA/OSW, July 1987, PB87-206165.

      Provides guidance to RCRA permit applicants and writers concerning the
      establishment of ACLS.  ACLS are case-by-case health and environmental
      based values, that when exceeded, require ground-water corrective a RCRA
      disposal unit.

Alternate Concentration Limit Guidance Based on 264.94(B) Criteria - Part II
Case Studies, EPA/OSW, May 1988, PB88-214267.

      The case studies are a series of examples of the type of information
      that would be appropriate for the development of ACLS.

Ambient Air/Source Transport and Transformation Relationships for Selected
Hazardous Air Pollutants, EPA/RTP,  November 1986, PB87-129730.

      Study goal was to obtain information that could improve modeling
      technique for hazardous organic vapors in atmosphere.  Detailed
      examination of alternative choices for pollution emission site and
      method of determination was made.

Analysis and Evaluation of Pumping Test Data, E.P.  Kruseman and N.A. De
Ridder,  Inter. Inst. Land Reclamation and Improvement, P.O. Box 6700AA,
Wageningen,  Netherlands,  1983.

      A guidebook for analyzing and evaluating data from pumping tests.  The
      methods presented are collected from the literature dealing with ground-
      water flow towards discharging wells,  with emphasis on when and how to
      apply a certain method.  Users of the book will need only an elementary
      background of mathematics and physics.

Analysis of Modified Wet-Air Oxidation for Soil Detoxification,  EPA/ORD,
EPA/600/2-87/079.

      The feasibility bof using wet-air oxidation is investigated in terms of
      the effects of temperature, pressure and the  presence or absence of soil
      on the oxidation rate of three compounds:   m-xylene,
      tetrachloroethylene,  and malathion.   The research was conducted with a
      1-L batch reactor at temperatures from 130 to 275 degrees C and
      pressures from 703,000 to 1,750,000 kg/m2.
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Application of Adsorptive Resins and Membranes .for Toxic and Hazardous Waste
Reduction, EPA/ORD, August 1985, PB85-241776.

      Literature review of ion exchange/ reverse osmosis, ultrafiltration, and
      capabilities of adsorptive and ion-exchange systems using resins.

Application of Chemical Fractionation Bioassy Procedure to Hazardous
Waste/Aquatic Site Monitoring, EPA/EMSL, September 1985, PB86-109493.

      Reports on the chemical fractionation/aquatic bioassay test to identify
      bioactive fractions of the original sample to assess the effects of the
      component waste chemicals on the aquatic ecosystem.

Assessment of Hazardous Waste Surface Impoundment Technology Case Studies and
Perspectives of Experts:  Final Report, EPA/ORD, November 1984, PB85-117059.

      Reviews and assesses design, construction, and operation of surface
      impoundments in 9 facilities.  Presents recommendations for research and
      development.

Assessment of Incineration as a Treatment Method for Liquid Organic Hazardous
Wastes, EPA, January 1985.

      Provides information for EPA decision-making on hazardous waste disposal
      options by assessing use of incineration for treatment of liquid organic
      wastes.  Gives detailed comparison of land-based and ocean-based
      incineration.

Assessment of Synthetic Membrane Successes and Failures at Waste Storage and
Disposal  Sites, EPA/ORD, January 1985.

      Describes factors that contributed to synthetic liner failure or success
      in  lined storage and disposal facilities.

Assessment of Techniques for  "In Situ" Repair of Flexible Membrane Liners,
EPA/ORD,  May 1987, PB87-191813.

      Investigation indicated that there is no current technology that can be
      used to repair leaks and other damage in flexible membrane liners  (FMLS)
      that are in service below wastes.

Avoiding  Failure of Leachate Collection Systems at Hazardous Waste Landfills,
EPA/ORD,  January 1984, PB84-235100.

      Discusses failure mechanisms including sedimentation, biological,
      chemical, or biochemical clogging, pipe deterioration and displacement,
      and exceeding design capacity.  Suggests regular inspection and system
      maintenance to avoid failure.

"Bacteriological Criteria for Ground Water Quality," M.J. Allen and E.E.
Geldreich, Ground Water, 13(l):45-52, Jan.-Feb. 1975.

      Article emphasizing the need for increased awareness and better
      detection of bacterial pathogens in untreated or marginally treated
      ground water used for human consumption.  Well protection,
      unsatisfactory well construction, and inadequate treatment are common
      causes of poor ground-water quality.
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Basic Ground-Water Hydrology, R.C. Heath, U.S.G.S. Water Supply Paper 2220.

      Common reference for introductory ground-water courses.  Discusses the
      basic elements of ground-water hydrology, arranged in order from the
      most basic aspects through a discussion of the methods used to determine
      the yield of aquifers to a discussion of common problems encountered in
      the operation of ground-water supplies.  Includes many illustrations and
      definitions and some important equations.

Biological Treatment of Aqueous Hazardous Waste, EPA/ORD, June 1987, PB87-
198321.

      Describes test to evaluate fate of aqueous organic hazardous waste
      compounds in activated sludge process.

Biological Treatment of Hazardous Waste, EPA/ORD, June 1987, PB87-198313.

      Study used rotating biological contractor  (RBC) to evaluate treatability
      of leachates from the Stringfellow and New Lyme hazardous waste sites.

BlocJt Displacement Method Field Demonstration and Specifications, EPA/ORD,
March 1987, PB87-170338.

      Block displacement technique as remedial action for isolating large
      tracts of ground contaminated with hazardous waste was demonstrated  in
      Florida.  Demonstration included topographical survey and bottom barrier
      assessment by core drilling.

Borehole Sensing Methods for Ground-Water Investigations at Hazardous Waste
Sites, EPA, December 1986, PB87-132783.

      Use of boreholes for site characterization, detection and monitoring of
      groundwater contamination.  Advantages over surface methods, techniques,
      problems.

Bromination Process for Disposal of Spilled Hazardous Materials, EPA/ORD,
September 1983, PB83-263806.

      Report on process for oxidizing organic materials and wastes, including
      refractories and pesticides.

Capture-and-Co/Jtai/J/nent Systems for Hazardous Material Spills on Land,
EPA/ORD,  April 1984, PB84-186089.

      Covers investigation of methods for sealing the surface of soils and
      preventing percolation of spilled hazardous materials into the ground.

Case Studies 1-23:  Remedial Response at Hazardous Waste Sites,  EPA/ORD,
January 1984.

      Identifies and assesses site response activities at uncontrolled
      hazardous waste sites.   Nationwide survey identified remedial action
      planned or ongoing at 395 sites.   Includes case studies of 23 sites
      where remedial response occurred.
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Case Studies Addendum:  1-8 Remedial Response at Hazardous Waste Sites,
EPA/ORD,  EPA/540/2-88/001.

      Provides additional case studies to supplement original publication.

Catalytic Dehydrohalogenation:  A Chemical Destruction Method for Halogenated
Organics, EPA/ORD, December 1986, PB87-133104.

      Potential of dehydrohalogenation in converting certain halogenated
      organics into inorganic salts and gaseous aliphatic compounds.
      Dehalogenation/elimination reaction initiated by strong base.  Uses
      sodium or potassium hydroxide/polyethylene glycol.

Cementing .Reactions in the Hazardous Waste Environment, EPA/ORD, January 1984,
PB84-151299.

      Discusses use of chemical grout for bottom sealing of waste sites,
      including discussion of interfering reactions from contaminated soil or
      ground water.

Characterization of Hazardous Waste SitesA Methods Manual, EPA/EMSL, April
1985.

      Provides field and laboratory managers, investigators, and technicians
      with consolidated source of information on site characterization.
      Covers steps from preliminary data gathering to sampling  and analysis.

Chemical, Physical and Biological Properties of Compounds Present at Hazardous
Waste Sites, EPA/OWPE, September 1985, OSWER Directive No. 9850.3.

      This document contains chemical profiles that are intended to serve as a
      concise reference relating to physiochemical properties,  fate and
      transport, toxicity, and regulatory standards for individual chemicals
      identified by EPA at hazardous waste sites.

Combustion Technologies for Hazardous Waste, EPA/ORD, March 1987, PB87-
167086.

      Describes basic incineration technology, technology for liquid
      injection, rotary kiln, and at-sea incineration, industrial boiler and
      cement kiln combustion, and universe of incinerated and incinerable
      waste.  Defines terminology and outlines states EPA regulations.

Compatibility of Grouts with Hazardous Wastes, ORD/HWERL, January 1984.

      Compatibility matrix of 12 grouts and 16 chemical classes, produced by
      literature search, interview, and theoretical prediction; can be used to
      select possible liner grouts for testing with specific landfill
      contents.

Compendium of Technologies Used in the Treatment of Hazardous Wastes,
EPA/ORD/CERI, September 1987, EPA/625/8-87/014.

      This document is intended to serve as an introduction to  available
      technologies which can be used in the treatment of hazardous wastes.
      Each technology discussed includes a description of the basis of the
      technology, and a brief discussion on the applicability,  limitations,
      and status of the technology.  A non-exhaustive listing of sources of
                                     III-5

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      the technology (vendors, suppliers,  or developers) are provided and when
      appropriate, a process diagram for a typical application.

Construction Quality Control and Post-Construction Performance Verification
for the Gilson Road Hazardous Waste Site Cutoff Wall, EPA/ORD, EPA/600/2-
87/065.

      Describes assessment activities undertaken to evaluate effectiveness of
      a soil/bentonite backfilled cutoff wall (slurry trench) installed for
      hazardous waste containment.

Corrective Action Plan,  EPA/OWPE, November 1936, OSWER Directive No. 9902.3.

      The purpose of the Corrective Action Plan is to and States and Regions
      in determining and directing the specific work the owner/operator or
      respondent must perform, as part of a complete corrective action
      program.

Corrective Measures for Releases to Ground Water From Solid Waste Management
Units, EPA/OSW, Draft Final, PB 88-185251.

      Uses technology assessments and case studies to evaluate the relative
      success or failure of each technology for various hydrologic settings
      and waste types.  Describes the steps involved in assessing the need for
      corrective measures at solid waste management units (SWMUs).  Provides
      an overview of corrective measures applicable to releases to ground
      water at SWMUs.

      Provides guidance to identify the need for corrective measures and to
      identify the need for corrective measures and to identify mechanisms to
      correct releases to soil.

Corrective Measures for Releases to Soil from Solid Waste Management Units,
EPA/OSW, August 1985, PB88-185277

      Provides guidance to identify the need for corrective measures and to
      identify mechanisms to correct releases to soil.

Corrective Measures for Releases to Surface Water, EPA/OSW,  Draft Final, PB88-
185251.

      Provides guidance to identify the need for corrective measures and to
      identify mechanisms to correct releases to surface water.

Covers for Uncontrolled Hazardous Waste Sites,  EPA/ORD, January 1985.

      Provides guidance for the design of cover systems for uncontrolled
      hazardous waste sites including information on soil properties tests,
      materials for impermeable applications, site preparation, support
      materials,  equipment,  and quality control and assurance.

Criteria for Identifying Areas of Vulnerable Hydrogeology Under the Resource
Conservation and Recovery Act:  Appendix A, Technical Methods for Evaluating
Hydrogeology Parameters, EPA/OSW, July 1986.

      This document describes how to determine hydraulic conductivity.   It
      also discusses factors affecting hydraulic gradient and effective
      porosity.
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Criteria for Identifying Areas of Vulnerable Hydrogeology Under the Resource
Conservation and Recovery Act:  Appendix B.  Ground-Water Flow Net/Flow Line
Construction and Analysis, July 1986,  EPA/OSW.

      This document describes how to construct ground-water flow nets using
      permit application data to understay flow patterns at hazardous waste
      facilities.

Criteria for Identifying Areas of Vulnerable Hydrogeology Under the Resource
Conservation and Recovery Act:  Appendix C,  Technical Methods for Calculating
Time of Travel in the Unsaturated Zone,  EPA/OSW, July 1986.

      This document presents methods for estimating TOT in unsaturated
      sediments in areas with aid or semi-aid climates where thick unsaturated
      lanes are common.

Criteria for Identifying Areas of Vulnerable Hydrogeology Under the Resource
Conservation and Recovery Act:  Appendix D,  Development of Vulnerability
Criteria Based on Risk Assessments and Theoretical Modeling, EPA/OSW, July
1986.

      This document describes EPA's analyses performed in developing the TOT
      criteria.  It includes health risk assessments of hypothetical ground-
      water users at actual RDRA facilities.

Data Quality Objectives:  Development Guidance for Uncontrolled Hazardous
Waste Site Remedial Response Activities, EPA/OERR/HSCD, October 1986, OSWER
Directive 9355.0-07A.

      Provides guidance in development of data quality objectives for remedial
      response under CERCLA.  Includes remedial investigations, feasibility
      studies, remedial design, and remedial actions.

Data Quality Objectives for Remedial Response Activities, EPA/OERR,
March 1987, OSWER Directive No. 9355.007B.

      Provides remedial project managers  (RPMs), quality assurance officers,
      and States with a consolidated reference of all REM field procedures,
      with the exception of site safety issues and personal protection
      requirements.  Promotes consistent field procedures among all ten EPA
      Regions.  Compiled from procedures that were used successfully in
      executing EPA work assignments nationwide.

Data Requirements for Selecting Remedial Action Technology, EPA/HWERL,
January 1987, EPA/600/2-87/001.

      Presents data requirements for screening remedial action technologies.
      Includes sections on biological chemical, physical, thermal, physical
      treatments, and stabilization/solidification.

Data Requirements for Selecting Remedial Action Technology, EPA/ORD, January
1987.

      Report defines data requirements for screening remedial action
      technologies applicable to:  air pollution,  surface water, leachate and
      ground-water and gas migration controls; sediment, waste, and soil
      removal, containment, and in situ and other treatments.
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Decontamination of Hazardous Waste Substances From Spills and Uncontrolled
Waste Sites by Radio Frequency In Situ Heating,  EPA/ORD, January 1984, PB84-
167642.

      Details radio frequency heating process which can be used to heat and
      decontaminate uncontrolled landfills and hazardous substances from
      spills.  Includes information on design and cost estimates.

Decontamination Techniques for Mobile Response Equipment Used at Waste Sites,
EPA/ORD/HWERL, January 1986, EPA-600/2-85-105.

      State-of-the-art review of facility and equipment decontamination and
      contamination assessment, and contamination prevention.

Description and Operation of a Thermal Decomposition Unit-Gas Chromatographic
System, EPA/ORD, September 1984, PB84-246362.

      Describes design and operation of the thermal decomposition analytic
      system.

Design, Construction and Evaluation of Clay Liners for Waste Management
Facilities, EPA/OSWER, March 1986, PB 86-184496.

      This document is compilation of all of the available information on the
      design, construction, and evaluation of clay liners for waste landfills,
      surface impoundments, and wastepiles.  The topics covered are:  clays,
      with emphasis on their composition, fabric, and hydraulic conductivity;
      geotechnical test methods and soil properties including index
      properties, soil classification, and hydraulic conductivity testing;
      clay chemical compatibility, including a discussion of the mechanisms of
      interaction and a comprehensive compilation of existing test data from
      the literature and private sources; construction and quality assurance;
      clay liner failure mechanisms; the performance of existing clay liners
      based on case studies of 17 sites; and clay liners based on case studies
      of 17 sites; and clay liner transit time prediction methods featuring an
      in-depth discussion of many available techniques and models.

Design, Construction,  and Maintenance of Cover Systems for Hazardous Waste:
An Engineering Guidance Document, EPA/ORD, May 1987, PB87-191656.

      Document emphasizes special characteristics of solid waste management
      cover systems while stressing need for engineering experience to
      integrate the complex factors into traditional engineering approach,

Design and Construction of a Mobile Activated Carbon Regenerator System,
EPA/600/2-86/015, PB86 156-486, January 1986.

      A mobile carbon regeneration unit is described that can be used with
      mobile activated carbon adsorption units.   It is housed in a standard
      van type of trailer and includes a rotating barrel kiln to thermally
      regenerate the carbon, an incinerator and scrubber to destroy the
      absorbed materials and treat the offgases, and a separator to reclaim
      the reactivated carbon granules.  In tests runs from the on-site
      treatment of a spill, the carbon was returned to essentially 100%
      activity with an 88% volume recovery.

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Destruction of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons by Catalytic Oxidation, EPA/OSWER,
September 1986,  PB 87-101234.

      Study on 2 pilot-scale systems for destroying vapor-phase chlorinated
      hydrocarbons by catalytic oxidation:  Metal oxide/fluidized bed
      (achieved >98% total organic destruction) and fixed bed with
      UV/zonation.

Destruction of Dioxin-Contaminated Solids and Liquids by Mobile Incineration,
EPA/ORD, May 1987, PB87-188512.

      Results of project that evaluated technical, economic, and
      administrative feasibility of on-site incineration of dioxin-
      contaminated materials.  The EPA mobile incineration system was found to
      be more than adequate for dioxin detoxification.

Destruction of PCB-Contaminated Soils With A High Temperature Fluid-Wall
 (HTFW) Reactor,  EPA/ORD, January 1984, PB84-168798.

      Demonstrates feasibility of a high temperature fluid-wall  (HTFW) reactor
      to detoxify biorefractory hazardous substances and contaminated soil.

Development of Chemical Countermeasures for Hazardous Waste Contaminated Soil,
EPA/Edison, January 1984, PB84-148840.

      Evaluates the efficacy of in-situ treatment of large volumes of
      subsurface soil and large static bodies of water.

Development of Chemical Compatibility Criteria for Assessing Flexible Membrane
Liners,  EPA/ORD, EPA/600/2-87/067.

      Laboratory testing was conducted to develop chemical resistance data
      using immersion tests.  Six flexible membrane liners were tested;
      polyvinylchloride, chlorinated polyethylene, chlorosulfonated
      polyethylene, high density polyethylene, epichlorohydrin, and ethylene
      propylene diene terpolymer.  Twenty chemical solutions providing a range
      of chemical challengers were also tested.

Dewatering of Dilute Aqueous Hazardous Waste Using Reversible Gel Absorption,
EPA/ORD, March 1987, PB87-168761.

      Feasibility of using crosslinked gels in a reversible process for
      extracting pure water from aqueous waste solutions was investigated.
      Near-critical gels have been developed which swell and collapse as
      function of process conditions.

Disposal Methods:  Landfills, Geologic Formations, Chemical Stabilization and
Chemical Treatment, EPA/ORD, August 1986, PB86-231214.

      Placement of waste in injection wells, salt formations, and underground
      mines.  Stabilization/solidification include processes that convert
      contaminants into least soluble, mobile, or toxic form.  Chemical
      treatment uses tools to prevent release.

DRASTIC:  A standardized System for Evaluating Ground Water Pollution
Potential Using Hydrogeologic Settings, National Water Well Association, May
1985.
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Drum Handling Practices at Hazardous Waste Sites, EPA/ORD, August 1985,
EPA/600/S2-86/013.

      Provides detailed technical guidance on methods, procedures and
      equipment suitable for removing drummed wastes.   Includes data on
      locating buried rums, excavation, on site transfer, waste consolidation
      and temporary storage.

Dust Control at Hazardous Waste Sites, EPA/ORD, November 1985, EPAX 8603-0214.

      Describes methods of controlling contaminated fugitive dust from
     .contaminated land surfaces.  Information on equipment decontamination
      and worker protection.  Discusses possible nonair impacts arising  from
      the use of dust suppressant measures.

Effect of Capillarity and Soil Structure on Flow in Low Permeability Saturated
Soils at Disposal Facilities, EPA/ORD, April 1987, PB87-180576.

      Report addresses leachate movement after release from facilities in
      saturated zones of low permeability  (low-K) soils.  Discussions include
      computer models and roles played by tension-saturated zone,
      anisotropous, and heterogeneities.

Effects of Organic Solvents on the Permeability of Clay Soils, EPA/ORD,  March
1983, PB83-179978.

      Presents study conducted to measure permeability of compacted clay soils
      to assess their suitability as liners for landfills or impoundments.

Electrical Resistivity Technique to Assess the Integrity of Geomembrane
Liners, EPA/ORD, November 1984, PB85-122414.

      Discusses electrical modeling of liner system performed using computer
      techniques and tests conducted to measure influence of leaks on surface
      voltage distributions of water and earth-filled liner systems.

Endangerment Assessment Handbook, Final, EPA/OWPE, November 1985, OSWER
Directive No. 9850.1.

      Guidance to EPA personnel on conducting endangerment assessments and
      preparing documentation to satisfy enforcement needs of each case.
      Supplement to the "Draft Endangerment Assessment Guidance," included in
      Appendix 1.

Enzyme-Based Detection of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Water,  EPA/Edison, April
1985, PB85-191716.

      Explores enzyme-based approach for detecting hazardous levels of high
      molecular weight chlorinated hydrocarbons in natural water.

Evaluating Cover Systems for Solid and Hazardous Waste,  EPA/ORD/MERL,
September 1980,  SW-867.

      Describes a 36-step procedure to be used by RCRA permit writers,  for the
      evaluation of permit engineering plans.   The 36  steps in the permit
      evaluation procedure fall into the following three categories:
      examination of data,  steps in cover system evaluation,  and evaluation of
      post-closure plan.   Designed to provide the RCRA permit writer with a
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      methodology for evaluating cover design, and post-closure maintenance
      and contingencies.

Evaluation of Geomembrane Seams Exposed to Selected Environmental Conditions,
EPA/ORD,  January 1984, PB84-166842.

      Describes research which evaluated geomembrane liner seams exposed to
      selected environmental conditions.

"Evolving Concepts of Subsurface Contaminant Transport," J.F. Keely, M.D.
Piwoni, and J.T. Wilson,  J. Water Pollution Control Fed.  58(5):349-357, May
1986.

      This paper, by three EPA scientists, examines the changing perceptions
      of how natural processes control the fate of contaminants in the
      subsurface.  The discussion focuses on three levels of understanding:
      conceptual  (state of the knowledge), theoretical  (state of the science),
      and practical  (state of the art).   Physical, chemical, and biological
      processes are discussed.

Factors in Assessing the Compatibility of FMLs and Waste Liquids, EPA/ORD,
EPA/600/2-88/017.

      This project examined various factors in the compatibility of flexible
      membrane liners  (EMLS) with liquids and other hazardous substances.

Feasibility of Commercialized Water Treatment Techniques for Concentrated
Waste Spills, EPA/600/2-81/213, PB82 108-440, September 1981.

      The suitability and economics of reverse osmosis, ultrafiltration, ion
      exchange, wet-air oxidation, high-purity oxygen-activated sludge
      process, ultraviolet-ozone oxidation, and coagulation/precipitation for
      on-site treatment of concentrated wastes were evaluated from published
      literature and data obtained from process suppliers.  Alone, none of the
      processes would be economically applicable for on-site treatment of the
      variety of concentrated wastes encountered, although reverse osmosis,
      ion exchange, and wet-air oxidation meet many of the application
      requirements.

Feasibility of In Situ Solidification/Stabilization of Landfilled Hazardous
Wastes, EPA/ORD, September 1983, PB83-261099.

      Discusses feasibility of solidifying or stabilizing hazardous industrial
      wastes already in landfills.

Feasibility of Using Fiber Optics for Monitoring Ground-water Contaminants,
EPA/EMSL, January 1984, PB84-201607.

      Contains results of initial feasibility study for research program to
      develop technology to use fiber optics for monitoring groundwater
      contaminants.  Presents information on chemical detection and
      qualification of tracer materials.

Field Studies of Geomembrane Installation Techniques, EPA/ORD, January 1984,
PB84-190586.

      Study of 14 construction sites where geomembranes were being installed.
      Generic types of geomembrane materials:  polyvinyl chloride, high
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      density polyethylene/ neoprene and ethylene propylene diene monomer.
      Describes preparation and installation technique.

Field Studies of In Situ Soil Washing, EPA/ORD, EPA/600-287/110.

      The U.S. EPA and Air Force conducted a research program demonstrating
      the removal of hydrocarbons from a sandy soil utilizing in situ soil
      washing.  A 50/50 blend of two commercially available surfactants  (Adsee
      799 and Hyonic PE-90),  was used to treat compounds with soil adsorption
      constants  (K)  between 10 and 1,000,000.  Contaminants included
      dichloromethane, chloroform, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethylene,
      as well as aromatics.'  Results of the studies showed that the aqueous
      surfactant solutions were not measurably affective.  It is likely that
      this same ineffectiveness would occur at other chronic spill sites with
      contaminants possessing high soil washing would require treatment of the
      ground water.

Field Studies of Liner Installation Methods At Landfills and Surface
Impoundments:  Final Report,  EPA/ORD, November 1984, PB85-117067.

      Investigates procedures for subgrade preparation and liner placement
      during construction of lined surface impoundments and landfills.
      Materials studied include admixes, soils and clays, sprayed on, and
      polymeric membranes.

Final Waste Soil Treatment Study:  Celtor Chemical Works Site, Hoopa,
California, EPA/OSWER, September 1986, EPAX 8710-0044.

      Discusses final treatments study of contaminated soils at Celtor
      Chemical Works.  Five remedial actions selected June 1985.  Treatment
      alternative is examined further including results of extraction study.

Floating Cover Systems for Waste Lagoons:  Potential Application at Old Inger
Site, Louisiana.  EPA/ORD, January 1984, PB85-124667.

      Investigates alternative methods for presenting lagoon overtopping with
      specific application to Old Inger site in Louisiana.

Fugitive Participate Emissions from Hazardous Waste Sites, EPA/ORD, EPA/600/2-
87/066.

      Control techniques are reviewed for applicability to fugitive
      particulate emissions from hazardous waste sites.  Techniques judged
      applicable include chemical stabilization (40 to 100 percent
      efficiency),  wet suppression (25 to 90 percent efficiency), physical
      covering (30 to 100 percent efficiency), vegetative covering (50 to 80
      percent efficiency),  and windscreens (30 to 80 percent efficiency).

Genetic Engineering and the Development of New Pollution Control Technologies,
EPA/ORD, January 1984, PB84-148972.

      Describes relationship between genetic engineering and biological waste
      treatment and identifies research topics for new pollution treatment
      techniques.
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Geophysical Methods for Locating Abandoned Wells, EPA/EMSL, May 1984,
EPA/600/4-84-065.

      Joint study between EPA and USGS on feasibility of using geophysical
      methods to find abandoned wells containing steel casings.  Magnetic
      methods promising effective electrical techniques may be used instead.

Geophysical Techniques for Sensing Buried Wastes and Waste Migration,
EPA/EMSL, June 1984, EPAX 8706-0050.

      Six geophysical techniques in sensing buried waste and waste migration:
      metal detection, magnetometry, ground penetrating radar,
      electromagnetics, resistivity, and seismic refraction, with emphasis on
      cost-effective investigations at hazardous waste sites.

Geosynthetic Design Guidance for Hazardous Waste Landfill Cells and Surface
Impoundments, EPA/ORD, EPA/600/2-87/097.

      This report provides guidance design procedures for the use of
      geosynthetic materials in hazardous waste land disposal cells.  The use
      of geosynthetic components beneath, within, and above the cell, and the
      construction and fabrication of caps, drainage, and filtration and
      subgrade are discussed.  Each design consideration is derived from
      specific equilibrium equations and example applications are used:
      beneath the cell (e.g. leachate collection/removal system
      transmissivity, FML's, and filters), within the cell  (e.g., ramps,
      interior berms, standpipes), and above the cell (e.g., surface water
      collection/removal systems).  Minimum Design Ratios are recommended for
      each design procedure and guidelines are given for evaluating the long-
      term stability of each component.  Factors influencing stability are
      rheological properties, aging characteristics, microbial growth, and
      deformations due to settling; chemical compatibility is not considered.

Geotechnical Analysis for Review of Dike Stability  (GARDS) Technical Manual,
EPA/ORD, December 1986, PB87-130951.

      User manual for GARDS, a program for geotechnical analysis of earth
      dikes  (developed for EPA but also suitable for general use), considers
      slope stability, settlement, liquefaction, hydraulic flow and pressure,
      piping. IBM PC/XT Compatible.

Geotextiles for Drainage, Gas Venting, and Erosion Control at Hazardous Waste
Sites, EPA/ORD, September 1986, EPAX 8612-0024.

      Properties and uses of geotextiles, permeable synthetic fabrics in  (1)
      landfill cover drains, leachate collection systems, and ground water
      control systems, (2) gas venting, and  (3) protection of landfill covers
      and waste disposal sites from surface erosion.

Graphite Electrode for the Measurement of Redox Potential and Oxygen Diffusion
Rate in Soil, EPA/Ada, January 1985, PB85-236248.

      Control measurements that might be made to determine effectiveness of
      hazardous waste management at land treatment sites.  Compares platinum
      wire electrodes and wax impregnated graphite for determining oxygen
      diffusion rate.
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Ground Water and Wells, E.E. Johnson, Ed.,  Johnson Division, UOP, Inc.,
Minneapolis, Minnesota, 1982.

      A basic reference presenting the technical aspects of ground-water
      occurrence, ground-water movement, well hydraulics, well design and
      ground-water geology, and the practical aspects of well drilling, well-
      screen selection, well maintenance, and well operation.

Ground-Water Hydraulics, S.W. Lohman, Geological Survey Professional Paper
708, 1972.

      A basic textbook for working professionals covering all subjects of
      concern in ground-water hydraulicsthe natural or induced movement  of
      water through permeable geologic formations.  The principal method of
      analysis in ground-water hydraulics is the application, generally by
      field tests of discharging wells.  Topics discussed include unsaturated
      one testing.

Groundwater Management:  The Use of Numerical Models  (Second Edition), P.  van
der Heijde, Y. Bachmat, J. Bredehoeft, B. Andrews, D. Holtz, and S. Sebastian,
Amer. Geophysical Union, Water Resources Monograph 5, 1985.

      A compilation of information by the International Ground-Water Modeling
      Center on almost 400 ground-water simulation models from around the
      world.  There is a general discussion of ground-water systems, a
      description of the basic equations used to model ground-water systems, a
      detailed examination of the intrinsic strengths and deficiencies of
      existing ground-water models, and information on the use of models in
      management.

Ground Water Modeling Newsletter, International Ground Water Modeling Center,
Holcomb Research Institute, Butler University, 4600 Sunset Avenue,
Indianapolis, Indiana, 46208.

      The Ground Water Modeling Newsletter is published quarterly by the
      Ground Water Modeling Center and is available free of charge  [telephone
      (317) 283-9458].  It contains up-to-date information about new
      publications, computer models, conferences and seminars, and
      announcements of services related to ground-water modeling.

Groundwater Transport:  Handbook of Mathematical Models, I. Javendel, C.
Doughty, and C.F. Tsang, Amer. Geophysical Union, Water Resources Monograph
10, 1984.

      A presentation of the best and most usable mathematical methods for
      predicting the extent of subsurface contamination, in a format useful to
      field-response personnel.  It contains selected analytical solutions,
      semianalytical methods and numerical approaches, and discusses the
      strengths and possible pitfalls in the application of each.  It also
      contains comprehensive tables and computer-program listings.  It should
      enable the user to make initial estimations of contaminant transport at
      a given site, and if the need arises, to select sophisticated numerical
      models.
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Groundwater, R.A. Freeze and J.A. Cherry, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ,
1979.

      This book is the universally accepted reference book for studying ground
      water.  Topics addressed in this book include physical and chemical
      properties, geology, flow nets, contamination, and fate and transport.

Guidance Document for Cleanup of Surface Impoundment Sites, Final, OERR,
June 1986, OSWER Directive No. 9380-0.06.

      Addresses remedial actions for cleanup of pits, ponds, and lagoons
      containing hazardous wastes.  To be used under direction of engineer or
      scientist experienced in hazardous waste remedial project.

Guidance Document for Cleanup of Surface Tank and Drum Sites, Final, OERR,
May 1985, OSWER Directive No. 9380.0-03.

      Provides concise descriptions of the necessary steps to implement
      surface remedial actions for the cleanup of surface tanks and drums
      within the provisions of the National Category Plan.

Guidance on Differentiating Alternative Technologies, EPA/OSWER/ERD, OSWER
Directive No. 9380.2-05.

      Designed to assist on-scene Federal, State, and local officials and
      private firms that plan and implement remedial actions at National
      Priorities List (NPL) sites containing hazardous wastes.

Guidance on Feasibility Studies Under CERCLA,  EPA/OWPE, June 1985, OSWER
Directive No. 9355.0-5C.

      Guide providing detailed structure for identifying, evaluating, and
      selecting remedial action alternatives under CERCLA and the National
      Contingency Plan  (NCP).

Guidance on Remedial Actions for Contaminated Ground Water at Superfund Sites,
EPA/OERR, October 1986,  EPA/68-03-3113.

      Describes how to develop, evaluate, and select remedial actions for
      ground-water remediation under the Superfund program.  Provides guidance
      and key considerations to be addressed when selecting a ground-water
      remedy during the CERCLA feasibility study of alternatives.  Helps
      ensure that the most cost-effective alternative is chosen during
      Superfund activities.

Guidance on Remedial .Investigations Under CERCLA, EPA/OWPE, June 1985, OSWER
Directive No. 9355.0-06B.

      Provides technical guidance to Superfund staff, contractor and
      potentially responsible parties on how to conduct a Remedial
      Investigation  (RI) under CERCLA requirements.  Describes how to
      characterize the extent of existing contamination and the potential for
      a release to soils, ground water, surface water, and air from
      uncontrolled hazardous waste sites.  Describes the interplay of the RI
      and FS activities during development of a response.
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Guidance Manual for Research, Development, and Demonstration Permits, EPA/OSW,
July 1986, EPA-530/SW-86/008.

      Provides information for RCRA permit applicants permit writers for
      preparing and processing applications for RCRA research, development,
      and demonstration permits.

Guide for Decontaminating Buildings, Structures, and Equipment at Super-fund
Sites, EPA/ORD/HWERL, March 1985, EPA-600/2-85-028.

      Discusses decontamination methods, types of contaminants, site-specific
      technology selection, effectiveness evaluation, case studies, and worker
      health and safety.

Guide to the Selection of Materials for Monitoring Well Construction and
Ground-Water Sampling, M.J. Barcelona, J.P. Gibb, and R.A. Miller, Illinois
State Water Survey Contract Report 327, 1983.

      A basic text on the selection of cost-effective materials, target
      chemical constituents, and procedures for monitoring-well casing
      materials to minimize disturbance of the subsurface.  Other topics
      covered include sampling apparatus and strategies, monitoring-well
      network design, and specific recommendations.

Guidelines for Ground-Water Classification Under the EPA Ground-Water
Protection Strategy, EPA/OW/OGWP, December 1986.

      Guidance document for ground-water classification under ground-water
      protection strategy.  Purpose is to define classes, concepts and key
      words related to the strategy and to describe procedures and information
      needs for classifying ground water.

Handbook of Applied Hydrology:  A Compendium of Water Resources Technology,
V.T. Chow, Ed., McGraw-Hill, 1964.

      An interdisciplinary handbook covering hydrology and water-resources
      technology.  Information comes under four major groupings dealing with:
      the closely related sciences upon which hydrology depends; various
      phases of the hydrologic cycle and phenomena; practice and application
      of hydrology in various fields; and some social-economic aspects of
      hydrology,  including planning, policy,  and law.

Handbook for Evaluating Remedial Action Technology Plans, EPA/ORD/MERL,
August 1983,  EPAX 8706-0052.

      Brief description, status, factors for determining feasibility and
      reliability,  principal data requirements, and basic information for cost
      review given for over 50 remedial action technologies.  Includes
      discussions of pathways, remedial approaches.

Handbook for Stabilization/Solidification of Hazardous Waste, EPA/ORD/HWERL,
June 1986.

      Describes reagents and methodology determined to be useful in
      stabilizing/solidifying hazardous wastes.  Can be used to assess
      technical solutions proposed for specific remedial action cases.
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Handbook: Ground Water, Final, EPA/ORD,  March 1987, EPA/625/6-87/016.

      This document provides a general framework for the protection of ground-
      water resources and for assessing the quality of those resources.
      Chapters are included on contamination, investigation, restoration,
      hydrogeology, well design and construction, sampling, tracers, use of
      mode geology.  Full report presently available.

Handbook on Treatment of Hazardous Waste Leachate, EPA/ORD, February 1987,
PB87-152328.

      Evaluates various leachate treatments including:  Sludge treatment, air
      stripping, carbon adsorption, flow equalization, granular media
      filtration, ion exchange, neutralization, oxidation/reduction, powdered
      activated carbon treatment, and many more.

Handbook, Remedial Action at Hazardous Disposal Sites, EPA/OERR, October 1985,
OSWER Directive No. 9380.0-04.

      Overview of remedial investigation/feasibility study process as outlined
      in the National Contingency Plan.  Describes specific remedial
      technologies including:  application and limitations, design,
      construction, implementation, operation, and selection.

Handbook:  Responding to Discharges of Sinking Hazardous Substances,
EPA/ORD/HWERL, September 1987, EPA/540/2-87/001.

      This document provides guidance on the response to spills of chemicals
      that sink in water bodies and contaminate bottom materials.  It
      describes the decision making process associated with defining spill
      parameters and impacts and selecting appropriate response measures.  It
      also describes the cleanup and mitigative technologies that may be used,
      including containment, removal, treatment, disposal, and in situ
      techniques.

Hazardous Waste Destruction, EPA/ORD, January 1986, PB86-224540.

      Current status of thermal destruction in U.S. including facilities and
      wastes typically handled.  Performance test results presented for
      incinerators, industrial boilers, and industrial process kilns.  Other .
      aspects of thermal destruction are also addressed.

Hazardous Waste Treatment Technology, EPA/ORD, January 1986, PB86-145539.

      Common innovative technologies for destruction of wastes.  Covers some
      emerging alternative technologies that treat waste other than through
      landfilling, landfarming, or lagooning.

Health Effects Assessment Documents  (58 chemical profiles), EPA/ORD, September
1984, EPA-540/1-86-001 through 058.

      These documents are brief summary assessments of potential adverse
      health effects following oral or inhalation exposure to chemicals.
      Documents are listed individually by chemical.
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"Health Risk Comparison Between Groundwater Transport Models and Field Data,"
Environmental Progress, 5(1):66-70, February 1986.

      Methods to predict contaminant migration using both computer modeling
      and field monitoring data, and case studies comparing health-risk
      (exposure) assessments and plume delineation based on modeling and
      monitoring predictions.

Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance  (HELP) Model, EPA/ORD, June
1984, PB85-100840.

      Describes hydrologic evaluation of landfill performance  (HELP) program
      developed to facilitate estimation of amounts of surface runoff,
      subsurface drainage and leachate in landfills.

Impact of High Chemical Contaminant Concentrations on Terrestrial and Aquatic
Ecosystems:  A State-of-the-Art Review:  Final Report, EPA/Athens, July 1984,
PB84-220292.

      Reviews available methods for predicting effects of high chemical
      concentrations on properties, processes, functions, cycles, and
      responses of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.

Improved Techniques for Removal of Sediments Contaminated With Hazardous
Materials, EPA/ORD, October 1984, PB85-116093.

      Describes research project set up to identify, characterize/classify
      chemicals that sink and review state-of-the-art contaminated sediment
      management technology.

"In-Situ Biorestoration as a Ground Water Remediation Technique,"  J.T.
Wilson,  L.E. Leach, M. Henson, and J.N. Jones,  Ground Water Monitoring
Review,  6<4):56-64, Fall 1986.

      This paper discusses the role of microorganisms in degrading or
      transforming a wide variety of subsurface organic contaminants and the
      possibilities for enhancing this process through various remediation
      techniques.

In Situ Methods to Control Emissions from Surface Impoundments and Landfills,
EPA/ORD,  October 1985, PB86-121365.

      Present results of 2-year study on methods of reducing volatile chemical
      emissions from surface impoundments and landfills.   Examines air-
      supported structures,  floating solid objects, shape modification, oil
      and surfactant covers, and synthetic membranes.

In Situ Restoration Technique for Aquifers Contaminated With Hazardous Wastes,
EPA/Ada,  January 1987, PB87-198396.

      In situ techniques for cleansing ground water and restoring aquifers,
      including chemical and physical treatments.  Neutralization, chemical
      reaction,  extraction,  and immobilization are presented.
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In Situ Methods to Control Emissions from Surface Impoundments and Landfills,
Final,  EPA/ORD, October 1985,  EPA/600/2-85-124.

      Presents results or two-year study on methods of reducing volatile
      chemical emissions from surface impoundments and landfills.   Examines
      air-supported structures,  Floating Solid objects, shape modification,
      oil and surfactant covers, and synthetic membranes.

Innovative Means of Dealing with Potential Sources of Groundvater
Contamination:  Proceedings of the National Groundwater Quality Symposium,
EPA/Ada, January 1984, PB85-196947.

      New means of dealing with potential sources of ground-water
      contamination:  underground storage tanks, mining waste, agricultural
      chemicals, injection wells, landfills, and impoundments.

Interim Report on the Feasibility of Using UV  (Ultraviolet) Photolysis and
APEG (Alkali Polyethylene Glycolate) Reagent for Treatment of Dioxin, EPA/ORD,
July 1985, PB85-232619.

      Field test at Shenandoah Stables in Moscow Mill, Missouri, to evaluate
      the potential of alkali polyethylene glycolate  (APEG) to dechlorinate
      2,3,7,8-TCDD.

Laboratory Studies of Soil Bedding Requirements for Flexible Membrane Liners,
EPA/ORD, January 1984, PB84-141498.

      Describes study that investigated performance of membrance liners during
      construction of hazardous waste landfills.  Discusses development of
      laboratory tests to determine bedding and cover requirements for
      protecting membrane from puncture.

Land Disposal  of Hexachlorobenzene Wastes:  Controlling Vapor Movement in
Soil, EPA/ORD, August 1980, EPAX 8603-0004.

      Presents results of study of volatilization and vapor phase movement of
      hexachlorobenzene  (HCB) from industrial wastes deposited on land.  To be
      used to  design soil covers land disposal.

Landfill and Surface Impoundment Performance Evaluation Manual, EPA/ORD, April
1983, EPAX 8603-0188.

      Recommended procedures for evaluating the effectiveness of liquid
      transmission control systems for hazardous waste landfill and surface
      impoundments.  Equations allow a determination of the performance of
      compacted-clay liners intended to impede the vertical flow of liquids,
      sand or  gravel drainage layers used to convey liquids laterally into
      collection systems, slopes on liners and drain layers, and spacings of
      collector drain pipes.

Leachate Characterization and Synthetic Leachate Formulation for Liner
Testing, EPA/ORD, January 1987,  PB87-145983.

      Study to characterize leachates from land disposals and assess
      feasibility of formulating a multicompound leachate for liner testing.
      Waste sample data were analyzed and evaluated.  Study includes
      recommendations for synthetic leachate makeup.
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Leaching Evaluation of Agricultural Chemicals (LEACH) Handbook, EPA/600/3-
84/
068, PB84 236-413, June 1984, CERI.

      The LEACH method provides an indication of the presence, absence, and
      severity of pesticide leaching below the rooting depth for major crop
      growing areas of the United States.  LEACH was developed from long-term
      simulation of annual pesticide-leaching time series using the Pesticide
      Root Zone Model.  Key parameters of a pesticide-site-crop-management
      scenario are used to locate unique cumulative-frequency distributions,
      which indicate whether the annual quantity of pesticides leached past
      the crop rooting depth will exceed a given value.

Leachate Plume Management, Final, November 1985, OSWER Directive No. 9380.0-
05.

      Provides an overview of fundamental concepts, procedures, and
      technologies used in leachate plume management.  Discusses plume
      generation dynamics and delineation, plume control technologies, and
      selection criteria.

Liner Materials Exposed to Hazardous and Toxic Waste, EPA/ORD, January 1986,
PB87-176897.

      Reports on experimental effectiveness and durability of wide range of
      liner materials when exposed to hazardous substances.  Discusses new
      testing methods.

Management of Hazardous Waste Leachate, EPA/ORD/MERL  August 1980, SW-871.

      To provide guidance for permit officials and disposal site operators on
      available management options for controlling, treating, and disposing of
      hazardous waste leachates.  Provides overviews of leachate generation
      and leachate characteristics.  Presents alternatives for leachate
      treatment and disposal.  Provides broad guidance for design of a
      monitoring program.  In general, the document provides narrative
      qualitative discussions of treatment alternatives and refers the reader
      to other documents for the technical detail necessary for selection or
      implementation of a treatment alternative.

Management of Hazardous Waste Leachate, EPA/OSWER, September 1982, EPAX 8706-
0051.

      Available management options for controlling, treating, and disposing of
      leachate generated at surface impoundments and landfills.  Emphasis is
      on treatment selection and treatment technologies.

Manual of Procedures and Criteria for Inspecting the Installation of Flexible
Membrane Liners in Hazardous Waste Facilities, EPA/ORD, EPA/600/8-87/056.

      This manual is intended to assist inspectors in performing flexible
      membrane liner  (FML) installation inspections.  The manual discusses
      four FML's most commonly used for waste containment:polyvinyl chloride,
      high-density polyethylene, chlorosulfonated polyethylene, and
      chlorinated polyethylene.  Seven installation operations are discussed:
      unloading and storage of FML's preparation and maintenance of supporting
      surface,  placement of FML on the supporting surface,  seaming operations,
      anchoring and sealing  (anchoring in earth and to concrete, piping,
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      etc.)/ testing, and covering the FML (earth, concrete, geotextiles, or
      drainage nets.) .

Methods/Materials Matrix of Ultimate Disposal Techniques for Spilled Hazardous
Materials, EPA/ORD, October 1984, PB85-116853.

      Describes study conducted to evaluate conventional and novel methods for
      ultimate disposal of spilled or released hazardous substances, including
      incineration pyrolysis, landfills, fixation, biological, and chemical
      treatment.

Methods for Determining Permeability, Tra.nsmissijbi.lity, and Drawdown, R.
Bentall, Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1536-1, 1963.

      Suggestions for correcting drawdown measurements analyzed by the This
      graphical method; remarks pertaining to Wenzel's limiting formula,
      gradient formula, and the recovery method; a formula for corrections to
      be applied if wells used for aquifer tests tap less than the full
      thickness of the aquifer; formulas for the determination of aquifer
      constants from water-level data obtained when a Well is bailed or  a slug
      of water is injected into a well; analyses of the effects of cyclic
      fluctuations of the water level, the pumping rate, or the pumping
      interval; and methods relating the specific capacity of a well to  the
      aquifer coefficient of transmissibility.

MEXAMSThe Metals Exposure Analysis Modeling System, EPA/600/3-84/031,  PB84
157-155, February 1984.

      MEXAMS provides enhanced capability for assessing the impact of
      priority-pollutant metals on aquatic systems.  It allows the user  to
      consider the complex chemistry affecting the behavior of metals in
      conjunction with the transport processes that affect their migration and
      fate.  This is accomplished by linking MINTEQ, a geochemical model, to
      EXAMS, an aquatic exposure assessment model.

Microbial Degradation of Selected Hazardous Materials:  Pentachlorophenol,
Hexachlorocyclopentadiene, and Methyl Parathion, EPA/ORD, November 1983, PB84-
123934.

      Evaluates use of selected pure culture microorganism for potential in
      biodegrading hazardous materials.

"Microbiology of Portable Water and Groundwater," D.J. Reasoner, J. Water
Pollution Control Fed.  55 (6):891-895, 1983.

      Recent studies of the microbiology of both potable and ground water are
      presented in this paper.  These studies include information on sampling
      techniques, environments conducive to different types of microbial
      growth, resistant strains of bacteria, and effects of various treatments
      on controlling microbial growth in different settings.

Microwave System for Locating Faults in Hazardous Materials Dikes:  Final
Report, EPA/ORD, January 1985, PB85-173821.

      Continuous wave microwave systems and pulsed radio frequency systems
      were  assessed for identifying dike failure characteristics and detecting
      subsurface objects.
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MINTEQA Computer Program for Calculating Aqueous Geochemical Equilibria,
EPA/600/3-84/032, PB84 157-148, February 1984.

      MINTEQ is a thermodynamic equilibrium model that computes aqueous
      specification, adsorption, and precipitation/dissolution of solid
      phases.  It combines the best features of two existing geochemical
      models, MINEQL and WATEQ3, and was developed for incorporation into the
      Metals Exposure Analysis Modeling System  (MEXAMS).   It has a well-
      documented thermodynamic data base that contains equilibrium constants
      and accessory data for seven priority-pollutant metals:  arsenic,
      cadmium, copper, lead, nickel, silver, and zinc.

Mobile System for Extracting Spilled Hazardous Materials from Excavated Soils:
Final Report, EPA/ORD, October 1983, PB84-123637.

      Describes laboratory tests to evaluate techniques for cleansing soil
      contaminated with released or spilled hazardous materials.

Mobile Treatment Technologies for Superfund Wastes, Final, September 1986,
EPA/540/2-86/003(f).

      Addresses use of established and developing mobile systems to treat
      Superfund wastes.  Discusses capabilities and limitation of 5 treatment
      categories:  thermal, immobilization, chemical, physical, and
      biological.

Mobility of Organic Compounds from Hazardous Wastes, EPA/EMSL, February 1983,
PB83-163956.

      Describes development of second generation test for mobility model of
      leachate production for organic and inorganic constituents.

Mobility of Toxic Compounds from Hazardous Wastes, EPA/EMSL, July 1984, PB85-
117034.

      Describes development of laboratory extraction method for solid wastes
      that stimulates inorganic and organic constituents in leachates
      resulting from co-disposing industrial wastes with municipal wastes in
      landfills.

Model Based Methodology for Remedial Action Assessment at Hazardous Waste
Sites, EPA/ORD, January 1983, PB84-128990.

      Describes remedial action assessment methodology for uncontrolled
      hazardous waste sites.

Modeling Remedial Actions At Uncontrolled Hazardous Waste Sites,
EPA/ORD/Athens, January 1985, EPAX 8603-0202.

      Selection and use of models to evaluate effectiveness of remedial
      actions at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites.  Guidelines to regulatory
      officials for incorporating models into remedial action planning process
      at Federal and state sites.
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Modified NRC Version of the USGS Solute Transport Model.  Volume 1:
Modifications,  EPA/OSWER,  September 1986,  PB87-103099.

Modified NRC Version of the USGS Solute Transport Model.  Volume II:
Interactive Preprocessor Program,  EPA/ORD, July 1986, PB87-103107.

      2-Volume report is technical documentation and nontechnical user's
      manual for NRC version of solute transport model developed by U.S.
      Geological Survey, used to predict contaminant concentrations in a
      plume.

Molten Salt Destruction of HCB  (Hexachlorobenzene) and Chlordane:-Bench and
Pilot Scale Tests, EPA/ORD,  September 1984, PB84-246354.

      Describes research test program to demonstrate destruction of
      chlorinated materials by molten salt destruction  (MSD) process.

Nondestructive Testing  (NDT) Techniques to Detect Contained Subsurface
Hazardous Wastes, EPA/ORD, EPA/600/2-87/078, PB88-185269.

      Four NDT (remote sensing) techniques were evaluated for detection of
      buried containers.  The techniques tested were electromagnetic induction
      (EMI), metal detection (MD), magnetometer  (MAG), and ground penetrating
      radar  (GPR).  The containers, steel and plastic, varied in size from 5
      to 55 gal and were buried in known distributions in a wide variety of
      soils, with some submerged in water.  Five diverse field sites were
      tested.  The results showed that GPR is the only reliable method to
      detect plastic containers, but it has limitations.

Performance of an Electrical Resistivity Technique for Detecting and Locating
Geomembrane Failures, EPA/ORD, May 1984, PB84-190594.

      Describes an electrical resistivity survey technique which has been
      developed and tested for assessing the integrity of geomembrane liner
      systems installed in fluid impoundments.

Permeability of Polymeric Membrane Lining Materials  (Technical Paper),
EPA/ORD, January  1984, PB84-166859.

      Reports on  permeabilities of 3 gases and 5 solvents for a broad range of
      commercial  polymeric membranes.

Permeability of Polymeric Membrane Lining Materials  for Waste Management
Facilities, EPA/ORD, May 1985, PB85-231900.

      Discusses materials used to manufacture polymeric liners for waste
      management  permeability of liners to gases, water vapor, solvent vapor.

Perspectives on Solidification/Stabilization Technology for Treating Hazardous
Waste, EPA/OSWER, January 1987, PB87-146346.

      Stabilization/solidification means using additives to change waste and
      reduce its mobility so it is suitable for landfills.  Technical and
      regulatory  factors affecting potential applications are discussed.
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Potential Clogging of Landfill Drainage Systems, EPA/ORD, October 1983, PB84-
110550.

      Describes investigation of potential clogging of landfill drainage
      systems at hazardous waste sites.

Practical Guide for Ground Water Sampling, EPA/Ada, September 1985,  EPAX 8706-
0004.

      Presents ground-water sampling procedures for long-term monitoring
      programs.  Discussed:  quality assurance, hydrogeologic settings, data
      selection, well placement and construction,  sampling equipment and
      protocol, conclusions,  recommendations, and references.

Practical Hydraulics, A.L. Simon, John Wiley & Sons, 1976.

      A basic reference on the science of hydraulics,  including chapters on
      the physical properties of water, laws of fluid mechanics, water
      pressure, pipe flow, pumps, seepage, elements of hydrology, open channel
      flow, flow through hydraulic structures, and flow measurements.

Prediction/Mitigation of Subsidence Damage to Hazardous Waste Landfill Covers,
EPA/ORD, March 1987, PB87-175386.

      Characteristics of RCRA landfills and of landfilled hazardous wastes
      described to permit development of models and other analytical
      techniques for predicting, reducing, and preventing landfill settlement
      and related cover damage.

Preparation of Soil Sampling Protocol:  Techniques and Strategies, EPA/EMSL,
May 1983, PB83-206979.

      Presents system for developing soil sampling protocols used by
      environmental scientists in numerous situations.

Procedures for Modeling Flow Through Clay Liners to Determine Required Liner
Thickness, EPA/OSWER, January 1984, PB87-191029.

      Describes technical procedures for determining adequate thickness of
      single soil liners.  Includes performance simulation model based on
      numerical techniques recommended in guidance.

Project Summary:  Destruction of Dioxin-Contaminated Solids and Liquids By
Mobile Incineration, EPA/OSWER, June 1987, EPAX 8605-0010.

      Summary of project on mobile incineration system for on-site treatment
      of dioxin contamination.  Contains findings of research to determine
      economic feasibility and to establish operation protocol.

Protection of Public Water Supplies from Ground-Water Contamination, EPA/ORD,
September 1985, EPA/625/4-85/016.

      Material from a series of technology transfer seminars designed to help
      the water-supply community prevent contamination and treat previously
      contaminated water supplies.  There is a good description of basic
      ground-water hydrology as well as sections dealing with classification
      of ground-water regions,  ground-water and surface-water relationships,
      ground-water pollution,  management alternatives, controlling volatile
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      organic compounds in ground water used for drinking, and in-situ
      treatment, restoration, and reclamation of ground water.

RCRA Corrective Action Interim Measures, Interim Final, OWPE/OSW, June 1988,
OSWER Directive No. 9902.4.

      For use by Regional  (and State) enforcement staff for developing
      language in RCRA Section 3008 (h) enforcement orders for guiding the
      implementation of interim measures.  Specific interim measures for the
      following types of waste management units are specified:  containers,
      surface impoundments, landfills, waste piles, tanks.  In addition,
      interim measures have been identified for the following media and/or
      pollution events:  ground water, surface water,  gas migration, air
      emissions.

RCRA Corrective Action Plan, Interim Final, OWPE/OSW,  November 1986, OSWER
Directive No. 9902.3.

      Assists Regions and  States in development of Corrective Action Orders
      (3008(h) ) and corrective action requirements in permit applications and
      permits.  Provides a technical framework for Regional and State
      personnel in development of a site-specific schedule of compliance to be
      included in a permit or a compliance schedule in a Corrective Action
      Order; includes requirements for RCRA Facility Investigations  (RFIs),
      Corrective Measures  Studies  (CMSs), and work plans for Corrective
      Measures Implementation (CMI).

RCRA Facility Assessment Guidance, Final, OSW, October 1986, PB87-107769.

      Provides guidance to Regional/State staff on how to conduct a RCRA
      Facility Assessment  (RFA).  It focuses on the following: identifying
      releases requiring further action; screening SWMUs for further
      investigation; collecting initial data on contamination levels; and
      media  specific investigation techniques.

RCRA Facility Investigation  (RFI) Guidance, Draft, OSW, July 1987, OSWER
Directive No. 9502.00-6C,  EPA 530/SW-87-001.

      Provides detailed guidance to owner/operators for performing a RCRA
      Facility  Investigation  (RFI).  This document identifies the critical
      steps, describes methods and addresses information requirements.  It
      describes how to prepare an RFI work plan and presents general strategy
      for characterizing releases; QA/QC procedures; data management and
      presentation; health and safety; waste and unit characterization; health
      and environmental assessment; media-specific investigation techniques;
      and case study examples.

RCRA Ground-Water Monitoring Technical Enforcement Guidance Document, Final,
OWPE, September 1986, OSWER Directive No. 9933.1.

      Describes essential  components of ground-water monitoring system which
      meets  RCRA goals.  To be used to evaluate and modify existing systems.

Rapid Assessment of Potential Ground-Water Contamination Under Emergency
Response Conditions, EPA/600/8-83/030, November 1983,   CERI.

      A rapid assessment method for evaluating potential ground-water
      contamination from a spill or waste site under a 24-hour emergency-
      response time frame.  The method allows order-of-magnitude estimates of


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      contaminant concentrations with time and distance below the surface.
      Assumptions and limitations of the procedures, auxiliary sources of
      information, and example "applications are discussed.

Reactivity of Various Grouts to Hazardous Wastes and Leachates, EPA/ORD,
EPA/600/2-88/021.

      A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the potential of selected
      grouts for controlling the percolation of leachates from hazardous and
      solid waste landfills and surface impoundments.

Reclamation and Redevelopment of Contaminated Land:  Volume I, U.S. Case
Studies, EPA/ORD/HWERL, August 1986, EPA/600/2-86/066.

      Describes land use history, nature of contamination, redevelopment
      objectives, site remediation and criteria for cleanup.  Documents case
      studies on 16 uncontrolled hazardous waste sites.

Remedial Response at Hazardous Waste Sites, EPA/OSWER, October 1985, OSWER
Directive No. 9380.0-04

      For use by government and industry personnel involved in selection,
      evaluation, and design of remedial response actions to provide an
      understanding of the remedial process so that future response actions
      can be developed and implemented in the most efficient way possible.  To
      provide a standard of comparison when evaluating or deciding on response
      actions for sites with similar problems.  To identify cleanup
      technologies which may warrant further research.  To quantify and
      document the extent and type of remedial response actions on a
      nationwide basis.

Removal of Hazardous Material Spills from Bottoms of Flowing Waterbodies,
EPA/600/2-81/137, PB81 230-922, July 1981.

      Results of a feasibility study for removing spilled insoluble hazardous
      materials from the bottom of flowing watercourses.  Two full-scale
      systems are described that were developed to collect spilled materials
      and contaminated bottom mud,  remove excess water from the pumped slurry,
      and return decontaminated water to the stream.  The two systems were
      successfully demonstrated at a creosote spill on the Little Menomonee
      River in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

"Removal of Radium-226 from Drinking Water by Reverse Osmosis in Sarasota
Florida," T.J. Sorg,  R.W. Forbes, and D.S. Chambers.  J. Amer. Wtr. ffrks.
Assoc. 72(4):230-237,  1980.

      Eight reverse osmosis treatment systems were studied for their
      effectiveness in removing naturally occurring RaJ2S and other dissolved
      solids from water.   Although the age, type,  and performance of the eight
      systems varied,  all systems lowered the Ra"6  concentration  in the  raw
      water below the EPA contaminant level of 5 pCi/L.

Report on Decontamination of PCB-Bearing Wastes, EPA/ORD, EPA/600/2-87/093.

      This report summarizes research progress on chemical/biological methods
      for detoxification/destruction of PCBs in sediments.
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Review and Evaluation of the Influence of Chemicals on the Conductivity of
Soil Clays,  EPA/ORD,  EPA 600/2-88/016.

      A study was undertaken to ascertain the effects of organic solvents on
      compacted soils.  Lab measurements showed that clay initially dispersed
      in water, will flocculate as the concentration of organics increases.
      The hydraulic conductivity typically increased two or three orders of
      magnitude at concentrations above which the clay flocculated.

Review of In-Place Treatment Techniques for Contaminated Surface Soils:
Volume 1Technical Evaluation, EPA/ORD/HWERL, July 1984.

      Presents information on in-place treatment technologies applicable to
      contaminated soils at shallow depths.  Discusses extraction
      immobilization, degradation, attenuation, and reduction of volatiles.

Review of In-Place Treatment Techniques for Contaminated Surface Soils:
Volume 2Background Information for In-Situ Treatment, EPA/ORD/HWERL,
July 1984.

      Presents information on in-place treatment technologies applicable to
      contaminated soils at shallow depths.  Discusses extraction,
      immobilization, degradation, attenuation, and reduction of volatiles.

Review of Treatment Technologies for Dioxin Wastes, EPA/ORD, January 1986,
PB87-174959.

      Presents generation and waste characteristics information for dioxin
      wastes and discusses state-of-the-art for several proposed alternative
      treatment processes for dioxin wastes.

Sampling Approaches for Measuring Emission Rates from Hazardous Waste Disposal
Facilities,  EPA/ORD, January 1984, PB84-194083.

      Sampling approaches for measuring fugitive air emission, including
      emission isolation flux chamber, vent'sampling, concentration-profile
      technique, transect technique, and mass balance.  Recommendations for
      selection of appropriate sampling method.

SARAH:  A Surface Water Assessment Model for Back Calculating Reductions in
Abiotic Hazardous Wastes, EPA/ORD/Athens, December 1986, EPAX 8705-0106.

      Background and manual for computer model that calculates acceptable
      leachate or industrial waste contaminant concentrations by working back
      from levels thought safe in surface water, drinking water, and fish.

Sediment Sampling Quality Assurance User's Guide, EPA/EMSL, July 1985, EPAX
8706-0003.

      Overview of selected sediment models presented as foundation for
      stratification study of regions and selection of sampling sites, methods
      of sampling, sample preparation and analysis.  Discussion covers rivers,
      lakes, and estuaries.
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Selection Guide for Volatilization Technologies for Water Treatment, EPA/ORD,
EPA/600/2-88/014.

      This guide presents a methodology for evaluating applicability of
      volatilityzation technologies for removing volatile organics from water.
      Technologies assessed include: surface sprayers, surface aerators,
      bubble columns, cooling towers, steam strippers, unaided evaporation
      from an impoundment, spray columns,  and packed air stripping columns.
      The guide enables users to assess performance and cost under a variety
      of operating conditions (e.g. temperature, influent and effluent
      concentrations, and flow rate) for representative equipment designs
      transportable on a trailer.  Offgas treatment is not considered.

Separation of Dilute Hazardous Organics by Low Pressure Composite Membranes,
EPA/ORD, July 1987, PB87-214870.

      Separation of dilute hazardous organics accomplished by use of thin-film
      composite aromatic polyamide membranes.  Technique offers advantage of
      high solute separation at low pressures (1-2 MPA) and broad pH operating
      ranges (pH 2 to 12).

Sesoil:  A Seasonal Soil Compartment Model, EPA/OSWER, May 1984, PB86-112406.

      Describes user-friendly mathematical soil compartment model designed for
      long-term environmental hydrologic,  sediment, and pollutant fate
      simulations.

Sesoil:  Execution Using the Data Management Supporting System, Sesin and
Sesoilfm.  User's Guide, EPA/OSWER, December 1984, PB86-112414.

      Describes sesoil: soil compartment model which estimates rate of
      chemical transport from soil surface to ground water.

Settlement and Cover Subsidence of Hazardous Waste Landfills  (Final Report),
EPA/ORD, April 1985,  EPAX 8605-0117.

      Presents numerical models using equations for linearly elastic
      deformation developed to predict maximum expected settlement,  cover
      subsidence, and potential cover cracking at hazardous waste landfills.

Shortcuts and Special Problems in Aquifer Tests, R. Bentall,  Ed.,  Geological
Survey Water-Supply Paper 1545-C, 1963.

      Seventeen previously unpublished papers dealing with special methods for
      solving fundamental ground-water formulas or solving particular ground-
      water problems  are brought together.  Shortcut methods include the use
      of special charts, scales, or graphs for the solution of the general
      nonequilibrium formula.  Some extend the equilibrium straight-line
      methods to obtain more information with less work; some analyze specific
      boundary problems; and one discusses hydraulic and economic factors in
      well spacing in a multiple-well system.

Slurry Trench Construction for Pollution Migration Control, Final,
February 1984,  OSWER Directive No. 9380.0-02.

      Guidance on use of slurry walls for control of subsurface pollutants.
      Describes how these barriers can be employed for waste site remediation
      and presents theory of their function and use.  Discusses feasibility,
      design, and construction.


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Soil, Clay, and Caustic Soda Effects on Solubility, Sorption, and Mobility of
Hexachlorocyclopentadiene, EPA/ORD, January 1983, PB84-116060.

      Describes project initiated to determine capacity of clay minerals and
      soils for C-56 adsorption and develop chemical model to predict
      migration.

Soil Sampling Quality Assurance User's Guide, EPA/EMSL, May 1984, EPAX 8706-
0055.

      Guide stresses inseparability of cost-effective soil sampling quality
      assurance/quality control plan from objectives of soil monitoring
      program.  Includes statistical considerations, sample collection and
      handling, and analysis of quality assurance data.

Soiliner ModelDocumentation and User's Guide  (Version 1)  (Rept. for May 85-
May  86), EPA/ORD, April 86, PB87-100038.

      Guide to soiliner, a program for IBM PC/XT or compatible, which models
      compacted soil liner systems for landfills, surface impoundments, and
      waste piles.

Soiliner Version 1  (for Microcomputers), EPA/ORD, July 1986, PB87-126033.

      Soiliner program models liner systems for  landfills/ surface
      impoundments and waste piles.  Written in  Fortran for IBM PC/XT
      compatible, needs DOS 2.1, 256K, hard disk.  Available as 2  (2-sided, 2-
      density) 5-1/4" diskettes plus documentation.

Solidification and Thermal Degradation of TNT Waste Sludges Using Asphalt
Encapsulation, EPA/ORD, August 1986, PB86-229150.

      Research conducted on closure methods for  lagoons containing TNT and RDX
      wastes  (pink water).  Synthetic sludge will be used for initial tests
      and modification of pilot system, actual lagoon sludge will be used
      during final testing.

Solubility of 2,3,7,8-TCDD  (Tetrachlorodibenzo-P-Dioxin) in Contaminated
Soils, EPA/OSWER, January 1986, PB87-115796.

      Investigation of soil/water partition coefficients for TCDD using
      aqueous batch and intact core leaching.  Coefficient strongly affected
      by co-contaminants: total solvent-extractable organic matter  (SEOM),
      halogenated semi-volatiles in SEOM.

Sorption of Organic Contaminants to a Low Carbon Subsurface Core, EPA/Ada,
January 1985, PB86-117470.

      Sorption of 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene, o-chlorotoluene and
      dimethylphthalate to a series of subsurface samples is reported.

"Sorption of Organics by Monitoring Well Construction Materials," A.L. Sykes,
R.N. McAllister, and J.B. Homolya.  Ground Water Monitoring Review, 6(4):44-
47,  Fall 1986.

      A study of the effect of well-casing material  (PVC, teflon, or stainless
      steel) on the sorption of volatile organic hydrocarbons found in
      contaminated ground water.   It also considers the sampling and storage


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      stabilities of these contaminants for periods up to nine days.  Results
      showed no significant differences in sorption between casing materials,
      but did find that length of storage resulted in some variability.

Specific YieldCompilation of Specific Yields for Various Materials, A.I.
Johnson, Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1662-D, 1967.

      A compendium of excerpts from selected reports that present and evaluate
      methods for determining specific yield,  limitations of those methods,
      and results of the determinations made on a wide variety of rock and
      soil materials.  Although no particular values are recommended in this
      report, it does summarize values of specific yield and their averages
      determined for 10 rock textures.

Standard Operating Procedures for Conducting Sampling and Sample Bank Audits,
EPA/EMSL, January 1985, PB85-143279.

      Guidelines for evaluating and auditing sample collection and sample bank
      activities.  Components and organization of audit program,
      administrative and procedural functions, and suggested qualification and
      training requirements for audit personnel.

Summary .Report:  Remedial Response at Hazardous Waste Sites, EPA/ORD/MERL,
March 1984, EPA/S40/2-84, EPA/540/2-84-002a.

      Updates conceptual design cost estimates for remedial action unit
      operations described in earlier reports.  Emphasizes uncontrolled
      landfill or impoundment disposal sites in New Jersey.

Superfund Exposure Assessment Manual,  Draft, EPA/OERROSWER Directive
No. 9285.5- 01.

      The Superfund Exposure Assessment Manual  (SEAM) is designed to
      complement the Superfund Public Health Evaluation Manual (SPHEM)  by
      describing how to develop both quantitative and qualitative exposure
      information at uncontrolled waste sites to support a public health
      evaluation during the Feasibility Study.  This document presents
      procedures for making an analysis of contaminant release, transport, and
      fate, and human population exposure.

Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program; EPA/ORD, February 1988,
EPA.540/5-88/001.

      A report to Congress on the status of the SITE Program including a
      discussion of new and innovative technologies.

Superfund Public Health Evaluation Manual, EPA/OERR, October 1986,  OSWER
Directive No. 9285.4-01.

      Establishes a framework to be used at Superfund sites to analyze public
      health risks and develop design goals for remedial alternatives based on
      Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements (ARARs) of other
      laws, where available; or risk analysis where those requirements are not
      available.  Procedures are designed to conform with EPA's proposed risk
      assessment guidelines.  Supplements Chapter 5 of the Guidance on
      Feasibility Studies Under CERCIA, which describes the public health
      evaluation process and provides detailed guidance on conducting the
      evaluation.
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Superfund Remedial Design and Remedial Action Guidance, Final, OERR,
February 1985, OSWER Directive No. 9355.0-04A.

      To assist agencies and parties who plan, administer and manage remedial
      design  (RD) and remedial action (RA) at Superfund sites.  Pertains to
      both fund financed RD/RA (i.e., Federal- and State-led) and responsible
      party RD/RA, and provides personnel guidance to be followed in order to
      ensure that RD/RA is performed properly, consistently, and
      expeditiously.

Superfund Risk Assessment Information Directory, EPA/OERR, November 1986,
OSWER Directive 9285^6-1.

      This directory identifies and describes sources of information useful in
      conducting Superfund-related risk assessments.  Information is presented
      on sources of automated data bases, data files and tapes, models,
      directories, periodicals, publications, and on human and corporate
      resources.

Superfund Treatment Technologies:  A Vendor Inventory, EPA/OSWER, September
1986, EPAX 8703-0116.

      Provides current information on capability and availability of mobile
      treatment units for Superfund waste, including descriptions and
      technical information.

Surface Sealing to Minimize Leachate Generation at Uncontrolled Hazardous
Waste Sites, EPA/ORD,  January 1981, EPAX  8606-0027.

      Discusses implementation of surface sealing to minimize surface
      infiltration at 2 uncontrolled hazardous waste sites.  Presented at
      National Conference on Management of Uncontrolled Hazardous Waste  Sites,
      Oct. 1981, Washington, DC.

Survey or" Mobile Laboratory Capabilities  and Configurations, EPA/EMSL, 1984,
EPA-600/X-84-170.

      Survey  of articles, conference proceedings, and specialists to identify
      mobile  laboratories and analytical  capabilities in emergency and
      remedial response efforts.  Includes design specifications.

Systems to Accelerate Jn-Situ Stabilization of Waste Deposits, EPA/ORD,  HWERL,
September 1986.

      Use of  reactants to stabilize waste.  Discusses four kinds:
      biodegradation,  surfactant-assistant flushing, hydrolysis, and
      oxidation.  Methods of delivery assessed include surface flooding,
      ponding, surface spraying, ditching, subsurface infiltration beds, and
      others.

Technical Guidance Document:  Construction Quality Assurance for Hazardous
Waste Land Disposal Facilities, EPA/OSWER, July 1986, Directive No. 9472.00-3.

      Presents guidance for preparing site-specific construction quality
      assurance  (QA)  plans for hazardous  waste disposal facilities, including
      landfills, surface impoundments, and wastepiles.
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Technical Guidance for Corrective Measures:  Determining Appropriate
Technology and Response for Air Releases,  EPA/OSW, March 1985, PB88-185269.

      To assist EPA/State personnel in implementing RCRA corrective action
      provisions by providing a central source of information on air emission
      control technologies and techniques for hazardous waste TSDFs.
      Describes waste management unit decision and operation practices which
      prevent or control vapor and particulate releases from containerized
      waste storage, storage tanks, surface impoundments, landfills, land
      treatment and waste piles.  Discusses control technologies used in the
      industrial/commercial sector.

Technical Guidance for Corrective Measures:  Subsurface Gas,  EPA/OSWER/OERR,
March 28, 1985, PB88-185285.

      To assist in the assessment of the potential for subsurface gas
      generation and migration from these facilities and to describe potential
      corrective measures.  Provides an overview of factors that impact
      subsurface gas generation and migration.  Provides methods to identify a
      subsurface gas release by the presence of specific hazardous waste
      constituents.  Describes criteria for emergency situations,
      investigation methods and potential remedies.

Technical Resource Document:  Treatment Technologies for Dioxin-Containing
Wastes, EPA/OSWER, October 1986, EPAX 8706-0020.

      Information on available technologies for treatment of dioxins.
      Includes various thermal technologies, biological, chemical, and gamma
      ray treatments.

Technical Resource Document:  Treatment Technologies for Solvents Containing
Wastes, EPA/ORD, October 1986, EPAX 8706-0022.

      Source of technical information for waste management options for
      solvents and other organic compounds.  Options include waste
      minimization, recycling, and treatment of waste streams.  Emphasis is on
      performance data for proven technologies.

Techniques for Treating Hazardous Wastes to Remove Volatile Organic
Constituents, EPA/ORD, January 1985,  PB85-218782.

      Discusses potential for using commercially available treatment
      techniques to remove volatile organic compounds from hazardous waste
      streams.

Technological Approaches to the Cleanup of Radiologically Contaminated
Superfund Sites, EPAIORD, EPA/540/2-88/002.

      This document identifies potential technologies for the control and
      remediation of radioactive contamination at Superfund sites.  The
      following technologies are discussed: stabilization/solidification,
      vitrification, chemical extraction and physical separation.
      Additionally, on- and off-site disposal methods are discussed.  The
      report only addresses treatment and disposal of radiologically
      contaminated soils and radon control:  it does not address remediation
      of radiologically contaminated ground water or buildings.
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Technologies for In-Situ Treatment of Hazardous Wastes, EPA/ORD, January 1987,
PB87-146007.

      Discusses natural processes of biodegradation and chemical
      transformations with emphasis on delivery and recovery systems.   Case
      histories of in-situ treatment are given along with current EPA/ORD
      activities.

Test Methods for Determining the Chemical Waste Compatibility of Synthetic
Liners, EPA/OSWER, April 1985,  EPAX 8605-0116.

      Evaluates test methods to measure/estimate chemical compatibility of
      polymeric flexible membrane liners (FML) with liquid wastes.  A
      combination of tests may be necessary.

Test Methods for Evaluating Solid Waste:  Physical/Chemical Methods, Final,
OSWER, November 1986, SW-846,  (EPA 8704-0107)  .

      Manual of test procedures pertaining to RCRA.  Volumes 1A-1C laboratory
      manual, Volume 2 field manual:  lists methods for collecting samples,
      determining reactivity,  ignitability, composition, and mobility.

Test Methods for Injectable Barriers,  EPA/ORD, January 1984, PB84-183631.

      Describes wide variety of test procedures used in pilot and bench-scale
      evaluation of grouted barriers to contain contaminated water at
      hazardous waste sites.

"The Effect of Sampling Frequency on Ground Water Quality Characterization,"
R. Rajagopal, Ground Water Monitoring Review,  6(4):65-73,  Fall 1986.

      Nitrate levels in Quaternary aquifers and fluorides and sulfates in
      Cambro-Ordovician aquifers in Iowa were studied to determine the
      relationship between sampling frequency and the reliability of the
      information obtained.  Since many of the distribution curves for
      chemicals in ground water are positively skewed, a broader perspective
      of the distribution of chemicals in the ground water could be obtained
      by studying a spectrum of parameters.  Using these parameters enabled
      close estimation of nitrates, fluorides, and sulfates in selected
      aquifers with as few samples as 50, 100, or 250.

"The Occurrence and Reduction of Sodium in Drinking Water," R.P. Lauch and
R.J. Sorg. J. Amer. Wtr. Wrks.  Assoc.  73(5):256-265, 1981.

      Discussion of how sodium can be increased daring drinking-water
      treatment, what concentrations can be expected after treatment,  and how
      sodium in drinking water can be reduced or eliminated.  A literature
      review on treatment techniques for reduction of total dissolved solids
      and a brief introduction on the health effects of sodium are also
      included.

"The Use of Industrial Hygiene Samplers for Soil-Gas Surveying," H.B.  Kerfoot
and C.L. Mayer, Ground Water Monitoring Review, 6(4):74-78, Fall 1986.

      A description of soil-gas surveying using a passive sampler, which
      allows quantitative determination of  concentration of volatile organic
      compounds and remote analysis of samples.  Use of this sampler above a
      chloroform ground-water plume is compared to results obtained through
      ground-water analysis and from a previous soil gas study above the same


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      plume.  Chloroform concentrations measured with passive samplers
      correlate well with the other two techniques.  The short-term
      variability of the technique is characterized by a coefficient of
      variation of 12% over a 27-foot distance for nine samplers, and compares
      favorably with grab-sample results at the same location.

Theory of Aquifer Tests, J.G. Ferris, D.B. Knowles, R.H. Brown,  and R.W.
Stallman, Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1536-E, 1962.

      Survey of developments in fluid mechanics that apply to ground-water
      hydrology.  The origin, occurrence, and motion of ground water in
      relation to the development of terminology and analytic expressions  for
      selected flow systems.  Emphasis is on concepts, principles, and the
      delineating limits of applicability of mathematical models for analyzing
      flow systems in the field.  The importance of the geologic variable and
      its role in governing the flow regimen is stressed.

Toxicology Handbook:  Principles Related to Hazardous Waste Site
Investigations,  EPA/OWPE, August,  1985.

      Explains to non-toxicology-trained personnel those principles of
      toxicology relevant to hazardous waste site investigations.  Describes
      toxicity assessment process.

Treatment Technology Briefs:  Alternatives to Hazardous Waste Landfills,
EPA/ORD/HERL, July 1986.

      Summary of current technology  (other than landfill and containment)
      including biological treatment, centrifugation, oxidation, absorption,
      injection, , neutralization, steam stripping, ultraviolet photolysis,
      plasma systems, and many others.

Treatment of Contaminated Soils with Aqueous Surfactants, EPA/600/2-85,129/
PB86 122-561, November 1985.

      An investigation of aqueous nonionic surfactants for cleaning soil
      contaminated with PCBs, petroleum hydrocarbons, and chlorophenol.
      Contaminant removal from the soil was 92% for PCBs, and 93% for
      petroleum hyrocarbons.  While these results are an order of magnitude
      greater than obtained with water alone, the inability to separate the
      surfactants from the contaminants for reuse would render the process
      uneconomical for field application.  Future work should investigate  the
      use of other surfactants that may be more amenable to separation.

"Treatment of Drinking Water Containing Trichloroethylene and Related
Industrial Solvents," O.T. Love, Jr., and R.G. Eilers, J. Amer.  Wtr. Wrks.
Assoc.,  74(8):413-425, 1982.

      A discussion of the effects of aeration, adsorption, and boiling on
      water contaminated with the volatile organic solvents trichloroethylene,
      tetrachloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethylene, cis-1,2-dichloroethylene,
      carbon tetrachloride,  and 1,2-dichloroethane.  Characteristics of the
      compounds and estimates of the treatment costs are also provided.

"Treatment of Ground-Water with Granular Activated Carbon,"  P.R. Wood and
J.J. DeMarco, Amer.  Wtr. Wrks.  Assn.  71 (11):674-682, 1979.

      An evaluation of raw,  lime-softened,  and finished water from the
      Hialeah,  Florida,  water system determined the adsorption capacities for


                                    111-34

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                                                                         DRAFT
                                                                   May 1, 1989

      four types of granular activated carbon.  The carbons were tested for
      halogenated organic compounds,  total organic compounds, and
      trihalomethane formation potential,  as well as for several high
      molecular weight compounds.

Treatment of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water,  EPA/600/8-83/019,
PB83 239-434, May 1983.

      A review of the properties,  occurrence, and efforts to control the
      following organic chemicals in drinking water:  tri- and
      tetrachloroethylene; cis- and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene; 1,1-
      dichloroethylene; vinyl and methylene chloride; 1,1,1-trichloroethane;
      1,2-dichloroethane; carbon tetrachloride; benzene; chlorobenzene; 1,2-,
      1,3-, and 1,4-dichlorobenzene;  and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene.

      This report provides a quantitative evaluation of the treatment
      potential in soil for 56 hazardous chemicals, including PAHs,
      pesticides, chlorinated hydrocarbons, and miscellaneous chemicals.
      Results of the fate and transport predictions of two mathematical models
      (RITZ and VIP) were compared with laboratory and literature results
      inorder to evaluate the ability of the models to predict chemical
      behavior in a soil system.

"Treatment Technology to Meet the Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations
for Inorganics,  (Part 1, Nitrate and Fluoride)," T.J. Sorg, J. Amer. Wtr.
Wrks. Assoc. 70(2):105-112, 1978.

      The first of a series, this article presents a summary of the U.S. EPA
      Water Supply Research Division's overall project to evaluate contaminant
      removal techniques.  The research program consisted of two phases:  (1) a
      series of laboratory tests to determine critical variables affecting
      removal of contaminants, and (2) pilot plant tests to verify laboratory
      results.  This article gives specific details on nitrate and fluoride
      health effects, chemistry, and removal treatment technology.  Subsequent
      articles will review the treatment technology for other NIPDWR-regulated
      inorganic contaminants and the radionuclides.

"Treatment Technology to Meet Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations for
Inorganics,  (Part 2, Arsenic and Selenium)," T.J. Sorg and G.S. Logsdon. J".
Amer. Wtr. Wrks. Assoc. 70(7) : 379-393, 1978.

      The second in a series summarizing existing treatment technology to meet
      the inorganic National Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations.
      Presents health effects, chemistry, and current treatment methods for
      removing arsenic and selenium from drinking water.

"Treatment Technology to Meet Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations for
Inorganics,  (Part 3, Cadmium, Lead, and Silver)," T.J. Sorg and G.S. Logsdon.
J. Amer. Wtr. Wrks. Assoc. 70 (12) :680-691, 1978.

      The third in a series summarizing existing treatment technology to meet
      the inorganic National Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations, this
      report describes current treatment methods for removing cadmium, lead,
      and silver from drinking water.  The chemistry and health effects of
      each metal are presented.
                                    111-35

-------
                                                                         DRAFT
                                                                   May 1, 1989

"Treatment Technology to Meet Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations for
Inorganics, (Part 4, Chromium and Mercury)," T.J. Sorg, J. Amer. Wtr. Wrks.
Assoc. 71(8):454-466, 1979.

      The fourth in a series summarizing existing treatment technology to meet
      the inorganic National Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations, this
      report describes current treatment methods for removing chromium and
      mercury from drinking water.  Detailed discussion of the health effects
      of contamination and the chemistry of these two metals are included.

Underground Storage Tank Corrective Action Technologies, EPA/OSWER, January
1987, EPA/625/6-87/015.

      Underground storage tank construction techniques, leak detection
      methods, and failure mechanisms.  Transport pathways of released
      substances, evaluating releases, risks to human health, profiles of
      corrective-action technologies.

"Underground Storage Tank Monitoring:  Observation Well Based Systems," R.A.
Scheinfeld, J.B. Robertson, and T.G. Schwendeman, Ground Water Monitoring
Review, 6(4):49-55, Fall 1986.

      A discussion of the currently available leak-detection monitoring
      systems that can be used with the three main types of observation wells:
      ground-water observation wells, vapor wells, and U-tubes.  Seven types
      of liquid hydrocarbon detectors and six types of hydrocarbon vapor
      detectors are described.

Underground Tank Leak Detection Methods:  A State-of-the-Art Review,
EPA/600/2-86-001, PB86 137-155, January 1986.

      A discussion of 36 leak detection methods for underground storage tanks
      used primarily for gasoline and other liquid petroleum fuels.  The
      emphasis is on volumetric and nonvolumetric leak detection methods.
      General engineering comments are provided for each method and there is a
      discussion of variables that may affect the accuracy of each method.

User's Manual for the Pesticide Zone Model PRZM, EPA/600/3-84/109 December
1984, EPA/CERI.

      The PRZM simulates the vertical movement of pesticides in the
      unsaturated soil within and below the plant root zone and extending to
      the water table.  The model uses generally available input data and
      hydrology and chemical transport components to simulate runoff, erosion,
      plant uptake, leaching, decay, foliar washoff, and volatilization of the
      pesticide.  Prediction can be made for daily, monthly, or annual output.
      It is designed to run on a DEC POP 1170 mini-computer, but with
      modification will run on other computers with FORTRAN compilers.

User's Guide for Wastoxf A Framework for Modeling the Fate of Toxic Chemicals
in Aquatic Environments.  Part 1:  Exposure Concentration, EPA/ORD/Gulf
Breeze, August 1984, EPAX 8607-0087.

      Wastox computer program allows user to examine transport of toxic
      chemicals dissolved in water or adsorbed to sediments.  Part 1 deals
      with exposure concentration component of the Wastox model.
                                    111-36

-------
                                                                         DRAFT
                                                                   May 1, 1989

Water Well Technology, M.D. Campbell and J.H. Lehr,  National Water Well
Association,  1982.

      A basic compendium of all of the salient features of water well
      technology.  It is a complete review of the water well industry,
      including exploratory drilling, development of production wells for
      industrial, municipal, and individual domestic water supplies, water
      quality, and treatment of drilling contaminants.
                                     111-37

-------
                         SECTION IV
COMPENDIUM OF COURSES, SYMPOSIA, WORKSHOPS, AND CONFERENCES

-------
                                                                         DRAFT
                                                                   May 1, 1989

      This initial compendium of courses/ symposia, workshops, and conferences
was prepared by the Office of Solid Waste under the direction of Jon Perry.
The entries are listed under Corrective Action Technologies, Design and
Management, Sampling and Analysis,  Health and Safety, and Risk Assessment.
                                     IV-2

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                                                        EPA/600/9-87-008
                         SECTION  v
              TECHNICAL  ASSISTANCE DIRECTORY
                       Prepared for the

              Office of Research and Development
Office of Environmental Engineering and Technology Demonstration
             U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                   Washington, D.C.  20460

                   John H. Skinner, Director
               James V. Basilico, Project Officer
                Performed under subcontract to
                      JACA Corporation
                  Fort Washington, PA 19034
                 (68-03-3252, Assignment 35)
         ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SUPPORT
                     9514 Mid wood Road
                Silver Spring, Maryland  20910
                       (301) 589-5318
                       March 27, 1987

-------
                                   1. INTRODUCTION

     This  Directory is intended  to foster communication  with  appropriate  scientists and
engineers throughout EPA's  Office  of Research and Development (ORD) and EPA,  state, and
local  personnel  involved in the protection  and management of ground-water  resources.   In
addition to listing ORD researchers  by location  and subject matter, the Directory provides brief
organizational descriptions  of the  ground-water research programs for each  office.   These
organizational descriptions may aid in locating assistance in areas  not  covered by the subject
indices.  Chapter 6 contains an annotated bibliography  of  selected ground-water  publications
considered to be essential references for permitting and other regulatory personnel.

     ORD's ground-water research program,  reflecting the information needs of EPA's operating
programs, consists of five elements:

    Source  control.    Control  of  discharges, leaks,  and other  surface  and underground
     contaminant sources to  prevent ground-water contamination, including regulated  hazardous
     waste disposal sites, unregulated dump sites, underground tanks, and accidental spills.

    Transport and fate.    The  physical movement of  ground water in the  saturated and
     unsaturated  zones  and  also  the change in  ground-water  quality either through natural
     degradation  or differential transport  rates.

    Monitoring.   Well-placement and sampling of  the  subsurface  environment to locate and
     characterize potential or known ground-water contamination.

    On-site and  in-situ  aquifer  cleanup.   Restoring  a  polluted aquifer  through physical
     removal, chemical treatment, and enhanced biodegradation.

    Technical  assistance  and  technology  transfer.    Preparation   and  dissemination   of
     information  about current research to decision makers,  field managers, the  regulated
     communities, and the scientific community.

     EPA derives its statutory authority to protect  ground water from the Clean Water Act,
the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation,  and Liability Act (Superfund),  the
Safe Drinking Water Act, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Federal Insecticide,
Fungicide, and Rodenticide  Act,  the Toxic Substances Control Act, the Hazardous  and Solid
Waste Amendments of 1984, and the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1*986.
In  response  to   these  broad  statutory  mandates,  in  1984  EPA's  Office of  Ground-Water
Protection developed  a  Ground-Water Protection Strategy to  give the Agency's program a focus
and direction. It  has four components:

    Short-term build-up of institutions at the state level.

    Assessment  of  problems  that  may exist from  unaddressed  sources  of  contamination
     including leaking storage tanks, surface  impoundments,  and landfills.
                                                                                        \
  m  Issuance of guidelines for ground-water protection and cleanup.

    Strengthening  EPA's  organization  to improve  ground-water  management at the head-
     quarters and regional levels and EPA's cooperation with Federal  and state  agencies.

     The  scientists  and engineers   listed  in   this  Directory  conduct  or manage  research,
development,  demonstration,  and  technical assistance  projects  to  support  the regulatory
programs of  the Office of Water,  the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response, and  the
Office of Pesticides  and Toxic Substances.   To  ensure cross-office  integration  of research
programs, ORD  designated  a Ground-Water Research Matrix  Manager to coordinate ORD,
Program Office,  and Regional input on  issues and priorities in the  areas of prediction,


                                         V-2

-------
monitoring,  and  cleanup.    The  Matrix  Manager  supplements  the  Water  and  Hazardous
Waste/Superfund Research Committees,  which advise the Assistant Administrator for Research
and Development on research and budget priorities.

     Before  calling  technical  assistance contacts  listed in  this Directory, interested  persons
should first become familiar  with relevant publications listed in Chapter 6.
                                                V-3

-------
2.  ORD GROUND-WATER RESEARCH FACILITY DESCRIPTIONS
                       V-4

-------
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-------
                       Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory
        Office of Acid Deposition, Environmental Monitoring, and Quality Assurance
                           U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                         P.O. Box  15027, Las Vegas, Nevada  89114
                              FTS 545-2525, (702) 798-2525
     The Aquatic and Subsurface Monitoring Branch of the Environmental Monitoring Systems
Laboratory in Las Vegas (EMSL-LV) conducts ground-water monitoring research and technical
assistance to support EPA operating programs.  Ground-water related research includes:

    Development,  testing,  and  application of  geophysical and geochemical  techniques  for
     detecting and mapping  shallow contaminant plumes, locating abandoned wells, and mapping
     deeply buried contaminant plumes associated with injection wells.

    Development of advanced technologies, including  laser-fluorescence spectroscopy, for in-
     situ ground-water contamination monitoring.

    Evaluation  of  indicator  parameters  for  RCRA ground-water  contaminant  detection
     monitoring.

    Development of vadose zone  monitoring  technologies  to  detect  percolation of pollutants
     from hazardous wastes.

    Evaluation of the influence  of seasonal variability, well placement, spatial  variability,  and
     monitoring-well  construction  methods  on  water  quality  data  from  drinking  water
     monitoring wells.

    Evaluation of underground storage tank external leak detection monitoring methods.

    Assistance to  field teams  in  the use  of geophysical  methods  in hazardous  waste  site
     investigations.

1
EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT
RESEARCH DIVISION

1

OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR
EMSL-LM Vegas
1

ADVANCED MONITORING
SYSTEMS DIVISION
AQUATIC AND
SUBSURFACE
MONITORING BRANCH
REMOTE AND AIR
MONITORING BRANCH
ENVIRONMENTAL PHOTO-
GRAPHIC INTERPRETATION
CENTER


1 1
NUCLEAR RADIATION
ASSESSMENT DIVISION
DOSE ASSESSMENT
BRANCH
FIELD MONITORING
BRANCH
RADIOANALYSIS
BRANCH

QUALITY ASSURANCE
DIVISION
HAZARDOUS WASTE
METHODS EVALUATION
BRANCH
TOXICS AND HAZARDOUS
WASTE OPERATIONS
BRANCH
PESTICIDES AND
RADIATION QUALITY
ASSURANCE BRANCH
                                         V-6

-------
                     Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Laboratory
                  Office of Environmental Processes and Effects Research
                           U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                           P.O. Box  1198, Ada, Oklahoma  74820
                              FTS 743-2224, (405) 332-8800
     The Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Laboratory (RSKERL) is entirely devoted to
ground-water  research, concentrating on studies of the  transport and fate of contaminants in
the subsurface, development of methodologies for protection and  restoration of ground-water
quality, and evaluation of the applicability and  limitations of using natural soil and subsurface
processes for the treatment  of hazardous wastes.  The core  of RSKERL's program is research
into the hydrologic,  biotic,  and  abiotic  processes  that govern  the  transport  and  fate  of
contaminants in the subsurface.  This provides the scientific  foundation for further application-
oriented research in  support of EPA  operating programs.  To promote the immediate needs of
EPA operating programs, RSKERL:

    Determines the  mechanical  integrity  of injection  wells  for  the  Underground  Injection
     Control Program.

    Evaluates remediation technologies for the Office of Underground Storage Tanks.

    Develops technical information  for the Office of Solid Waste land treatment permitting
     program.

    Provides  evaluations and direct technical assistance for the Superfund program.

    Transfers technology by sponsoring technical training courses, conferences, and symposia.

    Supports  the  operations  of  the  International  Ground-Water  Modeling  Center  at  the
     Holcomb Research Institute  in Indianapolis,  Indiana; and the  Ground-Water Information
     Center at the National Water Well Association in Dublin, Ohio.
                                     OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR
                                         RSKERL-Ada. OK
   PROCESSES AND SYSTEMS
     RESEARCH DIVISION

    SUBSURFACE PROCESSES
           BRANCH

     SUBSURFACE SYSTEMS
           BRANCH
 EXTRAMURAL ACTIVITIES
AND ASSISTANCE DIVISION

EXTRAMURAL ACTIVITIES AND
    ASSISTANCE BRANCH

    APPLICATIONS AND
    ASSISTANCE BRANCH
                                               V-7

-------
                            Environmental Research Laboratory
                   Office of Environmental Processes and Effects Research
                           U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                        College Station Road, Athens, Georgia 30613
                              FTS 250-3134,  (404)  546-3134
     The  Athens Environmental Research Laboratory (ERL-Athens) conducts  fundamental and
applied research to assess  the  human and environmental  risks associated  with pollutants in
water and soil ecosystems.  Ground-water related research activities include:

    Identification  and characterization  of  significant  physical, chemical, and  biological
     processes  affecting ground water to facilitate the  prediction of transformation products,
     the rate and extent of transport, and  the distribution of pesticides,  hazardous  wastes, and
     their constituents in saturated- and unsaturated-soil  environments.

    Development of  measurement protocols and  data bases for chemical-specific  properties,
     process-rate  constants,  and  environmental  properties  that  govern  pollutant  exposure,
     impact, and risk in soils and ground-water environments.

    Development of multimedia models and methods to predict  the release, transport, and fate
     of pesticides,  hazardous wastes,  and toxic  substances  for the full  range  of exposure and
     risk assessment scenarios relevant to regulatory programs.

    Reduction of prediction uncertainties through  field  validations  and  the application of
     uncertainty-analysis techniques to developed models and methodologies.

    Multispectral identification of organic  compounds that remain unidentified after  application
     of conventional mass-spectrometric techniques.

    Technology transfer to  communicate  research  results through workshops, publication of
     user's manuals, and distribution of user-friendly computer codes.
                                     OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR
                                         ERL-Athcnt. GA


CHEMISTRY BRANCH

BIOLOGY

BRANCH


MEASUREMENTS BRANCH


ASSESSMENT
BRANCH
                                           V-8

-------
                        International Ground Water Modeling Center
                       Holcomb Research Institute, Butler University
                       4600 Sunset Ave., Indianapolis, Indiana  46208
                                     (317) 283-9458

     The  International  Ground  Water Modeling Center  (IGWMC),  established at  Holcomb
Research Institute (HRI) in  1978, operates a clearinghouse for ground-water modeling software,
organizes and conducts  short-courses and seminars, and  conducts  a  modeling research program
to support the  Center's technology transfer  and educational activities.   Partially  supported
through a Cooperative Agreement with EPA's Robert S.  Kerr Environmental Research Labora-
tory^  the  Center  provides  assistance  to federal and  state  agencies  and  private  groups  in
organizing and conducting specially designed  training programs.  The  Center's activities focus
on:

    Collection and  organization of information regarding  ground-water  models.   Data bases
     compiled by  the Center contain computer codes,  test files,  and  descriptions of ground-
     water models.

    Distribution and support of ground-water modeling software, including model evaluation,
     code acquisition and implementation, code testing,  preparation  of documentation, and the
     development of code support capabilities.

    Research and  development  in ground-water model screening  and testing, evaluation  of
     model uses  and needs, software development and improvement, and reviews.

    Training and Education to enharice the use of ground-water models by qualified personnel.
     The Center offers a comprehensive program  of short  courses, workshops, and seminars
     stressing principles,  concepts,  theories,  and  applications   of   ground-water  models.
     Individual,  computer-interactive training courses are under development.

    Brochures,  reports, and newsletters  intended to  expand contacts  within the ground-water
     management and research community, available on request.
                                               V-9

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                      Environmental Criteria and Assessment Office
                      Office of Health and Environmental Assessment
                          U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                         26 W. St. Clair, Cincinnati, Ohio 45268
                              FTS 684-7531, (513) 569-7531
     The Environmental Criteria and Assessment Office in Cincinnati (ECAO-CIN) has developed
ground-water  risk assessment methodologies (GRAMs) in  support  of the Office of  Water
regulations for municipal  sludge  landfill  and land  application  programs (Clean Water  Act
40S(d)).   The GRAMs  assist  in evaluating risks of human  exposure  from  ground-water
contamination  resulting from various disposal practices. ECAO-CIN is also developing GRAMs
for the municipal waste  combustion  programs  of the Office of Air  Quality  Planning  and
Standards  and  the Office of Solid Waste.
                                OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR
                                   ECAO-Cincinnati. OH
  CHEMICAL MIXTURES
  ASSESSMENT GROUP
   METHODOLOGY
DEVELOPMENT GROUP
SYSTEMIC TOXICANTS
ASSESSMENT GROUP
                                         V-10

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                                Exposure Assessment Group
                      Office of Health and Environmental Assessment
                           U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                        401 M Street, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20460
                               FTS 475-8909, (202) 475-8909


     The  Exposure Assessment Group  (EAG) research program focuses  on predicting  human
exposure risks from hazardous materials. Current ground-water priorities include:

    Characterization of contaminant dispersion in ground water are being evaluated using data
   k from  recent  field  experiments to develop  a realistic  approach  to  modeling  dispersive
     transport in exposure assessments.

    Criteria  for  the selection  of  mathematical  models that   can  be  applied to  exposure
     assessments are  being developed.   Use  of the criteria will help eliminate the  use  of
     inappropriate models for estimating contaminant migration in ground water.

    A  technical support document  is  being  prepared to help  select  ground-water  fate and
     transport models for quick assessments as well as for detailed analyses.

    The EAG is conducting experimental studies to investigate  the migration characteristics  of
     concentrated organics in ground water for use in developing two-phase transport models.
                                              v-n

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                     Hazardous Waste Engineering Research Laboratory
             Office of Environmental Engineering  and Technology Demonstration
                           U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                          26 W. St. Clair, Cincinnati, Ohio 45268
                               FTS 684-7418, (513) 569-7418
     The  Hazardous Waste  Engineering Research Laboratory (HWERL) ground-water research
programs, conducted by the Land Pollution Control Division, concentrate on developing methods
to prevent the contamination of ground water by controlling surface pollutant sources.  HWERL
research and technical assistance programs  fall into three major areas:

    Land disposal technology development including research on cover systems, waste leaching,
     waste solidification and stabilization, flexible membrane  liners,  clay  soil  liners,  construc-
     tion  quality assurance  and quality control,  expert systems, and  "Subtitle D"  facility waste
     characterization.

    Remedial-technology development  and  technical assistance, including  Superfund site  and
     situation  assessments, verification of remedial  action  design and implementation projects,
     development  of  on-site  cleanup  and  in-situ  treatment  technologies,  development of
     personnel protection   techniques,  and  other  technical assistance services  necessary to
     support an increasingly field-oriented program.

    Prevention and  control of hazardous releases including development of  technologies to
     allow emergency response  personnel  to prevent,  contain, and clean up hazardous releases,
     and  development  of  technologies for  the prevention  and  control  of  releases from
     underground  storage tanks.
                                    OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR
                                      HWERL-Cincinnati, OH
ALTERNATIVE TECHNOLOGIES
         DIVISION

   THERMAL DESTRUCTION
         BRANCH

       CHEMICAL AND
        BIOLOGICAL
   DETOXIFICATION BRANCH
LAND POLLUTION CONTROL
        DIVISION

      CONTAINMENT
        BRANCH

    RELEASES CONTROL
        BRANCH    '
                                         V-12

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                          Water Engineering Research Laboratory
             Office of Environmental Engineering and Technology Demonstration
                           U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                          26 W. St.  Clair, Cincinnati, Ohio 45268
                               FTS 684-7951, (513) 569-7951

     The  Drinking Water Research  Division of the  Water  Engineering Research  Laboratory
(WERL) conducts research on new or improved technologies needed  for regulating the treatment
of drinking water.  This  includes laboratory and pilot-scale studies and  field-scale evaluations
of processes for removing organic, inorganic, microbial, paniculate,  and radionuclide contamin-
ants.  Capital, operating, and  maintenance costs are compiled for various unit processes and
treatment  trains to  permit  analyses  of the cost-effectiveness of  proposed systems.   Large,
centralized treatment systems, small systems, and  individual  point-of-entry units are analyzed.
                                      OFFICE OF THE DIRECTOR
                                        WERL-Cincinnati. OH
       DRINKING WATER
      RESEARCH DIVISION

         PHYSICAL AND
          CHEMICAL
       TREATMENT BRANCH

       MICROBIOLOGICAL
       TREATMENT BRANCH
 INDUSTRIAL WASTES
     AND TOXICS
TECHNOLOGY DIVISION

    CHEMICALS AND
      CHEMICAL
   PRODUCTS BRANCH

 MANUFACTURING AND
  SERVICE INDUSTRIES
       BRANCH
   WASTEWATER
RESEARCH DIVISION

   SYSTEMS AND
   ENGINEERING
EVALUATION BRANCH

   TECHNOLOGY
ASSESSMENT BRANCH
                                              V-13

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3.  TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE CONTACTS BY RESEARCH FACILITY
                      V-14

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        ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING SYSTEMS LABORATORY - LAS VEGAS
Jane Denne
     Aquatic and Subsurface Monitoring Branch
     FTS 545-2655
     702-798-2655

Joe D'Lugosz
     Aquatic and Subsurface Monitoring Branch
     FTS 545-2598
     702-798-2598
 t
Phil Durgin
     Aquatic and Subsurface Monitoring Branch
     FTS 545-2623
     702-798-2623

Larry Eccles
     Aquatic and Subsurface Monitoring Branch
     FTS 545-2385
 .   702-798-2385

Eric Koglin
     Aquatic and Subsurface Monitoring Branch
     FTS 545-2432
     702-798-2432

Aldo Mazzella
     Aquatic and Subsurface Monitoring Branch
     FTS 545-2254
     702-798-2254

Charles O. Morgan
     Aquatic and Subsurface Monitoring Branch
     FTS 798-2389
     702-798-2389

Ann Pitchford
     Aquatic and Subsurface Monitoring Branch
     FTS 545-2366
     702-798-2366

R. Rajagopal
     Aquatic and Subsurface Monitoring Branch
     FTS 545-2358
     702-798-2358
Ken Scarbrough
Aquatic and Subsurface Monitoring Branch
    FTS 545-2645
    702-798-2645

Jeff van Ee
    Aquatic and Subsurface Monitoring Branch
    FTS 545-2367
    702-798-2367
Well construction
Sampling techniques
Hydrogeology
Soil gas monitoring
Vadose zone monitoring
In-situ monitoring methods
     development
Fractured bedrock
Well placement
Geographic Information System
     (CIS)

Geophysical methods devel/eval
CERCLA site investigation
Underground injection control
     monitoring

Hydrogeology
Data acquisition
Ground-water monitoring methods
     standardization/Quality Assurance
Indicator parameters/seasonal variation
Monitoring strategies

Resource management and
     economics
Mathematical modeling
Ground-water quality monitoring
     systems

Fluid levels in underground
     injection wells
Air Force technical support
Underground storage tank external
     leak-detection monitoring
                                           V-15

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John Worland
Aquatic and Subsurface Monitoring Branch
     FTS 545-2656
     702-798-2656
Training, technology transfer, and
     project management
            ROBERT S. KERR ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY
*Lowell Leach
     Applications and Assistance Branch
     FTS 743-2333
     405-332-8800

*Leon Myers
     Applications and Assistance Branch
     FTS 743-2202
     405-332-8800

'Marion (Dick) Scalf
     Applications and Assistance Branch
     FTS 743-2308
     405-332-8800

*Jerry Thornhill
     Applications and Assistance Branch
     FTS 743-2310
     405-332-8800

Bert Bledsoe
     Subsurface Processes Branch
     FTS 743-2324
     405-332-8800

Dermont Bouchard
     Subsurface Processes Branch
     FTS 743-2321
     405-332-8800

Don Clark
     Subsurface Processes Branch
     FTS 743-2311
     405-332-8800

Roger Cosby
     Subsurface Processes Branch
     FTS 743-2320
     405-332-8800
Subsurface sampling
Land treatment of wastewaters
Underground injection
Monitoring  .

Land treatment of hazardous wastes
Technical assistance
Technology transfer
Wellhead protection
Monitoring

Underground injection
Hydrogeological investigations
Inorganic analytical chemistry
Subsurface abiotic processes
Inorganic analytical chemistry
Organic analytical chemistry
     "The Applications and  Assistance Branch is the  focus for technical assistance and tech-
nology transfer in RSKERL.   When  calling  for technical  assistance, please  first  contact the
specialists in  the  Applications  and Assistance Branch  (listed first  and starred) who will either
answer your questions or direct you to the appropriate researcher.
                                      V-16

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William Dunlap
     Subsurface Processes Branch
     FTS 743-2314
     405-332-8800

Carl Enfield
     Subsurface Systems Branch
     FTS 743-2334
     405-332-8800

Jerry Jones
  1  Extramural Activities and Evaluation Branch
     FTS 743-2251
     405-332-8800

Michael Henson
     Subsurface Processes Branch
     FTS 743-2420
     405-332-8800

Don Kampbell
     Subsurface Systems Branch
     FTS 743-2332
     405-332-8800

John Matthews
     Subsurface Processes Branch
     FTS 743-2233
     405-332-8800

James McNabb
     Extramural Activities & Evaluation Branch
     FTS 743-2216
     405-332-8800

Fred Pfeffer
     Subsurface Systems Branch
     FTS 743-2305
     405-332-8800

Marvin Piwoni
     Subsurface Processes Branch
     FTS 743-2262
     405-332-8800

Thomas Short
     Subsurface Systems Branch
     FTS 743-2234
     405-332-8800

Garmon Smith
     Subsurface Processes Branch
     FTS 743-2316
     405-332-8800
Transport and fate v organics
Contaminant transpc. t modeling
Underground stora?.  tanks
Aquifer restoration
Water chemistry
Anaerobic biotransi rmations
Aquifer restoration
Soil chemistry
Toxicity testing
Land treatment of hazardous wastes
Extramural research management
Aquifer Restoration
Inorganic analytical cb- mis try
Subsurface abiotic processes
Contaminant transport modeling
Organic analytical chemistry
                                            V-17

-------
John Wilson
     Subsurface Processes Branch
     FTS 743-2259
     405-332-8800

Lynn Wood
     Subsurface Processes Branch
     FTS 743-2304
     405-332-8800

Marylynn Yates
     Subsurface Processes Branch
     FTS 743-2236
     405-332-8800

Scott Yates
     Subsurface Systems Branch
     FTS 743-2246
     405-332-8800
Subsurface microbiology
In-situ biorestoration
Subsurface abiotic processes
Virus transport
Contaminant transport modeling
               ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY - ATHENS
Leo V. Azarraga
     Chemistry Branch
     FTS 250-3453
     404-546-3453

George W. Bailey
     Chemistry Branch
     FTS 250-3307
     404-546-3307

David S. Brown
     Assessment Branch
     FTS 250-3310
     404-546-3310

Robert F. Carsel
     Assessment Branch
     FTS 250-3565
     404-546-3565

J. Jackson Ellington
     Measurements Branch
     FTS 250-3197
     404-546-3197

Fred F. Fong
     Assessment Branch
     FTS 250-3210
     404-546-3210

Chad T. Jafvert
     Chemistry Branch
     FTS 250-3349
     404-546-3349
Fate of metals
Fate of metals
Metal speciation
Transport and transformation of metals
Model applications
Uncertainty analysis
Hydrolysis rate constants
Chemical transformation rate
     measurement
Modeling multiphasic transport in
     porous media
Numerical analysis
Pollutant sorption-desorption
                                      V-18

-------
Heinz P. Kollig
     Measurements Branch
     FTS 250-3770
     404-546-3770

John M. McGuire
     Measurements Branch
     FTS 250-3185
     404-546-3185

Lee A. Mulkey
     Assessment Branch
     FTS 250-3476
     404-546-3476

John . Rogers
     Biology Branch
     FTS 250-3592
     404-546-3592

Charles N. Smith
     Assessment Branch
     FTS 250-3302
     404-546-3302

William C. Steen
     Measurements Branch
     FTS 250-3776
     404-546-3776

Eric J. Weber
     Chemistry  Branch
     FTS 250-3198
     404-546-3198

N. Lee Wolfe
     Chemistry  Branch
     FTS 250-3429
     404-546-3429
Rate constant data for pollutant-fate
     modeling
Multispectral identification of organic
     chemicals
Multimedia modeling and
     uncertainty analysis
Anaerobic biodegradation processes
Conduct of field studies
Analysis of monitoring data
Aerobic microbial transformation rate
     measurement
Pollutant degradation
Pollutant degradation
                          HOLCOMB RESEARCH INSTITUTE
               INTERNATIONAL GROUND WATER MODELING CENTER
Milovan S. Beljin
     Senior Research Assistant
     317-283-9458

Margaret A. Butorac
     Technical Program Assistant
     317-283-9458
Aly I. El-Kadi
     Research Scientist
     317-283-9458
Croundwater models
Software support
Model use

Short course coordination
Newsletter production
Publication & software
     distribution

Flow and transport modeling
Stochastic modeling
Training
                                           V-19

-------
Paul K.M. van der Heijde
     Director
     317-283-9458

Richard E. Rice
     Research Scientist
     317-283-9458

Stanley A. Williams
     Hydrologist
     317-283-9458
Groundwater modeling research and
     training
Ground-water chemistry
Hydrochemical modeling
Ground-water models
Software support
Model use
        ENVIRONMENTAL CRITERIA AND ASSESSMENT OFFICE - CINCINNATI
Randall J.F. Bruins
Systemic Toxicants Assessment Branch
     FTS 684-7539
     513-569-7539

Larry Fradkin
Systemic Toxicants Assessment Branch
     FTS 684-7584
     513-569-7584
Ground-water risk assessment
  methodologies
Ground-water risk assessment
  methodologies
                          EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT GROUP
Seong T. Hwang
     Exposure Assessment Group
     FTS 475-8919
     202-475-8919
John Schaum
     Exposure Assessment Group
     FTS 475-8920
     202-475-8920
Fate and transport modeling
Health risk assessment for ground-
  water contaminants
Selection of models  for exposure
  assessment
Analysis of monitoring data

Fate and transport modeling
Health risk assessment for ground-
  water contaminants
Selection of models  for exposure
  assessment
Analysis of monitoring data
           HAZARDOUS WASTE ENGINEERING RESEARCH LABORATORY
Douglas C. Ammon
     Remedial Action Staff
     FTS 684-7876
     513-569-7876

Naomi P. Barkley
     Remedial Action Staff
     FTS 684-7854
     513-569-7854
Remedial Investigation/Feasibility
  Study process
.Remedial action costs and modeling
Plume management
Building decontamination
Grouting
                                     V-20

-------
Edwin Earth
     Remedial Action Staff
     FTS 684-7875
     513-569-7875

Michael I. Black
     Remedial Action Staff
     FTS 684-7664
     513-569-7664

John Brugger
  k   Technology Development Staff
     FTS 340-6634
     201-321-6634

Paul dePercin
     Pollution Assessment Staff
     FTS 684-7797
     513-569-7797

G. Kenneth Dotson
     Pollution Assessment Staff
     FTS 684-7858
     513-569-7858

John Farlow
     Technology Development Staff
     FTS 340-6631
     201-321-6631

Richard Field
     Technology Development Staff
     FTS 340-6674
     210-321-6674

Uwe Frank
     Chemistry Staff
     FTS 340-6626
     201-321-6626

Frank Freestone
     Technology Evaluation Staff
     FTS 340-6632
     201-321-6632

Daniel G. Greathouse
     Pollution Control Staff
     FTS 684-7859
     513-569-7859

Richard Griffiths
     Technology Development Staff
     FTS 340-6629
     201-321-6629
Stabilization/fixation
Gas works site
Physical, chemical, biological,
  and thermal treatment
Contaminated ground-water control
Volatile emissions
Fugitive dust control
Stabilization/fixation
Soil liners
Underground storage tanks (UST)
  hazardous release technology
UST reportable quantity technology
Ground-water hydraulics
Chemical analysis
Soil-water chemistry
On-site technology
Superfund Innovative Technology
Evaluation (SITE) program
Expert systems
Statistical design and analysis
OHMSETT* facility, oil spill
  technology
Water chemistry
     "Oil and Hazardous Materials Simulated Environmental Test Tank.
                                            V-21

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Walter G. Grube, Jr.
     Pollution Assessment Staff
     FTS 684-7798
     513-569-7798

Michael Gruenfeld
     Chemistry Staff
     FTS 340-6625
     201-321-6625

Eugene F. Harris
     Land Pollution Control Division
     FTS 684-7838
     513-569-7838

Robert P. Hartley
     Pollution Control Division
     FTS 684-7838
     513-569-7838

Ronald D. Hill
     Land Pollution Control Division
     FTS 684-7861
     513-569-7861

Robert Hillger
     Technology Development Staff
     FTS 340-6639
     201-321-6639

Jonathan G. Herrmann
     Pollution Control Staff
     FTS 684-7839
     513-569-7839

Janet M. Houthoofd
     Remedial Action Staff
     FTS 684-7863
     513-569-7863

Stephen C. James
     Land Pollution Control Division
     FTS 684-7877
     513-569-7877

Robert E. Landreth
     Pollution Control Staff
     FTS 684-7836
     513-569-7836

Norma Lewis
     Land Pollution Control Division
     FTS 684-7877
     513-569-7877
Slurry walls
Soil and admixture liners
Hydraulic conductivity
Chemical analysis
Personnel protection
Soil-water chemistry
Mining sites
Technical Assistance
Large-volume wastes
Covers
Flexible membrane liners
Superfund Innovative Technology
  Evaluation (SITE) program
In-Situ Treatment
Underground storage tank
  technology
Sorbents
Electrokinetics
Construction QA/QC
Mine storage
Superfund Innovative Technology
  Evaluation (SITE) program
Flexible membrane liners
Municipal solid waste
Expert systems
Superfund Innovative Technology
  Evaluation (SITE) program
                                      V-22

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Ronald F. Lewis
     Remedial Action Staff
     FTS 684-7856
     513-569-7856

Hugh Masters
     Technology Evaluation Staff
     FTS 340-6678
     201-321-6678

Charles J. Moench, Jr.
  v   Pollution Control Staff
     FTS 684-7819
     513-569-7819

Charles I. Mashni
     Pollution Assessment Staff
     FTS 684-7857
     513-569-7857

Edward J. Opatken
     Remedial Action Staff
     FTS 684-7855
     513-569-7855

Mike H.  Roulier
     Pollution Assessment Staff
     FTS 684-7796
     513-569-7796

Michael Royer
     Chemistry  Staff
     FTS 340-6633
     201-321-6633

Donald E. Sanning
     Remedial Action Staff
     FTS 684-7875
     513-569-7875

Norbert B. Schomaker
     Containment Branch
     FTS 684-7871
     513-569-7871

Mary Stinson
     Technology Evaluation Staff
     FTS 340-6683
     201-321-6683

Anthony  Tafuri
     Technology Development Staff
     FTS 340-6604
     201-321-6604
Biodegradation technology
Soil contamination
UST canine olfaction technology
Technical Information Exchange
  (TIX)
Municipal solid waste leaching
Municipal solidwsate combustion
  residue
Hazardous waste leachates
Thermoplastics
Ion exchange
Leachate treatment
Soil liners
Waste leaching
Personnel protection
Remedial action
Uncontrolled sites
In-situ treatment
Hazardous waste land disposal
Municipal solid waste
Superfund Innovative Technology
  Evaluation (SITE) program
UST technology
In-situ treatment processes
                                            V-23

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Richard Traver
     Technology Evaluation Staff
     FTS 340-6677
     201-321-6677

Ira Wilder
     Releases Control Branch
     FTS 340-6635
     201-321-6635

Carlton C. Wiles
     Pollution Assessment Staff
     FTS 684-7795
     513-569-7795

James Yezzi, Jr.
     Technology Evaluation Staff
     FTS 340-6703
     201-321-6703
Mobile, on-site, in-situ treatment
  technology
Waste site hazardous releases
Solidification, stabilization, fixation,
  and encapsulation
Surface impoundments
Municipal solid wastes

Mobile treatment technology
                   WATER ENGINEERING RESEARCH LABORATORY
Robert M. Clark
     Director, Drinking Water Research Division
     FTS 684-7201
     513-569-7201

Walter A. Feige
     Drinking Water Research Division
     FTS 684-7496
     513-569-7496

Kim R. Fox
     Inorganics and Paniculate Control Branch
     FTS 684-7820
     513-569-7820

Carol Ann Fronk
     Organics Control Branch
     FTS 684-7592
     513-569-7592

James A. Goodrich
     Systems and Cost Evaluation Staff
     FTS 684-7605
     513-569-7605

Richard P. Lauch
     Inorganics and Particulate Control Branch
     FTS 684-7237
     513-569-7237

Benjamin W. Lykins, Jr.
     Systems and Cost Evaluation Staff
     FTS 684-7460
     513-569-7460
Treatment technology cost
  estimation
Organic treatment processes
Radionuclide treatment processes
Organic treatment processes
Modeling
Radium and nitrate treatment
processes
Organic treatment processes
                                     V-24

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Richard Miltner
     Organics Control Branch
     FTS 684-7403
     513-569-7403

Thomas J. Sorg
     Inorganics and Particulate Control Branch
     FTS 684-7370
     513-569-7370
         Organic treatment processes
         Inorganic treatment processes
V-25

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4.  TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE CONTACTS BY SUBJECT
                 V-26

-------
Subiect
 Name
 Office
FTC
Commercial
Aquifer restoration
Biodegradation

In-situ

Biodegradation


John Wilson
Michael Henson
Jerry Jones
James McNabb
Ron Lewis
John Wilson

RSKERL
RSKERL
RSKERL
RSKERL
HWERL
RSKERL

743-2259
743-2420
743-2251
743-2216
684-7856
743-2259

405-332-8800
405-332-8800
405-332-8800
405-332-8800
513-569-7856
405-332-8800
Chemistry
     Analytical chemistry
       Inorganic
       Organic

     Chemical analysis

       Multispectral
     Ground-water
     Soil chemistry
     Soil-water chemistry

     Transformation rates

     Water chemistry
Bert Bledsoe
Don Clark
Fred Pfeffer
Roger Cosby
Gannon Smith
Uwe Frank
Michael Gruenfeld
John McGuire
Richard Rice
Don Kampbell
Uwe Frank
Michael Gruenfeld
Jack Ellington
Heinz Kollig
Richard Griffiths
Jerry Jones
RSKERL
RSKERL
RSKERL
RSKERL
RSKERL
HWERL
HWERL
ERL-Ath
IGWMC
RSKERL
HWERL
HWERL
ERL-Ath
ERL-Ath
HWERL
RSKERL
743-2324
743-2311
743-2305
743-2320
743-2316
340-6626
340-6625
250-3185

743-2332
340-6626
340-6625
250-3197
250-3770
340-6629
743-2251
405-332-8800
405-332-8800
405-332-8800
405-332-8800
405-332-8800
201-321-6626
201-321-6625
404-546-3185
317-283-9458
405-332-8800
201-321-6626
201-321-6625
404-546-3210
404-546-3770
201-321-6629
405-332-8800
Control of Contaminated
 ground water
John Brugger
HWERL    340-6634  201-321-6634
Contaminant source control
     Covers
     Construction QA/QC
     Gas works site
     Flexible membrane
      liners

     Fugitive dust control
     Hazardous waste land
      disposal
     Mining sites
     Municipal solid waste
     Slurry walls
     Soil liners
     Underground Storage
      Tanks (UST)
Robert Hartley
Jonathan G. Herrmann
Michael Black
Robert Hartley
Robert Landreth
Paul dePercin
Norbert Schomaker
Eugene Harris
Robert Landreth
Charles Moench, Jr.
Norbert Schomaker
Walter Grube, Jr.
G. Kenneth Dotson
Walter Grube, Jr.
Mike Roulier
John Farlow
Richard Field
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
684-7838
684-7839
684-7664
684-7838
684-7836
684-7797
684-7871
684-7838
684-7836
684-7819
684-7871
684-7798
684-7858
684-7798
684-7796
340-6631
340-6674
513-569-7838
513-569-7839
513-569-7664
513-569-7838
513-569-7836
513-569-7797
513-569-7871
513-569-7838
513-569-7836
513-569-7857
513-569-7871
513-569-7798
513-569-7858
513-569-7798
513-569-7796
201-321-6631
210-321-6674
                                            V-27

-------
Subject
  Name
 Office.
FTS
Commercial
Contaminant source control (Cont.)
                               Robert Hillger         HWERL    340-6639
                               Anthony Tafuri        HWERL    340-6604
                               Jerry Jones            RSKERL   743-2251
       canine olfaction           Hugh Masters         HWERL    340-6678
     Waste leaching              Mike Roulier          HWERL    684-7796
     Wastewater land treatment   Lowell Leach          RSKERL   743-2333
     Volatile emissions           Paul dePercin          HWERL    684-7797
                                           201-321-6639
                                           201-321-6604
                                           405-332-8800
                                           201-321-6678
                                           513-569-7796
                                           405-332-8800
                                           513-569-7797
Fate of contaminants
     Anaerobic
      biodegradation
      biotransformations
     Degradation

     Metals
     Metals speciation
     Organics
     Pesticide field
      studies
     Sorption/desorption
.John Rogers
 Michael Henson
 Eric Weber
 N. Lee Wolfe
 Bert Bledsoe
 Leo Azarraga
 George Bailey
 David Brown
 William Dunlap

 Charles Smith
 Chad Jafvert
ERL-Ath
RSKERL
ERL-Ath
ERL-Ath
RSKERL
ERL-Ath
ERL-Ath
ERL-Ath
RSKERL
ERL-Ath
ERL-Ath
250-3592
743-2420
250-3198
250-3429
743-2324
250-3453
250-3307
250-3310
743-2314
250-3302
250-3349
404-546-3592
405-332-8800
404-546-3198
404-546-3429
405-332-8800
404-546-3453
404-546-3307
404-546-3310
405-332-8800
404-546-3302
404-546-3349
Geographic Information
 System
 Eric Koglin
EMSL-LV  545-2432   702-798-2432
Ground-water hydraulics
     Hydraulic
      conductivity
 Richard Field

 Walter Grube Jr.
HWERL    340-6674   210-321-6674

HWERL    684-7798   513-569-7798
Hydrogeology
 Joe D'Lugosz
 Jerry Thornhill
 Charles Morgan
EMSL-LV  545-2598   702-798-2598
RSKERL   743-2310   405-332-8800
EMSL-LV  545-2389   702-798-2389
Hydrolysis rate constants
 J.J. Ellington
ERL-Ath   250-3197   404-546-3197
Injection wells

     Monitoring
 Lowell Leach
 Jerry Thornhill
 Aldo Mazzella
 Ken Scarbrough
RSKERL   743-2333   405-332-8800
RSKERL   743-2310   405-332-8800
EMSL-LV  545-2254   702-798-2254
EMSL-LV  545-2645   702-798-2645
International Ground Water
 Modeling Center
     Courses, publications
     Software support
 Margaret Butorac
 Milovan Beljin
 Stanley Williams
IGWMC
IGWMC
IGWMC
         317-283-9458
         317-283-9458
         317-283-9458
                                     V-28

-------
Subject
 Name
 Office
FTS
Commercial
Large-Volume Wastes
Eugene Harris
HWERL    684-7862  513-569-7862
Microbiology
John Wilson
RSKERL   743-2259  405-332-8800
Mining
S. Jackson Hubbard    HWERL    684-7502   513-569-7502
Modeling


Applications
Contaminant fate

treatment
transport




porous media
Exposure assessment

Flow and transport
Hydrochemical
Mathematical

Model use

Multimedia
Research
Pollutant rate constants
Stochastic
Training

Monitoring

Analysis of data


CERCLA site investigation
Data acquisition
Fractured bedrock
Indicator parameters
Injection wells

In-situ methods
Geophysical methods
Method standards/QA
Sampling techniques

Soil Gas
Douglas Ammon
Milovan Beljin
Stanley Williams
Robert Carsel
Seong Hwang
John Schaum
James Goodrich
Carl Enfield
Seong Hwang
John Schaum
Thomas Short
Scott Yates
Fred Fong
Seong Hwang
John Schaum
Aly I. El-Kadi
Richard Rice
R. Rajagopal
Fred Fong
Milovan Beljin
Stanley Williams
Lee Mulkey
Paul van der Heijde
Heinz Kollig
Aly I. El-Kadi
Aly I. El-Kadi
Paul van der Heijde

Lowell Leach
Seong Hwang
John Schaum
Charles Smith
Aldo Mazzella
Charles Morgan
Eric Koglin
Anne Pitchford
Aldo Mazzella
Ken Scarbrough
Larry Eccles
Aldo Mazzella
Ann Pitchford
Jane Denne
Marion (Dick) Scalf
Phil Durgin
HWERL
IGWMC
IGWMC
ERL-Ath
EAG
EAG
WERL
RSKERL
EAG
EAG
RSKERL
RSKERL
ERL-Ath
EAG
EAG
IGWMC
IGWMC
EMSL-LV
ERL-Ath
IGWMC
IGWMC
ERL-Ath
IGWMC
ERL-Ath
IGWMC
IGWMC
IGWMC

RSKERL
EAG
EAG
ERL-Ath
EMSL-LV
EMSL-LV
EMSL-LV
EMSL-LV
EMSL-LV
EMSL-LV
EMSL-LV
EMSL-LV
EMSL-LV
EMSL-LV
RSKERL
EMSL-LV
684-7876


250-3565
475-8919
475-8920
684-7605
743-2334
475-8919
475-8920
743-2234
743-2246
250-3210
475-8919
475-8920


545-2358
250-3210


250-3476

250-3770




743-2333
475-8919
475-8920
250-3302
545-2254
545-2389
545-2432
545-2366
545-2254
545-2645
545-2385
545-2254
545-2366
545-2655
743-2308
545-2623
513-569-7876
317-283-9458
317-283-9458
404-546-3565
202-475-8919
202-475-8920
513-569-7605
405-332-8800
202-475-8919
202-475-8920
405-332-8800
405-332-8800
404-546-3210
202-475-8919
202-475-8920
317-283-9458
317-283-9458
702-798-2358
404-546-3210
312-283-9458
317-283-9458
404-546-3476
317-283-9458
404-546-3770
317-283-9458
317-283-9458
317-283-9458

405-332-8800
202-475-8919
202-475-8920
404-546-3302
702-798-2254
702-798-2389
702-798-2432
702-798-2366
702-798-2254
702-798-2645
702-798-2385
702-798-2254
702-798-2366
702-798-2655
405-332-8800
702-798-2623
                                          V-29

-------
Subject
 Name
 Office
FTS
Commercial
Monitoring (Cont.)
Systems
Technology transfer
UST external leak
detection
Vadose Zone
Well construction
Well placement

R. Rajagopal
John Worland

Jeff van Ee
Larry Eccles
Jane Denne
Eric Koglin

EMSL-LV
EMSL-LV

EMSL-LV
EMSL-LV
EMSL-LV
EMSL-LV

545-2358
545-2656

545-2367
545-2385
545-2655
545-2432

702-798-2358
702-798-2656

702-798-2367
702-798-2385
702-798-2655
702-798-2432
Oil & Hazardous Materials
 Simulated Environ. Test Tank
Richard Griffiths
HWERL    340-6629   201-321-6629
Pesticides
     Field studies
Charles Smith
ERL-Ath   250-3302   404-546-3302
Remedial action

     Biodegradation

     Building decontamination
     Electrokinetics
     In-situ treatment

       Mobile

     Ion exchange
     Land treatment of
      hazardous wastes

     Leachate treatment
     Mine storage
     Oil spill technology
     On-site technology
     Personnel protection

     Plume management
     Construction QA/QC
     Soil contamination
     Sorbents

     Stabilization/
      fixation
     Technical information
      Exchange
     Thermoplastics
     Treatment

     Uncontrolled sites
     Waste site releases
Douglas Ammon
Donald Sanning
John Wilson
Ronald Lewis
Naomi Barkley
Jonathan Herrmann
Ronald Hill
Donald Sanning
Richard Traver
James Yezzi, Jr.
Edward Opatken

John Matthews
Leon Myers
Edward Opatken
Janet Houthoofd
Richard Griffiths
Frank Freestone
Michael Gruenfeld
Michael Royer
Naomi Barkley
Jonathan Herrmann
Ronald Lewis
Paul dePercin
Jonathan Herrmann
Edwin Barth
Janet Houthoofd
Charles Mashni
Carlton Wiles

Hugh  Masters
Edward Opatken
John Brugger
John Wilson
Donald Sanning
Ira Wilder
HWERL
HWERL
RSKERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
RSKERL
RSKERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
RSKERL
HWERL
HWERL
684-7876
684-7875
743-2259
684-7856
684-7854
684-7863
684-7861
684-7875
340-6677
340-6703
684-7855
743-2233
743-2202
684-7855
684-7863
340-6629
340-6632
340-6625
340-6633
684-7854
684-7839
684-7856
684-7797
684-7839
684-7875
684-7863
684-7857
684-7795
340-6678
684-7855
340-6634
743-2259
684-7875
340-6635
513-569-7876
513-569-7875
405-332-8800
513-569-7856
513-569-7854
513-569-7863
513-569-7861
513-569-7875
201-321-6677
201-321-6703
513-569-7855
405-332-8800
405-332-8800
513-569-7855
513-569-7863
201-321-6629
201-321-6632
201-321-6625
201-321-6633
513-569-7854
513-569-7839
513-569-7856
513-569-7797
513-569-7839
513-569-<7875
513-569-7863
513-569-7857
513-569-7795
210-321-6678
513-569-7855
201-321-6634
405-332-8800
513-569-7875
201-321-6635
                                      V-30

-------
Subiect
 Name
 Office
 FTS
 Commercial
Rate constants
Heinz Kollig
ERL-Ath   250-3770  404-546-3770
Resource management/economics  R. Rajagopal
                     EMSL-LV  545-2358   702-798-2358
Risk assessment

     Health
Randall Bruins
Larry Fradkin
Seong Hwang
John Schaum
ECAO-CIN 684-7539  513-569-7539
ECAO-CIN 684-7584  513-569-7584
EAG       475-8919  202-475-8919
EAG       475-8920  202-475-8920
SITE (Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation Program)
                              Frank Freestone       HWERL    340-6632
                              Ronald Hill           HWERL    684-7861
                              Stephen James        HWERL    684-7877
                              Norma Lewis         HWERL    684-7877
                              Mary Stinson         HWERL    340-6683
                                         201-321-6632
                                         513-569-7861
                                         513-569-7877
                                         513-569-7877
                                         201-321-6683
Soil chemistry
Don Kampbell
RSKERL   743-2332  405-332-8800
Soil-water chemistry
Statistical design
 and analysis
Uwe Frank           HWERL    340-6626  201-321-6626
Michael Gruenfeld     HWERL    340-6625  201-321-6625
Daniel Greathouse      HWERL    684-7859  201-569-7859
Subsurface abiotic processes
Dermont Bouchard
Marvin Piwoni
Lynn Wood
RSKERL   743-2321   405-332-8800
RSKERL   742-2262   405-332-8800
RSKERL   743-2304   405-332-8800
Subsurface microbiology


Subsurface sampling
John Wilson
Jane Denne
Lowell Leach
RSKERL   743-2259  405-332-8800
EMSL-LV  545-2655  702-798-2655
RSKERL   743-2333  405-332-8800
Testing for toxicity
John Mathews
RSKERL   743-2233   405-332-8800
Transport of contaminants
    Metals
    Modeling
      porous media
    Organics
    Viruses
David Brown
Carl Enfield
Thomas Short
Scott Yates
Fred Fong
William Dunlap
Marylynn Yates
ERL-Ath
RSKERL
RSKERL
RSKERL
ERL-Ath
RSKERL
RSKERL
250-3310
743-2334
743-2234
743-2246
250-3210
743-2314
743-2236
404-546-3310
405-332-8800
405-332-8800
405-332-8800
404-546-3210
405-332-8800
405-332-8800
                                         V-31

-------
Subiect
 Name
 Office
FTS
Commercial
Treatment
Inorganic processes
In- situ biorestoration
Modeling
Nitrate processes
Organic processes



Radionuclides
Radium processes
Technology costs
Uncertainty analysis

Underground Storage Tanks
Tank leakage




Canine olfaction
John Brugger
Thomas Sorg
John Wilson
James Goodrich
Richard Lauch
Walter Feige
Carol Ann Fronk
Benjamin Lykins, Jr.
Richard Miltner
Kim Fox
Richard Lauch
Robert Clark
Robert Carsel
Lee Mulkey
(UST)
John Farlow
Richard Field
Robert Hillger
Anthony Tafuri
Jerry Jones
Hugh Masters
HWERL
WERL
RSKERL
WERL
WERL
WERL
WERL
WERL
WERL
WERL
WERL
WERL
ERL-Ath
ERL-Ath

HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
HWERL
RSKERL
HWERL
340-6634
684-7370
743-2259
684-7605
684-7237
684-7496
684-7592
684-7460
684-7403
684-7820
684-7237
684-7201
250-3565
250-3476

340-6631
340-6674
340-6639
340-6604
743-2251
340-6678
201-321-6634
513-569-7370
405-332-8800
513-569-7605
513-569-7237
513-569-7496
513-569-7592
513-569-7460
513-569-7403
513-569-7820
513-569-7237
513-569-7201
404-546-3565
404-546-3476

201-321-6631
210-321-6674
201-321-6639
201-321-6604
405-332-8800
201-321-6678
     External leak
      detection monitoring
Jeff van Ee
EMSL-LV  545-2367  702-798-2367
Wellhead Protection
Marion (Dick) Scalf    RSKERL   743-2308   405-332-8800
                                     V-32

-------
5. PROGRAM OFFICE AND REGIONAL OFFICE CONTACTS
                  V-34

-------
                                OFFICE OF WATER

                           OFFICE OF DRINKING WATER

Franfoise Brasier                                   Underground Injection Control
     Land Disposal Restrictions Task Force              (UIC)
     FTS 382-5508
     202-382-5508

                     OFFICE OF GROUND-WATER PROTECTION

Nofbert Dee                                       Ground-Water Protection Strategy
     Data Management and Research Liaison Staff
     FTS 382-7077
     202-382-7077
              OFFICE OF SOLID WASTE AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE

                            OFFICE OF SOLID WASTE

Jeanette Hansen                                    RCRA Monitoring Requirements
    Permits and State Programs Division
    FTS 382-4754
    202-382-4754

Amy Mills                                        RCRA Monitoring Requirements
    Permits and State Programs Division
    FTS 382-3298, -2224
    202-382-3298, -2224

James Bachmaier                                   RCRA Regulations/Technical
    Waste Management Division                       Guidance Documents
    FTS 382-4679
    202-382-4679

Vernon Meyers                                    RCRA Regulations/Technical
    Waste Management Division                       Guidance Documents
    FTS 382-4685
    202-382-4685

Zubair Saleem                                     Ground-Water Modeling
    Characterization and Assessment Division
    FTS 382-4809
    202-382-4809

                OFFICE OF EMERGENCY AND REMEDIAL RESPONSE

Philip D. Jalbert                                   CERCLA Ground-Water Coordinator
    Policy and Analysis Staff
    FTS 382-2865
    202-382-2865

Marlene Berg
    Hazardous Site Control Division                  Superfund Remedial Analysis
    FTS 382-2339
    202-382-2339


                                         V-35

-------
Paul M. Beam
    Hazardous Site Control Division
    FTS 475-8106
    202-475-8106
                        Discovery and Investigation,
                         Monitoring Well Construction
                   OFFICE OF UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS
Richard Valentinetti
     Corrective Actions Staff
     FTS 382-4758
     202-382-4758
                        Underground Storage Tanks
                   OFFICE OF WASTE PROGRAMS ENFORCEMENT
Ron G. Wilhelm
    Technical Support Branch
    FTS 382-4847
    202-382-4847

Kenneth Jennings
    Guidance and Evaluation Branch
    FTS 475-9374
    202-475-9374
                        CERCLA Enforcement
                        RCRA Enforcement
                        Technical Enforcement Guidance
                         Document
                 OFFICE OF PESTICIDES AND TOXIC SUBSTANCES

                        OFFICE OF PESTICIDE PROGRAMS
Stephen L. Johnson
     Hazard Evaluation Division
     FTS 557-7695
     202-557-7695

Matthew Lorber
     Evaluation Division
     FTS 557-7328
     202-557-7328

Catherine Eiden
     Hazard Evaluation Division
     FTS 557-5734
     202-557-2243
                        Science Advisor
                        Pesticides Ground-Water Team Hazard
                         Leader
                        Pesticides Exposure Assessment
Karen Hammerstrom
    Exposure Evaluation Division
    FTS 382-3922
    202-382-3922

Annett Nold
    Exposure Evaluation Division
    FTS 382-3930
    202-382-3930
OFFICE OF TOXIC SUBSTANCES

                        TSCA Ground-Water Coordinator
                        TSCA Ground-Water Modeling
                                    V-36

-------
Loren Hall                                         TSCA Data Bases
     Exposure Evaluation Division
     FTS 382-3931
     202-382-3931
                                     REGION I
                           Environmental Protection Agency
                           John F. Kennedy Federal Building
                                     Room 2203
                                 Boston, MA  02203
   i
     Connecticut  Maine  Massachusetts  New Hampshire  Rhode Island  Vermont

George Furst                                       RCRA
     Waste Management Division
     Massachusetts Waste Management Branch
     FTS 223-1926
     617-223-1926

David Lang                                        CERCLA
     Waste Management Division
     VT, RI, and NH Waste Management Branch
     FTS 835-3662
     617-565-3662

Joeseph N. DeCola                                  Ground-Water Protection
     Water Management Division
     Office of Ground Water Protection
     FTS 835-3599
     617-565-3599

Ray Tompson                                      Field Services
     Environmental Services Division
     Surveillance Branch
     FTS 861-6700
     617-861-6700
                                     REGION II
                           Environmental Protection Agency
                                  26 Federal Plaza
                                New York, NY  10278

                 New Jersey  New York  Puerto Rico  Virgin Islands

 Charles Anderson                                  RCRA
     Air and Waste Management Division
     Hazardous Waste Compliance Branch
     FTS 264-6143
     212-264-6143

Grant Kimmel                                      CERCLA
     Emergency and  Remedial Response Division
     FTS 264-7364
     212-264-7364
                                           V-37

-------
John Malleck                                       Ground-Water Protection
     Water Management Division
     Office of the Ground-Water Coordinator
     FTS 264-5635
     202-264-5635

Louis DiGuardia                                    Field Services
     Environmental Services Division
     Surveillance and Monitoring Branch
     FTS 340-6612
     201-321-6612
                                     REGION III
                            Environmental Protection Agency
                                  841 Chestnut Street
                                Philadelphia, PA  19107

              Delaware  Maryland  Pennsylvania  Virginia  West Virginia

Frank Quirus                                       RCRA
     Hazardous Waste Management Division
     Waste Management Branch
     FTS 597-3176
     215-597-3176

Mindi B. Snoparsky                                  CERCLA
     Hazardous Waste Management Division
     Superfund Branch
     FTS 597-1268
     215-597-1268

Tom Merski                                         Ground-Water Protection
     Water Management Division
     Water Supply Branch
     FTS 597-2786
     215-597-2786                                                      "

Gary Bryant                                        Field Services
     Environmental Services Division
     Wheeling  Field Office
     304-233-1271
                                     REGION IV
                            Environmental Protection Agency
                               345 Courtland Street, NE
                                  Atlanta, GA  30365

  Alabama  Florida  Georgia  Kentucky  Mississippi  North Carolina  South Carolina

Michael Arnette                                     RCRA
     Waste Management Division
     Residuals Management Branch
     FTS 257-3433
     404-347-3433
                                      V-38

-------
John Mann                                         CERCLA
     Waste Management Division
     Emergency and Remedial Response Branch
     FTS 257-2643
     404-347-3433

Gail Mitchell                                       Ground-Water Protection
     Water Management Division
     FTS 257-3866
   i  404-347-3866

Donald Hunter                                      Field Services
     Environmental Services Division
     Environmental Compliance Branch
     FTS 250-5414
     404-546-5414
                                     REGION V
                            Environmental Protection Agency
                               230 South Dearborn Street
                                  Chicago, IL  60604

               Illinois  Indiana  Michigan  Minnesota  Ohio  Wisconsin

Richard Traub                                      RCRA
     Waste Management Division
     Solid Waste Branch
     FTS 886-6136
     312-886-6136

Greg Vanderlaan                                    CERCLA
     Waste Management Division
     Emergency and Remedial Response Branch
     FTS 886-6217
     312-886-6217

Jerri-Anne Garl                                     Ground-Water Protection
     Water Division
     Office of Ground Water
     FTS 886-1490
     312-886-1490

John McGuire                                       Field Services
     Environmental Services Division
     Central District Office
     FTS 353-2704
     312-353-2704
                                           V-39

-------
                                    REGION VI
                           Environmental Protection Agency
                                   1201 Elm Street
                                  Dallas, TX  75270

                 Arkansas  Louisiana  New Mexico  Oklahoma  Texas

Deborah Vaughn-Wright                             RCRA
     Hazardous Waste Management Division
     Hazardous Waste Compliance Branch
     FTS 255-6790
     214-655-6790

Ruth Izraeli                                        CERCLA
     Hazardous Waste Management Division
     Superfund Enforcement Branch
     FTS 255-6735
     2J4-655-6735

Clay Chesney                                      Ground-Water Protection
     Water Management Division
     FTS 255-7160
     214-655-7160

Michael Michaud                                   Field Services
     Environmental Services Division
     Surveillance Branch
     FTS 255-6491
     214-655-6491
                                    REGION VII
                           Environmental Protection Agency
                                726 Minnesota Avenue
                               Kansas City, KS  66101

                         Iowa  Kansas  Missouri  Nebraska

Richard Young                                     RCRA
     Waste Management Division
     RCRA Branch
     FTS 757-2891
     913-236-2891

Kerry Herndon                                     CERCLA
     Waste Management Division
     Superfund Branch
     FTS 757-2856
     913-236-2856
J. Patrick Costello                                   Ground Water Protection
     Water Management Division
     Office of Groundwater Protection
     FTS 757-2815
     913-236-2815
                                     V-40

-------
Robert Dona                                        Field Services
     Environmental Services Division
     Environmental Monitoring and Compliance Branch
     FTS 757-3884
     913-236-3884
                                    REGION VIII
                            Environmental Protection Agency
                                  One Denver Place
                                    999 18th Street
   i                                   Suite 1300
                                  Denver, CO 80202

          Colorado  Montana  North Dakota  South Dakota  Utah  Wyoming

Donald Shosky                                      RCRA
    . Waste Management Division
     Hazardous Waste Branch
     FTS 564-1642
     303-293-1642

Paula Schmittdiel                                    CERCLA
     Waste Management Division
     Superfund Remedial Branch
     FTS 564-1518
     303-293-1518

Richard R. Long                                    Ground-Water Protection
     Water Management Division
     Office of Ground-Water Protection
     FTS 564-1542
     303-293-1542

Marshall Payne                                      Field Services
     Environmental Services Division
     Surveillance Branch
     FTS 776-5064
     303-236-5064
                                     REGION IX
                           Environmental Protection Agency
                                 215 Freemont Street
                               San Francisco, CA 94105

                    Arizona  California  Guam  Hawaii  Nevada

Hannibal Joma                                     RCRA
    Toxics and Waste Management Division
    Waste Programs Branch
    FTS 454-8926
    415-974-8926
                                           V-41

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Keith Takada
     Toxics and Waste Management Division           CERCLA
     Superfund Programs Branch
     FTS 454-8910
     415-974-8910

Patricia Eklund                                     Ground -Water Protection
     Water Management Division
     Office of Ground-Water Protection
     FTS 454-0831
     415-974-0831

Peter Rubenstein                                    Field Services
     Toxics and Waste Management Division
     Field Operations Branch
     FTS 454-0307
     415-974-0307
                                     REGION X
                            Environmental Protection Agency
                                  1200 Sixth Avenue
                                  Seattle, WA  98101

                         Alaska  Idaho  Oregon  Washington

Paul Day                                           RCRA
    Hazardous Waste Division                        CERCLA
    Waste Management Branch
    FTS 399-2867
    206-442-2867

Matthew Gubitosa                                   Ground-Water Protection
    Water Division
    Office of Ground-Water Protection
    FTS 399-1219
    206-442-1219

Rene Fuentes                                       Field Services
    Environmental Services Division
    Field Operations & Technical Support Branch
    FTS 399-1599
    206-442-1599
                                           U s  Environmental
                                           Reoion 5, Library (PL-**--/
                                           77W|acksoncBoulevard,12th
                                           Chicago, It
                                      V-42

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