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                            TABLE OF CONTENTS



INTRODUCTION  	1


I.     Scope and Purpose of the EJP2 Grant Program 	1


II.    Eligible Applicants	3


III.    Amounts and Matching Requirements  	4


IV.    Eligible Activities  	4


V.    Development of Proposals  	6


VI.    Evaluation of Proposals  	1


VII.   Process for Awarding and Issuing Grants	8


VIII.  EPA Contacts  	  9


IX.    Definitions	9


Appendix A:  Examples of Possible Grant Activities	  A-l


Appendix B:  Application Forms and Instructions	B-l


Appendix C:  Checklist of Application Materials 	C-l


Appendix D:  Map of EPA Regions	  D-l


Appendix E:  State Single Points of Contact	E-l


Appendix F:  Summary of Previous Grant Awards	F-l


Appendix G:  Information Regarding Definition of Small Business	  G-l
                                       U.S. EPA Region II Library
                                         290 Broadway, 16th Fl.
                                       New York,  NY  10007-1866

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INTRODUCTION

       The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in its 1992 report Environmental
Equity: Reducing Risk for All Communities, found that people of color and low-income
communities experience higher exposure to toxic pollutants than the general population. The
environmental justice movement has focused attention on the need to more actively ensure
equitable environmental protection for all, and to empower those most often disenfranchised
from the decision-making process—the poor and people of color. Pollution prevention can play
a central role in reducing environmental risks while promoting public involvement and economic
benefits. Because many minority, low-income, and federally recognized tribal communities face
disproportionate environmental impacts, EPA is looking for ways to help these communities deal
with emerging environmental issues by using pollution prevention, rather than pollution control,
solutions.  EPA has defined pollution prevention as "source reduction," which is any practice that
reduces or eliminates any pollutant prior to recycling, treatment, or disposal.

       This guidance outlines the purpose, authorities, eligibility criteria, and general procedures
for application and award of fiscal year (FY) 1998 multi-media Environmental Justice Through
Pollution Prevention (EJP2) grant funds under the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics.
For FY 1998, EPA will award as much as $4 million in grant funds to eligible organizations.
Applications must be mailed to EPA's contractor, Eastern Research Group, Inc. (ERG) (listed in
Section VII), and received no later than 5 p.m., April 20,1998. Grant awards will be
announced no later than September 30,  1998 (see Section VII for a schedule of EJP2 grant-
related activities).
I.      SCOPE AND PURPOSE OF THE EJP2 GRANT PROGRAM

       The primary purpose of this grant program is to provide financial assistance to a variety
of nonprofit organizations, Federally recognized Indian Tribes, state and local governments, and
academic institutions for projects that address environmental justice concerns and use pollution
prevention as the proposed solution. This grant program is designed to fund projects that
have a direct impact on affected communities.

       EPA has made significant progress over the last 25 years in improving the quality of the
environment through implementation of pollution control programs—that is, those that manage,
treat, and dispose of pollution after it has been generated.  There is growing recognition;
however, that these traditional approaches have not adequately addressed existing environmental
problems and do not provide solutions for the prevention of future environmental problems. To
address this concern, Congress enacted the Pollution Prevention Act in November 1990, which
declared a national policy to prevent or reduce pollution at the source whenever possible. EPA
believes that the problems of environmental injustice are most effectively addressed by avoiding
the generation of pollution altogether.  The EJP2 grants are meant to support this preventative
approach to environmental management.

       EPA is particularly interested in innovative approaches that can be applied to other
communities. The Agency strongly encourages  cooperative efforts among communities,

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business, industry, and government to address common pollution prevention goals. Projects
funded under this grant program should focus on having a direct impact on the environmental
justice community to be served and may involve such activities as public education, training,
demonstration projects, public-private partnerships, or approaches to develop, evaluate, and
demonstrate non-regulatory strategies and technologies.

A.     What Is Environmental Justice?

       Environmental justice is the fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all people,
regardless of race, color, national origin, or income, with respect to the development,
implementation, and enforcement of environmental laws, regulations, programs, and policies.
Fair treatment means that no racial, ethnic, or socio-economic group should bear a
disproportionate share of the negative environmental consequences resulting from industrial,
municipal, and commercial operations, or from the execution of federal, state, local, or tribal
programs and policies.

B.     What Is Pollution Prevention?

       EPA has defined pollution prevention as "source reduction," which is any practice that
reduces or eliminates any pollutant prior to recycling, treatment, or disposal. EPA further
defines pollution prevention as the use of other practices that reduce or eliminate the creation of
pollutants through:

       •      Increased efficiency in the use of raw materials, energy, water, or other resources
       •      Protection of natural resources by conservation

       To help the public better understand pollution prevention, EPA has established a
hierarchy of environmental management practices. In order of preference, these practices
include:

       •      Pollution Prevention/Source Reduction
       •      Recycling
       •      Treatment
       •      Safe Disposal

       This grant program is focused on using pollution prevention/source reduction practices to
bring about better environmental protection.

C.     How Is Pollution Prevention Different from Other EPA Programs?

       EPA programs have traditionally focused on treatment, disposal, and remediation.
Although these types of activities are important parts of environmental protection, they  are not as
effective as pollution prevention activities because they are concerned with the handling and
management of waste and pollutants after they have  been generated.  EPA has other program
funds available for treatment, disposal, remediation, and recycling initiatives, including funds to
support lead abatement projects and the cleanup of hazardous waste sites.  The following section

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provides information on sources of federal funding for activities not related to pollution
prevention.

D.     What if My Project Is Not Pollution Prevention?

       EPA, along with many other federal agencies, has numerous grant programs available to
address your particular needs. For example, EPA's Environmental Justice Small Grants
Program, managed by the Office of Environmental Justice, provides grant funding for projects
that address environmental justice problems through ways other than pollution prevention.

       A listing of all EPA grant programs can be found in the Catalogue of Federal Domestic
Assistance.  You can find copies of the Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance at some 1,300
Federal Deposit Libraries around the nation (usually located in major colleges or universities), or
at National Agricultural Libraries (usually located in rural or agricultural areas). You also can
find the Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance on the Internet, located at:
.  To purchase copies of the Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance, call
the General  Services Administration  at 202 708-5126.
II.     ELIGIBLE APPLICANTS

A.     Who Is Eligible to Apply for Funding? May an Applicant Submit More Than One
       Proposal?

       Any affected, nonprofit organizations with 501(c)(3) or 501(c)(4)' IRS tax status or
Federally recognized Tribes may submit an application upon the publication of this solicitation.
A nonprofit organization is defined as any corporation, trust, association, cooperative, or other
organization that:

       (1) Is operated primarily for scientific, educational, service, charitable, or similar
       purposes in the public interest.

       (2) Is not organized primarily for profit.

       (3) Uses its net proceeds to maintain, improve, and/or expand its operations.

       State and local governments and academic institutions are also eligible. Organizations
must be incorporated by April 20, 1998, to be eligible to receive funds. Private businesses,
federal agencies, and individuals are ineligible for these grants. Organizations excluded from
applying directly, as well as those inexperienced in grant-writing, are encouraged to develop
partnerships and prepare joint proposals with eligible national, regional, or local organizations.
       1  As a result of the Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995, EPA (and other federal agencies) may not award
grants to nonprofit, 501(c)(4) organizations that engage in lobbying activities. This restriction applies to any
lobbying activities of a 501(c)(4) organization without distinguishing between lobbying funded by Federal money
and lobbying funded by other sources.

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       No applicant can receive two grants for the same project at one time. EPA will consider
only one proposal for a given project. Applicants may submit more than one application as long
as the applications are for separate and distinct projects.

       EPA strongly encourages partnerships between national and/or regional organizations
(e.g., large environmental or civic groups) and community-based/grass-roots organizations and
tribes in the development of grant applications.  The national and regional organizations can in
some instances act as a sponsoring or umbrella organization for community groups that may
otherwise be unable or ineligible to apply directly. In addition, the national and regional
organizations can provide support and assistance to the community-based/grass-roots or tribal
organizations, so that these organizations will increase their capacity to deal with their
communities' environmental justice issues and use pollution prevention as the preferred solution
to address these issues.
III.    AMOUNTS AND MATCHING REQUIREMENTS

A.     How Much Money May Be Requested?  Are Matching Funds Required?

       Organizations seeking funds from the EJP2 grant program can request up to $100,000 for
projects located within one EPA region. Up to $250,000 may be requested for projects of
national significance that involve multiple communities located in more than one of the 10 EPA
Regions. A map outlining EPA's 10 regions is included in Appendix D.  In accordance with 40
CFR (30)(23), EPA no longer requires cost sharing or matching funds for this grant
program.

B.     Are There Any Restrictions on the Use of Federal Funds?

       Yes. EPA grant funds can only be used for the purposes set forth in the grant agreement.
Grant funds from this program cannot be used for matching funds for other federal grants;
construction; personal gifts (e.g., t-shirts, buttons, and hats); purchasing furniture;
litigation; lobbying; or intervention in the federal regulatory or adjudicatery proceedings.
In addition, the recipient may not use these federal assistance funds to sue the federal government
or any other government entities.  Refer to 40 CFR (30)(27), "Allowable Costs," for details.


IV.    ELIGIBLE ACTIVITIES

       The goal of the EJP2 grant program is to promote the use of pollution prevention
approaches as the preferred way to address environmental problems of environmental justice
communities. Funds must be used to support pollution prevention projects and programs in
people of color communities, low-income communities, or tribal lands.

       Below are brief abstracts of project ideas that use pollution prevention approaches to
address environmental justice problems. These ideas may help guide you in developing your
proposal.  Appendix A provides more detailed project ideas and additional examples of projects.

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Appendix F provides a summary of grants awarded by the EJP2 grant program in the 1995
through 1997 funding cycles.

       •      Information Access.  Provide easier access to environmental information (such as
              EPA's Toxic Release Inventory database) to environmental justice communities
              by providing means of obtaining environmental information or by designing and
              implementing training programs that will help communities access such
              information.

       •      Demonstration Projects. Conduct demonstration projects in support of EPA
              voluntary programs that promote pollution prevention through resource efficiency
              (e.g., the Water Alliance for Voluntary Efficiency, the WasteWi$e Program, or the
              Green Lights Program).  A complete listing of all EPA voluntary programs,
              including summaries of program goals and contact information, can be found in
              Partnerships in Preventing Pollution, A Catalogue of the Agency's Partnership
              Programs (EPA Publication # 100-B-96-001, Spring 1996). You can obtain a free
              copy of this publication by calling the Pollution Prevention Information
              Clearinghouse (PPIC) at 202 260-1023 or by contacting PPIC via e-mail at:
              .

       •      Agricultural Projects. Conduct research, demonstrations, or public education that
              addresses issues faced by the agricultural community including the promotion of
              sustainable agricultural practices, integrated pest management, and pesticides use
              reduction.

       •      Small Business Assistance. Demonstrate the use of revolving loan funds and
              other financial instruments that can assist small businesses obtain loans to buy and
              install pollution prevention technologies and equipment.

       •      Pollution Prevention Approaches.  Work with local business community leaders
              to design and implement pollution prevention approaches that will protect the
              long-term environmental health of the community.

       •      Brownfield Sites. Help environmental justice communities near Brownfield sites
              engage in the public participation and decision-making processes and promote
              pollution prevention as a key principle in Brownfield redevelopment.
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V.     DEVELOPMENT OF PROPOSALS

       In order to be eligible to participate in the open competition for grants under this
program, proposals from eligible organizations must have the information listed below. The
standard forms cited below can be found in Appendix B of this grant guidance.

 1.     One page summary cover sheet that:

              a) Identifies the environmental justice issue(s) to be addressed by the project.
              b) Identifies how a pollution prevention approach will be utilized to address the
                environmental justice issues in the project proposal.
              c) Identifies the purpose of the grant proposal.

2.     Narrative of the proposal not to exceed 5 double-sided pages (10 pages in all). The
       narrative should include:

              a) Description of the affected communities.
              b) Identification of the environmental justice issue(s) to be addressed by the
                project.
              c) Identification of the pollution prevention approach that will be utilized in the
                project.
              d) Description of the extent of involvement of the community as well as partner
                organizations.
              e) Outline of methods and tools to be used to evaluate the success of the project.

3.     Key contacts information sheet.

4.     Application for Federal Assistance, SF 424, the official form required for all federal
       grants that requests basic information about the grantee and the proposed project.

5.     The Federal Standard Form SF 424A, which provides information on budget and match.

6.     Detailed, itemized budget.

7.     Certification of Non-Construction.

8.     Certification Regarding Debarment, Suspension, and Other Responsibility Matters form.

9.     Certification Regarding Lobbying form.

10.    Disclosure of Lobbying Activities form.

11.    Letters of commitment, memoranda of understanding, or other documents that highlight
       significant involvement of other partners in your grant application.
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 12.    Resumes or biographical information regarding the lead and other key personnel in the
       grant application.

 13.    Any additional information (e.g., history of the organization(s) and success stories).

       The total number of pages per application may not exceed 20 double-sided pages (40
 pages in all). Pages must be letter size (8-5/2 by 11-inch), with normal type size (12 CPI), and
 have at least 1-inch margins.

       Please include one original (with original signatures where appropriate) and four
 copies of the application packet.

       Proposals that do not include the information listed above will not be considered for
 award.
 VI.     EVALUATION OF PROPOSALS

 Proposal Requirements

       All proposals must meet two requirements in order to be considered for grant funding by
 this program:

       (1)     Is the community proposed to be affected by the project a minority and/or low-
              income community?

       (2)     Is pollution prevention the project's proposed approach?

 Evaluation Criteria

       In addition, proposals will be evaluated and scored by the reviewers on the basis of the
 following four criteria:

       (1)     Will the proposed approach successfully address the community's environmental
              concerns? Are local community representatives fully involved in the project from
              planning through implementation?

       (2)     Does the use of resources in this project seem cost effective? Has the applicant
              shown other sources of support or cooperation/partnering with another
              organization?  Does the applicant show effective use of existing sources of
              information?

       (3)     Does the project  identify a method for quantifying reductions in the amount of
              pollution generated or natural resources consumed?
EJP2 Guidance
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       (4)     Is the proposed project targeted toward specific audiences, facilities, industry
              sectors, and/or environmental problems within the affected community?
VII.   PROCESS FOR AWARDING AND ISSUING GRANTS

A.     How Will Applications Be Reviewed?

       There will be two different review processes. For local applications, each one of the 10
EPA regional offices will select review panels that will review and evaluate all local grant
applications from the region. For national applications, EPA's Pollution Prevention Division and
the regional offices will work in conjunction to form one review panel that will review and
evaluate all national grant applications. Applications will be screened to ensure that they meet all
eligibility requirements described in Sections II, IV, and V of this guidance. Applications will be
disqualified if they do not meet these criteria.

B.     How Will the Final Selections Be Made?

       After the individual projects are reviewed and ranked according to the evaluation criteria
described in Section VI, the Pollution Prevention Division will compare the best applications
selected by the 11 review panels and make final selections.  Additional factors that EPA will take
into account include geographic and socio-economic distribution, diversity of the projects, costs,
and projects whose benefits can be sustained after the grant has been completed.

       Please note that the EJP2 grant program is extremely competitive.  EPA expects to
receive a large number of grant applications, and funding for the program  is limited. EPA is
unable to fund all applications received. If your project is not funded, please refer to information
regarding other EPA and federal grant opportunities listed in the Catalog of Federal Domestic
Assistance, under Section I of this guidance.

C.     What Is  the Schedule and Overall Process for Issuing and Awarding Grants?

•      Proposals must be received by EPA at the following address no later than 5 p.m.,
       April 20,1998.  Proposals should be sent to:

              EJP2 Grant Program
              c/o ERG
              2200 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 400
              Arlington, VA 22201

       To request additional copies of the EJP2 guidance, or for any questions, please call
       703 841-0483.

•      Letters of acknowledgment to confirm the receipt of grant applications will be sent to all
       applicants no later than April 27,1998.
EJP2 Guidance                                                                     Page 8

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       Funding decisions for the EJP2 grant program's FY 1998 cycle will be publicly
       announced by September 30,1998.

       All projects must begin on or after October 1,1998. All projects must conclude, and
       funds must be expended, by September 30,2000.

       Official letters informing all applicants of the status of their applications will be sent out
       no later than October 10,1998.
VIII.  EPA CONTACTS

To obtain copies of the EJP2 grant program guidance and application package, or to obtain more
information regarding the EJP2 grant program, call 703 841-0483 or e-mail . A
complete, electronic copy of the EJP2 grant program guidance and application package is also
available on the EPA web site on the Internet. The EJP2 grant program guidance and application
package is located at: .
IX.     DEFINITIONS

Affected Communities - Individuals or groups of individuals who are subject to an actual or
potential health, economic, or environmental threat arising from, or which arose from, pollution
sources or proposed polluting sources. Affected parties, for example, include individuals who
live near pollution sources and whose health is or might be endangered or whose economic
interest is directly threatened or harmed.

Brownfields - Abandoned, idled or under used industrial and commercial properties where
expansion or redevelopment is complicated by real or perceived contamination.

Brownfields Redevelopment Initiative - Designed to empower states, communities, and other
stakeholders in economic redevelopment to work together in a timely manner to prevent, assess,
safely clean up, and sustainably reuse Brownfields. (Additional information can be found via e-
mail at .)

Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI) - An institution that meets the criteria
specified in Section 103 of the Riegle Community Development and Regulatory Improvement
Act of 1994.

Environmental Justice - The fair treatment of people of all races, cultures, and income with
respect to the development, implementation, and enforcement of environmental laws,
regulations, programs, and policies.  Fair treatment means that no racial, ethnic, or
socioeconomic group should bear a disproportionate share of the negative environmental
consequences resulting from the operation of industrial, municipal, and commercial enterprises
and from the execution of federal, state, local, and tribal programs and policies.
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Low-Income Community - A population that is classified by the U.S. Bureau of the Census as
having a mean income (for a family of four) of $16,404 per year, adjusted for by the cost-of-
living index of the locality, and whose income level is at the lowest 25 percent of the total
population of a defined area or jurisdiction.

People of Color Community - A population that is classified by the U.S. Bureau of the Census
as African American, Hispanic American, Asian and Pacific American, American Indian,
Eskimo, Aleut or other nonwhite persons, whose composition is at least 25 percent of the total
population of a defined area or jurisdiction.

Pollution Prevention - The reduction or elimination of pollutants through source reduction,
increased efficiency in the use of raw materials, energy, water, or other resources; or the
protection of natural resources by conservation. Pollution prevention measures reduce the
amount of pollutants released into the environment prior to recycling, treatment, and disposal.

Small Business - As defined by the Small Business Administration's (SBA) Small Business Size
Regulations in 13 CFR, Part 121. Because SBA's definition of a small business is very complex,
and varies by industry, Appendix G lists information that can help determine if the business you
intend to work with qualifies as a small business.

Toxic Release Inventory - A database which provides annual information to the public about
releases of toxic chemicals from manufacturing facilities into the environment. It has been very
successful in helping companies target toxic chemicals for reduction of releases.  (For additional
information contact 202 260-9592.)

Tribe - All Federally recognized Indian Tribes (including Alaska native villages), pueblos, and
rancherias. The term tribe refers to only federally recognized indigenous  peoples. Other
indigenous peoples are able to apply for grants as other eligible grass-roots organizations as long
as they are incorporated.
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         APPENDIX A: EXAMPLES OF POSSIBLE GRANT ACTIVITIES
       In the first 3 years of the EJP2 grant program, many projects were funded that provided
general education on pollution prevention to residents of low-income and minority communities
and/or encouraged community involvement on pollution prevention approaches.  These activities
were very appropriate in the early years of this program when community groups were in the
initial phases of learning about pollution prevention and how pollution prevention approaches
can be applied to the problems present in environmental justice communities.

       For this year's grant cycle, EPA is encouraging applicants to develop proposals which are
more targeted in nature.  These may include providing specific pollution prevention training
and/or technical assistance to businesses in their community; conducting a discrete project
demonstrating the value of pollution prevention at local businesses; incorporating pollution
prevention practices into identified local projects; or working cooperatively with a particular
facility or industry sector to jointly develop a pollution prevention strategy.

       In addition, applicants should be aware that this grant program has generated a substantial
amount of information related to specific targeted audiences. In particular, several projects have
focused on auto repair shops, dry cleaners, printers, and painting contractors. EPA is in the
process of collecting the results of those projects so that they may be more widely available to
environmental justice communities. In developing projects for specific industries or audiences,
we encourage applicants to use already existing information and materials rather than spending
resources in researching and developing new materials.

       Below are examples of activities that applicants may want to consider as they develop
EJP2 project ideas and grant proposals. The examples are not intended to serve as a
comprehensive list of possible grant projects; rather, they illustrate activities that use pollution
prevention principles in addressing environmental justice problems that exist in the communities.
The  activities are as follows:

       •       Community Involvement  	  A-l
       •       Technical Assistance/Demonstration	  A-2
       •       Small Business Assistance  	  A-3
       •       Agriculture  	  A-5
       •       Combination of Activities	  A-6
COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT:

•      Assist minority and low-income communities and tribal governments in becoming
       actively engaged in community environmental initiatives, such as Brownfields
       redevelopment projects, and in promoting pollution prevention as an important
       component of any community environmental initiative.
Appendix A                                                                      Page A-l

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       Increasingly, EPA and local governments are looking to a community-based approach to
environmental protection and community revitalization.  Two examples of this approach are the
Community Based Environmental Protection initiative and the Brownfields redevelopment
initiative. An important part of the community-based approach is the active participation by the
members of those communities.

       Increased citizen involvement in community environmental protection and redevelopment
not only provides greater citizen empowerment but ultimately creates a community better suited
to the needs of its members.

       A project that combines greater citizen involvement in community environmental
protection and redevelopment processes with the education of citizens to enhance their
understanding of the benefits of pollution prevention as it applies to communities, would greatly
advance the Agency's goals of promoting pollution prevention and community-based
environmental protection.

TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE/DEMONSTRATION:

•      Conduct demonstration projects in support of EPA voluntary programs (such as the
       Water Alliance for Voluntary Efficiency, the WasteWi$e Program, or the Green
       Lights Program) that promote resource efficiency or EPA's industry sector projects,
       such as the Common Sense Initiative.

•      Provide comprehensive, multimedia prevention technical assistance to the regulated
       community generators of hazardous waste, air emissions, and wastewater discharges
       and increase cooperative interaction between the state and the regulated
       community. The assistance could help involve environmental justice communities in
       pollution prevention planning required by state environmental laws.

       A complete listing of all EPA voluntary programs, including summaries of program goals
and contact information, can be found in Partnerships in Preventing Pollution, A Catalogue of
the Agency's Partnership Programs (EPA Publication # 100-B-96-001, Spring 1996).  You can
obtain a free copy of this publication by calling the Pollution Prevention Information
Clearinghouse (PPIC) at 202 260-1023 or by contacting PPIC via e-mail at:
.

       Pollution prevention can involve more efficient use of resources through, for example,
energy efficiency, water conservation, or waste reduction in community housing and businesses.
Specific approaches include energy efficient lighting, appliances, or buildings; low-flow toilets
or other water efficient equipment; and safe substitutes for cleaning products. EPA already
promotes several of these initiatives through its voluntary programs.  By installing efficient
equipment and adopting conservation practices, demand for power and water from utility
companies can be reduced, thus saving communities the expense of increased costs of water and
electricity.
Appendix A                                                                    Page A-2

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       A community might propose to develop and implement an action plan for restoring an
area both environmentally and economically. The action plan could identify and propose to
involve potential partners needed to help the community implement pollution prevention
opportunities such as utility companies, urban and rural planning development organizations,
economic development groups, and key businesses and industries in the area.

SMALL BUSINESS ASSISTANCE:

•      Provide technical assistance and training to small businesses to enable them to
       identify and use pollution prevention technologies.  A project may propose to assist
       businesses seeking information about source reduction opportunities including
       funding for experts to provide onsite technical advice and to assist in the
       development of source reduction plans. Proposals should target assistance to
       businesses where lack of information is an impediment to source reduction and
       provide training for pollution prevention techniques. By providing information,
       training, and technical assistance, EPA believes that businesses will enhance their
       competitiveness by reducing environmental costs, improving relations with the
       community, improving the quality of their products, and spending less money on
       environmental regulations.

•      Develop and implement a demonstration loan program by providing seed capital to
       nonprofit Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFIs), thereby
       leveraging their capacity  to provide financing to small businesses for pollution
       prevention activities in low-income and/or predominantly minority communities or
       tribal lands.

       EPA is committed to the proposition that a sound environment is a precondition for
sustainable economic development and that environmentally conscious, sustainable development
is more easily attainable when all groups in society have both a perceived and real stake in the
economic system. Thus, the ultimate purpose of this targeted loan provision is to enable
businesses that might otherwise be denied credit to install pollution  prevention equipment or
initiate pollution prevention techniques or practices in order to address environmental problems
posed by the normal course of operations.

       Entities eligible for funding under this demonstration loan program are national nonprofit
financial intermediaries that serve  nonprofit CDFIs as defined in section 103 of the Community
Development Banking and Financial Institutions Act of 1994. Applicants must have an
established track record in the following:

       a)     Raising capital on their own behalf from private sources.

       b)     Directing capital on a performance basis to nonprofit CDFIs in low-income and/or
             predominantly racial minority areas in both rural and urban settings.

       c)     Providing appropriate training to CDFI loan officers, staff, and board members.

Appendix A                                                                     PageA-3

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       Grant funds awarded to a national CDFI intermediary (hereafter, an "awardee") shall be
used primarily to capitalize CDFIs that will implement a demonstration loan program targeting
credit-worthy small businesses, as determined by the CDFI, to finance pollution prevention
equipment or activities.  Although these funds may be commingled with other funds for
administrative ease, the national CDFI intermediary and the CDFI recipients must be able to
document that the use of funds is entirely consistent with the purpose of this solicitation.
Awardee(s) also may use a portion of these funds to train CDFI staff in pollution prevention
concepts and practices as they apply to their business finance programs. CDFI recipients may
utilize a portion of the funds they receive to provide training and technical assistance to
businesses in their markets about pollution prevention concepts and practices in their industries.
Altogether, funds devoted to training on the national and local levels should not exceed one-third
of the total award.

       Awardees shall have broad discretion as to how they capitalize the loan programs at
participating CDFIs.  Accountability will be required between the national intermediary and the
CDFI recipients.  Some degree of matching funds must be required of the participating CDFI, so
that the feasibility of the "leveraged  financing" aspects of this demonstration loan program might
be tested.

       Specific terms of the financing to small businesses (amount, term, interest rate, fees, and
collateral required, etc.) should be determined directly by the CDFI participant.  The overall
structure of any financing, however,  must be such that it can reasonably be construed as a
business proposition.  Under no circumstances may funds be made available by the participating
CDFI to a business on a grant basis without provision for and reasonable expectation of
repayment.

       Other project ideas include:

•      Establish a program that will provide multimedia technical assistance to small and
       medium-sized businesses within environmental justice communities. Technical
       assistance will consist of both waste reduction audits and regulatory advice.

•      Help environmental justice small businesses contract for outside technical assistance that
       might not otherwise be available to them.

•      Provide comprehensive, multimedia pollution prevention technical assistance to the
       regulated community, including generators of hazardous waste, wastewater dischargers,
       and dischargers of air pollutants, and facilitate cooperative interaction between the
       regulated community and environmental regulatory agencies that focus on pollution
       prevention and waste reduction.

•      Identify and educate targeted business owners in the environmental justice community
       about the benefits and applicability of pollution prevention and availability  of assistance
       from the funded program and other organizations.
Appendix A                                                                       Page A-4

-------
•      Produce "self-help" information and educational materials applicable to specific
       businesses or industries in environmental justice communities for waste and toxicity
       reduction measures.

•      Provide matching challenge grants for multimedia pollution prevention projects.
       Information collected from the projects would benefit other companies and businesses
       through technology transfer efforts.

•      Identify small community wastewater treatment plants that are detrimentally impacting
       their receiving streams due to inadequate treatment of industrial effluent.

•      Develop facility-specific total cost assessments with four to five small companies within
       an environmental justice community to demonstrate financial impacts of pollution
       prevention initiatives.

•      Support public involvement in the development of a facility-wide pollution prevention
       auditing project in an environmental justice community.

•      Develop waste prevention options for local stores within an environmental justice
       community.

•      Conduct onsite opportunity assessments of businesses and facilities located in
       environmental justice communities. Train local officials, solid waste district officials,
       and sewage treatment plant operators to conduct these assessments.

AGRICULTURE:

•      Conduct research, demonstration projects, or public educational training activities
       to institutionalize sustainable agricultural practices including integrated pest
       management techniques to reduce use of pesticides.

       EPA promotes pollution prevention in agriculture through training or education on
integrated pest management or other alternatives to pesticide use.

       A cooperative training program could be designed to train both migrant farm workers and
farm owners on "integrated farm management" techniques, reduced use of pesticides, or
substitution of less environmentally damaging pesticides.  A proposal could seek to work with
farm workers' groups to educate migrant farm workers on pollution prevention issues and how
they may apply to their situation. A proposal also could seek to train farm owners on the benefits
of integrated pest management as a means for lowering the potential for worker exposure as well
as reducing nonpoint pollution of water resources.

       Pollution prevention includes reducing pesticide impacts on children and youth. Children
on farms are exposed to pesticides applied to crops and livestock, either directly or via their diet.
Suggested interventions for pollution prevention and environmental justice include targeting food

Appendix A                                                                      Page A-5

-------
crops consumed in large quantities by children for pesticide reduction programs or expanding the
successful practices of working with growers and large commodity groups.

       Other project ideas include:

•      Target a pollution prevention/environmental justice project toward developing pesticide
       use reduction plans for sustainable cropping systems for each crop currently dependent on
       the targeted pesticides. Key stakeholders include farmers, farm workers, processors,
       researchers, and pest control advisors. These plans might be used to guide site-specific
       research and implementation projects to hasten the phase out of a targeted chemical by
       replacing it with an integrated sustainable cropping system, rather than with replacement
       chemicals.  Biologically intensive integrated pest management, cover cropping, crop
       rotation, reduced synthetic fertilizer and pesticide inputs, and on-farm research are
       important elements of sustainable cropping systems.

COMBINATION OF ACTIVITIES:

•      Develop a course on pollution prevention technologies and applications that will make
       information relating to pollution prevention technology and applications available to
       facilities and others who are addressing the environmental problems of affected
       communities.  The course could include policy regulation updates, problem-solving
       mechanisms, and materials on available resources and could address the reduction of
       pollutants across all environmental media.  The goal would be to acquire leadership,
       managerial, and technical skills to  successfully implement a cost-effective pollution
       prevention program in any size organization.

•      Conduct a project to demonstrate prevention progress that can be achieved if a whole
       community focuses major and concerted attention upon implementing pollution
       prevention as its preferred waste management strategy. Targeted audiences for project
       activities within the environmental justice community could be business and industry,
       government and other institutions, and the general public. The waste management
       strategy could  include establishment of a mechanism to develop pollution prevention
       policies; development of methods to educate local business, industry leaders, and the
       public on pollution prevention concepts and their daily applications (e.g., providing
       technical assistance to small businesses to encourage them to implement a pollution
       prevention program); or establishment of a program for city governments as a model.

•      Integrate pollution prevention and energy conservation practices and awareness within
       various sectors through cooperative partnerships with construction, building, and
       architecture businesses in the community.

•      Assess environmental justice community's existing energy and water usage and
       determine methods to reduce water usage that will result in reduced wastewater
       discharge.  Provide informational brochures and cable TV broadcasts to the community
Appendix A                                                                       PageA-6

-------
       on water conservation methods, energy efficiency, and measures for the conservation and
       source reduction of solid waste.

       Provide workshops and on-site technical assistance in low-income communities.  The
       workshops could promote source reduction and educate generators regarding state and
       federal regulatory requirements for managing toxic wastes.
Appendix A                                                                      page A-7

-------
          APPENDIX B: APPLICATION FORMS AND INSTRUCTIONS

 Appendix B contains the following forms and instructions necessary for submitting a grant
 aoDlication:
             Key Contacts Information Sheet 	B-2
             Application for Federal Assistance, SF 424  	B-3
             Customized Instructions for the SF 424	B-4
             Budget Information - Non-Construction Programs, SF 424A	B-5
             Customized Instructions for the SF 424A	B-7
             Instructions for Detailed, Itemized Budget 	B-8
             Certification Regarding Debarment, Suspension, and
             Other Responsibility Matters	B-9
             Instructions for Certification Regarding Debarment,
             Suspension, and Other Responsibility Matters 	B-10
             Certification Regarding Lobbying	B-l 1
             Disclosure of Lobbying Activities, SF-LLL  	B-12
             Instructions for the Completion of SF-LLL  	B-13
Appendix B                                                            Page B-1

-------
                        KEY CONTACTS INFORMATION SHEET

Authorized Representative: Original awards and amendments will be sent to this individual for review
and acceptance, unless otherwise indicated.
       Name:.

       Title:_
       Complete Address:.
       Phone Number:.
Payee: Individual authorized to accept payments.

       Name:	

       Title:	
       Complete Address:.
       Phone Number:.
Administrative Contact: Individual from Sponsored Programs Office to contact concerning
administrative matters (i.e., indirect cost rate computation and rebudgeting requests, etc.)
       Name:.

       Title:_
       Complete Address:.
       Phone Number:.
Project Manager: Individual responsible for the technical completion of the proposed work.

       Name:	

       Title:	
       Complete Address:.
       Phone Number:.
Appendix B                                                                 Page B-2

-------
                                                                                                      OMB Approval No. 0348-0043
FEDERAL ASSISTANCE
1. TYPE OF SUBMISSION: 3. DATE RECEIVED BY STATE State Application Identifier
Application Preapplication
u """""""""' J 4. DATE RECEIVED BY FEDERAL AGENCY Federal Identifier
D Non-Construction | D Non-Construction


5. APPLICANT INFORMATION
Legal Name:
Address (give city, county, state, and zip code).
6. EMPLOYER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (EIN):
|
8. TYPE OF APPLICATION:
D New D Continuation D Revision
If Revision, enter appropriate letter(s) in box(es): Q Q
A Increase Award B. Decrease Award C. Increase Duration
D. Decrease Duration Other (specify)

10. CATALOG OF FEDERAL DOMESTIC 66 711
ASSISTANCE NUMBER:
TITLE EJP2 Grant Program
12. AREAS AFFECTED BY PROJECT (cities, counties, states, etc.):
Organizational Unit:
Name and telephone number of the person to be contacted on matters involving this
application (give area code)
7. TYPE OF APPLICANT: (enter appropriate letter in box)
A. State H. Independent Schoo
B. County I. State Controlled Ins
C. Municipal J. Private University
D. Township K. Indian Tribe
E. Interstate L. Individual
F. Intermunicipal M. Profit Organization
G. Special District N. Other (Specify):

Dist.
titution of Higher Learning

9. NAME OF FEDERAL AGENCY:
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
11. DESCRIPTIVE TITLE OF APPLICANT'S PROJECT:
13. PROPOSED PROJECT: 14. CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS OF:
Start Date Ending Date a. Applicant , b. Project
i j
15. ESTIMATED FUNDING: 16- IS APPLICA
a Federal $ .00 a' ORDER
b. Applicant S 00 DATE

c.S«a,a S -00 t, NOQ
d. Local S .00 r—
e. Other $ .00
t Program Income S .00 17. IS APPUCA
DYES
g TOTAL S 00
riON SUBJECT TO REVIEW BY STATE EXECUTIVE ORDER 12372 PROCESS?
IS PREAPPLICATION/APPLICATION WAS MADE AVAILABLE TO THE STATE EXECUTIVE
12372 PROCESS FOR REVIEW ON.
PROGRAM IS NOT COVERED BY E.O. 12372
OR PROGRAM HAS NOT BEEN SELECTED STATE FOR REVIEW
TION DELINQUENT ON ANY FEDERAL DEBT?
If 'Yes." attach an explanation.
DNO
TV. TOTHfrBHT Of-tfff WtOWtWSE AND BELIEF, ALL DATA IN THIS APPUCATION/PREAPPLICATION ARE TRUE AND CORRECT, THE DOCUMENT HAS BEEN DULY
AUTHORIZED BY THE GOVERNING BODY OF THE APPLICANT AND THE APPLICANT WILL COMPLY WITH THE ATTACHED ASSURANCES IF THE ASSISTANCE IS AWARDED
a. Typed Name of Authorized Representative
b. Title
d. Signature of Authorized Representative
c. Telephone number
e. Date Signed
Previous Editions Not Usable
                                                                                                     Standard Form 424  (Rev 4-8B)    cr
                                                                                                     Prescribed by OMB Circular A-102
      Appendix B
Page 5-3

-------
                                          U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
                                                      EJP2 GRANT PROGRAM
                                          CUSTOMIZED INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE SF 424

This is a standard form used by applicants as a required factsheet for applications submitted for federal assistance. It will be used by EPA to obtain
applicant certification that states that have established a review and comment procedure in response to Executive Order 12372 and have selected the
program to be included in their process, have been given an opportunity to review the applicant's submission.
Item:                      Entry:
1.        For the purpose of the E JP2 grant program, all applicants
         are completing applications for non-construction programs
         only.

2.        Date application submitted to EPA (or state if applicable)
         & applicant's own control number (if applicable).

3.        State use only (if applicable).

4.        If this application is to continue or revise an existing
         award, enter present federal identifier number.  If this
         application is for a new project, leave blank.

5.        Legal name of the applicant, name of primary
         organizational unit that will undertake the assistance
         activity, complete address of the applicant, and name and
         telephone number of the person to contact on matters
         related to this application.

6.        Enter Employer Identification Number (BIN) as assigned
         by the Internal Revenue Service.

7.        Enter the appropriate letter in the space provided.  Please
         note that for-profit organizations, federal agencies, and
         individuals are not eligible for award under the EJP2 grant
         program.

8.         Check appropriate box and enter appropriate letter(s) in
         the space(s) provided:

         —"New" means a new assistance award.
         —"Continuation" means an extension for an additional
         funding and budget period for a project with a projected
         completion date.
         —"Revision" means any change in the Federal
         Government's financial obligation or contingent liability
         from an existing obligation.

9.        Name of the federal agency from which assistance is  being
         requested with this application: U.S. Environmental
         Protection Agency has already  been filled in for you.

10.      The Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance number and
         title has been preprinted for your convenience.
Item:                       Entry:

11.       Enter a brief descriptive title of the project. If more than
         one program is involved, you should append an
         explanation on a separate sheet. If appropriate (e.g.,
         construction or real property projects), attach a map
         showing project location.

12.       List only the largest political entities affected (e.g., state,
         counties, and cities).

13.       All EJP2 grant projects must have a starting date on or after
         October 1,1998, and a ending date no later than September
         30, 2000.

14.       List the applicant's Congressional district and any
         districts) affected by the program or project.

15.       Please refer to Section III of the EJP2 grant  application
         package for information regarding cost sharing or matching
         requirements.  Amount requested from the Federal
         government for the entire life of the grant should go into
         box (a).  Cost-sharing or matching amount by the applicant
         should go into box (b). Please note that the  cost-sharing or
         matching amount by the applicant should equal to the
         determined percentage of the total cost of the project (e.g.,
         if the total cost of the project is $100,000, and the
         mandated applicant cost-sharing or matching amount is 25
         percent then the federal portion would equal $75,000, and
         the applicant portion would equal $25,000). The total (box
         (g)) should reflect the cost for the entire life of the
         program.

16.       Applicant should contact the State Single Point of Contact
         (SPOC) for Federal Executive Order 12372  to determine
         whether the application is subject to the State inter-
         government review process. A complete listing of SPOC's
         are attached in Appendix E of the grant guidance.

17.       This question applies to the applicant organization, not the
         person who signs as the authorized representative.
         Categories of debt include delinquent audit disallowances,
         loans, and taxes.

18.       To be signed by the authorized representative of the
         applicant.  A copy of the governing body's authorization
         for you to sign this application as official representative
         must be on file in the applicant's office.  (Certain Federal
         agencies may require that this authorization be submitted as
         part of the application).
         Appendix B
                                    Page B-4

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Page B-5

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Appendix B
Page B-6

-------
                  U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
                              EJP2 GRANT PROGRAM
                 CUSTOMIZED INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE SF 424A
This is a standard form used by applicants as a required budget information for applications
submitted for federal assistance. It will be used by the EPA to obtain budget information
regarding the application.

Please note that a detailed, itemized budget is also required as a part of the EJP2 grant
application.  Please refer to page B-8 for guidelines for completing the detailed, itemized budget.
Section:             Entry:

A.     Please leave blank.

B.     Please complete column 1 and
       column 5 of this section.  The totals
       for column 1 and column 5 should
       equal. If the proposed project is
       expected to generate income as a
       result of project activity, please
       complete column 1 and column 5,
       row 7, Program Income.  If no
       income is expected, please leave
       blank.

C.     Please leave blank.

D.     Please leave blank.

E.     Please leave blank.

F.     Direct charges (box 21) should equal
       to the total cost of project from
       section B. If you have an approved
       indirect charge rate, include estimate
       for indirect charges in box 22.
Appendix B                                                            Page B-l

-------
                      INSTRUCTIONS FOR CONSTRUCTING
                       DETAILED BUDGET INFORMATION
Please follow the format of the sample detailed budget below when constructing your detail
budget information form. Whenever possible, include an explanation for specific budget item.

I.     Personnel
      0.2 Full time equivalent (FTE) Executive Director at
             $40,000 per year                                     $ 8,000.00
      0.2 FTE Project Coordinator at $12.00 per hour                  4,600.00
      0.5 FTE Community Outreach Worker at $ 10.00 per hour          9.600.00
                                                                22,200.00

II.    Fringe Benefits at 10 percent
      0.2 FTE Executive Director                                  $  800.00
      0.2 FTE Project Coordinator                                    460.00
      0.5 FTE Community Outreach Worker                            960.00
                                                                 2,220.00
III.   Travel
      Local travel at $0.26 per mile: outreach coordinator              $  500.00
             travel to outreach communities
      2 conference travel: from Chicago, IL to
             Washington, DC at $500 per person to present
             results of project at the end of project                     1.000.00
                                                                 1,500.00

IV.   Equipment (Rental}
      Audio visual and projector rental: for community outreach
             presentations                                        $  500.00
      Computer equipment                                          500.00
                                                                 1,000.00

V.    Supplies
      Paper and office supplies                                    $   500.00
      Postage                                                       500.00
      Printing, 1,000 copies of report                                 1,500.00
      Telephone                                                     500.00
                                                                  3,000.00

TOTAL:                                                         $ 29,920.00
Appendix B                                                            Page B-8

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                                                           EPA Project Control Number
                             United States Environmental Protection Agency
                                       Washington, DC 20460

                                   Certification Regarding
               Debarment, Suspension, and Other Responsibility Matters


The prospective participant certifies to the best of its knowledge and belief that it and its principals:

(a) Are not presently debarred, suspended, proposed for debarment, declared ineligible, or voluntarily
excluded from covered transactions by any federal department or agency;

(b) Have not within a 3-year period preceding this proposal been convicted of or had a civil judgment
rendered against them for commission of fraud or a criminal offense in connection with obtaining,
attempting to obtain, or performing a public (federal, state, or local) transaction or contract under a public
transaction; violation of federal or state antitrust statutes or commission of embezzlement, theft, forgery,
bribery, falsification or destruction of records, making false statements, or receiving stolen property;

(c) Are not presently indicated for or otherwise criminally or civilly charged by a government entity
(federal, state, or local) with commission of any of the offenses enumerated in paragraph (l)(b) of this
certification;

(d) Have not within a 3-year period preceding this application/proposal had one or more public
transactions (Federal, State, or local) terminated for cause or default.

I understand that a false statement on this certification may be grounds for rejection of this proposal or
termination  of the award. In addition, under 18 USC Sec. 1001, a false statement may result in a fine of up
to $10,000 or imprisonment for up to 5 years, or both.
Typed Name and Title of Authorized Representative

Signature of Authorized Representative                                      Date
               I am unable to certify to the above statements.  My explanation is attached.
Appendix B                                                                      Page B-9

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                                   INSTRUCTIONS

Under Executive Order 12549, an individual or organization debarred or excluded from
participation in federal assistance or benefit programs cannot receive any assistance award under
a federal program, or a subagreement thereunder for $25,000 or more.

Accordingly, each prospective recipient of an EPA grant, loan, or cooperative agreement and any
contract or subagreement participant thereunder must complete the attached certification or
provide an explanation why they cannot. For further details, see 40 CFR 32.510, participants'
responsibilities, in the attached regulation.

Where to Submit:

The prospective EPA grant, loan, or cooperative agreement recipient must return the signed
certification or explanation with its application to EPA Headquarters or the appropriate regional
office as required in the application instructions.

A prospective prime contractor must submit a completed certification or explanation to the
individual or organization awarding the contract.

Each prospective subcontractor must submit a completed certification or explanation to the prime
contractor for the project.

How To Obtain Forms:

EPA includes the certification form, instruction, and a copy of its implementing regulation (40
CFR Part 32) in each application kit. Applicants may reproduce these materials as needed and
provide them to their prospective prime contractor, who, in turn, may reproduce and provide
them to prospective subcontractors.

Additional copies and assistance may be requested by calling the Grants Administration Division
at 202 564-5392 or by writing to:

              U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
              Office of Grants and Debarment
              Suspension and Debarment Division (3902R)
              401 M Street,  SW.
              Washington, DC 20460
Appendix B                                                               Page B-10

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                                                   EPA Project Control Number
                    CERTIFICATION REGARDING LOBBYING

                  CERTIFICATION FOR CONTRACTS, GRANTS,
                   LOANS, AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS

      The undersigned certifies, to the best of his or her knowledge and belief, that:

      (1) No Federal appropriated funds have been or will be paid, by or on behalf of the
undersigned, to any person for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of
any agency, a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or an employee of a
Member of Congress in connection with the awarding of any Federal contract, the making of any
Federal grant, the making of any Federal loan, the entering into of any cooperative agreement,
and the extension, continuation, renewal, amendment, or modification of any Federal contract,
grant, loan, or cooperative agreement.

      (2) If any funds other than Federal appropriated funds have been paid or will be paid to
any person for influencing or  attempting to influence an officer or employee of any agency, a
Member of Congress, or an employee of a Member of Congress in connection with this Federal
contract, grant, loan, or cooperative agreement, the undersigned shall complete and submit
Standard Form-LLL, Disclosure Form to Report Lobbying, in accordance with its instructions.

      (3) The undersigned shall require that the language of this certification be included in the
award of documents for all subawards at all tiers (including subcontracts, subgrants, and
contracts under grants, loans,  and cooperative agreements) and that all subrecipients shall certify
and disclose accordingly.

      This certification is a material representation of fact upon which reliance was placed
when this transaction was made or entered into.  Submission of this certification is a prerequisite
for making or entering into this transaction imposed by Section  1352, Title 31, U.S. Code.  Any
person who fails to file the required certification shall be subject to a civil penalty of not less than
$10,000 and not more than $100,000 for each such failure.
       TYPED NAME and TITLE OF AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVE
       SIGNATURE OF AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVE        DATE
Appendix B                                                            Page B-11

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                                         Disclosure of Lobbying Activities

                              Complete this form to disclose lobbying activities pursuant to 31 U.S.C. 1352
                                                    (See reverse side for Instructions.)
                                                                                                    Approved by OMB 0348-0046
Public Reporting Burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 30 minutes per response, including the time for reviewing instructions,
searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information.  Send comments
regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to the Office of Management
and Budget, Paperwork Reduction Project (0348-0046), Washington, D.C. 20503.
1.  Type of Federal Action:
        Da. contract
        b. grant
        c. cooperative agreement
        d. loan
        e. loan guarantee
        f.  loan insurance
                                            Status of Federal Action:
                                                 na. bid/offer/application
                                                 b. initial award
                                                 c. post-award
                                      Report Type:
                                            na. initial filing
                                            b. material change
                                            For Material Change Only:
                                            year	quarter	
                                                                                              date of last report.
4.
Name and Address of Reporting Entity:
I    I Prime        I    ISubawardee
                                        Tier.
., if known:
   Congressional District, if known:
5. If Reporting Entity in No. 4 is Subawardee, enter Name and Address of
   Prime:
                                                                   Congressional District, if known:
6. Federal Department/Agency:
                                                                7.  Federal Program Name/Description:
                                                                      CFDA Number, if applicable:.
B. Federal Action Number, if known:
                                                                9. Award Amount, if known:
                                                                   $
10a.  Name and Address of Lobbying Registrant
      (if individual, last name, first name, Ml):
                                                                b. Individuals Performing Services(including address if different from No. 10a.)
                                                                   (last name, first name, Ml):
 11. Information requested through this form is authorized by Sec.319,
    Pub. L 101 -121,103 Stat. 750, as amended by sec. 10; Pub. L. 104-
    65,Stat.700(31 U.S.C. 1352). This disclosure of lobbying activities
    is a material representation of fact upon which reliance was placed
    by the above when this transaction was made or entered into. This
    disclosure is required pursuant to 31 U.S.C. 1352. This information
    will be reported to the Congress semiannually and will be available
    for public inspection.   Any person who fails to  file the required
    disclosure shall be subject to a civil penalty of not less than $10.000
    and not more than $100,000 for each such failure.
                                                                 Signature:
                                                                 Print Name:
                                                                 Title:

                                                                 Telephone No.:
                                                           Date:
                                                                                                     Authorized for Local Reproduction
                                                                                                             Standard Form-LLL (1/96)
           Appendix B
                                                                                                    Page B-12

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Instructions for Completion of SF-LLL, Disclosure of Lobbying Activities

This disclosure form shall be completed by the reporting entity, whether subawardee or prime Federal recipient, at the initiation or receipt of a
covered Federal action, or a material change to a previous filing, pursuant to title 31 U.S.C. section 1352. The filing of a form is required for each
payment or agreement to make payment to any lobbying entity for influencing or attempting to influence an officer or employee of any agency,
a Member of Congress, an officer or employee of Congress, or any employee of a Member of Congress in connection with a covered Federal
action. Complete all items that apply for both the initial filing and material change report.  Refer to the implementing guidance published by the
Office of Management and Budget for additional information.
1. Identify the type of covered Federal action for which lobbying activity
is and/or has been secured to influence the outcome of a covered
Federal action.
2. Identify the status of the covered Federal action.
3.  Identify the appropriate classification of this report. If this is a
followup report caused  by a material change to the  information
previously reported, enter the year and quarter in which the change
occurred. Enter the date of the last previously submitted report by this
reporting entity for this covered Federal action.
4. Enter the full name, address, city, state and zip code of the reporting
entity. Include Congressional District, if known. Check the appropriate
classification of the reporting entity  that designates if it is, or expects
to be, a prime or subaward recipient. Identify the tier of the subawardee,
e.g., the first subawardee of the prime is the 1 st tier. Subawards include
but are not limited to subcontracts, subgrants and contract awards
under grants.
5. If the organization filing the report in item 4 checks "Subawardee",
then enter the full name, address, city, state and zip code of the prime
Federal recipient, Include Congressional District, if known.
6. Enter the  name of the Federal agency making the award or loan
commitment. Include at least one organizational level below agency
name,  if known. For example, Department of Transportation,  United
States Coast Guard.
7. Enter the Federal program name or description for the coverec
Federal action (item 1). If known, enter the full Catalog of Federa
Domestic Assistance (CFDA) number for grants, cooperative agree
ments, loans, and loan commitments.
8. Enter the most appropriate Federal identifying number available fo
the Federal action identified in item 1 (e.g., Requestfor Proposal (RFP
number; Invitation for Bid (I FB) number; grant announcement number
the contract, grant, or loan award number; the application propose
control number assigned by the Federal agency). Include prefixes
e.g.,"RFP-DE-90-001."
9.For a covered Federal action where there has been an award or loai
commitment by the Federal agency,  enter the Federal amount of th<
award/loan commitment for the prime entity identified in item 4 or 5
10. (a) Enter the full name, address, city, state and zip code of thi
registrant under the Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995 engaged by thi
reporting entity identified in item 4 to influence the covered Federc
action.
(b) Enter the full names of the individual(s) performing services, ant
include full address if different from  10  (a).  Enter Last Name, Firs
Name, and Middle Initial (Ml).
11. The certifying  official shall sign and date the form, print  his/he
name, title, and telephone number.
         Appendix B
                               Authorized for Local Reproductlc
                                       Standard Form-LLL (1/9
                                PageB-\3

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           APPENDIX C: CHECKLIST OF APPLICATION MATERIALS

Please be sure to include all the items listed on the checklist in your application packet. Each item should
be clearly identified and arranged in the following order. In order to help conserve paper, please provide
double-sided copies whenever possible.

D     Application for Federal Assistance, SF 424.

D     The Federal Standard Form SF 424A.

D     A one page summary cover sheet.

D     Narrative of the proposal not to exceed 5 double-sided pages (10 pages in all).

D     Key Contacts Information Sheet.

D     Detailed, itemized budget.

D     Certification of Non-Construction.

D     Certification Regarding Debarment, Suspension, and Other Responsibility Matters.

D     Certification Regarding Lobbying.

D     Disclosure of Lobbying Activities.

D     Letters of commitment, memoranda of understanding, or other documents.

D     Resumes or biographical information regarding the lead investigator and other key personnel in the
       grant application.

D     Any additional information deemed useful by the applicant.

The total number of pages per application may not exceed 20 double-sided pages (40 pages in all).

Please include one original (with original signatures where appropriate) and four copies of the application
packet.

Proposals must be received by EPA at the following address no later than 5 p.m., April 20,1998:

              EJP2 Grant Program
              c/o ERG
              2200 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 400
              Arlington, VA 22201

For questions concerning the grant program guidance, or for additional information, please  call 703 841-
0483.
Appendix C                                                                  Page C-l

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                Appendix  D:  Map of EPA Regions
                     EPA Regional Offices and State Breakdown
    Alabama
    Alaska
    Arizona
    Arkansas
    California
    Colorado
    Connecticut
    Delaware
    District of Columbia
    Florida
    Georgia
    Hawaii
    Idahp
    Illinois
    Indiana
    Iowa
    Kansas
    Kentucky
    Louisiana
Region 1
Region 2
Region 3
Connecticut
Maine
Massachusetts
New Hampshire
Rhode Island
Vermont


New Jersey
New York
Puerto Rico
Virgin Islands


Delaware
District of
   Columbia
Maryland
Pennsylvania
Virginia
West Virginia
 4          Maine                1
10          Maryland             3
 9          Massachusetts         1
 6          Mjchigan              5
 9          Minnesota             5
 8          Mississippi            4
 1          Missouri              7
 3          Montana              8
 3          Nebraska             7
 4          Nevada               9
 4          New Hampshire        1
 9          New Jersey           2
10          New Mexico           6
 5          New York             2
 5          North Carolina         4
 7          North Dakota          8
 7          Ohio                 5
 4          Oklahoma             6
 6          Oregon              10

 Region 4   Alabama        Region 6
           Florida
           Georgia
           Kentucky
           Mississippi
           North Carolina   Region 7
           South Carolina
           Tennessee

 Region 5   Illinois
           Indiana         Region 8
           Michigan
           Minnesota
           Ohio
           Wisconsin
                                                          Pennsylvania
                                                          Rhode Island
                                                          South Carolina
                                                          South Dakota
                                                          Tennessee
                                                          Texas
                                                          Utah
                                                          Vermont
                                                          Virginia
                                                          Washingtpn
                                                          West Virginia
                                                          Wisconsin
                                                          Wyoming
                                                          American Samoa
                                                          Guam
                                                          Puerto Rico
                                                          Virgin Islands
Arizona
Louisiana
New Mexico
Oklahoma
Texas
Iowa
Kansas
Missouri
Nebraska


Colorado
Montana
North Dakota
South Dakota
Utah
Wyoming
Region 9
                                                                          Region 10
                              3
                              1
                              4
                              8
                              4
                              6
                              8
                              1
                              3
                             10
                              3
                              5
                              8
                              9
                              9
                              2
                              2
Arizona
California
Hawaii
Nevada
American
   Samoa
Guam


Alaska
Idaho
Oregon
Washington
Appendix D
                                                                              Page D-l

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             APPENDIX E: STATE SINGLE POINTS OF CONTACT

 Your application to this EPA program may be subject to your state's inter-governmental review
 process and/or consultation requirements under Section 204, Demonstration Cities and
 Metropolitan Development Act. Listed below are the Single Point-of-Contacts for the states and
 U.S. territories with a designated Single Point-of-Contact.  Please check the list to see if such
 review is required in your state or territory.  Those states and U.S. territories that are not listed
 do not have an established single point-of-contact. For further information regarding Single
 Points-of-Contact, please call EPA at 202 564-5311.  Please also note that federally recognized
 tribal organizations are not required to comply with this procedure.
ARIZONA
Ms. Joni Saad
Arizona State Clearinghouse
3800 North Central Avenue
Fourteenth Floor
Phoenix, AZ 85012
Phone:602280-1315
Fax:   602 280-8144

ARKANSAS
Mr. Tracy L. Copeland, Manager
State Clearinghouse
Office of Intergovernmental Services
Department of Finance and Administration
1515 West Seventh Street, Room 412
Little Rock, AR 72203
Phone: 501 682-1074
Fax:   501682-5206

CALIFORNIA
Grants Coordinator
Office of Planning and Research
1400 Tenth Street, Room 121
Sacramento, CA 95814
Phone:916323-7480
Fax:  916323-3018
DELAWARE
Mrs. Francine Booth
State Single Point of Contact
Executive Department, Office of the Budget
Thomas Collins Building
P.O. Box 1401
Dover, DEI 9903
Phone: 302 739-3326
Fax:   302 739-5661

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Mr. Charles E. Nichols
State Single Point of Contact
Office of Grants Management and
Development
717 14th Street, NW, Suite 400
Washington, DC 20001
Phone: 202 727-6554
Fax:   202727-1617

FLORIDA
Florida State Clearinghouse
Department of Community Affairs
2740 Center-view Drive
Tallahassee, FL 32399-2100
Phone: 904 922-5438
Fax:   904 487-2899

GEORGIA
Mr. Tom Reid, III, Coordinator
Georgia State Clearinghouse
270 Washington Street, SW, Eighth Floor
Atlanta, GA 30334
Phone: 404 656-3855
Fax:   404 656-3828
Appendix E
                           Page E-\

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ILLINOIS
Ms. Virginia Bova
Single Point of Contact
Department of Commerce and Community
Affairs
James R. Thompson Center
100 West Randolph, Suite 3-400
Chicago, IL 60601
Phone:312814-6028
Fax:  312814-1800

INDIANA
Ms. Frances E. Williams
State Budget Agency
212 State House
Indianapolis, IN 46204
Phone:317232-5619
Fax:  317233-3323

IOWA
Mr. Steven R. McCann
Division for Community Assistance
Iowa Department of Economic Development
200 East Grand Avenue
Des Moines, IA 50309
Phone:515242-4719
Fax:  515242-4809

KENTUCKY
Mr. Ronald W. Cook
Office of the Governor
Department of Local Government
1024 Capital Center Drive
Frankfort, KY 40601-8204
Phone 502573-2382
Fax   502573-2512

MAINE
Ms. Joyce Benson
State Planning Office
184 State Street
38 State House Station
Augusta, ME 04333
Phone: 207 287-3261
Fax:  207 287-6489
MARYLAND
Mr. William G. Carroll, Manager
Plan and Project Review
Maryland Office of Planning
301 West Preston Street, Room 1104
Baltimore, MD 21201-2365
Phone: 410 767-4490
Fax:  410 767-4480

MICHIGAN
Mr. Richard Pfaff
Southeast Michigan Council of Governments
660 Plaza Drive, Suite 1900
Detroit, MI 48226
Phone:313961-4266
Fax:  313961-4869

MISSISSIPPI
Ms. Cathy Mallette, Clearinghouse Officer
Department of Finance and Administration
455 North Lamar Street
Jackson, MS 39202-3087
Phone: 601 359-6762
Fax:  601 359-6764

MISSOURI
Ms. Lois Pohl
Federal Assistance Clearinghouse
Office of Administration
P.O. Box 809
Room 760, Truman Building
Jefferson City, MO 65102
Phone:314751-4834
Fax:  314751-7819

NEVADA
Department of Administration
State Clearinghouse
Capital Complex
Carson City, NV 89710
Phone: 702 687-4065
Fax:  702 687-3983
Appendix E
                           Page E-2

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NEW HAMPSHIRE
Mr. Jeffery H. Taylor, Director
New Hampshire Office of State Planning
Attn: Intergovernmental Review Process
2 l/2 Beacon Street
Concord, NH 03301
Phone: 603 271-2155
Fax:   603 271-1728

NEW MEXICO
Mr. Robert Peters
State Budget Division
Bataan Memorial Building, Room 190
Santa Fe, NM 87503
Phone: 505 827-3640

NEW YORK
New York State Clearinghouse
Division of the Budget
State Capitol
Albany, NY 12224
Phone:518474-1605
Fax:   518486-5617

NORTH CAROLINA
Mrs. Chrys Baggett, Director
North Carolina State Clearinghouse
Office of the Secretary of Administration
116 West Jones Street, Suite 5106
Raleigh, NC 27603-8003
Phone: 919 733-7232
Fax:   919 733-9571

NORTH DAKOTA
North Dakota Single Point of Contact
Office of Intergovernmental Assistance
600 East Boulevard Avenue
Bismarck, ND 58505-0170
Phone: 701 224-2094
Fax:   701224-2308
OHIO
Ms. Linda Wise
State Clearinghouse
Office of Budget and Management
30 East Broad Street, 34th Floor
Columbus, OH 43266-0411
Phone: 614 466-0698
Fax:  614 466-5400

RHODE ISLAND
Mr. Kevin Nelson, Review Coordinator
Department of Administration
Office of Strategic Planning
One Capitol Hill, Fourth Floor
Providence, RI 02908-5870
Phone: 401 277-2656
Fax:  401277-2083

SOUTH CAROLINA
Mr. Rodney Grizzle
State Single Point of Contact
Grant Services
Office of the Governor
1205 Pendleton Street, Room 331
Columbia, SC 29201
Phone: 803 734-0494
Fax:  803 734-0356

TEXAS
Mr. Tom Adams, Director
Intergovernmental Coordination
Governor's Office
P.O. Box 12428
Austin, TX 78711
Phone:512463-1771
Fax:  512936-2681

UTAH
Ms. Carolyn Wright
Utah State Clearinghouse
Office of Planning and Budget
State Capitol, Room 116
Salt Lake City, UT 84114
Phone: 801 538-1535
Fax:  801 538-1547
Appendix E
                           Page E-3

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WEST VIRGINIA
Mr. Fred Cutlip, Director
Community Development Division
West Virginia Development Office
Building 6, Room 553
Charleston, WV 25305
Phone: 304 558-4010
Fax:   304 558-3248

WISCONSIN
Mr. Jeff Smith, Section Chief
State/Federal Relations Office
Wisconsin Department of Administration
101 East Wilson Street, Sixth Floor
P.O. Box 7868
Madison, WI 53707
Phone: 608 266-0267
Fax:   608267-6931

WYOMING
Mr. Matthew Jones
State Single Point of Contact
Office of the Governor
200 West 24th Street
State Capitol, Room 124
Cheyenne, WY 82002
Phone: 307 777-7446
Fax:   307 632-3909

GUAM
Mr. Giovanni T. Sgambelluri, Director
Bureau of Budget and Management Research
Office of the Governor
P.O. Box 2950
Agana,GU 96910
Phone:011-671-472-2285
Fax:   011-671-472-2825
PUERTO RICO
Ms. Norma Burgos, Chairwoman
Mr. Jose E. Caro, Director
Puerto Rico Planning Board
Federal Proposals Review Office
Minillas Government Center
P.O. Box 41119
San Juan, PR 00940-1119
Phone: 809 727-4444 or 809 723-6190
Fax:  809 724-3270 or 809 724-3103

NORTH MARIANA ISLANDS
Ms. Jacoba T. Seman, Federal Programs
Coordinator
State Single Point of Contact
Planning and Budget Office
Office of the Governor
Saipan,MP  96950
Phone: 670 664-2289
Fax:  670 664-2272

VIRGIN ISLANDS
Ms. Linda Clarke
Office of Management and Budget
41 Norregade Emancipation Garden Station
Second Floor
Saint Thomas, VI 00802
Phone: 809 774-0750
Fax:  809 776-0069
Appendix E
                           Page EA

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            APPENDIX F:  SUMMARY OF PREVIOUS GRANT AWARDS

 FISCAL YEAR 1995

 REGION 1

 BOWDOIN STREET HEALTH CENTER A PILOT SMALL BUSINESS ASSISTANCE PROGRAM IN A
 DIVERSE, URBAN COMMUNITY                                           Grant Award:  $53,450

 In communities of color, such as the area in which the Bowdoin Street Health Center is located, there exist small
 businesses owned and operated by individuals who reflect the diversity of the neighborhood. Oftentimes the
 businesses produce environmental pollution that affects the workers and nearby residents. This project is targeting
 automotive repair and autobody and laundry and dry-cleaning businesses.  The project will add a Certified Industrial
 Hygienist to  the community health center's occupational health clinic. The industrial hygienist will help automotive
 repair and bodyshops and dry-cleaning businesses to comply with all regulations; decrease the amount of hazardous
 and toxic substances they use; train both employers and employees on proper work practices in using these materials;
 and assist in  the formation of a Community Environmental Committee composed of business owners, employees,
 community residents, and BSHC staff.

 NORTHEAST WASTE MANAGEMENT OFFICIALS ASSOCIATION (NEWMOA): UTILIZING
 POLLUTION PREVENTION TO ATTAIN COMPLIANCE IN SMALL BUSINESSES: A MULTI-MEDIA
 TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM                                     Grant Award:  $53,450

 Automotive repair facilities are situated throughout environmental justice zones and represent a significant source of
 pollution generation. Possible exposure to hazards related to auto repair is not limited to the employees of the
 businesses. The entire community surrounding these shops can be at risk.  The Northeast Waste Management
 Official's Association (NEWMOA) proposes to develop a program to address these issues.  Through this project
 NEWMOA will develop a program to assist small automotive repair firms within environmental justice communities
 to utilize pollution prevention as their primary tool for achieving compliance with environmental regulations. The
 project will develop an educational tool and implement an outreach program.  The educational tool will consist of a
 synthesized multimedia information packet that will be designed to inform auto repair facilities of how to identify P2
 opportunities and use source reduction as their primary tool for achieving compliance with environmental
 regulations.  Outreach will be conducted to inform auto repair shops and community organizations of pollution
 prevention resources.  The project also will establish links between state and regional P2 programs and community
 organizations, creating a forum for these programs to share information.

 PEER PARTNERSHIPS, INC.: NOTHING TO WASTE                         Grant Award:  $100,000

 Recognizing  the connection between excess environmental waste and inadequate economic resources, the  "Nothing
 to Waste" initiative links proven pollution prevention and community economic development methodologies to pilot
 a model to reduce the waste and increase the  resources of microbusinesses in low-income communities of
 color throughout New England. The initiative links the business development and credit strategies of Working
 Capital with the pollution prevention expertise of Cambridge Environmental, the environmental education and
 training experience of Tufts University,  and mentorship and waste sharing models developed by EPA. A primary
 approach of "Nothing to Waste" is to tap into and link existing resources and programs that work, rather than create
 new and unrelated programs or invent untested approaches. The program includes: 1) incorporating P2 training
 modules into an existing business development curriculum being used by microenterprise peer groups operating
 throughout New England's low-income communities; 2) transferring the expertise of larger corporations to micro-
 businesses through mentorships, tapping into already existing EPA and state-sponsored WasteCap programs; 3)
 providing access to capital for microbusinesses implementing P2 strategies using capital already secured by major
 banks and foundations; 4) promoting more effective use of scarce community resources by encouraging the use of
 wastes as resources and providing a vehicle for micro-entrepreneurs to access existing regional and national waste
 sharing networks; 5) expanding the reach of successful existing business and environmental networks.
Appendix F                                                                               Page F-l

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ROXBURY COMMUNITY COLLEGE: ADVANCING ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE THROUGH
POLLUTION PREVENTION: A TRAINING PROGRAM AT THE ROXBURY COMMUNITY COLLEGE
                                                                            Grant Award:  $100,000

This project is a collaboration between the Roxbury Community College and the Tellus Institute.  There are an
estimated 40 auto maintenance and repair shops within the Roxbury area of Boston.  As a result, pollution from used
motor oil, old tires, and toxic paints directly impacts workers and neighbors and the air and water quality of the
community. Concerns about these businesses surface repeatedly in meetings with Dudley Street Neighborhood
Initiative, Environmental Diversity Forum, and other participants in the Roxbury-based Hazards Working Group.  In
addition, other small service-oriented businesses, such as dry cleaning and printing establishments, that are found in
many low-income and minority urban neighborhoods pose similar risks from solvents and other chemicals. Pollution
prevention is a key strategy for addressing the environmental burdens associated with these businesses while
enhancing their long-term economic viability. Roxbury Community College, in collaboration with Tellus Institute,
will design a program comprising of three components designed to reach three audiences within the community: 1) a
one-semester introduction to P2 for RCC students; 2) three industry-specific workshops to train owners, managers,
and employees in concrete P2 alternatives for auto maintenance and repair, dry cleaning, and printing; 3) an annual
conference for high school students from across the city to introduce them to educational and career opportunities in
P2 and environmental management. The curriculum will serve as a model for other community colleges and training
institutions across the country.

TRUSTEES OF HEALTH AND HOSPITALS: THE REDUCTION OF HAZARDOUS WASTE FOR
AUTOMOTIVE BODY AND REPAIR SHOPS IN BOSTON                       Grant Award: $53,450

In the city of Boston, automotive shops located in minority and low-income neighborhoods have increasingly
become an egregious source of uncontrolled hazardous waste. Health centers in these neighborhoods have reported
startling incidences of accidental direct and indirect exposure of the public to local automotive shop toxins. This
project proposes to address this issue by developing a 15 to 20 minute training film for auto shop owners on how to
establish and maintain sound environmental pollution prevention practices. The film will emphasize ways in which
pollution prevention can enhance community cleanliness, provide economic benefits, and protect worker health. To
ensure that the film reaches auto shop owners, required viewing of the film will be institutionalized into the city's
auto shop permitting process.

WASTE WATCH CENTER: CAMBODIAN HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE POLLUTION
PREVENTION PROJECT                                                     Grant Award: $39,649

This project is a collaboration between the Waste Watch Center and the Cambodian Mutual Assistance Association
of Greater Lowell, Inc.  The project will provide education, outreach, and technical assistance in pollution
prevention to the Cambodian community in Lowell, MA. The objectives of this project are: 1) to prevent automotive
and household hazardous wastes from being improperly disposed of in municipal solid waste and wastewater and
storm drain systems; and 2) to reduce home poisoning, indoor air pollution, injury, and illness by educating the
Cambodian American population on the proper use, storage, and disposal of household hazardous chemicals.  The
project will result in measurable reductions in use, storage and improper disposal of household hazardous wastes;
healthier and safer home and neighborhood environments; reduced quantities of hazardous waste in municipal solid
waste; more efficient and cost-effective treatment of wastewater and  storm drain runoff; improved water quality in
the Merrimack River; and enhanced integration of the Cambodian-American population into the civic and social
fabric of Greater Lowell.

REGION 2

CITIZENS ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH INSTITUTE:  ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE THROUGH
POLLUTION PREVENTION FOR GARDEN CITY PARK, NY                  Grant Award:  $100,000

The Garden City Park Industrial Park area is the source  of one of the largest ground-water contamination plumes in
New York State and in the U.S. The adjacent residential neighborhood is more than 50 percent African American
and Hispanic.  Although the area has been listed as a NYS Superfund site, the residents remain largely uninformed
about pollution prevention. This project will achieve pollution reduction in the Garden City Park area through a

Appendix F                                                                               Page F-2

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seven-point program aimed at the residents and the responsible business community.  A partnership of residents,
businesses, and government and civic leaders will develop a Community Wide Pollution Reduction plan to help
residents reduce the pollution they control such as water wastage, pesticides, and hazardous chemicals. The
businesses will reduce pollution through changes in processes, raw materials, and procedures. Residents and
businesses will be taught to conduct environmental audits, and experts will work closely with the community to
ensure proper training, skills development, and design and implementation of pollution reduction plans.

CLEAN WATER FUND: POLLUTION PREVENTION BEGINS AT HOME       Grant Award:  $11,663

This project will be implemented in partnership with the New Jersey Head Start Association (NJHSA) and the New
Jersey Environmental Federation (NJEF).  Its purpose is to revise the Clean Water Fund's (CWF's) existing consumer
and pollution prevention education exhibit and literature, known as Home SAFE Home  and Environmental Shoppers
Campaign. CWF will work with NJHSA and NJEF to ensure that the materials address  the diverse cultural, racial,
and economic backgrounds and diverse language and literacy skills of the Head Start community. Pollution
prevention educational and training models produced through this project will be made available for other
communities of color and urban settings.

COUNCIL ON THE ENVIRONMENT, INC.: GREENPOINT-WILLIAMSBURG  POLLUTION
PREVENTION PROJECT (GWPP)                                            Grant Award:  $49,452

This project addresses environmental justice issues in one of the most polluted communities in New York City.
Greenpoint/Williamsburg is home to three major ethnic groups: Latino, Polish, and Hasidic Jewish. The
neighborhood became the target of illegal dumping, the site of hazardous waste facilities and heavy industry, the
scene of excessive exposure to lead, and the home of one of NYC's largest and most problematic wastewater
treatment plants. The GWPP calls for hundreds of local high school students participating in the Council on the
Environment's award-winning Training Student Organizers Program to learn about the environmental problems
afflicting their area, to organize action and service projects to  ameliorate some of these problems, and to educate
local youth and adult residents about the issues and motivate them.

DUNBAR ASSOCIATION, INC.: DUNBAR ASSOCIATION'S MINORITY BUSINESS POLLUTION
PREVENTION PROJECT                                                    Grant Award: $100,000

Dunbar Association's project seeks  to address the fact that many minority-owned small businesses hi Syracuse, NY,
contribute to the pollution in their community. These businesses are frequently located in minority communities.
The initiative will: educate the community about pollution prevention; identify the pollution problems at a number of
small businesses and provide technical and material support to remedy those problems; and provide financial support
to those  businesses in the form of loans, which will be used to implement pollution prevention initiatives. The goal
of the project is to create a means by which minority small business owners can implement changes (in processes,
and equipment, etc.) that will have environmental and health benefits without undermining the economic well-being
of the businesses. The program will work cooperatively within existing frameworks such as the Pan-African
Business Association (PABA) and other Native American and Latino organizations.

EL PUENTE OF WILLIAMSBURG: THE COMMUNITY RIGHT TO ACT PROJECT:
ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION AND POLLUTION PREVENTION TRAINING AND NEGOTIATION
IN GREENPOINT-WILLIAMSBURG                                          Grant Award:  $98,885

The Greenpoint-Williamsburg community in Brooklyn, NY, is home to several heavy industries. Based on TRI
data, the toxic emissions in Greenpoint-Williamsburg are 60 times greater than the U.S.  average. The community is
predominantly comprised of Hasidic Jews, Latinos, African-Americans, Poles, and Italians. The Community Right
to Act Project has three primary objectives: 1) increase community empowerment through education and training; 2)
reduce pollution through creating community pollution prevention teams and developing prevention strategies to
address problems arising from local industries; and 3) begin a long-term planning process for environmentally
sustainable community development. The project will establish an adult environmental  education program and a
community assessment program to evaluate existing hazards using a Geographic Information System.  In addition,
the project will develop a series of pollution prevention strategies to address the problems uncovered.  El Puente will


Appendix F                                                                               Page F-3

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work cooperatively with several organizations, including the New York Committee for Occupational Safety and
Health, the Environmental Defense Fund, and the New York City Department of Environmental Protection.

ISLES, INC.: ISLES'ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAM                   Grant Award:  $25,000

The city of Trenton, NJ, is more than 66 percent low- and moderate-income and nearly 70 percent minority. It is
located downwind from a coal-fired electric and gas facility, which has led to extremely poor air quality. Isles feels
that to prevent deteriorating air quality, a key area for attention is limiting energy production.  This project will teach
fifth graders, and train teachers at two Trenton elementary schools, about the value and technique of energy
conservation. The program will demonstrate how to decrease energy use in homes and schools and begin to reduce
energy production in their community. In cooperation with Public Service Electric & Gas (PSE&G) and the City of
Trenton school district, Isles will show children how to conduct their own energy audits and engage families and
school administrators in pollution prevention methods.  In addition, with PSE&G, grants and discounts will be
provided to convert existing bulbs and fixtures to energy-efficient models in both schools and  homes. The project
will result in a more efficient use of energy resources and substantial savings for families and the city of Trenton.

REGION 3

ALICE HAMILTON OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH CENTER SMALL BUSINESS AND  COMMUNITY
POLLUTION PREVENTION INITIATIVE                                      Grant Award:  $81,670

This project focuses on economically disadvantaged communities located in Washington, DC, Baltimore and P.O.
County, MD, and the small businesses that serve them.  The initiative will include series of environmental health
promotions and training for community members and small business employees, provide small businesses and the
community with technical assistance in dealing with environmental health issues and P2 solutions and in-depth
assistance for small businesses identified by the grantee.

DELAWARE VALLEY CITIZENS' COUNCIL FOR CLEAN AIR:  POLLUTION PREVENTION BEGINS
WITH US                                                                     Grant Award:  $46,200

The program is designed to work with Mount Airy and Germantown communities (racially and economically diverse
communities near Philadelphia) so that P2 becomes part of the daily routine of households, local businesses,
government offices, and community organizations and institutions. Goals of the program include establishing a
waste reduction information and technical assistance center; developing a community-based task force to oversee
waste reduction strategies; assisting businesses, institutions, and residents with the development and implementation
of waste reduction strategies; creating an effective media campaign to promote these communities' efforts; and
preparing and releasing the P2 Begins With Us Report to evaluate the program and assist other communities in their
waste reduction efforts.

NEW RIVER-HIGHLAND RC&D COUNCIL: ADOPT-A-WATERSHED PROJECT
                                                                              Grant Award:  $96,960

This program is designed to work with Smyth and Washington Counties, VA. The region's unemployment rates are
consistently higher than state and national averages.  The median family income for the area is $25,235, which is 66
percent of the state average. The  goal of this project is to increase teacher, student, farmer, and community
understanding of how non-point source (NPS)  pollution prevention can prevent  adverse impact of NPS agriculture
and urban NPS pollution in Washington and Smyth Counties.  Goals of the program include establishing a two-year
pilot Adopt-a-Watershed Program, providing training and support to educators on watershed planning and
management, increasing the number of teachers who offer natural resource and water quality studies as part of their
curriculum, improving the IBI rating of six watersheds, increasing the voluntary installation of AG BMPs in the
adopted watershed.
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PAINTERS AND ALLIED TRADES LABOR MANAGEMENT COOPERATION FUND:
ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE AND POLLUTION PREVENTION IN PAINTING   Grant Award:  $94,875

The proposed P2 in Paint (P2iP) project will be an expansion of existing lead-based paint abatement program to
develop the abilities of painters to apply prevention practices at work sites. Existing education materials will be
modified for public housing residents, including the translation of materials into Spanish. Instructors will be trained
in English and Spanish.  Training seminars will be delivered to painting apprentices, painters, and painting
contractors who work on public housing construction projects.  A minimum of 20 4-hour seminars will be delivered
to 300 public housing residents, painters, and contractors. Participants will be tested upon the completion of
training, and test results will be analyzed.  A 6-month follow-up survey will be administered to students to gauge
their ability to apply P2 training at their worksites.  A survey of painting contractor and paint vendors will be
conducted to establish the level of knowledge and awareness of EJ and P2 among the community. The results will
be published. An EJ-P2iP communications network will be established to link the painting industry and the public to
a clearinghouse for information on EJ, P2, and health issues related to painting.

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND AT EASTERN SHORE: ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE PARTNERSHIP
BETWEEN UNIVERSITY AND PUBLIC SCHOOL                              Grant Award:  $49,940

UMES is a historically black college, and consists of a diverse student body, the majority of which is African
American. The target school is Eastern Senior High School, which is comprised of students from a neighborhood in
the District of Columbia classified as economically disadvantaged.  An overwhelming majority of the Eastern
students are racial minorities. The goal of the grant is two-fold:  1) educate teachers and students at Eastern on P2,
focusing on conservation; and 2) develop awareness in EJ and help train students as facilitators to educate other
citizens in inner city environments, and to empower those communities targeted as dumping grounds for
environmental pollutants. UMES faculty will train Eastern teachers and students on conservation techniques and EJ.
A major project will be Eastern High's participation in the cleanup of the Anacostia River.

REGION 4

BROWARD COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES:  ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE
THROUGH POLLUTION PREVENTION IN BROWARD COUNTY, FL AIMED AT SCHOOLS,
RESIDENTS AND BUSINESSES                                               Grant Award:  $80,000

This project targets Broward County, an area of Florida where more than 25 percent of the population lives below
the poverty level and more than 25 percent of the population is nonwhite. Through a series of workshops, the project
will provide education on the environment and pollution prevention to residents, businesses, and children. Residents
will receive assistance from pollution prevention professionals to improve the environmental quality of their
neighborhoods.  Businesses that create pollution caused by improper handling or disposal of hazardous materials and
solid waste will be offered pollution  prevention site assessments and written recommendations by professionals. The
grantee will work cooperatively with the American Forests Cool Communities Program, a nonprofit conservation
organization designed to implement  strategic tree planting and surface color lighting in selected communities.
Portions of the grant money will be allocated toward purchasing trees to plant around homes and for light-colored
shingles, paint, and asphalt for parking lots in environmental justice neighborhoods. This will result in lower cooling
costs and less smog.

CARROLL COUNTY FISCAL COAST: THE CARROLL COUNTY POLLUTION ABATEMENT AND
CONSERVATION PROJECT                                                 Grant Award:  $23,714

Carroll County, KY, a predominantly low- and moderate-income area, depends on two sources for its water supply.
The intent of this project is to ensure permanent, adequate supplies of clean and affordable water for area residents.
With input from several key members of the affected community, the Carroll County Water Supply Board will
develop a water supply plan and ground-water model of the Carroll County alluvial aquifer that identifies, quantifies,
and attempts to predict water supply  needs of the community.  The project will educate community residents and
businesses about the dynamics of the aquifer so they may take steps to protect it. The published report and ground-
water model that will result from the project will be a reference for all ground-water users in the Carrollton area. By


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providing a common base to all users, the study will provide the tools necessary for the rational management of
ground-water. The study and model will also assist the county in complying with Kentucky's water supply
regulations that require that Carroll County assess quality and quantity via a protection plan.

CITY OF ATLANTA, GA:  POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITIES IN LOW-INCOME AND
MINORITY AREAS WITHIN THE CITY OF ATLANTA                         Grant Award:  $50,000

This project focuses on developing a program of public outreach and industrial technical assistance for pollution
prevention in low-income and minority communities in Atlanta. The project seeks to develop a partnership between
the city of Atlanta, several state environmental organizations, and stakeholders such as industry and residents of
environmental justice communities. Through this partnership, strategies and techniques for the delivery of pollution
prevention assistance will be developed.  Project planning and implementation will provide an opportunity for
manufacturers and residents to exchange perspectives and information on issues of mutual concern related to
pollution prevention. Efforts will be focused on seeking the voluntary involvement of several companies to receive
in-depth, onsite assistance and pollution prevention training. The lessons learned during this project will serve as a
model for addressing pollution prevention issues in similarly situated communities throughout the country.

DADE COUNTY, FL:  POLLUTION PREVENTION AS A TOOL TO FIGHT ENVIRONMENTAL
INJUSTICES IN MINORITY COMMUNITIES                                  Grant Award:  $84,536

The Dade County Department of Environmental Resources Management's (DERM's) project will target the city of
Opa-Locka, a small, primarily black community, whose residential area is directly impacted by emissions and
discharges resulting from nearby industrial activities. DERM will work with local community and industrial
associations to provide training and to actively solicit on-site technical audits. Educational workshops will be held at
times and in locations that are convenient for the local industrial sector, and the residential community will be
encouraged to participate in these efforts. Existing educational materials will be modified and distributed throughout
the community.  The project's goal is to benefit both the residential and industrial communities by reducing wastes
through pollution prevention. The information and results gathered from this project will be used to assist other
minority communities throughout Dade County and will be transferrable to other cities with minority populations.

NORTHAMPTON COUNTY, NC: POLLUTION PREVENTION TO PROTECT HUMAN HEALTH AND
WATER RESOURCES IN NORTHAMPTON COUNTY AND BERTIE COUNTY, NC
                                                                              Grant Award:  $80,000

This educational program will focus on community involvement and training to protect local ground-water drinking
water supplies and surface-water resources.  The objectives of the program are to help residents of the targeted
counties who depend on ground-water as a drinking water source to assess potential sources of contamination at
farmsteads or homes and reduce these risks.  Practices adopted to protect ground-water drinking water supplies will
also decrease the possibility of nonpoint source pollution loadings to nearby surface waters. The program will be
implemented through the Extension Centers of the targeted counties. The two primary components of the program
are: 1) free well testing for low-income and minority residents in the two-county  project area and 2) training of
volunteers to use the Farmstead/Home Assessment System (Farm*A*Syst/Home*A*Syst~a nationally recognized
environmental program designed to increase farmers' awareness of environmental concerns on their farm and of
pollution prevention practices that may alleviate risks) materials and conduct assessments in their communities.

POARCH CREEK INDIANS: AGRICULTURE POLLUTION PREVENTION DEMONSTRATION
PROJECT                                                                    Grant Award:  $90,000

After years of agricultural runoff, the surface waters and watershed of the Poarch Creek Indian reservation, located in
Alabama, have become impaired. The goal of this project is to improve the surface-water quality of the Poarch
Creek Indian Community through the application of pollution prevention measure and/or best management practices
(BMPs). The tribe will form a partnership consisting of all Poarch Creek Community landowners, farmers, Indians
and non-Indians, and federal and state agencies to develop an agriculture pollution prevention plan and strategy for
the Poarch Community area, conduct a demonstration of agriculture pollution prevention measures or BMPs, include
in demonstrations measures or BMPs that are innovative but economically feasible, and involve the whole
community in all phases of the project.

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SOUTHFACE ENERGY INSTITUTE: POLLUTION PREVENTION IN ATLANTA NEIGHBORHOODS
                                                                             Grant Award:  $70,000

This project is a joint initiative between two nonprofit organizations in GA:  the Community Housing Resource
Center and the Southface Energy Institute. The organizations will work with leaders from community-based groups,
the private sector, and government to incorporate pollution prevention as part of low-income and minority
community revitalization in Atlanta. A major focus of the project will be helping low-income and minority
communities improve the energy, water, and resource efficiency of their buildings to provide economic benefits and
reduce greenhouse gases and other pollutants. Emphasis also will be placed on reducing pollution caused by the
construction and renovation of buildings in the target communities such as lead, asbestos, radon, and combustion
byproducts.

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHARLOTTE: DEVELOPMENT OF A MODEL
COMMUNITY-INVOLVED POLLUTION PREVENTION PROGRAM WITHIN WELLHEAD
PROTECTION AREAS FOR LOW-INCOME COMMUNITIES                   Grant Award:  $21,750

This project's objective is to demonstrate through nonregulatory means how low-income communities dependent on
groundwater can use pollution prevention to lower the risk of contamination. The primary nonregulatory activity is
to create a community-involved pollution prevention program targeting low-income mobile home trailer parks and
surrounding small businesses and industries in Gaston County, NC. Secondary goals include the development of a
lasting infrastructure for pollution prevention in  15 "rural-industrial" county areas forming the greater Charlotte
metropolitan region of the Carolinas, and an immediate reduction of risk to the communities directly served during
this 3-year pollution prevention project. The project will establish a pollution prevention education program that
will disseminate educational packets on drinking water and deliver workshops to residents in the targeted community
as well as technical assistance and training for small businesses in the low-income wellhead protection area.

REGION 5

CLEAN WATER FUND: MERCURY PREVENTION THROUGH INDIGENOUS EDUCATION AND
ACTION                                                                     Grant Award:  $85,000

The Indigenous Environmental Network and the Clean Water Fund, working with partners White Earth Land
Recovery Project and Clean Water Action Alliance, are requesting grant funding to address EJ issues of mercury
pollution that are threatening the health and traditional lifestyle of native populations in MN, WI, and MI through P2
and education. The project proposes four components to address mercury threats to native populations through P2,
including:  1) provide educational materials to native and normative people on the threat of mercury pollution; 2)
disseminate information to native and normative people through workshops on mercury pollution, with more in-depth
training provided to leaders within the communities; 3) adopt an Indigenous Policy Platform for mercury prevention,
and develop principles for a mercury prevention campaign; and 4) develop a Model Community Action Plan aimed
at encouraging community residents and institutions to adopt energy efficiency and conservation practices.

GRAND CAL TASK FORCE: EJP2 EDUCATION, OUTREACH, AND IMPLEMENTATION PROJECT
                                                                             Grant Award:  $66,080

Waste handling and polluting industries are increasingly looking to locate their facilities in African  American,
Hispanic, and poor communities, where people have fewer economic options and less control over development
resources.  Using the Calumet Region P2 Resource Center at Calumet College, the Grand Cal Task Force will
implement an EJP2 Education and Outreach Program to assist EJ communities in East Chicago, Gary, and
Hammond, IN. A full-time Education/Outreach Coordinator will work with existing Resource Center staff to
develop local EJ community-focused P2 outreach materials,  contact groups and key leaders, and promote ways for
communities to implement P2 programs.  Additional staff will reach out directly to communities through existing
community institutions and educate communities from available TRI and CIS data.  The Task Force has also
identified five P2 program implementation focus areas that will be promoted through the Education and Outreach
Program: 1) implementing the NW Indiana Brownfield Redevelopment Project pilot program; 2) getting
communities involved in redesigning P2 plans for the cities of East Chicago, Gary, and Hammond,  IN; 3) working


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with interested communities to set up P2 task forces to promote P2; 4) working with local community development
corporations, youth training programs, and city governments to identify partnership projects and funding
opportunities that involve young people in EJ projects; and 5) encouraging local participation and the application of
P2 principals in federal and state initiatives affecting the region.

ENVIRONMENTAL CAREERS ORGANIZATION: TECHNICAL ADVISOR PROGRAM FOR TOXICS
USE REDUCTION                                                             Grant Award:  $50,000

A major goal of the Technical Advisor Program for Toxic Use Reduction (TAPTUR) is to provide technical
assistance to low-income communities of color that are disproportionately affected by toxic exposure. TAPTUR is a
replicable model program that provides the technical training and education necessary for communities to understand
and develop P2 strategies and places retired engineers and scientists to work with community groups to implement
the strategies. The grant will provide technical assistance to six umbrella or resource organizations that serve low-
income and/or minority communities.  Goals include:  1) outreach to people of color and low-income
communities—ECO will conduct extensive outreach to communities involved in reducing industrial toxics; 2)
project solicitation and selection—through the outreach process, ECO will select two communities actively involved
in developing collaborative solutions to toxic pollution; 3) technical advisor recruitment, selection and benefits; 4)
community education and training—ECO will provide ongoing training on up-to-date P2 methodologies for all
participating communities; 5) networking—TAPTUR provides multiple networking opportunities for communities
and trains representatives on latest networking technologies; 6) evaluation and monitoring—including the number of
low-income and communities of color served, the number of "Good Neighbor Agreements" signed, the estimated
reduction in toxic emissions, the currently enacted legislation, and the number of advisors and community  groups
who wish to extend their project; and 7) P2 measures- ECO will assist communities participating in TAPTUR in
validating, monitoring, and demonstrating their efforts in reducing toxics emissions.

MINNEAPOLIS URBAN LEAGUE:  PARTNERSHIP FOR ENVIRONMENTALLY & ECONOMICALLY
HEALTHY COMMUNITIES                                                    Grant Award:  $58,320

Certain areas of Minneapolis include large populations of people of color and low-income families. It is proposed
that these areas be targeted for P2 technical assistance through a combination of established technical assistance
sources and through use of EJ interns. P2 results, including economic benefits, will be  measured throughout the
project duration. Minneapolis' large manufacturing base resides predominantly in minority and low-income
communities.  TRI data indicates that these communities include a significant number of facilities that report toxic
chemical releases and transfers.  Opportunities exist to employ P2 strategies to these manufacturers and businesses
located within the community. Young minority adults will be provided the opportunity to work in teams on P2
projects in local businesses. This intern experience will provide valuable knowledge, work experience, and
professional skills to be utilized in future educational and professional/vocational endeavors. By providing
environmental project opportunities, a significant environmental justice issue will be addressed.

NATIVE AMERICAN EDUCATIONAL SERVICES COLLEGE: MENOMINEE RESERVATION
ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE THROUGH POLLUTION PREVENTION EDUCATION PROJECT
                                                                                Grant Award:  $6,780

The Native American Educational Services (NAES) College will use  its grant funding to provide an educational
program and household hazardous waste P2 project on the Menominee Reservation in Wisconsin.  Approximately
6,000 people live on the Menominee Reservation, 4,000 of whom are Menominee.  The majority of the households
on the reservation are connected to septic tanks that are not adequate treatment systems to protect against potential
dangers associated with the disposal of hazardous household cleaning products. The project will provide
information on the basic principles of P2, the identification of household hazardous wastes, and the use of substitute
nontoxic cleaners. Participants in the project will gain first-hand experience with the use of nontoxic cleaners, public
education and community outreach, obtaining access to TRI data and other information on facilities handling
hazardous substances within their communities, and addressing the tribal government on P2 issues. Information will
be disseminated through a series of workshops.
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 UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI MEDICAL CENTER: POLLUTION PREVENTION: PROMOTING
 ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE IN LOWER PRICE HALL                       Grant Award:  $88,900

 The Lower Price Hall (LPH) neighborhood in Cincinnati, OH, is a predominantly urban Appalachian community,
 with more than half of its 1,600 member population living below poverty level. LPH is highly industrialized and is
 the location of Cincinnati's largest waste treatment facility. The objectives of this proposal are to develop a
 partnership among LPH, UC, and CHD that will empower the community to take effective action to prevent
 pollution. Specifically, the partnership will inform and educate residents about pollution, its sources, and its
 prevention in their community. Short-term and long-term plans will be formulated by LPH residents to prevent
 pollution in the home, community, and industry. Collaboration will be developed between representatives of
 industry and the municipal sewer district and residents of LPH to seek mutually acceptable pollution prevention
 options and agreements. The P2 strategy includes the following elements: community-based P2 solution, education,
 economic development, expert technical assistance, community-industry cooperation, resource development, and
 involvement with other organizations. Communication and cooperation strategies include: expand membership and
 participation in currently active citizens action groups in LPH; engage existing community institutions in P2
 education, training, and support of related activities; develop a P2 action group; and publish a monthly newsletter.

 UPPER SIOUX AND LOWER SIOUX COMMUNITIES: WIND ENERGY FEASIBILITY AND ENERGY
 EDUCATION PROJECT                                                      Grant Award:  $49,920

 Goals of this project are to complete the wind feasibility study, and allow the Lower Sioux community to move
 toward the use of wind power generated electricity and reduce reliance upon polluting methods of electrical
 generation, to develop an education program that will introduce tribal members to wind power as a viable alternative
 to current practices, and to create a model demonstrating the use of wind power on a community scale that sets an
 example for other communities in the region to follow. The 620 member Lower Sioux Indian Community is located
 in west central Minnesota and extends over an area of 1,743 acres near Morton, MN. The reservation lies within the
 Central Lowland physiographic province with 80 percent of the reservation above the Minnesota River Valley on the
 adjacent bluffs.

 WSOS COMMUNITY ACTION COMMISSION, INC.: ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE: PROTECTING
 PEOPLE THROUGH PESTICIDES POLLUTION PREVENTION                 Grant Award: $95,000

 WSOS Community Action Commission is a four-county private nonprofit agency located in Northwest OH. The
 proposed project affects the migrant and seasonal farm workers and their families. The target audience for the P2
 initiative is growers and owners of migrant labor camps.  This project is a demonstration to test the success of linking
 financial incentives for decision-makers and growers to undertake P2 activities with providing training and
 environmental information to the affected minority and lower-income populations and migrants that are impacted by
 these decisions. The goal of the project is to improve the environmental quality of life for migrant and seasonal farm
 workers and their families by voluntary methods of integrated pest management and alternatives to pesticides use.
 The objectives include:  1) establish and administer a RLF earmarked for financing equipment and/or practices for
 IPM; 2) provide information to 162 growers on IPM through the RLF outreach activities; 3) develop a model
 training program to deliver to 590 migrant and seasonal farm workers on the "Basics of Integrated pest
 Management," including information on alternatives to pesticide use and lower potential for worker exposure; and 4)
 provide migrant laborers an opportunity for input into environmental policy making in OH.

 REGION 6

 BILL J. PRIEST INSTITUTE FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT TECHNOLOGY ASSISTANCE
 CENTER: POLLUTION PREVENTION ASSISTANCE TO SMALL BUSINESS     Grant Award:  $80,000

 The Technology Assistance Center plans to target businesses within the City of Dallas. The center serves many
 minority and low-income communities. The goal of the project is to institutionalize P2 methods to improve the
 environmental quality of minority and low-income businesses in affected communities in the City of Dallas. The
 objectives include: 1) educate 200 minority-owned small businesses within the affected communities on P2; 2)
 provide  100 businesses with technical assistance on the use of P2 methods; and 3) provide one-on-one counseling to


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these businesses. Businesses located in minority communities will be targeted, including the City of Dallas
Enterprise Community. The targeted area is roughly 50 percent African American and 24 percent Hispanic and
contains more tharf 16,000 businesses employing more than 221,000 people.  Specific activities include: targeting
candidate businesses; matching the needs of businesses with feasible P2 methods; producing education seminars;
providing technical assistance and individual counseling; and tracking project performance.

GREATER LAREDO DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION: ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE THROUGH
POLLUTION PREVENTION COMMUNITY EDUCATION AND SMALL BUSINESS ASSISTANCE
                                                                               Grant Award:  $80,000

Laredo is 94 percent Mexican American, predominantly Spanish-speaking, and one of the lowest family income
cities in the U.S.  It is one of the busiest crossing points in the U.S., with roughly 15 million vehicles crossing to and
from Mexico each year. A large part of the traffic is trucking, specifically of potentially hazardous materials. The
organization estimates that at least 3,000 trade-handling workers require immediate and basic awareness and
preparedness in hazardous material handling and EPA regulations. Another 1,000 need advanced, in-depth
compliance training. The proposed program focuses on education and training of trade-handling workers and small
business operators. The proposed work plan includes: identification of all local small businesses that handle
hazardous materials; distribution of existing EPA information to identified businesses; solicitation of business
appointments of environmental manager/liaison/trainer; in-depth training of select environmental managers; training
workshop for "special focus" businesses; hazardous materials training for trade-handling workers; coordination of P2
program with private sector representation.

JEMEZ PUEBLO POLLUTION PREVENTION PROJECT: FIREPLACE INSERTS LOAN PROGRAM
                                                                               Grant Award:  $80,000

The Jemez Pueblo has documented prevalence of asthma that affects a significant  number of adults and children.
The rates of asthma for Jemez children is nearly 2.5 times the rate for African American or Anglo children. There
are three possible polluting factors that may contribute to this condition: nearby gypsum mining, possible radioactive
contamination from nearby Los Alamos National Labs, and wood smoke from the many fireplaces and wood stoves
in the pueblo itself. However, local citizens use wood as a heating source because they can afford it; the pueblo
owns forested property that can be accessed for free by tribal members. Because of the pueblo's economic
disadvantage, with more than 60 percent of the population having incomes below  current poverty guidelines, tribal
members individually cannot afford to install non-polluting heating equipment in their homes.  The proposed
program will: 1) provide education on asthma and its relationship to air pollution,  2) provide information on
alternative heating sources with an emphasis on fireplace inserts that meet EPA standards, and 3) provide grants or
subsidies to those families who wish to install a fireplace insert based on income credit.

NEW ORLEANS YOUTH ACTION CORPS: EDUCATIONAL OUTREACH POLLUTION PREVENTION
PROGRAM                                                                    Grant Award:  $80,000

The EJ issue addressed in the proposed project concerns the affect of urban stormwater runoff on low-income and
minority communities.  Urban stormwater runoff is the single largest source of pollution in Lake Pontchartrain.  The
first part of the proposed project will educate low-income and minority residents of Metropolitan New Orleans about
urban storm runoff, how it affects their lives, how they can prevent it, and how participating in the P2 process will
benefit individuals and communities. The second part of the proposed project will use the New Orleans Youth
Action Corps (NOYAC), an AmeriCorps program, to educate residents of the city about what they have to gain by
reclaiming Lake Pontchartrain as a popular swimming and recreational site and eliminating its current health risk.
There will be three parts to the project: 1) one team from NOYAC will be trained  as "Lake Ambassadors"; 2)
NOYAC will visit 10 schools located in two low-income and minority areas of metropolitan New Orleans; 3)
NOYAC will distribute educational brochures to roughly 28,000 households in the communities where the school
presentations and drain stenciling have taken place.
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PUEBLO OF POJOAQUE: ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER
                                                                             Grant Award:  $80,000

The Pueblo of Pojoaque has been central to the community of the Eight Northern Pueblos of New Mexico. Since the
resettlement of the native people on ancestral lands, Pojoaque has become the center for cultural redevelopment and
has been recognized by the Administration for Native Americans as a model of cultural revitalization. As the
population of the valley increases, it becomes increasingly important to educate people about the affect of population
changes on the environment. In order to achieve this goal, the community will establish the Pueblo of Pojoaque EJ
and Development Center. The center will be an educational facility designed specifically to address P2 in the
context of growth. The center will serve as a clearinghouse for seminars, workshops, and training in all aspects of P2
for the Indian and non-Indian communities of the area.  Some of the courses included in the curriculum are:
Infrastructure Planning Workshop, Seminar in Water System, Air Quality Monitoring Station, and Ongoing Studies.

ZION TRAVELERS BAPTIST CHURCH: ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE/POLLUTION PREVENTION
COMMUNITY PROJECT                                                    Grant Award:  $30,000

This project addresses environmental issues associated with a small minority community that is adjacent to several
major sources of air toxics and paniculate emissions. The focus of the project is  to evaluate ambient air quality in
order to identify specific air toxics and particulates that have an adverse impact on local air quality.  This project will
empower the communities of Mt. Airy, Garyville, and Lions with the capability to monitor local air quality on both a
periodic basis and during periods of accidental releases. Grant funds will be used to purchase equipment and operate
a local air monitoring station located within the community. The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality
will provide analytical support and pay for an outside third party contractor (selected by the community) who will
provide independent technical evaluations for the community. This project will supplement the existing
environmental justice activities currently in place within the community.

REGION 7

ARKANSAS INSTITUTE FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE: ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE COMMUNITY
ACCESS AND EDUCATION PROJECT                                        Grant Award:  $20,000

The Missouri Chapter of the Association of Community Organization for Reform Now (ACORN), in cooperation
with the Arkansas Institute for Social Justice (ISJ), will establish a community outreach, education, and training
project on environmental justice issues.  The overall goal of the project is to assist community leaders in lower-
income minority communities of St. Louis in obtaining information on the environmental status of their communities,
to increase community participation in decision-making and empower communities to develop community-based
pollution prevention strategies. To achieve this goal, the project will implement an outreach, education, and training
program to enable 30 community leaders to use geographic information systems (GIS) and employ the technology as
a tool to achieve environmental justice.

HASKELL INDIAN NATIONS UNIVERSITY: CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT IN POLLUTION
PREVENTION AND OUTREACH TO INDIAN COMMUNITY                   Grant Award:  $45,000

Haskell Indian Nations University was established in 1884 to serve the Native American community. This project
deals with two focus areas:  training in decision-making and problem-solving and advancement of partnerships.
Decision-making training will be implemented through four activities: 1) facilitate on-site workshops and training at
reservations or urban concentrations for selected topics; 2) provide on-site training for the measurement and
monitoring of various indications of pollution intensity; 3) provide investigative research support for tribal needs in
microbiology/toxicology; 4) develop and enhance public and private partnerships.

LINCOLN-LANCASTER COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT: EJP2 IN LINCOLN: DEFINITION,
FOCUS, AND OUTREACH                                                   Grant Award:  $39,000

Lincoln-Lancaster County Health Department (LLDHD) proposes to: 1) survey Lincoln's racial/ethnic minority
population to determine its environmental health knowledge base; 2) map, using GIS technology, potential exposure
of these populations to known contaminated sites and permitted releases; and 3) educate the affected populations,

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regulators, and permit-holders of the P2 options that they can use to reduce the affects of identified potential
exposure.  LLCHD wants to provide businesses and households with P2 educational materials that will be translated
for use in educating the population about how personal behavior affects toxic use reduction. The outreach will also
provide environmental information and educate affected populations on the availability of the information and how
to use it. Facilities will be notified of their impact on minorities and economically disadvantaged communities and
will be offered a chance to find and implement P2 in waste streams most likely to impact the environmental health of
the affected communities.

METROPOLITAN ENERGY CENTER: ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE THROUGH SUSTAINABLE
COMMUNITY PLANNING                                                   Grant Award:  $49,800

This project addresses environmental justice issues in the inner city of Kansas City through three P2 strategies: 1)
low-income home energy audits and weatherization; 2) sustainable, transit-oriented community planning; and 3)
community education. A recently conducted study shows that low-income families in Kansas City generally spend
over 29 percent of their income on utility costs, well above the national average of 20 percent for low-income
households. The vision is to empower low-income families and people of color in two selected Kansas City
neighborhoods to reduce energy consumption and resultant pollution in their communities, to develop community-
based and individual skills that will facilitate their participation in environmental and transportation planning
processes,  and to link them with other local and national EJ efforts, which can help address prevention and related
issues they face in their neighborhoods.

MISSOURI ENERGY RESOURCES PROJECT: SCHOOL ENERGY EFFICIENCY DEVELOPMENT
(SEED) PROGRAM                                                          Grant Award:  $72,000

The city of St. Louis, MO, is a predominantly African American, low-income community that currently faces several
air quality problems.  Among these problems is the potential classification of St. Louis as a serious ozone non-
attainment area.  St. Louis is also considered a non-attainment area for carbon monoxide. The Missouri Energy
Resources Project (MERP) proposes to bring its School Energy Efficiency Development (SEED) program to the St.
Louis Public School District in 1996. SEED'S approach to school district energy management combines energy
education with a professional audit of school facilities. MERP's goal is to change the way people think about and
use energy and improve the school district's energy efficiency; reduce the amount of energy consumed by the St.
Louis Public Schools; reduce the amount of money spent on energy; and prevent pollution emissions associated with
the St. Louis Public School's energy use.

NEBRASKA SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE SOCIETY: IMPACTING AGRICULTURAL POLLUTION
AND ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE IN RURAL NEBRASKA                    Grant Award:  $25,000

Rural communities in Nebraska (NE) and the Midwest shoulder many environmental problems that result from
"conventional" chemical-intensive farming and high-density livestock production. These communities are populated
by low-wage workers who lack the political and financial means to counteract pollution in their local  environments.
They are affected by agricultural pollution through exposure in the field, their food, and their water.  The NE
IMPACT project, a collaboration among farmers, community members, and NE agricultural institutions, helps
people in small local groups to educate themselves and others about P2 agricultural production methods. The goal
will be achieved through the following objectives: 1) help groups design and monitor on-farm investigation of
environmentally-sound production practices; 2) provide groups with support of educational outreach efforts such as
field days and demos; 3) provide funding and opportunities for group members to attend outside educational events
or receive publications in sustainable farming practices; 4) publicize group activities and feature P2 column in NSAS
newsletter; 5) encourage collaboration among NE's farmers/ranchers, agriculture institutions, technical advisors, and
community members in providing support for environmentally sound farming practices.

UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA—NEBRASKA BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER: PILOT PROJECT
EPA/SBA EJ FOR NEBRASKA PRINTER, A TECHNOLOGY SOLUTION        Grant Award: $75,000

This project will distribute EPA P2 and compliance information to small business printers throughout NE using
innovative computer technology to test and evaluate new methods, as well as traditional methods. It will also
provide training assistance to these printer businesses using state, federal and private resources, in support of EPA EJ

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 and P2 programs.  This project will also serve as a pilot for other follow-up projects to efficiently distribute all forms
 of EPA information to all kinds of businesses. The project will create a system that demonstrates cost-effective
 methods for training, advertising, assisting, and promoting source reduction and compliance. The North Omaha
 NBDC, a minority business incubator site, will be used to help develop and provide initial training.  North Omaha
 printers will be given hands-on instruction in the use of the Internet and the CTSAA system. The project will also
 use contract support from the North Omaha NBDC.

 WICHITA-SEDGWICK COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY HEALTH: PROGRAM
 DEVELOPMENT FOR ALLIANCE BETWEEN LARGE AND SMALL BUSINESSES FOR POLLUTION
 PREVENTION TECHNICAL EXCHANGE                                      Grant Award:  $73,000

 Small businesses often lack the staffing resources or funding to hire their own consultants to engage in pollution
 reduction, source control, or waste minimization activities. Wichita-Sedgwick County Department of Community
 health (WSCDCH) proposes to initiate a program that would educate small businesses in the latest techniques for P2
 via source reduction. To accomplish this task, WSCDCH proposes to hold seminars on P2 to communicate the
 technology, discipline, and philosophy of P2 as  the preferred approach to environmental management. In addition,
 WSCDCH intends to create an alliance program consisting of local business leaders from similar industries, public
 interest groups, and local governmental officials. WSCDCH will use the award money to staff a public educator who
 will be given the task of determining what P2 techniques are feasible for the community, holding seminars to
 promote these techniques, and creating small business alliances in which additional, more specific P2 methods will
 be delivered directly to target businesses.

 REGION 8

 DENVER URBAN GARDENS: SUSTAINABLE URBAN GARDENS — A POLLUTION PREVENTION
 DEMONSTRATION PROJECT                                                Grant Award: $25,000

 In 1994, Denver Urban Gardens (DUG), a nonprofit organization, became the sole organization responsible for
 preservation, management and planning, construction supervision, and volunteering coordination of 37 active and 12
 new community gardens and small parks in the Denver areas.  DUG makes available to low- and moderate-income
 persons an opportunity to supplement their diet by growing their own food in nearby community gardens.  The
 project proposes to address the following EJ issues: 1) detrimental presence of derelict, polluted, vacant land in the
 inner city; 2) need for healthy pesticide-free food for low-income families and children; 3) need to reduce the volume
 of yard waste in Denver's Solid Waste Stream; 4) nonexistent P2 education in schools and inner-city neighborhoods;
 and 5) need for sustainable, convenient, and nearby income generating solutions. The first part of each of the 10
 demonstration gardens will consist of a community effort to identify and clean up a polluted parcel of land.
 Secondly,  residents will turn the land into  a community garden to serve as a productive neighborhood focus for P2.

 MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY EXTENSION SERVICE: MONTANA TRIBAL POLLUTION
 PREVENTION CONSORTIUM —RESERVING A QUALITY CULTURE AND ENVIRONMENT
                                                                              Grant Award: $50,000

 There are nine Indian Tribal Nations located on  seven reservations and adjoining communities in the state of MT.
 The Tribal Nations comprise 6.2 percent of MT's population.  As independent nations, MT tribes have lacked the
 ability and resources to assess environmental issues unique to their reservations and design, implement, and evaluate
 effective strategies to prevent future environmental problems.  The consortium's project goals include: 1) coordinate
 with existing and proposed reservation EJP2 efforts; 2) bring representatives from each MT Indian reservation
 together to discuss and deal with environmental issues common and unique to the reservations through the
 implementation of reservation P2 assessment and education/training; 3) establish tribal leadership teams, from each
 reservation, to create reservation P2 programs; 4) with the  cooperation and input from each tribal leadership team,
 develop and conduct an assessment of environmental issues affecting the Native American population; 5) as a result
 of each reservation environmental issues assessment develop custom P2 education/training programs targeted to the
 affected audience, stakeholders, and reservation leadership; and 6) serve as a model program for other states with
 Native American reservations.
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NORTHWESTERN BAND OF THE SHOSHONI NATION: ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE THROUGH
POLLUTION PREVENTION EDUCATION TRAINING                          Grant Award:  $50,000

The purpose of this application is to develop, on behalf of all 89 tribes located within the borders of the State of UT
and through a cooperative effort, a comprehensive strategy to assist the tribal governments in identifying
environmental concerns and P2 processes to address these concerns within their own communities. The program
will be structured to educate and train tribal leaders and program managers in P2 processes to manage their own
environmental concerns.  The grant will also discuss how the tribes could join forces and collectively establish an
environmental office. This office would assist in the efforts to address mutual concerns and individual tribal
concerns, as well in seeking funding to aid in the development of specific strategies related to environmental
protection.  Other efforts included in this grant include: identifying what tribal regulations/ordinances currently exist
for each tribe and what steps need to be taken toward the development and/or enhancement of environmental
protection that include P2; how the regulations/ordinances are currently being enforced, and/or can these
enforcement techniques be improved, or should a stronger cooperative effort between tribes, EPA, the state and local
governments be developed; what are the tribal capabilities to respond to environmental emergencies, and/or what are
the tribes' needs to accomplish this type of objective?

SINTE GLESKA UNIVERSITY: A TRAINING AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT IN
ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE                                                 Grant Award:  $50,000

Many people on the Rosebud reservation live in houses that are full of hazardous materials. Sinte Gleska University
(SGU), also on the reservation, is implementing an "Energy and Technology Policy." SOU has also begun to
develop a "Sustainable Construction" component for the SGU Vocational Education Degree Building Trades
Program. The focus  is to teach SGU students how to best work with sustainable design, materials, and construction
techniques using the tribe's locally available and natural resources to construct culturally appropriate nontoxic
buildings.  To achieve this goal, SGU will:  1) provide continuing education for SGU instructors; 2) teach SGU staff
and students the need to learn how to do cost-benefit analysis for changing the existing university lighting system to
the most energy-efficient lighting available; 3) teach youths how to design and build their own culturally appropriate,
nontoxic buildings, using primarily tribal resources.

PINE RIDGE INDIAN RESERVATION: SLIM BUTTES COMMUNITY YOUTH AGRICULTURE
DEVELOPMENT PROJECT: RUNNING STRONG FOR AMERICAN INDIAN YOUTH
                                                                              Grant Award:  $25,000

The Slim Buttes Community Agricultural Development Project addresses P2 in agriculture through a demonstration
program and training activities promoting organic gardening and sustainable agriculture. Through organic gardening
workshops and gardening assistance provided to family and community gardening cooperatives, integrated pest
management and alternatives to the use of pesticides is demonstrated. The Slim Buttes Project provides small-scale
organic community farming cooperatives with agricultural technical assistance, equipment, supplies, seeds, and
seedlings.  Small-scale community farming allows families and neighbors the opportunity to work cooperatively and
provide a means of self-sufficiency and self-worth. All gardens in the programs are  completely organic.  Running
Strong for American  Indian Youth is dedicated to helping Native Americans solve Native American problems
through long-term, self-sufficiency programs. The Slim Buttes Project  is designed to raise the standard of living and
the self-esteem of the Ogalala Lakota on the Pine Ridge Reservation. Through organic gardening workshops, field
demonstrations, and "train-the-trainer" workshops, the Slim Buttes Community Agriculture Project can be easily
replicated on other reservations in SD and neighboring states.

SHOSHONE & NORTHERN ARAPAHO TRIBES: POPULATION PROTECTION THROUGH
POLLUTION PREVENTION                                                  Grant Award:  $40,000

The goal of this project is to reduce the exposure of tribal members to potentially toxic chemicals through a
combination of efforts aimed at education, access to information, planning for pollution prevention, elimination of
hazardous materials from individual homes, and a preliminary assessment of epidemiological conditions on the
reservation. This project will focus on education and training of tribal government employees, education of the
population at large, and education of individuals routinely involved in the handling and application of hazardous
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materials. Products include a needs assessment, a computerized epidemiological database, and a mapping of ground
water vulnerability through GIS.

TRI-COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT: ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE THROUGH POLLUTION
PREVENTION EDUCATION AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE                  Grant Award:  $30,000

Southwestern Adams County includes Commerce City and the northern part of the city of Aurora. It is surrounded
by five National Priority List Sites, including Rocky Mountain Arsenal. It is a heavily industrialized area with many
manufacturing and transportation-based companies, including large trucking firms, oil refineries, and flour mills.
This presence has a significant impact on the communities of Commerce City and north Aurora, which are
economically disadvantaged areas with significant minority populations and a high proportion of people living in
poverty.  Commerce City and north Aurora residents are at risk of exposure to toxic pollutants because of the heavy
concentration of large and small industry in these areas. At the same time, these communities are home to many low-
income individuals as well as people of color. To reduce VOC emissions from businesses such as auto maintenance
facilities, print shops, dry cleaners, and others, P2 strategies are imperative. Therefore, as part of its comprehensive
air quality program, Tri-County Health Department plans to work closely with these businesses to provide education
and technical assistance on proven methods for reducing and/or preventing VOC emissions into ambient air.

TURTLE MOUNTAIN BAND OF CHIPPEWA INDIAN TRIBES: POLLUTION PREVENTION
COMMUNITY EDUCATION AND INVOLVEMENT PROJECT                  Grant Award: $25,000

The Turtle Mountain Chippewa Reservation is located in north central ND. Most of the reservation is wooded, and
supports an economy of agriculture, livestock, various businesses, tribal and federal agencies, hospitals, and the
Turtle Mountain Manufacturing Company (TMMC).  The reservation is located in Rolette County, ranked as the
11th poorest county in the U.S. TMMC is the major employer and is an industrial facility that manufactures trailers
for the Department of the Army. Large amounts of paint, solvents, acids, chemicals, and other hazardous wastes are
utilized at this facility.  In  1988, EPA began enforcement action at a TMMC for violating the RCRA requirement
regarding handling of hazardous and solid wastes.  The tribe's sole source of reliable drinking water lies below
agricultural croplands and is adjacent to the reservation. This aquifer is subject to the effects of fertilizers and
pesticide use. The grant project will develop an intensive series of educational and informational meetings designed
to inform tribal members and residents of the importance of implementing and enforcing environmental policies and
codes. A P2 coordinator, in conjunction with the Tribal Environmental Coordinators Office, will institute P2
training and awareness mechanisms, including regular and frequent meetings with tribal elder groups, community
colleges, local schools, tribal programs, federal and state agencies, and the local business community.  Community
members will receive informational material, and an environmental  steering group composed of stakeholders will be
educated on major environmental laws and other opportunities.

TURTLE MOUNTAIN RESERVATION OF NORTH DAKOTA & WRITAR: SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
DEVELOPMENT: POLLUTION PREVENTION IN MANUFACTURED HOUSING Grant Award:  $50,000

The disproportionately high use of manufactured housing by Native Americans leads to long-term human exposure
to well-documented indoor air quality hazards existing in manufactured homes. Current manufactured housing
design does not integrate environmental considerations such as material selection, use, and application. Further,
while representing a significant portion of housing units for Native Americans, existing manufactured housing is not
responsive to the needs of Native Americans. This project will: 1) foster provision of affordable, healthy, resource-
efficient housing by a locally based industry; 2) complete a Design for the Environment (DfE) on manufactured
homes by developing a manufactured housing design utilizing materials and methods that minimize the use of natural
resources in the manufacturing process, as well as in the use and maintenance of these homes; 3) identify and
integrate specific environmental and cultural needs of Native Americans into this DfE for manufactured homes; 4)
create a business plan for Turtle Mountain Manufacturing Company that addresses economic injustices by
strengthening the economic base of this reservation through the fabrication of sustainable, manufactured housing to
serve the local population.
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REGION 9

CITY OF NOGALES, AZ: USE OF POLLUTION PREVENTION TO ADDRESS ENVIRONMENTAL
JUSTICE ISSUES                                                               Grant Award:  $86,250

More than 90 percent of the City of Nogales' population is of Hispanic origin. In addition, slightly more than 30
percent of the city's total population lives below the poverty level.  Nogales' historical economic base has relied
heavily on the industrial sector, notably under the auspices of the maquiladora program, which has attracted
significant industrial operations to Ambos Nogales. The proposed project would utilize a combination of public
participation and direct assistance to industry in order to increase the use of P2 techniques throughout the
community.  The public participation activities are designed to provide Nogales' residents with various tangible
means of advocating the use of P2 and the ability to nominate specific facilities to receive a high priority for
inclusion and evaluation in the technical assistance portion of the project. Direct technical assistance of industry
would focus  primarily on evaluating opportunities for P2 and assisting industries in implementing P2 practices,
including developing a prioritization plan for which facilities would be addressed first, conducting workshops and
facility-specific evaluations of P2 opportunities, implementing a system to measure progress in terms of the
reduction in chemicals and/or resources used, and the evaluation and establishment of a means to help facilities
finance P2 techniques.

INSTITUTE FOR RESEARCH AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE: REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE
CLEANING—REDUCING THE OVERALL HUMAN HEALTH  AND ENVIRONMENTAL RISK
                                                                                Grant Award:  $96,750

Auto repair facilities in the Los Angeles inner city area use parts cleaning units to remove oil, grease, and other soils
from automotive parts, accessories, tools, and other equipment. Generally, the parts cleaning equipment uses
mineral spirits containing aromatic fractions that include chemicals classified as air toxics that cause cancer and birth
defects.  The workers in the auto repair facilities, many of whom are people of color, are exposed to the solvents.
The community surrounding the facilities, which has a significant representation of low-income and/or people of
color, is also exposed to the solvents.  The proposed project would be  conducted with the collaboration of several
organizations with P2 programs  and would involve a demonstration to determine the technical and regulatory
feasibility and the cost of substituting water-based cleaning formulations for the toxic mineral spirits used today. At
least 20 auto repair facilities of various types would be selected as participants in the project with the assistance of
the local trade organization.  Equipment manufacturers and water cleaner formulators have agreed to donate cleaning
units and formulations for the demonstration and testing.  A study will be conducted to evaluate the toxicity of the
water-based solvent, and the results of the study will be disseminated at a conference for auto repair shops.  If water
conversion appears desirable, a simple pamphlet for accomplishing the substitution will be prepared and distributed
to auto repair facilities and their trade organizations. A P2 Best Management Practices brochure will also be
distributed to increase P2 awareness.

PIMA COUNTY, AZ: ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE THROUGH TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE IN
POLLUTION PREVENTION, SOURCE REDUCTION, AND HANDLING OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS
IN SOUTH  TUCSON                                                            Grant Award:  $72,000

The City of South Tucson, located on the south side of the metropolitan area and completely surrounded by the City
of Tucson, has a population of 5,465.  Minorities comprise approximately 93 percent of the City of South Tucson's
population. The primary health concerns in the city have been the contamination of ground water and air pollution;
over the last decade, the city has faced a disproportionate share of health problems arising from ground water
contamination. This project is designed to affect the manner in which chemical products are used, stored, and
disposed of by small business and homeowners. The proposal defines a plan to reach out to the small businesses and
retailers of hazardous materials in the city in order to provide them with technical assistance about P2 techniques and
practices.  The tasks will include: 1) survey of businesses; 2) needs assessment and action plan; 3) site visits and
evaluation; 4) education/information material development; 5) amnesty month; 6) ongoing contact; 7) retailer
contact, education, and material development;  8) advisory board; 9) project evaluation; 10) adapting the prototype
project in South Tucson to other communities in Region 9.
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RESOURCE POLICY INSTITUTE: EMERGING LEADERS TRAINING PROGRAM
                                                                              Grant Award:  $50,000

A training and technical assistance program is proposed to develop and strengthen community leaders with
capabilities for applying P2 solutions to EJ issues. The program will entail: 1) direct training; 2) practice P2
assessment; 3) development of training module for use by trainees and others for furthering understanding and action
in this critical field. The project will: 1) train community leaders in conducting a community-based P2 program; 2)
partner trainees with experienced P2 engineers associated with the City of Los Angeles' Hazardous Waste Reduction
Assistance Program to perform P2 opportunity assessments at both large and small businesses within the community;
3) measure P2 and the cost savings that resulted from recommendations offered during the assessments; and 4)
develop a EJP2 community leader training module.

SOUTH BAYSHORE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, INC.: BAYVIEW/HUNTER
POINT PILOT COMPOSTING PROJECT                                      Grant Award:  $95,000

The South Bayshore Development Corporation (SBCDC) proposes to develop a community-owned and operated
composting operation, Bayview Compost, at the Hunter Point Naval Shipyard.  The facility will compost plant
trimming and food material into soil amendments for use by local greening and gardening projects and for sale to
landscapers and topsoil dealers.  The Bayview/Hunter Point area is a predominantly African American community
that has experienced a long history of industrial pollution. The Naval Shipyard is now a Superfund site yet to be
remediated.  The project provides a community-based solution to recover the environmental integrity  of the area, to
improve the quality of life, and to bring about renewed economic vitality through: 1) developing a community-based
business that is an environmentally friendly alternative to the existing and proposed industrial facilities in the Hunter
Point/Bayview area; 2) generating public involvement and empowerment through local training and outreach; 3)
providing economic opportunities for local residents via creating jobs at the compost operation and its associated
community programs.

REGION 10

AMERICAN LUNG  ASSOCIATION: PARTNERSHIP FOR ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE—ASTHMA
IMPACTED ENVIRONMENTS AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY                   Grant Award:  $25,000

The goal of this project is to facilitate the current efforts of the Community Coalition for EJ (CCEJ) to strengthen
and build a community coalition whose mission is to identify and eliminate EJ and to advocate and create EJ.  The
specific focus of the work will be to utilize a partnership opportunity to address the excessively high rate of asthma
among residents of Central Seattle and portions of Southeastern Seattle known as Rainier Valley.  Both urban
neighborhoods have large proportions of minorities and below standard living conditions.  The primary activity will
be to mobilize and train volunteers to provide indoor air quality assessments to a number of households, with
recommendations for source removal and further exposure to contaminants, as well as to provide information and
education to persons identifying themselves as suffering from asthma. The plan for the project includes: 1)
developing a relationship with the community; 2) identifying neighborhood concerns; 3) conducting individual
outreach; 4) developing mechanisms for ongoing involvement; 5) securing and training core volunteers; and 6)
providing community  education.

CASCADIA REVOLVING FUND: MINORITY POLLUTION PREVENTION LENDING PROJECT
                                                                              Grant Award:  $75,000

In the Northwest, the Cascade Revolving Fund (the fund) is a community development financial institution (CDFI), a
nonprofit community development loan fund, that lends money to low-income entrepreneurs who cannot obtain
funding from traditional sources. Over the last several years, a number of small businesses have described their
inability to find financing to implement pollution source reduction strategies. Minority-owned small businesses have
additional problems in finding financing for this purpose. In response, the fund has developed a P2 Lending
Program (P2), which will encourage the adoption of P2 strategies by small businesses by removing barriers created
by the lack of financing and fear of technology. The fund will provide both loans and technical assistance to
implement source reduction strategies. Under the program, the fund has made two loans to date, one to a minority-


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owned dry cleaner and one to a machine shop. The project will target minority-owned small companies that release
pollutants to air, land and/or water or that generate waste. The loans funded will be for the "Highest and Best" P2
uses and not for non-P2, or end-of-pipe activities. Loans will not be limited exclusively to fixed assets acquisition
but may include funding for training programs as well.  The borrowers will act as demonstration sites, so certain
intangible qualities such as willingness to be a demonstration site are important. Potential target industries include:
dry cleaners, printers, machine shops, auto body repair shops, photofinishers, ship repair yards, and metal bearing
waste generators.

CITY OF PILOT POINT: PILOT POINT ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE THROUGH POLLUTION
PREVENTION PROJECT                                                      Grant Award:  $49,737

Pilot Point, AK, is a predominantly Native American community, isolated from access to the state's road system by
extreme terrain conditions and climates.  While the community has made progress with sewer, water, and electricity
projects for the base population, the impact of the increased summer population continually creates additional health
problems that over-burden the limited resources of the community to be able to develop and implement P2 strategies
effectively.  The community believes that it can work toward accomplishing its goal with assistance from the grant
program, which will help the community develop an Environmental Services Coordinator administrative position.
The coordinator will: 1) identify pollution concerns and develop prevention strategies, such as raising awareness of
issues through public education; 2) identify industrial pollution problems and develop prevention action plans; 3)
work with construction project designers to limit potential environmental damage; and 4) network with other
regional communities and EPA on environmental P2  concerns via conference travel and computer.

PAINTING  INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIP: THE PAINTING INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIP'S PROGRAM TO
INTEGRATE POLLUTION PREVENTION INTO PUBLIC HOUSING PAINTING JOBS AND
COMMUNITIES                                                               Grant Award:  $50,000

This program will address pollution problems created by the use of paint and solvents by public housing authorities
and their contractors during facility maintenance, renovation, and modernization. Community education for public
housing tenants, worker training and technical assistance to tenant councils, and small painting contractors and
public housing authorities about methods of P2 for painting will be integrated into existing programs designed to
provide jobs, training, and other work opportunities to public housing residents. Two affected communities will be
involved in the program:  1) tenants of public housing, which are low-income communities generally composed of a
disproportionate number of people of color and women; and 2) painters working for small business paint contractors,
who work for housing authorities.  The program consists of: 1) developing a 4-hour P2 in painting class for painters;
2) conducting a 16-hour "train-the-trainer" class for 10 instructors from Washington and Oregon on the 4-hour P2
class; 3) having trainers conduct 20 classes for 200 painters  in Seattle, Tacoma, and Portland; 4) conducting 20
public education sessions for public housing residents, tenant councils, and housing authority staff in Seattle,
Tacoma, and Portland; 5) providing technical assistance with P2 to  public housing residents, tenant councils, housing
authority staff, paint contractors, and workers throughout the Northwest; and 6) distributing program educational
materials, questionnaires, and evaluation instruments to assess program success.

SEA MAR COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER: COMMUNITY EDUCATION ON ENERGY
CONSERVATION, SOLID WASTE REDUCTION, AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY  Grant Award:  $25,000

Sea Mar Community Health Center is a nonprofit organization with more than 17 years of experience in providing a
multitude of health and social services to low-income populations, with an emphasis on the Hispanic, migrant and
seasonal farmers, homeless, and the isolated rural poor. The agency has facilities throughout Western WA. The
proposed project will provide community education through a number of avenues, beginning with its current
customer base of low-income and minority populations.  The training will include instruction for energy
conservation, solid waste reduction, indoor air quality and field experience in conducting workshops for consumers.
Nine to ten workshops will be held, with approximately 56 staff members receiving training. From the training, Sea
Mar will implement and provide the following program components to low-income and minority clientele: 1) initial
and follow-up home visits to provide client education, evaluation, and both pre- and post- testing; 2) client
workshops—pretesting at workshops with phone/home visits for post evaluation; 3) one-on-one client education
using existing Energy Assistance Program staff to provide services  to approximately 200 low-income clientele, many
of whom are living in subsidized housing projects and are people of color; 4) conduct large mail-out of over 4000

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clients three times per year; 5) bilingual articles, brochures, and flyers to educate community; 6) organization-wide
policy development on solid-waste reduction, energy conservation, targeting more than 520 employees and enabling
the Agency to set an example for other agencies as well as clients; and 7) detailed written evaluation of the program
and its success and/or failure.

SPOKANE TRIBE OF INDIANS: INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT AND USE OF BIOLOGICAL
PEST CONTROLS                                                             Grant Award:  $25,000

The Spokane  Indian Reservation faces a large and growing problem with noxious weeds on its 157,000 acres of
range land. Unable to afford an integrated pest management plan, the community has approached the problem by
using whatever funds are made available by the BIA to purchase chemicals and spray infested areas of land. This
budget-driven approach to pesticide use threatens the health of the tribe and its land. To address this issue, the
following project proposes to use EJP2 funds to develop an integrated pest management strategy to allow the tribe to
examine pest  control in a comprehensive way and to integrate pest control with other resource management goals.
Grant funds will allow the tribe to apply pesticides on the basis of need, as assessed in a survey of reservation pest
problems. Funding also will support the tribe's efforts to convert from chemical pesticides to biological pest controls
and train tribal members to assess pollution issues connected with pesticide applications. A coordinator will be hired
to help the tribal community develop and implement the project.

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN IOWA: MOBILE OUTREACH FOR POLLUTION PREVENTION
IDAHO TOUR                                                                 Grant Award:  $70,743

Small rural communities and tribal businesses face many barriers to implementation of P2. In rural locations,
hazardous waste management service providers are few and provide infrequent pickup of wastes, thereby driving up
the cost of proper waste management. Frequently, businesses  and tribal environmental attitudes are compatible with
P2 thinking, but sources of education and how-to information  are lacking. The Mobile Outreach for P2 (MOPP) has
been developed specifically to provide on-site assistance and learning experience for those who are least likely to
receive this type of help—poor rural communities and Native American tribes. The primary goal of MOPP is to
activate positive change in management of vehicle maintenance wastes in rural ID and on tribal lands.  To attain this
goal, five objectives have been identified: 1) determine the needs and local resources of the state of ID to enable
selection of demonstration sites; 2) tailor the MOPP project to specific ID small business needs in vehicle
maintenance,  auto body paint/repair and related industries; 3) work with ID partners to establish the proven system in
ID; 4) provide an educational experience that will lead to a significant change in environmental awareness and waste
management behavior by businesses in the target area; 5) build working relationships and make essential contacts
with native American tribes so that future MOPP projects can  be tailored to better meet  their needs.

URBAN LEAGUE OF PORTLAND: ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE THROUGH  POLLUTION
PREVENTION COMMUNITY EDUCATION PROGRAM                        Grant Award:  $79,155

Portland's legacy of EJ is similar to other American cities: the  region's major sources of air, water, noise, and solid
waste pollution are all in close proximity to residential areas that have high percentage of low-income people and
minorities.  Today, the North/Northeast area  is home to more toxic cleanup sites than any other region. Cleanup sites
include the  Gould Batteries Superfund site, the McCormick & Baxter Superfund site, the Rhone Poulenc Site, and
the closed St.  John's Landfill, the region's largest landfill that has leached toxic substances into the nearby Smith and
Bybee Lakes. The goal of the program is to educate and empower residents of North/Northeast Portland to become
effective advocates for the environmental health of their communities and to adopt personal behaviors that will
reduce pollution levels in their communities. The program objectives include: 1) teaching residents to adopt
behaviors that will help reduce the level of pollution they generate; 2) educate residents about the environmental
history of their community and the costs associated with pollution; 3) train residents to effectively monitor and
participate in  public decisions about land uses that can create pollution in their community; and 4) develop public
education methods and materials that can be  easily replicated in other communities.
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SUMMARY OF PREVIOUS GRANT AWARDS FOR FISCAL YEAR 1996

REGION 1

CONSERVATION LAW FOUNDATION: PUBLIC EDUCATION PROJECT        Grant Award: $77,791

The Conservation Law Foundation, in cooperation with two grassroots organizations in Boston, proposes to carry out
a public education project aimed at helping people of color and low-income people reduce the environmental
impacts of transportation in urban neighborhoods. The project will have four components: 1) publication of a guide
to transportation and environmental justice issues; 2) development and distribution of training and workshop
materials that grassroots groups can use in conjunction with the guide; 3) implementation of educational programs in
Roxbury, which will provide a model of how to carry out education and outreach on this subject; and 4) an outreach
program in Boston and other cities.

REGION!

NATURAL RESOURCES DEFENSE COUNCIL: NORTHERN MANHATTAN ENVIRONMENTAL
JUSTICE THROUGH POLLUTION PREVENTION CAMPAIGN                 Grant Award: $200,000

Northern Manhattan communities are disproportionately impacted by excess levels of airborne particulate matter and
toxins from multiple sources.  This proposal will address air pollution  from buses and trucks, air pollution and
improper waste disposal by dry cleaning operations, the lack of accurate commercial and industrial sites information,
and keeping brownfields clean through pollution prevention.  The proposal includes four program initiatives: 1)
Uptown Diesel Bus Initiative; 2) Dry Cleaning Initiative; 3) Commercial and Industrial Sites Audit, and 4) Keeping
Brownfields Clean Initiative.

REGIONS

DELAWARE VALLEY CITIZENS' COUNCIL FOR CLEAN AIR: PEER OUTREACH TEAM PROGRAM
ON COMMUNITY WASTE REDUCTION                                      Grant Award: $195,090

In the city of Philadelphia, minority and low-income communities such as Mount Airy and Germantown continue to
bear the brunt of the consequences of waste disposal activities. Throughout Philadelphia, poor and minority
neighborhoods host a disproportionately large share of transfer stations, truck traffic, and disposal facilities,
contributing to a lower quality of life and a threat to public health. This project, the Waste Reduction Network
program, will help experienced business operators, community groups, office workers, and others to spread the
success of their waste reduction pilot programs to similar audiences within the communities of color in Philadelphia.

REGION 4

UNIVERSITY OF LOUISVILLE: ADDRESSING COMMUNITY CONCERNS     Grant Award: $208,322

The West End of Jefferson County, Kentucky, is a low-income community whose citizens have long raised concerns
about the environment and threats to public health. The focus of this concern lies with some large chemical plants
located adjacent to the community. This proposal brings together major stakeholders in the area to develop and
implement strategies using pollution prevention principles to address community environmental concerns. The
University of Louisville will provide a neutral forum for stakeholders  to develop environmental improvement
strategies. The university also will bring the needed expertise to the community to incorporate pollution prevention
as the preferred strategy of addressing environmental problems.
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REGIONS

CITIZENS FOR A BETTER ENVIRONMENT: COMMUNITY POLLUTION PREVENTION
                                                                               Grant Award: $148,987

Citizens for a Better Environment (CBE), a regional nonprofit organization, plans to use the grant funding to provide
much-needed technical and financial support to local grassroots organizations as they work to foster pollution
prevention in their communities in Chicago, Milwaukee, and Minneapolis. All of the neighborhoods CBE will be
focusing on are communities of color, with the majority of their residents living in low-income households. The
project activities will include: providing technical assistance to at least two local organizations in Southeast Chicago
to establish good neighbor dialogues with local businesses; working with four partners to foster model pollution
prevention efforts among auto repair and metal fabricating businesses on Milwaukee's near south side; and working
with the Hawthorne community of Minneapolis, a low-income neighborhood, to engage in permit monitoring of
neighborhood facilities and the establishment of good neighbor dialogues between residents and businesses.

REGION 6

NATIONAL CENTER FOR APPROPRIATE TECHNOLOGY: EDUCATING THE COMMUNITY
                                                                               Grant Award: $236,442

This project targets Hispanic-American farmers and rural communities in the Texas  Panhandle who often suffer from
disproportionate exposure to pesticides. The project is designed to increase access to and use of practical technical
information on integrated pest management and other sustainable agriculture practices, available in written and
spoken Spanish. Learning and practice methods will include: farm demonstrations, workshops, and farmer-to-farmer
exchanges about successful production and marketing methods.

REGION 7

METROPOLITAN ENERGY CENTER: COMMUNITY PLANNING PROJECT     Grant Award: $213,760

The Metropolitan Energy Center has developed and coordinated a neighborhood-based approach to sustainable
community planning, developing a comprehensive process that engages community  residents in developing and
defining a sustainable community plan for their area.  This project proposes to work with a community located in the
Kansas City Empowerment Zone to develop an environmentally sound, sustainable community planning process that
will incorporate three levels of service, including: 1) direct pollution prevention activities; 2) sustainable community
planning and environmental mapping of the area; and 3) the development and implementation of a plan in the
community that will lead to long-term changes, resulting in a sustainable community.

REGIONS

NORTHEAST DENVER HOUSING CENTER, INC.: COMMUNITY EDUCATION  Grant Award: $250,000

The Northeast Denver Housing Center is a nonprofit agency that provides affordable housing, family assistance,
support services, and neighborhood economic development for minority communities in the city of Denver. The
center is proposing a project to add energy efficiency and sustainable design principles to a new low-income housing
project in Denver, Colorado. The project will demonstrate economically viable, sustainable design principles for
low-income housing, provide job skills training to low-income and minority people in an area of pollution
prevention, and provide safe, efficient, and affordable housing for low-income minorities and American Indians.
The experience gamed from this project will then be applied to housing projects that the center already owns, and
has planned for future development.
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REGION 9

KOREAN YOUTH & COMMUNITY CENTER, INC.: HEALTHY ALTERNATIVE TO
PERCHLOROETHYLENE (HAPP)                                            Grant Award: $100,000

The Korean Youth & Community Center is partnering with the UCLA Pollution Prevention Education and Research
Center and Clean by Nature (Southern California's first 100 percent wet cleaning shop). The center proposes to
develop a wet cleaning outreach and education program targeted at Korean-American dry cleaners who make up
close to 70 percent of the industry in the greater Los Angeles area, and roughly 60 percent of the industry
nationwide. This outreach and education program presents an innovative public-private partnership joining a private
entrepreneur, a major university, and a community-based organization in a collaborative effort to advance to state-of-
the-art environmental technology in the garment care industry. This technology will not only sustain these dry
cleaners' businesses, but the environments that surround them as well.

REGION 10

TULALIP TRIBES OF WASHINGTON: MODEL TRIBAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (TEPA)
PROJECT                                                                  Grant Award: $196,614

Under current conditions, economic development on and near Indian Reservations is resulting in short-term
economic gain at the expense of the reservation environment and culture.  This project will help tribes to balance the
competing demands of economic development and environmental protection, involve the community in this effort,
and encourage sustainable development through a focus on pollution prevention. The proposed project will result in:
1) the development of a model Tribal Environmental Policy Act (TEPA) that tribes can use to review development
proposals, 2) a pollution prevention reference chart for tribes to use in conjunction with their TEPA and NEPA
activities, and 3) a training curriculum to enhance tribal understanding of and effectiveness in the Federal NEPA
process.

NATIONAL

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT LOAN FUNDS:  POLLUTION
PREVENTION DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM                                Grant Award: $250,000

The National Association of Community Development Loan Funds (NACDLF) represents 46 private, nonprofit
community development financial institutions that provide credit, capital, and technical assistance to support the
revitalization of low-income rural, urban, and reservation-based communities across the United States. The
Association's Pollution Prevention Demonstration Program is designed to educate members to help small businesses
in low-income communities become more environmentally responsible. Specifically, NACDLF will provide the
following: 1) general training for all its members on how to improve an environmental justice finance program, 2)
seed capital awards to three members, and 3) customized training for those members receiving seed capital.
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SUMMARY OF PREVIOUS GRANT AWARDS FOR FISCAL YEAR 1997

REGION 1

ANDROSCOGGIN VALLEY COUNCIL OF GOVERNMENTS: AUTO REPAIR POLLUTION PREVENTION
CURRICULUM FOR VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS                                Grant Award: $ 93,161

The Androscoggin Valley Council of Governments is a regional planning and economic development agency that has
teamed with three local organizations to promote pollution prevention in economically disadvantaged communities.
The three partner organizations are the Oxford County Soil and Water Conservation District, the Oxford Hill Technical
School, and the Northeast Waste Management Officials' Association. The program will develop a model for outreach
in rural, low-income areas. This model will create access to pollution prevention information for very small businesses
and "do-it-yourself-ers."  It will include a pollution prevention curriculum for students in high school auto repair
programs as well as adult education programs, and outreach campaigns for do-it-yourself-ers and auto repair facilities.

COMMUNITY ACTION AGENCY OF SOMERVILLE: ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE THROUGH PEER
LEADERSHIP PROGRAM FOR HAITIAN LATINO YOUTH                    Grant Award: $ 46,839

The Community Action Agency of Somerville (CAAS) is a private, nonprofit agency.  Incorporated in 1981, CAAS's
goal is to represent low-income, culturally diverse, and  economically disadvantaged communities in the city of
Somerville.  The CAAS will teach pollution prevention skills to Haitian and Latino youth, who in turn, will work within
low-income, immigrant neighborhoods in Somerville.

NEIGHBORHOODS AGAINST URBAN POLLUTION: ALTERNATIVES  FOR COMMUNITIES AND
ENVIRONMENT                                                           Grant Award: $100,000

Neighborhood Against Urban Pollution (NAUP) is a coalition of organizations in Boston, MA that have joined forces
to address the environmental and public health threats in the minority and low-income neighborhoods of Boston and
surrounding communities. The project will promote and implement a pollution prevention campaign that involves;
promoting pollution prevention in public housing demonstration projects; promoting pollution prevention and total cost
assessment for local small business; conducting the Urban Transportation Pollution Prevention Awareness Project; and
conducting the Pollution Prevention Education Module.

TELLUS  INSTITUTE:  EMPOWERING  INCINERATOR HOST  COMMUNITIES  TO  ADVANCE
POLLUTION PREVENTION IN THE MERRIMACK VALLEY                  Grant Award: $100,000

Tellus Institute is an environmental research and consulting organization founded in 1976. The project will reduce the
burden of environmental injustice in the Merrimack Valley by involving citizens in the integrating pollution prevention
into incinerator emissions management.  Some of the actions Tellus will implement to meet this objective include:
establishing an inter-community incinerator workgroup, developing an integrated pollution prevention plan, and
developing good neighbor agreements.

REGION 2

HARLEM  ENVIRONMENTAL  IMPACT PROJECT, INC.: HARLEM ENVIRONMENTAL  IMPACT
PROGRAM                                                                 Grant Award: $ 30,000

The Harlem Environmental Impact Project will establish the Harlem Pollution Prevention Council. This council will
then enlist the services of residents, public officials, community planning boards, Harlem businesses, the Uptown
Chamber of Commerce, and other Harlem based non-profits to address pollution prevention issues. Their program,
which centers on community-based involvement and awareness will: increase access to pollution prevention information
by creating the Harlem Environmental Justice web site; provide a full series of environmental justice workshops to train
grass-roots community leaders so they may effectively train their peers; produce a series of local public access cable
TV broadcasts on the Manhattan Neighborhood Network, in conjunction with the Harlem Media Center, on pollution

Appendix F                                                                           Page F-23

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prevention; publish and distribute self-help informational brochures and newsletters, in English and Spanish, for Harlem
residents and the business community on pollution prevention issues.

COUNCIL  ON THE  ENVIRONMENT, INC.:  GREENPOINTAVILLIAMSBURG  ENVIRONMENTAL
EDUCATION PROJECT                                                      Grant Award: $ 99,997

The Greenpoint Williamsburg Environmental Education project focuses on intermediate and high school students in
this heavily-polluted community.  The goal of the project is to increase the awareness of environmental issues and
develop the capacity of young people to take action to resolve environmental problems.  The council will involve
students in weekly classes in which they will take real action leading to pollution prevention. Students will be involved
in a variety of issues that the council has identified in dialogues with community groups.

HAUDENOSUANEE  ENVIRONMENTAL  TASK  FORCE:  THE  HAUDENOSUANEE  OHENTEN
KARIHWATEHKWEN: AN INDIGENOUS STRATEGY FOR LONG TERM POLLUTION PREVENTION
                                                                            Grant Award: $100,000

The Haudenosaunee Environmental Task Force (HETF) was founded to address the environmental concerns of the
Iroquois Confederacy; to prevent future pollution problems; and to develop restoration plans to sustain the indigenous
people, their culture, and the natural world for future generations. The proposed funding will allow HETF to function
more efficiently as a clearinghouse for the exchange and dissemination of environmental information; to complete the
design of community education pollution prevention programs that combine traditional environmental knowledge with
scientific and technical information; and coordinate a conference that will bring together experts and the community
to discuss environmental laws, pollution prevention, and Haudenosaunee culture.

INCORPORATED RABANAL SMALL FARMERS: RABANAL ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE THROUGH
POLLUTION PREVENTION PUBLIC EDUCATION PROGRAM                  Grant Award $ 44,100

The goal of the project is to address wide spread use of toxic pesticides in the Rabanal community, a mostly agricultural
community hi Puerto Rico. The project will utilize a pollution prevention approach based on public educational and
training activities. The goal of the project is to institutionalize sustainable agriculture practices, such as integrated pest
management and maximum reduction of pesticides use.  Sustainable agricultural practices will be developed and
implemented through field demonstration activities. Documentation and quantification of the results of this pollution
prevention project will be kept and shared with other communities.

NEW JERSEY COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION: PATERSON POLLUTION PREVENTION
PROGRAM                                                                  Grant Award: $ 66,903

The New Jersey Community Development Corporation (NJCDC) is a non-profit community development and social
service agency located in Paterson, New Jersey. In collaboration with local partners,  NJCDC has designed the Paterson
Pollution Prevention Program. NJCDC and its program partners are committed to an outcome-oriented model that will
promote environmental justice in Paterson through a broad array of pollution prevention activities. The overarching
objective of the program is to plan, design, and carry out community education activities to introduce and familiarize
residents and businesses in Paterson with general pollution prevention concepts, and, in particular, to demonstrate how
pollution prevention relates to the construction industry.

REGION 3

ELIZABETH  RIVER  PROJECT: MOTIVATING BUSINESSES  TO ACHIEVE A CLEANER RIVER
POLLUTION PREVENTION PROJECT                                         Grant Award: $82,422

The Elizabeth River Project, is a grass-roots, nonprofit organization working to build broad community involvement
in restoring the environmental health of the heavily industrialized Elizabeth River. Toxics in the Elizabeth River pose
the highest risk to homeless and low-income residents who consume river fish for subsistence in the urbanized cities
of Norfolk, Portsmouth, and Chesapeake. The Business for a Cleaner River and River Stars are two related programs

Appendix F                                                                             Page F-24

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that provide resources, referrals, and recognition to businesses that reduce toxic river outputs by adopting voluntary,
cost-effective, pollution prevention alternatives.  River Stars, the certification and recognition portion of the program,
will build community appreciation and improve community relations for businesses as they make pollution prevention
gains.

HOWARD UNIVERSITY:  A  PROGRAM TO  PROVIDE  TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE  TO SMALL
BUSINESSES                                                                 Grant Award: $100,000

The Howard University project, in Washington, DC, will address the development of pollution prevention and waste
reduction programs for 38 to 42 commercial establishments identified by EPA as the primary source generators
responsible for "the most degraded sub-watershed in the Anacostia Basin," and one of the worst urban watersheds in
the United States. The goal of the program is to notify targeted business owners and educate them about the benefits
of pollution prevention, provide onsite technical assistance in the development of pollution prevention programs,
develop specific total cost assessments for pollution prevention projects, conduct business operations and management
assessments, and develop applications for financial assistance from an established public-private small business finance
program to fund the cost of pollution prevention projects where required.

GARDEN RESOURCES OF WASHINGTON: POLLUTION PREVENTION THROUGH GARDENING AND
COMPOSTING: COMMUNITY DEMONSTRATION SITES                       Grant Award: $56,245

Garden Resources of Washington, in collaboration with Community Harvest, will develop  three demonstration
gardening and composting sites in low-income communities of Washington, DC. These sites will serve as a focal point
for residents and other stakeholders to gain awareness of and design solutions to environmental and public health
problems related to the growth, distribution, and consumption of food.  These sites will serve  as a model for other
low-income communities. The proposed demonstration garden and compost sites will provide direct hands-on ways for
neighborhood residents to learn and use pollution prevention skills.  By learning to use environmentally safe landscaping
and gardening techniques, and by learning to compost, neighborhood residents will be able to grow pesticide and
preservative-free food, identify biological and other nonchemical alternatives to pest control, increase the health of soil
in the community, reduce the volume of waste generated, and create safer green space for themselves and their children.

CENTER FOR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL RESEARCH: CONFIDENTIAL SMALL BUSINESS POLLUTION
PREVENTION TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE IN TARGET ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE COMMUNITIES
                                                                              Grant Award: $100,000

In this project the center will develop and implement a confidential small business pollution  prevention technical
assistance program in cooperation with the World-Class Industrial network, Mon Valley Initiative, and Pittsburgh
partnership for Neighborhood development. The program will: develop a targeted outreach program to inform eligible
businesses of pollution prevention assistance available through the EPA EJP2 program; present pollution prevention
education seminars for businesses on environmental justice target areas; conduct onsite environmental compliance and
pollution prevention assessments for eligible business enterprises; conduct a pollution prevention demonstration project
for an eligible small business; and create a sustainable local pollution prevention strategic planning  business network
with target environmental justice communities.

REGION 4

ESCAMBIA COUNTY FLORIDA: POLLUTION PREVENTION ASSISTANCE TO THE BUSINESSES AND
RESIDENTS OF WARRINGTON                                                Grant Award:$ 79,728

The Warrington community has experienced rapid growth. Much  of this growth took place prior to the establishment
of county zoning regulations. As a result, the impact of industrial and commercial businesses on  residents and the
environment is evident. The purpose of Escambia County's project is to address the environmental justice issues faced
by Warrington, and to reduce the environmental and health impacts on the community by helping the industrial and
commercial sectors reduce and prevent the generation of air toxins, hazardous waste, waste water,  and solid waste. The
program will stress pollution prevention and source reduction, and also will include the promotion of energy efficiency


Appendix F                                                                               Page F-25

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and resource conservation, both at home and at work.  The first objective is to introduce pollution prevention to the
industrial and commercial businesses of the community. The second objective is to introduce pollution prevention to
homeowners and renters.  Pollution prevention will be promoted via onsite audits, education materials, seminars, and
citizen involvement.

CITIZENS FOR A BETTER SOUTH FLORIDA, INC.: ENHANCE ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS AND
POLLUTION PREVENTION INITIATIVES THROUGH THE TRANSLATION OF MATERIALS FOR THE
HISPANIC COMMUNITY                                                    Grant Award: $90,773

The city of Hialeah, a densely populated Hispanic community, will be the target for an outreach and education project
to provide information and education on environmental issues in Spanish.  Citizens for a Better South Florida will
partner with the local environmental regulatory agency, the Dade County Department of Environmental Resources
Management, to utilize their experienced staff and pollution prevention literature.  Existing literature will be revised,
translated into Spanish, and distributed, workshops will be offered for both the residential and industrial communities,
environmental talk shows will be offered in Spanish on local radio stations, a public service announcement will be
produced in Spanish and televised on a local television station, and articles will be written in Spanish and published in
local periodicals or publications.

MISSISSIPPI BAND OF CHOCTAW INDIANS: ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE THROUGH POLLUTION
PREVENTION                                                                 Grant Award: $91,632

As part of their project, the Chataw will conduct a comprehensive investigation into pollution prevention opportunities
and barriers  facing the community. The research will, in turn, produce recommendations for use in the development of
a community-wide pollution prevention plan.  To delineate pollution prevention opportunities and barriers, and provide
a foundation for pollution prevention planning supportive of economic and natural resource development, this project
will have three components: a sociological assessment of Choctaw community members; a natural resources assessment,
focusing on the watershed and tribal interactions with fisheries; and an assessment of waste reduction and energy
conservation opportunities and barriers on the reservation.  Priority will be placed on defining tribal education and
training need and as well as nonregulatory strategies and technologies for effecting community-wide pollution
prevention.  Tribal members will be involved in data collection and interpretation, recommendation development, and
oversight efforts.

BIRMINGHAM ENVIRONMENTAL  CLEARINGHOUSE: COMMUNITY-BASED ENVIRONMENTAL
JUSTICE PROGRAM                                                        Grant Award: $100,000

The Birmingham Environmental Clearinghouse is working on behalf of seven Birmingham, Alabama, neighborhoods
that border Village Creek,  a tributary of the Warrior River in Jefferson County. Industry and poverty have left a legacy
of environmental injustice in the area delimited by the Village Creek flood plain. The clearinghouse will address the
environmental aspect of this legacy with a holistic pollution prevention program it terms Total Environmental Quality
Management (TEQM). TEQM is an empowerment model in which area residents and businesses accept responsibility
for, and undertake concrete actions toward, improving the environments they directly impact.  The approach combines
community-based education, direct action toward immediate and incremental improvements, coordination of the efforts
of public agencies, and advocacy within public forums created by several large public works projects.

GEORGIA ENVIRONMENTAL ORGANIZATION: SUSTAINABLE ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE
                                                                               Grant Award: $31,900

By training and involving businesses and residents in the Proctor Creek watershed, this project provides an avenue by
which environmental justice communicates  can become more empowered and take control of their lives and what
happens around them.  Concentrating on pollution prevention, the project addresses many potential health problems at
their suspected source. By identifying and cataloging the potential sources of pollution in the watershed, residents will
take necessary steps in preventing their communities from being polluted by toxic discharges and stormwater run-off.
The project will also partner with the City of Atlanta,  the Department of Natural Resources, and the Proctor Creek
business community.


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REGION 5

RIVERS UNLIMITED MILL CREEK RESTORATION PROJECT:  MILL CREEK ENVIRONMENTAL
JUSTICE THROUGH POLLUTION PREVENTION INITIATIVE                  Grant Award: $99,998

This project is designed to incorporate pollution prevention into a community-wide effort to environmentally and
economically regenerate the highly urbanized and industrialized Mill Creek watershed. The partners in the project will:
achieve measurable reduction in industrial wastes within environmental justice communities through  pollution
prevention technical assistance to industry; bring  business  and industry  to the table as  collaborative partners  in
community-based watershed restoration efforts; provide pollution prevention education to students attending junior and
senior high schools in the watershed; and provide pollution prevention training for affected and concerned parties,
building a knowledgeable leadership that can incorporate pollution prevention into all future watershed initiatives.

FOND DU LAC RESERVATION BUSINESS COMMITTEE: POLLUTION PREVENTION INITIATIVE
                                                                                Grant Award: $22,080

The Fond du Lac Reservation Business Committee's  solid waste specialist will conduct waste audits on eight businesses
on the reservation. The  goal of these audits is to remove persistent toxins from the businesses' waste streams and
educate their employees on pollution prevention alternatives for reducing solid waste. The solid waste specialist will
do source reduction and pollution prevention audits on the eight nonresidential waste  generators.  Source reduction
audits will involve the staff and management of these businesses to help identify areas where toxic substances are being
used.  It will be the responsibility of the solid waste specialist to assist the staff and management of these businesses in
implementing appropriate changes to reduce or eliminate these hazards from the waste streams and follow up on their
progress.  This project will have a tribal focus and identify problems that may be unique to Indian Country, and will
document the resources available to deal with these  problems effectively.

YOUNGSTOWN-WARREN  REGIONAL   CHAMBER  OF  COMMERCE:   MAHONING  VALLEY
ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE PROJECT                                       Grant Award: $100,000

Mahoning Valley, Ohio, is rich in ethnic and racial diversity, but it also has a strong history of heavy manufacturing.
Due to large-scale job losses in the community, the revitalization of the economy and industry in the valley is a priority.
The chamber's project will couple education  and community initiatives, thereby  facilitating fair treatment  of
environmental issues for all community residents.  The pollution prevention approach for this project is to provide
integrated manufacturing assessments, coupled with the use of pollution prevention implementation assistance (through
advanced technical assistance) and educational  outreach, to at least four companies located  within the valley's
environmental justice areas.  The assessments will be used as a tool to evaluate each company's processes and identify
target areas for pollution prevention opportunities and their subsequent implementation.

SIXTEENTH  STREET COMMUNITY  HEALTH  CENTER: STRATEGIC POLLUTION PREVENTION
INITIATIVE FOCUSED ON HISPANIC CHILDREN                              Grant Award: $98,375

The Sixteenth Street Community Health Center (SSCHC), in partnership with the Wisconsin Department of Natural
Resources and Milwaukee Public Schools, has begun a 2-year pollution prevention initiative which will gather and
interpret ambient air quality data in the SSCHC neighborhood on key pollutants known to contribute to asthma. The
project also will assess certain health, lifestyle, and behavioral characteristics of students, residents, and employers and
workers in the neighborhood, and communicate with  low-income Hispanic residents and students about air pollution's
relationship to asthma and respiratory illness. The project will use air monitoring data and state-collected information
as the basis to tailor specific, language appropriate, pollution prevention outreach to residents on actions they can take
to reduce air pollution and risks of respiratory illnesses. As a final step, the project will assess the pollution prevention
strategy's effectiveness to determine behavioral changes and increase attention on the use of automobiles within the
project's service area.
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LOWER SIOUX RESERVATION: WIND ENERGY DEMONSTRATION PROJECT Grant Award: $90,000

Coal, oil, and gas-fired power plants are disproportionately located near minority communities, tribal communities, and
politically less established communities. The development of a local wind-powered electrical energy resource will
reduce dependency on pollution-creating energy production methods. By allowing the Lower Sioux community to
control its source of electrical energy, this project will help eliminate the negative effects of being a minority community
disengaged from the power plant siting process, while at the same time reduce the amount of pollution created. The
project consists of three components: a wind energy system demonstration project; the Lower Sioux Wind Energy:
Project Generation and Distribution System Design and Specification Report; and educational and community input
activities, including public meetings and information dissemination.

REGION 6

CENTRAL ARKANSAS REGIONAL SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT DISTRICT: ESTABLISHING A
PILOT POLLUTION PREVENTION OUTREACH CENTER                       Grant Award: $99,998

The Central Arkansas Regional Solid Waste Management District (CARSWMD), composed of four rural counties in
central Arkansas, will develop waste reduction programs and encourage pollution prevention and recycling by providing
education and technical assistance. CARSWMD will accomplish this by developing a pollution prevention program
that integrates source reduction materials for schools, public and private organizations, and volunteer committees in each
community. CARSWMD will work in coordination with local businesses to place pollution prevention informational
displays in areas near where pollution-causing materials are sold.

CITY OF HOUSTON: SOUTHWEST ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT TRAINING CENTER (SwEET
Center)                                                                       Grant Award: $94,062

The goal of the SwEET Center is to promote environmental justice in targeted low-income and minority areas in
Houston, Texas.  The center promotes public health, safety, and the environment through enforcement of local, state,
and federal environmental laws. The center also educates targeted low-income and minority residents in ways to protect
the health and safety of the public residing in environmentally distressed areas. The SwEET Center will provide an
organizational mechanism through which the "Rat on a Rat" and Neighborhood Environmental Education Training
programs, will continue to operate and further expand enforcement and education of the environmental laws at the local,
state, and federal levels.  The center will provide technical support through geographic information system mapping.

LOUISIANA   ENVIRONMENTAL  JUSTICE  PROJECT:   A   COMMUNITY  EDUCATION   AND
EMPOWERMENT PROGRAM                                                Grant Award: $100,000

In the greater New Orleans area, along the Mississippi River, three shipyards currently are releasing large quantities of
toxic chemicals into the surrounding communities. These communities are predominantly low-income and African
American.  Currently, these ship yards do not utilize adequate pollution reduction technology, and the affected
communities are unaware of the toxins that surround them. This project will build awareness and mobilization through
a community education and empowerment program modeled after the Equitable and Trinity Shipyard examples.  This
program will be expanded to include increased community capacity (especially youth involvement) to identify local
environmental justice problems and involve the community in the design and implementation of activities, particularly
decision-making, to address those concerns.  The community will work with business and government leaders to design
and implement pollution prevention approaches and pollution reduction technology at all three shipyards that will
protect the long-term environmental health of the community.
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REGION 7

UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN IOWA: DEMONSTRATION OF A LOW COST AIR EMISSION REDUCTION
TECHNOLOGY FOR URBAN BUSES                                           Grant Award: $99,163

The goal of this project is to demonstrate the effectiveness of the Hydro Power Pak as an innovative, low-cost means
to meet the urban bus retrofit requirements for reduced air emissions, specified in the Clean Air Act. Existing, pre-1993
municipal bus emissions, will be tested for hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxide, particulate matter, opacity,
and other relevant parameters to establish baseline data.  After installation of the Hydro Power Paks, and a break-in
period, the retrofitted buses will be retested. Before and after retrofit data will be compared with the Clean Air Act
compliance criteria.  Certification of the technology will be requested.

LINCOLN-LANCASTER COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT: POLLUTION PREVENTION EDUCATION
AND OUTREACH                                                             Grant Award: $80,000

The Lincoln-Lancaster County Health Department (LLCHD) recently completed work on the Minority Community
Environmental Health Hazards Risk Survey, and hopes to build on the work of the survey by mapping minority
communities' perception of environmental health risks. LLCHD plans to map areas of environmental justice concerns
using a geographic information system. While the GIS work is being done, LLCHD will research and identify existing
pollution prevention curricula.  LLCHD will then target minority community organizations to partner in the education
case studies. LLCHD will hold open public meetings to educate the minority community about actual and perceived
environmental health risks, critical-thinking and problem-solving skills, and pollution prevention principles. LLCHD
will then seek community assistance in identifying and prioritizing the environmental and human health issues about
which they are most concerned.

METROPOLITAN  ST. LOUIS SEWER  DISTRICT:  CURBSIDE  RECYCLING  FOR POLLUTION
PREVENTION                                                                 Grant Award: $80,554

The goal of this project is to address a minority community's lack of access to environmental education and community
involvement, in regards to solid waste management. Residents in the target community currently risk exposure potential
health threats from the improper disposal of solid waste and the deficiency of protective measures.  This project is
designed to minimize the volume of solid waste in landfills, waterways, and sewers in the community. The project's
strategy is to promote recycling as an educational tool and a disposal alternative.

COMMUNITY HEALTH & EDUCATION SERVICES: EDUCATION AND COMMUNITY OUTREACH
PROJECT                                                                    Grant Award: $70,000

The goal of this project is to educate and involve high-risk, low-income and culturally-diverse populations, community
leaders, and industries in the development of preventive and alternative measures and practices that reduce pollution
and environmental degradation in northeast Wyandotte County.  To accomplish these goals, the project plans to form
a task force that will partner with local industries and cooperatively develop pollution prevention initiatives; educate
families and businesses on the health and environmental effects of household hazardous waste, proper use and disposal
of such waste, and less toxic alternatives; and educate 60 high-risk, low-income youths from northeast Wyandotte
County on salient environmental topics pertaining to their urban setting, as well as water quality issues within the
community.

MID-AMERICA REGIONAL COUNCIL: KANSAS CITY STAR NEWSPAPERS IN EDUCATION PROJECT
                                                                              Grant Award: $10,000

This project seeks to empower residents of the Kansas City Bistate Enhanced Enterprise Community by providing
leadership training on environmental and pollution issues, and providing community-based strategies that speaks to the
issue. This project also encourages community participation in the environmental pollution prevention planning process.
The project will identify  leaders in the  community interested in learning more about pollution prevention and
environmental issues; survey attitudes regarding pollution prevention needs in the community then provide training in


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problem-solving strategies and methods, using the identified needs and issues as models; and execute community
outreach pollution prevention efforts that target residents of the community.

REGION 8

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF BLACK ENVIRONMENTALISTS: ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION
RESTORATION AND STEWARDSHIP PROJECT                             Grant Award: $100,000

The Sustainable,  Environmentally-Robust Urban Community Project (SERUC) proposes to introduce pollution
prevention, as well as water and energy conservation sensitivity and practices, to the residents of Northeast Park Hill
in Denver, Colorado. This 7-square mile, high-density community is made up of mostly low-income and minority
residents. The National Association of Black Environmentalists' (NABE) will provide this community with information
regarding the pollution  sources impacting the neighborhood.  The project will  include activities such as cooperative
pollution prevention education, restoration, stewardship opportunities, and job placement for qualified youth ages 12
to 19.

TOWN OF MEEKER/MEEKER POLLUTION PREVENTION: RIO BLANCO POLLUTION PREVENTION
PROGRAM                                                                  Grant Award: $25,000

The town of Meeker and the Meeker Pollution Prevention Committee have organized a partnership of community-wide
support for pollution prevention program  development.  This effort will benefit  Meeker and set the stage for a
countywide program. This proposal is for funding of a full-time pollution prevention specialist in the Town of Meeker
to develop and coordinate specific education programs in the community. The pollution prevention specialist would
develop regular educational articles on pollution prevention for publication in the local weekly newspaper, coordinate
a pollution prevention training session for local businesses with the Meeker Chamber of Commerce, using instructors
from the Western Slope Pollution Prevention Program and/or industry specialists, coordinate the establishment of a
community-wide used oil collection service, coordinate aluminum can and newspaper recycling, conduct a feasibility
study of an intergovernmental agreement to fund long-term pollution prevention programs in the county, and attend the
Colorado Pollution Prevention Local Networking quarterly  meetings to share learned experiences and pollution
prevention resources.

MONTANA STATE  UNIVERSITY: TRIBAL COLLEGE ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE  THROUGH
POLLUTION PREVENTION SCHOLARSHIP, INTERNSHIP AND EMPOWERMENT PROGRAM
                                                                            Grant Award: $100,000

The Montana Pollution Prevention Program is an educational and  nonregulatory program of the Montana  State
University Extension Service (MSUES). As a land-grant university, MSUES provides educational programming
throughout Montana including all tribal colleges.  Through  successful past experiences with Montana tribes, the
Montana Pollution Prevention Project will facilitate the creation of the Tribal College Environmental Justice/Pollution
Prevention Scholarship, Intern and Empowerment Program.  This scholarship and internship program at MSU will
provide pollution prevention support courses and experiential learning opportunities for Native American faculty and
students from Montana's seven tribal colleges.

MONTANA TRIBAL BUSINESS INFORMATION NETWORK: POLLUTION PREVENTION TECHNICAL
ASSISTANCE AND TRAINING PROJECT                                      Grant Award: $85,000

The Montana Tribal Business Information Network (TBIN)  is comprised of the seven Tribal Business Information
Centers (TBICS) located on each of the seven reservations in Montana (Crow, Northern Cheyenne, Fort Peck, Fort
Belknap, Rocky Boy, Blackfeet, and Flathead).  The TBIM is requesting funding to provide technical assistance and
training in implementing pollution prevention technologies and form a Pollution Prevention Tribal Cooperative. The
cooperative will serve all seven of the Indian reservations in Montana.  The grant will provide technical assistance and
training to the TBIC on each of the seven Indian reservations to enable them to identify and use pollution prevention
technologies.
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RUNNING STRONG FOR AMERICAN INDIAN YOUTH: POLLUTION PREVENTION IN AGRICULTURE
PROJECT                                                                   Grant Award: $30,000

Running Strong for American Indian Youth sponsors and operates the Slim Buttes Community Agricultural
Development Project on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Grant assistance will enable the Slim
Buttes project to address agricultural pollution prevention through a demonstration project and training activities
promoting organic gardening and sustainable community agriculture.  The program will involve workshops, field
demonstrations, new composting operations, and the creation and dissemination of written educational materials.

REGION 9

ASSOCIATION FOR COMMUNITY BASED EDUCATION: ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE THROUGH
SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE IN FARMWORKER COMMUNITIES          Grant Award: $100,000

The Association for Community Based Education and the Rural Development Center plan to provide intensive training
and technical  assistance to minority farmers in the Salinas Valley.  This training will help them reduce the use of
pesticides and adopt sustainable agricultural practices, including integrated pest management. The project will also
involve a public education campaign using organized forums and events, the media, field days and demonstration plots
to provide the migrant farm worker community and their employers with opportunities to learn more about, and apply
pollution prevention practices.

INSTITUTE  FOR  RESEARCH AND TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE: MINIMIZING THE HUMAN HEALTH
AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES                                    Grant Award: $96,516

The Institute's Pollution Prevention Center and the New Partnership Foundation will test and demonstrate water-based
brake cleaning alternatives to perchloroethlyne in inner city auto repair facilities in Los Angeles. The New Partnership
Foundation also will develop a pamphlet in Spanish to communicate results to Latino auto repair workers. The city of
Los Angeles will distribute a pamphlet to all permit holders.

LOS ANGELES CONSERVATION CORPS: COMMUNITY-WIDE COLLABORATION PROJECT
                                                                             Grant Award: $60,000

The Los Angeles Conservation Corps' (LACC) project will support chemical-free gardening in neighborhood gardens
in minority communities throughout Los Angeles. LACC collects resources (seeds, plants, soil, fencing, netting, etc.)
and distributes resources to individuals and groups of gardeners.  LACC also works to convert existing community
gardens that use pesticides to chemical-free gardens.

ECOLOGY ACTION, INC.: TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM              Grant Award: $41,484

Ecology Action will hold workshops on alternatives to drycleaning for the 1,000 Korean American owned and operated
dry cleaners in northern California.  They will also conduct guided Korean language tours of wet cleaning facilities in
the Bay Area and develop translated documents and technical resources on wet cleaning, as well as other EPA programs,
including Green Lights and WasteWi$e.

LOCAL GOVERNMENT COMMISSION: REDUCING JANITORS' USE OF TOXIC CHEMICALS
                                                                             Grant Award: $42,000

The Local Government Commission seeks to reduce janitors' exposure to cleaning chemicals, particularly focusing on
minority janitors.  The commission will establish a collaboration  between janitors, government, business, and
community groups in Richmond, a Northern California city with a high minority population.  The project includes a
focus not only on the janitors, but also on those who make  the decisions as to which cleaning  products are used.
Approximately 50 cleaning and maintenance activities will be assessed, and outreach materials developed.
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REGION 10

OREGON ENVIRONMENTAL COUNCIL: ALBINA POLLUTION PREVENTION PROJECT
                                                                              Grant Award: $80,000

The Albina Pollution Prevention Project is a 1-year effort culminating in an environmental justice action plan, a series
of specific initiatives, and pilot projects. The project is organized around four major tasks: community mapping to
identify community problems; community education and collaborative goal-setting; building capacity and partnerships
to address priority issues; and developing and implementing specific pollution prevention projects.

INTERNATIONAL DISTRICT HOUSING AND SOCIAL SERVICES: ASIAN AND PACIFIC ISLANDER
MOBILIZATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE                            Grant Award: $80,000

This project proposes to link the Wilderness-Urban Survival Skills Project for Youths and Families with residents living
in an urban environment. The curriculum juxtaposes environmental issues in both the wilderness and urban settings,
building bridges that will increase youths' capacity to become agents for positive social change. Pollution prevention
projects conducted by participants will focus on at least one of the following: reducing household exposure to and use
of pollutant chemicals; reducing use of polystyrene containers in packaging and sale of goods; and reducing pollutants
in storm drain runoff.

CHICKALOON NATIVE VILLAGE: RENEWABLE ENERGY DEVELOPMENT FOR ALASKAN NATIVE
VILLAGES                                                                   Grant Award: $80,000

This project will establish an integrated framework to help Alaska native villages assess the  development potential of
renewable energy resources on village land. Developing renewable energy sources will help villages lessen dependence
on fossil fuels.  Direct air pollution reduction benefits can be readily calculated for each megawatt of displaced fossil
fuel generation capacity, while direct and indirect community economic benefits will also accrue from reduced pollution
and local production of renewable energy.

TACOMA URBAN LEAGUE, INC: ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND ECONOMIC SUSTAINABILITY
THROUGH POLLUTION PREVENTION                                       Grant Award: $80,000

The goal of this project is to implement pollution prevention models that will reduce indoor environmental health risks,
and help build the economic base of the Salishan area. The project will have four broad areas of focus: reduce sources
of indoor air contaminants using air filtration; conserve energy by replacing heating and ventilation systems; improve
economic sustainability through workman's apprentice training and environmental education internships; and provide
an opportunity  for residents to learn, be involved with, and to be empowered to create a better future for themselves.

COMMUNITY  COALITION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE: COMMUNITY-BASED POLLUTION
PREVENTION PROJECT                                                      Grant Award: $20,000

This project is  designed to help  the  Community Coalition for Environmental Justice (CCEJ)  implement  a
Community-Based  Pollution Prevention Project.  The purpose  of the project is to develop local solutions to
environmental  injustices in South Park through community participation. The community will focus on  research to
identify and reduce exposure to  industrial pollutants hi the community. The project will take a direct approach to
pollution prevention by implementing  a community-driven  pollution prevention program that focuses on known
contaminated sites and identifies the most prevalent pollutants in the community. This effort will use existing data from
various local agencies and environmental organizations. Once primary pollutants and their sources are identified, the
most appropriate pollution prevention methods will be researched to allow for an informed community decision-making
process.
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NATIONAL

REYNOLDSTOWN REVITALIZATION CORPORATION: THREE COMMUNITY COLLABORATIVES IN
COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT; EDUCATION AND POLLUTION PREVENTION; AND A STRATEGIC
VISION FOR CHANGE                                                      Grant Award: $159,753

Three Empowerment Zone Community Corporation, in Atlanta, Georgia, has identified communities with typical
revitalization projects with existing pollution issues.  Without a holistic approach to their revitalization projects,
communities may experience adverse environmental impacts.  The communities involved have teamed up with the
Georgia Institute of Technology to gain assistance in designing and articulating a strategic vision of change, ensuring
resident participation, providing community education, accessing technical information relating to protecting the
environment, and creating sustainable redevelopment projects. Through a series of kick-off meetings, community
awareness programs, and an environmental awareness fair for neighborhood children, the communities involved propose
to create a model pollution prevention and environmental conservation program for inner city revitalization projects.

AMERICA WORKS PARTNERSHIP: POLLUTION PREVENTION PROGRAM IN CONSTRUCTION FOR
PUBLIC HOUSING RESIDENTS AND NATIVE ALASKANS                    Grant Award: $160,138

The America Works partnership worked with the United Brotherhood of Carpenters, the International Brotherhood of
Painters and Allied Trades, public housing authorities, and the Alaskan Native Council to recruit and train poor youth
of color into pre-apprenticeship programs that create a pathway for them to lifelong careers as skilled union
tradespeople. This project proposes to enhance the existing program by providing pollution prevention training for
America Works pre-apprentices in Chicago, Illinois, Oakland, California, and Alaska.  This will be combined with
pollution prevention education and assistance for painter and carpenter contractors in those areas, as well as pollution
prevention training and policy development for the Oakland and Chicago Housing Authorities.

OIL, CHEMICAL, AND ATOMIC WORKERS INTERNATIONAL UNION: ENVIRONMENTAL PROJECT
FOR COMMUNITY BASED TRAININGS                                      Grant Award: $130,000

The Partnership's overall goal is to encourage pollution prevention implementation that delivers environmental health
benefits for workers  and  nearby environmental justice communities.  This goal is advanced  through a systematic
program of peer-led local training workshops for workers, environmentalists, and environmental justice community
residents, and the development and implementation of a supportive training curriculum.  The partnership's curriculum
and training events are geared first toward engaging workers and community residents in a dialogue that overcomes
barriers, identifies shared  concerns, and develops a common definition of pollution prevention as it relates to local
facilities and nearby communities. Once productive communication is established, local participants work together on
a  site specific pollution  problem solving  through a two-stage process.  Activities  will be  focused on three
refinery-intensive regions:  southern California, northwestern Indiana, and  central  New Jersey  and  southeast
Pennsylvania.
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  SUMMARY OF PREVIOUS GRANT AWARDS TO TRIBAL ORGANIZATIONS

FISCAL YEAR 1995

REGION 2

DUNBAR ASSOCIATION, INC.:   DUNBAR ASSOCIATION'S MINORITY BUSINESS POLLUTION
PREVENTION PROJECT                                                  Grant Award:  $100,000

Dunbar Association's project seeks to address the fact that many minority-owned small businesses in Syracuse, NY,
contribute to the pollution in their community. These businesses are frequently located in minority communities. The
initiative will: educate the community about pollution prevention; identify the pollution problems at a number of small
businesses and provide technical and material support to remedy those problems; and provide financial support to those
businesses in the form of loans, which will be used to implement pollution prevention initiatives. The goal of the project
is to create a means by which minority small business owners can implement changes (in processes, and equipment, etc.)
that will have environmental and health benefits without undermining the economic well-being of the businesses. The
program will work cooperatively within existing frameworks such as the Pan-African Business Association (PABA) and
other Native American and Latino organizations.

REGION 4

POARCH CREEK INDIANS: AGRICULTURE POLLUTION PREVENTION DEMONSTRATION PROJECT
                                                                           Grant Award:  $90,000

After years of agricultural runoff, the surface waters and watershed of the Poarch Creek Indian reservation, located in
Alabama, have become impaired. The goal of this project is to improve the surface-water quality of the Poarch Creek
Indian Community through the application of pollution prevention measure and/or best management practices (BMPs).
The tribe will form a partnership consisting of all Poarch Creek  Community landowners, farmers, Indians and non-
Indians, and federal and state agencies to develop an agriculture pollution prevention plan  and strategy for the Poarch
Community area, conduct a demonstration of agriculture pollution prevention measures or BMPs,  include in
demonstrations measures or BMPs that are innovative but economically feasible, and involve the whole community in
all phases of the project.

REGION 5

CLEAN WATER FUND: MERCURY PREVENTION THROUGH INDIGENOUS EDUCATION AND ACTION
                                                                           Grant Award:  $85,000

The Indigenous Environmental Network and the Clean Water Fund, working with partners White Earth Land Recovery
Project and Clean Water Action Alliance, are requesting grant funding to address EJ issues of mercury pollution that are
threatening the health and traditional lifestyle of native populations in MN, WI, and MI through P2 and education. The
project proposes four components to address mercury threats to native populations through P2, including:  1) provide
educational materials to native and nonnative people on the threat of mercury pollution; 2) disseminate information to
native and nonnative people through workshops on mercury pollution, with more in-depth training provided to leaders
within the communities; 3) adopt an Indigenous Policy Platform for mercury prevention, and develop principles for a
mercury prevention campaign; and 4) develop a Model Community Action  Plan aimed  at encouraging community
residents and institutions to adopt energy efficiency and conservation practices.

NATIVE  AMERICAN EDUCATIONAL  SERVICES  COLLEGE:    MENOMINEE  RESERVATION
ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE THROUGH POLLUTION PREVENTION EDUCATION PROJECT
                                                                            Grant Award:  $6,780

The Native American Educational Services (NAES) College will use its grant funding to provide an educational program
and household hazardous waste P2 project on the Menominee Reservation in Wisconsin. Approximately 6,000 people


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 live on the Menominee Reservation, 4,000 of whom are Menominee. The majority of the households on the reservation
 are connected to septic tanks that are not adequate treatment systems to protect against potential dangers associated with
 the disposal of hazardous household cleaning products. The project will provide information on the basic principles of
 P2, the identification of household hazardous wastes, and the use of substitute nontoxic cleaners. Participants in the
 project will gain first-hand experience with the use of nontoxic cleaners, public education and community outreach,
 obtaining access to TRI data and other information on facilities handling hazardous substances within their communities,
 and addressing the tribal government on P2 issues.  Information will be disseminated through a series of workshops.

 UPPER SIOUX AND LOWER SIOUX COMMUNITIES: WIND ENERGY FEASIBILITY AND ENERGY
 EDUCATION PROJECT                                                     Grant Award:  $49,920

 Goals of this project are to complete the wind feasibility study, and allow the Lower Sioux community to move toward
 the use of wind power generated electricity and reduce reliance upon polluting methods of electrical generation, to
 develop an education program that will introduce  tribal members to wind power as a viable alternative to current
 practices, and to create a model demonstrating the use of wind power on a community scale that sets an example for other
 communities in the region to follow.  The 620  member Lower Sioux Indian Community is located in west central
 Minnesota and extends over an area of 1,743 acres near Morton, MN.  The reservation lies within the Central Lowland
 physiographic province with 80 percent of the reservation above the Minnesota River Valley on the adjacent bluffs.

 REGION 6

 PUEBLO OF POJOAQUE: ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER
                                                                             Grant Award:  $80,000

 The Pueblo of Pojoaque has been central to the community of the Eight Northern Pueblos of New Mexico.  Since the
 resettlement of the native people on ancestral lands, Pojoaque has become the center for cultural redevelopment and has
 been recognized by the Administration for Native Americans as a model of cultural revitalization. As the population of
 the valley increases, it becomes increasingly important to educate people about the affect of population changes on the
 environment In order to achieve this goal, the  community will establish the Pueblo of Pojoaque EJ and Development
 Center. The center will be an educational facility designed specifically to address P2 in the context of growth. The
 center will serve as a clearinghouse for seminars, workshops, and training in all aspects of P2 for the Indian and non-
 Indian communities of the area.  Some of the courses included in the curriculum are: Infrastructure Planning Workshop,
 Seminar in Water System, Air Quality Monitoring Station, and Ongoing Studies.

 REGION 7

 HASKELL  INDIAN NATIONS UNIVERSITY:  CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT  IN POLLUTION
 PREVENTION AND OUTREACH TO INDIAN COMMUNITY                   Grant Award:  $45,000

 Haskell Indian Nations University was established in  1884 to serve the Native American community. This project deals
 with two focus areas: training in decision-making and problem-solving and advancement of partnerships. Decision-
 making training will be implemented through four activities: 1) facilitate on-site workshops and training at reservations
 or urban concentrations for selected topics; 2) provide on-site training for the measurement and monitoring of various
 indications of pollution intensity; 3) provide investigative research support for tribal needs in microbiology/toxicology;
 4) develop and enhance public and private partnerships.

 REGION 8

 MONTANA  STATE  UNIVERSITY  EXTENSION  SERVICE:  MONTANA  TRIBAL  POLLUTION
 PREVENTION CONSORTIUM—RESERVING A QUALITY CULTURE AND ENVIRONMENT
                                                                             Grant Award:  $50,000

 There are nine Indian Tribal Nations located on seven reservations and adjoining communities in the state of MT. The
 Tribal Nations comprise 6.2 percent of MTs population.  As independent nations, MT tribes have lacked the ability and
 resources to  assess environmental issues unique to  their reservations and design, implement, and evaluate effective


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strategies to prevent future environmental problems.  The consortium's project goals include: 1) coordinate with existing
and proposed reservation EJP2 efforts; 2) bring representatives from each MT Indian reservation together to discuss and
deal with environmental issues common and unique to the reservations through the implementation of reservation P2
assessment and education/training; 3) establish tribal leadership teams, from each reservation, to create reservation P2
programs; 4) with the cooperation and input from each tribal leadership team, develop and conduct an assessment of
environmental issues affecting the Native American population; 5) as a result of each reservation environmental issues
assessment develop custom P2 education/training programs targeted to the affected  audience, stakeholders, and
reservation leadership; and 6) serve as a model program for other states with Native American reservations.

NORTHWESTERN BAND OF THE SHOSHONI  NATION: ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE THROUGH
POLLUTION PREVENTION EDUCATION TRAINING                          Grant Award:  $50,000

The purpose of this application is to develop, on behalf of all 89 tribes located within the borders of the State of UT and
through a  cooperative effort, a comprehensive strategy to assist the tribal governments in identifying environmental
concerns and P2 processes to address these concerns within their own communities. The program will be structured to
educate and train tribal leaders and program managers in P2  processes to manage their own environmental concerns.
The grant will also discuss how the tribes could join forces and  collectively establish an environmental office. This office
would assist in the efforts to address mutual concerns and individual tribal concerns, as well in seeking funding to aid
in the development of specific strategies related to environmental protection. Other efforts included in this grant include:
identifying what tribal regulations/ordinances currently exist for each tribe and what steps need to be taken toward the
development and/or enhancement of environmental protection  that include P2; how the regulations/ordinances are
currently being enforced, and/or can these enforcement techniques be improved, or should a stronger cooperative effort
between tribes, EPA, the state and local governments be developed; what are the tribal capabilities to respond to
environmental emergencies, and/or what are the tribes' needs to  accomplish this type of objective?

SINTE GLESKA UNIVERSITY: A TRAINING AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT IN ENVIRONMENTAL
JUSTICE                                                                      Grant Award:  $50,000

Many people on the Rosebud reservation live in houses that  are  full of hazardous materials.  Sinte Gleska University
(SOU), also on the reservation, is implementing an "Energy and Technology Policy." SGU has also begun to develop
a "Sustainable Construction" component for the SGU Vocational Education Degree Building Trades Program. The focus
is to teach SGU students how to best work with sustainable  design, materials, and construction techniques using the
tribe's locally available and natural resources to construct culturally appropriate nontoxic buildings. To achieve this goal,
SGU will:  1) provide continuing education for SGU  instructors; 2) teach SGU staff and students the need to learn how
to do cost-benefit analysis for changing the existing university  lighting system to the most energy-efficient lighting
available; 3) teach youths how to design and build their own culturally appropriate, nontoxic buildings, using primarily
tribal resources.

PINE  RIDGE  INDIAN RESERVATION:  SLIM  BUTTES  COMMUNITY YOUTH AGRICULTURE
DEVELOPMENT PROJECT: RUNNING STRONG FOR AMERICAN INDIAN YOUTH
                                                                                Grant Award:  $25,000

The Slim  Buttes Community Agricultural Development Project addresses P2 in agriculture through a demonstration
program and training activities promoting organic gardening and sustainable agriculture. Through organic gardening
workshops and gardening assistance  provided to  family and  community gardening cooperatives, integrated pest
management and alternatives to the use of pesticides is demonstrated. The Slim Buttes Project provides small-scale
organic community farming cooperatives with agricultural technical assistance, equipment, supplies, seeds, and seedlings.
Small-scale community farming allows families and neighbors  the opportunity to work cooperatively and provide a
means of  self-sufficiency and self-worth. All gardens in the programs are completely organic. Running Strong for
American Indian Youth is dedicated to helping Native Americans solve Native American problems through long-term,
self-sufficiency programs. The Slim Buttes Project is designed to raise the standard of living and the self-esteem of the
Ogalala Lakota on the Pine Ridge Reservation. Through organic gardening workshops,  field demonstrations, and "train-
the-trainer" workshops, the Slim Buttes Community Agriculture Project can be easily  replicated on other reservations
in SD and neighboring states.
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SHOSHONE & NORTHERN ARAPAHO TRIBES: POPULATION PROTECTION THROUGH POLLUTION
PREVENTION                                                                Grant Award:  $40,000

The goal of this project is to reduce the exposure of tribal members to potentially toxic chemicals through a combination
of efforts aimed at education, access to information, planning for pollution prevention, elimination of hazardous materials
from individual homes, and a preliminary assessment of epidemiological conditions on the reservation. This project will
focus on education and training of tribal government employees, education of the population at large, and education of
individuals routinely  involved in the  handling and application of hazardous materials. Products include a needs
assessment, a computerized epidemiological database, and a mapping of ground water vulnerability through GIS.

TURTLE MOUNTAIN BAND OF CHIPPEWA INDIAN TRIBES: POLLUTION PREVENTION COMMUNITY
EDUCATION AND INVOLVEMENT PROJECT                                Grant Award:  $25,000

The Turtle Mountain Chippewa Reservation is  located in north central ND. Most of the reservation is wooded, and
supports an economy of agriculture, livestock, various businesses, tribal and federal agencies, hospitals, and the Turtle
Mountain Manufacturing Company (TMMC). The reservation is located in Rolette County, ranked as the 11th poorest
county  in the U.S.  TMMC is the major employer and is an industrial facility that manufactures trailers for the
Department of the Army. Large amounts of paint, solvents, acids, chemicals, and other hazardous wastes are utilized
at this facility. In 1988, EPA began enforcement action at a TMMC for violating the RCRA  requirement regarding
handling of hazardous and  solid wastes.  The tribe's sole source of reliable drinking water lies below agricultural
croplands and is adjacent to the reservation. This aquifer is subject to the effects of fertilizers and pesticide use. The
grant project will develop an intensive series of educational and informational meetings designed to inform tribal
members and residents of the importance of implementing and enforcing environmental policies and codes. A P2
coordinator, in conjunction with the Tribal Environmental Coordinators Office, will institute P2 training and awareness
mechanisms, including regular and frequent meetings with tribal elder groups, community colleges, local schools, tribal
programs, federal and state agencies, and the local business community. Community members will receive informational
material, and an environmental steering group composed of stakeholders will be educated on major environmental laws
and other opportunities.

TURTLE MOUNTAIN RESERVATION OF NORTH DAKOTA &  WRITAR: SUSTAINABLE BUSINESS
DEVELOPMENT: POLLUTION PREVENTION IN MANUFACTURED HOUSING Grant Award:  $50,000

The disproportionately high use of manufactured housing by Native Americans leads to long-term human exposure to
well-documented indoor air quality hazards existing in manufactured homes. Current manufactured housing design does
not integrate environmental considerations such as material selection, use, and application. Further, while representing
a significant portion of housing units for Native Americans, existing manufactured housing is not responsive to the needs
of Native Americans. This project will:  1) foster provision of affordable, healthy, resource-efficient housing by a locally
based industry; 2) complete a Design for the Environment (Df£) on manufactured homes by developing a manufactured
housing design utilizing materials and methods that minimize the use of natural resources in the manufacturing process,
as well as in the use and maintenance of these homes; 3) identify and integrate specific environmental and cultural needs
of Native Americans into this DfE for manufactured homes; 4) create a business plan for Turtle Mountain Manufacturing
Company that addresses economic  injustices by strengthening the economic base  of this reservation through the
fabrication of sustainable, manufactured housing to serve  the local population.

REGION 10

CITY  OF PILOT POINT: PILOT  POINT ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE THROUGH  POLLUTION
PREVENTION PROJECT                                                    Grant Award: $49,737

Pilot Point, AK, is a predominantly Native American community, isolated from access to the  state's road system by
extreme terrain conditions and climates.  While  the community has made progress with sewer, water, and electricity
projects for the base population, the impact of the increased summer population continually creates additional health
problems that over-burden the limited resources  of the community to be able to develop and implement P2 strategies
effectively. The community believes that it can work toward accomplishing its goal with assistance from the grant
program, which will help the community develop an Environmental Services Coordinator administrative position. The


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coordinator will: 1) identify pollution concerns and develop prevention strategies, such as raising awareness of issues
through public education; 2) identify industrial pollution problems and develop prevention action plans; 3) work with
construction project designers to limit potential environmental damage; and 4) network with other regional communities
and EPA on environmental P2 concerns via conference travel and computer.

SPOKANE TRIBE OF INDIANS: INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT AND USE OF BIOLOGICAL PEST
CONTROLS                                                                 Grant Award: $25,000

The Spokane Indian Reservation faces a large and growing problem with noxious weeds on its 157,000 acres of range
land.  Unable to afford an integrated pest management plan, the community has approached the problem by using
whatever funds are made available by the BIA to purchase chemicals and spray infested areas of land. This budget-
driven approach to pesticide use threatens the health of the tribe and its land. To address this issue, the following project
proposes to use EJP2 funds to develop an integrated pest management strategy to allow the tribe to examine pest control
in a comprehensive way and to integrate pest control with other resource management goals. Grant funds will allow the
tribe to apply pesticides on the basis of need, as assessed in a survey of reservation pest problems. Funding also will
support the tribe's efforts to convert from chemical pesticides to biological pest controls and train tribal members to
assess pollution issues connected with pesticide applications. A coordinator will be hired to help the tribal community
develop and implement the project.

FISCAL YEAR 1996

REGION 10

TULALIP TRIBES OF WASHINGTON: MODEL TRIBAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT (TEPA)
PROJECT                                                                   Grant Award: $196,614

Under current conditions, economic development on and near Indian Reservations is resulting in short-term economic
gain at the expense  of the reservation environment and culture. This project will help tribes to balance the competing
demands of economic development and environmental protection, involve the community in this effort, and encourage
sustainable development through a focus on pollution prevention. The proposed project will result in: 1) the development
of a model Tribal Environmental Policy Act (TEPA) that tribes can use to review development proposals, 2) a pollution
prevention reference chart for tribes to use in conjunction with their TEPA and NEPA activities, and 3) a training
curriculum to enhance tribal understanding of and effectiveness in the Federal NEPA process.

FISCAL YEAR 1997

REGION 2

HAUDENOSUANEE  ENVIRONMENTAL   TASK  FORCE:  THE  HAUDENOSUANEE OHENTEN
KARIHWATEHKWEN: AN INDIGENOUS STRATEGY FOR LONG TERM POLLUTION PREVENTION
                                                                             Grant Award: $100,000

The Haudenosaunee Environmental Task Force (HETF) was founded to address the environmental concerns of the
Iroquois Confederacy; to prevent future pollution problems; and to develop restoration plans to sustain the indigenous
people, their culture, and the natural world for future generations. The proposed funding will allow HETF to function
more efficiently as a clearinghouse for the  exchange and dissemination of environmental information; to complete the
design of community education pollution prevention programs that combine traditional environmental knowledge with
scientific and technical information; and coordinate a conference that will bring together experts and the community
to discuss environmental laws, pollution prevention, and Haudenosaunee culture.
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REGION 4

MISSISSIPPI BAND OF CHOCTAW INDIANS: ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE THROUGH POLLUTION
PREVENTION                                                                 Grant Award: $91,632

 As part of their project, the Chataw will conduct a comprehensive investigation into pollution prevention opportunities
and barriers facing the community. The research will, in turn, produce recommendations for use in the development of
a community-wide pollution prevention plan. To delineate pollution prevention opportunities and barriers, and provide
a foundation for pollution prevention planning supportive of economic and natural resource development, this project
will have three components: a sociological assessment of Choctaw community members; a natural resources assessment,
focusing on the watershed and tribal interactions with fisheries; and an assessment of waste reduction and energy
conservation opportunities and barriers on the reservation. Priority will be placed on defining tribal education and
training need and as well as nonregulatory strategies and  technologies for effecting community-wide pollution
prevention.  Tribal members will be involved in data collection and interpretation, recommendation development, and
oversight efforts.

REGION 5

FOND DU LAC RESERVATION BUSINESS COMMITTEE: POLLUTION PREVENTION INITIATIVE
                                                                               Grant Award: $22,080

The Fond du Lac Reservation Business Committee's solid waste specialist will conduct waste audits on eight businesses
on the reservation.  The goal of these audits is to remove persistent toxins from the businesses' waste streams and
educate then- employees on pollution prevention alternatives for reducing solid waste.  The solid waste specialist will
do source reduction and pollution prevention audits on the eight nonresidential waste generators.  Source reduction
audits will involve the staff and management of these businesses to help identify areas where toxic substances are being
used.  It will be the responsibility of the solid waste specialist to assist the staff and management of these businesses in
implementing appropriate changes to reduce or eliminate these hazards from the waste streams and follow up on their
progress. This project will have a tribal focus and identify problems that may be unique to Indian Country, and will
document the resources available to  deal with these problems effectively.

LOWER SIOUX RESERVATION: WIND ENERGY DEMONSTRATION PROJECT Grant Award: $90,000

Coal, oil, and gas-fired power plants are disproportionately located near minority communities, tribal communities, and
politically less established communities. The development of a local wind-powered electrical energy resource will
reduce dependency on pollution-creating energy production methods.  By allowing the Lower Sioux community to
control its source of electrical energy, this project will help eliminate the negative effects of being a minority community
disengaged from the power plant siting process, while at the same time reduce the amount of pollution created. The
project consists of three components: a wind energy system demonstration project; the Lower Siotac Wind Energy:
Project Generation and Distribution System Design and Specification Report; and educational and community input
activities, including public meetings and information dissemination.

REGION  8

MONTANA STATE  UNIVERSITY: TRIBAL COLLEGE ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE THROUGH
POLLUTION PREVENTION SCHOLARSHIP, INTERNSHIP AND EMPOWERMENT PROGRAM
                                                                             Grant Award: $100,000

The Montana Pollution Prevention Program is an educational and nonregulatory program of the  Montana State
University Extension Service (MSUES).  As a land-grant university, MSUES provides educational programming
throughout  Montana including all tribal colleges.  Through successful past experiences with Montana tribes, the
Montana Pollution Prevention Project will facilitate the creation of the Tribal College Environmental Justice/Pollution
Prevention Scholarship, Intern and Empowerment Program.  This scholarship and  internship program at MSU will
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provide pollution prevention support courses and experiential learning opportunities for Native American faculty and
students from Montana's seven tribal colleges.

MONTANA TRIBAL BUSINESS INFORMATION NETWORK: POLLUTION PREVENTION TECHNICAL
ASSISTANCE AND TRAINING PROJECT                                     Grant Award: $85,000

The Montana Tribal Business Information Network (TBIN) is comprised of the seven Tribal Business Information
Centers (TBICS) located on each of the seven reservations in Montana (Crow, Northern Cheyenne, Fort Peck, Fort
Belknap, Rocky Boy, Blackfeet, and Flathead). The TBIM is requesting funding to provide technical assistance and
training in implementing pollution prevention technologies and form a Pollution Prevention Tribal Cooperative. The
cooperative will serve all seven of the Indian reservations in Montana. The grant will provide technical assistance and
training to the TBIC on each of the seven Indian reservations to enable them to identify and use pollution prevention
technologies.

RUNNING STRONG FOR AMERICAN INDIAN YOUTH: POLLUTION PREVENTION IN AGRICULTURE
PROJECT                                                                   Grant Award: $30,000

Running Strong for American  Indian Youth sponsors  and operates  the Slim  Buttes Community  Agricultural
Development Project on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota.  Grant assistance will enable the Slim
Buttes project to address agricultural pollution prevention through a demonstration project and training activities
promoting organic gardening and sustainable community agriculture.  The program will involve workshops, field
demonstrations, new composting operations, and the creation and dissemination of written educational materials.

REGION 10

CfflCKALOON NATIVE VILLAGE: RENEWABLE ENERGY DEVELOPMENT FOR ALASKAN NATIVE
VILLAGES                                                                  Grant Award: $80,000

This project will establish an integrated framework to help Alaska native villages assess the  development potential of
renewable energy resources on village land. Developing renewable energy sources will help villages lessen dependence
on fossil fuels. Direct air pollution reduction benefits can be readily calculated for each megawatt of displaced fossil
fuel generation capacity, while direct and indirect community economic benefits will also accrue from reduced pollution
and local production of renewable energy.
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           APPENDIX G: INFORMATION REGARDING DEFINITION
                                OF SMALL BUSINESS

  Small business regulations are contained in Title 13 CFR Part 121, and the Federal Acquisition Regulation
48 CFR Part 19. Small business is defined by the Small Business Administration's (SBA) Small Business Size
Regulations in 13 CFR, Part 121. Because SBA's definition of a small business is very complex, and varies
by industry, this appendix lists information that can help determine if the business you intend to work with
qualifies as a small business.

  For the applicable size standard and for size standard questions, you may contact the SBA located in one
of the area offices of the Office of Government Contracting or in Washington, DC. A downloadable file with
a table of the size standards also is available on "SBA ONLINE" under both the financial assistance and
government contracting sections. You may reach SBA ONLINE via your computer at 1 800 697-4636; or in
the Washington Metropolitan Area at 202 401-9600. The SBA ONLINE  home page is on the Internet at:
.

   Each of the six area offices of the SBA's Office of Government Contracting, and two offices in the
Washington, DC, area have an employee designated as a size specialist.  Their addresses and telephone
numbers are as follows:
1.  Office of Government Contracting
   New York Area Office
   U.S. Small Business Administration
   26 Federal Plaza, Suite 3108
   New York, NY 10278
   Phone: 212 264-7756

2.  Office of Government Contracting
   Philadelphia Area Office
   U.S. Small Business Administration
   475 Allendale Road, Suite 201
   King of Prussia, PA 19406
   Phone: 610 962-3723

3.  Office of Government Contracting
   Atlanta Area Office
   U.S. Small Business Administration
   1720 Peachtree Road, NW., Suite 318 North
   Atlanta, GA 30309
   Phone: 404 347-7587

4.  Office of Government Contracting
   Chicago Area Office
   U.S. Small Business Administration
   300 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 1975
   Chicago, IL  60606-6617
   Phone:312353-7674
5.  Office of Government Contracting
   Division of Program Certification and Eligibility
   U.S. Small Business Administration
   4300 Amon Carter, Suite 116
   Ft. Worth, TX 76155
   Phone:817334-5915

6.  Office of Government Contracting
   San Francisco Area Office
   U.S. Small Business Administration
   71 Stevenson Street, 20th Floor
   San Francisco, CA 94105-2939
   Phone:415744-6844

7.  Office of Size Standards
   U.S. Small Business Administration
   409 Third Street, SW.
   Washington, DC 20416
   Phone:202205-6618

8.  Office of Industrial Assistance
   U.S. Small Business Administration
   409 Third Street, SW.
   Washington, DC 20416
   Phone: 202 205-6475
Appendix G
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