United States
                      Environmental Protection
                      Agency
                        Pollution Prevention
                        and Toxics
                        (7407)
                   Summer 1995
                   EPA 749-R-95-002
vvEPA
Chemicals  in  the  Environment
 Public Access Information
New Chemicals
  Program: Gatekeeper
  to Prevent
  Unreasonable R/sfcs

Chemicalsiin the
  Environment: OPPT
  Chemical fact Sheets

Health and Safety
  Studies

8(e) Triage: Notices of
  Significant Health
  Risk Database

Lead in the
  Environment

Obtaining Information
  on Asbestos

TSCA Assistance
  information Service

Toxics Release
  inventory

Environmental
  Education Project

EPCRA Hotline

33/50 Program

Design for the
  Environment

Pollution Prevention
  information
  Clearinghouse
  Welcome Message
     Linda A. Travers, Director, Information Management Division
         The     United     States
        Environmental     Protection
        Agency (EPA) maintains a wide
  range of environmental information.
  Some of this information tells us what
  chemicals and pollutants are released
  by   industrial  plants.     Other
  information tells us about the health
  and environmental effects of chemicals.
  Still other information tells us what
  chemicals people may be exposed to.

  EPA believes that it is in everyone's
  interest  to make  this information
  available to the public. "Public" here
  includes industry, state governments,
  community groups,  environmental
  groups, and, of course, public citizens.
  Access to information is the best way
  to ensure everyone has the opportunity
  to evaluate and reduce environmental
  and health risks.

  To make this information accessible,
  the Office of Pollution Prevention and
  Toxics (OPPT) within EPA provides a
variety of information services and
products.    These  include  call-in
hotlines, publications, diskettes with
data, CD-ROMs, and access to on-line
databases.

This publication is one way for you to
find out about EPA's  information
products related to chemicals.  The
first edition  of the Chemicals in the
Environment: Public Access Information
provides information on a number of
major OPPT products and services that
reflect the scope of our programs. We
hope to reach a wide audience to let
you know what information products
are available, what they can do for you,
and how to get them.

We  would  like  to  know  if  this
publication is helpful to you.  Please
direct your comments or questions to
the editor, Randall Brinkhuis (see page
2  for  his  mailing  and Internet
addresses).

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Chemicals in the Environment
                                   Summer 1995
The New Chemicals Program: Gatekeeper to Prevent Unreasonable Risks
    David Di Fiore, Chemical Control Division

    Imagine that you had the opportunity to redesign the
    way  the  country  goes  about   protecting the
    environment and human health.   One important
focus  would certainly be  hazardous  chemicals-those
currently made and in use, but also, and perhaps more
importantly, those that have been developed but not yet
manufactured  commercially and released  into the
environment.  It is within this latter group that the best
opportunities exist to prevent pollution and harm, before
a single worker or consumer is exposed to a chemical and
before a single kilogram enters the environment.  It is
preventive action at this juncture that should avert the
catastrophic effects  of  a new  dioxin-  or PCB-like
compound.	
   Chemicals at the Environment: Public Access Information
   is published by EPA's Office of Pollution Prevention and
   Toxics (OPPT) to increase public access to and awareness
   of  information on toxic  chemicals  and pollution
   prevention available through  OPPT.

   This resource is also accessible through the EPA Gopher
   at gopher.epa.gov. It is located under EPA Offices and
   Regions/Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxics/Toxic
   Substances/Chemicals in the Environment Public Access
   Bulletin. (The EPA Gopher's menu structure will be
   undergoing some  changes.   In  the event that this
   publication is no longer located there, use the Jughead
   index tool to search for it.)

   Advisory Board
   Project Manager: Georgianne McDonald
   Editor: Randall Brinkhuis
         Internet: brinkhuis.randall@epantail.epa.gov
   Publisher: Chuck Freeman
         Internet feeeman.charles@epamail.epa.gov
   Assistant Editor: KathyHogan

   OPPT Divisional Representatives:
    David Di Fiore, CCD         Ted Jones, CSRAD
    Dan Fort, EETD             Mike McDaneH BAD
    Odelia Funke, IMD          Joe Merenda, HERD
    Ruth Heikkinen, BAD (forPPD)  Tim Torma, CMD

   Mailing Address:
    Chemicals in the Environment: Public Access Information
    U.S. EPA
    Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (7407)
    401 M St., SW
    Washington, DC 20460
Fortunately, the drafters of the Toxic Substances Control
Act (TSCA) had the good sense and foresight to realize
the importance of placing a gatekeeper between the
laboratory  and the  commercial marketplace.   That
gatekeeper is the New Chemicals Program (NCP).
                      The New Chemicals
                      Program reviews new
                      chemical notices to
                      determine whether the
                      manufacture, processing,
                      distribution in commerce,
                      use or disposal of a
                      substance may present an
                      unreasonable risk to
                      human health or the
                      environment.
The NCP derives its
authority     from
Section 5 of TSCA,
which  requires  all
manufactures    or
importers of "new"
chemicals to file a
notice with the EPA
90 days prior  to
commercial  activity
(or to file a request
for an exemption to
the  90-day  notice
requirement).     A
simplified definition
of a "new" chemical
under TSCA is one
made or brought into the U.S. after 1977--when the
"existing" chemical inventory was established-and one
not specifically regulated  under another statute (like
those that apply to pesticides or drugs).

The NCP reviews the new chemical notice to determine
whether the manufacture, processing, distribution in
commerce, use or disposal of the substance may present
an unreasonable  risk to human  health   or  the
environment.   The  program's  assessment  includes
exposures and risks to workers, consumers  and the
general population (for example, from drinking water or
fish consumption), as well as risks to wildlife, including
endangered  species.  From its inception in 1979, the
program has reviewed over 26,000 new chemical notices
and exemption applications and taken action to control
potential    unreasonable    risks    associated   with
approximately 10% of those chemicals.

A brochure and additional information on the New Chemicals
Program are  available through the EPA TSCA Assistance
Information Service  at (202) 554-1404.   If you have
additional questions about the program,  contact David Di
Fiore at (202) 260-3374, fax (202) 260-0118.

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Issue No. 1
                       Public Access Information
Chemicals in the  Environment:  OPPT Chemical Fact Sheets
    Randall Brinkhuis, Information Management Division,
    and Richard Wormell, Chemical Screening and Risk Assessment Division
       Chemicals can be released to the environment as a
       result of their manufacture, processing, and use.
       EPA has developed a series of fact sheets and
chemical summaries  to describe how  you might  be
exposed to selected chemicals, how exposure to them
might  affect you and  the
environment, what happens
to them in the environment,
and whom to  contact  for
additional    information.
EPA   is  committed  to
reducing   environmental
releases   of    chemicals
through  source  reduction
and  other  practices that
reduce    creation    of ^	^
pollutants.

Each Fact Sheet is also accompanied by a Chemical
Summary (a technical support document that provides
detailed technical information on the chemical named in
the Fact Sheets).

The initial goal of this project was to provide summaries
that    would   supplement   information   on  the
environmental  release  of Toxics  Release  Inventory
chemicals. The Fact Sheets are also intended to provide
the public with information  on other chemicals under
assessment by the  Office  of Pollution Prevention and
Toxics.
The first set of fact sheets has been completed for:
    Acetaldehyde
    Acetonitrile
    Acrylamide
    Acrylic acid
    1-Butanol
    Carbon disulfide
    Carbonyl sulfide
    Chlorine
    Cyclohexane
    Freon 113
    Methanol
Methyl ethyl ketone
Methyl isobutyl ketone
Methyl-tert-butyl ether
Methylchloroform  (a.k.a.
 1,1,1 -Trichloroethane)
Methylene chloride  (a.k.a.
 Dichloromethane)
2-Methoxyethanol
Perchloroethylene
Toluene
1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene
Fact sheets for  another  forty  chemicals  are  being
prepared.

Copies of the Fact Sheets for the first set of chemicals are
available from the TSCA Assistance Information Service,
(202) 554-1404.  They are also accessible electronically
on the Right-to-Know Network; dial in via modem at
(202) 234-8570 or telnet to rtk.net (login as "public")
for  Internet access.  The Fact Sheets and  Chemical
Summaries  are  also available  on  the  EPA Gopher
(gopher.epa.gov) under EPA Office and Regions/ Office
of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances / Toxic
Substances / Chemicals in the  Environment: OPPT
Chemical Fact Sheets.
                                         Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA)

                                The Toxic Substances Control Act was enacted by Congress in 1976. To ensure wise
                                and informed decision-making by the government, TSCA gives EPA authority to gather
                                certain kinds of basic information on chemical risks from those who manufacture,
                                process, import, or distribute chemicals.  The law also enables EPA to  require
                                companies to test selected existing chemicals for toxic effectst and requires the Agency
                                to review most new chemicals before they are manufactured.

                                To prevent unreasonable risks, EPA may select from a broad range of control  actions
                                under TSCA from requiring hazard-warning labels to outright bans on the manufacture
                                or use of especially hazardous chemicals.  Under TSCA, EPA may regulate  a chemical's
                                unreasonable risks at any stage in its iifecyde: the manufacturing, processing,
                                distribution in commerce, use, or disposal.
                                A more complete description of TSCA can befound in The Lay man's Guide to the Toxfc Substances
                                Control Aa. Copies of that publication, the law itself, and other publications dealing with TSCA
                                are available from the TSCA Assistance Information Service, {202} 554-1404,

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Chemicals in the Environment
                                  Summer 1995
                                                                 Health and Safety Studies
Toxic Substance Control Act Test Submissions (TSCATS)
    Geraldine Nowak, Information Management Division
       TSCATS (Toxic Substances Control Act Test
       Submissions)  is  an  online  index to
       unpublished, nonconfidential studies
covering chemical testing results and adverse
effects of chemicals on health and ecological
systems. The studies are submitted by U.S.
industry to EPA under several sections of the
Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). There
are four types of documents in the database:
Section 4 chemical testing  results,
Section 8(d)  health  and  safety
studies, Section  8(e) substantial
risk  of injury to health or the
environment  notices,  and  voluntary
documents submitted to EPA known  as a
For Your Information (FYI) notice.

TSCATS contains  information  that is
pertinent to the risk assessment and hazard
evaluation processes. The information can be
used in conjunction with published material
and is a valuable  source along with or in the absence of
published data. The data are used by federal and state
agencies, researchers, toxicologists, risk assessors, the
regulated industry,  attorneys, trade  and professional
associations.

TSCATS was developed to make ongoing and completed
chemical testing  studies available to the  public and
       includes    chemical    exposure     studies,
          epidemiology,      environmental     fate,
           monitoring, episodic incidents, such as spills
            and case reports.  There are 81,000 studies
            on 6,700  unique chemical substances  are
            contained in  23,000 documents.    On
           average three or four individual studies  are
          extracted from each document.

         Studies  are  indexed  under  three  broad
        categories: health effects, ecological effects and
       environmental  fate.   Additional  controlled
     vocabulary terms are assigned  to  describe  the
   experimental  protocol and test observations.   A
 TSCATS record also includes: the chemical name, CAS
 (Chemical Abstracts Service) Registry Number, Section
 of TSCA, title, document number, microfiche number,
 submitting organization,  and performing organization.
 A select number of studies also have abstracts.

 The index is accessible through a variety of electronic
formats (see sidebar).  The full text of the studies is
available  on microfiche  from Chemical Information
Systems or the National Technical Information Service.
Each study is referenced by a microfiche number which
is necessary when ordering the full-text document.

EPA  contact:  Geraldine  Nowak,  (202)  260-2320.
Internet address: nowak.geraldine@epamail.epa.gov.
                 Electronic Access to TSCATS
                    On-line System                Filename
                    National Library of Medicine       TOXLINE
                    Chemical Information Systems     TSCATS
                    Dialog Information Services        File 156
                    STN International               TQXLIST
            Phone #
            (301)496-6193
            (800) CIS-USER
            (800) 3-DIALOG
            (614) 421-3600
                    (Note: AD of the above services charge for accessing their files.)

                    CD-ROM                         ;
                    SUverPIatter (TOXUNE), (617) 235-1715

                    Magnetic Tape
                    National Technical Information Service, (703) 487-4650

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 Issue No. 1
                      Public Access Information
                                                       Notices of Significant Health Risks
 8(e) Triage Chemical Studies Database Product
    Charles Freeman, Information Management Division
    In order to help reduce the risks of chemicals in the
    environment,  EPA recognizes the importance of
    providing the public with access to the information
collected under environmental laws.

Under Section 8(e) of the Toxic Substances Control Act
(TSCA), manufacturers, importers,  and distributors of
chemical substances and mixtures are required to inform
EPA of studies conducted that reasonably support the
conclusion that the chemicals present a "substantial risk
of injury" to human health or the environment.   One
intended use of this information is to make it accessible
to the general public and organizations whose efforts are
associated with protection of health and safety.

                        If members of a community
                        question  whether  certain
                        chemicals being  released in
                             their community are of
                             significant health  risk,
                             information   collected
                        jy  under   Section   8(e)
                             could  assist  in  their
research  efforts.   EPA has  developed a user-friendly
database to  serve as  a vehicle for sharing this  8(e)
submission information.

In 1991, OPPT initiated the Compliance Audit Program
(CAP).   The  CAP was  a voluntary program  that
encouraged companies to audit their files for information
that was required by 8(e).  It provided reduced monetary
penalties for companies submitting studies that were past
the statutory submittal deadline.  EPA received about
10,000 submissions under the CAP, in addition to the
approximately  400 non-CAP 8(e)s the Agency receives
each year.

The Database includes the  majority of the CAP and non-
CAP submissions received after  1991. Version 1.0 of the
Database, released  in October  1993,  consisted of
approximately 6,000 studies which had been reviewed to
date.  The most recent version of the Triage Database,
released February  1995, includes an additional 4,000
studies that have recently  been reviewed by EPA for a
total of 10,000  studies.  The revised version also provides
a more user-friendly installation.  In addition, selected
Section 8(e) chemicals are the subject of OPPT Chemical
Fact Sheets (see page 3). These chemicals have their Fact
Sheets included in the Database to provide the user with
more  information  about them.  As  Fact  Sheets  for
additional 8(e) chemicals are completed, they too will be
incorporated into the Database.

To use Triage on your  computer you must have  the
following:

   IBM PC or compatible (286 processor or better);
   DOS Version 3.1 or higher; and
   45 megabytes of free space on the hard drive.

EPA is considering having the third version of the 8(e)
Triage Program  available on CD-ROM due  to  the
increased memory  that will be needed to run future
versions.

To receive a copy of the most recent version (2.0) of the
8(e) Triage Program please call the TSCA Hotline at
(202)  554-1404. In addition, the Database was recently
made  available through the Internet on the EPA Gopher
(address: gopher.epa.gov). Three files and instructions
on downloading the files are provided. The 8(e) Triage
files are presently found on the EPA Gopher by choosing
the following path:

   EPA Offices and Regions/ Office of Prevention,
   Pesticides and Toxic Substances/ Toxic Substances/
   8(e) Triage Chemical Studies Database

For more information on the Triage Database,  contact
Chuck Freeman at (202) 260-8918 (Internet address:
freeman.charles@epamail.epa.gov).

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Chemicals in the Environment
                                   Summer 1995
Lead in the Environment
    Karen Hoffman, Chemical Management Division

       bout one in eleven children in American have high
       levels  of lead in their blood,  according to the
        enters for Disease Control and Prevention. You
may have lead around your building without knowing it
because you can't see, taste or smell lead. You may have
lead in the dust, paint or soil in and around your home,
or in your drinking water or food.  Because it does not
break down naturally, lead can remain a problem until it
is removed.
The long term effects of lead in a child can be severe.
They  include learning disabilities, decreased growth,
hyperactivity, impaired hearing, and even brain damage.
If caught early these effects can be limited by reducing
exposure to lead or by medical treatment.   There are
simple things you can  do  to help protect your family
from the hazards of lead poisoning.  The National Lead
Information Center's  hotline and clearinghouse can
provide you with useful information.

The National Lead  Information Center  (NLIC)  is
sponsored jointly by  the  non-profit National Safety
Council and EPA, with support from three other federal
agencies: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
(CDC), Department of Housing and Urban Development
(HUD), and Department of Defense. The NLIC includes
a hotline and clearinghouse which provide  the general
public and professional audiences with information about
lead poisoning and prevention.
When a  caller  phones  the  24-hour National  Lead
Hotline,   (1-800-LEAD-FYI), they  hear  a recorded
message - in either English or Spanish - asking them to
leave their name and address.  Callers  receive a free
packet of information including four lead fact sheets, a
list of state and local lead  contacts and  a pamphlet
entitled "Lead Poisoning and Your Children."

Callers with specific questions are referred  to the
National Lead Clearinghouse (1-800-424-LEAD) where
they may speak with an information specialist in either
English or Spanish.  Hours are Monday through Friday
8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

The  clearinghouse  provides  callers  with  relevant
informational materials including  federal publications,
selected journal articles and updates of federal laws and
regulations.  Also available is information on qualified
laboratories, referrals to federal, state and  local agencies,
EPA Regional Lead Training Centers (RLTCs) and EPA
regional lead contacts.

Other services provided by the Center include a lead
education video lending library and a  lead speakers
bureau for community, school or church groups.  Posters
are available free of charge.

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 Issue No. 1
                                                                   Public Access Information
 Obtaining Information on Asbestos
    Robert Jordan, Chemical Management Division
 E
PA's asbestos message, most dearly enunciated in
1990 and the years since,  can be stated rather
simply:
    Asbestos is a problem because, as a
    toxic  substance  and  a  known
    carcinogen,  it  can cause several
    serious  diseases  in  humans.
    Symptoms  of  these   diseases
    typically develop over a period of
    years following asbestos exposure.

    Asbestos-containing materials (ACM) in buildings do
    not always pose a problem (that is, a hazard) to
    occupants and workers in those buildings. When can
    ACM become a problem? When asbestos fibers get
    into the air and are inhaled; that is, when there is
    human exposure.

    Intact,  undisturbed  asbestos-containing materials
    generally do not pose  a health  risk.  They may
    become hazardous and pose increased risk when they
    are  damaged,  are  disturbed in some manner, or
    deteriorate over time and thus release asbestos fibers
    into building air.

    EPA's asbestos program for schools (AHERA) and its
    guidance  for other  building owners is  founded
    on "in-place management of ACM." This approach
    is designed to  keep asbestos fiber levels low by
    teaching people to recognize  asbestos-containing
    materials and actively manage them.
In general, the Agency's major asbestos regulations were
promulgated under authority of the Toxic Substances
 Control Act (TSCA) or under the Clean Air Act (CAA).
 TSCA regulations and guidance are administered and
 managed by the Office of Pollution Prevention and
 Toxics (OPPT),  while the CAA  regulations are  the
 responsibility of the Office of Air and Radiation (OAR).
 Information on EPA's asbestos regulations, interpretive
 documents, and guidance materials are available to the
 public and the regulated community through a variety
 of sources.

The TSCA  Assistance  Information  Service,  (202)
554-1404, provides TSCA regulation (including asbestos)
information,  copies of regulations, Agency  guidance
documents, and referrals  to more specific sources of
information (for example, Regional Asbestos/NESHAP
Coordinators), as  needed.  Homeowners can obtain a
copy of the pamphlet "Asbestos in the Home" from this
source.

The Asbestos Ombudsman Clearinghouse/Hotline, (800)
368-5888 (in the  Washington metropolitan area dial
(703) 305-5938), provides general asbestos information
to the  public.  Operated by EPA's  Small  Business
Ombudsman's Office, it also assists small businesses in
complying with EPA regulations.

EPA's Public Information Center, (202) 260-2080, is an
additional information resource, although its coverage is
quite broad,  and  not specifically focused on asbestos
program information.
The Toxic Substances Control Act Assistance Information Service (T.A.I.S.)
    Wanda Woodburn, Environmental Assistance Division
      The T.A.I.S.,  or the "TSCA Hotline," operating
      under  contract  to  EPA, provides technical
      assistance and information about programs under
the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), including the
Asbestos School Hazard Abatement Act (ASHAA), the
Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA), and
the Lead Exposure Reduction Act.

The TSCA Hotline is staffed by professionals trained to
answer technical  questions  about  TSCA, ASHAA,
AHERA, the Lead Exposure Reduction Act, and some
Pollution Prevention  activities,  including the 33/50
Program.  The Hotline can  be reached at (202) 554-
                                             1404, Monday through Friday, from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00
                                             p.m. (Eastern time).

                                             The Hotline stocks TSCA-related documents, including
                                             Federal  Register  notices,  reports,  and  information
                                             brochures  and booklets.  These are  available free  of
                                             charge, and may be requested during business hours by
                                             phoning the Hotline, or by fax at any time to (202) 554-
                                             5603.

                                             Anyone with questions about these activities may contact
                                             the Hotline for information and assistance.

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Chemicals in the Environment
                                   Summer 1995
TRI Helps Communities Help
Themselves
    Jan Erickson, Information Management Division

    In 1984, a deadly cloud of methyl isocyanate killed
    thousands of people in Bhopal, India. This and other
    incidents underscored demands by industrial workers
and communities in  several states for information on
hazardous  materials.   In response  to  rising public
concern, Congress passed the Emergency Planning and
Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) requiring U.S.
manufacturers to report  amounts of toxic chemicals
released into the environment. The  resulting database
became known as the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI).

In  keeping with Congressional intent in passing the
legislation,  EPA endeavored  to  make  the Inventory
widely available to citizens groups, labor
organizations, academia, the media
and other potential users. A
variety    of    information
products  were  developed,
ranging from printed reports
highlighting particular facets of
the Inventory to CD-ROMs and
online systems for searching, displaying,
and downloading records electronically.  More recently,
TRI data has been available on the Internet. (For more
information, contact the TRI User Support Service  at
(202)260-1531.)

Outreach activities, by both EPA and public interest
groups,  were  also very  successful  in  raising public
awareness of TRI.  Communities began to use TRI  to
initiate  dialogues with  local facilities to encourage
manufacturers  to  reduce  their  emissions,   develop
pollution prevention plans, and improve safety measures.
Labor organizers used TRI as a basis for discussions with
employers regarding safety in the work place. National,
state and local officials are now using TRI to identify the
most pressing environmental problems and set priorities
for addressing  them.   Most importantly, reporting
facilities themselves use the data to identify opportunities
to prevent pollution and set goals for reducing toxic
chemical emissions.

And what has been the result of all this attention? TRI
has become a powerful force for reducing pollution!
Analyses reveal that toxic chemical releases have declined
dramatically since the inception of TRI.  A number  of
voluntary programs for reducing chemical emissions have
sprung up at the local,  state, and national levels.  In
many states, TRI provided the impetus for passage of
legislation requiring facilities to engage  in pollution
prevention planning.  TRI was  expanded  to include
Federal facilities, additional chemicals, and to require
reporting of additional data.
Environmental Education  Project
    Kathy Hogan, Information Management Division

       The  Information  Management  Division has
       launched an office wide educational strategy that
       seeks to place Office of Pollution Prevention and
Toxics (OPPT)  products and services in an educational
context for students in grades seven through twelve. The
first education product, in its review and comment stage,
              features the  Toxics Release  Inventory
                   (TRI) CD-ROM as its centerpiece.
                      In   coordination  with the
                      National   Science   Teachers
                      Association (NSTA), we  are
                      developing a  series  of cross-
                      curriculum teachers guides and
                   student activities featuring the TRI
             CD-ROM.  This project brings together
two good objectives:  The NSTA was searching for a
platform for introducing and encouraging the use of large
data banks in the classroom as a tool for education, and
OPPT has an ongoing objective to find ways of providing
meaningful public access.  The use of the TRI CD-ROM
as an educational tool will satisfy both objectives, and
encourage public understanding and appreciation of the
environmental usefulness  of the TRI.

In  addition to the  TRI  CD-ROM, the educational
package under  review includes a videotape presenting
several top environmental videos about on the Toxics
Release Inventory and other chemical subjects,  and a
number of  additional materials that highlight OPPT's
environmental protection activities. A group of educators
and other interested parties  will review EPA materials
and design a cross-curriculum teaching guide and student
activities manual.  The NSTA will distribute the final
product, including  the teaching guide and student
manual.

For more information about OPPTs Environmental Education
project, contact Kathy Hogan at (202) 260-9349, fax: (202)
260-4659, or at U.S. EPA, OPPT (Maikode 7407), 401 M
St., SW, Washington, DC  20460.

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Issue No. 1
                                                                   Public Access Information
 The  EPCRA Hotline:   Your Source
   for Information on the Emergency
   Planning  and  Community Right-
   to-Know Act
   Tamara McNamara,
    Environmental Assistance Division

   In  November  of  1986, Congress enacted  the
   Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know
   Act  (EPCRA), also known  as  Title  III of the
Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA
Title III), to help communities  prepare for chemical
emergencies and grant citizens and government officials
access to information about potential chemical hazards.
                    The  EPCRA  Hotline  is  a
                    publicly accessible service that
                    provides up-to-date information
                    on   EPCRA  and   related
                    programs,   such  as   the
                    Accidental Release Prevention
                    Provisions of the Clean Air Act.
                    Topics  commonly  addressed
                   planning,  hazardous chemical
                    public  access  to  chemical
include:  emergency
inventory  reporting,
information, toxic chemical release reporting, and the
toxic chemical inventory database.

The Hotline responds  to factual questions regarding
EPCRA  and  also responds  to  requests for related
documents.  Anyone can call the  Hotline.   It offers
information to  a broad  audience, including private
citizens.  If a question is not within the scope of the
Hotline's services, the information specialists attempt to
refer the question to the appropriate service.

The Hotline can be reached by calling toll-free:  1-800-
535-0202, Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 7:30 p.m. EST.
The Hotline is dosed on Federal Holidays.
Public Hotlines and
Clearinghouses referred to
in this publication

EPA Programs

Asbestos Ombudsman Clearinghouse/
Hotline, (800) 368-5888 or (703) 305-5938

Center for Environmental Research
Information (CERl)t (513) 569-7562

Emergency Planning and Community
Right-to- Know Act Hotline, (800) 535-
0202; in the Washington, DC, metropolitan
area, (703) 920-9877

Pollution Prevention information
Clearinghouse, (202) 260-1023

Public Information Center, (202) 260-2080

33/50 Program, (202)260-6907

Toxic Substances Control Act Assistance
Information Service (TSCA Hotline), (202)
554-1404

TRI User Support, (202) 260-1531

Other numbers

NationafLead Clearinghouse, (800) 424-
LEAD

National Lead Hotline, (800) LEAD-FYI

National Library of Medicine (TOXLINE),
(301) 496-6193

National Technical Information Service
(NTIS), (703) 487-4650
                                                                 ^

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Chemicals in the Environment
                                  Summer 1995
                                             Voluntary Pollution Prevention Programs
The 33/50 Program
    John Leitzke, Chemical Control Division
I                              he 33/50 Program is
                              an  EPA  voluntary
                              pollution prevention
                        initiative. It derives its name
                        from its overall goals - an
interim goal of a 33% reduction by 1992 and an ultimate
goal of a 50% reduction by 1995 in emissions of 17 high-
priority toxic chemicals.  EPA used the  1988 Toxics
Release Inventory (TRI) reporting data as a baseline.
TRI information for 1988 indicated that 12,800 facilities
reported  1.489  billion  pounds  of 33/50  Program
chemicals  directly  released to  the  environment or
transferred off-site to waste management facilities.  The
aim of the 33/50 Program is to reduce this 1.489 billion
pounds of pollution by at least 50%   745 million
pounds  by 1995, with an interim target of more than
496 million pounds by 1992.

1991  TRI reporting data indicates that releases  and
transfers of 33/50 Program chemicals declined by 32.8%
between 1988 and 1991, just shy of the Program's 1992
interim 33% national reduction goal a full year ahead of
schedule. By 1993 these figures had declined by 46%,
very close to the 1995 goal.

From  an  initial voluntary participation  of several
hundred companies, the 33/50 Program now includes
over 1,200 companies, and more are being contacted and
pledging voluntarily to reduce pollution each month.
EPA has a wide range of information and services on
pollution prevention technologies including: (1) nearly
20 company profiles that summarize successful programs
at industrial  facilities; (2) a generic waste reduction
manual, the Facility Pollution  Prevention Guide; (3)
nearly  20  industry-specific   Guides   to  Pollution
Prevention; (4) supplementary information in progress
reports, handbooks, reference  manuals, bibliographic
reports, and videos; (5) seven Manufacturing Technology
Centers across the nation for research and training; (6) a
variety of conferences and workshops held each year; (7)
state programs for grants and awards; and (8) several
Hotlines: (a) the TSCA Hotline at (202) 544-1404, (b)
the EPA Center for Environmental Research Information
in Cincinnati, OH,  at (513) 569-7562, and  (c) the
Pollution Prevention  Information Clearinghouse at (202)
260-1023. The Clearinghouse may also be reached using
a personal computer modem via Enviro$ense, a  free
computer bulletin board system on environmental issues,
at (703) 908-2092.  The 33/50 Program may also be
reached directly at (202) 260-6907.

The  17 high  priority toxic chemicals included in the
33/50 Programs are: Benzene, Cadmium and compounds,
Carbon tetrachloride, Chloroform, Chromium   and
compounds, Cyanides, Dichloromethane,  Lead   and
compounds, Mercury  and compounds, Methyl ethyl
ketone, Methyl isobutyl ketone, Nickel and compounds,
Tetrachloroethylene,  Toluene,  1,1,1 -Trichloroethane,
Trichloroethylene, and Xylenes.
Design for the Environment: Partnerships for a Cleaner Future
    Joe Breen, Economics, Exposure and Technology Division
      The Design for the Environment (DfE) Program is
      a cooperative, voluntary effort by EPA, industry,
      professional  organizations,  state  and  local
governments, other federal agencies (including the Small
Business  Administration),  and the public  aimed at
developing  specific pollution  prevention information
primarily for small-and medium-sized businesses.
DfE is  working with a  number  of small  business-
dominated industries including printing (screen printing
and lithography), dry cleaning,  and electronics/printed
wiring boards.  Specifically, the DfE Program uses its
industry projects  to  bring  together  comparative
information on the environmental and human health
risks,  exposures, performance and  costs of alternative
                                                1O

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Issue No. 1
                                                                             Public Access Information
 products and technologies so that small businesses can
 make more informed environmental  decisions. The DfE
 Program realizes that small businesses often do not have
 the resources or technical expertise to develop this kind
 of technical information on their own.

 DfE Screen Printing and Lithography Projects

   The screen printing sector of the printing industry is
    comprised of approximately 40,000 small businesses
    that employ an average of 15 people or fewer. The
    lithography sector  of  the  printing industry  is
    comprised of over 54,000 printers that  are mostly
    small- and medium-sized businesses.

   In the DfE Screen Printing and Lithography
    Projects, EPA and industry are working
    together to identify alternative work
    practices, products,  technologies,
    and   pollution   prevention
    options that are cost-effective
    and safer for workers and the
    environment.
   The  DfE  Screen  Printing
    Project worked with the Small
    Business Administration (SBA)
    and  the  New  Jersey Small
    Business  Development Center
    develop a pollution prevention video
    for  screen printers entitled, "Saving
    Money and Reducing Waste."

        The video introduces screen printers to pollution
        prevention  concepts   and  provides  specific,
        practical information  on ways  that  they  can
        incorporate  pollution  prevention into their
        processes.

   The DfE  Screen  Printing  and Lithography Projects
    are working with  SBA to facilitate the dissemination
    of DfE program information through  SBA networks,
    especially the Small Business Development Centers.

DfE Dry Cleaning Project

   The  DfE Dry  Cleaning Project  is  working  in
    partnership with this  small-business dominated
    industry to reduce exposure to dry cleaning solvents
    by working to remove barriers and create incentives
    for dry cleaners to use alternative garment cleaning
    methods.
                                                         To assess the viability of several alternative methods,
                                                         DfE has launched demonstration shops in three cities
                                                         - these sites will mirror typical dry cleaning shops,
                                                         but will use  alternative  water-based  technologies
                                                         instead of solvents to clean clothes.

                                                         The demonstration shops will provide dry cleaners
                                                         with an opportunity to observe alternative cleaning
                                                         processes under long-term, "real-world", conditions.

                                                            Performance, economic viability, and customer
                                                             satisfaction will be evaluated  and a training
                                                             program will  be  conducted  at the  shops  to
                                                             instruct dry cleaning professional in alternative
                                                             techniques, equipment, and quality control.
                                                                 DfE Printed Wiring Board (PWB) Project
                                                                           The vast majority (90%) of the
                                                                           approximately 750 independent
                                                                           PWB manufacturers are  small
                                                                           businesses  with  annual  sales
                                                                           under $10 million.

                                                                            The United States' share of the
                                                                            PWB   market   has   been
                                                                            declining  during  the  last
                                                                            decade, in part due to the costs
                                                                            associated with more stringent
                                                                            environmental  regulation  in
                                                                            the U.S.
                                                        The DfE PWB Project is working to identify and
                                                         evaluate  substitute   materials,   processes,  and
                                                         technologies for use in manufacturing PWBs so that
                                                         PWB manufacturers can make informed technology
                                                         choices, based on consideration of comparative risk,
                                                         performance, cost, and competitiveness.

                                                            PWB manufacturers are highly motivated  to
                                                            identify pollution prevention opportunities for
                                                            their industry and,  if  possible,   to  remove
                                                            themselves from the scope of some regulations,
                                                            particularly those  that  apply to  hazardous
                                                            wastes.

                                                     To obtain brochures, fact sheets, and other publications on
                                                     Design for the Environment (DfE) projects,  contact the
                                                     EPA Pollution  Prevention  Information Clearinghouse,
                                                     (202)260-1023.
                                                  1 1

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Chemicals in the Environment
                                                                                Summer 1995
The Pollution Prevention Information Clearinghouse
   Beth Anderson, Pollution Prevention Division
      The    Pollution    Prevention    Information
      Clearinghouse  (PPIC) is a free,  nonregulatory
      service of the United States
Environmental Protection Agency
established   in   response   to
requirements in the Pollution
Prevention  Act  of  1990.
PPIC    provides    several
services:        document
distribution,  reference   and
referral  telephone  service,  and
access  to  a  special  collection
pollution prevention materials.
                                               target federal, state, and local government agencies,
                                               industry, and academia, and other entities involved in
                                               pollution prevention activities.
                                                   Mailing Address:
                                                   Reference &. Referral:
                                                   Fax Number:
                                                   Internet:
                           of
PPIC
U.S. EPA (MC-3404)
401 M Street, SW
Washington, DC 20460
(202)  260-1023
(202)260-0178
ppic@epamail.epa.gov
The objectives of the clearinghouse are to reduce or
eliminate  industrial pollutants  through  technology
transfer, education, and public awareness. PPIC services
   c/EPA
vx
 United States
 Environmental Protection
 Agency
 (7407)
 Washington DC 20460
 Official Business
 Penalty for Private Use
 $300
                      Head Librarian
                      U.S. EPA
                      Region 6 Library, 6M-AI
                      1445 Ross Avenue, Siute 1200
                      First Interstate Bank Tower
                      Dallas, TX 75202-2733

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                                     ANNOUNCEMENT
         RELEASE  OP  "CHEMICALS  IN THE ENVIRONMENT" PUBLICATION
                                     Summer 1995
       The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maintains a wide range of
       environmental information.  Some of this information tells us what chemicals and pollutants
       are released by industrial plants. Other information tells us about the health and
environmental effects of chemicals.  Still other information tells us what chemicals people may be
exposed to.

EPA believes that it is in everyone's interest to make this information available to the public.  "Public"
here includes industry, state governments, community groups, environmental groups, and, of course,
public citizens. Access to information is the best way to ensure everyone has the opportunity to
evaluate and reduce environmental and health risks.

To make this information accessible, the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) within EPA
provides a variety of information services and products. These include call-in hotlines,
publications.videos, diskettes with data, CD-ROMs, and access to on-line databases.

This publication is one way for you to find out about EPA's information products related to chemicals.
The first edition of the Chemicals in the Environment: Public Access Information  provides information on a
number of major OPPT products and services that reflect the scope of our programs. Future editions
will focus on single themes. We hope to reach a wide audience to let you know what information
products are available, what they can do for you, and how to get them.

You can access "Chemicals in the Environment" by using one of the following OPPT information
services:
The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA)
Assistance Information Service Hotline
The Emergency Planning and Community
Rights to Know and Superfund Hotline

EPA Gopher Server on the Internet
Phone- (202) 554-1404
TDD-  (202)554-0551
Fax-   (202) 554-5603

Phone- (800) 535-0202 or
Local  (703) 412-9877

Address: gopher.epa.gov under the
heading "Newsletters and Journals"
We would like to know iftftis bulletin is helpful to you. Please direct your comments or questions to
the editor, Randall Bririkmris at (202) 260-9854 or write to him at U.S. EPA, Office of Pollution
Prevention and Tories, Information Management Division (7407), 401 M Street SW, Washington DC
20460, Internet address:
brinkhuis.randall@epamail.epa.gov

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