DESCRIPTIONS OF EIGHT SITES DELETED FROM THE
                   NATIONAL PRIORITIES LIST IN MARCH 1986
     This document consists of descriptions of the eight sites deleted on

March 1, 1986 (51 FR 7934) from the National Priorities List.  On December 31,

1985 (50 FR 53448), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced

its intention to delete the sites and solicited comments on the action for

a 30-day period.  Earlier, EPA had provided a local comment period in each

of the eight communities involved.  The sites were deleted because EPA has

determined that no further response is appropriate, in accordance with

section 300.66(c)(7) of the National Contingency Plan, the Federal regulation

under which the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and

Liability Act is implemented.

       Sites are arranged alphabetically by State and by site.

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  National Priorities List Site
  Hazardous waste site listed under the
  Comprehensive Environmental Response. Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA)("Superfund"
                               TAPUTIMU FARM
                     Island of Tutuila, American Samoa

      Conditions at listing (October 1981):  The Taputimu Farm Site is on
 the Island of Tutuila, Trust Territory of American Samoa.  The site, part
 of an experimental farm owned by the Territory, consists of three
 rooms of a farm warehouse and a trailer which have been used in excess of
 10 years for storage of unused and out-of-date agricultural chemicals and
 pesticides.  Approximately 4,000 pounds of hazardous wastes are on-site.
 The chemical storage areas are a short distance from a public beach area,
 and a primary concern is that these materials could be transported by
 flood water to the beach 0.3 miles away.  Direct human contact and contami-
 nation of drinking water and marine resources used for food are of concern.

      This is the top priority site in American Samoa.

      Response Actions;  In 1982, EPA conducted a remedial investigation/
 feasibility study (RI/FS).  The materials were found to be improperly
 stored within the buildings.   Analysis of the materials identified several
 pesticides and chlorinated organic solvents.  The materials were stored on
 a  concrete or steel floor of the storage areas and trailer.  Soil sampling
 and visual examination of the site confirmed that contamination was confined
 to the interior floors.

      The remedial action alternative selected and implemented at Taputimu
 Farm in 1984 involved repacking the chemical/pesticide materials for shipping
 to the continental United States for disposal in a facility permitted under
 the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.  The remedial action also
 included washing down all exposed surfaces of the storage areas with bleach
 to ensure deactivation of any residual materials not picked up by sweeping
 and vacuuming.   Finally, two layers of epoxy paint were applied to the
 interior walls  and 3 inches of concrete were poured over the existing
 floor,  thereby eliminating the threat of direct contact.  The Government of
American Samoa  uses the structure only to store farm equipment and has
 placed signs on the building  prohibiting food storage.  Since all materials
were removed and contaminated surfaces cleaned and sealed, no further
monitoring was  conducted.                            ,

      EPA,  with  the concurrence of the Government of American Samoa, has
determined that all appropriate Fund-financed response under CERCLA has
been completed  at the  Taputimu Farm Site, and that no further cleanup by
responsible  parties is appropriate.
 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency/Remedial Response Program

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 National Priorities List Site

 Hazardous waste site listed under the
 Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA)("Superfund")
                                PCB WAREHOUSE
             Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern  Mariana Islands

       Conditions at listing (October 1981);  The  PCB Warehouse on Saipan,
  Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands,  is a  temporary shelter
  built to store about 1,400 gallons of transformer fluid containing up to
  25,000 parts per million of PCBs.  The fluid is  stored  in drums awaiting
  shipment or off-site disposal.  The storage site is adjacent to the
  Philippine Sea, an area subject to tropical storms.   PCB contamination
  of drinking water and marine resources used for  food  is of concern.

       This is the top priority site in the Northern  Mariana Islands.

       Response Actions;  A remedial invesigation  of  the  site conducted by
  EPA in December 1982  revealed the presence of 21 drums of PCB-contaminated
  oil and 3 crates of sodium arsenite.  Drums were found  to be intact and
  there was no evidence of any reported spills or  leaks.   The transformers
  from which the oil had been drained were at the  Saipan  Headquarters
  Building and at the Department of Public Works Yard.  There was no indication
  of leaks or spills near those transformers.

       In 1984, EPA used CERCLA emergency funds to remove the 21 drums of
  PCB wastes and 3 crates of sodium arsenite.  These  were repackaged and
  transported to the continental United States for disposal at a facility
  meeting the requirements of the Toxic Substances Control Act.   The sodium
  arsenite was disposed of in the continental United  States at a facility
  permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery  Act.   Tests confirmed
  that no PCB wastes had been spilled during the removal  action.              {

       EPA,  with the concurrence of the Commonwealth  of the Northern Mariana ,
  Islands,  has determined that all appropriate Fund-financed response under
  CERCLA has been completed at the PCB Warehouse Site,  and that no further
  cleanup by responsible parties is appropriate.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency/Remedial Response Program

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National Priorities List Site
Hazardous waste site listed under the
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA)C'Superfund")
                             MORRIS ARSENIC DUMP
                              Morris,  Minnesota

       Conditions at listing (September 1983):   Morris Arsenic Dump is an
 old gravel  pit covering 5 acres in a rural area about 1 mile northeast of
 Morris  in Stevens County, Minnesota.  In the  early 1940s, about 1,500
 pounds  of arsenic-laced grasshopper bait ware on the site.  The subsequent
 construction of a highway in the area may have dispersed the bait and
 made  it difficult to discover the exact burial location.

       Tests  by EPA have  detected arsenic in the shallow ground water.
 The City of Morris and  private wells in the area draw on shallow ground
 water.  No  drinking water wells have been affected to date.

       Response Actions;   In 1984, as  part of a remedial investigation (RI), EPA
 installed 11 monitoring wells around the site and sampled soil in the
 site  area.   The results of the RI indicate that arsenic levels in the
 surface soils were all  below 7 micrograms per kilogram (-g/kg), well
 within  the  natural background range  of 3 to 14 ;g/kg.  Arsenic concentrations
 in the  soils at the water table were somewhat elevated, ranging between
 20 and  40ug/kg,  but far below the Centers for Disease Control (CDC)
 action  level of 100//g/kg for surficial soils.  CDC was consulted with
 respect to  the soils and concurred that no action was necessary.  Samples
 from  the monitoring wells and nearby domestic sources indicate that
 arsenic levels were considerably below the Primary Drinking Water Standard
 of 50 micrograms  per liter (o'_g/l).  Arsenic was found to be at or near
 S^g/l.  The municipal  well field for Morris  is approximately 1 mile in
 the opposite direction  of ground water flow and would not be impacted by
 any contamination at the site.   Other domestic wells sampled in the
 vicinity did not  have arsenic contamination above background.

       EPA, with the concurrence of the State of Minnesota, has determined
 that the Morris Arsenic Dump poses no significant threat to public health
 or the  environment and,  therefore, taking remedial measures is not appropriate.
 EPA has recommended to  State, county, and local officials that, as a
 further precaution,  a notice be placed on the property.  The deed notice
 would be entered  in county land records and state that the site had
 previously been used for the disposal of a hazardous substance.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency/Remedial Response Program

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 National Priorities List Site

 Hazardous waste site listed under the                               :        *
 Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA)("Superfund")
                              FRIECMAN PROPERTY
                     Upper Freehold .Township, New. Jersey

       Conditions at listing (October 1981);  The Friedman Property  is located
  in Upper Freehold Township, Mbnmouth County, New Jersey,   (The site was once
  listed under the name "Upper Freehold Site.") The 3-acre site lies just across
  the boundary from Plumstead Township and-is immediately adjacent to an
  unnamed tributary to Lahaway Creek, which is itself a tributary of the
  Delaware River.  In the late 1950s and early 1960s, free-flowing liquids,
  household wastes, and demolition debris were dumped into a natural ditch
  and then covered over.  Several residences and two trailer parks within
  0.3 miles of the site have private wells.  Four monitoring wells installed
  in 1980 by New Jersey detected heavy metals and a number of organic
  pollutants.  Organic chemicals were present in an adjacent stream.

       Response Actions;  In 1984, EPA and the New Jersey Department of
  Environmental Protection (NJDEP) completed a remedial investigation/
  feasibility study (RI/FS) covering the air, soils, wastes, ground water,
  surface water, and adjacent stream sediments.  The RI results indicate
  that limited contamination is present at the site, and that the site was
  not used as a hazardous waste disposal facility.  Its wastes were no
  different than those of a typical municipal landfill.  Air monitoring
  during the RI/FS did not show levels above ambient air quality standards,
  and no complaints of odors or fumes were received from area citizens
  before or during testing, or from personnel conducting the RI/FS.

       Ground water testing included the installation of six monitoring
  wells and sampling of domestic wells in the vicinity of the site.  The
  shallow ground water had slightly elevated levels of zinc  below 0.5
  milligrams per liter (mg/1)  and 0.03 mg/1 of phenols.  These levels are
  below current EPA Health Effects Assessment levels of 7.4 mg/1 for zinc
  and 3.5 mg/1 for phenols.  Analysis of deep ground water revealed only
  zinc at levels comparable to surface levels.  The only similarity between
  the shallow and deep ground water is in naturally occuring zinc.
  Since similar chemicals were not found in the two aquifers, and geologic
  analysis indicates no interconnections, there is no indication that the
  lower aquifer is contaminated or will be in the future.

       The RI/FS indicated that the adjacent stream sediments had not been
  significantly contaminated by materials found at the site, although trace
  contamination consistent with routine road maintenance practices from the
  adjacent highway was found.

       In summary,  the RI/FS concluded that there are no significant sources
  of  contamination at the site, and contaminants have not migrated from the
  site and are not expected to migrate.   Therefore, no remedial action was
  appropriate.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency/Remedial Response Program

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 National Priorities List Site

 Hazardous waste site listed under the
 Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA)("Superfund")

        EPA, with the concurrence of the State of New Jersey,  determined that
  the  Friedman  Property Site poses no significant threat to public health
  or the environment and, therefore, taking remedial measures is not
  appropriate.   However,  EPA the NJDEP have agreed  that the shallow aquifer
  in the vicinity of the  site will be monitored as  a precautionary measure
  to ensure that current  site conditions do not change.  The  State is
  responsible for periodic ground water monitoring  for  5 years.   State
  monitoring  to date indicates that conditions remain unchanged.

       As an  additional precaution, EPA recommended to  State, county, and
  local  officials that  a  notice be placed on the property deed and the plot
  plan amended.   The deed notice and plot restrictions  would  be  entered in
  county land records.  They would note that the site had previously been
  used for waste disposal and restrict on-site excavations, agricultural,
  and  residential use.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency/Remedial Response Program

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National Priorities List Site

Hazardous waste site listed under the
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980'(CERCLA)("Superfund")
                                  PCB SPILLS
                     243 Miles of Road in North Carolina

      Conditions at  listing  (October 1981):   Between June and August 1978,
 over 30,000 gallons of industrial waste containing PCBs were deliberately
 discharged along approximately 243 noncontiguous miles of highway shoulders
 in 14 counties of North Carolina.  In late August, the State covered the:
 spill areas with activated  charcoal and liquid asphalt..  Because, of the
 quantity of soils involved  and the distances to approved landfills, the
 State decided to construct  a new landfill.   In December 1978, North
 Carolina sought EPA approval for a PCB landfill in Warren County.  EPA
 approved the landfill  site  in June 1979,  subject, to compliance with a
 number of technical and procedural conditions.

      The State conducted several investigations and feasibility studies
 between 1979 and 1981  and ascertained that contamination did not migrate
 from the spill areas into surface water,  biota, or ground water..

      This is the top priority site in North Carolina.

      Response Actions;  In May 1982,  EPA and the State  initiated remedial
 action to: (1) construct a  landfill meeting the requirements of the Toxic
 Substances Control Act for  disposal of PCB wastes; (2)  remove, transport,
 and dispose of contaminated soils; and (3)  reconstruct the highway shoulders.
 Disposal of contaminated soil was completed in November 1982, and the
 landfill was capped, graded,  and vegetated.

      During soil removal, the beginning and end point  of each contaminated
 strip were sampled  to  ensure  that contaminated soils were removed.
 Random samples were collected after soils were removed.  Analyses indicated
 that nearly all samples  contained 10 parts  per million (ppm) or less of
 PCBs.   No soils with PCBs above  50 ppm were left in place.  Excavated
 areas were then filled with clean soil.

      EPA, with the concurrence of the State of North Carolina, has determined
 that all appropriate Fund-financed response under CERCLA at the PCB
 Spills Site has been completed,  and  that  no further cleanup by responsible
 parties is appropriate.  The  State is currently, monitoring the landfill
 constructed to contain contaminated  soils removed from the site.  The
 results indicate that  the landfill continues to meet all requirements for
 postclosure monitoring.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency/Remedial Response Program

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National Priorities List Site
Hazardous waste site listed under the
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA)C'Superfund")
                              ENTERPRISE AVENUE
                          Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

       Conditions at listing (December 1982);  The Enterprise Avenue Site
  covers about 57 acres along the Delaware River in an industrial area of
  Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  Fran 1971 to mid-1976, the city operated the
  site as a landfill.  Several waste-handling firms buried at least 10,000
  drums of hazardous wastes there without the city's permission.  During
  exploratory excavations in January 1979, the Philadelphia Water Department
  discovered approximately 1,700 drums that contained or had once contained
  wastes such as paint sludges, solvents, oils, resins, metal-finishing
  waste, and solid inorganic wastes.  In 1982, the city started cleanup
  actions, including removal of drums and soil to a landfill permitted under
  the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).  A total of 32,800
  cubic yards of excavated soil was identified as contaminated with organic
  chemicals (toluene, benzene,  ethylbenzene, or organic halogenated compounds)
  In  October 1982, after spending $7 million cleaning up the site, the city
  ran out of money.   Left on-site were approximately 20,000 tons of contami-
  nated soil in two piles that  had been partially covered.

       Response Actions;   In 1984, EPA and the city started to complete the
  remedial actions.   All of the spockpiled soils were analyzed for a variety
  of metals and organic chemicals.  Soils were divided into 100-cubic-yard
  lots.   A Key Indicator Analysis was used to determine which lots would be
  disposed of in an off-site facility.  If any one indicator exceeded
  action levels, the entire soil lot was deemed contaminated and sent
  off-site.   Action levels for  inorganics were selected based upon the
  Extraction Procedure Ibxicity Test used to determine if a waste is
  hazardous under RCRA.   Organic action levels were established using
  similar methodology and are consistent with levels that would be used
  today.   After removal  of contaminated soils from the site, the area was
  sampled  on a grid  pattern to  ensure that all soils not passing the test
 had been transported off-site.   The results indicate that the remedial
 objectives were attained,  and that all soils considered contaminated were
 removed.   The site was  then capped,  seeded, and fenced.

      EPA,  with the concurrence of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, has
 determined that all  appropriate Fund-financed response under CERCLA at
 the Enterprise Avenues  Site has been completed, and that no further cleanup
 by responsible parties  is  appropriate.   The Pennsylvania Department of
 Environmental  Resources  has agreed to operate and maintain the site.  The
 department has also  developed and implemented an operations and maintenance
 plan for the  cap and will  monitor ground water to ensure that water
 quality remains at background levels.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency/Remedial Response Program

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 National Priorities List Site

 Hazardous waste site listed under the
 Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA)("Superfund")
                      LEHIGH ELECTRIC & ENGINEERING CO.
                       Old Forge Borough, Pennsylvania

       Conditions at listing (October 1981);  The Lehigh Electric & Engineering
  Co.   Site, in Old Forge Borough, Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania, occupies
  approximately 5.4 acres adjacent to the Lackawanna River.  The company
  operated a storage and repair facility for electrical equipment fron the
  mid-1970s until March 1981.  On-site are 4,000 pieces of equipment, some
  contaminated with PCBs.  Analyses indicate that extremely high levels
  accumulated in the soil due to the indiscriminate disposal of dielectric
  fluids containing PCBs.  Contamination of ground water and surface water is
  possible because the soil is highly permeable and the site is in the floodplain.

       In April 1981, with funds made available under Section 104 of the Clean
  Water Act, EPA fenced the site and analyzed soil and water samples.  In
  September 1981, using funds made available under the Resource Conservation
  and  Recovery Act, EPA started a remedial investigation/feasibility study
  (RI/FS)to determine the type and extent of contamination at the site and
  identify alternatives for remedial action.

       Response Actions;  The RI/FS, completed in 1983, included the analysis
  of ground water, air, and river sediment samples, and the evaluation of
  cleanup alternatives.

       In Phase I of the remedial action, all transformers, transformer
  contents, and surface debris were removed frcm the site.  This was completed
  in December 1982.  In Phase II, contaminated soils and buildings were
  removed from the site, which was then backfilled, graded, and vegetated.
  These actions were completed in September 1984.  Analyses conducted
  during excavation showed that the remedial action reduced the concentration
  of PCBs in soils to 10 parts per million.  Contaminated soils were
  transported to a disposal facility meeting the requirements of the
  Toxic Substances Control Act.

       In May 1985, EPA inspected the site, collected samples, and verified
  that the objectives of the remedial action were met.

       After the contaminated soils were excavated, the remaining soils
  containing low levels of PCBs were buried beneath 10 to 15 feet of clean
  backfill.  PCBs are not readily soluble in water so that any PCBs remaining
  are  not expected to impact ground water; no PCBs were detected in ground
  water samples taken during the RI/FS.

       EPA, with the concurrence of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, has
  determined that all appropriate Fund-financed response under CERCLA at
  the  Lehigh Electric & Engineering Co. Site has been completed, and that
  no further cleanup by responsible parties is appropriate.  The Pennsylvania
  Depatment of Environmental Resources has agreed to perform all future
  operation and maintenance, including the continued monitoring of ground
  water for PCBs.

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency/Remedial Response Program

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 National Priorities List Site
 Hazardous waste site listed
 Comprehensive Environmental RfcpllWegtapwsatMKiaflfli Liability Act of 19gO (CERCLA)("Superfund")
                                  PCB WASTES
                    Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands

       Conditions at listing (October 1981):  The Trust Territory of the
  Pacific Islands, an area.larger than the continental United States, has
  eight separate areas for storing transformers contaminated with PCBs.
  The  sites were located on the islands of Koror in the Republic of Palau,
  Moen in Truk State, Yap, Kosrae, and two on both Ponape and Majuro.  The
  storage areas, which hold more than 2,000 gallons of wastes, are unprotected
  and  could contaminate ground water and surface water used as drinking
  water.   Contamination of marine resources used for food could also result.
  Wastes migrating from sane of these sites may already have contaminated
  the  surrounding area.

       This is the top priority site in the Trust Territory.

       Response Actions;   A remedial investigation conducted by EPA in
  December 1982 revealed that the PCBs in drums and transformers and some
  pesticides and chemicals were improperly stored.   A previous oil spill
  was  apparent at one location formerly used to store transformers.  In
  seme locations,  intact containers of transformer oil were in unsecured
  areas open to the general  public.

       In 1984,  EPA used  CERCLA emergency funds to remove wastes containing
  over 50 parts per million  (ppm)  of PCBs and the other hazardous wastes
  found at the various  locations.   During the removal action, soils and
  waste oils were  sampled in the field using a portable testing kit that
  allowed  segregation of  wastes for transport.  Only the transformer storage
  area had contaminated soils.   It is located in a fenced in rural area.
  Testing  was  conducted in the  area before and after removal of contaminated
 soils.   No PCBs  above 50 ppm were found in structures or soils after
 removal.

      Fluids  containing  under  50  ppm of  PCBs were  blended and burned on the
  islands.  Other  PCB wastes were  transported to a  disposal facility in the
 continental  United  States meeting  the requirements of the Toxic Substances
 Control Act.   Other hazardous wastes were removed and transported to a
 facility  in  the  continental United States permitted under the Resource
 Conservation and Recovery  Act.


      EPA, with the  concurrence of  the Trust Territory of the Pacific
 Islands, has determined  that  all appropriate Fund-financed response under
 CERCLA has been completed  at  the PCB Wastes Site, and that no further
 cleanup by responsible parties is  appropriate.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency/Remedial Response Program

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