EPA-660/2-75-026
JUNE 1975
                                      Ecological  Research  Series
Water  Quality  Control  Through
Single Crop  Agriculture
No. 4
                                     National Environmental Research Center
                                       Office of Research and Development
                                       U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                              Corvallis, Oregon 97330

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                      RESEARCH REPORTING SERIES


Research  reports of  the Office of Research and Development,
U.S.  Environmental Protection Agency, have been grouped into
five  series.  These  five broad categories were established to
facilitate further development and application of environmental
technology.   Elimination of traditional grouping was consciously
planned to foster technology transfer and a maximum interface in
related fields.  The five series are:

           1.   Environmental Health Effects Research
           2.   Environmental Protection Technology
           3.   Ecological Research
           4.   Environmental Monitoring
           5.   Socioeconomic Environmental Studies

This report has been assigned to the ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
TECHNOLOGY STUDIES series.  This series describes research
performed  to develop and demonstrate instrumentation, equipment
and methodology to repair or prevent environmental degradation from
point and  non-point sources of pollution.  This work provides the
new or improved technology required for the control and treatment
of pollution sources to meet environmental quality standards.

                         EPA REVIEW NOTICE

This report has been reviewed by the Office of Research and
Development, EPA, and approved for publication.  Approval does
not signify that the contents necessarily reflect the views and
policies of the Environmental Protection Agency, nor does mention
of trade names or commercial products constitute endorsement or
recommendation for use.

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                                      EPA-660/2-75-026
                                      JUNE  1975
HATER QUALITY CONTROL THROUGH SINGLE  CROP AGRICULTURE

                         No. 4-
                           By


                  Kenneth R. Lundberg
                   Patrick T. Trihey
           Center for Environmental  Studies
                 Bemidji State College
              Bemidji, Minnesota   56601
                   Grant No. 802168
                 ROAP 21 ASH, Task 17
                Program Element 1BB04.5

                    Project Officer

                   Richard E. Thomas
       National Environmental Research Center
  Robert S.  Kerr Environmental Research Laboratory
                  Ada, Oklahoma 74-820
       NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH CENTER
         OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
        U.S.  ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
                CORVALLIS, OREGON 97330

            For Silo by the National Technical Information Serra^    T
             U.S. Department of Commerce, Springfield, VA 22151

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                            ABSTRACT
A study was conducted to determine effects on water quality from
flooded paddies used for the commercial culture of wild rice,  Zizania
aquatica.  Water samples were taken from flooded impoundments  on fer-
tilized and unfertilized peat and mineral soils of northern Minnesota.
Weekly changes in the chemical and physical parameters of the  water
entering the paddies, within selected paddies, and seepage water leav-
ing the paddies were monitored throughout the summer.  Sampling was
increased in the receiving waters and discharge ditches during late
summer draining of the paddies.  No chemical changes were observed in
the receiving waters until the fall drawdown occurred when increases
in dissolved solids, total Kjeldahl-nitrogen, and total phosphorus
occurred in the Clearwater River.  Algal assay tests indicated that
the increase in nutrients at peak discharge was sufficient to  increase
algal populations.

Studies of new and older developments indicated less nutrient  re-
lease occurred from older paddies and mineral soils.  Major soil dis-
turbances were followed by increased turbidity and nutrient release.
Consumptive water use was determined to be 20-22 inches per acre
(51-56 cm/ha).  The quantities of nutrients released from rice pad-
dies were not significantly greater than would be expected in  normal
runoff in the area and much less than the amounts released from most
agricultural endeavors.

This final report was submitted in fulfillment of Project Number
16080 FQ7 and Grant Number 802168 by the Center for Environmental
Studies at Bemidji State College under the partial sponsorship of
the Environmental Protection Agency.  Field work was completed as of
October 1, 1973.
                                 ii

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                             CONTENTS

                                                           Page
Abstract                                                  ii
List of Figures                                            iv
List of Tables                                            v
Acknowledgments                                            vii
 Sections
 I      Conclusions                                        1
 II     Recommendations                                    A
 III    Introduction                                       6
 IV     Methods                                            20
V      Results                                            24.
VI     Discussion                                         62
VII    References                                         71
VIII   Appendices                                         75
                                 iii

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                             FIGURES

No.                                                            Page

1     A Map of the Red Lake River Watershed                    12

2     Standing Crops of Algae Produced in Clearwater
      River Water in 1972                                      44-

3     Weekly Precipitation Recorded at the Ki-Wo-Say
      Paddies on the Clearwater River (1972)                   45

4     Standing Crops of Algae Produced in Clearwater
      River Water in 1973                                      46

5     Flow Rates Measured at Three Sites on the Clear-
      water River in 1973                                      52

6     Seasonal Phosphorus Dynamics in an Older Fertil-
      ized Paddy System on Organic Soil in Clearwater
      County,  1972                                             66
                                iv

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                             TABLES


No.

1     Analytical Quality Control Samples                       22

2     Mean Summer Concentrations of Soluble and Total
      Phosphorus on the Clearwater River                       26

3     Mean Summer Concentrations of Soluble and Total
      Phosphorus on Two Drainage Ditches Entering the
      Clearwater River                                         27

4     The Mean Concentrations of Phosphorus Observed
      in the Clearwater River During Discharge                 28

5     Mean Phosphorus Concentrations in Rice Paddy
      Effluents                                                28
6     Phosphorus Concentrations Observed in Rice Pad-
      dies in the Clearwater River Drainage Basin Prior
      to Discharge                                             29
7     Phosphorus Concentrations Associated with Rice
      Paddies on Mineral Soil                                  30
8     Mean Phosphorus Concentrations in the Red Lake
      Watershed at Waskish, Minnesota                          31

9     Mean Concentrations of Ammonia-nitrogen and
      Kjeldahl-nitrogen in Fertilized Peat Paddies
      Along the Clearwater River                               32

10    Mean Nitrogen Concentrations in Paddy Effluents          33

11    Comparisons of Summer and Fall Nitrogen Concen-
      trations in the Clearwater River                         34

12    Mean Nitrogen Concentrations at Sites in the Vas-
      kish Area                                                35

13    Mean Seasonal Alkalinity and Hardness Levels in
      the Clearwater River Basin                               37
14-    Maximum Standing Crops Obtained at Selected Sites
      with the Sample Collected 8 August 1973  and with
      Spikes of Phosphorus and Nitrogen                        4-7

15    Maximum Standing Crops of Algae Produced at Sitss
      700 and 705 near Kelliher, Minnesota                     4.3

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No.                                                            Page

16    Standing Crops of Algae Produced at Three Sites
      at 'VTaskish, Minnesota                                    4-9

17    Consumptive Water Use for a 620 Acre Development         51

18    The Pounds of Selected Nutrients Found in Rice
      Paddy Seepage Compared to that Found in an Equal
      Volume of Intake Water                                   54

19    Nutrient Additions by Three Rice Paddy Effluents         55

20    Additional Nutrient Loads Carried by the Clearvrater
      River During Drawdown                                    56

21    Nutrient Loading by Rice Paddies Along the Clear-
      water River                                              56

22    General Characteristics of Paddy Soils                   57

23    Changes in Soil and Tfater Phosphorus Concentrations      59

24-    Changes in Soil Phosphorus Fractions with Depth          61
                                vi

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                         ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The Tribal Council of the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Indians,  the
manager and directors of Clearwater Rice Incorporated,  Messrs.
James and Valmer Halama, and Lester Bohs are acknowledged with  sin-
cere thanks for the use of their paddies and management records.
The support of the project by the Water Quality Control Branch,
Environmental Protection Agency, and the help provided  by Richard
E. Thomas, the Grant Project Officer, are acknowledged  with sincere
thanks.
                                 vii

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                              SECTION I

                             CONCLUSIONS

Significant increases in total phosphorus,  Kjeldahl nitrogen and other
parameters were observed in the  Clearwater  River concomitantly with the
major discharge of commercial wild rice paddies.  However, increases
of the same magnitude were observed for these parameters following
periods of heavy rain.  The phosphorus release was greatest from first-
year paddies applying balanced NPK fertilizers but decreased in the
effluents from older fertilized paddies and was significantly less in
paddies only applying nitrogen.   The fertilizer phosphates appear to
accumulate in the upper few inches of soil and are readily mobilized
with any soil disturbance.  No relationship between fertilizer use
and the release of Kjeldahl nitrogen could be established.  The re-
lease of Kjeldahl nitrogen-appears to be associated with water flow
over and through peat soils.  Turbidity and filterable solids were re-
leased in greater concentrations from first-year paddies.  Part of
this increase was due to the erosion of poorly constructed discharge
ditches.  As the ditch banks stabilized there was a decrease in tur-
bidity and filterable solids. The increased nutrient loading observ-
ed in the Clearwater River over  that attributed to paddies was par-
tially the result of the erosion of paddy ditches below the sampling
sites.  Stream flow and turbulance was great enough to prevent the
settling of organic material between sampling sites on the river.

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Phosphorus loading from the mineral paddies near Kelliher was not sta-
tistically significant but the increase of Kjeldahl-nitrogen in the
Battle River was partially attributable to rice paddy effluents.  Data
from this site were too limited to adequately explain these phenomena.

Increases in phosphorus were noted in the discharge from the mineral-
peat paddy development near Waskish.  At this site there was no sig-
nificant difference in the concentration of Kjeldahl-nitrogen and the
other parameters between inlet and discharge water.

During the spring and summer growing season the seepage from commercial
wild rice paddies did not appear to pose a threat to the receiving
streams in the areas studied.  Nevertheless, attempts should be made
to recover and recycle this water since it represents a measurable
water loss that must otherwise be made up from the inlet streams.

Algal assays indicated that sufficient nutrients entered the receiving
streams during the discharge period to promote extensive algal growth.
However, similar increases in potential productivity occurred natural-
ly after heavy rains in the area.   Due to the short duration of paddy
discharges and the time of release it is doubtful that rice paddy ef-
fluents contribute significantly to the eutrophication of the receiving
streams studied.  Increased productivity could occur if the paddy watsr
were discharged directly or indirectly into small lakes, particularly
those of the soft water type.

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The industry's major threat  to the water  courses is the overdeveloping
of an area with  regard to  water  supply.   During years of little  spring
runoff or long summer drought the flow of rivers and streams  could be
reduced so that  the needs  of rice farmers and other developments along
the river could  not be met.

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                              SECTION II

                            RECOMMENDATIONS

 Uniform management practices have not been established in this new
 and developing industry.  Considerable experimentation with paddy
 design, water level control, planting time, fertilizer application,
 and equipment utilization is being conducted by and for the industry.
 As  a result of these studies changes may be made which will signifi-
 cantly  affect water quality in the production areas.  Based on cur-
 rent trends and management practices the following recommendations
 are made:
           1.  Extensive fertilizer trials should be conducted on peat
 soils to determine the effect phosphorus fertilizers have on wild
 rice yields.  Until such a study is conducted phosphorus fertilizers
 should  be used with caution on commercial wild rice paddies.
           2.  Prior to the thinning of rice paddies, water levels
 should be controlled so that no release of water occurs during thin-
 ning or within the following week.
           3.  The rate at which water is released could be reduced
by extending the fall draindown period.  This would minimize soil
 disturbances within the paddies and reduce erosion of the discharge
ditches.  When feasible the discharge should be made over flat land
 and slowly returned to the receiving stream.
           A.  More effort should be devoted to the construction and
maintenance of dikes and discharge ditches to reduce erosion.

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           5.   Paddy developments should be designed to return water
lost through seepage back to the paddies.
           6.   Appropriate State and Federal agencies should carefully
balance water appropriation permits with available water supply.  These
agencies should cooperate with the rice producers in formulating pro-
cedures for equitably distributing water resources during drought
periods.
           7.   The development of paddies should be restricted along
water courses low in alkalinity, hardness, and dissolved solids.  No
developments should be allowed on the shores of soft-water lakes.

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                              SECTION III

                             INTRODUCTION

OVERVIEW OF THE PROBLEM
TJild rice (Zizania aquatic L.) has grown naturally in many lakes and
streams in Minnesota for centuries.  Vith the first successful at-
tempts at cultivating wild rice in paddies in I960 a new industry
was born.

The rapid growth of the wild rice industry and the intimate associ-
ation of this incipient industry with the aquatic environment have
caused concern for the lakes and streams of northern Minnesota.  Low
lying bogs, grassland, and, to a lesser degree, forestland riparian
to lakes and streams have been cleared, leveled, ditched, roto-tilled,
diked, and put in rice production.  As spring breakup occurs the pad-
dies are flooded to a depth of six to twelve inches (15 to 30cm) and
maintained until early August.  Of major concern is the summer see-
page water, occasional overflow water, and paddy water discharged
during August to dry the paddies.  Seed germination occurs as the
water reaches 3-5 C with the first visible submerged ribbon-like
leaves appearing near the first of May.  By mid-May the floating stage
is reached.  At this time mechanical thinning of paddies that have
been in production two or more years occurs to prevent the rice from
becoming too thick.  By early June the first leaves become upright
and the paddy takes on the appearance of a grassy field.  The develop-

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ment of the rice panicles is apparent by mid-July.   During early Aug-
ust the paddies are drained to allow the soil to  become dry enough to
be mechanically harvested with combines.  In the  study area, the rice
ripens over a two-week period starting in late August.   Most harvest-
ing is now done with modified white rice combines.   Since  wild rice
is a shattering grain, the rice kernels fall to the  ground as they
ripen; up to 50 percent of the rice is lost in this  manner as ripen-
ing occurs.  The fallen kernels act as seed for succeeding years
greatly overseeding the paddy.  Once better strains  of wild rice are
developed, yields will increase and problems of overseeding in the
older paddies will be reduced.

Most of the present rice production is located in northern Minnesota
on low, flat land west and east of Red Lake, in the Leech Lake area
and in Aitkin County, although commercial developments are also found
in northern Wisconsin and Canada at this time. The  potential for out-
of-state production follows the natural stands of wild rice east from
Minnesota to the Atlantic coast and southward into Florida.  The ra-
pid development of this industry in Minnesota saw an increase from
900 acres (360 ha) to 17,000 acres (6,900 ha) during  the years 1969-
1972.   Poor market conditions, cost of new development, the increas-
ed prices for upland grains, the lack of a good disease-resistant
nonshattering seed, and the introduction of crop  rotation  have slowed
development.  During 1974 Minnesota's acreage was estimated to be
                       
13,000 acres (5,300 ha).   As market conditions improve, the industry
will continue to develop on low, flat land with adequate water supplies
to maintain flooded paddies until early August.
                                7

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 GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF THE STUD! AREA

 Clearwater River Basin
 The  sites monitored from 1970 to 1973 consisted of four commercial
 void rice developments located in north central Minnesota.  Two of
 these developments, Clearwater Rice, (1971-1973) and the Ki-Tfo-Say
 paddies, (1970-1973) are located in the Clearwater River basin.
 The  remaining sites were located near Upper Red Lake in northern
 Beltrami County.  One was two miles (3.2 km) northeast of Waskish,
 (1971-73) and the other was four miles (6.4- km) west of Kelliher
 along Highway 38, (1973).

 The  Clearwater Rice development consisted of two major paddy systems
 of 600 and 1,000 acres (24-0 and 400 ha) located on opposite sides of
 the  Clearwater River.  The total acreage of the complex was close to
 2,000 acres (810 ha) when including two other operations directly
 bordering Clearwater Rice.  Portions of the 600 acre (24-0 ha) tract
 have been cultivated since 1968 and have been the site of intensive
 investigation.  The paddies were constructed on sapric peat ranging
 in depth from 16 to 4.0 inches (41 to 101 cm) over a sandy loam base.
 Samples were collected on a weekly basis from the Clearwater River
 above the paddies, from selected paddies, and from a 2,200-foot (670
m) ditch containing some bog  runoff and seepage water from adjacent
 paddies.  During the August discharge period, daily samples were ta-
ken  from the main drainage ditches to the river.

 The  Ki-Ub-Say paddies are located near the southwestern border of the
 Red Lake Indian Reservation adjacent to the Clearwater River approx-
 imately 10 miles (16 km) downstream from the Clearwater Rice develop-
ment.  There is no specific classification for the peat soils on
                                8

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which the Ki-Wo-Say paddies were constructed but they were similar
in texture and organic composition to the soils at Clearwater Rice.
The peat varies in depth from 4- to 6 feet (1.2 to 1.8 m) over a clay
base.  By 1973, 160 of the planned 180 acres (65 of 73 ha) were in
production.  Samples were collected weekly from the Ki-Vb-Say "Wild
Life Area bog, which was the source of water for all the paddies;
from one paddy; and from the outlet ditch which contained seepage wa-
ter from five paddies.  During the August 1973  drawdown, the ditch
was monitored daily.

The Clearwater River was monitored at 3 major sites.  One site was
above all rice producing areas, one was k miles (6.4- kai) below Clear-
water Rice at the Highway 10 bridge, and one 10 miles (16 km) below
the Ki-Vo-Say paddies at the Polk County Highway 2 bridge.  During
1973, samples were collected weekly until the drawdown period when
samples were taken daily.  Prior to 1973, the Polk County site was
only monitored during the 1972 discharge period.  By 1973 approxi-
mately 4,000 acres 0*600 ha) of rice were in production between the
Polk County site and the one located above Clearwater Rice.  Esti-
mates of water flow during drawdown were made during 1973 at the
three major river sampling sites.  The Clearwater River was the main
source of water for all paddies in the area.  All water lost through
surface seepage, overflow and fall draining of the paddies returned
to the Clearwater River.

In rice growing areas, the gradient of the river is very flat as is
the surrounding land. Starting in 1951, the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers
did extensive ditching and channelizing of the river and surround-
ing area to develop farmland.  The overall quality of the river water
is suitable for recreation  and municipal use but little or no recrea-

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 tional development has taken place nor is any anticipated at this
 time.

 Stations monitoring waterflow have been maintained at Leonard, 15
 miles  (24 km) above the study area, and at Plummer, approximately 30
 miles  (48 km) below the study area.  At Leonard, the stream drained
                        2
 153  square miles (396 km ) of area and had a minimum discharge of 2
 cubic feet (56.6 l) per second with an average discharge of 61.7 C.
 F.S. (1,7^7 3/sec ) during a period from 1935 to 1945.  At Plummer,
 the watershed was 512 square miles 0,300 km ) with a minimum stream
 discharge of 7.9 G.F.S. (223.6 I/sec) and an average discharge of
 178 C.F.S. (5,039 I/sec) from 194-0 to 1973.  The average flow of the
 Clearwater River during the rice growing season from April through
 July was 320 C.F.S. (9,060 I/sec).3

 The climate of the Clearwater watershed is moderate with an average
 temperature of approximately 39 degrees, (3.9C).  Average monthly
 temperatures range from a low of 3.3 degrees (-16 C) for January to
 a high of 69.2 degrees (20.7C) for August.  The April to August
 growing season average is 53 degrees (11.7C).  The average annual
 rainfall in the region since 1890 has been 22 inches (56  cm).  Of
 this amount 19.4 inches (49 cm) was lostj largely through evapotrans-
piration.   "With adequate moisture, evapotranspiration losses could be
 as high as 22.6 inches (57.4 cm).  A US. AIEQT Corp of Engineers survey
 stated annual evaporation losses from one square mile (259 ha) of
 lake or reservoir would be 1.8 cubic feet (51 1) per second or 25
 inches (64 cm) per year.   Even with these losses "there appears to
be adequate flow in the river during normal years for irrigation."
                                10

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Red Lake Basin
The paddy system studied near TIaskish,  was located in an area of pri-
marily organic soils.   The burning of portions of the peat and sub-
sequent agriculture resulted in the formation of small areas of min-
eral soils.  The mineral paddy investigated in this study was class-
ified as belonging to  the Chilgren series; a mixture of gley over grey
wooded soils.   This and adjacent paddies received their water from
peat bogs .by means of drainage ditches.  The discharge from these pad-
dies ultimately entered the Tamarac River which flows into Upper Red
Lake, as shown in Figure 1, a general map of the study area.  For de-
tailed maps of the paddies and sampling sites the reader is referred
to the 1971 report, Water Quality Control Through Single Crop Agricul-
ture.   When mineral paddies were removed from production at Waskish,
similar paddies were added 4, miles (6.4- km) west of Kelliher along
the Battle River.  Samples were collected weekly from the Battle River
above the paddies and within two paddies.  During the August drawdown,
discharge and river samples were taken daily.
                                11

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Figure 1.
A map of the Red Lake River "Watershed showing the general location of sampling
   ;es.   , is a station located upstream from all rice paddies on the Clearwater
 liver.  2 marks the location of the fertilized organic paddies of Clearwater Rice
    >cates a river station belov 2,000 acres.  /, locates the unfertilized Ki-Wo-Say'
paddies. 5 is a river station below 4,000 acres of paddies. 6 marks the location of
the mineral paddies near Waskish. 7 marks the location of the mineral paddies near
Kelliher.

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LOCATION AND DESCRIPTION OF SAMPLE SITES
Site 100 (CWB-l) was located on the Clearwater River above any paddy
         developments.   Samples were collected from the river near
         the bridge on  Glearwater County Highway FAS 11,  1.5 miles
         (2.4- km)  above the pumping station for Clearwater Rice, Inc.

Site 101 was located at the pumping station for the Clearwater Rice
         Inc.   This site was sampled in 1971 and 1972 prior to the
         development of additional paddies on the west side of the
         Clearwater River.

Site 105 was a 4-0-acre  (16 ha) paddy located on sapric peat soil.
         The paddy was  only sampled in 1973, but had been in produc-
         tion since 1968.  This paddy annually received a fall appli-
         cation of 13-18-17  NPK fertilizer at the rate of 250 to 300
         pounds per acre (280-336 kg/ha) and a July treatment of am-
         monium nitrate at 50-100 pounds per acre (56-112 kg/ha).

Site 115 was a 20-acre  (8.1 ha) rice paddy located just to the east
         of site 105.  Both paddies shared in common a 1,300 foot
         (396 m) dike.   Site 115 received the same fertilizer treat-
         ment as site 105.

Site 125 (SKP-3) was a  20-acre (8.1 ha) rice paddy located to the
         east of site 115.   This paddy shared a 1,300 foot (396m)
         dike in common with site 115.  Site 125 received the same
         fertilizer treatment as site 105.  This paddy had been re-
         gularly sampled since 1971 because of its accessibility.

Site H.O (SKM-D) was a  discharge ditch one quarter of a mile west of
                                13

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Site UO (cont.)
         site 105.  This ditch which contained only water during the
         discharge period drained sites 105, 115, 125, plus an addi-
         tional 300 acres (120 ha) of similarly managed paddies.
         This ditch emptied into the Clearwater River approximately
         1.75 miles (2.8 km) downstream from site 100.

Site 145 (SKP-E) was an 80-acre (33 ha) paddy on sapric peat soil lo-
         cated approximately one-half mile (.8 km) north of site 105.
         This paddy had been in production since 1969 and had been
         receiving fall applications of NPK fertilizers and July ap-
         plications of ammonium nitrate.  Seepage water from the south
         dike entered a 2,200 foot (670 m) ditch, site 160.

Site 155 (SKP-W) was a 20-acre (8.1 ha) paddy on the south side of
         the 2,200 foot (670 in) ditch.  This ditch received both see-
         page and discharge from site 155.  This paddy, in production
         since 1969, was managed in a manner similar to site 105.

Site 160 (SK4-D) was located near the inouth of a 2,200 foot (670 m)
         ditch bordered by fertilized peat paddies.  This ditch cut
         through the shallow peat into a sandy loam soil.  The spoils
         from the ditch were used to construct the adjacent paddy
         dikes for sites 145 and 155.  Water flowing in the ditch was
         a combination of seepage, bog drainage, and paddy effluents.
         This ditch emptied into the Clearwater River 2 miles (3.2 km)
         below site 100.

Site 200 was located on Ruffy Brook, one source of water for approx-
         imately 1,030 acres (4.05 ha) of paddies developed in 1972.

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Site 200 (cont.)
         Samples were collected near the bridge on Clearwater County
         FAS 11, one-half mile (.8 km) south of the paddies.

Site 210 was located on Ruffy Brook below the paddies and approximate-
         ly .25 miles (.4 km) above the confluence with the Clearwater
         River.  At this point Ruffy Brook contained part of its nor-
         mal flow, seepage water,  and during the fall discharge the
         effluent from approximately 4.00 acres (162 ha) of new paddies.

Site 215 was a 200-acre (81 ha) paddy on the west side of the Clear-
         water River adjacent to Clearwater County CSAH 5.  This paddy
         in its first-year of production had received a fall applica-
         tion of NPK fertilizer and an aerial application of ammonium
         nitrate in July.

Site 220 was located on a discharge ditch which drained a number of
         first year paddies on the west side of Clearwater River.
         This ditch contained only paddy effluents which flowed into
         Ruffy Brook below site 210.

Site 300 (CWB-2) was located on the Clearwater River approximately L,
         miles (6.4. km) below the  2,000acres (810 ha) of paddies.
         Samples were collected near the bridge on Clearwater County
         10 at the southwest corner of the Red Lake, Indian Reserva-
         tion.

Site 4-00 (\jLA) was located near a  culvert that contained water flow-
         ing from a 6,000-acre (2yi.OO  ha) marsh called the Ki-Wo-Say
        Wildlife Area.  The marsh on peat soil was drained in the
                                15

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Site 400 (cont.)
         fall and flooded in the spring with water  from the  Clear-
         water River and run-off water from surrounding forested
         areas.  The culvert drain from the marsh served  as  the
         source of water for the unfertilized peat  soil paddies on
         the southwest corner of the Red Lake Indian Reservation.

Site 405 (3P) was located in an unfertilized 20-acre (8.1 ha)  pad-
         dy on the Red Lake Indian Reservation.   This paddy  con-
         structed on heavy peat was put into production in 1970.

Site 410 (3D) was located in a 1,200 foot (370 m)  drainage ditch
         which bordered the west side of site 405 and two other 20-
         acre  (8.1 ha) paddies.  In 1973 an additional 60 acres (24
         ha) of paddies were put into production  on the west side of
         the ditch.  During the summer the ditch  contained seepage
         from the paddies which was monitored by  measuring the level
         over a v-notch weir.  Paddy discharge entered the ditch
         during August drawdown.

Site 500 was located on the Clearwater River below  the point where
         discharge from site 410 entered.

Site 600 (CWB-3) was located on the Clearwater River approximately
         17 miles (27 km) downstream and northwest  of site 100.  Sam-
         ples were collected near the bridge on Polk County  Highway
         CSAH 2, 12 miles (19.3 km) north of Gully, Minnesota. It
         was estimated that there were4000 acres (1,600  ha) of pad-
         dies in production between sites 100 and 600 in  1973.
                                16

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Site 700 was located on the  South Branch of the Battle River.  Sam-
         ples were taken near the bridge on Beltrami  County Highway
         CSAH 36,  4 miles (6.4 km) west of Kelliher,  Minnesota.  This
         site was  located near the source of water for the mineral
         paddies.

Site 700-A was located  on the South Branch of the Battle River.
         Samples were taken  near the bridge on Beltrami County High-
         way CSAH  38, 4.5 miles (7.2 km) west of Kelliher, Minnesota.
         This site was  located  three miles (4.8 km)  downstream and
         west of the mineral paddies.

Site 705 was in a  40 acre (16 ha) paddy located on a  sandy loam soil
         of the Nebish-Rockwood type.  This paddy was placed in pro-
         duction in 1973. The discharge from this flowed through a
         ditch, site 710, to the South Branch of the  Battle River.

Site 710 was on a  discharge  ditch which drained site  705.  This ditch
         only contained water after heavy rains and during the fall
         discharge period.

Site 715 was in a  paddy near the south bank of Hartman Creek.  The
         soil in this paddy  was a mineral soil of the Nebish-Rockwood
         type. The discharge from this 20-acre (8.1  ha) paddy flowed
         indirectly into the Battle River.

Site 801 (V3C) was located in a drainage ditch which  crossed Beltrami
         County Highway CSAH 40, 2.75 ailes  (4.4 km)  north and east
         of Waskish, Minnesota.  This ditch supplied  the water for
                                17

-------
Site 801 (cont.)
         tfee series of paddies.  This ditch carried drainage from the
         large bog north of TJaskish on Upper Red Lake.

Site 805 (V3P) was located on a paddy consisting of mineral soil of
         the Chilgren series which received its water from site 801.
         The paddy was in its second year of production and was first
         fertilized in 1972 with 6-24-24. at the rate of 200 pounds
         per acre (224 kg/ha).

Site 810 (V5C) was located on the drainage ditch 1 mile (1.6 km) be-
         low site 801.  The water at site 810 was a mixture of pad-
         dy seepage, stream water which flowed through a paddy, bog
         seepage, and paddy overflow.  The major influence on dis-
         charge in the ditch was bog soil since less than 20 acres
         (8 ha) of the 160  - 190-acre (64-77 ha) development was  on
         mineral soil.

Site 900 was located on the Tamarac River near the bridge on Minn-
         esota State Highway 72 in the village of Waskish.  It was
         estimated that the Tamarac River received the effluent from
         approximately 1,500 acres (600 ha) of rice paddies.
                                18

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PROJECT OBJECTIVE
The main objective of this project is to provide information, based
upon valid scientific data, that will assist the development of the
wild rice industry in such a manner as to minimize harmful ecological
effects.  Changes in the quality of water discharged from the wild rice
impoundments will be studied and recommendations will be made on methods
of farming and water discharge that will minimize potential problems.

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                            SECTION IV

                              METHODS

CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL DETERMINATIONS OF WATER QUALITY
Field collections started with spring break-up in mid-April on the
rivers and discharge ditches which carried water to and from the com-
mercial developments.   As  selected paddies were  flooded,  usually
before the  end of  May,  they were added as sampling sites.   At
each of these sites, samples were taken on a weekly basis.   In late
summer, during the period of paddy draindown, sampling was  increased;
and major sites, such as the discharge ditches and the Clearvater
River, were monitored daily.  Two 1-liter samples were collected in
                   
Plastic Cubitainers  at each site; one was preserved with 5 milli-
liters of chloroform and the other with 40 milligrams of mercuric
chloride.  Dissolved oxygen and temperature measurements were made in
the field with a Model 54 Yellow Springs Instrument.  Alkalinity and
pH measurements were made with a Beckman Electroscan 30 immediately
upon return to the laboratory.  Alkalinity measurements were not ta-
                                             7
ken if the sample was more than 24 hours old.   At the same time tur-
bidometric determinations were made with a Hach Model 2100 A turbid-
       7
imeter.   The determination of total Kjeldahl nitrogen employed the
micro-colormetric procedures with Nesslerization as outlined by the
EPA Methods For Chemical Analysis of Vater and Vastes. while ammoniacal
*Trade name
                                20

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nitrogen was determined by Nesslerization of a distillate as recommended
in Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Waste Watej?.  13 ed.
Calcium and magnesium were analyzed by means of atomic absorption in
accordance with EPA methods; with flame emission being used for potass-
ium.  Filterable and dissolved solids were determined by EPA methods,
while the phenoldisulfonic acid method outlined in Standard Methods for
the Examination of Water and Waste Water, 13 ed., was used for nitrate
determinations.

Soluble phosphorus was determined by using the single reagent method as
recommended by the EPA.  The samples were unfiltered and 20 milliliters
of isobutanol was used to concentrate the complex.  The accuracy of the
soluble phosphorus concentrations is doubtful because of interferences
observed in the determinations.  The procedure employed for the total
phosphorus analysis followed the EPA methodology with the exception that
the samples were not neutralized since their pH was consistently between
pH 7 and 8 and potassium persulfate was used in lieu of ammonium per-
sulfate.  The phosphomolybdate complex was extracted with isobutanol to
increase sensitivity.

QUALITY CONTROL
Precision and accuracy checks were made on the analyses for total phos-
phorus, total Kjeldahl-nitrogen, and ammonia-nitrogen using reference
samples supplied by the Environmental Protection Agency, Analytical
Quality Control Laboratory.  The results obtained by our laboratory are
compared with the known concentrations in Table 1.
                                21

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Table 1.       ANALYTICAL QUALITY CONTROL SAMPLES

Parameter
Total P
NH3-N
TKN
Known
Concentration
.17
1.70
1.70
Concentration
Reported
.18  .003
1.65  .11
1.65 - .11
Internal precision was maintained by replicate analyses of sample
aliquots performed routinely.  Accuracy determinations employed spik-
ing techniques to determine recovery percentages,

STREAM FLOW
Measurement of water volumes in the seepage and discharge ditches were
made by monitoring the flow over a 90-degree v-notch weir with a Stevens
Type F water level recorder.  Cross sections of the Clearwater River
were made at three sites with the aid of surveying instruments.
Stream velocities were estimated by timing a float over a measured
section of the river.  These measurements were used to determine water
budgets for the paddies and nutrient loading rates.

ALGAL ASSAY
Selenastrum capricornutum, supplied by National Eutrophication Labora-
tory, was used as the algal assay test organism.  The tests and repli-
cates were conducted in compliance with the Algal Assay Bottle Test
                                                             9
as developed by the National Eutrophication Research Program.   Mea-
surements of standing crops of algae were made by direct counting with
a Levy Heamocytometer and microscope during 1972.  Measurements made
during 1973 employed an Electro Zone Cello-scope particle counter.
                                22

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SOIL CHEMISTEC
All soil analyses were carried out  at  field moisture conditions ex-
cept pH, total phosphate,  and textural analysis.   The soil pH was
determined at the moisture saturation  point with  a glass electrode and
calomel reference electrode.   Total phosphate was analyzed according
to the acid-free vanadate-molybdate method of Tandon et al.    Textur-
al analysis of the mineral soil was carried out according to the hydro-
meter method outlined by Shirlaw,    and the semimicro technique of
                                                             12
Jackson was used to determine the  cation exchange capacities.    Avail-
able phosphate concentrations were determined by  the extraction method
                   13
suggested by Truog.    Color  was developed in the filtered extract by
                                          12
the sulfomolybdate acid method of  Jackson.    Inorganic phosphate was
fractionated according to  the method of Chang and Jackson,    while
the analytical procedures  for the  iron, aluminum, and calcium phos-
                                       12
phates were those suggested by Jackson.
                                23

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                              SECTION V

                              RESULTS

INTRODUCTION
The results have been divided into ten sections which summarize se=
lected data from various phases of this project.  A detailed summary
of the chemical analyses from all sampling sites is reported in tab-
ular form in the appendix of this paper.  Those tables separately
summarize data from the summer growing season and the fall discharge
period.

The concentrations of the chemical parameters are reported as milli-
grams per liter (mg/1), while turbidity measurements are reported as
Formazin Turbidity Units, (FTU).  Where applicable, confidence limits
(C.L.) at the ninety-five percent (95$)  certainty level for the mean
are reported.  Because of a limited number of observations (N) at
some sites the confidence limits of the mean were calculated by mul-
tiplying a tabled "t" value times the standard error of the mean.
The values reported are the mean (x) plus and minus () the standard
error of the mean ("Vvariance/N ) times t (.05).

PHOSPHORUS
Soluble and total phosphorus concentrations were determined at all
sites in the study area.  Analytical problems with soluble phosphorus

-------
were detected when some values exceeded total phosphorus concentrations.
The major problems were found in a fertilized organic soil paddy, site
125 and a drainage ditch,  site 160, carrying seepage vater from fer-
tilized organic soil paddies.  At these sites soluble phosphorus con-
centrations were usually greater than total phosphorus concentrations.
Though both soluble and total phosphorus values are reported and dis-
cussed the soluble values  exhibited greater uncertainty in some cases.

All phosphorus values are  reported as mg/1 phosphorus (P).  Site 100,
on the Clearwater River above the fertilized rice paddies, exhibited
little variation in the soluble phosphorus concentrations throughout
the growing seasons of 1971,  1972, and 1973.  The mean soluble phos-
phorus concentration was 0.060 - .065 mg/1 while total phosphorus con-
centrations ranged from a  mi TV? mum of .019 to .270 mg/1 with a mean of
.094- - .014. mg/1.  Summer  data collected at site 300, on the Clearwater
River located 4 miles (6.4 km) below 2,000 acres (810 ha) of Clearwater
Rice and associated paddies indicated that the mean phosphorus levels
were slightly higher in this portion of the stream with .031 mg/1 solu-
ble phosphorus and .098 mg/1 total phosphorus.  Limited midsummer data
from additional downstream sites indicated a leveling in the summer
phosphorus levels.  The mean soluble phosphorus concentration at site
500 located immediately below the Ki-Wo-Say paddy discharge was .015 -
.010 mg/1 while the total phosphorus concentration was .122 i .059 mg/1.
The July concentrations were slightly greater at site 600, located be-
low about 4,000 acres (1,600 ha) of rice cultivation.  The July concen-
trations at site 600 were .064 - .048 mg/1 soluble phosphorus and .140 i
.093 mg/1 total phosphorus   Table 2 summarizes the phosphorus data for
the Clearwater River.

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Table 2.      MEAN SUMMER CONCENTRATIONS OF SOLUBLE
          AND TOTAL PHOSPHORUS ON THE CLEARWATER RIVER
                        (mg/1  95* C.L.)
Site

100
300
500
600
Mean Soluble
Phosphorus
.060  .065
.031 f .009
.015 7" .010
.064 - .048
N

50
38
6
3
Mean Total
Phosphorus
.094 J .014
.098 f .016
.122 I .059
.140 i .093
N

49
40
6
4
During the summer months there was no active discharge from the rice
paddies.  A number of small streams and ditches contained drainage
and seepage Water from, rice paddies that entered the Clearwater River.

One such source was a 2,200 foot (670 m) ditch, site 160, bordered on
each side by rice paddies.  The water in this ditch was primarily see-
page water from the paddies and a small amount of bog drainage.  Dur-
ing the summers of 1971, 1972, and 1973 the soluble phosphorus con-
centrations fluctuated between .005 and .629 mg/1 with a mean value of
.113 - .127  for the three seasons.  Analytical problems with sol-
uble phosphorus raised some questions about its significance at high
concentrations.  The mean total phosphorus concentrations .248 - .096
mg/1 were slightly higher for the three summers.   Concentrations of-.095
 .041 mg/1 soluble phosphorus and .122 i .021 mg/1 total phosphorus,
were observed in the discharge ditch near the Ki-Vo-Say Wildlife Area.
This 1,200 foot (365 m) ditch, site 410, had paddies on both sides for
the entire length and was sampled periodically prior to discharge from
1970 through 1973.  These data are summarized in Table 3.
                                26

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Table 3,    MEAN SIMMER CONCENTRATIONS  OF SOLUBLE AND
            TOTAL PHOSPHORUS ON TWO  DRAINAGE DITCHES
                  ENTERING THE CLEARWATER RIVER
                        (mg/1  9556  C.L.)
Site
160
410
Mean Soluble P
.195
.095


.089
.041
N
42
47
Mean
.248
.122
Total P


.096
.021
N
41
47
The rice paddies in the Clearwater River area were generally dis-
charged during the first week of August.  This marked the second por-
tion of the sampling season when increased sampling occurred.  The
Clearwater River was monitored during the discharge periods of 1971,
1972, and 1973.  At site 100, above the rice paddies, the mean soluble
phosphorus and total phosphorus concentrations remained low at .039
ani .084mg/1,respectively .  During the discharge periods, at site 300,
a noticeable increase was observed in the concentrations of soluble
and total phosphorus.  Limited data from the downstream sites, 500
and 600 also showed increases, which appeared to correlate with the
increased acreages of rice.  Table 4 summarizes the phosphorus con-
centrations observed in the Clearwater River during discharge for the
years 1971, 1972, and 1973.  The majority of all the samples were ta-
ken during 1973.  Paddy effluents were discharged into drainage ditch-
es during the fall drawdown.  Sites 160 and 410 were monitored during
this period as well as two additional paddy outlets, sites 140 and
220.  Site 140 received water from approximately 400-acres (160 ha)
of fertilized rice paddies while site 160 received the discharge from
80 acres (32 ha).  Site 220 drained a portion of a new development of
approximately 1,400 acres (570 ha) of fertilized rice paddies.  Site
410 drained 100 acres (40 ha) of unfertilized rice paddies below the
                                27

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Ki-TSb-Say Wildlife Area owned by the Red Lake Band of Chippewa
Indians.
Table 4.      THE MEAN CONCENTRATIONS OF PHOSPHORUS
                OBSERVED IN THE CLEARVATER RIVER
                DURING DISCHARGE (mg/1  95# C.L.)
Site
100
300
500
600
Mean Soluble P
.039
.170
.139
.337




.020
.055
.343
.064
N
17
21
3
17
Mean
.08^
.339
.253
.442
Total P


+

018
.095
.418
.111
N
17
21
3
17
When compared with site 100, the increased levels of soluble phos-
phorus observed at sites 14-0 and 220 were statistically significant.
The same degree of significance can be attributed to the greater
levels of total phosphorus at sites 14.0, 160, and 220.  At site 410,
the small increase in total phosphorus above the Wildlife Area, site
400, was not statistically significant.
Table 5.     MEAN PHOSPHORUS CONCENTRATIONS IN RICE
                PADDY EFFLUENTS (mg/1  95% C.L.)
Site
140
160
220a
410
Mean Soluble P
.328 
.118 
.975 
.105 i
.081
.078
.440
.134
N
14
17
7
19
Mean Total P
.353 
.320 
.987 
.104 
.100
.081
.322
.045
N
14
16
8
19
   adrains paddies in the first year of production.

Data presented in Tables 5 and 6 indicate the mean phosphorus con-
centrations observed in the paddy effluents approximate the
                                28

-------
concentrations observed in the paddies  just prior to  discharge,  ex-
cept for soluble phosphorus at the Ki-Wb-Say,  site 05.   Increases
in phosphorus concentrations in the  discharge  to levels  above  that
observed in the paddy water appeared to correlate with increases in
suspended solids and turbidity.

Table 6.      PHOSPHORUS CONCENTRATIONS OBSERVED IN
              RICE PADDIES IN THE CLEARWATER RIVER
            DRAINAGE BASIN PRIOR TO  DISCHARGE  (mg/l)
Site
105
115
125
125
125
145
155
155
215a
405
405
405
Soluble P
.190
.184
2.180
.370
.050
.HO
.182
.074
.790
.054
.016
.028
Total P
.200
.275
1.450
.460
.113
.300
.280
.240
1.60
_ 
.075
.117

20 July 73
26 July 73
28 July 71
26 July 72
26 July 73
26 July 73
9 Aug. 72
2 Aug. 73
9 Aug. 73
28 July 71
2 Aug. 72
26 July 73
The phosphorus concentrations observed in the Battle River, west of
Kelliher, were higher than those observed in the Clearwater River
Basin.  Samples collected from the Battle River, site 700, during
the sunnier growing season exhibited little variation in soluble
phosphorus ranging from 0.019 to .052 mg/l with a mean value of
.034 rag/1.  The total phosphorus values observed during the summer of
1973 were slightly more ranging about the mean of .126 mg/l from 0.75
to  .25  ingA-  Tne concentrations of both soluble and total phosphorus
increased during the August discharge period to .071  and .168 mg/l,
respectively.
                                29

-------
Phosphorus concentrations observed at site 710,  the ditch draining
120 acres (48 ha) of new mineral paddies,  were lower than levels ob-
served in the Battle River throughout the  discharge period.  These
comparisons are depicted in Table 7.
Table 7. PHOSPHORUS CONCENTRATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH RICE
           PADDIES ON MINERAL SOIL, (mg/1  95% C.L.)
Site
200
700 A
710
Mean Soluble P
0.

0.
034 
071 
015 
.008
.009
.008
N
11
3
14
Mean Total P
0.126
.168
0.116

+
+
.034
.054
.032
N
11
15
13

summer
fall
fan
The third study area located near Waskish  consisted of a series of
paddies where the soil was a very thin layer of peat over a  mineral
soil.  The water used to fill the paddies was diverted from ditches
draining a large peat bog.  The major source of water, site 801, was
                                                        /
sampled above the rice paddies during the growing season and the dis-
charge period.  The mean soluble phosphorus was .032 mg/1 for the summer
months increasing to .059 mg/1  for the f all .   The total phosphorus
concentration rose slightly from .103 to .110 mg/1.   Site 810,  located
about one mile downstream from site 801, contained, in addition to
bog drainage, seepage from approximately 190 acres (77 ha) cf paddies.
During the discharge period, the effluent from the paddies was moni-
tored at site  810.  During the summer there was a significant con-
tribution of both soluble and total phosphorus to the ditch via the
paddy seepage with the mean values being .128  and .184 mg/1 for the
soluble and total concentrations.  However, the amount of phosphorus
                                30

-------
added to the stream by the discharge from the paddies did not sig-
nificantly increase the downstream concentrations in the discharge
ditch.
Table 8.  MEAN PHOSPHORUS CONCENTRATIONS IN THE RED LAKE
                TIATERSHED AT VASKISH,   MINNESOTA
                        (mg/1   95% C.L.)
Site
801
801
805
810
810
900
900
Mean Soluble P
.032 t .009
.659  .064
.138 t .124
.128 t .04.6
.069  .029
.046  .025
.068  .017
N
30
10
32
35
15
5
19
Mean Total P
.103  .022
.110 t .103
.153  .057
.184  .039
.175 ..078
.070  .049
.097  .039
N
30
9
30
35
15
5
19

summer
fall
paddy
summer
fan
summer
fall
From the data in table 8,  it appears that the discharge of rice pad-
dies into the Tamarac River, site 900,  did not significantly alter
the baseline phosphorus values.   It was estimated that the Tamarac
River received the discharge from 1,500 acres (600 ha) of ricelands.

NITROGEN DYNAMICS
Two forms of nitrogen were monitored throughout the course of this
study, ammonia-nitrogen and total Kjeldahl-nitrogen.  Nitrate-nitro
gen determinations were made at most sites during 1971 and 1972, but
were discontinued in 1973  as they had appeared rather constant.  Ni-
trate-nitrogen values are  recorded in the appendix.

The ammonia-nitrogen levels in the waters flooding fertilized rice
paddies on the peat soils  in Clearwater County generally remained
                                31

-------
less than 1 mg/1 over the three growing seasons.   During periods  of
radical soil disturbance, associated with thinning operations   in
late May and early June, and with the aerial application of nitrogen
fertilizers  in July, ammonia-nitrogen levels exceeded 1 mg/1  but
rapidly returned to baseline levels.  The total Kjeldahl-nitrogen
levels in the same paddies were more variable.  The mean annual con-
centrations ranged from 1.5 to 4 mg/1.   Fluctuation in Kjeldahl-nit
rogen closely followed changes in ammonical-nitrogen values and were
highest during the thinning periods.  Table 9 summarizes the mean
concentrations of both ammonia-nitrogen and total Kjeldahl-nitrogen
in the paddies.
Table 9.   MEAN CONCENTRATIONS OF AMMONIA-NITROGEN AND
          KJELDAHL-NITROGEN ITT FERTILIZED PEAT PADDIES
         ALONG THE CLEARWATER RIVER   (mg/1  95% C.L.)
Site
105
115
125
145
155
215a
Mean NH3~N
.266  .203
.616  .677
.538  .162
.216  .114
.306  .155
.402  .222
N
11
17
52
15
17
9
Mean
2.196
1.924
1.707
1.952
2.604
4.427
TKN-N
 .466
 .209
 .186
i .499
i .935
 1.031
N
11
17
52
18
18
9
  a A paddy in the first year of production.

Site 405 is a paddy on the Ki-o-Say development which only received
one application of ammonium-nitrate fertilizer in 1972.  Data from
this site shows that the ammonia-nitrogen levels were not signifi-
cantly different from the concentrations observed on the fertilized
paddies, but the Kjeldahl-nitrogen level was  lower.   The mean ammoni-
cal-nitrogen concentration for the study period in the Ki-Tfo-Say paddy
                                32

-------
was .521  .136 mg/1,  while  the total Kjeldahl-nitrogen level was
1.667 - .165  mg/1.

Throughout the growing season from April to the end of July the see-
page from the paddies  collected at sites 160 and 10 contained  as  much
or more ammonia and less Kjeldahl-nitrogen than the adjacent paddies.
At site 160 the mean ammonia-nitrogen concentration for the summer
months was .428 i .117 mg/1  and the Kjeldahl-nitrogen level was 1.149
* .140 mg/1.   At the Ki-Wo-Say paddy, site 405, the ammonia-nitrogen
concentration for the  summer months averaged .521 - .136 mg/1  compared
to .578 i .108 mg/1 for the  adjacent ditch, site 410.  The Kjeldahl-
nitrogen values for the paddy and the ditch were less divergent, 1.667
 .165 and 1.647  .143 mg/1, respectively.

The nitrogen levels observed in the paddy effluents during discharge
closely approximated the levels observed in the paddies during the
summer months.  A summary of nitrogen levels observed during draw-
down is found in Table 10.
Table 10.    MEAN NITROGEN CONCENTRATIONS IN PADDY
                  EFFLUENTS  (mg/1  95$ C.L.)
Site
140
160
210a
220a
410
Mean Ammonia
Nitrogen
.141 * .098
.335  .196
.444  .119
.598  .675
.455  .152
N
13
16
16
10
21
Mean Kjeldahl
Nitrogen
1.497  .220
1.541  .267
3.371  .537
4.102  .522
1.639  .282
N
13
16
16
10
21
      a Draining first year paddies.
                                33

-------
 The rice paddy effluents did not appear to significantly effect the
 ammonical-nitrogen concentrations in the Clearvrater River during the
 discharge period.  Increases in the Kjeldahl-nitrogen levels over the
 summer baseline levels, however, were observed at all stations except
 at site 100 which is above the rice paddies.  These changes are evi-
 dent from the data in Table 11.
Table 11.   COMPARISONS OF SUMMER AND FALL NITROGEN
             CONCENTRATIONS IN THE CLEARWATER RIVER
                        (mg/1  955? C.L.)

summer
fan
summer
fan
summer
fan
summer
fall
Site
100
100
300
300
500
500
600
600
Mean
.184
.267
.264
.269
.090
.283
.274
.321
NH3-N




i
t


.046
.104
.082
.089
.130
.404
.354
.093
N
46
16
35
24
6
3
4
17
Mean Kjeldahl



1

1
1
2
.665 
.608 
.774 
.341 
.605 
.647 
.080 
.296 
.086
.144
.125
.245
.133
1.311
.216
.315
N
47
14
40
24
6
3
4
17
The nitrogen dynamics associated with mineral paddies near Kelliher,
Minnesota, were similar to that observed in the Clearwater Basin.
The meanammoniacal-nitrogen level increased slightly from the summer
value of .124 * .094 to .138 t .078 mg/1  in the Battle River, site
700-A, which was the receiving stream for the rice paddies.  One of
the mineral paddies, site 705, averaged .174 * .107 mg/1 ammonia for
the summer.  A significant increase from .644 * .157 to 1.544 - .233
mg/1 Kjeldahl-nitrogen occurred during the discharge period.  The
effluent from the mineral paddy averaged 1.311 * .184 mg/1 Kjeldahl-
nitrogen at site 710.
                                34

-------
Nitrogen levels in the bog drainage ditches which supply water to the
paddies in the Vaskish area were  higher than the concentrations seen
in the Clearwater Basin.   The mean summer concentrations in the supply
ditches of ammonia-nitrogen and total Kjeldahl-nitrogen for site 801
were .554 - .181 and 1.66 - .226  mg/1, respectively.   During August, the
concentrations of both ammonia  and Kjeldahl-nitrogen increased in the
supply ditch,  site 801, to .741 - .400 and 2.072 i .455 mg/1 respective-
ly.  In this area the higher  nitrogen levels at site 805 in the paddy
did not appear to influence the concentrations of nitrogen at site 810
in the discharge ditch or at  site 900 in the Tamarac River which is in
the receiving stream.  These  data are summarized in Table 12.
Table 12. MEAN NITROGEN CONCENTRATIONS. AT SITES IN THE VASKISH
                     AREA  (mg/1  95% C.L.)

sunns r
fan
paddy
summer
fall
summer
fall
Site
801
801
805
810
810
900
900
Mean
.554
.741
.595
.552
.662
.299
.148
NH3-N
T
T

r




.181
.400
.167
.166
.415
.229
.069
N
31
10
27
31
13
5
19
Mean Kjeldahl-N
1
2
2
1
2
1
1
.662
.072
.188
.940
.in
.556
.627
+
+
+




.226
.455
.177
.294
.297
.402
.169
N
31
9
32
33
12
5
19
PH, ALKALINITY, HARDNESS AND METAL IONS

pH Levels
The pH values observed in the Clearwater River and associated paddies
were remarkably similar and fairly constant throughout the summer.
The Clearwater River was slightly basic averaging 8.1 - .1 pH units
                                35

-------
for all river stations for the study period.  The pH observed in the
paddies was slightly less, averaging  8.0  .1, while the paddy ef-
fluents ranged between 7.0 and 8.2 pH units.  No major variations in
pH were noted during the study and the slight variation appeared to
coincide with changes in precipitation.

Limited data from the mineral paddies in the Kelliher area indicated
that similar general conditions prevailed.  In the Waskish complex,
slightly lower pH values were observed at all stations.  The mean pH
values for the inlet, site 801; the paddy, site 805; and the outflow,
site 810 were 7.6, 7.7, and 7.5, respectively.

Alkalinity and Hardness
The alkalinity and hardness in the Clearwater River Basin did not ap-
pear to be adversely affected by the discharge from the rice paddies
during the study period.  There was an increase in both the alkalinity
and hardness at the site below the rice paddies during the fall dis-
charge.  However, the mean alkalinity during the fall was less than
that observed during the summer months.

It was expected that there would be a significant increase in both al-
kalinity and hardness in the river, since the levels found in the pad-
dies and their discharge ditches were significantly higher in most in-
stances ranging from 250 to 325 mgA. ibrboth parameters.  The exception
was the Ki-o-Say Wildlife Area and paddy complex where the alkalinity
and hardness were low relative to the Clearwater River.  The seepage
and effluent from the Ki-\Jb-Say paddies exhibited higher mean alkal-
inity and hardness than the river as shown in Table 13.
                                36

-------
Table 13.   MEAN SEASONAL ALKALINITY AND HARDNESS LEVELS
        IN THE CLEARWATER RIVER BASIN  (mg/1  95% C.L.)
Site
100-101

125
160

215a
300

400

405
410

Season
summer
fall
summer
summer
fall
summer
summer
fall
summer
fall
summer
summer
fall
Mean Alkalinity
228  6
207  9
260  20
274  9
303  63
321  27
215  10
215  27
162  11
158  16
182  17
276  24
250  43
Mean Hardness
217  9
193 - 9
251  16
253  n
274  22
313  44
211  8
232  n
157  9
168  9
199  21
299  33
257  45
   a First-year paddy.
Due to the necessity of storing samples from the Kelliher area for one
to three days before analysis, little can be discussed about the al-
kalinity of the Battle River or adjacent paddies. The limited
hardness data for the area point  to a moderate increase in hardness
in the river as a result of paddy discharges.

The summer alkalinity in the paddy in the Vaskish complex, site 805,
decreased with respect to the inlet ditch, site 801, while the aver-
age value for the same period in the discharge ditch, site 810,
approximated the inlet concentration.  The mean alkalinities for the
inlet, paddy and the outflow were 214, 186, and 216 mg/1, respectively.
A similar trend was observed with respect to mean hardness with inlet,
paddy, and outflow concentrations of 216, 205, and 216 mg/1.
                                37

-------
Calcium
The mean calcium levels in the Clearwater River increased moderately
from 42 mg/1 at site 100, located above the rice paddies, to 56 mg/1
at site 600, below 4,000 acres 0-,600 ha), during the fall discharge.
The effluent from the paddies reflected the concentrations observed
in the paddies themselves with levels ranging from 65-75 mg/1 in the
fertilized paddies to about 50-55 mg/1 for the unfertilized paddies.

The calcium levels in the discharge fror the mineral paddies at Kell-
iher averaged 55 mg/1 (site 710) while the summer mean for the Battle
River (site 700) was 52 mg/1.

There was no significant change in the calcium ion concentrations at
the Waskish paddy sites (801, 805, and 810) throughout the season.
Refer to the appendix for mean values by site for calcium.

Magnesium
Magnesium concentrations in the Clearwater River increased downstream
through the rice growing region with summer mean concentrations in-
creasing from 23 mg/1 at site 100 above the rice paddies to 31 mg/1 at
site 600, located below 4,000 acres (1,600 ha) of rice.

During the discharge period, increases of from 3 to 5 mg/1 were ob-
served at the downstream sites.  The inlet water for the Ki-Wo-Say
paddies site 00, and the paddies sampled, site 405j exhibited magnes-
ium concentrations in the range of 15-16 mg/1 for the summer months.
The discharge and seepage from the paddies showed respective increases
to 24 and 28 mg/1.  Magnesium ion concentrations at the Waskish sites
801, 805, and 810 averaged 19 mg/1 for the summer months.  A slight

-------
increase to 21 Mg/1 occurred during the fall at site 801 in the inlet
ditch and site 805 in the paddy.   However,  a decrease to 17 mg/1 was
recorded at site 810 in the discharge ditch.  Refer to the appendix
for mean value data.

Potassium
Potassium levels varied from 2 to 5 mg/1 in the Clearwater River basin
for the season.  The concentrations in the  river were high during the
spring, decreased during the summer, and increased to higher levels in
the fall.  Two to threefold  increases in potassium ion concentrations
were observed in fertilized paddies when they were flooded or radi-
cally disturbed during thinning operations.  These levels decreased
to river levels throughout the summer.

Though variable, the average potassium ion concentrations in the Ki-
Wo-Say area were less than those observed in the Clearwater River.

In the mineral paddy at Waskish, the concentration of potassium vac-
illated  from  .5 to 4 mg/1 for the study period rising to 6.5 mg/1 dur-
ing thinning operations.  The concentration in the discharge ditch,
though slightly higher on occasion, was not significantly different than
the inlet water.  Mean values by site are reported in the appendix.

DISSOLVED, FILTERABLE AND VOLATILE SOLIDS

Dissolved Solids
The dissolved  solids in the Clearwater River  above  the  paddies,  site
100, though varying from about 150 to 290 mg/1  during the three  sum-
mers, averaged 245  - 10 mg/1.  During the discharge  period,  site
                                39

-------
300, below2,000 acres (810 ha) averaged 298  19 mg/1 while the mean
value for site 600, located below4,000 acres (1,600 ha), was 4.03 - 39
mg/1.  The fall mean represented an increase of about 50 mg/1 over
the summer mean for sites 300 and 600.  The mean dissolved solids
discharged from the older organic paddies, sites 14-0 and 160, was
330 mg/1.  A much greater contribution was made by the first year
paddies where the mean values observed in the discharge ditches,
sites 210 and 220, exceeded 470 mg/1.

The dissolved solids were rather low in the Ki-Wb-Say marsh and pad-
dies averaging 198 and 243 mg/1, respectively, for sites 400 and 405,
but the leachate from the paddies averaged nearly twice the amount
found in the paddy.  The dissolved solids were significantly reduced
in the combined seepage-drainage ditch (site 410) with the discharge
of the paddy.  A similar trend was observed in the Battle River which
received the effluent from the mineral paddies near Kelliher.

At the Waskish paddy (805) the mean concentration of dissolved solids
of 202 mg/1 was significantly less than that observed in the inlet
water (site 801) or the discharge (site 810) which had mean levels
of 311 and 325 mg/1, respectively.

Filterable Solids
Due to the consistency of flooded peat soils, great fluctuations in
filterable solids were observed in the rice paddies.  Levels of 300
to 400 mg/1 were recorded during thinning operations, but these ra-
pidly decreased to mean levels of 20 to 30 mg/1 for most of the grow-
ing season.  During discharge, paddy effluents varied from 16 to 87
mg/1 filterable solids with the higher concentrations in the dis-
charges from the first-year paddies.
                                40

-------
The greatest change in mean filterable solids that occurred in the
Clearwater River was observed at site 300.   Here the fall levels
increased significantly from the mean summer value of 13.6 i 3.8 to
35.5 - 13.3 mg/1.  An increase from a July  average of 9 to 22 mg/1
was observed at site 600 during the same time period.

At the Waskish sites, during discharge, there was a decrease in fil-
terable solids from 17 mg/1 in the inlet stream, site 801, to 11 mg/1
at the discharge site 810.   The Tamarac River, the receiving stream
for these effluents, averaged less filterable solids during the dis-
charge period than during the summer months, 6 vs 12 mg/1.

Volatile Solids
The volatile solids in the  Clearwater River comprised a rather con-
stant 40 percent of the total dissolved solids, rising and falling
with the dissolved solids.   Increases in mean volatile solids from
less than 100 mg/1 above the paddies (site  100) to 135 nag/1 (site
300) and 193 mg/1 (site 600) were observed  during the fall drain-
down.  The mean volatile solids discharged  from older paddies at the
Clearwater Rice development averaged 172 mg/1 at site lAOtand 158
mg/1 at site 160.  The discharge from the first year paddies flow-
 f
ing past sites 210 and 220  maintained mean levels of volatile solids
of 227 and 215 mg/1, respectively.

The mean concentration of volatile solids,  during discharge, from
the Ki-Wo-Say paddies was 18 mg/1 less than the mean level of 159
mg/1 recorded in the same ditch during the summer months.

-------
Limited data from the Kelliher area indicated little change  in volatile
solids concentrations occurred in the Battle River as a  result of rice
paddy discharges.  A slight decrease from the summer mean was  noted in
the fall.
With the exception of occasional pulses, no significant  changes in mean
volatile solids were observed at Waskish between the inlet water at
site 801 and the discharge ditch, site 810, either during the  growing
season or the fall draindown.  The concentration of volatile solids in
the Tamarac River remained a rather constant 100 mg/1 for the  study
period.

PHISICAL FACTORS - TURBIDITY, TEMPERATURE AND DISSOLVED  OXYGEN

Turbidity
The Clearwater River is aptly named because the turbidity above the
paddies at sampling site 100, averaged about 3 FTU for the study period.
The turbidities below the rice paddies in the channelized portion of
the river averaged 6 FTU at site 300 and 9 FTU at site 600.  It is
difficult to determine if the moderate increases in turbidity  recorded
during the fall were a result of paddy discharges or of  the  3.3 inches
(8.3 cm) of rain which fell during the discharge period  in 1972 or the
2.4- inches (6.0 cm) that fell during the same period in  1973.   With the
exception of marked increases associated with flooding and thinning,
the turbidities observed on both the fertilized and unfertilized peat
paddies were generally less than the inlet waters.  The  turbidities
of the major discharge and seepage ditches remained near the levels
recorded in the receiving streams in the summer; but, during the dis-
charge period, levels in excess of 50 FTU were recorded.

-------
Turbidities of the inlet water for mineral paddies at Waskish (site
801) exceeded 20 FTU in the early spring but decreased  to about 1.5
FTU for the summer months.   The turbidity of the paddy  studied,
site 805, was generally less than that observed in the  inlet ditch.
During the final stages of  discharge,  turbidity levels  in excess of
20 FTU were observed but they quickly  returned to normal as flows
decreased.

Temperature
The temperatures observed in the rice  paddies, discharge ditches, and
receiving streams varied on a diurnal  basis.  On the average the tem-
perature of the paddy and discharge  water was generally 1 to 4C less
than the receiving streams  in the early morning; increasing to a max-
imum of 1 to 2C above the  temperature of the receiving stream during
afternoon samplings.  For the period of maximum discharge no fluctua-
tions in river temperature  were noted.

Dissolved Oxygen
The Clearwater River was consistently  supersaturated with dissolved
oxygen and no diurnal variation was  noted.  The water in the rice
paddies had lower dissolved oxygen tensions ranging from less than
lmg/1 to saturation.  These variations resulted from plant photo-
synthesis, respiration and  wind generated aeration.  The upper por-
tion of paddy had consistently higher  dissolved oxygen readings than
the water just above soil surfaces in peat paddies.  The discharges
from these paddies did not  appear to affect the oxygen tensions in
the receiving streams as they were well aerated by the time they
reached the stream.  Similar observations were recorded in the other
study areas.

-------
ALGAL ASSAYS
Algal assays were conducted on a preliminary basis  at  selected sites
along the Clearwater River in 1972.     The study was expanded in
1973 to include additional sites. All values are reported as means
with plus or minus 2 standard deviations.   Results  shown in figure
2, indicate that the maximum standing crop of the test organism,
Selenastrum capricornutum remained rather  constant  at  sites 100
and 300 until late June of 1972.

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1972 ALGAL ASSAY
SITE 100 
SITE 300 0 ,
SITE 60O +
95* CONE T
LIMITS 1

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J ULY AUGUST
Figure 2.  Standing crops of algae produced in Clearwater River
           water in 1972

-------
The increased productivity recorded prior to the beginning of paddy
discharges, which began on August 2, appeared to be induced by the
heavy raias recorded during the same period, figure 3.
      APRIL
MAY
JUNE
JULY
AUGUST
Figure 3.  Weekly precipitation recorded at the Ki-"Wo-Say paddies
           on the Clearwater River  (1972).
Though significant increases  above the potential productivity of site
100 occurred during the discharge period  at  sites  300 and 600 in early
August of 1972, the run-off from the  3.3  inches  (8.4. cm) of rain which
fell during this period undoubtedly influenced, the results.  Figure

-------
4,  summarizing the results of the 1973 assays conducted on the Clear-
water River water, shows that at site 600 the potential productivity
remains  quite  constant throughout the summer and fall, uninfluenced
by  either heavy rains or paddy discharge.  It appeared that during
the latter stages of paddy discharge, after August 8, the increased
nutrients from paddy effluents may have been responsible for the

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1973 ALGAL ASSAY '
SITE 100 

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' 1 8
SITE 300 0
SITE 600 +
95^ COMR T _
LIMITS  ;
-
.



! ' 1
5 io! 'i
JUNE JULY AUGUST OCTOBER
Figure ^..  Standing crops of algae produced in Glearwater River
           water in 1973.

-------
increases observed in the standing crop of algae produced by the
samples from site 300 compared to  site 100 located above the pad-
dies.

The maximum standing crop of the test  organism,  produced in water
from site 600,  was less than 20 percent of the crop produced in the
synthetic algal media indicating some  form of nutrient limitation,
5.4 x 105 cells/ml vs 6.3 x 10 for 1972 and 3.7 x 105 vs 1.8 x 106
for 1973.  Preliminary investigation led to the conclusion that the
river at site 100 was phosphorus limiting during the early summer but
subsequent data summarized in Table 14 indicates that nitrogen was
limiting at all sites in both the  Clearwater River and the paddy dis-
charges when drawdown occurred.
Table 14.  MAXIMUM STANDING CROPS OBTAINED AT SELECTED SITES
          WITH THE SAMPLE COLLECTED 8 AUGUST 1973 AND WITH SPIKES
     OF PHOSPHORUS AND NITROGEN.      ALL VALUES TMES 105 cells/ml.
Site
300
600
160
140
Sample
1.41  0.53
2.03  0.56
1.49  1.00
1.19  0.31
Plus .125 mg/1 P
1.27  0.35
1.92  1.34
1.15  0.61
.90  0.46
Plus .5 mg/1 N
3.28  1.49
4.38  2.07
4.45  0.29
4.50  1.71
Limited data from the Battle River, site 700, near Kelliher indi-
cated a considerable amount of variation in maximum standing crops.
From data shown in Table 15, it is evident that-the paddy assayed,
site 705, was limited early in the season but potential productivity
increased significantly to levels higher than the river prior to dis-
charge.
                                47

-------
 Table 15.   MAXIMUM STANDING CROPS OF ALGAE PRODUCED AT SITES
            700 AND 705 NEAR KELLIHER, MINNESOTA.   ALL VALUES
                            TIMES 104 cell/ml.
Date
22 June 73
13 July 73
18 July 73
1 Aug. 73
Site 700
12.20  0.05
6.32  1.76
11.70  2.39
1.89  0.95
Site 705
.69  1.90
8.72  6.27
35.10  9.20
discharge begun
The bog drainage in the Waskish area, site 801, produced a high
standing crop in June, but the potential productivity decreased
throughout the remainder of the season.  The potential productivity
of the discharge ditch, site 810, remained higher than site 801 for
the entire season, indicating enrichment by the seepage and discharge
from the paddies.  Though the highest standing crop produced in the
Tfeskish area occurred at site 810, as seen in Table 16, a 2.5 fold
increase in the standing crop occurred when the August 8 water sam-
ples were spiked with 0.50 mg/1 nitrogen indicating nitrogen limit-
ation.  The nutrients in the rice paddy effluents may be responsi-
ble for the increased standing crop produced in the Tamarac River
water samples, site 900, on August 8 but their effect was short-
lived as subsequent samples were less productive.

Sarrples were collected from Red Lake one-half niile (.8 km) fron the
mouth of the Tamarac River and at the outlet of Lower Red Lake.
Assays of these samples indicated that the potential productivity of
Red Lake was not influenced by rice paddy discharges at this time.
The mean standing crops produced at these sites did not vary signifi-
cantly from those produced by the Tamarac River water during summer

-------
and fall.   The last assays were  conducted on water collected October 1,
1973.
Table 16.    STANDING CROPS OF ALGAE PRODUCED AT  THREE SITES AT
            WASKISH, MINNESOTA.  ALL VALUES TIMES l'o4 cells/ml.
Date
22 June 73
10 July 73
18 July 73
1 Aug. 73
8 Aug. 73
11 Aug. 73
15 Aug. 73
30 Aug. 73
1 Oct. 73
Site 801
21.90  2.00

2.41 i 1.20
2.76 - 2.28
0.88 i 1.36

0.27 - 0.73


Site 810
25.6  5.90

7.98 I 0.52
.63  0.31
25.60  9.50

24.00  6.50


Site 900
7.81 J 1.48
12.10 i 2.00
9.15 i 2.86
3.73 ^ i-06
15.00  0.40
6.41 - 1.71
2.27 i 1.55
8.57 J 2.73
2.22  1.28
WATER BUDGETS
Water budgets were estimated for the Clearwater paddies from rain-
fall records, pumping records,  estimates of spring bonus water, see-
page and discharge water measurements.   Each year pumping began
about April 1 and continued through mid-July.  In 1973 a dry spring
reduced the rate of pumping and it was  mid-May before complete flood-
ing was achieved.  Additional water was added only to replace seepage
and evaporation losses during the growing season.

Spring bonus water, estimated to be 1.2 inches per acre (3.1 cm/ha),
entered the paddies via runoff  into the central supply ditch from
surrounding land during April and early May of 1973.  Pumping re-
cords show that 18.6 inches per acre (47.3 cm/ha) of water were added
to the 620 acres (251 ha) from the Clearwater River by electrical lift
      18
pumps.
                               49

-------
Paddy seepage and August drawdown water returned to the river via a
number of ditches.  The only site where seepage could be effectively
measured during the growing season was the 2,200 foot (670 m) ditch
between a series of paddies, site 160.  The entire flow in this ditch
was assumed to be seepage since plugging of a culvert by the Clearwater
Rice foreman, prevented bog water from entering the ditch.  Measure-
ments indicated that seepage was less during April and May, than in
June and July, because of late flooding.  Due to the number of discharge
ditches, flow data during the August draindown were estimated.

A monthly water budget is shown in Table 17.  The 1973 estimates of
21.1 inches per acre (53.6 cm/ha) of consumptive water use is in close
agreement with the 1972 estimate of 20.6 inches per acre (52.32 cm/ha).
The seepage and discharge loss for the two years was nearly identical;
the major difference was that the spring of 1973 was drier.  During
1973 an additional 2.6 inches per acre (6.6 cm/ha) was pumped from the
river.  This plus the 1.4 inches (3.6 cm) of rain offset the additional
runoff (bonus water) intercepted in 1972.

Low water levels and paddy design prevented estimates of water budgets
at Vaskish and the Ki-Wo-Say.
                                50

-------
Table 17.     CONSUMPTIVE TSATER USE FOR A 620 ACRE DEVELOPMENT
                        REPORTED AS INCHES PER ACRE
March
Bonus water
Pump water .5
Rainfall
Seepage loss
Discharge
water

April

4.3
.9*
-.30*



May
1.2*
7.6
1.7
-.37



June

2.5
2.1
-.46



July

3.7
4.2
-.45



August




- 6.0a

Total
Totals
1.2
18.6
8.9
-1.6
-6.0

21.1
   a estimated

FLOW RATES FOR THE CLEARWATER RIVER
Flow rates for the Clearwater River were estimated from July 26
through August 21, 1973, at 3 sites:  above all paddies, site 100;
below 2,000 acres (800 ha), site 300; and below4,000 acres Q.,600ha),
site 600.  The average flow for the period from July 26 to August 21
was 112 C.F.S. (3,200 I/sec) at site 100, 125 C.F.S. (3,570 I/sec) at
site 300 and 175 C.F.S. (5,300 I/sec) at site 600.  Flow rates shown
in figure 5, indicate major discharges began August 2.  Maximum flows
of 325 C.F.S. <,200 I/sec) at site 300 and 432 C.F.S. (12,200 I/sec)
were observed August 10.  By August 18, flow rates had returned to
pre-discharge levels.  Based on a mean flow of 175 C.F.S. $,300 I/sec)
at site 600 the increased flows, from August 2 to August 18, repre-
sented a total discharge of 2,700 acre feet (3,600 m3) for the 4,000
acres Q.,600 ha) of rice paddies.

This method of measuring stream flow was crude and no attempt was
made to account for the additional flow resulting from the 2.4 inches
(6.0 cm) of rain which fell from August 2 to August 9.
                                51

-------
Q
400
U
LJ
IS)
o:300-
UJ
0_
200-
LL
U
100-
u
A Site
\ 100 
/ I 300 o
. I 600 +
;/\ \
j \ *
A V
" ^ // v***\
****/ \ ^+ 	
^^*o '^-

25 30-1 10 20
JULY AUGUST



30
Figure 5.  Flow Rates Measured at Three Sites on the Clear-water
           River in 1973
NUTRIENT LOADING
Loading From Paddy Seepage
Calculations of stream loading were done on a seasonal "basis.   The
season was divided into growing seasons from April through the end
of July and the discharge period in early August.   The water dis-
charged during the growing season was mainly seepage water.  The
weight of the material that is reported is the difference between
the total weight of that parameter discharged and  the amount found
                                52

-------
in an equal volume of inlet water.   The reported value then represents
the contribution attributed to the  respective paddies.  The growing
season data were calculated from weekly analyses and total weekly flow
while discharge data was calculated from daily analyses and daily vol-
umes.  Results are shown in Table 18.

Prior to discharge 74. acre feet (90,000 m3)  of seepage water flowed
through the 2,200 foot (670 m) discharge ditch, site 160.  During the
week of July 12 the concentrations  of phosphorus and nitrogen increased
sharply in the discharge ditch as a result of heavy rains.  If these
data were omitted from the values reported in Table 18 for total phos-
phorus the resultant factors would  be significantly reduced.  During
the growing season total phosphorus, total Kjeldahl-nitrogen, ammonia-
nitrogen, total dissolved solids, alkalinity, and calcium increased as
the summer progressed, but no trends were evident in the discharge
weights of potassium and magnesium.

Flooding of the Ki-Wa-Say paddies did not occur until the first week of
June but monitoring of flows past site 4-10 in the seepage ditch began
May 10.  After flooding the flow of seepage averaged 1.3 acre feet
(1,600 m^) per week.  The weights of phosphorus, and ammonia-nitrogen
released from the Ki-Vo-Say paddies were similar to those found at site
160.  Considering the smaller amount of water discharged at site 4-10,
greater weights of metal ions, dissolved solids and alkalinity were
released per acre foot of discharge.

At the Waskish paddies the seepage  monitored at site 810 exhibited
trends very similar to those observed at the Clearwater Rice paddies
with the exception that more magnesium and less alkalinity were re-
leased per acre foot of seepage.
                                53

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Table 18.  THE POUNDSa OF SELECTED NUTRIENTS FOUND IN RICE PADDY
             SEEPAGE COMPARED TO THAT FOUND IN AN EQUAL VOLUME
             OF INTAKE WATER.  WEIGHT IN POUNDS PER ACRE FOOT
                               OF SEEPAGE.
Parameter
Total-P
TKN
Ammonia-N
Total Dis. Solids
Alkalinity (CaCoJ
Calcium
Magnesium
Potassium
Total Discharge
Site 160
.33
1.9
.35
24.0
150
31
-2.7
1.4
74 acre ft.
Site 10
.36
4.7
.54
1280
770
170
90
15
11 acre ft.
Site 810
.28
1.3
.31
50 .
65
18
5
1.8
32 acre ft.
  a Grams per cubic meter = Pounds per acre foot x .3676

Loading From Paddy Effluents
At site 160, the discharge flows were monitored from August 1 to
August 9 when the dam holding the weir broke.  During this period 34
acre feet (43,000 nr) of water had been discharged.  "When compared to
an equal volume of inlet water the paddies contributed .23 pounds per
acre (.26 kg/ha) total phosphorus, 1.38 pounds per acre (1.56 kg/ha)
total Kjeldahl-nitrogen and  .li, pounds per acre (.16 kg/ha) ammonia-
nitrogen.  The data in Table  19 shows that while the paddies appeared
to act as a sink for potassium and magnesium they released large  a-
mounts of calcium and dissolved solids.  During the first seven days
of the discharge period 2.4-  inches  (6.1 cm) of rainfall was recorded
at site 160.  This precipitation undoubtedly influenced the results
at all sites along the Glearwater River.

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 Table 19.    NUTRIENT ADDITIONS BY THREE RICE PADDY EFFLUENTS
               LOADING AS POUNDS* PER ACRE DURING DISCHARGE.
Parameter
Total-P
TKN-N
Ammonia-N
Total Dis. Solids
Calcium
Magnesium
Potassium
Acres of paddies
Site 160
.23
1.38
.14
130.
24.
-1.6
-.132
68
Site 410
-.08
.85
-.56
141.
no data
5.12
.42
78
Site 810
.199
.188
-.113
178.
no data
-6.32
1.68
190
 aKilograms per hectare = pounds per acre x 1.12

The effluent from the unfertilized Ki-Vo-Say paddies flowing past
site 410  carried less phosphorus and ammonia than was found in the
inlet water.  These paddies also released a large amount of dissolved
solids, but did not act as traps for magnesium or potassium.

Data collected from site 810 indicated that the Waskish paddies re-
moved ammonia-nitrogen and magnesium from the inlet water.  Rainfall
was also a problem at this site as 7.8 inches (20 cm) fell at the
time of discharge, raising water flow in the creek.

Nutrient Loading In The Clearwater River
Stream flow measurements and chemical analyses were made on a fre-
quent basis, see figure  5,   during the major discharge period at
three sites on the Clearwater River.   Table 20, nutrient loads car-
ried by the Clearwater River, was constructed by subtracting the weights
of materials carried past site 100 from the total weights carried by
an equal volume at site 600.
                                55

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Table 20.   ADDITIONAL NUTRIENT LOADS CARRIED BY THE CLEARWATER
               RIVER AT SITE 600 COMPARED TO AN EQUAL VOLUME
               OF WATER AT SITE 100 DURING DRAWDOWN, AUGUST 2
                TO AUGUST 17.  WEIGHT IN POUNDS8 TIMES 103.
            Parameter                         Site 600

       Total-P                                   4.6
       TKN                                      23.3
       Ammonia-N                                 2.1
       Total Dis. Solids                      2200.
       Calcium                                 240.
       Magnesium                                83.
       Potassium                                17

       akg = pounds x .4545
If the values reported in Table 20 for site 600 are divided by A,000,

the number of acres above that site, the quotient would estimate the

contributions made by each acre of rice paddy.   The results shown in

table  21  exhibit a trend quite similar to that seen in table  19

for sites 160 and 410.
Table 21.   NUTRIENT LOADING BT RICE PADDIES ALONG THE CLEARWATER
              RIVER.  LOADING AS POUNDS^ PER ACRE OF RICE LAND.
             Parameter                          Site 600

        Total-P                                  1.1
        TKN-N                                    5.8
        Ammonia-N                                  5
        Total Dis.  Solids                       550.
        Calcium                                 60.
        Magnesium                               21.
        Potassium                                4.. 2
       aKilograms  per hectare = pounds per acre x 1.12
                                 56

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A comparison of tables 20   and 21   will reveal that the loading
measured in the river is  from 2.5  to 5 times the levels recorded in
paddy effluents at sites  160, 410, and 810.

SOIL CHEMISTRY
The water logged soils of the rice paddies were studied to deter-
mine the levels of available soil  phosphorus and the forms in which
the phosphorus occurred.   Fertilized and unfertilized organic soil
paddies, site 125 and near site 405 constructed on sapric peat with
layers of hemic peat as well as a  mineral soil paddy, site 805, of
                                          19
the Chilgren series were  examined  in 1972.    Two additional mineral
paddies (sites 705, 715)  on soils  classified as belonging to the
Nebish-Rockwood series as well as  an additional sapric peat paddy
were included in 1973. The mineral paddies  near Kelliher were orig-
inally open farmland located well  above the  water table.  The peat
paddies were developed from low bog grassland or grassland with mix-
ed tamarack or small brush.

Prior to the flooding of  the paddies in 1972 the general soil chem-
istry was studied.  A summary of results is  shown in Table 22.

Table 22.      GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE PADDY SOILS
pH Total Phosphorus
ppm/gram soil
Mineral
paddy
Organic
unfert.
Organic
fert.
6.9
6.3
6.6
467
804
1200
Caticn exchange Percent
meq/100 gram soil Organic Content
51
275 -
289
10.8
74.5
71.3
                                57

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 One year later under flooded conditions the same organic fertilized
 paddy had a cation exchange capacity of 159 meq/lOOg soil.  However,
 3 other organic paddies  (sites 105, 115, 215) were found to have
 values of 273, 222,  and  198 meq/lOOg soil, respectively.   A new miner-
 al paddy, site 705,  and  an older fertilized mineral paddy, site 715,
 had exchange capacities  of 154 and 49.  The moisture content of the
 flooded organic soils averaged 89 percent while mineral soils aver-
 aged 4.6 percent.   Soil pH under flooded conditions ranged from 6.0
 to 7.0 with a mean value of 6.7 for organic paddies, while the miner-
 al paddies ranged  from 6.7 to 7.2 with a mean value of 7.0.

 During 1973 phosphorus fractions were extracted from the soils of six
 paddies.   The analytical results for pH; available phosphorus;
 aluminum,  iron, and calcium fractions;  and total phosphorus appear in
 Table 63 in the appendix.  Soil samples were taken from each site
 June 22, after the paddies had been flooded for one month;  July 10,
 immediately after a major soil  disturbance to simulate thinning; July
 11, 24 hours after thinning;  July 13, 72 hours after thinning; and on
 July 30.  Variation in the results of soils analyzed at  field moisture
 content made it difficult to  attach significance to changes but gen-
 eral characteristics of soil  are  shown.   Total phosphorus  did not show
 up as concentrating in older  organic paddies fertilized  at 300 Ibs/
 acre (336 kg/ha) of 18-18-17.   This was also true for the  fertilized
 paddy where application rates vere unknown.   Available phosphorus
 values ranged between 33  and  88 ppm/g soil for organic paddies if two
 larger values for disturbed soil  were omitted.   Aluminum phosphorus
was found between 85 and  230  ppm/g soil and increased to a maximum
 for the late season sampling  on organic soils in all cases.  Iron
phosphorus values were uniformly  low and never exceeded  33 ppm/g soil

-------
on mineral  or organic  soil  sites.   Calcium values ranged from 4.8 to
229 on organic  soils during the time when no soil disturbance occurred.
During the  1972 thinning of rice stands the mineral and organic pad-
dies showed decreases  in available phosphorus in the soil and increas-
es in soluble phosphorus in the water.   These results are shown in
Table 23:   Changes  in  soil  and water phosphorus concentrations.  In
1973 samples were studied at 1 minute,  24. hours, 72 hours, and 20 days
after soil  disturbance.   Available phosphorus trends at six sites also
show this decrease  reaching a minimum at the 24.-hour sampling period.
These results can be seen in the appendix Table 63 

A close correlation with turbidity and  soluble phosphorus levels for
the thinning process was observed.  "Within sixty hours after thinning
phosphorus  and  turbidity levels had returned to normal.

Table 23.    CHANGES IN SOIL AND WATER PHOSPHORUS CONCENTRATIONS
                   SOIL = ppm/g soil WATER = mg/liter-P
                0 hours      0.1 hours     60 hours      158 hours
              Soil Water   Soil  Water   Soil  Water   Soil  Water
Fertilized    17.7   2.3a   9.8    3.0    8.3    2.7    17.3   2.3
Organic
Soil
Unfertilized  11.6    .02   7.6     .36   7.3     .02    9.8    .02
Organic
Soil
Mineral        3.9    .04   2.0     .31   4-4.     .04.    4.1    .06
Soil
aLarge value due to positive interference observed at this site.
 Total phosphorus values indicate soluble to be closer to .02 to .05
 range.
                                59

-------
Soil samples were taken from a uniform mixture of 8 inch  (20 cm)
cores.  Comparison of 4 inch (10 cm) and 8 inch  (20 cm) cores by
Polfliet showed a marked increase in available phosphorus at the
surface.

Bather than looking at just available phosphorus  the distribution of
available aluminum, iron, calcium, and total phosphorus was  deter-
mined at depths of 0-2.5 inches (0-6 cm),  2.5 -   8 inches (6-20 cm),
and 8-12 inches (20-30 cm).  The mineral paddy in production for
several years showed increases in all forms of phosphorus with depth
(See Table 24:  Changes in soil phosphorus  fractions with  depth).  Both
the new and older organic paddies followed previously observed trends
of decreases with depth for available phosphorus  except for  the mid-
dle portion of the first-year paddy.
                                60

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Table 24.     CHANGES IN SOIL PHOSPHORUS  FRACTIONS WITH DEPTH.
                        VALUES ARE  REPORTED ppm/g.
Fertilized Mineral Soil Paddy (site 705)
Uppers
Middle3
Lower3
Avail. P Al-P
27. 21
3.6 34
58. 100
Fe-P
12
40
35
Ca-P
58
140
161
Total-P
371
492
510
First Year Organic Paddy - Fertilized (site
Upper
Middle
Lower

Upper
Middle
Lower
124
446
95
Organic
124
94
59
329
247
255
Paddy (4
134
100
124
21
12
19
186
149
120
years production -
13
7
12
118
93
46
1258
1043
750
fertilized)
1180
1250
1050
PH
7.1
7.1
7.0
215)
6.8
6.6
6.3
(site 125)
6.9
6.9
6.9
aUpper 0-2.5 inches (0-6.4 cm), middle 2.5-8 inches (6.4-20 cm),
 lower 8-12 inches (20-51 cm).
                                61

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                            SECTION VI

                            DISCUSSION

The rapid expansion of the wild rice industry that has occurred  since
1968 has slowed measurably.  This temporary slowing has been  caused by
a combination of factors.  The most important factor is a need to  ex-
pand the limited market for the wild rice.   Other contributing factors
are the rising costs of land, increased costs of developing land for
rice production, the costs of growing the crop  and the high market
value of other small grain crops.  Speculators  are seeking  other agri-
cultural investments while the present growers  seem content to improve
existing land to make management easier.

Costs for growing the crop should decrease as efforts to develop a
nonshattering, disease resistant, seed succeed. Better seed  and ef-
forts by the industry to expand the market will encourage a gradual
growth of the industry.

Increases in major nutrients were observed in the Clearwater  River
below large rice developments during the discharge periods  in 1972
and 1973.  Total phosphorus concentrations three times the  summer
mean of .14.0 mg/1 were recorded below 4,000 acres  (1,600 ha)  of  rice
paddies.  The increase in ammonia-nitrogen in the river during discharge
was not statistically significant, while the twofold increase to 2.3
mg/1 total Kjeldahl-nitrogen was.  The marked increase  in total
                               62

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dissolved, filterable and volatile solids was also statistically sig-
nificant.  No significance could be attached to the small changes in
turbidity, alkalinity, hardness, pH and metal ions that occurred in
the Clearwater River.

The discharge from the paddies on mineral soil did not alter the phos-
phorus concentration of the South Branch of the Battle River;  how-
ever, the total Kjeldahl-nitrogen concentrations increased from .64.
to 1.54 mg/1.  Little change was observed in the concentrations of
other parameters, but filterable solids jumped significantly in the
Battle River during discharge.

The drainage from the bog north of Upper Red Lake used to flood the
Waskish paddies averaged .1 mg/1 total phosphorus, .6 mg/1 ammonia-
nitrogen and 1.6 to 2.0 mg/1 total Kjeldahl-nitrogen.  Little, if any,
change in the concentrations of the above parameters was observed in
paddy effluents.  Dissolved solids increased slightly and magnesium
concentrations decreased but little change was observed in other para-
meters.  The Tamarac River which receives the discharge from approx-
imately 3,500 acres (600 ha) did not appear to be affected by rice
paddy effluents.

Nutrient release from paddies in their first year of production was
significantly greater than that observed in older psddies.  Phosphorus
and nitrogen levels were 2 to & times the levels found in the effluents
from older paddies.  This may have been due to the consistency of the
peat soils.  During the first growing season a great deal of fine
floating material was evident in the new paddies, as well as higher
concentrations of filterable solids and greater turbidity.  This
                                63

-------
suspension of fine particulates may be the major source of increased
nutrients.

The discharge ditches from most paddies were simply channels cut from
the paddy to the receiving stream.  Very little if anything was done
to stabilize the channel banks.  During the first discharge consider-
able erosion occurs washing large volumes of peat into the watercourse.
In subsequent years vegetation stabilizes the channel banks and erosion
is reduced.  The increased nutrients released from 1,000 acres (4.00 ha)
of new paddies in 1973 may have partially accounted for the increased
nutrient levels observed at site 600.

The seepage from rice paddies contains high concentrations of dissolved
solids and moderate levels of nutrients leached from the paddy soils.
Though seepage water represents a potential for considerable nutrient
input into receiving streams, most paddy operators attempt to retain as
much seepage as possible in their supply ditches.  Rice paddies should
be designed with a supply  ditch near the center of the development and
no ditches should be dug around the periphery.  This would reduce see-
page losses from the paddy system.

Estimates of nutrient loading, Table 18, made in the discharge ditches of
older paddies are 2.5 - 5  times less than the estimates made at site 600,
below 4,000 acres (1,600 ha) of rice paddies, Table 20. Three  factors, two
of which have already been mentioned, may account for this discrepancy.
           1.   The discharge from approximately 1,000 acres (00 ha)
of first year paddies.
           2.   The additional nutrient input into the river resulting
from the erosion of discharge ditches.

-------
           3.    The runoff from the 2.4 inches (6.1 cm) of rain
which fell during the discharge period in 1973.  The 3.3 inches
(8.4. cm) of rain which fell during the discharge period of 1972 may
have resulted in an overestimate  of phosphorus loading previously
reported.

Malathion tests were not run in 1973 due to the restricted application
of this pesticide in the study area.  Application time is governed
by the appearance and concentration of rice worm (Apamea apamiformis).
Most paddies were not sprayed as a result of low worm populations and
those that were treated were sprayed after drawdown in late August.
A new insect, the rice stalk borer (Chilo ple.jadellus) similar to the
white rice stalk borer is becoming a problem.  Since Malathion and
                                               20
Sevin appear ineffective against this organism,   new pesticides may
be requested for approval to use on wild rice.

Insects will remain a problem for the industry and late season Mala-
thion applications are expected to be the most common form of control.

Crop yields are improved on second year or older paddies by thinning
the rice plants.  Major soil disturbances occur in the top 6 inches
(15 cm) of soil as thinning machinery moves over the flooded paddies.
Fine particles from the soft peat soils become suspended increasing
the turbidity, which returns to pre-thinning levels within 3 days.
Soluble and total phosphorus were observed to follow the same trend
as turbidity.  Even though, interferences in the test for soluble
phosphorus made exact values uncertain, it was ,felt that it followed
the same trend as shown for total phosphorus in figure 6.  The sharp
increase in total phosphorus to 5.5 ppm resulting from thinning de-

-------
  creased to normal concentrations within 3 days.  Both anaerobic soil

  conditions and phosphorus loosely sorbed to soil particles were
                       21
  thought to be factors.    Low iron concentrations in the soil indicated

  that the sorbed phosphorus may be the major source.
                              fS-47
                                                    paddy water
                                                    paddy discharge
                                                    Clearwatcr river
          APRIL  I     MAY
                                                     JULY
AUGUST
Figure 6.  Seasonal phosphorus dynamics  in an older fertilized paddy
           system on organic soil in Clearwater County, 1972.
 Soil tests showed that available phosphorus concentrations reached a

 minimum 24. hours after thinning but returned to pre-thinning levels

 over the next 2 days.  Tfhen major disturbances occur on newer paddies

 portions of the soil (bog mat) can float to the surface.  In order to
                                66

-------
protect the crop, water levels must be reduced to prevent movement of
the soil mat.  Lowering water levels prior to thinning would reduce
this danger and prevent discharge at a time of high phosphorus levels.

Control of fall drawdown rates could reduce soil particles in the dis-
charge.  It would appear that slowing the drawdown rate,  as surface
soils became exposed along the edges of the inner ditches, would re-
duce filterable solids in the discharge.  "When drawdown is nearly
complete increased levels of total phosphorus were observed in the
final seepage from the paddy soil.  At this time, the volume of water
discharged is minimal and the total phosphorus concentrations rarely
exceeded one milligram per liter.

Though similar increases were noted with major disturbances on min-
eral soils, the increases were not of the magnitude observed over peat.
Studies conducted in 1972  showed that the greatest increases in to-
tal phosphorus concentrations in receiving streams occurred below
fertilized paddies.  These organic paddies had been fertilized annual-
ly with 18-18-17 NPK at the rate of 150 to 300 pounds per acre (168-
336 kg/ha).  This appeared to lead to an accumulation of total phos-
                                             TO  22
phorus in the upper 4 inches (10 cm) of soil.  *     Tests conducted
in 1973 on first year paddies confirmed this observation, but no
accumulation was evident in the soils of older paddies.  Either fer-
tilizer applications were not at such a rate that would lead to accum-
ulation in the upper portion of the soil or better removal of wood
debris allowed rotovating of the soil to deeper levels after normal
fall fertilizer application.  The one fertilized mineral paddy stud-
ied showed increased levels of total phosphorus vith depth.  Smith,
1971, reported that if nitrogen levels were maintained on mineral
                                Of

-------
 soils, that the  addition  of phosphorus did little to increase yields
                            23
 with phosphorus  application.
 In general,  results indicate phosphorus fertilizer applications
 could be reduced.   However,  the best answer to this question lies in
 the careful  correlation of crop yield to fertilizer application.  Re-
                                                2/
 search being done  by the University of Minnesota   and records of rice
 producers will provide a better answer to this problem.  The rising
 cost of fertilizers will encourage careful study of application rates
 and reduced  usage  is expected in the future as a result of economics
 alone.

 Measurements of consumptive  water use made in 1973 indicated 21.1 in-
 ches ('53.6 cm)  of  water were needed per acre of rice land.  E. Olke
 estimated water usage for the same development to be 21.9 inches
                                                                  2
 (55.6 cm) based on data collected and expected evaporation losses.
 Based on average weather conditions for the area in 1972 the average
 water usage  predicted by three different theoretical measurements was
 20.8 inches  (52.8  cm)  per acre.   This agrees closely with the field
 estimate of  20.6 inches (52.3 cm) made in 1972.   These values are in
 agreement with  estimates made by paddy operators which vary from 18
 to 24. inches  ( 4-5-61  cm).  Though year to year changes in weather
 conditions and differing soil types influencing seepage could cause
 deviations from the average,  consumptive water use by rice paddies in
 northern Minnesota should range between 20 to 22 inches (50-56 cm).

 Since ths rise industry is a largo water user care should be taken
to restrict expansion of the industry to regions with an adequate
water supply.
                               68

-------
Algal assays conducted on Clearwater River water during the discharge
periods of both 1972 and 1973 produced standing crops of algae sig-
nificantly higher than most samples collected during non-discharge
periods, figures 2 and 4.  Samples collected at site 300 in July of
1972 after heavy rains also produced high standing crops of the test
organism.  During 1973 the standing crop of algae, produced in
samples  collected at site 600 on the Glearwater River, appeared to
be unaffected by either heavy rains or rice paddy effluent.

Algal assays conducted at other sites, Kelliher and Vaskish, indicate
that there is considerable natural variation in the potential pro-
ductivity in the area streams.  Though increases in potential pro-
ductivity resulting from rice paddy effluents were measured, the
effect was short lived.

The results of the algal assays indicate that the Clearwater, Battle,
and Tamarac Rivers were all nitrogen limited.  Though increased levels
of nitrogen and phosphorus from paddy effluents produced increased
standing crops in samples from the receiving streams, the standing
crop was only 20 percent of that produced in a synthetic medium indi-
cating some other form of nutrient limitation or growth suppression.
This may possibly be due to growth inhibition bylignin and humic com-
                                                               25
pounds leached from the bogs which color the water in the area.

Though the potential for major -nutrient release from rice paddies
during the growing season is high, good design, proper maintenance
of water levels, and paddy dikes will prevent most accidents.  As
                                69

-------
the expansion of the industry slows and the paddy soils and discharge



ditches stabilize, nutrient release from wild rice paddies may be



similar to or less than that observed in many other agricultural en-


.       (20)(27)
deavors.   /v  '
                               70

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                             SECTION VII

                             REFERENCES

1.   Oelke, E. A., W. A. Elliott, M. F. Kerncamp  and D. M. Noetzel.
     Commercial Production of Wild Rice.  Agricultural Extension
     Service, Extension Folder 2&V.  University of MinnesotaU.S.
     Department of Agriculture, Institute of Agriculture, St. Paul,
     Minnesota.  1973.

2.   Oelke, E. A.  Personal Communication.  1974-.

3.   Bidwell, L. E., T. C. Winter  and R. W. McClay.  Water Resources
     of the Red Lake River Watershed, Northwestern Minnesota.  Hydro-
     logic Investigations Atlas HA.-3A6, U. S. Geological Survey,
     Vashington, D. C.  1970.

4-.   Preliminary Report:  Water Quantity Constraints on the Develop-
     ment of Commercial Wild Rice in the Clearwater River Watershed.
     Draft Copy, Subject to Revision.  Barr Engineering Co., Minne-
     apolis, Minnesota.  1974.

5.   Agricultural Stabilization Commission Survey Report.  On file at
     the Soil Conservation Office, Kelliher, Minnesota.  194-7.
                               71

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 6.   Lundberg, Kenneth R.  and P. T. Trihey.  Water Quality Control
      Through Single  Crop Agriculture,  No.  3.  Environmental Protection
      Agency,  Office  of Research and Monitoring, "Washington, D. C.
      1973.

 7.   Analytical  Quality Control Laboratory.  Methods for Chemical
      Analysis of Water and astes. Environmental Protection Agency.
      National Environmental Research Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.  Report
      No.  1602007/71.   1971.

 8.   American Public Health Association.   Standard Methods for the
      Examination of  Water  and Wastewater,  13th ed.  American Public
      Health Association Inc., New  York, N. Y.  1971.

 9.   National Eutrophication Research  Program.  Algal Assay Procedure
      Bottle Test.  Environmental Protection Agency, National Environ-
      mental Research Center, Corvallis, Oregon.  1971.

10.   Tandon,  H.  L. S.,  M.  P. Cescas  and E. H. Tyner.  An Acid-Free
      Vanadate-Molybdate Reagent for Determination of Total Phosphorus
      in Soils.   In:   Soil  Science  Soc. Amer. Proc.  32:45-51.  1968.

11.   Gilchrist Shirlaw,  D. W.   A Practical Course in Agriculture
      Chemistry.  Pergamon  Press, New York, N. Y.  1967.  158 pp.

12.   Jackson, J. L.  Soil Chemical Analysis.  Prentice-Hall Inc.,
      Englewood Cliffs, N. J.  I960.  4-98 pp.

13.   Troug, E.  The Determination of Readily Available Phosphorus in
      Soils.  Journal  American Society of Agronomy.  22:874-882.  1930.
                               72

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14.   Chang, S. C. and J. L. Jackson.  Fractionation of Soil Phosphorus.
      Soil Science.  84:133-144.  1957.

15.   Snedecor, G. W. and W. G. Cochran.  Statistical Methods, 6th ed.
      Iowa State University Press, Ames, Iowa.  1967.  594 pp.

16.   Koski, P. M.  The Algal Assay Procedure as a Means of Assessing
      the Effects of Rice Paddy Effluents on the Clearwater River.  M.A.
      Thesis.  Bemidji State College, Bemidji, Minnesota.  1973.

17.   Environmental Data Service.  Climatological Data-Minnesota.  U. S.
      Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Admin-
      istration.  Vol. 79, No. 5, 19 ppj No. 6, 22 pp; No. 7, 28 pp;
      No. 8, 17 pp; No. 9, 17 pp.

18.   Pumping  Records for Clearwater Rice Incorporated.  Kelliher,
      Minnesota.   1972, 1973.

19.   Polfliet, David J.  Phosphorus Movement in Waterlogged  Soils.
      Graduate Research Paper.  Bemidji State College, Bemidji, Minne-
      sota.  1972.

20.   Peterson, A. G., C. B. Johnson and D. M. Noetzel.  Research on
      Wild  Rice Insects.  In:  Progress Report of  1974 Wild Rice  Re-
      search.  University of Minnesota, Minnesota Agricultural Experi-
      ment  Station,  St. Paul, Minnesota,  pp 43-44.   1975.

21.   Mahapatra,  I.  C. and  W. H.  Patrick Jr.  Inorganic  Phosphate
      Transformations in Waterlogged Soils.   Soil  Science.   107;28l-
      288.   1969.
                                 73

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22.   Soil Testing Laboratory.  Soil Test Report for Clearwater Rice
      Incorporated.  University of Minnesota, Soil Testing Service,
      St. Paul, Minnesota.  1972.

23.   Snith, Larry.  Research on Seeding and Fertilizers, Practices
      and Plant Density.  A paper presented at a Wild Rice Production
      Conference held at Bemidji State College, Bemidji, Minnesota.
      April 18, 1971.

24.   Grava, J. and K. F. Rose.  Fertility of Paddy Soils and Fertili-
      zation of Wild Rice.  In:  Progress Report of 1974. Wild Rice Re-
      search*  University of Minnesota, Minnesota Agriculture Experi-
      ment Station, St. Paul, Minnesota,  pp 45-58.  1975.

25.   Novak, J. T., A. S. Goodman and D. King.  Aquatic-Weed Decay and
      Color Production.  Journal American Water Works Association.
      67:134-139.  March 1975.

26.   Keup, L. E.  Phosphorus in Flowing Water.   Water Research.
      2:373-386.   1968.

27.   Johnson, J. D. and C. P. Straub.  Development of a Mathematical
      Model to Predict the Role of Surface Run-off and Groundwater
      Flow in Overfertilization of Surface Waters.  University of Minne-
      sota, Water Resources Research Center.   Minneapolis, Minnesota.
      1971. 176  pp.

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                            SECTION VIII

                             APPENDIX A

    SUMMARY" STATISTICS OF ANALYTICAL RESULTS BY  SITE AND SEASON
Table                                                           Page
25    Site 100-101   Summer                                     77
26    Site 100-101   Fall                                       78
27    Site 105       Summer                                     79
28    Site 115       Summer                                     80
29    Site 125       Summer                                     81
30    Site UO       Fall                                       82
31    Site U5       Summer                                     83
32    Site 155       Summer                                     8/4.
33    Site 160       Summer                                     85
34-    Site 160       Fall                                       86
35    Site 200       Summer                                     87
36    Site 210       Summer                                     88
37    Site 210       Fall                                       89
38    Site 215       Summer                                     90
39    Site 220       Fall                           '            91
4.0    Site 300       Summer                                     92
41    Site 300       Fall                                       93
                                 75

-------
APPENDIX A (cont.)
Table
42
43
V*
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62

Site 400
Site 400
Site 405
Site 410
Site 410
Site 500
Site 500
Site 600
Site 600
Site 700
Site 700A
Site 705
Site 710
Site 715
Site 801
Site 801
Site 805
Site 810
Site 810
Site 900
Site 900

Summer
Fall
Summer
Summer
Fan
Summer
Fall
Summer
Fan
Summer
Fan
Summer
Fan
Summer
Summer
Fan
Summer
Summer
Fan
Sunnflsr
Fall
                                      94
                                      95
                                      96
                                      97
                                      98
                                      99
                                      100
                                      101
                                      102
                                      103
                                      104
                                      105
                                      106
                                      107
                                      108
                                      109
                                      no
                                      in
                                      112
                                      114
        76

-------
                       100
                           101
     M&NTH
     DAY
     HOUR

     TYPE


     S68HS1N
     LOCATION
                     TO TO  TJ

                   NO RESTRAINT
                   MO RESTRAINT

                   NO RESTRAINT

                   NO RESTRAINT
                   NO RESTRAINT
                   NO RESTRAINT

                   NO RESTRAINT
                   NO RESTRAINT
                   NO RESTRAINT
                   NO RESTRAINT
-.1
-J
PARAMETER VALUE  NO RESTRAINT

DEPTH            NO RESTRAINT


      SOLURLE ORTHO PHOSPHORUS IMG/D
      TOTAL SOLUBLE PHOSPHORUS
      TOTAl PHOSPHORUS
      KJEDAHL ^ITROGEN (MG/L)
      AVMOMIA NITROGEN (MG/L)
      NITRATE - NITROGEN (M6/L)
      DISSOLVED OXYGEN
      TUflBlDITY IN JACKSON UNITS
      TOTAL DISSOLVED SOLIDS IMG/D
      TOTAL FILTERABLE SOLIDS  CMG/D
      TOTAL VOLATIQLE SOLIDS IMG/D
      PH LAfl
      HARDNESS FROM CA AND M6
      ALKALINITY AS CAC03
      -- -	         Mfi/L
                      MG/L
                      MG/L
                                                      T  TEST   (.05)
     X2
     X25
     X02
     X03
  X30

  {?!
  X37
  X36
  X38
  X39

  X99
  XtOO

PSPAMCI
           CALCIUM
           HAUNTS TUH
           POTASSIUM
           RIVER MILEAGE
           TIME
PSBAMF.TfR
            .
          ?2.
          ?3.
          ?**
          25.
           2.
                    MEAN
                    MEAN
                    -MFAN
PSOAMETEB
f>,,Pt.METt
r'.ffAMETf
          29.
          30.
          31.
          \8.
f IBAMETfff 37.
PflPAMfTEP 36,
r-ARAMETfff 38.
          39,
          -VI.
                    MEAN
                    WfiAN
                    MEAN
                    MEAN
                    MEAN
                    MfAN
                    MEAN
                    MfAM
                    MEAN
                    KEAM
                    Mt'AN
   .09*
   .665
   .16*
   .113
  fl.786
  3.295
2*5.208
 12.506
 9ft.676
                             ,5AO
                             ).213
                             73
 ^
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
                                           PARAMETER 19.
                                           PARAMETER ?0.
                                           PARAMETER 22.
                                           PARAMETER 23.
                                           PARAMETER 2*.
                                           PARAMETER 25.
                                           PARAMETER  ?.
                                           PARAMETER  3.
                                           PARAMETER ?9.
                                           PARAMETER 30.
                                           PARAMETER 31.
                                           PARAMETER 18.
                                           PARAMETER 37.
                                           PAHAMETFR 36.
                                           PARAMETER 38.
                                           PARAMETER 39.
                                           PARAMETER *1.
                                              1
   .2700
  2.3000
   .5300
   .2000
 13.8000
 U.50CO
208.0000
 *9.0000
1*8.0000
  8.7000
300.0000
260.0000
 61.0000
 28.0000
  5.2009
                                                          MEAN
                                                          MEAN
                                                          MEAN
                                                          MEAN
                                                          MEAN
                                                          MFAN
                                                          MEAN
                                                          MEAN
                                                          MEAN
                                                          MEAN
                                                          MFAN
                                                          MEAN
                                                          MEAN
                                                          MFAN
                                                          MFAN
                                                          MEAN
                                                          MEAN
                                                     MIN
                                                     MIN
                                                     MIN
                                                     MIN
                                                     MIN
                                                     MIN
                                                     MIN
                                                     MIN
                                                     MIN
                                                     MIN
                                                     MIN
                                                     MIN
                                                     MIN
                                                     MIN
                                                     MIN
                                                                     .060LIMITS
                                                                      "
                                                                     .665L

  3.29SL
2*5.20PL
 12.596L
                                                HITS
                                                MITS
                                                HITS
                                                MITS
                                                HITS
                                                MITS
                                                MITS
                                                                   96.676LIMITS
                                                                    fl.JPBLlMITS
                                                  TS
                                                  TS
22.187LIMI
 3.273LIMI
                                            .065
                                            .990
                                            .01*
                                            .096
                                            .0*6
                                            .033
                                            .801
                                            .95*
                                          10.388
                                           2.896
                                           6.*89
                                            .071
                                           9,*8S
                                           5^789
                                           2.179
                                            .566
                                            .293
                                            LOW
                                            LOW
                                            LOU
                                            LOW
                                            LOW
                                            LOW
                                            LOW
                                            LOW
                                            LOW 23*.ft20
                                            LOW
                                            LOW
                                            LOW
                                            LOW
                                            LOW
                                            LOW
                                            LOW
                                            LOW
                                                              . 00* 0
                                                              .00*0
                                                              .0190
   .0200
   .0500
  *.2000
   .1000
 63.0000
  1.0000
 36.0000
  7.3000
 53.0000
101.0000
 20.0000
 18.0000
  1.4000
         VARIANCE
         VARIANCE
         VARIANCE     .002
         VARIANCE     .085
         VARIANCE     .023
         VARIANCE     .003
         VARIANCE    *.?69
         VARIANCE    9.152
         VARIANCF1271.317
         VARIANCE   96.72*
         VARIANCE  3*5.*3fl
         VARIANCE     .062
         VARIANCE1015.783
         VARIANCE  411.315
         VARIANCE   5*.780
         VARIANCE    3.773
         VARIANCE    1.029
                                9.700
                               90.183
                                fl.057
                               ?07.636
                               ?2?.751
                               A8.03*
                               21.622
                                2.981
                                                                                        S*MP.UE
                                                                                        SAMPCf
                                                                                        SAMPLE
                                                                                        SAMPLE
                                                                                        SAMPLE
                                                                                        SAMPLE
                                                                                        SAMPLE
                                                                                        SAMPLE
                                                                                        SAMPLE
                                                                                        SAMPLE
                                                                                        SAMPLE
                                                                                        SAMPLE
                                                                                        StMPLE
                                                                                        SAMPLE
                                                                                        SAMPLE
                                                                                        SAMPLE
                                                                                        SAMPLE
 HIAH
 H|flM
 HIGH
 HIGH
 HIGH
.HIGH
 HIGH
 HIGH
 HIGH
 HIGH
 HIGH
 HIGH
 HIGH
 HIGH
 HIGH
 HIGH
 HIGH
                                               .1?*
                                               .00*
                                               :io9
                                               .7?!
                                               ,230
                                               .1*6
                                              9.5B7
                                              4.2*9
                                            255. 59iS
                                         234.329
                                          52.392
                                          22.753
                                           3.566
                                     Table 25-   Site 100-101   SUMMER

-------
  SITES

  25AIH
  TVPE
 LOCATION

 fSUKHY*
LONGITUDE
LATITUDE
                   100    101
                   Tg TO  T3,

                  g R^TR-AM
                  NO RESTRAINT
                   NO RESTRAIN

                   88 BmgSftt!
                   NO RESTRAINT
                   NO RESTRAINT
                                10
 PARAMETER VALUE  NO RESTRAINT

 DEPTH           NO RESTRAINT
                                                 T TEST  t.05)
SIS
in
58!
        TOTAL PHOSPHORUS
        KJEOW  NITROGEN  MB/L;
  28
  JT4I
  X100
                    UNITS .
TOTAL'niSSOLVED  SOLIDS  :W
          39.
PARAMETER 41.
               MEAN
                                        PARAMETER 19.
                                        PARAMETER jo.
                                        PARAMETER i>
                                        PARAMETER ?3.
                                        PARAMETER 24.
                                        PARAMETER 2S.
                                        PARAMETER  ?.
                                        PARAMETER  3.
                                        PARAMETER Z9.
                                        PARAMETER 30.
                                        PARAMETFR 31.
                                        PARAMETER T.
                                        PARAMETFR 37.
                                        PARAMfTER 3A.
                                        PARAMETER 3fl.
                                        PARAMETfR 39.
                                        PARAMETER 4|.
                  3.663
                                 MAX
                                 MAX
                                 MAX
                                 MAX
                                 MAX
                                 MAX
                                 MAX
                                 MAX
                                 MAX
                                 MAX
                                 MAX
                                 MAX
                                 MAX
                                              00
                                              00
                                              oo
                                              60
                                             000
                                             OOO
                                        ??A.OOOO


                                          5^6000
                                                        MEAN
                                                        MEAN
                                                        MEAN
                                                        MEAN
                                                        MEAN
                                                        MEAN

                                                        MEAN
                                                        MFAN  218.UJL
                                                        MEAN   1T.214L
                                                        MEAN   R7.333L
                                                        MEAN    1.137L
                                                        MEAN  J--   -
                                                        MEAN
                                                        MfAN
                                                        MEAN
                                                        MEAN
                                                                                        77.293
                                                                                         7.997
                                                                                         4.220
                                                                                         fl.047
                                                                                         7.907
                                                                    VAR
                                                                    VAR
                                                                    VAR
                                                                    VAR
                                                                    VAR
                                                                    VAR
                                                                    VAR
                                                                    VAR
                                                                    VAR
                                                                    VAR
                                                                    VAR
                                                                    VAR
                                                            0000
                                                              VAR
                                                              VAR
                                                              VAR
                                                              VAR
                                                                       W&
                                                                              4ft.533
                                                                               9.*85
                                                                               1.620
                                                                                 AMPL
                                                                                               HIGH
                                                                                                 AH
SAMPLE S
SAMPLE |

       s

SAMPLE S
SAMPLE s
SAMPL"
SAMPL
SAMPL
SAMPL
SAMPL
SAMPL
SAMPL
SAMPL
 ?:
 i;
19,
                                Table 26.   Site 100-101   FALL

-------
  TVPF
  LOCATION
  TOWNSHIP
  ONfiTTItQF
 
                     70
                        TO
                            73
                      RFSTRATNT

                      RFSTOATNT
                   nO
                   MO
                   NO
                   NO
                   NO
                   WO RFSTPMNT
                   NO
            VALUF
                      PFST"A|wr
                   NO
                                                           (,0>)
  *'   SOflW F nPTHO DMOSI'^OPtlS  (MG/L)
  *?0   T^TAL "SOLUBLE PHOSPHORUS'
  x??   TOTAL
        TtiOPTOTTV IN JACSOi I'NITS
  X?9   T^AL rvT^SOtVFD SOI TOS  (Mfi/L)
  3   TniAi  FKTFPAPLF sonns
  3i   TOTAL vni'ATiLf SOLTOS  
  rlfl   P>* it'
  X31   C*tCT"
                   *S
  i4i   POTASSIU-
  it>9   PIvFP Mil FAGf
        TI*f
           7.
           3.
          30,
P^PAMFTFP 11.
PAQAMFTFP Ji),
P*PMfTFff
P1P4MRTFP
                 *ftn
                 MF*N
                 F*M
                 MEAN
PAOAMFTFP 1iS,
PSPAKfTfP 33.
PADAMETFP 39,
PPACTEP 41,
                   .
                 MFAN
                 HFAN
                            :US
 14
*1*.
  f>
107
  fl
30*
333
 7*
.000

1340
.OOO
.^73
,*00
                                     MAX
                 MEAN
                           1,100
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
                                           PAOAMPTFR \OQLIMlTS
                                  MFAN  7<
                                  "FAN  ?'
                                  MFAN  iKiooCiMits
                 .8400
                  6060
                 .7600
                4.0400
                1.0700
                 .0000
                6. ROOD
               30.5000
              49S.OOOO
               39.0000
                                                      MlfJ
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW   1.730
LOW    .063
LOW    .000
LOW   4.235
LOW   5.60(S
LOW 3B0.179
LOW   1.07ft
LOW 171.?9l
LOW   7.1*27
LOW 2R9.341
LOW 30P.7AR
LOW  ftp.OS?
LOW  ?7.7S9
LOW   ' -"
                                                                                            AMPL
                fl.4000
              3*0.5fl?0
              383.0000
               HS..OOOO
               33.0000
               14.9000
MIN
MIN
MIN

MIN
MtN
MIN
M I N
MIN'
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
.?000
1.4400
.0750
.0000
4.0000
l.iSOOO
333. (1000
2.0000
104.0000
7. MOO
365.9460
27fl.OOOO
A?. 0000
25.0000
6.1000
                                                               MTtH
                                                               HTRH
                                                               HlfiH
                                                               HTfiM
                                                               MIBH
                                                               HlfiH
                                                               HTOM
                                                               HTfiH
  .000
  ,A?9
                                                               HlfiH 450,
  ,4ft9
  .000
 A.ROS
?3.074
                                                               HlfiH ??4.345
                                                               HIGH   ,173
                                                               HlfiH 327.B78
                                                               HI6H 357.777
                                                                     RO.644
                                                                     fl.33?
                                                                     13.<
                                                                                                    HIGH
                                                                                                    HIGH
                                                                                                    HIGH
VARIANCE .0?3
VARIANCF .481
VARIANCE .09?
VARIANCF .000
VARIANCE 1.07?
VARIANCE 149.100
VARIANCF?743.?54
VARIANCE 68.455
VARIANCF1559.364
VARIANCE ,06ft
VARIANCE 7?5.614
VARIANCE1330.MA
VARIANCE 66.R44
VARIANCE 7.073
VARIANCE 9.R94
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLF
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLF
SAMPLE
SAMPLF
SAMPLE
SAMPLF
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SI7E
S 1 7F
SI7E
SI7E
SI7F
SI7F.
SI7F
SI7E
SI7E
SI7E
SI7F
SIZE
SI7E
SI7E
SIZE
                   i
                    S?
                   i?:
                    0.
                   11:
                                    Table  27.   Site  105   SUMMER

-------
ims

VFAP
MONTH
OAY
HOU

TVPF
 LorATIOM

 rOUNTV
 TOWNSHIP
LON8ITUOF
LATITUDE
                   m
                  NO
                  NO
TO TO

 SESTS
      T2
   TRAINT
RESTRAINT
                 NO RESTRAINT

                 NO RESTRAINT
                 NO RESTRAINT
                 NO RESTRAINT

                 NO RFSTRATNT
                 NO HESTBAINT
                 NO RFSTRAINT
                 NO RESTPAINT
 PARAMFTFP VAlUF

 OFPTM
                 WO  RESTRAINT

                 NO  RESTRAINT
                              T  T'ST   (,0*
 Xt9
 70   to.
       TOTAt. PHOSPHORUS
              OPTHO
          t. SOlULf  PHOSPHORUS
 in*
 ?9
 10

 Hi
 VIA
            
      DISSOLVED o*Yr,eN
      TuunfOifr If JAC"SOM UNITS
      TOTAL OTSSOI.VFO SOLIOS  {Mfi/i )
      TOTAL FTLTFOAPLF SOI IDS  (MO/LI
      TOTAL VOLATILE SOL lOS  (MO/LI
      PH L*B

      ALKALINITY AS ccoi
      CAI
       POT*SSIl.'
 100  TIT

t>t*rrre IQ.
                      Mfi/L
                F*M
                     OARAMFTEP
                     PARAMFTFP
                     PARAMFTEP
                     PAPAMFTEP  . ...
                     PAOAMFTEP  ?4,
                     PARAMfTFP  ~~
                     PAOAMFTFR
                     PARAMFT^P
                     PARAMETFP
                     PARAUFTFR
                     PARAMFTfO
                     PADAMFTFP  |fl.
                     PARAMFTFP  37.
                     PARAMETER  ),.
                     PARAMFTEP  34.
                     PARAMETER  .19.
                     PARAMETER  41.
MFAW   i.nm
                                                   K ' 
                                                   X:
                                10.
                                         H6.0000
                                         37.0000
                                         16.3000
                                                         "FAN
                                                         MFAM
HFAOj
VFAN
"F AN
UFAN
                                                         MFAN
                                                               &.Sill
                                           ft:
                                                                      MJT
                                                  MTTS
                                                  MfTS
                                                  MITS
                                                  MTTS
                                                  ITS
                                                  HITS

                                                  MITS
                                                  MfTS
                                MIN
                                MJN
                                MIN
                                        .0*00
                                        .0000
                                       3.5000
                                       2.4000
                                     ?79.0flOO
                                       j.OOOO
                                        ,onon
                                        .7000
                                     ?46.1070
                                     733.0000
                                      ss.nooo
                                      ?3.onno
                                       3.6000
                                                                            CE
                                                                            CF
                                                                          AN
                                                                          ANC
                                                                           ANCE
                                                                           ANCF.
                                                                           AN
                                                                           AN
              VAR
              VAR
              VAP
              VAR
              VAR
              VAR
              VAR
              VAR
              VAR
              VAR
              VAR
              VAR
              VAR
              VAw pt*wt.   * > >
              VARIANCE  6?.0.
              VARIANCE   S.410
              VARIANCE  20.930
                                                        I ^ T,      i W l
                                                        ICE   4lM3
                                                        ICE 351.146
                                                      ANCF?B55.0?9
                                                      ANCE 468.S29    ..
                                                      ANCE10S3.929    S
                                                      ANCE     .050    S
                                                                           ANCE
                                                                           ANCF  7
                                                                                   .
                                                                           ANCE17?7.A7
                                                                                 6?. 066
SAMPLE SU
SAMPLE SU
SAMPLE SU
SAMPLE SU
SAMPLE SU
SAMPLF S"
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
1AMPLF
.SAMPLE
SAMPLE su.
SAMPLE SUE
SAMPLE SUE
SAMPLE SUE
SAMPLE SUE
                                                                                                   z
                                                                                                  UE
                                                                                   ll\
                                                                                                        I:
                                                                                                        6'

                                                                                                        I'-
                                                                                                        ll
                                     Table  28.   Site  115

-------


1ITE* 1?5
VFAB 7 TO 73
DY NO RESTRAINT
HOUR NO RESTRAINT
TYPE NO RESTRAINT
SIIHHAStN NO RESTRJNT
I OCAT10N NO RESTRAINT
rot'NTv NO gf.sTRA!NT
l(:,h foTf.L SOLUBLE PHOSPHORUS
3 >? TOTf L PHOSPHORUS


V''j KJFf'AHL Jl"WO<",f>' (Mft/U)
-?4 AMMONIA NITROGEN (Mfi/L)


j-fi NITPATE - NITPOC-EN IMO/L)
.-:)? DISSOLVED OXYGEN
3 13 TUPBIOITY IN JACKSON UNITS
XP9 TOTAL DISSOLVED SOL IOSIMG/L)








P,v
P'.

P*:
P..
PA
P,

P,'
p/
Pi*
P:.
PI
ft-
P ft
P*
> 10 TOTAL fTLTFPARLE SOLIDS (MS/
MI TOTAL VOLATIBLE SOLIPS (MG/L
> 1 n PH | fl
X>7 HARDNESS FROM CA ANO MG
/!& ALKALINITY AS CAC03
fMt CALCIUM MG/L
V39 MAGf-ESIl.'M MG/L
4! Pr.T*.SSI(!M MG/L
*!00 TIMF
i'AMFTEP IV. MFAN 1.499
A^ETER ?0f MfAN .990
AHGTEP ?2 ,MFAN ,990
--"ETER ??. MFAN 1.70V
AwfcTEP ?4. MFAN .536
AKETEP 25. MEAN .07?
; s-ETEP 2. MF.AN 5.737

vnTEP ?9* MFAM 303 ^13?
".ifTEP 30. MFAN 24.9>?n
: r. ' F T E P 31. M^AN 132.97?
MC'TFR i. ^FAN 7.9,11
'. -tTER 37. fFAN 251.21?
;*-ETEP 36. MFAN 260.3.'10
. ii'ETEP 3*5. MEAN *i.4oo
JMfTEP 39. MEAN 24.01ft
: .-.METEP 41. MEAN 7.600
VI







MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
7 *
T

PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMFTER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER

6.1600
.9800
5.3POO
3.7600
5.9400
.1500
11.2000
39.0000
441.0000
496.0000
20&.0000
9.6000
367.9120
391.0000
92.0000
40.0000
19.1000
TFST

19.
8:
23.
24.
25.
jl
29.
30.
31.
18.
37.
36.
38.
39.
41.

MIN
MIN
MJN
MIN
MlN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MlN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MlN


MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MFAN
MEAN
MFAN
MKAN
MEAN
MFAN
MEAN
MFAN
MFAN
MEAN
MFAN
MEAN
MF. AN
MFAN






2

165
1
82
7
67
2

1 j

il

1.499L.IMITS .374
.980L1MITS .000
.99f)LlMlTS .240
1.707LIMITS .186
.53RLIMITS .162
,07?LIMITS .018
5.737LI"ITS .922
6.7?6LIMITS 2.576
303.132LIMITS 15.378
24.921LIMITS 20.085
132.972LIMITS 9.940
7.981LIHITS .128
25l.23?LIMITS 16.732
260.3BOLIMITS 20.686
61.400LIMITS 4.297
- 24.000LIMITS 1.491
7.688LIMITS 1.075

.0170 VARIANCE 1.
.9800 VARIANCE
,090 VARIANCE 
.4000 VARIANCE .
.0750 VARIANCE .
.0300 VARIANCE .
.1000 VARIANCE 7.
.3000 VARIANCE 74.
.0000 VARIANCF3133.
.0000 VARIANCE5244.
.0000 VARIANCE 872.
.2000 VARIANCE .
.0000 VARIANCE3367.
.0000 VARIANCE5251.
.0000 VARIANCE 226.
.noon VARIANCE 27.
.9000 VARIANCE 14.


LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW

?8o
746
474
340
001
180
896
462
?67
<542
215
005
342
571
?65
744


,9ftO
.750
1.522
.377
.054
4.815
4.150
2ST.754

123lo33
7.854
234.500
239.694
57.103
22.509
6.613

SAMPlF
SAMPCC
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLF
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLF
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE


HIGH
HIGH
HIGH
HIGH
H I GH
HIGH
HISH
HIGH
HIGH
HIGH
HIGH
HIGH
HIGH
HIGH
HIGH
HIPH
HIGH

I7F
SI7E
SI7E
SI7E
SI7E
SI7E
SI7E
SI7E
SI7E
SI7E
SI7E
SI7F.
ST7E
SI7E
SI7E
SIZE


':
J m

9!
318^
45.
142.
n.
267.
281.
65.
25.
8.

56.
52.
55.
52.
18.
35.
46.
53^
52.
36.
53.
49.
50.
50.
50.
51.


229

700
090
659
30?
510
OOR
912
109
964
066
697
491
764

















Table 29.  Site 125  SUMMER

-------
  sms
  DAY
  MOUft

  TYPE
  LOCATION

  COUNTY.
  TOWNSHIP
 LONSlTUOr
 LATITUDE
           NO RESTRAINT
           NO RESTRAINT

           NO RESTRAINT
           NO RFSTPATNT
           NO PF'TRtINT
                                   10
  PARAMETER VALUE

  DEPTH
           NO PrSTPAINT

           NO RFSTRtTNT
        TOTAt
        KJEOAHL NJ         ,
        AMHONtA NITROOFN (MO/I )
      PHOSPHORUS
KJEOAHL NJTPORFN 
-------
VFAR 70 TO 73
MONTH 4 5
OAV MO RFSTRAINT
HOUR NO RESTRAINT
TVPF NO RrSTRAINT
BASIN NO RFSTRttNT
SURAASlN NO RESTRAINT
LOCATION NO RESTRAINT
COUNTV WO RESTRAINT
TOWNSHIP WO RESTRAINT
bONGITUOF NO RESTRAINT
ATltllPE NO RESTRAINT
PARAMETER VM.UF NO RESTRAINT
nFPTM WO RESTRAINT
6










"I" 50M)"IF OPTHO PHOSPHORUS (MQ/L)
xjo TOTAL SOLUBLE PHOSPHORUS
X?? TOTAt PKOSPHORUS
x?i KJFO&HL NITPORFN IMR/LI
X?4 AMMflMU NITPOfiFN (MR/LI
X2S NITRATf - NITROfiFN 9 RIVFB "UEAcF
X100 TIMF
PAPAMFTPp 19 MFAN 214
PARAMETER ?n! MEAN lOOO

PARAMETER ?sl MEN ll9s?
PARAMETER 24. MEAN .216
PARAMETER ?5. MEAN .410
PARAMETER 2. MFAN 5.575
PARAMETER 3. MFAN 9.467
PARAMETFR 29. MFAN 2A1.A33
PARAMETER 30. MEAN 25.556
PARAMETER 31. MEAN 1>4.50P
PARAMFTFR 16. MFAN 7.824
PARAMETFR 37. MFAN 219. R97
PAPAMETfP 36. MEAN 236.412
PARAMETER 38. MFAN 4R.R12
PARAMETFR 39. MEAN 23.765
PARAMETER 41. MEAN 6. 035








MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
7 R








T

PARAMFTFR
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMFTFR
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMFTFR
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMFTER


.5200
. QQOO
.6400
4.2800
.6000
.4100
9.0000
32.5000
389.0000
165.0000
145.0000
8.3000
25ft. 4550
269.0000
59.0000
27.0000
11.9000









TFST

19.
?? 
?1
?4.

p m
3.
5S:
31.
Ifl.
37.
36.
^A 
39.
41.


"IN

M N
M N
M N
M N
MIN
MIN
M;N
MTN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MTN
MIN








































































(.0%)

Mf AN
MEAN
MFAN
MFAN
MFAN
MFAN
MEAN
MEAN
MFAN
Mf AN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN








2
231

86

.21*LI
.pOOLI"

1 .9S?t IM
161* f M
01 IM
~~1 IM
9i*6TLlM
124I500LIM
7.H29LIM

?36ll?LIM
4fl.81?LIM
23.76ltIM
6.03SLIM




[TS .069
TS .000

i m OTQ
TS i499
TS .114
TS .000
TS 1^594
TS 5.334
TS 18.644
TS 19.167
TS 10.221
T
.153
TS 8.982
TS 9T273
TS ?.4T
TS .919
TS 1.780


.0340 VAR
.0000 VAR
.1260 V
IR
.9000 VAR
.0350 VAR
.4100 VAR


ANCF
ANCE
ANCE
ANCE 1
ANCF
ANCF
.4000 VARIANCE 6
.3000 VARIANCE 115
.0000 VAR1ANCF1405
.0000 VAR
.0000 VAR
7.2000 VAR
181.3220 VAR
208
38
.0000 VAR1
.0000 VAR
ANCE1485
ANCE 313
ANCE
ANCF 284
ANCE 325
ANCF 21

LOW
tow
ow
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW


.019
 if 0 0
 0?5
* ft 05
.042
.000
.291
.016
.323
.320
.500
.088
.237
.257
.629
21.0000 VARIANCE 3.191
1.6000 VARIANCE 11.960

.148
.flOfl

ll45f
.10?
Sin

4^131
263.190
Il4l?79
7.676


HI AH
HIGH
HIGH
HtKH

HTH

,?85
.000
.417
2.450
.330
.410
7.169
Hir-H 14.800
HIRH 300.477
HJRH 44.723
HlfiH 134.721
HIAH
7 * Ort ?
HIGH ??RlR79
227ln9 HifiH ?S'lA85
46.335

41256


SAMP) F
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAUPLF
SAMPLF
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLF
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
HIGH 51.290
HlfiH 24.683
HlfiH


SI7F 1

SI7T J
SI7E
SI7E
SI7F
ST7E
SI7F
SI7F
SI7E
SI7E
SI7C
SI7E
SI7E
SI7P
SI7E
5176
7.815


8.
8!
in-,
8.
5.
1 

B!
4.
I:
I:
fc
Table 31.  Site
SUMMER

-------
  HOUR
  IftCATIftN

  ffllJNTV
  TOWNSHTP
                         T"
                    MO
                       RFSTRATNT
                      K8
                      Nft
                      MO    	
                      NO RF'STRAfllT
                      NO KSTPfNT
                      NO BfSTPAIMT
  PARAMETER  *10
                      10 FSTO|MT

                      WO PFSTPAfMT
  "I*
  ?0
  X??
             LIRI f
             TAL S0| Ul r PHOSPHORUS
           TOTAL PMOSPMOPtl;
                          ('R/ui   PARAMFTFR
                            !"
                            r O 
  X?4
  to?
oo
  xin

  S?l
  X17

  *ia
  *io
  X4I
AuunVli 4|TOpfiFM
I|TPTF - '|TBfir,F
oismvFn OYOEM
THOBTOTTV rw JAC50* UNITS

TOTAL" FiiTrpApiE srii ins  
                            10. 10H
                 MFAN
 17.son
160.?00
  7.9Q6
?30.?09

"*;**)

  9^SS1
                  PAPAMFTFP
                  PARAMETER
                  PARAMFTFR
                  PARAMFTFR
                  PAPAMFTER
                  RARIMFTFR
                  PARAMFTFP
                  PARAMFTFO
                  PAPAMFTFP
                  PARAMFTFR
                  PARAMFTFR
                  PARAMFTFR
                  PARAMFTEP If*.

                   APAMFTER 41 I
                     MF AM
                     Mf'AN
                                    MAX
                                    MA
                            MAX
                            MAX
                            MAX
                            MAX
                            MAX
                            MAX
                            MAX
MAX
MAX
M*X
MAX
MAX
MAX
        .4900
        .0000

      loloooo

        loono
      11.5000
      31.0000
     300,0000
     143.0000
     pon.nooo
       t.mao
337.0000
 64.0000
 31.0000
 16.7000
                                                            MF AN

                                                            MFAN
                                                       3ol
                                                       11.

                                                       srl
                                                       T..
                                                          "FAN
                                                          MFI
                                                          MEAN
                                                          *&*7-A
                                                          MFAN  ?*
                             M M
                             M M

                             MTN
                                                      MIN
                                                      M[N
                                                      MTN
                                                        MIN
                                                        MfN
   .0440
   .0000
   .1440
  1.0?00
   .OSSO
   .001)0
   .sooo
   .sooo
   .0000
  ,.0000
1?).0000
  7.3000
 A*.0000
1*1.0000
 ?6.0100
 19.0000
  1.6000
                              MtTS
                              !?5
                              SHI
                              -ITS
                              MTTS
                              MJTS
                              wJTS
                                   MITS
                                   M|TS
                                   MTTS
                                   MITS
                                   MfTS
                                   MITS
                              VAR
                              VAR
                              VAR
                              VAR
                              VAR
                              VAR
                              VAR
                          LOW
                           .OW
                           ,OW
                    , .     _OW
                    .1SS  LOW
                    .ftOO  LOW
        .06?  Lf

        :J8  $
                                                                                             .14S
                                                                                             .000
                                                                                             ,7'M
                                                                                            1 .''i*
                                                                                             .1"?
                                                                                             .000
                   1:701  r.o-
                   4.%94  L0
                  ?3.413  LOW
                  IS.674  |.0w
                  I>-.?14  LOW 1'
                    ,17  un.
                  ?9.0i9  inw ?L	 ,
                  ?U 1)6  LOW ?is. |ss
                   S,f6?  LOW  49.0?S
                   I7?H  LOW  ??-HQ7
                   ?.M)  LOW
                                                                                    .010
                                                                                   !:SI?
            .000
      CF   7.933
VARIANCF  BS.31?
VARTAMCF??96.SOO
VARIANCE 993.'~
VARIANCE "57.
VAR
VAR
VAR
VAR
VAR
VAR
ANCF .]?9
ANCE?754.794
ANCF)71fl.640
ANCF 91.496
ANCF 10.S17
ANCE 25. oil
                                                                                             SAMP) P
                                                                                             SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
                   SAMPLE
                   SAMPLE
                   SAMPLE
                   SAMPLE
                   SAMPLE
                   SAMPLE
        4T1H
        MTr,M
        MfnH
        MTUH
        MTH
        MTRH
        HTRH
        MTRM
        HTRH
                                                                                                   ,000
                                                                                                           .oon
                                                                                                          7.661
                                                                                                         14.^09
                                                                                                        34?.. 11.
                                                                                            T.7P7
                                   .313
                                 11.174
                           HIRM 17C..4U
                           MtnM   <).OB
                           "TRH ?S9.?7
                                                          MTRM   S9.
                                                                                                     S17F
                                                                                                  ST7E
       ST7E
       SI7E
       SI7E
       SI7E
       ST7E
       ST7E
       ST7E
       SUE
                                                                  .3SO

S



P
O*
                                     Table 32.  Site  155   SW4MER

-------
  MTM
  ny
  HOUR
  "ASTW
  SUHflASlM
  LOCATION

  COUNTY
  TOWNSHIP
 IONC.ITUOF.
 LATITUDE
                      T?  T0   T2
                   NO HFSTRATNT
                   MO RFSTPMNT

                   NO PESTU/JINT
                   NO PFSTTNT
                   NO PFSTlNT
                   NO PESTRAINT
                      RFSTPAtNT
                   NO PESTRSINT
                   NO RfSTPMNT
                   NO
                   NO
  PARAMETER VALUE  NO PFSTPINT

                   NO RESTRAINT
                                                   T TF5T  I.05J
  X19   SOLU"LF OPTHO PMOSPMOPUS  (MB/L)
  X20   TOTAL SOLUPLF PHOSPHORUS
  X??   TOTAL PHOSPHORUS
ca
X?4
X?5
xo?
X03
X?9
X30

X18
X37
X36
X3fl
X39
X41
X99
xiOO
        POTASSIUM
        RIVER MJLfAGF
        TIME
                        Mf./L
                        MR/I
          19.
!',-OAMtTER 73.
PARAMETER ?4.
           i:
 4PAMETER 30.
IAPAMCTtR 31.
          $:
i-AfJAMETEP
        AMMONIA NITPOGFN  (Mr;/* )
        NITRATF - NITPOr.FN  (Mg/L)
        niSe.OlVFn OXYfiFN
        TURBIDITY IN JAC*SOM UNITS
        TOTiL niSSIIVFD SOI 70S  MG/L)
        TOTAL FILTFBABLC SOUOS  MG/L>
        TOTAL VOIATIBLT SOLIOS  ?
                          7.471
                        253.4B6
                        274.??6
                                           PAPAMFTFP 19.   MFAN
                                           PAPAMFTEP ?n.   MFAN
                                           PARAMETER ??.   MEAN
                                           PARAMETFR ?3.   MFAN
                                           PARAMETER ?4.   MFAN
                                           PARAMETER 2S.   MFAN
                                           PAPAMFTEP  ?.   "FAN
                                           PARAMETER  3.   MfAN
                                           PARAMETER 29.   MFAN
                                           PARAMETER 30.   MFAN
                                           PARAMETER 31.   MFAN
                                           PARAMETER Ifl.   MMN
                                           PAPAMFTEP 37.   MFAN
                                           PARAMETER 36.   MFAN
                                           PARAMETER 3fl.   MFAN
                                           PARAMETER 39.   MFAN
                                           PARAMETER 41.   MEAN
                         .19SLIMITS
                         .OOOLlMtTS
                         .24ALIMITS
                        1.149LIMITS
                         .42PLIMITS
                         .094LIMIT5
                        4.76PLIMITS
                       16.039L1MJTS
                     3?H.n?LiMiTS
                       14,079LIMITS
                     136,65?L IMJTS
                        7.471LIMIT5
                     P51.486L I MI TS
                     ?74.??>.t IMTTS
                       65 .L I MI T5
                       ?1 .f97L JMTTS
                        3.486LIMITS
                                                               .009
                                                               .000
                                                               .096
                                                               .140

                                                               :o2o7
                                                               .968
                                                              4.713
                                                             14.50R
                                                              3.735
                                                             10.485
                                                               .129
                                                             11.055
                                                              9.266
                                                              3.664
                                                               .834
                                                               .651
                                                            LOW
                                                            LOW
                                                            LOW
                                                            LOW
                                                            LOW
                                                            LOW
                                                            LOW
                                                            LOW
                                                            LOW
                                                            LOW
                                                            LOW
                                                            LOW.
                                                            LOW
                                                            LOW
                                                            LOW
                                                            LOW
                                                            LOW
                                  .10*
                                  .000

                                 U009
                                  .311
                                  .074
                                 1.794
                                11.3?*
                               311.624
                                10.344
                               126.167
                                 7.34?
                               24?.431
                               264.960
                                *. !?*
                                                                                                   "K-M
                                                                                                             .000
                                                                                                             .344
                                                       IN
                                                       IN
                         !i\
                            466
  3.2000
  1.9700
   .1600
 11.2000
 39.0000
499.0000
 5S.OOOO
169.0000
  4.7000
319.1450
311.0000
 AS.0000
 26.0000
  9.0000
                                                        MIN
                                                        MlN

                                                        MIN
                                                        MIN
                                                        MIN
                                                        MTN
                                                        MlN
                                                        MIN
                                                        MfN
                                                        MIN
                                                        MIN

                                                        MIN
   .0330
   .4000
   .0400
   .0600
   .9000
   .5000
259.0000
  2.0000
 75.0000
  7.0000
103.9440
199.0000
 47.0000
 18.0000
   .1000
                              VARIANCE
                                 tANCF
                                                                                      .on?
                                                                                        00
 ;oo<
 .093
 .Jfl2
 .130
 .001
6.477
VAHl	
VARIANCE
VARIANCE
VARIANCE
VARIANCE
VARIANCE
VARIANCE 166.169
VARIANCE1962.962
VARIANCE 130.075
VARIANCE 567.873
VARIANCE
VARIANCE 	
VARIANCE 642.247
VARIANCE  fi9.?9i
VARIANCE   4.RIO
VARIANCE   2.928
SAMPIF
SAMP} f
SAMPi F
SAMPLE
SAMPI.F
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLF
SAMPI E
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
                         ,544

                       slno
                      JO.7*?
                HlfiH 34?.639

                HIKH 147! 13/<
                MIP.M   7.601
                                                                                            ?.fl35
                                                                                                          2*3.49?
                                                                                                     Hfr.K  69.09J
                                                                                                     HK-M  22.731
                                                                                                     HIGH   4.137
41.


8:
29.

3l!
38.

35l


li-

ft
ST7F
SI7F
SI7E
SI7F
SI7F
ST7E
SI7E
SI7F
SI7E
SI7E
SI7IT
SI7F
SI7F.
SI7E
SIZE
                                    Table 33.  Site 160  SUKMER

-------
   ittes
   UAJ1N
   SURdAStN
   LOCATION
          NO RESTRAINT



          NO RESTRAINT
                    82
             SfllSilK
             {
                                    10
   PARAMETER VALUE
   OFTH
         NO RESTRAINT

         NO RESTRAINT
                                  T TFST  (.051
                        i IHG/LI
TOTAL pMoXpnoDos"3''"IHUa
KJFOAML NITROGEN (MC./L)
AMMONIA NITROCiEN (MG/L)
NITRATF - NITROfiFN (MO/LI
DISSOLVFO OXYCFN
TUCRIOITV IN JACKSON UNITS
TOTAL oissoivto soiins IMO/LI
TOTAL FU.TFPAHLE sot  tos \:PAMF.TE IB.
f 1UAMETER 37,
r-.TAMETCR 3ft.
O.-iiAMETER 3*.
>;AWETER 39.
P/3AMETER 41.
MEAN
MEAN
MFAN
MFAN
MFAN
MEAN
MEAN
MFAN
WFAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
              MG/L
              MO/L
                   .13
                   Iii
                  3.107
                 16.3*0
                331. ?1
                 J6.8'7
                157.75fl
                  7^356
                774.51^
                303.400
                 67.4*2
                 ?5.706
                  4.193
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
NAX
  PARAMFTFP 19.
  PARAMETER ?0.
  PARAMETER ??.
  PARAMETER 73.
  PARAMETER ?4,
  PARAMETER ?s.
  PARAMETER  ?.
  PARAMETER  3.
  PARAMFTFR 79.
  PARAMETER 30.
  PAHAMFTFP
  PARAMFTFR
  PARAMETER
                                           31c
                                           18.

                                 PARAMFtER  3ft!
                                 SARAMETPR  -
                                                     3fl.
                          PARAMFTFiR 39.
                          PARAMFTER 41.
  1.4300
   .1400
  6.7000
 50.0000
3R6.0000
 s?.oooo
196.0000
  7.6000
351.44AO
3D?. 0000
 08.0000
 32.0000
  4.9000
MIN
MJN
MIN
M(N
MIN
MIN
MlN
MIN
     MEAN
     MFAN
     MMN
     MEAN
     MFAN
     MFAN
     MFAN
     MFAN
     MF AN
     MFAN
     MFAN
     MFAN
     MEAN
     MEAN
     Mf AN
     MFAN
     MFAN
                                                                    60L
                                                              MIT
331.714L1MIT.
 16.HSTLIMITS
15/.750LIMITS
  7.3S6LIMITS

303:40nLjMITS
                              .  ITS
                             _IMITS
                        4.153L1M1TS
                                                             11
                                                             2?
                                                                                ,
                                                                                .19
                                                                                .3n
                                                                                ,7fl
                                              81
                                            . 8f
                                            i571
                                            .939
                                          15.004
                                            .189
                                          27.851
                                          62:??J
                                           J:22?
                                                                                      LOW
                           LOW
                           LOW
                           COM
                           LOW
                           LOW
                           LOW
                           LOW
                           .OW

                           !OM
                           .OW
                           .OW
                           .OW
                           LOW
                                                                                   .044
   .0340
  1,0800
   .OSOO
   .0800
  1.4000
    3000
	0000
 10.0000
177.0000
  7.0000
716.7800
741.0000
 51.0000
 70.0000
  7.3000
VARIANCE
VARIANCE
VARIANCE
VARIANCE
VARIANCE
VARIANCE
VARIANCE   	
VARIANCE ?61.656
VARIANC?1R7.950
VARIANCE 116.13?
VARIANCE 557.659
VARIANCE    .060
VARIANCE1431.038
VARIANCE7S81.800
VARIANCE 107.603
VARIANCE  14.971
VARIANCE    .603
                   308.775
                    14.636
                   14?.746
                     7^167
                   751.666
                   740.319
                    61.343
                    73.716
                     3.69?
SAMPir
SAMPCf
SAMPIF
SAMPLE
SAMPIF
SAMPLE
SAMPIF
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
f AMPLE
 AMPLE
SAMPLE
                                                                                    OH
                                                                                    AH
                                                                                    AH
                                                                                    AH
                                                                                    r,H
                                                                                    H
                                                                                    6H
         HlfiH
         HI AH
        HIBH

         HlftH
         MJfiH
         Mff,H
         MffiM
         HIGH
                                                                                                           .00
                                                                                                           .40
                                                                                       366.481
                                                                                        73.580
                                                                                         4.6|4
                                         if;
                                         14.
                                         'li
                                         'I:
                                     Table  3h.   Site  160  FALL

-------
                            TO
     -PUP
                          rvT
                          KT

                          BFTWAIMT
                       V'
                                t.T
                                                        T T>
00
                      IK
     V5I    TrtTfll.
     r '.    * I a
     t* ^ T
     > -> r
     V 4ft
     5*i
                     SOLOS

                   c  A>O  MB
                     wft/f
                     *"?/(
           1".
           ?p.

PAQA~MFTrP  ?*\
PAPAMFTFP  ?4.
PAPAMFTFP  ?;.
                                         PAPAMFTFP  10
                                                'FP  31
           \":
PfPAMFTFO  ^q.
PARAMFTFO  41.
                                                                             TVTT1,
                                                                             IMITS
                                                                             T^ff.
                                                                             I" ITS
                Mt *M

                MffAW


                MFANl
                "f AN ?M(1.K^7|;T''ITS
                U A>l IftS.T'-QJ fMlT^
                Vf'ANi  >}4 ,400| t MI TS
                              1MITS
                                                                                .04?
                                                                                              .*
                                                                                       1 <
                                                           tllfjt
                                                           ir.M
                                                           Mf AM
                                                                               1.707
                                                                              ta . h ' f.
                                                                                      A i.
                                                                                     1T.O?7
       IS.
       14..1
        3.
                                             to*


                                             10.
                      *.**

                      7!
                                                                                                           nir.H
                                                                                                                   ."09
                                                                                                                 f )
                                                                                                    MICH   #,
  r,; r.
  t rr/.
  ff ic
'FTFO 17
                    Mf ttt
                    Vrltf,
                         ,'*'<
                         .no
                             6  , ' (1 f>
                                         "in
                                        MAX
  .1030
  .0000
  .3000
  .MOO
  .oor.o
                                              ?A*.0000
                                        "*
                                        VA
                                                .?ono
                                        MAX
                                        r?.r,oop
                                                           "IN
                                                           MTN
           MJN
           MfM
           MJN
                                                              .oonn
                     .AOOO
                     .Oi^O
                     .oono
                    3.SOOn
                    7.0flOO
                   ?.oooo
                  90.0000
                   7.POOO
                                                                    .nono
                                                                                >jirF
                                                                              VApfftNCF
VAPJANCF
VAPIANCF
VARIANCF
VARIANCF.
                              VARIANCF
                              VAPIANCF
                              V4RIAMCF
                              VARIANCF
                              VAPIANCF.
                              VAPIANCF.
                              VARIANCF
                                                                                           000
                                                                                           0?*.
                    SAMPI F SI7F

                    SflHOLF
                                                                                                  SI7F
                                                                                                  SI7F

                                                                                                F SI7F
                           SI7F
                    SAHP1F SI7F
                    SAMPJ F SI7F/
                         F ST7F
                                                                                           SAMPLF  SI7F
                                                                                           SAMPI F  SI7t
$'
 l:
13'.
1*1
1*.
13.
 9.
13.
!?:
13.
                                         Table 35.   Site 200  SUKMER

-------
   ;ITtS
   vr*n
   *,
   

   1 VPF
   S>55W%w
   t-OCATION
    lOIT
   -.m
                    70  TO  73
                 MO  RFSTHAtNT

                 HO  F*TPAINT

                 MO  RFStPATNT
                 MO  PFSTPAINT
                 Ml
                 NO  RFSJRMNT
                 NO  RESTRAINT
                 NO  PFSTRAfMT
                 NO  RFS1WAIWT
  MOJMETF*

  MPTM
                 WO RFSTRAfNT

                 MO PFSTRAINt
   1 19    SOiuaL? ORTHO PHOSPHORUS  (R/L)
   >0    TOTAL :;
   W
 11
    IDS
r*(
      AMMCI* NttCPF.N  I Mr,/) I
      HTTRATf - WITOGN
PAPAMFTFR 19.

PAPAMfTEP >?I
  	  ?1.
                                                        MFAM
                              HfjfTS
                                 .-31HMtTS
                                     ..0
-------
    ,TVPF

    '..->, I w
  ?'< TO   7.1
   ,j       5
                                        10
\0 PFSTHATNT

NO OFST"AIrjT

MO JFSTPATNI

M>
                                                        T TFST   (.OS)
     * ! a   SPI
     r:>1   TfT&l
     f?7   TPT'I
                                                          19.
           OTSSOI
Oo
                            soi in -  ,  ... _.
     * I ~    ininr  "I" I'-r'** i_r  SOI iHS  11* T fl* I
     , .t    TnTC.l. vr.LAf'HE SOLIOS  (MG/L)
                 S<
                 * y i
              CT"-
    CA  Air>
    C*C')3
           PTv/o
   Pt -;
   p/.-t w*
Pl iS'Jf TfP  ?4.
P. a/
P; '.
p."ij-FTFP   3.
p, .-;
P! .- I
p. -.--'FtFp  ii;
P.':/.fTFO  1*.
P,- -.'. v'TFP  17.
P.',I"? IT P  1*>.

P; ia-'f TFP  39,
Of - . wFTF  4 I ,
                                .444
                                .000
                     vftw
                     "FAM
                     *'FW
                     Ti1*
                            2?7.*37
.100
.000
                   MAX
                   MAX
                   MAX
                   MAX
                   MAX
                   MAX
                   MAX
                   MAX
                   MAX
                   MAX
                   MAX
                   MAX
                   MAX
                   MA*
                   MAX
                   MAX
                   MA*
                         PPAETFO
                         PAOAMFTFP
  i.e?oo
   .0000
   .96SO
  4.7&00
   .9000
   .0000
  fl.OOOO
 4S.SOOO
6P4.0000
los.oooo
31)9.0000
  9.1000
   .0000
   .0000
   .0000
   .0000
   .0000
                                         f AM
                                         FAN
                                                               Mf AH
                                               PAPAMFTFO
                                               PAPATTFO
                                               PAPAMFTFO
                                    31.
                                    it.
                                               PAPAMFTFP 10,
                                               PAPAMFTfP 41,
                 "FAM
                 MFAM
                 MFAT.J
                 MF AN
                 MF AM
                                                        MIM

                                                        MIM
                                                        MIN
                         .OOftl.

                        l!l7H
                                                      "IMITS
                                         "FAH  ?S.S'.7l T^ITS
                                                                       LOW
                                                                       LOW
                                                                       LOw
                                                                       LOW
                                                                         .,, IMTTS
                                                                     . .   >I.ITTS
                                                                     .OOni  [M| TS
                            MIN
                            MIN
                            MIN
                            MIN
                            MIN
                            MIN
                            MIN
  .oino
  .0000
  .1140
 l.ooo
  ,P00
  .0000
 6.noon
 7.ono
3.oooo
lo.nooo
J7.0000
                                                           MIN
  .onoo
  .0000
  .0000
  .0000
  .0000
                                        .?01   LOW
                                        .000   LOW
                                                       .S.I 7

                                                       Inoo
                                                      7,>i?4
                                                     l.f--
                                                     51.-
                                                     1?.'
                                                     11.1
                                                       .?iSi
                                                       .001)
                                                       .000
                                                       .000
                                                       .non
                                                       .000
                          LOW
                          LOW
                          LOW
                          LOW
                          LOW
                          LOW
                          LOW
                          LOW
                                                                                                  .1.11
                                                                                                  .ono
                                                                                                  .S14
                                                                                                 ?.f(34
                                                                                                  .1?*.
                                                                                                  .000
411. t
 IS.411

  Tls.14
   .000
   ,000
   .000

   looi
                                                                                                           Hf CM
                                                                                                        Mf.-,H



                                                                                                        MfftM
VABTANCF
VAPIANCF
VAPIANCF
VAPIANCF
VAPIANCF
VAP-IANCF
VARIANCF
VAtANCF.
lift
.OS?

loso
.000
.7?0
?03.167
VAPrNCF**
VARIANCF S63.796

VARIANCE'
VARIANCE
VARIANCE
VARIANCE
VARIANCE
VARIANCF
1S7*^  ft 6?
' .064
.000
.000
Inno
.000
SAMPl.F
SAMPLf
SA MPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPlF
SAMPLE
SAMPl F
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLF
SAMPLE
%\7t
*> t 7F
S I 7f
SI7F
SI7f
SI7E
ST7E
si/e
S I 7F
SI7E
SI7F
SI7E
SI7E
S17F
SI7E
                                                                                             ,000
                                                                   1S.O?4
                                                                   40.SIS
                                                                   ".0.71?
.!>. n.
 .000
 .000
 .000
 .000
 .000
                                                                                  16.
                                                                                   0.
                                                                                  16.
                                                                                  16.
                                                                                                                  2.
                                                                                                                  6.
                                                                                                                 16.
                                                                                                                 16.
                                          Table 37.   Site  210  FALL

-------
     yr*P
     Trof

     ftASfn
     SIlS
     lOCATION
             7} TO  J

           Ml R>STAT*T
           NO RFSTP*INT

           NO PfSTOAINT

           NO BFST&AINT
           M)
           NO
                      tt 88*58181
                      s
    . PAOAMPTFP VHHF

     PiFPTM
     >

     ?4
     7^
           NO PF.TINT

           "0 FS
*.!*OAH( MTJPfiEN   nr*r S^t 1**S  (MO/LI
TOTAL HI TfrAftLF SOI. IDS  tyfi/L
Tf'Al . VOI ATIHlf SOI. IOS  CMO/LJ

    Sw?.
                                               PAPtMFTFP  .10.


                                               PARAMFTf-P  4) !
                                          FAV
                                          vt \\
                                          uf A


                                          wr AN

                                          vf (n
                                          Mi* >l
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                                                .oono
                                               ?.?nno
                                               6.4AOO
                                                .0700
                                                .0000
                           9.
                          21.
                          JT.
    0000
   .OOOO
   . oono
331.0000
  A. 4000
3SS.A940
391.0000
 71.0000
 44.0000
 13.6000
 I"
 IN
 TN
MTN
MlN
MfN
MTN
MIN
MIN
MTN
                                          Cf 4k,
                                                   "FAN
                                                   V AM
                              .1-ITS


                                MIT^

                                M'?S
                        til'-nn) TMfTS
                        T . ft* ttmt ** T T*
                       *f.OA^||WT75
                       14.44*!.'TM|T
                       	T*MT.


                              .IMITS

                              "t"T
  .nnno
  ,310ft
 2.7000
  .loon
  .onoo
 *.snoo
 Z.sooo
 4.ROOO
 '.0000
  .0000
  .7000
  .3100
71.0000
SO.0000
10.0000
 6.040A
         .4n
         .000

        itojl

         loo*
        4.OS?
       11.S34
       i.l.OTJ
                                                                9.094
               L0
               LOW
               tnw
               t.ow
               LOW
VAPTANCF
VAPlANCF
VARTANCF

VAPlANCF
VARTANCF
VAPTANCF
VAPlANCF
                                                                              X
                                                                             ,
                                                                             1.79
                                            .000
                                           A. 487
                                          S5.77S
                                                                            VARTANCF
                                                                            VARI*WCF
                                                                            VARIANCE
                                                                 110.
                                                                 139.
VARIANCIT
VARIANCE
VARIANCE
                                   l
                             7S.D67
                             ?3.9B?
                              6.H46
SAMP) F
SAMPI.F
SAMPt F
SAP| F
SAMPLE
SAMPLF
SAMPLF
SAMP) F
SAMPl F
SAHPI.F
SAMPI.F
SAMPI.F
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLf
SAMPLE
                           R17E
                           S17F
                           S17F
                           ;I?F
                           SI7E
                           S17F
                           SI7F
                           ST7F
                           S17E
                           S17F
                           SI7F
                            113
                                                                                           8:
                                         Table 38,   Site 215  SUKMER

-------
       YFP
       r\V
       HCM|


       TVPF
     7( TO  71
            >
   "O PFTOf fMT
   tin PC 5 TO A TIT
                                                         T  TF<:T
       X?    Tf>TAI. I

       v?4    AwipufA MtTrnr.FM (ur./t )
       W01
             Tr>TAi.
             UNITS
            ns  (Mfi/L)
            rn<;
             fi3niF<;;
SO
       1O
       100
           | R

    PARAMFTI'R
    PiOAMFTFR  SI.
    PAPAMETI'P  J.
    PARftMFTVP  37.
    "APiMFtrR  16.
    PAP4MFTFP  41.
     CA  Ain  M
        f>1
        !,/(
                      MFAN
MFAN
MFAN
MFAN
MFAN
MFAN
MFAM
MFAN
                                .oon
                                ,AM
                              1".   MFAM
                   PAPAMFTTP  IT.   UFAN
                   PAPAMFTFR  i*.   "FAN
                   pfPflMFTFD  30.   FAM
                   PAPAMPTFD  1O.   vfAM
                   DAPAMFTFP  41.   MFAM
                                                                        .007)
                                                                 .440  tOW


                                                                 .1??  I.OW
                                                                        .0001 T1T^
                                                          .010
                                                          .00"   IPW
                                                          .000
                                                                       , ^1*   MfSH
                                                                       anoo   wren
                                                          -.077
                                                           .001
                                                           .000
                                                           .000
                    l.S64n
                     .0000
                    I.4000
                    4.9ROO
                    P.9000
                     .0000
                     .0000
                     .0000
                  MTN
                  MTN
                  MTN
                      .44AO
                      .onoo
                      ,?040
                     3.1000
J?S.OOOO
133.0000
   .0000
                                     MTN
                                     MINI
                                     MTN
                                     MTN
                                     MR'
                                                                    .0000
                     .0000
                  A4.0000
                  43.0000
                    7.6000
*!N

MTN
   .noon
i*R.nnon
 10.0000
17?,ooon
   .noon
                                                                    .0000
                                                                   i.nnoo
                                                                   >.oonn
                                                                                    ">.'
                                                                                             LOW
                                           is.
                                    MtT;    .000
                                   l_fM!TS  49.Pi)?
                                    TWITS    .000
                                                                              "IT*   fi.OAP
                                                                            .IMIT<   4.80?   |OW
                                                                             TUfT*
                                                                                             LOW
                                                        VARTANCF
                                                        VARIANCF
                                                        VAPTANCF
VARJANCF     .000

             !s3?

             .noo
             .coo
VARIBNCF     .000
VARlawCF
VARTANCF10ST.750

VARIANCF     ,fK)0
             ,S6S
             ,000
VARIANCE  41,?3fl
VARIA^JCF  40.SOO
VARIANCF.    1.
                                                                                                   4.43?
                                       0^  I.OW   44. |h?  "TOM
                                              LOW  ]Hn.S
-------
flflf
                  Ml
TEAR 70 T 73
MONTN i  
OAT NO RESTRAINT
MOUII NO RESTRAINT
TVPt NO RESTRAINT
MAS tN NO RESTRAINT
fUMAtfW NO RESTRAINT
LOCATION NO RESTRAINT
COUNT* NO RESTRAINT
TOVNSNIP NO RESTRAINT
LQNOITUOe NO RESTRAINT
LATITUDE NO RESTRAINT
ARAMETER VALUE NO RESTRAINT
MPTN NO RESTRAINT
1* SOLUBLE ORTKO PHOSPHORUS (MO/LI
170 TOTAL SOLUBLE PHOSPHORUS
X22 TnTAt PHOSPHORUS
X73 KjfOAHl NITROflEN INA/LI
X24 AMMONIA NITROGEN I*B/1
X2 NItPATE - NIT00CEN IM6/L)
xoz DISSOLVED OXTCEN
XOI TimsiOITY IN JACKSON UNITS
X2 TftTAL DISSOLVED SOLTftS (HO/LI
K30 TOTAL EILTCRARLE SOL IBS (Ma/LI
131 TOTAL VOLATIOLE SOL I ft $ (MO/LI
XI* PH LA9
X37 HARDNESS FRQM CA AND MO
X3* AlfALlNtTY AS CAC03
131 OI.CIUM I.S/L
X3* MAGNESIUM MA/L
X41 PATASSIUM Mfl/L
 RIVER MILEAGE
x| 00 TIME
PARAMETER; i*. MEAN .031 MAX
PARAMETER 20.
PARAMETER 22.
PARAMETER 23.
PARAMETER 74.
PARAMETER 29.
PARAMETER 2.
PARAMETER. 3.
PARAMETER 2*.
PARAMETER 30.
PARAMETER 31.
PAMAMETrR IB.
PARAMETER 37.
PARAMETER 1*.
PARAMETI.'R 31.
PARAMETER 3V.
PARAMETER 41.
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
.044
.0*1
.774
.7*4
.000
9.716-
4.1m
259.636
13.AO*
111.474
1.004
210,617
214. (124
44.779
21.103
3.303
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
 7
T
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAPFTFR
PARAMETER
PARAMOUR
PARAMfTfR
PARAMFTEP
PARtKfTFP
PARAMETER
PAPAMFTrP
PARAMFTER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
.0410
.2750
2.5*00
.0400
.0000
17.2000
!.ooco
304.0000
51.0000
195.0*00
1.5000
25****0
250.0000
3.0000
29*0000
1.7000
Table ho.
TEST (.05)
1*. MEAN .03IUMITS
20. MEAN .09*L1M|TS
22. MEAN .Q4L|M|TS
23. MEAN .T74LIMITS
24. MEAN .7.64L1HITS
25. MEAN ,OOOL|MITS
7. MEAN *.7iM.iMtTS l
3. MEAN .I**L1M|TS 1
74. MEAN 7S4.63M.tM1TS 4
30. MEAN I3.*OM.1M]TS 3
31. MEAN IM.4T4L1MITS 13
l. MEAN N.004LIMITS
37. MEAN 210.1TL)MIIS 
3*. MEAN 2l4,124LI*
-------
StTfS
300
YFA 70 TO 73
MONTH a 9 10
OAY NO P.F.STPAINT
HOUR NO RESTRAINT
TYPE NO RESTRAINT
BASIN NO RESTRAINT
SU^ASIN NO RESTRAINT
LOCATION MO RESTRAINT
COUNTY NO RESTRAINT
TOWNSHIP NO RESTRAINT
LONGITUOE NO RESTRAINT
LATITUDE NO RESTRAINT
PARAMETER VALUF NO RESTRAINT
OEPTH NO RESTRAINT
X19 SOLUBLE ORTHO PHOSPHORUS (MG/U)
*20 TOTAL SOLUTE PHOSPHORUS
177 TflTAI PHOSPHORUS


X?3 KJEDAHL NITROGEN (Mfi/L)
X24 AMMONIA NITROGEN (MG/L)


X2S NITPATE - NITROGEN MQ/L)
X02 DISSOLVED OXYGEN
X03 TUPRIOITY IN JACKSON UNITS











-

o
r:

!'
r-
r-
X29 TOTAL OISSOLVFD SOLIDS
X30 TnT*L FJITEPAHIE SOLIDS
3t TOTAL VOLATILE SOL I OS
1 PH LAP
X37 HAPDNE^S FRO" CA AND MG
X36 At "/'LlNITY AS CAC03
X38 CritCIUM KG/L

X41 POVASSIiJM MG/L
x99 RIVFP MILEAGE
xlOO TIME
cOAyfTER J9. MEAN .170
'"AMtT^Q * 0. MEAN ,000

 liAvETEP /'Si MEAN 1.341
.'.F'AMETER ?4. MEAN .269
-lOAMETER 25. vEA'M ,000
^ A ME TEP 2, MEAN 7,900
. HAMSTER 3. MF/.N 13.~f.lO
'buMFTFP ^0* VTAN Ti*S'50
SAwFTFP ^1* MFV.N 134*773
?4METR 18. MEAN 8.043
-^/ivfTEP. 37, M/,N 232.059
'.oiMETEP- ?6, MEAN 215.333
UAKE'TEP 39* MFAN 24^92
.-PAMETEP 41. MEAN 3.876
(MG/L)
 
3"!
?9 
30.
31.
1 ft 
37.
36.
3^ .
39 .
41.


MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
WIN
MIN
MlN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
(.05)
MFAN .170LIMITS
MFAN .OOOLIMITS
MFAN .339LIMITS
MFAN
MFAN
MFAN
MFAN
MFAN
MtAN
MFAN
MFAN
MFAN
MtAN
MEAN
MFAN
MEAN
MEAN




6
213
8
91
185
170
38
21
1.341LIMTS
269L1MITS
.OOOLIMITS
7.900L1MITS 2
13.700LIMITS 13
?97h40l_IMIT$ 19
35.520LIMITS 13
134.773LIMJTS 12
8.0411 IMITS
232.0S9LIMITS 10
21S.333LIMITS 27
52.M9LIM1TS 2
24.79?LIMITS 1
3.876LIMITS


.0100 VARIANCE
.0000 VARIANCE
.0200 VARIANCE
3500 VARIANCE
.0350 VARIANCE
.0000 VARIANCE
.0000 VARIANCE
.05S
.000
.095
.245
.089
.000
.291
1365
.279
.139
.206
.822
.117
.859
.155
.511




fc


3l
.3000 VARIANCE 173.
.0000 VARIANCE7200.
.0000 VAPIANCE1034.
.0000 VARIANCE
,7000 VARIANCE
.4380 VARIANCE
.0000 VARIANCE
.0000 VAPIANCE
.0000 VARIANCE
.8000 VARIANCE
749.
534'
667.
39.
7.
1.
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW


014
000
043
336
045
000
405
268
573
843
327
050
709
467
448
476
530
.000
.244
1.C9-S
.180
.000
-111 6
278.275
?? 24 1
122.634
7.8.17
221.237
188.216
49.760
23.637
3.365


SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE

MlGM
HIGH

HIGH
HIGH
HIGH
HIGH

HIGH
HIGH

HIGH
HIGH
HIGH


SI7E
SI7E
SIZE
SIZF
S17F
SIZE
SIZE
SIZE
SI7E
SIZE
SIZE
SI7E
SIZE
SIZE
SIZE
SIZE
1 000
.434

Issa
.000
10. m
317*005
48.799
146.912
8.7*9
242.881
242.450
55.478
25.946
4.387


?J*
2ll
I:
6.
25.
?5
6l
21.
24.
25.
                               Table Id.  Site 300 FALL

-------
   SITES
   HOUR

   TYPE
   .JiNSHIP
 tHWBF
                  400

                   TO TO  T|

                 NO RESTRAINT
                 NO RESTRAINT

                 NO RESTRAINT
                 NO RESTRAINT

                    REStEilN
PARAMETER VALUE  NO RESTRAINT

DEPTH            NO RESTRAINT
                                                  T TEST  (.OS)
                                 IMO/L)
        TOTAL PHOSPHORUS
        KJEOftHL NITROGEN  (MO/LI
        AMMONIA NITROGEN  (M6/L)
        NITRATE - NITHOOEN  CMG/L)
        DISSOLVED OXYGEN
               E SOLIDS (MG/L)
                SOLIDS (MO/LI
                                       PARAMETER 19.
                                       PARAMETER 20.
                                       PARAMETER ??.
                                       PRAM|TER
                                       PARAMETER
                                       PARAMETER
                                       PARAMETER
                                       PARAMETER
                                       PARAMETER
PH
HAHDJltSS FROM CA AND MO
ALKALINITY AS CACOS
CALCIUM         MO/L
MAONfSIUM       NG/L
POTASSIUM       MG/L
RIVER MILEAGE
I 1 Kc
PARAMETER
PARAHcTER
PARAMETER
PARAMETtR 	
PARAMETER 24.
PARAMETER 25.
PAHAHETtR  .
PARAMCTf R 29.
PAftAMETIS 3D.
PARAMETER 31.
PtPAKtTffl 10.
PARAMF.TfR 37.
PARAK^TfR 36.
Pif.AKtTlR 38.
PARAMETCR 39.
PARANCT1.R 41.
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
M#N
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
Mr AN
M'c'AN
MEAN
MEAN
                                                     o.
                                                    'I:
                                       PARAMETER 3
                                       PARAMETER 3..
                                       PARAMETER Hi.
                                       PARAMETER 37.
                                       PARAHFtgff 36.
                                       PARAMirtfR 35.
                                       PARAMETER 34.
                                       PARAMETER 41.
    MEAN
    MEAN
    MEAN
    MEAN
    MEAN
    MfAN
    MEAN
    MEAN
    MEAN
    MEAN
    MEAN
    MEAN
    MEAN
    MEAN
    MEAN
    MEAN
    MEAN
                                 MAX
                                 MAX
                                 MAX
                                 MAX
                                 MAX
                                 MAX
                                 MAX
                                 MAX
                                 MAX
                                 MAX
                                 MAX
                                 MAX
                                 MAX
                                 MAX
                                 MAX
M N
M N
M N
M N
M N
M N
M N

B"
M
M
M
M
M
M
                                                                      MITS
VAR.
VAR:
VAR:
VAR:
VAR:
VAR:
VAR:
VAP
VAR
VAR
VAR
VAR
VAX
VAR
VAR1
VAR
VAR
                                                                      ,000
                                                                                           .021
                                                                                           M
                                                                                          ':!
                                                                                           :2I?
                                                                                           .054
                                                                           ANCE
                                                                            CE
                                                                                          AMP
                            6H
                            RH
                            6H
                            OH
                            r,H
                          HI OH
                          MICH
                          HIGH
                          HIGH
                          HIGH
                          MIfiH
                          HIRH
                          HIGH
                          HIGH
                          Hi OH
                          HIGH
                          HIGH
                                                                                                          036
                                                                                  AMPLE
                                                                                  AMPLE
                                                                                  AMPLE
                                                                                  AMPLE
                                                                                  AMPLE
                                                                                  AMPLE
                                                                                  AMPLE
                                                                                  AMPLE
                                                                                  AHPL
                                                                                  AMPLl
                                                                                  AMPLI
                                                                                  AHPLI
                                                                                                          9Z6
                                                                                  AMPLJ
                                                                                  AMPLI
                                    Table h2.   Site 1^00 SUXMER

-------
 SITES

 YtAB
 MONTH
 DAY
 HOUR

 TYPE

 BASIN
 SURBASIN
 LOCATION

 COUNTY
    .
 ONCIT'JDE
 ATITUDE
                     400

                      70  TO   T3
                       6       9
                    NO RFS7R6TNT
                    NO RESTRAINT

                    NO RESTRAINT

                    NO RFSTRA1NT
                    NO RFSTRAiNT
                    NO NESTMAINT
                    NO qrSTfX.INT
                    MO (:fsrnAINT
                    NO KiSWINT
                    NO nt.SfRMNT
            10
 PARAMCTrR VALUE  NO RESTRAINT

 DEPTH             NO RESTRAINT
                                                     T TCST  J.05)
X19
x?o
X??
X23
X?*
X?5
xo?
X03

X30
X31
xie
X37
X36
X jR
X39
X41

X100
        SOIUBLF
        TOTAL  r.OLu::t.t
        TCTfL
                      PHOSPHORU
            ..                MG/L)
       OI'JSO'.VFD (.XVCiN
       TlHMUiTY IN .JAC'CJON UNITS
       TOTAL  tUSSOfVfD SOLIDS  CMG/L)
       TOT/.L  FILTEhAl.LE SUt.IOS  
       TCTAL  voLAtibLt SOLIDS  (MG/D
       PH  Ll !
       H(l'l.;..'SS FROM CA fltlO MS
       At!(,M IMJTY *S CAC0.1
       CJ:CIS.M         I::./L
       M/.O.Ki SIUK       H>i/l
       PCT/.S--IUSJ       KG/L
          3.
AMAltfi i
   f.1. vi a
V,n/./:' T; ? 37.
>(<,'.>.>. r,'t i.
W.Mtf.'Ti'? ?.P.
          ->.
                  Kr'AM
                  C/AN
                 V ',. AM
  5.^00
  1.360
2115.727
  .455
.^6.300
  7.',90
1H.13*
             MAX
             MAX
             MAX
             HAX
             MAX
             WAX
             !:*<
                                    MAX
MAX
n.rx
M/.X

MAX
KAX
                                            PARAMETER it,
                                            P*gJM|TfR ?*.
                                            PARAHT..P ?,^.
                                            PARAHJt ?J.
                                            PARAMFTPP ?'..
                                                  f       .
                                            PAHAKtTCR  ?.
                                            PAWA;!T-.R  3.
                                            PARAUrtrR ?<*.
                                            PAnAHCTiR 30.
                                            PARAKETFP 3!.
                                                   -n in.
                                                    '
                                                  ,     ..
                                            PfiF.A".fTi-f  1-6.
                                            p*ffft;?tr?.r>  3.1.
                                                       MSri
                                                       MIN
                                                       KlU
                                         III

                                         ISQ'.?CV$
                                         J7T.OC59
                                          4:.CiCO
                                          16.?CUO
                                                      MJM
                                                      MiN
                                   MfAM
                                  TUM TS
                                  ---U--- YS
                             96.50HL TNITS
                                               ..
                                   KFA.N J -j-"!. OrtfL J'll TS
                                   MCAN  4i.>o5i  MJTS
                            Ic?oo



                          3*1>COP
                                                    LOW

                                                     3H    ;. lifGO
                                                                             m  ^7-
    003
   .100
   .022
   .602
 ts.iseo
  T.P.10

157:473
126.944
    334

 a6i?.-.6
                                    Table  h3.   Site aOO   FALL
                                                                              MI6M
 7.*?.",


38170*
IS.L'O/
 2.191
                                                                 HIGH
                                                                 HIGH
                                                                 HIGH
                                                                 Kt'!M
                                                                 HTfrM
                                                                 MfGM
                                                                 HJf.H
   .037

   I?!o
  1.594
   .630
   .170
 4l!377
  3.034
Z17.092
 17.019
104.471
  7.95?
177.03?
174.434

 1SI97S
  2.flfl2

-------
    MTE*
    HOUR

    TVPt
    LOCATION
   tATlllOE
                      40*1
                     NO
                     no
           MO
           NO

           K3
           MO
           MO
                          TO
    OFP1M
           NO hFST*
          TOTAL
       OI
                  OPTHO
                   URL E
                                                                   TS
          NfTPATF -
TdPRIOITr If. JACKSON ONITS.
TOTAL OfSSOtv0 SOLtOS  (*I6/L
TOTAL FlLTFtJAMLf SOI IOS  IMO/i)
TflTAl VOLATJMLC SftL f OS  (M)/LT
PH t AH
           QH CA AMD Mr,
           AS CAC03
MARNES1U"
POTASSIUM
^IVF.U -HlLtAf.e
TIME
  PARAMETER
  PARAMETER
PARAMETER 23.
PARAMETER 24.
PARAMETER 2*.
PARAMETER  2.
PARAMETER  5.
PARAMETER 29.
CAPAMETER 30.
PARAMETER 31.
PARAMETER 18.
f'ARAMETER 37.
PARAMETER 36.
PARAMETER 31.
PARAMETER 39.
S'ARAMETEfl 41.
                             .
                          K6/L
                                                                                 .niu
                                                                                 .000
                                                                                 ,1/lr
                                                                                    *9
                              062
                                                       M N
                                                       M
                                                       M N
                                                       M
                                                       M
                                                       MIN
   ,o?on

   t0400
   .0700

  l:mi
14A.OQOO
  1.0000
 A*.0000
  T.3000
 AS.0000
 1H.OOOO
 19.0000
 13.0000
   .8000
                                                                                rlI2S
                                                                               ?l.i3A
                                                                               f?:te
                                                                                2:*f
VAR
VA
VAM
VAR
VAR
VAR
VAR
VAR
VAR
VAR
VAR
VAR
VAR
VAR
VAR
VAR
                           10
                           LOM
                           to*
                           L0
                                                                                        L0
                                                                                        LOW
                           L0i
                           I.Ota
                           10*
                           L0
                           LOta
                      ,01*
                                                                                      .070
                                                                                     4.7*4
                                                                                      *97?
                   JTM.0%*
                   16S.)()?
                    44.*l
                    17,?/0
H|(*f

"lfH


MJfiM
HIT,*
H|r,H

wir.M
M
M
  BH
  RH
  r,H
  ItM
  r,H
?TO,
i6J:

f?n
 ?4
 ?,
                                                                                   SAMPLE
                                                                                   fcAMpt!
                                                                                   SAMPLE
                                                                                   SAMPLE
                                                                                   SAMPLE
                                                                                   SAMPLE
                                                                                   SAMPLE
                                                                                   SAMPLE
                                                                                   SAMPLE
                                                                                   SAMPLE
                                                                                   SAMPLE
                                                                                   SAMPLE
                                                                                   SAMPLE
                                                                                   SAMPLE
                                                                                   SAMPLE
                                                                                   SAMPLE
                                                                                   SAMPLE
   .014
   .nnn
   .QNH


  jijfj
    ss
.T?9

:?
 309
 5*1
                                       Table Uu   Site U05   SLrlMER

-------
     STTFS
                       *lfl
     n*y
     OU*>

     TVPF

     PAS!*
     StlWAMi*
     LOCATION

     COUNT*
    LATTTtJOF.
                    wo PFSTPATNT
                    MC RESTRAINT

                    MO PFCTPMNT

                    Nft RFSTRAtNT
                    K'O PFST9ATNT
                    NO RFSTPAtNT

                    MO WFSTPATNT
                    MO PFSTRA1NT
                    MO PFSTPMNT
                    MO OFSTBMNT
     PARAMETER V*l.ur  MO PFSTR4IMT
     XlO
     ?0
     *??
     *?4
^o
~i
     xn?
     101
K10
11

Jl7
     X99
     X100
      TOTAL OLURtf PMO.PHaPi><
      TOTAL           -
                              I IPS
                                  (MG/
                                Mfl
                  I Mr,/i |
NITRATF - NITBrtRFN  (Mr./L>
"ISSOIVF" OKVOFN
TUOHIOirv IN JACKSON UNITS
TOTAI OTSSOLVFP     "'    ~
TOTAL FRTFPAflLF
TOTAL VOLATIRLt
PM L H
HA'JPNFSS FROM CA
ALKALFNITV A
CAI.CHIM
MAfiNFSIlIM
POTASSIU*"
RIVFP MILEAGE
                            Ionfl

                           !:J5I
                                    /L|
                                   /U
                    HFN
PARAMETER  2.

PARAMETER ?9l
PAPAMETER .10.
CAPAMETER 31.
PARAMETER Ifl.
PARAMETER 37.
PARAMETER 36.
PARAMETER .18.
CAPAMETEP. 39.
PARAMETER 41.
                    MFAN
                    MEAN
                    MEAN
                    MFAN
                    MFAN
                    MFAN
                    MFAN
                    MEAN
                    MFAN
                    MEAN
                    MEAN
                           Mf,/|
                       1S9.H97
                         7.636
                      ?76.|7t TITS
                                                       30.
                                                                    >.9?*L|ns
                                                            Mf AN
                                                                    ,|M|TS
                                                              T3.0TOLIMITS
                                                             .?<<.?OSlIMiTS
                                                               4.t6nilM|TS
MlN
MIN
MIN
MTN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MTN
MIN

MTN
M J N
MIN
MIN
^50

!0400
.osoo
3.?900
1.1000
?30.0000
3.0000
AO.OOOO
7.0000
114.5640
147.0000
43.0000
6.0000
2.2000
                                             tow
                                             LOW
                       .041
                       .050   	
                       .0?.!   |.0
                       .141
                       .ion
                       .043   _
                       .90?   LOW
                     T.3h6   Lf>
       6.67?
      15,307

      3?l663

       f>*10*
       3.139
        .40R
              VAh
              VAP,
              VAP
              VAR  	
              VAP.  ANCF
              VAR  ANCF
              VARIANCE
              VARUMCF  P75.H81
              VAS IANCF*
              VARIANCF  415.178

              VAPUNCF     Il55
               VAOIANCF5670.760
               VARIANCF.  693.114
               	  106.399
VARIANCF
VARIASCF
LOW  U.??1
LOW 144.?gn
LOW   7.S16
LOW ?6*.361
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
                                                  64.966

                                                   I^TSZ
                                                                                                    Hjr.H
                                                                                                    Mff.H
                                                    .470

                                                   4^7S*
                                    .116
                                    .oso
                                    !l44
                                   1.7H9
        6.SS7

      47oll6?
       P4.567
                                                          MfKH   7.756
                                                           '    ,131.*90
                                                                                              SAMPI F SJ7F
                                                                                              SAMPLF StXF
                                                                                      1.A43
     SAMPLF
     SAMPI F
     SAMPLF
     SAMPI F
     SAMPLF
     SAMPLE
     SAMPLF
     SAMPLF
     SAMPLF
     SAMPLE
     SAMPLF
     SAMPLE
     SAMPLF
     SAMPLE
SI7F
SI7F
S17F
SI7F

SI7E
SI7E
SI7F
SI7F
SI7F

s!^
                                                                                                      MK-H  3i.i43
                                                                                                      MIRH   4.S6R
39.
30.

44j
4?.
41.
43.
44.
                                       Table li$.   Site lilO  SU>MER

-------
    '.

    > f AP
    vtM
    r.A v
              7t<  TO   71
               M        -b
    >;'
    Vf >
    : i
    X "
    v >T
    I'M,
    V'iH
    t  ;<}   Rfvfi
rioo  TIMF
                    F*N
                    MR AN
                    CEAN
                    CAN
                    MFAN
                    Kf AN
                              .11*
                             1.A39
                    .
                  s.ni
                  ?.3*in
                 339.118
                   9. It*
                 1*1.100
                   7.7T3
                                                      *F AN
                                           PARAMFTFP ?*.
                                            '.
                                            T.
                                PARAMFTFP 311.
                                PAOAFTFP 11.
                                       PAPAMFTFP
                                       PAPAMFTFP
PAPAMFTFP  37.
PAPAMFTFP  3I
PARAMFTFP  39.
PARAMFTFP  4].
                             3,9*4
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
1 .?soo
.0000
.4150
3.0000
l.?300
.??00
ft. 0000
4.0000
554.0000
30.000.0
114.0000
4.4000
454.4080
3M.OOOO
116.0000
41.0000
7.3004
                MFAM
                Mf AH
                MFAM
                VFON
                        .nnm'fMiT*i
                        .ini |M|T
                        '  - PI.PMTS
                                                                             .OAO
                                                       s.
                                                                       .10*
                                                      Mr AM
                                                      Mf AN

                                                      Mf AM
                                                      Mr AM
                                                            AN
339.110|;
  9.1 7.|
] 4 I .Ooni
  7.77H
?S7.?.1U.
?49.50nL !' .
 6?,4f,7LiMITS
 P4.000LJMITS
  3.994LIM1TS
 KTIQ
43.904
 3.S3)
44.1
43.541
J?.417
 ?.7?0
  .71?
                                                     Ml N
                                                     MfN
                                                     MIN
                                                     MtN
                                                     MIN
                                                     MIN
                                                     MIN
                                                     MIN
                                                     MtN
                                                     MIN
                                                     MJN
                                                     MIN
                                                         MIN
                        ,6700
                        .1000
                        .0700
                      4.1000
                        .7000
                    ?19.0000
                      1.0000
                     92. 0000
                      7,?POO
I 0*
Low
tow
tow
ton
to*
tow
tow
I,OW
low
tow
tOw
tow
tnw
tow
            VARIANCE
            VARIANCF
            VARIANCE
            VAPIANCg
            VARIANCE
            VARIANCF
            VARIANCE
            VARIANCF   .....
            VARIANCE7330.73S
            VAP.3ANCF  47.1S4
            VARIANCE 7T6.714
            VARIANCE     .17
                                                     175.0000
                                                      4i.nooo
                                                      19.0000
                                                       l.flOOO
                               .ono
                                                                                              t;
                                                   i.64*.
                                 VARIANCF4696.091
                                 VARUNCF 504. ?67
                                 VARIANCE  33.TB9
                                 VARIANCE   ?.?.85
                                                                                   T.S4I
Mi'r.M

MTRH

Hir.M
                                                                                                  l.<
                                            T.
                                            4.
                                                                                                   .149
                                                                1'
:U1
                                                                                    1.030
                                                                                          HIGH
        1.006
     30?.130
     ?93.04l
      74.904
      ?
-------
                     SOD
   VFAP
    if>|T
   r>AV
   H(HlP
                      7,1
                     M
                      4
            .n  (,STOATiT

            MO  e-FST^A TUT
  o a <; T *
  > i ! n q & S T M
                    MO i>ST(fft|jr
                    ,^ smTS-AlNT
                    MO SFSTPAINT
  r COT*
                    Mf>
                                                    T TI-ST   (.OS)
  i
t 11   SPLHalr OOTHO
x?1   TpTtL SPlU^LF
;?   TPTAL DM
  x?^
  xn?
         TuoniniTv  I'l
TOTAL
TPTAL
PM |_*B
  >4)
  X9Q    pfyF
  XtOO   T|wF
Pt..if."t TEP  ?S,
PA: ;."?--
PA. /.f TFO  10,
PA:. V'fTfP  31,
P*i>/"fTE  37,
PA- .".'"FTF.B  36,
PA.OMFTFP  3ft,
PAIMWFTFO  394
           41.
                    
                   -  --'  (MR/LI
                                             ... _. .1 TCO
                                            OAtJAMFTF"
                                            OAUAMFTFO
                                            OAPAMFTFP )..
                                                       T.
                                          ... -    ..   31 ,
                                         PAOAMFTFC  1s,
                                                           ii'FAKi
                                                           'F 4M
                                                                    .ooni
                    AS
                         MG/l.
                            .000
                            .??
         "FAN
                    .000
         "FAN
         MFAN
                        1?.?00
                       105.500
                         .?00
         ft.n
         MFAN
         Mf AN
                      ?30.167
                       4A.OOO
                       ?3.?0n
                         4.1fl3
WAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
                                              .7600
                                           ,por*n
                                         10.0000
 ?3.0000
133.0000
  n.3000
234,5000
 ?4.ooon
  4.BOOO
                                                   Mf /.*
                                                   It. Akl
                                                                    ."niI
                                                                      TMITS
                                         OAPAMFTFP

                                         PAPAMFTFP
                                   PAOAWFTFP
                                   PAPAMFTFP
                                   OAPAWFTFP
                                   PISPAMFTEP
                      MflN
                      VF AN
                      "FAN
                      MFAN

                      wp AN
                      "FAN
                      "F AN
                                                       MTN
                                                           if)
                                                        ;onoo
                                                        .0640
MIN
MIN
MIN
M|N
MIN
MTN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
   ,0?00
   .0000
  6.5000
  2.5000
  1.0000
  i.OOOO
 41.0000
  1.1000
199.5420
196.0000
 4?.0000
 ?3.0000
  3.9000
                                 TS

                              .  .TS
                              IITS


                              IITS
                                             .njo  t ov
                                             ,05'J  IPn
                                             ,n?  i.ow
                                             .131  LOW
                                             .000  LOW
                          7.1'N
                         |A.*Sii
                          P.4H4
                         !.. IS?
                           .0()4
                                                                 ?3.?oni.
                                                                             ?0.'
                                                                              S.<00
                           LOW
                           LOW
                           I.PW
                           t.nw
                           LOw
                           LOW
                                                                                .33S
                                              1.0*
                                              LOW
                                              low
                                                                       VAUtANCF
                                                                       VARtANCF
                                                                       VARtANCF

                                                                       VAPIANCF
                                                                 VARIANCF
                                                                 VARIANCE
VAPIANCF
VARIANCF
VARIANCF
VAPIANCF
VAPIANCF
VAPIANCF
VARIANCF
   .000
   .000
   .003
   .016
   .ois
   .000
  ?.657
 46.747
 " .767
   .700
   .700
   .nos
191.SR3
3<4.167
 31.600
   ,?00
   .102
                                                     ,onr,

                                                     ^47?
                                                   SAMPLE
                                                   SAMPLE
                                                                                              SAMPLF
SAMPLE
SAMPLF
SAMPLF
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
                                                                                              I
                                         .100
                                       *. 1*7
                                        MJRH

                                        Mf RM
                                        H I r.H
                                        urr.H
                                                       .0?^
                                                       .000
                                                       !ii
                                                       .71*
                                                                                             RQ.14H
                            Mfr,H
                            MJ r.H
                            MK,M
                                      4?.100
                                      ??.645
                                       3.P4-1
                                                   SAMPI F
                                                   SAMPI F
                                                   SAMP) F
                                                   SAMPLE
                                  \\
                                 ?"1
                           .ono
                           ,143
                           .741
                           .4PO
                                                                ?Sl.o65
                                                                 S3.JOO
                                                                                                      H1RH
IW
ST7F
S17F
SI7F,
SI7F
SI7F
SI7F
SI7F
SI7F
SI7F
SI7F
SI7E
S17F
sue
6'
o,

ol

6!

I:
6.
6.
5.
6.
6.
5.
6.
                                      Table hi.   Site  00   SUMMER

-------
sires
VFAP
TYPE

BASIN
   H
I

COUNTY
TOWNSHIP
                     son

                      70 TO  71
                       M      4
                    NO PFSTWA7NT
                    NO HFST4AINT
                    iO
                    NO
                    MO RFST"AfNT
                    MO
                    HO

                    NO
                    NO
                                  10
             VAlUE
                 C)t RFSTC/dNT

                 NO PF;rpAfNT
o
o
I 57
1 ,9
              oPTwo PHOSPHOROUS
       PTAL .  MFAI
                          PAOAMFTFP ?*.  MFAJ
                          PAPAMFTFP ?.  MFAN
                          PAPAMFTFP f\.  MFAW
                          PARAMFTFP ?4.  WFA*.
                          PAPAMFTFO ?^.  MFAN
                          PARAMFTFP  ?.  WFAN
                          PAPAMFTFP  1.  TAr
                          PAOMFTF ?.  MFAN
                          PAPAMFTFO T>.  "FAN
                          P*PAFTFP 11.  "FAN
                          PAPAMFTFO \*.  f A>.
                          PARAMFTFP 37.  MKAM
                          PAPAMFTFP i*..  "FAN
                          PARAMFTFP 3".  ^AN
                          PAPAMfTFP 34.  "FAN
                                    41.  MFAN
                                                                                 .3*'<  LOW
                                                                                       LOW
                                                                                       L
                                                                   .?Rll|MTTS
                                                                       '
                                                               \ \ .>nni f'TS
                                                                7.pini IVITS
                                                              in?.^^-r TMITS
                                                               ?;.T^| TTS
                                                              |?4.0nftl ItTS
                                                             ?3*.ooo
                                     "IN
                                     "IN
                                     MfN
                                     HIN
                                     MIN
                                     "IN
                                      IN
                                                              .0170
                                                              .nn
                                                                 no
                                            344.0000
                                             31.0000
                                            144,0000
                                              B.4000
                                                                 1.0400
                                                                  .1000
                                                                  .0000
                                                                ll.sono
MIN
MJN
MIN
                                                            12.0000
                                                          110.
                                               ,0000
                                             64.0000
                                             ?4,0000
                                              4.4000
MIN
MIN
MIN
MM
MIN
 _,oono
 7.QOOO
  .0000
44.0000
23.0000
 4.0000
VARIANCE
VARIANCE
VAP ANCF
VAR ANCE
VAP
VAP
VAR  ...
VAR ANCE
VAR  -
VAR
VAR
VAR
VAP .. ...
VARIANCE
VARIANCE
VARIANCE
VARIANCE
    ''III

    $&
    .000
    .000
   5.445
1764.333
 1341333
 316.000
    .,000
 ion.333
  10.333
    .040
                                                   OW
                                                                                    *i<
                                            .404  LOW
                                            .000  LOW
                                            .OOn  LOW
                                          ?n,'hs  LOW
                                         104. is?  t.ow
                                          ?<.794  LOW
                                          44.1ft:<  LOW
                                                                                               .000   MIan
                                                                                              I.SCO   MIfiM
                                          QT.I'?*,  LOW
                                            .non  tow
                                          ?s.(Jei  ion
                                           7,*)h*.  LOW
                                            .4^7  LOW
                                          >e\  Mir-H
                                      '.4il  MIRK

                                       4^974  HIRH
                                      ?T.^t>?  HTr.H
                                        ,000  MTfiW
                                                                                              1.701
SAMP) f
SAMPLE
SAMP) F
SAMPLF
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
wt

Wl
SI7E
SI7E
SITE
SI7F
SI7E
SI7E
SI7F
SI7E
SI7E
SI7F
SI7E
SI7E
SIZE
                                                      .000
                                                      1*7?
                                                                                                               .000
                                                                                                             11.SCO
                                                                                                             ?,r  -
                                                                                                         11.1?*
                                                                                                             .000
                                                                                                           7H.1QI
                                                                                                           33^31*
                                   Table U8.   Site 500   FALL

-------
 rS 600
;, ^M TIJ TO 7j 5
'. f NO RFSTPATWT
1; -' ' ?8VV[L^P^r? K8MBH
\ TOTAl PHOSPHfinuS

5 (MG/L)

< Kjf.OAWL NITROGEN (MG/L)
''. AMMON-IA NiTnnrFN  PM L*3
r. ' HARfjK.^.S FROM CA AND MS
:< ALKALINITY AS CACOS
* POTAiiilUM MG/L
 : PIVER iLt'AGE
v ' a T!>
* ' ItS 19. ttf AN .0&'*
TEH ?0t ir&N .Ooci
TFR 22. MEAN .14!)
TCP ?3. J-EAW i.ono
TR ?4. Mj-'iM ,?7-
TE 25. sn.'AN .000
-TER. 2. Mir'AN .SOO
 ! 3. MfAW 10.77^5
H'f ?9. MEAN 351.000
=/ .OOli
itR 38. r-F*N 51.50*'
TfR 39. MEAN 27.00'!
;ER 4i. fEAN 5.400

MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
M.AX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
6 T
T

PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER

:82g8
 ?fJ50
i.?3bo
.sooo
.0000
P. 5000
17.0000
411.0000
17.0000
151.0000
fi.^000

'. o r, b o
5,?. 0500
2V. 0300
5.7000
TEST (.051

'?:
??.
25^
l!
3f)I
31.
37l
381
39.
41.

!
MIN
MtN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MtN
MIN
MtN
HIM
MIN
MIN
MIN
WIN
MIN
KIN

MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MfAN
MEAN
vr AN
MFAN
MF AN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
Mr AN
MEAN
MEAN



9


R.
6.
301.
1.
102.

236*


2bl
5.

.064Lt**!TS
*140LlMlTS
1.080LIMITS
.274LIMITS
.OOOLIMITS
fl.SOOL I"ITS
10.775LIMJTS JCE
8C0 VARfANCE
!l/?0 VARIANCE
44.?50
4 33 . ft67
.003
57.556
.000
.500
2.000
.087

.CIS
* Oit 7
. U"l 1
-topj
.000
Z7*'.f>7?
-1.833
95.369
17sIftR2
.000
45.147
24.750
4.932

?AMP! F
SAMPLE
SA ^PL f
SAMPLE
SAMPl F
SAMPLf
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAKPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE

MTAH
M??M
HI>*
HIGH
Hjr.H
HJGM
HIGH
HIGH

S{?r
Sf7F

ST7F
SI7F
SUE
SI7E
SI7F
S ! /
S ' 7f
si/f
ST7E
SI/E
SI7F
SI7E
size



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29
5

J.
4^
4,
4.
0.
1.
4.
4.
4.
4.
4.
2.
0.
2.
4.
4.

.11?
"5^li
l*?a
.oeo
Iocs
.000
r?5o
,A6B

















Table Itf.   Site 600

-------
o
N>
SITES 600
tFMt TO TO T3
 'ONTH  9
..AY NO RESTRAINT
,r(OUR NO RESTRAINT
!rVPE NO RESTRAINT
' .'SIN NO RFSTPA'NT
nUSlN NO RESTRAINT
.' ^CATION NO RESTRAINT
 --liNTY NO RSIIfII
 f.,/;VSHlP NO RfSTHlNT
I. M-tTUOC KQ PCSTRA INT
1.. rj ruot NO RESTRAINT
 .i^AMETER VHUE NO RESTRAINT

; rt>TM NO RESTRMNT
' 19 SOLUBLE (WHO PHOSPHORU
'..-a TOTAL SOLUBLE PHOSPHORU
-> TOTAL PHOSPHORUS

10











S (MG/L)
. /3 KJET'AHL NITROGEN (MR/LJ
! '* AMHCNlA NITROf.FN IVfi/L)
.S NIUATf - NITROGEN <*G/L>
: ? OIS'.OIVFO OXYGEN
 >:j Tut 1PITY IN JACKSON UNITS
? TOTL DISSOLVED SOLIDS IMG/LJ
: '.') TnTiL FILTERABLE SOLIOS (MG/U
' n TOUL VOLATIBLE SOLK/S (MG/LT
 M PHI h
t? MARINES? FROM CA ANO MG
' ;^ ALKALINITY AS CAC03
:.:! CALCIUM MG/L
I. .19 MAGI.ESIUH MG/L
<, l POT/SSIUM MG/L
;-V9 PIVfR MILEAGE
 100 lift
.>;' "iiTtR 2Cl MEAN iBiJO
rt  '-'tTER 22. M,"AN .442
,-'. .-tTER 23. Ht'AN 2.296
; fTf 24. MEAN .321
.-:TER 2S, MEAN .000
-.. -/TFR 2, MfAM 7.014
( riTEft 3. KtAN 8.833
 A ..:TR 29. MtflN 402. 556
t "EP 3C. Ml- AN 2?. 278
f iTER 31. Wi AM 193.357
si tTR 13. MIAN 7.917
:-i fna 37. HUM 267.232
(. "7F.9 36, Hf AM 2U.3J3
>* .-:TEfl 3*. Kt AN S'i^OO
A .TtR 3* Wf'AN 31,0>6
VA flTER 41. MLAN 5. Oil






MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
M/X
MAX











T

PARAMETER.
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PAI1AMFTER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER


;jj?88
?76dO
2.9800
.6900
.0000
9.7000
14.0000
530.0000
36.0000
236.0000
6.1000
338.27HO
2^3.0000
6S.OOOO
47,0000
6.9000











TEST .05>

19. MEAN .337LIMITS .064 LOW .273 HTfiM .401
20. MEAN .OOOLJMITS .000 LOW .000 MTfiM .000
22. MEAN .44?LlMlTS .111 Cow ,331 MIM w
23. McAN ?.29>,LIMITS .315 LOW I.9HI HIBM 2.AI2
24. MSAN .321LIMITS .0*3 LOW ,2?H HIGH .4J4
25. Mf.ftN .OOOLJMITS .000 LOW .OOf) HTf.M ..COO
2. MEAN T.OULIMITS 1.361 LOW 5.-ss5 HIGH .SOI*
1. MFAN a.aH3LIMITS 6.715 LOW ?.lf>fl MIfiM 15.599
29. MrAN 402.556L HITS 38.984 LOW 363.571 HIGH 441.549
30. MEAN 2?.?7LIMITS 3.195 LOW .19.0B3 MK,M 25.473
31. MEAN 193.3S7LIMITS 19.262 LOW 17*. 095 HIGH 212.619
18. t/FAN 7.917LIMITS .154 LOW 7.762 HIGH ft. 071
37l MEAN ?67l2S?L MITS 171873 LOW 249.379 HIGH 2B5.125
3i. MFAN 216I333LIMITS 16.164 LOW 200.169 HK.M 232.497
3B, MfAN 55.600LIMITS 3.125 LOW 5?. 475 HIGH 52J?$
39. MIAN 3lIo56LlMITS 2.475 LOW 2fl.Sl HIGH 33.5|0
41. MEAN 5.061LIMITS .811 LOW 4.250 HIGH 5.672


M!N :i8S8 vARl*N8F :8J8 UKptf HT! ll:
MIN loAOO VARIANCE Io33 |*MPLE SI7E ijl
MIN .0000 VARIANCE .000 SAMPLE SJ7E 0.
MIN 5.0090 VARIANCE 2.165 SAMPLF SITE 7.
WIN 3.5900 VARIANCE *0.934 SAMPLE SJ7E 6.
MIN 225.0000 VARIANCE6144.496 SAMPLE SI7E 18.
MIN 11.0000 VAR ANCF 41.271 SAMPLF. S 1 7E IB.
M N lin.OOPO VAR ANCE1113.324 SAMPLE S 7E 14.
MIN 7.7000 VAf ANCE .022 SAMPLE S17E 6.
M N 220.2590 VAR ANCF1041.40 SAMPLE S 7E 15.
MIN 210.0000 VAR SNCE *?.333 SAMPLE 5 7E 3.
MIN 47.0000 VAP ANCE 31.B29 SAMPLE SI7E 15.
MIN 25.0000 VAH ANCE 24. 761 SAMPLE SITE 18.
MIN 2.2000 VAR ANCE 2.659 SAMPLE SIZE 18.
                                  Table 0.  Site 600  FALL

-------
o
(.ij
1ITC9 TOO
MH T5 T0 T2
r>AY NO RESTRAINT
HOUR NO RESTRAINT
TYPE NO RESTRAINT
BASIN NO RESTRAINT
SURfUSlN NO RESTRAINT
LOCATION NO RESTRAINT
COUNTY NO RESTRAINT
TOWNSHIP NO RfSTBAfNT
LONGITUDE NO RFSTBAINT
LATITUDE NO RESTRAINT
PARAMETER VALUE NO RESTRAINT

nfPTH WO RESTRAINT
S

*19 SOLUBLE OBTHQ PHOSPHORUS MO/L>
K,*0 TOTAL SOLUBLE PHOSPHORUS
x?2 TOTAL PHOSPHORUS




X?3 Kj;'DftHL NITROfiFN {MC./L>
X?4 AM.-OVle NITPOOKN (MG/L)
?5 NITRATF - MTROGFN (MG/LI
X02 DISSOLVED OXYGEN




>03 TUNB1PITY IN JACKSON UNITS
?9 TOTAL DISSOLVED SOLIDS <*6/U
X10 TOTAI FILTERABLE SOLIDS IMG/L
x:u TOTAL VOLATILE SOLIDS IMG/L)
X18 PH LAR






ft
P
i- '



.
,'



-
y
^ .
r.
f
1-*.
XJ7 HADDHESS FROM CA ANO Mfi '
X36 ALKALINITY AS CAC03
Xlfl CAI CIUM MG/L
X)9 MA'/iNfSIUM MG/L
X*l POfASSI'JM MG/L
X19 RIVER MILE/.GE
xiOO Tlk.E
,r*METE 1?. MFAN .034
^.METCR ?0. MfAN .000
'/>4'. MfAN .124
-:i,"-tTEf 25. fSAW .900
ITJMETEB 2. MEAN fl.167

:^'i(FTEP ?9l MFA.'! 307^58?
'"?:7ER ?0, fifiM 5. '-36

 : :JETER \9, K?'f< 8*190
' .;-'TER ?7. MFflM 216.6*9
?':)t"TEB 38^ MEAN 5\'.h'&
, S*.1P 29. MF.OM 22,?73
*',;^ETR 41. MEAN 4.309






MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
 T
T

PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETF.R
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PRAMFTFR
PARAMETER
PARAMETER


TEST

19.
20.
?.
3.

2*S 
j> B
3.
29.
30.
31.
18.
37.
36.

39^
41.




MEAN
MEAN
MFAN
MFAN
MFAN
MFAN

MFAN
Mf AN
MFAN
MFAN
MFAN
MFAN
MFAN
MFAN
MFAN
MEAN

v
>)

.034LIHI
.OOOLlM
.126LIM

Il24LIM

e!l67LIM


TS .009
TS .000
TS .034
TS .157
TS .094
TS .000

1?.483LIMITS 3.414
307.18PLIMITS 3?.71fc
5.636LIMITS 1.953
111.545L1MITS 14.443
216*64nLtMITS 39^780
249.831LIMITS 34.160
51.77ALIMITS 9.452
22.P73LIMITS 3.479
4.309LIMITS .592






LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW
LOW




,0?6
:!i?

1 030
.000
T.A99
9.070
?74.46fc
9TllO?
fl.071
17A.A60
215.673
4?. 326
1.794
3.717




mn*
MJHK
Hfr.H

MIftH
Mf (IH
MI OH
MICH
MffSM
M|r,M
MJOM
HIGH
HIC.H
Mir.H
HI CM
Ml ftH
MJT.H


 Q520 MIN, Olc'5 VARIANCE .000 SAMPI F SfTF
.0000 MtH .6000 VARTANCF. lOOO SAMPCF StJF
.2500
.9800
.4100
.0000
0.6000
20.1000
367.0000
11.0000
13S.OOOO
8.6000
271.8180
296.0000
66.0000
27.0000
6.0000
MIN
MtN
MIN
MtN
MIN
MIN
MtN
MtN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MtN
MIN
MtN
MIN
.0750 VARIANCE .
.2400 VARIANCE
.0400 VARIANCE
.0000 VARIANCE
7
6
214
2
70
8
149
162
3S
14
3
.3000 VARIANCE .
.5000 VARIANCE 2R.
.0000 VARIANCE2371.
.0000 VARIANCE fl.
.0600 VSSiIANCe 462.
.0000 VARIANCE .
.1350 VARIANCE2678.
.0000 VARIANCE2fl90.
.0000 VARIANCE 151.
.0000 VARIANCE 26.
.4000 VARIANCE
003
054
020
noo
199
067
764
455
?73
028
515
194
R1R
777
SAMPLF
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLF
SAMPI F
SAMPI F
SAMPLF
SAMPLE
SAMPLF
SAMPLF
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SI7F
SI7F
SI7F
SI7F
SJ7F
SI7F
SI7F
S17F
SI7F
SI7E
SI7E
SI7F
SI7E
SI7E
SI7E


,04?
.000
MAO
.71 ^
,000
4.634
339*097
7.59fl
2>3*993

2S*,7
4.901


'{'

1 l#
11.
0.
6.
12.
11.
11.
11.
10.

9l
11.
11.
                                  Table 51.  Site 700  SUMMER

-------
                   7on
YFAB
MONT*
PAY
HOUR

TYPE

BASIN
StlBHA
LOCATION

COUNTY
TOWNSHIP
    TUD
    UDE
LONGITUDE
LATIT
                  NO  HFSTP4TNT

                  NO  PF5lpATNT
                  NO  PFSTOfltNT
                  NO  R
NO
NO PF*,TPitNT
NO RFSTPSINT
NO PFSTPAINT
                                 10
 PARAMETER VALUF   NO RESTRAINT

 DFPTH            NO RESTRAINT
                                               T TFST  (.05)
XI 9 SOLUBLE ORTHO PHOSPHORUS IMfi/L)
X20 TOTAL SOLUBLE PHOSPHORUS
?? TOTAL PHOSPHORUS
X23 KJFD*HL WITPOBEN IMR/D
X?4 AMMONIA NTTPOnEM 
X02 DISSOLVED OXYKtN
X03 TURBIDITY IN JACK30N UNITS
29 TOTAL
 X30 TOTAL
9 *31 TOTAL
OISSOLVEO
FILTEPARLE
VOLATIBLE
SOLIDS
SOL I OS
S )l 1 OS
CM6/L)
IMG/L)
(MG/L>
4' X1B PH LAP
X37 MA40NFSS FROM CA
X36 AL**L
AND MR

INITY AS CAC03
X38 CAI.CIUM M/L
x39 M.;NF

X4] POTASSIUM
x99 RIVER
xioo TIME
PARAMETER 19.
PARAMETER ?0.
PARAMETER 27.
PARAMETER ?3.
PARAMETER 74.

PARAMETER 2*.
PARAMETER 3.
PARAMETER 29.
PARAMETER 30.
r APAMETE* 31.
P4PAMETE1 18.
PARAMETER 37.
PARAMETER 36.
PARAMETER 38.
PARAMETER 39.
PARAMETER 41.
MIL t AGE

MFA1*
MEAN
MFAN
MEAN
MEAN

MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MFAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
ME*N
M(i/L
M(i/L


129
 03?
.168
1,544
.138
.000
10.100
rO.100
213.357

1C4^7I4
ft. tOO
153.903
,'700
30.500
13.714
3.367




MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMFTFP
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PAHAMFTFR
PAPAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER


.9900
10320
.3550
2.3000
.5100
.0000
10.1000
35.0000
265.0000
146.0000
121,0000
0.2000
104.0340
.0000
46.0000
17.0000
5.3000
19.
20.
2sl
3*

3ol
31 .
Irt.
37.
3"..
38.
39.
41.


MIN
MfN
MIN
MIN
MTN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MtN
MIN
MIN
MtN
MIN
MTN
MIN
MIN
MtN
MFAN
MEAN
MEAN
"FAN
MFAN
MFAN
MEAN
MEAN
MFAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MFAN
MEAN
MFAN
MEAN
MEAN





1


10
5
162
9
73
7
124

30
11
2
.129LIMITS
,03?LIMJTS
ll54*LIMITS
.13PL1MITS
.OOflLIMlTS
10.100LIMITS
P0.100LIMTTS Ifl9
P13.3S7LIMITS 17
34.2ULIMITS 21
100.7I4LIMITS 7
P.OOOLIMIT5 2

IOOOLIMITS
3fl.500LlMlTS 10
13.7ULIMITS 2
3.367LIMITS 1


.03RO VARIANCE
.03fO VARTANCF
.0140 VARIANCE
.0500 VARIANCE
.0600 VARIANCE
.0000 VARIANCE
.1000 VARIANCE
.2000 VARIANCE
.0000 VARIANCE
.127 LOW
,000 LOW
.054 LOW
.233 LOW
,07ft LOW
.000 LOW
.000 LOW
.319 LOW.
.455 LOW
.614 LOW
.S2 LOW
.541 LOW
.132 LOW
.000 LOW
.752 LOW
.371 LOW
.161 LOW


.040
.000
.010
.14ft
.Olft
.000
.000
444.020
914.247
.0000 VARIANCE1401.A74
.0000 VARIANCE
.4000 VARIANCE
.3020 VARIANCE
.0000 VARIANCE
.0000 VARIANCE
.0000 VARIANCE
.1000 VARIANCE.
1R4.989
.OAO
636. ?63
.000
45.667
6.S71
1.223
.00?
.0??
.114
1.3J!
.059
.000
10.100
'195^902
12.600

5l45*
11H.77?
.000

1K343



SAMPl F
SAMP) F
SAMPLE
SAMPLF
SAHPLF
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLF
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPl F
SAMPLF
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLF
SAMPLE
MfftM
MIBH
H|RH
HIGH
HIRH
HIRH
HK.H
HIRH
H t AH
HIRH
HK.H
HIAH
HTRH
HI RH


51 V
5 1 /F
S 1 7f
SI7F
SI7E
SI7F
SI7E
SI7C
SI7F
SI7E
SI7F
SI7F
SI7F
SI7E
SI7E
SI7E
SIZE
'.777
I.T7T
lo'.ioi
?09.4|9
230. HI?

1 AH.S'SS
14.541
199.015
.000
40. ?5?
16.00S
4,527


14.
1.
15.
13.
1 ^ *
0.
1.
2.
14.
14.
14 .
2.
4.
0.
4 .
7.
6.
                                  Table 52.  Site 700A  FALL

-------
- FTP'S
                 \tt
                 -r,
T a
            H [1*1 TS
M    l. TtTS
**rrs
v /...    A.I UI~IMIT^
  ^.;.r*-iLr'tr;
*-r .  ? *.,^7.(*i('j*irT<;
      ^.fc^i ^ir;
                                                          ** *
                                                          *F *1
                                                          UFI

                                                                                                               *

                                                                                        i
;|1


 l?.i*fl
3!>*.7I>S

ii:l??
  *.?ft'
?^*.7?7
?
-------
    sires
    VFAR
    MONTH
    HOU*
    TYPE
    LOCATION
            no

             TO TO  T3

           NO RESTRAINT
           NO RESTRAINT

           NO RESTRAINT

           NO RESTRAINT
           NO RESTRAINT
           NO RESTRAINT

           88
           NO RESTRAINT
           NO.RESTRAINT
10
    PARAMETER VALUE

    DEPTH
           NO RESTRAINT

           NO RESTRAINT
                T  TEST   (.OR)
          SOLUBLE OBTHO PHOSPHORUS 
          TOTAL SOLUBLE PHOSPHORUS
          TOTAL PHOSPMOOUS
          KJEOiHL NITROGEN IMG/LI
          AMMONIA NITROGEN (MG/L)
          NITRATE - NITROGEN IMG/L>
          DISSOLVED OXYGEN
                    IN JACKSON UNITS
O
o>
TOTAL DISSOLVED SOLIDS (MG/L)
TOTAL FILTERABLE SOLIDS 
-------
; TK
                     P.FfTPMlT
                  MO
                  NO PFMlT
               - f Srv.-
                           IfVS
                          1 l>t
                    .   w      ,

                    I   - VI   i!
           >
                                           P4.QAVFTFP
                                                 fTFp
                                    **
                                             .0000
                                           7.SMAA
                                             .4000
                  V|W
                  M?M
4*4)1   111,0000
       '  ,OfllA
tN


M|N
                  MtN
                                    "
                                               AOA
                  MJN
                  MtN
                  MtM
                                                                         r

                                                                        .. fMTT*.'
                                                                        l.t'fT
                                                                   H45t I"1TS
                            .JJ040
                              ooo
                                               .00   _.._
                                               .001   |ftt
                  -i ,- ,       .flnft  L'I'W
                  y f'MTS    ?.101  t.oi,

                  'i"T"TTS   |*T9H
                  	    .709
  .4400
  .0100
  .0000
  i.1000
  .4000
  ,0000
  .0000
   0000
7.9000
i?.7?70
>f.0000
10.0000
r.nooo
?.7000
                   VP
                   VAA
                   VAP
                   VAft
                   VAff
                   VAPUNCF
                        M
                        .001
                                      VAPTAMCF
VAPfANCF
V4BT4MCF
  .01?
  .000
 A.OOA
|7l?54
                                                                                    34.0R.1
                                                                              AMCF
       IF  49ft.9<
       IF   7H.1]
                                                                                         1
                                                                              AMCF
                                                                                              I*1
                                                                                               *Mp|
                                        S4MO| F S
                                        SAMPI F R
                                                                                              S4MP( F S
                              7F
                              7F
                              7F
                                                                                                   F SI7F
                                                                                                      I7F
                                                          SAMP) F
                                                          SAMP1 F
                            SI7F

                            ^
              J50   SAMPL
                 s:

                 I
7F
7F.
7F
                                                          ,077
                                                                                                       Mf f,U
                                                                   WfAM ?*.
                                                                   Hf'iH    ,
                                                                                                       "Tr,M  47.

      i:
      S:
     i?.
                                    Table  $5.   Site  71$   SUMMER

-------
MTfS
n* NO ftC?!"*lNl
HOUt* NO orsTHAtNT
TVPE NO RESTRAINT
fU'.tN NO RFSTRATNT
SdMfUVN NO RFSTHAlNT
LOCATION NO RESTRAINT
fC'INTY NO RESTRAINT
Tiv*NSMI0 NO RESTRAINT
LOi.ilTUftF NO RESTRAINT
LATftunC NO RESTRAINT
PARAMETER VALUE NO RESTRAINT
nfPTM NO RESTRAINT











T19 SOLULF OPTHO PHOSPHORUS (M0/LI
*>0 TOTAL SOLUBLE PHOSPHORUS
v,v TOTAL PHOSPHORUS
ft\ KJFOAML NITROGEN (Mfi/L)
X?k AMMONIA NITROGEN (Mfi/L)
I.">S NITPATF - NITROGEN IMG/LI
tf? OISSOLVEn OXYGEN
KM TURAiniTV IN JACKSON UNITS

HI *;> TOTAL nrssoLVFo SOLIOS 
o x:tn TOTAL FILTERABLE SOLIDS 
w xti TOTAL VOLATISLE SOLIOS CHG/LJ
X!> PM LAW
IOT HARDNESS FROM CA AND MO
v, ALKALINITY AS CACOS
x"M CALCIUM MG/L
X31* MAGNESIUM Mf/L
1*1 POTASSIUM MG/L
**
MFAN 7^90LIM TS .079 LOW T.6M HIRM 7.7f9
MFAN 2ii.39SLiM TS 24.a4 LOW 1*6.501 HI
-------
    MTt S

    VF Ai>
    WON'H
    fuv
    .
   LATITUOF.
                     AIM
                    NO PFSTWAtNT
                    NO PFSTPATNT

                    HO RESTRAINT

                    NO PFSTRAINT
                    Nfl PFSTRAtNT
                    NO PFSTPAINT

                    MO PF5TPMNI
                    \rt PFSTPANf
                    >iO PFSTPAINT
                    NO PFSTRAINT
                                    10
             VALUF
                      MO RESTRAINT

                      NO PFSTRAINT
                                                    T TFST   (,os)
o
\0
   II
  !>
   V
    /41

    rl t-)
        ORTMO PHOSPHORUS
fOTAL'SOLUHLf PHOSPHORUS
TOTAL PHOSPMOPUS
- 	  NITMOGfN
        NITROGEN  (MG/Ll
NITRC.Tf  - NITPOGEN  
OISSOLVFP OXYGEN
TIJORIDITY IN JACKSON  UNITS
TOTAL OJSSOLVFD SOLIOS
TOTAL FTLTFUAPLE  SOLTOS
TOTAL     "     "  ""
   _          CA
AUKALIMTY AS CACOS
CALCIUM         MG/L
MAGjFSTll|'       MG/L
PITASSTU"       MG/L
BfVEP    '  "
PAPA- TEP 19.
          20 .
        TF
  PACl-  TF0 24,
  PA:A'  TE 25.


  PAC'JI.  TEP 29l
  PA^A-  rr.a 30.
  P*r.a>  Tfp 31.
  PP-f>  TfP 18.
  PAf-t.  .' 37.
  PAr:-  TEP 36.
  PAT-AS  TEP 39,
  	   TEP 41.
         MFAN

         EAN
                 MEAN
                 EAN
                 MEAN
                 *E*N
                 MEAN
                 Mf AN
                 MEAN
                 MEAN
 .059
 .000
 .110

2;?4i
 .125
5.067
                346.000
                  17.000
                  7.650
                216.449
                214.400
                 53.167
                 20.625
                  1.762
J/L)


MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
PAP.AMF/TFP
DARAMFTEP
PAPAMFTFP
PARAMf TFP
PAPAMFTFP
PARAMETER
PARAMFTFP
PAPAMFTER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMFTER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PAPAMF.TEP
:
.4500
3.3600
1.5400
.1600
6.7000
3.4000
412.0000
70.0000
204.0000
A. 0000
257.8510
259.0000
67.0000
25.0000
4.7000
ii
3'.
30 1
31.
37l
3f>.
B:
41.
MIN
MfN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MFAN .059LIM1TS .064 LOM
MFAN .pOOLTMITS .000 LOM
MFAN .IlOLIMlTS .103 LOM
WEAN ?.07?LIM1TS .455 LOM
MFAN .T41L1MITS .400 LOM
MFAN .125LIMITS .040 LOM
MFAN 5.067LTMITS 3.569 LOM
MFAN l.flULTMITS 1.101 LOM
MFAN 346.000L1M1TS 43.322 LOM
MFAN 17.000L1MITS 17.291 LOM
MFAM 169.2A6L JM1TS 24.5S5 LOM
MFAN 7.6SOLIM1TS .245 LOM
MEAN 216.44QL1MITS 39.761 LOM
MEAN 214.400LJMITS 49.795 LOM
MFAN 53.16TLIMITS 9.256 LOM
MEAN 20.6PSL1MIT5 3.489 LOM
MEAN 1.762L1MITS l.25a LOM
.0020
.0000
.0100
1.1600
.0700
.0900
4.0000
.6000
266.0000
1.0000
13B.OOOO
7.0000
164.1170
159.0000
41.0000
14.0000
.1000
VARIANCF .OOfl
VARIANCF .000
VARIANCE .018
VARIANCE .150
VARIANCF .312
VARIANCE .001
VARIANCE 2.063
VARIANCE 1.418
VARIANCE3176.500
VARIANCE 506.000
VARIANCE 706.571
VARIANCF. .086
VARIANCF1435.064
VARlANCE160B.flOO
VARIANCE 77.767
VARIANCE 17.411
VARIANCE 2.263
-.oos
.000
.007
1.617
.341
.oas
1.494
.713
30?. 67*
-.291
144.701
7.405
176. 6
164.605
43.911
17.136
^505
SAMPLF
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLF
SAMPLF.
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLF
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
Mfr.M
HIGH
MK'H
HIGH
HIGH
SI7F
SIZF
SI7F
SI7F
517F
SI7F
SI7F.
SI7E
SI7E
SIZE
SIZF
SIZE
SI7P
SI7F
SI7F
SIZE
SIZE
I635
39l}??
7*9S
256.211
264.195
ft?. 423
?4.114
3.9?0
I:
9.
9.
10.
5.
3.
7.
9.
9.
T.
A.
6.
S.
6.
8.
a.
                                       Table $7.   Site 801  FALL

-------
  vriw
  TYt
  I f'CATJON

  rr-iiNTY
                     HOH

                      70  TO  T>
                    NO P,ST*AlNT

                    *0 PF/STMINT
                    NO
                    MO  _ .
                    NO KFSTKAlNT

                    NO fiFSTt'AlNT
                    NO RKSTRAtNT
                    NO PFSTPAINT
                    NO PFSTKAfNT
 LAflTUOE


  PARAMETER VAtUF  NO RESTRAINT
                                                            (.Ob)
  11 <>
  ?o
  M??
  ?S
  c?
  f,3
  tf"t
  i.i
  lift
  X37
                       PHOSCHORIJ-;
         TOTAL WORIJV
         TOTAL PHOSPHORUS
         *J*OAML  NlTuor-FN Crt/L>
         AMMONIA  NlTfOGfcN t"r./i j
         NITPATF  - NITPOfiFN (MG/L)
         DISSOLVES OXYGEN
         TiJfcRtOITV IN JACKSON UNITS
         TOTAL flfS;Ol.VfO SOLIOS (MiJ/l )
         TOTAL Ffi.TfPAHLE SOLIOS (Mfi7L)
         TOTAL VOLMIPIC SOLIDS CMG/LI
         PM  LAP
         HARDNESS FPOM CA AND KG
                    AS CAC03
                         M&/L
        POTASSIUM
        IVER
  1100

>AP/W*;TER 19.
          II:
           3.
PAP
PAC
PtP
PJB
PAP
PAP
PAP
Pl&iMFTER 24.
PAO ."ETCP. 25.
PAP.r?TCR
PA&i^ETER
PAP:-'-ETEB
    iTE
    ' tTER
    'FT ._.
    ETER 37.
     Tf 36.
     ftl* "
    ETE
           30.

           fl:
           37.
           34.

. ,- ,   - . _ -  JT*
PAP.'MtTCft  41.
                 MEAN
MEAN
FAN
VEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MFAN
MFAN
MEAN
MF.AM
MEAN
MEAN
                         nr,/r
  A.933
  3.321
293.0-S2
  9.979
 *5.*7(S
  7.$00
205,?43
115.897
 19,467
  2.252
                                     MAX
                                     MAX
                                     MA*
                                     MAX
                                     f A
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
                                                           "FAN
                                                            F AM
                                           PAPAHF TFF>
                                           PAPAMtTFP
                                           PARAMFTFP
                                                                    iini I
       OAPAMF.TFP 14.
       PAPAMFTCB ?n.
       PAHAMfTFo ?/%
       PARAMFTER ?j.  V*AH
       PAPAMFTFP ?4.  MEAN
                      MFAN
                      M(- AM
                      "FAN
                      MFAN ?
                      MMM   :--  
       - --,, ^,  i T- ^    ^1 * ^1 I^T'*Tfr|
       PARAMfTFR 1.  MFAN
       OAPAMETFR 37.  MTAN
       PARAMETER 3.  AM
       PAPAMFTFO 3^.  MFAN
       PAPAMETfR 39.  MFAN
                                                                .1<>4
                                                                        JMJTS
                                                                        IM TS
                                                                          i
                                                                  7J
                                                                  e.7
                                                                  19
                                           PAPAMFTfP
                                                           Mf AN
  3.3600
  1.5000
   .2100
 13.7000
 19.0000
373.0000
 40.0000.
184.0000
  0.7000
315.1450
281.0000
 H5.0000
 2?.0000
  6.5000
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
  N
                                                      M
                                                        N
                                                      MIN
  i-ttll
   .0700
   .0400
  3.4000
   .3000
1*1.0000
  2.0000
 99.0000
  6.6000
106.9600
[07.0000
 26.0000
  9.0000
   .5000
                                       !}.
                                       {11*3
                                     . .?34
                                      I.?*1*
                                     If, -'
                                                                               17.1
                                                                                5.636
                                                                                1.7fO
                                                               .
                                                               LO-
                                                               LOM
                                                               LOW
                                                               LO*
                                                               LOh
                                                               L0*
                                                               1.0*
                                                               LO*
                                                               L0
                                                               LOM
                                                               LOW
                                                               LOW
                                                               LOW

                                                               to1:
VARIANCE
VARIANCE
VARIANCE
VARIANCE
VARIANCE
VARIANCE
VARIANCE
VARIANCE
VARIAUC
VARIANC
VAR
VAR
VAR
VAH
VAR
VAR
VAR]
ANCI
ANC(
ANCI
ANCf
ANC(
ANCI
ANCE
 776*162

2R9oIf>73
2187.239
 211.217
  22.464
   2.400
                                                                                               .O
                                                                                               ,fli
                                                                                               ,OV*
                                                                                              ^.011
                                                                                                              444
                                                                                                             ./I I
                                                                                                     Mfr.H
                                                                                                            4*4*4
                                                                                             >.* J
                                                                                            IM.Q70   MI a*
                                                                                            UP. Ml   *fr.H  203;**3
                                                                                            4J.71J   M|ftM   5S.< '
                                                                                            1*1.097   IH
SIZE
SIZE

size
SIZE
SIZE
SIZE
SIZE
SIZE
SIZE
SIZE
SIZE
SIZE
SIZE
SI7E
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
t AMPLE
 AMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAHPLE
SAMPLE
                                     Table  58.   Site  80$  SUMMER

-------
 SITES
 DAY
 HOUR

 TYPE
 LOCATION

 COUNTY
 TOWNSHIP
LONG1TUOE
LATITUDE
            610

             Tg TO  7J




           NO RESTRAINT

           NO RFSTRA
           NO ftESTRA
           NO RESTRA

           NO RESTRAINT
           NO RESTRAINT
           NO RESTRAINT
           NO RESTRAINT
 PARAMETER VALUE

 DEPTH
           NO RESTRAINT

           NO RESTRAINT
S.PLURLC ORTMO PHOSPHORUS
TOTAL SOLUBLE PHOSPHORUS
TOTAL PHOSPHORUS
  EOAHL NITROGEN
       KJE
       AMMONIA NITROGEN
                 (MG/H
   	  ._    _  (MG/LI
NITRATE - NITROGEN 
TOTAL FILTERABLE SOLIDS (MG/L)
TOTAL VOLATILE sonos CMG/LJ
PH LAB
HARDNESS FROM CA AND MG
ALKALINITY AS CAC03
CALCIUM         MG/L
MAGNESIUM       MG/L
POTASSIUM       MG/L
                            MAX
                            MAX
                            MAX
                            MAX
                            MAX
                            MAX
                            MAX
                            MAX
                            MAX
                            MAX
                            MAX
                            MAX
                            MAX
                            MAX
                            MAX
X99 RIVER MILEAGE
X100 TIME
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
kl:
22.
23.
24.
?5.
?:
3.
29.
30.
31.
18.
37.
36.
30.
39.
41.
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
                          .164
                         11940
                          .J52
                          .098
                         9.110
                        10.300
                       32S.110
                        13.091
                       1*5.000
                         7.552
                       216.473
                       216.030
                        54.344
                        19.706
                         2.038
T
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PARAMETER
TEST
19.

23!
ft:
?.
.1.
29.
:
if-:
36.
3fl.
39.
41.
(.OS)
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MIAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN 3,
MEAN
MEAN n
MEAN
MEAN 2
MEAN 2
MEAN 
MEAN
MEAN

.IFUltlim
loOOL
144L
ll940L
:a
2:30$!:
'5. n PL
3.0-91L
ts.oflftL
7.S57L
I6.473L
6.030L
i4.344l
9:for<,L
W3
8K5
MITS
MITS
M TS
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
2.036LIM
TS
T|
}l
TS
TS
TS
TS
                                                                        046   LOW
                                    .6400
                                   4.8300
                                   1.6600
                                    .1630
                                  16.6000
                                  35.0000
                                 399.0000
                                  SB.0000
                                 2IS.OOOO
                                   7.9000
                                 275.3300
                                 259.0000
                                  74.0000
                                  24.0000
                                   4.4000
MTN
MlN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MtN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
.0750
.6400
.0650

3.8000
.5000
211.0000
2.0000
101.0000
7,?noo
123.2870
104.0000
23.0000
11.0000
.2000
VAR
VAR
VAR
VAR
VAR
VAR
VAR
VAR
ANgf
ANCE
ANCE
ANCE
ANCE
ANCE
ANCE
                                                                                          .OH)
                                                                            t85
                'W

              LOW
              LOW
              LOW   I...  .
              LOW 309.913
              LOW   fl.104
              LOW 133.264
              LOW   7.48?
              LOW 204.04?
              LOW 201.1>?
              LOW  50.572
                    .6?4
                    1.610
LOW
LOW
             MfRH
             H AH
               RH
               AH

               fiM
               AH

               AH
               AH
                                                                                                        .174
                                                                                                        :m
                                                                                                HIGH
                                                                                                HIGH
                                                                                                HIGH
                                                                                                HIRH
                                                                                                HIGH
                                                                                                HIGH
                                                                                                     .
                                                                                               14.314
                                                                                              340.3?3
                                                                                               ]*.07A
                                                                                              1S6.736
                                                                                                7.6?1
                                                                                              228. <03
                                                                                              22P.6IS9
                                                                                               5B.115
                                                                                               ?0.7Pfl
                                                                                                ?.46T
                                                                                  ,019   SAMPLE
                                                                                  ,otS   SAMPLE
            .?07
            .002
          12^442
	 ANCE 120.S29
VARIANCF1696.B34
VARIANCF 196.023
VARIANCE 664.700
VARIANCE    .039
VARIANCE1193.141
VARIANCE1312.593
VARIANCE 109,B46
VARIANCE   9.606
VARIANCE   1*507
     SAMPLE
     SAMPLE
     SAMPLE
     SAMPLE
     SAMPLE
     SAMPLE
     SAMPLF
     SAMPLE
     SAMPLE
     SAMPLE
     SAMPLE
     SAMPLE
     SAMPLE
     SAMPLE
                          SIZE
                                   Table 59.  Site 810  SUMMER

-------
  SITES
 MO
  TYPE


  &
  LOCATION
NO RFSTRATNT

NO QFSTRAINT
NO RESTRAINT
MO RESTRAINT
!Ht RKI
                            W
                      RESTRAINT
                      RFSTRAlNT
                                   10
  PARAMCTFR VALUE

  OEPTH
NO RESTRAINT

NO RESTRAINT
                                         T TFST  l.f)S
                      PMOSPHORIIS
                      PHO
PARAMf T
PARAMCT
PARAMCT
pARAMfT
PARAMIT
PARAMtT
       ta
       :R
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MEAN
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
                                          PAPAMFTFR  19.
                                          PARAMFTEP  ?o.
                                          MPT|R  ??:
                                                    3.
                                                    ii:
                                                     J:
                                          PAR'AMETER  30!
                                          PARAMETER  31
                                          PARAMETER
                                          PARAMETER
                                          PARAMETER
                                          PARAMETER
                                          PARAHFTR
                       PARAM.
                       PARAMETER
                       PARAMETER
                       PARAMETER
                       PARAMETER
                       PAPAMET
                       PARAMET
                                                .69L
                                                .OOOL
                                                               i
                                                 6?b
                                                 39L
                       PARAMETER *i.  MEAN
                     MFAN
                     MFAN
                     MFAN
                     MEAN
                     MEAN
                     MEAN
                     MEAN   6.(
                     MFAN   f.<  ._
                     MEAN 2B6.133L
                     MEAN  1?:533L
                     MEAN   -  	
                     MFAN
                     MEAN
                     MEAN
                     MEAN
                     MEAN
                                                    Ml
                                                    M!
                                          24.0600
                                           4.2000
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
,0290
1  6?>0 0
,0650
,0810
3:Jg3
197.0000
i.oooo
92.0000
7.1000
117.6890
179.0000
29.0000
11.0000
.5000
                                                                              ,0?9
                                                                              .687
 .040
 .000
 -OV7

  "'?
                                                                                          1
 :Ss4
*:S?
LOW

IT-

irSS

185
LOW    	
LOW 252.708
LOW   S.tR?
LOW 124.528
LOW  7.335
LOW 161.140
LOW 151.840
LOW  38.704
LOW  14.860
LOW   1.549
  RH

  fiM
  BM
  BH
  M

  PM
HIGH
HI OH
M
                                                                              MIAN
                                                                                fiH
                                                                                RH
                                                                              Mir.H
                                                                                fiH
                                                                                       7.63?
                                                                                       S.147
                                                                                     319.559
                                                                                      17.28S
                                                                                     174.549
                                                                                       7.A94
                                                                                     216.026
                                                                                     284.160
                                                                                      59.696
                                                                                      19.997
                                                   VAR
                                                   VAR
                                                   VAR
                                                   VAR
                                                   VAR
                                                   VAR
                                                   VAR
                                                   VAR
                                                   VAR
                                                   VAR
                                                   VAR
                                                   VAR
                                                   VAR
                                                   VAR
                                                   VAR
                                                   VAR
                                                   VAR
                                                                                 SAMPL
                                                                                 SAMPLE
                                                                                 SAMPL
                                                                                 SAMPL
                                                                                 SAMPL
                                                                                 SAMPL
                                                                                 SAMPLE
                                                                                 SAMPLE
                                                                                 SAMPL
                                                                                 SAMPL
                                                       AN
                                   Table 60.  Site 810  FALL

-------
SITES 900
YEAi 73 TO 73
MONTH 34
DAY NO RESTRAINT
MOU.3 NO rtESTRATNT
TYPE NO RESTRAINT
HAStN NO RESTRAINT
SUH-3ASIN NO PFSTHAINT
LOCATION NO RESTRAINT
COUNTY NO RESTRAINT
fnnNSHTP NO RrSTR*tNT
LONr.TTUOF NO RESTRAINT
LATITUDE NO RESTRAINT
PARAMETER VALUF NO RESTRAINT
DEPTH NO RESTRAINT

S










Xl"5 SfUUHLF OHTMO PHOSPHORUS 
x?o TOTAL sotufME PHOSPHORUS
t?? TOTL PHO^PMOCMS
X?3 KjFfJAHL NITHOGS'N (MG/L)
>? UNMONIA NITWOf.fN (MG/L)


X?5 NIlt'Atf - NITPC'OEN (MG/L)
xo? mssoLVFn OXYGEN
X02 TIIWHTOITY IN JACKSON UNITS
X?9 TOTAL OISSOIVFO SOLIDS
X30 TOTAL FILTERABLE 'iOLTOS
X3> TOTAL VOLATIBLt SOLfOS
XI 6 PH I AB
X37 HARDNESS FROM CA NO MG
X*6 A1KALINITY AS CAC03
X3B CM CIUM M-i/L
X3< MAPMKST'JM M(j/L
X41 POTASSIUM MG/L
x99 RIVER MILEAGE
X100 TIME
PAPATER 19. MEAN .046
PARAMETER ?0. MEAN .000
PARAMETER ??. XEAN .070
PARAMfTfR 23. MEAN 1.556
PAflAMcTFU ?4. MEAN .22*
PARAk;FTf.R ?S. MEAN .000
PARAMETER 2. MEAN .000
PARAMETER 3. MEAN .000
PARAMETER ?9. MEAN 166*400
PARAMETER 30. MEAN 12.AOO
PARAMETER 31. MEAN 99.600
PARAMETER 10. MEAN .000
PARADE Ttn 37. MEAN 105.204
PAWAMtTER 36. MFAN .000
PARAMETER 36. MEAN 24.000
PARAhETER 39. MF.AN 11.200
PARAhETLR 41. MEAN Z.560
(MG/L>
(MG/L>
(MG/L)





MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX
MAX

6 7








T

PARAMETER
PARAMETER
PAPAMF.TfP
PASAMKTtr*
PARAMETER
PARAMfTFP
PARAMfTF"
PABAMf TFR
PftRAMFTFP
PAPAMFTfP
PABAMETfR
PARAMETER
PAflAMF TFR
PARAMFTrO
PARAMMf i)
PARAMETER
PARAMETER


.07?0
.0000
1.9000
.4600
.0000
.0000
.0000
194,0000
20,0000
108.0000
.0000
120.9270
.0000
27.0000
13.0000
3.8000










TEST

19.
23^

?S 9
$1
3nt
31.
1H.
37.
Jf> #
3H.
39.


J5JJJ
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MlN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
MIN
















































































(.05)

MF4N
MFAN
Mf AN
Mf AN
MEAN
MFAN
Mf AN
MEAN
MFAN
Mf AN
KEAhl
MEAN
MFAN
ME A N
MFAN
MFAN
MEAN



1

175
4
91

,04*L
.OOOL
.070L
1.5SM.
.229
1.266


SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPI.F
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE.
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
SAMPLE

HIGH
H GH
H GH
HIGH
HIGH
HIGH
HIGH
HIGH
HIGH
HIGH
HIGH
HIGH
HIGH
HIGH
HIGH
HIGH
HIGH


IWt
SI7E
SI7E
SI7E
till
SJ7E
SI7E
SI7E
SUE
SI7E
SIZE

.071
K9SR

looo
.000
.000
197. BT9
107^H63
.000
147.708
.000
32.957
11.041
3.B34


8:
5.
5.
0.
I;
5 .
5.
I''
0.
 *
5 .
Table 6l.   Site  900  SUM1ER

-------
    SITES


    XStftt
    OAV
    TYPE
    LOCATION

    COUNTY
    ^WNSHTP
            900

             78 T0  T3
           NO RESTRAINT
           NO RESTRAINT

           NO RESTRAINT

           NO RESTRAINT
           NO Rl STRA.tNT
           NO RESTRAINT
           NO
           NO RE
         10
                           TRAINT
    PARAMETER VALUE

    DEPTH
           NO RESTRAINT

           NO RESTRAINT
                        T  TEST   (.85)
    X?4
    X25

    X03
    X29
   X30
   X31
^   X18
    X37
    X36

    X39
    X41
    X99
    X100
TOTAL PHOSPHORUS
KJEDAHL NITROGEN  . 	
AMMONIA NITROGEN  IMG/D
NITRATE - NITROGEN t*G/L>
 ?ISSOt.VED OXYGEN
 UROIDITY IN JACKSON UNITS
TOTAL DISSOLVED SOLIOS (MG/L)
TOTAL FILTEPAHLF SOLIDS  MG
ALKALINITY AS CAC03
CALCIUM         MG/I.
MAGNESIUM       MR/L
POTASSIUM       MG/L
RIVFR MILEAGE
TIME
  PARAMETCB 19.
  PARAMETER 26.
  PARAMETER
  PARAMETKH ...
  PARAMETER 24.
  PARAMETER 25.
  PARAMETER  2.
  PARAMETER  .1.
  PARAMETKR 29.
  PARAMETER 30.
  PARAMETCR 31.
  PARAMETER 18.
  PARAMETER 37.
  PARAME1ER 36.
  PARAMETER 38.
  PARAMETER 39.
  PARAMETER 41.
         MFAN
         MEAN
         MEAN
         MEAN
         MEAN
         MEAN
         MEAN
         MEAN
         MEAN
         MEAN
         MEAN
         MEAN
         MEAN
         MEAN
         MEAN
         MEAN
         MEAN
i.au
          M*X
          MAX
          MAX
          MAX
          MAX
          MAX
          MAX
          MAX
          MAX
          MAX
          MAX
          MAX
          MAX
          MAX
          MAX
          MAX
          MAX
                 PARAMETER  19.
                 PARAMETER  20.
                 PARAMETER  2?I
                 PARAMETER  23.
                 PARAMETER  2*.
                 PARAMETER  Isl
                 PARAMETER   ?.
                 PARAMETER   3.
                 PARAMETER  ?9.
                 PARAMETER  30.
                 PARAMETER  31.
                 PARAMETER  18.
                 PARAMETER  37.
                 PARAMETER  3
-------
                           SECTION VH


                           APPENDIX B


Table 63.   CHANGES IN SOIL PHOSPHORUS FRACTION RESULTING FROM
         RADICAL SOIL DISTURBANCE?  ALL VALUES REPORTED AS  ppm/g.
       Site (near 05) - Organic Soil Paddy - First Year Production
Dateb
pH
Avail. P
Al-P
Fe-P
Ca-P
Total-P
6-22-73
7-10-73
7-11-73
7-13-73
7-30-73
6.2
6.1
6.2
6.0
6.3
40
22
14
27
70
89
109
159
164-
200
7.6
5.8
2.4
8.2
7.6
48
70
29
71
58
1240
831
643
793
793
         Site 115 - Organic Soil Paddy - Fourth Year of Production
6-22-73
7-10-73
7-11-73
7-13-73
7-30-73
7.0
71
6.9
6.6
6.8
54
71
34
80
40
85
100
158
157
157
, 8.1
n.

8.5
11.
64
70
26
98
118
1072
1167
1219
1080
905
         Site 125 - Organic Soil Paddy - Fourth Year of Production
6-22-73
7-10-73
7-11-73
7-13-73
7-30-73
6.8
6.8
6.9
6.5
6.9
35
136
16
471
88
122
137
173
75
230
11.1
6.5
4.9
.8
19.1
75
175
42
67
129
1147
1181
1011
1144
111ft
         Site 215 - Organic Soil Paddy - First Year of Production
6-22-73
7-10-73
7-11-73
7-13-73
7-30-73
7.0
6.8
7.0
6.6
6.9
33
63
26
34
61
138
103
164
87
199
6.9
3.8
3.3
4.7 -
30.
119
83
40
115
87
909
856
806
1022
682
                               115

-------
Table 63. (cont.)    CHANGES IN SOIL PHOSPHORUS
                 FRACTION RESULTING FROM RADICAL SOIL
              DISTURBANCE.  ALL VALUES REPORTED AS ppm/g.
    Site 705 - Mineral Soil Paddy - First Year Production

Date       pH     Avail. P     Al-P      Fe-P      Ca-P     Total-P
6-22-73
7-10-73
7-11-73
7-13-73
7-30-73
7.2
6.9
7.1
7.0
6.9
2.9
15.0
2.4
0.6
47.0
13
Mr
48
85
249
2.5
14.0
2.2
24.0
33.0
22
80
13
98
100
412
573
617
897
701
     Site 710 - Mineral Soil Paddy - (3-5) Year of Production
6-22-73
7-10-73
7-11-73
7-13-73
7-30-73
7.1
6.8
6.7
6.9
7.2
5.9
60.0
7.6
37.0
.6
4.4
69.0
55.0
65.0
34.0
2.4
14.0
7.0
19.0
10.0
6.9
85.0
17.0
103.0
63.0
374
371
495
487
503
 aSoil analyses conducted at field moisture conditions except pH and
  total  soil phosphorus.
 bAt all sites the date 7-10-73 represents 1 minute after, 7-11-73
  24 hours  after and 7-13-73 72 hours  after major soil disturbance.
                                116

-------
                                  TECHNICAL REPORT DATA
                           (Please read Instructions on the reverse before completing)
 REPORT NO.
 EPA-660/2-75-026
                                                          3. RECIPIENT'S ACCESSION NO.
 TITLE AND SUBTITLE
                                                          5. REPORT DATE
 Water Quality Control Through Single  Crop
 Agriculture,  No.  4
                            6. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION CODE
 AUTHOR(S)
 Kenneth R. Lundberg
 Patrick T. Trihey
                                                          8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NO.
 PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS
 Center for Environmental Studies
 Bemidji State College
 Bemidji,  Minnesota  56601
                             10. PROGRAM ELEMENT NO.

                                 1BB045
                             11. CONTRACT/GRANT NO.

                              802168  (16080 FQV)
2. SPONSORING AGENCY NAME AND ADDRESS
 Robert S. Kerr  Environmental Research Laboratory
 National  Environmental Research Center
 P. 0. Box 1198
 Ada, Oklahoma  74820
                             13. TYPE OF REPORT AND PERIOD COVERED
                              Final- 7/1/70 - 10/1/73
                             14. SPONSORING AGENCY CODE
6. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES
6. ABSTRACT
 A study was  conducted to determine  effects on water quality from flooded paddies
 used for  the commercial culture of  wild rice, Zizania aquatica.   Water samples
 were taken from flooded impoundments  on fertilized peat  and mineral soils as well
 as unfertilized peat soils.  Weekly changes in the chemical and physical parameters
 of water  entering, within, and discharged from paddies were measured through the
 summer.   No  significant changes were  observed in the receiving waters until fall
 draindown occurred when increases in  dissolved^ solids, total Kjeldahl-nitrogen
 and total phosphorus occurred in the  Clearwater River.   Algal assay tests indicated
 that the  increase in nutrients at peak discharge was sufficient to increase algal
 populations.   The quantities of nutrients released from  rice paddies were not
 significantly greater than would be expected in normal runoff in the area and
 much less than the amounts released from most agricultural endeavors.

 Consumptive  water use was found to  be 20-22 inches per acre (51-56 cm/ha).
17.
                               KEY WORDS AND DOCUMENT ANALYSIS
                 DESCRIPTORS
                                              b.lDENTIFIERS/OPEN ENDED TERMS
                                                                         c. COS AT I Field/Group
      Agricultural wastes
      Nitrogen
      Phosphorus
      Surface waters
                  Wild rice culture
                  Nutrient  control
                  Peat soils
                                                                           02/04
18. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT
                                              19. SECURITY CLASS (ThisReport)
                                                                          SI. NO. OF PAGES
      Release to public
                20. SECURITY CLASS (Thispage)
                   Unclassified
                                                                         22. PRICE
EPA Form 2220-1 (9-73)
* U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: 1975-699-154 /24 REGION 10

-------