WATER POLLUTION CONTROL RESEARCH SERIES • 14010 ECC 08/71
     The  Effects of Various Gas
    Atmospheres on the Oxidation
        of Coal Mine Pyrites
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY • WATER QUALITY OFFICE

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       WATER POLLUTION CONTROL RESEARCH SERIES
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2G242.

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         The  Effects of  Various  Gas Atmospheres

         on  the Oxidation  of Coal Mine Pyrites
                            by
                 Cyrus Wm. Rice Division
                      NUS Corporation
                       Manor Oak Two
              Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania   15220
                        for the
          ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
                 Program 14010  ECC
                 Contract 14-12-877
                     August, 1971
For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 - Price $1.25
                      Stock Number 5501-0111

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               EPA Review Notice
This report has been reviewed by the Environmental
Protection Agency and approved for publication.
Approval does not signify that the contents neces-
sarily reflect the views and policies of the Environ-
mental  Protection Agency, nor does mention of trade
names or commercial  products constitute endorsement
or recommendation for use.
                   11

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                      ABSTRACT
A number of experiments up to 150 days in length were
conducted to study the acid production rate of coal mine
pyrites under various gas atmospheres.  The gas atmospheres
studied were air, nitrogen, methane, and carbon dioxide.
The lower limits of the oxidation process were studied by
introducing small amounts of oxygen along with the inert
blanketing gas and by studying the effects of deaerated
versus air saturated feedwater.  Acid production was found
to be proportional to the available oxygen partial pressure.

The acid parameters monitored continued to change and had not
completely reached a steady state by the termination of the
work.  The acid production of nitrogen blanketed pyrite
decreased to less than 1% of that of identical columns
under an air atmosphere.  Nitrogen and methane gases were
equally effective in reducing acid production.  Both of
gases were slightly more effective than carbon dioxide.
A large amount of detailed experimental data is presented.

This report was submitted in fulfillment of Contract No.
14-12-877 between the Environmental Protection Agency,
Water Quality Office and Cyrus Wm. Rice Division - NUS
Corporation

Key Words:  Acid mine water, inert gas blanketing of
            coal mines, pyrite oxidation, acid production
            in coal mines, pyrite, water pollution control,
            water quality, and acid mine drainage.
                        111

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                       CONTENTS
Section                                           Page
    I         Conclusions                           1



   II         Recommendations                       3



  III         Introduction                          5



   IV         Column Design                         9



    V         Column Operation                     11



   VI         Results                              13



  VII         Glossary                             23



 VIII         Acknowledgements                     25



   IX         References                           27



    X         Appendix                             29

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                        FIGURES
No.

I         Flow Diagram - Pyrite Column Study -
          9 Column System

II        Column Assembly -  (Typical 9 Columns)

III       Top Inlet Block

IV        Bottom Outlet Block

V         Retaining Plate Assembly

VI        Column Support Plate

VII       Wastewater  & Waste Gas Disposal System

VIII      Feed & Cooling Water Supply

IX        Deaerator

X         Aerated Feedwater System  (Column No. 2)

XI        Compressed  Gas Supply

XII       Bill of Material

XIII      Wastewater  and Waste Gas Disposal
          System  (Photograph)

XIV       Deaerator  (Photograph)

XV        Column Cooling Arrangement (Photograph)

XVI       Apparatus and General Arrangement of
          Equipment  (Photograph)

XVII      Acid Production, Iron Production and
          Conductivity Versus Oxygen Content of
          Carrier Gas

XVIII     Typical Column Performance on Air

XIX       Typical Curve for Rate of Falloff of Acid
          & Iron for Fresh Packed Columns with Inert
          Gas
Page

  30


  31

  32

  33

  34

  35

  36

  37

  38

  39

  40

  41

  43


  44

  45

  46


  47



  48

  49

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                  FIGURES  (Continued)
No.
                                              Page
XX
XXI
XXII
XXIII
XXIV
XXV
XXVI
XXVII
XXVIII
XXIX
Typical Curve for Rate of Falloff of
Acid & Iron Production When Blanketing
Gas Was Switched From Air to Either
Nitrogen or Methane

Concentration of Acid Parameter Versus
Time For Column I

Concentration of Acid Parameter Versus
Time For Column II

Concentration of Acid Parameter Versus
Time For Column III

Concentration of Acid Parameter Versus
Time For Column IV

Concentration of Acid Parameter Versus
Time For Column V

Concentration of Acid Parameter Versus
Time For Column VI

Concentration of Acid Parameter Versus
Time For Column VII

Concentration of Acid Parameter Versus
Time For Column VIII

Concentration of Acid Parameter Versus
Time For Column IX
 50
51


52


53


54


55


56


57


58


59
                        Vlll

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                       TABLES



No.                                                    Page

I        Column Operating Conditions                    60

II       Column-Gas and Water Flow Data                 61

III      Pyrite Analysis                                62

IV       Influent Gas Analyses,                         63
         Manufacturers Specifications

V        Analysis of the Variance of Effluent           64
         Total Iron Concentration Between
         Nitrogen Blanketed Pyrite Columns

VI       Analysis of the Variance of Effluent           65
         Total Iron Concentration Between Air
         Blanketed Pyrite Columns (Col.4,6)

VII      Analysis of the Variance of Effluent           66
         Total Iron Concentration Between Air
         Blanketed Pyrite Columns (Col.4,5,6)

VIII     Analysis of the Variation of Effluent          67
         Total Iron Concentration Between An
         Air Blanketed Control Column in Phase
         I and Phase II.

IX       Analysis of the Variance of Effluent           gg
         Total Iron Concentration Between Nitrogen
         and Methane Blanketed Pyrite Columns in
         Phase I

X        Analysis of the Variance of Effluent           69
         Total Iron Concentration Between Nitrogen
         Blanketed Pyrite Columns in Phase I and
         a Nitrogen Blanketed Pyrite Column in
         Phase II Atmosphere.
                          IX

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                       TABLES
No.                                                 Pa9e

XI       Analysis of the Variance of Effluent         71
         Total Iron Concentration Between Methane
         and Carbon Dioxide Blanketed Columns

XII      Analysis of the Variance of Effluent         72
         Total Iron Concentration Between Methane
         and Nitrogen Blanketed Columns Following
         Steady State Operation in an Air
         Atmosphere

XIII     Operating Log                                73

XIV      Acid Production, Iron Production and         77
         Conductivity as a Function of Oxygen
         Content of Carrier Gas

XV       Cation-Anion Balance Air Control             JQ
         Column 6
XVI      Column 1, Phas-e I - Daily Sample Data        79
         (Major Constituents)

XVII     Column 2, Phase I -Daily Sample Data         82
         (Major Constituents)

XVIII    Column 3, - Daily Sample Data                85
         (Major Constituents)

XIX      Column 4, Phase I - Daily Sample Data        89
         (Major Constituents)

XX       Column 5, Phase 1 - Daily Sample Data        91
         (Major Constituents)
                          x

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                       TABLES
No.                                                 Page

XXI      Column 6, - Daily Sample Data                94
          (Major Constituents)

XXII     Column 7, Phase I - Daily Sample             93
         Data  (Normal Water Flow Rate)

XXIII    Column 7, Phase I - Daily Sample             1QO
         Data  (Reduced Water Flow Rate)

XXIV     Column 7, Phase I - Daily Sample             10']
         Data  (Normal Water Flow Rate)

XXV      Column 8, Phase I - Daily Sample             102
         Data  (Major Constituents)

XXVI     Column 9, Phase I - Daily Sample             105
         Data  (Major Constituents)

XXVII    Column Feedwater, Daily Analytical Data      ]ns

XXVIII   Column I, Phase II - Daily Sample Data       112
          (Major Constituents)

XXIX     Column 2, Phase II - Daily Sample            114
         Data  (Major Constituents)

XXX      Column 4, Phase II - Daily Sample            116
         Data  (Major Constiuent)

XXXI     Column 5, Phase II - Daily Sample            118
         Data  (Major Constituent)

XXXII    Column 7, Phase II - Daily Sample            120
         Data  (Normal Water Flow Rate)

XXXIII   Column 7, Phase II Daily Sample              121
         Data  (Reduced Water Flow Rate)
                        XI

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                       TABLES
No.

XXXIV    Column 8, Phase II - Daily  Sample
         Data  (Reduced Water Flow Rate)

XXXV     Column 9, Phase II - Daily  Sample
         Data  (Reduced Water Flow Rate)

XXVI     Column 2, Phase II - Dissolved Oxygen
         Data

XXXVII   Column I - Weekly Sample Data
          (Minor Constituents)

XXXVIII  Column 2 - Weekly Sample Data
          (Minor Constituents)

XXXIX    Column 3 - Weekly Sample Data
          (Minor Constituents)

XL       Column 4 - Weekly Sample Data
          (Minor Constituents)

XLI      Column 5 - Weekly Sample Data
          (Minor Constituents)

XLII     Column 6 - Weekly Sample Data
          (Minor Constituents)

XLIII    Column 7 - Weekly Sample Data
          (Minor Constituents)

XLIV     Column 8 - Weekly Sample Data
          (Minor Constituents)

XLV      Column 9 - Weekly Sample Data
          (Minor Constituents)

XLVI     Column I, Phase II - Inlet  and
         Outlet Gas Analyses,  (Nitrogen
         + 0.523% Oxygen)
Page

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 124


 126


 128


 129


 T-30


 131


 132


 133



 134


 135


 1-36


 138
                         XII

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                       TABLES
No.

XLVII



XLVIII



XL IX
Column 8, Phase II - Inlet and
Outlet Gas Analyses, (Methane
+ 0.11% Oxygen)

Column 9, Phase II - Inlet and
Outlet Gas Analyses, (Carbon
Dioxide + 1.07% Oxygen)

Column 6 - Air Control - Inlet
and Outlet Gas Analyses, (Nitrogen
+ 20.9% Oxygen)
Page

 138



 139



 140
                          Xlll

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                  Comments From The  Project  Officer

  It  is profitable for the reader to  compare  the results  from this
  project with those given in project H010 DKN 11/70. This  latter
  work, performed by Dr. R.A. Baker,  at Mellon Institute, describes
  some similar, but not identical experiments.

  A comparison of column 2, of the Rice study (page 52) and  the
  Mellon Institute experiments (see page 58 of the former work)
  indicates a very close correlation. Both experiments provide
  a pyrite, exposed to water which was saturated with air.
  The effluent concentrations are listed below:

                         Rice                      Mellon
  pH                      4-5                       4.1

  iron (mg/l)            0.8-0.9                    1.3

  acidity (mg/l)          6-8                       7

  sulfate (mg/l)          6*                        7


* varies from 1 to 29 but the average is 6.
 The close correlation between two independent studies lends credence
 to the conclusions expressed in this report.
                               xiv

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                      SECTION I

                      CONCLUSIONS
 The following conclusions were drawn based on the results
obtained during this study:

1.  The acid drainage from coal mine pyrite, in terms of
iron, sulfate, acidity and conductivity is proportional to
the oxygen partial pressure in the gas phase in contact with
the pyrite.

2.  Nitrogen and methane are superior to carbon dioxide as
blanketing gases in reducing the acid production from coal
associated pyrites.

3.  Acid production by pyrite under an inert gas atmosphere
is affected by the dissolved oxygen content of the feedwater.

4.  Within the range of gas and water flow rates studied,
the amount of water available did not influence the rate of
oxidation of pyrite

5.  Inert gas blanketing  of coal mine pyrites is an effec-
tive method of reducing pyrite oxidation.

6.  The rate of change of acid production of pyrite as a
function of time appears to be influenced by the history of
the pyrite particle prior to its exposure to an inert
atmosphere.   This can be seen by comparing Figures XIX and .
XX with each other.

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                       SECTION II

                    •RE'COMMENDATI ON S
This study was limited to laboratory investigations on the
effects of various gas atmospheres on coal mine pyrite
oxidation.  A practical application of the findings of this
study would be full scale testing in an actual abandoned
deep mine.

In such a study, inert gas blanketing could be accomplished
by the use of a fuel-fired inert gas generator. Preliminary
investigations presently underway at a small drift mine in
southwestern Pennsylvania indicate that the gas require-
ments to pressurize this mine may be economically favorable
for the prevention of acid mine drainage over conventional
treatment methods.  The results of this laboratory study
indicate that the discharge from such a test mine under an
inert gas atmosphere would be reduced to essentially ground-
water limits while most conventional treatment methods, on
the other hand, produce a rather low quality effluent.

In view of the possible advantages of such a preventative
program, it is recommended that field testing be carried
out.

Another area in which the information, techniques, and
equipment used in this study could be applied is in the
prediction of the relative polluting potential of new
mining operations.  This study has shown that the pounds
of acid produced per unit of time is relatively independent
of the water flow rate (over the range studied).

Samples of pyritic material from existing mines could be
collected along with water samples of the discharge from
the mine.  The pyritic samples could then be subjected to a
standardized column test and the quality of the effluent
from the column correlated with the discharge from the mine.
If a correlation between the discharge from the mine, and
the discharge for the column could be developed, this data
could be used to predict the relative pollution potential
of future mines by subjecting core samples from the new
areas to the same standard column test.  The data could also
be used in evaluating the pollution potential of highway
cuts through coal seams, and other similar earth moving
operations where pyritic material may be exposed.

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                      SECTION III

                      INTRODUCTION


The formation of iron salts and sulfuric acid by the oxida-
tion of pyrites is the major source of pollution from coal
mining in the Eastern and Mid-Atlantic States.  Pyrites,
which are minerals containing sulfide, generally occur in
association with various minerals and ores; such as coal,
copper, gold, sulfur, etc.  The mining of these minerals
and ores exposes the pyritic materials which subsequently
oxidize in the presence of moisture and air to form sulfuric
acid and metallic sulfates.  Where coal is mined these
chemicals then dissolve in ground or surface waters to form
dilute solutions of sulfuric acid and iron sulfate commonly
known as "acid mine drainage."  It has been estimated (D that
more than 5,000 miles of streams and 13,000 acres of ponds
in Pennsylvania, Ohio, Maryland, West Virginia, Kentucky,
Tennessee, and Alabama have been polluted with coal mine
drainage.  The total mine drainage discharge has been esti-
mated ©  at more than 3.2 million tons of acid per year.

The chemical reaction

          2 FeS2 + 7 02 + 2 H20	>2 FeS04 + 2 H2SO4
generally describes the oxidation reaction of pyrite.  In
studying the chemical reactions that take place, it is ob-
vious that the exclusion of oxygen at the reactive pyritic
sites should prevent the basic acid production reaction from
occurring.  Leitch Q)  proposed air sealing of underground
mines as a solution to the problem as early as 1927.  This
preventative technique was widely employed by the Works Pro-
gress Administration under the direction of the United
States Public Health Service during the 1930's.  It has been
estimated that more than 20,000 air and water seals (D were
constructed by this Administration in order to prevent the
discharge of acid mine drainage.  The effectiveness of this
sealing was not systematically evaluated and there is little
factual information on the success of the program, however,
the information available indicates a substantial reduction
in acid production.

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Studies conducted by K. S. Shumate (J) and S. A. Bealey (f)
have documented this theory on the reduction or prevention
of  acid formation in deep mines by the reduction of oxygen.

Laboratory studies by S. A. Braley(7)W. E. Bell (f) have
further demonstrated that acid production can be controlled
by  the exclusion of oxygen, and that acid production will
immediately  start if air is admitted and will terminate
shortly after the air introduction ceases.

Based on previous work, it is evident that if the atmosphere
in  abandoned deep mines could be maintained in an inert  con-
dition; that is, free from oxygen, the formation of acid by
the oxidation process would be stopped and the production
of  acid mine drainage effectively eliminated.  As has been
pointed out, acid production will be induced as oxygen comes
in  contact with the pyritic material; however, the lower
limits of the oxidation process have not been determined.
The overall  objective of this project was to determine the
effect of various gas atmospheres on the oxidation of coal
mine pyrite  so that guidelines for field application of  this
technique can be set.

Specifically, this study was designed to answer the follow-
ing questions:

1.  How does the inclusion of small amounts of oxygen,
along with a blanketing gas, effect pyrite oxidation?

2.  What is  the effect of air saturated versus deaerated
water on pyrite under'the same atmosphere?

3.  Will changing from an air to an inert gas atmosphere
alter the production of acid by pyrite?

4.  What part does water flow play in pyrite oxidation?

5.  Would a carbon dioxide blanket be reactive with pyrite?

6.  If pyrite under a carbon dioxide blanket is nonreactive,
will small amounts of oxygen in the gas blanket have any
effect?

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7.  If carbon dioxide is reactive, would the introduction
of 90% nitrogen in place of carbon dioxide decrease the
reaction.

8.  How long does it require for a bed of coal mine pyrite
under dynamic water and gas flow conditions to reach a
steady state of acid production under different gas blankets?

9.  What happens to chemical species such as iron, sulfate,
aluminum, magnesium, calcium and manganese?

The experimental approach used in this study involved load-
ing insulated glass columns with pyrite and trickling
deionized water through the columns while controlling the
gaseous atmospheres.

The acid production of the various atmospheres were studied
by daily analysis of the effluent water quality of each
column.

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                       SECTION IV

                      COLUMN DESIGN
Nine  (9) pyrex glass columns, each 6' x 4" I.D., were ver-
tically mounted on a test rack and outfitted with separate
inlet gas and water tubes at the top and a common gas-water
exit tube at the bottom for each column.  Initially, all
columns were outfitted with inlet water and outlet gas
tubes at the top and inlet gas and outlet water tubes at
the bottom.  The gas and water exited at opposite ends to
produce countercurrent flow.  After 24 hours of operation
it was observed that shallow flooding was occurring in the
columns; to eliminate this situation, the inlet gases were
introduced at the top of each column and a common outlet
was provided at the bottom to produce cocurrent downward
flow.  Effluent gas and water separation took place in the
first effluent water trap.  Upon separation, gases were
passed through a second water trap designed to prevent
atmospheric air from entering the columns as well as to set
the total column back pressure at about 12" of H20.  The
wastewater and gas disposal system is illustrated in Figures
VII and XIII.  Thick walled rubber tubing, stainless steel
fittings and glass tubing were used for the various connec-
tions between columns and water traps to eliminate corrosion
and the possibility of oxygen diffusion into the columns.
The exterior support rack was arranged so that the dis-
charge line from each column was approximately one foot from
the floor.  The overall column arrangement and associated
hardware can be seen in Figures I and XVI.

The water flow rate to each column was controlled through
polyethylene capillary tubing encased in aluminum tubing
and fed from a common manifold.  Except for programmed
changes to Column No. 7, water flow rate into the columns
was controlled at approximately 8.5 ml/minute.  The common
water source was deionized Pittsburgh tap water, deaerated,
and dechlorinated by passage through the deaerator shown
in Figures IX and XIV.  After deaeration, the water was
chilled and then passed through a second deionizer and

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distributed to each column  (See Figure VIII).  The second
deionization was used to "polish" the water to insure its
quality.  The only exception to the exclusive use of deaer-
ated feedwater was the use of air saturated water in Column
No. 2, Phase II.  A schematic arrangement of the aerated
feedwater system is shown in Figure X.  Each column was
wrapped with fifty feet of 3/8" I.D. polyethylene tubing
followed by fiberglass insulation (See Figure XV). _  Water
was circulated from a chiller unit through the tubing in
order to maintain a column temperature of approximately 55 F
 (the approximate year-round temperature in deep coal mines
in the Pennsylvania area).

Inlet gas flows were controlled by a combination of regula-
tors, valves and rotameters (See Figure XI).  Gas flow rates
to the various columns were adjusted to between 30 and 50
cc/minute.  A "T" fitting was placed in both the inlet and
outlet gas lines to permit monitoring of gas quality
throughout the project.  A schematic arrangement of a
typical pyrite column assembly is shown in Figure II and
the associated hardware is shown in Figures III, IV, V and
VI.

The pyritic material used in this study was obtained from
the Shawville Power Station of the Pennsylvania Electric
Company, near Clearfield, Pennsylvania.  This material was
rejected at the coal crusher,  and is believed to have been
originally taken from strip mining operation in the Lower
Kittanning Seam.  The material was crushed and sized to a
size of 3/8"-5/8".   Each column was charged with 45 pounds
of pyrite.  A representative sample of the pyritic material
was examined by X-ray diffraction.  Iron pyrites, FeS2,
was identified as the principal crystalline component (the
intensity of the pyrite pattern indicated that probably at
least 75% of the sample was pyrite).  Based on this analysis
the total available iron present in each column was approxi-
mately 15.7 pounds.   A portion of the sample was heated to
about 500° overnight to convert it to the oxide form.  The
weight loss was 38.06%.  A more detailed analysis of the
pyrite is shown in  Table III.
                           10

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                      SECTION. V

                   COLUMN' OPERATION
The study was divided into two phases, each phase  lasting
approximately 75 days.  Table I summarizes the column-gas-
water flow data used in the project.  As indicated, two
columns were operated as control columns; Column No. 3 was
operated in a nitrogen atmosphere and Column No. 6 in an
air atmosphere throughout both phases of the study.

The lower limits of the oxidation process were investigated
by introducing small amounts of oxygen along with the blan-
keting gas.  Daily effluent water samples were collected and
analyzed for pH, conductivity, total iron, hot phenolphtalein
acidity and sulfate; influent samples were analyzed daily
for pH and conductivity and spot checks were made of the hot
phenolphthalein acidity and dissolved oxygen  (See Tables XVI
through XXXVI).  Weekly water samples were analyzed for alum-
inum, manganese, calcium, magnesium and ferric iron  (See
Tables XXXVII through XLV.  Tables XVI through XLIX are
published separately as Volume II.

Initial startup of all columns was begun by flooding the
columns with deionized water to displace all air.  The gas
used in each particular column was then used to displace
the water and normal operations were started.  The various
gases and gas mixtures used were supplied by commercial
sources (See Table IV for analyses).  The initial gas flow
rates were set at approximately 10 cc/minute and water
flow rates were controlled by calibrated polyethylene
capillary tubing at 8.5 ml/minute.  Frequent monitoring of
the influent and effluent gases during the first several
days of operation indicated that there was a noticeable
oxygen consumption in the four columns operating with an
air atmosphere, (discussed further under results).  To
insure an adequate oxygen supply for the oxidation reaction,
gas flow rates were increased to 45 cc/minute in all columns.
Generally this flow rate was maintained throughout the study
however, the inavailability of some gases necessitated a
decrease in the gas flow to several columns later in the
study (refer to Table II).
                          11

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As previously mentioned, the quality of the feedwater to all
columns was controlled by a second "polishing" deionization
and the mean temperature of the column atmospheres was regu-
lated at 55°F to simulate actual mine conditions.  Feedwater
analyses can be seen in Table XXVII.

The role of water flow rate on pyrite oxidation was studied
by varying the water flow rate in an air blanketed column
in Phase I and the same column in a nitrogen atmosphere
in Phase II (See Table II).

Aerated water was used in Phase II on Column No. 2 in order
to determine the effects of air saturated versus deaerated
water on acid production under the same atmosphere (See
Table XXXVI for Column No. 2 influent and effluent dis-
solved oxygen concentrations).

The total iron leached out in an air atmosphere for the
entire 149 days of operation was 129.5 grams or less than
1.90% of the total available iron.  The total iron removed
under a nitrogen atmosphere for the same period of time was
less than 0.085% of the available iron.

A detailed log of the column operation is presented as
Table XIII and graphic representation of the major para-
meters as a function of time is shown in Figures XXI
through XXIX.
                          12

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                       SECTION VI

                        'RESULTS
Internal Con's is ten cy

The data obtained throughout this study was evaluated pri-
marily by a statistical analysis of the variance between the
total iron concentrations in the effluent water discharge
from the various columns.  The 1% level of significance was
used as the predetermined rejection level in all cases.
Total iron concentrations were chosen as the test parameter
because of the relatively high degree of accuracy of this
analysis (total iron was analyzed according to ASTM methods
with a sensitivity of 0.1 ppm).  Sulfate analyses made
during this study were found to be much less reliable than
the other parameters.

The sequence of operation followed in this study resulted in
triplicate operation in Columns 1, 2, and 3 under a nitrogen
atmosphere and in Columns 4, 5 and 6 under an air atmosphere
in Phase I.  In order to verify the internal consistency of
the test results, the variance of total iron concentrations
between the related columns was determined.  The difference
in the effluent between the three nitrogen columns was
found to be negligible at the 1% level of significance
(refer to Table V), therefore, Column 3 will be used as the
basis for all further discussions regarding nitrogen blank-
eted pyrite since this was a control column and the operat-
ing conditions were not varied between Phase I and Phase II.

The effluent total iron concentration from the air columns
was found to be significantly different. (See Table VII).
Theoretically, the acid production from these three columns
should have been the same since the pyrite bed and operating
conditions were identical (corrections were made for differ-
ences in water flow rate). For the purpose of further dis-
cussions, Column 6 will be considered representative of an
air blanketed pyrite column.  Column 6 was chosen because
it was operated as a control column without any departures
from the planned procedure for the duration of the study.
                          13

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Nitrogen Atmosphere

The  log of the acid concentration in the effluent from a
column under a nitrogen atmosphere was found to decrease
linearly with the log of time.  This effect is shown in
Figure XIX.  Conductivity and iron concentration were also
found to fall off in essentially the same manner.

The  actual iron sulfate and sulfuric acid generated under^a
nitrogen atmosphere during the course of this study repre
sents an insignificant fraction of the total available.  I±
one  assumes a discharge of 8.5 ml/min with an average con-
centration of 3.17 ppm of Fe, 149 days of operation repre-
sents only 5.79 grams or 0.013 pounds of iron over that
period of time.  This is only about 0.08% of the total avail-
able iron in the pyrite column.

An analysis of the variance between nitrogen blanketed columns
in Phase I and Phase II, based on effluent total iron con-
centrations, reveals that acid production was significantly
lower in the columns that had been initially operated under
an air atmosphere (See Table X).   It is interesting to note
that the shape of the curves for rate of fall off of concen-
tration is also different for pyrite which had been operated
under an air atmosphere and for the fresh pyrite with which
the  columns were packed.  This can be seen by comparing
Figures XIX and XX.   It is possible that oxidation during
air  stage resulted in a partial blinding of the most active
pyrite sites, thereby reducing the oxidation reaction in the
second phase.  Since only a small fraction of the available
iron sulfate and sulfuric acid was actually generated the
possibility of iron depletion under the air atmosphere
can  be ruled out.   A visual observation of pyrite removed
from the subject columns at the termination of this study
seems to substantiate the theory of reduced active surface
area due to blinding of the pyrite by oxidation products.

Air Atmosphere

The data obtained from daily analysis of the effluent water
discharge from pyrite under an air atmosphere is shown in
Figure XVIII.
                          14

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As previously stated, the air  atmosphere  control  column
 (Column 6) will be used as the basis  for  conclusions  of
air blanketed pyrite in this study.   A cation-anion balance
was made based on the average  results for Column  No.  6 for
the period project day 111 through 132 in order to determine
the accuracy of the analytical results  (See Table XV).
The calculated error was less  than 8% indicating  a rela-
tively close agreement.

Acid production under an air atmosphere decreased rapidly
during the first eight to ten  days of operation and then
started to climb very slowly for the  rest of the  operating
period  (See Figure XVIII).  By a comparison of the analysis
of variance between the periods project day 59 through 73
and project day 120 through 134  (See  Table VIII), we  can
conclude that there was not a  significant difference  between
the variances of effluent total iron  concentrations for
those periods and that the column had reached a state of
equilibrium.  This result does not agree  with the data
shown in Figure XVIII.  An inspection of  the means for the
two periods shows the mean for the later  period to be
higher than the mean for the earlier  period as shown  in
Figure XVIII.  However, when the variability of the data
is taken into account, the two means  cannot be established
as being different.  The quality of the early discharge,
in terms of acid, sulfate, total iron, and conductivity
appears to be substantially worse than that of near steady
state conditions at the end of the run.   This is  believed
to be due to the leaching of oxidation products which had
accumulated prior to column startup.  This trend  is evident
in all cases (Phase I and Phase II) where  the pyrite had
been exposed to an oxidizing atmosphere prior to  startup.
Assuming an average daily discharge of 12.25 liters,  149
days of operation with an average discharge of 71 ppm Fe
represents only 129.5 grams or 0.29 pounds of iron over that
period of time.  This is less than 1.9% of the total  avail-
able iron in the pyrite column.  If one assumes the same
rate of production, that is, 0.29 pounds  per 149  days, it
would take approixmately 4 years of operation to  leach all
of the available iron from the column.

Methane and Carbon Dioxide Atmospheres

The acid production in the column blanketed with  methane
 (Column 8) follows the same pattern as the columns blanketed
                           15

-------
with  nitrogen  gas  (See  Figure  XIX).  This  is  not  the  case
with  carbon  dioxide  (Column  9).  As  can be seen from  Figure
XIX the  conductivity  and  iron  in the effluent of  the  carbon
dioxide  column is not the  same as the nitrogen and  methane
columns.   However, the  acidity of the carbon  dioxide  was
the same  as  the others.   This  results from the fact that
the acidity  was measured by  the hot  phenolphthalein test.
In this  test dissolved  gases do not  contribute to the
result.   The conductivity  was  measured on  the cold  samples
so the contribution to  conductivity  of the  dissolved  carbon
dioxide  began  to become more significant as the concentration
of non-gaseous dissolved matter decreased.  This  causes the
conductivity curve for  carbon  dioxide to drift off  to the
right.  The  iron concentration in the effluent from the
carbon dioxide column was  found to fall off at a  different
rate  from  the  nitrogen  and methane columns.   This is  pre-
sumably  caused by the formation of a small  amount of  iron
carbonate.

An analysis  of variance between the  three nitrogen  blan-
keted columns  (1,2,3) in Phase I and the methane  column  (8)
in Phase I shows a difference  at the 5% level but not at
the 1% level (See Table IX).   The same analysis performed
on the nitrogen  column  (4) and the methane  column  (5)  in
Phase II does  not show a difference  at either level of
significance.   This indicates  that the performance  of
nitrogen and methane  as blanketing gases are  very nearly
the same, with methane possibly being very  slightly inferior
to nitrogen.

An analysis  of  the variance between  the methane column (3)
in Phase I and  the carbon  dioxide column (9)  in Phase I
shows the carbon dioxide to be definitely inferior  to
methane  (and by implication also inferior to  nitrogen) as
a blanketing gas (See Table XI).

Neither the nitrogen, the methane,  nor the  carbon dioxide
blanketed columns had reached a steady state  of acid  pro-
duction by the termination of  the study.  Iron, acidity,
sulfate and conductivity continued to decrease at a very
slow rate; it is believed  that acid  production would  have
reached undetectable values had the  experiment been carried
out for a longer period of time.
                          16

-------
As has been noted previously, the rate of response of
columns under a nitrogen atmosphere is much slower than
columns under an air atmosphere.  The time schedule of
the experiment called for reducing the water flow rate to
the nitrogen column about 25 days after the start of Phase
II.  However, the data shows that the iron concentration
was still noticeably falling when the water flow rate was
reduced.  Therefore, there is no solid base against which
to compare the effect of the change.  For this reason, no
similar conclusions can be drawn for changes in water flow
on a nitrogen column, but the expected result would be the
same.

Gas Mixtures

The lower limits of the oxidation process were studied in
Phase II by introducing small amounts of oxygen along with
the various blanketing gases.  The oxygen concentrations of
the primary carrier gases are shown in Table IV.  The
findings of this study are graphically illustrated in
Figure XVII.  While it has been already acknowledged that,
statistically, acid production varies under different inert
gas atmospheres, the gas mixtures have been compared on an
equal basis in order to determine the effects of oxygen
concentration.  From the graphical analysis, it is apparent
that acid production is clearly a function of the oxygen
partial pressure in the carrier gas and that a decrease in
oxygen will decrease the amount of acid formed.

It is difficult to determine how long it would take to
reach a steady state of acid production under the subject
atmospheres.  An examination of the daily effluent water
analyses seems to indicate a slight increase in acidic
parameters throughout the study.  Analyses may have been
influenced on several occasions by exhaustion of the prim-
ary deionizer resin bed (See Table XIII).  One can only
speculate on the effect of this interference.  The graphical
representation (Figure XVII) of the data was made on the
assumption that an equilibrium had been reached in these
columns and that there were no significant interferences
from the feedwater deionizer.

The almost perfect agreement of the actual points for
acidity, and the straight line through them is striking.
                          17

-------
Using the mean value reported for the period between project
day 54 and 73, the total iron concentration in the nitrogen
blanketed column had been reduced to 0.68% of the total
iron concentration in the effluent of an air blanketed
column; this is in comparison with 0.75| with methane and
1.3% with carbon dioxide.


Water Flow Versus Acid Production


The effects of water flow rate of pyrite oxidation were  to
be studied by decreasing the water flow to an air and a
nitrogen blanketed column under approximate steady state
conditions by 80%  (See Tables XXIII and XXXIII for detailed
data).  The effect of this reduction on an air column was
an immediate increase in the acid concentration of the
effluent discharge.  While this appears to be a substantial
increase in acid production, a closer analysis shows that
the weight rate of leaching under the two flow conditions
is practically identical.  The means and flow rates of air
column No. 7 for the periods under study were:

Project Days          Iron Means           Flow Rate
36 - 4662.8 ppm            8.5 ml/min.
56 - 66                315.8 ppm            1.8 ml/min.
81-91                 72.4 ppm            8.5 ml/min.

The average iron concentration before and after the change
in flow is 67.6 ppm.  It can be seen that the weight rate
if iron dischage is virtually uneffected by the change in
water flow:

                           67.6 x 8.5 = 574.6
                          315.8 x 1.8 = 568.4

The difference between the above two weight rates is 1%.
The average of the before and after value is used because
the iron curve was still rising slowly at the time of the
test.

Upon returning the water flow rate to normal in an air
atmosphere, the iron concentration immediately returned  to
the levels which would have been expected if the change  in
flow rate had not occurred.
                           18

-------
The points for carbon dioxide which do not  fall on  the
curves occur at a very low value.  As previously explained,
this is believed to be caused by the contribution of the
dissolved carbon dioxide in the water.  The two points on
the iron curve which are for carbon dioxide atmospheres
are slightly above the curve also.  This iron deviation
for carbon dioxide as well as the conductivity deviation
for carbon dioxide are exactly as would be  predicted by the
data shown in Figure XIX.

Analyses of the influent and effluent gases  (See Tables
XLVI through XLIX) indicate that not all of the available
oxygen present in the influent gases reacted with the
pyrite; this is presumably due to the relatively short
contact time within the columns.  In a typical air  column
with an air flow of 45 cc/min, approximately 19.35  grams of
oxygen per day would be applied.  The dissolved oxygen
content of the effluent water of an air blanketed column
was increased by approximately 7 ppm.  This solubility
reduces the available gaseous oxygen to 19.27 g/day.  The
average daily discharge water from a column operated under
an air atmosphere contained 0.87 g/day of iron or 0.01566
moles of iron per day.  Since one mole of iron reacts with
3.5 moles of oxygen, the oxygen reacting with the pyrite
was approximately 1.74 g/day.  This represents a calculated
9.1% reduction of the gaseous oxygen in the effluent gas.
The actual oxygen reduction observed in the air column
was 10.8%.  The calculated error is 16% which may be due
to an error in the gas sampling procedure,  gas chromato-
graph sensitivity or effluent iron analyses.  The calculated
error for the results of the theoretical oxygen consumption
versus actual oxygen consumption is approximately the same
in the Column 1, Phase II  (nitrogen +0.5%  oxygen)  and in
Column 9, Phase II  (carbon dioxide + 1.07%  oxygen)  as in the
air column.  The error involved in the column blanketed by
methane + 0.11% oxygen is considerably higher  (38%); how-
ever, in considering the extremely low oxygen concentration
being studied, a 38% error may well be the  result of gas
sampling error.  Analyses of the influent and effluent
gases of the inert gas blanketed columns indicated  a trace
amount of oxygen in the effluent gases for  the first week
of operation; oxygen was not detected in subsequent analyses
                           19

-------
Deaerated Versus Air Saturated Water

The results of the investigation of the effects of deaerated
versus air saturated water can be seen by comparing the data
in Tables XVII and XXIX.  The dissolved oxygen content of
the influent and effluent water is presented in Table XXXVI.

The test column  (Column No. 2) was operated under a nitrogen
atmosphere using deaerated water in Phase I and under the
same atmospheres using air saturated water in Phase II.  Acid
production, in terms of sulfate, iron, acidity, and con-
ductivity, increased slightly upon switching to an air
saturated feedwater.  While there is an obvious response to
the use of air saturated feedwater, the effluent water
quality does not appear to be significantly changed.  Again,
the questionable influence of the deionizer upsets through-
out Phase II make it difficult to accurately assess whether
or not an equilibrium had been established by the termination
of the study.  If we were to assume that steady state con-
ditions had been established, the total iron concentration
in the effluent water discharge was increased by 55% by the
use of air saturated water.  Although this appears to be a
substantial increase in the total iron content, the discharge
water still contains less than 1 ppm of iron.

The average daily iron discharge from a nitrogen blanketed
column using air saturated feedwater was 0.86 mg/1 of iron.

Based on Figure XVII this iron concentration in the effluent
is equivalent to an oxygen concentration in the gas stream
of 0.092% when using deaerated water.

The incoming nitrogen gas to the column contained 0.02%
oxygen.   The incoming water contained 8.5 ppm of dissolved
oxygen.   If this dissolved oxygen is converted back to an
equivalent concentration and in the gas stream, it is
equivalent to applying gas with 0.11% C>2 content and
deaerated feedwater as was done with the other columns.
The disagreement between the 0.092% oxygen calculated from
the iron content of the effluent and the 0.11% oxygen
content calculated from the input conditions is 16%.  This
is generally the same level of accuracy as has been found
in other measurements.   With only this very limited data
as a guide,  it must be concluded that only the total
oxygen applied controls the oxidation of the pyrite, and
that it makes no difference whether the oxygen is gaseous
or dissolved in the Water.
                           20

-------
In summary, the following conclusions were drawn from the
experimental data;

1.  The rate of acid production, in terms of sulfate, iron,
acidity, and conductivity, are directly proportional to the
oxygen partial pressure.

2.  Nitrogen and methane are slightly more effective than
carbon dioxide as blanketing gases in reducing the acid
production from coal mine pyrites.  This is particularly
true when dealing with low concentrations of iron, acidity,
etc.

3.  The performance of pyrite in production of acid seems to
be influenced to some extent by its history prior to being
tested for acid production.

4.  Water flow rate did not affect the amount of iron
leached from coal mine pyrites within the range of flow
rates studied.

5.  There is no difference in acid production between
applying oxygen in the gaseous phase versus applying
oxygen dissolved in the water phase.
                          21

-------
                      SECTION VII

                       GLOSSARY
Analysis of Variance - The degree of dispersion of the
results of two or more groups from their means.

Deaerator - Hot water heater used to remove the dissolved
oxygen from the water supply -

Deionizer - Mixed-bed ion exchange resin used to polish the
water supply.

Dispersion - Extent to which a collection of data spreads
around its central tendency.

Equilibrium - A steady state or balance between opposing
influences.

Level of Significance - The probability, given in percen-
tages, that a statistical statement is invalid.

Mean - Average value.

Pyrite - A common mineral that is found in association with
most coal seams and consists of iron disulfide.

Rejection Level - The tabulated value, corresponding to the
level of significance and sample conditions, which is used
as the basis for acceptance or rejection of the hypothesis.
When the calculated value exceeds the tabulated value, th
variance between the groups being studied is deemed signi-
ficant.
                          23

-------
                      SECTION VIII

                    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Mr. E. Dennis Escher, formerly of the Rice Division - NUS
Corporation, assisted in the design, operation, and data
evaluation of the work which was the basis for this report.

The pyrite used in this project was obtained through the
cooperation of the management of the Shawville Station of
the Pennsylvania Electric Corporation located near Clear-
field, Pennsylvania.

The support of the project by the Water Quality Office of
the Environmental Protection Agency and the help provided
by Mr. Donald J. O1Bryan, Jr., Mr. Eugene Harris, Dr. James
Shackelford, the Grant Project Officer and Ernst P. Hall,
Chief of the Pollution Control Analysis Branch, is acknow-
ledged with sincere thanks.

The primary investigators on this work were Joseph C. Troy
and John D. Robins of the Cyrus Wm. Rice Division - NUS
Corporation.
                           25

-------
                       SECTION IX

                       'REFERENCES
1.  Kinney, Edward C., "Extent of Acid Mine Pollution in
the United States Affecting Fish and Wildlife, " U. S.
Bureau of Sport Fisheries and Wildlife Circular 191, 1964,
Page 27.

2.  U. S. Public Health Service, "Acid Mine Drainage,"
87th Congress House Committee Print No. 183 April 16, 1962.

3.  Leitch, R. D., and Yart, W. P., "A Comparison of the
Adicidity of Water from Some Acitve and Abandoned Coal
Mines," Bureau of Mines Publication No. 2895, 1928.

4.  "Substantial Progress Reported in Mine Sealing Program,"
Coal Mining, XV  (February, 1938), pages 8-10.

5.  Shumate, K. S., and Smith, E. E., 2nd Symposium on Coal
Mine Drainage Research, Mellon Institute, May 1968.

6.  Braley, S. A., "An Evaluation of Mine Sealing, " Mellon
Institute Special Report on the Coal Industry Advisory
Committee to Orsanco,  Research Project No. 370-8, February,
1962.

7.  Braley, S. A., "Summary Report of Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania Industrial Fellowship Nos. 1 to 7 Inclusive,"
Mellon Institute fellowship No. 326B, 1954, pages 192-93.

8.  Bell, W. E., "Report of Studies of the Effect of Gas
Atmospheres on Pyrite Oxidation," C. W. Rice Division -
NUS Corporation report to FWPCA, Contract No. 14-12-404,
April, 1969.
                          27

-------
SECTION X




APPENDIX
    29

-------
DEMORALIZED
WATER SUPPLY -
FLOAT VALVE

STEAM
   SAMPLE
   LINE	
   ELEVATION OF WATER SUPPLY TO BE
   5'-0" ABOVE COLUMN INLET TO
   ACHIEVE GRAVITY FLOW
TO OTHER
COLUMNS
 -WARM  ^HOT   DRAIN
 WATER   WATER
FROM OTHER
 COLUMNS i—*
                                  ^
                                  /
                  -CONDUCTIVITY
                   SENSOR

                   UNI-BED
                   POLISHER
                                    COOLING
                                    WATER
                                    RETURN
COOLING
CONTROL UNIT
                                 COOLING
                                 WATER SUPPLY
COOLING    \ COOLING
RESERVOIR—* WATER  PUMP-
                                SECTION OF .032" I. D.CAPILLARY  TUBING
                                ENCASED IN 1/4" O.D. ALUMINUM TUBING
                                LENGTH AS REQUIRED
                                	4	
VENT

BUBBLE
TUBE
                                                                : *—SAMPLE
                                                                   SEPTUM

                                                                   FLOWMETER

                                                                   FILTER
— GAS SUPPLY

TO OTHER
COLUMNS
                                                  REGULATOR

                                                  GAS
                                                           COMPRESSED GAS
                                                             CYLINDERS
                                                                                     WASTE

                  WATER TRAP a
                  SEPARATOR
                                                                 INSULATION
                                                                 BLOCK
                                SAMPLE
                                FLASK
           FLOW  DIAGRAM-PYRITE COLUMN  STUDY-9 COLUMN  SYSTEM
                                             FIGURE I

-------
COOLING  WATER
RETURN TO
RESERVOIR
SEE FIGURE
               mk.-AK
SECTION OF .032"I.D.
CAPILLARY TUBING
ENCASED IN I/4"O.D.
ALUMINUM TUBING-
LENGTH AS REQUIRED

FEED WATER
SUPPLY-SEE FIGURE "2IE
(FIGURE X COLUMN 2 ONLY

1/4"O.D. ALUMINUM
TUBING	
3/8" ID. PLASTIC
TUBING	
COOLING  WATER
FROM PUMP
SEE FIGURE
mk.-AH
SEE FIGURE 12

mk-AA
SEE FIGURE 3ZL
1/4" O.D. POLYETHYLENE
TUBING	
          mk-AA
          SEE FIGURE
                                                  mkr-AB
                                                  SEE FIGURE HT
           GAS SUPPLY
           SEE FIGURE Xt
       1/4" 0. D. ALUMINUM
       TUBING
          mk-AG
          SEE FIGURE Y
GAS AND WATER TO WATER
TRAP-SEE FIGURE 3ZH
                                           NOTE:  FOR MARK NO.
                                                DESCRIPTION SEE
                                                BILL OF MATERIAL
                                                FIGURE
 COLUMN ASSEMBLY-(TYPICAL 9 COLUMNS)
                           FIGURE H
                              31

-------
  GAS INLET
          oo
           o>
DRILL 7/16"DIA.X
5/8" DEEP	
                     B
                                                    mkrAB
                                                    SEE FIGURED:
                                                    WATER INLET
PLAN
                                        DR|L|_ |/8" DIA. XI 3/8" DEEP

                                        DRI LL ,7/16" DIA.X S/&" DEEP
                                        TAP 1/4 'N.P.T.— r
1

J
c
c



J
s~
c
1


5 I/'
•^
1 „
,1 1/4",
< 2
roiA.

oma
V^
5/8" %
	 ... -^.
^




                         SECTION  A-A
                                                  DRILL 1/8" DIA.X
                                                  5/8  DEEP
                                         DRILL 1/8" DIA. X 2 5/8" DEEP
                                         DRILL 7/l6"DIA.X 5/8" DEEP
                                         TAP 1/4" N.P.T.-
                                         dtBffi
                         SECTION B-B
                   TOP INLET  BLOCK
                                            NOTE:  FOR MARK NO.
                                                 DESCRIPTION SEE
                                                 BILL OF MATERIAL
                                                 FIGURE ZH
                            FIGURE TH


                              32

-------
SLOPE TO CENTER
OF BLOCK 	
 oo
                                                mk.-AH
                                                SEE  FIGURE E
                                              DRILL 1/8" DIA.X
                                              9/16" DEEP
                          PLAN
DRILL 1/8" DIA. X 2 11/16" DEEP
DRILL 7/16" DIA.X 5/8"DEEP

TAP 1/4" N.P.T.	
                         5 I/4UDIA.
"co "ao "oo
ro

L
t 1
^|

c 	 "f 	
f
^ 	
^\ 4" DIA.
, \ 33/4"DIA. ^
\


^^



,_ 	 — '


	 w
-^"iniBm1
-\HIIIH
Xo
/i
                       SECTION A-A
                                         NOTE:  FOR MARK NO.
                                             DESCRIPTION SEE
                                             BILL OF MATERIAL
                                             FIGURE
            BOTTOM OUTLET  BLOCK

                          FIGURE IS
                            33

-------
13 HOLES-1/2"DlA
DRILL
mk-AG
SEE FIGURE H
                       000 HH
               .3/4", 1.3/4". 1,3/4". 1,3/4",
                I 15/16"
                       PLAN
FIBERGLASS SCREEN
mk.-AF	
THIS SIDE UP WHEN
INSTALLED IN BOTTOM
OUTLET BLOCK,SEE
FIGURE
                   SECTION  A-A
                                         UJ
                                         i
                                         T
                                      NOTE"  FOR MARK NO.
                                          DESCRIPTION SEE
                                          BILL OF MATERIAL
                                          FIGURE 2H
          RETAINING  PLATE ASSEMBLY
                        FIGURE Y

                           34

-------
                 7 1/2 DIA.
                 BOLT CIRCLE
                                             mk.-AA
                                             SEE FIGURE
UJ
oo
                                          8 HOLES
                                          DRILL 5/16" DIA.
t
                                      NOTE:  FOR MARK NO.
                                          ASCRIPTION SEE
                                          BILL OF MATERIAL
                                          FIGURE 231
          COLUMN SUPPORT PLATE
                       FIGURE TEL
                          35

-------
&
         oir
         0=)
         cruj
         >-UJ
         0.05
VENT
                     DRAIN
    I/4"O.D.
    POLYETHYLENE TUBE
       8 WATER
    38X 200mm
    TEST TUBE
    WATER TRAP a
    THERMOMETER

    INSULATION
    BLOCK	
                      AM
                            CO
                                       -GAS
                                       GLASS TUBE-22mm O.D.
                                       X 4-0" LONG (STANDARD
                                       WALL) BUBBLE TUBE

                                       -SEPTUM (SAMPLE)
                 -TAPERED TO FINE POINT

                 •CLAMP

                 - 1/4" I.D.  RUBBER TUBE
                   (TYPICAL)
                                     —
                                      •TAPERED TO FINE POINT
               / i— 38 X 200mm TEST TUBE
              / / WATER TRAP
                                        •VENT

        WATER
            vn
WASTE
                              1000 ml
                              SAMPLE
                              FLASK
                                                FLOOR LINE
WASTE WATER ft WASTE  GAS DISPOSAL  SYS
                         FIGURE
                            36

-------
U)
        SAMPLE LINE

        1/4"O.D. ALUMINUM
        TUBE (TYPICAL)
         FEED WATER MANIFOLD

         1/2" O.D. ALUMINUM
         TUBE	
         WARM WATER
         FROM DEAERATOR
         SEE FIGURE IX
TO COLUMNS
SEE FIGURE E
    A.
             COOLING
           CONTROL UNIT
             mk.-AQ
3/8" I.D. PLASTIC
TUBE (TYPICAL)
              COOLING WATER
              RETURN MANIFOLD

              1/2"O.D. ALUMINUM
              TUBE

              CONDUCTIVITY
              SENSOR
               FROM COOLING COIL ON
               COLUMNS SEE FIGURE E
                                                                            TO COOLING COIL ON
                                                                           COLUMNS SEE FIGURE H
                                                                                   _A_
                                                             3/8"l.D. PLASTIC
                                                             TUBE (TYPICAL)
                                                             COOLING WATER
                                                             SUPPLY MANI.FOLD
                                                             COOLING WATER
                                                             PUMP mk.-AS
                               NOTE: FOR MARK NO.
                                   DESCRIPTION SEE
                                   BILL OF MATERIAL
                                   FIGURE 2H
                              FEED  a COOLING  WATER  SUPPLY
                                                FIGURE VTTT

-------
                                         I 2" 0. D. ALUMINUM
                                         TUBING (TYPICAL)
                                             STEAM VENT
                                             FLOAT VALVE
                                             mk.-AV
                                         6 W.X5 D. XI2  LG.
                                         FLOAT BOX
                                           •DEMINERALIZED
                                            WATER
                                   	 HEAT EXCHANGER
                                          mk.-AU

                                   WARM DEAERATED WATER
                                   TO COOLING RESERVOIR
                                   SEE  FIGURE 10JJ
                                          HEAT EXCHANGER
                                          rnk.-AU
-WARM WATER
-HOT  DEAERATED
 WATER
CONDENSATE
DRAIN
                                      NOTE:   FOR MARK NO.
                                          DESCRIPTION SEE
                                          BILL OF MATERIAL
                                          FIGURE ZTI
                 DEAERATOR
                      FIGURE IK

                        38

-------
   GAS SUPPLY
   SEE FIGURE
                AIR SUPPLY
                FROM LAB.
                COMPRESSOR
                     WATER
       o
                              , r  i—THERMOMETER
   O
                                          AIR-

          is 8
or
>-
D.
            LJ
            uj
            CO
                    V
                     4-
                                                   VENT-
                                               TAPER TO
                                               FINE POINT
               L—1000 ml
                SAMPLE  FLASK

                FEED WATER SUPPLY -
                SEE FIGURE WE
                           GLASS TUBE Z2mm O.D
                           X4-0" LONG (STANDARD
                           WALL) BUBBLE TUBE

                           TAPER TO FINE POINT

                                       CLAMP
AERATED FEEDWATER SYSTEM  (COLUMN  NO  2)
                           FIGURE z
                             39

-------
                   TO TOP INLET BLOCK
                    ON COLUMNS SEE
                       FIGURE H
                    mmi
1/4" O.D, ALUMINUM
TUBING (TYPICAL)
FLOWMETER
mk-AM
(TYPICAL)
                                        1/4"LINE FILTER
                                        mk.-AN
                                        (TYPICAL)
                                            REGULATOR
                                            mk.-AP
                                            (TYPICAL)
                                    NOTE:  FOR MARK NO.
                                       DESCRIPTION SEE
                                       BILL OF MATERIAL
                                       FIGURE TTT
         COMPRESSED GAS SUPPLY
                      FIGURE

                         40

-------
Mark    No.
 No.   Reg'd       Description          Mat'l

 AA     18    Plate 1/8" x 8 1/2" x    C. Stl.
               10 1/4" Long
 AB      91 1/8" Thick x 5 1/4"    Acrylic
               Diameter                Plastic
 AC     18    4" Gaskets Kimax No.     Rubber
               7256
 AD     18    4" Flanges Kimax No.     Alum.
               7151
 AE      9    4" Glass Pipe x 6'-0"    Glass
               Long Kimax
 AF      93 7/8" Diameter Fine
               Mesh Fiberglass Screen
 AG      9    Plate 1/8" x 3 7/8"      S. Stl.
               Diameter
 AH      91 1/8" Thick x 5 1/4"    Acrylic
               Diameter                Plastic
 AK    144    1/4" Diameter Bolts      Stl.
               w/nuts x 2 1/2" Long
 AL      9    1" Thick Insulation x
               l'-3" x 5'-10" Long
               Fiberglass Insulation
 AM      9    Flowmeter-Matheson
               No. 610 - Mounting Type
               No. 620 - Model No.
               622PB-1
 AN      9    Line Filter - Matheson   Brass
               No. 410X
 AP      4    Single State General
               Purpose Regulator -
               Matheson Model No.
               1L-320
 AQ      1    Constant Flow Portable
               Cooling Unit Blue M
               Electric Co. Model No.
               PCC-24A-2
 AR      1    Demineralizer Culligan
               Unibed Model No.
               E68-9223
 AS      1    Cooling Water Pump
               Eastern Centrifugal
               Model No. D-6
 Remarks

See Fig VI

See Fig III

See Fig II

See Fig II

See Fig II

See Fig V

See Fig V

See Fig IV

See Fig II

See Fig II


See Fig XI



See Fig XI

See Fig XI



See Fig VIII



See Fig VIII


See Fig VIII
                    BILL OF MATERIAL

                       FIGURE XII
                           41

-------
Mark    No.
 No.   Req'd         Description        Mat'1    Remarks

 AT      1    Water Heater - A.O.                See Fig IX
               Smith Mark III
               Model No.  GED-40
               40 Gal.  Cap.  or Equal
 AU      2    Heater Exchangers                 See Fig IX
 AV      1    MPT Float Valve 1/2"               See Fig IX
               Grainger Stock No.
               2x524 with 4  1/2"
               Diameter Float Stock
               No.  2x526
 AW      1    Gate Valve  - 1/4"                 See Fig VIII
             BILL OF MATERIAL (Continued)

                      FIGURE XII


                          42

-------
               FIGURE  XIII




WASTEWATER AND WASTE GAS  DISPOSAL SYSTEM
                  43

-------
FIGURE XIV




DEAERATOR





   44

-------
        FIGURE XV




COLUMN COOLING ARRANGEMENT







           45

-------
                  FIGURE XVI




APPARATUS AND GENERAL ARRANGEMENT OF  EQUIPMENT

-------
      ACID PRODUCTION. IRON PRODUCTION

      8 CONDUCTIVITY Vs Oa CONTENT OF
                 CARRIER  GAS
  1000
 II

5 W
Q. O
Q. I


-g "oo

z o
Q >

< o  10
1 g
z z
o o
UJ
o
z
o
o
   1.0
   O.I
    0.01
            A
                     FIGURE YVTT
                     *>
                              CARRIER GAS

                              0 NITROGEN

                              A METHANE

                              m CARBON DIOXIDE
                        1.0
10
100
               CONCENTRATION OF OXYGEN IN

                  CARRIER GAS IN PERCENT
                                   = x
                     47

-------
IOOO
    TYPICAL  COLUMN  PERFORMANCE  ON  AIR
                    FIGURE  XVIII
 100
z
o
<
a:
UJ
u
z
o
o
  10
                             CONDUCTIVITY  IN  MICROMHOSj

                               ACIDITY  IN  PPM        i

                                  IRON  IN  PPM        I
  10
    LO
    10

TIME IN  DAYS
                                                 100
                                                    150
                         48

-------
TYPICAL  CURVE FOR RATE OF  FALLOFF OF

 ACID 8 IRON PRODUCTION  FOR  FRESH

    PACKED  COLUMNS WITH INERT GAS
tlJ
o
z
o
o
   1000
    100
                FIGURE
       CONDUCTIVITY IN MICROMHOS

         ACIDITY IN PPM

           IRON IN PPM
                                    N2,CH4,C02
                     10

                 TIME IN DAYS
                     49

-------
TYPICAL  CURVE FOR RATE OF FALLOFF OF ACID

 8  IRON  PRODUCTION  WHEN  BLANKETING  GAS

    WAS  SWITCHED FROM  AIR  TO EITHER

                 N2 OR  CH4

                  FIGURE

     1000
      100
  o
  I-
  <
  LU
  o
  z
  o
  o
          CONDUCTIVITY

            ACIDITY IN

              IRON IN
IN MICROMHOS

PPM

PPM
        1.0
                 100
                  TIME
                       50

-------
 1000
 100
  10
<
a:
o
o
  O.I
  0.01
                                                      OPERATING CONDITIONS
                                                    DAYS 0 TO 79 - NITROGEN GAS
                                                    DAYS 80 TO 150 - NITROGEN + 0.5 %
                                                              OXYGEN
                                                       WATER FLOW CONSTANT
                                                   11 LI III1TI1111 ItlHTI II1
                                                     CONDUCTIVITY- IN MICROMHOS
                                                     ACIDITY	IN mo/I
                                                     IRON	IN mg/l
                                   PROJECT DAY NUMBER
             COLUMN  1-TIME  VS  CONCENTRATION  FOR
                            CONDUCTIVITY. ACIDITY,  IRON &  PH
                                       FIGURE 331

-------
          KX>0
ui
          100
          10
       i
       iu
       o
       o
          0.1
          0.01
                                                         OPERATING  CONDITIONS
                                                        DAYS 0 TO 83 - NITROGEN GAS
                                                        DAYS 84TO ISO-NITROGEN GAS +
                                                                  AIR SATURATED
                                                                  WATER
                                                          WATER FLOW CONSTANT
                                                        CONDUCTIVITY- IN MICROMHOS
                                                        ACIDITY	IN mg/l
                                                        IRON	IN mg/l
                                                       m
                                        CONDUCTIVITY I
                       20    30    40   50    60    70   80    90    100    110    120   130    140    ISO
                                           PROJECT DAY NUMBER
                     COLUMN 2-TIME  VS  CONCENTRATION  FOR
                                    CONDUCTIVITY, ACIDITY,  IRON  81  PH
                                               FIGURE

-------
        1000
Ul
U)
        100
        10

     o
        0. I
        aoi
                                                          OPERATING CONDITIONS
                                                         DAYS 0 TO ISO-NITROGEN GAS
                                                          WATER FLOW CONSTANT
                                                        iiiiiiiiiiiiiiii-mtttiiiiiiuti:
                                                         CONDUCTIVITY - IN MICROMHOS
                                                         ACIDITY	IN ma /I
                                                         IRON	IN ma/I
                10    20    30    40    50    60    70    80    90    100    110   120    130    I4O   ISO
                                          PROJECT DAY NUMBER
                    COLUMN 3-TIME  VS  CONCENTRATION  FOR
                                   CONDUCTIVITY, ACIDITY, IRON  S  pH
                                             FIGURE

-------
Ln
    §
                              CONDUCTIVITY
                              •
                           OPERATING CONDITIONS
                        I  DAYS 0 TO 77 — AIR
                          DAYS 78 TO 150 - NITROGEN GAS

                            WATER FLOW CONSTANT
                           CONDUCTIVITY - IN MICROMHOS
                           ACIDITY	IN mg/l
                           IRON	IN mo/1
      0.01
                                       PROJECT DAY NUMBER
                   COLUMN 4 - TIME  VS  CONCENTRATION  FOR
                                  CONDUCTIVITY,  ACIDITY,  IRON  a   PH
                                          FIGURE

-------
       woo
(J1
       to
 OPERATING CONDITIONS

DAYS 0 rO 80 - AIR
DAYS 81 TO ISO — METHANE GAS

  WATER FLOW CONSTANT
                          CONDUCTIVITY- IN MICROMHOS
                                 IN mg/l
                                 IN mg/l
       O.I
       0.01
                                      PROJECT DAY NUMBER
                 COLUMN  5 - TIME  VS  CONCENTRATION  FOR
                                CONDUCTIVITY, ACIDITY. IRON  a  PH
                                          FIGURE	

-------
       1000
Ul
(Ti
       100
        10
o
I
8
5
o
       O.I
       0.01
                                                               OPERATING CONDITIONS
                                                              DAYS 0 TO 150-AIR
                                                               WATER FLOW CONSTANT
                                                              CONDUCTIVITY - IN MCROMHOS
                                                              ACIDITY	IN mg/l
                                                              IRON	IN mg/l
               10    20    30    40   50   60
                                                   80    90    100   110   120    130    140    ISO
                                        PROJECT  DAY NUMBER
                  COLUMN  6 - TIME  VS  CONCENTRATION  FOR
                                  CONDUCTIVITY, ACIDITY.  IRON  &  PH
                                           FN3JRE XXVI

-------
       1000
U1
     <
     a:
     8
                     .COLUMN OPERATING
                      DIFFICULTIES
  OPERATING CONDITIONS
DAYS 0 TO 105-AIR
DAYS 106 TO 150-NITROGEN
   WATER FLOW REDUCED
DAYS 50 TO 77
DAYS 134 TO 150
     HF
                                                  CONDUCTIVITY- IN MICROMHOS
                                                  ACIDITY	IN mj/l
                                                  IRON	IN ing/ I
                                           60    70    80    90    100    110    120    130    140   150
                                          PROJECT  DAY NUMBER
                   COLUMN 7 - TIME VS   CONCENTRATION  FOR
                                    CONDUCTIVITY, ACIDITY,  IRON  a  PH
                                              FIGURE

-------
01
CO
        10
     u
     o
     I
                                                            OPERATING CONDITIONS
                                                          IDAYS 0 TO 80-METHANE
                                                          DAYS 81 TO ISO-METHANE +
                                                                   QJSfc OXYGEN
                                                            WATER FLOW CONSTANT
                                                          CONDUCTIVITY- IN MCROMHOS
                                                          ACIDITY	IN mg/l
                                                          IRON	M mo/I
        O.I
       0.01
               10    20    30    40    50    60    70    80    90    100   110    120    130   140   ISO
                                         PROJECT DKf  NUMBER
                   COLUMN 8 - TIME  VS  CONCENTRATION  FOR
                                   CONDUCTIVITY. ACIDITY,  IRON  a  pH
                                             FIGURE

-------
        1000
Cn
        100
        10
     UJ
     o
        O.I
        0.01
                                «-CONDUCTIVITY
                                                                       OPERATING CONDITIONS
                                                                     DAYS 0 TO 83-CARBON DIOXIDE GAS
                                                                     DAYS 84 TO 150-CARBON DIOXIDE
                                                                              GAS+I.O %OXYGEN
                                                                        WATER FLOW CONSTANT
CONDUCTIVITY- IN MICROUHOS
ACIDITY	IN mg/l
IRON	IN mg/l
                                          PROJECT  DAY NUMBER
                    COLUMN 9 - TIME  VS   CONCENTRATION  FOR
                                    CONDUCTIVITY, ACIDITY,  IRON  &  pH
                                              FIGURE  XXIX

-------
                        TABLE  I

                COLUMN OPERATING CONDITIONS
                          PHASE I
Column

  1
  2
  3d)
  4
  5
     Gas

Nitrogen
Nitrogen
Nitrogen
Air
Air
Air
Air
            Methane
            Carbon Dioxide
Gas Flow
cc/minute

   45
   45
   45
   45
   45
   45
   45
                     45(2)
                     45
Water Flow
ml/minute

   8.5
   8.5
   8.5
   8.5
   8.7
   8.5
   8.5(3)
   1.8
   8.5
   8.5
   8.5
                          PHASE II
Column
  2
  3(D
  4
  5
  6(D
  7
  8

  9
     Gas

Nitrogen +0.5%
 Oxygen
Nitrogen
Nitrogen
Nitrogen
Methane
Air
Nitrogen
Gas Flow
cc/minute

   45

   45
   45
   45
   30
   45
   45
Methane +0.1%       45
 Oxygen
99% Carbon Dioxide   30
 1% Oxygen
Water Flow
ml/minute

   8.5

   8.5C4)
   8.5
   8.5
   8.7
   8.5
   8.50)
   1.8
   8.5
   8.5

   8.5
(1)These columns serve as controls.
(2)Gas Flow was decreased to 30 cc/minute on project day 63,
(3)water flow rate was varied in order to determine the
   effects on acid production.
(4)Air saturated water.
                          60

-------
                                    TABLE II

                           COLUMN GAS AND WATER FLOW DATA
                             Water Flow Rate
                               (ml/minute)
           Column Temp.
                                                                     Dissolved Oxygen
                             		   In Feedwater^i)
Column   Phase IPhase II   Phase I  Phase II   Phase I  Phase II   Phase IPhase II
Gas Flow Rate
 (cc/minute)
  1
  2
  3
  4
  5
  6
  7
  8
  9
           45
           45
           45
           45
           45
           45
           45
           45'
           45
           45
           45
           45
           45
           30
           45
           45
           45
           30
8.5
8.5
8.5
8,5
8.7
8.5
8.5(2)
8,5
8,5
8.5
8
8
8.5
8.7
8.5
8.5(2)
8,5
8.5
55
55
55
55
55
55
55(3)
55
55
55
55
55
55
55
55
55(3)
55
55
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
8
0

0
0
0
0
0
(!)A deaerator drain line problem occurred on project day 136  causing  an increase in
   the dissolved oxygen concentration of approximately 1,0 ppm.   This  condition was
   corrected on project day 141.
(2)The water flow rate was reduced to 1.8 ml/minute on project day 49,  returned to
   8.5 ml/minute on project day 77 and reduced again to 1.8 ml/minute  on project day
   133 in order to study the effects of water flow rate on acid production.
(3)The reduced water flow rate (refer to (2)  above)  resulted in an effluent  water
   temperature of approximately 65°F.  This value,  which is higher than expected, is
   believed to be due to the increased detention time in the effluent  water  receiving
   vessel rather than the actual  effluent water temperature.
(4)The gas reserve became very low on project day 63 and the gas flow  rate was
   decreased to 30 cc/minute and  remained at  this rate through project day  81.

-------
                       TABLE III

                      PYRITE ANALYSIS
A sample of ground iron pyrite was examined by X-ray diffrac-
tion and iron pyrites, FeS2/ was identified as the principal
crystalline component.

Five very weak lines could not be assigned.  The intensity
of the pyrite pattern indicates that probably at least 75%
of the sample is pyrite.

A portion of the sample was heated to about 500°C overnight
to convert it to the oxide form.  The weight loss was 38.06%.
Semi-quantitative spectrochemical analysis of the ignited
sample revealed the following information:

          Element                  Approximate %

            Fe                         25
            Si                          1
            Al                          0.1
            Mn                          0.05
            Ti                          0.03
            Ca,Cu,Ni,Sn            Traces (less than 0.01%)

The following elements were looked for but not found:  Ag,
As, B, Ba,  Be, Fi,  Cd, Co, Cr, Hg, Mg, Mo, Na, Pb,  Sb, V,
Zn, and Zr.
                          62

-------
                        TABLE  IV

                   INFLUENT GAS  ANALYSES
                MANUFACTURERS  SPECIFICATIONS
                                Constituent Gases
Cylinder Gas N2 C02 CH^_ 02
Nitrogen (1)
Carbon Dioxide (1)
Methane (!)
Air(D
Nitrogen + 0.5%
Oxygen (2)
Methane + 0.1%
Oxygen ( 3 )
Carbon Dioxide +
1% Oxygen*4)
99.5
Trace
-
78.9
99.477
—
-
0.002
99.8
-
0.03
—
-
98.9300
-
-
99.5
-
-
99.8875
-
0.02
0.05
0.05
20.9
.5230
.1125
1.0700
   Manufacturers minimum guaranteed purity

(2)Certified Analytical Report Lab. No. 56-10579-70
   (Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.)

(3)Certified Analytical Report Lab. No. 56-10628-70
   (Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.)

(4)certified Analytical Report Lab. No. 56-11982-70
   (Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.)
NOTE: The percentage not accounted for in the above
      analyses is composed of varying amounts of argon,
      ethane, propane and higher hydrocarbons and water
                           63

-------
                                          TABLE  V
                      ANALYSIS  OF  THE  VARIANCE  OF  EFFLUENT  TOTAL  IRON
                  CONCENTRATION  BETWEEN NITROGEN BLANKETED PYRITE  COLUMNS
    Time Period - Project  Day  54  through  73(2)

    Means - Column  1  (Phase  I  - Nitrogen) ..........  0.445 ppm of Fe
            Column  2  (Phase  I  - Nitrogen) ..........  0.490 ppm of Fe
            Column  3  (Phase  I  - Nitrogen) ..........  0.475 ppm of Fe
    Computation:
CTl

Between
Within
Total
Sum of Squares
0.02
0.27
0.29
df
2
57
59
Mean Square
.01
.005

F Ratio
F = ' =20
.005 Q5 (2,57) = 3.16
F-01 (2,57) = 5.0
    Conclusion:  There is not a significant difference  between  the effluent total
                 iron  concentrations  from pyrite under nitrogen atmospheres at
                 either the 5% or 1%  level of  significance.

    Note:   (1)Total iron was chosen as  the test  parameter because  of the high degree of
              accuracy of the total iron  analysis.
            (2)The time period used is believed to  represent  a near steady state of acid
              production.

-------
                                          TABLE  VI
                        ANALYSIS OF THE VARIANCE OF EFFLUENT TOTAL IRON
                     CONCENTRATION BETWEEN AIR BLANKETED PYRITE COLUMNS
                                        (Columns 4 & 6)
      Time Period - Project Day 54 through 73(2)
      Means - Column 4 (Phase I - Air)	77.3 ppm of Fe
              Column 6 (Phase I - Air)	69.5 ppm of Fe
      Computation:
Ul

Between
Within
Total
Sums of Squares
608.4
37267.2
37875.6
df
1
38
39
Mean Square
608.40
980.72

F Ratio
F _ 608.40 _ 600
* 980.72
F>Q5 (1,38) = 4.10
F.oi (1,38) = 7.35
      Conclusion:  There is not a significant difference between the effluent total
                   iron concentrations from pyrite under air atmospheres in Columbus
                   4 and 6 at either the 5% or 1% level of significance.

      Note:   (1)Total iron was chosen as the test parameter because of the high degree of
                accuracy of the total iron analysis.
             (2)The time period used is believed to represent a near steady state of acid
                production.

-------
                                  TABLE VII
                  ANALYSIS OF THE VARIANCE OF EFFLUENT TOTAL IRON
               CONCENTRATION BETWEEN AIR BLANKETED PYRITE COLUMNS(1)
                                  (Columns 4, 5,  & 6)


Time Period - Project Day 54 through 73(2)

Means - Column 4  (Phase I - Air)	77.3 ppm of Fe
        Column 5  (Phase I - Air)	65.2 ppm of Fe
        Column 6  (Phase I - Air)	69.5 ppm of Fe
Computation:(3)

Between
Within
Total
Sum of Squares
.082
.17
.252
df
2
56
58
Mean Square
.041
.003

F Ratio
F _ .041 _ ,3 —
F .003 1J>6/
F
-------
                                    TABLE VIII

           ANALYSIS OF THE VARIATION OF EFFLUENT TOTAL IRON CONCENTRATION
         EFTWEEN AN AIR BLANKETED CONTROL COLUMN IN PHASE I AND PHASE II(D


Time Period - Project day 59 through 73 in Phase I and 120 through 134 in Phase II

Means - Phase I - Air	70.63 ppm of Fe
        Phase II - Air	82.77 ppm of Fe
Computation:

Between
Within
Total
Sum of Squares
1096.87
13924.48
15021.35
df
1
28
29
Mean of Square
1096.87
497.30

F Ratio
v 1096.87 0 01
* 497.30
F>Q5 (1,28) = 4.20
F>01 (1,28) = 7.66
Conclusion:
Note:
      There  is  not a significant  difference  between  the  effluent  total
      iron concentration  in  Phase I  and  Phase  II  of  an air  blanketed column
      at  either the 5%  or 1% level of  significance indicating  that a
      steady state of acid production  has  been reached.

   Total  iron was  chosen  as  the test parameter because of the  high degree  of
   accuracy  of  the total  iron analysis.
(2)The time  period used is believed  to represent  a near  steady state of  acid
   production.

-------
                                           TABLE IX

                ANALYSIS OF THE VARIANCE OF EFFLUENT TOTAL IRON CONCENTRATION
              BETWEEN NITROGEN AND METHANE BLANKETED PYRITE COLUMNS IN PHASE I (1)
     Time Period - Project day 54 through 73 (2)

     Means - Column 1  (Nitrogen) ............... 0.445 ppm of Fe
             Column 2  (Nitrogen) ............... 0.490 ppm of Fe
             Column 3  (Nitrogen) ............... 0.475 ppm of Fe
             Column 8  (Methane) ............... 0.520 ppm of Fe
     Computation:
CO

Between
Within
Total
Sum of Squares
0.06
0.36
0.42
df
3
76
79
Mean Square
0.02
0.005

F Ratio
F _ 0.02 = 4 0
0.005 *U
F<05 (3,76) = 2.74
F.01 (3,76) = 4.09
     Conclusion:   There is a significant difference in the total iron concentration
                  between nitrogen and methane atmospheres at the 5% but not  at  the  1%
                  level of significance.

     Note:   (1)Total iron was chosen as the test parameter because of the high degree of
               accuracy of the total iron analysis.
            (2)The time period used is believed to represent a near steady  state of  acid
               production.

-------
                                     TABLE X
           ANALYSIS OF THE VARIANCE OF EFFLUENT  TOTAL IRON CONCENTRATION
            BETWEEN NITROGEN BLANKETED PYRITE  COLUMNS IN PHASE I AND A
              NITROGEN BLANKETED PYRITE COLUMN IN  PHASE  II WHICH HAD
                     ORIGINALLY BEEN UNDER AN  AIR  ATMOSPHERE (!) (2)
Time Period - Project Day 43 through 57  for Columns  1,  2,  and  3  and  Project
              Day 120 through 134 for Column  4<3)

Means - Column 1  (Phase I - Nitrogen)	0.600 ppm of  Fe
        Column 2  (Phase I - Nitrogen)	0.679 ppm of  Fe
        Column 3  (Phase I - Nitrogen)	0.686 ppm of  Fe
        Column 4  (Phase II - Nitrogen)	0.552 ppm of  Fe
Computation:

Between
Within
Total
Sum of Squares
.18
.62
.80
df
3
53
56
Mean Square
.06
.012

F Ratio
F _ 0. 6 -so
0.12 b*U
F<05 (3,53) - 2.79
F>01 (3,53) = 4.20
Conclusion:
There is a significant difference between the effluent total
iron concentration from pyrite under a nitrogen atmosphere in
Phase I and pyrite under a nitrogen atmosphere in Phase II at
both the 5% and 1% level of significance.

-------
                               TABLE X  (Continued)


Note:   (1)Total iron was chosen as the test parameter because of the high degree
          of accuracy of the total iron analysis.
        (2)Column 4 was under an air atmosphere in Phase I and a nitrogen atmosphere
          in Phase II.
        '3)Project days 120 through 134 were chosen for Phase II since this represents
          a near steady state of acid production and a period when most daily
          samples were analyzed.  Project days 43 through 57 were chosen for Phase
          I in order to match the Phase day of operation.

-------
                                     TABLE XI

           ANALYSIS OF THE VARIANCE OF EFFLUENT TOTAL  IRON  CONCENTRATION
              BETWEEN METHANE AND CARBON DIOXIDE BLANKETED  COLUMNS(D


Time Period - Project days 54 through 73(2)

Means - Column 8  (Phase I - Methane)	0.52 ppm  of Fe
        Column 9  (Phase I - Carbon Dioxide)	0.795 ppm of  Fe
Computation:

Between
Within
Total
Sum of Squares
.759
.681
1.440
df
1
38
39
Mean Square
.759
.018

F Ratio
F = -759 = 45.17
.018
F.05 (1,38) = 4.10
F.oi (1,38) = 7.35
Conclusion:  There is a significant difference between the variance of effluent
             total iron concentrations from pyrite under a methane and a carbon
             dioxide atmosphere at both the 5% and 1% level of significance.

Note:   (DTotal iron was chosen as the test parameter because of the high degree  of
          accuracy of the total iron analysis.
        (2)The time period used is believed to represent a near steady state of acid
          production.

-------
                                         TABLE XII
               ANALYSIS  OF THE VARIANCE  OF  EFFLUENT  TOTAL  IRON  CONCENTRATION
                 BETWEEN METHANE AND NITROGEN  BLANKETED COLUMNS FOLLOWING
                       STEADY STATE OPERATION  IN AN  AIR ATMOSPHERE
    Time  Period -  Project days  120  through 134(2)
   Means  -  Column 4  (Phase  II  -  Nitrogen)
            Column 5  (Phase  II  -  Methane)
                                                   .545 ppm of Fe
                                                   .533 ppm of Fe
    Computation:
to

Between
Within
Total
Sum of Squares
.02
.65
.67
df
1
27
28
Mean Square
.02
.046

F Ratio
F - • 02 _ *-,<-
.046 ' b
F>Q5 (1,27) = 4.21
F.oi (1,27) = 7.68
   Conclusion:
   Note:
      There is no significant difference between the variance of effluent
      total iron concentration from pyrite under a nitrogen and methane
      atmosphere following a steady state of acid production in an air
      atmosphere.

(1)Total  iron was chosen as the test parameter because of the high degree of
  accuracy of the total iron analysis.
(2)Project days 120 through 134 were chosen in Phase II since this represents
  a  near steady state of acid production and a period when most daily samples
  were analyzed.

-------
                     TABLE  XIII

                    OPERATING LOG
Project
  Day      Date    Remarks
           7/14    Project start-up
                   All columns were alternately flooding
                   to a depth of  6-8" and siphoning

    1      7/15    Water trap to  column No. 9 was broken
                   Gas flow was increased from 8 to  13 cc/min

    2      7/16    Gas flow in air columns  (4, 5, 6  and 7)
                   was increased  to 86 cc/min

    5      7/19    Gas flows were readjusted to 15 cc/min
                   in the inert columns  (1, 2, 3, 8  and 9)
                   and 80 cc/min  in the air columns  (4, 5,
                   6 and 7)

   11      7/25    Column No. 7 was modified to eliminate
                   the shallow flooding noted earlier  (refer
                   to Figure II)

   15      7/29    Gas flow to all columns readjusted to
                   45 cc/min

   16      7/30    Column Nos. 6, 7 and 9 were modified
                   as column No.  7
                   Insulation on  the effluent water  trap
                   was removed from these columns for
                   observation purposes

   17      7/31    All remaining  columns were modified as
                   column No. 7
                   All effluent water trap insulation was
                   removed for observation purposes

   18      8/1     Column No. 5 continued to flood to a
                   depth of 8-10"
                             73

-------
                TABLE XIII  (Continued)
Project
  Day      Date    Remarks
   20      8/3     The tygon tubing connecting the gas
                   separator and column discharge line was
                   found to be leaking in column Nos. 1, 2,
                   5 and 7 (replacement of this tubing
                   eliminated the flooding condition pre-
                   viously noted in column No. 5)

   28      8/11    The primary water trap to column No. 5
                   was broken

   48      8/31    Primary deionizer exhausted

   49      9/1     Water flow to column No.  7 was decreased
                   by 80%

   57      9/9     Water sample for column No. 5 was ac-
                   cidently discarded

   63      9/15    Gas flow in column No. 8 was decreased
                   to 30 cc/min for remainder of Phase I

   70      9/22    Coal particles in column No. 8 water
                   separator caused effluent water to dis-
                   charge through the effluent gas line
                   rather than the sample receiving flask

   77      9/29    Operational problems with the chiller
                   control unit
                   Water flow to column No.  7 increased to
                   original flow rate
                   Column No.  4 changed to Phase II
                   atmosphere

   80      10/2    Column Nos.  1, 5 and 8 changed to Phase
                   II atmospheres

   81      10/3    Gas flow to column No. 5 decreased to
                   30 cc/min

   83      10/5    Column No.  9 changed to Phase II
                   atmosphere
                           74

-------
               TABLE XIII  (Continued)
Project
  Day
Date
Remarks
   84


   92

   94
  105
  106
108
111
113
10/30
11/2
11/4
  125
  128

  133


  136
10/6    Column No. 2 changed to Phase II
        conditions (aerated feedwater)

10/14   Primary deionizer exhausted

10/16   Project pH meter inoperative - pH's were
        recorded from any one of three alternate
        meters during the period October 16-26,
        1970

10/27   Column No. 7 changed from air to
        nitrogen atmosphere

10/28   Gas supply to column No. 9 became low
        resulting in decreased flow rates during
        the period October 28 - November 2, 1970

        Primary deionizer exhausted

        Column No. 9 gas cylinder replaced

        Operational problems with the chiller
        control unit

11/16   Project conductivity meter inoperative -
        conductivities were recorded on an alter-
        nate meter during the period November 16
        to 23, 1970

11/19   Primary deionizer exhausted

11/24   Water flow to column No. 7 decreased
        by 80%

11/27   Deaerator problems resulting in abnor-
        mally high dissolved oxygen concentration
        in the column feedwater
                            75

-------
               TABLE XIII (Continued)
Project
  Day      Date    Remarks
  137      11/28   Project pH meter inoperative - pH's were
                   recorded from any one of three alternate
                   meters during the period November 28 -
                   December 10,  1970

  141      12/2    Column No.  8  atmosphere changed from
                   CH4 + 0.11% 02 to N2 + 0.52% O2
                   Deaerator drain line problem corrected -
                   dissolved oxygen concentration returned
                   to 0 ppm

  149      12/10   Deionized water supply interrupted
                   Phase II terminated
                           76

-------
                             TABLE  XIV

              ACID PRODUCTION,  IRON  PRODUCTION AND
              CONDUCTIVITY AS A FUNCTION OF OXYGEN
                     CONTENT OF CARRIER GAS
Time Period
Column
6
9
1
8
5
9
3
of Data
Project Days
111-139
111-138
111-138
111-138
111-138
51-83
111-138
Carrier
Gas
N2
(Air)
C02
N2
CH4
CH4
C02
N2
Oxygen
20.
1.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
Content
9
07
523
11
05
05
02
Iron
82
8.2
3.
0.
0.
0.
0.
1
72
61
8
23
Acidity
ppm
230
29
15.
6.
4.
3.
2.

8
8
7
9
3
Conductivity
micromhos
691
127
67
24
11
28
8.





4

-------
                        TABLE  XV

       CATION-ANION BALANCE AIR CONTROL  COLUMN NO.  6



Time Period - Project Days 111 through 132(1)
CATIONS
Calcium  (Ca)
Magnesium  (Mg)
Iron Total  (Fe)
Manganese  (Mn)
Aluminum (Al)
Hydrogen (H)
             Factor To         ppm
ppm Ion   CaC03 Equivalent   as CaCO3

  0.698        2.500           1.745
  0.085        4.100           0.349
 82.140        1.790         147.031
  0.035        1.820           0.064
  0.168        3.704           0.622
  1.008       50.000          50.400
                               Total Cations
                             200.211
ANIONS
Sulfate (804)
             Factor To         ppm
ppm Ion   CaC03 Equivalent   as CaCO3

208.180        1.040         216.507
                               Total Anions
                             216.507
(l)This time period was chosen since it represents a near
   steady state of acid production and a period when most
   daily samples were analyzed.
                           78

-------
         TABLE XVI

       COLUMN NO. 1
  PHASE I - NITROGEN GAS
ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
Day
Of

Operation
Project
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
Phase I
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
EH
3.30
3.50
3.80
3.90
3.95
4.00
4.10
4.05
4.15
4.20
4.10
4.15
4.20
4.25
4.10
4.20
4.25
4.20
4.25
4.25
4.25
4.40
4.00
4.30
4.35
4.45
4.45
4.55
4.55
4.50
4.55
4.55
4.55
4.55
4.50
4.65
4.55
4.55
Sp.
Cond.
mmhos
480
285
220
160
140
120
95
75
70
63
56
47
45
47
45
43
38
42
35
31
27
35
28
26
23
22
22
23
20
20
19
18
18
18
17
16
16
15
Hot
Acid
as
CaCOs
272
150
96
68
60
44
36
28
26
22
20
18
16
16
14
14
11
13
11
9
9
10
10
9
8
8
6
6
6
6
6
6
5
5
5
4
5
6

Iron
as Fe
114.0
55.7
41.0
27.2
21.5
17.0
14.6
10.3
8.2
7.4
6.7
5.7
4.9
4.5
4.2
3.9
3.9
4.0
3.3
2.7
2.6
2.4
2.2
2.0
1.9
1.7
1.8
1.6
1.5
1.5
1.3
1.3
1.2
1.2
1.1
1.0
1.0
1.1

Sulfate
as S04
235.0
113.0
71.8
56.5
23.0
40.0
35.7
25.8
16.6
15.8
14.3
13.9
1.4
1.4
12.2
11.7
11.9
2.5
3.7
6,9
7.1
3.3
3.7
10.0
10.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
13.2
5.3
13.2
8.8
1.0
5.7
9.3
9.1
1.0

-------
    TABLE XVI (Continued)

       COLUMN NO.  1
  PHASE  I - NITROGEN GAS
ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
Day
Of

Operation
Project
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
Phase I
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
£H
4.60
4.60
4.60
4.60
4.65
4.65
4.70
4.60
4.60
4.27
4.60
4.70
4.75
4.70
4.60
4.70
4.75
4.75
4.75
4.70
4.70
4.70
4.70
4.75
4.80
4.60
4.75
5.00
4.85
5.05
4.85
4. 80
4.80
4.80
4.80
4.95
4.90
4.95
Sp.
Cond.
mmhos
15
14
14
13
13
13
13
13
13
21
14
13
14
13
13
12
12
11
11
12
12
12
11
11
11
16
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
10
11
10
Hot
Acid
as
CaCO-3
4
4
4
4
4
5
5
4
4

3
4
4
4
4
5
5
5
4
3
4
4
4
4
4
6
6
5
5
4
5
4
4
5
5
4
5

Iron
as Fe
1.0
1.0
0.9
0.8
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.6
0.7

0.6
0. 6
0.6
0. 6
0. 6
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0. 5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0. 4
0. 4
0.5
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.3

Sulfate
as 804
7.6
6. 0
1.0
6. 6
1.0
2. 6
1.2
1. 0
11.3

6. 5
7 0
/ • \J
1 0
j_ • \j
1 0
-L • \J
8 9
U • If
1 0
-J_ • \J
i n
j_ • \j
8 n
o • u
O C
£* • D
t: n
D • U
1.0
5.0
1.0
i n
JL • U
1 7
J- . J
1.0
1.5
6.1
1.0
4.1
1.0
1.0
4.2
1.0
1.0
13.2
11.0

-------
                    TABLE XVI  (Continued)

                        COLUMN NO. 1
                   PHASE I - NITROGEN GAS
                 ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
     Day Of
   Operation
Project  Phase I
  77
  78
  79
  80
77
78
79
80
 pH

5.00
5.10
4.80
4.85
 Sp.
Cond.
mmhos

   9
   9
  12
  11
Hot
Acid
 as
CaC03

   4
   4
   4
Iron
as Fe

  0.3
  0.3
  0.3
Sulfate
 as 304

   4.4
   1.0
   2.1
                           81

-------
         TABLE  XVII

        COLUMN NO.  2
  PHASE I  - NITROGEN  GAS
ANALYTICAL AND OTHER  DATA
Day
Of

Operation
Project
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
Phase I
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
£S
3.30
3.50
3.80
3.85
3.90
3.95
4.10
4.00
4.10
4.00
4.10
4.15
4.10
4.05
4.00
4.10
4.25
4.10
4.10
4.20
4.30
4.20
4.35
4.30
4.35
4.45
4.45
4.45
4.45
4.45
4.60
4.55
4.45
4.40
4.40
4.55
4.50
4.50
Sp.
Cond.
mmhos
630
310
235
190
155
140
105
80
75
70
63
57
52
57
53
47
43
48
43
37
35
35
28
28
25
25
24
27
24
22
21
20
20
20
19
19
17
17
Hot
Acid
as
CaCOs
284
180
108
76
64
52
52
34
28
24
22
22
20
18
18
17
13
16
13
15
10
12
10
11
7
10
8
8
8
6
6
6
6
6
5
5
5
7

Iron
as Fe
125.0
66.3
45.5
30.7
24.4
19.2
17.2
12.3
10.4
9.3
7.6
7.4
5.8
5.5
5.3
4.7
4.2
4.9
3.5
3.1
3.0
2.6
2.4
2.2
2.1
1.9
1.9
1.9
1.7
1.8
1.5
1.4
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.2
1.1
1.2

Sulfate
as S04
189-0
96.3
91.6
63.2
47.2
43.8
41.6
32.7
13.4
17.4
15.0
18.4
2.9
8. 6
7.5
15.2
15.1
9 . 2
9 . 9
7. 3
9 . 5
6. 9
3.1
10 . 0
10 . 0
5.1
1.0
1. 0
3 . 4
4. 1
2. 7
7 . 8
11.2
5.4
9.5
8.3
7.0
1.0
         o
         32

-------
  TABLE  XVII  (Continued)

       COLUMN NO. 2
  PHASE I - NITROGEN GAS
ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
Day
Of

Operation
Project
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
Phase I
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
ES
4.50
4.60
4.60
4.60
4.65
4.70
4.70
4.60
4.50
4.50
4.60
4.70
4.70
4.70
4.60
4.65
4.70
4.80
4.70
4.70
4.70
4.65
4.75
4.70
4.80
4.70
4.75
5.00
4.90
4.90
4.85
4.80
4.75
4.75
4.80
5.00
4.90
5.00
Sp.
Cond.
mmhos
16
15
15
14
14
14
14
14
15
15
14
14
15
15
15
13
13
12
13
12
16
13
12
11
12
14
12
12
12
11
12
12
12
12
12
10
11
10
Hot
Acid
as
CaC03
5
5
4
4
4
5
5
5


4
4
4
4
5
5
5
5
4
4
5
4
4
4
4
4
5
5
4
4
5
5
4
5
4

4
5

Iron
as Fe
1.1
1.0
1.0
1.0
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8


0.7
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.8
0.6
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.5
0.5
0.4

0.4
0.4

Sulfate
as S04
2.1
8. 4
1.0
3. 3
3. 6
2.7
1.0
6. 5


5.9
5. 8
2.4
1.0
1.0
5.4
8.1
6.6
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.4
1.0
1.0
4.5
1.1
1.0
3.9
3.3
9.1
1.0
3.4
7.1

1.0
2.5
         83

-------
   TABLE  XVII  (Continued)

       COLUMN NO. 2
  PHASE I - NITROGEN GAS
ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA



Day Of
Operation
Project
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
Phase I
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
pH
5.00
5.10
4.75
4.75
4.90
4.95
5.00
4.90

Sp.
Cond.
mmhos
10
10
12
11
10
10
10
10
Hot
Acid
as Iron
CaCO^ as Fe
4 0.3
4 0.3
4 0.3






Sulfate
as S04
4.4
1.0
1.0






-------
                         TABLE XVIII

                        COLUMN NO. 3
                        NITROGEN GAS
                  ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
Day of Operation

        1
        2
        3
        4
        5
        9
       10
       11
       12
       13
       14
       15
       16
       17
       18
       19
       20
       21
       22
       23
       24
       25
       26
       27
       28
       29
       30
       31
       32
       33
       34
       35
       36
       37
       38

pH
3.40
3.50
3.80
3.90
3.95
4.05
4.15
4.00
4.15
4.10
4.10
4.20
4.15
4.20
4.20
4.15
4.20
4.25
4.20
4.25
4.30
4.30
4.50
4.35
4.40
4.40
4.50
4.45
4.50
4.55
4.50
4.50
4.60
4.45
4.45
4.55
4.55
4.55
Sp.
Cond.
nunhos
500
300
230
190
155
125
100
80
75
66
58
52
48
52
48
43
37
42
40
35
32
31
27
26
24
24
23
25
22
21
20
19
18
19
18
18
17
16
Hot
Acid
as
CaC03
260
170
108
80
64
52
48
32
30
24
22
20
18
18
16
14
11
14
12
14
10
10
10
10
8
8
6
7
7
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
Iron
as Fe
114.0
66.3
45.5
30.1
25.1
19,2
17.2
11.8
10.2
9.0
7.6
6.8
5.6
5.3
5.0
4.3
3.7
4.6
3.8
3.2
3.0
2.7
2.5
2.3
2.1
1.9
1.9
1.8
1.6
1.6
1.4
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.2
1.1
1.0
1,1
Sulfate
as 804
190.0
126.0
81.3
56.3
25.0
42.3
39.5
30.6
16.6
3.4
17.4
6.7
11.4
1.4
59.6
13.0
11.8
10.7
10.3
7.4
11.7
5.2
1.4
10.0
10.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
5.6
7.8
10.7
6.1
12,7
1.0
1.0
9.1
6.5
1.0
                           85

-------
                     TABLE XVIII (Continued)
                        COLUMN NO. 3
                        NITROGEN GAS
                  ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
Day of Operation

       39
       40
       41
       42
       43
       44
       45
       46
       47
       48
       49
       50
       51
       52
       53
       54
       55
       56
       57
       58
       59
       60
       61
       62
       63
       64
       65
       66
       67
       68
       69
       70
       71
       72
       73
       74
       75
       76


pH
4.55
4.55
4.55
4.60
4.60
4.70
4.65
4.55
4.50
4.20
4.60
4.70
4.70
4.70
4.60
4.70
4.70
4.75
4.70
4.70
4.70
4.65
4.70
4.70
4.75
4.45
4.75
5.05
4.90
4.85
4.80
4.80
4.75
4.80
4.80
4.95
4.85
4,95
Sp.
Cond.
mmhos
16
15
15
15
15
14
14
14
15
22
14
14
15
14
14
13
13
12
12
12
15
13
12
11
12
19
13
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
10
11
10
Hot
Acid
as
CaCOs
4
4
5
4
5
4
5
4


3
4
4
4
5
4
6
6
4
4
4
5
4
4
4
7
4
4
4
3
8
7
4
5
5

4
4

Iron
as Fe
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
0.8
0.8
0.7
0.8


0.7
0.7
0. 8
0.8
0.7
0.6
0.5
0 .5
0.5
0 . 5
0.5
0.5
0 .5
0.5
0.5
0. 5
0 . 4
0 . 4
0.4
0. 4
0,5
0. 4
0.5
0.5
0.4

0.4
0.4

Sulfate
as 304
1.0
8.1
1.0
1.3
1.0
3.5
1.0
1.0


1.0
3.5
2.7
1.0
2.8
1.0
1.0
3.9
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
3.2
1.0
1.0
2.6
1.0
11.2
1.0
7.9
6.2

1.0
2.6
                            pc
                            Ov..'

-------
                   TABLE XVIII (Continued)

                        COLUMN NO. 3
                        NITROGEN GAS
                 ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
Day of Operation

       77
       78
       79
       80
       81
       82
       83
       84
       85
       86
       87
       88
       89
       90
       91
       92
       93
       94
       95
       96
       97
       98
       99
      100
      101
      102
      103
      104
      105
      106
      107
      108
      109
      110
      111
      112
      113
      114


p_H
5.00
5.05
4.75
4.65
4.90
4.95
5.00
4.95
4.95
4.85
4.80
4.70
4.95
4.80
4.65
4.90
4.75
4.80
5.00
5.05
4.90
4.80
4.95
5.10
5.00
5.00
5.00
4.90
4.95
4.90
4.90
4.80
4.70
4.85
4.80
4.95
4.90
4.95
Sp.
Cond.
mmhos
10
10
12
12
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
11
9
10
10
10
10
10
9
10
10
9
8
8
9
9
15
12
10
13
9
7
7
Hot
Acid
as
CaCOs
4
4
4
4
4
5
4
5
5
4
4
5
4
4
4
4
4
4
3
4
5
6
3
3
6
3
4
3
3
6
3
4
4
3
4
2
5
8

Iron
as Fe
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.4
0.4
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.2
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.2
0.3
0.2
0.3
0.2
0.2
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.2
0.4
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3

Sulfate
as 804
1.0
1.8
2.5
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.3
1.0
1.0
12.9
5.3
1.0
4.4
14.5
1.0
11.7
7.1
1.1
1.0
5.0
1.0
2.0
14.3
8.8
1.0
1.0
5.9
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
8.5
                           87

-------
                    TABLE XVIII  (Continued)

                        COLUMN NO.  3
                        NITROGEN GAS
                  ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
Day of Operation

      115
      116
      117
      118
      119
      120
      121
      122
      123
      124
      125
      126
      127
      128
      129
      130
      131
      132
      133
      134
      135
      136
      137
      138
      139
      140
      141
      142
      143
      144
      145
      146
      147
      148
      149


pH
4.90
4.95
4.95
4.95
5.00
5.00
4.95
4.95
4.95
5.00
4.85
4.95
5.00
4.85
4.95
4.95
4.95
4.85
4.75
5.00
5.00
5.00
4.80
4.50
5.00
4.95
Sp.
Cond.
nunhos
10
7
9
7
9
7
8
8
8
8
8
8
8
10
9
8
8
8
8
10
9
8
13
9
8
9
Hot
Acid
as
CaC03
2
8
2
5
1
2
3
4
2
4
2
2
3
3
3
4
3
4
4
3
5
4
5
2
3
2

Iron
as Fe
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.3
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.4
0.4
0.4
0.2

Sulfate
as SO4
7.1
1.4
1.0
1.0
3.1
9.2
17.6
5.4
14.0
6.7
8.3
1.0
1.7
1.0
1.4
7.0
11.5
8.6
4.7
4.4
1.0
1.5
1.0
1.0
5.3
4.8
4,95
5.00
5.00
4.70
11
9
9
12
4
3
4
5
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.3
8.9
6.9
6.2
L4.9

-------
                        TABLE XIX

                     COLUMN  NO.  4
                    PHASE  I  - AIR
              ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
  Day Of
Operation
Project
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
Phase I
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
                 PH
                3
                3
                3,
                3,
  ,00
  ,20
   30
   20
 3.25
 3.25
 3.35
                3,
                3,
                3,
                3.
   10
   20
   05
   05
                3.10
                3
                3,
   05
   00
 2.95
 2.95
   05
   90
 2.85
 2.85
 2.95
   90
   90
 2.95
 2.95
   90
   00
   90
                3
                2,
                2,
                2,
                2.90
                2,
                2,
 .90
 .90
2.95
2.95
2.85
2.95
2.90
2.85
2.85

Sp.
Cond.
nunhos
900
550
500
520
490
485
425
420
420
490
505
500
550
580
555
540
515
740
710
680
640
659
610
636
620
640
620
645
650
650
640
655
650
670
635
645
630
615
Hot
Acid
as
CaCO-,
420
264
200
176
176
168
160
136
148
140
152
152
152
160
156
158
152
211
209
201
185
189
201
193
193
189
193
185
193
228
188
200
212
200
196
188
200
184


Iron
as Fe
175.0
108.0
79.2
67.4
61.4
56.2
56.9
50.4
49.4
49.6
48.3
50.4
51.1
52.4
53.7
51.0
50.5
69.1
65.3
67.6
65.1
63.7
61.6
64.1
62.2
61.6
63.1
65.5
66.2
64.0
66.0
64.0
66.0
67.0
67.0
68.0
66.0
65.0


Sulfate
as S04
247.0
236.0
192.0
183.0
151.0
155.0
142.0
139.0
122.0
95.1
82.5
114.0
80 Q
*~* \J • _/
127.0
128.0
152.0
136.0
197.0
185.0
174.0
179.0
174.0
175.0
180.0
163.0
176.0
176.0
180.0
172.0
179.0
172.0
181.0
180.0
190.0
179.0
188.0
184.0
172.0

-------
   TABLE  XIX (Continued)

      COLUMN NO. 4
     PHASE I - AIR
ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
Day
Of

Operation
Project
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
Phase I
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
pH
2.90
2.90
2.95
2.95
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.95
2.95
2.90
2.90
2.80
2.85
2.90
2.90
2.85
2.90
2.90
2.70
2.85
2.85
2.85
2.90
2.85
2.90
3.25
3.05
3.05
3.00
3.00
2.95
2.90
2.95
3.05
3.00
3.05
3.05
Sp.
Cond.
mirth os
630
620
630
605
630
630
640
645
650
690
655
710
750
760
710
680
660
655
660
670
1065
825
755
750
760
820
830
850
840
850
845
780
810
875
820
705
745
705
650
Hot
Acid
as
CaCOs
196
192
196
192
204
200
200
196

192
217
228
228
220
208
196
192
200
200
264
250
220
220
208
208
212
204
208
204
212
220
224
232
224
212
204
192

Iron
as Fe
67.0
66.0
67.0
66.0
70.0
67.0
67.0
66.0

67.5
75.0
76.0
79.0
78.0
86.0
87.0
86.0
71.0
72.0
112.0
76.0
76.0
73.0
68.0
71.5
72.0
72.0
69.0
72.0
71.0
76.0
77.0
82.0
76.0
74.0
69.0
66.0

Sulf ate
as 804
183.0
175.0
183.0
180.0
186.0
183.0
179.0
182.0

173.0
195.0
217.0
217.0
209.0
196.0
191.0
188.0
187.0
198.0
245.0
225.0
210.0
203.0
203.0
204.0
202.0
202.0
199.0
200.0
196.0
209.0
212.0
233.0
213.0
190.0
192.0
182.0

-------
          TABLE  XX

       COLUMN NO. 5
      PHASE I - AIR
ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
Day Of
Operation
Project
1
9
£^
0
o
A
*±
C
o
c
D
7
/

10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
«-i M
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
Phase I pH
1






8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
2.95
3.10
3.20
3.25
3.25
3.30
3.30
3.15
3.10
3.05
3.10
3.00
3.00
2.95
3.00
2.95
3.00
3.00
3.15
3.30
3.05
2.90
3.05
3.05
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.95
2.90
2.95
3.00
2.95
2.85
2.90
2.90
2.85
2.85
Sp.
Cond.
iranhos
840
560
480
510
495
475
440
420
415
480
495
500
540
575
560
520
510
500
350
255
505
570
550
570
570
575
570
600
605
605
600
600
600
620
590
600
580
570
Hot
Acid
as
CaCO^
440
264
204
180
172
172
156
148
144
140
148
152
152
156
152
148
140
129
98
70
156
168
160
168
176
176
164
181
176
172
136
172
172
172
172
180
176
168
Iron
as Fe
181.0
109.0
81.9
68.4
63.5
58.5
56.9
49.3
47.8
48.4
51.5
51.6
49.5
51.6
52.6
49.8
49.5
42.0
29.1
21.2
53.5
54.5
56.1
56.7
56.7
56.4
56.3
58.2
57.0
58.0
56.0
58.0
57.0
59.0
58.0
59.0
60.0
58.0
Sulfate
as 304
381.0
254. 0
188.0
147.0
111.0
146.0
140. 0
128. 0
94.4
88.9
107.0
110.0
62.4
106.0
130.0
142.0
136.0
121.0
83. 6
58. 9
143.0
151.0
151.0
153. 0
147.0
152. 0
150.0
159.0
155.0
154. 0
148.0
157.0
158.0
167.0
154.0
162. 0
163.0
153.0

-------
     TABLE  XX  (Continued)

       COLUMN NO. 5
      PHASE I - AIR
ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
Day
Of

Operation
Project
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
Phase I
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
pH
2.95
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.90
3.00
2.90
2.95
2.90
2.85
2.95
3.00
2.90
2.85
2.85
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.95
3.30
3.05
3.10
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.05
2.95
3.05
Sp.
Cond.
ramhos
590
585
580
580
600
600
595
610
610
655
610
680
740
710
670
650
620
615
610
600
650
650
670
675
680
770
720
770
750
745
745
710
735
740
735
640
685
640
Hot
Acid
as
CaCOs
172
172
176
180
188
184
180
176


177
192
200
208
204
192
180
184

176
200
200
200
190
182
186
184
184
180
184
192
188
200
212
204

184
174

Iron
as Fe
60.0
59.0
61.0
61.0
62.0
61.0
62.0
61.0


60.7
72.0
72.0
69.0
70.0
65.0
63.0
62.0

64.0
66.0
64.0
65.0
65.0
62.0
63.9
62.0
63.0
63.0
63.0
63.0
71.0
70.0
74.0
70.0

66.0
62.0

Sulfate
as SO4
157.0
156.0
160.0
171.0
168.0
163.0
162.0
151.0


158.0
181.0
192.0
204.0
192. 0
180.0
174.0
175.0

179.0
173.0
183.0
182.0
180.0
180 . 0
180.0
182.0
181.0
174.0
180.0
181. 0
183 . 0
189.0
203 . 0
192.0

170. 0
171.0

-------
                     TABLE  XX (Continued)

                        COLUMN NO. 5
                       PHASE I - AIR
                 ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
     Day Of
   Operation
Project  Phase I

  77       77
  78       78
  79       79
  80       80


El
3.10
3.15
3.00
3.05

Sp.
Cond.
mmhos
600
575
760
770
Hot
Acid
as
CaC03
172
174
200


Iron
as Fe
60.0
57.0
67.0


Sulfate
as 504
159.0
161.0
183.0

                               93

-------
                        TABLE XXI

                       COLUMN NO. 6
                            AIR
                ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
Day of Operation

        1
        2
        3
        4
        5
        6
        7
        8
        9
       10
       11
       12
       13
       14
       15
       16
       17
       18
       19
       20
       21
       22
       23
       24
       25
       26
       27
       28
       29
       30
       31
       32
       33
       34
       35
       36
       37
       38


ES
2.95
3.10
3.25
3.25
3.20
3.20
3.30
3.10
3.10
3.05
3.15
3.00
2.95
2.90
2.95
3.00
3.05
2.85
2.90
3.00
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.95
2,85
2.95
3.00
3.00
2.95
2,95
2,90
3.00
2.90
2,90
2.90
2,90
2,85
2.85
Sp.
Cond,
itunhos
962
595
525
525
490
505
440
445
435
515
500
515
570
595
590
555
455
675
650
625
600
630
570
590
595
600
590
620
630
630
610
615
610
640
600
620
605
595
Hot
Acid
as
CaCOs
490
276
208
188
176
168
180
144
156
170
152
160
156
156
164
160
128
194
189
180
180
185
180
176
189
176
185
177
177
204
176
180
180
180
176
184
180
176

Iron
as Fe
196.0
117.0
79.9
72.4
64.0
60.6
58.3
50.5
50.7
51.2
52.8
54.2
53.2
51.6
56.1
54.1
43.3
64.1
64.4
61.6
58.9
61.0
61.0
59.8
61.6
59.8
60,6
60,6
60,7
60.0
61,0
58,0
61,0
63.0
62.0
64.0
64.0
65.0

Sulfate
as SO4
362.0
261.0
230.0
108.0
166.0
156.0
148.0
133.0
128.0
137,0
109.0
130.0
99.8
106.0
157.0
158.0
112.0
175.0
170.0
168.0
164.0
168.0
160.0
164.0
162.0
159.0
163.0
165.0
164.0
161.0
162.0
168,0
165.0
175.0
171.0
176,0
177,0
169.0
                          ?4

-------
                    TABLE XXI  (Continued)

                        COLUMN NO. 6
                            AIR
                 ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
Day of Operation

       39
       40
       41
       42
       43
       44
       45
       46
       47
       48
       49
       50
       51
       52
       53
       54
       55
       56
       57
       58
       59
       60
       61
       62
       63
       64
       65
       66
       67
       68
       69
       70
       71
       72
       73
       74
       75
       76


BE
2,90
2.90
2.90
2.90
3.00
2,90
3.00
2.90
2.90
2.85
2.95
3.00
2.90
2.85
2.85
2.85
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.90
2,90
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.90
3.20
3.00
3,10
3,00
3.00
3.00
2,95
3,00
3,10
2.95
3.10
Sp,
Cond.
mmhos
605
600
600
600
615
620
610
630
630
680
640
705
760
730
685
655
635
615
610
615
650
695
690
690
700
740
770
796
770
775
760
725
745
780
745
650
695
650
Hot
Acid
as
CaCOS
180
184
184
193
188
200
192
188


184
204
208
224
208
196
192
190
188
186
188
200
200
200
188
194
188
1S6
184
200
190
200
212
216
204

204
194

Iron
as Fe
61.0
64.0
64.0
66,0
65,0
66.0
64,0
65.0


64.3
74,0
75.0
78.0
75.0
69.0
64.0
63.0
67.0
67,0
71,0
71.0
69.0
70.0
67.0
70.5
67.0
69.0
68,0
70.0
69-0
72,0
73.0
80,0
73,0

73,0
68,0

Sulfate
as SO^
166.0
170.0
175.0
177.0
167.0
178.0
174.0
170,0


172,0
192.0
198.0
209.0
200.0
190.0
188.0
184.0
177.0
179.0
180.0
194.0
193.0
189.0
189.0
195.0
194.0
191.0
188.0
197.0
190.0
186.0
193.0
204.0
199.0

180,0
184.0

-------
                    TABLE XXI (Continued)

                        COLUMN NO,  6
                            AIR
                 ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
Day of Operation

       77
       78
       79
       80
       81
       82
       83
       84
       85
       86
       87
       88
       89
       90
       91
       92
       93
       94
       95
       96
       97
       98
       99
      100
      101
      102
      103
      104
      105
      106
      107
      108
      109
      110
      111
      112
      113
      114


PH
3.05
3.15
3.00
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.00
3.00
2.95
3.05
3.00
3.00
2.95
2.95
3.00
3.30
3.20
3.00
3.00
3.15
3.20
3.20
3.20
3.15
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
2.95
2.95
2.90
3.00
3.05
3.00
Sp.
Cond.
mmhos
615
600
760
755
685
670
630
670
650
640
670
700
680
700
740
735
750
640
630
690
735
680
730
675
725
710
710
705
705
615
600
680
850
675
730
675
570
570
Hot
Acid
as
CaC03
188
184
212
216
200
202
198
208
204
204
196
200
194
210
220
232
221
200
192
204
208
208
220
208
228
216
220
216
216
216
220
216
296
276
264
236
228
228

Iron
as Fe
64.0
66.0
74.0
77.0
73.0
75.0
74.0
75.0
77,0
74.0
74.0
74.0
60.0
61.0
72.0
74.0
78.0
71.0
67,0
79.0
63.0
69.0
72.0
71.0
81.0
59.0
67.0
59.0
71,0
55.0
72.0
68.0
99,0
92.0
84.0
88.0
83.0
79.0

Sulfate
as 304
174.0
156.0
184.0
175.0
177.0
181.0
187.0
193.0
216.0
165.0
188.0
187.0
187.0
195.0
213.0
229.0
204.0
182.0
173.0
188.0
205.0
211.0
219.0
222.0
202.0
216.0
220.0
235.0
233.0
216.0
232.0
184.0
247,0
243,0
261.0
118.0
204.0
200.0

-------
                    TABLE XXI (Continued)

                        COLUMN NO. 6
                            AIR
                 ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
Day Of Operation

      115
      116
      117
      118
      119
      120
      121
      122
      123
      124
      125
      126
      127
      128
      129
      130
      131
      132
      133
      134
      135
      136
      137
      138
      139
      140
      141
      142
      143
      144
      145
      146
      147
      148
      149

PH
3.00
3.00
3.05
3.05
3.05
3.05
3.00
3.05
3.05
3.05
2.85
3,00
3.00
3.00
2.95
2.95
2.95
2.90
2.90
3.00
3.00
2.95
3.05
2.90
2.95
2.95
Sp.
Cond,
rrtrahos
605
635
645
630
660
660
670
710
705
700
705
705
675
675
780
740
745
740
705
705
685
790
770
710
750
720
Hot
Acid
as
CaCOa
224
208
168
204 '
229
232
250
225
232
232
224
236
216
220
244
228
236
296
236
236
216
244
252
248
248
244
Iron
as Fe
79.
77.
79.
79.
81,
84.
86.
88.
83.
82.
81,
81.
83.
71.
88.
84.
84.
83.
85.
78.
74.
87.
88.
89.
88.
80.
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
3
Sulfate
as
208
201
199
203
222
225
226
223
226
178
189
191
205
189
232
220
228
232
214
186
183
200
203
198
207
186
S04
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
,0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
,0
,0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
-0
.0
3.00
2.95
2.95
2.75
760
760
750
840
244
254
246
264
80.0
90,0
89.0
94.0
214.0
239.0
220.0
240,0

-------
       TABLE XXII
        COLUMN NO. 7
       PHASE I - AIR
ANALYTICAL AND OTHER  DATA
Day
Of

Operation
Project
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
Phase I
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
PS
3.10
3.10
3.25
3.50
3.25
3.25
3.30
3.10
3.10
3.05
3.10
3.05
2.85
2.85
2.85
2.75
2.80
2.80
2.85
2.85
2.90
2.90
2.85
3.00
3.00
2.90
2.90
3.00
2.85
2.90
2.90
2.95
2.90
2.85
2.90
2.90
2.85
2.85
Sp.
Cond .
mmhos
750
565
510
480
465
480
430
425
415
495
515
505
740
715
820
805
755
750
695
670
600
660
655
605
605
615
605
650
645
650
630
635
635
660
630
645
615
605
Hot
Acid
as
CaCO'3
370
252
216
180
168
160
152
140
140
170
152
192
204
208
240
228
212
217
203
197
176
189
197
185
185
185
185
189
181
180
176
184
184
192
180
188
200
184

Iron
as Fe
145.0
109.0
81.2
68.4
62.0
58.2
56.2
50.1
49.3
49.3
53.2
51.7
69.0
54.2
79.3
79.3
73.4
70.8
69.1
64.4
58.0
63.1
68.4
61.6
61.0
59.8
61.9
61.9
60.7
63.0
61.0
59.0

64.0
59.0
62.0
64.0
63.0

Sulfate
as S04
302.0
235.0
191.0
165.0
156.0
152.0
136.0
132.0
96.3
90.1
122.0
114.0
61. 5
138.0
230. 0
220.0
198 . 0
192.0
190.0
171.0
166. 0
172.0
184.0
169. 0
167.0
164. 0
163 . 0
166.0
162. 0
167. 0
162. 0
166 . 0
169 0
_l_ \J _/ • \J
173.0
170. 0
174. 0
172. 0
164.0
          93

-------
  TABLE XXII  (Continued)

       COLUMN NO. 7
      PHASE I - AIR
ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
Day
Of

Operation
Project
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
Phase I
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
pH
2.85
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.90
2.90
Sp.
Cond.
mmhos
630
615
615
600
620
610
610
625
625
650
Hot
Acid
as
CaCOs
188
184
180
184
188
188
192
192
188
180

Iron
as Fe
63.0
62.0
63.0
63.0
64.0
63.0
62.0
62.0
63.0
61.2

Sulfate
as S04
175.0
166.0
169.0
171.0
172.0
170.0
168.0
166.0
168.0
164.0
            no

-------
        TABLE  XXIII

       COLUMN  NO.  7
      PHASE  I  -  AIR
(REDUCED WATER FLOW RATE)
ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
Day
Of

Operation
Project
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
Phase I
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
pH
2.95

2.40
2.25
2.25
2.30
2.30
2.30
2.25
2.30
2.30
2.30
2.30
2.30
2.35
2.30
2.35
2.75
2.40
2.55
2.40
2.40
2.40
2.40
2.40
2.45
2.40
2.45
2.55
Sp.
Cond.
mmhos
630

2900
2950
3100
3050
3000
2925
2950
2900
2900
3000
2975
2950
2975
3050
3250
3200
3100
3050
3250
3000
3050
3000
3000
2950
2950
2950
2450
Hot
Acid
as
CaCOs
668

880
884
910
864
844
818
836
796
932
910
920
910
888
928
884
908
932
928
964
936
984
1044
996

984
928
860

Iron
as Fe
284.0

351.0
333.0
306.0
293.0
293.0
297.0
303.0
295.0
333.0
314.0
315.0
315.0
340.0

325.0
321.0
316.0
334.0
325.0
356.0
367.0
367.0
359.0

331.0
326.0
301.0

Sulfate
as S04
675.0

802.0
886.0
873.0
835.0
798.0
818.0
773.0

822.0
839.0
846.0
848.0
851.0
901.0
875.0
864.0
879.0
877.0
859.0
960.0
964.0
985.0
968.0

913.0
871.0
828.0
         100

-------
         TABLE  XXIV

       COLUMN NO. 7
      PHASE I - AIR
 (NORMAL WATER FLOW RATE)
ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
Day
Of

Operation
Project
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
Phase I
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
p_H
3.10
3.00
3.05
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.00
3.05
2.95
3.05
3.00
3.00
2.95
2.95
3.00
3.30
3.20
3.00
3.05
3.15
3.20
3.10
3.10
3.10
3.05
3.05
Sp.
Cond.
mmhos
655
810
830
705
700
690
700
680
700
700
710
700
730
735
775
780
650
635
700
740
710
750
700
750
740
740
730
720
Hot
Acid
as
CaCOs
184
214
212
180
208
204
198
212
208
204
208
196
208
224
244
229
200
180
222
212
220
224
240
220
220
216
212
228

Iron
as Fe
61.0
72.0
75.0
72.0
76.0
71.0
73.0
75.0
74.0
74.0
74.0
70.0
72.0
65.0
78.0
80.0
72.0
67.0
81.0
65.0
74.0
76.0
67.0
82.0
58.0
60.0
58.0
76.0

Sulfate
as S04
164.0
183.0
143.0
176.0
186.0
186.0
208.0
186.0
187.0
190.0
192.0
188.0
199.0
211.0
220.0
215.0
179.0
187.0
204.0
205.0
190.0
153.0
245.0
197.0
219.0
228.0
222.0
224.0
          101

-------
         TABLE  XXV

       COLUMN NO.  8
    PHASE I - METHANE
ANALYTICAL AND  OTHER DATA
Day
Of

Operation
Project
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
Phase I
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
pH
3.20
3.50
3.70
3.90
3.95
4.00
4.10
4.00
4.15
4.10
4.10
4.15
4.15
4.20
4.10
4.15
4.10
4.10
4.20
4.25
4.25
4.20
4.40
4.40
4.35
4.45
4.40
4.45
4.50
4.55
4.50
4.55
4.50
4.50
4.50
4.55
4.50
4.55
Sp.
Cond.
mmhos
600
325
235
190
150
125
105
85
60
65
59
53
53
50
47
43
48
46
40
35
31
34
25
23
24
23
23
23
21
20
19
20
17
18
20
17
18
16
Hot
Acid
as
CaC03
310
170
104
76
60
48
52
56
26
24
22
20
18
16
18
14
15
14
13
11
9
11
9
8
9
4
8
8
6
5
6
6
5
5
5
5
5
6

Iron
as Fe
135.0
73.8
45.8
30.2
24.8
19.0
17.0
12.4
10.1
9.0
8.0
6.8
5.8
5.4
5.5
4.4
5.2
4.2
3.8
3.2
3.0
2.6
2. 4
2.3
2.1
1.9
1.9
1.8
1.6
1.6
1.4
1.4
1.3
1.3
1.2
1.2
1.1
1.2

Sulfate
as S04
217.0
155.0
97.3
63.5
52.3
47.1
40.2
18.1
15.1
1.4
18. 1
12. 2
1.4
16 . 2
15. 9
14 . 7
7 . 8
3. 4
9. 5
6 f,
\J » \J
9 7
—' * /
5.6
1 4
_!_ « ^
10 . 0
1 0
-L. m- \J
1 0
-1- * \J
1 0
-!-•«_/
1 0
J- • \J
13. 4
10 6
-L \J • \J
9 C
-f • \J
3 4
*J • *±
6 fi
\J • \J
1 5
-U • ^)
1 8
-L • 
-------
TABLE  XXV   (Continued)

       COLUMN NO. 8
    PHASE I - METHANE
ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
Day
Of
Hot
Sp. Acid
Operation
Project
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
Phase I
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
pH
4.55
4.55
4.60
4.60
4.60
4.70
4.65
4.55
4.50
4.25
4.55
4.60
4.60
4.50
4.50
4.50
4.50
4.45
4.50
4.60
4.70
4.50
4.40
4.45
4.50
4.65
4.50
4.85
4.85
4.35
4.45
4.40
4.60
4.50
4.50
4.50
4.45
4.50
Cond.
mmhos
16
15
15
14
14
14
14
14
15
22
15
15
15
16
16
15
14
13
14
12
12
14
13
15
16
16
15
12
11
16
15
16
13
15
16
13
14
13
as
CaC03
5
4
4
4
5
4
4
5
5

4
4
3
4
4
5
5
6
4
4
4
4
4
4
5
3
4
4
5
4
4
5
4
5
4

5
5
Iron
as Fe
1.1
1.1
1.0
1.0
0. 8
0.8
0. 8
0.8
0.7

0.7
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.5
0.5
0.6
0.6
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.4
0.4
0.5
0.5
0.6
0.5
0.5
0.4

0.5
0.4
Sulfate
as S04
1 0
j- • \j
1 6
JL • \J
8. 7
1 0
-U * \J
1. 0
1. 0
4.3
1.0
1.0

4.6
4. 5
1.0
5.3
1.0
2.5
7.2
6.1
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
4.4
1.0
1.0
1.0
11.7
3.5
1.0
1.0
1.5
1.0
2.5
6.6

6.5
1.0
            103

-------
   TABLE  XXV(Continued)

       COLUMN NO. 8
    PHASE I - METHANE
ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA



Day Of
Operation
Project
77
78
79
80
Phase I
77
78
79
80
PH
4.50
4.70
4.90
4.70

Sp.
Cond.
mmhos
13
11
12
11
Hot
Acid
as
CaCOq
4
4
4


Iron
as Fe
0.3
0.3
0.3


Sulfate
as S04
1.0
1.0
1.0


-------
         TABLE  XXVI

       COLUMN NO. 9
 PHASE I - CARBON DIOXIDE
ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
Day
Of

Operation
Project
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
Phase I
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
El
3.10
3.40
3.65
3.75
3.85
3.85
3.90
3.80
3.75
3.70
3.75
3.75
3.70
3.80
4.15
3.75
3.75
3.80
3.75
3.75
3.80
3.75
3.75
3.80
3.75
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.85
3.90
3.90
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.80
Sp.
Cond.
mmhos
650
330
240
200
150
145
120
100
87
97
85
83
85
83
79
72
73
74
69
65
62
64
57
59
57
55
55
56
56
56
54
53
53
53
52
52
51
50
Hot
Acid
as
CaCOs
380
156
92
68
72
44
44
64
24
24
22
20
20
16
14
15
14
18
23
11
10
12
10
19
116
7
8
24
17
5
5
5
5
5
4
5
5
6

Iron
as Fe
141.0
67.8
40.3
26.7
23.1
17-0
15.5
10.6
9.2
8.6
7.1
6.4
5.5
5.0
5.0
4.6
5.2
4.7
4.1
3.6
3.3
3.0
2.7
2.4
2.3
2.2
1.8
2.1
1.9
1.8
1.7
1.7
1.6
1.6
1.5
1.4
1.3
1.5

Sulfate
as SO4
300.0
128.0
67.5
63.9
35.3
38.7
37.7
15.9
9.1
1.4
13. 0
8.4
1.4
4.9
14.0
15.6
9.2
4.5
8.8
10.4
11.1
7.8
1.4
10.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
9.3
12.2
12.0
8.1
4.6
15.9
1.0
4.8
14.4
           105

-------
 TABLE XXVI  (Continued)

       COLUMN NO.  9
 PHASE I - CARBON  DIOXIDE
ANALYTICAL AND OTHER  DATA
Day Of
Operation
Project
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
Phase I
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
pH
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
3
3
4
4
4
.80
.80
.85
.90
.80
.80
.90
.80
.85
.80
.90
.90
.95
.90
.90
.90
.90
.90
.90
.85
.90
.90
.90
.85
.90
.50
.90
.00
.00
.05
.00
.00
.00
.95
.95
.00
.00
.00
Sp.
Cond.
mmhos
50
48
48
46
47
47
47
47
48
53
48
49
50
48
46
46
46
45
45
43
47
49
50
50
50

53
52
51
52
53
48
47
46
48
46
48
46
Hot
Acid
as
CaCOs
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
3
4

3
4
3
4
4
5
5
6
3
3
4
5
4
4
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
4
4
4
5

5
5
Iron
as Fe
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

0
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

1
0
.4
.3
.3
.3
.1
.1
.0
.0
.0

.9
.0
.0
.0
.8
.9
.8
.7
.8
.2
.3
.9
.9
.8
.7
.7
.7
.7
.7
.7
.6
.7
.7
.7
.7

.1
.8
Sulfate
as S04
4.
1.
1.
3.
3.
1.
1.
1.
1.

4.
3.
2.
4.
5.
1.
6.
9.
1.
1.
1.
1.
1.
1.
1.
1.
1.
1.
7.
3.
5.
1.
1.
4.
6.

1.
7.
1
0
0
2
9
0
0
0
0

5
5
2
5
4
0
6
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
3
2
0
0
5
7

0
9
            IOC

-------
                   TABLE  XXVI  (Continued)

                         COLUMN NO.  9
                   PHASE  I - CARBON  DIOXIDE
                 ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
     Day Of
   Operation
Project  Phase I
  77
  78
  79
  80
  81
  82
  83
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
4.00
4.05
3
4
4
4
90
00
00
00
4.04
 Sp.
Cond.
mmhos

  45
  4-
  47
  53
  47
  47
  47
                       Hot
                       Acid
                        as
4
4
4
4
4
5
4
                     Iron
                     as Fe

                       0.8
0,
0,
0.7
0.7
0.8
0.8
                               Sulfate
                                as S04
1.2
2.1
  0
  0
1,
1,
1.0
1.0
1.0
                            in?

-------
                       TABLE XXVII

                   COLUMN FEEDWATER
                 DAILY ANALYTICAL DATA
                        Specific
 Day of               Conductance     Hot Acid      Dissolved
Operation      pH        mmhos        as CaCO^        Oxygen
     1
     2
     3
     4
     5
     6        6.35        1.7                           0
     7        6.70        1.3            6              0
     8        6.50        1.1                           0
     9        6.40        1.2                           0
    10
    11
    12
    13
    14        6.40        1.2                           0
    15        5.75        1.3                           0
    16
    17
    18
    19
    20        5.95        0.8                           0
    21        5.65        1.0                           0
    22
    23
    24
    25
    26
    27        6.20        0.9                           0
    28                                                  0
    29        6.20        1.1                           0
    30
    31
    32
    33
    34
    35
    36
    37
    38
                            10t
5.80
6.40
6.10
6.50
6.20
6.35
6.70
6.50
6.40
6.20
6.45
6.75
6.40
6.40
5.75
5.75
5.80
5.75
6.05
5.95
5.65
6.10
5. 85
5.65
6.00
6.15
6.20
6.20
6.00
6.25
6.20
6.15
5.65
5.90
5.60
5.50
5.90
1.0
0.9
1.4
0.9
1.2
1.7
1.3
1.1
1.2
1.9
1.4
1.3
1.7
1.2
1.3
0.8
1.3
0.8
1.0
0.8
1.0
0.7
1.0
0.9
0.9
0.9
0.9
1.1
0.7
1.3
1.0
1.0
1.2
1.5
1.0
1.2
1.2

-------
              TABLE XXVII   (Continued)

                   COLUMN FEEDWATER
                 DAILY ANALYTICAL DATA
                        Specific
 Day of               Conductance     Hot Acid     Dissolved
Operation      pH        mmhos        as CaC03       Oxygen


    39        6.00        1.1
    40        6.30        1.0
    41        6.50        1.1                          0
    42        6.35        1.2
    43        6.35        1.1
    44        5.70        0.9                          0
    45        6.00        1.0
    46        5.65        1.3
    47        5.60        2.5
    48        5.00        2.0
    49        5.50        1.2
    50        6.30        1.0
    51
    52
    53
    54
    55
    56        5.75        1.5
    57        5.80        0.9                          0
    58        5.80        1.0
    59                                                 0
    60        5.90        0.9
    61        5.55        1-4
    62        5.60        1.0                          0
    63        6.00        1-2                          0
    64        5.70        1-2
    65        6.00        1-2
    66        5.90        0.9
    67        6.25        1-5
    68        5.60        1.3
    69        5.50        1.0            3.5
    70        5.90        1-1                          °
    71        5.65        1.1                          °
    72        5.60        1.4
    73        5.40        1.5
    74        5.55        1.3
    75        5.25        2.5
    76        5.55        1.3
                             1Q9

-------
               TABLE XXVII  (Continued)

                   COLUMN FEEDWATER
                 DAILY ANALYTICAL DATA
                        Specific
 Day of               Conductance     Hot Acid      Dissolved
Operation      pH        mmhos        as CaCO^        Oxygen
                          0.9
                          0.8

                          1.0
                          1.0
                          1.2
                          1.4                           0
                          1.2
                          1.0
                          1.1
                          0.9                           o
                          1.0
                          1.2
                          1.0                           o
                          1.5                           o
                          1.2           5.0
                          1.3
                          1.2
                          1.3
                          1.0
                          1-1           2.0             0
                          1.2
                          1.3
                          1.3
                          0.9                           o
                          1.4
                          1.3
                          0.6           4.0
                          2.0
                          0.8           2.0
                          0.5
                          8.0
                          9.0
                          5.0
                          5.0           2.0             o
                          5.0
                          3.5
                          4.0                           n
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
5.40
5.80

5.85
5.85
5.50
5.60
5.80
5.50
5.50
5.70
5.45
5.40
5.40
5.95
5.70
5.80
6.00
5.80
5.90

5.80
5.70
6.00
6.10
5.80
5.85
6.20
5.75
5.70
6. 60
5.05
5.95


5.65
5.95
6.05

-------
              TABLE XXVII   (Continued)

                   COLUMN FEEDWATER
                 DAILY ANALYTICAL DATA
                        Specific
 Day of               Conductance     Hot Acid     Dissolved
Operation      pH        mmhos        as CaC03       Oxygen
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
6.05



5. 80
6.05
5.85
6.05
6.10
6.00
6.05
5.95
5.75
5.40
5.55
5.60
5.60
5.45
5.85
5.65

5.75




6.50
5.85



5.75
5.75
5.70
5.70
                                        1.0            0
                           2.5
                           3.5
                           3.5
                           3.0
                           3.5
                           3.0
                           3.0           1.0            0
                           3.0
                           3.5
                           4.0
                           2.5
                           2.5
                           2.5
                           2.0           1.0
                           2.5                          0
                           3.5

                           2.5                          1-2
                                                       1.2
                           3.0                           0
                           2.5                           0
                           3.0                          0
                           3.0                          0
                           3.0                          0
                           3.0                          0
                             111

-------
           TABLE  XXVIII

             COLUMN NO.  1
PHASE II - 99.5% NITROGEN  +  0.5%  OXYGEN
      ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
Day Of
Operation
Project
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
Phase II
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
pH
4.95
4.75
4, 55
4.45
4.40
4.15
4.15
4.05
4.15
4.10
3.95
4.40
3.80
4.20
4.20
4.40
4.10
4.00
4.35
4.55
4.60
4.20
4.30
4.10
4.20
4.15
4.10
4.00
3.90
3.90
3.85
4.10
4.05
4.10
4.00
4.00
4.05
4.00
Sp.
Cond.
mmhos
13
17
24
28
31
37
39
42
41
45
46
48
53
44
40
48
52
48
52
50
51
50
51
60
60
57
54
63
83
67
68
56
48
46
63
55
60
55
Hot
Acid
as
CaCOs
6
7
8
10
9
11
10
11
11
11
12
13
15
11
11
12
13
12
11
11
12
12
12
12
13
13
12
13
17
16
16
14
16
18
14
16
14
15

Iron
as Fe
1.1
1.7
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.3
2.2
2.3
2.0
2.3
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.2
2.1
2.5
2.3
2.1
2.5
2.1
2.6
2.0
2.3
2.4
2.6
2.5
2.4
2.6
3.6
3.5
6.5
3.2
2.9
2.8
2.9
2.6
2.5
2.6

Sulfate
as S04
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
7.1
1.0
7.8
13.2
17.1
11.8
11.7
8.2
5.5
17.5
12. 0
16.9
15.4
1. 0
8 . 8
2. 4
13.0
12. 0
12. 0
19. 8
12. 6
19 . 0
18.5
14. 8
11. 6
14. 2
4.3
5. 6
11. 6
17. 6
1 0
-i- • \J
6 0
\J • \J
7.8
                  112

-------
        TABLE  XXVIII (Continued)

              COLUMN NO.  1
PHASE II - 99.5% NITROGEN +0.5%  OXYGEN
       ANALYTICAL AND OTHER  DATA
Day Of
Operation
Project
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
Phase II
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
pH
4.00
4.00
4.00
3.95
3.95
3.95
4.00
4.00
4.00
3.80
3.95
3.95
3.95
3.90
4.00
3.95

4.00
3.95

4.00
3.70
3.95
3.95



3.90
3.95
3.95
3.65
Sp.
Cond .
mmhos
65
63
65
63
67
65
67
65
67
72
72
85
77
70
70
74

74
80

80
82
75
76



75
78
75
95
Hot
Acid
as
CaC03
16
15
16
19
17
16
15
15
17
12
16
15
17
19
14
15

19
17

18
15
17
17



16
16
17
24

Iron
as Fe
2.6
3.0
3.1
3.1
3.1
2.9
3.0
2.9
2.9
3.0
3.1
3.2
3.0
3.0
3.1
3.1

3.0
3.4

3.3
3.2
3.2
3.0



3.0
3.3
3.2
4.3

Sulfate
as SO4
1.0
12.2
16.9
11.1
18.0
19.3
29.7
13.0
5.2
9.7
5.0
13.0
14.2
22.3
12.7
8.9

12.0
10.5

14.6
6.2
6.2
12.5



11.9
12.3
13.9
28.3
                   11:

-------
       TABLE XXIX
      COLUMN NO.  2
 PHASE II  - NITROGEN GAS
   (AIR SATURATED WATER)
ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
Day
of

Operation
Project
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
Phase II
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
El
5.05
4.80
4.80
4.50
4.65
4.65
4.40
4.70
4.20
4.50
4.75
4.80
4.50
4.50
4.35
4.75
4.55
4.55
4.60
4,50
4.50
4.50
4.50
4.30
4.65
4.40
4.40

4.45
4.50
4.40
4.45
4.45
4.45
4.55
4.50
4.50
4.45
Sp.
Cond.
mmhos
10
11
12
14
14
15
18
18
18
17
16
18
20
16
20
20
20
20
20
23
23
22
22
26
30
23
26
21
20
19
21
18
20
19
22
21
23
23
Hot
Acid
as
CaC03
4
5
4
5
5
6
6
5
8
6
6
6
5
6
7
6
4
6
7
5
5
7
7
5
7
6
6
5
8
8
5
19
5
7
5
5
5
6

Iron
as Fe
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.9
0.9
0.9
0.8
0.9
1.0
0.9
0.8
0.9
0.9
0.8
0.9
0.7
0.8
0.8
0.7
0.7
0.6
0.8
0.7
0.7
1,1
1.0
0. 9
0.8
0.8
0.7
0.7
0.6
0.6
0.7
0.7
0. 8
0.8
0.8

Sulfate
as SO4
1.0
1.0
8.2
1.0
1.0
1.0
8.3
1.0
1.2
1.0
11.8
19.0
5.6
10.8
6.1
6.4
1.0
4.0
12.0
18.0
29.0
7.0
13.0
6.7
1.0
5.2
1.0
1,0
1.0
6,6
1.0
1.0
2.8
1.0
6,1
6.7
14.8
1.0
         114

-------
 TABLE XXIX  (Continued)

      COLUMN NO.  2
 PHASE II - NITROGEN  GAS
   (AIR SATURATED  WATER)
ANALYTICAL AND OTHER  DATA
Day
of


Operation
Project
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
Phase II
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65

4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4

3
4

4
3
4
4



4
4
4
3
El
.45
.45
.35
.45
.35
.15
.35
.30
.30
.30
.40
.35

.95
.30

.45
.90
.40
.30



.20
.30
.15
.85
Sp.
Cond.
mmhos
24
23
23
23
24
28
27
25
27
26
27
30

33
28

30
31
30
35



40
45
45
55
Hot
Acid
as
CaCOj
5
7
5
5
6
5
7
7
7
8
7
6

8
7

8
5
6
8



9
10
11
14


Iron
as
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1

0
0

1
1
1
1



1
1
1
2
Fe
.8
.7
.7
.8
.8
.9
.0
.0
.0
.0
.0
.1

.9
.8

.2
.2
.3
.2



,3
.5
.8
,4


Sulfate
as
15
28
21
5
1
1
1
1
3
16
4
13

1
1

1
3
4
1



11
6
7
18
S04
.0
.7
.0
.3
.4
.0
.0
.5
.7
.3
.6
.1

.2
.0

.0
.4
.4
.0



.6
.5
.7
.7
          115

-------
         TABLE  XXX

       COLUMN NO.  4
    PHASE II -  NITROGEN
ANALYTICAL AND  OTHER DATA
Day Of
Operation
Project
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
Phase
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
II pH
3.65
3.95
4.10
4.15
4.25
4.30
4.30
4.40
4.40
4.40
4.40
4.45
4.60
4.40
4.40
4.20
4.45
4.70
4.80
4.40
4.35
4.70
4.80
4.75
4.80
4.75
4.70
4.75
4.70
4.70
4.55
4.55
4.70
4.65
4.80
4.80
4.80
4.80
Sp.
Cond.
inmhos
200
130
80
51
43
39
37
30
28
27
25
23
24
24
23
23
18
17
17
18
16
17
16
15
15
14
16
15
13
14
19
19
15
16
14
11
11
14
Hot
Acid
as
CaCOs
62
40
28
28
18
16
13
12
10
11
10
9
9
9
9
10
8
7
7
6
3
5
5
6
7
4
4
4
4
5
4
6
5
5
4
6
6
4

Iron
as Fe
18.0
11.0
7.6
6.1
5.3
4.6
3.9
3.4
3.0
2.6
2.4
2.4
1.8
1.9
1.6
2.3
1.5
1.3
1.4
1.3
1.2
1.1
0.9
1.1
1.0
1.0
0.9
0.9
0.9
0.8
0.7
1.1
1.0
1.0
0.9
0.7
0.7
0.7

Sulfate
as S04
51.0
23.9
13.6
9.0
4.9
7.8
2.8
1.0
1.0
1.0
9.8
8.9
1.6
11.6
7.7
14.7
3.6
9.2
16.8
4.7
3.2
7. 5
9.1
1 0
_i_ • \j
7. 0
1 0
•J- • V
13.0
12. 3
13.3
3. 9
3. 3
1. 0
1 0
-J- • \j
3 6
*J • \J
1.0
1 0
-J- • \j
9 . 8
1.0
          lie

-------
  TABLE XXX(Continued)

      COLUMN NO.  4
   PHASE II - NITROGEN
ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
Day
of

Operation
Project
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
Phase II
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
El
4.80
4.85
4.80
4.80
4.80
4.80
4.85
4.85
4.85
4.70
4.85
4.80
4.70
4.75
4.75
4.75
4.75
4.75
4.70

4.80
4.75

4.60
4.45
4.75
4.75



4.85
4.80
4.80
4.65
Sp.
Cond.
mmhos
10
15
10
11
11
11
11
11
10
10
10
11
13
12
10
11
10
13
15

15
15

20
12
13
13



10
11
10
13
Hot
Acid
as
CaCOi
11
4
2
2
4
6
5
4
5
3
4
5
4
4
5
5
4
7
6

7
6

7
5
6
4



4
4
3
5

Iron
as Fe
0.5
0.6
0.6
0.5
0.5
0.6
0.6
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.4
0.7
0.7
0.8

0.8
0.8

0.9
0.6
0.6
0.4



0.3
0.4
0.4
0.5

Sulf ate
as S04
1.0
1.0
1.0
11.1
4.7
11.9
5.1
6.2
9.6
9.1
5.9
1.0
4.2
1.0
4.1
12.1
6.9
11.0
15.8

5.2
4.3

2.0
1.0
3.0
1.0



5.0
4.6
3.0
5.2
          117

-------
        TABLE XXXI

       COLUMN NO.  5
    PHASE II - METHANE
ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
Day Of
Operation
Project
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
Phase II
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
pH
3.55
3.90
4.10
4.20
4.30
4.30
4.40
4.30
4.30
4.50
4.40
4.40
4.20
4.30
4.75
4.80
4.40
4.40
4.75
4.80
4.75
4.80
4.75
4.70
4.74
4.70
4.80
4.50
4.60
4.50
4.70
4.90
4.80
4.80
4.80
4.80
4.80
4.80
Sp.
Cond.
mmhos
230
115
70
56
44
37
36
30
28
26
25
25
23
18
14
17
17
16
16
15
15
14
13
16
15
13
13
17
15
18
15
13
10
10
14
10
14
9
Hot
Acid
as
CaCOa
72
42
32
20
16
14
22
12
11
10
9
9
10
8
6
8
7
5
7
5
6
5
6
5
4
5
4
5
5
4
5
5
6
3
4
10
4
3

Iron
as Fe
24.0
14.0
9.1
7.2
5.8
4.8
4.1
3.4
2.7
2.4
2.5
2,0
2,2
1.8
1.5
1.6
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.3
1.2
1.0
1.0
1,0
0.8
0,9
0.8
1.0
1.1
1.0
0,9
0,8
0.8
0,7
0.7
0.6
0.6

Sulfate
as S04
54.5
18.5
5.2
6.3
10.7
1.2
1.0
10.8
12.0
3.0
4.8
12.4
5.7
3.4
10.6
24.2
5.9
6.1
24.3
1.0
1.0
4.0
9.0
9.0
12,6
8,4
2.8
12.0
1.8
1,0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1,0
10,0
3.1
1,0
12.0

-------
  TABLE XXXI  (Continued)

       COLUMN NO.  5
    PHASE II - METHANE
ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
Day Of
Operation
Project
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
Phase
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
II pH
4.80
4.80
4.80
4.90
4.90
4.85
4.70
4.90
4.85
4.70
4.75
4.80
4.80
4.85
4.85
4.75

4.80
4.80

4.70
4.60
4.75
4.75



4.85
4.80
4.80
4.80
Sp.
Cond.
mmhos
11
10
10
10
10
9
11
10
10
12
11
9
11
9
11
14

10
10

14
10
14
12



10
12
10
12
Hot
Acid
as
CaCOs
3
2
7
4
5
3
4
4
4
7
4
4
4
5
7
5

5
5

4
3
5
4



4
4
4
5
Iron
as Fe
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.5
0.6

0.6
0.6

0.8
0.8
0,7
0.5



0.4
0.4
0.4
0.6
Sulfate
as S04
*±
2 .0
11.5
12.1
3.4
1. 0
4.4
9 .1
16.3
1.0
1.0
1.0
6.0
1 0
_i_ » v/
8 .6
10,6
4.7

1,0
3,6

1.2
1,0
1.0
1.0



2.0
4.8
2.9
3.5
         11'

-------
       TABLE  XXXII

      COLUMN NO.  7
 PHASE II - NITROGEN GAS
 (NORMAL WATER FLOW RATE)
ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
Day of
Operation
Project
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
Phase II
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
pH
3.40
3.40
3.80
4.05
4.10
4.10
4.25
4.25
4.20
4.40
4.45
4.40
4.45
4.60
4.50
4.50
4.45
4.45
4.45
4.25
4.45
4.60
4.55
4.60
4.60
4.65
4.60
4.60
Sp.
Cond.
mmhos
311
115
109
88
64
68
57
44
38
29
31
22
29
22
26
28
26
25
25
24
24
24
24
17
15
17
15
16
Hot
Acid
as
CaCO-3
144
48
32
28
22
17
13
14
11
9
15
9
8
6
7
9
6
8
7
6
6
9
9
8
8
6
9
10

Iron
as Fe
26.0
12.0
8.9
8.2
7.4
5.4
4.6
3.9
3.3
3.4
2.6
2.4
2.1
2.0
1.7
1.7
1.6
1.5
1.4
1.3
1.2
1.2
1.1
0.8
1.2
0.9
0.9
1.1

Sulfate
as SO^
99.0
43.0
18.7
18.3
12.4
17.9
1.0
5.1
7.9
13.0
1.0
1.0
17.2
7.3
0.6
2.2
6.2
2.6
8.5
1.3
4.2
1.0
1.0

1.0
6.4
11.5
5. 4
            12'

-------
       TABLE  XXXIII

       COLUMN NO.  7
 PHASE II - NITROGEN  GAS
 (REDUCED WATER FLOW RATE)
ANALYTICAL AND OTHER  DATA
Day Of
Operation
Project
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
Phase II
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
ES
4.20
4.20
4.20
3.80
4.25
4.15


4.15
4,20
4.20
4.00
Sp.
Cond,
iranhos
50
60
61
63
64
60
53


49
50
53
55
Hot
Acid
as
CaCOs
16
18
20
21
17
16
20


14
15
15
16
Iron
as Fe
4.1
4.6
4.2
6.0
5.5
5.4
3.9


3.4
3.3
3.3
3.5
Sulfate
as S04
^t
17.7
21.8
10.7
18.4
6 5
w • _/
11.3
10.9


12. 4
12.1
11.2
20.2
         121

-------
          TABLE  XXXIV

         COLUMN  NO.  8
PHASE II - METHANE  +0.1% OXYGEN
  ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
Day Of
Operation
Project
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
Phase II
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
PH
4.65
4.60
4.60
4.65
4.50
4.60
4.45
4.40
4.30
4.45
4.35
4.35
4.10
4.60
4.55
4.55
4.25
4.40
4.20
4.55
4.45
4.40
4.50
4.50
4.40
4.35
4.40
4.40
4.30
4.35
4.30
4.40
4.35
4.50
4.50
4.45
4.45
4.45
Sp.
Cond.
mmhos
12
13
14
17
15
17
17
18
20
20
21
25
24
18
18
20
22
22
22
22
22
22
22
23
25
26
22
29
33
29
32
24
25
24
18
25
19
23
Hot
Acid
as
CaC03
4
5
5
5
5
7
6
7
6
6
7
7
6
5
6
8
5
6
5
7
7
6
6
5
5
5
5
4
6
7
6
6
8
5
6
5
15
6

Iron
as Fe
0.6
0.7
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.9
0.8
0.9
0.8
0.7
0.8
0.8
0.9
0.8
0.7
0.9
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.6
0.7
0.7
0.8
0.8
0.6
0.6
0.7
1.0
1.0
0.9
0.8
0,8
0.8
0.8
0.7
0,7
0.7

Sulfate
as S04
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
2.3
9.4
1.0
10.8
5.6
6.4
14,0
1.0
10.8
9.3
17.8
11.1
9.5
35,0
4,0
25.0
20.0
14.0
9.1
6.5
1.0
1.0
6.1
9.4
3,2
1.0
4.9
9.2
2,6
16.7
1.0
            122

-------
     TABLE XXXIV (Continued)

          COLUMN NO. 8
PHASE II - METHANE + 0.1% OXYGEN
   ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
Day Of
Operation
Project
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
Phase II pH
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4

4
4

4
4
4
4



4
4
4
3
.55
.45
.45
.40
.45
.40
.20
.35
.30
.35
.30
.35
.30
.30
.40
.40

.35
.35

,20
.30
.35
.30



.10
.15
.15
.90
Sp.
Cond.
mmhos
20
24
25
25
24
25
25
27
27
28
23
23
25
23
22
23

26
25

29
23
26
35



52
49
55
71
Hot
Acid
as
CaCOs
6
8
6
5
7
5
5
5
5
9
8
7
8
8
10
7

5
6

9
7
7
11



12
12
13
18
Iron
as Fe
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0

1
1
1
1



2
2
2
3
.7
.7
.7
.8
.7
.7
.7
.6
.7
.7
,3
.8
.7
.7
.8
.8

.7
,8

.1
.1
.0
.7



.2
.3
.5
.6
Sulfate
as
13
1
6
6
7
8
35
5
1
1
1
1
11
7
3
8

1
3

5
1
1
7



17
11
7
22
S04
.7
.0
.9
.1
.2
.7
.7
.3
.0
.0
,0
.0
,6
.1
.7
.9

.0
.0

.3
.0
.0
.6



.1
.2
.7
,8
              123

-------
                 TABLE XXXV

              COLUMN  NO,  9
PHASE II - 99% CARBON DIOXIDE + 1% OXYGEN
       ANALYTICAL AND OTHER DATA
Day Of
Operation
Project
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
Phase II
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
PH
3.90
3.80
3.65
3.65
3.65
3.70
3.65
3.60
3.60
3.55
3.90
3.90
3.85
3.65
3.70
3.85
3.85
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.70
3.80
3.80
3.85
3.75
3.60
3.70
3.70
3.65
3.85
3.80
3.80
3.80
3.90
3.80
3.80
Sp.
Cond.
nunhos
73
110
120
125
125
125
130
140
145
140
120
120
125
135
125
130
135
125
130
125
125
125
110
115
130
88
130
165
180
125
120
105
115
110
114
110
120
120
Hot
Acid
as
CaCOs
10
17
19
19
25
21
22
30
27
25
22
24
23
22
23
23
23
30
30
26
23
24
22
24
22
20
42
49
42
31
24
24
32
22
25
26
31
23

Iron
as Fe
1.8
3.4
1.6
4.4
5.0
5.0
5.0
5,1
5.4
6,2
5.8
5,8
6.6
5.8
6.3
5.7
5.8
7.1
6.0
6.8
6.5
6.6
5.9
5.8
5.8
6.2
25,0
16.0
14,0
9.0
8.7
7.8
8.0
9.0
7.4
7.7
7.9
7.9

Sulfate
as S04
1.0
9.9
10.5
1.0
19.3
18.5
18.5
22.1
18.5
18.5
19.2
22.0
36,1
20,1
11,4
19.0
20.7
9.8
26.0
13.4
21.0
9.4
39.0
14.2
1.0
15.0
26,8
42.9
26.0

22.5
22.0
10.1
7.1
10.4
30,5
19,6
24.0
                 I O/i
                 I C-"r

-------
        TABLE XXXV  (Continued)

              COLUMN NO,  9
PHASE II - 99% CARBON DIOXIDE +  1%  OXYGEN
       ANALYTICAL AND OTHER  DATA
Day Of
Operation
Project
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
Phase II
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
EH
3.75
3.75
3.80
3.70
3.70
3.65
3.70
3.65
3.70
3.65
3.60
3.70
3.80

3.70
3.70

5.10
3.60
3.80
3.65



3.70
3.70
3.70
3.50
Sp.
Cond.
nutthos
120
120
125
125
125
130
135
125
130
125
125
125
130

125
130

138
130
130
125



125
125
125
150
Hot
Acid
as
CaC03
22
27
24
22
24
22
27
24
23
29
28
32
24

31
27

31
32
29
56



29
29
28
41

Iron
as Fe
8.2
7.7
7.5
7.4
7.2
7.6
7.3
3,0
7,8
7.7
7,6
7,7
7.8

8.0
8.1

8.6
8.3
8.8
8.2



8.4
8.5
8.3
11.1

Sulfate
as SO4
33.2
2.5
10.7
14.9
20.3
15.2
18.8
21.5
21.2
16.5
27.8
20.1
20.5

31.7
18.4

23.1
28,9
14.2
20.1



20.6
23.1
21,3
47.2
                  125

-------
                         TABLE XXXVI

                        COLUMN NO. 2
                  PHASE II - NITROGEN GAS
                    (AIR SATURATED WATER)
                FEEDWATER & EFFLUENT WATER
                   DISSOLVED OXYGEN DATA
      Day Of                              Dissolved Oxygen
	Operation	        Water                mg/1
Project   Phase II       Temp. °C         Tn           OTTE

   85         1             14            6.4
   86         2             14
   87         3             14            8.4          4.4
   88         4             14            8.4          5.6
   89         5             14            8.4          2.6
   90         6             14            8.2          3.2
   91         7             14            7.8          2.4
   92         8             15            8.2          1.8
   93         9             14
   94        10             12            8.6          2.8
   95        11             12            8.6          2.8
   96        12             14            8.6          3.5
   97        13             13            8.4          2.8
   98        14             14            8.5          3.4
   99        15             15            8.8          3.2
  100        16             14            8.6          2.4
  101        17             14            8.0          2.6
  102        18             14            7.6          2.2
  103        19             14            8.2          3.4
  104        20             15            8.0          3.2
  105        21             14            7.6          4.8
  106        22             13            8.4          5.8
  107        23             13            8.4          2.8
  108        24             14
  109        25             14
  110        26             14
  111        27             14            8.5          3.2
  112        28             14            8.2          3.0
  113        29             13            8.4          2.8
  114        30             12            8.6          3.0
  115        31             12
  116        32             13
  117        33             13
  118        34             13
  119        35             13            8.5          3.0
  120        36             14            8.5          2.9
  121        37             14            8.3          3.0
                           12G

-------
              TABLE XXXVI  (Continued)

                    COLUMN NO. 2
              PHASE II - NITROGEN GAS
                (AIR SATURATED WATER)
          FEEDWATER DISSOLVED OXYGEN DATA
  Day Of                              Dissolved Oxygen
Operation	        Water           	mg/1	
                     Temp. °C         In           Out

                        14            8.4          2.8
                        14            8.3          3.0
                        14            8.4          2.9
                        13            8.3          2.8
                        13            8.5          2.9
                        13            8.6          3.0
                        13            8.5          2.7
                        14            8.2          2.7
                        13            7.9          3.0
                        14
                        14            8.3          3.0
                        13            8.2          3.0
                        13            8.1          3.1

                        14            8.5          2.9
                        13            8.6          3.0
                        14                         2.8
                        14            8.5          2.9
                        14            8.5          2.9
                        14            8.4          2.9
                        14            8.3          2.7
                        14            8.4          2.8
                        14            8.3          3.1
Project
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
Phase II
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
                        127

-------
    TABLE XXXVII

   COLUMN NO. 1
WEEKLY SAMPLE DATA
MINOR CONSTITUENTS
Day Of Operation Al
49
56
62
69
83
90
97
104
111
118
125
132
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
18
04
02
02
07
07
18
40
16
08
14
06
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Mn
.02
.02
.02
.02
.03
.02
.02
.03
.04
.05
.01
.01
Mg
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
34
22
03
03
07
04
02
04
05
06
09
01
Ca
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
33
30
30
33
88
39
30
32
82
66
82
16
Fe++
0.
0.
0.
0.
2.
2.
2.
1.
5.
2.
2.
3.
6
5
4
3
1
1
0
7
9
6
8
0

-------
   TABLE XXXVIII

   COLUMN NO. 2
WEEKLY SAMPLE DATA
MINOR CONSTITUENTS
Day Of Operation
49
56
62
69
83
90
97
104
111
118
125
132
Al
0.15
0.04
0.14
0.02
0.05
0.05
0.16
0.36
0.14
0.16
0.05
0.11
Mn
0.02
0.02
0.02
0.02
0.05
0.02
0.02
0.03
0.04
0.05
0.02
0.01
Mg
0.41
0.22
0.03
0.05
0.05
0.05
0.02
0.04
0.03
0.03
0.02
0.01
Ca
0.34
0.30
0.30
0.60
0.36
0.44
0.28
0.34
0.44
0.44
0.27
0.16
Fe++
0.6
0.5
0.5
0.4








       129

-------
    TABLE XXXIX

   COLUMN NO. 3
WEEKLY SAMPLE DATA
MINOR CONSTITUENTS
Day of Operation Al
49
56
62
69
83
90
97
104
111
118
125
132
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
11
25
12
02
05
06
15
15
17
05
05
02
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Mn
.02
.02
.02
.02
.04
.03
.02
.02
.02
.05
.01
.01

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Mg
.43
.27
.02
.03
.05
.04
.02
.03
.02
.10
.03
.01

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
Ca
.37
.35
.30
.38
.39
.30
.21
.20
.22
.20
.38
.13
Fe++
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
6
5
5
4
3
2
3
2
3
2
2
2
      130

-------
    TABLE  XL

   COLUMN NO. 4
WEEKLY SAMPLE DATA
MINOR CONSTITUENTS
Day Of Operation Al
49 0.
56 0.
62 0.
69 0.
83 0.
90 0.
97 0.
104 0.
Ill 0.
118 0.
125 0.
132 0.
39
34
16
16
05
05
24
30
09
05
05
02
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Mn
.04
.04
.02
.05
.04
.02
.02
.02
.03
.05
.01
.01
Mg
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
34
31
08
09
04
05
02
04
02
02
02
01
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Ca
.81
.73
.80
.80
.44
.27
.16
.29
.21
.33
.20
.11
Fe++
61.
83.
69.
70.
4.
1.
1.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
9
0
0
0
4
8
2
2
9
5
5
4
       131

-------
    TABLE XLI

   COLUMN NO. 5
WEEKLY SAMPLE DATA
MINOR CONSTITUENTS
Day Of Operation AT
49
56
62
69
83
90
97
104
111
118
125
132
0.11
0.16
0.24
0.08
0.13
0.15
0.10
0.05
0.09
0.08
0.11
0.02
Mn
0.04
0.04
0.02
0.06
0.04
0.03
0.02
0.02
0.02
0.05
0.01
0.01
Ma
^j_
0.31
0.41
0.04
0.08
0.03
0.03
0.02
0.03
0.04
0.06
0.02
0.01
Ca
\~rG.
0.51
0.38
0.04
0.60
0.25
0.21
0.10
0.36
0.60
0.77
0.20
0.11
FP>
J- t=
57
58
64
63
8.
2.
1.
0.
1.
0.
0.
0.
++

.9
.0
.0
.0
,9
1
3
4
0
6
5
5
    132

-------
   TABLE  XL 11

   COLUMN NO. 6
WEEKLY SAMPLE DATA
MINOR CONSTITUENTS
Day Of Operation
49
56
62
69
83
90
97
104
111
118
125
132
Al
0.07
0.36
0.20
0.08
0.21
0.18
0.45
0.69
0.29
0.20
0.16
0.02
Mn
0.05
0.06
0.03
0.06
0.07
0.06
0.04
0.09
0.05
0.06
0.01
0.02
M£
0.41
0.48
0.10
0.11
0.13
0.09
0.07
0.08
0.08
0.14
0.07
0.05
Ca
0.69
0.73
1.00
0.77
0.68
0.54
0.41
0.43
0.43
1.30
0.40
0.66
Fe++
62.2
61.0
67.0
63.0
60.0
54.0
58.0
40.0
53.0
54.0
55.0
55.0
      133

-------
   TABLE XLIII

   COLUMN NO. 7
WEEKLY SAMPLE DATA
MINOR CONSTITUENTS
Day Of Operation
49
56
62
69
83
90
97
104
111
118
125
132
Al
0.05
0.11
0.30
0.42
0.28
0.13
0.29
0.64
0.12
0.05
0.05
0.02
Mn
0.03
0.14
0.14
0.15
0.04
0.04
0.04
0.13
0.02
0.05
0.01
0.01
Mg
-*
0.31
3.20
0.18
0.21
0.05
0.06
0.02
0.05
0.02
0.01
0.01
0.01
Ca
0.51
2.80
1.30
1.60
0.54
0.34
0.46
0.26
0.19
0.55
0.16
0.12
Fe++
58.0
250.0
235.0
212.0
61.0
50.0
53.0
45.0
5.2
2.1
1.3
0.9
     134

-------
    TABLE  XLIV

   COLUMN NO. 8
WEEKLY SAMPLE DATA
MINOR CONSTITUENTS
Day Of Operation
49
56
62
69
83
90
97
104
111
118
125
132
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Al
.04
.15
.04
.02
.05
.05
.15
.10
.12
.10
.08
.04

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Mn
.02
.02
.02
.03
.03
.02
.02
.02
.03
.05
.01
.01
Mg
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
II.-
33
22
06
02
03
05
02
03
05
02
03
01
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Ca
.43
.32
.40
.38
.45
.35
.23
.46
.55
.33
.36
.14
Fe++
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
.7
.5
.5
.4
.8
.7
.7
.7
.9
.7
.7
.7

-------
    TABLE   XLV

   COLUMN NO.  9
WEEKLY SAMPLE  DATA
MINOR CONSTITUENTS
Day Of Operation Al
49
56
62
69
83
90
97
104
111
118
125
132
0.18
0,
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
.30
.23
,03
05
05
35
32
37
06
08
02
Mn
0
.02
0.02
0.02
0.03
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
02
02
02
08
02
05
01
01
Mg
0
.33
0.24
0.03
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
,05
07
05
03
05
01
02
05
01
Ca
0
0
0,
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
0.
.58
.50
.50
.60
61
49
37
27
22
44
50
22
Fe++
0.9
0.
0.
0.
0.
5.
5.
5.
15.
7.
6.
7.
.7
.8
6
6
0
8
4
0
4
8
6
     13C

-------
                                      TABLE XLVI

                                 COLUMN NO. 1 - PHASE II
                                 NITROGEN + 0.523% OXYGEN
                              INLET AND OUTLET GAS ANALYSES
          Day Of
        Operation
CO
Project
125
127
128
129
132
133
134
136
137
141
142
146
147
148
149
*142
146
147
148
149
Phase II
45
47
48
49
52
53
54
56
57
61
62
66
67
68
69
62
66
67
68
69
% Oxygen In
 Inlet Gas

   0.523
   0.523
   0.523
   0.523
   0.523
   0.523
   0.523
   0.523
   0.523
   0.523
   0.523
   0.523
   0.523
   0.523
   0.523

   0.523
   0.523
   0.523
   0.523
   0.523
% Oxygen In
Outlet Gas

   0.500
   0.500
   0.440
   0.440
   0.469
   0.483
   0.479
   0.436
   0.361
   0.384
   0.418
   0.436
   0.441
   "0.390
   0.392

   0.418
   0.447
   0.441
   0.397
   0.403
Difference

  0.023
  0.023
  0.083
  0.083
  0.054
  0.040
  0.044
  0.087
  0.162
  0.139
  0.105
  0.087
  0.082
  0.133
  0.131

  0.105
  0.076
  0.082
  0.126
  0.120
    *The column operating on a methane-oxygen mixture (Column No,
     to nitrogen + 0.523% oxygen on 12/2/70.
    Gas Flow Rate

      45 cc/min
      45 cc/min
      45 cc/min
      45 cc/min
      45 cc/min
      45 cc/min
      45 cc/min
      45 cc/min
      45 cc/min
      45 cc/min
      45 cc/min
      45 cc/min
      45 cc/min
      45 cc/min
      45 cc/min

      45 cc/min
      45 cc/min
      45 cc/min
      45 cc/min
      45 cc/min

8)  was changed

-------
                                     TABLE  XLVII

                                COLUMN NO. 8 - PHASE II
                                 METHANE + 0.11% OXYGEN
                             INLET AND OUTLET GAS ANALYSES
          Day Of
        Operation
CO
co
Project
125
133
134
136
137
141
Phase
45
53
54
56
57
61
II






% Oxygen In
 Inlet Gas

   0.112
   0.112
   0.112
   0.112
   0.112
   0.112
% Oxygen In
Outlet Gas

   0.087
   0.098
   0.077
   0.092
   0.066
   0.060
                                                        Difference

                                                          0.025
                                                          0.014
                                                          0.035
                                                          0.020
                                                          0.046
                                                          0.052
Gas Flow Rate

  30 cc/min
  30 cc/min
  30 cc/min
  30 cc/min
  30 cc/min
  30 cc/min

-------
                                         TABLE XLVIII

                                   COLUMN NO. 9 - PHASE II
                               CARBON DIOXIDE + 1.07% OXYGEN
                               INLET AND OUTLET GAS ANALYSES
            Day  Of
          Operation
CO
115
Project
121
125
127
128
134
136
137
141
146
147
149
Phase II
38
42
44
45
51
53
54
58
63
64
66
; Oxygen  In
Inlet Gas
  1,
  1,
  1,
  1,
  1.
  1,
  1,
  1,
  1,
  1,
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
07
                               1.07
% Oxygen In
Outlet Gas

   0.390
   0.514
   0.871
   0.924
   0.659
   0.993
   0.963
   0.856
   0.781
   0.996
   0.927
Difference

  0.680
  0.556
  0.199
  0.146
  0.411
  0.077
  0.107
  0.214
  0.289
  0.074
  0.143
Gas Flow Rate

  45 cc/min
  45 cc/min
  45 cc/min
  45 cc/min
  45 cc/min
  45 cc/min
  45 cc/min
  45 cc/min
  45 cc/min
  45 cc/min
  45 cc/min

-------
               TABLE  XL IX

      COLUMN NO.  6 - AIR CONTROL
        NITROGEN  + 20.9% OXYGEN
     Day of Operation

            1
            2
            3
            4
            5
            6
            7
--           8
o          44
          121
          125
          127
          129
          132
          133
          134
          137
          141
          142
          146
          147
          148
; Oxygen  In
Inlet Gas

  20.9
  20.9
  20.9
  20.9
  20.9
  20.9
  20.9
  20.9
  20.9
  20.9
  20.9
  20.9
  20.9
  20.9
  20.9
  20.9
  20.9
  20.9
  20.9
  20.9
  20.9
  20.9
% Oxygen In
Outlet Gas

   19.8
   19.8
   19.9
   20.4
   20.4
   20.4
   20.4
   20.4
   19.6
   19.2
   19.5
   18.1
   19.2
   18.4
   19.3
   18.4
   18.9
   17.5
   17.3
   17.0
   18.7
   19.6
Difference

   1.1
   1.1
   0.9
   0.5
   0.5
   0.5
   0.5
   0.5
   1.3
   1.7
   1.4
   2.8
   1.7
   2.5
   1.6
   2.5
   2.0
   3.4
   3.6
   3.9
   2.2
   1.3
Gas Flow Rate

  10 cc/min
  86 cc/min
  86 cc/min
  86 cc/min
  86 cc/min
  86 cc/min
  86 cc/min
  86 cc/min
  45 cc/min
  45 cc/min
  45 cc/min
  45 cc/min
  45 cc/min
  45 cc/min
  45 cc/min
  45 cc/min
  45 cc/min
  45 cc/min
  45 cc/min
  45 cc/min
  45 cc/min
  45 cc/min

-------
BIBLIOGRAPHIC:
Cyrus Wm. Rice Division
NUS Corporation, The Effects of Various Gas Atmosphere
On The Oxidation of Coal Mine Pyrites, Final Report,
FWQA Grant No. 14010 ECC,           1971
ABSTRACT:

A number of experiments up to 150 days in length were
conducted to study the acid production rate of coal
mine pyrites under various gas atmospheres.  The gas
atmospheres studied were air, nitrogen, methane, and
carbon dioxide.  The lower limits of the oxidation
process were studied by introducing small amounts of
oxygen along with the inert blanketing gas and by
studying the effects of deaerated versus air saturated
feedwater.  Acid production was found to be propor-
tional to the available oxygen partial pressure.

The acid parameters monitored continued to change and
had not completely reached a steady state by the ter-
mination of the work.  The acid production of nitrogen
blanketed pyrite decreased to less than 1% of that of
identical columns under an air atmosphere.  Nitrogen
and methane gases were equally effective in reducing
acid production.  Both of these gases were slightly
more effective than carbon dioxide.  A large amount
of detailed experimental data is presented.

This report was submitted in fulfillment of Contract
No. 14-12-877 between the Environmental Protection
Agency, Water Quality Office and Cyrus Wm. Rice
Division - NUS Corporation.
                                                                   ACCESSION  NO.
                                                                   KEY WORDS:

                                                                   Acid mine water
                                                                   Inert gaa blanketing
                                                                   Pyrite oxidation
                                                                   Acid production
                                                                   Pyrite
                                                                   Water Pollution Control
                                                                   Water Quality
                                                                   Acid mine drainage
BIBLIOGRAPHIC:

Cyrus Wm. Rice Division
NUS Corporation, The Effects of Various Gas Atmospheres
On The Oxidation of Coal Mine Pyrites, Final Report,
FWQA Grant No. 14010 ECC,           1971
ABSTRACT:

A number of experiments up  to 150 days  in  Length were
conducted to study the acid production  rate of coal
mine pyrites under various  gas atmospheres.  The gas
atmospheres studied were air, nitrogen, methane, and
carbon dioxide.  The  lower  limits of the oxidation
process were studied  by introducing small  amounts of
oxygen along with the inert blanketing  gas and by
studying the effects  of deaerated versus air saturated
feedwater.  Acid production was  found to be propor-
tional to the  available oxygen partial  pressure.

The acid parameters monitored continued to change and
had not completely reached  a steady state by the ter-
mination of the work.  The  acid  production of nitrogen
blanketed pyrite decreased  to less than 1% of that of
identical columns under an  air atmosphere.  Nitrogen
and methane gases were equally effective in reducing
acid production.  Both of these  gases were slightly
more effective than carbon  dioxide.  A  large amount
of detailed experimental data is presented.

This report was submitted in fulfillment of Contract
No. 14-12-877 between the Environmental Protection
Agency, Water Quality Office and Cyrus Wm. Rice
Division - NUS Corporation.
                                                                   ACCESSION NO.
                                                                   KEY WORDS:

                                                                   Acid mine water
                                                                   Inert gas blanketing
                                                                   Pyrite oxidation
                                                                   Acid production
                                                                   Pyrite
                                                                   Water Pollution Control
                                                                   Water Quality
                                                                   Acid mine drainage
BIBLIOGRAPHIC:

Cyrus Wm. Rice Division
NUS Corporation, The Effects of Various Gas Atmosphere
On The Oxidation of Coal Mine Pyrites, Final Report,
FWQA Grant No. 14010 ECC,           1971
A number of experiments up to 150 days in length were
conducted to study the acid production rate of coal
mine pyrites under various gas atmospheres.  The gas
atmospheres studied were air, nitrogen, methane, and
carbon dioxide.  The lower limits of the oxidation
process were studied by introducing small amounts of
oxygen along with the inert blanketing gas and by
studying the effects of deaerated versus air saturated
feedwater.  Acid production was found to be propor-
tional to the available oxygen partial pressure.

The acid parameters monitored continued to change and
had not completely reached a steady state by the ter-
mination of the work.  The acid production of nitrogen
blanketed pyrite decreased to less than 1% of that of
identical columns under an air atmosphere.  Nitrogen
and methane gases were equally effective in reducing
acid production.  Both of these gases were slightly
more effective than carbon dioxide.  A large amount
of detailed experimental data is presented.

This report was submitted in fulfillment of Contract
No. 14-12-877 between the Environmental Protection
Agency, Water Quality Office and Cyrus Wm. Rice
Division - NUS Corporation.
                                                                   ACCESSION NO.
                                                                   KEY WORDS:

                                                                   Acid mine water
                                                                   Inert gas blanketing
                                                                   Pyrite oxidation
                                                                   Acid production
                                                                   Pyrite
                                                                   Water Pollution Control
                                                                   Water Quality
                                                                   Acid mine drainage

-------
1

5
Accession Number
(x)
2

Subject Field & Group
OSG
SELECTED WATER RESOURCES ABSTRACTS
INPUT TRANSACTION FORM
Organization
        Cyrus Win. Rice  Division - NUS Corporation (Contractor)
    r«t;e
        THE EFFECTS  OF  VARIOUS ATMOSPHERES ON THE OXIDATION OF COAL MINE PYRITES
 10
    Authors)
      Robins, John D.
      Troy, Joseph C.
                                    16
Project Designation
 14010 EGG 08/71
                                     21
                                        Note
 22
     Citation
     Descriptors (Starred First)
    '
       *Acid mine water/*inert gas blanketing/*pyrite oxidation/*acid production/
       *pyrite/water  pollution control/water quality
 25
    Identifiers (Starred First)

         *oxygen free atmospheres/mine drainage/pyrite depletion
 27
    Abstract
     A number  of  experiments up to 150 days in length were conducted to  study the
acid production rate of coal mine pyrites under various gas atmospheres.  The gas
atmospheres  studied were air, nitrogen, methane, and carbon dioxide.  The lower
limits of the  oxidation process were studied by introducing small amounts of oxygen
along with the inert blanketing gas and by studying the effects of deaerated versus
air saturated  feedwater.  Acid production was found to be proportional to the avail-
able oxygen  partial pressure.

The acid  parameters monitored continued to change and had not completely reached a
steady state by the termination of the work.  The acid production of nitrogen
blanketed pyrite  decreased to less than 1$ of that of identical columns  under air
atmosphere.  Nitrogen and methane gases were equally effective in reducing  acid
production.  Both of these gases were slightly more effective than carbon dioxide.
A large amount of detailed experimental data is presented.

This report  was submitted in fulfillment of Contract No. 14-12-877 between  the
Environmental  Protection Agency, Water Quality Office and Cyrus Wm. Rice Division  -
NUS Corporation.
Abstractor
                               Institution
                                       Cyrus  Wm.  Rice Division-NUS Corporation
 WR:102 
-------