v-xEPA
United States
Environmental Protection
Agency
   Lead and  Copper Rule:  Public Education  & Consumer Notification
    Requirements for  Non-Transient  Non-Community Water Systems
Public Education Requirements
Utilities must ensure that water from the customer's tap does not exceed the action level for lead in drinking water (15
ppb) in at least 90 percent of the taps sampled. If you have a lead action level exceedance you must complete the
following steps to comply with the Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) public education (PE) requirements.

Section 141.85 of the LCR regulations contains specific requirements regarding the content and delivery of your public
education program. To learn more about the revisions to the public education requirements, refer to Implementing the Lead
Public Education Provision of the Lead and Copper Rule: A Guide for Non- Transient Non-Community Water Systems., Section
1, page 5.

Step 1: Develop the content of your written public  education materials.	

The following information must be included in your PE materials. Text in italics is mandatory and must be included
as written. Headings in bold must be addressed, but can be customized.  Fill-in-the-blank templates (in English and
Spanish) are available at www.epa.gov/safewater/lcrmr/coinplisuicehelp.html.  More information can be found in
Implementing the Lead Public Education Provision of the Lead and Copper Rule: A Guide for Non- Transient
Non-Community Water Systems; Section 1, page 7: Required Content of Public Education Materials and
Appendix B:  Public Education Templates.
Table 1. Required Content and Language for Public Education Materials
Section
           Language
Informational
Statement
* Mandatory language
           Important Information about Lead in Your Drinking Water                          ^-^
           [Insert name of water system] found elevated levels of lead in drinking water in some homes/
           buildings. Lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young
           children. Please read this information closely to see what you can do to reduce lead in your
           drinking water.
Health Effects of
Lead
* Mandatory language
          Lead can cause serious health problems if too much enters your body from drinking water
          or other sources. It can cause damage to the brain and kidneys, and can interfere with the
          production of red blood cells that carry oxygen to all parts of your body. The greatest risk of
          lead exposure is to infants, young children, and pregnant women. Scientists have linked the
          effects of lead on the brain with lowered IQ in children. Adults with kidney problems and high
          blood pressure can be affected by low levels of lead more than healthy adults. Lead is stored in
          the bones and it can be released later in life. During pregnancy, the child receives lead from the
          mother's bones, which may affect brain development.
Sources of Lead
* Can be customized;
Example language
           Lead is a common metal found in the environment. The main sources of lead exposure are
           lead-based paint and lead-contaminated dust or soil. Drinking water is also a possible source
           of lead exposure.  Most sources of drinking water have no lead or very low levels of lead. Most
           lead gets into drinking water after the water leaves the local well or treatment plant and comes
           into contact with plumbing materials containing lead. These include lead pipes, lead solder
           (commonly used until 1986), as well as faucets, valves, and other components made of brass.
Office of Water (4606M)
                     EPA816-F-08-020
June 2008
www.epa.gov/safewater/

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oEPA
United States
Environmental Protection
Agency
Table 1. Required Content and Language for Public Education Materials (continued)
Section
Steps you can take to
reduce your exposure
to lead in your water
* Can be customized;
Example language
What happened?
What is being done?
* Can be customized;
Example language
For More Information
* Mandatory language
Language
1 . Run your water to flush out lead. If water hasn't been used for several hours, run water
for 1 5 - 30 seconds [or insert a different flushing time if your system has representative data
indicating a different flushing time would better reduce lead exposure in your facility and
if the Primacy Agency approves the wording] or until it becomes cold or reaches a steady
temperature before using it for drinking or cooking.
2. Use cold water for cooking and preparing baby formula. Lead dissolves more easily
into hot water.
3. Do not boil water to remove lead. Boiling water will not reduce lead.
4. Look for alternative sources or treatment of water. You may want to consider
purchasing a water filter or bottled water.
5. Test your water for lead. If you think you may have elevated lead levels in your home
drinking water, have it tested. Call the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791) for more
information.
6. Get your child's blood tested. Contact your local health department or health care
provider to find out how you can get your child tested for lead, if you concerned about
exposure.
[Insert information about how and when the exceedance was discovered in your facility and
provide information on the source(s) of lead in the drinking water, if known.]
[Insert information about what your system is doing to reduce lead levels in your facility]
Call us at [Insert Number] or (if applicable) visit our Web site at [insert Web site Here]. For
more information on reducing lead exposure around your home/building and the health
effects of lead, visit EPA's Web site at www.epa.gov/lead, or contact your health care provider.
[We recommend you include the name of your system and the date that the information is
being distributed, along with the state water system ID, somewhere on the notice.]

             Different Language Facilities. If significant proportions of the population in your facility speak languages other
             than English, The PE materials must contain information in the appropriate language(s) regarding the importance of
             the notice or a contact where persons can obtain a translation or assistance.
               Step 2: Get State approval.
                 You must submit all written public education materials to your Primacy Agency prior to delivery. The

              Primacy Agency may require the system to obtain approval of PE materials prior to delivery.
Office of Water (4606M)
                       EPA816-F-08-020
June 2008
www.epa.gov/safewater/

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           United States
           Environmental Protection
           Agency
Step 3: Deliver your public education materials.
             Timing: PE delivery requirements must be conducted within 60 days after the end
              of the monitoring period in which the lead exceedance occurred and repeated once
              every 12 months. For systems that are required to conduct monitoring annually or
              less frequently, the end of the monitoring period is September 30 of the calendar
              year in which the sampling occurs, or, if the Primacy Agency has established an
 alternate monitoring period, the last day of that period. You may discontinue delivery of PE
materials if you have met the lead action level during the most recent six month monitoring
period. You must recommence PE if testing subsequently exceeds the lead action level during any
monitoring period.

For more information go to Implementing the Lead Public Education Provision of the Lead and Copper Rule: A Guide for
Non-Transient Non-Community Water Systems; Section 1, page 8: Required Methods of Delivery for Non-Transient Non-
Community Water Systems.
          Table 2. Required Methods of Delivery for Non-Transient Non-Community Water Systems
          for PE Materials Following a Lead Action Level Exceedance1
          Requirement
          Post informational posters on lead in drinking
          water in a public place or common area in each
          of the buildings served by the NTNCWS.
          Distribute informational pamphlets and/or
          brochures on lead in drinking water to each
          person served by the NTNCWS.
                       Examples
                         Church or school bulletin board
                         Lunchroom or cafeteria
                         Employee lounge
                       >  Church or school bulletin board
                       >  School letter to parents
                       >  Paycheck stuffer
                       >  Interoffice memo/mail
'Public Education Materials templates and Consumer Notification of Results templates can be found in Appendix B of Implementing
the Lead Public Education Provision of the Lead and Copper Rule: A Guide for Non-Transient Non-Community Water Systems.
   Tip: The Primacy Agency may allow the NTNCWS to utilize electronic transmission in lieu of or combined with printed materials as
   long as it achieves at least the same coverage.
Office of Water (4606M)
EPA816-F-08-020
June 2008
www.epa.gov/safewater/

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           United States
           Environmental Protection
           Agency
Notification of Results - Reporting Requirements
The following must be completed whether or not you have a lead action level exceedance:
V  Must provide a consumer notice of lead tap water monitoring results to all persons served at the tap from which the
   sample was taken.
V  Must provide consumer notice as soon as practical, but no later than 30 days after system learns of tap monitoring
   results.
Must include the following information: results of lead tap water monitoring, an explanation of the health effects of lead
(you may use the health effects language in Table 1), list steps consumers can take to reduce exposure to lead in drinking
water, and facility contact information. The notice must contain the maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) and the
action level (AL) for lead and the following definitions:

          The MCLG for lead is zero and the action level is 15ppb.  The MCLG is the level of a contaminant in drinking
          water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. The
          action level is the concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements
          which a water system must follow.
V  Must be provided to all persons served at the site by mail or other methods,  such as posting (subject to approval by the
   Primacy Agency).
For Additional  Information:	

^ Implementing the Lead Public Education Provision of the Lead and Copper Rule: A Guide for Non-Transient Non-
   Community Water Systems; (EPA 816-R-08-008, June 2008)
^ EPA's Website on Lead in Drinking Water  Lead and Copper Rule: www.epa.gov/safewater/lcrmr
> EPA's Safe Drinking Water Hotline: (800) 426-4791
^ Your Primacy Agency
   Disclaimer: This document is designed for NTNCWS; the guidance contained in this document does not substitute for provisions
   or regulations, nor is it a regulation itself. Thus, it does not impose legally-binding requirements on EPA, States, or the regulated
   community, and may not apply to a particular situation based upon the circumstances.
Office of Water (4606M)           EPA 816-F-08-020               June 2008               www.epa.gov/safewater/

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