United States
            Environmental Protection
            Agency
              Policy, Planning,
              And Evaluation
              (PM-222B)
EPA-230-B-93-001
February 1993
v/EPA
Guide to Federal Water Quality
Programs and Information
               ^         VH •
                                          Printed on paper that contains
                                          at least 50% recycled liber

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&ERA
Guide to Federal Water Quality
Programs and Information

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                                 Acknowledgements
       The Guide to Federal Water Quality Programs and Information has been prepared by the Interagency Work
Group on Water Quality under the leadership of Tim Stuart, Chair of the Work Group, and N. Phillip Ross, Director
of the  Environmental Statistics and Information  Division (ESID) for the  Office of Strategic Planning and
Environmental Data (OSPED) in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency with assistance from, in alphabetical
order:

               John Belshe, ESID and Army Corps of Engineers
               RiduirdCotIiern,ESID
               Carroll Curtis, Consultant
               Judy English, VIGYAN Inc.
               Sandra Gehring, VfGYAN Inc.
               Luis Hernandez, ViGYAN Inc.
               Eleanor Leonard, ESID
               James Morant, ESID
               Ingrid Schultz, ESID
               Jolm Williams, JRW Associates
               David Zoellner, Consultant
                                   For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office
                          Superintendent of Documents, Mail Stop: SSOP, Washington, DC 20402-9328
                                        ISBN 0-16-041708-2
 PAGE I!
                                         GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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                                           Foreword
        The overall goal of the Guide to Federal Water Quality Programs and Information  is to help make key
Federal information on water quality available to environmental analysts. In this time of increased environmental
awareness it is vital to share as much information as possible, avoid duplication of effort, and limit the resources
used to identify and collect necessary data.

     '   Many factors are important in assessments of water quality.  Specifically, the Guide  includes information
on 1) underlying demographic pressures; 2) the use of land, water, and resources; 3) pollutant loadings; 4) ambient
water quality; 5) other effects of water pollution; and 6) a listing of programs established to preserve, protect and
restore water quality. This encompasses statistics from the Bureau of the Census oh demographic data, statistics from
EPA's Toxics Release Inventory, statistics from the U.S. Department of Agriculture on pesticide use on crop lands,
statistics on ambient water quality from several NOAA and USGS programs, information from the Centers for
Disease Control on waterborne diseases, information from  such control programs  as EPA's Permitting and
Enforcement programs, and other sources.  An appendix includes information on additional sources of information
such as directories, selected databases,  individual water quality studies, clearinghouses, and  analytical tools. The
Guide also contains an index of keywords and phrases that can be used to locate desired programs.

        The entries in this Guide are arranged by the six categories of information described above. Included are
programs that use documented procedures to collect statistics in a way that is consistent across the Nation and publish
those statistics.  Those programs  can  be identified by their two-column format and by the following special
identification box.



:..Y....:.
f
Datatype: Statistics
Source: Program Contact
         The Guide references a number of programs which  also appear in the Guide to Selected  National
 Environmental Statistics in the U.S. Government (EPA, 1992). These entries are marked with the following special
 identification box.  These programs have been included in this Guide as a convenience for the reader in locating
 programs with relevant information for water quality analyses.
                                                us.
                                                Guide
                                                Entry
Data Type: Statistics
Source: U.S. Guide
         The Guide also includes water related program entries. They appear in one-column format and are marked
 by the following special identification box.
TP =.
Datatype; Program
Information
Source: Program Contact
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                                  PAGE Hi

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        Comments and suggestions concerning the Guide are welcomed.  A comment/recommendation form is
provided following the Keyword Index.

        For additional copies of the printed version of the Guide, please contact:

               Public Information Center (PIC)
               U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
               401 M Street, SW
               Washington, DC 20460


        In addition to the printed version, a limited number of copies of the Guide will be available in an electronic
version that can be viewed on an IBM-compatible personal computer with 640K of RAM memory, hard disk drive,
DOS 3.0 or higher, and an EGA or VGA monitor. If you would like a copy of the electronic version of the Guide,
please contact:

               Tim Stuart, Ph.D.
               Environmental Statistics and Information Division
               U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (PM-222B)
               401 M Street, SW
               Washington, DC  20460
 PAGE Jv
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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                   Guide to Federal Water Quality
                       Programs  and Information

                           A Guide with Computer Software
              Developed by the Interagency Work Group on Water Quality


              Chair:  Tim Stuart, U.S.  Environmental Protection Agency

                                     Members:
Frank Skidmore and Charles Herrick
Council on Environmental Quality

Michael LeBlanc and Merritt Padgitt
Economic Research Service

Dean Knighton, Dick Cline and
Warren Harper
Forest Service

Sam Rives and Van Johnson
National Agricultural Statistics Service

Wildon Fontenot and Peter Tidd
Soil Conservation Service

Charles Alexander and Gerald Barton
National  Oceanic   and   Atmospheric
Administration

Jesse Havard
Bureau of the Census

Earl Eiker and Pete Juhle
Army Corps of Engineers

Anita Highsmith and Anne Moore
National Centers for Disease Control

Ron Huntsinger
Bureau of Land Management
Keith Eggleston
Bureau of Reclamation

Jim Andreasen
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Tim Smith, Cliff Haupt and Don Bingham
U.S. Geological Survey

Bill Jackson
National Park Service

John Belshe/Rick Cothern
Eleanor Leonard
Wendy Blake-Coleman
Kim Devonald/Ruth Chemrys
Tom Dixon
Elizabeth Jester-Fellows/Jack Clifford
Dave Wolf/Joel O'Connor
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

Ted Engman and Jim Ormsby
National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Mike Hines and Richard Shane
Tennessee Valley Authority

Claude Magnuson
Department of Energy
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                 PAGEv

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                                Table of Contents
Acknowledgements  	ii
Foreword  	iii
Title Page and Interagency Work Group Members	v
Introduction	 xiii


I.      Population Pressures	   l

                    DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE	   3
                    Decennial Census of Population	   3
                    National and Subnational Population Estimates and National and State Population
                            Projections	   5

II.     Use of Land, Water and Resources	   7

              A. Land Use	   9

                    DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE	  11
                    Major Uses of Land in the United States	  11
                    National Resources Inventory	  13

                    DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR	  15
                    National Land Use and Land Cover Mapping Program 	  15

              B. Water Use	  17

                    DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE	  19
                    Snow Survey and Water Supply Forecasting	  19

                    DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE	  20
                    Farm and Ranch Irrigation Survey  	  20

                    DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE	  21
                    Major Water Projects and Their Characteristics  	  21

                    DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR	  22
                    National Water Conditions Reporting System	  22
                    National Water Use Information Program  	  24
                    Water Supply Conditions for the Western United States	  26

              C. Resource Use	  27

                    DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE	  29
                    Resource Planning Act Assessments  	  29
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
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                     DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR	31
                     Federal Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA) Assessments	  31
                     National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation	  33

in.    Pollutant Loadings	  35

                     INTERAGENCY PROGRAMS  	  37
                     National Acid Deposition Program/National Trends Network	  37

                     DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE	  39
                     1989 Cotton Water Quality Database	  39
                     Agricultural Chemical Use on Field Crops	  40
                     Agricultural Chemical Use on Fruits and Nuts 	  41
                     Agricultural Chemical Use on Vegetables  	  42
                     Chemical Use Surveys	  43
                     Fertilizer Use and Price Statistics 	  44
                     Water Quality and Farm Chemical Studies	  45

                     DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE	  46
                     National Coastal Pollutant Discharge Inventory Program	  46

                     DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION  	  48
                     Highway Statistics	  48
                     Marine Pollution Retrieval System  	  50
                     National Transportation Statistics 	  51

                     ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY	<	  52
                     Comprehensive  Environmental  Response,  Compensation   and   Liability
                             Information System	  52
                     National Air Pollution Control Program	  53
                     Toxics Release  Inventory	  54

               Other Items of Interest	  55

                     Month and State Current Emissions Trends  	  57
                     National Energy Information Center	  57
                     Hazardous Waste  Surveys 	  58
                     Non-Hazardous Waste Surveys	  60

IV.    Ambient Surface and Ground Water Quality	  61

               A. General	  63

                     DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE	  65
                     Watershed Management and  Rehabilitation Research Program	  65

                     DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE	  66
                     National Status and Trends Program	  66
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                                       GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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                     DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR	  68
                     National Contaminant Bipmonitoring Program 	  68
                     Colorado River Salinity Program  	  70
                     National Hydrologic Bench-Mark Network Program	  71
                     National Stream Quality Accounting Network	  73
                     National Water-Quality Assessment Program	..	  75
                     Watershed Protection Program: Park-Based Water Quality Data Management
                            System 	  76
                     Water Resources Assessment Program	  78

                     ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY ....		  80
                     Great Lakes Fish Monitoring Program	  80
                     National Surface Water Survey	  81
                     National Water Quality Monitoring Program 	  83

                     TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY	  86
                     Water Resources and Ecological Monitoring 	  86

              B. Ecological	  89

                     DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE	  91
                     Fisheries Statistics Program	  91
                     Living Marine Resources	  92
                     National Coastal Wetlands Inventory	  94

                     DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR	  95
                     Biomonitoring of Environmental Status and Trends (BEST) Program  	  95
                     National Wetlands Inventory	  97
                     North American Breeding Bird Survey  	100
                     Waterfowl Breeding Population and Habitat Survey  	101

                     ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY	102
                     Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program  (EMAP)  	102

V.     Other Effects of Water Pollution	103

                     DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE	105
                     Classified Shellfishing Waters  	105

                     DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES	107
                     Waterbome Disease Outbreak Surveillance	107

VI.    Preservation, Protection, and  Restoration Programs	109

                     DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE	Ill
                     Forest Service Water Quality Program	Ill
                     SCS Water Quality Programs	112
                     Working Group on Water Quality	113

                     DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE	115
                     Annual Surveys of Government Finances and Government Employment	115
                     Survey of Pollution Abatement Costs and Expenditures	117
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                     PAGE ix

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                     DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE	119
                     Defense Environmental Restoration Program	 .	119

                     DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY	.121
                     Environmental Restoration Program  	121

                     DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR	122
                     National Irrigation Water Quality Program	122
                     National Wild and Scenic Rivers System	123
                     U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands  	124
                     Bureau of Land Management Initiatives	125

                     ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY		127
                     Construction Grants/State Revolving Fund Programs  .. .	127
                     National Clean Lakes Program	130
                     National Effluent Guidelines Program		132
                     National Marine and Estuarine Programs	134
                     National Nonpoint Source Program	136
                     National Public Water Supply Supervision Program  	138
                     National Water Quality Standards, Water Quality Criteria, and Total Maximum
                             Daily Load (TMDL) Programs	140
                     National Wetlands Program	143
                     Office of Wastewater Enforcement and Compliance Permits Program  ......... 145
                     Wellhead Protection Program/Comprehensive State Ground  Water Protection
                             Program (CSGWPP)	147

APPENDICES	149

              A.  Individual Water Quality Studies	151

                     1982 National Fisheries Survey	153
                     Environmental Investments: The Cost of A Clean Environment  	153
                     Environmental Monitoring Methods Index . . .	154
                     National Pesticide Survey		154
                     National Study of Chemical Residues in Fish	155
                     National Urban Runoff Program	 155
                     Nitrate Occurrence in U.S. Waters 	156
                     Pollutant Loadings and Impacts From Highway Stormwater Runoff 	156

              B. Analytical Tools	157

                     Environmental Display Manager	159
                     Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Program	159
                     Water Quality Modeling 	161

              C.  Clearinghouses, Data Centers, and Additional Directories	163

                     COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY  	165
                     Annual Report to Congress 	.165

                     DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE	165
                     Water Quality Information Center	165
                                       GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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                    DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE	166
                    Climate Analysis Center	I66
                    Earth System Data Directory 	167
                    National Climate Data Center	168
                    National Environmental Data Referral Service (NEDRES)  .	169
                    National Geophysical Data Center	171
                    National Oceanographic Data Center	 .	173
                    National Weather Service .	174
                    Ocean Pollution Data and Information Network	176
                    Office of Hydrology	177

                    DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR	178
                    Earth Science Data Directory	178
                    Global Land Information System (GLIS)	179
                    National Water Data Exchange (NAWDEX)  ..	179
                    National Water Data Storage and Retrieval System (WATSTORE)	180
                    National Water Information Clearinghouse	180
                    National Water Information System		181

                    ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY	181
                    ACCESS EPA	181
                    Guide to Selected National Environmental Statistics in the U.S. Government .... 182
                    INFOTERRA/USA Directory of Environmental Sources  .	183
                     Office  of  Water  Environmental  and   Program  Information  Systems
                            Compendium	184
                     STOrage RETrieval (STORET)  	184
                     Waterbody System  	•	185

                     INTERAGENCY EFFORT			186
                     Intergovernmental Task Force on Monitoring Water Quality (ITFM)	186
                     Inventory of Exposure-Related Data Systems Sponsored by Federal Agencies  ... 187

                     NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION	188
                     Global Change Master Directory	188

Keyword Index  	  191

Following the Keyword Index:

       Comment / Recommendation Form                                     ,
       Entry Updating  Procedures
       New Entry Submission Information                              ;
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                      PAGE xi

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                                         Introduction
        The Guide to Federal Water Quality Programs and Information is designed to direct the reader to Federal
programs with useful information on water quality programs and conditions. The Guide does not contain actual water
quality data; instead  it provides descriptions of programs and names, addresses, and phone numbers for program
contacts. The program contacts generally will provide access to the actual data.  Although the primary audience for
the Guide is water quality analysts in the Federal Government, the Guide also should prove of interest to a much
larger audience.

        The Guide was developed by the Interagency Work Group on Water Quality through a series of meetings
and discussions as an attempt to inventory all significant Federal water quality programs and information of a
national scope or interest. We recognize that some important activities may have been overlooked and, as noted
below, we would welcome suggestions for changes to the Guide.

        In line with the Clean Water Act and recent EPA Policy1, the Interagency Work Group took the approach
that water quality includes the chemical, physical and biological/ecological integrity of the receiving waters. The
definition of "water quality," as used in this Guide, thus includes habitat for aquatic  life as well  as the chemical
quality of the sediment and water column. The Guide contains information on programs dealing with surface and
ground waters in freshwater, estuarine and marine environments.

        The Guide is divided into six sections. Each section consists of a brief discussion followed by a listing of
one or more Federal programs. The first three  sections  address Federal programs with information on factors that
affect water quality, i.e., underlying demographic pressures; the use of land, water and resources; and pollutant
loadings. The fourth section contains information on ambient water quality, while the fifth section discusses other
effects of water pollution such as waterborne disease. The final section includes information on Federal programs
established to preserve, protect and restore water quality. The Appendix contains information on additional sources
of  information,  including:  individual  studies; analytical tools; and clearinghouses, data centers, and additional
directories.

        In  addition to the information on loadings and water quality impacts referenced in the Guide, additional
estimates on pollutant loadings and water quality impacts can be developed by using the analytical tools, e.g., water
quality models, referenced in the Appendix. For example, the Environmental Display Manager2 will allow mapping,
display, analysis support, and information management capabilities, and will provide estimates of water quality
conditions using a number of national water quality databases at local, regional and national scales.

        For this first edition of the Guide the focus is on national-level programs and information. Over time, the
Guide may  be expanded to provide more comprehensive coverage of water quality programs and information  at
Regional and State levels. As resources allow, we expect to update the Guide in the future. Therefore, we would
welcome suggestions for changes to  the Guide, including suggestions for additional Federal programs that should
be  included. A comment/recommendation form is provided following the Keyword Index.
    1 Policy on the Use of Biological Assessments and Criteria in the Water Quality Program, Office of Water, Environmental
 Protection Agency, June, 1991. Also see Technical Support Document for Water Quality-based Toxics Control, Environmental
 Protection Agency, Office of Water, 1991.

    2 See "The Environmental Display Manager: A Tool for Water Quality Data Integration." Water Resources Bulletin, Volume
 27, Number 6,  1991.
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                                  PAGE xiii

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                                     Section I
                              Population Pressures
       This Section provides information on several Bureau of the Census programs that track




and  project human population in the U.S.  Such  statistics  are important in  water quality




assessment since some types of water pollutants, e.g., sewage, are directly related to population




and population centers that produce urban runoff from streets and parking lots. Thus, changes




in population and population density generally lead to changes in water quality.  Of course, the




water quality  impact  from a particular population level depends  upon a number of factors




discussed in later sections of this Guide. These factors include land use, water use, treatment and



prevention programs, and the characteristics of the receiving waters.  For example, a large urban



area located on a small stream will most likely produce larger water quality impacts than a small




town located on a large river.
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                  PAGE 1

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DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

Decennial Census of Population

OFFICE:

Bureau of the Census
Population Division

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The decennial census provides a comprehensive set of
population statistics  for the  United  States.  Basic
demographic  characteristics  are  collected  on a
100-percent basis. Social and economic characteristics
are collected from a large sample of all households
and persons in group quarters.

DATA COVERAGE:

The decennial census provides demographic (e.g., age,
race, sex, relationship, Hispanic origin), social (e.g.,
education,  migration,   ancestry,  language),   and
economic (e.g., occupation, industry, income, place of
work) characteristics of the population of the United
States, Puerto  Rico, the  Virgin Islands, Guam,
American Samoa, the Northern Marinas, and Palau.
Trend  data are available from  previous decennial
censuses.

COLLECTION METHODS:

Basic  demographic  data are collected from  100
percent of the population. Social  and economic
characteristics are collected from a large sample -
approximately one-in-six in 1980 and 1990.

COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

Decennial.

GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

The 50 States, the District of Columbia, and substate
areas such as  counties, county  subdivisions, cities,
towns, villages, and census tracts. Also covers Puerto
Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the
Northern Marinas, and Palau.
                              U.S.
                             Guide
                             Entry
Data "type: Statistics
Source: U.S. Guide
CONTACT:

Philip N. Fulton
Assistant  Division  Chief  for Census  Programs
Population Division, U.S. Bureau of the Census
Washington, DC 20233
Phone: (301) 763-7890

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

The results of the Census of Population are issued in
various forms; printed reports, computer tape files,
CD-ROM, and microfiche. Computer tape files are
designed to provide statistics with greater detail than
is feasible or desirable to provide  in printed and
microfiche reports. Many computer tape files also are
released on CD-ROM.  The  following  is a brief
summary of 1990 census data releases:

P.L.  94-171, Population Counts - In accordance with
    Public Law (P.L.) 94-171, the Census Bureau has
    provided population tabulations to all States for
    legislative reapportionment/redistricting.

Summary Tape Files (STFs) 1A, IB, and 1C, and 2A,
    2B, and 2C -  Complete count  population and
    housing data summarized for a wide range of
    census geography (United  States, metropolitan
    areas,  urbanized areas, American  Indian and
    Alaska Native areas, States, county subdivisions,
    places, census tracts, block numbering  areas,
    block groups, and block).

Summary  Tape Files (STFs) 3A and 3C - Sample
    population and housing data summarized for a
    wide range of census geography (as shown above
   - but excluding blocks).

Census/Equal Employment  (EEO)  Special File -
    Sample census data to support affirmative action
    planning.
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
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Summary  Population and  Housing Characteristics
    (CPH-1) reports - Complete count population and
    housing data derived from STF 1.

Summary   Social,  Economic,   and  Housing
    Characteristics  (CPH-5)  reports  -  Sample
    population   and  housing   data  for   local
    governments, including American  Indian and
    Alaska Native areas.

General Population Characteristics (CP-1) reports -
    Detailed  statistics  on  age,  sex,  race, and/or
    Hispanic  origin, martial status and household
    relationship presented for States, counties, places
    of 1,000 or more inhabitants, etc.

The Census Bureau is in the process of releasing STF
1-B U.S. Summary File, and STF 2 Census Tracts
and soon  will begin releasing General Population
Characteristics STF 1-C. STF  3,  which  presents
social, economic, and detailed housing characteristics
for geographic areas comparable to STF 1-A, and
STF 4, which is the geographic counterpart to STF 2.
STF-4 will be released in early 1993.

Customized special tabulations of census data may be
obtained on a cost reimbursable basis.

DATABASE(S):

CENDATA

    CENDATA  is the Census Bureau's online
    information service. It  is available  through two
    information vendors, CompuServe and DIALOG.

    For more information, contact:

    Data User Services Division
    U.S. Bureau of the Census
    Washington, DC 20233
    Phone: (301) 763-2074
PAGE 4
                                         GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

National and  Subnational Population  Estimates and
National and  State Population Projections
OFFICE:

Bureau of the Census
Population Division
Population Estimates and Projections Branches

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The Population Estimates and Projections Branches
produce current estimates of the U.S. population (the
50 States, the  District of Columbia, the  counties,
incorporated areas, Puerto Rico, and the territories)
and project the future population.

DATA COVERAGE:

Statistics include: estimates of the total, resident, and
civilian population of the United States by State, with
components of change; estimates of national and State
population by age, sex, race, and/or Hispanic origin;
projections of future population by age and sex for
States and by age, sex, race, and/or Hispanic  origin
for the United  States;  yearly estimates of county
population; biennial estimates of the population of
incorporated places  and functional  minor  civil
divisions;   and   estimates   of   populations   of
metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas; population
migration   by  religion;  population  density;  and
population growth rate.

COLLECTION METHODS:

Estimates  of the U.S.  population are derived  by
updating the total population including Armed Forces
overseas at the time of the last census, year by year,
through the components of population change.  State
population totals are estimated using vital statistics,
school  enrollment,  internal  migration (based  on
Federal income tax data), net internal migration, and
Medicare enrollment.  State estimates for age and sex
 are developed by a procedure that carries forward the
decennial census data for each single year of age by
 State, and allows for births, deaths, and net migration.
 Net migration is estimated using school enrollment to
 obtain a  school-age migration rate,  which is then
 converted  to rates for single years of age.   The
 methodology to develop household estimates is based
on national trends and estimated State trends in adult
per household, and on estimates of adult population
for States.   For detailed descriptions of  specific
methodologies, see reports referenced in Publications.

COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

Continuous.

GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

Entire United States.

CONTACT:

For national estimates:

    Frederick W. Hollmanh
    National Projections Branch
    U.S. Bureau of the Census
    Washington, DC  20233
    Phone: (301)763-7950

For national projections:

    Jennifer Day
    National Projections Branch
    U.S. Bureau of the Census
    Washington, DC  20233
    Phone:  (301)763-1902

For subnational estimates:

    Edwin Byerly
    Subnational Estimates Branch
    U.S. Bureau of the Census
    Washington, DC  20233
    Phone:  (301)763-5072

For state projection statistics:

    Paul Campbell
    Demographic Statistician
    Population Division
    U.S. Bureau of the Census
    Washington, DC 20233
    Phone:  (301)763-1902
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                             PAGES

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FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

Byerly, E. 1990.  State Population and Household
    Estimates:  July  1, 1989.  Current Population
    Reports, Series P-25, No. 1058. U.S. Department
    of Commerce. Washington, DC.

Day, J. 1992.  Population Projections of the United
    States, by Age, Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin:
    1992 to  2050.   Current Population Reports,
    Publication   Series  P-25,   No.   1092.   U.S.
    Department of Commerce. Washington, DC.

Hollman, F.W. 1992.  U.S. Population Estimates, by
    Age,  Sex, Race, and Hispanic Origin:  1980 to
    1991. Current Population Reports, Series P-25,
    No.  1095.   U.S. Department of Commerce.
    Washington, DC.

Stamisinc, D.E.  & R.L. Forstall.  1989.  Patterns of
    Metropolitan  Area  and  County  Population
    Growth:    1980-1987.    Current  Population
    Reports, Series P-25, No. 1039. U.S. Department
    of Commerce. Washington, DC.

Bureau of the Census. 1990. Population Estimates
    for Metropolitan Statistical Areas, July 1,1988,
    1987, and 1986.   Current Population Reports,
    Series P-25, No.  1088-B.  U.S.  Department of
    Commerce.  Washington, DC.

—.  Estimates  of the Population of the United States
    to August  1 (annual).   Current Population
    Reports,  publication  Series  P-25.     U.S.
    Department of Commerce. Washington, DC.

Wetrogen, S.I. 1990. Projections of the Population of
    States,  by Age, Sex,  and Race:   1989-2010.
    Current Population Reports, Publication Series P-
    25, No. 1053. U.S. Department of Commerce.
    Washington, DC.

DATABASE^):

CENDATA

    The Census Bureau's online information service
    is available through two information vendors,
                CompuServe and DIALOG, and on  tape and
                diskette.

                For more information contact:

                    Data User Services Division
                    U.S. Bureau of the Census
                    Washington, DC 20233
                    Phone: (301) 763-2074
PAGE 6
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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                                     Section II





                     Use of Land, Water and Resources









   The programs in this section have information on land use, water use, and resource use. These



uses are important factors in determining water quality, since, as discussed earlier, they interact



with human populations to determine pollutant loadings.  For example, different types of land



use usually provide different  types and levels of pollutants; the amount of water in  a stream



affects its water quality, including its ecology.  Resource uses such as timber harvesting often



alter the quality and quantity of the runoff from the resource area.



    Analytical tools, such as water quality models (see Appendix B), can be used to estimate the



loadings and resulting water quality impacts associated with different population levels and land,



water, and resource uses.



    Additional information on precipitation records is provided in Appendix B. Information on



land use as related to wetlands can be found in entries for the National Wetlands Inventory and



the National Coastal Wetlands Inventory in Section  IV,  Ambient Surface and Ground Water




Quality.
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
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                             A.  Land Use
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                      PAGES

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 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

 Major Uses of Land  in the United States
                                   Data Type: Statistics
                                   Source: U.S. Guide
 OFFICE:

 Economic Research Service
 Resource and Technology Division
 Land and Capital Assets Branch

 SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

 For more  than  50 years, the  Economic  Research
 Service and its predecessor agencies have estimated
 acreage and maintained an inventory of the major
 uses  of land in  the  United  States  at  intervals
 coinciding with the Census of Agriculture.

 DATA COVERAGE:

 Estimates are made for major land  use  classes:
 cropland; grassland pasture and range; forest land;
 special use; and unclassified use. Each major class is
 further classified by specified  uses and some by
 ownership.  Land  uses  are  also  designated  as
 agricultural and nonagricultural.

 Agricultural land uses  include: cropland (cropland
 harvested, cropland failure, cultivated summer fallow,
 and idle cropland); grazing lands (cropland pasture
 and permanent pasture and range); grazed forest land;
 and miscellaneous agricultural uses (farmsteads, farm
 roads,  and farm lanes).

 Special land uses  include: forest land not grazed;
 intensive uses (highways and roads, railroads, and
 airports); and extensive  uses (national  parks,  State
'parks,  wilderness areas, Federal  wildlife areas, State
 wildlife areas, national  defense areas,  and  Federal
 industrial facilities).  Unclassified other land uses
 include: urban and other special  uses not inventoried
 and other miscellaneous areas such as marshes, open
 swamps, bare rock areas, deserts, and tundra. Data are
 analyzed for trends.

 COLLECTION METHODS:

 Data from the Bureau of the Census, agencies of the
 Department of Agriculture, public land management
 and conservation organizations, and other sources are
 assembled,  analyzed, and  synthesized  to  estimate
 State, regional, and national land use acreage. Barnard
 and Hexem (1988) describe how the statistical series
 on acreage of cropland and other land in the United
 States are constructed and used; they also identify
 sources of current and historical data and information
 used in constructing the series.

 COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

 The major uses of land are inventoried every 5 years
 coinciding  with years in  which  the  Census of
 Agriculture is completed.  The inventories generally
 have been comparable in format and coverage since
 1945. The series on "cropland used for crops" dates
 back to 1909.

 GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

 All 50 States.

 CONTACT:

 Arthur B. Daugherty
 Agricultural Economist
 Economic Research Service
 U.S. Department of Agriculture
 1301 New York Ave., NW, Room 408
 Washington, DC  20005-4788
 Phone: (202) 219-0424

 Economic Research Service
 U.S. Department  of Agriculture
 1301 New York Ave., NW Room 408
 Washington, DC  20005-4788
 Phone: (202) 219-0424

 FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

 See Contacts.

PUBLICATIONS:

Barnard, C.H. and R.W. Hexem. 1988. Land Values
    and Land Use. Agricultural Handbook No. 671.
    Vol.  6, Major Statistical Series  of  the  U.S.
   . Department   of Agriculture.  Resources   and
    Technology   Division,   Economic   Research
    Service,   U.S.   Department  of  Agriculture.
   . Washington, DC.
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                            PAGE 11

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Daugherty, A.B.  1991. Major Uses of Land in the
    United States:  1987.  Agricultural  Economic
    Report  (AER)  No.  643.  Resources   and
    Technology   Division,   Economic   Research
    Service,  U.S.  Department  of  Agriculture.
    Washington,  DC.

Frey, H.T. and R.W. Hexem. 1985. Major Uses of
    Land in the United States:  1982. Agricultural
    Economic Report (AER) No. 535. Resources and
    Technology   Division,   Economic   Research
    Service,  U.S.   Department  of  Agriculture.
    Washington, DC.

DATABASE^):

Major Land Uses Database (MLU) #89003

    The MLU database contains  State, regional, and
    national estimates of 15 major land  use classes
    for Census of Agriculture years between 1945
     and 1987. The MLU database is available on one
     5.25" diskette in LOTUS 1-2-3 (Release 2) for
     $25. It is also available on magnetic medium.

     For information, contact:

     ERS-NASS
     341 Victoria Drive
     Hemdon, Virginia 22070
     Phone: (800) 999-6779
  PAGE 12
                                           GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


 National Resources Inventory

 OFFICE:

 Soil Conservation Service
 Resources Inventory Division

 SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:   '

 For 50 years, the Soil Conservation Service (SCS) has
 been conducting periodic inventories of the Nation's
 soil, water, and  related  resources.  The  National
 Resources Inventory (NRI), which is an extension and
 modification of earlier inventories, provides data on
 the status, condition, and trends of these resources of
 nonfederal land in the United States.

 DATA COVERAGE:

 The many types of data collected by the NRI process
 are  organized  into  eight general categories:  soil
 characteristics    and   interpretations   (including
 agricultural land capability); land cover, land use
 (including irrigated and non-irrigated cropland, grazed
 and  ungrazed  forest land,  prime farmland,  etc.);
 erosion (such as sheet and rill, wind, and ephemeral
 gullies); land treatment (such as irrigation, tillage, and
 windbreaks); conservation treatment needs; vegetative
 conditions (such as wetlands, rangeland condition and
 species, and pasture management); and potential for
 conversion to cropland.

 COLLECTION METHODS:

 The NRI is a multi-resource inventory based on soils
 and  related resource data collected at scientifically
 selected random sample sites. The NRI sample design
 was  developed by the Iowa State University (ISU)
 Statistical  Laboratory at Ames. It uses census  area
 and point methods for data collection. Data collection
 involves both field investigation and remote sensing
 (photo-interpretation).

 COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

Data are collected on a 5-year cycle.  Recent surveys
were conducted in 1977, 1982, and 1987.

$£
'
us.
Guide
Entry
Datal^pc: Statistics
Source: U.S. Guide
GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

The 1987  NRI  data  were collected from nearly
300,000 sample sites from all counties of the United
States except those in Alaska, and in Puerto Rico and
the Virgin Islands. Most of these samples were part of
the 1982 NRI which had nearly 1 million sample
sites.  The  1987 NRI data  has a high degree of
reliability  at the State  level and  the  1982  NRI
provides  a  high  degree  of  reliability  at  the
multi-county level. Data estimates can be  made by
Major  Land Resources Areas;  SCS Administrative
Areas;   Water  Resources   Council  Aggregated
Subareas;   and   other  multi-county   geographic
subdivisions.

CONTACT:

Jeff Goebel
Resources Inventory  and Geographic  Information
    Systems Division
Soil Conservation Service
U.S. Department of Agriculture
P.O. Box 2890
South Agricultural Building, Room 6175
Washington, DC  20013
Phone:  (202) 720-4530

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

Soil Conservation Service. 1984. Basic Statistics 1977
    National Resources Inventory. Statistical Bulletin
    No. 686. Department of Agriculture, SCS/ISU.
    Washington,  DC.

--. 1987. Basic Statistics 1982 National Resources
    Inventory,    Statistical   Bulletin   No.   756.
    Department   of   Agriculture,   SCS/ISU.
    Washington,  DC.
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                            PAGE 13

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--. 1989. Summary Report 1987 National Resources
    Inventory.   Statistical   Bulletin   No.   790.
    Department  of   Agriculture,   SCS/ISU.
    Washington, DC.

DATABASE(S):

National Resources Inventory Database

    The database contains 1977, 1982 and  1987
    National Resources Inventory data sets.

    For more information contact:

    Iowa State University Computation Center
    Ames, IA 50010
    ,Phone: (515) 294-3402
  PAGE 14
                                          GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Land Use and Land Cover Mapping Program

OFFICE:                                            CONTACT:
                              Guide
                              Entry
Data'type: Statistics
Source: U.S. Guide
U.S. Geological Survey
Office of Geographic and Cartographic Research

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

As part of its National Mapping Program, the USGS
produces and distributes land use and land cover maps
and digitized data. Land use refers to human activities
that  are directly related to the  land. Land  cover
describes the vegetation, water, natural surface, and
artificial constructions at the land surface. Associated
maps  display  information   on  political  units,
hydrologic units, census county subdivisions, and in
some cases, Federal land ownership.

DATA COVERAGE:

Land use and land cover areas are classified into nine
major classes:  urban  or built-up  land; agricultural
land; rangeland; forest land; water areas; wetland;
barren land; tundra; and perennial snow or ice. Each
major class is subdivided into several minor classes,
for 37 minor classes total. For example, forest lands
are  further classified as deciduous,  evergreen,  or
mixed forest land, and water is further classified as
streams  and canals, lakes,  reservoirs,  or bays and
estuaries.

COLLECTION METHODS:

Remote sensing methods are used, including satellite
imagery,   high-altitude  imagery, medium-altitude
remote sensing (1:20,000), and low-altitude imagery.

COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

Data were collected hi the late 1970s and early 1980s.
GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

1:250,000  maps are  available for the continental
United States. Digitized data at 1:250,000 scale are
available for most of the East, Midwest, West Coast,
and parts of the Rocky Mountain States and Texas. A
few  areas,  including  Hawaii,  are   available  at
1:100,000 scale.
Richard L. Kleckner
Office of Geographic and Cartographic Research
U.S. Geological Survey
590 National Center
Reston, VA 22092
Phone: (703) 648-5741

Kathy F. Lins
Office of Geographic and Cartographic Research
512 National Center
Reston, VA  22092
Phone: (703) 648-4535

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

Earth Sciences Information Center
U.S. Geological Survey
507 National Center
Reston, VA  22092
Phone: (703) 648-6045

To order maps, call 1-800-USA-MAPS.

PUBLICATIONS:

Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey.
    1986. Land Use and Land Cover Digital Data from
    1:250,000 and 1:100,000 Scale Maps, U.S. Geodata
    Users Guide 4. Washington, DC: Department of the
    Interior, U.S. Geological Survey.

DATABASE(S):

U.S. GeoData

The U.S. GeoData database contains digitized data on
land use and land cover (see  above description),
elevation models, digital line graphs  for planimetric
data, and geographic names information. Land  use
and land cover data are produced in two formats: the
vector polygon and the composite theme grid cell and
are  available in ASCII character or  in IBM binary
format from the Earth  Sciences  Information Center.
Summary  land  use  data  for census   county
subdivisions, hydrologic units, and political units are
available on  microfiche  from the Earth Sciences
Information Center.
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
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                               B.  Water Use
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Snow Survey and Water Supply Forecasting



^.y.....
*
Data Type: Statistics
Source: Program Contact
OFFICE:

Soil Conservation Service
Resources Inventory Division

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

Snowpack and other  hydrometeorological data  are
collected and analyzed  to produce seasonal  water
supply forecasts and  related conservation planning
products.

STATISTICAL COVERAGE:

Variables estimated  monthly for about  600 river
forecast points include: most probable seasonal water
supply,  exceedance probabilities, and the 25-year
seasonal average.

Variables measured daily for  about 560  SNOTEL
Automated Data Collection Sites include: accumulated
snow  water  content,  accumulated  precipitation,
average air temperature, maximum air temperature,
minimum  air temperature,  and measurements by
various sensors at select SNOTEL sites.

Trend data available include: western basin snow pack
summaries provided monthly from January 1 through
May  1 (in a few basins June  1). Mid-month data are
made for some basins.  Daily data are available by
computer access. Comparative base in both cases is
the 25-year average.

DATA COLLECTION METHODS:

Measurements at manual snow courses are made by
trained snow surveyors using  a line of about 10
sampling points of approximately 50 to  100  feet
 spacing to represent a particular area. Snow density is
 used to test consistency between points in a course.
 Automated SNOTEL sites report data from a variety
 of sensors.  Sensor performance standards and ground
 truthing are  monitored  regularly. Correlations are
 made to test the effectiveness of data collection sites.
 Forecast accuracy is evaluated  against  measured
 seasonal flows.
COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

Data are collected monthly during the snow season at
approximately 1,500 manual snow courses (twice a
month in a few basins). Data from the 560 SNOTEL
sites are measured throughout the year every 15
minutes and reported  daily (or more  frequently in
some cases).

GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

Eleven  (11)   western  States:  Alaska,  Arizona,
California (Great Basin only),  Colorado,  Idaho,
Montana,  Nevada, New  Mexico, Oregon, Utah,
Washington, and Wyoming.

CONTACT:

David E. Johnson
Snow Survey Program Manager
USDA, Soil Conservation Service
511 N.W. Broadway, Room 248
Portland, OR 97209-3489
Phone: (503) 326-2843

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

Soil Conservation Service. (Annual).  Water Supply
     Outlook for the Western U.S., January 1 through
    May  1.  U.S.  Department   of  Agriculture.
     Washington, DC.

--. (Annual). Water Supply Forecasts -- Individual
     Basins in Western States, January 1 through May
     1  (some basins  June 1). U.S. Department of
     Agriculture. Washington,  DC.

--. (Annual). Annual  Data Summary  (with map of
     data  collection  sites).  U.S. Department  of
     Agriculture. Washington,  DC.

DATABASE(S):

 Centralized Forecasting System (CFS)
 The CFS contains data and products described above
 as well as related information.
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                           PAGE 19

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DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE


Farm and  Ranch Irrigation Survey

OFFICE:

Bureau of the Census
Agriculture Division

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The Farm and Ranch Irrigation Survey is conducted
on a  sample of the  farms  and ranches reporting
irrigation in  the  Census  of  Agriculture to  provide
detailed data relating to on-farm irrigation practices.

DATA COVERAGE:

The survey generates statistics on: total acres of farm
and ranch land irrigated; acres irrigated by category of
land use; acres and yield of irrigated and nonirrigated
crops;  quantity  of  water  applied;  method  of
application to selected  crops;   acres irrigated and
quantity of water used by source; acres irrigated by
type  of water distribution systems; and number of
irrigation wells and pumps.

Also  reported   are  irrigation  expenditures for
maintenance  and repair of irrigation  equipment and
facilities; purchase of energy for on-farm pumping of
irrigation water;  investment in irrigation equipment,
facilities, and land improvement; and cost of water
received from off-farm water suppliers.

Additional information is  provided on the number of
irrigated farms; depth and pumping capacity of wells
used;  the number of pumps and quantity of energy
used  in  irrigation;  application of chemicals in
irrigation; timing of irrigation; and crop yields from
irrigated farms.

COLLECTION METHODS:

The survey is a  probability  sample  of all irrigated
farms  and  ranches identified  in the  Census of
Agriculture,  except farms in Alaska and  Hawaii,
horticultural  specialty and  abnormal  farms.  The
survey is conducted by questionnaire. Two types of
statistical estimation procedures  are used to  account
for selection of survey sample and for nonresponse to
the questionnaire. Methodologies are  more generally
described in the publications listed below.
~~s


U.S.
Guide
Entry
Data Type: Statistics
Source: U.S. Guide
            COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

            Farm and Ranch Irrigation Surveys were conducted in
            1979,  1984, and 1988. The next survey is scheduled
            for 1993.  Selected irrigation  data  for on-farm
            irrigation have  been collected in  the  Census of
            Agriculture since 1890.

            GEOGRAPHIC  COVERAGE:

            Estimates  are made for the  27 leading irrigation
            States, 18  water resource areas,  and  the entire
            conterminous United States.

            CONTACT:

            Dave Peterson
            Special Surveys Branch, Agriculture Division
            Bureau of the Census
            Room 436, Iverson Mall
            Washington, DC 20233
            Phone: (301) 763-8260

            FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

            Public Information Office
            Phone:(301)763-1113

            PUBLICATIONS:

            Bureau of the Census. 1979, 1984, 1988. Farm and
                Ranch  Irrigation Survey U.S.  Department of
                Commerce. Washington, DC.

            DATABASE(S):

            Farm and Ranch Irrigation Survey

                Data are available on flexible diskettes, computer
                tapes,  compact  disk   read-only  memory
                (CD-ROM), and online access.

                For information on these services and published
                reports, contact  Data User Services Division,
                Customer  Services,  Bureau of  the  Census,
                Washington, DC 20233 or call (301) 763-4100.
PAGE 20
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE
Major Water Projects and Their Characteristics

—fj
*y?~
^ ' -
DataTVpe: Statistics
Source: Program Contact
OFFICE:

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Hydraulic and Hydrology Branch
Engineering Division
Directorate of Civil Works

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

Listing of major Corps of Engineers projects and non-
Corps projects which  have Federal flood control or
navigation storage.

STATISTICAL COVERAGE:

Data collected include: location, stream,  purpose,
storage,  operating range,  owner, legislation, year
completed, hydraulic  head,  regulation capacities,
hydropower capacities, drainage area, normal annual
precipitation, average annual flow, and 100-year flow.

DATA COLLECTION METHODS:

None provided.

COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

Data are updated every 3  to 5 years or as necessary.

GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

Entire U.S. and Puerto Rico.

CONTACT:

David Wingard
Hydraulic Engineer
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
CECW-EH-W
20 Massachusetts Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20314-1000
Phone: (202) 272-8510
FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

Charles Sullivan, Chief
Water Control/Quality Section
HQ U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
CECW-EH-W
20 Massachusetts Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20314-1000
Phone: (202) 272-8509

PUBLICATIONS:

None provided.

DATABASE(S):

Major Water Projects Database (ER240)

For more information contact David Wingard (address
above).
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                      PAGE 21

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Water  Conditions Reporting System

*yj£

U.S.
Guide
Entry
Data Type: Statistics
Source: U.S. Guide
OFFICE:

U.S. Geological Survey
Water Resources Division
Office of Scientific Information Management
Hydrologic Information Unit

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

This program collects and analyzes streamflow data
from 190 sites in the U.S., Canada, and Puerto Rico;
ground water levels from about 200 sites  in the
conterminous  U.S.;  reservoir  contents  from 100
reservoirs in  the  U.S.  and Canada; and limited
water-quality data  from five sites on major rivers.
These data, or summaries thereof, are published in the
free monthly newsletter, "National Water Conditions."

DATA COVERAGE:

Slreamflow data include maximum, minimum, and
mean  monthly discharge, and  also maximum and
minimum daily discharges for the period of record.
Classed data (quartiles) for the current  30-year
reference period  (1951-80   at  this  time)  include
monthly,  quarterly,  and annual  (water-year and
calendar  year) means. Period-of-record  monthly
averages, maximums and minimums are available for
ground water levels, reservoirs,  and  water quality
data.

Data reveal trends in stream flow and volume (for
example, effects of droughts, floods, and reservoirs on
discharges). Spatial data (e.g. maps) and descriptive
text are generated from the data.

COLLECTION METHODS:

Sampling locations and rivers sampled are selected so
as to provide an overall picture of conditions in the
Nation. Selection criteria depend upon purpose (e.g.,
major rivers  are chosen by  streamflow). The data
collection design is based on  professional judgement
that data are representative; a statistical design was
not developed or implemented.

Data   parameters   are  measured   by   recording
instrumentation and stored  in  the  WATSTORE
database.  USGS  personnel  extract  the data from
WATSTORE and  the external source listed  under
            "Databases" (below) and conduct statistical analyses
            to produce trends in national water conditions.

            COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

            Frequency includes: monthly means for all streamflow
            with highest, lowest, and last available day of month
            for  some sites; month end reservoir contents; and
            month end ground water levels.

            GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

            Entire United  States,  Puerto  Rico, and  southern
            Canada.  Streamflow sites were selected to  provide
            enough data to define maps of streamflow conditions
            on  a monthly  basis.  Reservoirs  were selected to
            provide  a general picture. Ground water network
            provides data on areas of significant ground water
            use.

            CONTACT:

            Thomas  G. Ross, Chief
            Hydrologic Information Unit
            U.S. Geological Survey
            419 National Center
            Reston, VA 22092
            Phone: (703) 648-6814

            FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

            See Contact.

            PUBLICATIONS:

            National Water Conditions Newsletter (monthly; since
            1944.) Subscription free upon request.

            DATABASE(S):

            Water   Data   .Storage  and  Retrieval   System
            (WATSTORE)

            WATSTORE contains surface water data and  other
            water quality   and  water  resource data  from the
            National Hydrologic Benchmark Network.  Data are
            available on magnetic  medium and as hard copy.
PAGE 22
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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Information about the -data system and computer-
related matters can be obtained from:

    USGS Branch of Computer Technology
    440 National Center
    Reston, Virginia 22092
    Phone: (703)648-5605

Additional information  used in the National Water
Conditions  Report  is furnished  by the Bureau of
Reclamation,  the Corps of Engineers, the National
Ocean Service, the NOAA/USDA Joint Agricultural
Weather Facility, and other sources.
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                             PAGE 23

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
National  Water Use Information Program
OFFICE:

U.S. Geological Survey
Water Resources Division
Program Coordination and Technical Support
Branch of Water Use Information

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The National Water Use Information  Program is a
Federal-State cooperative program designed to collect,
store, analyze, and disseminate water-use information
both nationally and locally. The program began in
1978 to meet the need for a single source of uniform
information on water use. The water-use information
from the program complements long-term USGS data
on the availability and quality of the Nation's water
resources.

The objectives of the program are to determine, on a
national level, how much fresh and saline surface
water and ground water are withdrawn and for what
purposes; how much of this water is consumed during
use; and  how much water is returned  to the source
after use.

DATA COVERAGE:

Water withdrawals from surface and  ground water
sources and consumptive use estimates are compiled
by State and water resources regions for the following
water-use  categories:  public  supply,  domestic,
commercial, industry,  mining, irrigation,  livestock,
thermoelectric power generation, and  hydroelectric
power  generation.  Instream use  is estimated for
hydroelectric power generation.     Trend data are
available at 5-year intervals from 1950 to 1990.

COLLECTION METHODS:

Water-Use data are based on direct measurements or
estimation,  depending  on whether  the parameter is
metered or not.   The  data are compiled through a
census, primarily mail  surveys or permit reports
required  to meet State  regulations.   Personnel of
cooperating  States  collect   water-use data  and
aggregate these data by county and hydrologic unit.
The point data are stored on State-level databases; the
aggregated  data are  compiled  by the USGS for
incorporation into the national Aggregated Water Use
Data System (AWUDS).
            COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

            National compilations of Estimated Use of Water in
            the United States have been published by the USGS
            since 1950 at 5-year intervals. Many States compile
            and publish monthly or annual water use data as part
            of the cooperative program.

            GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

            Water use estimates are compiled for all 50 States,
            Puerto  Rico, Virgin  Islands, and  the  District of
            Columbia. Data are available for 1985 by county and
            four-digit hydrologic subregion.

            CONTACT:

            Wayne Solley, Chief
            Branch of Water Use Information
            U.S. Geological  Survey
            414 National Center
            Reston, VA 22092
            Phone: (703) 648-5670

            FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

            Sandra Holmes
            Technical Information Specialist
            U.S. Geological  Survey
            419 National Center
            Reston, VA 22092
            Phone: (703) 648-6815

            PUBLICATIONS:

            U.S. Geological  Survey. Estimated Use of Water in
                the United States. 1950, 1955,1960, 1965, 1970,
                1975,  1980, 1985,  1990. U.S. Department of
                Interior.  Reston, VA.

            —. 1992. Preliminary Estimates of Water Use in the
                United States, 1990.  U.S. Geological  Survey
                Open-File Report 92-63. U.S. Department of
                Interior.  Reston, VA.
PAGE 24
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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DATABASE(S):

Aggregated Water Use Data System (AWUDS)

    AWUDS contains estimates by source for various
    water-use categories. The database contains over
    120 data elements for all 50 States, Puerto Rico,
    Virgin  Islands, and Washington,  DC Latest
    information available is for 1985. The database is
    maintained  in  the USGS  district office  in
    Doraville, GA State Water Use Data System.

State Water Use Data System  (SWUDS)

    SWUDS provides specific water use information
    for each  State.  Databases are maintained  by
    USGS in district offices in each State.

    For more  information, contact:

    Robert Pierce, Hydrologist
    U.S. Geological Survey
     6481-B Peachtree Industrial Blvd.
     Doraville, GA 30360
     Phone: (404) 986-6860
  GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                                PAGE 25

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 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

 Water Supply Conditions for the Western
 United States

1 =
Data Type: Program
Information
Source: Program Contact
 OFFICE:

 Bureau of Reclamation
 Earth Science Division
 Surface Water Branch

 SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

 This program does not collect any water quality data directly. However, some water quality information can be
 inferred due to expected runoff conditions. The program publishes monthly water supply forecasts during the spring
 runoff period when most western reservoirs are filled.  The reports are based on many sources of data. These
 sources are the Palmer Drought Severity Index, spring and summer stream flow forecasts (Soil Conservation Service
 and National Weather Service) and Reclamation reservoir storage.

 This summary information on water supply is based on a percentage of the normal water supply expected for the
 irrigation season.  This allows the irrigation districts and irrigators to plan their operations to utilize the expected
 water supply. The acre feet of runoff and reservoir storage is measured. Snow pack data is measured in inches of
 water. Available 8 1/2- by 11-inch maps in a report show data in the 17 western United States.

 Collection methods for this program are set by the agency collecting  the basic data and represents professional
 judgement. The agency personnel collect the data under established procedures. The raw data has been collected
 for many years. The recent drought caused the need for providing the  data to irrigation districts and irrigators so
 they would not plant more acres than could be irrigated. Direct measurements are made of precipitation, snow water
 content, reservoir storage and stream flow which are then analyzed statistically to predict the irrigation water supply.
 QA\QC measures are established by the agency collecting the data. Data is collected daily and monthly for the 17
 western States.

 CONTACT:

 Dave King
 Hydrologist
 P.O. Box 25007 (D-5750)
 Denver, CO 80225
 Phone: (303) 236-3813
 FAX:  (404) 776-0199

 FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

 See Contact.

 PUBLICATIONS:

 Monthly report starting in January through runoff period, then quarterly. The November report is a summary and
 outlook for the next year.

 DATABASE(S):

None provided.
PAGE 26
                                        GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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                         C.  Resource Use
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                    PAGE 27

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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Resource Planning Act Assessments
1 =
Data Type: Program
Information
Source: Program Contact
OFFICE:

U.S. Forest Service
Resources Program and Assessment Staff

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The Resources Planning Act (RPA) Assessment includes an analysis of present and anticipated uses, demand for,
and supply of the renewable resources of forest, range, and  other associated lands with consideration of the
international resource situation, and an emphasis on pertinent supply, demand and price relationship trends. The 1989
RPA Assessment Summary Document presents an overview analysis of the present situation and an outlook for the
land base, outdoor recreation and wilderness, wildlife and fish, forest-range grazing, minerals, timber and water.
Complete analyses for each of these resources are contained in seven supporting technical documents. The supporting
appendix for water, entitled "An Analysis of the Water Situation in the United States: 1989-2040," discusses the
environmental, social and economic effects of projected water withdrawals and consumption, and the implications
and opportunities for water resource management. The supporting appendix for wildlife and fish, entitled "An
Analysis of the Wildlife and Fish Situation in the United States: 1989-2040," discusses current status and recent
trends in wildlife and fish resources, including habitat, populations, harvests, and use. The appendix also discusses
projected inventories and uses of wildlife and fish and the implications and opportunities for wildlife and fish
management.

This assessment is required by law once every 10 years. Information is derived from published literature and other
information sources.

RPA legislation directed the Forest Service to follow two principles in conducting assessments. First, assessments
were to analyze the resource situation from a national perspective-including all ownerships, public and private.
 Second, the Forest Service was to use,  to the extent practicable, information collected by other public agencies  on
 the resources studied.

 Data are collected every 10 years for the entke U.S.

 CONTACT:

 Director
 Resource Program and Assessment Staff
 USDA, Forest Service
 PO Box 96090
 Washington, DC 20090-6090
 Phonfc: (202) 205-1235

 FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

 See Contact.
  GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                              PAGE 29

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PUBLICATIONS:

U.S. Forest Service. The Resource Planning Act Assessment for 1989. U.S. Department of Agriculture. Washington,
    DC.

-.  1989. An Analysis of the Water Situation in the United States: 1989-2040: A Technical Document Supporting
    the 1989 USDA Forest Service RPA Assessment. U.S. Department of Agriculture. Washington, DC.

--. 1989. An Analysis of the Wildlife and Fish Situation in the United States: 1989-2040. U.S. Department of
    Agriculture. Washington, DC.

DATABASE(S):

None provided.
PAGE 30
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Federal Land Policy and Management Act
(FLPMA) Assessments

T =
Data Type: Program
Information
Source: Program Contact
OFFICE:

Bureau of Land Management
Soil, Water and Air Program Staff

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The Federal Land Policy and Management Act established as a national policy that land use plans and programs be
developed to manage natural resources on public lands based on the principles of multiple use and sustained yield.
The lands are to be managed in the public interest in a manner that will protect the quality of the water resource,
among other values.  The Act directs that an inventory of all public lands and their resources be prepared and
maintained on a continuing basis.  In carrying out this direction, the BLM conducts baseline inventories of surface
water quality to assist in evaluation of resource condition and capability for the  development of management plans
and programs.  Samples also are taken periodically to determine the impacts of resource use and development
activities. Water quality records are maintained at BLM field offices, as well as being stored in the EPA STORET
database. The BLM is in the process of developing an agency-wide database for water quality data,  as well as
working with the EPA and the USGS on the expansion and improvement of national databases.

Public Water Supply Assessments

Water quality samples are taken at BLM facilities providing potable water sources to the public. This program is
conducted under agreements with State public health agencies, and data collected are submitted to the State agencies
as well as being stored by the responsible BLM field office.

Wilderness Monitoring Program

The BLM has established 19 monitoring stations in designated wilderness areas  in the western United States which
monitor water quality among other parameters.  This is a long-term effort which is  designed to assist in the
assessment of condition and trend of these special designation, high priority areas on a continuing basis.  Data from
these stations are also being used as a part of the information base for the global climate change assessment effort,
and these stations contribute to a nationwide, interagency monitoring network.

CONTACT:

Hydrologist
DOI/BLM
Washington  Office (222)
18th and C Street, NW
Washington, DC 20240
Phone:  (202) 653-9202
FAX:  (202)653-9118

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                           PAGE 31

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PUBLICATIONS:

Bureau of Land Management. 1992. Annual Report of Accomplishments for FY92. U.S. Department of the Interior.
   Washington, DC.

DATABASE(S):

None provided.
PAGE 32
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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DEPARTMENT OF THE  INTERIOR

National  Survey of Fishing, Hunting,
and Wildlife-Associated Recreation

OFFICE:

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Federal Aid Division

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The  National  Survey   of  Fishing,  Hunting,  and
Wildlife-Associated Recreation has been conducted
about every 5 years since 1955. It is one of the oldest
and  most  comprehensive  continuing  recreation
surveys.

The purpose of the survey is to gather information on
the number of anglers, hunters, and nonconsumptive
wildlife recreation participants in the United States, as
well as how often they participate and how much
money   they   spend  on   these   activities.
Nonconsumptive recreationists are those who enjoy
photographing, observing, and feeding wildlife.

DATA COVERAGE:

Numerical data include:  number of participants in
different    types   of    hunting,   fishing,   and
wildlife-associated  recreation  activities;  days of
participation and trips;  species  hunted  and fished;
types of expenditures;  and  selected  socioeconomic
characteristics of participants.

COLLECTION METHODS:

The 1985 survey was conducted in two phases. In the
first phase, a sample of almost  110,000 households
nationwide was screened, mostly  by telephone, to
determine  who in  the household had participated in
wildlife activities.  The  second  phase of the survey
consisted of detailed in-person interviews conducted
with subsamples  of  anglers,   hunters,  and   non-
consumptive wildlife participants who were identified
in the screening phase. Sample sizes were designed to
provide statistically reliable  results at the State level
for the  surveyed activities. In 1985, a total of 33,973
anglers and hunters and 30,177  non-consumptive
users were in the detailed sample.
                                  Data'type: Statistics
                                  Source: U.S. Guide
Some changes have been made in the 1991 survey
design.  For example, telephone  interviews were
conducted three times  during the year (as opposed to
once) and interviewees were asked to recall hunting,
fishing,  and  non-consumptive activities  for  the
previous four months (as opposed to one-year recall).
Despite these changes, data from the 1991 survey will
be comparable with previous survey results.

COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

Five year intervals (except between the 1985 and
1991 surveys because additional time was required to
revise survey design).  The  1991 survey will be
available in May 1993.

GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

The entire United States.

CONTACT:

Sylvia Cabrera
Federal Aid Division
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Mailstop 322 ARLSQ
1849 C Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20240
Phone: (703) 358-2156

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

Richard  Aiken
Federal Aid Division
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Mailstop 322 ARLSQ
1849 C Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20240
Phone: (703) 358-2156

PUBLICATIONS:

Fish and Wildlife Service.  1988. 1985  National
    Survey  of  Fishing,  Hunting,  and
    Wildlife-associated Recreation (and earlier reports
    in this series). U.S. Department of the Interior.
    Washington, DC.
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                      PAGE 33

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—.  1988. Net Economic Recreation Values for Deer,
    Elk, and Waterfowl Hunting and Bass Fishing,
    1985. Fish and Wildlife  Service Report 85-1.
    U.S. Department of the Interior. Washington, DC.

--. 1988. Net Economic Values of Non-Consumptive
    Wildlife-Related  Recreation, 1985.  Fish  and
    Wildlife Service Report 85-2. U.S. Department of
    the Interior. Washington, DC.

--.  1989. Wildlife Related Recreation  on Public
    Lands, 1985. Fish and Wildlife Service Report
    85-3.  U.S.   Department  of  the  Interior.
    Washington, DC.

--.  1989. Hunting on Wetlands, 1985.  Fish  and
    Wildlife Service Report 85-4. U.S. Department of
    the Interior. Washington, DC.

--.  1989. Black Bass  Fishing in the U.S. Fish and
    Wildlife Service Report 85-6. U.S. Department of
    the Interior. Washington, DC.

—.  1989. Trout Fishing in the  U.S. Fish and Wildlife
    Service Report 85-7.  U.S. Department  of  the
    Interior. Washington, DC.

DATABASE(S):

The database provides the statistics described under
Data Coverage. Public access by data tape or diskette
is available.
 PAGE 34
                                           GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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                                     Section III
                                Pollutant Loadings
   This  section references programs with information on pollutant loadings from both point




sources of pollution, e.g., factories and sewage treatment plants, and nonpoint source of pollution




such as sheet runoff from farms and cities. As noted earlier, information on loadings can be used




with analytical tools such as water quality models to assess and project water quality conditions.




The programs in this section of the guide provide information useful in estimating loadings from




a number of source types, including agricultural lands, factories,  sewage treatment plants, air




deposition, hazardous  waste sites, transportation activities and energy production.  Also see the



entries for the EPA Office of Wastewater and Permits and the National Effluent Guidelines




Program in Section VI for additional  information on loadings from point sources  of  water



pollution. See the entry on the National Nonpoint Source Program in Section VI for additional



information on loadings from nonpoint  sources of water pollution.
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                 PAGE 35

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 INTERAGENCY PROGRAMS

 National Acid  Deposition Program/
 National Trends Network
 OFFICE:
•3*
P£-H
'
U.S.
Guide
Entry
Data Type: Statistics
Source: U.S. Guide
Interagency Effort

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The National  Acid  Deposition  Program/National
Trends  Network (NADP/NTN) was the first, and
continues  to be the only, U.S. network to monitor
precipitation chemistry on a  national  scale.   The
current  network  consists of 196 sites  in the
conterminous  U.S.,  Hawaii,  Puerto   Rico,  and
American  Samoa.  Sites are located in predominantly
rural areas to avoid the localized influences of large
point sources and major urban centers.  Nearly 14
years of continuous data are available from the sites
with the greatest longevity; many of these sites are
associated  with  State  Agricultural  Experiment
Stations.

The primary objective of the NADP/NTN network is
the determination of geographical patterns of temporal
trends in chemical deposition.  The program provides
scientists,  managers and policy-makers with weekly
precipitation chemistry data  and information  on
geographical  patterns  and   temporal  trends  in
concentrations and deposition of hydrogen (H), sulfate
(SO,,), nitrate (NO3), ammonium (NtQ, calcium (Ca),
magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na), potassium (K), and
chloride (Cl),  and ortho-phosphate (PO4) ions in
precipitation. Final, quality assured data are available
to a multitude of data users upon request, within six
months of sample collection.

DATA COVERAGE:

Principal constituents monitored in precipitation and
analyzed for trends  are pH,  specific conductance,
hydrogen ions, sulfate and nitrate ions, ammonium
and calcium ions, and chloride, magnesium, sodium,
and potassium ions.

COLLECTION METHODS:

The NADP/NTN monitoring program has developed
criteria  and  protocols  which  ensure uniformity in
siting, sampling methods, analytical techniques, data
handling, and overall network operations. Precipitation
is collected  by wet/dry precipitation collectors and
rain gages.  Analytical methods  for  the  chemical
variables measured  are: laboratory pH;  field pH;
laboratory conductivity;  electrometric detection of
hydrogen   (also  reported  as  Ph);  automated
colorimetric   detection  of   ammonium;  atomic
absorption spectrophotometric detection of calcium,
magnesium,   sodium,   and  potassium;  and  ion
chromatographic detection of sulfate, nitrate, and
chloride. Methodologies are  described in National
Atmospheric  Deposition  Program  (1988) -  See
Publications.  This  interagency  program  involves
participation by many Federal agencies.

COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

Samples are  collected weekly. Data from some sites
are available from 1979.

GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

The entire United States; however, not all States have
stations located within their boundaries. The  trend
analysis report covers 19 stations located mainly in
the eastern United  States.

CONTACT:

Ranard J. Pickering
U.S. Geological Survey
416 National Center
Reston, VA 22092
Phone: (703) 648-6875

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

Carol Simons
NADP/NTN  Coordinator
Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory
Colorado State University
Ft. Collins, CO 80523
Phone: (303) 491-5580
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                            PAGE 37

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PUBLICATIONS:

National  Atmospheric Deposition Program.  1988.
    NADPINTN Site Operation Instruction Manual.
    Colorado State University,  Natural Resource
    Ecology Laboratory. Ft. Collins, CO.

--.  1991.  NADPINTN  Annual  Data  Summary:
    Precipitation  Chemistry in the United States,
    1990.  Colorado   State  University,  Natural
    Resource Ecology Laboratory. Ft. Collins, CO.

Sehertz, T.L. and R.M. Hirsch. 1985. Trend Analysis
    of  Weekly Acid Rain Data,  1978-83.  U.S.
    Geological   Survey   Water   Resources
    Investigations Report WR185-4211. Reston, VA.

Sisterson, D.L., V.C. Bowersox, A.R. Olsen, T.P.
    Meyers  and  RJ.  Vong.  1990.  Deposition
    Monitoring - Methods and Results. Report 6,
    Acidic  Deposition:  State  of  Science  and
    Technology.   National  Acidic   Precipitation
    Assessment Program. Washington, DC:

 DATABASE(S):

 The Acid Deposition System (ADS)

    The ADS database contains all data from  the
     NADP/NTN  precipitation chemistry monitoring
     program along with data from several other North
     American precipitation chemistry  networks.

     For more information, see Contact.
  PAGE 38
                                           GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


1989  Cotton Water Quality Database

OFFICE:

Economic Research Service
Resource and Technology Division
Resource Indicators Branch

SUMMARY PROGRAM  DESCRIPTION:

The USDA conducted a survey of cotton producers in
1989  to provide  a comprehensive  accounting of
pesticide and  fertilizer use along with  benchmark
information about pest management, soil conservation,
tillage, and water management practices.  The survey
provided an opportunity to pilot test chemical use and
other  data collection procedures  prior to  applying
them to other crops.

STATISTICAL COVERAGE:

Available pesticide and  fertilizer  statistics include
share of acres treated, average number of treatments,
and application rate for each pesticide  material or
nutrient  applied.   Nonchemical  pest management
practices, irrigation conservation and management
practices  applied,  soil  characteristics  including
erodibility,  general   farm   size,   and  operator
characteristics were  also  a  part  of  the survey
questions.

DATA COLLECTION METHODS:

A statistical survey, using a combination of list and
area  frames,   was  designed  by  the  National
Agricultural  Statistics  Service   to  represent  the
commodity acreage in each State surveyed.  Personal
interviews were conducted with farm operators to
obtain the information about the specific field selected
for the survey. Local offices of the Soil Conservation
Service provided the soils information.

COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

The survey was conducted as  a pilot survey for the
1989 production year.



^y--

f
Datatype: Statistics
Source: Program Contact
GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

Cotton production  region included  the  States of
Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona,  California,  Georgia,
Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, New Mexico, North
Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, and
Texas.

CONTACT:

Merritt Padgitt,  Agricultural Economist
Economic Research Service, RTD
1301 New York Ave, NW, Rm 528
Washington, DC 20005-4788
Phone: (202) 219-0433

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

Crutchfield, Stephen  R.  December  1990. Cotton
    Agricultural  Chemical   Use  and   Farming
    Practices  in 1989,  An  Overview  of Survey
    Results.   ERS  Staff  Report   AGES  9076.
    Washington, DC.

DATABASE(S):

The database is administratively confidential and is
not accessible to outside users. Inquiries should be
addressed to contacts.
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                          PAGE 39

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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Agricultural Chemical Use on  Field Crops

*&£
•"Y-™
u
Data "type: Statistics
Source: Program Contact
OFFICE:

Economic Research Service
Resource and Technology Division
Resource Indicators Branch

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The USDA conducts annual surveys of producers of
major  field  crops  to  provide  a comprehensive
accounting of the pesticides, fertilizers,  and  tillage
practices. This information is being linked to specific
soils, water quality, and other data sources using the
geographic identifiers for the sample points.  The
survey program began in 1990 and included  wheat,
com, soybeans, cotton, rice, and potatoes. In 1991 it
was expanded to include grain sorghum and peanuts.

STATISTICAL COVERAGE:

Available  statistics include share of acres treated,
average number of treatments, and application rate for
each pesticide material or nutrient applied.  Statistics
are also available on yields, plant density,  tillage
types, seeding, and pest management practices used.

DATA COLLECTION METHODS:

A statistical survey,  using a combination of list and
area frames was designed by the National Agricultural
Statistics Service to represent the commodity acreage
in each State surveyed.   Personal interviews were
conducted  with  farm  operators  to  obtain  the
information about the specific field selected  for the
survey.

 COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

 Annual. The specific crops and States included in the
 survey may change from year to year.

 GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

 The survey includes all the dominate production
 States for each crop and is designed to  represent
 about 80 to 90 percent of the U.S. acreage.  The 1990
 survey included 47 States and the 1991 and  1992
 surveys include 35 States.
CONTACTS:

Merritt Padgitt
Agricultural Economist
Economic Research Service, RTD
1301 New York Ave, NW, Rm 528
Washington, DC 20005-4788
Phone: (202) 219-0433

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

National Agricultural Statistics Service and Economic
    Research Service, March   1991. Agricultural
    Chemical Usage, 1990 Field Crop Summary
    AgChl(91). U.S. Department of Agriculture.
    Washington, DC.

National Agricultural Statistics Service and Economic
    Research Service, March   1992. Agricultural
    Chemical Usage, 1991  Field Crop Summary.
    AgChl(91). U.S. Department of Agriculture.

DATABASE(S):

The database is administratively confidential and is
not accessible to outside users.   Inquiries should be
addressed to contacts.
 PAGE 40
                                         GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Agricultural Chemical  Use on  Fruits and Nuts

	 _*^J
iffi—

u •
Data Type: Statistics
Source: Program Contact
OFFICE:

Economic Research Service
Resource and Technology Division
Resource Indicators Branch

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The  USDA conducted  a  survey of  fruit  and nut
producers  in  1990 to  provide a  comprehensive
accounting of pesticide and fertilizer use along with
information on nonchemical pest management and
other cultural  practices  used in  fruit  and  nut
production. Information was also obtained about farm
sales and income, production expenditures, farm size,
and other characteristics of fruit and  nut farms and
operators.  USDA plans to conduct a similar survey
in 1993 and at 2-year intervals thereafter.

STATISTICAL COVERAGE:

Available  pesticide and fertilizer statistics include
share of acres treated, average number of treatments,
and  application rate for each  pesticide material or
nutrient  applied.    Fruit and  nut acreage  and
production  along  with acreage using non-chemical
pest  management  practices,  irrigation, and  other
applied practices are included.  Information on farm
sales and income, expenditures for purchased inputs,
labor, assets and liabilities, and general characteristics
of the farm operators  are also a part of the database.

DATA COLLECTION METHODS:

A statistical survey was  designed  by the  National
Agricultural Statistics Service  to represent the fruit
and nut acreage in each State or region surveyed. A
personal interview with  the  farm  operators  was
conducted at the end of the growing season to obtain
the  information  on  acreage,  production,  applied
pesticides and nutrients,  and  practices. A second
personal interview was  conducted  to  obtain  the
economic information.
COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

The first survey was conducted in 1991 and will be
conducted every other year.

GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

Fourteen predominant fruit and nut producing States
were included in the 1991 survey.

CONTACT:

Merritt Padgitt
Agricultural Economist
Economic Research Service, RTD
1301 New York Ave, NW, Rm 528
Washington, DC 20005-4788
Phone: (202) 219-0433

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

National Agricultural Statistics Service and Economic
    Research  Service,  June   1992.  Agricultural
    Chemical Usage, 1991 Fruits and Nuts Summary.
    AgChl(92).  U.S. Department  of Agriculture.
    Washington, DC.

DATABASE(S):

The database is administratively confidential and is
not accessible to outside users.   Inquiries should be
addressed to contacts.
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                            PAGE 41

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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Agricultural Chemical Use on Vegetables



1
Data Type: Statistics
Source: Program Contact
OFFICE:

Economic Research Service
Resource and Technology Division
Resource Indicators Branch

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The USDA conducted a survey of vegetable producers
in 1990 to provide a comprehensive accounting of
pesticide and fertilizer use along with information on
nonchemical  pest  management and other cultural
practices used in vegetable production.  Information
was  also obtained  about  farm sales  and income,
production  expenditures,  farm  size,   and   other
characteristics of  vegetable farms and  operators.
USDA plans to conduct a similar survey in 1992 and
at 2-year intervals thereafter.

STATISTICAL COVERAGE:

Available pesticide and fertilizer  statistics include
share of acres treated, average number of treatments,
and application rate for each pesticide material or
nutrient applied. Vegetable acreage and production
along  with   acreage using  non-chemical  pest
management  practices, irrigation,  soil  conservation,
and other applied practices are included. Information
on farm sales and income, expenditures for purchased
inputs,  labor, assets  and  liabilities,  and general
characteristics of the farm operators are also a part of
the database.

DATA COLLECTION METHODS:

A statistical  survey was designed by the National
Agricultural  Statistics Service to  represent  the
vegetable acreage in each State or region surveyed.
A personal interview with the farm operators was
conducted at the end of the growing season to obtain
the  information on  acreage,  production, applied
pesticides and nutrients, and practices.   A second
personal interview was  conducted to  obtain  the
economic information.
            COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

            The first survey was conducted in 1990 and will be
            conducted every other year.

            GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

            The  predominate  vegetable  production States  of
            Arizona, California, Florida,  Michigan, and Texas,
            were included in the 1990 survey. The 1992 survey
            will include 14 States.

            CONTACT:

            Merritt Padgitt
            Agricultural Economist
            Economic Research Service, RTD
            1301 New York Ave, NW, Rm 528
            Washington, DC 20005-4788
            Phone: (202) 219-0433

            FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

            See Contact.

            PUBLICATIONS:

            National Agricultural Statistics Service and Economic
                Research   Service,  June  1991.  Agricultural
                Chemical  Usage, 1990  Vegetables Summary.
                AgChl(91). U.S. Department of Agriculture.
                Washington, DC.

            DATABASE(S):

            The database is administratively confidential and is
            not accessible to outside users. Inquiries should be
            addressed to contacts.
PAGE 42
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Chemical Use Surveys

OFFICE:

National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS)
Research and Applications Division
Environmental Statistics Group

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

State level statistics on agricultural chemical usage for
major field crops, fruits, nuts, and vegetables in the
largest producing States.

STATISTICAL COVERAGE:

Beginning in 1990, chemical usage statistics for field
crops, fruits and  vegetables  for major producing
States. The time frame covered by these statistics is
from 1990 through 1991.

DATA COLLECTION METHODS:

NASS field offices collect  the data.  Chemical use
data were collected on winter wheat beginning in late
May 1990, while data collection for com, cotton, rice,
soybeans, and other spring  wheat, and durum wheat
begin in late July  1990.  The potato data collection
period varied by State but most activity occurred in
early fall.  A total  of 15,025 sample  fields were
included in the 1990 survey program.

A random sample of fields was selected for each crop
so that the probability of selecting a particular field
was directly proportional to the total acres planted to
that crop in the State.  Thus, each acre  planted to a
crop had exactly the same chance of selection.  For
winter  wheat, the selection was based on acres
standing for  harvest  rather  than acres planted.
Farmers operating the sample fields were contacted
and  they   supplied   information  on   chemical
applications made to those specific fields.

The lists of fields and crops from which the  sample
fields were selected came from information obtained
through two  surveys of farm operators  conducted
earlier in the year.   The  survey for winter wheat
 acreage was conducted in March and the survey for
 other crops in June. In each case, all areas of land,
 called  segments, were screened  throughout  the



XSfir.
u
Data Type: Statistics
Source: Program Contact
country to determine which crops were growing. For
winter wheat, rice, and potatoes, these area segments
were supplemented with lists of farm operators  to
increase sampling efficiency.

COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

Data are collected  yearly.

GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

This depends a great deal on funding, specific studies,
etc. but generally, the surveys cover the major field
crops, fruits, nuts,  and vegetable States.

CONTACT:

Van Johnson
Survey Statistician
USDA/NASS
14th and Independence Ave. SW
Room 4801  South Building
Washington, DC 20250-2000 ,
Phone: (202) 720-7492                ,

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

National  Agricultural   Statistics  Service.  1990.
    Agricultural Chemical Usage: 1990 Field Crops
    Summary.   U.S. Department  of  Agriculture.
    Washington, DC.

--.  1990.   Agricultural  Chemical  Usage:  1990
    Vegetables  Summary.  U.S.  Department  of
    Agriculture. Washington, DC.

DATABASE(S):

 Summarized data  available at the State level.
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                            PAGE 43

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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Fertilizer Use and Price Statistics

OFFICE:

USDA, Economic Research Service
Resource and Technology Division
Resource Indicators Branch

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

A spreadsheet of annual statistics of fertilizer nutrients
applied to field crops and fertilizer prices. The data
are available as an ERS electronic data file.

STATISTICAL COVERAGE:

U.S. fertilizer use and prices and nutrients applied per
acre for major farm States, 1964 to 1991, for corn,
cotton, soybeans, and wheat.

DATA COLLECTION METHODS:

None provided.

COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

Annual

GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

Predominant States which produce the field crops.
The States differ for each crop and may slightly differ
between years.

CONTACT:

Harold Taylor, Agricultural Economist
Economic Research Service, RTD
1301 New York Ave, NW, Rm 428
Washington, DC  20005-4788
Phone: (202) 219-0464

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.


n-V,n/n!£
*?~"
^
Data Type: Statistics
Source: Program Contact
           PUBLICATIONS:

           Vroomen, Harry.  February  1987. Fertilizer Use
               Statistics and Price Statistics, 1960-85. SB 750.
               Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of
               Agriculture. Washington, DC.

           DATABASE(S):

           Data are available as an ERS electronic data product.
           The file is a LOTUS 1-2-3 (release 2) spreadsheet.
           It can be ordered from the contact person or from the
           ERS-NASS order desk (1-800-999-6779). Order No.
           86016.  Price $25
PAGE 44
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Water Quality and Farm Chemical Studies

_^,_-/V^

f
Data Type: Statistics
Source: Program Contact
OFFICE:

Economic Research Service
Resource and Technology Division
Resource Policy Branch

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

This study is part of a national program to develop
reliable information about water quality and related,
agricultural activities.   The data collection effort
provides  information needed  to understand  the
relationships among  farming  activities;  resource
characteristics such as soil type, terrain, and climate;
and ground water quality. This is part of an inter-
departmental activity in  response to the Presidential
Water Quality Initiative.

STATISTICAL COVERAGE:

The  information   includes    detailed   survey
measurements on pesticide and fertilizer use, pest and
nutrient management practices,  cropping  history,
livestock enterprises,  and other activities' that may
help determine the extent a ground  water quality
problems and potential solutions.  The information is
obtained at the same point used to develop a national
inventory  of  soil resources  (National  Resource
Inventory) by the Soil Conservation Service, and also
coordinated with the ground water inventory efforts of
the U.S. Geologic Survey.

DATA COLLECTION METHODS:

Personal enumeration  of  farm producers  within
selected study areas.

COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

One-time data collection effort.

GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

A total of 12 sites plus an initial pilot study are to be
conducted. The pilot study was conducted in 1990
for  the DelMarVa Drainage area.   In  1991  data
collection was for the  Lower Susquehanna Basin,
White River Basin (Indiana), Central Nebraska Basin,
and Columbia River Basin (Washington).  The 1992
studies are the Albemarle-Pamlico  Basin,  South
Georgia, Iowa/Illinois, Snake River (Idaho).

CONTACT:

Merritt Padgitt, Agricultural Economist
Economic Research Service, RTD
1301 New York Ave, NW, Rm 528
Washington, DC 20005-4788
Phone:(202)219-0433

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

None provided.

DATABASE(S):

The database  is administratively confidential and is
not accessible to outside users.  Inquiries should be
addressed to contacts.
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                          PAGE 45

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DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE


National  Coastal Pollutant  Discharge
Inventory Program

OFFICE:

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
National Ocean Service
Office of Ocean Resources Conservation and
 Assessment
Strategic Environmental Assessments Division
Pollutant Source Characterization Branch

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The National  Coastal Pollutant Discharge Inventory
(NCPDI) Program is a series of database development
and analytical activities within the National Oceanic
and  Atmospheric   Administration's     Strategic
Assessment Program of  coastal and estuarine areas.
The cornerstone of the program is a comprehensive
database and computational framework that has been
developed over the last 9 years. The database contains
pollutant loading estimates for all major categories of
point, nonpoint, and riverine sources located in coastal
counties or the 200-mile Exclusive Economic Zone
that discharge to  the estuarine, coastal, and oceanic
waters  of the contiguous U.S. (excluding the Great
Lakes).

DATA COVERAGE:

The pollutant discharge estimates in the NCPDI are
made for the following  base years for each coastal
component: East  Coast - 1982; West Coast - 1984;
and  Gulf Coast -  1987.  The  estimates  can be
considered  to  approximate  pollutant  discharge
conditions for a 5-year period around the base year.
Estimates are made for 9 major source categories and
17  pollutants. Source   categories  include:  point
sources, urban nonpoint sources, nonurban nonpoint
sources, irrigation return flow, oil and gas operations,
marine transportation operations, accidental spills, and
dredging operations. Pollutant parameters  include:
flow   (wastewater  flow   or  surface   runoff);
oxygen-demanding  materials  (BOD);  paniculate
matter; nutrients (total  nitrogen and phosphorus);
metals  (arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, iron,
lead, mercury, and zinc); petroleum hydrocarbons (oil
and grease); pesticides (35 compounds); pathogens
(fecal coliform bacteria); and wastewater  treatment
                                  Data Type: Statistics
                                  Source: U.S. Guide
sludges. The pollutant estimates can be aggregated by
county, USGS hydrologic cataloging unit, or estuarine
watershed.

COLLECTION METHODS:

Estimates are based on a combination of computed
methodologies  and actual monitored observations.
Data  sources  include  EPA's  Permit  Compliance
System, Industrial Discharge file, and Construction
Grants Needs Survey, USGS Land Use/Land Cover
Database, and USDA's National Resource Inventory
and SOILS-5 Database. For detailed descriptions of
the methodologies, the reader  is  directed  to  the
various reports  listed under Publications.

COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

Estimates are seasonal (winter, spring, summer, and
fall) for a base  year. Updated discharge estimates for
1987 for the coastal areas of the Gulf of Mexico and
for 1989 for the East Coast are being prepared.

GEOGRAPHIC  COVERAGE:

Coastal areas  of the continental  United  States,
excluding the Great Lakes.

CONTACT:

Daniel R. Farrow, Chief
Pollutant Sources Characterization Branch
NOAA
6001 Executive Blvd., Room 220
Rockville, MD 20852
Phone: (301) 443-0454
FAX:  (301)468-6675

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.
PAGE 46
                                         GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

-------
PUBLICATIONS:

Arnold, F.D. and D.G. Farrow.  1987. The National
    Coastal Pollutant Discharge Inventory: Pollutant
    Discharge Concentrations for Industrial Point
    Sources.  National  Oceanic and  Atmospheric
    Administration. Rockville, MD.

Arnold, F.D., J.A. Lowe and D.G. Farrow. 1988. The
    Coastal Pollutant Discharge Inventory: Analysis
    of Pollutant Dischargers from West Coast Point
    Sources  (DRAFT).  National   Oceanic  and
    Atmospheric Administration. Rockville, MD.

Basta, D.J., B.T. Bower,  C.N.  Ehler, F.D. Arnold,
    B.P.  Chambers,  and  D.G.  Farrow. 1985.  The
    National Coastal Pollutant Discharge Inventory.
    National  Oceanic   and   Atmospheric
    Administration. Rockville, MD

Farrow, D.G., F.D.  Arnold,  M.L. Lombardi, M.B.
    Main and P.D. Eichelberger. 1986. The National
    Coastal Pollutant Discharge Inventory: Estimates
    for Long Island Sound.  National Oceanic and
    Atmospheric Administration. Rockville, MD.

DATABASE^):

The National Coastal Pollutant Discharge Inventory

Agricultural Pesticide Use in Coastal Areas
  GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                             PAGE 47

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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
Highway Statistics
                                                                                      Data Type: Statistics
                                                                                      Source: U.S. Guide
OFFICE:

Federal Highway Administration
Office of Highway Information Management

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The  program  includes  the  collection,  analysis,
summary, and dissemination of a broad range of data
related to the physical characteristics of the Nation's
highway  system, as well as the  traffic/travel and
related performance activity  which occurs on those
systems.

DATA COVERAGE:

Data  are compiled by the  State highway and
transportation agencies, using guidelines prepared by
Federal   Highway  Administration  (FHWA)  and
approved by the Office of Management and Budget.
Data reported to FHWA include characteristics such
as: traffic volumes; travel estimates (for example,
miles traveled and fuel consumption per vehicle and
per capita); vehicle speeds;  distribution  of vehicle
types and weights by highway category; vehicle fuel
efficiency ratings and motor fuel consumption; vehicle
registrations and driver licensing (including revenues
related to latter variables); State and local highway
finance; Federal Highway Trust Fund status; highway
mileage; pavement condition; and accidents.  Data
also include personal travel characteristics collected as
part of the Nationwide Personal Transportation Study
(NETS).  Trend data for many of the characteristics
date back to the early 1990s.

COLLECTION METHODS:

Data collection methods vary by program.  Some data
are collected by a full census whereas other data are
collected  using statistical sample basis, such as
collection of travel data. Methodologies are generally
described in reference publications  listed below.
            COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

            Highway statistics have been published annually since
            1945. Most data are reported on an annual basis with
            the exception  of  speed data  which are reported
            quarterly and traffic volumes/fuel consumption data
            which are reported monthly. NPTS data are available
            for 1969, 1977, 1983, and  1990.

            GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

            National coverage  with further stratification by State
            and functional highway category.

            CONTACT:

            Frank E. Jarema, Chief
            National Data Management
             and Dissemination Division
            Federal Highway Administration, HPM-40
            400 7th Street,  SW
            Washington, DC 20590
            Phone: (202) 366-0160

            FOR PUBLIC INQUIRES:

            See Contact.

            PUBLICATIONS:

            Federal Highway Administration, Office of Highway
                Information Management.    1992.    Highway
                Statistics   1991.   U.S.   Department   of
                Transportation, Washington, DC.

            —. 1992. Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey
                - Summary of Travel Trends 1990.  FHWA-PL-
                92-027.  U.S.  Department  of Transportation.
                Washington, DC.

            —.  1992. New  Perspectives in Commuting.   U.S.
                Department of Transportation. Washington, DC.

            —.   Our Nations  Highways:   Selected Facts and
                Figures. U.S. Department of Transportation.
                Washington, DC.
PAGE 48
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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—.  Research and Special Programs Administration.
    1992. National Transportation Statistics (Annual
    Report).    VOLPE  National  Transportation
    Systems Center.  Washington, DC.

--.  Selected Highway  Statistics  and Charts 1991.
    FHWA-PL-93-001.  U.S.   Department   of
    Transportation. Washington, DC.

-.  1992. Travel Behavior Issues in the 90's. U.S.
    Department of Transportation. Washington, DC.

Federal Highway Administration.  1985. Highway
    Statistics: Summary to 1985. U.S. Department of
    Transportation. Washington, DC.

--. 1992. Highway Statistics 1991 (and earlier annual
    reports in this series). FHWA-PL-90-003. U.S.
    Department of Transportation. Washington, DC.

--.  1991.   Selected Highway Statistics and Charts
    1989 (and earlier reports in this series). FHWA-
    PL-91-001. U.S. Department of Transportation.
    Washington, DC.

--. 1986. Personal Travel in the United States; 1983-
    1984 Nationwide Personal Transportation Study.
    (2  Vols.) U.S.  Department of Transportation.
    Washington DC.

--.  Driver Licenses (annual). FHWA-PL-(year)-002.
    U.S. Department of Transportation. Washington,
    DC.

-.  Motor Fuel Reported by States (monthly). U.S.
    Department of Transportation. Washington, DC.

DATABASE^):

Highway  Statistics  Information  Retrieval System
 (HSIRS)

    The HSIRS database contains "Highway Statistics
     Summary to 1985" and "Highway Statistics" for
     years 1986-1991.
For more information, contact:

    Walter Hagan
    Federal Highway Administration (HPM-40)
    400 7th Street, SW
    Washington, DC 20590
    Phone: (202)366-3208
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                               PAGE 49

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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
Marine  Pollution Retrieval  System
                                                                                 vs.
                                                                                 Guide
                                                                                 Entry
                                             Data "type: Statistics
                                             Source: U.S. Guid«
OFFICE:

U.S. Coast Guard
Pollution Response

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The Marine Pollution Retrieval System  contains
details  of pollution incidentals in the coastal  zone
where the Coast Guard is the on-scene coordinator
and in the inland zone where Coast Guard personnel
assist an on-scene coordinator for the Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA).

DATA COVERAGE:

Records are kept on: oil spills (number, volume, date,
substance, costs for Federally-funded responses, and
case histories);  spills  of hazardous  substances
(substance name, CHRIS ID code, physical/chemical
properties);  geographic  information (latitude and
longitude and/or river mile number, waterbody name,
city, State, and, where applicable, vessel name and
ID); facility information (name, address, ID codes);
and transportation information  (air, land, inland, and
coastal waterways).

COLLECTION METHODS:

The Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended
(Section 311), and Executive Order 11735 require that
any discharge of an oil or a hazardous substance in a
harmful quantity be reported to the U.S. Coast Guard.
Data  are  reported  for  actual spills  only,  i.e.,
discharges which 'entered the water.   Incidentals
which are reported to EPA  and occurred in waters
under Coast Guard jurisdiction also are compiled.  A
sample data reporting form is provided in the Coast
Guard publication listed below.

COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

Data are collected when spills occur.

GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

Entire United States.
            CONTACT:

            Commandant (G-MEP-2)
            Marine Information Branch
            U.S. Coast Guard
            2100 Second St., SW
            Washington, DC 20593
            Phone: (202)267-2611

            FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

            See Contact.

            PUBLICATIONS:

            United States Coast Guard. 1989.  Polluting Incidents
                In and Around U.S. Waters, 1984,  1985, and
                1986  (and  earlier  reports  in  this series).
                COMDTINST  M16450  series. United States
                Coast Guard. Washington, DC.

            DATABASE(S):

            Marine Pollution Retrieval System (MPRS)

            MPRS is a computer-based system developed by the
            Coast Guard to support Pollution Response. Initially
            designed for  the Collection and  Maintenance  of
            discharge data, subsequent  modifications have been
            made  to permit the inclusion of  additional  data
            describing clean-up (response) activities and penalty
            actions.  MPRS is available to Congress, government
            agencies, academia, and private interests.
PAGE 50
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

National Transportation  Statistics

OFFICE:

Research and Special Programs Administration
Volpe National Transportation Systems Center
Center for Transportation Information

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The program includes the collection,  analysis, and
summary of selected national transportation statistics
from  a wide variety  of government and  private
sources.

DATA COVERAGE:

Statistics  are  generated  for various transportation
modes including  air  carrier,  general  aviation,
automobile, bus, truck, local transit, rail,  water, oil
pipeline, and natural gas pipeline. For example, data
are reported for passenger travel by automobile,
airplane, bus, and railroad, and freight miles of travel
by truck, railroad, airplane, pipeline, and waterway.
Basic descriptions of  U.S. transportation, such  as
operating revenues  and  expense, and vehicle and
passenger miles, are provided.  Supplementary data
include transportation and the economy, and energy in
transportation.   Data show  10-year trends and,  in
some instances, extend back to 1955.

COLLECTION METHODS:

Data are abstracted from government and private data.

COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

Data are collected on an annual basis.

GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

Entire United States.
                       ,.„...„ F
                             U.S.
                             Guide
                             Enlry
Data "type: Statistks
Source: U.S. Guide
CONTACT:

Kathleen Bradley
Transportation Data Specialist
Volpe National Center for Transportation
 Information
Transportation Systems Center
55 Broadway
Cambridge, MA 02142
Phone: (617) 494-2614

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

Research   and  Special  Programs  Administration.
    1990.  National Transportation Statistics Annual
    Report,  1990.  DOT-TSC-ESPA-90-7.   U.S.
    Department of Transportation. Cambridge, MA.

—. 1990.  Transportation Safety Information Report,
    1989 Annual Summary. DOT-TSC-RSPA-90-4.
    Department of Transportation,  Volpe  National
    Transportation Systems Center. Cambridge, MA.

--.  1990.  U.S. International Air Travel Statistics, CY
    1989.   Department of Transportation, Volpe
    National   Transportation   Systems  Center.
    Cambridge, MA.

DATABASE(S):

None  provided.
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                         PAGE 51

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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

Comprehensive Environmental  Response,
Compensation and Liability Information System
==g
~^~~

us.
Guide
Entry
Data Type: Statistics
Source: U.S. Guide
OFFICE:

Office of Emergency and Remedial Response

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The   Comprehensive  Environmental  Response,
Compensation  and  Liability  Information  System
(CERCLIS) contains information  on abandoned or
uncontrolled hazardous waste sites.

DATA COVERAGE:

The CERCLIS database contains information on the
location  of over  30,000 sites.   In  addition, the
database contains information on pre-remedial actions
such as the discovery date and the completion date of
a preliminary assessment, site inspection, and the date
of final hazardous ranking  determination.  Of the
sites, over 1,200 are listed on the National Priority
List (NPS). CERCLIS also contains information such
as: description of NPL site (predominant land uses,
waste treatment storage  and  disposal,  distance to
nearest population);  owner/generator  information;
regulatory and response  history;  waste description
(physical  state, predominant waste type and quantity
of waste); environmental  impact information;  water
use information; and the remedial events occurring at
the NPL sites, including planned and actual starts and
completions,  prior  year   obligations,   current
obligations, and outlays to date.

COLLECTION METHODS:

Data are collected during  inventory, assessment, and
cleanup of uncontrolled hazardous waste sites. EPA
Regional  Offices  maintain  the data in CERCLIS
databases.

COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

On-line updating.
GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

Sites throughout the entire United States and the
territories.

CONTACT:

For telephone inquiries concerning the database, call
(703) 538-7234.

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

Written requests for information should be addressed
to:

    Freedom of Information Officer
    Environmental Protection Agency
    401 M Street, SW
    Washington, DC 20460

PUBLICATIONS:

Office  of Solid Waste and  Emergency  Response.
    1991. Superfund NPL Characterization Project:
    National   Results.  EPA/540/8-91/069.  U.S.
    Environmental Protection Agency. Washington,
    DC.

DATABASE(S):

Comprehensive   Environmental  Response,
Compensation and  Liability Information  System
(CERCLIS)
 PAGE 52
                                       GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

National Air Pollution Control Program
                                   Data Type: Statistics
                                   Source: U.S. Guide
OFFICE:

Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards
Data Analysis Section

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The Air Pollution  Control  Program  collects  and
analyzes data on ambient air quality and air pollution
levels and compares  them to National  Ambient Air
Quality Standards (NAAQS).

DATA COVERAGE:

Ambient concentrations of the following criteria air
pollutants are  monitored  and analyzed for  10-year
trends and recent changes:  sulfur dioxide, nitrogen
dioxide,  carbon    monoxide,   total   suspended
particulates, ozone, and lead.

Emission estimates  are  available  for particulates,
sulfur  oxides,  nitrogen  oxides,  reactive  volatile
organic compounds, carbon monoxide, and lead. Data
are broken down by  the following emission sources:
transportation   (e.g.,  motor   vehicles,   aircraft);
stationary fuel  combustion  (e.g., coal, natural gas);
industrial processes (e.g., copper, pulp mills); solid
waste disposal; and miscellaneous sources (e.g., forest
fires, agricultural burning).  Air quality trends for
major urban areas are provided.

COLLECTION METHODS:

Ambient air quality conditions are based upon actual
direct measurements.  The data are  analyzed for
 trends and these trends are supplemented with trends
for nationwide emissions, which are based upon best
 available engineering calculations. Data are collected
 and reported to EPA by State and local agencies.

 COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

 Data are collected hourly and daily.  Estimates are
 provided for 1940, 1950, 1960, and 1970 to give a
 historical  perspective  on national air quality  and
 pollutant emissions  and  for 1975  to  present as an
 indication of recent trends.
GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

All 50  States,  with metropolitan  statistical areas
(population  greater than  500,000) more  heavily
analyzed.

CONTACT:

Thomas C. Curran, Chief
Data Analysis Section
Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards
Environmental Protection Agency, MD-14
Research Triangle Park, NC 27711
Phone: (919) 641-5558 or (919) 541-5467

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 1992. National
    Air Quality  and Emissions Trends Report, 1991
    (and earlier reports in this series). EPA-450-R-92-
    013.  U.S.  Environmental  Protection  Agency.
    Research Triangle Park, NC.

—.  1992. National Air Pollutants Emissions Estimates
    1900-1991 (and earlier reports in this series). EPA-
    450-R-92-013.  U.S.  Environmental Protection
    Agency. Research Triangle Park, NC.

DATABASE(S):

Aerometric Information Retrieval System (AIRS)

    The AIRS contains data on air quality and pollution
     collected from State and local agencies.

For more information, contact:

     Andrea Kelsey
     National Ah- Data Branch
     Environmental Protection Agency
     Research Triangle Park, NC 27711
     Phone: (919) 541-5549   "

     Howard Wright
     National Air Data Branch
     Environmental Protection Agency
     Research Triangle Park, NC 27711
     Phone: (919) 541-5584
  GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                               PAGE 53

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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
Toxics  Release Inventory
zzzzy
$£

V.S.
Guide
Entry
Dcila Type: Statistics
Source: U.S. Guide
OFFICE:

Office of Toxic Substances
Economics and Technology Division

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is a mandatory
annual inventory of the release of 328 toxic chemicals
to air, water, land, and off-site disposal  from more
than 17,000  manufacturing facilities  across  the
country.

DATA COVERAGE:

Data collected include: facility information, including
Resource  Conservation  and Recovery  Act  and
National  Pollution  Discharge Elimination System
permit numbers;  pounds/year emissions information
for air, water, and land disposal, and off-site transfers
of wastes; treatment processes and efficiencies;  and
waste reduction data.

COLLECTION METHODS:

The   Emergency   Planning   and  Community
Right-to-Know Act requires manufacturers to report
on the EPA and  the States for amounts of over  300
toxic chemicals that they release directly to air, water,
or land, or that they transfer to offsite facilities  that
treat or dispose of wastes. Facilities are required only
to report  data that are already known or reasonably
ascertainable to  them, e.g.,  engineering estimates.
They are not required to measure or otherwise verify
the data they submit. Survey submissions on forms
are tabulated and stored by EPA on computer tape or
disk, and the data are compiled into  an  annual
inventory of releases and transfers.

COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

Data are collected yearly through mandatory industry
reporting.
            GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

            Entire United States.

            CONTACT:

            Samuel Sasnett
            Environmental Protection Specialist
            Economics & Technology Division (TS-792A)
            Office of Toxic Substances
            Environmental Protection Agency
            401 M Street, S.W.
            Washington, DC 20460
            Phone: (202) 260-1821

            FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

            See Contact.

            PUBLICATIONS:

            U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 1991. The
                Toxics Release Inventory: National and Local
                Perspectives.   EPA   560/4-91-014.  U.S.
                Environmental Protection Agency. Washington,
                DC.

            --. 1992.1990 Toxic Release Inventory:  Public Data
                Release. EPA-700-S-92-002. U.S. Environmental
                Protection Agency. Washington, DC.

            DATABASE(S):

            TOXNET/Toxic Release Inventory

                All  data  from the  Toxic  Release Inventory
                include more than 74,000 reports filed by 17,000
                manufacturing facilities on 328 toxic chemicals.
                Data are also available on disk, CD-ROM, tape,
                and  microfiche.

            For more information, contact:

                National Library of Medicine
                Phone: (301) 496-6531
PAGE 54
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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                             Other Items of Interest



                                Pollutant Loadings
   The following entries were believed to be of less direct interest to most water quality analysts.




More detail for the items marked with the "U.S. Guide Entry" identification box can be found




in the Guide to Selected Environmental Statistics in the U.S. Government (EPA, 1992).
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION                             PAGE 55

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DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

Month and State Current  Emissions Trends
                                  Data Type: Statistics
                                  Source: U.S. Guide
OFFICE:

Argonne National Laboratory
Energy and Environmental Systems Division
Policy and Economic Analysis Group
Energy Policy Section

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The  Month  and  State Current Emission Trends
(MSCET) program provides emissions estimates for
nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and  nonmethane
volatile organic compounds. The data set can be used
to monitor regional and/or seasonal emissions trends
or trends for specific emission source groups.

National and sectoral emissions estimates for nitrogen
oxides,  sulfur  dioxide,  and nonmethane volatile
organic compounds are generated for all 48 States in
the contiguous United States and Washington, DC.
The database contains emissions data estimated by
month and State for 68 emission source groups.  Six
general emission categories are:
electric   utilities,  industrial   fuel   combustion,
commercial/residential  fuel  combustion, industrial
processes, transportation, and miscellaneous.   The
database has been updated to include  the National
Acid Precipitation Assessments Program's emissions
inventory.

CONTACT:

Dan Miller
Argonne National Laboratory
9700 South Cass Avenue
Argonne, IL 60439-4815
Phone: (708) 252-5775
 National Energy Information Center

 OFFICE:

 Energy Information Administration
 National Energy Information Center

 SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

 The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the
 Department of  Energy's independent statistical and
 analytical agency, with  a mandate to collect and
 publish  data  and  prepare  analyses  on  energy
 production,  consumption, prices, and resources, and
 projections of energy supply and demand.

 EIA collects and disseminates data on the following:
 energy sources; energy  reserves;  total production;
 consumption by source, by end use sector, per capita,
 and per GNP dollar; energy imports and exports; and
 related economic and statistical information,  both
 historical  and  forecasted  (e.g.,  energy  efficient
 indicators).  Also available are data on the production
 of specific fuel types (e.g., coal, oil and natural gas
 plant liquids, and natural gas); production of nuclear
 and hydroelectric power; and use of certain renewable
 energy sources - such as solar, geothermal, wood, and
 wind; and production of electricity by source.

 CONTACT:

 National Energy Information Center
 U.S.  Department of Energy
 Forrestal Building, 1F-048
 Washington, DC 20585
 Phone: (202) 586-8800
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                            PAGE 57

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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY


Hazardous Waste Surveys

OFFICE:

Office of Solid Waste
Communications, Analysis and Budget Division
Information Management Staff

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The  office of Solid  Waste manages  two major
national information systems to support the Resource
Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Subtitle C
program:  the Resource Conservation and Recovery
System (RCRIS) and the Biennial Reporting System
(BRS).

DATA COVERAGE:

RCRIS is  a  national  program management  and
inventory system of RCRA hazardous waste handlers.
Handlers are characterized as fitting one or more of
the following categories:   Treatment,  storage and
disposal facilities (TSDFGs); large quantity generators
(LQGs); small  quantity generators (SQGs);  and
transporters.   RCRIS  captures identification  and
location on TSDFs regarding permit/closure status,
compliance with Federal and State regulations, and
cleanup activities.

BRS is a national system that collects data on the
generation,  management,  and  minimization  of
hazardous waste.  BRS captures  detailed data on the
generation  of hazardous waste from LQGs and data
on waste management practices from TSDFs. These
data are collected every other year and provide the
ability to perform trend analysis.

COLLECTION METHODS:

Data are collected through the Biennial Hazardous
Waste Report, EPA Forms (Notification and Part A
Permit  Application),  other  data  submittals  by
hazardous   waste  facilities   (Part    B  Permit
Applications) as well as inspections and assessment of
RCRA  sites.
            COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

            Data maintained in the BRS are  collected every 2
            years. Data maintained in the RCRIS are collected as
            the event or activity occurs (i.e.,. as the Notification of
            Hazardous Waste Activity Form is submitted or as
            inspections are performed).

            GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

            Entire United States.

            CONTACT:

            For RCRIS:

            Kevin Phelps
            OSW/Information Management Branch (OS-312)
            U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
            401 M Street, SW
            Washington, DC  20460
            Phone: (202)260-4697

            For BRS:

            John Fogarty
            OSW/Information Management Branch (OS-312)
            U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
            401 M Street, SW
            Washington, DC  20460
            Phone: (202)260-4697

            FOR PUBLIC INQUIRES:

            Liza Heams
            OSW/Information Management Branch (OS-312)
            U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
            401 M Street, SW
            Washington, DC  20460
            Phone: (202) 260-4697
PAGE 58
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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PUBLICATIONS:

Office of Solid Waste. 1991.1987 National Biennial
    RCRA  Hazardous   Waste  Report.   U.S.
    Environmental Protection Agency. Washington,
    DC.

--.  1992. Hazardous Waste FOIA Reports Catalog.
    U.S.  Environmental   Protection   Agency.
    Washington, DC.

DATABASE(S):

Biennial Reporting System (1989)

Resource Conservation and Recovery Information
System (RCRIS)
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                         PAGE 59

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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY


Non-Hazardous Waste Surveys

OFFICE:

Office of Solid Waste
Office of Policy, Planning and Information
Information Management Staff

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

Data are collected through survey and reporting
mechanisms on  non-hazardous  ("solid")  wastes
generation and management. Various capabilities are
available for retrieving and analyzing these  data.
Generally,  the information  available  consists of
regulated entities  and waste volumes generated and
managed.

DATA COVERAGE:

National statistics are available for wastes generated
and managed.  The data covers the  industrial sector
and the municipal landfill sector.

Industrial: Statistics are available on the amounts of
non-hazardous waste by type of industry (e.g., textile,
pulp  and  paper,  water treatment),  management
practices (e.g., landfills, surface  impoundments,
incineration, recycling), and by size of establishment.

Municipal Landfills:  Trend data are available on:
quantity of materials generated in the municipal waste
stream (including paper, glass, metal,  and plastics,
rubber, leather, textiles,  wood, and other nonfood
waste, and  food,  yard, and  miscellaneous inorganic
waste); quantity  and type  of waste  accepted and
refused (e.g., household, commercial, construction);
size and capacity of facility, monitoring systems;
types   of  liners   and covers;     hydrological
characteristics  and  proximity to  drinking  water
supplies; and number of persons using these sources.

COLLECTION METHODS:

Data are collected by survey methods and direct
reporting.

COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

Data collection and reporting frequency range from
once to every 2 years.
TYV
SE_.

us.
Guide
Entry
Data Type: Statistics
Source: U.S. Guide
GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

Entire United States.

CONTACT:

Myra Galbreath, Chief
OSW/Information Management Branch (OS-312)
Environmental Protection Agency
401 M Street, SW
Washington, DC 20460
Phone: (202) 260-4697

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

Office of  Solid Waste and  Office of Emergency
    Response.  1988. National Survey of Solid Waste
    (Municipal)   Landfill   Facilities.   U.S.
    Environmental Protection Agency. Washington,
    DC.

--. 1990. Characterization of Municipal Solid Waste
    in the United States:  1990 Update. EPA-530-
    SW-90-042.  U.S.  Environmental  Protection
    Agency. Washington, DC.

--.  1992. Characterization of Municipal Solid Waste
    in the United States: 1992 Update. EPA-530-R-
    92-019. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
    Washington, DC.

DATABASE(S):

Industrial Subtitle D  Survey

Municipal Landfill Subtitle D Survey
 PAGE 60
                                         GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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                                     Section IV





              Ambient Surface and Ground Water Quality









   This section provides information on programs which assess ambient surface and ground



water quality. The programs in the general  section, while they may collect biological data,



primarily assess the chemical aspects of water quality, while the programs  in the ecological



section focus on biological and ecological conditions, including the extent of wetlands.  Measures



of ambient water quality are useful for assessing current conditions, changes in water quality over



time,  and as a baseline for developing projections of future conditions. As discussed in the



Introduction, water  quality  assessments  increasingly   include  measures  of  toxicity  and



biological/ecological integrity to complement the classical chemical/physical parameters.  Of



course, biological and ecological conditions are influenced by factors other than water pollution,



e.g., drought, disease, introduction of exotic species and harvesting pressures.       :



   Several of the  studies in Appendix A, e.g., the 1982 National Fisheries Survey and the USDA



Nitrate Study, also address ambient water quality conditions.
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                 PAGE 61

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                               A.  General
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                       PAGE 63

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T =
Data T^pe: Program
Information
Source: Program Contact
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Watershed Management and Rehabilitation Research
Program
OFFICE:

U.S. Forest Service
Forest Environment Research Staff                                                       •

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

Nationwide program of site-specific research related to watershed management problems. The program was initiated
in 1910 with the Wagon Wheel Gap studies in Colorado and has continued to the present.  The present program
encompasses research at 27 locations nationwide.

Statistics are site specific but are often continuous over long periods of time (i.e., Conesta Hydrologic Laboratory -
continuous hydrologic research since 1934).  Measurements vary depending on research objectives at each location.

The data collected is national in scope.

CONTACT:

Staff Specialist (Watershed Research Program)
Forest Environment Research                                                ,
USDA, Forest Service                                                                     .
PO Box 96090
Washington, DC 20090-6090
Phone: (202) 205-1524
FAX: (202) 205-1530

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

See Contact.

DATABASE^):

None provided.
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
PAGE 65

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DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

National Status and Trends  Program
                             vs.
                             Guide
                             Entry
Data*fype: Statistics
Source: U.S. Guide
OFFICE:

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
National Ocean Service
Office of Ocean Resource Conservation and
  Assessment

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

Beginning in 1984, NO A A undertook the task of
providing information on the status  and  trends of
environmental quality in estuarine and coastal areas.
The program defines the  geographic  distribution of
contaminant concentrations in  tissues of  marine
organisms and in sediments.

DATA COVERAGE:

Status and trends data are available from the Mussel
Watch and Benthic Surveillance for 4 major elements,
 12 trace elements,  DDT and its metabolites, selected
chlorinated  pesticides,  selected PCB  congeners,
approximately  22  polyaromatic  hydrocarbons,  and
ancillary sediment and tissue parameters.

COLLECTION METHODS:

Samples have been collected since 1984 at about 50
Benthic Surveillance sites and since 1986 at about
 150 Mussel  Watch sites.  Sediment samples are
 collected at all sites. At  Benthic Surveillance sites,
 benthic fishes  are collected and their livers excised
 and stored  for subsequent  chemical analysis. At
 Mussel Watch sites, bivalve mollusks are collected for
 analysis.

 COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

 Data are collected annually.

 GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

 National coverage of all coasts including Alaska and
 Hawaii.
CONTACT:

Thomas P. O'Connor, Manager
National Status and Trends Program
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
6001 Executive Blvd.
Ocean Assessments Division
Rockville, MD 20852
Phone: (301) 443-8655

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

National  Oceanic and Atmospheric  Administration.
     1991. National Status and Trends Program for
    Marine Environmental Quality Progress Report.
    Second summary of chemical contaminants in
    sediments from the  National Status and Trends
    Program. NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS
    OMA  59.  U.S.  Department  of Commerce.
    Washington, DC.

—. 1990. Coastal Environmental Quality in the United
     States,  1990.   Chemical   contamination   in
     sediments and  tissues.  A special NOAA 20th
     Anniversary   Report.  U.S.  Department   of
     Commerce. Washington, DC.

--.  1990. "The Potential for Biological Effects of
     Sediment-sorbed  Contaminants Tested in  the
     National  Status and Trends  Program." NOAA
     Technical Memorandum NOS OMA 52. Seattle,
     WA.

 -.  1989. "National Status and Trends Program for
     Marine Environmental Quality Progress Report.
     A Summary of Data on Tissue Contamination
     from the First  Three Years (1986-1988) of the
     Mussel   Watch  Project."  NOAA  Technical
     Memorandum NOS OMA 49. U.S. Department
     of Commerce.  Washington, DC
 PAGE 66
                                         GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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-.  1988. "National Status and Trends Program for
    Marine Environmental Quality Progress Report.
    A  Summary  of  Selected Data on  Chemical
    Contaminants in  Sediments  Collected During
    1984, 1985, 1986, and 1987." NOAA Technical
    Memorandum NOS OMA 44. U.S. Department
    of Commerce. Washington, DC.

--.  1988.    "PCB    and   Chlorinated   Pesticide
    Contamination  in U.S. Fish  and Shellfish: A
    Historical Assessment Report." NOAA Technical
    Memorandum NOS OMA 39. U.S. Department
    of Commerce. Washington, DC.

--.  1987.  National Status and Trends Program for
    Marine Environmental Quality Progress Report.
    A  Summary  of  Selected  Data on  Chemical
    Contaminants in Tissues Collected During 1984,
    1985, and 1986. NOAA Technical Memorandum
    NOS OMA 38. U.S. Department of Commerce.
    Washington, DC.

DATABASE(S):

National Status and Trends Database

    This database contains all data for site and station
    information and  chemical concentrations of all
    matrices  for  the Mussel Watch and Benthic
    Surveillance programs.

    For more information contact:

    National Status and Trends Program
    NOAA
    6001 Executive Blvd.
    Rockville, MD 20852
    Phone: (301) 443-8655
Note:  In the latest version of A Guide To Selected National Environmental Statistics in the U.S. Government, this
entry has been divided into the Benthic Surveillance Project and the Mussel Watch Project entries.
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                             PAGE 67

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National  Contaminant Biomonitoring  Program
                                  Data Type: Statistics
                                  Source: U.S. Guide
OFFICE:

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Fish and Wildlife Enhancement
Division of Environmental Contaminants

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The National Contaminant Biomonitoring Program
(NCBP) is maintained  by the Fish and Wildlife
Service (FWS) to document temporal and geographic
trends  in  concentrations   of   certain  persistent
environmental contaminants that may threaten fish
and wildlife.  The Program originated as the FWS
segment  of  the National  Pesticide  Monitoring
Program, a multi-agency monitoring effort  by the
member agencies of the Federal Committee on Pest
Control. Since 1965, FWS periodically has determined
concentrations of potentially toxic  elements  and
selected organochlorine chemicals in fish and wildlife
collected from a nationwide network of stations. The
NCBP is being phased out with the implementation of
the broader Biomonitoring  of Environmental Status
and Trends (BEST) Program.

DATA COVERAGE:

Organochlorine   chemical  residues  measured  in
freshwater fish, starlings, and waterfowl samples and
analyzed  for  trends   include:  p,p'-DDT   and
DDT-metabolites p.p'-DDE and p,p'-DDD  (TDE);
PCBs  (aroclor  1242, 1248, 1254,  1260); aldrin,
dieldrin,  endrin;  heptachlor; heptachlor epoxide;
chlordane  (five  isomers);  toxaphene;  benzene
hexachloride;   lindane;   hexachlorobenzene;
methoxychlor, mirex; pentachloranisole; and dacthal.
In addition, freshwater fish are analyzed for elemental
contaminants, including: arsenic, cadmium,  copper,
lead, mercury, selenium, and  zinc.

COLLECTION METHODS:

Composite samples of whole  freshwater fish are
collected in replicate from 112 stations in major rivers
throughout the United States and in the Great Lakes.
Preferred  fish  species,   methods   of  collecting,
shipping, archiving,  and preparing samples, and data
analysis  procedures  are described in Ribick et al.,
 1983;  Lowe et al., 1985;  Schmitt et al., 1990;
Schmidtt and Brumbaugh,  1990. (See Publications.)
Quality  control  samples  are  analyzed to estimate
accuracy and precision of results.

Starlings are collected in replicate from 139 terrestrial
sites in the contiguous  48 States. Chemical and
statistical methodologies are described in Bunck et al.,
1987.

Wings of mallards and black ducks shot by hunters in
the continental United States are collected to assess
body  burden  of  organochlorine  compounds  in
migratory birds. Procedures for collecting, pooling,
sample preparation, chemical analysis, and statistical
analysis are described in Cain, 1981 and Prouty and
Bunck, 1986.

COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

This monitoring program has continued at 2- to 4-year
intervals since 1965.

GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

The fish monitoring network covers the major rivers
of the  United States and the Great Lakes. Starling
collection sites are located within each 5-degree block
of latitude and longitude in the contiguous 48 States.
Mallards are collected throughout the  continental
United States and black ducks are collected from the
Atlantic Flyway.

CONTACT:
  0
Chief
Division of Environmental Contaminants
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
4401 N. Fairfax Drive
Suite 330
Arlington, VA 22203
Phone: (703) 358-2148
 PAGE 68
                                          GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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Fish data:

Christopher J. Schmitt
Fishery Biologist
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
National Fisheries Contaminant Research Center
4200 New Haven Road
Columbia, MO 65201
Phone: (314) 875-1800

All data:

James K. Andreasen
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Division of Environmental Contaminants
4401 N. Fairfax Drive, Suite 330
Arlington, VA 22203
Phone: (703) 358-2148

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

Bunck, C.M-, R-M. Prouty, and A.J. Krynitsky. 1987.
    "Residues  of  Organochlorine  Pesticides and
    Polychlorobiphenyls  in   Starlings   (Sturnus
    vulgaris) from the Continental United  States,
    1982." Environ. Mon. Assess.  8:59-75.

Cain,  B.W.  1981.  "Nationwide  Residues  of,
    Organochlorine Compounds in Wings  of Adult
    Mallards and Black Ducks, 1979-80." Pesticide
    Mon.J. 15:128-134.

Lowe, T.P., T.W. May, W.G. Brumbaugh, and D.A.
    OKane.   1985.   "National   Contaminant
    Biomonitoring Program: Concentrations of Seven
    Elements in Freshwater Fish,  1978-1981." Arch.
    Environ. Contam. Toxcol. 14:363-388.

Prouty, R.M. and C.M. Bunck. 1986. "Organochlorine
    Residues in Adult Mallard  and  Black  Duck
    Wings, 1981-82." Environ. Mon. Assess. 6:49-57.

Schmitt, CJ. and W.G. Brumbaugh. 1990. "National
    Contaminant   Biomonitoring   Program:
    Concentrations of Arsenic, Cadmium, Copper,
    Lead, Mercury, Selenium, and Zinc  in U.S.
    Freshwater  Fish,  1976-1984." Arch.  Environ,
    Contam. Toxicol 19:731-747.
Schmitt, C.J., M.A. Ribick, J.L.  Ludke, and T.W.
    May.   1983.  Organochlorine  Residues   in
    Freshwater Fish, 1976-1979.  U.S. Fish and.
    Wildlife Service Publication 152. U.S. Fish and
    Wildlife Service. Washington, DC.

Schmitt, C.J., J.L. Zajicek and M.A. Ribick.  1985.
    "National   Pesticide   Monitoring   Program:
    Residues of Organochlorine Chemicals in U.S.
    Freshwater  Fish,  1980-81."  Arch.  Environ.
    Contam. Toxicol. 14:225-260.

Schmitt, CJ., J.L. Zajicek and P.H. Peterman.  1990.
    "National Contaminant Biomonitoring Program:
    Residues of Organochlorine Chemicals in U.S.
    Freshwater  Fish,  1976-1984."  Arch.  Environ.
    Contam. Toxicol. 19:748-782.

Schmitt, CJ. 1990. "Persistent Organochlorine and
    Elemental Contaminants in Freshwater Fish  of,
    the United  States." Environmental Monitoring,
    Restoration, and Assessment:  What Have We
    Learned? Proceedings  of the 28th  Hanford
    Symposium. R. Gray, Ed. Pp. 5-14.  Battelle
    Press. Columbus, OH.
DATABASE(S):

Environmental  Contaminant
System (ECDMS)
Data  Management
    ECDMS is the cataloging, sample management,
    and data storage system  for residue data from
    field studies conducted by the Fish and Wildlife
    Service.   Data are from  sample  matrices
    consisting of animal and plant tissues, sediments,
    soils and water.  The system contains data on
    pesticides, elements, PCBs and other compounds.
    Requests for  information  from  the  database
    should be directed to:

    James K. Andreasen
    U.S. Fish and  Wildlife Service
    Division of Environmental Contaminants
    4401 N. Fairfax Drive, Suite 330
    Arlington, VA 22203
    Phone: (703) 358-2148
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Colorado River Salinity  Program

T — ""
Datatype: Program
Information
Source: Program Contact
OFFICE:

Bureau of Reclamation
Assistant Commissioner-Resources Management
Colorado River Salinity Program Coordinator

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

This program uses historical salinity data, collects current data, and evaluates programs designed to reduce salinity
of the main stem Colorado River in the lower basin States below Lee Ferry. Biennial reports are submitted showing
program status.  The reports were started in 1963. Reclamation is required by law to implement this program and
provide the progress reports.

Salinity of Colorado River - Total dissolved solids are monitored at various points in the Colorado River Basin and
are compared to the model generated values based on predicted salt load removal for each project implemented or
being considered for implementation.

Data collection for this program are conducted by the agency personnel under established procedures. General water
quality data which include total dissolved solids have been collected since about 1940. The preconstruction data are
used to establish baseline conditions.  QA\QC measures are established by the agency collecting the data. Data is
collected daily and monthly for the 17  western States. Modeling is used to evaluate impacts of salinity control
projects which reduce salt loading from  both naturally occurring and man-induced salt inputs to the river.  Control
projects are selected based on predicted improvements to the river and cost of implementation.  The most cost
 effective projects are selected for construction.

 CONTACT:

 Stan Gappa
 Colorado River Salinity Program Coordinator
 P.O. Box 25007 (D-003)
 Denver, CO 80225
 Phone: (303) 236-6782
 FAX:  (303)236-6763

 FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

 See Contact.

 PUBLICATIONS:

 Individual project planning report/environmental impact statements and biennial progress reports are published. The
 progress reports give program status and progress in meeting program goals.

 DATABASES):

 None provided.
  PAGE 70
                                          GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National  Hydrologic Bench-Mark Network  Program
                                  Data Type: Statistics
                                  Source: U.S. Guide
OFFICE:

U.S. Geological Survey
Water Resources Division
Office of Water Quality

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The National  Hydrologic  Bench-Mark  Network
Program was initiated in 1964 to provide a nationally
uniform basis for assessing long-term trends in the
physical and chemical characteristics of surface waters
largely  unaffected  by  land use activities.  Water
quality monitoring is carried out in basins where there
are generally no man-made storage, regulation, or
diversion.  Ground  water in hydrologic benchmark
basins is not affected by pumping, and the probability
is small that human activity would increase within the
basin.

DATA COVERAGE:

Principal constituents monitored in freshwater and
analyzed for trends are pH, alkalinity, siilfate, nitrate,
phosphorus, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium,
chloride, suspended sediment, fecal coliform bacteria,
fecal  streptococcal bacteria, dissolved oxygen, and
dissolved oxygen deficit.  Trace elements monitored
in  freshwater  and  analyzed for trends are  arsenic,
cadmium, chromium, iron^ lead, manganese, mercury,
selenium, and  zinc. The following radionuclides are
also monitored but  have not been analyzed for trends:
gross alpha, gross beta, radium-226, and uranium.

COLLECTION METHODS:

Data-collection stations  are maintained at  selected
locations to provide standardized records on surface-
and ground water conditions. A variety of automated
instruments are used to measure and record water
conditions.

 COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

 Data are collected monthly at 4 percent of the sites,
 bimonthly  at 18 percent of the sites, and quarterly at
 78 percent of the  sites. Trace element collection is
 quarterly only, and radionuclides are only collected
 semiannually.
GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

Coverage includes 58 locations in 37 States.

CONTACTS:

Richard A. Smith, Hydrologist
Water Resources Division
U.S. Geological Survey
410 National Center
Reston, VA  22092
Phone: (703) 648-6870

Richard B. Alexander, Hydrologist
Water Resources Division
U.S. Geological Survey
410 National Center
Reston, VA 22092
Phone: (703) 648-6869

Timothy Miller
National Networks Coordinator
Water Resources Division
U.S. Geological Survey
412 National Center
Reston, VA 22092
Phone: (703) 648-6868

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRES:

For general information about the USGS water data
program, contact the  National Water Information
Clearinghouse at (800) 426-9000.

For State-level information about the USGS  water
data program, contact the District Chief of the USGS
District Office in the State of interest. Addresses and
telephone numbers for each District office are given
in the Water Resources Division Information Guide.

For information about the USGS water data program
networking, contact Timothy Miller (see Contacts
above).
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                             PAGE 71

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For information about the USGS water data program
administration, contact:

    Assistant Chief Hydrologist for Operations
    U.S. Geological Survey
    441 National Center
    Reston, VA 22092
    Phone: (703)648-5031
    FAX:  (703)648-5295

PUBLICATIONS:

Data on streamflow, ground water levels, and water
quality of surface and ground water are available for
each State by water year in a publication series
entitled U.S. Geological Survey Water-Data Reports.
These reports may be purchased from the  National
Technical   Information   Service   (NTIS),  U.S.
Department of Commerce, Springfield, VA  22161.
Reference  copies  can be inspected at appropriate
USGS offices nationwide.  Data are also available in
tables, charts, and  machine-readable files.

DATABASES):

Water   Data  Storage  and  Retrieval   System
(WATSTORE)

    WATSTORE  contains  surface water data and
    other water quality and water resource data from
    the National Hydrologic Bench-Mark Network.
    Data are available on magnetic medium and as
    hard copy.

    Information about the data system and computer-
    related matters can be obtained from:

    USGS Branch of  Computer Technology
    440 National Center
    Reston, VA 22092
    Phone: (703) 648-5605
PAGE 72
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
National  Stream Quality Accounting Network

^
'
as.
Guide
Entry
Data'fype: Statistks
Source: U.S. Guide
OFFICE:

U.S. Geological Survey
Water Resources Division
Office of Water Quality

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The National Stream Quality Accounting Network
(NASQAN)  program, started in 1972, provides  a
nationally uniform basis for assessing large-scale and
long-term  trends  in  the  physical,  chemical,  and
biological  characteristics  of  the  Nation's  surface
waters. Water quality monitoring is carried out at the
stations which are generally located on major rivers at
the downstream end of the accounting unit.

DATA COVERAGE:

Principal constituents monitored in  freshwater and
analyzed for trends are pH, alkalinity, sulfate, nitrate,
phosphorus, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium,
chloride, suspended sediment, fecal coliform bacteria,
fecal  streptococcal bacteria, dissolved oxygen, and
dissolved oxygen deficit.

Trace elements monitored in freshwater and analyzed
for trends are arsenic, cadmium, chromium, iron, lead,
manganese, mercury, selenium, and zinc.

Operating within NASQAN is  the Radio Chemical
Surveillance Network consisting of 46 sampling sites.
The following radionuclides are also monitored at 46
sites but have not been analyzed for trends:  gross
alpha,  gross  beta,   radium-226,  and  uranium.
Additional radiochemical data are collected from the
tritium   Network,  which   monitors   Tritium
concentrations at  13 streamflow and 9 atmospheric
precipitation  sampling sites throughout the United
States.

COLLECTION METHODS:

Data-collection stations are maintained at  selected
locations to provide standardized records on surface-
 and ground water conditions. A variety of automated
 instruments  are used to measure and record  water
conditions.    Standard  laboratory  analyses are
performed on samples according to the substance
being measured.  Quality control procedures  are
carried out in the laboratory.

COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

Data are collected bimonthly at 58 percent of sites
and quarterly at 42 percent of sites. Trace element
collection is quarterly and radionuclides are collected
semiannually. Annual data summaries  are available
for each state.

GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

Coverage includes: 21 water resource regions,  213
water resource subregions, 411 monitoring stations,
and the 50 States plus Puerto Rico.

CONTACTS:

Richard A. Smith, Hydrologist
Water Resources Division              '
U.S. Geological Survey
410 National Center
Reston, VA  22092
Phone: (703) 648-6870

Richard Alexander, Hydrologist
Water Resources Division'
U.S. Geological Survey
410 National Center
Reston, VA  22092
Phone: (703)648-6869

Timothy Miller
National Networks Coordinator
Water Resources Division
U.S. Geological Survey
412 National Center
Reston, VA  22092
Phone: (703) 648-6868
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                            PAGE 73

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FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

For general information about the USGS water data
program, contact  the  National Water Information
Clearinghouse at (800) 426-9000.

For State-level information  about the USGS  water
data program, contact the District Chief of the USGS
District Office in the State of interest. Addresses and
telephone numbers for each  District office are given
in the Water Resources Division Information Guide.

For information about the USGS water data program
networking,  contact Timothy Miller  (see contacts
above).

For  information about the USGS  water  program
administration, contact:

Assistant Chief Hydrologist  for Operations
U.S. Geological Survey
441 National Center
Reston, VA  22092
Phone: (703) 648-5031

PUBLICATIONS:

Alexander, R.B. and R.A. Smith. 1988. 'Trends in
    Lead Concentrations  in Major U.S. Rivers and
    Their  Relation   to  Historical  Changes  in
    Gasoline-Lead Consumption." Water Resources
    Bulletin. 24:557-569.

Gilliom, R.J., R.B. Alexander, and R.A. Smith. 1985.
    Pesticides in the Nation's Rivers, 1975-1980 and
    Implications  for   Future  Monitoring.   U.S.
    Geological Survey Water Supply Paper No. 2271.
    U.S. Department of the Interior. Reston, VA.

Hirsch, R.M., J.R.  Slack,  and R.A.  Smith.  1982.
     'Techniques  of Trend Analysis for  Monthly
     Water Quality Data." Water Resources Research
     18:107-121.

Smith, R.A., R.B.  Alexander, and G. Wolman. 1987.
     "Water  Quality Trends  in the Nation's Rivers."
     Science 235:  1607-1615.

—. 1987. Analysis and Interpretation of Water-Quality
     Trends  in  Major U.S. Rivers, 1974-81. U.S.
     Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper No. 2307.
     U.S. Department of the Interior Reston, VA.
Smith, R.A. and R.B.  Alexander. 1985.  'Trends in
    Concentrations of  Dissolved Solids,  Suspended
    Sediment,  Total  Phosphorus,  and  Inorganic
    Nitrogen at  U.S.  Geological Survey  National
    Stream Quality  Accounting Network Stations."
    In: U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper
    No.  2275.  U.S. Department of  the Interior.
    Reston, VA.

—. 1983. A Statistical Summary of Data from the U.S.
    Geological  Survey's  National  Water  Quality
    Networks.  U.S. Geological  Survey  Open-File
    Report No.  85-533.  U.S. Department of the
    Interior. Reston, VA.

—. 1982. A  Study of Trends in Dissolved Oxygen and
    Fecal Coliform Bacteria at NASQAN Stations.
    U.S. Geological Survey  Open-File Report No.
    82-1019. U.S. Department of the Interior. Reston,
    VA.

Smith, R.A., R.M. Hirsch, and J.R. Slack, 1982. A
    Study   of   Trends  in   Total   Phosphorus
    Measurements  at NASQAN  Stations.   U.S.
    Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper No. 2190.
    U.S. Department of the Interior. Reston, VA.

DATABASE^):

WATSTORE

    WATSTORE contains surface  water  data and
    other water quality and water resource data from
    the National Hydrologic Bench-Mark  Network.
    Data are available on magnetic medium and as
    hard copy. Information about the data system and
    computer-related matters can be obtained from:

    Branch of Computer Technology
    USGS
    440 National Center
    Reston, Virginia 22092
    Phone: (703) 648-5605
 PAGE 74
                                          GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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EE&?
\t*=\
Data T^pe: Statistics
Source: Program Contact
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR


National  Water Quality Assessment Program

Note: The following program is now being implemented. Only limited data is available at this time.

The long-term goals of the NAWQA program, administered by the U.S. Geological Survey, are to describe the status
and trends in the quality of a large, representative part of the Nation's surface and ground water resources and to
provide a sound, scientific understanding of the primary natural and human factors  affecting the quality of these
resources.  In meeting these goals, the program will produce a wealth of water quality information that will be useful
to policy makers and managers at the national, State, and local levels.  A major design feature of the NAWQA
program will enable water quality information at different scales to be integrated. The program consists of two major
components:  study unit investigations and national assessment activities.

The principal  building blocks of the NAWQA program are the study unit investigations of hydrologic systems that
include parts  of most major river basins  and  aquifer systems.  The program will be  accomplished through
investigations of 60 study areas that are distributed throughout the Nation and that incorporate about 60 to 70 percent
of the Nation's water use and population served by public water supply.

The  NAWQA program will focus on integrating results from the study unit investigations and other programs to
provide information at regional and national scales. The national assessment component of the program will address
specific water quality issues that are of concern in many areas of the Nation. A framework has been established to
ensure nationwide consistency in  approach to each study, in field and laboratory methods, in water quality
measurements, and in supporting data requirements.

CONTACT:

Patrick Leahy
Deputy Assistant Chief Hydrologist for NAWQA
U.S. Geological Survey
414 National  Center
 12201 Sunrise Valley Drive
Reston, VA  22092                                                                              '
Phone: (202) 648-5012
  GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                             PAGE 75

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DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR
T1 — —
Data Type: Program
Information
Source: Program Contact
Watershed  Protection  Program:  Park-Based  Water
Quality Data Management System
OFFICE:

National Park Service

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:                      *   .     .

The Watershed Protection Program was initiated in 1991 to: (1) expand the professional water quality expertise in
the National Parks Service; (2) integrate the appropriate technical, legal, and regulatory water quality methodologies
to resolve critical part-based water quality issues; (3) assist in the development and initiation of park-based water
quality issues;  and  (4) assist in the development and initiation of park-based water quality inventorying  and
monitoring and data acquisition programs.  The Watershed Protection Program also coordinates and promotes
interagency communication and coordination for water quality planning, regulation, and applied research,  and
wetlands inventorying, monitoring, and restoration.

The Park-Based Water Quality  Data Management System is a major  1992 initiative of the Watershed Protection
Program to develop an interactive national park-based water quality data storage, retrieval, and management system.
The cornerstone of the system is a PC-based water quality data shell that is highly user oriented, and permits park
staff to create, from a parameter pick list, a database tailored to park needs.  The system also is designed to be
interactive with STORET;  thus, park specific water quality data can be uploaded, archived, and retrieved by the
Water Resources Division for national-level statistical summaries.

Initially, databases for 30 parks will be established in 1993 by downloading existing STORET data into a water
quality shell. This process will  entail the creation of digital descriptions of park boundaries to define the scope of
the STORET retrieval, downloading of all physical, chemical, and biological data that reside in STORET for each
park, reformatting of the data for the NFS data management system, and the completion of a basic statistical analysis
of the data. Ultimately, the data management program will incorporate data from about 300 units of the National
Park System.

CONTACTS:

Dean Tucker
Water Resources Programmer/Analyst
Water Resources Division
National Park Service
1201 Oakridge Drive, Suite 250
Fort Collins, CO 80525
Phone: (303) 225-3516

Gary Rosenlieb
Hydrologist
Water Resources Division
1201 Oakridge Drive, Suite 250
Fort Collins, CO 80525
Phone: (303) 225-3518
PAGE 76
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

Chief, Water Resources Division
National Parks Service
1201 Oakridge Drive
Fort Collins, CO 80525
Phone: (303) 225-3501

PUBLICATIONS:

User's Guide under development and scheduled for completion by the end of 1993.

DATABASE(S):

Under development for 1993.
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                       PAGE 77

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1 =
Data Type: Program
Information
Source: Program Contact
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Water Resources Assessment Program

OFFICE:

U.S. Geological Survey
Water Resources Division
Office of Water Assessment and Data Coordination
Branch of National Water Summary

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The principal goal of the program is to develop summary level statistics on water resources at the State and national
levels appropriate for the preparation of USGS's biennial report, National Water Summary. Each report is oriented
toward a specific water resource theme (e.g., ground water quality).

Statistics for major subjects covered at the national and State levels include: water availability (e.g., surface and
ground water potential, use, and development); water quality (e.g., point and nonpoint sources of pollution,
eutrophication, bottom sediment contamination, saline-water intrusion, hazardous wastes, radioactive wastes, and
acidic  precipitation); hydrologic  hazards  and  land  use  (e.g., flooding,  land  subsidence,  sinkholes, erosion,
sedimentation, wetlands, and resource development); and institutional and management activities. Also covered are
seasonal hydrologic conditions and hydrologic events such as precipitation, streamflow, floods, and storms.

Data summarized in the National  Water Summary are compiled from existing U.S. Geological Survey and other
agency data files and cover the entire United States, Puerto Rico, and Trust Territories.

CONTACT:

Richard W. Paulson, Chief
Branch of National Water Summary
U.S. Geological Survey
407 National Center
Reston, VA 22092
Phone: (703) 648-6851

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

Publications are for sale and can be acquired by contacting:
Books and Open File Reports Section, USGS
Federal Center, Box 25425
Denver, CO 80225-0425
Phone: (303) 236-7476

PUBLICATIONS:

U.S. Geological Survey. 1991. National Water Summary 1988-89, Hydrologic Events and Floods and Droughts.
    Water Supply Paper No. 2375. U.S. Department of the Interior. Washington, DC.

U.S. Geological Survey. 1990. National Water Summary 1987 - Hydrologic Events and Water Supply and Use.
    Water-Supply Paper No. 2350. U.S. Department of the Interior. Washington, DC.
PAGE 78
                                         GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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-. 1988. National Water Summary 1986 - Hydrologic Events and Ground Water Quality. Water-Supply Paper No.
    2325. U.S. Department of the Interior. Washington, DC.

-. 1986. National Water Summary 1985 - Hydrologic Events and Surface Water Resources, Water-Supply Paper No.
    2300. U.S. Department of the Interior. Washington, DC.

- 1985. National Water Summary 1984: Hydrologic Events, Selected Water-Quality Trends, and Ground Water
    Resources. Water-Supply Paper No. 2275. U.S. Department of the Interior. Washington, DC.

--. 1984. National Water  Summary 1983 - Hydrologic Events and Issues. Water-Supply Paper No. 2250. U.S.
    Department of the Interior. Washington, DC.

DATABASE(S):

Because this program uses existing U.S. Geological Survey and other agency databases, it is not a database source.
  GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                             PAGE 79

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 ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

 Great Lakes Fish Monitoring  Program

'^£m.

Data Type: Statistics
Source: Program Contact
 OFFICE:

 Great Lakes National Program Office

 SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

 This program collects lake trout, rainbow smelt, and
 Chinook salmon in the Great Lakes and analyzes the
 fish for contamination.

 STATISTICAL COVERAGE:

 For lake trout and rainbow smelt, measured variables
 include age, length,  weight, PCB (as A1254), DDT
 and metabolites, chlordane, dieldrin, toxaphene, and
 mirex (Lake Ontario only). Annual data on DDT and
 PCB are available back to 1970. Dioxins, furans, and
 other special studies  are done periodically. For fillets
 of coho  (even number years)  and  chinook  (odd
 number years), the above variables are measured as
 well as hexachlorobenzene, dacthal, endrin, lindane,
 heptachlor epoxide,  and pentachlorophenyl methyl
 ether. Trend data are available for each lake (e.g.,
 Lake Superior,  Lake Michigan,  Lake Huron,  Lake
 Erie, and Lake Ontario).

 DATA COLLECTION METHODS:

 Described in Publications (see below).

 COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

 Most data are collected annually, some biennially.

 GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

 Great Lakes.

 CONTACT:

 David DeVault, Coordinator
 Great Lakes Fish Monitoring Program
 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
 Great Lakes National Program Office 5GL
 230 S. Dearborn St.
 Chicago, IL 60604
 Phone: (312) 353-1375
FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

DeVault, D.S. 1985,  "Contaminants  in Fish from
    Great Lakes Harbors  and  Tributary Mouths."
    Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 14:587.

—. et al. 1986. "Contaminant Trends from the Upper
    Great Lakes." Arch. Environ. Contam. Toxicol.
    15:349.

-.  1989.  "Polychlorinated  Dibenzofurans   and
    Polychlorinated Dibenzo-p-dioxins in Great Lakes
    Fish:  A Baseline and  Interlake  Comparison."
    Environ. Contam. Toxicol. and Chem.

DATABASE(S):

None provided.
PAGE 80
                                      GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY


National Surface  Water Survey

OFFICE:

Office of Ecological Processes and Effects Research
Environmental Research Laboratory

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The National Surface Water Survey consists of two
parts: the National  Lake Survey and the National
Stream Survey.

The purpose of the National Lake  Survey is  to
quantify,  with  known  statistical confidence,  the
current  status, extent, and chemical and biological
characteristics of lakes in regions of the United States
that are potentially sensitive to acidic deposition.

The purpose of the National Stream Survey  (NSS) is
to determine the percentage, extent, and location of
streams in the United States that presently are acidic
or  have low acid-neutralizing  capacity and may,
therefore, be susceptible to  future acidification, as
well as to identify  streams that represent important
classes  in each region for possible use  in more
intensive studies or long-term monitoring. The NSS
provides an overview of stream  water chemistry in
regions of the United States that are expected, on the
 basis  of  previous alkalinity  data,  to   contain
 predominantly low acid-neutralizing capacity waters.

 DATA COVERAGE:

 Variables   monitored  include:   acid  neutralizing
 capacity (ANC), aluminum, ammonium, base cations,
 conductance, major ions, metals, nitrate, organics, pH,
 and sulfate.

 COLLECTION METHODS:

 A randomly selected subset of  lakes was  sampled
 using appropriate methods. The sample results were
 then weighted to estimate the chemical compositions
 of lake   populations  with known  confidence.
 Uncertainties  with  time   of   sampling,  spatial
 variability, and population definition are included in
 specific research projects to improve confidence in
 estimates.
                              U.S.
                              Guide
                              Entry
DolaTjpe: Statistics
Source: U.S. Guide
The NSS employed a randomized, systematic sample
of regional  stream  populations  and used rigorous
quality assurance protocols for field sampling and
laboratory chemical analysis.

COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

"Index" sample taken at the time of the fall overturn
for lakes and high and low flow for streams.

GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

Northeastern,  Southeastern, Upper  Midwest, and
Western United States for lakes, and Middle Atlantic,
Southeast, and Southern Blue Ridge  Province for
streams.

CONTACT:

Dixon Landers
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Environmental Research Laboratory
200 SW 35th St.
Corvallis, OR 97333
Phone: (503) 754-4427

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

 See Contact.

 PUBLICATIONS:

 Brakke, D.F., D.H. Landers and J.M. Eilers.  1988.
     "Chemical and Physical Characteristics of Lakes
     in the Northeastern United States." Environ. Sci.
     Technol. 22:155-163.

 Brakke, D.F., D.H. Landers  and J.M. Eilers. 1987.
     "Hydrologic and  Chemical  Characteristics  of
     Darkwater, Clearwater, and Acidic Lakes in the
     United States."  Proceedings of UNESCO/IMP
     Symposium.

 Eilers,  J.M., D.F.Brakke, D.H. Landers  and P.E.
     Kellar.   1988.  "Characteristics   of  Lakes  in
     Mountainous  Areas   of the  Western  United
     States."   Verh.   Internal.   Verein.   Limnol.
     23:144-151.
  GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                              PAGE 81

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 Eilers, J.M., D.H. Landers and D.F. Brakke. 1988.
     "Chemical and Physical Characteristics of Lakes
     in the Southeastern United States." Environ. Sci.
     Technol 22:172-177.

 Eilers, J.M., D.F.  Brakke  and D.H. Landers. 1987.
     "Chemical and Physical Characteristics of Lakes
     in the Upper Midwest, United States." Environ.
     Sci. Technol. 22:164-172

 Eilers, J.M.,  P.  Kanciruk,  R.A.  McCord, W.S.
     Overton, L.  Hook, D.J. Blick, D.F. Brakke, P.E.
     Lellar, M.S. DeHan, M.E. Silverstein and D.H.
     Landers. 1987. "Characteristics of Lakes in the
     Western  United   States."   Vol.  2,  Data
     Compendium for Selected Physical and Chemical
     Variables. EP/600/3-86-054b. U.S. Environmental
     Protection Agency. Washington, DC.

 Herlihy, A.T., P.R. Kaufmann and M.E. Mitch. 1991.
     "Chemical Characteristics of  Streams  in  the
     Eastern United States: II. Sources of Acidity and
     Low ANC Streams." Water Resources Research.
     27:624-642.

 Herlihy, A.T., P.R. Kaufmann, M.E. Mitch and D.D.
     Brown.  1990. "Regional Estimates of Acid Mine
     Drainage Impacts on Streams of the Mid-Atlantic
     and Southeastern United States." Water, Air, and
     Soil Pollution. 50:91-107.

 Kaufmann, P.R.,  A.T. Herlihy, M.E. Mitch and W.S.
     Overton.  1991.  "Chemical  Characteristics  of
     Streams in the Eastern United States: I. Synoptic
     Survey Design, Acid Base Status, and Regional
     Patterns."  Water   Resources   Research.
     27:611-627.

 Kaufmann, P.R., A.T. Herlihy, J.W. Elwood, M.E.
    Mitch,  W.S.  Overton, MJ.  Sale,  J.J. Messer,
    K.A. Cougan,  D.V.  Peck,  K.H. Reckhow, A.J.
    Kinney, SJ.  Christie, D.D. Brown, C.A. Hagley,
    and H.I. Jager. 1988. "Chemical Characteristics
    of Streams in the Mid-Atlantic and  Southeastern
    United States." Vol. 1, Population  Descriptions
    and   Physio chemical   Relationships.
    EPA/600/3-88/021 a.   U.S.   Environmental
    Protection Agency. Washington, DC.

 Landers, D.H., W.S. Overton, R.A. Linthurst and D.F.
    Brakke.  1988.  "Eastern Lake Survey:  Regional
    Estimates  of Lake  Chemistry." Environ. Sci.
    Technol. 22:128-135.
 Landers,  D.H.,  J.M. Eilers,  D.F.  Brakke, W.S.
    Overton, P.E. Kellar,  M.E. Silverstein, R.D.
    Schonbrod, R.E. Crowe, R.A. Linthurst,  J.M.
    Omernik, S.A. Teague and E.P. Meier. 1987.
    "Characteristics of Lakes in the Western United
    States." Vol. 1,  Population Descriptions and
    Physi co chemical  Relationships.
    EPA/600/3-86/054a.   U.S.   Environmental
    Protection Agency. Washington, DC.

 Linthurst, R.A.,  D.H. Landers, J.M.  Eilers,  D.p.
    Brakke, W.S.  Overton, E.P.  Meier and  R.E.
    Crowe.  1986. "Characteristics of Lakes in the
    Eastern United  States."  Vol.  1,  Population
    Descriptions and Physicochemical Relationships.
    EPA/600/4-86/007a.   U.S.   Environmental
    Protection Agency. Washington, DC.

 Mitch, M.E., P.R. Kaufmann, A.T.  Herlihy, W.S.
    Overton, and MJ. Sale. 1990. National Stream
    Survey  Database Guide. EPA/600/8-90/055.2.
    U.S.   Environmental   Protection   Agency.
    Washington, DC.

 Overton, W.S., P. Kanciruk, L.A. Hook, J.M. Eilers,
    D.H. Landers, D.F. Brakke, DJ. Blick, Jr., R.A.
    Linthurst,  M.D.  DeHaan  and  J.M. Omemik.
    1986. "Characteristics  of Lakes in  the Eastern
    United  States."  Vol.  2,  Lakes Samples  and
    Descriptive Statistics for Physical and Chemical
    Variables.   EPA/600/4-86/007b.   U.S.
    Environmental Protection  Agency. Washington,
    DC.

 Sale,  M.J., P.R.  Kaufmann, H.I. Jager, J.M. Coe,
    K.A. Cougan, A.J. Kinney, M.E. Mitch and W.S.
    Overton. 1988.  "Chemical Characteristics  of
    Streams of the Mid-Atlantic and Southeastern
    United States." Volume 2, Streams Sampled,
    Descriptive   Statistics,  and  Compendium   of
    Physical  and   Chemical  Data.
    EPA/600/3-88/021b.   U.S.  Environmental
    Protection Agency. Washington, DC.

DATABASE(S):

The database is available: see Contact, and Mitch, et
al. (1990) under Publications.
PAGE 82
                                         GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
National  Water Quality Monitoring Program

T -—
DalaType: Program
Information
Source: Program Contact
OFFICE:

Office of Water
Office of Wetlands, Oceans and Watersheds
Assessment and Watershed Protection Division
Monitoring Branch

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The mission of the Monitoring Program is to develop and implement national surface water quality assessment and
monitoring guidelines, protocols, and programs as well as develop and manage the associated database and analysis
programs.

Section 305(b) of the Clean Water Act requires States to report to EPA on the extent to which their waters are
meeting the goals of the Act and to recommend how these goals can be achieved.  States enter information on the
status of specific waterbodies, including causes and sources of water quality impairments, into a national database
system known as the Waterbody System (WBS). The Waterbody System ties data to an individual, geographically-
defined waterbody and produces assessment reports on specified dates.  A waterbody may  be  any discrete
hydrogeologic entity that is useful for assessment and management purposes, such as a river, lake, estuary, ocean,
or wetland with a boundary that remains constant over time. EPA compiles information from State reports and
transmits this biennially as a National Water Quality Inventory report to Congress.  The 1992 report summarizes the
States' 1990 and 1991  data collection activities and analyses.

Water quality is reported as attainment or non-attainment of water quality standards as well as through indicators
of environmental conditions. States use fixed-station network  data, surveys, ecological and habitat assessment,
remote sensing, modeling, and other data and estimating techniques to prepare assessments for the entire United
States and territories.

In addition, the Office of Water, Monitoring Programs jointly manages, with the  Office of Information Resources
Management, one of the Nation's largest water information systems, STORET (Storage and Retrieval of U.S.
waterways parametric data). This system contains water and related resource data from various Federal, State, local
and private sources.

As the Office of Water continues to expand and strengthen its water monitoring programs, EPA is providing new
guidance for the States on effective biological habitat and watershed monitoring as well as developing local volunteer
monitoring programs.  National conferences and workshops and other technical tools support these activities.

CONTACT:

Policy:
Mary L Belefski, Chief
Monitoring Section
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
WH-553
 401 M Street, SW
 Washington, DC 20460
 Phone: (202) 260-7061
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                             PAGE 83

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Information Management:

Robert King, Chief
Information Services Section
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
WH-553
401 M Street, SW
Washington, DC 20460
Phone: (202) 260-7028

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 1992. National Water Quality Inventory: 1990 Report to Congress.  U.S.
    Environmental Protection Agency. Washington, DC.

Office of Wetlands, Oceans and Watersheds. 1991. Guidelines for the Preparation of the 1992 State Water Quality
    Assessments (305(b)  reports). U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Washington, DC.

--.  1990. National Water Quality Inventory: 1988 Report to Congress. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
    Washington, DC.

--. 1989. Guidelines for the Preparation of the 1990 State Water Quality Assessments. U.S. Environmental Protection
    Agency. Washington, DC.

—.1989. Rapid Bioassessment Protocols for Use in Streams and Rivers: Benthic Macroinvertebrates and Fish. U.S.
    Environmental Protection Agency. Washington, DC.

~.  1992. PC Waterbody  System User's Guide. 3rd edition., (version 3.0). U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
    Washington, DC.

--.  1988. National Water Quality Inventory: 1986 Report to Congress. U.S. Environmental Protection 'Agency.
    Washington, DC.

--. 1987. Guidelines for the Preparation of the 1988 State Water Quality Assessments. U.S. Environmental Protection
    Agency. Washington, DC.

DATABASE(S):

STORET (STOrage and RETrieval of U.S. waterways parametric data):

    STORET is one of the oldest and largest water information systems in use. The Office of Water and the Office
    of Information Resources Management jointly manage STORET. STORET has three main information areas:
    Water Quality System (WQS), Biological System (BIOS), and Daily How System (DPS). The  WQS contains
    chemical  and  physical information; BIOS contains information on the distribution,  abundance, and physical
    condition of aquatic organisms; and DPS contains daily observations  of flow and water quality parameters
    collected  at the gaging stations belonging to the U.S. Geological Survey.  There are over 800,000 sampling
    stations which have detailed locational information and more than 180 million parametric observations covering
    13,000 water quality parameters. EPA is restructuring and improving STORET so that it can be more responsive
    to Agency data needs.
PAGE 84
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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Oceatv Data Evaluation. System (ODES):

    EPA designed ODES in 1985 to support managers and analysts in meeting regulatory objectives of the Office
    of Wetlands, Oceans and Watersheds.  ODES contains over two million  records from a wide range of EPA
    programs including the 301(h) sewage discharge program, the National Pollutant Discharge Program (NPDES),
    the ocean dumping program, and the National Estuary Program (NEP). Records include information on water
    quality, oceanographic description, sediment pollutants, physical/chemical/biological characteristics, and estuary
    information.

For more information on STORET or ODES contact:

    Robert King
    U.S. Environmental  Protection Agency
    WH-553
    401 M Street, SW
    Washington, DC  20460                                                              '.
    Phone: (202)260-7028

For more information  on ODES contact:

    Kevin Perry
    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
    WH-556F
    401 M Street, SW
    Washington, DC  20460
    Phone: (202) 260-6833

Waterbody System (WBS);

    The Waterbody System includes a software package and database to manage State water quality assessment and
    related information. The WBS facilitates State preparation of the biennial report of water quality status required
    by Section 305(b) of the Clean Water Act. It does not store or analyze raw monitoring data but does include
    information on water quality, user support, status, causes of impairment, and sources of pollution for each
    waterbody. A waterbody is defined as any discrete hydrologic entity that is useful for assessment purposes, such
    as a river, lake, estuary, ocean, or wetland.

 For more information on WBS contact:

     Jack Clifford
     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
     WH-553
     401 M Street, SW
     Washington, DC  20460
     Phone: (202) 260-3667
  GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                                PAGE 85

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TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY

Water  Resources and  Ecological Monitoring


^TX.
QtZZ.
f
Data Type: Statistics
Source: Program Contact
OFFICE:

Water Resources Division

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

TVA  conducts a  continuing  program  of  water
resource  quality monitoring to evaluate ecological
health and suitability for body-contact recreation of
reservoirs and major streams in the Tennessee Valley,
and to evaluate the suitability for human consumption
of the fish in those  water bodies.

STATISTICAL COVERAGE:

The program includes systematic  measurement of
physical, chemical and biological variables.  Physical
variables monitored include streamflow, water clarity,
turbidity and suspended solids, depth profiles of
temperature and conductivity, habitat evaluation, and
sediment  particle  size  distribution.    Chemical
measurements  include  depth profiles of dissolved
oxygen and pH, nutrients, major cations and anions,
hardness, selected metals in water, sediments, and fish
tissue, and selected toxic organics in sediments and
fish tissue.  In addition to fish tissue contaminants,
biological variables include  chlorophyll, benthic
invertebrate  abundance and  community structure,
fisheries   abundance  and  community   structure
(fisheries Indes of Biotic  Integrity), fish biomass
estimates, autopsy-based  evaluation of health of
largemouth bass, and  toxicity  screening bioassays
using sediment pore water and overlying lake/stream
water.

DATA COLLECTION METHODS:

Depth profile data  are collected using Hydrolab or
comparable field instruments, and clarity is measured
using secchi disks. Water is collected using peristaltic
pumps for depth-integrated photic zone samples and
either Kemmerer or Van Dorn bottles for near-bottom
samples and stream samples (collected at mid-depth).
Sediment samples for chemical analysis and particle
size consist of composites of the upper 3 cm. from 10
or more gravity cores  collected along a transverse
transect. Benthic invertebrates  in lakes are  collected
using Eckman, Petersen, or Ponar dredges.  Stream
invertebrates are collected using Surber and Hess
            samplers, and D-nets for sampling along the shoreline.
            Electroshocking is used to collect fish in streams and
            near-shore areas  of lakes, and  various nets in the
            pelagic zone of lakes.  Biomass estimates are based
            on hydroacoustic data calibrated  with  trawling  to
            validate species and size.

            COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

            In streams,  physical/chemical  data  are collected
            bimonthly;  sediments  and. biological  samples are
            collected annually.  In lakes, physical/chemical and
            chlorophyll samples and data are  collected once in
            winter  (fully mixed conditions), then monthly from
            April through September or October. Sediments and
            biological  samples are  collected  annually  in  mqst
            cases.

            GEOGRAPHIC  COVERAGE:

            Tennessee Valley streams and reservoirs:  12 major
            tributary  streams, 9  mainstem  Tennessee  River
            reservoirs (forebay, transition zone, and inflow), and
            22 tributary reservoirs (1 to 4 stations each).

            CONTACT:
            Any of the following:
            Dr. Neil E. Carriker
            Mr. Ronald W. Pasch
            Mr. Donald L. Dycus
            Mr. Dennis L. Meinert
            Mr. Donald W. Anderson
(615) 751-7330
(615) 751-7309
(615) 751-7322
(615) 751-8962
(615) 751-7329
            at the following address:
            HB-2C
            TVA-Water Resources Division
            1101 Market Street
            Chattanooga, TN 37402

            FOR PUBLIC INQUIRES:

            See Contact.
PAGE 86
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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PUBLICATIONS:

Public Information Documents:

Tennessee Valley Authority. 1992. RiverPulse-1991.
20pp.

Tennessee Valley Authority. 1990-1992.  Reservoir
    Status Report series.   Includes monographs on
    Cherokee, Norris, Wheeler, Blue Ridge, Chatuge,
    and Melton Hill reservoirs,  and on the three
    Ocoee River projects.

Technical Reports:

Dycus, D.L and D.L Meinert. 1992.  Reservoir Vital
    Signs Monitoring-1991; Summary of Vital Signs
    and Use Impairment Monitoring on Tennessee
    Valley Reservoirs.  TVA/WR-92-8.   Tennessee
    Valley Authority,  Water Resources  Division.
    Chattanooga, TN.

Meinert, D.L. and J.P. Fehring. 1992. Reservoir Vital
    Signs  Monitoring-1991;    Physical/Chemical
    Characteristics  of   Water   and  Sediment.
    TVA/WRD-92-1.   Tennessee Valley Authority,
    Water Resources Division. Chattanooga, TN.

Moses. J. and DC Wade. 1992. Reservoir Vital Signs
    Monitoring-1991; Acute Toxicity Screening  of
    Reservoir Water and Sediment.  TVA/WR-92-2.
    Tennessee  Valley  Authority, Water Resources
    Division. Chattanooga, TN.

 Wilson,  W.K.   1992.     Reservoir  Vital  Signs
    Monitoring-1991;  Hydroacoustic Estimates  of
    Fish  Abundance.  TVA/WR-92-4.   Tennessee
    Valley  Authority  Water  Resources Division.
     Chattanooga, TN.

 Masters,  A.E.   1992.     Reservoir  Vital  Signs
    Monitoring-1991;  Benthic  Macroinvertebrate
     Community Results. TVA/WR-92-3.  Tenneessee
     Valley Authority, Water Resources Division.
     Chattanooga, TN.

 Scott, E.M.,  G.D. Hickman, and A.M. Brown. 1992.
     Reservoir  Vital Signs Monitoring-1991;   Fish
     Community Results.  TVA/WR-92-5. Tennessee
     Valley Authority, Water Resources Division.
     Chattanooga, TN.
Bates,  J.A., G.E.  Hall,  and D.L.  Dycus.  1992.
    Reservoir Monitoring-1991;  Fish Tissue Studies
    in the Tennessee Valley in 1990. TVA/WR-92-7.
    Tennessee  Valley Authority, Water  Resources
    Division. Chattanooga, TN.

Fehring,  J.P.  1992.   Reservoir Monitoring-1991,
    Bacteriological  Conditions  in the  Tennessee
    Valley:  Third Annual Report.  TVA/WR-92-6.
    Tennessee Valley Authority, Water  Resources
    Division. Chattanooga, TN.

Parr,  K.P..  1991.   Water  Quality  of the  TV A
    Fixed-Station   Monitoring   Network.
    TVAAVR-91-13.  Tennessee Valley Authority,
    Water Resources Division.  Chattanooga, TN.

Fehring,  J.P.  1992.  Upper Hiwassee River  Basin
    Reservoirs-  1989  Water Quality Assessment..
    TVA/WR-92-1.  Tennessee Valley  Authority,
    Water Resources Division. Chattanooga, TN.

Dierberg, F.E. 1991.  Feasibility  of  Using Remote
    Sensing Platforms  as an Aid  to Water Quality
    Monitoring in the Tennessee Valley-Capabilities
    and  Costs.  TVA/WR-91-8. Tennessee Valley
    Authority,   Water  Resources   Division.
    Chattanooga, TN.

Dierberg. F.E. 1992.  Remote  Sensing  for  Water
    Quality   Monitoring  in   the   Tennessee
    Valley-Field   Tests  of  Two   Systems.
    TVA/WR-92-17.   Tennessee  Valley Authority,
    Water Resources Division. Chattanooga, TN.

 DATABASE(S):

 None provided.
  GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                               PAGE 87

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                             B.  Ecological
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                       PAGE 89

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DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

Fisheries Statistics  Program

OFFICE:

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
National Marine Fisheries Service
Office of Research and Environmental Information
Fishery Statistics Division, F/RE1

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The  Fishery  Statistics  Division   develops  and
maintains a national collection of statistics (biological,
economic, and sociological) on domestic commercial
and recreational fisheries, as well as joint ventures
and foreign catch in the U.S. Exclusive  Economic
Zone (EEZ). It maintains data files on the processing,
freezing, and holding of fishery products, and monthly
information  on  imports  and  exports  of fishery
products.  The  Division also   aids  in  developing
policies and operational guidelines for the coordinated
collection and publication of basic fishery statistics. It
develops, implements, and manages computerized data
systems   for  handling,  archiving,  and  retrieving
statistical databases.

DATA COVERAGE:

The following data are collected: monthly and annual
commercial landings (catch) in pounds and value by
species. State, county, year, waterbody, and distance
from shore; annual  operating units and number  of
vessels and fishermen by State, year, and country;
annual processed products  data by State, county,
plant, species, and type of processing; annual world
catch by  species, country, and area;  weekly shrimp
imports by country and count size; and recreational
finfish saltwater catch by species and geographic area.

COLLECTION METHODS:

Commercial data are obtained through census of first
buyers of seafood, review of logbooks, intercept
surveys, and reporting by observers. Recreational data
are  collected   through  extensive  telephone  and
intercept  surveys  designed  as  a stratified random
sample. Approximately 44,000 households in coastal
counties  are  contacted  for the telephone survey.
On-site interviews  are conducted with  as many  as
56,000 marine recreational anglers for an intercept
survey.
COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

Data  are  collected  daily,  monthly,  and/or  yearly
depending on subject and area covered.

GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

All commercial catch by U.S. flag-vessels landed in
the continental United States, Puerto Rico, and other
50  ports  outside  the  50  states.  Recreational
information covers marine waters only.

CONTACT:

Mark Holliday
Fishery Statistics Division, F/RE1
National Marine Fisheries Service
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
1335 East West Highway., Rm. 8313
Silver Spring, MD 20910
Phone: (301) 713-2328

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

National  Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration,
    National Marine Fisheries Service. 1984. Marine
    Recreational Fishery Statistic Survey, Pacific
    Coast, 1979-1980. Current Fishery Statistics No.
    8392.   U.S.   Department   of   Commerce.
    Washington, DC.

     1987. Marine  Recreational Fishery Statistic
    Survey,  Pacific  Coast,  1986. Current Fishery
    Statistics  No.  8393.   U.S.  Department   of
    Commerce. Washington, DC.

--.  1992. Fisheries  of the  United States 1991 (and
    earlier reports in  this  series.) Current Fishery
    Statistics  No.  8900.   U.S.  Department   of
    Commerce. Washington, DC.

DATABASE(S):

Databases are maintained  by field offices  of  the
National   Fisheries   Service,  Fisheries   Statistics
Division in Silver Spring, MD.
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                       PAGE 91

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DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

Living  Marine Resources
OFFICE:

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
National Ocean Service
Office of Ocean Resources Conservation and
  Assessment
Strategic  Environmental Assessment Division

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The Living Marine Resources Program gathers data
from published  sources on  spatial  and temporal
distributions of marine species (invertebrates, fishes,
seabirds,   and  mammals).   Information  includes
distributions by life stage, statistics  on commercial
harvest,  and  status of seabird colonies. In  1990,
additional information  was  gathered  on sampling
programs.

DATA COVERAGE:

Gulf of Mexico: spatial and temporal distributions for
adult, juvenile,  and reproductive  life  stages  of 73
species of invertebrates and fishes.

Gulf  of  Mexico shrimp harvest:  1960-1988   (by
month) harvest weight for seven shrimp species.

Gulf  of Mexico  estuaries:  spatial  and  temporal
distributions for adult, juvenile, reproductive, larval
and egg life stages of 44 species of invertebrates and
fishes in 25 estuaries.

Bering,  Chukchi,  and Beaufort Seas:  spatial  and
temporal distributions for adult and juvenile stages of
 102 species  of  invertebrates, fishes  and marine
mammals.

West Coast:  spatial and temporal distributions for
 adult, juvenile, and reproductive life stages of  130
 species of invertebrates, fishes, and marine mammals.

Southeast estuaries: spatial and temporal distributions
for adult, juvenile, reproductive, larval and egg life
 stages of 40 species of invertebrates and fishes in 20
 estuaries.
]£&
H^H
1
U.S.
Guide
Entry
Data Type: Statistics
Source: U.S. Guide
COLLECTION METHODS:

Alaska seabird colonies: populations of 30 species of
seabirds within 1,300 individual colonies.

Data are compiled from  published literature and
agency databases.

COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

Ongoing.

GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

Entire  U.S., Exclusive  Economic  Zone  including
Alaska,   excluding  Hawaii,  Puerto   Rico,   and
protectorates.

CONTACTS:

Tom LaPointe, Operations Research Analyst
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
6001 Executive Blvd., Room 220
Rockville, MD 20852
Phone: (301) 443-0453

Robert Wolotira, Fisheries Biologist
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
6001 Executive Blvd., Room 220
Rockville, MD 20852
Phone: (301) 443-0453

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contacts.

PUBLICATIONS:

Bulger, A.J., B.P. Hayden, M.E. Monaco, and M.G.
    McCormick-Ray. 1989. Towards a Biogeographic
    Estuarine   Salinity  Classification.   National
    Oceanic  and  Atmospheric   Administration.
    Rockville, MD.

 Monaco,  M.E., T. Czapla, D.M.  Nelson,  and M.
    Pattilo. 1989. Estuarine Living Marine Resources
    Project: Texas Component. National Oceanic and
    Atmospheric Administration. Rockville, MD.
 PAGE 92
                                          GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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Monaco, M.E. and R.L. Emmett. 1988. Living Marine
    Resources Program: Estuarine Living  Marine
    Resources Project: Washington State Component.
    National   Oceanic    and   Atmospheric
    Administration. Rockville, MD.

Monaco, M.E. 1986. National Estuarine Inventory:
    Living Marine Resources Component Preliminary
    West  Coast  Study.  National  Oceanic  and
    Atmospheric Administration. Rockville, MD.

Ray, G.C., M.G. McCormick-Ray, J.A. Dobbin, D.N.
    Ehler, and  DJ. Basta.  1980. Eastern United
    States Coastal and Ocean Zones Data Atlas.
    National   Oceanic    and   Atmospheric
    Administration. Rockville, MD.

National Oceanic and  Atmospheric Administration,
    Strategic  Assessment Branch.  1989.  Bering,
    Chukchi, and Beaufort Seas Coastal, and Ocean
    Zones  Strategic  Assessment:  Data   Atlas.
    Government Printing Office. Washington, DC.

—.  Strategic Assessment Branch and Northwest and
    Alaska  Fisheries Center.  1988. West Coast of
    North America Strategic Assessment: Data Atlas,
    Marine Mammal Volume, Pre-Publication Edition
    National   Oceanic    and   Atmospheric
    Administration. Rockville, MD.

—.  Strategic  Assessment Branch  and  Southeast
    Fisheries  Center. 1986. Gulf of Mexico Coastal
    and Ocean Zones Strategic Assessment: Data
    Atlas. Government Printing Office. Washington,
    DC.

DATABASE(S):

Computer Mapping and Analysis System (CMAS)

    CMAS  is a geo-referenced database. It requires
    a  Macintosh   microcomputer.   For   more
    information, see Contacts.
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                            PAGE 93

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DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

National Coastal Wetlands Inventory

OFFICE:

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
National Ocean Service
Office of Ocean Conservation and Assessment

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The program is developing a database to estimate the
distribution and abundance of coastal wetlands in the
conterminous United States.

STATISTICAL COVERAGE:

Estimates  of areas are summarized for 12 wetland
habitats and 3 non-wetland habitats. The database was
completed in October 1989 and contains information
from 5,290 NWI maps, most of which are 1:24,000
scale.

DATA COLLECTION METHODS:

The data  are generated by using  a grid sampling
technique  on  maps  produced by the National
Wetlands  Inventory (NWI) of the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service. The grid sampling procedure is a
stratified  systematic  sampling  technique.   On  a
 1:24,000 scale map, there are approximately 850-900
sampling  points. The grid cell size associated with
each sampling point is equal to 45  acres.

 COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

 Data were collected on a one-time  basis.

 GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

 All  coastal  counties  and estuaries as described  in
 NOAA's  National Estuarine Inventory program, on
 the East, West and Gulf Coasts of  the United States.

 CONTACT:

 Don Field
 Marine Resource Specialist
 U.S. Department of Commerce
 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
 National Ocean Service
 Office of Ocean Conservation and Assessment
 6001 Executive Blvd., Room 300 (N/OMA31)
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Sown: Program Contact
Rockville, MD 20852
Phone: (301) 443-0453

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

Alexander,  C.E., M.A.  Broutman, and D.W. Field.
    1986. An Inventory of Coastal Wetlands of the
    USA.   National Oceanic   and   Atmospheric
    Administration. Rockville, MD.

Field, D.W., C.E.  Alexander, and M.A. Broutman.
    1988.  "Towards Developing an Inventory  of
    Coastal Wetlands of the USA." Marine Fisheries
    Review. 50(1): 40-46.

Reyer,  A.J., D.W.  Field, J.E.   Cassells,  C.E.
    Alexander, and C.L. Holland.  1988. National
    Coastal Wetlands Inventory-the Distribution and
    Areal Extent of Coastal Wetlands in Estuaries of
    the Gulf of Mexico.    National  Oceanic  and
    Atmospheric Administration. Rockville, MD.

Office of Ocean Conservation and Assessments. 1989.
    National Estuarine Inventory: Data Atlas. Vol 3,
    Coastal  Wetlands  -  New England  Region.
    National  Oceanic   and   Atmospheric
    Administration. Rockville, MD.

 --. 1989. National Estuarine Inventory: Data Atlas.
    Vol. 5, Coastal  Wetlands  -  Gulf of Mexico
    Region.  National  Oceanic and Atmoshperic
    Administration. Rockville, MD.

 --. 1988. National  Estuarine Inventory: Data Atlas.
    Vol. 4, Public Recreation Facilities in Coastal
    Areas.  National  Oceanic  and  Atmospheric
    Administration. Rockville, MD.

 DATABASE(S):

 National Coastal Wetlands Inventory

 Data are now being loaded into SPANS Geographic
 Information System.
 PAGE 94
                                         GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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i^E:

y
Data Type: Statistics
Source: Program Contact
 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR


 Biomonitoring  of Environmental Status  and Trends
 (BEST) Program

 Note:  The following program is now being implemented. Only limited data is available at this time.

 OFFICE:

 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
 Division of Environmental Contaminants
 Branch of Contaminant
  Investigations and Monitoring

 SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

 The BEST Program will monitor and respond to the effects of contemporary environmental contaminant problems
 associated with fish and wildlife resources.  When fully operational, the BEST Program will identify the extent,
 magnitude, and location of contaminant-related ecosystem degradation and will provide information to answer many
 questions, some of which include:

    •   What are the major contaminant threats to FWS trust resources?

    •   Are contaminant impacts to FWS  trust resources increasing or decreasing?

    •   Which trust resources are degrading or improving on a national, regional and local level?

    •   What contaminants are affecting National Wildlife Refuges and what are the probable contaminant sources
        and exposure pathways?

 The BEST Program is the only Federal biomonitoring program that will document the current level of contaminant
 impacts to the Nation's fish and wildlife resources in a predictive and action-oriented manner. The information it
 produces, in conjunction with other Federal  biomonitoring programs, will support numerous Federal, State, and local
 efforts to evaluate and protect fish and wildlife from contaminant-related impacts.

 The BEST Program will use a comprehensive, ecosystem-based approach to address the transport, fate, and effects
 of environmental contaminants on trust resources.  An integrated biomonitoring network will be established to
 evaluate contaminant impacts at the tissue, organism, population, community, and ecosystem levels.

 To determine the status, trends, and effects  of contaminants on fish and wildlife resources, the BEST Program will
 use bioassessment techniques from four broad categories.

    •   Ecological Surveys will be used to assess changes in composition, structure, and function of plant and
        animal communities.

    •   Organism health or biomarkers such as physiological anomalies will be used to measure fish and wildlife
        exposure to contaminants.

    •   Bioassays and toxicity tests will measure the relative species responses to contaminant exposure in natural
        systems.

    •   Residue analysis will determine the ecological pathways and prevalence of various contaminants.
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
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Collection methods development is still underway at this time. Pilot studies to be conducted during FY94 will test
proposed methods.

The specific frequency of data collection has not been determined at this point in the development process.

The BEST Program's sampling approach has been designed around two major components, trust resources on FWS
lands (primarily National Wildlife Refuges) and trust species found outside of Service lands.  Distinct sampling
designs will be implemented for each component.

CONTACT:

Chief
Division of Environmental Contaminants
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
4401  North Fairfax Drive, Room 330
Arlington, VA 22203
Phone: (703) 358-2148
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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR


National Wetlands Inventory

OFFICE:

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Fish and Wildlife Enhancement
Branch of Coastal and Wetland Resources

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

In  1975,  the  U.S.  Fish  and  Wildlife  Service
established the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI) to
develop  technically  sound  and   comprehensive
information  on the  characteristics  and extent  of
wetland resources in the United States.

DATA COVERAGE:

Status and trends information is available for selected
wetland types including: estuarine wetlands; palustrine
wetlands; lacustrine wetlands; and deepwater habitats
in the lower  48 States. In addition, statistical data are
available for coastal waters and bay bottoms, coastal
marshlands and mangroves, recent changes in inland
vegetated  wetlands,  recent changes in lacustrine
deepwater habitats,  estimates  of  current  annual
wetland losses,  estimates  of  wetland losses by
flyways, States  with  significant changes in wetland
resources, indicators of  development pressures on
wetland resources, and causes of wetland losses. The
Emergency Wetlands Resources Act of 1986 requires
that updates  of the  wetland status and trends be
produced on  a 10-year cycle with reports due in 1990,
2000, 2010,  etc.

COLLECTION METHODS:

A stratified random sample is used with the basic data
strata being  formed by State boundaries and the 35
physical subdivisions  described by E.H. Hammond
(1970).  Additional strata specific to the study are
special  coastal strata encompassing  the  Marine
Intertidal category, the Estuarine  System, and other
strata encompassing the Great Lakes. This  results in
over  200  strata for the study.  Sample  units are
allocated  to  strata  in proportion to the  expected
amount of wetland and deepwater habitat acreage as
estimated  by earlier work.  Each sample  unit is  a
4-square-mile area, 2 miles  on each side.  After the
units are selected at random  within strata and plotted
on U.S. Geological Survey topographic maps, aerial
photography is obtained for the new time period. All
wetland and deepwater habitat changes are marked as
to cause,  either natural  or human  induced. The
photointerpreted data for each unit is then prepared
for computer analysis. Several quality control checks
are routinely made to eliminate errors.

COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

Data are collected  continuously with updates  on a
ten-year cycle. The 1990 update provides trend data
on wetlands losses and gains between the 1970s and
the 1980s.

GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

The  wetland mapping phase  of the  project has
produced map coverage for approximately 70 percent
of the lower 48 States, 22 percent of Alaska, and all
of Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and Guam. Wetland status
and  trends  information  is designed  to  provide
statistical  estimates  on a national basis (lower  48  '
States). In addition, regional intensification studies are
available for the Chesapeake Bay Region (Delaware,
Maryland, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Virginia),
and the Central Valley of California. Other statewide
status  information  is available for  the States  of
Florida, Delaware, New Jersey, Illinois, Washington,
Maryland, and Connecticut. Status reports covering
the coastal wetlands of Alaska and the Prairie Pothole
Region (North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota) are
also available.

CONTACTS:

Thomas E.  Dahl -  for wetlands status and trends
information

Linda Shaffer - for digital wetland map information

National Wetlands Inventory
U.S. Fish  and Wildlife Service
9720 Executive Center Drive
Suite 101  Monroe Bldg.
St. Petersburg, FL 33702-2440
Phone: (813) 893-3624
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FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:
DATABASE(S):
Earth Sciences Information Center
U.S. Geological Survey
507 National Center
Reston,VA 22092
Phone:  (703)860-6045

National Wetland Inventory maps can be obtained by
calling: 1-800-USA-MAPS.  In Virginia, call (703)
648-6045.

PUBLICATIONS:

Dahl, T.E. and H.R. Pywell.  1989. "National Status
    and Trends Study: Estimating Wetland Resources
    in  the   1980s."   Wetlands:   Concerns   and
    Successes. American Water Resources Assoc.

Dahl, T.E. and C.E. Johnson. 1991. Status and Trends
    of Wetlands in the Conterminous United States,
     1970s to 1980s. U.S. Department of the Interior,
    Fish and Wildlife Service. Washington, DC.

Prayer, W.E., TJ. Monahan, DC Bowden, and  F.A.
     Graybill.  1983. Status and Trends of Wetlands
     and Deepwater Habitats in  the Coterminous
     United States 1950s  to  1970s.  Colorado  State
     University:  Department  of Forest and Wood
     Science.

 Hammond, E.H. 1970. "Physical Subdivisions of the
     United States." National Atlas of the United
     States. U.S. Geological Survey. Reston,  VA.

 Hefner, J.M. and J.D. Brown. 1985.  Wetland Trends
     in the Southeastern United  States.  Fish and
     Wildlife Service. Atlanta, GA.

 Tiner, R.W. Jr. 1984. Wetlands of the United States:
     Current Status and Recent Trends. Department of
     the  Interior,   Fish   and  Wildlife   Service.
     Washington, DC.

 Wilen, B.O.  and W.E. Prayer.  1988. "Status and
     Trends of U.S. Forested Wetlands." Proceedings
     of the International Forested Wetlands Resource:
     Identification and Inventory. Baton Rouge, LA.

 --. and R.W. Tiner Jr. 1989.  "The National Wetlands
      Inventory - the First Ten  Years."  Wetlands:
      Concerns  and  Successes.   American Water
      Resources Assoc.
Wetland Plant Species Database

    The database is a listing of plants occurring in
    wetlands, as defined  by the  U.S.  Fish and
    Wildlife   Service's  wetland   definition  and
    classification system.  It lists  scientific and
    common names and distribution of 6,728 plant
    species. It can be accessed by family, scientific,
    or common name,  region, State, and  wetland
    indicator  status.  The  database  is updated  as
    additional information is received.

    State and regional subdivisions of the Wetland
    Plant Species Database are available on floppy
    disks from:

    BIODATA, Inc.
    13950 W. 20th Avenue
    Golden,  CO  80401
    Phone: (303) 278-1046

 Books

    Books contains bibliographic citations for almost
    300 sources such as national, regional, and State
    floras, checklists, and botanical manuals used to
    compile the Wetland Plant Species Database.

 Wetland Values Citation Database

    This is a bibliographic  database with over 12,000
    listings   of worldwide  published  scientific
    literature on wetland functions and values. It has
     an  extensive  number  of searchable  fields,
     including  geographic  descriptors, hydrological
     units, ecological regions, and wetlands types, as
     well as  subject,  title,  and  abstract  fields.  It
     includes literature from the 1950s to the present.

     Information on the Wetlands Values  Citation
     Database is available from:

     Paul Alford
     U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
     National Wetlands  Inventory
     9720 Executive Center Drive
     Monroe Blvd., Suite 101
     St. Petersburg, FL  33702-2440
     Phone: (813) 893-3624
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Wetland Geographic Information System

    The National Wetlands Inventory is constructing
    a  geo-referenced  wetland  database  using
    geographic   information   system   (GIS)
    technologies. Three systems comprise the GIS:

    (1) The Wetlands Analytical  Mapping System
        (WAMS);

    (2)  The  Map  Overlay and  Statistical  System
        (MOSS); and

    (3) The Cartographic Output System (COS). To
        date,   more   than   7,746   NWI  maps
        representing 12.8 percent of the continental
        United States have been digitized. Statewide
        databases have been built for New Jersey,
        Indiana, Washington, Illinois, Delaware, and
        Maryland, and are in progress for Virginia,
        Minnesota,  South  Dakota,   and  South
        Carolina. NWI digital data are also available
        for portions of 33 other States. Wetland GIS
        database files may be  purchased from  The
        National Wetlands Inventory  office in St.
        Petersburg, FL (see Contacts).
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

North American  Breeding Bird  Survey
                            Guide
                            Entry
Data Type: Statistics
Source: U.S. Guide
OFFICE:

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Office of Migratory Bird Management
Patuxent Wildlife Research Center

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The Breeding Bird Survey Program, started in 1966,
provides  a uniform  basis for  assessing long-term
trends in avian populations throughout North America.

DATA COVERAGE:

Total number of  individuals recorded by species,
survey route, and State are available. Long-term trend
analyses are performed every 2  years.

COLLECTION METHODS:

Held procedures provide uniform  sampling of bird
populations by major physiographic regions across the
continent. The data collection methods, which involve
censusing of birds by sight and sound for  specified
periods of time along established survey routes during
the breeding season (usually the month of June), and
methods  for data  processing and  analysis  are
described in Robbins, Bystrak and  Geissler (1986).

 COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

 Data are collected annually.

 GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

 Randomly distributed roadside routes  have been
 established within each one degree block of latitude
 and longitude in the conterminous United States and
 the roaded areas of Alaska and Canada.

 CONTACT:

 Bruce Peterjohn, Ornithologist
 Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
 Department of the Interior
 Laurel, MD 20708
 Phone: (301) 498-0330
FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

Droege, S. and J.R. Sauer.' 1990. "North American
    Breeding Bird Survey Annual Summary 1989."
    Stud. Avian Biol. 90(8). U.S. Fish and Wildlife
    Service. Washington, DC.

Robbins, C.S., D. Bystrak and P.  Geissler. 1986. The
    Breeding  Bird Survey:  Its First 15  Years,
    1965-1979. Resource Pub. No. 157. Department
    of  the Interior,  Fish  and  Wildlife  Service.
 ;   Washington, DC.

DATABASE^):

Breeding Bird Survey Database

    This database contains raw  counts,  weather
    information,   route  histories,   and  observer
    information.
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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Waterfowl Breeding Population and Habitat Survey
                                 Data Type: Statistks
                                 Source: U.S. Guide
OFFICE:

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Office of Migratory Bird Management

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION;

This survey is designed to provide annual breeding
population estimates and  measure  breeding habitat
changes over a major portion of the duck breeding
range in North America.

DATA COVERAGE:

Variables measured include number  of breeding
waterfowl by species (for example, northern pintail
and mallard, Canada goose, canvasback and redhead,
and Tundra swan) and number of waterbodies (ponds)
available during  the  breeding   season.  Annual
comparisons  and long-term trend  information  are
available.

COLLECTION METHODS:

This survey is an aerial plot survey. Individual duck,
goose, and swan populations by species and ponds are
counted on strip transects that total 71,110 kilometers
for an approximately one percent sample of the total
surveyed area. Detectability bias is corrected through
the use of a double-sampling  scheme.  Waterfowl
along a small portion of the transect lengths  are
counted from the ground. These counts represent a
census, allowing the correction of the aerial counts by
using ratio  estimators. The number  of breeding
waterfowl  for each species and  the number of
waterbodies is the target population.

COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

Data collected on an annual basis.

GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

Includes the 50 States, Yukon Territory,  Northwest
Territories, Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, western
Ontario, North and  South Dakota, and Montana.
CONTACT:

Dr. Robert J. Blohm, Chief
Branch of Operations
Office of Migratory Bird Management
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Mailstop 634 ARLSQ
1849 C Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20240
Phone:(703)358-1838

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

U.S. Fish  and Wildlife and  Canadian Wildlife
    Service. 1987. Standard Operating Procedures
    for   Aerial   Waterfowl   Breeding   Ground
    Population  and Habitat  Surveys  in  North
    America. Washington, DC.

—. Trends in Duck Breeding Populations (annual).
    U.S.  Fish  and  Wildlife   Service,  Office  of
    Migratory Bird Management. Laurel, MD.

—. Status of Waterfowl and Fall Flight Forecast
    (annual). U.S. Fish  and Wildlife Service, Office
    of Migratory Bird Management. Laurel, MD.

DATABASE(S):

For data information, see Contact.
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                                                                                        PAGE 101

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*£££
*y.....
4
Data Type: Statistics
Source! Program Contact
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program

(EMAP)

Note: The following program is now being implemented. Only limited data is available at this time.

In 1988, EPA's Science Advisory Board recommended implementing a program within EPA to monitor the status
and trends of ecological conditions and to develop innovative methods for anticipating emerging problems before
they become crises. In response, EPA initiated EMAP. EMAP objectives include:

    •   estimation of the current status, changes, and trends in indicators of the conditions of the Nation's
        ecological resources on a regional basis;

    •   monitoring of indicators of pollutant exposure and habitat condition;

    •   identification of associations between human-induced stresses and ecological conditions;

    •   and generation of periodic statistical summaries and interpretive reports on status and trends to
        resource managers and the public.

When fully implemented, in cooperation with other agencies that share resource monitoring responsibilities, this
coordinated research and monitoring effort will provide the information needed to document the current condition
of our ecological resources, understand why that condition exists, and predict what it may be in the future under
various management alternatives. Such information will enable EPA to take proactive steps that will minimize future
risk or to revise current efforts that fall short of their intended results.

 CONTACT:

 Tom Dixon
 Office of Research and Development (RD-680)
 U.S.  Environmental Protection Agency
 401 M Street, SW
 Washington, DC 20460
 Phone: (202) 260-7238
 FAX: (202) 260-4346
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                                     Section V




                      Other Effects of Water Pollution








   In addition to the direct effects of water pollution evident in assessments of ambient water



quality, water pollution has other impacts such as increased incidence of waterborne disease and



interference with the beneficial uses of the ambient waters. This section describes programs that



track waterborne disease outbreaks and shellfish bed closures. Additional information on impacts



upon beneficial uses,  including fishing bans and beach closures, is provided by  the National



Water Monitoring Program described in Section IV.
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
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DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE


Classified Shellfishing Waters

OFFICE:

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
National Ocean Service
Office of Ocean Resources Conservation and
  Assessment
Strategic  Environmental Assessment Division

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

Classified shellfishing  waters  are monitored as an
indicator of bacterial water quality nationwide. Waters
are classified for the commercial harvest of oysters,
clams, and mussels based on the presence of actual or
potential  pollution sources and  coliform bacteria
levels in surface waters. Each  shellfish-producing
State classifies  its  waters   in  accordance  with
guidelines established  by the  National  Shellfish
Sanitation Program.

DATA COVERAGE:

Approximately 2,000 classified shellfishing areas are
defined by name, location (nautical chart number,
estuary,  State,  region),  classification (approved,
prohibited, conditionally approved, or restricted), size,
and pollution sources (identified for all non-approved
areas).

Trends in classification by region from 1966 to  1990
and by selected estuaries in the Northeast, Southeast,
Gulf of Mexico, and Pacific from 1971 to 1990 are
available. Areas that  were reclassified because of
improved  or  diminished   water   quality   are
distinguished from those that  were reclassified as a
result of improved monitoring.

 Data also are collected on administration of  State
 programs, including: identification of State agencies
 responsible   for  monitoring  waters,   assigning
 classification,  analyzing water samples, etc.;  number
 of personnel; budgets;  number of sampling stations;
 frequency of  sampling; and  other factors that may
 influence classification.

£f~:.
k

U.S.
Guide
Entry
Data 'type: Statistics
Source: U.S. Guide
COLLECTION METHODS:

Data are collected by questionnaire and followed by
interviews. Classifications are noted on 265 Nautical
Charts (NOS 1:80,000).

COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

Data were compiled in 1966,1971,1974,1980,1985,
and 1990. The next survey is scheduled for 1995.

GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

East, West, and Gulf Coasts of the United States.

CONTACT:

Sharon Adamany
Environmental Analysts
NOAA, N/ORCA
6001 Executive Blvd.
Rockville, MD 20852
Phone: (301)  443-8843

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

Strategic Assessment Branch, National Oceanic and
    Atmospheric  Administration.  1989. The Quality
    of Shellfish Growing Waters on the West Coast.
    National    Oceanic   and   Atmospheric
    Administration,   Department   of  Commerce.
    Rockville, MD.

--. 1991. The 1990 National  Shellfish  Register of
     Classified Estuarine Waters. National Oceanic
     and Atmospheric Administration, Department of
     Commerce. Rockville, MD.

 Leonard, D.L., M.A. Broutman, and K.E.  Harkness.
     1989. The Quality of Shellfish  Growing Waters
     on the East Coast of the United States. National
     Oceanic   and   Atmospheric   Administration.
     Rockville, MD.
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Broutman, M.A. and D.L. Leonard.  1988. National
    Estitarine  Inventory: The  Quality of Shellfish
    Crowing Waters in the Gulf of Mexico. National
    Oceanic   and  Atmospheric  Administration.
    Rockville, MD.

—. 1986. National Estuarine Inventory: Classified
    Shellfish Crowing Waters by Estuary. National
    Oceanic   and  Atmospheric  Administration.
    Rockville, MD.

DATABASE(S):

National Shellfish Register

    This database contains shellfish area name, size,
    classification, chart number,  State, and region.
    Also included  are  pollution sources,  contact
    persons, budget data, and sampling stations.
PAGE 106
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Waterborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance

T —
Data Type: Program
Information
Source: Program Contact
OFFICE:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Public Health Service
National Center for Infectious Diseases
Division of Parasitic Diseases
Parasitic Diseases Branch

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

Since  1971, in collaboration with EPA, CDC has tabulated data concerning waterborne disease outbreaks in the
United States and has compiled the data in surveillance summaries.  The summaries include data about a) outbreaks
associated with water intended for drinking, b) outbreaks associated with water used for recreational purposes, and
c) outbreaks of gastroenteritis (whether food or waterborne) on ocean-going passenger vessels that call on U.S. ports.
A goal of the surveillance systems is characterization of the epidemiology of waterborne diseases.  Other goals
include the identification of water system deficiencies and identification of etiologic agents associated with outbreaks,
so that improved water systems can be designed.

Summary information data is collected on outbreaks associated with water intended for drinking and water used for
recreational purposes.  Outbreaks  are characterized by location (State), date, number of cases, etiologic agent, water
source, type of water supply (e.g.,  community, noncommunity, or private), and water system deficiency. Information
about the type of water treatment will be available starting in 1991.  Data collection is ongoing from 1971.

A largely passive surveillance system is used and therefore relies  on voluntary reporting to CDC by State health
departments. The extent of under-reporting is unknown. The likelihood that individual cases of illness will be linked
epidemiologically to a water source varies among locations and depends upon consumer awareness, physician interest,
and surveillance of State health and environmental agencies. Large outbreaks and those involving community water
systems  are most likely to be reported.  Therefore, the data cannot be used to determine the true incidence  of
waterborne disease outbreaks.  However, the data may be useful for looking at regional and year-to-year trends.

Local and State health departments carry out epidemiologic investigation of disease  outbreaks.  Analysis of water
 samples is carried out  by local and  State laboratories.  Analysis of clinical samples may be carried out by local,
 State, or private laboratories. Most of the data provided are directly measured or observed, i.e., etiologic agents  have
 been identified by laboratory analysis and cases have been identified by clinical or laboratory criteria.  However, for
 large outbreaks, the numbers reported are generally estimates based on the epidemiology. The method and accuracy
 of the approximations vary among outbreaks.

 The quality of the data implicating water varies widely among outbreaks. Factors influencing the quality of the data
 include the financial resources of health department, laboratory resource, and the timing of the investigation with
 respect to the course of the outbreak. Reports by the States to CDC  use a standardized form.

 Samples are collected  when a potential outbreak is identified.  Reporting of outbreaks occurs after  epidemiologic
 investigation. Surveillance is ongoing for the entire U.S.
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                                                                                               PAGE 107

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CONTACT:

Waterbome Disease Outbreak Surveillance Coordinator
Parasitic Disease Branch, F-13
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
1600 Clifton Road
Atlanta, GA  30333
Phone: (404) 488-4050
FAX: (404) 488-4492                         '     '

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

Statistics are available as surveillance summaries published in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR).
The summaries include tables and charts and are published every 2-3 years.

Centers for Disease Control.  1992. 'Water-Borne Disease Outbreaks, 1989-1990." MMWR 40(SS-3): 1-21. Centers
    for Disease Control, Department of Health and Human Services. Atlanta, GA.

-. 1990.  "Water-Borne Disease Outbreaks, 1986-1988.  MMWR 30(SS-1): 1-13. Centers for Disease Control,
    Department of Health and Human Services.  Atlanta,  GA.

-. 1988.  "Water-Borne Disease Outbreaks, 1985."   MMWR 37(SS-2):  15-24.  Centers  for Disease Control,
    Department of Health and Human Services.  Atlanta,  GA.

Craun G.F., ed. 1986. Water-Borne Diseases in the United States. CRC Press. Boca Raton.

Craun G.F. 1988. "Surface Water Supplies and Health." J. American Water Works Assoc. 80:4-0-52.

Hayes E.B., Matte T.D., O'Brien T.R., et al.  1989. "Large Community Outbreak of Cryptosporidosis Due to
    Contamination of a Filtered Public Water Supply." New England Journal of Medicine 320 1372-1376.

DATABASES):

None provided.
PAGE 108
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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                                   Section VI




         Preservation, Protection, and Restoration Programs








   This section references programs carried out by a number of Federal Agencies (and in many



cases, the States). These programs collect and  present water pollution data, control existing



sources, protect existing water  quality, construct needed treatment facilities, assess ambient



conditions, estimate the costs and benefits of abatement efforts, and clean up existing problems.
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
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                                     GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Forest Service Water Quality Program

1 =
Data Type: Program
Information
Source: Program Contact
OFFICE:

Watershed and Air Management

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The Forest Service is responsible for managing approximately 191 million acres of public lands that have been
reserved from the public domain for the purpose of ensuring favorable conditions of water flow, and  to furnish a
continuous supply of timber. In addition, Congress has directed that these lands are to be managed for multiple use
purposes including timber, range, recreation, minerals, wildlife, fish, soil and water.

Nonpoint source pollution management program: Nonpoint source pollution that may result from land management
activities is controlled by designing practices that are expected to meet water quality objectives, monitoring to ensure
that such practices are implemented, monitoring to ensure practices are effective, mitigation to correct for unexpected
problems, and adjustment in land management design criteria where necessary. This program is coordinated with
individual States to ensure compliance with State water quality requirements.

Watershed restoration program: The Forest Service Watershed Improvement Program targets over 35,000 acres
 annually, treating those National Forest lands adversely  affected by past uses and events. Significant improvements
 in water quality and watershed condition are attained through this  program.

 In addition the Forest Service has an affirmative program to protect, wisely use, and improve valuable wetlands in
 the National Forests. The Forest Service provides leadership in research on forested wetlands, and provides technical
 assistance to private landowners through the State foresters.

 Forest Service wetlands policy recognizes wetlands as specific management areas in the National Forests. The goal
 is to preserve and enhance the natural and beneficial values of wetlands, and to avoid adverse impacts which may
 be associated  with their destruction, loss, or degradation.

 CONTACT:

 Director, Watershed and Air Management
 Forest Service - USDA
 201 14th Street, SW, Auditors 3S
 Washington, DC 20250
 Phone: (202)205-1473
 FAX: (202)205-1096
  GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                              PAGE 111

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 DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

 SCS Water Quality Programs

1 =
Data Type: Program
Information
Source: Program Contact
 OFFICE:

 Soil Conservation Service

 SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

 The Soil Conservation Service (SCS) provides leadership and administers programs to help people conserve, improve,
 and sustain our natural resources and environment. SCS is expanding and improving technical assistance for water
 quality utilizing the Agency's extensive field delivery system through local Soil and Water Conservation Districts.
 As a part of USDA's Water  Quality Initiative,  SCS  is providing increased technical assistance  for selected
 agricultural watersheds or acquifer-recharge areas called  "Nonpoint Source Hydrologic Unit Areas" (HUA's). This
 assistance is being provided to  address agricultural nonpoint pollution concerns identified by States under Section
 319 of the Water Quality Act of 1987.  SCS also is supporting demonstration projects to encourage the application
 of effective and efficient conservation practices to benefit  water quality programs and designated estuaries of national
 significance.  SCS provides  assistance to State agencies in developing both surface and ground water practices,
 programs, and policies.

 SCS is implementing new programs and accelerating ongoing programs to address agriculture-related water quality
 concerns.  SCS has developed and is implementing a 5-year Water Quality Plan in support of the USDA initiative.
 The principal objective of the USDA initiative is to provide farmers and ranchers the educational, technical, and
 financial means to respond voluntarily and independently to on-farm environmental concerns and related State water
 quality requirements. SCS objectives are to:

 •   Increase technical assistance in areas with concerns about water quality and quantity and demonstrate available
    technology that will protect or improve water quality.

 •   Help State  water quality management agencies and  appropriate State soil and water conservation agencies to
    develop and implement programs to manage nonpoint source pollution.

 •   Evaluate pollutant loads (sediment, pesticides,  nutrients, animal waste, salts, and trace elements) to determine
    the level of contribution from agricultural sources relative to other sources.

 •   Plan and implement a system of conservation practices to improve water quality and quantity affected by
    agricultural operations.

 *   Evaluate the effects of conservation systems and conservation practices in reducing or preventing agricultural
    nonpoint source pollution.

 CONTACT:

 Peter Tidd
 U.S. Department of Agriculture
 Soil Conservation Service
 P.O. Box 2890, Room 6002-S
 Washington, DC 20013-2890
 Phone: (202) 720-1870
 FAX: (202) 720-0630
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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Working Group on  Water Quality

T1 	
Data Type: Program
Information
Source: Program Contact
OFFICE:

Working Group on Water Quality
Office of the Secretary                                                                       ,

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

President Bush proposed an initiative in 1989 to protect ground water and surface water from contamination by
fertilizers and  pesticides.  The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), U.S. Environmental  Protection Agency
(EPA) U S  Geological Survey (USGS), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) were
given definitive roles under the initiative. The USDA, as the lead agency, released its Water Quality Program in
July 1989 a multiyear plan to guide its agencies in implementing activities designed for and directed to protecting
water quality  A USDA Working Group on Water Quality was established, made up of 11 Agency administrators,
who  in turn  organized four program  committees:  Education and Technical/Financial Assistance, Research and
Development;  Database and Evaluation; and Information.  USDA is cooperating with other federal agencies in
defining water quality problems.

 Under the joint leadership of USDA's ASCS, ES, and SCS, 74 hydrologic unit areas were selected in FY'90 and
 FY'91 and provided with increased technical, information and education, and financial assistance to solve agricultural
 non-point source pollution problems identified in State water quality plans.  In addition, 16 demonstration projects
 were selected to show the economic and environmental effectiveness of conservation practices in reducing non-point
 source pollution problems.

 By 1995 USDA is to have identified areas where the agricultural threat to water quality is most serious and to have
 taught farmers and ranchers in those areas how to use agricultural chemicals in ways that are safe to the environment,
 yet economically practical. These methods will reduce the loss of agricultural chemicals that leach into ground water
 or run off  to  surface water, ensuring  that  agricultural impacts on water quality are minimized.  The USDA is
 evaluating the progress of Agency programs to identify strengths or weaknesses and make shifts in programs, where
 needed  to increase their effectiveness. NASS and ERS have published the results of a chemical use and cropping
 practices survey on corn, cotton, potatoes, rice, soybeans, and wheat in the major producing States. The results of
 a Vegetable Chemical Use Survey in the five major vegetable-producing States was published in June 1991. A Fruit
 and Nut Chemical Usage Survey was begun during 1991.  A second annual Field Crops Chemical Use Survey is
 being planned  A comprehensive evaluation  strategy was developed to identify key  questions that each Initiative
 component should address and outlines a process for collecting data.  The Working Group is using this  strategy to
 assess  progress and to make corrections to  present  activities.

 Water quality monitoring for the USDA water quality projects is done by USGS, EPA, and the States through various
 agreements and the data are analyzed to determine the effectiveness of the control measures  being implemented.
 Monitoring results are analyzed annually.  USDA agencies involved collect data on crops, acres, animal units, etc.,
 and these data are used to assess the progress of programs.  The data collection is ongoing, year-round for the entire
 U.S. where projects/activities are located.
  GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                              PAGE 113

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 CONTACT:

 Fred N. Swader
 U.S. Department of Agriculture
 14th and Independence Ave. SW
 Room 324-A Admin. Bldg.
 Washington, DC 20250-0100
 Phone: (202) 720-4751

 FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

 See Contact.

 PUBLICATIONS:

 Numerous technical and research documents-
 Contact:
 Water Quality Information Center
 National Agricultural Library
 Room 1402
 1301 Baltimore Blvd.
 Beltsville, MD 20705-2351
 Phone: (301)504-6077

 DATABASES:

 Agricultural Chemical Use Database
PAGE 114
                                      GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE


Annual   Surveys   of  Government
Government Employment

OFFICE:

Bureau of the Census
Governments Division

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

These parallel surveys of State and local government
finances  and employment cover all aspects of State
and local government activities and contain detailed
data for  some specific activities that relate  to the
environment.

DATA COVERAGE:

The finance survey variables include: functions and
services  such as health, sanitation,  environmental
services  (natural resources,  parks  and recreation,
sewerage, and solid waste management), housing and
community development, and water utilities; character
 and  object  items  such  as  current  operations,
 construction, and land and equipment; and revenue
 items.

 The employment survey variables are: employees —
 full-time, part-time, and full-time equivalent; payroll;
 and functions that are the same as those described
 under the finance survey.

 The  finance  survey  produces detailed  data for
 expenditures for both current operations and capital
 outlay.  The  employment survey contains data for
 these same functions, showing number of employees
 and monthly payroll.

 Both the finance  and employment surveys are
 designed primarily to  generate data  on  the total
 activity of State and local governments. This provides
 analysts with the ability to determine the relationships
 among  the various functions of government - for
 example, comparing education or police expenditures
 with sewerage outlays or the percentage any specific
 function is of the total.

 Trend data for both series are  available in national
  summations that go  back to the  early 1950s for
  employment  and early  1900s for finance data.
Finances  and
                              U.S.
                              Guide
                              Entry
Data'type: Statistics
Source: U.S. Guide
 Individual government data for the largest units of
 government (cities greater than 50,000 population,
 counties greater than 100,000 population, and all the
 State  governments)  follow  relatively   consistent
 patterns for about the past 30 years.

 COLLECTION METHODS:

 The sample is the same for both surveys. It  is a
 stratified random sample of local governments in the
 United States. Units include: all State governments;
 all county governments with a population of 50,000
 or more;  all  municipalities with a population of
 25,000 or more; and other units of local government
 that meet  specified financial or functional criteria.
 Estimates of major U.S. totals, such as total revenue
 or total expenditures,  are subject  to  a computed
 sampling variability  of less  than one-half of one
 percent. Other  local government  totals, such as
 functional expenditures, are generally  subject to
 sampling variability of less than one percent.

 COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

 Surveys are conducted annually.

 GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

 The data are aggregated to national totals and to totals
 for each  of the 50  States  and  the  District  of
 Columbia. The surveys also publish data for  large
 individual governments such as county governments
 (population   greater  than  100,000),   municipal
 governments  (populations greater than 75,000), and
 each  of the State governments.

  CONTACT:

  Gerald T. Keffer
  Finance and Taxation Branch
  Governments Division
  U.S.  Bureau of the Census
  Washington, DC 20233
  Phone: (301)763-5356
  FAX: (301)763-8290
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FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

Concerning  purchase  of  tapes,  microfiche  or
publications, call or write:

Customer Services
Data User Services Division
U.S. Bureau of the Census
Washington, DC 20233
Phone: (301) 763-4100
FAX: (301) 763-4794

PUBLICATIONS:

Department  of Commerce, Bureau of the Census.
    State Government  Finances, (annual).

—.  City Government Finances, (annual).

--.  Government Finances, (annual).

--.  County Government Finances, (annual).

—.  Public Employment, (annual).

--.  City Employment,  (annual).

--.  County Government Employment, (annual).

DATABASE(S):

Annual Survey of Government Finance

    File  A is  a  data  file  for a sample  of
    approximately   35,000   individual   units  of
    government  containing  revenue,  expenditures,
    debt, and assets for each unit. File B is a data file
    for U.S. and State area aggregations. The totals
    of each State area are divided into eight different
    records  (State  and  local  summation,   State
    government only, local government summation,
    county  government   summation,   municipal
    government  summation,  township government
    summation,   special  district  government
    summation, and school district summation). This
    file contains 416 records.

Annual Survey of Government Employment

    This is  a single  data  file for  a  sample  of
    approximately  23,000   individual   units  of
    government containing employment and payroll
    data for the  month  of  October. (Note: The
                 samples  for  the Annual Finance and Annual
                 Employment   Surveys   are  the  same.  The
                 difference in  the counts between Finance File A
                 and the  Employment File  is  that the  former
                 includes  additional units in States where it was
                 possible  to obtain universe data annually instead
                 of relying on the sample.)
PAGE 116
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE


Survey of Pollution Abatement
Costs and  Expenditures

OFFICE:

Bureau of the Census
Industry Division
Special Surveys Branch

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The survey collects information on annual operating
costs and capital expenditures for pollution abatement
activities in manufacturing industries. The survey was
started in 1973  and has been conducted annually
except for  1987. The survey provides  estimates of
pollution abatement spending for detailed levels of
industrial classification.

DATA COVERAGE:

Estimates of pollution abatement operating costs and
capital  expenditures are made for manufacturing
plants with 20 employees or more (except the apparel
 group). Detailed estimates are provided by pollution
 type and  for the  following  three-digit  standard
 industrial classification (SIC) industries: food and
 kindred products; tobacco manufacturers; textile mill
 products; lumber and wood products;  furniture and
 fixtures; paper  and allied products;  printing and
 publishing; chemicals and allied products; petroleum
 and coal products; rubber and miscellaneous plastics
 products; leather and leather products; stone, clay, and
 glass products; primary metal industries; fabricated
 metal products; machinery, except electrical; electric
 and  electronic   equipment;   transportation
 equipment; instruments and related products; and
 miscellaneous manufacturing industries. Detail also is
 provided for expenditures by sector, for industries by
 four-digit SIC codes, and for States by two-digit SIC
 codes. Capital expenditures are provided for air and
 water pollution abatement by abatement technique
 (changes-in-production processes  and  end-of-line
 techniques), for air pollution abatement by type of
 pollution abated, and for hazardous and nonhazardous
 solid waste  management.  Operating  costs include
 labor, depreciation, materials and supplies, services,
 equipment leasing, and other costs. Costs recovered
  by  manufacturing   plants  from  their  pollution
  abatement activities also are given.
                              JS-I DotaT^pe: Statistics
                              ggg[ Source: U.S. Guide
COLLECTION METHODS:

The  probability   sample  includes about  20,000
manufacturing plants. The sample is selected as a
subsample of the  Annual Survey of Manufacturers
which represents about 360,000 plants in the country.
The probability of selection is based on the plant size
in terms of total value of shipments. Response to the
survey is about 90 percent.   .

COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

Except for 1987, when no survey was conducted, data
have been collected annually since 1973.

GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

The sample is selected to represent the entire United
States.  Estimates  are  given also for  States  and
regions, but with less detail.

CONTACT:

Jesse Havard
Industry Division
Bureau of the Census
Washington,  DC  20233
Phone: (301)763-1755

 Gretchen Dickson
 Industry Division
 Bureau of the Census
 Washington, DC  20233
 Phone: (301) 763-1755
  GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                             PAGE 117

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 FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

 See Contact.

 PUBLICATIONS:

 Bureau of the Census. 1991. Manufacturers' Pollution
    Abatement Capital Expenditures and Operating
    Costs. Current Industrial Reports MA200(91)-1
    (and earlier reports in this series.) Bureau of the
    Census, Department of Commerce. Washington,
    DC.

 DATABASE(S):

 None available for public access.
PAGE 118
                                       GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

Defense  Environmental Restoration Program

T =
Data Type: Program
Information
Source: Program Contact
SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The Defense Environmental Restoration Program (DERP) was established in 1984 to promote and coordinate efforts
for the evaluation and cleanup of contamination at Department of Defense (DoD) installations.  The program
currently includes:

    (1)  The Installation Restoration Program (IRP), where potential contamination at DoD installations and formerly
        owned or used properties is  investigated and, as necessary, site cleanups are conducted; and

    (2)  Other Hazardous Waste (OHW) Operations, through which research, development, and  demonstration
        programs aimed at improving remediation technology and reducing DoD  waste generation rates are
        conducted.

The IRP conforms to the requirements of the National Oil Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP).
EPA guidelines are applied in conducting investigation and remediation work in the program. The initial stage, a
Preliminary Assessment, is an installation-wide study to determine if sites are present that may pose hazards to public
health or the  environment. The  next step, a Site Inspection, consists  of sampling and analysis to determine the
existence  of actual site contamination.    Contaminated  sites  are  investigated  fully  in   the  Remedial
Investigation/Feasibility Study. After agreement is reached with appropriate EPA and/or State regulatory authorities
on how to clean up the site, Remedial Design/Remedial Action work beings. During this phase, detailed design plans
for the cleanup are prepared and  implemented.

By the  end of FY 1991, a total of 17,660 sites at 1,877 installations were included in the IRP, and 90 DoD
installations were listed on or proposed for the NPL (National Priorities List).

By the end of FY 1991, 6,336 projects were underway at sites throughout the Nation.  The end point for IRP sites
is closeout - when no further actions are considered appropriate and no further response action is planned. At the
end of FY 1991, DoD components had identified 6,736 sites as closed out.

CONTACT:

For copies of the report contact:

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)
Phone:  (800) 553-6847 or (703)  487-4650
 1991 Annual Report Document # ADA 244196

PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

Each step in  the IRP process is thoroughly documented in reports available  to the general public.  Individuals  or
organizations can obtain copies of these documents by  contacting the Public Affairs Offices at the installations in
which they are interested.
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                            PAGE 119

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PUBLICATIONS:

U.S. Department of Defense. February 1992. Defense Environmental Restoration Program, Annual Report to
    Congress for Fiscal Year 1991. U.S. Department of Defense.

DATA BASES:

None provided.
PAGE 120
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY
Environmental Restoration Program

T =
Data Type: Program
Information
Source: Program Contact
OFFICE:

Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management
Office of Environmental Restoration

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The Office of Environmental Restoration is responsible for reducing and/or eliminating risks to human health and
safety and the environment posed by past Department of Energy (DOE) practices which have resulted in radioactive
waste, hazardous waste, and  mixed waste contamination at DOE facilities.  The goal of this program is the cleanup
of the current inventory of contaminated and legislatively authorized sites within 30 years (by the year 2019) in
accordance  with  the Department's policy of compliance with Federal, State, and local  health, safety and
environmental statutes.  The strategy of the environmental restoration program is to first clean up the highest risk
situations and then turn to the long-term contamination problems on a priority basis.

Program requirements are derived primarily from the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and
Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986, and
the Resource Conservation  and Recovery Act of  1976 (RCRA), as amended.   In addition, the Department's
remediation efforts are  conducted in full compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act.  The scopes,
schedules, and cleanup standards for these  activities are negotiated with the Environmental Protection Agency and
the States, and are the subject of RCRA permits, Consent Orders and Compliance Agreements, and CERCLA Federal
Facility Agreements.

CONTACT:

U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management
Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40)
Washington, DC  20585-0002
Phone: (202) 586-6331

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

January  1993. Environmental Restoration  and Waste Management Five-Year Plan for Fiscal Years 1994-1998.
    Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, U.S. Department of Energy. Washington, DC.

May 1992.  Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, U.S. Department of Energy. CERCLA
    Section 120(e)(5) Annual Report to Congress for Fiscal Year 1991. Office of Environmental Restoration and
    Waste Management, U.S. Department  of Energy. Washington. DC.

DATABASES (S):

None available for public access.
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
PAGE 121

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1 =
Data Type: Program
Information
Source: Program Contact
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR


National  Irrigation Water Quality Program

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The purpose of the National Irrigation Water Quality Program (NIWQP) is to determine from existing information
and reconnaissance investigations whether irrigation drainage has caused or has the potential to cause harmful effects
on human health, fish and wildlife, or reduce the utility of return flow from other uses. When problems are identified,
detailed studies are conducted to:  (1) determine the geographical extent and severity  of existing and  potential
irrigation-induced water quality problems; and (2) provide the scientific understanding for development of reasonable
alternatives to remediate problems.

In December 1985, a Department of the Interior (DOI) Interbureau Task Group developed the NIWQP management
strategy which created NIWQP and committed the program to addressing irrigation-induced contamination problems
in the following areas: (1) project irrigation or drainage facilities constructed or managed by DOI; (2) National
Wildlife Refuges that receive irrigation drainage water from DOI projects; and (3) other migratory bird or endangered
species management areas that receive water from Department-funded projects.

CONTACT:

For further information concerning NIWQP and reports contact:

Richard A. Engberg
Manager, National Irrigation WQ Program
U.S. Department of the Interior
1849 C Street, N.W.
MS 6640-MIB
Washington, DC 20240
Phone: (202) 208-4367
Fax: (202) 371-2815

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATION:

As of October 1992, the NIWQP has published reconnaissance investigation reports for 19 areas in 14 western States
and 4 interpretive or data reports for 3 areas.  A  list of publications is available from the Contact.

DATABASES):

All data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey are stored in the survey's WATSTORE system and  in EPA's
STORET  system.
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                                         GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

National Wild and  Scenic Rivers  System

OFFICE:                                            CONTACT:
                             vs.
                             Guide
                             Entry
DntnTjpe: Statislics
Source: U.S. Guide
National Park Service
Park Planning and Protection Division

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

This program is designed to collect data on wild, free-
flowing, scenic rivers  of the Nation which have
outstanding natural, recreational, or cultural values
and that provide  for public  enjoyment without
destroying those values.

DATA COVERAGE:

The basic statistics are:  number of rivers in National
Wild and Scenic Rivers System; river miles in the
system, including miles by agency administration and
classification (wild, scenic, and recreational); number
of rivers formally studied pursuant to congressional
direction; and number  of rivers and river mileage
potentially eligible for  designation as listed on the
Nationwide Rivers Inventory.

COLLECTION METHODS:

Inventory of designated and proposed wild and scenic
rivers.

COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

Data for the  Nationwide  Rivers  Inventory were
collected in the late 1970s and early 1980s. National
Wild and Scenic  River  designations are updated
biennially or as designations occur.

GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

Entire United States.
John Haubert
Outdoor Recreation Planner
National Park Service
P.O. Box 37127
Washington, DC 20013-7127
Phone: (202) 208-4290

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

For Nationwide Rivers Inventory contact:

Chris Brown
Outdoor Recreation Planner
National Park Service
P.O. Box 37127
Washington, DC 20013-7127
Phone: (202) 343-3765

PUBLICATIONS:

National Park Service. 1982. The Nationwide Rivers
    Inventory.   U.S.  Department of the  Interior.
    Washington, DC.

Olson, W.K. 1988.  Natural Rivers and the Public
    Trust. Washington, DC.

Watanabe,  A.  1988.   Two  Decades of River
    Protection: A Report on the National Wild and
    Scenic Rivers System. Washington, DC.

DATABASE(S):

River Mileage Classification for Components of the
National Wild and Scenic Rivers System.
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                         PAGE 123

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lands

OFFICE:

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Division of Realty
Branch of Operations

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

Two primary data series are compiled and reported to
the general public: the Annual Report of Lands Under
Control of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the
Migratory Bird Conservation Commission Annual
Report.

DATA COVERAGE:

The following data are collected:  unit number and
acreage, acquisition type,  and  location  of  FWS
properties, including National  Wildlife  Refuges,
Waterfowl  Production  Areas,   National  Fish
Hatcheries,  coordination  areas, and  administrative
sites.

COLLECTION METHODS:

Inventories of property are conducted for the Real
Property Management Information System.

COLLECTION FREQUENCY:

Updated annually since 1945.

GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE:

The contiguous United States, Alaska, Hawaii, and
associated governments and possessions.

CONTACT:

Olivia A. Short
Chief, Branch of Operations
Division of Realty
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Mailstop 622 ARLSQ
 1849 C Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20240
Phone:(703)358-1811
                            us.
                            Guide
                            Entry
Data Type: Statistics
Source: U.S. Guide
FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

Fish and Wildlife Service. 1990. Annual Report of
    Lands  Under Control  of the U.S.  Fish  and
    Wildlife Service as of September 30, 1990. U.S.
    Department of the Interior. Washington, DC.

--. 1990. Migratory Bird Conservation Commission:
    1990 Annual Report.  U.S. Department of the
    Interior. Washington, DC.

DATABASE(S):

Real Property Information  System (using Paradox
software).
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il
Dal:
Sou
Type: Program
Information
-ce: Program Contact
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR


Bureau of Land  Management Initiatives

OFFICE:

Bureau of Land Management

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

These programs are major BLM initiatives and have non-point source control benefits.

Recreation 2000

The principal goal of the BLM's recreation policy is to ensure the availability of public lands for a variety of outdoor
activities. Specific goals include the following: improve information and interpretive services to visitors; protect vital
recreation resources; publicize the BLM's recreation management and support programs; distribute information about
recreation opportunities through Federal, State, local and private partnerships; and expand public outreach initiatives.

The BLM contracted with a national computer recreation information service to distribute data to home computer
users and the travel industry. The system is scheduled to be expanded to give up-to-date information on recreation
events and volunteer opportunities.

The BLM continues to publish and broadcast in-house information through its bulletins, program notes, catalogs, and
videos.  The agency also sponsors interpretive training courses and workshops.

Fish and Wildlife 2000

This initiative seeks to improve the management of fish and wildlife habitat on all BLM-administered public lands.
Pertinent natural resource data, including that for water resources, is gathered to support this initiative.

An automated information system is being developed to track and analyze accomplishments which will enable the
BLM to prepare accomplishment reports in a more timely and efficient manner.

Riparian-Wetlands Initiative for  the 1990's

This initiative was developed as a blueprint to manage  and restore riparian-wetland ares covering 23.7 million acres
managed by the BLM. The initiative recognizes that riparian-wetland areas are biologically, economically, and
environmentally valuable and sets a series of goals and strategies to meet healthy conditions on the riparian-wetlands
managed by the BLM. The  initiative establishes four general goals: (1) restoration and maintenance, (2) protection
and expansion, (3) information and education, and (4) coordination and cooperation.

Forestry Program
Forest Management Support for Improving Water  Quality

The maintenance and improvement of water resources in association with the timber harvest program begins at
elevations far above the stream bed and continues down through the sale area and beyond in association with road
construction, use, and maintenance.  Disturbance of vegetation and  soil resources  is closely monitored and Best
Management Practices (BMPs) are used to maintain and enhance water quality.  Baseline watershed monitoring
programs are frequently being established to determine long range trends.  Due regard is given to improvements
necessary to conserve waters for the propagation of fish and aquatic life as well as other forms of wildlife.
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                             PAGE 125

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CONTACT:

Hydrologist
DOI/BLM
Washington Office (222)
18th and C Street, NW
Washington, DC 20240
Phone: (202) 653-9202
FAX:  (202) 653-9118

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

Bureau of Land Management.  1988. The Annual Report of Accomplishments for Fish and Wildlife 2000. U.S.
    Department of the Interior. Washington, DC.

Bureau of Land Management. September 1991. Meeting the Challenge in 1991, Recreation 2000, Fish and Wildlife
    2000, Riparian-Wetland Initiative for the 1990's. U.S. Department of the Interior. Washington, DC.

Bureau of Land Management.  Riparian-Wetland Initiative for  the 1990's. U.S.  Department of the Interior.
    Washington, DC.

DATABASES:

None provided.
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                                        GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

Construction Grants/State Revolving Fund Programs

1 =
Data Type: Program
Information
Source: Program Contact
OFFICE:

Office of Water
Office of Wastewater Enforcement and Compliance
Municipal Support Division
Program Management Branch

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The Construction Giants Program provided grant assistance to municipalities for the building of wastewater treatment
projects.  Construction Grants Program objectives were to ensure that the highest priority treatment facilities were
expeditiously constructed to achieve the maximum environmental benefit. EPA's State Revolving Loan Fund (SRF)
program replaced the Construction Grants Program. It is designed to give individual States the responsibility for
developing and operating their own programs, including providing financial assistance for POTW construction and
other eligible  activities.  Financial assistance  provided by SRFs can include  loans and various forms of credit
enhancements, but not grants. A key element of SRFs is their "revolving" nature-loan repayments to the fund are
used to provide assistance to  additional recipients.  The SRF program is a significant  step in restoring the
responsibility for financing wastewater treatment facilities to the States and Municipalities.  SRF assistance can be
used for a broader range of water quality management activities than construction grants assistance, such .as the
implementation of nonpoint source management programs and the development and implementation of comprehensive
conservation and management plans under the National Estuary Program.

Construction Grants Program data consists of administrative, financial, technical, and project status information pn
each construction grant funded by EPA. Construction grants data are analyzed to determine the number of projects
awarded; number of projects that have initiated operation; the number of projects closed out, and other appropriate
program information.

The  State Revolving Fund capitalization grant data consists of identification and financial information on
Capitalization Grants funded by EPA.  SRF project data consists of administrative, financial, technical, and limited
project status information on each SRF project. SRF capitalization grant and project data is analyzed to track progress
of the SRF program from a national perspective; to provide aggregate level information to identify patterns and
trends or to make comparisons among Regions or States which will serve to guide program judgements; to assist
in assessing the financial status and operation of the SRF program; and to provide information on the implementation
of the States' SRF progress  to assist in the Annual Review.

Grants Information and Control System (GICS) reports provide detailed information on the characteristics and status
of individual projects and can be used to compare, analyze, monitor, and evaluate information on a large number
of projects. GICS is used to generate lists, tables, and summary reports.

Data is entered directly into the Grants Information and Control System (GICS) by the Regions and States. National
data entry screens and instruction manuals are developed by EPA Headquarters Office of Water and Office of
Information Resources Management staff.  Program is monitored on a monthly basis through the use of GICS
national reports generated through the GICS database. There is also an annual  review process conduced  at the
regional office by the headquarters staff.               "   ,        "        •

Data is updated continuously in the GICS  system for Construction Grants Projects and twice a year for SRF
programs. The data covers the entire United States.
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CONTACT:

Jannie Latta, Chief
Systems Management Section (WH-547)
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
401 M Street, SW
Washington, DC  20460
Phone:(202)260-5831
FAX: (202)260-1827

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

Computer generated GICS national reports programmed in ADABAS in the Natural 2 environment are available.

Other publications published by EPA:

Construction Grants and State Revolving Fund GICS Users Guides.

SRF Instructional Manual.

State Revolving Fund Report to Congress-Financial Status and Operations of Water Pollution Control Funds. 1991.

Funding of Expanded Uses Activities by State Revolving Fund Programs-Examples and Program Recommendations.
     1990.

 GICS Reports Library for the Construction Grants and State Revolving Fund Programs.

 State Water Pollution Control Revolving Fund Management Manual.

 Construction Grants and SRF Data Element Dictionaries.

 DATABASES):

 Grants  Information and Control System (GICS)

 The system contains administrative, financial, technical, and project status information for the Construction Grants
 and State Revolving Fund Programs.  Access can be provided by the GICS ADABAS Administrator. Database
 resides on an IBM-3090 computer at the EPA National Computer Center.

 For GICS information contact:

 Connie Dwyer
 Office  of Information Resources Management (PM-218)
 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
 401 M Street, SW
 Washington, DC 20460
 Phone: (202) 260-5300
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Needs Survey

The Needs Survey is an automated inventory, maintained by the Office of Wastewater, Enforcement and Compliance
(OWEC), of all existing or proposed Publicly  Owned Treatment Works (POTWs) that need construction or
renovation to meet the requirements of the Clean Water Act.  The 1990 database contains over 27,000 records, each
of which includes over 230 data elements organized by  19 subject areas.  Among the information included is:
location and characteristics of POTWs, construction cost estimates and how they were documented, population served
by collection, and treatment, flow capacity, effluent characteristics, and treatment processes. All past Needs Survey
information is open to the public. Current Needs Survey information is only accessible to authorized EPA and State
users.

Contact:
Len Fitch
Office of Wastewater, Enforcement and Compliance
Municipal Support Division
Phone: (202) 260-5858
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

National Clean  Lakes Program

T =
Datatype: Program
Information
Source: Program Contact
OFFICE:

Office of Water
Office of Wetlands, Oceans and Watersheds

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The Clean Lakes Program, established under Section 314 of the Clean Water Act, is committed to supporting total
lake and watershed management from initial diagnosis through post-restoration monitoring. Continuing its grass-roots
orientation as the Federal partner in State lake restoration and protection programs, the Clean Lakes Program consists
of four phases: 1) State/Tribal Lake Water Quality Assessments must be performed biennially by States or Tribes
to attain or maintain eligibility for Clean Lakes Program funding. In submitting their 1990 Clean Water Act section
305(b) reports, States were to include the information required by section 314; 2) Diagnostic/Feasibility Studies
(phase I)  must be completed to determine the actual work that needs to be  accomplished in  phase  II;  3)
Restoration/Implementation Projects (phase II) put into effect the recommendations of the phase I studies; and 4)
Post-restoration Monitoring Studies (phase in) determine through monitoring the longevity, progress, and success
of the phase II project. Data coverage and collection frequency are specific to each project and include the entire
United States.

CONTACT:

Frank Lapensee
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Office of Water, Clean Lakes Program (WH-553)
401 M Street, SW
Washington, DC 20460
Phone: (202) 260-7105

 FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

 See Contact.

 PUBLICATIONS:

 U.S.  Environmental Protection  Agency,  1991.  Clean Lakes Demonstration Program:  1990 Annual Report to
     Congress. Draft. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Washington, DC.

 --. 1991.  Clean Lakes Program: 1991 Annual  Report (Distributed by Terrene Institute). U.S.  Environmental
     Protection Agency. Washington, DC.

 -. 1990. Lake and Reservoir Restoration Guidance Manual. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Washington,
     DC.

 -.  1990.  Monitoring Lake and Reservoir Restoration. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Washington, DC.

 -. 1989.  Clean Lakes Demonstration Program: 1989 Annual Report to Congress. U.S. Environmental Protection
     Agency. Washington, DC.
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DATABASE(S):

Clean Lakes Clearinghouse

    Description  of Services:   Collects, organizes, and  disseminates information  on lake issues:  restoration,
    management, and protection.  The database includes citations and abstracts of technical reports, conference
    papers, journal articles, and other publications, indexed by keywords, title, author, State/region, and date.  The
    database currently is maintained on the U.S EPA mainframe, with periodic downloads for use on computerized
    bulletin boards and user PCs. The Clearinghouse staff responds to inquires and provides printed bibliographies
    on lake topics.

    For more information, contact:

    Terrain Institute
    Phone: (800) 726-LAKE
    Fax:  (202)466-8554

Clean Lakes Grants Management System

    Provides extensive information on grants awarded under Section 314 of the CWA, including: type of grant
    (LWQA, Phase I, II, and III), basic financial information, description of the project and project goals.

    For more information, contact:

    Susan Ratcliffe
    Phone:  (202)260-5404
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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

National Effluent Guidelines Program

1 =
Datatype: Program
Information
Source: Program Contact
OFFICE:

Office of Water
Office of Science and Technology
Engineering and Analysis Division

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The major objective of this regulatory program is the development of national technology-based effluent regulations,
e.g., the national categorical effluent limitations guidelines and standards required under Sections 306,307, and 304
of the Clean Water Act. These limitations and standards are established by this program for industrial facilities
which discharge or may discharge directly into waterways of the United States, or which discharge or may discharge
into publicly owned treatment works. The national guidelines and standards specify the achievable effluent pollution
reduction attainable based upon performance or treatment  technologies actually employed within an industrial
category. Effluent guidelines have been promulgated for 51 categories. Twenty new or revised regulations will be
promulgated between 1993 and 2003.

Summary information is available of information collected by the Office of Science and Technology on an industry-
by-industry basis to support  development of technology-based effluent guidelines, as required by the Clean Water
Act.  Information collection  includes questionnaires  covering engineering and economic information on individual
plants.  The questionnaires  are supplemented by sampling  and analyses from wastewater discharge points, and
secondary engineering and economic information. Information collected includes: plant name and location, plant size
(by production and/or employment), wastewater characteristics, wastewater controls, treatment technologies, plant
age, types of products/services, water use, costs of wastewater treatment, and pollution prevention practices.

Information is collected on an as-needed basis to develop or revise effluent guidelines on an industry-specific basis.
Wastewater samples are collected by contractors. Although the basic information collected is generally similar across
studies, there is great variation of the particular parameters. Efforts are underway to standardize data definitions and
collection and analysis methods.  Most information is collected at one time only, although wastewater sampling for
some industries may include short-term series. Over the last 10 years, all sample and analysis information has been
managed by a sample control center, where the information is checked for accuracy and consistency. Questionnaires
are usually sent to a stratified sample of the population; for some industries a census may be conducted.

 CONTACT:

 Eric  Strassler
 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
 Office of Science and Technology
 Engineering and Analysis Division
 401 M Street, SW
 Washington, DC  20460
 Phone: (202) 260-7120

 FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

 See Contact.
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PUBLICATIONS:

None provided.                                              •   _    .   ..                   ,

DATABASE(S):

Effluent Guidelines Studies (EGS).  Databases vary from study to study.

    EGS are a collection of information collected by the Office of Science and Technology on an industry-by-
    industry basis to support development of technology-based effluent guidelines, as required by the Clean Water
    Act. These guidelines are designed to control discharges into waterways and publicly owned treatment works
    resulting from the industrial processes. Regulations are set for both direct and indirect 'dischargers based on
    available technology.

    See Contact above.
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

National  Marine and Estuarine  Programs

T =
Data Type: Program
Information
Source: Program Contact
OFFICE:

Office of Water
Office of Wetlands, Oceans and Watersheds
Oceans and Coastal Protection Division

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The Oceans and Coastal Protection Division (OCPP) implements EPA's program to protect the Nation's oceans and
coastal waters  OCPP carries out the following activities: establish and oversee regulatory and monitoring policies
for ocean disposal activities; support the development and implementation of comprehensive management plans for
estuaries of national importance; support the Great Lakes and Chesapeake Bay Programs; coordinate marine research
activities- provide a coordination  point for interagency and international ocean and coastal actions and issues, and
implement the Clean Water Act  (CWA) Section 301(h) and 403 programs related to the control of point source
discharges to marine waters.

Information is available on several programs, including OWOW's Ocean Dumping Program, the objective of which
is to minimize any impacts of ocean disposal through permitting, site designation, monitoring,  and enforcement
programs and actions; the Aquatic Debris program, the objective of which is to minimize the impact of floating
persistent debris on the marine environment; point source control activities, the  objective of which is to ensure
protection of the marine ecosystem through controls on point source discharges; Near Coastal Water program, the
objective of which is to prevent the further degradation of estuaries and other near coastal waters; and the National
Estuary Program, the purpose of which is to protect and restore the environmental quality of estuanne water through
 the development and implementation of local planning and demonstration programs.

 A wide variety of monitoring programs is conducted by EPA to determine whether the waste disposal is causing any
 unexpected adverse effects, and to assess other anthropogenic impacts on coastal biological communities.

 EPA has designed and conducted  programs for monitoring environmental conditions at disposal and discharging sites.
 EPA also operates an Ocean Survey Vessel, the Peter W. Anderson, for ocean monitoring and other field studies.

 Monitoring is being conducted and data are collected on an ongoing, year-round basis at load sites in all eight of
 EPA's Coastal  Regions.

 CONTACT:

 Kevin Perry
 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
 Office of Wetlands, Oceans and Watersheds
 Oceans and Coastal Protection Division
 401 M Street, SW
 Washington, DC 20460
 Phone: (202) 260-6833

 FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

  See Contact.
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PUBLICATIONS:

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. National Estuary Program Report. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
    Washington, DC.

-.  1992. Implementation of Section 403(c), Phase I (Point source discharges into the marine environment). U.S.
    Environmental Protection Agency. Washington, DC.

--.  1990. Harbor Studies Program: Final Data Report for the Study of Floatable Debris in U.S. Waters. U.S.
    Environmental Protection Agency. Washington, DC.

-.  1989. Marine and Estuarine Protection: Program and Activities.  U.S.  Environmental  Protection Agency.
    Washington, DC.

—.  1989. Near Coastal Waters Program: Restoring and Protecting the Nation's Coastal Areas.  U.S. Environmental
    Protection Agency. Washington, DC.

--.  1989. Ocean Disposal Monitoring Programs in Response to the Ocean Dumping Ban Act: Report to Congress.
    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Washington, DC.

-.  1990. Progress in the National Estuary Program, Report to Congress. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
    Washington, DC.

DATABASE(S):

Ocean Data Evaluation System (ODES):

EPA designed ODES in 1985 to support managers and analysts in meeting regulatory objectives of the Office of
Wetlands, Oceans and Watersheds. ODES contains over two million records from a wide range of EJPA programs
including the CWA 301(h) program, the Ocean Dumping Program, and the National Estuary Program (NEP).
Records  include  parametric  data  on   water quality,  oceanographic  description,   sediment  pollutants,
physical/chemical/biological characteristics, and permit conditions.

For more information on ODES contact:

Kevin Perry
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
WH-556F
401 M Street, SW
Washington, DC  20460
 Phone: (202) 260-6833
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
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T =
Data Type: Program
Information
Source: Program Contact
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY


National Nonpoint Source  Program

OFFICE:

Office of Water
Office of Wetlands, Oceans and Watersheds

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

In 1987, Congress enacted section 319 of the Clean Water Act, which established a national program to control
nonpoint sources of water  pollution.   EPA's Office of Water provides guidance  for the States to use in
developing/updating their nonpoint source assessments and management programs. EPA also provides guidance and
oversight to EPA Regions in  making annual section 319 grant awards to the States for the purpose of implementing
approved nonpoint source management programs. The Office of Water sponsors national conferences and workshops
and issues technical and programmatic guidance to assist States and localities in implementing effective nonpoint
source control and prevention activities.

Section 319 requires States to develop nonpoint source assessment reports describing their nonpoint source pollution
problems and to adopt nonpoint source management programs  to control pollution.   EPA issued guidance in
December  1987  that established the submission and approval process for .assessment reports and management
programs.  All States have approved assessment reports and approved management programs.

CONTACT:

Dov Weitman
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Office of Water
Nonpoint Source Program (WH-553)
401 M Street, SW
Washington, DC 20460
Phone: (202) 260-7085

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

Environmental Protection Agency. 1991. Managing Nonpoint Source Pollution. Nonpoint Source Program Report
    to Congress. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Washington, DC.

—. 1991. The National Clean Water Program; A Report. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Washington, DC.

—.  1991. Monitoring Guidelines -  Forest Streams in the  Pacific Northwest and  Alaska. Region 10. U.S.
    Environmental Protection Agency. Washington, DC.

—.  1990. Share the  Costs  - Share the Benefits: Agricultural  Nonpoint Source  Cost Share Programs. U.S.
    Environmental Protection Agency. Washington, DC.
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-. 1990. Livestock Grazing on  Western Riparian Areas.  Region 8. U.S. Environmental Protection  Agency.
    Washington, DC.

-. 1990. Urban  Targeting and Best Management Practice Selection. Region 5.  U.S. Environmental Protection
    Agency. Washington, DC.

--. 1989. Selecting Priority Nonpoint Source Projects: You Better Shop Around. U.S. Environmental Protection
    Agency. Washington, DC.

--. 1988. Creating Successful Nonpoint Source Programs: The Innovative Touch. U.S. Environmental Protection
    Agency. Washington, DC.                                                                           •

DATABASE(S):

Nonpoint Source Bulletin Board System.

    This system provides an active national center for the exchange of information and environmental education
    concerning the nature of nonpoint  source (NPS) pollution, NPS management techniques and methods, and
    institutional  arrangements  for the  planning and implementation of NPS management, including  financial
    arrangements.  The system is used to obtain timely and relevant NPS information by Federal, State and local
    agencies; private organizations;  businesses;  and individuals. It also is used to exchange  computer text and
    program files and as an information resource and forum for open discussions:  Several "mini-bulletin boards"
    allow parties with specialized interests to share information. The Clean Lakes Clearinghouse and NPS News-
    Notes database also are available on-line.

    Contacts: Hal Wise or Elaine Bloom - (202).260-3665.

Nonpoint Source Grants Reporting and Tracking System

    This system provides information on all grants awarded under Section 319 of the CWA, including basic financial
    information  and descriptive information on how States plan to expend funds by NPS category.

    For more information, contact:

    Don Kunkowski
    Phone: (202) 260-7103
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

National Public Water Supply Supervision  Program

T1 z=:
Data Type; Program
Information
Source: Program Contact
OFFICE:

Office of Water
Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water (OGWDW) is responsible for the implementation of the Public
Water Supply Supervision (PWSS) program established under the auspices of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA)
of 1974, Public Law 93-523. Two of OGWDW's major responsibilities under the Act are to set national standards
for drinking water quality and to ensure that States that have assumed primary enforcement responsibility (primacy)
are complying  with these standards.  The program publishes a Yearly Compliance Report and data on violation of
maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) and enforcement actions.  Contaminants that exceed the MCL are reported
as violations of the SDWA. Data is collected and reported quarterly. Individual States collect the data, which covers
all States, territories, and Indian lands.

CONTACT:

Abe Seigel
Senior Systems Analyst
Data Management Section (WH-550E)
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
401 M Street, SW
Washington, DC  20460
Phone: (202) 260-2804
FAX: (202) 260-3464

FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

See Contact.

PUBLICATIONS:

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.  1991. Drinking Water Publications List. Includes information on available
   Regulatory Impact Analyses (RIA), Health Advisories  and Drinking Water Criteria are available for various
   pollutants, as well as the following:

—. 1984. National Statistical Assessment of Rural Water Conditions. Volumes I-IV. U.S. Environmental Protection
   Agency. Washington, DC.

--. 1990. National Survey of Pesticides in Drinking Water. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Washington, DC.
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DATABASE(S):

Federal Reporting Data System (FRDS)

    Information on public water supply systems inventory, violations of the MCL and enforcement actions for public
    water systems. User aids include: FRDS Interactive Users Guide, FRDS Data Entry Instructions,-FRDS Data
    Entry Package, FRDS Data Element Dictionary.

    For more information, contact:

    Abe Seigel
    Phone: (202) 260-2804

Hazardous Waste Injection Well Database

    Automated inventory of Class I - Hazardous Waste injection wells as defined in the Safe Drinking Water Act.
    The system stores information  that was obtained during a special study to collect information for the 1985
    Report to Congress on Injection of Hazardous Waste.  Information in  the system includes: facility or well
    owner/operator, identification and well class codes, chemical information  concerning  the injectate, well
    construction information, hydrogeological information about the area where injection occurs, waste information,
    and RCRA codes and volumes.  The database is maintained on a PC and is not directly accessible. Users can
    obtain information from the national manager in disk and report form.

    For more information, contact:
    Mario Salazar
    Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water
    Ground Water Protection Division
    Phone:  (202)260-5530

 Summary of State/Federal Drinking Water Standards and Guidelines
                                                                      j
    This system contains the results of the 1989 survey of State and Federal drinking water standards and guidelines
    as of January 1, 1989, conducted by the Federal/State  Toxicology and Regulatory Alliance Committee
    (FSTRAC). The database contains information on existing and planned standards, descriptions of State drinking
    water programs, and State recommendations on contaminants for which there should be future Federal standard
    development.

    For more information,  contact:

     Bruce Mintz
     Phone:  (202)260-9569
  GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
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 ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

 National  Water  Quality  Standards,  Water  Quality
 Criteria,  and   Total  Maximum   Daily  Load  (TMDL)
 Programs
T =
Data Types Program
Information
Source: Program Contact
 OFFICE:

 Office of Water
 Office of Science and Technology; and Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds

 SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

 Standards: Section 303 of the Clean Water Act authorizes the water quality standards program. In establishing water
 quality standards, States define the water quality goals for their water by designating uses for the water bodies and
 adopting water quality criteria to protect the designated uses. Standards are set taking into consideration the use and
 value of the water body for public water supply, propagation of fish, shellfish and wildlife and for recreational,
 agricultural, industrial, and navigational purposes.  Water quality standards also contain an antidegradation policy
 that, at a minimum, ensures the maintenance and protection of existing uses and water quality necessary to protect
 those uses, provides for the protection of high quality waters,  and maintains water quality in waters  that are
 outstanding natural resources.  By establishing the goals for a  water body, water quality standards provide the
 regulatory and legal basis for point source and non-point source water quality-based controls beyond those required
 by the uniform minimal technological requirements of the CWA.  Water quality standards are enforced through the
 National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits for point source discharges and through non-point
 source control programs.

 Criteria: Under the authority of the CWA section 304(a), EPA has developed methodologies and specific criteria to
 protect aquatic life and human health. EPA criteria are guidance to be used in the adoption of formal water quality
 standards. The EPA criteria methodologies are intended to provide protection for all surface water on a national basis.
 The methodologies have been subject to public review, as have the additional criteria documents.  Additionally, the
 methodologies have been reviewed by EPA's Science Advisory Board.

 An aquatic  life  criterion derived using EPA's Section 304(a) method represents  an estimate  of the highest
 concentration, of a pollutant in water that does not present a significant risk to aquatic organisms, per se, or to their
 use. The combination of a criteria maximum  concentration  (CMC), a one-hour average acute limit, a criteria
 continuous concentration (CCC), and a 4-day average concentration chronic limit, provides protection from acute and
 chronic toxicity to animals and plants, and from bioconcentration  by aquatic organisms, without being as restrictive
 as a one-number criterion would have to be. EPA's section 304(a) criteria for human health are based on two types
 Of biological endpoints: 1) carcinogenicity, and 2) systemic toxicity (i.e., all other adverse effects other than cancer).
        A TMDL is a tool for implementing State water quality standards and is based on the relationship between
pollution sources and in-stream water quality conditions. The TMDL establishes the allowable chemical loadings
and pollution reductions necessary to attain water quality standards for a water body. It thereby provides the basis
for States to establish  water quality-based controls in discharge permits and implement other pollution control
measures.

Section 303(d) of the CWA established the TMDL process to provide for more stringent water quality-based controls
when technology based controls are inadequate to achieve State water quality standards.  The TMDL process can
broaden the opportunity for public participation, expedite water quality-based NPDES permitting,  and  lead to
technically sound and legally defensible decisions for attaining and maintaining water quality standards.
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Like water quality standards, TMDLs are established by the State, with EPA having responsibility if a State fails
to act.

States have data for activities within their borders. The Program covers the entire United States and territories.

CONTACT:
Standards: David K. Sabock, Chief
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Water Quality Standards Branch
Office of Science and Technology
401 M Street, SW
Washington, DC 20460
Phone: (202) 260-1315

Criteria: Robert April, Chief
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Office of Water
Health and Ecological Criteria Division
Office of Science and Technology
401 M Street, SW
Washington,  DC 20460
Phone: (202) 260-5389
TMDL Program: Bruce Newton, Chief
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Watershed Branch
Assessment and Watershed Protection Division
Office of Wetlands, Oceans and Watersheds
401 M Street, SW
Washington, DC 20460
Phone: (202) 260-7074

TMDL Modeling: Russel Kinerson, Chief
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Watershed Branch
Assessment and Watershed Protection Division
Office of Wetlands, Oceans acid Watersheds
401 M Street, SW
Washington, DC 20460
Phone: (202) 260-1330
 FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

 See Contact.

 PUBLICATIONS:

 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 1991. Technical Support Document for Water Quality-Based Toxics Control.
     U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Washington, DC.

 --. 1991. Guidance for Water Quality-Based Decisions: The TMDL Process. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
     Washington, DC.

 --.  1990. Reference Guide to Water Quality Standards for Indian Tribes. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
     Washington, DC.                                           ,

 --. September 1988. Introduction to Water Quality Standards. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Washington,
     DC.

 --. 1988. Water Quality Standards Criteria Summaries: A Compilation of State/Federal Criteria. U.S. Environmental
     Protection Agency. Washington, DC.

 --.  1988. Guidance for State Implementation of Water Quality Standards for CWA Section 303(c)(2)(B). U.S.
     Environmental Protection Agency. Washington, DC.                                                   ,

 --.  1988. State Water Quality Standards Summaries. U.S.  Environmental Protection Agency. Washington, DC.
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                              PAGE 141

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-.   1986. Quality Criteria for Water. (Also called the "Gold Book").  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
    Washington, DC.

--.  1983. Water Quality Standards Handbook. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Washington, DC.

DATABASE^):

Technical Guidance Document Database

    This database is an automated inventory of the technical guidance documents which are presently distributed
    by the Exposure Assessment Branch through the OST/OGWDW Resource Center.  This database is in dBase
    in format with 8 fields  of information.  It  currently is distributed  in xeroxed form and  is expected  to be
    accessible through the TMDL special interest group (SIG) for the NFS Bulletin Board System (NPS/BBS) by
    January 1993.

Watershed Model Database

    This database serves to highlight the  many  tools and applications used in the development of TMDLs.  It
    includes over 20 water quality models, interfaces and subroutines. The database is compiled in dBase HI format
    with 15 fields of information.  It serves as a quick guide for determining the application of each model as it
    pertains to a particular watershed or ecosystem.  It currently is distributed in xeroxed form and is expected to
    be accessible through the TMDL special interest group (SIG) for the NPS Bulletin Board System (NPS/BBS)
    by January 1993.
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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

National  Wetlands Program
1 =
Data Type: Program
Information
Source Program Contact
OFFICE:

Office of Water                                                                          ..-..,:
Office of Wetlands, Oceans and Watersheds
Wetlands Division

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The Environmental Protection Agency protects wetlands through a variety of regulatory and nonregulatory tools.
The cornerstone of these efforts is the section 404 program of the Clean Water Act, which EPA jointly administers
with the Army Corps of Engineers.  EPA has primary roles in the development of the environmental guidelines by
which permit applications must be evaluated; review of proposed permits; prohibition of discharges with unacceptable
adverse impacts; approval and oversight of State assumption of the program; establishment of jurisdiction^ scope
of waters of the United States; and interpretation of section 404 exemptions.  Enforcement authority is shared
between  EPA and the Corps.                                                     .      .-..•-.-

EPA also pursues a variety of nonregulatory activities to take advantage of other opportunities to protect wetlands.
These efforts  include  influencing  Federal  agency  policies  and  programs;  information  and  educational
materials/curricula; promoting and influencing international activities; integrating consideration of wetlands into EPA
programs and developing strategies; and improving the scientific information base.  Some specifics under these
programs include: floodplain management, wetlands management on public lands, agricultural policy, multiobjective
river corridor management, section 401 certification, State assumption of section 404, international coordination,
 Superfund and nonpoint source coordination, stormwater management, coastal zone management, and water quality
 standards development.

 CONTACT:

 Wetlands and Aquatic Resources Regulatory Branch (A-104F)
 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
 401 M Street, SW
 Washington, DC 20460
 Phone: (202) 260-1799

 Wetlands Strategies and State Programs Branch (A-104F)
 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
 401  M Street, SW
 Washington, DC 20460
 Phone: (202) 260-9043

 FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

 See Contact.
  GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
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  PUBLICATIONS:

  Office of Water, Wetlands Division. July 1990. Beyond the Estuary: The Importance of Upstream Wetlands in
     Estuarine Processes. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Washington, DC.

  Office of Water.  February 1988.  America's Wetlands: Our Vital Link Between Land and Water.   U.S.
     Environmental Protection Agency. Washington, DC.

  Office of Water.  July  1990.  Water Quality Standards for Wetlands (National Guidance). U.S. Environmental
     Protection Agency.  Washington, DC.

  Office of Water. April 1989. Wetlands and 401 Certification: Opportunities and Guidelines for States and Eligible
     Indian Tribes. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Washington, DC.

  Office of Water. Federal Manual for Identifying and Delineating Jurisdictional Wetlands.  U.S. Environmental
     Protection Agency.  Washington, DC.

 DATABASES):

 None provided.
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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

Office  of  Wastewater Enforcement and Compliance
Permits Program

T =
Data Type: Program
Information
Source: Program Contact
OFFICE:

Office of Water
Office of Wastewater Enforcement and Compliance

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The Office of Wastewater Enforcement and Compliance at EPA is responsible for administering the programs aimed
at reducing and eliminating pollution to the Nation's water from point sources.  This is accomplished through
implementation of the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit, pretreatment and sludge
programs, and aggressive enforcement of these program requirements. The States have joined with the Federal
government to implement these control programs.

Each discrete source of wastewater (known as "point source") must obtain a NPDES permit which regulates the
facility's discharge of pollutants into waters of the United States. This approach  to control and eliminate water
pollution is focused on the pollutant source determined to be harmful to receiving waters.

Responding  to the problem of polluted storm water runoff,  Congress amended  the Clean Water Act in 1987
establishing  specific schedules for EPA to develop controls for storm water  discharges associated with industrial
activity and discharges from municipal separate storm sewer systems as part of the NPDES program. This covers
over 100,000 industrial facilities and municipal separate storm sewers located in 173  cities and 47 counties identified
by EPA. A more complete definition of these terms is located in 40 CFR Part 122.  Storm water discharge permits
will provide a mechanism for monitoring the discharge of pollutants to waters of the United States  and for
establishing source controls where necessary.

The National Pretreatment Program, a cooperative effort of Federal, State, and local officials is implementing the
practice of "pretreatment," removing or eliminating pollutants  from industrial wastewater before discharging them
into the municipal sewage treatment system, on a nationwide basis. By reducing the level of pollutants discharged
by industry into municipal sewage systems, the program ensures that industrial development vital to the well-being
of a community will be compatible with a healthy environment.

The Nation's success in treating its wastewater has given rise to another challenge-proper management and disposal
 of sludges (the solids that are removed from wastewater during treatment) which may contain concentrations of toxic
 and nonconventional pollutants.  EPA's primary responsibility is to develop and enforce the technical standards and
 oversee State programs.  In 1987, Congress amended Section 405 of the CWA to emphasize EPA's role in sludge
 management.  The new provisions made it clear that NPDES permits  (or other permits affording equivalent
regulation) are to  be used to regulate the use and  disposal  of  sewage sludge to protect public health and the
 environment and to promote beneficial use of sludge.

 The ultimate goal of the water enforcement program is to improve environmental quality through compliance with
 environmental laws. More specifically, EPA's water enforcement program is designed to accomplish four major
 objectives: identify instances of noncompliance, return the violator to compliance; recover any economic advantage
 obtained by the violator's noncompliance; and deter other regulated facilities from noncompliance.

 The permittees report self-monitored data on a Discharge Monitoring Report (DMR) and submit it to either the
 appropriate State agency or EPA regional office. The data covers point sources discharging to waters of the U.S.
 in all States, territories and Indian lands.
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 CONTACT:

 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
 Office of Water
 Office of Wastewater Enforcement and Compliance (WH-540)
 401 M Street, SW
 Washington, DC  20460

 FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

 See Contact.

 PUBLICATIONS:

 Office of Wastewater Enforcement and Compliance. 1992.  Storm Water Overview. U.S. Environmental Protection
     Agency. Washington, DC.

 -.  1991. Guidance Manual for the Preparation of NPDES Permit Applications for Storm Water Discharges
     Associated with Industrial Activity. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Washington, DC.

 --.  1991. Technical Support Document for Water Quality-Based Toxics Control.  U.S. Environmental Protection
     Agency. Washington, DC.

 --. 1991. National Pretreatment Program Report to Congress. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Washington
     DC.

 -. July 1986. Environmental Regulations and Technology.  The National Pretreatment Program (available through
     NTIS) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Washington, DC.

 DATABASES):

 Permit Compliance System (PCS)

     PCS is a computerized management information system which contains data on the NPDES permit-holding
     facilities. PCS keeps extensive records on more than 65,000 active water-discharge permits nationwide.  There
     are 13 types of data within PCS: permit facility, permit event, compliance schedule  violation, outfall schedule,
     permit limits, discharge monitoring reports, inspection, single event violation, enforcement action, pretreatment
     compliance inspection/audit, pretreatment performance summary, and evidentiary hearing. Each permit record
     contains many types of information including that which identifies and describes the facility to which the permit
     has been granted, specifies the pollutant discharge limits  for that facility, records the actual amounts of pollutants
     measured in the facility waste water discharges, and tracks the facility's compliance schedule and violations.

    Two levels of edit checking are used.  The first level  verifies the completeness and validity of data in each
     transaction. Required fields are checked for values, numeric fields are checked to ensure that the value entered
    was numeric;  and code fields are checked against valid PCS values.  The second level verifies the transaction's
    relationship to existing data for that facility (for example, an outfall schedule cannot be added  unless the facility
    record exists).

    The system resides on ADABAS NATURAL software and there are no retrieval access restrictions for EPA and
    state water organizations.   Available user documentation includes  the  following: Inquiry  User's Guide,
    Generalized Retrieval User's Guide, Data Entry, Edit and Update User's Guide, Data Element Dictionary, PCS-
    PAL User's Guide, and Guide to National Computing Center Services.

    For more information contact:
    PCS  User's Support Line (202) 260-8529 (CML) 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. (EST) Monday-Friday
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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

Wellhead  Protection Program/Comprehensive State
Ground Water Protection Program (CSGWPP)
T =
Data Type: Program
Ihfonnation
Source: Program Contact
OFFICE:

Office of Water
Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water
Ground Water Protection Division

SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:

The Ground Water Protection Division has responsibility for Federal administration and oversight of the Wellhead
Protection Program and currently is providing support for EPA's implementation of the Agency's new Ground Water
Protection Strategy for the  1990s. GWPD is assisting EPA and the States in defining Comprehensive State Ground
Water Protection Programs, the Strategy's key approach to protecting the Nation's ground water.

Authorized by the 1986 amendments to the  Safe Drinking Water Act, the Wellhead Protection  Program was
established to protect supplies of ground water used as public drinking water from contamination. The program is
based on the concept that development and application of land-use controls and other preventive measures can protect
ground water. States develop and implement Wellhead Protection Programs and submit program plans for EPA
approval.

EPA's new Ground Water Protection Strategy, released in 1991, established CSGWPPs as the Agency's overall
approach to adequately protect ground water from contamination.  EPA is working with  the States to define the
program. States will have the primary role in designing and implementing CSGWPPs in accordance with distinctive
local needs and conditions.

 CONTACT:

 Safe Drinking Water Act Hotline (800) 426-4791

 FOR PUBLIC INQUIRIES:

 See Contact.

 PUBLICATIONS:

 Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water. 1991. Protecting the Nation's Ground-Water: EPA's Strategy for the
     1990s. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Washington, DC.

 --.  1989. Wellhead Protection Program: Tools for Local Governments. U.S.  Environmental Protection Agency.
     Washington, DC.                                                                :

 DATABASE(S):

 There is no national ground water database. Some States place ground water data in STORET.
  GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                       PAGE 147

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                                    GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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                                  APPENDICES









   These  appendices  reference selected  Federal  sources  of information on water quality




conditions and programs not discussed in the previous sections of the Guide.








       Appendix A - Individual Water Quality Studies




       Appendix B - Analytical Tools



       Appendix C - Clearinghouses, Data Centers, and Directories
 GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
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             A.  Individual Water Quality Studies
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY AND U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

1982 National Fisheries Survey

The National Fisheries Survey was an assessment of the biological condition of the Nation's waters conducted jointly
by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). Sport fish
species, Federally-designated threatened and endangered fish species, and State-designated fish species of special
concern were used as indicators of biological status. For the purposes of this survey, the Nation's waters were
defined as all flowing waters in the contiguous 48 United States, including main stem impoundments but excluding
the Great Lakes, estuaries, coastal waters, and wetland areas. The survey was based on a statistically selected sample
of 1,303 river segments from across the Nation using a questionnaire developed  by the EPA, FWS, and their
contractors.  The respondents were State fish management experts with an average of nine years of experience in
the selected cataloging units or watersheds.  An assessment of the fisheries information collected shows that 40
percent of the reaches had been quantitatively or qualitatively sampled. Sampling occurred in surrounding cataloging
units for an additional 33 percent of the reaches. Twelve hundred and eighty-five questionnaires, 98.5 percent of
the total distributed, were completed and returned to the survey project team.  The  survey design, the probability
structure used to select the sample reaches, the experience level of the  respondents, and the high response rate
combine to provide reliable estimates of the  status of the Nation's waters, accurate appraisals of their ability to
support fish communities, and informed judgements  on limiting factors affecting those fish communities.

CONTACT:

Assessment and Watershed Protection Division
Office of Water
U.S.  Environmental Protection Agency
401 M Street, SW
Washington, DC 20460

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

Environmental Investments:  The Cost of A Clean Environment

This report to Congress is in response to Section 312(a) of the Clean Air Act and Section 516(b) of the Clean Water
Act.  Unlike previous such reports, however, it goes beyond the requirements of these sections, by presenting a
broader picture of environmental pollution control expenditures reflecting the Environmental Protection Agency's
broad mandate. In general, this report presents data on environmental pollution control costs during the period 1972
to 1987, projects these costs for each subsequent year to the year 2000 under a number of assumptions, and breaks
them down in a variety of ways.  These ways include differentiating among capital, operating, and annualized costs,
as well as the medium where the pollution is controlled, the sector (e.g., public, private) from which the control is
funded, new versus existing regulations, whether the control is primarily a result of a Federal mandate or the result
of local initiative, and to the extent permitted by the data, by pollutant controlled.

CONTACT:

Alan Carlin
Economic Analysis and Innovations Division
Office of Policy Analysis
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
401 M Street, SW
Washington, DC 20460
Phone: (202) 260-5499
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY


Environmental Monitoring Methods  Index

The Environmental Modeling Methods Index system (EMMI) is an automated inventory of information on
environmentally significant analyses monitored by EPA and methods for their analysis. The EMMI database includes
information on more than 2,600 analyses from over 80 regulatory and non-regulatory lists and more than 900
analytical methods.  EMM includes analyses from the Clean Water Act, Comprehensive Environmental Response,
Compensation, and Liability Act, Superfund Amendments Reauthorization Act, Resource Conservation and Recovery
Act, Safe Drinking Water Act, and the Clean Air Act, as well as from analyses from other Agency and State lists.
The database provides a comprehensive cross-reference between analyses and analytical methods, and contains
information on related laws and organizations and additional databases for further information.

CONTACT:

EMMI User Support
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Sample Control Center
P.O. Box 1407
Alexandria, VA 22313
FAX: (703) 684-0610


ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY


National  Pesticide Survey

The National Pesticide Survey was a one-time survey to determine the national occurrence of pesticides and nitrates
in domestic (private) and public community water supply wells currently used for drinking water, and assess the
relationships between patterns of contamination and aquifer vulnerability and agricultural activity such as pesticide
use.

Data were collected on the occurrence of 126 pesticides and nitrates in water supply wells. In  order to assess the
relationship between patterns of contamination and aquifer vulnerability and agricultural activity, the following data
were collected at each level: hydro-geologic vulnerability; well construction; pesticide use patterns; and other sources
and causes for contamination.

Stratified random sampling, involving 3 ground water vulnerability strata and 4 "pesticide use" strata, was used.
Community water supplies using ground water were randomly chosen from the  Federal  Reporting Data System
database. Domestic water supplies were chosen randomly from counties that met strata criteria.

CONTACT:

Jeanne Briskin, Director
National Pesticide Survey
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (WH-550)
401 M. Street, SW                                                            '.
Washington, DC 20460
Phone: (202) 260-5508

Safe Drinking Water Hotline
Phone:  1-800-426-4791
In Washington, DC Phone: (202) 260-5533
 PAGE 154
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 ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY


 National Study of Chemical Residues in Fish

 The report for EPA's National Study of Chemical Residues in Fish was prepared by the Office of Science and
 Technology, Standards and Applied Science Division. The Study was a one-tune screening investigation to determine
 the prevalence, concentration, and sources of selected bioaccumulative pollutants in fish, which may not be detected
 in routine water monitoring.  In addition, estimates were made of human health risks for those pollutants studied for
 which cancer potency factors and/or reference doses have been established. Initiated in 1986, this study contains
 analysis for 60 pollutants including PCBs, dioxins, furans, pesticides/herbicides, mercury, biphenyl, and other organic
 compounds.  The sites sampled included 314  "targeted" sites  thought to be contaminated by various point and
 nonpoint pollutant sources. Targeted sites included pulp and paper mills (using chlorine and non-chlorine bleaching
 processes, wood preserving operations, certain refineries, Superfund sites, publicly-owned treatment works (POTWs),
 sites near industrial complexes, and sites that could be contaminated by runoff from urban or agricultural areas.
 Other sites included 35 background locations and 39 United States Geological Survey National  Stream Quality
 Accounting Network (NASQAN) sites.  To obtain a copy of the report, interested parties  should submit a written
 request to: Office of Water Resources Center (RC-4100), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 401 M Street, SW,
 Washington, DC 20460.  Phone:   (202) 260-7786. Please provide your name, mailing address, and the EPA
 document numbers, EPA-823-R-92-008A (Volume 1) and EPA-823-R-92-008B (Volume 2).

 CONTACT:

 Richard Healy  (WH-585)
 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
 Standards  and Applied Science Division
 401 M Street, SW
 Washington, DC 20460
 Phone:  (202)260-7812

 ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

 National  Urban Runoff Program

The National Urban Runoff Program (NURP) investigates the nature of urban nonpoint source pollution and
preventive measures that might reduce impacts on water quality. The program consists of 28  component studies
carried out in the early 1980s. Each study focused on an urban runoff problem for which one or more approaches
could be evaluated. Data on water quality and quantity were collected for 19 cities. There are 2,000 site-events at
70 sites. All land uses except heavy industrial were monitored. The complete data set  has  over three million
observations. Fixed-site data include catchment area, land use, drainage type and coverage, soil moisture data, and
USGS quad map name. Water quality data include rainfall/runoff,  solids loading, oxygen demand, pH, nutrients,
metals, and priority pollutants.  Management data include surface loading data, particle size distribution, nutrient
loads, priority pollutants, and load removed by management practice. Basin maps showing location,  land use,
topography, drainage also are available.  Data were collected hourly during storm events for 19 cities nationwide.
Summary reports are available for these  19 cities.

CONTACT:

Illinois State Water Survey
Environmental Protection Agency
2204 Griffith Drive
Champaign, EL 61820
Phone: (217) 333-9544
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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


Nitrate Occurrence in U.S. Waters

Development of this reference summary of published information on nitrate occurrence in U.S. waters and related
questions was undertaken in 1990 by the USDA Working Group on Water Quality. The summary is intended to
provide the USDA a broad perspective on the proportions of the problem of ground and surface water and estuary
contamination associated with nitrate from agricultural sources. This summary largely is based on the published data,
analyses, and reports available in the U.S. literature.  The information from these diverse sources is not strictly
additive due to differences in methodology and study designs. Nor does it fully reflect the dimensions of the
problem of nitrate contamination in U.S. waters. Nevertheless, the amount of quantitative information available is
substantial and reflects what is known of the distribution and levels of  nitrate contamination and the factors
influencing its occurrence in U.S. waters and water wells.

The formal assessment of water quality conditions is primarily the role of USGS and EPA at the Federal level and
primarily of the States at the local level.  However, the USDA  uses the information from such assessments along
with its own research to establish the dimension of the problem  and to shape the direction of programs and project
priorities.

CONTACT:

Office of Budget and Program Analysis
Office of the Secretary
US Department of Agriculture
Washington, DC  20250
 FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION

 Pollutant Loadings and Impacts From Highway Stormwater Runoff

 The primary purpose of this investigation was to develop a probabalistic procedure to estimate pollutant loadings
 from highway Stormwater runoff. Based on this procedure, the study also developed methods to determine whether
 receiving water sites for highway runoff  water are adversely impacted, the significance of these impacts, and
 guidance to deal with the impacts. The procedure is available in both a practical workbook format and an interactive
 user interface system available on personal computer software.

 CONTACT:

 Fred G. Bank, Ecologist
 Federal Highway Administration
 Environmental Quality Branch, (HEP-42)
 400 Seventh Street, SW
 Washington, DC 20590
 Phone:  (202)366-5004
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                                        GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION

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                          B. Analytical Tools
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
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  ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

  Environmental  Display Manager


  The Environmental Display Manager (EDM) is a development system on an IBM 3090 mainframe at the U S EPA
  National Computer Center in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.  EDM provides mapping, display, analysis
  support and information management capabilities to workstations located across the United States, and is connected
  to bPA through Federal, State, academic, and private communications networks. Through interactive software EDM
  can support analyses quickly, create maps and graphics, and generate reports that integrate millions of pieces of
  environmental data.  The concept of EDM is to provide easy access to environmental information,  to provide
  automated environmental analyses and reports, and then to provide data, graphics, images, text, and documents that
  can be used by numerous output devices, software packages, and computers.  EDM is described in more detail in
  W.B. Samuels, et al., Water Resources Bulletin, Vol.  27, Number 6, 1991.

  CONTACT:

  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
  Office of Wetlands, Oceans and Watersheds
  Assessment and Watershed Protection Division
  401 M Street, SW
  Washington, DC  20460
  Phone: (202) 260-7046

  MULTIPLE AGENCY


  Geographic Information Systems (GIS)  Program

 EPA GIS Program

 ^0gltaPniC If ?T? ^ SyStT iS a SedeS °f software/hard™ "tools" combining multiple map layers or themes,
 with spatially related data or attnbutes, to produce a variety of cause and effect scenarios for improved environmental
 deveTnn^nt1116"  ?  h ^^ ** .^^^ at & raPid rate in Fede^ Agencies, aided by recent  technical
 developments, e.g., high powered yet inexpensive work stations with CD-ROM.

 EPA's GIS Program was established by the Office of Information Resources Management (OIRM), to provide the
 Agency with advanced computer capabilities to analyze complex environmental  issues in a common geographic
 framework. The most important  components of EPA's GIS program are the environmental analysts and  managers
 who operate and support the technology. The National GIS Program is comprised of multidisciplinary teams within
 UFA s regions and laboratories and is coordinated by OIRM's Program  Systems Division.
 r/T     fv ™      Summarized in Wamecke, L., et al., State Geographic Information Activities
 Compendium, Lexington, KY: The Council of State Governments.  1992.

 CONTACT:

 Thomas Dewald
 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (3405 R)
 401 M Street, SW
 Washington, DC 20460
 Phone: (703) 557-3083
 FAX: (703) 557-3186
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                rmatoa sysem      is a computer system designed to allow users to collect, manage and analyse
             of spatially referenced data. The use of GIS technology has revolutionary implications for the way
                                  h and presents the results. As the Nation's primary producer of cartographic,
                         gWQgcal data, ifae Geological Survey is using advanced GIS technologies to improve
SX aSy to perform Lditional missions of earth science data collection, research, and information delivery.

The Geological Survey and other bureaus and offices of the Department of the Interior have created a number of

wSwto**^**«bei<*usedin*e0graphiCinf0rmatrSyStT TATl^'^dT' d Cover1 Mapping
             Data Base, the Federal Mineral Land Information System, the Land Use and Land Cover Mapping
             NaSmal Coal Resources Data System, the National Uranium Resources Evaluation System, the Rock
          torage System, and the National Water Data System. The Geological Survey is increasingly ^ W> £
           a central repository as well as the Federal authority on information regarding such critical_i sues as  he
                and mineral potential, the assessment of risks from natural hazards, and questions of the quantity
                   s^plies.  Because" GIS technology allows scientists to process and interrelate many more: kinds
                 previously feasible. GIS applications research can provide new scientific understanding of these

 issues.

 CONTACT:

 James VanDriel
 USGS National Center 586
 Reston, VA 22092
 Phone: (703) 648-4185

 Public Inquiries: 1-800-USA-MAPS
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   MULTIPLE AGENCY


   Water Quality Modeling
























  CONTACT:

  Policy Aspects:

  Assessment and Watershed Protection Division
  Office of Water
  Environmental Protection Agency
  401 M Street, SW
  Washington, DC 20460

 Technical Aspects:

 Exposure Assessment Branch
 Standards and Applied Science Division
 Office of Water
 Environmental Protection Agency
 401 M Street, SW
 Washington, DC 20460

 Center for Exposure Assessment Modeling
 Environmental Research Laboratory
 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
 College Station Road
 Athens, GA 31613
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                                                                                     PAGE 1.61

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               C.  Clearinghouses, Data Centers,
                                and
                     Additional Directories
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
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  COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY


  Annual  Report to Congress


  The Council on Environmental Quality is required, by the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 to report on
  the status and the condition of the environment;  current and foreseeable trends in the quality, management and
  utilization of the environment; and the effects of environmental trends. The Council reports to Congress in an annual
  report and maintains an archive of national environmental statistics, which it updates and publishes periodically in
  the annual report  as statistical tables, and in environmental trends reports as charts, graphs, and maps.

  CONTACT:

  Chuck Herrick
  Council on Environmental Quality
  722 Jackson Place, NW
  Washington,  DC  20503
  Phone: (202) 395-5750
  FAX: (202) 395-3744


  DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


 Water Quality Information Center

 The Water Quality Information Center is part of the National Agricultural Library (NAL), which is an agency of the
 U.S Department of Agriculture. As the focal point of NAL's water quality efforts, the Center collects, organizes
 and disseminates information on the scientific, educational, and public policy aspects of water quality and agriculture!

 The Water Quality Information Center manages the Water Information Network (WIN)-a computer conference on
 NAL s electronic bulletin board, the Agricultural Library Forum. Examples of information found on WIN include
 bib hographies on  water  quality topics, announcements of upcoming meetings, and a directory of water-related
 hotlines.  Contact the Center for a WIN user's guide.

 Other activities of the  Center include producing  bibliographies, performing brief literature searches,  and
 recommending additions to  NAL's collection.  In carrying out its functions, the Center often  collaborates with
 individuals and organizations with similar interests.

 CONTACT:

 Joe Makuch
 NAL, Water Quality Information Center
 10301 Baltimore Boulevard, Room 1402
 Beltsville, MD 20705-2351
 Phone: (301)  504-6077
 FAX:  (301) 504-7098
 Modem, via ALF, (301) 504-5497
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DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE


Climate Analysis Center

OFFICE:

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
National Weather Service/National Meteorological Center

SUMMARY DESCRIPTION:










 CONTACT:

 David Miskus
 NOAA/NWS/NMC
 Climate Analysis Center
 World Weather Building, Room 811, W/NMC53
 Washington, DC 20233
 Phone: (301) 763-8071
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 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE


 Earth System  Data Directory

 SUMMARY DESCRIPTION:

 The NOAA Earth System Data Directory (NOAADIR) is an on-line computer guide to environmental data held by
 the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.  It serves two major purposes:

    1.  It provides NOAA with a common system for documenting data held in NOAA offices.

    2.  It provides the general research and scientific community with a way to locate NOAA data sets that are
        useful for their studies.

 This directory is part of an international network of Data Directories based on the NASA Master Directory. Most
 of the directories on the network use identical software developed for the NASA Master Directory system.

 The cornerstone for the NOAADIR and the Master Directory is the Directory Interchange Format or DIP, that was
 developed by the NASA/NOAA/USGS team as the standard for documenting high level information about space
 and environmental data sets.  All of the directories in the Master Directory system use the DIP layout or can
 exchange data using the DIP.

 A wide variety of earth science dataset descriptions is included in the directory. The fields represented in the
 directory include: meteorology, oceanography, marine biology, fisheries, and geology.  You can search by scientific
 discipline, measured parameters, time period, geographic location, sensor and source, project, and other criteria.

 Any user in the United States can access NOAADIR using computer terminal dial-in telephone lines, including a
 toll free 800 number, the NASA Dec-Net (formerly SPAN), and  the Internet Networks.  The user connects to
 NOAADIR using a controlled VAX account called NOAADIR.  This account enables the user to search only the
 NOAA directory, not any other software on the VAX, thus keeping the system secure. The NOAADIR contains only
 descriptions, not the actual data, and refers the user to the holder of the data.  The referenced data have a wide
 variety of classification schemes, standards, formats, reference systems, resolutions, and are of varied  degrees of
 accuracy and currentness. They are drawn from many sources of meteorological, oceanographical, marine biological,
 and geological data.

 Data descriptions are displayed on the user's terminal in a screen oriented presentation. The user may request off
 line printer listings from the NOAADIR office.

 SYSTEM CONTACT:

 Gerald S. Barton
Environmental Information Services
NOAA/NESDIS EX2, Room 506
 1825 Connecticut Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20235
Phone: (202)606-4548
FAX: (202) 606-0509
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DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE


National Climatic  Data Center


OFFICE:

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
National Climatic Data Center
Climate Services Division

SUMMARY DESCRIPTION:

The National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) collects and maintains all United States weather records and is the
largest climatic data center in the world.  It is a unique central source of historical weather information and related
products.  NCDC holds all weather records routinely collected by the  U.S. Federal Government, as well as large
quantities of data acquired from foreign sources and from cooperative  exchanges with State or local agencies and
various research activities. These data include  surface observations from land stations, ocean weather stations, and
moving ships. Daily climatological observations from cooperative observing stations, upper air observations, and
radar observations are also archived at NCDC. NCDC's archive of historical weather data includes observations from
the 1800s to the present. National weather service products such as forecasts, warnings and analyses, are archived
at NCDC through a system known as the Service Records Retention System. A component of NCDC is the Satellite
Data Services Division located in Washington, DC.  They handle requests for meteorological satellite and satellite
derived data. In addition to providing data, NCDC provides analysis  and preparation of statistical  summaries of
archive holdings, library search  services, publications, (including reference manuals), catalogs of holdings, data
reports, atlases, and certification  of records and publications for litigation.

Precipitation parameters related to water quality include: amounts, days with, rate, and duration of liquid and frozen
precipitation; drizzle; hail;  ice  crystals; ice  pellets; rain; snow;  snow grains; snow pellets;  and convective
precipitation. Evaporation parameters include: humidity; dewpoint; water vapor; and vapor pressure. Ice parameters
include: forms of; stages of development; and thickness on water. Soil/crop moisture parameters include: supply and
demand, drought and wet spills.   Satellite parameters include: ocean color Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS);
radiance Synthetic Apature Radar (SAR);  water vapor, and sea ice  Selected Microwave Mapping Radiometer
(SMMR).

CONTACT:

National Climatic Data Center
Climate  Services Division
NOAA/NESDIS E/CC3
Federal Building
Asheville, NC 28801-2696
Phone: (704) 259-0682
FAX: (704)259-0876

National Climatic Data Center
Satellite Data Services Division
 NOAA/NESDIS E/CC6
 Princeton 100 Camp Springs
 Laurel, MD
 Phone:(301)763-8111
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 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE


 National Environmental Data Referral Service (NEDRES)

 SUMMARY DESCRIPTION:

 The National Environmental Data Referral Service, NEDRES, is a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
 (NOAA) program.  Users may access a broad range of environmental information through the NEDRES on-line
 computer directory. The NEDRES database is a computer catalog of environmental data that identifies the existence,
 location, characteristics, and availability  of environmental data.

 NEDRES is a unique database on a major commercial information service computer system, BRS Information
 Technologies. Most of the databases on these information systems contain bibliographic descriptions of literature
 such as the National Technical Information Service Database, or contain the entire text such as the New York Times
 Database. NEDRES is the only database on a commercially operated system with worldwide, public access that
 describes environmental data.  With NEDRES, the user can locate and then obtain the data from the contact given
 in the data description.

 The database documents environmental data from the sun through the atmosphere to the earth and the oceans. Solar
 and upper atmosphere physics, satellite remote sensing, oceanography, climatology, meteorology, pollution, toxic
 substances, geophysics  and geology, geochemistry, and freshwater and marine fisheries  are some of the areas
 included.  It contains only descriptions, not the actual data, and refers the user to the holder of the data.  The
 database documents several types of environmental information descriptions, It includes:

        1. Data centers, programs and organizations;
        2. data files not in published form;
        3. serial publications of data;
        4. published data sets;
        5. atlases or published data in graphic or analog form;
        6. publications containing extensive compilations, analyses or applications of data; --•".-.
        7. manuals, user guides, or documentations .of data sets;  and                  ,
        8. data catalogs, inventories, or bibliographies.

 A search of the NEDRES database provides a complete description of available data sources that satisfy the search
 specifications. The resulting information describes the data in sufficient detail, allowing the user to decide whether
 to contact the data holder for specific details or to arrange to acquire the data.

 The BRS system offers a variety of powerful  text searching capabilities for the database.  Every word hi a data
 description is indexed so a user can record, or can be limited to specific fields  such as CO, the contact, or GE, the
 Geographic Place Name.  The full range  of  Boolean operations  is supported.  Complete citations or  selected
 paragraphs may be viewed on the user's  terminal, and off-line listings can be printed and mailed to the user.

 Anyone may use the database who has an account with BRS Information Technologies, a commercial information
 service, telephone 1-800-289-4BRS. Most  users are from the United States, but there are users from all over the
 world who use the international telecommunications networks to connect with BRS.  Researchers and scientists who
 use the NEDRES database are from all disciplines including users from academic, private, corporate, and government
 organizations.
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CONTACT:

Gerald S. Barton
Environmental Information Services
NOAA/NESDIS EX2, Room 506
1825 Connecticut Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20235
Phone: (202) 606-4548
FAX: (202) 606-0509
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 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE


 National  Geophysical  Data Center

 OFFICE:

 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
 National Geophysical Data Center
 Information Services Division

 SUMMARY DESCRIPTION:

 The National  Geophysical Data Center  (NGDC) combines, in a single data center, the fields of seismology,
 geomagnetism, marine geology and geophysics, solar phenomena, the ionosphere, and snow and ice. NGDC collects,
 organizes, archives, publishes, and disseminates solid earth, solar terrestrial physics, paleoclimate, and snow and ice
 data from worldwide sources. The National Snow and Ice Data Center is co-located with NGDC. Earthquake and
 tsunami data are also part of NGDC's holdings. Geomagnetic data consist primarily of worldwide geomagnetic, and
 aeromagnetic survey measurements, observatory magnetograms, digital values of various sample ratings, and indexes
 of magnetic activity.  Holdings include more than one million magnetograms, most held on 35-mm microfilm, and
 hundreds of magnetic tapes containing digital data derived from magnetograms and survey, measurements. Solid
 earth geophysics data include a large number of files pertaining to common depth point, seismic data, gravity, and
 topography data. Geothermic holdings include data and maps  on volcanoes, geothermal energy, and global heat flow.
 In the marine geology and geophysics area, users can access gravimetric, magnetic, bathymetric, and seismic data,
 along with geotechnical textural, petrologic, and paleontologic analyses and descriptions of sediment and rock
 samples.  The solar-terrestrial data division includes data  on  solar flares, solar radio emission events, sudden
 ionospheric disturbances and satellite measurements of the solar wind, ultraviolet, x-ray, and particle emissions.

 The National Snow and Ice Center holds data on all forms of snow and ice: one million transparencies and negatives
 of DMSP imagery; 400 magnetic tapes containing sea ice, snow cover, lake ice and ice core data; 200 microfiche
 and film reels of lake ice, climatological  and snow cover data;  and 10,000 historical glacier photos.  The marine
 geology and geophysics holdings include 10.2  million track miles of underway geophysical data, 35.5 million
 National Ocean Survey hydrographic  records, information on 132,000 ocean bottom geologic core samples, and
 geochemical analyses of over 5,100 marine samples. NGDC can supply specialized data services on a reimbursable
 basis utilizing geographic information systems and tabular database processing.

 Marine geophysical parameters related to  water quality include:  depths, hazardous features, bottom characteristics,
 SESAT gridded gravity, marine gravity survey, seismic reflection, seiche, sea level and lake level variations, and
 tsunamis.

 Marine geological parameters include: geological composition; oil; gas; well velocity; split well cores; time, velocity,
 and depth; shotpoint location; stacking velocities; marine well logs; manganese nodules; heavy minerals; calcium
 carbonate; phosphorites; polymetallic sulfides; and paleomagnetic intensity, inclination and declination.

 Geothermal parameters include: thermal springs, world heat flow, and geothermal resources.

 Snow and ice data include: sea ice coverage; sea ice extent and concentration; sea ice position; snow ice thickness;
 thickness on water, slush ice thickness; ice condition; ice characteristics; ice form;  ice type; ice profile; ice pattern;
 ice transect width; total ice area; ice drift and velocity; icebergs; glaciers; melting stage; polar ice soundings; Oxygen-
 18; Great Lakes ice; lake ice concentration; and SSM/I satellite data (sea ice extant,  sea ice concentration, and multi-
 year fraction).
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CONTACT:

National Geophysical Data Center
Information Services Division
NOAA/NESDIS E/GC4
325 Broadway
Boulder, CO  80303-3328
Phone: (303) 497-6958
FAX: (303) 497-6513
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 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE


 National Oceanographic Data Center

 OFFICE:

 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
 National Oceanographic Data Center
 User Services Division

 SUMMARY DESCRIPTION:

 The National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) maintains and stores a large, multidisciplinary marine scientific
 database, through activities that include acquisition, processing, storage, and retrieval of Oceanographic data.  The
 principle types of data stored at NODC are serial Oceanographic station data, bathythermograph, current, biological
 and sea surface observations.  About 1,500 marine scientific publications, reports and articles are also received by
 NODC. NODC maintains several data inventory systems to answer detailed inquiries about data availability. Users
 can be supplied with various types of data inventory products.  Data can be provided to users in a number of forms
 from simple magnetic tape copies of data to complicated computer-generated data summaries, statistical analyses,
 and graphic plots. Components of NODC beside the operating divisions include the following: Ocean Pollution Data
 and Information Network (OPDIN), the NOAA Library Information Network (NLIN), and Coastwatch.

 Water pollution parameters archived at NODC include:  hydrocarbons,  heavy metals, organochlorides, pesticides,
 polychlorinated biphenyls, sediments, and marine samples.

 Chemical parameters include: chlorophyll, phaeopigment, C-14 assimilation, phosphate, ammonia, nitrate, nitrite,
 silicate, salinity, secchi depth, oxygen, pH, turbidity, and transmissivity, water color and transparency, clay and mud
 fraction, paniculate matter,  sediment color and size, suspended solids, dissolved organic carbon, and paniculate
 organic carbon.

 Land/Ocean property parameters include: snow cover depth, melt stage, ice bearing, ice characteristics, ice coverage,
 ice deformation, ice form, ice level, ice pattern, ice transect width, ice type, water level, and discharge.

 Meteorological variables: include precipitation amount, humidity, and dewpoint.

 The NODC Users Guide is a document that describes the data available from NODC.

 CONTACT:

 National Oceanographic  Data Center
 User Services Division
 NOAA/NESDIS E/OC21
 1825 Connecticut Avenue, NW
 Washington, DC  20235
 Phone: (202) 606-4549
 FAX: (202) 606-4586
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DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE


National Weather Service

SUMMARY DESCRIPTION:

The National Weather Service (NWS) maintains a constant watch for life-threatening situations from weather such
as hurricanes, tornadoes, winter storms, and floods.  This service is carried out by field offices and supported by
national centers that serve the entire U.S. The National Hurricane Center in Miami, the Pacific hurricane office in
Honolulu, the National Severe Storms Forecast Center in Kansas City, Missouri and a number of River Forecast
Centers are on round-the-clock vigil for dangerous weather situations.  In addition,  NOAA has tsunami warning
centers in Alaska and Hawaii.

NOAA collects weather observations from hundreds of stations across the U.S. These data include: surface and
upper air data collected by weather radar, ocean data buoys, ships, satellites, and volunteer observers. At the National
Meteorological Center (NMC) in Maryland, more than 100,000 weather observations are ingested in the numerical
physical models of the atmosphere that produce forecasts out to 10 days in advance.  Monthly and seasonal forecasts
are produced by the Climate Analysis Center (CAC) in Camp Springs, Maryland.  NMC guidance is transmitted
electronically to all regions of the U.S., where local meteorologists prepare forecasts using this information.

Presently, the National Weather Service is undergoing a modernization plan that will replace the outdated equipment
of the 1960's with the most modem technological advances, which include Next  Generation Radar (NEXRAD),
Automated Surface Observing Stations (ASOS), more sophisticated weather satellites, and a computerized system
for the processing and communication of weather information. These tools will enable the operational forecaster to
pinpoint more accurately the location and timing of severe storms.

International agreements, both bilateral and through the United Nations specialized agencies (particularly the World
Meteorological Organizations), provide access to foreign weather data which helps NOAA provide global analyses
and forecast services.

The main components of the National Weather Service are the Office of Hydrology, Office of Meteorology, the
National Meteorological Center, Office of Systems Development, Office of Systems Operations, the NOAA Data
Buoy Data Center, and the NWS Training Centers.

CONTACT:

Office of Hydrology:

Charles Schauss
Hydrological Operations Division, Room 8440
Silver Spring Metro Center n
 1335 East-West Highway
Silver Spring, MD 20910
Phone: (301) 713-0624

Office of Meteorology:

Andrew Horvitz
Systems Requirement Branch, Room 13228
Silver Spring Metro Center n
 1335 East-West Highway
Silver Spring, MD 20910
Phone: (301) 713-1867
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Mike Uhart
Marine Services Branch, Room 14472
Silver Spring Metro Center II
1335 East-West Highway
Silver Spring, MD 20910
Phone: (301) 713-1677

The National Meteorological Center:

Paul Julian
Quality Assurance, Room 301
World Weather Building
5200 Auth Road
Camp Springs, MD
Phone: (301) 763-4409

Office of Systems Development:

David Kitzmiller
Techniques Development Laboratory, Room 10390
Silver Spring Metro Center n
1335  East-West Highway
Silver Spring, MD 20910
Phone: (301) 713-1774

Office of Systems Operations:

Tom Blackburn
Observing Systems Branch, Room 17318
Silver Spring Metro Center II
 1335 East-West Highway
Silver Spring, MD 20910
Phone: (301) 713-1724

NWS Training Centers:

 Don Burgess
 Operation Support Facility (OSF)
 1200 Westheimer Drive
 Norman, OK  73069
 Phone: (405) 366-6510

 Richard Mcnulty
 Chief, Hydrometeorology and Management Division
 617 Hardesty St., Bldg. 9
 Kansas City, MO 64124-3097
 Phone: (816) 374-6324

 Tim Spangler
 COMET
 P.O. Box 3000
 Boulder, CO 80307
 Phone: (303) 497-8475
NOAA Data Buoy Data Center

Eric Meindl
Stennis Space Center
SSC, MS 39529-6000
Phone: (601) 688-1717
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 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE


 Ocean  Pollution Data and  Information Network

 OFFICE:

 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
 Ocean Pollution Data and Information Network

 SUMMARY DESCRIPTION:

 The NODC established the Ocean Pollution Data and Information Network (OPDIN) in response to the National
 Ocean Pollution Planning Act of 1978. OPDDSf's goals are to facilitate access to Federal ocean and Great Lakes
 pollution data and information, and to enhance communication and coordination among Federal agencies conducting
 ocean and Great Lakes activities related to pollution. During 1991, OPDIN staff developed a new, user-friendly
 desktop information delivery system, AESOP (Automated Electronic System for Ocean Pollution), that links together
 4 major databases.  AESOP is PC-based and operates in a WINDOWS environment.  At present,  AESOP's
 component databases include:

        •       National Marine Pollution Information System (NMPIS) - searchable inventory of Federally funded
               pollution projects, including information on project research, geographic area, pollution type,
               funding, oceanographic zone, and principal investigator,

        •       Handbook of Federal  Systems and Services - inventory of Federal systems and services  which
               house ocean and Great Lakes pollution data or information, like EPA's  ODES, STORET, and
               USGS's NAWDEX,

        •       Pollution Literature - almost 5,000 citations from ASFA (Aquatic Science and Fisheries Abstracts),
               BIOSIS, MPA (Marine  Pollution Abstracts), NTIS (National Technical Information Service),
               CCOD (Current Contents on Diskette) are included in this database,

        •       Guide  to Marine  Pollution-Related Data - database of selected NMPIS projects  including
               information about types of data generated, data location, and data access.

 All of the databases except the literature are available in hardcopy form as well.

 OPDIN provides information on Federal ocean and Great Lakes pollution activities and information on access to data
 generated by these activities.  The NMPIS database is updated annually and extends back to  1978. This time series
 could be searched to provide summary  statistics on trends in  Federal pollution  research (pollutants studied,
 geographic areas, funding, etc.).

 CONTACT:

 Roz Cohen, Chief OPDIN
NOAA/NESDIS/NODC E/OC24
 1825 Connecticut Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20235
Phone:  (202) 606-4539
FAX: (202) 606-4586
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DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

Office  of Hydrology

SUMMARY DESCRIPTION:

The Office of Hydrology serves as the primary interface between the National Weather Service Headquarters and
the field service programs on all  operating matters and technical aspects of hydrologic service programs and,
procedures.  The Office is responsible for handling all hydrologic matters at a national level  within NWS in
cooperation with other NWS headquarters offices and for representing NWS on all interagency matters concerning
hydrology. The Office establishes policies and develops plans for hydrologic procedures, including the collection
and processing of hydrologic data for river, flood, and water-supply forecasts and warnings. It supports the integrity
and operational readiness of technological support systems  employed by the hydrology program of NWS( and
conducts research and development programs  for improving field services.  It manages overall  hydrologic field
operations and coordinates functions supporting these activities.  The Office conducts surveys and policy-review
studies to determine the effectiveness of hydrologic field programs.  It serves as advisor  and consultant to the
Assistant Administrator  for Weather Services on hydrology, both nationally and internationally.

CONTACT:

Earl Laws
NOAA/NWS/Office of Hydrology                                                     :
SSMC2, Room 8232, W/OHX2
1325 East West Highway
Silver Spring, MD 20910                                                         ,
Phone: (301) 713-1660
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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR


Earth Science Data  Directory

SUMMARY DESCRIPTION:

The Earth Science Data Directory (ESDD) is being developed by the U.S. Geological Survey as a system for readily
determining the availability of specific earth science and natural resource data.  It offers online access to a USGS
mainframe computer repository of information about earth science and natural resource databases. The referenced
databases are both automated and non-automated, and they belong to many different entities. ESDD participants
include governmental agencies, academic institutions, and those from the private sector.

The term "earth science and natural resource data" as used for the ESDD, is an all-embracing term referring to any
systematic body of knowledge, automated or not, relating to the Earth, its environment and its energy, mineral, water,
land, plant, animal and other resources. The ESDD can enable users to locate everything from complex computerized
indices, systems,  and files to paper records, maps and files.

Databases referenced in the ESDD include those concerned with the geologic, hydrologic, cartographic and biologic
sciences. References to databases that support the protection and management of natural resources are also included.
Geographic, sociologic, economic, and demographic databases are among those cataloged. Arctic region database
entries are included in the Arctic Environmental Data Directory as an ESDD subset. The ESDD is also the USGS
repository of information on databases related to interagency Global Change activities. Many of this full range of
data sources offer  potential  as leads to base and/or  overlay input  for geographic information system (GIS)
applications.

CONTACT:

ESDD Project Manager
U.S. Geological Survey
801 National Center
Reston, VA  22092
Phone:(703)648-7112
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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Global Land Information System  (GLIS)

SUMMARY DESCRIPTION:

The GLIS is an interactive computer system developed by the U.S. Geological Survey,(USGS) providing sources
of information about the Earth's land surfaces. GLIS contains metadata - descriptive information about data sets-
arranged in 3 levels of detail: directories, user guides, and inventories. Through GLIS, researchers can evaluate data
sets,  determine their availability, and  place online requests  for products.   Users can bring up outlines of the
geographic areas covered by the data sets.  Using digital browse functions to manipulate data, they can determine
such information as the amount of cloud coverage or the quality of individual scenes.  Online requests can be placed
via GLIS for the earth science data. The producing  organization will receive the request and provide the researcher
with price and ordering information.

GLIS contains references to regional, continental, and global land information including land use, land cover, and
soils data; cultural and topographic data; and remotely sensed satellite and aircraft data.  Continual updates of
information, and the addition of new data set descriptions as  they are contributed by the global change scientific
community, will allow GLIS to remain current.

CONTACT:

For system access information, please  contact GLIS User Assistance:

U.S. Geological Survey
EROS Data Center
GLIS User Assistance
Sioux Falls, SD  57198 USA

1-800-252-GLIS (1-800-252-4547)
Commercial: (605)594-6099

DEPARTMENT OF THE  INTERIOR

National  Water Data Exchange  (NAWDEX)

The National Water Data Exchange (NAWDEX) is a national confederation of water-oriented organizations working
together to improve access to water data. Its primary objective is to assist users of water data in the identification,
locations and acquisition of needed data.  NAWDEX consists of member organizations from the water data
community. The members are linked so that their water data holdings may be readily exchanged for maximum use.
A central Program Office coordinates  this  linkage  and provides overall management of the program. The office
provides data exchange policy  and guidelines to all participants in the NAWDEX Program. It encompasses 4 major
areas of operation: (1) maintaining an  internal data center, including access to automated data processing facilities
for maintenance and use of its information files; (2) indexing water data held by participating organizations;  (3)
providing facilities and personnel for responding to requests for water data; and (4) formulating recommended water
data handling and exchange standards.

CONTACT:

National Water Data Exchange
U.S. Geological Survey
421  National Center
Reston, VA 22092
Phone: (703) 648-6848
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DEPARTMENT OF THE  INTERIOR


National  Water Data Storage and Retrieval System (WATSTORE)

The National Water Data Storage and Retrieval System (WATSTORE) was established in 197,1 to modernize the
Geological Survey's existing water data processing procedures and techniques and to provide for more effective and
efficient management of its data releasing activities. The system is operated and maintained on the central computer
facilities of the Survey at its National Center in Reston, VA.

The WATSTORE system consists of several files in which data are grouped and stored by common characteristics
and data collection frequencies.  The system also is designed to allow for the inclusion of additional data files as
needed. Currently, files are maintained for the storage of (1) surface water, quality-of-water, and ground water data
measured on a daily or continuous basis; (2) annual peak values for streamflow stations; (3) chemical analyses for
surface and ground water sites; (4) water data parameters measured more frequently than daily; (5) geologic and
inventory data for ground water sites; and (6) summary data on water use.  In addition, an index file of sites for
which data are stored in the system also is maintained.

CONTACT:

WATSTORE  Program Office
Branch of Computer Technology
USGS
440 National Center
Reston, Virginia 22092
Phone: (703) 648-5605

DEPARTMENT OF THE  INTERIOR

National  Water Information Clearinghouse

The National Water Information Clearinghouse (NWTC) is a new and emerging program designed to manage and
coordinate the exchange of water resources information with Federal, State, and local  governmental agencies,
academia, industry, and the general public.  Clearinghouse activities include education outreach and training;
information/data dissemination,  including water-data indexing  and  literature  abstracting;  and  data-systems
modernization. The NWIC will be decentralized with regional centers located across the country. It will not be a
data repository but will operate primarily as a referral center to other Federal and State data and information systems.
When practical, however, the Clearinghouse will provide information directly to requestors so as to streamline the
exchange of information.  A Federal and non-Federal advisory committee will be established to provide guidance
relative to clearinghouse services. Two Clearinghouse pilot centers are in operation. One  center in Reston, VA, is
focusing on developing linkages  with Federal agencies and the technical and general user communities in the
Washington, DC, metropolitan area. The Sacramento, CA, pilot is focusing on developing computerized interfaces
with State and local agencies and creating an automated tracking system for Clearinghouse requests. A nationwide
toll-free number, 1-800-H2O-9000 (1-800-426-9000) has been  established to promote easy access  to the
Clearinghouse.

CONTACT:

Chief, National Water Information Clearinghouse
U.S. Geological Survey
423 National Survey
Reston, VA 22092
Phone: 1-800-426-9000 or (703) 648-6832
FAX:  (703)648-5704
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DEPARTMENT OF INTERIOR

National Water Information System

The U.S. Geological Survey is in the process of designing and developing a new National Water Information System
(NWIS). The goal of the NWIS effort is to develop and implement a highly flexible hydrologic data management
and processing system; one that can be easily changed and expanded in a rapidly changing  technological
environment. The NWIS will replace the National Water Data Storage and Retrieval System (WATSTORE) and
the National Water Data Exchange System (NAWDEX), both of which reside on the mainframe computer at USGS
headquarters in Reston, Virginia. NWIS will be a single integrated system that will have the functionality of current
data systems plus expanded capability for processing and managing additional chemical constituent, sediment,
biological and spatial data.

CONTACT:

TomYorke
Chief, National Water Information System
U.S. Geological Survey
437 National Center
Reston, VA  22092
Phone: (703)648-5659
FAX: (703)648-5295

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

ACCESS EPA

ACCESS EPA is a guide to EPA information resources, services and products. Its purpose is to make environmental
information useful for citizens, environmental organizations and businesses, as well as EPA staff.

Each  chapter in ACCESS EPA  begins with a  brief  introduction and a table of contents.  In some instances,
supplementary material is provided at the end of the chapter.  ACCESS EPA  includes information on EPA
clearinghouses, hotlines, bulletin boards, dockets, records programs libraries, scientific models, major environmental
databases and state environmental libraries.  The publication includes a list of acronyms that appear throughout
ACCESS EPA, a state information index and a name/title/subject index.

ACCESS EPA is updated annually and is available for reference at Federal Depository Librarian and Public Libraries
nationwide.  ACCESS EPA is available in paper copy for $21.00 at the addresses listed below.
 CONTACT:

 Superintendent of Documents
 P.O. Box 371954
 Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954
 Phone:  (202)783-3298
 FAX:  (202)512-2250

 Online Access is now available through the following:
 (GPO) Federal Bulletin Board System       (202) 512-1387
 EPA Library Online Library System (OLS) (919) 549-0720
 INTERNET:  EPA.IBM.RTPNC.GOV "Public Access"; "OLS"
 For additional information contact ACCESS EPA (202) 260-2049
National Technical Information Service (NTIS)
5285 Port Royal Road
Springfield, VA 22161
Phone:  (703)487-4650
FAX: (703)321-8547
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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY INTERAGENCY EFFORT


Guide  to   Selected   National   Environmental   Statistics  in   the  U.S.
Government

A Guide to Selected National Environmental Statistics in the U.S. Government is a reference to national-level,
time-series environmental statistics that are compiled and distributed by the U.S. Government on a regular basis.
It is a guide to statistical programs and the primary and secondary summary statistics they generate, not a guide to
raw data or databases.  The Guide is a starting  point to learning more about various environmental statistical
programs of the U.S. Government. It is not meant to supplant information that can be obtained directly from the
Government agencies. Furthermore, it is not an inclusive guide to U.S. environmental statistical programs, but one
to selected programs that produce frequently sought-after, national-level statistics.

The development of the Guide was an effort requiring input from seven U.S. Government Agencies including:
Department of Agriculture, Department of Commerce, Department of Health and Human Services, Department of
Transportation, and the Environmental Protection Agency.

Contents of the Guide include: statistical programs on environmental quality such as ambient air and water quality
and on natural resources such as water resources and land use; statistical programs on energy, mining, agriculture,
manufacturing, transportation, and other human activities that have direct impacts on the environment; and statistical
programs on activities and expenditures to prevent or control pollution, establish parks and protected areas, protect
critical ecosystems, fight forest fires,  and manage  fisheries.

The statistical programs in the Guide are  arranged by Government department and  agency.  Each entry contains
information about a separate statistical program (e.g., program purpose, data coverage and collection methods,
geographic coverage, agency contacts, pertinent publications, and database access  options).  Information in the
records was prepared and provided by Government agencies in response to a questionnaire.

The Guide also contains an index of over 150 keywords and phrases and an index of 55 databases that can be used
to locate desired records.

In addition to the hardcopy version, the Guide is available in an electronic  version that can be viewed on an
IBM-compatible personal computer with 640K of memory, DOS version 3.0 or higher, and an EGA or VGA monitor.

CONTACT:

Brand Niemann
Office of Policy, Planning, and Evaluation
Environmental Statistics and Information Division (ESID)
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (PM-222B)
401 M Street, SW
Washington, DC 20460
Phone: (202) 260-2680
FAX: (202) 260-4968
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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

INFOTERRA/USA Directory of Environmental Sources

INFOTERRA is the international environmental information exchange network coordinated by the United Nations
Environment Programme. INFOTERRA was established in 1975 following recommendations from the Stockholm
Conference. At present, the INFOTERRA network comprises a partnership of 140 countries which have designated
national focal points to promote the exchange of environmental information.

Each national focal point prepares a 'Who's Who" of environmental information sources in its country and selects
the best  sources for inclusion in the INFOTERRA  International Directory of Environmental Sources.  Several
countries including Bangladesh, Canada, China, Guyana, Japan, Nepal, Thailand, and the United States publish their
own national directories. These together with the international directories serve as a primary reference tool for the
INFOTERRA network in its mission to provide reliable, comprehensive and timely environmental information to
requestors.

The INFOTERRA/USA Directory of Environmental Sources lists 445 national information sources which have agreed
to provide environmental information free or at a minimal fee to international requestors. Each entry contains contact
information, fields of environmental enterprise, and a description of services.

CONTACT:

INFOTERRA/USA
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (PM-211A)
401 M Street, SW
Washington, DC  20460
Phone: (202) 260-5917
FAX:  (202)260-3923
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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

Office  of  Water  Environmental  and  Program  Information  Systems
Compendium

The Federal Statutes that govern water programs convey a unique stewardship role to EPA and its State counterparts:
protecting and restoring the integrity of the Nation's water resources. In order to carry out this mission, the Agency
and its partners collect and manage large amounts of information.  The type of information collected ranges from
site-specific information on water and sediment chemistry, biota, and hydrogeology to national summary information
on water programs implementation. The purpose of this Compendium is to increase the awareness of water program
managers about the kinds of information available for their use as they make policy and program decisions. This
is accomplished with a combined text and graphic profile  of 20 key Office of Water information systems. These
profiles highlight the type of information contained in the 20 systems and the management tools (statistical, graphical,
and linkage packages) associated with each.

CONTACT:

Wendy Blake-Coleman
U.S. EPA
Office of Water (WH-556)
401 M Street, SW
Washington, DC 20460
Phone:  (202) 260-5680
FAX:  (202)260-0732


ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

STOrage RETrieval  (STORET)

STORET is an information system that contains information on ambient water quality, the results  of intensive
surveys, information on effluents, and biological water quality monitoring data. Data is contributed by a number
Of Federal, State, and private organizations (approximately 800 organizations). Each organization is responsible for
its own data. There are over 800,000 sampling stations in STORET, which have locational information, and more
than 180 million parametric observations covering 13,000 water quality parameters.

For additional information, see the entry in Section V above for the EPA National Water Quality Monitoring
Program.

CONTACT:

Bob King
Assessment and Watershed Protection Division
Office of Water
Environmental Protection Agency (WH-553)
401 M Street, SW
Washington, DC 20460
Phone:  (202)260-7028
FAX:  (202)260-7024
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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

Waterbody System

The Waterbody System was designed to simplify the management of assessment information at the State level and
provide a systematic way to process assessment data in a more standard form for national analysis. WBS includes
PC and Mainframe versions.  The system includes provisions for geo-referencing by indexing waterbodies to Reach
File 3 using PCRF3, but this feature was not yet implemented widely in 1992.  Information is available on counts
and size estimates of categories of designated use support for each assessed waterbody, counts  and indications of
magnitude of non-support attributable to various source and causes of water pollution for each assessed waterbody,
various CWA parameters (e.g., TMDLs, Toxic) for each waterbody.  The time frame covered by this information
varies by State, but information entered in 1988, 1990, and 1992, most clearly corresponds to the current guidelines
for preparation of the 305(b) report and includes  information collected to meet the  requirements of the 1987
amendments to the CWA.

For additional information, see the entry in Section  V above for the EPA National  Water Quality  monitoring
Program.

CONTACT:

Jack Clifford                                                                                      ;
Assessment and Watershed Protection Division
Office of Water
Environmental Protection Agency
401 M Street, SW
Washington, DC  20460
Phone: (202) 260-3667                             .   . .           .,...,       ,...,.
FAX: (202)260-7024
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                           PAGE 185

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INTERAGENCY EFFORT

Intergovernmental Task Force on Monitoring Water Quality (ITFM)

The Intergovernmental Task Force on Monitoring Water Quality (ITFM) is a 3-year effort to design and arrange
implementation of an intergovernmental strategy to link individual water monitoring activities into a comprehensive
nationwide effort. This integrated monitoring will support effective decision making with quality information and
will use resources most effectively.

The ITFM includes 20 members:  10 Federal agencies (EPA, USGS, USDA, USFWS, NOAA, the Corps, DOE,
TVA, NFS, and OMB) and 10 State and Interstate agencies  (Arizona, California, Colorado, Delaware River Basin
Commission, New Jersey, Ohio, South Carolina, Washington, and Wisconsin, and a vacancy to be filled).

The Task Force is chaired by EPA, with USGS as vice-chair and executive secretariat. The ITFM operates under
USGS Water Information Program established under OMB memorandum M-92-01.

Five Task Groups address: the nationwide institutional framework, environmental indicators, data collection methods,
data management and information sharing, and assessment and reporting. Over 80 Federal and State staff sit on the
four Task Groups.

The effort began in April 1991 and will disband in favor of full implementation activities in December 1994.  The
ITFM produces reports and recommendations in December of each year.

The ITFM also produces "building block products" they and other monitoring programs can use.  Draft products to
date include a national monitoring vision and principles, an optimal  monitoring program outline, a matrix for
choosing environmental indicators and environmental indicator selection criteria.

During its first year, the ITFM recommended the development of a nationwide monitoring strategy built upon the
existing monitoring players and stations. The strategy would result in status and trends information of water resource
quality across the nation. This information would be collected using consistent or comparable monitoring methods
and common parameters. The data would be stored so as to allow use by others, and would be used in an integrated
nationwide water quality report.

Other recommendations will result in a methods Comparability Council, standard, data descriptions to allow system
to share data easily, and links between data systems for data transfer.

CONTACT:

Bernard Malo
ITFM Executive Secretary
Office of Data Coordination
U.S. Geological Survey
417 National Center
Reston, VA 22092
Phone:  (703)648-5017
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 INTERAGENCY EFFORT


 Inventory of  Exposure-Related  Data Systems  Sponsored  by Federal
 Agencies

 The Inventory of Exposure-Related Data Systems Sponsored by Federal Agencies report (May 1992), was a result
 of a combined effort among the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Health Research; Centers for
 Disease Control, National Center for Health Statistics, Office of Analysis and Epidemiology; and Agency for Toxic
 Substances and Disease Registry, Division of Health Studies.

 This report is a compilation of information on Federally-managed data systems that contain exposure information.
 These systems access collections of analytical related to environmental media such as air, soil, or water, as well as
 analytical results from food, human samples, or bulk chemicals. The inventory focuses on data systems that: (1)
 contain information on a large geographic area (national, State, regional); (2) have data or summary documents that
 generally are available for research or other purposes; and (3)  are supported, at least in part, by public funds.

 The report consists of a brief overview of the purpose, scope, method, limitations, organization, and findings of the
 inventory, followed by detailed summaries of each data system. This inventory includes detailed descriptions of 67
 data collection systems managed by 17 lead Government agencies, the United Nations Environment Programme, and
 the World Health Organization.  Twelve data handling systems are also included.  The majority (54) of the data
 systems contain environmental concentration measurements. The geographic coverage of most of the included data
 collection systems was national  (44).  The primary objective of the data collection systems was monitoring (36).
 The primary focus of other systems was regulatory support (19), and  research (29).

 CONTACT:

 The report (EPA document # EPA/600/R-92/078) can be obtained by contacting:

 EPA-ORD Publications
 Center for Environmental Research Information
 26 Martin Luther King Drive
 Cincinnati, OH 45268
 Phone: (513) 569-7562
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
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NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION


Global Change  Master Directory

OFFICE:

National Space Science Data Center

SUMMARY DESCRIPTION:

The Global Change Master Directory (GCMD) is a free, on-line, multidisciplinary directory of data sets that are of
potential interest to the earth and space sciences research community. The primary contents of the Master Directory
are descriptions of data sets - not the data sets themselves. The GCMD is intended to be an initial reference to a
wide variety of data. Every entry names a person or institution to contact for more information.  As a source of
leads to datasets over a very broad area, the GCMD is unprecedented.

The MD's descriptions are indexed by a variety of keywords as well as by spatial and temporal coverage, instrument,
investigator, and data center (when such  information is available  for the data set).  In addition, supplementary
information is available for other data systems and archives, campaigns and projects with significant data collections,
data-gathering sensors, and sources (such as spacecraft) which carry sensors.

The  MD is  more than just a directory,  however.  In  order to simplify  the process  of finding more detailed
information or accessing on-line data, the MD provides automatic connections - called LINKs - to a number of data
systems such as NOAA's National Climate Data Center (NCDC), the NASA Climate Data System (NCOS), and
the Pilot Land Data  System (PLDS), and others; as of late 1991,  47 such systems were LINKed to the MD.  It
represents the first major step in the Catalog Interoperability Project, whose objective is to enable researchers  to
identify, obtain information about,  and get access to space and earth sciences data quickly and efficiently.

CONTACT:

Angelia Bland
Master Directory User Support Office
National Space Science Data Center
Code 633
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
Grcenbelt, MD 20771
Phone: (301)513-1687
FAX:  (301)513-1608
 PAGE 188
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GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER ^p_ITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
PAGE 189

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                                         Keyword Index
 Acid deposition 37, 38
 Agriculture   11-14,  19, 20, 29, 30,  39-45,  65,
         111-114, 155, 165, 182
 Alkalinity 71, 73, 81
 Aquifer 75, 154
 Argonne National Laboratory 57

                       B
 Benthic Surveillance  66, 67
 Biomonitoring of Environmental Status and Trends
        (BEST) Program  68,95
 Bird 100, 101, 122, 124
 Bureau of Land Management  31, 32, 125, 126
 Bureau of Reclamation  23, 26, 70
 Bureau of the Census 1, 3-6, 11, 20,  115-118
 Census   1, 3-6, 11-13,  15,  20, 24, 48, 91, 101,
         115-118, 132
 Centers for Disease Control  107, 108, 187
 Chemical studies 45
 Chemical use  39-43, 113, 114
 Chemicals 20, 54, 68, 69, 113, 117, 161, 187
 Clean Water Act  83, 85, 129,  130,  132-134, 136,
         140, 143, 145, 153, 154, 161
 Climate  31, 45, 166, 168, 174, 188
 Coast(s)   15, 46, 47, 50, 66, 91-94,  105
 Coastal areas  46, 47, 66, 94, 135
 Coastal pollutant discharge 46, 47
 Colorado River Basin  70
 Conservation  11, 13, 19, 26, 39, 42, 45, 46, 54, 58,
        59, 66, 92, 94,105,112, 113, 121, 124, 127,
         154
 Contamination  66, 67, 78, 80, 108, 113, 119, 121,
         122, 147, 154, 155
 Corn 40,43, 44, 113
 Cotton 39, 40, 43, 44, 113
 Cropland 11, 13
 Crops  11, 20,  39, 40, 43, 44, 113

                      D
 Demographic 3, 5, 178
 Department of Agriculture  11-14, 19, 29, 30, 39-45,
        65, 111-114, 155, 165, 182
 Department of Commerce  3, 5, 6, 20, 46, 66, 67, 72,
        91, 92, 94,105,115-118,166-169,171,173,
        174, 176, 177, 182
Department of Defense 21, 119,  120
 Department of Energy 57, 121
 Department of Health and Human Services
                 107, 108, 182
 Department of the Interior 15, 22, 24, 26,
                 31-34, 68, 70, 71, 73-75,
                 78,  79, 95,  97,  98,  100,
                 101,   122-126,   160,
                 178-180
 Department of Transportation 48-51,182
 Discharge 22, 46, 47, 50, 54, 85,  132, 140,
                 145, 146,  161, 173
 Drainage 21, 45, 82,  122, 155
 Duck breeding 101

                       E
 Economic Research Service  11, 12, 39-42,
                44,45
 Emission(s) 53-54, 57, 171
 Energy  20, 35, 51, 57, 121, 160, 166, 171,
                178,  182
 Energy Information Administration 57
 Enforcement 127, 129, 134, 138, 139, 143,
                145,  146
 Environmental  Protection  Agency    50,
                52-54, 58-60, 80-85, 102,
                113,  121,  127, 128, 130,
                132,   134-138,   140-147,
                153-155,   159,   161,
                181-187
 Estuaries   15, 92, 94, 105, 112,  134,153,
                161
 Estuarine 46, 66, 92-94, 97, 105, 106, 134,
                135,  144
Farm 11,20,39-45
Federal  Highway Administration  48, 49,
                156
Federal  Land Policy and Management Act
                31
Fertilizer(s)  39, 40, 41, 42, 44, 45, 113
Fish 29, 30, 33, 34, 67-69, 80, 84, 86, 87,
                94-98, 100, 101, 111, 122,
                124-126, 140, 153
Fish monitoring  68, 80
Fisheries 61, 69, 86, 91-94, 153,  167, 169,
                176, 182
Fishing  33, 34, 103
Fruits 41, 43
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
                                                                                           PAGE 191

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                      G
Grazing  11,29, 137
Great Lakes National Program Office 80
Ground water 7, 22, 24, 45, 61, 71, 75, 78,
               79,  112,  113,  138,  139,
                147, 154, 180

                      H
Hazardous  waste  35, 52, 58-60,  119, 121,
                139
Health 31, 86,95, 107, 108, 115, 119, 121,
                122,  138, 140,  141, 145,
                182, 187
Highways  11,48
Hydrogeology 184
Hydrology 21, 174, 177
 Industry 3, 24, 54, 60, 117, 125, 132, 133,
                145, 180
 Irrigation 13, 20, 24, 26, 39, 41, 42, 46, 70,
                122
 Lakes  15, 46, 68, 80-82, 86, 97, 130, 131,
                134, 137, 153, 171, 176
 Land use 1, 7, 9, 11-13, 15, 20, 31, 46, 71,
                78, 155, 160, 179, 182
 Lead   1, 46, 53, 68, 69, 71, 73, 74, 113,
                140, 166, 187

                       M
 Major Water Projects Database  21
 Manufacturing 54, 117, 182
 Marine organisms  66
 Marine pollution 50, 176
 Minerals 29, 111,171
 Mussel Watch 66,67

                       N
 National Acid Deposition Program 37
 National  Agricultural  Statistics  Service
                39-43
 National  Contaminant   Biomonitoring
                Program 68,69
 National Hydrologic Bench-Mark  Network
                 Program 71
 National Irrigation Water Quality Program
                 122
 National Mapping Program  15
 National Ocean Service  23, 46, 66, 92, 94,
                 105
National    Oceanic   and   Atmospheric
               Administration 46,47,66,
               91-94,  105,  106,   113,
               166-169, 171, 173, 176
National Park Service  76, 123
National Pesticide Monitoring Program  68,
               69
National Resources Inventory 13, 14
National    Stream  Quality  Accounting
               Network 73, 74
National Surface Water Survey  81
National Water Quality Monitoring Program
                83, 184, 185
National Water Summary 78, 79
National  Weather  Service   26, 166, 168,
                174,  177
National Wetlands Inventory 7, 94, 97-99
Nitrate  37, 61,  71, 73, 81, 155, 173
Non-chemical pest management  41, 42
Nonpoint  source   35, 111,  112,  127, 136,
                137,  143, 155
Nuts 41,43

                       o
Ocean(s)   23,  46, 66, 83-85,  92-94,  103,
                105,  107,  134-  136,  140,
                141,  143,  159,  168,  169,
                171,  173, 174, 176
 Ocean pollution 173,  176
 Office  of  Air   Quality   Planning  and
                Standards Data  53
 Office of Ecological Processes and Effects
                Research  81
 Office   of  Emergency   and   Remedial
                Response  52
 Office  of Environmental Restoration and
                 Waste Management 121
 Office of Hydrology  174, 177
 Office of Solid Waste 52, 58-60
 Office of Toxic Substances  54
 Office of Water   71, 73, 78, 83, 84, 127,
                 130,  132,  134, 136, 138,
                 140,  141,  143-147,  153,
                 161, 184,  185
 Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds
                 140
 Oil  46,50,51,57, 119, 171
 Oil spills  50
 Oxygen  46, 71,  73, 74, 86, 155, 171, 173
  Palmer Drought Severity Index 26
  Permits  35, 76, 121, 140, 143, 145, 146
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 Pesticide(s)  39-42, 45, 46, 47, 66, 69, 74,
                 112, 113, 138, 154, 173
 Plants  35,98, 117, 132, 140
 Point source  113, 125,  134, 135,  140
 Pollution  35, 50, 53, 54, 61, 78,  82, 85,
                 103,   105,   106,   109,
                 111-113,   117-119,  128,
                 132, 136,  137,  140, 145,
                 153, 155,  169,  173, 176,
                 182, 185
 Population Estimates  5, 6, 101
 Population Projections  5,6 .
 Precipitation  19, 21, 26, 37, 38, 57, 70, 73,
                 78, 168,  173
 Public water supply  31, 75, 108,  138-140

                       R
 Ranch  20
 Resource Conservation  and Recovery Act
                 (RCRA)  58
 Resources 7, 11-14, 19, 22, 24, 29, 31, 38,
                 45,46,57,70,71,73-79,
                 82-84,  86,  87,  92,  93,
                 95-98,  102, 105,  107, 112,
               •  115, 125, 127,  128, 140,
                 143, 159, 160,  166, 171,
                 178, 180-182, 184
 Rivers  22, 68, 73, 74, 84, 123
Salinity  70, 92, 173
Sediment  66, 71, 73, 74, 78, 85-87,  112,
                135, 171, 173, 181, 184
Sediments  66, 67, 69, 86, 173
Sewage  1, 35, 85, 145
Sewage treatment  35, 145
Shellfish 67, 103, 105, 106,  140
Shellfishing waters  105
Sludge  145
Snow  15, 19, 26, 70, 168, 171, 173
Soil  13, 19, 26, 31, 39, 42, 45,  82,  111,
                112, 125, 155, 161,  168,
                187
Soil Conservation Service 13, 19, 26, 39,
                45, 112
Solid waste  52, 53, 58-60, 115, 117
Soybeans 40, 43, 44, 113
Stormwater runoff  156
Streamflow 22, 72, 73, 78, 86, 180
Streams  15, 81, 82, 84, 86, 136
Superfund  52, 121, 143, 154
 Surface water  22, 24, 26, 31, 72,  74, 79,
                 81,83,108,113,140,155,
                 180
 Tennessee Valley Authority  86, 87
 Timber  7,29, 111, 125
 Toxics Release Inventory  54
 Transportation 35, 46, 48-51, 53, 57, 117,
                182
 Treatment  1,  13, 35, 46, 52,  54, 58, 60,
                107, 109, 127, 129, 132,
                133, 145

                   .    U
 U.S. Coast Guard  50
 U.S.   Environmental  Protection  Agency
                52-54, 58-60, 80-85, 102,
                128, 130,  132,  134-138,
                141-144, 146, 147,  153,
                154, 159, 161, 182,  183,
                187
 U.S. Fish  and Wildlife   33,  34, 68,  69,
                94-98, 100, 101, 124, 153
 U.S. Forest Service 29, 30, 65
 U.S. Geological Survey  15, 22, 24, 25, 37,
                38, 71-75, 78,  79, 84, 97,
                98, 122, 178-181
 Urban  runoff  1, 155
Vegetables 42, 43
Volpe  National  Transportation  Systems
                Center  49, 51

                      W
Waste  35, 52-54, 58-60,  112, 115, 117,
                119, 121, 134, 139, 146
Waste treatment  52
Wastewater treatment 46, 127, 132
Water Data Storage and Retrieval System
                (WATSTORE)   22,  72,
                180, 181
Water pollution  35, 50, 61, 103, 109, 117,
                128, 136,  145, 173,  185
Water quality  1, 7, 22, 26, 31, 35, 39, 40,
                45,55, 61, 71-76,78, 79,
                83-85, 87, 103, 105, 109,
                111-114,  122,  125,  127,
                130, 135,  138,  140-144,
                146, 149, 151, 155, 161,
                165, 168, 171, 182, 184,
                185
GUIDE TO FEDERAL WATER QUALITY PROGRAMS AND INFORMATION
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Water Quality Information Center 114,165
Water supply  19, 26, 31, 70, 74, 75, 78,
               107, 108, 138-140, 154
Water use 1, 7, 17, 22, 24, 25, 52, 75, 132,
               180
Waterbome disease 103, 107, 108
Waterfowl  34, 68,101, 124
Watershed  46, 65, 76, 83, 111, 125, 130,
               141, 142,  153, 159, 161,
               184, 185
Watershed management 65,130
Weather 23, 26, 100, 166, 168, 174, 175,
               177
Wcll(s)  19, 20, 31, 33, 48, 58, 80, 81, 83,
               91,98,125,138,139,145,
               153,  154, 155, 160,  168,
               171, 176, 181, 187, 188
Wetlands 7, 13, 34, 61, 76, 78, 83-85, 94,
               97-99,  111,  125,   130,
               134-136,  140,  141,  143,
               144, 159
Wheat  40,43,44, 113
Wilderness  11,29,31
Wildlife 11, 29, 30, 33, 34, 68, 69, 94-98,
                100,    101,   111,   122,
                124-126, 140, 153
 Working Group on Water Quality 113, 155
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Guide to Federal Water Quality Programs and Information

Comments /  Recommendations Form
 Please circle one number per question (scale l=low rating, 5=highest rating)

  1. How would you rate overall usefulness of the Guide?         12    34    5

  2. How would you rate the usefulness of the Key word Index?     123    45
 To aid us in identifying the users of the Guide, briefly describe your work/goals and your
 agency/organization.
 Comments / Recommendations:
 Return the Comments /
 Recommendations Form
 to:
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
OPPE
ESID (PM-222B)
Attn: Guide to Federal Water Quality Programs and Information
401 M Street, SW
Washington, DC 20460

FAX: (202)260-4968

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Guide to Federal Water Quality Programs and Information

Entry Updating Procedures
We would like to keep this Guide current. To update an entry you may photocopy the entry and
mail or fax a marked-up version to:

      U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
      OPPE
      ESID (PM-222B)
      Attn: Guide to Federal Water Quality Programs and Information
      401M Street, SW
      Washington, DC 20460

      FAX: (202)260-4968

Please identify a contact person and phone number with the update, in case clarification of the
edits/fax is necessary.

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Guide to Federal Water Quality Programs and Information

New Entry Submission Information
 We realize with the first print of this guide that water-related programs and information may have been
 overlooked.  Please help to make the Guide complete by sending in entries on additional water-related
 programs and information that should be included in the Guide.
         Individual programs to be included in the Guide should provide National statistics or summary
     information on water quality. For this Guide, National statistics are defined as collections of quantitative
     data computed on a National basis using a consistent methodology for either a defined sample or a
     complete census. An example of National statistics would include median level of chemical contami-
     nants found in samples from aNational water quality monitoring network orthe number of pulp and paper
     mills in the U.S.  (census). Summary information is defined as  nonquantitative information (or
     quantitative information that has not been collected using a consistent methodology on aNational basis)
     Examples of summary information would include a listing of chemicals with EPA water quality criteria!
     or National estimates of the number of stream miles meeting designated uses.

         While the focus of the Guide is on water quality statistics and information on a National level, some
     regional information (e.g., Great Lakes) can be of National importance due to the key nature of the
     resource. This type of information is of recognized importance and will be included in the Guide to the
     extent resources allow.

         The National statistics  and summary information included in  the Guide should relate to (1)
     underlying demographic and socio-cultural pressures such as population growth, (2) resulting proximate
     or direct effects such as pollution loadings, (3) the state of the environment such as levels of chemicals
     in the water column, (4) resulting impacts on society such as beach closures and water-borne disease, and
     (5) societal responses such as regulatory actions.

         National statistics included in the Guide should (1) reflect meaningful conditions or variations
     related to water quality, (2) allow for aggregation of data to display National trends in water quality
     related conditions, and (3) be measurable and of sufficient coverage to reveal trends over time or
     conditions at a point in time.

         National statistics included in the Guide should also describe conditions or trends using some
     numerical measure. Although it is recognized that few environmental data sets meet the requirements
     for inferential statistical testing, the measures should be suitable for developing descriptive measures that
     summarize the data in various ways, e.g., spatially or temporally.

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Guide to Federal Water Quality Programs and Information

New Entry Submission Information  (continued)
 Please use the entries in the Guide as a sample format for the information to be included for
 each entry. The categories of information needed for the two types of entries is summarized
 below:
   Statistical Entry:
   Statistical entries are defined throughout the Guide
   by the box below:

W f
_A f •
v\/
»
i

Data Type: Statistics
Source: Program Contact
   These entries contain statistical information. Please
   include the following items:


     • OFFICE
     • SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
     • STATISTICAL COVERAGE
     • DATA COLLECTION METHODS
     • COLLECTION FREQUENCY
     • GEOGRAPHIC COVERAGE
     •CONTACT
     • FOR PUBLIC INQUIRES
     •PUBLICATIONS
     •DATABASE(S)
                  Program Entry:
                  Program entries are defined throughout the Guide
                  by the box below:

1 =
Data Type: Program
Information
Source: Program Contact
                   These entries contain a brief program description.
                   Please include the following items:


                     • OFFICE
                     • SUMMARY PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
                     • CONTACT
                     • FOR PUBLIC INQUIRES
                     • PUBLICATIONS
                     •DATABASE(S)
 Please submit the entry to:
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
OPPE
ESID (PM-222B)
Attn: Guide to Federal Water Quality Programs and Information
401 M Street, SW
Washington, DC 20460
FAX: (202)260-4968
  Please identify a contact person and phone number, so that
  we can contact you concerning your proposed Guide entry.
      •ti US. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFRCE: 1993 346-069

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