-------
                   CONTENTS
Opening Statement - Murray Stein
Hon. Stewart L. Udall
H. W. Poston
Grover Cook
Loring P. Oeming
Ralph W. Purdy
Dr. E. W. Arnold
George Eagle
Blucher A. Poole
Walter A. Lyon
Dwight Metzler
Robert D. Hennlgan
Stanley  P. Spislak
Summary
PAGE
   3
   6
  10
  27
  71
  71
 203
 207
 472
 521
 523
 550
 557
                        *  *•  *

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                                                         2




                            ThirC meeting  in the Matter




of Pollution of the Waters of Lake Erie and its Tributaries,




convened at 10:05 a.m., on June 2.2., 1966, at the Statler-




Hilton Hotel, Cleveland, Ohio.









           PERMANENT CHAIRMAN:




               Mr. Murray Stein, Assistant Commissioner




           for Enforcement, Federal Water Pollution Control




           Administration, Department of the Interior








           CHAIRMAN, MORNING OF JUNE 22, 1966:




                Hon. Stewart L. Udall, Secretary of the Interior









           ALSO PRESENT:




                Hon. James M. Quigley, Commissioner', Federal




           Water  Pollution Control Administration








           CONFEREES:




                Mr. Blucher A.  Poole, Technical Secretary,




           Indiana Stream  Pollution Control Board




                Mr.  Loring  F. Oeming, Executive Secretary,




           Michigan  Water Resources Commission




                Mr.  Robert  D. Hennigan,  Director, Bureau of




           Water  Resources, State  of  New York




                Mr.  Dwight  Metzler, Deputy Commissioner, New



           York State  Department of Health

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                                          2-A






CONFEREES  (Continued):




   Mr. Robert W. Teater, Assistant Director,




Ohio Department of Natural Resources




   Dr. E. W.  Arnold,  Director, Ohio Department



of Health




   Mr. George Eagle, Chief Engineer, Ohio Depart-




ment of Health




   Mr. Walter A. Lyon, Director, Division of



Sanitary Engineering, Pennsylvania Department  of




Health




   Mr. Larry Miller, Sanitary Engineer for




Region 3 of Pennsylvania Department of Health




   Mr. H. W. Poston, Federal Water Pollution




Control Administration, Department of the Interior,




Chicago, Illinois
PARTICIPANTS:



   Grover Cook, Chief, Enforcement Activities,




Federal Water Pollution Control Administration,



Great Lakes Region




   Ralph W. Purdy, representing the Michigan




Water Resources Commission




   Dr. E.  W. Arnold,  Director, Ohio Department



of Health

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                                            2-B






PARTICIPANTS  (CONTINUED):




     Stanley  P. Spisiak, Representing the New York




State Conservation Council
OTHERS IN ATTENDANCE:




     Dr. Thomas Acker, Assistant  Professor of Biology,




  >hn Carroll University, University Heights, Ohio



     A. V. Agnew, Superintendent, Water and Sewage




Department, City of Lorain, Ohio



     Robert H. Anderson, Project  Manager, Stanly




Engineering, Cleveland, Ohio




     Mrs. James H. Angel, Chairman, Citizens for Land




and Water Use, League of Women Voters, Lakewood, Ohio




     H. Duane Applequist, Coordinator, The Standard




Oil Company, Cleveland, Ohio



     Joseph August, Manager, Sales Tech. Service, Sohio,



Cleveland, Ohio



     John Barrett, Superintendent, Westerly Water



Pollution Control Plant, Cleveland, Ohio




     G. G. Becher, Manager, Ernst & Ernst, Cleveland,




Ohio



     Ralph J. Bernhagen, State Geologist, Chief, Ohio




Division, Geological Survey, Ohio Department of Natural




Resources, Columbus, Ohio

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                                              2-C




OTHERS IN ATTENDANCE (CONTINUED):



     Stanley Berke, Shaker Heights, Ohio




     Jack P. Berry, District Manager, Nalco Chemical,



Solon, Ohio




     Louis F. Birkel, Superintendent, Water Management.,



Republic Steel, Cleveland, Ohio



     Charles Boatner, Assistant to the Secretary,




Director of Information, Department of the Interior,




Washington, D. C.



     Mrs, H. E. Boehm,  League of Women Voters, Cleveland,




Ohio



     A. D. Brandt, Manager, Industrial Health




Engineering, Bethlehem Steel Corporation, Bethlehem,




Pennsylvania



     Theodore E. Brenner, Research Director, The Soap



and Detergent Association, New York, New York



     David L. Burre, Sanitary Engineer, Federal Water



Pollution Control Administration, Cleveland, Ohio




     Daniel B. Burke, General Manager, Radio Station




WJR, Detroit, Michigan




     Charles R. Collier, Assistant District Chief,



United States Geological Survey, Columbus, Ohio




     Thomas Colpetzer,  Assistant Lake County Sanitary




Engineer, Painesville,  Ohio

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                                                   2-D




OTHERS IN ATTENDANCE  (CONTINUED):



     Frederick J. Condon, Research and Development,




International Pipe and Ceramics, Inc., Parsippany,




New Jersey




     Robert Cottrill, District Sanitary Engineer, Ohio




Department of Health, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio




     Richard S. Gray, Public Relations, Cleveland




Electric Illuminating Company, Cleveland, Ohio




     Hugh Danaceau, Reporter, Chagrin Palls, Ohio




     Charles Day, News Director, Radio Station WGAR,




Cleveland, Ohio




     R. J. Dougherty, Chief Sanitary Engineer, Radcoff




Associates, Cleveland, Ohio




     E. V. Ehrbar, Pollution Control Engineer, Lubrizol




Corporation, Wickliffe, Ohio




     Seba H. Estill, Izaak Walton League, Cleveland, Ohio




     John Co Everett, Chief, Plant Services Division,




NASA, Cleveland, Ohio




     Richard Forster, Senior Information Specialist,




New York State Health Department, Albany, New York




     Thomas G. Frangos, Executive Director, Michigan




State Legislative Committee on Water Resources Planning,




E. Lansing, Michigan




     Mary Pulmer, Engineer, Battelle, Columbus, Ohio




     John J. Garner, Lake County Sanitary Engineer,




Painesville, Ohio

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                                                   2-E



OTHERS IN ATTENDANCE  (CONTINUED):



     Mrs. David Garland, President, League of Women



Voters, Euclid, Ohio




     Mrs. Ira E. Garver, Treasurer, League of Women




Voters, Director, Cuyahoga River Reclamation Commission,



Citizens' Coordinating Committee, Cuyahoga Palls,  Ohio




     Carolyn Gazdik, Secretary, Federal Water Pollution



Control Administration, Cleveland, Ohio



     Walter E. Gerdel, Commissioner, Division of Water




Pollution Control, City of Cleveland, Ohio



     Thomas M. Gibson, Manager, Hudson Worthington




Associates, Hudson, Ohio




     Richard W. Gilbert, District Sanitary Engineer,




Ohio Department of Health, Cuyahoga Palls, Ohio




     James A. Gouck, Supervisor, Effluent Control,



Allied Chemical Corporation. Buffalo, New York



     Nicholas M. Graziano, Treasurer, Rand Development



Corporation, Cleveland, Ohio




     Stephen B. Hagenboom, Chemist, Man-Gill Chemical




Company, Euclid, Ohio



     G. A, Hall, Engineer-Secretary, Water Pollution




Control Board, Ohio Department of Health, Columbus, Ohio



     George Harlow, Director, Lake Huron Program Office,




Grosse lie, Michigan




     Robert P. Hartley, Oceanographer, Federal Water



Pollution Control Administration, Cleveland, Ohio

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                                                2-F




OTHERS IN ATTENDANCE  (CONTINUED):




     Richard D. Hall, Staff Engineer, Diamond Alkali



Company, Cleveland, Ohio




     Frank Hall, Federal Water Pollution Control



Administration, Chicago, Illinois




     Ted Heineman, Consulting Engineer, Mentor, Ohio



     G. LaMar Hubbs, Director, Lake Erie Program




Office, Cleveland, Ohio




     George W. Huber, Chemist, Cleveland Electric



Illuminating Company, Cleveland, Ohio




     Mrs. J. Louis Hanna, Water Resource Study Chairman,




League of Women Voters, Euclid, Ohio




     Lansing C. Hoskins, M.D., Committee on Pollution



of the Cleveland Academy of Medicine, Cuyahoga County




Medical Society, Cleveland, Ohio



     Paul A. Johnson, Water Quality Coordinator, City



of Akron, Ohio



     Cliff R. Hindman, Associate, Burgess & Niple, Ltd.,




Mentor, Ohio



     Phil Jones, News Editor, Radio Station WJR, Detroit,




Michigan



     Edward F, Kehoe, Administrative Assistant, Congress-




man M. A. Feighan, Cleveland, Ohio



     Jim Kerwln, Reporter, Detroit News, Detroit,




Michigan

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                                            2-G




OTHERS IN ATTENDANCE  (CONTINUED):




     F. W. Klttrell, Chief, Pollution Evaluation,



Federal Water Pollution Control Administration,



Cincinnati, Ohio



     K. L. Kollar, Director, Water Industries and



Engineering Services, United States Department of




Commerce, Washington, D. C.,




     Ray Kozlowski, News Editor, Radio Station WGAR,



Cleveland, Ohio




     Robert G. Klausner, Rackoff Associates, Cleveland,



Ohio




     Carole Kramer, Federal Water Pollution Control



Administration, Cleveland, Ohio




     Edward A. Kramer, Sanitary Engineer, Federal




Water Pollution Control Administration, Cleveland, Ohio



     Byron S. Krantz, Field Representative to Senator




Stephen M. Young, Cleveland, Ohio



     Lawrence R. Kumnick, Loss and Waste Control



Engineer, Sun Oil Company, Toledo, Ohio



     Frank Lectaks, Editorial Writer, WJW Radio arid




TV, Cleveland, Ohio




     Tom LaRochelle, Reporter, Akron Beacon Journal,




Northampton, Ohio




     Rosanne Light, Federal Water Pollution Control




Administration, Washington, D. C.

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                                                  2-H





OTHERS IN ATTENDANCE (CONTINUED):



     Mrs. George Lowry, League of Women Voters,



Euclid, Ohio




     James McDonald, Construction Program Representa-




tive, Federal Water Pollution Control Administration,




Chicago, Illinois



     Albert M. Lord, Senior Engineering Specialist,




TRW, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio



     Kenneth M. Mackenthun, Aquatic Biologist, Federal



Water Pollution Control Administration, Cincinnati,




Ohio




     D. R. Malthaner, Chief Metallurgist, General




Motors Corporation, Cleveland, Ohio




     John Mahoney, Reporter, WJW-TV, Cleveland, Ohio



     'Philip Q. Maiorana, Superintendent, City of




Loraln Sewage Treatment Plant, Lorain, Ohio



     Mrs. Don W. Maurus, League of Women Voters,



Wickliffe, Ohio



     Mrs. L. Merkle, Sr., League of Women Voters,




Cleveland, Ohio



     Steohen Megregian, Deputy Project Director, Great



Lakes-Illinois River Basins Project, Chicago, Illinois




     Mrs. Lillian Miller, Water Chairman, League of



Women Voters, Cleveland, Ohio

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                                                2-1




OTHERS IN ATTENDANCE  (CONTINUED):




     Hal Morgan, News Reporter, WJW Station,  Cleveland,



Ohio




     Henry Moss, Consultant, Monsanto Company, St.



Louis, Missouri




     Don Mortimer, Assistant Executive Secretary,




Academy of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio




     Barbara J. Nelson, Engineering Aide, Citizens




for Land and Water Use, Akron, Ohio




     George Newell, Engineer, Sewer Design, City of



Cleveland, Ohio




     Richard P. Noland, Principal Engineer, Burgess &




Niple, Ltd., Columbus, Ohio




     William E. Norris, Sanitary Engineer, Burgess &




Niple, Ltd., Columbus, Ohio



     Mary Nyests, Engineering Aide, Water Quality




Management, Akron, Ohio



     Mrs. Burks Oakley, League of Women Voters,



Cleveland, Ohio




     Dr. Paul Olynyk, Associate Professor, Cleveland



State University, Cleveland, Ohio




     Harriet Roth Parsons, Attorney, Willoughby, Ohio




     R. G. Paulette, Project Manager, Stanley Engineering




Company, Uscatine, Iowa



     Ben Phlegar, U.S. News & World Report, Detroit,




Michigan

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                                                  2-J




OTHERS IN ATTENDANCE  (CONTINUED):




     Rheta Piere, Federal Water Pollution Control



Administration, Washington, D. C.




     P. F. Pokorny, Optomestrist, Anti-Spraying



Committee, Cleveland, Ohio




     Ralph Porges, Deputy Chief, Technical Advisory




and Investigations, Federal Water Pollution Control




Administration, Cincinnati, Ohio




     G. D. Pratt, Sanitary Engineer, Federal Water



Pollution Control Administration, Cleveland, Ohio



     Mrs. A. R. Purins, Cleveland, Ohio




     H. J. Rand, President, Rand Development Corpora-



tion, Cleveland, Ohio




     Art Robinson, Public Relations Officer, Ohio




Department of Health, Columbus, Ohio



     John E. Richards, Engineer-in-Charge, Sewage



and Industrial Wastes, Ohio Department of Health,



Columbus, Ohio



     Frazier Reams, Jr., State Senator, Toledo, Ohio



     William J. Riley, Sanitary Engineer, Federal




Water Pollution Control Administration, Chicago,




Illinois




     Herbert Salsbury, Supervisor, Water and Waste




Treatment, Campbell Soup Company, Napoleon, Ohio

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                                                2-K



OTHERS IN ATTENDANCE  (CONTINUED):




     N. E. Sanders, Resident Engineer, U. S. Army




Corps of Engineers, Cleveland, Ohio




     Neil E. Seyler, Superintendent, Operations,




Allied Chemical Corporation, Painesville Plant,



Morristown, New Jersey




     Ruth Seymour, League of Women Voters, Cuyahoga



Falls, Ohio




     Albert M. Shannon, Chief, Water and Sewage




Treatment, City of Detroit, Michigan




     Allan M. Shapiro, Data Processing Chief, Lake



Erie Program Office, Cleveland, Ohio



     Leila Shrigawa, Secretary, Three Rivers Watershed




Organization, Leaecue of Women Voters, Cleveland, Ohio




     George D. Simpson, Partner, Havens & Emerson




Consulting Engineers, Cleveland, Ohio



     William R. Sigler, Commercial Analyst, Diamond



Alkali, Cleveland, Ohio



     Willard P. Schade, Partner, Willard P. Schade




& Associates, Cleveland, Ohio



     Edward P. Stevenson, Civil Engineer, NASA,




Cleveland, Ohio



     Mrs. Kenneth L. Stevens, President, Citizens for




Land and Water, Akron, Ohio

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                                                2-L





OTHERS IN ATTENDANCE  (CONTINUED):



     Jack M. Stewart, President, Industrial Tech-



nological Associates, Inc., Cleveland, Ohio




     A. D. Staursky, Assistant Director of Public



Relations, United States Steel Corporation, Cleveland,




Ohio



     Stanley H. Suttom, Partner, Havens & Emerson,




Cleveland, Ohio




     David W. Swetland, Western Reserve Historical



Society, Natural Science Museum, Cleveland Health



Museum, Cleveland, Ohio




     Nelson S. Talbott, Cleveland, Ohio




     J. R. Thrasher, Project Engineer, American




Industrial Disposal, Inc., Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania




     John S. Tygert, Project Engineer, New York State




Department of Health, Buffalo, New York




     Richard A. Vanderhoof, Regional Director, Ohio



Basin, Federal Water Pollution Control Administration,



Cincinnati, Ohio




     Effie M. Wandland, League of Women Voters,



Willoughby, Ohio




     R, W. Warner, Waste Disposal Supervisor,




Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company, Barberton, Ohio




     P. J. Weaver, Procter and Gamble, Cincinnati, Ohio



     Eugene W. Weber, Commissioner, International Joint




Commission, Washington, D. C

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                                                2-M





OTHERS IN ATTENDANCE (CONTINUED):




     Edward T. Wellejus, Editorial Writer, Erie Times,



Erie, Pennsylvania



     Ed Whipple, Columbus Correspondent, Toledo Blade,




Ohio




     John J. Wirts, Chemical Engineer, Easterly



Pollution Control Center, Cleveland, Ohio




     Donald J. Yark, Director of Public Utilities, City




of Toledo, Ohio



     George R. Tallon,  Senior Scientist, Koppers




Company, Inc., Monroeville, Pennsylvania



     Lyle A. Miller, Consultant, James Campbell Smith,




Inc., Willoughby, Ohio

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           Opening Statement - Mr, Stein
                 OPENING STATEMENT




                        BY




                 MR. MURRAY STEIN








         MR. STEIN:  The Meeting is open.




         This is the Third Meeting in the Matter of




Pollution of the Waters of Lake Erie, held under the




provisions of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.




         In order to save time, I wonder if we may have




all the conferees at the head table introduce themselves




and their States.  Let's start with you, Mr. Hennigan.




         MR. HENNIGAN:  Robert D. Hennigan, Director of




the Bureau of Water Resources, New York State Department




of Health.




         MR. METZLER:  Dwight Metzler, Deputy Commissioner,




State Health Department, New York, in charge of the water




pollution program.




         MR. TEATER:  Bob Teater, Assistant Director,




Department of Natrual Resources, Ohio, representing Fred

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Morr, who is one of the Ohio conferees.




           MR. EAGLE-  George Eagle, Chief Engineer, Ohio



Department of Health.




           DR. ARNOLD:  Dr. Arnold, Director of the Ohio




Department of Health, and Chairman of the Ohio Water




Pollution Control Board.




           MR. QUIGLEY:  Jim Quigley, Commissioner of the




Federal Water Pollution Control Administration.




           MR. POOLE:  Blucher Poole, Technical Secretary



of the Indiana Stream Pollution Control Board.




           MR. OEMING:  Loring F, Oeming, Executive




Secretary, Michigan Water Resources Commission, Conferee.




           MR. LYON:  Walter Lyon, Director of the Division




of Sanitary Engineering, Pennsylvania Department of Health.




           MR. MILLER:  Larry Miller, Regional Sanitary



Engineer, Northwestern Section of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania




State Department of Health.



           MR. STEIN:  And, as you know, my name is Murray




Stein and I am from headquarters, Department of the Interior,




           This is the first look you have at us in a new




Department, the Department of the Interior.  I know I have




found it refreshing being in Interior, and I suspect you




will find the same thing.




           We do have a Secretary of the Interior who has

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                                                   5



an abiding and deep interest in this program.  He has



come here with us and will chair this Meeting as long as




he is here.




         I would like to introduce at this time the




Honorable Secretary of the Interior, Stewart Udall.




         (Rising Applause.)

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                  Secretary Udall








         STATEMENT OP THE HONORABLE STEWART




         L. UDALL, SECRETARY OP THE INTERIOR








           SECRETARY UDALL:  Thank you very much,  Murray.




           I want to be very brief, because I am here




primarily to listen.




           I will have some questions to ask, I am sure,




as we go along, and I will have some observations  to make




when we finish this morning.




           Today, before my participating in the Meeting




this morning, Congressman Vanik and the Mayor invited me




to take a noon trip along the Cuyahoga.  We are going to




sort of get the feel or the smell of some of your problems




during the noon hour.



           Then I have an interesting trip this afternoon




on the old Ohio Canal and will go down to Akron and Canton,




           Congressman Vanlk has made the suggestion that




perhaps here is an opportunity for a major conservation




project that my Department in the Federal Government might




be involved in, of preserving this old canal and its




environs as a fine recreation area for this region.




           I think, Congressman Vanik, if I may say so,

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                                                       7



                  Secretary Udall




Ohio is one of the few States where the National Park




Service of the Federal Government does not have a major




conservation project.  Maybe this is the place where we




should do it.




         President Johnson has expressed to me many times




that we need to make the big effort in air pollution,




water pollution and outdoor recreation where the people are,




near the big cities.  We will look into this with great




interest.




         With regard to the Meeting this morning, I have




only two or three observations that I would like to make.




         This is the first conference of this kind I have




participated in since the Water Pollution Control Administra-




tion was transferred to my Department from the Department




of Health, Education, and Welfare six weeks ago.




         I came here for a deliberate reason.  I came on



the recommendation of Commissioner Quigley and Murray




Stein, because I think this is one of the real battlegrounds




or proving grounds with regard to the war on water pollution,




         The Great Lakes represent the finest fresh water




resource that this Nation has.  The lakes are in trouble,




and the one that is in the most trouble is Lake Erie.




         It seems to me that if we can lick the water

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                                                      8





                  Secretary Udall




pollution problem in the next few years on Lake Erie,




we can lick the problem nationwide.  If we can't get on



top of it here, we are obviously going to fail.



         Therefore, nearly a year after the conferences




that were held in August, I think it is very vital that




we come back here and, in effect, have a report session




and find out what is being done, find out what needs to be




done.  This is particularly true in light of the fact that




my Department is now in the picture and we want, with all




of our responsibilities, to focus clearly on what is being




done.




         So I am delighted to preside here this morning




and participate in this Meeting.




         Commissioner Quigley and Murray Stein have




suggested the procedure this morning, because I would like



to hear the major presentations.  Maybe we ought to hear



a presentation of what the Federal Government has and has




not been doing -- for us to confess our sins and short-




comings at the beginning.  Then perhaps we will hear from




Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, New York and Pennsylvania, in




that order.



         Let us proceed ahead with the presentations and




reports this morning.  We can have a lively discussion as

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                  Secretary Udall




we go ahead.



           I was scheduled initially to leave at 11:30,



but will stay a little later,  if necessary,  in order to



get right down to the crux of the matter.



           Thank you very much.



           (Applause.)

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                                                        10
                      H. W. Poston








         STATEMENT OP H. W. POSTON, FEDERAL CON-




         FEREE, FEDERAL WATER POLLUTION CONTROL



         ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR,




         CHICAGO, ILLINOIS








           MR. POSTON:  My name is H. W. Poston, and I am



the Federal Conferee representing the United States Depart-



ment of the Interior for the purposes of the Meeting in




the matter of pollution of Lake Erie and its tributaries.




I am also the Acting Regional Director of the Great Lakes




Region of the Federal Water Pollution Control Administration,



           The enforcement conferences held in Cleveland



and Buffalo in August of 1965 resulted in a set of conclu-



sions and recommendations which were unanimously agreed upon



by the conferees and were adopted subsequently by the



Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare.  Among these




recommendations, several required action on the part of the




Federal Water Pollution Control Administration.  The recom-



mendation numbers to which I will refer are those of the



Summary of the Second Session of the Lake Erie Enforcement



Conference held in Buffalo on August 10-12, 1965.  I will




report briefly on the activities of our agency in furthering

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                                                         11
                      H. W. Poston



the aims of those recommendations for which we have a direct



responsibility.
                    RECOMMENDATION
Recommendation #11 requires that:




           "Combined storm and sanitary sewers are to



      be prohibited in all newly developed urban areas,



      and eliminated in existing areas wherever feasible."




           In furtherance of this recommendation, the



Federal Water Pollution Control Administration has reviewed



plans for several urban renewal projects financed by the




United States Department of Housing and Urban Development in



the Lake Erie drainage basin which originally proposed the



construction of combined sewers.  Our recommendation for



the construction of separate storm and sanitary sewers will



be complied with at the following projects:



           l)  University-Euclid Urban Renewal Project,



      Cleveland, Ohio;



           2)  Vistula Meadows Urban Renewal Project,



      Toledo, Ohio;



           3)  Cascade Urban Renewal Project, Akron, Ohio.

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                                                         12




                      H. W. Poston
                  RECOMMENDATION
           Recommendation number 15 requires the conferees



to meet with "representatives of Federal, State, and local



officials responsible for agricultural, highway and community



development programs for the purpose of supporting satis-



factory programs for the control of runoff which deleteriously



affects water quality in Lake Erie."




           On June 17, 1966, a meeting was held in Pittsburgh



to discuss pollution caused by highway construction.  In




attendance were top-ranking officials of the United States



Bureau of Public Roads, the Federal Water Pollution Control



Administration, the highway departments of Ohio and Penn-



sylvania, and the Ohio State Department of Health.  Plans are



being made to meet with representatives of agriculture and



planning agencies, as recommended in the Summary.



           The Federal and State highway officials indicated




great interest in minimizing pollution, and have received



an Instructional Memorandum from the Federal Highway



Administrator to conduct the Federal highway program in




such a way as to be in compliance with President Johnson's



Executive Order No. 11258.   (Pertaining to pollution from

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                                                        13






                      H. W. Poston



Federal or Federally financed projects.)



           The State highway engineers reported that their



agencies are taking steps to carry out the elements of the




Instructional Memorandum issued by the Federal Highway



Administrator.  They stated that the greatest pollutional



effect is erosion of soils during road construction.  They



believe there has been progress in getting earlier ground



cover, but erosion during construction is still the biggest



control problem.



           Further conferences will be held as required to



discuss specific remedial steps that can be taken to control



pollution caused by soil erosion during highway construction.








                    RECOMMENDATION #19








           Recommendation #19 obliged the Federal Water



Pollution Control Administration to "establish water pollution



surveillance stations at appropriate locations on Lake Erie"



and to "assist the States at such times as requested" in



the surveillance of the tributaries.



           A Federal surveillance program has been estab-



lished in the western portion of Lake Erie covering Michigan




and Ohio waters.  Plans are presently being prepared which

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                                                      14






                      H. W. Poston




will provide a more complete surveillance program on Lake



Erie to evaluate the effectiveness of pollution control



practices in local and lake-wide situations,  to determine



needs in local and lake-wide pollution situations,  and to




determine cause and effect relationships among chemical,



biological and physical factors in lake eutrophication.



           To evaluate the effectiveness of pollution




control practices in Lake Erie, seasonal and  long-term



changes will be measured in mid-lake water in all three of



the lake's basins.  Much of this can be done  most efficiently



by automatic recording of five factors:



          (l) Dissolved oxygen;




          (2) conductivity;



          (3) water temperature;



          (4) water transparency; and



          (5) wind velocity and direction.



             In addition to automatic monitoring, lake survey



cruises will be necessary at approximately two-week inter-




vals at ten  preestablished stations in each of the three




lake basins.  Lake bottom samples will also be collected at



each of the  stations once each in the spring, summer and




fall.



            Surveillance of local effects of  pollution

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                                                         15



                      H. W. Poston



control practices will necessitate periodic sampling near



lakeshore outfalls, the mouths of tributaries, and at dredge



dumping grounds within the lake.




           Sludge deposits at the mouths of each of the



tributaries and at lake bottom dredge dump areas will be




sampled seasonally.



           The East Harbor, Lorain, Cleveland, Erie, Dunkirk



and Buffalo beach areas will be sampled periodically to



monitor bacterial water quality.








                    RECOMMENDATION #20








           Recommendation #20 gives the Federal Government



responsibility "for developing up-to-date information and




experience concerning effective phosphate removal and the



control of combined sewer systems" and requires that this



information "be reported to the conferees regularly."



           Information has been made available by the




Federal Water Pollution Control Administration to the States



and municipalities on both phosphate removal and on control




of combined sewer systems.  The Technical Committee heard



from Federal Water Pollution Control Administration scientists



and engineers and private consultants were made available.

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                                                      16





                      H. W. Poston




The Chief of the Technical Services Branch, Federal Water



Pollution Control Administration,  met with the Michigan



Water Resources Commission to relate recent experiences



in phosphate removal. Several sites are now being surveyed



in the Lake Erie area for a field  demonstration of phosphate



removal at one or more operating sewage treatment plants.




           The new Federal Water Quality Act of 1965 pro-



vides for 50 percent grants for demonstrations of sewer



separations, and some of the cities in the Lake Erie



conference area have applied.



           An annotated selected bibliography of the



biological effects of "Nitrogen and Phosphorus in Water"



has been prepared and distributed  by our agency, and the



Federal Water Pollution Control Administration is now pre-



paring a summary review of the literature and a report on



research activities on phosphate removal.








                     RECOMMENDATION #21








Recommendation #21 states that:



            "Regional planning is often the most logical



     and economical approach toward meeting pollution



     problems.  The water pollution control agencies of

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                                                         17
                      H. W. Poston




     Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New York,



     and the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare




     will encourage such regional planning activities."



           Regional planning on pollution problems was




furthered by the provision of the Water Quality Act of 1965




that permits construction grant increases on 10 percent where




a sewage treatment plant project is certified as conforming




with a comprehensive metropolitan area plant.  Such increased




grants have been made to Detroit, $60,000; Oakland County,




Michigan, $18,624; the 8-£ Mile Relief Drain in Macomb County,




Michigan, $110,715; and Sylvania, Ohio, $20,340.  The total




10 percent grant increases amount to $209,679.  Meetings have




also been held with some conference area regional planning




agencies.




           In addition to the 10 percent construction grant




increases, a total of 15 regular construction grants,



amounting to $4,089,190, in support of eligible construction




of $14,121,147, have been made to communities in the Lake Erie




Basin since last summer.








                       RECOMMENDATION #24








           Recommendation #24 of the conference summary requires

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                                                       18




                      H. W. Poston




that needed waste treatment facilities at Federal installa-



tions are to be completed and in operation by August of 1966,




This recommendation supports Executive Order 11258,  which




requires that all Federal installations provide secondary



treatment facilities.




           There are 323 Federal installations in the




conference area, 284 of which discharge waste waters to




municipal sewer systems.  The treatment provided by these




municipal systems is as follows:




     a)  3 installations discharge to municipal systems




         providing no treatment.




     b)  79 installations discharge to municipal systems




         providing primary or intermediate treatment.




     c )  202 installations discharge to municipal systems




         providing secondary treatment.



           Of the installations or portions of installations




not discharging to municipal systems, 16 are Defense Area




Housing Units leased by the Army and for which the Federal




Government presently exercises no control over the waste




treatment facilities provided.




           It is a pleasure to report that all except one




major Federal installation in the conference area will have




adequate treatment facilities by the deadline date of August

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                                                    19



                  H. W. Poston




1966.  Plans are under way to place the final major Federal




Installation in compliance by next year.




         SECRETARY UDALL:  Mr. Poston, may I stop you at




that point?  What is that installation?




         MR. POSTON:  The installation is the NASA Lewis




Laboratory.




         SECRETARY UDALL:  And what are our plans in terms




of deadlines to get on top of that problem?




         MR. POSTON:  The plans are under way for this




particular installation to be financed and put under con-




struction by a year from July.




         SECRETARY UDALL:  Is there money in the new fiscal




year budget that begins next year to accomplish this, as



far as you know?




         MR. POSTON:  I understand that there Is.  This




will move ahead.



         SECRETARY UDALL:  This is, I take it, not a small




project, but a rather large one?




         MR. POSTON:  I think there is a gentleman back




here who might give us more information.




         MR. JOHN C. EVERETT:  This installation at NASA




Lewis now has a primary treatment plant, but this new job will




cost between $50,000 and $100,000, depending on the salvage

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                                                   20




                  H. W. Poston




of the old plant.  Engineering studies are under way, and




we will proceed with construction when the funds are




available, as soon as possible.  There is now primary




treatment at the particular plant.




         SECRETARY UDALL:  The reason that I wanted par-




ticularly to focus on that is that I don't think we can




be too harsh with other people for not meeting the August




deadline if we haven't met it ourselves.  I think that we




should know precisely what is being undertaken and what




we propose to do.




         The other thing that strikes me with regard to




the Federal Government putting its house in order, Mr.




Poston, is the previous paragraph, that in these defense




area housing units leased by the Army for which the Federal




Government presently exercises no control over waste treat-




ment facilities, it just seems to me that we need to work




with all of the other Federal agencies from here on




prospectively in terms of leases and the Federal Government's




activities.  If we are going to set high standards, the




Federal Government must lead the way.  I think that this




should apply both to the facilities that it owns and to




the facilities that it leases.




          (Applause. )

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                                                   21




                  H. W. Poston




           MR. POSTON:  I would hasten to add, Mr.




Secretary, that we haven't given up on this, and we are




pursuing this matter.




           MR. STEIN:  If I may say something here, we




did, as Mr. Poston mentioned before, effectuate a separa-




tion of storm and sanitary sewers in urban renewal projects,




           I think these three projects — and I think the




press here was very active in this — set a policy for




the country.




           Now urban renewal will not permit any combined




sewers in any of its budgets throughout the country.




           I think this may be a case where we may get




together with the Defense Department and be sure that the




leases contain appropriate provisions.  We might try to do




that retroactively for existing leases as they are renewed.




           SECRETARY UDALL:  Go right ahead.




           MR. POSTON:  I will proceed with Recommendation




# 25.

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                                                          22





                      H. W. Poston








                   RECOMMENDATION #25








           Recommendation #25 states that  representatives




of the United States Army Corps of Engineers are to meet




with the Conferees, develop and put into action a program for




disposal of dredged material in Lake Erie  and its tributaries




which will satisfactorily protect water quality. Such a




program is to be developed within six months after the issu-




ance of this summary and effectuated as soon as possible




thereafter.




           On September 24, 1965, a meeting was held in




Washington with representatives of the Chief of the Corps of




Engineers and the Federal Water Pollution  Control Administra-



tion.  The problem of disposal of dredged  material was dis-



cussed, and it was decided that the Corps  would develop a




plan for disposal that would minimize pollutional effects.




Later the Corps asked the Federal Water Pollution Control




Administration for economic Justification  for the preliminary




estimate of the additional expense of disposal of dredging




in diked areas.




           The Federal Water Pollution Control Administration




is making a study of cost benefits that may be derived from

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                                                       23




                      H. W. Poston




disposal of dredged material in diked areas.   Studies in




this matter will be completed in about two months.




           The Corps of Engineers has  written a statement




that I will read into the record of this meeting.  This is




a letter to the Chairman of the Conferees, Lake Erie Enforce-




ment Conference, Cleveland, Ohio, dated 21 June 1966:




     "Dear Mr. Chairman:




           "The following is a summary of the actions




     the Corps of Engineers has taken following the




     conferees' conference of last August.




           "A meeting was held in Washington, D. C.




     on 24 September 1965 relative to Paragraphs 24 and




     25 of the  'Preliminary Recommendations and Con-




     clusions' of the conferees of the conferences held




     in Cleveland, Ohio and Buffalo, New York during




     August 3 to 12, 1965, on pollution of interstate




     and intrastate waters of Lake Erie.  This meeting



     was attended by representatives of Health, Educa-




     tion, and Welfare and the Corps of Engineers.




           "Subsequent to the above meeting,  a report




     was prepared by the Buffalo and Detroit  Engineer




     Districts as to the feasibility of providing




     alternate diked disposal areas at fifteen Lake

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                                                  24






                 H. W. Poston



"Erie Projects, including the Detroit and Rouge




River Projects.  The report was forwarded to the




Office, Chief of Engineers on 11 February 1966.




The first cost of providing the diked disposal




areas with a 10-year life was estimated to be about




$110 million, which together with the added




dredging costs would amount to an annual charge




of about $16 million over and above the cost of




disposal by present methods.




      "The report has been under review in the




Office, Chief of Engineers.  On 11 April 1966, the




Office, Chief of Engineers wrote a letter to the




Honorable John W. Gardner, Secretary of Health,



Education, and Welfare, in which data were requested




as to the monetary benefits to be realized from the




change to using diked disposal areas in lieu of



open lake dumping of dredged materials in order to




complete our analysis and make recommendation to




higher headquarters.  On 26 May 1966, a follow-up




letter was written to the Honorable Stewart L. Udall,



Secretary of the Interior, enclosing a copy of the




above letter since the pollution problem had, in



the interim, been transferred from Health, Education,

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                                                         25
                      H. W. Poston
     "and Welfare to the Interior Department.  To date,
     the Office, Chief of Engineers has had no reply
     to the above letters and has suspended further work
     on evaluating the situation and moving toward
     correction thereof until the requested data are
     received.  Upon receipt of this information, you
     may be assured that the Corps will follow through
     on the problem with all diligence.
                              "Sincerely yours,
                     /s/       Roy T. Dodge
                               Brigadier General, USA
                               Division Engineer"

                    RECOMMENDATION #26

           Finally, Recommendation #26 called for the
conferees to "establish a Technical Committee as soon as
possible which will evaluate water quality problems in Lake
Erie relating to nutrients and make recommendation to the
conferees within six months after the issuance of this
Summary."  The conferees developed a specific mission for
the committee.
           On December 17, 1965, the Technical Committee was

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                                                        26
                      H. W. Poston

formally appointed and has since met with representatives
of Federal, State and local agencies as well as consultants

from various midwest universities.  Mr. Qrover Cook,  Chief

of the Enforcement Activities in the Great Lakes Region,
served as chairman for this committee and is here today to

summarize the Technical Committee's recommendations to the

conferees.

           I will call on Mr. Cook at this time.

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                                                         27




                    Grover Cook:








         STATEMENT OF GROVER COOK, CHIEF, ENFORCEMENT




         ACTIVITIES, FEDERAL WATER POLLUTION CONTROL




         ADMINISTRATION, GREAT LAKES REGION




            MR. COOK:  Secretary Udall, Mr. Quigley, Conferees,




Ladies and Gentlemen:  Recommendations to the Lake Erie




Enforcement Conferees by the Lake Erie Enforcement Conference




Technical Committee on Nutrients, June 22, 1966.








                    BACKGROUND








            At the request of the Honorable James A. Rhodes,




Governor of the State of Ohio, the Secretary of the Department




of Health, Education and Welfare, under authority granted in




Section 8 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act of 1961,




on June 23, 1965 called a conference on pollution of Lake



Erie and its tributaries.  The conference was held in two




sessions, in Cleveland on August 3~5> 1965 and in Buffalo




on August 10-12, 1965.  The conferees were as follows:




            Mr. B. A. Poole, Indiana




            Mr. Loring Oeming, Michigan




            Dr. E. W. Arnold, Ohio




            Mr. George Eagle, Ohio




            Mr. Fred  Morr, Ohio

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                                                        28
                  Grover Cook;
            Mr. Richard Boardraan, Pennsylvania

            Mr. Robert Hennigan, New York

            Mr. H. W. Poston, FWPCA


            The conference chairman was Mr. Murray Stein,

Federal Water Pollution Control Administration, Washington,

D. C.

            After hearing a Federal report on pollution in

the conference area, reports on pollution control activities

in each of the five States, and statements by others, the

conferees agreed unanimously on a summary containing con-

clusions and recommendations that was later issued by the

Secretary of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare

on November 12, 1965.  A copy of the conference summary is

attached as Appendix A.

            One of the summary recommendations stated:

            "The conferees will establish a Technical

            Committee as soon as possible which will

            evaluate water quality problems in Lake Erie

            relating to nutrients and make recommendations

            to the conferees within six months after the

            issuance of this Summary."

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                                                          29
                  Grover Cook:

            At a conferees meeting In Cleveland on

September 1, 1965 members of the Technical Committee were

selected.  On December 17, 1965 the conferees met with

the designated committee members and the Lake Erie Technical

Committee on nutrients was formally established.  The

following members and their alternates were appointed:




STATE           MEMBER                ALTERNATES

Michigan        Carlos Fetterolf      	

Indiana         Perry Miller          John Winters

Ohio            3. E. Richards        George Garrett

Pennsylvania    Walter Lyon           Daniel Bardarik

                                      Paul Heitzenrater

New York        Robert Hennigan       Donald Stevens

            Grover Cook, Federal Water Pollution Control

Administration, was appointed Chairman, and Frank Hall,

Federal Water Pollution Control Administration, served as

Secretary.




                   INTRODUCTION




            At the September 1, 1965 meeting the conferees

also outlined the mission of the committee.  The committee

was asked to investigate  the following aspects of Lake Erie

problems:

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                  Grover Cook



      (l)  Determine the situation, past and present, in




           Lake Erie with regard to nutrient levels and the



           related consequences.  Also determine how the



           existing situation would be modified by various



           pollution control methods.



      (2)  Determine the nutrient levels or concentrations



           which constitute interstate pollution of Lake Erie,




      (3)  Determine the nutrient levels or concentrations



           which should be established as water quality



           objectives in various parts of Lake Erie.



      (4)  Determine the sources of nutrients entering Lake



           Erie, and the percentages originating from:



           detergents; other municipal wastes; industrial



           wastes; and agricultural land use.



      (5)  Determine the nutrient balance of Lake Erie.



      (6)  Identify the various nutrients affecting Lake Erie



           water quality and determine which are susceptible



           to control.



            An organizational meeting of the committee was



held on December 16, 1965, at which time it was decided



that experts in special areas related to nutrient enrichment



of lakes, and particularly those having worked on Lake Erie,



should be called in for consultation with the committee.

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                                                        31
                 Grover Cook


            The following advised  the  committee.  Their


assistance was greatly appreciated.


            Dr. Edward Martin,  FWPCA,  Washington


            Mr. C.  E.  Herdendorf,  Ohio Department of  Natural


                History, Sandusky


            Dr. Alfred M. Beeton,  University of Wisconsin


                at  Milwaukee


            Dr. Gerard Rohlich, University  of Wisconsin


            Dr. Matthew Hohn, Central  Michigan University


            Mr. John Neil, Ontario Water Resources  Commission


            Mr. Stephen Megregian, FWPCA, Chicago


            Dr. Richard Engelbrecht, University of  Illinois


            Dr. Stanford Smith, U, S.  Bureau of Commercial


                Fisheries, Ann  Arbor


            The following also  provided information:






            Mr. John Carr, U. S. Bureau of  Commercial


                Fisheries, Ann  Arbor


            Mr. John Wirts, Cleveland  Easterly Pollution


                Control Center


            Mr. Kenneth Biglane, FWPCA, Washington


            Mr. G.  LaMar Hubbs, FWPCA,  Cleveland


            Mr. Robert Hartley, FWPCA,  Cleveland


            Miss Linda Gordon,  FWPCA,  Washington

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                                                          32
                  Grover Cook

            Mr. George Harlow,  FWPCA,  Detroit

            Mr. Paul Olynyk,  Cleveland State University

            Mr. Russell Brant,  Ohio  Department  of Natural

                Resources,  Columbus

            Mr. C. Ray Ownbey,  FWPCA,  Chicago



            The committee also  wishes  to thank  others who

were unable to attend meetings  but supplied  information,

especially Dr. Jacob Verduin, Eastern  Illinois  University,

Mr. David Wagner, FWPCA, Chicago,  Dr.  N. Wilson Britt, Ohio

State University, and Mr. Harold Hall, FWPCA, Chicago.

            This report to the  conferees will discuss the

several aspects of the Lake Erie nutrient problems by

presenting the views of the experts  who counselled the

committee. It should be stated  that  there was not complete

agreement among the consultants as to  certain problems,

particularly in regard to the changes  In the fishery.  It

is, however, the concensus of everyone that  an  action pro-

gram is needed to reduce nutrient  inputs to  Lake Erie.

Hopefully, this report will add impetus to a program that

will prevent further deterioration of  the Lake  by emphasizing

immediate needs.

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                                                      33
                  Grover Cook

            The mission assigned the Technical Committee on

nutrients was far-reaching and included areas which have

not yet been fully explored.  However, the committee has

gained much information and data useful in achieving the

goals set forth by the conferees.  Through the counsel or

specialists and committee deliberations the following con-

clusions were reached:

            "(l)  Determine the situation, past and present,

                in Lake Erie with regard to nutrient levels

                and the related consequences."

            Recent changes were reported by specialists in

different fields; namely, water chemistry, physical character-

istics, algae, bottom-dwelling animals, and fishes.




            Chemistry.  Records from many sources over the

past fifty years show a rise in chlorides from 8 milligrams

per liter (mg/l) to 26 mg/1, and a rise in sulfates from

13 mg/1 to 23 mg/1.  Good long-term records for phosphorus

are not available, but recent information indicates there

has been a substantial increase in phosphorus inputs and a

significant increase in concentration in the Lake.

            During summer thermal stratification dissolved

oxygen ,1s depleted in the bottom waters of a large area in
       \
the Central basin.  This was first reported in 1929 and has

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                 Grover Cook



been observed many times since.  However, the DO now appears



to reach zero, and the area where depletion occurs has



widened.  This DO deficit is caused largely by organic



decomposition.  (A theoretical relationship between



phosphorus inputs and DO depletion is attached as Appendix B.)



It concludes that t-he oxygen deficit observed in the Central



basin is caused predominantly by decay of organic carbon



produced through biological processes.








            Physical Conditions.  Records of Lake levels



have been kept for over a hundred years and fluctuations of



several feet are well known.  When the Lake is high, shore



erosion occurs and some scientists believe this has contri-



buted to nutrient increases in the Lake.  When Lake levels



are low, as in the recent past, a larger shoal area is



affected by sunlight and a larger crop of Cladophora



(attached algae) has been observed.



            Lake currents are mostly the product of winds.



The Federal Water Pollution Control Administration has



measured currents near the Lake bottom with velocities as




high as 2.0 feet per second.  A strong wind will induce



thorough mixing more than 30 feet deep.  Strong winds also



produce an oscillation of the thermocline that results in

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                                                       35
                  Grover Cook

mixing of the bottom waters, but without intermixing of

the upper and lower water layers.  This lack of intermixing

is significant in that the oxygen rich water of the upper

layer (epilimnlon) does not replenish the depleted oxygen

supply in the lower layer (hypolimnion), and oxygen demanding

material and nutrients do not leave the bottom waters during

periods of thermal stratification.

            Another physical characteristic that may bear

upon the overall problem is water temperature.  Records

show that there has been a rise of 2°F since 1936.  Air

temperature, which has also risen, is probably the major

causative factor.

            It is concluded that the three physical pnenomena

discussed above may be related to excessive algal growths,

but the contribution of each would be difficult to determine.




            Algae.  Both the microscopic suspended algae

called phytoplankton, or planktonic algae, and the

filamentous algae that grow attached to any hard sub-

surface are responsible for nuisance conditions in Lake

Erie.  Of the two kinds of algae, Cladophora have been

troublesome for a longer time.  The beaches on Kelleys Island

have been littered by Cladophora for perhaps 30 years.

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                                                        .i
                  Grover Cook


            Chemical control has not been too successful


because periods of calm are needed and chemicals work best



when applied during a rather short span in the early part


of the season.  Also, the expense is very high if applied in


a large area.  It is estimated that Lake Erie has at least


400 square miles where the subsurface is suitable for


Cladophora growth.



            Lake-wide information on phytoplankton is rather


sparse.  However, there are good data on samples taken in


Cleveland since 1929, and in the South Bass Island area over


the past 30 years.  The kinds and number have changed dramatic-



ally.  In 1929 the diatoms Fragillaria, Asterlonella, and


others that are common in Lakes Superior, Huron, and Michigan



were predominant.  Today the diatoms Stephanodisous and


Gyclotella, which are typical of enriched lakes are the more


abundant kinds.  In the past three years the Federal Water


Pollution Control Administration has on occasion found the high-


ly undesirable blue-green algae appearing in dense "blooms."


These are typical of eutrophic lakes and are rare in lakes



like Superior and Huron.  If nothing is done to minimize


the conditions that promote blue-green algae the periodicity


of blooms will increase.






            Bottom-dwelling Animals.  Prior to 1953

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                                                       37
                  Grover Cook

burrowing mayflies were by far the predominant bottom-dwelling

animals in the Western basin.  In September 1953 that Lake

area became thermally stratified and dissolved oxygen was

depleted in the lower layer of water.  A catastrophic die-off

of mayflies occurred.  Although smaller populations were

found in 195^- the overall distribution of these important

fish food organisms declined year by year, and by 1959 only

a few could be found.  Today the small worms, sometimes

called sludgeworms, and midge larvae are predominant.

            It is generally believed that the prime cause of

the decline of mayflies was low DO, but other factors may

have contributed.  In any event, conditions favorable to

their growth and propagation have not existed since 1959 or

earlier, and improved water quality will have to be provided

before they can repopulate that part of the Lake.




            Fis_hes.  Dramatic changes have occurred in the

Lake Erie fishery.  Although Lake Erie is still the most

productive of all of the Great Lakes, the catch is of poorer

quality.  The only high quality fish still abundant is the

perch.  Blue pike have disappeared, and walleyes, whitefish

and herring are scarce.  These changes are attributed to

environmental changes.  Desirable fish food organisms such

-------
                  Grover Cook                            38



as the burrowing mayfly and caddisfly are scarce, and the




low DO that occurs in the hypolimnion of the Central basin



creates an unfavorable habitat for both fish and the



organisms upon which they feed.  If desirable species of fish



are to be restored in abundance,  conditions must be made



favorable for all stages of their life, from egg to adult.



            "(2)  Determine the nutrient levels or



                concentrations which constitute interstate



                pollution of Lake Erie."



            The committee was unable to obtain information



sufficiently substantive to cope  with this complex question.



            "(3)  Determine the nutrient levels or con-



                centrations which should be established as



                water quality objectives in various parts



                of Lake Erie."



            The experts who met with the Committee were un-



willing to state what they considered to be a suitable water



quality objective for phosphates  (other nutrients were not



discussed quantitatively), but they did not disagree with



the value used by Sawyer in his classical Madison, Wisconsin,



lake studies.  Sawyer stated: "When the concentrations of




inorganic nitrogen and soluble phosphorus exceed 0.3 mg/1



and 0.01 mg/1, respectively, prior to the algal growing



season nuisance conditions can be expected."

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                                                           39
                  Grover Cook


(This report uses the term phosphate which is PC>4.  Phosphate


is approximately three times heavier than phosphorus as P, so


this would be 0.03 mg/1 as phosphate.)  It is generally


agreed that as far as these two nutrients are concerned this


is the best available information.


            "(4)  Determine the sources of nutrients entering


                Lake Erie, and the percentages originating


                from:  detergents, other municipal wastes,


                industrial wastes, and agricultural land use."


            According to Mr. Charles G. Bueltman, Technical


Director, The Soap and Detergent Association, "A statistical


analysis of the potential man made sources of phosphate


(fertilizers, animal feeds, Pharmaceuticals, etc.) indicates


that detergent phosphates represent only 11-12 percent of


the total."  Just how much of this actually reaches streams


and lakes is not known because a portion is removed by well-


operated secondary sewage treatment plants.


            The contribution of soluble phosphate from


municipal wastes has been determined to be about 100,000


pounds per day.  The total input was determined to be 174,000


pounds per day, so municipal inputs are about 60 percent of


the total.


            One industry contributes about 10,000 pounds per

-------
                                                          4o
                  Grover Cook



day, or about 6 percent of the total.  The actual inputs



from all industrial sources may be as much as 10 percent.



            Prom the above it appears that agricultural



land use may contribute as much as 30 percent of the phos-



phates.  However, runoff from urban areas may also be



significant.  A Federal Water Pollution Control Administration



research project in 1964 revealed that an urban test area



yielded 2,5 pounds of soluble phosphate per acre per year.



A city of 200 square miles could provide 220,000 pounds per year



or 600 pounds per day.  This could mean that the percentage of



phosphorus from agricultural practices could be less than 30



percent.



            "(5)  Determine the nutrient balance of Lake Erie."



            Information of soluble phosphate inputs and



discharges were obtained from the Federal Water Pollution



Control Administration program offices in Detroit, Cleveland



and Rochester, New York.  The following summarizes those data:



            Pounds per day             Source



                70,000           City of Detroit STP



                10,000           Industry



                 5,000           Canada (estimated)



                 3,000           Tributaries



                12,000           Lake Huron discharge



                35,000           Ohio Municipalities

-------
                  Grover Cook



            Pounds per day             Source



                28,000           Ohio Tributaries



                 5,500           Pa. Mun. and Trlbs.



                 4,800           New York



               174,300     Total



               -24,000     Discharge via Niagara River



               150,300     Net to Lake Erie
            "(6)  Identify the various nutrients affecting



                Lake Erie water quality and determine which



                are susceptible to control."



            No further information was obtained on this



subject. Some of the specialists who met with the committee



mentioned nutrient substances such as nitrogen, potassium,



vitamins, and carbon, but phosphorus remains as the one element



most susceptible to control.








                    REG OMMEND AT IONS








            In order to further the pollution abatement



measures presented in the Summary of Conference on Pollution



of Lake Erie and its Tributaries the following actions are



recommended :

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      Grover Cook                        42



1.  The Federal Water Pollution Control Administra-



    tion is urged to expedite implementation of



    Recommendation 20 which concerns development



    by the Federal Water Pollution Control Ad-



    ministration of up-to-date information on



    phosphate removal.  This information would be



    supplied to a task force of engineers and



    scientists in each State to work with sewage



    treatment plant operators throughout the basin



    to assist and consult in plant operation to



    maximize phosphorus removal.  This group should



    have available the services of engineers and



    scientists experienced in sewage treatment



    plant operation for nutrient removal.



2.  Development of a rapid, relatively simple



    determination of low concentrations of soluble



    and total phosphates.  (It has been suggested



    that one existing standard procedure be used



    by all laboratories).



3.  Sewage treatment plants routinely test for



    phosphates, both soluble and total.




4.  Through analysis of data provided the States



    on phosphate reduction, determine whether



    maximum reduction is being effected and report



    findings to the conferees periodically.

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                                                      43
                  Grover Cook



            5.  The appropriate State and Federal agencies



                be urged to step up their activities relative



                to the restoration of a fishery comprised  of



                desirable species, and eradication of low



                value species.



            6.  The value of 0.03 milligrams per liter for



                soluble phosphate be considered a goal for



                Lake Erie areas where this concentration is



                exceeded before the beginning of the algal



                growth season.



            7.  A long range surveillance program be initiated



                to evaluate trends in water quality, especially



                nutrient concentrations and algal growths.



            8.  Studies be initiated that will provide informa-



                tion on nutrient contributions from agricultural



                practices.






                BIBLIOGRAPHY






Neil, John H. and Glenn E. Owen. 1964.  Distribution,



            Environmental Requirements and Significance  of



            Cladophora in the Great Lakes.  Great Lakes



            Research Division, University of Michigan, Publ. 11.

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                                                        44
                   Grover Cook


Beeton, Alfred M. 1961.  Environmental Changes in Lake Erie.


            Transactions of the American Fisheries Society,


            90 (2): 153-159.


	.  1965.  Eutrophication of the St.  Lawrence-


            Great Lakes.  Limnology and Oceanography, 10 (2):240-


            254.


Verduin, Jacob. 1964.  Changes in Western Lake Erie During


            the Period 1948-1962, Verh. Internat. Vercin.  Llmnol,


            XV:639-644, Stuttgart.


	.  I960.  Phytoplankton Committee of Western Lake


            Erie and the C02 and 02 Changes Associated with


            Them.  Limnology and Oceanography, 5 (4): 372-380.


	.  1962.  Energy Flow Through Biotic Systems of


            Western Lake Erie.  Great Lakes Basin American


            Association for the Advancement of Science.


	.  1961.  Phytoplankton Communities, C02 and 02

            Changes.  Limnology and Oceanography, 6 (3):36?-368.


	.  1963.  Radioactivity of Suspensoids in Aquatic


            Environments of Northwestern Ohio.  The Journal


            of Science, 63 (l):39.


	.  1961  Measurement of Environmental Radioactivity


            with Basic Counting Equipment.  The Ohio Journal


            of Science 6l (l) :1.

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                                                     4s
                   Grover Cook



	.  1961.  Separation Rate and Neighbor Diffusivity.



            Science, 134 (3482): 837-838.



	.  1954.  Phytoplankton and Turbidity in Western



            Lake Erie.  Ecology, 35 (4):550-56l.



	.  1956.  Energy Fixation and Utilization by Natural



            Communities in Western Lake Erie.  Ecology.



            37 (1):40-50.



Scott, W. B. and Stanford H. Smith.  1962.  The Oocurance of



            the Longjaw Cisco, Leucichthys Alpenae, in Lake



            Erie.  J. Pish. Res. Bd.  Canada, 19 (6) -.1013-1023.



Foerster, John W. and Harold E. Schlichting, Jr. 1965.  Phyco-



            Periphyton in an Oligotrophic Lake.  Trans. Amer.



            Micros. Soc. 84 (4):485-502.



Hartley, Robert P., Charles E. Herdendorf and Myrl Keller.



            1966.  Synoptic Survey of Water Properties in the



            Western Basin of Lake Erie,  State of Ohio,



            Dept. of Natural Resources, Division of Geological



            Survey, Report of Investigation No. 58.



Carman, J. Ernest.  1964.  The Geologic Interpretation of



            Scenic Features in Ohio,  State of Ohio, Department



            of Natural Resources, Division of Geological Survey,



            Reprint Series No. 3.



Department of Natural Resources.  State of Ohio.  1961.  Soil



            Erosion in Ohio.  Division of Shore Erosion.

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                  Grover Cook                          46




Department of Natural Resources.  State of Ohio.   1961.




            Preliminary Estimate of Erosion or Accretion




            Along the Ohio Shore of Lake Erie and Critical




            Erosion Areas.  Division of Shore Erosion, Technical




            Report No. 8.




Hartley, Robert P.  1961.  Bottom Deposits in Ohio Waters of




            Central Lake Erie.  State of Ohio, Department of




            Natural Resources, Division of Shore  Erosion,




            Technical Report No. 6.




Smith, Stanford H.  1962.  Lake Erie or Lake Eerie?  The Izaak




            Walton Magazine.




Van Meter, Harry D.  November, I960.  The Yellow Perch of




            Lake Erie.  Ohio Conservation Bulletin.




Buettner, Howard J.  1965.  Commercial Fisheries  of the Great




            Lakes, 1879-1963.  Fishery Statistics of the



            United States 1963 (Fish and Wildlife Service




            Statistical Digest No. 57), Department of the




            Interior.



Carr, John F. and Jarl K. Hiltunen. 1965.  Changes in the




            Bottom Fauna of Western Lake Erie from 1930 to




            1961.  Limnology and Oceanography, 10 (4) .-551-569.




Hiltunen, Jarl K.  1965.  Distribution and Abundance of the




            Polychaete, Manayunkia Speciosa Leidy, in Western




            Lake Erie.  The Ohio Journal of Science, 65




            (4):i83-l85.

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                  Grover Cook




Carr, John P., Vernon C. App legate and Myrl Keller.  1965.




            A recent Occurance of Thermal Stratification and




            Low Dissolved Oxygen in Western Lake Erie.  The




            Ohio Journal of Science, 65 (6):319-32?.



Beeton, Alfred M.  1963.  Limnological Survey of Lake Erie




            1959 and I960.  Great Lakes Fishery Commission,




            Technical Report No. 6.




Engelbrecht, R. S. and J. J. Morgan.  April, I960.  Lake




            Drainage as a Source of Phosphorous in Illinois




            Surface Waters.  Transactions of the Seminar on




            Algae and Metropolitan Wastes, U. S. Public Health




            Service, Robert A. Taft Sanitary Engineering Center,




            Cincinnati, Ohio.




Gates, W. E. and J. A. Borchardt.  1964.  Nitrogen and




            Phosphorus Extraction from Domestic Wastewater




            Treatment Plant Effluents by Controlled Algal




            Culture.  Journal Water Pollution Control Federation,



            36 (4):443-462.




Sawyer, Clair N.  1965.  Problem of Phosphorus in Water Supplies.




            Journal American Water Works Association, 57
Stephan, David G. September, 1965.  Water Renovation -- Some



            Advanced Treatment Processes.  Civil Engineering.

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                                    48
Grover Cook
APPENDIX "A"

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                                                    kq
                  Grover Cook                        *
            REVISED CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS


                       OF THE CONFEREES





                 CONFERENCE ON POLLUTION OF


                LAKE ERIE AND ITS TRIBUTARIES


                        August 12, 1965





            1.  The waters of Lake Erie within the United


States are interstate waters wi^nin the meaning of section


8 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.  The waters of


Lake Erie and its tributaries within the United States are


navigable waters within the meaning of section 8 of the


Federal Water Pollution Control Act.


            2.  Lake Erie and many of its tributaries are


polluted.  The main body of the Lake has deteriorated in


quality at a rate many times greater than its normal aging


processes, due to the inputs of wastes resulting from the


activities of man.


            3.  Identified pollutants contributing to damages


to water uses in Lake Erie are sewage and industrial wastes,


oils, silts, sediment, floating solids and nutrients


(phosphates and nitrates).  Enrichment of Lake Erie, caused


by man-made contributions of nutrient materials, is proceeding

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                  Grover Cook                         50



at an alarming rate.  Pollution in Lake Erie and many of



its tributaries causes significant damage to recreation,



commercial fishing, sport fishing, navigation, water supply,




and esthetic values.



            •;-,  Eutrophlcation or over-fertilization of



Lake Erie is of major concern.  Problems are occurring along



the Lake shoreline at some water intakes and throughout the




Lake from algal growths stimulated by nutrients.  Reduction



of one or more of such nutrients will be beneficial in



controlling algal growths and eutrophication.



            5.  Many sources of waste discharge reaching



Lake Erie have inadequate waste treatment facilities.  The



delays in controlling this pollution are caused by the lack




of such adequate facilities and the complex municipal, in-



dustrial, and biological nature of the problem.
*Representatives of:     Indiana



                         Michigan




                         New York



                         Ohio




                         Pennsylvania




                         U. S. Department of Health, Education




                              and Welfare

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                  Grover Cook                          J



            6.  Interstate pollution of Lake Erie exists.




Discharges into Lake Erie and its tributaries from various



sources are endangering the health or welfare of persons In



States other than those in which such discharges originate.



In large measure this pollution is caused by nutrients which



over-fertilize the Lake.  This pollution is subject to abatement




under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.



            7.  Municipal wastes are to be given secondary



treatment or treatment of such nature as to effectuate the



maximum reduction of BOD and phosphates as well as other




deleterious substances.



            8.  Secondary treatment plants are to be so de-




signed and operated as to maximize the removal of phosphates.




            9.  Disinfection of municipal waste effluents is



to be practiced in a manner that will maintain coliform



densities not in excess of 5*000 organisms per 100 ml. at



water supply intakes, and not in excess of 1,000 organisms



per 100 ml. where and when the receiving waters in proximity



to the discharge point are used for recreational purposes




Involving bodily contact.  It is recognized that bathing



water quality standards are established by statute in New



York State.



            10.  All new sewerage facilities are to be



designed to prevent the necessity of bypassing untreated




waters.

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                  Grover Cook:                           -^



            11.  Combined storm and sanitary sewers are to



be prohibited in all newly developed urban areas, and



eliminated in existing areas wherever feasible.  Existing



combined systems are to be patrolled and flow-regulating



Structures adjusted to convey the maximum practicable amount



of combined flows to and through treatment plants.




            12.  Programs are to be developed to prevent



accidental spills of waste materials to Lake Erie and its



tributaries.  In-plant surveys with the purpose of preventing



accidents are recommended.



            13.  Unusual increases in waste output and



accidental spills are to be reported immediately to the ap-



propriate State agency.




            14.  Disposal of garbage, trash, and other



deleterious refuse in Lake Erie or its tributaries is to be



prohibited and existing dumps along river banks and shores



of the Lake are to be removed.



            15.  The conferees are to meet with representa-



tives of Federal, State, and local officials responsible for



agricultural, highway, and community development programs



for the purpose of supporting satisfactory programs for the



control of runoff which deleteriously affects water quality



in Lake Erie.

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                  Grover Cook:                            53



            16.  Industrial plants are to improve practices



for the segregation and treatment of waste to effect the



maximum reductions of the following:



            a.  Acids and alkalies



            b.  Oil and tarry substances



            c.  Phenolic compounds and organic chemicals



                that contribute to taste and odor problems




            d.  Ammonia and other nitrogenous compounds



            e.  Phosphorous compounds



            f.  Suspended material



            g.  Toxic and highly-colored wastes



            h.  Oxygen-demanding substances



            i.  Excessive heat




            j.  Foam-producing discharges



            k.  Other wastes which detract from recreational



                uses, esthetic enjoyment, or other beneficial



                uses of the waters.



            17,  The Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania



and New York water pollution control agencies are to under-




take action to insure that industrial plants discharging



wastes into the waters of Lake Erie and its tributaries withir.



their respective jurisdictions institute programs of sampling



their effluents to provide necessary information about waste



outputs.  Such sampling shall be conducted at such locations

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                  Grover Cook                       ,-^



and with such frequency as to yield statistically reliable




values of all waste outputs and to show their variations.



Analyses to be so reported are to include, where applicable:



pH, oil, tarry residues, phenolics, ammonia, total nitrogen,



cyanide, toxic materials, total biochemical oxygen demand, and



all other substances listed in the preceding paragraph.



            18.  Waste results are to be reported in terms




of both concentrations and load rates.  Such information will



be maintained in open files by the State agencies for all



those having a legitimate interest in the information.




            19.  The U. S. Department of Health, Education,



and Welfare is to establish water pollution surveillance



stations at appropriate locations on Lake Erie.  Surveillance



of the tributaries will be the primary responsibility of the



States.  The Department of Health, Education, and Welfare



will assist the States at such times as requested.



            20.  The United States Department of Health,



Education, and Welfare will be responsible for developing



up-to-date information and experience concerning effective



phosphate removal and the control of combined sewer systems.



This, information will be reported to the conferees regularly.



            21.  Regional planning is often the most logical



and economical approach toward meeting pollution problems.



The water pollution control agencies of Michigan, Indiana,



Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New York, and the Department of

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                                                      55



                    Grover Cook




Health, Education, and Welfare will encourage such regional



planning activities.




         22.  Within six months after the issuance of this




Summary, the State water pollution control agencies con-




cerned are to present a schedule of remedial action to




the Conferees for their consideration and evaluation.




         23.  The Federal Conferee recommends the following



for the consideration of the State agencies:




         a.  Recommended municipal treatment:  Completion




             of plans and specifications, August 1966;




             completion of financing, February 1967;




             construction started, August 1967;




             construction completed, January 1,  1969;




             chlorination of effluents,  May 15,  1966;




             provision of stand-by and emergency equipment



             to prevent interruptions in operation of




             municipal treatment plants, August 1966;



             patrolling of combined sewer systems,




             immediately.




         b.  Discontinuance of garbage and trash dumping




             into waters:  immediately.




         c.  Industrial waste treatment  facilities:




             Completed and in operation  by January 1, 1969.

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                                                     56
                    Grover Cook

            24.  Federal installations:  Waste treatment

facilities are to be completed and in operation by August

of 1966.

            25.  Representatives of the U. S. Army Corps of

Engineers are to meet with the Conferees, develop and put

into action a program for disposal of dredged material in

Lake Erie and its tributaries which will satisfactorily

protect water quality.  Such a program is to be developed

within six months after the issuance of this Summary and

effectuated as soon as possible thereafter.

            26.  The conferees will establish a Technical

Committee as soon as possible which will evaluate water

quality problems in Lake Erie relating to nutrients and

make recommendations to the conferees within six months

after the issuance of this Summary.

            27.  The conference may be reconvened on the

call of the Chairman.

            At the conclusion of the Cleveland session of

the conference, the following was included among the con-

clusions and recommendations of the conference;

            "Pollution of navigable waters subject to

abatement under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act is

occurring in the Ohio waters of Lake Erie and its tributaries,

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                  Grover Cook                          57



The discharges causing and contributing to the pollution



come from various municipal and industrial sources, from



garbage, debris, and land runoff.



            "Pollution of the Ohio waters of Lake Erie and its



tributaries within the State of Ohio endangers health and



welfare."



            A question has been raised concerning the



jurisdiction of this conference over intrastate Ohio waters.



The conferees agree to present this question to the Secretary



of Health, Education., and Welfare, and the Governor of Ohio



for clarification and resolution.

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Grover Cook:
 APPENDIX  "B"

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                  Grover Cook                     59



                  APPENDIX B

    The Relationship of Phosphates to Oxygen Depletion

            The volume of Lake Erie has been calculated to

be approximately 110 cubic miles.  Therefore, in Lake Erie,

one part per million of any substance is equal to one billion

pounds if distributed evenly throughout the lake waters.

            A.  According to the data in Table V-8, Part I,

Lake Erie, U. S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare,

Public Health Service, Water Supply and Pollution Control Div.

July 1965, known discharges of soluble phosphate via the

Detroit River are:

       70,000 pounds per day - City of Detroit effluent

       10,000   "     "   "  - Industry (Michigan)

        5,000   "     "   "  - Canada (Estimated municipal)

        2,900   "     "   "  - Tributaries

       11,800   "     "   "  - Lake Huron

       99,700   "     "   "  - To Lake Erie via the Detroit River

Known and estimated discharges to Lake Erie from all other

sources:

   35»500 pounds per day - Ohio municipalities

   28,500     "     "    " - Ohio tributaries
                                                         taries,,
    5,500     "     "    " - Pennsylvania - municipal and tribu-

    4,800     "     "    " - New ifork municipalities

   74,300     "     "    " - To Lake Erie

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                  Grover Cook                         60




174,000 pounds per day - Total known discharge of soluble




                         phosphates into Lake Erie




 24,000    "    "    " - Discharge of soluble phosphates from




	                 Lake Erie via the Niagara River




150,000    "    "    " - Net daily discharge of soluble




                         phosphates to Lake Erie




            B.  A net daily soluble phosphates accumulation




of 150,000 pounds x 365 days = 55 million pounds per year,



which means that the lake, during the process of photosynthesis,




has 55 million pounds of soluble phosphate (PO^) per year and




can convert this to organic matter which would remove the PO^,




and deposit it in the lake.




            Since 3 pounds of PO^ can generate 100 pounds of




organic carbon, 55 million pounds of PO^, could produce 1.8




billion pounds of organic carbon.




            This carbon, upon ultimate decay to carbon dioxide




(COg) would utilize 2.68 times its weight of oxygen (plus the



oxygen needed to oxidize associated hydrogen) or a minimum of



1.8 billion x 2.68 ~ 4.9 billion pounds of oxygen consumed.



            We know (from observations in the central basin)



that at times there exists an oxygen deficit of at least




(1740 pounds per square mile per foot x 2600 square miles x 10




feet average depth x 6 parts per million oxygen deficit)




= 270 million pounds.

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                  Grover Cook                            61




            We also know from Table (l)  - Part I,  Lake Erie




(if the data were converted to pounds of biochemical oxygen




demand (BOD) discharged) that the Lake Erie basin  receives




182 million pounds of BOD annually.




            We therefore conclude that:




            (l)  The potential oxygen demand that  would be




                 generated through productivity of organic




                 carbon is about  4.9 billion f 182 million




                 = 27 times the annual load of BOD now dis-




                 charged to the Lake Erie basin, and probably




                 much higher than that discharged  directly to




                 Lake Erie.




            (2)  The oxygen deficit found in the central basin




                 in 1964 was 2?0  million 7 182 million =1.5



                 times greater than the  annual load of BOD




                 now discharged.



            (3)  That the oxygen  deficit observed  in the




                 central basin is caused predominantly by




                 the decay of organic carbon produced through




                 biological processes.




            Known (or controllable) soluble phosphate (



inputs to Lake Erie are:

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                  Grover Cook
              Soluble Phosphate
              input
                      62
Possible soluble phosphate
input reductions which could
be achieved by operating
secondary treatment plants for
maximum nutrient removal
Source
Detroit
Industry
Ohio cities
Pa. cities
N. Y. cities
Totals
(Pounds per day)
70,000
10,000
35,500
2,600
4,800
122,900
(pounds per day)
65$ reduction or 45,500
80$ " " 8,000
50$ " " 17,500
50$ " " 1,300
_
72,300
            Estimated total annual soluble phosphate removal

" 72,300 pounds per day x 365 days - 26.5 million pounds per

year.

            If this reduction can be achieved through improved

secondary treatment, (26.5 r 55)-:48$ of the soluble phosphate

that is now being metabolized by the lake would be removed.

            On this basis it is concluded that such a reduction

in soluble phosphate (POij.) inputs should result in a marked

reduction in lake organic carbon productivity and a corresponding

improvement In the oxygen levels below the thermocline of the

central basin of Lake Erie.

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                Grover Cook                         63



           SECRETARY UDALL:   Are there  any  questions  by



the conferees or comments with regard  to  the  presentations




of Mr. Poston and Mr.  Cook?




           (No response. )




           SECRETARY UDALL:   If not, we thank them both




for some very precise presentations.




           I think I am particularly impressed with the




work of the Technical Committee, and if we  can get organized




in terms of the technicians  and water  experts understanding




each other and getting common procedures  and  common




standards set, then it seems to me that we  are organized




and we are heading in tne right direction.




           MR. OEMING:  Mr,  Secretary,  may  I  make  a comment,




please?




           SECRETARY UDALL:   Yes, indeed.




           MR. OEMING:  May  I ask:  What  is the disposition



of this report?  Is this to  be considered by  the conferees




after this conference, or how would you like  to have  it




handled?   I think it makes  a difference  on what we decide.




           Is it your feeling that this should now be




considered by the conferees  as being responsive as far as




they are concerned?




           SECRETARY UDALL:   Well, I would  be interested in



whether they consider this an interim  report, or whether

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                 Grover Cook                          64
they would like to have us evaluate it,  or pass upon it
at this time.
           What is your view,  Mr.  Cook?
           MR. COOK:  It is a  little difficult for me to
say without the committee members  here.   I wouldn't want
to speak for all of them.
           Several have indicated  that they prefer to call
it a preliminary report, or interim report.
           SECRETARY UDALL:  Are there still unresolved
issues?
           MR. COOK:  Yes, sir, there are.
           SECRETARY UDALL:  I would think then that we
ought to consider this an interim  report, and ask them tc
put it Jn final form so that it can be considered later.
           MR. OEMINGt  I think that is  my primary concern.
           SECRETARY UDALL:  That's fine.
           MR. OEMING:  Surely.
           SECRETARY UDALL:  All right.   Let us consider
this an interim report then.
           MR. LYON:  Mr. Secretary, is  this the time when
we can comment on this report?
           SECRETARY UDALL:  Yes.   I think any comments
that are pertinent would be appropriate.
           MR. LYON:  Let me first of all commend Mr. Grover

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                                                        65




Cook for doing an outstanding job in conducting this




committee.




           I think they brought  to the  committee a  number




of top experts from across  the country  to  help the  delibera-



tions of the committee.




           As you have already indicated,  this should indeed




only be considered an interim report, simply because  there




is a great deal of additional information  that is needed




that will have to be resolved by way of research and




development before we will  know  exactly what nutrients are



the critical ones.




           We think phosphates are the  most  critical  ones.




We in Pennsylvania are concerned naturally about the  pollu-




tion of Lake Erie.  We have an important recreational




resource there, as you know,  Mr. Secretary,  at the  present




time, but I think we are also concerned about the fact that




this committee really needs to be backed up  with a  great




deal more research than is  now going on in the Federal




establishment.  I hope your Department  will  lend support




towards that effort.




           I know such efforts have already  been initiated,




as Mr. Poston indicated, but  this we consider very  important,




simply because there are so many unanswered  questions.




           We all, I think, want the committee to go  on.

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                                                    66
They are going to have to be backed up by a massive
research effort.  Certainly we want to go ahead and abate
pollution, as we have done In Pennsylvania, and as  the  other
States are doing, and this will help the lake.
           However, I don't think we have all the answers
yet.  We need a lot more answers.
           SECRETARY UDALL:  Well, I would certainly agree
with you that the phosphate problem is one of the most
serious unanswered questions that we have.
           I think the convening of this conference is  an
indication cf the priority that we give to this lake.   We
are confident that the new legislation that is  going to be
passed will give us additional monies.
           I would certainly agree that there are many
areas of research that were covered by this report  that
deserve to be strengthened.  I think I can assure you that
we will do the very best we can in this field.
           MR. POSTON:  Mr. Chairman, I feel very confident
in this matter of phosphate removal.  I think that this
technical committee has served very well in carrying out
our recommendation, or the conferees' recommendation,  that
the Administration keep the States informed of the latest
information on phosphate removal.  We have brought in
experts not only within our own agency, but experts from

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                                                   67




around the country who have the very latest information



on phosphate removal.  We have been * le to pass this  on



through this medium.



           I think this committee can serve in this capacity



in the future.  We have studies going on, and have had




studies going on, in San Antonio, and we hope to release



very soon a research report on removal of phosphates.




           We are very optimistic and confident that we can



remove phosphates from all of these municipal and industrial



wastes, and it isn't going to be the job or the tremendous



expense that some people have felt it may be.



           SECRETARY UDALL:  Well, does the San Antonio



experiment indicate that there may be a new process of




phosphate removal that represents a new breakthrough of



sorts?



           MR. POSTON:  Essentially it is an operating



phenomenon with the increased solids, increased amount of



air and rapid removal of solids as it gets into the final



settling tank, as a procedure for removing this.



           Now, this can be done in some of the existing




plants as they are already constructed, as it was found in




San Antonio, where, with three plants, two of them had been



removing oractically no phosphates, the one plant was doing



an 80 to 90$ job, and then, by changes in these two plants

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                                                      68
which were receiving the same kind of sewage and located
on the same grounds, they have been able to step up that
removal to 80 or 90^.
         SECRETARY UDALL:  In other words,  instead of
having to go to additional facilities and tertiary treat-
ment, we may be able to accomplish this through added
techniques with existing equipment?
         MR. POSTON:  That is right.
         SECRETARY UDALL:  I think this is  the sort of
thing that indicates we are reaping the fruits of earlier
investment in research.
         I was telling Mayor Locher this morning about one
project that we made a grant on a month ago, that I think
would be of interest to most of the municipal people here.
         One of the big, tough problems that we have in
this country, and the most expensive problem, really, is
the problem of separation of storm and sanitary sewers -- a
problem that most of our cities have.
         We made a grant of nearly $1 million to St. Paul-
Minneapolis, which they will match, to carry out a program
designed -- and we know each system has peculiarities --
to find out whether in terms of using existing or potential
reservoir capacities or managing sanitary sewer systems on
a computer basis, we cannot hold back or prevent the normal
process of overflowing and bypassing.  It may be that a

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                                                       69





computer system can direct the holding of discharges in



reservoirs and direct the utilization of other unused



capacity temporarily to achieve the sort of control that



management has over electric power systems.  We hope that



such a computerized system can achieve perhaps as high



as 80 percent to 95 percent control in terms of what



happens normally when a storm occurs.




         Now, if we can do this,  we may have achieved



a tremendous shortcut, whereby we can at least achieve



in this interim period an 85 to 90 percent goal in terms



of preventing raw sewage from entering our watercourses



and our lakes at a very small cost, as compared with the



enormous cost of actual physical  separation.



         We do not know what the  results will be of this,



but this is the type of project that we are very excited



by, and we say to all of the cities if you have one



equally exciting or promising, just lay it on our door and



maybe something favorable will happen.



         MR. QUIGLEY:  Mr. Secretary, I might note for



the record the City of Detroit has come in with a somewhat




comparable proposal that we now have under consideration.




The only difference is basically that Detroit is more

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                                                     70




modest in its expectation.  I think they are talking about



perhaps a 30 to 35 percent reduction.



           However, even this helps bring the problem down



to size, where we can maybe put a saddle on it and ride it.



           SECRETARY UDALL:  Let's move right ahead to the



first of our State reports.




           We will ask the spokesman,  at this point, for




the State of Michigan, to make its report.

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                                                  71

                  L. F. Oeming
                  R. W. Purdy


         STATEMENT OF LOERING F. OEMING, CONFEREE

         AND EXECUTIVE SECRETARY, MICHIGAN WATER

         RESOURCES COMMISSION



           MR. OEMING:  Mr. Chairman and Conferees:

           I want to introduce Mr. Ralph Purdy, Chief

Engineer of the Water Resources Commission, who will present

the statement on behalf of the Water Pollution Control

Agency in Michigan.

           We have a bound report to present here, and I

will pass this out to the conferees.  There are extra

copies available after this conference.
          STATEMENT OF RALPH W. PURDY, REPRESENTING

          THE MICHIGAN WATER RESOURCES COMMISSION

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                                                      72
                    R. W. Purdy

           MR. PURDY:  Secretary Udall, Commissioner

Quigley, Mr. Stein, Conferees, Ladies and Gentlemen:

           This report has been prepared for presentation

to the Conferees representing the States of Indiana,

Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and the Federal

Government in the matter of pollution of Lake Erie and its

tributaries.  It sets forth remedial action that the State

of Michigan Water Resources Commission has taken to abate

pollution and to achieve and preserve a water quality in the

Michigan waters of Lake Erie and its tributaries consistent

with the requirements of both State and Federal law.

           By letter of November 12, 1965, to the

Michigan Water Resources Commission, John W. Gardner, the

Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare, transmitted

a summary of two sessions of a conference on the pollution

of interstate and Ohio intrastate waters of Lake Erie and

its tributaries held August 3-5, 1965, in Cleveland, Ohio,

and August 10-12, 1965, in Buffalo, New York,  under the

provisions of Section 8 of the Federal Water Pollution

Control Act.  One of the conclusions was that the State

water pollution control agencies concerned present to the

Conferees, within six months after the issuance of the

summary, a schedule of remedial action for their

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                                                      73
                    R. W. Purdy

consideration and evaluation.  The Michigan Water

Resources Commission had on August 3,  1965> received from

Under Secretary Wilbur J. Cohen a comparable but more

specific conclusion growing out of a conference on the

pollution of the navigable waters of the Detroit River

and Lake Erie within the State of Michigan held June 15-18,

1965, in Detroit, Michigan.  The No. 5 recommendation of

that conference states :

           "The Report on Pollution of the Detroit

      River and the Michigan waters of Lake Erie and

      their tributaries, prepared by the U. S. Depart-

      ment of Health, Education, and Welfare, dated

      April 1965, will be submitted to the Michigan

      Water Resources Commission for implementation

      under State and local law.  Action taken by the

      Michigan Water Resources Commission will be

      reported to the Conferees at six-month inter-

      vals at public meetings to be called by the

      Chairman of the Conference.  The Conferees

      expect that a time schedule for  the control of

      pollution in the area covered by the Conference

      will be established by the Michigan Water

      Resources Commission regarding all sources of

      pollution within one year from the date of the

-------
                                                    74
                    R. W. Purdy

      issuance of this summary."

           Promptly upon receipt of the Detroit conference

summary, the Water Resources Commission initiated a fast-

moving program of remedial action, the details of which

are included in the report presented at the August 3-5>

1965, conference in Cleveland.  A brief resume of the

Commission's action program is presented as introductory

to the discussion of the subsequent proceedings and current

status.

           The Michigan Water Resources Commission on June

24, 1965* requested that the governmental units and the

industries involved appear for conferences to discuss the

recommendations in the Detroit River-Lake Erie Federal

Report and to explore and identify the issues as the

basis for a determination of further action; that the Com-

mission  staff develop water quality goals to be sought in

the Detroit River and Michigan waters of Lake Erie and

that the following procedure and program be pursued:

       1.  July 29, 1965.  Initial Commission

           approval of staff recommendations for

           water quality goals to be sought in the

           Detroit River and Michigan waters of Lake

           Erie.

       2.  August 25-26, 1965.  Public conference with

-------
                                                      75
                    R.  W.  Purdy
           Interested parties and final approval of
           water quality goals.
       3.  September 29-30 and October 1,  1965.
           Conference with municipalities  and in-
           dustries in the Detroit River area to
           discuss the specific recommendations  in
           the Federal Report pertaining to each and
           to explore and  identify the areas of  dis-
           agreement .
       4,  November 4,  19&5.   Conference with munici-
           palities and industries in the  Monroe-Lake
           Erie area to discuss the specific recom-
           mendations in the  Federal Report pertaining
           to each and to  explore and identify the
           areas of disagreement.
       5.  December 15> 1965.  Invoke the  statutory
           procedures or other appropriate action dis-
           closed by the preceding conferences to be
           required to establish programs  and dates for
           abatement of pollution determined to  be
           unlawful under State statutes.


           The interstate Lake Erie recommendations con-
tained in the November 12, 1965, summary were presented to

-------
                                                  76
                    R. W. Purdy
the Michigan Water Resources Commission at its December
1965 meeting and the members were of the opinion that the
program already established constituted the type and
extent of action which would lead to attainment of the
objectives emerging from both conferences.
           Now what has actually occurred?  On July 29,
1965t the Michigan Water Resources Commission received
from its staff proposed water quality goals to be sought
in the Detroit River and Michigan waters of Lake Erie.
The Commission accepted the staff recommendations as
tentative goals for presentation at a conference which was
held August 25, 1965, in Detroit.  Representatives of
governmental units, industries and other interested parties
were present.  Comments on the proposed goals were made
by representatives of twelve interested groups.  On August
26, 1965, the Commission considered the statements presented
at the conference and comments thereon by staff.  The
proposed water quality goals were amended and adopted and
they are shown in the report in Appendix A in their entirety,
The goals as adopted are intended to protect and enhance
present and future uses of the Detroit River and Michigan
waters of Lake Erie.
           Attention is invited in particular to the water

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                                                     77
                    R. W. Purdy

quality goals for Lake Erie at a location identified as

a line extending due east and west through the Detroit

River light to the international boundary near the debouch-

ment of the Detroit River and Lake Erie.


    Coliform (total organisms/100 ml)....Mean density of

                          less than 1,000.  (Determination
                          to be made at later date on

                          maximums).


    Dissolved oxygen (tng/l)	Minimum 6.0.

                          Daily average, greater than 7.0.

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                                                 78



               R. W. Purdy




Phenols £ug/l)	Maximum 5.0



                     Average, 2.0.








Oils and greases	No visible film of oil or globs




                     of grease.








Suspended and settleable solids...Limited to the




                     extent necessary to prevent the




                     formation of deposits of either




                     industrial or municipal waste




                     origin.








Chlorides (mg/1) as Cl...Limited to present levels




                     and reduced where feasible.




Iron (mg/1) as Fe....Less than 0.3.




Ammonia (mg/1) as NH~-N... Less than 0.2.








Phosphates (soluble mg/1) as P...Limited to the




                     extent necessary to prevent



                     stimulation of nuisance growths




                     of algae and weeds in the Detroit



                     River and Lake Erie.  On the




                     basis of the best information

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                                                  79
               R.  W.  Purdy
                     available  to  the  Commission at
                     this time  this  limitation  would
                     be in the  range of less  than
                     0,015 mg/1 of soluble  phosphates
                     expressed  as  phosphorus.
Cyanide (mg/1) as  CN...None detectable.
pH	7.0 to 8.5.


Color and turbidity..Not offensive in  appearance or
                     otherwise  unattractive as  the
                     result of  wastes  of industrial
                     or municipal  origin.


Dissolved organics...Limited to the  extent  necessary
                     to prevent interference  with the
                     use of the waters as a raw water
                     source for potable use where
                     applicable or which will not
                     produce a  detectable off flavor
                     in the flesh  of fish or  the
                     development of  fungi or  other
                     growths as the  result  of in-
                     dustrial or municipal  waste effluent

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                                                     80
                    R. W. Purdy
           Goals were also adopted for the Raisin River,
which is tributary to Lake Erie.  These are also shown
in Appendix A.
           The September and October conferences were
held as scheduled.  Interested parties from the Detroit
area (shown in Appendix B) and the Monroe area (shown in
Appendix C) were present to discuss the specific Federal
recommendations for effluent restrictions pertaining to
each and Michigan Water Resources Commission staff recom-
mendations for a time schedule to implement the Federal
recommendations. Areas of disagreement were identified;
however, on the whole, there were many areas of agreement
and it was evident that Michigan municipal units of govern-
ment and industries were ready to assume their obligation
to abate pollution of the Detroit River and Michigan
waters of Lake Erie.
           At its December 15, 1965, meeting, the
Michigan Water Resources Commission received from its
staff proposed effluent restrictions and time schedules
for performance of steps to be taken by each of the
industries and governmental units to abate their respective
contributions to the pollution of the Detroit River and
Michigan waters of Lake Erie.  The effluent restrictions

-------
                                                       81
                    R. W. Purdy

recommended were based upon the desired water quality

to be obtained in the receiving waters as established

by the goals previously adopted.  After lengthy discussion,

the meeting was recessed until the afternoon of January 6,

1966, so that the Commission members could have additional

time for consideration of the staff recommendations.  The

recommendations were reviewed further at the Commission

meeting on January 6, 1966.  With minor modifications,,

they were approved by the Commission for incorporation into

Stipulations or Notices of Determination and Hearing to

each governmental unit and industry involved -- the

Stipulations to afford opportunity for voluntary compli-

ance, and the Notices to initiate statutory enforcement

procedures for abatement in the cases where such agreement

could not be consummated.  The Commission directed that

the Stipulations or Notices in lieu thereof be presented

for consideration at its March 1966 meeting.  It is grati-

fying to report that all of the governmental units and

all but one industry comprising thirty-five waste dis-

posing entities have stipulated in formally executed

documents to meet the time schedules and effluent require-

ments established by the Commission.  The statutory

procedure of Notice of Determination and Hearing has been

-------
                                                        82





                  R. W. Purdy




initiated against the one industry that  failed to




accept the terms of the Stipulation presented to it.   The




initial phase of the statutory hearing was held April 28,




1966.   The company took issue with several of the terms




of the proposed Order contained in the Notice (Appendix




D) and the proceedings were referred to a hearing commis-




sioner for the taking of testimony and evidence and the




preparation of a record and proposal for a decision in-



cluding findings of fact and conclusion of law.  A date for




a continuation of the hearing will be set by the hearing




commissioner in the very near future.




           SECRETARY UDALL:  I wonder if I might interrupt




at this point, because I am going to favor, as the Cabinet




Officer responsible nationally for water pollution, a




rather brutally frank approach to the problem.



           I think we ought to have the name for the record




here today of this company.



           MR. PURDY:  Well, the complete Notice of




Determination and Hearing Is shown in Appendix D in the




report.  It is the proceedings against the Scott Paper




Company, a Pennsylvania corporation, for abatement of pollu-




tion of the Rouge River.




           SECRETARY UDALL:  Well, was this company asked

-------
                                                    83



                    R. W.  Purdy




to assume burdens or obligations that other similar




industries in the region are not asked to assume?




         MR. PURDY:  They were asked to reduce their




suspended solids down to the same level as other industries




that have a suspended solids problem.




         They have a biochemical oxygen demand problem




and they were asked to reduce their biochemical oxygen




demand load by the same percentage as others that have the




same sort of problem — for example, the municipalities.




         SECRETARY UDALL:   Well, I don't want to indicate




that I am attempting to pass judgment on this particular




case at this time.  Indeed, it is before your Commission




under your regular proceedings.  I assume it will move




forward.  However, we do not have in my Department, nor




does the Federal Water Pollution Control Administration




have, all of the enforcement powers that we would like to



have.  There are some that I suspect we would like to have




that Congress won't give us anyway, but there is one power




that we do have, and I propose that henceforth we use it,




Commissioner Quigley, and use it effectively wherever we can,




This is the power of what has been called pitiless publicity,




         I think, acting in a completely judicious way,




where we can, that industries in this country who will not

-------
                                                        84
                  R.  W.  Purdy


cooperate with the programs that the States or cities put


forward, or, for my part,  municipalities that do not have


good and valid reasons for not voting bond issues and will


vote down bond issues, we  ought to consider seriously in


the Department before the  year is out, again judiciously


weighing it, having a list that the Secretary of the


Interior will maintain of  filthy American industries and


filthy American cities.   We will simply let the Nation know


who these people are, what these communities are, and we


take them off the list when appropriate action is taken.


            (Applause.)


           This, if it is  done in the right way, it seems


to me might help to put the focus of public opinion where


it will help the most with regard to this clean-up program.


           This is the reason that I asked the question.


As I say, I do not want to be passing judgment on this


particular company.   It may be there are particular reasons


why they feel that they are a special case.  We will await


the determination.


           However, it does strike me that where you have


water quality standards set and you have a whole group of


industries that have  different types of effluents and they


all cooperate and one does not, I think a very serious

-------
                  R. W. Purdy                          85




burden falls on that Industry to justify its conduct,  or




falls on a city, if it refuses to vote bond issues where




other similar cities in similar States are taking action.




I think we have to have ways of measuring the national




effort, and we propose to do this not by way of interfering



with the actions of the State people, but to help the




State people carry out their own enforcement programs.




           MR. OEMING:  Mr. Chairman, by the same token, I




believe that backing all this up, we need to initiate  this




enforcement procedure, and the State of Michigan intends




to pursue the enforcement procedure where voluntary com-




pliance cannot be obtained.  This is the purpose of this




procedure.




           SECRETARY UDALL:  Well, the way for the States




to maintain their principal responsibilities and the way




for the States to keep the Federal Government from exer-




cising inordinate domination in this field, in my Judgment,




is aggressive action.  I am glad to see it; taking place in



this instance.




           MR. PURDY:  The Stipulations are binding agree-




ments — these are the Stipulations that I have referred to




with respect to the other 35 industries -- between the




Michigan Water Resources Commission and the governmental unit




or Industry involved.  Their provisions state that the

-------
                                                    86
                    R. W. Purdy

Commission is of the opinion that the waste discharges

are or may become injurious to the public health,  safety or

welfare; or are or may become injurious to domestic,

commercial, industrial, agricultural, recreational or

other uses which are being made of such waters;  or are  or may

become injurious to the value or utility of riparian lands;

or are or may become injurious to livestock,  wild  animals,

-------
                                                    87
                    R. W. Purdy



birds, fish, aquatic life or the growth or propagation



thereof be prevented or injuriously affected; or whereby



the value of fish and game is or may be destroyed or



impaired.  They provide for the Michigan Water Resources



Commission holding in abeyance the initiation of statutory



proceedings for pollution abatement of the waters of the



State as prescribed in Section 7, Act 245> Public Acts of



1929, as amended, to allow for a voluntary program to be



completed.  Waste effluent restrictions and time



schedules for performance are defined in the Stipulations



as well as requirements for reporting upon the waste



constituents discharged.  A further provision sets forth



that if there is a failure to meet timely any of the



provisions of the agreement, the Michigan Water Resources



Commission may, following notice to the party involved of



its default of the agreement, enter a Final Order of


Determination incorporating the provisions of the agreement



and requiring compliance with the uncompleted terms of



the agreement.  Appendix E is a summary of the restrictions



and time schedules contained in the Stipulations.



           The Stipulations with the governmental units



set a maximum effluent loading expressed in pounds per day



for biochemical oxygen demanding substances, suspended solids,



phenols, and soluble phosphates.  They restrict the

-------
                    R. W. Purdy                     38




concentration of oils and greases to 15 milligrams per



liter and total coliform content to 1,000 organisms per



100 ml, which is in the effluent from the waste treatment



plant.  The time schedule in general calls for the



completion of a preliminary engineering study and basis



of design for needed facilities by April 1, 1967; for



final construction plans and specifications to be approved




by November 1, 1968; and to finish construction and place




the facilities in operation by November 1, 1970.  There



is some variation between the Stipulations in time



scheduling of certain steps and requirements to accommodate



special conditions, but  in no case is the deadline for



meeting the required effluent restrictions later than




November 1, 1970.  In fact, May 1, 1969, is the deadline



for the governmental units in the Monroe area.  The City



of Detroit, in addition to the above requirements common



to  all Stipulations with governmental units, has agreed



to take immediate steps to decrease, wherever possible,



combined storm and sewage overflows by more effectively



utilizing the storage capabilities of the sewer system and



by improved operation of flow regulators and diversion



devices.  Also, it has agreed to make a study of methods




and cost of reducing the frequency, magnitude, and



polluting content of overflows of combined storm and

-------
                                                     89
                    R.  W.  Purdy
sewage water from the city's sewer system and to submit
a report thereon to the Michigan Water Resources Commission
on or before April 1, 1968.
           The Stipulation with industry, where applicable,
set a maximum effluent  loading expressed in pounds per
day for oxygen-consuming substances, phenols, iron, soluble
phosphates, chlorides and  cyanides.  They restrict the
concentration of suspended solids to 50 milligrams per
liter, except in the Monroe area, where the restriction is
35 milligrams per liter; oils and greases to 15 milligrams
per liter; iron to 17 milligrams per liter; cyanide to
0.025 milligrams per liter; and total coliform content
to 1,000 organisms per 100 ml.  The schedules for meeting
the required effluent restrictions vary, but in no case
does the time period extend beyond November 1, 1969, and,
in some, calls for compliance by April 1, 196?.
           The Michigan legislature gave recognition to
the new responsibilities imposed by Federal and State
legislation relative to conducting industry and municipal
visitation programs, stream evaluation programs and
comprehensive stream surveys in Senate Concurrent Resolution
125 adopted October 1965.   This resolution authorized the
doubling of the Michigan Water Resources Commission

-------
                                                   90
                    R. W. Purdy

pollution enforcement staff effective January 1, 1966.

Pull-time staff at the district headquarters serving

the southeastern portion of Michigan has been expanded,

enabling the surveillance and inspection activity to be

intensified.  A new, completely equipped laboratory will


be in operation by July 1 of this year.  Visual sur-

veillance of the Detroit River initiated in I960 has been

further augmented by the establishment of a regular

sampling program.  Samples are routinely obtained and

tested from outlets discharging to the Detroit River and

from the river itself.  Visual surveillance maintained

over the past six years by means of a helicopter when ice


interferes with the operation of a boat is being continued


with increasing frequency.  The Huron and Raisin Rivers

are being and have been sampled routinely since March of

1963.  The data collected from the sampling station on the

Huron River are shown in Appendix P and for the Raisin

River in Appendix G.

           All of the communities located in the Huron and


Raisin River Basins that have sewer systems provide at

least primary treatment and chlorination, with 94# of the


I960 population served in the Huron Basin and 5^# in the

Raisin River Basin discharging to secondary treatment


systems.  A program for secondary treatment at Monroe has

-------
                                                   91
                    R. W. Purdy

been established and will raise to 90#> the population

tributary to secondary treatment.  With respect to

maximizing phosphate removal at existing secondary plants,

information is awaited from research programs now under-

way by the Federal Water Pollution Control Administration

after which the results will be translated into required

modifications or operating procedures.  There are other

communities located in the Basins, generally with popula-

tions of less than 1,000, that do not have sewers for

collection of wastes but where raw sewage of human origin

is discharged to surface ditches and drains.

           The Michigan Water Resources Commission has

held conferences with the involved governmental units

predicated upon the 1965 amendment to the Michigan Water

Pollution Control Act which makes the discharge of any raw

sewage of human origin prima facie evidence of a violation

of the Act.  The conferences are for the purpose of ascer-

taining what action needs to be taken by the Commission

to abate the discharges.

           With respect to the Michigan portion of the

Maumee River Basin, only two communities have sewer

systems and both provide either secondary treatment or its

equivalent.  In addition, the Michigan Water Resources Commission

-------
                                                       92




                    R. W. Purdy




on May 27, 1966, held its first public hearing for the



establishment of water quality criteria for the Maumee




River Basin interstate waters as required by Section 10




of Public Law 89-234, the Water Quality Act of 1965.  The




proposed criteria and program for implementation are shown




in Appendix H.  At the close of the hearing the criteria




ano program for implementation were referred by the Commis-




sion to staff for analyses of the hearing record together




with the Federal Guidelines released May 11, 1966, with




recommendations to be made for Commission consideration at




a subsequent meeting.




           Existing programs in relation to such items as




disinfection of municipal waste effluents, prevention of




accidental losses, prevention of bypassing of untreated




waste and elimination of combined sewers are continuing




and have been strengthened.  Solid waste disposal is



controlled by new legislation, Act 87, Public Acts of 1965,




Any person, partnership, corporation, or governmental unit




or agency thereof operating a refuse dump must post a




performance bond and obtain a license through the Michigan




Department of Public Health.  Regional planning is an



important approach toward meeting and correcting pollution




problems.  An outstanding example of this is the overall

-------
                    R. W. Purdy                      93




long-range general plan that was developed for sewerage




and surface runoff or dainage for Macomb, Monroe, Oakland,




St. Glair, Washtenaw and Wayne Counties,  located In south-




eastern Michigan and comprising, in general,  the metro-




politan area surrounding the City of Detroit.  This plan




includes the determination of future needs, a plan showing




existing and programmed systems, forecast of population and




urban development, future capacity requirements, technical




standards to be employed, cost estimates, and an administra-




tive method of construction, operation and maintenance.




The study was made as the result of the awareness of the




need on the part of the Supervisors Inter-County Committee




from the above-mentioned counties for an overall look at




the sewerage problems and was financed through contribu-




tions and grants from industry, local government, and the




U.S. Public Health Service.



           The previous report made to the Conferees closed




by stating:



           "The protection and enhancement of this




     great water resource (Lake Erie) must neces-




     sarily be a cooperative effort involving the




     Federal Government, the several states,  and the




     waste contributing cities and industries with

-------
                                              94
                    R. W.  Purdy


     each of these entities playing its appropriate


     role supported by an alert and responsible


     citizenry."


           The orderly processes of investigation  and


administrative procedures  which have been initiated and


which have been pursued by the State of Michigan in the


acceptance and discharge of its obligations amply


demonstrate the soundness  of this position.  They  assure


the realization of the objectives of the people, through


the partnership of their State and Federal governments for


water quality of Lake Erie.


           That is the end of my statement.


           I would ask that the entire statement with the


appendices be included as  part of the record.


           MR. QUIGLEY:  That will be included as  part of


the record.


           (The appendices referred to are as follows:)

-------
                                          95
           APPENDIX A
       WATER QUALITY GOALS

             for the

     MICHIGAN WATERS OP THE
   DETROIT RIVER AND LAKE ERIE
         Adopted By The
MICHIGAN WATER RESOURCES COMMISSION
         August 26, 1965

-------
S.S
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-------
                                                      97





     WATER USES TO BE IMPROVED AND PROTECTED








Detroit River




    Dt 30.8W to Pt. Hennepln




           Commercial shipping




           Sport fishing




           Waterfowl




           Recreational boating




           Swimming




           Water skiing




           Marinas




           Raw water source for potable use




           Industrial water source




                Process uses



                Cooling and condensing uses




           Esthetics




           Thermoelectric power plant condensing water








Michigan Waters of Fighting Island Channel, Pt. Hennepin




to Dt. 3.9



           Commercial shipping




           Sport fishing




           Waterfowl




           Recreational boating

-------
                                                        98
           Swimming
           Water skiing
           Esthetics

Trenton Channel, Ft. Hennepln to Dt 3.9
           Commercial shipping
           Sport fishing
           Waterfowl
           Recreational boating
           Swimming
           Water skiing
           Marinas
           Industrial water uses
               Process water
               Cooling and condensing water
           Esthetics

Lake Erie
     Michigan Waters
           Commercial shipping
           Sport fishing
           Commercial fishing
           Waterfowl
           Recreational boating

-------
                                                     99
           Swimming
           Water skiing
           Marinas
           Raw water source for potable use
           Industrial water uses
               Process water
               Cooling and condensing water
           Esthetics
           Thermoelectric or thermonuclear power plant
            condensing water

Rouge River
     1-94 Bridge to Zug Island Channel
           Commercial shipping (Limited to designated channel)
           Waterfowl
           Recreational boating
           Industrial water uses
               Process water
               Cooling water

Raisin River
     U. S. 24 Bridge to Mouth
           Commercial shipping (Limited to designated channel)
           Waterfowl

-------
                                        100
Recreational boating
Industrial water uses
     Process water
     Cooling water
Esthetics

-------
                                                  103
                    APPENDIX B
                    Conferences
                       with
       Detroit Industries and Governmental Units
                   September 29, 30
                         and
                    October 1, 1965


City of Detroit
Wayne County Department of Public Works
Wayne County Drain Commissioner
City of Riverview
City of Trenton
Township of Grosse lie, Wayne County
Great Lakes Steel Corporation, Division of National Steel
    Corporation
Ford Motor Company
American Cement Corporation, Peerless Division
Darling and Company
Wyandotte Chemicals Corporation
Pennsalt Chemicals Corporation
McLouth Steel Corporation
Revere Copper and Brass,  Incorporated

-------
                                                     104
Firestone Steel Products Division, The Firestone Tire
and Rubber Company

Mobil Oil Company
Monsanto Company
Allied Chemical Corporation
Scott Paper Company
E, I. duPont de Nemours, Incorporated

-------
                                                       101
MICHIGAN

                               ONTARIO
                                                M
                                                 5
                                                s I
                                                ! ••

-------
                                                               102
T ••-
              IS
 ^r'"
                        LAKE      ERIE
                                                     |Hj
                                                     it!
                                                     n

-------
                                                       105
                    APPENDIX C
                    Conference

                       with

      Monroe Industries and Governmental Units



                  November 4, 1965




City of Monroe

Village of Estral Beach

Village of South Rockwood

Monroe County Drain Commissioner

Township of Erie, Monroe County

Township of LaSalle, Monroe County

Township of Berlin, Monroe County

Township of Frenchtown, Monroe County

Township of Monroe, Monroe County

Time Container Corporation

Consolidated Packaging Corporation

Union Bag-Camp Paper Corporation

Ford Motor Company

-------
                                                     106




                    APPENDIX D








                STATE OF MICHIGAN




           WATER RESOURCES COMMISSION
Proceedings Against SCOTT PAPER COMPANY  :




a Pennsylvania Corporation,  for Abatement:




of Pollution of the ROUGE RIVER	:_








        NOTICE OF DETERMINATION AND HEARING








TO:  SCOTT PAPER COMPANY, A  PENNSYLVANIA CORPORATION,



     DETROIT, MICHIGAN








YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the Water Resources Commis-




  sion, after due consideration of complaints received



  and of investigations made,  is of the opinion and has



  determined that you are violating the provisions of Act




  245, Public Acts of 1929,  as amended, in  that you have




  failed and are failing to  control the polluting content




  of industrial wastes discharged by you or permitted by




  you to be discharged to the  Rouge River from a plant




  owned and operated by you  at Detroit, Michigan, which



  act creates in the Rouge River conditions contrary to

-------
                                                       107
the public interest.   The specific violation is as follows:


1.  Scott Paper Company discharges industrial wastes into the
    Rouge River from  its Detroit plant,  said wastes contain-
    ing suspended solids and oxygen consuming substances.


YOU ARE FURTHER NOTIFIED that it is the  opinion of the
  Commission that said wastes discharged by the Company
  are or may become injurious to the public welfare; pr
  are or may become injurious to domestic,  commercial,
  industrial, recreational,  or other uses which are being
  made of such waters; or are or may become injurious to the
  value or utility of riparian lands; or are or may become
  injurious to birds, fish,  aquatic life, or plants or the
  growth or propagation thereof be prevented or injuriously
  affected; or whereby the value of fish and game are or may
  be destroyed or impaired.
YOU ARE FURTHER NOTIFIED that to abate the pollution of
  Rouge River the Commission has under consideration the
  adoption of a Final Order of Determination requiring you
  to comply with the following conditions and restrictions:


  1.  Treat or control the Industrial wastes from your
      manufacturing operations to the extent that when

-------
                                                   108
   discharged to the Rouge River they shall:


   a.  Not contain more than fifty (50) milligrams per
       liter nor add more than eighteen thousand three
       hundred (18,300) pounds per day of suspended
       solids, as a result of Company operations.
   b.  Not add more than thirty one thousand (31 .,000)
       pounds per day of oxygen consuming substances, as
       measured by the five-day biochemical oxygen
       demand test, as a result of the Company operations,


2.  Provide facilities capable of producing the waste
    effluent quality specified in paragraph 1 hereof
    according to the following time schedule:


    a.  Submit construction plans and specifications for
        facilities to attain the limitations on suspended
        solids to the Chief Engineer of the Commission
        and obtain his approval thereof by November 1,
        1966.
    be  Complete construction of facilities to attain
        cne limitations on suspended solids and place
        same in operation by November 1, 19^7.
    c.  Submit preliminary engineering study and basis
        of design for facilities to attain limitations on

-------
                                                     109



          oxygen  consuming  substances  by  November  1,  1966.




      d.   Submit  construction plans  and specifications  for



          facilities  to  attain limitations  on  oxygen




          consuming substances to  the  Chief Engineer  of




          the  Commission and  obtain  his approval thereof



          by November 1, 1967.




      e.   Complete  construction of facilities  to attain




          the  limitations on  oxygen  consuming  substances




          and  place same in operation  by  November  1,  1968.








  3.   Perform  analyses to determine  the content of the




      substances  enumerated in paragraph  1  hereof  to  the




      extent necessary and  sufficient  to  demonstrate




      compliance  status  and file reports  of said analyses




      with the Chief Engineer of the Commission at the  end




      of each month,  beginning January 3l>  1967.



  4.   Failure  to  meet timely  any requirement of the proposed




      Final Order shall constitute a default of the entire




      Order.








YOU ARE FURTHER NOTIFIED that a hearing on  the facts  and  the




  above proposed  Order will be provided you and held  by the




  Commission at 3:00 p.m.,  April 28, 1966,  in  Room 514  of




  the Veterans Memorial Building,  Detroit,  Michigan.

-------
                                                     110





YOU ARE FURTHER NOTIFIED that unless the hearing discloses




  that testimony will be unnecessary and agreement on the




  facts and proposed action can be reached between the




  parties by stipulation, by agreed settlement,  by consent




  Order or default,  the Commission will adjourn  the




  hearing and will refer to its Hearing Commissioner the




  taking of all testimony, evidence and arguments on the




  facts and the law  relating to the above proposed Order.




YOU ARE FURTHER NOTIFIED that upon completion of the




  testimony, evidence and arguments and service  upon you




  of the Hearing Commissioner's record including his proposal




  for a decision including findings of fact and  conclusions




  of law, the Commission will set a date for final hearing




  upon the record made before the Hearing Commissioner at




  which time full and fair opportunity to argue  and present




  contentions orally to the Commission will be provided in




  accordance with Rules 6 and 7, Commission Rules of




  Procedure, following which decision will be rendered by




  the Commission on the adoption of a Final Order of Deter-




  mination for abatement of the pollution herein described.








  The files and records of the Department of Conservation,




  Michigan Department of Public Health and Water Resources




  Commission pertaining to the aforesaid violation will be

-------
                                                    Ill
  available for inspection prior to or at the hearing and
  will be presented at the statutory hearing as evidence of
  said violation.
This Notice was adopted at the March 31, 1966 meeting of the
  Commission in accordance with the provisions of Act 245*
  Public Acts of 1929, as amended, on motion by Mr. Gilmore,
  supported by Mr. vogt and unanimously carried.

                    PRESENT AND VOTING:

Gerald E. Eddy, for Director of Conservation, Chairman
Lynn F. Baldwin, for Conservation Groups, Vice Chairman
John E. Vogt, for Director of Public Health
James V. Murray, for State Highway Commission
Stanley Quackenbush, for Director of Agriculture
Jim Gilmore, for Industrial Management Groups
George F. Liddle, for Municipal Groups

-------
                                                  112
                    APPENDIX E








       Summary of Restrictions and Time Schedules



                         in




                  Executed Stipulations
CITY OF DETROIT




Waste Constituent




5-day Biochemical Oxygen Demand




Suspended Solids








Phenol




Total Coliform M.p.H.




Phosphates








Oil
Maximum of 206,000 Ibs/day




Maximum of 50 mg/1 and




  324,000 Ibs/day



Maximum of 93 Ibs/day




Maximum of 1,000




Minimum of 80# removal and



  maximum of 21,000 Ibs/day




Maximum of 15 mg/1
Analyses shall be made of the effluent waste constituents



listed, to the extent necessary and sufficient to demonstrate



compliance status and shall be filed with the Chief Engineer



at the end of each month beginning February 1, 1967.
Time schedule for construction of facilities to implement



the above waste effluent criteria limits :

-------
                                                    113
Complete preliminary engineering

  study and basis of design by       April 1, 1967

Construction plans and specifica-

  tions approved by                  November 1, 1968

Finish construction b-"               November 1, 1970


A study shall be made of the combined storm water overflow

problem to determine effective methods of control and

related costs and shall be submitted to the Commission by

April 1, 1968.


Immediate steps shall be taken to decrease, wherever

possible, combined storm water overflows by more effectively

utilizing the storage capabilities of the sewer system and

by proper operation of regulators and diversion devices.



WAYNE COUNTY

Waste Constituent
5-day Biochemical Oxygen Demand    Maximum of 28,900 Ibs/day

Suspended Solids                   Maximum of 50 mg/1 and

                                     19,000 Ibs/day

Phenol                             Maximum of 10 Ibs/day

Oil                                Maximum of 15 mg/1

-------
Total Coliform M.P.N.
Phosphates
                 114





Maximum of 1,000




  (April-November)




Minimum of 80$ removal and



  maximum of 3*000 Ibs/day
Analyses shall be made of the effluent, waste constituents




listed, to the extent necessary and sufficient to demonstrate




compliance status and shall be filed with the Chief Engineer




at the end of each month beginning February 1, 1967.








Time schedule for construction of facilities to implement




the above waste effluent criteria limits :
Complete preliminary engineering




  study and basis of design by




Construction plans and specifica-



  tions approved by




Finish construction by
  April 1, 1967









  November 1, 1968




  November 1, 1970
CITY OF RIVERVIEW




Waste Constituent




5-day Biochemical Oxygen Demand




Suspended Solids
Maximum of 920 Ibs/day




Maximum of 50 mg/1 and




  470 Ibs/day

-------
Phenol
Oil
Total Collform M.P.N
Phosphates
                  115




Maximum of 0.2 Ibs/day




Maximum of 15 mg/1




Maximum of 1,000




  (April-November)




Minimum of 8C$ removal and




  Maximum of 35 Ibs/day
Analyses shall be made of the effluent waste constituents




listed, to the extent necessary and sufficient to demonstrate




compliance status and shall be filed with the Chief Engineer




at the end of each month beginning February 1, 1967.








Time schedule for construction of facilities to implement




the above waste effluent criteria limits:
Complete preliminary engineering




  study and basis of design by




Construction plans and specifica-




  tions approved by




Finish construction by
  April 1, 1967








  November 1, 1968




  November 1, 1970
CITY OF TRENTON
Waste Constituent^
5-day Biochemical Oxygen Demand    Maximum of  1,8^0 Ibs/day

-------
                                                    116





Suspended Solids                   Maximum of 50 mg/1 and




                                     935 Ibs/day




Phenol                             Maximum of 5  Ibs/day




Oil                                Maximum of 15 mg/1




Total Collform M.P.N.              Maximum of 1,000




                                    (April-November)



Phosphates                         Minimum of 80$ removal and




                                     Maximum of  138 Ibs/day








Analyses shall be made of the effluent  waste constituents




listed, to the extent necessary and sufficient to demonstrate




compliance status and shall be filed with the Chief Engineer




at the end of each month beginning February 1, 196?.








Time schedule for construction of facilities to  implement




the above waste effluent criteria limits :








Complete preliminary engineering




  study and basis of design by     April 1, 1968




Construction plans and specifica-




  tions approved by                November 1, 1969




Finish construction by             November I, 1970

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                                                    117
GROSSE IEE TOWNSHIP




Waste Constituent




5-day Biochemical Oxygen Demand



Suspended Solids








Phenol




Total Coliform M.P.N.








^hosphates








Oil
Maximum of 980 Ibs/day



Maximum of 50 mg/1 and



  500 Ibs/day




Maximum of 1 Ib/day




Maximum of 1,000




  (April-November)




Minimum of 80^ removal and




  Maximum of 20 Ibs/day




Maximum of 15 mg/1
Analyses shall be made of the effluent waste constituents




listed, to the extent necessary and sufficient to demonstrate




compliance status and shall be filed with the Chief Engineer




at the end of each month beginning February 1, 1967.








Time schedule for construction of facilities to implement




the above waste effluent criteria limits:
 Complete  preliminary engineering study



   and  basis of design by                April  1, 1967




 Construction  plans  and  specifications



   approved by




 Finish construction by
      November  1,  1968




      November  1,  1970

-------
                                                    118






GREAT LAKES STEEL CORPORATION




Waste Constituent




Suspended Solids (l,  2,  3)         Maximum of 50 mg/1




Phenol (l)                         Maximum of 180 Ibs/day




Acid Waste pH (3)                  5.5 - 10.6




Oil (l, 2, 3)                      Maximum of 15 mg/1




Iron (3)                           Maximum of 17 mg/1 and



                                     4,000 Ibs/day








Analyses shall be made of the effluent waste constituents




listed, to the extent necessary and sufficient to demonstrate




compliance status and shall be filed with the Chief Engineer




at the end of each month beginning January 31* 196?•








Time schedule for construction of facilities to Implement




the above waste effluent criteria limits :








Construction plans and specifications




  for waste constituent reduction,




  other than acid, iron, and No. 11




  Ecorse plant outfall approved by         November 1, 1966




Finish construction of facilities




  for waste constituent reduction,




  other than acid, iron, and No. 11

-------
                                                       119
Conduct study of actual outfall




  No. 11 basin water quality
  Ecorse plant outfall by            April 1, 1968




Construction plans and specifica-




  tions for acid and iron reduction




  approved by                        December 1, 1<




Finish construction of facilities




  for acid and iron reduction by     April I, 1969




Submit report on scale model test




  study on Ecorse plant No. 11




  outfall by



Complete modifications indicated




  by model test study by
November 1, 1966
April 1, 1967
April 1-June 30, 1967
     If study of basin water quality



     shows need for additional




     treatment facilities to meet




     stipulation limits;




Construction plans and specifications




  for outfall No. 11 approved by      October 1967




Finish construction of treatment




  facilities for No. 11 outfall by    October 1968




(l)  Blast Furnace Division  (2)  Strip Mill  (3)  Ecorse Plant

-------
                                                        120




FORD MOTOR COMPANY (ROUGE PLANT),  DEARBORN




Waste Constituent



Suspended Solids                   Maximum of 50 mg/1




Phenol                             Maximum of 70 Ibs/day




Iron                               Maximum of 17 mg/1 and




                                     2.,500 Ibs/day




Oil                                Maximum of 15 mg/1








Analyses shall be made of the effluent waste constituents




listed, to the extent necessary and sufficient to demonstrate




compliance status and shall be filed with the Chief Engineer




at the end of each month beginning January 31, 1967.








Time schedule for construction of facilities to implement




the above waste effluent criteria limits:
Construction plans and specifications




  for waste constituent reduction,



  other than iron and suspended solids




  approved by




Finish construction of facilities for
October 1, 1966
  waste constituent reduction, other




  than iron and suspended solids           Seventeen months



                                   after approval of plans

-------
                                                       121
Construction plans and specifications
  for iron and suspended solids reduction
  approved by                              March 1,  1967
Finish construction of facilities
  for iron reduction                       Twenty-four months
                                           after approval of
                                           plans

Finish construction of facilities
  for removal of suspended solids          Twenty-seven months
                                           after approval of
                                           plans


AMERICAN CEMENT CORPORATION, PEERLESS DIVISION

Waste Constituent
Suspended Solids                   Maximum of 50 mg/1


Analyses shall be made of the effluent waste constituent
listed, to the extent necessary and sufficient to demonstrate
compliance status and shall be filed with the Chief Engineer
at the end of each month beginning January 31, 196?.


Time schedule for construction of facilities to implement

the above waste effluent criteria limit:

-------
                                                      122
Construction plans and specifications




  approved by




Finish construction by
        May 1, 1966




        May 1, 1967
DARLING AND COMPANY




Waste Constituent




5-day Biochemical Oxygen Demand




Total Coliform M.P.N.
Maximum of 600 Ibs/day




Maximum of 1,000
Analyses shall be made of the effluent waste constituents




listed, to the extent necessary and sufficient to demonstrate



compliance status and shall be filed with the Chief Engineer



at the end of each month beginning January 31, 1967.








Time schedule for construction of facilities to implement




the above waste effluent criteria limits:








Construction plans and specifications




  approved by                              November 1, 1966




Finish construction by                     November 1, 1967
WYANDOTTE CHEMICALS CORPORATION
Waste Constituent

-------
Suspended Solids
Oil
Chlorides
North Plant
               South Plant
                   123
Maximum of 50 mg/1
Maximum of 15 mg/1 - all
  outlets
Maximum of 1,300,000 Ibs/day
Maximum of 550,000 Ibs/day
Analyses shall be made of the effluent waste constituents
listed, to the extent necessary and sufficient to demonstrate
compliance status and shall be filed with the Chief Engineer
at the end of each month beginning January 31* 1967.

Time schedule for construction of facilities to implement the
above waste effluent criteria limits:
Construction plans and specifications
  approved by
Finish construction by
                            November 1, 1966
                            April 1, 1968
Continue investigating alternate methods of chloride and
concentrated brine disposal with the view of reducing the
discharge of these materials to the Detroit River.
PENNSALT CHEMICALS CORPORATION
Waste Constituent

-------
                                                      124





Suspended Solids                   Maximum of 50 mg/1




Chlorides            East Plant    Maximum of 500,000 Ibs/day




                     West Plant    Maximum of 8,800 Ibs/day








Analyses shall be made of the effluent  waste constituents




listed, to the extent necessary and sufficient to demonstrate




compliance status and shall be filed with the Chief Engineer




at the end of each month beginning January 31, 1967.








Time schedule for construction of facilities to implement




the above waste effluent criteria limits:








Construction plans and specifications




  approved by                              November 1,  1966




Finish construction by                     April 1, 1968








Continue investigation, at the East Plant, of alternate




methods of chloride and concentrated brine disposal with




the view of reducing the discharge of these materials to




the Detroit River.








MC LOUTH STEEL CORPORATION, TRENTON PLANT




Waste Constituent

-------
                                                     125
Suspended Solids                   Maximum of 50 mg/1
Iron                               Maximum of 17 mg/1 and
                                     2,500 Ibs/day
Oil                                Maximum of 15 mg/1

Analyses shall be made of the effluent waste constituents
listed, to the extent necessary and sufficient to demonstrate
compliance status and shall be filed with the Chief Engineer
at the end of each month beginning January 31> 1967.


Time schedule for construction of facilities to implement
the above waste effluent criteria limits:


Construction plans and specifications
  approved by                      November 1, 1966
Finish construction by             April 1, 1968

REVERE COPPER AND BRASS, INCORPORATED
Waste Constituent
Suspended Solids                   Maximum of 50 mg/1
Oil                                Maximum 15 mg/1


Analyses shall be made of the effluent waste constituents
listed, to the extent necessary and sufficient to demonstrate

-------
                                                     126



compliance status and shall be filed with the Chief Engineer




at the end of each month beginning January 31, 1967.








Time schedule for construction of facilities to implement




the above waste effluent criteria limits:
Construction plans and specifications




  approved by




Finish construction by
        November 1, 1966



        November 1, 1967
FIRESTONE TIRE AND RUBBER COMPANY
Waste Constituent
Iron
Maximum of 17 mg/1 and




  330 Ibs/day
Analyses shall be made of the effluent waste constituent




listed, to the extent necessary and sufficient to demonstrate



compliance status and shall be filed with the Chief Engineer




at the end of each month beginning January 31> 1967.








Time schedule for construction of facilities to implement




the above waste effluent criteria limit:
Construction plans and specifications

-------
  approved by




Finish Construction by
                                                       127
November 1, 1966




November 1, 1967
MOBIL OIL COMPANY




Waste Constituent




Suspended Solids




Oil
Maximum of 50 mg/1




Maximum of 15 mg/1
Analyses shall be made of the effluent waste constituents




listed, to the extent necessary and sufficient to demonstrate




compliance status and shall be filed with the Chief Engineer




at the end of each month beginning January 31, 1967.








Time schedule for construction of facilities to implement




the above waste effluent criteria limits:








Construction plans and specifications




  approved by                              November 1, 1966



Finish construction by                     November 1, 1967
MONSANTO CHEMICALS CORPORATION, TRENTON RESINS PLANT




Waste Constituent




5-day Biochemical Oxygen Demand    Maximum of 2,800 Ibs/day

-------
                                                        128




Analyses shall be made of the effluent waste constituent




listed, to the extent necessary and sufficient to demonstrate



compliance status and shall be filed with the Chief Engineer



at the end of each month beginning January 31, 1967.








Time schedule for construction of facilities to implement




the above waste effluent criteria limit:








Complete preliminary engineering study



  and basis of design by                   November 1,  1966



Construction plans and specifications




  approved by                              April 1, 1967



Finish construction by                     April 1, 1968








MONSANTO CHEMICALS CORPORATION, INORGANIC CHEMICALS DIVISION



Waste Constituent



Phosphates                         Maximum of 2,000 Ibs/day








Analyses shall be made of the effluent waste constituent




listed, to the extent necessary and sufficient to demonstrate




compliance status and shall be filed with the Chief Engineer




at the end of each month beginning January 31* 19&7.








Time schedule for construction of facilities to implement

-------
the above waste effluent criteria limit:
                                                      129
Complete preliminary engineering study




  and basis of design by




Construction plans and specifications




  approved by




Start construction by




Finish construction by
                                           November 1,  1967








                                           August 1968




                                           November 1968




                                           November 1,  1969
Proceed immediately with presently authorized plans to




segregate in-plant waste flows and reduce known phosphate




discharges where possible.
ALLIED CHEMICAL CORPORATION, SQLVAY PROCESS DIVISION




Waste Constituent




                                   Maximum of 50 mg/1




                                   Maximum of 2,800,000 Ibs/day
Suspended Solids




Chlorides
Analyses shall be made of the effluent waste constituents




listed, to the extent necessary and sufficient to demonstrate



compliance status and shall be filed with the Chief Engineer




at the end of each month beginning January 31, 196?.
Time schedule for construction of facilities to implement

-------
                                                   130





the above waste effluent criteria limits:








Construction plans and specifications




  approved by                              November 1, 1966




Finish construction by                     April 1, 1968








ALLIED CHEMICAL CORPORATION, SEMET SOLVAY DIVISION




Waste Constituent




Oil                                None in amounts sufficient



                                     to cause a visible film




                                     on the surface waters








Analyses shall be made of the effluent waste constituent;




listed, to the extent necessary and sufficient to demonstrate




compliance status and shall be filed with the Chief Engineer




at the end of each month beginning January 31, 1967.








Time schedule for construction of facilities to implement




the above waste effluent criteria limit:








Construction plans and specifications




  approved by                              April 1, 1966




Finish construction by                     April 1, 1967

-------
                                                      131
E.I. DuPONT de NEMOURS AND COMPANY, INDUSTRIAL AND
  BIOCHEMICAL DIVISION
Waste Constituent
pH                                         5.8 - 10.3


Analyses shall De made of the effluent waste constituent
listed, to the extent necessary and sufficient to demonstrate
compliance status and shall be filed with the Chief Engineer
at the end of each month beginning January 31> 196?.


Time schedule for construction of facilities to implement
the above waste effluent criteria limit:


Construction plans and specifications
  approved by                              April 1, 1966
Finish construction by                     April 1, 1967


TIME CONTAINER CORPORATION MONROE PAPER PRODUCTS DIVISION
Waste Constituent
5-day Biochemical Oxygen Demand    Maximum of 500 Ibs/day
Suspended Solids                   Maximum of 35 mg/1 and
                                     650 Ibs/day
Total Coliform M.P.N.              Maximum of 1,000
                                     (April-November)

-------
                                                       132
Analyses shall be made of the effluent waste constituents




listed, to the extent necessary and sufficient to demonstrate




compliance status and shall be filed with the Chief Engineer



at the end of each month beginning January 31, 1967.








Time schedule for construction of facilities to implement




the above waste effluent criteria limits:
Complete preliminary engineering



  study and basis of design by




Construction plans and specifications



  approved by



Finish construction by
        January 1, 1967








        January 1, 1968




        January 1, 1969
CONSOLIDATED PACKAGING CORPORATION, NORTH PLANT




Waste Constituent




5-day Biochemical Oxygen Demand    Maximum of 2,400 Ibs/day
Suspended Solids
Total Coliform M.P.N.
Maximum of 35 mg/1 and




  2,200 Ibs/day




Maximum of 1,000 (April-



  November )
Analyses shall be made of the effluent waste constituents



listed, to the extent necessary and sufficient to demonstrate

-------
                                                    133
compliance status and shall be filed with the Chief Engineer
at the end of each month beginning January 31*
Time schedule for construction of facilities to implement
the above waste effluent criteria limits:
Complete preliminary engineering
  study and basis of design by
Construction plans and specifications
  approved by
Finish construction by
        January 1,  196?


        January 1,  1968
        January 1,  1969
CONSOLIDATED PACKAGING CORPORATION, SOUTH PLANT
Waste Constituent
5-day Biochemical Oxygen Demand    Maximum of 1,500 Ibs/day
Suspended Solids
Total Coliform M.P.N.
Maximum of 35 mg/1 and
  2,100 Ibs/day
Maximum of 1,000
  (April-November)
Analyses shall be made of the effluent waste constituents
listed, to the extent necessary and sufficient to demonstrate
compliance status and shall be filed with the Chief Engineer
at the end of each month beginning January 31, 1967.

-------
Time schedule for construction of facilities to implement



the above waste effluent criteria limits:
Complete preliminary engineering



  study and basis of design by



Construction plans and specifications



  approved by




Finish construction by
        January 1, 1967








        January 1, 1968



        January 1, 1969
UNION BAG-CAMP CORPORATION




Waste Constituent




5-day Biochemical Oxygen Demand



Suspended Solids








Total Coliform M.P.N.
Maximum of 2,500 Ibs/day




Maximum of 35 mg/1 and




  1,350 Ibs/day



Maximum of 1,000



  (April-November)
Analyses shall be made of the effluent waste constituents



listed, to the extent necessary and sufficient to demonstrate




compliance status and shall be filed with the Chief Engineer




at the end of each month beginning January 31, 1967.
Time schedule for construction of facilities to implement




the above waste effluent criteria limits:

-------
                                                      135
Complete preliminary engineering




  study and basis of design by




Construction plans and specifications




  approved by




Finish construction by
        January 1, 196?








        January 1, 1968




        January 1, 1969
FORD MOTOR COMPANY, MONROE




Waste Constituent




Cyanide








Oil reaching dilution canal




Phosphates




Total Coliform M.P.N.
Maximum of 0.025 mg/1



  and 25 Ibs/day




Maximum of 15 mg/1




Maximum of 200 Ibs/day




Maximum of 1,000



  (April-November)
Analyses shall be made of the effluent waste constituents




listed, to the extent necessary and sufficient to demonstrate




compliance status and shall be filed with the Chief Engineer



at the end of each month beginning January 31, 196?.
Time schedule for construction of facilities to implement



the above waste effluent criteria limits:

-------
Construction plans and specifications




  approved by




Finish construction
                 136









        December 1, 1967




        Twenty-four months




        after approval of



        plans
CITY OF MONROE




Waste Constituent




5-day Biochemical Oxygen Demand




Suspended Solids








Phosphates








Total Coliform M.P.N.
Maximum of 350 Ibs/day




Maximum of 50 mg/1 and



  1,200 Ibs/day




Minimum of 80^ removal and




  .Maximum of 128 Ibs/day




Maximum of 1,000



  (April-November)
Analyses shall be made of the effluent waste constituents




listed, to the extent necessary and sufficient to demonstrate




compliance status and shall be filed with the Chief Engineer




at the end of each month beginning February 1, 1967.
Time schedule for construction of facilities to implement



the above waste effluent criteria limits:

-------
                                                     137
Complete preliminary engineering
  study and basis of design by             May 1, 1967
Construction plans and specifications
  approved by                              May 1, 1968
Finish construction by                     May 1, 1969

The City shall accelerate plans for separating storm runoff
and infiltration from the sanitary sewer system.

CITY OF LUNA PIER

The discharge of raw and semi-treated sewage into water-
courses shall be discontinued and areas of need shall be
sewered to transport wastes to treatment facilities for
treatment, disinfection and substantial reduction in
phosphates.

Time schedule for the construction of treatment facilities
to implement this recommendation:

Complete preliminary engineering study
  and basis of design by                   May 1, 1967
Construction plans and specifications
  approved by                              May 1, 1968
Finish construction by                     May 1, 1969

-------
                                                   138





Perform analyses of waste constituents and submit reports




to the Chief Engineer at the end of each month beginning




May 1, 1969.








VILLAGE OF ESTRAL BEACH








The discharge of raw and semi-treated sewage into water-




courses shall be discontinued and areas of need shall be




sewered to transport wastes to treatment facilities for




treatment, disinfection and substantial reduction in




phosphates.








Time schedule for the construction of treatment facilities




to implement this recommendation:








Complete preliminary engineering study




  and basis of design by                   May 1, 1967




Construction plans and specifications




  approved by                              May 1, 1968




Finish construction by                     May 1,
Perform analyses of waste constituents and submit reports




to the Chief Engineer at the end of each month beginning




May 1, 1969.

-------
                                                       139
BERLIN TOWNSHIP BOARD


The discharge of raw and semi-treated sewage into water-
courses shall be discontinued and areas of need shall be
sewered to transport wastes to treatment facilities for
treatment, disinfection and substantial reduction in
phosphates.


Time schedule for the construction of treatment facilities
to implement this recommendation:


Complete preliminary engineering study
  and basis of design by                   May 1, 1967
Construction plans and specifications
  approved by                              May 1, 1968
Finish construction by                     May 1, 1969


Perform analyses of waste constituents and submit reports
to the Chief Engineer at the end of each month beginning
May 1, 1969.


FRENCHTOWN TOWNSHIP BOARD


The discharge of raw and semi-treated sewage into water-

-------
                                                   140




courses shall be discontinued and areas of need shall



be sewered to transport wastes to treatment facilities for




treatment, disinfection and substantial reduction in




phosphates.








Time schedule for the construction of treatment facilities




to implement this recommendation:








Complete preliminary engineering study




  and basis of design by                   May 1, 1967




Construction plans and specifications




  approved by                              May 1, 1968




Finish construction by                     May 1, 1969








Perform analyses of waste constituents and submit reports




to the Chief Engineer at the end of each month beginning




May 1, 1969.








MONROE TOWNSHIP BOARD








The discharge of raw or semi-treated sewage into water-




courses shall be discontinued and areas of need shall be




sewered to transport wastes to treatment facilities for




treatment, disinfection, and substantial reduction in

-------
                                                141
phosphates.
Time schedule for the construction of treatment facilities

to implement this recommendation:


Complete preliminary engineering study

  and basis of design by                   May 1,  1967

Construction plans and specifications

  approved by                              May 1,  1968

Finish construction by                     May 1,  1969


Perform analyses of waste constituents and submit  reports

to the Chief Engineer at the end of each month beginning

May 1, 1969.

-------
            APPENDIX F
          HURON RIVER




               AT




       RIVER ROAD BRIDGE




3.5 MILES SOUTHEAST OP ROCKWOOD
                                         142

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-------
                                            161
             APPENDIX H
            RECOMMENDED




      WATER QUALITY CRITERIA




                for




      INTERSTATE WATERCOURSES




              at the




          MICHIGAN - OHIO




          STATE BOUNDARY
Michigan Water Resources Commission



    Station B, 200 Mill Street




        Lansing, Michigan

-------
                                                     162
                   RECOMMENDED
             WATER QUALITY CRITERIA
                       for
                 MICHIGAN - OHIO
             INTERSTATE WATERCOURSES


Water criteria are herein provided to fulfill the provisions
of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (PL 89-23*0
adopted in 1965.  Said Act provides the appropriate state
authority to establish water quality criteria to protect
the public health or welfare, and enhance the quality of
the water.  In establishing such criteria, the authority
is urged to take into consideration their use and value for
public water supplies, propagation of fish and wildlife,
recreation purposes, and agricultural, industrial and other
legitimate uses.


Constituents                 Recommended Criteria
COLIFORM                     As the result of industrial or
   (Total organisms/lOOml)   domestic activity the median
                             MPN during the Interval of April
                             1 to October 31 shall not exceed
                             1000 for samples collected on 10
                             or more days during any one

-------
                                                    163




                        month,  nor shall 2C$ or more of




                        these samples exceed an MPN of 5000.




                        During the interval of November 1 to




                        March 31 of the succeeding year the




                        median MPN shall not exceed 5000 for




                        samples collected on 10 or more days




                        during any one month, nor shall 20$




                        or more of the monthly samples exceed



                        an MPN of 10,000.
DISSOLVED OXYGEN
The daily average DO content shall




not be less than 6.0 milligrams per




liter, nor shall the concentration




as determined for any one sample be




less than 4.0 milligrams per liter.
DISSOLVED ORGANICS
Limited to the extent necessary to




prevent detectable off-flavor in the




flesh of fish or the development of




slimes or other nuisance growths as




the result of industrial or domestic




wastes.

-------
SOLIDS



   (Suspended and




    Floating)
COLOR AND TURBIDITY
                        164





Limited to the extent necessary




to prevent the formation of deposits




of either industrial or domestic




waste origin on the bed, banks or




surface of the stream.









Not offensive in appearance or other-




wise unattractive as the result of




wastes of industrial or domestic




origin.
OILS AND GREASES
No visible film of oil or globules




of grease.
TEMPERATURE
Stream temperatures, as a result of




domestic or industrial waste dis-



charges, shall not be increased more




than 10° p above the ambient stream




temperature, nor exceed a maximum of




35° F.
CHLORIDES
Average annual chloride ion con-



centration shall not exceed 125 milli-




grams per liter, nor shall the

-------
                                                   165






                        maximum concentration for any sample



                        be in excess of 250 milligrams per



                        liter.
PHENOLS
Less than 5.0 micrograms per liter




Oug/1).
PH
Not less than 6.5 nor more than 8.8,
PHOSPHATES
Limited to the extent necessary to




prevent stimulation of nuisance




growths of algae and weeds.
CYANIDE (as CN)         Less than 0.025 milligrams per liter,








CHROMIUM (as Cr)        Less than 0.05 milligrams per liter.



  (hexavalent and



   trivalent)








COPPER ( as Cu)         Less than 0.1 milligram per liter.
ZINC (as Zn)
IRON (as Fe)
Less than 0.2 milligrams per liter,
Less than 0.3 milligrams per liter

-------
                                                      166




CADMIUM (as Cd)         Lees than 0.05 milligrams  per  liter.








NICKEL (as Ni)          None detectable.








OTHER CONSTITUENTS      Shall not contain other  substances




                        which are or may  become  injurious  to




                        the uses set forth in Section  6 of




                        P. A. 2^5, of 1929,  as amended.

-------
                                                                                     167
                                           WATER  USES


                                                of


                                         MICHIGAN -  OHIO


                                     INTERSTATE WATERCOURSES
 Water quality criteria are provided for the purpose  of  protecting and enhancing the following

 values and uses of Michigan-Ohio Interstate waters and  portions thereof:
 PRESENT AND POTENTIAL WATER USES
                                                                   0 J3
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                        CQ
 1.  Partial body contact recreation


 2.  Total body contact recreation


 3.  Fish and aquatic life


 4.  Wildlife


 5,  Livestock watering


 6.  Industrial process uses and cooling and

        condenser use


 7.  Irrigation


 8.  Domestic water supply


 9.  Waste water assimilation


10.  Aesthetic value
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X


X
X


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X


X

-------
                                                                                  168
                                   LISTING OF MICHIGAN - OHIO

                                     INTERSTATE WATERCOURSES
The following is a listing of interstate watercourses at the Michigan-Ohio boundary as
identified by name on quadrangle maps edited and published by the U.  S.  Geological Survey, for
which interstate water quality criteria are to apply.  Intermittent watercourses such as ditches
and drains and small streams with drainage areas of less than 30 square  miles are not listed
below.
Watercourse
  Flow                     Location at Michigan Boundary	
Direction  Tributary    Civil Unit     Public Land Survey	
  (to)       (to)         (Twp.)     Section^   Town   Range
BRANCH COUNTY

   1.  No streams of significant
       Michigan drainage area.
HILLSDALE COUNTY

   1.  W. Br. St. Joseph River

   (Michigan drainage area at
   boundary equals 90 square
   miles)
  Ohio
Nettle Creek
Camden
10
T.9S.  R.UW.
   2.  E. Br.  St. Joseph River

   (Michigan drainage area at
   boundary equals 88 square
   miles)
  Ohio
Maumee River
Amboy
12
T.9S.  R.2W.
LENAWEE COUNTY

   1.  Bean Creek

   (Michigan drainage area at
   boundary equals 201 square
   miles)
  Ohio
Tiffin River
Seneca
       T.8S.  R.2E.
MONROE COUNTY

   1.  No streams of significant
       Michigan drainage area.

-------
                                                   169
           These water quality criteria shall become




effective on January 1, 1968,  providing they have been




approved by the appropriate Federal agency.




           The Commission will maintain a program of




periodic stream sampling and in the event it is determined




that water quality in any of these streams at the Michigan-




Ohio boundary does not conform to these criteria, the




Water Resources Commission will thereafter Implement the




criteria by initiating statutory proceedings against the




industries or governmental units whose wastes are causing




the non-conformance.  This would entail for each such




industry or governmental unit:




      a.  Notice of Determination and Hearing on proposed




          form of Order




      b,  Hearing




      c.  Final Order of Determination




      d„  Court review, if invoked by recipient of Order




      e.  Court enforcement at Commission's order on




          request for non-compliance.

-------
                                       170
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-------
                                                    171
      ACT 87 OP THE PUBLIC ACTS OF 1965
                      and
REGULATIONS GOVERNING SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL AREAS
                     ****
This Act and these Regulations establish minimum require-




ments for solid waste disposal areas.
        MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OP PUBLIC HEALTH




                 LANSING, MICHIGAN

-------
                                                      172




                     ACT 8?




          OF THE PUBLIC ACTS OF 1965








           AN ACT to license and regulate garbage and




refuse disposal; and to provide a penalty for violation




of this act.








           THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF MICHIGAN ENACT:




    Sec. 1.  As used in this act:




   (a)  "Refuse" means putrescible and nonputrescible




solid wastes, except body wastes, and includes garbage,




rubbish, ashes, incinerator ash, incinerator residue, street




cleanings and solid market and industrial wastes.




   (b)  "Garbage" means rejected food wastes including




waste accumulation of animal, fruit or vegetable matter



used or intended for food or that attend the preparation,




use, cooking, dealing in or storing of meat, fish, fowl,




fruit or vegetable.




   (c )  "Rubbish" means nonputrescible solid wastes,




excluding ashes, consisting of both combustible and pon-




combustible wastes, such as paper, cardboard, tin cans,




yard clippings, wood, glass, bedding, crockery, or litter




of any kind that will be a detriment to the public health




and safety.




   (d) "Ashes" means the residue from the burning of wood,

-------
                                                       173




coal, coke or other combustible materials.




    (e)  "Commissioner" means the state health commissioner.



    (f)  "Health Officer" means a full time administrative




officer of an approved city, county or district department




of health.




    (g)  Applicant means individuals, firms, corporations




or any political subdivisions of the state including any




governmental authority created by statute.




   Sec. 2.  No person shall dispose of any refuse at any




place except a disposal area licensed as provided in this




act.  Nothing in this act nor any act of the commissioner's




shall usurp the legal right of a local governing body from




developing and enforcing local ordinances, codes, or rules




and regulations on solid waste disposal equal to or more




stringent than the provisions of this act, nor will this




act relieve the applicant for license to operate a disposal



area from obtaining a license from a local governing body




when required or relieve the person owning or operating



a disposal area from responsibility for securing proper




zoning permits or complying with all applicable local




ordinances, codes, or rules and regulations not in conflict




with this act.




    Sec. 3.  (l)  A person, partnership, corporation,




governmental unit or agency thereof desiring a license to




operate a disposal area shall make application therefor

-------
each year to the commissioner through the health officer




on a form provided by the commissioner.   Where the disposal




area is located in a county or city not  having a full time



organized local health department,  the application shall




be made directly to the commissioner.




    (2)  The application shall contain the name and




residence of the applicant, the location of the proposed




disposal area, and such other information as may be




necessary.  The application shall be accompanied by a fee




of $25.00, except that governments  and agencies thereof are




exempt from payment of the fee.




   (3)  Fees collected by the health officer shall be




deposited with the city or county treasurer, who shall




keep the deposits in a special fund designated for use in




carrying out the purposes of this act.  If there is an




ordinance or regulation prohibiting a city board of health




or health officer from maintaining any such special fund,




the fees shall be deposited and used in  accordance with the




ordinance and regulations.  Pees collected by the commis-




sioner shall be deposited in the state treasury to the




credit of the general fund.




    Sec. 4. (l)  Upon receipt of the application the com-




missioner or health officer or their representatives shall




inspect the proposed site and determine  if the proposed




operation complies with this act and the rules and

-------
                                                     175



regulations adopted pursuant thereto.





    (2)  If the inspection discloses that the disposal area




and the proposed operation thereof comply with this act and




the rules and regulations adopted hereunder,  and the commis-




sioner or health officer finds that the applicant is a




responsible and suitable person to conduct the business.,




the commissioner shall issue a license to the applicant




upon filing by the applicant with the  commissioner a per-




formance bond in an amount equal to $500.00 per acre of



disposal area, but not less than $2,500.00.




   (3)  Licenses shall expire on September 1 following the




date of issuance but may be renewed upon payment of an




annual fee of $25.00 if the licensee has complied with the




act and the rules and regulations adopted hereunder.




   Sec. 5.  The commissioner may revoke a license, after




reasonable notice and hearing if he finds that the disposal




area is not operated in accordance with this act and the



rules and regulations adopted hereunder.




   Sec. 6.  The commissioner shall promulgate rules




and regulations which shall contain sanitary standards for




disposal areas and otherwise implement this act.  The rules




shall be promulgated in accordance with the provisions of




Act No. 88 of the Public Acts of 19^3* as amended, being




sections 24.71 to 24.80 of the Compiled Laws of 1948, and



subject to Act No. 197 of the Public Acts of 1952, as

-------
                                                     176




amended, being sections 24.101 to 24.110 of the Compiled




Laws of 1948.  The commissioner or health officer shall




periodically inspect all licensed disposal areas and




enforce this act.




    Sec. 7.  This act does not prohibit a person from dis-




posing of refuse from his own household upon his own land




as long as such disposal does not create a nuisance or




hazard to health.




   Sec. 8.  Any person who violates any provisions cf this




act is guilty cf a misdemeanor.  Each day of the violation




shall be considered a separate violation.




    This Act is ordered to take immediate effect.









THIS ACT BECAME EFFECTIVE JUNE 28, 1965.






                       * * * # *







                DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH




                  DIVISION OF ENGINEERING




     REGULATIONS GOVERNING SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL AREAS









    (Filed with Secretary of State, November 23, 1965)




 Published in Supplement No. 45, 1954 Administrative Code









 (By authority conferred on the department of public




 health by section 6 of Act No. 87 of the Public Acts

-------
                                                    177




    of 1965,  being section 325.296 of the Compiled




    Laws of 1948,  and by section 7 of Act No.  146




    of the Public  Acts of 1919*  as amended,  being




    section 325.7  of the Compiled Laws of 19^8.)








R 325.1101.  Definitions.




   Rule 1.  As used in these rules:




   (a)  "Cell" means compacted refuse completely enveloped




by cover material.




   (b)  "Central garbage grinding" means the grinding by




mechanical means of garbage accumulated by municipal,




commercial or private delivery vehicles.




   (c)  "Director" means the director of the department of




public health.




   (d)  "Disposal  area" means a site, location,  tract of




land, area, building, structure or premise used  or intended



to be used for partial and/or total refuse disposal.



   (e)  "Ground water" means water in the ground that is




in the zone of saturation.




   (f)  "Habitable building" means a structure or part




thereof where persons live, sleep, reside or congregate.




   (g)  "Hazardous material" includes, but is  not limited




to, explosives, pathological wastes, radioactive materials




and chemicals.




   (h)  "Health department" means an approved  city, county

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                                                     178



or district health department, including the Michigan




department of public health.




   (i)  "Open dump" means a site where refuse is dumped




and which due to lack of control may create a breeding




place for flies and rats, may catch fire or may produce




air pollution.




   (J )  "Premises" means a tract or parcel of land with




or without habitable buildings.




   (k)  "Salvaging" means the controlled removal of




reusable materials.




   (l)  "Sanitary landfill" means a method of disposing




of refuse on land without creating nuisances or hazards




to public health or safety, by utilizing principles of




engineering to confine the refuse to the smallest practical




area, to reduce it to the smallest practical volume,  and to




cover it with a layer of suitable cover at the conclusion



of each day's operation or at more frequent intervals as




necessary.



   (m) "Scavenging" means the uncontrolled picking of




materials.




   (n) "Surface water" means a body of water whose top




surface is exposed to the atmosphere Including a flowing




body as well as a pond and a lake.

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                                                      179




R 325.1102.  General requirements for licensing.








   Rule 2.  Where refuse is removed from premises, to a




location other than its point of origin, for disposal or




where refuse is not removed from the premises but disposed




at the point of origin in such quantities as to become of




public health concern:




        Plans and specifications.




   (a)  Refuse disposal facilities shall be designed in




accordance with these rules by a registered professional




engineer.  Detailed plans, specifications, and necessary




reports shall be submitted in triplicate to the health




department having jurisdiction for review, approval and




file.  Alterations or deviations from these plans shall




also be submitted for approval and file.  In the development




of the required plans and specifications for sanitary land-




fill, hog feeding and open dump operations when the health




department, in their judgment, believe that technical prob-



lems will not be encountered, the services of a registered




professional engineer may be waived.








        Inspection and evaluation.




   (b)  The director or health department having jurisdic-




tion shall make routine inspections and evaluations of




solid waste disposal operations.  A written notice of

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                                                      180




deficiencies,  together with recommendations for their




correction, shall be provided to the operator or the




appropriate individual, firm, corporation,  governmental




unit or agency thereof responsible for the  solid waste




disposal operation.








R 325.1103.  Sanitary landfills; design.








        Maps.




   Ruie 3.  (l)  The design of the sanitary landfill shall




include 1 or more topographic maps at a scale of not over




100 feet to the inch with contour intervals which clearly




show the character of land.  These maps and accompanying




data shall indicate the following:  the proposed fill area;




any borrow area; access roads; on-site roads; grades for




proper drainage of each lift required and a typical cross-




section of a lift; special drainage devices if necessary;




fencing; structures on the site; existing and proposed




utilities; and all other pertinent information to indicate




clearly the soil characteristics, water table, orderly




development, operation and completion of the sanitary land-




fill.  A sanitary survey and a land use plan of the adjacent




areas may be required.









      Geology.

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                                                     181




   (2)  The geological characteristics of the site shall




be determined by on-site testing or from earlier reliable



survey data to indicate soil conditions, water tables




and subsurface cnaracteristics.








        Characteristics of cover material.




   (3)  Cover material shall be of such character that it




can be compacted to provide a tight seal and shall be




free of putrescible materials and large objects.








        Water pollution and nuisance control.




   (4)  Sanitary landfill operations shall  be so designed




and operated that conditions of unlawful pollution will




not be created and injury to ground and surface waters




avoided which might interfere with legitimate water uses.




Water-filled areas not directly connected to natural lakes,




rivers or streams may be filled with specific inert



material not detrimental to legitimate water uses and




which will not create a nuisance or hazard  to health.




Special approval of the inert material to be used in this




manner is required in writing from the health department




having jurisdiction.  Such approval shall be filed with




the Director.  Inert material shall not include residue




from refuse incinerators, unless evidence,  satisfactory

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                                                     182
to the Director, is submitted by the licensee substantiating




that such residue will not create a nuisance or hazard to




health.








      Equipment.




   (5)  Adequate numbers,  types and sizes of properly main-




tained equipment shall be  used in operating the landfill




in accordance with good engineering practice and with these




rules.  Emergency equipment shall be available on the site




or suitable arrangements made for such equipment from other




sources during equipment breakdown or during peak loads.








R 325.1104.  Sanitary landfills; preparation of the site.








       On-site roads.



   Rule 4.  (l)  On-site roads shall be designed and con-




structed so that traffic will flow smoothly and will not



be interrupted by ordinary inclement weather.








       Fire protection.




   (2)  Suitable measures  shall be available to extinguish




accidental fires.








R 325.1105.  Sanitary landfills; operations.

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                                                   183
           Supervision of operation.

    (Rule 5.   (l)  A landfill operation shall be under the

direction of a responsible individual at all times.



           Limited access.

    (2)  Access to a sanitary landfill shall be limited to

those times when an attendant is on duty and only to those

authorized to use the site for the disposal of refuse,

except as otherwise approved in writing by the health

department having jurisdiction and concurred in by the

director,.  Access to the site shall be controlled by a suit-

able barrier.



           Unloading of refuse.

    (3)  Unloading of refuse shall be continuously super-

vised, except as may be modified by Rule 5, paragraph (2).



           Site maintenance.

    (4)  Measures shall be provided to control dust and

blowing paper.  The entire area shall be kept clean and

orderly.



           Spreading and compacting of refuse.

    (5)  Refuse shall be spread so that it can be compacted

in layers not exceeding a depth of 2 ft. of compacted

material.  Large and bulky items, when not excluded from

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                                                     184




the site, shall be disposed of In a manner approved  by




the health department.








           Volumes of cells.




   (6)  Volumes of Individual cells shall not  exceed the




daily quantity of wastes.








           Daily cover.




   (7)  A compacted layer  of at least 6 inches of suitable




cover material shall be  placed on all exposed  refuse by




the end of each working  day.   The placing of cover material




may be modified in writing by the health department  having




jurisdiction when deemed necessary.








           Final cover.




   (8)  A layer of suitable cover material compacted to a




minimum thickness of 2  feet shall be placed over the entire




surface of each portion  of the final lift not  later  than 1




week following the placement of refuse within  that portion.








           Maintenance  of cover.




   (9)  All daily cover  depths must be continually maintained




and final cover depths  shall be maintained for a period of




2 years.

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                                                      185



           Hazardous materials,  including liquids and sewage.




   (1C))  Hazardous materials,  including liquids and sewage,



shall not be disposed of in a sanitary landfill unless



special provisions are made for such disposal through the



health department having Jurisdiction.  This provision in



no way precludes the right of a landfill operator to exclude



any materials as a part of his operational standards.








           Burning.




   (11)  No garbage or refuse containing garbage shall be



burned at a sanitary landfill.  Burning of select materials




shall be severely restricted and shall be conducted only



in designated areas with the permission of the health depart-




ment having jurisdiction and other appropriate authorities..








           Salvage.




   (12)  Salvaging, if permitted, shall be organized so



that it will not interfere with prompt sanitary disposal



of refuse or create unsightliness or health hazards.  This



provision in no way precludes the right of a landfill



operator to prevent salvaging as a part of his operational



standards. Spavenging shall not be permitted.








           Insect and rodent control.



   (13)  Conditions unfavorable for the production of

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                                                      186






Insects and rodents shall be maintained by carrying out




routine landfill operations promptly in a systematic manner.




Supplemental insect and rodent control measures shall be




instituted whenever necessary.








           Drainage of surface water.




   (l4)  The entire site, including the fill surface, shall




be graded and provided with drainage facilities to minimize




runoff onto and into the fill, to prevent erosion or




washing of the fill, to drain off rainwater falling on the




fill, and to prevent the collection of standing water.








           Completion of landfill.




   (15)  An inspection of the entire site shall be made by




the health department having jurisdiction to determine



compliance with approved plans and specifications before the




earth-moving equipment is removed from the site.  Any




necessary corrective work shall be performed before the




landfill project is accepted as completed.  Arrangements




shall be made for the repair of all cracked, eroded, and




uneven areas in the final cover during the first 2 years




following completion of the fill.








           Modification of sanitary landfill ru.1es.



   (l6)  Modifications of the rules on sanitary landfills

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                                                  18?
as applicable to existing disposal areas may be made by


the health department having jurisdiction.  These modifica-


tions may continue in effect to May 31* 1968, providing the


modifications are:  approved in writing, supported by a


comprehensive improvement plan, the modified operations


are not a hazard to public health nor contribute to a


nuisance and are concurred in by the director.




R.325.1106.  Open dumos.





   Rule 6.  Open dumps shall not be permitted unless the


location and specific method of operation has been approved


in writing by the health department and concurred in by the


director, and provided further that the isolation and


operation and maintenance does not constitute a nuisance


or hazard to health.




R 325.1107  Hog feeding.


           Feeding area.


   Rule 7.  (l)  Garbage, as defined in Act 87  Public


Acts of 1965* when fed to hogs shall be fed on a readily


cleanable impervious feeding area.





           General area.


   (2)  The general area including cooking facilities,

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                                                    188
when provided, shall be kept in a sanitary manner to



prevent the attraction, harborage and breeding of insects



and rodents and shall not create a nuisance.








           Residue disposal.



    (3)  All residues resulting from the day's feeding




operation shall be disposed of by a method approved by the




health department having Jurisdiction.








           Garbage cooking.



    (4)  Garbage cooking operations licensed under Act No.



173  Public Acts of 1953 are exempt from the license



provision of Act No. 8? Public Acts of 1965 but shall



comply with all other applicable sections and these rules.








R 325.1108.  Central garbage grinding.



   Rule 8.  Central garbage grinders receiving wastes



categorized under introductory paragraph of Rule 2 shall be



designed to provide reasonable safety for employees and




to Incorporate operating features which will assist in main-




taining and operating the facility in a, sanitary manner.



The general sanitation in and around the central garbage



grinder as well as the operational procedures employed



shall be subject to the approval of the health department.

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                                                      189
R 325.1109.  Refuse burners.
   Rule 9.  Refuse burners receiving wastes categorized
under introductory  paragraph of Rule 2. shall be designed:
to provide reasonable safety for employees, to incorporate
operating features which will assist in maintaining and
operating the facility in a sanitary manner and in
accordance with Act No. 348 of the Public Acts of 1965
(the air pollution control act) and applicable local require-
ments.  The general sanitation in and around the refuse
burner as well as the operational procedures employed shall
be subject to the approval of the health department.

R 325.1110.  Other methods.
   Rule 10.  Any other method of solid waste disposal not
covered by these rules shall be reviewed by the health
department for the purposes of evaluating the design and
operational methods with reference to:  the nuisance factor,
the safety of emoloyees and the protection of the public
health. Such disposal methods shall be subject to the evalua-
tion and approval of the director.

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                                                  190



                    R,  W. Purdy




         MR. QUIGLEY:  May I just make the comment that




I think the report as written and presented is most




encouraging.  In fairness to the other conferees,  who may




come after you and may not have time to say quite  as much




or in as great detail,  I think it should be noted, of




course, that Detroit started on this particular assignment




a little earlier than the rest of the States,  as far as




Federal enforcement action is concerned.  However, regard-




less of when you started and regardless of how long it




has taken, I think the report as submitted is  an excellent




progress report.




         Let me just ask one question:  The biggest




municipality involved in this operation is the City of




Detroit.  What kind of treatment are we talking about for




the city?




         MR. PURDY:  The specific requirement  for  the




City of Detroit is shown in Appendix E.  It sets forth




that they shall control their load to a maximum of 206,000




pounds per day of five-day BOD; 324,000 pounds of  suspended




solids; 93 pounds of phenol; a coliform maximum of 1,000;




for phosphates a minimum of 80$ removal and a  maximum of




21,000 pounds a day; and oil, a maximum of 15  milligrams




per liter.

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                                                       191




                    R. W. Purdy



           When this is related to the present waste load




at Detroit, it means upwards of an immediate 80^ or 75$




reduction in BOD load, which, I believe, means secondary




treatment.




           MR. QUIGLEY:  All right.  Now let me ask you



this:  Has there been any further planning since the




stipulations were agreed upon and the City of Detroit In-




dicated its readiness to move towards compliance?




           Has there been any discussion of the kind of




money that is involved here for the City of Detroit to come




up with the necessary secondary treatment?




           MR. PURDY:  Detroit has estimated that this is




somewhat in excess of $100 million -- I believe exactly




$104 million in the next four years'  time.




           The financing problem has  not been completely




solved as of this date.




           MR. QUIGLEY:  Do any of the other conferees have




any questions or comments?




           Yes, Mr. Oeming?




           MR. OEMING:  Mr. Chairman, I would like to point




out here that in connection with this report, in the




conferences that have been held on the Clinton River Basin,




which is not exactly within the confines or the definition

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                                                     192




                    R. W. Purdy




of this particular Meeting,  the problem was identified




as the Selfridge Air Force Base having inadequate collection




and inadequate treatment of sewage.




         This has been brought to the attention of the




Regional Director of the Federal Water Pollution Control



Administration, Mr. Poston,  who sits as a conferee here.




We had excellent response, at least insofar as a willingness



to undertake correction of this problem, and we are hopeful




that this will follow through so that the Federal establish-



ment will provide the necessary facilities concurrent with




other problems and solutions in the area.




         MR. QUIGLEY:  Thank you for bringing up that




fact.  Despite the fact that technically it might not fall




within the purview of this Meeting, if it is a Federal




installation and it is not doing what it ought to, this




ought to be brought out.  If it is doing what it ought to




do, this ought to be brought out also.




         As the Secretary pointed out, our own house has




to be very much in order if we are going to give any kind




of direction and guidance and leadership to the States,




municipalities, and industries.  We thoroughly have to be




just a little bit like Caesar's wife.




         MR. OEMING:  Mr. Quigley, I also have another

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                                                  193
                       R. W. Purdy
comment to make here.  It was not brought out in Mr.
Purdy"s presentation, but we have attached to the report,
for the benefit of the conferees, a copy of the Solid
Wastes Disposal Act, which has just gone into effect, and
which is now being administered to meet that provision in
the summary and conclusions of the conference with respect
to dumping materials into Lake Erie.
           I want the record to show that the conferees, at
least, have a copy of the Act, and the regulations that are
being applied and have already been applied in the Raisin
River area to regulate the discharge and dumping of
materials that could get into the screams and the lake.
           MR. POSTON:  Mr. Chairman, in further reference
to the Selfridge Air Force Base, it was indicated this is
out of the area which we are discussing here today, but I
would be the first to acknowledge that this has been a
knotty problem with us.  It is out of the area, and that is
why we did not report on it.
           However, Mr. Harlow is here today and, if you so
desire, I would have him elaborate further on this problem,
if you think that might be indicated.
           SECRETARY UDALL:  We are running into a time
problem.  Maybe this might fit in later.

-------
                    R. W. Purdy




         I want to make two or three observations of my




own with regard to the Michigan report.




         My technical people indicate that the type of




standards that you have adopted are sound and good, and




I think the general quickening pace of action, the picture




presented here today, from my point of view, is satisfactory.




         This Waste Disposal Act passed by the Legislature




— I have been looking at it here -- is a sound one.  I




wish all of our States had sound, strong laws in this field,




and I will certainly be watching the way that it functions




with great interest.




         Up to this point, the American people have been a



Nation of dumpers,  of Just littering the landscape, the




old-fashioned city dump.  I really can't think of anything




that is more barbarous or outrageous.




         On the trip which President Johnson sent me last




March to West Germany, I ran into a very interesting




approach that the City of Munich is using.  As you probably




know, it is one of the largest cities of Western Europe.




         They tell me they have a somewhat different type




of garbage and refuse, a little more inflammable,, but there




the city garbage is collected; it is taken out to a new

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                                                      195



                    R. W. Purdy




electric power station that burns two-thirds coal and one-




third garbage, and it is entirely consumed.




         What emerges out of this is a little bale of




metal, the "Goldfinger-type" bale of metal, that is then




sent off and sold to the scrap processors.  The garbage




is actually burned to produce electric power.  They have




no city garbage dump, in other words.




         However, the thing that distresses me as a conser-




vationist is that if we continue another hundred years




the dumping practices, the whole country will come to be




a dump.  All the beautiful stream valleys and riverfront




areas -- I mean, dumping can be used at times to create




land, and even to create parks -- will be dumps.  Much of




the American dumping practice I think does us more dis-




credit as a people than almost anything that we have done.




I think this type of statute is overdue and is sound,




and I certainly want to applaud it.




         I wanted to make one other observation here.  I




wish I had time -- I have a schedule to go on this river




trip -- to hear the Ohio presentation in particular.  One




thing that does concern us a great deal in Washington is




the new pattern of cooperation and action that is emerging.




I think we are in a very critical period now.  Of course,




what President Johnson has proposed in this clean rivers and

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                                                    196



                    R. W. Purdy




clean waters legislation Is for the Federal Government to




play a larger role In terms of monetary contribution, 30




percent or more, if the people who share a common lake or




a common river or the States and the communities will get




together and develop a clean-up program.  This is the




essence of the present approach.




         It also is obvious to most of us that we are




going to get the job done faster when the State participates




the way that New York State is participating -- where the




State will put up 30 percent of the money.




         I noticed in the New York Times last week that




the Wisconsin Legislature passed a new program where they




are providing tax incentives and providing loans.




         It does seem to me that for really quick action,




we have to give the cities more help.




         I would like to hope that the States bordering




on Lake Erie will all participate in some manner.  I



noticed Governor Rhodes' announcement in the press earlier




in Cincinnati at the Governors' Conference with regard




to what Ohio is proposing.  He referred in his state-




ment to 4l2 municipal sewage treatment plants serving a




population of seven million and a 1970 goal for most of



this action.  There was a total price tage of something in

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                                                     197



                    R. W.  Purdy



the order of, well,  one billion dollars.




         I think again we  have a picture  of action here,




but the one thing that is  missing to me is that there is




no State action.  The Governor is announcing what the




municipalities and industries are doing,  but he is not




announcing anything that the State is doing.




         It seems to me that the best way to help all of




our municipalities move rapidly is for the Federal Government




to make a larger contribution in terms of money and for the



States to make a contribution -- whether  the New York




State formula of 30-30-40  is correct, or  whether some




other formula is correct.




         It seems to me that in order to  lick this big




backlog, we are going to need not only strong State leader-




ship in terms of enforcement of the type  we have had




pictured here this morning,  but I think the States are




going to have to get into  business.  Again, it can be done



on a bond issue basis of helping move in  aggressively and




tackling this backlog problem.




         The great thing about using the  bond approach




with regard to water clean-up, it seems to me, is that we




are essentially then letting the people who are going to




benefit from the clean-up  and are going to achieve the




human advantage ultimately from having clean lakes and clean

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                                                  198



                    R. W. Purdy




rivers, help pay it off.  That, I think,  is sound




politically from the standpoint of carrying out an action




program of this kind.




         So I think certainly, from the standpoint of




what was being done a year ago in all of these States,  we




can already see a new action pattern -- a much more




aggressive approach.




         I commend this, and I commend the State of




Michigan for the report, but I still think that there is




a bigger job to be done, and that we can do more.




         MR. TEATER:  Mr. Chairman, may I respond briefly




to that comment, please?



         Today, in Columbus, there is a meeting of the




Ohio Water Commission and its 115-man advisory council,




which is made up of members of industry,  municipal




water supply and public interests, to develop a program




for complete water management for Ohio based upon a request



by the Governor to come up with a plan to be presented  to




the next General Assembly for complete water management,




including not only pollution control, but water develop-




ment for water supplies, recreation, flow augmentation, and




so forth.




         This meeting in Columbus is the first of a

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                                                       199





                     R. w. Purdy



series which will be developing a water plan for complete




water management in Ohio to include,  as the Governor gave




them the job, not only organization changes that might




be necessary in Ohio, but also legislation and financing




to finance a complete water development plan for the State,




not overlooking the needs for water supply for industry and




recreation and municipal use, including, as the Secretary




suggested very ably, a plan for complete financing of the




job which is ahead of us.




           Thank you.




           (Applause. )




           MR. OEMING:  Mr. Chairman, I think you raised a




question here that I should comment on about this financing




situation.




           Governor Romney recommended to the Legislature




some statutes that would extend the grants that are now




provided by the Federal Water Pollution Control Administra-




tion.  The Legislature is meeting today on a statute which




will appropriate funds to supplement the Federal grant




funds -- not a matching program, but a supplemental program




— and this is the first start in Michigan in this kind of




a financing arrangement.




           I suspect that it will pass.  There is quite a

-------
                                                   200




                    R. W. Purdy




lot of push behind it.




         SECRETARY UDALL:  I am trying to be constructive,




and I think I am getting constructive responses.   Because




Wisconsin and New York anchor on different ends of the




Great Lakes, I have been asking myself a question.  I




don't think that either State is any more enlightened




or forward-looking than the rest of the States.  If these




two States feel that they should play a more aggressive




role, then it seems to me the other States might  well




join in asking themselves whether they can move more




rapidly and whether increased State participation won't




be able to help the cities lick their backlog problem




faster.




         Maybe I have been talking too much lately to




some of the mayors of big cities, and hearing of their woes,




but my desire, and I think the desire of the people, is to




get the clean-up program under way as quickly as possible.




I suspect that if the States lead out on this in a very




vigorous way, that you are going to find that it is not only




good stewardship, but it is good politics.




         Governor Rockefeller's program -- and I don't




normally go around the country boosting Republican governors




--  (Laughter) -- but Governor Rockefeller's program that a




Democratic Stste legislature a year ago passed unanimously

-------
                                                    201
                     R. W. Purdy

was on the ballot last November and passed by four to one.

The people of the State of New York were asked this

question, just quite bluntly:  "Do you want to clean up

the rivers of this State at a cost of one billion dollars?"

And they answered, by a four to one vote, "yes.."

           I think that if we give you the right support

and help present this, that you would get the same answer

in the other States.

           So I am trying to say this not critically, but

I am trying to say it constructively.

           MR. POOLE:  May I say something?

           SECRETARY UDALL:  Yes.

           MR. POOLE:  I would like to report for the State

of Indiana, Mr. Secretary, that the Indiana Stream Pollution

Control Board has recommended to the 1967 legislature that

the State provide a 30^ matching grant to go along with the

Federal funds.  This has the support of Governor Branigin.

           I would not want to forecast at this moment what

the 1967 legislature will do, but I am hopeful that it will

look at it favorably.

           SECRETARY UDALL:  Maybe I should come over and

give them a speech.

           MR. POOLE:  I may want you to.

           MR. LYON:  Mr. Secretary, speaking for Pennsylvania,

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                                                     202



                     R.  W.  Purdy




I would like to say that Pennsylvania has had a State




grants program since 1956,  making grants to municipalities,




and that Governor Scranton  just to this legislature proposed




a constitutional amendment  to increase the capacity of the




State by a half a billion dollars for a land conservation




fund.  This has already passed the Senate, and hopefully




will pass the House.




           The chairman of  our board just last week recom-




mended another act that will establish watershed authori-




ties with State financing to further enhance our clean-up




program.




           SECRETARY UDALL:  Our trip on the  sweet waters




of the Cuyahoga is already  fifteen minutes late.




           If it is all right with the rest of the




conferees, we will adjourn  at this time until 2:30.




           Thank you all for coming.




           (Whereupon, at 11:45 a.m., a recess was taken




until 2:30 p.m. of the same day.)

-------
                                                    203
                   E. W. Arnold
                 AFTERNOON SESSION

                                     (2:30 p.m. )
           MR. STEIN:  May we reconvene?

           May we hear from Ohio?


         STATEMENT OF DR. E. W. ARNOLD, DIRECTOR,

               OHIO DEPARTMENT OP HEALTH


           DR. ARNOLD:  Mr. Quigley, Mr. Stein, Conferees,

Participants, Ladies and Gentlemen:

           The Ohio conferees were very pleased with the

results of the Conference on Pollution of Lake Erie last

August.  The accord reached by the conferees, representing

rive States and the Federal Government, presented 27

recommendations and conclusions which have given us an

outstanding and realistic program for cleaning up this

vital body of water.
           We feel further that our meeting today should

mark another milestone in this program, with a presentation
of schedules for necessary remedial action to protect the

lake.

           Although there was a delay of three months last

fall when the Federal Water Pollution Control Agency re-

viewed the recommendations before issuing the final official

-------
                                                      204
                     E. W. Arnold

summary of the conference, Ohio took Immediate action to

implement its part of the agreed to program.

           In September 1965,  less than a month after the

final session of the conference, the Ohio Water Pollution

Control Board began a series of meetings with the representa-

tives of industries and municipalities where pollution

control improvements would be  needed.   These meetings con-

tinued each succeeding month.   The municipalities and

industries were informed of the new and stricter require-

ments for pollution control and were put on record with an

official time schedule for the installation of the

improvements.

           At its October meeting, the Ohio Water Pollution

Control Board issued a ban on  any further construction of

combined storm and sanitary sewers.  This is in line with

one of the very important recommendations of the conference.

           The Ohio Water Pollution Control Board also in-

formed municipalities which now have only primary sewage

treatment that they would need to improve or provide

secondary treatment.  It might be pointed out that we are

talking about only 21 percent  of the approximately three

million urban population of Ohio's share of the Lake Erie

Basin.  The other 79 percent in Ohio already has secondary

sewage treatment facilities.

-------
                                                       205
                     E. W. Arnold



           Actually, much of the fine value of the Lake




Erie Conference Is being extended to all of Ohio, because




the Ohio Water Pollution Control Board chose to make Its




ban on combined sewers a statewide ban, and is informing




municipalities throughout the State that all existing




primary sewage treatment plants must be stepped up to




secondary treatment.  There is agreement that no more




primary sewage treatment plants will be allowed in Ohio.



And even beyond this, a number of the larger cities on small




streams are now under orders to provide facilities for




tertiary treatment.




           Ohio has been working hard at its pollution




problem.  The heavy population density of Ohio and the




large number of city-sized municipalities makes it a big




problem.  On a statewide basis -- Ohio River Watershed as




well as Lake Erie Basin -- Ohio has a total of 412 municipal



type sewage treatment plants.  At the present time, 293 of



these ?re secondary treatment plants serving a population




of 4,866,000 and 119 are primary plants serving a population




of 2,253,911.  This is virtually all of Ohio's urban popula-




tion.  The remaining Ohioans live on farms or in small




villages.




           Improvements now scheduled in Ohio for both the



Lake Erie Basin and for the rest of the State amount to more

-------
                                                      206
                     E. W. Arnold

than a billion dollars.  More than $413 million of this is

for additional municipal and industrial waste treatment

facilities in the Lake Erie area.  Added to this would be

another $100 million which it is expected will be needed

for additional population growth and industrial expansion

during the period of constructing improvements.

           This is a monumental program and Ohio is prepared

to carry it out.

           Our engineering staff has prepared a complete and

detailed report on our schedules.

           We are pleased to present these.

           We, of course, also are interested in hearing

the reports from the other States of the Lake Erie area,

because we are well aware that cleaning up Lake Erie calls

for more than the action of one State.  It needs interstate

and even international cooperation, as Governor Rhodes of

Ohio said last year when he made the official request that

brought this very conference that we are having today into

being.

           And now, I should like to introduce Mr. George

Eagle, Chief Engineer of the Ohio Department of Health and

one of the official conferees for our State.  He will

present a brief narrative summary of the detailed report for

Ohio.

           Thank you.

-------
                                                      207




                       G. Eagle








       STATEMENT OF GEORGE EAGLE, CHIEF




       ENGINEER, OHIO DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH,




       COLUMBUS, OHIO








         MR. EAGLE:  Mr. Quigley, Mr. Stein, fellow




Conferees, and Ladies and Gentlemen:




         I am not going to read all this report.  This




report is divided into --




         MR. STEIN:  Mr. Eagle, do you want this report




in the record as if read?




         MR. EAGLE:  Yes, I want the complete report in




the record.




         MR. STEIN:  All right.  Without objection, that




will be done.




         MR. EAGLE:  This report is divided into parts or




items as they appear in the recommendations and conclusions




of the conferees (See Appendix III).




         Data and comments are submitted on each item




which the Ohio conferees understand to be a responsibility




of the State of Ohio to carrv out.




         With regard to Items 7 and 8 -- secondary




treatment and removal of phosphates:  The details regarding




the status of municipal and county  waste treatment facilities

-------
                                                    208
                     G. Eagle


and additional needs for compliance with the conference


recommendations and conclusions are included under Item 22,


which is the schedules of remedial actions.


           In general, the Ohio Water Pollution Control


Board is requiring that all sewage in the Lake Erie Basin


be given secondary treatment.  Dr. Arnold already mentioned

that.  Conditions for permit renewals issued after September

1, 1965, and to date, so stipulate. All others not in full


compliance have been notified by letter from the Ohio Water

Pollution Control Board that design and construction


schedules for required secondary treatment must be sub-

mitted.  Future permit renewals will verify schedules and

order compliance.


           The officials of all major existing secondary

waste treatment plants are studying the phosphate problem,

i.e., making regular analyses for phosphates of influent


and effluer.t samples, evaluating removals with respect to


their operating procedures, in some instances doing pilot


and/or experimental studies, and in general trying to work

out ways and means of maximizing phosphate reductions.


           Many more such studies are expected to be


initiated in the near future.  Competent personnel and

necessary laboratory facilities are problems in this regard.


           Now, with regard to 9 -- disinfection of

-------
                                                      209






                     G. Eagle




municipal waste effluents:  Rarely do monthly average values




for coliform concentrations exceed 5,000 organisms per 100




ml at the water supply intakes in Lake Erie, according to




reports received in the Ohio Department of Health from the



water plant operators each month.   Investigations and




studies are under .way to determine the causes of these




occasionally high counts.   Necessary steps will be taken




to correct them.



           There are 19 municipal and county waste treat-




ment facilities discharging directly, or nearly directly,




to Lake Erie.  All have taken steps to maximize their




present treatment facilities and according to reports sub-




mitted to the Ohio Department of Health, all are chlorinat-




ing their effluents.  Of course, higher disinfection




efficiencies will be effected when secondary treatment




facilities have been completed.




           Several local agencies are making continuing




bathing beach bacteriological studies.  This information




will be helpful in the surveillance program.




           Item 10, with regard to bypassing untreated




waters:  All plans are carefully checked to insure a




minimum of infiltration into sewers and the misuse of




sanitary sewerage systems  for ca±'rylr,^ of roof,  storm and

-------
                                                  210



                     G.  Eagle




other such clear waters.   Bypassing arrangements are




critically reviewed.   In some instances,  larger design




capacities are being  required to eliminate the necessity




of frequent bypassing.




           Item 11, with regard to combined sewers:  Under




date of October 1, 1965, the Division of  Engineering of




the Ohio Department of  Health issued the  following directive




           "The recent  conference on pollution of Lake




     Erie and its tributaries held in Cleveland, Ohio,




     and Buffalo, New York, August 3-12,  1965, further




     confirmed a general policy of the Ohio Department




     of Health of several years standing.  The con-




     ferees agreed that,




                "Combined storm and sanitary sewers be




           prohibited in all newly developed areas,




           and eliminated in existing areas wherever




           feasible."




           "Newly developed areas are construed to mean




     unsewered areas  and areas redeveloped through urban




     renewal of other similar programs.




           "Effective this date, the Ohio Department of




     Health will require:




     (l)  All plumbing plans submitted for approval under

-------
                                              211
                G.  Eagle

     the  provisions of  Sec.  3703.03  of  the  Revised

     Code include a separate 'building  drain'  for

     sewage  and  a separate  'building storm  drain.'

          "Combined building drains'  will not  be

      approved.

(2)    Sewerage plans submitted  for approval under

      provisions of Sec.  3701.18, of the Revised

      Code,  shall propose separate sanitary and

      storm  sewers  for  all  newly developed  areas,

      for redeveloped areas  and for  all other  areas

      where  deemed  practicable.

          Municipalities and sewer  districts  now

      served by  combined  sewers shall have  a general

      plan of separate  sanitary and  storm sewers  for

      the entire area.  All  new.construction shall

      conform to the general plan; and

(3)    Future permits issued  by  the Ohio Water  Pollution

      Control Board under provisions ef Sees.  6111.01

      through 6111.08,  of the Revised Code, shall

      require existing  combined sewer systems  to  be

      regularly  inspected and flow-regulating

      structures set so as  to minimize  pollution  of

      receiving  waterways."

      This directive has  been strictly  enforced and has

-------
                                                      212




                     G. Eagle




resulted in forcing changes from combined to separate




sewers in a number of plans submitted for approval.




           All major cities, notably Cleveland, Akron and




Toledo, are carrying out extensive combined sewer overflow




surveillance programs.  Also they plan to extend and improve




such programs.  Further, these municipalities and some 20




others are studying their combined sewers, and in some




instances the sanitary sewer systems carrying excessive in-




filtration, and they are developing plans for their




elimination and/or improvement.  Cleveland, for example,




is proposing three new express trunk sewers that will carry




the sanitary sewage from the suburbs direct to the treat-




ment plants rather than to existing overloaded combined




sewers.  These express sewers are estimated to cost




$20,500,000 and are expected to be completed in four to



five years.




           The conferees may be assured that the Ohio




Department of Health and the Ohio Water Pollution Control




Board will vigorously follow through on the correction of




the combined sewer problem.  Almost all municipal and county




sewage collection systems need improvement to eliminate and




prevent pollution and local nuisances.




           Items 12 and 13 on accidental spills:  A report




on these items is included in the Item 17 report.

-------
                                                    213
                     G. Eaecle

           Item 14 -- disposal of refuse:  Ohio's report

on Item 14, In the matter of prohibiting the disposal of

garbage, trash and other deleterious refuse in Lake Erie

or its tributaries, is best covered by quoting a news

release issued by Governor James A. Rhodes under date of

June 8, 1966:

           "Governor James A. Rhodes today took steps

     to strengthen Ohio's laws against dumping debris

     in rivers and streams.  He asked Natural

     Resources Director Fred E. Morr bo prepare legis-

     lation for consideration by the Ohio General

     Assembly in 1967.

           "Pointing out that statewide control of

     anti-debris dumping malpractices is necessary,

     Governor Rhodes said strong anti-water littering

     legislation is as necessary as our present laws

     against highway littering.

           " Conservation of the usefulness and beauty

     of our streams is Important,   said Governor Rhodes.

     'Streams littered and clogged with debris lose

     their value for outdoor recreation.  People do not

     enjoy fishing, swimming,  boating or hiking along

     streams strewn with litter,1  he said.   'Furthermore,

     certain types of debris dumped into streams causes

-------
                G. Eagle




flooding when the streams peak and the debris




piles in areas along the stream.




     "'Stream and river littering is not only




unsightly but expensive,  he said. 'Recently the




City of Cleveland was forced to appropriate




thousands of dollars to police the river front and




lake front areas.  This is an unnecessary expense




and the money could have been used somewhere else




had the responsible parties for the debris been




more considerate,' he said.




      "In asking Director Morr to prepare strong




legislation against stream and river littering,




Governor Rhodes said:




      "'The littering of our shores and the streams




and rivers themselves must be prevented.  We do not




have at the present time adequate existing laws to




solve this problem of desecration of the shores and




flood plains of our rivers and streams.




      "'Civil action by individuals to prevent




littering of the shores of our streams and rivers




is not the solution.  The authority of local




boards of health to prevent and enjoin nuisances




is inadequate because there is no uniform



application of this authority and the questionable

-------
                                                      215
                     G. Eagle

     extent of this authority to prevent or abate all

     the sources of pollution.

           "'The solution to this problem will require

     an intensive educational program, the enactment

     of appropriate laws to prevent littering, dumping

     and operation of dumps and junk yards, and the

     prohibiting of the stock piling of industrial

     wastes along the shores and flood plains of our

     rivers and streams,1 Governor Rhodes stated."

           Further, in this regard, the Ohio Department

of Health plans to recommend to Governor Rhodes state-wide

legislation on solid wastes collection and disposal.  Such

legislation would require the provision of adequate

approved solid wastes disposal facilities and the use of

such facilities by all persons, agencies and industries.

           Item 16 -- maximum reduction of certain

Industrial waste constituents:  The maximum reduction of

the polluting constituents listed in Item 16 are used as

the criteria for determining the adequacy or inadequacy of

waste treatment facilities reported in Item 22, Schedules

of Remedial Actions.

           Items 17 and 18 -- sampling and reporting of

industrial waste discharges:  The Ohio Department of Health

has demanded, for the past ten years or more, that industry

-------
                                                   216
                     G. Eagle

as well as municipalities and others Immediately report

spills that may seriously Impair stream quality, and further,

that immediate steps be taken to eliminate future spills.

This program is constantly stressed riot only by the Ohio

Water Pollution Control Board but also by the Ohio Division

of Wildlife.  Ohio law requires polluters to pay for

aquatic life damages.

           Ohio has required regular sampling and analysis

of major industrial discharges since the adoption of the

State Water Pollution Control Law in 1951.  Such programs

are carried out reasonably well by industry.  However,

present-day considerations have revealed shortcomings in

some of these programs, and more frequent sampling and more

extensive analyses are being required.  Many industries

have already improved their programs; others are in the

process of doing so.  It is expected that full conformity

with Item 17 will be attained in the next six months to a

year; it takes time for industry to obtain necessary staff

and to set up adequate laboratory facilities, and for State

personnel to give the consultation which is needed to work

out adequate sampling programs.

           As to reporting, the vast majority of the

industries are regularly reporting to the Ohio Department

of Health their analytical results, and wnere the

-------
                                                       217
                     G. Eagle


Information can be obtained, they are reporting the flows


at the points where the samples were collected.  A few


Industries have not been regularly submitting their


analytical and flow date to the State; however, they have


made such data available to us upon request.


           The Ohio Department of Health  has under way


a program for placing all waste water and stream data on


data processing.   We expect to publish this data periodically,


at least once each year.  All industries will be asked to


submit their date  to us for inclusion in these published


reports.  The reports will be made available to the public.


We do not anticipate any difficulties in this regard.  We


expect to have this data processing program in full opera-


tion within the next year.


           The Ohio Water Pollution Control Board has


cooperated with the Lake Erie Field Station of the Federal


Water Pollution Control Administration by furnishing them


all of the Lake Erie Basin municipal, county, industrial


and other analytical and flow data available in our files.


In accordance with Ohio law, industries in the Maumee


Basin were requested to give permission for release of their


data.  Most industries readily gave such permission.  A


few problems remain to be worked out.  We hope to resolve


these in the near future.  Requests to industries in the

-------
                                                      218



                     G. Eagle




other basins, for release of their data to the Federal




Water Pollution Control Administration, will be made by




the State as soon as staff time becomes available to do it.




We anticipate no major difficulties with industries in




releasing the necessary data to the Federal Water Pollu-




tion Control Administration.




           It may be of interest to the conferees to know




that the major industries, municipalities and counties in




the Cuyahoga River Basin formed a committee about two




years ago known as the Cuyahoga River Water Quality



Committee.




           The major functions of this committee are:




(l)  To determine existing river quality; (2) to determine




the causes of changes in water quality; (3) to determine the



treatment or control requirements necessary to upgrade and




maintain water quality for all reasonable and legitimate




uses; and, (*J) to determine the cost of such requirements.




           The committee is carrying on a very extensive




sampling program in the Cuyahoga River.  Individual munici-




palities and industries are furnishing waste load data to




the committee.  The committee expects to compile a report




in the near future which will be made available to all




interested agencies and persons.  This committee is to be




commended for their interest and efforts.

-------
                                                     219






                     G. Eagle




           Item IS, with regard to surveillance of



tributaries to Lake Erie:  The State of Ohio, by contract




with the Water Quality Branch of the Geological Survey of




the United States Department of the Interior, has established




the following automatic monitoring stations:




           Maumee River near Defiance — DO, Conductivity,




                                         Temperature




           Auglaize River near Defiance -- DO, Conductivity,




                                           Temperature




           Maumee River at Watervllle — DO, Conductivity.



                                         Temperature, pH




           Black River at Elyria -- DO, Conductivity,



                                    Temperature




           Cuy.ahoga River at Independence -- DO, Conductivity,



                                             Temperature




           Cuyahoga River at DuPont at Cleveland — Conductivity



           Cuyahoga River at Center Street at Cleveland --



                         DO, Conductivity, Temperature, pH








           During fiscal year 19^7> four parameter monitors




(DO, Conductivity, Temperature, and pH) will be installed




at four additional sites:




           Grand River at Painesville



           Sandusky River below Fremont

-------
                                                        220




                     G. Eagle




           Maumee River at the mouth




           Auglaize River below the Ottawa River at




                Cascade Park




           The cooperative program between Ohio and the




United States Geological Survey includes, in addition to




the monitoring stations, the operation of three daily




sampling stations — Sandusky River at Fremont, Black




River at Elyria, and Grand River at Palnesville.  A complete




chemical analysis is made for the days of maximum and




minimum conductance each month and analyses for dissolved




oxygen, detergents, total phosphates,  iron, and manganese




are made monthly.  A thermograph record is obtained for




the Huron River at Milan.




           In addition to the above,  complete chemical




analyses are obtained annually during low stream flow for




about thirty (30) gauging stations on streams tributary




to Lake Erie.




           Item 22 -- schedules of remedial actions:




The schedules of remedial actions in  the Lake Erie Basin




have been developed on an individual  municipality, county,




and industry basis by the Ohio Water  Pollution Control




Board.  Many of the major permittees  were called before the




Board to explain in detail their programs and schedules for




compliance with the recommendations and conclusions of the

-------
                                                        221







                     G. Eagle




Lake Erie pollution conference; others were ordered by the




Board to submit their proposals for compliance in writing,




and the remainder of the permittees not in full compliance




were contacted by the Ohio Department of Health staff.




All permittees have either proposed or concurred in their




respective programs and schedules.




           You will note from the Summary Status (Appendix




I) that a total of 180 municipalities and counties with




more than 3 million people, and 191 industries, are included




in this report.  You will further note that about h^% of




the municipalities and counties with about 2.2 million




people and about 30^ of the industries listed, do not




fully comply with all of the treatment requirements set




forth in the recommendations and conclusions of the




conference.




           These are considerably higher percentages with




respect to inadequacy than indicated in Ohio's report to




the conference in August 1965.   This results, of course,




from the upgrading of requirements by the conferees.




           As to municipalities and counties, the status




reports on municipalities and counties under this item




are based on treatment requirements only.  As required by




Item 7, those not having secondary treatment for maximum

-------
                                                        222




                     G. Eagle




removal of BOD and phosphates are listed as inadequate,




while the municipalities and counties having complete




secondary treatment facilities of adequate capacity are




classified as adequate at this time (See Appendix II for




details ).




           Of the 85 municipalities and counties having




inadequate treatment facilities,, the status with respect




to compliance is as follows:




     (l)  Studies, reports and general plans




         under way                                   4l




     (2)  Detail plans and financing programs




         under preparation                           24




     (3)  Under construction in 1966                  20




                               TOTAL                 85








           Estimated schedules for completion of construction




of required treatment facilities:




     Completion in 1966            8




     Completion in 196?           12




     Completion in 1968           63




     Completion in 1970-71     	2_




                        TOTAL     85








           The two treatment facilities scheduled for

-------
                                                      223






                     G. Eagle




completion In 1970 and 1971 are at Cleveland and Akron.



These existing secondary treatment facilities are being




considerably enlarged and improved.  These projects are




planned, programmed and scheduled in detail by these two




cities.




    Industries




           According to Item 16 requiring the maximum




reductions of certain polluting constituents, 64 industrial




establishments do not fully comply at this time (See




Appendix II for details).




           Of the 64 industries having inadequate treatment




or control facilities, the status with respect to compliance




is as follows:




     (l)  Studies, reports, proposals and/or



          plans under, way                            30




     (2)  Under construction in 1966                 28



     (3)  Under construction in 1967                  6




                                          TOTAL      64








           Estimated schedules for completion of construction




of required treatment or control facilities :

-------
                                                   224




                     G.  Eagle




       Completion in 1966          25




       Completion in 1967          30




       Completion in 1968        	9




                        TOTAL      64








Conclusion




           In conclusion, Ohio has accomplished much since




our meetings here in Cleveland and in Buffalo last August.




We have made real progress toward the goals outlined in the




conclusions and recommendations of those meetings.  You may




be assured that Ohio is  pursuing this program with all




possible diligence and will continue on this course until




all of the goals have been reached.

-------
       APPENDIX I
      SUMMARY STATUS




WASTE TREATMENT FACILITIES




 LAKE ERIE DRAINAGE BASIN
                                            225

-------
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                                                          227
                   APPENDIX II
1.  Municipal and County Waste Treatment Facilities



    (Including Water Pollution Control Board Permit Letters)








2.  Industrial Waste Treatment Facilities



     (Including Water Pollution Control Board Permit Letters)

-------
            STATUS OF MUNICIPAL WASTE TREATMENT       228

                       FACILITIES

            LAKE ERIE DRAINAGE AREA IN OHIO

                   KEY TO ABBREVIATIONS

Treatment Facilities - Pr. - Primary

                       Int. " Intermediate

                       Sec. - Secondary

                       (EA = Extended Aeration
                       (AS = Activated Sludge Proc.
                       (TF = Trickling Filter
                       (San Filt = Sand Filters

Planning & Construction

            RGP * Report & General Plan

            DP » Detail Plans

            UC * Under Construction

Sewerage

            SSE * Sewer System Extension

            SWEP = Storm Water Elimination Program

Treatment

            WTPI - Wastewater Treatment Plant Improvements

            MTP = Maximize Treatment Process

S. D. = Sewer District of County

Type Sewer System

            S = Separate

            C = Combined

Status

            A = Adequate

            I - Inadequate

-------
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                                                  231
Re:  Lorain
     Sewerage
                              November 10, 1965
Mayor and Council
City Hall
Lorain, Ohio
 Gentlemen:
            As a result of Board action November 9* 1965*
enclosed is renewal permit for the discharge of sewage from
your municipality into "waters of the State" pursuant to the
provisions of the Water Pollution Control Act of Ohio.
            You will note that this permit expires September
15, 1966.  Renewal of this permit is contingent upon compliance
with the following Orders:
            1.  Submit a summary report on findings of
                inspections and maintenance of intercepting
                and overflow devices on the sewerage system.
            2.  Submit with application for renewal of permit
                a report indicating any major sewer projects
                completed or placed under construction during
                the period of this permit.
            3.  Provide satisfactory operation and maintenance
                of the existing sewerage and wastewater treat-
                ment works including the submission of regular

-------
                                                     232
                operating reports and  annual summaries  as

                required by the Division of  Engineering, Ohio

                Department of Health.

            4.  Submit a report and  general  plan for compliance

                with the Conclusions and Recommendations of

                the Lake Erie Conference (copy enclosed),  with

                special reference to Sections 7* 8,  9*  and 10

                concerning the means to maximize the reduction

                of biochemical oxygen  demand, phosphates,  and

                coliform concentrations.

            Should you have any questions with respect  to  the

above Orders, please notify us promptly.

                      Yours very truly,

                      E. W. Arnold,  M.D., Chairman

                      Water Pollution  Control Board

Enc.-Permit 46?.14
    -Recom. & Concl.

Certified mail

cc:  Mr. A, V. Agnew

cc:  Health Commissioner

co:  District Office.

-------
                                                                                                 233
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-------
Re:  Akron



     Sewerage



                                November 10, 1965




Mayor and Council



Municipal Building



Akron, Ohio 44308



Gentlemen:



            As a result of Board action November 9> 1965*



enclosed is renewal permit for the discharge of sewage from



your municipality into "waters of the state" pursuant to the



provisions of the Water Pollution Control Act of Ohio.



            You will note that this permit expires September



15, 1966.  Renewal of this permit is contingent upon compliance



with the following Orders:



            1.  Complete detail plans, specifications, and



                financing for Phase I of proposed improvements



                to the wastewater treatment works and secure



                approval thereof by the Ohio Department of



                Health.




            2.  Place under construction Phase I of the pro-



                posed improvements to the wastewater treatment



                works.



            3.  Prepare detail plans and specifications and



                submit means of financing Phase II of the



                improvements program for the wastewater

-------
                                                         238
                treatment  works,  and  secure  approval thereof
                by the  Ohio Department  of  Health.

            4.   Provide satisfactory  operation  and maintenance
                of the  existing  sewerage and wastewater treat-

                ment  works Including  the submission  of  regular

                operating  reports and annual summaries  as
                required by the  Division of  Engineering,  Ohio

                Department of Health.
            5.   Submit  a report  and general  plan  for compliance

                with the Conclusions  and Recommendations  of the
                Lake  Erie  Conference  (copy enclosed), with

                special reference to  Sections 7*  8*  9*  10, emd
                11 concerning the means to maximize  the reduction

                of biochemical oxygen demand, phosphates,  and
                coliform concentrations.
            Should you have any  questions  with  respect  to the
above Orders, please notify us promptly.

                      Yours very truly,
                      E. W. Arnold, M.  D., Chairman

                      Water Pollution Control Board

Enc.-Permit 541.14

    -Recom. & Concl.

Certified mail
cc:  Dir. of Public Service

cc:  Glaus, Pyle & Schomer

-------
                                                       239



cc:  Health Commissioner



cc:  District Office








Phase I - Addition of Aeration and Final Settling Facilities,



            Blower Building and Miscellaneous Plant



            Modifications.



            Completion of Final Plans and Specifications -



                December 1, 1965



Phase II - Addition of Preliminary (Grit Chambers and Screening



            Equipment) and Primary Facilities (Primary Sedimenta-



            tion Tanks and Preservation Tanks), Grease



            Incineration.




            Completion of Plans and Specifications -



                October 1, 1966



Phase III - Sludge Disposal Modifications and Modifications to



            Existing Secondary Facilities.



            Completion of Plans and Specifications -



                October 1, 1967.

-------
                                                     240



                  STATE OF OHIO




              DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH




        Water Pollution Control Board




                                  May 10, 1966



Re:  Cleveland




     Sewerage




Mayor and Council




City Hall




Cleveland, Ohio 44114




Gentlemen:




            As a result of Board action May 10, 1966,




enclosed is renewal permit for the discharge of sewage from




your municipality into "waters of the state" pursuant to the




provisions of the Water Pollution Control Act of Ohio.




            You will note that this permit expires April 15,




1967.  Renewal of this permit is contingent upon compliance




with the following Orders:




            General.




            1.  Provide satisfactory operation and maintenance




                of all existing sewage pump stations, waste-




                water treatment works, and intercepting devices




                of the city of Cleveland, including the sub-




                mission of regular operating reports and annual




                summaries as required by the Division of



                Engineering, Ohio Department of Health.

-------
                                           241






2.  Submit a progress report prior to January 1,



    1967* on the status of the Master Plan Study



    of Pollution Abatement and the expected date



    for completion.



Wastewater Treatment Works.




1.  Southerly Works.



    A.  Continue construction on Contracts Nos. 130



    (Imhoff Tank Conversion) and 131 (Elutriation



    Tanks) and submit a status report of such.




    B.  Complete detail plans and specifications



    and secure approval thereof by the Ohio Depart-



    ment of Health for Contracts Nos. 134 (Primary



    Treatment Improvements) and 135 (Secondary



    Treatment Improvements) and place such under



    construction.




    C.  Authorize the preparation of detail plans



    and specifications for Additional Improvements



    and Enlargements to existing facilities as



    outlined in February 1966 Report on Southerly



    Treatment Plant (references 11.4, 12.2, and




    12.3).



2.  Easterly Works.




    Prepare and secure approval by the Ohio Depart-



    ment of Health of detail plans for Construction

-------
                                            242



    Packages Nos. 1 and 2 in accordance with



    February 1966 Plan for Improvements and



    Enlargements of the Easterly Sewage Treatment



    Plant (Part VIII, Table 6).




3.  Westerly Works,



    A.  Complete Engineering Study and Report to



    provide for secondary treatment facilities and




    submit such prior to September 15, 1966, for



    approval by the Ohio Department of Health.



    B.  Submit a schedule as to when detail plans



    will be completed and construction will be



    undertaken, in accordance with the conclusions



    and recommendations of the above report.



Collection System.



1.  Implement the "Improvements Recommended for



    Immediate AGtion" set forth in Part V of the



    Preliminary Survey of Water Pollution:



    A.  Proceed immediately with the preparation



    of detail plans of (l) Heights Sanitary Trunk



    Sewer (A-l), (2) Broadway Sanitary Irunk Sewer




    (A-2), and (3) Southwest Suburban Sanitary




    Trunk Sewer (A-3)* and submit a schedule for



    completion of plans and for construction of



    these trunk sewers.

-------
                                                      243



                B.  Item D regarding the rehabilitation and




                repair of existing pumping stations and in




                addition automatic telemetering  equipment




                for continued surveillance of operations of




                the pumping stations.




                C.  Item C regarding gauging and sampling




                stations.




                D.  Item E regarding sewer construction projects,




                plans for which have been prepared; in addition




                the establishment of priorities for construction




                of such projects during 1966-1971.




            2.  Submit a report on other major sewer projects




                completed, placed under construction, and




                planned for construction.




            Please note that the reports referred to above




should be submitted at times specified and that the application




for renewal of permit should be submitted by March 15, 1967.




            Specific attention should be directed




to the real need for the City of Cleveland to provide monies




on a continuing basis so that construction, operation, and




maintenance can be provided to assure maximum abatement of




pollution in the least amount of time.  Only with assured and




continued financing of this kind can the city be expected to




implement a program of pollution abatement which the Board can




consider satisfactory.

-------
                                                      244




                      Yours very truly,




                      E.  W. Arnold,  M. D.,  Chairman




                      Water Pollution Control Board




Enc.-Permit 468.13




Certified mail




cc:  Director of Law




co:  Commr. of Water Pollution Control




cc:  Commr. of Engineering




cc :  Health Commissioner




cc:  District Office

-------
                                                          245
           The recommended Immediate Improvement Program
contains the following items:
A - New Trunk Sanitary Sewers



    A-l  Heights Sanitary Trunk Sewer



                            Easterly




    A-2  Broadway Sanitary Trunk Sewer



                            Southerly




    A-3  Soutwest Suburban Sanitary



         Trunk Sewer
                                               Estimated



                                             Project Cost
                                       $10,100,000.00









                                         2,600,000.00








                                         7,800,000.00



                                        20,500,000.00
B - Wastewater Treatment Plant Improvements
C -
D -
B-l  Easterly Treatment Plant



B-2  Southerly Treatment Plant



     Completion of Improvements




B-3  Westerly Treatment Plant



     (Under Study)








Gauging & Sampling Stations



Construction




Pump Station and Regulator



Better program underv.way




Repairs
                                          $  8,441,000.00
                                             6,385,000.00
                                            12,000,000.00




                                          $ 25,826,000.00
                                          $    175,000.00
                                          $    350,000.00

-------
                                                      246
E - Sewer Construction,  non-assessable



    Div. Engineering & Construction -



    Capital Improvement  Program



    1966-1971



    3,000,000/yr for 6 yrs.                 $ 18,500,000.00



                                  TOTAL    $ 66,351,000.00






Trunk Sanitary Sewers



           The City of Cleveland plans to propose to the



suburban communities that preliminary engineering and



design of the recommended New Trunk Sanitary Sewers be



started as soon as possible, and that the cost of this



engineering work which is estimated at $1,025,000 be included



in the new sewerage service contracts which are now being



negotiated.  If agreement is reached, the City of Cleveland



would hire consulting engineers to proceed immediately with



the necessary preliminary engineering, survey and design



work.  It is expected that while this engineering work



would be in progress, that the Master Plan for Pollution



Abatement would be completed and that this plan would contain



recommendations as to financing the actual construction of



the new Trunk Sanitary Sewers.

-------
                                                      24?
Re:  Solon



     Sewerage                    November 15» 1965




Mayor and Council




City of Solon



City Hall




6315 S.O.M. Center Road




Cleveland, Ohio  44139




Gentlemen:




            Enclosed is renewal permit for the discharge of




sewage from your municipality into "waters of the state"




pursuant to the provisions of the Water Pollution Control Act




of Ohio.




            You will note that this permit expires November




15, 1966.  Renewal of this permit is contingent upon compliance




with the following conditions:




            1.  Place under construction the proposed sewerage



                and wastewater treatment facilities for North




                and Northeast Areas in accordance with approved




                detail plans.




            2.  Provide satisfactory operation and maintenance




                of the existing sewerage and wastewater treat-




                ment works including the submission of regular




                operating reports and annual summaries as




                required by the Division of Engineering, Ohio




                Department of Health.

-------
                                                      248



            3.  Submit a status report  with regard  to  completion




                of sewerage and wastewater treatment facilities



                for the North and  Northeast Areas.



            Should you have any questions with respect to  the



above conditions, please notify us promptly.



                      Yours very truly,



                      E. W. Arnold, M.  D., Chairman




                      Water Pollution Control Board




Enc.-Permit 563.7



Certified mail



cc:  Burgess & Niple



cc:  Health Commissioner



cc:  District Office

-------












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                                                       251




Re:  Huron




     Sewerage                   December 15 > 1967




Mr. Dean E. Sheldon, Jr.




City Manager




City Hall




Huron, Ohio  44839




Dear Sir:




            As a result of Board action December 14, 1965*




enclosed is renewal permit for the discharge of sewage from




your municipality into "waters of the state" pursuant to the




provisions of the Water Pollution Control Act of Ohio.




            You will note that this permit expires December 15,




196b.  Renewal of this permit is contingent upon compliance




with the following Orders:




            1.  Provide satisfactory operation and maintenance




                of the existing sewerage and wastewater treat-




                ment works including the submission of regular




                operating reports and annual summaries as




                required by the Division of Engineering, Ohio




                Department of Health.




            2.  Place under construction sanitary sewerage in




                the Huronic Beach, North Palm Beach and  Oak




                Point Areas in accordance with approved detail




                plans.

-------
                                                      252




            3.  Submit a report and  general plan for compliance




                with the Conclusions and Recommendations of




                the Lake Erie Conference (copy enclosed),  with




                special reference to Sections J, Q,  9* 10* and




                11 concerning the means  to maximize  the reduc-




                tion of biochemical  oxygen demand, phosphates,




                and coliform concentrations.




            Should you have any questions with respect to  the




above Orders, please notify us promptly.




                      Yours very truly,



                      E. W. Arnold,  M. D., Chairman




                      Water Pollution Control Board




Enc.-Permit 134.14




    -Recom. & Concl.




Certified mail




cc:  Mayor and Council




cc:  Health Commissioner




cc:  District Office

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-------
                                                     258




Re:  Defiance




     Sewerage                    November 10, 1965




Mayor and Council




City Hall




Third and Perry Streets




Defiance, Ohio  43512




Gentlemen:




            As a result of Board action November 9, 1965,




enclosed is renewal permit for the discharge of sewage from




your municipality into "waters of the state" pursuant to the




provisions of the Water Pollution Control Act of Ohio.




            You will note that this permit expires September




15, 1966.  Renewal of this permit is contingent upon compliance




with the following Orders:




            1.  Complete detail plans for proposed sanitary




                sewers as outlined in supplemental report dated




                September 13, 1965* and submit to the Ohio



                Department of Health for approval.




            2.  Place under construction sanitary sewers




                covered by Order No. 1.




            3.  Submit a report on progress made in elimination




                of storm waters in sanitary sewers.




            4.  Provide satisfactory operation and maintenance




                of the existing sewerage and wastewater

-------
                                                       259



                treatment works including the submission of



                regular operating reports and annual summaries



                as required by the Division of Engineering,



                Ohio Department of Health.



            5.  Submit a report and general plan for compliance



                with the Conclusions and Recommendations of the



                Lake Erie Conference (copy enclosed), with



                special reference to Sections 1, 8, 9, 10, and



                11 concerning the means to maximize the reduc-



                tion of biochemical oxygen demand, phosphates,



                and coliform concentrations.



            Should you have any questions with respect to the



above Orders, please notify us promptly.



                      Very truly yours,



                      E. W. Arnold, M.  D., Chairman



                      Water Pollution Control Board



Enc.-Permit 306.15



    -Recom. & Concl.



Certified mail



cc:  Health Commissioner



cc :  District Office

-------
                                                      260



Re  Delphos




    Sewerage                       January 17, 1966




Mayor and Council




City Building




East Second Street




Delphos, Ohio  45833




Gentlemen:




            Enclosed is renewal permit for the discharge of




sewage from your municipality into "waters of the state"




pursuant to the provisions of the Water Pollution Control Act




of Ohio.




            You will note that this permit expires December




15* 1966.  Renewal of this permit is contingent upon compliance




with the following conditions:




            1.  Adopt all legislation and take all legal steps




                necessary to issue and sell bonds, notes, or




                other securities and provide adequate funds




                for the construction, operation, and maintenance




                of the groposed sewerage improvements.




            2.  Provide satisfactory operation and maintenance




                of the existing sewerage and wastewater treat-




                ment works including the submission of regular




                operating reports and annual summaries as




                required by the Division of Engineering, Ohio




                Department of Health.

-------
                                                        261




            3.   Submit a report  and  general plan for compliance




                with the Conclusions and  Recommendations of




                the Lake Erie Conference  (copy enclosed),




                with special reference to Sections 7,  9, 10,




                and 11 concerning maximum plant performance




                and eliminating  combined  sewers.




            Should you have any  questions with respect to the




above conditions, please notify  us promptly.




                      Yours very truly,




                      E. w. Arnold,  M. D., Chairman




                      Water Pollution Control Board




Enc.-Permit 532.11




    -Recom. & Concl.




Certified mail




cc:  Health Commissioner




cc :  District Office








                    *****









Re:  Saint Marys




     Sewerage                    August 13, 1965




Mayor and Council




City Building




North Hickory Street




Saint Marys, Ohio

-------
                                                       262





Gentlemen:



            Enclosed is renewal permit for the discharge of




sewage from your municipality into "waters of the state"




pursuant to the provisions of the Water Pollution Control




Act of Ohio.




            You will note that this permit expires August 15,




1966.  Renewal of this permit is contingent upon compliance




with the following conditions:




            1.  Prepare detail plans, specifications, and




                estimates of cost of proposed wastewater




                treatment plant improvements substantially




                in accordance with the general plan approved




                May 24, 1965, and secure approval thereof by




                the Ohio Department of Health.




            2.  Investigate ways and means for financing the



                construction of the proposed wastewater treat-




                ment plant improvements; formulate a program




                of financing and construction of the proposed




                work and submit for approval.




            3.  Provide satisfactory operation and maintenance




                of the existing sewerage and wastewater treat-




                ment works including the submission of regular




                operating reports and amnual summaries as




                required by the Division of Engineering, Ohio



                Department of Health.

-------
                                                      263



            4.  Submit a proposed schedule for construction




                of the wastewater treatment plant improvements.




            Should you have any questions with respect to  the




above conditions, please notify us promptly.




                      Yours very truly,




                      E. W. Arnold, M. D., Chairman




                      Water Pollution Control Board




Enc.-Permit 431.7




Certified mail




cc:  Health Commissioner




cc:  District Office








                   # * # #• #









Re:  Toledo




     Sewerage                       October 15* 1965




Mr. Prank H. Beckstrom




City Manager




310 Safety Building




Toledo, Ohio  43624




Dear Sir:




            As a result of Board action October 14, 1965,




enclosed is renewal permit for the discharge of sewage from




your municipality into "waters of the state" pursuant  to the




provisions of the Water Pollution Control Act of Ohio.

-------
                                                      264




            You will note that this permit expires July 15,




1966.  Renewal of this permit is contingent upon compliance




with the following Orders:




            1.  Complete the detail plans, specifications, and




                financing for the sludge de-watering facilities




                together with other proposed improvements to




                the wastewater treatment works and secure




                approval thereof by the Ohio Department of




                Health.




            2.  Submit a report setting forth the capital




                improvements, specifically regarding sanitary




                sewerage projects placed under construction,




                completed, or planned during the interim of




                this permit.




            3.  Provide satisfactory operation and maintenance




                of the existing sewerage and wastewater treatment




                works including the submission of regular




                operating reports and annual summaries as




                required by the Division of Engineering, Ohio




                Department of Health.




            4.  Submit a report and general plan for compliance




                with the Conclusions and Recommendations of the




                Lake Erie Conference (copy enclosed), with




                special reference to Sections 7, 8, 9, 10, and

-------
                                                     265




                11 concerning the  means  to maximize  the




                reduction of biochemical oxygen demand,




                phosphates,  and coliform concentrations.




            Referring to Order 2 above,  it is apparent  that




review and revision of the city's  capital improvement program




is necessary in accordance with the Conclusions and  Recommenda-




tions of the Lake Erie Conference.  Attention is directed  to




the need to place a higher priority on sewering the  Reynolds




Road Area because of the Board's past findings concerning




serious conditions of pollution.




                      Yours very truly,




                      E. W.  Arnold, M. D., Chairman




                      Water Pollution Control Board




Enc.-Permit 105.16




    -Recom. & Concl.




Certified mail




cc:  Mayor and Council




cc:  Mr. James E. Frock



cc:  Health Commissioner




cc:  District Office








                    * * * * •*









Re:  Van Wert




     Sewerage                       January 17, 1966

-------
                                                      266






Mayor and Council




City Building




Van Wert, Ohio 45891



Gentlemen:




           Enclosed is renewal permit for the discharge




of sewage from your municipality into "waters of the state"




pursuant to the provisions of the Water Pollution Control




£ct of Ohio.




           You will note that this permit expires




November 15, 1966.   Renewal of this permit is contingent



upon compliance with the following conditions:




           1.  Provide satisfactory operation and main-




               tenance of the existing sewerage  and  waste-




               water treatment works including the sub-




               mission of regular operating reports  and




               annual summaries as required by the



               Division of Engineering,  Ohio Department of




               Health.




           2.  Submit a report and general plan  for




               compliance with the Conclusions and Recom-




               mendations of the Lake Erie Conference  (copy




               enclosed), with special reference to  Sections




               7,  8, 10, and 11 concerning the means to



               maximize the reduction of solids, biochemical




               oxygen demand, phosphates, and coliform

-------
                                                      267



               concentrations, together with eliminating




               combined sewers.




           3.  Submit a proposal by April 15, 1966, for




               placing the operation of the wastewater




               treatment plant under the supervision of at




               least a Class II operator.




           A high degree of treatment for the receiving




stream may necessitate consideration being given to tertiary




treatment.




           Should you have any questions with respect to




the above conditions, please notify us promptly.




                                   Yours very truly,




                                   E. w. Arnold, M.D., Chairman




                                   Water Pollution Control Board




Enc.-Permit 714.14




    -Recom. & Concl.




Certified mail




cc: Supt. Wastewater Treat. Plant




cc: Health Commissioner




cc: District Office
                     #******
Re:  Northwood




     Sewerage                      November 15, 1965

-------
                                                      268






Mayor and Council




Village of Northwood




3615 Oram Road




Toledo, Ohio ^3616




Gentlemen:




           Enclosed is renewal permit for the discharge of




sewage from your municipality into "waters of the state"




pursuant to the provisions of the Water Pollution Control




Act of Ohio.




           You will note that this permit expires September




15, 1966.  Renewal of this permit is contingent upon




compliance with the following conditions:




           1.  Submit a copy of agreement reached with




               Toledo for acceptance of municipal  wastes




               from the westerly part of Northwood into




               the Toledo sewer system.




           2.  Submit copies of the resolutions adopted




               whereby Wood County assumes the responsi-



               bility for preparing detail plans for




               lateral sanitary sewers within Northwood,



               together with an estimate of time for




               completion of plans and construction of




               sewers.




           Should you have any questions with respect to




the above conditions, please notify us promptly.

-------
                                                     269

                             Yours very truly,

                             E. W. Arnold, M.D., Chairman

                             Water Pollution Control Board

Enc.-Permit 1846.3

Certified mail

cc:  Finkbeiner, Pettis & Strout

cc:  Health Commissioner

cc:  District Office



                     *•#***




                       Before

         THE WATER POLLUTION CONTROL BOARD

                DEPARTMENT OP HEALTH

                   STATE OF OHIO



In the Matter of the       )
                           )  Order to Show Cause - Case No. 94
Village of Ohio City, Ohio )

                 FINDING AND ORDER

           The Board coming now to consider the evidence

and arguments presented in the hearing on this matter finds:

                That due notice of this hearing has

                been given to the respondent herein

                pursuant to Section 6ll.06(C) and

                119.07, Revised Code.

-------
                                                     270'






It is therefore




           ORDERED, that this hearing be continued until




10:00 a.m., November 8, 1966, in the Conference Room of




the Ohio Department of Health, Room 155, ^50 Eilast Town




Street, Columbus, Ohio.




           ORDERED, that the respondent herein, the




Village of Ohio City, Ohio, prepare and submit for approval




by the Ohio Department of Health detail plans and speci-




fications of proposed sewerage and wastewater treatment




works and substantially in accordance with approved general




plan.




           ORDERED, that the respondent formulate a program




of financing and construction of the proposed project arid




submit for approval.




           ORDERED, that the respondent submit June 1,




August 1, and November 1, 1966, reports of progress regarding





the preparation of plans and the formulation of a financing




program.




It is further




           ORDERED, that a certified copy of this order be




served forthwith by certified mail upon the respondent




herein.
                             E. W. Arnold, M.D., Chairman
                             J. Gordon Peltier, Vice Chairman

-------
                                                    271





                           Fred E. Morr






                           Barton Holl
                           S. D.  Bresler




Adopted April 12, 1966




at Columbus, Ohio








                     *****









                       Before




          THE WATER POLLUTION CONTROL BOARD




                 DEPARTMENT OP HEALTH




                    STATE OF OHIO
In the Matter of the     )  Order to Show Cause - Case No. 76



Village of Pandora, Ohio )           (Continued)
                   FINDING AND ORDER




           The Board coming now to consider the evidence




and arguments presented in the hearing on this matter finds




               That due notice of this hearing has




               been given to the respondent herein




               pursuant to Sections 6111.06(C) and




               119.07, Revised Code.

-------
                                                     272






 It is therefore




           ORDERED, that this hearing be continued until




 10:00 a.m., E.S.T., August 9, 1966, in the Conference Room




 of the Ohio Department of Health, Room 155, ^50 East Town



 Street, Columbus, Ohio.




           ORDERED, that the respondent herein,, the Village




 of Pandora, Ohio, submit by August l, 1966, a summary report




 indicating progress made with respect to (a) securing




 approval by the Ohio Department of Health of detail plans




 for necessary sewerage and wastewater treatment facilities,




 (b) formulation of a financing program,  and (c ) construction




of such facilities.




It is further




           ORDERED,  that a certified copy of this order be




served forthwith by certified mail upon  the respondent herein,
                           E. w. Arnold,  M.D., Chairman
                           J. Gordon Peltier, Vice Chairman
                           Robert W. Teater
                           Barton Holl
                           S. D  Bresler




Adopted March 8, 1966,




at Columbus, Ohio.

-------
                                                     273
Re:  Waterville


     Sewerage                      February 15, 1966


Mayor and Council

Town Hall

16 North Second Street


Waterville, Ohio 43566

Gentlemen:

           Enclosed is renewal permit for the discharge


of sewage from your municipality into "waters of the state"


pursuant to the provisions of the Water Pollution Control


Act of Ohio.

           You will note that this permit expires February


15> 1967.  Renewal of this permit is contingent upon

compliance  with the following conditions:

           1.  Prepare report and general plan for

               necessary wastewater treatment plant


               improvements and expansions and secure

               approval thereof by the Ohio Department


               of Health.

           2.  Provide satisfactory operation and

               maintenance of the existing sewerage and

               wastewater treatment works including the

               submission of regular operating reports


               and annual summaries as required by the

               Division of Engineering, Ohio Department

-------
                                                     274






               of Health.




           3.  Prior to June 15,  1966,,  submit a schedule




               for compliance with the  Recommendations




               and Conclusions of the Lake Erie Con-




               ference (copy enclosed), with special




               reference to Sections 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11




               concerning  the means to  maximize the




               reduction of biochemical oxygen demand,




               phosphates, and coliform concentrations.




           Should you have any questions with respect to the




above conditions, please notify us promptly.




                           Yours  very truly,




                           E« W.  Arnold, M.D., Chairman




                           Water  Pollution Control Board




Enc. -Permit 264.14




    -Recom. & Concl.




Certified mail




cc :   Health Commissioner




cc :   District Office
                         * * *
Re:  West Unity




     Sewerage
April 1, 1966

-------
                                                     275



Mayor and Council




Municipal Building




West Unity, Ohio 43570




Gentlemen :




           Enclosed is renewal permit for the discharge




of sewage from your municipality into "waters of the state"




pursuant to the provisions of the Water Pollution Control




Act of Ohio.




           You will note that this permit expires June 15,




1966.  Renewal of this permit is contingent upon compliance




with the following conditions:




           1.  Complete the report and general plan




               for necessary sewerage and wastewater




               treatment works and secure approval




               thereof by the Ohio Department of Health.




           2.  Submit a report setting forth steps taken




               to implement a financing program for




               construction of sewerage and wastewater




               treatment works.




           Cognizance is taken of the change of consulting




engineers recently.




           The permit is timed for completion of the first




step as set forth in the letter of March 10, 1966, by your




solicitor.




           Should you have any questions with respect to the

-------
                                                       276






above conditions, please notify us promptly.




                           Yours very trulyj



                           E. W. Arnold, M.D., Chairman




                           Water Pollution Control Board



Enc.-Permit 24.16




Certified mail




cc:  Village Solicitor




cc:  Mr. Eugene C. Gerken, Engr.




cc:  Health Commissioner




cc:  District Office








                     *  * * * *









Re:  Whitehouse




     Sewerage                      May  16, 1966




Mayor and Council




Municipal Building



Whitehouse, Ohio 43571




Gentlemen:




           Enclosed is  renewal permit for the discharge




of sewage from your municipality into "waters of  the  state"




pursuant to the provisions of the Water Pollution Control




Act  of Ohio.




           You will note that this permit expires May 15,



1967.  Renewal of this  permit is  contingent upon compliance

-------
                                                    277



with the following conditions:




           1.  Submit a report with respect to com-




               pliance with the Conclusions and




               Recommendations of the Lake Erie




               Conference (copy enclosed), with special




               reference to Sections 9,  10, and 11.




           2.  Submit a report with respect to progress




               made regarding connection of those




               residences or establishments not yet



               tributary to the municipal sewerage system.




           3.  Provide satisfactory operation and main-




               tenance of the existing sewerage and waste-




               water treatment works including the sub-




               mission of regular operating reports and




               annual summaries as required by the




               Division of Engineering,  Ohio Department of




               Health.




           Prior to May 15, 1968, you will be expected to




comply with Regulation 452, Ohio Sanitary Code, by placing




your wastewater treatment plant under the responsible charge




of a full-time employee of the municipality who possesses




an operator's certificate appropriate for this Class I




plant, and to continue technical supervision until the




operator is properly certified.




           Should you have any questions with respect to

-------
                                                      278






the above conditions, please notify us promptly.




                           Yours very truly,




                           E. W. Arnold, M.D., Chairman




                           Water Pollution Control Board




Enc.-Permit 318.13




    -Recom. & Concl.




Certified mail




cc:  Finkbeiner, Pettis & Strout




cc:  Supt. Wa'stewater Treat. Plant




cc:  Health Commissioner




cc:  District Office



                        *****

-------
279











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-------
                                                       281
Re:  Bloomdale

     Sewerage                       April 15, 1966

Mayor and Council

Municipal Building

Bloomdale, Ohio  4481?

Gentlemen:

            Enclosed is renewal permit for the discharge of

sewage from your municipality into "waters of the state"

pursuant to the provisions of the Water Pollution Control Act

of Ohio.

            You will note that this permit expires February

15* 1967.  Renewal of this permit is contingent upon compliance

with the following conditions:

            1.  Complete a financing and construction schedule

                for sewerage and wastewater treatment works

                and submit for approval.

            2.  By February 15.» 196?> submit a schedule for

                compliance with the Recommendations and Conclu-

                sions of the Lake Erie Conference (copy

                enclosed), with special reference to Sections

                7-11* inclusive.

            Should you have any questions with respect to the

above conditions, please notify us promptly.

                      Yours very truly,

                      E. W. Arnold, M. D., Chairman

                      Water Pollution Control Board

-------
                                                     282
Enc.-Permit 234.16

    -Recom. & Concl.

Certified mail

cc:  Village Solicitor

cc:  Finkbeiner, Pettls & Strout

cc:  Health Commissioner

cc:  District Office


                   *******



Re:  Elmore

     Sewerage                    April 1, 1966

Mayor and Council

Municipal Building

Elmore, Ohio  43416

Gentlemen:

            Enclosed is renewal permit for the discharge  of

sewage from your municipality into "waters of the state"

pursuant to the provisions of the Water Pollution Control Act

of Ohio.

            You will note that this permit expires December

15* 1966.  Renewal of this permit is contingent upon compliance

with the following conditions:

            1.  Complete the revised report and general plan

                for necessary sewerage and wastewater treatment;

-------
                                                          283
                facilities and secure approval thereof


                by the Ohio Department of Health.


            2.  Authorize and direct the preparation of


                detail plans and specifications of proposed


                sewerage and wastewater treatment facilities


                substantially in accordance with approved


                revised general plan and secure approval


                thereof by the Ohio Department of Health.


            3.  Complete the investigation of ways and means


                for financing the construction of the proposed


                sewerage and wastewater treatment facilities;


                formulate a program of financing and construc-


                tion of the proposed work: and submit for


                approval.


            Should you kave any questions with respect to the


above conditions, please notify us promptly.


                      Yours very truly,


                      E. W. Arnold, M. D., Chairman


                      Water Pollution Control Board


Enc.-Permit 289.16


Certified mail


cc:  George W. Raike, Inc.


cc :  Health Commissioner


oc:  District Office

-------
Re:  McComb



     Sewerage                           April 15, 1966



Board of Public Affairs



Municipal Building



McComb, Ohio  45858



Gentlemen:



            Enclosed is renewal permit for the discharge of



sewage from your municipality into "waters of the state"




pursuant to the provisions of the Water Pollution Control Act



of Ohio.



            You will note that this permit expires April 15,




1967.  Renewal of this permit is contingent upon compliance



with the following conditions:



            1.  Prepare detail plans anc! specifications for



                proposed sewers and wastewater treatment plant



                improvements in accordance with approved



                general plan and secure approval thereof by



                the Ohio Department of Health.



            2.  Complete the investigation of ways and means



                for financing construction of the proposed




                sewerage and wastewater treatment plant improve-



                ments; formulate a program of financing and




                construction of the proposed work and submit



                for approval.




            3.  Provide satisfactory operation and maintenance

-------
                                                         285



                of the existing sewerage and wastewater



                treatment works including the submission of



                regular operating reports and annual summaries



                as required by the Division of Engineering,



                Ohio Department of Health.




            Should you have any questions with respect to the



above conditions, please notify us promptly.



                      Yours very truly,



                      E. W. Arnold, M. D., Chairman



                      Water Pollution Control Board



Enc.-Permit 130.13



Certified mail



cc:  Mayor and Council




cc :  Health Commissioner



cc:  District Office

-------
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-------
                                                        288
Re:  Lakewood
     Sewerage                      November 10, 1965
Mayor and Council
City of Lakewood
12650 Detroit Avenue
Cleveland, Ohio 44107

Gentlemen:
           As a result of Board action November 9,  1965,
enclosed is renewal permit for the discharge of sewage
from your municipality into "waters of the state" pursuant
to the provisions of the Water Pollution Control Act of Ohio
           You will note that this permit expires October

15,  1966.  Renewal of this permit is contingent upon
compliance with the following Orders:
           1.  Submit a report and general plan for
               compliance with the Conclusions and
               Recommendations of the Lake Erie Conference
               (copy enclosed), with special reference to
               Sections 7* 8, 9, 10, and 11 concerning

               the means to maximize the reduction  of bio-
               chemical oxygen demand, phosphates,  and
               coliform concentrations.

           2.  Provide satisfactory operation and main-
               tenance of the existing sewerage and new
               wastewater treatment works including the

-------
                                                       289
               submission of regular operating reports




               and annual summaries as required by the




               Division of Engineering, Ohio Department




               of Health.




           Should you have any questions with respect to




the above Orders, please notify us promptly.




                           Yours very truly,




                           E. W. Arnold, M.D., Chairman




                           Water Pollution Control Board




Enc.-Permit lM.15




    -Recom. & Concl.



Certified mail




cc :  Director of Public Works




cc:  Frank L. Woodruff & Associates




cc:  Health Commissioner




cc:  District Office








                     * # # # *








Re:  North Olmsted




     Sewerage                      January 17, 1966




Mayor and Council




City Hall




North Olmsted, Ohio 44070



Gentlemen:

-------
                                                    290




           Enclosed is renewal permit for the discharge




of sewage from your municipality into "waters of the state"




pursuant to the provisions of the Water Pollution Control




Act of Ohio.




           You will note that this permit expires January




15, 1967.  Renewal of this permit is  contingent  upon com-




pliance with the following conditions:




           1.  Complete construction  of sewerage in




               accordance with approved plans.




           2.  Provide satisfactory operation and main-



               tenance of the existing sewerage  and waste-




               water treatment works  including the sub-




               mission of regular operating reports and




               annual summaries as required by the Division




               of Engineering, Ohio Department of Health.




           3.  Submit a proposed schedule for construction




               of sanitary sewerage to serve the remaining




               unsewered portion of North Olmsted.




           4.  Prior to June I, 1966, submit a schedule




               for compliance with the Conclusions and




               Recommendations of the Lake Erie  Conference




               (copy enclosed), with  special reference to




               Sections 6, 7, 9, 10,  and 11 concerning the




               means to maximize the  reduction of bio-




               chemical  oxygen demand,  phosphates  and

-------
                                                     291
               coliform concentrations.




           Cognizance is taken that the  wastewater treatment




plant is operated under an appropriately certified operator




in accordance with Regulation 452 of the Ohio Sanitary Code.




           Should you have any questions with respect to




the above conditions, please notify us promptly.




                           Yours very truly,




                           E. W. Arnold, M.D., Chairman




                           Water Pollution Control Board




Enc.-Permit 58.1?



    -Recom. & Concl.




Certified mail




cc:  Health Commissioner




cc:  District Office



                       *****

-------





























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-------
                                                       293



Re:  Tiffin




     Sewerage                      April I,  1966



Mayor and Council




Municipal Building




Tiffin, Ohio 44883




Gentlemen:




           Enclosed is renewal permit for the discharge of




sewage from your municipality into "waters of the state"




pursuant to the provisions of the Water Pollution Control




Act of Ohio.




           You will note that this permit expires February




15, 1967.  Renewal of this permit is contingent upon com-




pliance with the following conditions:




           1.  Complete the detail plans and specifica-




               tions of proposed wastewater treatment




               ment plant improvements substantially in




               accordance with approved general plan and




               secure approval thereof by the Ohio Depart-




               ment of Health.




           2.  Place under construction the proposed waste-



               water treatment plant improvements in




               accordance with approved detail plans.




           3.  Provide satisfactory operation and main-



               tenance of the existing sewerage and waste-




               water treatment works including the submission

-------
                                                       294






               of regular operating reports  and  annual




               summaries as required by the  Division of




               Engineering, Ohio Department  of Health.




           4.   Prior to June 15, 1966,  submit a  schedule




               for compliance with the  Recommendations and



               Conclusions of the Lake  Erie  Conference




               (copy enclosed),  with appropriate considera-




               tion to Sections  7 through 11, inclusive.




           Should you have any questions with respect to




the above conditions, please notify us  promptly.




                           Yours very truly,




                           E. W. Arnold, M.D., Chairman



                           Water Pollution Control Board




Enc.-Permit 313.17




    -Recom. & Concl.




Certified Mail




cc :  Safety-Service Director




cc:  F. G. Browne & Associates




cc :  Health Commissioner




cc:  District Office

-------
                                                      295



Re:  Attica




     Sewerage                      February 15, 1966




Mayor and Council




Municipal Building




Attica, Ohio 4480?




Gentlemen:




           Enclosed is renewal permit for the discharge




of sewage from your municipality into "waters of the state"




pursuant to the provisions of the Water Pollution Control




Act of Ohio.




           You will note that this permit expires June 15,




1966.  Renewal of this permit is contingent upon compliance




with the following conditions:




           1.  Complete negotiations with industry and




               determine the tributary loads so that the




               design of the necessary sewerage and waste-



               water treatment facilities can be completed




               without delay.



           2.  Complete the report and general plan for




               necessary sewerage and wastewater treatment




               facilities in accordance with determinations




               of Condition 1.




           Should you have any questions with respect to the




above conditions, please notify us promptly.




                           Yours very truly,

-------
                                                       296
                           E. w. Arnold, M.D., Chairman



                           Water Pollution Control Board




Enc.-Permit 45.15




Certified mail




cc:   Village Solicitor




cc:   Jones, Henry & Williams



cc:   Health Commissioner




cc:   District Office








                   **#***








                 STATE OP OHIO




              DEPARTMENT OP HEALTH




         WATER POLLUTION CONTROL BOARD








               NOTICE OP VIOLATION




Mayor and Council




Municipal Building




Bloomville, Ohio 448l8             January 14, 1966




           You are hereby notified, pursuant to  Section




6111.06  (A) Revised Code, that it appears to the Water




Pollution Control Board you are in violation of the pro-




visions of the Water Pollution Control Act in that:




           1.  You are causing pollution of the waters




               of the State  of  Ohio without a valid

-------
                                                      297



               and unexpired permit, or renewal thereof,




               to do so.  This constitutes a violation




               of Section 6111.04 Revised Code.




           2.  You have failed to indicate progress made




               with respect to the preparation of detail




               plans for necessary sewerage and wastewater




               treatment facilities.




           Unless the matters above stated be corrected




within a period of sixty days from the date of this notice,




or unless you shall request a hearing en said matters within




thirty days of the date of this notice, the Board at the




end of the sixty-day period will make and issue an order,




finding you in violation of the Act, and requesting the




Attorney General to prosecute the violation.




           The above results from Board action taken January




11, 1966.
                           E. W. Arnold, M.D., ^Chairman



                           Water Pollution Control Board




Certified mail




cc :  Attorney General




cc:  Mr. Warren G. Wolf




cc:  Alfred LePeber & Assocs.




cc:  Health Commissioner




cc:  District Office

-------
                                                                                      298

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                                                                 300




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