innovative Solutions
      The Office of Wastewater
Management supports innovative initiatives
for clean water, such as:
           Mexico Border Program:
           In support of the North
           American Free Trade
           Agreement, the U.S. and
           Mexico are establishing new
           organizations to help control
pollution along the border and protect
the nine million people who live there.
Pollution Prevention: EPA promotes
pollution prevention efforts to reduce
wastewater pollution and conserve water
resources.  Our Water Alliances for
Voluntary Efficiency (WAVE) Program helps
participating businesses reduce the amount
of water they use.
Municipal Water
Pollution Prevention
Program: Federal,
state, and local
government investments'
in wastewater treatment
total billions of dollars.  Through the
Municipal Water Pollution Prevention
Program, EPA helps municipalities to
reduce water pollution, improve
environmental compliance, and reduce
waste in many communities.
Innovative Technology: EPA investigates
new, easier, and less costly technolgies to
meet the needs of the wastewater industry.
The Agency's efforts focus on both
wastewater treatment and pollution
prevention technologies.
    For more information
  about EPA's wastewater
  management  programs,
                    -f;
           United States         830-F-94-001
           Environmental Protection  July 1994
           Agency
           Off ice of Water (4201)

&EPA    Clean Water...
           A  Better
           Environment:

           Wastewater
           Management
           at  EPA



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    EPA'S  WASTEWATER
   PROGRAM ACTIVITIES
      EPA's Office of Wastewater
Management administers programs to
improve the condition of our nation's
watersheds.  Operating under authority of
the Clean Water Act, the Office works with
key stakeholders, including EPA Regions,
states, municipalities, and the public, to
enhance ecosystem protection. Major
activities include:
The National Pollutant Discharge
Elimination System Permit Program:
The Clean Water Act requires factories,
municipal sewage treatment plants, and
other dischargers ("point sources") to have
permits establishing pollution limits and
monitoring and reporting requirements.
                                           Storm Water: Rain and snow melt that run
                                           off streets and parking lots often combine
                                           with litter, pesticides, and other wastes to
                                           create polluted storm water.  Eventually,
                                           industrial facilities, businesses, and large
                                           municipal storm water collection systems will
                                           need permits limiting the amount of pollution
                                           allowed in storm water.
                        Working
                        Together
                        for a Better
                        Environment
Biosolids (Sewage Sludge): Properly
managed biosolids (sewage sludge that can
be beneficially used) can be of great benefit
to agricultural crops. EPA regulates the use
and disposal of sewage sludge to obtain
benefits while avoiding harm to the
environment.
Combined Sewer Overflows: Combined
sewer overflows are mixtures of raw sewage,
industrial wastewater, and storm water
released into the environment without
treatment.  Such overflows occur when the
volume of wastewater exceeds the capacity of
a combined sewer system. There are about
1,100 communities with 11,000 overflow
discharge points. Overflows can close
beaches, contaminate shell fish, and cause
other water quality and health problems.
                                           National Watershed Permitting Strategy:
                                           Working with the states, EPA has
                                           developed a strategy to streamline
                                           wastewater permitting on a watershed basis.
                                           This strategy is part of EPA's effort to
                                           promote integrated solutions to surface
                                           water, groundwater, and habitat protection .
                                           in America's watersheds.
Pretreatment: The National Pretreatment
Program regulates industrial users
producing wastes that pass through or
interfere with municipal treatment works.
EPA also authorizes cities to establish
pretreatment requirements to solve local
pollution problems.
State Revolving Funds: These funds
provide loans for municipalities to finance
publicly-owned treatment works, to manage
pollution control  efforts, and to establish
conservation programs.  EPA also helps
communities find alternative sources of
funds to meet their wastewater
management needs.
   Indicators of Success: As industry
   and communities implement
   pollution-control  requirements, EPA
   is developing new ways to measure
   success, such as environmental
   indicators.  Partnerships with key
   stakeholders will track progress in
   pollution prevention and control.

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