United States
         Environmental Protection
         Agency
             Air and Radiation
             6202J
EPA430-B-97-037
September 1997
EPA REGION VII IRC
 160955
Opportunities for Landfill
Gas Energy Recovery in
Kansas
Draft Profiles of Candidate Landfills
and Current Projects

-------

-------
        Opportunities for
Landfill Gas Energy Recovery in
              Kansas
 Draft Profiles of Candidate Landfills
        and Current Projects
            Prepared for:

Atmospheric Pollution Prevention Division
  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

            Prepared by:

          ICF Incorporated
     Under Contract Number 68-D4-0088
           September 1997

-------

-------
                             TABLE OF CONTENTS

Section                                                                         Page
PREFACE
ACRONYMS AND TERMS
1.     Introduction  	1-1
       1.1    Purpose  	1-1
       1.2   Summary of State Landfill Profiles	1-2
       1.3   Background Information	1-2
             1.3.1   Landfill Gas Generation	1-2
             1.3.2   Landfill Gas Collection	1-3
             1.3.3   Landfill Gas Utilization	1-3
       1.4   Benefits  	1-6
             1.4.1   General Benefits  	1-6
             1.4.2   Benefits to Specific Groups	1-7
       1.5   Opportunities for Project Participants  	1-10
       1.6   References	1-11
2.     Instructions for Evaluating Landfill Profiles	2-1
       2.1    Landfill Location and Status	2-1
       2.2   Waste Collection Information	2-2
       2.3   Gas Collection and Control Data	2-5
       2.4   Gas Utilization Data	2-6
       2.5   Site Potential  	2-7
       2.6   Environmental Benefits of Utilization	2-13
       2.7   Contact Information 	2-17
       2.8   Comment Field	2-17
       2.9   References	2-18
3.     Data Collection Methods and Evaluation Processes	3-1
       3.1    Methodology Used to Collect Data from State and Local Agencies	3-1
       3.2   National Databases Used to Complete Profiles  	3-1
       3.3   Data Interpretation Issues 	3-5
       3.4   Landfill Candidacy Screening Process  	3-5
       3.5   References	3-8

                             Working Draft -- September 1997

-------
                   TABLE OF CONTENTS (continued)

Section                                                                 Page
4.     Profiles of Candidate Landfills	4-1
5.     Profiles of Current Projects  	5-1
6.     Index of Landfill Profiles	6-1
                          Working Draft -- September 1997

-------
                                     PREFACE
                  EPA Landfill Methane Outreach Program

       The EPA Landfill Methane Outreach Program, a key component of President Clinton's
Climate Change Action Plan, encourages the use of landfill gas (LFG) as an energy resource.
EPA assists utilities, municipal and private landfill owners and operators, tribes, and state
agencies in reducing methane emissions from landfills through the development of profitable
landfill energy recovery projects. Methane captured from landfills can be transformed into a
cost-effective fuel source for electricity, heat, boiler and vehicular fuel, or sale to a pipeline. The
goals of the Program are to promote cost-effective projects at U.S. landfills and remove barriers
to their development.   There are currently about 130 landfill methane recovery projects in the
U.S., although EPA estimates that up to 750 landfills could install economically viable landfill
energy projects  by the year 2000.

       The Landfill Methane Outreach Program includes three important components: the
State Ally, Utility Ally, and Industry Ally programs. EPA establishes separate alliances with
state agencies, utilities (including investor-owned, municipal and other public power utilities and
cooperatives), and members of the landfill gas development community (including developers,
engineers, equipment vendors, and others) through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU).
By signing the MOU, each Ally acknowledges a shared commitment to the promotion of landfill
gas-to-energy recovery at solid waste landfills, recognizes that the widespread use of landfill gas
will reduce emissions of methane and other emissions, and commits to certain activities to
enhance development of this resource.  In return, EPA agrees to provide landfill gas-to-energy
project assistance and public recognition of the Allies' participation in the program.
                             Working Draft - September 1997

-------
                          ACRONYMS AND TERMS
Acronym

Btu
cf
CH4
C02
CRER
DOE
EPA
GW
GWh/yr
GWP
hr
1C
IRS
kW
kWh
LFG
LMOP
m3
mm Btu
mmcf/d
mmcf/yr
MOU
MSW
MW
NA
NARUC
NOx
PUC
REPI
RFP
SO2
VOCs
WIP
yd3
Term

british thermal unit
cubic feet
methane
carbon dioxide
Conservation and Renewable Energy Reserve
U.S. Department of Energy
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
gigawatt (1 billion watts)
gigawatt hours/year
Global Warming Potential
hour
internal combustion
Internal Revenue Service
kilowatt (1,000 watts)
kilowatt hour
landfill gas
Landfill Methane Outreach Program
cubic meters
million Btu
million cubic feet per day
million cubic feet per year
Memorandum of Understanding
municipal solid waste
megawatt (1 million watts)
not available
National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners
nitrogen oxides
Public Utility Commission
Renewable Energy Production Incentive
request for proposals
sulfur dioxide
volatile organic compounds
waste-in-place
cubic yards
year
                            Working Draft - September 1997

-------
o
Q
O
3

-------

-------
                                  1.   Introduction
1.1    Purpose

       In the United States there are over 130 fully operational landfill gas energy recovery
projects. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that up to 750 economic
landfill gas energy recovery projects could be developed; these potential projects are
constrained by informational, regulatory, and other barriers. Through the Landfill Methane
Outreach Program (LMOP), EPA is working to remove these barriers and encourage the
environmentally and economically beneficial development of landfill gas-to-energy projects. The
LMOP encourages the economic use of landfill gas generated by waste deposited in landfills
over the last few decades and from waste that continues to be deposited after implementation of
source reduction and reuse-recycling practices.1 A key component of the LMOP is to provide
landfill owners and operators, developers of landfill gas-to-energy projects, utilities, and other
potential project participants with information on landfills that may offer attractive energy
development opportunities. EPA has developed a series of documents that identify and profile
landfills in each of the following 31 states: Alabama, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida,
Georgia, Illinois,  Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts,
Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio,
Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, and
Wisconsin.

       This document in the first step in identifying and profiling landfills in Kansas that are
candidates for landfill gas-to-energy recovery projects. Candidate landfills have been chosen
based on specific criteria (see Chapter 3). This document also contains profiles of current
landfill gas recovery and utilization projects, as well as a list of landfills for which the data
gathering efforts  are still in progress ("profiles in progress"). Existing landfill projects have been
included to illustrate the wide range of successful project development options,  and  also
because they may have considerable potential for expansion. Landfills for which EPA has
incomplete information have been included because many of these landfills are likely to be
candidates for the development of energy recovery projects; ongoing research efforts conducted
by EPA in cooperation with relevant state agencies will clarify the status of these landfills.

       This document is a first step in determining the potential for developing  landfill gas
recovery projects and can also serve to address informational barriers by providing details about
specific candidate landfills to organizations that may be interested in the development of such
projects. It does not, however, include a detailed technical and economic analysis of each site,
a critical step in determining whether the development of a landfill gas-to-energy recovery
project at a particular site is feasible.

       Profiles are available from EPA's Landfill Methane Outreach Program, Atmospheric
Pollution Prevention Division, Office of Air and Radiation. For information call 1-888-STAR-YES
(782-7937).
   1 This is consistent with the principles of EPA's integrated waste management hierarchy, which places
landfilling of waste after source reduction and reuse/recycling.


Introduction                     Working Draft--September 1997                       Page 1-1

-------
1.2    Summary of State Landfill Profiles

       Chapter 4 of this report contains profiles of landfills that are potential candidates for
energy recovery projects and Chapter 5 contains profiles of landfills with projects in place. The
preliminary results of the evaluation of landfills in Kansas are summarized below.

       In Kansas, EPA estimates that 11 landfills have the potential to support economically
viable gas-to-energy recovery projects. No landfills currently have an energy recovery project.
Chapter 6 of this report contains an index of landfills profiled, a list of profiles in progress and a
list of additional landfills that might be candidates for energy recovery projects in the future
(dependent on their continued operation).  The landfills in this last group were selected based on
their annual acceptance rate and the amount of waste landfilled (i.e., landfills that have between
500,000 and 999,999 tons of waste landfilled and landfills with less than 500,000 tons of waste
landfilled with an annual acceptance rate greater than 75,000 tons).

       As discussed in Chapter 3 of this report, the data used to produce the landfill profiles
were assembled from state and local sources as  well as various national solid waste
publications. Thus, the accuracy of information contained in this report depends upon the
accuracy of information contained in these sources and publications.  Some landfills may have
been missed during data collection efforts; their omission from this report does not automatically
exclude them as potential candidates for landfill gas recovery and utilization projects. EPA plans
to update these profiles periodically. Please report any new information or corrections to the
LMOP hotline at 1 -888-STAR-YES (782-7937).
1.3    Background Information

       This section provides general background information on landfill gas generation,
collection, and utilization. For more detailed information, a number of additional sources are
available, including Turning a Liability into an Asset: A Landfill Gas-to-Energy Handbook for
Landfill Owners and Operators (U.S. EPA, 1994) and Opportunities to Reduce Anthropogenic
Methane Emissions in the United States: Report to Congress (EPA 430-R-93-012).

1.3.1   Landfill Gas Generation

       Landfill gas is produced through the natural process of anaerobic (i.e., without oxygen)
decomposition of organic wastes. Typically, landfill gas is composed of about 50 percent
methane, 45 percent carbon dioxide, and 5 percent of other gases including hydrogen sulfides
and volatile organic compounds (VOCs).  Since methane is the primary constituent of natural
gas, landfill gas can be used as a fuel. Characteristics of the landfill gas, such as quantity of
methane per unit of landfill gas and amount of landfill gas generated per unit of waste, are a
function of the quantity and type of waste-in-place,  climate, and several other site-specific
factors.

       Landfill gas generation is thought to begin from six months to two years after waste is
placed in a landfill. Gas generation rates vary depending on moisture content and other site-
specific factors.  Generally, the generation rate will  increase until landfill (or cell) closure, when
Page 1-2                       Working Draft--September 1997                    Introduction

-------
it will decline relatively rapidly. However, the gas profile for an individual landfill may vary
considerably from this trajectory; for example, landfill gas generation may continue at a
significantly higher rate than expected for many years after landfill closure depending on site
conditions.

       A first order decay model is often used to predict landfill gas generation, following the
profile described above.  However, a simpler model was used for the profiles contained in this
report. This model assumes a constant rate of landfill gas generation, unlike the first order
decay model which accounts for changing gas generation over the life of the landfill. Therefore,
it may predict a lower or higher gas generation rate than the first order decay model (depending
on the age of the landfill). The model used is explained in greater detail in Chapter 2 of this
report.

1.3.2  Landfill Gas Collection

       Landfill gas can be collected using a relatively simple system of vertical wells drilled into
the landfill at selected points. Well spacing depends on site-specific variables, but typically
ranges from 150 to 300 feet. Horizontal trenches can also be used in place of, or in addition to,
vertical wells. Horizontal trenches tend to be less durable than vertical wells because refuse
added to the top of the trenches can weaken the pipes and cause breakage. All of the wells (or
trenches) are connected by horizontal piping to a central point where a motor/blower provides a
vacuum to remove the gas from the landfill.  In an effectively designed and constructed system,
methane recovery efficiencies in excess of 85 percent can be achieved (Maxwell, 1990).

       Collection systems are usually operated as part of an overall landfill  gas control system.
In many cases, a collection system is necessary because of the potential safety hazard posed
by the explosive potential of landfill gas, as well as to suppress landfill gas odors.  Accidents
involving landfill gas have resulted in explosions and landfill  fires that have caused death, injury,
and extensive property damage.

1.3.3  Landfill Gas Utilization

       Once collected, landfill gas can be used as an energy source for many different
applications, including electricity generation, space "heating and cooling, industrial  processes,
and vehicle fuels. In addition, landfill gas can simply be flared when a cost-effective utilization
option cannot be developed. Exhibit  1-1 illustrates various landfill gas-to-energy recovery
systems. In each of these options, the methane contained in the recovered landfill gas is
consumed, either through combustion (i.e., use as a fuel, including upgrading to pipeline quality
gas and flaring) or conversion to a non-greenhouse gas (i.e., production of industrial chemicals),
thereby reducing emissions of methane to the atmosphere.  Moreover, using landfill gas to
generate electricity can displace other fossil fuel use, thereby further reducing carbon dioxide
emissions, as well as reduce emissions of local air pollutants.

       As mentioned previously, there are over 130 fully operational landfill gas recovery and
utilization projects in the U.S., with over 90 additional projects under development (GAA, 1994).
Landfill gas-to-energy projects have established a track record that demonstrates the reliability
and economic viability of landfill gas recovery and utilization technology. Electric power
generation is the most common gas utilization method for landfill gas recovery projects. In fact,
more than 70 percent of the planned or operational landfill energy projects generate electricity,
while about 24 percent sell medium-Btu gas to a direct user, and 4 percent upgrade
Introduction                    Working Draft -- September 1997                       Page 1 -3

-------
                                      Exhibit 1-1
                         SCHEMATIC OF VARIOUS LANDFILL
                       GAS-TO-ENERGY RECOVERY SYSTEMS
                                                        GAS COLLECTION
                                                        NETWORK
         GASENGINE&
         ALTERNATOR
               NETWORK

            PROCESS V


            DISTRICT *
HEAT
                                 BOILER
their gas to pipeline quality (Thorneloe, 1995). The electricity generating capacity of landfill gas
projects typically ranges between 0.5 and 4 megawatts (MW), with the largest operational facility
generating almost 50 MW. Total U.S. operational capacity fired by landfill gas is roughly 400
MW, with an additional 245 MW of capacity planned or under construction.

       The following is a brief summary of landfill methane utilization options. For more
information on these technologies and their costs, see EPA's Turning a Liability into an Asset: A
Landfill Gas-to-Energy Handbook for Owners and Operators (U.S. EPA, 1994).
Page 1-4
      Working Draft - September 1997
Introduction

-------
       Electricity Generation

       For landfills that generate significant amounts of landfill gas (i.e., more than 1.3 million
cubic feet per day), electric power generation can be a cost-effective method of utilization.
Several proven technologies can be used to generate electricity from landfill gas.

       Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines (1C). These engines have proven to
       be cost-effective in many applications, and, in the case of small landfills, may be
       the only available, proven generating option.  1C engines are currently in use at
       about 73 sites (Thorneloe, 1995), with typical engine sizes ranging from 250
       kilowatts (kW) to 1 MW in size (more than one engine can be installed at a single
       site, and a typical project's total generating capacity is 3 to 4 MW). The three
       primary manufacturers of these engines have modified their designs and
       operating procedures to make the engines "landfill-gas-adapted."

       Gas Turbines.  Gas turbines have higher capital costs than 1C engines per
       kilowatt of installed capacity, but at larger landfills they have a lower cost of
       electricity (i.e., 0/kWh). Turbines require a reliable gas flow of approximately 2
       million cubic feet per day (mmcf/d) in order to be economically feasible, which
       corresponds to a generating capacity of at least 3 to 4 MW. Although they
       require higher gas flows, gas turbines have a number of advantages over 1C
       engines.  Because of the large quantities of excess air,  NOX emissions are
       considerably lower than from 1C engines.  In addition, gas turbines have
       continuous combustion which better adjusts to fluctuations in heat values of the
       landfill gas fuel.  Furthermore, the alloys used in turbines tend to be more
       resistant to corrosion  from  impurities within the gas supply.  There are about 26
       landfill gas projects in the U.S. using gas turbines (Thorneloe, 1995).

       Rankine Cycle (Steam) Turbines.  In rare cases where gas flow rates are
       extremely high, a rankine cycle turbine may be used. If the scale of the operation
       will support a rankine cycle turbine, high electrical efficiencies can be achieved
       with lower emissions of air pollutants and lower costs per kWh of output.  Steam
       turbines also produce large amounts of high temperature water that can be easily
       utilized for thermal co-generation activities. The smallest facilities usually
       generate at least 8 to 9 MW of power. Currently, rankine cycle turbines are only
       used at a handful of landfills in the U.S., the largest being a 47 MW facility at
       Puente Hills, California.

       Gas Delivery Systems

       Gas processing and delivery systems process landfill gas so it can be sold as a gaseous
fuel. The fuel can be delivered directly to a customer via dedicated pipes or to the natural gas
pipeline network. The two main options include:

       Sale as a Medium-Btu Fuel.  Landfill gas can be used for a variety of industrial
       and commercial applications, such as firing boilers and space heating, and can
       also be co-fired with other fuels. Medium-Btu gas can be economically
       transported via dedicated pipelines to one or more industrial facilities. An ideal
       medium-Btu gas customer is located within 5 miles of the landfill and has
       constant demand for gas.
Introduction                     Working Draft--September 1997                       Page 1-5

-------
       Sale as a High-Btu Fuel. Landfill gas can be upgraded to a high-Btu fuel and sold
       directly to natural gas companies. The cost to upgrade the gas to pipeline quality
       is generally very high, as the process involves the removal of water, carbon
       dioxide (CO2), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), hydrocarbons, and on some occasions,
       nitrogen.  In addition, sale as a high-Btu fuel to a pipeline usually requires that a
       natural gas pipeline be located within close proximity of the site.

       Emerging Utilization Options

       Other less conventional utilization options for landfill gas are also available or may soon
become available. Some of these options, such as fuel cells, are currently in the demonstration
phase to determine their operational and economic viability.  Other options, such as the use of
landfill gas to produce alternative vehicle fuels are  underway at several landfills.  Recently, a
small number of landfills have  used recovered gas to incinerate soil contaminated with
hazardous waste (GAA, 1994).

1.4    Benefits

       This section discusses the many benefits of recovering energy from landfill gas. Section
1.4.1 discusses general benefits of landfill gas-to-energy recovery projects and Section 1.4.2
discusses benefits realized by specific groups.

1.4.1  General Benefits

       Recovery of energy from landfill gas conveys many important global and local
environmental benefits as well as energy and economic benefits. For example, landfill gas-to-
energy improves the global environment by reducing methane emissions, and provides local
environmental benefits by reducing VOC emissions, as well as displacing other pollutants
associated  with fossil fuel use.  In addition, it provides a secure, low-cost energy supply (an
energy supply that is currently wasted) that can reduce dependence on fossil fuels.  These
benefits are discussed in more detail below.

       Environmental Benefits

       Landfill gas projects provide both direct and indirect environmental benefits.  Direct
environmental benefits from utilizing landfill gas include: reducing VOC emissions; reducing risk
of global warming; and reducing pungent decaying waste odor.  Landfill gas contains VOCs,
which contribute substantially to ground-level ozone and include air toxics.  Without control
systems, these compounds are released to the atmosphere as waste decomposes. When
landfill gas  is collected and burned through flaring or in an energy recovery system, VOCs are
destroyed.  However, since energy recovery projects try to optimize gas recovery for the
economic benefit, they minimize emissions to the atmosphere relative to flaring. Combusting
landfill gas  also destroys methane, which is a principle greenhouse gas. Landfill gas is the
single largest source of methane emissions in the U.S., contributing almost 40 percent of annual
methane emissions. Because of methane's potency and its rapid cycling through the
atmosphere, reducing methane emissions  is crucial in slowing global warming; a ton of methane
emitted into the atmosphere is 21 times more damaging than a ton of carbon dioxide, over a 100
year time frame (IPCC, 1995). Furthermore, landfill gas-to-energy recovery projects also
substantially reduce the odor of landfills.
Page 1-6                      Working Draft - September 1997                    Introduction

-------
       The primary indirect environmental benefit of landfill gas-to-energy recovery projects is
the displacement of fossil fuels.  Generating electricity from oil and coal leads to the emission of
several pollutants, including sulfur dioxide (SO2), which is a major contributor to acid rain. By
generating electricity from landfill gas, instead of fossil fuels, these emissions are avoided.
Moreover, displacing fossil fuels substantially reduces the production of ash and scrubber
sludge.

       Energy Benefits

       There are several energy benefits associated with utilizing landfill gas.  First, because
decomposing organic waste continuously produces landfill gas, landfill gas-to-energy recovery
projects are a nearly constant source of energy.  For example, a landfill that has two million tons
of landfilled municipal solid waste (MSW) produces on average 1.8 mmcf/day of landfill gas and
can generate 2.5 MW of electricity.  Second, landfill gas has a variety of applications such as
electricity generation and direct use. Third, landfill energy projects add to a community's and
utility's fuel diversity, as well as provide valuable experience in renewable energy.  Finally,
landfill projects can provide important distributive generation benefits typical of demand-side
management options; since electricity generated from landfill gas is typically directed to local
users, transmission losses from the point of generation to the point of consumption are
negligible.

       The value of landfill gas as an energy source has been recognized by the National
Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC).  In March of 1994, NARUC adopted
a resolution "urging regulators to  focus their regulatory attention on the landfill gas resources in
their states to determine the role that energy from landfill gas can play as an energy resource for
utilities and their customers."

       Economic Benefits

       Landfill gas provides a low-cost source of renewable energy. In addition, more
widespread use of landfill gas as  an energy source will create jobs related to the design,
construction, and operation and maintenance of these systems and lead to advancements in
U.S. environmental technology.

1.4.2  Benefits to Specific Groups

       Traditionally, landfill gas has been viewed as a safety hazard and a general nuisance.
However, there is now an increasing awareness on the part of landfill owners and operators,
project developers, utilities, state  and local governments, and others, of the environmental,
energy, and economic benefits that can result from recovering the energy value of this gas.
Some of the principle benefits for different groups and their potential roles in the development
process are highlighted below.

       Utilities

       There are many ways in which electric utilities can benefit from the development of
landfill gas-to-energy.  Examples  include:

       Stronger  Relations With Key Customer Groups: Landfill gas-to-energy recovery
       projects enable utilities to  enhance long-term relationships with a variety of
       customer groups. A utility can add significant value to their service
Introduction                    Working Draft - September 1997                       Page 1-7

-------
       offerings through direct or indirect involvement in landfill gas-to-energy
       development. Some innovative approaches a utility may wish to consider include
       participation in projects that directly supply landfill gas as a medium-Btu fuel to
       industrial or commercial end-users, offering project development assistance to a
       municipality, or initiating a residential or commercially-oriented green marketing
       program.

       Diversified Resource Base: Landfill gas-to-energy projects offer utilities the
       opportunity to add dispersed base-load capacity to their current system and to
       diversify their fuel mix. They also offer a competitive source of renewable energy
       to utilities.

       Contribution to Environmental  Protection:  By participating in landfill gas-to-
       energy projects, utilities help prevent local and global air pollution.  The EPA
       Landfill Methane Outreach Program recognizes utilities that work with EPA to
       identify, explore, and act on the best project opportunities.  These utilities gain
       recognition from EPA as well as greenhouse gas reductions that satisfy Climate
       Challenge commitments.

       Landfill Owners and Operators

       Benefits of participating in landfill gas-to-energy recovery projects for landfill owners and
operators include:

       Revenue Creation/Reduction of Regulatory Costs: Landfill gas projects may be a
       significant source of revenue generation for landfill owners/operators, depending
       on the size of the landfill, energy costs, and other site specific factors.  Even
       where projects do not generate profits, they may offset the cost of regulatory
       compliance. EPA's New Source Performance Standards and Emission
       Guidelines were promulgated on April 12, 1996 and require many landfill owners
       and operators to collect and combust their landfill gas.  States are already
       requiring collection and flaring of landfill gas.  Utilizing the collected landfill gas as
       an energy resource, instead of flaring it, will offer many owners and operators an
       opportunity to recover some of the regulatory costs, and may generate profit.

       Reduction of Risk:  Even in low concentrations, methane is explosive and  can
       result in fires and explosions that can imperil both people and property.
       Regulations promulgated under Subtitle D of the Resource Conservation and
       Recovery Act require owners and operators of landfills to monitor their facilities
       for methane levels to reduce the risk of landfill gas explosions. If methane
       concentrations exceed specified limits, owners and operators are required to take
       necessary steps to ensure protection of human health.  Landfill gas-to-energy
       recovery projects offer the opportunity to virtually eliminate the risk of injury and
       property damage by collecting and combusting landfill gas before it can
       accumulate to dangerous concentration levels within the landfill.

       Financial Incentives: Developers of landfill gas-to-energy recovery projects may
       qualify for a number of financial incentives.  The Renewable Energy Production
       Incentive (REPI), mandated under the Energy Policy Act of 1992, provides a cash
       subsidy of up to $0.015 per kWh to publicly owned facilities that generate
Page 1-8                      Working Draft--September 1997                     Introduction

-------
       electricity from renewable energy sources, such as landfills, for the period
       October 1993 through September 2002. Also, developers of landfill gas-to-
       energy projects who sell to an unrelated third party may qualify for a tax credit
       under Section 29 of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) tax code. The credit is
       worth $3.00 per barrel of oil-equivalent (on a mmBtu basis) and is adjusted
       annually for inflation.  Currently, the credit is worth $0.979 per mmBtu, about
       $0.012/kWh for a typical landfill gas electricity project.

       Industrial and Other End-Users

       Industrial and other potential landfill gas end-users can benefit from landfill gas-to-energy
recovery projects. Facilities with constant energy needs that are located near landfills can lower
their fuel costs, improve environmental quality, and enhance their public image by using landfill
gas in place of traditional fuels.

       Lower Fuel Costs:  For industrial end-users, a nearby landfill that is collecting its
       landfill gas can be an inexpensive source of medium Btu fuel or steam.

       Environmental Benefits:  By using landfill gas, industrial end-users contribute to
       environmental protection by displacing local air emissions associated with fossil
       fuel use and reducing emissions of methane.

       Public Image Enhancement: Through participation in the development of landfill
       energy recovery projects, industrial end-users can enhance their public image by
       mitigating the threat of global warming and contributing to improvements in the
       local economy and environment.

       Municipalities/Communities

       Municipalities and local communities can also benefit from landfill gas-to-energy recovery
projects. Benefits include:

       Increased Tax Base:  Municipalities or communities that have a landfill gas
       project in their area increase their tax base, as well as create new job
       opportunities.

       Attract New Industries: A local energy source may attract new industry to the
       area.  For example, industrial producers that could use large quantities of
       medium Btu gas might want to locate a plant near the landfill since the landfill
       could provide a cheap source of energy.

       Reduction of Air Pollution Emissions and Odors: VOCs emitted from landfill
       waste decomposition can endanger human health, particularly for those who work
       on or live near landfills without a collection system.  Landfill gas recovery projects
       offer an opportunity to greatly reduce this health risk by collecting and destroying
       these harmful compounds before they escape into the atmosphere.  In addition,
       collection and combustion of landfill gas reduces noxious odors.
Introduction                     Working Draft--September 1997                       Page 1-9

-------
1.5    Opportunities for Project Participants

       As mentioned above, there are numerous benefits from participating in a landfill gas-to-
energy project.  For each potential project participant, a brief discussion of how to assess
opportunities is provided below.

       Utilities

       Utilities should assess how, in light of rapid restructuring in the energy industry,
participating in landfill gas projects can enhance critical business objectives. These business
objectives include building stronger relationships with key customer groups, broadening utility's
resource base, and realizing substantial environmental benefits. This document can help
utilities determine the best opportunities for using landfill gas to help achieve these company
objectives. Innovative approaches to consider include:  assistance to municipalities that must
install gas collection systems to comply with regulations or that have candidate landfills ready for
project development; participation in projects that directly provide landfill gas as a medium-Btu
fuel to targeted  industrial or commercial end-users; and development of new marketing
programs, such as green pricing, with landfill gas as part of the energy mix to meet customer
demands for cleaner, renewable energy sources. These "value-added" services are effective
mechanisms to build stronger, more responsive relationships with key customer groups, while
acquiring a competitive renewable resource. Moreover, utilities should consider how landfill gas-
to-energy furthers their environmental objectives. By participating in landfill gas-to-energy
projects, utilities help improve local and global air quality; receive  national recognition from the
EPA; and fulfill commitments under the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Climate Challenge
Program.

       Landfill Owners and Operators

       Landfill owners and operators can assess conditions at their sites to determine whether
their landfill can support an economically attractive project. If it appears that the landfill has
potential for energy recovery, owners and operators can take active roles in determining what
project configuration is right for the landfill, identifying potential energy customers, and seeking
potential development partners. As necessary during each stage of this process, landfill owners
and operators can work with project development experts for guidance in designing a successful
and profitable project.

       Industrial End-Users

       Potential industrial, commercial, or other end-users should assess the potential for
reducing energy expenses by using landfill gas  in their facilities. These industrial customers can
assess project potential by examining conditions at the local landfill and evaluating their current
and future energy requirements.  If it appears that there is a match between the end-user and
the landfill, they can work as partners in project development,  potentially involving additional.
project developers as well.
Page 1-10                     Working Draft - September 1997                    Introduction

-------
1.6    References

GAA 1994. 1994-5 Methane Recovery from Landfill Yearbook, Governmental Advisory
       Associates.

IPCC 1995. Climate Change 1995: The Science of Climate Change. Intergovernmental Panel
       on Climate Change

Landfill Control Technologies, 1994.  "Landfill Gas System Engineering Design Seminar."

Maxwell 1990.  Will  Gas-to-Energy Work at Your Landfill?  Solid Waste & Power.

Thorneloe 1992.  Landfill Gas Recovery/Utilization - Options and Economics. Presented at the
       Sixteenth Annual Conference by the Institute of Gas Technology on Energy from
       Biomass and Wastes, Orlando, Florida, March 15,1992.

Thorneloe and  Pacey, 1994a. Database of North American Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects.
       Presented at the 17th Annual International Landfill Gas Symposium by the Solid Waste
       Association of North America, Long Beach, California, March 22-24,1994. Published in
       Conference Proceedings.

Thorneloe and  Pacey, 1994b. Landfill Gas Utilization - Technical and Non-Technical
       Considerations. Presented at the 17th Annual International Landfill Gas Symposium by
       the Solid Waste Association of North America, Long Beach, California, March 22-24,
       1994. Published in Conference Proceedings.

Thorneloe and  Pacey, 1995. Database of North American Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects.
       Presented at the 18th Annual International Landfill Gas Symposium by the Solid Waste
       Association of North America, New Orleans,  Louisiana, March 27-30,1995. Published in
       Conference Proceedings.

U.S. EPA 1993. Opportunities to Reduce Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in the United
       States:  Report to Congress, United States Environmental Protection Agency. EPA 430-
       R-93-012.

U.S. EPA 1994. Turning a Liability into an Asset: A Landfill Gas-to-Energy Handbook for
       Landfill  Owners and Operators, United States Environmental Protection Agency.
Introduction                    Working Draft -- September 1997                     Page 1-11

-------

-------

-------

-------
               2.   Instructions for Evaluating  Landfill Profiles
       This chapter provides instructions for interpreting the profiles contained in Chapters 4
and 5. A landfill profile has been prepared for each of the current projects (which include both
operational and planned landfill gas-to-energy projects) and candidate landfills (landfills
potentially generating enough landfill gas to  make recovery economical). The information in
each profile is grouped into eight sections:

       •      Landfill Location and Status;
       •      Waste Collection Information;
       •      Gas Collection and Control Data;
              Gas Utilization Data;
              Site Potential;
       •      Environmental Benefits of Utilization;
       •      Contact Information; and
       •      Comments Relating to Landfill Gas Recovery Projects.

The current projects profile sheet has all of the above sections, while the candidate landfill profile
omits the gas utilization data section.  In addition, the contact information for the candidate
landfill does not include information on an energy recovery system owner or operator, as these
fields do not apply.

       Information contained in the profiles has been compiled from a number of sources, the
most important of which was state and local  sources, such as permits and annual acceptance
reports, supplemented by:  the 1994-5 Methane Recovery from Landfill Yearbook (GAA, 1994);
Implementation Guide for Landfill Gas Recovery Projects in the Northeast:  Draft Final Report
(SCS,  1994);  Survey of Landfill Gas Generation Potential: 2 MW Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell
(EPRI, 1992); and Landfill Gas-to-Energy: 1994-1995 Activity Report (SWT, 1994).

       A detailed description of each entry on the landfill profile sheet is presented  below.
When no information was available for a value, the data field is reported as not available (N.A.).
The accuracy of the data depends on the quality of the information contained in the documents
reviewed (further information on data collection  activities and data interpretations is provided in
Chapter 3).

       Data marked with a single asterisk (*) indicates that default values were used.  For
example, if the number of days per week waste is accepted at a landfill is not known, a default
value of 5.5 days is used and an asterisk appears next to the value.  It should also be noted that
numbers within a profile may not add correctly due to rounding. The remainder of this  section is
organized by sub-section of a landfill profile.

2.1    Landfill Location and Status

       The first section of each profile provides a brief overview of the landfill site, including its
physical location, operating status, and the status of gas collection and energy recovery
activities. This overview section also lists any alternate names for the landfill. Specific items
included are:
Instructions for Evaluating         Working Draft ~ September 1997                       Page 2-1
Landfill Profiles

-------
       Location: The physical location of the site, including city, county, and state.  More
       information is included in the Contact Information section of the profile, such as
       owner, operator, contact names, and telephone numbers.

       Status: The current operational status of the landfill.  Standard entries are Open
       (active) or Closed (inactive).  Landfills that were reported as temporarily closed in
       state documents were considered closed.

       Year Opened: The year that waste was first accepted at the landfill.  In cases in
       which the open year was not available, the year the first (or oldest) permit was
       issued was assumed  to be the open year.

       Year Closed: The year the landfill stopped accepting waste (closed landfills), or
       is scheduled to stop accepting waste (open landfills). For open landfills, if a
       reported year of closing is not available, the year is estimated by dividing the
       remaining landfill capacity by the annual waste acceptance rate, and adding the
       result to the current year.  (Remaining capacity is estimated as the difference
       between the design capacity and the current waste-in-place.)

       Gas Collection: The status of gas collection at the landfill; standard responses
       include operational, planned, shutdown, none, or N.A. (Not Available).  Additional
       detail on gas collection activities is provided in the Gas Collection and Control
       Data section of the profile.

       Gas Utilization: The status of gas utilization at the landfill; standard responses
       include operational, planned, shutdown, none, or N.A. (Not Available).  Gas
       utilization is synonymous with energy recovery; flaring and venting are not
       considered  utilization  in the context of the landfill profiles.  Additional detail on gas
       utilization activities is  provided in the  Gas Utilization Data section of the profile.

       Primary Contact: The name and telephone number of the primary contact for the
       landfill. More detailed contact information is provided in the Contact Information
       section at the end of the profile.

       Alternative Name(s):  Any identified name for the landfill that is significantly
       different from the main landfill name.  Many landfills have operated under different
       names at different times in their history.

2.2    Waste Collection Information

       This section presents important waste collection information that can affect the suitability
of a site for landfill gas recovery. The information includes the design capacity, the estimated
current waste-in-place and waste acceptance rate, the waste types and percent MSW, acreage,
average depth, and tipping fee.

       Types of Wastes Accepted: The types of wastes accepted at the landfill; possible
       entries include MSW, yard waste, paper mill waste, sewage sludge, other sludge,
       commercial solid waste, industrial solid waste, ash, construction and demolition
       debris, and  other waste. Some of these wastes contain
Page 2-2                       Working Draft - September 1997         Instructions for Evaluating
                                                                            Landfill Profiles

-------
       inorganic material and therefore will generate no methane; others, such as
       sludges and yard waste, have a lower methane generation potential due to
       excess moisture and other factors.

       Percent of Waste that is MSW: If known, the percent of the total waste-in-place
       at the landfill that is MSW. If the  percentage of MSW in the total waste-in-place is
       unknown, the percentage of MSW in annual waste accepted was used. Currently
       this value is not used in the methane generation equations described later in this
       section. The percentage of MSW in the landfilled waste is an indication of the
       potential suitability of the landfill for gas recovery.

       Tipping Fee: The standard fee charged for the disposal of MSW, in $/ton. This
       value has been converted from $/cubic yards to $/tons where necessary,  using
       an assumed density of 1 ton/1.667 cubic yards.2 In some cases the tipping fee
       varies by waste type or origin of the waste. The entry reflects, to the extent
       possible, the average fee levied on the waste accepted.

       Design Capacity: The total amount of waste that the landfill is designed to
       accept, reported in tons. This information is also called current permitted
       capacity.  Values reported in cubic yards have been converted to tons, by
       assuming a density of 1 ton/1.667 cubic yards.

       Days Open per Week: The reported number of days per week the landfill is
       open. When both a daily acceptance rate and annual acceptance rate were
       given in a single source, the number of days open per week was calculated by
       dividing the annual acceptance rate by the daily acceptance rate and by 52
       weeks per year. Where not available, a default of 5.5 days per week was used,
       consistent with typical industry operating experience.

       Annual Acceptance Rate:  The amount of waste received and  landfilled for a
       reported year, including all waste types, reported in short tons (tons). Values
       reported in units other than tons per year have been converted using an assumed
       density of 1 ton/1.667 cubic yards.  If only a daily acceptance rate was  available,
       an annual  acceptance rate has been calculated by multiplying the daily
       acceptance rate by 52 weeks and the days open per week. When multi-year
       annual acceptance rate data were available, the most recent year's acceptance
       rate is presented in the profile.

       Total Landfill Acreage: The number of acres that have been landfilled. Where
       possible, this has been made distinct from permitted or site acreage.

       Average Depth: The average depth of the landfilled waste, reported in feet.
       Where a breakdown is available,  this value includes any buried soil cover and
       landfill cap material.
  2 NSWMA (1985), page 5, presents the density of refuse in landfills as a range.  The lower end of this
range, 1,200 Ib/cubic yard was used in the profiles.
Instructions for Evaluating         Working Draft -- September 1997                      Page 2-3
Landfill Profiles

-------
       Estimated Current Waste-in-Place: The total amount of waste that has been
       landfilled since the landfill opened. All waste types have been included, and units
       other than tons have been converted using landfill specific information where
       available, or by assuming a density of 1 ton/1.667 cubic yards. The following
       methods are used, in the order presented, to estimate WIP:

       1.     For landfills where the estimated current year WIP is not known, it has
             been estimated from the most recent available estimates of waste-in-
             place (WIP) and acceptance rate.
           Equation 1:

           Estimated WIP (tons) =
       Reported WIP (tons) + (Annual Acceptance
       Rate (tons/yr) x ((Current or Closed Year) -
       Year WIP Reported))
2.      If no estimate of the reported WIP was available for any year, then the estimated current
       WIP was estimated from the Year Opened, and the Acceptance Rate, as follows:
           Equation 2:

           Estimated WIP (tons)  =
      Annual Acceptance Rate (tons/yr) x (((Current
      or Closed Year) + 1) - Year Opened)
             When multi-year annual acceptance rates were available, the average
             value of the reported acceptance rates was used in the above equations.
       3.     If acceptance rate data were not available, the reported WIP was used as
             the estimated current WIP.
       4.     If acceptance rate data and reported WIP were not available, the
             estimated current WIP was estimated from the landfilled acreage, the
             average depth, and an assumed MSW density of 1 ton/1.667 cubic yards.
Page 2-4
Working Draft - September 1997
Instructions for Evaluating
         Landfill Profiles

-------
            Equation 3:

            Estimated WIP


            or


            Estimated WIP (tons)   =
          Landfill Area Used x Average Depth x
          Density of Waste
          Area (acres) x Depth (ft) x 1613.33
          (yd3/acre-ft) x (1 ton/1.667 yd3)
2.3    Gas Collection and Control Data

       This section presents information on current and planned gas collection activities,
including the type of collection equipment, its operational status and initial year of operation, the
percentage of waste welled and the collection efficiency, and the amount of gas collected.  Many
landfills without gas utilization systems still collect landfill gas for safety reasons.  Note that many
landfills are in the planning stages of developing a collection system, in which case data
presented in this section represents the anticipated characteristics of the system.  In other
cases, landfills have collection systems in place which have been shutdown.  In these cases the
data reflect the characteristics of the collection system when it was operating.  Gas collection
and control information was obtained from:  GAA, 1994; SCS, 1994; SWT, 1994; EPRI, 1992;
and state lists.

       Collection System Status: The status of gas collection activities at the landfill.
       Standard entries are: operational, planned, shutdown, none, or N.A. (Not
       Available).   Note that this entry is also printed at the top of the Landfill Location
       and Status section of the profile.

       Collection System Type:  The type of landfill gas collection systems used at the
       landfill; standard entries are wells, trenches, wells & trenches, none, or N.A. (Not
       Available).

       Collection Efficiency: The efficiency of the gas collection system, expressed in
       percent. The efficiency will be less than 100 percent due to a number of potential
       factors, including: poor well placement and air infiltration through the landfill
      . cover, the wellhead, or lateral pipe connections. Collection efficiency can range
       from 50 percent or lower at existing landfills to 95 percent at newer, well-designed
       landfills. Unless an estimate is provided by the landfill, a default value of 85
       percent is used.
Instructions for Evaluating
Landfill Profiles
Working Draft - September 1997
Page 2-5

-------
       Methane Concentration: The concentration of methane in the collected gas,
       which may vary due to differences in waste type, other landfill specific factors,
       and collection system inefficiencies. The methane concentration directly affects
       the heat value of the recovered gas. A default value of 50 percent methane is
       used in the absence of reported data.

       Year Gas Collection Began:  The year that the landfill gas collection system
       became operational. If in planning or construction stages, the date of anticipated
       operation is used.

       Estimated Percent of Landfill Area Welled: The portion of the landfill supporting
       the landfill gas collection system, expressed in percentage.  Landfills sometimes
       do not install gas collection systems over the entire landfill area.  Reasons for this
       include: the collection system is a demonstration project or the first phase of a
       larger planned system; there are diminishing returns on gas production in some
       areas of the landfill;  some areas may be too far from the central collection point;
       continued landfilling has expanded the landfill acreage; or installing wells or
       trenches would  interfere with ongoing operations. If not reported, the percentage
       of waste welled is calculated by dividing the welled acreage by landfill acreage.

       Landfill Gas Collected: The reported volume of landfill gas (i.e., not only
       methane) flowing through the collection system, in million cubic feet per day
       (mmcf/d) and million cubic feet per year (mmcf/yr). Values reported in units other
       than mmcf/d or  mmcf/yr have been converted.

       Methane Gas Collected: The estimated volume of methane in the collected
       landfill gas. Unless  reported, this is calculated by multiplying the amount of
       landfill gas collected by the reported methane concentration or a default value of
       50 percent.

2.4    Gas Utilization  Data

       This section presents information on the current or planned use of collected landfill gas,
including the portion of the collected gas that is used, the utilization option, its operational status
and first year of operation, the size of the project, and any expansion plans. This section is only
included  in the profiles  of landfills with current projects. Note that some landfills are in the
planning  stages of developing a gas utilization system, in which case data presented in this
section represents the anticipated characteristics of the system.  In other cases, landfills have
utilization systems in place which are no longer operating.  Utilization data for landfills  with a
shutdown utilization system reflect the characteristics of the utilization system when it was
operating. Gas utilization status was obtained from a number of sources, including: GAA, 1994;
SCS, 1994;  SWT, 1994; EPRI, 1992; and state data sources.

       Utilization System Status:  The status of gas utilization activities at the landfill.
       Standard entries are: operational, planned, shutdown, none, or N.A. (Not
       Available). Note that this entry is also printed at the top of the Landfill Location
       and Status section of the profile.
Page 2-6                       Working Draft -- September 1997         Instructions for Evaluating
                                                                            Landfill Profiles

-------
       Year Project Initiated: The year that the landfill gas recovery project began using
       collected gas, or, if in planning or construction stages, the date of anticipated
       operation.

       End-Use of Collected Gas:  The percentage of gas utilized, flared, or vented.
       Collected gas may be utilized as fuel for power generation or in other energy
       applications, in addition to being flared or vented. Where known, the percentage
       of each option is provided; otherwise N.A. (Not available) is entered.

       Utilization System Type: The type of energy utilization system. Standard entries
       include: electricity generation, electricity generation/direct gas sales, high Btu
       gas production, medium Btu gas, on-site use, other, to be determined,  or N.A.
       (Not Available).

       System Description:  Additional available information on the utilization system.
       For example, the type of equipment used to generate electricity is included here
       when available or appropriate. Standard entries include: 1C Engines, Gas
       Turbines, 1C Engines/Gas Turbines,  Steam Turbines, Combined Cycle, and gas
       upgrade equipment.

       Energy Purchaser(s): The name of the utility or gas customer(s).

2.5    Site Potential

       This section presents information on landfill gas generation and collection potential,
power generation potential, and other gas utilization options. The information includes:
estimates of the total volume of methane generated in the landfill, current and potential landfill
gas collection, additional gas available for use, and possible energy utilization options for the
additional collection potential.

       Estimated Total Methane Generation

       Methane (CH4) is generated in landfills as the organic content of the waste decomposes.
Estimated Methane Generation in million cubic feet per day (mmcf/d)  is based on two equations
adapted from U.S. EPA 1993b, Opportunities to Reduce Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in
the United States.  Equation 4a estimates annual methane for landfills with less than 907,200
tons of Waste  in Place. Equation 4b estimates annual methane for landfills with at least 907,200
tons of Waste  in Place. These equations were derived from statistical analyses of existing
projects.3
   3 Equation 4 was adapted from:

                      CH4 (rrrVmin) = 8.22 + 5.27 WIP (million metric tons),

found on page 4-25 of U.S. EPA 1993b, Opportunities to Reduce Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in
the United States: Report to Congress.
Instructions for Evaluating         Working Draft -- September 1997                       Page 2-7
Landfill Profiles

-------
       This methodology is based on the assumption that waste has a 30 year methane
generation lifespan. Therefore, the Waste in Place value used to estimate emissions does not
include waste that was accepted more than 30 years before the current year.  This waste value
will be referred to as WIPm.
         Equation 4a (WIP<907,200 tons):

         CH4 generation (mmcf/d) =0.05085 x  (6.95x10'6x WIPm (tons))
         Equation 4b (WIP>907,200 tons):

         CH4 generation (mmcf/d) =0.05085 x [8.22+(5.03x10'6x WIPm (tons))]
       If the landfill began accepting waste less than 30 year from the publication data of this
document, then WIPm is considered to be the same as the WIP calculated using the method
described in Section 2.2.  If the landfill began accepting waste over 30 years ago, then WIPm is
calculated by estimating the total quantity of waste that was placed in the landfill within the last
30 years. For these landfills WIPm is calculated as follows:
         Equation 4c:

         WIPm (tons) = (WIP (tons)/(current year-open year)) x (number of years the
         landfill has been open in the past 30 years)
The result of this equation is also presented in the profile in mmcf/yr, which is obtained by
multiplying mmcf/d by 365 days per year.
         Equation 4d:

         CH4 generation (mmcf/yr) = CH4 generation (mmcf/d) x 365 days/yr
       One limitation of this methane generation model is its use of national averages to
estimate individual landfills' gas generation rates. While such a model may provide a useful
indication of potential gas flow, site specific factors not included in such a model, such as
percent MSW, age, moisture content, temperature, pH, and density of waste, may diminish the
accuracy of the predicted gas flow.  Since such models can generate estimates with potentially
large uncertainties, site monitoring is extremely important in order to verify gas flows.
Page 2-8                      Working Draft - September 1997         Instructions for Evaluating
                                                                           Landfill Profiles

-------
       Landfill Gas Collection and Utilization Potential

       The following data and estimates for gas collection and use are presented in terms of
landfill gas volume, not methane volume. This conforms with typical industry practice. All of the
entries are reported in both mmcf/d and mmcf/yr.

       Estimated Total LFG Collection Potential: The estimated maximum volume of
       landfill gas that can feasibly be recovered from the landfill. Because landfill gas
       contains other  gases in addition to methane, the volume of landfill gas generated
       will typically be about twice the volume of methane generated (i.e., the methane
       concentration is typically 50 percent).  The estimates of gas collection and
       utilization potential are presented in terms of landfill gas, as opposed to pure
       methane, to conform with industry practice.
         Equation 5:

         Estimated Total LFG Collection Potential

             =    Estimated Methane Generation x Collection Efficiency x
                  1/Methane Concentration
       where:

              Estimated Methane Generation is calculated using Equation 4a or 4b.

              Collection Efficiency represents the amount of gas generated in the landfill
              that can be recovered by a gas collection system.  A default value of 85
              percent is used (U.S. EPA, 1993b); and

              Methane Concentration represents the percentage of methane contained
              in the landfill gas. This value is based on the reported value from the Gas
              Collection and Control section, if available, or a default value of 50
              percent (U.S. EPA, 1993b).


       When default values are used:
         Equation 5a:

         Estimated Total LFG Collection Potential (mmcf/d)

             =   CH4 generation (mmcf/d) x 0.85 x 2
Instructions for Evaluating         Working Draft - September 1997                       Page 2-9
Landfill Profiles

-------
      The result of this equation is also presented in the profile in million cubic feet per
      year (mmcf/yr):
         Equation 5b:

         Estimated Total LFG Collection Potential (mmcf/yr)

            =   Total LFG Collection Potential (mmcf/d) x 365 days/yr
       However, if the Current or Planned Reported LFG Collection Volume exceeds the
       value estimated using Equation 5, the Current or Planned Reported LFG
       Collection Volume is used as the Estimated Total LFG Collection Potential.

       Current Reported LFG Collection Volume: This is the average volume of landfill
       gas currently being collected each day.  This value is typically obtained from GAA
       (1994) and SWT (1994).  If this reported value exceeds the Total LFG Collection
       Potential estimated above, then the value reported here will also be used as the
       Estimated Total LFG Collection Potential.

       Planned Reported LFG Collection Volume: This is the planned volume of landfill
       gas that will be collected each day. Planned LFG Collection may represent the
       installation of a new collection system or the expansion of an existing collection
       system.  This value is typically obtained from GAA (1994) and SWT (1994).  If this
       reported value exceeds the Total LFG Collection Potential estimated above, then
       the value reported here will also be used as the Estimated Total LFG Collection
       Potential.

       Estimated Additional LFG Collection Potential: This value represents the
       additional volume of landfill gas that can be collected, assuming a default
       collection efficiency of 85 percent. This includes the volume of  gas that could be
       collected if the entire landfill acreage had a collection system. It is estimated as
       the Estimated Total LFG Collection Potential less the Current and Planned
       Landfill Gas Collection Volume (described above).
         Equation 6:

         Estimated Additional LFG Collection Potential (mmcf/d)

            =   Total LFG Collection Potential (mmcf/d) - Current LFG Collection
                 Volume (mmcf/d) - Planned LFG Collection Potential (mmcf/d)
       The additional collection potential will be zero if the sum of the Current and
       Planned LFG Collection Volumes equals or exceeds the Estimated Total LFG
       Collection Potential, even though additional potential may exist.

       Estimated Total LFG Utilization Volume Potential: The total amount of landfill gas
       that could be utilized for energy recovery; this value is equal to the Estimated
       Total LFG Collection Potential.
Page 2-10                      Working Draft - September 1997         Instructions for Evaluating
                                                                          Landfill Profiles

-------
       Current Reported Volume of LFG Utilized: This is the amount of landfill gas that
       is currently collected and used for power generation or another energy
       application.  It does not include that fraction of the collected gas that is flared or
       vented into the atmosphere. The value is calculated as the product of the Current
       LFG Collection Volume and the Percent Utilized value reported in the Gas
       Utilization Data section, which are typically obtained from GAA (1994), SWT
       (1994), or state data. If the percent utilized is not available, the Current Reported
       Volume of LFG Utilized is N.A. (Not Available).

       Planned Reported Volume of LFG Utilized:  This is the planned volume of landfill
       gas that will be used for power generation or another energy  recovery operation.
       This value is calculated as the product of the Planned LFG Collection Volume
       and the Percent Utilized value reported in the Gas Utilities Data section, which
       are typically obtained from GAA (1994), SWT (1994), or state data. If the percent
       utilized is not available, the Planned Reported Volume of LFG Utilized is N.A.
       (Not Available).

       Estimated Additional LFG Available for Use: This is the amount of landfill gas
       that is potentially available for use in power generation or other energy
       application.  This includes any additional gas to be collected as well as gas
       currently being collected that is currently vented or flared. Thus:
         Equation 7:

         Estimated Additional LFG Available for Use (mmcf/d)

             =    Estimated Total Utilization Potential (mmcf/d) - Current Utilization
                  Volume (mmcf/d) - Planned Utilization Volume (mmcf/d)
       If either Current LFG Utilization Volume or Planned Utilization Volume is N.A. (Not
       Available), then the above equation is not evaluated and N.A. (Not Available) is entered
       in the profile.

       Power Generation Potential

       Entries in this section are presented both as capacity (MW) and energy generation
(GWh/yr). Assuming an availability (load) factor of 85 percent (7446 operational hours/yr),  the
capacity can be converted to energy by multiplying by the number of hours in a year that the
equipment is operational, and then dividing by 1000 (i.e., to convert from MWh to GWh).

       Estimated Total Electric Potential: This value represents the total installed
       electricity generation capacity that could be supported by the landfill site,
       assuming that all uncollected and unutilized landfill gas is collected and used for
       power generation. The equation for generation capacity assumes the use of 1C
       engines with a heat rate of 13,000 Btu per kWh:
Instructions for Evaluating         Working Draft -- September 1997                     Page 2-11
Landfill Profiles

-------
         Equation 8:

         Estimated Total Electrical Potential (MW)

             =    Estimated Total LFG Utilization Potential (mmcf/d) x %CH4 x
                  (1 day/24 hr) x (1000 Btu/cf) x (1,000,000 cf/mmcf) x
                  (1 kWh/13,000 Btu) x (1 MW/1000 kw)
       or
         Equation 8a:

         Estimated Total Electrical Potential (GWh/yr)

             =    Estimated Total Electrical Potential (MW) x 7446 hours/yr x
                  1 GW/1000 MW
       Current Generation: This value, typically obtained from either GAA (1994) or
       SWT (1994), is the reported installed generation capacity of landfills for existing
       utilization projects. If a landfill gas project is currently selling, or is planning, to
       sell gas directly to a nearby customer, then this entry is entered as zero.  For
       planned electricity generation projects, this value will be zero. For candidate
       landfills, this value will be N.A. (Not Available).

       Planned Generation: If a landfill gas project is in the planning stages, the
       Planned Generation is presented here. This value is typically obtained from
       either GAA (1994) or SWT (1994).  For current electricity generation projects, this
       value will be zero. For candidate landfills, this value will be N.A. (Not Available).

       Estimated Additional Generation Potential:  The estimated  installed generating
       capacity, in MW, that could be supported by the Estimated Additional LFG
       Available for Use (i.e., the currently uncollected and unutilized volume of landfill
       gas).
         Equation 9:

         Estimated Additional Generation Potential (MW)

             =    Estimated Total Electrical Potential (MW) - Current Electrical
                  Potential (MW) - Planned Electrical Potential (MW)
       or
Page 2-12                      Working Draft - September 1997         Instructions for Evaluating
                                                                             Landfill Profiles

-------
         Equation 9a:

         Estimated Additional Generation Potential (GWh/yr)

             =    Estimated Additional Generation Potential (MW) x 7446 hours/yr x
                  1 GW/1000MW
       For landfills for which either the current or planned electrical potential is N.A. (Not
       Available), the additional generation potential will also be N.A. (Not Available).
       One limitation of the electric potential estimates is their derivation from the current
       waste-in-place. For landfills that are still accepting waste, as are most of those
       profiled, the waste-in-place and associated gas flow will be increasing over time.
       Depending on the anticipated closure date, the generating capacity may be
       significantly underestimated.

       Utilities in County:  The electric utilities that are located in  or serve the county in
       which the landfill is located. The majority of the electric utilities listed are located
       in the same county as the landfill.  These data are based on DOE's Energy
       Information Administration's publication Electricity Trade in the United States in
       1992 and supporting databases (U.S. DOE, 1992).  The rest of the utilities listed
       serve the county in which the landfill is located and supplement the utilities listed
       in DOE's database. They are provided by the Utility Data  Institute's Electric Utility
       Demographic Database (UDI, 1995). Note that utilities in  nearby counties that do
       not serve the county in which the landfill  is located, are not listed, even though
       they could be closer to the landfill then the utilities located in the same county.

2.6    Environmental Benefits of Utilization

       This section presents data on both the current environmental benefits of landfill  gas
collection and utilization, as well as the additional environmental benefits that can be achieved
by further utilizing landfill gas. For landfills where the breakdown  between percent flared,
percent vented, and percent utilized is not available, only the Estimated Total Potential  Methane
Reductions are presented, and N.A. is reported for Current and Planned Methane Reductions,
as well as Estimated Potential (Additional) Methane Reductions.

       Estimated Total Potential Methane Reductions: The sum  of the current, planned,
       and additional methane reductions, in mmcf/yr. This value differs from Estimated
       Total Methane Generation because it incorporates the collection  efficiency.  For
       landfills where these values are not available, the following equation can be used.
Instructions for Evaluating         Working Draft - September 1997                      Page 2-13
Landfill Profiles

-------
         Equation 10:

         Estimated Total Potential Methane Reductions (mmcf/yr)

             =   Estimated Total LFG Collection Potential (mmcf/d) x Methane
                 Concentration x 365 days/yr
      The estimate of Methane Emissions Reduction Potential presented here is likely
      to be an overestimate because in the absence of the gas recovery system, a
      portion of the methane produced in the landfill would be oxidized as it migrates
      out of the landfill. The portion of the methane that is oxidized is not emitted to the
      atmosphere, and therefore does not contribute to landfill methane emissions.
      Withdrawing the gas with a collection system prevents this oxidation step, so that
      more methane is recovered than would otherwise have been emitted. The extent
      of oxidation that will occur can vary greatly depending on local conditions, and an
      estimate is not incorporated here.

      Current and Planned Methane Reductions: The amount of methane that is not
      being released to the atmosphere because it is being collected and either utilized
      or flared.  It is calculated in mmcf/yr, using the following equation:
         Equation 11:

         Current and Planned Methane Reductions (mmcf/yr)

            =    ((Current LFG Collection Volume + Planned LFG Collection
                  Volume (mmcf/d) x Methane Concentration) x (100 - percent
                  vented)) x 365 days/yr
       where:

                    Methane concentration is reported in the Gas Collection and
                    Control Data section of the profile (Default value of 50 percent.)

             •      Percent Vented is reported in the Gas Utilization Data section of
                    the profile.

       If Percent Vented is not available, this equal is not evaluated and N.A. (Not
       Available) is entered in the profile.

       Estimated Potential (Additional) Methane Reductions: The amount of methane
       that could be reduced by collecting and either flaring or utilizing gas that is
       currently being emitted. The additional  methane reduction potential is estimated
       using the following formula:
Page 2-14                      Working Draft - September 1997         Instructions for Evaluating
                                                                           Landfill Profiles

-------
         Equation 12:

         Estimated Additional Methane Reduction Potential (mmcf/yr)

             =    {((Estimated Additional LFG Collection Potential) x Methane
                  Concentration) + ((Current + Planned LFG Collection Potential) x
                  Methane Concentration x Percent Vented)} (mmcf/d) x 365
                  days/yr
       or, substituting equation 6,
         Equation 12a:

         Estimated Additional Methane Reduction Potential (mmcf/yr)

             =  {[(Estimated Total LFG Collection Potential - Current LFG Collection
                  Volume - Planned LFG Collection Volume) x Methane
         Concentration] +         [((Current + Planned LFG Collection) x Methane
         Concentration) x
                Percent Vented]} (mmcf/d) x 365 days/year
       where:

              •      Methane concentration is reported in the Gas Collection and
                    Control Data section of the profile (Default value of 50 percent.)

                    Percent Vented is reported in the Gas Utilization Data section of
                    the profile.

       If Percent Vented is not available, this equal is not evaluated and N.A. (Not
       Available) is entered in the profile.

       CO, Equivalent of Methane Emission Reductions: The magnitude of the methane
       emissions that could potentially be reduced through increased landfill gas
       collection, expressed in thousand tons of carbon dioxide equivalent per year.
       The Emissions Reduction Potential, presented in thousand tons per year, is
       converted to thousand standard tons of CO2 equivalent per year using a Global
       Warming Potential of methane equal to 21:4
  4 The Global Warming Potential (GWP) is an expression of the radiative forcing of one mass unit of
methane relative to one mass unit of carbon dioxide. Thus, one gram of methane has 21 times the
radiative forcing of one gram of carbon dioxide over a 100 year timeframe. For additional information see
IPCC1995.
Instructions for Evaluating         Working Draft -- September 1997                     Page 2-15
Landfill Profiles

-------
         Equation 13:

         Annual CO2 Equivalent of CH4 Emission Reductions (thousand tons/yr)

            =    Estimated CH4 Reduction Potential (mmcf/yr) x 21.12 tons/mmcf x
                 21 tons CCytons CH4 x 1 thousand tons/1000 tons
      where the CH4 Reduction Potential can be either Total, Current and Planned, or
      Additional, assuming the density of methane at 15°C and 1 atmosphere is 21.12
      ton/mmcf.

      Estimated Acid Rain "Bonus Allowances": Under Title IV of the Clean Air Act (the
      EPA Acid Rain Program), the Conservation and Renewable Energy Reserve
      (CRER) allocates a pool of SO2 allowances for renewable energy technologies.
      These allowances are available to utilities for landfill energy recovery projects, at
      the rate of one for every 5QO MWh/yr generated (i.e., one for every 0.5 GWh/yr
      generated).  These bonus allowances can be earned each year between 1994
      and 2000 by applying to the CRER.  The allowance is rounded down to a whole
      number.
         Equation 14:

         Total EARBA = Total Electric Potential (GWh/yr) x 1  EARBA/0.5 GWh/yr
         Equation 15:

         Current or Planned EARBA  =  (Current + Planned Generation (GWh/yr)) x
                                   (1 EARBA/0.5 GWh/yr)
         Equation 16:

         Additional EARBA  = Additional Generation Potential (GWh/yr) x
                            1 EARBA/0.5 GWh/yr
       Emissions Avoided through Fuel Displacement: Landfill gas utilization projects
       can result in avoided emissions not only of methane, but also of CO2 and SO2.
       The collection of landfill gas and its subsequent use as a fuel for generating
       electricity (or other energy application) will displace the use of fuel by other
       generating units, and thereby avoid the emissions associated with the displaced
       generating units (in addition to the reduced methane emissions).
Page 2-16                     Working Draft - September 1997         Instructions for Evaluating
                                                                         Landfill Profiles

-------
       The magnitude of the emissions avoided in this manner depends on the
       difference between the emission characteristics of the landfill generating unit and
       those of the displaced utility unit. These marginal emission characteristics are
       highly dependent on the exact type of fuel (especially the sulfur content of coal),
       the equipment type, and emission control technologies in place. While the
       emission characteristics for individual projects should be estimated using regional
       or local values, national averages have been used for illustrative purposes in the
       profiles.
         Equation 17:

         Total Emissions Avoided (tons/yr) =
               Total Electrical Potential (GWh/yr) x
               Incremental Emission (tons/GWh)
       The annual incremental emissions per GWh generated are presented in the table
       below.
Displaced Fuel
Coal (High/Med S) - Steam
Oil - Steam
Incremental Emissions (tons/GWh)
CO2
1025.90
829.57
S02
7.880
5.602
2.7    Contact Information

       This section presents, where available and applicable, the following contact information:
landfill owner, landfill operator, energy utilization system developer, and the energy utilization
system operator.  For each contact, a name, position, organization name, mailing address, city,
state, zip, phone, and fax are included. This section also states whether the landfill owner and
operator are public or private entities. In addition, the appropriate site contact name and number
are indicated.

2.8    Comment Field

       The information in this field, taken from GAA (1994), Solid Waste Technologies'
Bimonthly Periodical, and/or  state data provides additional information on gas collection or gas
utilization activities.  In addition, comments related to the potential impacts of each landfill's
operating status on its gas generation rate are also included.
Instructions for Evaluating
Landfill Profiles
Working Draft -- September 1997
Page 2-17

-------
2.9    References

EPR11992. Survey of landfill Gas Generation Potential: 2 MW Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell,
       Electric Power Research Institute.

GAA 1994. 1994-5 Methane Recovery from Landfill Yearbook, Governmental Advisory
       Associates.

IPCC 1995. Climate Change 1995: The Science of Climate Change. Intergovernmental Panel
       on Climate Change

NSWMA 1985. Basic Data: Solid Waste Amounts, Composition and Management Systems,
       National Solid Waste Management Association, Technical bulletin #85-6, October 1,
       1985.

SCS 1994. Implementation Guide for Landfill Gas Recovery Projects in the Northeast:  Draft
       Final Report,  SCS Engineers.

Solid Waste Technologies 1994.  Landfill Gas-to-Energy 1994-1995 Activity Report, HCI
       Publications.

U.S. DOE Energy Information Administration 1992. Electricity Trade in the United States in 1992
       and supporting Data Bases.

U.S. EPA 1993a. Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in the United States: Estimates for 1990,
       Report to Congress, United States Environmental  Protection Agency.  EPA 430-R-93-
       003.

U.S. EPA 1993b. Opportunities to Reduce Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in the United
       States: Report to Congress, United  States Environmental Protection Agency. EPA 430-
       R-93-012.

Utility Data Institute 1995. U.S. Electric Utility Demographics from the Electrical World Directory.
       UDI, Washington, DC.
Page 2-18                     Working Draft - September 1997        Instructions for Evaluating
                                                                         Landfill Profiles

-------
uata collection

-------

-------
          3.   Data Collection Methods and Evaluation Processes
       This chapter describes the methodology used to collect data from state and local
sources, the national databases used to complete profiles, data interpretation issues, and the
landfill candidacy screening process.

3.1    Methodology Used to Collect Data from State and Local Agencies

       In general, a top-down approach was used to gather data, by obtaining the maximum
amount of information  on all landfills from state records, and then filling in data gaps with
information from records at the regional, county, or municipal levels, as well as from published
national reports.

       In many cases, states did not have data available in a consolidated format (e.g., a
database). In these situations, discrete data sources that provided essential data were
gathered.   When state documents did not provide the level of detailed information necessary to
determine candidate landfills, regional  offices located within each state and/or county or
municipal offices were contacted to assess the types of information in their files.

3.2    National Databases Used to Complete Profiles

       In addition to data collected from state, regional, or local offices, data was drawn from
several national data sources.  These sources include:

       •      Government Advisory Associates (GAA, 1994), which provides
             information on current and planned LFG Energy Recovery Projects;

             Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI, 1992), which examines the
             potential to use fuel-cells at large landfills;

             SCS Engineers  (SCS, 1994), which examines the potential for landfill
             energy  recovery projects in the Northeast;

             Solid  Waste Association of North America (SWANA, 1992), which lists all
             landfills in the U.S.;

       •      Solid  Waste Technologies (SWT, 1994), which  reports on landfill gas-to-
             energy facilities throughout North America; and

             Solid  Waste Atlas (SWA, 1994), which lists all solid waste landfills in the
             U.S.,  transfer stations, incinerators, and waste-to-energy facilities.

Exhibit 3-1 provides  a detailed description of the types of information available from each  data
source. The data obtained from the  national databases was used mainly to supplement or verify
data received from state or local offices.  One exception is the Government Advisory Associates
(GAA, 1994) data, which provides information on current and planned landfill gas  recovery
projects. Because data on landfill gas  recovery projects were difficult to obtain from
Data Collection Methods and      Working Draft -- September 1997                      Page 3-1
Evaluation Processes

-------
  T3
  W
  CO
  (D
  00
  ro
                                                                              Exhibit 3-1
                                                                   Summary of National Databases
                                    GAA
                       Methane Recovery from Landfill
                                 Yearbook
                                                           EPRI
                                             Survey of Landfill Gas Generation
                                           Potential; 2 MW Molten Carbonate Fuel
                                                           Cell
                                                         SCS
                                         Implementation Guide for Landfill Gas
                                           Recovery Projects in the Northeast
              Purpose of
              Report
                  Report provides information on current and
                  planned LFG energy recovery projects
                                          Report examines potential to use fuel-cells
                                          at large landfills
                                         Report examines potential for landfill
                                         energy recovery projects in the
                                         Northeast
              Types of
              Landfills
              Discussed in
              the Report
                  MSW landfills that have current or planned
                  energy recovery projects
                                          Large MSW landfills with a minimum active
                                          life of 15 years and an average solid waste
                                          delivery rate of 72,000 tons per year
                                         MSW landfills with 20 or more acres and
                                         daily waste receipts of 100 tons per day
                                         or more
  (Q
  O
  CO
  0>
  I
  cr
  CD
  co
  -j
   O
   a
   o>
   O
m 2.
c  =ħ
Q)  O
=r. 3
§  2
(D
CO
              States Included
              in Report
                  All states
                                          All states, but more detailed information
                                          provided for Minnesota and Wisconsin
                                         Northeastern states (Connecticut,
                                         Delaware, Massachusetts, Maryland,
                                         Maine, New Hampshire, New Jersey,
                                          New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island,
                                         Vermont)
Types of
Landfill Data
Included in
Report
Detailed information on more than 120 fully
operational LFG energy recovery projects
and over 90 in development, including
general landfill data, landfill gas collection
system, landfill gas processing/energy
generation system, institutional
arrangements, operating issues, and costs
Identifies 749 candidate landfills in all
states, and provides: site name, location,
waste flow, years remaining, maximum and
ten year gas flows, and number of 2MW
units. For Minnesota and Wisconsin, the
above information includes year opened,
contact name and phone, utility, and gas
controls
Identifies 207 candidate landfills in the
northeast, and provides:  landfill site
name, location, address, phone number,
contact person, and ownership; landfill
acreage; estimated in-place refuse;
waste flow; estimated closure year; and
landfill gas features
Methods and
Sources Used
for Data
Collection
Listing of sites compiled through GAA's
contacts in the public and private sector as
well as a review of articles.  A detailed
questionnaire was administered by phone,
in several cases the contact person
provided supplementary written materials
Data gathered from Cambridge
Environmental Group, GAA, and SWANA.
 Data on landfills in Minnesota and
Wisconsin were obtained directly from
state agencies and from landfill operators
Contacted solid waste regulatory
agencies; reviewed Solid Waste Atlas,
SWANA Directory, and SCS Project files;
and incorporated EPRI data
Year When
Landfill Data
 Was Collected
1994; Updated on a yearly basis
                                                                          1992
                                         1994
How Data from
National Report
is Used in EPA
Profiles Report
                                Data used to supplement missing
                                information
                                          Data used to supplement missing
                                          information
                                         Data used to supplement missing
                                         information

-------
m o
§ a
= ^
D) O
s-S:
3 (D
8 a
s ^
CO o
  Q.
  CO
  (U

  Q.
     Exhibit 3-1 (continued)
Summary of National Databases

Purpose of
Report
Types of
Landfills
Discussed in
the Report
States Included
in Report
Types of
Landfill Data
Included in
Report
Methods and
Sources Used
for Data
Collection
Year When
Landfill Data
Was Collected
SWANA
U.S. Landfill Directory
Report lists all landfills in the U.S.; goal of
report not linked to energy recovery
MSW landfills
All states with the exception of Montana
The Directory is comprised of over 4,300
facility names and addresses with most
referencing the contact name and telephone
number
Directory information obtained by contacting
each state using the "Directory of Solid
Waste Management Program Officials"
1993; Pin Point Technologies now collects
this data, which is updated daily
SWT
Landfill Gas-to-Energy 1994-1995
Activity Report
A comprehensive status report on landfill
gas-to-energy facilities throughout North
America
214 landfill gas recovery facilities; 143
operational, 14 under construction, and 57
planned
35 states with operating facilities, and
under construction and planned facilities.
Includes landfills in Canada
Information includes the capital cost of
each facility, the current gas generation of
the landfill, megawatt capacity for projects
producing electricity, and the identity of
electricity or direct gas sales customers
Community personnel and owners of
landfills and landfill gas-to-energy projects
1994
SWA
Directory and Atlas of Solid Waste
Disposal Facilities
Report lists all landfills in the U.S.,
transfer stations, and incinerators and
waste-to-energy facilities
MSW disposal facilities
All states
Directory contains 4,500 public and
private disposal facilities. Provides
names and locations, with corresponding
names, addresses, and phone numbers
for both owners and operators, average
daily
intake, and the expected or permitted
closure dates
Publisher's solid waste database, state
agencies, trade associations, and
facilities
1994
  I
  CO

  O


  I
  CT
  (D
  CO
  CO
  •vl
  CO
  (D
  CO

-------
  CO
  CQ
  CD
  03
                                                                   Exhibit 3-1 (continued)
                                                              Summary of National Databases
  f
  i:
  CQ
  to
  CD
  T3
  (D
  3
  cr
  (D
  CO
  CD
  •vl
                                SWANA
                         U.S. Landfill Directory
                                                       SWT
                                         Landfill Gas-to-Energy 1994-1995
                                                  Activity Report
                                                     SWA
                                       Directory and Atlas of Solid Waste
                                               Disposal Facilities
How Data from
National Report
is Used in EPA
Profiles Report
Data used to supplement missing
information
Data on operating facilities and under
construction and planned facilities is used
Confirmation of owner/operator contact
data
EPRI      =    Electric Power Research Institute
GAA      =    Government Advisory Associates
SCS      =    SCS Engineers
SWA      =    Solid Waste Atlas
SWANA   =    Solid Waste Association of North America
SWT      =    Solid Waste Technologies
  D
  ID
  Q)
  O
m 2.
0) 2?
— O
0) 5'

I'2
-n CD
$ §
CO Q.

-------
the states, GAA data was used as the primary source of information on current and planned
energy recovery projects.

3.3    Data Interpretation Issues

       During the data collection and key entering processes, certain data interpretation
questions arose. To ensure consistency across all states, the following guidelines were
established for interpreting data:

       •      For landfills where open years were either unavailable or extremely
              difficult to obtain, initial permit dates were used when available.

       •      Because several data sources were used, many landfills had multiple data
              for some fields. In some cases, data from one source conflicted with data
              from another source. For example, two different sources may report
              completely different names for a landfill owner.  To resolve problems with
              conflicting data, each data source was ranked according to its probable
              reliability. When data from all sources was collapsed to form one record
              for each landfill, a computer program scanned for data from the highest
              ranking source first, filling in as many fields as possible with that data, and
              then scanned for the next highest ranking data source,  filling in fields with
              data from this source. Fields that already contained data from a higher
              ranking source were skipped.  This procedure continued until all data
              sources had been scanned and all data fields with information from at
              least one data source were filled.

3.4    Landfill Candidacy Screening  Process

       After the landfill data was collected, interpreted, and key-entered, the database was
analyzed to evaluate each landfill's probability of supporting a landfill gas-to-energy project.
Landfills were categorized into one of the following groups:

              The landfill is a current project (i.e., the landfill has participated, is
              participating or is planning to participate in a gas recovery project);

       •      The landfill is a candidate (i.e., the landfill has a high probability of
              generating enough methane to make a landfill gas recovery project
              economical);

       •      The landfill is a profile in progress (i.e., more data is required to determine
              the status of the landfill);

       •      The landfill is not a candidate, but may be a candidate in the future (i.e.,
              the landfill has between 500,000 and 1,000,000 tons of waste-in-place; or
              the landfill has less than 500,000 tons waste-in-place, but is receiving
              more than 75,000 tons of waste annually); or

       •       The landfill is not a candidate and is not likely to be a candidate in the
              future.
Data Collection Methods and      Working Draft--September 1997                       Page 3-5
Evaluation Processes

-------
This categorization scheme is based on the premise that a landfill must be capable of generating
a certain amount of methane to make a gas recovery project desirable. The generation of
methane is a function of many factors, the most critical being the amount of waste-in-place and
the number of years the waste has been in the landfill.  Peak methane generation occurs soon
after closure. Therefore, the longer a landfill has been closed, the less attractive it becomes for
methane recovery. For the purposes of determining candidate landfills, those landfills that
ceased accepting waste prior to 1989 were eliminated because they have a low probability of
generating enough methane to make a gas recovery project economical.  By modelling the
relationship between waste-in-place and methane generation, a cut-off of 1,000,000 tons of
waste was established; landfills having at least 1,000,000 tons of waste-in-place were
considered candidate landfills.

       The following four steps describe the landfill candidacy screening process:
         Step 1:  The first step in the process involves determining if a landfill has
                  a current project -- is the landfill already participating in a landfill
                  gas-to-energy recovery project or planning to do so? Those
                  facilities that are already participating, are classified as
                  "operational."  Facilities that are planning landfill gas (LFG)
                  recovery projects are classified as "planned." When readily
                  available, additional data were gathered for operational and
                  planned facilities in order to present a more complete landfill   .
                  profile.
         Step 2:   The next step is to determine whether the landfill is receiving
                   municipal solid waste.  If a landfill receives MSW, the landfill then
                   underwent additional screening. Landfills that do not receive
                   MSW are not considered potential candidates, since they may
                   not
                   generate enough landfill gas to support a utilization project.
Page 3-6                      Working Draft--September 1997      Data Collection Methods and
                                                                      Evaluation Processes

-------
         Step 3:   If gas utilization is neither planned nor occurring at a facility, the
                   landfill's operating status (i.e., open or closed) is determined.
                   Landfills closed prior to January 1,1989 were not candidates;
                   landfills that have closed after January 1, 1989 were potential
                   candidates and underwent additional screening before their
                   candidacy could be confirmed. Open landfills were all
         considered
                   potential candidates in this stage of the screening process.  If the
                   operating status of a landfill was not available, the landfill's
                   candidacy could not be determined.
         Step 4:
         of
         could
         exceeded
In the next step of the screening process, waste-in-place data
were examined for all active landfills and inactive landfills that
stopped receiving waste after 1988. Landfills with waste-in-place
in excess of 1,000,000 tons were considered candidate landfills.
Some states do not collect the total amount of waste-in-place at
each landfill. Instead, the state may have on file annual
acceptance  rates, open years, landfill acreage and depth, daily
acceptance  rates, and
number of days operating per week. From different combinations
these data elements, a value for the landfill's waste-in-place
be estimated in some cases.  If the estimated waste-in-place

1,000,000 tons, the landfill was considered a candidate.
       Landfills which did not meet the candidacy criteria, but have between 500,000 and
999,999 tons of waste-in-place are also listed in Chapter 6. These landfills have been included
for two reasons: (1) it is likely, if they remain operational, they will reach 1 million tons WIP within
a few years; and (2) landfills with this amount of WIP may generate enough landfill gas for direct
gas sales to industries or other end-users with smaller energy requirements.

       Landfills which had less than 500,000 tons of waste-in-place but accept at least 75,000
tons per year of waste are also listed in Chapter 6, because they also may become candidates
within a few years. Finally, Chapter 6 also lists the landfills for which waste-in-place could not be
estimated (i.e., profiles in progress).  Therefore, their candidacy could not be determined, and
they could not be eliminated from this analysis.
Data Collection Methods and
Evaluation Processes
            Working Draft - September 1997
Page 3-7

-------
3.5    References

Chartwell 1994. Directory and Atlas of Solid Waste Disposal Facilities 1994, Chartwell
       Information Publishers.

EPR11992. Survey of landfill Gas Generation Potential: 2 MW Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell,
       Electric Power Research Institute.

GAA 1994. 1994-5 Methane Recovery from Landfill Yearbook, Governmental Advisory
       Associates.

SCS 1994. Implementation Guide for Landfill Gas Recovery Projects in the Northeast: Draft
       Final Report, SCS Engineers.

SWANA 1992. U.S. Landfill Directory, Solid Waste Association of North America.

Solid Waste Technologies 1994.  Landfill Gas-to-Energy 1994-1995 Activity Report, HCI
       Publications.
Page 3-8                      Working Draft - September 1997      Data Collection Methods and
                                                                    Evaluation Processes

-------
uanamaie uanann
    Profiles

-------

-------
    Summary of Statewide Collection Potential and Benefits for Candidate Landfills


Number of Candidate Landfills:                                              11.0

Estimated Total LFG Collection Potential (mmcf/day):                          27.9

Estimated Total Generation Potential (MW):                                   44.9

CO2 Equivalent Available (tons/yr):l                                        2,259  -    343,916
  1- The range of vlues are the total annual carbon dioxide equivalent of methane reductions (low range) and
  the total annual carbon dioxide equivalent of methane reductions plus the annual carbon dioxide reductions
  realized from coal displacement (high range)

-------
                                                                                           September 1997
                                             Brooks Site LF
Location
City:      N.A.

County:    Sedgwick

State:     KS

 Primary Contact (see contact informatio  N.A.
 Alternate Landfill Name(s):   N.A.
                                          Operating Status
                                          Status:   Open

                                          Year Open:  1976

                                          Year Closed 2002
Gas Utilization
Gas Collection?:  N.A.

Gas Utilization?:  N.A.
                                                                          Phone:   316-722-0601
                                     Waste Collection Information

 Types of Waste Accepted:  Municipal Solid Waste; Other Landfill Wastes

 % of Waste that is MS W:        N.A.                    Tipping Fee ($/ton):         N.A.

 Days Open Per Week:          5.5*                     Design Capacity (tons):      N.A.

                                                     Acres Currently Landfilled:   N.A.

                                                     Average Depth (feet)        N.A.
Annual Acceptance Rate (tons):  555,170
              Year Reported:  1994
 Waste-in-Place (tons)  a/
                            10,737,610
                                    Gas Collection and Control Data
Collection System Status:  N.A.
Collection System Type   N.A.
Collection Efficiency     85%*
Methane Concentration:   50%*
                                                    Year Gas Collection Began:        N.A.
                                                    Est. Percentage of LF Area Welled:  N.A.
                                                    LF Gas Collected (mmcf/d):        N.A.
                                                    CH4 Gas Collected (mmcf/d        N.A.
* - Default Value
a/ - WIP calculated from acceptance rate and open year using average of multiple years annual acceptance
rate data.
                                           Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                        September 1997
                                      Brooks Site LF (continued)
 EST. TOTAL METHANE GENERATION
     (Estimated from Waste-in-Place):
 LF GAS COLLECTION AND UTILIZATION POTENTIAL
     Est. Total LF Gas Collection Potential: d/
        Current Reported LF Gas Collection Volume:
        Planned Reported LF Gas Collection Volume:
        Est. Additional LF Gas Collection Potential^/
     Est. Total LF Gas Utilization Volume Potential:
        Current Reported Volume of LF Gas Utilized:
        Planned Reported Volume LF Gas to be Utilized:
        Est. Additional LF Gas Available for Use: c/

 POWER GENERATION POTENTIAL
     Est. Total Electric Potential:
        Current Reported Generation:
        Planned Reported Generation:
        Est. Additional Generation Potential: c/
 Utilities in County:
                   mmcf/d
                         3.2
               mmcf/d
                         5.4
                        N.A.
                        N.A.
                        N.A.
                         5.4
                        N.A.
                        N.A.
                        N.A.
                      Capacity
               (MW)
                         8.6
                       N.A.
                       N.A.
                       N.A.
                                                              mmcf/yr
                                                                1,154.8
                                                          mmcf/yr
                                                                 1,963.2
                                                                    N.A.
                                                                    N.A.
                                                                    N.A.
                                                                 1,963.2
                                                                    N.A.
                                                                    N.A.
                                                                    N.A.
                                                                 Energy
                                                          (GWh/vr)
                                                                     64.2
                                                                     N.A.
                                                                     N.A.
                                                                     N.A.
Butler Rural El Coop Assn Inc; Kansas Gas & Electric Company; Mount Hope Muni
Electric System; MulVane Munic Light & Wtr Dept; Sedgwick Cnty El Coop Assn Inc;
Southwestern Power Admin; St Mary's Light & Water Dept; Sumner-Cowley Elec
Coop Inc; Western Resources Inc; Wheatland Electric Coop Inc
                                     Environmental Benefits of Utilization
 Est. Potential CH4 Reduction (mmcf/yr):
 CO2 Equivalent of CH4 Reduction ('000 tons/yr):
 Estimated Acid Rain Bonus Allowances:
 Total
981.6
435.4
  128
                                           Current &
                                        Planned
                                            N.A.
                                            N.A.
                                            N.A.
Additional
Potential
      N.A.
      N.A.
      N.A.
                                            Total Emissions Avoided
Emissions Avoided through Fuel Displacement:
Displacement of Coal (tons/yr):
Displacement of Oil (tons/yr):
CO2
65,844
53,244
SO2
506
360
c/ - This value is calculated from other estimated values and is particularly sensitive to the following
factors: (1) whether the landfill is open or closed and (2) portion of landfill that is welled.
                                            Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                    September 1997
                                    Brooks Site LF(continued)
 LANDFILL OWNER
 Organization Name:  City of Wichita
 Contact Name:      N.A.
 Phone Number:     N.A.
 Mailing Address    N.A.
 City:              N.A.
                      Contact Information



                            Fax Number:     N.A.

                            State:     N.A. Zip code:
                             N.A.
 LANDFILL OPERATOR
 Organization Name:  N.A.
 Contact Name:
 Phone Number:
 Mailing Address
 City:
N.A.
316-722-0601
4100 North West Street
Wichita
Fax Number:     316-268-4002

State:     KS  Zip code:        67204
N.A.
                          Comments Relating to LFG Recovery Projects
Note: This landfill is open. Therefore, the gas generation may be increasing.
                                        Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                           September 1997
Cowley County LF
Location
City: N.A.
Operating Status
Status: Open
Gas Utilization
Gas Collection?: N.A.
County:    Cowley

State:      KS
                                          Year Open:  1983

                                          Year Closed 1997
 Primary Contact (see contact informatio  Ronnie Thiel
 Alternate Landfill Name(s):   N.A.
Gas Utilization?: N.A.
                                                                          Phone:    316-221-4066
                                     Waste Collection Information

Types of Waste Accepted:  Municipal Solid Waste; Other Landfill Wastes

% of Waste that is MSW:        N.A.                    Tipping Fee ($/ton):        N.A.

Days Open Per Week:          5.5*                     Design Capacity (tons):     N.A.

                                                     Acres Currently Landfilled:  N.A.

                                                     Average Depth (feet)       N.A.
Annual Acceptance Rate (tons):  32,978
             Year Reported:  1994
Waste-in-Place (tons) a/
                            1,095,150
                                    Gas Collection and Control Data
Collection System Status:  N.A.
Collection System Type   N.A.
Collection Efficiency     85%*
Methane Concentration:   50%*
                                                    Year Gas Collection Began:         N.A.
                                                    Est. Percentage of LF Area Welled:  N.A.
                                                    LF Gas Collected (mmcf/d):         N.A.
                                                    CH4 Gas Collected (mmcf/d        N.A.
* - Default Value
a/ - WIP calculated from acceptance rate and open year using average of multiple years annual acceptance
rate data.
                                           Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                        September 1997
                                    Cowley County LF (continued)
 EST. TOTAL METHANE GENERATION
    (Estimated from Waste-in-Place):
 LF GAS COLLECTION AND UTILIZATION POTENTIAL
    Est. Total LF Gas Collection Potential: d/
        Current Reported LF Gas Collection Volume:
        Planned Reported LF Gas Collection Volume:
        Est. Additional LF Gas Collection Potentiate/
    Est. Total LF Gas Utilization Volume Potential:
        Current Reported Volume of LF Gas Utilized:
        Planned Reported Volume LF Gas to be Utilized:
        Est. Additional LF Gas Available for Use: c/

 POWER GENERATION POTENTIAL
    Est. Total Electric Potential:
        Current Reported Generation:
        Planned Reported Generation:
        Est. Additional Generation Potential: c/
 Utilities in County:
                         mmcf/d
                               0.7
                     mmcf/d
                               1.2
                              N.A.
                              N.A.
                              N.A.
                               1.2
                              N.A.
                              N.A.
                              N.A.
                             Capacity
                     (MW)
                               1.9
                             N.A.
                             N.A.
                             N.A.
                                                              mmcf/vr
                                                                  254.8
                                                          mmcf/yr
                                                                  433.1
                                                                    N.A.
                                                                    N.A.
                                                                    N.A.
                                                                  433.1
                                                                    N.A.
                                                                    N.A.
                                                                    N.A.
                                                                 Energy
                                                          (GWh/vr)
                                                                     14.2
                                                                     N.A.
                                                                     N.A.
                                                                     N.A.
Butler Rural El Coop Assn Inc; Caney Valley El Coop Assn Inc; Kansas Gas &
Electric Company; Southwestern Power Admin; Sumner-Cowley Elec Coop Inc;
Udall Water & Light Dept; Western Resources Inc; Winfield Mun Electric Util
 Est. Potential CH4 Reduction (mmcf/yr):
 CO2 Equivalent of CH4 Reduction ('000 tons/yr):
 Estimated Acid Rain Bonus Allowances:

 Emissions Avoided through Fuel Displacement:
    Displacement of Coal (tons/yr):
    Displacement of Oil (tons/yr):
Environmental Benefits of Utilization
                             Current &
       Total              Planned
      216.6                  N.A.
       96.1                  N.A.
         28                  N.A.
       Total Emissions Avoided
       CO2       SO2
        14,527       112
        11,747        79
                                                              Additional
                                                              Potential
                                                                    N.A.
                                                                    N.A.
                                                                    N.A.
c/ - This value is calculated from other estimated values and is particularly sensitive to the following
factors: (1) whether the landfill is open or closed and (2) portion of landfill that is welled.
                                            Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                    September 1997
                                  Cowley County LF(continued)
 LANDFILL OWNER
 Organization Name:  Cowley County
 Contact Name:      N.A.
 Phone Number:     N.A.
 Mailing Address     N.A.
 City:              N.A.
                                       Contact Information
Fax Number:     N.A.
State:     N.A. Zip code:
N.A.
 LANDFILL OPERATOR
 Organization Name:  N.A.
 Contact Name:      Ronnie Thiel
 Phone Number:     316-221 -4066
 Mailing Address     PO Box 464
 City:              Winfield
Fax Number:     316-221 -5448

State:     KS  Zip code:        67156
N.A.
                          Comments Relating to LFG Recovery Projects
Note: This landfill is open. Therefore, the gas generation may be increasing.
                                       Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                           September 1997
                                            Crawford County
Location
City:      N.A.

County:    Crawford

State:      KS
                                          Operating Status
                                          Status:   Closed

                                          Year Open:  1976

                                          Year Closed 1994
 Primary Contact (see contact informatio  Dan Swyers
 Alternate Landfill Name(s):   N.A.
Gas Utilization
Gas Collection?:  N.A.

Gas Utilization?:  N.A.
                                                                          Phone:    913-631-3300
                                     Waste Collection Information

 Types of Waste Accepted:  Municipal Solid Waste; Other Landfill Wastes

 % of Waste that is MS W:        N.A.                   Tipping Fee ($/ton):        N.A.

 Days Open Per Week:          5.5*                    Design Capacity (tons):     N.A.

                                                    Acres Currently Landfilled:  N.A.

                                                    Average Depth (feet)       N.A.
Annual Acceptance Rate (tons):  37,706
              Year Reported:  1994
 Waste-in-Place (tons)  a/
                            1,661,063
                                    Gas Collection and Control Data
 Collection System Status:  N.A.
 Collection System Type   N.A.
 Collection Efficiency     85%*
 Methane Concentration:   50%*
                                                    Year Gas Collection Began:        N.A.
                                                    Est. Percentage of LF Area Welled:  N.A.
                                                    LF Gas Collected (mmcf/d):        N.A.
                                                    CH4 Gas Collected (mmcf/d        N.A.
 * - Default Value
 a/ - WIP calculated from acceptance rate and open year using average of multiple years annual acceptance
 rate data.
                                           Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                         September 1997
                                     Crawford County (continued)
EST. TOTAL METHANE GENERATION
(Estimated from Waste-in-Place):
LF GAS COLLECTION AND UTILIZATION POTENTIAL
Est. Total LF Gas Collection Potential: d/
Current Reported LF Gas Collection Volume:
Planned Reported LF Gas Collection Volume:
Est. Additional LF Gas Collection Potential^/
Est. Total LF Gas Utilization Volume Potential:
Current Reported Volume of LF Gas Utilized:
Planned Reported Volume LF Gas to be Utilized:
Est. Additional LF Gas Available for Use: c/
mmcf/d
0.8
mmcf/d
1.4
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
1.4
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
mmcf/yr
307.6
mmcf/yr
522.9
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
522.9
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
 POWER GENERATION POTENTIAL
    Est. Total Electric Potential:
        Current Reported Generation:
        Planned Reported Generation:
        Est. Additional Generation Potential: c/
 Utilities in County:
                      (MW)
                                                                  Capacity
                                                                  Energy
                                                           (GWh/vr)
                                                                     17.1
                                                                     N.A.
                                                                     N.A.
                                                                     N.A.
Arcadia Munic Elec Dept; Anna Electric Dept; Girard Munic Light & Water Dept;
Kansas Gas & Electric Company; Mulberry City Utilities; Sekan Electric Coop Assn
Inc; Western Area Power Admin; Western Resources Inc
                               2.3
                              N.A.
                              N.A.
                              N.A.
 Est. Potential CH4 Reduction (mmcf/yr):
 CO2 Equivalent of CH4 Reduction ('000 tons/yr):
 Estimated Acid Rain Bonus Allowances:

 Emissions Avoided through Fuel Displacement:
    Displacement of Coal (tons/yr):
    Displacement of Oil (tons/yr):
Environmental Benefits of Utilization
                             Current &
       Total              Planned
      261.5                   N.A.
      116.0                   N.A.
         34                   N.A.
       Total Emissions Avoided
       CO2       SO2
        17,539       135
        14,182        96
                                                              Additional
                                                              Potential
                                                                    N.A.
                                                                    N.A.
                                                                    N.A.
c/ - This value is calculated from other estimated values and is particularly sensitive to the following
factors: (1) whether the landfill is open or closed and (2) portion of landfill that is welled.
                                            Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                    September 1997
                                   Crawford County(continued)
                                       Contact Information
 LANDFILL OWNER
 Organization Name:  Oak Grove Landfill
 Contact Name:      N.A.
 Phone Number:     N.A.
 Mailing Address     N.A.
 City:              N.A.
Fax Number:
     N.A.
State:
N.A. Zip code:
N.A.
 LANDFILL OPERATOR
 Organization Name:  N.A.
 Contact Name:      Dan Swyers
 Phone Number:     913-631 -3300
 Mailing Address     18181 West 53rd St.
 City:              Shawnee
Fax Number:     N.A.

State:     KS  Zip code:
                    66203
N.A.
                          Comments Relating to LFG Recovery Projects
Note: This landfill is closed. Therefore, the gas generation may be declining.
                                       Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                           September 1997
                                            Finney County LF
Location
City:       Garden City

County:     Finney

State:       KS
                                          Operating Status
                                          Status:   Open

                                          Year Open:  1986

                                          Year Closed 2012
 Primary Contact (see contact informatio  Max Morgan
 Alternate Landfill Name(s):   N.A.
Gas Utilization
Gas Collection?:  N.A.

Gas Utilization?:  N.A.
                                                                          Phone:    316-276-3051
                                     Waste Collection Information

 Types of Waste Accepted:  Municipal Solid Waste; Other Landfill Wastes

 % of Waste that is MSW:        N.A.                    Tipping Fee ($/ton):        N.A.

 Days Open Per Week:          5.5*                     Design Capacity (tons):      N.A.

                                                     Acres Currently Landfilled:  N.A.

                                                     Average Depth (feet)        N.A.
Annual Acceptance Rate (tons):  50,846
              Year Reported:  1994
Waste-in-Place (tons)  a/
                            1,339,005
                                    Gas Collection and Control Data
Collection System Status:  N.A.
Collection System Type   N.A.
Collection Efficiency     85%*
Methane Concentration:   50%*
                                                    Year Gas Collection Began:         N.A.
                                                    Est. Percentage of LF Area Welled:  N.A.
                                                    LF Gas Collected (mmcf/d):         N .A.
                                                    CH4 Gas Collected (mmcf/d        N.A.
* - Default Value
a/ - WIP calculated from acceptance rate and open year using average of multiple years annual acceptance
rate data.
                                           Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                           September 1997
Finney County
EST. TOTAL METHANE GENERATION
(Estimated from Waste-in-PIace):
LF GAS COLLECTION AND UTILIZATION POTENTIAL
Est. Total LF Gas Collection Potential: d/
Current Reported LF Gas Collection Volume:
Planned Reported LF Gas Collection Volume:
Est. Additional LF Gas Collection Potentiate/
Est. Total LF Gas Utilization Volume Potential:
Current Reported Volume of LF Gas Utilized:
Planned Reported Volume LF Gas to be Utilized:
Est. Additional LF Gas Available for Use: c/

POWER GENERATION POTENTIAL
Est. Total Electric Potential:
Current Reported Generation:
Planned Reported Generation:
Est. Additional Generation Potential: c/
LF (continued)
mmcf/d
0.8
mmcf/d
1.3
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
1.3
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
Capacity
(MW)
2.1
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.

mmcf/yr
277.5
mmcf/yr
471.8
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
471.8
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
Energy
(GWh/vr)
15.4
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
Utilities in County: Garden City Muni Utils; Lane-Scott Electric Coop Inc; Pioneer Electric Coop Inc;
Victory Electric Coop Assn Inc;
Coop Inc
Western Area Power Admin;

Environmental Benefits of Utilization
Current &
Total
Est. Potential CH4 Reduction (mmcf/yr): 235.9
CO2 Equivalent of CH4 Reduction ('000 tons/yr): 1 04.6
Estimated Acid Rain Bonus Allowances: 30
Planned
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
Wheatland Electric

Additional
Potential
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
Total Emissions Avoided
Emissions Avoided through Fuel Displacement: CO2
Displacement of Coal (tons/yr): 1 5,825
Displacement of Oil (tons/yr): 1 2,796
S02
122
86



c/ - This value is calculated from other estimated values and is particularly sensitive to the following
factors: (1) whether the landfill is open or closed and (2) portion of landfill that is welled.
                                              Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                    September 1997
                                   Finney County LF(continued)
 LANDFILL OWNER
 Organization Name:  Finney County
 Contact Name:      N.A.
 Phone Number:     N.A.
 Mailing Address    N.A.
 City:              N.A.
Contact Information



      Fax Number:     N.A.

      State:     N.A. Zip code:
N.A.
 LANDFILL OPERATOR
 Organization Name:  N.A.
 Contact Name:      Max Morgan
 Phone Number:     316-276-3051
 Mailing Address     504 St. John
 City:              Garden City
      Fax Number:     316-272-3567

      State:     KS  Zip code:        67846
N.A.
                          Comments Relating to LFG Recovery Projects
Note: This landfill is open. Therefore, the gas generation may be increasing.
                                       Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                          September 1997
                                             Forest View SLF
Location
City:      Kansas City
County:

State:
          Wyandotte

          KS
Operating Status
Status:   Open

Year Open:  1976

Year Closed 2007
 Primary Contact (see contact informatio  Kevin O'Brien
 Alternate Landfill Name(s):   N.A.
Gas Utilization
Gas Collection?:  N.A.

Gas Utilization?:  N.A.
                                                                          Phone:    913-287-2711
                                     Waste Collection Information

 Types of Waste Accepted:  Municipal Solid Waste; Other Landfill Wastes

 % of Waste that is MS W:        N.A.                    Tipping Fee ($/ton):        N.A.

 Days Open Per Week:          5.5*                     Design Capacity (tons):     N.A.

                                                     Acres Currently Landfilled:  N.A.

                                                     Average Depth (feet)       N.A.
Annual Acceptance Rate (tons):  288,262
              Year Reported:  1994
Waste-in-PIace (tons)  a/
                            9,935,717
                                    Gas Collection and Control Data
Collection System Status: N.A.
Collection System Type   N.A.
Collection Efficiency     85%*
Methane Concentration:   50%*
                                                    Year Gas Collection Began:        N.A.
                                                    Est. Percentage of LF Area Welled:  N.A.
                                                    LF Gas Collected (mmcf/d):        N.A.
                                                    CH4 Gas Collected (mmcf/d        N.A.
 * - Default Value
 a/ - WIP calculated from acceptance rate and open year using average of multiple years annual acceptance
 rate data.
                                           Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                          September 1997
                                      Forest View SLF (continued)
 EST. TOTAL METHANE GENERATION
     (Estimated from Waste-in-Place):
 LF GAS COLLECTION AND UTILIZATION POTENTIAL
     Est. Total LF Gas Collection Potential: d/
        Current Reported LF Gas Collection Volume:
        Planned Reported LF Gas Collection Volume:
        Est. Additional LF Gas Collection Potential^/
     Est. Total LF Gas Utilization Volume Potential:
        Current Reported Volume of LF Gas Utilized:
        Planned Reported Volume LF Gas to be Utilized:
        Est. Additional LF Gas Available for Use: c/

 POWER GENERATION POTENTIAL
     Est. Total Electric Potential:
        Current Reported Generation:
        Planned Reported Generation:
        Est. Additional Generation Potential: c/
 Utilities in County:
                                         mmcf/d
                                               3.0
                                     mmcf/d
                                               5.0
                                              N.A.
                                              N.A.
                                              N.A.
                                               5.0
                                              N.A.
                                              N.A.
                                              N.A.
                                             Capacity
                                     (MW)
                                               8.1
                                              N.A.
                                              N.A.
                                              N.A.
Kansas City Bd of Pub Util; Kansas City Power & Light Co; Western Area Power
Admin; Western Resources Inc
                                      Environmental Benefits of Utilization
 Est. Potential CH4 Reduction (mmcf/yr):
 CO2 Equivalent of CH4 Reduction ('000 tons/yr):
 Estimated Acid Rain Bonus Allowances:

 Emissions Avoided through Fuel Displacement:
    Displacement of Coal (tons/yr):
    Displacement of Oil (tons/yr):
                       Total
                      918.0
                      407.1
                        120
    Current &
Planned
     N.A.
     N.A.
     N.A.
                       Total Emissions Avoided
                       C02        S02
                        61,577       473
                        49,793       336
Additional
Potential
      N.A.
      N.A.
      N.A.
c/ - This value is calculated from other estimated values and is particularly sensitive to the following
factors: (1) whether the landfill is open or closed and (2) portion of landfill that is welled.
                                             Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                   September 1997
                                   Forest View SLF(continued)
                                       Contact Information
 LANDFILL OWNER
 Organization Name:  Browning-Ferris, Inc.
 Contact Name:      N.A.
 Phone Number:     N.A.
 Mailing Address    N.A.
 City:              N.A.
Fax Number:
     N.A.
State:
N.A. Zip code:
N.A.
 LANDFILL OPERATOR
 Organization Name:  Waste Management of Kansas, Inc.
 Contact Name:      Kevin O'Brien
 Phone Number:     913-287-2711                Fax Number:     N.A.
 Mailing Address    PO Box 11116
 City:              Kansas City                 State:     KS  Zip code:
                             66111
N.A.
                          Comments Relating to LFG Recovery Projects
Note: This landfill is open. Therefore, the gas generation may be increasing.
                                       Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                           September 1997
                                            Harvey County LF
Location
City:       N.A.

County:     Harvey

State:       KS
                                          Operating Status
                                          Status:   Open

                                          Year Open:  1976

                                          Year Closed 2002
 Primary Contact (see contact informatio  Howard Harvey
 Alternate Landfill Name(s):   N.A.
Gas Utilization
Gas Collection?:  N.A.

Gas Utilization?:  N.A.
                                                                          Phone:   316-283-1890
                                     Waste Collection Information

 Types of Waste Accepted:  Municipal Solid Waste; Other Landfill Wastes

 % of Waste that is MSW:        N.A.                    Tipping Fee ($/ton):         N.A.

 Days Open Per Week:          5.5*                     Design Capacity (tons):      N.A.

                                                     Acres Currently Landfilled:   N.A.

                                                     Average Depth (feet)        N.A.
Annual Acceptance Rate (tons):  38,993
              Year Reported:  1994
Waste-in-Place (tons) a/
                            1,511,401
                                    Gas Collection and Control Data
Collection System Status:  N.A.
Collection System Type   N.A.
Collection Efficiency     85%*
Methane Concentration:   50%*
                                                    Year Gas Collection Began:        N.A.
                                                    Est. Percentage of LF Area Welled:  N.A.
                                                    LF Gas Collected (mmcf/d):        N.A.
                                                    CH4 Gas Collected (mmcf/d        N.A.
* - Default Value
a/ - WIP calculated from acceptance rate and open year using average of multiple years annual acceptance
rate data.
                                           Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                        September 1997
                                    Harvey County LF (continued)
 EST. TOTAL METHANE GENERATION                          mmcf/d
    (Estimated from Waste-in-Place):                                     0.8
 LF GAS COLLECTION AND UTILIZATION POTENTIAL         mmcf/d
    Est. Total LF Gas Collection Potential: d/                              1.4
        Current Reported LF Gas Collection Volume:                      N.A.
        Planned Reported LF Gas Collection Volume:                      N.A.
        Est. Additional LF Gas Collection Potential^/                      N.A.
    Est. Total LF Gas Utilization Volume Potential:                         1.4
        Current Reported Volume of LF Gas Utilized:                      N.A.
        Planned Reported Volume LF Gas to be Utilized:                   N.A.
        Est. Additional LF Gas Available for Use: c/                       N.A.
                                                                  Capacity

                                                                    2.2
                                                                   N.A.
                                                                   N.A.
                                                                   N.A.
POWER GENERATION POTENTIAL                          (MW)
    Est. Total Electric Potential:
       Current Reported Generation:
       Planned Reported Generation:
       Est. Additional Generation Potential: c/
                      mmcf/vr
                          293.6
                  mmcf/yr
                           499.2
                            N.A.
                            N.A.
                            N.A.
                           499.2
                            N.A.
                            N.A.
                            N.A.
                         Energy
                  (GWh/yr)
                             16.3
                             N.A.
                             N.A.
                             N.A.
 Utilities in County:
                     Ark Valley Elec Coop Assn Inc; Butler Rural El Coop Assn Inc; Flint Hills Rural E C A
                     Inc; Kansas Gas & Electric Company; Sedgwick Cnty El Coop Assn Inc;
                     Southwestern Power Admin; Sumner-Cowley Elec Coop Inc; Western Resources Inc
                                     Environmental Benefits of Utilization
 Est. Potential CH4 Reduction (mmcf/yr):
 CO2 Equivalent of CH4 Reduction ('000 tons/yr):
 Estimated Acid Rain Bonus Allowances:

 Emissions Avoided through Fuel Displacement:
    Displacement of Coal (tons/yr):
    Displacement of Oil (tons/yr):
                                           Total
                                           249.6
                                           110.7
                                             32
    Current &
Planned
     N.A.
     N.A.
     N.A.
                                           Total Emissions Avoided
                                           CO2       SO2
                                             16,742        129
                                             13,538         91
Additional
Potential
       N.A.
       N.A.
       N.A.
c/ - This value is calculated from other estimated values and is particularly sensitive to the following
factors: (1) whether the landfill is open or closed and (2) portion of landfill that is welled.
                                            Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                    September 1997
                                   Harvey County LF(continued)
 LANDFILL OWNER
 Organization Name:  Harvey County
 Contact Name:      N.A.
 Phone Number:     N.A.
 Mailing Address    N.A.
 City:              N.A.
                      Contact Information



                            Fax Number:     N.A.

                            State:     N.A. Zip code:
                             N.A.
 LANDFILL OPERATOR
 Organization Name:  N.A.
 Contact Name:
 Phone Number:
 Mailing Address
 City:
Howard Harvey
316-283-1890
201 S.E. 7th
Newton
Fax Number.     316-284-6856

State:     KS  Zip code:        67114
N.A.
                          Comments Relating to LFG Recovery Projects
Note: This landfill is open. Therefore, the gas generation may be increasing.
                                       Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                          September 1997
                                           Johnson County LF
Location
City:

County:

State:
          N.A.

          Johnson

          KS
Operating Status
Status:   Open

Year Open:  1979

Year Closed 2004
 Primary Contact (see contact informatio  Bob Vantuyl
 Alternate Landfill Name(s):   N.A.
Gas Utilization
Gas Collection?:  N.A.

Gas Utilization?:  N.A.
                                                                          Phone:    913-631-3300
                                     Waste Collection Information

 Types of Waste Accepted:  Municipal Solid Waste; Other Landfill Wastes

 % of Waste that is MS W:        N.A.                   Tipping Fee ($/ton):        N.A.

 Days Open Per Week:          5.5*                    Design Capacity (tons):      N.A.

                                                    Acres Currently Landfilled:  487

                                                    Average Depth (feet)        N.A.
Annual Acceptance Rate (tons):  887,869
             Year Reported:  1994
 Waste-in-Place (tons)  a/
                            11,097,340
                                    Gas Collection and Control Data
 Collection System Status:  N.A.
 Collection System Type   N.A.
 Collection Efficiency     85%*
 Methane Concentration:   50%*
                                                    Year Gas Collection Began:         N.A.
                                                    Est. Percentage of LF Area Welled:   N.A.
                                                    LF Gas Collected (mmcf/d):         N.A.
                                                    CH4 Gas Collected (mmcf/d        N.A.
 * - Default Value
 a/ - WIP calculated from acceptance rate and open year using average of multiple years annual acceptance
 rate data.
                                           Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                         September 1997
                                   Johnson County LF (continued)
 EST. TOTAL METHANE GENERATION
     (Estimated from Waste-in-Place):
 LF GAS COLLECTION AND UTILIZATION POTENTIAL
     Est. Total LF Gas Collection Potential: d/
        Current Reported LF Gas Collection Volume:
        Planned Reported LF Gas Collection Volume:
        Est. Additional LF Gas Collection Potentiate/
     Est. Total LF Gas Utilization Volume Potential:
        Current Reported Volume of LF Gas Utilized:
        Planned Reported Volume LF Gas to be Utilized:
        Est. Additional LF Gas Available for Use: c/

 POWER GENERATION POTENTIAL
     Est. Total Electric Potential:
        Current Reported Generation:
        Planned Reported Generation:
        Est. Additional Generation Potential: c/
 Utilities in County:
                                         mmcf/d
                                              3.3
                                     mmcf/d
                                               5.5
                                              N.A.
                                              N.A.
                                              N.A.
                                               5.5
                                              N.A.
                                              N.A.
                                              N.A.
                                            Capacity
                                     (MW)
                                              8.9
                                             N.A.
                                             N.A.
                                             N.A.
DeSoto Elec Light Dept; Gardner Muni Elec Syst; Kansas City Power & Light Co;
Western Area Power Admin; Western Resources Inc
 Est. Potential CH4 Reduction (mmcf/yr):
 CO2 Equivalent of CH4 Reduction ('000 tons/yr):
 Estimated Acid Rain Bonus Allowances:

 Emissions Avoided through Fuel Displacement:
    Displacement of Coal (tons/yr):
    Displacement of Oil (tons/yr):
               Environmental Benefits of Utilization
                                            Current &
                      Total              Planned
                    1,010.1                  N.A.
                      448.0                  N.A.
                       132                  N.A.
                      Total Emissions Avoided
                      CO2       SO2
                       67,759        520
                       54,792        370
Additional
Potential
      N.A.
      N.A.
      N.A.
c/ - This value is calculated from other estimated values and is particularly sensitive to the following
factors: (1) whether the landfill is open or closed and (2) portion of landfill that is welled.
                                            Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                   September 1997
                                 Johnson County LF(continued)
 LANDFILL OWNER
 Organization Name: Johnson County
 Contact Name:     N.A.
 Phone Number:     N.A.
 Mailing Address    N.A.
 City:             N.A.
Contact Information



      Fax Number:    N.A.

      State:     N.A. Zip code:
N.A.
 LANDFILL OPERATOR
 Organization Name: Deferbaugh Industries
 Contact Name:     Bob Vantuyl
 Phone Number:     913-631 -3300
 Mailing Address    PO Box 3220
 City:             Shawnee
      Fax Number:     N.A.

      State:     KS Zip code:
66203
N.A.
                         Comments Relating to LFG Recovery Projects
Note: This landfill is open. Therefore, the gas generation may be increasing.
                                       Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                           September 1997
                                              N.R. Hamm LF
Location
City:      N.A.

County:    Jefferson

State:      KS
                                          Operating Status
                                          Status:   Open

                                          Year Open:  1976

                                          Year Closed N.A.
 Primary Contact (see contact informatio  Charles Sedlock
 Alternate Landfill Name(s):   N.A.
Gas Utilization
Gas Collection?:  N.A.

Gas Utilization?:  N.A.
                                                                          Phone:   913-597-5111
                                     Waste Collection Information

Types of Waste Accepted:  Municipal Solid Waste; Other Landfill Wastes

% of Waste that is MS W:        N.A.                   Tipping Fee ($/ton):         N.A.

Days Open Per Week:          5.5*                    Design Capacity (tons):      N.A.

                                                    Acres Currently Landfilled:   N.A.

                                                    Average Depth (feet)        N.A.
Annual Acceptance Rate (tons):  218,333
             Year Reported:  1994
Waste-in-Place (tons) a/
                            1,904,204
                                   Gas Collection and Control Data
Collection System Status: N.A.
Collection System Type  N.A.
Collection Efficiency    85%*
Methane Concentration:  50%*
                                                    Year Gas Collection Began:        N.A.
                                                    Est. Percentage of LF Area Welled:  N.A.
                                                    LF Gas Collected (mmcf/d):        N.A.
                                                    CH4 Gas Collected (mmcf/d        N.A.
* - Default Value
a/ - WIP calculated from acceptance rate and open year using average of multiple years annual acceptance
rate data.
                                           Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                            September 1997
N.R. Hamm LF
EST. TOTAL METHANE GENERATION
(Estimated from Waste-in-Place):
LF GAS COLLECTION AND UTILIZATION POTENTIAL
Est. Total LF Gas Collection Potential: d/
Current Reported LF Gas Collection Volume:
Planned Reported LF Gas Collection Volume:
Est. Additional LF Gas Collection Potentiate/
Est. Total LF Gas Utilization Volume Potential:
Current Reported Volume of LF Gas Utilized:
Planned Reported Volume LF Gas to be Utilized:
Est. Additional LF Gas Available for Use: c/

POWER GENERATION POTENTIAL
Est. Total Electric Potential:
Current Reported Generation:
Planned Reported Generation:
Est. Additional Generation Potential: c/
(continued)
mmcf/d
0.9
mmcf/d
1.5
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
1.5
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
Capacity
(MW)
2.5
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
Utilities in County: Brown Atchison EGA Inc; Leavenworth-Jefferson Elec Coop

mmcf/vr
330.3
mmcf/yr
561.5
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
561.5
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
Energy
(GWh/vr)
18.4
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
Inc; Western Area
Power Admin; Western Resources Inc
Environmental
Total
Est. Potential CH4 Reduction (mmcf/yr): 280.8
CO2 Equivalent of CH4 Reduction ('000 tons/yr): 1 24.5
Estimated Acid Rain Bonus Allowances: 36
Benefits of Utilization
Current &
Planned
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
Additional
Potential
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
Total Emissions Avoided
Emissions Avoided through Fuel Displacement: CO2
Displacement of Coal (tons/yr): 18,833
Displacement of Oil (tons/yr): 1 5,229
SO2
145
103



c/ - This value is calculated from other estimated values and is particularly sensitive to the following
factors: (1) whether the landfill is open or closed and (2) portion of landfill that is welled.
                                              Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                    September 1997
                                     N.R. Hamm LF(continued)
                                       Contact Information
 LANDFILL OWNER
 Organization Name:  N.R. Hamm Quarry
 Contact Name:      N.A.
 Phone Number:     N.A.
 Mailing Address    N.A.
 City:              N.A.
Fax Number:
     N.A.
State:
N.A. Zip code:
N.A.
 LANDFILL OPERATOR
 Organization Name:  N.A.
 Contact Name:      Charles Sedlock
 Phone Number:     913-597-5111
 Mailing Address    PO Box 17
 City:              Perry
Fax Number:     913-597-5117

State:     KS  Zip code:        66073
N.A.
                          Comments Relating to LFG Recovery Projects
Note: This landfill is open. Therefore, the gas generation may be increasing.
                                       Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                           September 1997
                                             Reno County LF
Location
City:

County:

State:
          N.A.

          Reno

          KS
Operating Status
Status:   Open

Year Open:  1976

Year Closed 2006
 Primary Contact (see contact informatio  Cindy Kidd
 Alternate Landfill Name(s):   N.A.
Gas Utilization
Gas Collection?: N.A.

Gas Utilization?: N.A.
                                                                          Phone:    316-665-2976
                                     Waste Collection Information

 Types of Waste Accepted:  Municipal Solid Waste; Other Landfill Wastes

 % of Waste that is MSW:        N.A.                    Tipping Fee ($/ton):        N.A.

 Days Open Per Week:          5.5*                     Design Capacity (tons):      N.A.

                                                     Acres Currently Landfilled:  N.A.

                                                     Average Depth (feet)       N.A.
Annual Acceptance Rate (tons):  97,933
              Year Reported:  1994
 Waste-in-Place (tons)  a/        2,624,021
 Collection System Status: N.A.
 Collection System Type   N.A.
 Collection Efficiency     85%*
 Methane Concentration:   50%*
                                    Gas Collection and Control Data
                                                    Year Gas Collection Began:
                                         N.A.
                                                    Est. Percentage of LF Area Welled:  N.A.
                                                    LF Gas Collected (mmcf/d):        N.A.
                                                    CH4 Gas Collected (mmcf/d        N.A.
 * - Default Value
 a/ - WIP calculated from acceptance rate and open year using average of multiple years annual acceptance
 rate data.
                                           Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                        September 1997
                                     Reno County LF (continued)
 EST. TOTAL METHANE GENERATION
     (Estimated from Waste-in-Place):
 LF GAS COLLECTION AND UTILIZATION POTENTIAL
     Est. Total LF Gas Collection Potential: d/
        Current Reported LF Gas Collection Volume:
        Planned Reported LF Gas Collection Volume:
        Est. Additional LF Gas Collection Potentialx/
     Est. Total LF Gas Utilization Volume Potential:
        Current Reported Volume of LF Gas Utilized:
        Planned Reported Volume LF Gas to be Utilized:
        Est. Additional LF Gas Available for Use: c/

 POWER GENERATION POTENTIAL
     Est. Total Electric Potential:
        Current Reported Generation:
        Planned Reported Generation:
        Est. Additional Generation Potential: d
 Utilities in County:
mmcf/d

mmcf/d









(MW)




1.1

1.9
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
1.9
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
Capacity

3.0
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
mmcf/yr
. 397.5
mmcf/yr
675.7
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
675.7
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
Energy
(GWh/vf)
22.1
N.A.
N.A.
N.A.
Ark Valley Elec Coop Assn Inc; Haven Light & Water Power Plant; Ninnescah Rural E
C A Inc; Sedgwick Cnty El Coop Assn Inc; Southwestern Power Admin; Western
Resources Inc
                                     Environmental Benefits of Utilization
 Est. Potential CH4 Reduction (mmcf/yr):
 CO2 Equivalent of CH4 Reduction ('000 tons/yr):
 Estimated Acid Rain Bonus Allowances:

 Emissions Avoided through Fuel Displacement:
    Displacement of Coal (tons/yr):
    Displacement of Oil (tons/yr):
                                            Total
                                            Current &
                                        Planned
                     337.9                   N.A.
                     149.9                   N.A.
                        44                   N.A.
                      Total Emissions Avoided
                      CO2       SO2
                       22,664       174
                       18,326       124
Additional
Potential
      N.A.
      N.A.
      N.A.
c/ - This value is calculated from other estimated values and is particularly sensitive to the following
factors: (1) whether the landfill is open or closed and (2) portion of landfill that is welled.
                                            Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                   September 1997
                                   Reno County LF(continued)
 LANDFILL OWNER
 Organization Name: Reno County
 Contact Name:     N.A.
 Phone Number:     N.A.
 Mailing Address    N.A.
 City:             N.A.
Contact Information



      Fax Number:     N.A.

      State:     N.A. Zip code:
N.A.
 LANDFILL OPERATOR
 Organization Name: Reno County
 Contact Name:     Cindy Kidd
 Phone Number:     316-665-2976
 Mailing Address    206 West 1st
 City:             Hutchinson
      Fax Number:     N.A.

      State:     KS  Zip code:
67501
N.A.
                         Comments Relating to LFG Recovery Projects
Note: This landfill is open. Therefore, the gas generation may be increasing.
                                       Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                          September 1997
Salina County LF
Location
City: N.A.
County: Saline
State: KS
Primary Contact (see contact informatio
Alternate Landfill Name(s): N.A.
Operating Status
Status: Open
Year Open: 1976
Year Closed N.A.
Frank Weinhold
Gas Utilization
Gas Collection?: N.A.
Gas Utilization?: N.A.

Phone: 913-827-7131
                                     Waste Collection Information

Types of Waste Accepted:  Municipal Solid Waste; Other Landfill Wastes

% of Waste that is MSW:       N.A.                    Tipping Fee ($/ton):         N.A.

Days Open Per Week:          5.5*                    Design Capacity (tons):      N.A.

                                                    Acres Currently Landfilled:   N.A.

                                                    Average Depth (feet)        N.A.
Annual Acceptance Rate (tons):  52,788
             Year Reported:  1994
Waste-in-Place (tons) a/
                            2,797,917
                                   Gas Collection and Control Data
Collection System Status: N.A.
Collection System Type  N.A.
Collection Efficiency     85%*
Methane Concentration:  50%*
                                                    Year Gas Collection Began:         N.A
                                                    Est. Percentage of LF Area Welled:   N.A
                                                    LF Gas Collected (mmcf/d):
                                                    CH4 Gas Collected (mmcf/d
N.A.
N.A.
* - Default Value
a/ - WIP calculated from acceptance rate and open year using average of multiple years annual acceptance
rate data.
                                          Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                         September 1997
                                     Salina County LF (continued)
 EST. TOTAL METHANE GENERATION
    (Estimated from Waste-in-Place):
 LF GAS COLLECTION AND UTILIZATION POTENTIAL
    Est. Total LF Gas Collection Potential: d/
        Current Reported LF Gas Collection Volume:
        Planned Reported LF Gas Collection Volume:
        Est. Additional LF Gas Collection Potentials/
    Est. Total LF Gas Utilization Volume Potential:
        Current Reported Volume of LF Gas Utilized:
        Planned Reported Volume LF Gas to be Utilized:
        Est. Additional LF Gas Available for Use: c/

 POWER GENERATION POTENTIAL
    Est. Total Electric Potential:
        Current Reported Generation:
        Planned Reported Generation:
        Est. Additional Generation Potential: c/
 Utilities in County:
                                         mmcf/d
                                              1.1
                                     mmcf/d
                                               1.9
                                              N.A.
                                              N.A.
                                              N.A.
                                               1.9
                                              N.A.
                                              N.A.
                                              N.A.
                                            Capacity
                                     (MW)
                                              3.1
                                             N.A.
                                             N.A.
                                             N.A.
Ark Valley Elec Coop Assn Inc; 0 S & O Rural EGA Inc; Smoky Hill Elec Coop Assn
Inc; Western Area Power Admin; Western Resources Inc
 Est. Potential CH4 Reduction (mmcf/yr):
 CO2 Equivalent of CH4 Reduction ('000 tons/yr):
 Estimated Acid Rain Bonus Allowances:

 Emissions Avoided through Fuel Displacement:
    Displacement of Coal (tons/yr):
    Displacement of Oil (tons/yr):
               Environmental Benefits of Utilization
                                            Current &
                      Total              Planned
                      351.7                  N.A.
                      156.0                  N.A.
                        45                  N.A.
                      Total Emissions Avoided
                      CO2       SO2
                        23,589       181
                        19,075       129
Additional
Potential
       N.A.
       N.A.
       N.A.
c/ - This value is calculated from other estimated values and is particularly sensitive to the following
factors: (1) whether the landfill is open or closed and (2) portion of landfill that is welled.
                                             Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                    September 1997
                                   Salina County LF(continued)
 LANDFILL OWNER
 Organization Name:  City of Salina
 Contact Name:      N.A.
 Phone Number:     N.A.
 Mailing Address    N.A.
 City:              N.A.
Contact Information



      Fax Number:     N.A.

      State:     N.A. Zip code:
N.A.
 LANDFILL OPERATOR
 Organization Name:  N.A.
 Contact Name.      Frank Weinhold
 Phone Number:     913-827-7131
 Mailing Address    PO Box 736
 City.              Salina
      Fax Number:     N.A.

      State:     KS  Zip code:
67402
N.A.
                          Comments Relating to LFG Recovery Projects
Note: This landfill is open. Therefore, the gas generation may be increasing.
                                       Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                           September 1997
                                              Wheatland LF
Location
City:

County:

State:
          N.A.

          Cherokee

          KS
Operating Status
Status:   Open

Year Open:  1976

Year Closed N.A.
 Primary Contact (see contact informatio  N.A.
 Alternate Landfill Name(s):   N.A.
   Gas Utilization
   Gas Collection?:  N.A.

   Gas Utilization?:  N.A.



Phone:   N.A.
                                     Waste Collection Information

 Types of Waste Accepted:  Municipal Solid Waste; Other Landfill Wastes

 % of Waste that is MS W:        N.A.                    Tipping Fee (S/ton):         N.A.

 Days Open Per Week:          5.5*                     Design Capacity (tons):      N.A.

                                                     Acres Currently Landfilled:   N.A.

                                                     Average Depth (feet)        N.A.
Annual Acceptance Rate (tons):  228,263
              Year Reported:  1994
 Waste-in-Place (tons)  a/
                            1,514,421
                                    Gas Collection and Control Data
 Collection System Status: N.A.
 Collection System Type   N.A.
 Collection Efficiency     85%*
 Methane Concentration:   50%*
                                                    Year Gas Collection Began:        N.A.
                                                    Est. Percentage of LF Area Welled:  N.A.
                                                    LF Gas Collected (mmcf/d):        N.A.
                                                    CH4 Gas Collected (mmcf/d        N.A.
 * - Default Value
 a/ - WIP calculated from acceptance rate and open year using average of multiple years annual acceptance
 rate data.
                                           Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                          September 1997
                                       Wheatland LF (continued)
 EST. TOTAL METHANE GENERATION
     (Estimated from Waste-in-Place):
 LF GAS COLLECTION AND UTILIZATION POTENTIAL
     Est. Total LF Gas Collection Potential: d/
        Current Reported LF Gas Collection Volume:
        Planned Reported LF Gas Collection Volume:
        Est. Additional LF Gas Collection Potentiate/
     Est. Total LF Gas Utilization Volume Potential:
        Current Reported Volume of LF Gas Utilized:
        Planned Reported Volume LF Gas to be Utilized:
        Est. Additional LF Gas Available for Use: c/

 POWER GENERATION POTENTIAL
     Est. Total Electric Potential:
        Current Reported Generation:
        Planned Reported Generation:
        Est. Additional Generation Potential: c/
 Utilities in County:
                                         mmcf/d
                                               0.8
                                     mmcf/d
                                               1.4
                                              N.A.
                                              N.A.
                                              N.A.
                                               1.4
                                              N.A.
                                              N.A.
                                              N.A.
                                             Capacity
                                     (MW)
                                               2.2
                                             N.A.
                                             N.A.
                                             N.A.
Empire District Elec Co; Sekan Electric Coop Assn Inc; Twin Valley Electric Coop
Inc; Western Area Power Admin
                                      Environmental Benefits of Utilization
 Est. Potential CH4 Reduction (mmcf/yr):
 CO2 Equivalent of CH4 Reduction ('000 tons/yr):
 Estimated Acid Rain Bonus Allowances:

 Emissions Avoided through Fuel Displacement:
    Displacement of Coal (tons/yr):
    Displacement of Oil (tons/yr):
                      Total
                      249.8
                      110.8
                        32
    Current &
Planned
     N.A.
     N.A.
     N.A.
Additional
Potential
      N.A.
      N.A.
      N.A.
                      Total Emissions Avoided
                      CO2       SO2
                        16,758       129
                        13,551        92
c/ - This value is calculated from other estimated values and is particularly sensitive to the following
factors: (1) whether the landfill is open or closed and (2) portion of landfill that is welled.
                                            Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                                    September 1997
                                    Wheatland LF(continued)
                                       Contact Information
 LANDFILL OWNER
 Organization Name: Cherokee County
 Contact Name:     N.A.
 Phone Number:    N.A.
 Mailing Address    N.A.
 City:             N.A.
Fax Number:
     N.A.
State:
N.A. Zip code:
N.A.
 LANDFILL OPERATOR
 Organization Name: N.A.
 Contact Name:     N.A.
 Phone Number:    N.A.
 Mailing Address    N.A.
 City:             N.A.
Fax Number:     N.A.

State:     N.A. Zip code:
                    N.A.
N.A.
                          Comments Relating to LFG Recovery Projects
Note: This landfill is open. Therefore, the gas generation may be increasing.
                                       Candidate Projects

-------
                                                                        vieuei auuii aiiu IMIVII uniiieiiiai
 26-Sep-
                              Landfill Power Generation Potential - Capacity (MW) and Environmental Benefits of Landfill Gas Utilization
Utility Company Match
    Landfill Name
    City, State
    County
    Year Close
Arcadia Munic Elec Dept
   Crawford County
   N.A., KS
   Crawford
                 Current &
                 Planned CO2
                 Equivalent     Total         Emissions Avoided through Fuel Displacement (tons/yr)
    Est.Total      ofCH4       Estimated     CO2          CO2          SO2          SO2
Electric       Reductions    Acid         DisplacemfflbplacemdiltsplacemdMsplacemnt
    Generation     (kt/v)   Rain Bonus   of Coal       ofOil        of Coal       of Oil
        2.30
0.00
34.00  17,539.00    14,182.00
135.00
96.00
    Totals for Candidate Landfills
Ark Valley Elec Coop Assn Inc
   Harvey County LF
   N.A., KS
   Harvey
         2.30
0.00
 34.00   17,539.00    14,182.00
        2.20         0.00        32.00   16,742.00    13,538.00
 135.00        96.00
                                                129.00       91.00
   Reno County LF
   N.A., KS
   Reno
         3.00         0.00        44.00   22,664.00    18,326.00
                                                174.00       124.00
   Salina County LF
   N.A., KS
   Saline
         3.10         0.00        45.00   23,589.00    19,075.00
                                                181.00       129.00
     Totals for Candidate Landfills
         8.30
 0.00
121.00   62,995.00    50,939.00
 484.00       344.00

-------
                                             MATCHING OF UTILITIES TO CANDIDATE LANDFILLS IN SAME COUNTY
                                                              Power Generation and Environmental Benefits
 26-Sep-
                             Landfill Power Generation Potential - Capacity (MW) and Environmental Benefits of Landfill Gas Utilization
Utility Company Match
    Landfill Name
    City, State
    County
    Year Close
Arma Electric Dept
   Crawford County
   N.A., KS
   Crawford
                Current &
                Planned CO2
                Equivalent     Total         Emissions Avoided through Fuel Displacement (tons/yr)
    Est.Total     ofCH4       Estimated     CO2         CO2         SO2         SO2
Electric      Reductions    Acid         Displacemdfllsplacemdftisplacemdaisplacemnt
    Generation     (kt/y)   Rain Bonus    of Coal       of Oil         of Coal       of Oil
        2.30
0.00
34.00  17,539.00    14,182.00
135.00
96.00
    Totals for Candidate Landfills
Brown Atchison E C A Inc
   N.R. Hamm LF
   N.A., KS
   Jefferson
        2.30
0.00
34.00   17,539.00    14,182.00
        2.50         0.00        36.00   18,833.00   15,229.00
135.00        96.00
                                              145.00      103.00
Totals for Candidate Landfills
Butler Rural El Coop Assn Inc
Cowley County LF
N.A., KS
Cowley
Harvey County LF
N.A., KS
Harvey
Brooks Site LF
N.A., KS
Sedgwick
2.50 0.00 36.00 18,833.00 15,229.00 145.00 103.00
1.90 0.00 28.00 14,527.00 11,747.00 112.00 79.00
2.20 0.00 32.00 16,742.00 13,538.00 129.00 91.00
8.60 0.00 128.00 65,844.00 53,244.00 506.00 360.00
     Totals for Candidate Landfills
        12.70
0.00       188.00   97,113.00     78,529.00
                                                                  747.00       530.00

-------
                                                               Power Generation and Environmental Benefits
 26-Sep-
                             Landfill Power Generation Potential - Capacity (MW) and Environmental Benefits of Landfill Gas Utilization
Utility Company Match
    Landfill Name
    City, State
    County
    Year Close
Caney Valley El Coop Assn Inc
   Cowley County LF
   N.A., KS
   Cowley
                Current &
                Planned CO2
                Equivalent    Total         Emissions Avoided through Fuel Displacement (tons/yr)
    Est.Total     ofCH4       Estimated     CO2         CO2         SO2          SO2
Electric       Reductions    Acid          DisplacemffllsplacemdMsplacemdMsplacemnt
    Generation     (kt/y)   Rain Bonus    of Coal       of Oil         of Coal       of Oil
        1.90
0.00
 28.00   14,527.00   11,747.00
112.00
79.00
    Totals for Candidate Landfills
D S & O Rural E C A Inc
   Salina County LF
   N.A., KS
   Saline
         1.90
        3.10
0.00
0.00
 28.00   14,527.00    11,747.00
 45.00   23,589.00    19,075.00
 112.00
79.00
181.00      129.00
    Totals for Candidate Landfills
DeSoto Elec Light Dept
   Johnson County LF
   N.A., KS
   Johnson
         3.10
        8.90
                    0.00
0.00
            45.00   23,589.00    19,075.00
                                                                    181.00       129.00
132.00   67,759.00    54,792.00
520.00      370.00
    Totals for Candidate Landfills
Empire District Elec Co
   Wheatland LF
   N.A., KS
   Cherokee
         8.90
        2,20
 0.00       132.00   67,759.00    54,792.00
0.00        32.00   16,758.00    13,551.00
                                                                    520.00       370.00
                                     129.00       92.00
    Totals for Candidate Landfills
         2.20
 0.00
 32.00   16,758.00     13,551.00
 129.00
                                                             92.00

-------
                                              MATCHING OF UTILITIES TO CANDIDATE LANDFILLS IN SAME COUNTY
                                                              Power Generation and Environmental Benefits
 26-Sep-
                             Landfill Power Generation Potential - Capacity (MW) and Environmental Benefits of Landfill Gas Utilization
Utility Company Match
    Landfill Name
    City, State
    County
    Year Close
Flint Hills Rural E C A Inc
   Harvey County LF
   N.A., KS
   Harvey
                Current &
                Planned CO2
                Equivalent     Total        Emissions Avoided through Fuel Displacement (tons/yr)
    Est.Total     ofCH4       Estimated     CO2         CO2          S02         SO2
Electric      Reductions   Acid         DisplacemdJtsplacemdWsplacemdflisplacemnt
    Generation     (kt/y)  Rain Bonus   ofCoal       of Oil        of Coal       of Oil
        2.20
0.00
32.00  16,742.00    13,538.00
129.00
91.00
    Totals for Candidate Landfills

Garden City Muni Utils
   Finney County LF
   Garden City, KS
   Finney
        2.20
                    0.00
            32.00   16,742.00    13,538.00
        2.10        0.00        30.00  15,825.00    12,796.00
                                    129.00        91.00
                                               122.00        86.00
    Totals for Candidate Landfills
Gardner Muni Elec Syst
   Johnson County LF
   N.A., KS
   Johnson
        2.10
                    0.00
            30.00   15,825.00     12,796.00
                                    122.00       86.00
        8.90        0.00       132.00  67,759.00    54,792.00
                                               520.00       370.00
    Totals for Candidate Landfills
Girard Munic Light & Water Dept
   Crawford County
   N.A., KS
   Crawford
        8.90
        2.30
                    0.00
0.00
           132.00   67,759.00    54,792.00
                                                                   520.00       370.00
34.00  17,539.00    14,182.00
135.00
96.00
     Totals for Candidate Landfills
         2.30
0.00
                                34.00   17,539.00     14,182.00
                                               135.00
                                                 96.00

-------
                                                              Power Generation and Environmental Benefits
 26-Sep-
                             Landfill Power Generation Potential - Capacity (MW) and Environmental Benefits of Landfill Gas Utilization
Utility Company Match
    Landfill Name
    City, State
    County
    Year Close
Haven Light & Water Power Plant
   Reno County LF
   N.A., KS
   Reno
                Current &
                Planned CO2
                Equivalent    Total         Emissions Avoided through Fuel Displacement (tons/yr)
    Est.Total     ofCH4       Estimated     CO2         CO2         SO2          SO2
Electric      Reductions    Acid         DisplacemdfllsplacemffitsplacemdJllsplacemnt
    Generation     (kt/y)   Rain Bonus    of Coal       of Oil         of Coal       of Oil
        3.00
0.00
44.00  22,664.00    18,326.00         174.00      124.00
    Totals for Candidate Landfills

Kansas City Bd of Pub Util
   Forest View SLF
   Kansas City, KS
   Wyandotte
        3.00
0.00
 44.00   22,664.00     18,326.00
                                                                    174.00       124.00
        8.10        0.00       120.00   61,577.00   49,793.00        473.00      336.00
    Totals for Candidate Landfills
Kansas City Power & Light Co
   Johnson County LF
   N.A., KS
   Johnson
         8.10
0.00       120.00   61,577.00    49,793.00
        8.90        0.00       132.00   67,759.00    54,792.00
                                                                    473.00       336.00
                                               520.00      370.00
   Forest View SLF
   Kansas City, KS
   Wyandotte
        8.10
0.00       120.00  61,577.00    49,793.00        473.00      336.00
     Totals for Candidate Landfills
        17.00
 0.00       252.00  129,336.00    104,585.00
                                                                    993.00       706.00

-------
                                             MATCHING OF UTILITIES TO CANDIDATE LANDFILLS IN SAME COUNTY
                                                             Power Generation and Environmental Benefits
 26-Sep-
                             Landfill Power Generation Potential - Capacity (MW) and Environmental Benefits of Landfill Gas Utilization
Utility Company Match
    Landfill Name
    City, State
    County
    Year Close

Lane-Scott Electric Coop Inc
   Finney County LF
   Garden City, KS
   Finney
                Current &
                Planned CO2
                Equivalent    Total         Emissions Avoided through Fuel Displacement (tons/yr)
    Est.Total      ofCH4      Estimated     CO2         CO2         SO2         SO2
Electric       Reductions    Acid         DisplacemeBUsplacemdaisplacemdiUsplacemnt
    Generation     (kt/y)   Rain Bonus    of Coal       of Oil        of Coal       of Oil
        2.10
0.00
30.00   15,825.00   12,796.00
122.00
86.00
    Totals for Candidate Landfills
Leavenworth-Jefferson Elec Coop Inc
   N.R. Hamm LF
   N.A., KS
   Jefferson
        2.10
        2.50
                    0.00
            30.00   15,825.00     12,796.00
0.00
36.00   18,833.00   15,229.00
                                                                  122.00
                                                                              86.00
145.00       103.00
    Totals for Candidate Landfills
Mount Hope Muni Electric System
   Brooks Site LF
   N.A., KS
   Sedgwick
        2.50
                    0.00
            36.00   18,833.00     15,229.00
        8.60        0.00       128.00  65,844.00   53,244.00
                                   145.00       103.00
                                              506.00      360.00
    Totals for Candidate Landfills

Mulberry City Utilities
   Crawford County
   N.A., KS
   Crawford
        8.60
0.00       128.00   65,844.00    53,244.00
                                                                  506.00      360.00
        2.30        0.00        34.00   17,539.00   14,182.00
                                              135.00       96.00
     Totals for Candidate Landfills
        2.30
0.00
34.00   17,539.00    14,182.00
                                                                  135.00
                                                           96.00

-------
                                                              Power Generation and Environmental Benefits
 26-Sep-
                             Landfill Power Generation Potential - Capacity (MW) and Environmental Benefits of Landfill Gas Utilization
Utility Company Match
    Landfill Name
    City, State
    County
    Year Close
Mulvane Munic Light & Wtr Dept
   Brooks Site LF
   N.A., KS
   Sedgwick
                Current &
                Planned CO2
                Equivalent     Total        Emissions Avoided through Fuel Displacement (tons/yr)
    Est.Total     ofCH4       Estimated     CO2         CO2         SO2          SO2
Electric      Reductions    Acid         DisplacemdWsplacemffllsplacemdWsplacemnt
    Generation     (kt/y)   Rain Bonus    of Coal      of Oil        of Coal       of Oil
        8.60
0.00
128.00   65,844.00   53,244.00
506.00       360.00
    Totals for Candidate Landfills
Ninnescah Rural EGA Inc
   Reno County LF
   N.A., KS
   Reno
        8.60
        3.00
0.00
0.00
128.00  65,844.00    53,244.00
 44.00  22,664.00    18,326.00
506.00      360.00
174.00      124.00
    Totals for Candidate Landfills
Pioneer Electric Coop Inc
   Finney County LF
   Garden City, KS
   Finney
         3.00
 0.00
 44.00   22,664.00    18,326.00
        2.10        0.00        30.00  15,825.00    12,796.00
 174.00      124.00
                                               122.00       86.00
    Totals for Candidate Landfills
Sedgwick Cnty El Coop Assn Inc
   Harvey County LF
   N.A., KS
   Harvey
         2.10
                    0.00
        2.20
            30.00   15,825.00    12,796.00
0.00        32.00   16,742.00   13,538.00
                                                                   122.00        86.00
                                    129.00       91.00

-------
                                              MATCHING OF UTILITIES TO CANDIDATE LANDFILLS IN SAME COUNTY
                                                              Power Generation and Environmental Benefits
 26-Sep-
                             Landfill Power Generation Potential - Capacity (MW) and Environmental Benefits of Landfill Gas Utilization
Utility Company Match
    Landfill Name
    City, State
    County
    Year Close
   Reno County LF
   N.A., KS
   Reno
                Current &
                Planned CO2
                Equivalent    Total        Emissions Avoided through Fuel Displacement (tons/yr)
    Est.Total     ofCH4       Estimated     CO2         CO2         SO2         SO2
Electric      Reductions    Acid         DisplacemdaisplacemdBisplacemd&lsplacemnt
    Generation     (kt/y)   Rain Bonus   of Coal       ofOil         of Coal       ofOil
        3.00
                                                                          0.00
           44.00  22,664.00    18,326.00
                                   174.00      124.00
   Brooks Site LF
   N.A., KS
   Sedgwick
                                                              8.60
                    0.00
           128.00  65,844.00    53,244.00
                                   506.00      360.00
    Totals for Candidate Landfills
Sekan Electric Coop Assn Inc
   Wheatland LF
   N.A., KS
   Cherokee
        13.80
0.00        204.00  105,250.00     85,108.00
                                    809.00       575.00
        2.20        0.00        32.00  16,758.00    13,551.00
                                               129.00       92.00
   Crawford County
   N.A., KS
   Crawford
        2.30        0.00        34.00  17,539.00    14,182.00
                                                                                                                         135.00       96.00
    Totals for Candidate Landfills
Smoky Hill Elec Coop Assn Inc
   Salina County LF
   N.A., KS
   Saline
        4.50
        3.10
0.00
0.00
66.00  34,297.00    27,733.00
45.00  23,589.00    19,075.00
264.00       188.00
181.00       129.00
    Totals for Candidate Landfills
         3.10
o.oo
45.00  23,589.00    19,075.00
181.00       129.00

-------
                                                              Power Generation and Environmental Benefits
 26-Sep-
                             Landfill Power Generation Potential - Capacity (MW) and Environmental Benefits of Landfill Gas Utilization
Utility Company Match
    Landfill Name
    City, State
    County
    Year Close
St Mary's Light & Water Dept
   Brooks Site LF
   N.A., KS
   Sedgwick
                Current &
                Planned CO2
                Equivalent    Total         Emissions Avoided through Fuel Displacement (tons/yr)
    Est.Total     ofCH4       Estimated     C02         CO2         SO2          SO2
Electric      Reductions    Acid         DisplacemsGWsplacemdMsplacemdWsplacemnt
    Generation     (kt/y)   Rain Bonus    of Coal       of Oil         of Coal       of Oil
        8.60
0.00
128.00   65,844.00    53,244.00
506.00      360.00
    Totals for Candidate Landfills
Sumner-Cowley Elec Coop Inc
   Cowley County LF
   N.A., KS
   Cowley
        8.60
0.00       128.00   65,844.00    53,244.00
        1.90        0.00        28.00   14,527.00   11,747.00
                                     506.00       360.00
                                               112.00       79.00
   Harvey County LF
   N.A., KS
   Harvey
        2.20
0.00        32.00   16,742.00    13,538.00
                                     129.00       91.00
   Brooks Site LF
   N.A., KS
   Sedgwick
        8.60
0.00       128.00   65,844.00    53,244.00
                                     506.00       360.00
    Totals for Candidate Landfills
Twin Valley Electric Coop Inc
   Wheatland LF
   N.A., KS
   Cherokee
        12.70        0.00       188.00   97,113.00    78,529.00
        2.20        0.00        32.00   16,758.00    13,551.00
                                                747.00       530.00
                                               129.00       92.00
     Totals for Candidate Landfills
         2.20
                     0.00
            32.00   16,758.00    13,551.00
                                                                    129.00
                                                  92.00

-------
                                             MATCHING OF UTILITIES TO CANDIDATE LANDFILLS IN SAME COUNTY
                                                              Power Generation and Environmental Benefits
 26-Sep-
                             Landfill Power Generation Potential - Capacity (MW) and Environmental Benefits of Landfill Gas Utilization
Utility Company Match
    Landfill Name
    City, State
    County
    Year Close
Udall Water & Light Dept
   Cowley County LF
   N.A., KS
   Cowley
                Current &
                Planned CO2
                Equivalent     Total        Emissions Avoided through Fuel Displacement (tons/yr)
    Est.Total     ofCH4       Estimated     CO2         CO2         SO2          SO2
Electric      Reductions    Acid         DisplacemdflbplacemdflisplacemdWsplacemnt
    Generation     (My)   Rain Bonus    of Coal       ofOil        of Coal       ofOil
        1.90
0.00
28.00   14,527.00   11,747.00
112.00
                                                                               79.00
    Totals for Candidate Landfills

Victory Electric Coop Assn Inc
   Finney County LF
   Garden City, KS
   Finney
        1.90
                    0.00
            28.00   14,527.00     11,747.00
                                                                   112.00       79.00
        2.10         0.00        30.00  15,825.00    12,796.00
                                               122.00       86.00
    Totals for Candidate Landfills
Western Resources Inc
   Crawford County
   N.A., KS
   Crawford
        2.10
                    0.00
            30.00   15,825.00     12,796.00
        2.30        0.00        34.00  17,539.00    14,182.00
                                                                   122.00        86.00
                                               135.00       96.00
   Harvey County LF
   N.A., KS
   Harvey
        2.20        0.00        32.00  16,742.00    13,538.00
                                               129.00       91.00
   N.R. Hamm LF
   N.A., KS
   Jefferson
        2.50        0.00        36.00  18,833.00    15,229.00
                                               145.00      103.00

-------
                                                                Power Generation and Environmental Benefits
 26-Sep-
                              Landfill Power Generation Potential • Capacity (MW) and Environmental Benefits of Landfill Gas Utilization
Utility Company Match
    Landfill Name
    City, State
    County
    Year Close
   Johnson County LF
   N.A., KS
   Johnson
                 Current &
                 Planned CO2
                 Equivalent     Total         Emissions Avoided through Fuel Displacement (tons/yr)
    Est.Total      ofCH4       Estimated     CO2          CO2          SO2         SO2
Electric       Reductions    Acid         Displacemdftteplacemfflbplacemd&lsplacemnt
    Generation     (kt/y)   Rain Bonus    of Coal       of Oil        of Coal       of Oil
        8.90        0,00       132.00  67,759.00   54,792.00        520.00       370.00
   Reno County LF
   N.A., KS
   Reno
        3.00        0.00        44.00  22,664.00   18,326.00
                                                174.00      124.00
   Salina County LF
   N.A., KS
   Saline
        3.10        0.00        45.00  23,589.00    19,075.00
                                                181.00      129.00
   Brooks Site LF
   N.A., KS
   Sedgwick
        8.60
0.00       128.00  65,844.00    53,244.00         506.00      360.00
   Forest View SLF
   Kansas City, KS
   Wyandotte
         8.10         0.00       120.00  61,577.00   49,793.00        473.00       336.00
   Cowley County LF
   N.A., KS
   Cowley
         1.90
0.00        28.00  14,527.00    11,747.00         112.00       79.00
     Totals for Candidate Landfills
Wheatland Electric Coop Inc
   Finnev County LF
   Garden City, KS
   Finney
        40.60
         2.10
0.00       599.00  309,074.00    249,926.00        2,375.00     1,688.00
0.00
30.00  15,825.00    12,796.00
122.00       86.00

-------
                                             MATCHING OF UTILITIES TO CANDIDATE LANDFILLS IN SAME COUNTY
                                                             Power Generation and Environmental Benefits
 26-Sep-
                             Landfill Power Generation Potential - Capacity (MW) and Environmental Benefits of Landfill Gas Utilization
Utility Company Match
    Landfill Name
    City, State
    County
    Year Close
   Brooks Site LF
   N.A., KS
   Sedgwick
                Current &
                Planned CO2
                Equivalent    Total         Emissions Avoided through Fuel Displacement (tons/yr)
    Est.Total      ofCH4      Estimated     CO2         CO2         S02         SO2
Electric      Reductions    Acid         DisplacemdiJlsplacemdflisplacemdatsplacemnt
    Generation     (kt/y)   Rain Bonus    of Coal       of Oil         of Coal       of Oil
                                                             8.60
                   0.00
          128.00  65,844.00    53,244.00
                                   506.00      360.00
    Totals for Candidate Landfills
Winfield Mun Electric Util
   Cowley County LF
   N.A., KS
   Cowley
       10.70
        1.90
0.00
0.00
158.00   81,669.00     66,040.00
28.00  14,527.00    11,747.00
                                               628.00
            446.00
112.00
                                                                              79.00
    Totals for Candidate Landfills
        1.90
0.00
 28.00   14,527.00     11,747.00
112.00
                                                                               79.00

-------
Current Project
    Profiles

-------

-------
This State has no Current Projects

-------

-------
profile index

-------

-------
                                   Landfill Index
Candidate Landfills
        Brooks Site LF
        Cowley County LF
        Crawford County
        Finney County LF
        Forest View SLF
        Harvey County LF
        Johnson County LF
        N.R. Hamm LF
        Reno County LF
        Salina County LF
        Wheatland LF

Profiles in Progress
        Butler County LF
        Chanute LF
        Clay County LF
        Graham County LF
        Oak Grove (Deffenbaugh)
        Refuse Service Inc. LF

WIP* 500,000 to 999,999 tons
        Allen County LF
        Barton County LF
        Ford County LF
        Seward County LF
* WIP = Waste-in-Place.  Profiles for landfills with WIP between 500,000 and 999,999 tons are not
included in this report.

-------

-------

-------

-------