ENVIRONMENTAL  PROTECTION AGENCY
      OFFICE OF  ENFORCEMENT
           EPA-33O/2-79-O14a
       Compliance Evaluation
                And
     Wastewater  Characterization
       Union  Carbide Company
       Institute,  West Virginia
           M ENT
        DENVER
REGION
                AND
                PHILADELPHIA
      MARCH 1979  RFV. MAY 1979
                                               1

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          Environmental  Protection Agency
               Office of Enforcement
                 EPA-330/2-79-014a
               COMPLIANCE EVALUATION   fc

                        AND

            WASTEWATER CHARACTERIZATION


               UNION CARBIDE COMPANY

             INSTITUTE, WEST VIRGINIA
         REGION III LIBRARY
         ENVIRONMENTAL PROTEf-TTOW
                 James L.  Hatheway
            March 1979 - Rev. May 1979
National Enforcement Investigations Center - Denver
                        and
             Region III - Philadelphia

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A-9
II.
PROCESS OPERATIONS AND POLLUTION SOURCES
Union Carbide produces about 40 products from approximately 350 raw
materials. Twenty-eight of the products or raw materials are on the
Toxic Pollutant List [Table 1]. Production rates~and process capacities
are considered confidential and are not included in this report. Figures
It 2 and 3 show the general flow of materials at this plant and Figures
4 and 5 show the relationship of process units and wastewater disposal
routes.
Kanawha River watert 720tOOO m3 (190 mgd)t is used for cooling and
process water at the plant. All process wastewatert domestic wastet and
storm runoff are discharged after treatment in the activated sludge waste-
water treatment facility (WWTF) to the Kanawha River through Outfall
001. Non-contact cooling water is discharged untreated through 5 per-
mitted outfalls (002t 003t 004t 005 and 008). The Company has installed
specific organics monitors on two major cooling water discharges (Outfalls
003 and 005). The NPDES limitations [Tables 2 and 3] for these discharges
were effective July It 1977.
OLEFINS PRODUCTION
The olefins unit is currently used only for removing contaminants
from methane. The major process equipment is the distillation column.
The only wastewater associated with this unit is the non-contact cooling
water that is discharged through Outfall 004. All still column residues
are burned at the powerhouse. There are no air emission sources from
this unit.

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A-10
Table 1
UNION CARBIDE, INSTITUTE PLANT
MATERIALS ON TOXIC POLLUTANT LIST
Acrolein
. Acryl onitri 1 e
Antimony Trichloride
Benzene
.Carbon Tetrachloride
Carbaryl
Chlorobenzene
Chloroform
Chlorophenol
Chrome nitrate.
Copper
Dichlorobenzene
Dichlorophenol
Dinitrotoluene
~
Isophorone
Isophorone residue
Methyl Chloride
Naphthalene
Nickel
Nickel Nitrate
Ni cke 1 Sulfate
Phenol
Ramey Nickel
Sil ver
Sil ver Oxi de
Toluene
Trichlorobenzene
Trichlorophenol

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CONTENTS
I INTRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

II SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS. . . . . . . . . .~. . . . . . . . .
SUMMARY OF INVESTIGATIONS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CONCLUSIONS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

SURVEY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1
3
3
3
6
III INSPECTION METHODS AND RESULTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
POLLUTION SOURCES AND DISPOSAL METHODS. . . . . . . . . . . 8
SELF-MONITORING EVALUATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
NEIC SAMPLE ANALYSIS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
IV SURVEY METHODS AND RESULTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
FLOW MEASUREMENTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
TOXtCITY EVALUATION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
REFERENCES. . . . . . . . . .
. . . . .
. . . . .
. . . .
. . 53
APPENDICES
A - Union Carbide Institute (Inspection)
B - Lithium Flow Verification Procedures and
Sampling Techniques
C - Chain-of-Custody
D - Analytical Methods and Quality Control
E - Bacteriological Methods
F - Mutagen Assay Methods
G - Bioassay Methods
H - Technical Information Data Base Description

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TABLES
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
Cooling Water Flows. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Description of Monitoring Stations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Summary of Field Measurements and Analytical Data. . . . . . 23
Summary of Field Measurements and Analytical Data.. . . . . . 25
Mutagenic Activity of Union Carbide Institute Discharge. . . 27
96-Hour Flow-Through Survival Data. . . . .~. . . . . . . . . 30
Neutral Extractable Organics Sampling Data. . . . . . . . ... 32
Volatile Organics Data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Direct Aqueous Injection Organics Data. . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Summary of Field Measurements and Analytical Data. . . . . . 36
Toxicity of Organic Compounds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
FIGURES
1
Schematic of Union Carbide Institute Wastewater Treatment

Facilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Schematic of Union Carbide Institute Cooling Water
Sewer System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Union Carbide Institute Discharge Mutagen Testing Dose
Response Curve. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
2
3

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1.
INTRODUCTION
Union Carbide Corporation, Chemicals and Plastic Division, oper-
ates a petrochemical plant at Institute, West Virginia. On the 314
hectare (775 acre) plant site, Union Carbide Institute (UCI) produces
"

about 40 different chemicals, the largest volume associated with the
insecticide SEVIN@. .
The Kanawha Valley contains numerous industrial plants engaged
in the production of organic and/or inorganic chemicals. The passage
of the Toxic Substance Control and Resources Conservation and Recovery
Acts in 1976 focused attention on the need to control the discharges
of toxic s~bstances. Large volumes of such wastes are produced and
disposed of in the Kanawha Valley with resultant potential for release
to the environment.
The Environmental Protection Agency, Region III, requested that
the National Enforcement Investigations Center (NEIC) inspect the
Union Carbide facility to a) determine the sources and types of toxic
pollutants discharged to the Kanawha River, b) evaluate pollution
abatement practices, and c) determine if NPDES* permit requirements
were being met. NEIC conducted a detailed plant inspection and a
subsequent field survey. The inspection results are summarized in
this report, and presented in full context in Appendix A.
* NPDES: National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System, Public
Law 92-500, Sec. 402 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act
as amended in 1972, and subsequently Sec. 402 of the Clean Water
Act as amended in 1977.

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2
The objectives of the April 1978 plant inspection were to:
l.
2.
3.
4.
inspect process operations
evaluate pollution sources and abatement practices
evaluate self-monitoring procedures
analyze a process wastewater sample for toxic pollutants
and organic compounds.
The objectives of the August 9 to 18, 1978 survey were to:
l.
2.
. .
measure all wastewater discharge flows.
determine if NPDES permit No. WV0000086 effluent limitations
were being met.
collect wastewater and water intake samples for organic
characterization.
3.
In addition to determining the sources and types of toxic pollutants,
NEIC evaluated the potential health effects of all organic compounds
identified in wastewater and water intake samples.

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II.
SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS
SUMMARY OF INVESTIGATIONS
NEIC conducted an inspection of the UCI facility in April 1978.
During this inspection, each process operation was discussed in detail
with Company personnel [Appendix A]. Evaluations were made of air,
water and solid waste pollution sources and associated abatement prac-
tices. Self-monitoring procedures including sample collection, flow
monitoring, sample analysis, bioassay procedures, and discharge moni-
toring reports (DMRs) were also evaluated. The inspection team col-
lected a sample from the process wastewater for organic analyses in
the NEIC Denver laboratory.
From August 9 to 18, 1978, NEIC personnel conducted a survey at
the UCI facility. Cooling water flows were measured using lithium
chloride dilution procedures. Twenty-four hour composite samples of
the wastewater treatment plant and cooling water discharges and intake
water were collected to determine compliance with NPDES effluent limi-
tations and to identify organic compounds. Each organic compound was
searched in the Registry of Toxic Effects and Chemical Substances and
the Toxline data bases to obtain toxic information.
CONCLUSIONS
Inspection
Air pollution control devices used at this facility appear to be
adequate. Air pollution emissions are controlled by scrubbers, flares,
baghouses and. electrostatic precipitators. Combustible gases are
collected and burned.

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4
Solid wastes disposal in the
Holz pond appears to be adequate.
most hazardous chemical wastes are
Goff Mountain Chemical Landfill and
According to Union Carbide officials,
trucked to the Goff Mountain Chemical
Landfill for disposal. Waste containing heavy metals and toluene
diisocyanate are contract disposed. Waste activated sludge from the
wastewater treatment facility (WWTF), are pumped to Holz pond.
Even though time-weighted composite, instead~of flow-weighted
composite, samples are collected from the non-contact cooling water
and WWTF discharge, sample collection procedures are adequate. Cool-
ing water flows and the WWTF discharge remain fairly constant over
any given 24-hour period. Therefore, Company time-weighted samples
are equivalent to flow-weighted composites.
Measurement of WWTF effluent flow is inadequate. The Marsh
McBirney Model 250 flow meter was not operating. Flow was being cal-
culated based on the amount of water entering the aeration basin less
the amount of sludge wasted. The NPDES permit requires that the flow
be continuously measured and recorded.
Sample preservation is inadequate. Samples for phenolic analysis
are not preserved during collection. TOC, phenol, NH3 and TKN samples
collected during weekends and not analyzed until Monday are only kept
cool, not prese).ved as required by EPA prescribed procedures.
In general, chemical analyses are adequate with most analysis
performed according to EPA approved methods. The TDS concentrations
were being calculated by subtracting the difference between total and
suspended solids. However, this is not an approved method and would
result in TDS values greater than actual values. Analyses of standard
reference samples provided by NEIC showed TOC, TKN and TDS results
were not within acceptance limits.

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5
In general, bioassay procedures are adequate. Discrepancies
observed include: a) not starting tests within 8 hours as recommended
by Standard Methods, b) using city dechlorinated tap water as dilution
water instead of Kanawha River Water, c) not running tests in duplicate,
d) aerating samples throughout the 96-hour test period. It is advisable,
though not required, that the laboratory use a constant-temperature
water bath to maintain test temperature rather than depending on ambient ."
air temperature.
Ii
According to DMRs, the Company exceeded NPDES permit limitations
during the period October 1977 through March 1978. The 001 discharge
@xceeded either monthly average or daily maximum BOD, TSS, TOC and
chloride limitations 3, 6, 2 and 1 months, respectively. TOC limita-
tions were exceeded on each cooling water outfall. TKN violations
were reported from Outfalls 004, 005 and 008, NH3 from Outfalls 004
and 005 and pH from 002, 004, 005 and 008. Flow values were not re-
ported on the DMRs.
The WWTF effluent contained 13 priority pollutants.* Seven of
these, 1,2-dichlorobenzene, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, 2,6-dinitrotoluene,
1,4-diphenylhydrazine, methylene chloride, naphthalene, and bis-(2-ethyl-
hexyl) phthalate, had concentrations greater than 10 ~g/l.
SURVEY
The Company flow measurements using lithium chloride are not
accurate because of discrepancies in the procedures. The lithium
chloride injection pump discharge rate charges during the test such
that the volume of concentrate added to the wastewater decreases.
Company personnel use the average discharge rate to
which assumes linear variation during the test. In
nique it is necessary that the tracer be introduced
rate otherwise the calculated flow can be in error.
calculate flow
using tracer tech-
at a constant

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6
The Company installed flow device (March McBirney Model 250) on
the WWTF effluent is not accurate. Instantantous measurement showed
that the meter recording flow was approximately 50% higher than actual.
The WWTF effluent (Outfall 001) was in compliance with permit
limitations. Outfall 001 had a daily averaged discharge of 220 kg/day
BOD, 480 kg/day TSS, 1,600 kg/day TOC, 270 kg/day TKN, 150 kg/day NH3
and 23,000 kg/day chloride. These values were only 10, 38, 35, 18,
22 and 22%, respectively, of the NPDES limitations. Fecal coliform
bacteria densities ranged from 5 to 33/100 ml (permit limitation of
400/100 ml).
Outfall 001 discharge was determined to be mutagenic by the Ames
test. The basic extract displayed a mutagnic activity ratio greater
than 2.5 which correlates closely (>90% probability) with inducement
of cancer in laboratory animals.
The WWTF effluent was acutely toxic as demonstrated by bioassay
tests. These test results show that the 96-hour LCso was 80.5% ef-
fluent in Kanawha River dilution water.
]
. Except for Outfall 002, cooling water discharges complied with
NPDES limitations. The 002 discharge exceeded TOC, TKN and NH3 permit
limitations. The daily maximum net TOC, TKN and NH3 concentrations
ranged from 12 to 15,0.2 to 1.6 and 0 to 0.8 mg/l, respectively.
The NPDES TOC, TKN and NH3 limitations were exceeded 2, 1 and 1 day
respectively.
A total of 53 organic (38 confirmed) compounds were identified
in the UCI discharges. Concentrations of the confirmed compounds
ranged from <1 to 140,000 ~g/l. Seventeen of the 53 compounds are
* .For explanation of Priority Pollutant see Section IV.

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7
priority pollutants. Four of the priority pollutants benzene, carbaryl,
carbon tetrachloride and chloroform are known carcinogens. Benzene
is carcinogenic to humans; the others are carcinogenic to animals.

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III.
INSPECTION METHODS AND RESULTS
During the April 1978 inspection, NEIC personnel obtained infor-
mation on process operations and associated pollution sources, pollu-
tion abatement practices and self-monitoring techniques [Appendix A].
According to Company personnel, the plant operates continuously with
little production variation. Production rates and process capacities
are not included in this discussion because of their confidential
stntuS.
POLLUTION SOURCES AND DISPOSAL METHODS
Process, boiler feed and cooling waters are obtained from the
Kanawha River. All process and. domestic wastewater and supernatant
from Goff Mountain Chemical Landfill are collected and treated in a
conventional activated sludge wastewater treatment facility (WWTF)
[Figure 1]. The treatment system includes primary clarification,
flow equilization, biological treatment (aeration basins) and final
sedimentation. The effluent is discharged into the Kanawha River
throug~ Outfall 001. Non-contact cooling water is discharged into
the Kanawha River through five outfalls (002, 003, 004, 005 and 008)
[Figure 2]. Methylisocyanate unit residues are hydrolyzed and burned
in a liquid incinerator.
The Company has an extensive in-plant wastewater monitoring pro-
gram. Unit process wastewaters are monitored with in-plant samplers
and total carbon (TCA) and gas chromotographic (GC) analyzers to ident-
ify and locate spills and/or leaks. Each outfall is equipped with a
total TCA which is telemetered to the WWTF. When the TCA value exceeds
v
a specific value, grab samples are collected and analyzed on a GC to

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Station 29
o
Influent"
Emergency
Storage Pond
~
Hl04
t
Aeration
Basins (3)
~
Sludge Recycle
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
~~..........~.........a.a...aa.....a..................a
Figure 1.
.
.
.
{................
.
.
.
.
.
.
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t Pipeline to Hplz Pond
Caustic
Acid
I
Equalization
Basin
Neutral ization
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.
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Station 30
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Supernatant :
. .
.............,............~........,.......................................~
Emergency
Sludge
Holding
Pond
........u.........~
Trucked
to
Holz
Pond
~chematic of Union Carbide Institute Wastewater Treatment Facilities
'.0

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,..i."O.....,
E1
~~~,,~~aUL
--WEST AREA ----
Station 32
Outfall 002
PLANT
COOLING
WATER
SEWER SYSTEM
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GOODRICH - GULF C~E""CAL PLANT
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------.
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--~ CENTER AREA-
Station 33
Outfall 003
Fi9ure
2. Schematic of Union Carbide
Cooling Water Sewer System
TOt
S
!I"" 'A'
L..u~.
~..~..
Station 36
;
!.'
:~: ~. .... 'rO~""'.-C"
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----j--"- EAST AREA
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Station
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.
34
n04
Institute
.1<1(1,-,\ C.O"''T8ILUC.~'iCI'II.IIt..
S ta t ion 35
;~e,,~...."" OU"'.I"L
Outfall
on5
a

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11
identify the pollutant source. Specific organics monitors were in-
stalled on cooling water Outfalls 003 and 005 during the inspection.
The air pollution emission from the various processes are con-
trolled by scrubbers. flares. baghouses, and electrostatic precipitators.
These control devices appear to adequately control air emissions from
this plant. According to information provided by Company personnel,
most combustible gases are collected and burned in the flares
[Appendix A].
Solid wastes are disposed of in Goff Mountain Chemical Landfill,*
Holz Pond* or the Regional Development Authority Landfill. Hazardous
chemical wastes and toxic substance from UCI and Union Carbide South
Charleston (UCSC) are hauled to the Goff Mountain Landfill. Leachate
from the landfill is collected in underdrain piping network and treated
in the wastewater treatment facility. Waste-activated sludge is pumped
to Holz pond, an anaerobic lagoon. Non-chemical solid wastes (lumber.
paper, scrap polymer, etc.) are disposed of in the Regional landfill.
SELF-MONITORING EVALUATION
An evaluation of self-monitori~g procedures consisted of interviews
with UCI sampling, analytical and bioassay perscnnel, and evaluations
of sampling, monitoring. and analytical equipment [Appendix A]. The
findings of this evaluation are discussed below:
The NPDES permit requires the collection of 24-hour flow-propor-
tional composite samples. Company personnel collect time-weighted
composite samples from the non-contact cooling water and WWTF discharges.
Company personnel indicated that flows remain fairly constant, therefore.
the samples are essentially flow-proportional.
* Goff Mountain landfill is operated by Union Carbide Institute personnel.
Holz Pond is operate~ by Union Carbide, South Charleston personnel.

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12
The flow measurement device on the WWTF effluent (Outfall 001)
was not operating during the April inspection [Appendix A]. Fiows
were being calculated based on an instantaneous measurement of the
amount of water entering the aeration basin less the amount of sludge
wasted. The NPOES permit requires that the WWTF effluent (Outfall
001) be continuously monitored and recorded. Flow data have not been
reported on OMRs.
#
WWTF effluent samples are collected from a manhole at the point
where the clarifier discharges join. Company personnel performed
tests subsequent to the inspection to determine if representative
samples can be collected at this point. Test data show the samples
ar~ representative.
Samples for phenolic analysis are aliquoted from composite samples
and not preserved during collection. Samples collected during weekends
are not analyzed until Monday. These samples are only kept cool and
not preserved as required by EPA prescribed procedures. TOC, phenolic,
NH3-N, and TKN samples require acid preservation, as well as cooling
to assure stability.
Company personnel also analyzed standard reference BOO, TOC,
TSS, chlorides, TKN, pH, T05, total -alkalinity, NH3-N, sulfate, fluor-
ide and orthophosphorous samples provided by NEIC. All of these analy-
ses, except TOS, were performed according to EPA-approved methods.
TOS were being calculated by subtracting the difference between total
and suspended solids. Company reference sample results show that
TOC, TKN and TOS values were not within acceptance limits.
Bioassay testing is conducted quarterly on all outfalls as required
by the NPDE5 permit. Discrepancies noted in the Company's bioassay
procedures were: a) collection of time rather than flow-proportional
samples, b) testing not starte~ within 8 hours as recommended by Standard

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13
Methods, c) city dechlorinated tap water was used as
instead of Kanawha River water, d) not running tests
and e) aerating samples throughout the 96-hour test.
dil ut i on water
in duplicate,
It is advisable, though not required, that the laboratory use a
constant-temperature water bath to maintain test temperatures rather
than depend on ambient air temperatures.
'.
Discharge Monitoring Reports [Appendix A, Tables 4 and 5J show
that for the period October 1977 through March 1978 the Company was
in violation of monthly average or daily maximum permit limitations
as follows:
  No. of Months Limitation Exceeded 
   Outfall   
Parameter 001 002 003 004 005 008
BOD 3 N/Aa N/A N/A N/A N/A
TSS 6 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
TOC 2 1 4 5 3 2
TKN 0 0 0 1 1 1
NH3-N 0 0 0 1 2 0
Chlorides 1 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
pH 0 2 0 3 5 2
a N/A - not applicable.    
A composite sample representing combined discharges of Outfalls 002,
003, 004, 005 and 008 also violated the daily maximum phenol limitation
in January 1978.
NEIC SAMPLE ANALYSIS
NEIC personnel collected a grab sample from the UCI WWTF effluent.

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14
This sample was analyzed for priority pollutants* and other organics
[Appendix A]. A total of 30 organic chemicals, including 13 priority
pollutants, were identified. Of the priority pollutants, 7 had concen-
trations of 10 ~g/l or greater; these were 1,2-dichlorobenzene, 1,4-di-
chlorobenzene; 2,6-dinitrotoluene; 1,4-diphenylhydrazine; methyl chloride;
naphthalene and bis-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate. In addition, the pesticide.
Carbaryl was detected.
* Priority Pollutants are derived from the June 7, 1976 Natural Resources
Defences Council (NRDC) vs. Russell Train (USEPA) Settlement Agreement.

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IV.
SURVEY METHODS AND RESULTS
-
During August 1978 NEIC personnel measured wastewater flow, deter-
mined compliance with NPDES permit effluent limitations and character-
ized the wastewater discharged and the water inta~e. Permit compliance
was based on the following effluent limitations, which became effective
July 1, 1977.
OUTFALL 001
Dischar;e Limitations
kg day (lbs/day)
Daily Average Daily Maximum
Paramter
Flow m3/day
BODs May-Oct
Nov-Apr
NA
2,270 (5,000)
3,860 (8,500)
1,270 (2,800)
4,540 (10,000)
7,720 (17,000)
1,500 (3,300)
680 (1,500)
104,000 (228,000)
200
512
NA
TSS
TOC May-Oct
Nov-Apr
TKN .
NH3-N
Chlorides
Fecal Coliforms/100 ml
Threshold Odor No.
Temperature C (OF)
pH
Range 6-9
NA
5,000 (11,000)
8,600 (19,000)
1,910 (4,200)
10,000 (22,000)
17,250 (38,000)
3,000 (6,600)
1,360 (3,000)
136,000 (300,000)
400
1,024
43.3 (110)

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16
OUTFALLS 002, 003, 004, 005 and 008
Parameter
Discharge Limitations (Net)
kg/day (lbs/day) Other Units
Daily Avg. Daily Max. Daily Avg. Daily Max.
TOC
TKN
NH3-N
Chlorides
Phenolics
Threshold Odor No.
Temperature C (OF)
Sulfi des
(O.F. 005 only)
pH
NA
NA
NA
137,000 (302,000
30 (70)
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA :!
182,000 (400,000)
82 (180)
NA
NA
NA
4 mg/l
0.5 mg/l
0.2 mg/l
NA
NA
128
NA
NA
12 mg/l
1. 5 mg/l
0.6 mg/l
NA
NA
256
43.3 (110)
NA
NA
NA
Range 6-9a
a For Outfalls 002, 003, 004. and 005, deviations from the pH range 6-9
which (1) do not exceed 15 minutes for any single instances, (2) do not
exceed a total of 30 minutes in any calendar day, (3) do not exceed a
total of 10 hours in any calendar month, and (4) are within the pH range
of 4.0-10.5 units, are not considered violations of this permit.
The permit requires that toxicity be monitored by quarterly bioassays.
The above limitations, except for temperature, pH, sulfides and
fecal coliform organisms are based on 24-hour composite samples. Sulfide,
fecal coliform organisms and pH are .based on grab samples. Temperature
is to be measured in the effluent stream.
FLOW MEASUREMENTS
j
The NPDES permit requires that cooling water flows be determined
from quarterly water meter balances and that the WWTF discharge be con-
tinuously measured and recorded. Company personnel determine relative
percent of water meter flow being discharged through each cooling water
outfall using the lithium chloride dilution technique. Instantaneous
cooling water discharge rates are measured quarterly. NEIC p~rsonnel

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17
measured the flow through each cooling water outfall August 9, 1978 using
the lithium chloride dilution technique [Appendix B]. Results [Table 1]
show a total instantaneous cooling water discharge of 974,000 m3/day (257 mgd).
Average recorded water intake for this date was reported as 883,000 m3/day
(233 mgd), 9% less than the measured value. Company" data for these outfalls
[Table 1] show a total discharge of 883,000 m3/day (220 mgd), 14% less than
measured by NEIC.
~
Observations of Company procedures showed them to be similar to NEIC
procedures. The major difference observed was that, during the test, the
volume of lithium chloride discharged from the Company's injection pump
did not remain constant. Company personnel average the initial and fi~al
lithium chloride injection rates to determine flow. Unless the injection
rate varies linearly during the test period, the procedure will result
in erroneous flow calculations.
The WWTF discharge (Outfall 001) flow-meter is monitored with a
Marsh McBirney Model 250 meter. This flow-meter was checked by NEIC
using lithium chl~ride. Results are tabulated below:
  NEIC Company 
Date Time Lithium Chloride Flow Meter Flow
(August) (Approx.) m3/day mgd m3/day mgd
9 1145 27,600 7.3 22,700 6.0
16 1825 17,800 4.7 30,700 8.1
19 0950 18,900 5.0 29,900 7.9
19 1110 18,900 5.0 29,900 7.9
" 19 1230 18,900 5.0 31,800 8.4
 Avg. 20,400 5.4 29,000 7.7

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18
  Table 1  
 COOLING WATER FlOWSa  
 UNION CARBIDE INSTITUTE ;I 
  NEIC Company 
Outfall No. m3/day mgd m3/day mgd
002 216,000 57 160,410 42.4
003 178,000 47 218,050 57.6
004 22,300 5.9 36,710 9.7
005 553,000 146 411,810 109
008 4,500 1.2 5,680 1.5
Total 974,000 257 833,000 220
a Flows were measured using lithium chloride. NEIC data
for 8/9/78 and company data 7/29/78 (Outfalls, 002, 003,
004 and OQ5) and 8/4/78 (Outfall 008).

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19
During a power outage August 18) the flow-meter was registering
approximately 9460 m3/day (2.5 mgd). However no wastewater was being
discharged. This discrepancy was reported to Company personnel.
Based on Marsh McBirney chart readings) the flows average 28)000)
29)500 and 29)100 m3/day (7.4) 7.8 and 7.7 mgd)) respectively) August
16) 17 and 18) 1978. These values show that) during the survey) the
flow remained fairly constant.* The average of tpe five instantaneous
lithium chloride dilution measurement noted above show a flow of
20,400 m3/day (5.4 mgd), compared to an average meter reading of
29,000 m3/day (7.7 mgd).
Company personnel can also measure process wastewater from the
in-plant collection sump (orifice plates), influent to WWTF (venturi
meter) and the effluent from aeration-basins (weirs). After the above
discrepancy was reported) the flow values for these measuring monitoring
points were compared and none agreed.
As previously noted, Company personnel have only been reporting
Outfall 001 analytical data on DMRs and not flow values as required
by the permit. Data submitted to the State however) show average
monthly flow values for October 1977 through July 1978 ranging from
17,000 to 21,200 m3/day (4.5 to 5.6 -mgd). Based on these results) a
conservative flow of 19,000 m3/day (5 mgd) was used by NEIC to determine -
compliance with NDPES limitations.
Sampling
Sampling was performed by NEIC at Union Carbide Institute August
15 to 18, 1978. Samples ~ere collected from the river intake, cooling
water discharges (Outfalls 002, 003, 004, 005 and 008) [Figure 2] and
* According to Company personnel, wastewater from the equalization basin
is discharged into the aeration basins at a constant rate.

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20
WWTF influent and effluent (Outfall 001) [Figure 1J. Sample aliquots
were manually collected from the cooling water discharges and river
intake every two hours and continually composited on a time-weighted
basis, except for volatile organics. Volatile organic samples were
collected three* times per day. The influent to the WWTF was manually
sampled hourly and continually composited on a time-weighted basis.
Grab samples were collected three times each day for volatile organic
and direct aqueous injection analysis. The WWTF ~ffluent was also
manually sampled hourly and continually composited on a flow-weighted
basis for all parameters, except for volatile organics, direct aqueous
injection and fecal coliform analyses. Three grab samples were collec-
ted daily for these parameters. Samples were collected ~ver the period
7 a.m. to 7 a.m. which corresponds to the production day at Union
Carbide Institute. The parameters monitored. and the sample type of
each station are shown in Table 2. Chain-of-custody procedures [Appen-
dix C] were followed for the collection of the samples and for labora-
tory analyses. All samples were analyzed by procedures discussed in
Appendices 0, E and F.
Flow-through bioassays were conducted August 15 to 19, 1978 on
the WWTF effluent [Appendix G]. The effluent wastewater was contin-
ually composited on a equal-volume basis. During collection, .the
wastewaters for bioassay were not preserved or iced. Dilution water
. was obtained from the ~anawha River at a point approximately 3 km
(2 miles) upstream of the mouth of the Elk River.
*
Four volatile organic samples were collected on the first day of the
survey from Outfall 005.

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Table 2
DESCRIPTION OF MONITORING STATIONS
UNION CARBIDE INSTITUTE
21
Stationa Description Type of Sample
29 Influent to WWTF 24-hour composite
  Grab 
30 Effluent from WWTF 24-hour composite
 (Outfall 001)  
  Grab 
32
33
34
35
36
37
Cooling Water 24-hour composite
(Outfall 002)  
 Grab 
Cooling Water 24-hour composite
(Outfall 003)  
 Grab 
Cooling Water 24-hour composite
(Out fa 11 004)  
 Grab 
Cooling Water 24-hour composite
(Outfall 005)  
 Grab 
Cooling Water 24-hour composite
(Outfall 006)  
 Grab 
Water Intake 24-hour composite
 Grab 
b
Parameter
chlorides; TOC; NH3; TKN;
organics
volatile organicsC; direct
aqueous injectionc
BOD; TS5, chloride; TOC;
NH3; TKN; metals; shenol;
organics; mutagens
volatile organics; direct
aqueous iBjections; fecal
coliforms
TOC; NH3; TKN; organics
volatile organics
TOC, NH3; TKN; organics
Volatile organics
TOC; NH3; fKN; organics
Volatile organics
TOC; NH3; TKN; organics
Volatile organics
TOC; NH3; TKN; organics
Volatile organics
TOC; NH3; TKN; organics
Volatile organics
a Figures 1 and 2 show station location.
b Temperature and pH were measured periodically at all stations.
c Grab samples collected three time each day for this parameter, except
for voaltile organics at Outfall 005 which was collected four times
on the first day of sampling.
d Mutagen samples were collected twice during the survey. Only one of
the mutagen samples was analyzed.

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22
Plant production* for the week prior to and during the survey
are summarized below.
Date(s)
(August)
Total Plant Operating Rate
(% of Capacity)
6-12
15
16
" 17
47.49%
49.10%
50.20%
51.76%
~
Units reported down during this
time period were:
6-12
15
16
Methyl Chloride
SEVIN
Methyl Chloride
and MIC
Following is a discussion of sampling results by individual outfalls.
Outfall 001 (Station 30)
Outfall 001, a submerged discharge~ contains the effluent from
the activated sludge wastewater treatment facility (WWTF). The WWTF
treats all process wastewaters and leachate from the Goff Mountain
Chemical Landfill. Influent and effluent samples were" collected respec-
tively at the splitter box just upstream of the primary clarifiers
and from the last manhole on the discharge line.
Results [Table 3] show that the WWTF influent contained an average
of 18,000, 700, 48 and 25,000 kg/day respectively, of TOC, TKN, NH3,
and chloride. The final effluent contained an average of 1,600 kg/day
* Actual production figures are considered confidential by Company
personnel. Percentage figures were provided by the Company.

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23
   Table 3  
 SUMMARY OF FIELD MEASUREMENTS AND ANALYTICAL DATA 
   UNION CARBIDE INSTITUTE  
 Parameters (August) 16 17 18 Average
   Station 29  
   I nfl uent to WWTF  
    ~ 
Flowa     
-     
m3/day x 103  19.0 19.0 19.0 19.0
mgd  5.0 5.0 5.0 5.0
Temperature C Range 39-44 38-43 39-46 
pH Range  3.9-12.2 3.5-10.5 1. 5-10. 8 
TOC      
mg/l  500 740 1)600 950
kg/day  9)500 14,000 30,000 18,000
19/day  21,000 31,000 67,000 40,000
TKN      
mg/l  16 59 .37 37
kg/day  300 1)100 700 700
lb/day  670 2)500 1)500 1)600
NH3-N     
mg/l  1.0 5.3 1.3 2.5
kg/day  19 100 25 48
lb/day  42 220 54 110
Chloride     
mg/l  850 1,100 2,000 1,300
kg/day  16,000 21,000 38,000 25,000
lb/day  35,000 46,000 83)000 55,000
a Conservative estimate based on effluent flows measured with lithium
 chloride dilution techniques.   

-------
24
TOC, 270 kg/day TKN, 150 kg/day NH3 and 23,000 kg/day chloride [Table 4].
These data show that the WWTF removed 91% of the TOC, 61% of the TKN
and 8% of the chloride. The amount of NH3 discharged was more than 3
times that contained in the influent.
Daily maximum discharges of BOD, TSS, TOC, TKN, NH3 and chloride
were only 5, 31, 18, 10, 14 and 17% respectively, of NPDES limitations.
As previously noted, compliance was based on a conservative flow of
19,000 m3/day. However, if the WWTF had been operated at a design
flow* of 24,600 m3/day (6.5 mgd), the discharge would still have met
permit limitations.
Composite samples were also analyzed for metals (Zn, Al, Ni, Sn,
As, Cd, Cr and Cu) [Appendix D]. With the exception of zinc and alumi-
num, the concentrations were below detectable limits. Zinc concentrations
ranged from 0.03 to 0.06 mg/l and aluminum from 0.4 to 1.0 mg/l.
DMR data for August to October 1978 show that the TSS maximum
limitation was violated on two different days [Appendix.A]. The re-
ported DMR data are generally higher than those obtained during the
survey.
Bacteriological analyses [Appendix E] show that, during the survey,
the WWTf effluent contained fecal coliform bacteria densities ranging
from 5 to 33/100 ml (geometric mean of 19/100 ml) which is well within
NPDES permit limitations (daily average 200/100 ml; daily maximum
400/100 ml).
Analyses
one composite
Mutagenicity!
for mutagenic activity [Appendix F] were performed on
sample from Outfall 001. The Ames Bacterial Assay for
was performed on sample concentrates using the agar
* Observations and instantaneous lithium chloride flow checks show
that the plant was operating at less than design flow.

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        25
     Table 4   
 SUMMARY OF FIELD MEASUREMENTS AND ANALYTICAL DATA
    UNION CARBIDE INSTITUTE   
 Parameters (August) 16 17  18 Average
    Station 30   
  WWTF Discharge (Outfall 001)   
 a       
Flow       
m3/day x 103   19.0 19.0  19.0 19.0
mgd   5.0 5.0 !i 5.0 5.0
Temperature C Range 29-32 27-31  28-31 
pH Range   6.3-8.5 5.6-7.8  6.0-7.4 
BOD        
mg/l   9 13  13 12
kg/day   170 250  250 220
lb/day   380 540  540 490
TSS        
mg/l   20 24  32 25
kg/day   380 450  610 480
lb/day   830 1,000  1,300 1,000
TOC        
mg/l   80 80  95 85
kg/day   1,500 1,500  1,800 1,600
lb/day   3,300 3,300  4,000 3,500
TKN        
mg/l   14 15  14 14
kg/day   260 280  260 270
It/day   580 630  580 600
NH3-N       
.mg/l   5.5 9.8  8.4 7.9
kg/day   100 190  160 150
lb/day   230 410  350 330
Chloride       
mg/l   1,200 1,200  1,200 1,200
kg/day   23,000 23,000  23,000 23,000
lb/day - 50,000 50,000  50,000 50,000
Phenolic Compounds     
I-Ig/l   29 26  57 37
kg/day   550 490  1,100 710
lb/day   1,200 1,100  2,400 1,600
a Conservative estimate based on results obtained by the 1 ithi urn
 chloride dilution technique.    

-------
26
plate incorporation method [Appendix F]. The standard Ames Test deter-
mines mutagenic activity through use of bacteria as indicator organisms;
this information correlates closely (~90% probability) with inducement
of cancer in laboratory animals by organic compounds.2,s,4 Extrapolation
of this information to higher organisms (such as humans) is warranted
because mutagens may alter genetic material (deoxyribonucleic acid)
in a similar manner in other life forms. If a compounds is mutagenic
in any organism, it should not be exposed to the human population.
Only one molecule of a mutagen is potentially sufficient to cause a
mutation that is also likely to be carcinogenic. Because genetic
repair systems are not completely effective, safe doses of mutagens
and carcinogens cannot be projected.S'6
Acidic and basic sample extracts were prescreened for mutagenic
activity using four standard Salmonella test strains, TA 98, TA 100,
TA 1535 and TA 1537. Samples were first tested individually and then
subjected to metabolic activation by addition of rat liver homogenate.
The sample failed to show evidence of mutageni~ activity when
screened individually with the four Salmonella tester strains. When
the Union Carbide Institute WWTF discharge sample extract was treated
with the rat liver preparation [Appendix F], Salmonella tester strain
TA 98 showed obvious mutagenic activity. The basic extract from this
sample displayed a mutagenic activity ratio* higher than 2.5. Table 5
* The mutagenic activity ratio is a measure of the tester strain
mutation rate compared to control rates. A mutagenic activity
ratio of 2.5 or greater correlates closely (>90% probability) with
inducement of cancer in laboratory animals.2,s,4 If the activity
ratio is 2.5 or greater and a typical dose response relationship can
be demonstrated between the tester stain and increasing concentrations
of sample, the results are considered. posi.tive (i. e., the substance
is a mutagen). The mutagenic activity ratio is defined as (E-C)/c
where E is the average number of mutant colonies per test with the
sample added; C is the corresponding value for the control, and c
is the historical control value of 40 averaged over 100 or more tests.

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Station Number
Description
Samp1ea
. Type
Date-Time
Co 11 ected.
Table 5

MUTAGENIC ACTIVITY OF UNION CARBIDE INSTITUTE DISCHARGE
ON SALMONELLA TESTER STRAIN TA 98
INSTITUTE, WEST VIRGINIA
August 15-21, 1978

b
Volume of Sample
Concentrate Tested
Extract

pH
(111)
Equivalent Volume
of Sample (m1)
No. of Revertant
Colonies Per Plate

Contro1c Experimenta1d
Mutagenic Activity
Ratioe
30 Composite 8/18/78 Base 500 63.3 40 346 7.7
Union Carbide  0608  400 50.7  321 7.0
Institute ~F    300 38.0  339 7.5
Discharge    200 25.3  268 5. 7
    100 12.7  218 4.5
    50 6.3  103 1.6
    25 3.2  56 <1. 0
    10 1.3  39 <1. 0
a Composite Samples - Compositing was hourly for each 24-hour period; date and
time listed is date and time .that period ended.
b Rat-liver homogenate (5-9 mix) added.
c Value based on average of 30 control values.
d Average of 2 plates -
e Mutagenic Activity Ratio = (E-C)/c, where E is the_no. of colonies/experimental
plate, C is the no. of colonies/control plate and c is the historical control
value of 40 averaged over 100 tests.
N
-...J

-------
28
shows the volume of extract tested, the equivalent sample volume and
the resultant mutagenic effect on tester strain TA 98 for the sample
collected on August 18, 1978. Further testing showed a typical dose-
response relationship [Figure 3] between tester strain TA 98 and the
concentrated extract, illustrating an increasing number of revertant
colonies with increasing concentrations of sample. The optimum concen-
tration causing highest reversion rates was 500 ~l (63.3 ml equivalent
volume of sample) causing a mutagenic activity ra~io of 7.7. Volumes
larger than 500 ~l could not be tested because they exceed the limits
of the assay procedures. Acidic sample extracts from the UCI WWTF
discharge did not satisfy the Ames Test requirements for mutagenicity.
Data for test results that did not exhibit elevated reversion rates
(negative mutagenic activity) are not presented in this report.
A flow-through bioassay was conducted on Outfall 001 to determine
whether the wastewater was acutely toxic to fish. Juvenile fathead
minnows (Pimephales promelas Raginesque) averaging 4 cm in length
were used as test organisms [Appendix G]. Results show that the effluent
is acutely toxic. The 96-hour LCso* for this discharge was calculated
to be a mixture of 80.5% effluent in Kanawha River dilution water.
Because of the limited mortality of test fish [Table 6], the confidence
limits for the LCso were not calculated.
Chemical analysis indicate that this effluent contains a complex
mixture of organic [Tables 7, 8, 9] and inorganic compounds [Table 4],
as well as aluminum and zinc. Toxicity to fish could have been due
to the presence of a single chemical component in lethal concentration
or resulted from additive or synergistic effects of two or more chemical
compounds individually present at sub-lethal concentrations. From
the scope of the analysis, the exact cause could not be determined.
* LCso indicates the concentration (actual or interpreted) at which
50% of the test organisms died or would be expected to die.

-------
300
.f/) 
.... 
z 
~ 
... 
(}::. 
UJ 
> 200
UJ 
0::' 
L1.. 
0 
0:: 
UJ 
[I) 
~ 
:J 
Z 100
 ..-
fi
25
.50
EQU (VALENT m I of EFFLUENT
..'Figur'e 3. "Union Carbide Institute Discharge
75
100
M uta 9 en: T est in 9 D 0 ~ eRe s po n s e Cur v e (B as; C Ext r a c: t)
! '.
N
\.0

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Table 6

96-HOUR FLOW-THROUGH SURVIVAL DATA
UNION CARBIDE INSTITUTE ~
August 1978
30
Time Period
% Survival
Effluent Concentration (%)
10 18 32
Control
(Kanawha River Water)
56
75 100
24-hour
48-hour
72-hour
96-hour
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
95
95
95
75
95
70
30
o

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31
Organic data [Tables 7, 8, 9] show that the influent to the WWTF
contained 27 organic compounds with concentrations ranging from 2 to
140,000 ~g/l. Of these, 13 are priority pollutants. Ten additional
compounds were identified; 9 of which could not be confirmed.
The majority of these compounds were effectively removed in the
WWTF. The effluent (Outfall 001), however did contain 0- and p-dichloro--
benzene (5 to 19 ~g/l), N,N-dimethylaniline (3,509 ~g/l), isophorone
(55 ~g/l) and chloroform (10 to 100 ~g/l). Several other compounds -
m-dichlorobenzene, 4-ethylacetophenone, butyloctenal, ethylmethylpyridine,
trimethylisocyanurate, (l-butyloctyl)-benzene and (l-ethyldecyl)-
benzene were identified but either could not be quantified because of
interfering compounds or confirmed because pure standards were unavailable.
Chloroform, 0- and p- dichlorobenzene, isophorone and m-dichlorobenzene
are priority pollutants.
Two samples from Outfall
This compound was detected in
of 26 ~g/l.
001 were also analyzed for carbaryl.
both samples at a maximum concentration
Outfall 002 (Station 32)
The discharge from Outfall 002 contains non-contact cooling water
originating from ethylideneorbornene and vinylnorbornene production,
ethylene glycol recovery, the allethrin unit, acrolein derivatives
production, anhydrous isopropanol recovery, and the LINDE@ System.
Sampling results [Table 10] show that this discharge contained
net concentrations of 12 to 15 mg/l TOC, 0.2 to 1.6 mg/l TKN, and 0
to 0.8 mg/l NH3' These data show that TOC, TKN and NH3 NPDES daily
maximum limitations (12, 1.5 and 0.6 mg/l), respectively, were exceeqed.
The average net TOC, TKN and NH3 concentrations for the three-day
survey were respectively 3.5, 1.8 and 2 times the allowable daily
average permit limitations.

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               32   
        Table 7         
 NEUTRAL EXTRACTABLE ORGANICS SAMPLING DATA       
    Concentration in ~g/l (Gross)       
      UNION CARBIDE INSTITUTE        
               Station 32 
Date Station 29 - Influent to WWTF Station 30 - Outfall 001  Outfall 002
Chemical Name (August) -+ 16  17  18  16 17 18  16  18
Anil i ne    600  N02  NO  NO NO NO  NO  NO 
Biphenyl    NA3 NA  NA  NA NA NA  
-------
   Table 7 (Cont'd.)   
NEUTRAL EXTRACTABLE ORGANICS SAMPLING OATA 
  Concentration in ~g/l (Gross)  
  UNION CARBIOE INSTITUTE  
Oate Station 33 - Outfall 003 Station 34 - Outfall 004
(August) ... 16 17 18 16 17 18
  NO NO NC NC NC NC
  NO NO NO NO NC NC
  NO NO NC NO NO NO
  NO NO NO NO NC NO
  NC NC NC NC NC NC
  NO NO NO NO NO NC
  NO NO NO NO NC NO
  NO NO NO NC NC NC
  NO NO NO NC NC NC
  NO NO NO NC NC NC
  NO NO NO NC NC NC
  NO NO NO NC NC NC
Chemical Name
Ethylmethylpyridine
I-Methyl naphthalene
Methylnitroaniline
Tetrahydromethylnaphthalene
Oihydrotetramethylnaphthalenone
Trimethylisocyanurate
(l-Butylhexyl)-Benzene
(l-Methylnonyl)-Benzene
(l-Butyloctyl)-Benzene
(l-Propylnonyl)-Benzene
(l-Ethyldecyl)-Benzene
(l-Methylundecyl)-Benzene
33
 Station 35 
 Outfall 005 
16 17  18
NC NC  NO
NO NO  NC
NO NC  NO
NC NO  NC
NO NO  NO
NC NO  NC
NO NO  NO
NO NC  NO
NO NO  NO
NO NO  NO
NO NO  NO
NO NO  NC
 Station 37 
Water Intake 
17   18 
NO   NO 
<1   NO 
<1   <1 
1   <1 
<1   NO 
NO   NO 
NO   NO 
NO   NO 
NO   NO 
<1   NO 
NO   NO 
NO   NO 
NO   NO 
2   NO 
NO   NO 
NO   NO 
<1   NO 
NO   NO 
25   <1 
NO   NO 
NO   NO 
NO   NO 
NO   NO 
NO   NO 
NO   NO 
NO   NO 
NO   NO 
NC   NO 
NO   NO 
NO   NO 
NO   NO 
NO   NO 
NO   NO 
NO   NO 
NO   NO 
NO   NO 
Chemi ca 1 Nanl!!
Oate (August)
...
Station 36 - Outfall 008
16 17 18
Anil i ne
Biphenyl
m-Oichlorobenzene1
0- and p-Oichlorobenzenes1
3,4-0ihydro~1(2H)-Naphthalenone
N,N-Oimethylaniline .
2,6-0initrotoluene1
4-Ethylacetophenone
2-Ethyl-1-Hexanol
Isophorone1
N-Methyl anil i ne
2-Methyl-4-0ctanone
2-Methylnaphthalene
Naphthalene1
2-Naphthalenol
p-Nitrotoluene
Phenyl Ether
alpha-Terpineol
1,2,3,4-Tetrahydronaphthalene
l,2,3,4-Tetrahydronaphthalen-l-ol
5,6,7,8-Tetrahydronaphthalen-1-ol
Butyloctenal
Chloronaphthalene
Oinitrotoluene (other than 2,6)
Ethylmethylpyridine
I-Methyl naphthalene
Methylnitroaniline
Tetrahydromethylnaphthalene
Dihydrotetramethylnaphthalenone
Trimethylisocyanurate
(l-Butylhexyl)-Benzene
(l-Methylnonyl)-Benzene
(l-Butyloctyl)-Benzene
(l-Propylnonyl)-Benzene
(l-Ethyldecyl)-Benzene
(l-Methylundecyl)-Benzene
NO
NO
MS
2
6
NO
NO
NO
NO
MS
NO
NO
NO
4
NO
NO
NO
NO
6
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
1
MS
2
11
NO
NO
NO
NO
9
NO
NO
<1
30
87
NO
1
NO
95
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NC
NO
NO
NC
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
<1
MS
3
4
NO
NO
NO
NO
3
NO
NO
NO
3
NO
NO
<1
NO
4
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
NC
NO
NO
NO
NC
NO
Nt)
NO
NO
NO
NO
NO
3.

i
Chemical is a priority pollutant (NRCOVS Train Consent decree June 1976).
NO means not detected by-computerized mass spectrometric data analysis.
NA means not specifically searched for during computerized mass spectrometric data analysis. -
MS means the chemical was identified from its mass spectrum but interferring compounds or difficulties in
correlation to the flame ionization chromatogram prevented quantitation.
"<" -less than- means the chemical was identified and quantitated but the result was below an extimated
detection limit of 1 ~g/l.
NC means the identification was not confirmed by analysis of pure st,ndards on the same instrument.
- 6.

I

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         Table 8         
         VOLATILE ORGANICS DATA        
         UNION CARBIDE INSTITUTE        
      WWTF Discharge Cooling Water Coo 1; ng Water Cooling Water Cooling Water  Cooling Water Water 
   Influent to WWTF Outfall 001 Outfall 002 Outfall 003 Outfall 004  Outfall 005  Outfall 008 Intake 
 (August 1978) 15a 16a 17a ISa 16a 17a 16b  16b 15-17c 15d 15d 16d 17d 16b ~ 
 f       concentration in jJgll ,(Gross)        
 Compound              
Acrolein NDe NO NO NO NO NO NO  NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO 
Benzene 24 270 NO NO NO NO 11  8 NO NO 260 190 43 22 17 
Bromodichloromethane NO NO NO NO NO NO 1  NO NO NO NO 8 NO 11 NO 
Bromoform NO NO NO NO NO NO 4  NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO 
Carbon tetrachloride 24 72 NO NO NO NO 2  2 NO NO 5 42 2 2 1 
Chlorobenzene 2 3 NO NO NO NO NO  NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO 
2-Chloroethylvinyl NO NO NO NO NO NO ND  ND NO ND NO NO ND NO NO 
 ether                 
Ch 1 oroform 66 350 ND 100 71 10 40  31 5 51 91 550 31 110 45 
Chlorodibromomethane ND NO ND NO ND ND ND  NO NO NO NO 2 NO 2 NO 
1,2-Dichloroethane 1 2 NO NO NO ND 5  ND ND NO ND NO NO NO ND 
1,1-Dichloroethene ND NO ND NO ND ND ND  NO NO ND ND ND ND ND NO 
trans-1,2-Dichloro- ND ND NO NO ND NO NO  NO NO ND ND ND ND NO NO 
 ethene                 
1,2-Dichloropropane NO NO ND NO NO ND ND  ND ND ND ND NO NO ND ND 
Ethylbenzene 130 510 ND NO ND ND ND  ND ND NO 8 30 3 ND ND 
Methylene chloride ND 12 5 NO ND ND ND  NO ND NO NO ND NO NO NO 
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloro- ND NO NO NO ND ND ND  NO NO NO ND ND NO ND ND 
 ethane                 
Tetrachloroethene ND ND ND ND ND NO NO  NO NO ND NO ND ND NO ND 
Toluene ND 250 170 NO NO ND 23  27 100 ND 910 350 230 80 49 
1,1,1-Trichloroethane ND 9 ND NO NO ND ND  ND ND NO NO ND ND ND ND 
1,1,2-Trichloroethane ND NO' NO ND ND ND NO  NO ND NO ND ND ND ND ND 
Trichloroethene ND ND ND ND ND ND ND  NO ND ND ND ND ND ND ND 
Vinyl chloride ND NO ND ND ND ND ND  ND ND NO ND NO ND ND ND 
a Equal volume composite of three grab samples.            
b Single grab, grab samples collected on August 15 and 17 not analyzed.         
c Equal volume composite of 2 grab samples, one collected on Aug 15 and the other        
 August 17.                 
d Single grab sample.                 
e ND - none detected. Detection limit 1 jJg/l for all components except acrolein,        
 which has a detection limit of 50 jJg/l.             
f All chemicals listed are priority pollutants.            
                   w
                   4':>

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       Table 9       
     DIRECT AQUEOUS INJECTION ORGANIC DATA      
  /    UNION CARBIDE INSTITUTE      
   ./          
  V   .          
Station Oatea acetone methyl ethyl-  acryloni- styrene i sopro- diethyl isobutro- n-butanol 1-chloro- ethanol 4-methyl-.2- cellosolve
Description (August)  ketone trile  panol ketone nitrile  butane   pentene-2-one acetate
I nfl uent to 16 NOd NO NO  ND 2l0b NO NO ND ND  NO 100 NO
Ww'T F 17 15c NO NO  ND 330 NO ND NDc ND ,. NO 36 NO
 18 17 ND NO  NO 180b,c ND ND 25 ND  NO NO ~D
Ww'TF Discharge 16 NO NO ND  NO NO NO ND NO ND  NO NO NO
(Outfall 001) 17 NO NO NO  NO NO NO ND NO NO  NO NO NO
 18 NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO  NO NO NO
a Equal volume composite of three grab samples.
b Value exceeded the known linear range for this
of the sample was not analyzed.
c Value represents an average of two replicates.
d Not detected. .
parameter. A diluted aliquot
w
(J1

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     Table 10       
   SUMMARY OF FIELD MEASUREMENTS AND ANALYTICAL DATA     
   UNION CARBIDE INSTITUTE COOLING WATER OUTFALLS     
Station Station Date Flow  Temperature Range TOC (mg/l) TKN (mg/l) NH3-N (mg/l)
No. Description (August) m3 / dayx103 mgd Range DC pH Gross Net Gross Net Gross Net
32 Outfall 002 16 196 52 28-29 6.1-7.4 19 12 1.6 1.6 0.5 0.5
  17 171 45 28-29 5.9-7.3 20 15 1.4 1.0 0.8 0.8
  18 183 48 29-31 5.5-9.2 19 15 0.6 0.2 <0.2 0
  Avg. 183 48   19 14 1.2 0.9 0.4 0.4
33 Outfall 003 16 162 43 30-31 6.7-8.4 8 1 0.7 0.7 <0.2 0
  17 141 37 30-31 6.3-8.2 6 1 0.6 0.2 <0.2 0
  18 151 40 31-33 6.6-8.1 6 2 0.6 0.2 <0.2 0
  Avg. 151 40   7 1 0.6 0.4 <0.2 0
34 Outfall 004 16 20 5.4 29-32 7.2-7.8 7 0 1.1 1.1 <0.2 0
  17 18 4.7 28-31 6.6-7.5 12 7 0.9 0.5 <0.2 0
  18 19 5.0 30-36 7.0-7.8 4 0 0.4 0 <0.2 0
  Avg. 19 5.0   8 2 0.8 0.5 <0.2 0
35 Outfall 005 16 502 132 29-31 6.6-8.8 8 1 0.6 0.6 <0.2 0
  17 437 115 30-31 6.6-8.3 8 3 0.4 0 <0.2 0
  18 467 123 31-31 6.6-10.0 6 2 0.5 0.1 <0.2 0
  Avg. 468 123   7 2 0.5 0.2 <0.2 0
36 Outfall 008 16 4.4 1.2 35-49 4.4-7.8 6 0 0.4 0.4 <0.2 0
  17 3.8 1.0 38-41 6.2-7.8 6 1 0.3 0 <0.2 0
  18 4.1 1.1 32-47 6.6-7.8 8 4 0.4 0 <0.2 0
  Avg. 4.1 1.1   7 2 0.4 0.1 <0.2 0
37 Water Intake 16 883 233 25-30 6.5-7.7 7  <0.2 1.: <0.2 
  17 769 203 25-27 6.7-7.5 5  0.4  <0.2 
  18 823 217 25-27 6.8-7.5 .4  0.4  <0.2 
  Avg. 825 218   5  0.3  <0.2 
W
0"1

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37
DMR data for October 1977 through March 1978 [Appendix A] show
that this outfall exceeded NPDES permit maximum TOC limitations by
25% in December. In addition, UCI reported two pH violations.
Numerous organic compounds were observed in Outfall 002 neutral
extractable analyses.. Seven compounds [Table 7] were identified,
confirmed and quantified with concentrations ranging from <1 to 710 ~g/l. -
Two additional organic chemical (m-dichlorobenzene and 3,4-dihydro-1(2H)-
naphthalenone) were identified and confirmed but interfering compounds
or difficulty in chromatographic correlation prevented quantification.
Five other chemical compounds were identified but could not be confirmed.
Of the 9 organic chemicals confirmed 5 (m-dichlorobenzene, 0- and
p-dichlorobenzene, 2,6-dinitrotoluene, isophorone and naphthalene)
are priority pollutants.
Volatile organic analyses [Table 8] showed that this discharge
contained benzene (11 ~g/l), bromodichloromethane (1 ~g/l), bromoform
. (4 ~g/l), carbon tetrachloride (2 ~g/l), chloroform (40 ~g/l), 1,2-di-
chloroethane (5 ~g/l) and toluene (23 ~g/l). Benzene and chloroform
concentrations (17 and 45 ~g/l), respectively, were higher in the
intake water than in the discharge. This is probably due to recycling
Outfall 005 wastewater back into the water intake (see discussion of
Outfall 005). These volatile compounds are priority pollutants.
Outfall 003 (Station 33)
This outfall contains cooling water from the No.1 Boilerhouse
and from polyol, butanol, ethylbutyraldehyde, acetone, mixed ketones,
crude naphthol, isophorone, methyl chloride and catalyst production.
The maximum net TOC and TKN concentrations in the cooling water
discharged through Outfall 003 were 2 and 0.7 mg/l respectively, 17
and 47% of the NPDES permit limitations. Net NHa concentrations for

-------
38
the three-day survey were zero. These data are lower than those report-
ed in UCI self-monitoring data with monthly maximum values ranging
from 3 to 21 mg/l TOC, 0.09 to 1.46 mg/l TKN and 0 to 0.2 mg/l NH3
[Appendix A, Table 5].
Outfall 003 neutral extractable organics data [Table 7] show
that this discharge contained biphenyl, 0- and p-dichlorobenzene,
3,4-dihydro-1(2H)-naphthalenone, N,N-dimethylaniline, 4-ethylaceto-
phenone, isophorone, 2-methyl-4-octanone, naphthalene, phenyl ether
and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene at concentrations ranging from <1
to 95 J.Jg/l. In addition, m-dichlorobenzene and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol
were identified and confirmed but could not be quantified. Butyloc-
tenal, methyl ethyl pyridine , methylnitroaniline, and dihydrotetramethyl-
naphthalenone were identified but could not be confirmed. Of these
16 organic compounds, 4 (m-dichlorobenzene, 0- and p~dichlorobenzene,
isophoroneand naphthalene) are priority pollutants.
VOA data [Table 8J show that this outfall also contained benzene
(8 J.Jg/l) , carbon tetrachloride (2 J.Jg/l), chloroform (31 J.Jg/l) and
toluene (27 J.Jg/l). All of these compounds are priority pollutants.
Except for carbon tetrachloride, the concentrations of these compounds
were higher in the intake water than in the discharge. The intake,
however, is located downstream of Outfall 005. Outfall 005 concentra-
tions were much higher than the intake indicating recycling of waste-
water. (See discussion for Outfall 005.)
Outfall 004 (Station 34)
This outfall reportedly contains cooling water from olefins,
cellosize, butanol and ethylbutyraldehyde production.
Sampling results [Table 10] show that this discharge meets NPDES
limitations. The maxium net TOC concentration during the survey,

-------
39
7 mg/l, was only 58% of the limitation (12 mg/l). The average net
TKN concentration of 0.5 mg/l was the same as the permit limit. October
1977 through March 1978 DMR self-monitoring data [Appendix A, Table 6]
show that TOC, TKN and NH3 daily maximum limitations were violated 5,
1, and 1 months respectively.
Fourteen organic compounds were identified and confirmed by neu-
tral extractable organic analysis. All except one were quantified
with concentrations ranging from <1 to 300 ~g/l. ~In addition, 13
other organic compounds were identified but could not be confirmed
because pure standards were unavailable. Of these 27 compounds,
m-dichlorobenzene, 0- and p-dichlorobenzene, isophorone and naphthalene
are priority pollutants.
Volatile organic samples contained chloroform and toluene at 5
and 100 ~g/l respectively. The intake water contained chloroform at
a higher concentration (45 ~g/l) than the discharge (5 ~g/l). Again,
this is probably due to the discharge from Outfall 005 which is located
upstream of the water intake. (See Outfall 005 discussion.) These
two compounds are also priority pollutants.
Outfall 005 (Station 35)
Cooling water from SEVIN@ (including synthetic gas unit, tetralone
production, I-naphthol refining, phosgene processing, napthychloroformate
production, methyl isocyanate production and SEVIN@ processes), alkyl
benzene, toluene diisocyanate, toluene diamine, POLYOX@ UCARE@ polymer
Jr, and rigid polyols production is discharged into the Kanawha River
through submerged Outfall 005.
During the survey, this discharge contained maximum net TOC, TKN
and NH3 concentrations of 3,0.6 and 0 mg/l, respectively [Table 10].
DMR data October 1977 through March.1978 were higher with maximum

-------
40
daily TOC, TKN and NH3 NPDES permit limitations being violated 3, 1
and 2 months respectively.
Twenty-one organic compounds were identified in this discharge
by neutral extractable organic analysis [Table 7]. Of the 21 com-
pounds, 9 could not be confirmed and one, although confirmed, could
not be quantified due to either interfering compounds or difficulties
in correlation to the flame ionization chromatogram. The other eleven
compounds were present in concentrations ranging from 2 to 950 ~g/l.
Four of the compounds (m-dichlorobenzene, 0- and p-dichlorobenzene,
2,6-dinitrotoluene and naphthalene) are priority pollutants.
VOA analysis [Table 8] showed this discharge contained the prior-
ity pollutants benzene (43 to 260~g/1), bromodichloromethane (8 ~g/l),
carbon tetrachloride (2 to 42 ~g/l), chloroform (31 to 550 ~g/l),
chlorodibromomethane (2 ~g/l), ethyl benzene (3 to 30 ~g/l) and toluene
(230 to 910 ~g/l).
On August 15, Company officials reported a chloroform spill into
Outfall 005 cooling water.* VOA data show that chloroform which was
detected in the first sample at 51 ~g/l, increased to 550 ~g/l and
then decreased to 31 ~g/l.
Outfall 005 discharges wastewater upstream of the water intake.
The volatile organic data [Table 8] show that wastewater from this
outfall is being recycled back into the cooling water. For example,
550 ~g/l of chloroform was discharged through this outfall August 16,
1978 which resulted in an intake water concentration of 45 ~g/l.
Toluene results are similar with discharge and intake concentrations
of 350 and 49 ~g/l, respectively.
* Company personnel did not identify the source of the spill.

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41
Outfall 008 (Station 36)
Cooling water from Boilerhouse No.2 is discharged through Outfall
008 into Goff Branch, a tributary to the Kanawha River. During the
survey, TOC, TKN and NH3 concentrations ranged from 6 to 8, 0.3 to
0.4 and <0.2* mg/l respectively. These concentrations are similar to
those observed in the intake water (4 to 7 mg/l TOC, <0.2 to 0.4 mg/l
TKN, and <0.2* mg/l NH3). DMR data from October 1977 through March
~
1978 show significantly higher concentrations. Maximum Toe concentra-
tions ranged from 3 to 101 mg/l, TKN from 0.2 to 1.85, and NH3 0.04
to 0.27 mg/l. TOC permit limitations were in violation in February
and March and TKN limitations in February [Appendix A].
Neutral extractable organic data [Table 7] show that the Outfall
008 discharge contained 9 compounds with concentrations ranging from
<1 to 87 ~g/l. Four additional compounds were identified. Of these
4, 1 was confirmed but could not be quantified. The other 3 could
not be confirmed due to unavailability of pure standards. Four of
the 9 neutral organic. compounds are priority pollutants.
VOA data [Table 8] show that the cooling water discharged through
Outfall 008 contained 6 compounds, all of which are priority pollutants.
Concentrations ranged from 2 to 110 ~g/l. All of these compounds
were identified in the Outfall 005 discharge and four were also identi-
fied in the water intake. As this outfall only contains boilerhouse
cooling water, the organics are probably a direct result of Outfall
005 wastewater being recycled back into the water intake.
On August 9, NEIC personnel observed a brownish, turbid discharge
from Outfall 008. Company personnel immediately investigated the
problem and determined that a control valve on the #1 hot line water
softener malfunctioned, causing an overflow of lime mud. As the ash
* All values were the same.

-------
42
system was temporarily out of service, the lime mud was discharged
into the cooling water instead of the ash bin. Company personnel
repaired the control value and put the ash system back into service.
Water Intake (Station 37)
Approximately 720,000 m3/day (190 mgd) of Kanawha River water
~
are used for cooling and process water at the UCI"plant. Sample data
[Table 10] showed that the intake contained small TOC and TKN concen-
trations (average 5 and 0.3 mg/l, respectively). The intake also
contained 10 neutral extractable organic compounds ranging in concen-
trations from <1 to 25 ~g/l [Table 7]'0 VOA analyses. identified 4
compounds with concentrations of 1 to 49 ~g/l. Of these 14 organic
compounds identified by neutral organic and VOA analyses, 8 are prior-
ity pollutants.
As previously noted, the water intake is downstream from the
Outfall 005 discharge. VOA data [Table 8] show that Outfall 005 waste-
water is being recycled back into the cooling water through the water
intake. Outfall 005 wastewater contained very high concentrations of
benzene, chloroform and toluene (260, 550 and 910 ~g/l, respectively).
Water intake concentrations for these compounds were also high (17 ~g/l
benzene, 45 ~g/l chloroform and 49 ~g/l toluene) undoubtedly due to
recycling of Outfall 005 wastewater. The intake concentrations of
these compounds were higher than those observed in cooling water Out-
falls 002, 003 and 004.
TOXICITY EVALUATION
A total of 53 organic compounds were identified in the UCI samples.
Fifteen of these 53 compounds could not be confirmed by GC/MS. The
53 compounds were searched in the Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical

-------
43
Substances (RTECS)* and the Toxline** database to obtain health effects
data [Appendix H].
THE RTECS search yielded toxicity information on 34 of the 53
compounds. The Toxline search located 686 references to human health
effects from 35 of 38 confirmed compounds. Information on each compound
is summarized in Table 11. Seventeen of the 34 compounds identified
in RTECS are listed as priority pollutants. ~
Of the 53 organic compounds, 49 were being discharged to the
Kanawha River in concentrations ranging from <1 to 140,000 ~g/l. The
other four compounds were identified in the influent to the WWTF.
The information presented in Table 11 shows that 23 compounds have
demonstrated human effects associated with them. The hazards of injec-
ting minute quantities of these organic pollutants in drinking water
overlong periods of time are difficult to evaluate. From the stand-
point of adverse health effects, 4 of the compounds are known carcino-
gens, benzene to humans, and carbaryl, carbon tetrachloride and chloro-
form to animals.
* This Registry is compiled annually by the National Institute for
Occupational Safety and Health.
** Toxline is a computerized bibliographic retrieval system for toxi-
cology.

-------
Table 11
TOXICITY OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS
UNION CARBIDE INSTITUTE
Compound Name
Molecular
Formula
Chemical
Abstracts Route of
Service No. Aquatic Toxicitya Entry
Species
Other Toxicity Datab
Type or
Dose
Duration
Effectse
Acetone
C3H6HO
Exposur~
Limits
alpha-Terpineol
C1oH1SO
C6H7N
Aniline
67-64-1
98-55-5
62-53-3
TLm 96:0ver .1000
ppm
TLm96: 100-10 ppm
Oral-human
Inhalation-human
Inhalation-man
Oral-rat
Inhalation-rat
Inhalation-mouse
Intraperitoneal-mouse
Oral-dog
Intraperitoneal-dog
Subcutaneous-dog
Oral-rabbit
Skin-rabbit.
Subcutaneous-guinea pig
Intramuscular-mouse
Oral-human
Unknown-human
Oral-rat
Inhalation-rat
Skin-rat
Intraperitoneal-rat
Ora l-mouse
Intraperitoneal-mouse.
Subcutaneous-mouse
Unknown-mouse
Oral-cat
Inhalation-cat
Skin-cat
Intraperitoneal-rabbit
Subcutaneous-rabbit
Skin-rabbit
Skin-guinea pig
Skin-guinea pig
LDLo: 50 mg/kg
TCLo: 500 ppm
TCLo: 12,000 ppm

LD50: 9,750 mg/kg
LCLo: 64,000 ppm
LCLo: 110,000 mg/m3
LD50: 1,297 mg/kg
LDLo: 24 g/kg
LDLo: 8 g/kg
LDLo: 5 g/kg
LD50: 5,300 mg/kg
LD50: 20 gm/kg
LDLo: 5,000 mg/kg
LD50: 2,000 mg/kg

LDLo: 50 mg/kg
LDLo: 357 mg/kg
LlJ50: 440 mg/kg
LCLo: 250 ppm
LD50: 1,400 mg/kg
LD50: 1,400 mg/kg
LD50: 464 mg/kg
LD50: 492 mg/kg
LDLo: 480 mg/kg
LD50: 572 mg/kg
LDLo: 1,750 mg/kg
LCLo: 180 ppm
LD50: 254 mg/kg
LDLo: 200 mg/kg
LDLo: 1,000 mg/kg
LD50: 820 mg/kg
LDLo: 1,750 mg/kg
LD50: 1,290 mg/kg
4H
4H
62M
4H
8H
...-
Eye
Central Nerv.
System
OSHA
std (air):
TWA 1000 ppm
OSHA std (air):
TWA 5 ppm (skin)
~
~

-------
     Table 11 (Cont'd.)     
     TOXICITY OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS     
     UNION CARBIDE INSTITUTE     
  Chemi ca 1   Other Toxicity Datab   
Compound Name Molecular Abstracts Aquatic Toxicitya Route of  Type of  Effectse Exposur~
 Formula Service No. Entry Speci es  Dose Duration li mi ts
Anil ine ,N ,N- CsHuN 121-69-7   Oral-human  LDLo: 50 mg/kg   OSHA std (air):
dimethyl-     Oral-rat  LDLO: 1,410 mg/kg   TWA 5ppm (skin)
     Skin-rabbit  LD50: 1,770 mg/kg   
Aniline,N-methyl- C7HgN 100-61-8   Intravenous-cat LDLo: 24 mg/kg   OSHA std (air):
     Oral-rabbit  LDLo: 280 mg/kg   TWA 2ppm (skin)
     Intravenous-rabbit LDLo: 24 mg/kg   
     Oral-guinea pig LDLo: 1,200 mg/kg   
     Subcutaneous-guinea pig LDLo: 1,200 mg/kg   
Benzene C6H6 71-43-2d TLm96:100-10ppm Oral-human  LDLo:50 mg/kg   OSHA std (air):
     Inhalation-human LDLo:20,OOO ppm 5M  TWA 10 ppm;
     Inhalation-human TCLo:210 ppm  Blood Cl 25
     Inhalation-man TCLo:2,lOO mg/m3 4YI Carcino- Pk 50/10M/8H
          genic 
     Oral-rat  LD50:3,800 mg/kg   
     Inhalation-rat LC50:10,OOO ppm 7H  
     Intraperitoneal-rat LDLo: 1,150 mg/kg ,   
     Oral-mouse  LD50:4,700 mg/kg   
     Inhalation-mouse LC50:9,980 ppm   
     Ski n-mouse  TDLo:l,200 gm/kg 49WI Neoplas. 
          tic 
     Intraperitoneal-mouse LD50:468 mg/kg   
     Subcutaneous-mouse TDLo:2,700 mg/kg 130 Terato- 
         (preg) genic 
     Oral-dog  LDLo:2,OOO mg/kg   
     Inhalation-dog LCLo:146,OOO mg/m3   
     Inhalation-cat LCLo:170,OOO mg/m3   
     Intraperitoneal-guinea pig LDLo:527 mg/kg "'-  
     Subcutaneous-frog LDLo:l,400 mg/kg  
     Inhalation-mammal LCLo:20,OOO ppm 5M  
Benzene, Chloro- C6HsCl d  Oral-rat  LD50:2,910 mg/kg   OSHA std (air):
108-90-7 TLm96:100-lppm   
     Subcutaneous-rat LDLo:4,OOO mg/kg   TWA 75 ppm
     Oral-rabbit  LD50:2,830 mg/kg   
     Intraperitoneal-rat LDLo:7,400 mg/kg   
     Intraperitoneal-guinea pig LDLo:4,lOO mg/kg   
Benzene,o-dichloro- C6H4C12 95-50-ld   Oral-human  LDLo: 500 mg/kg   TLV (air):
           50 ppm
     Oral-rat  LD50: 500 mg/kg   OSHA std (air):~
     Inhalation-rat LCLo: 821 ppm 7H 
     Intravenous-mouse LDLo: 400 mg/kg   Cl 50 ppm
     Oral-rabbit  LD50: 500 mg/kg   
     Intravenous-rabbit LOLo: 250 mg/kg   
     Oral-guinea pig LDLo: 2,000 mg/kg   
     Inhalation-guinea pig LCLo: 800 ppm 24H  

-------
Table 11 (Cont'd.)
TOXICITY OF ORGANIC COMPOUNOS
UNION CARBIOE INSTITUTE
  Chemical    Other Toxicity Oatab     
Compound Name Molecular Abstracts  Route of  Type of    Exposur~ 
 Formula Service No. Aquatic Toxicitya Entry Speci es  Oose Ouration Effectse limits 
Benzene,p-dichloro- C6H4C12 106-46-7d  Oral-human  LOLc: 500 mg/kg    TLV (air): 
    Oral-human  TOLo: 300 mg/kg  Systemic 75 ppm 
    Oral-rat  L050: 500 mg/kg    OSHA std (air): 
    Intraperitoneal-rat L050: 2,562 mg/kg    TWA 75 ppm 
    Oral-mouse  L050: 2,950 mg/kg     
    Oral-guinea pig LOLo: 2,800 mg/kg     
Benzene, Ethyl- CSH10 d  Inhalation-human TCLo:100 ppm 8H Irritant 0 SHA s td (a i r): 
100-41-4 TLm96:100-10 ppm 
    Oral-rat  L050:3,500 mg/kg    TWA 100 ppm (skin)
    Inhalation-rat LCLo:4,000 ppm 4H    
    Ski n- rabbi t  L050:5,000 mg/kg     
    Inhalation-guinea pig LCLo:10,000 ppm     
Biphenyl C12H1o 92-52-4  Inhalation-human TOLo 4,400 ~g/m3  Irritant TLV (air): 
           0.2 ppm 
    Oral-rat  L050: 3,280 mg/kg     
    Subcutaneous-mouse TOLo: 46 mg/kg  Neop 1 ast ic OSHA std (air): 
           TWA 0.2 ppm 
    Oral-rabbit  L050: 2,410 mg/kg     
Butyl alcohol C4H1oO 71-36-3 TLm96:over Oral-human  LOLo: 500 mg/kg    TLV(air):50 ppm 
(n-butanol)   1,000 ppm Inhalation-human TCLo: 25 ppm  Irritant (skin) 
    Oral-rat  L050: 790 mg/kg    OSHA std (air): 
    Intraperitoneal-rat LOLo: 970 mg/kg    TWA 100 ppm 
    Oral-mouse  LOLo: 3,.000 mg/kg     
    Oral-rabbit  LOLo: 4,250 mg/kg     
    Skin-rabbit  L050: 4,200 mg/kg     
Carbaryl C12Hll 02N 63-25-2 TLm96:10-lppm Oral-man  TOLo: 2,800 ~g/kg  Central  
        ".- Nerv. Syst. OSHA std (air): 
           TWA 5 mg/m3 
    Oral-human  LOLo: 50 mg/kg     
    Oral-rat  L050: 400 mg/kg     
    Oral-rat  TOLo: 5,700 mg/kg 95 WI Carci nogeni c  
    Inhalation-rat LC50: 721 mg/kg    NIOSH recm std (ai r):
    Oral-rat  TOLo: 50 mg/kg (9 or 100 . Teratogenic TWA 5 mg/m3 
        preg)    
    Intraperitoneal-rat L050: 48 mg/kg     
    Implant-rat  TOLo: 80 mg/kg  Carci nogeni c  
    Unknown-rat  L050: 500 mg/kg.     
    Oral-mouse  L050: 438 mg/kg     ~
    Intraperitoneal-mouse L050: 396 mg/kg     m

-------
Table 11 (Cont'd.)
TOXICITY OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS
UNION CARBIDE INSTITUTE
Compound Name
Molecular
Formula
Chemi ca 1
Abstracts
Service No. Aquatic Toxicitya
Route of
Entry
Species
Other Toxicity Datab
Type of
Dose
Duration
Effectse
Exposurl:
Limits
Teratogenic
Carbon tetrachloride CC14
(Tetrachloromethane)
Chloroform CHC13
(Trichloromethane)
d
56-23-5 TLm96:100-10 ppm
d
67-66-3 TLm96:100-10 ppm ~
Oral-dog
Oral-rabbit
Oral-guinea pig
Oral-guinea pig
Oral-hamster
Oral-chicken
Oral-wild bird
Oral-human
Oral-woman
Inhalation-human
Oral-woman
Oral-man
Inhalation-human
Oral-rat
Inhalation-rat
Inhalation-rat
In~raperitoneal-rat
Subcutaneous-rat
Oral-mouse
Oral-mouse
Inhalation-mouse
Intraperitoneal-mouse
Subcutaneous-mouse
Oral-human
Inhalation-human
Inhalation-human
Oral-rat
Oral-rat
Inhalation-rat
Inhalation-rat
TDLo: 388 mg/kg
LD50: 710 mg/kg
LD50: 280 mg/kg
TDLo: 300 mg/kg
LOLo: 250 mg/kg
LD50: 197 mg/kg
LD50: 56 mg/kg

LDLo: 43 mg/kg
TDLo:. 1,800 mg/kg
TCLo: 20 ppm
TDLo: 1,800 mg/kg
TDLo: 1,700 mg/kg
LCLo: 1,000 ppm
LD50: 2,800 mg/kg
LCLo: 4,000 ppm
TCLo: 300 ppm

LD50: 1,500 mg/kg
TDLo: 133 mg/kg
LD50: 12,800 mg/kg
TDLo: 4,800 mg/kg
LC50: 9,526 ppm
L050: 4,675 mg/kg
LDLo: 12 gm/kg
LOLo: 140 mg/kg
TOLo:l,OOO mg/m3
TCLo:5,OOO mg/m3
LD50:800 mg/kg
TDLo:70 gm/kg
LCLo:8,000 ppm
TCLo:lOO pfim
(preg)
(preg)
Teratogenic
Systemic

Central
Nervous
System
OSHA std (air):
TWA 10 ppm;
Cl 25; Pk 200/
5M/4H
Pulmonary

Central
Nervous
System
NIOSH recm std
(air): Cl 2 ppm/60M
4H   
(6-15D Terato-  
preg) . geni c  
25 WI Neoplastic  
88DI Carcinogenic  
.... 8H   
  OSHA std (air): 
IV Systemic TWA 50 ppm 
7M Central  
 Nervous  
 System  
78WI Neoplas- NIOSH recm std 
 tic (air): Cl 2 ppm/60M
4H   
7H Terato-  
(6-15 D preg) genic  
   ~
   '-J

-------
    Table 11 (Cont'd.)      
    TOXICITY OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS     
    UNION CARBIOE INSTITUTE     
  Chemical    Other Toxicity. Datab    
Compound Name Molecular Abstracts  Route of  Type of   Exposur~ 
 Formula Service No. Aquatic Toxicitya Entry Species Dose Duration Effectse Limits 
    Oral-mouse  LOLo:2,400 mg/kg    
    Oral-mouse  TOLo:18 gm/kg 12001 Carcinogenic  
    Inhalation-mouse LC50:28 gm/m3    
    Intraperitoneal-mouse L050:1,671 mg/kg    
    Subcutaneous-mouse L050:704 mg/kg    
    Oral-dog  LOLo:1,000 mg/kg    
    Inhalation-dog LC50:100 gm/m3    
    Intraperitoneal-dog LD50:1,OOO mg/kg    
    Intravenous-dog LDLo:75 mg/kg    
    Inhalation-cat LCLo:35,OOO mg/m3 4H   
    Oral-rabbit  LOLo:500 mg/kg    
    Inhalation-rabbit LC50:59 gm/m3    
    Subcutaneous-rabbit LOLo:3,000 mg/kg    
    Inhalation-guinea pig LCLo:20,000 ppm 2H   
    Inhalation-frog LCLo:6,000 mg/m3    
    Inhalation-mammal LCLo:25,OOO ppm 5M   
2-r.yclohexen-l-one, C9H140 78-59-ld  Inhalation-human TCLo:25 ppm  Irritant OSHA std (air): 
3,5,5-trimethyl-    Oral-rat  L050:2,330 mg/kg   TWA 25 ppm 
(isophorone)    Inhalation-rat LOLo:l,840 ppm 4H   
    Ski n-rabbi t  L050:1;500 mg/kg    
Ethane, C2H4C12 107-06-2d TLm96:1,OOO-100 ppm Inhalation-human TClo:4,OOO ppm H Central OSHA std (air): 
l,2-0ichloro-         Nervous TWA 50 ppm 
(Ethylene Oichloride)        System Cl 100; 
          Pk 200/5M/3H 
    Oral-human  TDLo:428 mg/kg    
    Oral-man  LOLo:810 mg/kg    
    Oral-human  LOLo:500 mg/kg    
    Oral-rat  L050:680 mg/kg 'Ie   
    Inhalation-rat LCLo:1,OOO ppm 4H   
    Intraperitoneal-rat LOLo:600 mg/kg    
    Subcutaneous-rat LDLo:500 mg/kg    
    Oral-mouse  LOLo:600 mg/kg   NIOSH recm std (air):
    Inhalation-mouse LCLo:5,OOO mg/m3 2H  TWA 5 ppm; 
    Intraperitoneal-mouse LOLo:250 mg/kg   Cl 15 
    Subcutaneous-mouse LOLo:380 mg/kg    
    Oral-dog  LOLo:2,OOO mg/kg    
.j::>.
::0

-------
Table 11 (Cont'd.)
TOXICITY OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS
UNION CARBIDE INSTITUTE
Compound Name
Molecular
Formula
Chemical
Abstracts Route of
Service No. Aquatic Toxicitya Entry
Species
Other Toxicity Datab
Type of
Dose
Duration
Effectse
Exposur~
Limits
    Intravenous-dog LDLo:175 mg/kg   
    Oral-rabbit LD50:860 mg/kg   
    Inhalation-rabbit LCLo:3,OOO ppm 7H  
    Subcutaneous-rabbit LDLo:l,200 mg/kg   
    Inhalation-pig LCLo:3,OOO ppm 7H  
    Inhalation-guinea pig LCLo:l,500 ppm 7H  
    Intraperitoneal-guinea LDLo:600 mg/kg   
    pig    
Ethane, 1,1,1- C2H3C13 71-55-6d TLm96:100-10 Oral-human LDLo:500 mg/kg   
Trichloro-   ppm Inhalation-man LCLo:27 gm/m3 10M  OSHA std (ai r):
(Methyl Chloroform)    Inhalation-man TCLo:350 ppm  Psycho- TWA 350 ppm
       tropic 
    Inhalation-human TCLo:920 ppm 70M Central NIOSH recm std (air):
       Nervous Cl 350 ppm/15M
       System 
    Oral-rat LD50:14,300 mg/kg   
    Inhalation-rat LCLo:l,OOO ppm   
    Inhalation-mouse LCLo:ll,OOO ppm 2H  
    Intraperitoneal-mouse LD50:4,700 mg/kg   
    Oral-dog LD50:750 mg/kg   
    Intraperitoneal-dog LD50:3,lOO mg/kg   
    Intravenous-dog LDLo:95 mg/kg   
    Oral-rabbit LD50:5,660 mg/kg   
    Subcutaneous-rabbit LD50:500 mg/kg   
    Oral-guinea pig LD50:9,470 mg/kg   
Ether, diphenyl C12H1oO 101-84-8  Oral-rat LD50:3,370 mg/kg   TLV (air):
(phenyl ether)         1 ppm (vapor)
     ...  OSHA std (air):
        TWA 1 ppm
l-hexanol,2-ethyl- CSH1SO 104-76-7  Oral-rat LD50:3,200 mg/kg   
    Ora l-mouse LDLo:3,200 mg/kg   
    Skin-rabbit LD50:2,380 mg/kg   
~
1.0

-------
     Table 11 (Cont'd.)       
     TOXICITY OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS      
     UNION CARBIDE INSTITUTE      
  Chemical     Other Toxicity Datab     
Compound Name Molecular Abstracts   Route of  Type of    Exposur~ 
 Formula Service No. Aquatic Toxicitya Entry Speci es Dose Duration Effectse Limits 
Isopropyl Alcohol CaHsO 67-63-0 TLm 96:1000-100 Inhalation-human TCLo:400 ppm   Irritant TLV (air): 
(Isopropanol)   ppm Oral-rat  LDSO:S,840 mg/kg    400 ppm (skin) 
     Oral-mouse  LDLo:192 mg/kg    OSHA std (air): 
     Intraperitoneal-mouse LDS,O:933 mg/kg    TWA 400 ppm 
     Subcutaneous-mouse LDLo:6,OOO mg/kg     
     Oral-dog  LDSO:6,lSO mg/kg     
     Intravenous-dog LDLo:S,120 mg/kg     
     Intravenous-cat LDLo:l,963 mg/kg     
     Oral-rabbit  LDLo:S,000 mg/kg     
     Skin-rabbit  LDSO:16 mg/kg     
     Intravenous-rabbit LDLo:8,230 mg/kg     
     Subcutaneous-mammal LDLo:6 mg/kg     
Methane, Dichloro- CH2C12 7S-09-2d TLm96:1,OOO-100 ppm Inhalation-human TCLo:SOO ppm  lYI Central OSHA std (air): 
(Methylene Chloride)          Nervous TWA SOO ppm; Cl 
           System 1,000; Pk 2,OOO/SM/2H
     Oral-human  LDLo:SOO mg/kg     
     Inhalation-human TCLo:SOO ppm  8H Blood NIOSH recm std (air):
     Oral-rat  LDSO:94S mg/kg    TWA 7S ppm; 
     Inhalation-mouse LC50:14,400 ppm  7H  Pk SO/15M 
     Intraperitoneal-mouse LD50:1,SOO mg/kg     
     Subcutaneous-mouse LDSO:6,460 mg/kg     
     Oral-dog  LDLo:3,OOO mg/kg     
     Inhalation-dog LCLo:20,OOO ppm  7H   
     Intraperitoneal-dog LDLo:9S0 mg/kg     
     Subcutaneous-dog LDLo:2,700 mg/kg     
     Intravenous-dog LDLo:200 mg/kg     
     Ora 1- rabbit  LDLo:l,900 mg/kg     
     Subcutaneous-rabbit LDLo:2,700 mg/kg     
     Inhalation-guinea pig LCLo:5,OOO ppm It." 2H   
Methane, CHBra 7S-2S-2d   Subcutaneous-mouse LDSO:l,820 mg/kg    OSHA std (air): 
Tribromo-     Subcutaneous-rabbit LDLo:410 mg/kg    TWA 0.5 ppm (skin)
(IJromoform)             
Naphthalene C10Hg 91-20-3d TLm96:10-1 ppm Oral-child  LDLo: 100 mg/kg    OSHA std (air): 
     Oral-human  LDLo:SO mg/kg    TWA 10 ppm 
     Oral-rat  LDSO:l,780 mg/kg     
     Subcutaneous-rat TDLo:3,SOO mg/kg  98DI Neoplastic  
     Intraperitoneal-mouse LDLo:1SO mg/kg     
             (J'1
Naphthalene, 1- CllH10 1321-94-4   Oral-rat  LDLo:S,OOO mg/kg     a
methyl-             
Naphthalene, 2- C11H1o 91-S7-6   Oral-rat  LDLo:S,OOO mg/kg     
methyl-             

-------
     Table 11 (Cont'd.)     
     TOXICITY OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS    
     UNION CARBIDE INSTITUTE    
   Chemical    Other Toxicity Datab   
Compound Name Molecular Abstracts  Route of  Type of   Exposur~
  Formula Service No. Aquatic Toxicitya Entry Species Dose Duration Effectse Li mi ts
Naphthalene, C1oH12 119-64-2 TLm96:100-10 ppm Oral-human  lDlo: 500 mg/kg   
1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-    Oral-rat  lD50:2,860 mg/kg   
     Skin-rabbit  lD50:17 gm/kg   
     Inhalation-guinea p'ig lCLo:275 ppm 8H/17D  
2-naphtha1eno1 C10HgO 135-19-3  Oral-human  lDlo:50 mg/kg   
(2-naphtho1)    Subcutaneous-rat lDlo:2,940 mg/kg   
     Oral-rat  lD50:2,420 mg/kg   
     Subcutaneous-mouse lDlo:100 mg/kg   
     Ora 1- rabbi t  lDlo:3,800 mg/kg   
     Subcutaneous-guinea pig lDlo:2,670 mg/kg   
1(2H)-Naphtha1enone, C1oH100 529-34-0  Oral-rat  lD50:810 mg/kg   
3,4-Dihydro-          
3-penten-2-one, C6H100 141-79-7 Tlm96:100-10 ppm Inhalation-human TClo:25 ppm  Irritant TlV (air):
4-methy1-    Oral-rat  lD50:1,120mg/kg   25 ppm
(4-methyl-3-pentene-    Inhalation-rat lClo:1,000 ppm 4H  
2-one)     Intraperitoneal-mouse lD50:354 mg/kg   OSHA std (air):
           TWA 25 ppm
     Oral-rabbit  lD50:1,000 mg/kg   
     Skin-rabbit  lD50:5,990 mg/kg   
     Subcutaneous-rabbit lDlo:840 mg/kg   
     Subcutaneous-frog lDlo:1,440 mg/kg   
Toluene  C7Hg 108-88-3d Tlm96:100-10 ppm Oral-human  lDlo:50 mg/kg   
     Inhalation-human TClo:200 ppm  Central OSHA std (air):
          Nervous TWA 200 ppm;
         '..: System C1 300; Pk SOD/10M
     Inhalation-man TClo:100 ppm  Psycho- NIOSH recm std (air)
          tropic TWO 100 ppm; C1
     Oral-rat  lD50:5,OOO mg/kg   200/1Of1
     Inhalation-rat lClo:4,000 ppm 4H  
     Intraperitoneal-rat lDLo:800 mg/kg   
     Inhalation-mouse lC50:5,320 ppm 8H  
     Skin-rabbit  lD50: 14 gm/kg   
     Subcutaneous-frog lDlo:920 mg/kg   
Toluene, dinitro- C7H6N04   Oral-human  lDlo:50 mg/kg   TlV (air):
           1.5 mg/m (skin) un
           ~
Toluene, 2,6- C7H6N204 606-20-2d TLm96:100-10 ppm Oral-rat  lD50: 177 mg/kg   OSHA std (air):
dinitro-    Oral-mouse  lD50:1,OOO mg/kg   TWA 1500 ~g/m3 (skin)
Toluene, p-nitro- C7H7N02 99-99-0  Oral-rat  lD50:2,144 mg/kg   OSHA std (air):
     Skin-rat  LD50:l6,OOO mg/kg   TWA 5 ppm (skin)
     Intraperitoneal-rat LD50:940 mg/kg   
     Oral-mouse  LD50:l,23l mg/kg   

-------
Table 11 (Cont'd.)
TOXICITY OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS
UNION CARBIDE INSTITUTE
Abbreviations
(per Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical
Substances - NIOSH - 1977 Edition)
a Aquatic Toxicity: TLm96 - 96-hour static or continuous flow standard protocol, in parts per million (ppm).
b Other Toxicity Data: L050 - lethal dose 50~ kill
LOLo - lowest published lethal concentration
LC50 - lethal concentration 50% kill
LOLo - lowest published lethal dose
TOLo - lowest published toxic dose
TCLo - lowest published toxic concentration
TO - toxic dose
M - minute' H-hour' D-day; W-week; Y-year
C - contin~ous '
I - intermittent
NR - not reported
NIOSH - National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
OSHA - Otcupational Safety and Health Act of 1970
TWA - time-weighted average concentration
TLV - threshold. limit value.
Cl - ceiling
Pk - peak concentr~tion .
d This chemical has been selected for priority attention as point source water-effluent discharge toxic pollutant (NROC vs Train consent decree).
e Blood - Blood effects; effect on all blood elements, electrolytes, pH, protein, oxygen carrying or releasing capacity.
Carcinogenic - Carcinogenic effects; producing cancer, a cellu1ar tumor the nature of which is fatal, or is associated with the formation
of secondary tumors (metastasis).
Central Nervous System - Includes effects such as headaches, tremor, drowsiness, convulsions, hypnosis, anesthesia.
Eye - Irritation, diplopia, cataracts, eye ground, blindness by affecting the eye or the optic nerve.
Irritant - Any irritant effect on the skin, eye or mucous membrane.
Neoplastic - The production of tumors not clearly defined as carcinogenic.
Psychotropic - Exerting an effect upon the mind.
Pulmonary - Effects on respiration and respiratory pathology.
Systemic - Effects on the metabolic and excretory function of the liver or kidneys.
Teratogenic - Nontransmissible changes produced in the offspring.
c Exposure Limits:
"'-
U"I
N

-------
53
REFERENCES
1.
Ames, B.N., McCann, J., and Yamasaki, E., Methods for Detecting
Carcinogens and Mutagens with the Salmonella/Mammalian Microsome
Mutagenicity Test. Mutation Research, 31 (1975) 347-364.
2.
Commoner, B., Chemical Carcinogens in the Environment, Presentation
at the First Chemical Congress of the North American Continent,
Mexico City, Mexico, December, 1975.
3.
Commoner, B., Development of Methodology, Based on Bacterial
Mutagenesis and Hyperfine Labelling, For the Rapid Detection
and Identification of Synthetic Organic Carcinogens in Environmen-
tal Samples, Research Proposal Submitted to National Science
Foundation, Feb., 1976.
4.
Commoner, B., Henry, J.I., Gold, J.C. ~ Reading, M.J., Vithatil,
N.J., Reliability of Bacterial Mutagenesis Techniques to Distinguish
Carcinogenic and Non-carcinogenic Chemicals, Final Report to the
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, EPA-600/1-76-022, Government
Printing Office, Washington, D.C., (April 1976).
5.
Hollander, A., ed., Chemical Mutagens, Principles and Methods
for Their Detection, Vol. 1, New York: Plenum Press, Chap. 9,
p. 267, 1971.
6.
Schoneich, J., Safety Evaluation Based on Microbial Assay Procedures,
Mutation Research, 41 (1976) 89-94.

-------
APPENDIX A
UNION CARBIDE INSTITUTE
(INSTITUTE)
April 1978 .

-------
CONTENTS
I INTRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-7
II PROCESS OPERATIONS AND POLLUTION SOURCES. . . . .. A-9
OLEFINS PRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-9
ETHYLIDENEORBORNENE AND VINYLNORBORNENE
PRODUCTIQN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-19
CELLOSIZE PRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-19
ETHYLENE. GLYCOL RECOVERY. '@' . . . . . . . . . . A-23
POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL (CARBOWAX ) PRODUCTION. . . . A-25
ALLETHRIN UNIT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-25
POLYOL PRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-30
BUTANOL AND ETHYLBURYALDEHYDE PRODUCTION. . . . . A-30
ACETONE, MIXED KETONES, CRUDE NAPTHOL
AND ~SOPHORONE PRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . . . . A-33
SEVIN PRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-36
ACROLEIN DERIVATIVES PRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . . A-49
ANHYDROUS ISOPROPANOL RECOVERY. . . . . . . . . . A-51
DINITROTOLUENE PRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . A-51
TOLUENE DIAMINE PRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . . . . A-55
TOLUENE DIISOCYANATE PRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . . A-57
ALKYL@BENZENE PRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . A-57
LINDE SYSTEM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-60
METHY~ CHLORINE PRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . . . . A-60
UCARER@POLYMER JR PRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . . . A-62
POLYOX PRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-65
CATALYST PRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-67
RIGID POLYOLS PRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . A-71
BOILERS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-73
OTHER POLLUTION SOURCES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-75
III POLLUTION ABATEMENT PRACTICES. .
. . . . . . . .
. A-77
IV EVALUATION OF SELF-MONITORING PRACTICES. . . . . . A-83
BIOASSAY PROCEDURES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-83
ANALYTICAL PROCEDURES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-84
SAMPLING PROCEDURES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-84
FLOW MONITORING. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-85
SELF-MONITORING DATA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-85

-------
FIGURES
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
Flow of Materials at Institute. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-II
Flow of Materials at Institute. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-12
Flow of Materials at Institute. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . A-13
Plant Contaminated Sewer System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-14
Plant Cooling Water Sewer System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-15
Ethyliden@orbornene Process Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . A-20
CELLOSIZE@ Unit Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-21
CELLOSIZER Process Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-22
Recovery of Returned Spent Glycol Schematic ~. . . . . . . . . . A-24
Polyethy@ene Glycol Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-26
TERGITOL Process Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-27
Miscellaneous Chemicals Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-28
Glutaraldehyde Process Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-29
Polyol Process Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-31
Butanol and Ethylbutraldehyde . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-32
Acetone and Mixed Ketones Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-34
Isophorone Process Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-35
H2-CO@Process Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-37
SEVIN Complex Tetrahydronaphythalene Unit Schematic. . . . .' . A-40
Tetralone Process Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-41
I-Naphthol Process Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-42
Phosgene Proc@ss Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-43
NCF and SEVIN Processes Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-45
Methyl isocyanate Process Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-47
MIC to SEVIN~ Process Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-48
Acrolein Derivatives Process Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . A-50
Anhydrous Isopropanol Recovery Process Schematic. . . . . . . . A-52
Dinitrotoluene Process Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-53
Dinitrotoluene Unit Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-54
Toluene Diamine Process Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-56
Toluene Diisocyanate Process Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . A-58
Alkyl@Benzene Process Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-59
LINDE System Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-61
Methy@ Chloride Process Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-63
UCARE @Pol~mer JR Sy~tem Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-64
POLOYX Unlt Schematlc .................... A-66
No.1 Catalyst Unit Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-68
No.2 Catalyst Unit Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-69
Catalyst Unit - Metal Recovery Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . A-70
Rigid Polyols Unit Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-72
Energy Systems Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-74
Plant Treatment Facilities Schematic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-78

-------
TABLES
1
2
Union Carbide, Institute Materials on Toxic Pollutant List. . . A-I0
I.i
NPDES Permit Limitations, Outfall 002
. . . . . . . . . . . .
. A-16
3
NPDES Permit Limitations, Outfalls 002, 003, 004, 005

and 008 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . .
. . A-17
4 Summary of Discharge Monitoring Reports, Outfall 001. . .  A-86
5 Summary of Discharge Monitoring Reports NCCW Outfalls . . . A-87
6 Summary of Permit Violations, October 1977 through    
 March 1978 . . . .     A-88
ATTACHMENTS
A Organic Chemicals Identification
B Goff Mountain Chemical Landfill Information
C Bioassay Evaluation
D Analytical Procedures Evaluation

-------
A-7
1.
INTRODUCTON
Union Carbide Corporation, Chemicals and Plastics Division
(NPDES Permit No. WV0000086), has a chemical manufacturing facility
located at Institute, West Virginia. The plant operates 24 hr/day,
year around and employs 1,800 people.
The Environmental Protection Agency, Region III requested that
the National Enforcement Investigations Center (NEIC) insper.t the Union
Carbide Institute Facility to: a) determine the sources and types of
toxic pollutants* discharged, b) evaluate pollution abatement practices
and c) determine if NPDES permit requirements are being met.
On April 7, 10 and 11, 1978, Dr. Wayne Smith, Mr. James L.
Hatheway, Mr. Bruce A. Binkley and Mr. D. David Vietti of NEIC
visited the plant to inspect process operations, pollution abatement
practices and self-monitoring techniques which include the sampling,
flow measurement, analytical and bioassay procedures used. The
Company, represented by Mr. R.L. Foster, Mr. John Huddleston and Ms.
Jan Ketcham, provided information and assistance.
* Toxic Pollutant List published January 31, 1978 in Federal Register
Vol. 43, No. 21.

-------
. Alcohols
LEGErm:
o
o
. ,
Products shipped to Institute
Products produced at Institute
.1
Figure 1.
'.--....--...--

Paraffi n
Concentrate
Propane-Ethane.
By-products C -C8
Hydrocarbons ~nd
Propylene
EDP
Flow of r1aterials at Institute
;::.
I
---'
.....

-------
HCl
By-product
LEGEND:

I
o
Hexanol
and
Acrylic
Acid
Paraffin
'. Concentrate
and Benzene
Products shipped to Institute
Products Produced at Institute
Figure 2.
Flow of t1aterials at Institute
Acrolein
By-oroducts
Chlorine
)::0
I
......
N
I

-------
lEGErm:
I !
o
U.1phtha 1 ene
I\~thilne
Dimethyl limine
Products shipped to Institute
Products produced at Institute
Figure 3.
Fiow of 11aterials at Institute
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-------
A-16
Table 2

NPDES PERMIT LIMITATIONS
. OUTFALL 002 .
UNION CARBIDE COMPANY
INSTITUTE, WEST VIRGINIA
Parameter
Net Discharge
Limitations
Daily Daily
Avg. Max.
kg/day (lb/day)
Monitoring
Requirements
Measurement Sample
frequency Type
3
Flow m /day (mgd)
BOD5
~Iay-Oct.
Nov.-Apr.

TSS

TOC
Hay-Oct.
Nov.-Apr.
TKN

NH3N
Chlorides-
Fecal Coliform
Threshold Odor No.
Temperature
pH (range)
Other
N/A
2,270
3,860
1,270
(5,000) 5,000
(8,500) 8,600
(2,800) 1,910
(11 ,000)
(19,000)
(4,200)
4,540 (10,000)
7,720 (17 ,000)

1,500 (3,300)

680 (1,500)

104,000 (228,000)

200/100 m1
10,000 (22,000)
17,250 (38,000)

3,000 (6,600)

.1,360 (3,000)

136,000 (300,000)

400/100/m1
43.3C(11OF)

6.0-9.0
Continuous Recorded
3/week 24 hr. a
com.
3/week 24 hr. com.
l/day 24 hr. -com.
1/ day 24 hr. com.
l/day 24 hr. com. 
3/week 24 hr. com.
3/week 24 hr. com.
l/week 24 hr. com.
l/month Grab 
l/quarter . 24 hr. com.
l/day Instantaneous
Continuous Recorded
There shall be no discharge of floating 301id~ or
visible foam in. other than trace amounts.
a Composite

-------
fJ..- 1 7
Table 3
NPDES PERMIT LIMI1ATIONS
OUTFALLS 002, 003, 004, 005, 008
UNION CARBIDE COMPANY
INSTITUTE, WEST VIRGINIA
Dai ly
Avg.
kg/day
Daily
t.1ax.
(lb/day)
t~onitoring
Reauirements
Measurement Sample
. Frequency Type
Parar.leter
Net Discharge
Limitations
II
Flow m3/day (mgd)
TOC
TKN
NH N
Chiorides
Phenolics
Threshold Odor No.
Temperature
Sulfide (Outfall 005
pH
only)
N/A a
12 mg/l 5/week a
1.5 mg/l 5/week a
0.6 mg/l 5/week a b
182,000 (400,000) l/week 24 hr. com.
82 (180) l/week 24 hr. com.
256 l/quarter 24 hr. com.
43.3C(110F) b Instantaneous
N/A l/week Grab
The pH shall not be less than 6.0 standard units
not greater than 9.0c standard units and shall be
monitored once/day, utilizing grab samples. There
shall be no discharge of floating solids or visib)e
foam in other than trace amounts.
4 mg/l
0.5 mg/l
0.2 mg/l
37,000 (302,000)
32 (70)
128
Other
Quarterly, the permittee shall determine the 96-
hour median tolerance limit applicable to the
fathead minnow CPimephales promelas) using the
latest EPA approved static bioassay procedures
and 24 hour samples from the outfalls as indi-
cated below. The results of the bioassay tests.
shall be reported quarterly to the Environmental
Protection Agency, Region III, and to the State
of West Virginia, Department of. Natural Resources,
Division of Water Resources. Separate tests shall
be conducted for 24-hour composite samples from
Outfalls 001, 002, 003, 004, and 005. A single
test shall be conducted for a flow-weighted
aggregate prepared from 24-hour composite sam-
ples from Outfall 008.
Individual Outfalls
002, 003, 004 005

Outfalls 006, 007, 008, 009
. 010 ~nd 032 combined
Composite
Parameter
TOC, TKN, NH3N
b
24-Hour Comoosite Samole
,
TOC, TKN, NH3N
r

-------
A-18
Table 3 (Continued)
24-Hour Composite Sample
Parameter
Outfalls 002, 003, 004, 005
006, 007, 008, 009, 010, and
032 combined
Chlorides, phenolics
threshold odor
Sulfides will be determined once per week utilizing grab samples from
discharge 005. Deterioration of 24-hour composite samples prevents
accurate analysis for sulfides. . ~
Temperature measurements will be made daily on Outfalls 001, 002, 003,
004, and 005 during the months of July, August and September. Tempera~
tures willb~ measured weekly during other times and at other discharge
locations.
c
For Outfalls 002, 003, 004 and 005, deviations from the pH range of
6 - 9 which (1) do not exceed 15 minutes for any single instance,
(2) do not exceed a total of 30 minutes in any calendar day (3) do
net exceed a total of 10 hours in ~ny calendar month, and (4) are
within the pH range of 4.0 - 10.5 units, shall not be considered
violations of this permit. All such instances of deviation, how-
ever, shall be reported quarterly with the discharge monitoring
reports. .
". -..-----.---.--------------- - Op--- . ~ ._--.
-~..,.-----

-------
A-19
ETHYLIDENENORBORNENE AND VINYLNORBORNENE PRODUCTION
Ethylidenenorbornene (ENB) and vinylnorbornene (VNB) are produced
[Figure 6] using dicyclopentadiene, butadiene, vinylcyclohexane, vinyl-
norborene, bicyclononadiene, gums, ammonia, ethylbenzene, ethylidenenor-
bornene, noryl phenol, tertbutylcatechol, cyclopentadiene and a patented
sodium-potassium-amide catalyst.
~
The major wastewater sources are the decanters that collect the
steam jet condensate and the ammonia scrubber. This wastewater, 190
l/min (50 gpm), is discharged to the WWTF. The non-contact cooling
water, 15 m3/min(4,000 gpm) is discharged through Outfall 002. All
distillation column residue, 18,200 kg (40,000 lb)/day, is burned in the
powerhouse.
There are 16 process emission points and 3 storage tank emission
points associated with this processing area. Only three have significant
emissions. Point 2e emits 91 kg (200 lb)/hr of cyclopentadiene, point
14e emits a total of 135 kg (300 lb)/hr of cyclopentadiene, ENB and VNB,
dnd point l6e emits cyclopentadiene at 545 kg (1,200 lb)/hr on an inter-
mittent basis (14 minutes per run, 43 runs/yr).*
CELLOSIZE@ PRODUCTION
@
CELLOSIZE (hydroxyethyl cellulose) is formed by reacting ethylene
oxide, caustic, a viscosity control agent, a pH control agent and cellu-
lose floc [Figures 7 and 8].
* Data source is a UCI-developed air emissions inventory.
emissions discussion is based on this inventory.
All air

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-------
A-23
The major wastewater source is the solvent recovery still. This
waste contains isopropanol, benzene and CELLOSIZE@ and is discharged to
the WWTF. The non-contact cooling water, 15 m3/min (4,000 gpm), is dis-
charged through Outfall 004.
There are emissions from 27 baghouses, 4 process vents and 2 storage
tanks. However, the emissions are less than 9 kg (20 lb)/hr per emission
point.
~
Solid wastes from the process are collected and either disposed of
in the Goff Mountain landfill or sold to a paper company.
ETHYLENE GLYCOL RECOVERY
Spent ethylene glycol containing ethylene glycol, solids, water and
methanol is refined in a series of distillation columns to recover the
ethylene glycol [Figure 9J.
Process wastewaters are the methanol still bottoms and the water
from the concentrator. These wastes are combined and discharged to the
WWTF. Non-contact cooling water and vacuum jet condensate are discharg-
ed through Outfall 002. The solids from the concentrator and methanol
are burned in the powerhouse.
Air emission sources include the water, containing some methanol,
from the methanol still and the water evaporated from the concentrator.
There are no air emissions inventory data available for this unit.

-------
Methanol-Solids to Powerhouse
Storage
Steam
Solids
Figure 9.
TOJl./ltITP

)1

I
Steam
Refined Glyco
Glyco-Solids
C. vi.
r1ethanol
Steam
Vent to Atmosphere
c.w.
"'-
Recovery of Returned Spent Glyco Schematic
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VI

-------
A-25
POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL (CARBOWAX@) PRODUCTION
Ethylene glycol and a caustic catalyst
several different CARBOWAXES@ [Figure 10].
WAXES@ are sold as a liquid or converted to
are reacted to produce

After filtering, the CARBO-

a solid. and bagged.
Wastewater sources include the reactor scrubber, cooling filter
wash and bin wash waters. This waste is discharged, 152 1/min'(40 gpm),
~
to the WWTF for treatment.
The air emission sources include the ethylene oxide storage tanks
vents (2), reactor vent and bagging area. The storage tank vapor is
condensed to recover the ethylene oxide, reactor off-gases are condensed
and water scrubbed and the bagging area emissions are controlled by a
baghouse.
Filter solids and spilled solids are disposed of in the Goff
Mountain Landfill.
ALLETHRIN UNIT
Other chemicals are produced in the Allethrin unit at different
times. These include TERGITOLS@ (a1'ky1 phenol type detergents), glutaral-
dehyde and 100-150 others. Process equipment includes reactors, filters
and distillation columns [Figures 11, 12 and 13].
The process wastewaters include filter leaks and washes, condensate
from vacuum jets and reactor cleaning. This water, 1,3301/min (350
gpm), is discharged to the WWTF. Non-contact cooling water (5,200 gpm)
is discharged through Outfall 002. Still residues are burned in the
powerhouse.

-------
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Fi9ure 10.
Polyctl1yl ene .Glycol (C.A.R13()H/\~ Schematic

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11isc:cllilneous Chcmicals SCIH.'nliltic

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:::-
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-------
A-30
All air emissions, except the
burned in flares. The still gases
phere. Filter solids are disposed
still off-gases, are collected and
are condensed and vented to the atmos-
of in the chemical landfill.
POLYOL PRODUCTION
Approximately 65 different polyols are produced from 30 raw
materials [Figure 14]. Process equipment includes a reactor, ion ex-
changer, filters, product refiner and solvent recovery still.
Wastewaters include the vacuum jet condensate, still bottoms and
ion exchange regeneration. These wastewaters, 950 l/min (250 gpm) are
discharged to the WWTF. Non-contact cooling water, 265 l/min (70 gpm),
is discharged through Outfall 003.
The air emission points are 6 process
no emission rate exceeds 7 kg (15 lb)/hr.
controlled by nitrogen blanketing.
vents and 6 storage tank vents;
All 12 of these vents are
Filter solids and exhausted ion exchange resins are disposed in the
Goff Mountain landfill.
BUTANOL AND ETHYLBUTYRALDEHYDE PRODUCTION
Butanol and ethylbutyraldehye are produced by reacting acetaldehyde,
butyraldehyde, hydrogen and caustic as shown in Figure 15.
Wastewaters include tails from the sodium acetate still, the stripping
still and the butyraldehyde still. This waste, 190 l/min (50 gpm), is
discharged to the WWTF. Non-contact cooling water, 85 m3/min (22,500
gpm), is discharged through Outfalls 003 and 004. Residues from the
distillation columns are burned in the powerhouse.

-------
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. . . -;.:- S.ripp Ing Still
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(rolono IJe:h,/'ch' . I
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Butanol and Ethylbutrald~hyde Process Schematic.
:t::
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-~~.
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)
h VI\'! H'

-------
A-33
This entire system operates under pressure; therefore the only air
emission sources are pressure relief valves that can open to the atmos-
phere in case of an emergency.
ACETONE AND MIXED KETONE CRUDE NAPHTHOL AND ISOPHORONE PRODUCTION
Acetone, mixed ketones, crude 1-naphtho1, isophorone and mesity1
~
oxide are all produced in this process area.
Acetone and mixed ketones-are produced by the catalytic dehydro-
genation of isopropyl alcohol [Figure 16]. By using various catalysts
the reaction can be controlled to produce only acetone or acetone, alco-
hols and various ketones. Crude 1-naphtho1 is produced by converting
tetralone to 1-naphthol using a metal catalyst and caustic. Both 1-naph-
thol and tetralone are intermediates for SEVIN@ production. Acetone is
converted to isophorone and the by-product mesityl oxide by a metal cata-
lyst [Figure 17].
Wastewaters include the isopropanol stripper tails, 1-naphtho1 con-
version unit and the isophorone water layer stripping still. These waste-
waters, 1,140 l/min (300 gpm), are discharged to the WWTF for treatment.
Non-contact cooling water, 87 m3/min (23,000 gpm), is discharged through
Outfall 003. The tails from the several ketone and recovery stills are -
burned in the powerhouse.

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A-36
Air emissions from all process vents are collected and burned in
the acetone unit petrochem furnace. There are 32 storage tanks and the
petro-chern furnace that vent to the atmosphere. Emissions from the tanks
are less than 9 kg (20 lb)/hr per tank.
All catalyst is recovered and returned to the vendor for reprocessing:
SEVIN@ PRODUCTION
Jhe SEVIN@ manufacturing process includes the synthetic gas, tetra-
lin, tetralone, naphthol, phosgene, l-naphthol refining, naphthylchloro-
formate (NCF), methyl isocynate and SEVIN@ units. SEVIN@ is a contact
insecticide that, under alkaline conditions, hydrolyzes tol-naphthol,
carbon dioxide and methylamine.
Synthetic Gas Unit
The synthetic gas (syn gas) unit converts natural gas to carbon
dioxide (C02)' carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen (H2)' removes the C02
from the gas and separates the CO from the H2 [Figure 18J.
The only process wastewater is that from the C02 extraction and
drying system. It consists of water and monoethanol amine blowdown.
This blowdown, 38 l/min (10 gpm), is discharged to the WWTF. Non-con-
tact cooling water, 3,400 l/min (900 gpm), is discharged through Outfall
005.
All air emissions from the syn gas system are collected and flared.

-------
I (ethane
Natural
qas
.. .. '-',

\
I
i
I
I
,
I
I
I
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< I .
heade! j /
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hcthanator
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. I
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'C!U~~".._r~ ,


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Fuel
---"-.-'.........-
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11
Compression

-'--""'''''F-
~CO t~'" '.: . CO ..
fieadcrj
I . L'''-l-'''''' .

. Non-contact.
'0/ Condensate to . 'cooling water
. cooling~water '. .
sewer' .
lNon-contact
. cooling w~ter
compress1on


-{ 1"
Degassing pot
'II .
I' to cooling
. water sewer
: . C02 vent

. ---'j--~~air'
CO-HZ gas: 1
separation! 'J
system! . i
. I I
".qean dryl ~.
'1I?-CO . I"
. ~ . 'I' fOZ .extraction system
. '.f ~ _...- rnd 'drying system


.... . LOdensate to ..
. process sewer
Figure 18.. H?-CO Process Schematic

I
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......,

-------
A-38
Tetralin
Tetralin (tetrahydronaphthalene) is produced [Figure
naphthalene, hydrogen and sodium metal. Small amounts of
crude naphthalene are introduced into the system and must
from the wastewater.
19J by reacting
sulfur in the
be removed
The only wastewater source is the decanter w?ter layer. This water
is treated in the wastewater sulfide oxidation system and discharged to
the WWTF. Non-contact cooling water is discharged through Outfall 005.
The refining still residues are burned at the powerhouse.
The major air emissions from the degasser and the refining system
are collected and burned in the petro-chem furnace. Other vents emit
less than 0.9 kg (2 lb)/ day per vent to the atmosphere.
Tetralone
Tetralone is produced [Figure 20J by oxidizing tetralin with a cat-
alyst and air. Process equipment includes the oxidizer, 3 decanters and
a refining unit with vacuum distillation.
Wastewater discharges include the No.3 decanter water and the re-
fining tails. The wastewater from the first two decanters flows to the
No.3 decanter before being discharged. In addition, the vacuum jet
condensate is collected and decanted prior to being discharged. The
majority (80-90%) of the decanter water and still tails are burned in
the powerhouse along with the decanter residue. If this waste is not
burned it is steam stripped and discharged to the WWTF. Non-contact
cooling water is discharg~d through Outfall 005.

-------
A-39
There are 5 process and 4 storage tank air emission points in the
process. Vapors from the oxidation process pass through a condenser
before being discharged to the atmosphere. The refining system off-
gases are condensed and sent to the crude naphthol unit. The maximum
emission rate, 11 kg (24 lb)/hr of tetralin, is from the 4 vents on the
oxidation system. All still residues are burned at the powerhouse.
The used catalyst is cleaned from the oxidizer on a batch basis and
buried in the Goff Mountain Landfill.
l-Naphthol Refining
Crude napthol is refined [Figure 21] to l-naphthol in a s~ries of
distillation columns. A solvent is used, recovered and recycled in
this process. By-product recovery is accomplished by using a series of
distillation columns.
The major discharge is the by-product still vacuum jet condensate.
This waste is collected and discharged to the WWTF for treatment. All
residues from the distillation columns are burned at the powerhouse.
The only air emission sources are the l-naphthol storage tanks which
vent to the atmosphere. Other emissions are collected and burned.
Phosgene Process
Phosgene is produced [Figure 22] by reacting carbon monoxide (CO)
with chlorine in the presence of an activated carbon catalyst.

-------
Gt~
I ~'YST~J
~ JD r.:oRr'1A L
t: fl; ~siMJS
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1:
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'STRU\lil F/?uM \:( -<.. -I~ S~S.TE 1'1
'--1
S 1m C 'I
EVIl - omp ex Tetruhych'onuphythalcne Unit Schematic
*NORr'1t"\LLY ~,IA';uJD II\! ?(n:O-C.\\\:M ~"'''''CAN \?E
'. ) .
t);'JIO'Kr D TD AIl,- IN CAS' 0(- -P'oBLEM::, vJ ITH r.UhJJER5.
Figure 19.
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t;... 'f',::c.D'JCT
'::JiCK p..~E
~ TO Sf\vfR.

-------
Residues to Powerhouse
Tetralone
Refining
V1
.-
C.H.
Steam
to
I-
+>
VI
Figure 20.
{ .
Tetralone Process Schematic
I ~

~IIII~.
Reactor
Compressed Air
~
To vJ\-JTP
~
~ - C.f/.
::x:-
I
.po
--'

-------
c.w.
Crude
l-~Ja phtho 1
C. \.1.
By-product
Recovery
Solvent
L
Refinin9
Ste~1I11


Residues to
Powerhouse
Steam
Residues to Powerhouse
.Stil1 Tails
Extract
~
Solvent
. Recovery
Tails to .
\'J\'JT P
'\i,;..
l-~Iaphtho 1
Figure 21.
l-Naphtho1 Process Schematic
0-
t:
=:
...;..
)::0
I
~
N
o
r-

-------
tiaOH
QJ
c:
'r-
~
o
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u
Cl Stor.
ria OH
Reactor and
Condensin9
H20
Vent Gas Brine
Phosgene
. Storage
Figure 22.
Vent Scrubber
co
~-C.II.
 ~
 c:
 ro
 I-
 QJ
 CJ)
 ro
~ ~
QJ 0
..0 +>
.0 V1
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U 
V) 
+> 
c: 
QJ 
> 
Phosgene Process Schematic
c:
3:
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co
QJ
c:
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co
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I
-Po
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-------
A-44
Phosgene is a very toxic gas; therefore contact with air or water
is carefully controlled. There are no process wastewater sources, how-
ever there are vent scrubbers to neutralize and scrub any chlorine or
phosgene that is emitted from the reactor, surge tank or the chlorine
storage tank. This wastewater contains sodium chloride and is discharged
to the WWTF for treatment. Non-contact cooling water is discharged through
Outfall 005.
~
The spent activated carbon is removed from the reactor and buried
in the Goff Mountain landfill.
Naphthylchloroformate and SEVIN@ Process
Naphthylchloroformate CNCF) is produced by. reacting l-naphthol with
phosgene in a solvent mixture of dimethylamine COMA) and toluene [Figure
23J. Hydrochloric acid is a by-product from the NCF process. SEVIN@ is
then produced by reacting NCF with methyl amine. The DMA and toluene are
recovered and recycled to the process.
Wastewater sources include NCF and SEVIN@ decanters, stripping
stills, caustic scrubbers and the vacuum jet system. The decanter water
is collected and steam stripped prior to being discharged to the WWTF
along with the vacuum jet condensate and the scrubber media. The
stripper overheads are returned to the process. The steam condensate is
also discharged to the WWTF. The NCF and SEVIN@ processes are highly
corrosive resulting in an unusual number of leaks from condensers, pipes,
pumps, etc. This process area is diked so that the contaminated water
and pad spills can be recycled to the process. Non-contact cooling water
is discharged through Outfall 005.
All air emission vents, except the SEVIN@ storage bin, dryer and
bagging machine vents, are caustic scrubbed and burned in a flare.

-------
1.Naph,h"01
-):...
Plr.>o'},ylonollno ->.
f~.e.gone .
1 "J"" 1'10
P\:I
--'
A\oJhyl,
Am ,n Q
11 0 cycle!
c.w.
.....
-J-
>-
r.
UCF
lIydrolYla,
a'''~ Oe
PW
To il. 10 WWH
r
Figure 23.
c.w.
~-- Slo,og.
SI.a..
Slrlp,lng $1111 Tall.
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J.t Condon.e"
~ Sloom CondQn.alo
>-
Dlmoll.,lanoline
Storage
ChiCiod Waler
V
SEVIN
. Drying
.~"">
,.-
r,
Naphthylchloroformate (NCF) andSEVT~~Processes Schematic
To
Po....o,hollu
c..
-
->-~
e
_.
S te a...
;;x::.
t
~
U1

-------
A-46
The stor~ge bins and the bagging machine vent to the atmosphere through
a baghouse and the drier vapors are condensed to recover the toluene
before being discharged to the atmosphere. Only toluene is discharged
to the atmosphere (maximum rate 22 kg-(50 lb)/hr)., Any SEVIN@ residue is
burned at the powerhouse.
All solid wastes (SEVIN@,
@
area clean-up) from the SEVIN
fill.
filter cones, bags from the baghouse and
unit are buried in, the Goff Mountain land-
~
The NCF to SEVIN@ process was to be shut down in late 1978, being
replaced by the methyl isocyanate to SEVIN@ process and will be shut down
in late 1978. SEVIN@ is the largest volume product at the plant.
Methylisocyanate and SEVIN@ Processes
Methylisocyanate (MIC) is produced by reacting methylamine with
phosgene [Figure 24J. Hydrochloric acid (HC1) is a by-product of this
process. Any excess phosgene is hydrolyzed to HCl and the HCl is scrubbed
with water.
SEVIN@ is produced by reactingMIC and methyl chloride in toluene
solvent [Figure 25J.
The wastewater sources include the HCl scrubber water, the SEVIN@
and MIC caustic scrubbers, the emergency scrubber and the incinerator.
scrubber. Currently the HCl scrubber water is used for neutralization
at the WWTF. When the new MIC to SEVIN@ process is in operation the HCl
scrubber water will be discharged through limestone pits, neutralized

-------
...-.-._.......__._-_.._-~---

. I
r--.--l_- .

. rll.liJO~.


. :[. : r--.". i--=::=- -

. . --- .(

~,'I\'yl,.."I.. ----~ ?'O"'IC'.' I 'I. .


. '1'


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. Slril=pllltJ a
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----z;--......
y
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5'.0"
Fi~Jure 21).
r'1c lhyli SOG:'yl\Iii1 te Process Schema ti c

I
..".
........

-------
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. "Rfs7 au E':>~ r.:: ell) U
.. l.IJ r;-. (!
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t
C.r'l1~;. TIc..
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(6)- Two SYSTE"r15
Figure 25.
(lib - . (p,)
SEVHI) COl1lplex ~lIC to SEVIN' . PI'ocess Schematic

-------
A-49
and discharged through Outfall 005. The caustic scrubber waters are
discharged to the WWTF along with the incinerator scrubber water. The
emergency scrubber is used only when the flare is inoperable.
All air emissions, except the toluene recovery jet system, are col-
lected and burned in a flare. The MIC and SEVIN@ reaction and refining
emissions are caustic scrubbed prior to burning in the flare. The MIC
residues are hydrolyzed and burned in a liquid in~inerator and the in-
cinerator gases are caustic scrubbed prior to being discharged to the
atmosphere. The toluene recovery vacuum jets discharge 3 kg (7 lb)/hr of
toluene to the atmosphere.
Molecular sieves are used in this process and the spent sieves are
buried in the Goff Mountain landfill.
ACROLEIN DERIVATIVES PRODUCTION
Several acrolein derivatives are
with other raw materials [Figure 26J.
a reactor, settling pot, decanter and
produced by reacting acrolein
The process equipment includes
several distillation columns.
Wastewater sources include the ,settling pot, waste pit, decanter,
still and refined tank wash, vacuum jet condenser and tank car wash
area. The settling pot water and water from tank car cleaning are
discharged to the waste pit to allow solids settling. The waste pit,
decanter, still wash and jet condenser waters are discharged to the
WWTF. Non-contact cooling water, 3,200 llmin (850 gpm), is discharged
through Outfall 002.
Emissions from all equipment are collected and burned in a flare.
There are'no uncontrolled vents in this system.

-------
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Acrolein DerivatiVes Process Schematic

-------
A-51
Waste pit .and still
Goff Mountain landfill.
discharged to the WWTF.
the powerhouse.
clean-out solids are normaliy disposed in the
At times, the solids from the waste pit are
Still and refined tank residues are burned at
ANHYDROUS ISOPROPANOL RECOVERY
Spent isopropanol is recovered and processedJto anhydrous isopropanol
in a series of distillation columns [Figure 27].
The only process wastewater source is the vacuum jet condensate.
This condensate is discharged to the WWTF. The still water is returned
to the ethylene glycol recovery system. Non-contact cooling water is
. discharged through Outfall 002.
All air emissions, except those from the storage tank, are collected
and burned in a flare. The storage tank emissions are less than 0.5 kg
(1 lb)/hr.
DINITROTOLUENE PRODUCTION-
. Dinitrotoluene (DNT) is produced by reacting toluene with nitric
acid in the presence of sulfuric acid [Figures 28 and 29].
The wastewater sources include DNT wash, scrubbers water, and cooling
tower blowdown. These wastes, 285 l/min (75 gpm), are discharged to a
pond for solids settling before being discharged to the WWTF. Cooling
water is provided from the unit cooling tower.
The reactor-DNT washer and the spent acid- concentrator vents are
the major air emission sources. The reactor-DNT washer emissions

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A-55
are.controlled by a water scrubber and the spent acid concentrator
emissions are controlled with a venturi scrubber followed by a water
scrubber. The spent acid concentrator vents are the major source of
NO ; the emissions include 450 kg (100 lb)/hr of NO and 41 kg (9 lb)/hr
x . . x
of DNT. The DNT field storage vent is submerged in a sump that dis-
charges to the WWTF. The toluene storage tank emissions are controlled
by conservation vents.
~
About once/year. the solids are removed from the settling pond and

buried in the Goff Mountain landfill.
TOLUENE DIAMINE PRODUCTION
Toluene diamine (TDA) is produced by reacting DNT in
hydrogen in the presence of a metal catalyst [Figure 30J.
crude TDA is then refined in a series of stripping stills
TDA. The methanol solvent is recycled to the process.
a solvent with
The resulting
to obtain refined
The major source of wastewater is from the secondary solvent removal
still. This water containing methanol and TDA is discharged to the WWTF
for tr~atment. Non-contact cooling water is discharged through Outfall
005.
There are 14 air emission points in this process and these emis-
sions are controlled by nitrogen blanketing the process units. No vents
discharge more than 5 kg (lOlb)/hr methanol and 0.25 kg (0.5 lb)/hr
TDA. Still residues from the stills are burned at the powerhouse.
Normally there are no solid wastes from this process but if product
problems occur (about once/year) the solids generated are disposed in
the Goff Mountain landfill. The.metal catalyst is recovered and reused.

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A-57
TOLUENE OIISOCYANATE PRODUCTION
TOA and phosgene react in a solvent (dichlorobenzene) to form
toluene diisocyanate (TOI) [Figure 31]. Phosgene is extremely toxic)
therefore all vapors containing phosgene must be collected and the
phosgene destroyed.
Wastewater sources include the vent kettle (caustic scrubber to
~ .
destroy phosgene) and the vacuum jet condensate from the ball mill.
These wastes are discharged to the WWTF for treatment. Anhydrous hydro-
chloric acid (HC1) is produced in the phosgene recovery system. Normally
this HCl is used in the methyl chloride plant but) in the event the methyl
chloride plant is not operating) HCl is discharged to the neutralization
pit) neutralized and discharged through OutfaJl 005 along with the non-
contact cooling water.
. .
All vapors from the reactor) degassers, and TOI refining are collec-
ted, caustic treated and burned in a flare. Emissions from all storage
tanks are controlled with nitrogen blanketing and conservation vents.
There are no emissions greater than 0.5 kg (1 lb)/day from this process.
Recovered TOI ball mill and clean-out solid wastes are buried in
the Goff Mountain landfill. Evaporator residue and line flushings are
drummed and contract disposed.
ALKYL BENZENE PRODUCTION
Several alkyl benzene (AB) products are made by reacting CiO through
CiS paraffins) chlorine and benzene in the presence of an aluminum chloride
catalyst [Figure '32]. Hydrochloric acid (HCl)) a by-product) must be
washed from the products.

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A-50
Wastewater sources include the hydrolysis unit scrubber water, the
decanter water, vacuum jet condensate, the decolorizing water and neutral-
izer wash water. These wastes, 300 l/min (80 gpm), are discharged to
the WWTF for treatment. Non-contact cooling water, 14 m3/min (3,700
gpm), is discharged through Outfall 005.
There are 13 air emission points from this unit and all except the
sludge hydrolysis vent are controlled by nitrogen; blanketing and conser-
vation vents. The sludge hydrolysis emissions are controlled with a
water scrubber. Up to 40 kg (90 lb)/hr of benzene is emitted from the
storage tanks during tank filling.
Filter cones, drums, hydrolysis sludge and aluminum chloride catalyst
are disposed in the Goff Mountain landfill.
LINDE@ SYSTEM
The LINDE@ system receives whole residues from the alkyl benzene
unit and converts them to heavy and jight residues in a distillation
column [Figure 33].
The vacuum jet condensate is discharged to a sump where the oil and
water 'are separated. The oil.is burned at the powerhouse and the water
and solids are discharged to the WWTF. This is the only wastewater source
from the unit. Non-contact cooling water is discharged through Outfall
002.
METHYL CHLORIDE PRODUCTION
Methanol and hydrochloric acid react in the presence of an organic
catalyst on silica to form crude methyl chloride. The crude product

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A-62
is scrubbed with sodium hydroxide,
furic acid (H2S04)' compressed and
[Figure 34J.
dried with molecular sieves and sul-
condensed to produce methyl chloride
The major wastewaters are the methanol recovery still tails, spent
H2S04, regenerator scrubber and the vacuum jet condensate. The still
tails, scrubber water and jet condensate are discharged to the WWTF.
The spent H2S04 is collected and stored for use at the WWTF.. Non-contact
cooling water is discharged through Outfall 003.
There are 4 process and 5 storage tank vents in this process. The
vapors from the product condenser, dryer and methanol still are water-
scrubbed while the spent acid vent discharges to the atmosphere. The
storage tank emissions are controlled by nitrogen blanketing. Only 1.8
kg (3.9 lb)/hr of methyl chloride is discharged to the atmosphere.
Spent molecular sieves and catalyst are neutralized and disposed in
the Goff Mountain landfill.
. UCARE@ POLYMER JR PRODUCTION
The UCARE@ Polymer JR System converts hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC)
to several cellulose polymers [Figure 35J. Chemicals used in this pro-
cess are acetic acid, isopropanol , hydroxyethyl cellulose, and trimethyl
amine.
The wastewater consists of the vacuum jet condensate, the flash pot
water and the acetic acid scrubber effluent. The vacuum jet condensate
and the flash pot water are collected and treated at the WWTF. The acetic
acid scrubber media is burned at the powerhouse. Non-contact cooling'
water is discharged through Outfall 005.

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A-55
Air pollution sources include the HEC charging system, process
vents, acetic acid scrubber and storage tanks. The HEC charging system
gas passes through a baghouse before being discharged to the atmosphere.
The vapors from the process vents are collected and acetic acid scrubbed
with small amounts discharged to the atmosp~ere. The emissions from the
scrubber are minimized by maintaining a nitrogen blanket on the system.
Storage tank emissions are controlled by nitrogen blanketing and
nitrogen purging. Less than 2.3 kg (5 lb)/hr of isopropanol is dis-
charged to th~ atmosphere from this system.
Solid wastes from the ion exchange unit~ spilled product and fil-
ters are collected and disposed of in the Goff Mountain Landfill.
POLYOX@ PRODUCTION
The POLOYX@ unit produces ethylene oxide polymers by reacting ethyl-
ene oxide and isopentane in the presence of a rare earth catalyst [Figure
36J.
The primary wastewater sources are the vacuum jets from the iso-
pentane recovery system and the caustic scrubber on the drier. This
water, 170 l/min (45 gpm), is discharged to the WWTF for treatment.
Non-contact cooling water is discharged through Outfall 005. All burn-
able wastes are collected and burned at the powerhouse.
The drier vent, the solids conveying air process vents, and storage
tanks are air pollution emission sources. The emissions from the storage
tanks and the isopentane recovery system are controlled by conservation
vents and nitrogen blanketing and the reactor vent is controlled with a
pressure vent and nitrogen bl~nketing. The emissions from the drier are
caust i c scrubbed and vented to the atmosphere.- The- so 1 ids conveyi ng and
storage bin air discharg~ through baghouses before being vented to the
atmosphere.

-------
C0
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3~
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CATALYST
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Figurp. 36.
POLOYX@ Unit' Schematic
::::-
I
0"1
0"1
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I.Sl~"'P,6E'
bllJS
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-------
A-57
Solids from the baghouse and reactor clean-ups including the spent
catalyst are disposed of in the Goff Mountain Landfill.
CATALYST PRODUCTION
There are three catalyst producing units and one catalyst metal

. .
recovery unit at this plant. The No.1 catalyst unit produces a metal
catalyst by reacting metals and acid with water and other additives
[Figure 37J. This is a batch operation.
The only wastewater sou!ce is the water from the scrubber on the
evaporator. This wastes 380 l/min (100 gpm)s is discharged to the WWTF.
Non-contact cooling and floor drain waters are discharged through
Outfall 003.
There are two air emission sources that discharge NO. The vapors
x
from the evaporator are water scrubbed and vented to the atmosphere and
roaster gases are discharged through a stack to the atmosphere without
control.' NO [32 kg (70 lb)/hrJ is emitted from these sources. During
x
the inspections emissions of greater than 50% opacity were noted for
short periods.
Roaster clean-ups blending and shipping solids are collected and
disposed of in the Goff Mountain landfill.
The No.2 catalyst unit [Figure 38J and the catalyst metal recovery
unit [Figure 39J are involved in metal recovery.
Wastewater sources include the roasters demisters leach tank and
precipitator. The leach tank and roaster waterss ls800 l/min (480 gpm)s
are discharged to the WWTF for treatment. The demister water is recycled
to the process and the precipitator water is used in the No.3 catalyst
unit. Non-contact cooling water and floor drains discharge through Out-
fall 004. Normallys there is no flow of cooling water.

-------
_t: ~I_Q~
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DISSOLVER.
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-------
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HEAT
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-------
Spent
Catalyst
Nitric Acid
Water' .
10
FLARE
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t:..
\ !


CF\RR;ER
T"'''IK
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DR)'
. ..1:J qn \"'->
01-\ D

-------
A-71
, i;'.
Air emission sources include the No.2 catalyst stackt the leach
tank ventt the drier vent and the nitric acid storage tanks. The stack
and leach tank emissions are burned in a flare and the nitric acid stor-
age tanks are nitrogen blanketed.
then to the atmosphere.
The drier vents to a baghouse and
The No.3 catalyst unit has no air emissions or solid wastes. The
only wastewater source is from' the settling tanks~ Once per day 19 m3
(StOOD gal) of water is discharged to the WWTF.
RIGID POLYOLS PRODUCTION
Rigid Polyols are produced by a series of batch reactors and dis-
tillation columns [Figure 40J. Raw materials used are ethylene oxidet
propylane oxides caprolactonet methylene chloridet and toluene disocyanate.
The only wastewater sources are the reactor
This waters 230 l/min (60 gpm)s is discharged to
Non-contact cooling waters S m3/min (ls300 gpm)s
Outfall 005.
and refining jets.
the WWTF for treatment.
is discharged through
There are 12 emission points from this process. Vents ls 2s 3s 4s
5 and 7 are controlled by vent jets followed by condensers and nitrogen
blanketing. Vent 6 discharges through a resin bed to the atmosphere.
Vent 8 discharges th~ough a carbon adsorption column to the atmosphere.
Vents 9t lOt 11 are nitrogen blanketed; 'vent 12 is also-nitrogen blanke-
ted and has a conservation vent. Methylene chloride is discharged to
the atmosphere from the storage tanks during tank filling (30 kg-(65
lb/hr)).
L

-------
@ IDe ~
-: 1.1 ...!i "1
(',' N. 
C' (\1 0 ()
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-------
A-73
So 1 i d waste sources "i ncl ude fi 1 ter waste, used drums, mud slurry
from sumps, trenches, carbon traps, resin bed and etc. These wastes are
disposed of in the Goff Mountain landfill.
BOILERS
There are two powerhouses at this facility [Figure 41]. The No.1
powerhouse has eight boilers; emissions are controlled by cyclones and
electrostatic precipitators (ESP's). The ESP's were installed between
1968 and 1972 for particulate control. Sulfur dioxide (S02) is control-
. led by burning low sulfur (less than 1%) coal. Source tests, conducted
by Union Carbide, indicate ~he particulate discharges were between 1.8
and 6.8 kg (4 and 15 lb)/hr/stack and the State Regulations allow 8.8 kg
(19.3 lb)/hr/stack. The opacity of each of the 8 stacks is monitored by
Bailey monitors.
The No.2 powerhouse has three boilers and one stack. An ESP is
currently being installed on each boiler. The Company planned for these
ESP's to be operational by August 1978. In addition a Lear Siegler opac-
ity monitor will be installed.
Boiler blowdown and softener backwash from both powerhouses are
. discharged to the WWTF. Cooling water from No.1 powerhouse is dis-

. .
charged through Outfall 003 while the cooling water from No.2 power-
house is discharged through Outfall 008 (Goff Branch).
Fly ash and.bottom ash are disposed of by a contractor (Cunningham
Realty). In,the event that the contractor cannot take the fly ash, the
Company has an emergency fly ash pond. Water overflow from this pond is
discharged through Outfall 008 (Goff Branch).

-------
('~l
\~'"
, t~
~ElEU ~O;:' /, Tic..
I'REC.IPI""iATORS

---1 .


(r:;Et,IIA~JiC~'L J'
COLI.[ (1 (jl\~")

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I'W.l
STEAM 'PlA NT
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(..) F.lbllT P-.OILER'S 'JI'J1D r. <:.\).'(.\ E. STrlc.i~. .r-D (n'/'Cru5T 1978
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Fuel Oi\
, C j. 0 r a <1 e
r,:.:.. .J J

-------
A-75
OTHER POLLUTION SOURCES
Domestic, shop and barge dock sump wastes are discharged to the
WWTF. In addition, the WWTF receives truck washing waste from a Com-
pany-owned truck washing facility. The facility is not managed by UCI
personnel.

-------
A-77
III.
POLLUTION ABATEMENT PRACTICES
The NPDES permit issued to the Union Carbide Institute Plant
authorizes the discharge of wastewaters to the Kanawha River through
eleven outfalls. The Company has eliminated five~of these outfalls.
Non-contact cooling water (NCCW) is discharged untreated to the river
through Outfalls 002, 003, 004, 005 and 008.
Sanitary wastes, Goff Mountain landfill leachate, and process waste-
waters are treated in an activated sludge wastewater treatment facility
(WWTF) [Figure 42]. The process wastewaters are neutralized in the plant
prior. to being pumped to the WWTF. Higher than normal flows and spills
6
are diverted into a 26,500 m3 (7xlO gal) emergency storage pond and
then slowly returned to the WWTF for treatment. The combined flow is
discharged into two primary clarifiers, 945 m3 (250,000 gal) each. The
clarifier effluent is discharged into an equalization basin (18,900 m3 -
5 x 106 gal) equipped with two 50HP aerators to keep the contents mixed.
The equalization basin effluent pH is adjusted with either NaOH or H2S04. .
H3P04 is added to provide, a source of phosphorus as the wastewaters enter
the three activated sludge basins (18,900 m3 - 5xl06 gal each). Each
basin is equipped with ten aerators, rated at 75 to 100 HP each. The
biologically treated wastewater then passes through three 945 m (250,000
gal) final clarifiers and is discharged into the Kanawha River through
Outfall 001.
Solids removed from the secondary clarifier are either returned to
the activated sludge basins or wasted along with primary solids to a
1,040 m3 (275,000 gal) thickener. The thickener overflow is returned to
the neutralization pit. The thickened sludge (2% solids) is either
piped or trucked to Holz Pond which is operated by Union Carbide South

-------
\!
[1I1(~(9cncy
StOl'iJqC Pond
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Caustic
Acid
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Basin
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~~ Neutralization.
.
.
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Outfall 001'
Elliergency
Sludge
Holding

-------
A-79
Charleston Plant. The supernatant from Holz pond is treated at the
South Charleston Sewage Treatment Company.
The Company measures WWTF influent and effluent (Outfall 001) flows
by means of a calibrated orifice and Marsh McBirney (Model 250) flow
meter, respectively. In addition, the influent (Kennison Flow Nozzles)
and effluent (Weir) flow from the aeration basins and the overflow
(Kennison Flow Nozzle) from the sludge thickener ~re also measured. At
the time of the NEIC visit, the Marsh McBirneyflow meter was not opera-
ting. Therefore, effluent flows were calculated based on the influent
to the aeration basins less the amount of-sludge wasted. Companyoffi-
cials stated that the WWTF discharge normally varies between 17,000 and
18,900 m3/day (4.5 and 5 mgd).
The flow through the Outfalls 002, 003, 004, 005 and 008 is measur-
ed periodically by a lithium-tracer technique. Those results are com-
pared to intake meter readings which, in turn, are used to determine
daily flow. According to Company officials, these flows remain fairly
constant.
Time-weighted composite samples from the cooling water discharges
and the emergency ash pond overflow are collected in refrigerated sam-
pling containers. . In addition, each outfall is equipped with a total
-carbon analyzer (TCA) which is telemetered to the WWTF and monitored by
the operators. If the TCA indicates a problem, grab samples are collec-
ted and analyzed on a GC to identify the source of the discharge.
WWTF effluent samples (Outfall 001) are composited by continuously
pumping an equal volume aliquot into the glass sampling container. - The
Company also installed a TCA to continuously monitor the quality of the
discharge.
In addition to the sampling and TCA installed to monitor the
outfalls, the Company has installed several in-plant samplers, TCA

-------
A-80
and GC units to monitor the process wastewaters. Company personnel
use these data to identify spills, leaks, poor housekeeping practices,
etc.
Union Carbide has done some organic chemicals monitoring in the
effluent but the results were preliminary and were not available. During
the inspection, NEIC personnel collected a grab sample from Outfall 001
to screen for toxic pollutants and other organics~ The analyses showeQ
a total of 30 organic chemicals present in the sample [Attachment AJ.
Of these, 13 were toxic pollutants and 7 had concentrations of 10 ~g/l
or greater. These were 1,2 dichlorobenzene (260 ~g/l); 1,4 dichloroben-
zene (13 ~g/l); 2,6-dinitrotoluene (1,000 ~g/l); .1,2-diphenylhydrazine
(41 ~g/l); methylene chloride (20 ~g/l); naphthalene (99 ~g/l) and bis
(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (25 ~g/l). In addition, the insecticide carbaryl
. was detected at 260 ~g/l. No nitrosamines were detected.
The Company has extensive air pollution controls including numerous
scrubbers, flares, baghouses, and electrostatic precipitators. In 1977
an air emissions inventory was conducted at the plant. This inventory
includes estimates of hydror::a~bon, NOx and S02 emission rates, from each
vent.
Chemical solid waste, 44,500 kg (98,000 lb)/day is d1sposed of in
. the Company owned and operated Goff Mountain 1 andfi 11 along wi th the
chemical solid wastes from the Union Carbide, South Charleston plant. A
listing of materials disposed of in this landfill is presented in Attach-
ment C. Trash (paper, wood, etc.) about 3,175mtons (3,500 tons)/yr is
disposed in the Regional Development Authority Landfill located at Cross
. .

Lanes, West Virginia. WWTF waste sludge is collected and trucked to
'Holz pond (Company owned) in South Charleston; fly and bottom, ash are
contract disposed.

-------
A~8l
The Goff Mountain chemical landfill has been studied by E. D'Appo-
lonia Consulting Engineers. The D'Appolonia Report [Attachment B] states
that this landfill has a 0.6lm (2 ft) thick selected clay seal to pre-
vent leaching. In addition, the landfill has two extensive drainage
systems. The first collects the contaminated waste from the landfill and
the second collects the peripheral storm runoff. At the time of the
inspection, the storm runoff collection system was in the final construc-
tion stages. The contaminated water is treated to remove the oil and
retained in a pond. This waste is then discharged slowly to the WWTF
for treatment. The peripheral storm runoff will be discharged to Goff
Branch. The ground water in the area is sampled and analyzed for pH,
total carbon, carbonat6 carbon and color from 4 wells at least once per
quarter.
The landfill standard operating procedure is to surface blend one
volume of earth with one volume of waste and then compact these. This
earth/waste blending is a continuous operation six out of every eight
working hours.
The Company keeps records of all material disposed in the landfill.
This landfill is expected to be active until the year 2004.

-------
A-83
IV.
EVALUATION OF SELF-MONITORING PRACTICES
BIOASSAY PROCEDURES
The bioassay evaluation [Attachment C], cond~cted on April 11,
1978 shows that the Company bioassay facilities are maintained at the
Union Carbide Technical Center in South Charleston. The facility is
environmentally controlled and properly equipped for bioassay testing.
The bioassays and the associated chemical tests are performed accord-
ing to Standard Methods@, except as noted below:
1.
The effluent sample collected for bioassay testing is a
24-hour equal-volume composite rather than a 24-hour flow-
proportional composite as required by the NPDES permit.
2.
The bioassay tests do not always commence within eight
hours after sample collection as recommended by Standard.
Methods.
3.
Dechlorinated city tap water is used as dilution water
rather than Kanawha River water' as required by the NPDES
permit.
4.
The bioassay tests are not done in duplicate as recom-
mended by Standard Methods.
5.
All bioassays are aerated throughout the 96-hour test
period. Aeration should be discontinued except in cases
where BOD or COD are sufficiently high that adequate dis-
solved oxygen concentrations cannot be maintained..

-------
A-84
6.
The laboratory depends on controlled ambient air tempera-
ture to maintain a constant test temperature. It is advis-
able, but not required that a constant temperature water
bath be used to maintain test temperature~.
ANALYTICAL PROCEDURES
~
The Company performs all analyses required by the NPDES permit.
Analyses are performed according to EPA-approved methods except for
total dissolved solids (TDS) [Attachment OJ. TDS is determined by
subtracting the difference between total and suspended solids. This
results in a value higher than the true value.
Samples collected on weekends are not analyzed until Monday.
The TOC, NH3-N and TKN samples are not being cooled but are acidified
as required to preven~ sample degradation. Lack of proper preserva-
tion could result in low TOC and TKN values and higher NH3-N results.
The analytical quality assurance program consists of routine and
blend duplicates, blend and spikes, and reference samples for all.
permit parameters. These procedures are continually being updated by
the Union Carbide Technical Center.
SAMPLING PROCEDURES
As previously noted, Company personnel collect time-weighted
composite samples from the NCCW and WWTF discharges. Company
officials stated that as the discharge flows remain essentially con-
stant, the resulting time-weighted samples should be flow proportional,
as required by the NPDES permit.

-------
A-85
Samples from the WWTF (Outfall 001) are collected from a manhole
at the point where the clarifier discharges Join. These samples may
not be representative of the combined discharge. Company personnel
should either verify that the samples are representative or relocate
the sampling station.
Phenolic compound samples are aliquoted from the composite sampl~
and not preserved during collection. ~
FLOW MONITORING
As previously noted, the flow measurement device on the WWTF
discharge (Outfall 001) was not operating. Flows were being cal-
culated based on the amount of wastewate~ entering the aeration
basins, less the amount of sludge wasted. Provided these flow
devices are calibrated properly, the resulting calculated value
should be acceptable.
SELF-MONITORING DATA
Data from the Discharge Monitoring Reports (DMR1s) for October
1977 through March 1978 are summarized in Tables 4 and 5. These data
show that the Company has been in violation of permit limitations as
shown in Table 6.

-------
>-
I
co
0'
Table 4

SUHI.If1RY or 0 I SCllflflGE ~10tllT()R I NG RE PORTS
UNIOII CflllOlOE It~SrnUTE PLfIIH
OUH IlL L 001
au traIls
parametera
Permit LimiLJtions
(Oai I:';~
Avg. '.lax.
October
(Oil i ly)
/lvg. 1.lax.
November
-,iiaTyy-r--
Avg. /.1ax.
Oecemher
-:-CD~i ly)
Avg. "1Jx.
-~~!.!~~Y-
(Dai ly)
Avg. 11ax.
--.!:~~I'Ui1!:L-
(Daily)
flvg. '.Iax.
--~e.ri 1
(Dai ly)
Avg. '.Iax.
BOD-kg/day Hay-Oct 2,270 5,000 397 1,090           
-lb/dJY  5,000 11,000 875 2,400           
- kg/day Nov. -April 3,860 8,600   500 1,860 4,860. 7,220 8,580 14,200 6,000 8,850 3,360 8,580
-lb/day  8,500 19,000   1 ,100 4,100 10,700 15,900 18 ,900 31,200 13,200 19,500 7,400 18,900
TSS-ky/day  1,270 1,910 4,000 46,800 590 3,540 730 1,680 6,580 24,600 4,000 27,100 1,230 12,400
-lb/day  2,800 4,200 8,800 103,000 1,300 7,800 1,600 3,700 14,496 54,200 0,800 59,700 2,700 '27,300
TOC-k9/day Hay-Oct. 4,450 10,000 1,860 3,900           
-1t>/d~iy   10,000 22,000 4,100 8,600          
-k9/day lIov. -April 7,720 1,729   2,3GO 4,450 7,200 15,400 12,000 24,400 0,540 16,200 6,270 11,850
-lb/day  17,100 30,000   5,200 9,800 15,900 34,000 26,3BO 53,800 18,800 35,600 13 ,000 26,100
TKll-fl- f.q/day 1,500 3,000 1,040 3,000 UGO 1,540' 1,210 2,000 1,3(jO 1.%0 1,140 1,900 7JO 1,73.1
-lb/day 3,300 6,600 2,300 G,600 1,900 3,400 2,800 4,400 3,OlHJ 4,30n 2,500 4,200 1,600 3,.000
tIII3-N-kg!d.1Y G80 1,360 4!J0 1,040 540 1,270 270 730 210 270 lB5 020 210 680
-1t>/d.-IY 1 . ~)OO 3,000 1,0110 2,300 1,200 2,HIIO [,110 1, GOO 4JO (iliO 406 I,BOO '1('11 1,500
Ch 1 od d" ~ - kg/day 10-1,000 136,OIJ0 63 ,GOO' 06,700 55,100 80, ) 00 . 104,900 120,000 72,200 102,600 59,900 G 1,700 55,BOO 78,300
-1l1/day 228,000 300,000 140,000 191,000 121,400 176,500 231,000 202,000 159,000 225,900 132,000 136,000 123,000 172,500
Fecal Cel i form               
110./100 ml 200 400 0 0   Nil Nil Nil Nil Ni1 Nil Nil IIi 1
Threshold Odor flo. 512 1,024 32 32 128 128   512 512    
Temp 0C (oF) tVA 43.3  23  22  23  16  20  21
   (110)  (73)  (72)  (74)  (60)  (68)  (69)
pH range   6.0-3.0 6.8-1'.6 7.0-7.9 6.9-7.6 7.0-7.5 ,,: 6.8-7.4 6.8-7.5
a Kg/uay and DC calculated by IIEIC.

-------
Tah1'p' !j
SUI.IW\I!Y OF OISCIIAI!GF ,.torHlornNG Hl:f'OI!TS
IH/IOtI CAIWIIJE lU:;IIIIJII: f'l.i\fll
IICCH OIlLI.III~,
----------------. -
.-----------..-------------.---....---------.
Oul.I"II'.
1',"'''1111' L("'~;\
/"'1"1111 t. I i 111 i , ;, l. i 1111',
(11.,j 1'1)" -
AV~/. /'I"x.
Oc 1.11111'1' IIIIv"lIIhl'"
"(11.;;1'1)''''''. ..... (11.11/'1)
Av!!. 1.1<1)(. , Av!!. 1.1.lx.
111'1;"1111",1'
. (11.d I y ) ......
AvO. 1-1<1)(.
-------
 002 TOC 01911 4  12 0.35 4   
  TKU mull 0.5 1.5 0.05 0.42   
  IIII,,-N mfJll 0.2 0.6 0.02 0.12   
  pll I','lIfJe  6. O' !. 0     6.9-7.8  
  1p.mp 0c (oF) N/A 43.3(110) -   25(77)   
 003 ToC mall 4  12 0.5 3 0.65 4
  1 Kfl m~l/ 1 0.5 1.5 0.06 0.39 0.02 0.09
  UII3-N O1CJ/l 0.2 0.6 0.004 0.03 0  0
  pll rall!]e  6.0-';.0     7.2-7.6  6.0-8.2
  Temp C(F) ilIA 43.3(110) -   22(72)   23(74)
 004 lOC 019/1 4  12 1.3 8 4.6 62
  TKII mg/l 0.5 1.5 0.05 0.24 0.15 0.36
  IIH3-N mgll 0.2 0.6 0.008 0.06 0.006 0.1
  pH range  6.0-j.0     3.5-7.5  6.0-10.3
  Temp C(F) 'N/A 43.3(110) -   .24(75)   29(85)
 005 lOC 1\I()/l 4  12 1.6 29 2.5 16
  TW mn/l 0.5 1.5 0.7.7 1.73 0.34 1. 41
  /111'1- II 11I~,1 I 0.2 0.6 0.21 0.90 0.31 1. 92
  I'll ";111'1(>  (,. n. '1.0    fi.0-7.n  1.7-11.0
  I'.'IIIJI "I:( "I ) II/A 1]3.3(110) -   21](75)   23(13)
 SuI f i tic lII!lll /1/1\ 1111\ 0.06 0.21\   
' 008 lOC mrJ/l 4  12 0.4 3 0.75 4
  1Kf1 011)/1 0.5 1.5 0.06 0.58 0.02 0.2
  IHl3 - N mg/l 0.2 0.6 0.03 0.17 0  0.04
  pll ra nge  6.0-9.0    6.9-8.5  4.0-10.4
  Temp O( (0 F) N/A 43.3(110) -   27(80)'   31(88)
[011111 1'H'd Chlol'id. klJ/d"y 1:17,000 IIJ7.,OO(J  (,0,500 94.500  46,400 %,GOO
(fill? ,00.1, 11I/0I.1Y 30?',Onl) 400,0(1) 1:!3,1~5 20fJ,?~,O 102,?02 212,/1/5
0(,4 ,OU5,            
111111) 1'1"'11111. ~ ,,/.1.0.'1 1i'  Hi' 2.0 4. f) '1../ I ,.
 .1. ~,
   III/day '/U  IIJO 6.2 8.8 5.9 12
  Thrp.sllOld Odor 110. 128 256 4   1\   
        I    
a kg/day and DC calculaLed by IlEIC.
2.2
0.14
o
.... ,J.11I1I;\I'Y. ...
(11.,11 y)
/IV!). I'\"x.
r ..II 1'1 I.II'Y
..... .. (11.111.'1) , .-
Av!). t'I..,~.
----
'.t'l'ch
.--_. (lI.d Iy j" ,-
A'/'I. H,'K.
.--.
15 1.7 7
0.80 0.16 1.2
0.03 0.001 0.~2
5.6-11.5 7.0-10."
14(57) 9(~0)
2.4 13
0.15 1.28
o 0.2
6.0-7.4
19(66)

1. 9 14
0.24 1.5
o 0.5
7,0- 9.2 .
26(78) ,
5.6 28
0..13 n.79
O.Dl 0.01
. ".5-10. "
II (f~O)
0.00
n.03
1. 3 9
0.1 0.83
0.02 0.27
6.8-7.4 .
20((;0)
/J2,9I)O 116,)00
1U2,500 25G.on~
!i.O
11. 1
n."
18.4
4.8 21
0.14 0.9
0.001 0.01
6.0-7.0
14(57)
22
1.5
0.8
7.1-8.8
20C 68)
3.6
0.34
o
2.4 10
O. :\? 1. 5
O. OJ O.?U
3.0-1".3
Ir.(!,")
0.(113
0.0:\
3.7 17. "'-
0.1]2 0.70
0.03 0.09
7.1\-7.9
13(56)
9",(;UO
?0IJ,3f!4
111,900
2'1(. , 5Cilj
'/./.(,
'GO.8
1 :W
30!"
0.8 3
0.03 ,0.29
o 0
7.3-8.7
10(50)
16
0.94
0.05
6.0-9.0
13(55)

2.3 19
0.10 0.32
o 0.05
7.2-8.9
21(70)
2.6
0.00
o
1.8 8
0.3fi 2.2
O. (J.I n.33
:1.0-10.0
I jI( 54)
0.4
0.1
3 16
0.32 1.85
0.04 O. 16
7.2-10
14(57)
/0, GOO !I~i, !JOO
113 .200 210,3(;5
0.1'1
. 1.7
3.0
(j.G
6
0.99
0.06
6.5-8.8
18(65)
0.7
0.09
o
14
1. 46
0.05
6.3-9.0'
16(61)

7.2 64
0.66 3.:41
0.03 0.22
6.0-11.0
24(75)
3. 1
0.24
o
1.8 10 .
0.0[, 0.7.7
0.02 n. II
3.0-10.5 '
Hi( (.0)
1. 84
0.54
12.8 101
O. 18 1. 08
0.03 0.17
7.0-9.0
27(130)
01,400 ')I,20U
179,340 214,200
7.r.
5./1
". r.
lU. I
:l-
I
co
-......J

-------
A-88
  Table 6     
 SUMMARY OF PERMIT VIOLATIONS    
 OCTOBER 1977 THROUGH MARCH 1978   
    ~  
  No. Months Limitation Exceeded  
Parameter   Outfall    
 001 002 003 004 005 008
BOD 3 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
TSS 6 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
TOC 2 1 4 5 3 2
TKN 0 0 0 1 1 1
NH -N 0 0 0 1 2 0
3
Chlorides 1 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
pH 0 2 0 2 5 2
In addition, the combined discharges of Dutfalls 002, 003, 004 ,005
and 008 also violated the daily maximum phenol limitation in January 1978.

-------
A-89
ATTACHMENT A
ORGANIC CHEMICALS IDENTIFICATION

-------
w.
s'
~~
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
. OFFICE OF ENFORCEMENT'
NATIONAL ENFORCEMENT INVESTIGATIONS CENTER
. BUILDING 53, BOX 25227, DENVER FEDERAL CENTER
DENVER, COLORADO 80225
TO
Dr. ~Jayne Smi th
Process Control Branch
DATE: June 2, 1978
fROM:
O. J. Logsdon
SUBJECT:
Organics Analysis Results:
W\.JTC Recon Sampl es -
Union Carbide Institute Plant and South Charleston
'.
~
Summary:
Water samples from Union Carbide Institute Plant and South Charleston \.JHTC
were received under chain-of-custody procedure~ and analyzed for organics
characterization and selected priority pollutants. These reconnaissance
sampl es contained numerous chemicals, some of ".,hi ch \'Jere pri ority po n utants.
Recommendations:
Analysis of the reconnaissance samples showed many organic solvent components,
cellosolves, etc. If a full survey is conducted, arialysis by direct aqueous
injection techniques will be required to acquire accurate quantitative data
for these compounds. Only small amounts of phenol and 2,4-dinitrophenol .
and some low molecular weight acids were detected in the acidic fractions.
Therefore, with only a minor compromise in data quality, samples from the
survey ~hould be analyzed for neutrals extractables instead of the time
consuming acids and base/neutrals procedure. for these two locations unless
priority pollutants are specifically requested.
Union Carbide Institute Plant
Table I shows the results of organics characterization analysis of sample
number 003-30-A~4-ll~78-0900~SeV~n chemical~ were confirmed by comparison
.' of thei rmass spectra to i n-housereference spectra; . Ten additional coni-
pounds were identified but not confirmed. Priority pollutant analysis de-
tected 12 co~pounds, 7 of which exceeded 10 ug/l.The data are attached.

This sample was also analyzed for extractable nitrosamines. Attached is
Mr. Nottingham's memo describing the analysis. None of the following nitro-
samines were detected: dimethyl, diethyl, methyl ethyl, methyl propyl,
ethyl propyl, di propyl, ethyl butyl, propyl butyl, methyl amyl,. d i butyl,
and diamyl nitrosamines, nitrosopiperidine, nitrosopyrolidine, and nitroso-
morpholine. - .
The sample was also subjected to analysis by high performance liquid chroma-
tography. The herbicide Carbaryl was detected at 260 ug/l. Mr. Nottingham'~
discussion of the analysis is attached. .

:!-

-------
.
- A,92
'"
- '- -
South Charleston \o!HTC

Tables rr*and rrr*show the results of the organics characterization analysis
of samples: 003-40-A-4-12-78-lll5, 003-4l-A-4-l2-78-l030, 003-43-A-4-l2-78-ll00
and 003-45-A-4-l2-78-l050. Thirteen chemicals were identified and confirmed
by GemS analysis. Thirty other chemicals were identified but not confirmed.
Numerous other components were not identified; however, many mass spectra
had the characteristics of alkyl ethers-and alcohols. Available self-
monitoring data (SeSTH influent and effluent July - December, 1977) show
numerous oxygenated solvents e.g. cellosolves, acetates, and alcohols, a
few of which have been identified in these $amples. - -
~
.~
Priority pollutant analysis was limited to acid and base/neutrals extractables
and volatile organics. Numerous compounds were detected and are reported in
the attached tables. -In addition, sample 003-45-A-4-l2-78-l080 was analyzed
for nitrosamines. None of the following nitrosamines were detected: dimethyl,
diethyl, methyl ethyl, methyl propyl, ethyl propy), dipropyl, ethyl.butyl,
propyl butyl, methyl amyl, dibutyl, and diamyl nitrosamines, nitrosopiperidine,
nitrosopyrolidine, and nitrosomorpholine. "" -
-
" "


. 'Iy\/U~[~L- . r~

o. JohrJLogsdon
Attachments
cc:
Hatneway
Young
r~asse
-
* Tables II and" III not included in this report; available upon request
from NEre.

-------
A-93
Table I;' Union Carbide Institute; 'Outfall 001
003-30-A
Compounds Identified and Confirmed
Name
Concentration (ug/l)
Acetone
a
'-
310.
260. ;1,
Chloroform
1,2-dichlorobenzene
Dicyclopentadiene
a
2,6-dinitrotoluene
210.
1000.
N,N-dimethylaniline
2-naphthol
b
a-could not quantitate; does not purge quantitatively during volatile
organics analysis
b-unable to quantitate
Compounds Identified But Not Confirmed
Name
m-aminoacetophenone
l-butoxy-2-propanol
Carbon disulfide
3,4-dihydro-dimethyl-l(2H)-naphthalene isomer
2,5-dimethyl-1H-benzimidazole
2-methyl-l,3-dioxolane
2-methyl-2-pentanol
2-methylpropanenitrile
1,2,6-trimethylpiperidine
1 ,e ,5-tri methyl-2,4 ,6-~ri oxohexahydrotri azi ne

-------
A-94
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
OFFICE OF ENFORCE.MENT. .
NATioNAL ENFORCEMEl'H INVESTIGATIONS CENTER
BUILDING 53, BOX 25227, DENVER FEDERAL CENTER
DENVER, COLORADO 80225
TO
Mr. O. John Logsdon
Chemistry Coordinator
Kanawha River Study
DATE: Apri 1 25, 1978
FROM:
K. E. Nottingham
SUBJECT:
Nitrosamine Analysis of Kanawha River Samples
~~
Results
.;,
. .
Two samples were ~ubmitted for nitrosamine analysis. . No nitrosamines were
found in either sample. The detection limits are given below.
Station # Sta ti on Location  Date Time
003-030 U.C. Inst. Outfall 001 4/11 /78 0900
,:fi     
-"      
'003-04"}=- SCW0TC Outfall 001  4/12/78 1050
Sequence
Detection Limit
of Dimethyl n itrosami ne I
A
A
<0.1
ug/l
<0.05 ug/l
,."
The dimethylnitrosamine detection limit for 003-045 was less than that of
003-030 due to the large amount of interferences in 003-030.

Methodology
--
.,'
";
~
.~t'~10 ~.
One liter of the sample was extracted serially with two 50 ml portions of
methylene chloride. The extracts were combined in a 250 ~l Kuderna-Danish
evaporative-concentrator. 0.7 ml of isooctane was added to the solvent
extract and the mixture was concentrated to 1 ml at 600C.
The extract was analysis by gas chromatography-thermal energy analysis.
~T~
K. Eric Nottingham

-------
Et'JVIRONMENT M PRO~ECTION AGEt-JCY
OFrICE Of Er-!F02CE!v\ENT
Nf, TlONAL ENFORCEMENT INI/ESTIGA TIONS CENTER
A~-95
BUJLD:NG 53, BOX 25227, DE~\/cR FEDERAL CENTti\
DENVER, COlORADO 80225
TO
Mr. O. John Logsdon
Chemistry Coordinator
Kana\'/ha Ri ver Study
DATE: Apri 1 24. '/978
FROt.\ :
K. E. Nottingham
SUBJ,,(T,
Carbaryl Analysis of Sample No. 003-030A from the Kanawha River Study
~~
Res ul ts
~
Carbaryl was detected on a liquid chromatograph at a concentration of
260 ug/l. .
f'1ethodo 1 09Y
The use of 1 i qui d chromatography \'/aS necessary
detected on a gas chromatograph due to thermal
~,-n a heated injection port.
becau se Ca l~ba I~yl can not .be
degradation of the compound
,

500 ml of the sample was extracted serially with two 50 ml portions of
~J1ethylene chloride. The extracts were combined and passed through Na2S04
into a 100 ml round bottom flask. 50 ml of ethyl acetate was added to the:'
flask and the solvents \./ere concentrated to 10 ml in a rotary evaporator'
at 450C.- The extract--~'las passed through a clean-up column of 3 cm Flor'isi1
topped \'lith 1 cm of Na-ZS04' The Carbaryl el uted \.:ith the 10 ml of ethyl
acetate. - .
The extract was analyzed on a Waters 204 Liquid Chromatograph. A methano1-
1% acetic acid gradient was used over 25 minutes at a flow rate of2.0 ml/min.
. TI12 gradient viaS run from 0 to 60~~ methanol. The dual channel UV detector
was operated at wavelengths of 254 nm and 280 nm. The ratio of 254/280
response fo}' both the standards and the Carbaryl peak in the sample \'/a.s .38.
~
~" 'YI -:-T' (I
. 14":L--t.lJ....,-,.c-~",,~,,-&-
'J .
K. Eric Nottingham

-------
.- . ~ ; ~.I,.... l, I
A-B6
--------------------------
.- :.J!. t.. ~.j ~. ... p.: .;... t.. r L . oJ '* ..:.a
U.C. INST.
OtJT!="t.LL 001
STORET !.:O
STATION LDCATI6N: OUTFALL 001
LAS02ATORY SAMPLE NO: 003-30..
OAT~ & TIME OF SAMPLE COLL~CTION:
COMPJSITE TIME: 00 H~ .
00111
08"20
003.
004.
005.
805.
DO?
0,]13.
009.
01.) .
J 11 .
012.
013.
01/u
015.
016.
:) 17.,
018.
019.
02:).
021 II
o 2? e
o 2~.
024.
025.
~J26.
027.
028.
0290
031 II
11APR78
CO;1PO ur~ 0 NAN E
U 9 CO H R S
"r~NAPHTHEt\E
ACROLEIN
,t,CRYLONITRILE
3FNZENE:*
DF~iZIDINf:
C~RaO~ .TFTRACHLORIOE CTETRACHLOROMETHANE)*
CHLOROBENZENE*
1,214 -H, ICHLOR08ENZEi\F
HEXACHLOR08ENZF~E
'12-0ICHLO~O[THA~E*
'J111-TRICHL0ROETHA~E*
H[XACHLCROETHANE
',1-JICHLOROETHA~EM
1 , 1 J 2 - T F. I C H L C ROt: T H A i-i E *
111J2J2-TETRACHLORJ~THANE*
CHLCROETHAN~*
8ISCCHLOROMfTHYL) ETHFR*
6I$C2-CHLORG[THYL) ETH~~
~ - C ii L 0 ~ GET H Y L V I N Y LeT H i: R <:1 I X f D ) *
2-CHLOQONAPHTHALErE
2'4J6-TRICHLO~OFHENOL
FtR.l.CHLORO~ETA CF;FSGL
CHLOROFORM CTRICHLORC~ETHANE)*
2-C~LORGPHENOL .
1 j2-0ICHLCROSOiZENE
1 13 - J I C H LOR a b E ~; ZEN E
1 J L. -'D Ie H LOR () 3 E N '- [r~ E
3,3~-DICHLOR03~NZIDINE
iJ1-01CHLORGErHYLEN~~
1J2-T~ANS-OIC~LORJETHYLENF*
..
* VOA A~ALYSrS (UNPR~SFRV=D/PRESfRVED)
T T~~CE
NA NOT ANALYZED FO~
NO "OT DETECTED
N~I NOT ABLE TO A~ALYZ~ DU~ TO IN1~~FERENCE
-#-
r " l:> r U .,
~
UG/L .
CONC.
. uo.
. NA
NA
NO
NA
3.8
NO
NO
1;0
-~8-
ND
rw
NO
NO
NO
NA
NA
1..9
ND
NI)
NO
NO
- NO
NO
260.
6..6
13.
NA
N8
NO
;""':"".-. -,
.:..

-------
, .. ~ -. . . . -~... ..
..' ~ ,'.",.... I V -. ......
-------,_._-----------------
u.::. INST.
OUTFALL 001
STORrT ~;Q
STATION LOCATION: OUTFALL 001
L~SOR~TO~Y SAMPLE NO: 083-30
DATE & TIME OF SAMPLE COLLECTION:
C 0 ~ P G ~ I TF. T 1;1 E: 00 H R
11AfR78
CO~POIJi\D NA~1[
031. 214-0ICHLORuPH:::NOL
o 32. 1 1 2 - 0 I C; H LOR CPR 0 F M!-:;: * .
Q33. 113-~ICHLORCFROPYLENE*
034. 2}4-0n~fT~YLPHEi,OL
035. 2JL-DINITROTOLUENE
:J ? 6 t 2}:S -0 un 1 ROT 0 L U E~! I:
037. 1}Z-JIPH[NYLHYDRtZI~E
038. ET~YL9E~ZENE*
039. FLUORIN1HENl
040. 4-CHLO~GFHENYL PHENYL FTriER
041.. 4-~R0!1JHiF.NYL PHE::OL ETH::R
04~, 3IS(2-CHLGROISOPROPYL) ETHER
043~ 3rS(2-CHLOROETHOXYJ METHANE
04Le METHYLENE CriLORIDE (OICHLOROMETHAN~)*
045. ~[THYL CHLORIDE (CHLOROMCTHANE)*
046. METHYL 8ROMIDE (B~OMOMETrlAN~)*
047e 3ROMOFORM (TRI8~OMOMETHANE).
048. JICHLORG~ROMO~ETHA~E*
0&9. T~ICHLOROFLUDROMfTHANE*
050. DICHLORJDIFLUOROMETHANE
051. CYLORO]I8ROMO:JETHANE*
J52. HF.>:ACHLORO~\.JTADIE!J~
053. HEXACHLOROCYCLOF[NTtOIF~E
054" ISOPhOr.OI~E .
055, NAPHTY~L~NE
056. r~ITRoa!:r,ZEN[
057. 2-NITROPHENUL
058. 4-NITROFHEMOL
059~ 2}4-CINITRO~H~NOL
061. 416-UINITRO-O-CrtESOL
*
V0AAHALYSFS (UNPRFSERVFO/PRES~RVED)
T TR!.CE
NA ~CT A~ALYZF.D FOR
NO flOT OETECTED
N Id ~. UTA 8 L E 1 0 H: A L Y ZF
our: TO INTfRFEREr~CF.
-#-
r .- '.- ~ '.' ::.
o 900 H R S
~
...
A-97
UG /L
CONC.
NO
l'4D
NO
NO
N8
1!JOJ.
41 .
NO
/';D
i'~ A
N!"J
NO
NO
2:::: II
jiA
NA
~.! i)
t~ i)
N8
NA
NO
ND
ND
2.2
99.
f\lD
t~.D
tiD
ND
NO

-------
A-98
u c C. I 1'-! ST.
UUTrALL 081
S T 0 ~ ~ T ~~ G
ST~TIO~ L~CATION: OUTFALL 001
LASO~ATORY SA~PLE ~o: 003-30
DATE & TI~f OF SAMPLE CDLLECTION:
CO~?OSITE TIMe: 00 HR .
11APR7g
J 9 GO H h S
COMPO'H:Q NA~E
061. ~-~ITROSODIHETHYLAMINE
062. N-NITROSODIPHENYLAMINE
0t 3 .. t\ -1\; I T R 0 S u :) I - N - PROP '( L J.t1 1I~ E
o 6l. D P E 11 T ." C H L U R 0 F HEN 0 L
065. f~;:i..JOL (l.AAP).
066. t:ISC2-E.THYLHE~YU PHTHALATE
067. BUTYL 8~~ZYL PHTriALATE
06? 2!-N-3UTYL. PHTHALATE
G6? OI-N-OCTYL FHTHALAT~
070. JI~HTYL FTH1HALATF
'. 0718 G I ') E TH Y L P T H T ~ A LA T E
.072. 9ENZO(A)fNTHRACENE. (1,2 BENZATHRACENE)
073?--wENZO(~ )~Y~ENE (3,4-bENZCPYfd:NE>
874. 3,4-SF~ZDFLUORATHENE
075. arNZCCK)FLUORANTHANE <11,12-JENlOFLUORAhTHENE)
[)7t,. CHRYSEt.E
877~ ACENfPHTriYLE~E
073. A~THRACENE .
079, c'ENZO~JHJI)PF.RYL;::JJ[ <1J12-SNZOfF~YLENE)
080. FL1JJR=~:E
081. PH;:N:.tn~F.ENE
'08? J r B c:~; z 0 U: J H )A t\ T h ~~. c :: ?~ E
aS3.. I~;~FNa (1.J2J3-CD)PYRE~!r:
OSL.fYRfNf . .
JSS. TETRACHLCROtTHYLlNf*
086. TOLU~NE*. .
087~ 1RIC~L~RUETHYLENE*
03. . V p1 Y L c;; LOR I DE (C:-I L 0:\ 0:: THY L E ~ F. ) *
089. IiLDRU~
09.J. DI:=LDRlt-i
~
.....
)I" VQ/. ANAL YSFS (UNFH::SERVEJ/PRESERVEO)
T H.;.CE
NA NOT ANALYZ~D FOR
NO NGT c~TEC1EO
N A I i41JT A 2, LET 0 A [.;.t. L Y Z E iJ U E T;) I in E R F l: R E t: C E
UG/L
CONCa
tW
NO
~O
t-!O
3.5
25.
NO
ND
ND
1 .2
ND
ND
NO
~~o
ND
ND
ND
NO
NA
.~J 0
."D
NA
. NA
NO
ND
NO
NO
NA
NO
NO

-------
U . c. I ~j ST.
OUT F ,, L L 0 0 1
S T a ~ E T ~i 0
STATION LOCATION: OU1FALl 001
LA80RATO~Y S~~PLE NO: OJ3-30
CfT~ & TI~E UF S~~PLE COLL~CTIO~~
11.L,PR78
090a HRS
COMPOSITE TIMl: 00 HR
COM P G I J N D ~}. i" E
091. C !i LOR AN c (T E C H .1 M I X T U R E & ;'1E T II B 0 LIT E .3) ,
092.4.141-[10T
O~. 4 J 4 I -~D E
09~. 4J41-DD~ (PJPI-TDE)
095.. A-E~D.JSIJLFH'i-ALFHA
096. 3-EWJOSULFMi-?=T A
097. ENlOSULFAN ~JLFATE
09~. ~NCRIN ,
099~ c~QRIN ALOEHYQE
10,']. h'?rTACHLOR
101. ;;~;::l ACHLCF\ rfOXI9E
102:.-: A-BhC-ALF!-!A
1 0:3 .-=--B -3 He - 8 r: T A
1GL. 4-9HC-
-------
.1\-1 00
u.e.. U~ST.
OUTFALL 001
STOR ~T I,'C
ST:..TIQ\; LOCATlcn-;: Ol)TFALL G01
L~80~ATC2Y SAMPLE NO: J03-3u
D~TF & TIME uF S~HPLE COLLECTION: 11APR78
CO;" P J SIT E T I i1 f: 0 Co H R
c 0 ~1 PO U~; DNA 11 E:.
121 ~ CHNIDE CTOT,A,L)
1 22. L r:: I,D (T 0 T t., L )
1 2. 3 4 ,-: ~ PC ~ R Y (T 0 TAL)
1 24, t~ ! C K L E (T 0 T A.L )
125. S~L~NIU~ (TOTAL)
126. SILVeR ,nOTAL)
127. TH~LLIUM (TOTAL)
1 a" z r : ~ cn uTA L )
129. 2J3,7J~-ifT~ACrlLORCjISENLO-P-QIOXIN
65Ao PH~~OL (~Y GC/FIO OR ~C/MS)
'-
*
VU,~ M~AL Y;:.ES
1 R,t. c:
(U~PRFS[RVED/PRESERVED)
T
I
~i .
,. "
1\8T f.~U.LYZ::D FOR
~D NuT DETECTED
tHI ;.\-.)T Ai3LE .0 'AFAL YZE: DU~ TO INiFRFEREr"CE
,-#-
0<100 HI\S

-------
A-101
ATTACHMENT B
GOFF MOUNTAIN CHEMICAL LANDFILL INFORMATION

-------
~.~."........t;:-""--"----' -~.'" ~,--_._~_..
,------------------",,,,,~'a._.---._~-_.__.._--.r_-_.._,,.,... ,.
...'.-. . -""'." ..-.-,.-..- -'-.,"'-'-'''''''''''' -~ .:.
. --~
~. ;.
A-103
A TT ACHMENT III-A
UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION
CHEMICALS AND PLASTICS
1=1//"
P. O. BOX 2611, CH.L>.Rli:5TON; W. VA 25~10
IN',;TlluTF. rU.Nl
;-1<.Jrch 2'), l:rtl
l.ill. JOHN E. NORTHEINER
Industri81 Waste Section
Permi ts"Branch -.
Stnte of West Vireinia
Department of Natural Resources
Water Resources Division
1201 Greenbrier Street
Charleston, West Virginia
. . .
~
25311
Subject: Applic<:ltion I-9j'r-L Requesting P.pproval for ExpGtlsion of the Chemical
L,mdfill Located at Union C:rbide Co:rpore:tion's Institut.e, W. Va.,
Organic Chemicals Pl,mt He f'ercnce: H. V. D1'1R Po'ml t '~])Il, lyG
John,
He have completed a plan to 'J.lpe;rade this hil1dt'ill und extend its
useful life from the year 1989 to 2004.
Permit application I-937-L has been prepnred and is forwarded \o/ith
this transmittal for' your department Ii s approval.
'i
Any questions you iay have about the project can ue referred to me
for prompt response.
Th
-------
.-.' ...- ..--- .--
. .--..-...
. _n._'. -..-_u..-- -.. -- - --'-',
- "--------'.---'.--.---.. ~-----_.
A - 1 0.4
WRD ',70
-
APPLICATION NO. 1- q 3'/
- DATE March 22, 19'7'7
-L
STATE OF WEST VIRGINIA
DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES
DIVISION OF WATER RESOURCES
CHARLESTON 25311
~
.~
APPLICATION FOR WATER POLLUTION CONTROL PERMIT
DISPOSAL OF INDUSTRIAL WASTE BY LANDFILL OPERATION
In accordance with Sections 5, 6 and 7, Article 5A, Chapter 20 of the Code of West Virginia,
. Institute Plant .
-
Union Carbide CorporatIon -Chemicals and Plastics Division
(Name 01 Applicant)
P. O. Box ;:[331
Chcrleston, West Virginia
25330
(Post Olfi~f:! Address)
.-;.
. hereby makes application for the issuance of a Permit to
Construct and/or operate New Facilities
x
Modify or extend existing Facilities
Establishment located at or near
Institute
(City)
Kanavrha
(County)
West Virginia.
The applicant hereby certifies that the following information is true and correct to the best
of the applicant's knowledge and belief and that the applicant has in operation or. can
reasonably be expected to place in operation the landf~1i operation herein described within
* days after receipt of any permi~ issued pursuant to this application.
* = Existing licensed chemicallanqfil1 (W.V. Permit 3141, DNR) will continue in.c
operation without inte,rruption'd.uring the eXJ>ansion.

-------
A-l 05 .
V;RD '-70 ~. ,
Page 2 l'iO"e: For response to questions on this page see appropria te attached page",
bearing section numbers corresponding to the question numbers shown
here. Supporting documents and reports can be found in the appendix.
.'.'. ._- -~
A.
PLANT AND LANDFILL DESCRIPTION:
1.
a.
Type of Establishment -
b.
Principal products
--..-------.-----.--. --.- ----
c.
Principal raw materials
f'!
d.
Establishment operation
HRS/DA Y
. DA YS/WK
.WKS/YR
Average
Maximum
2.
Name the streams or waters near which the landfill operation is located
.-'
3.
. ,
Attach ,a topographic map (7 Y2' minute quadrangle) showing the exacl location of
Jhe landfill (lati~~de and longitude), and a drawing, on a sCtJle of 1" = 100' indicatinQ
the following topographic features including cross-sectional views of: (1) initial
contours of the landfill, (2) proposed contours of the landfill upon completion, and
(3) :he location of diversion ditches that will beused to control surface runoff from
. ..
outside the landfill area.
4.
Discuss pertinent geological information:
a.
Soils
,- Specify physical characteristics and thickness of soil zone. (Physical'
characteristics would include color, grain size (sieve analysis), per-
meability, degree of consolidation and compaction characteristics)
""-
b.
Bedrock Units - Specify the following:
(1) Type (lithology)
(2) Depth and thickness
(3) Dip
(4) Fr\
I.~

-------
A-106
\"r-.- .-:....
Page 3 .
~
. . . '"." .
. ..- "'--". ",.....", ....--._.~ -.......~._..,...-,- ..-....-.. . .",'
Note: For response to questions on this page see ~ppropriate attached poge~
bearing section numbers corresponding to the question numbers shown
here. Supporting documehts and reports can be found in the ADDendix
c. Ground Water - Specify the following:
(1) Depth to highest ground water table
plane view and/or cross-section)
elevation (ft.) (Contour on '
(2) Direction of Movement
(3) Quality (Chemical)
Up-gradient from landfill (Analysis should be made for all potential
. .
- .
c6ntaminants in the waste to be dispo~ed of in the landfill)
. Indicate sources of information and describe fully any tests used in the deter-
mination of properties, physical or chemical, concerning the following:

(1) Soil and Bedrock
, , ,
(2) Ground Water
5.
Provide a list of major constituents going to the landfill stating the number of pounds
per day of each constituent. List the toxicity of each constituent on the basis of a
rat, oral, single dose for LDso. Also provide information concerning the solubility and
. .
leachability of the waste.
6.
In' the case of toxic or noxious materials or materials that could degrade water
, .
quality,'describe in detail the special provisions to be taken to prevent leaching and
percolation of any constituent of the waste into the waters (ground or surface) of
, . .
the State. Specify the monitoring controls to be maintained to check the quality of
the ground and surface' waters in the vicinity of the ,landfill. indicate s~urces of
information and describe fully any tests used in the determination of properties,
physical or chemical, concerning the use of a lining material for the site.
7.
Are any putrescible wastes to be disposed of in the landfill? What proportion of the
total wasteload is putrescible matter?
8.
What precautions are taken to prevent unrestricted disposal by others at this site?

. '., . .
9.
Give the expected service life of the landfill.
10.
Specify the plan at maintenance for the landfill:
a. Type and degree of compaction.
b. Applica~ion of daily cover.
',. 't

-------
A-107
Page 4
. , ,
'-
It is understood that any Water Pollution Control Permit issued pursuant to this application
may be revoked or suspended and aU of t;18 enforcement procedures sel forth in An:icle SA,
Chapter 20 of the Code of West Virginia invoked in the event ,that (1) future investigations
, .
disclose conditions 'other than stated in this application; or (2) there is failure to comply with
'the terms and conditions of such permit issued pursuant to this application, with the plans
and specifications submitted herewith, or with the plan of maintenance and method, of
operation submitted herewith.
":
~
By
R. L. Foster
(Signature)
CONSULTING ENGINEER:
Department Head - Environmental Protection

(Title)
Union Carbide Corporotion, .
Chemicals and Plastics Division
Institute, West Virginia
Dr. James H. Poellet
(Name)
E. D'Appolonia Consulting Engineers, Inc.
.(Company)
10 Duff Road; Pittsburgh, Pa. 15235
(Seal or Numbed
-#-

-------
A-108
Introduction
Section 2
Permit Imolication No. 1-937 for DisDO~,-ll of Inciustri.l1l i-Ju~tes uy Lnnclfill
Union Carbide Corporation's Inst. i tute Plant Chem:i.<.:;Jl Land fill
2.
Streams and Waters Near the Institute Chemical Landfill OueraLion
!I
Cerbide's Institute Chemical Landfill divides the headl'lCJ ters of Goff
Branch through two peripheral drains. Goff Branch then passes off
the landfill area, under W. Va. State Highway 25, across the Institu-
te Plant proper and into a junction Hith Hashington Branch at the East
boundary fence of Union Carbide property. The combined streams then
pass across the Hest Virginia RehabilitGtion Center and West Virginia.
State College properties,. under the Penn Central RailroGd right-of-way
and into. the Kanawha River as Cabell Branch near railroad mile post 117.
-
(Note: 1. Surface drainage from the
Institute Plant enters Goff Branch
property.
northeast production areas of the
as the stream crosses the Curbide
~: 2. Human _~wage enters Washington Brcmch before :Jnd after it
joins Goff Branch
Note: 3. The headwaters of populuted
and beyond the ridge topping off the
fill property. ) .
Rocky Fork b:r'anch lie Northwest.
area surrounding the chemical land-
- End Section 2 -
ees
3-25-77
. -

-------
A-lOg
Intn;ductio!l
Section 1
Permit ADT.Jlication No. I-g37 for DisT.Josal of Industrial \~ast.es by Landfill
Union Carbide CorT.Joration's Institute Plant Chemiral Landfill
1. a. T}~e of Establishment
The Institute Plant of Union Carbide is a large org~nic chemical manufac-
turing facility. Class I wastes from plant operations are processed in
a licensed chemical landfill with peripheral water control, sOil/waste
blending, leachate collection, "and leachate treatment.
b. PrinciT.Jle Products
Chemicals produced at the Institute location include poly-glycols, iso-
cyanates, carbaryls, alcohols, ketones, detergents, polymers, extenders,
and refrigerants.
..-.
- -..
c.
PrinciT.Jle Raw Materials
Organic chemicals ranging from methane gas to heavy l1
-------
Mll0
Introduction
Section .3.
Permi t .tr'ODlication No. I-Q3'( for DisDosDl of Indu~.triol \V;'lsles by Lundfill
Union Carbide Corporation's Ins ti tute Plant Chernit:ul Landfill
'-
3. a.
TODo~raDhical MaD
-1 2 minute Quadrangle
EXact Location of Fill
An 8 x 11 cut of VSGS Quadrangle Map entitled "Saint Albans, W. Vu., N3822.1
W8145/7.5 (Revised 1971)" is included \'lith this application. ' -J
b. Cross Sectional Views of Initial Contours of Landfill
The embankmen t profile shm-ling the Dppyoxima te' contour of the orie;inal
ground surface can be found on sketch 14 in the appended report from the
soil consulting firm responsible for the desiGn of the exp<::nsion (See
D'Appolonia Consulting Ene;ineers, Inc., "Report, Site Investie;ution and
Design for Chemical Haste Landfill", Gorf l'-1ountain, Iustitute, vi. Va.,
Union Carbide Corporation, Chemicals and Plastics Division, Project 75-734,
Dwg. 75-734-E13, February, 1976.)
c. Proposed Contours of Landfill Upon Completion
The embankment profile dravline; referenced in item 3-b above shorTS the pro-
posed contours of the landfill upon completion.
d. Location of Diversion Ditches That ~lill Control Surface Runoff Around Fill
Hater runoff from the eastern portion of the landfill property \'lill be reo
moved through the special channel shown on sketch 17 (Dwg. 75-734-E17) in
the report cited in 3-b above.
Water removed from the Qortheyn peripheral drain area will be controlled
through the drain cited in the previous paragraph.
Water re~oved from ~he west~~n peripher~Jl drain ar,ea Vl~ll be carried. thro~.
road dnn.ns along H1C;hway 6.:::.::: ar.d DIone: the hDUl road In.to the landflll Sl t'e
(See Figures 12, & 14 - Dwgs. 75-73tf-E12 and '(5-734-13 - in the report cit(
in 3-b above.)
y.
End Sec~ion 3
ees
3-25-77

-------
, /\-111
Introduction
Secdon )1
Permit AOTIlication Ho. 1-937 for Dispostll of Industrial WUGi~CS by Landfill
Union C<:Irbide Corporation's Im;t.itute PIGnt Chemical Landfill
q. a. Soils - Physical Characteristics
',I
Physical characteristics of the soils can be found in the t;onsul ting en-
gineer's report included with this application (See refc:J:'cnce in section
3-b). A narrative discussion can be found on pages 9 throu~h 13 and the
soil laboratory test sheets are Figures 9 (Dwg. 75-'('34-E6), 10 (D\-lg. 75-
734-E7), and 11 (Dwg. 75-734-E8).
b. Bedrock Units
b-1. Type (lithology) - See the consultine; engineer's report c..i.ted in
Section 3-b. Figures 6 (Dwg. 75-73};-E9), 7 (DH~. 75-731~-EIO), and
8 (D\'rg. 75-734-Ell).
b-2. Depth and thicY~ess - ibid
b-3. Dip - ibid (Narrative section and drawings)
b-4. Fracturing ~ ibid
b-5. Permeability - ibid (Narrative page 11)
b-6. Bore Logs - ibid, Figures 3 (Dwg. 75-734-:83), 4 (Dv:g. 75-73!t-E4),
5 (Dwg. 75-734-E5).
c. Ground Water
c-l. Depth to hiGhest ground water table elevation - ibid, page 8.
c-2. Direction of Movement - ibid, page 8.
c-3. Chemical Quality - iLid, page 111 (Narrative), T;)ble II (See Spring
analysis).
Sources of Information
(1) Soil and Bedrock - Standard tests performed by D'Appolonia Consultine;
Engineers, J#c., are described and reported in their project report
75-734 (See Reference in Section 3-b).
(2) Ground WDter - Standard tests, both chemical and physical, wcre applied
by the cons\fl1ting ~mgineer, D'l\pPQlonia, to c\/'a-J..uate C'l:ounU,A.Hater'. Chc'm-
':'""'I. ...~ .. ~ .'''' - -." :.. - ,

-------
. .
Permit .Application No. 1:-937 f6r;Disposal of, Tndust:r;j,al 'flestes by Landfill
PaGe 'J! 'of 8
Constituents Fed to Union Carbide Cor~oration's Institute Plent Chemical Landfill (Section 5)
/,
Low value on r.!ellon Ins ti tute Scale range
Istituent pounds/Doy Olal LD50
'. . +t- ('grn/kg)

r
2.5*
(LD50 Column Only)
Water Solubility
(ppm) .

. ~
Under 100*
'.t:.eryla te'
Polymer
(2-El:.hyl-
h:!xylacr.)
lLI
(* = As Acrylic Acid)
ft.luminum
Chloride
70
3.7
Reacti with ~ater
to j"l( CH)A;,t BCl
''-'
.i'.
Leachabili ty
r';il for' Polyrr:er
Al( OH) ~ . = Inso1.
HCl . -' :; 801.
Carbon ,t",. 1197 1.0+ Insoluble Nil
(Activated)    
,.     
.,     
Carbowax +  1825 10.0 + 5000 High
Dirt  1217   
Cardboard
From Trade-
Name Boxes
1513
10.0 +
Insoluble
Catalyst
Carrier
,( Alumina)
11410
10.0 +
Insoluble
Nil
Nil
3615 1.0 + Insoluble Nil
5152 10.0 + Miscible with High
  water 
Catalyst -
(Limestone)
CELLO SIZE
Scrap (Hy-
droxyethyl
Cellulose)
~, -,.~,...
- .ub.
-"I'}'Il,~H:U-r
1I1:.U..
---
---
:x:-
I
........
........
N
++ Base =260 da/yr o~er.
Leach Control ~easures
(Section 6)
~orce complete polymer~
ization using ~eat or
hydrogen'peroxide. Blend.
Force the reaction with
water. Al(CH)~ remains
in the fill. DCl reacts
with CaC03 waste in fill
to yield innocuouS CaC12
and H2C03' Blend.
Blend \\lith landfill eCJrth
Blend i~nediately with
earth in upper reaches
of landfill to permit.
full bio-degradation.
Blend with landfill ea~th
to promote degradation to
",. soil fiber. '.
Blend into landfill as
soil stabilizer ~
Blend into landfill as
acid waste neutralant.
Blend immediately Hith
earth in upper reaches
of landfill to permit.
full biodegradation.

. Blend widely over fill
--'rk:tt81 as -.. c1lilit

-------
A-1l3
~t I:Itrca.ucti6D
-. -
Section 5
. Permit ADDlication No. I-93'f for DisDosul of Indust.riul HAstes lJy Landfill
Union Carbide CorDoration's Institute Plant ChemirDl Landfill
,..:
..
The following eight pages document t.he information requested by the State
of West Virginia from landfill applicants seeking tq,comply with Section 5, Form
HRD 1-70.
Included in the tables are:
1. Waste descriptions and principle con-
stituents;
--
2. Pounds of each constituent charged into
the fill daily (basis = 260-day working
year) ;
~
oJ'
Oral LD50 for each constituent based on
single doses fed to rats perorally (source
texts: Sax, "Dangerous Properties of In-
dustyial YJaterials"; Eighth Edition "Merck
Index"; Eighth Edition "The Condensed Chemical
Dictionary"; Uoion C::Jrbide, "Material Safety
Data Sheets"; Union CarlJide, "Reactive and
Hazardous Chemicals l>1anuDl"; Union Carbide,
"Manual of H&zards to Health From Chemicals");
- --.
4. Water solubility of principle constituents
expressed as parts per million in water where
possible (source texts: same as "3" above ex-
cept for the UCC "Jvjanual of Hazards to Health
From Chemicals");
::a;...
5. Leachability based on chemical and physical
properties and the experience of Union Carbide
while operating Goff Chemical Landfill under
W. Va. DIffi-~~ Permit No. 3141.
Note: The sixth column in the tables contains information required in
Section 6, Form WRD 1-70. Data is shown here for clarification
and quick reference.
- -
- End Section 5 -
ees
2-22-7'(

-------
nit Application No. 1-937 - Continued
1t
. ..
., .
~.2 - Continued
S titUE r.~  Pourids/Day Oral LD~O vlater Solubili t~{ Leachabili ty
  ++ (gm/k(!,)  (ppm) 
Croton A1- 1 0.1 + . 153 x 103 High
de ~'dc: on     
Ab:.;orbent 97    
Dicyc10-1 97  0.1+ 200 Nil for Polymer
'- .. ~~       
pen \,8cne       
Po1YI!,e r       
Diri',~Slag- 1683     
Tn;sh Fn)m       
a-Naphthol 17 (a-Nap.) 1.0+ . Insoluble  Nil 
Area        
DHT + Dirt 1600 ~DNT) 1.0+ Insoluble Nil (Dinitro-
       toluene is a
  17 (Dirt)   solid) 
.Drums (Steel) 20  10.0 + Insoluble Slight (As FeC1~
      ..I
       '-Ii th chlorides
       present) 
Filter Aid 90  10.0 + Insoluble Nil 
(Dieto:!lF.ceous       
Earth)       
Filter Cake 8393 (Earth)  Surfactant is  
(Diatomaceous     Miscible with  
Earth + Ter- 85 (Surf.) 1.0+ Hater. High 
gito1 surfactant)      
Filter Cones 186 (cones)    
(Traces of H2SOq) 2 (acid) 0.01 + Infinite High 
Paee 2 of 8
):0
I
-J
-J
Leach Control Measures
(Section 6)
+:>
TaJte up on hydrophobic,
solid absorbent and blend
thoroughly ir; upper reaches
of fill to give a:nple bio-
degradation time.
Force complete polymeri-
zatio:1 with hydrogen per-
c~ide and blend thoroughly
into upper reaches of fill.
Blend thoroughly into l:.md-
fill work face to promote
bio-degradation of a-Naph-
thol.
Blend thoroughly into upper
reaches of fill to insure
thorough bio-degradation.
Blend widely over entire
landfill workface to mini~
mize contact Hith chlorides.
,;;.-
Bler.d throuehout fill as
soil conditioner.
Blend thoroughly into upper
reaches of fill to insure
absorption and bio-degrada-
tion of surfactant. .
Blend the cones with lime-
stone wastes to react the
aCId to CaSOq) an innocuous
material.

-------
ni t P.'D"Jlicstion No. I.:,2TI
:;ioQ-2 - Continued
Pound~';Day
++
:;1.:itt.:e:-.~
Filtrcl-25
+ 1 1; !i2S04
\Gecrgie: Clay
with adsorbed
. "\
fJ C 10 I
Floor S'\';~~PingS
. ., ~,
(J,,2Clllr,e ::op)
(Oil + Absorbent)
G1Dss (Broken)
(Bot,1es + Ligh'...
Tube;:; \dth tl'aces
of r.1ercL:.r~.' metvl)
Gloves + Plastic
( sa tU!'a ted vii th
paraffins)
Glue (Vinyl
Acetate)
Glutaric
A,nhydride
191. (clay)
2 (acid)
260 (abs.)
3 (oil)
1'1 (glass)
0.002 (Hg)
"
Oral LD50
( r;m/J~g
0.01 +
10.0 +
0.01 +
13 (gloves)
1 (paraffins) 10.0 +
~o
-./
25
1.0+
1.0+
Hater Sclubili ty
( ppm)
Leachabili ty
1nfini te
High
Insoluble
High
*' Pe trol. - be se
oils degrade
poorly &
flush out of
Goff Fill.
Nil (Hg will not
re act \011 th the
cold HCl or H2S04
in the fill)
'-
Insoluble
Insoluble
. Nil
275 y. 103
High
Reactive with water High
to form totally sol-
uble glutaric acid
Pa~ ofT
LeGch Control r.1easures
(Section 6)
Blend the ~aste thoroughly
with limestone to react the
acid to CaSO~;, an inno~uc\ls
material.
I..
Blend the waste widely over
U~e la nd.fill Yl02"1, f& ce to
get whatever bic-degradation
possible. Collect oil on
leach basin surface; sk!m
and burn as fuel.
Equip dozer operators with
breathing air: exclude all
other personnel from the
site; crush and blend ever
wide fill area (TLV treath.
is 0.05 mg/J,j air).
Blend waste widely over
landfill work face.
.,..
Force the glue to polymer-
ize through exposure to dr.
Spread thinly on fill work
face and blend into first 8
inches of soil.
Wearing proper protection,
,wrkers carefully blend the
solid anhydride Ylith soil ~
over wide areas in the upper ~
reacl1es of the fill. Work U1
is done on dry days. Rain
reacts the anhydride to a
dep-redable acid form.

-------
'.~!:.~licatiC?.n l'!o. l.-937
.tion-2 - Ccntir.ued
Istitucnt.
Hose
(Con::'amin-
ated \.:i '.r.
Sevin)
Insulaticn +
Trash
(Sevin is
contam:r.ant)
Isophorone +
Sl~1g (SiG2)
,I" j-
Lab \'le:3t~-~lc
(Territol,
Glycol,
CurbO\lC,,;: )
Lab Haste-511
. (HDZa rcjous)
(Acetone,
Isopropanol,
. Polyols,
Pyridine,
Styrene-:PVA*
* = Polyvinrl
Acetate)
Lab Waste-511
(Low Hazard)
(Lotex,*
~ ~lyox
oc"'c)
Pounds/Day
----
80 (hose)
1 (Sevin)
5451 (insuJ..)
55 (Sevin)
2 (isoph.)
215 (slag)
8 (g18ss)
83 (.Terg.)
. 83 (Glycol)
83 (Caroo.)

11 (glass) .
Oral ~D10'
(gm/Lg .
r:
9.5
II
1.0+
1.0+
1.0+
10.0+
103 (acet.) 5.3
103 (isopr.) 5.8
103 (polyols) 1.0+
103 (pyridine) 1.0+
103 (sty-PVA) 1.0+
36 (glass)

580 (latex)
580 (polyox)
...> ."
\';cJter 801u1:;ili ty
(np~)
40
II
II
7
?O X 10-'
11iscible
Complete.
Complete
Infi nite
II
10
Vrisci'cle
3 (sty.) ~
19.~ x 10-'
1.0+ (EHA) 1
10.0+ (poly.) Comp~ete
" '
1)'1'
.
(PVA)
:
~1~fJchabili ty
LoVi (Sevin de-
e:r3des easily
in the ground)
II
Noderate
High
11
II
High
II
Low
High
Low
Moderate
Low
High
Page 4 of 8" I
:,
, '"
)::0
I
~
~
0'1
Leach Control 1.1eDsures
( Se~tioz 6)
Hose is sprp.ad over wide
fill area with special
effort being taken to
bring hose in contact with
soil.
Treat insulation in same
manner as hose.
Contaminated slag is
scattered over a wide
area high in the fill to
permit long ,retention time
end gocd bio-degradetility.
Blend mixture over a wide
area high in the fill to
give maximum biodegradation
ti me.
....- Vlorkmen in protective gear
carefully blend these chem-
ical bottles \oJith earth
high in the fill after crush
ing under dozer treads. Air
polymerizes the styrene-PVA
and the other materials are
retained in the fill until
they are degraded.
~futerials are crushed into
the fill workface over a
-~ .. d tLIiiII8 d:iIIIIiiI: io..
~, "'(,-~''':1~p. ~nt., ~1 m'~.

-------
PolyoxScrap 2052 10.0 + Forms gel \.:i th
   water 
Begs (Used) 69   
(Oil, 4 10.0 + Insoluble
Glycol) 4 1.0+ Complete
'..    
R'oofing l3!.J 10.0 + (oil) Insoluble
~! Application No. 1-937
~ic~ 5 - Continued
:~i tue nt
Pounds/Day
'"
Ill: te x
: I,c8ctcd
Ethvlhc:,:vl
r,cryla te)
308
Liners - Drum
(Polye thylene)
67
i~2ph thale ne
'laste
668
8-I{aphthol
12
,14 ,.
Paint Haste
79 (latex)
Pipe - Contam-
inated
(TDI Solids)
73
Polyolr, - l'I'IAX
11
Oral LD50 '
'( p.;m/kr-,)
Water Solubility
(ppm)
'11)' \-. .
Lea'chaulll ty
1.0+
(Ius EHA)
1
Low
10.0 + (PE) Insoluble  Nil
1.0+ Insoluble ' il' Nil
. 9.0 (rabbit) Insol~)le
Hil
1.0 +
1
Lm...
(I~ot applicable; Pipe is stainless filled with
tolylene diisocyanate insoluble polymer.)
1.0+
10
Low
Lm.;
High (petroleum-
base oils do not
degrade easily)
High (petroleum- .
base oils do not
deC;rade easily)
,
~5~1
. 'I.
Leach Control ~~asures
(Section 6)
Blend into surface soil of
landfill workface; get as
much air contact as posdble
to complete polymerization.
Blend into lanafill work-
face.
Protect worluDen with bre," th-
ing air ana blend directly
into landfill workface.
Provide \'lorkmen wi th skin
and breathing protectio~ and
blend directly into landfill
~orkface. .
Treat as ilIa tex" in i t.ern ::0
above. .
Place pipe in little-used
section of fill workface.
~. .
Crush and blend drum and
contents into work face of
fill.
Blend with earth and spread
widely at landfill work face.
Treat as "oil" in item 19
above.
)::>
I
--'
.......,
Treat as "oil" in item 19
above.

-------
.mit Applicetion No. 1-937
'1',
. .'
. ". " ": ".-:' .. ."
)1
tion-2 - Continued
stituent
Pounds/Day
Leachability
Oral LD50
( gm/lq!,)
Water Solubility
( ppm)
Rcsidues
(Dimethyl-
8l1iline,
Sevin,
Send)
148
2.0
Insoluble to slight
Low
148
112-9
110
0.5
Low
Resin - 'kn
Exchange, Cones.
(Isopropanol)
1.0 + (Zccl.) Insoluble
630
Nil
6
5.8
Infinite
High
Send Bla ster       
Send  30 (silicc:.) 10.0 + Insoluble nl  
(Silica, 1 (Fe203)     
Ferric Oxide) 10.0 + Insoluble Nil  
Sevin Floor       
Sv:eepi.nGs 857 (oil +v100d) 10.0.+ Insoluble High (See Item 19)
(Oi.led SaVldust,       
. Sevin) 286 (Sevin) 0.5 40 LO'11  
"        
Sevin Product 223  0.5 .1.,0 LO\.  
Sevin, Speedi-Dri,
and Trash 10~838
(Sevin) 109
40
. 0.5
Lov!
Page 6 of 8
Leach Control I.~aSUl'es
(Section 6)
:J::o
I
.....
.....
(X)
Horkmen protected against
skin penet.ration and inhal-
ation hazard blend this
residue thoroughly with
earth for maximum bio-
degradation.
CQnes and zeolite resin
blend v:ell into the fill
...:i thoui: protlem. Isoprop-
anol must be absorbed promp-
tly on soil to speeG bio-
degradation so good blend-
ing is a "must".
Vlorkmen h'earing respira-
tors blend the sand into
the fill a t the work fa ce .
Protect worbnen against
~skin penetration and inhal-
atiop hazard and prcceed
as in Item 19 above.
Protect workmen against
skin penetration and in-
halation hazard and blend
the waste over a wide area
at the landfill workface.
Process into landfill as
in ~tem 44 above.

-------
i"t Ap-plication No. 1-937
tou - Continued
; ti tuent
--
Sieves,
!.jolccula}'
(Silic:::.,
H2S04)
SludGe s,
Lirr,estone
( C'aC12,
C(JCO~)
'!'Dl Ball-
!,!ill He s- ;..,
ic:L;.e
(Toluene
DE socy:::.n-
at.e Polymer)
Pounds/Day
1167 (silicd
12 (H2S0!!) .
39 (CnCl2)
~806 (CaCO-:')
~ -' ..J
10267
Oral LD50
(gm/kg)
r
10.0 +
0.01 +
11.0
10.0 +
10.0 + *
(* = Estimate.' TDI is
ext:re mely d i ffi cuI t to
. ..)
l.ngesv.
TDI (Neutral-
ized) and Trash
(Tr~sh, 3516
Urea) 390
'l'DA-TDI,Trash
(Tolylene Di-
amine,
Tcly1ene Di-
isocyanate) .
( trash)
(urea)
968 (trash)
161 (TDA)
161 ('I'DI)
1.0+
0.1 +
10.0 + *
(* = See Item 48 above)
Page 7 of e
. 'l
Water S6lubility
( ppm)
.~I,.'
L~achability
Leach Control ~~asures
(Section 6)
Insoluble
Ir:.fini te
Hil
High
Process \,'aste as sho',:n
in Item 18 above. .
Soluu1e
15
High
Slight
, Vlorkmen equipped with
skin and eye protect..ior.
spread the sludge on the
fill workface and blend
it in.
1)1'
,
Heacts with ,..'aterO
to form insoluble
solid. 'I'DI-BI.ffi is
the product of an
intentjonal reaction
to a solid state.
v/orkmen wearing breD th- '
ing air against possible
acti ve l'DI (TLV = 0.02 pp:n
in air) tlend &nd react
the residue with damp earth.
Soluble
High (readily degra- ""Vlorkn:en in brea thing air
ded, however, if re- against possible active
tained in soiL Bac- 'I'DI (TLV - 0.02 pprn in
teria seek the contain- air) carefully blend
ed nitrogen.) the waste high on the
landfill workface.
Soluble
High
Horkmen wearing skin pro-
tection end breathing air
carefully blend the waste
on' ,the landfill face.
lD

I
-J
-J
Insoluble Solid
o

-------
.,
it Application No. 1-937
~ - Continued
tituent
Sieves,
i.\olecular
(Sili.CD,
H2S04)
SludGes,
Limestone
( CeCl2, I~, '
C3C03)
'1.'1)1 Ball-
HEl He s-
ic c;e
( Toluene
Diisocyan-
Gte Polymer)
Pounds/Day
1167 (silica)'
12 (H2S011)
39 (CaC12)
~806 (CaCO~)
J ./ ..J
18267
Oral LD50
( gm/kpJ
10.0 +
0.01 +
4.0
10.0 +
10.0 + *
(* = Estimate. TDI is
extremely difficult to
inGes"'~)
'I'DI (Neutral-
ized) and Trash
(Trash, 351G
Urea) 390
TDl\-TDI, Trash
('I'01y1ene Di-
amine,
Tcly1ene Di-
isocyanate)
( trash)
(urea)
968 (trash)
161 (TDA)
161 (TDI)
1.0+
0.1 +
10.0 + *
'* = See Item 48 above)
Water Solubility
( ppm)
Insoluble
Ir.fini te
Soluble
15
Reacts with water
to form insoluble
solid. 'I'DI-m1H is
, the product of an
intentional reaction
to a solid state.
Soluble
I,
Soluble
Insoluble Solid
1"
Pege 7 of 8
. '
Leachabili ty
Leach Cont.rol I'Jeasures
(Section 6)
):a
I,
--'
N
a
Nil
High
Process ...:aste as shmm
in Item 18 above.
High
Slight
Work.rnen equipped wi th
skin 81:(';' eye protectior!
spread the sludge on the
fill ",,'orkface and blend
it in.
o
Workmen wearing breath-
ing air against possible
, act i ve TDI (TIN = 0.02 ppm
in air) 'lilend end react. '
the residue \-lith damp eart.h.
High (readiljT degra- "vlorkmen in brea thing air
ded, however, if re- against possible active
tained in soiL Bac- TDI (TLV .. 0.02 ppm in
teria seek the cont,ain-, air) carefully blend
ed nitrogen.) the waste high on the
landfill workface.
High
Workmen wearing skin pro-
tection and breathing air'
carefully blend the waste
on the landfill face.
o

-------
Pe ri'ii'i't A pPIiCa t i"O["1'1o. ~ 7 .
Section 5 - Continued
Constituent
51. Te tralin
52. Wood, Oil
Contaminated
(Lube Oil).
I~,
",1/,.
US/ees
Pounds/Day
18
103 (\-Iood)
12 (oil)
2-21-'77
Oral LD50
( gm/lr.g)

2.86
10.0 +
W~ter Solubility
( ppm)
Leachabili ty
Insoluble
Low
Insoluble
High (See Item 19
above)
- End -
~ge ~ 8 -
Leach Control Measures
(Section 6)
Wearing skin and breathing
protection, \mrkmen crush
and tlend the solid into
the landfill work face.
See Item 19 above.
,t
,.
j;.
I ,
-'
N
-'

-------
A-122
f
.
- C:' -
Permit ADDlicGtion No. 1-937 - Continued
Section 6 - Continued
2. . (Continued)
a. Routine surface wat.er sampling and alwlysis perfOTIlled
e.ccorciing to the sampling schedule di2[~rDm included 'v/ith
this DpplicatioIi (Control parameters monitored are:
.~
a-1. pH
~
e.-? TotDl Carbon
a-3. CDrbonute C~rbon
. a-I,. Color (Platinum-Cobe.lt)
\'''''/1''
Any.deviation from the observed norms for the control pDl'-
am'2ters is cause for in-depth study o~' the sample using gas
chrometographic, mass spectrometric, Dto~c ab~orp~ion, wet
chemical or other Dppropriate stDndm'd me thod approved by the
United State Environmental Protectior. AGency for contaminantsl
in potable water); . .
.~
-..,-.
;~,~
b. Routine ground and leach water sampling and analysis per-
formed according to the sampling schedule diagram for 1974-
1978 (included wi th thi s applic2 tion) . (The new program tobe
followed after the landfill upgrading begins will be carried ou
according to the sample schedule diagram for 19'(8-2001,. conti
parameters for leCJchate "later will be those. shown in 2a. abo
Samples taken from the new borings and the spring will be run.
for the components described in Table II, "Summary of vlateII
Quali ty, Goff Mountain Chemic&l Wcste Lcndi'ill", D f Appolonia :
sulting'Enzineers, Inc., Report: Site Investi~ation Dnd Design
for Chemical Waste Landfill. Goff Mountain. Institute W. Va.
Project No. 75-734, July, 19'(0; See 2a. above for control pa
eters currently being used).
.
..
.~::...:..
....".
3. Testing of the clay seal included permeability, liquid limit; sieve
hydrometer analysis, water content, compaction, consolidation, pore press'
and shear measurements. Documentation can be found in the design engil:
report on the project: D'Appolonia Consulting Engineers, Inc.,"Heport:
Investigation' and Design for Chemical Haste Landfill, Goff MountCJin, Inst
tute, West Virginia", Project No. 75-734, 1'-11, figures 9, 10, 11, July..
anal.
ees
2-22-77
- End Section 6 -
-#-
....,..:3:.
.'

-------
A-123
..... ';
Introduc Lion
Section G
Permit Aoulicotion ]\/0. I-g37 for Disuosol or Industrial H;;st.cs by LDndfill
Union Carbide
Coruon~tioCl' s
Institute Plant Che~ical L2n~fill
II
Measures taken at the Goff Chemical Landflll to comply .lith Section 6 are:
1. Prevention of ground or surface water quality degrudation
through leachinb or percolation of toxic or noxiou~ mater-
ials into vioters of the State is accomplished through . these
means:
._~
a. An i::mervious clCl.'f seal under all of the work-
ing area of the chemical l2ndfill. Tbis seal
is illustr3ted and discussed in the following
publications: Huinley, J. D., Slover, E. E.,
"Union Carbide Chcwicul Lemafill, 1nsi tute, We st
Virgini<1", Solid H2stes: Origin CollecLion, Pro-
cessin~ and Disposal (Mantell, et 01 , Hiley In-
terscierlce, New York, pp 1004-1008, 19'(5; and.,
D'Appolonia Consult.i.ng EI1[';ii:eers, Inc., (Heport)
"Site Investip:c:ti.on and DeL:ir:;n for Cberniccil Haste
Landfill, Goff Mountain, Institute, Hest Virginia"
Project No. 75-734, July, 1976.
b. E::te:1sive surfi1ce and perinhcral drairit!P.:e systems
to keep Hater from entering the fill (Re: D'Appol-
onia, ibid).
~
c. Collection sne; bio-treatm.ent of the leuchate throu[
a system of inter~al drains, collection headers, e~
. impervious basin, C) process seVier, and u 5-rr.illion
gallon per day activ~ted sl~dEe w~stew3ter treatmer
unit. (Re: b'ApPolonia, ibid; Midwest. Technicul, Ir
"Goff r..;ountain Cheinicul Waste Landfill Project", Jc
Ho. 99102, J8nu<..:ry, 1977.; 1:1antell, et Dl, ibid, pp-
1015-1016) .
2. 1.10nitorinc; controls maintDineci to check the qu"lity of ,?;round anc
surface wDters in!-the vicinity of t.he L:ndfill ure:
ees
.,2-22-Ti
- Continued -

-------
"
. '"::
(
.'
i,
''',
\'~,~~
A-124
Introduction
~
Section 7
Permit ADDlication No. 1-9;, for DisDosDl of Industrial W0stes by L8ndfill
Union Carbide CorDora tion' s Institute Pl1Jnt Chemical Landfill
.z-..:....
:a;...
No putrescible wastes are chal'geci into the Goff Chemical
Landfi~l.
. -
- Eud Section r( -
e'

-------
H-3
TECHNICAL INFORMATION
DATA BASE DESCRIPTION
RTECS contalns toxicity data for approximately 2l~0'o0 substances,
but does not presently include all chemicals for which toxic effects
have been found.
Chemical substances in RTECS have been selected
primarily for the toxic effects produced by single doses, some lethal
and some non-lethal.
Substances whose principal toxic effect is from
\
, -
exposure over a long period of time are not presently included.
Toxic
information on each chemical substance is determined by examining and
evaluating the published medical, biological, engineering, chemical
and trade information and data for each substance selected.
The Toxline data base contains over 650,000 -records taken from
material published in primary journals.
It is part of the MEDLINE
file from the National Library of Medicine and is composed of ten
subfiles:
(1)
Chemica1-BiQlogical Activities, 1965- -
(taken from Chemical Abstracts, Biochemistry Sections)
(2) Toxicity Bibliography 1968-
(a subset of Index Medicus)

(3) Abstracts on Health Effects of Environmental Pollutants,
1971- (published by the American Society of Hospital
Pharmacists) -
...--. "'-.--.--- -.. '----
----.-.- -..
.--.."---'
.. --..-. -
(4 )
International Pharmaceutical Abstracts 1970-
(published by the American Society of Hospital Pharmacists)

Pesticides Abstracts 1967-
(compiled by EPA
(5)
(6 )
Environmental Mutagen Information Center 1969-
(Dept. of Energy, Oak Ridge National Lab)

-------
.r-

)
. t.
".
H~4
Envi ron~enta 1 Terato1 ogy'Informati on Center 1950-
(Dept. of ~nergy, Oak Ridge National Lab) .

(8) . Toxic Materials Information Center.
(Dept. of Energy, Oak Ridge National Lab)
(7)
(9) Teratology file 1971-1974
(a collection of citations on teratology compiled by the
. National Library of Medicine)

(10) The Hayes File on Pesticides .
. (a collection of more than 10,000 citations o'n the..hea1th
aspects of pesticides compiled by Dr. W. J. Hayes, Jr., EPA)
(' ~

-------
A-125
In :..:;ud u c ti or.
Section 8
Permit Apblication No. 1-937 for Disposal of IndustriAl Wastes by Landfill
, Union Carbide CornorCltion t s Insti tut.e Plant ChemicRl LDndfill
The Goff Chemical Ll.mdfill is restricted to the processing
of selected chemical wastes from three Union Carbide loca-
tions in the Kanawha Valley: uce South Charleston, UCC Tech-
nical Center, and UCC Institute. Of the three, the institute
Plant makes greatest use of the facility.
~_..
Use of the site is controlled through a special monitoring pro-
gram built around a 5-step procedure that makes the, vlaste gen-
erator consider reprocessing, sole, incineration, or bio-oxida-
tion (liquid phase) before consigning the waste to the chemical
landfill (1).
Every disposal requires the completion of a special Order' for
Waste Removal before the material can even be loaded into its
transZ;ort container (2). Full 8E:reement must. be reached between
the waste genera tor and t~1e landfill technical stOlff in these
areas before the special stamp authorizing waste pickup is applied
to the order by the landfill supervisor (3):
~
1. Health hazard and required personnel protection;
2. Flammability h;3Zard and its minimization;
3. Reactivity hazard and its atcnuation;
4. Environmental impact and its elimination;
5. Physical state;
6. Quantity; ,
7. Location of the waste;
8. Payment for the service;
9. Signature and telephone of the vTaste generator.
Upon approval by the landfill supervisoy, the Order for Haste Hemo'
is presented to the special waste driver under UCC supervision. TI
driver sees that the order travels with the load ~s emergency iden
fication and as the "admission ticket" to the landfill U:).
No wDste is permitted into the fill Hark face without a properly
approved ticket.
'"
(1) Mantell, et al, "Solid Wastes: Origin, Collection, Processing, God Dispo::;[Jl",
Wiley Interscience, John Wiley and Sons, 605 Third Avenue, I~evT York, p-1019, ,1'.
(2) Mantell, ibid~ p-1C2~.

-------
.~ f-
~;I1"#. ~~
'.
,.: --
.~ ._.
'-
.
.... ..
=: .i!
.... . ~
.:...
~.
. A-126
Int.roduction
Section ~
Permit ADplication ~o. 1-937 for Disposal of Industrial WDstes by Landfill
.. .
ees
-
Union Carbide CorDoration' s Institute Plont Ch~'mic[)l Lendfill
The Goff Chemical Landfill is e~pected to serve
its three Kanavrha Valley Union Carbide locations
until the year 2001f.
- End Section 9 -
2-22-77

-------
-~
h - - --~. U-..-.-.- ---.- ---- -----_._- ....
A-127
Intrcduc L :i.on
Section 10
Permi t Application No. I-9i'( for DisPo~>Dl of IlJdu~t.ri,ll Htir;ution and
for Chemical Waste Landfill, Goff rilount
-------
. ),
. ,~
",
. .-.-
,-
( :-.:
"
~\:
.A.-12R
,~3
-"
JI.PPErmIX
II
Permit P.lmlication No. I-q~7-L for Disnosal of lndustriul H2stes 1:1:/ Landfill
ees
3-25-77
Union Carbide Corporation
Chemicals and Plastics Division
Institute Plant
Chemical Landfill
Sunnortinr~ Docurr.~nts
-#
~-

-------
",~, . ~' , A-129

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, ',' ,or 'U '\ \~Q'~ N' ~i: ;',;: r ",,) I. '0 ", '" "N \,,/,,\u / / // '1 I "" ,',- ,-', "" i / !~"'~2
,~~'L. ",,'; \-"'<'~ (j;.::~'~'", /}c" \" '\:::"! }';(///j//j'/\\'( AP~?(l,~,~",I~7~..J j/(C!
',,:--' \: :, ',' ", . ,', "'" '-,' r- ,<:> / -"" 'II, "\'" ~';n~. '
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I :-0.....-' o{', \ "-, :v; ~" . ,,' }' , 'L ~ 1 I... J ) "', ... " \,' ",,-/ ,
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.. \ '~ \'. ''tt ...'t .".-, ~~ ~. I . .-... ,", \..,.... ); I' J: '.. \....-" --..'" C"..
".,.:,.....;..., , ' ':' \" \ ',..", , , ',""" """" /', /,',<;;":'.1 ,,) " '( [',./ ( ',',"', , '
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,',/., ""J ',':..'1(\'1' ''''_'7 /.""'\.)'~)"l (:'''1\''',~... l,) ,,"'" ):"""':""" ",""'-,.. ',(~ (l"'11o~
~. -', ~ -/ ,'.\ 'I -' I \ 0 ' ... .. " -- " I ;.
'. "q ~"\ .:-". ----. / .:.... / -....(---...-.... 'oJ ,;.. "\ " \. "0. ";9' /.11'-."" ,L.lf'oI~-. ", \. "'1: I)
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" '" ",:'\',\;I~.'" 1t"E:'...-/:: f\ ' j\ ,.....-\ r ~/;4-,---~;..:),-'."'.va!leYVie\~;,- 1'",,' If""", \\,..:-.:::.::),;;:<.,~ ;:~
-~~.-;-;~::':""-,' .1J'1E'~~_~'/'" . :.'J . { J \ ..J '-"'1"( .. ~ CI\ I '-"","".'," - " ., V'\
( / ..-"'-~" . ~ ';----\' . " ....(,,, .., {',. , ",\ ' " , " II' \ f' . ~

,/::11 7 ('( ;,.:\-:'~o..: \.. ';/'>"fi:J.::',--- >,': -''-,' ,,:~, (~J () )' ~','~).:~I<" ::". :: ~':'~,~~}./" "'l. /) ""-"\':/. 'II' ,1 f

I, ( "... \ :~"".~'. .'. ,,' /' (. ....' -'-'~'-'-, . \ .'~ ... 'f '\. .'..:-' 719 . -'4 I'", -'~ \.. ~.Jt
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1 ~ L//' ".\\ ""\ 1" \ '. \" r ... 7' II, ' ) ." /,'/ ,.." \,.J >" ' ':'. ,: :" '(62' .. ' : ,-, ",:"C4!n I "; ~
) " ,--- , )" /0 \,' " \,' '.. \ ( I ' ' , f '. , .., , ~ ....., , ' \... .. . t
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f,' ....;, ',' j', ," I' \ \ (",,; ':'--,'..' /"", ,"';, ,,' \ ') j' ..-- '" 770.,. ....
I ..;;_~'~:~'",~..", ,..-'\ \, '\'" " ,,' II \. ", ,~r-'.../'~ ..",B,"~~ ,.' .""',, ':, '-', \ /"""L'1
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,~":, \....--..... /' (',.. ':-, i \ '~, ' ,'" '---- /' ,--"~! / .'- '..,' , \, \,/ ,..., '" .):',.,) /) r-
\_,-,~..v,,/\ \,..../ \,' tJqC' ,Che'ti1ic:ai Lel1dfi~1::>,-/"- ~~''. " i'\ \ I.. \. I, "', '. ',! \ ,/ .,\, ,/~, /-:>' -1'150
, ' '''''"=-'';'~---'', (..7.' ',,': Institute' Plarlt ", ,,"q0,': I,' \ " '~','" \ \ ' I ( I )/ '-' .II l_'~:-V: I
:--... ~-' .. 'Ran' ' ',,", , , , .....---'~' \,\" \ I \" I, \ ' , / / '/
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-p"--~)~::?~j~ ..,~>~..._~~,>~.~:">\,~ ,'~.\~:~'" >~'~~~/ ',,~jt"L '\ 'I4.~), i)~~,\\\"\> .::~/\ f(//. /f~'~:

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. !', ': - ;~''''';: t"... . i.; - "-~'.:) 1 i 'I; ~.' ( '.'~""-, , ',. \ ,~. ~~ : .",'" . '.. \\ \ ~"1: ,
" ,'it I' "\""-'\ \:\'" \: :,' / '"'' " '!"'/'" i'3:t'"'~!V ,I :,:;'" (,\ ",~' I, \--- "----"\ \ -}, :." , \ \':\ 'J. 1"'1/ (' J
/\J' (..'\/" \..."""~;":";,:,:JJ'" '\i< ",t "'i,:,<\~, ",,:..:,'."."(':'''t'~\ \\-';-' ~,~ -(, \ \, \\\"" ///,l// j/!

I\....=-J C\JII \." \_',~-::'-)'1';:::'.' !\:/ '. : ,/ ::'~'\f:~'h\ '~11,';\ ,,7\"-1:'-" I,): i:\,..-- /\ i, \ \, <.,\,..:,,:.,~, 0' .J (/1
" J" l-" ,I \. ..' ", \ -" I" /' " . 'I (;
--' (., -----.--' .. ';:' , ,:: ",' '~,-:... ,"-'I.... \.,......~ ,.7' r, I " \ ,,', -f',)' ',' I:,~,c;; :) ,~ :,.. \~ ,7., ,
....:..:.....~:.:::..,~, ::,..._-" ~~~~..,.-3,:,,"';': -',- ,f. - . ''''''..', '~l.... .-;, '., " . ~\" 'i '/'1 }",:,"~, I~( ,.I ~;.. < '\ \-:..;..., ')j' 4149
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.......... --...:.:..:.. ...J!.J~~'b,' ;1 :::,: . ".,~,:' /',' ';,:'~:~:" J. ,.,:'..- ,In"tl't' L1 te /': " .:'~~~ ' ",' (, I-\.' \' ......."~~ '
........... h' -....:......~ /, ./ II,. . I:......... ...,., 4; ."/ ." I.,t.:) ,"..-. ",. "'- . 0 ., 'i .) /1 . I
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t:' '''',...., V L:>/? -.... -:-'''l~ :', ,;~." ,..,: !..:~(."'~" "/-- ..'... ~'\\'t~"T:VIItr:!:->l',I. .;'. ~ ~""''': '''',' ,: ,/ ,~: ) 5': ( AJ
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')0 47'30" :"" "11' CIIAHI ,. ..; 1(1:, ,. . ",,"""" 432VOm E. . '''''l "<"'" .,101 \,)G.:,..., ...,....... wo.A~'H'~I',I:;.Jt"';;J~';': I/~:" AfI' 81 "'45'
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I MILE
ROAD CLASSIFICATION
1tX:O r  L!
~
I fJI.ON [1 UI
I '~".l!'s." :',
'.:~.r~~~:~ ';,
'X""'io."'" "

:;J~~~/
Heavy duty
Medlum,duty
-- --.
Light,duty
~=-~-=-
~.~---=
Untmp10ved dirt = = = = = ~. = .
~

(~7


OUADRANGLf. LOC.\!ION'
( '} Inte1stalt' Rl)utt:
'./
, U,S, Routt<
:-
'-..) St~le Route
SA I NT A LB!,d\!S, W, V k
. ", ~ ""'. ..
" , . . . ''''' -

-------
A-130
.~
,',
, ;\!.;,'~'
..~ "
....
,',
, ';~
-....- _"n
Support Document: Sectill
Requirement
Permit Application 1-938
Appendix Item III
1004
PIWCESS 1:\1)\ 'STI{'r' WASTES
~I
~
.~
I :01",: -ldiL'====<,', \ rl'\~"-t:~,~'j ,
'.'.1"'1' ", UII'!'
. . ~ (r:>L "Lc.Jky" C.:..utfl \ . L --.. - - - ,
2, ,ft -......., r;'1j. l1ulhe~al (L_,...J '
I uriJlI1S --
L--.-. Inl~cr\l;uus
, , doke
Figure 1. (;olT \l"UI1Llill dll'llIi.'al lalldi'ilL III"till1l,' 1'1.11'1. litli"l1 ('arhidl'
Curp, IJ,\'na 111 ii' Wt'l Prol't'S'; bi'H'hl'll1icti ,;\',;1('111. III :"" "tI..r,,; alll/\\'I'd:,\:!1 nil
~roulldwalcr p"lIlIliol1; \:;, II.. air Ih11lllliClII alli/\\,,'d Ifill'''' ;':,1,,1: 1,1) Lit'CIISl' 1'1"
ljuired. ' '
~
Site study i,; an expell,;i\'l' anL! tiIlIL,.t'(Jlhlllnill~ ;Il,tivity, as Tabl\' :!
indicate:;, However, the SUCl'l:';S of tIll' landfill is IIIt;lIl\ depench-llt Oil
its being d(J(1C well.
~\.
Clay Membranc

A ~-t't.thick, selected-day seal is th... kl',\' i'l~at\lrl' that 11I;1I>L'S this wL'l
pruce:;s I:.mdfill !HI:;sible. it h;" to bL' plat'l.d tlnc!..:r tin' wc;nllL.r l'ondi.
tion:; and is rolll'd at li.ill. illlL'J'vals tu a dL'llsit.\' alld Inllistllr~ l'olltL'nl
that ensure ilnpl'l'IlIealJility, .
The seal is used under the entirL' LUHlfill \ Iill lilts, dike kL'\S.
cont:ll1lilwted II:lsin, and ilnpL'r\'iolb dik1,). Fil,ld :111,'1 I:tbor:ltllr:-o 'tl'StS
are rUII constantly ctllrin~ in,;wllati'lIl, :lnd 1'lIllip:lctilln lay'ers Ih:l! till
not meet the ,;tand:tr~~'i are scraped off and n'bid,

-------
A-131
Proiect No. 75-734
, .
Fab. 76
(Revised July 76)
, ' '>:'JI,)),2) M","! D:';"II D ~I'D1"'f t' ~ .~'..... V'"'\.
",j! ,,' .' -, I~',~ ,,-', .:;.,q "', . /" V''1' ~:"' 1"
F:;:- 0- - t'M r~ ~.:.!t '-. .". ~ (~ '., j"
ti.. AI.' ' 1.".. '-So..: ).....,..;.!'<'?..,.1/ ~ ' _..:
CONSULTING ENGINc:ERS. INC,
Support Document: Section 3
Requirement: b
PerrnitApplication I-937-L
Appendix Item II
tBIeport '

SEts anvestigation
Design for
Cnemeca! Waste landfeU
'.'-
, ,

Goif i\Jiountairn
Bnstitute West VirroQnia
, """"
""-
Chemicals & Plastics Division
Union Carbide Corporation
South Charleston, West Virginia -'
. A

-------
A-132
lOO~
I'IWCESS INIJUSTHY W,\STI':S
'J'ul,lc ;]
'1'('.~l n'l/'il/Us tll/d SIIil
llU't:;ili:iUlilJll for (;".If
IV uslt: 1.lIIlI/Jill
Support Doc~~ent: SectiJ
Requirement
Permit Application I~93
. -..-- --Append-i~rrr N
'/'/',\1.; fill" SIlI,sl/Ijlll'"
.If 0/1111" il/( .'lwlII it:
-------
:!
ci
cr
2
"tIt,.
Landslide
C'ay '~~-'
.. SJndst~~1
Cia\, ~hJle -'
SJrds!une. .
--,
. Clay shale, - ,
"="'"
"J
o
l
o
60 It. (horiz.1
,
20 It. (verr.)
>1
E
'?I
jJ
::)1
I
':11
r
Residual silty cia\, soil
L"""" """"". '''om,"'',



I
. J'I.'

!.t
S.ll1dstone
.Cby shJ!e
I,
Sar.dston~
-/l
. I
I.
. ,
Cia'; sl'ale
S!'c1:r.!?r::i!~' rock l.r Pcn:1S','!va:-:ia ;::!!ric~ Copen:Jugh series
Figure 5.
Gpolri;!ir cr(J;;~ ,;P('t i(~n.
-
720
~hale
-:--700
.. 6EO
eGJ
640
;.' 620
:x:- '" ~ tl)
Idro(i)~
"d ~.o fd
CD :3 ~ fcJ
~ ~. f-'. 0
p., ('1" fi fi
f-'. ro ct.
~~~t:I
HfcJ~O
cI' 1-' cI' ()
ro f-'. ~
S ~ CD
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I
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t-<
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ro W
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~.-..- - _#_.& . -- ----.-
A-134
Supp6r~ Docu~ent: Sect:
Hequiremcnt
Penn:!. t Application 1-9:
Appendix Iiem VI
Summar,! of tviidv:est Technical, Inc., Job I'io. 9ql02
"Goff MountDin Chemi.cal H3ste LHndi'ill P:co;ject"
LeDchate from ~he la~dfill will be treated in ~ corrue~ted-plate
-~
~
Heil oil sepDrator for removal of the flo<:ltable organics and then
retDined. in a nCH leach.:Jte pond (He: D'i>.ppolonia, Report, Project
~1"i-'7~4)
,/ I.... .
It Hill be mete.red cO:1tinuously ,md mod tored periodically before
-
'i=-.
being routed to the Institute Plant \-[ctei1ater Tree:tment Unit fo:r:
. ,
bio-oxidation.
-~
"'-
JilicjS-ri"rljE?Sj ees
3-25-7'1
- -

-------
. ---.--.--.--.-..---..
A-135
Support Document: Section
Requirement
Perr.~t Application
A;pendix It~m \~I
6

1. '.

I-937~L
ll:-';ION CAHIIIDE CHEr-.1I<',\L LMWFILL. I:-':STITUTE
1015
A vital part of the operation of this continually Ilushing chemical
landfill is pH control. Fortunat.eIy, a large quality of both acidic and
basic sulid wastes is availahle and greatf'r or lesser amounts can be
blended into the fill lifts as daily rcadin:;s rlidale. Generally, effort is
made to keep the leachate around a pH of G.H -7.2 to meet t.he needs of
the wastewater treatment unit.
There is some indic:1tion that the leachate will tend to go ~:.lcid (pH
around :>,2) if no effort is made to keep the fill at relatively neutral
conditions. Since the operation is hasically anaerobic, this i" not. too
surpnsm~.
BOD t.ests arc run uccasionally, hut t.he real control is t.he daily total
carbon analysis, which gives results in a matter of seconds. \Vhen the
landfill is working well t.he tot al carbon ll'vel is generally a round liOOO
!lpm. When waste loadin:~ occurs and insutTicicnt blt'!H! carth is heillg
"-""sed the figure can climb to 14,000 ppm.'
Although it is somewhat. difficult to relate total (':irhnn and BOI>,
there 'is enough correlation to make a rough comparison with the BOD
fi~Hes on "sanitary" landfillleachatl~s.
Daily samples are taken from the contaminated collection basin aIlll
run for total carhon, pH, color. foam, and carbon:Hc-('arhon. The latter
is necessary because the total c:uhon instrument picks up c:1rhon from
nil sources, including ground minerals. To gel' a true picture of the or-
I-,"!'inic c;:jrhon requir:i:1g tre:.ltmcnt, the carhon'ate-carhlm is suhtracted
IWII1 the total carhon reading. ,
Uncontaminated water from the wells anri peripheral drains is sam-
"It'd on a c~'cle that catches each point ahout oncc a w('t'k. A total
carbon I('\'el ofI~() ppm is indic:lti\'C' of uncont:uninatt'd waler al this
landfill location. (Naturally occurring organics at othpr landfill sitc>s
would make this figure different.)
A complete air quality ':.:ontrollaboratory is availahle through thl' In-
~tit\Jte Plant's Environmentall'roteclion function. Prohle'rns with miors
.\IId gases are handlrcl through this group.
Treatment

~)ils leaving the fill lifts :1110 collecting on the' surface of the watef in
the contaminated hasin are skirnn1C'd 01'1" :mcl taken :IS fuel to the
phn! '.~ steam !wilers.
Th(~ cont:1l11inat.ed water rem:lining is t f:lnsported t.o the institute's
:1(.tivated-sludge W:1stewater t.reatrnr.nl unit for hactni:d slahiliz:\tion.
Sludge' is rcmoved and ('ollt'l'ted in an an:II'fohic h;1sin 'aml t 111' t fI':IIl'd
wafer is fl'l(':1sed to the Kanawha I~i\"cr. Ex("(',;,; sludge is sent hack to
tlH' dWl1lical hndfill to (,{)TI1plc>te till' proCt'ss c~Tle. Figure !I is a now
dia'gralll of the !rr.alment uni!."
..
---.----

-------
. u_- ,.. -_.- -
.A-116.
Support Document: Sect~
Requirement
Permit Application I~9]i
Appendix I tem VIII
.. ------ -------...-.------.-.-------.-.--
---
1016
1'lWCESS INlJUSTHY WASTEs
LL'adJ;.Jtc
Goff LJlldtili
\V..J~tt.:w~ter
institute ~1~U'lt
'.
'-~:
"
r--._-j--~

Ilifluelit I
I
I
I
I

1 :

I f I I
I I I I
I I I
I I I I
... I I: I
'". ~'" : :: I
....._->~ --~-L ---~...._--- - -------~
Sludge recycle
. Efflucnt Acllvated sluuyc
Itollve~1
~ruCC~5 .



Plant. I CO. + H. 0 Hive.

wastewater lJ, N.) P 11" .' .', .

Organics ~, . '. . .)
. U"ctella" '-. ---
. Cells
Oils
~Iow
--1
SllIlJye sto! Jye
n
000
0000
000
000
OUoO
000
000
0000
000
Aer6Jtiun
UJ5il1s
Clarifiers
..
-
" .
"\. .;
.j: .
Hccyclt:d
Wasted as
lIe~es~ry
, ~-:!.
)
Clarifier
Acr a ted basin
Fi~ure 9.
Plant).
Activated sludge water tre;Jlltll'nt ';IlIil llTniun Carbide lll~:titutl'
Standards
~
. Basic~lly, th~ Guff chemical. landfill is cupabll' of processin;: any
chemical that is acceptaLle to the bacteria in the wastl:waLer treuLlIlClit
unit. Stalluard oxygen-uptake tests using treaLmellL unit bacteria arc
pcrformeu in cases of doubt.
Metuls (with the exceptiun of iron, sodium, putas.,illlll. ca}ciulJI, alltl
aluminum) are not generally aCI:epted into thi~; lalldfili because of their
toxicity to Luderia both in the fill and at the tn.'atllh':I,L unit. Heel/very
is recummcnded wherever !lossi ble and elaburate ellcasemclIL ir
concrete is provided in the few cases when: reclamation efforts fail. .
~
..

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-------
A-140
Support Docum~nt: Sect~on e
Requirement . . 8
Per~it Application 1-937-L
Apper.~ix Item XII~
'.1 i.t.9.'
- ..r:..,~.-':~~ -:. .~

~'hT~t'tmT~11
.~~~~.,

~
'.
INT::::RHAl.. CORREn?ONCENC:S
CHEFlHCALS AND PLAZ7:C5
.
INSTITUTE PlAHT
P. O. BOX 2831, CHARLESTON, WlST VIRGINIA 25330
,Hame:
Distribution Lists A-I, A-2, A-3
C-l, C-2, C-3, C-6, C-7
E-l, E-2, E-lO, E-ll, E-12
F-4, F-S, F-6, F-7
Date
February 17, 1976
ISlon
.Hlon
Oriltinatin& Dept.
Environmental'protection
.-
.Answering letter date
General Operating Policy'
Goff Landfill
;y to
Mr. R. F. HW1t
l-'.r. R. W. Kiefer
l-'x. J. L. Worstell
Subject
Gentlemen:
'~I"t
'.r ;
," ~ ' Tne attached General Operating Policy for the Goff Landfill has been approved
.I,,~
'. by the Institute Plant Hanager's Department and is being distributed for your use.
: This policy, which is effective immed.ia1::eJ,y, has been adopted so that wastes can
':be dis9Qsed of economically and within prescribed governmental regulations.
'.
"
Please note that the Goff Landfill is the fifth and last alternative for
waste disposal, and disposal must st::-ictly comj?ly with the attached procedures.
~~ Waste generating departIT~nts are going to become more involved in developing
disposal procedu::-es, ::-ecord keeping, and transportation of the wastes. Tne . I
landfill will not be used'as a chemical drum storage facility. Wastes and chemicals
will be processed as they arrive; therefore, approved disposal procedures must be
developed prior to t~ansferring them to the landfill.
"
'"
'!"II,-
please refer any questions regarding this policy to Mr. R. L. Foster:
Very truly yours,
~g~
H~ D. Coombs
Ih
T.
~-

-------
~
A-141
Support Doclli~ent: Section
Require:r.ent ' :
Permi t Application
Appendix Item"Xllb
8
8
I-937-L
GOFF h~DFILL OPEP~TING POLICY
t' .
1.
Puroose of the Chemical Landfill
The purpose of the landfill i6 to safely and ~conomically dispose
of materials or wastes which are contaminated, obsolete, small in volume.
or whose physical properties will not allow them to be accepted by other
Plant 512 disposal facilities.
II.
Criteria for Accepting Wastes at the Chemical Landfill'
1.
"
Waste ~nformation - Waste generators are r~sponsible for providing
full information (chemical. physical and toxicological) on each
waste submitted for disposal (See UCC Reactive and Hazardous Chemicals.
~nual - Safe Practice Series and 512 Industrial Hygiene Department).
The information must be provided on a properly-completed Order for
Waste Removal (Form: . 512-1747-H) and sent to the 512 Miscellaneous
Di9posa1 Coordinator prior to any handling or processing. Informa-
tion taken from the Order for Waste Removal will serve as the basis
for developing the processing procedures.
--'
2.
Waate Identification - All waste containers will be marked by the
generator prior to shipment for disposal processing. Markings shall
include the correct DOT name stencil and label (See DOT Shipping
Manual maintained by the 512 Laboratory Service,Department). the--
correct UCC Hazard Signal Code (Engineering Specification FP-211) .
- and the ~umt~~ assigned by the 512 EP Depar.tment to the Order for
Waste Removal (Form: 5l2-l747-H) covering the waste. .
3.
Waste Di9Posal Method - The 512 Elp Department Staff will determine
the disposal altern&tives according to the following prioriti=ed
criteri&: .
a.' Reprocessing Potential - The generating unit will be required to
sh~J the reprocessing has been considered and its feasibility
evaluated before any other method of disposal will be developed.
b.
Sales - Should reprocessing be unfeasible. the generator will be
requested to submit a Request for Disposal of Excess Chemicals
(Form: 512~1724) to the 512 Investment Recovery Coordinator for
Materials in Distress. The disposal number assigned by 512 EP
to the original Order for Waste Removal (Form: S12-1747-H) will
be entered in the appropriate space on Form: 512-1724.
:.a;..,...
c.
Therm~l Oxidation - Failing to sell the material in distress. the
512 Investment Recovery Coordinator for ~wteria18 in Distress will
notify the 512 EP Staff and provide the originally-assigned disposs!
number. 512 EP will reopen consideration of the .disposal request
and check the possibi~ities of thermal oxidation for heat recovery
at 512 or co~ercial oxidation by an approved outside contractor.
d.
Bio-oxidation - If 512 EP finds th8t thermal oxidation 19 not
possible. the disposal of the waste through bio-oxidatio~ will be
cans idered .

-------
, A-142
Support Document: Section 8
Requirement 8
Permit Application I-937-L
Appendix Item XIIc . .

Page 2
GOFF LANDFILL OPERATING POLICY
... .'
7T
.......
. :: A,.. .:) ~. ..... r. -.... .... ..i.
Crlteria~or nC~~pL~n~ wa~t~~
3.
Special Note:
4.
~:r
.--
,.-
-
,~
fi
.:.
5.
at the ChemicalL3ndfill
(continued)
Waste Disposal Hethod (continued)
... I
c~.:-:-.~ ...-.~ ~.""-~c~ ~,
- ~'L_.:;,..,
~:-. ,~:~~'":"~
",;.,.1-,"::"1 ,-';~~~!"'=',:!~1. ,:,,:.r-:.th().~ .=;:-:.n
be found, disposal in the chemical landfill will be considered.
-.--
The red-tamp approval by the 512 EP Department will not be
, given the waste generator until the a~propriatedisposal
alternative is selected.
Waste Acceptance - Waste materials will be accepted subject to
the limitations specified belo~:
a.
Metals - Only those metals found naturally in the local geo-
logical environment at Plant 512 will be processed'into the
chemical landfill. They include: aluminum, calcium, iron,
magnesium, potassium, silicone, sodium, and titanium.

Hetals that cannot be processed into th~ landfill are:
antimonYi arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium. chromium, cobalt,
copper, ead, mercury. nickel, silver, and strontium. .

Chemicals - Only those chemicals rendered HsafeH for direct
blending into the chemical landfill will be processed. Pro-
blems of toxicity (particularly those related to human health),
flammability (as defined by UCC Engineering Standard FP-210),
and reactivity (as defined by the UCC Reactive Chemicals
Program) shall be resolved before any waste is classed as
"safe" for blending.
b.'
c.
Radioactive Waste - Radioactive waste will not be accepted
at the chemical landfill.
d.
Biotoxic Was te - Non-biodegradable carcinogenic, mutage.nic
and teratogenic ~astes will not be accept~J.
e.
Inor~anic Wastes - Biotoxic inorganic wastes will be accepted
only at the discretion of the 512 EP Department Staff.
Example: salt, etc.
f.
Laboratory Samples - Samples which meet code 2, 2, 1 (UCC
Hazard Signal System, Engineering Standard FP-210) or lower
will be accepted into the chemical landfill. (See section on
"Record Keeping and Transportation" below for further require-
ments.) ..'
Waste Disposal Processing Procedures
a.
Landfill Operation - Operating activities at the chemical
landfil~will be consistent with governmental permit and
regulatory requi~jments. .
b.
Written Procedures -.An approved, written processing procedure
will -be dcvelQped. fot each waste shipment: before it is accept(!d

-------
. ~.~. .._.._--
-. -.____n_.__-
tl-143
Section 8
8
I-937-L
Page 3
Support DoctLrnent:
Requirement
Permit Application
AppendIx Item XlId
COrr
LA1~D~!LL OPERATING POLTCY
II.
Criteria for AcceptinQ Wastes at the Chemical Landfill (continued)
5.' Waste Disposal Processing Procedures (continued)
6.
7.
c.
Procedure Development - The 512 EP Staff will initiate the
development of processing procedures.
d.
Procedure Approval - Each processing procedure must have signa-
ture approval from each of the following in the order listed
before a waste shipment will be accepted into the chemical
landfill: . ~ .
1.
Waste Generating Department Head
2.
Safety Department
3.
Maintenance Department Head
4.
E. P. Departw~ntHead
Record Keeping and Transportation
a.
Order for Haste Removal - An approved, coded Order for Waste
Removal (Form: 512-1747-H) must travel with each waste every
time it moves. .
b.
Sample and Waste Containers - All shipments of san~le and waste
containers will ~onform to the Adjacent Compartment Loading List
used by the UCC Distribution Department and to the DOT regula-
tions set by the Federal Government.
c.
Meterials Mixing - Mixing of miscellaneous materials in distre68
will conform to the adjacent compartment. loading list used by
the UCC Distribution Department.
. .
d.
Waste Vessel Cleaning - Transport tanks will be cleaned to meet
t~eBpecificationB set by the 512 EP Depart~nt Staff.
e.
Waste Carriers - All waste carriers will abide by State and
Federal transportation regulations.
Waste Storap,e
a.
Storage (General) - Chemicals will not be stored on the chemical
landfill. (Waste aent there for disposal will be processed upon
arrival. ~None will be accepted until preparations have been made
.."...
to carry -out proc:~sing.) .

-------
~~$~~~~~.. .. ... ... .
.<~"~~l'~l:::--:"i>::~:"t~ ',~;;;;~~~~}1~-t~?,:~';jt~j U"IO~ CARBIDE CHL\IICAL LA~DF1LL, 1~STJTUTE 1019
f;~$: ,~f{~~i.*,~~:~Q~:;::;:l\':'''~~,:;:,j.~~h~:\l ' ' '

t~~!~i~J~~~ty:~~~;: ~;~~}~ifi~~",~$1.;A4 combinina the optimum in en\'ironn1l:ntal acccpt3bility and process
;:",:!~*~;:y:,.~:-: ~"'~#i";i,.~;.:',:~~'::~"',~ ;;,:~~:,,'-;;,?!~.;;i ' ~ '
'~"":'.;;.~~ ;l.:t.rs~,,'f';lf,,:,:''':::.':'.. ,~.:;.":', >T:;"'~"'" i!i~''I:.:., ~\'" eco nom ~ ' '
,,,,.,,-;,,:,,c'-::,,",-, ",....."."f.~,~..,,,,,,,1;."...,~,,..J . 1 L d .1 \.1 h "r hI 6 F' 0
:..".,;.,:,:,-~:;~;;,~~:::..<~.::;y".:;:',,::. ., ::',:,:,~:,;',-<;r::,,',~"''r.:-:, D;SDosa. metnO s a\'al au e are s own In a e . Igure 1
;~~;~:~..\::-;~~'{~~~~~~.~t'~~~,:~--;~,:'lfr)r,~)~'~~':~'~:~ " .. h . ."., :. ,.. , .;. ., ,:."f".:,::-"-" ~,- "4~':-'~':''''' ..1 r-
r:."""""""\i-'."", ,.,..,,..,,,:-,," """'.-"""V.""'iI""+"'~ Il1u~trates t e SUPT\I~dT\ Of'S:GI,IZaUUII r..,I..~,"~'" '- .I,_...,~L. .,.1,
'.i.i",,,,~~,,:,<'p'~~ ~~,,''''e..'',' ,:.#',c,. .',.".., ~;;"",~(.', , .. . ' I
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:~~~;:;;~J{~~~~~::i~r:17..;:.~;r.~~~~~TJ Plant's Ellvironment31 Protection Department (Figure 10), but the
~~~~;~~!i~:t~~:',>Y~;Z:f~~}~?:#~~';:~i waste-producing unit bears the cost and r(>~ponsibility for complete, ef.
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:~~:,i:,~~,,':.-r:;.;..;.;"',c,: ._~:'-".;,,'S ,,/:;;~,r';~:'~:';":--'25 fective disposal. ounu-tle.c oc' <.I V;1 I a I It)', v<.Irlet)' 0 ta l'lIt, an a
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i;:';::r':t:,:,,:~:"., .:-"'{:'';~''i',\,',,';7''',~;:,~~:,,~{:~3':~;--:'~ cloS" work in::; re!:JtlOnsliljJ (IIOt. I1l\Jltt'd by partH.:ular speclalt.y) make
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":"Ji>I{;:;~~-:;,;-~,}"t:.-;'---~,:,,:,"'(';""'\'"';:';'''.-/~-;?<;;'~:'\~'.=T.''' the IlIstltute s enVirunmental team hIghly effective,
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~jJ..r:~~i<;.~\~\~,~~JI~~#~.:"'t..y..~~~~:..':\~?i1:. A branch of the plant laboratory is devot\~d entirely to problems in
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i~~!;.I;",'::t"!',~~J';'~1.:;:..~'~';';~';:~.;~.;f.",:\'~~~;'j.,t.t?J Tie 111 movIng \'l' lIC es IS rt'ta1l1e y t H: nstltute p <.Int s :.nVlron-
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~~ ';'~':f}~~l'<~Jfj~J:~; (-""~:;:~~':;.:":t~,,> \~~+ mental P rdt:\:t 11111 DE'pa rllnent.
t..$~{~~~~.fti';~~~~~~~.:f../t;;:~~i~>;..:4r The super,i~or of the mi;;ccllaneuus di~po~al function, (figure 10)
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~1"Jr~fj;,~si~.~1~;,;;.;.~~~~fl;~~:~;;~~::.11{~;i permits no \'ehic1e-,borne wa::;te (liquid or ~ulid) to l'ntl'r any Plant dis-
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;j".'~~;.i~~i:i]f<"",,:~~.:,~@:..:,;;:~;,,~,':i',.'1::;.,.,.;'~~:f~J;;(;;H;~.f Persuns re4uestmg wa,;te dl;;pus:..II ,Ire f('qulred tn ~lllll11ll an order
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;':~;;>~~~;)t:~~~t:~f...~~~;~~q";~:j.~l;1f~,,-.:;~.<{f, be3ring their si~liature. a comp]pte ch(>mical de"crijJtion uf till' w:I~te,
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::'::i::.~iJ:z~};'3-ff(flL,~Y:.::~;~,~~':;;'?~ ;:er;b~I' , posal Supervisor before waste containers or tran;;poTt.atioll are sup- .
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~."",(",/,:-~!~"'il:!:"'~f!<::-~",'~;:.i"~'''''.~''''"''.~'7~;;",,'itt):'';J cause eae 1 ur er IS tn~atl' I e 3 (>;;<1 cOlltract. nv \lJClC Cllt arising
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,~",-~&.~~;';:;!l:W';::''''..~~{:::.J''';f.'15\~~d'';i'J.- ' frum failure to identif\' the waste or the hazards is made t.he J'l'spol1si-
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~;;r." ~'~V,~f."':f'~',~""""'.:1:,,~;.i7.;...ft:~":'!,J~ bIllty of the dIsposer. All rt'pflrnands, ('(IStS, IlIvestlgallOns, and
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~>W~. ',~"~J,;~~;':-;;~":j'i<~~'" ,)f, '.~';;&~;~~ Wrltll1g of 1Il~'l',;sary repurts, With the fullhal'king of the plant's
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'!'~~:::r.;~.'4'~'2~\!.';'~~'4}~-~;"'.'I~J~\'. . 't,~'i;'f!"i"-: managpment JIl the same 1111(> org3\l17.'>'*il";v.~'i~"i~fo>-'i;,~;:"~ d d' .
'~'(.~{<:i'::;-j6~~H;~~"~:'{<&-:'~~':'~fJi~!~~,'g1r;';~~'~f t; re stamp, an notdies the appropri:..lte driver or crrw to pick up the
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,.,~..~.'~=:.,t..'),'/.-:';!',$",,,:-~!;':";'7':::r"~d'.{Y:,;..f-;".:e:,!~7"~',,?::J or er rom IS 0 Ice and handle the waste according to the written
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~~'.i~i}.~(;;:';'?f:1t.~~1~~:.;_~'7?~:P;,t.';~f-t,:~~ instructIOns, Each load must carry an order in transit. No plant driver
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'~"t"'~~-;:;'~~"14~~,;;.o~',\::'\?'1""~~-~~~~~}'~'/-;;'] lO:l2 PIWCFSS \:'<;OLTSTI{Y WASTr:S
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;~)~,;~,/',:':it~;.;'.;.:.'i~"';";~ ':';'\:'r~.t,~~:',>,;,r.,~-;..{.~!X"';..~ wdl acce~t any waste without a reJ.st:lInped ,order. I hrough
.:.-.~....~:,:~:~~~~~< x:. "';~':'J\.." tI 7F'':~' "'~'i'..,;"{~' ~.., ,'~,;: ..
;~~~f~~':ift.:~k?~:',: ~...~:r",~~~~t:~~~~~~, and expencnce, the driver:.:; thcmselves have become excglle
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;.r~'''''~~'~''t.r:I:..,",,,,,:.,.~,.,,~.,~tr.i~,~~i4, ;.'~'j visor
~~"';~:~~'~~'~:..:'/'~~~~";::;'~'.\_;;'~V1"')~h..;;,~~,,~~f"".'~rr1' ~ -." . ' ". '.
~'i~~'~~~~7-,..:>t';'t"};"';;;::':,::";~~~~":::;';~';..:~~~ Disposal unit operators llIust recclve a tlckd fur cach shl .
';.:.'. -~:-rr." "~"','I;''''-' .:"'"-""l ,,~-r f""'1J.-s:r~,t r,' "-, ' . . ,., ..
:::':'W'~7r-,"-:7:'S,;"",,~t\'t'~.:. ,:.:? ~,It~~~,,\,~:.,:;~hi:$, waste or they will not accept It. I hey, also. requlfl: the drivel
.::.Jj-'l.~:: I,~..~:"~...s'~,,,':..~~.~,, .~ 11<4;;".,' ~~'~"~'(:sr~~~~".:? \:",~1 . ~ .
i1.'2~.t~,';-;S:'~~~j'~~~,,~~,,:,~!... /"':~:of';'t:':J;~~Z;,~i and date the order UpOIl arrt\'al at the fadlty, and they fon ....'
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::.~g:~"J~i-"".""'~\:~'., l,ii'J:"''',''';''iJ~~}.I,'''',L'~'' ~1.J",...t/~;-f. ' SIg'!H',C tlc'ds to tie Isposa supervisor. i"\ og, 100 allu a :
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;t:~:':~i'T~:~~,:~;~t~,~. ',~>" ::';\:;~.'';-:~l~rtS::''\:''';':i) returned tickets is retained bv the dispiJ,;al supervisor as a c
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'J":.l;C;;:;/,i',.(.,,:.,~~:-c:":,~ .'~,o;.(j'''',{''''(~~.!'o...;i;)r~'>;'~J:R:'''-'' the disposal facillk:; he u:;cs. In the ca,~l' of the lalldllll, the
~,.~(.o,;'.I",'~J~(::;'.;..~,.JJ.-....""'lA..." - C' .".\.,~.~ ..'?i?!,:"~'~.~:: .
4~4!!~;.:.t',;,,~~~'~<':1,,;;;'/<;,,;,:!'i~j;.:n'~hi;41;1 orders are the fin a! !'l'cords fWIII which the ftee! mix and VI
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"";.',:;,:, ~./~;':{!-~;:F\,,;;.>:~~,-~""" J1}!'';;~!'~''';:Cl",,~'?~;: loading are calculated, . , '
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::';.J"'~7~~-;~''':'-T<':':':.'..~'~~':-~.!:''':''~;: 1~1Jr;~~~J(f.,);: I'n~tructlOns are pfU\'lded with each book of blall k form 1
~~""\.-4"'''',l..q 'rl'i;Q._~..'"",~' "'\""'~-'~' .',10.,": '"...~'.;:. _.,\.110:' . .
i~,"::'J?'<:.~'~~,\"U"-,.",";~i,;~:~:-:'~.,,~ ~,':','~""~~~'-'p',,: " (Table 7) and SinCe'S for all the d'1ta needed are rHovided on the
:}~"~'''~i!:~~~t~~{f!fu, 7"':~,~W~~::1~:z?1 ,itself (Figure 11). ' , I
t~~~~~r~#'~~~~-b.T:~~~,~~~~\.:~:~~j;.~'~?;~r . ~,E1, .,'.
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~@~m:~~i:~r>t.t~~~ ~'/i::;~-{t':'~~~~~,~,} Se g re ga t 10 n , '
~~~y~~~!;f{~~q~~j1'~~, :Xi;;~: Solid waste production at th'e Institule plant is fairly characteri
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. ~~;:'f;);~i::,~;2.~\.>~~~Ft~~.;.:-;:i"" some idea of the general breakdown. how it IS handled, and
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'~~lfK~~h~~~";"~l:;~'!~'~"'~~";,~~'''"t{,:[.t~ ft~ures) mdlCallo.l1 of amounts,
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f~,',~:';;"':',~~2?"', ~':"<';",',~"~, ::':':/'~';L~.i!,,~ ')':'!'i~?i,'!;.U~ " f'f',' ' nstructlOns or mamtal!1111g t Ie Ill'L'eS~~try Sl) Jus-segregatlOn,1
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~~,~~~~{~~~~P":?\'/;4T~'i:;;\?f'~;:~;~',":';'~~~; vlded each productIOn ciepartment 1 able ~. '
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~.~;,:<">';:.-::I,I;"...;>",,. ,'~'~:::. ,.",::~;,~,., -fI'", Recovery of 'II1\' waste eitht.'r as.is or thrull,'h re!lrucessirl;
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'if&,'f';>ft~:s~,~~~'(.?~;.:it:f':~~Hi!t\f'~;'" '. . most desirahle method of dispo:;al w!lene\'er it can be practiccl,
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':.*-tt~~::1i.~;:?;f.~,.it~. ", .:,' mnmenlal problem:iare generally eliminated and the company 11.
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'fi~' ,,~~'fJ?fJ~';?':";'1l;r,:~~f:.'ft\:~.. '~R ec~nomlc r~tu,rn. .ar JI e ,e I,eves I~ t IS 3pprO:lc I all( ap l
~1~'1),~~:;-.t't;''':i')~~~~1;',?::'~:?';~t~~",u~~'~~~~.:.t: philosophy \IJ Its plants 3.nd 111 Its deslg-n and development wor :
~',,~?-~~~:"~""" ''''-lJ'',~ _.'~ '.''f~,.'f,'i~~I,~'''''~iotI....~~ ~.. .'
i':~''''t..;,! ;j~;l";':f.~!?;'~~.f:~,,'';''ll;':';.'.1::.;''''~, 'if.,,"<. .;..~ processes. '
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~';"f.'~,~_>.".,.t!=J.06~'i'W )',,';\,!O' Each Order for Wa,;te Remuval and each request for del
~'-i'...r;,:V"!j;,,~'i.::..,~,...~.~~.tf.r~!:~:.:'.?:.........i'I'~~', ~Z~~.,.~ ... . -..
~~!;;1!:f:f;;/fff(~-:::;;f*1;'Y'ltJ.~f5.:::$-" ''i-.,~-: tena lI1\'olvll1g wastes at the Institute plant are con~ldered In l'
:;:......,... ,~"..,...,Ii.J:."'~'"~,,,.,,~~: .~'~, f h d' I h d h 'T II "I d' 1'1 f'
~j.;':m<~~~~~\.ii~'~~:;:-i;i'~~~~:{.~'"~",, ~, 0 t e Isposa met 0 .5:; own 111 a) e G, .' ost CSlfau e. 0 cou:
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~:',;'~'~, ':r:"':>-Xt"-:r.:'"",';::")}-4;"~":~':;:"~::''1~';,~::''-'if:.lJ&!:'' t e I1rst reproces~lng. al1 ea~t IS t e Ilt (anu I ), t
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~~);j.:#-~';';.,,~3::~;.~';t.,:~~tJ(.j~~' ' SeIlll1g the waste C3.11 often henetlt the curporatlOn If a b '
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6,:'{2:,>~':5~,~j~&:~~';'$t4{;"",/:#.:<';J..~tfk.S.:;,i':1.~-;j,;"~.f' provided a formal, in, house organization that helps its plants I 
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512-1747-G
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Malerial:

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CuhLJ     ( I 1'1.."1   { I LIli. Tllln { I O'U'" 5~ Gul.  ( I QUill" P\l1I  M.D.C.
I I OuII' IS> ~lulo t I 5uII1II   ( I Lill. Truck I ) Drulil 30 Cdl.  ( I DUIIII' 11,,!>!>o, FILE
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~~~~~!~j~~~ 'I . ' A-151 .

~a~-~'-"""':'t.... h..:. :.".~..,.,;~~;.~'1;.....,,.<,,, 'r"""'I' ll"'IO'\ CARBIDL- C,q,-"IC 'L ' . "DFILL IN"TI'!" 'l'L' 102-
~"""1";,,.'%~t-"'A" ,-.',-,'\;"'-k..,.~ ...,~""';";..." -',r,,,, .' . .. n.L.' .., LJ"'. . . -, v c.. I
':7'0.. ~ 'S };.."'";;j. '."~~3j" "8':--~'f4'~"'''''''''' ::\~;.~.~ '/:,~~'" .

~Z't~~~::;,-:.~5\:-;.~.:~:-:;. v~ l;;,~tkt~,~i;t1 ;'/ .
~>71;:~+-:?i:.;"'..'-.:7.:.~::.o~;....,,;~;.,.;{'7':.~',\:'~'i"_;~:~\~,~,.,.;, ,- "Good wast!:' preparation in ad\'anC'(- of la!ldfilling seems to be an im-
~~~>r,,~..~,.:,-\t...T....tt...W,<....~'i-':'r.,t';'" - '. G - ,'. f 0 I.
~.:",:~,;~~';~.{,:";:'.,.'~~' '~.'r.!.,:.;<:or.~,,;\"'~~'f :'ley Portant factor In the Jofl fanllty~ per ormaJlce, verwet surnes
~,.~~_...-......-~"",..:-t"'.~ &.('~' ,,' ,.~W",:!:;r~"1.";f;.""'''''~'';;:''' . .
~~"~'i~'";~',i':;':;I.":"A:,:' "..t~~:.;..;:X~K';~"f,~ , modified with more ear-hllke ....ast~ from uther.~ourC'es arc more easily
....r "':r......,~.,~"..- ".....".'.''-'' ''1;."..,'':1: d
~~~j,~:~~":'~" ",,:,~~,;;(,"'!\;;,.~,~l:J~~OIfj~J:~rJ blended into till' lift~, Acid ~Iudg'::' are mix!:d with a~h :1bsorbents. then
~~');~~f"~:'-;;..~:~~.'.1r)f~;'~;~~'i.~fJ;';:.~ - blended with CTll"hed limc":1unt' to {:iH' an alm~st neutral mix that can
...,,""""" ,-"..' ,..,...,,, .,. ~. ...' "'.;1. 'J. :., k d \. I I-ill" 1"11'..1 .1
'.~-',:,..,;.,:. .~, ,.,'.")',: :~::".,; '," .~;-:';iiI'..:,:..;.,~,:!,';.~i,l be ~afdv wor 'e u\' 3tH t ""'U1!Jml'nl. astlc uOjJCS are mure ea51 y
'. ..~;"~~.\':'~It:!. .,... :,J~'" .'j.~..._~~~....,.r.."r.."'~} !'n- .. .. "'''''i
t}if:irif,i;~;~~~)]'~'%i"~'F'. .'-:~'S':;~~:~-11~~~4f.~ . managed if they can hi' ab:;:orbt'd on waste fiJter aids taken from
,...z:..-..: ..~r .." ". ..~'.I" "~". \". .\~.>:-f.."'~~.~'" ftO ~..:..,] .., . .
i1f?~.G:l.'"(\-~~~.;?I!..~~:-!.~~\~,:;::~~j~'.-.,r,~:..:t.'j.- pre~se5 handl1llg compatible chemical:;, H!:(\lth haz:Hds. flammabIlity,
._<.~-,~,,, , ."~.' .,\ y.' '. < . ,.,. ')1' " .~"' ~/.f;.O'J. ';if' ,.-~
,~~,Z;~JV~:k...V\/.I).3{~"'~"',1.;~,) :.~;:",~""'\:"/.':~f.i~: and reacti\'it\" "o\'ern thet\"j}C of IHelreatment given any one waste,
~-$r1.'J?~~,Z;;""',.:.~\.~;-..;.":_.'\'--..J. ~",'~'1.:~'t;"'1,;~.~.I'~~ . b. . .
~,.!'~;!~;':~;i~ ~'.J,~~-;''i~,,~-:,:'!J;;si.-;:-~.~~~,~,~~J? ' Again, the fun amen.a tn1\1.S on t e ut.>gree 0 prelreatment are t e
'..:.,.)J:!,-.-~~~i:'t:t:,.- ":"."" 't:f.,:;.. ~. .~'.":'!i';~A~';"';:""~<"" '-! . - ., . -
~~~il.~:~~~.:.;:.:$':',~~:;':t:,.l;-L.::~:,~~~!"~~~:;:.rr'T2 haz3rds of the speot]C' chE-G1IC'al:;:!ln\'ul\'ed and the cff(:C't on the lalldhll
~,~........~.~.",,,.~:.'<.~.,,. ~,..~ "..,.:..;.:;o:','Ji"'''''''''''''<':~ .. d 'h' -} I'
~:",~"l-'~;~'~';~-::'?> ,,,,,"",'rfl,~"";--.j ".'.w}~"ii\",'f.'):'~' 11- an trt'atment Unit acterl~ p,-1j1U 3t10ns.
~~1~~> "'. -'~~-!I;;~~'~,-;" ..~..,:~.......;'t~.}~.:.~;:'.~~.;'I'~~:' .' . ..
~\:~!."..'f~l~~~.~,:'~:<:-~~~l,.<'W:~~.;~~"-o:-?t~...,~~: An up-to-thC'-l1llnme Wt-.rklll~ knuwlt.dge of th(' chetmcab III the
, ~ ,.,', ;j""""'" ,lhti:1;'- ,.,."/ .., "'1""'''''''''''':i-,''' ~i>'-' 1 . 'I I I d -j} 'I" 10)
'<.{~-::".~~""'-~'.'...-.;....:f;~""':"".. ~,~"'~':'\l: '".". :~~~U"~'~.~A~1 Wr;..:;"~~r;:~~~ . . .
"f;j/!:'-?f.'#~'itiJ:!;,"t!"' . '.~~:,j{~\.f.?:::i,i;'.;:;:'1zfi.!~"'iE.'\;;~5:~I~:i~!~~\"~ll?i~\ lL<; egra(bbility. ~rhis c~lI~ for a \',,~iet:-: ~f tC'l"~lIliql1es fWlIl ~('agent-
'f.\~:~'~\r~;r?;~:;;frl~,,,~~A1;:tE?f.i~~,(~~.;,;g:: filled treatment pitS to ~Irr,ple :,urf3l't' mmng with tl11' landfill s blend
'.~ ......:~..4~:('p .~~ .' ,.-.:..),('~ ""t.t.~. --'i'~~"cl..,..~~~.,.-~ . 0
~Yt:::'?~::~~f;~~;~ii~%";:'z;,~~~~~~~Z~~~ sOIL J) the a\'crage. some furm of surfaCl: blending will be employed at
.. , f -:<;1"';,., - . ,.....::.I'-f-, ~I:""'''->J. ..,. ....;" .t.,-/,!,' .l1S-,~~, .c', .' h d' - I ., I. d h I. I d
;:"':J;i0*z~~~.i.~'J;..:k:i.c'7"Y';';'~'k.r;.,.t;;:~::.~.:..j'" some p01l1t In eac 1~p;_tt.~~~~,~!;.;.,\; ~ :"..'f...-y..-<,~"j:J?i,~.:; fill proC'e55,
~ 1fff-;';'~~~',$~':':;';'~:: ".::"L,;,j~""::-t'>'i .. ':',~~ie.'-:4!1:~ < } . '
\':~0: .:;;~t{~':h4:4"j:i'~::'{-"iV.~t'-*,~i~~~';'h:\~'t r Je prucedure C'urrenrly l1~["': l'\'o!\'co'as expl'nencl' with Loth the
'-q;:t~..t~,~';>E.~'~i~~:~~H.!,~.,!'~'~..:;.j:1-';;.;;t older impoundment-t\'j)e landfill and the ncwer wet I)fOCl'~S was ob.
~,(S'..C'I""'!.:-'C~ ,!."~:;,.,..~.,,~ .t~ r~"...r.:'-""'..(" .,:~;l.,;...."... t .. .
:-qp.,~~~;t~~:~S.J~~~~$:~;~l!,,~~;$):..~: 1.2ined. .
~.:..:'~~if*:~.,:~-~t"'}.:f!'!:q:'t:'~"i. "."~;~'~Z '.t'i-S~ \\'.. - - ..'
~."",,>_..~g,:"J:~'~'~~~~li-':~"!""~":'!."';-:":~ aste-ccl1 COI1~tructlOn. commonl\' u:'l'd m ~al11tary landfdl, was
;'Tf~'"'41KI/f;l'..~~;;"'!!i.~~-?":"'.b~J.j!,;~;~B~i7,~~};;4.;I~'}~~ij:~;:"l,t;:,:~.;;.:.:i";"'~l~ a an une after only a few w'ks of operatIOn m 19G5, Ram water
"'~~~~:e ;::....'',Jt..(~t'.''~'.'''' ",,~';,~ ~~..,~... q~( ,-"'.... ~~\.,. . .
jit:W$~.:":t.4.~~.~~~(~:P.m~.-~~'!..O;"'J~:lI collecting 111 the cells before co\"Cra"l' and on the surface after ::tpplyina
~.".!:.; .; '.. ~,.. '-":~;;{.:;~:~.':!J':.~:.?:'1.*~-t1"'. ..'.:.'.~P3::?!I.~",~'r.if~. th "I al t:- . . . . t:-
!;i:~~ ':0~"!'8c$~~:,-::''f. ~"'~:f-:'.;-;'~~~!:iL e" necessa~ cay se calliro a ~wampv condltlOli that lI)lred o~r
rc'. ~;;;:,,- ;;;:,""""....,.~':+ .,I.,...' ,..- ;,;?1 I1F"-':';>"' - I b lId -
.~i~,.;:;:i>:;:;~~;;;,r;"'l~;.;~,;~~:p.~~r'~":J?iM;...~:;;:~ ' arge~t u ozers and made it impossible to get good contact between
:-:.-,. ,.f:~~~t~"i.~~;f~.~~'~~4V?J.,. ;i1~1' th '} d h '
;~'~v~,f~" !~~'-}';~'X:~'.r:~:i'<"":Y<."'"!'riifi",~",-'o;:"i~:;;~~,';i;: e SOl an t e \l.aste. Support Docwnent' Section
~~1f,'}f.Jt&f.,~.~'<~{,;~.;f-~;:-;,<,.~-;';.ly{--;ii':~~.;j. . .'
~~"~""'~'\';"'''f''-''' ".'('o....,.....~""':f"'d,'1' Reqm.rement .
;,r,: s'vflll:t:."J!,"':;;.~~.f,;~;~;~"1!~:~!;!:~~~1'~,~;t} . ., . - .
~,:7:-:~:.&~~:'~:,~.-:"}'~s;r; ~~~<;e:.~~J.-.~~t. "'';;~ Perffil. t ApphcDtlOn I-937-.L
~..! h~ .t", '.' ,e'~.o:~':1Y"9:''''':'' r-,~'<': ->'.-.'1{'ff'f..-,?1!;:':--.?:$'/' A d. I t XT'IT
r:'PB~~.I.._~ \",.,7t;.,'il...~:;-:::.;;,t ~ "~. ~":.c.. )-i':~, ~r--41::~,*,~ ~ . ppe n ~ x. em .L v g
~:'.:~"~\.~;;'~:~'>'''''~:~~;.I!,]o:'''>l~.;~f"'':-''~'-'J"~:i~.1;~r~~1...,.:~". :,..;.', . .'~..,..-, ~ .t. ... .t'_~~'.-"I# ".. ..~. I ....~. . ' . -.J
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A-l 52
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lO:.!tI
PHOC~S I~ UL'STH Y \\'.,\'::;TE.,";
A primitive form of the rndhod Carbide u.::;~ today wast:.
lutiunary step. To avoid the miring probl~Ill and get th "
coverage without too much muvement, a crawler crane;
bucket was employed. \\'a.:;'tc was drupped into pits (sumeti
deep) from the transport tru-:k.s and the crane clamrl(
amount 'of earth in <:>n top- Then, a mixing process w'
bucket was conducted. It W:.L:> ba:,ically a lift.drop-lift prott'
,gradual,ly g:.lve a. mix.turt" that r~"'e!llbk:: ~)il~ \\'hl'n th~ rl' ,
much like the sod being adued. It was IIHt:d Irum the pit, !
over ;IS wide an arc as the.crane worn would perlllit :wd simi:
,with a burtdozer during tht: next Hr-ett:!-I of dry Wl.c~. the operator h:J.s bee c
maintain the 6-in. layer uf earth be(w~n hi::; m:!('hin~ tre;Jd.
waste to avoid picking up unbll'ndt-d m:H.:orial Lind c!Oggilli
0:ext he begins (0 walk hi...; machine over the s3ndwid1. \\ ~.
end-lo;JeJer forces the track"cleJ[.5 duwn iino th~ blend eartb ar.
the latter into t~e w3ste. By Ob"erY3uon. the op.-.:rator cleciOl' ,
earth-waste mixture seems mO:;l ,homogeneous. At .th .
proceeds to spread the entire nu.:nure o\'er ~ wide an are' ,~
on the lift. ,
Rubber-tired vehicles h;JVC bt.>-en tric-J in this work. LI'
unable to make good blel1cL.; 11;;Jrticub.rly ,01\ wet days). :\ole"
hides not only do the blending- well. bUt they also ovcrco!nl
jection tu placing rubber in contact with O~"iiniC-Ch!:micall'
bulldozers and end-loader:;. with track.:; ha\'e been u.:;ed on ~;
Operators, whe:l given a choice. prefer the cnd-Iuader because
perior ability to place earth exactly where tbey want iLI'\'
sizes, the end-loader seems to do [hi,:; type of landfill :'
rapidly. ,Support Document: Sectio,
Requirement
Permi t Application 1-93]1
Appendix Item XIVh

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:;;>-ft:,,'.l1,"". "',,-,';' "", '. ',','~ "'!',"" ". ":.f-'\.~~~'l"~"~;~:S I
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~:.:- "" "";:"':&""''''U';'':''~'! "~'%~~f~~$.~~~~~M~~~~~~~~;' ,':, ~~~I~Cs~r:i~e~:(~~~J~~~~~~I~IJ~;~~~::~'(:l' \~~~'i~~:~n 5(\I;'~~~e::l!~~~a:;~'I:;:I:~:~

j " ~,.~~,".).-,:--O.'r~!!;.....~i;" (".,~."I~,~~.;.!'~'~';,2~g " j ('ven with proper drainii,l:e. In the btter c"se the sl'rnipefilleahll' cby
~,,':.1~&~~:~~~<~,~~r~~}'~4*~~:.;'~('~ I absorbs ju~t enough water to b0con1l' SP"II~'Y, Cenl'r:!lly, the al'fpded
,r."< ,: '.:~~~t1:.;:,~~;'~t.~:,:i~~ >~144li?i~~i ,:~ ~ area appars to be the same as the rl~t (If thl' fill surLtcc, ami the con-
''''', n,:,::~),,~'~~";':=~:;;"'''k;:','':f''~'' "..;~1i;~5);~+ 1
';;t,,~](;rf?~\~;:-i'''~';r:'''~[i/:'?~~;i,.;~~~;~t~A/~I'<:: dition does not come to lii.:ht until sonle \lns\lSlwcting hravy equilJl11ent

,~~~~~!~l~~;~~)r~~~ii~l):~~'t;'~.f:.:~ ~ oP;~~~~~nrgu~)::I:~e71~~c:~n~i:l~~~t~~o~~,I~:.h~~i::!I;I~~:;~;:~~ ~~~~~'n the wet
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Gff~.r"W,].~,'~.;:,~~.~~.P.f;,'~.~~i.~...~$ik,.~~~:;:,.~ 'I ~~~l'~~: :~tSe~~~ i~~~i~:~~ \~:~1~\~:S t~~~t:~r~~~~ s~~~', ~~',(:~~)~:;:::~(~tb;~rf~;i

jQ"!':'J:4.''>;.'.\i,;;.'''i:;,''!~.~..~:f?;,',:~~;.-".t.!\:;\,.;;f.t.". ;~:"'(~\!<~'~-" .I, zones, Reguiar addition of wastes containing limcstone ::lI1d alumina
~*-;:;;'~~~%~;';':-~~;.i'f;;,:~;,~~t;s:,~)f~~~i~ 'c- with 3 particle.size of ~., in. keeps the fill surface open and provides the'
:~f~~*&;-;?~"{~~,~~~~';.~i?I$~~4J' added benefit of keeping the ground frum freezing in the winter time.
~;17;?"~..;.i~:~~y;;;~ '\.'~;~f::,t;;J.,"r;;>\~ ~i';;,~, ' This is P3rticularl)' important to tl1e cOI'tl'llu"d ()per"ttl'un of the W"ste-
Etl~~;ft./[;;~~~~'.~,;,~i!.',<~r4i:,~~fQl?:~~~k;re 1 blendl'n!! operatl'on, Suo ppo~t Document: Section
~J1.;;j~~~'~~n.~i::~~~.:~~f:;:..:;~,r~[f.;F ~~~~~~~;;~~a.;.;~~J OJ -
iI~;-jJ~'7i.$~r....o(.';.. ,.'t.<:\~" ,.-'-~M;.:;,.t'", ~1 Hequirement
i'r~~~t~l[~~J.~~i;l~(:t~~~!1 J Permi t Application I-937-}
'~~!tf:~J:;~:t.~~~[~~;itt~ ... '~ .. . -- -'- -..-.- .~, A:pe~d~~. Ite:~~~~--~

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A-153
L':--'IO:\ CARl:!lDI:: CHE.\UCAL. LA!"l)FlLL, !)\;STlTUTE
1029
FILL-SOIL HECSE A:\D SUPPLY

"'Ack~~hei],s study inuicatt's that there will, he t'nough overhurden and
"borruw" earth to sustain this landfill's bll'nding rt'quirl:'ments for the
full 20.year life span, Supplil's of this e:Hth are removl'd ;JS they are
needed rather than all at once in order to kl'p as much n;Jtural cover
on the g-ruund as pO~'iiLle.
As a lH'dg' a~ain5t unfofl'Sl'l'n prulJh'ms in obtaining blendearth at
the site. the landfill superyisur has taK('n option on all Lurrow removed
from in-plant construction projeCL'i, \,"hat is not used at the chemical
landfill is taken to the company's lH'arhy inert landfill.
Operation has conrinued long enou~h to pf'rmit some estimation of
the time required for stabilizing the wasIl' mix being fed to' the fill.
Conversion to the wet pron,'s..<; rcquirl-d l'XC1\'3Iion of sOllie of the older
waste.soil mixture~, and it was f(,und that some could be reused as
blend soil' ~fter as linJe as 18 months, It I113Y bc possible to use less
than the predicted I,Li acre:; over the 20'Yl'ar life of the fill.
Gas Generation Control

Gas gener~tion within the landfill has nut Lcell a ~r()1J1e1l1 since t.he
wet process has ben inst
-------
, A-l S4, , , ' I
~~*~~~~Z;:';~:'~~fJ~c':;'~.;,:r~:~ ' ','
ifti;~~~i~$:(;~>:;~~~;:;l%~~~i~~iio~~~~ 1030 PROCESS l~UCSTHY \\'.\.:)IES ' '
'~f~~~;~~~;7%,::~;~ii.~~~~:~Z\~~~f{';~}1~'}.1 ' . ' ' n ,
;! <~,;""",",~'h'~""",':" ,f'>~~ ,.",,,,",...;L'.... fi, ''o.,i i ~ Draln'lgc I
~{~;;t,\s~,.;.~t1,~i~~,:rr?:~<;J,:~~!.;.t:~.~~, .. ,;", . ,', ' ". '".."
'i!\ ,:-' .:.,.,'.,~~~:,.~,:\-:~ ~'t~.~;::~..r';::"~,~51.1...~':' 1\luch of th~ Ih:u;::o:.ar:- Jr;ll.l.I",~ protectlon ha::. bef2r1 d :>"
.'t.....)~...... ,.,....~",,\. .~.'c!'.Jt.;c""-""'''''''.' ~"".I....,,: ". ,..,.
~.. "r.~,\,..\r~,~~;:..~:o; ~::i 'A~>.>:.~I.:~;.;.~t"':J:.,,,,~~::'~',:",'I~~' thl::; land!tll (r Igure G). Tht:'re art:' day-to.day problems, howl.
'~~. "'.;.\'~'" "".,'~-'" I' .,..-,:-"."., '!~'''' ,,~. , . 'I
-> . ',:.:;.;:~~ ,;',,;~,), ,::~~\: ,\,:-p~:(,:~::~:~~~<:..:.{f - mllst be resolved hy the operating crew.
"" 'I", -~I '. -t',... ''''''~''...., .~t" -<0- ~ .....
~>;~:;[~..:.j:t~'~~v::;t:r~~~~'t?.i~!.~..?:'_.t:j:{~<',Z: Most of the dlillcullle:::; rdate to dralO3ge Immeulately
..ii':~:;'''''''~~''''-' .h','~" 'r, ~,,*;.~ ' :," ,~f; f'111'" Tl'" .J h . h I ~ 't "
~;~,;;,~,,>,~,,':\L~:; .:~;...~,t~?~..: '~'~':~:~.";. t:,!.':,,~,; .:~":'& 1 . ut area. ns I:' Ins. e tt e p-enp, t?r31 araln 5110\\':1 In t:
~',,;J!, ~, ~ ~ ,""" 'fl"'" J:J,r"""""" ',or. ~ ..",= I ,I h h I ' , h. f h fil'
'~~.~,;\:*-~,;',jiif:;'<':~.~.,,-:,.;..; '~jf.t.':'--::-:t~,.5~!:1'i~<' ,-,:1:,,' p :.10, allu t e trenc ~ C J:'1n~e p<\:.'Hlon 3.5 t e SIW 0 tell
~...~.!:: "" '. "<,,,,,, ~--{'~'J.:!:,~,.,':f~",. '.:t'" '~"'" "1' 1 I \' I d .1' II k . l
"~'.'.:, ;(.'1' ,~-,.}:i'''f:,h''f;:';>:'~:i},~,''~<'.~' ,"':r,'::'<':,:~?" ,Lv l/wr oca S l( es an ::'1 t:HlOn cau...'t' ) OC ':1!;e In l H:~ t ;
~., "-4, 1e ',.. ',"~ ,',.,;:,' ': .~1,' ".,' '..., ';i-/'{; ," ~-,;"",......~,." '
'~~ ,"',;';~\';:,k',:#!;~f~":'!:~"~J'1-ir"e:.t':'-r.,i.t~ mllst be cOlltrulleJ bv the l3udiill t."ljuipmellt oper3lor. PE:i
W';'~'" "'..:.~.,l~.:::\"';;.:-'~]"..~~ ,;v-;:":.,,'...iJ ~# FJ~~"""..(\t;./..\-~J~t . : .'
*'\.:,'~ ':'.:;-': ,'-,: 'U",', " ': 'f :';.,' '~r:';l.."/",i'r.~~",' :;;";, ' mtl\'al, uf suspected sIlpp.."1~e lOnt'>:> ;lIld regular :><:raIJIfJg 01'
~!"".:'l.~~,f':'~~;'~~'...'.... 't\,."~~'.,:":" ~:...~ .".i..~..: ',:~:.. ~~.' . :- .. - "'
""t~~';:1f~N~?:~~,:~~.:~,:::t.-:.lj-.;?Tt~l':.t.t;'~:~;~f: bottoms 15 a reguhr p:m 01 hI..:> Jub. . '
, ,.....",-~:.~..,,~,. -. )f;;'" ",.J., ""~.' ...':t ;(,""
,~'~~>~~~/f:<;:.,~~.~.:-k;Si:7t'.;~~~'1t,~,-;"-::~':id Slag drains in the "I~aky" di:-e ha\e ~hown a tt:'ndency t .
'=...~~it,i ~'''''''''''~~,,'..;n.t'I;t. . .. ~!:,,"'C".' ,r.;., \:..~.- ~"'Q"!: . ~f ...
~t?#i;"':~";;:~i> ,~~,.iJ:"t'i~;:';~~~:;;~~~~"'::~'.;t>;~:#. watery sludge w3,;tes :He ~Hl)<:"",,,,'d, ~111'" reml1\'al and rep!uc
.~~~~"~,;~;;~~,',:~~;';""~,:~:", ~i~:",/h~~T,,';~~';,'::'~,~l,: ,the sbg has bcen nt.'t't,>SS3r:-' :.I:' a elln~e'qlJt'11I:e. (.-\ bt:'uer prel:
~L."'rl:';.~~: ~~..,(:1",~ '~..~...,"':-!-',;,:'~ ~\~:~''l"~~<:,,,.....,~ ~~ .,,'.' 1:'., ~ .
:~\-~~:;'I:;~::'~A;',...u~.;,,?~~,;,~','~!;j,,;'~~:.;i-'~(""1;J:,' , sludge W:.l::itcs seems tu be cOrn'CtI!l~ [he problem.)
~,..~~....".;...."'~'..,' '~..f'''~< "~",-"r{",, ";r.;,'
: ~~.,'~~"r!;,~,'::k'\ttl:'ilr,:~~';:~~)P~~,:~i~'i'~'o\,*~~,~[;';",' , Maintt:'nance ,of draj~plJ.nL-::; ano",,", [he wp of lh~. fill lifts h
~-~~~~,;t'~;l'.:"''\~~~'~ ~~~~~,i61".'1~;~jJ;i'i:~' for close attcntlon, A 2~ :.'Iope w:c; rE-\.'ommended 10 thel;
.,........~.~, ~..fI".,.,. 4"....-: ~,r...",.'i~~. ftf''1''''''"~,,,\ "~~'!:Ii:. .
~~\~:t-'~--:~~--%~i:.#"!~~~#;-t%,i~~~-'~"~:{}. , process dcsign, and [his ~erT'l.5 to ~ ade-quate as long as t ,
'1.":f~.~J~'~,:~'J!"!..",:r"?f. ')~';"":'~"':~",:, "lh:,~~~~~-l.~,$.'-"~~,~':' ....,
~(~~:,'J,";:;"",~"~..f.;~~,t<;'~':'7".'.g..:;-:-."r~';~"7:i.'~ kept trec of slight high .:;puts. ,

~;~X~~~t~i~~~1i Sl~p"g~ . . . ,., . .. . I
" $.;, "-"~'t'j'.;~:TiY...-,~,~~..::};:.<:;t~"'t'i,~~~~~,:~:-::,:t Sl1ppage IS 3 pmhlem 3PH.:.nd the Gol! IIlI :,lle oec.1ll:)c
.:'c~'IJ~'17:-"It'"~,.:8,,,":'t':Uo"'+~!i.4"\it'~..., '. . ~........[C;' :/.. ':.ft,~.. ':.:.~.:1 '
,,.~iF,~?, ~ls::!.~i;~-~>~~: ~:;#~:~-"',~1~1"'t,~~H' clay deposits alld rather "r.:~p :.'Iope';' on t!'lt:' ~ides of the hollov
.. ",~..,-I", ''''''..'', ....', .':I_j' .,.. ;"... ,~,-, t" .;Jf, ..'~~., , , ,.' . '." ,
~~~~:~,';{~,::',\;:{,AI,~"""""..~/1t1~-5~"~3!j,':~''-i.~:~~ i--,i;':~; shear. slnl1!ar to th:.H exp-:r.enccd In \\ e-:ol \ Ir~lnI~ hlghwl'
~~,,,,,,')\,'~,:.\",~:i':, '';;'' , ':I:~," "~":~"~""L"r;::_"':"'..t,o,,~\;\ ."4;~ , f I . d f h.. . - 'I
.'>}~,;';fi~z.):,:t>,;;~~;.:,~i,:,,~'~~~'1i;,!:~j..:it~'{1:~;~,;~:!';~ ' tlOn, occurs a ter on~ per:o :.'- 0 l~n raWi3I. ,
i'-'-~o;>"J':;~'''7,!!F.,,:,t:'' ,Jf"i'.~'C, '~':.H~';;'''.!;';J..,'':;;'::' L - . , h 1 I fi' ,
'~:C",::.1{.~?.:r!'::;;,?:.';i':;"d'>'/:; !'''''';'J'';',~,;.~t,(;*!,''-o ,;;: ',n'?' andtt!! Sllper\'lO:lIm h8..::' to ,e ever 3.(':1: to t H:~ lrst Slg,
, :.~.~..:;:~lf~':-J,~" .!~ ::.~~.~:.-1~.t~~~:"~,,":\~ -,..,~~:t,~P!:)".\.::;1';\,~~ ..,.~ . . .. ..
'fu.....-~t!:'1~~;...",~,~,;"~~"+,-,:~,;,,,,.,\,,~,,;:;',I;~"I".)':'i:-""f' ';;"~""'''''~''[','f,};';.,',: bulge::; on hdlsi(le,,) uf slip ~ aCtll.lfl C:.jfl bt> t~ken to pre\'lt
""', .L')'S\' '~""',,\~1''r :4-1\','''''',-,1 {'I"-$ .......", '1~ '. .."'"!"..r'~'1o..:&>.,..
:' :~,L~~.;.4~!:"'~\!''!'~t~{~~~~~~...~j.~Q..~,~\ ' slide, Dike>; within the fill h.M: Dt.'-211 roo pr.)blern becau
'.!~~"""I!.;:..~~.,.~ b-1~~~~i:.o{~......-iJ~"'" ,,~(;...~ '.~'"
'f~ ~"."!~~~~:: ~)"~~"'Jr;;;:;t,<;~f~;-r~~~!~'::-;:':~ii; keyed to the top of the bed ro~:k. bu. thi,,; tL'\:hllique is difficu ,
'.!'1.t, ,,'i~,~,,'f~:,;;,;~~}.;;'::-~';W...-:.'1;';i!i!j~,:<,-~- h h I' , II' ' "
iU:..,.Ii-,.........\?~~\:,.;..::". ~.,'~' .-.J:~..;-: .bZ~!-t#C'~~~~.:"i."~~,-;:,~~~ to t e 0 l()\V 5 \'1.:1 ~. . ' ,
W"~-;~.r:"'~- :'{i.ji-.~:' ~';<;.;~""i!q;,"~.:J: '. , ',' !'I",<-;'".;.~- , ,. '. I
~~, '-;;'~~"~-::,'\'r,,"S~"tf'~1~"'::,.;;~';.", . - :f~;.t'~";;~,, Most of the tIme It 1$ ne1.:e::...--.ary (0 cererr1llne the'full' :Ire: ..
. .. .. ..}-...,-+ ~ -' .".";.,.=.--. f.;,,?r,,-":e~~~t'iat' .,. , ,,,. - .. "","''' .. J't":'r.I..:!:.
1,,\~&~fW;;tt}~~~~j;~,~;j;~;{,-L. ~1?:~~:"'~Wt 'strip ,it off. remo\'e ~oil to rh~ top of t;:1l!edyin~ flIck. thell j
, ,;,{o:;".':':'<' '.~" "~;" ~\,~"..~~""""~ '>' '~~~.f..'7."~''''''''J-',''' ' I k" I C - , ,
..~,)t;i.::rJ'd'";',~";;'~"::',,,~""';"~8'i',,~:<::/-~~,~,,,~.:.r~,-,"1; II1ter oc 'ln~ nprar 3:' a ):.l~e. onCrt:te G ~\rne[lmt":5 requlrt
~,~-~>o.>.:~p.r;f,"I:..;,':. ~"~~'''i.;''i...-..~~~., ~.~.....~\",,~..,.,!:.\.;
~~~'~<;::i~~*~.,if~~>;.~!t:J'it~~~;~~,~.,~1i';{ the repair is complete,~r3...--":; 3nd Iret":' are pbmed to holt.! itl
~'.1.',~,,,,'''''c:---t',,.,.~,..o.'' '~~J'}~""'~~;l:.'1......,.j'-'Ii':" '
~ il~~~~;'~~~~;;a itt.,r.~-~.ft"~I~~~ii~~yj~~~~~' . ~ ' , ' .
~~''''''';'-'';''''-.:I;~'~~!~'..:,..:1>''''''';;(~M+;,:';'F''';:; Equipment '
~~~.::~Pf'r~:~l~~~j~~:~::i~~~,:~~~~~:!~~~{~~~;;:(~' ' .. .' .. ' -. .
'~,'.' ~, '. " ~,i~t>;:':',$~'#:~r;{D.'>t,~J:-P.~'-'tIi"J',a,f<"",-o.;,~~; Becausc of Its ahtllt\' to Illr 3nd pLice t:'3rrh e3:,1l\'. carbll}
l;-~~;':..~'''l,~''!~~.:..","-::~{:',;.;~~~.,~~,~.!')~,;:~~~,,:~,::.,,~-;J~,~'~~' .". , . . ,"'. .,
~i!!!:'r".;'';~~''il,;,>;:':2''''ii'i,;~SA'::~~~~\:-ti'ii'J~~~~~t the track-eqUipped end-Ioacer ItS- oa:'IC plt-Ce ul chernl :
",",~'''-jj~-<;o-~t."~~,..,.."I,.'J''-,,; 'i".~' ';r>;"":;'Jo..'-iI>l;'''''' ~"to..,., ,. I.. _.J '-II
$).,,;!,7.,~,;~,'t';;'.,~"~~~;,:~ ';;;~;~,i;:':-~';:;",,;:","ii>,;~';;:,q.;';',;:, operatll1g equipment. t 15 3...'-:.'IgT1t"1.1 contlnU:iJ \' to wa.,)te.eart
:~....~;.",:~~' ."l,'.:;J;:'~":'~;:'~~"i~~'~";~'::"r'tn~>,":t.~'A'~>~ - , ... . .. ~
'~,~~;."1~~:",';-,;~,:ftP~ '"~:,~'?i'i2~},'~~,':i;;\:,'.'i.;;~'~4-~'-'''':'';~ on an 8-hrfcI.:Jy, ;).d:\y we-ek 8:.1:"IS,l hmu~h ~HrJngement '1\'1\,
ij;",:~~J/~."'-~.r~'~.4I. '>,4-,'7'9':"~~.~;'-t"~-:r~''"'~~;';.~;,~. . .
~'i*f~~ .-.;~~~~~'?':~;:~~;i>';;J;!'r,o\);.";':':,~:~~~:,3.,'--:' ;r.-,~~ equipment rental agency. a backup can he obtaIn(>d In t
~';;-:"'~'";~2.-:;.~~..-z-;~'~';;':"",~.....:,.;,;;.,;:>;I,I,~":-;i~ f 'I S t 'D Q t. S t"
J~':'i':-0~:;:~'~ii~I"'::"'~'~:":'>;;"":;'::";t.1.~, :':'('~;ii';"',"'".r''''';''~ ~l ure. uppor ocum~n. ec l ,
~~r;.fi:;t!!~::;;:~~ti.;~m~1'i.i;~1.~1't'}?,~:~:' ,Requ~rement. . : ~.
~,""""';; ~~r~':-:- ';,,'.::~i~::::CS;,..~,'::~, .:;; '~'~":\~~,', ,J, ,:1.'~~,"'~<..d'ii;, Pe rnu t Appl~ ca t:LOn I -9 jl'
. "', ,~'}:"-;'~!r:"P"I-"'~~'!'""'j'."'~~'''''';'''~''' ~ .~:,,),;;;'; "q':,~;;, ,
~~*\i~~~q~~~~'~k~t1.r~;f!~;~;:'~~ " Appendix Item XIVj ,
~~.. .;~~-a-..: \~~:foI~ ',)r"" ",' i-..~.~,.!...; ....i\=t; ,i{'~'" ',~.1.~;; , , ,
~i..:\~~~}~~:,\,:::,:~;,;~.t::'.,iJi~~:~ ;~':'~~:~:'~'~:::~~~?'~'~t:~~./~, -~~'--. ~~; , " - , :"'~,"'~".'~~ -':"~~"""~-- ..--~.~.~r- '-:-'"'--:"'..,u_~~'~.~r "'~~''''-
..- :..,e, :.)"'*,." ""''''1;"",''''1'' . . ";~' '""', ""''''''R' c' ;".,,,.,"",,,,," "", >... , \''' "'.i'~'{""'r''', . ". ,.. '.






~sf->'.,. ''; "r;,'~;;"<: :~.I'1."'" ',\'~"';/~';'~, '~~~, . ,;. ",;.. ". ':,,':'( :t'':" "'~~', r~' ,,'~' " ' .,' ~..,(:>'.. ~ .'-<"" "~'+,~: -;;. -",.;r...:.'~~ '," ,".," >10, '.-'r. :; : "I'
~;t~~'~~;~~~~4~4a~~':r~i:"2 '.:4,~.-.:r }-r~~ ': ~':?'.~~ ~ ~"~,~~.~.~ f.. :: ~';"?,:~i'; ~:.~' <.':~~I",~;:~~ '~"'.;.~~~.~t~~.~~~ ~.. ~~(~:'~ ;..}o ~~r:;!'_:-' :,,<' \'~ ':~;~ '~";~ :~~1;J t '~, ,':
,~~~;:,;~~:;..~~.,)o,~t' "'..v.~t. ~;;-~ }.~,' '"..' '~::... ,t,,,,!/~ ~~, "":" } ':'..t:I:".;,~,?, ~~\',,,,.,,~-..,-~, ,,,i' ~' - J'!' .....~ ~1 ~ ro-:..);.',: ,'::;' "',
ht~;df~.:~.'r,.:~:: ',:~::!~.;.:. '1.(~.\..i~~..:~~~':Z';:~~';':~', :;:', ,~~~, ,~.~~~',;,,~,1~f~~ ~~~~-:-' :.~. .,~~~ ~r':~~'~? ,~~.' ~'.~:'.'h";\"':~':'~~ {..',; .::.~'~:~:;~" : ~.~~'.-, '.:" :-. / ~.~.. ':':. '" "

-------
{~~"."'''{'<'''__~.'"..;.- . '~~7.:~tt~;:.::-,~,.,._~,~,.:'.'~"".t .
~+:.I.' ~. ,:o;;,~':'-~-;"", ""w'A' t;'''<;,'1<'-.'''~.'''\~j'7:-"{.:f;'r!f.I~+
~::iFk::;,i;~r:..;..t#J:~;:'-:,~~~.':~~~..,~F~;
i:r.-:-"...~.. .;. .. )".-.r .' -...~ "I"'~":''.tc.l ~~.;.i:;;)::-..._:,.;.
~."-:, ....~~....:..-:': "'~i !,-,_':'t:~~''J,~~ ....,;Jt'~:S"~" .,14.
~:~,.:.,~!':~r~;~"'!~;-:: ~ ~jt"~~'~,,.:~\~~~
~~~~,~";;~~~ '1'.''''~''~i';'.~7;;-~:~
~';' "\\?~~' ,.': ,r: .. ..... ..;;.,..... ~,"."";"~Vc~~.7'
."j~,\,.,~;..:;.~"{,,:;.,, ~"..: f";'" '.~~'~':'~'O:~".'-~~' t
;~.'t..,~~""~,t,H~" ';':". ",,'.... ..'\:"" ";' ...":i.';:""" ~i;
~.~..~:..~.~... "J:. .\..~~~I'.J"'~'f..~"~~~"


~ift;~~~~4~i~1(tt~1,~
"-i".?'~"~'I~~"'~'~"'~~:'I';'~~": :,P: : '''~'~, ,>->:~:J:J..;'
'~~'I'-!;jo';1.~~""" ' .,.,.;,\( :t1""")." ",.,";:"'~..
~#O~~.:..\.....~" 'if~.....,' ;'t..~..',.~:1.tf;~:"'~~:]
[~-:~~~ ::.<::. ,', ,;,>~ < ~~::r..;";..,,:. :;:.~"'~~'#-i' Ii
~ ~1". ''''''':;1;/?f,'''1,'''''''''''' "'~'t'~''''t:J ".~i'."O
~~,~~'fi~~~ {~'r -;;.;~:-; :~'~~j.;:r.[t::%7~, ,-
~~";'-:i~~.~,,,,...,70';~''''"~':.''; ; ij/ ~<'~t;;~ 'I
~~~~f&;l~;~:Y~~~~!~~~~ :\

~-w1t"?S"i:-')' ;:"..:...',:"'i.'\',,'" f':";' h:.(~F'I>~~~,~ f

~4ft~~~..f~~q~}:}~~~1j~tJ,,"f
~'1: -',0'".",-";;;' ..~,.., -:""fr';" c..,.' '*" -.,.;. :',' >' ~ "." r,...:'~r.'r' \
~I'<':~: ~ ".~':",""'~ /... .~'.~ r~ '. ..'~'" '~~''E.:'~:;~'I iJ..7
~~~.....~~,...r.:~"'. "'.1't,-..,,.: ,..,'.' ':'-.",~~'\' J
-...:,~""'" ..,: . .,' ""'''',.v~J'i .; . ,",l": . ,_......." C.
. J':t."""C"','fi:.';-""(''''''''' ~1.'~~~i,,:~1J.#"'~';':i?~kd Was te ontame rs
~t~~fr;,~}~~~~,~~..t:~~~~~~~~~l~: The practice of ~rabb~ ::.ny old can ano janllning ~olicl wa~te into it
.I'~~~;~~i~~~;f.~;{:~:f~~f~it~~~> ~u:t ~::;t:;'u~~:::e~ ~~l ~h(::;C:; n;:~~ I; ':~':'!~:$ '~~ It: ~:;~ ';~:, ::,:~";:t~' ~~:

. ,.";~.'-'j!,.jtr..'.'.<""'~.-:~;.'"'''' :"'>~~t:..~..~.). ,:-..-.,.-;,,;;.~,.~.;J..~".. st;II luuked new and had acti,.e chemical in il!, they ale ,,,,tly in

themselves. anclthey take up fill 'volume without using it efficicntly,
Closing the space~ t>et\\'.-'.l drum~ plact'd in landfill cannot 1)(' done
without considerab1e exp<.>nse. The un~e:,dt:tl \'oids rl-present IanJfil1
volume nut dcvoted to w3..o'tE de~radatiun. and thc'y provide air p:.l~sages
that promote under~OlL"1ci fl!,::;,
The InstitUte follow~ an active p!"\1graJl1 uf drum elimination at the
ii-:C~'~<,... .r!;'~i!i :y.-~'4"'-"~' ~L",-",:'}~~~'!;,,'rl!'~C waste source. Lint-d. slvpc--:-idco g:nhage (':.Ins with lids are used
~~~,.~?~~~::'::~;.~.~~:~(..:~~f(~.;~I~"'~~~~~~+-:.~:7r;;;j~I' , 'I b1 'l'h \-11 d I' I' 'I f 1
~~~'~;O~~~:"'.~"ii'.:'"~ ,r~ri;\<:']~;""~:iY,'_~~~ .:,' W 1ere\'er POSS! e, e wa~te- I l' lI1ers Sip (';'IS! Y (Jul u t Ie cans
~:.,.-;~:.~.$;;'J.~.'1)i"'''k~i't:;c,-~l:J onto the chemical till. :iJ)Q the cans are tak('TI back to the ~OUfl:e.
o -, :ti~~4:~~'R;'~Zi~t~~\'~~ '\ l'\a~tic liners break e3~ily under the end'\lIaders's wcight so the waste
~~;,t'1~CJ..~Jt:.i;'~t-'~;';;4"..u,~\.kfO;;:f,;;-~'::;7' '. processes s3ti~factora1ly.

. Jt~;~~~~~~'f.t!'r~ . Dump (,uck, and dump pan> (both lio<'';~"r;,~"oo~\)"'! ;::''''~c'':f.''~~''4.>''i ' })1a S
~,t'".~'<;:d"';:,:.: ~\..~ ::~t~,~..,.~~""'''''?'' ".' ',,~.... ~~~"":'.:{..,,,," T k 01 . 1 -~.1 d
,'~:T'qfti!:(--::::f>,,~ ,;~;'3.~~h!~~)~f.*,,:i~~f.!. rjf an' tral er ngs are current y U:;..t.'U to muve the cont:-lminate water

, ~~~$~~~1:~ [10m the landfilL An ine,penS~;p6~'tl;;c~~~~~,:tinJe~~ ;~~ awe<
.~'!.',...,.It-'~"'f~,~-,.,::,aj:;.o_"<" y""i.-'~. tij;t!!~"f;.'o~: Requirement 8
~~d~}':":;o,~.~~-i~=5!1"~,:~(.~'~'i:~';~;f~~" Permi t APplication I-q~7-L
~~;if'iJci1fi\~"-:-.~.,. ,..,~..~.: -t:.t. ~P:..f"; , -
~1.~~.;+o,,"1;r..,tt~,*''''''';:<;:'~':~~f~~'-'::';'(' Appendi:< Item XIVk
W.:~,-~,.....' ::'~\1~:""" ~",~"'~'<""';::>.' ,~~:"~~o:%' '

1.I~fi~~t~:l~~~~l~!~1~:;~~~~~i[~~1Jf~~:!.:~;f'if~\~'::~s~~1~~;,~di"~.~:'::~1.'


fi. ~~;......,.1Io." ,. .6''''\-' J....'J."~/f't1-.':"-,J:. ;,;~' ","""". ':JrJ ~...~~.. .~,..\. 5:".tI'.\'~~~: ~ ~,' .'!~ '~I\"'',: ,..,',~,:;y, ... ~~t'~ J"~. .


fit~~:~!:':[l~~;~i;:':,,:~','J~;i:;~?~~~',~;:;;;~';t'~~~~~,'~j'~j1~~~~~i'~[;\;~I
/\-155
U:-;iO:--; C.-\!;,Hll) CHE..\liCAL L;~l)FILL, INSTITUTE
1U31
Sta't~"i;n'afiil regu!:1tinn;:. ;:,pN..if:-' th:Jt cO\'l'ral!e cquipment be
3vaibble at e\'ery appron-d landfill al all times, The end.\o:Jder is left
at the chemicallandtill :::it.: HI m('{'t this require!l\rnt. A 30-ton crawler
crane rigged w~th :.I ~p<.'{"ial ~~:rforatillg wei:,:ht for oruill crllshin~ also
remains at 'the !;iteo If co\'er~e or fire problem::; ari~e. this machine can
be quickly rigged with an 3\'ailab1e clam bucket. Some of the drain3ge
and lift-surface work i~ done by rental bullduzers on a part-time basis,
This keeps the cnd-loader on the blending oper:-ltion and specd~ dis-
po~al generally,
Gradalls. !;craper::;, and ~im:lar peN.ncl are hired whcn \1l'Cl'SS;lry tu
dig some of the spt.'{"ial pit~ nH"
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A-156
ab~ut El. 890, and proceed
Support Document: Section 10
Requirement: 1, 2, 3
Permit Application 1-937-L
dO~ll the slope. Initial excavation in
5
Appendix Itet
each
borrow area should begin at the natural drainageways and continue as a
bench across the hillside.
By sloping the borrow area bench about 5 per-
cent to the rear of the cut, a drainage channel will be formed.
This
channel should be sloped to provide drainage ,to the natural drain::q~eways.
;!'-"
At the completion of the first cut across a borrow ar~a,a permanent
diversion channel should be constructed to divert water around the area
(Figure 6).
This diversion has two. purposes:
{I) to reduce the runoff
entering the working area and creating difficult, wet working.conditiulIs,
and (2) to reduce the potential for erosion in the borrow area ano the
resulting sediment discharge to the stream below the .land fill.
~~.
4.0
CLAY SEAL AND llLANKE'f
A clay seal is required under the chemical landfill tu miuiwize potcutlal
contamination of tQe groundwater by the leachate. . This se~ll must. be
-~
constructed prior to placing chemical wastes in. the valley bottom or on
the hillsides.
In areas where the natural soi:lcover is a clay more thau
one foot thick after stripping the oq~anic material, the seal may be
formed by compacting the in-place soils.
In areas where rock is exposed,
a one-foot-thick compacted clay seal is to be placed in accordance with
Specification 2.08. 111 all areas, this seal should extend upslope _3 to
5 feet above the surface of the lan-dfill to insure continuity of the ~eal
as the landfill rises.
:.0-
To reduce infiltration of rainfall and to. insure that runuff froUlLhe
completed areas of the laridfill is not contaminated by chemical wastes,
the completed or inactive areas of the landfill are to be covered and
sealed with a one-foot-thick compacted clay blanket (Specification 2.08).
This blanket s~ould be placed as the completed portions of the landfill
are shaped and graded for drain~_ge.
The clay blanket should be constructed
concurrently with the landfill bench slopes so that slope runoff is not
contaminated by chemical wastes.
I
I
The blanket. should be topsoiled, fcrtili2cd

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. . .
..~ ~_. --'----'-"_._-'---'---'~'- ._._.__._...._~. -_. ---..-----.---.--.-.-";- .'_..__. '--'-.
-~
-
2.08
. ,-... -~ -.'------~
'-.- -..-.---'.. .-"
A-157
. .)~ ....;
Support Document: Section 10
Requirement: 1, 2, 3
Permit Application I-937-L
Appendix Item XVIa 13.
c.-
Earth Backfill - Structur~s: Earth materials used for filling
and h:1ckfilling .around conc-xete structures shall be of a
quality approved hy the En~ineer. L:1r~c stones, clods, refuse,
or debris of any kind shall not be included ill the backfill.
All earth backfil shall be placed in horizontal layers not over
nine (9) inches thick measured loose and c'~mpacted usin!~ an
approved compactor to 100.percent of Standard Proctor m
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,11.-1 SR
Support Document: Section 10
Requirement: 1, 2, 3 .
Permit Application I-937-L
Appendix Item XVIb
J.4.
d.
Compaction: Complete control of the compaction operation
shall be exercised, under the rlirection of the Engineer, by
developing regional moisture-density diagrams coverinr, the.
range of soils available. Suitable criteria fnr judginp, the
adequacy of compaction attained shall be Clevelopec1 by makinp,
an adequate number of field density determinations and by
making check compaction tests on the cmbankmC'nt and fill
m.) I'crCl'nt lwr 1!10re' r.1t,m four (4) percent :'0
.& ..1 ."'---,~.("..."" ,,,.-,.J,,. ,;11 ,..;11 '(Ir""');n f)-",.t.l,., "()\J;lrd "h(O slrH)C~~.

-------
A-159
f :,..<-\, ~_-~I'
"
._- --,._.
.._.__0.-
Support Document: Section lO
Requirement: l, 2, 3
Permit Application I-937-L
Appendix Item XVIc .
15.
!l.t the close of c<:1ch day's Work, or Hlaen~ Wor.k i~; to hl~ stopped
for a period of time, the entire surface of the compacted fill
shall be sealed by a method approved by the Engineer. If after
a prolonged rainfall the top surface. of the embankment is too
wet and plastic to work properly, the top m~teri.ql shall he
removed to expose firm soiL The top material shall be removed
to expose firm soil. The top material 50 removed shall be
disposed of at the Contractor's expense. The entire surface
of any. section of the embankment under construction shall he
maintained in such condition that construction equipmcnt can
travel on any part of tlae section. Ruts in. the surface of any
layer shall be suitably filled or eliminated by grading before
compaction. Care shall be t.:lken to prevent excess tra.vel (}ver
any section of the embankment to .:lvoid.over-rolling of tlaat
section.
\.fhere compaction by me.:ms of the roller specified for use on
the embankment is impracticable, or undesirable, and in '
locations where reasonable maneuverability of the specified
roller is not possible, the Contractor will be required to. use
. other equipmre the Stage III toe emb..mkment is tieo to the Sta.ge II toc
embankment, care shall be taken to insure an .:lde'luate bond is
formed between the two (2) sections of emhankment. This ~;hall be
done by removing m.:lteri:t1 on the face of the existing emb;mkmcot
and tvin~ the nc\V fill into thL: face \vLth nnmcrlv canst .lIctcd

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A-160
..~
-
.=...
2.09
Support Document: Section 10
Requirement: 1, 2, 3
Perrnit App1i9ation 1-937~L
Appendix Item XVId
16.
. g.
Compaction Equipment: The embankments shall. be eompactcd with
a water- or s:md-hallasted sheepsfoot tamper-type roller hav ing
tamping feet uniformly staggered over its cylindrical surface
and equipped with cleaners. Each tamping foot shall project
not less than nine (9) inches from the roller cylindrical sur-
face and shall have a cross-sectional area of not more than ten
(10) square inches at a plane normal to the axis of the shank
six (6) inches from the drum surface. The spacinp, shall be
such as to provide not less than one tamping foot for each 100
square inches of cyliridrical.drum surface. Tl~total weight
of the roller in peunds divided by the total area. of the
tamping feet in one row parallel to the axis of the roller shall
not be less than 250 pounds per square inch. The size of the
roller shall be such that this unit pressure may be increased
to a. maximum of 750 pounds persC]uare inch hy hallasting, if
required. Self-propelled tamper-type rollers Hhich do not meet
the above specifications may be used if the Contractor ~an
demonstrate that the roller will result in the required degree
of compaction without excessive p;isses.
- The Contract,,~~' s equipment will be calibrated and suitable
adjustments made as the Work progresses;
h.
Heasurement: The fill portion of the embankments will not be
cross-sectioned in the field. but will be measured for payment
by plan quantities based on volume placed above the actual
stripping or excavation line. The stripping or excavation line
shall be, determined by cross sections taken in the field after
completion of the stripping oper;ations, as set forth in these-
Specifications. Topsoil wilL-not be included in embankment
measurement. Riprap, filter blankets, drains, and other items
specified elsewhere in the Specifications will not be included
"'- in embankmen t measu remen t.
J...
PaymC:1t: Payruent for construction of the fill portio;"; ;)f the
embankments will be made at the Contract unit price bid for
"Embankment," measured as specified above. This price and
payment shall constitute full compensation for borrow area
treatment, excavation, haulin~, placing, manipulating, compac~ing.
anJ for all material, equipment, labor, water, supplies and all
other incidentals necessary to complete the Hork.
FILTER BLANKETS
- -
a.
~: Granular filter blankets-as shown on the Plans shall be
constructed under the downstream sJopes of the toe embankment,
leachate dike and beneath the concrete channels.
b.;
The m:ltcrj:ll for: the filter'ol;mkets shal.1
be c ].('al1.
1.\,1 terial:

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A-1 61
ATTACHMENT C
BIOASSAY EVALUATION

-------
A-163
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
. OFFICE OF ENFORCEMENT
NATIONAL ENFORCEMENT INVESTIGATIONS CEt-JTER
BUILDING 53, BOX 25227, DENVER FEDERAL CENTER
DENVER, COLORADO 80225
TO
: Wayne Smi th
DATE:
r,1ay 16,1978
~FROM : Bruce Binkley
SUBJECT.
Laboratory Evaluation Inspection of Industries in the Kana\'lha Valley,
Charlesion, West Virginii ~
On April 11, 1978, NEIC conducted a laboratory evaluation
inspection of the Union Carbide Corp. plant at Charleston, West
Virginia. The purpose of this inspection was to determine whether
laboratory facilities and test procedures were adequate to satisfy
the self-monitoring bioassay requirements of NPDES Permit Number
WV0000073. .
~
The bioassay facilities are maintained at the Union Carbide
Corporations South Charleston Technical Center. In general, this
laboratory is adequately equipped and staffed to perform static bio-
assay tests. The testing area is environmentally controlled for
temperature and photo~eriod; however, it appeared to be somewhat limited
iIT adequate working space. Bioassay, physical and chemical tests are
performed according to recognized standard methods. Procedural incon-
sistancies and recommendations for improvement of this testing facility
are as follovls:
--
1) Expansion of existing floor space could be utilized to
provide more efficient working areas.

2) Effluent samples for bioassay consist of 24-hour equal
volume composites. This is inconsistent with the permit limitation
which specifies a 24-hour flow proportioned composite for bioassay
testing. The current sampling method should be modified to reflect
NPDES Permit specifications. .
3) It vias reported that bioassay tests do not ahlays commence
\'Iithin eight hours of the sample collection. These tests. must be
initiated within eight hours of the completion of composite sampling.
-:#-
~-

-------
A-164
-2-
4) Dechlorinated city tap water is used for holding test
organisms and as the dilution water for bioassay testing. This
water supply is accpptable for long-term holding of test fish;
however, dilution water for bioassay testing should consist of
Ka~awha River water. Test fish should be acclimated to Kanawha
River water at least four days prior to bioassay testing.
5) Bioassay tests are not done in duplicate.
-~ that all bioassay tests be done in duplicate.

. 6) Physical and chemical parameters (dissolved oxygen concen-
t1~ation, pH, and temperature) are monitored daily. . Because ammonia
buildup can be a problem in static bioassay testing, measurements
for totalammonia-N should be included. Measurements for total
ammonia-N should b~ made at the high and low test concentrations at
",' the beginning and end of the test period. , Calculations for un-ionized
~~. ammonia concentrations should then be made. .
It is recommended
iI
~.~;; --
:> -=- 7) Thi s 1 aboratory currently conducts
:.' 1 i ght photoperi od. Thi s photoperi od shoul d
1';
I light and 8-hour dark interval.
.~
bioassays on a l2-hour
be increased to a l-hour
. 8) All bioassays are aerated throughout the 96-hour test period.
:. Aeration should be discontinued except in cases where B.O.O. and/or
,,;:' C.O.D. arC! sufficientlY-:.high that adequate dissolved oxygen concen-
~ trations cannot be maintained. Any use of aerated test water must
.,:~~l be documented on the bi oassay bench sheets.
9) Washing procedures for bioassay test chambers should include
a solvent rinse. Acetone'is an acceptable solvent for this purpose.
10) This laboratory depends'on controlled ambient air tempera-
ture to maintain a constant test temperature in bioassay test solutions.
It is advisable that test chambers be pl-aced in a constant temperature
water bath for more precise temperature control.
',;;...
cc:
J. Ha thevlay
R. Harp
Biology Branch Files
. -

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~
.,"1
'I
A-165
BIOASSAY LABORATORY EV;"LUATIO;'~
2///.?,,)Gr-~,-i 01()'

/CZ'OA1A-t alLntd:A/ I 11/~5T U~UI~

Dote / L 4rj L"i'1;'

Investigator ,'4{((: ,>-1. &~;L Lf '. , -
.~ Company Re~;~s~ntative O/.:~ 1 /2.n(J:'(,~J\.I (.4j-l. i U:(.e &J~j~
-.~ ' ," ./- ,


Test Hethod S"%. .... j'-;//'7 J~~'f-LL)j~.' (S 1: f-J. ~ I~~:j- ~".Lro)--
)ll:_Jt) < J4# Erl-7Nt. -- ViI.: I hr::./ucr! ~//ij ~:;c{~1 -~(' .-C/;{,
jJli\\:!"""1 tQ7Cf / , -"/
f
L~b0rat0rv or Industry
Location
"
.';
..,
Dilution '.J
-------
A-l' 66
I~
. If . / A~~ ;) j' C...., / ., .~
Loauint; rate, ,,/.,.1.1 ~'"C.,,,, J:;~ .-1", .-<.r> ----
. /'1.1 /
~;"'''~ jja.---:~
Duration and frequency of tes~
N,(Yj'I":; 0n':C(='i{:t,;.; llluu
" I J " /. ';) ,
J iL:c... l '..' t: . I' ~, II .ire ~ - I
. ~ p~d ,)f /v~IJ.
Definition of adverse effect
Frequency of observations-
. /7t./-
l"":/"'''J i')
. ~ 1..~ . - J->
, .... r' ~-> I } i.~..
~. "'
Method of calculating ~C50 c;J,~.fL
r. C/," \"'. ~ 0'1 I ~':'\.~::::!" '.- > -C'.,.\.n I
Spec~al condition~ ~L-h~/1/;'~i,..J J."l. /'{Jrf
;:)i'-!,~ q ~.;.:t/,~ t. I .
~-
.:> Methods useu for all chemical analyses
EFi4
l~la:1/\'i .-j -",~lLdN j\ j OLbL.Ld.>:..-
II .
de
..
~'. ...
. .
~~l;~ .~.~.
--
T
-~

-------
i
!
i
I
, \
!
" i
i
I
I
I
I
I
I'
I
I
I
i
I
"
, .,
. . ;
. , '~
Effluent \';i1ter
Retention
Sampling technique .21 ~f'U~"
. ..vi'-"'t\cJ +\'(' hr-i'\7 .,,-
I -
Holding time and conditions

~"it',..,-,I-; F-,-t-: ",,:: ;

Prt:::treatment -k\\il:"-
ej'f.;,/-I ((,/1;1'1 r"
A-167
OJ
(N'
()
/i..f;.~,.. ~[r-~')"j Zi/-h/lIl ,
cOo'(.-;;r'(,'i~ II>
,
Performed
" /
of, ,
/ '
Dr f,,'~ !:,-) rC.~'1I r:'rJ-U awei!, -kdlu'ill
I ( I
,-I. -
;"--i/{
I
Test Orr,Clnisms
Species
-~
4~"
I
, /.)
Life stageJL.!;:'if;' .:3J~.
I /;
,1_. ( I
~~~ f '- I
Sou,-,"cc -k~~:?I,)
.i-I i.>_~LL~..i':" ,
f
t= I
'=WJ)
'-")"" 5. )(-UF- f I h~ L~ 11:.0...7-
Boldino':' .facilities,- c::;,,-?II\!L.~:~ ,<;)--1- ,i'L.., -/h.",'-;lO)1
'i . \ !" '/ I
rL.. ./"\:1 !/~~")111) 1~-v.::c.+r:11''\ ft,,;Ar;:>
Acclir:wtion Procedure --$- -,)jr.)i.:Li1
T~e.:l.tment -dc:b~:'i.~CJ,;<, ,e ;Jt .J ;'/;');(, LI::: (-J;Zf'c'/I: -- d..-,
/J J 1 ) 'L 11 J 1 i /
,-//ro .. i rlli -'[ /"-:"7 ri) "rfl. 1 /'7"'"> ," j,'(' . },.., /( -

Experimental Desi~n
Test
Chambers '
Construction Naterial --ell! <;"L
Dimensions -O;,-L.;Ni-j~ ( !j1!/C/2!
yolumc I;:; ~ Ie: i"
Volumeteric exchange rate Il) / A
I .
-}'H1
Test concentrations 5" .)../'"7-1- r-:.-1Jt::~~J""; j""''')''~i(-I\'')
y O~i\ .ir~ I :.:fL' ~ :> ~;- 'J. ,. .. )
.] ~ I / 7~ I '
l;u::lb~r o'organis~:1s per con~ntra~ion-J..r~/"! ',1,Ci.1
1/, I
hr-,~ )
cr-el/))L] ~ h ,) /1 ) Ll S
/ '
-/0/"

-------
A-169
~
ATTACHMENT D
ANALYTICAL PROCEDURES EVALUATION

-------
A-17l
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
OFFICE OF ENFORCEMENT
NATIONAL ENFORCEMENT INVESTIGATIONS CENTER
BUILDING 53. BOX 25227, DENVER FEDERAL CENTER
DENVER, COLORADO 80225
o
Dr. Wayne C. Smith
Process Control Branch
DATE: June 1, 1978
Technical Coordinator for
Inorganics and Air Analysis

SUBJECT; Compl iance ~lonitoring Inspections for Union Carbide - Institute, Hest
~ Virginia; South Charleston WWTP - South Charleston, West Virginia; and
.~ Union Carbide - South Charleston, West Virginia ~
FROM;
Attached are my evaluations of the two above-mentioned Union Carbide
facilities as well as the South Charleston Wastewater Treatment Facility
along with completed "Self-Monitoring Program" sheets.
If there are any questions concerning the inspections, please ~ontact me.

.~~~ J~
-
-D. David Vietti
Attachments
cc:
Meiggs
Carter
Sl oVi nski
Masse
-
--
~
- -

-------
A-l72
UNION CARBIDE
Institut~, West Virginia
April 11, 1978
Inspection Attendees
Affiliation
Jack Rittenhouse
L. J. Cockran
David Vietti
Chief Chemist, Union Carbide
Chemist, Union Carbide
Chemist, EPA-NEIC
-:
In trodu:ti on
;,.
The laboratory was evaluated for its ability to generate and report reliab}e
NPDES self-monitoring data. The inspection consisted of a review of the.
analytical methods in use, laboratory techniques, instrument calibration and
maintenance, sample preservation and holding times, data handling and record
ke2ping, and quality control practices and documentation. .
. . -
The chief chemist and his assistant were interviewed concerning chemical and
b2ct~riological laboratory procedures. The chief chemist. has approximately
19 years of a~21ytical laboratory experience and his assistant, 24. The
technical analysts have background training in analytical chemistry ranging
f~om 1 to 25 years. .. ..
-
St~ndard reference samples for BOD, TOC, suspended solids, chlorides, total
Kj~ldahl nitrogen, pH, TDS, total alkalinity, ammonia, sulfate, fluoride,
ar~! orthDphosphorous were left with the company and theywer~ asked to return.
the results by the end of the month. .
B~sed on the.observations and findings during the insoection, the data and
in~0rmation obtained, the evaluation form presented on the following p~ges
vias completed and conclusions, summary, and recommendations were prepared.
Ccnclusi'ons and Summary
~
Sa~ples collected during weekends w~re iced, but not analyzed until the fol-
lo~ing Monday. ,These samples w~re not properly preserved. Samples for TOC,
NH3-N, and TKN require acid as well as cooling to assure stability. Samples.
preserved only by cooling may have low TOC + TKN results compared to properly
preserved samples. NH3-N results would tend to be higher if organic matter
is present. .
TO~ijl dissolved solids are being "analyzed" by subtracting the difference
between total and suspended solids. This is not consistent with'the approved
procedure. TDS results obtained in this manner \'lOuld be higher than true
va 1 ues. .
An excellent analytical quality assurance program consisting of routine and
blind duplicates as well as bl'ind and routine spikes and reference sampl'es'
is in use for all perrni~ parameters, Techn,ical guidance and continuing
t:::(:t~n;: 07 q'Jali~j' con':rol p~'~c...2:!!.!r~s is being pro'/ided by the Union Carbide'
Technical Center. -,'

-------
, 4.
-2-
A-173
R '2C o:Tl!T:enda t ion s
1.
Reco~nended preservation techniques should be employed when the samples
are not being analyzed as soon as compositing is completed. Acid should
'be added to the sample for proper preservation when the parameter tribe
analyzed is TOC, TKN, or NH3-N. .
2.
Sample holding times prior to analyses in conformance with 40 CRF 136.3
regulations must be adhered to.

Total dissolved (filterable) residue must be analyzed according toap-
proved EPA analytical testing procedures (40 CFR 136.3).
. ~ '
3.
The use of the 5-tube MPN procedure for NPDES self-monitoring should be
tnitiated immediately.
5.
In order to improve their already excellent analytical quality assurance
program, thermometers calibrated with a National Bureau of Standards
thermom'eter shou 1 d be purchased'. Control charts caul d be cons tructed to
further document their analytical quality control program.
6.
Generally, the results of the reference samples, indicated that the labor~
atory facility \'Ias doing an adequate to qood job for most parameters in "
generatirg data for the NPDES self-monitoring program. However, TOS~ TOe.
and low level TKN results were not within acceptance limits. The results
of these parameters would place serious doubt upon the validity of past
reported data. Further parti'clpation in a performance evaluation progj"am
on a regular-basis may establish the validity of the past self-monitoring
data.
.. ,
- .
i . . . .
", ." .
, ~
- .
, .
. . ...".

-------
A-174
. ---..
..!--/ 7 .
,""!---;"' ('
~/ c:~ .
.:.1.:' 9 .
F; 10.
/-1" 11.
,-,-'
11hen anS;'I~r to ~'10. 51s yes, results are beirirj.re::orted in
per IT] i t tee I 5 D i s c h a r 9 ~ ~'1 0 n i to ri n QF 0 rm ( E P r\ No.3 3 2 CJ - 1 ) .
\'!h2f! neC:2:::s2'i'j curing
~J~pa'sitinq, samples
are properly icej.
Proper preservation techni~ues used.
Flow proportioned sa~ples obtained where
r~qui red b.:,'
r":QV""""" -
~.: '-. !II I\...
Sample holdinG times prior to analyses in conformance with 4n
CFR 135.3 regu12tions.
Other Co~~ents on Samoling Techniou~s:
.~
. .....
9 and 11. Consistently proper preserva~'on
~~ployed. The sampl~s collected on Saturday.
analyzed until Monday.
techniques are not being
and Sunday are not being
.-
LASO~A~C2Y ,PROCEDURES
/1/ 1.
/27 -'2 .
LJ7 3.
I~ 11
L1:/ "
~.: 5.
~/ 6.
.~
LJ/ 7.
/~ 8
,~/ .
,. ._-
EPA approved analytical testing orocedures used (40 CFR 136.3).
If altern2.-'te anclytical procedures are used, proper approval
has been obtained.
Paramet2rs other than
Itiase
required by the permit are analyzed.
COr::merci a 1
1 aoora tory uti 1; zed.
. Nar;;e
Address
Commercial laboratory State certified.
Satisfactory calibr2ti0:1 end maintenance of instr'ur.;ents and
equ i pmen t.
Quclity control
proce':'Jres used.
Duplicate samples are analyzed.
50
~I. of ti me .
".
\.
. -----'--------."--' ..'-.--
- . ... ..- .
. - ---

-------
SeLF -:.10n I TORI r-~G
.A-175
PROGR:\;.!
..... .'-'
On the following ite~s, code 1 = yes, 2 = no,
RECQRDS
.r-: 1.
:~=
@2.
&. 3.
LI7 4.
2/ 5.
&6.
-
~..
07.
. 'j 1/8.
:T7 9
L....~../ .:
3 = undetermined,
4 = not applicable.
AiiD . RCPORTS
..
Properly maintained recofds of date, exact place and time of
scfilplinq. .
Properly maintained records of the dates samples were analyzed.
Proverly maintained records of who performed the analyses.
Properly maintained records of the analytical techniques and
methods used.
Properly maintained records of the results of analyses.
Records maintained for a minimum of three years includi~g all
origin~l strip chart recordin~s (contir:ucus monitoring instru-
mentation calibration, maintenance recorcs).
Plant 6perating records kept including operating logs of each
treatment uni t.
,. ..~_.
.- _.. ." . .
Results of sa~ple analyses correctly 'calculated and recorded.
-. . --. -
Self-monitoring frequency and oarameters' conform to permit.
requirements.
/3710. Lab:natory records consistent with Di.1R data.
L/1.1.
D 12.
Records. maintained of major contributinG industries usinq
publicly owned treatment works. '.
Records mainta.ined of major ccntribL.:ting industries' compliance/
non-compliance status.
.LV l3.";"Quaiity assurance records kept including sf1iKed samples, laboratory
equip~ent calibration, etc.
o the,
Comments on Records and Reports:
2-6. Good \llOrkable reco"rding and recordkeeping system are being utilized.
All the original documents and bench cards are kept and stored in a central
file for one year and then sent to the company's headquarters central file
for storage. Each analyst has his own green record notebook and they are
reviewed Periodically by the supervisory chemists.
. \.
13.
. . ,

An.excellent company internaf auditing proqra~ in existence 'andin use.
- - . - - '.. ..
.- -- _--__0- -'------_..~.,--- ---
--_...' -- . ."'.'''' '--...-- ---

-------
A-176
.-:;;..=
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-
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79.. Spiked saIT:;Jles are used.
50
/;-: 10.
--'--
Laboratory records properly maintained.
/::711.
'---+--
Laboratory employees qualified.
Gen2ral
Com~ents 0" Laboratory Procedures:
i. J',~~~!V2G. ~0'L:i\i5 ,-,ei"'t: 0c:-;i~t9' :'c.i'Q',j'z;;;ci:' uj
between total and suspended solids.
% of ti~e.
SLAG"c. ~., G ~ ~ -j ;"j';
. ..
'I.,.~':.:. G', ;'i\::~~:::i'iC.~
3.
Additional parameters are being analyzed to meet state permit require-'
ments.
5.
The state of West Virginia does not have a state certification proqram
7-9. -The laboratory quality control program c~nsists of analysis of
routine and blind duplicate samples as well as known and unknown spiked
and reference samples. The program is a~ministered internally with
assistance and guidance provided by the Union Carbide Technical Center.
The results looked excellent. . -
Results of NEI{ Quality
Control Check Samoles
Union Carbide
at Institute,
mg!l
1 ) 20*
2) 121*
1 ) 16
2) 160
. AA) 25.8
AC) 900
1) 35.8
2) 100. 1
'1) 1.17*
2)' 5.35
1)-- 0.19
2) 1 .66 .
1 ) 7.3
2) 8.1
1) 131 *
2) 460*
1) 17.6
2) 37.1
1) 9.9
2) 106.4
1) 0.16
2) 1. 00
1) 0.01
.~- 2 ) O. 51 '
. Pa raiT!eter
".--
TOC .
BOD
-~
T55.
Chlorides
TKN
NH3
pH
. ,
. '
~
TDS
Total Alkalinity
Sulfa te
Fluoride
Orthophos
*Not within acceptance l,imits.
Analyzed
by Laboratory
True, mg/l
\.'
1) 44.8
2) 165
1) 28.7
2) 264
AA) 30
AC) 950
1) 28.1
2) 86.4
1) 0.34
2 ) 4 . 80 .
1) 0.15-:
2) '1.72
1) 7.9
2) 8.4
1) 71.7
2) 318.3
1) 10.4
2) 35.7
1) 12.0
2) 102.4
1) - 0.2
. 2) 1.'-
1) 0.017
2) 0.513
. ... .- - .,.-..- - --- "

-------
APPENDIX B
LITHIUM FLOW VERIFICATION PROCEDURES
AND
SAMPLING PROCEDURES

-------
B-3
LITHIUt.' FLOWVERIFICATION PROCEDURES
Flow verification was accomplished with the tracer dilution
technique, using lithium as the tracer.
The concept employed
is that mass is conserved (i.e., mass of tracer in equals mass
of tracer out).
Fundamental to the use of this technique are
the following conditions:
L
2.
A conser~ative tracer.
A constant tracer injection rate and an accurate
measurement of the rate.
3.
An accurate measurement of the tracer concentrate,
background tracer levels, and diluted tracer in the
flow stream to be measured.
4.
Complete mixing in the flow stream to be measured.
It was determined that all these respective criteria'
could be met by:
1.
Using lithium (Li) in the form of lithium chloride
as a tracer. Previous studies have shown that spiking
various types of wastewater with known amounts of
lithium results in an overall average recovery of 100%.
2.
Metering the injected tracer solution with low flow
rate, high precision pumps.- During verification,
injection rate was checked at least b/ice with a
graduated cylinder and stop watch.

-------
8-4'
3.
Measuring Liconcentration with a Perkin-Elmer Model
. . .
403 Atomic Absorpti~n Spectrophotometer.
Thi s i nstru-
ment was calibrated before each use with lithium
standards of known concentration. . Concentrate samples
wer~ analyzed each time a batch was mixed.
Background
'samples were collected and analyzed .each.time a flow
. .
measurement was performed.
4.
Injecting the lithium chloride concentrate solutiDn
.,'
into the suction side of the effluent pump and moni-
toring the diluted Li tracer on the discharge side.
,~J~~
. .
Flow was calculated with the following equation:
.. ~,
,
.:,4~'.
'.'
,7,'
Q= q Cq .F
. . C-Cb' .

where Q is unknown flow (mgd)
.~ I,
", J~~
,"'~'.
. \
.\

:\~.
. :1
, t;~.
!.
q is injection rate (l/min)
Cq is lithium concentration of injection solution (mg/l)
C is lithium concentration downstream of injection (mg/l)
Cb is background concentration of lithium (mg/l)

. .
F is factor to convert l/min to mgd
(380.45 x 10-6 min - gal)
. . day- 1 iter
,',

-------
8-5
SAMPLING PROCEDURES
Composite samples were collected by hand at regular
intervals throughout a 24-hourperiod and aliquoted pro-
portional to the volume of the discharge into iced sample
containers.
For those samples !whose nature could change
during the collection period chemical preservatives were
added to the sample container prior to the start of the
collection period.
Each of the sample aliquots were chemically
preserved upon. collection.
At the end of the sampling period,
the chemically unpreserved portion of the sample was trans-
ferred into appropriately preserved containers, identified
and transported to either NEIC mobile laboratories located at
the South Charleston Sewage Treatment Company plant or-the NEIC
laboratori.Denver, Colorado.
Grab samples we)~ handled as discussed above with the
exception that the sample consisted of a single aliquot rather
than multiple samplings.

-------
APPENDIX C
CHAIN-OF-CUSTODY-PROCEDURES

-------
C-3
CHAIN-OF-CUSTODY PROCEDURES
(March 29, 1978)
Due t~ the evidentiary nature of samples collected during en-
forcement investigations, the possession of samples must be traceable
. from the time the samples are collected until they are introduced as
evidence in legal proceedings. To maintain and document sample posses-
sion, Chain-of-Custody procedures are followed.
SAMPLE CUSTODY
A sample is under custody if:
1.
2.
Itis in your actual possession, or
It is in your view, after being in your physical
possession, or
3.
It was in your physical possession and then you
locked it up to prevent tampering, or

It is in a designated secure area.
4.
FIELD CUSTODY PROCEDURES
1.
In collecting samples for evidence, collect only that number
which provides a fair representation of the media being
sampled. To the extent possible, the quantity and types of
samples and sample locations are determined prior to the
actual field work. As few peopl~ ~s possible should handle
samples. .

-------
C-4
~~
,::t'
,
~,.:~
'It.;
~
"
" \f
'-~:
-,.
2.
. . . .
The field sampler is personally responsible for the care

. .
and custody of the samplescollec:ted until they' are trans-
ferred or properly dispatched.
3.
Sample tags (see attached) shall be completed for each sample,
using waterproof ink unless prohibited by weather conditions.

. .
4.
During the course and at the' end of the field work, the
Project Coordinator determines whether these procedures,
have been followed, and if additional samples are required.
TRANSFER OF CUSTODY AND SHIPMENT'
1.
Samples are accompanied by a Chain-of-Custody Record. (see
attached). When transferring the possession of samples,
the individuals relinquishing and receiving will sign, date,
and note the time on the Record. This Record documents
transfer of custody of samples from the sampler to another
. .
person, to a mobil e 1 aboratory, or 'to theNEIC 1 aboratory
in Denver.
2.
Samples will be properly packaged for shipment and dispatched
to the appropriate NEIC laboratory* for analysis, with a
separate Record prepared for each laboratory (e.g., Mobile
Chemistry Lab, Mobile Biology Lab(s), Denver Chemistry Lab,
Denver, Biology Lab). Shipping containers will be padlocked
for shipment to the Denver laboratory. The IICourier to
Airportll space on the Chain-of-Custody Record shall be dated
and signed.
* See Appendix B of NEIC Policies and Procedures Manual for Safety
Precautions When Accepting Samples From Outside Sources.

-------
,- -. ~- -
1, :. ,::.~
C-s
3.
Whenever samp i es';~~e'sp 1 it ~i th:'a faci 1 i ty or government
agency, a separate Chain-of-Custody Record is prepared for
those samples and marked to indicate with whom the samples
are being split.
4.
All packages will be accompanied by the Chain-of-Custody
Record showing identification of the contents. The original
Record will accompany the shipment~ and a copy will be re- .
tained by the Project Coordinator.
5.
If sent by mail, the package will be registered with return
receipt requested. If sent by common carrier, a Government
8i11 of Lading should be used. Receipts from post offices.
and bills of lading will be retained as part of the permanent
documentation.
LABORATORY CUSTODY PROCEDURES
1.
A sample custodian or a designated alternate will receive
samples for the laboratory and verify that the information
on the sample tags matches that on the Chain-of-Custody
Record included with the shipment. The custodian signs the
custody record in the appropriate space; a laboratory staff
member performs this function in the field. Couriers picking
up samples at the airport, post office, etc., shall sign in
the appropriate space.
2.
The custodian distributes samples to the appropriate analysts.
The names of individuals who receive samples are recorded
in internal Branch records. Laboratory personnel are responsible
for.the care and custody of samples from the time they receive
them until they return them to the custodian. Samples received
after normal working hours may be analyzed immediately or
stored as appropriate.

-------
C-6
"
.{
~,'\ .
.,.
~.... ..
. "
. I ~
j ':-
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. :~i.,.
. ~,)(. ~ .
":"1
-~
3..
Once field-sample testfng and oecessaryquality assurance
. checks have been completed, the uriused portion of the sample
may be disposed of. All identifying tags, data sheets and
laboratory records shall be retained as part of the permanent
. .
documentation.' Samples forwarded'to the :Denver laboratory
for analysis will be retained after analyses are completed. .
These samples may be disposed of only 'upon the orders of
the Chief, Enforcement Specialist Office and Assistant Director
for Technical Programs, and only after all tags have been
removed for the permanent file. .
;.

-------
..\ ,f..
C-7
SAMPLE TAG
-.----.
 Proj. Code Station' No. Sequence No. Mo./Day/Yr. Time
 Station Location    Comp. Grab
o ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY  ~
;~' ' .'"  OFFICE OF ENFORCEMENT   U1
~ . -. NATIONAL ENFORCEMENT INVESTIGATIONS CENTER a
 BUILDING 53, BOX 25227, DENVER FEDERAL CENTER ~
  DENVER, COLORADO 80225   
 Samplers: (Signature).    
- ----
obverse
---
~-----_.- .
_.. -..---
Sample Type/Preservative(s)

1. General Inorganicsjlce
2. Metals/HNOa
3. Nutrients/H~S04 & Ice
4. Oil & Grease/H~S04 & Ice
5. Phenolics/HaP04 & CuSO, & Ice
6. Cyanide/NaOH & Ice .
7. Organic Characterization/Ice
8. Voiatile Organics/Ice
9. General Organics/Ice
10. Tracer/None
11. Solids - Inorganicsilce or Freeze.
12. Solids - Organics/Ice or Freeze
13. BioI. - Inorganics/lce or Freeze
14. BioI. - Organics/Ice or Freeze
15. Source Filter/None
16. hube Wash/None
17. In:pinger Catch/None
. 18. Ambient Filter/None
, 19. Solid Adsorbant/lce or Freeze
20. Ambient ImpingerjAmb. or Ice
2L Benthos;, Ethanol or Formal'
22. Bacteriology; Ice .
23. Plankton/Formal; HgCI2i Lugol's
24. Chlorophylljlce or Freeze.
25. Pathogenic Bacteria/Ice
26.
Remarks:
reverse
1.rGPO 777.941

-------
..~;.-.:~ ''''-~'r'~'_----:.
, . - .' ~ ./'~""
',. ,'- ,t-",..-
. .'
CHAIN OF CUSTODY RECORD
'NATIONAL ENFORCEMENT INVESTIGATIONS CENTEI
Building 53. Box 25227, 6enver Federal Center
Denver, Colorado 80225
Proj. No.
Project Name
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
Oflice 01 Enlorcement .
SAMPLERS: (Signa lure)
STA, NO. SEO, NO. . DATE
. Relinquished by: (Signsture)
-
Relinquished by: (Signa/ure)
Relinquished by Courier
,Slgna.'ure) .
Method 01 Shipment:
-.~. ,.~,---,
SAMPLE TYPE

g .
II }; .. II '~II Ii'~
'c fi,~,- c,-rJlI C CD u
~ . ~:i:i ~:i'~,-,," ~ai~'~ a;
Q :J !iDe' oOtD~tt.cl3="'E 2': -u
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APPENDIX D
ANALYTICAL METHODS
AND
QUALITY CONTROL

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D-3
CHEMISTRY ANALYTICAL METHODOLOGY AND QUALITY CONTROL
The analytical procedures used by the Chemistry Branch are de-
scribed in the following sections which are organized by working groups:
Inorganics, Organics, and Trace Metals. The quality control procedures
and data used to verify the quality of the analytical data are also
discussed. .
INORGANICS
The samples from this study were analyzed for the following inorganic
parameters - BOD, TSS, TOC, NH3, total Kjeldahl nitrogen, chloride and
phenolics. Methods approved by the EPA for the NPDES program (40 CFR 136,
Federal Register, December 1, 1976) were used to analyze all samples. The
references to the methods for each parameter are listed in Table I be1ow;
Parameter
Technique
Detectn. Li m it
mg/l
Reference
BOD
TSS
TOC
NH3
Phenolics
TKN
Multiple bottle dilution
Glass fiber filter filtration
Combustion-Infrared
Automated phenolate
4-AAP colorimetric
Kjeldahl digestion, Automated
phenolate
Mercuric nitrate
2
1
1
0.05
0.001
0.2
1
Chloride
Std. Methodsa
Std. Methods
Std. Methods
Std. Methods
Std. Methogs
EPA Manual
Std. Methods
Std. Methods
pg 543
pg 94
. pg 532
pg 616
pg 574
pg 175
pg 616
pg 304
a Std. Methods = "Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and
wastewater", 14th edition (1975).
b EPA Manual = "Methods for Chemical Analysis of Water and Wastes", 1974.

Written methods prepared from "Standard Methods" for BOD and TSS are in-
cluded as Attachments I & II. Additional precautions taken during the
analysis of the samples are discussed below by parameter.
BOD
The dissolved oxygen meter was calibrated by the azide modification
of the Wink)er method ("Standard Methods", 14th edition, 1975, pg. 443)
to assure accurate D.O. measurements. Sampl~s were seeded with seed
material that was acclimated to the specific. waste being studied. The
D.O. depletions were normal for all dilutions of all samples.

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. Qua 1 ity control consisted of dup Ii cate"ana lys is of seven samp 1 es
and analysis of EPA reference sample #276-2 on six different days.
Additional quality control procedures are described in Attachment 1.
Since two duplicate samples did not have valid dilutions,the pre-
cision was caltulated from five sets of data. The relative standard
deviation "of the duplicate results is 25%. One reference sample re-
sult was invalid because of improper preparation. . The mean accuracy
of the five valid reference sample results is 94.5%. " "
TSS
The analytical and quality control procedures described in Attachment
II were closely followed. The relative standard deviation of five
. dup 1 i cate determi nat ions is 3%. The mean accuracy of ana lys is of a
standard reference sample on four different days was 105%.
TOC
Samples were acidified and homogenized before analysis to drive
off the inorganic carbon and reduce the particl~ size. Sample~ were
alternately homogenized and analyzed until two successive results
agreed within 2 mg/l. One reference sample was analyzed with an accuracy
of 101%.. Three samples were spi ked with a mean recovery of 107%.

. Chloride
Low and high level mercuric nitrate reagents were used for samples
be low and above 25 mg/l. Ei ght samples were spi ked wi th a mean .recovery
of.100%. A reference sample was analyzed on five days with an accuracy
of 100%. Fifteen samples were analyzed in duplicate with a mean FSD
of 1%. .
Ammonia
The auto-analyzer method was adapted to 0-30 mg/l full scale by
adding a dilution loop onto the front.end of the manifold. Two reference
samples were analyzed six times each with accuracies of 98 and 104%. .
Seven samples were analyzed in duplicate with five samples below the
detection limit. The RSD of the two pairs of data is 1.6%.
Phenolics
All absorbances were measured against a chloroform blank." Three
samples were spiked with a mean recovery of 98%. One reference sample
was a~alyzed with 92% accuracy. . .

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The method was set up for 20 mg/l TKN-N full scale. Samples
over 20 mg/l were diluted and re-digested before analysis. A ~efe-
rence sample was analyzed five times with 92% accuracy.
METALS
The samples from this study were analyzed for the following metals:
Al, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sn,and In. The samples consisted of
water samples. Methods approved by the EPA for the NPOES program (40
CFR 136, Federal Register, December 1, 1976) were used in the analysis
of all water samples. The references to the methods used in the anal-
ysis of the water samples for each metal and the detection limits for
each metal are listed in Table I. The detection limits in Table I
for the water samples are reported in units of milligrams per liter.
The methods listed in Table I for each element were closely fol-
lowed. There were no significant deviations from the approved method.
As an added precaution, all analyses, with the exception of mercury,
were performed using background correction procedures in order to
preclude extraneous signals from the sample matrix.
Water Samples

Aluminum: Sample replicates and spikes were analyzed for aluminum.
Only one sample replicate contained a detectable quantity for aluminum.
This replicate agreed with the orginal sample within 17%. The recoveries
for the sample spikes ranged from 80% to 100% with an average recovery
of 87%. This represents a slight negative bias in the aluminum results.
The EPA reference standard #3, lot 575, was analyzed. The experimental
value was 0.9 mg/l while the true value was 0.904 mg/l aluminum.
Arsenic: Sample replicates and spikes were analyzed for arsenic.
Only one sample replicate contained a detectable quantity of arsenic~
This replicate agreed with the original sample within 12%. The recoveries
for the sample spikes ranged from 110% to 150%, with an average recovery
of 130%. This represents a positive bias in the arsenic results.
The EPA reference standards #2 and #3, lot 575, were analyzed. The
experimental values were 0.11 and 0.16 mg/L, while the true values
were 0.109 and 0.154 mg/L-arsenic respectively.
Cadmium: Sample replicates and spikes were analyzed for cadmium.
None of the sample replicates contained detectable quantities of cadmium..
The recoveries for the sample spikes ranged from 104 to 110%, with an
average recovery of 106%. The EPA reference~ standard #3, lot 575,
was analyzed. The experimental value was 0.06 mg/L, while the true
value was 0.073 mg/L cadmium.

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Chromium: Sampl~ "replicates and spikes were an~lyzed for chromium. .
None of the sample replicates containeddetectable.quantities of chromium.
The recoveries for the sample spikes ranged from 102% to 104% with an .
average recovery of 103%. The EPA reference standard #3, lot 575,
was analyzed. The experimental value was 0.2 mg/l, while the true
value was 0.204 mg/l chromium.

Copper: Sample replicates and spikes were analyzed for copper.
Only one sample replicate contained a detectable quantity of copper.
This replicate agreed with the original sample within 26%. This repre-
sents a difference in concentration of only 0.03 mg/l. The recoveries
for the sample spikes ranged from 96% to 104% with an average recovery
of 99%. The EPA reference standard #3, lot 575, was analyzed.. The
experimental value was 0.1 mg/l, while the true value was 0.102 mg/l
copper.
. Nickel: Sample replicates and spikes were analyzed for nickel.
The replicate results varied from 3% to 35% relative percent difference.
The 35% difference represents a concentration difference of only 0.03
mg/l. The recoveries for the sample spikes ranged from 102 to 110% .
with an average recovery of 107%. The EPA reference standard #3, lot
575, was analyzed. The experimental value was 0.21 mg/l, while the
true value was 0.152 mg/l nickel.' .
lead: . Sample replicates and spikes were analyzed for l~ad.
None of these sample replicates contained detectable quantities of
lead. The recoveries for the sample spikes ranged from 92% to 134%
with an average recovery of 113%. This represents a slight positive
bias in the lead results. The EPA referenc~ standard #3, lot 575,
was analyzed. The experimental value was 0.45 mg/l, while the true
value was 0.352 mg/l.lead. .

Tin; Sample replicates and spikes were analyzed for tin. None
of the sample replicates contained detectable quantities of tin.
The recoveries for the sample spikes ranged from 58 to 90% with a
mean recovery of 74%. This represents a negative bias in the deter-
mination of tin. This is not surprising since tin is known to be
unstable in solution. T~e EPA reference standard #3, lot 575, does
not contain tin. Therefore, no AQC data is available for tin.
Zinc: Sample replicates and spikes were analyzed for zinc. The
relative percent difference for the zinc replicates ranged from 0% to
29%. The 20% relative percent difference represents a concentration
difference on only 0.015 mg/l. The recoveries for the sample spikes
ranged from 152% to 168% with an average recovery of 159%. This repre-
sents a positive bias in the zinc results.. .laboratory contamination
of the zinc spikes was investigated by determining the zinc concentra-
tions'of laboratory reagent blanks using the same acid that was used
to preserve the samples in the field. The laboratory reagent blanks
were found to contain no zinc. The EPA reference standard #3, lot

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575. was analyzed for zinc: The experlmentalvalue was 0.17 mg/l.
while the true value was 0.174 mg/l zinc. The fact that the experi-
mental results for EPA reference standard #3. log 575. were in good
agreement with the true value provided by the Environmental Monitoring
and Support Laboratory. Ci nci nnat i, Ohi o. together wi th ,the, fact that
the reagent blank contained no zinc. indicates that the water ~amples .
were inadvertently spiked at a higher level than that which was expected.
The average value of the field blanks was 0.04 mg/l zinc. Sample
results having this approximate concentration are questionable.
Table 1
ANALYTICAL METHODS AND DETECTION LIMITS - WATER SAMPLES
   Detection Limit.  
Metal Technique mg/l  Referencel
Al Flame Atomic Absorption 0.3 A. p. 92
As Flameless Atomic Absorption 0.002 B
Cd Flame Atomic Absorption 0.03 A. p. 101
Cr Falme Atomic Absorption 0.04 A. p. 105
Cu Flame Atomic Absorption 0.04 A, p. 108
Ni Flame Atomic Absorption 0.06 A. p. 141
Pb Flame Atomic Absorption 0.2 A. p. 112
Sn Flame Atomic Absorption 1. Of: A. p. 150
Zn Flame Atomic Absorption 0.01 A. p. 155
lA = Methods for Chemical "Analysis of Water and Wastes, U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency, (1974).
B = Atomic Absorption Newsletter, 14 109 (1975).
ORGANICS
Several techniques for the analysis of organic compounds were utilized
for the waste source evaluation. Union Carbide facilities and South Charles-
ton WWTP Survey. Identification of individual organic compounds was made
by combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) while capillary
column gas chromatography (CPGC) was used for quantitation and confirmation
of identity. The samples were analyzed for neutral extractables, volatiles,

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and se 1 ected samp les were analyzed for pri ori ty pollutants. - Other. .
- samples, notably nonpurgeables, were analyzed by direct aqueous injec-
tion analysis (DAI). Carbaryl was analyzed by high pressure liquid
. chromatography (HPLC).
,; .
NEUTRAL EXTRACTABLE ANALYSIS
. GC/MS Identification: Methylene chloride extracts of the water, -
and acetone extracts of the sediment samples were concentrated to
small volumes and exchanged with isooctane and analyzed by GC/MS.
The initial identification was made using a manual search utilizing
reference spectra analyzed under the same instrumental conditions
used for the samples. ' .

A library of standard spectra of the commonly occurring compounds
was made using a computer assisted evaluation program (1). In those
instances where other than the commonly occurring compounds appeared,
. a more complete search was made of the complete computer library
and a follow up manual search (2, 3, 4, 5).
- -
Capillary Column Gas Chromatography: All the sample extracts
were analyzed by capillary column gas chromatography. Initial screening
and quantitation were carried out on this gas chromatograph. Compounds
were identified by coincidence of retention times with standards and
quantitation was made using peak height measurement.
Pack Column
by packed column
matic injector.
tograph.
Gas Chromatography:' All the extracts were analyzed
gas chromatography using a computer controlled auto-
Initial screening was carried out on this gas chroma-
REFERENCES
1.
"INCOS Data System - MSDS Operator's Manual, Revision 3".
Finnigan Instruments, March 1978. - .
2.
"Eight Peak Index of Mass Spectra", Mass Spectrometry Data
Centre, Al, dermaston Reading, UK. Second Edition 1974.
3.
"Registry of Mass Spectral Data", Stenhagen, Abrahamsom and
Mclafferty, John Wily & Sons, New York 1974~
- 4.
"Atlas of Mass Spectra Data" edited by: Stenhagen,Abrahamson
and McLafferty, John H. Wiley & Sons, New York 1969.
5.
Computer AS,sisted Evaluation of Organic Priority Pollutant
GC/MS Data - NEIC, September 1978.

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Quality Control: QuaYity'control 'procedures consisted of analy-
sis of selected duplicate samplest analysis of solvent and procedure
blanks to identify interferencest and gas chromatographic analysis of
standards on a daily basis to confirm the integrity of the GC system.
For mass spectrometrYt a daily calibration was used to tune the mass
spectrometert and assure the integrity of the complete system. . The
quality control procedures are documented in the attached methodolo-
gies. (Attachments V to X).
......
DIRECT AQUEOUS INJECTION ANALYSIS (DAI)
Selected samples were analyzed by DAI gas chromatography/mass
spectrometry (GC/MS). An aliquot of a sample is injected directly
into the inlet system of a gas chromatograph interfaced to a mass
spectrometer equipped with a computerized data system. GenerallYt
low boiling semi-volatile compounds that purge poorly are analyzed by
this method. .
Quality Control: Blankst duplicate and spiked samples were anal-
yzed concurrently with the survey samples. None of the thirteen
selected DAI compounds were found in any of the three blank samples.

Five spiked samples representing eleven compounds were analyzed.
(One sample contained as many as three spiked compounds. Some compoundst
such as acetone were spiked into more than one sample.) Of the eleven
discrete spikes the mean recovery was 116% with a Relative Standard
Deviation of 19%. .
Two sets of replicates were analyzed with four compounds detected.
The average percent Relative Standard Deviation (% RSD) was 15. The
average percent difference of all the sets of replitates was 22.
VOLATILES ANALYSIS
GC/MS Identification: An aliquot (5 ml) of a water sample was
purged with inert gas. The lower molecular weight purgable organic
compounds were stripped from the sample and trapped on a porous poly-
mer. These compounds were then desorbed from the column by reversing
the gas flow and rapidly heating the trap. The volatile organics
released were collected on an analytical GC column at room temperature.
After collectiont the GC column oven was heated at a uniform rate and
the eluted compounds analyzed by the mass spectrometer. The common
volatile organic solvents are all identified using this technique and
it also includes the identification of the volatile priority pollu-
tants. This procedure is recommended for the priority pollutants
(1). The identification again was made using a computer assisted
evaluation program as for the neutral extractables (2). A library of
standard spectra was created by analyzing all the commonly occurring

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organics in the Kanawha samp'les, and adding the,se to the library.'
The samples were routinely searched for these ~ompounds fbr each sample
analyzed by GC/MS.'
Quantitative results were obtained using an internal standard computer
technique (2, 3).
REFERENCES
1.
"Samples and Analysis Procedures for Screening of Industrial
Effluents for Priority Pollutants", U.S. EPA, Environmental
Monitoring and Support Laboratory, Cincinnati, Ohio, March 1977,
revised April 1977. "

"INCOS Data System - MSDS Operator's Manual - Revision 3",
Finnigan Instruments, March 1978.
2.
3.
Computer Assisted Evaluation of Organic Priority Pollutant
GC/MS Data - NEIC, September 1978.
Quality Control: Quality control procedures consisted of daily routine
calibration of the GC/MS, analysis of an organics free water blank, and a
standard mix at a concentration near midpoint of the standard calibration
curve. The calibration curve was previously established by analyzing each
standard over a typical working range of 20 to 200 ppb' concentration, with
response factors calculated relative to an internal standard. Field blanks
were analyzed with each set of samples. Replicate analyses were run on at
least two samples for every set of twenty samples or less.
Blanks
One contaminant, methylene chloride, appeared consistently in the blank
results. Blanks for the fifteen days of analysis gave a methylene chloride
value of 3 t 2 ~g/l. '
  Summary of blank results (~g/l)  
  Times Detnd.    
Compound  (15 samples) Range of Values Average
     - 3 t 2
Methylene chloride 12 j 2-13 
Toluene  2  2-5  nil
l,l,l-Trichloroethane 1  3  nil

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D-11-
Duplicates

Nine samples, six of them composites, were analyzed in duplicate. Ten
compounds of interest were determined in these analyses. The results are
summarized as follows:
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Compound
Ti mes Detnd.
(9 samples)
Deviation
Benzene
Bromodichloromethane
Carbon tetrachloride
. Chloroform
1,2-Dichloroethane
Ethyl benzene
Methylene chloride
Tetrachloroethane
Toluene
l,l,l-Trichloroethane
2
1
1
6
1
1
6
1
2
1
:t 8%
:t 100%
:t 50%
:t 27%
:t 20%
:t 80%
:t 45%
:t 25%
:t 48%
:t 17%
Recoveries
Four samples were spiked with standard mix to give each component
at a concentration of 200 ~g/l. Recoveries are listed below:
Compound
Percent Recovery
Benzene
Bromodichloromethane
Bromoform
Carbon tetrachloride
Chlorobenzene
2-Chloroethy.lvinyl ether
Chloroform .
Chlorodibromomethane
1,2-Dichloroethane
1,1-Dichloroethene \
trans-l,2-Dichloroethene
1,2-Dichloropropane
Ethyl benzene
Methylene chloride
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane '
Tetrachloroethene
Toluene
l,l,l-Trichloroethane
1,1,2-Trichloroethane
Trichloroethene
Vinyl chloride
Average
60%
108
127
80
86
125
88
113
114
81
77
84
72
93
140
83
87
78
121
85
97
95%

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D,,:,13
ATTACHMENT I
""":'."'4'" ..t1;<.~..~;.i ..' :'.. .:.~. ,~",.... . .
EIOCnEr-1I CI\L OXYGEn OHil,:'/D - no PRORE PROCEDURE
(5 Days~20oCJ
STORET NO. 00310
1. Score and I\pplication . ,
1.1 The biochemical oxygen demand test is a laboratory bioassiJY procedure
used'to estimate the quantity of oxyqen that is required to stabilize
the biodeqradable matter in a wastewater.
1.2 The test \~laS originally designed for and works most reliably on ra\'l
.' and tr~ated domestic wastes. The test can b~ applied to industrial
" \'las tes .\'lith careful attenti on to interferences and correct choi ce of
bi~logical seed." .
--
2.
Su:nm3.ry of l1ethod ,'. . .
2.1 -An appropriate number of dilutions 6f each~ample are prepared usinq
dilution water with added nutrients so that at least one dilution has
a depletion of at least 2 mg/l and a residual 00 of at least 1 mg/l
after incubation for 5 days in the dark at 200C.

2.2 'Dissolved oxygen is measured by a DO probe based On the polaro~raphic-
princip1e. The probe is calibrated \-/ith air saturated water at kno~
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: 5.1 Disti lled \'iater free of orqanic contaminants as inrlicated by tf-tr:?
, Pcrmun~V:1ate Test as follm'/s:' Determine the consumption of potassium
p:~rmunganate by adding 0.20 ml of KHn04 solution (0.316 9/1) to SfJOml
or the'distilled \-/atcr and 1 ml of cone. H2S04 in a stoppered qlass ' ,
bottle. The water has passed the test if thepermanganate color does
not disappear in less than 10 minutes upon standing at room te~per~ture.
Ideally, the color should be retained for 30 ~inutes. ' ,
5.2' Phosphute buffer solution:, bisso'lve 8.5 q potassium di"7hyd}~oqen phos--
phate, KH2P04' 21.75 q dipotassium hydrogen phosphate, K2HP04. 33.4 9
disodium ~drogen phosphate heptahydrate, Na2HP04.7H20 and 1.79 9 ,
ClrrJ1loniu~ chloride NH4Cl in about 500 ml 'distilled \'later and dilute to ,
one liter. The pH of this buffer should be 7.2. Store in the refriC'Jer-
ator and discard (including any of the follm.ting reagents) .if there is
any sign of biological growth in the bottle. -,
5.3 Magnesium sulfate solution: Dissolve 22.5 9 ~9S04'7H20. in distilled
\-/ater and dilute to one liter. -, ,":'
,5.4 Calcium chl~ride solution: Dissolve 27.5 9 anhyd~ous CaClz in distil.-Iecll
,\'/ater and dllute to one llter., ' '
'5.5 Ferric chloride solution: Dissolv~ 0.25 9 FeC13'6H20 in distilled water'
'and dilute to one liter. '
5.6 1 n H2S04 and 1 NNaOH solutions.
5.7 Sodium sulfite solution 0.028 N: Dissolve 1.77 9 anhydrous Na2S03 in
one litei distilled \'/ater. Prepare daily. '
5.8 R~agent grade potassium iodide., '
5.9 Starch indicator solution: Add a cold water suspension of 59 q soluble
starch to 800 ml of boiling water, with stirring and boil for a few
minutes. Cool, dilute to approximately 1 liter and let settleover~
, night. Use supernate and preserve with 5 ml of chloroform.
5.10 Glucose-glutamic acid solutions: A) Dissolve 150 mg of each indis- '
tilled \'/ater and dilute to 1 liter. B) Dissolve 100 mg 'of each in I
distilled \'/ater and dPute to 1 liter. Split up each solution into 25,m11
bottles or tube autoclave at 12loC for 112 hour and store at 40C or
prepare fresh daily. "
,5.11 Biological seed. '. '
6.
Glassware and Dilution Water Prepuration, '
6.1 All dilution water and reagent storage bottles. Bon incubation bottles,
and other glassware must be free of orQRnic contaminants and toxic
rr.eta 1 s. Clean all ql aS5\-/are with hot soapy \'Iate'~) ri nse \.ti th 3 N HCl
rinse three times \'/ith hot tap \'later and t\'lice \.lith distillcrl \'late}'.
Any qlasswarc with a film should not be uspo. ,
6.2 The distilled \':ater should be cooled to 206C, saturated \.rith O>:YClcn by
bubbling air through the \'/ater and then stored at 200C until use. Just'
priolo to using the dilution "/iltC", add 1 ml each of the magnesium
, sulfate. calcium chloride. fenic chlodd~ and phosphate buffer solution
solutions for' each lite.' of \'Ii!tcr. Th~ biolonlcal seed should be added
(5 ml seed/l of dilution water) to the dilutl~n water just before use.

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10.
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7.
~election of Seed .
7.1 All chlorinated domestic wastes and most in~ustrial wastes require
seeding because oflow~microbial\porulations. The standard seed
material is primary treated sc\'/aqe that has been stored at 200C for
24 hours. Hm./ever) it is important that, if possible, the. seed to
.be us cd has been exposed to the waste that.is being measured. There-
fore) an effluent from a treatr.i2nt pt'ocess or. a receiving \-later col-
lected below the outfall \-,i11 sometimes be used as seed r.latct-l,Il.
8. .
Tnteifercnces and Pretreat~ent of Samples . '.
8.1 Blend samples containing non-homogeneous particulate matter with the
TekmiH' SOT Tissuemizcr. Thirty seconds is usually adequate.
8.2 Neutralize samples with a p}1 outside of the range 5-10 using the 1 H
acid or base. Host samples do not require neutralization because the
. buffering capacity of the dilution water and dilution of the samples.
8.3 Residual chlnrine kills the seed organisms. All samoles except those
knowh not to contain residual chlorine should be checked as follows:
l\dd 5 ml of 1 N HZSOll) 2 9 KI crystals and 1 ml of starch solution
to laO ml of sample. I Add the 0.028 N sodium sulfite solution in
'0.1 ml increments until the purple color disappears. Each 0.1 ml .
increment corresponds to 1 mg/l ClZ' Add a proportional volume of.
0.028 N sodium sulfite to an aliquot of sample for testing. If there
. is any uncertainty) add an extra increment of sulfite. An excess of
sulfite solution of 1 ml/l saC'lple causes a BOD of less thon 0.5 mg/1 ~
which is insignificant. ".
8.4 ~any organic compounds and trace metals are toxic to the seed organisms. "
Sometimes this interference can be eliminated by sample dilution.
~igher BOD values from the more dilute aliquots is evidence of iample
tC1xicit.y. These results should be carefully evaluated before beinq
reported. " "." .
8.5 Samples containing more than 9 mg/l DO at 200C may be encountered durinq
winter months or in localities where alqae are qrowinQ actively. To
prevent loss of oxygen during incubation of these samples) reduce the
DO to saturation by bringing the sample to about 200C.in a partly filled
bottl e and agitating it by vigot"ouS shaki ng. . . .
'\
9.
Calibration of Dissolved Oxyqen Meter
9.1. Carefully fill 3 BOO. bottles by use of a siphon \'lith dilution \'/atel~
(containing nutrient~ but not seed) that has been saturated with air
at 20C. Using the table Tnthe 00 meter manuill, find the DO concen- .
tration at the ambient atmospheric pressure and 200C. Set the tem-
perature dial on the metet' if necessary to 20C and adjust the culi-
bration kno~ until the rr.cter reads t~e value determincd from the tahle. .
Save the aU;::!!" t\.:o bottles for checkin!'] the rr.etet~ dudng the analysis.
9.2 LId ft i na of the metet" response or a very s 10\" response to 00 chan~J;;s
is usually caused by a coated or torn electrode membrane.
Sample An~lYsis Procedure
lO~1 Since most samp.les rcq:.Iire mJt"C th~n 7 mg/l of 02 fat. stabilization)
dilutions arc rcquired befol'c incu~ation. Prepare a sufficient nllii8Ct'
of dilutions S~ that at least one aliquot d2plctes ~t lcost 2 ~g/l end
has a rcsidu~l 00 of at least 1 ElQ/l after incllJation. Usually three
and so::::::tin:~s four dilutions are rcquir2d. Oilutions UP to l~.~ arc
r:Jde directl)' in the GOD bottles. A guid~ to scl:iplc size selection
f 0 11 o~,/s :

-------
.:

.b~ 1 6 .
M~asurableBOD Range
'. ..
~(}mple Size, ml
Factor
% Dilution'
4 - . 12
8 - .24
12 - 36
20 - 60
40 - 120
60 - 180
120 - 360.
200 -- 600
150
75
50
30
15
10
5
3
2.
,'I
6 .
10 .
20
30
60.
100
50
25 .
16.67
10
5
3.33
. 1.67
. .1
. ,
for dilutions less than 1%) the sample is first diluted 1/10 or
1/100 with dilu~ion water and then thedilutinns are cOffiQleted in .
the BOD bottles. . The samples should be homogenized'and shaken just
before a1iquots are taken. A qraduate cylinder is used to m~asure .
. volumes of 15 m1 or larger. large bore pipets are used for smaller
volumes. One bottle per'dilution is prepared. Exercise care in
filling the bottles with dilution water so as not to have the water
into the neck of the bottle more than 1/8".. ~ .
10.2 Prepare tHO bottles \'lith seeded dilution water~ Depletion of these
samples should be about 0.6 mg/l if domestic sewage is used for seed.
Blank values over 1.0 mg/l indicates contaminated dilution water or
incubation bottles. ., .
,10.3 Prepare one bottle with 5 mlof gluc6se-glutamic acid standard A and
one bottle with 10 ml of standard B and fill with seeded dilution
water. The result~ for standards A and B shou1d be about 200 and
160 mg/l, respectively.,. .. .
" 10.4 Measure the initial DO of all .samples, being careful not to displace
. . any of the dilution water. At the sa~e time the DO is measured, the.
~.' probe mixes the samples. Wash the probe \'lith distilled water between
each sample~ After determinin~ the DO it may be necessary to add a
s~all amount of dilution water to prevent trapping bubhl~s in thc ,
bottle when ~toppering. Place a,water seal in the neck of the bottle
; and place a cap ov~r ~he neck to maintain the'water seal.. .
10.5 It,is helpful to measure the 00 of the samples after two days in order
to judge the adequacy of the dilutions selected., Pour off the water
seal before measuring the DO. Calibrate the no meter accordina to the
directions given in Section 9. Measure the DO of the most concentrated
dilution of each sample. If there is less than 2 mq/l, }'esidual I)(). ':
increase the di1 uti on factot's o,n subsequent days and measure the 00 in I
the next most dilute sample. If the DO on the second sample is less
than 4 mq/l, re-aerate \'lith an air- stone attached to an. ai I' pump hc:inq i
careful not to displace ,any of the ,'rater. RCC01'd the initial }'esiduul .
and re-aeratcd DO values. ~iscard any sample with a residual 00 he low
1 mg/l.. If there is less than a 2 mg/l depletion, increase th!? strenqth
of the dilutions on subsequent days. .
10.6 The final DO mea~urer:1ents arc made \.,ithin 4 hours of 5 duys of ,.,hen
, the s~mples were set up. Calibrate th~ 00 meter by the method qiven
in sc:ct~(;(1 9. Any ciiiutions resulting in residual OO's that are.
1 mg/l 01 great~r and depletions that are 2mg/l or greater are valid.
Calculate the BOOvalues by the follo~,ting fOrir.uli1: ..
.-
'"
\.,W?,
~\
..4 .

-------
. .
-
D-17 -
BO~5 = F[(Oi-Of)-f(~)l,

} 1..::"'.', ""~-'~' ~;..t. '!~; '1' ~ .... '. ',1J. .\.

where 0i = initial 00 of sample) mg/l
- -
Df = final DO of sample) mg/l

B = the mean depletion of the
-mg!l "
two seeded dilution water blanks)
f = de~imal fraction of dilution water in s~mple"bottle
F = whole number dil~tion factor of sampl~

For exa~p1e) 30.ml ~f sample was used,the initial 00 was 8.2 mg/l
and the final DO was 1.7 mg/l. - The initial DO of both of the seeded
blanks was 8.1 mg/l and the final DO was 7.3 mg/l
BODS = 10[(8.2~1.7)-O.9(8.1-7.3)J
= 10[6.5-0.9(0.8)]
-
10[6.5-0.7]
- .

= 10[5.8]"
=- 58 1I!911
10.7 Report the averag~ value of all of the valid dilutions to the ne~rest
whole number 0ith ~t most two significant figures. If the 00 deple~
tions increase \'rithincreasing dilution) toxicity is indicated and -
the r~sults should be carefully evaluated before being r~ported.
10.8 The results of the A&B glucose-~lutamic acid standards should be be-
tween 160-240 and 130~190 mg/l, respectively. High results indicate
a very efficient seed"or contaminated samples." lOi'/ results indicate
a poor seed or blank values that were too hiqh. " -
10.9 The mean of the seeded dilution water blank depletions should be be- "
low 1 mg/1, ideally 0.6 mg/1. High.va1uesindicate contaminated
nutrients and minerals) dilution \':ater Ot~ fllass\.tare. Correct any
problems before proceedin9. - -
10.10 Report the BOO',values from different dilutions as duplicates on the -
AGC sheets.
10.11 Attach the incubator temperature recordel~ chart to the non Data/
Calculation Sheet. (attached).
Prepar~d hy 11. Cartel' 6/9/78
. . \ ...

-------
BOD Data/C~'culation.~heet, Rev. 6/9/78.
'. -~. _.~~~~~~~~~~-~~t'~~;-~-!Jf~,lP~"f::~~:;'~-~ ~ ~.~., .
. Analyst.' Study
"~::r-) e No.
:~ini:_\ c . pI!
.JmfJ\~ vol, ml
nTt rrr-[)O', mq/ I
~-ci~-y DO, p)'1(1
~e -(I C I'D. tc"lfo, mg!l
111) aT()~ci7T
ir~j~ dep., mq/1
[ni)nk Carr., rnq/l
:e t o? de pI; , r.~qr\
Fuctor
130ijs_, 1:19/1 .-
leon 130D" , mq! 1
!
-
jamr. \ e No.
;01:11)] e pH
;J~~i:~O I, m I
:nitia1 00, rnq!1
~-da z..J?~ '.
. .
.
..

-------
ATTACH~1ENT II
D- 1 9
TOIAL.SUSPE~DED $OLID~.
, '.. :' . ~ .
STC1RET NO. 0()S3()
1.
Scope and Application .
1.1 The method is applicable to drinking. surface
and to domestic and industrial wastes.
1.2 The detection limit of the method is 1 mg/l.
and saline waters. .
2.
Summary of Nethod .
2.1 A homogenized sample is filtered through a pre-washed glass fiber.
filter. The residue retained on. the filter 1S washed and then drled .
to constant weight at 105C and weighed to the nearest 0.1 milligram.
The TSS is calculated from the amount of residue per unit.volume of
samp1e~ . .
. 2.2 The fi 1 trate from thi s method may be used to determi ne the tot a 1
dissolved solids.
3.
Sample Handlinq and Preservation
3.1 Samples should be stored at 4C and analyzed as soon as possible,
. but no later than 7 days after collection.
4.
Apparatus .
4.1 Whatman GF/C glass fiber filter discs) 43 mn.
.4.2 Millipore membrane filtering apparatus with reservoir and a coarse
fritted disc as a filter support. .
4.3 Aluminum drying pans) 50 mm and metal tray.
4.4 Tekmar SOT Tissuemizer.
4.5 Drying oven. 103-105C.
4.6 Desiccator. with Drierite indicating desiccant.
.4.7 Analytica1"ba1ance) 160 g capacity or larger. sensitive' to 0.1 mg
and one weight equivalent to the optical range of the balance.
4.8 Graduate cylinder and \'iide bore pipets.. .

Balance Calibration .
5.1 Using a balance with an opticalrange of 1.0.q, place a 1.0 Q (15%)
weight on the balance pan. set the weight control knob to 1.0 g,
release the balance and set the zero point with the optical zero
knob. With the balance released. slowly turn the weight control
knob back to zero. The optical scale should come to rest exactly
at 1.0 g. If the reading is more or less than 1.0 q, arrest the
balance. remov~ the top housing cover and adjust the sensitivity
weight. Repeat the calibration check.
5.
6.
Procedure
6.1 Preparation of glass fiber filter disc: Place the glass fiber fil-
ter en the membrane fi17.er appuratl;5 .vJith \'/rilik~2d surface up..
4hile vacuum is applied. wash the disc with 100 m1 of distilled
water. Remove all traces of water by continuing to apoly vacuum
after water has passed through. Remove filter from membrane filter
apparatus, place in aluminum pan, and dry in .an oven at 1()3-11)50C
for one hour. Remove to desiccator and store until neerled. Weigh
inrnedi~tely before use. After'0eighinq. handle the filter with
forceps only.

-------
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6.2 Ho~ogeniie all non-uniform samples with blender and shake the. .
bott 1 es before \.ti thdra~'iinC1 an aliquot to assure taki ng a represen-'
. tative sample.. . . .'. .
6.3 Choose a maximum sample volume that will filter in 5 min~tes o~ less.
. Heasure' volumes smaller than' 15 ml \'iith \'lide bore pipets and large'r
volumes with graduate cylinders. Discard any sample which does not
filter in 5 minutes and filter a'smaller sample. volume.' '.
6.4 Wash the graduated cylinder or pipet ann with the suction on. wash.
the filter funnel\'/all. filter and residue \'Ii.th t\-IO t".,enty'-five ml .
portions 'of distil led. water allowing complete drainage between.
"lashings. Remove all traces of\,tater by continuing to apply vacuum
. after water has passed. through. . . . . .
6.5 Carefully remove the filter from the filter support. Place. in an.
, aluminum pan and dry at least one hour at 103-1050C. Cool and weigh
immediately or place in a desiccator for later weiohing. Re-drY and
re-weigh 10% or at least one filter per set of samples.' If the in-
cremental weight loss is less than 0.5 mg. calculate the results
based on the original weights. If the weigbt loss exceeds 0.5 m~, .
re-dry and re-wei 9h all of the' fi 1 ters and re-check 10% of the fi lters.
6.6 Analyze two blanks per set of samples boY filteringlOO ml of distilled
water through b/o prepared filters. The amount of additional weight
105s after the filters have been prepared is nearly independent of
the volume of water filtered. Therefore. add the mean blank \'Ieight"
105s to the residue weight for each ~ample. '.
6.7 Analyze 10% or at least one sample per set in duplicate.
6.8 Analyze a standard sample \'/ith each sample set. .
6.9 Calculate the results as follows:
TSS = (WG - WT) + B .
Vs
WG = ~rOS$ weight of filter and residue. mg ..
Wr = Tare \'ieight of filter. mg
B . = The mean of the two blank results.mg
WhereB = B1 + B2
2
B1 = BT - BG
BT = Tare weiqht of filter. mg
BG = Gross weight of filtering
Vs = Volume of samplefilte~ed. 1 .

-------
T8IIAT"-CU"N _T .Iiii!i. 6'-8
Analyst
Study
Date/Time Filters in Oven
Date/Time Out
Scfiiple No.       I   
Samnle Vol., 1       
5e-check "It. mq       
ir,ross I'/t. , mq       :  
(Tare !'It.. mg         
:Res i due  I'it., mq     r  
Blank Corr., mQ       
Carr. Res. \.Jt., mq      
:TSS. mqll          
,           
iSamo 1 e No.          
Samole Vo 1 . ~ 1   .   " 
Re-check In.,  mg     ',.. 
     . 
Gross I,lt., mg      . 
     '-, 
Tare \~t.. mq         
~es;due  ',I t., mQ ,      
31ank Corr., mq       
Carr. Res. \.It., mg      
TSS, mg/1          
Sample No.         . 
        . '
Sample Vo I ., 1      ::i~ 
Re-check \4t.,  mg     ", 
'~ros s v/t., mg         
Tare I'/t., mg         
'Res; due      -    .--
\./t.. mg       
S'i O:'i~: Corr., mq  , ,     
Corr. Res. !~t., mq      
'="-c.:-':. nq!l          
I..1J,          
-I
L
''fi.
~
"
Balance Calibration
 I Readin~ on 100 mq "/el qht, mg
Tare  
Gross  
Re-check  
';::)
I
r~
......
II
'II

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,,: D724
ATTACHMENT I II
. _.'~. . \ . '.
PlnJ.lysis of Organic Pollutants' in Hate\" by Direct
Pl'.Jueous Injection, Gas Chromatography~f.1ciss Sp~ctrometry
NEI C - Septernb[:t~ 1978
1.0 Introduction
1.1
r'1e.ny vol ati le organic compounds are sol ub 1 e in \"/ater at concentrati ons
exceeding 1 mg/l. HO\'Jever, they are not suitable for Volatile Organics
Analysis (V.O.A.) due to their 10'.'1 purgeability. This method is
suitable for GC/MS identification, confirmation, and quantitation of
the previously mentioned types of compounds. '
. I .'
2.0 Summa ry of f1ethod
2.1
A sample is injected into the inlet system of a gas chro~~tcigraph.
After vaporization, the aqueous smnple is carried through a column
by an inert carrier gas. 'The sample components are partitioned
between the carrier gas and a stationary liquid phase on an inert
solid support. The column effluent is introduced into a qu~drupole
mass spectrometer by means of a glass jet separator. From the'
interface, the sample is passed into an electron impact ionization
source. The various' ion fragments are filtered by a quadrupole
mass filter and detected by a continuous dynode electron multiplier. '
The signal is then fed to a computer controlled data system for
processi ng. Compounds are matched \'/ith standard spectra stored,
in a libral'y and identified based upon their spectral similarity
and relative retention times. Concentrations are calculated for
each identified compound based upon its relative response to an
internal standard.'
3.0
Interferences
Particulate me;", ::' Particulate or suspended matter should be ,
removed to pr::'\ both plugging of syringes and formation of con-
densation nuc1:, Allowing particulates to settle before analysis
is acceptable.

3.2 Stability - Aqueous solutions of D-chloroform (CDC13) are unstable.
The CDC13 can exchange to CHC13. ' "
3.1
stock standards of deuterochloroform (7500 nglul) that are prepared
24 hours prior to dosing and analysis, display large losses in response.

Even stock standards prepared 8 hours prior to dosing ,1d analysis,
exhibit some loss of response. Stock standards of D-ci.loroform al'e
prepared in vials that have app~oximately two ml. head space. Vola-
til ity losses occur in this head space. No losses are c.1:::ervable if
,the stock standard solution is -refrigerated and used \'/1',;/1 fout'
hours of preparation. ' '

-------
0-23
Id;~ntical Retention Times - It. is possible \'lith any given .column
and operating condit,ions, to have '..h/o .compounds that el ute at
identical retention times. It is especially important to choose
an . internal standard that does not coelute with another compound
c;:.-. interest. This problem is minimized by using GC/r..1S.
3.:1
4.0 Apparatus
4.1
Finnigan j200 Gas Chromato~raph/Mass Spectrometer System with a
Finnigan INCOS data system and Revision 3.1 software (1).
. .
5.0 Reagents and Materials

.5.1 . Purity of Reagents - All chemicals used for standards and internal
standards shall be of the highest purity available.
5.2 Purity of Hater - All \'/ater.shall be of sufficient purity such that
no background is observed above the detection limit of the compounds
of interest. Filtration through activated carbon will eliminate any
interferences. .
. 5.3 Carrier Gas
Only high purity helium shall be used.
5 .4 Co 1 umn .
5.4.1
Column Tubing - Stainless steel, oil free. . Dimensions. 1/8" 00
x 20 '.
5.4.2 Solid Support - Chromosorb W acid washed 80/100 mesh.
5.4.3 Liquid Phase - Carbowax 20m - 5% loading.
Internal Standard - Dilute 50 ul of deuteroch10roform to 10 ml with
water. Shake well to assure all D-chloroform is in solution. The'
concentration of this solution is 7500 ng/ul. .
5.5
5.5.1
5.6 Standards
5.6.1
5.6.2
Prepare this solution fresh every four hours and keep refrigerated.
Concentrated Standards - Prepare stock standards of each
compound of interest by weighing out 50 mg of pure compound
and diluting this with water to a volume of 50 ml. Stability
of stock solutions is enhanced by keeping the solutiuns
refrigerated. Stock solutions should be prepared .fresh every
two we.eks. .
Analytici.ll Standards for GC/r.1S -, Dilute the concentrated
standards by adding 0.5 ml of each concentrate to a 12 ml
vial and bringing the volume to 10 101. This working standard
should be prepared each day. Each ul of \'/orking standard is
eq~al to 50 ng (50 ng/ul). .

-------
0-24
"
. '
5.7 t1ass Spectrometer Performance Standard Prepare a, 150 nglul
aqueo~s solution of Pentafluorobromobenzene and refrigerate until
ready for use. T.!~is ,so#,uJ:.Jon;'.ci,s stable for ope ,month. ' '
. '

6.0 SC1,mp 1 es and' Sam!" ling' Proc;:edure' ,
.:~?A
, .~~~'
,I,
1.1'
'r~
~ "
~.
,(,; 7. 0
f....'
'~
,;\\
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.,,', .
tl:. .
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. ;.;;~
.1 '.~p,'
. ,,':~. ~ . '
. '
. ~..~
Sample Collection - Samples should be collected ~o that rib air
remains in the bottle as a head space once the vial cap i~' tightened.

. 6.2 SampleCohtainers- 1 oz. glass bottles equipped ~ith Tefl~n,lined '
. silicone septa and screw caps (Pierce #13074 and #12722 or equivalent).
,Before sampling, wash used bottles \-lith soap (Alconox or equivalent) . ,
. and tap water,rinse with tap water. New bottles require only washing
"lith tap water. Bake bottles at 2000C and septa at BOoC for 30 minutes.
Allow to cool in ~ desicator with charcoal adsorbant to m~intain an'
organics free atmosphere. Then cap the bottles and hold for sampling~
~ . 1
6.3 Sample Size for Analyses- The 'sample size must be small, to prevent
. (\'/er load i ng of the column. . For aqueous anal ys is, a sample size of
5 ul is optimum. ' . . .'

6.4 Sample Storage - Storage time of samples should'be kept toa minimum.
If storage cannot be avoided, the bacterial' action, as well as vola-.
tility 'losses, should be minimized by refrigeration (2). '
\
Procedu re
7.1
Mass Spectrometer Calibration
Adjust and calibrate the mass spectrometer according to th~
manufacturers specifications.

7.1 ~2 Analyze a sample of pentafluorobromobenzene (PFBB);'
7. L 1
7.1.3
Determine if the PFBB spectrum meets the performance criteria (3)
(Attachment 1). Proceed to analyses if it does. or retune the
instrument to meet. the performance criteri a.. .
7.1.4
. '
Analyze a standard mix of the compounds of interest and d~termine
if the response is \,tithin an acceptable range of the pY"~viously:
established response factors. If not, determin~ the cause of .
the problem, make the necessary corrections and reanalyze the'
standard. ' ,
7.2 Sample Analysis
7.2.1
Equilib',;:: the sample bottles to ambient temperatureanc'
pipette :,'~ ml'ofsample into. a 12 ml vial~ Composite si:
-------
, --, ~ ,'I.~!/?;:~~ti' ',-
D-25
7.2.3 Equilibrate.the, GC ?ven temperature to 70oC.

),.':. "'~+-:~:-"'~ \: '-'. . ~ ~.;v ~', -~ .," .
7.2.4
Inject 5 ul of the dosed sample, turn the vacuum diverter off -
and immediately start collecting 'H.S. data using the following
condit.ions:
'~1dSS Range 33 - 130 Ar~U
Scan Time - 3 seconds
After four minutes start the G.C. oven
(6o/min) oven max = 1800C .
program
7.2.5 Collect data until the last components have eluted from the
G.C. column. ,Typically this would be 320 scans or about 16
minutes. . ,
7.3 Data Evaluation
7.3.1
After each analysis, collected data is analyzed by the procedure -
Computer Assisted Evaluation of Direct Aqueous Injection GC/MS
Data l4}.

-------
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References'
-'
Finnigan INCOS Data System Operators f1anual, Revision 3; Finnigan 3200
GC/f'iS Systems ~1a!1ual, Finnigan Corporation, Sunnyvule,. California
, '. \
(2)
Standard Recommended Practice for Measuring Volatile Organic Matter in
Water byAqueous~Injection Gas Chromatography, ASTM D-2908~74, ~ 480-487
(3)
r1emo of J. 'Eichelberger and H. Budde, ~1arch 10, 1978, Environmental
f'1onitoring and Support Laboratory, Ci nc innati, Ohio 45268, Subject -
Pel'fl uorob!~omobenzene Reference Compound for Use wi th Typi ca 1 Purge
and Trap Columns that Do Not Transmit DFTP~ ~eadily. '
(4)
Computer Assisted Evaluation of Direct Aqueous Injection GC/f.1S Data -
Procedun~ Developed by the Che.mistry Branch of the EPA, Nati onal Enforce.:.
ment Investigations Center, Denver, Colorado, September 1978 '

-------
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ATTACHMENT IV
D-27.
Computer' Assisted Evaluation of
Direct Aqueous Injection GC/MS Data
T_..\:...,; .....r .,' '. , .;, .". ...'.';;:Z'

NEIC - September 1978
1.0 Introduction
1.1
This procedure is a slightly modified version of the priority
pollutant data evaluation procedure (1). Minor modifications
were made to enhance the handling of direct aqueous injection
(DAI) analyses data for the Kanawha River Valley project. .
(August 1978).' .' '. .
2.0 Summary of Method
GC/MS data files are processed by location of an internal stan-
dard that is used for response reference. Compounds of interest
in a user library are reverse searched using an absolute retention
time window.: If a compound is located and passes the match cri-
teria, it is quantitated and the spectrum printed. Printed re-
sults are manually audited and the data verified or rejected.

3.0 Summary of Modifications'
2.1
The compound detection routine (Detect) was changed to use
absolute retention times for location of the retention time
window. Only masses 41 through 125 were used in locating com- .'
pounds due to the Argon background (m/e 40) in the system. . . .

3.2 The required spectrum match parameter limit (fit) in the compound
identification routine (Detec 2) was set to 450. This lower limit
was necessary due to the poor character of the spectra of the'
DAI compounds. Poor character here means that the spectra con-
tain few ions and their response (sensitivity) is poor.
3.1
3.3 The names of procedures. used in both the-DAI data evaluation and
the priority pollutant evaluation were changed to allow independent
operation of the two procedures. .
4.0 Interferences
4.1
In some cases, a spectrum may match the library reference
sufficiently to be passed. During quantitation, however, the
ion of interest may be too weak to locate and no entry will be
made in the quantitation list. In such a case, no entry at
all (e.g. no "not found" entry) will appear in the quantitation
report. The .name and match results will, however, appear in the
~ualitative data report. .

-------
D-28
4.2 Occasionally, multiple peaks will be detected during quantitation
due to background interferences and multiple entries will be made
in the quantitation list. Generally, the entry having the same
label as the correct spectrum is used for quantitation and the
others are disregarded. In some instances, however, the correct
selection is not obvious and manual evaluation of the quantitation
results must be done. '",
5.0 Apparatus

5.1 Finnigan INCaS data system software, Revision 3.1 or later. To
initially set up this procedure, the user must understand and be
" proficient in the use of MSDA (2).
~
6.0 Procedure
6.1
Procedure Set Up
6.1.1
Create the procedures from the trace of EVDAI in Appendix I.
6.2 Library Set Up
.,-:.r'

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Build a user librarY containing each. compound' oi interest. ' ,
Appendix II is a library list of the 01 library. The first
entry must ah'lays be the internal standard and each. entry
must include the quantitation parameters and retention times. '
6.2.1
6.2.2 ,Execute EVDAI, edit the quantitation list for accuracy and
update the library parameters using commands in "QUAN".
. . ~
, .~~~~~~., .
Using the "LIBR" program, ,generate hard copies of library
spectra for reference. Using the library list editor, ,
"EOLL", generate summaries of the entries.,and,quantitation'
parameters as in App~ndix II. "

6.3 Routine Use,
6.2.3
6.3.1
Analyze samples, standards and quality control samples using
the same instrument conditions used to set up the libraries.

Using the name1ist editor, create a name1istcontaining the'
names of the data files to be processed.
6.3.2
6.3.3 Execute the procedure as follows:
EVDAI library, namelist, yes (no)
Hhere:
library is the appropriate user library name.
namelist is the list containing the files to beproce~sed.

yes (no) selects printout of the spectra at a peak that was
identified by the orocedure.
~_..._..~--.- -.-.---

-------
f '!"\!"'I
D-29
6.3.4 Appendix II{'''ikh~n example ofPPEVAL output.
option was selected.
The "No"
7.0 Quality Control
7. 1
Each identification can be manually audited if the "yes" option
was selected. Inaccurate qualitative results may then be checked
. and manually corrected.
"7.2 Quantitation data accuracy is monitored by use of standard quality,
control techniques such as daily standardization, replicate analysis
and spikes (3)'. Daily cal ibration of the method. can .be accommodated
by analyzing the standard data first, updating the relative response
. factors, obtaining hard copy of the new factors (library list editor)
and then analyzing sample data.

8.0 Precision and Accuracy
8.1
The.overall precision and accuracy is limited to the quality of the
raw data being processed.
9.0 References
(l)
"Computer Assisted Evaluation of Organic Priority Pollutant GC/MS
Data", US EPA, National Enforcement Investigations Center,
September 1978. .
(2)
"INCaS Data System - MSDS Operators Manual - Revision 3", Finnigan
Instruments, March 1978.
(3)
"Quality Assurance Program for the Analyses of Chemical Constituents
in Environmental Samples", US EPA, Environmental Monitoring and
Support Laboratory, Cincinnati, Ohio, March 1978.

-------
, I D-30
J'-I.
.(."
'~., .
..
:".
.h:.
't~' .t
'~}'
.~..
.,~,
":;~~ .
-0'".:'&
" ..
..
APPENDIX Ia.
. .
.. ~
TRAC OF PROCED~F.E ~vD~I
~ ERAS: .
* ;(~~ PRIORITY POLLUTANT EVALU~TIC:-I ?RDCEDU!1""*,,".1<]
* ;(THIS PROCEDURE MAY DE US;~ TO 'EVALUATE GC/MS tATA J
* ;(FOR PRIORITY POLLUTANT ("PR SECTIml 3a7CFU) COM'GUNDS J
* ;(THE PROCEDURE UTILIZES ,;m:::!~~p.L STAND~R~S mID RELATI'/E J
* ;(R"SPONSE FACTORS FOR ou::mnTATION. THE !"GDS OPTION]
* ;[SEARCH IS USED TO LOCA~ AND IDENTIFY PE~KS. THE E?A J
* ;( IDENT;FICATION CRITERIA. E.G.. THRE: ImlS PER CCi'"'.oOU~!D ]
* ;c. IS USED TO LOCATE THE CC::?OUND OF ItHE::!E5T. HG"E IO.~S ].
* ;(HOWE'v'ER i1AY 8:: USED AS 'il;':: FIT OF THE SEARCH ROUTI:-iE'.JILLJ
* ;(YIELD tI< ; [THE FILE NAME AftD Ei P n ED au T. DETECT r S CALLED TO LOCrlT:: EACH]
* ;(CO~,OCUtlD (IF PRE5"nn. aUAH IS TI!::N CALLED TO CAC:CULATE j
'" ;(IIIE RESULTS mID THE P~OCEDUR': RET\;R~IS TO PFEVI TO GET THE']
'" ; CtIEXT FILE TO PROCESS. ]
:I< ;FILECK PRIH.99/N;E)
* ;EDLL PPLIST(-;W;E)
* ;5ETJ I>I;CHROCI;H1.90a.30a;E);SET4 tol;LOCIS:SETlO ! 14;SET4 -a
:I< ;SETO 51:EDOL(-;W;E);EDSL(-;W;E);SETL $3:DETECT;OUAHCl;H;E)
* :EDLL ?PLtSTCO!I;E)
..
;r-.::.:(O?Pj .
;F [LE(C PRItI.99/tl,M: ;E)
;FEED
;BEEP
J;<
*
*
:I<
*
ERASE

-------
, .. ' ~..; ,.'
0-31
APPENDIX lb.
~': .~'.. r-.." ~y.f
, '
, ,
. ,
"
'- ._"'_.._-~.-'
,- .. -. - .-.- _.."
.- '
. -..,...
..
.. ; [?ART OF PPEVAI. ]
'" ;[ROUTn;~ TO FIND AH IHTERHAL STAHDARD IH A SAM?LE ]
'" ;[USE A REVERSE SEARCH TO LO~ATE THE INT:RNAL STANDARD]
'" ;SE.14 ~ '
'" ;SEAR/VCI;S;V25a~eaa:N2.18.4aO;&;D-60.68:E)
'" ;LOCIS!
*
ERASE
SET14
SEAR (I:s;V25aeaaO;N2.la.490;&;D-6a.60:E)/v
LOCISI
'" IF LOCIS! .!14
* ;(PART OF PPE'/AL ]
* ;(HO IHTERNAL STANDARD FOUND]
. '" ;PRWCOIS)
'" ; RETU PPEV2
*
IF LOCISI.! 14
PRIN CQIS)
RETU PPEV2
SETH) ! 14
SET4
SETO $1
EPOL ' (-;W;E)
EDSL . (-;W;E)
SETL 53
DETECT
* ; [PART OF PPEVAL ]
'" ;[TH!S ROUTItiE LOCATES COt
-------
" 0-32'
.,'
.'
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,,,,./-
1 I';
" .
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. .
~.
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.~~~':'I ~. . . . . .
tt',
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. . ...1
.'''.~ :1
APfENDIX Ie.
* ;CDATA IN THE OUANLIST ASSIGNED EARLIER.
* ;CALSO CHECK AND PASS ONLY PEAKS WITH
* ;eA FIT OF 756 OR GRE~TER
* ;IF DETEC2 116.DETEC2 ~5a
. * :SET! 114
* :CHRQ(I;R;S:o:tIl.3:A>S.3;G-4.4:D-5.5:E)
* ;DETEC3
* : RETU DETEC I
*
IF DETEC2!16.DETEC2.456
SET! ! 14
CHRO (I:R:S:*:N!.3;A>5.3:G-4.4:D-S.S:E)
DETEC3
* IF. !25 DETEC3.DETEC3
* ;SPECc"iN:H:E)
*
IF DETEC3!26.DETEC3
SPEC (" :N:H:E)
RETU DETEC I
EDCL (-:N:o;A:E)
LOOP
. CUAN (l;H:E)
EDLL PPLISi CB!I;E)
. cPR IN (OP?)
'FILE (C PRItI.99/tl.11: ;E)'
FE~D
BEE?
. LOOP
FEED
BE:::?
Bi:E?
BEE?
!
.!
. '...
..
]
]
]
. . '. - --..

-------
J' .~, ..
D-33
APPENDIX IIa..
.~ .. - 1: '.'
'" ,-
HAM HUM: HAME         
 IJT FOF!I"1ULA   RET TI!':E BASE AREA U.P.*I U.P.~2
REL.P.ET.1~t1E/CA5. t:.
-------
,.0-'34'
APPENDIX IIb.
.J. ....~. .
"
~:. ,
   -'- .. ..-. .        
HRM NUM: NAME        
 IJT FORMULA  RET TI~ BRSE AREA U;P.O\ U.P.o2
REL.RET.T~ME/CAS~' t",ASS RNT. REF.PERK RESP.FILE RESP.FRCTO~ 
DC 1: DCHLGROFORM        
119     7: 15  B4 163848. e.e~e e.El28
   1.,eea 94.811a 75.aa DC 1  :5 l.ee8 . 
DC  2: ETHANOL        
 46 C2.H6.0   5: 18  45 le6624. e.aea e.aae
   e.73\ 45.86828a.oe, DC 1  :5 e.235 
DC  . 3: MESITYL OXIDE        
99 C6.Hte.O   la:35  83 93568. a.Da!! e.CiJj}
   1.462 83. mm2::0. <:0 DC 1  :3 D.2:9 
DC  4: ETHAHOL.2-METHOXY-.A;E7ATE      
118 C5.H10.G3   13:57  43 S656<:~. e.~aa a . ef",
   1.924 S8.eOG28
-------
..
APPENDIX. IIIa.
- - ------------------------.
QUAtiTITATIOH REPORT
DATA: D9aS7BE.TI
09~5/78 9:28:EJa
SAM?L:: NIX D 5eHG/UL +15
CONDS.: 70-160
FORMJLA: Q6/11IN
sua~tTTED BY: JJS
FILE: D9e15?8E
INSTRUrENT: 3200EI
ANALYST: JJ5
..,', . '.
" ,
AMOUNT-AREA * REF.R~T/(REF.AREA~ P.ESP.FRCT)
, '
HO NA~!E
I D-CHLOROFORN
2 ACRYLOHtTRILE
3 I. I D INEiHOXYETHANE
4 ISOPROPANOL,
5 D!ETHYL KETCNE
6 ISOSUTROHITRILE
7 N-8UTAHOL
9 PROPAHE.2828-OXYBIS
9 t.3-DIOXOLAHE.2-NETHYL
10 eUTANE.t-CHLORO
.',
NO WE SCAN
1 84 147
2 53 137
3 75 69
4 45 lei
5 96 130
6 42 144
7 56 222
8 45 53
9 73 118
IB 55 79
TINE REF
7:21 I
, 6:51 1
3:27 1
s:e3 I
,6:3e 1
7:12 1
11:06 1
2:39 1
5:54 1
3:57 1
',. ::
. ',' . .
RRT r.ETH
1.0Ba A Ba
0.932 R' 88
a.4;9 A 83
B.687 A a8
0.884 A 89
a.9sa A 68
1.51a A 8S
B.3';1 A 83
B.883 A Ba
0.537 A 89,
ARER
652434.
222688.
2e8334.
552815.
145856.
36ge56.
72484.
512704.
4a9852.
122668.
. --
WEIGHT: 0.eee,
ACCT. HO.: J24a
Ar.DUNT
, 7S. eem HG/UL
, sa. BEJa HG/UL
se ~ caB ~IG/UL
sa. mm ~:G/UL
5B.ceo HG/UL
5e.eae HG/UL
58. (J!!!a HG/UL
SB.aaB NG/UL
se.osa tlG/UL
sa. mm ~IG/UL
?TOT
14.29
9.52
9.52
9.52
9.52
9.52
9.52
9.52'
9.52
9.5Z
D-35

-------
0-36
':t}:z,'.
.~~':t.\ .
. '
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..!~~..~. ,. .
l;~;.
J,'1;.
{~;;. .
-;:..'
h'
.t.,..
:to:
bh
APPENDIX I lIb .
"HAM NUM:
... - -----...----------------...'
\.IT FORMULA
DI
DI
DI
DI
Dl
Dl
DI
Dl
Dl
DI
bt
DI
Dl
DI
1: 119
2: 74 C4.HI0.0
3: 58 C3.H5.0
4: 72 C4.H8.0
5: 53 C3.H3.N,
6: 104 C8.H8
7: 90 C4.HI0.02
8: 60 C3 .H8.0
9:, 86 CS.H 10.0
lEI: 69 C4.H7.N
11: 74 C4.HI0.C
12: '102 C5.HI4.0
13: 88 C4.H8.02
14: 92 C4.H9.CL
..
IDENTIFICATION REPORT
NO SC~N
1 1':8
2 49
3 73
4 97
5 0
6 277
7 73
8 97
9 148
10 l
-------
'0-37
ATTACHt1ENT V
:... ~ . ..' :
Methodology: Carbaryl Analysis,.
. -
. . .
", '~~-.II'" .~.\ "'''''''''i''r.:: ~;.,. ;"'. . ".'
.' '/'
A liter of the sample was extractec serially with three 5U ml portions
of methylene chloride. The extracts were combined and passed through Na2S04
into a 250 ml round bottom flask. 50 ml of ethyl acetate was added to the.
flask and the solvents were concentrated to 10 m1 in a rotary evaporator at
450C. The extract was passed through a clean-up column of 3 cm Florisil
. topped with 1 cm of Na2S04~ The Carbaryl was eluted with 20 ml of ethyl
acetate. The 30 ml of ethyl acetate was concentrated to 10 mlon a hot
plate under a gentle stream of carbon filtered air.

The extract was analyzed on a Waters 204 Liquid Chromatograph with a
M Bondapak C18 column. A methanol - 1% acetic acid gradient was used over
25 minutes at a flow rate of 2.0 m1/min. The gradient was run from 0 to 80%
methanol. The dual channel UV detector was operated at wave lengths of 254
nm and 280 nm. .
Quality Control: A blank and a spike were analyzed along with the samples.
The blank did not contain any interferences at the retention time of Carbaryl.
The spike was at a concentration of 250 ug/l of Carbaryl and the recovery
was 117%. .
The presence of Carbaryl in the samples was established bY the coin-
cider.ce of retention time and confirmed by the ratio of the 254 to 280
r~sponse.
. ..... .....~ A .' ---- -.. ..'.'." -.

-------
D-38 '
ATTACHMENT. VI
Neutral Extraction Technique for Organics Analysis
September 1978 .'
1.0 Scope and Application

1.1 This procedure is applicable for analysis of water and
, wastewater samples for a broad spectrum of organic
~ollutants. . .
2.0 Summary of Method
2.1 Water and wastewater samples are extracted with CH2C12
(dichlorornethane) at ~ neutral pH. The extract is aried
and concentrated with the addition of acetone and iso-
octane to exchange solvents. The resultant extract
concentrate is subjected to GC and GC/MS analysis to
. identify and quantitate the organic pollutants present.

3.0 Sample Handling and Preservation
I:'
...,,'
...J"....
~1't
"
Prior to extraction, samples are refrigerated and
extracted as soon as possible, generally within 48
hours.' Samples maybe held 5 days or more if necessary.

4.0 Definitions and Comments
3.1
:;.;
"1.
:'1:
"
~1
J';
t.-.-.
.~ .
"
5.0 Interferences
'-\'\
~:~
5. 1
Solvents, glassware and reagents could be sources of
contamination. Therefore, at least one "Reagent Blank"'
must be prepared contacting the solvent with all
potential sources of contamination. This blank should
then be processed through the same analytical scheme
as the associated samples.

5.2. Typical interferences from reagents,are:
4-methyl-4-hydroxy-2-pentanone (diacetone alcohol)
from acetone, phthalate esters from Na2S04, ,
cyclohexene from dicholormethane. .
,.
6.0 Apparatus
6.1
Separatory funnels: 21 and 41 glass with glass or
teflon stoppers and stopcocks. No stopcock grease used.
6.2
Drying column: All glass 3 cm x 50 cm with attached'
250 ml reservoir.
. '
--~_.

-------
0-39
6.3 Concentrator: 250 or 500 ml Kuderna-Danish evaporative
concentrator equipped, with a 5 or 10 ml receiver ampule
. .'\ ~.... -.... .
and a 3 ball Snyder column. ' ...
7. a Reagents'
Extraction solvent: Pesticide analysis grade CH2C12
(dichloromethane) (Burdick and Jackson or equivaTent)

7.2 Exchange solvents
7.1
7.2.1
Exchange solvent: Pesticide analysis grade
acetone (Burdick and Jackson or equivalent)
Exchange solvent: Iso-octane suitable for
pesticide analysis (Burdick and ,Jackson '
,or equivalent)

7.3 Drying agent: Analytical reagent grade granular
anhydrous Na2S04 (sodium sulfate). Washed with
CH2C12 prior to use.
7.2.2
7.4 Glass.wool that has been extracted with CH2C12
prior to use.
7.5 6N NaOH for pH adjustment.
7.6 6N HCl for pH adjustment.'
7.7 pH paper for pH measurement.
8.0 Procedure
8.1
If low concentrations of pollutants are expected, measure
3 1 of sample for extraction. Otherwise, one 1 is sufficient.
8.2 Measure and record the initial pH. Adjust the pH to 6-8 if
necessary, and record the adjusted pH. '
8.3 Extract the sample with 3 successive extractions of 100, 50
, and 50 ml of CH2C12 for 1 liter samples and 200, 100, 100 ml
of CH2C12 for 3 liter samples. '

If emulsions form, use a wire or stirring rod to break it,
pass the emulsion through glass wool or centrifuge if
necessary. Combine the extracts and measure the volume
recovered. 85 percent constitutes an acceptable recovery.
.-

-------
, "
}':
'.',
, ~.
, "
r;!40- ..'
-,: ~ .~r
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, . .
D-40
8.4 Place a glass wool plug in a drying column and add ca 10 cm
of Na2S04' Wash the Na2S04 with at least 50,m1 of CH2C12'
Pour the combined extract through the column. Follow with
10Q m1 of acetone. Collect the CH2 and acetone and tra~sfer
to a KD assembly. Ad ctlm 1 of iso-octane for 1 1 iter extracts
and 5 m1 iso-octane for 3 liter extracts. .
8.5 Concentrate on a hot water bath at 80-900C until the extract
stops boiling. Quantitatively t~ansfer the receiving tube
contents to a graduated centrifuge tube. Adjust the volume
to 2 or 5m1, by either adding more iso-octane or evaporating
the excess iso-octane under a gentle stream of carbon filtered
air. Transfer to a 12m1 vial and cap with a tef10n lined
cap., (Note: The final extract volume should depend on the
'sample. Extracts containing high concentrations of pollutants
may not require concentrations to 5 m1 while cleaner samples.
may require a final volume of 2 m1). .
9.0 Quality Control
A representative group of the organic pollutants of interest
should be spiked into water and carried through the extraction
procedure, recoveries calculated and compared to literature
values (if available). . .

10.0 Calculations
9.1
10.1
Solvent Recovery:
% recovery = Volume recovered (ml)*lOO/volume added (ml)
.,,-'..
10.2 Pollutant Recovery: .
% recovery - (Concentration measured - initial concentration)*lOO
Concentration added
11.0 Precision and Accuracy
Precision and accuracy vary with the pollutants being measured.
Recoveries range from 48 - 119 percent and precision values
range from 1 to 9 percent relative standard deviation (% RSD).
Typical values are ~5 % RSD. .

12.0 References
11.1
(1) "An EPA GC/MS Procedural Manual-Review Copy", Environmental
Monitoring and Support Laboratory, Cincinnati, Ohio.

-------
..J..",;o'';, , .
. .- .. ":. .
"

.' ~-".:.l.~{'~~-
: t '5
D-41
ATTACHHENT VII

Summary
-------
,..~. . -
. -." - '-. -:.'~- ~.....- '.-,....'~ ~
. - - r
Table 1.
Recoveries for selected organics from tap water for neutral pH extractions.
Name
1 1 extraction - 2500ug/l
% Recoverya
3 1 extractiori 10 ug/l
% Recoveryb

16 :!: 0.3
methyl cellosolve acetate
79 :!: 9
" styrene
99 :!: 1
167:!: 25
328 :t 20
anisole
119 :!: 4
phenol
48 :!: 3
o
o-creso 1
98 :!: 4
105 :!:.0.1
88c
N,N-dimethyl aniline
benzothiazole
108 :!: 5
103 :!: 4
27c
83c ."
butyl carbitol acetate-
86 :!: 69
2,6-dinitrotoluene
119 :!: 53
217 .:!: 2""
a = Values represent results of 3 replicate sample analyses
b = Values represent results of 2 replicate sample analyses.
c = No recovery in one sample, value is result where recovery was observed.
"0
I
" -+=-
N .

-------
0-43
- 3.-
.1, .,'.: ,",
" , '
number of cases of no recoveries.
The limiting factor for detection is
most likely the use of packed column gas chro~atography and could account
.for a large part of the variation.
Recoveries at low levels, however, can
be expected to be more variable due to the. larger samples and extreme
concentration factors required.
Conclusion
Extraction recoveries can be expected to be quite good at high com-
ponent concentrations.
At low levels, 10 ug/l, the variation will be
larger and with packed column gas chromatography, may be unacceptable.*
*Note: GlassCapillary column gas chromatography (GC) was used for quantf-
tation of survey samples lowering the effective GC detection limit by a
factor of ca 10.

-------
D-44
ATTACHt~ENT VI II .
.August, 1978
METHODS: VOLATILE ORGANICS ANALYSES
Purge an d -Ira p . ~'~:iG ctS Ch roma t~g,ra p ~y- M.ass Spec t r0lI!e t ry .,
This method is basically drawn from "Sampling 'and Analysis
Procedures for Screening of Industrial Effluents for Priority
Pollutants", U.S.E.P.A. Environmental Monitoring and Support
,Laboratory, Cincinnati, Ohio, 45268, Mar~h, 1917, revised.
April, 1977, and "Volatile Organic Compounds by GC/MS",
U.S.E.P.A., NEIC, Denver, Co10rado,'80225,Ju1y, 1978.
. ,
Scope
..
. . . .

The Volatile Organics Analyses (VOA) method.isdesigned to
determine "priority pollutants II associated with the Consent.
Decree that are amenable to the purge and trap method. It is .
a gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) method intended
for the qualitative and quantitative determinations of these
compounds. ..

'::~ ,"'. The purge and trap method is complementary to the 1iquid-
: .~~ :liquid extraction method. There is an area of overlap between
,;: '::, ~-the two methods, an d some compoun ds may be an a1yzed by ei the r
; ~ ~method. The efficiency of recovery depends on the vapor pressure
. ~ ,~and water solubility of each compound. The overlap region in
~ general consists of compounds which boil between 1300 and 1500C
; ~. (1 atmosphere pressure), with a water solubility of approximately
'~',. two percent. The method of choice for these overlap region com-
.~ pounds is selected according to overall method efficiency and ..
'Iii:;; ,:~",dependabil i ty: . . .

: ,. .~It", .{" S p e cia 1 A p par a t u s
Tekmar Liquid Sample Concentrator, Model LSC-1; Tekmar
'Company, P.O. Box 37202, Cincinnati, Ohio, 45222..

I Special sorbent trap for LSC: stainless steel tube 1/8~
inch O. D. by 17-cm.; packing from inlet, 1 cm glass wool, 5 cm.
type 15 silica gel, 8 cm Tenax, 60/80 mesh; 3 cm. glass wool.
. ,
GCCo1umn: a 6-ft. by 1/8-inch OD column packed with'
0.2% Carbowax 1500 on 60/80 mesh Carbopack C; manufactured by
Supe1co, Supelco Park" Bellefonte, P,ennsy1vania, 16823.
Standards
For liquid standards, a primary standard solution for each
compound was prepared from 10 u1 of the compound in 10 m1 of
methanol. Concentrations were calculated from the desnjty of
each compound, ~nd a standard mix was prepared by diluting a
calculated volume of each solution (ca 150 ul) together to a .
total volume of 10 m1 in methanol. Due to instability, acrolein

-------
D-45
and acrylonitrile were prepared in a separate standard mix.
. . .
For gaseous standards - only vinyl chloride in this pro-
cedure - a primary standard~solution was prepared by bubbling
the gas into a tared volumetric flask of suitable solvent
(methanol in this instance). The mass increment was measured
and the concentration calculated. As with the liquid standards,
a calculated volume was then diluted for the standard 'mix.
For internal standards, 100 mg each of bromo chloromethane
and 1,4-dichlorobutane were made up to 20 ml in methanol. For
e a c h day 0 f : a n a 1 y s is, 2 Q u 1 0 f t his sol uti 0 n was d i 1 ute d to
1.0 ml in water, and 10 ul of this preparation was added to
each 5 m1sample aliquot, to give 200 ug/1 of each component..
Analysis Procedure

'The helium purge gas flow on a liquid sample concentrator
(lSC) was adjusted to 40 ml/min. and the lSC valve set to the
purge ~osition. The VOA sample was removed from cold storage
and brought up to ambient temperature. . The bottle was ,carefully
opened and the sample water poured into a 5-ml syringe to over- .
flowing. The syringe plunger was replaced 'and the sample volume.
adjusted to 5.0 ml, and the syrin~e valve was closed. A 10 ul
aliquot of the internal standard (IS) mixture was introduced.
into the sample by opening the valve and injecting the IS into
the syringe. An 8-inch needle was attached to the syringe valve',
and the sample was injected into the purging chamber of the'
lSC. The timer of the lSC was set to purge the sample for 12
minutes, with the silica gel-Tenax trap at ambient temperature
( 20- 2 SO C ) .
.
At this time, the oven of the gas chromatograph was brought
to near ambient temperature by opening the oven door with the
heater off. . .

. After the 12-minute purge time t~e sample from the trap wis
injected into the GC by turning the valve to the desorb p~sition
and starting a timer for the analysis cycle (time zero). The
GC-MS data collection was started at one minute; at four minut~s
the desorb was ended by turning the valve back to the purge
position, and simultaneously the GC oven was. closed and the oven
temperature was set at 600C. The temperature program conditions:
isothermal at 600 until 8 minutes; program at 8oC/mm to 1700;
hold at 1700 to the end of the program at.29 minutes.
After the sample purge',.and while data was being collected,
the trap was baked out at 2100C for ten minutes, then allowed to
cool to ambient temperature. Also, the sample tube was removed
from the assembly, washed in methanol and baked out, and replaced
on the lS~ by a cl~an tube.

-------
0-46

Mass Spectrometer Parameters

The mass spectrometer used was a Finnigan. 1015 S/l inter-
faced to aSyst~ms Industrie~ System 150 data system. The
operational parameters include: electron" energy, 70 ev; .mass
~ange, 20-27 and 33-260 amu; integration time/amu, 17 milli-
. seconds; samples/amu, .1. .
GC Column Preparation

The colu~n was connected at the ~nlet, the helium flo~
was adjusted, and the column was bak~d out overnight. - This
column must be handled with care, due to the fragile character
. of the Carbopack. .
MS Calibration
The mass spectrometer was calibrated daily with perfluoro-
tributylamine (FC 43), according to the Finnigan instrument.
mariual. A further calibration check was made with the first
ru~ each day of analysis of a blank with internal standards
added. The mass spectrum of bromochloromethane must meet
these specifications:
m/e
Relative Intensity
, .
49
130
128
51
100 "
65-98
50-75
25-35
~uality Assurance

The analysis of blanks is most important in the purge and
, trap technique, since the purging device and the trap can be
contaminated by residues from very concentrated samples and by
vapors in the laboratory. Blanks are of low-organic water,
prepared by passing distilled water through an activated carbon
column. If positive interferences are observed, the blank is
repeated; if interferences persist, appropriate measures are
taken to elimina~e them before analyses are made.
The precision of the method is determined by running blanks.
dosed with the internal ~tandards, bromochloromethane and 1,4-
dichlorobutane. These compounds represen~ early and late eluters
over the range of the Consent Detree compounds and are not on
the list. . .
Each sample is dosed with the internal standards'and .
analyzed by the set pro~edure. The operator monitors the sensi-
tivity of the system to the internal standards as compared with
blank runs; if the deviation is too great, a sample run is re-
peated. If excess deviation of sensitivity persists, appropriate

-------
r' ,
" :.'} "
. .
D-47
steps are taken by the operator to stabilize the operation.

To determine the pre~ision of.the method, replicate aliquots
of environmental samples"ii'l"e"'analyzed, with at least one set of
replicate analyses made for each group of 2D samples or less
analyzed. Over the course of a survey, replicate analyses are
made on samples which represent the entire range of. concentrations
and interferences found in that survey.
To determine the recovery of the method, ~t least one en-
vironmental sample for each group of 20 samples or less is re-
analyzed after the addition of a spike mixture. The spike con-
centration should approximately double the background concentra-
tion. If the background is negligible, the spike concentration
sould be five to fifteen times the lower detection limit.

The qualitative and quantitative determinations of the
volatile priority pollutants are based upon the characteristic
masses and their relative and absolute intensities, from which
an extracted ion current profile is obtained for each compound.
Details of these determinations are presented in IIComputer-
Assisted Evaluation of Volatile. Organics GC/MS Data", NEIC,
July, 1978.

-------
'/~~
.'"
,,) '.
,.
'J.~~ ! ;~\
i~
',' :~.
,; .
" ;
,
".
'\""
~t .'
,~. '.. ,I:,
"" .
"'~' , ".
.,
'j
.~. c

.' D':'.~~,:;'.>"-,,.. ,..'
. .
ATTACHMENT IX
-' . ""''''-''
. Computer Assisted Evaluation of .
Otganic Priority Poll~tant GS/MS Data
NEIC - September 1978
1.0 Introduction
This procedure is ipplicable to GC/MS data collected under constant
analytical conditions for the organic priority pollutant defined
in "Sampling and Analysis Procedures for Screening of Industrial
Effluents for Priority Pollutants ". (l) ,

2.0 Summary of Method
1.1
2.1
GC/MS data files are processed by location of an internal standard
that is used for response and retention time reference. Components
of interest are then located by reverse searching from library'
spectra.. If a compound is located and the match is sufficient, it .
is quantitated and its spectrum optionally printed. The concen-
trations are then calculated from each component found using a
relative response quantitation technique. .Printed reports of both
quantitative and qualitative results are available.
3.0 Definition.s and Comments
"
Unlike the 3 ion and retention time compound identification tech-
nique described for priority pollutant analysis in reference 1,
this procedure allows the user to audit each identification where
the spectra are printed. Thus, each identification is unambiquous
and marginal data may be eliminated. .

4.0 Interferences
3.1
In some cases, a spectrum may match the library reference.
sufficiently to be passed. During quantitation, however, the ion
of interest may be too weak to locate and no entry will be made in .
the quantitation list. In such a case, no entry at all (e.g. no
"not found" entry) will appear in the quantitation report. The name
and match results will, however, appear in the qualitative data
report.

4.2 Occasionally, multiple peaks will be detected during quantitation
due to background interferences and multiple entries will be made
in the quantitation list. Generally, the entry having the same
label as the torrect spectrum is used for quantitation and the
others are disregarded. In some instances, however, the correct
, selection' is not obvious and manual evaluation of the quantitation'
results must be done.
4. 1

-------
.- .
, ,
f. .
" . ",j. . ~
,t, ,
D-49
.0 Apparatus
. ,-' ~...j .... ":. ~~'" ' .' ..
Finnigan INCaS data system software, Revision
initially setup this procedure, the user must
proficient in the use of MSDS. (2)

.0 Procedure
5.1
3.1 or later. To
understand and be
6.1
Pr'ocedure Setup'
Load the procedures listed in Appendix I into the system
disc or create the procedures from the trace of PPEVAL in
Appendix II. .

6.2 Library Setup
6.1.1
6.2.1
Build userlibrar;es for each analytical class of priority
pollutants (VOAs, base-neutrals and phenols). Appendicies
III, IV and V are library lists of example libraries. The
first entry must always be the internal standard and each
entry must include the quantitation parameters and relative
retention times.
6.2.2 Execute PPEVAL, edit the quantitation list for accuracy and
update the 1 ibrary parameters using commands in IIQUANII.
Using the "LIBR" program, generate .hard copies of 1 ibrary-
spectra for reference. Using the library list editor, .
"EDLL", generate summaries of the entries and quantitation
parameters as in Appendicies III, IV andV.

6.3 Routine Use
6.2.3
6.3.1
Analyze samples, standards and quality control samples using
the same instrument conditions used to set up the libraries.
6.3.2
Using the namelist editor, create a namelis~ containing the
names of the data files to be processed.

6.3.3 Execute the procedure as follows:
PPEVAL library, namelist, yes (no)
Where:
library is the appropriate user library name.

namelist is the list containing the files to be
processed.
yes (no) selects print out of the spectra at a peak that
was identified by the procedure.

6.3.4 Appendix VI is an example of PPEVAL output for a sample con-
taining one internal standard and one component. The lIyesll
option ~'i~S selected.
. -- -~---_._- .

-------
,J
0-50
7.0 Quality Control
7.1. Each identification can be manually audited if'the "yes~1 option
was selected. Inaccurate qualitative results may then be checked
and manually corrected. . .

7.2 Quantitation data accuracy is monitored by use of standard quality
~ontro1 techniques such as daily standardization, replicate analysis
and spikes. (3) Daily calibration of the method can be accorrrnodated.
by analyzing the standard data first, updating the relative response
factors, obtaining hard copy of the new factors (library list editor)
and then analyzing sample data.
8.0 Precision and Accuracy
, 8.1
The overall 'precision and accuracy is limited to the quality of the
raw data being processed.
9.0 References
. . ~-
(1)
"Sampling and Analysis Procedures for Screening of Industrial
Effluents for Priority Pollutants", US EPA, Environmental Mon1toring
and Support Laboratory, Cincinnati, Ohio, ~1arch1977, Revised
April 1977. ...., .
(3)
"INCOS Data System - MSDS Operators Manual - Revision 3", Finnigan
Instruments, March 1978.

"Quality 'Assurance Program for the Analyses of Chemical Constituents'
in Environmental Samples", US EPA, Environmental Monitoring and
Support Laboratory, Cincinnati, Ohio, March 1978. .
(2)
..,
'..
,., .
'. .
. -.---.-

-------
III.
IV.
..
Appendicies
I.
II.
List of procedures, file names, and functions for PPEVAL
Trace of PPEVAL
VOAs library list
Base neutrals library list
V.
VI.
Phenols library list
Example PPEVAL output
0-51

-------
REQUIRED PROCEDURES ~ND METHODS FOR OPER~TION OF PPEVAL .
0-52
PROCEDURE OR METHOD
:t~:!:*>I::I<"'"**:'~I<:I<**:I<:IC
PPEVAL
PPEV~
PPEV8
PPEVC
PPEVD
PPEVE
PPEVF
PPEVG
PPEVH
PR HIP 1
PR fA~2
~;.
ll"'.\.'

~~..~~ .
',""
. ..
, '
1. '1
J;-r ~:
'!
.,.
~~.~: -
. .
~. .
FUNCTION.
**'!O\OIOt<**
IN ITI~L IZATION
DATA FILE PROCESSING LOOP
DATA FILE PROCESSING
LOCATING THE INTERNAL STANDARD
. INTERNAL ~TAND~RD ERROR HANDLER
COMPOUND LOCATER
NOT DETECTED ERROR HANDLER
IDENTIFICATION CHECK
SPECTRA PRINTING
IDENTIFICATiON REPORT HE~DER
INTERNAL STAND~RD ERROR MESSAGE
. .
.
H
X
H
c::I
Z
~
p.,
~
,. .
". .. """'. ,." '. ~.
.. .. -..

-------
., . I ~ ,.
D-53
APPENDIX IIA.
. ...... ....... ..._........._...._..._--....'._~"'''''' ...
... ..... ...,
TRACE OF PROCEDURE PPEVAL
* E~~5~ . '
'" ;(******** PRIORITY POLLUTANT EVALUATION PROCEDURE ********]
* ;(TlHS PROCEDURE MAY BE USED TO EVALUATE GC/MS DATA ]
* ;(FOR PRIORITY POLLUTANT (EPA SECTION 387(A COMPOUNDS]
'" ;[THE PROCEDURE UTILIZES INTERNAL STANDARDS AND RELATIVE ]
* ;[RESPONSE FACTORS FOR QURHTITRTIOH. THE MSDS OPTION ]
'" ;[SEARCH IS USED TO LOCATE AND IDENTIFY PEAKS. THE EPA ]
* ;(IDENTIFICATIOH CRITERIA. E.G.. THREE IONS PER COMPOUHD ]
* ;(.IS USED TO LOCATE THE COMPOUND OF INTEREST. MORE IONS]
* ;(HOWEVER MAY BE USED AS THE FIT OF THE SEARCH ROUTINE WILL]
'" ;[YIELD MORE SPECIFICITY FOR THE COMPOUND. THE FULL ]
* ;(SPECTRUM IS OUTPUT IN ORDER TO PROVIDE CONFIRMATION OF ]
* ;[THE PRESENCE OF THE COMPOUNDS. ]
'" ;[*-",,,,,t.-*~,,,__********,M"'_"'>IuI<""''''''',,,*J
* ;(TO USE PPEVRL. BUILD A LIBRARY CONTAINING THE SPECTRA. OF ]
* ;(THE COMPOUNDS OF INTEREST. INCLUDE THE OUANTITATIVE DATAJ
* ;[THAT IS NECESSARY AS DESCRI8ED IN THE MSDS MANUALS. ]
* ;(CREATE A NA:-oELIST WITH THE NAMES OF THE FILES TO BE ]
* ;(PROCESSED. ExeCUTE THE PROCEDURE AS FOLLOWS: j
* ;( PPEVAL LI8RARYHAME. NAMELIST .YES(NO) ]
* ;[WHERE YES (NO) SELECTS PRINTED SPECTRA OF ACCEPTABLE ]
* ;[MATCHES. E.G. PPEVAL va. SAMPLE
*;( WRITTEN IBAUG7B O.J.LOGSDON II EPA-NEIC 3e3-234-4GGI ]
*;( REVISED BSSEP78 O.J.LOGSDON II EPA-HEIC 383-234-46GI ]
'" ;SETS PPSCAH;EDLL YES(-;$;W;E);EDLL NO(-;W;E)
* ;SETH $2;SET4 51;PPEVA;FEED;BEEP;BEEP;8EEP
*
ERASE
SETS PPSCAN
EDLL YES (-;S;W;E)
EDLL NO (-;W;E)
SETH $2
SET4 $1
PPEVR
* ERASE
* ;(PART OF PROCEDURE PPEVAL .
* ;[GET THE HEXT NAMELIST ENTRY AND CONTINUE PROCESSING
'" ;(AT PPEVB
* ;GETH;PPEV8;LOOP
'"
ERASE
GETN
PPEVB
'" ERASE
'" ;(PART OF PPEVAL. THIS PROCEDURE SETS THE LI8RARY ENTRY ]
'" ;(POINTER TO THE FIRST ENTRY. WHICH MUST ALWAYS BE THE INTERNAL]
'" ;(STANDARD. PPEVC IS THEN CALLED AND THE INTERNAL FOUND ]
'" ;[THE SPECTRUM HU~ER OF THE INTERNAL STANDARD IS ]
'" ;[STORED IN fiB FOR FUTURE REFERENCE. THE LIBRARY POINTER]
'" ;[IS THEN RESET TO THE BEGINNIHG. THE QUANTITATION LIST SET TO ]
'" ;[THE FILE NAME AND EMPTIED OUT. PPEVE IS CALLED TO LOCATE EACH]
'" ;[COMPOUND (IF PRESENT). OUAN IS THEN CALLED TO CALCULATE]
'" ;[THE RESULTS AND THE PROCEDURE RETURNS TO PPEVA TO GET THE ]
'" ;[NEXT FILE TO PROCESS. ]
'" ;FILE(K PRIN.99/N;E)
'" ;EDLL PPLIST(-;W;E)
'" ;SETI *1;PARA(I;H;E);CHROCI;HI.IBSB.3SB;E);SET4 .1;PPEVC;SETI8 114;SET4 .8
* ;SETa $I:EDOL(-;W;E);EDSLC-;W;E);SETL $3;PPEVE;OUANCI:H:E)
* ;EDLL PPLISTCB!I;E)
'" ;?,
-------
0-54
APPENDIX IIB.
""'.. --"."'--" ",'..'."'''''-'-----------'._-~
'!,
CHRO (I;Hl.1esa.3sa;E)
SET4 *1
PPEVC
* ERASE
* ;[PART OF PPEVAL - J
* :[ROUTINE TO FIND AN INTERNAL STANDARD IN ASA~LE ]
* :[USE A REVERSE SEARCH TO LOCATE THE INTERNAL STANDARD]
* ;SETt4 .a
* ;SEAR/VC 1;$:V2Seaaaa;N2.1a.6ea:&;D-6a.6E1:E)-
* ;PPEVD
*
ERASE
SETt4
SEAR
PPE'ID
* IF PPEVD . 114
* :[PART OF PPEVAL ]
* ;[NO INTERNAL STANDARD-FOUND]
* ;PRINC@P2) -
* ;RETU PPEVB
*
IF PPEVD.114
PRIN (@P2)
RETU PPEVB
SETla 114
SET4
SETa $1 -
EDOL (-;W:E)
EDSL (-;IJ;E)
SETL S3-
PPEVE
* :[PART OF PPEVAL ]
* ;[THIS ROUTINE LOCATES COMPOUNDS IN THE ]
* :[SAMPLE FILE BY COMPARING THE SPECTRA IN THE LIBRARY]
* :[IJITH THE SA~PLE. RELATIVE RETENTION TIMES ARE USED]
* ;[AND REFERENCED TO THE INTERNAL STANDARD-FOUND EARLIER.]
* ;[THE LIBRARY POINTER IS BUMPED AND TESTED TO ]
* :[SEE IF THE LAST LIBRARY ENTRY HAS BEEN PROCESSED. ]
* :[THEN THE CURRENT SCAN NUMBER 15 SET TO THE INTERNAL]
* :[STAHDARD LOCATION BY RECALLING THE CONTENTS OF Ila. ]
* ;[STORE THE SCAN NUMBER OF ]
* ;[THE BEST MATCH IN VARIABLE 14 AND ALLOW INTEGRATION]
* : [AT THAT SPECTRUM NUM3ER ONLY- ]
* ;[IF THE CO~DOUHD IS NOT FOUND. PLACE A NOT FOUND]
* ;[ENTRY INTO THE OUANTITATION LIST FOR LATER REFERENCE]
* ;SET4 14...1
* ;IF 124-1.14
* :SETl4 ...,
* ;SETt ! lEI
* :EDLL PPLIST($:IJ:E)
* :SEAR/v(I:$:y.:V2seeaaEl:Nl.la.la:D-2E1.2E1:E)
* :PRIN/KXC!4.2: 114.6: 115.6: 116.7;C:E)
* ;PI'EVF
* ;LOOP
*
SET4 14...1
IF -1124.14
SETt4
SET! 11E1
EDLL PPLIST ($:W;E)
C:SP~ (I :s:.~:\/2s~~ee~;t'1.. !'3..1~;D-1~..2~::)/'J
PR IN C 14.2; ! 14.6: 115.6: 116. 7:C:E) /KX
PPEVF
* [PART OF PPEVRL]
* :[ IF THE FIT 15 LESS THAN OR EOUAL TO 7S9 ]
~ :[U~ITE A NOT DETECTED. NAMED ENTRY INTO THE]
* :COUAHTITRTION LIST FOR FUTURE REFERENCE]
* : PPEVG
* :EDOLC-:N:-:A:E)
* -
(I:$:V2saaaaEl:N2.1E1.6E1E1:&;D-6E1.6E1;E)/V
}.,'
-',
.::
;J.
}:

-------
. .. : :...;. ~;:'I '..:
, I
APP"'WIX IIC"
...-------...-......-..----' -.......-............-....., .--... ..-.'..... "."-.'
- ... - . " . . - . . - '. ...
PPEVG
>I< [PART OF PPEVAL
>I< ;CACCESS ANY SCANS IDENTIFIED IN DETECT
>I< ;[AND INTEGRATE THEIR AREAS. RECORD THE
* ;[DATA IN THE OUANLIST ASSIGNED EARLIER.
* ;[ALSO CHECK AND PASS ONLY PEAKS WITH
* ;[A FIT OF 7Se OR GREATER
* ;IF PPEVG !I6.PPEVG .7ee
>I< ;SETl 114
>I< ;CHROCI;R;$;.:NI.3;A)S.3:G-4.4:D-S.S;E)
>I< ;PPEVH
>I< : RETU PPEVF
*
IF PPEVGI16.PPEVG.7ea
SETl 114 .
CHRO (I;R;$;.:NI.3;A)S.3;G-4.4;D-S.S;E)
PPEVH
>I< IF 126 PPEVH.PPEVH
* ;SPECC";N;H;E)
*
IF PPEVH!26.PPEVH
SPEC C";N;H:E)
RETIJ PPEVF
EDOL (-;N;#;A;E)
LOOP
QUAN CI;H;E) ,
EDLL PPLIST CBII;E)
PR IN (@P 1)
FILE CC PRIN.99/N.M: ;E)
FEED
BEE?
LOOP
FEED
BEE?
BEEP
BEEP
D-55
_.. . ...... -. .. .....
]
]
]
]
]
;J

-------
0:'56
APPENDIX IID.
,
,----~-------------_._-_. --.....'
PRINP2.ME = C20;T;
C;T;
C;T;
;E
P?-IORITY POLLUTANT EVALUATION;
1'10 INTERNAL STANDARD WAS FOUND HI SAMPLE; $1;
;D;F
J . ~~----_...__. ------------..---. .
FILE:
.....-......,
PRINP1.ME a C2;T;IDENTIFICATION REPORT
;$1;C2;T;NO SCAN PURITY FIT
;C;E

-------
 11_1.1  RET ~ BAS""AREA~..I ..2 " - I"H4.o.;'8JI ~01J.E)~ - .. u.~_u.u~~
 r FORttJLA     O. 
 . RET. 11 f"E/CAS. t1ISS AMT. REF.PEAK  RESP.FILE RESP.FACTOR               
                 va IB: 338 1.2-TRAHS-D1CHLORO-I-PROPEHE     
                 liB C3.H4.CL2  2:34  15 B. B.BOB B.oao
  I.  1.4-DICHLOROBUTAHE (IHTERHAL STAHDARD)          o.ooa 15.00a20a.aa va I  \IS I. aoo 
 Ii C4.HB.CL2   3:3a  55 a. O.BOO o.aoo  ..c            
    1.000 55.0a020a.oa \II I   C I.aoa   .... va 191 3B  E~YlBEHZEHE      
                .... 106 ca.HIO    o:aa  91 O. a.ooa 0.000
  2:  BROMOCHLOROMETHAHE (IHTERHAL STAHDARD)      ....    B.OoO 91. oa02aa. oa va I  \IS , I. oao 
 J C.H2.CL.OR   B:44 130 B. 0.000 o.BaB  ..:            
    ....            
   0.000 49.000200.0a \10 I   \IS I.oaa   ~ va 213: 44  METHYlEHECHLOR1DE      
                '" 84 C.H2.CL2   B:04  B4 B. a.aaa a.aoa
                '"   
  3: 02 ACROLIEH            ~    B.OOO B4.0a02aa.00 va I  \IS I. aoa 
 ; C3.H4.0    a:Ba  56 a. a.aOB B.Boa             
    O.OOB 56.aaa20a.aa va I   \IS I.oaa    'va 21: 41  8ROMOFORM       
                 2sa C.H.8R3   3.B2 113 B. B.Baa B.aea
  4: a3 ACRYlOHITRILE               O.aOB 113.aaa20a.aa va I  \IS I.oaa 
 J C3.H3.H    a:oo  53 B. 0.000 0.000              
    0.1)00 53.0002BO.00 va I   \IS 1.00B    va 22: 48  BROMODICHLOROMETHAHE      
                 162 C.H.CL2.0R  1:59  83 B. B.OOB O.OOB
  5: 04 BEHZEHE                B.C00 B3.00020a.0a va I  \IS I.BaB 
 .] C6.H6    2: 19  18 B. B.Bao O.OOB              
    B.OBO 78.00a2BO.Ba va I   \15 I.aaa    'va 23: 49  TRICHLOROFLUOROMETHAHE      
                 136 C.CL3.F   B: 19 1131 a. a.aaB B.oaB
  6. 136 CAR80HTETRACHLORIDE              a.a00 10 I. 13130200 . 1313 \10 I  \15 I.aaa 
 2 C.CL4    1:45 117 a. a.aaa a.aaa              
    a.aoo 117.aoa2BB.aa \10 I   \IS I. 01313    va 24: 51  D1BROMOCHLOROMETHAHE      
                 2B6 C.H.CL.BR2  2132 129 a. a.oaa a.aBa
  7: 06 CHLOROBEHZEHE               o.Baa 129.aaa2aa.Ba va I  \IS I. aea 
 2 C6.HS.CL   3:5a. 112 a. a.aee a.aea              
    B.aae 112. oe02ea. aa va I   \IS I. eao    va 25: 85  TETRACHLOROETHEHE      
                 164 C2 . CL4   3:22 166 O. B.aoa B.aBB
  B: IB 1.2-DICHLOROETHAtlE              a.OBa 129.0aB20a.ao va I  \IS I. aBB 
 '3 C2.H4.CLZ   1:26   62 B. B.BBa B.aaa              
    O.OOB 6Z.000200.BB va I   \IS I.Bea    va 26: B6  TOLUEHE       
                 92 C7.HB    3:29  91 e. a.oaa e.aoo
  9: II 1.1.I-TRICIILOROETHAtlE              B.oao 91.Ba02aB.BO \10 I  \15 I.oaa 
 ,2 C2.H3.CL3   1:41  97 B. O.Boa 13.13013              
    a.aOB 97.DoaZOO.aB \10 I   \IS I.BBa    \10 27: 87  TRICHLOROETHEHE      
                 13a C2.H.CL3   2:213 13a a. B.aoa B.aBa
  la: 13 I.I-DICHLOROETHAHE              B.aBB 95.aae2aa.aa VO I  \IS I.aaa 
 '3 CZ.H4.CL2   a:S2   63 B. ' a.aao . 13.131313              
    a.ooa 96.00a20a.0a \/0 I   \IS I. Doa               
I  II: 14 1.1.2-TRICHLOROETHAHE                      
i :z C2.H3.CL3   2:32   97 B. a.aaa a.aaa              
   o.ooa 03.aBa20a.oa va I  \IS I. aaa               
  12. 15 1.1.2.2-TETRACHLOROETHAHE                     
 '6 C2.HZ.CL4   3:27   B3 a. B.oaa 13.131313              
    a.aOB 83.aBa200.00 va I   \IS I. ooa               
  13: 23 CHLOROFORM                       
 B C.H.CL3    1:2B   83 a. a.aoa ' a.oaa              
    0.aoa B3.0BB200.aB va I  \IS I. Boa                
  14: 29 I.I-DICHLOROETHEHE                      
 '6 C2.H2.CL2   B:29   61 a. a.aaa B.aaa              
    0.00a 96.aoa2Ba.aa va I  VS I.Baa               
  IS. 30 I. Z-TRAIIS-D I CHLOROETHEliE                     
 " C2.H2.CLZ   I:al   96 a. a.aoa a.aaa              
    a.aOB 96.aa0zaa.aa va  I  \IS I.aaa               
  16. 32 I. 2-D ICHLOROPROPAtlE                      
 2 C3.H6.CLZ   2: II   63 a. a.aaa a.aaB              
    a.ooa 63.aaa2BB:aa va  I \IS I. aaa               
  17. 33A 1.3-CIS-D1CHLORO-I-PROPEHE                     
..'
....
....
....
'..:
....
c
z
'"
'"
'~
'='
I
c.T1
'-.I

-------
 .I~..: hH.~           0148 CI2.H~.O.U~  J:.U G:>eI .... Y.I.IVU U.",vu  
 I ORI'tJLR  REf TINE BASE RRER U.P..I U.P..2    0.B93 24B.000 2a.ae BH 1  .S 0.153   
 REf. TlNE/CRS. mss RMT. REF.PERK  RESP.FILE RESP.FRCTOR               
             81'1 IB: 42 BISI2-CHLOROISOPROPYLIETHER       
             170 C6.HI2.0.CL2  0:43  45 O. e.aaa a.aea  
 I:  Dle-RHTHRRCEHE IIHTERHRL STRHDRRDI        a.193 45.eOa 5a.ae BH I  .S e.664   
      3:44 IBB 44B64. a.aoa B.aaa             0 
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, C6.H4.CL2   0141 146 0, o.aea o,oeo              
   0.\B3 146.00e 20.00 BH  I :5 0.706   BH 27: 67 BUTYLBENZYLPHTHRLRTE        
             312 CI9.H20.04  5.27  149 O. 0.000 0.000  
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; C6.H4.CL2   0:34  146 o. o,oee o.eeo              
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   II.B03 165.0~0 511,00 BH  I ,5 11.191   8N 30. 70 DIETHYLPHTHALRTE        
             222 CI2.HI4.04  3:04  149 O. II.IIOS II.SSO  
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   D.744 165.eoo 50.De BH  I .5 1I.IB4   81'1 31. 71 DIMETHYLPHTHRLATE        
             194 Cla.Hlo,04  2',4e  163 o. 11.000 o.aao  
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             228 C19.H12  6.14  229 II. 0.000 a.aoa  
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             228 CIB.HI2  6114  228 II. lI.aos II.OSII  
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   0.799 204.00e 20.00 BH  I :S 1I.28S   91'1 34: 77 RCENAPHTHYLENE        
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I. 000
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17B.IIIIO 20.ae
3:" 17B - O. -"aa . ilia
BH I .5 1.433
-
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36: BO FLUOREHE        PH  I:  Dle-RHTHRRCEHE (IHTERHRL 5TRHDARD)     
CI3.HIO   3:00 166 e. a.eoe a.aoo  IBB      2:43 IBB 44B64. a.oao 13.131313 
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   >       
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CI4.HIO   3:44 17B e. a.aaa a.aae H        1:46 196 a. 0.0013 0.0130 H
  Q 196 C6.H3.0.CL3   Q
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    w      w
         '"              '"
30: 84 P'(REHE       ~ PH  3: 22 .4-CHLORO-3-METHYLPHEHOL       ~
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          PH 4, 24 2-CHLOROPHEHOL       
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1.0

-------
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'igi'
'~'~,
-"-".
......
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"';"
.tit
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, ,\~
. ,~,.
..".
','
;.
.:;:',.
",
~~~~....r:A..: ~~
,.'~'\
~'. .
APPENDIX VIA.
.. . ----...
. -..----........--
CUANTITATION REPORT
, FILE: St'.A$A
DATA: SMA$A.MI
a:ee:aa
SAMPLE: VCA STD MIX A WI.S.
CONDS. :
FORMULA:
SU8MI~D 8V:
SEPT 3. 1978

INSTRUMENT: SVSIND
AN~L '?ST: '
tJEIGHT:
ACCT. NC.:
a.eeB
AMOUNTmAREA * REF.AMNT/(REF.AREA* RESP.FACT)
NO NAME
I 1.4-DICHLOROBUTANE (INTERNAL STANDARD)
2 BROMOCHLOROMETHAtiE (iNTERtiAL STANDARD)
3 a2 ACROLIEN
4 a3 ACRYLONITRILE
5 a4 BENZENE
6 136 CARBOHTETRACHLOR'IDE
7 137 CHLOR08ENZEtiE
8 la I.2-DICHLOROETHANE
9 11 1. 1. I-TRICHLOROETHANE
la 141.1.2-TRICHLOROETHAHE
11 IS 1.1.2.2-TETRACHLOROETHANE
12 19 2-CHLOROETHYLVINYLETHER
13 23 CHLOROFORM
14 3a 1. 2-TRAtiS-DICHLORCETHENE
15 32 1.2-DICHLOROPROPANE
16 38 ETHYLSENZEHE
17 44 METHYLENE ,CHLORIDE
18 47 BROMOFORM
19 48 BROMOD ICHLOROtlETHANE
2a 51 D18ROMOCHLOROMETHANE
21 85 TETRACHLOROETHENE
22, 86 TOLUENE
23 87 TRICHLOROETHEHE
24 88 VItiYL CHLORIDE
25 29 1.I-DICHLOROETHENE
NO M/E SCAN TIME REF RRT METH AREA AMOUNT ?TOT 
1 S5 251 4:11 1 1. eea A BB 1191esa. 2ea.eea PP8 4.55 
2 49 75 1:15 1 13.299 A B8 112eS8a. 2ea.eea UG/L 4.55 
3 NOT FOUND        
4 HOT FOUND        
5 78 175 2:55 1 a.697 A 89 17341113. 2ee.eea UG/L 4.55 
6 117 139 2: 19 1 13.554 A Ba 1242116. 2aa.aaa UG/L 4.55 
7 112 272 4:32 1 l.a84 A 88 194475a. 2ae.aea UG/L 4.55 
B 62 117 1 :57 1 13.466 A BB 11155Ia. 2ee.aaa UG/L 4.55 
9 97 134 2: 14 1 6.534 A 88 12548213. 2ae.aae UG/L 4.55 
Ie B3 '189 3:69 1 8.753 A 8e 8a5288. 2ea.eea UG/L 4.55 
11 83 247 4:e7 1 a.934 A 89 1293270. 2ae.eae UG/L 4.55 
12 106' 260 3:26 1 a.797 A Ba 119882. 2aa.a6e UG/L 4.55 
13 83 lea 1 :48 1 a.433 A 8B 16127513. 2aa~aea UG/L 4.55 
14 96, 88 1:28 1 6.351 A 88 774512. 280.80a UG/L 4.55 
15 63 167 2:47 1 a.665 A 8e la38S6a. 2013.13013 UG/L 4.55 
16 91 3136 5:136 1 1. 219 A i38 2419713. 28EL 8ea IJG/L 4.55 
17 84 45 13:45 1 8.179 A 88 56a656. 2eEl.8ea UG/L 4.55 
18 173 221 3:41 1 8.880 A 89 1054980. 2E1Ei.ao~ UG/L 4.55 
19 83 153 2:33 1 EI.610 A 89 161314B. 20e.eaa UG/L 4.55 
2a 129 189 3:89 I 0.753 A 88 1452530. 2aa.aoe UG/L 4.55 
.........- .. -'~... ~.. ",-",,,,--,,,,-'.-"--------'- -.---....-- -........, "  --.." .. -. . . .
1'10 M/E SCAN TIME REF RRT METH AREA AMOUNT 7.TOT 
21 129 243 4:El3 1 13.968 A 88 le~9630. 2ea.ooa UG/L 4.55 
22 91 251 4:11 1 1.0aa A 88 187952B. 20a.00o UG/L 4.55 
23 95 178 2:53 1 B.7e9 A 88 999815. 2130.8130 UG/L 4.55 
24 HOT FOUND        
25 96, 63 I:B3 1 1.251 MXX 55884. 2eO.aoe UG/L 4.5S? 
~()A1vrnfj7/iJ/il POf2. mil
, C,)J~1rcU/Ji:) N4IVu1LLyItD/)ED
-, of2-
..------...-

-------
ATTACHMENT X
. D-61 .~
Organic Compoun~. I,gentification, by,Glass
Capillary Gas Chromatography/Mass 'Spectrometry
1.
Scope and Application
1.1
2.
3.
4.
This method is applicable to surface waters and industrial
effluents.
1.2 The limit of detection for this method varies from 1 to 10
ug/1 (ppb) depending on the type of compound.

1.3 The concentration range is from 1 to 100 ug/1 (ppb):
Summary of Method
2.1
Concentrated extracts of 1 to 3 liter water samples are injected
into a glass capillary column gas chromatograph directly coupled
to a quadrupole mass spectrometer thru a small diameter heated
stainless steel glass lined tubing. A sp1it1ess inject10n tech-
nique is used. Initial identification is ~stablished us~ng a
routine computer search of a library of standard reference spectra.
The identification is 'confirmed by comparing the mass spectra of
reference standards, analyzed using the same instrumental con-
ditions. The coincidence of the gas chromatography retention
times of standards and sample components provides additional
confirmation of identity.
Interferences
Concentrated solvent extracts often contribute interferences
and a method blank is always run to dffferentiate reagent con-
tamination from sample components~

3.2 Common solvent interferences are: diacetone alcohol (4-methy1-
4-hydroxy-2-penta~one) from acetone, phthalates from sodium
sulfate, and cyclohexene from dichloromethane.
3.1
Apparatus
4.1
Finnigan Model 9500 gas chromatograph equipped with a glass
capillary column.
4.1.1
Grob type injector for splitless injection.
4.1.2 Capillary glass column, 25 meters x 0.25 mm 10, OV-10l.
.. -..... .
-...-----

-------
0-62'
, ,
"
"
,
f
'f'
A'
. '
"
'-II
. '
.~.. .
i
, .
4.2
Finnigan Model 3200 electron
i '
impact mass spectrometer.'
. I '
steel tubing~ direct coupling
Glass lined stainless
to gas chromatograph.

4.3 Finnigan INCOS data system (1).
4.2.1
5.
Procedure
5.1
Gas Chromatography
5.1.1
5.1.2
Inject 1 u1 of sample into the gas chromatograph with
the splitter turned off for 1 minute after injection
then-turn on. (Splitter flow 100 ~l/min).

The initial column temperature is equilibrated at GOoC
and held for 1 minute after injection, then a temperature
program is initiated at 40C/min. to a final' temperature
of 2200C and held from 10 to 15 minutes. Column flow
is adjusted to give a nominal flow of 1.5 ml/min. at
10QoC.
5.2 Mass Spectrometry
5.2.1
The following MS instrumental parameters are used:
Electron multiplier voltage
Lens voltage' '
Collector voltage
Extractor voltage
Ion Energy voltage
Electron Energy voltage
Emission Current
1600 volts
100 volts
35 vo lts
6 volts
10 volts
70 volts
0.5 ma
,..
5.2.2 The following data acquisition parameters are used:
5.2.3
5.2.4
Scan time - 2 sec.
Mass Range - 33-300
Sensitivity - 10-7 amp.
The data acquisition is initiated immediately upon
injection of a sample into the gas chromatograph in
a suspended mode with the ionizer turned off. At 4
minutes the ionizer is turned on and at 5 min. the
data acquisition is changed from the suspended mode
to the centroid mode and actual data collection begun.
A normal analysis using the 25 meter capillary OV-10l
column will require data collection for 35 to 40 minutes.

A reconstructed ion chromatogram is generated using the
MSDS program system and specific spectra are then plotted.
A manual computer search of the reference library gives
an identification. The initial identification is then
cOnfirmed by comparison of sample spectra and reference
spectra obtained by analyzing standards under the same
instrumental conditions. '
. "--'-
"

-------
, .
"",..,'"','.:!oof
,", " "
0-63
6.
Qua 1 ity Control
6.1
Daily calibration of the-'GCjHS is performed before any sample
analysis using a standard reference compound. (Pufluorotri-
butylamine-FC-43)~
6.2 The reference compound is metered into the mass spectrometer
via a variable leak valve at a constant rate. Several scans
are recorded at a scan rate of 3 seconds and a sensitivity. of
10-6 amps. The calibration is then made utilizing the MSDS
system calibration routine.
6.3 An ion intensity ratio of 2 to 1 for mass 69 to mass 219 is
desirable for good spectra using the capillary system. The
ion intensity ratio can vary from 3 to 1 to almost 1 to 1 and
still provide legitimate spectra. .
7.
References
(1)
II INCOS Data System - r1SDS Operators Manua 1 - Revi s i on 3",
Finnigan Instruments, March 1978.

-------
1'-64 .
ATTACHMENT XI
. ..,. ...''''.
~..
CCMPUTER ASSISTED EVALUATION OF -
ORGANICS CHARACTERIZATION .GC/MS DATA

August 1978
1. 0 This procedure is applicable to OC/MS data collected under constant
analytical conditions for sualitative data analysis.
2.0 Surm1ary of Methcd
-.,7
2.1 GC;MS data files are processro by comparing spectra fraTI the
s&"Itple against spectra of known or suspectro pollutants con-
tainro in a project related library. - If a spectrum rratches
the project library spectrum sufficiently, an entry is rrade in
a table showing at what spectrum number the ~tch occured and
how gocd the match was. .After canpletion of the search for
each spectrum in the proj ect library, a list of the ccrnpounds
searchro for arrl the matching results is printro as well as
each ?pctrumthat was identifiro as a probable pollutant'.
-to.
If
, ,-
selectro by the user, the procroure will then search the cur-
rent version of the NB (EPA/NIH/MSOC) library attempting to
identify unknown spectra fran peaks selectro by the Biernann-
Billleralgorithin in MAP.
3.0 Def ini tions am Ctmnents
3.1
In some cases, canpounds may be identified by canparison to
external reference spectra only (1;2,3).
These "unconfirme:i"
compourrl data may however be useful since the computer matching
still'traces the presence of selected canpounds through each
sample analyzed"
Therefore, even these "unconfirmed" pollu-
tants can serve to trace a waste stream.

-------
3.2
. ~ !.pf .~ _,-14" )\
. .'1 ,:,\:(f' ..', ,,(
, ". -j.
." .'
. 'J.; ': .
. ,'.'
'.
" ,'"':", -..':- ,Ii ,.".
-w.'" . ''70'
D-65
Quantitation of FOllutants identified is effecte:i by locating.
the correspondir,g GCpeaJunds.
SUch
identities are indicate:i by "CF."
3.4
COITIfX'nents not identified by rrass spectranetry are rep:>rte:i as
"00" to denote not detected.
3.5 Analytical schemes may not allow measurement of some suspected
,
pollutants in all samples and the result is reported as "NA"
or not analyzed.
Interferences
4.1
Since absolute GC retention times' are used for setting the search
windows, the windows must be wide enough to account for slight
variations in instrument concH tions.
This could cause identi-
fication errors if compounds with similar spectra (isomers) are
in the window.
Manually checking each spectrum produced essen-
tially eleminates any error.

-------
. .0-66'
5.0 Apparatus
5.1 Finnigan n-x:os data system sofbvare rurining revision 3.1 or
later version.
To initially set up this proce::lure, the user
must understarrl and be proficient in the use of MSDS (4).
5.2 Th'COS "NE" mass spectra library (5).
6.0 proce::lure
6.1 Procedure Setup
6.1.1 wad the proce::lures liste::l in apperrlix 1 onto' the sys-
tan disc or create the procedures fran the trace of OCEVAL
~,.
in Appendix 2.
6.2 Library Setup
Hl~
6.2.1 Obtain spectra of the ccmpo\J.l'Xls of interest by' running.
standards under the same analytical cordi tions to be
used for sample analysis.
..
. '
6.2.2 Using the library editor, create a library containing
the standard spectra with chemical names and retention
t}'"
times.
Obtain a reference spectrum of each library
entry for a permanent record and reference via the li-
brary program:
Gli HSi G2i HSi... etc.
6.3 Routine use
6.3.1 Collect mass spectra of samples to be processed under.

the same conditions as the standards were analyze::l.
6.3.2
Using the namelist editor, create a namelist containing
the names of the files to be processe::l.
6 . 3. 3
Execute the procedure:

-------
. .'. . ";. ;..
D-67
CCEVAL library; namelist,- no - (yes)
Where:
library is the user library name, namelist is
the file containing the names of the data files
to be precessed and no or yes select a contin.led
search through the NB library.
If the user wants only to perform an NB search,
the procedure is initiated as follows:
CCEVAL NB, namelist
6.3.4 Appendix 3 is an e.,
-------
0..68'
.':;0
9.0 References
(1) "Eight Peak Index of r-lass Spectra," Mass Spectranetrj Data Cen-
ter, Alderrnaston, Reading, UK. Second Edition 1974.
(2)
'.'Registry of Mass Spectral Data, II Stenhagen, Abramsson ar.d
McLafferty, Wiley & Sons, New York, 1974.
"Atlas of Mass Spectra Data," edited by:
SteI}hagen, Abraharns-
, (3)
son and McLafferty, wiley & sons, New York, 1969.
(4) "Th'COS Data System - MSDS Operators Manual - Revision 3, II Fin-
nigan Instruments, March 1978
(5) liNES - NIH/EPA/MSOC Library - Revision 3, II Finnigan'Instruments,
, '
March 31, 1978
::1
(.
",
. .

-------
0-69
APPENDIX 1.
. .
. ~ " . ! :. .
PROCEDURES AND ~~THODS REQUIRED FOR OCEVAL
1. OCEVAL
2. OCEVO
3: OCEV1
4. OCEV2
. 5. OCEV2A
6. OCEV2B
7. OCEV3-
8. OCEV5
9. OCEV6
10. OCEV7
11. PRINOl.ME
12. PRIN02.HE

-------
.D-70
APPENDIX II.
a.
- '" .__e, ..-. "" --'."'-' ...".,......" ." ..... "..
--."""",'."'" .
. ''''''..
'"
':.'~~~
TR~CE OF PP.OCED1J~E OCE\'~L
* [:I<'.jCk* OCE'v'AL **,1<'.jC1:~'Y.":":C!<::"::;--''<:'!< JULY 29.1978 _>lCk]
:IC ;[OCEV~L PROVIDES TH~ CPE'mIEtn.]
'" :[TO USER THE PP.OCEDU~E. C2EATE A LI8RARY]
'" :CWITH THE SPECT~A AND RE",NTiON TItlES. CREAR A]
'" ;nIiW:ELlST CGNTAINII'IG T:iE; ?ILE TO BE ?ROCSSScD.]
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>!< :[TriEtI: >CCEVAL XY.liAI'1::L:3T.r/OCYES)
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* :[ NAtlELlST IS fHE :!,~I'I!LI5T COtITAINING TriE FILES]
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* :[ IF TriE U3E~ :ELECTED THE NB LIO~HRY]
* ;'( INITIALLY NO ENTRY IS REQUIRED] .
. '" ;[LAST REVISED 9/27/78 OJLOGSDOHII]
*;SET411
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APPENDIX II. b.
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SETS OCEV2
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SETS OCEVI
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MAP (I;FI;UI88;V25~~:C;33.3~O;N>2.S.7;Hl.2880.SC~;E)
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FILE (K PRIH.99/N;E)
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.--..
0-71

-------
"
0-72
APPENDIX II. c.
'...'..'. .. - .
.1"
~
'" ;FEED
",'
SETL 53
aCEV6 '
'" IF aCEVG o2S0ae.OCEV6 !24
'" ; IF OCE'/5 !:6.0CE'/5
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*
IF OCEYG~~2Se30.0CEV6!24
IF OCEV5!26.0CEV5
RHU OCEV6 '
SET
-------
PR!NOl.~ = C;D;T;
;;:;I:C2;T;
.;D;C2;E
. --. --- .- .... ..- - .
PRIN02.M~ = C2;T;
;C;E
D-73
. APPENDIX II: d ~
O~:~:~~: ~ cs
CiiAi
-------
  \JT FORMULR
VI 1: 126 C4.H8.CL2
VI 2: 128 C.H2.CL.8R
VI 3: 56 C3.H4.0
VI 4: 53 C3.H3.N
VI 5: 78 C6.H6
VI 6: 152 C.CL4
VI 7: 112 C6.HS.CL
VI 8: 9a C2.H4.CL2
VI 9: 132 C2.H3.CL3
VI H': 132 C2.H3.CL3
VI 11: 166 C2.H2.CL4
VI 12: 186 C4.H7.0.CL
VI 13: 118 C.H.CL3
VI 14: 96C2.H2:CL2
VI 15: 96 C2.H2;CL2
VI 16: 112 C3.H6.CL2
VI 17: 186 C8.HI8
VI 18: 84 C.H2.CL2
VI 19: 258 C.H.8R3
VI 28: 162 C.H.CL2.8R
VI 21: 266 C.H.CL.BR2
Vt 22: 164 C2.CL4
VI 23: 92 C7.H8
VI 24: 1313 C2.H.CL3
VI 25: 62 C2.H3.CL
IDENTIFICRTION REPORT
NO SCRN PURI1Y F.IT
1 251 4za 864
2 75 819 978
3 53 41 43
4 45 43 284
5 176 615 9413
6 139 841 977
7 272 778 9613
8 117 673 994
9 134 765 9Bl
16 189 4EJ6 979
11 247 606 964
12 2613 . 643 959
13 188 825 984
14 6?;s.g: 789 988
15 89 786 977
16 167 726 977
17 387 758 995
18 45 781 976
19 221 798 9421
2EJ 153 837 995
21 183 417 945
22 243 835 961
23 251 565 955
24 177 525 981
25 " 8 0
FILE: D:SMR$R;MI
HRME
02
03
04
06
06
18
11
14
15
19
23
29
313
32
38
.44
47
48
51
85
86
B7
88
1.4-DICHLOR08UTRNE (INTERNRL STRNDAR
BROMOCHLOROMETHANE (INTE~NRL STRNDRR
RCROLIEN
RCR'I1...0H I TR ILE
BENZENE
CRRBONTETRRCHLORID~
CHLOR08EHZEHE
1.2-DICHLOROETHRNE
1. 1. I-TRICHLOROETHANE
1.1.2-TRICHLOROETHRNE
1.1.2.2-TETRRCHLOROErrlRNE
2-CHLOROETH'I1...VIN'I1...ETHER
CHLCROcORM
I.I-DICHLOROETHEHE
1.2-TRANS-DICHLaROEr.~ENE
1.2-DICHLOROPROpAHE
ETH'I1...BENZEHE
METH'I1...ENECHLORIDE
BROMOFORM
8ROMODICHLOROMETHRNE
DIBROMOCHLOROMETHANE
tEtRACHLOROETHEHE
TOLUEHE
TRICHLOROETHENE
VIN'I1... CHLORIDE
"
'.
Spectra printouts. deleted
to conserve paper.

-------
." - "- .-- .-'.
B/tJO'"O!!
NAM NUM:
39
39
39
39
39
39
39
39
39
39
39
39
39
39
39
39
39
39
39
39
39
39
39
39
39
39
39
1 :
2:
3:
4:
5:
6:
7:
8:
9:
Ia:
11:
12:
13:
14:
IS:
16:
17:
18:
19:
20:
21 :
22:
23:
24:
25:
26:
27:
HUM SPEC~
1 0
2 e
3 0
4" 221
5 0
6 a
7 0
8 I)
9 0
10 a
11 a
12 a
13 a
14 a
IS 696
16 696
17 928
18 a
19 a
2E1 a
21 48E!
22 602
23" 0
2.1 0
2S 0
25 2G7
27 0
~~",~~-r.:p./~ ~.' Il'~"
',' ..,..1:' ..
".\ "
) . . ".."~
. '", . "
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D-75
APPENDIX III.
. .-.... .............
~_.... ..,.. . ,,""~"~._'
.",.- . .'. -' . ,.. " - '.
a/oeae
0:eo:S~IAL (NC)
2.6-DI~~THYL-4-~EPTA~OL OR 5 NaNA~OL (
D ICHLOROBEN2ENE ISOt'=~ (HC)
2-ETHYL-l-HE:~ANOL (NC)
ISOPHOii!ONE (NC)
BUTYL CAR91TOL (NC)
POL V GL VCOL ETHER (NC UI'IKNOl.."I)
I-PHENYL-I-PROPAtim:E (NC)
BIPHENYL (NC)
f'~!E~IYL Err!ER OR HYDROXY BIPHENYL (tiC)
DIETHYL PHTHALnTE (NC)
PO'_Y GLVCOL ElliE~ (HC UNKNOWN)
2.5-DI-TE?-T-8UTYL-P-CRESOL (NC)
4(lH)-PYRIMIDHIONE (HC)
UNKNOI..,li PEAK A
Ut::
-------
APPENDIX E
Bacteriological Methods

-------
E-3
Bacteriological Methods
Bacteriological analyses of fecal coliform bacteria densities
were performed according to standard procedures using the Most
Probable Number technique*.
Using asceptic techniques, all samples
were collected in sterile bottles prepared by the accepted procedure.
." ,.
. ....,
Replicate analyses wa:s performed for quality control purposes;
these data showed very good control and are available in the NEIC
laboratory files.
* Rand, M. et al, 1975. Standard Methods for the Examination
of Water andlWastewater. 14th Ed. APHA - AWWA - WPCF, 1193 pp.

-------
APPENDIX F
MUTAGEN ASSAY METHODS

-------
F-3
Mutagen Assay Methods
I.
Sample Extraction
A 4:1 (80% bezene, 20% isopropanol) mixture.of solvents was placed
in a clean, 1 gallon amber solvent bottle and continuously stirred during
the extraction procedure to assure adequate mixing.
For basic extractions, l-liter portions of sample were adjusted above
pH 12 with NaOH; Each 1 liter aliquot was extracted three times (5 minutes
each) with 35 ml of fresh solvent. The solvent fraction was then separated,
mixed with anhydrous sodium sulfite to remove any emulsion and filtered
into a one-liter round bottom flask. The aqueous fraction 'was retained
for acidic extraction.
The combined solvent fractions (35 ml x liters of sample extracted)
were evaporated to dryness at 50C in a rotoevaporator. The residue was
resuspended into 15 ml sterile dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), labeled and
stored at 4C until assayed by the Ames Procedure.
II.
Bacterial Mutagenicity Assay
The Standard Ames Bacterial Assay was performed using the plate
incorporation assay as described by Ames, et al*. Acid and basic sample
extracts were screened with standard Salmonella typhimurium tester strains
TA 98, TA 100, TA 1535 and TA 1537. Samples were first tested individual-
ly; if the sample extract demonstrated on elevated reversion rate, a dose-
response relationship between concentration of sample extract and number
of revertant colonies was determined for each responsive tester strain.
* Ames, B.N., McCann, J., and Yamasaki, E., Methods for Detecting
Carcinogens and Mutagens ~ith' the Salmonella/Mammalian-Microsome
Mutagenicity Test. t1utation Research, 31 (1975) 347-364.

-------
F-4
Samples exhibiting a negative mutagenic.response were subjected to
metabo1 ic activation by addition of S-9 mix (supernatant from 9000 xg
centrifugation of rat liver homogenate). The Bacterial Assay was then
repeated as described above.
III. Quality Control
A three-liter volume of sterile distilled water was added to a
1-ga110n amber glass bottle and treated as a sample. This served as a
blank on the sample bottles, distilled water, extracting solvents, emulsion
removal, and the concentration process. A DMSO blank was tested to ensure
. ..

- that the material did not interfere with test results.
..
The tester strains, TA 1535, TA 1537, TA 98 and TA 100, were exposed
to diagnostic mutagens to confirm their natural reversion character~stics.
The strajns were tested for ampicillin resistance, crysta1~vio1et sensitiv-
ity, and histidine requirement. Spontaneous reversion rates were tested
with each sample analyzed.
'., ".
. .."
. 1':~
"
Rat liver homogenate was tested with 2-aminof1uorene against strains
TA 98 and TA 100 to confirm the ~etabo1ic activation process. Sterility
checks were performed on solvents, extracts, liver preparation, and all
culture media.

-------
APPENDIX G
BIOASSAY METHODS

-------
G":3
B IOASSA Y METHODS
Toxicity tests consisted of 96-hour bioassays performed according to
EPA standardized methods (EPA-600l43-78-0l2).
A continuous flow propor-
"tional diluter was used which provided a series of six effluent concen- "
trations and a 100% dilution water control.
Test chambers were of all
glass construction and of 8 liter capacity.
Flow rates were regulated
to provide a minimum of nine volumetric exchanges of test solution for
each chamber for each 24-hour period.
All concentrations were done
in duplicate with all test chambers containing ten fish.
The test fish" used were young of the year fathead minnows (Pimephales
" Promelas Rafinesque) obtained from the Newtown Toxicology Laboratory
located at Cincinnati, Ohio.
The fi sh, averagi.ng approximately 4 cm
in length, were acclimated for 96-hours prior to testing in Kanawha River
water and given prophylic treatment (25 mg/l Oxytetracycline HCl) to
prevent bacterial infection.
Dilution water was obtained from the Kanawha River at a point
approximately 3 km (2 river miles) upstream of the mouth of the Elk
Ri ver.
The dilution water was stored in 1100 liter (300 gallon)
epoxy-coated wooden reservoirs and was replenished every 24-hburs.
Bioassay test water from Union Carbide Institute was collected by
continuous flow compositing at outfall 001.
A 180 liter (47 gallon)
composite sample was transported to the diluter every six hours for
the duration of the test.
All test chambers were monitored daily for pH, temperature and
, "
dissolved oxygen concentration (TableG-l)." In addition the high,
. -. -,.. -
'" . '.. . - ~ .
--.-- ....--------..

-------
.j.'~.
.,;
.~:)
,
'.1

:,;;
~..;\~~
'>
. G'-4'
:>\i.
~ '/
. .~
'.
'>,
"
, ,
middle and low concentrations were analyzed for total alkalinity., Water
temperature in the test c~ambers was mantained at 23.5C ~ 1C by use
of a constant temperature recirculating water bath.
Mortalities in each test chamber were recorded at 24-hour intervals. '
The 96-hour LC50 value was calculated by computerized tape program based
on the Spearman-Karber probit technique.

-------
   .. ' .      
t.. ..J, "-::"1 I         G-5
"         
I          
     TABLE G-l    
  Physical-Chemical Characteristics   
  Union Carbide Institut~ Effluent   
   August, 1978    
      Effluent Concentration(%)  
Parameter Control   10 18 32 56 75 100
 (Kanawha River Water)      
      24-hour    
DO mg/l 6.5'   6.2 6.0 6.1 5.9 5.8 5.5
Temp. DC 23.0  23.2 22.8 22.7 23.0 22.5 22.7
pH  7.2   7.2 7.3 7.2 7.2 7.2 7.2
Tota 1 al kal inity 34     ., 66  92
      48-hour    
DO mg/l 6.5  6.0 6.0 6.0 5.8 5.0 5.0
Temp. c '23.3  23.4 23.2 23.1 23.4 22.8 23.0 "
pH  7.2   7.2 7.3 7.2 .7.2 . 7.2 7.2
Total A 1 ka 1 i nity 29      63  84
-:      72-hour &   
DO mg/l 7.0   6.5 6.5 ......r:5 5.5 5.2 5.0 .
Temp. DC 23.2  23.4 23.2 23.0 23.2 22.7 22.8
pH  7.3   7.3 7.3 7.3 7.3 7.2 7.2
Total Alkalinity 28      56  77
      96-hour    
DO mg/l 6.9   6.0 6.0 5.0 4.5 4.0 3.5
Temp. c 23.2  23.5 23.0 23.1 23.3 23.0 23.2
pH  7.2   7.0 7.1 7.0 7.0 6.9 6.9
Total Alkalinity 29      62  ,88
ill....

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APPENDIX H
TECHNICAL INFORMATION
DATA BASE DESCRIPTION

-------