STATE OF NEW MEXICO
         WATER   QUALITY   STANDARDS   SUMMARY
                           FEBRUARY 1970
U. S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
FEDERAL WATER POLLUTION CONTROL ADMINISTRATION
        NEW MEXICO
WATER QUALITY BOARD

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                           PREFACE
This summary is  intended for use by those who have an interest
in the water quality standards of the State of New Mexico.

The  information contained herein  has  been summarized from six
documents and amendments thereto prepared under the direction
of the New  Mexico Water Quality  Control Commission. These
documents,  dated  June  1967  and subsequent amendments, have
been approved as official State and Federal Water Quality Standards
by  the Secretary  of the  Interior and have  the following titles:

   1.  "Implementation and Enforcement  Plan for  Water  Quality
       Control in New  Mexico."

   2.  "W_ater Quality Standards for the San Juan,  La Plata, and
       Animas Rivers in New Mexico."

   3.  "Water Quality Standards  for the Gila and San Francisco
       River in New Mexico."

   4,  "Water Quality Standards for the Rio Grande in New Mexico."

   5.  "Water Quality Standards for the Pecos River in New Mexico."

   6.  "Water Quality Standards  for  the  Canadian  River  in New
       Mexico."

A  summarization  of this type, of necessity, omits some  details.
For  more detailed' information the user should  refer to the com-
plete text of the documents cited  and  amendments  thereto or the
New Mexico Water Quality Control Commission.
                          February 1970

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                         CONTENTS
                                                       Page


    Introduction                                            1
    Water Uses                                             3
    Water Quality Standards                                  7
    Implementation Plan                                    20
    Definition of Terms                                     26
    State and Federal Agency Addresses                      29
                          TABLES
 I.  Water Use Designations                                  5
II.  Water Quality Standards                                 18
                          FIGURES

 I.  State of New Mexico

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          SUMMARY OF WATER QUALITY STANDARDS

                             FOR

          THE  INTERSTATE WATERS OF  NEW MEXICO

INTRODUCTION
Congress authorized the  establishment of water quality standards
for interstate  (including coastal) water by passage of the Water
Quality Act of 1965. The purpose of these standards is to protect
and enhance the quality and productivity of the Nation's interstate
waters  to serve a  variety of beneficial uses, such as public water
supply, recreation  and protection of aquatic life, and industrial
and agricultural uses.  This publication summarizes the standards
for the general information of the American public and Federal,
State,  and  local officials  as to the uses  and associated require-
ments for interstate waterways in New Mexico.

The  Act, which  amended  the Federal  Water Pollution  Control
Act,  provided  for  the States to have the first opportunity to es-
tablish  standards for  their interstate waters,  which were then
subject to  review  and approval  by the Secretary of the Interior.
All of  the  States,  the District  of Columbia and the Territories
of Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands participated in this
landmark effort  to set standards.  In the course  of establishing
the standards, public hearings were held  by the States and other
jurisdictions  noted above to  give the public  an opportunity to
participate  in setting water  quality objectives  and  standards.

New Mexico adopted standards for its interstate  waters  on June
7, 1967, which were then submitted to the Department of the In-
terior.  Subsequently,  certain  revisions were made by the  State
in the original standards, and the Secretary of the  Interior approved
the standards,  as revised on July 9, 1968,  with certain exceptions.

At the request of the Secretary of the Interior, New Mexico adopted
a policy to  protect  its high quality interstate waters, and revised
all other criteria excepted from approval.

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The Secretary  of the Interior  totally approved  New  Mexico's
Water  Quality Standards as  Federal  standards  by his  letter of
August 21, 1969. The  approved standards are thus both State and
Federal  standards. Protection of the standards is achieved under
the New  Mexico water pollution  control statutes, the New Mexico
Water  Quality Act, and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act,
as  amended  (Section  10). The waters for which standards were
adopted are shown on the map  in Figure I.

The standards consist of three major components: designations
of the uses  which  interstate waters are to serve, specification
of narrative  and  numerical criteria to protect and enhance water
quality, and  specification of a plan of implementation and  enforce-
ment,  which  includes treatment and  control  requirements  for
municipal, industrial,  and other  waste  discharged to or  affecting
interstate waters. These components are discussed in the following
sections;  all  three are essential to a complete standards program.

The standards are  now being implemented. However,  there will
be continuing research on water quality requirements for various
beneficial  uses  and improved collection and evaluation  of water
quality data.  As more  information  becomes  available  and ex-
perience with implementing the standards is gained the standards
will be  refined  and  improved  to  reflect this new knowledge.

Should more  detailed  information be  required on any aspect of
the standards, it may be obtained  from the New Mexico Water
Quality Control Commission or the Federal Water Pollution Control
Administration Regional  Office  in  Dallas,  Texas. Constituent
agencies  of  the New Mexico  Water Quality Control Commission
are the  State Game and Fish Department, the Oil Conservation
Commission,  the State  Engineer Office  and Interstate Stream
CommJssion, the State Department of Agriculture,  the Parks and
Recreation Commission,  and  the  Health and Social Services De-
partment. The addresses of these agencies  are provided on page
33.

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WATER USES
All beneficial uses are allowed. Certain reaches are  designated
for higher  standards to protect fishing and recreation.  Existing
water  uses  in  the State  of New Mexico include: agriculture and
livestock;  municipal and  rural  domestic uses; fish, wildlife and
recreation; industrial and m'.litary applications; evaporation from
streams,  rivers,  adjacent uncultivated  lands,  and stock ponds;
transpiration from native vegetation; and nonbeneficial  uses, such
as, willows, cottonwood trees,  and  salt  cedars.  Synoptic  use-
designations for the  interstate waters covered by the New Mexico
Standards are provided in Table I,

The general aim  in designating uses for particular  interstate
waters  is to recognize present  uses  and practicable future uses,
to provide where possible for a variety of uses. In order to satisfy
the intent of the Federal  Water Pollution Control Act  to enhance
water  quality,  the standards  specifically provide that no inter-
state  waters may be used solely or primarily for waste assimila-
tion.

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                                     MAJOR INTERSTATE WATERS
i
        STATE
    FIGURE I



of    NEW   MEXICO

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TABLE I
INTERSTATE STREAM
SAN JUAN RIVER BASIN
STREAM:
NAVAJO RESERVOIR IN NEW MEXICO
THE MAIN STEM OF THE SAN JUAN RIVER FROM
NAVAJO DAM DOWNSTREAM TO N. M HIGHWAY 17 AT
BLANCO, NEW MEXICO, 8 THE MAIN STEM OF THE
ANIMAS RIVER FROM THt NEW MEXICO - COLORADO
LINE DOWNSTREAM TO U.S. HIGHWAY 550 AT AZTEC,
NEW MEXICO, a THE LOS PINOS a NAVAJO RIVERS
IN NEW MEXICO.
r
THE MAIN STEM OF THE SAN JUAN FROM N. M. Lj
HIGHWAY 17 AT BLANCO, NEW MEXICO DOWNSTREAM
TO THE POINT WHERE THE SAN JUAN LEAVES NEW MEXICO a RE-ENTERS
COLORADO 8 THE MAIN STEM OF THE ANIMAS RIVER FROM U.S. HIGHWAY
550 AT AZTEC, NEW MEXICO DOWNSTREAM TO ITS JUNCTION WITH THE
SAN JUAN RIVER a THE MANCOS RIVER.
GILA RIVER 8 SAN FRANCISCO
RIVER BASIN
STREAM:
THE MAIN STEM OF THE SAN FRANCISCO RIVER JN NE
STATE ROAD 12 AT RESERVE , NEW MEXICO, & THE It
WEST FORKS OF THE GILA RIVER FROM THEIR HEADWX
TO GILA HOT SPRINGS, NEW MEXICO.
THE MAIN STEM OF THE SAN FRANCISCO FROM
STATE ROAD 12 AT RESERVE, NEW MEXICO
DOWNSTREAM TO THE POINT WHERE THE SAN
FRANCISCO LEAVES NEW MEXICO a ENTERS
ARIZONA , a THE MAIN STEM OF THE GILA
RIVER FROM GILA HOT SPRINGS, NEW MEXICO
DOWNSTREAM TO WHERE IT LEAVES THE STATE
OF NEW MEXICO

W MEXICO ABOVE
kST , MIDDLE a
(TERS DOWNSTREAM


./ ' 	
RIO GRANDE BASIN
STREAM:
THE MAIN STEM OF THE RIO GRANDE & THE RIO
CHAMA FROM COCHITI 0AM UPSTREAM TO NEW MEXICO -
COLORADO LINE AT ALL FLOWS.
THE MAIN STEM OF THE RIO GRANDE FROM THE HEA
WATERS OF ELEPHANT BUTTE RESERVOIR UPSTREAM
TO COCHITI DAM.
THE MAIN STEM OF THE RIO GRANDE FROM ONE
MILE BELOW PERCHA DAM TO THE HEAD WATERS
OF ELEPHANT BUTTE RESERVOIR.
THE MAIN STEM OF THE RIO GRANDE FROM THE
INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY a WATER COMMISSION
SAMPLING STATION ABOVE AMERICAN DAM AT
EL PASO, TEXAS UPSTREAM TO ONE MILE BELOW P
D
M ,
f
%
-r-33
ERCHA DAM.
WATER USES
PUBLIC WATER
SUPPLY
INDUSTRIAL WATER
SUPPLY
IRRIGATION
LIVESTOCK
FISH a WILDLIFE
PROPAGATION
EVAPORATION -
TRANSPI RATION
RECREATION (which
may or may not include
body contact aquatic
sport*.)

X
X
X

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

X
X


X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

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TABLE I
INTERSTATE STREAM
PECOS RIVER BASIN
STREAM:
THE MAIN STEM OF THE PECOS RIVER FROM
ANTON CHICO.NEW MEXICO TO THE HEAD WATERS.
THE MAIN STEM OF THE PECOS RIVER FROM
TANSIL LAKE UPSTREAM TO ANTON CHICO, NEW
MEXICO.
FROM HARROUN DAM UPSTREAM TO TANSIL LAKE.
THE MAIN STEM OF THE PECOS RIVER FROM THE
NEW MEXICO -TEXAS LINE UPSTREAM TO HARROUN
DAM.

Jl
CANADIAN RIVER BASIN
STREAM:
THE MAIN STEM OF THE CANADIAN RIVER FROM
THE NEW MEXICO -COLORADO LINE DOWNSTREAM
TO TAYLOR SPRINGS 8 FOR CHICORICA CREEK
FROM THE NEW MEXICO -COLORADO LINE
DOWNSTREAM TO LAKE ALICE DAM.
THE MAIN STEM OF THE CANADIAN RIVER FROM
TAYLOR SPRINGS DOWNSTREAM TO THE NEW
MEXICO- TEXAS LINE INCLUDING CONCHAS
RESERVOIR S LITE LAKE.

-i* 	










WATER USES
PUBLIC WATER
SUPPLY
INDUSTRIAL WATER
SUPPLY

X



X
X
X
X
IRRIGATION
LIVESTOCK
FISH a WILDLIFE
PROPAGATION

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
EVAPORATION -
TRANSPI RATION

X
X
X
X

X
.X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
RECREATION (which
may or may not include
body contact aquatic
sports.)

X
X
X
X

X
X

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WATER QUALITY STANDARDS


The protection of water quality  and  uses requires the establish-
ment of  numerical   and  narrative  limits  on pollutants which
damage these uses. Numberical standards are used wherever it
is necessary or reasonable to do  so. However, narrative standards
are  also  necessary  in  some cases, particularly  with respect to
aesthetic considerations.

Stream  standards seek to protect the quality of the surface waters
of the State of New Mexico,, The standards specified for the various
streams are  intended to  accomplish the following:

    1.  to  provide as  high a quality of water as practicable for
       beneficial uses.

    2.  to  preclude pollution of the stream, and in this fashion to
       enhance the quality of the  stream.

    3.  to  protect  the  quality of the water stored in the reservoirs
       of  the stream system.

It should  be  noted that these standards are stream standards and
not  effluent  standards,  as samples  taken  for the administration
of  these  standards are to  be  collected at the mid-point of the
stream  flow  at locations  a sufficient distance downstream from
the  point  of introduction  of  a  wastewater  inflow to provide for
reasonable mixing of  the stream and the inflowing water. Where
stratification exists,  other  sampling  techniques may be employed.
Sampling  in  reservoirs  and lakes for the purpose of the standards
may be at any point in the body of the water, bat not closer than
250  feet  from the point of  inroduction of  a water contaminant.
A reservoir or lake is considered to include all of the area flooded
when the water in the basin is  at the spillway level.

The appropriation of water in the  State of New Mexico is subject
to the application of  water to beneficial use. The appropriative
right to water does not include the right to pollute, but concomitant
to use is the degradation of quality to some  degree. Thus, inherent

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with the beneficial use of water is some deterioration of its quality.
Degradation  is  not considered  to  be readily preventable by
economical treatment methods. For those  interstate  waters with
a higher quality  than the minimum levels assigned for protection
of water uses,  the standards seek to protect this higher quality
as much as possible in the face of increasing social and economic
development.  New Mexico  adopted the following provision which
was  approved November  19, 1968, by the Secretary of the Interior
for the protection of New Mexico's high quality waters:

      Degradation of waters  whose existing quality is better than
      the stream standards established by the New Mexico Water
      Quality Control Commission, unless  justifiable as a result
      of necessary economic or social development, is not reason-
      able degradation  and is  subject to  abatement under the
      authority granted  the  Commission  by  the Water  Quality
      Act  of 1967. To  protect  the existing quality of water, the
      effluent  standards established by the  Commission  under
      that  act will require the highest and best degree of effluent
      treatment  practicable,  In  implementing this paragraph, the
      Commission  through the appropriate  regional offices of
      the Federal Water Pollution Control  Administration will
      keep the Secretary of the Interior advised and provided with
      such  information  concerning the interstate waters of New
      Mexico as he will need  to discharge  his responsibilities
      under  the Federal  Water  Pollution  Control Act (PL 84-
      660), as amended.

Insomuch as  possible, the New Mexico  Standards  are  tailored
to present water quality  or that quality anticipated to result from
installation of high-degree waste treatment facilities.  These stan-
dards as applied to interstate  waters are outlined in Table II.
GENERAL STANDARDS

The following general standards  apply to all interstate waters
in New Mexico regardless of the  magnitude of flow. Detection of
an infraction of these standards in a single sample shall be suf-
ficient cause for investigation with the sources  of pollution subject
to abatement  in accordance with regulations  of the New Mexico
Water Quality Control Commission.

    1.  Odor and  Taste  of  Fish  -  Water  contaminants shall be
       limited to concentrations  in the receiving water that will
       not impart  unpalatable flavor to  fish, or result in offensive
       odor  arising  from the stream or  otherwise interfere with
       the  reasonable  use  of the  water. Materials of natural
       origin  affecting  odor and  taste of fish are not subject to
       this section.

                               8

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2.  Floating Solids, Oil and Grease - Receiving waters shall
    be  free  of objectionable floating solids, oils, and grease
    where these  materials  come  from  other  than  natural
    sources.

3.  pH  - pH of the receiving  water should be within the range
    6.6  to 8.6.   Sudden fluctuation  of  pH  from  that normally
    found at a particular  sampling station shall be subject to
    study. If  these fluctuations  of  pH  are   considered  to be
    inimical to beneficial uses, sources of pollution are subject
    to abatement.  Changes  attributed to  natural causes  are
    not  subject to this section.

4.  Turbidity - Turbidity of receiving waters shall not reduce
    light  transmission to the  point that existing aquatic  life
    in that section of the stream is inhibited or that will cause
    substantial  visible  contrast with natural  appearance  of
    water. Naturally  occurring turbidity  caused  by  silt  and
    suspended  sediment or by the reasonable operation of irri-
    gation or flood control facilities are not subject to these
    regulations.

5.  Color  -  Color  of receiving waters should  not create an
    esthetically undesirable  condition nor  should color impair
    the  use of the water by existing aquatic life with abatement
    action to be taken only where color  is caused by pollution.

6.  Bottom Deposits  - The  stream bottom shall  be free of
    debris and sediment  of other than natural origin that will
    adversely  inhibit  the  growth of normal  stream flora and
    fauna  or   significantly  alter  the  physical and  chemical
    properties  of the bottom.

7.  Toxic  Substances  -  Toxic  substances  such as,  but  not
    limited to, pesticides, herbicides, heavy metals,  and or-
    ganics,  shall  not be present in receiving waters  in con-
    centrations  which will  change  the  ecology  of receiving
    waters to  an  extent detrimental to  existing forms  of life
    or which  are toxic to human, plant, fish and animal life.
    Toxicities  of  substances in receiving waters will be de-
    termined  by  appropriate  bioassay  techniques,  or other
    acceptable  means, for the particular form of aquatic life
    which  is to be preserved with the concentrations of the
    toxic  materials not to  exceed 10 percent of the 48-hour
    median tolerance limit.

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   8.  Radionuclides - The  concentration of radioactivity will be
       maintained  at  the lowest practical level.  Radionuclides
       shall  not be  present  in receiving waters in concentrations
       that  are inimical to  aquatic  life or that will, after con-
       ventional  drinking water treatment, prevent meeting the
       U. S. Public Health Service 1962 Drinking Water Standards
       or be greater than  1/30 of the 168 hour value for other
       radioactive substances specified in the   "National Bureau
       of Standards  Handbook 69."


SPECIAL STANDARDS

In addition to the general standards,  special standards have been
adopted  to protect  the  waters  of  New  Mexico for both  existing
and for potential future  uses. In addition to the quality character-
istics  protected  by the  general standards, the most significant
criteria  for a fishing  water is the dissolved oxygen (DO)  concen-
tration. Trout, or cold-water fish,  require a higher minimum DO
than do  warm-water  fish.  The  DO  concentration  in water is
directly  dependent upon  the  water  temperature  because the solu-
bility  of oxygen decreases as the water  temperature increases.
The  biochemical  oxygen demand  is a  measure  of the organic
matter in  solution  and  in suspension  in the  stream. Thus, the
special standards for this purpose differ from one reach to the
next,  depending upon water  temperature and the type of fish life
possible. Special standards are also designed to protect the waters
of these rivers for their continued use for domestic and municipal
supplies and for recreational purposes. Special standards to pro-
tect  the chemical  quality of the water for these same purposes
and for irrigation and industrial use are provided.

   1.  Temperature - Special standards under  this section apply
       at any point on  the  river's course between the indicated
       stations  at  all times. Detection of an infraction  of these
       standards in a sampling period shall be sufficient  cause
       for  investigation  with the sources of pollution subject to
       abatement. Deviations from the  established speqial stan-
       dards  as a  result of  natural causes  shall not constitute
       an infraction of these standards.

       a.  For  Trout - The temperature of lakes and  streams
           shall not exceed 70 degrees F.  The introduction of heat
           in a  stream  shall not increase the temperature of the
           water, as  measured  above  the  point  of introduction,
           more than 2 degrees F., provided that this temperature
           standard shall not apply to impoundments constructed
           offstream or  on  ephemeral streams for the  purpose
           of heat disposal.
                               10

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For Warm-Water Fish  - The  temperature of lakes
and streams shall not exceed 93 degrees F0 The intro-
duction of  heat  in  a stream  shall  not  increase the
temperature of the water, as measured above the point
of introduction,  more than 5 degrees F., provided that
this temperature standard shall not apply to impound-
ments  constructed offstream or on ephemeral streams
for the purpose of heat disposal,,

Exceptions - Three exceptions to the above temperature
criteria and the stream reach they cover are listed
below:

(1)  For the main stem of the Pecos River  from the
    New Mexico-Texas  line  upstream to Anton Chico,
    New Mexico. The temperature of lakes and streams
    shall  not exceed 93 degrees F.  The introduction
    of heat in a stream shall not increase the temper-
    ature of the water,  as measured above the point
    of introduction,  more than 5 degrees F.; provided,
    however, that  in the reach from Tansil Lake to
    Harroun Dam the introduction of heat in the stream
    may  increase the  temperature  of the water,  as
    measured  above the point of  introduction by not
    more  than  9 degrees F.  These standards apply
    at all flows.

(2)  For the main stem of  the Rio  Grande  from the
    headwaters of Elephant Butte Reservoir upstream
    to Cochiti  Dam.  Temperature of receiving  waters
    should  not be such  so as to render the water un-
    suitable for  beneficial use nor should the temper-
    ature of the receiving water be increased so as to
    result in a water pollution condition. These stan-
    dards apply to all flows.

(3)  For the main stem of  the Rio  Grande  from the
    International  Boundary  and Water  Commission
    sampling station above American Dam at El Paso,
    Texas upstream to  one mile below Percha Dam.
    Temperature of receiving  waters should  not  be
    such  so as  to  render the water  unsuitable  for
    beneficial use nor should the temperature of  the
    receiving water  be increased  so as to result in
    a  water pollution condition. These standards apply
    to all flows.
                     11

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2.  Dissolved Oxygen and Biochemical Oxygen Demand

    a.   For Trout  - Materials in  solution and in  suspension
        which  exert  an oxygen demand, shall not be present in
        concentrations sufficient to reduce the dissolved oxygen
        in the stream to 50 percent of the saturation concen-
        tration or to  6,0  mg/1, whichever yields the higher
        value. A lower dissolved  oxygen concentration  in  a
        single sample will be  cause for  investigation of the
        sources  of pollution by the Commission, with the source
        of any pollution subject to abatement.,

    b.   For Warm-Water Fish - Materials in solution and in
        suspension which  exert an oxygen demand, shall not be
        present  in concentrations sufficient to reduce the dis-
        solved oxygen in the stream to 50 percent of  the satura-
        tion concentration  for longer than 8 hours per 24-hour
        period   for  the particular  stream conditions or 5.0
        mg/1  whichever is the higher oxygen concentration.
        A dissolved  oxygen concentration below 400 mg/1 in a
        single sample will be  cause for  investigation of the
        source, with pollution subject to abatement.

    c.   Exceptions  -  The following exceptions  apply to  the
        stream reach as shown:

        (1)  For Navajo Lake  - Materials in solution or  sus-
            pension which exert an oxygen demand  shall not
            be present in any portion of the lake in concentra-
            tions sufficient to reduce the dissolved oxygen in
            the  lake as measured in the epilimnion  (that region
            of the lake that  extends from the surface to the
            thermocline and does not have a permanent tem-
            perature stratification) to 50 percent of the
            saturation concentration or to 6.0 mg/1 whichever
            yields the higher value.

        (2)  For the main stem of the Rio Grande  from the
            headwaters of Elephant Butte Reservoir upstream
            to  Cochiti Dam.   Materials  in solution  and  sus-
            pension which exert an oxygen demand  shall not
            be present in concentrations which will deplete the
            dissolved oxygen  in the  stream  to  a point that
            water pollution exists. These  standards apply to
            all  flows.

        (3)  For the main stem of the Rio Grande  from the
            International   Boundary and  Water Commission
            sampling  station above American Dam at El Paso,
            Texas upstream to one mile below Percha  Dam.
            Tne average  BOD as determined during any 3-day
            sampling period shall not exceed 10 mg/1. A 3-day

                           12

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                sampling period is three  consecutive days during
                which samples are collected  at 4-hour  intervals
                and composited in proportion to  flow into a daily
                sample which  is analyzed for the particular con-
                stituent. The average dissolved oxygen concentra-
                tion in the stream shall not be less than 5.0 mg/1
                during any  one-day sampling period,, A one-day
                sampling  period   is any  24-hour  period during
                which samples are collected at one-hour intervals
                for  analysis  for  a  particular constituent.  This
                standard  applies  at times  when  the flow in the
                river  equals  or  exceeds 350  cfs at  El  Paso.


       Fecal Coliform Bacteria* - Five consecutive  daily stream
       samples collected under similar conditions shall not exceed
       the values set at designated  flows measured in cubic feet
       per second (cfs) for the stream reach as shown in Table II.
       It should be noted  that geometric average is designated on
       stream  reaches, where body contact recreation  uses are
       to be protected and  arithmetic on other  stream reaches.

       Dissolved  Ionic Constituents  -  The Commission will make
       every  practical effort  to limit the degree of degradation
       resulting from an increase  in the  dissolved  ionic  con-
       stituents of the waters.

       a.  Main stem of  the  San Juan,  La  Plata, Animas, San
           Francisco, and Gila Rivers - Reasonable degradation
           of  water quality  resulting from beneficial use shall be
           allowed.  The Commission will, however, make  every
           effort  to lim't the degree of degradation resulting from
           an increase in the  dissolved ionic constituents of the
           waters  within  the  specific reach. Full consideration
           will be given to all practical methods within the current
           technology to limit, control and/or reduce the degree
           and  nature of  the  deterioration. Future development
           and utilization  of these water resources for expansion
           of  irrigated agriculture,  increases in population,  and
           industrial growth will  be accompanied by progressive
           increases in consumptive losses of water and  attendant
           increases in concentration of dissolved solids.
*As  determined  by any  method  prescribed in the most current
edition of "Standard Methods".
                              13

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b0  Rio Grande - Relatively long-term records of chemical
    analysis are  available for six points on the main stem
    of the Rio Grande in New  Mexico, with  the principal
    sources of this  information being the U0  S. Geological
    Survey and the International Boundary and Water Com-
    mission.  These  analyses are  for  a  number  of con-
    stituents  but  the most important for chemical  quality
    control purposes are the common  cations and anions,
    with chlorides and sulfates  usually the principal anion
    constituents.  It  will be possible to monitor the river
    for pollution by establishing  standards for  these two
    anions and for  total dissolved solids  at points along
    the river for which records are available. At very low
    flows, the concentration of  some of the chemical con-
    stituents is quite high and quite variable but these flows
    represent  a  relatively small  part  of  the total water
    supply of the river. To allow for these low  flow periods,
    the standards are not imposed below certain flows.
    Because  of the regulation   of the  flow  of  the Rio
    Grande by  dams  and reservoirs,  the experience  at
    many of the stations is that either relatively high flows
    exist or that there  is virtually  no flow.

    Special standards for this purpose apply only to samples
    collected at the  station indicated and only for  periods
    during which the monthly average  flow equaled or ex-
    ceeded the  indicated  minim am.  Samples shall  be
    collected and  analyzed in a manner similar to that used
    by the agency which has  maintained the indicated sta-
    tion  in the past. The Commission  will initiate an in-
    vestigation  to determine the source of pollution should
    the conditions required by the  special standards in this
    section not  be  met during more  than one calendar
    month in any water year, with any pollution found sub-
    ject to abatement.
    (1)  For the  main  stem of  the  Rio Grande in New
        Mexico above the U. S. Geological Survey sampling
        station at Otowi  Bridge. These standards shall
        not apply during months when the average monthly
        flow falls below 100 cfs at Otowi Bridge.

        (a)   Chlorides  - The monthly average concentra-
             tion  of chlorides  shall not exceed 25 mg/1 as
             determined by chemical  analysis of the sam-
             ples  collected at  the U0  S0 Geological Survey
             gaging station at  Otowi Bridge, New Mexico.
                        14

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    (b)  Sulfates - The monthly average concentration
         of  sulfates shall not exceed 150 mg/1 as de-
         termined by chemical analysis of the samples
         collected  at the  U0 S.  Geological Survey
         gaging station at Otowi Bridge, New Mexico.

    (c)  Total Dissolved Solids - The monthly average
         concentration  of total dissolved solids shall
         not exceed 500 mg/1 as determined by chemi-
         cal analysis of the samples collected at the
         U. S. Geological Survey  gaging  station  at
         Otowi Bridge, New Mexico.

(2)  For the main  stem of  the Rio Grande from Otowi
    Bridge  downstream to the U_ S. Geological Survey
    sampling   station at San Marcial,  New  Mexico.
    These  standards shall  not apply  during months
    when the  average monthly flow falls below 100 cfs
    at San Marcial,,

    (a)  Chlorides - The monthly average  concentra-
         tion  of chlorides  shall not exceed 250 mg/1
         as  determined  by chemical analysis of samples
         collected at the U.  S. Geological Survey gaging
         station at San Marcial, New Mexico,,

    (b)  Sulfates - The monthly average concentration
         of  sulfates shall not exceed 500 mg/1 as de-
         termined by chemical analysis of the samples
         collected at the U.  S. Geological Survey gaging
         station at San Marcial, New Mexico.

    (c)  Total Dissolved Solids - The monthly average
         concentration  of total dissolved solids shall
         not exceed  1,500  mg/1  as determined by
         samples  collected  at the  U. S.  Geological
         Survey gaging  station  at  San Marcial, New
         Mexico.
                     15

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    (3)  For  the main  stem of the Rio Grande from San
        Marcial downstream to the International Boundary
        and  Water  Commission  sampling station  above
        American Dam at El Paso, Texas (reported as the
        Rio  Grande  at  El  Paso). These  standards shall
        not apply during months when the average monthly
        flow falls below 350 cfs at the International Boun-
        dary Commission sampling station above American
        Dam.

        (a)   Chlorides  - The monthly average concentra-
             tion of chlorides  shall not exceed 400 mg/1
             as  determined  by chemical  analysis of the
             samples collected by the International Boun-
             dary  and Water Commission at the El Paso,
             Texas sampling point.

        (b)   Sulfates - The monthly averageconcentration of
             sulfates shall not exceed 500 mg/1 as determined
             by chemical analysis of the samples collected by
             International Boundary and Water Commission
             at  their El  Paso,  Texas  sampling  point.

        (c)   Total Dissolved Solids - The monthly average
             concentration of total dissolved  solids shall
             not  exceed  2000  mg/1   as  determined  by
             chemical analysis of the samples collected
             by  International Boundary and Water  Com-
             mission at their  El  Paso, Texas sampling
             point.

c.  Pecos River - There is a general degradation  in the
    chemical quality  of water as it is used, or when water
    water is stored  for future uses and for  recreational
    purposes; this  degradation becoming  more noticable
    as the river proceeds downstream.  Special standards
    to protect the  chemical quality must be related to
    points where sampling stations have been maintained
    for long periods  of time. For this reason the river is
    divided  into separate reaches for  special standards
    related to these characteristics.
                       16

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    Relatively long-term records of chemical analysis are
    available  for five points on the main stem of the Pecos
    River in New Mexico with the principal source  of this
    information being the  U. S. Geological Survey. These
    analyses are for a number of constituents bat the most
    important  for  chemical  quality control  purposes are
    the common cations  and anions,  with  chlorides and
    sulfates usually the principal anion constituents. It will
    be possible to monitor  the river for pollution by es-
    tablishing  standards for these two anions and for total
    dissolved  solids  at points  along the  river for which
    records are  available. At very low flows, the concen-
    tration  of some  of the chemical constituents is quite
    high and  quite  variable,  but these flows represent a
    relatively  small part  of the total  water supply of the
    river.  Because of its hydrologic  nature and because
    of the regulation  of  the  flows of the Pecos River by
    dams and reservoirs,  the experience at many points on
    the river is  that  either relatively high flows exist or
    that  there is virtually no flow in the stream. To allow
    for these'low flow periods, and to protect  the quality
    of the stream at high flows, the standards for chlorides,
    sulfates, and total dissolved solids have been formulated
    in terms  of mathematical relationships between flow
    and the concentration of the particular constituent. The
    special  equations  for  determination  of the  stream
    reaches  of the Pecos River  have been intentionally
    omitted so as to prevent any misunderstanding. Those
    people interested in the chlorides, sulfates, and total
    dissolved   solids  criteria  should contact  either the
    State or Federal agency listed on the last page of this
    booklet.

d0  Canadian  River  - Reasonable degradation of water
    quality resulting from beneficial use shall be allowed.
    The  Commission will, however, make every effort to
    limit the  degree  of  degradation resulting from an
    increase  in  the  dissolved ionic  constituents  of the
    waters  within  the specific reach. Full  consideration
    will  be  given to  all practical methods within the cur-
    rent technology  to limit,  control and/or reduce the
    degree  and nature of the deterioration. Because of
    recently constructed projects, the uncertain nature of
    proposed  uses and the limited and incomplete basic
    data concerning  total dissolved  solids, sulfates, and
    chlorides  suitable predictive values  are now available
    at this  time.  When  suitable answers  and data are
    available, numerical values for  total dissolved solids,
    sulfates, and chlorides will be established.
                        17

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TABLE  H
INTERSTATE STREAM
SAN JUAN RIVER BASIN
STREAM:
NAVAJO RESERVOIR IN NEW MEXICO
THE MAIN STEM OF THE SAN JUAN RIVER FROM
NAVAJO DAM DOWNSTREAM TO N M HIGHWAY 17 AT
BLANCO, NEW MEXICO, 8 THE MAIN STEM OF THE
ANIMAS RIVER FROM THE NEW MEXICO- COLORADO
LINE DOWNSTREAM TO U.S HIGHWAY 550 AT AZTEC,
NEW MEXICO, 8 THE LOS PINOS a NAVAJO RIVER
IN NEW MEXICO.
p
THE MAIN STEM OF THE SAN JUAN FROM N M. Lj
HIGHWAY 17 AT BLANCO, NEW MEXICO DOWNSTREAM
TO THE POINT WHERE THE SAN JUAN LEAVES NEW MEXICO 8 RE-ENTERS
COLORADO a THE MAIN STEM OF THE ANIMAS RIVER FROM U.S. HIGHWAY
550 AT AZTEC, NEW MEXICO DOWNSTREAM TO ITS JUNCTION WITH THE
SAN JUAN RIVER 8 THE MANCOS RIVER.
GILA RIVER S SAN FRANCISCO
RIVER BASIN
STREAM:
THE MAIN STEM OF THE SAN FRANCISCO RIVER IN NE
STATE ROAD 12 AT RESERVE, NEW MEXICO, 8 THE U
WEST FORKS OF THE GILA RIVER FROM THEIR HEADW/
TO GILA HOT SPRINGS, NEW MEXICO.
THE MAIN STEM OF THE SAN FRANCISCO FROM
STATE ROAD \Z AT RESERVE, NEW MEXICO
DOWNSTREAM TO THE POINT WHERE THE SAN
FRANCISCO LEAVES NEW MEXICO 8 ENTERS
ARIZONA , 8 THE MAIN STEM OF THE GtLA
RIVER FROM GILA HOT SPRINGS, NEW MEXICO
DOWNSTREAM TO WHERE IT LEAVES THE STATE
OF NEW MEXICO.

W MEXICO ABOVE
tST , MIDDLE 8
HERS DOWNSTREAM


_^ 	
RIO GRANDE BASIN
STREAM.
THE MAIN STEM OF THE RIO GRANDE 8 THE RIO
CHAMA FRO"M COCHITI DAM UPSTREAM TO NEW MEXICO -
COLORADO LINE AT ALL FLOWS.
THE MAIN STEM OF THE RIO GRANDE FROM THE HE*
WATERS OF ELEPHANT BUTTE RESERVOIR UPSTREAM
TO COCHITI DAM.
THE MAIN STEM OF THE RIO GRANDE FROM ONE
MILE BELOW PERCHA DAM TO THE HEAD WATERS
OF ELEPHANT BUTTE RESERVOIR.
THE MAIN STEM OF THE RIO GRANDE FROM THE
INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY a WATER COMMISSION
SAMPLING STATION ABOVE AMERICAN DAM AT
EL PASO, TEXAS UPSTREAM TO ONE MILE BELOW F
tD
Ji -
t_
>ERCHA DAM.
* STANDARDS
TEMPERATURE
|
O
g
U.
0
8

X
X



X
2'F MAX INCREASE
5F MAX. INCREASE
9* FT MAX. INCREASE
DISSOLVED
OXYGEN
MIN. OF 50% SAT.
PROVIDED THE VAIVE
IS NOT LOWER THAN
mg/l

X
X



X



6.0
6.0
5.0
BACTERIA
FECAL COLIFORM)
200/100 ml
GEOMETRIC AVG.

X


2,000/IOOml
ARITHMETIC AVG.


X

9.0OO/IOO ml
ARITHMETIC AVG.



X
pH
IO
00
o
i-
u>
u>
MINERAL
SEE
NARRATIVE
STANDARDS
OTHER
SEE
GENERAL
STANDARDS

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

X


X
X


X


6.0
5.0

X

X


SEE
PAGE
It

X

X

SEE
PAGE
II
6.0
SEE
PAGE
12
5.0
5.0



X

X

X
X


X
X
X
X
X
X




X
>330
eft

X

X
<350
Cfl
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
 18
NOTE! The  General  Standards are an integral
      part of  these  requirements.

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TABLE
INTERSTATE STREAM
PECOS RIVER BASIN
STREAM.
THE MAIN STEM OF THE PECOS RIVER FROM
ANTON CHICO, NEW MEXICO TO THE HEAD WATERS.
THE MAIN STEM OF THE PECOS RIVER FROM
TANSIL LAKE UPSTREAM TO ANTON CHICO, NEW
MEXICO.
FROM HARROUN DAM UPSTREAM TO TANSIL LAKE.
THE MAIN STEM OF THE PECOS RtVER FROM THE
NEW MEXICO - TEXAS LINE UPSTREAM TO HARROUN
DAM.

J.
CANADIAN RIVER BASIN
STREAM:
THE MAIN STEM OF THE CANADIAN RIVER FROM
THE NEW MEXICO- COLORADO LINE DOWNSTREAM
TO TAYLOR SPRINGS a FOR CHICORICA CREEK
FROM THE NEW MEXICO- COLORADO LINE
DOWNSTREAM TO LAKE ALICE DAM
THE MAIN STEM OF THE CANADIAN RIVER FROM
TAYLOR SPRINGS DOWNSTREAM TO THE NEW
MEXICO -TEXAS LINE INCLUDING CONCHAS
RESERVOIR 8 UTE LAKE.

-r J 	






-
^STANDARDS
TEMPERATURE
X
i
u.
o
R

X



g
Z
u:
o
ro
0>
2F MAX. INCREASE
UJ
CO
li-
9 IT MAX. INCREASE
DISSOLVED
OXYGEN
MIN. OF 50% SAT.
PROVIDED THE VALVE
IS NOT lWER THAN
mg/l.
BACTERIA
(FECAL COUFORM) pH
200/100 ml
GEOMETRIC AVG.
2,000/roo qti
AWITffMETIC AVO
5,000/100 ml
ARITHMETIC AVG.
CD
CO
o
1-
co
to
MINERAL
SEE
NARRATIVE
STANDARDS
OTHER
SEE
GENERAL
STANDARDS


X
X
X
X




X

X


X

6.0
5.0
5.0
5.0
X
X
X
X








X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

X


X
X


X


6.0
5.0


X



X
X
X
X
X
X
       NOTE! The General Standards are an  integral
             part of these requirements.

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IMPLEMENTATION PLAN
The "action" plan of the standards is the plan of implementation
and  enforcement.  This plan sets forth the requirements for treat-
ment and/or control of all  conventional municipal and industrial
waste  discharges  in  the  State which affect  interstate waters,
specifies the time within which this is to be accomplished, and con-
tains programs for dealing  with  other  water pollution  control
problems.  All municipal treatment plants have secondary treat-
ment* in  New Maxico.  All industrial wastes are to receive the
equivalent of  secondary treatment or control by 1972. Information
on  the  requirements for any particular waste discharge  may be
obtained from the New Mexico Water Quality Control Commission
or one  of its  constituent agencies   Information concerning waste
discharges from  facilities for the production refinement and pipe-
line transmission of oil and gas, or products thereof, is available
from the Oil Conservation Commission; Health and Social Services
Department administers other waste discharges.

As  stated  earlier, the New Mexico Water Quality Control Com-
mission is the official water pollution control body for the State
with constituent agencies comprised of the State Game and Fish
Department, the Oil Conservation Commission, the State Depart-
ment of Agriculture,  the Parks  and Recreation Commission, the
State Engineer Office  and  Interstate  Stream  Commission,  and
Health and Social Services  Department. By legislation, the Water
Quality  Control Commission consists of the  Directors of these
constituent agencies.

The Water  Quality  Control Commission  does not  have  a staff,
and  it has  designated general duties to constituent State agencies
as follows:

    1.  The  Health and  Social  Services  Department - Acts as
       administrative  body  for  the  Commission,  keeps the re-
       cords  of  the  Commission,  administers  Public  Law  660,
       works  with the Federal  Water Pollution Control Adminis-
       tration  as  a  water  pollution  control agency, analyzes
*Commonly defined as that process or group of processes capable
of removing virtually all floating and settleable solids, generally
from 80 to 95 percent of the 5-day biochemical oxygen demand,
and a similar level of removal of suspended solids.
                              20

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       samples collected by the Department and other agencies,
       and files water quality data.

    2.  Department of Game and Fish - Enforces the Water Quality
       Control Commission Regulations to prevent pollution that
       affects the game and fish resources of the State.

    3.  Oil Conservation  Commission  -  Controls pollution from
       oil and gas production activities.

    40  Department of Parks and Recreation - Enforces the Water
       Quality Control Commission Regulations  to prevent pollu-
       tion from small marinas and boats at State park facilities.

    5.  State  Engineer Office and Interstate Stream Commrssion -
       Continue  financing  of  water quality  monitoring stations
       and flow data required by the Commission.

    6.  Department of Agriculture  - Administration of the New
       Mexico Economic  Poison Act, and the New Mexico Pesti-
       cide Applicators Law.

The constituent agencies will strive to obtain voluntary compliance
with the  standards or rules adopted by the Commission. If they
cannot obtain compliance, the problem is turned  over to the Com-
mission for legal action.

Persons  making discharges  of waste water to  the  waters of the
State  are asked  and encouraged to monitor  their discharge on a
regular basis, and to submit  routine monitoring reports  to the
Water  Quality Control Commission. This  self-monitoring may
extend to the  receiving waters. Periodic checks  on these waste
discharges and the receiving waters  are made by county sani-
tarians  who  also  submit  reports  on their  findings to the Water
Quality  Control Commission. Finally, the Water Quality  Control
Commission  makes periodic checks  on the waste  discharges and
the receiving waters.

The program for discharge and receiving stream monitoring may
include all or a portion of the following:

    1.  Municipal Sewage  Treatment Plants,  1.0 million gallons
       per day (mgd),  or More - Daily recording of flow, settleable
       solids,  chlorine residual and contact time.  Three-time-
       weekly  BOD of the  effluent, fecal  coliform bacteria con-
       centration   in  the  effluent  (either  MF or multiple tube
       method), and  stream  tests  above and below the point of
       discharge (at locations to be specified  by the Water Quality
       Control Commission)  to  include  DO, temperature, fecal
                              21

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    coliform bacteria, and visual observations for sludge de-
    posits, oil, grease, or other floating materials,,

2,  Municipal Sewage Treatment  Plants, Less Than 100 mgd -
    Daily recording of flow, settleable solids, chlorine residual
    and contact time, Once per week BOD of the effluent, fecal
    coliform bacteria concentration in the effluent (either M"?
     of  multiple  tube  method), and  stream  tests  above and
    below  the  point of discharge (at locations to  be specified
    by the Water  Quality Control Commission) to include  DO,
    temperature, fecal  coliform bacteria, and visual observa-
    tions  for sludge deposits, oil,  grease, or other  floating
    materials,

30  Industrial  and Irrigation  Waste Discharges - Monitoring
    programs  for  industrial and irrigation waste discharges
    will  be designed  to suit the characteristics  of the waste
    under  question.  The extent of monitoring programs  will
    correspond to the  significance  of the  discharge and its
    potential effect on the receiving waters0 A generalization
    of the tests for various types of wastes is tablulated below:
    Type Waste     Discharge Tests
    Organic
    Mineral
    Toxic
    Cooling
    Sand & Gravel
    Oily
Flow, BOD, COD,
s s
Flow, TD3, Chlo-
rides, 804
Flow, 96-hr TLM
Others as neces-
sary
Flow, Temp.
Flow, Turbidity
Flow, Ether Sol-
uble Materials
Stream Tests

DO, Temp, visual

TDS, Cnlorides,
Stream Live Boxes
Aquarium Studies

Temp. & Chem. Anal.
Turbidity
Visual for oils
    Local  Health  Offices  - The county  sanitarians inspect
    waste  water discharges  on  a  routine basis,  and during
    these  inspections make notes on plant operation and run
    tests  or grab  samples for  analyses.  These  inspections
    are made on a weekly or monthly basis depending upon the
    size and significance of the discharge. Reports summarizing
    the findings of these inspections  and tests are to be sub-
    mitted by the sanitarians to the Health and Social Services
    Department.
                            22

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   5.  Water  Quality Control  Commission - Representatives of
       the Commission  make inspections of all waste water dis-
       charges on  a  routine basis, the frequency depending on the
       size and significance of the discharge and on the need as
       indicated  by  monitoring  programs, reports of persons
       making discharges  and  of county sanitarians. Significant
       discharges  are  to  be  inspected  at  least  once  a year.

Additional  programs for water quality  control include, but  are
not limited to, the following:

   1.  Agricultural Waste  Waters  -  Agricultural use  of water
       affects stream quality through consumptive use of irrigation
       return flows  containing substantially all of the dissolved
       ionic  constituents originally present in the total flow di-
       verted for irrigation.  In addition  to such concentration of
       dissolved  solids, irrigation return  flows may also  contain
       salts leached  from the soil, residue from use of fertilizers
       and m;cro-contam*nants from  the  use  of pesticides  and
       similar materials,,

       Dissolved  ionic  constituents  in  irrigation  return flows
       constitute a source of degradation when these waters reach
       the stream. Economically  feasible  means  of control or
       enhancement of the  quality or irrigation return flows are
       not currently  available.  However, the State of New  Mexico
       will cooperate whenever possible with the Federal Govern-
       ment or others  in meaningful programs or studies aimed
       at improving the quality or irrigation return flows.

   2.  Economic Poisons   -  Control  over  the  use of economic
       poisons in New Mexico  is in two principal areas.  County
       extension  agents  carry out a program to aid farmers and
       ranchers  in the proper  use  of  economic poisons, thereby
       minimizing  possible  damage  to  water  supplies  through
       misuse of the  economic poisons.

       In addition, the  New  Mexico  Department  of Agriculture
       administers two State laws concerning economic poisons. The
       New Mexico Economic Poison Act requires all economic poi-
       sons sold  in  the State  to be registered and approved for
       use by the New Msxico  Department of Agriculture.  Before
       State  approval is granted, the economic poison must be
       registered and approved by the U. S. Department of Agri-
       culture. The Act also  requires  proper labeling  regarding
       use, application, precautions, and container disposal.
                               23

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    The  New  Mexico  Pesticide Applicators Law requires all
    commercial applicators  of pesticides  to take  a  test de-
    monstrating their  knowledge  and  ability  to properly use
    pesticides,, The law  provides  that the applicators must be
    banded. The New Msxico Department of Agriculture grants
    and revokes  licenses  to the applicators  under the terms
    of the law,

3.  Fertilizers - County extension agents carry out a program
    to aid farmers and ranchers intheproper use of fertilizers.
    One  goal  of  this  program is to reduce  the quantities of
    fertilizers  reaching  surface waters,  thereby reducing nu-
    trient enrichment of  these waters.

    In  addition, the New  Mexico  Department of Agriculture
    administers the New Mexico Fertilizer Act which  requires
    that  substances sold  to  promote  plant  growth  must be
    registered  with the State, Fertilizers  must be properly
    labeled as to content.

40  Land  Erosion  - In New Mexico,  one of the principal pro-
    blems  of water quality is that  associated with land erosion.
    Daring periods of high runoff, eroding land contributes to
    sedimentation  of streams  with consequent high suspended
    solids  content and turbidity. A namber of State and  Federal
    agencies have  active  programs  to  control land  erosion
    and stream sedimentation. These programs employ a wide
    variety of  land treatment  and  management practices. Some
    of  these methods  include  grass seeding;  brush control to
    reduce competition with soil holding grasses; soil stabili-
    zation  through ripping, furrowing, and check dams;  pre-
    vention of destructive grazing,  including   fencing;
    reforestation;  detention  dams for controlled releases of
    runoff water; gully dikes; small watershed  dams; terracing;
    and bank protection and stabilization.

50  Other programs to improve water qaality include:

    a.   Malaga Bend Project  - Approximately 20 miles south
        of  Carlsbad, several  natural springs  add brine  to the
        Pecos  River.  This project consists of pumping brine
        from  the  underground formation into an evaporation
        pond to reduce the  brine inflow to the river.

    b0   Pecos  River  Basin  Non-Beneficial Consumptive Use
        Reduction  Program  - This  is a program  to  remove
                            24

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salt-cedars  from land  bordering the Pecos River to
conserve water for beneficial uses downstream,

Rio  Grande  Water  Salvage Project  - This  project
initially consisted of rehabilitating irrigation and drain-
age systems, river channelization, and levee improve-
ments. Later, it was  expanded to include the removal
of salt-cedars  from  land  bordering the Rio Grande.

O'.l and  Gas  Field  Pollution Control - The Oil Con-
servation Commission is responsible for administering
State  laws,  rules and regulations regarding the pre-
vention of water pollution  which nr'ght be a result of
oil and gas operations.

 Pollution  Affecting Game  and  Fish - The State Game
Commission and  Department of Game  and Fish are
responsible  for  the  protection  and enhancement  of
wildlife and their habitat, especially  the waters of the
State,
                    25

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DEFINITION OF TERMS
For  the purposes  of these standards, the  terms employed are
to be  interpreted  in  light of their context in the standards and
their most obvious implication, unless otherwise specifically de-
fined in the text. The folio wing terms have been given more specific
definitions:

   10  Pollution  - Water  pollution  means  introducing or  per-
       mitting the  introduction into water, either directly or in-
       directly, of one  or more water contaminants in such quantity
       and of such duration as will with  reasonable probability
       injure human  health, animal or plant life, or property, or
       to unreasonably  interfere  with the public welfare  or the
       use of property.

   20  Water Contaminant  - Water contaminant means  any  sub-
       stance which  alters the physical, chemical or  biological
       qualities of water.

   30  Wastes - Wastes means sewage,  industrial wastes or any
       other liqaid, gaseous or solid substance which will pollute
       any waters of the State.

   4.  Degradation - Degradation is  used  to describe the de-
       terioration of water  quality which results through beneficial
       uses, but which is  not  readily preventable by economical
       treatment methods.

   5  Treatment Works - Treatment  works means any plant or
       other  works for the purpose of treating,  stabilizing or
       holding wastes 

   60  Conventional Waste-Water Treatment - Conventional waste-
       water  treatment means  one  of  the many economically
       feasible waste-water treatment techniques which have been
       evolved through engineering practice,,

   70  Natural - Natural means nat resultingfrom-mn's activities.
                                         o '
   8.  Dissolved Ionic  Constituents -  This term is used to imply
       the filterable  inorganic substances dissolved in water. For
       practical  purposes, it is taken to be equivalent to the total
                               26

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     dissolved  solids  content of a water as determined by the
     filterable  residue test described on page 245 of the twelfth
     edition  of "Standards Methods for the  Examination of
     Water and Waste-Water."

 9.  Sampling Period  - A sampling period is the time interval
      specified in the language of a particular standard over
     which samples are  to be  collected  for  analysis for the
     detection  of  an   infraction  of  the  particular standard,,

10.  BOD -  5-day, 20 degrees C, biochemical  oxygen demand
     in  mg/1 as  determined by the  dilution  bottle technique
     described  in most current edition of "Standard  Methods
     for the  Examination of Water and Waste-Water," published
     by the American Public Health Association.

11.  DO - Dissolved  oxygen concentration in mg/1 as deter-
     mined by  the unmodified Winkler technique as described
     in  the most current edition of "Standard Methods for the
     Examination  of  Water and Waste-Water," or by an ap-
     propriate  modification of  the Winkler method as described
     in that text.

12.  M?N Technique  - A  method used  to  evaluate  the  most
     probable number  of coliform bacteria in a unit volume of
     water;  for techniques,  see the most current edition of
     "Standard  Methods  for  the Examination  of Water   and
     Waste-Water."

13.  mg/1  -  Milligrams  per  liter;  equivalent to parts  per
     million  (ppm) for waters  with  a specific gravity of one.

14.  Main  Stem  of the  Rio  Grande  - The main Rio Grande
     channel  from the International Boundary and Water Com-
     missions  sampling station above the  American Diversion
     Dam at  El Paso, Texas, upstream to where the Rio Grande
     crosses  the  New Maxico-Colorado line.  The term  main
     stem does not include diversion  canals or  drain  ditches,
     but  does include  the flow in the Rio Grande in conveyance
     channels.

15.  MDnthly  Average  Concentration  -  The monthly  average
     concentration is  the mean value of analytical values ob-
                            27

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     tained for  samples  collected during any calendar month
     when samples representative of each day of the month have
     been collected and analyzed.

16.   Monthly  Flow  Weighted  Average  Concentration  -  The
     monthly  flow  weighted average  concentration is deter-
     mined from monthly composites made by taking from each
     independent water sample an amount of water volumetri-
     cally proportional  to the river flow represented by that
     sample.
                             28

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            STATE AND FEDERAL AGENCY ADDRESSES
A.  STATE

    New Mexico Water Quality Control Commission
    P. (X BOX 2348
    Santa Fe,  New Mexico  87501
      Attn: Water & Liquid Waste Section

    New Mexico Health & Social Services Department
    P. (X BOX 2348
    Santa Fe,  New Mexico  87501

    State Engineer & Interstate Stream Commission
    State Capitol Building
    Santa Fe,  New Mexico  87501

    Department  of Game and Fish
    State Capitol Building
    Santa Fe,  New Mexico  87501

    Oil Conservation Commission
    Land Office  Building
    Santa Fe,  New Mexico  87501

    Department  of Agriculture
    c/o New Mexico State University
    Las Cruces, New Mexico  88001

    State Parks  and Recreation Commission
    141 E,, DeVargas Street
    Santa Fe,  New Mexico  87501

B.  FEDERAL

    South Central Region
    Federal Water Pollution Control Administration
    1402 Elm Street, 3rd Floor
    Dallas, Texas  75202

    Federal Water Pollution Control Administration
    Department of the Interior
    Washington,  D. C. 20242
                              29

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