903R91009
                          CBP/APR92 102
        CHESAPEAKE BAY
                   PROGRAM
         Annual Progress Report
                          1 '; ' '  ' ' " -" "-1 ."^e
                          ;   ' .. ... • i ^.source
                              :-.cet
                            .."3, PA 10107
           I
    The Waterfowl
    Workgroup
    Living Resources
    Subcommittee
           I	
                              1991
TD   ==============
225
. C54  Printed on Recycled Paper
W19
1991

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                                                x~
        Waterfowl Workgroup
 Living Resources  Subcommittee


       Annual Progress  Report
           Chesapeake Bay Program
                   1991
                              '"' '    ';i r;.,:,:i;cn /gency
                                  . ...ii-tion Resource
                                <• {;.''.-)
                              r  . • .'.Street
                              I   '.::j,FA 29107
Printed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for the Chesapeake Bay Program

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                  Annual Report of the Waterfowl Workgroup
       Living Resources Subcommittee, Chesapeake Bay Program - 1991

This report outlines the major accomplishments of the Waterfowl Workgroup in 1991.
The workgroup consists of biologists from both state and Federal agencies
representing the various interests in waterfowl management in the Chesapeake Bay
Region. The names of the members and agencies involved with the workgroup are
listed in Table 1.
HIGHLIGHTS

The Waterfowl Management Plan was completed in December of 1990.  Unfortunately,
the signing of the Plan at the Executive Council Meeting scheduled for early January
was canceled due to inclement weather.  When the signatures of the Executive Council
are obtained the plan will be printed and distributed.

The Workgroup met on three occasions in 1991.  The meetings of the Workgroup
have been keep to a minimum to allow members time to work on projects related to
the Plan. Two members of the workgroup resigned; David Krementz transferred, and
Pete Poulos was unable to make the commitment of time.  The following three
members were added to the Workgroup: Hal Laskowski, the Regional Biologist for
LJSFWS Refuges in Maryland and Virginia, Gary Costanzo of Virginia Department of
Game and Inland Fisheries, and Roland Limpert of Chesapeake Wildlife Heritage.

The major accomplishments of the Workgroup are listed below and all work is listed in
Appendix 1 in a tabular format.

Waterfowl Concentration Database - Biologists from all three states collected data
on the location and numbers of waterfowl concentrations during the Mid-winter
Waterfowl Surveys. The data was entered into a computerized database.
Computerized mapping capabilities have been developed.  Additional data will be
collected in 1992 and incorporated in an atlas which will be completed in the spring of
1992.

Impact of Hydraulic Clam Dredging on SAV - The waterfowl workgroup is
cooperating with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation's study to determine if the use of
hydraulic clam dredges is having a negative effect on SAV.  Preliminary results indicate
that further study is warranted.  As funds or personnel become available a study will be
initiated. The study will focus on three areas. 1. Determination of the areas and
severity of light reduction caused by suspended sediments;  2. Comparison of SAV
distribution and abundance in areas where clamming occurs and areas where it is
prohibited; 3. Determine the extent and effect of disturbance by hydraulic dredges on
SAV tubers throughout the year.

Develop Guidelines for Wetland Management and Farming Practices that Benefit
Waterfowl - A draft manual on  creation of impoundments for dabbling ducks was
written and is being reviewed.

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Develop New Educational Materials - Fact sheets on the Waterfowl Plan,
Canvasbacks, and Canada Geese were prepared.  A fact sheet on limiting the spread
of Phragmites is in preparation.

Status and Trends Report - A database was developed from the Mid-winter
Waterfowl Surveys which covers 1950 to 1991. This database will be used to produce
a status and trends report of Chesapeake Bay waterfowl with maps,  graphics, and
color photographs.

Determine the Effects of  Releasing Game Farm Mallards on  Wild Waterfowl
Populations - A study was initiated by Dr. Frank Rohwer to determine the survival rate
of released game farm mallards. The study was funded by the State of Maryland, the
U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and The Grand National Hunt Club.
OUTLOOK FOR 1992

The workgroup will proceed with the above projects and take on additional tasks as
time allows. Most projects are behind the schedule set by the Plan. With the current
funding levels and limited personnel it is clear that the implementation schedule was far
too optimistic. It is doubtful that the schedule can be gained upon, and most likely that
we will fall further behind.
Table 1.  Members of the Waterfowl Workgroup.
Doug Forsell, Chair        USFWS - Chesapeake Bay Estuary Program
Carin Bisland              USEPA - Chesapeake Bay Program
Gary Costanzo            Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries
John Dunn                Pennsylvania Game Commission
Dick Dyer                 USFWS - Regional. Coordinator. NAWMP
Steve Funderburk          USFWS - Chesapeake Bay Estuary Program
John Gill                  USFWS - Division of Ecology Service
Mike Haramis             USFWS-Patuxent Wildlife Research  Center
Fred Hartman             Pennsylvania Game Commission
Bill Harvey                Maryland Department of Natural Resources
Larry Hindman            Maryland Department of Natural Resources
Dick Jachowski            USFWS - Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Dennis Jorde              USFWS - Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Hal Laskowski             USRVS - Division of Refuges
Roland Limpert            Chesapeake Wildlife Heritage
Jerry Serie                USRVS - Office of Migratory Bird Management
Fax Settle                 Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries

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