&EPA
  United States
  Environmental Protection
  Agency
Taking Stock of Your Water System
A Simple Asset Inventory for Very Small
Drinking Water Systems

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Off ice of Water
(4606 M)
EPA  816-K-03-002
www.epa.gov/safewater
October 2004
                                                                                                                  OX
                                                                                                                      Printed on Recycled Paper

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                                                         Contents
Why Take Stock of Your Water System? An Overview of this Brochure 	1
How to Use this Brochure	2
Elements of a Simple Asset Inventory	3
How Long Will It Last? Using the Typical Life Expectancies Table 	4
Asset Inventory Worksheets	5
    Drinking Water Source and Intake Structures 	5
    Treatment System	9
    Tanks	 11
    Distribution System	 13
    Valves	 15
    Electrical Systems	 17
    Buildings	 19
    Service Lines	21
    Hydrants	23
Next Steps: Asset Management Plan	25
    Prioritization Table	26
    Budgeting for Rehabilitations and Replacements	29
    Budgeting Table 	30
How to Carry out the Plan	33
The Role of Key Decision Makers	33
Next Steps 	33
Appendix A: Safe Drinking Water Act Primacy Agencies and Tribal Contacts 	34
Appendix B: Sources of Financial Assistance to Drinking Water Systems	40
Appendix C: Sources for  More Information on Asset Management	42

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Why Take Stock of Your Water System?   An Overview of this Brochure


This brochure is a guide to help very small water systems, such as manufactured home communities and homeowners' associations, assess their condition by
preparing a simple asset inventory.

Knowing what components your system has and what condition they are in will help you maintain the safety, security, and reliability of the drinking water that your
system provides. An asset inventory can help you in the following ways:

          Keeping a precise inventory of your water system can assist you in complying with the federal Safe Drinking Water Act and with your state's drinking
           water regulations by: helping you prepare accurate budgets, identifying concerns, and preparing for future needs (whether financial, growth-related,
           or regulatory).

          Knowing your system's strengths and weaknesses will help you head off sudden or unexpected problems with the system's operation or the quality of
           water it provides.

          Gaining a better overall picture of your system will enable you to spot gaps in your system's security and take steps to address them.

          Knowing the details of your system will enable you to explain its current condition and how it operates. You will be better able to answer questions
           from customers, local health officials, and the media.

Inside this brochure you'll find information and worksheets (both completed examples and blank) to help you prepare an asset inventory and begin to develop a
written asset management plan. You should keep a copy of this brochure with other relevant asset records and refer to them when making decisions about your
system. Contact your  State or Tribal Drinking Water Primacy Agency for help completing the worksheets or for more information on conducting an asset
inventory. Contact information appears in Appendix A.
                                Maintaining and Replacing Your Assets - The Basis of Asset Management
  An important part of conducting an inventory is determining when to repair, rehabilitate, or replace an asset. At some point, continuing to repair the asset will
  no longer be cost-effective and you will need to rehabilitate or replace it. The worksheets in this brochure will help you get a better picture of the current
  condition of your assets, including the ones nearing the end of their useful lives. To further help you manage your assets, EPA has developed Asset
  Management: A Handbook for Small Water Systems. The Handbook can be obtained by calling the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791 and
  requesting document EPA-81 6-R-03-01 6. You can also download it from EPA's Safe Drinking Water Website atwww.epa.gov/safewater/smallsys/ssinfo.htm.

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How to  Use this Brochure
The worksheets on the following pages will enable you to get an idea of the overall state of your water
system. There are worksheets for source and intake structures, treatment system, storage tanks,
distribution system, valves, electrical systems, buildings, service lines, and hydrants.

Carry out the following steps to complete the worksheets:


           Fill in as much information as you can about the asset's characteristics, including quantity, size,
           location, age, and the manufacturer of the components. These characteristics will vary by
           asset type.

   o      Using the estimates from the table, "Typical Life Expectancies of Water System Equipment,"
           on page 4, and taking into account the current condition of each asset, its service history, and
           your experience, estimate an adjusted useful life for each of your assets. Subtract the age of
           your asset from its adjusted useful life to calculate a remaining useful life. Adjusted useful lives
           are the typical life expectancies of water system assets adjusted based on the characteristics
           of your system (e.g., poor source water quality, extreme weather conditions, operation and
           maintenance routines). Adjusted useful lifes can be the same as or lower than typical life
           expectancies.

           Identify the contact information  of the person or company you would call to service each
           component and include a telephone number. If you do not know who to call, you can ask your
           State or Tribal Drinking Water Primacy Agency, parts manufacturers and distributors, or other
           water systems.

   M      Once you've completed the asset inventory worksheets, use them to develop a basic asset
           management plan. Completing the asset management plan worksheets (beginning on page 28)
           will help you prioritize the components that will need to be replaced or rehabilitated, plan for
           the timing of replacement or rehabilitation, and help you determine how much money you'll
           need to set aside each year if you plan to pay for replacements and rehabilitations through cash
           reserves.
    How  Taking Stock of Your Water
  System Can Improve Your System's
                Capacity

"Water system capacity" describes a system's
ability to plan for, achieve, and maintain
compliance with national and local drinking
water standards. System capacity has three
components: technical, managerial, and
financial. Completing this asset inventory will
help you improve all three components by:

   Increasing your knowledge of the physical
    components of your system, which will
    allow you to make better technical and
    managerial decisions.

   Identifying components that may need to be
    replaced or rehabilitated in the near future,
    which will enable you to develop a financial
    plan and research cost-effective options.
 Each worksheet is preceded by a completed example that illustrates how to fill out the worksheet. Refer to
 the example if you have any questions about the sort of information you should include.
  Inventorying your assets can be an intensive job. Get the best information you can, but use estimates if you need to. If you keep up with an asset
  management program, new information will become available as assets are replaced or rehabilitated, and your inventory of assets will improve.

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Elements of a Simple Asset  Inventory
A note to the users of this brochure: It's quite likely that all of the details of the asset management plan presented in this brochure will not apply to every small
drinking water system. You should feel free to modify the worksheets and plan so they conform to the particular needs of your system. Help in using this
document, conducting asset inventories, and preparing future plans is available from your State or Tribal Drinking Water Primacy Agency.
          Drinking Water Source
        The source provides water to the
       treatment and distribution systems.
             Storage
          Storage provides a
      sufficient amount of water
      to average or equalize the
         daily water demands.
       Well
                        Buildings,
                     Treatment and
                   Electrical  Systems
U^H^
                                       Hydrants
                                  Hydrants provide water
                                  for fire suppression, line
                                  flushing, and irrigation.
        Valves
Valves regulate the flow of
water through the pipes of a
  drinking water system.
        Valves
        Buildings, Treatment and Electrical System
      Buildings contain components of a water system, including
            treatment equipment, offices, and pumps.

        Treatment plants provide the necessary treatment to
                   make water safe to drink.

        Electrical systems include transformers, motor control
      centers (MCCs), variable frequency drives (VFDs), alarm
      circuits, sensors, level indicators, computers, and wiring.
                                     Service Lines
                       Service lines are the pipes and appurtenances that
                       are necessary to deliver water from the system's
                           water main to the customer's plumbing
                        connection. Each service line typically provides
                          service for one or two users or connections.
                                             NX
                                      Service  Lines
                                                                                   House
Courtesy of Roger Bergeron, Vermont Water Supply Division

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How Long Will  It Last?  Using the  Typical Life

Expectancies Table


One of the most important aspects of managing your assets is determining how
much longer you think they will last. A number of factors can affect how long
your assets will last, including routine service and proper maintenance, excessive
use, and environmental conditions such as poor source water quality, soil quality,
or climate.

The worksheets on the following pages ask you to:

1.  Determine the adjusted useful life of each asset. Estimate how long the
   asset should last (the expected useful life) and adjust these numbers based
   on the specific conditions and experiences of your system. The useful life of
   an asset will be affected by water quality, operation and maintenance
   routines, the number of years the asset lasted in the past, the asset's
   service history, and its current condition.

For help in determining the adjusted useful life, you can use the table on this
page and talk to parts distributors, your State or Tribal Drinking Water Primacy
Agency, and other public water systems.

2.  Subtract the estimated age of each asset from its adjusted useful life to
   determine its remaining useful life (or how many months or years remain
   before you will have to replace or significantly rehabilitate the asset).
                          Remember!

   A preventive maintenance program will enable you to maximize the useful
   lives of your assets and can help you avoid problems and cut down or delay
   replacement costs. Contact your State or Tribal Drinking Water Primacy
   Agency for more information on developing and implementing a preventive
                         maintenance program.
How Lonq Will it Last?
Typical Life Expectancies of Water System Equipment
Component
Wells and Springs
Intake Structures
Pumping Equipment
Disinfection Equipment
Hydropneumatic Tanks
Concrete and Metal Storage
Tanks
Transmission Structures
(Pipes)
Valves
Mechanical Valves
Computer
Equipment/Software
Transformers/Switchgears/
Wiring
Motor Controls/Variable
Frequency Drives
Sensors
Buildings
Service Lines
Hydrants
Worksheet
Drinking
Water
Source
Treatment
System
Tanks
Distribution
System
Valves
Electrical
Systems
Buildings
Service Lines
Hydrants
Useful Life
25 years
35 years
1 0 years
5 years
1 0 years
30 years
35 years
35 years
1 5 years
5 years
20 years
1 0 years
7 years
30 years
30 years
40 years
Note: These expected useful lives are drawn from a variety of
sources. The estimates assume that assets have been properly
maintained. The adjusted useful life of an asset will be equal to or
less than typical useful life.

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                                              Drinking Water Source: Completed Example
Well Construction
Obtain a well log or look at receipts from the time of drilling for the following information. Remembe
useful life. Subtract estimated age from adjusted useful life to determine remaining useful life.
Drilling Contractor
JAC Construction
Adjusted Useful Life
25 years
Estimated Age
- 8 years old
= Remaining Useful Life
= 17 years
Whom would you call to service your well? This may be the well driller.
Company/Agency Contact
JAC Construction
John Smith
Telephone Number
(800) 555-7788
Well Pump and Controls
Look at receipts or records from the time of
Pump Manufacturer
Peter's Pumps
installation for the following information:
Well Pump Model Number (typically located on pump casing. If buried, look
for information near the electrical system.)
ZZ-0001234
Remember that maintenance, water quality, use, and soil conditions can affect useful life.
Subtract estimated age from adjusted useful life to determine remaining useful life.
Adjusted Useful Life - Estimated Age
10 years - 5 years old
Whom would you call to service your pumps
installer.
Company/Agency
Peter's Pumps
= Remaining Useful Life
= 5 years

and controls? This may be the pump manufacturer or
Contact
Peter Williams
Date Worskheet Completed or Revised
Telephone Number
(800)555-1212

8/1/04
                                                                                    Remember that the typical useful life of wells and springs is 25
                                                                                    years and that the typical useful life of pumping equipment is 10
                                                                                    years. Use this as a basis for determining the adjusted useful life
                                                                                    of your well or spring and pump and pump controls. In this
                                                                                    example, the typical useful lives equal the adjusted useful lives
                                                                                    because the well, pumps, and controls have been properly
                                                                                    maintained.
                                                                                      A Ground Water System Well

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                                                            Drinking Water Source
Well Construction
Obtain a well log or look at receipts from the time of drilling for the following information. Remember that maintenance, water quality, use, and soil conditions can affect
useful life.  Subtract estimated age from adjusted useful life to determine remaining useful life.
Drilling Contractor    Adjusted Useful Life
                           Estimated Age  =  Remaining Useful Life
Whom would you call to service your well? This may be the well driller.
                                                                   Remember that the typical useful life of wells and springs is 25
                                                                   years and that the typical useful life of pumping equipment is 10
                                                                   years.  Use this as a basis for determining the adjusted useful life
                                                                   of your well or spring and pump and pump controls.
Company/Agency     Contact
                                          Telephone Number
Well Pump and Controls
Look at receipts or records from the time of installation for the following information:
Pump Manufacturer
Well Pump Model Number (typically located on pump casing. If buried, look
for information near the electrical system.)
Remember that maintenance, water quality, use, and soil conditions can affect useful life.
Subtract estimated age from adjusted useful life to determine remaining useful life.
Adjusted Useful Life   -   Estimated Age
                         = Remaining Useful Life
Whom would you call to service your pumps and controls? This may be the pump manufacturer or
installer.
Company/Agency
Contact
Telephone Number
Date Worskheet Completed or Revised
                                                                     A Ground Water System Well

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                                                    Intake Structures: Completed Example
Intake Structures: Concrete Catch Basin
Look at receipts or records from the time of installation for the following information:
Adjusted Useful Life
   Estimated Age  =   Remaining Useful Life
35 years
-  15 years old     = 20 years
Remember that the typical useful life of concrete catch basins is 35 years.  Use this
as a basis for determining your concrete catch basin's adjusted useful life.  In this
example, the adjusted useful life equals the typical useful life because the concrete
catch basin has been properly maintained.
Intake Structures: Underwater Pipe
Company/Agency
Chris' Contractors
Contact
Chris Carpenter
Telephone Number
(555) 123-4567
Look at receipts or records from the time of installation for the following information:
Adjusted Useful Life
   Estimated Age  =   Remaining Useful Life
15 years
   5 years old     =10 years
Whom would you call to service your intake structures?
Whom would you call if you had a potential wellhead protection problem?  You
can find the appropriate contact by calling the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at
(800) 426-4791 or by contacting your State or Tribal Drinking Water Primacy
Agency.
Date Worksheet Completed or Revised
8/1/04
Remember that the typical useful life of underwater pipes is 15 years.  Use this as a
basis for determining your underwater pipe's adjusted useful life. In this example, the
adjusted useful life equals the typical useful life because the intake  structure has been
properly maintained.
Regulatory Agency
Natural Resources Dept.
Contact
Walt Sreenleaf
Telephone Number
(555) 498-9898
                                                                            A Drinking Water Intake for a Surface Water System

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                                                             Intake Structures
Intake Structures: Concrete Catch Basin
Look at receipts or records from the time of installation for the following information:
Adjusted Useful Life
Estimated Age   =  Remaining Useful Life
                                                                  Remember that the typical useful life of concrete catch basins is 35 years.  Use this
                                                                  as a basis for determining your concrete catch basin's adjusted useful life.
Intake Structures: Underwater Pipe
Look at receipts or records from the time of installation for the following information:
Adjusted Useful Life
Estimated Age   =  Remaining Useful Life
Whom would you call to service your intake structures?
Whom would you call if you had a potential wellhead protection problem?
You can find the appropriate contact by calling the Safe Drinking Water
Hotline at (800) 426-4791 or by contacting your State or Tribal Drinking
Water Primacy Agency.

Date Worksheet Completed or Revised
                                                                  Remember that the typical useful life of underwater pipes is 15 years. Use this as a
                                                                  basis for determining your underwater pipe's adjusted useful life.
Company/Agency

Contact

Telephone Number

Regulatory Agency

Contact

Telephone Number

                                                                      A Drinking Water Intake for a Surface Water System

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                                               Treatment System:  Completed Example
Many systems are required to disinfect their water as treatment against common disease-causing organisms (bacteria, viruses, and protozoa). The
characteristics of your water source and the regulations of your state will dictate what type of treatment system, if any, your drinking water system needs.
Look at receipts or records from the time of installation for the following information:
Treatment System Name
Chlorinator
                  Manufacturer
                  Carl'sChlorinators
Model Number (may be located on the apparatus)
                        Remember that the typical useful life of disinfection systems is 10 years. In this
                        example, adjusted useful life for the chlorinator is 5 years lower than the typical
                        useful life because the system has not properly maintained it.
CL-00987
Remember that maintenance, water quality, use, and soil conditions can
affect useful life. Subtract estimated age from adjusted useful life to
determine remaining useful life.
Adjusted Useful Life
   Estimated Age  =  Remaining Useful Life
5 years
   3 years old     =  2 years
Whom would you call to service your treatment system? This may be the
manufacturer or installer.
Company/Agency
Carl's Chlorinators
Contact
Carl Cooper
Telephone Number
(555)333-9876
Date Worksheet Completed or Revised
8/1/04
                                                                       A Chlorination System

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Model Number (may be located on the apparatus)
Remember that maintenance, water quality, use, and soil conditions can
affect useful life. Subtract estimated age from adjusted useful life to
determine remaining useful life.
Adjusted Useful Life
   Estimated Age  =  Remaining Useful Life
Whom would you call to service your treatment system? This may be the
manufacturer or installer.
Company/Agency
Contact
Telephone Number
Date Worksheet Completed or Revised
                                                                       A Chlorination System
                                                                        10

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                                                         Tanks:  Completed Example
Your system will most likely use one of the following types of tanks:

A hydropneumatic tank is automatically started and stopped by the air pressure in a compressed-
air or captive-air chamber. The air in the tank maintains pressure throughout the distribution system.

A concrete reservoir is a structure that is either cast in place or pre-cast to be used for water
storage.

A metal reservoir is a water storage tank constructed by welding or bolting galvanized or painted
plates of metal.
Look at receipts or records from the time of installation for the following information:
Type of Tank (hydropneumatic, concrete reservoir, metal
reservoir)
Hydropneumatic
                        100 gallons
              Paul's Pressurized
              Tanks
Major Maintenance
Pressure tested, 2002
Remember that maintenance, water quality, use, and soil conditions can affect useful life. Subtract
estimated age from adjusted useful life to determine remaining useful life.
Adjusted Useful Life
   Estimated Age
=  Remaining Useful Life
10 years
   5 years old
=  5 years
Whom would you call to service your pressure tank?
Company/Agency
Paul's Pressurized Tanks
Contact
Paul Pullman
Telephone Number
(555)999-7777
Date Worksheet Completed or Revised
8/1/04
                                                           Remember that the typical useful life of tanks can vary.
                                                           Concrete and metal tanks generally last 30 years.
                                                           Hydropneumatic tanks generally last 10 years. In this example,
                                                           the adjusted useful life is the same as the typical useful life
                                                           because the tank has been properly maintained.
                                                                                             A Hydropneumatic Storage Tank
                                                                                             A Metal Storage Tank
                                                                        1 1

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                                                                       Tanks
Your system will most likely use one of the following types of tanks:
A hydropneumatic tank is automatically started and stopped by the air pressure in a compressed-
air or captive-air chamber.  The air in the tank maintains pressure throughout the distribution system.

A concrete reservoir is a structure that is either cast in place or pre-cast to be used for water
storage.

A metal reservoir is a water storage tank constructed by welding or bolting galvanized or painted
plates of metal.
Remember that maintenance, water quality, use, and soil conditions can affect useful life.  Subtract
estimated age from adjusted useful life to determine remaining useful life.
Adjusted Useful Life
   Estimated Age
=  Remaining Useful Life
Whom would you call to service your pressure tank?
Company/Agency
Contact
Telephone Number
  ate Worksheet Completed or Revised
                                                            Remember that the typical useful life of tanks can vary.
                                                            Concrete and metal tanks generally last 30 years.
                                                            Hydropneumatic tanks generally last 10 years.
Look at receipts or records from the time of installation for the following information:
Type of Tank (hydropneumatic, concrete reservoir, metal
reservoir)
                                       Manufacturer
Major Maintenance
                                                               A Hydropneumatic Storage Tank
                                                                                                A Metal Storage Tank
                                                                          12

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                                                  Distribution  System: Completed Example
You may want to note the location of shut-off valves to isolate particular sections of the system in case of an
emergency.

You may also want to note the location of "as-built" drawings showing the layout of the distribution system.

If your system has many types of pipe (e.g., different size, different material), reproduce this worksheet and list
the information for each type.
Remember that the typical useful life of pipes is 35
years.  In this example, the system has estimated
that the adjusted useful life will be the same as the
typical  useful life because in the past its distribution
system pipes have lasted for the typical number of
years.
Look at receipts or records from the time of installation for the following information:
Type of Pipe
PVC
Si,
3-
Where Used or Located
le Length (feet)
inch 2, 200 feet

Main St. Line
Remember that maintenance, water quality, use, and soil conditions can affect useful life. Subtract estimated age
from adjusted useful life to determine remaining useful life.
Adjusted Useful Life
35 years
Whom would you call to service
Company/Agency
Chris' Contracting
Esti mated Age
21 years old
your pipes?
Contact Te
Chris Carpenter (5
Remaining Useful Life
14 years

lephone Number
55) 123-4567
Date Worksheet Completed or Revised
8/1/04
                                                                                                               Preparations for Pipe Installation in a
                                                                                                               Distribution System
                                                                         13

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                                                                Distribution System
You may want to note the location of shut-off valves to isolate particular sections of the system in case of an
emergency.

You may also want to note the location of "as-built" drawings showing the layout of the distribution system.

If your system has many types of pipe (e.g., different size, different material), reproduce this worksheet and list
the information for each type.
                                                                  Remember that the typical useful life of pipes is 35
                                                                  years.
Type of Pipe

Size

Length (feet)

Where Used or Located
Look at receipts or records from the time of installation for the following information:
Remember that maintenance, water quality, use, and soil conditions can affect useful life.  Subtract estimated age
from adjusted useful life to determine remaining useful life.
Adjusted Useful Life
Estimated Age
Remaining Useful Life
Whom would you call to service your pipes?
Company/Agency

Contact

Telephone Number

Date Worksheet Completed or Revised
                                                                                                             Preparations for Pipe Installation in a
                                                                                                             Distribution System
                                                                          14

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                                                         Valves:  Completed Example
Valves can be used to isolate portions of the distribution system for cleaning, maintenance, and repairs. In addition, valves regulate flow and pressure.

Air-relief valves (or manual bleeds) are  used to release trapped air and prevent surge problems when lines are filled. They also can eliminate water hammer (a
condition in which pressure in the pipes increases and decreases very quickly, possibly damaging the tank, valves, piping network, and customers' plumbing). These
valves respond to pressure variations.

Blowoff valves are used to eliminate accumulated sediment or stagnant water from low spots or dead ends in the line and can be used to dewater lines or reservoirs
for repairs or inspection.

Backflow prevention valves and devices eliminate reverse flow conditions to prevent contamination in the system's distribution pipes.

If your system uses more than one type of valve, reproduce this worksheet and list the information for each type.
Look at receipts or records from the time of installation for the following information:
Valve type (air-relief,
blowoff, etc.)
Air Relief
Number of Valves
5 Valves
Size
4"
Manufacturer
Veronica's Valves
Remember that maintenance, water quality, use, and soil conditions can affect
useful life. Subtract estimated age from adjusted useful life to determine
remaining useful life.
Adjusted Useful Life
   Estimated Age
       Remaining Useful Life
20 years
   3 years old
       17 years
Whom would you call to service your valves?
Company/Agency
Veronica's Valves
Contact
Veronica
Johnson
Telephone Number
(555)555-6789
Date Worksheet Completed or Revised
Remember that the typical useful life of valves is 35 years.  In this example, the
adjusted useful life is lower than the typical useful life because of the system's source
water characteristics and lack of routine maintenance.
8/01/04
                                                                        An Air-Pressure Relief Valve
                                                                         1 5

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Valves can be used to isolate portions of the distribution system for cleaning, maintenance, and repairs.  In addition, valves regulate flow and pressure.

Air-relief valves (or manual bleeds) are used to release trapped air and prevent surge problems when lines are filled.  They also can eliminate water hammer (a
condition in which pressure in the pipes increases and decreases very quickly, possibly damaging the tank, valves, piping network, and customers' plumbing).  These
valves respond to pressure variations.

Blowoff valves are used to eliminate accumulated sediment or stagnant water from low spots or dead ends in the line and can be used to dewater lines or reservoirs
for repairs or inspection.

Backflow prevention valves and devices eliminate reverse flow conditions to prevent contamination in the system's distribution pipes.

If your system uses more than one type of valve, reproduce this worksheet and list the information for each type.
Look at receipts or records from the time of installation for the following information:
Valve type (air-relief,
blowoff, etc.)
Number of Valves
Size
Manufacturer
Remember that the typical useful life of valves is 35 years.
Remember that maintenance, water quality, use, and soil conditions can affect
useful life. Subtract estimated age from adjusted useful life to determine
remaining useful life.
Adjusted Useful Life
   Estimated Age
       Remaining Useful Life
Whom would you call to service your valves?
Company/Agency
Contact
Telephone Number
Date Worksheet Completed or Revised
                                                                           An Air-Pressure Relief Valve
                                                                          16

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                                                   Electrical Systems: Completed Example
Electrical systems help control the automatic components of a water system. Your electrical systems may include transformers, motor control centers (MCCs), variable
frequency drives (VFDs), power supplies, alarm circuits, sensors (level indicators, pH, flow meters), computers, wiring, and other instrumentation. If your system uses
multiple types of electrical systems,  reproduce this worksheet and list the information for each type.
Look at receipts or records from the time of installation for the following information:
Type of Equipment (MCC, VFD, etc).
Computer
Manufacturer
Carlos' Computer Shack
Number of Units Size of I
2 Pentium
Model Number
Jnits (HP, voltage, KvA)
III 256 RAM computers
1
CC-5657; CC-5658
Remember that maintenance, water quality, use, and soil conditions can affect useful life. Subtract estimated age
from adjusted useful life to determine remaining useful life.
Adjusted Useful Life Estimated Age = Remaining Useful Life
5 years 2 years
old = 3 years
Whom would you call to service your electrical components?
Company/Agency
Carlos' Computer Shack
Contact
Carlos Rodriguez
Date Worksheet Completed or Revised
Telephone Number
(555) 345-6788

8/1/04
                                                                                                      Remember that the typical useful life varies by type
                                                                                                      of electrical equipment. The typical useful life for
                                                                                                      computers is 5 years, sensors typically last 7 years,
                                                                                                      MCCs, and VFDs typically last 10 years, and
                                                                                                      transformers, switchgears, and wiring typically last
                                                                                                      20 years.  In this example, the adjusted useful life is
                                                                                                      the same  as the typical useful life because the
                                                                                                      computer  has been properly maintained.
                                                                                                       A Variable Frequency Drive
                                                                         17

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                                                                Electrical Systems
Electrical systems help control the automatic components of a water system. Your electrical systems may include transformers, motor control centers (MCCs), variable
frequency drives (VFDs), power supplies, alarm circuits, sensors (level indicators, pH, flow meters), computers, wiring, and other instrumentation. If your system uses
multiple types of electrical systems, reproduce this worksheet and list the information for each type.
Look at receipts or records from the time of installation for the following information:
Type of Equipment (MCC, VFD, etc).

Manufacturer

Number of Units Size of Units (HP, voltage, KvA)

Model Number

Remember that maintenance, water quality, use, and soil conditions can affect useful life. Subtract estimated age
from adjusted useful life to determine remaining useful life.
Adjusted Useful Life Estimated Age = Remaining Useful Life
-
Whom would you call to service your electrical components?
Company/Agency

Contact Telephone Number

Date Worksheet Completed or Revised

                                                                                                        Remember that the typical useful life varies by type
                                                                                                        of electrical equipment.  The typical useful life for
                                                                                                        computers is 5 years, sensors typically last 7 years,
                                                                                                        MCCs, and VFDs typically last 10 years, and
                                                                                                        transformers, switchgears, and wiring typically last
                                                                                                        20 years.
                                                                                                          A Variable Frequency Drive
                                                                          18

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                                                       Buildings: Completed Example
If you need more space to list all your buildings, reproduce this worksheet and list the information on
separate pages.
Look at receipts or records from the time of installation for the following information:
Structure Use
Administrative Facilities
Structure Type (building, shed,
manufactured home)
Manufactured Home
Major Maintenance Needed
Roof repairs due to leaking problems
Remember that maintenance, water quality, use, and soil conditions can affect useful life. Subtract
estimated age from adjusted useful life to determine remaining useful life.
Adjusted Useful Life
30 years
Roof: 15- 20 years
Estimated Age
16 years old
= Remaining Useful Life
Leaking roof should be repaired now.
Rest of building: 14 years
Whom would you call to service your building?
Company/Agency
Mark's Maintenance
Contact
Mark Mullins
Telephone Number
(555) 444-6666
Date Worksheet Completed or Revised
8/1/04
Remember that the typical useful life of buildings is 30 years.
In this example, the adusted useful life for the roof  is the same
as the age (16 years), since it is leaking and should be
repaired now. The adjusted useful life for the rest of the
building is the same as the typical useful life.
                                                                                            APumphouse
                                                                        19

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Major Maintenance Needed
Look at receipts or records from the time of installation for the following information:
Structure Use
                           Structure Type (building, shed,
                           manufactured home)
Remember that maintenance, water quality, use, and soil conditions can affect useful life. Subtract
estimated age from adjusted useful life to determine remaining useful life.
Adjusted Useful Life
      Estimated Age        =  Remaining Useful Life
Whom would you call to service your building?
Company/Agency
Contact
Telephone Number
Date Worksheet Completed or Revised
                                                                                             A Pumphouse
                                                                         20

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                                                     Service Lines: Completed Example
The service line is composed of the parts that are necessary to deliver water from the main to the customer's or user's plumbing connection.  Each service line typically
provides service for one or two users or connections. If you have more than one type of service line, reproduce this page and list the information on separate pages.
Look at receipts or records from the time of installation for the following information:
Ownership of Lines
Size of Lines (inches)
Water system owns all lines
Number of Lines
42
1-inch
Approximate Length of Lines
75 ft. each
                                     Remember that the typical useful life for service lines is 30
                                     years.  In this example, the system has estimated that the
                                     adjusted useful life will be the same as the typical useful life
                                     because in the past its distribution system assets have
                                     lasted the typical number of years.
Material of Lines
PVC
Remember that maintenance, water quality, use, and soil conditions can affect useful life. Subtract
estimated age from adjusted useful life to determine remaining useful life.
Adjusted Useful Life
        Estimated Age
          Remaining Useful Life
30 years
         6 years old
               24 years
Whom would you call for service line maintenance?
Company/Agency
Chris' Contractors
Contact
Chris Carpenter
Date Worksheet Completed or Revised

8/1/04
Telephone Number
(555) 123-4567
                                                                   Service Lines Deliver Water to the Customer's
                                                                   Plumbing Connection
                                                                        21

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                                                                  Service Lines
The service line is composed of the parts that are necessary to deliver water from the main to the customer's or user's plumbing connection.  Each service line typically
provides service for one or two users or connections. If you have more than one type of service line, reproduce this page and list the information on separate pages.
Look at receipts or records from the time of installation for the following information:
Ownership of Lines
Number of Lines
Size of Lines (inches)
Approximate Length of Lines
Material of Lines
Remember that maintenance, water quality, use, and soil conditions can affect useful life. Subtract
estimated age from adjusted useful life to determine remaining useful life.
Adjusted Useful Life
        Estimated Age
          Remaining Useful Life
Whom would you call for service line maintenance?

Company/Agency
Contact
Date Worksheet Completed or Revised
Telephone Number
                                                                                               Remember that the typical useful life for service lines is 30
                                                                                               years.
                                                                    Service Lines Deliver Water to the Customer's
                                                                    Plumbing Connection
                                                                         22

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                                                        Hydrants: Completed Example
If your system uses different types of hydrants (e.g., dry-barrel, wet-barrel), reproduce this worksheet and list the information for all types of hydrants.

If your system is not responsible for the hydrants, note the contact for flushing and maintenance.
Look at receipts or records from the time of installation for the following information:
Type of Hydrant
Dry-Barrel
Type
2-nozzle
Number of Flush Valve Vaults
Diameter of Pipe (inches)
6-inch
                                    Remember that the typical useful life for hydrants is 40
                                    years.  In this example, the adjusted useful life is the
                                    same as the typical useful life because both hydrants
                                    have been properly maintained.
Size of Nozzle
2 1/2 inch
Number of Hydrants
Manufacturer
                                                             M&H
Remember that maintenance, water quality, use, and soil conditions can affect useful life. Subtract
estimated age from adjusted useful life to determine remaining useful life.
Adjusted Useful Life
       Estimated Age      = Remaining Useful Life
40 years
       23 years old
=  17 years
Whom would you call for hydrant maintenance?

Company/Agency                    Contact
Chris' Contracting
Chris Carpenter
                         Telephone Number
(555)123-4567
Date Worksheet Completed or Revised

8/1/04
                                      Hydrants Provide Water for Fire Suppression, Line
                                      Flushing, and Irrigation
                                                                        23

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If your system uses different types of hydrants (e.g., dry-barrel, wet-barrel), reproduce this worksheet and list the information for all types of hydrants.

If your system is not responsible for the hydrants, note the contact for flushing and maintenance.
Look at receipts or records from the time of installation for the following information:
Type of Hydrant

Type

Number of Flush Valve Vaults

Diameter of Pipe (inches)

Size of Nozzle

Number of Hydrants Manufacturer

Remember that maintenance, water quality, use, and soil conditions can affect useful life. Subtract
estimated age from adjusted useful life to determine remaining useful life.
Adjusted Useful Life Estimated Age = Remaining Useful Life
-
Whom would you call for hydrant maintenance?
Company/Agency

Contact Telephone Number

Date Worksheet Completed or Revised

                                                                                                      Remember that the typical useful life for hydrants is 40
                                                                                                      years.
                                                                                                        Hydrants Provide Water for Fire Suppression, Line
                                                                                                        Flushing, and Irrigation.
                                                                           24

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                                          Next  Steps: Asset Management Plan
Once you have completed the worksheets in this booklet, you can use them to develop an asset management plan. Asset management is a planning process that
ensures that you get the most value from each of your assets and have the financial resources to rehabilitate and replace them when necessary. The worksheets
on the following pages will guide you through the process of creating an asset management plan.

A completed asset management plan will help you:

   Prioritize your assets to make sure that you allocate funds to the rehabilitation or replacement projects
    that are most urgent and most important for system operation and customer safety.

   Estimate how much money you will need to set aside each year to pay for the replacement or
    rehabilitation of your assets.

You should review, revise, and update the worksheets in this booklet, including your asset management
plan, at least once a year.  Updated information in the worksheets will give you a better picture of your
system's position and better prepare you to meet your water system's future needs.

For more complete information on how to develop and implement an asset management plan, see EPA's
Asset Management: A Handbook for Small Water Systems (EPA 81 6-R-03-01 6), which you can obtain by
calling the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791.

Just as an asset inventory is one part of asset management, asset management is part of a larger
management concept called strategic planning. Strategic planning helps you prepare for and address
anticipated and unexpected problems. It uses asset management to evaluate your system's current
physical situation, and it also evaluates your system's financial and managerial situation. It requires you to
make fundamental decisions about your water system's purpose, structure, and functions.

For more information on strategic planning, see EPA's Strategic Planning Workbook (EPA 81 6-R-03-01 5),
which you can obtain by calling the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791.
A Storage Tank that Has Outlived Its Useful Life!
                                                                       25

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Prioritization  Table
Use the inventory information you collected on the worksheets to fill out the prioritization table.  Consider how important the asset is to your ability to provide safe
drinking water to your customers, how soon you will need to replace an asset to adequately serve your customers (its remaining useful life), and how important the
asset is to the operation of your system (can other assets do the same job?).

  In the column labeled "Asset," list a short name for the asset (e.g., chlorinator). List different components of the asset on separate lines.

  In the column labeled "Remaining Useful Life," enter the value you determined for that asset on its worksheet (earlier in the booklet). Components of your
   asset that have different remaining useful lives should be listed on separate lines. For example, the building roof and the building structure in the example on
   page  19 have different useful lives and, therefore, should be listed separately.

  In the column labeled "Importance," describe the importance of each asset to the operation of your system and the protection of public health. Assets that are
   required to  keep your system running are usually more important than assets that just make  its operation more efficient. Assets that may affect public health
   are more important than those that improve the aesthetics of your water. Assets without a backup unit available (i.e., there is no redundant unit) should have
   a higher priority than units that have a backup (i.e., a redundant unit).

  In the column labeled "Priority," rank your assets according to how important it is to reserve  money for them. Consider impact on public health, remaining
   useful life, and importance to your system's operation when ranking your assets.
                                                         Things to  Keep in Mind
                        Assets that are more important to your ability to deliver safe water should have a higher priority because these assets
                        affect public health.

                        Assets with short remaining useful lives should have a higher priority because you will have to replace these assets
                        soon.

                        Assets for which there is less redundancy should have a higher priority because your system will have trouble
                        continuing to operate without them.
                                                                     26

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Prioritizing Your Assets: Completed Example
Asset
Administrative building
(roof)
Chlorinator
Hydropneumatic Tank
Computer







Remaining Useful
Life
1 year -- leaking roof
should be repaired
2 years
1 2 years
3 years







Importance
Medium
High -- system cannot
operate without it
High -- maintains pressure
in the system
Medium







Priority
2
1
3
4







Notes











                   27

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                              Prioritizing Your Assets
Asset
Remaining Useful
      Life
Importance
Priority
Notes
                                         28

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Budgeting for Rehabilitations and Replacements
Once you have inventoried and prioritized your assets, you should determine how much money you will need to rehabilitate or replace them. Budgeting for these
projects now can help avoid large, unplanned expenditures in the future and will ensure that you allocate your resources efficiently.

The worksheet on page 32 will help you figure out how much money you need to reserve each year to fund your highest priority activities.

It is important that you update this worksheet every year, and as new information becomes available, because your system's priorities and finances may change.
Costs of new assets or rehabilitations may also change.  Updating your worksheet annually and setting aside the required reserve amount will help ensure that you
have enough money to cover rehabilitations and replacements when you need them.

Remember that although the total reserves needed each year may seem like a lot of money, it is easier to put aside $200 a year to replace a chlorinator than to
come up with  $2,000 once it fails.

The budgeting worksheet asks for the estimated cost of rehabilitation and replacement activities associated with your highest priority assets.  Remember to gather
information on all of the costs associated with the rehabilitation or replacement of an asset, such as equipment purchase, installation, pilot tests, labor charges,
cleanup, and disposal of the replaced asset. To determine what a rehabilitation or replacement might cost, you can:

 Consult with your State or Tribal Drinking Water Primacy Agency;

 Ask local contractors and businesses for estimated costs;

 Contact equipment manufacturers; and

 Talk to other systems about the cost of their rehabilitations or replacements.

The budgeting worksheet does not include standard operation and maintenance costs such as chemicals for disinfection. It accounts only for funds you will need to
replace or rehabilitate your assets. You should keep standard operation and maintenance costs in mind when thinking about financing your asset management plan.
                                                                         29

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Budgeting Table
The table on the next page will help you determine how much money you will need to set aside each year to ensure you can continue to deliver safe and secure
drinking water to your customers and pay for the necessary replacement of your assets. A completed example follows the blank worksheet.

  In the column labeled "Asset," list the short name for your asset (e.g., chlorinator). You should list different components of the asset on separate lines.

  In the column labeled "Activity," list the rehabilitation and replacement activities that you expect to perform. Provide enough detail so that you can determine
   the cost of each activity.

  In the column labeled "Cost," fill in the expected cost of each activity. Make sure to include the complete cost including preparation, cleanup, and disposal of
   any waste.

  In the column labeled "Years Until Action Needed," fill in the remaining useful life of the asset from the inventory worksheets you completed earlier.

  Divide the cost by the years until action needed. Enter the result in the column labeled "Reserve Required Each Year." This is the amount of money you will
   have to set aside each  year to ensure that you have enough money to perform the required activity in the allotted time.

  Add up the amounts in the "Reserve Required Each Year" column and enter the total in the box marked "Total Per Year." This is the amount of money you
   should be setting aside each year to be able to pay for all of your planned replacements or rehabilitations.
                                                                    30

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Budgeting for Rehabilitation and Replacement of Assets: Completed Example
Asset
Chlorinator
Administrative Building
(roof)
Hydropneumatic Tank
Computer






Activity
Replace unit
Repair roof
Replace unit
Replace unit






Cost
$2,000
$1,500
$300
$1,000






Years Until Action
Needed
3
1
13
4






Total per year
Reserve Required
Each Year
$667
$1,500
$23
$250






$2,440
                                 31

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Budgeting for Rehabilitation and Replacement of Assets
Asset










Activity










Cost










Years Until Action
Needed










Total Per Year
Reserve Required
Each Year











                      32

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                                                  How  to Carry out  the  Plan
It may be overwhelming to see how much money you should be saving each year to fund the replacement and rehabilitation of your assets. You can finance capital
improvements by saving the total per year cost of replacements (calculated in the budgeting table) in a reserve account. Alternatively, you can use the money you
already have more efficiently and put the savings towards replacing and rehabilitating your assets. Here are some strategies that could help you use your current
resources more efficiently or raise additional funds:

 Form partnerships with other water systems to reduce operating costs. This may allow you to simplify management and obtain bulk purchasing agreements.

 Consider charging rates or increasing your rates to raise revenue.  If your system does not already do so, you can charge your customers a separate fee for
   water. Alternatively, consider assessing a flat fee for infrastructure improvements or for funding a reserve account. Check with your State or Regional Tribal
   Drinking Water Primacy Agency for more information on setting rates.

 Apply for financial assistance.  Banks and government agencies can help fund infrastructure projects such as treatment system upgrades and distribution line
   repairs. For large projects, you may want to research funding options such as state and federal drinking water grant and loan programs. Appendix B lists some
   sources of funding for which your system may qualify. Consult your State or Regional Tribal Drinking Water Primacy Agency for information on funding
   sources that might be available to your system.
                                            The Role  of Key  Decision Makers
Key decision makers (for example, the Board of Directors of the Association, elected officials of the community, or owners of manufactured housing associations)
make critical decisions about the finances of your water system.  For this reason, they need to understand the financial requirements related to the rehabilitation
and replacement of the system's equipment and assets. The information compiled in this brochure should be presented to key decision makers and incorporated
into the annual budget. This information should be reviewed annually and modified as necessary. The key decision makers can also present this information to the
public at a board meeting and in the water system's annual Consumer Confidence Report.
                                                             Next Steps
Once you have completed the worksheets and tables in this brochure and identified your system's needs, you can use the results to help you evaluate your
infrastructure and shape decisions about your water system. Do not stick the worksheets and tables in a drawer and forget about them! You should try to review
the worksheets at least once a year and make changes as your system's situation changes. Developing a good picture of when you will need to replace your assets
and how much money you will need to fund those replacements will allow you to continue to deliver safe and secure drinking water to your customers.
                                                             Remember!

       The worksheets in this guide could contain sensitive information about your water system. Make sure you store the worksheets, as well as all other
                                           information about your system's assets, in a secure location.
                                                                       33

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Appendix A:  Safe Drinking Water Act Primacy Agencies and Tribal Contacts

For additional information or to learn more about the laws in your own state, please contact your EPA Regional Coordinator or State or Tribal Drinking
Water Primacy Agency.
State Contact Information
Alabama
Department of Environmental Management: Water Supply Branch
Alaska
Department of Environmental Conservation: Drinking Water and Wastewater
Program
American Samoa
Environmental Protection Agency: American Samoa
Arizona
Department of Environmental Quality: Drinking Water Monitoring and
Assessment Division
Arkansas
Department of Health: Division of Engineering
California
Department of Health Services: Division of Drinking Water and Environmental
Management
Colorado
Department of Public Health and Environment: Drinking Water Program
Connecticut
Department of Public Health: Drinking Water Division
Delaware
Delaware Health and Social Services: Division of Public Health
District of Columbia
Environmental Health Administration: Water Resources Management Division
Florida
Department of Environmental Protection: Drinking Water Section
Georgia
Department of Natural Resources: Water Resources Branch
Web site
www.adem.state.al.us/WaterDivision/WaterDivisionPP.htm
www.state.ak.us/dec/eh/dw/index.htm
www.epa.gov/Region9/cross_pr/islands/samoa.html
www.adeq.state.az.us/environ/water/dw/index.html
www. hea Ithya rka nsas . com/e ng/i nd ex. htm 1
www.dhs.ca.gov/
www.cdphe.state.co.us/wq/wqhom.asp
www.dph.state.ct.us/BRS/water/dwd.htm
www.state.de. us/dhss/dph
www.dcwasa.com/
www.dep.state.fl.us/water/drinkingwater/index.htm
www.dnr.state.ga.us/dnr/environ/
Phone Number
(334)271-7773
(907) 269-7647
(415)972-3767
(602)771-2303
(501)661-2623
(916)449-5577
(303) 692-3500
(860) 509-7333
(302)739-5410
(202)535-2190
(850) 245-8624
(404) 656^087
                                                    34

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State Contact Information
Guam
Guam Environmental Protection Agency
Hawaii
Department of Health: Environmental Management Division
Kentucky
Department of Environmental Protection: Drinking Water Branch
Idaho
Department of Environmental Quality: Water Quality Division
Illinois
Environmental Protection Agency: Division of Public Water Supplies
Indiana
Department of Environmental Management: Drinking Water Branch
Iowa
Department of Natural Resources: Water Supply Section
Kansas
Department of Health and Environment: Public Water Supply Section
Louisiana
Office of Public Health: Division of Environmental and Health Services
Maine
Maine Department of Human Services: Division of Health Engineering
Maryland
Department of the Environment: Public Drinking Water Program
Massachusetts
Department of Environmental Protection: Drinking Water Program
Michigan
Department of Environmental Quality: Drinking Water and Radiological
Protection Division
Web site
www.epa.gov/region09/cross_pr/islands/guam.html
www.hawaii.gov/health/eh/sdwb/index.html
www.water.ky.gov/dw/
www.deq.state.id.us/water/water1 .htm
www.epa.state.il.us/water/index-pws.html
www.ai.org/idem/owm/dwb/index.html
www.state.ia.us/epd/wtrsuply/wtrsup.htm
www.kdhe.state.ks.us/pws/
www.oph.dhh.state.la.us/engineerservice/safewater/index.html
www.state.me.us/dhs/eng/water/index.htm
www. md e .state . md . us/a bo utmd e/re po rts/i nd ex.as p
www.state.ma.us/dep/brp/dws/dwshome.htm
www.michigan.gov/deq
Phone Number
(671)972-3770
(808) 586^258
(502)564-3410
(208) 373-0502
(217)785-8653
(317)232-8603
(515)725-0275
(785)296-5514
(225) 765-5038
(207) 287-2070
(410)537-3000
(617)292-5770
(517)335^176
35

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State Contact Information
Minnesota
Department of Health: Drinking Water Protection Section
Mississippi
Department of Health: Division of Water Supply
Missouri
Department of Natural Resources: Public Drinking Water Program
Montana
Department of Environmental Quality: Public Water Supply Section
Nebraska
Department of Health and Human Services Regulation and Licensure
Nevada
Department of Human Resources: Bureau of Health Protection Services
New Hampshire
Department of Environmental Services: Water Supply Engineering Bureau
New Jersey
Department of Environmental Protection: Bureau of Safe Drinking Water
New Mexico
Environment Department: Drinking Water Bureau
New York
Department of Public Health: Bureau of Public Water Supply Protection
North Carolina
Department of Environment and Natural Resources: Public Water Supply
Section
North Dakota
Department of Health: Division of Municipal Facilities
Ohio
Environmental Protection Agency: Division of Drinking and Ground Water
Web site
www.health.state.mn.us/divs/eh/water/index.html
www. msd h .state . ms . us/msd hs i te/i nd ex. cf m
www.dnr.state.mo.us/wpscd/wpcp/index.html
www.deq.state.mt.us/wqinfo/index.asp
www.hhs.state.ne. us/enh/enhindex.htm
www.health2k.state.nv.us/bhps/phe/sdwp.htm
www.des.state.nh.us/wseb/
www.state.nj. us/dep/watersupply/safedrnk.htm
www.nmenv.state.nm.us/dwb/dwbtop.html
www.health.state.ny.us/nysdoh/water/main.htm
www.deh.enr.state.nc.us/pws
www.ehs.health.state.nd.us/ndhd/environ/mf/index.htm
www.epa.state.oh.us/ddagw/
Phone Number
(651)215-0770
(601)576-7518
(573)751-5331
(406) 444-3080
(402)471-2541
(775)687-6615
(603)271-2513
(609) 292-5550
(505) 827-7545
(518)402-7650
(919)733-2321
(701)328-5211
(614)644-2752
36

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State Contact Information
Oklahoma
Department of Environmental Quality: Water Quality Division
Oregon
Department of Human Resources: Drinking Water Program
Pennsylvania
Department of Environmental Protection: Bureau of Water Supply
Management
Puerto Rico
Department of Health: Public Water Supply Supervision Program
Rhode Island
Department of Health: Office of Drinking Water Quality
South Carolina
Department of Health and Environmental Control: Bureau of Water
South Dakota
Department of Environment and Natural Resources: Drinking Water Program
Tennessee
Department of Environment and Conservation: Division of Water Supply
Texas
Texas Commission on Environmental Quality: Water Supply Division
Utah
Department of Environmental Quality: Division of Drinking Water
Vermont
Department of Environmental Conservation: Water Supply Division
Virgin Islands
Department of Planning and Natural Resources: Division of Environmental
Protection
Web site
www.d eq .sta te .0 k. us/WQD ne w/i nd ex. htm
www.ohd.hr.state.or.us/dwp/index.cfm
www.dep.state.pa.us/dep/deputate/watermgt/wsm/
wsm.htm
www.epa.gov/region02/cepd/prlink.htm
www.healthri.org/environment/dwq/Home.htm
www.scdhec.net/water/html/dwater.html
www.state.sd .us/denr/des/dri nki ng/dwprg .htm
www.state .tn. us/e nvi ronme nt/dws/
www.tnrcc.state.tx.us/permitting/waterperm/pdw/pdwOOO.html
www.drinkingwater.utah.gov
www.ve rmontd ri nki ngwater.org
www.epa.gov/region02/cepd/vilink.htm
Phone Number
(405)702-8100
(503)731^317
(717)787-5017
(787) 977-5870
(401)222-6867
(803) 898^300
(605) 773-3754
(615)532-0191
(512)239^671
(801)536^200
(802)241-3400
(340)773-1082
37

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State Contact Information
Virginia
Department of Health: Division of Water Supply Engineering
Washington
Department of Health: Drinking Water Division
West Virginia
Bureau for Public Health: Environmental Engineering Department
Wisconsin
Department of Natural Resources: Bureau of Water Supply
Wyoming
EPA Region 8: Wyoming Drinking Water Program
Web site
www.vd h.state .va .us/dw
www.doh.wa.gov/ehp/dw/
www.wvdhhr.org/oehs/eed/
www.d nr.state .wi . us/o rg/wa te r/d wg/i nd ex. htm
www.epa.gov/region08/water/dwhome/wycon/wycon.html
Phone Number
(804) 864-7500
(360)236-3100
(304) 558-2981
(608) 266-0821
(307) 777-7781
38

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Tribal  Contacts
For additional information or to learn more about the laws governing your tribe, use the contact information provided below.
US EPA Headquarters
American Indian Environmental Office
www.epa.gov/indian
(202) 564-0303
US EPA Tribal Coordinators
EPA Region 1
EPA Region 2
EPA Region 4
EPA Region 5
EPA Region 6
EPA Region 7
EPA Region 8
EPA Region 9
EPA Region 10
www.epa.gov/region01/topics/government/tribal.html
www.e pa .g ov/reg i o n02/nati o ns/i nd ex. htm I
www.epa.gov/region04/ead/indian/index.htm
www.epa.gov/region5/water/stpb
www.epa.gov/region06/6xa/tribal.htm
www.epa.gov/region07/gove rnment_triba I/index, htm
www.epa.gov/region08/tribes
www.epa.gov/region09/cross_pr/indian/index.html
yosemite.epa.gov/r10/tribal.NSF/webpage/
tribal+office+homepage?opendocument
(888) 372-7341
(212)637-3600
(404) 562-6939
(312)353-2123
(800) 887-6063
(913)551-7030
(303)312-6116
(415)744-1500
(206)553-4011
Other Contacts
Administration for Native Americans
Bureau of Indian Affairs
Indian Health Service
Native American Water Association
www.acf.dhhs.gov/programs/ana/
www.doi.gov/bureau-indian-affairs.html
www.ihs.gov
www.nawainc.org
(877) 922-9262
(202)208-3710
(301)443-3024
(775) 782-6636
                                                                39

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Appendix B:  Sources of Financial  Assistance to Drinking Water Systems


System improvements can be funded by raising rates and obtaining loans or grants. The table below provides information on some programs that may provide
financial assistance to help you maintain assets in good condition, replace deteriorated assets that have outlived their useful lives, and continue to provide safe and
secure drinking water to your customers. Consult your State or Regional Tribal Drinking Water Primacy Agency for additional information.
Major Providers of Financial Assistance to Drinking Water Systems

Program
Drinking Water State Revolving
Fund (DWSRF)
Rural Utilities Service (RUS) Water
and Wastewater Loan and Grant
Program
State-specific programs
Tribal-specific programs
Manufactured Housing Institute
Description
These state-administered loan programs enable water systems
to finance infrastructure improvements, provide training, and
fund source water protection activities.
This program offers loans and grants to develop water and
waste-disposal systems in rural areas.
Your state may offer additional funding programs.
EPA gives grants to tribes through the DWSRF Tribal Set-Aside
Program for improvements to water systems that serve tribes.
States and the Indian Health Service may provide additional
assistance.
The Manufactured Housing Institute provides information on
loan programs for manufactured homes to its members. It also
offers forums to interact with financial services companies
that cater to the manufactured homes market.
Contact Information
www.epa.gov/safewater/dwsrf/contacts.html
Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800) 426-4791
www.usda.gov/rus/water/states/usamap.htm
(202) 720-9540
See Appendix A for state contact information
See Appendix A for tribal contact information
www.manufacturedhousing.org
(703) 558-0400
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              Program
                        Description
             Contact Information
 Small Business Administration (SBA)
SBA helps small businesses get low-interest loans.
www.sba.gov
(800) 827-5722
 Rural Community Assistance
 Corporation (RCAC)
 Local Commercial Banks
RCAC provides loans to rural utilities in 11 western states to
help meet the financing needs of rural communities and
disadvantaged populations.
www.rcac.org/programs/serv-financial.html
(916) 447-2854
Banks in your community can offer loans to help finance
capital improvements. Although interest rates may not be as
favorable as other options, it may be easier for you to
negotiate a loan through a local bank.
Talk to your city clerk, a local accountant, or
your state or tribal coordinator about which
banks in your area most closely match your
needs.
Before you apply for funding, find out what each source will pay for and what information it will need to consider in your application. Ask about local matching
fund requirements, application procedures, what makes a project "fundable," and special program requirements and restrictions. Ask to see applications from
previously funded projects. Get an idea of what information is required for an application; most lending and granting agencies will want to see financial statements
such as budgets, income statements, and cash flow documents.
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Appendix C:  Sources  for More  Information on Asset  Management
Computer Programs

  CAPFinance. The Environmental Finance Center at Boise State University
   has developed an easy-to-use computer program to help water systems
   inventory their assets and analyze funding options for rehabilitation and
   replacement of assets.  For more information or to order a copy, call (208)
   426-1 567 or visit Boise State's website at http://sspa.boisestate.edu/efc/
   services.htm.

  Show-me Water Ratemaker. The Missouri Department of Natural Resources
   has developed software to help water systems set rates. To obtain a free
   copy visit www.dnr.state.mo/us/oac/Ratemakerbrochure.pdf or call (800)
   361-4827.

Documents

  A Guidebook of Financial Tools, produced by the Environmental Financial
   Advisory Board and the Environmental Finance Center Network, is available
   in PDF format at www.epa.gov/efinpage/guidbkpdf.htm.  It is also available
   by e-mailing efin@epa.gov or by calling (800) 490-91 98.

  Financial Accounting Guide for Small Water Utilities, by Michael D. Peroo,
   1 997, Kansas Rural Water Association. This document is available from the
   National Drinking Water Clearinghouse at West Virginia University, (800)
   624-8301.

  Asset Management: A Handbook for Small Water Systems (EPA 81 6-R-03-
   01 6) and Strategic Planning: A Handbook for Small Water Systems (EPA
   816-R-03-01 5), part of EPA's Simple Tools for Effective Performance
   (STEP) Guide Series. These documents are available from EPA's Small
   Systems Information and Guidance Web site (www.epa.gov/safewater/
   smallsys/ssinfo.htm) and by calling the Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (800)
   426-4791 and requesting the guides by document  number.

  Sources of Technical and Financial Assistance for Small Drinking Water
   Systems (EPA 81 6-K-02-005). This document is available from EPA's Small
   Systems Information and Guiance Web site (http://www.epa.gov/safewater/
   smallsys/pdfs/tfa_sdws.pdf) and by calling the Safe Drinking Water Hotline
   at (800) 426-4791 and requesting document EPA 81 6-K-02-005.
Other Organizations

  The Safe Drinking Water Act Primacy Agency in your state (see Appendix
   A for a list of contact information)

  EPA's Environmental Finance Program provides financial and technical
   assistance to water systems and other regulated entities. Visit
   www.epa.gov/efinpage/ or call (202) 564-4994 for more information about
   the program, for access to the program's publications, and to reach the
   Environmental Finance Center network.

  U.S. EPA Safe Drinking Water Hotline, (800) 426-4791

  National Rural Water Association, (580) 252-0629, www.nrwa.org

  Rural Community Assistance Partnership, (888) 321 -7227, www.rcap.org

  American Water Works Association, (303) 794-7711, www.awwa.org

  Manufactured Housing Institute, (703) 558-0400,
   www.manufacturedhousing.org
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