Office of Solid Waste          Form Approved
                          and Emergency Response       OMB No. 2050-0114
                          Technology Innovation Office      Approval Expires 6-1-94
                          Washington, DC 20460
                                       EPA/540/2-91/011, No.2 June 1992
vEPA  Vendor Information Form
         To be completed for participation in the:

         Vendor Information System
         for  Innovative Treatment
         Technologies (VISITT)
         Version 2.0
          NOTE: You may submit data electronically instead of typing or writing responses
              on the enclosed Vendor Information Form. Each Form is accompanied
              byone3.5"IBM-compatiblediskette. If you need additional diskettes, call
              the VISITT Hotline.
         Completion of this form is voluntary. Any questions, call VISITT
         Hotline: 800/245-4505 or 703/883-8448.

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                                    EPA/540/2-91/011
                                    Number 2
                                    June 1992
Vendor Information Form
To be completed for participation in the:
U.S. Environmental Kroiecnon agency
Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response
Technology Innovation Office
Washington, DC 20460
                                    Printed on Recycled Paper

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A Letter to Technology Vendors

       One of this country's greatest challenges is cleaning up its many hazardous waste
sites. The nature and extent of contamination varies widely at these sites, and it is becoming
increasingly clear that acceptable and cost-effective remedies will require the expedited
development of new treatment technologies. EPA established the Technology Innovation
Office (TTO) within the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response to promote greater
development and use of these new remediation methods.

       A serious obstacle to technology development and use is the lack of readily available
and current  technology information.   To address this problem, TIO has developed an
automated database - the Vendor Information System for Innovative Treatment (VISITT) - for
.use by state,  federal, and private sector professionals responsible for cleanup of hazardous
waste  sites.  VISITT Version 1.0, which we made available this June, contains  detailed
information on the availability, performance, and cost of 155 innovative technologies offered
by 97 vendors.  The database is available free of charge to the public,  and we announced
its availability  to over 17,000 people who have  expressed  an  interest in  remediation
technologies.

       Although we've made a good start, we know that the initial version of VISITT did not
include some of the companies in this growing industry. This booklet  describes the types
of technologies that we are including in the database. If you offer one of these technologies,
I encourage you to complete the Vendor Information Form in Appendix  D, and submit it by
the October  1, 1992 deadline.   Submittals received by that date will be considered for
inclusion in the second release of VISITT in early 1993.

       EPA believes that VISITT offers an unprecedented opportunity  for developers  and
vendors of innovative treatment technologies to showcase their capabilities and to improve
communication among technology developers, users, and the  investment community.  To
rally appreciate  the advantages of participating in VISITT, you must  see it  for yourself.
IBM-compatible diskettes and a user manual are available free of charge from the VISITT
Hotline (800/245-4505 or 703/883-8448). I invite you to order the system, and see how easy
it is for a user to access information serving a wide variety of  needs.

       Submittal of the information requested in this form is completely optional.  We do,
however, urge all vendors  who offer  (or are developing) relevant innovative  treatment
technologies  to respond.  With your help, we expect that this cooperative EPA/industry
effort will play a significant role in  making new  technologies available to remediate  our
nation's hazardous waste sites.
                                      Walter W. Kovalick, Jr., Ph.D.
                                      Director
                                      Technology Innovation Office

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                            TABLE OF CONTENTS

Section                                                                   Page

LETTER TO TECHNOLOGY VENDORS	   i

GENERAL INFORMATION

      I.     Synopsis  	   1

      II.    Contents of This Booklet	   2

      III.    Why is This Database Needed?	   3

      IV.    Why Should You Participate?  	   3

      V.    What Innovative Technologies are Eligible for Inclusion?	   4

      VI.    Should Confidential Business Information (CBI) be Submitted?	   4

      VII.   How Much Documentation is Required Regarding Performance and Other
            Technology Claims?  	   4


Appendices

A    INSTRUCTIONS  	    A-l

B    DEFINITIONS  	    B-l

      1.     Technology Types  	    B-l
      2.     Other Definitions  	    B-5

C    KEY TO CONTAMINANT GROUPS	   C-l

D    VENDOR INFORMATION FORM  	   D-l

      Part 1: General Information and Technology Overview	   D-l
      Part 2: Full-Scale Equipment/Capabilities	  D-10
      Part 3: Pilot-Scale Equipment/Capabilities  	  D-13
      Part 4: Treatability Study Capabilities (Bench Scale)	  D-15
      Part 5: Summary of Performance Data 	  D-16
      Part 6: Representative Applications and Client References  	  D-19
      Part 7: Literature and Technical References	  D-21

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GENERAL INFORMATION
I.      Synopsis
       The U.S.  Environmental  Protection Agency (EPA)  has  recently developed an
       automated  database,  the  Vendor  Information  System  for Innovative  Treatment
       Technologies (VISITT), for use by  state, federal, and private sector professionals
       responsible for cleanup of the nation's hazardous waste sites.  VISITT Version 1.0,
       which was made available in June 1992, contains 155 innovative technologies offered
       by 97 vendors.  IBM-compatible diskettes and a user manual are available free of
       charge from the VISITT Hotline (800/245-4505 or 703/883-8448).

       VISITT contains information on innovative treatment technologies,  those for which
       a lack of cost and performance data inhibit their routine use to cleanup  hazardous
       waste sites.  Exhibit 1 gives  a partial list of innovative technologies eligible  for
                                            EXHIBIT 1

              PARTIAL LIST OF INNOVATIVE TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES OF INTEREST
         Acid Extraction*
         Adsorption - In Situ*
         Air Sparging - In Situ Ground Water*
         Bioremediation - General*
         Bioremediation - In Situ Ground Water*
         Bioremediation - In Situ Lagoon
         Bioremediation - In Situ Soil*
         Bioremediation - Slurry Phase*
         Bioremediation - Solid Phase Bioventing*
         Chemical Treatment - Dechlorination*
         Chemical Treatment - Other*
         Chemical Treatment - In Situ Ground Water*
         Delivery/Extraction Systems*
         Electrical Separation*
          Category included in VISITT Version 1.0.
Magnetic Separation*
Materials handling*
Off-Gas Treatment*
Pyrolysis
Slagging - Off-Gas Treated*
Soil Rushing - In Situ*
Soil Vapor Extraction*
Soil Vapor Extraction - Thermally Enhanced*
Soil Washing*
Solvent Extraction*
Thermal Desorption*
Thermal Desorption - Off-Gas Treated*
Vitrification*
Vitrification - Off-Gas Treatment*
       inclusion in VISITT.  The database is designed to serve as a tool to screen these
       technologies for remediation of contaminated hazardous waste sites, and to direct
       users to more complete information.  The investment community may also use this
       database to identify potential investment opportunities.

       The  Technology Innovation  Office  (TIO) of  the  Office  of  Solid  Waste  and
       Emergency Response (OSWER) is conducting this Second Invitation for Submittals
       for developers and providers of innovative treatment technologies. The information

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      submitted by applicants on the Vendor Information Form (VIF) (Appendix D) will be
      considered for inclusion in the second version of the database.

      EPA believes that VISITT offers an unprecedented opportunity for developers and
      purveyors of innovative treatment technologies  to  showcase  their capabilities.
      Innovative technologies are undergoing rapid change, which makes it difficult to
      maintain  current  information  on their developmental  status  and commercial
      availability.  We  anticipate  that this database will play  an important role in the
      efficient expansion of this industry by tracking this changing market and improving
      communication between technology developers and users.

      One of  EPA's highest  priorities is  the generation of new  methods  to  treat
      contaminated soil, sludge, solids, sediments, and solid-matrix waste and to  treat
      ground water in situ. VISITT applies to only innovative treatment technologies that
      address these media/wastes.  EPA will not accept information on the more widely
      available technologies:  incineration, solidification/stabilization, and above-ground
      groundwater treatment.  Technologies must address remediation of contaminated
      sites, not industrial wastes generated  on an ongoing basis.  Nor does this database
      address innovative measurement, monitoring, or containment technologies.

      The purpose of VISITT is to facilitate the increased domestic use of innovative
      treatment technologies.  Firms that respond may be located either inside or outside
      the United States; however,  non-U.S. firms should intend to operate commercially
      within the U.S.

      Technologies of interest include those at any stage of development, from bench to
      pilot to full scale.  However, EPA desires information only on those technologies that
      respondents intend to commercialize, rather than those on which they are conducting
      academic research only.

      Information submitted  by applicants  on  the  VIF by October  1,  1992, will be
      considered for  inclusion in  the second release of VISITT in early  1993.  After
      October  1, EPA will review  applications as time and resources permit. To remain
      in the database, all vendors must verify or update submitted information during the
      update cycle.

II.    Contents of This Booklet

      This booklet contains  three  sections.  General Information gives  background to
      VISITT and this Second Invitation for Submittals. Appendix A contains instructions
      for completing the Vendor Information Form (VIF), definitions of terms used in the
      form, and a key to contaminant groups. Appendix B  contains the blank VIF to be
      submitted.

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       The  VIF consists  of seven parts, which  are listed in Exhibit 2.  Part 1 must be
       completed  in order for the vendor to be included in VISITT.  This part contains
       questions on the name and location of the vendor and on the description, status, and
       application of  the technology.   Part 2 is  required for  applicants  with  full-scale
       technologies; Part  3 is required for applicants with pilot-scale technologies.  Parts 4
                                           EXHIBIT 2

                               CONTENTS OF VENDOR INFORMATION FORM


                       Part 1:  General Information and Technology Overview
                       Part 2:  Full-Scale Equipment/Capabilities
                       Part 3:  Pilot-Scale Equipment/Capabilities
                       Part 4:  Bench-Scale Treatability Study Capabilities
                       Part 5:  Summary of Performance Data
                       Part 6:  Representative Applications
                       Part 7:  Literature and Technical References
       through 7 are optional,  and apply to technologies at any  scale of  development.
       Lastly, this submittal package includes an IBM-compatible computer diskette, which
       contains an automated version of the blank VIF.

III.    Why Is This Database Needed?

       The impetus for VISITT is the Agency's need to increase the availability and use of
       treatment technologies that can cost effectively clean up hazardous waste sites.  The
       database provides  a service to  vendors who are  developing and applying  new
       technology by creating a vehicle to make known the application and performance of
       their technologies to the full range of users. The Agency anticipates that VISITT will
       be used by the thousands of professionals responsible for the cleanup of Superfund
       sites,  RCRA corrective  actions, State-led  cleanups,  Federal facility restoration
       programs, and remedial  actions at  leaking underground storage tank (UST) sites.
       The database allows users to screen technologies for engineering feasibility studies,
       and to identify vendors who provide treatability studies and  cleanup services.

IV.    Why Should You Participate?

       EPA expects that VISITT will prove to be an excellent opportunity for vendors to
       promote their capabilities.  The system allows the vendor  to provide substantial
       information on the applicability, performance, and current use of their technologies.
       The database is publicly available free-of-charge on computer diskette, and EPA is
       studying online access.  We reach cleanup personnel and investors throughout the
       U.S. and abroad by widely advertising VISITT in trade journals, at conferences,  and

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      through direct mailings to an extensive list of potential users.  Prior to the database's
      release, over 1,500 people requested order information.

V.    What Innovative Technologies Are Eligible for Inclusion?

      EPA includes only certain innovative treatment technologies in VISITT.  These are
      technologies to treat the particular remedial problems identified earlier:  treatment
      of contaminated soil, sludge, sediments, and solid-matrix wastes; and treatment of
      ground water in  place.  Innovative  treatment technologies  that  treat off-gases
      generated from a primary treatment technology also are included in VISITT. Exhibit
      1 contains a partial list of eligible innovative technologies.  EPA will continue to
      expand this list to  include additional innovative technologies submitted.

      Incineration, solidification/stabilization, and above-ground groundwater treatment
      technologies will not be accepted.  EPA recognizes that these technologies are vital
      to the clean up of hazardous  waste  sites, and that some innovative approaches
      utilizing these technologies  are being developed and used.  However, the Agency
      believes that, for the most part, information on these technologies is readily available
      and that there is a greater need to disseminate information on technologies for which
      there is far less  information.

      As noted earlier, this VISITT submittal also does not apply to  technologies related
      to (1) treatment  of industrial wastes generated on an ongoing basis, (2) measurement,
      (3) monitoring, or (4) containment.

VI.   Should Confidential Business Information (CBI) Be Submitted?

      Confidential business information should not be submitted, because EPA plans to
      make all submitted information available to the public. However,  applicants may
      write "available  on a case-by-case basis" as  their response to those questions for
      which they have  information, but would prefer not to make this information generally
      available.

      Applicants are encouraged  to provide "sanitized" or masked information that will
      allow users to review general information on a vendor's experience, without revealing
      confidential information.  For instance, in Part  6, which details project experience,
      you may provide a generic industry name, such  as "organic chemical manufacturer"
      instead of the actual site name. A lack of information may discourage users from
      considering the  technology further.

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VII.   How Much  Documentation  is  Required  Regarding  Performance and Other
       Technology Claims?

       VISITT is intended to be a showcase for technology vendors.  To optimize the
       usefulness of the data, EPA will review each submittal for clarity, completeness, and
       adherence to instructions.  It is in the applicant's best interest to fill out each part
       of VIF as completely as possible since incomplete information may discourage users
       from considering the technology further.

       EPA reserves the right to clarify or question information submitted. The respondent
       will be given the opportunity to review any substantive  changes to the submittal that
       the Agency wishes to make, with two exceptions: (1) EPA may list Superfund sites
       or Federal facilities at which the vendor's technology  has been used, and (2) EPA
       may add publicly-available references of which EPA is aware.

       The Agency will not review submitted data for accuracy or quality; to do so would
       be too resource intensive and subjective, and would substantially delay dissemination.
       VISITT clearly states that vendors have supplied  the information, and that the data
       have not been verified by the Agency. Applicants should expect that interested users
       will request additional information regarding applicability and performance  of a
       particular treatment technology.  The database contains  the following disclaimer:

             Inclusion in  the  U.S.  Environmental  Protection  Agency's  Vendor
            Information  System for Innovative  Treatment Technologies does not
             mean that the Agency  approves, recommends, licenses, certifies,  or
             authorizes the use  of any of the technologies.  Nor does the  Agency
             certify the accuracy of the data.   This listing  means only that the
            vendor has provided information on a technology  that EPA considers
             to be eligible for inclusion in this database.

       EPA includes abstracts of all references cited in Part 7 of the VIF, and includes the
       abstracts in the Alternative Treatment Technology Information Center (ATTIC), an on-
       line service operated by EPA's  Office of Research and Development.   For this
       reason, we request that copies of references be included in the submittal.

VIII.   EPA's Authority for Submittal and Burden Statement

       EPA's authority for conducting this Second Invitation for Submittals is Section 311 of
       the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (42 U.S.C. 9601 et
       seq.). Under Section 311, EPA may collect and disseminate information related to
       the use of innovative treatment  technologies for remediation of hazardous waste
       sites.

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      EPA estimates that the vendor reporting burden for this collection of information
      will average 12 hours per response for  completion of Part 1,  and 28 hours for
      completion of the entire form.  These estimates include the time applicants will
      require to review and maintain the data needed, and to complete and review the
      VIF. Send comments regarding this burden estimate, or any other aspect of reducing
      the burden, to  Chief, Information Policy  Branch, PM-223, U.S. Environmental
      Protection Agency, 401 M Street, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20460;  and to Paperwork
      Reduction Project (OMB #2050-0114), Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs,
      Office of Management and Budget, Washington,  D.C. 20503.

IX.   When and Where to File

      EPA will review Vendor Information Forms received by October 1,1992, for inclusion
      in the second release of VISITT in early 1993.  EPA will review responses received
      after October 1  as time and resources permit.

      Vendors already included in VISITT Version 1.0 will be contacted by EPA to verify
      or update submitted information.  VISITT participants may also  submit  further
      technologies for consideration.

      Send completed VIFs and diskettes to:

            System Operator, VISITT
            PRC Environmental Management, Inc.
            1505 PRC Drive
            McLean, VA 22102

      EPA  may  need to  contact respondents  for further  information  or to clarify
      information submitted, prior to inclusion in VISITT.

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 APPENDIX A
INSTRUCTIONS

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INSTRUCTIONS

1.    Part 1 must be completed in its entirety in order to be considered for inclusion in
      VISITT. A clear and concise technology description is particularly important, since
      this may be the first information reviewed by the user.

2.    Provide your Vendor Name on each page in upper right corner; you need provide
      Technology Type on each page only if you are submitting more than one form.

3.    Applicants with full-scale technologies (Question 17a checked) must fill out Part 2.
      You may also complete this part if the technology is at pilot scale.

4.    Applicants with pilot-scale technologies (Question 17b checked) must fill out Part 3.
      You may also complete this part if the technology is at full scale or bench scale.

5.    Parts 4 through 7 are optional, but it is in the applicant's best interest to  complete
      these sections as thoroughly as possible. Incomplete information may discourage
      users from considering the technology further.

6.    To answer Pan 1, Question 9, refer to the definitions of Technology Types provided
      in Appendix B.  Appendix B also contains other useful definitions of terms used in
      the VIF.

7.    In Part 7, cite only references that you can provide with your application.  If you are
      a participant in VISITT Version 1.0, you  need not provide references submitted to
      EPA earlier.

8.    You may submit responses on the computer diskette provided. A printed hard copy
      of the form should accompany the diskette, in case the latter is damaged in transit.

9.    Submit one copy each completed VIF, references, and the computer diskette (if
      appropriate) to the System Operator, VISITT,  PRC Environmental Management,
      Inc., 1505 PRC Drive, McLean, VA 22102.

10.    Questions regarding the VIF should be addressed to the VISITT Hotline at 800/245-
      4505 or 703/883-8448.

11.    EPA  welcomes any comments on the contents of this form.  You may provide
      comments in writing to the address given in No. 9, above, or by calling the VISITT
      Hotline.
                                       A-l

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APPENDIX B
DEFINITIONS

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DEFINITIONS

I.      Technology Types

       Acid Extraction - This technology is used to remove hazardous metals from excavated soils
       and sludges through the application of an acidic solution.  It is a liquid-solid extraction
       technology that operates on the principle that the metals of concern  will be preferentially
       solubilized and thereby removed from the waste. Further treatment will be required of the
       metal-containing  acid solution.

       Adsorption -  In Situ -  In this technology, containerized adsorptive materials (for example,
       various organic polymers, activated carbon, and sponge material) are placed directly in ground
       water to remove various hazardous compounds. This technology also would include systems
       that drill wells and place adsorptive materials in the air space above the ground water, in
       order to achieve reductions of relatively volatile compounds. The use of this technology will
       depend to a large  extent on site-specific soil and ground-water characteristics.

       Air Sparging - In Situ Ground Water - This technology reduces concentrations of hazardous
       compounds in ground water by injecting air below the water table. The  injected air creates
       air  bubbles  in the ground water. The  air bubbles contact dissolved/adsorbed-phase
       contaminants and non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in the aquifer,  causing contaminants
       to volatilize. The volatilized contaminants are transported by the  air bubbles into the vadose
       zone.  Removal of the contaminants transferred to the vadose zone would be accomplished by
       another technology, usually soil vapor extraction. The application and effectiveness of this
       technology will depend to a large extent on  site-specific soil and ground-water  conditions.

       Bioremediation -  General  - This  technology  uses  microorganisms to degrade organic
       contaminants. The microorganisms breakdown the organic contaminants by using them as a
       food source. End  products of the degradation are typically CO2 and H2O. Nutrients such as
       phosphorous, nitrogen, or oxygen may be added to enhance the biodegradation process. The
       VISITT database identifies  FIVE subcategories of this technology, based on the type and
       media treated. The technologies listed in this category are those  that did  not specify one of
       the processes listed in the subcategories or were not described in enough detail to  be included
       into one of the four subcategories.

       Bioremediation - In Situ Ground Water - The defining characteristic of this technology is an
       injection system (typically injection wells) to circulate microorganisms,  nutrients, and oxygen
       through contaminated aquifers.  In most instances ground water  is pumped, treated to some
       extent, and then reinjected  with additives  that enhance biodegradation. Common  system
       design consists of  a central withdrawal of ground water and reinfiltration upgradient of the
       treated area. Biodegradation relies on contact between contaminants in  the ground water and
       microorganisms.

       Bioremediation - In Situ Lagoon - This technology is similar to Bioremediation - Slurry Phase.
       However, it is in situ. The target media has a considerably higher moisture content.  It may
       be close to a slurry in consistency.  The various microbes  and nutrients may be added by
       injection, sprayed on top of lagoon and mixed or applied in another  manner.  In many
       situations the  media may also be stirred or aerated to promote bioremediation. Applications
       for this technology would include hazardous waste sludge lagoons.
                                            B-l

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Bioremediation - In Situ Soil - The target media for this technology are subsurface soils and
the vadose zone above the water table. In this technology, various microbes, nutrients and an
oxygen source are injected through injection wells into the soil.  In general, subsurface soil
moisture is required, and soils must be relatively permeable.

Bioremediation - Slurry Phase - This technology mixes excavated soil, sludge, or sediment
with water to form  a slurry that is mechanically agitated in an environment (usually a tank
or reactor vessel, although in situ lagoon applications are possible) with appropriate ambient
conditions of nutrients, oxygen, pH, and temperature. Upon completion of the process, the
slurry is dewatered  and the treated material disposed.

Bioremediation - Solid Phase - In this system, excavated soils are placed in a tank, building,
or on a lined treatment bed.  Nutrients and  other additives are tilled into the soil using
conventional equipment to facilitate microbial growth. The tillage equipment may provide
aeration for the soil  as well.  Water is provided via a sprayer or sprinkler system.  The VISITT
system includes composting and land farming  in this category.

Bioventing - This technology combines soil vapor extraction with bioremediation. It involves
a system of vapor extraction wells that induce air flow in the subsurface through air injection
or through the use  of a vacuum. The increased air flow increases the amount of oxygen
available for microbial degradation.  A  nutrient solution may be injected with the  air or
percolated into the soil to enhance biodegradation.

Chemical Treatment - Dechlorination -  This category  includes  any chemical treatment
technology that results in the removal or replacement of chlorine atoms bonded to hazardous
compounds. Further treatment of the newly formed chlorinated compounds may be required.

Chemical Treatment - In Situ Ground Water - This technology treats ground water in situ
through chemical treatment technology.  In this technology chemicals may be injected into
the ground  water to  convert  hazardous compounds  to less  hazardous compounds. This
technology is different from conventional pump and treat technologies in that the ground
water is treated in situ and not pumped above ground, treated, and then reinjected.

Chemical Treatment - Other -  Hazardous compounds are converted to less hazardous or
nonhazardous compounds through chemical reactions. The chemical reactions may be induced
through the addition of other compounds or through exposure of the contaminant to light
(photo-initiated reactions). Treatment technologies that fall under this classification operate
at moderate temperatures and pressure.

Delivery/Extraction Systems - These technologies do not treat hazardous wastes directly but
facilitate the use  of other waste treatment technologies. Such technologies may provide a
means of in situ treatment in cases in which such treatment previously was not feasible. Such
VISITT technologies include horizontal wells and other in situ delivery systems. In cases in
which the delivery  and extraction technology is integrally  linked to the use  of a particular
treatment, the technology has been placed in the same technology category as the technology
to which it is linked.

Electrical Separation - The operating principle of this technology is the establishment of an
electric field that will allow positive and negative ions to migrate through the contaminated
material and thereby be removed. The effectiveness of this technology will depend to a great
extent on the electrolytic nature of the waste.
                                     B-2

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Soil Flushing - In Situ - This technology consists of recycling substantial volumes of water
through a contaminated area for the purpose of flushing hazardous waste compounds from the
contaminated site. Water is injected into the soil through injection wells, flows through the
contaminated soil and   is extraction  through extraction  wells.  The  principal  defining
characteristic of this technology is the ability to essentially isolate the injected water from any
aquifer,  and then to recover the water for aboveground treatment.  The treated water is
recycled through  the contaminated area.  Treatment chemicals maybe added to the water to
help remove the  hazardous constituents of concern (for example, water can  be slightly
acidified to help flush toxic metals from the waste site). As is the case in air sparging in situ
ground-water, the use of this technology depends to a great extent on site-specific soil and
ground-water conditions.

Materials Handling - These technologies do not treat hazardous  waste directly but facilitate
the use of other hazardous waste treatment  technologies.  Such VISITT technologies include
innovative  technologies to dewater  waste, and remove debris.  In cases in which material
handling technology is integrally linked to the use of a particular treatment (for example, a
specialized reactor for bioremediation), the technology also has  been  placed in the same
technology category as the technology to which it is linked.

Off-Gas Treatment - This technology is specifically designed to treat the off-gas generated
by  another treatment technology such  as thermal desorption or soil  vapor  extraction.
Treatment of the gases may involve a chemical reaction to convert the gases to less hazardous
compounds. Other treatments may involve a physical process such as absorption of the gases
onto a substrate where  they  can be further treated.  The VISITT database contains only
innovative  off-gas treatment technologies.

Pyrolysis -  This technology,  also referred  to as  cracking, breaks down large hydrocarbon
molecules into molecules with lower molecular weight.  This is  achieved in the absence of
oxygen (i.e. no oxidation) by high temperature alone.  The  process often takes place in a
fluidized bed  reactor.    The  products  of the  process include low  molecular weight
hydrocarbons and stack gases. Catalysts may be used to promote  the pyrolysis process.  Some
pyrolysis systems  may required air emission control systems for  gases generated.

Slagging - This technology applies to hazardous wastes that contain substantial concentrations
of  metals  (approximately  5  percent or greater).   This system  operates in an  oxygen
environment at temperatures of 3900 F (2150 C) or greater. Metal compounds are converted
into a molten slag. Some slagging systems may require air emission control systems for acid
gas, metal vapors, and particulate. The VISITT database identifies a separate subcategory of
this technology  if treatment of the off-gas generated by this process was specified.  Slagging
technologies listed under this  category did not  specify any type of off- gas treatment.

Slagging -  Off-Gas Treated - This technology applies to hazardous wastes that contain
substantial  concentrations  of  metals  (approximately 5  percent  or greater) and organic
compounds.  This system operates in an oxygen environment  at temperatures  of 3900F
(2149C) or greater.  Organics  are treated  by  combustion or  other  off gas treatment
technology  and metal compounds are converted into a molten slag. The off gas treatment
systems may consist  of air  emission  control systems  for  acid gas,  metal vapors, and
particulates.
                                     B-3

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Soil Vapor Extraction - This technology applies a vacuum to a series of extraction wells to
create an air flow through the vadose zone. Air also may be injected through injection wells
to enhance air flow. As air moves through the soil, volatile contaminants move from the soil
and pore water to the air. The contaminated air is withdrawn often with entrained water.
This technology typically strips volatile organic compounds from the soil. Further treatment
of the extracted vapors usually is required.

Soil Vapor Extraction - Thermally Enhanced - This technology typically injects hot air or
steam directly into the soil to induce vaporization of various volatile and semivolatile organic
compounds. Injection of the hot air or steam may occur either through injection wells or by
other devices such as hollow stem augers. The vaporized  compounds are extracted directly
from the soil  through  the use of vapor extraction wells.  The hot air  or steam (thermal
treatment)  enhances volatilization of the contaminant, thus increasing removal rates and the
volatilization of less volatile compounds that would not have been extracted with non-
thermally enhanced soil vapor extraction. Further treatment of the extracted vapors usually
is required.

Soil Washing - This ex situ technology uses water and mechanical action to remove hazardous
constituents that adhere physically to soil particles.  It makes use of the fact that contaminants
have a tendency to adhere to the organic carbon and fine-grained soil fraction (silt and clay)
as opposed to the coarse grain mineral fraction (sand and gravel).  Surficial contamination is
removed from the coarse fraction of the soils by abrasive  scouring. The wash water may be
augmented with a leaching  agent, surfactant, pH adjustment, or chelating  agent  to  help
remove  organics or heavy metals. The spent wash  water will require further  treatment and
most likely will be recycled back to the treatment unit.

Solvent  Extraction - Similar to acid extraction, this technology focuses on the removal  of
organic  compounds, from contaminated material instead of on  the removal of metals.  This
is an ex situ liquid-solid and liquid-liquid extraction that operates on the principle that the
organic  constituents of concern can be preferentially removed from the waste to the solvent
phase.  The solvent  used can be varied depending on the  organic compounds to be  treated.
As with acid extraction, the  contaminated solvent solution will require further treatment.

Thermal Desorption - This technology uses heat in a controlled environment to cause various
organic compounds to volatilize and thereby be removed from contaminated material.  In some
cases an inert gas is used to carry the desorbed organics. The processes are planned and
designed to avoid combustion (that  is, not conducted in the  presence of oxygen) in the
primary unit.  This technology differs from incineration in that the temperature range is
usually 300F - 1200F (150C - 650C). Higher temperatures may be used when there is
no oxygen  present in the desorption chamber. Constituents that are  volatilized will require
further control. The VISITT database identifies a separate subcategory of this technology if
treatment of the off-gas generated by this process was specified.  Technologies listed under
this category did not specify any type of off-gas treatment.

Thermal Desorption - Off-Gas Treated - As defined here, this technology includes all thermal
desorption  systems that are followed by some type of off-gas treatment system such as systems
that liquify and recover volatilized constituents, adsorb off-gas with carbon, use a non-flame
low temperature catalytic destruction process, or use incineration  (that is, destruction  of
organic  constituents in a controlled flame combustion process).
                                     B-4

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       Vitrification -  This  technology  treats  wastes containing  primarily  metals  and high
       concentrations of silicates (soil-like material).  This technology uses heat usually applied
       through electrical power to melt contaminated soils  and sludges to form a stable glass and
       crystalline structure with very low leaching characteristics. The contaminated waste is
       typically heated to a range of 2900F to 3600F (1600C to 2000C) well above the soil's
       melting point. In some cases vitrifying agents may be added. Metals are encapsulated in the
       glass-like structure of the melted  silicate compounds.  As used here,  this technology also
       includes systems where treated wastes  are ceramic-like in nature. Constituents that  are
       volatilized will require further control. The VISITT database identifies a separate subcategory
       of this technology  if  treatment of the off-gas generated  by this process was  specified.
       Technologies listed under this category did not specify any type of off-gas treatment.

       Vitrification - Off Gas-Treated - As defined here, this technology includes all vitrification
       systems that include some type of off-gas treatment such as systems that liquefy and recover
       volatilized constituents,  adsorb off-gas with carbon,  use  a  non-flame  low  temperature
       catalytic destruction process, or use incineration (that is, destruction of organic constituents
       in a controlled flame combustion process). This technology is useful for wastes containing
       both metals and organic wastes containing high concentrations of silicates (soil-like material).
       As used here, this technology also includes systems where treated wastes are ceramic-like in
       nature. As with Slagging and Thermal Desorption, this technology may require air emission
       controls for acid gas, metal vapors, and  particulates.

II.     Other Definitions

       Batch Process -  Processing of the  waste occurs  without any waste entering or leaving  the
       process vessel during treatment.  An example of a batch treatment process would be a solvent
       extraction system where a fixed amount of solvent and waste are mixed for a given period of
       time prior to transfer to another treatment operation.

       Continuous Process -  Untreated and treated wastes  are  simultaneously  introduced and
       discharged from the particular treatment unit operation.

       Semicontinuous Process - Treatment operations are semicontinuous when  1) after the initial
       charge, no wastes are  added  to the process but some part of the waste is  continuously
       discharge, or 2) no material is discharged from the process but wastes or treatment chemicals
       are continuously added for a finite period of time. An example of the former  system could
       be a thermal desorption process where  a  fixed amount of waste is heated and vapors  are
       continuously withdrawn.

       Soil - Any of the various  types of  natural surface materials present above bedrock.

       Soil Classification - As used in this form, the term is meant to describe any of five groupings
       of soil based on particle size. The soil groupings and associate particle size are as follows: clay
       (.0002 to .002 millimeters), silt (.002 to .02 mm), fine  sand (.02 to .2 mm), coarse sand (0.2 to
       2.0 mm), and gravel (greater than 2 mm).*1
   1    Soil Survey Staff, 1975, Soil Taxonomy Handbook No. 436. U.S. Government Printing
       Office, p. 40 (Appendix 1).

                                            B-5

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Sludge - A semi-solid material with a moisture content typically between 2 and 20 percent.
The term is used here to identify the applicability of various technologies to a material that
contains  significant amounts of moisture but is relatively viscous and  may present some
problems with regard to pumping and mixing. Examples of sludges include residuals from
treatment of metal wastes and the mixture of waste/soil at the bottom of a waste lagoon.

Ground water in situ - As used here, the term "ground water" refers to subsurface water found
in the zone of saturation (i.e., the fraction of the subsurface where all pore space is filled with
water). Treatment of "ground water in situ" refers to treatment of ground water in place.

Technology Limitations - This term is meant to describe any contaminant, contaminant group,
or waste  parameter that can prohibit the  applicability of a technology to a given waste, or
adversely affect that technology in treating a particular waste. For example, biodegradation
is inhibited by high concentration of toxic  metals, and thermal desorption requires more
energy in the presence of significant  amounts of moisture.  Other factors that may affect
applicability and/or performance include soil particle size, oil and grease concentration, total
organic carbon concentration (TOC),  moisture content, cyanide concentration, and complex
metals.

Treatability Studies - As used here, the term applies to treatment technology tests (usually at
the  bench  or pilot scale)  conducted to  generate  data on  the untreated  and  treated
concentrations (i.e., performance data) of various constituents, constituent groups, or pollutant
parameters. These performance data are then used to assess whether a particular technology
is a viable option for cleanup of actual hazardous waste sites or used to determine design
parameters.

Operating Principle - These are the underlying scientific explanation for "why" a treatment
technology  works.  For example,  the operating principle of thermal desorption is that the
addition  of energy (in this case, in the form of heat) can cause chemicals to volatilize (i.e., go
from liquid to vapor phase) and thereby be separated from the waste of concern. (Note:  An
explanation of "how" heat is supplied to a various  chemical is a description of the various
treatment operations.)

Transportable Technology - Any technology that can be moved either completely assembled
or in  various parts and then reassembled at a hazardous waste site is considered to be a
transportable technology.

Fixed Technology - A technology that can only be used at the locations at which it is already
assembled.

In situ - As used here, the term is meant to describe the treatment of hazardous wastes in the
media and  at  the location  that they are found.  In  situ treatment does  not  involve any
excavation of the wastes.

Contaminant - For the purpose of this information request, any of the hazardous substances
that are  listed later in this appendix are considered contaminants.   These are the same
substances that are designated as hazardous under CERCLA at 40 CFR 302.4.
                                     B-6

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Contaminant Group - As used here, a term that applies to any of the generic names used to
describe multiple contaminants that have similar chemical and/or physical properties. Two
examples of contaminant groups are volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and radioactive
metals.

Pollutant Parameter - Any of the terms used to describe waste characteristics as a whole as
opposed  to discrete  groups of individual contaminants.   Pollutant  parameters include
biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), total organic carbon (TOC), pH, and moisture content.
                                    B-7

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       APPENDIX C
KEY TO CONTAMINANT GROUPS

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CONTAMINANT GROUP CODES FOR HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES LIST
   Organic
   LA"]  Halogenated volatiles
   |B~|  Halogenatedsemivolatiles
         Nonhalogenated volatiles
   ID I   Nonhalogenated semivolatiles
   IE I   Organic pesticides/herbicides
   |T1   Dioxins/furans
   [Gl   PCBs
   [H~|   Polynucleararomatics(PNAs)
    I I  Solvents
Inorganic
|M|   Heavy metals
 N|   Nonmetallic toxic elements (As, F)
 0|   Radioactive metals
 P|   Asbestos
      Inorganic cyanides
 Rl   Inorganic corrosives
Miscellaneous
 s|   Explosives/propellants
         Benzene-toluene-ethylbenzene-xylene (BTEX)    Irl  Organometallic pesticides/herbicides




         Organic cyanide




         Organic corrosives
                                             C-1

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HAZARDOUS SUBST ANCES
Organic Contaminant Group

  CAS No.
   208968   Acenaphthylene	D,H
    83329   Acenaphthene	D,H
    75070   Acetaldehyde	C
    67641   Acetone	C,I
    75058   Acetonitrile	CJC
    98862   Acetophenone	D
   591082   Acetyl-2-thiourea, 1	D
   107028   Acrolein	C
    79061   Acrylamide	D
    79107   Acrylic acid	C,L
   107131   Acrylonitrile	C
   124049   Adipicacid	L
   116063   Aldicarb	E
   309002   Aldrin	E
   107186   Allyl alcohol	E
    62533   Aniline	DJ,L
   120127   Anthracene	D,H
  1912249   Atrazine	E
  2642719   Azinphos-ethyl	E
    86500   Azinphos-methyl	E
   151564   Aziridine	C

    71432   Benzene	C,U
    98884   Benzene carbonyl chloride	B
    92875   Benzidine	D
   205992   Benzofluoranthene, 3,4-	H
    65850   Benzoic acid	D,L
   100470   Benzonitrile	A,C,I
    95169   Benzothiazole, 1,2-	D,I
    50328   Benzo (a) pyrene	D,H
   206440   Benzo (jW fluorene	H
   207089   Benzo (k) fluoranthene	D,H
   100447   Benzyl chloride	A
    56553   Benz (a) anthracene	D,H
   117817   Bis (2-ethyl hexyl)  phthalate	D
   111911   Bis (2-chloroethoxy) methane	B
   111444   Bis (2-chloroethyl) ether	B
   542881   Bis (chloromethyl)  ether	B
    75274   Bromodichloromethane	A
    74964   Bromomethane	A
  1689845   Bromoxynil	E
   106990   Butadiene, 1,3-	C
    71363   Butanol	C
    85687   Butlbenzyl phthalate	D
    94826   Butyric acid, 4-(2,4-dichlorop	C,L
CAS No.
  133062   Captan	B
   63252   Carbaryl	E
 1563662   Carbofuran	Ef
   75150   Carbon disulfide	C
   56235   Carbon tetrachloride	A
   78196   Carbophenothion	E
   75876   Chloral	A
   57749   Chlordane	E
  106478   Chloroaniline, p-	B
  108907   Chlorobenzene	A
   67663   Chloroform	A
   74873   Chloromethane	A
  107302   Chloromethyl methyl ether	A
  106898   Chloromethyloxirane, 2-	E
   91587   Chloronaphthalene, 2-	B
   95578   Chlorophenol, 2-	B
   59507   Chloro-3-methylphenol, 4-	B
 2921882   Chloropyrifos	E
  218019   Chrysene	D,H
   56724   Coumaphos	E
 8021394   Creosote	H
  108394   Cresol, m-	D
  106445   Cresol, p-	D
   98828   Cumene	C,I
21725462   Cyanazine	E
  110827   Cyclohexane	C, I
  108941   Cyclohexanone	C
   72548   ODD	E
   72559   DDE	E
   50293   DDT	E
   78488   DEF	Cf.
  333415   Diazinon	E
  132649   Dibenzofuran	D
   53703   Dibenz (a,h) anthracene	D,H
  124481   Dibromachloromethane	A
  106934   Dibromoethane, 1,2-	A
   96128   Dibromo-3-chloropropane, 1,2-	A
 1918009   Dicamba	E
   95501   Dichlorobenzene, 1,2-	B
  541731   Dichlorobenzene, 1,3-	B
  106467   Dichlorobenzene, 1,4-	B
   91941   Dichlorobenzidine, 3,3-	B
   75718   Dichlorodifluoromethane	A
   75343   Dichloroethane, 1,1-	A
  107062   Dichloroethane, 1,2-	A
                                                      C-2

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Organic Contaminant Group (continued)
 CAS No.
    75354   Dichloroethene, 1,1-	A
   156592   Dichloroethylene, cis-1,2-	A
   156605   Dichloroethylene, trans-1,2-	A
   120832   Dichlorophenol, 2,4-	B
    94757   Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 2-	L
    78875   Dichloropropane, 1,2-	A
   542756   Dichloropropene, 1,3-	A
    62737   Dichlorvos	E
   115322   Dicofol	E
    60571   Dieldrin	E
    84662   Diethyl phthalate	D
   111466   Diethylene glycol	D,I
  1660942   Diisopropylmethylphosphonate	D
    60515   Dimethoate	E
   119904   Dimethoxybenzidine, 3,3-	D
   105679   Dimethyl phenol, 2,4-	D
    13113   Dimethyl phthalate	D
    77781   Dimethyl sulfate	C
    99650   Dinitrobenzene, 1,3-	D
    51285   Dinitrophenol, 2,4-	D
   121142   Dinitrotoluene, 2,4-	D
   606202   Dinitrotoluene, 2,6-	D
    88857   Dinoseb	E
   123911   Dioxane, 1,4	C
    78342   Dioxathion	E
   122667   Diphenylhydrazine, 12-	D,H
    85007   Diquat	E
   298044   Disulfoton	C,E
   330541   Diuron	E
    84742   Di-n-butyl phthalate	D
   117840   Di-n-octyl phthalate	D

   115297   Endosulfan	E
   959988   Endosulfan	I
 33212659   Endolsulfan II	E
  1031078   Endolsulfan sulfate	E
   145733   Endothall	E
    72208   Endrin	E
 7421934   Endrin aldehyde	E
   563122   Ethion	E
   141786   Ethyl acetate	C
   100414   Ethyl benzene	CJ
    75003   Ethyl chloride	A,I
    60297   Ethyl ether	C
   107211   Ethylene glycol	I
   110805   Ethylene glycol monoethyl ether	CJ
   759944   Ethylpropylthio carbomate, S-	E
 CAS No.
  122145
   86737
   50000
Fenitrothion	E
Fluorene	D,H
Formaldehyde	C
   64186   Formic acid	L
  110009   Furan	F
   98011   Furfural	I,C

  765344   Glycidyaldehyde	C
   76448   Heptachlor	E
 1024573   Heptachlor epoxide	E
  118741   Hexachlorobenzene	B
   87683   Hexachlorobutadieene	B
   60873   Hexachlorocyclohexane, alpha-	E
   60873   Hexachlorocyclohexane, beta-	E
   60873   Hexachlorocyclohexane, delta-	E
   77474   Hexachlorocyclopentadiene	B
   67721   Hexachloroethane	B
   70304   Hexachlorophene	B
  110543   Hexane	CJ
 1689834   loxynil	E
   78831   Isobutanol	C
   78591   Isophorone	D

  143500   Kepone	E

   58899   Lindane	E

  121755   Malathion	CJE
  108316   Maleic anhydride	E
  123331   Maleric hydrazide	E
  126987   Methacrylonitrile	C
   67561   Methanol	C
16752775   Methomyl	E
   72435   Methoxychlor	E
   79221   Methyl chlorocarbonate	L
   78933   Methyl ethyl ketone	C
  108101   Methyl isobutyl ketone	CJ
   80626   Methyl methacrylate	C
  101144   Methylenebis (2-chloroaniline)	B
   75092   Methylene chloride	A
   23855   Mirex	E

   91203   Naphthalene	DJi
  100016   Nitroaniline, p-	D
   98953   Nitrobenzene	D
  100027   Nitrophenol,4-	D
                                                       C-3

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Organic Contaminant Group (continued)
 CAS No.
  1116547   Nitrosodiethanolamine, n-	D
    55185   Nitrosodiethylamine, n-	D
    62759   Nitrosodimethylamine, n-	D
    86306   Nitrosodiphenylamine, n-	D
   930552   Nitorsopynolidine, n-	D
   924163   Nitroso-di-n-butylamine, n-	D
   615532   Nitroso-di-n-methylurethane, n-	D
    99990   Nitrotoluene, 4-	D

    56382   Parathion, ethyl-	E
   298000   Parathion, methyl-	E
  1336363   PCBs	G
   608935   Pentachlorobenzene	B
    76017   Pentachloroethane	B
    82688   Pentachloronitrobenzene	B
    87865   Pentachlorophenol	B
    85018   Phenanthrene	D,H
    108952   Phenol	D
    139662   Phenyl sulfide	D
    62384   Phenylmercurie acetate	E
   298022   Phorate	C
    75445   Phosgene	E
 13171216   Phosphamidon	E
  7803512   Phosphine	E
    85449   Phthalic anhydride	DJI
 23950585   Pronamide	D
    129000   Pyrene	D,H
    110861   Pyridine	C,I

    91225   Quinoline	D,H

    108463   Resorcinol	D
   299843   Ronnel	E

    57249   Strychnine	E,H
    100425   Styrene	C
CAS No.
 1746016   TCDD	F
   95943   Tetrachlorobenzene, 1,2,4,5-	B
  630206   Tetrachloroethane, 1,1,1,2-
   79345   Tetrachloroethane, 1,1,2,2-	A
  127184   Tetrachloroethene	A
   58902   Tetrachlorophenol, 2,3,4,6	B
 3689245   Tetraethyldithiopyrophosphate	E
  109999   Tetrahydrofuran	F,I
  137268   Thiram	E
  108883   Toluene	CJ
  584849   Toluene diisocyanate	D
 8001352   Toxaphene	E
   93721   TP, 2,4,5-	E
   75252   Tribromomethane	A
  120821   Trichlorobenzene, 1,2,4-	B
   71556   Trichloroethane, 1,1,1-	A
   79005   Trichloroethane, 1,1,2-	A
   79016   Trichloroethylene	A
   75694   Trichlorofluoromethane	A
  933788   Trichlorophenol, 2,3,5-	B
   95954   Trichlorophenol, 2,4,5-	B
   88062   Trichlorophenol, 2,4,6-	B
  609198   Trichlorophenol, 3,4,5-	B
   93765   Trichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 2-	L
  933788   Trichloro-l,2,2-trifluoroethane	A,I
27323417   Triethanolamine	E
  126727   Tris (2,3-dibromopropyl) phosphate	B

  108054   Vinyl acetate	C
   75014   Vinyl chloride	A

   81812   Warfarin	E

  108383   Xylene, m-	CJ
   95476   Xylene, o-	CJ
  106423   Xylene, p-	CJ
                                                        C-4

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Inorganic Contaminant Group

 CAS No.
  7429905   Aluminum	M
 20859738   Aluminum phosphide	M
  7440360   Antimony	M
  7440382   Arsenic	M
  1327533   Arsenic trioxide	M
  1303339   Arsenic trisulfide	.....M

  7440393   Barium	M
   542621   Barium cyanide	M,Q
  7440417   Beryllium	M

  7440439   Cadmium	M
 13765190   Calcium chromate	M
  7778543   Calcium hypochlorite	M
  1333820   Chromic acid	M.R
  7440473   Chromium	M
            Chromium (III)	M
            Chromium (VI)	M
  7440484   Cobalt	M
  7440508   Copper	M
   544923   Copper cyanide	M,Q
  7720787   Ferrous sulfate
.M
  7439896   Iron
.M
  7439921   Lead.
.M
  7439965   Manganese	M
  7439976   Mercury	M

  7440020   Nickel	M
  7718549   Nickel chloride	M
 10102440   Nitrogen dioxide	R

  7789006   Potassium chromate	M
   151508   Potassium cyanide	M,Q
   506616   Potassium silver cyanide	M,Q

  7783008   Selenious acid	MR
  7782492   Selenium	M
  7440224   Silver	M
   506649   Silver cyanide	M,Q
  7440235   Sodium	M
 26628228   Sodium azide	M
  7681494   Sodium fluoride	M
  7775113   Sodium chromate	M
CAS No.
143339 Sodium cyanide 	
1310732 Sodium hydroxide 	
7440280 Thallium 	
1314325 Thallic oxide 	
563688 Thallium acetate 	
6533739 Thallim carbonate 	
7791 120 Thallium chloride 	
10102451 Thallium nitrate 	
12039520 Thallium selenide 	
7446186 Thallium (I) sulfate 	
7440291 Thorium 	
1314621 Vanadium pentoxide 	
7440666 Zinc 	
557211 Zinc cyanide 	
1314847 Zinc phosphide 	
7733020 Zinc sulfate 	
Explosives/Propellants
CAS No.
7664417 Ammonia 	
131748 Ammonium picrate 	
7773060 Ammonium sulfamate 	
460195 Cyanogen 	
2691410 Cyclotetramethylenetetranitramine
302012 Hydrazine 	
55630 Nitroglycerine 	
99990 Nitrotoluene, 4- 	
26628228 Sodium azide 	
99354 Trinitrobenzene, 1,3,5 	
118967 Trinitrotoluene 	

	 M,Q
M,R
	 M
	 M
	 M
	 M
	 M
	 M
	 M
	 M
M
M
	 M
	 M,Q
	 M
M


	 S
	 S
S
	 S
S
S
	 S
S
M,S
	 S
S
                                                    C-5

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                    APPENDIX D
          VENDOR INFORmilON FORM


                 Blank Submittal Form
NOTE: You may submit data electronically instead of typing or writing
       responses on this Vendor Information Form.  Each form is
       accompanied by one 3.5" IBM-compatible diskette. If you need
       additional diskettes, call the VISITT Hotline at 800/245-4505 or
       703/883-8448.

-------
              UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
VENDOR INFORMATION SYSTEM FOR INNOVATIVE TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES
                                           (VISITT)
                              VENDOR INFORMATION FORM

                PART  1: GENERAL INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW

 1.   Date Submitted  	/       /
 2.   Developer/Vendor Name

 3.   Street Address 	
 4.   City
State/Province
Zip Code
 5.   Country 	

 6.   a.  Contact Name:

      b.  Title:

 7.   Contact Phone (
           8.  Fax Number (     ).
 9.   Technology Type.*  Check one only. Fill out a separate form for each additional technology.
      LJ Acid Extraction

      II Adsorption - In Situ

      LJ Air Sparging - In Situ Ground Water

      LJ Bioremediation - In Situ Ground Water

      II Bioremediation - In Situ Lagoon

      LJ Bioremediation - In Situ Soil

      II Bioremediation - Slurry Phase

      LJ Bioremediation - Solid Phase

      LJ Bioventing

      LJ Chemical Treatment - Dechlorination

      II Chemical Treatment - In Situ Ground Water

      LJ Chemical Treatment - Other

      LJ Delivery/Extraction Systems

      LJ Magnetic Separation


   See Appendix B for definitions of technology types.
           II Materials Handling

           LJ Off-Gas Treatment

           LJ Pyrolysis

           LJ Slagging - Off-Gas Treated

           LJ Soil Flushing - In Situ

           LJ Soil Vapor Extraction

           LJ Soil Vapor Extraction - Thermally Enhanced

           Q Soil Washing

           II Solvent Extraction

           LJ Thermal Desorption

           LJ Thermal Desorption - Off-Gas Treated

           U Vitrification

           LJ Vitrification - Off-Gas Treated


           Other: 	
 EPA Form 9210-1 (6-92)
      D-1

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                                                             Vendor Name:
                                                             Technology Type:
           PART 1:  GENERAL INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW (Continued)

10a. Technology Name Assigned By Vendor.  (If different than Question 9).




10b. Registered trademark?             Q  Yes     Q  No

11.   Patents


     a.  Is technology patented?            L]  Yes      Q  No

     b.  Is patent pending?                 LJ  Yes      LJ  No

12.   Super-fund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program.

     a.  Is this technology being tested or has this technology been tested in EPA SITE Emerging Technology Program?

                                        Q  Yes      Q  No

     b.  Is this technology being tested or has this technology been tested in EPA SITE Demonstration Program?

                                        Q  Yes      Q  No

13.   Description of Technology.   In 300  words  or less, describe treatment process, including scientific
     principle on which  the technology is  based; key treatment steps; unique and innovative features;
     whether full-scale system is/will be batch, continuous, or semicontinuous; and whether the technology
     is above ground or in situ.  Parts 2 and 3 allow more detail for full- and pilot-scale systems.
                                                EXAMPLE

                                         Description of Technology

       ABC Corporation has developed an innovative solvent extraction technology (SUPER) utilizing Super Chemical as
       the solvent. Super Chemical is a biodegradable solvent

       The key to success of this process is Super Chemical's property of inverse miscibility; below 65 degrees F, Super
       Chemical is soluble in water (hydrophilic)  and  above 65  degrees F, Super Chemical is insoluble  in water
       (hydrophobic). Therefore, cold Super Chemical can extract water and water-soluble compounds and warm Super
       Chemical can extract organic contaminants, such as PCBs, pesticides, PAHs, semi-volatile organic, and VOCs.

       Within the  unit, the soil is continuously washed with Super Chemical in a counter current process.  The
       contaminants dissolve  in the solution,  and are removed  from the soil  by the  counter current flow.  The
       contaminated solvents are reclaimed in a closed-loop circuit, eliminating the need for large volumes of solvent.
       The dean washed soil is moved to a closed-loop dryer system, where any excess solvent rs removed from the soil.
       When the soil exits the system, it is relatively free of organics, and dry. The collected contaminant from the solvent
       washing  is concentrated 1,000 to 10,000 times, reducing the volume and the associated disposal costs, and is
       periodically pumped from the system into labeled 55-gallon  drums for conventional off-site disposal.

       Emissions of organic vapors to air are controlled arid treated by using a carbon absorption system;
EPA Form 9210-1 (6-92)                                D-2

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                                                 Vendor Name:
                                                 Technology Type:
         PART 1:  GENERAL INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW (Continued)




13.  Description of Technology (Continued).
EPA Form 9210-1 (6-92)                          D-3

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                                                            Vendor Name:
                                                            Technology Type:
          PART 1: GENERAL INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW (Continued)

14.  Technology Highlights. In 200 words or less, describe in terms of contaminants treated, performance,
     implementation,  or cost, the key marketable  features of technology, such as  treatment niche and
     advantages over other technologies.
                                                EXAMPLE

                                          Technology Highlights

       The SUPER solvent extraction process can treat soils, sludges, and sediments contaminated with PCBs,
       carcinogenic PAHs, pesticides, and VOCsat 20% to 40% of incineration costs* Treated products from the SUPER
       process Include: water suitable for discharge, oil for recycle as fuel, and solids that can be returned to the site as
       backfill. The process can also reduce the initial volume of contaminated material by as much as 90%.

       The SUPER solvent extraction process operates at near ambient pressures and temperatures, uses off-the-shelf
       process equipment, and controls air emissions. The extraction efficiency (organic removal efficiency) achieved
       is as high as 99%.

       Solvent recovery is also greater than 99%. The process can treat up to 300 tons per day of contaminated soil.
       This technology is well accepted by communities because air emissions are minimized.
EPA Form 9210-1 (6-92)                                D-4

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                                                            Vendor Name:
                                                            Technology Type:
           PART 1:  GENERAL INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW (Continued)

 15.  Technical Limitations.   In 200 words or  less, describe  technical  limitations, such as  specific
     contaminants, that could adversely affect applicability or performance.
                                                EXAMPLE

                                          Technology Limitations

       The SUPER process is not applicable for metal-only, (e.g., radioactive) or other inorganic wastes, but its
       performance fs not affected by inorganics at tow concentrations. This process may require screening or crushing
       to 0.25 inches, and other feed preparation operations depending on the waste.  The extraction efficiency of an
       organic contaminant will depend on its solubility in the solvent  The solvent used is best suited for PCBs and
EPA Form 9210-1  (6-92)                               D-5

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                                                          Vendor Name:
                                                          Technology Type:
          PART 1:  GENERAL INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW (Continued)

16.  Other  Comments.   In 200  words  or less,  provide additional technology  information, such as
     technology history,  status, capabilities, experience, and  applicable  permits obtained (e.g., TSCA,
     RCRA).
                                              EXAMPLE

                                           Other Comments

       The SUPER process has been successfully demonstrated at bench scale, pilot scale, and at full scale. A full-scale
       SUPER umt was used to treat PCB-contaminated sludges at the BAD Oil Refining Superfund site.

       Two pilot-scale units have been built. One was operated under the SITE program to treat soiis and sludges
       contaminated with PCBs.

       Bench-scale treatability studies have been conducted on contaminated soils containing petrochemical compounds,
       pharmaceutical compounds, pesticides, PCBs, and wood preserving wastes containing PAHs.
EPA Form 9210-1 (6-92)                              D-6

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                                                             Vendor Name:
                                                             Technology Type:
           PART 1:  GENERAL INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW (Continued)

17.  Technology Status.  Using the following definitions, indicate the operational status of the technology.
     Check only one.

     a.  LJ Full scale. Available equipment is sized and commercially available for actual site remediation.  (If you select full
           scale, you must fill out Part 2).

     b.  LJ Pilot scale. Available equipment is of sufficient size to verify technology feasibility or establish the design and
           operating conditions for a full-scale system.  However, it is not of the size typically used for a cleanup. (If you select
           pilot scale, you must fill out Part 3).

     c.  Q Bench scale or emerging.  Technology shown to be  feasible through the use  of bench-top equipment in the
           laboratory. Data from these studies cannot be used to scale up the technology to full scale.

18.  Media treated. Check "actual" for all media that have been treated by technology.  Check "potential"
     for all media to which technology may be  applied  in the future.

     Actual     Potential

      Q          Q       Soil fin situ)
      Q          Q       Soil (ex situ)
      LJ          LJ       Sludge (Does not include municipal sewage sludge)
      Q          Q       Solid (e.g.,  slag)
      LJ          LJ       Natural sediment (in situ)
      LJ          LJ       Natural sediment (ex situ)
      I	I          I	I       Ground water in situ
      LJ          LJ       Off-gas generated from a primary innovative treatment technology

19.   Contaminants and  Contaminant Groups* Treated.  Check all that may apply.  Check "actual" for
      all that have been treated by your technology (i.e., data exist).   Check "potential" for all that the
      technology may be applied to in the future.  Data for actual contaminants treated should be included
      in Part 5.  If your technology  is materials handling, delivery/extraction  or you  are  an equipment
      vendor, this question may not apply.

        Actual Potential                                  Actual Potential

         II    LJ  Halogenated volatiles                    LJ     LJ  Heavy metals
         LJ    LJ  Halogenated semivolatiles                II     LJ  Nonmetallic toxic elements
         LJ    LJ  Nonhalogenated volatiles                 II     LJ  Radioactive metals
         II    LJ  Nonhalogenated semivolatiles             II     LJ  Asbestos
         LJ    LJ  Organic pesticides/herbicides             II     II  Inorganic cyanides
         LJ    LJ  Dioxins/furans                         LJ     LJ  Inorganic corrosives
         I	I    	I  peas
         pT    pf                                              Miscellaneous
         LJ    LJ  Polynuclear aromatics (PNAs)
         LJ    II  Solvents                              LJ     LJ  Explosives/propellants
         II    II  Benzene-toluene-ethylbenzene-          II     II  Organometallic pesticides/herbicides
                     xylene  (BTEX)
         Q    Q  Acetonitrile (organic cyanide)           Others (sPecifV): 	
         II    I	I  Organic acids                        	
* See Appendix C for key to contaminant groups.

EPA Form 9210-1 (6-92)                                D-7

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                                                             Vendor Name:
                                                             Technology Type:
20.
      PART 1:  GENERAL INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW (Continued)


Industrial Waste Sources or Site Types Treated. Check all that may apply.  Treatment data should

be available for those sites for which "actual" is checked. (See Table A for wastes typically associated

with each industry.)
        Actual  Potential
          a
          a
          a
          a
          a
          a
          a
          a
          a
          a
          a
          a
            a
            a
            a
            a
            a
            a
            a
            a
            a
            a
            a
            a
Agriculture


Battery recycling/disposal


Chloro-alkali manufacturing


Coal gasification


Dry cleaners


Electroplating


Herbicide manufacturing/use


Industrial landfills


Inorganic/organic pigments


Machine shops


Metal ore  mining and smelting


Municipal Landfill
        Others (specify)
21.  Vendor Services.  Check all that apply.




     !_l Equipment manufacturer

     LJ Subcontractor for cleanup services


     LJ Prime contractor for full-service remediation

     LJ Other (specify)	
                                                    Actual Potential
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
a
    Munitions Manufacturing


    Paint/ink formulation


    Pesticide manufacturing/use


    Petroleum refining and reuse


    Photographic products


LJ Plastics manufacturing


LJ Pulp and paper industry


LJ Other organic chemical manufacturing


LJ Other inorganic chemical manufacturing


LJ Semiconductor manufacturing


LJ Rubber manufacturing


LJ Wood preserving


LJ Uranium mining
EPA Form 9210-1 (6-92)
                                              D-8

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                                                      Vendor Name:
                                                      Technology Type:
          PART 1: GENERAL INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY OVERVIEW (Continued)
                                            TABLE A
       1.
       2.
       3.
       4.
       5.
       6.
       7.
       8.
       9.
       10.
       11.
       12.
       13.
       14.
       15.
       16.
       17.
       18.
       19.
       20.
       21.
       22.
       23.
       24.
       25.
                     Contaminants/Wastes Associated With Industrial Waste
                                     Sources or Site Types
Chloro-Alkali Manufacturing
Coal Gasification
Agriculture
Battery Recycling/Disposal
Dry Cleaners
Electroplating
Herbicide Manufacturing/Use
Industrial Landfills
Inorganic/Organic Pigments
Machine  Shops
Metal Ore Mining and Smelting
Municipal Landfills
Munitions Manufacturing
Paint/Ink Formulation
Pesticide Manufacturing/Use
Petroleum Refining and Reuse
Photographic Products
Plastics Manufacturing
Pulp and Paper Industry
Other Organic Chemical Manufacturing
Other Inorganic Chemical Manufacturing
Semiconductor Manufacturing
Rubber Manufacturing
Wood Preserving
Uranium Mining
Chlorine Compounds, Mercury
PAHs
Pesticides
Lead (acid)
Solvents
Chrome, Metals
Pesticides
Wastes from Multiple Sources
Solvents, Chrome, Zinc
Metals, Oils
Metals
Wastes from Multiple Sources
Explosives, Lead
Solvents, Some Metals (Chrome, Zinc)
Pesticides
Petroleum, Hydrocarbons, BTEX
Silver, Bromide, Solvent
Polymers, Phthalates
Chlorinated Organics, Dioxins
Organics, Metals (used for Catalyst)
Inorganics,  Metals
Degreasing Agents (Solvents), Metals
Rubber, Plastics, Polymers, Organics
Creosote, PCP, Arsenic, Chrome, PAHs
Uranium, Radioactive Metals
EPA Form 9210-1 (6-92)
                                D-9

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                                                               Vendor Name:
                                                               Technology Type:
                           PART 2: FULL-SCALE EQUIPMENT/CAPABILITIES

     You must complete this part if Question I7a is checked (i.e., technology is at full scale). You may also
     complete this part if the technology is at pilot scale.

22.  Major Unit Processes. In 300 words or less, describe the steps and operation of the full-scale system,
     including list of key components (e.g., pre- and post-processing).  Provide more detail than you did
     in Question 13.
                                                  EXAMPLE

                                             Major Unit Processes                         :

      Pre-processing

      *  Front-End Loader and Weight"Scale:
        Shredder
         Radial Stacker Belt Conveyor and Surge Hopper

         t.   Stockpiled soff is transported to a weigh scale by a front-end loader.

         2.   Sof is deposited directly on a power shredding device.  Classified soil with a top size of less than 2 inches
              passes through the shredder into the feed conveyor.

         3,   The feed conveyor is an enclosed radial stacker belt conveyor that is 18 inches wide and 60 feet long. The
              conveyor discharges into the surge hopper located above the thermal processor. The soil will be fed into
              the LT system at regular intervals to maintain the surge hopper seal.

      Process

        Tnermat Processor
         Induced Draft Fart for Vapors
        Horizontal Screw Conveyor and Ash Conditioner

         1.   The thermal processor houses four tnterrneshed screw conveyors. The function of each screw conveyor 5s
              to move soil forward through the processor and to thoroughly mix the material, providing indirect contact
              between the heat transfer fluid and the soil. The shafts and flights of the screw conveyors and the processor
              jackets are hollow to allow circulation of a heat transfer fluid (i.e., hot oil).

         2.   Vapors are driven off the soil and are drawn out of the thermal processor by an induced draft (ID) fan.

         3,   Soil te discharged from the thermal processor onto a horizontal screw conveyor and then an ash conditioner.

         4.   The conditioner is a ribbon flight screw conveyor.  Water spray nozzles are installed in the conditioner
              housing to cool  the discharge material and  to minimize fugitive dust emissions.

      Post-Processing

         Stacker Belt Conveyor and Dump Truck

         t.   The conditioner  discharges onto an inclined stacker belt. The stacker belt conveys the wetted  processed
              soiHrom the conditioner to the dump truck.
EPA Form 9210-1 (6-92)                                 D-10

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                                                   Vendor Name:
                                                   Technology Type:
                 PART 2: FULL-SCALE EQUIPMENT/CAPABILITIES (Continued)



22.  Major Unit Processes. (Continued)
EPA Form 9210-1 (6-92)                          D-11

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                                                          Vendor Name:
                                                          Technology Type:
                   PART 2:  FULL-SCALE EQUIPMENT/CAPABILITIES (Continued)

23.  Full-Scale Facility is (Chech one only)

     LJ   Transportable           LJ   Fixed                  LJ    In situ

     b.  City:	and State:  	of fixed facility.
24.  Number of Full-Scale Systems

     	   Planned/in design
Under Construction
       Constructed
25.  Capacity Range per Hour.
                        to
                         (units)   Q  Not applicable
26.  Estimated Price Range.  Provide a "ballpark" estimate per unit of waste treated.  Include waste
     preprocessing and exclude excavation, permitting and residual disposal.
                        to
per
(units)
27.  Factors Affecting Unit Price.  With "1" being the highest, rank any of the following items that will have
     a significant effect on unit price. If technology is in situ, excavation and waste handling cannot affect
     price.
                 Initial contaminant concentration
                 Target contaminant concentration
                 Waste quantity
                 Depth of contamination
                 Depth to ground water
                 Residual waste characteristics
                  Site preparation
                  Waste handling/preprocessing
                  Amount of debris with waste
                  Utility/fuel rates
                  Labor rates
     Other Factors (specify)
28.  Full-Scale Cleanups.

     a.  If you are a subcontractor or prime contractor, give the number of full-scale cleanups initiated or
        completed by your firm using your technology.
     b.  If you are an equipment manufacturer, give the number of full-scale cleanups that you know of by
        other firms using your technology.
EPA Form 9210-1 (6-92)
                                                D-12

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                                                               Vendor Name:
                                                               Technology Type:
                          PART 3:  PILOT-SCALE EQUIPMENT/CAPABILITIES

     You must complete this part rf Question  I7b is checked.  You  may also complete this  part  if the
     technology is at full scale or bench scale.

29.  Major Unit Processes.  In 200 words or less, describe steps and operation of the pilot-scale treatment
     system, including list of key components  (e.g.,  pre- and post-processing) of the pilot-scale system.
     Provide more detail than you did  in Question 13.
                                                   EXAMPLE

                                             Major Unit Processes

      Pilot-scale tasting involves processing the soils or bulk soils through various operations of reduced-size equipment
      which when set in series would be similar to a fuR-scale operation.  The equipment consists of the following:

      1. A hopper and screen for feed preparation.  Removal of tramp material and sizing, if needed.

      2. fixing or attrition tank where the prepared feed is introduced to the ttquids.   In the most basic scheme
         contaminant extraction takes place at this stage,

      3. Classification circuit consisting ot a sump, pump, and cyclone for separation of coarse sand, grave}, and organics
         from fine days and sifts.

      4. 8 contaminant extraction requires, coarse material is subjected to a specific gravity (SJ3.) separation utilizing a
         vessel, cyclone, or hydrosizer. Contaminant bearing organics (lowS.G.) are separated from the clean, coarse (high
         S.G.) material.

      5. dean, coarse material is dewatered with a screen, although in full-scale operation, additional dryers (centrifuges)
         may be employed.

      6. Contaminant bearing tow S.G. organics are dewatered with a screen and collected for disposal or secondary
         treatment

      7. Clays and silts are flocculated in a reaction tank and gravity concentrated in a thickener or clarifier.

      8. Thickened, contaminant bearing clays and silts are dewatered in a belt press and sent for disposal or secondary
         processing.

      9. Recycled Squid from the thickening and dewatering process are collected and in some cases treated before being
         returned to the mixing/attrition tank.
                                                                                                 (Continued)
EPA Form 9210-1 (6-92)                                D-13

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                                                       Vendor Name:
                                                       Technology Type:
                 PART 3: PILOT-SCALE EQUIPMENT/CAPABILITIES (Continued)

29.  Major Unit Processes. (Continued)
30.   Pilot-scale facility is (Check only one)

        U Transportable               II  Rxed               II   In Situ

     b.  City:  	and State: 	of fixed facility.

31.   Number of Pilot-Scale Systems

     	  Planned/in design    	 Under construction  	  Constructed


32.   Capacity Range Per Hour.  Prorate capacity of batch processes.

     	to	 	(units)   LJ Not applicable


33.   How many times have you used this technology at your facility or at other locations to conduct pilot-
     scale studies on actual wastes?   Count studies pertaining to the same site once, regardless of the
     number of different wastes or tests.  Do not count tests on surrogate wastes.
34.  Can you conduct pilot-scale treatability studies on some types of waste at your location?

     Q Yes      Q  No

     At a contaminated site?

     Q Yes      Q  No
35.  Quantity of Waste Needed for Pilot-Scale Treatability Study. Give estimated range of quantity of
     waste needed to test, at the pilot scale, the feasibility of this technology on a specific waste.

     	to	(units)
EPA Form 9210-1 (6-92)                            D-14

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                                                            Vendor Name:
                                                            Technology Type:
                   PART 4: TREATABILJTY STUDY CAPABILITIES (BENCH SCALE)

36.  Can you conduct bench-scale treatability studies on some types of waste at your location?

     Q  Yes       Q  No

37.  Number  of  Bench-Scale  Studies  Conducted.   Estimate total  number  of bench-scale studies
     conducted on actual waste from different sources or sites.  Count studies pertaining to the same site
     once, regardless of the number of different wastes or tests.  Do not count tests on surrogate wastes.
38.  Description of Bench-Scale Testing Procedures. In 200 words or less, describe the type of test that
     would be performed to determine feasibility of this technology for treating a specific waste.
                                                EXAMPLE

                                Description of Bench-Scale Testing Procedures

      In our feasibility assessment tests, we usually start with a sample of the soil to be treated, and a knowledge of the
      nature and tevei of contaminants and the effluent goals to be met.  The following steps are then taken:

      a. The optimal conditions for soM washing will be studied, such as pH, time, and chelating agent and concentration.

      b. Various likely adsorbents are studied on & batch basis to determine which are most effective at removing the
        metals of interest from the chetating agent in the washing water.

      c. One or more selected media are then studied on columns to determine their metal retention ability in a continuous-
        flow situation.

      d. Fortiie surviving adsorbent(s), the ion elution performance is then determined; after this step, one resin will have
        been selected as optimal for the particular task under study.

      e. The selected adsorbent is then subjected to a number of charge/regeneration cycles to establish its ruggedness.
EPA Form 9210-1 (6-92)                               D-15

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                                                              Vendor Name:
                                                              Technology Type:
                            PART 5:  SUMMARY OF PERFORMANCE DATA

39.  Summarize treatment results  obtained for up to five  specific contaminants, contaminant groups, or
     pollutant parameters that best represent technology performance.   Data provided do  not have to
     correspond to the projects  listed in Part 6, but should be supported by documentation  available on
     request.
Note:   (1)
List one contaminant per page. May list contaminant more than once if different treatability ranges apply.
       (2) and (3)  Circle appropriate units; for concentration that were non-detect write N.D.; treated concentration should be
                  lower than untreated concentration unless the technology is dewatering or some other volume reduction
                  method.  If a concentration range cannot be given, provide an average and note it as such.

       (4)         Check scale of equipment used to produce data given in (3).

       (5)         Check the appropriate test sample matrix.

       (6)         Check soil classification if appropriate. More than one classification may be checked.

       (7)         Briefly describe waste or media treated (e.g., 3,000 cubic yards of oily sludge, 5,000 cubic yards of solvent
                  contaminated soil)

       (8)         Explain any conditions that may have impacted treated concentration achieved, such as cleanup standards,
                  site conditions, and mode of operation.
(1) Contaminant or Pollutant Parameter:
(2) Untreated Concentration Range
Units: mg/kg mg/l (Circle one)
Lower Limit
To
Upper Limit
(5) Matrix (Check aO Otat apply)
Unsaturated Soil
Saturated Soil
Ground Water
Gas Phase
Sediment
Sludqe

(3) Treated Concentration Range
Units: mg/kg mg/l (Circle one)
Lower Limit
To
Upper Limit
(4) Equipment Scale
(Check only one)
Bench
Pilot
Full

(6) Soil Classification (Check all that apply)
Clav (0.000
Silt (0.002 t
Fine Sand I
Coarse Sar
Gravel (are
Not aDDlica
(7) Waste Description (10 worts or less):

(6) Comments:

2 to 0.002 mm)
o 0.02 mm)
0.02 to 0.2 mm)
d (0.2 to 2.0 mm)
ater than 2.0 mm)
ble




EPA Form 9210-1 (6-92)
                                 D-16

-------
                                                      Vendor Name:
                                                      Technology Type:
                      PART 5: SUMMARY OF PERFORMANCE DATA (Continued)
(1) Contaminant or Pollutant Parameter:
(2) Untreated Concentration Range
Units: mg/kg mg/l (Circle one)
Lower Limit
To
Upper Limit
(S) Matrix (Check attttiatappW
Unsaturated Soil
Saturated Soil
Ground Water
Gas Phase
Sediment
Sludge

(3) Treated Concentration Range
Units: mg/kg mg/l (Circle one)
Lower Limit
To
Upper Limit
(4) Equipment Scale 'i :: :
(Check only one)
Bench
Pilot
Full

(6) SoH Classification (Check attthat apply)
ciav (o.ooa
Silt (0.002 t
Fine Sand (
Coarse San
Gravel (are
Not applica
(7) Waste Description (10 words or less):

(8) Comments:

2 to 0.002 mm)
o 0.02 mm)
0.02 to 0.2 mm)
d (0.2 to 2.0 mm)
ater than 2.0 mm)
ble




39b.
(1) Contaminant of Pollutant Parameter:
(2) Untreated Concentration Range
Units: mg/kg mg/l (Circle one)
Lower Limit
To
Upper Limit
(5) Matrix (Check all that appfy)
Unsaturated Soil
Saturated Soil
Ground Water
Gas Phase
Sediment
Sludge

(3) Treated Concentration Range
Units: mg/kg mg/l (Circle one)
Lower Limit
To
Upper Limit
{4} Equipment Scale
(Check only one)
Bench
Pilot
Full

(6) Soil Classification (Chec* a// ttafspp/tf
Clav (0.000
Silt (0.002 1
Fine Sand (
Coarse San
Gravel (are
Not applica
2 to 0.002 mm)
o 0.02 mm)
0.02 to 0.2 mm)
d (0.2 to 2.0 mm)
ater than 2.0 mm)
ble
(7) Waste Description (10 words or less):

(8) Comments:

39c.
     EPA Form 9210-1 (6-92)
D-17

-------
                                                      Vendor Name:
                                                      Technology Type:
                      PART 5: SUMMARY OF PERFORMANCE DATA (Continued)
(1) Contaminant or Pollutant Parameter:
(2) Untreated Concentration Range
Units: mg/kg mg/l (Circle one)
Lower Limit
To
Upper Limit
(5) Matrix (Checkoff that appfy)
Unsaturated Soil
Saturated Soil
Ground Water
Gas Phase
Sediment
Sludqe

(3) Treated Concentration Range
Units: mg/kg mg/l (Circle one)
Lower Limit
To
Upper Limit
(4) Equipment Scale
(Check only one)
Bench
Pilot
Full

(6) Soil Classification (Check ail that apply) J
Clav (0.000
Sitt (0.002 t
Fine Sand (
Coarse San
Gravel (are
Not applica
(7) Waste Description (10 words or less):

(8) Comments:

2 to 0.002 mm)
o 0.02 mm)
0.02 to 0.2 mm)
d (0.2 to 2.0 mm)
ater than 2.0 mm)
ble




39d.
(1) Contaminant or Pollutant Parameter:
(2) Untreated Concentration Range
Units: mg/kg mg/l (Circle one)
Lower Limit
To
Upper Limit
(5) Matrix (Chock alltttatappfy)
Unsaturated Soil
Saturated Soil
Ground Water
Gas Phase
Sediment
Sludqe

(3) Treated Concentration Range
Units: mg/kg mg/I (Circle one)
Lower Limit
To
Upper Limit
(4) Equipment Scale
(Check only one)
Bench
Pilot
Full

(6) Soil Classification (Check all that apply)
Clav (0.000
Silt (0.002 1
Fine Sand 1
Coarse Sar
Gravel (are
Not applica
(7) Waste Description (10 words or less):

(8) Comments:

2 to 0.002 mm)
o 0.02 mm)
0.02 to 0.2 mm)
id (0.2 to 2.0 mm)
ater than 2.0 mm)
ble




39e.
     EPA Form 9210-1 (6-92)
D-18

-------
                                                             Vendor Name:
                                                             Technology Type:
                    PART 6: REPRESENTATIVE APPLICATIONS AND CLIENT REFERENCES
        40.  List up to five representative projects that can also serve as references.  Full- and pilot-scale projects
            are of most importance. EPA reserves the right to add information on projects conducted for the federal
            government of which EPA is aware.
Site Name or Industry Type If Client
Identity Confidential:
Location:
Citv
State/Province:
Country
Regulatory Authority or Statute
(Check all that apply)
RCRA Corrective Action
CERCLA
TSCA
Safe Drinking Water Act
UST Corrective Action
State (specify):
Other (Specify):

Not Applicable
Media Treated (Check all fiat apply)
Soil (in situ)
Soil (ex situ)
Sludge
Solid
Natural Sediment (in situ)
Natural Sediment (ex situ)
Ground Water In Situ
Off-gas from a primary
treatment technology
Equipment Scale
(Check one only)
Bench
Pilot
Full

Volume/Quantity:
(Units)
Project Status
Contracted:
Month Year
In Cleanup: Yes No
Completed:
Month Year


Project Took Place at Site Named
Yes
No

At another Site (i.e., a Test Facility)
Yes
No

Application Type (Check only one) : ;
Full-Scale Cleanup
Reid Demonstration
Pilot-Scale Treatabilitv Study
Bench-Scale Treatabilitv Study
TSCA National Demonstration
TSCA Research and Development
EPA SITE Demonstration Program

EPA SITE Emerging
Technology Program
Research
Other (soecifv):




Contaminant Group Treated (Check alt that apply)
Organic
Halogenated Volatiles
Halogenated Semivolatiles
Nonhaloqenated Volatiles
Nonhalogenated Semivolatiles
Organic
Pesticides/Herbicides
	 Dioxins/Furans
	 PCBs
Polynuclear Aromatics (PNAs)
Solvents
Benzene-toluene-ethyl benzene-
xylene (BTEX)
Acetonitrile
Organic Acids

Inorganic
Heavy Metals
Nonmetallic Toxic Elements
Radioactive Metals
Asbestos
Inorganic Cyanides
Inorganic Corrosives
Miscellaneous
Explosives/Propellants
Orqanometallic pesticides/
herbicides
Person outside of company familiar with project (optional):
Name: Company:
Address:


Is Literature Available on this Project? (Include
Yes
Additional Project Information:

citations in Part 7}
No




40a.
        EPA Form 9210-1 (6-92)
D-19

-------
                                                        Vendor Name:
                                                        Technology Type:
              PART 6:  REPRESENTATIVE  APPLICATIONS AND CUENT REFERENCES (Continued)
Site Name or industry Type if Client
Identity Confidential:
Location:
City
State/Province:
Country
Regulatory Authority or Statute
(Check all that apply)
RCRA Corrective Action
CERCLA
TSCA
Safe Drinkinq Water Act
UST Corrective Action
State (specify):
	 Other (Specify):
	 Not Applicable
Media Treated (Check att ftat apply)
Soil fin situ)
Soil (ex situ)
Sludqe
Solid
Natural Sediment (in situ)
Natural Sediment (ex situ)
Ground Water In Situ
Off-qas from a primary
treatment technology
Equipment Scale
(Check one only)
Bench
Pilot
Full

Volume/Quantity:
(Units)
Project Status
Contracted:
Month Year
In Cleanup: Yes No
Completed:
Month Year


Project Took Place at Site Named
Yes
No

At another Site (i.e., a Test Facility)
Yes
No

Application Type (Check onfyona)
Full-Scale Cleanup
Field Demonstration
Pilot-Scale Treatabilitv Study
Bench-Scale Treatability Study
TSCA National Demonstration
TSCA Research and Development
EPA SITE Demonstration Program

EPA SITE Emerainq
Technology Program
Research
Other (specify):




Contaminant Group Treated (Check att that apply}
Organic
Halogenated Volatiles
Haloaenated Semivolatiles
Nonhaloaenated Volatiles
Nonhaloqenated Semivolatiles
Orqanic
Pesticides/Herbicides
Dioxins/Furans
PCBs
Polvnuclear Aromatics (PNAs)
Solvents
Benzene-toluene-ethyl benzene-
xylene (BTEX)
Acetonitrile
Oraanic Acids

Inorganic
Heavy Metals
Nonmetallic Toxic Elements
Radioactive Metals
Asbestos
Inorqanic Cyanides
Inorqanic Corrosives
Miscellaneous
Explosives/Propellants
Orqanometallic pesticides/
herbicides
Person outside of company familiar with project (optional):
Name: Company:
Address:

Is Literature Available on this Project? (Include
Yes
Additional Project Information:

citations in Part 7)
No




40b.
        EPA Form 9210-1 (6-92)
D-20

-------
                                                        Vendor Name:
                                                        Technology Type:
              PART 6:  REPRESENTATIVE APPLICATIONS AND CLIENT REFERENCES (Continued)
Sit* Nam* or Industry Type if Client
Identity Confidential:
Location:
Citv
State /Province:
Country
Regulatory Authority or Statute
(Check all that apply)
RCRA Corrective Action
CERCLA
TSCA
Safe Drinking Water Act
LIST Corrective Action
State (specify):
Other (Specify):

Not Applicable
Media Treated (Check alt that appfy)
Soil (in situ)
Soil (ex situ)
Sludae
Solid
Natural Sediment (in situ)
Natural Sediment (ex situ)
Ground Water In Situ
Off-gas from a primary
treatment technology
Equipment Scale
(Check one only)
Bench
	 Pilot
Full

Volume/Quantity:
(Units)
Project Status
Contracted:
Month Year
In Cleanup: Yes No
Completed:
Month Year


Project Took Place at Site Named
Yes
No

At another Site (i.e., a Test Facility)
Yes
No

Application Type (Check only one)
	 Full-Scale Cleanup
Field Demonstration
Pilot-Scale Treatabilitv Study
Bench-Scale Treatability Study
EPA SITE Emerqing
Technology Program
Research
Other (soecifv):
TSCA National Demonstration
TSCA Research and Development
EPA SITE Demonstration Proqram




Contaminant Group Treated (Check att that apply)
Organic
Haloqenated Volatiles
Haloqenated Semivolatiles
Nonhaloqenated Volatiles
Nonhaloqenated Semivolatiles
Organic
Pesticides/Herbicides
Dioxins/Furans
	 PCBs
Polynuclear Aromatics (PNAs)
Solvents
Benzene-toluene-ethyl benzene-
xylene (BTEX)
	 Acetonitrile
	 Organic Acids
Inorganic
Heavy Metals
Nonmetallic Toxic Elements
Radioactive Metals
Asbestos
Inorganic Cyanides
Inorganic Corrosives
Miscellaneous
Explosives/Propellants
	 Organometallic pesticides/
herbicides
Person outside of company familiar with project (optional):
Name: Company:
Address:

Is Literature Available on this Project? (Include
Yes
Additional Project Information:

citations in Part 7)
No




40c.
        EPA Form 9210-1 (6-92)
D-21

-------
                                                        Vendor Name:
                                                        Technology Type:
              PART 6:  REPRESENTATIVE  APPLICATIONS AND CUENT REFERENCES (Continued)
Sit* Name or industry Type if Client
Identity Confidential:
Location:
Citv
State/Province:
Country
Regulatory Authority or Statute
(Check alt that apply)
	 RCRA Corrective Action
CERCLA
TSCA
Safe Drinking Water Act
UST Corrective Action
State (specify):
Other (Specify):

Not Applicable
Media Treated (Check att that apply)
Soil (in situ)
Soil (ex situ)
Sludqe
Solid
Natural Sediment (in situ)
Natural Sediment (ex situ)
Ground Water In Situ
Off-qas from a primary
treatment technology
Equipment Scale
(Check one only)
Bench
Pilot
Full

Volume/Quantity:
(Units)
Project Status
Contracted:
Month Year
In Cleanup: Yes No
Completed:
Month Year


Project Took Place at Site Named
Yes
No

At another Stte (I.e., a Test Facility)
Yes
No

Application Type (Check only one)
Full-Scale Cleanup
	 Field Demonstration
Pilot-Scale Treatability Study
Bench-Scale Treatability Study
TSCA National Demonstration
TSCA Research and Development
EPA SITE Demonstration Program

EPA SITE Emeraina
Technology Program
Research
Other (specify):




Contaminant Group Treated (Check an that apply)
Organic
Haloaenated Vola tiles
Haloqenated Semivolatiles
Nonhaloaenated Volatiles
Nonhaloqenated Semivolatiles
Organic
Pesticides/Herbicides
Dioxins/Furans
PCBs
Polynuclear Aromatics (PNAs)
Solvents
Benzene-toluene-ethyl benzene-
xylene (BTEX)
	 Acetonitrile
	 Organic Acids
Inorganic
Heavy Metals
Nonmetallic Toxic Elements
Radioactive Metals
Asbestos
Inorqanic Cyanides
Inorganic Corrosives
Miscellaneous
Explosives/Propellants
Oroanometallic pesticides/
herbicides
Person outside of company familiar with project (optional):
Name: Company:
Address:

Is Literature Available on this Project? (Include
Yes
Additional Project Information:

citations in Part 7]
No




40d.
        EPA Form 9210-1 (6-92)
D-22

-------
                                                         Vendor Name:
                                                         Technology Type:
              PART 6: REPRESENTATIVE APPLICATIONS AND CLIENT REFERENCES (Continued)
Site Nam* or industry Type tf Client
Identity Confidential:
Location:
Citv
State /Province:
Country
Regulatory Authority or Statute
(Check all that apply)
RCRA Corrective Action
CERCLA
TSCA
Safe Drinking Water Act
LIST Corrective Action
State (specify):
Other (Specify):

Not Applicable
Media Treated (Check aff that apply)
	 Soil fin situ)
Soil (ex situ)
Sludge
Solid
Natural Sediment (in situ)
Natural Sediment (ex situ)
Ground Water In Situ
Off-gas from a primary
treatment technology
Equipment Scale
(Check one only)
Bench
	 Pilot
Full

Volume/Quantity:
(Units)
Project Status
Contracted:
Month Year
In Cleanup: Yes No
Completed:
Month Year


Project Took Place at Site Named
Yes
No

At another Site (I.e., a Test Facility)
Yes
No

Application Type (Check only one)
Full-Scale Cleanup
Field Demonstration
Pilot-Scale Treatabilitv Study
Bench-Scale Treatability Study
TSCA National Demonstration
TSCA Research and Development
EPA SITE Demonstration Proqram

EPA SITE Emeraina
Technology Program
Research
Other (specify):




Contaminant Group Treated (Check att that apply)
Organic
Haloqenated Volatiles
Haloqenated Semivolatiles
Nonhaloaenated Volatiles
Nonhaloaenated Semivolatiles
Organic
Pesticides/Herbicides
Dioxins/Furans
	 PCBs
Polynuclear Aromatics (PNAs)
	 Solvents
Benzene-toluene-ethylbenzene-
xylene (BTEX)
Acetonitrile
	 Organic Acids
Inorganic
Heavy Metals
Nonmetallic Toxic Elements
Radioactive Metals
Asbestos
Inorqanic Cyanides
Inorganic Corrosives
Miscellaneous
	 Explosives/Propellants
Oraanometallic pesticides/
herbicides
Person outside of company familiar with project (optional):
Name: Company:
Address:

Is Literature Available on this Project? (Include
Yes
Additional Project Information:

citations in Part 7)
No




40e.
        EPA Form 9210-1 (6-92)
D-23

-------
                                                      Vendor Name:
                                                      Technology Type:
                     PART 7:  LITERATURE AND TECHNICAL REFERENCES

41.   List and attach available documentation (e.g., journal articles, conference papers, patents) that best
     describes technology and vendor capabilities.  Avoid listing references that contain the same data. Do
     not include personal references.  EPA reserves the right to add to the list other publicly available
     references.   EPA  will  abstract references and include in  the Alternative Treatment  Technology
     Information Center (ATTIC) operated by the Office of Research and Development.
Authorfe):
Title:
Journal/Conference:
Date:
Authorfe):
Title:
Journal/Conference:
Date:
Authorfe):



NTIS/EPA Document Numberfe):



NTIS/EPA Document Numberfe):

Title:
Journal/Conference:
Date:
Authorfe):
Title:
Journal/Conference:
Date:
Authorfe):
Title:
Journal /Conference:
Date:


NTIS/EPA Document Numberfe):



NTIS/EPA Document Numberfe):



NTIS/EPA Document Numberfe):

EPA Form 9210-1 (6-92)                            D-24

-------
    This appendix explains the use of the enclosed vendor
information software  package for applicants to the U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Vendor Informa-
tion System for Innovative Treatment Technologies (VISITT).
The enclosed software enables VISITT participants to com-
plete the Vendor Information Form (VIF).

    The software produces a form that looks similar to the
blank form in Appendix D.

HARDWARE REQUIREMENTS

    An IBM  compatible microcomputer with the following
characteristics  is  necessary  to  operate  the  enclosed
software:

      DOS  3.3  or higher and Files=45 in config.sys
      A floppy disk  drive for 3-1/2-inch double density
       diskette
      At least 640K of random access memory (RAM)
      Any conventional printer (optional)

STARTING THE SOFTWARE

    Insert the disk into the appropriate disk drive.  If your 3-
1/2-inch floppy disk drive  is drive A:, type  A:,  press
< Enter>, then at the A: prompt, type VENDOR. If your 3-
1/2-inch disk drive is drive B:, type B:, press , and
then at the B: prompt, type VENDOR. The main menu will
appear on your screen.

ENTERING INFORMATION

    *  From the main menu,  you will be able to choose any
       of the options  by using the left and right arrows on
       your keyboard and by pressing < Enter > while the
       cursor is  positioned on an option you want.

       At the bottom of each screen, you will find the
      functions you can perform on that screen and their
       corresponding keys.

      The screen will prompt you when you can press the
      function one  key for on-line help.

      The escape key  will take you  back to the
       previous  screen.  The  arrow keys will  move the
      cursor to any available position on the screen.

      The function ten  key selects chemicals and
      assigns them to the appropriate contaminant group.
    UD1DOR IHFOfllRTim SYSTEM FOR UMOUftTIUE TBEfflHEMT TECHhQLOGIES
                     t U I S I T T >
      	U.S. HW - TKHK3L06Y IIMMITIOH OWICE
                             Print       Butt
Main Menu
   When you are completing the information for the vendor
form, you can choose one of four options: view , add
, edit , or delete . These options wl appear
at the top of the screens and you may choose whichever is
appropriate.  The page up  and  page  down
 keys will allow you to move within the form once
, , or   is chosen.  By pressing  , you
will return to the viewing mode.

PRINTING FORMS

   The VIF software has many print options. By moving the
cursor to the print menu in the main menu, you can print the
following:
     A VIF for a specific technology
   *  All completed VIFs
   *  A blank VIF

   We recommend that you print out the VIF(s) for your
own flies, as well as for EPA submitta! after completing the
information.

EXITING THE SOFTWARE

   If you press  to return to the VIF software's main
menu, you can exit by either pressing , or  and
then < Enter >.

OTHER INFORMATION

   You can copy the VIF software onto your computer's
hard drive by inserting the disk(s) Into the floppy drive and
by using the appropriate DOS copy command.  This will
allow you to save a copy of the software and your files.

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