United States
Environmental Protection
Agency
                                  PB92-904201
                               January-March 1992
EPA Publications
Bibliography
Quarterly Abstract
Bulletin

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                                             PB92-904201
                                        January-March 1992
EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
      QUARTERLY ABSTRACT BULLETIN
                 SPONSORED BY
          U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
        Center for Environmental Research Information
               Cincinnati, Ohio 45268
                     AND
          U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
        Information Management and Services Division
               Washington, DC 20460

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About this  Bibliography
  The entire EPA collection at the National Technical Information Service can be accessed
through the EPA Publications Bibliography, Quarterly Abstract Bulletin and earlier
publications in this series. The EPA Cumulative Bibliography, 1970 - 1976, (order number
PB-265920) contains bibliographic citations of reports generated by EPA and its
predecessor agencies and entered into the NTIS collection through 1976. It contains
bibliographic citations with abstracts, plus six indexes: Title, Subject (Keyword),
Corporate Author, Personal Author, Contract Number, and Accession/Report Number.

   The next publication in this series, the EPA Publications Bibliography,  1977 - 1983,
(order number PB84-158500) contains EPA reports entered into the NTIS collection and
published in the EPA Publications Bibliography, Quarterly Abstract Bulletin from its
inception in 1977 through December, 1983.  This volume contains all the indexes of the
original 7-year cumulation, plus a Sponsoring EPA Office index. Original hardbound
copies, of this publication are no longer available; stock has been reproduced by NTIS in
order to continue making it available.

  A new EPA Publications Bibliography, 1984 -1990, (order number PB91-205500) again
cumulates 7 years of EPA reports in a 2-part, hardbound publication which contains the
same 7 indexes as the prior edition.

  Quarterly supplements to this series continue to be published in the form of the EPA
Publications Bibliography, Quarterly Abstract Bulletin. Each issue contains an indexed
listing of all EPA technical reports and journal articles added to the NTIS collection
during the preceding quarter.  The fourth issue of each calendar year contains its
appropriate abstracts plus complete cumulated  indexes for that year.

   Bibliographic records of all EPA reports  in the NTIS collection are contained in the
NTIS  Bibliographic Database and are searchable online through various commercial
vendors.  Copies of individual reports are available in paper or microfiche form.  To order
documents, computer products, or subscriptions, complete and return the order form at the
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   The EPA Publications Bibliography is available on annual subscription from NTIS at a
cost of $135 for U.S, Canada and Mexico. Single copies are $34.  Customers in other
countries should contact NTIS for prices.
                                  11

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                          CONTENTS
About this Bibliography	ii
New EPA Document Numbering System	iv
About NTIS	v
NTIS Ordering Options	...v
EPA Library Network	vi
Report Summaries	1
Title Index	TI-1
Keyword Index	KW-1
Sponsoring EPA Office Index	SO-1
Corporate Author Index	CA-1
Personal Author Index	PA-1
Contract/Grant Number Index	,	CG-1
NTIS Order/Report Number Index	OR-1
Order Form	At end
Price Codes	,	Outside Back Cover
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                                ill

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       Mew  KPA  Docmnant  Numbering  S vat am  f January-   1992)
The following document numbering system has been adopted by EPA to  indicate
the Assistant Administrator/Program Office  or  Regional  Office  originating each
report.  Each 2-digit series listed below is preceded by "EPA" and  is  followed
immediately by a single numeric  digit representing the  appropriate  office
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publication number.  This information is provided  as a  guide to allow  the
users of this bibliography to use the report number to  know program
sponsorship of documents listed.
  10        Administrator; Deputy Administrator
  11        Administrative Law Judges
  12        Science Advisory Board
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  14        Associate Administrator for Congressional & Legislative Affairs
  15        Civil Rights
  16        Assistant Administrator for International Activities
  17        Associate Administrator for Commuinications & Public Affairs
  18        Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization
  20 - 22   Assistant Administrator for Administration  & Resources  Management
  23        Assistant Administrator for Policy,  Planning and Evaluation
  27        Associate Administrator for Regional Operations &  State/Local
              Relations
  30 - 34   Assistant Administrator for Enforcement
  35        Inspector General
  36        General Counsel
  40 - 45   Assistant Administrator for Air &  Radiation
  50 - 55   Assistant Administrator for Solid  Waste & Emergency Response
  60 - 65   Assistant Administrator for Research &  Development
  70 - 75   Assistant Administrator for Pesticides  &  Toxic  Substances
  80 - 85   Assistant Administrator for Water
  901       Region 1
  902       Region 2
  903       Region 3
  904       Region 4
  905       Region 5
  906       Region 6
  907       Region 7
  908       Region 8
  909       Region 9
  910       Region 10
  930       Central Regional Laboratory,  Annapolis, MD
                                      iv

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                        EPA  Library  Network
Most  of the  following  EPA libraries maintain reference  sets of  EPA
reports on microfiche.
   U.S.  EPA  Region  1 Library
   JFK Federal Building
   Boston, MA  02203
    (617) 565-3298
   FTS: 835-3298

   U.S.  EPA  Region  2 Library
   26 Federal Plaza
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    (212) 264-2881
   FTS: 264-2881

   U.S.  EPA  Region  3 Library
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   U.S.  EPA  Region  4 Library
   345 Courtland Street, NE
   Atlanta, GA  30365-2401
    (404) 347-4216
   FTS: 257-4216

   U.S.  EPA  Region  5 Library
   230 South Dearborn Street, Rm. 1670
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    (312) 353-9506
   FTS: 353-9506

   U.S.  EPA  Region  6 Library
   1445 Ross Avenue
   Dallas, TX  75202-2733
    (214) 655-6444
   FTS: 255-6444

   U.S.  EPA  Region  7 Library
   726 Minnesota Avenue
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    (913) 236-2828
   FTS: 757-2828

   U.S.  EPA  Region  8 Library
   Denver Place, Suite 500
   999 18th Street
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   FTS: 330-1444
U.S.  EPA  Region  9  Library
75 Hawthorne Street
San Francisco,  CA  94105
(415)  744-1517
FTS: 484-1517
                   10  Library
U.S.  EPA  Region
1200 Sixth Avenue
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(206)  553-1289
FTS: 399-1289
U.S.  EPA,  National  Enforcement
 Investigations  Center  Library
Building 53,  Box 25227
Denver Federal Center
Denver,  CO  80225
(303) 236-5122
FTS: 776-5122

U.S.  EPA,   Environmental
  Monitoring  Systems   Laboratory
  Library
P.O. Box 93478
Las Vegas,  NV  89193-3478
(702) 798-2648
FTS: 545-2648

U.S.  EPA,  Environmental
 Research  Laboratory  Library
200 SW 35th Street
Corvallis,  OR  97333
(503) 757-4328
FTS: 420-4328

U.S.EPA,  Andrew W.   Breidenbach
  Environmental Research  Center
26 W. Martin  Luther King Drive
Cincinnati, OH  45268
(513) 569-7707
FTS: 684-7707

U.S.  EPA,  Motor Vehicle
  Emissions  Laboratory  Library
2565 Plymouth Road
Ann Arbor,  MI   48105
(313) 668-4311
FTS: 374-8311
                                    VI

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U.S.  EPA,  Environmental
  Research  Laboratory Library
6201 Congdon Boulevard
Duluth,  MN.  55804
(218) 720-5538
FTS: 780-5538

U.S.  EPA,  Robert  S.  Kerr
  Environmental  Research
  Laboratory  Library
P.O. Box 1198
Ada, OK  74820
(405) 743-2256
FTS: 743-2256

U.S.  EPA,  Environmental
  Research  Laboratory Library
South Ferry Road
Narragansett,  RI  02882
(401) 782-3025
FTS: 838-6025

U.S.  EPA Region  2
Field   Office   Library
2890 Woodbridge Avenue
Building 209,  MS 245
Edison, NJ  08837-3679
(908) 321-6762
FTS: 340-6762

U.S.  EPA,  Central Regional
  Laboratory  Library
839 Bestgate Road  (3ES20)
Annapolis, MD   21401
(301) 266-9180
FTS: 652-2103

U.S.  EPA,  Library Services,
  MD-35
Research Triangle  Park, NC 27711
(919) 541-0094
FTS: 629-0094
U.S.  EPA,  Environmental
  Research  Laboratory   Library
Sabine Island
Gulf Breeze,  FL  32561
(904)  932-5311
FTS: 686-9011

U.S.  EPA,  Environmental
  Research  Laboratory   Library
College Station Road
Athens,  GA  30613-7799
(404)  546-3324
FTS: 250-3324

U.S.  EPA,  AREAL, MD-80
Atmospheric  Sciences   Modeling
  Division  Library
Research Triangle Park, NC  27711
(919)  541-4536
FTS: 629-4536
U.S.  EPA,
PM-211A
401 M Street
Washington,  DC
(202) 260-5922
FTS: 260-5922
Headquarters  Library
   20460
U.S.  EPA,  Office  of  Toxic
 Substances  Chemical  Library
TS-793
401 M Street
Washington,  DC  20460
(202) 260-2321
FTS: 260-2321
                                vi l

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EPA  PUBLICATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHY
  The full bibliographic report entries in this section are arranged alphanumerically by
  NTIS order number. Alphabetic data precedes numeric.
SAMPLE ENTRY
        NTIS Order Number/Media Code
                      Price Code*

                       Report Title
                   Corporate Author

                   Personal Authors

                           Date
                           Pages
                    Report Number

                   Contract Number
                         Abstract
PB90-120072/HSU
                                                        PC A09/MF A01
       Keywords (Descriptors & Identifiers)
Sensitivity of Ecological Landscapes and Regions to Global
Climatic Change

Oregon State Univ., Corvallis

F. P. Neilson, G. A. King, R. L. DeVelice, J. Lenihan, and
D. Marks.
Sep89
193p
EPA/600/3-89/073

EPA-68-C8-0006
Prepared in cooperation with NSI Technology Services Corp.,
Corvallis, OR. Sponsored by Corvallis Environmental Research
Lab., OR.

Increasing awareness  of the potential impacts from global
climatic change has elicited a storm of research planning
among all the major federal agencies. One of the primary
difficulties confronted- in the planning effort is the need to
objectively define dear priorities for research dollars.  The
report is an  attempt to contribute to the process of defining
those priorities by scientifically defining specific regions, eco-
logical systems and attributes of those systems that might be
particularly sensitive to climatic change. Two approaches to
addressing sensitivity have been defined, intrinsic sensitivity
and sensitivity relative to a particular stressor. Intrinsic sensi-
tivity is gauged by past variations in different ecosystems.
Extrinsic or stressor relative sensitivity addressed the same
question, but from the perspective of a particular stress.

'Climatic changes, 'Environmental Surveys,  'Research
projects, Hydrology, Forecasting, Weather, Biological Sur-
veys, Precipitation (Meteorology), Runoff, Natural Resources,
Seasonal variations, Biomass, vegetation, Forestry, 'Regional
Analysis, * Ecosystems, 'Global aspects, Federal agencies,
Comprehensive planning.

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                            EPA   PUBLICATIONS   BIBLIOGRAPHY
                                        Quarterly  Abstract   Bulletin
 PB91-1676SO/REB
                               PC A14/MF A03
 Methods for Measuring the Acute Toxiclty of Ef-
 fluents and Receiving Waters to  Freshwater and
 Marine Organisms (Fourth Edition).
 Environmental  Monitoring  Systems Lab., Cincinnati,
 OH.
 C. I. Weber. Sep 91,311 p* EPA/600/4-90/027
 See also  PB85-205383, PB86-158474 and PB89-
 220503.

 The manual describes methods for measuring the
 acute toxicity of effluents and receiving waters to
 freshwater, estuarine, and marine macroinvertebrates
 and fish. The methods include single and multiple con-
 centration static nonrenewal, static-renewal, and flow-
 through toxicity  tests  for effluents  and receiving
 waters.  Also included are guidelines on laboratory
 safety; quality assurance; facilities and equipment; test
 species selection and handling; dilution water, effluent
 and receiving water sample collection, preservation,
 shipping, and holding; test conditions; toxicity test data
 analysis; report preparation; and organism culturing.

 Keywords;  'Hazardous materials, 'Toxicity, 'Aquatic
 biology, 'Marine biology, Manuals, Test methods, Lab-
 oratories,  Quality assurance,  Measurement, Equip-
 ment, Invertebrates, Fishes, Estuaries, Fresh water,
 Sampling,           Chemical           analysis,
 Concentration(Composrtion),   Licenses,  Microorga-
 nisms,     Tables(Data),     'Water     pollution
 effects(Animals), Chemical compounds, LC50.
 PB91-220376/REB               PC A04/MF A01
 Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
 Reduction Engineering Lab.
 Industrial Pollution Prevention Opportunities for
 the 1990s. Project rept.
 Science Applications International Corp., Paramus,
 NJ.
 I. J. Licis, H. S. Skovronek, and M. Drabkin. Aug 91,
 68p EPA/600/8-91/052
 Contract EPA-68-C8-0062
 Prepared In cooperation with Versar, Inc., Springfield,
 VA. Sponsored by Environmental Protection Agency,
 Cincinnati, OH. Risk Reduction Engineering Lab.

 A set of criteria was developed for the purpose of sub-
 jectively prioritizing industry segments for their pollu-
 tion prevention potential and their opportunity for im-
 provement Using this set of criteria, high priority indus-
 tries were selected from a Standard Industry Classifi-
 cation (SlC)-based list for investigation of the need or
 opportunity for waste reduction through source reduc-
 tion and/or material recycle. A final list consisting of 17
 industries was identified. In addition, the investigation
 identified a list of  generic research or technological
 needs  where industry contacts  believed research
 could lead to waste  minimization applicable to more
 than one industry.  Since the start of the project, the
 USEPA initiated the Industrial  Toxics Project (also
 known  as  the 33/50) that identifies 17 high priority
 contaminants on the  Toxics Releases Inventory (TRI)
 for voluntary reductions by the companies generating
 the waste.

 Keywords: 'Protection, 'Industrial wastes, 'Pollution
 control, 'Waste minimization, Improvement, Preven-
 tion, Industries, Sources, Technical assistance, Toxici-
 ty, State government. Government agencies, Recy-
 cling, SIC, Priorities.
PB91-227967/RE8              PC A04/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
Reduction Engineering Lab.
Guides  to  Pollution  Prevention: The  Fiberglass-
Rebrforced and Composite Plastics Industry.
Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., Pasadena, CA.
J. D. Shoemaker, and R. Krishnan. Oct 91,61 p EPA/
625/7-91/014
Contract EPA-68-D8-0112
See also  PB87-114328, PB90-256439 and  PB90-
216532.  Sponsored  by Environmental  Protection
Agency, Cincinnati,  OH. Risk Reduction Engineering
Lab.

The fiberglass reinforced and composite plastic indus-
tries generate wastes (including air emissions) during
fabrication processes and from the use of solvents for
clean-up tools, molds and spraying equipment The
wastes generated are: partially solidified resins, con-
taminated  solvent from equipment clean-up,  scrap
coated fiber, solvated resin streams, and volatile or-
ganic emissions.  The guide manual presents source
reduction  and recycling  opportunities for  reducing
these wastes. Suggestions include using substitutes
for solvent cleaners, making changes to  mixing and
application equipment recovering and recycling sol-
vent and implementing good materials management
and housekeeping practices. To help companies in the
industry identify opportunities for waste reduction at
their own facilities, the guide includes a set of work-
sheets which take the user step-by-step  through an
analysis of the on-site waste generating operations.

Keywords: 'Composite  materials, 'Fiberglass rein-
forced plastics, 'Hazardous materials, 'Water pollu-
tion abatement Manuals, Industrial wastes, Solvents,
Equipment Scrap,  Fibers, Reduction, Management
Mixing, Recovery,  Guidelines, Substitutes,  'Waste
minimization, 'Volatile organic compounds,  Cleanup,
Recycling.
PB91-227983/REB               PC A04/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
Reduction Engineering Lab.
Biological  Treatment of  Wood  Preserving Site
Groundwater by BioTrol, Inc. Applications Analy-
sis Report
Science Applications International  Corp., Paramus,

H. S. Skovronek, and W. Hahn. Sep 91,51p EPA/540/
A5-91/001
Contract EPA-68-03-3485
See also PB92-110048. Sponsored by Environmental
Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk Reduction En-
gineering Lab.

The report is an evaluation of the BioTrol, Inc. Aque-
ous Treatment System (BATS), a fixed-film, aerobic bi-
ological treatment process for contaminated ground-
waters and other wastewaters. It summarizes and ana-
lyzes the results of the Superfund Innovative Technol-
ogy Evaluation (SITE) Program's six week demonstra-
tion at the MacGillis and  Gibbs  Company wood pre-
serving site in  New Brighton, MM.  The conclusions
from the pilot scale demonstration  study and  other
available data are: (1) the  fixed film aerobic process is
capable of  degrading pentachlorophenol (PCP) and
other organic pollutants to more than  95% removal.

Keywords: 'Wood preservatives, 'Waste treatment
Aerobic processes, Sites,  Ground water, Waste water,
Organic compounds, Regulations, Degradation, Cost
analysis, Operating costs,  Minnesota, Biological waste
treatment, Phenol/pentachloro.
PB91-228817/REB              PC A04/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
Reduction Engineering Lab.
Guides to Pollution Prevention: The Marine Main-
tenance and Repair Industry.
Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., Pasadena, CA.
Oct 91,70p EPA/625/7-91 /015
Contract EPA-68-D8-0112
See also PB88-213004. Sponsored by Environmental
Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk Reduction En-
gineering Lab.
Marine maintenance and repair facilities generate a
variety of waste streams during repair and mainte-
nance of mechanical systems, structural components,
upholstery, electrical systems, and surfaces of ships
and boats. Typical wastes generated from these oper-
ations, which present opportunities for waste reduc-
tion, are oils, coolants, lubricants, and cleaning agents;
various chemicals; paints and coatings; as well  as
dusts from sanding, sand blasting, and polishing and
refinishing operations. Both source reduction and recy-
cling opportunities are identified. To help companies in
the industry identify opportunities for waste reduction
at their own facilities, the guide includes a set of work-
sheets which take the user step-by-step through  an
analysis of tile on-site waste generating operations
and the possibilities for minimizing each waste.

Keywords: 'Hazardous materials, 'Materials recovery,
'Industrial wastes, Marine engines. Solvents, Ships,
Maintenance,  Reduction, Oils, Dust  Paints,  Lubri-
cants, Cleaving agents. Shipbuilding, Risk, 'Pollution
prevention, Recycling, Waste minimization, Shipyards.
PB91-242636/REB              PC E99/MF E99
Application  for  Certification  1991 Model Year
Light-Duty Vehicles.
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
1991,14169p
Set includes PB91-242644 through PB91-242743.

No abstract available.
PB91-242644/REB              PC A99/MF E99
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
	    for  Certification  1991 Model  Year
         r Vehicles -Audi.
         i of America, Inc., Ann Arbor, Ml.
          )EPA/460/A-91/1
         391-242651. Sponsored by Environmental
Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Also available in set of 11 reports PC E99/MF E99,
PB91-242636.

Every year, each manufacturer  of passenger  cars,
light-duty trucks, motorcycles,  or heavy-duty engines
submits to EPA an application for certification. In the
application, the manufacturer gives a  detailed techni-
cal description of the vehicles or engines he intends to
market during the upcoming model year. These engi-
neering data include explanations and/or  drawings
which describe engine/vehicle parameters such as
basic engine design, fuel systems, ignition systems
and  exhaust and evaporative emission control sys-
tems. It also provides information on emission test pro-
cedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be
used, and proposed maintenance requirements to be
followed during testing. Section 16 of the application
contains the results of emission testing, a statement of
compliance to the regulations, production engine pa-
rameters and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which
issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.

Keywords: 'IntemaJ combustion engines, 'Light duty
vehicles, 'Emission control, 'Certification, Air pollution
control, Compliance, Exhaust emission control de-
vices, Evaporative emission control devices, Motor ve-
hides(1991 models), Audi light duty vehicles, Volkswa-
gen of America.
PB91-242651/REB              PC A99/MF EOS
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
	  " n  for  Certification  1991  Model  Year
        ] Vehicles -BMW.
    / of North America, Inc., Montvale, NJ.
1991,876p EPA/460/A-9112
See also PB91-242644 and PB91-242669. Sponsored
by Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
                                                                                                                                              1

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                                                  EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
 Also available in set of 11 reports PC E99/MF E99,
 PB91-242636.

 Every year, each  manufacturer of passenger cars,
 light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines
 submits to EPA an application for  certification. In the
 application, the manufacturer gives a detailed techni-
 cal description of the vehicles or engines he intends to
 market during the upcoming  model year. These engi-
 neering data include  explanations and/or drawings
 which describe engine/vehicle parameters such  as
 basic engine design,  fuel systems, ignition systems
 and exhaust and evaporative emission control sys-
 tems. It also provides information on emission test pro-
 cedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be
 used, and proposed maintenance requirements to be
 followed during testing. Section 16 of the  application
 contains the results of emission testing, a statement of
 compliance to the regulations, production  engine pa-
 rameters, and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which
 issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.

 Keywords: •Internal combustion engines, 'Light duty
 vehicles, 'Emission control. 'Certification, Air pollution
 control. Compliance,  Exhaust  emission control  de-
 vices. Evaporative emission control devices. Motor ve-
 hictes(1991 models), BMW of North America Incorpo-
 rated, BMW light duty vehicles.


 PB91-242669/REB                PC A07/MF A02
 Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
 Application  tor  Certification  1991  Model Year
 Light-Duty Vehicle* - Ferrari - Flat
 Rat Research and Development Dearborn, Ml. U.SA
 Branch.
 1991,136p EPA/460/A-91/3
 See also PB91-242651 and PB91-242677. Sponsored
 by Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
 Also available in set of 11 reports PC E99/MF  E99,
 PB91-£42636.

 Every year, each manufacturer of passenger cars,
 light-duty  trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines
 submits to EPA an application for certification. In the
 application, the manufacturer gives a detailed techni-
 cal description of the vehtctes or engines he intends to
 market  during the upcoming model year. These engi-
 neering data include explanations and/or drawings
 which describe engine/vehicle parameters such  as
 basic engine design, fuel systems, ignition systems
 and exhaust and evaporative emission control  sys-
 tems. It also provides information on emission test pro-
 cedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be
 used, and proposed maintenance requirements to be
 followed during testing. Section 16 of the application
 contains the results of emission testing, a statement of
 compliance to the regulations, production'engine pa-
 rameters and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which
 issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.

 Keywords: 'Internal  combustion engines, 'Light duty
 vehicles, 'Emission control, 'Certification, Air pollution
 control, Compliance, Exhaust emission control de-
 vices, Eraporatwe emission control  devices, Motor ve-
 hictes(1991 models). Rat Auto R &  D U.SA, Rat light
 duty vehicles.
PB91-242677/REB               PC A99/MF E19
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Application for  Certification  1991  Model  Year
light-Duty Vehicle*-Ford.
Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, Ml.
1991,19180 EPA/460/A-91/4
See also PB91-242669 and PB91-242685. Sponsored
by Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Also avaaabte in set of 11  reports PC E99/MF E99.
PB91-242636.

Every year, each manufacturer of passenger cars,
light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines
submits to EPA an application for certification. In the
appfcatjog the manufacturer gives a detailed teehnt-
cal description of the vehicles or engines he intends to
market during the upcoming model year. These engi-
neering data include explanations and/or  drawings
which describe  engine/vehicle  parameters such as
basic engine design,  fuel systems, ignition systems
and exhaust and evaporative emission control  sys-
tems. It also provides Mtfu^hk&tion on emssion test pro-
cedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be
used, and proposed maintenance requirements to be
followed during testing. Section 16 of the application
contains the results of emission testing, a statement of
compiance to the regulations, production engine pa-
 rameters, and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which
 issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.

 Keywords: 'Internal combustion engines, 'Light duty
 vehicles, 'Emission control, 'Certification, Air pollution
 control, Compliance,  Exhaust emission control de-
 vices, Evaporative emission control devices. Motor ve-
 hides(1991 models), Ford Motor Company, Ford light
 duty vehicles.
 PB91-242685/REB               PC A99/MF E11
 Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
 Application  for Certification 1991  Model  Year
 Light-Duty Trucks - Ford.
 Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, Ml.
 1991,1051 p EPA/460/A-91/5
 See also PB91-242677 and PB91-242693. Sponsored
 by Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
 Also available in set of  11 reports PC E99/MF E99,
 PB91-242636.

 Every  year,  each  manufacturer of passenger  cars,
 light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines
 submits to EPA an application for certification. In the
 application, the manufacturer gives a detailed techni-
 cal description of the vehicles or engines he intends to
 market during the upcoming model year. These engi-
 neering data include  explanations  and/or drawings
 which  describe engine/vehicle parameters such  as
 basic engine design,  fuel systems, ignition systems
 and exhaust and evaporative emission control sys-
 tems. It also provides information on emission test pro-
 cedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be
 used, and proposed maintenance requirements to be
 followed during testing. Section 16 of the application
 contains the results of emission testing, a statement of
 compliance to the regulations, production engine pa-
 rameters, and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which
 issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.

 Keywords: 'Internal combustion engines, 'Light duty
 vehicles, 'Emission control, 'Certification, Air pollution
 control, Compliance,  Exhaust  emission control de-
 vices, Evaporative emission control devices, Motor ve-
 hicles(1991 models), Ford Motor Company, Ford light
 duty trucks.
PB91-242693/REB               PC A99/MF A06
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Application  for  Certification  1991  Model Year
Light-Duty Vehicle* - Fu(L
Fuji Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan). Subaru En-
gineering Div.
1991,7% EPA/460/A-91 /6
See also PB91-242685 and PB91-242701. Sponsored
by Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Also available in set of 11 reports PC E99/MF E99,
PB91 -242636.

Every year, each manufacturer of passenger cars,
light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines
submits to EPA an application for certification. In the
application, the  manufacturer gives a detailed techni-
cal description of the vehicles or engines he intends to
market during the upcoming model year. These engi-
neering data include explanations and/or  drawings
which describe  engine/vehicle parameters such as
basic engine design, fuel systems, ignition systems
and exhaust  and evaporative emission  control sys-
tems. It also provides information on emission test pro-
cedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be
used, and proposed maintenance requirements to be
followed during  testing. Section 16 of the application
contains the results of emission testing, a statement of
compliance to the regulations, production engine  pa-
rameters, and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which
issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.

Keywords: 'Internal combustion engines, 'Light duty
vehicles. 'Emission control, 'Certification, Air pollution
control. Compliance, Exhaust emission control de-
vices, Evaporative emission control devices, Motor ve-
hictes(1991 models),  Fuji  fight  duty vehicles, Fuji
Heavy Industries Ltd.


PB91-242701/REB               PC A99/MF E99
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Application  for  Certification  1991 Model  Year
Ught-Outy Vehicle*-General Motor*.
General Motors Proving Ground. MiKord, Ml.
1991.21340 EPA/460/A-91/7
See also PB91-242693 and PB91-242719. Sponsored
by Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
 Also available in set of 11 reports PC E99/MF E99,
 PB9.1-242636.

 Every  year, each  manufacturer of passenger  cars,
 light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines
 submits to EPA an application for certification. In the
 application, the manufacturer gives a detailed techni-
 cal description of the vehicles or engines he intends to
 market during the upcoming model year. These  engi-
 neering data include  explanations  and/or drawings
 which  describe engine/vehicle parameters  such as
 basic engine design,  fuel  systems, ignition  systems
 and exhaust and evaporative emission control sys-
 tems. It also provides information on emission test pro-
 cedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels  to be
 used, and proposed maintenance requirements to be
 followed during testing. Section 16 of the application
 contains the results of emission testing, a statement of
 compliance to the  regulations, production engine pa-
 rameters, and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which
 issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.

 Keywords: 'Internal combustion engines,  'Light duty
 vehicles, 'Emission control, 'Certification, Air pollution
 control, Compliance,  Exhaust emission  control de-
 vices. Evaporative emission control devices, Motor ve-
 hicles(1991 models), General  Motors Corporation,
 General Motors light duty vehicles.
 PB91-242719/REB               PC A19/MF AIM
 Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
 Application  for Certification  1991 Model Year
 Light-Duty Trucks - Isuzu Motors.
 Isuzu Technical Center of America, Novi, Ml.
 1991,436p EPA/460/A-91 /8
 See also PB91-242701 and PB91-242727. Sponsored
 by Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
 Also available in set of 11 reports P
 PB91-242636.
reports PC E99/MF E99,
 Every year, each  manufacturer of passenger cars,
 light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines
 submits to EPA an application for certification. In the
 application, the manufacturer gives a detailed techni-
 cal description of the vehicles or engines he intends to
 market during the upcoming model year. These engi-
 neering data include  explanations  and/or drawings
 which describe engine/vehicle parameters such as
 basic engine design,  fuel systems, ignition systems
 and exhaust and evaporative emission control sys-
 tems. It also provides information on emission test pro-
 cedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be
 used, and proposed maintenance requirements to be
 followed  during testing. Section 16 of the application
 contains the results of emission testing, a statement of
 compliance to the regulations, production engine pa-
 rameters, and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which
 issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.

 Keywords: 'Internal combustion engines, 'Light duty
 vehicles,  'Emission control, 'Certification, Air pollution
 control, Compliance, Exhaust emission control  de-
 vices, Evaporative emission control devices, Motor ve-
 hides(1991 models), Isuzu Technical Center of Amer-
 ica, Isuzu light duty trucks.


 PB91-242727/REB               PC A13/MF A03
 Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
 Application for Certification 1991 Model  Year
 Light-Duty Vehicles - Isuzu Motors.
 Isuzu Technical Center of America, Novi, Ml.
 1991,291 p EPA/460/A-91 /9
 Sea also PB91-242719 and PB91-242735. Sponsored
 by Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
 Also available in set of 11 reports PC E99/MF E99,
 PB91-242636.

 Every year,  each  manufacturer of passenger  cars,
 light-duty trucks, motorcycles, or heavy-duty engines
 submits to EPA an application for certification. In the
 application, the manufacturer gives a detailed techni-
cal description of the vehicles or engines he intends to
market during the upcoming model year. These engi-
 neering data  include explanations and/or drawings
which describe engine/vehicle  parameters such as
basic engine design, fuel systems, ignition systems
and exhaust and evaporative emssion  control  sys-
tems. It also provides information on emission test pro-
cedures, service accumulation procedures, fuels to be
used, and proposed maintenance requirements to be
followed during testing. Section 16 of the application
contains the results of emission testing, a statement of
compliance to the regulations, production engine  pa-
        Vol. 92, No. 1

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                                                  EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
rameters, and a Summary Sheet Input Form on which
issuance of a Certificate of Conformity is based.

Keywords: * Internal combustion engines, 'Light duty
vehicles, 'Emission control, 'Certification, Air pollution
control. Compliance, Exhaust  emission control  de-
vices, Evaporative emission control devices, Motor ve-
hides
-------
                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
who do not yet have municipal water connections uti-
lize the ground water for their drinking water source.
Froml 969 to 1975, the plant was operated to reclaim
used waste paint and ink-type solvents. In addition, the
plant area was used to store drummed wastes, includ-
ing waste diemicals and sludges from area industries.
The Record of Decision (ROD) addresses the remedh
atton of remaining contaminated soil and the contami-
nated ground water and surface water. The primary
contaminants of concern affecting the soil, ground
water, and surface water are VOCs including benzene,
PCE, TCE, toluene and xytenes; other organics includ-
ing PCBs and phenols; and metals including arsenic,
chromium and lead.

Keywords: 'Waste disposal, •Pollution control. Decon-
tamination, Hazardous materials.  Water pollution,
Ground water, Surface water, Soils,  Toutene, Ben-
zene, Xytenes, Phenols, Metals, Arsenic, Chromium,
Lead, Porychkxinated biphenyte,  North Carolina. *Su-
perfund, 'First remedial action - Final, Record of Deci-
sion, Jadco-Hughes Site, North Bermont(North Caroli-
na),  Gaston County(North Carolina), Volatile organic
compounds, Ettiyteoe/trichkxo.
P691-921S66/REB               PCA03/MFA01
Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 3):
Hrarica LandfH, Buffalo Townshfe PA. (first Re-
medW Action), June 1990.
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of Emergency and Remeolal Response.
29 Jun 90,SOp EPA/ROD/R03-90/092
Paper copy available on  Standing Order, deposit ac-
count required (minimum deposit $150 U.S., Canada,
and Mexk»; all others $300). Single copies also avai-
abte in paper copy or microfiche.

The i5-acre Hranica Landffll site is an inactive landfill
21 rrtles north of Pittsburgh, in Butter County, Pennsyl-
vania.  The site is in a rural agricultural setting with
4,000 people residing within a two-mite radius of the
site. Between 1966 and 1974, both municipal and in-
dustrial wastes were accepted onste including paint
and solvent wastes, plating wastes, metal sludge, and
                 '  . u-JL innInn«lBr.H Mwl t~ ^MHuJ
waste oils. The v
                                  land/or stored
onsite in surface impoundments until 1981. The first
operable unit Record of Decision addresses the soil
contamination in the ash pie area and other areas
where the lead concentration exceeds the background
range. The selected remedfel action for this site in-
cludes repairing the 29,000-square foot ash pile cover,
capping other areas where lead contamination ex-
ceeds 300 mg/kg; monitoring ground water and sur-
face water.

Keywords: 'Waste disposal, •Hazardous materials,
•PoOuBon control, Ground water. Earth fills. Industrial
wastes.  Municipalities. Paints. Solvents. Incinerators.
Liquids,  Lead(Metal), Soil properties, Metals, Ash, Sur-
face waters,  Land  use,  Monitoring,  •Superfund,
Record  of Decision,  first Remedial Action, Buffalo
Towrship(Pemsyrvania),                    'Butter
County(Pennsyrvania), Capping.
PB92-100072/REB
                                PC A05/MF A01
Msttiods for fVy|uatlff Toxidty MsfitJflcstfon Eval*

dura*. Second Edition.
Environmental Research Lab.-Duruth, MN.
T. J. Noroerg-King, D. Mount, E. Durhan, G. T. Anktey,
and L Burkhard. Feb 91,85p EPA/600/6-91 /003
See also PB89-12S934. Prepared in cooperation with
ASclCorp.,Duhitn,MN.

The document provides NPDES permitties with proce-
dures to assess the nature of effluent ttndcity to aquat-
ic organisms. It is intended for use by those perrnmies
having difficulty meeting their permit for whole effluent
aquatic organism toxicity fimrte or puuiiiUies required,
through special conditions, to reduce orejkninate efflu-
ent toxicity. The document  does not address human
health  toxicity concerns such as those  from biocon-
centration. water supplies and recreational uses. The
methods are applicable to identifying the causeoftox-
icity for samples other than mfluWfcte which display
acute toxicity, such as ambient water samples, elu-
triates  and pore waters from seolments, and posatty
leachates. While the authors generafly refer to ef-
fluents, the application of the techniques for any aque-
ous sample isimpiod. These methods may have appB-
caHrty to effluents and other types of samples that ex-
Nbit chronic toxicity as weD.
Keywords: 'Aquatic ecosystems, 'Water pollution ef-
fects, Toxicity, 'Toxic substances, 'Risk assessment,
•Bfoassay, Permits, Clean Water Act, Procedures, Pol-
lutant identification, Water quality. Chemical analysis,
Quality  assurance,  Water  pollution sampling, pH,
Water pollution detection, Quality control. Laboratory
equipment,  Ox>centration(Cc>mposition),   •Toxicity
Identification Evaluations.
                                                  PB9M00148/REB               PC A1S/MF A03
                                                  Robert S.  Kerr Environmental  Research Lab., Ada,
                                                  OK.
PB92-100114/REB
Toxic Rs
                                     MF$600.00
                     >ry (TRI) United States and
Territories, 1987.
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington. DC.
Office of Toxic Substances.
1991,962p
Includes 962 sheets of 24X microfiche and index. See
alsoPB91-S06816.

The Toxic Release Inventory (TR1) data gives annual
estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environ-
ment The set contains all of the data provided on the
magnetic tape version. Twelve indexes allow easy
access to the data. Section 313 of the Emergency
Planning  and  Community  Right-to-Know  Act  (also
known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and
Reauthorization Act (SARA) of  1986 (Pubic Law 99-
499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic
 '    fcal emissions from certain fadNtfe   ~
                                       ctkxi313
informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their
communities and releases of these chemicals into the
community. The data includes (1) the names, address-
es, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufac-
turing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2)
the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved;
and  (4) the  estimated quantity emitted into the air
(point  and  non-point emissions),  discharged into
bodtes of water, injected underground, released to
land, roloaaod to publicly owned treatment works, or
transferred to off-site waste disposal facilities. All re-
leases are in pounds per year.
                   «

Keywords: 'Toxic substances, 'Chemical compounds,
•Environmental surveys, 'Waste management. United
States, Superfund, Water pollution, Air pollution, Land
pollution,             Waste            disposal,
O>ncentration(Cornposition), Standard Industrial Clas-
sification, 'Emission inventory, Toxic Release Inven-
tory,  Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-
Know Act
PB92-100122/REB
Toxtc Retoas* lrrv«
                                     MFJ600.00
                       r (TRI) United States and
Environmental Protection Agency. Washington. DC.
Office of Toxic Substances.
1991,1052p
Includes 1,052 sheets of 24X microfiche and index.
See also PB91-607509.

TheToxic Release Irrventory (TRI) data gives annual
estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the envwon-
ment The set contains all of the data provided on the
magnetic tape version. Twelve indexes allow easy
access to the data. Section 313  of the Emergency
Planning and  Community Right-to-Know  Act  (also
known as Tide III) of the Superfund Amendments and
Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1966 (Public Law 99-
499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic
 '    lies) emissions fro     	    "  "   '
                     i certain facHfes. Section 313
iiiluinis the pubic of the presence of chomicals in their
communities and releases of these chemicals into the
community. The data includes (1) the names, address-
es, counties, and pubic contacts of facilities manufac-
turing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2)
the SK?bode for the plants; (3) the chemical involved;
and (4)  the  estimated quantity emitted into the air
(point and  non-point emissions),  discharged  into
txxfies of water, injected underground, released to
land, rotoosod to publicly owned treatment works, or
transferred to off-site waste Disposal facilities. AH re-
leases are in pounds per year.

Keywords: Toxic substances, •Chemical compounds,
•Environmental surveys, 'Waste management United
States, Superfund, Water pokitton. Air pollution, Land
pollution,             Waste             ^^r^fnl
Co«»rrtratton(Compo8ition), Standard Industrial da*
stfication, •Emission inventory. Toxic Release Inven-
tory, Emergency Planning and  Community Right-to-
Know Act
                                                                   ent of Aquifer Vulnerability and
                                                                    Conterminous United  States.
Regional Ass
Senstovlty in  the
Final rept 10 Apr 89-9 Apr 91.
Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater.
W. A. Pettyjohn, M. Savoca, and D. Self. Sep 91,329p
EPA/600/2-91/043
Grant EPA-R-815754
Sponsored by Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research
Lab., Ada, OK.

The report provides, in a generalized, largely graphic
format a  representation of ground-water vulnerability,
precipitation distribution, population density, potential
well yield, and  aquifer sensitivity for each of the 48
conterminous states. A classification scheme is devel-
oped based on an assessment of the vulnerability of
surfitial and relatively shallow aquifers. Aquifer sensi-
tivity is related to the potential for contamination. That
is, aquifers that have a high degree of vulnerability and
are in areas of high population density are considered
to be the  most sensitive. About 46 percent of the land
area of the conterminous United States consists of vul-
nerable class I aquifers. Of this amount 26.4 percent is
Class la, 10.4 percent is Class Ib and Ib-v, 8.1 percent
is Class Ic, and  Class Id accounts for an additional 1.4
percent The moderately vulnerable Class II aquifers
cover about 1 percent of the United States,  while the
least vulnerable, Class III, makes up about 19 percent
The undefined systems, Class U, account for an addi-
tional 19 percent

Keywords: 'Aquifers, 'Ground water, 'Water pollution
abatement 'Regional analysis, 'Water pollution con-
trol,  'Environmental  impact  assessments, United
States, Water  management(App)ied),  Environmental
protection, Preciprtation(Meteorology), Water supply.
Population density,  Maps,  Distribution patterns, 'US
EPA Regions 1-10.
                                                  PB92-100841/REB
                                                                                 PC A13/MF A03
RtQiratory ImpACt Anslyvw for the ruin Critofta
for Municipal SotM Waste LandfWs.
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response.
S. Rasmussen. Sep 91,295p EPA/530/SW-91 /073A
See also PB88-242516 and Addendum, PB92-100858.
Prepared  in  cooperation with Temple, Barker and
Stone, Inc.,  Lexington, MA,  ICF, Inc.,  Fairfax, VA.,
DPRA, Inc.. SL Paul, MN., and American Management
Systems, Inc., Arlington, VA.

The  Regulatory  Impact  Analysis was  prepared to
evaluate the U.S. EPA's revisions to Subtitle D criteria
for municipal solid waste landfills. These regulations
are a major rutemaking according to Executive Order
12291. Therefore, an RIA is required as part of the
rulemaking. The analysis in the report evaluates the
hybrid approach relative to four regulatory alternatives
in terms of costs, economic impacts, impacts on small
entities, health risk, and resource damage and dis-
cusses the overall rationale for the Agency's  final
choice. The RIA also includes a RFA that asesses im-
pacts to small entities.

Keywords: 'Municipal wastes.  •Pollution regulations,
•Sanitary  landfills, •Environmental  impact assess-
ments, 'Waste disposal,  'Solid wastes. Earth fills,
Cost analysis, Economic impacts, Waste manage-
ment. Risk assessment. Natural resources, Communi-
ty relations.
                                                  PB92-100858/REB               PC A03/MF A01
                                                  Addendum to the Regulatory Impact Analysis for
                                                  the Final Criteria for Municipal Solid Waste Land-
                                                  Ms.
                                                  Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
                                                  Office of Solid Waste ami Emergency Response.
                                                  S. Rasmussen. Sep 91,44p EPA/530/SW-91 /073B
                                                  See also PB92-100841. Prepared in cooperation with
                                                  Temple. Barker and Sloane, Inc., Lexington, MA., and
                                                  ICF, Inc., Fairfax, VA.

                                                  The analysis represents EPA's best efforts to quantify
                                                  the costs, economic impacts and benefits (health risk
                                                  and resource damage) of the regulatory options. It
                                                  should be noted, however, that as in any analysis, the
                                                  results are necessarily based upon incomplete data
                                                  and on simplified assumptions. A discussion of limita-
                                                  tions of the analyses is included in the RIA.
        Vol. 92, No. 1

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                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
Keywords: 'Municipal wastes, 'Pollution regulations,
'Sanitary landfills,  'Environmental impact assess-
ments, 'Waste  disposal,  'Solid wastes, Earth fills,
Cost analysis, Economic  impacts,  Waste manage-
ment Risk assessment, Natural resources, Communi-
ty relations.
PB92-101336/REB               PC A06/MF A02
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC.  Atmospheric Research and Exposure As-
sessment Lab.
Laboratory and Field Evaluations of a Methodolo-
gy for Determining  Hexavatent Chromium Emis-
sions from Stationary Sources. Final rept
Entropy Environmentalists, Inc., Research Triangle
Park, NC.
A.C.Carver.Oct91,108p EPA/600/3-91/052
Contract EPA-68-02-4550
Sponsored by Environmental  Protection Agency, Re-
search Triangle Park,  NC. Atmospheric Research and
Exposure Assessment Lab.

The study  was initiated to determine whether chromi-
um emissions should  be regulated under Section 112
of the Clean Air Act National Emissions Standards for
Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP).  To support sta-
tionary source regulations, it is important that (1) the
sampling procedure not change the chromium valence
state during sampling and (2) an analytical technique
for measuring low concentration levels of chromium be
available. These goals are achieved  with the current
EPA 'Draft Method for Sampling and Analysis of Hexa-
valent  Chromium  at  Stationary  Sources.' The  draft
method utilizes a recirculating system to flush impinger
reagent into the sampling nozzle during sample collec-
tion. Immediate contact of the stack gas with impinger
reagent 'fixes' the chromium  valence state. Ion chro-
matography coupled  with post column derivatization
and ultraviolet visible detector is used to analyze Cr(VI)
in the parts per trillion range. Field tests were conduct-
ed at metal plating facilities, industrial cooling towers,
municipal  waste incinerators, sewage sludge  inciner-
ators, and hazardous waste incinerators. It was at the
hazardous waste  facility that the  new method was
proven to  have  acceptable precision  and essentially
no conversion in the sample train.

Keywords: 'Chromates, 'Flue gases, Chromatogra-
phy. Air pollution. Stationary sources, Laboratory tests.
Field tests, Toxic substances.  Incinerators, Evaluation,
Valence, 'Hexavalent chromium.
PB92-101344/REB                PC A10/MF A03
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Manual for Non-CFC Aerosol Packaging: Conver-
sion from  CFC to Hydrocarbon Propellants. Final
reptDec90-Ju!91.
Radian Corp., Austin, TX.
K. M. Adams, K. E. Hummel, T. P. Nelson, and S. L
Wevill. Sep 91,219p EPA/600/2-91 /056
Contract EPA-68-DO-0125
Sponsored by Environmental Protection Agency,  Re-
search Triangle Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering
Research Lab.

The report provides technical assistance to aerosol
product marketers and fillers in other nations now
faced with eliminating chlorofluorocarbons  (CFCs)
under the terms of the Montreal Protocol. It addresses
the issues of  hydrocarbon propellent supply, product
reformulation, equipment conversion, and safety con-
cerns for both the manufacturing plants and the aero-
sol  products  themselves.  Because  stratospheric
ozone provides protection from biologically damaging
uttraviolet-B radiation, and because CFCs have been
strongly implicated in the thinning of the Earth's strato-
spheric ozone layer, there is an urgent need to elimi-
nate production and use of the CFCs. In  the U.S.,
CFCs were banned for use as propellents from nearly
all aerosol products as early as 1978. In place of the
CFC propellents, liquified hydrocarbons such as pro-
pane, n-butane, and isobutane were found to be ac-
ceptable substitutes for most aerosol products.

Keywords:  'Ruorohydrocarbons, 'Substitutes, 'Hy-
drocarbons, 'Propellants, 'Aerosols, Ozone,  Strato-
sphere, Ultraviolet radiation, Packaging, Air pollution
control, Propane, Butanes, Manuals.


PB92-1013S1/REB                PC A13/MF A03
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Analysis of Factors Affecting Methane Gas Re-
covery from Six Landfills. Final rept Jul 90-Jul 91.
Radian Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC.
D. Campbell, D. Epperson, L Davis, R. Peer, and W.
Gray. Sep 91,298p EPA/600/2-91 /055
Contract EPA-68-D9-0054
Portions of this document are not fully legible. Spon-
sored by Environmental Protection Agency, Research
Triangle Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Re-
search Lab.

The report gives results of a pilot study of six U.S. land-
fills that have methane (CH4) gas recovery systems.
(NOTE: The study was a first step in developing a field
testing program to gather data to identify key variables
that affect CH4 generation and to develop an empirical
model of CH4 generation based on those variables.
The field test program development in turn, is part of
EPA/AEERL's research program aimed at improving
global landfill CH4 emissions estimates.) To evaluate
the effects of climate on CH4 production and recovery,
the six sites represented a variety of moisture and tem-
perature patterns (i.e., hot and wet cool and wet hot
and  dry). Landfill gas was tested at each landfill to
evaluate the quality of the gas recovery data available
at each. The testing included assessing the adequacy
of on-site instrumentation and scanning the landfill sur-
faces for organic vapors that would indicate emissions
of CH4. In addition, information on waste composition
and landfill characteristics was sought for each landfill.
Except for flow measurements, the test procedures
selected were well suited to the types of gas recovery
installations encountered at the landfills visited. Based
on comparisons between EPA Reference Method 3C
and  instrument analyses of the landfill gas composi-
tions, all on-site analysis instruments appeared to be
operating with reasonable accuracy.

Keywords: 'Methane, 'Earth fills,  'Gas production,
'Materials recovery, 'Waste disposal, 'Emission fac-
tors, 'Air pollution control, Riot studies, On-site inves-
tigations, Field tests. Climates, Data processing. Math-
ematical models, Site characteristics, Global aspects,
Study estimates,  Pollution sources,  Greenhouse
effect
PB92-101369/REB                PC A03/MF A01
Fluorescence Techniques for MetaJ-Humic Inter-
actions. Journal article.
Environmental Research Lab., Athens, GA. Office of
Research and Development.
W. Susetyo. L A. Carreira, L V. Azarraga, and D. M.
Grimm. C1991,14p EPA/600/J-91 /215
Pub. in Fresenius Jnl. of Analytical Chemistry, v339 n9
P624-635 Sep 91. See also PB91 -116921. Prepared in
cooperation with  Georgia Univ.,  Athens.  Dept of
Chemistry, and Technology Applications, Inc., Athens,
GA.

Two fluorescence techniques to study metal-humic
interactions are presented. In the first technique, Lan-
thanide Ion Probe Spectroscopy (LIPS), the humic
samples are titrated by Eu(+3) ions. The ratio of the
intensities of two  emission lines of Eu(+3), R=l(sub
592)/l(sub  616), is used to estimate the amount of
bound and free species of the probe ions. The titration
plot is presented  as R versus the logarithm  of total
added Eu(+3). In  the second technique, fluorescence
quenching of the humic material by Cu(+2) is used to
produce titration curves of intensity versus the loga-
rithm of total added Cu(+2). The two techniques are
used in conjunction with a model that treats the various
ligands  in humic  substances as continuous distribu-
tions of binding sites in which individual ligand concen-
trations are normally distributed with respect to the in-
dividual stability  constants for  metal binding.  The
model includes the effects of pH, ionic strength,  and
competing metal ions. The parameters of the model
are estimated by fitting the spectral titration data to the
calculated titration plot Some simulation and experi-
mental data are presented and discussed. (Copyright
(c)Springer-Verlag1991.)

Keywords:  'Humic acids,  'Fluorescence, Titration,
Ion probes, Europium, Spectrum analysis.  Copper
tons, Water pollution, Ligands, Mathematical models.
Reprints, Metal humic interactions.
PB92-101377/REB                PC A02/MF A01
Environmental Research Lab., Athens, GA.
Continuous MulUligand Distribution Model Used
to Predict the Stability Constant of Cu(ll) Metal
Comptoxation with Humic Material from Fluores-
cence Quenching Data Journal article.
Technology Applications, Inc., Athens, GA.
D. M. Grimm, L V. Azarraga, L. A. Carreira, and W.
Susetyo. C1991.7p EPA/600/J-91/216
Grant EPA-R-813461
Pub. in Environmental Science  and Technology, v25
n8 p1427-1431 Aug 91. Prepared in cooperation with
Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept of Chemistry. Sponsored
by Environmental Research Lab., Athens, GA.

The use of a pH-dependent continuous multiligand dis-
tribution model to determine the stability constant be-
tween Cu(ll) and dissolved humic material is reported.
Fluorescence quenching  of the humic material by
Cu(ll) is used to produce spectral titration curves. The
values from the titration curves are then fit by use of a
feast-squares fitting routine, to  the calculated values
produced by the model. Three titrations at pH 2.5,3.5,
and 4.5 were conducted using  this method, and the
observed  and  calculated values  are compared.  A
single stability constant for Cu(ll) with the humic mate-
rial  is reported. The results are compared with those of
experiments carried out using a new technique that
relies on  the spectral properties of the Eu(lll) ion  to
probe metal binding sites in humic material. (Copyright
(c) 1991 by the American Chemical Society.)

Keywords:  'Copper  ions,  'Humic acids, 'Ligands,
'Chemical  equilibrium, Fluorescence, Titration, pH,
Water pollution, Reprints,  'Stability constants, 'Con-
tinuous multiligand distribution model.
PB92-10138S/REB
QuantttaUv
          PC A02/MF A01
nt of the Effects of Metals
on Mterobtal Degradation of Organic Chemicals.
Journal article.
Environmental Research Lab., Athens, GA.
W. A. Said, and D. L Lewis. C1991,8p EPA/600/J-91/
217
Pub. in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, v57
n5 p1498-1503 Jul 91. Prepared  in cooperation with
Technology Applications, Inc., Athens, GA., and Geor-
gia Univ., Athens. Faculty of Ecology.

Bkxtegradation  inhibition  of a  benchmark chemical,
2,4-dichloro-phenoxyacetic acid  methyl  ester (2,4-
DME),  was used to quantify the  inhibitory effects of
heavy  metals on aerobic  microbial degradation rates
of organic chemicals. The procedure used lake sedi-
ments  and aufwuchs (floating mats) collected in the
field or from  laboratory microcosms. Effects of CuCI2,
Hgd2, ZnCI2, Cd(NO3)2, and Cr(NO3)3 at initial con-
centrations ranging from  0.3 mteroM to 73 mM (ap-
proximately 0.1  to 10,000 mg/liter) were investigated.
In general, such metallic compounds appeared to be
considerably more inhibitory to the bkxJegradation of
an organic chemical than high concentrations of mi-
crobially toxic compounds studied previously.  Effects
of  various  metal  concentrations  were  evaluated.
(Copyright (c) 1991 American  Society for Microbiolo-
gy.)

Keywords: ' Microbial  degradation,  'Water pollution,
•Organic compounds,  'Metals, 'Biodeterioration,  Re-
action  kinetics, Risk assessment Sediments, Sedi-
ment-water  interfaces,  Lakes, Aquatic  microorga-
nisms, Biochemistry, Concentratipn(Composition), In-
hibitors,   Reprints,  Acetic  atid/dichloro-prienoxy-
(methyt-ester).
 PB92-101393/REB                PC A03/MF A01
 Predicting  Chemical  Concentration  Effects on
 Transformation Rates of  Dissolved Organic* by
 Complex Microbial Assemblages. Journal article.
 Environmental Research Lab., Athens, GA. Office of
 Research and Development
 D. L Lewis, and D. K. Gattie. C1991,22p EPA/600/J-
 91/218
 Pub. in Ecological Modelling, v55 n1 IZ p27-46 Jul 91.
 Prepared in cooperation with Technology Applications,
 Inc., Athens, GA., and Georgia Univ., Athens. Inst of
 Ecology.

 Microbial transformation rate data and theoretical con-
 siderations were analyzed for selected organic chemi-
 cals with respect to the general utility of mathematical
 models for predicting microbial transformation rates
 for risk assessment and regulatory purposes. By rec-
 ognizing the unique problems associated with predict-
 ing microbial transformation rates within specific sub-
                                                                                                                                 Mar 1992

-------
                                                   EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
  strata concentration ranges, (S), the research, devel-
  opment,  and  testing  of  predictive  mathematical
  models for environmental exposure assessment can
  be better focused Lacking site-specific data, such an
  approach may yield useful interim models to meet our
  current needs as our understanding of environmental
  processes continues towards developing models more
  capable of accurately predicting microbial rates over
  broader ranges of conditions. (Copyright (c) 1991 - El-
  sevier Science Publishers B.V.)

  Keywords: 'Mathematical  models,  •Organic com-
  pounds, 'Microorganisms,  *Btoconversion, 'Environ-
  mental effects, Microbial degradation, Biodeteriora-
  tion,  Ctoncentrat»n(CompositK>n), Risk assessment.
  Pollution  regulations,  Reaction kinetics. Exposure,
  Toxic substances. Reprints.
  PBM-101401/REB               PCA03/MFA01
  Environmental Research Lab., Athens, GA.
  Fat* of Commercial Disperse Dyes In Sediments.
  Journal article.
  Georgia Univ., Athens. Deot of Textiles, Merchandis-
  ing and Interiors.
  C. P. C. Yen, T. A. Perenfch, and G. L Baughman.
  C1991,11p EPA/600/J-91/219
  GrantEPA-R815415
  Pub. in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, vIO
  P1009-1017 Aug 91. Sponsored by Environmental Re-
  search Lab., Athens, GA.

  Kinetics of disappearance of seven different disperse
  dyes were determined in compacted sediments at
  room temperature. The commercial dyes fm dispersed
  solid form) were representative  of nrtroazo, anthra-
  guinone, and qunofine structures that are widely used.
  Reaction rates were found to be first order over at
  least two  half-lives and were  different for the three
 groups of dyes. Half-lives were on the order of hours,
 days and months for the nttroazobenzene, airmoanth-
 raquinone, and quinoline dyes, respectively. Stability of
 the latter is consistent with detection of a quinoline dye
 in treatment plant sludge and in sedtanent from a water
 body receiving ------
 are degraded by cleavage of the azo group to give ani-
 lines and ring-substituted phenylenedtamines from the
 dbzo component of the molecule. Products from the
 other portion (coupling component) of the molecule
 are unidentified, as yet. but are expected to be N,N-
 dfeubstituted phenytenediamines.  Products of  the
 anthraquinone dyes were unidentified, except for the
 case of a nitrated dye on which the nftro group was re-
 duced.

 Keywords: •Water pollution sampling,  'Sediments,
 'Dyes, Environmental effects. Reaction kinetics, Sedi-
 ment-water  interfaces.  Environmental  transport.
 ReducttorXChemistiy). Industrial wastes, Azo  dyes,
 Anthraquinones, Colloid chemistry. Reprints.


 PM2-101419/REB              PCA02/MFA01
 Apphatton  of Hutttspectral Techniques to the
 Prectoe Identification of Aldehyde* in  the  Envi-
 ronment Journal article.
 Environmental Research Lab., Athens. GA.
 S. D. Richardson, A. D. Thruston, T. W. CoHette, and J.
 M. McGuire. 1991. 9p EPA/600/J-91 /220
 Pub. in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, v10
 n8p991-997Aug91.

 By using gas chromatography coupled with tow- and
 high-resolution  etoctrorMmpact mass spectrometry,
 low- and high-resolution  chemical ionization  mass
 spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectros-
 copy, eight straight-chain aldehydes were identified in
 a water sample taken from the overflow pipe of a mu-
 nicipal sewer line that contained a combination  of in-
 dustnal and domestic sewage. This combination of in-
 frared and  mass spectral techniques yielded precise
 identifications of n-hexanal, n-heptanal. 2-heptenal, n-
environment, and aH Ihose previously found were satu-
rated.

Keywords:  'Water  poHution  detection,  'Industrial
wastes. 'Sewage  disposal,  'Water analysis. 'Alde-
hydes, Waste disposal, Maw spectroscopy, Fourier
transform spectrometers, Gaa chromatography, Infra-
red spectroscopy, Spectrum analysts, Chemical anary-
  PB92-101427/REB               PC A05/MF A01
  Electric and Magnetic Fields Near AM Broadcast
  Towers. Final rept.
  Office of Radiation Programs, Las Vegas, NV.
  E. ManSply, and R. F. Cleveland. Jul 91,89p EPA/
  520/6-91/020
  See also PB89-234850.

  The purpose of the study was to obtain actual meas-
  urement data in the close-in near field of representa-
  tive AM broadcast antennas and compare the data to
  values  predicted by  a Numerical Electromagnetic
  Code (NEC) model. Measurements of electric and
  magnetic fields were made along several radial direc-
  tions at distances from 1 to 100m from the transmitting
  towers of eight AM broadcast stations. These stations
  operated at various frequencies, electrical heights, and
  power outputs.

  Keywords:  'Radio  broadcasting,  *Radk>  stations,
  •Electric fields, 'Magnetic fields, Radiation hazards,
  Amplitude modulation, Electrical measurement, Near
  field, Graphs(Charts), NEC model.


  PB92-101435/REB               PC A14/MF A03
  Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
  Office of Emergency and Remedial Response.
  Citizens' Guidance Manual  for the Technical As-
  sistance Grant Program.
  ICF Technology, Inc., Fairfax, VA.
  Jun 88,320p EPA/540/G-88/001,, OSWER
  DIRECTIVE-9230.1-03
  Contract EPA-68-01 -7389
  Sponsored  by  Environmental  Protection  Agency,
  Washington, DC. Office of Emergency and Remedial
  Response.

  The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act
 of 1986 (SARA), which amended CERCLA, provides
 under section 117(e) an important new component of
 EPA's community relations activities at  Superfund
 sites-technical assistance grants to affected  groups.
 The purpose  of  these grants is to assist citizens'
 groups in understanding technical information  that as-
 sesses potential hazards and the selection and design
 of appropriate response actions at Superfund sites.
 This manual outlines Federal policies, procedures, and
 regulations related to the Technical Assistance Grant
 Program and provides instructions on how to complete
 Federal grant forms. If a State administers the Techni-
 cal Assistance Grant Program, the State may have ad-
 ditional procedures and requirements that affect citi-
 zens' groups applying for grants within that State.
 Groups,  therefore, should contact  the appropriate
 State representative for specific information.  This
 manual is designed to help citizens' groups apply for
 and manage a technical assistance grant It is written
 as a self-help guide in an easy-to-understand manner.
 Step-by-step instructions for completing various forms
 are included throughout the manual.

 Keywords: 'Citizen participation, 'Technical  assist-
 ance. 'Manuals. 'Superfund.  'Hazardous  materials,
 'Waste management. Community relations, Public in-
 formation, Guidelines,  State  government,  Require-
 ments, Procedures, Remedial action, Forms(Paper),
 •Technical Assistance  Grant Program, Remedial re-
 sponse.
PB92-101666/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Problems Associated with Published Environmen-
tal Fate Data. Journal article.
Environmental Research Lab., Athens, GA.
H. P. Kollig, and B. E. Kitchens. c1990,11 p EPA/600/
J-90/544
Pub. in lexicological and Environmental Chemistry,
v28n2-3p95-103Dec90.

Some of the problems associated with published data
on the environmental fate of chemicals are unknown
quality/reliability, misquoted numbers, citations from
other publications and not the original work, data refer-
     I as unpublished or as personal communication,
non-corroborating data up to several orders of magni-
tude apart in different sources, and insufficient docu-
mentation. These problems are discussed in the paper
and suggestions are made for improving the quality of
the literature data In particular, researchers should
apply a sound quality  assurance program and ade-
quately document experiments to enable investigators
to repeat them. Better attention should  be given to
writing and proofreading manuscripts to minimize mis-
takes, and the primary reference should be obtained to
  assure the correctness of a value. (Copyright (c) 1990
  Gordon and Breach, Science Publishers, Inc.)

  Keywords: 'Environmental effects, 'Chemical com-
  pounds, 'Error analysis, Quality control, Quality assur-
  ance, Data processing, Environment models, Environ-
  mental transport, Chemical reactions, Reaction kinet-
  ics, Concentration(Composition), Study estimates, Ex-
  perimental design,  Data base management. Risk as-
  sessment, Reprints.
  PB92-101674/REB               PC A03/MF A01
  Regtospecfflc  DechlorinaUon  of  Pentacnkxo-
  phenol  by  Dtehlorophenol-Adapted  Microorga-
  nisms In Freshwater, Anaerobic Sediment Slur-
  ries. Journal article.
  Environmental Research Lab., Athens, GA.
  F. O. Bryant, D. D. Hale, and J. E. Rogers. c1991,11 p
  EPA/600/J-91/221
  Pub. in Applied and  Environmental Microbiology, v57
  n8 p2293-2301  Aug  91. Prepared in cooperation with
  Technology Applications, Inc., Athens, GA.

  The reductive  dechlorinatton of pentachkxopbenoi
  (PCP)  was investigated in anaerobic sediments that
  contained nonadapted or 2,4- or 3,4-dtahlorophenol-
  adapted  microbial communities. Adaptation of sedi-
  ment communities increased the rate of conversion of
  2,4- or 3,4-DCP to  monochtorophenols  (CPs) and
  eliminated the lag phase before dechkxination was ob-
  served. Both 2,4- and  3,4-DCP-adapted sediment
  communities  dechtorinated the six DCP  isomers to
  CPs. The specificity of chlorine removal from the DCP
  isomers indicated a  preference for ortho-chlorine re-
  moval by 2,4-DCP-adapted sediment communities and
  for para-chlorine removal by 3,4-DCP-adapted sedi-
  ment communities. Sediment slurries containing nona-
  dapted microbial communities either did not dechtorin-
  ate PCP or did so following a lag phase of at least 40
  days. Sediment communities adapted to dechtorinate
  2,4- or 3,4-DCP dechtorinated PCP without PCP with-
  out an  initial lag  phase. The 2,4-DCP-adapted commu-
  nities initially  removed the ortho-chlorine  from  PCP,
  whereas the 3,4-DCP-adapted communities initially re-
  moved the  para-chlorine from PCP. A 1:1 mixture of
  the adapted sediment communities also dechlorinated
  PCP without a  lag phase. Intermediate products of
  degradation-2,3,5,6-tetrachlorophenol. 2,3,5-trichlor-
 ophenol. 3.5-DCP, 3-CP,  and phenol-were identified
 by a combination of cochromatography (high-pressure
 liquid chromatography) with standards and gas chro-
 matography-mass spectrometry. (Copyright (c) 1991.
 American Society for Microbiology.)

 Keywords: 'Dechtorination,  *Microbial  degradation,
 •Anaerobic processes, 'Water pollution, 'Sediments,
 'Biodeterioratkjn, Freshwater, Biological communities,
 Reaction  kinetics, Biochemistry, Chemical analysis,
 Gas chromatography,  Mass spectroscopy,  Sediment-
 water    interfaces,    Aquatic    microorganisms,
 Reduction(Chemistry),  Reprints,  'Phenol/pentach-
 toro, Chemical reaction mechanisms, PhenoJ/dichloro.
 PB92-101682/REB               PC A02/MF A01
 Microbial Degradation of  Flurtamone  hi Three
 Georgia Soils. Journal article.
 Environmental Research Lab., Athens, GA.
 T. C. Mueller, P. A. Banks, and W. C. Steen. c1991, 7p
 EPA/600/J-91/222
 Pub. in Weed Science, v39 n2 p270-274 Apr-Jun 91.
 Prepared in cooperation with Georgia Univ., Athens.

 Degradation of flurtamone in a Greenville sandy loam,
 a Cecil loam, and a Dothan loamy sand with 0,1, or 2
 years of previous flurtamone field use was evaluated
 under controlled conditions. Soil sterilization by auto-
 daving significantly  reduced flurtamone dissipation
 rate in all sorts. Enhanced degradation of flurtamone
 was observed in a Greenville sandy day loam after 1
 year of previous flurtamone field use and in a Cecil
 loam after 2 years of previous flurtamone field use. No
 enhancement of flurtamone degradation was  ob-
 served in a Dothan loamy sand. Flurtamone degrada-
 tion kinetics in these  studies was described as a first-
 order process. Microbial  populations in each soil
 showed no major changes in  total bacterial numbers
due to preexposure to flurtamone in the field.

 Keywords: 'Microbial degradation, 'Soil microbiology,
 'Land pollution, 'Herbicicles. Georgia, Son types. Soil
chemistry. Reaction  kinetics.  Environmental persist-
ence, Furans,  Biochemistry, Reprints, 'Flurtamone,
        Vol. 92, No. 1

-------
                                                  EPA PUBLICATIONS  BIBLIOGRAPHY
 Furanone/(methylamino)-phenyl-
 ((trifluoromethyl)phenyl).
 PB92-101690/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Carbonate Equilibria and  Groundwater  Sample
 Collection: Implications  for Estimated  Average
 Subsurface Properties In Continental North Amer-
 ica. Journal article.
 Environmental Research Lab., Athens, GA.
 N. T. Loux, J. D. Allison, C. R. Chafin, and S. M.
 Hassan. C1991,15p EPA/600/J-91/223
 Pub. in International Jnl. of Environmental Analytical
 Chemistry, v44 n1  p41-53 Jan 91. Prepared in coop-
 eration with Lake Michigan Federation, Chicago, IL,
 Technology Applications, Inc., Athens, GA., and Man-
 soura Univ. (Egypt). Faculty of Pharmacy.

 The geochemistry of  carbon  dioxide in  oxygenated
 groundwater may have a profound impact on analytical
 results obtained from efforts to measure in situ ground-
 water pH conditions and on the speciation, partitioning
 behavior and potential transport of inorganic contami-
 nants in aquifers. Based on the observation that an es-
 timate of the mean, national-average groundwater pH
 changes from 6.65 to 6.83, depending on the delay
 time before analysis, a mechanism of pH alteration re-
 sulting from CO2 degassing is examined to provide an
 estimate of the ratio between groundwater and atmos-
 pheric  partial  pressures  of  CO2   (PCO2.GW/
 PCO2atm=1.5). The instability in groundwater sample
 pH after exposure to the atmosphere may be useful for
 characterizing the source environments.

 Keywords:  'Carbon dioxide, 'Geochemistry, "Ground
 water, 'Aquifers, Metals, pH, Environmental transport,
 Instability, Concentration(Composition), Degassing, Bi-
 carbonates, Sampling, Reprints, 'Foreign  technology,
 Metal speciation.
 PB92-101708/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Reductive Dechlorination of Dlchlorophenols in
 Anaerobic Pond Sediments  (Chapter 13). Book
 chapter.
 Environmental Research Lab., Athens, GA.
 D. D. Hale, J. E. Rogers, and J. Wiegel. c1991,14p
 EPA/600/D-91/230
 Pub. in Organic Substances and Sediments in Water.
 Volume 3. Biological, p211-222 1991. See also PB90-
 263922. Prepared in cooperation with Technology Ap-
 plications,  Inc.,  Athens,  GA.,  and  Georgia  Univ.,
 Athens.

 The time required for the microbially mediated dechlor-
 ination  of chloroaromatics  in anaerobic freshwater
 sediments may be dependent upon sediment microbia!
 communities and physical characteristics, as well as
 chlorine position on the aromatic ring. To better under-
 stand such possible relationships,  the authors studied
 the reductive dechlorination of three dichlorophenol
 isomers in anaerobic sediments collected every other
 month for a year from five sites in one pond. Numbers
 of specific dechlorinating microorganisms were esti-
 mated by a most proable number technique, and sedi-
 ment temperature, pH, Eh, and organic carbon content
 were determined. Levels of dissolved organic carbon,
 sulfate, and nitrate also were quantified in water sam-
 ples collected with the anaerobic sediments. The rela-
 tive susceptibility of the 2,4-, 2,5-, and 3,4- isomers to
 dechlorination  was determined in sediment slurries.
 Dechlorination  to monochlorophenols required from 2
 to more than 32 weeks for completion, with the relative
 rates being 2,4-> 2,5->3,4-. The  number of specific
 dechlorinating microbes appears to be important in de-
 termining the time required for the transformation.

 Keywords: 'Dechlorination,  'Water pollution sampling,
 'Sediments, "Microbial degradation, 'Anaerobic proc-
 esses, Chemical properties, Physical  properties, Mo-
 lecular structure, pH, Oxidation reduction  reactions,
 Environmental  persistence,  Phenols,  Ecosystems,
 Sediment-water interfaces, Aquatic microorganisms,
 Freshwater, Aromatic  compounds, Biodeterioration,
 Reprints, Phenol/dichloro.
PB92-102169/REB               PC A13/MF A03
OSWER Source Book:  Training and Technology
Transfer Resources.
Environmental  Protection Agency,  Washington, DC.
Office of Solid Waste and  Emergency Response.
May 91,297p EPA/540/9-91 /001

The OSWER Source  Book consolidates information
on the numerous training  and other technology trans-
far resources sponsored  by EPA's Office  of Solid
Waste and  Emergency Response (OSWER)  and
others. The OSWER Source Book provides descrip-
tions of training courses, videos and publications of in-
terest to Federal and State personnel working in solid
and hazardous waste  management  The  OSWER
Source Book should be especially useful to Federal
personnel working in programs under authorities of the
RCRA, CERCLA, SARA, or other similar Federal envi-
ronmental management and restoration programs.

Keywords: 'Technology transfer, 'Hazardous materi-
als, 'Waste management, 'Superfund,  'Training,  Bib-
liographies, Documents, Information transfer, State
government, Personnel development  Technical as-
sistance, Information systems, Video tapes, Training
programs, Data bases, 'Office of Solid Waste  and
Emergency Response,  Resource Conservation  and
Recovery Act  Comprehensive  Environmental  Re-
sponse Compensation and Liability Act


PB92-102433/REB               PC A20/MF ACM
INFOTERRA/USA  Directory  of  Environmental
Sources. Final rept
Environmental  Protection  Agency, Washington,  DC.
Office of Information Resources Management
Oct 91,470p EPA/IMSD-91 /014
See also PB81-186876.

The INFOTERRA/USA Directory of  Environmental
Sources,  previously entitled the U.S. Directory of Envi-
ronmental Sources, is the 5th edition of a directory of
445   United  States   environmental  organizations
(sources) registered with the INFOTERRA/USA Na-
tional Focal Point INFOTERRA is the international en-
vironmental information exchange network coordinat-
ed  by  the United Nations Environment  Programme
(UNEP). Sources listed in the directory have agreed to
provide environmental information free of charge or at
a minimal fee to international requestors.  Each entry
contains contact information, fields of  environmental
expertise, and a description of services. The sources
are grouped by the type of organization  originating the
information: Federal, State or local government aca-
demic, or nongovernmental interest groups. For ease
of access, both alphabetical and subject indexes are
provided.

Keywords: 'Environmental research, 'Directories, 'In-
formation  transfer,  Subject   indexing,  Licenses,
Sources,  Organizations, Services,  Government, Busi-
nesses, Universities, United States.
  PB92-102656/REB              PC A04/MF A01
  Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
  Park, NC. Atmospheric Research and Exposure As-
  sessment Lab.
  Example Environmental Assessment Report for
  Estuaries.
  Versar, Inc., Columbia, MD.
  J. B. Frithsen, J. Gerritsen, G. Saul, M. C. Fabrizio, and
•  A. F.Holland.May91,68pEPA/600/4-91/026
  Contracts EPA-68-DO-0093, EPA-68-D9-0094
  Sponsored  in part by contracts EPA-68-D9-0166 and
  EPA-68-D-00-106. Prepared in cooperation with Man-
  Tech Environmental Technology, Inc., Research Trian-
  gle Park, NC., and FTN Associates Ltd., Austin, TX.
  Sponsored  by Environmental Protection Agency, Re-
  search Triangle Park, NC. Atmospheric Research and
  Exposure Assessment Lab.

  The Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Pro-
  gram (EMAP) is  a  comprehensive, multiagency pro-
  gram designed to assess the condition of the nation's
  ecological resources at national, regional, and subre-
  gipnal scales. Data and information collected by EMAP
  will be integrated with data from other monitoring pro-
  grams and environmental information of other types to
  produce periodic environmental assessment reports.
  These reports will assess the extent and magnitude of
  pollution impacts, report trends, describe relationships
  among indicators of ecological condition, contaminant
  exposure, and environmental stress, identify the likely
  causes of poor ecological condition, and evaluate the
  overall effectiveness of regulatory and control pro-
  grams on regional scales. Using hypothetical data and
  a fictional estuarine system, the example report dem-
  onstrates the types of information that EMAP can pro-
 vide and how that information can be interpreted in the
  context of national environmental policy.

  Keywords: 'Environmental impact assessments, 'Es-
 tuarine environment 'Water pollution effects, 'Marine
 biology, 'Toxic substances.  Environmental effects,
                                                    Aquatic ecosystems, Trends, Biological indicators, Re-
                                                    gional analysis, Dissolved oxygen, Sediments, Infor-
                                                    mation transfer, Public health, Data processing, Bio-
                                                    logical communities,  Food chains,  'Environmental
                                                    Monitoring and Assessment Program.
                                                    PB92-103449/REB               PC A04/MF A01
                                                    Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
                                                    Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Pro-
                                                    gram (EMAP) Design Report
                                                    ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc., Corvallis,
                                                    OR.
                                                    W. S. Overton, D. White, and D. L. Stevens. Oct 91,
                                                    53p EPA/600/3-91 /053
                                                    Contract EPA-68-C8-0006
                                                    Prepared in cooperation with Oregon State Univ., Cor-
                                                    vallis. Dept of Statistics. Sponsored by Corvallis Envi-
                                                    ronmental Research Lab., OR.

                                                    The Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Pro-
                                                    gram (EMAP) design was developed with the following
                                                    considerations:  consistent representation of environ-
                                                    mental reality by use of a probability sample, potential
                                                    representation of all resources and environmental enti-
                                                    ties, capacity for quick response to a new question or
                                                    issue, and spatial distribution of the sample according
                                                    to the distribution of the resource. These consider-
                                                    ations have been met by prescribing a triangular sam-
                                                    pling grid on approximately 27  km spacing, with a 40-
                                                    sq km hexagon (40-hex) centered on each grid point to
                                                    supply the sample representation of resource space.
                                                    Inventory of each 40-hex provides the Tier 1 sample.
                                                    The sample grid thus provides  a one-sixteenth proba-
                                                    bility sample of the resource area. The Tier 2 sample is
                                                    a subsample of resource sites in the sample hexa-
                                                    gons; these provide the detailed monitoring data. This
                                                    double sample provides the monitoring data for char-
                                                    acterization  of status and  trends of  the various  re-
                                                    sources. This document provides an overview of the
                                                    EMAP sampling design and grid framework, along with
                                                    a discussion of the statistical estimation and analysis
                                                    procedures.

                                                    Keywords: 'Environmental  monitoring, 'Ecosystems,
                                                    Sampling, Guidelines, Design criteria, Implementation,
                                                    Statistical analysis, Long term effects, Biological indi-
                                                    cators, Environmental surveys,  Data processing, Qual-
                                                    ity assurance, Procedures, 'Environmental Monitoring
                                                    and Assessment Program.
                                                  PB92-103456/REB               PC A08/MF A02
                                                  Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
                                                  Marine Debris Survey Manual. Final rept
                                                  Washington Univ., Seattle.
                                                  C. A. Ribic, T. R. Dixon, I. Vining, and M. Duke. Oct 91,
                                                  165p EPA/600/8-91/204
                                                  Contract NMFS-52ABNF-0-00071
                                                  Sponsored by Corvallis Environmental Research Lab.,
                                                  OR., and National Marine  Fisheries Service, Silver
                                                  Spring, MD.

                                                  Over the last several years, concern  has increased
                                                  about the amount of  man-made materials lost or dis-
                                                  carded at sea and the potential impacts to the environ-
                                                  ment  The scope  of the problem  depends on the
                                                  amounts and types of debris. One problem is making a
                                                  regional comparison of debris is the lack of a standard
                                                  methodology. The  objective of this manual is to dis-
                                                  cuss designs and methodologies for assessment stud-
                                                  ies of marine debris. This manual has been written for
                                                  managers, researchers, and others who are just enter-
                                                  ing this area of study and who seek guidance in de-
                                                  signing marine debris surveys. Active researchers will
                                                  be able to use this manual along with applicable refer-
                                                  ences  herein as a source for design improvement To
                                                  this end, the authors  have reviewed and synthesized
                                                  survey techniques that have been'used in the past for
                                                  assessing marine debris, such as sighting surveys,
                                                  beach  surveys, and trawl surveys,  and have consid-
                                                  ered new methods (e.g., aerial photography). All tech-
                                                  niques have been put into a general survey planning
                                                  framework  to  assist  in developing different marine
                                                  debris surveys.

                                                  Keywords: 'Ocean waste disposal, 'Litter, 'Water pol-
                                                  lution  effects,  'Manuals,   Environmental  surveys,
                                                  'Land  pollution, Research and development, Beach-
                                                  es, Aerial surveys,  Water pollution sources, Hazards,
                                                  Environmental effects, Regional analysis,  Manage-
                                                  ment planning, Quality assurance, Field tests, Trawl-
                                                  ing, Monitoring, 'Marine debris.
                                                                                                                               Mar 1992

-------
                                                  EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
 PB92-103464/REB               PC A08/MF A02
 Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
 Evaluating the Utility of Natural Vegetation In As-
 sessing Arctic Accumulation of Ah- Toxics.  Final
 draft rept
 Oregon State Univ., Corvallis. DepL of General Sci-
 ence.
 M. V. Santelmann. 7 May 91,155p EPA/600/3-91 /
 055
 Sponsored by Corvallis Environmental Research Lab.,
 OR.

 Accumulation of toxic, airborne pollutants in the arctic
 and sub-arctic is of growing  concern to scientists.
 Levels of atmospheric deposition of these elements in
 the arctic prior to anthropogenic augmentation of their
 cycling are unknown, and in many cases, current con-
 centrations of these elements in surface vegetation
 and their rates of deposition in the arctic are also un-
 known. The purpose of this document is to provide
 species-specific  information on the  use of natural
 vegetation to monitor trace-metal deposition and accu-
 mulation in  high-latitude regions of North America.
 Data will help in research design for arctic contamina-
 tion studies, because they aid in estimating expected
 concentration ranges and between and withm-site vari-
 ability of element concentrations in vegetation  sam-
 ples.

 Keywords:   'Toxic  substances,   'Air   pollution
 effectsCPIants), 'Vegetation, 'Deposition, 'Arctic re-
 gions, 'Air pollution sampling. Trace amounts, Metals,
 Concentratkxi(Composition),      Site      surveys,
 Lead(Metal), Data processing, Bioaccumulation,  Food
 chains, Plants(Botany).
 PB92-104348/REB               PC A01/MF A01
 Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
 Roduction Enofoioorinci L&b.
 Waste Mmtonteatton Assessment for a Manufactur-
 er of Refurbished RaUcar Bearing Assemblies. En-
 vironmental research brief.
 University City Science Center, Philadelphia. PA.
 F. W. Kirsch, and G. P. Looby. Oct 91. 5p EPA/600/M-
 91/044
 Grant EPA-R814903
 See also PB91-234518. Sponsored by Environmental
 Protection Agency, Cincinnati. OH. Risk Reduction En-
 gineering Lab.

 The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has
 funded a pilot project to assist small- and medium-size
 manufacturers who want to minimize their generation
 of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. Waste
 Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were es-
 tabHshed at selected universities and procedures were
 adapted from the EPA Waste Minimization Opportunity
 Assessment Manual (EPA/625/7-88/003, July 1988).
 The WMAC team at the University of Tennessee per-
 forrned an assessment at a plant which rebuilds railcar
 bearing assemblies - approximately 163,200 bearing
 components per year.  Bearings are  disassembled,
 washed,  then inspected. 'Premium' bearings, those
 still within specifications, are reassembled with  new
        and bearing seals,  packaged and shipped.
            i bearings are buffed/rinsed in hot water,
 and then chrome plated to build up the bearing sur-
 faces. After chroming, the parts are rinsed, baked, and
 allowed to air cool. Cooled bearings are reassembled
 with new grease and seals, then  packaged  and
 shipped. The team's report, detailing findings and rec-
 ommendations,  indicated that the  majority of waste
 was generated during the railcar bearing cleaning op-
 eration and that the  greatest  savings could be ob-
 tained by instigating onsite wastewater treatment and
. redrculating recovered water to reduce (90 percent)
 water consumption in the railcar bearing cleaning op-
 eration.

 Keywords: 'Water pollution control, 'Pollution abate-
 ment, 'Hazardous materials. 'Research and develop-
 ment, 'Rail transportation, 'Bearings, *Waste man-
 agement Cleaning. Waste water.  Industrial  wastes,
 US  EPA,  Plating,  Chromium coatings,  Washing,
 Greases,  Lubrication, Corrosion  prevention,  Deter-
 gents,  'Waste minimization. Source reduction, Smalt
 systems, SIC 3743.
                                                   Waste Minimization At
                                                                                nt for a Manufactur-
er of Prototype  Printed Circuit  Boards. Environ-
mental research brief.
University City Science Center, Philadelphia, PA.
F. W. Kirsch, and G. P. Looby. Oct 91, 5p EPA/600/M-
91/045
Grant EPA-R814903
See also PB91 -234542. Sponsored by Environmental
Protection Agency, Cincinnati. OH. Risk Reduction En-
gineering Lab.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has
funded a pilot project to assist small- and medium-size
manufacturers who want to minimize their generation
of hazardous waste but who lack the expertise to do
so.   Waste  Minimization   Assessment  Centers
(WMACs) were established at selected universities
and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste
Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual (EPA/
625/7-88/003, July 1988). The WMAC team at Colora-
do State University performed an assessment at a
plant manufacturing prototype printed circuit boards.
Various processes are involved including photographic
operations, drilling, scrubbing, laminating, etching, and
plating. The majority of the waste generated  by this
plant comes from the  plating process. The  team's
report, detailing findings and recommendations, indi-
cated that the greatest waste reduction and cost sav-
ings would result from recovering copper, tin, and lead
from the plating wastewater.

Keywords: 'Pollution abatement, 'Hazardous  materi-
als, 'Research  and development, 'Waste manage-
ment, 'Water pollution control, 'Printed circuits. Plat-
ing, Materials recovery. Metals, Etching, US EPA, In-
dustrial wastes, Laminating, Drilling, 'Waste minimiza-
tion, Source reduction. Small systems, SIC 3679.
PB92-104363/REB                PC A01/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
Reduction Engineering Lab.
Waste Minimization At
nt for a Manufactur-
 PB92-104355/REB               PC A01/MF A01
 Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
 Reduction Engineering Lab.
er of Speed Reduction Equipment Environmental
research brief.
University City Science Center, Philadelphia, PA.
F. W. Kirsch, and J. C. Maginn. Oct 91, 5p EPA/600/
M-91/046
Grant EPA-R814903
Sponsored by Environmental Protection Agency, Cin-
cinnati, OH. Risk Reduction Engineering Lab.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has
funded a pilot project to assist small- and medium-size
manufacturers who want to minimize their generation
of hazardous waste but who lack the expertise to do
so.    Waste  Minimization   Assessment  Centers
(WMACs)  were established at selected universities
and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste
Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual (EPA/
625/7-88/003, July 1988). The WMAC team at Colora-
do  State University performed  an assessment  at a
plant manufacturing speed reduction equipment - ap- '
proximately  110,000 speed reduction units/yr. Plant
operations include machining and assembling parts for
worn gear shafts and other shafts, worn gear bodies,
hubs  and housings, bearings and seals. Keyed and
threaded shafts are case-hardened, ground  with a
thread grinder, and debarred. Component parts are
washed with an aqueous cleaner before  assembly,
and finished assemblies are spray painted with sol-
vent-based paints and lacquer thinner. Spent cutting
fluid and sludge, inducing turnings, and spent wash
water are shipped effete for dbposal. Spent hydraulic
oil and non-aqueous cutting fluid are shipped to a recy-
der.  Waste paint and  spent  lacquer thinner are
shipped offsrte for incineration. The team's  report, de-
tailing findings and recommendations,  indicated that
most waste consists of spent aqueous cutting fluid,
and that the greatest savings could be obtained by ul-
trafmratkjn and recycle of spent wash water.

Keywords: 'Pollution abatement 'Hazardous  materi-
als. 'Research and development,  'Water pollution
control, 'Waste management  US  EPA,  Industrial
wastes. Waste water. Waste Disposal, Cleaning, Spray
painting, Waste recycling, Ultrantration, 'Waste mini-
mization,  'todustrial equipment Source  reduction,
Small systems, SIC 3714.
PB92-104371/REB                PC A02/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
Reduction Engineering Lab.
Waste Minimization Assessment for a Manufactur-
er of Printed Labels. Environmental research brief.
University City Science Center, Philadelphia, PA.
F. W. Kirsch, and J. C. Maginn. Oct 91, 6p EPA/600/
M-91/047
Grant EPA-R814903
Sponsored by Environmental Protection Agency, Cin-
cinnati, OH. Risk Reduction Engineering Lab.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has
funded a pilot project to assist small- and medium-size
manufacturers who want to minimize their generation
of hazardous waste but who lack the expertise to do
so.   Waste  Minimization   Assessment  Centers
(WMACs) were  established at selected  universities
and procedures were adapted from the EPA Waste
Minimization Opportunity Assessment Manual (EPA/
625/7-88/003, Jury 1988). The  WMAC team at the
University of Tennessee performed an assessment at
a plant producing printed labels-approximatety 14 bil-
lion labels/yr. Steel printing cylinders are  nickel and
copper plated, etched with the  label patterns  to be
printed, chromium plated, and then  used with ink ap-
plied to print the labels. About 75 percent of the cylin-
ders are chemicalty etched, and the remainder are me-
chanically etched. Solvents used with ink concentrate
and for cleaning press parts are recovered and sold to
reclaimers.  Spent reagents, fitters, cleaning rags, and
sludge are shipped offsrte for disposal. Process
wastewater and  rinse water are treated by ion ex-
change and distillation. The team's report, detailing
findings and recommendations,  indicated that most
waste other man water and paper  consists of spent
solvents, and that the greatest savings could  be ob-
tained by using recovered solvent instead of virgin sol-
vents for cleaning at press side.

Keywords:  'Pollution abatement, 'Hazardous materi-
als, 'Research and development 'Labels, 'Water pol-
lution control, Printing inks, Industrial wastes, Waste
recycling, Solvents, Ion exchanging, US EPA, Waste
water, Cleaning, Waste disposal, Plating,  Chromium
coalings,  'Waste  minimization, Source  reduction,
Small systems, SIC 2752.
                      PB92-104389/REB               PC A02/MF A01
                      Pesticide Fact Sheet Number  226: Bensutfuron
                      Methyl.
                      Environmental  Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
                      Office of Pesticides and Toxic Substances.
                      17Feb89,7p EPA/540/FS-91/143

                      The document  contains up-to-date chemical informa-
                      tion, including a summary of the Agency's regulatory
                      position and rationale, on bensulfuron methyl. A Fact
                      Sheet is issued after one of the following actions has
                      occurred. (1) Issuance  or reissuance of a registration
                      standard, (2) Issuance of each special review docu-
                      ment (3) Registration of a significantly changed use
                      pattern, (4) Registration of a new chemical, or (5) An
                      immediate need for information to resolve controver-
                      sial issues relating to a specific chemical or use pat-
                      tern.

                      Keywords: 'Pesticides,  'Toxic substances, Hazardous
                      materials. Chemical properties,  Regulations, Toxicol-
                      ogy,  Ecology,  Agricultural  products,  'Bensulfuron
                      methyl, Path of pollutants, Chemical information fact
                      sheet Use patterns, Science findings, CAS 83055-99-
                      6.
                      PB9M04397/REB               PC A03/MF A01
                      Evaluation of a Kemira Oy Restetrvety Heated Cat-
                      aryst on a Methanot-Fuetod Vehicle. Technical rept
                      Environmental  Protection Agency,  Ann  Arbor, Ml.
                      Office of Mobile Sources.
                      G. K. Ptotrowski, and R. M. Schaefer. Sep 91,31 p
                      EPA/AA/CTAB-91/04

                      A fresh resistively heated catalytic converter was fur-
                      nished by Kemira Oy to the U.S. Environmental Protec-
                      tion Agency (EPA) for evaluation on a methanol-fueled
                      vehicle.  This  converter substrate was  constructed
                      from metaWc  foil and was  considerably smaller  in
                      volume than three-way catalysts found on most late
                      model U.S. automobiles. The Kemira Oy converter is
                      referred to hereafter as an electrically heated catalyst
                      (EHC).  The EHC was evaluated in four separate
                      modes. First  this catalyst was placed on an M100
                      (neat methamQ fueled  vehicle and emission tested
                      without resistive heating or catalyst air assist The EHC
                      was then tested using resistive heating, but with no air
                      assist provided during the period of heating. A catalyst
         Vol.  92, No.  1

-------
                                                  EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
 operating mode utilizing both resistive heating and air
 assist was evaluated next. Finally, a larger catalyzed
 ceramic monolith was added behind the  EHC as a
 main catalyst. This two-catalyst system was then eval-
 uated, with resistive heating and catalyst air assist ap-
 plied to the upstream EHC.

 Keywords: 'Methanol fuels,  'Automobile exhaust,
 Catalytic converters, Tests, Emission, Motor vehicles,
 Exhaust emissions, Evaluation.


 PB92-104405/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 IM240 Transient I/M Dynamometer Driving Sched-
 ule and the Composite I/M Test Procedure.
 Environmental Protection  Agency, Ann Arbor,  Ml.
 Office of Mobile Sources.
 W. M. Pidgeon, and N. Dobie. Jan 91,18p EPA/AA/
 TSS-91/1

 Changes in motor vehicle technology have created the
 need for more sophisticated Inspection and Mainte-
 nance tests. In response to this need, the Environmen-
 tal Protection Agency Motor Vehicle Emission Labora-
 tory has developed the IM240, a short transient test,
 as a possible alternative to the current Inspection and
 Maintenance tests. The EPA Motor Vehicle Emission
 Laboratory is evaluating the IM240 as well as the COH-
 226 and several  steady-state tests in the Composite
 Inspection and Maintenance Test Procedure.

 Keywords: 'Automobile exhaust,  'Maintenance, 'In-
 spection, Clean Air Act,  US EPA, Tests, Motor vehi-
 cles,  Dynamometers, Air pollution  control, Exhaust
 emissions.
 PB92-104413/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Second EPA Evaluation of the Platinum Gasaver
 Device under Section 511 of the Motor Vehicle In-
 formation and Cost Savings Act (Updated). Tech-
 nical rept
 Environmental Protection Agency, Ann Arbor, Ml. Test
 and Evaluation Branch.
 Jul 91,25p EPA/AA/TEB-511/91/01
 See also PB81-226706 and PB92-104421.

 The report announces  the  conclusions of the  EPA
 evaluation of the Platinum Gasaver Device under the
 provisions of Section 511 of the Motor Vehicle Infor-
 mation and Cost Savings Act The second evaluation
 of the Platinum Gasaver device was conducted upon
 the request of the Federal Trade Commission. The unit
 is a vapor bleed device.  It functions by bleeding a mix-
 ture of  air and  'platinum  concentrate'  through a T
 connection that is installed in the Positive Crankcase
 Ventilation (PCV) line. It is  claimed to reduce emis-
 sions, improve fuel economy, raise the octane of gaso-
 line, and extend engine line.  Three  typical vehicles
 were tested at the EPA's Motor Vehicle Emission Lab-
 oratory. The basic test sequence included 2,000 miles
 of mileage accumulation, replicate Federal Test Proce-
 dures (FTP) and replicate  Highway Fuel Economy
 Tests (HFET). The test sequence was conducted both
 without and with the Platinum Gasaver installed. The
 overall conclusion from these tests is that the Platinum
 Gasaver device did not significantly  change  vehicle
 emissions or fuel economy for either the FTP or the
 HFET.

 Keywords: 'Automobiles, 'Fuel  consumption, Tech-
 nology assessment, Exhaust emissions, Platinum, Air
pollution control equipment Road tests, Evaluation,
 'Platinum gasavers.
PB92-104421/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Emissions and Fuel Economy Effects of the Plati-
num Gasaver, a Retrofit Device. Technical rept
Environmental Protection Agency, Ann Arbor, Ml. Test
and Evaluation Branch.
Jul 91,18p EPA/AA/TEB-91 /02
SeealsoPB92-104413.

The  report describes the Environmental Protection
Agency's (EPA) testing of the •Platinum Gasaver' as
part of its evaluation under Section 511 of the Motor
Vehicle Information and Cost Savings Act This eval-
uation was conducted at the request of the Federal
Trade Commission (FTC) to verify the claims for large-
greater than 20 percent-fuel economy benefits. The
Platinum  Gasaver is a vapor air bleed device. The
device is claimed to improve fuel economy, reduce
emissions, raise the octane  of gasoline, and extend
engine life. Only the fuel economy and emission claims
for the device were evaluated in this test program.
 Three typical vehicles were tested at EPA's Motor Ve-
 hicle Emission Laboratory. The basic test sequence in-
 cluded 2,000 miles of mileage accumulation, replicate
 Federal Test Procedures (FTP) and replicate Highway
 Fuel Economy Tests (HFET). This test sequence was
 conducted both without and with the Platinum Gasaver
 installed. The  overall conclusion from these tests is
 that the Platinum Gasaver did not significantly change
 vehicle emissions or fuel economy for either the FTP
 or HFET.

 Keywords: 'Automobiles, 'Fuel economy, Evaluation,
 Platinum,  Exhaust emissions, Retrofitting, Fuel  con-
 sumption, Road tests, Gasoline, Technology assess-
 ment,  Federal test procedure, 'Platinum gasaver.
 Motor Vehicle Information and Cost Savings Act.
 PB92-104439/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Recommended I/M Short Test Procedures for the
 1990's: Six Alternatives. Technical rept.
 Environmental  Protection  Agency, Ann Arbor,  Ml.
 Technical Support Staff.
 E. J. Tiemey, E. W. Herzog, and L. M. Snapp. Jan 91,
 49p EPA/AA/TSS/IM-90-3

 The report discusses the test procedures recommend-
 ed for current technology vehicles. The test proce-
 dures presented in this report represent the best tech-
 nical information the Environmental Protection Agency
 Motor Vehicle Emission Laboratory has on how to test
 current motor vehicles and do not represent a new re-
 quirement at this time. EPA recognizes that for Inspec-
 tion and Maintenance (I/M) programs to adopt these
 new procedures, changes in regulations,  rewriting test
 protocols, software and, in some cases, hardware up-
 grades, and other changes would be  needed and
 would require time to implement. This report is being
 released at this time so that programs may take advan-
 tage of any opportunities that arise to update the test
 procedures as they make other program changes, in-
 cluding changes necessary to comply  with require-
 ments of the 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act.
 EPA has not yet considered whether states and local-
 ities should be required to eventually adopt and imple-
 ment a test from among those described here.

 Keywords: 'Automobile exhaust 'Maintenance, 'In-
 spection, Clean Air Act US EPA, Tests, Motor vehi-
 cles, Air pollution control, Exhaust emissions.
 PB92-104447/REB                PC A04/MF A01
 I/M Network Type: Effects on Emission Reduc-
 tions, Cost, and Convenience. Technical Informa-
 tion Document
 Environmental  Protection  Agency, Ann  Arbor,  Ml.
 Technical Support Staff.
 E. J. Tiemey. Jan 91,69p EPA/AA/TSS/IM-89/2

 The dean  Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 re-
 quire that EPA review and repubfish Inspection and
 Maintenance  (I/M)  guidance  in the Federal Register
 addressing a variety of issues including network type,
 i.e., whether the program is centralized or decentral-
 ized. Nearly every State that must operate an I/M pro-
 gram will need to obtain legislative authority to meet
 revised guidelines. This need provides an opportunity
 to reassess the effectiveness of current I/M program
 designs and make changes that will lead to improved
 air quality over the next decade. Network type is the
 most obvious and influential factor at work in an I/M
 program. This report attempts to analyze how emis-
 sion reduction effectiveness,  cost and convenience
 vary by network type.

 Keywords:  'Automobile exhaust 'Maintenance, 'In-
 spection, Clean Air Act Amendments, US EPA, Motor
 vehicles, Air pollution control, Federal test procedure,
 Exhaust emissions, Costs.
PN2-1044S4/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Integrating On-Board Diagnostic System Capabili-
ties Into the Inspection and Repair Functtons of I/
M Programs. Technical rept
Environmental  Protection Agency, Ann  Arbor, Ml.
Emission Control Technology Div.
Dec 90,19p EPA/AA/TSS/IM-90/1

At any point in time, a certain percentage of motor ve-
hicles on the road are emitting in excess of their design
standards  due to repairable  causes.  Motor vehicle
emissions inspection and maintenance (I/M) programs
employ a short screening test to identify high emitters
and a retest after repairs to confirm their effectiveness
in reducing emissions. It is the initial screening test and
the retest after repairs that differentiate I/M from a
public information campaign about motor vehicle main-
tenance or from a program to train automotive me-
chanics. This report describes the capability  of the
newer  motor vehicles to perform self-diagnosis, and
how these capabilities could be integrated into both
the inspection function and the repair function. Specif-
ic recommendations to the I/M programs are also in-
cluded.

Keywords: 'Automobile exhaust, 'Maintenance, 'In-
spection, Onboard equipment, Clean Air Act US EPA,
Tests,  Motor vehicles. Air pollution control, Exhaust
emissions.
PB92-104462/REB               PC A20/MF A04
Nonroad  Engine  and  Vehicle  Emission  Study-
Report and Appendixes. Draft rept.
Environmental Protection Agency,  Ann  Arbor, Ml.
Office of Mobile Sources.
Oct91,457p

The study quantifies the contributions of emissions
from nonroad engines and vehicles to the air quality
problem. EPA considered over 80 different types of
nonroad equipment in this analysis. The equipment
types include; lawn and garden  equipment, airport
service, recreational, recreational  marine, light  com-
mercial, industrial, construction, agricultural, logging,
and commercial marine vessels. Aircraft and locomo-
tives were not included. Emission inventories, (detailed
listings of amounts of pollutants to account for emis-
sions from various sources) were developed and ana-
lyzed for categories of nonroad equipment. The study
does not attempt to make a determination of the sig-
nificance of emissions from nonroad sources. The
report also contains appendixes which provide back-
ground information.

Keywords: 'Exhaust emissions, *Air pollution stand-
ards, 'Engines, Motor vehicles, Air quality, Pollution
regulations, Air pollution abatement, Air pollution con-
trol, Volatile  organic compounds, Nitrogen  oxides,
Logging(lndustry),  Gardening,  Marine engines,  Con-
struction equipment, Agricultural machinery, Carbon
monoxide, Emission factors, Particles,  Clean Air Act
Airports, Recreation, 'Emission inventories, 'Nonroad
engines, 'Nonroad vehicles, Industrial equipment
PB92-104470/REB               PC A08/MF A02
Chetco Ocean  Dredged Material  Disposal Site
(ODMDS) Designation: Final Environmental Impact
Statement.
Environmental  Protection  Agency,   Seattle,  WA.
Region X.
Aug 91,164p EPA/910/9-89/027F
See also PB90-227125.

The final EIS provides information to support designa-
tion of an ocean  dredged material disposal  site
(ODMDS) in the Pacific Ocean off the mouth  of the
Chetco River in the State of Oregon. The final designa-
tion will allow for continued deposition of sediments
dredged by the Corps of Engineers to maintain the fed-
erally-authorized  navigation projects  at  the Chetco
River, Oregon and other dredged materials authorized
in accordance with Section 103 of the Marine Protec-
tion, Research, and Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (MPRSA).
No  significant or long-term adverse environmental ef-
fects are predicted to result fromthe designation.

Keywords: 'Dredge spoil, 'Sediments, 'Ocean waste
disposal,  'Pacific  Ocean,  'Environmental  impact
statements-Final, Site  surveys, Oregon, Evaluation,
Chetco River, Protection, Navigation.
PB92-104488/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Environmental  Protection  Agency,  Seattle,  WA.
Region X.
Long-Term Trends In Puget Sound Marine Fishes:
Selected Data Sets. Final rept
Washington Univ., Seattle. Fisheries Research Inst
B. S. Miller, L L Moulton, and J. H. Stadler. Apr 91,
50pFRI-UW-9105, EPA/910/9-91/010
Sponsored by Environmental Protection Agency, Seat-
tle, WA. Region X.

The primary objective of  the project was to analyze
long-term trends in Puget Sound marine fishes based
on a synthesis of available data. Three data sets were
chosen for  trend  analysis:  geographical distribution
                                                                                                                                Mar 1992      9

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                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
data, University of Washington research beach seine
data, and University of  Washington research trawl
data The geographical distribution data consisted of
frequency of occurrence (presence-absence) data that
was analyzed in terms of (1) the occurrence of rare
(exotic) marine fish  that entered Puget Sound from
ocean waters on occasion, and (2) the occurrence of
marine fish species that were commonly caught in re-
search trawls in Puget Sound. While frequency of oc-
currence did seem to measure real changes in abun-
dances of some populations (most notably localized
declines), there was no indication of a serious change
in the  relative occurrence of marine fish in Puget
Sound. Data on commercial species is often not very
useful for looking at long term trends other than trends
within that given fishery. It is often impossible to sepa-
rate trends due to fishery pressures from those that
are environmentally driven. Thus, the authors believe
that there is a strong case for monitoring as many non-
economically important fish species as possible. Ideal-
ly this would include assemblages of fish species oc-
cupying the major habitat types of Puget Sound.

Keywords:  'Marine  fish,  'Marine  biology,  'Puget
Sound, 'Environmental monitoring, Long term effects,
Trends, Rshes, Washington(State), Data processing,
Fisheries, Species diversity, Population distribution,
Aquatic ecosystems, Geographical Distribution Data,
University of Washington Research Beach Seine Data,
University of Washington Research Trawl Data.
PB92-104496/REB               PC A06/MF A02
Environmental  Protection  Agency,   Seattle,  WA.
Region X.
Long-Term Changes In the Area! Extant of  TkW
Marshes, Eelgrass Meadows and Kelp Forests of
Puget Sound. Final rept
Washington Univ., Seattle. Fisheries Research Inst
R. M. Thorn, and L Haiium. Mar 91,116p FRI-UW-
9008, EPA/910/9-91/005
Sponsored by Environmental Protection Agency, Seat-
tle, WA. Region X.

Historical and present day records on the distribution
of marshes, eelgrass meadows and kelp forests are
compiled and compared to evaluate historical changes
in these nearshore habitats. The findings of the  study
are as follows: The most comprehensive records were
for tidal marshes, which have decreased 71 percent in
area since  records made in the 1800s. Much of the
io?s  is due  to diking, filling and dredging; Records of
eelgrass meadows from before the  major  influx of
humans in  the late 1800s were not comprehensive.
However, eelgrass losses of 30 percent and 15 per-
cent were estimated for BeHingham Bay and the Sno-
homish River  delta, respectively. Eelgrass cover may
have increased by approximately fivefold in PacHIa
Bay. Kelp has apparently increased approximately 58
percent in Puget Sound and the Straits. The greatest
increase in  kelp distribution was documented in the
most populated areas including the Main Basin and
south Puget Sound. Invading  species of algae and
flowering plants have had a major impact on the  distri-
bution of eelgrass and kelp,  tideflat  and  estuarine
marsh in some subregions. Recommendations are:
Monitor habitats in a quantitative manner; investigate
causal factors related to dramatic changes in kelp dis-
tribution; develop methods to quantify subtidal eel-
grass distribution; investigate  factors affecting eel-
grass distribution, especially subtidal meadows; incor-
porate only  new quanWative habitat records into a Ge-
ographic Information System (GIS) which includes irv,
formation on water quality and physical site condWonaM

Keywords:  Tidal marshes, 'Kelp,  'Marine plants,-'
'Man-environment interactions.  Environmental ef-
fects. Long term effects, Washirtgton(State), Estuarine
environment  Puget Sound, Strait of  Juan de Fuca,
Dredging, Species diversity, San Juan Islands, Aquatic
ecosystems, Habitats, Coastal regions, Spatial  distri-
bution, Wetlands, 'Eelgrass.
PB92-104504/REB               PCA06/MFA02
Environmental   Protection  Agency,   Seattle,  WA.
Region X
Puget Sound  Psstlcldo neconnnl§iiflnce Survey,

PTI Environmental Services, BeHevue, WA.
Aug91,125p EPA/910/9-91/020
Contract EPA-68-D8-0085
See also PB90-164534 and PB91-211946.Portions of
this document are not fuHy legible. Sponsored by Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency, Seattle, WA. Region X
The 1989-1990 Pesticide Reconnaissance Survey was
conducted  by  the  U.S.  Environmental Protection
Agency Region  10, Office of Coastal Waters and the
Puget Sound Estuary Program to assess the extent
and lexicological  significance  of water-soluble and
sediment-bound pesticide residues present in Puget
Sound drainages. Fifteen water samples and six sedi-
ment samples were collected from five drainage areas
that empty into Puget Sound and analyzed for 33 dif-
ferent pesticide residues. Five pesticides were detect-
ed in at least one water sample: diazinon, 1,4-dichloro-
pbenoxyacetic acid  (2,4-D), dicamba,  bromacil and
diuron. The most  commonly detected pesticide was
2,4-D which was detected in 13 water samples at con-
centrations from 0.077 to 0.70 micrograms/liter. Four
pesticides or their degradation products were detected
in at least one sediment sample: dichlobenil, pentach-
lorophenol, DDT/DDE/DDD and endosulfan I  and II.
Pentachlorophenol was detected  in all six sediment
samples at concentrations up to 33 micrograms/kg.

Keywords: 'Toxicity, 'Pesticides, 'Puget Sound, Sur-
veys,  Sediments,  Pesticide   residues,   Sampling,
Concentration(Composition),  Degradation, Diazinon,
Endosulfan, Pentachlorophenol, Bromacil.
PB92-104512/REB               PC A07/MF A02
Environmental  Protection  Agency,  Seattle,  WA.
Region X.
Sunken Vessels  and Aircraft Containing Hazard-
ous Materials In Puget Sound.
PTI Environmental Services, BeHevue, WA.
K. M. Barnard, and D. G. Gordon. Aug 91,132p EPA/
910/9-91/021
Contract EPA-68-D8-0085
Sponsored by Environmental Protection Agency, Seat-
tle, W A. Region X.

In past years, numerous ships, barges, and aircraft po-
tentially containing various kinds of hazardous cargo
and large amounts of fuel and oil have sunk in Puget
Sound and adjacent waters. Some of the cargo, fuel
and oil, if present in sufficient quantities could pose a
hazard to  human  health or the aquatic environment
Vessels of interest include commercial transport and
military vessels over 50 tons gross weight (greater
than 100 feet in length) that sank after 1915,  and all
commercial and military aircraft Thirty-seven sources
of information were  investigated including state and
federal government agencies, public port associations,
maritime organizations, historical archives, and individ-
uals. Using information from  these sources, a list of
134 sunken vessels and aircraft were compiled.

Keywords:  'Hazardous materials,  'Fuel oil,   'Puget
Sound, Ships, Barges, Aircraft, Cargo transportation.
Volume, State  government  Military  transportation.
Sources, Investigations, Public health.
PB92-104520/REB               PC A09/MF A02
Environmental  Protection  Agency,   Seattle,   WA.
Region X
Monitoring Guidelines to Evaluate Effects of For-
estry Activities on Streams In the Pacific North-
west and Alaska.
Washington Univ., Seattle.
L H. MacOonakJ, A. W. Smart, and R. C. Wissmar. May
91,180p EPA/910/9-91/001
See also PB81-119828 and PB89-164263. Sponsored
by Environmental Protection Agency, Seattle,  WA.
Region X

The publication provides guidance for designing water
quality monitoring projects and selecting monitoring
parameters. Although the focus is on forest manage-
ment and streams in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska,
a broader perspective is taken and much of the infor-
mation is more  widely applicable. Part I reviews the
regulatory  mechanisms  for nonpoint source pollution
arid defines seven types of monitoring. A step-by-step
process for developing monitoring projects is present-
ed. Because monitoring is a sample procedure, study
design and statistical analysis are explicitly addressed.
Part  II is a technical review of the parameters, and
these are grouped into seven categories: physical and
chemical constituents, flow,  sediment channel char-
acteristics, riparian, and aquatic organisms.

Keywords: 'Water pollution, 'Forest management
•Alaska. Streams, Monitoring,  Statistical analysis.
Chemical properties, Physical properties. Sediments,
Aquatic animals. Microorganisms, Standards, Pacific
"             RegkxKUnited   States),   Nonpoint
                                                   PB92-105196/REB               PC A04/MF A01
                                                   Conducting RCRA Inspections at Mixed Waste Fa-
                                                   cilities.
                                                   Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
                                                   Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response.
                                                   E. Epstein. Jul 91,74p OSWER-9938.9

                                                   The document gives an overview of the regulation of
                                                   radioactive mixed waste and provides RCRA inspec-
                                                   tors with information on radiation, health physics, and
                                                   training and access requirements for inspections of
                                                   mixed waste facilities.

                                                   Keywords:  'Superfund,  'Radioactive wastes, 'Haz-
                                                   ardous wastes, 'Waste management Mixtures, In-
                                                   spection, Pollution regulations, Information transfer,
                                                   Specialized training,  Requirements,  Radioactivity,
                                                   Compliance, Requirements, Occupational safety arid
                                                   health, Radiation  protection, 'Office of Solid Waste
                                                   and Emergency Response, 'Resource Conservation
                                                   and Recovery Act
                                                   PB92-105402/REB               PC A06/MF A02
                                                   Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
                                                   Reduction Engineering Lab.
                                                   Waste  Minimization  Opportunity  Assessment
                                                   Scott Air Force Base. Final rept
                                                   Science Applications International Corp., Cincinnati,
                                                   OH.
                                                   G. Wahl, B. McNeil, and G. Baker. Nov 91,104p EPA/
                                                   600/2-91/054
                                                   Contract EPA-68-C8-0061
                                                   Sponsored by Environmental Protection Agency, Cin-
                                                   cinnati, OH. Risk Reduction Engineering Lab.

                                                   The report describes a waste minimization  assess-
                                                   ment of three operations at Scott AFB. Circuit board
                                                   manufacturing, non-destructive wheel inspection, and
                                                   paint stripping/painting/parts cleaning are the  oper-
                                                   ations addressed  in the assessment The  primary
                                                   focus of the assessment was on the non-destructive
                                                   wheel inspection and several options for reducing
                                                   waste. The assessment was carried out  under the
                                                   WREAFS Program.

                                                   Keywords: 'Waste management Military facilities, As-
                                                   sessments, Inspection, Painting, Nondestructive test-
                                                   ing, Wheels, Cleaning, Circuit boards, 'Waste minimi-
                                                   zation, 'Scott Air Force Base.
                                                  PB92-105469/REB
                                                                                  PC A03/MF A01
Northwestern
source.
                                                  Community Relations during Enforcement Activi-
                                                  ties and  Development  of  the  Administrative
                                                  Record. Directive.
                                                  Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
                                                  Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response.
                                                  3 Nov 88, 28p OSWER DIRECT1VE-9836.0-1 A

                                                  The directive discusses enforcement community rela-
                                                  tions. The directive, which is Chapter VI of 'Community
                                                  Relations in Superfund: A Handbook,' discusses de-
                                                  veloping community relations plans, the relationship
                                                  between the administrative record for response selec-
                                                  tion and community relations, and community relations
                                                  during specific enforcement actions and settlements.
                                                  The document supersedes directive  number 9836.0
                                                  'Interim Guidance on Community Relations in Enforce-
                                                  ment' dated March 22,  1985, and directive number
                                                  9836.0-1a 'Community Relations Activities at Super-
                                                  fund Enforcement Sites,' dated August 8, 1 985.

                                                  Keywords: 'Waste management 'Superfund, 'Haz-
                                                  ardous materials, Handbooks, Community relations,
                                                  Law enforcement  Administrative procedures, Legal
                                                  aspects, Judicial decisions, Notification procedures,
                                                  Cost recovery, Citizen participation, 'Office of Solid
                                                  Waste and  Emergency Response, Settlements, De
                                                  minimis settlements.
PB92-10S477/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Section 3008(h) Module Order on Consent
Environmental  Protection  Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response.
19 Jan 88,25p OSWER DIRECTIVE-9902.5

The directive contains general language to assist Re-
gional personnel with drafting section 3006(h) consent
orders. Among provisions  included are those dealing
with jurisdiction, findings of fact and conclusions of
law and determinations.
10     Vol. 92, No.  1

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                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS  BIBLIOGRAPHY
Keywords: 'Superfund,  "Waste management, 'Haz-
ardous materials, Decisions and orders, Law enforce-
ment, Proposed remedial orders, Consent orders, Ad-
ministrative procedures, US EPA, Regional analysis,
State government, Pollution regulations, "Office  of
Solid Waste and Emergency Response, Potentially re-
PB92-105626/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Recommended  Sub-Slab  Depressurization Sys-
tems  Design Standard of  the Florida Radon Re-
search Program. Final rept.
Florida Univ., Gainesville. Dept. of Nuclear Engineer-
ing Sciences.
D. E. Hintenlang, and C. E. Roessler. Oct 91,19p EPA/
600/8-91/208
Grant EPA-R-814621
Sponsored by Environmental Protection Agency, Re-
search Triangle Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering
Research Lab.,  and Florida  Dept. of Community Af-
fairs, Tallahassee.

The report recommends  sub-slab  depressurization
systems design  criteria to the  State of Florida's De-
partment of Community Affairs for their building code
for radon resistant houses. Numerous details are set
forth in the full report. Primary criteria include:  (1) the
operating soil depressurization system shall maintain
under the entire building a static pressure less than the
outdoor air static pressure; (2) suction shall be  provid-
ed by  a fan rated for continuous operation and  having
thermal overload protection with automatic reset fea-
tures;  (3) vent piping shall have a minimum slope of 1 /
8-in./ft (1.04 cm/m) in order to drain any condensation
back to the soil beneath the  soil gas retarder; and (4)
suction points shall be equally distributed as follows:  a
maximum of 1300 sq ft (120.8 sq m) per suction point,
each suction point located not less than 6 ft (1.3 m) nor
more  than 18 ft (5.5 m) from  the perimeter, and multi-
ple suction points shall be located within 36 ft (11.0 m)
of each other. Documentation is presented in support
of the recommendations.

Keywords: 'Residential  buildings, 'Radon, 'Florida,
'Air pollution control, 'Concrete slabs, 'Design crite-
ria, Indoor  air pollution, Building codes,  Stationary
sources, 'Sub-slab depressurization.
PB92-105659/REB               PC A08/MF A02
Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
Permit Tracking System (PTS): A User's Manual.
ManTech Environmental technology, Inc., Corvallis,
OR.
C. C. Holland, and M. E. Kentula. Aug 91,154p EPA/
600/8-91/054,, EPA/SW/DK-92/015A
Contract EPA-68-C8-0006
For system on diskette, see PB92-500347. Sponsored
by Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.

The Permit Tracking System (PTS) was developed to
track information on the wetland resource affected by
permitting, as opposed to information  on permit status
and activity (e.g., acceptance or renewal). The authors
designed the PTS  to complement existing systems
that track permit activity to avoid duplicating the efforts
of other agencies. It is designed to track information
from three types of permit systems, permits issued
under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act, Section 401
of the Clean Water Act, and state authority. There is
also an option to track data from other permit systems.

Keywords: * User manualsfComputer programs), 'Wet-
lands, 'Permits, 'Information retrieval,  'Water pollu-
tion, Clean Water Act, State programs, US EPA, Infor-
mation transfer, Documentation,  Federal agencies.
Natural  resources  management,  'Permit  Tracking
System.
PB92-105857/REB               PC A04/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
Reduction Engineering Lab.
Pilot-Scale Incineration of Contaminated Soil from
the Purity ON Sates and McColl Superfund Sites.
Final rept.
Acurex Corp., Jefferson, AR.
R. H. Vocque, and L R. Waterland. Nov 91,74p EPA/
600/2-91/058
Contract EPA-68-C9-0038
See also PB88-239223 and PB89-148076. Sponsored
by Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH.
Risk Reduction Engineering Lab.
An incineration test program was conducted at the
U.S.  Environmental Protection Agency's Incineration
Research Facility to evaluate the potential of inciner-
ation as an option to treat contaminated soils at the
Purity Oil Sales Superfund site in Fresno, California,
and the McColl Superfund site  in Fullerton, California.
The soils from these sites are contaminated with up to
several percent sulfur and with some hazardous  or-
ganic contaminates. The Purity site has lead  contami-
nation from 760 to 10,200 mg/kg. The tests were con-
ducted in a pilot-scale rotary kiln using a single stage
ionizing wet scrubber for exhaust  particulate control.
Test results suggest that incineration would be an ac-
ceptable treatment  option for the McColl site materi-
als.

Keywords: 'Soils,  'Incinerators,  'Waste treatment,
'Hazardous materials,  Lead(Metal),  Sulfur, Organic
compounds, Rotary kilns, Pilot plants, Scrubbers, Su-
perfund, Oil recycling.
PB92-105865/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Recommended  Foundation  Fill  Materials  Con-
struction Standard of the Florida Radon Research
Program. Final rept.
Rogers and Associates Engineering Corp.,  Salt Lake
City, UT.
V. C. Rogers, and K. K. Nielson. Oct 91,25p EPA/600/
8-91/206
See also PB91-217372 and PB92-105626. Sponsored
by Environmental Protection Agency, Research Trian-
gle Park, NC. Air and Energy  Engineering  Research
Lab., and Florida Dept. of Community Affairs, Tallahas-
The report summarizes the technical basis for a rec-
ommended foundation fill materials standard for new
construction houses in Florida. The radon-control con-
struction standard was  developed  by  the Florida
Radon Research Program (FRRP). Rll material stand-
ards are formulated for. (1) natural foundation soils; (2)
fill materials or layered natural soils; and (3) foundation
backfill materials. Standards for building materials and
testing procedures are also set forth. Soil  standards
are based on allowable entry rate of radon into a dwell-
ing that is consistent with an indoor radon concentra-
tion of 2 pCi/L for many average dwelling condition.
Radium concentrations for over 700 undisturbed Flori-
da soils averaged 0.6 pCi/g and ranged from 0.1 to 2.9
pCi/g. Radon emanation coefficients range from 0.1 to
0.45 for most soils.

Keywords:   'Houses,  'Foundations,   'Standards,
'Radon,  'Air pollution.  Earth  fills,  Soil  properties,
Concentration(Composition),  Construction  materials,
Florida, Stationary sources.
PB92-106913/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Review of  Energy Efficiency of  Refrigerator/
Freezer Gaskets. Final rept Jul-Nov 90.
Iowa State Univ., Ames. Engineering Research Inst.
M. Ghassemi, and H. Shapiro. Oct 91,30p EPA/600/
2-91/060
Contract EPA-68-02-4286
Sponsored by Environmental Protection Agency, Re-
search Triangle  Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering
Research Lab.
The report gives results of an investigation of the sig-
nificance of heat leakage through gaskets in house-
hold refrigerator/freezers, explores different design
features, and suggests further study if necessary. The
report gives results of an extensive literature review,
interviews with refrigerator/freezer and gasket manu-
facturers, and some engineering  analysis.  (NOTE:
Home refrigerators are the largest consumers of elec-
tricity among household appliances and are consum-
ing an estimated 8% of the total electricity used in the
U.S. Recent studies show that gasket area heat leak-
age may account for as much as 21 % of the total ther-
mal load.)

Keywords:  'Refrigerators,   'Freezers,  'Gaskets,
Energy efficiency, Heating load, Stationary sources,
Pollution control, Design criteria, Safety engineering.
PB92-106939/REB               PC A05/MF A01
Regional Fine Particle Field Study: Data Base and
Initial Results. Rept. for Jul 88-91.
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park,  NC.  Atmospheric Research and Exposure As-
sessment Lab.
R. L. Bennett, and L. Stockburger. Nov 91,77p EPA/
600/3-91/065

The Fine Particle Network (FPN), a group of rural sites
located in the northern two-thirds of the eastern United
States, has been used to determine fine particle con-
centrations during selected periods between August
1988 and February 1989 and then continuously from
July 1989  through May 1990. Samples from the net-
work,  collected 24 h each day, were analyzed for the
most abundant elements by wave length dispersive x-
ray fluorescence (WDXRF). About thirty sites were in
operation during each sampling period. The 14 sam-
pling sessions produced 12,859 samples  for the  44
stations that were analyzed by WDXRF. Seasonal
averages of fine particulate mass and elemental sulfur
concentrations were determined for each of the seven
seasons in which samples were collected. Concentra-
tions of both were highest in the summer. The average
concentrations for all sites  and all  collection dates
were 15.5 and 1.9 micrograms/cu m for the fine partic-
ulate mass and elemental sulfur, respectively.

Keywords: 'Fines, 'Aerosols,  'Air pollution monitor-
ing, 'Rural areas, 'Sulfur, Seasonal variations, Chemi-
cal analysis, Particle size,  'Eastern Region(United
States), 'Fine Particle Network.
PB92-108000/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Nutritional Value of 'Artemia' and 'Tigriopus call-
fomicus' (Baker) for Two Pacific Mysid Species,
•Metamysidopsis elongata' (Holmes)  and 'Mysi-
dopsis intii' (Holmqulst). Journal article.
Environmental Research Lab.-Narragansett, Newport,
OR. MarkO. Hatfield Marine Science Center.
K. E. Kreeger, D. A. Kreeger, C. J. Langdon, and R. R.
Lowry. c1991,14p EPA/600/ J-91 /231,  ERLN-NX20
Pub. in Jnl. of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecolo-
gy, v148 p147-158 1991. Prepared in cooperation with
Oregon State Univ., Corvallis.

The nutritional values of four diets, (1)  newly hatched
Artemia, (2) Artemia enriched with highly unsaturated
fatty acids (HUFA), (3) HUFA-enriched Artemia, sup-
plemented with lipid  microspheres, and (4) HUFA-en-
riched Artemia, supplemented with lipid microspheres
and the harpacticoid copepod Tigriopus califomicus
(Baker), were assessed for the epibenthic mysid spe-
cies Metamysidopsis elongata (Holmes) and Mysidop-
sis intii (Holmquist). These diets differed  in fatty acid
composition as determined by gas  liquid chromatogra-
phy. Mysid survival, growth, and the proportion of fe-
males brooding offspring were not significantly differ-
ent among dietary treatments. In contrast, the number
of viable offspring produced by both  mysid species
was greatly improved by adding lipid microspheres and
T. califomicus to  a  diet of HUFA-enriched  Artemia,
probably because both lipid microspheres and T. cali-
fomicus were rich sources of the  fatty acids 20:5n-3
and 22:6n-3, compared with that of  Artemia diets
alone. (Copyright (c)  1991 Elsevier Science Publishers
B.V.)

Keywords: 'Marine biology, 'Food chains, 'Artemia,
'Crustacea,  'Nutritive  value,  Pacific  Ocean, Fatty
acids, Diet, Lipids, Esters, Gas chromatography,  Re-
prints, 'Tigriopus califomicus,  Metamysidopsis elon-
gata, Mysidopsis intii.
PB92-108018/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Environmental Research Lab.-Narragansett, Newport,
OR. Mark 0. Hatfield Marine Science Center.
Test  of Criteria  for  Introduced  Species: The
Global Invasion by the  Isopod 'Synldotea laevl-
dorsalls' (Miers, 1881). Journal article.
American Scientific International, Inc., McLean, VA.
J. W. Chapman, and J. T. Cartton. c1991,17p EPA/
600/J-91 /232,, ERLN-NX11
Contract EPA-68-CO-0051
Pub. in Jnl. of Crustacean Biology, v11 n3 p386-400
1991. Sponsored by Environmental Research  Lab.-
Narragansett, Newport,  OR. Mark 0. Hatfield Marine
Science Center.

Criteria  for distinguishing introduced  from endemic
peracaridan crustaceans were used to deduce that a
human-borne global invasion by  the Oriental isopod
                                                                                                                                Mar 1992     11

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                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
Synidotea laevidorsalis (Miers, 1881) has occurred in
the past 100 years. These criteria concern the ecologi-
cal, evolutionary, and geographical attributes of intro-
duced species. Trie criteria were used first to hypoth-
esize that Synidotea laticauda is an introduced species
in the eastern Pacific that arrived on the hulls of nine-
teenth-century sailing  ships.  The hypothesis was
tested by searching for previously described conspeti-
fics throughout the world. The search culminated in
discoveries that Synidotea laticauda Benedict, 1897 of
the eastern Pacific and Synidotea marplatensis (Giam-
biagi, 1922) of the Atlantic coast of South America are
misidentified populations and thus synonymies of S.
laevidorsalis.  Synidotea brunnea Pires and Moretra,
1975, of central Brazil is also a probable junior syno-
nym of S. laevidorsalis. The discovery of these synony-
mies was thus based upon predictive criteria rather
than inductive classical,  taxonomic  revisions. The
errors in species identifications indicate that the preva-
lence of marine and  estuarine introductions has been
underestimated and that the extent of many introduc-
tions remains poorly resolved.

Keywords: 'Crustacea,  Species diversity. Global  as-
pects, Taxonomy, Spatial distribution,  Body constitu-
tion, Pacific Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, Ecology, Reprints,
•Synidotea laevktordalis.


PB92-108026/REB               PC A02/MF A01
Environmental Research Lab., Narragansett, Rl.
Interactive  Effect* of AMrin,  Cydohexylamlne,
2,4-DiamlnotoliMne and Two PhortxH  Ester*  on
Metabotlc Cooperation between V79 Cells. Journal
article.
Science  Applications International Corp., Narragan-
sett, Rl.
L J. Mills, 0. L Robson, and A. R. Malcolm, d 991, 9p
EPA/600/J-91/233,, ERLN-1217
Contracts EPA-68-C1-0005, EPA-68-03-3529
Pub. in Carcinogenesis,  v12 p1293-1299 1991. Spon-
sored by Environmental  Research Lab., Narragansett,
Rl.

The in vitro V79/metaboltc cooperation assay meas-
ures the extent of gap-junctional transfer of metabo-
lites from wild-type to mutant V79 cells. The assay is
currently being explored as a short-term test to screen
for tumor promoting  chemicals, many of which inhibit
metabolic cooperation.  In the study, the assay was
used  to determine whether  chemical interactions
affect detection of tumor promoters in mixtures and to
investigate types of interactions that may occur  be-
tween chemicals. Several two-chemical mixtures were
examined. The effects of phorboH2-myristate-13-ac-
etate (PMA) and phorboM2,13-diDutvrate, two inhibi-
tors of metabolic cooperation that operate through the
same receptor-mediated  pathway, were  additive at
concentrations below the maximally effective concen-
trations of either. A summation effect was observed in
mixtures of two other inhibitors of metabolic coopera-
tion, trie pestk^ aldrin ajxJ trw principal metabolite of
sodium cydamate, cydohexytarriine.

Keywords:  'Carcinogens, 'Phorbol esters,  *Aldrin,
•Cydohexylamines,  ^Metabolism,  Intercellular junc-
tions, Chinese hamsters. Cell line, Dose-response re-
lationships. Reprints, 'Diaminotoluenes.


PB92-1M034/REB               PC A02/MF A01
Environmental Research Lab., Narragansett, Rl.
Increased Reproduction by Mysfcto f Mysidopsis
bahta1) Fed with  Enriched 'Artemis' spp. NaupM.
Journal article.
Science Applications International Corp.,  Narragan-
sett, Rl.
A. H. Kuhn, D. A. Bengtson, and K. L Simpson. c1991,
10p EPA/600/J-91/234,, ERLN-X136
Contract EPA-68-C1 -0005
Pub. in American Fisheries Society Symposium, v9
p192-199 1991. Prepared in cooperation with  Rhode
Island  Univ., Kingston.  Sponsored by Environmental
Research Lab., Narragansett, Rl.

A study was conducted  to assess effects of four diets
on reproduction by the mysid MyskJopsis bahia in rou-
tine culture conditions. Two experiments were  per-
formed: the first lasted 25 d under semistatic condi-
tions and the second lasted 60 d under flow-through
cond&ons. The objective was to determine which nu-
tritional  options, including  supplementation  of  the
normal diet of brine shrimp (Artemta spp.) with other
five food (rotifers) or with an artificial Artemia spp.-en-
richment product, AEP (Seteo). most effectively in-
creased growth and reproduction of the mysids. Diet
treatments  included reference  artemia nauplii as a
control; artemia nauplii with no detectable long-chain
highly unsaturated fatty acids; the latter artemia diet
enriched with AEP; and reference artemia plus live ro-
tifers (Brachkmus plicatilis). Mysids fed AEP-enriched
artemia had significantly higher percentages of fe-
males with  eggs developed  on days 10, 12, and 13
posthatching than  did  mysids  fed  the other  diets.
Weekly subsamples of  population densities  showed
that the AEP treatments consistently produced  larger
numbers of young. The results indicated that AEP-en-
riched artemia were an efficient and  cost-effective
means of boosting  production of mysid cultures. The
AEP also was found to be free of contaminants and
therefore suitable for culture of lexicological test orga-
nisms. (Copyright (c) by the American Fisheries Socie-
ty 1991.)

Keywords:  *Reproduction(Biology),  *Artemia, 'Food
chains, Diet, Growth, Ovum, Reprints, "Mysidopsis
bahia.
PB92-108042/REB
                                 PC A03/MF A01
Influence of Constant and Fluctuating Salinity on
Responses of 'MysMopsis bahia' Exposed to Cad-
mium hi a Life-Cycle Test Journal article.
Environmental Research Lab., Narragansett, Rl.
R. A. Voyer, and D. G. McGovem. c1991,17p EPA/
600/J-91 /235, ERLN-1190
Pub. in Aquatic Toxicology, v19 p215-2301991.

Two 28-day, life-cycle tests were conducted to evalu-
ate effects of constant and  fluctuating salinities on
chronic toxicity of  cadmium  to  Mysidopsis bahia at
27C. Salinities of 10 to 32% and cadmium concentra-
tions of 1 to 9 micrograms/l were examined. Estimated)
median tolerance concentrations at day 28 ranged
from 4.8 to 6.3 micrograms Cd/l over the salinity range
of 13 to 29%. Size and fecundity of exposed and unex-
posed females were predicted to be comparable when
cadmium was equal or greater than 5.0 micrograms
Cd/l and salinities equal or less than 20% and at con-
centrations of less than 5 micrograms/l at lower salini-
ties. At higher cadmium levels both  responses were
impaired regardless of salinity. Reproduction in control
treatments was an order of magnitude lower in low (10
and 13%) as compared to high (21, 29, 32%) salinity
treatments. This effect of salinity on reproduction was
not moderated by periodic exposure to higher, more
suitable salinities. Survival, growth and reproduction
were not impacted by addition of 5 micrograms Cd/l
under fluctuating salinity conditions. The  no-effect
concentration is 4-5 micgrogram Cd/1 regardless of
salinity. Changes in survival, growth and reproduction
observed are consistent with the principal distribution
of M. bahia in estuaries relative to salinity. Comparison
of these data with previously reported acute responses
suggests that the acute water quality criterion for cad-
mium should  be  salinity-dependent  whereas the
chronic criterion need not be. (Copyright (c) 1991 Else-
vier Science Publishers B.V. (Bfomedical Division))

Keywords: 'Salinity, 'Water pollution effects(Animals),
•Life cycles, 'Toxicity, 'Cadmium, Body weight Mor-
tality, Reprints, 'Mysidopsis bahia.
PB92-1080S9/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Environmental Research Lab., Narragansett, Rl.
Effects of a Contaminated Sediment on Life His-
tory  Traits  and  Population  Growth Rate  of
•Neanthes Arenaceodentata' (PoTychaeta: Nerei-
dae) In the Laboratory. Journal article.
Science  Applications  International  Corp., Narragan-
sett, Rl.
C. E. Pesch, W. R. Munns, and R. Gutjahr-Gobell.
C1991,13p EPA/600/J-91 /236,, ERLN-1084
Contracts EPA-68-03-3236, EPA-68-03-3529
Pub. in Environmental  Toxicology and Chemistry, v10
0805-8151991. Also pub. as Environmental Research
Lab.,  Narragansett, Rl. rept no. CONTRIB-1084.
Sponsored by Environmental Research Lab., Narra-
gansett, Rl.

The effects of a highly contaminated sediment on life
history traits and population dynamics of the nereidpo-
lychaete Neanthes arenaceodentata Moore were as-
sessed in a laboratory experiment Survival, growth
and fecundity were measured for one generation of
worms exposed to 40 and  10% Black Rock Harbor,
Connecticut  (BRH) sediment (a  contaminated sedi-
ment), 100% reference (REF) sediment from central
Long Island Sound (the control)  and a no-sediment
treatment (to follow progress of pairing and reproduc-
tion). The BRH sediment did not affect survival or size
of adults or number of broods. Number of eggs per
brood appeared to be lower in 40% BRH sediment
than 10% BRH or REF sediment but the difference
was not significant (1,397, 1,621 and 1,556 eggs per
brood, respectively). However, number of larvae per
brood was significantly lower in the 40% BRH sedi-
ment than in 10% BRH or REF sediment (363,770 and
850 larvae per brood, respectively). Number of juve-
niles appeared to be lower in 40% BRH than in the
other sediment treatments, although the differences
were not significant Size of juveniles did not differ in
the sediment treatments. The finite multiplication rate
of population increase, lambda was the same for all
treatments. The lack of significant differences but the
presence of some trends may indicate that 40% BRH
sediment was not a high enough dose to produce sig-
nificant effects.

Keywords: 'Water pollution  erfects(AnimaJs),  •Pory-
chaeta,  'Sediments, 'Life cycles, Population dynam-
ics, Reproduction(Biology), Survival analysis, Toxicity,
Reprints, * Neanthes arenaceodentata.
PB92-108067/REB              PC A03/MF A01
Two Different Approaches for Control and Meas-
urement of  Plant Functions In  Closed Environ-
mental Chambers. Symposium paper.
Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
C. McFariane, T. Pfleeger, H. D. Payer, W. Schmolke,
and D. Strube. d 991,21 p EPA/600/D-91 /231
Proceedings of ASHS in Jnl. of the American Society
for Horticultural  Sciences.  Prepared in cooperation
with Gesellschafl fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung
m.b.H. Muenchen, Neuherberg (Germany, F.R.).

Two approaches  are described for the control and
measurement of plant  functions  in  environmental
chambers; one approach was developed at the US En-
vironmental Protection Agency Research Laboratory
in Corvallis, OR, and the other developed at the GSF
(Research  Center for  Environment  and Health)  in
Munich, Germany. Both laboratories needed experi-
mental studies performed under a  variety of physical
and chemical conditions that can only be faithfully re-
produced in  the absence of  environmental disturb-
ances, typical of field and greenhouse studies. The drf-
ferent  goals of  each facility determined the different
approaches to control and measurement Both labora-
tories have many ideas that can be  useful to research-
ers studying  the interactions  associated with plants
and pollutants.

Keywords:  *Plants(Botany),  'Plant physiology, 'Test
chambers,  Environmental pollutants, Photosynthesis,
Toxicity,  Field tests, Laboratories. Graphs(Charts),
Ozone,  Seasonal  variations,  Greenhouses,  pH,
Carbon dioxide, Reprints.
 PB92-108075/REB
 Uncertainties In Nltrt
 si Watersheds.
igenMass
  PC A03/MF A01
Loadings hi Coast-
 Environmental Research Lab., Narragansett, Rl.
 N. A. Jaworski, and L C. Linker. c1990,15p EPA/600/
 D-91/232, ERLN-1344
 Also pub. as Chesapeake Research Consortium, Inc.,
 Baltimore, MD. rept no. CRC-PUB-137. Presented at
 New Perspectives in the Chesapeake System: A Re-
 search and Management Partnership, Baltimore, MD.,
 December 4-6,  1990. Prepared in  cooperation with
 Chesapeake  Research Consortium, Inc., Baltimore,
 MD.

 With the increasing need for reduction of nutrients for
 coastal eutrophication control, the importance of well
 defined nitrogen mass balance becomes paramount
 A limited number of  attempts have been made  to
 quantify inputs and outputs within major coastal eco-
 systems including its watersheds. Presented in the
 paper is a review of the mass balance of the Chesa-
 peake Bay by the EDF, URI/EPA, and Chesapeake
 Bay Program. The balance  for the  Upper Potomac
 Basin is also reviewed. The current Chesapeake Bay
 'nitrogen data is incorporated into the approach used
 for the Upper Potomac Basin.

 Keywords:  'Watersheds,  'Nitrogen,  'Mass balance,
 •Coastal regions, 'Water pollution control, 'Potomac
 River Basin, Forecasting, Chesapeake Bay, Nutrients,
 Pollution sources, Probability theory, Industrial wastes.
 Air water  interactions. Point  sources,  Deposition,
 Runoff, Eutrophication. Animal wastes, Fertilizers, Re-
 prints.
 12    Vol. 92, No. 1

-------
                                                   EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
 PB9M08083/REB                PC A03/MF A01
 Watershed  Nitrogen  Management Upper  Poto-
 mac River Basin Case Study.
 Environmental Research Lab., Narragansett, Rl.
 P. M. Groffman, and N. A. Jaworski. C1990,14p EPA/
 600/D-91 /233, ERLN-1255
 Also pub. as Chesapeake Research Consortium, Inc.,
 Baltimore, MD. rept. no. CRC-PUB-137. Presented at
 New Perspectives in the Chesapeake System: A Re-
 search and Management Partnership, Baltimore, MD.,
 December 4-6,  1990. Prepared in  cooperation with
 Rhode Island Univ., Narragansett, and Chesapeake
 Research Consortium, Inc., Baltimore, MD.

 Are watershed processes controlling the yield, trans-
 port, and transformation of carbon, nitrogen, and phos-
 phorus  scientifically  understood  and  amenable to
 man's control in an ecological management frame-
 work. For many large estuarine ecosystems such as
 the Hudson, Chesapeake Bay, and Pamlico Sound, the
 major contribution of  nutrients  is from  numerous
 sources within the terrestrial  portion of the  estuarine
 watershed. The watershed's topography, geology and
 hydrology along with  land use greatly influences the
 nutrients yield, transport and transformation. The yield
 and flux rates can often vary  by two orders  of magni-
 tude among sub basins within a watershed. The large
 variability observed in nitrification rates, denitrification
 rates, carbon yield, etc. suggest possible mechanics
 for management if one can determine controlling fac-
 tors and if man can target practices based on optimal
 use of natural processes to manage nutrients on wa-
 tershed bases. Presented in the paper are some sug-
 gested concepts and insights which could possibly en-
 hance the selection and evaluation  of best manage-
 ment practices, forestry practices, urbanization prac-
 tices, etc., leading to total watershed nutrient manage-
 ment

 Keywords: * Watersheds, 'Nitrogen, 'Potomac River
 Basin, 'Water pollution control, Nitrification, Nutrients,
 Best technology, Forestry, Industrial wastes, Fertiliz-
 ers,  Urbanization,  Population growth, Environmental
 transport,   Water   management(Applied),    Animal
 wastes, Reprints.
 PB92-108091/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Toxfctty of Chlorine and Ammonia to Aquatic Life:
 Chemistry,  Water Quality  Criteria,  Recent Re-
 search, and Recommended Future Research.
 Environmental Research Lab., Narragansett, Rl.
 B. D. Metaan, and N. Jaworski. C1991,14p EPA/600/
 D-917234, ERLN-1262
 Presented at Water Quality Standards for the 21st
 Century, Arlington, VA., December 10-12,1990.

 In 1987, more than half (53 percent) of the population
 in the United States lived within 50 miles of the coasts
 along the Great Lakes, Gulf of Mexico, and Atlantic
 and Pacific Oceans. While predictions vary, estimates
 indicate that 54 to 80 percent of this Nation's popula-
 tion will be residing in coastal areas by the year 2000.
 As a result of this significant population growth, the
 amount of  chlorine and ammonia entering coastal
 waters will undoubtedly increase. Chlorine and ammo-
 nia are ubiquitous and  highly toxic 'conventional' pol-
 lutants whose sources  include effluents from sewage
 treatment plants, large power plants,  and industry.
, Chlorine is used to disinfect  drinking water and ef-
 fluents  from sewage  treatment  plants  to protect
 humans from exposure to pathogens (bacteria and vi-
 ruses) in drinking water, receiving waters through body
 contact (such as swimming, scuba diving, and wind
 surfing), and contaminated shellfish. Another  major
 source of chlorine is a  biockte in power plant cooling
 waters and industrial effluents.

 Keywords:  'Chlorine,  'Ammonia, 'Water  pollution
 abatement 'Water quality standards,  'Coastal  re-
 gions, 'Water pollution effects. Water chemistry. Pollu-
 tion sources, Great Lakes, Mexico Gulf, Forecasting,
 Population growth, Industrial wastes, Disinfections, At-
 lantic Ocean, Pacific Ocean, Toxicity, Marine biology,
 Aquatic biology, Reprints.
 PB92-108109/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Florida Radon Research Program: Technical Sup-
 port for the Development of  Radon Resistant
 Construction Standards. Rept. for Aug-Sep 91.
 Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
 Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
 D. C. Sanchez, R. Dixon, and M. Madani. 1991,11 p
 EPA/600/D-91/235
 Presented at the ARRST Meeting, Rockville, MD., Oc-
 tober 9-12,1991. Prepared in cooperation with Florida
 Dept of Community Affairs, Tallahassee.

 The paper describes the technical direction of the Flor-
 ida Radon Research Program (FRRP), its current ob-
 jectives, and accomplishments to date. The 1988 Flori-
 da Legislature mandated the development of stand-
 ards for the construction of radon resistant buildings. A
 program of research and development was initiated in-
 volving the Florida State University System, the Florida
 Department of Community Affairs,  and the U.S. EPA.
 The FRRP will complete two years of concentrated
 effort to develop, test, and demonstrate a sound tech-
 nical basis for radon resistant construction standards.

 Keywords: 'Radon, 'Air pollution, 'Pollution control,
 Construction, Building codes, Standards, Tests,  Uni-
 versities, Stationary sources.


 PB92-108117/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Indicators for Monitoring Biodiversity: A Hierar-
 chical Approach. Journal article.
 Corvaliis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
 R. F. Noss. C1990,12p EPA/600/J-90/545
 Pub. in Conservation Biology, v4 n4 p355-364 Dec 90.
 Prepared in cooperation with NSI Technology Services
 Corp., Corvaliis, OR.

 Biodiversity is presently a minor consideration in envi-
 ronmental policy. It has been regarded as too broad
 and vague a concept to be applied to real-world regu-
 latory and management problems. The three primary
 attributes  of biodiversity recognized by Jerry Franklin -
 composition, structure, and function -  are expanded
 into a nested hierarchy that incorporates elements of
 each attribute at four levels of organization: regional
 landscape,  community-ecosystem,  population-spe-
 cies, and genetic. Indicators of each attribute in terres-
 trial ecosystems, at the four levels of organization, are
 identified  for  environmental  monitoring  purposes.
 Projects to monitor  biodiversity will benefit from a
 direct linkage to long-term ecological research and a
 commitment to test hypotheses relevant to biodiversity
 conservation. A general guideline is to proceed from
 the top down, beginning with a coarse-scale inventory
 of landscape pattern, vegetation, habitat structure and
 species distributions, then overlaying data  on  stress
 levels to identify biologically significant areas at high
 risk of impoverishment Intensive research and moni-
 toring can be directed to high-risk ecosystems and ele-
 ments of biodiversity, while less intensive monitoring is
 directed to the total landscape. In any monitoring  pro-
 gram, particular attention should be paid to specifying
 the questions that monitoring is intended to answer
 and validating the relationships between indicators
 and the components of biodiversity they represent.

 Keywords: 'Biological indicators, 'Species diversity,
 'Environmental monitoring,  'Resource conservation,
 'Ecosystems,  Environmental  impact  assessments,
 Genetics,  Terrestrial ecosystems, Trends, Implemen-
 tation,  Environmental policy,  Natural resources man-
 agement,  Vegetation, Risk assessment, Populations,
 Reprints, 'Biodiversity.
PB92-108125/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Determination and Occurrence of AHH-ActJve Poh
ychtorinated   Blphenyls,  2,3,7,8-Tetrachloro-p-
Dioxin  and  2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodlbenzofuran  in
Lake Michigan Sediment and Biota. The Question
of Their Relative Toxicotogical Significance. Jour-
nal article.
Environmental Research Lab.-Narragansett Newport,
OR. Mark O. Hatfield Marine Science Center.
L M. Smith, T. R. Schwartz, K. Feltz, and T. J. Kubiak.
C1990,25p EPA/600/J-90/546, ERLN-N095
Pub. in Chemosphere, v21 n9 p1063-1085 1990. Pre-
pared in cooperation with National Fisheries Contami-
nant Research Center, Columbia, MO.

An  analytical procedure  has been developed for the
determination of the 18 PCB congeners which are in-
ducers of methyteholanthrene-like mixed function  oxi-
dase activity in animals  and include the most toxic
PCBs. Determinations of the toxic PCB congeners in
samples  of  eggs  of predatory fish and piscivorous
birds of the Great Lakes and in Aroclor mixtures dem-
onstrate that the apparent toxic potency of PCB resi-
dues in these samples is dominated by two congeners,
3,3',4,4',5- and 2,3,3',4,4'-pentachlorobiphenyl.  Fur-
thermore, the analyses demonstrate that the potential
toxicity of PCB residues can increase 5 to 10 fold as
they reach upper  levels  of aquatic  food chains and
 most often exceed the potential toxicity of chlorinated
 dibenzodioxins and furans in higher animals even in
 environments highly contaminated by the latter com-
 pounds.

 Keywords: 'Water pollution detection, 'Lake Michi-
 gan, 'Sediments, 'Polychlorinated biphenyls, 'Water
 pollution effects, 'Biota, Chemical analysis, Toxicol-
 ogy, Aquatic ecosystems, Aquatic biology, Chlorine or-
 ganic compounds, Aroclors, Food chain, Polychlorinat-
 ed dibenzodioxins, Polychlorinated dibenzofurans, Ex-
 traction, Distillation, Reprints.
 PB92-108133/REB                PC A02/MF A01
 Waste Reduction Technology Evaluations of the
 U.S. EPA WRITE Program. Journal article.
 Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
 Reduction Engineering Lab.
 T. M. Harten, and I. J. Ucis. C1991,10p EPA/600/J-
 91/224
 Pub. in Jnl. of the Air and Waste Management Associa-
 tion, v41  n8  p1122-1129  Aug 91.  See also PB91-
 162412.

 The Waste Reduction  Innovative Technology Evalua-
 tion (WRITE) Program was established in 1989 to pro-
 vide objective, accurate performance and cost data
 about waste reducing technologies for a variety of in-
 dustrial and commercial applications. EPA's Risk Re-
 duction Engineering  Laboratory conducts  the Pro-
 gram's full- or pilot-scale technology evaluations coop-
 eratively with six states and one local government. In
 WRITE's second year, four evaluations had been com-
 pleted and ten other active projects were to be com-
 pleted within several months. In the paper, results are
 summarized for completed projects and descriptions
 provided for the technologies and test designs of the
 active projects. The projects emphasize waste reduc-
 ing modifications for metal finishing, electronics manu-
 facturing,  transportation, solvent cleaning and strip-
 ping, and printing  and publishing operations. The 35
 technology evaluations planned for the full life of the
 Program and. subsequent technology transfer activities
 are intended to speed the early introduction of cleaner,
 pollution preventing technologies.

 Keywords:  'Hazardous materials,  'Waste minimiza-
 tion, 'Pollution control, Recovery, Metal finishing, Sol-
 vents,  Cleaning, Printing inks, Publishing, Industrial
 plants, Transportation.
 PB92-108141/REB               PC A02/MF A01
 Recovery  of Bulk DNA from  Soil  by a Rapid,
 Small-Seale Extraction Method. Journal article.
 Corvaliis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
 L. A. Porteous, and J. L Armstrong. c1991, 6p EPA/
 600/J-91/225
 Pub. in Current Microbiology, v22 p345-3481991.

 The authors describe an extraction method that yields
 restrictable 20-25 kb DNA from one gram of soil. Cells
 are lysed directly in the soil. The crude DNA extract is
 separated from contaminating humic compounds, con-
 centrated, and purified by CsCI gradient centrifugation
 and the commercial product Geneclean.

 Keywords:  'Extraction,   'Soils,  'Deoxyribonucleic
 acids, Separation,  Humic acids, Centrifuging, Ecology,
 Reprints, Lysozyme, Novogym.
PB92-108158/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Patch  Size of Forest  Openings and Arthropod
Populations. Journal article.
Corvaliis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
D. J. Shure, and D. L. Phillips. c1991,12p EPA/600/J-
91/226
Pub. in Oecologia, v86 D325-3341991. Prepared in co-
operation with Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA. Dept. of Biol-
ogy.

Five sizes of canopy openings (0.016 ha to 10 ha)
were established in the Southern Appalachian Moun-
tains in early 1982  to examine  the initial patterns of
plant and arthropod establishment across a size range
of forest disturbances. Vegetation standing crop after
the first growing  season was considerably higher in
large than small  openings in apparent response to
greater resource release (e.g., sunlight) in larger open-
ings. Woody stump and root sprouts were the domi-
nant mode of revegetation in each patch size. Forest
dominants such as Quercus rubra, Q. prinus and Can/a
spp. were less important as sprouters in openings than
                                                                                                                                 Mar 1992     13

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                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
several  minor  forest  components (e.g., Robinia
pseudo-acacia,  Acer rubrum, Halesia  Carolina  and
Comus florida). Arthropod abundance and community
composition varied across the size range of forest
openings.

Keywords:  'Forestry,  'Appalachian  Mountains, Ar-
thropoda, Forest trees, Disturbances, Abundance, En-
vironments, Reprints, Quercus rubra, Standing crop,
Rabinia pseudo-acacia.
PB92-108186/REB               PC A03/MF A01
On-Stte Methods for Assessing Chemical Impact
on the Soil  Environment Using Earthworms:  A
Case Study at the Baird and McGuire Superfund
Site, Holbrook, Massachusetts. Journal article.
Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
C. A. Callahan, C. A. Menzie, D. E. Burmaster, D. C.
Wilbqm, and T. Ernst c1991,12p EPA/600/J-91 /227
Pub. in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, v10
p817-826 1991. Prepared in cooperation with Menzie-
Cura and Associates, Inc., Chelmsford, MA., and NSI
Technology Services Corp., Corvallis, OR. Environ-
mental Research Lab.

Five Lumbricus terrestris LJnneaus were placed into
enclosures at a field site and evaluated after 7 d. The
enclosures were distributed in transects  throughout
areas of high and low contamination and in a reference
area.  Observations of earthworm responses for mor-
tality, morbidity (coiling, stiffening, swelling, lesions)
and whole body burden were compared to chemical
measurements in  corresponding soil samples. Nine
chemicals (DDT, DDE, ODD alpha chkxdane, gamma-
chkxdane, chlordene, gamrna-chlordene, endnn, non-
acMor) were measured  in the whole body of earth-
worms and soil samples. Various levels of impact were
described by scoring earthworm responses from sam-
pling locations throughout the field site. A ranking of
the sample locations from low to high impact by the
earthworm response variables is directly correlated to
the ranking of these locations for concentrations of
total chkxdane and total DDT in  corresponding soil
samples. Results show acute toxicity to earthworms
placed on-site and suggest that whole body concen-
trations could impact earthworm predators. In addition,
the on-site method eliminates the need to transport
soils to off-site laboratories, thus preventing subse-
quent disposal issues. (Copyright (c) 1991 SETAC.)

Keywords: 'Land pollution,  'Biological  indicators,
'Pesticides,  'Environmental   impact  assessments,
'Annelids, 'Chemical compounds, Worms, On-site in-
vestigations.          Soil          contamination,
Concentration(Composition), Ranking, Waste dispos-
al, Superfund, Case studies,  Food chain. Sampling,
Toxicity,     Reprints,     Lumbricus     terrestris,
Holbrook(Massachusetts).
PBS2-108174/REB               PC A02/MF A01
Model of Additive Effects of Mixtures of Narcotic
Chemicals, Journal article.
Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
M. A. Shirazi, and G. Under. c1991, 9p EPA/600/ J-91 /
228
Pub. in Archives of Environmental Contamination and
Toxicology, v21 p183-189 1991. Prepared in coopera-
tion with ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc.,
Corvallis, OR.

Biological effects data with single chemicals are  far
more abundant than with mixtures. Yet, environmental
exposures to chemical mixtures, for example near haz-
ardous waste sites  or nonpoint sources, are very
common and using test data from single chemicals to
approximate effects of mixtures can be useful in envi-
ronmental risk assessment To facilitate the linkage,
the Weibull function was used as  a common model to
link responses of single chemicals with the response
of their mixtures. The present paper addresses the re-
sponse of fish to mixtures of narcotic chemicals and a
second  paper addresses the developmental malfor-
mation of frog embryos when exposed to defined mix-
tures of teratogenic chemicals. Biological effects data
with singly tested chemicals cannot be used directly to
predict effects of mixtures. However, narcotic chemi-
cals are known to produce an additive concentration
effects in fish and the Weibull function with an additive
concentration variable was used to model the effects
of mixtures of these chemicals. The model produced
good agreement with data over a wide range of chemi-
cals and mixture ratios and provides a useful initial as-
sessment of environmental effects of mixtures of nar-
cotic chemicals.
Keywords: 'Water pollution effects(Animals),  'Toxic
substances,  'Narcotics, Tables(Data),  Teratogens,
Mixtures, Fishes, Frogs, Embryo, Reprints, 'Chemical
interactions, Hazardous waste sites.
PB92-108182/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
Forest Soil Response to Add and Salt Additions
of Sulfate. 1. Sulfur Constituents and Net Reten-
tion. Journal article.
Illinois Univ. at Urbana-Champaign. Dept of Forestry.
M. B. David, W. J. Fasth, and G. F. Vance. c1991,12p
EPA/600/J-91/229
Pub. in Soil Science, v151 n2 p136-145 1991. Spon-
sored by Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.

The authors used soil columns constructed from a
Maine Spodosol  and Illinois  Alfisol to investigate the
retention of SO4(2-) added as Na2SO4 or H2SO4.
Both organic and inorganic S pools were examined to
determine how retention of added SO4(2-) was influ-
enced by both mineralization/immobilization and ad-
sorption/desorption  processes. Forty  columns were
leached weekly for a year with simulated throughfall
solutions containing base cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+),
K(+), Na(+), NH4(+), NO3(-), Cl(-),  and  either 80,
280. or 1080 microeq SO4(2-)/L for varying periods. At
the conclusion of the experiment acid and control col-
umns were destructively sampled by depth increments
to examine organic (C-bonded S and ester sulfate) and
extractaote SO4(2-) concentrations, .as well as soil pH.
For all Spodosol columns, SO4(2-) adsorption by the B
horizon was the dominant process of SO4(2-) reten-
tion; no changes in  organic S pools were observed.
Soils  in acid columns  retained greater SO4(2-) than
salt columns, most likely due to pH dependent adsorp-
tion. However, all Spodosols retained large amounts of
SO4(2-). In the Alfisol SO4(2-) retention was lower
than in the Spodosols (<25%) due to a limited SO4(2-
) adsorption capacity; mineralization of C- bonded S re-
sulted in S inputs nearly equaling outputs. Although or-
ganic S was the dominant S pool in both soils, there
was little mineralization overall,  and inorganic adsorp-
tion appeared to be the primary process of SO4(2-) re-
tention. (Copyright (c) 1991 by Williams & Wilkins.)

Keywords: 'Forest land, 'Soil analysis, 'Acidification,
'Sulfates,  'Salts. 'Land pollution, Adsorption, Envi-
ronmental effects, Mineralization, Desorption, Immobi-
lization,  Experimental  design,  pH,  Environmental
transport, Water pollution, Ecosystems, Soil chemistry,
Reprints.
PB92-108190/REB               PC A02/MF A01
Developmental Malformation of Frog Embryos: An
Analysis of Teratogentotty of Chemical Mixtures.
Journal article.
Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
M. A. Shirazi, and D. A. Dawson. C1991, 8p EPA/600/
J-91/230
Pub. in Archives of Environmental Contamination and
Toxicology, v21 p177-182 1991. Prepared in coopera-
tion with Tennessee Univ., Knoxville. Coll. of Veteri-
nary Medicine.

Chemical compounds known to be teratogenic to frog
embryos were tested singly and in binary mixtures and
Weibull functions were used to model their concentra-
tion-response relationships. A separate Weibull func-
tion with an additive concentration variable modeled
the mixtures using only single  chemical test  data
Seven chemicals in five binary mixtures at 3/1, 1/1,
and 13 mixture proportions each were tested. The
ratios of measured and calculated model parameters
and median concentrations were estimated for com-
paring the results. The ratios ranged from 0.72 and
1.44 with an average at 0.99, an agreement that was
qualitatively similar to modeling  mixtures of narcotic
chemicals which are known to produce additive con-
centration effects. The model reliability in determining
mixture response classes and prediction of effects
based on  single chemical data  was quantified. The
model is useful for environmental risk assessment of
chemical mixtures in hazardous waste sites and for the
design of mixture experiments.

Keywords:  'Teratogenic  compounds,  'Frogs,  'Em-
bryos, Risk assessment. Hazardous materials, Toxici-
ty. Toterances(Physiology), Reprints.
PB92-108760/REB               PC A05/MF A01
Guideline for Regulatory Application of the Urban
Airshed Model.
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards.
D. C. Doll. Jul 91, 96p EPA/450/4-91 /013
See also PB91 -131227.

The document provides guidance on application of the
U.S. EPA Urban Airshed Model for ozone nonattain-
ment area State Implementation Plan development as
required by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990.
The Urban Airshed Model is an urban-scale, grid-
based  photochemical dispersion model.  The model
provides a means for studying the relationship of vola-
tile  organic compound and nitrogen oxide emissions to
ambient levels of ozone in urban areas. The document
provides information on data requirements and model
application strategy.

Keywords: 'Ozone, 'Atmospheric diffusion, 'Pollution
transport, 'Urban areas, 'Air pollution.  Photochemical
reactions, Nitrogen oxides,  Volatile  organic  com-
pounds,  Regulations, Atmospheric models, Guide-
lines, Performance evaluation, 'Urban  airshed model.
PB92-108778/REB               PC A20/MF A04
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards.
Screening Methods for the Development of Air
Toxics Emission Factors.
Radian Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC.
J. T. Bursey. Sep 91,456p EPA/450/4-91 /021
Contract EPA-68D90054
See also PB91-216184 and PB91-126003. Sponsored
by Environmental Protection Agency, Research Trian-
gle Park, NC. Office of Air Quality Planning and Stand-
ards.

Under the program the literature has been surveyed to
determine the applicability of existing methodology.
The primary goal was to  use methodology applicable
to the largest number of analytes listed in the Clean Air
Act Amendments with the full realization that a broad
coverage by a methodology may require some sacri-
fice of sensitivity and accuracy. The need for validation
of proposed methodologies has been recognized. As-
signments of analytes to a specific methodology have
been made on the basis of previous validation studies
and/or physical properties (available physical proper-
ties for the chemicals of the Clean Air Act list are sup-
plied in an appendix). The range of applicability of a
given sampling or analytical method, when available, is
included as a part of the method description. Tables
are included which summarize  the potentially applica-
ble  sampling  and analytical methods for chemicals
listed in the Clean Air Act Amendments. General infor-
mation  on cost for the sampling and analysis proce-
dures is presented.

Keywords: 'Air pollution sampling, 'Toxic substances,
'Emission factors, 'Air pollution detection, 'Chemical
compounds,   Concentration(Composition),   Physical
properties, Tables(Data), Chemical analysis, Proce-
dures, Environmental surveys,  Pollution sources, US
EPA, Laboratory equipment *EPA methods, Clean Air
Act
PB92-108786/REB               PC A15/MF A03
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards.
Regional Ozone Modeling for Northeast Transport
(ROMNET). Final project rept
Computer Sciences Corp., Research  Triangle  Park,
NC.
N. C. Possiel, L B. Milich, B. R. Goodrich, E. L Meyer,
and K. L Schere. Jun 91,335p EPA/450/4-91 /002A
Contracts EPA-68-01 -7176, EPA-68-D9-0173
See  also PB89-136691  and  Appendices, PB92-
108794. Prepared in cooperation with  Alliance Tech-
nologies Corp., Chapel Hill, NC. Sponsored by  Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park,
NC. Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards.

The Regional Ozone Modeling for Northeast Transport
(ROMNET) Project was initiated by the U.S. EPA and
State and local air pollution agencies in the  Northeast
to address the problem of regional transport in devel-
oping effective  and equitable control programs to
attain the ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard
in the region. The specific goals of ROMNET are:  (1) to
evaluate the relative effectiveness of regional controls
on ozone levels in the Northeast; (2) to provide quanti-
14     Vol. 92, No. 1

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                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
tative estimates of ozone and precursor levels trans-
ported between urban areas following application of
control measures; and (3) to provide procedures and
guidance for incorporating ozone and precursor trans-
port  in  future State Implementation development
ROMNET included the application of the EPA Region-
al Oxidant Model for a number of regional emissions
control strategies. These strategies were designed to
address  five major issues: (1) What are the relative
benefits of VOC controls versus NOx controls in reduc-
ing ozone levels across the region; (2) What is the
impact of  reducing regional transport on Northeast
Corridor  ozone levels; and (3)  What levels of VOC
and/or NOx emissions reductions  are necessary to
reduce predicted ozone levels  in  the Northeast to
below 125 ppb; (4) How effective are potential reactiv-
ity-based strategies; and (5) How does the large uncer-
tainty in  biogemc emissions alter conclusions on the
effectiveness of controls.

Keywords: *Ozone,  'Photochemical  reactions,  *Air
pollution control, 'Atmospheric models, 'Smog, Emis-
sion factors, Pollution transport, Meteorological data,
Air  quality data, Nitrogen  oxides,  Meteorological
charts, 'Northeast RegionfUnited States), 'Regional
Ozone Modeling for Northeast Transport Project.


PB92-108794/REB               PC A15/MF A03
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Office of Air Qualify Planning and Standards.
Regional Ozone Modeling for Northeast Transport
(ROMNET). Appendices. Final rept.
Computer  Sciences  Corp.,  Research Triangle  Park,
NC.
N. C. Possiel, L. B. Milich, B. R. Goodrich, E. L. Meyer,
and K. L Schere. Jun 91,344p EPA/450/4-91 /002B
Contracts EPA-68-01 -7176, EPA-68-D9-0173
See also PB92-108786. Prepared in cooperation with
Alliance  Technologies Corp., Chapel  Hill, NC. Spon-
sored by Environmental Protection Agency, Research
Triangle Park, NC. Office of Air  Quality Planning and
Standards.

The Regional Ozone Modeling for Northeast Transport
(ROMNET) Project was initiated by  the U.S.  EPA and
State and local air pollution agencies in the Northeast
to address the problem of regional transport in devel-
oping effective and equitable  control  programs to
attain the ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standard
in the region. The specific goals of ROMNET are: (1) to
evaluate the relative effectiveness of regional controls
on ozone levels in the Northeast; (2) to provide quanti-
tative estimates of ozone and precursor levels trans-
ported between urban areas following application of
control measures; and (3) to provide procedures and
guidance for incorporating ozone and precursor trans-
port  in  future State Implementation development
ROMNET included the application of the EPA Region-
al Oxidant Model for a number of regional emissions
control strategies. These strategies were designed to
address five major issues: (1) What are the relative
benefits of VOC controls versus NOx controls in reduc-
ing ozone levels across the region; (2) What is the
impact of reducing regional transport on Northeast
Corridor ozone levels; and (3)  What levels of VOC
and/or NOx emissions reductions  are necessary to
reduce predicted ozone levels in  the  Northeast to
below 125 ppb; (4) How effective are potential reactiv-
ity-based strategies; and (5) How does the large uncer-
tainty in biogemc emissions alter conclusions on the
effectiveness of controls.

Keywords: 'Ozone,  'Photochemical reactions, 'Air
pollution control, 'Atmospheric models, Emission fac-
tors. Pollution transport, Meteorological data, Nitrogen
oxides, Meteorological charts, Tables(Data), 'Smog,
'Northeast Region(United States),  'Regional Ozone
Modeling for Northeast Transport Project


PB92-109057/REB               PC A08/MF A02
Technical Guidance Document Inspection Tech-
niques for the Fabrication of Geomembrane Field
Seams. Final rept.
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
Reduction Engineering Lab.
R. E. Landreth, D. A. Carson, and R.  M. Koemer. May
91,166p EPA/530/SW-91/051

The Technical Guidance Document is meant to aug-
ment the numerous construction quality control and
construction quality assurance (CQC and CQA) guide-
lines that are presently available for geomembrane in-
stallation and inspection. It is focused on all current
methods of producing geomembrane seams including
HOPE and VLDPE, PVC, PVC-R, CSPE, CSPE-R, CPE,
CPE-R, EIA and EIA-R. In general, the tone of most of
the existing guidelines is to allow the installer almost
complete freedom in making seams with the only con-
ditions being that they pass: (1) destructive shear and
peel  tests to a stipulated strength, and (2) selected
nondestructive tests. By  developing a report some-
where between the typical CQC/CQA Documents and
an installer's training manual, i.e., a  'Technical Guid-
ance Document', it is hoped that this technical guid-
ance document will provide meaningful insight for an
inspector as to what the  installer is  trying to accom-
plish. At the same time, it might be also helpful to the
installer in recognizing that  others have an interest in
their specific activity. After some introductory material,
the manual presents six specific methods used for fab-
ricating  field seams of the types of geomembranes
being most widely used for environmental control sys-
tems, they are the following: (1) extrusion fillet seams,
(2) extrusion flat seams, (3) hot wedge seams, (4) hot
air seams, (5) chemical fusion seams, and (6) adhesive
seams.

Keywords:   'Inspections,   'Hazardous   materials,
'Waste disposal, 'Lining processes, 'Seaming, 'Land
pollution abatement Quality assurance, Quality con-
trol,  Construction, Guidelines, Specialized training,
Manuals, Nondestructive tests, Reid tests, Thermo-
plastic resins, Seams(Joints), Adhesion, Environmen-
tal engineering, Performance standards, 'Geosynthe-
tic materials, 'Land covers,  'Geomembranes, Cap-
ping, Extrusion fillet seams, Extrusion flat seams. Hot
wedge seams, Hot air seams, Chemical fusion seams,
Adhesive seams.
PB92-109065/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of Emergency and Remedial Response.
Guide for Conducting Treatabiltty Studies under
CERCLA:   Aerobic   Biodegradation    Remedy
Screening. Interim Guidance.
Science Applications International Corp., Cincinnati,
OH.
J. Rawe. Jul 91,43p EPA/540/2-91 /013A
Contract EPA-68-C8-0061
See also PB90-249772 and PB92-109073. Sponsored
by Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of Emergency and Remedial Response.

Systematically conducted, well-documented treatabil-
ity  studies are an important component of remedy
evaluation and selection under the Superfund pro-
gram. The manual focuses on aerobic biodegradation
remedy screening treatability studies conducted  in
support of remedy selection that is conducted prior to
the Record of Decision (ROD). The manual presents a
standard guide for designing and implementing an aer-
obic  biodegradation  remedy screening treatability
study. The manual presents a description of and dis-
cusses the applicability and limitations of aerobic bio-
degradation  technologies and defines the prescreen-
ing and field measurement data needed to determine if
treatability testing is required. It also presents an over-
view of the process of conducting treatability tests and
the applicability of tiered treatability testingfor evalua-
tion aerobic biodegradation technologies. The specific
goals of each tier of testing are defined and perform-
ance levels are presented that should be met at the
remedy screening level before additional tests are
conducted at the next tier. The elements of a treatabil-
ity study work plan are also defined with detailed dis-
cussions on the design and execution of the remedy
screening treatability study.

Keywords: 'Superfund, 'Waste management,  'Haz-
ardous materials, 'Biodeterioration, 'Aerobic process-
es, Remedial action, Guidelines, Biological treatment.
Manuals, Technology utilization, Field tests, Perform-
ance evaluation, Data processing. Sampling, Chemical
analysis, "Preremedial  actions, Cleanup  operations,
Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensa-
tion and Liability Act Remedial designs.
 PB92-109073/REB                PC A02/MF A01
 Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
 Reduction Engineering Lab.
 Guide for Conducting Treatability Studies under
 CERCLA:   Aerobic   Biodegradation   Remedy
 Screening. Fact sheet
 Science  Applications International Corp., Cincinnati,
 OH.
 J. Rawe. Jul 91, 9p EPA/540/2-91 /013B
 Contract EPA-68-C8-0061
See also PB92-109065 and PB90-249772. Sponsored
by Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH.
Risk Reduction Engineering Lab.

The fact sheet provides a summary of  information to
facilitate the planning and execution of aerobic biode-
gradation remedy screening treatability studies in sup-
port of the RI/FS and the remedial  design/remedial
action (RD/RA) processes. The fact sheet follows the
organization of the 'Guide for Conducting Treatability
Studies Under  CERCLA: Aerobic Biodegradation
Remedy Screening, Interim Guidance (PB92-109065),
July 1991. Detailed information on designing and im-
plementing remedy screening and remedy selection
treatability studies for aerobic biodegradation is provid-
ed in the guidance document The guidance discusses
only screening of biological treatment. Remedy selec-
tion guidance for aerobic biodegradation is currently in
the planning stages.

Keywords: 'Superfund,  'Waste management 'Haz-
ardous materials, 'Biodeterioration, 'Aerobic process-
es, Remedial action. Guidelines, Biological treatment,
Feasibility studies, Technology utilization, 'Office of
Solid Waste and Emergency Response, 'Preremedial
actions. Cleanup operations. Comprehensive Environ-
mental Response Compensation and Liability Act, Re-
medial designs.
PB92-109081/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of Emergency and Remedial Response.
Superfund Engineering Issue:  Issues Affecting
the  Applicability and Success  of Remedial/Re-
moval Incineration Projects. Final rept
PEI Associates, Inc., Cincinnati, OH.
F. Hall, and L Staley. Feb 91,30p EPA/540/2-91 /004
Contract EPA-68-03-3413
Sponsored by Environmental Protection  Agency,
Washington, DC. Office of Emergency and Remedial
Response.

Incineration has been a recommended method for dis-
posing of hazardous materials, and its use in the Su-
perfund Program is increasing rapidly.  It has become
one of the most often selected methods for treating
hazardous constituents found at Superfund sites. Be-
cause of the increased reliance of Superfund decision
makers on incineration,  the Engineering Forum has
identified the informed evaluation  of incineration as a
remedy, and the issues inherent in its implementation
as a high priority. The paper was prepared by RREL's
Engineering and Treatment Technical Support Center,
under  the technical direction of Laurel Staley (RREL)
and Paul Leonard (Region III), with the support of the
Superfund Technical Support Project

Keywords: 'Superfund, 'Remedial action, 'Hazardous
materials, 'Waste disposal,  'Incineration,  Perform-
ance evaluation, Implementation, Information transfer,
Air pollution control, Cost analysis, On-site investiga-
tions,  Operations, Tables(Data), Cleanup operations,
On-scene coordinators, Remedial project managers,
Remedial design.
 PB92-109099/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
 Reduction Engineering Lab.
 Running a Conference as a Clean Product Inter-
 national  Conference on  Pollution  Prevention:
 Clean Technologies and Clean Products. Held in
 Washington, DC. on June 10-13,1990. Final rept.
 Science Applications International Corp., Falls Church,
 VA.
 K. R. Stone, and M. E. Bourassa. Jun 91,40p EPA/
 600/2-91/026
 Contract EPA-68-C8-0062
 Sponsored by Environmental Protection Agency, Cin-
 cinnati, OH. Risk Reduction Engineering Lab.

 More than 1000 attended the International Conference
 on  Pollution Prevention: Clean Technologies and
 Clean  Products, held in Washington, DC, June 10-13,
 1990.  With support from the Department of Defense,
 the Department of Energy, and the International Asso-
 ciation for Clean Technology,  this conference was
 sponsored by the EPA's Risk Reduction Engineering
 Laboratory in Cincinnati, Ohio. Featuring 52 sessions
 and more than 250 speakers, the conference explored
 the innovative  technologies  and socio-economic
 issues arising in the field of pollution prevention. With
 an agenda of presenting successful examples of clean
 technologies and  clean  products, the conference


                            Mar 1992     15

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                                                   EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
  became the perfect opportunity to  examine how a
  large meeting might itself be run as  a clean product
  Several pollution prevention options were identified
  and implemented, with varying degrees of success.
  The report examines the development of the confer-
  ence as a clean product, the options identified, how
  they were implemented  and the level of  success
  achieved. It demonstrates the common sense value of
  adopting dean practices at every level of their profes-
  sional activities and is being used by  RREL managers
  as a guide to minimizing the generation of wastes at or-
  ganized meetings, workshops, and conferences.

  Keywords: 'Meetings, "Pollution abatement, •Environ-
  mental  protection, 'Waste management, Technology
  utilization, Waste recycling, Waste utilization, Informa-
  tion transfer, Environmental policy, Guidelines, Waste
  minimization, Source reduction.
  analysis,  Surface runoff,  Environmental protection,
  Storm water runoff.
  PB92-109107/REB                PC A06/MF A02
  Indoor Air Assessment A Review of Indoor Air
  Quality Risk Characterization Studies.
  Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
  Park, NC.  Environmental Criteria and Assessment
  Office.
  Mar 91,117p EPA/600/8-90/044, ECAO-R-0314
  See also PB87-210712.

  Risk assessment methodologies provide a mechanism
  for incorporating scientific evidence and judgments
  into the risk  management decision process.  A risk
  characterization framework  has been developed to
  provide a systematic approach for analysis and pres-
  entation of risk characterization study results.  The
  framework was used as a tool to review  published
  studies that provide quantitative risk estimates associ-
  ated with exposure to indoor air pollutants. Compari-
  sons of both the methods and the resulting risk esti-
  mates are presented. Critical assumptions concerning
  risk estimates and exposure estimates for each study
  are recorded on the framework. Fourteen risk charac-
 terization studies were reviewed include three studies
 for radon, six for environmental tobacco smoke, three
 for volatile organfcs, one for formaktehyde  only,  and
 one for asbestos. The quality and rigor of analysis
 varied greatly among the studies reviewed. Some of
 the studies dearly state that they are intended to be
 preliminary analyses or screening studies, others are
 reported as sensitivity analyses, and others are de-
 tailed risk assessments. Studies which are technically
 rigorous in  some risk  components (e.g.,  dose-re-
 sponse relationships) are often less rigorous in other
 components (e.g. exposure assessment).

 Keywords:  •Indoor air  pollution, 'Risk  assessment,
 •Malignant neoplasms, 'Air pollution effects(Humans),
 Radon, Formaldehyde,  Volatile organic compounds.
 Reviews, Pulmonary neoplasms, Dose response rela-
 tionships, Exposure, Decision making. Environmental
 tobacco smoke.


 PB92-109115/REB              PCAOS/MFA01
 Environmental Research Lab., Athens, GA.  Office of
 Research and Development
 Modeling of  Nonpoint Source Water Quality In
 Urban and Non-urban Areas.
 AQUA TERRA Consultants, Mountain View, CA.
 A. S. Donfaian, and W. C. Huber. Jun 91,80p EPA/
 600/3-91/039
 Contract EPA-68-03-3513
 Prepared in cooperation with Florida Univ., Gainesville.
 Sponsored by  Environmental  Research Lab., Athens,
 GA. Office of Research and Development

 Nonpoint source'assessment procedures and model-
 ing techniques are reviewed and discussed for both
 urban and non-urban land areas. Detailed reviews of
 specific methodologies  and models  are presented,
 along with overview discussions focusing on urban
 methods and models, and on non-urban (primarily agri-
 cultural)  methods and  models.  Simple  procedures,
 such as constant concentratioa regression, statistical,
 and loading function approaches are described, along
 with complex models such as SWMM,  HSPF, STORM,
 CREAMS, SWRRB, and others. Brief  case studies of
 ongoing and recently completed modeling efforts are
 described. Recommendations  for nonpofnt  runoff
        s of future modeling efforts.

Keywords:  'Water  quality,  •Mathematical  models,
•Nonpoint sources. 'Water poHutJon, 'Urban areas,
•Agricultural runoff, Computerized simulation. Case
studies. Hydrology, Statistical analysis.  Regression


16     Vol. 92,  No. 1
  PB92-109123/REB               PC A03/MF A01
  Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Lab., Ada,
  OK.
  Techniques to Determine Spatial Variations In Hy-
  draulic Conductivity of Sand and Gravel. Research
  rapt
  Geological Survey, Mariborough, MA.
  K. M. Hess, and S. H. Wolf. Feb 91,35p EPA/600/2-
  91/006
  See also PB91-242370. Prepared in cooperation with
  Massachusetts Inst of Tech., Cambridge. Sponsored
  by Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Lab., Ada,
  OK,

  Methods for determining small-scale variations in aqui-
  fer properties were investigated for a sand and gravel
  aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts.  Measurements
  of aquifer properties, in particular hydraulic conductivi-
  ty, are needed for further investigations into the effects
  of aquifer heterogeneity on macrodispersion, or the
  enhanced dispersion of solutes in aquifers. The pri-
  mary methods used to measure vertical profiles of hy-
  draulic conductivity were multiple-port permeameter
  analysis of cores  and impeller-flowmeter hydraulic
  tests in long-screened wells. More than 1,600 hydrau-
  lic-conductivity measurements have been made using
  these methods. Several other methods of measuring
  aquifer properties also were investigated, including pi-
  ezometer  tests,  geophysical  borehole  logs,  and
  ground-penetrating radar.

  Keywords: 'Aquifers, 'Hydraulic conductivity, 'Gravel,
  •Sands, Hydrogeology, Water wells. Porosity, Forma-
  tions, Permeability, Percolation, Ground water,  Bore-
  holes, Hydrology, Cape Cod(Massachusetts).


  PB92-109131/REB               PC A08/MF A02
 Forest Service, Washington, DC.
 Proceedings of the International Workshop on
 Large-Scale  Reforestation.   Held  in  Corvallis,
 Oregon on May 9-10,1990.
 Corvallis Environmental Research Lab.,  OR.
 J. K. Wmjum, P. E. Schroeder, and M. J. Kenady. May
 91,172p EPA/600/9-91/014
 Prepared in cooperation with ManTech  Environmental
 Technology, Inc., Corvallis, OR. Sponsored by Forest
 Service, Washington, DC.

 The purpose of the workshop was to  identify major
 operational and ecological considerations needed to
 successfully conduct large-scale reforestation projects
 throughout the forested regions of the world where, by
 human effort, approximately 100,000 hectares or more
 of new forests nave been established or are planned
 annually for about a oecade in an individual country or
 region. Operational and ecological considerations and
 case  studies were discussed. Four points of impor-
 tance surfaced: (1) a dear determination  of the
 amount of land available for reforestation throughout
 the world;  (2)  economically  speaking, reforestation
 does  require money investments; (3) social and politi-
 cal considerations must be emphasized; and (4) large-
 scale reforestation projects mean more  than just con-
 tiguous block plantings, they can include many small,
 dispersed plantings, also. Forest ecosystems play a
 pivotal role in the global carbon cycle. This suggests
 that forests are a primary control point in the cycle and
 that through management, they can possibly contrib-
 ute to increased carbon conservation and sequestra-
 tion to offset a part of the CO2 buildup  in the atmos-
 phere. As a major management tool, large-scale refor-
 estation would likely make a significant contribution.

 Keywords: 'Meetings, 'Reforestation, 'Forestry, •Af-
 forestation, 'Carbon cycle, Global  aspects, Ecosys-
 tems,  Case  studies,  Forest  management.  Global
 warming,  Greenhouse effect,  Climatic  changes,
 Carbon dioxide, Land use, Air pollution effects(Plants).


 PB92-1N149/REB               PC A07/MF A02
 Environmental Protection  Agency,  WasrAwton,  DC.
 Office of Health and Environmental Assessment
 Methodology for  Assessing  Environmental  Re-
 leases of and Exposure to Municipal  Solid Waste
 Combustor Residuals. Final rept^
Technical Resources, Inc., RockvBle, MD.
A. Mittelman, I. Diwan, H. Brown, L. Cofone, and M.
Lorber. Apr91,148p EPA/600/8-91/031
  See also PB90-187055. Sponsored by Environmental
  Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Health
  and Environmental Assessment.

  The purpose of the document is to provide users with a
  methodology to assess the potential exposure to mu-
  nicipal solid waste (MSW) residuals. The document
  does so by: (1) summarizing existing information on
  MSW combustor design, types, and location of MSW
  facilities nationally; beneficial uses of ash; characteris-
  tics of ash; and contaminant concentrations of ash, (2)
  summarizing the management of MSW ash to identify
  points of environmental release from generation to dis-
  posal in a landfill, (3) providing methodologies to quan-
  tify these releases, and (4) directing the reader to other
  documents which detail fate and  transport models,
  and exposure and  risk algorithms.  The  document
  closes with an example of the methodologies applied
  to an organic contaminant TCDD, and  an inorganic
  contaminant cadmium, both common in MSW com-
  bustor residuals.

  Keywords: 'Risk assessment, 'Waste management
  'Municipal wastes, 'Incinerators, 'Environmental ex-
  posure    pathways,    'Ashes,    Air    pollution
  effects(Humans), Toxicity,  Fugitive emissions,  Public
  health, Design criteria, Earth fills, Environmental trans-
  port, Concentration(Composition),  Information  trans-
  fer, Exposure, Fly ash.


  PB92-110006/REB               PC A02/MF  A01
  Pesticide Fact Sheet Number 227: Goktlaht
  Environmental Protection Agency,  Washington,  DC.
  Office of Pesticides and Toxic Substances.
  1991,8p EPA/540/FS-91/144

  The document contains up-to-date  chemical informa-
  tion, including a summary of the Agency's regulatory
  position and rationale, on  Gokilaht. A Fact Sheet is
  issued after one of the following actions has occurred.
  (1) Issuance or reissuance of a  registration standard;
  (2)  Issuance of each  special review  document; (3)
  Registration of a significantly changed use pattern; (4)
  Registration of a new chemical; or  (5) An immediate
  need for information to resolve controversial issues re-
  lating to a specific chemical or use pattern.

  Keywords: 'Pesticides,  'Insecticides. 'Toxic  sub-
 stances, Hazardous  materials,  Chemical properties.
 Regulations,  Toxicology, Ecology, 'Gokilaht, Path of
 pollutants, Chemical information fact sheet, Use  pat-
 terns, Science findings, CAS 39515-40-7.
 PB92-110014/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Fuel Volatility  Effects on Exhaust Emissions.
 Technical rept
 Environmental Protection Agency, Ann Arbor, Ml, Test
 and Evaluation Branch.
 C. Shih. Aug 90,44p EPA/AA/TEB/EF-90/4

 The report examines the effect of fuel volatility on ex-
 haust emissions  from motor vehicles, based on data
 not included in the MOBILE4 model.

 Keywords: 'Automotive fuels. 'Volatility, 'Exhaust
 emisstons, Tests, Exhaust gases, Emission factors, Air
 pollution, Vapor pressure, Motor vehicles.


 PB92-110022/REB               PC A13/MF A03
 Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
 Park, NC. Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards.
 Urban Air Toxics Monitoring Program, 1990.
 Radian Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC.
 Jun 91,285p EPA/450/4-91 /024
 Contract EPA-68-08-0014
 See also PB91-148262. Sponsored by Environmentai
 Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Office
 of Air Quality Planning and Standards.

 From March 1990 through February 1991 samples of
 ambient air were collected at 12 sites in the eastern
 part of the U.S. Every 12 days, air was integrated over
 24-hour periods into passivated stainless steel canis-
 ters. Simultaneously, air was drawn through cartridges
 containing dinttrophenylnydrazine to collect carbonyl
 compounds. The  samples were analyzed at a central
 laboratory for a total of 37 natogenated and aromatic
 hydrocarbons, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and other
 oxygenated species. The hydrocarbon species were
analyzed  by gas  chrornatography/muttiple  detectors
and  gas chromatography/mass spectrometry,  white
the carbonyl species were analyzed by liquid chroma-

-------
                                                  EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
 tography. Complete data for all the hydrocarbon sam-
 ples are presented in the report.

 Keywords:  *Toxicity,  *Air pollution,  "Urban areas,
 Monitoring,  Carbonyl  compounds,  Hydrocarbons,
 Sampling,  Carbon tetrachloride,  Toluene,  Xylene,
 Concentration(Composition), Cleanup, Ethylene/tetra-
 chloro.
 PB82-110030/REB                PC A07/MF A02
 Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
 Park, NC. Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards.
 Urban Air Toxics Monitoring  Program Carbonyl
 Results, 1990.
 Radian Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC.
 Jul91,130p EPA/450/4-91/025
 Contract EPA-68-D8-0014
 See also PB91-148288. Sponsored by Environmental
 Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Office
 of Air Quality Planning and Standards.

 The report summarizes the results of sampling ambi-
 ent air for selected carbonyl containing compounds in
 12 urban centers in the contiguous  United States as
 part of the Urban Air Toxics  Monitoring Program
 (UATMP).  Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acetone
 concentrations were measured using 2,4-dinitrophen-
 ylhydrazine (DNPH)-coated silica cartridges to collect
 the carbonyis for subsequent analysis. Sampling and
 analysis followed guidance provided in U.S. Environ-
 mental Protection Agency (EPA) compendium method
 TO-11.  Formaldehyde concentrations  ranged from
 0.42 to 34.5 ppbv with an average concentration for all
 sites of 4.2 ppbv. Site average formaldehyde concen-
 trations ranged from 1.5 ppbv for Houston, TX (H1TX)
 to 7.9 for Washington, DC (W2DC). Acetaldehyde con-
 centrations ranged from 0.37 to  9.5 ppbv, averaging
 1.7 ppbv over all 1990 UATMP sites. Site average ac-
 etaldehyde concentrations ranged from 0.76 ppbv at
 Houston, TX (H1TX) to 2.5 ppbv at Baton Rouge, LA
 (BRLA). Acetone concentrations  ranged from 0.37 to
 10.8 ppbv and averaged 1.8 ppbv over all sites. Site
 average acetone concentrations ranged from 0.68
 ppbv at Houston, TX (H1TX) to 2.9 ppbv at Chicago, IL
 (C4IL).

 Keywords: 'Formaldehyde, * Acetaldehyde, 'Acetone,
 •Urban areas, *Air pollution monitoring, Tables(Data),
 Graphs(Charts), Toxic substances, 'Urban Air Toxics
 Monitoring Program, 'Eastern Region(United States).
 PB92-110048/REB               PC A06/MF A02
 Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
 Reduction Engineering Lab.
 Technology Evaluation Report: Biological Treat-
 ment of Wood  Preserving Site Groundwater by
 Btotrol, Inc.
 Science Applications International Corp., Paramus,
 NJ.
 W. Hahn, and H. S. Skovronek. Oct 91,120p EPA/
 540/5-91/001
 Contract EPA-68-03-3485
 See also PB91 -227983. Sponsored by Environmental
 Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk Reduction En-
 gineering Lab.

 The report provides the in-depth data analysis from the
 SITE Program's six-week demonstration of BioTrol's
 Aqueous Treatment System (BATS) at the MacGillis
 and Gibbs Company wood treatment  facility in  New
 Brighton, Minnesota. The pilot scale (5gpm), fixed-film
 biological system using  a pentachlorophenol-specific
 bacterium  was  evaluated   at  three groundwater
 throughput rates. Operational and analytical data were
 carefully monitored throughout to establish a database
 to use in evaluating the vendor's claims for pentachlor-
 ophenol (PCP) and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon
 (PAH) removal. It was concluded that the system
 achieves over 95% PCP removal  (vendor's claim:
 90%), probably by mineralization to carbon dioxide
water and chloride ion. Because of unexpectedly low
concentrations in the groundwater, removal of PAH's
could not be determined.

Keywords: 'Wood preservatives, 'Biological industrial
waste treatment  'Ground water, Aromatic polycydic
hydrocarbons,  Removal, Carbon dioxide,  Chlorides,
Ions, Concentration(Composition), Metals, Operating
costs,      Nutrients,       Maintenance,       New
Brigmon(Minnesota), Phenol/Pentachloro,  Fixed film
reactor.
 PB92-110352/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Evaluating the Human  Health Effects of Hazard-
 ous  Wastes:  Reproduction  and  Development,
 Neurotoxicity, Genetic Toxiclty and Cancer.
 Health  Effects  Research  Lab., Research Triangle
 Park, NC.
 R. S. Dyer, V. S. Houk, and L W. Reiter. 1991,20p
 EPA/600/D-91/236

 Several approaches are available  for characterizing
 potential toxicity of wastes. The paper describes bio-
 logical tests which are appropriate for identifying waste
 as neurotoxic, genotoxic, or likely to produce develop-
 mental or reproductive effects. The  tests recommend-
 ed are, for neurotoxicity a functional observational bat-
 tery, coupled with a measure of motor (bodily move-
 ment) activity; for genetic toxicity, the 'Ames' test of
 mutagenicity in Salmonella and a test of clastogenicity
 (DNA damage);  and for developmental and reproduc-
 tive toxicity, the Chemoff-Kavlock assay and a multi-
 generational reproductive assay. In addition, the paper
 identifies several generic factors which must be con-
 sidered in performing any  evaluations of hazardous
 wastes.

 Keywords:  'Health hazards, 'Reproduction(Biology),
 'Carcinogens, 'Mutagens, 'Nervous system, 'Toxici-
 ty,  Test  methods.  Salmonella typhimurium, DNA
 damage, Motor  activity, Mutagenicity  tests, Bioassay,
 Dose-response  relationships,  Humans,  Teratogens,
 'Hazardous wastes.
PB92-110360/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Health Effects of Arsenic in Drinking Water.
Health Effects Research  Lab.,  Research Triangle
Park, NC.
J. R. Fowle, C. O. Abemathy, M. J. Mass, J. D.
McKinney, and D. W. North. 1991,17p EPA/600/D-
91/237
See also PB87-232542. Prepared in cooperation with
Decision Focus, Inc., Los Altos, CA.,  and Agricultural
Research Service, Grand Forks, ND. Human Nutrition
Research Center.

Current knowledge  about metabolism, essentiality,
and toxicity is summarized in the document. These are
placed in a risk assessment context. Research needs
are identified with their implications for  improving the
ability to assess risk from exposure to arsenic.

Keywords:  'Risk  assessment,  'Public  health,  'Ar-
senic, 'Potable water, 'Water pollution effects, 'Envi-
ronmental surveys, Humans, Laboratory animals, Tox-
icity, Lethal dosage, Exposure, Long  term  effects,
Ingestion(Biology),  Ecology,  Metabolism,  Carcino-
gens, Epidemiology, Food chains.
PB92-110378/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Impact of Methanol and CNG Fuels on Motor Vehi-
cle Toxic Emissions.
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Atmospheric Research and Exposure As-
sessment Lab.
F. Black, and P. Gabele. 1991,19p EPA/600/D-91/
240

The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments require that the
Environmental Protection Agency investigate the need
for reduction of motor vehicle toxic emissions such as
formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, benzene, 1,3-butadiene,
and polycyclio organic matter. Toxic organic emissions
can be reduced by utilizing the control technologies
employed for regulated THC (NMHC) and CO emis-
sions, and by changing fuel composition. The paper
examines emissions associated with the use of metha-
nol and compressed natural  gas fuels. Both  tailpipe
and evaporative emissions are examined at varied am-
bient temperatures ranging from 20 C to  105 F. Tail-
pipe  emissions are also examined over  a variety of
driving cycles with average speeds ranging from 7 to
48 mph. Results suggest that an equivalent ambient
temperatures and average speeds, motor vehicle toxic
emissions are generally reduced with  methanol and
compressed natural gas fuels relative to those with
gasoline, except for formaldehyde emissions, which
may be elevated. As with gasoline, tailpipe toxic emis-
sions with methanol and compressed natural gas fuels
generally increase when ambient temperature or aver-
age speed decreases (the sensitivity to these variables
is greater with methanol than with compressed natural
gas). Evaporative emissions generally increase when
fuel volatility or ambient temperature increases (how-
ever, the relative contribution of evaporative sources
to the aggregate toxic compound emissions is small).
Keywords:  'Automotive  fuels,  'Methanol,  'Com-
pressed gases, 'Natural gas, Toxic substances, Ex-
haust gases. Clean Air  Act, Motor vehicles, Exhaust
emissions.
PB92-110386/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Atmospheric  Research and Exposure As-
sessment Lab.
Summary of the 1991 EPA/AWMA International
Symposium:  Measurement of Toxic and Related
Air Pollutants. Held in Durham, North Carolina on
May 6-10,1991.
Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC.
R. K. M. Jayanty, and B. W. Gay. c1991,16p EPA/
600/D-91/241
Sponsored by Environmental Protection Agency, Re-
search Triangle Park, NC. Atmospheric Research and
Exposure Assessment Lab.

A joint conference for the sixth year co-sponsored by
the Atmospheric Research and Exposure Assessment
Laboratory (AREAL) of the U.S. Environmental Protec-
tion Agency and the Air and Waste Management Asso-
ciation was held in Durham, North Carolina,  May 6-19,
1991. The technical program consisted of 220 presen-
tations, held in 25 technical sessions, on recent ad-
vances in the measurement and monitoring of toxic
and related pollutants found in ambient and  source at-
mospheres. Covering a wide range of measurement
topics and supported by 78 exhibitors of instrumenta-
tion and  consulting services, the symposium was at-
tended by almost a thousand professionals from the
United States and other countries. The overview high-
lights a selection of the technical presentations. A syn-
opsis of the keynote address to the symposium is also
included.

Keywords: 'Meetings, 'Air pollution sampling, 'Toxic
substances,  'Research and development,  'Hazard-
ous materials, Exposure,  Air samplers, Air pollution
monitoring, Pollution  sources,  Indoor air  pollution,
Emission factors, Personnel monitoring, Mobile pollut-
ant sources.  Atmospheric chemistry, Ozone, Waste
disposal, Aerosols.A/olatile organic compounds, Math-
ematical models.
PB92-110394/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Status and Needs for Toxic Emission Inventories
for Regional Dispersion and Deposition Modeling.
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Atmospheric  Research and Exposure As-
sessment Lab.
W. G. Benjey. 1991,15p EPA/600/D-91 /242
Presented at the EPA/AWMA International Specialty
Conference on Emission  Inventory Issues in  the
1990s, Durham, NC., September 9-12,1991. Prepared
in cooperation with National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration, Research Triangle Park, NC. Air  Re-
sources Lab.

Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 es-
tablished several new study and regulatory require-
ments for toxic air pollutants that make dispersion and
deposition modeling and the associated toxic emission
inventories necessary. There are currently no compre-
hensive regional emission  inventories compiled with
the purpose of regional  dispersion modeling of toxic
emissions. Limited  emission inventories have or are
being compiled although not necessarily for the pur-
pose  of modeling. There are useful databases from
which information can be extracted to construct inter-
im regional toxic emission inventories.  In the long-
term,  basic information on toxics and improved inven-
tory methodologies are needed to create inventories
sufficient to drive sophisticated models. These needs
may be summarized as:  (1) improved toxic speciation
and emission factors and application techniques; (2)
improved knowledge of the atmospheric chemistry of
toxic emissions; and (3) intergovernmental coordina-
tion in compiling emission inventories and in conduct-
ing research on toxic chemicals.

Keywords: 'Air pollution monitoring, 'Pollution trans-
port. Acid rain. Toxic substances,  Emission factors,
Pesticides,  Atmospheric  diffusion,  Atmospheric
models, 'Toxic emission inventories, 'Emission inven-
tories, TRISfToxfc Release Inventory System), Nation-
al Acid Precipitation Assessment Program, NESHAP
database.
                                                                                                                                Mar  1992     17

-------
                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
PB92-110402/REB               PC A02/MF A01
Intel-comparison of Sampling Technique* for Nic-
otine In Indoor Environment*. Journal article.
Health  Effects Research Lab.,  Research  Triangle
Park,NC.
F. M. Caka, 0. J. Eatough, E. A. Lewis, H. Tang, and S.
K. Hammond. C1990,10p EPA/600/ J-90/547
Pub. in Environmental Science and Technology,  v24
nB p1196-1203 Aug 90.  Prepared in cooperation with
Brigham Young Unw., Prove, UT. Dept of Chemistry,
Massachusetts Univ. Medical School. Worcester, Yate
Univ., New Haven, CT. School of Medicine, and Har-
vard School of Public Health, Boston, MA.


A study using several types of sampling, systems was
conducted in the chamber facility at the Pierce Labora-
tory to compare the determination of nicotine in envi-
ronmental tobacco smoke generated by  volunteer
smokers. The sampling  systems used included filter
packs,  annular denuders, sorbent beds and passive
samplers. Total nicotine  determined using the various
sampling systems was generally in good agreement
Agreement among samplers was also generally good
for gas phase nicotine.  The most notable exception
was the determination of nicotine using a nonpassivat-
ed stainless steel passive sampler where the results
were low due to adsorption of nicotine by the sampler.
Agreement, but with poor precision, was seen for the
determination of  particulate  phase nicotine using  a
Tenax micratube sorbent sampling system and two dif-
ferent armulardenuder systems. However, toss of par-
ticulate nicotine to the gas phase occurred during sam-
pliog with the filter pack systems, and determination of
particulate phase nicotine by these systems was in
error. Because greater than 95% of the nicotine wash
the gas phase, this toss  of particulate nicotine dkf not
signrfteantly affect the determination of gas phase nic-
otine using a filter pack sampling system. (Copyright
(c) 1990 by the American Chemical Society.)

Keywords: 'Nicotine, 'Air sampling, 'Tobacco smoke
pollution, Laboratory tests. Indoor air pollution, Com-
parison, Gas chromatography, Performance  evalua-
tion. Reprints, 'Environmental tobacco smoke.
PB92-110410/REB               PC A02/MF A01
Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research  Lab., Ada,
OK.
ftddatlon Reduction Capacities of Aquifer Solids.
Journal article.
Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo.
M. J. Barcelona, and T. R. Holm. C1991,9p EPA/600/
J-91/238
Grant EPA-R813149
Pub. in Environmental Science Technology,  v25  n9
p1565-15721991. Prepared in cooperation with IMnois
State Water Survey DK/., Champaign. Sponsored by
Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research  Lab., Ada,
OK.

Oxidation-reduction processes play a major role in the
mobility, transport, and fate of inorganic and organic
chemical constituents in natural waters. Therefore, the
manipulation of redox conditions in natural and treated
water systems is assumed to be a common option for
the control erf contaminant  concentrations. Measure-
ments of the oxidation (i.e., of aqueous Cr(2+)) and
reduction (La, of aqueous Cr2O7(2-) and H2O2) ca-
pacities of aquifer solids and groundwater have been
made on samples from a sand-and-gravel aquifer. The
groundwater contributed less than 1% of the system
oxidation or reduction poising capacity. Reduction ca-
pacities averaged 0.095.0.111,and 0.136 mequiv/gof
dry solids for oxfc, transitional, and reducing En corxS-
lions, respectively. Measured  oxidation  capacities
                             lids over the range of
                             capacities represent
averaged 0.4 mequiv/g of dry solids over the range of
redox intensity condrtions. These capacities represent
considerable resistance to the adjustment of redox
conditions even at uncontaminated sites. Hydrogen
peroxide reduction by aquifer sold samples proceeds
rapidly relative to microbialty medated decomposition.
The study indfcates the need for closer scrutiny of the
predictability and cost effectiveness of attempts to ma-
nipulate redox condrtions in poorly poised aquifer sys-
tems.

Keywords:  'Oxidation  reduction reactions. 'Sand
aquifers, 'Aquifer management. •WaterpoflutJon con-
trol, Ground water. Hydrogen peroxide. Electron trans-
fer,  Microorganisms, Reaction  kinetics,  Chromium
oxides. Reprints, 'Poising capacity. 'Aquifer solids.
PB92-110428/REB               PC A02/MF A01
Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research  Lab., Ada,
OK.
Effect of Sodium Chloride on Transport of Bacte-
ria hi a Saturated Aquifer Material. Journal article.
Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY. Dept of Soil, Crop and At-
mospheric Sciences.
J. Gannon, Y. Tan, P. Baveye, and M. Alexander.
C1991, 7p EPA/600/J-91 /239
Pub. in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, v57
n9 p2497-2501 Sep 91. Sponsored by Robert S. Ken-
Environmental Research Lab., Ada, OK.

Determinations were made of  the influence of NaCI
concentration, cell density, and flow velocity on the
transport of Pseudomonas sp. strain KL2 through col-
umns of aquifer sand  under saturated conditions.  A
pulse-type boundary condition was used. When a 1-h
pulse of a 0.01 M NaCI solution containing 10 to the
8th power cells per ml was added at  a flow rate of
.0001 m/s, the bacterial density in the effluent never
exceeded 2.2% of the density of cells aoded, and only
1.5% of the bacteria passed through the aquifer mate-
rial. In contrast, when the bacteria were applied in dis-
tilled water, the relative cell density of the effluent ap-
proached 100%, and 60% of the bacteria were trans-
ported through the aquifer solids. Under these condi-
tions, the  breakthrough of Pseudomonas sp.  strain
KL2 was slower than cntoride. When the ftow rate was
.0002 m/s, the cell density of the effluent reached
7.3% of that added in 0.01 M NaCI solution, but only
3.9% of the bacteria were transported through the aq-
uifer particles. On the other hand, the density in the ef-
fluent approached 100% of that added in detonized
water, and 77% of the added bacteria were recovered.
Replacement of the NaCI solution with deiontzed water
caused  some of  the retained cells  to  be carried
through  the column.  The authors suggest that the
movement of bacteria added to sandy aquifers for btor-
emediation of contaminated sites may be promoted by
modifying the chemical composition of the carrying so-
lution. (Copyright (c) 1991. American Society for Micro-
biology.)

Keywords: 'Sodium chloride, 'Sand aquifers, 'Aquatic
bacteria,  'Water pollution  control, 'Biological treat-
ment,  'Environmental transport,  Biodeterioratkm,
Porous media. Electrolytes, Flow rates, pH, Sorption,
Microorganisms, Reprints, Pseudomonas.
PB92-110436/REB               PC A02/MF A01
Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Lab., Ada,
OK.
Sampling of Contaminated Sites. Journal article.
Mantech Environmental Technology, Inc., Ada, OK.
F. D. Busche. and D. S. Burden. c1991, 7p EPA/600/
J-91/240
Contract EPA-68-C8-0025
Pub. in  Hazardous Materials Control,  v4 n3 p35-40
May/Jun 91. Sponsored by Robert S. Kerr Environ-
mental Research Lab., Ada, OK.

A critical aspect of characterization of the amount:and
species of contamination of a hazardous waste site is
the sampling plan developed for that site. If the sam-
pling plan is not thoroughly conceptualized before
sampling takes place, then certain critical aspects of
the limits of the contamination may be ignored. If a
contaminant has both a petroleum and a heavy metal
component there may be a separation of components
in the subsurface because of interaction with the min-
eral matter contained in the subsurface environment
The  paper presents a discussion of some strategic
sampling questions that should be addressed before
going into the field to collect data.

Keywords: 'Contamination, 'Sites, 'Hazardous mate-
rials. Sampling, Petroleum  products, Metals, Separa-
tion, StadstJcaldata, Soils.
                                                  PB9M10444/REB               PC A03/MF A01
                                                  Effect of Nitrate Addition  on Btorestoration of
                                                  Fuel-Contaminated Aquifer Field Demonstration.
                                                  Journal article.
                                                  Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Lab., Ada,
                                                  OK.
                                                  S. R. Hutohins, W. C. Downs, J. T. Wilson, G. B. Smith,
                                                  andD. A. Kovacs.c1991,12p EPA/600/J-91/241
                                                  Pub. in Ground Water. v29 n4 p571-580 Jul/Aug 91.
                                                  Prepared in cooperation with NSI Technology Services
                                                  Corp., Ada, OK., Traverse Group, Inc., Traverse City,
                                                  Ml., and Solar Universal Technologies, Inc., Traverse
                                                  City, Ml. Ground Water Remediation Div.
A spill of JP-4 jet fuel at the U.S. Coast Guard Air Sta-
tion in Traverse City, Michigan, contaminated a water-
table aquifer. An infiltration gallery (30 ft X 30 ft) was
installed above a section of the aquifer containing 700
gal JP-4. Purge wells recirculated three million gallons
of ground water per week through the infiltration gal-
lery at a rate designed to raise the water table above
the contaminated  interval. Ground water containing
ambient concentrations was first recirculated for  40
days. Concentrations  of benzene in monitoring  wells
beneath the infiltration gallery were reduced from 760
to < 1 micrograms/1. Concentrations of toluene, ethyl-
benzene, m,p-xylene, and o-xylene were reduced from
4500 to 17,840 to 44,2600 to 490, and 1400 to 260 mi-
crograms/1,  respectively.  Average core  concentra-
tions of benzene, toluene, ethylbinzene, m,p-xy1ene,
and o-xylene were reduced from 0.84 to 0.032,  33 to
0.13, 18 to 0.36, 58 to 7.4, and 26 to 3.2 mg/kg, re-
spectively. Ground water amended with  nitrate (10
nig/1  nitrate-nitrogen) and nutrients was then recircu-
lated for 76 days. Final core concentrations ef ben-
zene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m,p-xytene and o-xytene
were 0.017, 0.036, 0.019, 0.059, and 0.27 mg/kg, re-
spectively. Final aqueous concentrations were <1 mi-
crograms/1 for benzene and toluene, 6 micrograms/1
for ethylbenzene, and 20 to 40  micrograms/1 for the
xylene isomers, in good agreement with predicted
values based on residual fuel content and partitioning
theory. Although alkylbenzene  concentrations  have
been substantially reduced, the test plot is  still con-
taminated with the weathered fuel. Based on stoichi-
ometry, approximately 10 times  more nitrate was con-
sumed than could be accounted for by BTX degrada-
tion alone, indicating that other compounds were also
degraded under denitrifying conditions.

Keywords: 'Biological treatment, 'Oil pollution remov-
al, 'Aquifers, 'Biodeterioration,  'Nitrates, 'Water pol-
lution control, Water quality, Oil spills, Denitrification,
Jet engine fuels, Microbial degradation. Anaerobic
processes, Aerobic processes, Recirculated water,
brill core analysis,  Aromatic compounds, Field tests.
Benzene, Toluene, Xylones, Reprints, Benzene/ethyl.
PB92-110451/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Health Effects  Research  Lab., Research  Triangle
Park.NC.
New Action for Topoisomerase Inhibitors. Journal
article.
ManTech Environmental Technology,  Inc., Research
Triangle Park, NC.
R. M.Zucker, and K. H. Elstein. C1991,12p EPA/600/
J-91/242
Pub. in Chemico-Biological Interactions, v79 n1 p31-40
Apr 91. Sponsored by Health Effects Research Lab.,
Research Triangle Park, NC.

Topoisomerases are known to aid DNA replication by
breaking and reseating supercoiled DNA Consequent-
ly, cells exposed to topoisomerase inhibitors before or
during the S (DNA synthetic) phase of the cell cycle
undergo abnormal DNA replication and become irre-
versibly blocked in the G2 (pre-mitosis)  phase. The au-
thors  report that following a 4-h exposure to topoiso-
merase II inhibitors,  murine erythroteukemic cells
(MELC) do not form mitotic figures but exhibit a time-
dependent progression into G2 (4N DNA) and > G2
(up to 8N DNA) stages of the cell cycle. Following ex-
posure to the topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin,
recovering MELC also exhibit > G2 polyploidy, but to
a  considerably  lesser degree:  mitotic  figures are
present and a subpopulatton of cells resumes cycling.
However, both  topo  I and topo II inhibitors induce
maximal percentages of > G2 cells when synchro-
nized  MELC  are in the G2/M phase at the time of ex-
posure. This  suggests that in addition to their S-phase
action, topoisomerase  inhibitors can interfere with
chromosome condensation during G2 and, in so doing,
induce potyptoidy. (Copyright (c) 1991 Elsevier Scien-
tific Publishers Ireland Ltd.)

Keywords: 'Enzyme inhibitors, "DNA topoisomerase I.
'Camptothecin,  'Cell cycle, Biosynthesis, DNA repli-
cation, Acute erythroblastic leukemia, Cultured tumor
cells,  Ptotdies, Flow cytometry, Mice, Chromosomes,
Reprints.
                                                   PB92-110469/REB               PC A01/MF A01
                                                   OH Sp* Clean Up. Journal article.
                                                   Hearth Effects Research  Lab., Research Triangle
                                                   PanXNC.
                                                   L D. daxton, V. S. Houk, R. Williams, and F. Kremer.
                                                   C1991, 3p EPA/600/J-91 /243
 18     Vol.  92, No.  1

-------
                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
Pub. in Nature, v353 p24-25 Sep 91.

Due to the  consideration  of  bioremediation for  oil
spills,  it is important to understand the ecological and
human health implications  of  bioremediation efforts.
During biodegradation, the toxicity of the polluting ma-
terial may actually increase upon the conversion of
non-toxic constituents to toxic species.  Also,  toxic
compounds refractory to biological degradation may
compromise the effectiveness of the treatment tech-
nique. In the study, the Salmonella mutagenicity assay
showed that both the Prudhoe Bay crude oil and its
weathered  counterpart collected from oil-impacted
water were weakly mutagenic. Results also showed
that the mutagenic components were depleted at a
faster rate than the overall content of organic material.

Keywords: 'Toxicity, 'Public health, 'Oil pollution, Bio-
deterioration, Waste  treatment,  Salmonella,  Muta-
gens, Assay, Beaches, Sampling, Ecology, Oil spills.
PB92-110477/REB                PC A03/MF A01
Health Effects  Research  Lab.,  Research  Triangle
Park,NC.
Color Yes; Cancer No. Journal article.
CIBA-GEIGYCorp., Raleigh, NC.
H. Freeman, M. Esancy, J. Esancy, and L. Claxton.
C1991,11 p EPA/600/J-91 /244
Pub. in ChemTech, p438-445 Jul 91. Prepared in coop-
eration with Central Piedmont Community Coll., Char-
lotte, NC., and  Sandoz  Chemicals  Corp., Charlotte,
NC. Sponsored by Health Effects Research Lab., Re-
search Triangle Park, NC.

Dyes based on known carcinogens such as benzidine
and  beta-naphthylamine  can no longer be manufac-
tured in the United States. In addition, numerous color-
ants have been banned from use by the food and cos-
metic industries. These limitations have led to the ex-
amination of structure-activity relationships that could
help in the development of suitable nongenotoxic dyes
and dye precursors. The  authors' goal was to demon-
strate how nonmutagenic dyes could be developed by
identifying nongenotoxic dyestuff intermediates.  The
authors' working hypothesis stated that an azo dye
would be nonmutagenic  if  both the synthetic precur-
sors and reductive cleavage products of the dye were
nonmutagenic themselves. By examining  a related
series of compounds, the  work was able to demon-
strate the effect of adding specific substructural com-
ponents to parent compounds used in the synthesis of
dyes. The paper provides an overview of these struc-
ture-activity studies.

Keywords: *Azo dyes, 'Aniline compounds, 'Toxicity,
'Carcinogens, Structure-activity relationships, Chemi-
cal reactions, Mutagens,  Dose-response relationships,
Reduction(Chemistry), Analogs, Reprints.
 PB92-110485/REB               PC A02/MF A01
 Improvement in the Diagnostic Potential of (32)P-
 Postlabellng Analysis Demonstrated by the Selec-
 tive Formation and Comparative Analysis of Nl-
 trated-PAH-Derived Adducts Arising from Diesel
 Particle Extracts. Journal article.
 Health Effects Research Lab.,  Research Triangle
 Park, NC.
 J. E. Gallagher, M. J. Kohan, M. H. George, and J.
 Lewtas. C1991, 9p EPA/600/J-91 /245
 Pub.  in Carcinogenesis,  v12  n9 p1685-1691  Sep 91.
 Prepared in cooperation with Environmental Health
 Research and Testing, Inc.,  Research Triangle Park,
 NC.

 Studies suggest that DNA adducts derived from N-sub-
 stituted aryl-compounds are poorly recovered in the
 nuclease P1  version of  the  (32)P-postlabeling assay
 but not the butanol extraction version. Both versions
 were employed to ascertain whether the differences in
 sensitivity could be used to  select for nitroaromatic-
 DNA adducts derived by treating calf thymus DNA with
 organic extracts from four diesel and one gasoline ve-
 hicle emission  particles. The authors' enhanced the
 formation of nitrated-PAH-derived adducts  through
 xanthine oxidase-catalyzed nitroreduction of  nitrated-
 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; constituents previ-
 ously detected in the diesel emissions. All four diesel
 organic extracts treated with xanthine oxidase resulted
 in the formation of one major DNA adduct chromato-
 graphfcally distinct from  the multiple DNA adducts de-
 tected in the rat  liver  S9-treated incubations. The
 adduct was detectable with the butanol extraction but
 not the nuclease P1 version  of the <32)P-postlabeling
 assay and was chromatographteally similar to  DNA ad-
ducts formed following xanthine oxidase nitroreduction
of 1-nitropyrene or ascorbic acid treatment of 1-nitro-
B-nitrosopyrene and 1-nitro-6-nitrosopyrene.

Keywords: 'Air pollution effects(Animals),  'Aromatic
polycyclic hydrocarbons, 'Diesel fuels, 'Exhaust emis-
sions, 'Toxicity, DNA adducts, Xanthine oxidase, Ca-
talysis, Reduction(Chemistry), Nitro compounds, Meta-
bolic activation, Rats, Cattle, Nitroso compounds, In
vitro analysis, Liquid chromatography, Reprints.
PB92-110493/REB          .      PC A02/MF A01
Health Effects  Research  Lab.,  Research Triangle
Park, NC.
Synthesis of a Novel Fluorlnated Benzo(a)pyrene:
4,5-D)fluorobenzo(a)pyrene. Journal article.
Environmental Health Research and Testing, Inc., Re-
search Triangle Park, NC.
S. C. Agarwal, G. Lambert, W. Padgett, and S.
Nesnow. c1991, 6p EPA/600/J-91 /246
Contract EPA-68-02-4456
Pub. in Carcinogenesis, v12 n9 p1647-1650 Sep 91.
Sponsored by  Health Effects Research  Lab.,  Re-
search Triangle Park, NC.

The synthesis  of  4,5-difluorobenzo(a)pyrene, as  a
fluorinated probe to investigate the involvement of the
K-region  in  the  further  metabolic  activation  of
benzo(a)pyrene    metabolites,     is    described.
Benzo(a)pyrene-4,5-dione obtained from 2,3-dichloro-
5,6-dteyano-1,4-benzoquinone oxidation of cis-4,5-di-
hydro-4,5-dihydroxybenzo(a)pyrene   was  fluorinated
with   dimethylaminosulfur   trifluoride    to   give
4H,5H,4,4,5,5-tetrafluoro-benzo(a)pyrene.  Defluonna-
tion using lithium aluminum hydride  in tetrahydrofuran
gave 4,5-difluorobenzo(a)pyrene.

Keywords:  'Chemical reactions, 'Fluorescent dyes,
'Biochemistry,  Benzo(a)pyrene, Metabolic activation,
DNA     damage,      Carcinogens,     Reprints,
*Benzo(a)pyrene/difluoro.
 PB92-110501/REB               PC A02/MF A01
 Compensatory Alterations In Receptor-Stimulated
 Phospholnosltlde Hydrolysis In the Hippocampus
 Vary as a Function of Dose of Cotehicine. Journal
 article.
 Health Effects Research  Lab., Research Triangle
 Park, NC.
 M. J. Bonner, and H. A. Tilson. C1991, 8p EPA/600/J-
 91/247
 Pub. in Toxicology Letters, v58 n1 p7-12 Sep 91. Pre-
 pared in cooperation with North  Carolina Univ. at
 Chapel Hill.

 The stimulation of inositol phospholipid (PI) hydrolysis
 by various receptor agonists  was measured in the
 hippocampus of rats 12 weeks after various concen-
 trations  (0.5-2.0 micrograms/site) of colchicine were
 infused into the dentate gyrus. Colchicine produced a
 dose-related decrease in the average width and length
 of the granule cell line; the pyramidal cells in CA1  and
 CA3 regions of the hippocampus were affected only at
 higher concentrations of cotehicine. Compensatory in-
 creases in receptor-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoin-
 ositides  (PI) in hippocampal slices  were  seen at 100
 micromoles carbachol and ibotenic  acid in rats receiv-
 ing 1.5-3.5 micrograms colchicine/site. Compensatory
 increases in norepinephrine (100 micromoles) and N-
 methyl-D-aspartate (100 micromoles) stimulated PI
 were seen at 2.5-3.5 and 3.5 micrograms colchicine/
 site, respectively. Compensatory increases in PI hy-
 drolysis  were not seen in slices from animals receiving
 0.5  micrograms colchicine/site. These data support
 the  hypothesis that the signal  transduction system in
 the  hippocampus undergoes a compensatory change
 following experimentally  induced destruction of den-
 tate gyrus granule cells. In addition, these changes
 occur for more than one neurotransmitter and the al-
 terations vary as a function of the  size of the lesion.
 (Copyright (c) 1991 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V.)

 Keywords: 'Phosphoinositides, 'Hippocampus, 'En-
 dogenous substance receptors, 'Colchicine, Hydroly-
 sis, Norepinenephrine, N-methylaspartate, Carbachol,
 Ibotenic acid, Rats,  Dose-response  relationships,
 Cerebellar nuclei, Reprints.
PB92-110519/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Quantitative  Comparison  of Molecular  Electro-
static  Potentials for  Structure-Activity  Studies.
Journal article.
Health Effects  Research  Lab., Research  Triangle
Park, NC.
A. M. Richard. C1991,13p EPA/600/J-91 /248
Pub. in Jnl. of Computational Chemistry, v12 n8 p959-
969Aug91.

Further development of an approach for representing,
efficiently calculating and comparing discreet 3-dimen-
sional molecular electrostatic potentials using a quan-
titative similarity index (MEP-SI) based on the Carbo
formalism is presented. A radial-type (MACRA) grid
representation is described which provides:  much
more efficient storage of MEP information than a cubic
grid of similar range; appropriate emphasis; and a con-
venient means for restricting the comparison of MEP
functions  to a local  molecule region. The  MACRA
based MEP-SI formalism was used to evaluate the
suitability of a variety of approximate methods for effi-
ciently calculating the MEP for use in MEP-SI compari-
son of dissimilar molecules. The Mulliken  charge
method did not produce MEP functions of sufficient ac-
curacy, particularly for molecules with flat, non-polar
MEP  functions or with large polar atoms,  such  as
sulfur. The   method  of  potential-derived  charges
(PDC's), with additional charges for lone pair electrons
included on sulfur, provided an efficient and sufficiently
accurate representation of the MEP for this purpose.
Convergence of  the MEP-SI with respect to MACRA
grid extent and point density was demonstrated, and
the effect of the different grid point emphasis in the
MACRA versus the cubic grid representation was in-
vestigated. Finally, the alternative similarity  index for-
mula suggested by Hodgkin et al. did  not produce re-
sults  appreciably different  from  the  Carbo formula
when PDC's, rather than Mulliken charges, were used
to generate MEP functions.

Keywords: 'Electrostatics, 'Structure-activity relation-
ships, Mathematical  models,  Biochemistry, Reprints,
'Molecular electrostatic potentials.
 PB92-110527/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Assessment of Neurotoxiclty: Use of Glial Fibril-
 lary Acidic Protein as a Blomarker. Journal article.
 Health Effects Research  Lab.,  Research  Triangle
 Park, NC. Neurotoxicology Div.
 J. P. O'Callaghan. c1991,12p EPA/600/J-91 /249
 Pub.  in Biomedical and Environmental Sciences, v4
 n1-2p197-206Jun91.

 Diverse neurotoxic insults results in proliferation and
 hypertrophy of astrocytes. The hallmark of this re-
 sponse is enhanced expression of the major intermedi-
 ate filament protein of astrocytes, glial fibrillary acidic
 protein (GFAP).  These  observations  suggest that
 GFAP may be a useful btomarker of neurotoxicity. To
 investigate this possibility,  the authors administered
 prototype neurotoxicants to experimental animals and
 assessed  the effects of these agents on the tissue
 content of GFAP, as determined by radioimmunoas-
 say. A review of the background, design and results of
 these experiments are presented in the paper. Study
 findings indicate that radioimmunoassay of GFAP is a
 sensitive and specific biomarker of neurotoxicity.

 Keywords: 'Nervous system, 'Toxicity, 'Biological
 markers, 'Glial fibrillary acidic protein, Astrocytes, Ra-
 dioimmunoassay,  Toxic  substances,  Hippocampus,
 Reprints.
 PB92-110535/REB               PC A02/MF A01
 Concentration of GHal Fibrillary Acidic Protein In-
 creases with Age  In the  Mouse and Rat Brain.
 Journal article.
 Health  Effects Research  Lab.,  Research Triangle
 Park, NC. Neurotoxicotogy Div.
 J. P. O'Callaghan, and D. B. Miller. c1991, 6p EPA/
 600/J-91/250
 Pub. in Neurobiology of Aging, v12 n3 p171-174 May
 91.

 The role of aging in the expression of the astrocyte
 protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), was exam-
 ined. In both mice and rats the concentration of GFAP
 increased throughout the brain as a function of aging.
 The largest increase (2-fold) was observed  in striatum
 for both species. The neuron-specific proteins, synap-
 sin I and neurofilament-200 were not altered by aging
 in any  region of the mouse or rat brain. The data sug-


                             Mar 1992     19

-------
                                                EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
gest that strocytic hypertrophy observed with aging in-
volves an accumulation of glial filaments.

Keywords: 'Glial fibrillary acidic protein, *Brain chem-
istry,  'Aging(Biology), Mice, Rats,  Corpus striatum,
Synapsins, NeurofiTament proteins, Species specifici-
ty, Monoclonal antibodies, Radbimmunoassay,  Re-
prints.
PB92-110543/REB               PC A02/MF A01
Btodegradaflon  of  MonoaromatJc Hydrocarbons
by Aquifer Microorganisms Using Oxygen, Nitrate,
or Nitrous Oxide as the Terminal Electron Accep-
tor. Journal article.
Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Lab., Ada,
OK.
S. R. Hutehins. c1991, 8p EPA/600/J-91 /251
Pub. in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, v57
n8p2403-2407Aug91.

Microcosms were prepared  from aquifer material,
spiked with monoaromatic hydrocarbons, and amend-
ed with oxygen, nitrate, and nitrous oxide. Benzene
and alkylbenzenes were degraded to concentrations
below 5 microgram/liter within 7 days under anaerobic
conditions, whereas only the alkylbenzenes were de-
graded when either nitrate or nitrous oxide was used.
With  limited  oxygen,  monoaromatic  hydrocarbons
were degraded but removal ceased once oxygen was
consumed. However, when nitrate was  also present,
bfodegradation of alkylbenzenes continued with no ap-
parent lag. Although benzene was still recalcitrant
levels were reduced  compared with levels after treat-
ment with nitrate or  limited oxygen alone. (Copyright
(c) 1991, American Society for Microbiology.)

Keywords: 'Biological treatment, 'Water pollution
control. 'Aquifers, 'Mfcrobial degradation, 'Electron
acceptors, Anaerobic processes.  Benzene, Nitrates,
Denitrification, Oxygenation, Aerobic proceses, Micro-
organisms, Toluene, Xytenes,  Aromatic compounds.
Nitrogen oxide(N2O), Oil  pollution control, Reprints,
Benzene/ethyl.


PB92-110550/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Health  Effects Research  Lab.,  Research  Triangle
Park, NC.
Comparison of In vivo ChoMnestenne Inhibition in
Neonatal and Adult Rats by Three Organophos-
phorothloate Insecticides. Journal article.
Northeast Louisiana Univ., Monroe. School of Pharma-

C. N. Pope, T. K. Chakraborti, M. L Chapman, J. D.
Farrar.andD. Arthun.c1991,13p EPA/600/J-91/252
Pub. in Toxicology, v68 n1 p51-61 JuT91. Sponsored
by Health Effects Research Lab., Research Triangle
Park.NC.

Developing mammals are more sensitive than adults
to acute toxicity from a variety of organophosphoroth-
ioate insecticides (OPs), compounds which act in vivo
by inhibition of chofinesterase (ChE). Little is known,
however, regarding age-related  differences in bio-
chemical responses to these toxicants.  The time
course of ChE inhibition and recovery in whole brain
was compared in neonatal (7 days of age) and adult
(80-100 days of age) rats after treatment with maximal
tolerated doses (MTDs) of either parathkm (PS),
methyl parathfon (MPS) or chtoryprifos (CPF). Neona-
tal rats were more sensitive than adults in all cases
 (MTDs for PS, MPS  and CPF: neonates=2.1, 7.8 and
45 mg/kg, sc; adults=18,18, and 279 mg/kg, sc, re-
 specfrrely). In general, brain ChE was inhibited to simi-
 lar degrees (>78%)  in both age groups following
 MTDs of either paratriton, methyl parathton or chtorpvr-
 ifos but recovered faster hi neonates in all cases. The
 results indicate that neonatal rats are more sensitive to
 acute toxicity from these compounds and MTD expo-
 sures produce extensive ChE inhibition in both age
 groups.  Significant  mNbitor-related and age-related
 differences in the duration of ChE inhibition can ensue,
 however, following such Op exposures.

 Keywords: 'Organothiophosphate insecticides, 'Cho-
 linesterase inhibitors. Rats, Aging(B»togy),  In vivo
 analysis, Dursban. Methyl paratNon, Parathfon, Dose-
 response relationships. Comparison, Blood chemical
 analysis. Body weight. Brain chemistry, AcetytehoHne,
 Ervthrocytes, Reprints.


 PBtt-110568/REB               PCA02/MFA01
 Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
 Reduction Engineering Lab.
Trace Metal Fate In a Rotary Kiln Incinerator with
an Ionizing Wet Scrubber (Journal Article).
Acurex Corp., Jefferson, AR.
L R. Watertand, D. J. Foumier, J. W. Lee, and G. J.
Carroll. C1991,9p EPA/600/J-91/253
Contract EPA-68-C9-0038
Pub. in Waste Management, v11 r>3 p103-109 1991.
See also PB90-246174. Sponsored by Environmental
Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk Reduction En-
gineering Lab.

A series of pilot-scale incineration tests was performed
at EPA's Incineration Research Facility (IRF) in Jeffer-
son, Arkansas, to evaluate the fate of trace metals fed
to a rotary  kiln  incinerator equipped with an  ionizing
wet scrubber (IWS) for paniculate and acid gas con-
trol. Test variables were kiln temperature, ranging from
816 to 927  C (1500 to 1700 F); afterburner tempera-
ture, ranging from 982 to 1204 C (1800 to 2200 F); and
feed chlorine content, ranging from 0 to 8 percent. The
test program evaluated the fate of five hazardous con-
stituent trace metals (arsenic, barium, cadmium, chro-
mium, and  lead) and four nonhazardous constituent
trace metals (bismuth, copper, magnesium, and stron-
tium). The test results indicate that cadmium and bis-
muth were  relatively volatile,  with an  average of less
than 40 percent discharged with the kiln ash. Arsenic,
barium,  chromium,  copper,  lead,  magnesium,  and
strontium were  relatively nonvolatile, with an average
of greater than 80 percent discharged with the kiln ash.
Observed relative metal volatilities generally agreed
with the volatilities predicted based  on  vapor pres-
sure/temperature relationships, with the exception of
arsenic  which was much less volatile than predicted.
The volatility of  cadmium, bismuth, and lead increased
as  kiln temperature was increased; the discharge dis-
tributions of the remaining metals were not significant-
ly affected  by changes in kiln temperature. Apparent
scrubber collection efficiencies for the metals aver-
aged 22 to 71 percent, and were generally higher for
the less volatile metals. The overallaverage metal col-
lection efficiency was 43 percent

Keywords:  'Metals, 'Incinerators,  'Air pollution con-
trol equipment, 'Waste disposal, Scrubbers, Pilot
plants, Particles, Acids, Hazardous materials, Perform-
ance evaluation, Afterburners, Combustion products,
Wet methods, Reprints.


PB92-110576/REB              PC A03/MF A01
Production of Carbon Monoxide by the Homoge-
neous  NOx-lnduced Photooxktetton  of  Volatile
Organic Compounds in the Troposphere. Journal
article.
Environmental  Protection Agency,  Research Triangle
Park, NC. Atmospheric Research  and Exposure As-
sessment Lab.
A. P. Altshuller. c1991,30p EPA/600/J-91 /254
Pub. in Jnl. of  Atmospheric  Chemistry 13, p155-182
1991.

The reaction mechanisms of products, along with then-
rates of reaction with hydroxyl radicals and their rates
of photolysis, have been used to obtain carbon monox-
ide, CO, yields  from the  products of the homogenous
atmospheric photcoxidation from emissions of hydro-
carbons and other volatile organic compounds, VOCs.
Seasonally averaged CO yields are estimated for a
 number of types of VOCs. The annual production of
 CO is estimated for the contiguous United States from
 combustion sources of CO and from the atmospheric
 photcoxidation of anthropogenic and btogentc emis-
 sions of volatile organic compounds. Limitations on es-
 timates of  CO yields and of CO production from vari-
 ous heterogeneous processes are discussed. (Copy-
 right (c) 1991 Kluwer Academic Publishers.)

 Keywords: 'Carbon monoxide, 'Photochemical reac-
 tions, 'Volatile organic compounds. Troposphere, At-
 mospheric chemistry, Nitrogen oxides, Catalysis, Acet-
 ylene. Alkanes, Alkene hydrocarbons, Seasonal vari-
 ations,  Reprints.


 PB92-110824/REB               PC A08/MF A02
 Corvallis Environmental Research Lab.. OR.
 PIRLA DBMS Quick Reference Guide.
 ManTecn  Environmental Technology, Inc., Corvallis,
 OR.
 J. Smith. 1  Nov 91,174p EPA/600/8-91/205
 See also PB91-182162 and PB91-146472. Sponsored
 by Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.

 The handbook facilitates the use of the PIRLA (Pa-
  leoecotogical Investigation of Recent Lake Acidifica-
tion) database  retrievals by showing all possible
inputs, outputs, ranges, and quick reference informa-
tion that you would want at your fingertips when ac-
cessing the PIRLA data.  The handbook assumes no
prior knowledge of PIRLA or SIR (a database manage-
ment system), although a baste familiarity with comput-
ers is helpful. The PIRLA Data Base Management
System User's Manual is recommended for reference,
much additional  detail,  description of the intrinsic
structure of the PIRLA database, and how it is set up
under SIR.

Keywords: 'Lakes, 'Acidification, 'Handbooks, *Pa-
ledimnology,  'Information systems, 'Water pollution
effects,  Data base  management  Water chemistry,
Diatoms,  Aquatic biology, Taxonomy,  Chrysophyta,
Adirondack Lake, Information retrieval, User manuals,
•Paleoecological Investigation of Recent Lake Acidifi-
cation Project Adirondack Park.
 PB92-111566/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
 Evaluating Created Wetlands through Compari-
 sons with Natural Wetlands.
 Florida Univ., Gainesville. Center for Wetlands.
 M. T. Brown. Nov 91,47p EPA/600/3-91 /058
 See also PB90-113119 and PB90-261512. Sponsored
 by Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.

 The report summarizes the evaluation and recommen-
 dations regarding an approach to wetland sampling
 and characterization developed by the Wetlands Re-
 search Program (WRP) at U.S. Environmental Protec-
 tion Agency,  Environmental  Research  Laboratory,
 Corvallis,  OR. Between trials, team members dis-
 cussed at length the methodology and field protocols
 and modified them to reflect the conditions and difficul-
 ties encountered in sampling herbaceous wetlands in
 urban  areas of Florida. Major emphasis  is placed on
 the appropriateness of measured variables for deter-
 mining successful  wetland  re-creation. Numerous
 physical  and biological  parameters  were measured
 and compared in the  nine created and nine natural
 wetlands. Analysis of these data has shown some im-
 portant similarities and differences between created
 and natural wetlands and lends insight into the com-
 plex questions surrounding wetland creation and the
 equivalency of created wetlands to naturally occurring
 wetlands. Evaluations of temporal changes in hydrolo-
 gy and plant successional trends within  created wet-
 lands  seem most important in determining ultimate
 Keywords: 'Wetlands,  'Natural resources manage-
 ment 'Water pollution,  'Environmental protection.
 Comparison, Florida, Urban areas. Hydrology, Con-
 struction, Clean Water Act Aquatic life, Sampling. Nat-
 ural resources, Performance evaluation, Field tests,
 Vegetation,  Water quality. Data processing, 'Natural
 wetlands, 'Created wetlands.
 PB92-111707/REB                       PC E99
 RCRA Permit PoHcy Compendium.
 Environmental Protection Agency,  Washington, DC.
 Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response.
 Aug91.3402p-in11v
 Set includes PB92-111715 through PB92-111814.

 No abstract available.
 PB92-111715/REB                       PC E10
 RCRA Permit  PoHcy  Compendium. Volume  1.
 User's Guide. Key Word Index.
 Environmental  Protection  Agency,  Washington, DC.
 Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response.
 D. Eberiy. Aug 91,157p EPA/520/SW-91 /062A
 Includes 3 1/2 inch diskette containing the key word
 index. See also Volume 2, PB92-l11723.Portions of
 this document are not fully legible.
 Also available  in set  of 11 reports PC E99,  PB92-
 111707.

 The RCRA Permit Policy Compendium is a reference
 for Regional and State permit writers which consists of
 Headquarters' permitting policies and procedures. The
 Compendium volumes include the Users' Guide, a key
 word index, and reference memoranda, letters. Office
 of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER)
 Directives, and other documents organized chronotog-
 fcally within subject categories. The Compendium was
 originally compiled in late 1985. The updated Compen-
 dium includes documents issued through  September
 20     Vol. 92, No.  1

-------
                                                EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
30,1990. A key word index is included in Vol. I to assist
the user in identifying and locating relevant docu-
ments. The index, organized in alphabetical order, lists
the topic and the documents which are relevant to the
topic,  identified by title, document number and date.
The key word index groups related topics and cross
references topics  which  may  be relevent.  Subkey
words have been  Identified as a means to specify
groups of titles which may fall within  a  broader key
word category. Summaries of documents which had
been included in the original Compendium have been
deleted. Users of the original Compendium did not find
them useful.

Keywords: 'Waste management,  'Permits,  "User
manuals, 'Administrative procedures, 'Hazardous ma-
terials, 'Environmental surveys, Guidelines,  Subject
index terms, Permit applications, Superfund, Informa-
tion retrieval,  Subject indexing, Searching,  Listings,
Environmental policy,  'Resource Conservation  and
Recovery Act Office of Solid Waste and Emergency
Response.
PB92-111723/REB                       PC A13
RCRA  Permit  Policy  Compendium. Volume  2
(0420.19804434.1900). Hazardous Waste Manage-
ment System (Part 260). General, Definitions, Peti-
Enwonmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response.
D. Eberly. Aug 91,278p EPA/530/SW-91 /062B
See  also Volume  1, PB92-111715 and  Volume 3,
PB92-111731.Portions of this document are not fully
legible.
Also available in set of 11 reports PC E99, PB92-
111707.

The document represents all OSWER related policy di-
rectives  that deal with RCRA permit  poNcy.  The
volume contains general information, definitions, and
petitions regarding the hazardous waste management
system.

Keywords: 'Waste management, 'Permits, 'Adminis-
trative procedures, 'Hazardous materials, 'Environ-
mental surveys, Environmental policy. Pollution regula-
tions, Chemical compounds, Superfund, Law enforce-
ment, Pollution regulations, 'Resource Conservation
and Recovery Act, Office of Solid Waste and Emer-
gency Response, Petitions.
PB92-111731/REB                       PC A14
RCRA Permit  Policy  Compendium.  Volume  3
(9441.1960-9441.1986).  Identification and  Listing
of Hazardous Waste (Part 261). General.
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response.
D. Eberty. Aug 91,323p EPA/530/SW-91 /062C
See also Volume 2, PB92-111723 and Volume 4,
PB92-111749.Portions of this document are not fully
     available in  set of 11 reports PC E99, PB92-
111707.

The document represents a compendium of OSWER
policy directives that deal with RCRA permit policy.
The volume contains identification and listings of haz-
ardous wastes as well as general information.

Keywords: 'Waste management, 'Permits,  'Adminis-
trative procedures, 'Hazardous materials,  'Environ-
mental surveys, Superfund, Listings, Chemical com-
pounds, Environmental policy, Pollution regulations,
'Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Office of
Solid Waste and Emergency Response,   US EPA
Region 1-10.
PB92-111749/REB                       PC A14
RCRA  Permit Policy  Compendium.  Volume  4
(9441.1987-9441.1990).  Identification and  Listing
of Hazardous Waste (Part 261). General.
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response.
D. Eberfy. Aug 91,314p EPA/530/SW-91 /062D
See also Volume 3, PB92-111731 and Volume 5,
PB92-111756.
Also available in set of 11 reports PC E99, PB92-
111707.

The document is a compendium of all OSWER Policy
Directives that deal with RCRA Permit Policy. The
volume contains identification and  listings of hazard-
ous materials.
Keywords: 'Waste management, 'Permits, 'Adminis-
trative procedures, 'Hazardous materials, 'Environ-
mental surveys, Listings, Environmental policy, Pollu-
tion  regulations,  Superfund, Chemical compounds,
'Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Office of
Solid Waste and Emergency Response.
PB92-111756/REB                      PC A14
RCRA Permit  Policy  Compendium.  Volume 5
(9442.1980-9444.1986).  Identification  and Listing
of Hazardous Waste (Part 261). Criteria for Identi-
fying Hazardous  Waste, Characteristics  of Haz-
ardous Waste, Lists of Hazardous Waste.
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington,  DC.
Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response.
D. Eberly. Aug 91,325p EPA/530/SW-91 /062E
See  also Volume  4, PB92-111749 and Volume 6,
PB92-111764.Portions of this document are not fully
legible.
Also available in set of 11 reports PC E99, PB92-
111707.

The document represents all the OSWER Policy Direc-
tives that deal with RCRA  Permit  Policy. The volume
discusses criteria  for identifying  hazardous wastes,
characteristics of hazardous wastes, and lists of haz-
ardous wastes.

Keywords: 'Waste management, 'Permits, 'Adminis-
trative procedures, 'Hazardous materials,  'Environ-
mental surveys. Environmental policy, Superfund, List-
ings, Chemical compounds, Pollution regulations, 'Re-
source Conservation and Recovery Act, Office of Solid
Waste and Emergency Response.
PB92-111764/REB                      PC A15
RCRA Permit  Policy  Compendium. Volume  6
(9444.1987-9457.1990).  Identification and  Listing
of Hazardous Waste (Part 261). Lists (Cont'd),
Generator Standards (Part 262), General, Pretran-
sportation,  Recordkeeping, Special Conditions,
Importing.
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response.
D. Eberly. Aug 91,343p EPA/530/SW-91 /062F
See  also Volume  5,  PB92-111756 and  Volume 7,
PB92-111772.Portions of this document are not fully
legible.
Also available in set of 11  reports PC E99, PB92-
111707.

The document is a compendium of all OSWER Policy
Directives that deal with RCRA Permit Policy. The
volume contains identification of hazardous wastes,
listings of hazardous wastes, and generator standards.
Generator standards is subdivided into general, pre-
transportation, recordkeeping, special conditions, and
importing sections.

Keywords: 'Waste management, 'Permits, 'Hazard-
ous materials, 'Administrative procedures, 'Environ-
mental surveys, Environmental policy, Superfund, List-
ings, Chemical compounds, Pollution regulations, Haz-
ardous materials transportation, Record management,
Standards, Imports, 'Resource Conservation and Re-
covery Act, Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Re-
sponse.
PB92-111772/REB                      PCA11
RCRA  Permit  Policy  Compendium. Volume  7
(9460.1980-9482.1990).   Transporter  Standards
(Part 263). (TSDFs) (Parts  264 and 265), TSDF
Technical Requirements (Parts 264 and 265).
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington,  DC.
Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response.
D. Eberty. Aug 91,237p EPA/530/SW-91 /062G
See also Volume  6,  PB92-111764 and Volume 8,
PB92-111780.Portions of this document are not fully
legible.
Also available in set  of 11 reports PC E99,  PB92-
111707.

The report represents a compendium of all OSWER re-
lated policy directives that deal  with RCRA  Permit
Policy.  The volume contains  transporter  standards;
treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDF); and
TSDF technical requirements.

Keywords: 'Waste management, 'Permits, 'Hazard-
ous materials, 'Administrative procedures,  'Environ-
mental  surveys, Pollution abatement. Hazardous  ma-
terials transportation, Records management. Environ-
mental  policy, Superfund, Pollution regulations, Waste
treatment, Waste storage, Waste disposal, Standards,
Contingency    planning,   Closures,    Financing,
Containers(Drums), Water  pollution  standards,  'Re-
source Conservation and Recovery Act, Office of Solid
Waste and Emergency Response.
PB92-111780/REB                       PC A15
RCRA  Permit  Policy  Compendium.  Volume 8
(9483.1980-9489.1990).  TSDF Technical  Require-
ments  (Parts 264 and 265). Tanks, Surface  Im-
poundments, Waste Piles, Land Treatment, Land-
fills, Incinerators, Miscellaneous Units.
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington,  DC.
Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response.
D. Eberly. Aug 91,340p EPA/530/SW-91 /062H
See also Volume 7, PB92-111772 and Volume 9,
PB92-111798.Portions of this document are not fully
legible.
Also available in set of 11 reports PC E99, PB92-
111707.

The document is a compendium of all OSWER related
Policy Directives that deal  with RCRA Permit Policy.
The volume contains the treatment, storage, and dis-
posal (TSDF) technical requirements. It covers tanks,
surface impoundments, waste piles,  land treatment,
landfills, incinerators, and miscellaneous units.

Keywords: 'Waste management,  'Permits, 'Hazard-
ous materials, 'Administrative procedures,  'Environ-
mental surveys, Requirements, Waste treatment, Su-
perfund, Environmental  policy, Pollution  regulations,
Waste storage, Open dumps, Incineration, Standards,
Earth fills, Waste disposal, Soil treatment, Ground dis-
posal, Storage tanks, Underground storage, Surface
impoundments, 'Resource Conservation and Recov-
ery Act, Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Re-
sponse.
PB92-111798/REB                      PC A15
RCRA Permit  Policy  Compendium.  Volume  9
(9490.1980-9521.1990).  Standards  for  Managing
Specific Hazardous Wastes (Part 266). Permitting
Policies,  Permitting  Procedures (Parts 124 and
270).
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response.
D. Eberly. Aug 91,349p EPA/530/SW-91 /062I
See also Volume 8, PB92-111780 and Volume 10,
PB92-111806.Portions of this document are not fully
legible.
Also available in set  of 11 reports PC E99,  PB92-
111707.

The document is a compendium of all OSWER related
Policy Directives that deal with RCRA Permit Policy.
The volume contains standards for managing specific
hazardous wastes, permitting policies, and permitting
procedures.

Keywords: 'Waste management, 'Hazardous materi-
als, 'Permits, 'Environmental surveys, 'Administrative
procedures, Environmental policy, Superfund, Chemi-
cal compounds, Standards, Law enforcement, Waste
recycling, Energy sources, Standards compliance, Citi-
zen participation, Remedial action,  Pollution regula-
tions, 'Resource  Conservation and Recovery Act,
Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response.
PB92-111806/REB                      PC A15
RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume  10
(9522.1980-9528.1990).  Permitting   Procedures
(Parts 124  and 270). Applications, Conditions,
Changes, Interim Status.
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington,  DC.
Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response.
D. Eberly. Aug 91,348p EPA/530/SW-91 /062J
See also Volume 9, PB92-111798 and Volume 11,
PB92-111814.Portions of this document are not fully
legible.
Also available in  set  of 11 reports PC E99,  PB92-
111707.

The document is a compendium of OSWER Policy Di-
rectives that deal  with RCRA  Permit Policy. The
volume contains permitting procedures. It discusses
applications, conditions, changes, and interim status.

Keywords: 'Waste management 'Hazardous materi-
als, 'Permits, 'Environmental surveys, 'Administrative
procedures, Environmental policy, Superfund, Chemi-
cal compounds,  Permit applications, Revisions, Law
                                                                                                                             Mar 1992    21

-------
                                                  EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
 enforcement, Rankings, 'Resource Conservation and
 Recovery Act, Office of Solid Waste and Emergency
 Response.
 PB92-111B14/REB                       PC A17
 RCRA  Permit Policy Compendium.  Volume  11
 (9530.1980-9581.1990). Air Emissions Standards,
 State Authorization (Part 271), Land Disposal Re-
 strictions (Part 268). Waste Minimization, Subtitle
 D, RCRA Grant Funds.
 Environmental  Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
 Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response.
 D. Eberiy. Aug 91,388p EPA/530/SW-91 /062K
 See also Volume  10, PB92-111806.Portions of this
 document are not fully legible.
 Also  available  in set  of 11  reports  PC E99, PB92-
 111707.

 The document is a compendium of all OWSER Policy
 Directives that deal with RCRA  Permit Policy. The
 volume contains air emissions standards, state author-
 ization. Land Disposal Restrictions, Waste  minimiza-
 tion,  and Subtitle D. Subtitle D  discusses  mining
 wastes, state programs, municipal waste combustion,
 and household hazardous wastes.

 Keywords: 'Waste management, 'Hazardous materi-
 als, 'Permits, •Environmental surveys, 'Administrative
 procedures,  Air pollution standards, Environmental
 policy, Superiund, Ground disposal, Waste disposal,
 Pollution regulations,  Law enforcement, State  pro-
 grams, Municipal wastes, Household wastes, Techni-
 cal assistance, Grants, Mine wastes, 'Resource Con-
 servation and Recovery Act, Office of Solid Waste and
 Emergency Response, Waste minimization. Land Dis-
 posal Restrictions.
PB92-111830/REB                PC A10/MF A03
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Office of Ahr Quality Planning and Standards.
National Air Toxics Information Clearinghouse:
Bibliography  of  Selected  Reports and Federal
Register Notices Related to Air Toxics. Volume 5.
Citations, 1991. Final rept (Interim).
Radian Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC.
C. A. Owen, L Y. Cooper, L C. Huff, V. J. McDonald,
and J. S. McLean. Jul 91,207p DCN-91-203-O99-37-
06, EPA/450/3-91/016
Contract EPA-68-D8-0065
See also Volume 4, PB91 -168435. Sponsored by Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park,
NC. Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards.

The National Air Toxics Information Clearinghouse has
been established by the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency's (EPA) Office of Air Qualify Planning and
Standards for the purpose of facilitating information
transfer among Federal, State, and local air  quality
management agencies. The document has been pub-
fished as part of that effort The purpose is to provide
State and local agencies and other Clearinghouse
users with bibliographic citations of reports and Feder-
al Register notices useful in developing and operating
air toxics control programs. The bibliography is pub-
lished in five volumes plus an  index. Volume 5 has the
more recent citations from January  1990 to January
1991. The volume consists of two sections. Section 1
includes introductory material  describing the bibliogra-
phy scope and organization and contains information
necessary for the proper  use of the document This
part updates the corresponding part in Volume  1,2,3,
and 4.  Volume 5, Section 2 contains the report and
Federal Register notice entries with bibliographic infor-
mation and, in most cases, an abstract The current
index to the bibliography (Index -1991, EPA-450/3-91 -
017) covers all the reports from 1974 to the present

Keywords: 'Toxic substances, 'Air quality, 'Air pollu-
tion, 'Bibliographies, 'Research and development,
•Information  dissemination, Air pollution control. Air
pollution standards. Public health, Occupational safety
and  health,  Information  transfer.  Chemical  com-
pounds, Radioactive materials, Indexes, 'National Air
Toxics Information Clearinghouse, Federal Register.
PB92-111848/REB               PCA02/MFA01
RED Facts: Methoprene. Fact sheet
Environmental  Protection Agency, Washington,  DC.
Office of Pesticides and Toxic Substances.
Mar 91, 8p EPA/540/FS-92/129
See also PB92-111855.
 All pesticides sold or used in the United States must be
 registered by EPA, based on scientific studies showing
 that they can be used without posing unreasonable
 risks to people or the environment. In evaluating pesti-
 cides for registration, EPA obtains from pesticide
 producers and reviews a complete  set  of studies
 showing the human health and environmental effects
 of each pesticide. The Agency imposes any regulatory
 controls that are needed to effectively manage each
 pesticide's risks. EPA then reregisters pesticides that
 can be used without posing undue hazards to human
 health or the environment. When a pesticide is eligible
 for ^registration, EPA announces this and  explains
 why in a Registration Eligibility Document, or RED.
 The fact sheet summarizes the information in the RED
 for methoprene.

 Keywords: 'Pesticides, 'Toxic substances, Standards,
 Pesticide residues,  Tolerances(Physiology),  Hazard-
 ous materials. Agricultural products. Public health,
 Regulations,  Ecology, 'Methoprene, * Registration,
 Environmental exposure pathway, Federal  Insecti-
 cides Fungicide and Rodenticide Act CAS 40596-69-
 8, Chemical Information Fact Sheet.
 PB92-1118S5/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Registration Eligibility Document (RED): Metho-
 prene (List A, Case 0030).
 Environmental Protection Agency,  Washington, DC.
 Office of Pesticide Programs.
 Mar 91,50p EPA/540/RS-92/128
 See also PB92-111848 and PB87-109443.

 The document contains information regarding the re-
 registration of pesticides containing methoprene. The
 document includes how to register under a registration
 standard, regulatory position  and rationale, and sum-
 maries of data requirements  and data gaps. Also in-
 cluded is a bibliography containing citations of all stud-
 ies reviewed  by EPA in arriving at the positions and
 conclusions contained in the standard.

 Keywords: 'Pesticides, 'Toxic substances, Standards,
 Guidelines, Genetics, Packaging, Labels, Hazardous
 materials, Agricultural products, Public health, Regula-
 tions,      Ecology,      Pesticide      residues,
 Tolerances(Physiology),  'Methoprene,  'Reregistra-
 tion. Federal  Insecticides Fungicide and Rodenticide
 Act, CAS 40596-69-8.
PB92-111863/REB                PC A03/MF A01
Rereglstration Eligibility  Document  (RED): He-
DothlszeaNPV(Ust A, Case Number 151).  .
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of Pesticide Programs.
Jan 91,45p EPA/540/RS-92/127
See also PB85-134393 and PB92-111871.

The document contains information regarding the re-
registration of pesticide products containing Heliothis
zea NPV. The document includes how to register
under a registration standard, regulatory position and
rationale, and summaries of data requirements and
data gaps. Also included is  a bibliography containing
citations of all studies reviewed by EPA in arriving at
the positions and conclusions contained in the stand-
ard.

Keywords:  'Pesticides,  'Biological  pest  control,
Standards,  Guidelines, Genetics, Packaging, Agricul-
tural products, Public health,  Regulations,  Ecology,
Pesticide residues, Toterances(Ptiysiology), Baculovir-
idae, 'Heliomis zea NPV,  'Reregjstration, Federal In-
secticides Fungicide and Rodenticide Act, CAS 2401-
948-01.
PB92-111871/REB               PC A02/MF A01
RED Facts: Heliothis zea NPV. Fact sheet
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of Pesticides and Toxic Substances.
Jan 91, 6p EPA/540/FS-92/125
See also PB92-111889 and PB87-112280.

All pesticides sold or used in the United States must be
registered by EPA, based on scientific studies showing
that they can be used without posing  unreasonable
risks to people or the environment Because of ad-
vances in scientific knowledge, the law requires that
pesticides which were first registered years ago be rer-
egistered to ensure that they meet today's more strin-
gent standards. In evaluating pesticides for reregistra-
tipn, EPA obtains from pesticide producers and re-
views a complete set of studies showing the human
 health and environmental effects of each  pesticide.
 The Agency imposes any regulatory controls that are
 needed to effectively manage each pesticide's risks.
 EPA then reregisters pesticides that can be used with-
 out posing undue hazards to human health or the envi-
 ronment. When a pesticide is eligible for ^registration,
 EPA announces this and explains why in a Reregistra-
 tion Eligibility Document, or RED. The fact sheet sum-
 marizes the information in the  RED for Heliothis zea
 NPV.

 Keywords:  'Pesticides,   'Biological   pest  control,
 Standards,   Baculoviridae,  Tolerances(Physiology),
 Hazardous  materials,  Agricultural products, Public
 health,  Regulations, Ecology,  Labels, Farm crops,
 •Heliothis zea  NPV, 'Reregistration,  Environmental
 exposure pathway, Federal Insecticides Fungicide and
 Rodenticide  Act, Chemical Information Fact Sheet,
 CAS 2401-948-01.
 PB92-111889/REB               PC A02/MF A01
 Alachlor Position Document 2/3.
 Environmental Protection Agency,  Washington, DC.
 Office of Pesticide Programs.
 8 Oct86,10p EPA/540/09-92/145
 Pub. in Federal Register, v51 n195,8 Oct 86. See also
 PB92-111871 and PB85-175503.

 The Position Document addresses the risks and bene-
 fits of pesticide  products  containing alachlor. The
 Agency has determined that the use of products con-
 taining the subject active  ingredient may meet  or
 exceed a risk criterion described in 40 CFR Part 154.
 Potential hazards will be examined further to deter-
 mine the nature and extent of the risk, and considering
 the benefits of the subject active ingredient, whether
 such risks cause unreasonable adverse effects on the
 environment.

 Keywords:   'Environmental  surveys,  'Pesticides,
 'Toxicology, 'Toxic substances, Regulations, Carcino-
 genicity tests, Health  hazards. Risk  assessment
 Ground water, Surface waters, Farm crops, Pesticide
 residues, Exposure, 'Alachlor,  'Position document
 PB92-111905/REB               PC A10/MF A03
 Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
 Park, NC. Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards.
 National Air  Toxics Information Clearinghouse:
 Ongoing Research  and Regulatory Development
 Projects. Final rept (Interim).
 Radian Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC.
 L. Y. Cooper, L C. Huff, V. J. McDonald, and J. S.
 McLean. Jul 91,207p  DCN-91-203-099-37-07, EPA/
 450/3-91/015
 Contract EPA-68-D8-0065
 See also PB91-161752. Sponsored by Environmental
 Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Office
 of Air Quality Planning and Standards.

 The National Air Toxics Information Clearinghouse has
 been established by the U.S. Environmental Protection
 Agency's (EPA)  Office of Air Quality Planning and
 Standards for the purpose of facilitating information
 transfer among Federal, State, and local air  quality
 management agencies. The document has been pub-
 lished as part of that effort.  Its purpose is to inform
 State and local  agencies  and other Clearinghouse
 users of U.S. EPA, National Institute for Occupational
 Safety  and Health (NIOSH),  Agency for Toxic Sub-
 stances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), and State and
 local agency  research and  regulatory development
 projects concerning toxic air pollutants. The document
 is divided into three sections and an appendix. The first
 section is an introduction that explains document
 scope and use. Section 2 lists 269 air toxics projects in
 progress as of March 31, 1991, at EPA, NIOSH,
 ATSDR, and State and local agencies. The third sec-
tion of  the document contains the index that allows
 readers to locate projects  of interest. The appendix
 lists regulatory development projects on toxic chemi-
 cals under way at the EPA's Office of Drinking Water
 (ODW). Although most of these projects are not direct-
 ly related to air problems, health information on toxic
chemicals from ODW projects may be of interest to
 Clearinghouse users.

 Keywords: 'Research and development,  'Information
dissemination,  'Air quality, 'Toxic substances, 'Air
pollution, 'Bibliographies, Information transfer, Pollu-
tion regulations, US EPA, Indexes, Indoor air pollution,
Air water interactions, Potable water, Chemical com-
pounds, Public health, Occupational safety and health.
22    Vol. 92, No. 1

-------
                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS  BIBLIOGRAPHY
Air pollution standards, 'National Air Toxics Informa-
tion Clearinghouse, National Institute lor Occupational
Safety and Health, Agency for Toxic Substances and
PB92-111913/REB               PC A21/MF ACM
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards.
National Air Toxics  Information  Clearinghouse:
Bibliography of Selected Reports and  Federal
Register Notices Related to Air Toxics. Index,
1991. Interim rept (Final).
Radian Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC.
C. A. Owen, L Y. Cooper, L C. Huff, V. J. McDonald,
and J. S. McLean. Jul 91,487p DCN-91 -203-099-37-
08, EPA/450/3-91/017
Contract EPA-68-D8-0065
See also PB91 -168443. Sponsored by Environmental
Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Office
of Air Quality Planning and Standards.

The National Air Toxics Information Clearinghouse has
been established by the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency's (EPA) Office of Air Quality Planning  and
Standards for the purpose of  facilitating information
transfer among Federal, State, and local air quality
management agencies. The document has been pub-
lished as part of that effort. The purpose is to provide
State and  local  agencies and other Clearinghouse
users with bibliographic citations of reports and Feder-
al Register  notices useful in developing and operating
air toxics control programs. The bibliography is pub-
lished in five volumes plus an index. The index to the
Bibliography covers  all the reports from 1974 to the
present. Under each keyword, report titles are listed
for which the keyword has been assigned. Each listing
indicates which of the five volumes contains the cita-
tion and is followed by an alphanumeric^  identifier.
The identifier is used to locate  the citation in the bibli-
 ography that is organized  in alphabetic, then numeric
 order in each volume. The current index to the bibliog-
 raphy (Index -  1991, EPA-450/3-91-017) is organized
 by document type; by  pollutant class, name, or CAS
 number; by source category SIC Code; and by spon-
 soring agency.

 Keywords:  'Toxic substances, *Air quality,  *Air pollu-
 tion, 'Bibliographies,  'Research and  development,
 •Information  dissemination, 'Indexes,  Air pollution
 control, Air pollution standards, Public health, Occupa-
 tional safety and health, Information transfer, Chemi-
 cal compounds,  Radioactive materials,  'National Air
 Toxics Information Clearinghouse, Federal Register.


 PB92-112101/REB                PC A10/MF A03
 Environmental Protection Agency,  Washington,  DC.
 Drinking Water Standards Div.
 Lead and  Copper Rule Guidance Manual. Volume
 1. Monitoring.
 EGOS, Inc., Landover,  MD.
 Sep91,201p
 Contracts EPA-68-CO-0062, EPA-68-C8-0010
 Prepared  in cooperation with  Black  and Veatch,
 Kansas City, MO., and Pirnie (Malcolm), Inc., Mahwah,
 NJ. Sponsored by Environmental Protection Agency,
 Washington, DC. Drinking Water Standards Div.

 The manual discusses the monitoring requirements of
 trie rule and provides recommendations to assist sys-
 tems in the design of their monitoring programs. The
 manual provides guidance on identification of potential
 sample sites, selection of sample sites, procedures for
 homeowner participation, sampling procedures, and
 monitoring reporting requirements and deadlines, vol.
 1 focuses  on the development of necessary sampling
 plan and monitoring program elements contained in
 the Rule.

 Keywords: 'Lead(Metal),  'Copper, 'Environmental
 monitoring, 'Water pollution sampling,  'Water  treat-
 ment 'Potable water, Guidelines, Manuals, Pollution
 regulations. Design criteria,  Requirements, Sample
 preparation, Environmental chemical substitutes, dis-
 tribution  systems,  Corrosion  control,  'Lead  and
 Copper Rule.


 PB92-112150/HEB                PC A05/MF A01
 Environmental Protection Agency,  Research Tnangle
 Park, NC. Office of Air Quality  Planning and Standards.
 Emission   Inventory Requirements for Carbon
 Monoxide State Implementation Plans, 1991.
 Radian Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC.
 Mar 91,77p EPA/450/4-91 /011
Contract EPA-68-D00125
See also PB89-152391. Sponsored by Environmental
Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Office
of Air Quality Planning and Standards.

The  document describes the emission inventory re-
quirements related to preparation and submission of
carbon monoxide State  Implementation Plans (SIPs)
for those States required to revise their plans after No-
vember 15, 1990.  Discussed in  the document are
emission inventory requirements relating to geograph-
ic area of coverage, point source cutoff size specifica-
tions, sources to be included, data reporting formats,
documentation requirements,  quality of data base,
years to be addressed, and schedule for inventory sub-
mission.

Keywords:  'State  implementation  plans,  'Carbon
monoxide, 'Air pollution, Requirements, Point sources,
Forms(Paper), Clean Air Act, Pollution sources. Speci-
fications, Site surveys, 'Emission inventories.
 PB92-112168/REB               PCA11/MFA03
 Procedures for the Preparation of Emission In-
 ventories for Carbon Monoxide and Precursors of
 Ozone. Volume 1.  General Guidance for Station-
 ary Sources.
 Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
 Park, NC. Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards.
 May 91,234p EPA/450/4-91 /016
 See  also  PB89-152409  and PB91-216176.  Errata
 sheet inserted.

 Volume I describes procedures for preparing a county
 wide inventory of volatile organic compounds (VOC),
 nitrogen oxides (NOx) and carbon monoxide (CO) for
 stationary  sources.  It is  a companion document to
 Volume II,  which describes procedures for converting
 an annual county wide emission inventory to a detailed
 inventory needed for photochemical models. The doc-
 ument is an update to  the  original, (PB89-152409),
 published in 1988.

 Keywords: 'Ozone, 'Carbon monoxide, 'Stationary
 sources, 'Air pollution  control, 'State  government,
 Procedures, Requirements, Pollution sources, Volatile
 organic compounds, Nitrogen oxides, Point sources,
 Data processing, Questionnaires, Numerical analysis,
 Guidelines, 'Emission inventories, Area sources.
 PB92-112176/REB               PC A18/MF A04
 Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
 Park, NC. Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards.
 Example Emission Inventory Documentation for
 Post-1987  Ozone  State  Implementation  Plans

 Radian Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC.
 G Brooks, and G. Reeves. Oct 89,412p EPA/450/4-
 89/018
 Contract EPA-68-02-4392
 See also PB89-152383 and PB89-152409. Sponsored
 by Environmental Protection Agency, Research Trian-
 gle Park, NC. Office of Air Quality Planning and Stand-
 ards.

 The document supplements recent US EPA guidance
 on  compiling emission inventories for reactive volatile
 organic compounds (VOC), oxides of nitrogen (NOx),
 and carbon monoxide (CO), for use in developing post-
 1987 State  Implementation Plans (SIPs) for demon-
 strating attainment of the ambient ozone standards.
 The document contains an example emissions inven-
 tory for reactive VOC, NOx, and CO, which has been
 compiled and documented for a fictitious ozone nonat-
 tainment area called Ozoneville. The document  up-
 dates and generally supersedes an earlier EPA inven-
 tory guidance document for ozone SIPs entitled Exam-
 ple Emission Inventory Documentation for 1982 Ozone
 SIPs.

  Keywords: 'State implementation plans,  'Ozone, 'Air
  pollution standards, 'Air pollution control, Volatile or-
  ganic compounds, Nitrogen oxides, Carbon monoxide.
  Pollution sources, Point sources, Stationary sources,
  Mobile pollutant sources, Exhaust emissions, Combus-
  tion products, Emission factors, Mathematical models,
  Quality  assurance,  'Emission inventories,  Area
  sources.
  PB92-112895/REB               PC A17/MF A04
  National Sea Grant Coll. Program, Silver Spring, MD.
Nutritional  Role  of Endosymbiotic  Bacteria  in
Animal-Bacteria Symbioses:  'Solemya velum', a
Case Study. Doctoral thesis.
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA.
N. M. Conway. c1990,391 p WHOI-90-42
Grants NA-86-AA-D-SG090, EPA-R-814895-01-1
See also AD-A208 999. Prepared in cooperation with
Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge. Sponsored
by National Sea Grant Coll. Program, Silver Spring,
MD., and Environmental Protection Agency, Washing-
ton, DC.

The nutritional role of endosymbiotic sulfur-oxidizing
chemoautotrophic bacteria in animal-bacteria symbi-
oses was  investigated using the endosymbiont-con-
taining protobranch clam, Solemya velum, as a gener-
al model of animal-bacteria symbioses. Animal-bacte-
ria symbioses are often very difficult to maintain in the
laboratory; consequently, it is difficult to cany out phys-
iological experiments on these organisms. As a result,
a detailed biochemical characterization of S. velum
was undertaken in order to determine the presence of
biochemical markers of endosymbiont activity which
might  be useful in determining the nutritional impor-
tance  of the endosymbiotic bacteria. Analysis of the
stable isotope ratios, lipid, and amino acid composi-
tions of S. velum revealed the presence of strong en-
dosymbiont biomarkers which demonstrate that bacte-
rial  endosymbionts  serve as  the  major nutritional
source for this bivalve. The endosymbiotic bacteria
may provide almost 100% of the host's C and N budg-
ets, and much of the host's lipid and amino acid re-
quirements. Analysis of the stable  isotope  and lipid
 composition profiles of two additional animal-bacteria
 symbioses, Solemya borealis and Inanidrilus leukoder-
 matus, also  revealed the presence of biochemical
 markers of endosymbiont activity, demonstrating  the
 nutritional importance of endosymbiotic  bacteria in
 these species.  The  biomarker approach is extremely
 useful in the study of nutrition in animal-bacteria symbi-
 Keywords: 'Bacteria, 'Symbiosis, 'Host-parasite rela-
 tions, 'Mollusca,  'Nutrition,  Theses,  Amino  acids,
 Lipids, Biochemistry, Isotopes, Carbon, Nitrogen, Fatty
 acids, Biological markers, Chromatography, Electron
 microscopy, 'Solemya velum, Inanidnlus leukoderma-
 tus, Endosymbionts, Chemoautotrophic bacteria.
 PB92-113000/REB               PC A09/MF A03
 Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
 Final Quality  Assurance  Report for  the Tampa,
 Florida Wetlands Study.
 ManTech  Environmental Technology, Inc., Corvallis,
 OR.
 A. D. Sherman, and S. E. Gwin. Nov 91,193p EPA/
 600/3-91/059
 Contract EPA-68-C8-0006
 Sponsored by Corvallis Environmental Research Lab.,
 OR.

 The report examines the data quality achieved during a
 field study implemented by the Environmental Protec-
 tion Agency's (EPA) Wetlands Research  Program
 (WRP) at Corvallis, OR. The project was conducted by
 the Center for Wetlands, University of Florida, Gaines-
 ville, as part of the WRP's ongoing research on cre-
 ated wetlands. It was one of three pilot projects (Con-
 necticut, Florida,  and Oregon) aimed at developing
 methods for comparing the structure of natural wet-
 lands with the structure of created wetlands. Soils,
 vegetation, hydrology, and site morphology data were
 recorded. In  addition,  each  site  was  surveyed,
 mapped, and photographed. The report outlines the
 data quality assessment procedures used.

  Keywords: 'Field tests,  'Research projects, Data
  processing, Soils, Vegetation, Project planning, Map-
  ping,  Photographs,  Connecticut, Florida,  Oregon,
  'Wetlands, Restoration.
  PB92-113018/REB               PC A07/MF A02
  Forest Health  Monitoring,  New England,  1990.
  Annual Report.
  Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
  Park, NC. Atmospheric Research and Exposure As-
  sessment Lab.
  R. T. Brooks. Nov 91,132p EPA/600/3-91 /066
  See also PB91-196071. Prepared in cooperation with
  Forest Service, Washington, DC., and National Asso-
  ciation of State Foresters, Washington, DC.


                             Mar 1992     23

-------
                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
The publication reports the findings of the 1990 (first)
Northeastern Forest Health Monitoring field season.
The objectives were to establish baseline conditions
for assessing attributes of forest health. Field visits
were made to 263 sample plots across the 6 New Eng-
land states, and measurements  were taken on  206
plots determined to be forested. Results are detailed in
46 tables and summarized in text and charts. The rep-
resentatives of the sample is discussed as are findings
from tree crown ratings, damage signs and symptoms,
and bioindicators plants.

Keywords: 'Forest management, 'Baseline measure-
ments, 'Environmental  surveys, 'Forest trees, Biologi-
cal indicators, Forest land, Man-environment interac-
tions. Exposure, Air pollution effects(Plants), Climatic
changes, Trees(Plants), Plant ecology, Plant patholo-
gy, Land use, Tabtes(Data), 'Forest Health Monitoring
Project, New England.
PB92-1 13026/REB               PC A07/MF A02
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Atmospheric Research and Exposure As-
sessment Lab.
Method 25: Determination of Total Gaseous Non-
Methane Organic Emissions as Carbon from Sta-
tionary Sources.
Deeco, Inc., Gary, NC.
W. G. DeWees, G. Howe, and D. von Lehmden. 31
May 91, 143p EPA/600/6-91/209
Contract EPA-68-D10009
See also PB80-1 1 2303 and PB88-1 78025. Prepared in
cooperation with Research Triangle  Inst, Research
Triangle Park, NC. Sponsored by Environmental Pro-
tection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Atmos-
pheric Research and Exposure Assessment Lab.

Section 3.17 describes the procedures and specifica-
tions for  determining volatile organic compounds as
total gaseous non-methane organics from stationary
sources.  An emission sample is withdrawn from the
stack at a constant rate through a heated filter and a
chilled condensate trap by means of an evacuated
sample tank. After sampling is completed, the total
gaseous  nonmethane organics are determined by in-
dependently analyzing the condensate  trap  and
sample tank fractions and combining the analytical re-
sults. The organic content of the condensate trap frac-
tion is determined by oxidizing the nonmethane organ-
ics (NMO) to CO2 and quantitatively collecting the ef-
fluent in  an evacuated vessel; then a portion of the
CO2 is reduced to CH4 and measured by a flame ioni-
zation detector  (FID).  The organic  content  of the
sample tank fraction is measured by injecting a portion
of the sample into a gas chromategraphic column to
separate the NMO from carbon monoxide (CO), CO2,
and CH4; the NMO are oxidized to CO2, reduced to
CH4, and measured by an FID. Quality assurance guid-
ance is provided in Section 3.1 7.

Keywords: 'Volatile organic compounds, 'Rue gases,
'Gas  chromatography.  'Air  pollution.  Stationary
sources, Emission factors,  Carbon monoxide, Carbon
dioxide. Methane.
 PB92-113109/REB               PCAOS/MFAOI
 Effects on Electrostatic Precipitation of Changes
 hi Grata Loading, Size  Distribution, Resistivity,
ticulate  compliance,  especially  for  smaller  ESPs.
Recent improvements in ESP modeling are allowing
the effects of space charge to be computed more pre-
cisely than previously possible.

Keywords: 'Electrostatic precipitators, 'Air pollution
control equipment Electric  corona,  Space charge,
Particle  size  distribution,  Performance  evaluation,
Temperature   effects,   Simulation,   Mathematical
models.
                 -
 Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
 Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
 N. Plaks. 1991, 140 EPA/600/D-01/243
 Presented at tne Symposium on the Transfer and Utili-
 zation of Paniculate Control  Technology (9th), Wil-
 liamsburg, VA., October 16-18, 1991.

 The paper discusses the simulation of the effects of
 changes to particle loading, particle size distribution,
 and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) operating tempera-
 ture, using ESP models. It also illustrates the useful-
 ness of modem ESP models for this type of analysis.
 Increasing the inlet grain loading and changing the size
 Distribution can affect the performance of ESP to the
 extent that it can seriously put the plant out of compli-
 ance for paniculate matter. An increase in inlet grain
 loading can result in a larger quantity of fine particles,
 especially if the particle size distribution changes. The
 resulting  paniculate  space  charge,  if  sufficiently
 severe, may suppress the corona in the inlet sections
 to the point that those sections are ineffective and the
 performance of the ESP degrades. Temperature  re-
 duction will improve ESP performance. However, the
 performance restoration from lowering the tempera-
 toe may not be sufficient to put the ESP back into par-
PB92-113117/REB               PCA03/MFA01
Evaluation of Pilot ESP Performance with Elevat-
ed Loadings from Sorbent Injection Processes.
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
C. B. Sedman, R. E. Valentine, and N. Plaks. 4 Sep 91,
18pEPA/600/D-91/244
Presented at the  Symposium on Paniculate Control
(9th), Williamsburg, VA. on October 15-19,1991.

The paper gives results of an evaluation of pilot elec-
trostatic precipitator (ESP) performance with elevated
loadings from the advanced silicate (ADVACATE) sor-
bent injection process. Measurements were made of a
calcium silicate sorbent injected into a duct upstream
of an ESP. The concentration of ADVACATE sorbent
submicron particles (=/< 1 micrometer) and project-
ed  ESP emissions tended to peak and began to de-
crease when the overall  paniculate matter  addition
rate to the gas stream approached and then exceeded
12  g/Nm3. The submicron fly ash, subjected to the
same duct injection, increased linearly with increased
injection rates from 3 to 24 g/Nm3. A possible expla-
nation is in-duct agglomeration of fines by the coarse
particles, similar to observations reported on cyclone
performance evaluations. The duct, flue gas, and sor-
bent characteristics that affect agglomeration tenden-
cies probably play a major role in the observations pre-
sented. Most of the ADVACATE material settled out of
the gas stream. Measurements of the gas-suspended
residual partfculate matter were used to model expect-
ed  ESP performance. The encouraging results of the
modeling  suggest that collection of reacted ADVA-
CATE sorbent in a ESP is manageable.

Keywords: 'Electrostatic precipitators, 'Air pollution
control equipment Sorbent injection processes, Per-
formance evaluation, Sorbents, Sulfur dioxide, Particle
sizes, Fty  ash. Process charting, Silicates,  'ADVA-
CATE process.


PB92-113125/REB               PC A03/MF A01
SUPER ESP: Ultimate Electrostatic Precipitation.
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
N.  Plaks. 1991,14p EPA/600/D-91/245
Presented at  the Symposium on Paniculate  Control
(9th), Williamsburg, VA., October 15-18,1991.

The paper discusses SUPER ESP, a new electrostatic
precipitator (ESP) concept enabling high collection ef-
ficiencies with considerably smaller collection areas
than has previously been possible. The new concept
allows a major reduction in ESP size by using an alter-
nating sequence of prechargers and short collector
sections. The length of the collection section in each
pracharger/coltector pair (module) dominates the opti-
 mization. The size reduction is greater for ESPs oper-
 ating with  high resistivity paniculate matter than with
 low resistivity paniculate matter. The  relationship in
 number of modules, collector section size, and overall
 ESP collection is presented and discussed. Compari-
 sons are given of ESP size for both conventional and
 SUPER ESP technology operating with either high or
 low resistivity paniculate matter. Because of the size
 reduction, the cost of the SUPER ESP is projected to
 be lower than that of a conventional ESP of compara-
 ble efficiency. The paper is based on an ESP model,
 ESPVI 4.0.

 Keywords:  'Electrostatic precipitators, 'Air pollution
 control equipment Performance evaluation, Stationary
 sources, Particle size distribution. 'SUPER ESP.
 PB92-113133/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
 Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
 Field Performance of Woodbuming  Stoves In
 Crested Butte, Colorado.
 Virginia Polytechnic Inst and State Univ.. Blacksburg.
 Dept of Mechanical Engineering.
D. R. Jaasma, M. Gundappa, M. R. Champion, and R.
C. McCrillis. 24 Apr 91,27p EPA/600/D-91 /246
Presented at the AWMA Annual Meeting (84th) held in
Vancouver, B. C. on June 16-21, 1991. Sponsored by
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.

The paper discusses field emissions from woodstoves
measured in Crested Butte, Colorado, during the win-
ters of 1988-89 and 1989-90. Both paniculate matter
and carbon monoxide emissions were measured. The
database from the work is large, including convention-
al stoves and EPA-certified stoves of the catalytic and
noncatalytic types. The data are discussed and com-
pared to results of other field studies.

Keywords: 'Carbon monoxide, 'Particulates, 'Stoves,
•Wood burning  appliances, 'Air pollution  monitoring,
Indoor air pollution, Stationary sources, Air pollution
control, 'Crested Butte(Colorado).
PB92-113141/REB               PCA03/MFA01
Robert S. Kerr Environmental  Research Lab., Ada,
OK.
Reduction of Hexachloroethane and Carbon Tet-
rachtoride at  Surfaces  of Btotite, Vermiculite,
Pyrite, and Marcastte. Book chapter Apr 88-Apr 90.
Stanford Univ., CA. Dept. of Civil Engineering.
M. R. Kriegman-King, and M. Reinhard. c1991,18p
EPA/600/D-91/247
Grant EPA-R-814823
Pub. in Organic Substances and Sediments in Water,
v2 p349-364 1991. Sponsored by Robert S. Kerr Envi-
ronmental Research Lab., Ada, OK.

Contamination of groundwater  resources by haloge-
nated compounds spurred the formation of a  national
program to clean up hazardous waste sites across the
United States. Compounds such as carbon tetrachlo-
ride (CTET), chloroform (CF), and hexachloroethane
(HCA) are a few  of the chemicals which have been
proposed to be 'characteristic' hazardous wastes to be
included in the toxic contaminant leachate potential
(TCLP) test  Consequently, chemical  and biological
transformation pathways are being studied to aid in un-
derstanding the fate of these contaminants in ground-
water environments and to apply the processes occur-
ring naturally in groundwater environments to remedi-
ation technologies. Environmental factors significantly
affect the transformation rates and the pathways of
halogenated aliphatic compounds. The authors have
studied the  transformation of  tetrachloromethane
(CTET), and hexachloroethane  (HCA) in homogenous
and  heterogenous  systems  designed to  simulate
groundwater and sediment conditions. The laboratory
studies were aimed at (1) identifying the sediment
components which may act as reducing components
and (2) quantifying  the environmental factors which
govern the transformation rates. Both model and natu-
ral systems were studied. Their data indicate that the
humic acid fraction in combination with sulfide and
Fe(2+) may promote transformation rates. Similarly,
surfaces of sheet silicates, such as biotite and vermic-
ulite, were found to promote degradation of CTET and
perchkx oethytene, respectively.

 Keywords: 'Water pollution control, 'Chlorine organic
compounds, 'Waste disposal, 'Sediments, 'Bkxfeter-
foration, 'Environmental effects. Path of pollutants.
 Ground  water, Anaerobic  processes,  Humic acid.
 Carbon tetrachloride, Marcasite, Vermiculite, Pyrite,
Tetrachtoroethylene,      Hazardous      materials,
 Reduction(Chemistry), Reaction kinetics,  Bfotile, Min-
 erals, Reprints, Methane/tetrachloro, Ethane/hexach-
 loro.
 PB92-113158/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Combustion Control of Trace Organic Air Pollut-
 ants from  Municipal  Waste Combustors.  Journal
 article.
 Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
 Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
 J. D. Kilgroe. C1989,26p EPA/600/ J-89/550
 Pub. in Environmental Impact Assessment Review, v9
 n3p199-222 Sep 89.

 The paper  discusses  the  use  of combustion tech-
 niques for controlling air emissions of chlorinated dfox-
 ins, chlorinated furans, and other trace organics from
 municipal waste combustion (MWC) facilities.  Recom-
 mendations for  good combustion practice  (GCP) for
 controlling trace organics were initially  published in
 June 1987. These recommendations provided key cri-
 24    Vol.  92, No.  1

-------
                                                  EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
teria for the design, operation, control, and verification
(compliance testing) of three types of combustors: wa-
terwall  mass burn, refuse derived  fuel, and modular
starved air combustors.  The paper summarizes the
technical  considerations on which the initial  GCPs
were based. It also discusses current activities in revis-
ing the initial GCPs and in developing GCPs for other
classes of municipal waste combustors. GCP is one of
the pollution  control options  being considered  for
MWC air  pollution standards. Standards which  are to
apply to new MWC facilities (as well as emission guide-
lines which are to apply to existing MWC facilities) are
to be proposed in November 1989 and promulgated in
December 1990.

Keywords:  'Air pollution abatement,  'Incinerators,
'Municipal  wastes,  'Waste disposal, 'Combustion
control, 'Organic compounds, Trace amounts, Diox-
ins, Combustion efficiency,  Design criteria, Perform-
ance evaluation, Compliance, Air pollution standards,
Furans, Reprints.
PB92-113166/REB                PC A03/MF A01
Limitations of  the Fluorescent Probe Viability
Assay. Journal article.
Health Effects  Research  Lab.,  Research  Triangle
Park, NC.
E. J. Massaro, K. H. Elstein, K. W. Bair, and R. M.
Zucker. C1989,16p EPA/600/J-89/551
Pub. in Molecular Toxicology, v2 p271-284 Oct 89.
Prepared in cooperation with ManTech Environmental
Technology, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC.

Cell viability commonly is determined flow cytometri-
cally by the carboxyfluorescein diacetate (CFDA)/pro-
pidium iodide (PI) assay. CFDA  is taken up by the
viable cell and  converted  via cytoplasmic esterase-
catalyzed hydrolysis to carboxyfluorescein (CF). CF
fluorescence intensity is considered to be an index of
cellular vigor. It is generally accepted that the viable
cell excludes PI. PI uptake is indicative of irreversible
cellular injury and presages cell death. The authors ob-
serve that, following incubation for 4 hr with 0.5 - 1.0
microMolar tributyltin (TBT),  murine erythroleukemic
cells (MELC) exhibit supranormal CF fluorescence and
exclude PI.  Apparent cell volume is unaltered. Howev-
er, the rate of growth (cell duplication) of these cells is
depressed,  suggesting that supranormal CF fluores-
cence, even in the absence of PI uptake, is indicative
of cellular perturbation.  Furthermore, at higher TBT
concentrations  (>1.0, <50.0 microMolar), the cells
exhibit both increased CF fluorescence and PI fluores-
cence and are growth inhibited. These observations in-
dicate that, by and of itself, CF fluorescence is neither
a reliable indicator of cell viability nor vigor and sug-
gest that at least in the case of perturbed cells, viabili-
ty/growth assays based on intrinsic enzyme activities
potentially are unreliable and inaccurate.

 Keywords:  'Cell survival,  'Fluorescent  dyes,  'Toxic
substances, Row cytometry, Tributyltin, Acute  eryth-
roblastic  leukemia, Propidium, Antineoplastic agents,
Cell division, Growth, Reprints.


PB92-113174/REB                PC A02/MF A01
Comparison of In situ Vitrification and Rotary Kiln
 Incineration  for Soils Treatment. Journal   article

 Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
 Reduction Engineering Lab.
T. L Shearer. c1991, 8p EPA/600/J-91 /255
 Pub. in Jnl.  of Air and Waste Management Association,
 v41 n9 p1259-1264 Sep 91.

 In the hazardous waste community, the  term thermal
 destruction' is a catch-all phrase that broadly refers to
 high temperature destruction of hazardous contami-
 nants. Included in the thermal destruction category are
 treatment technologies such as rotary kiln incineration,
 fluidized bed incineration,  infrared thermal treatment,
wet air oxidatio'n, pyrolytic incineration,  and vitrifica-
 tion. Among them, conventional rotary kiln incineration
 is the most established, having been  a disposal
 method for many years, and therefore often serves as
 a barometer by which the relative success of  similar
 technologies may be gauged. Public sentiment  on en-
 vironmental issues and increasingly stringent environ-
 mental regulations has, over time, spurred the  design
 and development  of innovative thermal treatment
 processes  that are directed at reducing harmful emis-
 sions and residuals  that may require further treatment
 or disposal. In-situ vitrification (ISV), a technology mat
 combines heat and immobilization, is one such innova-
 tive and relatively new technology. The paper presents
a comprehensive overview of ISV as compared with
rotary kiln incineration in the areas of process perform-
ance, process residuals, process limitations, applica-
ble or relevant and appropriate (ARARs) regulations,
criteria and limitations, and costs. (Copyright (c) 1991 --
Air and Waste Management Association.)

Keywords: 'Soil treatment, 'Vitrification, 'Incineration,
'Waste disposal, 'Hazardous materials, Pollution reg-
ulations, Comparison, Technology utilization, In-situ
processing, Immobilization,  Performance evaluation,
Heat treatment. Waste forms, Reprints.
PB92-113182/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Field-Testing  Distribution Water Quality Models.
Journal article.
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
Reduction Engineering Lab.
R. M. Clark, W. M. Grayman, J. A. Goodrich, R. A.
Deininger, and A. F. Hess. c1991,11 p EPA/600/J-91 /
256
Pub. in American Water Works Association, p67-75 Jul
91. Prepared in cooperation with Michigan Univ., Ann
Arbor, and South Central Connecticut Regional Water
Authority, New Haven.

The article briefly reviews an extensive field study by
the  US Environmental Protection Agency and the
North Penn Water Authority, which resulted in the de-
velopment of a series of models to investigate con-
taminant propagation in a water distribution system.
The application of one such model to the exploration
of contaminant movement in the distribution network
of Cabool, Mo., is explained. An extension of the work
to a large water utility-the South Central Connecticut
Regional Water Authority-is also discussed.

Keywords: 'Water quality, 'Water distribution, 'Mathe-
matical models, 'Distribution systems, 'Water pollu-
tion effects, Case studies, Path of pollutants,  Field
tests, Public health, Mathematical models, Diseases,
Systems engineering, Reprints.
Asbestos Fiber Release during  Change-Out of
Filter Bags from HEPA-Filtered Vacuum Cleaners.
Journal article.
IT Environmental Programs, Inc., Cincinnati, OH.
J. R. Kominsky, R. W. Freyberg, B. A. Hollett, P. J.
Clark, and K. A. Bracket!. c1991, 7p EPA/600/J-91 /
258
Contract EPA-68-03-4006
Pub. in NAC Jni., p15-19,  Summer 91. Sponsored by
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
Reduction Engineering Lab.

High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtered vacuum
cleaners are the primary tool used to clean up asbes-
tos containing material during operations and mainte-
nance (O&M) activities. The change-out of vacuum
bags is a potential source of airborne asbestos con-
tamination. In 1989 and 1990 the Risk Reduction Engi-
neering Laboratory (RREL) of the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency conducted a series of controlled
tests to determine airborne  asbestos fiber levels
during change-out of filters bags used in HEPA-filtered
vacuum cleaners. Five different HEPA-filtered vacu-
ums of varying brands and capacities were tested. The
study was conducted at  EPA's controlled  asbestos
test (CAT) facility. The data from two studies indicates
that airborne asbestos levels can increase significantly
during normal bag change-out operations and that
these  increases vary with the configuration of the
vacuum cleaner. The primary potential point of fiber re-
lease during each bag change-out occurred when the
paper bag was separated from the intake tube. The
use of a glove-box enclosure significantly reduced the
increase in  airborne asbestos concentrations during
bag change-out.

Keywords:  'Asbestos,  'Vacuum cleaners, 'Pollution
sources,  'Indoor  air  pollution,   Risk  assessment,
Health  hazards, Emission factors, Industrial hygiene,
Occupational exposure,  Laboratory tests. Reprints,
Janitorial workers, Custodial workers.
 PB92-113190/REB               PC A02/MF A01
 Robert S.  Kerr Environmental Research Lab., Ada,
 OK.
 Evaluation of Sorption Models in the Simulation of
 Naphthalene  Transport Through Saturated Soils.
 Journal article.
 ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc., Ada, OK.
 K. H. Liu, C. G. Enfield, and S. C. Mravik. c1991,10p
 EPA/600/J-91/257
 Contract EPA-68-C8-0025
 Pub. in Ground Water, v29 n5 p685-692  Sep/Oct 91.
 Sponsored by Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research
 Lab., Ada, OK.

 The transport of organic pollutants in ground water is
 determined by the physical,  chemical, and biological
 processes  occurring within  the porous  medium. To
 show the effect of sorption model selection, the one-
 dimensional transport of naphthalene in two saturated
 soils was simulated using numerical models, which in-
 cluded the processes of dispersion, advection and
 sorption. Three different models describing  the sorp-
 tion process: (1) a local equilibrium model,((2) a first-
 order kinetic sorption model, and (3) a two-site model
 were examined. In addition, the study considered two
 types of boundary conditions: constant concentration
 and constant flux boundary conditions. Simulations
 were made for data of naphthalene transport through a
 laboratory  soil column packed with Lincolfi or Eustis
 soil series. Numerical simulation results show that the
 selection of the sorption model had significant effects
 on the numerical solutions. The numerical solution ob-
 tained using either the local equilibrium model or the
 first-order kinetic sorption model described the experi-
 mental data very well from the Lincoln soil column. In
 contrast, the  numerical solution obtained using  the
 two-site model described the experimental data for the
 Eustis soil  better than the equilibrium or kinetic model.
 Different boundary conditions  had little  influence on
 the numerical solutions.

 Keywords: 'Water pollution, 'Naphthalene,  'Environ-
 mental transport,  "Sorption, 'Mathematical models,
 'Porous media, Land pollution, Soil properties, Equilib-
 rium,  Kinetics, Organic matter, Ground  water, Sedi-
 ment-water interfaces, Boundary conditions, Reprints.
 PB92-113208/REB                PC A02/MF A01
 Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
 Reduction Engineering Lab.
 PB92-113216/REB               PC A02/MF A01
 Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
 Foliar Injury Symptoms and Pigment Concentra-
 tions in Red Spruce Saplings in the Southern Ap-
 palachians. Journal article.
 Oak Ridge National Lab., TN. Environmental Sciences
 Div.
 C. P. Andersen, S. B. McLaughlin, and W. K. Roy.
 c1991,7pORNL/PUB-3695, EPA/600/J-91/259
 Contract DE-AC05-84OR21400
 Pub. in Canada Jnl. of Forest Research, v21 p1119-
 11231991. Sponsored by Corvallis Environmental Re-
 search Lab., OR.,  and Department of Energy, Wash-
 ington, DC.

 The frequency and percent surface area  covered by
 necrotic flecking on red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.)
 needles from sapling-sized trees  were examined on
 nine research sites on three mountains in the southern
 Appalachians. Foliar pigment  analysis was conducted
 on trees from two  of the nine  research sites. Flecking
 increased with foliar age on all sites, and on two of the
 mountains, the area covered by flecks increased with
 elevation. Above 1720 meters on Clingman's dome,
 foliar flecking was found  to  comprise >8% of the
 upper needle surface area of one-year-old needles.
 Chlorophyll A and B concentrations  increased with
 foliar age and were greater in  trees growing at the mid
 elevation site (1720 m) than at the high elevation site
 (1935 m) on Clingman's Dome. Pigment concentra-
 tions did  not correspond to foliar flecking frequency at
 the two sites in common. Foliar flecking appears to in-
 crease over winter  and its  widespread  occurrence
 throughout the southern Appalachian suggests that re-
 gional, rather than local, site-related phenomena are
 involved.

 Keywords: 'Plant diseases, 'Leaves(Botany), Chloro-
 phyll,  Altitude,  Carotenoids,  Reprints, 'Red  spruce
 trees, Southern Appalachian  Region(United States),
 Picea rubens.
 PB92-113224/REB                PC A02/MF A01
 Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
 Can Intensive Management Increase Carbon Stor-
 age In Forests. Journal article.
 NSI Technology Services Corp., Corvallis, OR. Envi-
 ronmental Research Lab.
 P. Schroeder. c1991, 9p EPA/600/J-91 /260
 Contract EPA-68-C8-0006


                             Marl 992    25

-------
                                                  EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
Pub. in Environmental Management, v15 n4 p475-481
1991.  Sponsored  by Corvaltis  Environmental  Re-
search Lab., OR.

A possible response to increasing atmospheric CO2
concentration is to attempt to increase the amount of
carbon stored in terrestrial vegetation. One approach
to increasing the size of the terrestrial carbon sink Is to
increase the growth of forests by  utilizing intensive
forest management practices.  Trie paper uses data
from the literature and from forest growth and yield
models to analyze the impact  of three  management
practices on carbon storage: thinning, fertilization, and
control of competing vegetation. Using  Douglas-fir
(Pseudotsuga  menziesii)  and  loblolly  pine  (Pinus
taeda) as example species, results showed that thin-
ning generally does not increase carbon storage, and
may actually cause a decrease. The exception is thin-
ning of very dense young stands. (Copyright (c) 1991
Springer-Veriag New York Inc.)

Keywords: 'Forest management, 'Carbon cycle,  *Air
pollution effectsfPlants), Forest trees, Plant growth,
Carbon sinks, Carbon sources. Environmental trans-
port, Greenhouse effect. Carbon dioxide. Global warm-
ing, Air pollution control, Reprints, Pseudotsuga men-
ziesB, Pinus taeda, 'Air-biosphere interactions.
 PB92-113232/REB               PC A02/MF A01
 Indoor  Mr PoNutants from  Unvontod Kttrosonv
 raMtor  EifnsvlofMt in Moblto Homos:  Stuows  on
 PartMM, Semrvolatfl* Organic*, Carbon Monox-
 kte. Mid Mutagwrieity. Journal article.
 Health Effects  Research Lab.r Research Triangle
 Park,NC.
 j. L Mumford, R. W. Williams. D. B. Walsh, R. M.
 Burton, and D. J. Svendsgaard. c1991, 9p EPA/600/J-
 91/261
 Pub. in Environmental Science and Technology, v25
 nIO p1732-1738 Oct 91. See also PB90-263179. Pre-
 pared in cooperation with Environmental Health Re-
 search and Testing, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC.,
 and Battelle, Columbus, OH.

 The study was conducted to assess human exposure
 to air pollutants resulting from the use of kerosene
 heaters in mobile homes. It has been estimated that
 15-17 million unvented kerosene heaters have been
 sold in the United States, and 33% of these heaters
 have been sold to mobile home residents. The emis-
 sions from kerosene heaters can result in high pollut-
 ants levels in mobile homes that have a small  air
 volume and low ventilation rate. Eight totally electric
 mobile homes with  no smokers living in the homes
 were monitored for indoor air particles < 10 microme-
 ter (PM10), semivolaete organics, carbon monoxide
 (CO),  and mutagenicity of semivolatite and particle-
 phase organics in Salmonella typhimurium TA98 with-
 out  S9  using a microsuspenston  reverse-mutation
 assay. Each home was monitored for an average of
 6.5 h/day, 3 days/week, for 4 weeks (2 weeks with the
 heater on and 2 weeks with the heater off) during the
 heating season of 1989. Indoor air exchange rate, tem-
 perature, and humidity were measured. Chemical anal-
 yses, including potycycfic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)
 and nrtro PAH, also were performed on the indoor air
 samples from a selected home with the  kerosene
 heater on and off. Increases in CO and organic con-
 centrations resulting from the use of kerosene heaters
 were found in most homes monitored. Chemical analy-
 sis data also  suggested the presence of evaporated,
 unbumed kerosene fuel present in semivolatile organ-
 ics collected in the XAD samples. In comparison with
 the U.S. national ambient air standards, four out of the
 eight heaters investigated in the study emitted pollut-
 ants that xceeded the ambient air standards some
 days. These data suggested that emissions from un-
 vented  kerosene heaters can significantly  impact
 indoor air quality in mobile homes and that these emis-
 sions contain carcinogenic compounds and can be po-
 tentially carcinogenic in humans.

 Keywords:  'Indoor   air  pollution,   'Air  pollution
effects/Humans),  'Mobile homes,  'Public health,
 Heating equipment.  Exposure, Particles, Kerosene,
 Heating fuels, Dose-response relationships, Air pollu-
tion detection, Chemical analysis. Carcinogens,  Air
poffution sampling, Air quality, Ventilation, Tenacity, Mu-
tagens, Concentration(Compositkxi), Reprints.
PB92-113240/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Differential Impact of Hypothermia and Pentobar-
bital on Brain-Stem Auditory Evoked Responses.
Journal article.
Health  Effects Research  Lab.,  Research Triangle
Park, NC.
R. Janssen, B. E. Hetzler, J. P. Creason, and R. S.
Dyer. d991,12p EPA/600/J-91 /262
Pub. in Electroencephalography and Clinical Neuro-
phystotogy, v80 n5 p412-421 Sep 91. Prepared in co-
operation with Lawrence Univ., Appleton, Wl.

Two experiments were conducted to determine the ef-
fects of hypothermia and pentobarbital anesthesia,
alone and in combination, on the brain-stem auditory
evoked responses (BAERs) of rats. In experiment  I,
unanesthetized rats were cooled  to cotontc tempera-
tures 0.5 and 1.0 C below normal. In experiment II,  2
groups of rats were cooled and tested at 37.5, 36.0,
34.5 and 31.5 C. One group was  anesthetized during
testing and the other group was awake. The rat BAER
was sensitive to cooling of 1 C or less. Peak latencies
were prolonged and peak-to-peak amplitudes were in-
creased by hypothermia alone. The effect on ampli-
tude may be related to the time course of temperature
change or to stimulus level. Pentobarbital significantly
affected both  latencies and amplitudes  over and
above the  effects of cooling. The specific effects of
pentobarbital differed by  BAER peak and by tempera-
ture. The findings point up the importance of the po-
tential confound of  anesthetic  drugs in most of the
evoked potential literature on hypothermia and, for the
first time, quantify the complex interactions between
pentobarbital and temperature which affect the BAER
wave form.  (Copyright (c) 1991 Elsevier Scientific Pub-
lishers Ireland, Ltd.)

Keywords:  'Hypothermia,  'Pentobarbital, 'Auditory
brain stem evoked potentials, 'Anesthesia, Body tem-
perature regulation,  GraphsfCharts), Comparison, Re-
prints.
PB92-113257/REB
                                 PC A03/MF A01
Assessing the Use of Known Mutagew to Cali-
brate the *SalmorM«a typMmurium' Mutagenfetty
Assay.  1. Without Exogenous Activation. Journal
article.
Health  Effects Research  Lab.,  Research Triangle
PanXNC.
L D. Claxton, V. S. Houk, L G. Monteith, L E. Myers,
and T. J. Hughes. c1991,14p EPA/600/ J-91 /264
Pub. in Mutation Research, v253 n2 p137-147 Oct 91.
See  also Part 2, PB92-113273. Prepared in coopera-
tion with Research Triangle Inst, Research Triangle
Park, NC., and Environmental Health Research and
Testing, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC.

There has been an increasing need in genetic toxicol-
ogy to progress from strictly qualitative tests to more
quantitative tests. This, in turn, has increased the need
to develop better quality assurance and comparative
bioassay methods.  In  the  paper,  two laboratories
tested 10 Salmonella mutagens in order to determine
the usefulness of selected chemicals as  potential ref-
erence materials to calibrate the Salmonella assay.  If
variance within a bioassay is sufficiently low and the
rankings of the compounds are of acceptable consist-
ency, the chemicals later could be evaluated for use as
standard control compounds, as audit materials, and
as standard reference materials for comparative bio-
assay efforts. The results demonstrated  that  the
chosen chemicals (with the possible exception of di-
rrethylcarbamylchloride) provide such consistent re-
sults in the Salmonella mutagenicity bioassay that they
can be used for semi-quantitative  calibration and as
possible bioassay controls,  special audit chemicals,
and potentially as reference standards in comparative
bioassay efforts. (Copyright (c) 1991 Elsevier Science
Publishers B.V.)

Keywords:  'Salmonella typhimurium, 'Mutagenicity
tests,  'Mutagens,  Metabolic  activation,  Dose-re-
sponse relationships, Tabtes(Data), Data bases. Rats,
Liver, Comparison, Reprints, Standard reference ma-
terials.
PB92-113265/REB                PC A02/MF A01
Developmental  Toxfctty  of  BromoxynH hi Mice
and Rats. Journal article.
Health Effects  Research  Lab., Research Triangle
PanXNC.
J. M. Rogers, B. M. Francis, B. D. Barbee, and N.
Chemoff  d 991, 9p EPA/600/J-91 /264
Pub. in Fundamental and Applied Toxicology, vl7 n3
p442-447 Oct 91. Prepared in cooperation with Illinois
Univ. at Urbana-Champaign.  Inst. for Environmental
Studies.

The developmental toxicity of the wide-spectrum her-
bicide bromoxynil (bromoxynil phenol; 3,5-dibromo-4-
hydroxyphenyl cyanide) was evaluated  in Sprague-
Dawley rats and Swiss-Webster mice, and the devel-
opmental toxicity of its octanoate ester (2,6-dibromo-
4-cyanophenyl octanoate) was evaluated in Sprague-
Dawley rats. Animals were treated from Day 6 to Day
15 of gestation (presence of sperm or semen plug — 0
of gestation). The doses administered were as follows:
bromoxynil phenol in the mouse, 342,114, and 38 mi-
cromoles/kg/day, bromoxynil phenol and bromoxynil
octanoate in the rat, 54,18, and 6 micromoles/kg/day.
Some animals were killed on selected  days during
treatment for measurement of organ weights sensitive
to stress. In mice treated with bromoxynil phenol, ma-
ternal mortality was noted at 114 and 342 micromoles/
kg/day, but surviving females gained weight normally.
Liver to body weight ratios increased with increasing
dose, but no consistent effect was seen on adrenal,
thymus, or spleen  weights. Fetuses of mice treated
with the highest dose  of bromoxynil phenol were of
lower weight and had a higher incidence of supernu-
merary ribs than  controls. In rats, bromoxynil phenol
and its octanoate  ester  at the  highest  doses used
caused no mortality but resulted in only transient de-
creases in maternal weight gain and significantly in-
creased the liver to body weight ratio, but did not sig-
nificantly alter adrenal,  thymus, or spleen weight in the
dams. (Copyright (c) 1991  by the Society of Toxicol-
ogy.)

Keywords: 'Toxicity, "Teratogenic compounds, 'Her-
bicides,  Rats, Mice,  Dose-response relationships,
Esters, Body  weight,  Organ weight,  Mortality, Liver,
Spleen, Thymus gland, Adrenal glands, Reprints,  'Su-
pernumerary ribs, 'Bromoxynil.
PB92-113273/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Assessing the Use of Known Mutagens to Cali-
brate the 'Salmonella typhimurium' Mutagenicity
Assay. 2. With Exogenous Activation. Journal arti-
cle.
Health Effects  Research  Lab., Research Triangle
Park, NC.
L D. Claxton, V. S. Houk, J. R. Warner, L E. Myers,
and T. J. Hughes. c1991,13p EPA/600/J-91 /265
Pub. in Mutation Research, v253 n2 p149-159 Oct 91.
See also Part 1, PB92-113257. Prepared in coopera-
tion with Research Triangle Inst, Research Triangle
Park, NC., and Environmental Hearth Research and
Testing, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC.


In order to determine the usefulness  of  selected
chemicals as potential reference materials for calibrat-
ing the Salmonella assay, two laboratories tested a
series of Salmonella mutagens that require exogenous
activation. When  the  variance for  individual sub-
stances within a bioassay is sufficiently low and the
rankings of those substances are of acceptable con-
sistency, they  can later be evaluated for use as stand-
ard control compounds, as audit materials, and as
standard reference materials for comparative bioassay
efforts. The purpose of the project therefore, was to
evaluate the variability in the mutagenic response of
potential reference chemicals that require exogenous
metabolic activation  in the  standard  plate-incorpora-
tion Salmonella mutagenicity assay,  and to develop
ranking criteria for mutagenic activity  based on these
data. Ten indirect-acting mutagens were tested in two
laboratories using Salmonella typhimurium TA100 and
an Aroclor-induced rat liver S9. Each laboratory con-
ducted four definitive testing rounds. A different batch
of S9 was utilized for every  two rounds. Of the 10
chemicals tested only 2-anthramine had a mean slope
value greater than 1000 revertants/microgram. Three
chemicals had slope values between 1000 and 100;
and five chemicals had slope values between 100 and
10. (Copyright (c) 1991 Elsevier Science Publishers
B.V.)


Keywords:  'Salmonella typhimurium, 'Mutagenicity
tests, 'Mutagens, 'Metabolic activation,  Dose-re-
sponse relationships, Tables(0ata), Data bases, Rats,
Liver, Comparison, Analysis of variance, Reprints,
Standard reference materials.
26     Vol.  92, No. 1

-------
                                                  EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
 PB92-113281/REB                PC A03/MF A01
 Modulation of Human Alveolar Macrophage Prop-
 erties by Ozone Exposure In vitro. Journal article.
 Health  Effects  Research  Lab.,  Research  Triangle
 Park, NC.
 S. Becker, M. C. Madden, S. L. Newman, R. B. Devlin
 and H. S. Kqren. C1991,15p EPA/600/J-91 /266
 Pub. in  Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, v110
 n3 p403-415 1991. Prepared in cooperation with ABB
 Environmental Services, Inc., Chapel Hill, NC., Cincin-
 nati Univ.  Medical Center, OH., and North Carolina
 Univ. at Chapel Hill.

 The study investigated changes in human alveolar ma-
 crophage  (HAM) function  after exposure in vitro to
 ozone (O3)(0.1 -1.0 ppm for 2-4 hr). The functions stud-
 ied reflect concern that O3 is detrimental to host de-
 fense mechanisms in the bronchoalveolar spaces. Ex-
 posure of HAM to O3 caused a concentration-depend-
 ent increase in release of prostaglandin E2(PGE2), an
 important  modulator of inflammation,  phagocytosis,
 and pxidative burst. Although phagocytosis of particu-
 late immune complexes was decreased by O3, the au-
 thors found no change in the quantity of Fc receptors
 and complement receptors on the HAM surface. Su-
 peroxide (O2) production in response to phorbol ester
 was reduced after exposure of HAM to  03 while the
 basal O2 release in response to plastic adherence was
 not affected.  Growth  inhibition of  the  opportunistic
 yeast Cryptococcus neoformans by HAM was not  af-
 fected by O3 exposure. The production of inflamma-
 tory mediators and immune modulators such as tumor
 necrosis factor-alpha, interteukin 1, and interteukin 6
 were not induced by exposure to O3. However, com-
 pared to controls, OS-exposed HAM produced signifi-
 cantly lower levels of these cytokines when simulated
 with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS).  (Copyright  (c)
 1991 by Academic Press, Inc.)

 Keywords:  *Ozone,  'Air  pollution effects(Human),
 'Macrophages, 'Toxicology, Humans, Pulmonary  al-
 veoli, In vitro  analysis, Cryptococcus  neoformans,
 Prostaglandins,  Superoxide,  Complement,  Electro-
 phoresis, Cytokines, Tetradecanoylphorbol  acetate,
 Growth, lnterteukin-1, lnterieukin-6, Immunofluores-
 cence techniques, Reprints.
PB92-113299/REB                PC A02/MF A01
Significance of Supernumerary Ribs  in  Rodent
Developmental Toxlctty Studies: Postnatal  Per-
sistence In Rats and Mice. Journal article.
Health Effects  Research  Lab.,  Research  Triangle
Park, NC. Developmental Toxicology Div.
N. Chemoff, J. M. Rogers, C. I. Turner, and B. M.
Francis. c1991, 8p EPA/600/J-91 /267
Pub. in Fundamental and Applied Toxicology, v17 n3
P448-453 Oct 91. See also PB89-103980. Prepared in
cooperation with NSI Technology Services Corp., Re-
search Triangle Park, NC.

Pregnant Sprague-Dawley  rats  and Swiss-Webster
mice were  gavaged with bromoxynil at 15 and 96.4
mg/kg/day, respectively, on Days 6-15 of gestation.
The frequency of supernumerary ribs (SNR), which are
here defined as any degree of ossification lateral to the
first lumbar vertebrae, was determined in  fetuses at
term and offspring on  Postnatal  Days  6, 20,  and 40.
Bromoxynil  induced significant increases in  the inci-
dence of SNR in fetuses of both species. In rats, SNR
occurred  in 62% of treated fetuses as compared to
14% in controls; in mice these values were 45% and
11%, respectively. The postnatal incidence and per-
sistence of  SNR was species dependent.  In the rat,
postnatal SNR incidence in treated animals did not
differ significantly from controls. In contrast, in  mice
the bromoxynil-induced elevated incidence  of  SNR
persisted through Day 40 (42.3% in treated vs 0% in
controls). Analysis of SNR was also done on the basis
of their length (greater or less than 1/2 the length of
the 13th rib). In the mouse, the  incidence of smaller
SNR was much tower on Day 40 as compared to Day
20; in contrast the incidence of larger  SNR persisted
through Day 40. In the rat, the incidence of larger SNR
was too small to draw conclusions as to the postnatal
fate of these structures. As in the mouse, however, the
incidence of smaller SNR was significantly lower by
Day 40. The significance of SNR in developmental tox-
icity remains problematic. (Copyright (c) 1991 by the
Society of Toxicology.)

Keywords: 'Teratogenic compounds, Rats,  Mice, Spe-
cies specificity. Fetus, Reprints, * Supernumerary ribs,
Bromoxynil.
PB92-113307/REB               PC A02/MF A01
Evaluation of 10 Chemicals for Aneuploidy Induc-
tion in the Hexaploid Wheat Assay. Journal article.
Health Effects Research  Lab., Research  Triangle
Park, NC. Genetic Toxicology Div.
S. S. Sandnu, J. S. Dhesi, B. S. Gill, and D.
Svendsgaard. c1991, 7p EPA/600/J-91 /268
Pub. in Mutagenesis, v6 n5 p369-373 Sep 91.  Pre-
pared in cooperation with North Carolina Central Univ.,
Durham. Dept. of Biology, and Environmental Health
Research  and Testing, Inc., Research Triangle Park,
NC.

The study was a part of an international project spon-
sored by the Commission of the European Communi-
ties to evaluate the utility of certain bioassays including
hexaploid  wheat assay to identify potential aneugens.
Ten suspect  spindle  poisons, i.e.  colchicine (COL),
cadmium chloride (CdCI2), chloral hydrate (CH), diaze-
pam (DIZ), econazole (EZ), hydroquinone (HQ),  pyri-
methamine (PY), thiabendazole (TB), thimerosal (TM),
and vinblastin sulphate (VBL) were tested for their abil-
ity to induce green and/or white leaf sectors as indica-
tors of loss or gain of a chromosome respectively, in
Neatby's   strain  of Chinese Spring wheat (2n  =
6x=42). All the chemicals tested in  the study, with the
exception of CH and HQ yielded positive response.

Keywords: 'Aneuploidy, "Mutagens, 'Wheat, Mutage-
nicity tests, Mitotic spindle apparatus, Tables(Data),
Bioassay, Reprints, Seedlings.
PB92-113315/REB               PC A02/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park,  NC.  Mutagenesis  and Cellular  Toxicology
Branch.
Induction of Micronuclei by X-radiation in Human,
Mouse  and  Rat  Peripheral  Blood Lymphocytes.
Journal article.
Environmental Health Research and Testing, Inc., Re-
search Triangle Park, NC.
G. L. Erexson, A. D. Kligerman, M. F. Bryant, M. R.
Sontag, and E. C. Halperin. c1991, 8p EPA/600/J-91 /
269
Contract EPA-68-02-4456
Pub. in Mutation Research, v253 n2 p193-198 Oct 91.
Prepared  in  cooperation  with Duke  Univ. Medical
Center,  Durham,  NC. Sponsored by  Environmental
Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Muta-
genesis and Cellular Toxicology Branch.

The study compared the radiosensitivity of human, rat
and mouse peripheral blood lymphocytes  (PBLs) by
analyzing micronuclei (MN) in cytochalasin B-induced
binucleated (BN) cells. For each species and dose 4-
ml aliquots of whole blood were X-irradiated to obtain
doses of 38, 75,150 or 300 cGy. Controls were sham-
irradiated. After exposure to X-rays, mononuclear leu-
kocytes were isolated using density gradients and cul-
tured in RPM11640 medium containing phytohemagg-
lutinin to stimulate  mitogenesis. At 21 h cytochalasin B
was added to produce BN PBLs, and all cultures were
harvested at 52 h post-initiation using a cytocentrifuge.
Significant dose-dependent increases in  the percent-
age of micronucleated cells and the number of MN per
BN cell were observed in all three species. The linear-
quadratic regression curves for the total percentage of
micronucleated cells for the three species were simi-
lar however, the  curve for the mouse  PBLs had a
larger quadratic component than either of the curves
for the rat or human PBLs. Although the correlation be-
tween the percentage of cells with MN and those with
chromosome aberrations was high (r squared > 0.95),
the mouse and rat PBLs were over twice as efficient as
human PBLs in forming MN from  presumed acentric
fragments. These  data  indicate that the  induction of
MN in BN  cells following ionizing radiation is similar in
human, rat and mouse PBLs, but care must be taken in
using the  MN results to predict frequencies of cells
with chromosomal aberrations. (Copyright (c) 1991 El-
sevier Science Publishers B.V.)

Keywords: *X rays,  'Micronucleus  tests,  'Lympho-
cytes, Humans, Rats, Mice,  Cytochalasin B, Species
specificity, Chromosome aberrations, In vitro analysis,
Dose-response relationships, Pnytohemagglutins, Re-
prints.
PB92-113323/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Enhanced  Neurotoxiclty  of  3,3'-lminodipropioni-
trile Following Pretreatment with Carbon Tetra-
chloride in the Rat Journal article.
Health Effects  Research  Lab.,  Research  Triangle
Park, NC. Neurotoxicology Div.
J. Llorens, and K. M. Crofton. c1991,12p EPA/600/J-
91/270
Pub. in NeuroToxicology, v12 n3 p583-594 Sep 91.

The work tested the hypothesis that IDPN must be me-
tabolized  by  the  liver to an active  metabolite  to
become neurotoxic. Thus a reduction in IDPN neuro-
toxicity would be expected when liver function is com-
promised. Male Long-Evans rats were given ip  injec-
tions of saline, 100 (IDPN1) or 200 (IDPN2) mg/kg of
IDPN for three days. Half of the animals in each IDPN
dose group received corn oil po and the other half 1 g/
kg of the  hepatotoxicant carbon tetrachloride (CCI4)
for three days, starting one day before IDPN adminis-
tration. Motor activity and acoustic  startle response
(ASR)  were monitored prior to, and 1,. 3, 9 and  16
weeks  after IDPN exposure. An  observational rating
score was obtained at 1, 3 and 9  weeks.  Auditory
thresholds for 5- and 40-kHz tones were estimated by
reflex modification procedures at  10 weeks. Animals
receiving IDPN2 alone displayed the overt behavioral
signs characteristic of IDPN intoxication (postural dis-
turbances, head dyskinesias, backward walking, cir-
cling, increased motor activity, and decreased ASR).
They also showed weight loss, hyperactivity, a tran-
sient rearing deficit, decreased ASR amplitudes and
elevated auditory thresholds for low- and high-frequen-
cy tones. None  of these symptoms were observed in
the animals treated with CCI4 alone, and only a mild
transient effect on the observational  rating score was
shown  by the IDPN1 alone animals.  (Copyright (c)
1991 by Intox Press, Inc.)

Keywords: 'Toxicity, "Nervous system, 'Carbon tetra-
chloride, Rats, Animal behavior, Metabolic activation,
Liver, Motor activity,  Startle reaction, Pentobarbital,
Auditory thresholds, Reprints, 'Iminodipropionitriles.
PB92-113331/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Evaluating the Relationship of Metabolic Activa-
tion System Concentrations and Chemical Dose
Concentrations for the  Salmonella  Spiral and
Plate Assays. Journal article.
Health Effects  Research  Lab., Research  Triangle
Park, NC.
L. D. Claxton, V. S. Houk, J. C. Allison, and J. Creason.
C1991,12p EPA/600/J-91 /271
Pub. in Mutation Research, v253 n2 p127-136 Oct 91.

A factorial experimental design was used within the
study to evaluate the influence of multiple metabolic
activation  system concentrations  on the  dose-re-
sponse exhibited by promutagens (indirect-acting mu-
tagens) in the Salmonella spiral and plate assays. The
mutagenic activity  of the three compounds  used
spanned three orders of magnitude.  The mutagenic
activity of the compounds ranged from 10 to 100 rever-
tants/microgram for acetylaminofluorene (2AAF) to
more than 1000 revertants/microgram  for 2-amin-
oanthracene (2AA). Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) activity was
within an intermediate range (100-1000 revertants/mi-
crogram). During a single experiment, a mutagen was
tested in TA100 at 13 doses plus a negative control
dose. Each dose was tested at 10 S9 concentrations.
The S9 concentrations ranged from 0.1  mg protein/
plate to 4 mg protein/plate in the standard plate assay
and from 0.25 to 4.90  mg-equivalents in the spiral
assay. The spiral Salmonella assay, an automated ver-
sion of the standard assay, generates dose-response
data from  a  concentration gradient on a single agar
plate, thereby providing a straightforward  approach to
this type of study. The study demonstrates  not only
that even small differences in S9 concentrations can
affect the measurement of mutagenic potency but that
S9/compound interactions  cannot be  generalized
through the use of interaction studies. (Copyright (c)
1991 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V.)

Keywords:  'Metabolic activation, *Mutagens, 'Salmo-
nella, 'Dose-response  relationships,  Aminoanthra-
cene, Benzo(a)pyrene, Microbial colony count. Re-
prints, Spiral assay, Plate assay.
PB92-113349/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Toxlcity Equivalency Factors for PCBs. Journal ar-
ticle.
Health  Effects  Research Lab.,  Research  Triangle
Park, NC.
D. Barnes, A. Alford-Stevens, L Bimbaum, F. W. Kutz,
and W. Wood. c1991,12p EPA/600/J-91 /272
Pub. in Quality Assurance: Good Practice, Regulation,
and Law, v1 n1 p70-81 Oct 91.
                                                                                                                                Mar 1992     27

-------
                                                EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
In December 1990 the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency sponsored a workshop to discuss the applica-
bility of an interim 'toxteity equivalency factor1 (TEF)
approach to assessing risks posed by exposures to
complex mixtures of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).
The group concluded that application of the TEF ap-
proach to PCBs would be less straightforward than it
was in the case of chlorinated dibenzop-dioxins and
dibenzofurans (CDDs/CDFs).  It appears that 'dtoxin'-
like properties of some PCB congeners are amenable
to a TEF treatment that is compatible with that used for
CDDs/CDFs. Such a scheme also seems to have utili-
ty in assessing risks to wildlife. Other non-'dioxin'-like
toxic endpoints (e.g., neurotoxicity) appear to have a
different   structure-activity-related   mechanism-of-
actbn that requires a  separate TEF scheme. The
ical chemistry that hinder adoption of proposed TEF
schemes for PCBs at this time. (Copyright (c) 1991 by
Academic Press, Inc.)

Keywords: 'Toxfcity, *Polychk>robiphenyl compounds,
•Health hazards, Risk assessment Mixtures, Meet-
ings.  Exposure, Reprints,  "Toxkaty equivalency  fac-
tors, Chlorinated dibenzo-p-dtoxins, Chlorinated diben-
zofurans.


PB92-113356/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Evaluation of Immunotoxtetty of an Urban Profile
of  Nitrogen  Dtoxkte:  Acute,  Subchronte,  and
Chronic Studies. Journal article.
Health  Effects Research  Lab.,  Research Triangle
Park, NC. Environmental Toxicology Div.
M. K. Belgrade, M. J. Daniels, and E. C. Grose. c1991,
17p EPA/600/J-91/273
Pub. in Inhalation Toxicology, v3 p389-403 Jul 91.

Although a number of studies have demonstrated sup-
pression of extrapulmonary immune responses follow-
ing exposure to NO2, a ubiquitous ambient and indoor
air  pollutant, most of these studies have utilized ex-
tremely high concentrations of NO2 relative to the en-
vironment The authors'intent was to assess effects of
NO2  on extrapulmonary immune responses using an
environmentally relevant exposure regimen. Rats were
exposed for 1,3,13,52, or 78 wk to air or a pattern of
NO2  designed to mimic episodic pollution in urban
areas at concentrations 2-5 times those commonly
seen in such areas. Daily exposures consisted of 0.5
ppm  for 16 h,  a 6-h exposure spike during which the
concentration rose to 1.5 ppm, remained there for 2 h,
and then returned to 0.5 ppm, and a 2-h down time.
There were no NO2-relaled changes in mitogen re-
sponses, although significant suppression of these re-
sponses in  both air and NO2 groups was noted in
spleen at 52 and 78 wk, and in PBL at 13, 52, and 78
wk, presumably due to aging. Suppression of NK-cell
activity was noted after 3 wk of exposure but not after
 1,13.52, or 78 wk of exposure. Age did not appear to
affect NK-cell activity.

 Keywords: 'Toxtaity.  *Afr  pollution effects(Animals),
 •Immune system, 'Nitrogen dioxide.  Rats, Lympho-
cyte  subsets, Natural killer cells. Dose-response  rela-
 tionships, Mtogens, Pathology, Spleen, Bone marrow,
 Thymus glanoVLymph nodes, Reprints.


 PB92-113448/REB               PCA03/MFA01
 Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
 Impact of Conservation  THtage Use on Sod and
 Atmospheric Carbon in the Contiguous United
 States.
 ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc., Corvallis,
 OR
 J. S.  Kern, and M. G. Johnson. Sep 91,42p EPA/600/
 3-91/056
 Sponsored by Corvallis Environmental Research  Lab.,
 OR.

 Soil  organic matter is the largest global terrestrial  C
 pool and is a source of CO2, CH4 and other green-
 house gases. Changes in soil organic C (SOC) content
 arrf  fossH fuel C emissions in response to conversion
 of conventional tillage to conservation tillage (mini-
 mum and no-till) in the contiguous USA for field crop
 production by the year 2020 were projected. The pro-
 jections were made by developing a model based on
 published data, and geographic databases of current
 conservation tillage usage and agricultural SOC.

 Keywords:  'Cultivation, '8011 conservation, 'United
 States. 'Air  pollution. Gases,  Greenhouse effect.
 Carbon. Carbon dioxide. Methane. Farm crops. Mathe-
 matical models. Losses. Organic materials, Agricul-
ture,   Soil  classification,   Regression   analysis,
Graphs(Charts), Global.


PB92-113455/REB               PC A04/MF A01
Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
SELCTV  System Manual for SELCTV and REFER
Databases and  the SELCTV Data  Management
Proofsin.
Oregon State Univ., Corvallis. Dept of Entomology.
K. M. Theiling, and B. A. Croft c1991,63p EPA/600/8-
91/207
Grant EPA-R-814530
Sponsored by Corvallis Environmental Research Lab.,
OR.

The SELCTV database is a compilation of the side ef-
fects of pesticides on arthropod predators and parasi-
tokte that provide biological control of pest arthropods
in the agricultural ecosystem. The primary source of
side effects data is the published scientific literature;
reference citations are accessible for every one of the
nearly  12,600 records. Data in SELCTV represent the
impact of over 400 agricultural chemicals, including in-
secticides, fungicides, acaricides and herbicides on
609 species of natural  enemies. Documented pesti-
cide impact on natural enemies covers 60 crop desig-
nations from nearly 60 countries around the work. Ten
specific screening methods are identified, ranging from
field testing to topical application. In most cases, mor-
tality is the measurement of impact however sublethal
effects data are  included where available. All impact
data are translated to a common 1-5 scale for uniform
comparison. Pesticide selectivity and  natural enemy
resistance are other types of indices included in the
SELCTV database.

Keywords: 'Pesticides,  'Biological pest control, 'Data
bases, 'User manuals(Computer programs), Arthropo-
da. Insecticides, Herbicides, Acaricktes, Insecticide re-
sistance, 'SELCTV data base, 'REFER data base.


PB92-113463/REB                PCA13/MFA03
Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
Workshop Proceedings: The Role of Created and
Natural Wetlands In Controlling Nonpoint Source
Pollution. Held  In Arlington, Virginia on June 10-
11,1991.
ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc., Corvallis,
OR
R. K. Olson, and  K. Marshall. Nov 91,276p EPA/600/
9-91/042
Contracts EPA-68-C8-0006, EPA-68-C»-0021
Prepared in cooperation with Technical  Resources,
Inc., Rockvitle. MD. Sponsored by Corvallis Environ-
mental Research Lab., OR.

Nonpoint source (NPS) pollution control and wetlands
protection are two  overlapping scientific and policy
issues of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
Created, restored, and natural wetlands can contribute
significantly to watershed water quality, but at the
same  time  must be protected from degradation by
 NPS pollution. Effective use of wetlands in NPS con-
trol requires an integrated landscape approach includ-
 ing consideration of social, economic, and government
 policy issues as well as scientific knowledge.

 Keywords: 'Meetings, 'Water pollution control, 'Non-
 point sources, 'Wetiands, Watersheds, Water quality,
 Environmental protection. Pollution  sources.  State
 programs, Guidelines, dean Water Act Government
 policies, 'Natural wetlands, 'Created wetlands.


 PB92-114131/REB               PC A99/MF E99
 Ecological Indicators. Proceedings of  an Interna-
 tional SyrnposHiin. Held In Fort Lauderdale, Flori-
 da on October  16-19,1990.
 Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
 D. H. McKenzie,  D. E. Hyatt, and V. J. McDonald. 3
 Nov 91,2692p EPA/600/9-91 /039
 See also PB91-141796.Portions of this document are
 not fully legible. Prepared in cooperation with Radian
 Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC.

 An international symposium on ecological indicators
 was developed to explore both the potential of ecolog-
 ical indicators and the issues surrounding their devel-
 opment and implementation. The symposium present-
 ed state-of-the-science information on the identifica-
 tion, application, research and development of appro-
 priate indicators to describe and evaluate ecological
 status is crucial to improved information on the condi-
 tion of the environment and to the success of the Envi-
ronmental  Monitoring   and  Assessment  Program
(EMAP). The symposium was designed to help ensure
that the indicators used in the program have  the
strongest possible basis of technical information from
the international body of knowledge.

Keywords:   'Biological  indicators,   'Ecosystems,
'Meetings, 'Environmental monitoring, Implementa-
tion, Research and development, Information transfer,
Trends, Environmental  policy, Pollution regulations,
Environmental  management, Environmental Monitor-
ing and Assessment Program.


PB92-114164/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Computerized Risk and Bioaccumulatton System
(Version 1.0).
Environmental Research Lab., Narragansett, Rl.
H. Lee, M. Winsor, J. Pelletier, R. Randall, and J.
Bertling. Nov 91,27p EPA/600/3-91 /069, ERLN-
N196

The Computerized Risk And Bioaccumulation  System
(CRABS, Version 1.0) is an expert system that predicts
tissue residues of fifteen neutral organic pollutants in
sediment-dwelling organisms and the human cancer
risk from consumption of the contaminated shellfish.
Bioaccumulation from  bedded sediment can  be  pre-
dicted from the thermodynamic partitioning, first-order
kinetic, or toxicokinetic model. All the models can pre-
dict steady-state tissue residues while the two kinetic
models can predict non-steady-state uptake or elimi-
nation.  CRABS  then  predicts the lifetime  human
cancer risk from consumption of clams and other non-
mobile  sediment-dwelling organisms containing the
predicted (or measured) tissue residue. The linearized
multistage model is used to predict cancer risk for a
single  pollutant from a single species diet The  pro-
gram guides the user in estimating shellfish consump-
tion rates if no site-specific rates are available. CRABS
is designed to promote thorough documentation of the
assumptions and data as well as to error check the en-
tered values.

Keywords:  'Shellfish,  'Bioaccumulation, 'Organic
wastes, 'Carcinogens, 'Expert systems, Cancer, Risk,
Mathematical models, Public health, Water pollution
effects(Humans), Food consumption, Computer appli-
cations, Installing, Toxicology, Thermodynamics, Ki-
netics, Manuals, "CRABS computer program.


PB92-114172/REB              PC A03/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Research  Triangle
Park, NC. Atmospheric Research and Exposure As-
sessment Lab.
Standard Operating Procedures for Lead  In Paint
by Hotplate - or Microwave-Based Add Diges-
tions and Atomic Absorption or Inductively Cou-
 pled Plasma Emission Spectrometry. Rept for May
 90-Sep91.
 Research Triangle Inst, Research Triangle Park, NC.
 D. A. Binstock, D. L Hardison, P. M. Grohse, and W. F.
 Gutknecht Sep 91,24p EPA/600/8-91 /213
 Contract EPA-68-02-4550
 Sponsored by Environmental Protection Agency, Re-
 search Triangle Park, NC. Atmospheric Research and
 Exposure Assessment Lab.

 Two extraction and two quantitation procedures are
 given for the qualitative determination of lead in paints
 along with recommended OA/QC practices.  The pro-
 cedures were evaluated with 0.10 g samples of syn-
 thetic or old real-world paints that had been crushed or
 pulverized. Both extraction procedures gave recover-
 ies greater than 90%. The hotplate  boiling HNO3/
 H2O2 procedure combined with atomic absorption
 spectrometry (AAS) analysis yielded precisions of 4 to
 8% RSD for samples greater than 1000 ppm Pb, with a
 linear sample analysis range of 1000 to  20,000 ppm
 Pb. Inductively coupled argon plasma (ICP) analysis
 gave precisions of 6 to 10% RSD for samples above
 300 ppm Pb  and a linear  analysis range of 100 to
 200,000 ppm Pb. Using the microwave HN03/HCL ex-
 traction procedure, AAS had precisions  of  2 to 4%
 RSD for samples above 1000 ppm Pb and an analysis
 range of 200 to 4,000 ppm Pb, and ICP had precisions
 of 2 to 6% RSD for samples above 300 ppm Pb with an
 analysis range of 20 to 40,000 ppm Pb.

 Keywords: 'Paints, 'Lead(Metal), Quantitative analy-
 sis. Measurement Standards, Digesters, Standard op-
 erating procedures, Microwave  heating, Absorption
 spectroscopy,  Emission  spectroscopy,  Extraction,
 Quality assurance, Precision, Bias, Nitric acid, Hydro-
  28    Vol. 92, No. 1

-------
                                                  EPA PUBLICATIONS  BIBLIOGRAPHY
 gen peroxide, Argon plasma, US EPA, Acidolysis, Hot
 plates.


 PB92-114180/REB               PC A04/MF A01
 Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
 Park, NC. Atmospheric Research and Exposure As-
 sessment Lab.
 Standard Operating Procedures for Measurement
 of Lead In Paint Using the SCITEC MAP-3 X-ray
 Fluorescence Spectrometer. Rept. for May 90-Sep

 Research Triangle Inst, Research Triangle Park, NC
 D. L Hardison, J. D. Neefus, E. D. Estes, and W. F.
 Gutknecht Sep 91,73p EPA/600/8-91 /214
 Contract EPA-68-02-4550
 Sponsored by Environmental Protection Agency, Re-
 search Triangle Park, NC. Atmospheric Research and
 Exposure Assessment Lab.

 A portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF)  procedure for
 quantitatively measuring lead in  paint in situ is de-
 scribed along with recommended QA/QC  practices.
 The procedure was evaluated using calibration paint
 films over various substrates and with  field samples.
 Using the K shell X-rays, a typical linear range of 0.2 to
 10.0 mg Pb/sq.  cm was found. Precisions achieved
 were 0.1 mg Pb/sq. cm for laboratory standards and
 0.3 mg Pb/sq. cm for field samples. At 1.0 mg Pb/sq.
 cm, accuracy was 0.1  mg Pb/sq. cm. Due to variable
 attenuation effects, use of the L shell X-ray option with
 the instrument is recommended only when the paint is
 known to be thin and consist of only two or three
 layers.

 Keywords: *Lead(Metal), 'Paints, *X-ray spectrosco-
 py, 'Fjuorescence spectroscopy, 'Standards, K shell,
 Quantitative analysis, Measurement, On-line measure-
 ment systems, Standard operating procedures, Test
 equipment, Quality assurance, Calibrating, Precision,
 Residential sector, Field tests, Buildings, Walls, US
 EPA, Portable equipment
 PB92-114198/REB                PC A01/MF A01
 Daminozide Position Document 4.
 Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
 Office of Pesticide Programs.
 14 Nov 89,5p EPA/540/09-92/150
 Pub. in Federal Register, v54 n218, 14 Nov 89. See
 also PB92-114222 and PB92-114214.

 A Special  Review Document addresses the risks and
 benefits of pesticide products containing daminozide.
 The Agency has determined that the use of products
 containing the subject active ingredient may meet or
 exceed a risk criterion described in 40 CFR Part 154.
 Potential hazards will be examined further to deter-
 mine the nature and extent of the risk, and considering
 the benefits of the subject active ingredient, whether
 such risks cause unreasonable adverse effects on the
 environment

 Keywords:  'Environmental  surveys,   'Toxicology,
 'Pesticides,  'Toxic  substances. Pesticide  residues,
 Ecology, Mutagenesis, Laboratory animals, Exposure,
 Physiological effects, Regulations, Environmental im-
 pacts, Standards,  ' Daminozide, Health risks, Path of
 pollutants, Oncogenesis, Bioaccumulation.
PB92-114206/REB               PC A02/MF A01
1,3-Otehloropropene Position Document 1.
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of Pesticide Programs.
8 Oct 86,8p EPA/540/09-92/158
Pub. in Federal Register, v51 n195,8 Oct 86.

A Special Review Document addresses the risks and
benefits of pesticide products containing 1,3-dichloro-
propene. The Agency has determined that the use of
products containing the subject active ingredient may
meet or exceed a risk criterion described in 40 CFR
Part 154. Potential hazards will be examined further to
determine the nature and extent of the risk, and con-
sidering the benefits of the subject active ingredient,
whether such risks cause unreasonable adverse ef-
fects on the environment.

Keywords:  'Environmental  surveys,   'Toxicology,
'Pesticides,  'Toxic substances, Pesticide residues,
Ecology, Mutagenesis, Laboratory animals, Exposure,
Physiological effects, Regulations, Environmental im-
pacts. Standards, 'Dichloropropenes,  Health  risks.
Path of pollutants, Oncogenesis, Bioaccumulation.
 PB92-114214/REB               PCA03/MFA01
 Daminozide Position Document 2/3.
 Environmental  Protection Agency,  Washington, DC.
 Office of Pesticide Programs.
 24 May 89,18p EPA/540/09-92/149
 Pub. in Federal Register, v54 n99,24 May 89. See also
 PB92-114198 and PB92-114222.

 A Special Review Document addresses the risks and
 benefits of pesticide products containing daminozide.
 The Agency has determined that the use of products
 containing the subject active ingredient may meet or
 exceed a risk criterion described in 40 CFR Part 154.
 Potential  hazards will be examined further to deter-
 mine the nature and extent of the risk, and considering
 the benefits of the subject active ingredient whether
 such risks cause unreasonable adverse effects on the
 environment

 Keywords:  'Environmental  surveys,   'Toxicology,
 'Pesticides, 'Toxic substances,  Pesticide residues,
 Ecology, Mutagenesis, Laboratory animals, Exposure,
 Physiological effects,  Regulations, Environmental im-
 pacts, Standards, 'Daminozide, Health risks. Path of
 pollutants, Oncogenesis, Bioaccumulation.


 PB92-114222/REB               PC A02/MF A01
 Daminozide Position Document 1.
 Environmental  Protection Agency,  Washington, DC.
 Office of Pesticide Programs.
 18 Jul 84,7p EPA/540/09-92/148
 Pub. in Federal Register, v49 n139,18 Jul 84. See also
 PB92-114198 and PB90-259912.

 A Special Review Document addresses the risks and
 benefits of pesticide products containing daminozide.
 The Agency has determined that the use of products
 containing the subject active ingredient may meet or
 exceed a risk criterion described in 40 CFR Part 154.
 Potential hazards will be examined further to deter-
 mine the nature and extent of the risk, and considering
 the benefits of the subject active ingredient  whether
 such risks cause unreasonable adverse effects on the
 environment

 Keywords:  'Environmental   surveys,   'Toxicology,
 'Pesticides, 'Toxic substances,  Pesticide residues,
 Ecology, Mutagenesis, Laboratory animals, Exposure,
 Physiological effects. Regulations, Environmental im-
 pacts, Standards, 'Daminozide, Health risks, Path of
 pollutants, Oncogenesis, Bioaccumulation.
PB92-114230/REB                PC A01/MF A01
Cadmium: Special Review Document
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of Pesticide Programs.
10 Apr 91, 3p EPA/540/09-92/147
See also PB90-259896 and PB90-261603.

The Position Document addresses the risks and bene-
fits of pesticide products containing the Cadmium. The
Agency has determined that the use of products con-
taining the Cadmium may meet or exceed a risk crite-
rion described in 40 CFR Part 154. Potential hazards
will be examined further  to determine the nature and
extent of the risk, and considering the  benefits of the
Cadmium, whether such risks cause unreasonable ad-
verse effects on the environment

Keywords: 'Cadmium, 'Toxicology, 'Pesticides, 'En-
vironmental  surveys,  'Toxic  substances, Ecology,
Manufacturing, Laboratory animals, Regulations, Reg-
istration, Health hazards, Kidney, Fungicides, Path of
pollutants.
PB92-114248/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Alachlor: Position Document, 4.
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of Pesticide Programs.
31 Dec 87,26p EPA/540/09-92/146
Pub. in Federal Register, v52 n251, 31 Dec 87. See
alsoPB87-181319.

The Position Document addresses the risks and bene-
fits of  pesticide products  containing  Alachfor. The
Agency has determined that the use of products con-
taining Alachlor may meet or exceed a risk criterion de-
scribed in 40 CFR Part 154. Potential hazards will be
examined further to determine the nature and extent of
the risk, and considering the benefits of the Alachlor,
whether such risks cause unreasonable adverse  ef-
fects on the environment
 Keywords:  'Environmental   surveys,  'Pesticides,
 'Toxicology,  'Toxic substances,  Pesticide residues,
 Ecology,  Regulations,  Risk  assessment, Chemical
 water pollutants, Agricultural chemicals, Registration,
 •Alachlor, Oncogenesis, Path of pollutants.
 PB92-1142SS/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Evaluation of a Schatz Heat Battery on a Flexible-
 Fueled Vehicle.
 Environmental Protection Agency, Ann Arbor, Ml. Con-
 trol Technology and Applications Branch.
 G. K. Piotrowski, and R. M. Schaefer. Sep 91,31p
 EPA/AA/CTAB-91/05

 The report describes the evaluation of a Schatz Heat
 Battery as a means of  reducing cold start emissions
 from a motor  vehicle fueled with both gasoline and
 MBS high methanol blend fuel. The evaluation  was
 conducted at both 20 F and 75 F ambient tempera-
 tures. The test vehicle was a flexible-fueled 1990 Audi
 80 supplied by Volkswagen  of America.  The report
 also includes a description of the test vehicle, the test
 facilities, the analytical  methods and test  procedures
 used.

 Keywords: *Automotiye fuels,  'Methanol, Nitrogen
 oxides, Exhaust emissions, Gasoline, Carbon monox-
 ide, Waste heat Heat storage.
 PB92-114263/REB               PC A02/MF A01
 Ethalfluralin Position Document 1/2/3/4.
 Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
 Office of Pesticide Programs.
 4 Jan 84,7p EPA/540/09-92/157
 Pub. in Federal Register, v49 n2, 4 Jan 84. See also
 PB87-115143.

 The Position Document addresses the risks and bene-
 fits of pesticide products containing ethalfluralin. The
 Agency has determined that the use of products con-
 taining the  subject  active ingredient may  meet or
 exceed a risk criterion described in 40 CFR Part 154.
 Potential hazards will be examined further to deter-
 mine the nature and extent of the risk, and considering
 the benefits of the subject active ingredient, whether
 such risks cause unreasonable adverse effects on the
 environment

 Keywords:   'Environmental  surveys,   'Toxicology,
 •Pesticides, 'Toxic substances, 'Herbicides, Pesticide
 residues, Ecology, Mutagenesis, Laboratory animals,
 Exposure, Physiological effects, Regulations, Environ-
 mental impacts, Standards, 'Ethalfluralin, Health risks,
 Path of pollutants, Oncogenesis, Bioaccumulation.
 PB92-114271/REB               PC A02/MF A01
 Dlchlorvos (DDVP) Position Document 1.
 Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
 Office of Pesticide Programs.
 24 Feb 88,10p EPA/540/09-92/151
 Pub. in Federal Register, v53 n36,24 Feb 88. See also
 PB87-181335 and PB88-179981.

 The Position Document addresses the risks and bene-
 fits of pesticide products containing dichlorvos. The
 Agency has determined that the use of products con-
 taining the subject  active ingredient  may meet or
 exceed a risk criterion described in 40 CFR Part 154.
 Potential hazards will be examined further to deter-
 mine the nature and extent of the risk, and considering
 the benefits of the subject active ingredient, whether
 such risks cause unreasonable adverse effects on the
 environment

 Keywords:  'Environmental   surveys,  'Toxicology,
 •Pesticides,  'Toxic substances,  Pesticide residues.
 Ecology, Mutagensis, Laboratory animals, Exposure,
 Physiological effects, Regulations, Environmental im-
 pacts, Standards, Insecticides, 'Dichlorovos,  Health
 risks,  Path of pollutants, Oncogenesis, Bioaccumula-
 tion.
PB92-114289/REB               PC A01/MF A01
Captafol Final Decision.
Environmental Protection Agency,  Washington, DC.
Office of Pesticide Programs.
31 Aug 88,4p EPA/540/09-92/154
Pub. in Federal Register, v53 n169, 31 Aug 88. See
also PB85-175495.
                                                                                                                                Mar 1992    29

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                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
The Position Document addresses the risks and bene-
fits of pesticide products  containing captafol.  The
Agency has determined that the use of products con-
taining the subject  active ingredient may  meet  or
exceed a risk criterion described in 40 CFR Part 154.
Potential hazards will be examined further to deter-
mine the nature and extent of the risk, and considering
the benefits of the subject active ingredient, whether
such risks cause unreasonable adverse effects on the
environment.

Keywords:   'Environmental  surveys,   "Toxicology,
•Fungicides, 'Toxic substances, Pesticide residues,
Ecology, Mutagenesis, Laboratory animals, Exposure,
Physiological effects, Regulations, Environmental im-
pacts. Standards, Fruit crops, 'Captafol, Health risks,
Path of pollutants, Oncogenesis, Bioaccumulation.
PB92-114297/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Inorganic Arsenical* Position Document 2/3.
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of Pesticide Programs.
2 Jan 87,11pEPA/540/09-92/152
Pub. in Federal Register, v52 n1, 2 Jan 87. See also
PB92-114305 and PB87-181327.

The Position Document addresses the risks and bene-
fits of pesticide products containing inorganic arseni-
cals. The Agency has determined that the use of prod-
ucts containing the subject active ingredient may meet
or exceed a risk criterion described  in 40 CFR Part
154. Potential hazards will be examined further to de-
termine the nature and extent of the risk, and consider-
ing the benefits of the subject active ingredient, wheth-
er such risks cause unreasonable adverse effects on
the environment

Keywords:   'Environmental  surveys,   'Toxicology,
•Pesticides,  'Toxic  substances,  'Arsenic  inorganic
compounds, Pesticide residues, Ecology, Mutagene-
sis, Laboratory animals, Exposure, Physiological ef-
fects, Regulations, Environmental impacts, Standards,
Hearth risks. Path of pollutants, Oncogenesis, Bioac-
cumulation.
PB92-114305/REB                PC A03/MF A01
Inorganic Arsenical* PosrOon Document 4.
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of Pesticide Programs.
30 Jun 88,12p EPA/540/09-92/153
Pub. in Federal Register, v53 n126, 30 Jun 88. See
also PB92-114297.

The Position Document addresses the risks and bene-
fits of pesticide products containing inorganic arseni-
cal*. The Agency has determined that the use of prod-
ucts containing the subject active ingredient may meet
or exceed  a risk criterion described in 40 CFR Part
154. Potential hazards will be examined further to de-
termine the nature and extent of the risk, and consider-
ing the benefits of the subject active ingredient wheth-
er such risks cause unreasonable adverse effects on
Die environment

Keywords:   'Environmental   surveys,   'Toxicology,
•Pesticides, "Toxic  substances,  'Arsenic inorganic
compounds, Pesticide residues, Ecology, Mutagene-
sis, Laboratory animals, Exposure, Physiological ef-
fects. Regulations, Environmental impacts. Standards.
Health risks, Path of pollutants, Oncogenesis, Bioac-
cumulation.
 PB92-114313/REB               PC A01/MF A01
 CNorobendate Position Document 1.
 Environmental Protection Agency,  Washington,  DC.
 Office of Pesticide Programs.
 26 May 76,5p EPA/540/09-92/155
 Pub. in Federal Register, v41 n103, 26 May 76. See
 also PB87-113981 and PB80-213929.

 The Position Document addresses the risks and bene-
 fits of pesticide products containing chtorobenzflate.
 The Agency has determined that the use of products
 containing the subject active ingredient may meet or
 exceed a risk criterion described in  40 CFR Part 154.
 Potential hazards will be examined further to detar-
 rrine the nature and extent of the risk, and considering
 the benefits of the subject active ingredient, whether
 such risks cause unreasonable adverse effects on the
 envffonrnent.

 Keywords:  'Environmental  surveys,  'Toxicology,
 •Pesticides,  'Toxic substances,  Pesticide residues,
Ecology, Mutagenesis, Laboratory animals. Exposure,
Physiological effects, Regulations, Environmental im-
pacts, Standards, *Chl
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                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
The Position Document addresses the risks and bene-
fits of pesticide products containing the subject active
ingredient. The Agency has determined that the use of
products containing the subject active ingredient may
meet or exceed a risk criterion described in 40  CFR
Part 154. Potential hazards will be examined further to
determine the nature and extent  of the risk, and  con-
sidering the benefits of the subject active ingredient,
whether such risks cause unreasonable adverse ef-
fects on the environment.

Keywords: *Nitrophenols,  "Pesticides, Toxicity,  Haz-
ardous materials,  Chemical properties, Regulations,
Fruits,  Apples, Berries,  Grapes, Vegetables,  'Toxic
substances, 'Dinocap,  Chemical  information  fact
sheet.
PB92-114412/REB               PC A07/MF A02
Risk Assessment, Management, Communication:
A Guide to Selected Sources. Volume 4, Number
1.
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of Pesticides and Toxic Substances.
Sep 91,143p EPA/560/7-91 /008
SeealsoPB90-272105.

The issue  of  Risk Assessment, Management, and
Communication: A Guide to Selected Sources is the
ninth update in EPA's series of risk management bib-
liographies. References were gathered from the envi-
ronmental, medical, and scientific literature included in
the following databases: ABI/lnform, Cambridge Sci-
entific Abstracts, Conference Papers Index, Enviroline,
Legal Resources Index, Life Sciences Collection, Mag-
azine Index, NTIS, PAIS International, and NLM's Tox-
line and Medline. The  citations cover documents
added to those collections during the period from No-
vember 1989 to July  1991. Like its predecessors, the
document is subdivided into Risk Assessment, Risk
Management, and Risk Communication. The Table of
Contents lists further divisions of each of these cate-
gories. Citations are  arranged  alphabetically by title,
with the exception of the chemical specific references.
The citations are grouped alphabetically by chemical
name. Abstracts in the Risk Assessment section have
been edited or eliminated if the content of the article is
adequately reflected in the title.

Keywords:  'Bibliographies,  'Risk assessment, 'US
EPA, 'Communications management, Information sys-
tems, Chemical compounds, Abstracts,  Management
planning, Environment management
 PB92-114453/REB               PC A04/MF A01
 Reregistration Eligibility Document (RED): Sulfur
 (List A, Case 0031).
 Environmental Protection  Agency,  Washington, DC.
 Office of Pesticide Programs.
 May 91,67p EPA/5407RS-92/161

 EPA is directed by the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide,
 and Rodenticide Act as amended in 1988 (FIFRA '88)
 to review all pesticide products containing active ingre-
 dients initially registered before November 1, 1984,
 and to reregister those products that have a substan-
 tially complete data base and do not pose unreason-
 able adverse effects to people or the  environment.
 The pesticide reregistration program is to be complet-
 ed by the late 1990's. The Reregistration Eligibility
 Document (or RED) discusses the scientific data and
 other information supporting EPA's regulatory conclu-
 sion that products containing Sulfur do not pose unrea-
 sonable risks when used  as directed by Agency-ap-
 proved labeling, and are eligible for reregistration.

 Keywords: 'Pesticides, 'Toxic  substances, 'Sulfur,
 Guidelines, Genetics,  Packaging,  Labels,  Marking,
 Hazardous materials, Agricultural materials,  Manufac-
 turing,   Public   health,   Regulations,   Standards,
 Tables(Data), Ecology, 'Reregistration, Federal Insec-
 ticide Fungicide and Rodenticide Act, Environmental
 exposure pathways, CAS 7704-34-9.


 PB92-114461/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Robert S. Kerr  Environmental Research Lab., Ada,
 OK
 Performance Evaluations of Pump-and-Treat Re-
 mediation*.
 Keely (Joseph F.), Portland, OR.
 J. F Keely. Oct 89,21 p EPA/540/4-89/005
 Contract EPA-68-03-3312, Grant EPA-R-812808
 See also  PB90-274549. Sponsored by Robert S. Kerr
 Environmental Research Lab., Ada, OK.
The report contains an overview of the processes af-
fecting the mobility of contaminants through the sub-
surface, and the ability to pump the contaminants from
the subsurface for treatment. It points out the limita-
tions of pump-and-treat remediation techniques and
stresses the importance of proper site characterization
and the relevance of computer modeling as a perform-
ance evaluation technique.

Keywords: 'Water pollution,  'Ground water, 'Water
treatment, Pumping, Sites, Surface, Evaluation, Effec-
tiveness, Hydraulics, Advection, Sediment transport,
Sorption, Ion exchanging, Superfund, Remedial action.
tion, accounted for most of the losses observed. The
amounts of observed dechlorination products were not
dependent on the duration of lime treatment  and  no
evidence of phenyl-phenyl bond cleavage was found.
The use of quicklime as an in-situ treatment of removal
of PCBs is not supported by these results.

Keywords: 'Polychlorinated biphenyls, 'Stabilization,
'Calcium oxides, 'Path of pollutants, 'Waste treat-
ment, US EPA, In-situ processing, Soil treatment, Sub-
stitutes, Soil contamination, Experimental design, Test
chambers, Decomposition, Cooperative agreements.
PB92-114479/REB               PC A06/MF A02
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of Research and Development.
Environmental Monitoring and Assessment  Pro-
gram:  1991 Project Descriptors. Summary rept.
Kilkelly Environmental Associates, Inc., Raleigh, NC.
P. Kellar, P. Suk, and A. Beach. Apr 91,109p EPA/
600/4-91/015
Contract EPA-68-D9-0093
See also PB91-191320 and PB91-141796. Sponsored
by Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of Research and Development.

The Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Pro-
gram (EMAP) is a joint effort of the Office of Modeling,
Monitoring Systems, and Quality Assurance and the
Office  of  Environmental Processes and Effects Re-
search, within the Office of Research and  Develop-
ment The document has been prepared to provide in-
formation  on the projects within EMAP completed in
Fiscal Year 1990 and funded for Fiscal Year 1991. The
document is organized into five major sections: the In-
troduction and Overview and four sections that contain
individual  Project Descriptors  for the four major ele-
ments of EMAP. Sections 2,3,4, and 5 contain individ-
ual Project Descriptors for Resource Monitoring, Co-
ordination Activities, Integration Activities, and Devel-
opmental  Research,  respectively. Additionally,  each
Project Descriptor is coded (to assist in budget and de-
liverables  tracking) and indexed for  easy reference.
The categories used to generate the three indices at
the back of the document are (1) Regions and States -
EPA Regions and states in which field projects or prin-
cipal research activities are or will be conducted; (2)
Project Officers - responsible for managing the project
providing technical direction and guidance, and ensur-
ing coordination among related projects; and (3) Princi-
pal Investigators - responsible for ensuring the objec-
tives are met and the work plan is executed. The Prin-
cipal Investigators  Index is further broken down into
four categories.

 Keywords: 'Environmental monitoring, 'Research and
development, 'Information transfer, Natural resources
 management, Technology transfer, Data processing,
 Ecology, Biological indicators, Landscaping,  Air  pollu-
tion, Deposition, Water pollution, 'Environmental Mon-
 itoring and Assessment Program, Total Quality Man-
 agement.


 PB92-114487/REB               PC A07/MF A02
 Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
 Reduction Engineering Lab.
 Fate of Polychlorinated Biphenyls  (PCBs) In Soil
 Following Stabilization with Quicklime.
 Technology Applications, Inc., Cincinnati, OH.
 R. L. Einhaus, I. Honarkhah, and P. Erickson. Sep 91,
 128p EPA/600/2-91/052
 Contract EPA-68-CO-0001
 Sponsored  by Environmental Protection Agency, Cin-
 cinnati, OH. Risk Reduction Engineering Lab.

 Over  the past two years, EPA  Regional staff have
 made observations at several field sites that suggest-
 ed an inexpensive  alternative treatment  for  PCBs
 using  quicklime containing  materials. As  a conse-
 quence of these observations, EPA entered into a co-
 operative agreement with RMC Environmental and An-
 alytical Laboratories.  However,  the small project did
 not include all the experiments needed to prove chem-
 ical decomposition of PCBs as the  major effect  of
 quicklime treatment. An in-house project was designed
 to answer  questions  about  quicklime treatment  of
 PCBs. Synthetic soil samples were spiked  with three
 PCB congeners (3.5-dichlorobiphenyl, 3,3;5,5'-tetrach-
 lorobiphenyl, and 2,2;4,4;5,5;-hexochlorobiphenyl) and
 treatment with quicklime and water. PCB losses (60%
 to 85%) were evidenced after five hours of treatment.
 However evaporation and steam stripping at elevated
 temperature conditions, rather than PCB decomposi-
PB92-114495/REB               PC A04/MF A01
Environmental Protection  Agency, Cincinnati, OH.
Center for Environmental Research Information.
Stabilization Technologies  for  RCRA Corrective
Actions. Handbook.
Metcalf and Eddy, Inc., Wakefield, MA.
Aug 91,75p EPA/625/6-91 /026
Contract EPA-68-CO-0068
See also PB92-102102 and PB92-102110. Prepared in
cooperation with Eastern Research Group, Inc., Arling-
ton, MA.  Sponsored by  Environmental Protection
Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Center for Environmental Re-
search Information.

Several technologies are available for stabilizing con-
taminant sources for corrective action sites. Innovative
technologies such as horizontal well drilling and biore-
mediation are discussed.

Keywords: 'Stabilization, 'Remedial action, 'Technol-
ogy utilization, 'Waste management, Handbooks, Pol-
lution sources, Implementation, Grouting, Drains, Well
surveys, Well completion, Trenching, Hydraulic fractur-
ing, Water pollution control,  Surface waters, Extrac-
tion, Biological treatment, Ground water, 'Resource
Conservation and Recovery Act, Capping, Soil venting.
 PB92-114503/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Facilitated Transport of Inorganic Contaminants
 in Ground Water. Part 2. Colloidal Transport. Envi-
 ronmental research brief.
 Robert S.  Kerr Environmental Research Lab.,  Ada,
 OK.
 R. W. Puts, R. M, Powell, D. A. Clark, and C. J. Paul. Jul
 91,14p EPA/600/M-91 /040
 See also PB91-168419. Prepared in cooperation with
 ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc., Ada, OK.

 The project entailed both field and laboratory compo-
 nents. Field studies evaluated routine sampling proce-
 dures for determination  of aqueous inorganic  geo-
 chemistry and assessment of contaminant transport
 by colloidal mobility. Research at three different metal-
 contaminated sites has shown that 0.45 micrometer fil-
 tration  has not removed potentially mobile colloids,
 when samples have been collected using low pumping
 flow rates (approximately 0.2-0.3 L/min). However,
 when pumping velocities greatly exceed formation
 groundwater flow velocities, large differences between
 filtered and unfiltered samples are observed, and nei-
 ther are representative of values obtaine with the llow
 flow-rate pumped samples. In controlled laboratory ex-
 periments, the stability and transport of radio-labeled
 Fe2O3 model colloids were studied using batch and
 column  techniques.  Variables  in the study included
 flow rate, pH, ionic strength, electrolyte composition
 (anion/cation), colloid concentration, and colloid size.
 Iron oxide colloids in the 100-900 nm particle diameter
 range were not only mobile to a significant extent, but
 under some hydrogeochemical conditions were trans-
 ported faster than a conservative tracer, tritium. Parti-
 cle size and anionic composition together with particle
 stability provided  the highest statistical  correlation
 governing extent of colloidal transport. The rate of col-
 loid-arsenate transport was over 21  times that of the
 dissolved arsenate.

 Keywords: 'Water pollution sampling, 'Inorganic com-
 pounds, 'Environmental transport, 'Colloids, 'Ground
 water,  Field tests, Geochemistry,  Tracer techniques,
 Water flow, Desorption, Adsorption, Path of pollutants,
 Samples, Particle size, Experimental design, Electro-
 lytes, pH, Flow rate.
  PB92-114529/REB               PC A05/MF A02
  Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
  Office of Health and Environmental Assessment.


                             Marl 992    31

-------
                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
Workshop Report on Toxicity Equivalency Fac-
tors for  Potychtorinated  Biphenyl  Congeners.
Risk Assessment Forum.
Eastern Research Group, Inc., Arlington, MA.
Jun 91 , 97p EPA/625/3-91 /020
Contract EPA-68-C8-0036
See also PB92-1 13349. Report on a workshop held in
Washington, DC. on December 11-12, 1990.  Spon-
sored by Environmental Protection Agency, Washing-
ton, DC. Office of  Health and Environmental Assess-
ment

The purpose of the workshop was to examine the ex-
isting toxicity and exposure database on pohrchlorinat-
ed blphenyls (PCBs) to ascertain the feasibility of de-
veloping toxicity equivalency factors (TEFs) for PCB
congeners. Given the widespread acceptance and ac-
knowledged utility of the TEF method for assessing
risks associated with exposures to complex mixtures
of chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans,
some experts have urged development of comparable
TEF schemes for other structurally related chemicals,
such as PCBs. Information from the workshop will con-
tribute to Risk Assessment Forum  recommendations
on whether to pursue development of a TEF scheme
for PCBs.

Keywords:  'Meetings, 'Potychlorinated biphenyls,
•Risk assessment, *Toxicity, 'Environmental surveys,
•Environmental  health. Exposure, Feasibility studies,
Public health, Environmental exposure pathway, Poly-
chlorinated dibenzodioxins,  Polychlorinated dibenzo-
furans, Information transfer, Dioxins, Chemical proper-
ties, Physical properties.


PB92-114537/REB               PCA08/MFA02
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
Reduction Engineering Lab.
Selection  of Control Technologies for  Remedi-
ation of Lead Battery Recycling Sites.
Foster Wheeler Enviresponse, Inc., Edison, NJ.
T. K. Basu, A. Selvakumar, and R. Gaire. Jul 91 , 1 59p
EPA/540/2-91/014
Contract EPA-68-03-0033
See also PB89-1 84626 and PB90-252594. Sponsored
by  Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH.
Risk Reduction Engineering Lab.

The objective of the report is to provide federal Reme-
dial Project Managers (RPMs) and their supporting
contractors with information to facilitate the selection
of treatment alternatives and cleanup services at lead
battery recycling sites. It tailors the RI/FS process to
lead battery recycling sites, evaluates currently used
treatments, identifies remediation alternatives, and
evaluates the expected effectiveness of treatments.
Eleven RI/FS and fifteen ROD documents for lead bat-
tery sites were the primary sources of information.
Treatability studies are also addressed. Relevant ex-
amples drawn from typical results of such studies con-
ducted for lead battery recycling sites are presented.
Also, the technologies commonly proposed in RI/FS
and RODs are described and evaluated against six of
the nine  EPA  evaluation  criteria (compliance with
ARARs; long-term effectiveness and permanence; re-
duction of toxicity, mobility, or volume; short-term ef-
fectiveness; imptementability. and cost). The technol-
ogies are compared to underline their salient advan-
tages and disadvantages, and to emphasize those
treatments most likely to be successful in remediating
 lead battery recycling sites. Innovative and emerging
 technologies, which have the potential to treat lead-
 contaminated wastes are also mentioned in the docu-
 ment

 Keywords: 'Remedial action, 'Waste management,
 •Lead acid batteries,  'Waste treatment, Waste recy-
 cling, Feasibility  studies. Substitutes, Long term ef-
 fects, Water pollution control. Land pollution  control,
 Implementation, Cost analysis. Technology utilization,
 Site characterization, Soil treatment, Remedial project
 managers, Record of Decision, Applicable  and Rele-
 vant or Appropriate Requirements.


 PBS2-11454S/REB               PCA10/MFA03
 Indoor Air-Assessment  An Inventory of  Indoor
 Air Quality Research in  the United States: 1989-
 1990.
 Environmental  Protection Agency, Research Triangle
 Park. NC.  Environmental  Criteria and  Assessment
A survey of indoor air quality research projects in the
United States was undertaken using a standard form
and keyword list. In response to the request for partici-
pation, 110 completed forms were received from 69
principal investigators at 34 institutions. Universities
had the largest number of IAQ research  projects (23),
followed by  EPA (20), other Federal agencies (18),
state (18), national laboratories (15), and private re-
search organizations (12). The results of the inventory
will provide EPA and NATO-CCMS with information on
the current directions and  funding levels of  IAQ re-
search in the United States. Although the information
is preliminary, it can be useful to EPA in planning future
research.

Keywords: 'Indoor air pollution, Research projects, Air
quality, Directories, Catalogs.
PB92-114552/REB               PC A16/MF A03
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
Reduction Engineering Lab.
Assessing UST Corrective Action Technology: A
Scientific Evaluation of the Mobility of Organic
Contaminants  in Subsurface  Environments. Rnat
rept.
Camp, Dresser and McKee, Inc., Cambridge, MA.
W. J. Lyman, P. J. Rekty, and B. Levy. Sep 91,362p
EPA/600/2-91/053
Contract EPA-68-03-3409
See also PB90-266727. Sponsored by Environmental
Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk Reduction En-
gineering Lab.

The problems associated with leakage of motor fuels
and organic  chemicals from  underground storage
tanks (USTs)  are compounded by a general lack of un-
derstanding of the partitioning,  retention, transforma-
tion, and transport of these contaminants in the sub-
surface environment The research material presented
herein is the result of an intensive data collection and
evaluation. The objective of the research was to com-
pile the most up to date and comprehensive knowl-
edge of contaminant behavior in the subsurface into a
single document It  provides an understanding of mt-
croscale fate and transport processes as a means to
understanding the larger scale movement of contami-
nants. This, in turn,  leads to a more thorough under-
standing of the application of corrective measures and
remediation techniques. The microscate analysis fo-
cuses on 13 loci, each of which represents a location
and condition in the subsurface environment where
and how contaminants may exist after an UST release.

Keywords: 'Subsurface investigations, 'Environmen-
tal transport, 'Organic compounds, 'Land pollution,
'Petroleum products, 'Soil properties,  Underground
storage, Storage tanks, Remedial action, Fuel storage,
Soil science, Biodeterioration, Saturated zone, Water
pollution,  Soil contamination, Chemical compounds,
Waste storage, Leakage, Site surveys, Cleanup oper-
ations.
 T. Pierson, and D. Greenwood. Dec 90, 214p EPA/
 600/8-90/080F, ECAO-R-0516
 See also PB90-1 67362 and PB92-109107.
 PB92-114560/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Storm and Combined Sewer Pollution Control: A
 Compilation of Significant References.
 Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
 Reduction Engineering Lab.
 R. Field, and F. Everson. May 91,34p EPA/600/9-91 /
 012
 See also PB90-255670. Prepared in cooperation with
 Foster Wheeler Enviresponse, Inc., Edison, NJ.

 The report represents an overview of the Storm and
 Combined Sewer Pollution Control Research Program
 (SCSP). These selected abstracts comprise a fraction
 of the research performed over a 20-year period,  be-
 ginning with the mid-1960's. These descriptions serve
 as a guide for using the collection. A matrix is provided
 (centerfold) which  targets subject content for each
 report or reprint, and serves as a handy locator. As
 controls to reduce water pollution for traditional point
 sources have been implemented, it became more evi-
 dent that diffuse sources of pollutants, including dis-
 charges from separate storm drainage systems and
 combined sewer overflows (CSO), are major causes of
 water quality  problems. In response to this situation,
 Congress required  the U.S. Environmental Protection
 Agency (EPA), by adding Section 402(p) to the Clean
 Water Act (CWA) in 1987, to regulate stormwater  dis-
 charges to protect  water quality by establishing com-
 prehensive programs for permit application, guidance,
 and management and treatment requirements.
Keywords: 'Combined sewers, 'Storm sewers, 'Water
pollution  control, 'Bibliographies, Overflows,  Urban
areas,  Meetings, Research projects,  'Storm water
runoff, Point sources.
PB92-114966/REB               PC A05/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
Reduction Engineering Lab.
Volumetric Leak Detection in Urge Underground
Storage Tanks. Volume 1.
Vista Research, Inc., Mountain View, CA.
J W. Starr, R. F. Wise, and J. W. Maresca. Aug 91,86p
EPA/600/2-91/044A
Contract EPA-68-03-3409
Previously announced as PB91-227942 (reannounced
as  2  separate   documents).  See  also   PB92-
114974.Portions of this document are not fully legible.
Prepared in cooperation with COM Federal Programs
Corp., Fairfax, VA. Sponsored by Environmental Pro-
tection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk Reduction Engi-
neering Lab.

A set of experiments was conducted  to determine
whether volumetric leak detection system presently
used to test underground storage tanks (USTs) up to
38,000 L (10,000  gal)  in capacity could meet EPA's
regulatory standards for tank tightness and automatic
tank gauging systems when used to test tanks up to
190,000 L (50,000 gal) in capacity. The experiments,
conducted on  two partially filled 190,000-L (50,000-
gal) USTs at Griffiss Air Force Base in upstate New
York during late August 1990, showed that a system's
performance in large tanks depends primarily on the
accuracy of the temperature  compensation, which is
inversely proportional to the volume of product in the
tank. Errors in temperature compensation that were
negligible in tests  in small tanks were important in
large tanks. The experiments further suggest that a
multiple-test strategy is also required.

Keywords:  'Underground  storage,  'Storage tanks,
'Leakage,   'Volumetric  analysis,  'Land  pollution
abatement, Performance standards, Pollution regula-
tions, Crude oil, Materials tests, Standards compli-
ance, Temperature, Petroleum products.


PB92-114974/REB               PC A05/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
Reduction Engineering Lab.
Volumetric Leak Detection  in Large Underground
Storage Tanks. Volume 2. Appendices A through

vista Research, Inc., Mountain View, CA.
J. W. Starr, R. F. Wise, and J. W. Maresca. Aug 91,94p
EPA/600/2-91/044B
Contract EPA-68-03-3409
Previously announced as PB91-227942 (reannounced
as 2 seperate documents). See also Volume 1, PB92-
 114966.  Prepared in cooperation with COM Federal
 Programs Corp., Fairfax, VA. Sponsored by Environ-
 mental Protection  Agency, Cincinnati,  OH.  Risk  Re-
 duction Engineering Lab.

The program of experiments conducted at Griffiss Air
 Force Base was devised to expand the understanding
 of large  underground storage tank behavior as it im-
 pacts  the performance of volumetric leak  detection
 testing. The report addresses three important ques-
 tions about testing the larger underground  storage
 tanks for leaks. First  can the EPA regulatory stand-
 ards be met when volumetric methods are used to test
 tanks up to 190,000 L (50,000 gal) in capacity. Second,
 what is the precision required of the temperature  and
 level sensors and what is the minimum duration of the
 data collection period in order for a volumetric system
 to accurately test larger tanks, particularly those  that
 are partially filled. Third, what are the important  fea-
 tures of a volumetric system that  meets or exceeds the
 regulatory performance standards. The document pre-
 sents the  results of  experiments  conducted  on
 190,000-L  (50,000-gal) underground  storage tanks
 (USTs) to determine how to test large tanks for leaks
 with volumetric leak detection systems. The work re-
 ported in the document has applications to the UST re-
 lease detection technical standards in CFR 280 Sub-
 part D.

 Keywords:  'Underground storage,  'Storage tanks,
 'Leakage,  'Volumetric   analysis,   'Land  pollution
 abatement Performance standards, Pollution regula-
 tions. Crude oil, Materials tests,  Standards compli-
 ance, Temperature, Petroleum products.
  32    Vol. 92,  No. 1

-------
                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
PB92-114990/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
Natural Enemy Risk Assessment (NERISK) User's
Manual.
Oregon State Univ., Corvallis. Dept. of Entomology.
R. Messing, and B. A. Croft. C1989,24p EPA/600/8-
91/203 ,, EPA/SW/DK-92/018A
For system on diskette, see PB92-500446. Sponsored
by Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.

The user manual discusses NERISK (Natural Enemy
Risk Assessment), a computer-aided decision-support
system designed to assist the user in examing the po-
tential risks of pesticides to arthropod natural enemies
(i.e., predators and parasitoids) in agricultural systems.
It is a tool that helps to organize, store, and recall large
amounts of information and make it readily available to
even novice users. It is also a mechanism to integrate
diverse information sources, particularly  databases,
simulation models, and expert opinions, and to provide
quantitative estimates of pesticide risk based on these
sources. NERISK is based on a 'shell' expert system
called RECOG, and was designed and developed by a
team of workers at Oregon State University (Messing
et al, 1989). (Copyright (c) 1989  by Russell Messing
and Brian A. Croft.)

Keywords: "Pesticides, *Risk assessment, *Pest con-
trol, *User manuals(Computer programs), Documenta-
tion, Expert system, Agriculture, Information transfer,
Computerized simulation, 'Natural Enemy Risk As-
sessment System, 'NERISK system.
PB92-115203/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Liquid and Gaseous  Fuel  Distribution System.
Final rept
Alliance Technologies Corp., Chapel Hill, NC.
J. D. Winkler, B. Henning, and P. Marsosudiro. Oct 91,
41 p EPA/600/2-91/057
Contract EPA-68-D9-0173
See also PB91-119669. Sponsored by Environmental
Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park,  NC.  Air
and Energy Engineering Research Lab.

The report describes the national liquid and gaseous
fuel distribution system. The study leading to the report
was performed as part of an effort to better understand
emissions of volatile organic compounds from the fuel
distribution system. The primary, secondary, and terti-
ary segments of the liquid fuels (crude oil and refined
liquid petroleum products) distribution system  are dis-
cussed individually, the quantities of liquid fuels are es-
timated, and the transportation modes for each system
segment are described.  The report includes a flow
chart describing the fuel distribution  system and its
end users. The discussion of the U.S. natural  gas dis-
tribution system includes estimates of state-specific
and total gas production, a flow chart describing  the
system and its end users, and flow charts describing
the natural gas marketing system.

Keywords: 'Pipelines,  'Natural gas distribution sys-
tems, Natural gas liquids, Transport, Petroleum prod-
ucts, Fuel oil, Environmental effects, Pollution control.
PB92-115211/REB               PC A05/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Development of Alternate Performance Standard
for Radon Resistant  Construction  Based  on
Short-Term/Long-Term Indoor Radon Concentra-
tions. Volume 1. Technical Report Final rept. Feb
90-Apr91.
Southern Research Inst, Birmingham, AL.
A. 0. Williamson, S. E. McDonough, and C. S. Fowler.
Oct 91,83p SRI-ENV-91 -526-6411-083-VOL-1, EPA/
600/8-91/210A
Grant EPA-R-814621, Contract DCA-91RD-41 -15-00-
02-008
See also Volume 2, PB92-115229. Sponsored by Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park,
NC. Air and Energy  Engineering Research Lab., and
Florida Dept of Community Affairs, Tallahassee.

The report gives results of a study of short- and long-
term variations  in radon concentration  in about 80
houses  in  Florida. The study involves  comparative
sampling using the most common radon measurement
technologies during the past year. The study, address-
es the time variation of indoor radon concentrations.
The degree of variation of radon varies roughly in pro-
portion to the long-term  mean concentration, with a
coefficient of variation within a calendar quarter of
about 25% of the quarterly mean, and a coefficient of
variationwithin a  year of about 35% of the  annual
mean. The pattern of variability supports the use of
multiplicative models to fit the variation  and to predict
intervals of confidence for long-term averages based
on short-term measurements. These  models have
been used to develop threshold values for the per-
formance criteria of the proposed Building Standard
for Radon-resistant Construction for the State of Flori-
da.

Keywords: "Radon, 'Residential buildings, 'Pollution
control,          Performance         standards,
Concentration(Composition), Measurement, Seasonal
variations. Mathematical models, Building codes, Con-
struction, Florida, 'Indoor air pollution.
PB92-115229/REB               PC A04/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Development of Alternate Performance Standard
for Radon Resistant  Construction  Based  on
Short-Term/Long-Term Indoor Radon Concentra-
tions. Volume 2. Appendices. Final rept. Feb 90-Apr
91.
Southern Research Inst., Birmingham, AL.
A. D. Williamson, S. E. McDonough, and C. S. Fowler.
Oct 91,74p SRI-ENV-91 -526-6411-083-VOL-2, EPA/
600/8-91/21 OB
Grant EPA-R-814621, Contract DCA-91RD-41 -15-00-
02-008
See also Volume 1, PB92-115211. Sponsored by Envi-
ronmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park,
NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab., and
Florida Dept. of Community Affairs, Tallahassee.

The report gives results of a study of short- and long-
term variations  in radon concentration in  about  80
houses in Florida. The study involves comparative
sampling using the most common radon measurement
technologies during the past year. The study, providing
the most detailed database addresses the time varia-
tion of indoor radon concentrations  in a significant
number of occupied houses having moderately elevat-
ed  radon concentrations. In  the study houses,  the
degree of variation of radon varies roughly in propor-
tion to the long-term mean concentration, with a coeffi-
cient of variation within a calendar quarter of about
25% of the quarterly mean, and a coefficient of varia-
tion within a year of about 35% of the annual mean.
The study indicates a distinct seasonal effect on the
average radon, with quarterly averages relative to the
annual average increasing in the order of spring (82%)
< summer (93%) < fall (97%) < winter (123%).

Keywords: 'Residential buildings, 'Radon, 'Pollution
control,          Performance          standards,
Concentration(Composition),    Seasonal   variations,
Mathematical  models,  Construction, Building codes,
Florida, Measurement, 'Indoor air pollution.
PB92-115237/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Environmental Monitoring Systems Lab., Las Vegas,
NV.
Watershed Characterization Using Landsat The-
matic Mapper Imagery: Blackfoot River, Montana.
Lockheed Engineering and  Sciences  Co., Inc., Las
Vegas, NV.
K. H. Lee. Dec 91,34p EPA/600/4-91 /027
Contract EPA-68-CO-0050
See  also PB-205 822. Sponsored by  Environmental
Monitoring Systems Lab., Las Vegas, NV.

The  report describes a  portion  of a  large regional
project undertaken by the Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) and  water quality  authorities  in the
States of Montana, Idaho, and Washington to identify
and analyze factors which are affecting water quality in
the Lake Pend Oreille hydrologic system. To achieve
this directive in Montana, a spatial database is being
constructed which will contain satellite derived land
cover, photo-interpreted macrophyte locations, and
data from other sources for climate, topography, hy-
drography, and soils. The database will be used by
EPA Environmental  Monitoring Systems Laboratory-
Las Vegas to demonstrate the utility of a watershed
scale information management system. The informa-
tion management system is geared toward nonpoint
pollution modeling and will evolve into a decision sup-
port  mechanism capable of assessing the suitability
and  feasibility  of  various  management scenarios
(James and Hewitt,  1990). The data layers focus on
the elements required for nonpoint source pollution
modeling in which derivation of factors for soil erodabi-
lity, rainfall, topographic slope-length, and vegetation
management are generated for the watershed. The
vegetation management factor will be partly based on
land cover derived from  Landsat Thematic Mapper
satellite imagery.  Vegetative  management factors
combine vegetative cover and soil surface conditions
into one numerical factor. The report addresses only
the generation of land cover for the Blackfoot River
Watershed through quantitative remote sensing tech-
niques.

Keywords: 'Watersheds,  'Blackfoot River,  'Remote
sensing, 'Thematic mapping, 'Water quality manage-
ment, Montana, Satellite observations, Landsat satel-
lites. Hydrology, Water pollution, Soil conservation,
Vegetation effects, Idaho,  Washington(State), Non-
point sources.
PB92-115252/REB               PC A06/MF A02
Markets for Scrap Tires.
Environmental  Protection Agency,  Washington, DC.
Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response.
Oct 91,125p EPA/530/SW-90/074A
See also PB91 -206771 and DE84003924.

It is the goal of the EPA to eliminate illegal dumping al-
together and to reduce the stockpiling and landfilling of
discarded tires as much as possible. Interestingly
enough, over the last 40 years, tires have  been some-
what of a success story for source  reduction. The
advent of the 40,000-mile tire means that tires last
longer before they wear out. Potential source reduc-
tion measures  for tires include the design of longer
lived tires, reuse of tires removed from vehicles, and
retreading. These practices all extend the  useful life of
tires before they are discarded. In the report, tire utili-
zation methods are described and the market barriers
to their  utilization. Also discussed are options to ad-
dress the waste tire problem.

Keywords: 'Earth  fills,  'Solid waste disposal, 'Tires,
Scrap, Law enforcement, Reduction, Removal, Waste
recycling. Design,  Service life, Utilization, Marketing,
Cost effectiveness, Legislation, Shredding, Retread-
ing.
 PB92-115260/REB               PC A05/MF A01
 Environmental Protection Agency,  Cincinnati, OH.
 Drinking Water Research Div.
 Radium Removal from Water by Manganese Diox-
 ide Adsorption and Diatomaceous Earth Filtration.
 Final rept
 Houston  Univ., TX. Dept. of Civil and Environmental
 Engineering.
 R. Patel, and D. Clifford. Nov 91,92p EPA/600/2-91 /
 063
 Sponsored by Environmental Protection Agency, Cin-
 cinnati, OH. Drinking Water Research Div.

 The study reveals that radium adsorption onto precipi-
 tated MnO2 followed by diatomaceous earth (DE) fil-
 tration is a very effective treatment process for radium-
 contaminated water. Radium removals in the range of
 80% to 97% were observed for performed MnO2 feed
 concentrations of 0.63 and 1.26 mg/L  as Mn in
 groundwaters with hardness in the range of 100 to 245
 mg/L as CaCOS. Radium removal increased slightly
 with increasing pH whereas it decreased slightly with
 increasing hardness and iron (II) concentrations. Pilot
 studies were performed in Lemont, IL using DE filtra-
 tion on a groundwater containing 12 pCi/L226Ra and
 6 pCi/L228. Radium removals for both the pilot plants
 ranged from 90% to 97% at a MnO2 feed concentra-
 tion of 1.26 mg/L as Mn, a total hardness of 245 mg/L
 as CaCOS, and a pH of 6.5. The costs of water treat-
 ment by MnO2 adsorption and DE filtration were esti-
 mated at $0.71 per 1000 gal for 280,000 gpd plants
 and $0.47 for 1 Mgd plants.

 Keywords: 'Manganese oxides, 'Radium,  'Filtration,
 'Diatomaceous   earth,  'Water  treatment,  Ground
 water, Concentration(Composition),  Removal,  pH,
 Pilot plants, Cost analysis.
 PB92-115278/REB               PC A04/MF A01
 Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
 Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
                                                                                                                               Mar 1992     33

-------
                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
Proceeding* of the Workshop on Radon Potential
Mapping, Florida Radon Research Program. Held
hi Gainesville, Florida on April 20,1990.
Rogers and Associates Engineering Corp., Salt Lake
City.UT.
K. K. Nielson, and V. C. Rogers. Nov 91,73p EPA/
600/9-91/044
See also PB91-217372. Sponsored by Environmental
Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Air
and Energy Engineering  Research Lab., and Florida
Dept of Community Affairs, Tallahassee.

The report documents a workshop on radon potential
mapping, in Gainesville,  Fl_ on April 20, 1990. The
workshop, part ot me Florida  Radon Research Pro-
gram (FRRP), was designed to identify and discuss in
an expert forum the technical issues associated with
radon  potential  characterization  of  Florida  lands.
(NOTE: The FRRP is aimed at developing radon-relat-
ed building construction standards for Florida.) If de-
veloped, radon potential maps would be used to identi-
fy geographic areas with  greatest potential for indoor
radon problems so that appropriate precautions, spec-
ified by related building construction standards, could
be taken. Existing radon maps tar Florida and other
states and regions were reviewed, and their uses of
aeroradiometnc, geological, indoor radon, and other
data were identified.

Keywords: 'Mapping, *Radon, 'Florida,  'Meetings,
Buildings, Building codes, Standards, Soils, Construc-
tion,     Radiation      measuring    instruments,
Graphs(Charts), Backfills, Maps, 'Indoor air pollution.


PB92-115288/REB               PC A04/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Evaluation of VOC Emissions from  Heated Roof-
Ing Asphalt Final rept
Acurex Corp., Research  Triangle  Park, NC. Environ-
mental Systems Div.
P. Kariher, M. Tufts, and L Hamel. Nov 91,66p EPA/
600/2-91/061
Contract EPA-68-DO-0141
See also PB-238 445. Sponsored by Environmental
Protection Agency, Research  Triangle Park, NC. Air
and Energy Engineering Research Lab.

The report gives results of a short-term in-house
project to characterize emissions from a simulated as-
phalt roofing kettle, performed at EPA/AEERL Hot as-
phalt surfacing and resurfacing has been identified as
a possible significant  source of volatile organic com-
pound (VOC) emissions that may affect human health
and contribute to the  ozone non-attainment problem.
The purpose of the study was to collect, identify, and
semi-quantitate as many compounds as possible that
are discharged during the open heating of roofing as-
phalt and relate them  to the amount volatilized into the
air. Types 1, 2, and 3 mopping grade asphalts were
chosen for the study.  They constitute more than 90%
of roofing asphalt used. Samples of each type of as-
phalt were placed in a simulated roofing kettle, heated
to predetermined temperatures, and sampled for vola-
tile and semi-volatile  organic emissions. Compounds
identified during the study were alkanes, aromafics, a
ketone, and an aldehyde.

Keywords:  'Volatile  organic compounds, 'Roofing,
'Air pollution sampling,  *Asphalts, Heating,  Expen-
mental       design,      Pollution       sources,
Concentration(Composition).


PB92-115294/REB               PC A06/MF A02
Environmental Protection Agency,  Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Standard Measurement Protocol*: Florida  Radon
Research Program.  Final rept
Southern Research Inst, Birmingham, AL
A. D. Williamson, and  J. M. Finkel. Nov 91,123p EPA/
600/6-91/212
Grant EPA-R-814621
See also PB89-224273 and PB92-108109.Portions of
this document are not fully legible. Sponsored by Envi-
ronmental Protection  Agency, Research Triangle Park,
NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab., and
Florida Dept of Community Affairs, Tallahassee.

The manual, in support of the Florida Radon Research
Program, contains standard protocols for key meas-
urements where data quality is vital to the program.  It
contains two sections. The first section, soil measure-
ments, contains field sampling protocols for soil gas
permeability and radon concentration, in-situ soil den-
sity,  soil classification, and penetrometer  analysis.
Laboratory procedures include soil moisture, radium
and radon emanation, particle-size analysis, specific
gravity, the proctor method for moisture/density rela-
tionships, a laboratory gas permeability test, a radon
diffusion coefficient measurement, and two radon flux
measurements.  The second section, building  meas-
urements, includes diagnostic procedures for sub-slab
radon, sub-slab  communication, and differential pres-
sure measurements  followed  by building  leakage
measurements.

Keywords:  'Radon,  'Radiation  measuring  instal-
ments, 'Measurement, 'Pollution control, Buildings,
Slabs, Soils, Permeability, Stationary sources,  Manu-
als, Soil classification, Soil water. Particle size, 'Flori-
da Radon Research Program, 'Protocols.
PB92-115302/REB                PC E99/MF E99
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
Reduction Engineering Lab.
Technology Evaluation Report Biotrol Soil Wash-
ing System for Treatment of a Wood Preserving
Site.
Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA.
Dec91,997p-in3v
Set includes PB92-115310 through PB92-115336. See
also PB92-115245. Sponsored by Environmental Pro-
tection Agency. Cincinnati, OH. Risk Reduction Engi-
neering Lab.

No abstract available.
PB32-11S310/REB               PC A13/MF A03
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
Reduction Engineering Lab.
Technology Evaluation Report Biotrol Soil Wash-
Ing System for Treatment of a Wood Preserving
Site. Volume 1.
Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA.
H. S. Skovronek, W. Ellis, J. Evans, O. Kitaplioglu, and
J. McPherson. Dec 91,276p EPA/540/5-91 /003A
Contracts EPA-68-03-3486, EPA-CO-0048
See also Volume 2, Part A, P892-115328. Sponsored
by Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH.
Risk Reduction Engineering Lab.
Also available in set of 3 reports, PC  E99/MF E99,
PB92-115302.

The report presents and evaluates the extensive data-
base from the  SITE Program  demonstration at the
MacGillis and Gibbs wood treatment facility in New
Brighton, MN. Soil washing and segregation, biotreat-
ment of contaminated process water, and biodegrada-
tion of a slurry of the contaminated fines from the soil
washing were evaluated over several weeks of oper-
ation. The contaminants of concern were pentachloro-
phenol (penta)  and polynuctear aromatic hydrocar-
bons (PAHs). The results indicate that the soil washer
effectively segregates contaminated soil into coarse,
relatively uncontaminated sand constituting the largest
output fraction  and  a much  smaller fraction of fine
day/silt particles retaining about 30% of the original
contamination. Penta removal efficiency from the feed
sett is 87%-S9% (vendor's claim-. 90%). Contaminated
woody material is also segregated. Operational vari-
ations and their impact on output qualities and quanti-
ties are described. Biotreatment of process water from
the soil washing successfully degraded 91-94% of the
penta. The results for the slurry biological treatment of
the contaminated fines indicated that >90% removal
of penta and PAHs  probably can be achieved with a
fully acclimated system  operating at  steady state.
Combined operating and capital equipment cost for an
integrated system are estimated to be $168/ton of soil
treated. Incineration of the woody debris is a major
cost factor. Costs are also presented by process since
specific applications may require different configura-
tions of the three units.

Keywords: 'Soil treatment, 'Land pollution control,
'Waste management 'Wood preservatives, 'Biologi-
cal treatment 'Superfund, Remedial action. Aromatic
polycydic hydrocarbons. Aerobic processes, Separa-
tion, Particle size, Cost analysis, Operating costs, Cap-
italized costs, Fines, Phenol/pentaehtoro, Technology
utilization,  Performance evaluation,  Biodeterioration,
Hazardous  materials,  'Soil  washing,  'BioTrol  soil
washing system, New Brighton(Minnesota).


PB92-115328/REB               PC A17/MF A04
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
Reduction Engineering Lab.
Technology Evaluation Report Biotrol Soil Wash-
Ing System for Treatment of a Wood Preserving
Site. Volume 2, Part A.
Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA.
H. S. Skovronek, W. Ellis, J. Evans, O. Kitaplioglu, and
J. McPherson. Dec 91,387p EPA/540/5-91 /003B
Contracts EPA-68-03-3485, EPA-68-CO-0048
See also Volume 1, PB92-115310 and Volume 2, Part
B, PB92-115336. Sponsored by Environmental Protec-
tion Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk Reduction Engineer-
ing Lab.
Also available  in set of 3 reports PC E99/MF E99,
PB92-115302.

The SITE Program demonstration of one configuration
of the BioTrol Soil Washing System (BSWS) was con-
ducted to obtain reliable performance and cost data
that can be used to evaluate the potential applicability
of the technology as a remediation alternative for sites
contaminated  with hazardous wastes.  The BSWS
treatment train used in the study consists of three
technologies: a soil washer; an aqueous treatment
system; and a slurry bio-reactor. The  demonstration
was carried out at the MacGillis and Gibbs Superfund
site in New Brighton, MN. The report analyzes the re-
sults from the SITE demonstration. It includes discus-
sion of the  operation of the three separate treatment
technologies (SW, SBR,  and BATS) evaluated in the
test and provides flow diagrams, a summary of the
sampling and analytical programs, an economic analy-
sis, and a quality assurance/quality control evaluation
of the data. The volume, consisting of several appendi-
ces, presents key analytical data and the quality con-
trol and quality assurance studies that were carried out
as part of  the demonstration evaluation.  Additional
supporting  data is archieved  in  EPA's Edison,  New
Jersey laboratory.

Keywords:  'Soil treatment, 'Land pollution control,
'Waste management 'Wood preservatives, 'Biologi-
cal treatment,  'Superfund, Remedial action, Aromatic
polycyclic hydrocarbons, Aerobic processes, Separa-
tion, Cost analysis, Phenol/pentachloro, Technology
utilization, Performance  evaluation, Bkxfeterioration,
Hazardous  materials, Quality  control, Quality  assur-
ance, *Soil washing, *BtoTrol soil washing system,
New Brighton(Minnesota).
 PB92-115336/REB               PC A15/MF A03
 Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
 Reduction Engineering Lab.
 Technology Evaluation Report Biotrol Soil Wash-
 Ing System for Treatment of a Wood Preserving
 Site. Volume 2, Part B.
 Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA.
 H. S. Skovronek, W. Ellis, J. Evans, O. Kitaplioglu, and
 J. McPherson. Dec 91,334p EPA/540/5-91 /003C
 Contracts EPA-68-03-3485, EPA-68-CO-0048
 See also Volume 2, Part A, PB92-115328. Sponsored
 by Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH.
 Risk Reduction Engineering Lab.
 Also available in set of 3 reports PC E99/MF E99,
 PB92-115302.

 The SITE Program demonstration of one configuration
 of the BioTrol Soil Washing System (BSWS) was con-
 ducted to obtain reliable performance and cost data
 that can be used to evaluate the  potential applicability
 of the technology as a remediation alternative for sites
 contaminated  with hazardous wastes. The BSWS
 treatment train used in the study consists  of three
 technologies: a  soil washer,  an aqueous treatment
 system; and a slurry bio-reactor. The demonstration
 was carried  out at the MacGillis and Gibbs Superfund
 site in New Brighton, MN. The report analyzes the re-
 sults from the SITE demonstration. It includes discus-
 sion of the operation of the three separate treatment
 technologies (SW, SBR, and BATS) evaluated in the
 test and provides flow diagrams, a summary of the
 sampling and analytical programs, an economic analy-
 sis, and a quality assurance/quality control evaluation
 of the data. Conclusions were reached concerning the
 technology's suitability for use in remediations involv-
 ing both similar and different materials at other sites.

 Keywords-. 'Soil treatment, 'Land pollution control,
 'Waste management 'Wood preservatives, 'Biologi-
 cal treatment, 'Superfund, Remedial action, Aromatic
 polycyclic hydrocarbons, Aerobic processes, Separa-
 tion, Cost analysis, Phenol/pentachloro, Technology
 utilization, Performance evaluation, Biodeterioration,
 Hazardous  materials,  Quality control, Quality assur-
 ance, 'Soil washing,  'BioTrol soil washing system,
 New Brighton(Minnesota).
 34    Vol. 92, No. 1

-------
                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
PB92-115344/REB               PC E99/MF E99
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Proceedings: The 1991 International Symposium
on Radon and Radon Reduction Technology. Held
In Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on April 2-5,1991.
Cohen (S.) and Associates, Inc., McLean, VA.
Nov91,1616p-in4v
Set includes PB92-115351 through PB92-115385. See
also PB91 -234435. Sponsored by Environmental Pro-
tection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC.  Air and
Energy Engineering Research Lab.

No abstract available.
PB92-115351/REB               PC A18/MF A04
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Proceedings: The 1991 International Symposium
on  Radon and  Radon Reduction Technology.
Volume 1. Symposium Oral Papers Opening Ses-
sion and Technical Sessions 1 through 5. Symposi-
um paper Apr-Jul 91.
Cohen (S.) and Associates, Inc., McLean, VA.
T. D. Dyess, S. M. Conrath, C. M. Hardin, and S.
Cohen. Nov 91,417p EPA/600/9-91 /037A
Contract EPA-68-DO-0097
See also Volume 2, PB92-115369. Proceedings of a
symposium  held  in Philadelphia, PA. on  April 2-5,
1991.   Sponsored by  Environmental  Protection
Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Air and Energy
Engineering Research Lab.
Also available in set  of 4 reports PC E99/MF E99,
PB92-115344.

The proceedings, in four volumes, document the 1991
International Symposium on Radon and Radon Reduc-
tion Technology, held in Philadelphia, PA, April 2-5,
1991.  In all, 65 oral papers (including the welcome ad-
dress, the lead address, and the keynote address), 14
panel session papers,  and 40 poster papers were pre-
sented. The papers addressed a wide range of radon-
related topics. This volume contains government pro-
grams and policies, health studies, health risk commu-
nication,  measurement  methods,  radon  reduction
methods in existing houses, radon transport, and entry
dynamics.  The symposium speakers included EPA
personnel, representatives from federal and state en-
vironmental/health agencies, research and develop-
ment groups, academic and medical personnel, manu-
facturers of testing equipment, and those in the con-
struction and real estate industries. Attendees repre-
sented 14 countries other than the U.S. The interna-
tional  papers provided updates on government poli-
cies, results of surveys,  and technological develop-
ments in radon and radon reduction technology.

Keywords: 'Radon, "Buildings, *Air pollution control,
•Indoor air pollution, 'Meetings,  'Air  pollution abate-
ment  Radioactive materials, Public health. Air  pollu-
tion sampling, Environmental policy, Technology utili-
zation, Government policies, Environmental health.
Environmental transport, Residential buildings, For-
eign technology. Source reduction.


PB92-115369/REB               PC A19/MF A04
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Proceedings: The 1991 International Symposium
on  Radon and  Radon Reduction Technology.
Volume 2. Symposium Oral Papers Technical Ses-
sions 6 through 10. Symposium paper AprJul 91.
Cohen (S.) and Associates, Inc., McLean, VA.
T. M. Dyess, S. M. Conrath, C. M. Hardin, and S.
Cohen. Nov 91,449p EPA/600/9-91 /037B
Contract EPa-68-DO-0097
See also Volume 1,  PB92-115351 and Volume  3,
PB92-115377. Proceedings of a symposium held  in
Philadelphia, PA. on April 2-5,1991. Sponsored by En-
vironmental  Protection  Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Also available in set  of  4 reports  PC E99/MF E99,
PB92-115344.

The proceedings, in four volumes, document the 1991
International Symposium on Radon and Radon Reduc-
tion Technology, held in Philadelphia, PA, April 2-5,
1991. In all, 65 oral papers (including the welcome ad-
dress, the lead address, and the keynote address), 14
panel  session papers, and 40 poster papers were pre-
sented. The papers addressed a wide range of radon-
related topics. This volume contains survey results, ge-
ological data, radon-resistant new construction  meth-
ods, and radon measurement and mitigation in schools
and other large buildings. The symposium speakers in-
cluded EPA personnel, representatives from federal
and state environmental/health agencies,  research
and development groups, academic and medical per-
sonnel, manufacturers of testing equipment, and those
in the construction and real estate industries. Atten-
dees represented 14 countries other than the U.S. The
international papers provided updates on government
policies, results of surveys, and technological develop-
ments in radon and radon reduction technology.

Keywords: "Radon, "Buildings, *Air pollution control,
'Indoor air pollution,  'Meetings, 'Air pollution abate-
ment,  Environmental  surveys, Geology, Radiation de-
tection, School buildings, Technology utilization, Natu-
ral radioactivity,  Residential buildings, Construction,
Mitigation, State programs, Environmental policy, For-
eign technology.
PB92-115377/REB               PC A20/MF A04
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Proceedings: The 1991 International Symposium
on  Radon and  Radon  Reduction  Technology.
Volume 3. Symposium Panel and Poster Papers
Technical Sessions 1 through 5. Symposium papers
Apr-Jul 91.
Cohen (S.) and Associates, Inc., McLean, VA.
T. M. Dyess, S. M. Conrath, C. M. Hardin, and S.
Cohen. Nov 91,462p EPA/600/9-91 /037C
Contract EPA-68-DO-0097
See  also  Volume 2, PB92-115369 and Volume 4,
PB92-115385. Proceedings of a symposium held in
Philadelphia, PA. on April 2-5,1991. Sponsored by En-
vironmental Protection  Agency, Research  Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Also available in set of 4 reports PC  E99/MF E99,
PB92-115344.

The proceedings, in four volumes, document the 1991
International Symposium on Radon and Radon Reduc-
tion Technology,  held in Philadelphia,  PA,  April 2-5,
1991. In all, 65 oral papers (including the welcome ad-
dress, the lead address, and the keynote address), 14
panel session papers, and 40 poster papers were pre-
sented. The papers addressed a wide range of radon-
related topics. This volume contains risk communica-
tion,  detection of radon measurement tampering,
short-term/long-term   measurement,   and  poster
papers for Sessions I, II, III, IV, and V.

Keywords: 'Radon, 'Buildings, 'Air pollution control,
'Indoor air pollution, 'Meetings,  'Air pollution abate-
ment Risk assessment Public health, Environmental
health, Radiation  detection,  Air pollution  sampling,
Long term effects, Technology utilization, Short term
effects, Foreign technology.
PB92-11538S/REB               PC A13/MF A03
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Proceedings: The 1991 International Symposium
on Radon and  Radon Reduction Technology.
Volume 4. Symposium Poster Papers Technical
Sessions 6 through 10. Symposium paper Apr-Jul
91.
Cohen (S.) and Associates, Inc., McLean, VA.
T. M. Dyess, S. M. Conrath, C. M. Hardin, and S.
Cohen. Nov 91,288p EPA/600/9-91 /037D
Contract EPA-68-DO-0097
See also Volume 3, PB92-115377. Proceedings of a
symposium held in Philadelphia, PA. on April 2-5,
1991.  Sponsored  by  Environmental  Protection
Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Air and Energy
Engineering Research Lab.
Also available in set of 4 reports PC E99/MF E99,
PB92-115344.

The proceedings, in four volumes, document the 1991
International Symposium on Radon and Radon Reduc-
tion Technology, held in Philadelphia, PA, April 2-5,
1991. In all, 65 oral papers (including the welcome ad-
dress, the lead address, and  the keynote address), 14
panel session papers, and 40 poster papers were pre-
sented. The papers addressed a wide range of radon-
related topics. This volume contains poster presenta-
tions in the areas of radon  surveys,  state programs
and policies relating to radon, radon prevention in new
construction, radon occurrence in the  natural environ-
ment and radon in schools and large buildings.

Keywords: 'Radon, 'Buildings, 'Air pollution control,
•Indoor air pollution, 'Air pollution abatement 'Meet-
ings, Environmental surveys,  State programs, Environ-
mental   policy,    Construction,    Graphs(Charts),
Tables(Data), Residential buildings. Natural radioactiv-
ity, School buildings, Technology utilization, Environ-
mental protection. Geology, Foreign technology.
PB92-116037/REB               PC A07/MF A02
Parametric Analysis of the Installation and Oper-
ating Costs of Active Soil Depressurization Sys-
tems for Residential Radon Mitigation. Final rept.
Dec 90-May 91.
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
D. B. Henschel. Oct91,126p EPA/600/8-91/200

The report gives results of a recent analysis showing
that cost-effective indoor radon reduction technology
is required for houses with initial radon concentrations
<  4  pCi/L,  because 78-86% of the national  lung
cancer risk due to radon  is associated with those
houses. Active soil depressurization  (ASD) is an effec-
tive and widely applicable radon reduction technology,
but commercial use has been limited in part by installa-
tion and operating costs. A parametric cost analysis
was conducted to determine if ASD installation and op-
erating costs might be reduced enough to increase
voluntary use of the technology, especially in houses
< 4 pCi/L. The analysis showed that various modifica-
tions to ASD system designs offer potential for reduc-
ing installation costs by up to several hundred dollars,
but would not reduce total installed costs much below
$800-$1000. Such reductions would probably not be
enough to dramatically increase voluntary use of ASD
technology. Thus, some innovative, inexpensive miti-
gation approaches) that would be widely used, in addi-
tion to ASD, would appear to be necessary to reduce
the risk associated with low-radon houses. Decreased
ASD fan capacity and increased sealing might reduce
ASD  operating  costs (for fan electricity and house
heating/cooling) by roughly $7.50/mo. This amount
would not likely be a deciding factor for most home-
owners.

Keywords: 'Radon, 'Air pollution control, 'Indoor air
pollution,  'Houses,   Residential  buildings,  Public
health, Operations, Design criteria, Operating costs,
Performance  evaluation,  Installing,  Cost  analysis,
Fans, Seating, 'Active Soil Depressurization Systems,
Subslab depressurization systems, Sump/draintile de-
pressurization  systems,  Blockwall  depressurization
systems, Crawlspaoe submembrane depressurization
systems.
 PB92-116045/REB               PC A06/MF A02
 Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
 Evaluating Design  and Verifying  Compliance  of
 Created Wetlands m f   " '  "   ' ~       ~  '
                                                  da.
                                                                     i the Vicinity of Tampa, Flori-
 ManTech  Environmental Technology, Inc., Corvallis,
 OR.
 S. E. Gwin, M. E. Kentula, and D. L. Frostholm. Oct 91,
 110p EPA/600/3-91 /068
 Contract EPA-68-C8-0006
 See also PB90-261512. Prepared in cooperation with
 Florida Univ., Gainesville. Center for Wetlands. Spon-
 sored by Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.

 Completed mitigation projects are being studied by the
 Wetlands  Research Program  nationwide to  identify
 critical design features, develop methods for evaluat-
 ing projects, determine the functions they perform, and
 describe how they change with time. The report is the
 second in a series designed to evaluate the physical
 adequacy of created wetlands  by comparing  field
 measurements of wetlands created as compensatory
 mitigation with their construction plans and permit con-
 ditions.  Because  the information  contained in  the
 project fields was  limited to hydrology, wetland area,
 wetland shape, slopes of banks, and vegetation, eval-
 uation was also limited to these elements. It is impor-
 tant to examine wetland area created to ensure that
 losses in area do not occur as a result of compensato-
 ry mitigation, and wetland shape and slopes of banks
 are structural features which influence wetland type
 and wildlife habitat.

 Keywords:   'Swamps,   'Construction,   'Marshes,
 'Design criteria, Slopes, Shape, Habitats, Banks, Wild-
 life,   Hydrology,   'Wetlands,   Clean  Water  Act
 Tampa(Florida), Mitigation.
 PB92-116052/REB               PC A12/MF A03
 Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
                                                                                                                               Mar 1992    35

-------
                                                EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
Plant Tier Testing: A Workshop to Evaluate Non-
target  Plant  Testing  In  Subdivision  J Pesticide
GukfoHn08. Hold In CorvAflte, Orooon on Novwiv
her 20-Oecember 1,1990.
Oklahoma Univ., Norman.
J. Fletcher, and H. Ratsch. 1 Oct 91,256p EPA/600/
9-91/041
See also PB83-153940 and PB87-101705. Sponsored
by Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is required
by law (The Federal Insecticide,  Fungicide, and Ro-
dentictde Act) to determine the potential hazard posed
by pesticides to nontarget vegetation. This is accom-
plished by examining phytotoxicity data collected and
submitted by registrants according to procedures de-
scribed in SubdMsfen J of the Pesticide Assessment
Guidelines. Although these guidelines were published
in 1982, their performance has never been evaluated
by a working group representing different scientific ex-
pertise and economic interests.  Therefore, the pur-
pose of the workshop was to critically evaluate the tier
test system described in Subdivision J, and make rec-
ommendations as to how the guidelines may be im-
proved.

Keywords: *P1ants(Botany), 'Pesticides, 'Tests, *Tox-
icity, Hazards, Performance  evaluation,  Field tests,
Laboratories,  Standards. Herbicides, Potatoes, Inju-
ries, Environmental impacts. Air pollution.
PB92-117936/REB               PC A10/MF A03
Manual of SmaB PubHc Water Supply Systems.
Environmental  Protection Agency. Washington, DC.
Office of Drinking Water.
May 91,21 Op EPA/570/9-91/003
Sec also PB85-242279.

The manual is designed to assist owners and opera-
tors of small public water systems in their goal of pro-
viding safe and sustainable water to their customers. It
contains appropriate information about requirements
under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act and basic
information about implementing water quality improve-
ments. Like the predecessor document 'Manual of In-
dividual Water  Supply Systems' (EPA-570/9-82-004,
1982), the manual contains practical  information for
building safe water systems. The manual is updated
with current technology information.  Coverage in-
cludes the basics of water purification by dfeinfection
and filtration; package plants; corrosion control; de-
salting; household treatment units; solar-, wind-, and
hand-powered pumping devices; sanitary water catch-
ment defluoridation; conservation; and other subjects.
The manual is also outfitted with useful advice for im-
proving the ties among the community, water system
owners and operators, and external groups that offer
financial, technical and other support to small systems.

Keywords:      'Public      utilities,      •Water
distribution(Applied), 'Water  supply. 'Water quality,
•Water treatment,  'Water pollution  control, •Potable
water.    Surface    water,    Manuals,    Water
management(Applied), Ground water, Water weds.
Energy sources, Disinfection, Water sources, Distribu-
tion systems. Houses, Pumping, Water storage. De-
salination,'Small systems. Safe Drinking Water Act
PB92-117944/REB               PC A09/MF A02
Manual of Individual and Non-PuMc Water Supply
Systems.
Environmental  Protection Agency,  Washington. DC.
Office ot the Assistant Adminfetrator for Water.
May 91,182p EPA/570/9-91/004
See also PB85-242279.

The manual is designed to help owners and operators
of small non-public water supplies that are not subject
to Federal  regulation but nonetheless share sknter
water quality problems. Federal standards are briefly
discussed as are the institutions that support water
suppliers. Like the predecessor document, 'Manual of
Individual Water Supply Systems' (EPA-570-9-82-004,
1982), the  manual contains practical information for
bidding safe and sustainable safe water systems. The
manual is updated with current technology information.
Coverage includes the basics of water purificatjonby
disinfection and filtration; package plants; corrosion
control; desalting; household treatment units; solar-,
wind-, and  hand-powered pumping devices; sanitary
water catchment; defluoridation; conservation; and
other subjects.
Keywords: 'Water supply, 'Water treatment, 'Water
quality,  'Potable  water,  'Water pollution control,
•Water distribution(Applied), Manuals, Operation and
maintenance. Water management(Apptied), Ground
water, Surface water,  Energy sources, Disinfection,
Water sources, Distribution systems, Houses, Pump-
ing, Water storage. Desalination, 'Small systems, Safe
Drinking Water Act
PB92-117993/REB               PC A04/MF A01
Environmental  Protection Agency,  Washington, DC.
Office of the Assistant Administrator for Water.
Pflylno  for Sflfo Wtatan  Altai nfltivo  FInsncing
Mechanisms for State Drinking Water Programs.
Final rept
Government Finance Officers Association, Washing-
ton, DC. Government Finance Research Center.
Sep 90,54p EPA/570/9-90/014
Sponsored  by  Environmental  Protection  Agency,
Washington, DC. Office of the Assistant Administrator
for Water.

The booklet discusses alternate financing mecha-
nisms that can be used by states to meet the needs of
their drinking water programs. These mechanisms in-
clude user fees, dedicated or 'earmarked' taxes, fines
and penalties.

Keywords: 'Potable water, 'State programs, 'Financ-
ing, 'Water pollution economics, Substitutes, Funding,
Penalties, Case studies, Water quality. Water supply,
Water  management(Applied),  State  implementation
plans. User charges, Fees, Safe Drinking Water Act of
1974.
                                                  PB92-1 18009/REB
                                                                                  PC A03/MF A01
                                                  Evaluation of a Vehicle Equipped with a Direct In-
                                                  jection Engine Using  Neat MethanoL  Technical
                                                  rept
                                                  Environmental Protection Agency, Ann Arbor, Ml. Con-
                                                  trol Technology and Applications Branch.
                                                  R. I. Bruetsch, and K. H. HeHman. Sep 91 , 35p EPA/
                                                  AA/CTAB-91/06
                                                  SeealsoPB90-203217.

                                                  The cyclic and steady-state vehicle emissions, fuel
                                                  economy, performance, and cold start behavior of an
                                                  automobile equipped with a direct  injection methanol
                                                  engine are compared with those of three other compa-
                                                  rable vehicles. One of the comparable vehicles was
                                                  powered by a gasoline-fueled engine, and the other
                                                  two were Diesels. One of the Diesel-powered vehicles
                                                  was naturally aspirated and  the  other was turbo-
                                                  charged. AH evaluations were made using the same
                                                  road load horsepower and equivalent test weight All
                                                  the evaluations were conducted at low mileage.

                                                  Keywords: •Automotive fuels, 'Methand, Perform-
                                                  ance evaluation, Diesel  engines, Tests, Motor vehi-
                                                  cles, Alternative fuels, Exhaust emissions.
PB92-118017/REB               PC A06/MF A02
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park. NC. Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards.
Emission  Inventory  RsouJrsntents for  Ozone

Radan Corp.. Research Triangle Park, NC.
Mar 91,105p EPA/450/4-91/010
Contract EPA-68-D00125
See also PB89-152383. Sponsored by Environmental
Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Office
erf Air Quality Planning and Standards.

The document describes the emission inventory  re-
quirements related to preparation and submission of
ozone State  Implementation  Plans (SIPs)  for those
States required to revise their plans after November
15,1990. Addressed in the document are emission in-
ventory requirements relating to geographic area of
coverage, point  source cutoff  size  specifications,
sources to be included, pollutants of interest, date re-
porting formats, documentation requirements, quality
of data base, years to be addressed, and schedule for
inventory submission.

Keywords: 'State implementation plans, 'Ozone, 'Air
pollution, Requirements, Point sources. Volatile organ-
ic compounds.   Clean Air  Act,  Pollution  sources,
FormsfPaper), Specifications, Revisions, Site surveys,
•Emission inventories.
PB92-118447/REB               PC A06/MF A02
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Atmospheric Research and Exposure As-
sessment Lab.
Forest Health Monitoring Plot Design and Logis-
tics Study.
ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc., Research
Triangle Park, NC.
K. Riitters, M. Papp, D. Cassell, and J. Hazard. Aug 91,
123p EPA/600/3-91/051
Contract EPA-68-DO-0106
See also PB92-103449. Prepared in cooperation with
Lockheed Engineering and Sciences Co.,  Inc.,  Las
Vegas, NV., ManTech  Environmental Technology,
Inc., Corvallis, OR., and Statistical Consulting Service,
Bend, OR.  Sponsored by Environmental Protection
Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Atmospheric Re-
search and Exposure Assessment Lab.

Concern over the condition of forests in relation to nat-
ural and manmade stresses has ted to an interagency
Forest Health Monitoring program. To improve the effi-
ciency of forest monitoring, the forest group of EPA's
Environmental  Monitoring and Assessment Program
conducted a field test of selected measurements. The
objectives of the  field test were to decide statistical,
plot design, and  logistical issues. Measurements of
soil, vegetation structure, foliar chemistry, mensura-
tion, light transmittance,  and visual symptoms were
made at 40 plot locations in New England and Virginia.
The data were used to  derive optimum multi-stage
sampling  intensities for different  cost assumptions.
The field test also provided a realistic test of logistics.
The numbers of different types of measurements are
recommended for monitoring in these forest types and
regions. Specific recommendations are also made to
streamline field sampling. In general, the plot designs
and sampling intensities currently used for forest mod-
eling are adequate for the measurements tested.

Keywords:  'Forestry,  'Environmental  monitoring,
'Ecosystems, Logistics, Field tests, New England, Vir-
ginia, Statistical analysis, Design criteria, Man-environ-
ment interactions, Soil surveys, Vegetation, Sampling,
Foliar uptake, Light penetration, Plant growth, 'Forest
Health Monitoring Program, Environmental Monitoring
and Assessment Program.
PB92-119015/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
Estimating Critical Loads of Sulfate to Surface
Waters in the Northeastern United States: A Com-
parative Assessment of Three Procedures for Es-
timating Critical Loads of Sulfate for Lakes.
ManTech Environmental Technology,  Inc., Corvallis,
OR.
P. W. Shaffer, B. Rosenbaum, G. R. Holdren, T. C.
Strickland, and M. K. McDowell. Nov 91,44p EPA/
600/3-91/062
Contract DE-AC05-84OR21400
See also DE91010125.  Prepared in cooperation with
Oak Ridge National Lab.,  TN., and Science Applica-
tions International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN.  Sponsored
by Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR., and
Department of Energy, Washington, DC.

The objective of the U.S.  critical loads program  has
been to develop a framework for estimating critical
loads and to evaluate the effects of multiple assump-
tions inherent in those estimates. A general framework
for developing critical loads estimates was developed
by the UNECe (1990). A flow chart describing this pro-
cedure. The status report presents examples of efforts
to estimate critical loads of sulfate for surface waters
in the United States and discusses the effects of differ-
ent assumptions on the final estimates. Sulfate in sur-
face water was selected as the pollutant-receptor pair
for the current  examination because the information
necessary to evaluate the  assumptions are better de-
veloped for this pair  than for any other  candidates
(e.g., nitrate effect on soil acidification) in the U.S. It is
important to note that no attempt to evaluate or identi-
fy any of the results presented here as right/wrong, or
to rank the reliability of results was made.  The objec-
tive, rather, has been  to generate sets of critical load
estimates using multiple models and data sets, and to
compare the results. The results presented here repre-
sent a first step in the  critical evaluation of models
used to estimate critical toads and to cross-validate
model-based estimates.  The results have demonstrat-
ed substantial  variability in critical loads estimated
using different datasets  and procedures. Given these
results,  it seems dear that extensive  review, refine-
ment and verification of models and datasets will be
36     Vol. 92, No. 1

-------
                                                  EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
required before any critical load estimates can be reli-
ably used.

Keywords: *Water pollution effects, "Surface waters,
"Sulfates, "Mathematical models, "Acidification, Study
estimates. Substitutes,  Comparison, Exposure, pH,
Water chemistry, Biological indicators, Ecosystems,
Acid neutralizing capacity, Lakes, Air pollution, Deposi-
tion, Air water interactions, 'Northeast Region(United
States), 'Critical  loads, Direct/Delayed  Response
Project.
PB92-119023/REB                PC A04/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
Reduction Engineering Lab.
DuPont/Oberlin Mterofiltratlon Technology. Appli-
cations Analysis Report Final rept.
PRC Environmental Management, Inc., Chicago, IL.
Oct 91.62p EPA/540/A5-90/007
Contract EPA-68-CO-0047
See also PB84-128677 and PB90-144155. Sponsored
by Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH.
Risk Reduction Engineering Lab.

The DuPont/Obertin microfiltration technology demon-
stration was conducted under the SITE program at the
Palmerton Zinc Superfund site in Palmerton, Pennsyl-
vania, in April and May 1990.  During the demonstra-
tion, the microfiltration system achieved zinc and total
suspended  solids (TSS) removal efficiencies of about
99.95 percent, and a filter cake solids content of 41
percent The filter cake contained no free liquids, and a
composite  sample  from all the demonstration runs
passed both the extraction procedure toxicity charac-
teristic leaching procedure (TCLP) test. The filtrate met
applicable  National Pollutant  Discharge Elimination
System permit limits for metals and TSS.

Keywords: "Water pollution control, "Hazardous mate-
rials, "Land pollution control, "Superfund,  "Liquid fil-
ters, "Liquid wastes, Zinc, Metals, Total suspended
participates, Materials handling, Economic analysis,
Pollution  regulations, Waste disposal, Waste water,
Case studies,  Performance evaluation, Technology uti-
lization, Design criteria,  Standards compliance, 'Mi-
crofiltration, "DuPont/Oberlin  Microfiltration Treat-
ment System, Toxicity characteristic leaching proce-
dure, National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System,
Pretreatment processes, Chemical treatment.
PB92-119957/REB                PC A07/MF A02
Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research  Lab., Ada,
OK. Processes and Systems Research Div.
Model of Virus Transport in Unsaturated Soil. Re-
search rept
Agricultural Research Service, Riverside, CA. Salinity
Lab.
M. V. Yates, S. R. Yates, and Y. Ouyang. Dec 91,148p
EPA/600/2-91/062
See also PB91-137307. Prepared in cooperation with
California Univ., Riverside. Dept. of Soil and Environ-
mental Sciences. Sponsored by Robert S. Ken- Envi-
ronmental Research Lab., Ada, OK.  Processes and
Systems Research Div.

As  a  result of the  recently-proposed  mandatory
ground-water disinfection requirements to inactivate
viruses in potable water supplies, there has been in-
creasing interest in virus fate and transport in the sub-
surface. Several models have been developed to pre-
dict the fate of viruses in ground water, but few include
transport in  the unsaturated zone, and all require a
constant virus inactivation rate. These are serious limi-
tations in the models, as it has been shown that con-
siderable virus removal  occurs in the unsaturated
zone, and inactivation rate of viruses is dependent on
environmental conditions. The purpose  of  the  re-
search was to develop a predictive model of virus fate
and transport in unsaturated soils that allows the virus
inactivation rate to vary based on changes in soil tem-
perature. The model was developed based on the law
of  mass conservation  of a contaminant  in porous
media and couples the flow of water, viruses, and heat
through the soil. Model predictions were compared to
measured data of virus transport in laboratory column
studies, and were within the 95% confidence limits of
the measured concentrations. Model simulations were
performed to identify variables that have a large effect
on  the results.

Keywords: "Viruses, 'Soil microorganisms, "Land pol-
lution, "Environmental transport, "Water pollution con-
trol, "Mathematical models, Zone of aeration, Unsatu-
rated flow, Path of pollutants, Porous media, Disinfec-
tion, Disease outbreaks, Ground water, Potable water,
Water supply, Soil temperature, VIRTUS model.


PB92-120427/REB               PC A02/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Modeling Air Row Dynamics in Radon Mitigation
Systems: A Simplified Approach. Journal article
May90-Mar91.
Princeton Univ., NJ. Center for Energy and Environ-
mental Studies.
T. A. Reddy, K. J. Gadsby, H. E. Black, D. T. Harrje,
and R. G. Sextro. C1991, 9p EPA/600/J-91 /318
Pub. in Jnl. of Air and Waste Management Association,
v41 n11 p1476-1482 Nov 91. Prepared in cooperation
with Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA. Indoor Environment
Program. Sponsored  by Environmental Protection
Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Air and Energy
Engineering Research Lab.

The paper refines and extends an earlier study-relat-
ing to the design of optimal radon mitigation systems
based on subslab depressurization-that suggested
that subslab air flow induced by a central suction point
be treated as radial air flow through a porous bed con-
tained between  two impermeable disks. It also shows
that subslab air flow is most likely to be turbulent under
actual field situations in houses with subslab gravel
beds,  while  remitting  laminar when soil is present
under the slab. It discusses the physical significance of
a model and derives simplified closed-form equations
to predict pressure and flows at various distances from
a single central depressurization point. A laboratory
apparatus was built to verify the model and experimen-
tally determine the model coefficients of the pressure
drop versus flow for commonly encountered subslab
gravel materials. These pressure drop coefficients can
be used in conjunction with the simplified model as a
rational means  of assessing subslab connectivity in
actual houses, which is an important aspect of the pre-
mitigation diagnostic phase. Preliminary field verifica-
tion results in a house with gravel under the basement
slab are presented and discussed.

Keywords: "Mitigation, "Air pollution control,  "Radon,
"Air flow, "Indoor air pollution,  "Mathematical models,
Residential buildings, Performance  evaluation, Pres-
sure  dependence, Dynamics,  Experimental  design,
Environmental engineering, Design criteria, Soil gases,
Air  infiltration,  Reprints,  "Subslab depressurization
systems, Active  soil depressurization systems.


PB92-120435/REB                PC A03/MF A01
RCRA Cover Systems for Waste Management Fa-
cilities. Journal  article.
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
Reduction Engineering Lab.
R. E. Landreth, and D. A. Carson. c1991,11 p EPA/
600/J-91/319
Pub. in Geotextiles and Geomembranes, v10 p383-
391 1991.

The closure of waste management facilities, whether
Subtitle C, Subtitle D or CERCLA, requires consider-
ation  of site-specific information, the Federal regula-
tions  and applicability of state regulations and the liq-
uids management strategy. The paper will present the
current EPA guidance for covers at hazardous waste
facilities. Also discussed are insights into the proposed
Subtitle D and CERCLA requirements for closure.
(Copyright (c) 1991 Elsevier Science Publishers.)

Keywords: "Waste management, "Hazardous materi-
als, "Ground cover, "Coverings, "Closures, 'Land pol-
lution control,  Pollution regulations, Guidelines,  Re-
quirements, Leaching, Earth fills, Environmental trans-
port, Reprints, "Resource Conservation Recovery Act,
Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensa-
tion and Liability Act, Geosynthetic materials.
 PB92-120443/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Cost  Analysis of  Soil  Depressurization Tech-
 niques for Indoor Radon Reduction. Journal article
 Dec90-May91.
 Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
 Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
 D. B. Henschel. C1991,17p EPA/600/J-91 /320
 Pub. in Indoor Air, v1 n3 p337-351 Sep 91.

 The article discusses a parametric cost analysis to
 evaluate active soil depressurization (ASD) systems
 for indoor radon reduction in houses. The analysis de-
 termined the relative importance of 14 ASD design
variables and 2 operating variables on the installation
and operating costs of residential ASD systems in sev-
eral types of houses. Knowledge of Jhe most important
variables would enable EPA's research and develop-
ment efforts to be more effectively directed at ways to
reduce ASD costs and thus to increase utilization of
the technology. Parameters offering the greatest po-
tential  for reductions in installation costs included
three dealing with houses with poor subslab communi-
cation: (1) reducing the number of subslab depressuri-
zation pipes; (2) eliminating excavation of large subs-
lab pits beneath the suction pipes to improve suction
field extension; and (3) improving the effectiveness of
premitigation subslab communication diagnostic test-
ing in achieving simpler, less expensive ASD system
designs. In addition,  determining acceptable condi-
tions for discharging ASD exhaust at grade level would
reduce installation costs. Better design guidance for
crawl-space submembrane depressurization (SMD)
systems could reduce  installation  costs,  if  difficult
membrane  sealing steps and complete coverage of
the crawl-space floor by the membrane can be avoid-
ed.

Keywords: "Indoor air pollution, "Radon, "Air pollution
control, "Houses, "Cost analysis, Mitigation, Residen-
tial buildings, Design criteria, Performance evaluation,
Installation, Operating costs, Environmental engineer-
ing, Radioactive aerosols, Reprints, "Active Soil De-
pressurization Systems, Subslab depressurization sys-
tems,  Crawlspace  submembrane  depressurization
systems.
 PB92-120450/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
 Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
 Trajectory and Incineration of Rogue Droplets in
 a Turbulent Diffusion Flame. Journal article.
 Energy and Environmental Research Corp., Durham,
 NC.
 S. R. Agrawal, W. S. Lanier, R. K. Srivastava, J. A.
 Mulholland, and J. O. L. Wendt. c1991,16p EPA/600/
 J-91/321
 Contracts EPA-68-02-4247, EPA-68-02-3988
 Pub. in Combustion and Flame, v86  p297-310 1991.
 Prepared in cooperation with Acurex Corp., Research
 Triangle  Park, NC.,  Massachusetts  Inst of Tech.,
 Cambridge. Dept. of Chemical Engineering, and Arizo-
 na Univ.,  Tucson. Dept. of Chemical  Engineering.
 Sponsored by Environmental Protection Agency, Re-
 search Triangle Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering
 Research Lab.

 Of the hazardous organic  wastes produced in the
 United States, about  75% are liquids or dissolved in
 liquids. Hazardous compounds that are not completely
 destroyed when treated in this way, or any hazardous
 products of incomplete combustion  (PICs) that are
 produced and not destroyed, will be either emitted into
 the atmosphere as a gas or aerosol or captured in the
 solid residue for subsequent disposal. The paper gives
 results of measurements of the trajectory and inciner-
 ation efficiency of individual droplet streams of a fuel
 mixture injected into a swirling gas turbulent diffusion
 flame, as a function of droplet size, droplet velocity, in-
 terdroplet spacing, and droplet injection angle. Addi-
 tional experiments were performed in a laminar flow
 flat flame burner to evaluate the predictive capabilities
 of  a droplet stream burning model, simplified by as-
 suming infinitely  fast  flame chemistry and by utilizing
 measured temperature and velocity fields. It was found
 that use of a measured burning rate parameter signifi-
 cantly improved  model predictions.  Destruction  of
 these droplets appears to limit overall incineration effi-
 ciency.

 Keywords: "Trajectories, "Incineration, "Liquid waste
 disposal,   "Combustion  efficiency,   "Mathematical
 models, "Drops(Liquids), "Flames, Thermal environ-
 ment Combustion products, Turbulent diffusion,  Haz-
 ardous materials, Performance evaluation, Air pollu-
 tion abatement, Particle size, Combustion kinetics, Re-
 prints.
 PB92-120468/REB               PC A02/MF A01
 Health  Effects Research Lab.,  Research Triangle
 Park, NC.
 Potentlatton of Inhibition with Perforant Path Kin-
 dling: An NMDA-Receptor  Dependent Process.
 Journal article.
 ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc., Research
 Triangle Park, NC.
 M. E. Gilbert C1991,10p EPA/600/J-91/322


                            Mar 1992    37

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                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
Contract EPA-68-02-4450
Pub. in Brain Research, v564 m p109-116, 8 Nov 91.
Sponsored by Health Effects Research  Lab., Re-
search Triangle Park, NC.

Kindling produces a long-lasting enhancement of exci-
tatory and inhibitory  neurptransmission.  Both long-
term potentiation arid kindling-induced pptentiation of
hippocampal excitatory neurotransmission  are sup-
pressed by N-methyt-D-aspartate  (NMDA) receptor
antagonists. These antagonists also greatly retard the
development of electrical kindling. The authors have
previously reported prolonged afterdischarges (AO) in
animals stimulated in the perforant path and treated
with the NMDA antagonist, dizocilpine maleate (MK-
801), despite a retardation in the development of kin-
dling. In the study the potentiation of excitation and in-
hibition was assessed during perforant path kindling
when NMDA channels were blocked with MK-801.
Paired pulse inhibition at 8 interpulse intervals (IPI20-
1000 ms)  was monitored before and during kindling
development MK-801 (1 mg/kg. i.p.) delivered 30 min
prior to  perforant path stimulation  increased  AD
thresholds and delayed kindling development Poten-
tiation of the excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP)
and of paired pulse inhibition measured 20-24 h after
each drug administration/stimulation were suppressed
in MK-801-treated  animals. Paradoxically, AD dura-
tions were prolonged by MK-801. Longer AD durations
could be accounted for by a higher incidence of sec-
ondary AD bouts in MK-801  relative to control animals.
Development of potentiation of the early phase of
paired pulse inhibition (IPI 20-30 ms) was delayed and
the potentiation of the late phase of inhibition (I Pis of
200-1000  ms)  was completely blocked by MK-801.
Thus, some of the enhancement of inhibition seen with
kindling is dependent upon NMDA neurotransmission.
Suppression of the potentiated inhibition may account
for prolonged focal ADs in the perforant path and den-
tate gyrus. (Copyright (c) 1991 Elsevier Science Pub-
lishers B.V.)

Keywords: *Kindling(Neurotogy), •N-methyl-D-aspar-
tate receptor. Hippocampus, Dizocilpine maleate, Syn-
apses, Amygdala, Rats, Reprints, •Perforant path.
PB92-120476/REB             .   PCA03/MFA01
Health Effects Research  Lab.,  Research Triangle
PanXNC.
Cotchtdne-lnduced Deafterentatkm of the Hippo-
campus Selectively Disrupts ChoMnerglc Rhythmi-
cal Stow Wave Activity. Journal article.
ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc., Research
Triangle Park. NC.
M. E Gilbert, and G. M. Peterson. c1991,12p EPA/
600/J-91/323
Contract EPA-68-02-4450
Pub. in Brain Research, vS64 n1 p117-126,8 Nov 91.
Prepared in  cooperation  with  East  Carolina Univ.
School of Medicine,  Greenville,  NC. Sponsored  by
Health Effects Research  Lab.,  Research Triangle
PanXNC.

It has been proposed that hippocampal rhythmical
stow wave activity (RSA or theta-rhythm) induced by
sensory stimulation (atropine-sensrttve theta) is gener-
ated by the cholinergic septo-hippocampal system. Al-
though ablations of file septum or its projections to the
hippocampus disrupt hippocampal RSA, such non-se-
lective lesions damage both cholinergic and non-cho-
Bnergic septo-hippocampal inputs. The study assesses
the effects of a selective septal neurotoxic  lesion on
hippocampal electrical activity. Cotehtcine, which has
been reported to-be selectively toxic to cholinergic
neurons in the medial septum, was injected into the
right lateral ventricle, and electrodes were implanted
bilaterally into the dorsal hippocampus of female Spra-
gue-Dawley rats. Hippocampal electrical activity was
recorded 10-14 days later from the  ipsilateral (cotehi-
oine-treated) and contralateral (control)  hemispheres
during tocomotor activity or immobility.  RSA ranging
from 6.3 to 8.7 Hz was evoked in both hippocampi
during mobility. Following i.p. administration of an an-
esthetic dose of urethane, hippocampal RSA at a fre-
quency of 4 Hz could be elicited in the control hemi-
sphere (n=12) of all animals by pinching the tail. RSA
was absent in 6 of 9 animals in the cotehicine-treated
hemisphere.  RSA from control and treated  hemi-
spheres persisting after urethane administration was
abolished by 5 mg/kg of scopolamine, thus verifying its
cholinergic nature. A decrease in the number of cho-
Ine  acetyttransferase  (ChATHmmunoreactive neu-
rons in the medial septum and a depletion  of acetyl-
choKnesterase (AChE)-stainmg  in the hippocampus
were evident in the hemisphere ipsilateral to colchicine
administration. These data support the  septal pace-
maker  hypothesis of hippocampal theta-rhythm and
further demonstrate the neurotoxic effect of colchicine
on septo-hippocampal cholinergic neurons by the  in-
duction of a functional alteration. The selective disrup-
tion of cholinergic neurons in the  medial septum  by
colchicine provides a means to dissociate the contri-
bution  of septal cholinergic and non-cholinergic com-
ponents to hippocampal electrical activity. (Copyright
(c) 1991 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V.)

Keywords: •Colchicine, 'Hippocampus,  'Cholinergic
receptors, 'Afferent neurons, 'Toxicology, Acetylcho-
linesterase,  Locomotion,  Rats,  Urethane,  Scopola-
mine, Reprints, * Rhythmical slow wave activity.
PB92-120484/REB                PC A02/MF A01
Health Effects Research  Lab.,  Research Triangle
Park, NC.
Genotoxldty In Mouse Lymphoma Cells of Chemi-
cals Capable of Michael Addition. Journal article.
Environmental Health Research and Testing, Inc., Re-
search Triangle Park, NC.
K. L Dearfield, K. Harrington-Brock, C. L Doerr, J. R.
Rabinowitz, and M. M. Moore. C1991,9p EPA/600/ J-
91/324
Contract EPA-68-02-4456
Pub. in Mutagenesis, v6 n6 p519-525 Nov 91.  Spon-
sored by Health Effects Research Lab., Research Tri-
angle Park, NC.

Chemical agents that react via the Michael addition re-
action have important industrial and consumer applica-
tions. Over the past several years, the authors have
been evaluating the mutagenicity and clastpgenicity of
compounds capable of Michael-type reactions. These
compounds, including  acrylamide, several  acrylate
and methacrylate esters, vinyl sulfones, and phorone,
have  been evaluated using TK(+/-)-3.7.2C  mouse
lymphoma  cells.  Mutagenic chemicals induced  in-
creases in the number of small colony tk(-) deficient
mutants.  This suggested a clastogenic  mechanism
which was confirmed  by demonstrating increases in
aberrations and mteronucleus frequencies in cultured
cells,  vinyl sulfone was found to be the most effective
chemical  mutagen with induction of genotoxic effects
at concentrations as low as 0.25 microgram/ml.  The
other compounds also produced positive results, but at
higher concentrations.

Keywords:  * Lymphoma,   'Mutagens, 'Toxic  sub-
stances, Cultured tumor cells, Mutagenicity tests, Thy-
mkjine kinase, Metabolic activation, Mice, Acrylates,
Sulfones, Reprints, 'Michael addition reaction.
PB92-120492/REB               PC A02/MF A01
Neural Factors in the Development of Renal Func-
tion: Effect of Neonatal Central Catechotaminer-
gto Lesions with 6-Hydroxydopamine. Journal arti-
cle.
Health Effects Research  Lab.,  Research  Triangle
Park,NC.
J. A. Gray, R. J. Kavlock, F. J. Seidler, and T. A.
Stotkin. C1991, 8p EPA/600/J-91 /325
Pub. in Jnl. of Developmental Physiology, v15 p325-
330 Nov 91. Prepared in cooperation with Duke Univ.
Medical Center, Durham, NC. Dept of Pharmacology.

Peripheral sympathetic neurons are thought to provide
trophic regulatory  signals  for  development of their
target tissues. In the current study, the authors investi-
gated the role of sympathetic tone in the functional de-
velopment of the kidney in the rat using intracistemal
administration  of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The
treatment destroys central catecholaminergic  path-
ways and permanently reduces sympathetic activity
without ablating peripheral nerves terminals.  Renal
function was evaluated  over the first two postnatal
weeks, a period of  rapid gtomerular and  tubular matu-
ration, by tests of basal renal clearance, urinary con-
centrating ability in response to fluid deprivation, and
the response to a vasopressin analog  (DDAVP).  Al-
though basal renal  clearance and the homeostatic re-
sponse to fluid deprivation developed normally in the
lesioned rats,  the  response to a maximally-effective
dose of DDAVP was attenuated at the end of the
second postnatal  week, a time during  which the
normal response increased dramatically.

Keywords: * Vasopressin, 'Kidney, 'Catecholamines,
•Peripheral nerves. Body weight, Homeostasis, Rats,
Newborn animals, Kidney concentrating ability, Organ
weight Water consumption, Reprints.
PB92-120500/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Mercury Deposition and Sources  for  the  Upper
Great Lakes Region. Journal article.
Environmental Research Lab.-Duluth, MN.
G. E. Glass, J. A. Sorensen, K. W. Schmidt, G. R.
Rapp, and D. Yap. C1991,17p EPA/600/J-91/326
Pub. in Water, Air, and Soil Pollution, v56 p235-249
Dec 91. Prepared in cooperation with Minnesota Univ.,
Duluth. Coll. of Science and Engineering, and Ontario
Ministry of the Environment Rexdale.

Mercury concentrations and depositions for northeast-
em Minnesota were measured in precipitation to inves-
tigate depositional trends, relationships with major ca-
tions and anions, and possible source emission re-
gions. Results for 1987-1990 showed that environ-
mentally significant amounts of Hg are present in pre-
cipitation and air and are subsequently deposited to
remote lake watersheds. Volume-weighted concentra-
tions of total Hg in precipitation averaged about 18 ng
Hg/L with calculated annual  depositions near 15 mi-
crograms Hg/sq m. Mercury concentrations in precipi-
tation are positively correlated with  the  major ions,
conductivity, and  pH,  and are negatively correlated
with precipitation volume. The best predictor equation
from stepwise regression has an r(sup 2) of 0.65 with
Mg and chloride concentrations as predictor variables.
From measurements of Hg in rain  concentrations as a
function of  time within events, scavenging ratios for
'washable'  Hg were calculated to be 140 + of - 80
(mass based at a 1 mm/hr precipitation rate). Up to
about 10%  of the total Hg in  air is subject to washout
by precipitation for a given event. Air parcel back-tra-
jectories indicate that  possible source regions within
72-hr travel time were located mostly to the  south,
southeast,  and southwest up to 2500 km distance
away but local  sources may also be important (Copy-
right (c) 1991 Kluwer Academic Publishers.)

Keywords: 'Mercury(Metal), •Water pollution, 'Depo-
sition, 'Air  water interactions,  "Pollution  sources,
Great Lakes, Concentration(Composition), Air pollu-
tion,  Precipitation(Meteorology),  Biological  effects.
Trends,  Ions, Fishes, Environmental transport, Precipi-
tation      washout      Reprints,      Northeast
Region(Minnesota).
PB92-120831/REB                PC E05/MF A03
Another Look: National Survey of Pesticides In
Drinking Water Wells. Phase 2 Report
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Jan 92,194p EPA/579/09-91 /020
See also PB91 -125765.

The Phase 2 report of the National Pesticide Survey
studies how detections and concentrations of nitrate
and pesticides in drinking water wells are affected by
the sensitivity of groundwater to contamination, use of
fertilizers and pesticides, precipitation, irrigation, the
chemical characteristics of  pesticides, and the age,
depth, construction, and location of community water
supply wells and rural domestic water supply wells.

Keywords: 'Water supply, 'Pesticides, 'Water wells,
'Water pollution monitoring, 'United States, Surveys,
Drinking        water,       Ground       water,
Concentration(Composition), Inorganic nitrates, Fertil-
izers,  Statistical data, Chemical analysis, Age, Depth,
Communities,  Sites,   Construction,  Mathematical
models, Detection.
PB92-121144/REB                PCA03/MFA01
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Atmospheric Research and Exposure As-
sessment Lab.
Routine Estimation and Reporting of Dry Deposi-
tion for the U.SJV. Dry Deposition Network.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Re-
search Triangle Park, NC. Atmospheric Sciences Mod-
eling Div.
J. F. Clarke, E. Edgerton, and R. P. Boksleitner. 1991,
14p EPA/600/D-91 /248
Contract EPA-68-D-80016
Prepared in cooperation with Environmental Science
and Engineering, Inc., Durham, NC. Sponsored by En-
vironmental Protection Agency,  Research  Triangle
Park, NC. Atmospheric Research and Exposure As-
sessment Lab.
        Vol. 92,  No. 1

-------
                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
A National Dry Deposition Network (NDDN) was estab-
lished in the United States during 1986 to document
the magnitude,  spatial variability, and trends in dry
deposition of ozone and acidic particles and gases.
Currently, the network consists of 50 stations: 41 in the
eastern United States and 9 in the western United
States. Dry deposition is  not measured directly in the
NDDN, but is estimated by an inferential approach, i.e.,
fluxes are calculated as the product of measured ambi-
ent concentration and modeled deposition velocity.
The temporal resolution for the dry deposition calcula-
tions is weekly. Chemical species include ozone, sul-
fate, nitrate, ammonium, sulfur dioxide and nitric acid.
Preliminary dry deposition calculations yielded the fol-
lowing observations: (1) calculated values of dry depo-
sition for colocated sites are in good agreement sug-
gesting good network precision, and (2) spatial pat-
terns of S02 and HNO3 dry deposition are consistent
with emission patterns.

Keywords:  'Deposition, *Dry  methods, "Air pollution,
United States, Study estimates. Temporal distribution,
Concentration(Compositipn),  Flux(Rate),  Mathemati-
cal models, Ecology, Nitric acid, Sulfur dioxide, Spatial
distribution,  Ozone,  Sulfates, Nitrates,  Ammonium,
'National Dry Deposition Network.
PB92-121151/REB                PC A03/MF A01
Dechlorinations of Polychlorlnated Biphenyls in
Sediments of New Bedford Harbor. Book chapter.
Environmental Research Lab., Narragansett, Rl.
J. L. Lake, R. J. Pruell, and F. A. Osterman. 1991,27p
EPA/600/D-91/249, ERNL-1099
Pub. in Organic Substances and Sediments in Water,
Chapter 11, v3 p173-197 1991. Also pub. as Environ-
mental Research Lab., Narragansett, Rl.  rept no.
CONTRIB-1099.

The breakdown of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) con-
geners in situ in sediments heavily contaminated with
PCBs by processes called  reductive dechlorinations
have been reported. These studies characterized sev-
eral distinct dechlorination patterns, caused by differ-
ent strains of anaerobic bacteria, which resulted in
PCB residues that were altered from the original Aro-
clor inputs. The upper New Bedford  Harbor (NBH),
above the Coggeshall St. Bridge, is a shallow, approxi-
mately 200-acre salt marsh estuary, which received
large inputs of Aroclor 1254 (A-1254) and Aroclor 1242
(A-1242) from  1947 to 1970,  and possibly  Aroclor
1016 (A-1016)  from 1970 to 1978, from a capacitor
manufacturing plant designated plant A. Another study
found variations in the extent of dechlorination proc-
esses in 5- to 7.5-cm and 15- to 17.5-cm sections of
cores taken in  the northern part of the upper NBH.
However, the distributions of PCBs in extracts of sedi-
ment core sections taken in the southern part of the
upper NBH as part of a pilot dredging study at the Envi-
ronmental Research Laboratory-Narragansett (ERLN)
showed only small alterations relative to mixtures of A-
 1242 and A-1254. The present study was undertaken
to determine the extent of alteration of PCB residues in
the sediments of upper NBH resulting from dechlorina-
tion processes, and to estimate the rates of these
 processes.

 Keywords:  'Polychlorinated  biphenyls,  Sediments,
 •Water pollution control, 'Dechlorination, 'Biodeter-
 toration,  Anaerobic processes, Reduction(Chemistry),
 Sediment-water                        interfaces,
 Concentration(Composition),  New Bedford  Harbor,
 Aroclors, Reaction kinetics, Graphs(Charts), Reprints.


 PB92-121169/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment
 Program: An  Ecological Status and  Trends Pro-

 Environmental Research Lab., Narragansett, Rl.
 J F Paul, F. Holland, J. K. Summers, S. C. Schimmel,
 and K. J. Scott. 1991,22p ERLN-1349, EPA/600/D-
 91/250
 Proceedings of the Annual Aquatic Toxicity Workshop
 (7th),  Vancouver,  British  Columbia,  November 5-7,
 1990. Pub. in Canadian Technical Report of Fisnenes
 and Aquatic Sciences, n1774  v1  p80-98J3ee also
 PB91-136986.  Prepared in cooperation with Versar,
 Inc., Columbia, MD.

 The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has initiat-
 ed the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Pro-
 gram (EMAP) to monitor the status and trends of the
 nation's near coastal waters, forests, wetlands, agroe-
 cosystems, surface waters, and arid lands. The pro-
 gram is also intended to evaluate the effectiveness of
Agency policies at protecting ecological resources oc-
curring in these systems. Monitoring data collected for
all these natural resources will be integrated for nation-
al status and trends assessments. The near coastal
component of EMAP consists of estuaries, coastal
waters,  coastal and estuarine wetlands, and Great
Lakes. The  country's near coastal resources  have
been regionalized and classified, an integrated sam-
pling strategy has been developed, and quality assur-
ance/quality control procedures and data manage-
ment  designs have  been implemented. EPA  and
NOAA have agreed to coordinate and, to the extent
possible, integrate near coastal component of EMAP
with NOAA National Status and Trends Program.  A
demonstration project was jointly conducted in the es-
tuaries of the mid-Atlantic states (Chesapeake Bay to
Cape Cod) in the summer of 1990. In 1991, monitoring
will continue in the mid-Atlantic estuaries and will be
initiated in estuaries in part of the Gulf of Mexico.

Keywords: 'Environmental monitoring, 'Ecology, 'En-
vironmental  protection, 'Natural  resources,  'Coastal
regions, Quality assurance,  Quality control, Great
Lakes, Forests, Wetlands, Surface waters, Arid lands,
Trends,  Water quality, Estuaries,  Reprints, 'Environ-
mental Monitoring and Assessment Program, National
Status and Trends Program.


PB92-121177/REB               PC A03/MF A01
United  States Environmental Protection Agency
Municipal Waste Combustion Residue Solidifica-
tion/Stabilization Evaluation Program.
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
Reduction Engineering Lab.
C. C. Wiles, D. S. Kosson, and T. Holmes. Jun 90,16p
EPA/600/D-91/251
Presented at United States Conference Proceedings
on (1st), Municipal Solid Waste Management, June 13-
16,1990,  p883-895. Prepared in cooperation with Rut-
gers - The State Univ., Piscataway, NJ., and Army En-
gineer Waterways Experiment Station,  Vicksburg, MS.

Vendors of solidification/stabilization (S/S) and other
technologies are cooperating with the U.S. Environ-
mental Protection Agency's (U.S.  EPA's) Office of Re-
search and Development (ORD), Risk Reduction Engi-
neering Laboratory to demonstrate and evaluate the
performance of the technologies to treat residues from
the combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW). Solidi-
fication/Stabilization is being emphasized in the cur-
rent program. The technology may enhance the envi-
ronmental performance of the residues when disposed
in the land, when used as road bed aggregate,  as
building blocks, and in  the  marine environment  as
reefs or shore erosion control barriers. The program in-
cludes  four S/S  process types:  cement, silicate,
cement kiln dust and a phosphate based process.
Residue types being evaluated are fly ash, bottom ash
and combined residues. An array of chemical leaching
tests and physical tests are being conducted to char-
acterize the untreated and treated residues. The S/S
 Solid Waste Innovative Technology Evaluation (MITE)
 program.

 Keywords: 'Municipal wastes, 'Solidification, 'Stabili-
 zation, 'Incineration,  'Waste management,  'Resi-
 dues, Waste forms, Waste treatment,  Performance
 evaluation, Fly ash, Air pollution control, US EPA,
 Technology utilization, Waste utilization, Ground dis-
 posal, Waste disposal, Reprints, Municipal Innovative
 Technology Evaluation Program.


 PB92-12118S/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 U.S. EPA Program for Evaluation of Treatment
 and Utilization Technologies for Municipal Waste
 Combustion Residues.
 Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
 Reduction Engineering Lab.
 C. C. Wiles. 1991,26p EPA/600/D-91 /252
 Presented at International  Symposium  on Municipal
 Waste Combustion  (2nd),  Tampa, FL,  April  15-19,
 1991,p205-227.

 Vendors of solidification/stabilization (S/S) and other
 technologies are cooperating with the  U.S. Environ-
 mental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA's) Office of Re-
 search and Development (ORD), Risk Reduction Engi-
 neering Laboratory to demonstrate and evaluate the
 performance of the technologies to treat residues from
 the combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW). Solidi-
 fication/Stabilization is being emphasized in the cur-
 rent program. The technology may enhance the envi-
 ronmental performance of the residues when disposed
in the land, when used as road bed aggregate, as
building  blocks, and in the  marine  environment as
reefs or shore erosion control barriers. The program in-
cludes four  S/S  process types: cement,  silicate,
cement  kiln dust and  a phosphate  based process.
Residue types being evaluated are fly ash, bottom ash
and combined residues. An array of chemical leaching
tests and physical tests are being conducted to char-
acterize the untreated and treated residues. The paper
discusses program design, status and preliminary re-
sults. The S/S evaluation program is the first part of
ORD's Municipal Solid Waste Innovative Technology
Evaluation (MITE) program. ORD is also supporting re-
search to address the scientific and other issues asso-
ciated with utilizing MSW Combustion residues. The
paper also discusses these issues and research direc-
tions.

Keywords: 'Municipal wastes, 'Solidification, 'Stabili-
zation, 'Incineration, 'Waste treatment, 'Waste utili-
zation,  'Residues,  US  EPA,  Waste  management,
Waste disposal. Design criteria, Technology utilization,
Roads,  Cements, Erosion control, Performance eval-
uation, Fly ash, Air pollution control,  Reprints, Munici-
pal Innovative Technology Evaluation Program.
 PB92-121193/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Comparison of  Five  Solidification/Stabilization
 Processes  for Treatment of  Municipal  Waste
 Combustion Residues. Part 1. Physical Testing.
 Environmental  Protection  Agency, Cincinnati, OH.
 Drinking Water Research Div.
 T. Holmes, D. Kosson, and C. Wiles. 1991,22p EPA/
 600/D-91/253
 Pub. in the International Symposium on  MWC (2nd).
 Tampa, FL, April 15-19,1991 p228-247. See also Part
 2, PB92-121201. Prepared in cooperation with Army
 Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg,
 MS., and Rutgers - The  State Univ., Piscataway, NJ.
 Dept. of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering.

 The paper presents results from physical tests used to
 evaluate MWC residues treated by five S/S processes.
 The physical properties  are especially important for
 determining utilization applications. Considerable em-
 phasis was placed on structural properties and long-
 term durability during exposure to varied environmen-
 tal conditions. For each process, side-by-side compari-
 sons were made of physical tests results from the (1)
 unconfined  compressive strength (UCS) determina-
 tions,  (2) the UCS after immersion tests, (3) the wet/
 dry weathering tests, (4) the freeze/thaw weathering
 tests,  and (5) permeability determinations. In general,
 the test specimens resulting from processes that ob-
 tained the higher UCS's, performed better in the UCS
 after  immersion tests,  the freeze/thaw weathering
 tests,  and the wet/dry weathering tests. Permeability
 had little effect on the performance of the test speci-
 mens during the physical testing.

 Keywords: 'Municipal  wastes, 'Solidification, 'Stabili-
 zation, 'Incineration,  'Waste treatment, 'Residues,
 Physical properties,  Waste utilization,  Comparison,
 Weathering, Air pollution control. Waste management,
 Fly ash, Waste disposal, Waste forms, US EPA, Re-
 prints, Municipal Innovative Technology Evaluation
 Program.
 PB92-121201/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Comparison  of Solidification/Stabilization  Proc-
 esses for Treatment of Municipal Waste Combus-
 tion Residues. Part 2. Leaching Properties.
 Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
 Reduction Engineering Lab.
 D. S. Kosson,  H. van der Sloot, T. T. Holmes, and C. C.
 Wiles. 1991,17p EPA/600/D-91 /254
 Pub. in Proceedings for the Municipal Waste Combus-
 tion Symposium, Tampa, FL, April 15-19, 1991 p248-
 262. See also Part 1, PB92-121193. Prepared in coop-
 eration with Rutgers - The State Univ., Piscataway, NJ.
 Dept of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Neth-
 erlands Energy Research Foundation ECN, Petten,
 and Army Engineer Waterways  Experiment Station,
 Vicksburg, MS.

 Increasing reliance on municipal combustion (MWC)
 for disposal of  solid waste has focused concern on
 management  of MWC residues. A key consideration in
 resolving these issues is the release of contaminants
 from MWC residues to the environment and the effec-
 tiveness of treatment and utilization techniques to min-
 imize contaminant release. Leaching has been identi-
 fied as the most important contaminant release mech-


                             Mar 1992     39

-------
                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
anism from MWC residues to the environment To ad-
dress these issues and others,  USEPA initiated the
Municipal (Waste) Innovative Technology Evaluation
Program (MITE). Technology evaluation under the pro-
gram includes extensive testing of the physical, chemi-
cal and leaching properties of untreated and treated
MWC residues. The paper presents an overview of sig-
nificant results from the chemical and leaching tests
carried out under the program for five solidification/
stabilization processes.

Keywords:  'Municipal wastes, 'Solidification, 'Stabili-
zation,  'Incineration, 'Waste treatment 'Residues,
Environmental transport, Waste disposal, Waste man-
agement Waste utilization, Leaching, US EPA, Tech-
nology utilization, Chemical properties, Air pollution
control, By ash, Reprints, Municipal Innovative Tech-
nology Evaluation Program.
 PB92-121219/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 U.S. Standards for Air Sampling of Environmental
 Contaminants: Current Basis and Future Options.
 Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
 Park, NC. Atmospheric Research and Exposure As-
 sessment Lab.
 W. J. Mitchell. Oct 91,11 p EPA/600/D-91 /255
 Presented at the International Symposium on Air Sam-
 pling Instrument  Performance,  Research  Triangle
 Park, NC., October 29-31,1991.

 EPA's initial approach to reduce the exposure of the
 population to the 189 hazardous air pollutants (HAPS)
 identified in  the  1990 dean Air Act Amendments
 (CAM) involves voluntary reductions in the release of
 the  HAPS to the atmosphere by manufacturers and
 users of the HAPS. Later, EPA plans to specify engi-
 neering-based control requirements on these manu-
 facturers and users of HAPS. The above approach dif-
 fers markedly from the 'control with compliance' ap-
 proach that EPA used in the 1970's to reduce the ex-
 posure of the population to the six  criteria pollutants
 (CO, NO2, SO2,03, particles and Pb).  The  first part of
 the report describes why this difference occurred and
 identifies opportunities the current approach provides
 to those who develop, manufacture or install stack gas
 monitoring equipment and those who serve  as consult-
 ants in pollution control matters. The second part iden-
 tifies five emerging issues addressed in the CAAA of
 1990 and how suppliers of pollutant monitoring equip-
 ment can assist EPA in addressing these issues.

 Keywords: 'Air pollution monitoring. 'Standards, Rue
 gases. Air pollution control equipment PartkxHates,
 Lead, Ozone,  Nitrogen  oxides,  Carbon  monoxide,
 Sulfur dioxide. Priority pollutants.
 PB92-121227/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Laboratory and FMd Studies on BTEX Bkxtegra-
 dation in a Fuel-Contaminated Aquifer under Den-
 itrifying Conditions. Book chapter May 88-Dec 92.
 Robert S.  Kerr Environmental Research Lab., Ada,
 OK.
 S. R.Hutchins, and J.T.WHson. 1991,18p EPA/600/
 0-91/256
 Pub. in In situ BkxecJamation Applications and Investi-
 gations for Hydrocarbon and Contaminated Site Re-
 mediation, p157-1721991.

 Leaking underground storage tanks are a major source
 of groundwater contamination by petroleum hydrocar-
 bons.  Of the approximately 1.4 million underground
 tanks storing gasoline in the United States, some pe-
 troleum experts estimate that  75,000 to 100,000 are
 leaking (Feiictano 1984). Gasoline and other fuels con-
 tain benzene, toluene, ethytbenzene, and xytenes (col-
 lectively known as BTEX), which are hazardous com-
 pounds regulated by the U.S.  Environmental Protec-
 tion Agency (EPA 1977). Laboratory studies were con-
 ducted in  conjunction with a  field demonstration
 project on  nitrate-mediated biorestoration of a fuel-
 contaminated aquifer at a U.S. Coast Guard facility in
 Traverse City,  Ml.  Microcosms were prepared  under
 either aerobic or strictly anaerobic, denitrifying condi-
 tions using «xe samples aseptically obtained from the
 aquifer. The microcosms were spiked with aromatic
 hydrocarbons (BTEX) and incubated as 12 C. Virtually
 at of the aromatic hydrocarbons, including benzene,
 were degraded to below detection  limits within seven
 days under aerobic conditions, although o-xytene was
 somewhat more recalcitrant Under denitrifying condi-
 tions, toluene,  ethytbenzene, m-xytene, arid 1,2,4-tri-
 methyfeenzene were also degraded to below detec-
 tion Kmte, although this occurred between two to three
 weeks. o-Xytene was only slowry degraded  and ben-
zene was recalcitrant under denitrifying conditions. In
the field demonstration project, an infiltration gallery
was used to recirculate water at a rate sufficient to
create a water table mound encompassing the con-
taminated  interval. After hydraulic equilibrium was
achieved nitrate and nutrients were added to the re-
charge water. Benzene removal occurred before ni-
trate addition; mass balances indicated that sufficient
oxygen was recirculated to account for complete bio-
degradation  aerobically. Based on zero-order rate
processes for BTEX removal, there was good agree-
ment between removal rates observed in the field and
those in the laboratory.

Keywords: 'Water pollution control, 'Aquifers, *Deni-
trification,  'Biodeterioration,  'CHI  pollution, Ground
water, Remedial action, Leakage,  Underground stor-
age, Storage tanks. Experimental design, Field tests,
Aromatic hydrocarbons, Toluene,  Xylenes, Reprints,
Benzene/ethyl, Benzene/trimethyl.
PB92-12123S/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Fuel Cell Energy  Recovery  from  Landfill  Gas.
Rept for Jan-Sep 91.
International Fuel Cells Corp., South Windsor, CT.
G. J. Sandelli, and R. J. Spiegel. 1991,13p EPA/600/
D-91/257
Contract EPA-68-01 -0008
Presented at the Grove Fuel Cell Symposium (2nd),
London, England, September 24-27,1991. Sponsored
by Environmental Protection Agency, Research Trian-
gle Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research
Lab.

The paper discusses Phase I results of an EPA-spon-
sored program to demonstrate energy recovery from
landfill gas using a commercial phosphoric acid fuel
cell power plant EPA is interested in fuel cells for the
application because it is the cleanest energy conver-
sion technology available. Phase I  is a  conceptual
design, cist and evaluation study.  The  conceptual
design of the fuel energy recovery  concept is de-
scribed and its economic and environmental feasibility
is projected. Phase II covers the construction and test-
ing of  a landfill gas pretreatment system which will
render landfill gas  suitable for use in the fuel cell.
Phase III is the demonstration of the energy recovery
concept

Keywords: 'Gas production, 'Earth fills, 'Fuel cells,
'Waste disposal, 'Energy recovery, Fuel cell power
plants. Design criteria. Performance evaluation. Eco-
nomic  analysis.  Feasibility studies, Air pollution con-
trol, Air pollution abatement Technology utilization,
Acid electrolyte fuel cells,  Pretreatment  processes,
Phosphoric acid fuel cells.
PB92-121243/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Modeling Wave Form Effects in ESPs: The Algo-
rithm to ESP* and ESPV1. Rept for Jun 89-Sep 91.
Research Triangle Inst, Research Triangle Park, NC.
P. A. Lawless, N. Plaks, and R. F. Altman. 1991,15p
EPA/600/D-91/258
Grant EPA-R812281
Presented at the Symposium on the Transfer and Utili-
zation of PartJculate Control Technology (9th), Wil-
liamsburg, VA., October 16-18,1991. Prepared in co-
operation with Electric Power Research Inst, Chatta-
nooga, TN. Sponsored by Environmental Protection
Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Air and Energy
Engineering Research Lab.

The paper details the ways in which waveform effects
in electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) are modeled. The
effects of waveforms on particle  charging, space
charge corona suppression, and sparking are exam-
ined. The paper shows how the models extend these
results to the case of intermittent energization. Electri-
cal energization waveforms were discovered to have
an  unexpected  large rote during the development of
two ESP programs, ESPM and ESPVI 4.0. The model
that predicted laboratory voltage/current curves su-
perbly gave unacceptably  high current densities for
large scale ESPs. This is primarily due to the wave-
forms: pure dc in the laboratory and pulsating dc in the
field.

Keywords: 'Electrostatic precipitators, 'Air pollution
control,  'Waveforms,  Electric corona. Mathematical
models, Stationary sources, Electric sparks. Space
charge.
PB92-121250/REB               PC A02/MF A01
U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development
Overview of Current Radon Research.
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
T. M. Dyess, and M. C. Osbome. Aug 91,10p EPA/
600/D-91/259
Presented at AARST Radon Conference,  Rockville,
MD., October 9-11,1991.

The paper gives an overview of current radon research
being conducted by  EPA. In 1984, EPA  began a re-
search program to develop and demonstrate radon
mitigation alternatives. Since then, the program  has
evolved from an initially focus on houses with severely
elevated  radon levels in Boyertown (Pennsylvania)
and Clinton (New Jersey) to the multi-faceted program
currently concerned with reducing radon to near-ambi-
ent levels in existing houses, new houses, schools,
and other large buildings. The program direction  rec-
ognizes successes achieved by EPA and others in
demonstrating mitigation options capable of reducing
radon levels to below 4 pCi/L in most houses. Howev-
er, these options: (1) fail to achieve the ambient radon
goal established by the Indoor Radon Abatement Act
of 1988; (2) are too expensive for general homeowner
acceptance;  and (3) have only limited development
and demonstration for schools and other large com-
plex structures. To address these needs, emphasis is
being placed on research of low-radon-level houses,
directed at low-cost  solutions for lower radon level
houses in order to have significant impact on the esti-
mated 16,000 to 20,000 radon-induced  lung cancer
deaths each year.

Keywords: 'Radon, 'Research and development,  'Air
pollution  control,  'Mitigation,  US EPA,  Substitutes,
Indoor air pollution, Houses, School buildings. Air pol-
lution       standards,       Cost       analysis,
Boyertown(Pennsylvania),   Clinton(New   Jersey),
Indoor Radon Abatement Act of 1988.
PB92-121268/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Sub-Slab Pressure Field Extension in Schools and
Other Large Buildings. Rept. for 1988-91.
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
D. B. Harris, A. B. Craig, and K. W. Leovic. 1991,20p
EPA/600/D-91/260
Presented at the Annual AARST National Fall Confer-
ence (5th), Rockville, MD., October 9-12,1991.

The paper discusses EPA's experiences using  pres-
sure field extension (PFE) to design active subslab de-
presurization (ASD) systems to reduce radon levels in
old and new  schools, including instances where the
data collected resulted in the installation of smaller
systems than expected and selection of high vacuum
fans instead of 'normal' mitigation fans. A central col-
lection system for use under very large slabs is dis-
cussed and PFE data are given for a hospital under
construction. The most direct method of projecting or
measuring the performance of an ASD system is to
measure the strength and extent of the pressure field
established under the slab. The PFE  can be deter-
mined (during diagnostics) to help design an ASD
system and (following installation) to ascertain system
performance.  In schools and other large buildings,
these data are invaluable to provide a system that will
mitigate the building without undue cost escalation.

Keywords: 'Radon, 'Schools, 'Air pollution  control,
'Slabs,  'Indoor air pollution, Fans, Hospitals,  Soils,
Stationary sources, Buildings, 'Active subslab depres-
surization, 'Pressure field extension.
PB92-121276/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Evaluation of NOx Emission Control Catalysts for
Power Plant SCR Installations. Rept. for Mar-Apr
91.
Acurex Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC.
M. A. Buzanowski, W. Jozewicz, and S. L. Rakes.
1991,13p EPA/600/D-91 /261
Contract EPA-68-DO-0141
Presented  at  International Joint Power  Generation
Conference, San Diego, CA., October 10,1991. Spon-
sored by Environmental Protection Agency, Research
40     Vol. 92, No. 1

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                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
Triangle Park, NC. Air and  Energy Engineering Re-
search Lab.

The paper gives results of an evaluation of nitrogen
oxide  (NOx) emission control catalysts commercially
developed for power plant selective catalytic reduction
(SCR) installations. With the objective of establishing
the performance of SCR catalysts and related technol-
ogy, control at the 85% removal level was achieved
with sulfur dioxide (SO2) present. In the absence of
S02 and under optimum conditions, greater than 99%
removal was possible.  (Ammonia slip was not meas-
ured.) Several SCR catalysts were tested under differ-
ent operating conditions. The effects of NH3/NO ratio
(0.1/1.0), space velocity (3,000 - 8,000 h to the -1 at
STP), and temperature (270 - 400 C) on reaction kinet-
ics are reported. The target  NO concentrations were
500 and 1000 ppm. Particular emphasis was on inves-
tigating the poisoning effects of S02 on the SCR cata-
lysts due to the significant sulfur content in U.S. coals.
It was confirmed that, while SO2 may exhibit poison-
ous effects on some catalysts, the commercial cata-
lysts designed for the high- and low-dust SCR installa-
tions show high resistance to SO2 poisoning.

Keywords: *Air pollution control,  'Electric power
plants, "Nitrogen  oxides. Fossil-fuel  power  plants,
Catalysts, Sulfur dioxide,  Dust, Emission, Stationary
sources.
PB92-121284/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Radtonucllde Removal.
Environmental  Protection  Agency, Cincinnati,  OH.
Drinking Water Research Div.
T.J.Sorg. 1991,13pEPA/600/D-91/262
Pub. in AWWA Seminar Proceedings, Cincinnati, OH.,
June 17-21,1990, p113-123.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed
new and revised regulations on radionuclide contami-
nants in drinking  water in June  1991.  During the
1980's, the Drinking Water Research Division, USEPA
conducted a research program  to evaluate various
technologies to remove radium, uranium and radon
from drinking water. The research consisted of labora-
tory and field studies conducted  by USEPA, universi-
ties and consultants. The paper summarizes the re-
sults of the most significant projects completed.  Gen-
eral  information is also presented on the general
chemistry of the three  radionuclides. The information
presented indicates that the most practical treatment
methods for radium are ion exchange and lime-soda
softening and reverse  osmosis. The methods tested
for radon are aeration  and granular activated carbon
and the methods for uranium are anion exchange and
reverse osmosis.

Keywords: *Water treatment, 'Radioisotopes, 'Pota-
ble water,  'Pollution  regulations, 'Water pollution
standards, Radium, Natural radioactivity, Radon, Ura-
nium, Radiation protection laws, Granular carbon
treatment, Performance evaluation, Aeration, Reverse
osmosis, Radioactive  contaminants,  Water quality,
Technology  utilization,  Ion  exchanging,  Calcium
oxides, Reprints.
PB92-121292/REB                PC A02/MF A01
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environ-
mental Monitoring and Assessment Program: An
Ecological Status and Trends Program. Journal ar-
ticle.
Environmental Research Lab., Narragansett, Rl.
J. F. Paul, A. F. Holland, S. C. Schimmel, J. K.
Summers, and K. J. Scott C1990,10p EPA/600/J-90/
548.ERLN-1347
Pub. in Federal Coastal Wetland Mapping, Fish and
Wildlife Services, Biological Report, v90 n18 p71-78
1990. See also PB91-196535. Prepared in cooperation
with Versar, Inc., Columbia, MD., and Science Applica-
tions International Corp., McLean, VA.

The U.S. Environmental  Protection Agency (EPA)  is
initiating  an Environmental Monitoring  and Assess-
ment Program  (EMAP)  to monitor the status  and
trends of the Nation's near-coastal waters,  forests,
freshwater wetlands, surface waters, agroecosystems,
deserts, and rangelands. The program is also intended
to evaluate the effectiveness of EPA policies in pro-
tecting the ecological resources of these systems. The
monitoring data collected for all ecosystems will be in-
tegrated for national status and trends assessments.
The near-coastal component of EMAP consists of four
ecosystem  categories: estuaries,  wetlands,  coastal
waters, and the Great Lakes. The  near-coastal eco-
systems have been regionalized and classified, an in-
tegrated sampling strategy has been designed, and
quality-control  procedures  and data-base manage-
ment designs will be implemented.

Keywords:   'Environmental  monitoring,   'Ecology,
Trends, Government policies. Decision making, Statis-
tical analysis, National government, State government,
Coasts, Great Lakes, Reprints, US EPA, Wetlands,
EMAP.
PB92-121300/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Cleaning of Flue Gases from Waste Combustors,
1990. Journal article.
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
T. G. Bma. C25 Jun 90,18p EPA/600/J-90/549
Pub. in Combustion Science and Technology, v74 p83-
98 1990. Presented at the International Congress on
Toxic Combustion Byproducts (1st): Formation and
Control, Los Angeles, CA., August 2-4,1989. See also
PB90-112541.

The paper addresses flue gas cleaning processes cur-
rently used commercially in waste combustion facili-
ties.  It also discusses the operating concepts of dry,
semi-dry, and wet processes, and their effectiveness
in controlling various pollutants. Air pollutants from the
combustion of hazardous and municipal wastes which
may require control include acid  gases, organic com-
pounds, heavy metals, and  paniculate matter. Dry,
semi-dry, and wet processes are available to control
these classes of gaseous pollutants. The process that
represents the optimum solution depends on many
factors, including type of waste/fuel, targeted pollut-
ants and the desired level of control for each,  location
of combustion unit, and residue  disposal restrictions.
The  combustion of hazardous and municipal wastes
can  effectively destroy targeted  substances and
reduce waste volume, thus extending the useful life of
existing landfills. In  addition, combustion may serve
the beneficial conversion of waste to energy,  such as
for heating, cooling, or electrical energy applications.
These benefits, however,  are accompanied by the
emission of air pollutants that require post-combustion
controls in order to meet regulatory requirements.

Keywords:  'Air pollution control,  'Waste disposal,
'Municipal wastes,  'Hazardous materials, 'Inciner-
ators, 'Flue gases, Volume,  Energy source develop-
ment, Pollution regulations, Dry methods, Combustion
efficiency, Wet methods, Combustion products, Heavy
metals, Particles, Acid gases, Reprints.
PB92-121318/REB               PC A02/MF A01
Science  Applications  International  Corf., Narragan-
sett, Rl.
Genotoxic Effects of Complex Marine Sediment
Extracts on V79  Chinese Hamster Lung Fibrob-
lasts. Journal article.
Environmental Research Lab.-Narragansett, Newport,
OR.
C. Mueller, S. Anderson, and G. Pesch. c1991,7p
EPA/600/J-91/274, EPA/600/J-91/274
Pub. in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, v10
p1149-11531991. Sponsored by Science Applications
International Corp., Narragansett, Rl.

A mammalian in vitro system was used to evaluate the
genotoxic potential of two complex environmental
samples. Sister chromatid  exchanges (SCEs) were
measured in Chinese hamster V79 lung  fibroblast
cells, following exposure to whole extracts of sedi-
ments collected from  a highly contaminated harbor-
Black  Rock Harbor, Connecticut (BRH)-and from a
reference site-central- Long  Island Sound  (CLIS).
Characterization of BRH sediment by analysis of  pre-
pared chemical extracts revealed high concentrations
of poryaromatic hydrocarbons, anthraquinones, carba-
zoles, and several inorganic substances that are geno-
toxic and capable of inducing SCEs. The CLIS sedi-
ment, although cleaner than BRH sediment, does con-
tain low  levels of similar contaminants. For instance,
BRH sediment contains 3.16  micrograms g/g of the
polynuclear  aromatic  hydrocarbon benzo(a)pyrene
(BP), whereas CLIS sediment  contains only 0.897 mi-
     ams g/g BP.  Sediments  were extracted with or-
      sotvents and redissotved in dimethyl sulfoxide
      3)  for culture exposure. Results indicated a con-
centration-dependent  increase in SCEs  in cells ex-
posed to whole BRH sediment extracts and a smaller
but significant increase in SCEs in cells exposed to
whole CLIS sediment extracts. Four times as much
CLIS material (0.13 g extracted sediment (dry wt.)/ml
of exposure media) was needed to induce a significant
doubling in SCEs, compared to BRH material, in which
only 0.03 g extracted sediment (dry wt.)/ml of expo-
sure media was needed.

Keywords:     'Mutegens,    'Water    pollution
effects(Animals),  'Sister  chromatid exchange, 'Sea
water, Fibroblasts, Chinese hamsters, Aromatic poly-
cyclic hydrocarbons, Metabolic activation, In vitro anal-
ysis,  Dose-response relationships,  Reprints, Marine
sediment extracts.
PB92-121326/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Influence of Size on Fate and Ecological Effects
of Kepone In Physical Models. Journal article.
Environmental Research Lab., Narragansett, Rl.
K. T. Perez, G. E. Morrison, E. W. Davey, N. F. Lackie,
and A. E.Soper.c1991,14p EPA/600/J-91/275,
ERLN-784A
Pub. in Ecological Applications, v1 n3 p237-248 1991.
Prepared in  cooperation  with Science Applications
International Corp.,  Narragansett, Rl.,  and  Rhode
Island Univ., Narragansett.

Three different sizes of marine microcosms were used
to study the influence of two features of spatial scale
on the chemical fate and ecological effects of the pes-
ticide Kepone. Increasing  the size of microcosms re-
duced the ratio of wall surface area to volume of con-
tained sea water, but increased the number of benthic
species due to increasing sample size. Other features
of spatial scale, such as water turbulence, water turn-
over, etc., were held constant.  Intact water-column
and benthic  communities from  a north-temperate
marine system were coupled together in 9.1-, 35.0-,
and 140.0-L containers. Kepone at 20.4  nmol/L  was
added to these microcosm systems over  a 30-d
period. A 3 x 2 factorial design was used to discern the
effects of size and Kepone. In the absence of Kepone
the  phytoplankton community exhibited excessive
growth relative to the field system for all system sizes.
Growth was directly related to the size of microcosms.
In addition, the time required to achieve  maximum
algal biomass was also directly related  to size. Re-
lease of a growth-stimulating compound(s) from  foul-
ing organisms settling on the microcosm walls and
size-dependent increases in benthic species provided
the best explanation for the observed phytoplankton
dynamics. (Copyright (c) 1991 by the Ecological Socie-
ty of America.)

Keywords: 'Kepone, 'Ecology, 'Chemical water pol-
lutants, Sea water, Phytoplankton, Zooplankton, Sedi-
ments, Field tests, Aquatic ecosystems, 'Water pollu-
tion effects(Plants), 'Water pollution effects(Animals),
Reprints, 'Spatial size.
 PB92-121334/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
 Reduction Engineering Lab.
 Hydraulic  Fracturing to  Improve  Nutrient  and
 Oxygen Delivery for In situ Bioreclamation. Jour-
 nal article.
 Cincinnati Univ., OH.
 S. J. Versper, W. J. Davis-Hoover, L. C. Murdoch, H. R.
 Pahren, and O. L. Sprockel. C1991,18p EPA/600/J-
 91/276
 Contract EPA-68-C9-0031
 In situ Bioreclamation Jnl. p67-82. Prepared in coop-
 eration with National Urban League, Inc., Cincinnati,
 OH. Center Hill Lab., and  Cincinnati Univ.  Medical
 Center, OH. Sponsored by Environmental Protection
 Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk Reduction Engineering
 Lab.

 A serious problem in the implementation of in situ bior-
 eclamation is the delivery of nutrients and oxygen to
 soil of low permeability. The problem commonly re-
 quires contaminated soil to be excavated for biorecla-
 mation, resulting in  increased exposure to toxic materi-
 als, liability and cost. The authors demonstrated that is
 feasible to create hydraulic fractures at shallow depths
 (several m) in silty clay till. Fractures created during a
 recent field test were flat-lying and roughly equant in
 plan with a maximum dimension of 8 m. Coarse  sand
 was pumped into the fractures to hold them open. The
 sand was an average of 1.1 cm in maximum thickness.
 As many as four fractures were created from the same
 borehole, stacked at vertical spacing of 15 or 30 cm.
 The technique will  be used to deliver slow-releasing
 granules of nutrients and encapsulated oxygen com-
 pounds in an effort to enhance in situ bioredamation of
 contaminated soil.
                                                                                                                                 Mar 1992    41

-------
                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
Keywords: 'Land reclamation, 'Remedial action, 'Bio-
logical treatment 'Hydraulic fracturing,  *ln-srtu proc-
essing,  *BkxJeterioration, Nutrients, Oxygen com-
pounds, Land pollution, Waste disposal, Reid tests,
Fluid injection processes, Boreholes, Encapsulation,
Performance evaluation, Reprints,  'Slow releasing
chemicals.
PB92-121342/REB               PC A02/MF A01
Btoventing to Treat Fuel Spills from Underground
Storage Tanks. Journal article.
Robert S. Kerr  Environmental Research  Lab., Ada,
OK.
D. H. Kampbell, and J. T. Wilson. c1991, 8p EPA/600/
J-91/277
Pub. in Jnl. of Hazardous Materials, v28 p75-80 1991.
Presented at the QCHSRC Annual  Symposium (3rd):
Bioremediation,  Fundamentals and  Effective Applica-
tions, Beaumont, TX., February 21 -22,1991.

Bioventilation is a procedure to cleanse soil gas of
volatile  fuel hydrocarbons originating from storage
tank leaks. The rate of vapor degradation is a control-
ling parameter in the design of a btoventing system. A
laboratory microcosm procedure using sandy soil from
an aviation gasoline spill site was used to measure rel-
ative kinetics of some fuel vapors. (Copyright (c) 1991
Elsevier Science Publishers B.V.)

Keywords: *Bkxteterioration, 'Soil gases, 'Volatile or-
ganic compounds, 'Biological treatment, 'Land pollu-
tion control, 'Oil pollution, Underground storage, Stor-
age tanks, Remedial action. Design criteria, Perform-
ance evaluation Kinetics, Microbial degradation. Re-
prints, 'Soil venting.


PB92-121359/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Global  Carbon  Cycle and  Climate Change:  Re-
sponses and Feedbacks from Below-Ground Sys-
tems. Journal article.
Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
R. K. Dixon, and D. P. Turner. d 991,20p EPA/600/J-
91/278
Pub. in Environmental  Pollution, v73 p24&-262 1991.
Prepared in cooperation with ManTech Environmental
Technology, Inc., Corvallis, OR.

According to most global climate-models, a continued
build-up of CO2 and other greenhouse gases will tead
to significant changes in temperature and precipitation
patterns over large parts of the Earth. Belowground
processes will strongly influence the response of the
biosphere to climate change and are  likely to contrib-
ute to positive or negative biosphere: feedbacks to cli-
mate change. Current global carbon budgets suggest
that as much as 2000 Pg of carbon exists in son sys-
tems. There is considerable disagreement, however,
over pool sizes and flux (e.g. CO2, CH4) for various
ecosystems. An equilibrium  analysis of changes in
global  betowground carbon storage due to a doubte-
CO2 climate suggests a range from a possible sink of
41 Pg to a possible source of 101 Pg. Components of
the terrestrial biosphere could be managed to seques-
ter or conserve carbon and mitigate  accumulation of
greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. (Copyright (c)
1991 Elsevier Science Publishers Ltd, England.)

Keywords: 'Carbon cycle, 'Climatic  changes, •Sub-
surface  investigations,  'Air-biosphere  interactions,
•Air pollution, 'Environmental effects. Global aspects,
Greenhouse effects, Soil surveys, Carbon dioxide. Ter-
restrial ecosystems, Global warming. Vegetation, Or-
ganic matter, Biomes, Reprints.


PB92-121367/REB              PC A02/MF A01
Extraction of  Mercury  from Groundwater Using
Immobilized Algae. Journal article.
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
Reduction Engineering Lab.
N. P. Berkley. c1991, 9p EPA/600/ J-91 /279
Pub. in Jnl. of Air and Waste Management Association,
v41 n10p1387-1393Oct91.

Bio-recovery Systems  Inc., conducted a project under
the Emerging Technology portion of the United States
Environmental Protection Agency's (EPAs) Superfund
 Innovative Technology Evaluation  (SITE) Program to
evaluate the ability of immobilized algae to  absorb
 mercury from contaminated groundwater in laboratory
studfes and pilot-scale field tests. Algae bkxnass was
 incorporated in  a permeable polymeric matrix. The
 product, AlgaSORB, packed into absorption columns,
 exhibited excellent flow characteristics,  and func-
tioned as a 'biological' ion exchange resin. A sequence
of eleven laboratory tests demonstrated the ability of
the product to absorb mercury from groundwater that
contained high levels of total dissolved solids and hard
water components. However, use of a single  Alga-
SORB preparation yielded non-repeatable results with
samples collected at different times of the year. The
strategy of extracting the groundwater through two col-
umns containing different times of the year. The strate-
gy of extracting the groundwater through two columns
containing different preparations of AlgaSORB was
developed and proved successful in laboratory and
pilot-scale field tests. Field test results indicate that Al-
gaSORB could be economically competitive with ion
exchange resins for removal of mercury, with the ad-
vantage that hardness and other dissolved solids do
not appear to compete with heavy metals for binding
capacity. (Copyright (c) 1991-Air and Waste Manage-
ment Association.)

Keywords: 'Water pollution control,  'Mercury(Metal),
•Btotogical  treatment, 'Algae, 'Absorption(Biology),
'Ground water, Heavy metals, Ion exchanging,  Com-
parison, Biomass, Waste disposal,  On-site investiga-
tions, Technology utilization, Field tests, Performance
evaluation, Superfund, Remedial action, Reprints, 'Al-
gaSORB.


PB92-121375/REB              PC A02/MF A01
Stationary Combustion NOx Control: A Summary
of the 1991 Symposium. Held In Washington, DC,
March 25-28,1991. Journal article Mar-Jul 91.
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
A. Kokkinos, J. E. Cichanowicz, R. E. Hall, and C. B.
Sedman. c1991,10p EPA/600/J-91 /280
Pub. in Jnl. of Air Waste Management Association, v41
n9 p1252-1259 Sep 91. See also  report for  1989,
PB90-104S14. Prepared in cooperation  with  Electric
Power Research Inst, Palo Alto, CA. Generation and
Storage Div.

The  paper summarizes the 1991 Symposium on Sta-
tionary Combustion NOx (nitrogen oxides) Control,
held March 25-28,1991, in Washington, DC. Approxi-
mately 500 attended, representing 53 domestic and 13
foreign utility companies, federal and state  govern-
ment agencies,  research and development organiza-
tions, and equipment vendors. Sixty-six presentations
were made. The symposium focused on new results
and understandings since the previous (1989) sympo-
sium, as they pertain to electric utility power plants and
other boilers burning coal, oil, and gas. Key points in-
cluded the significant increase in  full-scale  retrofit
demonstrations of low-NOx combustion systems in the
U.S. and abroad over the past 2 years; full-scale oper-
ating experience in Europe with selective catalytic re-
duction (SCR); pilot- and bench-scale SCR investiga-
tions in the U.S.; increased attention to selective non-
catalytic reduction (SNCR) in the U.S.; and NOx con-
trols for oil- and gas-fired boilers.

Keywords: 'Meetings, 'Nitrogen oxides,  'Air pollution
control, Electric utilities. Coal fired power plants, Cata-
lysts, Research management. Stationary sources, Ret-
rofitting, Boilers, Reprints.
 PB92-1213S3/REB               PC A02/MF A01
 Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
 Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
 Rote of Gas-Phase CtZ hi the Formation of PCDD/
 PCDF during Waste  Combustion.  Journal article
 Oct89-Aug90.
 Acurex Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC.
 K. R. Bruce, L O. Beach, and §. K. Gullett c1991, 8p
 EPA/600/J-91/281
 Contract EPA-68-02-4701
 Pub. in Waste Management, v11  p97-102 1991. See
 also PB90-221961. Sponsored by Environmental Pro-
 tection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Air and
 Energy Engineering Research Lab.

 The paper proposes a scheme for controlling the for-
 mation of potychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs)
 and potychlorinated dfcenzofurans (PCDFs) during in-
 cineration  using  sorbent materials to remove  the
 source of chlorine at high temperature. Results of pre-
 vious experiments investigating the formation  of
 PCDD/PCDF through tow temperature (300 C), fly-
 ash-catalyzed reactions are demonstrated to have oc-
 curred through intermediate formation of gas-phase
 C12 by decomposition of the added catalyst CuC12.
 The dependence of PCDD/PCDF formation rates on
C12 concentration is shown and the implications of the
Deacon process on these rates is discussed.

Keywords: 'Air pollution  control, 'Waste disposal,
'Municipal wastes, 'Hazardous materials, 'Polychlori-
nated dibenzodioxins, 'Pofychlorinated dibenzofurans,
'Incineration, Catalysis, Fly ash, Combustion products,
Decomposition reactions, Reaction kinetics, Sorbents,
High temperature tests, Chlorine, Reprints, Deacon
process, Chemical reaction mechanisms.
PB92-121391/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Environmental Research Lab.-Duluth, MN.
Three  Case Studies of Lake Temperature and
Stratification Response to Wanner Climate. Jour-
nal article.
Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. St. Anthony Falls Hy-
draulic Lab.
M. Hondzo, and H. G. Stefan. C1991,11p TP-316-
SER-A, EPA/600/J-91/282
Grant EPA-R-816230
Pub. in Water  Resources Research, v27 n8 p1837-
1846 Aug 91. Sponsored by Environmental Research
Lab.-Duluth, MN.

The impact of climatic warming on lakes will most likely
have serious implications for water resources  and
water quality. Rather than using model predictions of
greenhouse warming, the paper looks at the changes
in heat balance and temperature profiles in a particu-
larly warm year (1988) compared to a more normal one
(1971). The comparisons are made for three different
morphometrically different lakes located 45 deg N lati-
tude and 93 deg W  longitude (north central United
States) and for the summer period (April 1 to October
31). Water temperatures are daily values simulated
with a model driven by daily weather parameters and
verified against several sets of measurements. The re-
sults show that in the warmer year epilimnetic water
temperatures were higher, evaporative water loss in-
creased, and summer stratification occurred earlier in
the season.

Keywords:  'Warming,  'Climatic changes,  'Lakes,
'Stratification,  'Water pollution, Greenhouse effect
Morphometry, Water  temperature, Diurnal variations,
Weather, Evaporation, Reprints, 'Global warming.
 PB92-121409/REB               PC A02/MF A01
 Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
 Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
 Characteristics of Stogie Particle Coal Combus-
 tion. Journal article.
 Massachusetts Inst  of Tech., Cambridge. Dept. of
 Chemical Engineering.
 L D. Timothy, A. F. Sarofim, and J. M. Beer. c1982,
 10p EPA/600/J-91/283
 Grants EPA-R805552-03, EPA-R-808774
 Pub. in International Symposium on Combustion/The
 Combustion Institute (19th), p1123-1130 1982. Spon-
 sored by Environmental Protection Agency, Research
 Triangle  Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Re-
 search Lab.

 The paper discusses the measurement of the burning
 history of single coal particles, using a two-color opti-
 cal  pyrometer. From  intensity traces at two wave-
 lengths,  information on burning times and tempera-
 tures, the duration of a volatile flame, and projected
 areas was obtained for two lignite and three bitumi-
 nous coals. The coals were pulverized, classified in 38-
 45 and 90-105 micrometer  size ranges, and burned at
 furnace temperatures of 1250 and 1700 K in atmos-
 pheres containing from 15 to 100% oxygen. The inten-
 sity  traces at short times showed the influence  of
 either attenuation by votatites or, in some cases, an in-
 tense peak attributed to luminous radiation by soot A
 model was developed to simulate the combustion of a
 coal particle. Model predictions of the duration of vola-
 tile flames agreed with the  values inferred from the in-
 tensity traces. Burning times predicted by the model
 agreed partially with measured values. At 1700 K, the
 bituminous coal burned dose to the predicted diffu-
 sion-limited times, while the lignite coal took longer. At
 1250 K,  the experimental  burnout times for all coals
 were longer than predicted. Possible reasons for the
 tow predictions may be differences in volatile yields
 and retardation of the reaction by finely distributed ash
 particles.

 Keywords: 'Coal combustion,  *Air pollution, Soot Air
 pollution control, Flames, Stationary sources, Maine-
 42     Vol. 92, No. 1

-------
                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
matical models, Pulverized  fuels,  Reprints,  'Single
particle coal combustion.
PB92-121417/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
NO/Char Reactions at Pulverized Coal Flame Con-
ditions. Journal article.
Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge.
J. M. Levy, L K. Chan, A. F. Sarofim, and J. M. Beer.
C1981,12p EPA/600/J-91 /284
Grant EPA-R-805552
Presented at  International  Symposium on Combus-
tion/The Combustion Institute (18th), p111-120  1981.
Sponsored by Environmental Protection Agency, Re-
search Triangle Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering
Research Lab.

The paper discusses nitrogen oxide (NO)/char reac-
tions at putverized-coal flame conditions. The effective
rate of the NO/char reaction, measured over the tem-
perature range 1250 to 1750 K, was found to be retard-
ed by water vapor and enhanced by carbon monoxide
(CO) by amounts that decrease with increasing tem-
perature. This is consistent with a hypotehsis that the
NO/carbon (C) reaction is retarded by the formation of
a chemisorbed layer that can be removed by reaction
with  CO. Support for the hypothesis  is provided by
transient experiments which show that, at  low tem-
peratures, NO reacts with C to form nitrogen (N2) and
a chemisorbed oxygen (O2) layer, and that the chemis-
orbed O2 decomposes at higher temperatures to form
CO or reacts with CO to form carbon dioxide (CO2).

Keywords: "Coal combustion, 'Nitrogen oxides, *Air
pollution, Pulverized fuels, Flames, Stationary%ources,
Reaction kinetics,  Surface chemistry, 'Chars, Re-
prints.
 PB92-121425/REB                PC A02/MF A01
 Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
 Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
 Non-Equilibrium  Effects  In  the  Vaporization  of
 Mutticomponent Fuel Droplets. Journal article.
 Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge. Dept. of
 Chemical Engineering.
 S. P. Hanson, J. M. Beer, and A. F. Sarofim. c1982,
 10pEPA/600/J-91/285
 Grants EPA-R805552, EPA-R808848
 Presented at International Symposium  on Combus-
 tion/The Combustion   Institute  (19th),  p1029-1036
 1982.   Sponsored  by  Environmental   Protection
 Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Air and Energy
 Engineering Research Lab.

 The paper reports results of a study of non-equilibrium
 effects  in the  vaporization of multicomponent  fuel
 droplets. The effect of diffusional limitations on vapori-
 zation was studied for model systems consisting of n-
 dodecane doped  with  pyridine, quinoline, or acridine,
 which are amendable  to both theoretical and experi-
 mental  study. The model  systems  were selected to
 show the effect of non-equilibrium vaporization on ni-
 trogen evolution for the cases in which the nitrogen
 dopant had a volatility higher than (pyridine), about
 equal to (quinoline), and lower than (acridine) that of
 the n-dodecane fuel. Experiments performed on 150-
 micrometer droplet arrays of real fuel  oils revealed
 non-equilibrium evolution of nitrogenous components.
 The nitrogen  of  petroleum residual fuels is usually
 found to have concentrated in the high boiling and as-
 phaltene fractions. The interplay between volatility and
 mass transfer effects was shown to be directly respon-
 sible for the effects observed in fuel oils by a similar set
 of model  fuel experiments using the doped n-dode-
 cane. Although the model has been  applied to a binary
 system, in this instance, there is no practical distinction
 between the described processes and those to be
 found in complex fuels. The only obstacle to the pre-
 diction of species evolution from a real fuel is the lack
 of detailed information on fuel composition and materi-
 al properties in complex mixtures.

 Keywords: 'Stationary sources, 'Nitrogen  oxides, Va-
 porizing, Fuel  oil, Mathematical models, Pyridmes,
 Acridines, Quinolines, Combustion, Air pollution  con-
 trol, Reprints.


 PB92-121433/REB                PC A03/MF Ml
 Environmental Protection  Agency, Research Tnangle
 Park, NC, Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Nitric Oxide Formation during Pulverized Coal
Combustion. Journal article.
Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge. Dept. of
Chemical Engineering.
Y. H. Song, J. H. Pohl, J. M. Beer, and A. F. Sarofim.
c1982,11p EPA/600/J-91 /286
GrantEPA-R805515
Pub. in Combustion Science and Technology, v28 p31 -
39 1982. See also PB-263 277. Sponsored by Environ-
mental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park,
NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.

The paper discusses the formation of nitrogen oxides
(NOx) during pulverized coal combustion. Data on the
overall conversion of coal-nitrogen to NOx were ob-
tained at 1250 and 1750 K for a residence time  of 1
second. The conversion  of coal-nitrogen to NOx de-
creased  monotonically with  increasing  fuel/oxygen
equivalence ratio and decreased slightly with increas-
ing temperature. Oxidation experiments were also car-
ried out on char to separate the contribution to NOx
emissions of the char  from that of the volafiles.  The
char used was prepared by the pyrolysis of coal  at a
temperature  and  residence  time  corresponding to
those of oxidation experiments. The conversion to
NOx of char-nitrogen was lower than the correspond-
ing value for coal-nitrogen. It was found that volatilized
nitrogen compounds accounted for a major fraction of
NOx produced from coal-nitrogen, especially at  high
temperatures and low fuel/oxygen equivalence ratios.

Keywords: 'Coal combustion, 'Nitrogen oxides, 'Air
pollution, Flames, Air pollution  control,  Stationary
sources, Pulverized fuels, Chars, Volatility, Reprints.
 PB92-121441/REB               PC A02/MF A01
 Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
 Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
 Oxidation and Devolatillzatlon of Nitrogen in Coal
 Char. Journal article.
 Massachusetts Inst.  of  Tech., Cambridge. Dept of
 Chemical Engineering.
 Y. H. Song, J. M. Beer, and A. F. Sarofim. C1982,9p
 EPA/600/J-91/287
 Grant EPA-R805552
 Pub. in Combustion Science and  Technology, v28
 p177-183 1982. Sponsored by Environmental Protec-
 tion Agency, Research  Triangle  Park,  NC.  Air and
 Energy Engineering Research Lab.

 The paper gives results of a study of the reactions of
 organically bound nitrogen in coal char during combus-
 tion in a laboratory furnace using size-graded char par-
 ticle prepared by the pyrolysis of a Montana lignite.
 The time-resolved variations of nitrogen/carbon ratio
 during char oxidation have revealed that there is no se-
 lectivity between nitrogen and carbon loss due to oxi-
 dation, but that the char-nitrogen can undergo devola-
 tilization in  parallel  with  the  oxidation. The paper
 shows that the rates of devolatilization of fuel nitrogen
 can be obtained from oxidation experiments under
 conditions were: (1) carbon devolatilization is unimpor-
 tant, as in the case for char, and (2) the oxidation of ni-
 trogen and carbon is nonselective. The oxidation rate
 of  char-nitrogen can be given by the product of the
 char oxidation rate and the mole  ratio of nitrogen/
 carbon in the char. The devolatilzation rate of char-ni-
 trogen  is correlated by first-order  kinetics, showing
 good agreement with those of previous investigators.

 Keywords: 'Coal combustion, 'Nitrogen, 'Devolatiliza-
 tion, 'Oxidation, 'Chaus,  'Air pollution, Stationary
 sources, Air pollution control, Reaction kinetics, Pul-
 verized fuels, Reprints.


 PB92-122761/REB               PC A11/MF A03
 Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
 Quality Assurance Project Plan: Tampa,  Florida
 Wetlands Study.
 ManTech Environmental Technology,  Inc., Corvallis,
 OR.
 A. D. Sherman, S. E. Gwin, M. E. Kentula, and M.
 Brown. Dec 91,228p EPA/600/3-91/060
 Contract EPA-68-C8-0006
 See also PB92-113000. Prepared in cooperation with
 Florida Univ.,  Gainesville. Center for Wetlands. Spon-
 sored by Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.

 The project will  compare characteristics of naturally
 occurring wetlands with wetlands created or restored
 as mitigation required under Section 404 of the Clean
 Water Act It will also evaluate the utility of the Wetland
 Characterization Method developed by Corvallis Envi-
 ronmental Research Laboratory (ERL-C). The study in-
cludes field work and the associated data analysis.
Data on vegetation, soils, and hydrology will be collect-
ed at each site. The study sites will be photographed
and mapped, relative elevation measured, and general
site descriptions compiled. Project results will be sum-
marized for use by 404 personnel in making decisions
concerning the use of creation and restoration as miti-
gation for proposed wetland destruction.

Keywords: 'Wetlands, 'Mitigation, 'Water pollution
abatement, 'Research and development, Quality as-
surance, Florida, Clean Water Act, Field tests, Reme-
dial action, Hydrology, Vegetation, Soil surveys,  Data
analysis, Sampling,  'Natural wetlands, 'Created wet-
lands, Tampa(Florida).
PB92-122787/REB               PC A08/MF A02
Assessment of  Promising Forest  Management
Practices and  Technologies  for  Enhancing  the
Conservation and Sequestration of Atmospheric
Carbon and Their Costs at the Site Level.
Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
R. K. Dixon, P. E. Schroeder, and J. K. Winjum. Oct 91,
155p EPA/600/3-91/067
See also PB91 -233270 and PB91-226530. Prepared in
cooperation with ManTech Environmental Technolo-
gy, Inc., Corvallis, OR.

The objectives of the report are to assess and synthe-
size current knowledge on three policy-science topics:
(1) Identify promising technologies and practices that
could be  utilized  at technically suitable sites  in the
world to manage forests and agroforestry systems for
sequestering and conserving carbon; (2) Assess avail-
able data on costs at the site level for promising forest
and agroforestry management practices;  and  (3)
Evaluate estimates of land technically suitable in for-
ested nations and biomes of the world to help meet the
Noordwijk forestation targets and the proposed Global
Forest Agreement goals.

 Keywords: 'Conservation, 'Cartoon dioxide, 'Forest
 management, Climatic changes, Policies, Agreements,
 Biomes, Farms, Forest trees, Cost analysis, Bfomass,
 Statistical  analysis,  Graphs(Charts),  'Air  pollution
 effects(Plants), Reforestation, Global.
 PB92-122795/REB               PC A09/MF A02
 Technical Assistance Document for Sampling and
 Analysis of Ozone Precursors.
 Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
 Park, NC. Atmospheric Research and Exposure As-
 sessment Lab.
 L. J. Purdue, D. P. Dayton, J. Rice, and J. Bursey. 31
 Oct 91,184p EPA/600/8-91 /215
 See also PB90-127374 and PB91 -211326. Prepared in
 cooperation with  Radian Corp., Research Triangle
 Park, NC.

 The document contains guidance and discussion on
 methods applicable to the proposed revisions to Title
 40 Part 58 of the Code of  Federal  Regulations. The
 proposed revisions pertain to the enhanced monitoring
 of ozone precursors and meteorological monitoring.
 The  precursors addreased include volatile organic
 compounds, carbonyl compounds oxides of nitrogen,
 and total reactive oxides of nitrogen. The meteorologi-
 cal parameters include surface meteorology and upper
 air meteorology. The primary users of the document
 are expected to be Regional, State, and local Environ-
 mental Protection Agency personnel  addressing the
 new enhanced ozone ambient  air  monitoring  provi-
 sions.

 Keywords: 'Meteorological data, 'Ozone, 'Air pollu-
 tion  sampling,  Regulations,  National  government,
 Chlorine organic compounds, Nitrogen oxides, Strato-
 sphere, Ionosphere, Ambient  air, Carbonyl  com-
 pounds, Chemical analysis, Vaporizing, Chromatoga-
 phic analysis, Standards, 'Volatile  organic  com-
 pounds.
  PB92-122803/REB               PC A16/MF A03
  Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
  Global Ecosystems Database. Version 0.1 (Beta-
  test).  EPA  Global  Climate  Research Program.
  NOAA/NGDC Global Change Database Program.
  Prototype 1. Database Documentation. NGDC Key
  to Geophysical Records Documentation No. 25.
  User's manual.
  National Geophysical Data Center, Boulder, CO.


                             Mar 1992     43

-------
                                                  EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
 W. G. Campbell, and J. J. Kineman. Nov 91,368p
 EPA/600/8-91/216
 Errata sheet inserted. See also PB86-1B4298.Portiorts
 of this document are not fully legible. Prepared in co-
 operation with  ManTech Environmental Technology,
 Inc., Cocvallis, OR. Sponsored by Corvallis Environ-
 mental Research Lab., OR.

 The primary objective of the cooperative research and
 development is to produce an integrated, quality con-
 trolled, global database (including time sequences) for
 spatially distributed modeling.  The project concen-
 trates  on modem observational data, including re-
 motely sensed data and data from other sources. The
 database includes complementary multi-thematic data
 sets on compatible grids, registered to a common
 origin and projection  (latitude-longitude). The data-
 base has been structured to be operable with several
 existing  Geographic  Information Systems (GIS), so
 that a complete analytical package could be provided
 to reviewers and other scientists for evaluation, experi-
 mentation, and further development The software ac-
 companying the CD-ROM (a subset of the GIS known
 as IdrisO was developed and adapted for the project at
 dark University. Although compatible with Idrisi, the
 database is also designed to be easily up-loaded to the
 GIS known as GRASS, running on UNIX operating sys-
 tems. Since the database structure is as system inde-
 pendent as possible, it should also be easily usable in
 other systems.

 Keywords: 'Information systems, 'Research and de-
 velopment,   'Computerized   simulation,  'Climatic
 changes, 'Air-biosphere interactions, 'Environmental
 surveys, 'Ecosystems, Documentation,  Data base
 management Remote sensing, Spatial distribution,
 Precbttation(Meteorology), Sous, Land use, Vegeta-
 tion, Global aspects, Interagency agreements, Quality
 control.  Quality  assurance,  Thematic  mapping,
 •Global Ecosystems Database, Global Change Data-
 base Program, Global Climate Research Program, Ge-
 ographic Information Systems.
PB92-122968/REB
                                PC A04/MF A01
Summary of Phase II Regulations: National Prt-
      ~      I Water Regulation for 38 I
mary Drinking'
and Synthetic Organic Chemicals. Final root
Environmental Protection  Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of the Assistant Administrator for Water.
A. HavingaOct 91,67p EPA/570/9-91/022

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency promulgat-
ed National Primary Drinking Water Regulations for 38
inorganic and synthetic organic chemicals oh January
30,1991 and July 1,1991. Collectively, these two rule-
makings are referred to as the Phase II Rule. The fol-
lowing packet of materials summarizes the Phase II
Rule and is intended for use by EPA regional officials,
state and water system personnel. The first section of
the package  consists of a regulatory overview; the
second section consists of a series of 14 fact sheets
which describe specific aspects of the rule (i.e., moni-
toring and analytical requirements, state primary con-
drtions, public notification, treatment options, etc.); and
the third section consists of contaminant-specific data
sheets. The various components of the package have
been designed to be used individually or as part of the
larger package.

Keywords:  'Pollution regulations, 'Water  pollution
standards.  'Potable water, 'Water pollution abate-
ment, Distribution systems. Water treatment Notifica-
tion procedures. Requirements, Water pollution moni-
toring. Standards compliance, 'Phase 2 Rule. National
Primary Drinking Water Regulations.
PBB2-122977/REB               PC AOS/MF A01
Environmental Profiles and Hazard Indices for
Constituents of Municipal Sludge: Mercury. Final
rept
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of Water Regulations and Standards.
Jun 85,66p
See also P892-123009, PB92-122993, PB92-122985
andP885-123925.

The preliminary data profile is one of a series of pro-
files dealing with  chemical  pollutants potentially of
concern in municipal sewage sludges. Mercury (Hg)
was tnitiaHy identified as being of potential concern
when sludge is landspread (including distribution and
marketing), placed in a landfill, incmerated or ocean
disposed. The profile is a compilation of information
that may be useful in determining whether mercury
                                                   poses an actual hazard to human health or the envi-
                                                   ronment when sludge is disposed of by these meth-
                                                   ods.


                                                   Keywords: 'Mercury(Metal), 'Sewage sludge, 'Haz-
                                                   ardous materials,  'Municipalities,   Waste disposal,
                                                   Public health. Earth fills, Incinerators, Marketing, Envi-
                                                   ronmental impacts, Profiles, Assessments, Land appli-
                                                   cation.
                                                   PB92-122985/REB               PC A05/MF A01
                                                   Environmental  Profiles and  Hazard  Indices  for
                                                   Constituents of Municipal Sludge: Lead.
                                                   Environmental Protection Agency,  Washington, DC.
                                                   Office of Water Regulations and Standards.
                                                   JunB5,89p
                                                   See also PB92-123009, PB92-122993, PB92-122977,
                                                   PB84-144591 and PB85-163996.


                                                   The preliminary data profile is one of a series of pro-
                                                   files dealing  with chemical pollutants  potentially of
                                                   concern in municipal sewage sludges. Lead (Pb) was
                                                   initially identified as being of potential concern when
                                                   sludge is landspread (including distribution and mar-
                                                   keting), placed in a landfill, or incinerated. The profile is
                                                   a compilation of information that may be useful in de-
                                                   termining whether lead  poses an  actual hazard to
                                                   human health or the environment when sludge  is dis-
                                                   posed of by these methods.


                                                   Keywords: 'Lead(Metal), 'Sewage  sludge,  'Hazard-
                                                   ous materials, 'Municipalities, 'Waste disposal,  Public
                                                   health.  Earth fills, Incinerators, Marketing, Environ-
                                                   mental impacts, Profiles, Assessments, Land applica-
                                                   tion.
PB92-122993/REB                PC A03/MF A01
Environmental Profiles and  Hazard  Indices  for
Constituent* of Municipal Sludge: Beryllium. Rnal
rept
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of Water Regulations arid Standards.
Jun85,28p
See also PB92-123009, PB92-122985,  PB92-122977
and PB85-168433.


The preliminary data profile is one of a series of pro-
files dealing with chemical pollutants  potentially of
concern in municipal sewage sludges. Beryllium (Be)
was initially identified as being of potential concern
when sludge is incinerated. The profile is a compilation
of information that may be useful in determining
whether beryllium poses an actual hazard to human
health or the environment when sludge is disposed of
by this method.


Keywords: 'Berillium, 'Sewage sludge, 'Hazardous
materials,  'Municipalities,  'Waste  disposal,  Public
health. Earth fills,  Incinerators, Marketing, Environ-
mental impacts. Profiles, Assessments,  Land applica-
tion. Ocean waste disposal.
PB92-123009/REB               PC A05/MF A01
Environmental Profiles  and Hazard Indices for
Constituents of Municipal Sludge: Nickel.
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of Water Regulations and Standards.
Jun 85,83p
See also PB92-122993, PB92-122985, PB92-122977
and PB85-248303.


The preliminary data profile is one of a series of pro-
files dealing with chemical pollutants potentially of
concern in municipal sewage sludges. Nickel (Ni) was
initially identified as being of potential concern  when
sludge is landspread (including distribution and mar-
keting), placed in a landfill, or incinerated. The profile is
a compilation of information that may be useful  in de-
termining whether nickel poses an actual hazard to
human health or the environment when sludge is dis-
posed of by these methods.

Keywords: 'Nickel, 'Sewage sludge, 'Hazardous ma-
terials, 'Municipalities, 'Waste disposal, Public health,
Earth fills. Incinerators, Marketing, Environmental im-
pacts, Profiles, Assessments, Land application. Ocean
waste disposal.
                                                   PB92-123025/REB               PC A12/MF A03
                                                   National Survey of Hazardous Waste Generators
                                                   and Treatment, Storage, Disposal, and Recycling
                                                   Facilities In 1986. Hazardous  Waste Generation
                                                   and Management
                                                   Environmental  Protection Agency,  Washington, DC.
                                                   Office of Solid Waste.
                                                   Oct 91,255p EPA/530/SW-91 /075
                                                   See also PB86-197837 and PB91 -211821.

                                                   The report presents comprehensive information de-
                                                   scribing the entire universe of hazardous waste man-
                                                   agement activities,  including  detailed  information
                                                   about each major category of hazardous waste man-
                                                   agement operations. The report also addresses the
                                                   significant quantities of hazardous wastes that are
                                                   managed in treatment and recovery units that qualify
                                                   for exemptions from RCRA-permitting requirements.

                                                   Keywords: 'Hazardous  materials,  'Waste manage-
                                                   ment,  'Pollution  control,  Permits,  Requirements,
                                                   Waste treatment Surveys, Hazardous materials trans-
                                                   portation, Sewers, Water pollution, Waste recycling,
                                                   Sources,  Waste water, Waste disposal, Ground dis-
                                                   posal,  Waste storage,  Industrial wastes, US EPA
                                                   Region 1-10, Resource Conservation and Recovery
                                                   Act Land Disposal Restriction Rule.
 PB92-123793/REB               PC AOS/MF A01
 Child Lead Exposure Study, Leeds, Alabama. Rnal
 rept.
 Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry,
 Atlanta, GA.
 C. Woernle, R. Rao, J. White, and R. Amler. Sep 91,
 92pATSDR/HS-92/13
 See alsoFBBS-100184.

 In August 1989, a human exposure study was under-
 taken near a secondary battery lead reclamation facto-
 ry in Leeds, Alabama. A door-to-door census survey
 was conducted in two targeted residential areas  near
 the factory. Venous blood samples were analyzed for
 lead, erthrocyte protoporphyrin, hemoglobin, and hem-
 atocrit. Among 81 children  (9-71 months) studied the
 mean blood lead value was 6.96 micrograms per deci-
 liter (mcg/dl), with a range of 3 to 16 mcg/dl; 85% of
 the values were below 10 mcg/dl. A multivariate linear
 regression model and a logistic regression model iden-
 tified  several  following factors as being associated
 with an increased blood lead value or,  having a blood
 lead concentration in the upper 15th percentile (>10
 mcg/dl).

 Keywords: 'Public health, 'Environmental exposure,
 'Lead poisoning, 'Children, Blood chemical analysis.
 Water pollutants, Soil contamination,  Risk  assess-
 ment   Tabtes(Data),   Hemoglobin,   Hematocrit
 Leeds(Alabama).
PB92-123801/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Benzene Groundwater Exposure Study, Nesmtth,
South Carolina. Rnal rept
Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry,
Atlanta, GA.
F. L Stallings. Jun 91,48p ATSDR/HS-92/12
See also PB89-209464.

Residents whose private well was contaminated with
benzene  and  other volatile  organic  compounds
(VOCs) were evaluated for VOC exposure. The extent
to which they may have ingested contaminated water
before discovering that the well was contaminated was
not certain. However, they reported continuing to use
water obtained from the well for bathing and house-
hold sanitation purposes after becoming  aware of its
contamination.  Each adult household  member com-
pleted a  survey questionnaire to quantify individual
water usage and characterize other potential exposure
sources for VOCs. Although results of blood measure-
ments for benzene for three family members showed
blood levels of benzene that were within the range
found in the third National Health and Nutrition Exami-
nation Survey (NHANES HI) results, Blood levels for
two of the family members were above the 90th per-
centile value for the  reference population. Trichtor-
oethene was not a suspected contaminant but blood
specimens of three study participants showed eleva-
tions in the upper 10 percent of the NHANES III popu-
lation  range. Two of the participants gave an occupa-
tional  history consistent with an exposure potential to
these analytes.
44     Vol. 92, No. 1

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                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
Keywords: 'Public health, 'Ground water, 'Water pol-
lutants, Benzene, Risk assessment, Questionnaires,
Blood chemical analysis, Well surveys, Volatile organic
compounds, Environmental exposure, Nesmith(South
Carolina).
PB92-124049/REB               PC A07/MF A02
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
Reduction Engineering Lab.
Construction,  Monitoring,  and  Performance of
Two Soil Liners.
Illinois State Geological Survey Div., Champaign.
I. G. Krapac, K. Cartwright, B. ft. Hensel, and B. L
Herzog. 1991,127p IL/SGS/ENG-141
See also PBB9-181937 and PB89-129670. Prepared in
cooperation with  Illinois Dept. of Energy and Natural
Resources, Champaign. Hazardous Waste Research
and Information Center. Sponsored by Environmental
Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk Reduction En-
gineering Lab.

A prototype and large-scale soil liner were constructed
to test whether compacted soil barriers in cover and
liner systems could be built to meet the standard set by
the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for saturat-
ed hydraulic conductivity. In situ ponded infiltration
rates into the prototype liner were measured and water
containing fluorescein and rhodamine WT dyers was
allowed to infiltrate in the prototype liner. Although the
liner met the USEPA conductivity requirement, the dye
flow paths indicated a  need for better bonding be-
tween lifts and a reduction in soil clod sizes. These ob-
servations suggested that if soil liners are to perform
according to design specifications,  soil processing
prior to construction and rigid construction QA/QC are
necessary. The large-scale liner (7.3 c 14.6 x 0.9 m)
consisted of  six 15-cm compacted  lifts.  Full-scale
equipment was used for compaction, and construction
practices were modified on the basis of experience
gained from the prototype liner study. The work con-
ducted so far indicates that compacted soil barriers
can  be constructed to  meet the saturated hydraulic
conductivity requirements established by the USEPA.
Questions regarding methodologies to collect in situ
infiltration data have arisen from the research. Differ-
ences have been noted in infiltration fluxes, as meas-
ured by different types of infiltrometers. Perturbations
in measurements of infiltration rates and soil tensions
have been correlated with barometric pressure fluctua-
tions and/or temperature changes in the liner.

Keywords: 'Linings, 'Waste disposal, 'Water pollution
abatement, 'Earth fills, 'Land pollution abatement,
 'Hydraulic conductivity, Standards, US EPA, Quality
assurance, Quality control, Environmental monitoring,.
Infiltration, Tracer  techniques, Design  criteria,  Per-
formance standards.
 PB92-124130/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Source Reconciliation of Ambient Volatile Organic
 Compounds  Measured  in   the   Atlanta  1990
 Summer Study: The Mobile Source Component
 Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
 Park, NC. Atmospheric Research and Exposure As-
 sessment Lab.
 C. W. Lewis, and T. L Conner. 1991,11 p EPA/600/D-
 91/263

 A field study of precursors to the formation of ozone
 was conducted in Atlanta  during summer, 1990,  in
 which average concentrations of C2 - C10 volatile or-
 ganic compounds (VOCs) were measured hourly at six
 sites by an automated gas chromatographic system. If
 the source profiles of the prominent VOC sources are
 known, chemical mass balance (CMB) receptor mod-
 eling can be applied to obtain the contribution of each
 source to the measured ambient concentration of total
 non-methane organic compounds (NMOC)  in each
 sampling period. Dispersion information can then be
 used in a subsequent step to obtain VOC source emis-
 sion rate estimates,  which  are independent of emis-
 sions inventories derived by traditional methods. Re-
 sults from the first step of the procedure are given, in
 which a subset of ambient data from the Georgia Tech
 site was analyzed by CMB to extract the motor vehicle
 exhaust contribution to ambient NMOC. Future imple-
 mentation of the second step is also discussed.

 Keywords: 'Volatile organic compounds, 'Air pollution
 detection,  'Mobile pollutant sources, 'Exhaust emis-
 sions. 'Air pollution monitoring, Ozone, Mass balance,
 Mathematical  models,   Concenfratton(Composrtion),
 Gas  chromatography. Non-methane hydrocarbons,
 Tables(Data), Chemical analysis, AUanta(Georgia).
PB92-124148/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Effect of Natural Ventilation on Radon and Radon
Progeny Levels in Houses. Rept for Apr 90-Sep 91.
Princeton Univ., NJ. Center for Environmental Studies.
A. Cavallo, K. Gadsby, T. A. Reddy, and R. Socolow.
1991,11 p EPA/600/D-91 /264
Contract EPA-R-817013
Presented at International Symposium on the Natural
Radiation Environment (5th), Salzburg, Austria, Sep-
tember 22-28,1991. Sponsored by Environmental Pro-
tection Agency,  Research Triangle Park, NC. Air and
Energy Engineering Research Lab.

The paper discusses the effect of natural ventilation
on radon and radon progeny levels in houses. Contra-
dicting the widely held assumption that ventilation is in-
effective in reducing indoor radon concentrations, ex-
periments in a research house have shown that the
basement radon level can be reduced by a factor of 5
to 10 using only natural ventilation. Measurement of
the outdoor-basement pressure differential and the
radon entry rate shows that this unexpectedly large re-
duction  in indoor radon levels is caused by two com-
plementary physical processes: (1) the obvious one,
dilution, which lowers radon concentrations by adding
uncontarninated outdoor air; and (2) although less evi-
dent,  introducing  a pressure break in the system
through an open basement window which, in turn, re-
duces the outdoor-basement pressure differential and
the rate at which radon-laden soil gas is drawn into the
house. The radon entry rate was found to be a linear
function of basement depressurization up to a differen-
tial pressure of about 4 Pa, as would be expected for
laminar  soil gas flow; opening two basement windows
approximately doubled the building air exchange rate
and reduced the radon entry rate by up to a factor of 5.

Keywords: 'Radon, 'Houses,  'Indoor  air  pollution,
'Ventilation, 'Air  pollution control, Residential build-
ings,  Soils, Basements,  Dilution, Depressurization,
Stationary sources, 'Natural ventilation.


PB92-124155/REB                PC A02/MF A01
Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
Adjusting Ambient Ozone  Air Quality Indicators
for Missing Values. Symposium paper.
ManTech Environmental  Technology, Inc., Corvallis,
OR.
 E. H.  Lee, D. T. Tingey, and W. E. Hogsett 1991, 8p
 EPA/600/D-91/265
 Proceedings of  American Statistical   Association's
 Business and  Economics  Section,   Atlanta,  GA.,
 August  20-23, 1990. Sponsored by Corvallis Environ-
 mental Research Lab., OR.

 The paper focuses on the adjustment of the exposure
 indices developed in work on exposure-response stud-
 ies on crops to deal  with missing data patterns in ambi-
 ent air quality data and present three statistical meth-
 ods that are fundamentally related to the methods pro-
 posed by Davidson and  Hemphill (1987) for  dealing
 with entire days of missing data and incomplete days.
 These methods are applied to hourly O3 data at eight
 nonurban monitoring sites in the United States to com-
 pare the capabilities of each method to adjust for vary-
 ing frequencies and temporal distributions of missing
 observations. Because most of the data  on atmos-
 pheric pollutants and related variables available in the
 United  States  from continuous-monitoring networks
 has been collected at urban sites (Schere, 1988), the
 paper focuses on the use of statistical methods that do
 not  require concomitant  variables for dealing  with
 missing observations.

 Keywords: 'Ozone, 'Rural areas, 'Air quality data,
 'Farm  crops, 'Exposure, Air pollution monitoring. Sta-
 tistical  analysis,  Regression  analysis, Correlation,
 Urban areas, Reprints.
Pesticide impact research on arthropod natural en-
emies is summarized here as a preface to the remain-
ing chapters of this volume, which discuss susceptibili-
ty, sublethal and ecological effects, selectivity, resist-
ance, and resistance management. The presentation
documents the amount of side-effect testing that is an
on-going part of IPM research. The overview was de-
rived from analysis of a database (SELCTV) which
contains information from  literature published mainly
from 1950 to 1986. Seldom has database technology
been used to summarize pesticide  side-effect data on
natural enemies. To our knowledge, no global review
of the topic has  been attempted in  a database format.

Keywords: 'Arthropoda, 'Pesticides, Statistical analy-
sis, Species diversity, Life cycles, Test methods,  Field
tests, Toxicity, Reprints, 'Natural enemies,  'SELCTV
 PB92-124163/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
 Pesticide Effects on Arthropod Natural Enemies:
 A Database Summary. Book chapter.
 Oregon State Univ.,  Corvallis.  Dept of Botany and

 B **. Crorfan^K. Theiling. 1991,18p EPA/600/D-91 /
 226
 Pub in Arthropod Biological Control Agents and Pesti-
 cides, Chapter  2, p17-47 1990. See also PB90-
 108192. Sponsored by Corvallis Environmental Re-
 search Lab., OR.
PB92-124171/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Toxicotogical Implementations  of Remediating
Hazardous Wastes. Symposium paper.
Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
S. A. Peterson, J. J. Barich, and J. J. Greene. 1991,
20p EPA/600/D-91 /267
Pub. in Proceedings, International Conference of the
Protection of the  Environment, Lublin, Poland, Sep-
tember 16-19, 1991  and International Conference on
Btoindication of Reg. Deterioration (6th), Ceske Bude-
jovic, Czechoslovakia, September  15-21, 1991. See
also PB88-125430.

Section 121 of the amendments (1986) to the Compre-
hensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and
Liability Act of 1980 (SUPERFUND) calls for hazard-
ous waste site remediations that will permanently and
significantly reduce the volume, toxicity, or mobility of
hazardous  substances, pollutants, and contaminants.
Traditional  engineering technology has concentrated
on reduction in volume and mobility as  assessed by
chemical and geophysical measures, assuming that
reduction in volume and  mobility would lead to reduc-
tions in toxicity. Environmental scientists long have
argued that this might not be the case. However, lack
of consensus on how complex  hazardous waste mix-
tures should be measured lexicologically has ham-
 pered integrated assessments. Therefore, new work
 was initiated to assemble a battery of aquatic and ter-
 restrial bioassays  to  be evaluated comparatively
 against  several  individual chemicals,  mixtures  of
 chemicals, and actual waste site chemical mixtures.
 The bioassays were then applied to a mobility reduc-
 tion demonstration to help assess its overall chemical,
 physical, and biological performance. Results indicat-
 ed that although remediation accomplished the pri-
 mary objective of mobility reduction, it introduced un-
 desirable secondary effects (toxicity). These trade-offs
 must be considered in the holistic sense with regard to
 the implementation and  evaluation  of remediation
 measures.

 Keywords: 'Toxicology, 'Remedial action, 'Hazard-
 ous materials, 'Bioassay,  'Toxic substances, Chemi-
 cal compounds, Superfund, Land pollution, Water pol-
 lution effects. Ecosystems, Aquatic ecosystems, Envi-
 ronmental  transport,  Leaching, Pesticides, Soil sur-
 veys,  Soil contamination, Sediments, Surface waters,
 Ground water, Resource Conservation and Recovery
 Act, Comprehensive Environmental  Response Com-
 pensation and Liability Act.
 PB92-124189/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
 Toxicity, Selectivity and Sublethal Effects of Pes-
 ticides on Arthropod  Natural Enemies: A Data-
 Base Summary. Book chapter.
 Oregon State Univ., Corvallis. Dept. of Entomology.
 K. M. Theiling, and B. A. Croft c1991,23p EPA/600/
 D-91/268
 Pub.  in Pesticides  Effects on Non-Target Inverte-
 brates, Chapter 11,  p213-232 1989. See also PB92-
 113455. Sponsored by Corvallis Environmental Re-
 search Lab., OR.

 The literature  on  natural enemy/pesticide research
 has grown rapidly since the mid 1970s. Comprehen-
 sive  summarization using  traditional methods has
 become limited and much less feasible. Computer
 data base techniques can improve summarization by
 allowing rapid processing of  large information sets.
 Reasons for summarizing existing work are many: to
 provide a tabulation of research; to elucidate trends
 from a perspective not previously possible; to evaluate


                             Marl 992     45

-------
                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
hypotheses regarding species susceptibility and pesti-
cide toxicity; to develop selectivity charts by crop; to
evaluate test protocols for standardization; and many
other applications of this information. Data published
over the past 40 years on pesticide side-effects to ar-
thropod natural enemies of agricultural pests have
been appended into a data base (SELCTV). Further
development of SELCTV is imminent Expansion and
refinement of fields for more detailed recording of sub-
lethal effects are  anticipated. Literature updates  are
critical to keep SELCTV relevant to emerging natural
enemy research.

Keywords:  'Toxicity, 'Pesticides, 'Arthropoda, Data
bases, Species diversity, Reprints, 'Natural enemies,
'SELCTV database, Pesticide selectivity,  Integrated
pest management
PB92-124197/REB                PC A03/MF A01
Drinking Water Research Division'* Research Ac-
tivities in Support of EPA's Regulatory Agenda.
Environmental  Protection  Agency, Cincinnati,  OH.
Drinking Water Research Div.
R. M. dark, and W. A. Feige. 1991,19p EPA/600/D-
91/269
Pub. in Jnl. of American Water  Works Association
Seminar  Proceedings, Cincinnati,  OH., June 17-21,
1990,p1-17.

The Safe Drinking Water Act and its Amendments will
have a dramatic impact on the way in which one views
the treatment and distribution of water in the U.S. The
paper discusses the regulatory agenda, including pro-
posed and promulgated regulations for volatile and
synthttic organic contaminants,   pesticides,  lead,
copper, inorganic contaminants, and radionudides. In
addition, the Surface Water Treatment and Coliform
Rules  are discussed in some detail. Tables are pre-
sented that list the Maximum Contaminant Levels
(MCLs)  and  Maximum Contaminant Level Goals
(MCLGs), as well as Best Available Technology (BAT)
for reducing many of these contaminants to accepta-
ble levels. Finally, a discussion of expected disinfec-
tion requirements and the regulation of disinfection by-
products (DBF) is made. Treatment techniques  for
controlling DBFs are briefly described.

Keywords  *Water treatment, 'Water pollution abate-
ment,  'Distribution  systems,  'Pollution  regulations,
•Potable water,  Management  Law enforcement.
United Slates, US EPA, Disinfectants, Organic  com-
pounds,  TabtesfData), By products, Coliform bacteria,
Best technology, Pesticides, Lead(Metal), Copper, Ra-
dioactive isotopes. Inorganic compounds, 'Safe Drink-
ing Water Act, Maximum contaminant levels.
 PB92-124205/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 FteM Studies for Control of Organic* and Disin-
 fection By-Products. Journal article.
 Environmental Protection Agency,  Cincinnati,  OH.
 Drinking Water Research Div.
 B. W. Lykins. 1991,19pEPA/600/D-91/270
 Pub. in Jnl. of American Water Works Association Con-
 ference Proceedings.  Cincinnati, OH., June  17-21,
 1990,095-111. See also PB90-200742.

 For some time, the Drinking Water Research Division
 has evaluated the performance, cost and feasibility of
 using GAC and AS for removing organic compounds
 from drinking water:  The data collected at field loca-
 tions have been used to develop and verify computer
 models to  aid in evaluating preliminary  designs of
 packed tower aeration and liquid-phase  GAC treat-
 ment systems for removing organic contaminants in
 drinking water. Little  additional research is being done
 in the field at this time evaluating treatment technol-
 ogies for removing  synthetic organics from drinking
 water.  An extensive  amount of field research, howev-
 er, is underway evaluating control of disinfection by-
 products. The paper will briefly discuss the cost and
 performance computer models and more thoroughly
 discuss four research field projects for controlling cfis-
 irrfection by-products.

 Keywords: 'Water pollution control, 'Water treatment
 'Byproducts, 'Disinfectants, 'Potable water. Granular
 activated carbon treatment RekJ tests. Design criteria.
 Aeration, Computerized simulation, Cost analysis, Or-
 ganic compounds. Performance evaluation,  Strippers,
 Reprints.
PB92-124213/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Design,  Development, and  Implementation of
AIRS' Area and Mobile Source Subsystem.' Rept
forApr-Aug91.
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Parts, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
E. S. Kimbrough, A. T. Kelsey, and C. 0. Mann. 1991,
14pEPA/600/D-91/271
Presented at American Water Works Association Spe-
cialty  Conference, Durham,  NC., September  9-12,
1991. See also PB90-207242.

The paper summarizes the anticipated capabilities of a
new data subsystem  called the  Area  and  Mobile
Source Subsystem (AMS),  and gives a preliminary
schedule for its development AMS is in the process of
being designed, developed, and implemented. Part of
the Aerometric Information  and  Retrieval  System
(AIRS), AMS will replace the National Emissions Data
System (NEDS) as the computer system to calculate,
store, and retrieve area and mobile source emissions
data for the national inventory. Base system capabili-
ties include support of emission inventory reporting,
tracking, and analytical requirements as stated in Title
I of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments.

Keywords: 'Mobile  pollutant  sources,  'Information
systems,  'Air pollution, Data processing,  Design crite-
ria, Implementation, US EPA, Substitutes, 'Area and
Mobile Source Subsystem, 'Area sources, Stationary
sources,   Aerometric  Information  and  Retrieval
System, Emission inventories, Clean Air Act  National
Emissions Data System.


PB92-124221/REB                PC A02/MF A01
Formation of Disinfection By-Products.
Environmental  Protection  Agency.  Cincinnati,  OH.
Drinking Water Research Div.
J. C. Ireland. 1991, 6p EPA/600/D-91 /272
Pub. in Proceedings of Seminar on American Water
Works Association, Cincinnati, OH., June 17-21,1990,
p19-22. See also PB91-171652.

An abbreviated discussion of the fundamental chemis-
try of drinking water disinfection byproduct formation is
presented. The most vexing problems known to be as-
sociated  with oxidants other than free chlorine are
summarized. Ozone, monochloramine, chlorine diox-
ide, and  the most important associated  chemical by-
products of each are briefly reviewed. Chemical issues
relevant to the  formulation of the USEPA Disinfection
 Byproduct Rule (to be promulgated in 1995) are sum-
 marized.

 Keywords: 'Water treatment 'Disinfectants, 'Byprod-
 ucts, 'Water pollution abatement 'Potable water, Oxi-
 dants, Ozonization, Chtorination, Pollution regulations,
 Environmental  chemical substitutes, Distribution sys-
 tems, Chtoramines, Chlorine oxides, Reprints, 'Chemi-
 cal reaction mechanisms, Disinfection Byproduct Rule,
 Maximum contaminant levels.


 PB92-124239/REB               PC A02/MF A01
 Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
 Reduction Engineering Lab.
 Soft-Air  PernwaMHty Method Evaluation. Symposi-
 um paper.
 Camp, Dresser and McKee, Inc., Cambridge, MA.
 K. L. Sellers, T. A, Pederson, and C.Y. Fan. 1991.8p
 EPA/600/D-91/273
 Contract EPA-68-03-3409
 Pub. in Hazardous Materials Control - Northeast Con-
 ference  Proceedings, Boston. MA., July 10-12, 1991,
 D209-213. Sponsored by  Environmental Protection
 Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk Reduction Engineering
 Lab.

 The feasibility of soil vapor extraction (SVE) is, in part,
 based on vadose zone soil-air permeability. Field, lab-
 oratory and empirical correlation methods for estimat-
 ing soil-air permeability have been reviewed for their
 appropriateness in determining SVE feasibility, and the
 development of SVE system design criteria.  To better
 understand the available air permeability test methods,
 a review of their  theoretical development is  provided.
 Empirical correlation methods are available to derive
 estimates of soil-air permeabilities from  soil grain size
 distributions, hydraulic conductivity measurements or
 pump test drawdown data Although these techniques
 provide data that are of value in determining if the use
 of SVE at a specific site should be excluded from fur-
 ther consideration, they do not provide adequate data
 for system design criteria development Laboratory
 soil-air permeability tests are also inappropriate for
SVE system design because they do not take into ac-
count field variability and the  non-representative
nature of soil  cores collected in the field. Most field
techniques employed for determining soil-air perme-
ability for surficial soils are likewise inappropriate for
the evaluation of contaminant releases that have mi-
grated to depths of greater than one meter. The in situ
field borehole permeability techniques used  by petro-
leum engineers, and subsequently modified for use at
relatively shallow soil depths, hold the  most promise
for application to SVE design.

Keywords:  'Land pollution control, 'Soil contamina-
tion, 'Waste management, 'Soil treatment, 'Remedial
action, 'Aeration,  Permeability, Soil texture, Particle
size distribution, Design criteria, Performance evalua-
tion, Field tests, Mathematical models, Experimental
design, Volatile organic compounds, Soil properties,
Vadose water. Hydraulic conductivity,  Pumping, Re-
prints, 'Soil vapor extraction.


PB92-124247/REB              PC A03/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Paris, NC. Atmospheric Research and  Exposure As-
sessment Lab.
Regional  Air Quality and Add Deposition Model-
Ing and the Rote for Visualization.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Re-
search Triangle Park, NC. Atmospheric Sciences Mod-
eling Div.
J. H. Novak, and R. L. Dennis. Nov 91,11 p EPA/600/
D-91/274
Grant EPA-R-814854
Sponsored by Environmental Protection Agency, Re-
search Triangle Park, NC. Atmospheric Research and
Exposure Assessment Lab.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) uses
air quality and deposition models to advance the scien-
tific understanding of basic physical  and chemical
processes related to air pollution, and to assess the ef-
fectiveness of alternative emissions control strategies.
The paper provides a brief technical description of sev-
eral regional scale atmospheric models, their current
use within EPA, and related data analysis issues. Spa-
tial analysis is a key component in the evaluation and
interpretation of the model predictions. Thus, the au-
thors highlight several types  of  analysis  enhance-
ments focusing on those related to issues of spatial
scale, user access to models and analysis  tools, and
consolidation of air  quality modeling  and graphical
analysis capabilities.  They discuss their initial experi-
ence with a Geographical Information System (GIS)
pilot project that generated the initial concepts for the
design of an integrated modeling and analysis environ-
ment. And finally, they present current plans to evolve
this modeling/visualization approach to a distributed,
 heterogeneous computing environment which enables
 any research scientist or policy analyst to use high per-
formance visualization techniques from his/her desk-
 top.

 Keywords: 'Air pollution,  'Air quality, 'Deposition,
 'Mathematical models, 'Atmospheric models, Air pol-
 lution  control, US EPA, Regional analysis, Physical
 properties, Chemical properties, Pollution sources,
 Spatial distribution, Geographic  Information System,
 Substitutes, Acid rain, Meteorological  data, Regional
 Acid Deposition  Model,  Regional  Oxidant  Model,
 Urban Airshed  Model, Regional Lagrangian Model of
 Air Pollution.
 PB92-124254/REB               PC A02/MF A01
 Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
 NERISK: An Expert System to Enhance the Inte-
 gration of Pesticides with Arthropod Biological
 Control. Journal article.
 Oregon State Univ., Corvallis. Dept of Entomology.
 R. H. Messing, and B. A. Croft 1989,8p EPA/600/J-
 89/552
 Pub. in Acta Horticulture, v276 p15-20 1989. Spon-
 sored by Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.

 An expert system termed NERISK was developed to
 evaluate the effects of pesticides on arthropod preda-
 tors and parasitokte in a variety of  agroecosystems.
 Based on a shell system (RECOG) with minor coding
 modifications, the system was designed to let even a
 novice user access the vast amount of information
 available on pesticide  impacts on natural enemies. A
 large database (ca.  16,000 records), a simulation
 model of  microbial pesticide  effects,  and several
 expert opinion components have been organized and
  46    Vol. 92, No. 1

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                                                  EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
integrated into an easy-to-use yet robust program. The
system can assist academic, industry, and regulatory
personnel make decisions regarding the integration of
pesticides with biological control agents in many crop-
ping systems.

Keywords: 'Biological pest control,  "Expert systems,
•Pesticides, 'Arthropoda, Data bases, Terrestrial eco-
systems, Species diversity, Reprints, *NERISK com-
puter   program,  'Integrated  pest   management,
RECOG computer program, Natural enemies.
PB92-124262/REB                PC A03/MF A01
Optimizing BTEX Biodegradatfon under Denitrify-
ing Conditions. Journal article.
Robert S. Kerr Environmental Research Lab., Ada,
OK.
S. R. Hutchins. c1991,14p EPA/600/J-91 /288
Pub. in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, v10
p1437-144,1991.

Leaking underground storage tanks are a major source
of ground water contamination by petroleum hydrocar-
bons. Gasoline and other fuels contain benzene, tolu-
ene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (collectively known as
BTEX), which are hazardous compounds, regulated by
the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Lab-
oratory tests were conducted to determine optimum
conditions for  benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene,  and
xytene (collectively known as BTEX) biodegradation by
aquifer microorganisms under denitrifying conditions.
Microcosms, constructed  with aquifer samples from
Traverse City, Michigan, were amended with selected
concentrations of nutrients and one or more hydrocar-
bons. Toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, and p-xylene,
were degraded  to  below  5 micrograms/L  when
present as sole source substrates; stoichiometric cal-
culations indicated that nitrate removal was sufficient
to account for 70 to 80% of the compounds being min-
eralized. o-Xylene was recalcitrant when present as a
sole source substrate, but was slowly degraded in the
presence of the other hydrocarbons. Benzene was not
degraded within one year, regardless of whether it was
available as a sole source substrate or in combination
with toluene, phenol, or catechol. Pre-exposure to low
levels of BTEX and nutrients had variable effects, as
dkj the addition of different concentrations of ammonia
and phosphate. Nitrate concentrations as high as 500
rog/L NO3-N were slightly inhibitory. These data indi-
cate that nitrate-mediated biodegradation of BTEX at
Traverse City can occur under a variety of environmen-
tal conditions with rates relatively independent of nutri-
ent concentrations.  However, the data reaffirm that
benzene is recalcitrant under strictly anaerobic condi-
tions in these samples.

Keywords: 'Water pollution control, 'Biodegradation,
'Petroleum products, 'Ground water,  'DenitrificatJon,
'Aquifers, Underground storage, Storage tanks, Leak-
age, Environmental transport, Experimental  design,
Benzene,  Toluene,  Xylenes,  Microorganisms, Nutri-
ents,    Reprints,     Benzene/ethyl,     Traverse
City(Michigan).


PB92-124270/REB                PC A02/MF A01
Environmental Protection  Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Effect of Storage Conditions  on  Handling  and
SO2 Reactivity of Ca(OH)2-Based Sorbents. Jour-
nal article Oct 89-Oct 90.
Acurex Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC.
W. Jozewtez, and B. K. Gullett C1991, 9p EPA/600/J-
91/289
Contract EPA-68-02-4701
Pub. in Zement-Kalk-Gips International, n5 p242-247
1991.  See  also PB89-172159,  PB89-127167  and
PB89-208920. Sponsored by Environmental Protec-
tion Agency, Research Triangle  Park, NC. Air and
Energy Engineering Research Lab.

The article  gives results of an investigation  of the
effect of relative humidity  (RH),  time, and aeration
during calcium hydroxide-Ca(OH)2-storage  for its
effect on sorbent handling and reactivity with sulfur di-
oxide (SO2). Investigated was  the effect of sorbent
storage conditions of time (1-24 hr),  RH (zero-90%),
silo wall material, and aeration on handling properties
of flowability and floodability and their subsequent
effect on sorbent/SO2 reactivity. Increased RH in the
storage chamber and prolonged storage increased
floodability, as predicted by the angte of difference. No
significant effect of RH on the flowability of Ca(OH)2,
as predicted by the angle of repose, was detected. The
importance of silo walfmaterial on proper sorbent dis-
charge pattern has been demonstrated through testing
on four common surfaces. The effect of sorbent stor-
age conditions on the reactivity of Ca(OH)2 with S02
was  evaluated in a  short  time  differential reactor
(STDR)operated under conditions typical ofdry sorbent
injection for SO2 control near the preheater. Increased
RH and aeration with air during storage resulted in de-
creased reactivity of Ca(OH)2 with S02. The effect of
storage  conditions on handling  of novel Ca(OH)2-
based sorbents for the removal of SO2 was also evalu-
ated. ADVACATE sorbent appears to have significant-
ly better handling properties than the other sorbents
tested.

Keywords: 'Air pollution control, 'Sorbents,  'Calcium
hydroxides, 'Materials handling,  'Storage,  Humidity,
Sulfur  dioxide,  Aeration,  Performance  evaluation,
Chemical properties, Materials tests, Time, Dry meth-
ods, Injection, Reprints.
PB92-124288/REB               PC A02/MF A01
American Water Works Association Research Foun-
dation, Denver, CO.
Comparison of  Animal  Infectlvlty,  Excystation,
and Fluorogenic  Dye  as Measures of 'Giardla
muris' Cyst Inactivatton by Ozone. Journal article.
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
Reduction Engineering Lab.
C. W. Labatiuk, f. W. Schaefer, G. R. Finch, and M.
Belosevic. cNov 91, 8p EPA/600/ J-91 /290
Pub. in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, v57
n11  p3187-3192 1991. See also PB86-164811. Pre-
pared  in cooperation with Alberta Univ., Edmonton.
Sponsored by American Water Works Association Re-
search Foundation, Denver, CO., and Natural Sci-
ences  and Engineering Research Council of Canada,
Ottawa (Ontario).

Giardia muris cyst viability after ozonation was com-
pared by using fluorescein diacetate-ethidium bromide
staining, the C3H/HeN mouse-G. muris model, and in
vitro excystation. Bench-scale batch experiments were
conducted under laboratory conditions (pH 6.7,22C) in
ozone-demand-free phosphate  buffer.  There was a
significant difference between fluorogenic staining and
infectivity (P = or < 0.05), with fluorogenic staining
overestimating viability compared with infectivity esti-
mates  of viability. This suggests that viable cysts as in-
dicated by fluorogenic dyes may not be able to com-
plete the life cycle and produce an infection. No signifi-
cant differences between  infectivity and excystation
and between fluorogenic staining and excystation (P
= or  < 0.05) were detected for inactivations up to
99.9%. Only animal infectivity had the sensitivity to
detect inactivations greater than 99.9%. Therefore,
the animal  model is the best  method currently avail-
able for detecting high levels of G. muris cyst inactiva-
tion. (Copyright (c) 1991, American Society for Microbi-
ology.)

Keywords:  'Ozone, 'Toxicology, 'Fluorescent dyes,
'Virulence,  Mice, Animal  disease models,  Fluores-
ceins,  Ethidium bromide, In vitro analysis, Reprints,
'Giardia muris.
 PB92-124296/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Acid-Volatile Sulfide as a Factor Mediating Cadmi-
 um and  Nickel BtoavaitaWlity  in  Contaminated
 Sediments. Journal article.
 Environmental Research Lab., Narragansett, Rl.
 G. T. Ankley, G. L. Phipps, E. L Leonard, D. A. Benoit,
 and V. R. Mattson. c1991,11 p EPA/600/J-91 /291,
 ERLN-1227
 Pub. in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, v10
 p1299-1307 1991. Prepared in cooperation with Man-
 hattan Coll., Bronx, NY. Dept. of Chemistry.

 The authors investigated the  influence of sulfide,
 measured as acid-volatile sulfide (AVS), on the bioa-
 vailability of cadmium and nickel in sediments. Seven-
 teen samples from an estuarine system heavily con-
 taminated with cadmium and nickel were analyzed for
 AVS and simultaneously extracted metals (SEM) and
 tested in 10-d exposures with the amphipod Hyalella
 azteca and the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus.
 Molar SEM(cadmium + nickel)/AVS ratios in the sedi-
 ments ranged from less than one to greater than 200,
 with several in the range of 1  to 10. Samples with
 SEM/AVS ratios greater than one were  consistently
 toxic to Hyalella azteca, whereas sediments with ratios
 less than one were not Lumbriculus variegatus was
 less sensitive  to  the  test sediments than Hyalella
 azteca, which was consistent with their relative sensi-
 tivity to cadmium and nickel in water-only exposures.
SEM/AVS ratios in the sediments also appeared to be
important in determining bioaccumulation of metals by
Lumbriculus variegatus. These results support other
studies with  metal-spiked samples in  demonstrating
the importance of AVS in determining metal bioavaila-
bility in sediments and suggest that AVS normalization
is  a reasonable means for assessing the  hazard of
some sediment-associated metals to aquatic ecosys-
tems.

Keywords: 'Sediments, 'Water pollution effects, 'Bio-
logical availability, 'Aquatic ecosystems, 'Marine envi-
ronment, 'Metals, Bioaccumulation, Physicochemical
properties, Toxicity, Nickel, Cadmium, Sulfides, Extrac-
tion, 'Acid volatile sulfide, Partition coefficients.
PB92-124304/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Life History and  Toxicologlcal  Comparisons of
Temperate and Subtropical Mysids. Journal article.
Environmental Research Lab., Narragansett, Rl.
S. M. Lussier, A. Kuhn, M. J. Chammas, and J. Sewall.
C1991,15pEPA/600/J-91/292, ERLN-916
Pub. in American Fisheries Society  Symposium, v9
p169-181 1991. Prepared in cooperation with Science
Applications International Corp., Narragansett, Rl. En-
vironmental Testing Center,  and Rhode Island  Univ.,
Kingston. Coll. of Business Administration.

Field and laboratory-cultured populations of the tem-
perate mysid Mysidopsis bigelowi were compared with
Mysidopsis bahia to assess the former's suitability as a
test organism for lexicological studies. Mysidopsis bi-
gelowi is widely distributed and often sympatric with M.
bahia. a well-established subtropical test species. The
overall sex ratio for both  species was 1.0,  and both
had a similar intermolt period at 20 C, but M. bigelowi
had a longer intermolt period at 25 C. The correlation
of female length to the number of young per brood was
strongly linear for cultured  M. bahia and for pooled nat-
ural populations of M. bigelowi. Despite a decrease in
size of females and in number of young produced by
the temperate mysid over the summer season, produc-
tivity of June and July field collections exceeded that
of cultured  subtropical females,  and developmental
times were similar. Cultures of the two species were
similar in numbers of young produced, although the
first brood of M. bahia developed earlier. The mean life
span and intrinsic  rate of growth for M.  bahia were
twice those for M. bigelowi, although generation times
were similar. Acute toxicity tests showed similar sensi-
tivity for both species to seven compounds when 96-h
LCSOs (concentrations lethal to 50% of mysids) were
compared.

Keywords:  'Toxicology,  'Life  cycles, 'Tropical re-
gions,  'Temperate regions, Comparison,  Species di-
versity, Reproduction(Biology), Toxic substances, Sur-
vival analysis, Reprints, 'Mysidopsis bahia, 'Mysidop-
sis bigelowi.
 PB92-124312/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Predicting Chemical Reactivity by Computer. Jour-
 nal article.
 Environmental Research Lab., Athens, GA.
 S. W. Karickhoff, V. K. McDaniel, C. Melton, A. N.
 Vellino, and D. E. Nute. c1991,14p EPA/600/J-91 /
 293
 Pub. in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, vIO
 n11 p1405-1416, Nov 91. Prepared in cooperation with
 Georgia Univ., Athens.

 Mathematical models for predicting the fate of pollut-
 ants in the environment require reactivity parameter
 values-that is, the physical and  chemical constants
 that govern reactivity. Although empirical structure-ac-
 tivity relationships have been developed that allow es-
 timation of some constants, such relationships gener-
 ally hold only within limited families of chemicals. Com-
 puter programs are under development that  predict
 chemical reactivity strictly from molecular structure for
 a broad range of molecular structures.  A prototype
 computer system called SPARC (SPARC Performs
 Automated Reasoning  in Chemistry) uses computa-
 tional  algorithms based on  fundamental  chemical
 structure theory to estimate a variety of reactivity pa-
 rameters  (e.g., equilibrium/rate constants, UV-visible
 absorption  spectra,  etc.).  The  capability  crosses
 chemical family boundaries to cover a broad range of
 organic compounds. SPARC does not do first princi-
 ples' computation, but seeks to analyze chemical
 structure relative to a specific reactivity query in much
 the same manner in which an expert chemist would do
 so.  Molecular  structures are broken into functional


                            Mar 1992     47

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                                                  EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
 units with known intrinsic reactivity. The intrinsic be-
 havior is modified for a specific molecule in question
 with mechanistic perturbation models. To date, com-
 putational procedures have been developed for UV-
 visibte light absorption spectra, ionization pK(sub a).
 hydrolysis  rate  constants,  and numerous physical
 properties. The paper describes the logic of the ap-
 proach to chemistry prediction and provides an over-
 view  of the computational procedures.  Additional
 papers are in  preparation  describing in  detail the
 chemical models and specific applications. (Copyright
 (O1991SETAC.)

 Keywords: 'Chemical reactions, 'Computerized simu-
 lation, 'Environmental effects, 'Pollution, 'Chemical
 compounds, Molecular structure, Physical properties,
 Chemical properties, Organic compounds, Reaction ki-
 netics, Ecosystems,  Spectrum analysis. Hydrolysis,
 Thermodynamic properties,  Absorption spectra, loni-
 zation, Reprints, SPARC system.


 PBA2-124320/REB               PCA03/MFA01
 Department of the Army, Washington, DC.
 Estimation of Water Solubility and Octanol/Water
 Partition Coefficient of Hydrophobte Dyes. Part 1.
 Relationship between Solubility and Partition Co-
 efficient Journal article.
 Environmental Research Lab., Athens, GA.
 G. L Baughman, and E. J. Weber. c1991,13p EPA/
 600/J-91/295
 Pub. in Dyes and Pigments,  v16 n4 p261-271 Oct 91.
 See also Part 2, PB92-124338. Sponsored by Depart-
 ment of the Army, Washington, DC., and Environmen-
 tal Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

 Three regression approaches are examined  for use in
 estimating water solubilities and octanol/water parti-
 tion coefficients, two fundamental  equilibrium con-
 stants that are widely used in predicting the fate of or-
 ganic chemicals in aquatic systems. Approaches ex-
 amined are regression of solubility against partition co-
 efficient, determination of the product of solubility and
 partition coefficient, and application from Yalkowsky
 and VaJvani (J.  Pharm. Sci., 69 (1980) 912). The re-
 gressions are based on data for water solubility, octa-
 nol/water  partition coefficient, entropy of fusion, and
 melting point of 20 disperse and solvent dyes.  In the
 study, all three methods produced more reliable data
 on dyes than other equations available in the  literature.
 Root-mean-square deviations are on the order of a
 factor of four to six for all three methods. Factors such
 as purity, polymorphism,  tautomerization, polarization
 and hydrogen bonding are suggested as factors pre-
 cluding the development of highly reliable prediction
 relationships between solubility and partition coeffi-
 cient  of dyes. Sources of error in both the  data and
 methodologies are discussed. The study also provided
 information on entropies of fusion, which ranged from
 50.7 to 136 and averaged 78.8 J/mcJ K. Arrthraquin-
 one dyes  exhibited much lower entropies  of fusion
 than did azo dyes. Thus, use of an average entropy in
 estimation is inappropriate for dyes and leads to more
 error  than  neglecting  the change in  heat  capacity.
 (Copyright (c) 1991 US Government)

 Keywords:  'Water pollution,  'Organic  compounds,
 •Solubility, 'Dyes, 'Mathematical models. Separation,
 Chemical equilibrium, Regression analysis, Octanofe,
 Purification, Polymorphism,  Polarization, Tautomers,
 Water, Study estimates. Entropy, Hydrogen bonds, Re-
 prints,'Partition coefficients.
PB92-124338/REB  .             PCA02/MFA01
Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept of Textiles, Merchandis-
ing and Interiors.
Estimation of Water SotabHty and Octanol/Water
Partition Coefficient para>meta; however,
the influence  of chlorine position on the ring on the
persistence of the DCPs was generally not statistically
significant

Keywords: 'Water pollution control,  'Sediments, 'En-
vironmental effects, 'Dechlorination, BJodeterioration,
Sediment-water interfaces, Stereochemistry,  Isomeri-
zation,         Environmental         persistence,
Reductkxi(Cnemistry), Chlorine organic  compounds,
Physical properties, Chemical properties. Microbiolo-
gy, Aromatic compounds, Reprints, 'Phenol/dfchloro.
PB92-124353/REB                PC A02/MF A01
Technology Applications, Inc., Athens, GA.
Muttlspectral Identification of Alkyl and Chtoroal-
kyl Phosphates from an Industrial Effluent Journal
article.
Environmental Research Lab., Athens, GA.
A. D. Thruston, S. D. Richardson, J. M. McGuire, T. W.
Collette,andC. D. Trusty. c1991,10pEPA/600/J-91/
297
Pub. in Jnl. of American Society for Mass Spectrome-
try, v2 n5 p419-426 Sep 91. Sponsored by Technology
Applications, Inc., Athens, GA.

Murtispectral techniques (gas chromatography com-
bined with low  and high resolution electron-impact
mass spectrometry, low and high resolution chemical
ionization mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform
infrared mass spectroscopy) were used to identify 13
alky) and chtoroalkyl  phosphates in a water sample
taken from the effluent of a plant that manufactures
fire-retardant chemicals. Of the 13 phosphates identi-
fied, only 4 were located in library mass  spectra data
bases; thus, techniques other than  conventional low
resolution electron-impact mass spectrometry with
data base matching were required. Several of the iden-
tified phosphates are commonly  used fire retardants;
however, three exhibited chemical structures different
from those of the commercially manufactured fire re-
tardants  and  the reactants used in their  synthesis.
 (Copyright (c) 1991 American Society for Mass Spec-
 trometry.)

 Keywords: 'Industrial wastes, 'Water pollution detec-
 tion, 'Water analysis, 'Organic phosphates, 'Fire re-
 sistance coatings. Waste water, Mass spectroscopy,
 Gas chromatography, Fourier transform spectroscopy,
 Plastics processing, Textile industry, Lubricants, Re-
 prints.
PB92-124361/REB                PC A02/MF A01
Influence  of Experimental  Conditions on the
Liquid Secondary Ion Mass Spectra of Sulfonated
Azo Dyes. Journal article.
Environmental Research Lab., Athens, GA.
S. D. Richardson, A. D. Thruston, J. M. McGuire, and
G. L. Baughman. c1991, 7p EPA/600/J-91 /298
Pub. in Organic  Mass Spectrometry, v26 p826-830
1991.

Two mpnosulfonated and eight disulfonated azo dyes
of varying relative molecular mass were examined by
liquid secondary ion  mass spectrometry (LSIMS). The
effects of matrix, concentration, primary beam energy,
and mode of operation were addressed in order to op-
timize sample ionization, whilst minimizing interference
from matrix ions.  Seven matrices were investigated:
glycerol, thioglycerol, 3-nitrobenzyl alcohol, diethano-
lamine, 2-hydroxyethyl disulfide, a 1:1 (v/v) mixture of
2-hydroxyethyl disulfide and thioglycerol, and a 1:3 (v/
v) mixture of dithioerythritol and ditfnothreitol. Of these
matrices, 3-nitrobenzyl alcohol produced LSIMS spec-
tra that exhibited the most intense sample ions and the
least interference  from matrix ions. Minimum concen-
trations of 0.4 microg/microl and 4 microg/microl (dye
in matrix) were necessary to  produce useful full-scan
spectra for monosulfonated azo dyes and disulfonated
azo dyes, respectively, maximum sample ion intensi-
ties were obtained with concentrations ranging from
20  microg/microl  to 60 microg/microl. A primary ion
beam (cesium) of 10 to 15 kV produced the greatest
secondary  ionization efficiency, and  a negative-ion
analysis  mode produced more useful spectra than
those obtained in the positive-ion mode.

Keywords:  'Water pollution  detection, 'Azo dyes,
'Mass spectroscopy,  'Water analysis, Dyes,  Textile
industry,   Environmental  transport.   Experimental
design, Industrial wastes, Chemical analysis, Molecu-
lar  structure, Sultanates, Reprints, 'Liquid secondary
ion mass spectrometry.
PB92-124379/REB                PC A02/MF A01
Evaluation of Selected Upid Methods for Normal-
izing Pollutant BtoaccumulaUon. Journal article.
Environmental Research Lab.-Narragansett, Newport,
OR. Mark O. Hatfield Marine Science Center.
R. C. Randall, H. Lee, R. J. Ozretich, J. L Lake, and R.
J. Pruell. c1991, 7p EPA/600/J-91 /299, ERLN-1186
Pub. in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, v10
P1431-1436 1991. Also pub. as Environmental Re-
search Lab.-Narragansett,  Newport,  OR. rept no.
CONTRIB-1186.

Current environmental models use organism lipid con-
centrations to estimate maximum  pollutant bioaccu-
mulation  potentials.  The  collaborative  study  has
shown that significantly different lipid concentrations
(3.5x) are found when using common, but different ex-
traction solvents and methods.  Based on these vari-
able lipid values, models that estimate tissue pollutant
concentrations normalized to lipid will give significantly
different bioaccumulation estimates. To reduce that
variability, a standard lipid method needs to be devel-
oped or adopted.

Keywords: 'Water pollution effects(Animals),  'Lipids,
Marine biology,  Tissues(Biology), Chemical analysis,
Chloroform, Methanol, Reprints, * Bioaccumulation.
PB92-124387/REB               PC A02/MF A01
U.S. EPA SITE Demonstration of AWD Technol-
ogies' AquaDetox/SVE System. Journal article.
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
Reduction Engineering Lab.
G. M. Evans. c1991. 7p EPA/600/J-91 /300
Pub. in Jnl. of Air Waste Management Association, v41
n11p1519-1523Nov91.

The report covers the results of the Superfund Innova-
tive Technology Evaluation Program's demonstration
of  the  AWD Technologies  AquaDetox/SVE.  The
48     Vol. 92, No.  1

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                                                  EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
system combines a vacuum assisted steam stripping
unit and a soil vapor gas extraction system into an inte-
grated unit. The demonstration was conducted during
September  1990  at  the  Lockheed  Aeronautical
System Corp. in Burbank, CA. The results of a 2-week
demonstration confirmed the ability of the system to
meet regulatory discharge requirements for the con-
taminants of concern, TCE and PCE.

Keywords:   *Superfund,  *Land  pollution  control,
*Water pollution  control, 'Remedial action,  'Waste
management, 'Volatile organic compounds, Ground
water, Soil gases, Soil contamination. Technology utili-
zation, Tetrachloroethylene, Performance evaluation,
Design criteria, Steam stripping, Soil  treatment, Re-
prints, *AquaDetox/SVE treatment system, Soil vapor
extraction, Soil vacuum extraction, Ethylene/trichloro.
PB92-124551/REB                PC A03/MF A01
Application of a Plant Test System in the Identifi-
cation of Potential Genetic Hazards at Chemical
Waste Sites.
Health Effects  Research  Lab.,  Research Triangle
Park, NC. Genetic Toxicology Div.
B. S. Gill, S. S. Sandhu, L. C. Backer, and B. C. Casto.
1991,11pEPA/600/D-91/275
Pub. in American Society for Testing and Materials -
Plants for  Toxicity  Assessment:  Philadelphia, PA.,
pp309-317  1991. Prepared in cooperation with Envi-
ronmental Health Research and  Testing,  Inc.,  Re-
search Triangle Park, NC.

The authors utilized the Tradescantia micronucleus
fJrad-MCN) assay for evaluating genetic hazards at a
chemical waste site  contaminated with agricultural in-
secticides scheduled for clean-up under the Superfund
program. The chemical analysis of soil samples from
the site indicates presence of lindane (17 mg/kg), beta
BHC (13 mg/kg), and heptachlor (0.4 mg/kg) in the
subsurface sample. Tradescantia plants were planted
at five locations to evaluate the mutagenic effects of
trie total environment, i.e., soil, water, and air. In addi-
tion, stem cuttings were also placed at these locations
to sample the genetic impact of vapor phase organics
in the atmosphere. The surface and subsurface sam-
ples were  obtained from  these locations for their
chemical and biological analysis in the laboratory. The
results of the Tradescantia planted on the site, as well
as the stem cuttings exposed on the test site, showed
significantly higher  frequencies of micronuclei from
contaminated plots before remediation; but no genetic
activity was detected after  the remedial action.  The
plants exposed to the soil samples in the laboratory
yielded nonsignificant  results except for one subsur-
face sample before remediation and two surface sam-
ples after remediation.

Keywords: 'Toxicity, 'Mutagens, *Plants(Botany), Su-
perfund, Btoassay, Water pollution, Air pollution, Pesti-
cides, Risk assessment. Hazards, Reprints, "Chemical
waste sites, Cleanup, Micronucleus test, Soil contami-
nation, Mutagenicity tests.


PB92-124569/REB                PC A03/MF A01
Review of the Mutagenicity of Ethylene Oxide.
Journal article.
Health  Effects Research  Lab.,  Research Triangle
 Park,NC.
V. L Dellarco, W. M. Generoso, G. A. Sega, J. R.
 Fowte, and D. Jacobson-Kram. c1990,21p EPA/600/
J-90/550
 Pub. in Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis,
v16 n2 p85-103 Aug 90. See also PB86-102597 and
 PB88-188784.  Prepared in cooperation  with  Oak
 Ridge National Lab., TN. Biology Div.

 Ethylene oxide has been shown to be an effective mu-
 tagen in a variety of organisms ranging from bacteria
 to mammalian cells. There  is also an association be-
 tween ethylene oxide exposure and human somatic
 ceH cytogenetjc damage. Furthermore, ethylene oxide
 has been shown to  alkylate protein and DNA at expo-
 sure levels that have been encountered occupational-
 ly. Ethylene oxide is not only effective at producing so-
 matic cell mutations but  also at inducing  genetic
 damage in germ cells. While it is clear that ethylene
 oxide is a germ cell mutagen in whole mammals, the
 mechanism
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                                                  EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
stricted movements and (2) it automatically monitors
ST(sub a) over a relatively tong, uninterrupted period
of time. All three rat strains selected relatively cool
ST(sub a)'s of 21 to 26C during the first 1 to 3 hr in the
temperature gradient This was followed by a gradual
increase in the ST(sub a) which peaked at 4 (F344) to
6 hr (SD and LE) after being placed in the gradient

Keywords: 'Body temperature regulation, 'Animal be-
havior, Rats, Species diversity, Motor activity, Temper-
ature, Orcadian rhythms, Reprints.


PB92-124627/REB                PC A01/MF A01
Health  Effects Research  Lab., Research Triangle
Park,NC.
DNA  Adducts In Rat  Lung, Uver and  Peripheral
Blood Lymphocytes Produces by Lp. Administra-
tion of Benzo(a)Pyrene Metabolites and Deriva-
tives. Journal article.
Environmental Health Research and Testing, Inc., Re-
search Triangle Park, NC.
J. Ross, G. Nelson, G. Erexson, A. Kligerman, and K.
Eariey. c1991, 5p EPA/600/ J-91 /306
Contract EPA-68-02-4456
Pub. in Carcinogenests, v12 n10 p1953-1955 Oct 91.
Prepared in cooperation with Kentucky Univ., Lexing-
ton. Sponsored by Health Effects Research Lab., Re-
search Triangle Park, NC.

DNA adducts produced in vivo in rat lung, liver, and pe-
ripheral Wood lymphocytes following the i.p. adminis-
tration of several synthetic  benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P)
metabolites and ring-substituted derivatives have been
analyzed by the nudease P1 version of the 32P-post-
labeling assay. These include 1-,2-,3-,4-.5-,6-,7-,8-,9-
.10-.11-, and 12-hydroxyB(a)P, (+ or -) -B(a)P-trans-
4,5-dJhydrodtol, (+ or -) -B(a)P-trans-7,8-dihydrodiol,
(+ or -) -B(a)P-trans-9,10-dihydrodoil, and B(a)P-7,8-
dtone. Among the monohydroxy derivatives, only 2-,9-,
and 12-hydroxyB(a)P produced  detectable adducts.
The only disubstituted derivative studied  which pro-
duced adducts was the trans-7,8-dttiydrodtol. The re-
sulting DNA adducts were compared to  those pro-
duced in each tissue by administration of B(a)P. 9-
hydroxyB(a)P and B(a)P-trans-7,8-dihydrodiol  each
toad to the formation of major B(a)P adducts seen hi
lung and liver, respectively. None of the adducts de-
rived from either 2-nydroxyB(a)P or 12-hydroxyB(a)P
were observed followmg administration of B(a)P atone.

Keywords:  'Deoxyribonudeic acids, 'Lung, 'Liver,
'Lymphocytes, *Benzo(a)pyrene, DNA damage, Rats,
Reprints.
PB92-124635/REB
Roto of
Zinc Status In tt
       PC A03/MF A01
Induction flnd Altered
       I D0wlopm0ntsl
ToxtcttyjCompsrison of the Effects of Urethane
4VM StyrofW In fwts. Jouirn&J srticte.
Health  Effects Research  Lab., Research Triangle
Park, NC. Developmental Toxfcotogy Div.
G.P.Daston,G.IOvermann,M.W.Taubeneck,L.D.
Lehman-McKeeman, and J. M. Rogers. C1991,16p
EPA/600/J-91/307
Pub. in Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, VMO
n3 D450-463.15 Sep 91. Prepared m cooperation with
Procter and Gamble Co., Cincinnati, OH. Miami Valley
Labs., and California Univ., Davis. Dept of Nutrition.

The authors hypothesize that maternal metaHothionein
(MT) induction by toxic dosages of chemicals may con-
tribute to or cause developmental toxicity by a chain of
events leading to a transient but developmental^ ad-
verse decrease in Zn availability to the embryo. The
hypothesis was tested by evaluating hepatic Mr induc-
tion, maternal and embryonic Zn status, and develop-
mental toxicity after exposure to urethane, a develop-
mental toxicant, or styrene, which is not a develop-
mental toxicant Pregnant Sprague-Dawtey rats were
given 0 or 1 g/kg urethane  ip, or 0 or 300 mg/kg sty-
rene in com oil po, on Gestation Day 11 (sperm posi-
tive = Gestation Day 0). These were matemalty toxic
dosages. As both treatments decreased food con-
sumption, separate pair-fed control groups were also
evaluated for effects on MT and Zn status and devel-
opment In addrtion, Gestation Day 11 rat embryos
were exposed to urethane in vitro in order to determine
whether urethane has the potential to be directly em-
bryotoxic. Urethane treatment induced hepatic MT 14-
fotd over control; styrene treatment induced MT 2.5-
foM. The MT induction by styrene couM be attributed
to decreased food intake, as a similar level of induction
was observed  in a pair-fed untreated control group.
However, the level of MT induction by urethane was
                                                   much greater than that produced by decreased food
                                                   intake atone. (Copyright (c) 1991  Academic Press,
                                                   Inc.)

                                                   Keywords:  'Teratogenic  compounds,  'Urethanes,
                                                   'Styrene, 'Metaltotruonein, 'Zinc, 'Maternal-fetal ex-
                                                   change, Rats, Comparison, Enzyme induction, Liver,
                                                   Embryo, Reproduction(Biology), Reprints.
                                                   PB92-124643/REB               PC A03/MF A01
                                                   Developmental Toxteny of  TCDD and  Related
                                                   Compounds: Species  Sensitivities  and  Differ-
                                                   ences. Journal article.
                                                   Health  Effects  Research Lab.,  Research  Triangle
                                                   Park, NC. Environmental Toxicology Div.
                                                   L S. Bimbaum. c1991,19p EPA/600/J-91 /308
                                                   Pub. in Banbury Report, n35 p51-67 Aug 91. See also
                                                   PB91-211383.

                                                   The issue of the developmental toxicity  of 2,3,7,8-te-
                                                   trachtorodibenzo-p-dtoxin (TCDD) and related com-
                                                   pounds has been the subject of  two recent reviews
                                                   (Morrissey and Schwetz, 1989; Couture et al., 1990s).
                                                   There is little doubt that TCDD  is one of the most
                                                   potent developmental toxins known, yet its production
                                                   of frank structural malformations in species other than
                                                   in the mouse are poorly described. The objective of the
                                                   review is to critically address the role which TCDD and
                                                   its approximate isostereomers have in causing a wide
                                                   array of developmental effects  in various species, in-
                                                   cluding some very recent results. The bias of the
                                                   author is that the teratogenic response of the mouse is
                                                   a reflection of extreme sensitivity of the-species to the
                                                   induction of frank teratogenic responses in two epithe-
                                                   lial tissues. That is, that the mouse is an outlier in the
                                                   field of developmental toxicity,  possibly  in parallel to -
                                                   the exquisite sensitivity of the guinea pig vs the resist-
                                                   ance of the hamster to the lethal effects of TCDD. or in
                                                   the resistance of haired  rodents to the induction of
                                                   chtoracne. The crucial point  is  that most species re-
                                                   spond similarly to TCDD; for any  given endpotnt out-
                                                   liers wKI exist However, no species is an outlier for all
                                                   responses. In terms of developmental toxicity, essen-
                                                   tially all  species critically examined to date demon-
                                                   strate potent developmental^ toxic effects following
                                                   exposure to TCDD and related chemicals. Relatively
                                                   tow doses to the dam (varying within an order of mag-
                                                   nitude) result in  embryo/fetal toxicity. The actual  in-
                                                   duction of terata is an extremely rare response. (Copy-
                                                   right (c) 1991 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.)

                                                   Keywords:  'Teratogenic compounds,  'Toxicity, *Te-
                                                   trachtorodibenzodtoxins. Species  specificity,  Stereoi-
                                                   somers,  Rodents, deft palate, Hydronephrosis, Re-
                                                   prints.
                                                  PB92-124650/REB                PC A03/MF A01
                                                  Health Effects Research  Lab.,  Research Triangle
                                                  Park.NC.
                                                  Enhance  and Prolonged  Pulmonary  Influenza
                                                  Vlnjs  Infection Following  Phosgene  Inhalation.
                                                  Journal article.
                                                  New York Univ. Medical Center, Tuxedo Park. Inst of
                                                  Environmental Medicine.
                                                  J. P. Ehrlfch, and G. R. Burieson. c1991,17p EPA/
                                                  600/J-91/309
                                                  Contract EPA-68-02-4450
                                                  Pub. in Jnl. of Toxicology and Environmental Health,
                                                  v34 n2 0259-273 Oct 91. See also PB90-146044.
                                                  Sponsored by  Health Effects Research  Lab.. Re-
                                                  search Triangle Park. NC.

                                                  Animal infectivity models have been important in the
                                                  demonstration of enhanced susceptibility to viral and
                                                  bacterial infection as a result of tow-level toxicant ex-
                                                  posure. The study demonstrated an enhanced and
                                                  prolonged viral infection using an influenza virus infec-
                                                  tivity model in the rat following exposure to the toxicant
                                                  gas phosgene. Rscher-344 rats exposed to either air
                                                  or a subtethal concentration of phosgene demonstrat-
                                                  ed peak pulmonary influenza virus liters 1 d after infec-
                                                  tion. Wits liters in rats exposed to air declined rapidly
                                                  falling below detectable levels by 4 d after infection.
                                                  However, a significantly enhanced and prolonged pul-
                                                  monary influenza vims infection was observed on d 3
                                                  and 4  after infection in  rats exposed to phosgene.
                                                  Virus was cleared below detectable limits on d 5 after
                                                  infection in animals exposed to phosgene. Thus, inha-
                                                  lation of subtethal concentrations of phosgene result-
                                                  ed in an increased  severity of  pulmonary influenza
                                                  virus infection. The study provides a demonstration of
                                                  the effective  use of a rat viral infectivity  model  to
                                                  detect  the immunotoxicity of inhaled pollutants. The
                                                  model will allow future studies to focus on the immune-
                                                                            logical  mechanism(s) responsible for the enhanced
                                                                            and prolonged pulmonary  influenza virus infection.
                                                                            (Copyright (c) 1991 by Hemisphere Publishing Corpo-
                                                                            ration.)

                                                                            Keywords: 'Phosgene,  'Toxicity,  'Influenza, 'Lung,
                                                                            Influenza virus, Rats, Plaque assay, Bronchpalveolar
                                                                            lavage fluid, Virus replication, Virulence, Reprints.
PB92-124668/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Acute Effects of  Diisopropyl  Fluorophosphate
(DFP) on Autonomte and Behavioral Thermoregu-
latory Responses In the Long-Evans Rat Journal
article.
Health Effects  Research Lab., Research Triangle
Park, NC.
C. J. Gordon, L Fogelson, L Lee, and J. Highfill.
C1991,17p EPA/600/J-91 /310
Pub. in Toxicology, v67 m p1-14,25 Mar 91. See also
PB91-191551.

Experiments were  designed to assess the mecha-
nisms of diisopropyl fluorophosphate  (DFP)-induced
changes in thermoregulation of the rat In one study,
male rats of the Long-Evans strain were injected with
DFP (s.c.) at doses ranging from 0 to 2.0 mg/kg while
maintained at an ambient temperature (Ta) of 20-24C.
Body (Tb) and tail skin (Tt) temperatures were record-
ed for 5 h post-injection. DFP doses of > or = 1.0 mg/
kg resulted in significant decreases in Tb fasting up to
5 h and increases in Tt lasting up to 1 h post-injection.
In a second  study, metabolic rate (MR), evaporative
water loss (EWL), motor activity (MA), Tb, and Tt, were
measured at 2 h post-injection of 0, 0.5,1.0, and 1.5
mg/kg DFP (s.c.) at Ta values of 10,20, and 30 C. DFP
treatment  resulted in  hypothermia  at all three  Ta
values, but the effect was attenuated at 30 C. MR was
significantly reduced at a Ta of 20 C following 1.5 mg/
kg, unaffected by DFP at a Ta of 30 C, and stimulated
at 10 C following 0.5 mg/kg DFP. EWL was significant-
ly elevated at 30 C following 1.5 mg/kg DFP. MA was
significantly reduced following > or = 1.0 mg/kg DFP
at 20 and 30 C and 1.5 mg/kg at 10C.T1 was elevated
and reduced by DFP at Ta values of 30 and 10C, re-
spectively. In a third study, rats were injected with DFP
and placed in a temperature gradient for 1 to 2 h post-
injection while  selected Ta and Tb were  monitored.
While both control and DFP-treated rats remained in
the cool end of the gradient, rats administered DFP at
doses of 1.0 and 1.5 mg/kg were significantly hypoth-
ermia (Copyright (c) 1991  Elsevier Scientific Publish-
ers Ireland Ltd.)

Keywords: 'Diisopropytfluorophosphate, 'Body tem-
perature regulation, 'Toxicology, 'Autonomic nervous
system, Rats, Dose-response relationships, Metabo-
lism, Acetytoholinesterase, Motor activity,  Blood, Re-
prints.
                                                                            PB92-124676/REB               PC A02/MF A01
                                                                            Hearth  Effects Research Lab.,  Research  Triangle
                                                                            Park,NC.
                                                                            Airway Structure Variability in the Long-Evans Rat
                                                                            Lung. Journal article.
                                                                            Nortnrop Services, Inc., Research Triangle Park, NC.
                                                                            M. G. Menache, A. L Patra, and F. J. Miller. c1991, 9p
                                                                            EPA/600/J-91/311
                                                                            Contract EPA-68-02-4450
                                                                            Pub. in Neuroscience and Btobehavioral Reviews, v15
                                                                            n1 p63-69 Sep 91. Sponsored by Health Effects Re-
                                                                            search Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC.

                                                                            Mathematical models used to study deposition of  in-
                                                                            haled toxicants require morphometric data to repre-
                                                                            sent the tracheobronchial airways of laboratory ani-
                                                                            mals. Because  of the difficulty and cost of obtaining
                                                                            detailed measurements,  morphometric models are
                                                                            generally  based on  measurements  from  a  small
                                                                            number of specimens. To determine the degree of  in-
                                                                            teranimal  variability among laboratory animals of the
                                                                            same strain and size, lengths and diameters of the
                                                                            same 200 airways were  measured in solid casts in
                                                                            each of 10 male Long-Evans rats. Intraanimal variabili-
                                                                            ty was substantially greater than interanimaf variability
                                                                            for airway lengths and diameters. Intraanimal variabili-
                                                                            ty was reduced when the airways were grouped so that
                                                                            airway generations were  adjusted for lobar position.
                                                                            The study results suggest that detailed measurements
                                                                            of the conducting airways in a small number of casts
                                                                            with summarization techniques that retain lobar infor-
                                                                            mation will provide a less variable estimate of lung ge-
                                                                            ometry than a smaller number of measurements made
                                                                            in several casts.
50     Vol. 92, No.  1

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                                                  EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
Keywords: 'Trachea, *Lung, "Anatomy, Rats, Statisti-
cal analysis, Particles, Reprints, Intra-animal variability,
Inter-animal variability.
PB92-124684/REB                PC A03/MF A01
Health Effects  Research  Lab.,  Research  Triangle
Park, NC. Developmental Toxicology Div.
Rat Sperm Motility Analysis: Methodologlc Con-
siderations. Journal article.
ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc., Research
Triangle Park, NC.
V. L Slott, J. D. Suarez, and S. D. Perreault. c1991,
12p EPA/600/ J-91/312
Contract EPA-68-02-4450
Pub. in Reproductive Toxicology, v5 n6 p449-458 Nov
91. See also PB90-147810. Sponsored by Health Ef-
fects Research Lab., Research Triangle Park, NC. De-
velopmental Toxicology Div.

The objective of these studies was to optimize condi-
tions for computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) of
rat epkJidymal spermatozoa. Methodologic issues ad-
dressed include sample collection technique, sampling
region within the epididymis,  type of diluent medium
used, and sample chamber depth. In addition, sources
of variation were identified and accuracy of the analy-
sis was examined. All samples in the report were ana-
lyzed  using a Hamilton Thorn Motility Analyzer (HTM-
2000; Hamilton Thorn  Research, Danvers, MA). The
authors found that allowing the sperm to swim out from
cuts made in the distal cauda  epididymidis yielded
samples with percentages of motile sperm 60% higher
than samples collected using an aspiration  method.
Furthermore, sperm isolated from the distal cauda epi-
didymidis  exhibited slightly  but  significantly  greater
percentages of  motile sperm and  swimming  speeds
than sperm isolated from the proximal cauda epididy-
midis. Of the four motility media examined, all main-
tained a high percentage of motile sperm over an hour-
long incubation period, but Medium 199 and modified
Hanks' Balanced Salt supported substantially greater
sperm velocity than Dulbecco's  Phosphate Buffered
Saline (with Ca+ + and Mg+ +), with or without glu-
cose. Motility and velocity endpoints were comparable
in 200-, 100-, or 40- micrometers deep chambers, but
significantly lower in 20- micrometers deep chambers.
(Copyright (c) 1991 Pergamon Press pic.)

Keywords: 'Sperm motility, Rats, Epididymis, Micro-
computers, Regression analysis,  Cell survival, Re-
prints.
PB92-124692/REB                PC A03/MF A01
Use of Bromoergocryptine In the Validation of
Protocols for the Assessment of Mechanisms of
Early Pregnancy Loss in the Rat Journal article.
Health Effects Research Lab.,  Research  Triangle
Park, NC.
A. M. Cummings, S. D. Perreault, and S. T. Harris.
C1991,14p EPA/600/J-91/313
Pub. in Fundamental and Applied Toxicology, v17 n3
D563-574 Oct 91. See also PB90-217449. Prepared in
cooperation with NSI Technology Services Corp., Re-
search Triangle Park, NC.

Validated protocols for evaluating maternally mediated
mechanisms of early pregnancy failure in rodents are
needed for use in the risk assessment process. To
supplement previous efforts in the validation of a panel
of protocols assembled  for the purpose, bromoergo-
cryptine (BEC) was used as  a model compound be-
cause it is known to inhibit pituitary prolactin secretion.
BEC was tested using the early pregnancy protocol
(EPP), the decidual cell response technique (OCR), the
pre- vs postimplantation protocol (PPP), and embryo
transport rate analysis (ETRA). These protocols evalu-
ate the effects of chemicals on multiple endpoints fol-
lowing exposure during (1) the first 8 days of pregnan-
cy  (2) early pseudopregnancy accompanied by decid-
ual induction, (3) the pre- and postimplantation inter-
vals of early pregnancy, or (4) the period of embryo
transport In the EPP, dosing with BEC during Days 1-8
of pregnancy reduced the number of implantation sites
found on Day 9 as well  as serum  progesterone.  The
DCR technique revealed a dose-dependent inhibition
of decidual growth concomitant with decreased serum
progesterone as a result of BEC treatment. A modified
DCR technique using hormone-supplemented ovariec-
tomized rats demonstrated that BEC did not impair de-
cidual growth in  the presence of adequate progesto-
genic support. (Copyright (c) 1991 by the Society of
Toxicology.)
Keywords:  'Animal  pregnancy,  'Missed  abortion,
'Bromocriptine,   Corpus  luteum,  Pituitary   gland,
Embryo, Rats, Ovariectomy, Progesterone, Risk as-
sessment. Organ weight, Reprints, 'Early Pregnancy
Protocol.
PB92-124700/REB               PC A02/MF A01
In vitro Teratology. Journal article.
Health Effects  Research  Lab., Research  Triangle
Park, NC.
B. A. Schwetz, R. E. Morrissey, F. Welsch, and R. A.
Kavlock. c1991, 6p EPA/600/J-91 /314
Pub. in Environmental Health Perspectives, v94 p265-
268 Jul 91. Presented at a conference held  in Re-
search Triangle Park, NC. on September 21-22,1989.
See also PB83-209817. Prepared in cooperation with
National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Re-
search Triangle Park, NC:, and Chemical Industry Inst
of Toxicology, Research Triangle Park, NC.

The purpose of the In Vitro Teratology Conference
was to (1) reevaluate the need for and use of  in vitro
teratology assays, (2) examine the validation process
for in vitro tests, and (3) discuss progress in the valida-
tion of in vitro teratology screens. Participants enthusi-
astically supported further development of short-term
in vivo and in vitro systems both as pre-screens for de-
velopmental toxicity and as experimental systems  to
explore mechanisms of action of toxicants. The group
strongly endorsed the development of an updated ref-
erence list ('gold standard') of known developmental
toxicants and non-toxicants  as essential to  further
progress in developing and validation pre-screening
efforts. Independently, an expert group should further
evaluate the performance characteristics for a validat-
ed pre-screen. The limits of mechanistic investigations
need to be clearly defined. Finally, too few in vitro tera-
tology pre-screens  have been evaluated under multi-
ple-laboratory conditions with common agreed-upon
test agents to draw firm  conclusions regarding the
merit  and reproducibility of in vitro teratology pre-
screens.

Keywords:  'Meetings,  'Teratogenic   compounds,
'Toxicology, 'Screening, 'In  vitro analysis, Validity,
Nomenclature, Reprints.
PB92-124718/REB                PC A02/MF A01
Neonatal  Exposure to TrlmethyltJn Disrupts Spa-
tial Delayed Alternation Learning  In Preweanling
Rats. Journal article.
Health Effects  Research  Lab.,  Research Triangle
Park, NC. Neurotoxicology Div.
M. E. Stanton, K. F. Jensen, and C. V. Pickens. C1991,
8p EPA/600/J-91/315
Pub. in Neurotoxicology and Teratology, v13 p525-530
Oct 91. See also PB91-171793. Prepared in coopera-
tion  with NSI Technologies,  Inc., Research Triangle
Park, NC.

Trimethyltjn  is an organotin compound that produces
potent neurotoxicity in both adult and developing ani-
mals. The limbic system is a primary CNS target site
for this toxicity and a prominent behavioral effect of
TMT is disruption of learning and memory. Impairment
of cognitive development has also been suggested by
studies showing that rats neonatally exposed to TMT
cannot perform spatial working memory tasks during
adulthood. However, the question of how early in on-
togeny such deficits can be detected has not been ad-
dressed. The present study examined the question
with a T-maze delayed alternation learning paradigm.
Long-Evans rat pups, injected i.p. on postnatal day 10
(PND10) with 6 mg/kg TMT and tested on PND18,
were unable to learn delayed alternation in the manner
shown by vehicle control pups. However, TMT- and ve-
hicle-treated groups were both able to learn a simple
position discnmination. These findings indicate a se-
lective impairment of spatial working memory by neon-
atal  TMT exposure and show that the impairment can
be demonstrated during the preweanling period in the
rat

Keywords:  'Toxicology,  'Trimethyttin  compounds,
'Learning disorders, 'Central nervous system, Expo-
sure, Rats, Newborn animals, Dose-response relation-
ships, Histology, Analysis of variance, Reprints.
PB92-124726/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Neonatal Exposure to Triethyltin Disrupts Olfacto-
ry Discrimination  Learning in  Preweanling Rats.
Journal article.
Health Effects  Research Lab.,  Research  Triangle
Park, NC. Neurotoxicology Div.
M. E. Stanton. C1991,12p EPA/600/J-91/316
Pub. in Neurotoxicology and Teratology, v13 p515-524
Oct 91. See also PB85-242832 and PB91 -109660.

Triethyltin is an organotin compound which is known to
produce neurotoxicity in both adult and developing or-
ganisms. The present study reports four experiments
that examined this question with an odor  aversion
learning paradigm in which pups receive presentations
of one odor paired with footshock and an alternate
odor without shock. In Experiment 1, Long-Evans rat
pups were injected i.p. on postnatal day 5 (PND5) with
either 0,3 or 5 mg/kg TET and then tested for olfacto-
ry discrimination learning on PND18. Only the 5 mg/kg
dose impaired discrimination learning. In Experiment 2,
PND5 exposure to TET (5 mg/kg) disrupted olfactory
learning on PND18 but not on PND12 whereas expo-
sure on PND10 disrupted learning at both ages of test-
ing. In Experiment 3, PND16 exposure to TET (5 mg/
kg) also disrupted acquisition of olfactory learning on
PND18 but had no effect on retention of an olfactory
discrimination that was acquired prior to TET exposure
(ie. on PND14 and PND15). Unconditioned responses
to footshock were also unaffected by TET (Experiment
4). These findings indicate that neonatal  exposure to
TET impairs associative learning in developing rats
and are discussed in relation to other studies of the de-
velopmental neurotoxicity of this compound.

Keywords:  'Triethyltin  compounds,  'Discrimination
learning, 'Smell, 'Teratogenic compounds, Newborn
animals,   Dose-response   relationships,   Nervous
system, Animal behavior, Conditioning, Reprints.
              1 Comparison of Thermospray and
              n   Liquid   Chromatograpny/Mass
              Interfaces: Evaluation of a Chlorin-
PB92-124734/REB               PC A02/MF A01
Environmental Monitoring Systems Lab., Las Vegas,
NV.
Interiaboratory '
Particle  Beam
Spectrometry Interfaces: I
ated Phenoxy Acid Herbicide Liquid  Chromatog-
raphy/Mass Spectrometry Analysis Method. Jour-
nal article.
Lockheed Engineering and Sciences Co., Inc.,  Las
Vegas, NV.
T. L Jones, L. D. Betowski, B. Lesnik, T. C. Chiang,
and J. E. Teberg. c1991, 7p EPA/600/J-91 /317
Contract EPA-68C-00049
Pub.  in Environmental Science and Technology, v25
n11 1991. See also PB88-215306. Prepared in coop-
eration with Department of Energy, Washington, DC.
Lab.  Management Div. Sponsored by Environmental
Monitoring Systems Lab., Las Vegas, NV.

Seven laboratories participated in an interiaboratory
evaluation of a liquid chromatography/mass spec-
trometry (LC/MS) method for the analysis of 10 chlor-
inated phenoxy acid herbicides. The focus of the eval-
uation was  to test the  Intel-comparability of LC/MS
data obtained from two types of LC/MS interfaces (i.e.,
thermospray (TS) and particle beam (PB)). Eight simu-
lated sample extracts were sent to each laboratory for
LC/MS analysis. There were statistically significant dif-
ferences  between  interfaces in the quantitative data
for all analytes except 2-(2,4,5-trichlorophenoxy) pro-
panoic acid  (silvex). Particle beam exhibited a high
positive bias and a low relative standard deviation at
the highest sample extract concentration range, 500
micrograms/mL, while TS showed a low bias and a low
relative standard deviation at the  lowest sample ex-
tract concentration range, 5 micrograms/mL. Another
factor of the study was to look for any performance dif-
ferences between interfaces of the same type, but dif-
fering manufacturers. A  statistical  difference was ob-
served, between PB interfaces, for 2-(1-methylpropyl)-
4,6-dinitrophenol (dinoseb). (Copyright (c) 1991 by the
American Chemical Society.)

Keywords: 'Herbicides,  'Chemical analysis, 'Liquid
chromatography, 'Mass spectroscopy,  'Interiabora-
tory comparisons,  Pesticides, Chlorine organic com-
pounds, Performance evaluation,  Extraction, Experi-
mental design, Dinoseb, Reprints, Thermospray liquid
chromatography, Silvex, Propanoic  acid/(trichloro-
phenoxy).


                            Mar 1992     51

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                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
PB92-125418/REB               PC A06/MF A02
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Waste Combustion  System  Analysis. Final  rept
Feb-Aug90.
Energy and Environmental Research Corp., Irvine, CA.
J. Newhall, G. Taylor, and B. Folsom. Dec 91,123p
EPA/600/7-91/008
Contract EPA-S8-03-3365
See also DE88-008501. Sponsored by Environmental
Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Air
and Energy Engineering Research Lab.

The r»pc>rtgrves results of a study of btornass combus-
tion alternatives. The objective was to evaluate the
thermal performance and costs of available and devel-
oping biornass systems. The characteristics of avail-
able biomass fuels were reviewed, and the perform-
ance parameters of alternate power generating  sys-
tems were  evaluated  using a thermooynamic model.
The results were compared with available information
on commercially available equipment Capital and op-
erating costs were also estimated. The selection of an
optimum biomass combustion system depends on
available fuel and the specific application. A  case
study of an ethand plant was conducted to illustrate
the key considerations.

Keywords:  •Biomass,  'Alternative fuels, * Air pollution
abatement, 'Waste utilization. *Combustors, Combus-
tion products, Agricultural wastes. Industrial wastes,
Substitutes,  Performance  evaluation,  Capitalized
costs, Operating costs. Thermodynamics, Design cri-
teria.
Sponsored by Environmental Protection Agency, Cin-
cinnati, OH. Risk Reduction Engineering Lab.

Five technology areas encompassing eight waste re-
duction  technologies  at  the  General  Dynamics
Pomona Division (Southern California) were technical-
ly and economically evaluated under the California/
EPA Waste Reduction Innovative Technology Evalua-
tion  (WRITE)   Program.  Evaluations  were  made
through site visits and follow-up discussions with Gen-
eral Dynamics  staff and equipment suppliers. The
technologies and the type of waste reduction repre-
sented included (1) computerized printed circuit board
plating process (process substitution), (2) suKuric acid
anodizing system (process substitution),  (3) robotic
paint facility operations - (a) proportional  paint mixing
(process substitution), (b)  water-based  solvent re-
placement (process  substitution),  (c) electrostatic
paint sprays (process substitution), (d) solvent stills
(recycling), (4) bead-blast paint stripper (process sub-
stitution), and  (5) Freon recovery  stills  (recycling).
Overall, there was a decrease in hazardous waste gen-
eration and an increase in productivity or reuse of recy-
cled materials. In most cases, the technologies could
be easily transferred to other industries except for the
computerized circuit board and some processes within
the robotic paint operation due to prohibitive costs.

Keywords: 'Waste  management, 'Pollution  abate-
ment 'Hazardous materials, 'Surface  coating, Tech-
nology utilization, Revisions, Weapon systems, Waste
recycling. Painting, Freons, Paint removers, Stripping,
Printed  circuits,  Anodization,  Military   equipment.
Waste utilization, Environmental chemical substitutes,
•Waste minimization, 'Source reduction, 'General Dy-
namics Pomona Division, Southern Regton(Califomia).
 PB92-125749/REB               PC A08/MF A02
 Environmental Protection Agency. Washington, DC.
 Office of Emergency and Remedial Response.
 Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation: The
 Delaware SITE Study, 1989.
 NSI Technology Services Corp., Research Triangle
 PanXNC.
 W. A. McCtenny, G. M. Russwurm, M. W. Holdren, A. J.
 Pollack, and J. D. Pteil. Jan 92,174p EPA/600/3-91 /
 071
 Contracts EPA-68-02-4444, EPA-68-DO-0106
 Prepared in cooperation with Battetle Columbus Labs.,
 OH. Sponsored by Environmental Protection Agency,
 Washington, DC. Office of Emergency and Remedial
 Response.

 The 1989 Delaware Superfund Innovative Technology
 Evaluation (SITE) Field Study was a cooperative effort
 between the Atmospheric Research and Exposure As-
 sessment Laboratory and the Environmental Monitor-
 ing Systems Laboratory located in Las Vegas, NV. The
 STTE was established to satisfy the mandate of the Su-
 perfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986
 to demonstrate alternative or innovative treatment and
 site characterization technologies. As such, the pro-
 gram provides for the predemonstration testing of new
 monitoring technologies. A  number of new technol-
 ogies including sector sampling, temporal profile anal-
 ysis, open air long path monitoring, and fence-line do-
 simetry were employed in the 1989 study. The report
 documents the successful use  of these techniques
 and shows their potential to provide the Agency and
 others with improved, cost-effective means to monitor
 the air exposure pathway during Superfund site as-
 sessment and remediation.

 Keywords: 'Superfund, 'Air pollution sampling,  'Air
 pollution detection, 'Waste disposal, 'Volatile organic
 compounds, Field tests, Interiaboratory comparisons,
 Delaware,   Occupational   safety    and    health,
 ConcenfratiorKComposition), Gas analysis,  Remedfel
 action. Site characterization, Fourier transform spec-
 trometers. Experimental design. Long  path infrared
 spectroscopy. Air samplers. Anton exchanging,  Ad-
 sorberrts,Gaschromatography.


 PB92-12S7S6/REB               PCA04/MFA01
 Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati. OH. Risk
 Reduction Engineering Lab.
 Evaluation of Five Waste Minimization  Technol-
 ogies at the General Dynamics Pomona DMston

 IT Environmental Programs, Inc., Cincinnati, OH.
 M. L Apel, and L M. Brown. Jan 92.63p EPA/600/2-
 91/067
 Contract EPA-68-03-3389
 Prepared in cooperation with California Dept of Health
 Services. Sacramento. Alternative Technology  Div.
PB92-12S764/REB                PC A99/MF EOS
Environmental Monitoring Systems Lab., Las Vegas,
NV.
International  Symposium  on  Field  Screening
Methods for Hazardous Wastes and Toxic Chemi-
cals  (2nd),  Proceedings.  Held  in  Las  Vegas,
Nevada on February 12-14,1991.
Department of Energy, Washington, DC.
L R. Williams, and E. N. Koglin. Dec 91,850p EPA/
600/9-91/028
GrantEPA-R-815138
See also PB90-132572 and PB89-134159. Sponsored
by Environmental Monitoring Systems  Lab., Las
Vegas,  NV.,  Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials
Agency, Aberdeen Proving Ground.  MD., Department
of the Air Force, Washington, DC., and Florida State
Univ., Tallahassee.

The document presents the technical papers that were
presented at the Second International Symposium on
Field Screening Methods for Hazardous Wastes and
Toxic Chemicals. Sixty  platform  presentations were
made and included in one of ten sessions: chemical
sensors; ion mobility spectrometay;  robotics; QA and
study design; air pathway monitoring at  Superfund
sites; field mobile GC/MS techniques; portable gas
chromatography; field screening methods  for worker
safety; x-ray fluorescence; and, Fourier transform in-
frared spectrometjy and  other spectroscopy methods.
In addition, sixty poster presentations were made and
each presenter submitted a  four-page extended ab-
stract for inclusion in the proceedings. The poster
 presentations covered the same topics as those men-
tioned above and other  topics such as immunoassay
techniques, sample preparation techniques, and case
 studies of technology application.

 Keywords: 'Hazardous  wastes,  'Meetings, 'Waste
 management 'Site characterization, 'Chemical analy-
 sis, 'Environmental monitoring. Toxic substances,
 Chemical compounds.  Gas  chromatography, Mass
 spectroscopy, Sample preparation, Case studies, X ray
 fluorescence, Fourier transform spectrometers. Super-
 fund. Robots,  Infrared  spectroscopy, Occupational
 safety and hearth.


 PB92-126788/REB               PCA08/MFA02
 Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
 Park, NC. Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards.
 Locating  and  Estimating  Air Emissions from
 Sources of Styrene, Interim Report.
 Radian Corp., Research  Triangle Park, NC.
 D. Campbefl. Oct91,160pEPA/450/4-91/029
 Contract EPA-68-DO-0125
 See also PB90-170002. Sponsored by Environmental
 Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Office
 of Air Quality Planning and Standards.
To assist groups interested in inventorying air emis-
sions of various potentially toxic substances, EPA is
preparing a series of documents such as this to com-
pile available information on sources and emission of
these substances. The document deals specifically
with styrene. Its intended audience includes Federal,
State and local air pollution personnel and others inter-
ested in locating potential emitters of styrene and in
making gross estimates of air emissions therefrom.
The document presents information on: (1) the types
of sources that may emit styrene; (2) process vari-
ations and release points that may be emitted within
these sources; and (3) available emissions information
indicating the potential for styrene releases into the air
from each operation. The document is being released
as an interim document pending incorporation of test-
ing results from the U.S. EPA. The  EPA is currently
testing several unsaturated polyester resin fabricators
who produce cultured marble bathroom fixtures. When
the test results  are available, the EPA will publish a
final report including these data.

Keywords: 'Pollution sources, 'Toxic substances, 'Air
pollution,  'Styrene,  'Emission  factors, Study esti-
mates, Point sources,  State government Local gov-
ernment,  Polyester  resins,  Air pollution control,
ConcentrationjComposition), Aromatic hydrocarbons,
Styrene resins, Plastics industry, Industrial wastes,
'Emission inventories.


PB92-126796/REB               PC A07/MF A02
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Development of Seasonal and Annual Btogente
Emissions Inventories for  the U.S. and Canada.
Final rept Sep 89-May 91.
Alliance Technologies Corp., Lowell, MA.
L G. Modica, and J. R. McCutcheon. Nov 91,147p
EPA/600/7-91/006
Contract EPA-68-D9-0173
See also PB89-198816 and PB91 -119669. Sponsored
by Environmental Protection Agency, Research Trian-
gle Park,  NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research
Lab.

The report describes the development of a biogenic
emissions  inventory for the  U.S.  and Canada, to
assess the role of biogenic emissions in ozone forma-
tion. Emission inventories were developed at hourly
and grid (1/4 x 1/6 degree) levels from input data at
the same scales. Emissions were calculated as a func-
tion of  biomass density and meteorological param-
eters (solar radiation, cloud cover, temperature, wind-
speed, and relative humidity). These factors were ap-
plied to a forest canopy algorithm that simulated proc-
esses generating biogenic emissions from foliage. Re-
 sultant emissions were aggregated to monthly, sea-
 sonal, and annual levels, and spatially to counties and
 states.  (NOTE Historically, ozone control programs
 based on reductions of known anthropogenic volatile
 organic compound (VOC) emissions have had limited
 success in obtaining the National Ambient Air Quality
 Standard. Researchers have, therefore, been actively
 evaluating VOC emission sources not routinely consid-
 ered in ozone control strategies. One potentially large
 source  of reactive VOCs is thought to be emissions
 from crop and forest foliage.) Approximately 50% of
 the biogenic  hydrocarbon  emissions occur in the
 summer, approximately equal amounts (20%) in the
 spring and fall, and much lower amounts in the winter.

 Keywords: 'Natural emissions, 'Ozone, 'Air pollution
 control, Biomass, Volatile organic compounds, For-
 ests, Farm crops, Pollution sources, Annual variations,
 Vegetation, Btoengineering,  Meteorology, Hydrocar-
 bons, Seasonal variations, "Emission inventories.


 PB92-126804/REB               PC AOS/MF A01
 Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
 Reduction Engineering Lab.
 Automotive and Heavy-Duty  Engine Coolant Re-
 cycling  by  Filtration.  Technology  Evaluation
 Report
 Battelte, Columbus, OH.
 A. R. Gavaskar, R. F. Olfenbuttel, J. A. Jones, and P.
 R. Webb. Oct 91,90p EPA/600/2-91 /066
 Contract EPA-68-CO-0003
 Sponsored by Environmental Protection Agency, Cin-
 cinnati, OH. Risk Reduction Engineering Lab.

 The report addresses the product quality, waste reduc-
 tion, and economic issues involved in recycling auto-
 motive and heavy-duty engine coolants. The specific
 52    Vol. 92, No.  1

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                                                  EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
recycling units evaluated are a fleet-size unit and a
portable unit, both based on the technology of chemi-
cal filtration. Coolant recycling was found to have good
potential as a means of waste reduction and cost sav-
ings. But further improvements are necessary in the
product quality achieved by these units. Product qual-
ity was evaluated by conducting selected performance
tests recommended  in ASTM  D 3306, and ASTM D
4985 standards, and by chemical characterization of
the spent recycled, and virgin coolants.

Keywords: 'Coolants, *Motor vehicle engines, 'Recy-
cling, Automobiles, Economic analysis, Filtration.
PB92-126812/REB               PC A04/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Measurement and Prediction of the Resistivity of
Ash/Sorbent Mixtures Produced by Sulfur Oxide
Control Processes. Final rept. Sep 86-Jun 88.
Southern Research Inst, Birmingham, AL. Environ-
mental Sciences Dept.
R. P. Young. Dec 91, 55p SRI-ENV-88-1076, EPA/
600/7-91/009
See also PB86-178126. Sponsored by Environmental
Protection  Agency, Research Triangle Park,  NC. Air
and Energy Engineering Research Lab.

The report describes the development of (1)  a modi-
fied procedure for obtaining consistent and reproduci-
ble laboratory resistivity values for mixtures of coal fly
ash and partially spent sorbent, and (2) an approach
for predicting resistivity based on the chemical compo-
sition  of the sample and the resistivities of  the key
compounds in the sample that are derived from the
sorbent Furnace and cold-side sorbent injection tech-
nologies for reducing the emission of sulfur oxides
from electric generating plants firing medium- to high-
sulfur coal are under development for retrofit  applica-
tions.  The paniculate resulting from injecting this sor-
bent will be a mixture of coal fly ash and partially spent
sorbent The presence of this sorbent causes the re-
sistivity of the mixture to be significantly higher than
that of the fly ash alone. Since higher resistivity dusts
are more difficult to collect in an electrostatic precipita-
tor (ESP), accurate knowledge of the resistivity of the
mixture is needed to determine if the ESP will  operate
within an acceptable efficiency range.

Keywords: *Air pollution sampling, *Air pollution con-
trol equipment 'Electrical resistivity,  'Sorbents, 'Fly
ash, Mixtures, Electrostatic precipitators, Performance
evaluation, Sulfur oxides, Chemical composition, Com-
bustion products, Particle size distribution, Conductivi-
ty.
PB92-126820/REB               PC A10/MF A03
Preliminary Risk Assessment for Bacteria in Mu-
nicipal Sewage Sludge Applied to Land.
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. En-
vironmental Criteria and Assessment Office.
Jul 91,204p EPA/600/6-91 /006
See  also  PB88-154273,  PB90-171901, and PB90-
171919.

Section 405 of the Clean Water Act requires the U.S.
Environmental  Protection Agency to  develop and
issue regulations that identify. (1) uses for sludge in-
cluding disposal; (2) specify factors (including costs) to
be taken into account in determining the measures
and practices applicable for each use or disposal; and
(3) concentrations of pollutants that interfere with each
use or disposal. To comply with this mandate, the U.S.
EPA has embarked on  a program to develop four
major technical regulations: land application, including
distribution and marketing; landfilling;  incineration and
surface disposal. The report is one of a series whose
purpose is to use  the  methodology described  in
Pathogen Risk Assessment for Land Application of
Municipal Sludge' to develop preliminary assessments
of risk to human health posed by parasites, bacteria
and viruses in municipal sewage sludge applied to land
as fertilizer or soil conditioner. The preliminary risk as-
sessment includes a  description of the most critical
data gaps that must be filled before development of a
definitive risk assessment and recommends research
priorities.

Keywords:  'Risk   assessment  'Sewage  sludge,
•Sludge disposal, 'Pathogens, 'Public health, Ground
disposal, Municipal wastes, Clean Water  Act Para-
sites, Waste treatment Microorganisms, Case studies,
Viruses, Pollution  regulations, Fertilizers,  Bacteria,
Waste utilization, Waste disposal.
PB92-126838/REB               PC A02/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
Reduction Engineering Lab.
Removal of Creosote from Soil by Thermal  De-
sorption.
International Technology Corp., Knoxville, TN.
R. P. Lauch, J. G. Herrmann, M. L. Smith, E. Alperin,
and A. Groen. 1991, 9p EPA/600/D-91 /276
Contract EPA-86-C9-0036
See  also  PB91-228080.  Proceedings  of  HMCRI's
Annual  National Conference and Exhibition (12th),
Washington, DC., December 3-5, 1991, p362-368.
Sponsored by Environmental Protection Agency,  Cin-
cinnati, OH. Risk Reduction Engineering Lab.

Performance of the thermal desorption process for re-
moval of organic contaminants, mostly polynuclear ar-
omatic hydrocarbons  (PAHs), from soils was evaluat-
ed. A Superfund Site Soil that was contaminated  with
creosote was tested. An operating temperature of 550
C and an operating residence time of 10 minutes at
temperature, determined  from  bench studies, were
used in the pilot scale desorber. Test results showed
that greater than 99%  of the PAHs were removed from
the test soil. The concentrations of total PAHs in the
soil before and after treatment averaged 4629 mg/kg
and below detection limits respectively.

Keywords:  'Soil treatment,  'Hazardous  materials,
'Creosote, 'Thermal environments, 'Desorption, Re-
medial action, Waste treatment Aromatic  polycyclic
hydrocarbons,  Performance  evaluation, Superfund,
Tables(Data), Air pollution control, Flue gases,  Fur-
naces, Technology utilization, Reprints.
PB92-126846/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Research and  Development  Efforts to Develop
Improved  Inventory  Methodologies  for  Area
Source Solvent Emissions. Rept. for May-Sep 91.
Pechan (E.H.) and Associates, Inc., Durham, NC.
W. Battye, G. Viconovic, and P. J. Chappell. 1991,14p
EPA/600/D-91/277
Contract EPA-68-D9-0168
See also  PB89-151427, PB89-207203, PB90-238908,
and PB91-119669. Presented at the Air and Waste
Management  Association Conference, Durham, NC.,
September 10-12,1991. Prepared in cooperation with
EC/R,  Inc., Chapel Hill,  NC. Sponsored by Environ-
mental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park,
NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.

The paper discusses a long range program to  improve
EPA's inventory methodologies for area source emis-
sions of organic solvents. The most important input to
the area  source solvent inventory is national solvent
usage. Therefore, a major focus  of the research to
date has been the analysis of potential new sources of
information on solvent usage. Data sources have been
identified which would improve on the estimation of na-
tional solvent use and on the distribution of solvent use
to geographical regions and to various time  periods.
Improved methodologies for distributing national sol-
vent emissions to the state and county level were also
investigated. Three potential enhancements to the in-
ventory methology have been identified: (1) improve-
ment of the solvent material balance, (2) incorporation
of state and local regulations into the distribution of
solvents to states and counties, and (3) incorporation
of consumer preference  into the geographic  distribu-
tion of solvent use.

Keywords: 'Organic  solvents, 'Air pollution sampling,
•Research and development, Pollution sources, Data
processing, Concentration(Composition), State gov-
ernment,  Local government, Pollution regulations, Ma-
terial balance, Consumer products, Industrial  wastes,
Evaporation, Volatile organic compounds,  'Emission
inventories, 'Area sources.
PB92-126853/REB                PC A03/MF A01
Applicability of  UV/Oxidation Technologies to
Treat  Contaminated  Groundwater.  Symposium
paper.
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
Reduction Engineering Lab.
K. V. Topudurti, N. M. Lewis, and S. R. Hirsh. 1991,30p
EPA/600/D-91/278
See also PB90-221672. Prepared in cooperation with
PRC Environmental Management Inc., Chicago, IL.

The paper presents information useful in  evaluating
the applicability of UV/Oxidation treatment technol-
ogies for groundwater contaminated with  organics.
The  information presented includes a description of
the technologies, factors affecting  the technologies,
and results from two pilot-scale studies of UV/Oxida-
tion treatment system applications. The first pilot-scale
study describes the performance of a UV/Oxidation
system, developed by Ultrox International of  Santa
Ana, California, in treating groundwater contaminated
with  volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The second
pilot-scale study describes the performance of another
UV/Oxidation system, developed by Peroxidation Sys-
tems, Inc., of Tucson, Arizona, in treating groundwater
contaminated with VOCs and chemical-warfare agent
degradation products.

Keywords: 'Ground water, 'Water pollution control,
•Hazardous materials, 'Ultraviolet  radiation, 'Oxida-
tion, Waste disposal, Organic compounds, Volatile or-
ganic compounds, Pilot plants, Process development
units,  Performance evaluation,  Stripping, Hydroxyl
radicals,  Hydrogen peroxide, Chemical reactions,
Chemical  warfare  agents, Santa  Ana(Califomia),
Tucson(Arizona), Ultrox system, Preoxidation systems.
PB92-126861/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Ugnocellulosic-Plastlc  Composites from Recy-
cled Materials. Book chapter.
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
Reduction Engineering Lab.
J. Youngquist, G. E. Mye
                  dyers, andT. M. Harten. 1992,
18pEPA/600/D-91/279
Pub. in Emerging Materials and Chemicals from Bio-
mass, American Chemical Society Symposium Series,
P42-56 1992. See also PB87-178323.Pprtions of this
document are not fully legible. Prepared in cooperation
with Forest Products Lab., Madison, Wl.

Waste wood, waste paper, and  waste plastics are
major components of MSW and offer great opportuni-
ties as recycled ingredients in wood-fiber plastic com-
posites. USEPA and the USDA Forest Products Labo-
ratory (FPL) are collaborating on a research project to
investigate the processing, properties, and commercial
potential of composites containing these recycled in-
gredients. Two processing technologies are being em-
ployed - melt blending and nonwoven web. Some past
research  studies  are brerfly reviewed  to illustrate the
behavior of wood fiber-polyolefin  composites and re-
sults of initial testing under the EPA/FPL project are
also presented.

Keywords: 'Lignocellulose, "Plastics, 'Composite fab-
rication, 'Recycled materials, 'Waste management,
Processing, Economic  factors, Test methods, Paper
industry, Wood wastes,  Polyethylene, Wood fibers, Uti-
lization, Melt blending, Nonwoven web.
 PB92-126879/REB               PC A03/MF A01
 Feline Bronchopulmonary Disease.
 Health  Effects Research  Lab., Research Triangle
 Park, NC.
 J. A. Dye. 1991,23p EPA/600/D-91/280

 The article discusses the current state of knowledge of
 naturally occurring feline bronchopulmonary disease;
 using in-depth diagnostic evaluation and pulmonary
 function testing to emphasize the diversity of the clini-
 cal manifestations and pathophysiologic abnormalities
 of these cats. While of more clinical than experimental
 value to the authors' program which involves rats and
 guinea  pigs,  the  review emphasizes the  homology
 among  species in the pathophysiology of airway dis-
 ease and hence the relevance of animal research.

 Keywords: 'Cat diseases. Airway resistance. Species
 diversity, Differential  diagnosis, Respiratory function
 tests, Asthma, Bronchitis, Pathology, Thoracic radiog-
 raphy, Therapy,  Inflammation, Emphysema,  'Feline
 bronchopulmonary diseases.
 PB92-126887/REB               PC A02/MF A01
 Health  Effects Research  Lab., Research Triangle
 Park, NC.
 Fracttonatton of Complex  Combustion Mixtures
 Using an Ion-Exchange Methodology.
 Environmental Health Research and Testing, Inc., Re-
 search Triangle Park, NC.
 R. Williams, L. Brooks, M. Taylor, D. Thompson, and D.
 Bell. 15 May 91, 9p EPA/600/D-91 /281
 Contracts EPA-68-02-4456, EPA-68-02-4443
 Presented at the EPA/A&WMA Symposium 'Measure-
 ment of Toxic and Related Air Pollutants', Durham,


                            Mar  1992     53

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                                                  EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
 NC., May 1991. Prepared in cooperation with ManTech
 Environmental Technology, Inc., Research  Triangle
 Park, NC. Sponsored by Health Effects Research Lab.,
 Research Triangle Park, NC.

 Fractionation of  particle emission extracts captured
 from complex combustion mixtures was  performed
 upon environmental samples using an ion-exchange
 technique. Captured emissions from hazardous waste,
 municipal and medical/pathological incinerators along
 with urban air impacted by woodsmoke and mobile
 sources  were utilized to evaluate the fractionation
 scheme. Separation of complex mixtures into class
 fractions is necessary to perform in-depth biological
 testing as well as to allow for efforts to identify biologi-
 cally  active  components. A  non-aqueous ion-ex-
 change technique using the resin AG-MP1, allowed for
 fractionation of complex mixtures which  potentially
 contained significant amounts of organic  acids.  Re-
 sults jndicated that when the resin technique was uti-
 lized in a solid phase extraction procedure, mass re-
 covery found in the base/neutrals, polar/weak acid,
 weak and strong acid fractions of select marker stand-
 ards was in the range of 60-118%. Mass distribution
 and recovery of eight  combustion extracts indicated
 that 54-106% of loaded mass was recovered overall,
 with the  base/neutral and strong acid fractions con-
 taining the majority of  the mass. Mutagenic activity
 from the fractions  was recovered  in a range of  20-
 132%  as compared to the whole extracts with  the
 base/neutrals and  strong acids responsible for a  sig-
 nificant portion of the total mutagenicity.

 Keywords: *Air pollution detection, 'Toxic substances,
 'Bioindicators, 'Bioassay, 'Distillation, 'Incineration,
 Mutagens, Ion exchanging, Hazardous materials. Mu-
 nicipal wastes, Fractionation, Waste disposal, Com-
 bustion efficiency, Solvent extraction, Mobile pollutant
 sources,  Wood burning appliances, Combustion prod-
 ucts. Medical wastes.
PB92-126895/REB               PC A03/MF A01
PMiidopregnancy  and  the  DeckJual  Cell  Re-
sponse (OCR) In the Rat
Health  £-----
       Effects Research  Lab., Research Triangle
Park,NC.
A. M. Cummings. 1991,14p EPA/600/D-917282
See also PB89-105530.

Pseudopregnancy, an  induced physiological state in
the rat which mimics the rodent's luteal phase, can be
used to assess the impact of chemicals on the luteal
phase of female animals. Female rats can be induced
to be pseudopregnant by a variety of methods and as-
sessment of the successful initiation and maintenance
of pseudopregnancy is accomplished via vaginal cytol-
ogy. The decidual cell response is a technique in which
pseudopregnant rats undergo a surgical treatment of
their uteri to induce uterine differentiation and prolif-
eration. This results in massive tissue growth which
mimics the response of the uterus during normal blas-
tocyst implantation. Measurement of decidual growth
during chemical treatment can be used to assess both
hormonal status and uterine function. Uterine weight
serves as a sensitive measure of the success of  the
decidual cell response.

Keywords:  'Pseudopregnancy,  'Ovum implantation,
'Toxic  substances,  Vaginal  smears.   Hormones,
Uterus, Luteal phase, Organ weight Rats.
PB92-126903/BEB               PC A03/MF A01
Aii6Hiii6iU of hnptentstlon In tho Rflt,
Health Effects  Research  Lab., Research Triangle
PanXNC.
A. M. Cummings. 1991,12p EPA/600/D-917283

A series of protocols has been assembled and used
for the assessment of implantation failure following
chemical exposure in the rat Upon detecting a chemi-
cally-induced blockade of implantation, these proto-
cols are designed to probe the physiological  mecha-
nisms through which the  chemical may impair early
pregnancy, including a distinction between embryotox-
icity and maternal reproductive toxkaty. The protocols
include the early pregnancy protocol, the decidual cell
response technique, the pre-vs. postimplantation pro-
tocol, and the embryo transport rate analysis. These
protocols are simple and rapid and provide constder-
abte information regarding the effects of chemicals on
the processes involved during embryo implantation.

Keywords: 'Ovum  implantation, 'Toxic  substances,
Rats,     Teratogerric     compounds,     Embryo,
 Reproduction(Biology), Animal pregnancy, Hormones,
 Radioimmunoassay.
PB92-126911/REB               PC A03/MF A01
In vitro Lymphocyte Proliferation Assays: The Mi-
togen-Stimulated Response and  the Mixed Lym-
phocyte Reaction in Immunotoxicfty Testing.
Health Effects Research Lab.,  Research Triangle
Park, NC.
R. J.Smialowicz. 1991,27pEPA/600/D-91/284
See also PB90-143066,  PB86-162419,  and  PB86-
118666.

The report describes detailed methodologies  for the
determination  of the in vitro  mitogen-stimulated re-
sponse and one-way mixed lymphocyte  reaction of
mouse and rat lymphocytes. A list of reagents, sup-
plies and equipment necessary  for the successful
completion of these assays is provided. Also,  a step-
by-step description of each of these assays is present-
ed, so that laboratories unfamiliar with these proce-
dures should be able to perform them. These  assays
are useful for the identification and characterization of
agents capable of altering the immune system  and as
such are useful as screening tests for potential immun-
otoxicants.

Keywords: 'Toxicity, 'Lymphocytes, 'Mitogens, 'Cell
division, 'Immunology, In vitro analysis, Lymphocyte
transformation, Test methods, Spleen,  Rats, Mice,
Toxic substances.
PB92-126929/REB               PC A02/MF A01
Prospects for In situ Chemical Treatment for Con-
taminated Soil.
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. Risk
Reduction Engineering Lab.
B. Davila, and M. H. Roulier. Dec 91,9p EPA/600/D-
91/285
See also PB87-146007. Presented at HMCRI's Annual
National Conference and Exhibition (12th), Washing-
ton, DC., December 3-5,1991.

Treating large volumes of contaminated soil at Super-
fund sites is costly.  These factors have led the U.S.
EPA's Superfund Program to consider in situ chemical
treatment as an alternative technology for treatment of
contaminated soil. Oxidation, reduction, neutralization,
hydrolysis, dehalogenation, and  UV/photdysis  are
chemical processes  currently used for above-ground
treatment Temperature, physical and chemical char-
acteristics of soil, are some operating parameters that
control the effectiveness of these processes. Improve-
ments in mixing treatment materials in soil, and meth-
ods for recovering unreacted material reaction  prod-
ucts, are needed to  allow wider application of these
treatments in situ. Excalibur catalytic ozone technolo-
gy, Exxon and Rio Linda cyanide destruction, and Trini-
ty ultrasonic detoxification are innovative technologies
that are being considered.

Keywords: 'Hazardous materials, 'Soil properties,
'Waste treatment, Materials recovery, Biodeteriora-
tion, Oxidation reduction reactions, Neutralization, Hy-
drolysis,  Halogens,  Removal,  Ultraviolet radiation,
Photochemical  reactions. Pilot plants,  Ozonation,
Mixing, Recovery, Catalysis, 'In situ treatment, 'Su-
perfund, Chemicals, Ultrasonic detoxification.
PB92-126937/REB               PC A06/MF A02
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Atmospheric Research and Exposure As-
sessment Lab.
Tropospheric Nitrogen: The Influence of Anthro-
pogenic  Source* on  Distribution and Deposition.
Rept for Jul 89-90.
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA. Atmospheric
and Geophysical Sciences Div.
J. E. Penner, C. S. Atherton, and J. J. Walton. Dec 91,
119p EPA/600/3-91/070
See also DE90015401 and DE90015408. Sponsored
by Environmental Protection Agency, Research Trian-
gle Park, NC.  Atmospheric Research and Exposure
Assessment Lab.

A general circulation model is used to provide three-di-
mensional  global  winds,  vertical convective  mass
transport and  precipitation fields for modeling the
transport of reactive nitrogen  and its removal by pre-
cipitation. Major sources of NOx include lightning, soil
microbial activity, oxidation of N2O in the stratosphere
and its transport to the troposphere, fossil-fuel com-
bustion, and biomass burning. In the modeling study, a
simplified approach for the atmospheric chemistry of
NOx and its conversion  to HNO3 is used. The gas-
phase concentrations of NOx and HNO3 throughout
the troposphere as well as the deposition of nitrate in
precipitation and dry deposition are determined for
January and July. Model predictions of NOx, HNO3,
and NO3(-) concentrations in precipitation are com-
pared to measured abundances as well as predictions
of surface NOx and HNO3 concentrations. The model
is used  to  treat three  situations:  only  fossil-fuel
sources, only natural sources, and all sources in order
to discern the contribution of various sources to the
observed  and  predicted abundances. Information
about the source  and deposition amounts are com-
bined to create regional net nitrogen mass balances,
thereby, illustrating which regions and sources contrib-
ute to increase nitrogen deposition.

Keywords:  'Troposphere,  'Nitrogen, 'Atmospheric
chemistry,  'Air pollution sampling, 'Mathematical
models, 'Deposition, Natural emissions, Combustion
products, Environmental transport, General circulation
model, Biomass, Burning, Precipitation(Meteorology),
Global  aspects,  Mass  transfer,  Mass  balance,
Concentration(Composition).
PB92-126945/REB               PC A07/MF A02
Compilation  of Air Pollutant Emission  Factors.
Volume  1. Stationary  Point  and Area Sources.
Fourth Edition. Supplement D.
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards.
W. M. Joyner. Sep 91,137p AP-42-SUPPL-D
See also Supplement C, PB91 -125906.

In the Supplement to the  Fourth Edition of AP-42, new
or revised emissions data are presented for Natural
Gas Combustion; Residential Fireplaces, Residential
Wood Stoves; Refuse Combustion; Nonindustrial Sur-
face Coating; Waste Water Collection, Treatment and
Storage;   Polyvinyl  Chloride  and  Polypropylene;
Poly(ethylene terephthalate); Polystyrene; Ammonium
Phosphates; Portland  Cement  Manufacturing;  Sand
and Gravel Processing; Western Surface Coal Mining;
Wildfires and Prescribed Burning; Wet Cooling Towers
and Industrial Flares.

Keywords: 'Emission factors, 'Air pollution,  'Station-
ary sources, Point sources, Combustion products, Nat-
ural gas, Fireplaces, Wood burning appliances,  Resi-
dential buildings, Gravel, Industrial wastes, Chemical
industry, Plastics, Surface coatings, Waste water, Port-
land cement. Coal mining, Cooling towers. Metallurgy,
Area sources, Prescribed  burning.
PB92-126952/REB               PC A06/MF A02
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park, NC. Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
Experimental Investigation of PIC  Formation in
CFC Incineration. Final rept. Jun-Sep 91.
Energy and Environmental Research Corp., Irvine, CA.
G. R. Hassel. Dec 91,114p EPA/600/7-91 /010
Contract EPA-68-CO-0094
Sponsored  by Environmental Protection Agency, Re-
search Triangle Park,  NC. Air and Energy Engineering
Research Lab.

The  report gives results of the collection of combus-
tion emission characterization data from chlorofluoro-
carbon (CFC) incineration. A bench scale test program
to provide emission characterization data from CFC in-
cineration was developed and performed, with empha-
sis on the formation of products of incomplete  com-
bustion (PICs). Tests involved separate  metering of
CFC-11 and -12 into a propane gas primary flame. Pro-
pane also fueled an afterburner. Simultaneous  com-
bustion gas samples were taken upstream and down-
stream of the afterburner. The gas samples were ana-
lyzed for the CFCs to determine the destruction effi-
ciencies of the CFCs and for the major PICs from each
CFC. Sampling was performed on time to screen for
polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlori-
nated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and polycyclk; aromatic
hydrocarbons (PAHs) white incinerating CFC-12.  Tolu-
ene and xylene were the two most frequently occurring
PICs in the study. Most of the PICs identified were non-
halogenated. PIC concentrations were independent of
the concentration of  CFC in the fuel. Flammability
limits were  39 volume % CFC-11 and 58 volume %
CFC-12 in propane. Destruction efficiencies of at least
99.999% can  be repeatedly attained for both  CFC-11
and -12 even from relatively low temperature flames.
54     Vol. 92, No.  1

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                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
Keywords:  'Combustion  efficiency,  'Incineration,
'Chlorohydrocarbons, *Air pollution control, 'Com-
bustion products, Polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, Pql-
ychlorinated dibenzofurans, Freons, Dioxins, Aromatic
poJycyclic hydrocarbons, Furans, Flammability, After-
burning,  Performance   evaluation,  Experimental
design.
PB92-126960/REB               PC A24/MF A04
Nonroad Engine and Vehicle  Emission  Study-
Report. Final rept.
Environmental  Protection  Agency,  Ann  Arbor,  Ml.
Office of Mobile Sources.
Nov 91,566p EPA/460/3-91 /02
See also PB92-104462.

Section 213 of the Clean Air Act (as amended)  re-
quires  that the  Environmental  Protection  Agency
(EPA) complete a study of the contribution of nonroad
engines and vehicles to air pollution in areas that fail to
meet the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for
ozone and/or carbon monoxide. The act also directs
the EPA to study emissions of other pollutants that en-
danger public health or welfare. The report is the final
study  of emissions from nonroad engines and vehi-
cles. Nonroad engines and vehicles include many dif-
ferent types of internal combustion engines used off
the nation's highways.  Some examples are:  weed
wreckers, lawnmowers,  airplane tow tractors, all-ter-
rain vehicles, snowmobiles, portable generators, fork-
lifts, bulldozers, asphalt compactors,  farm tractors,
pleasure boats, and oil tankers. In the report, EPA also
studied emissions nationwide and in the 24 nonattain-
rnent areas. Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds
(VOC), Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx), Carbon Monoxide
(CO),  and  seven other pollutants were calculated.
Emissions from nonroad engines and vehicles were
compared to those from other sources such as high-
way vehicles. The report appendixes contain  detailed
background information.

Keywords:  'Exhaust emissions, 'Air pollution stand-
ards, 'Engines, Towing  vehicles, Clean Air Act, Inter-
nal combustion engines, Motor vehicles, Air quality,
Pollution regulations. Ground vehicles.  Air pollution
abatement, Air pollution control, Volatile organic com-
pounds, Nitrogen oxides, Carbon monoxide, Construc-
tion equipment. Marine  engines. Recreation, Agricul-
tural machinery, 'Emission inventories, 'Nonroad en-
gines, 'Nonroad vehicles, Snowmobiles.
 PB92-500032/REB                        CP 002
 PA-Score (Preliminary Assessment Score),  Ver-
 sion 1.0 (for Microcomputers). Software.
 Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
 Office of Emergency and Remedial Response.
 Sep91,1 diskette EPA/SW/DK-92/002
 System: IBM PC or compatible; MS DOS 3.0 operating
 system, 384K. Language: Compiled C. See also PB92-
 500024, PB91-507509, PB91-506964, PB90-502030,
 PB90-501487, PB89-186068, PB91-592001, PB91-
 591331, PB91 -591311, and PB90-591781.
 The software is on one, 5 1/4 inch diskette, 1.2M high
 density. File format.  ASCII documentation included;
 may be ordered separately as PB92-963302.

 The PA-Score computer program has been developed
 to assist Superfund site assessment investigations in
 the Hazard Ranking System (MRS) at the Preliminary
 Assessment stage of site scoring. The Preliminary As-
 sessment is used to assess the relative threat associ-
 ated  with actual or potential releases of hazardous
 substances  to ground water, surface water, soil, and
 air.

 Keywords: 'Software, 'Superfund, 'Hazardous mate-
 rials,  'Waste management, 'Environmental  surveys,
 Diskettes, Ranking, Scenarios,  Information  transfer,
 Site characterization, US EPA, Procedures,   Prelimi-
 nary  Assessment,  National Priorities  List,  Hazard
 Ranking System, PA-Score computer program, PA-
 Print computer program.


 PB92-500347/REB                       CP D03
 Permit Tracking System (PTS), Version  1.0 (for
 Microcomputers). Software.
 Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
 28 Aug 91,3 diskettes EPA/SW/DK-92/015
 System: IBM PC XT, AT, or compatible; PC DOS or MS
 DOS Version 2.0 or greater operating system, 640K.
 Language: Clipper (XBase). The key features that are
 helpful, but  not essential are: a color monitor, a fast
hard disk (less than 28 milliseconds average access
time), and a fast processor (for example, a 386).
The software is on three 5 1 /4 inch diskettes, 360K
double density. File format ASCII. Documentation in-
cluded; may be ordered separately as PB92-105659.

The Permit Tracking System (PTS) was developed to
track information on the wetland resource affected by
permitting, as opposed to information on  the permit
status and activity (e.g., acceptance or renewal). The
authors designed the PTS to complement existing sys-
tems that track permit activity to avoid duplicating the
efforts of other agencies. It is designed to  track infor-
mation from three  types of permit systems, permits
issued under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act, Sec-
tion 401 of the Clean Water Act and state authority.
There is also an option to track data from other permit
systems. The Permit Tracking System (PTS) is divided
into two main components: data entry and query. The
PTS simplifies the process of data entry.  In most
cases, the user is merely required to check off items,
as opposed to doing a lot of typing. Standardized cate-
gories, with definitions, are given for items, such as
Cowardin wetland types (Cowardin et al. 1979), project
types, and wetland functions. Selecting items and en-
tering minimal verbiage eliminates most of the errors
typically associated with data entry. The PTS  also con-
tains a program that sorts and prints all the items listed
in each category, making it easy to recognize informa-
tion that has been entered incorrectly. After data have
been entered, corrections, additions, and  deletions
can easily be incorporated into the PTS.

Keywords:  'Software, 'Permits, 'Wetlands, 'Water
pollution,  'Information  retrieval, Clean  Water  Act,
State programs, Diskettes, US EPA, Information trans-
fer, Federal agencies, Natural resources management,
'Permit Tracking System.


PB92-500446/REB                      CP D06
Natural Enemy Risk Assessment (NERISK)  (for
Microcomputers). Model-Simulation.
Corvallis Environmental Research Lab., OR.
21 Aug 91,6 diskettes* EPA/SW/DK-92/018
System: IBM PC/XT, AT or compatibles; PC  DOS 3.30
operating system,  640K.  Language: Pascal. A Math
co-processor chip and EGA color monitor are useful in
operating the simulation model, but are not necessary
to run the program. See also PB91-591330 and PB91-
591331.
The software is on six, 51/4 inch diskettes,  1.2M high
density. File format ASCII. Documentation  included;
may be ordered separately as PB92-114990.

Natural Enemy Risk Assessment (NERISK)  is a com-
puter-aided  decision-support   system designed  to
assist the user in examining the potential risks of pesti-
cides to arthropod natural enemies (i.e., predators and
parasitoids) in agricultural systems. It is a tool that
helps to organize, store, and recall large amounts of in-
formation and  make it readily available to  even novice
users. It is also a mechanism to integrate diverse infor-
mation sources,  particularly  databases, simulation
models, and expert opinions, and to provide quantita-
tive estimates of  pesticide  risk  based  on these
sources. NERISK is based on a 'shell' expert system
called RECOG, and was designed and developed by a
team workers  at Oregon State University (Messing et
 al, 1989).

 Keywords:  'Models-Simulation, 'Software,  'Pesti-
 cides, 'Risk assessment *Pest  control,  Diskettes,
 Expert systems,  Agriculture,   Information  transfer,
 Computerized simulation, 'Natural Enemy Risk As-
 sessment System, 'NERISK system.


 PB92-500453/REB                       CP T02
 Aquatic Toxidty  Information  Retrieval Data Base
 (ACQUIRE). Data file.
 Environmental Research Lab.-Duluth, MN.
 Sep 91, mag tape EPA/DF/MT-92/019
 System: DEC VAX 11 /785; VMS 5.4 operating system.
 Supersedes PB89-170344. Other formats available as
 VAX VMS BACKUP with executable files.
 Available in 9-track ASCII character set 1600 or 6250
 bpi. For 6250 bpi, the price is T02.

 The purpose  of Acquire is to provide scientists and
 managers quick access to a comprehensive, system-
 atic, computerized compilation of aquatic  toxicity data.
 Scientific papers published both nationally and interna-
 tionally on the toxicity of chemicals to aquatic orga-
 nisms and plants are collected and reviewed for AC-
 QUIRE. Independently compiled data files  that  meet
ACQUIRE parameter and quality assurance criteria are
also included. Selected toxicity test results and related
testing information for any individual chemical from
laboratory and field aquatic toxicity effects are includ-
ed for tests with freshwater and marine organisms.
The total number of data records in ACQUIRE is now
over 105,300. This includes data  from 6000  refer-
ences, for 5200 chemicals and 2400 test species. A
major data  file, Acute Toxicity of Organic Chemicals
(ATOC), has been incorporated into ACQUIRE. The
ATOC file contains laboratory acute test data on 525
organic chemicals using juvenile fathead minnows.

Keywords:  'Data file, 'Aquatic plants, 'Aquatic ani-
mals, 'Toxicity, 'Water pollution effects, 'Aquatic or-
ganisms, Magnetic tapes, Fresh water biology, Marine
biology, Chemical compounds, Toxic substances, Or-
ganic  compounds, Water pollution  effects(Plants),
Water pollution  effects(Animals),  'ACQUIRE  data
base.
 PB92-592210/REB                   Subscription
 Enforcement Document Retrieval System (EDRS)
 - ASCII (1972-November 1991). Data file.
 Environmental Protection Agency, Washington,  DC.
 Office of Enforcement.
 Nov 91, mag tape*
 System: IBM 9021; MVS operating system. Other for-
 mats available as PB92-592220 (EBCDIC version).
 Available on subscription, U.S., Canada, and Mexico
 price $1,440; price for others $2,880. Issued quarterly.
 Available in 9-track tape, 1600 or 6250 bpi. Also avail-
 able individually; order number  PB92-592211, price
 T03 for either 1600 or 6250 bpi.

 The Enforcement Document Retrieval System (EDRS)
 is a full text database for documents related to en-
 forcement policy and procedures, administrative deci-
 sions, judicial decisions, and model/sample forms. All
 environmental statutes that the Environmental Protec-
 tion Agency (EPA) enforces  are covered. There are
 approximately 2500+ EPA enforcement related docu-
 ments covering  the time period  from approximately
 1972 to the present. Each document has been retyped
 in order to upload it to the mainframe so it may not be
 exactly like the original. Any graphics and/or extensive
 tables or exhibits were not uploaded from the original
 document. The file is in ASCII format.

 Keywords: 'Data file, 'Environmental legislation, 'Law
 enforcement, Government policies, Administration, Ju-
 dicial decisions, Magnetic tapes, 'US EPA.
 PB92-592220/REB                   Subscription
 Enforcement Document Retrieval System (EDRS)
 - EBCDIC (1972-November 1991). Data file.
 Environmental  Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
 Office of Enforcement.
 Nov 91, mag tape*
 System: IBM 9021; MVS operating system. Other for-
 mats available as PB92-592210 (ASCII version).
 Available on subscription, U.S., Canada, and  Mexico
 price $1,440; price for others $2,880. Issued quarterly.
 Available in 9-track tape 1600 or 6250 bpi. Also avail-
 able individually; order number PB92-592221, price
 T03 for either 1600 or 6250 bpi.

 The Enforcement Document Retrieval System (EDRS)
 is  a full text database for documents related to en-
 forcement policy and procedures, administrative deci-
 sions, judicial decisions, and model/sample forms. All
 environmental statutes that the Environmental Protec-
 tion Agency (EPA) enforces are  covered. There are
 approximately 2500+ EPA enforcement related docu-
 ments covering the time period  from  approximately
 1972 to the present Each document has been retyped
 in  order to upload it to the mainframe so it may not be
 exactly like the original. Any graphics and/or extensive
 tables or exhibits were not uploaded from the original
 document. The file is in EBCDIC format.

 Keywords: 'Data file, 'Environmental legislation, 'Law
 enforcement, Government policies, Administration, Ju-
 dicial decisions, Magnetic tapes, 'US EPA.
  PB92-904200/REB                   Subscription
  EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) Publica-
  tions  Bibliography,  Quarterly Abstract Bulletin.
  Quarterly.
  Environmental Protection Agency, Washington,  DC.
  Office of Administration.
  1992,4 issues


                             Marl 992     55

-------
                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
Supersedes PB91-904200.
Paper copy available on Subscription, U.S., Canada,
and Mexico price  $135.00/yean all others  $270.00.
Single copies also available.

EPA Publications Bibliography is a quarterly abstract
bulletin containing the abstracts, corporate source,
subject, contract number and title indexes. The fourth
issue of the year contains bibliographic citations with
abstracts for the proceeding quarter and cumulative in-
dexes for the calendar year.

Keywords: 'Bibliographies, *Air pollution, 'Water pol-
lution. Abstracts, Subject indexing, Authors, Technical
reports,  Regulations,  Standards,  Waste disposal,
Public health, 'Environmental protection. Air quality
maintenance. Air pollution effects.
PB92-911600/REB                   Subscription
Pesticide Compact Label FHe - 1990 Updates. Ir-
regular repts.
Environmental Protection  Agency, Washington,  DC.
Office of Pesticide Programs.
1992, open series
Supersedes PB91-911600.
Microfiche available on* subscription, U.S.,  Canada,
and Mexico price $180/yean all others $360.00. Basic
set available as PB91-911699.

Photographs of updated and new pesticide labels plus
updated index to the entire Compact Label File. Con-
tains a collection of information on registered pesticide
labels. Information includes active ingredients and per-
centages of same; common name of active chemicals,
sites and pests for usage, dosage and safety informa-
tion. The subscription update service provides current
updates to the manual (base set).

Keywords:   'Documentation,  'Pesticides,   Photo-
graphs,   Microfilm,  Labels, Information   retrieval,
)ndexes(Documentation).
PB92-911699/REB                   MFS2640.00
Compact Label FHe-1992 (FIctM 1-5281).
Environmental Protection  Agency,  Washington,  DC.
Office of Pesticide Programs.
1992,5281p
Supersedes PB91 -911699.
Demand  Item. Updates available on subscription as
PB92-911600.

The report includes photographs of pesticide labels
plus updated index to the entire compact label file. The
1991 file  contains fiche number 1 -5281 plus the up-
dated index.

Keywords:   'Pesticides,   'Labels,   Photographs,
lndexes(Documentation), Data storage devices, Micro-
film.
PB92-921100/REB                Standing Order
Httttth  Efrects AssossiiMfrt  Sumnwy  T&DKB.
Quarterly.
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
1992,4 issues
Supersedes PB91-921100.
Paper copy available on Standing Order, Deposit Ac-
count required (Minimum deposit $100 U.S., Canada,
and Mexico; all others $200). Single copies also avail-
able. Issued and superseded quarterly.

The document is an excellent 'pointer1 system to iden-
tify cun^m literature or changes in assessment crrteria
for many chemicals of interest to Superfund.  It was
prepared for Superfund use by the Environmental Cri-
teria and Assessment Office (ECAO-  Cin) in  EPA's
Office  of Health and  Environmental  Assessment
Chemicals considered are those for which Health Ef-
fects Assessment Documents, Health  and Environ-
mental Effects Profiles,  Health  Assessment  Docu-
ments or Air  Quality Criteria Documents have been
prepared by  ECAO.  Radonudides considered are
those believed to be most common at Superfund sites.
Tables summarize reference doses (FHDs) for toxicity
from subchronic and chronic inhalation, oral exposure,
slope factors and unit risk values for carcinogenicity
based on lifetime inhalation and oral exposure, and ra-
dnnudide carcinogenicity.

Keywords: 'Public health, 'Hazardous materials, *Ra-
dnactive wastes, 'Chemical compounds, Waste dis-
posal, Exposure, Site surveys, Dosage,  Tabtes(Data),
Risks, Reviews, 'Superfund program, 'Environmental
impact assessments, 'Biological effects, 'Health haz-
ards, Air quality, Environmental effects.
PB92-921700/REB                   Subscription
Environmental  Protection Agency Civil Enforce-
ment Docket Quarterly rept.
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington,  DC.
Office of Enforcement
M. J. Miller. 1992, open series
Supersedes PB91-921700.
Available on subscription, U.S., Canada, and Mexico
price $230/yr price for others $460/yr.  Individual
issues are available at price code E17. This subscrip-
tion is also available on diskette, order number PB91-
591970.

The  Enforcement  Docket is the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency's system for tracking civil judicial
cases filed on the Agency's behalf by the Department
of Justice. The  Docket contains information on filed
civil cases from 1972 to the end of October 1990. The
information contained in the Docket can be grouped
into case information, facility  information and defen-
dent information. Case information contains data on a
case such as case name, data filed, date concluded,
laws/sections violated, and penalty information. Facili-
ty information contains data related to the facility in-
cluding a complete address and EPA ID number. Final-
ly, there are a list of all the defendants associated with
the case.

Keywords:  'Law  enforcement, Law(Jurisprudence),
'US EPA, 'Environmental pollution, Case studies, Pol-
lution regulations.
PB92-963200/REB                 Standing Order
Superfund: Program PoHctes and Administration.
Irregular repts.
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington,  DC.
Office of Emergency and Remedial Response.
1991, open senes
See also PB92-963300, PB92-963400, PB92-963500,
PB92-963600, and PB92-964700.
Available on Standing Order, deposit account required
(minimum deposit $200 U.S., Canada, and Mexico; all
others $400). Single copies also available in paper
copy or microfiche.

Program Policies and  Administration: This category
covers  ARAR's;  contracts management; data  sys-
tems; environmental indicators; internal policies and
procedures; planning; and special reports.

Keywords: 'Project management 'Hazardous materi-
als, Government policies, Project planning, Contract
administration, 'Superfund.
PB92-963300/REB                 Standing Order
Superfund: Site Assessment and Remediation. Ir-
regular repts.
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of Emergency and Remedial Response.
1991, open senes
See also PB92-963200, PB92-963400, PB92-963500,
PB92-963600, and PB92-964700.
Available on Standing Order, deposit account required
(minimum deposit $200 U.S., Canada, and Mexico; all
others  $400). Singles copies also available in paper
copy or microfiche.

Site  Assessment and Remediation:  This  category
covers site assessment-general; the  National  Prior-
ities  Listing Process; risk assessment; risk manage-
ment; remedial action-general; remedial investigation
and feasibility studies; remedial design and remedial
action; guidance on records of decision; public partici-
pation-general; community relations; state and local
involvement; Technical Assistance Grants.

Keywords:  'Hazardous materials, 'Waste  disposal,
Sites, Assessments, Feasibility studies. Technical as-
sistance,  Grants,  'Superfund,  'Remedial action,
Record of Decision.
PB92-963302/REB               PC A04/MF A01
PA-Score Software,  Version 1.0.  Users Manual
and Tutorial.
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of Emergency and Remedial Response.
Sep 91,73p OSWER-9345.1-11, EPA/SW/DK-92/
002A
For system on diskette, see PB92-500032.
Paper copy available on Standing Order, deposit ac-
count required (minimum deposit $200 U.S., Canada,
and Mexico; all others $400). Single copies also avail-
able in paper copy or microfiche.

The PA-Score software package is comprised of the
PA-Score and PA-Print computer programs and the
users manual. The PA-Score software package has
been developed to assist preliminary assessment (PA)
evaluations by generating an upper bound estimate of
the Hazard Ranking System (HRS) score and associ-
ated documentation for a site. The PA-Score computer
program (PA-Score) assists  investigators in meeting
PA evaluation requirements. PA-Score performs PA
calculations from raw data to calculate site  scores.
The PA-Print computer program (PA-Print) generates
PA scoresheets  and the Potential Hazardous Waste
Site Preliminary Assessment form. The users manual
provides instructions to install and use PA-Score and
PA-Print

Keywords: 'Superfund, 'User manuals(Computer pro-
grams), 'Hazardous materials, 'Waste management
 Environmental surveys, Ranking, Scenarios, Informa-
tion transfer, Procedures, Site characterization, US
EPA,  Documentation, 'Preliminary Assessment,  Na-
tional Priorities  List,  Hazard Ranking System,  PA-
Score computer program, PA-Print computer program.
PB92-963303/REB               PC A13/MF A03
Guidance  for  Performing  Preliminary Assess-
ments under CERCLA.
Environmental  Protection  Agency,  Washington,  DC.
Office of Emergency and Remedial Response.
Sep 91,277p OSWER-9345.0-01 A
Supersedes PB90-183054.
Paper copy available on Standing Order, deposit ac-
count required (minimum deposit $200 U.S., Canada,
and Mexico; all others $400). Single copies also avail-
able in paper copy or microfiche.

The purpose of the guidance is to provide instructions
for conducting a PA and reporting results. The guid-
ance discusses the information required to evaluate a
site and how to obtain it, how to  score a site, and re-
porting requirements. The document  also provides
guidelines and  instruction  on  PA evaluation, scoring,
and the use of standard PA scoresheets. The overall
goal of the guidance is to assist PA investigators in
conducting high-quality assessments that result in cor-
rect site screening or further action recommendations
on a nationally consistent basis.

Keywords:  'Assessments,  'Hazardous   materials,
'Sites, Instructions,  Evaluation,  Reporting, Require-
ments, Standards, 'Superfund.
PB92-963333/REB               PC A04/MF A01
Risk  Assessment  Guidance  for   Superfund.
Volume 1. Human Health Evaluation Manual  (Part
B, Development of Risk-Based Preliminary Reme-
diation Goals). Interim rept.
Environmental Protection  Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of Emergency and Remedial Response.
Dec 91,66p OSWER-9285.7-01 B
See also PB92-963334.
Paper copy available on Standing Order, deposit ac-
count required (minimum deposit $200 U.S., Canada,
and Mexico; all others $400). Single copies also  avail-
able in paper copy or microfiche.

The document is one of a three-part series. Part B pro-
vides guidance on using USEPA toxicity values and ex-
posure information to derive risk-based preliminary re-
medial goals (PRG) for a CERCLA site. Initially devel-
oped at the scoping phase using readily available infor-
mation, risk-based PRGs generally are modified based
on site-specific data gathered during the remedial in-
vestigation/feasibility study.  The guidance does not
discuss the risk management decisions that are nec-
essary at a CERCLA site. The potential users of Part B
are those involved in the remedy selection and imple-
mentation process, including risk assessors, risk as-
sessment  reviewers, remedial project managers, and
other decision-makers.

Keywords: 'Hazardous materials, 'Public health, 'Pol-
lution control, Toxicity, Exposure, Investigations, Ob-
jectives, Selection,  Decision  making, 'Superfund, Re-
medial response.
56     Vol.  92, No.  1

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                                                 EPA  PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
PB92-963334/REB               PC A05/MF A01
Risk  Assessment  Guidance  for   Superfund.
Volume 1. Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part
C, Risk Evaluation of Remedial Alternatives). Inter-
im rept
Environmental  Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
Office of Emergency and Remedial Response.
Dec 91,77p OSWER-9285.7-01 C
See also PB92-963333.
Paper copy available on Standing Order, deposit ac-
count required  (minimum deposit $200 U.S., Canada,
and Mexico; all others $400). Single copies also avail-
able in paper copy or microfiche.

The document is one of a three-part series. Part C pro-
vides guidance on the human health risk evaluations of
remedial alternatives that are conducted during the
feasibility study, during selection and documentations
of a remedy, and during and after remedy implementa-
tion. Part C provides general guidance to assist in site-
specific risk evaluations and  to maintain flexibility in
the analysis and decision-making process. The poten-
tial users of Part C are persons involved in the remedy
selection and implementation process, including risk
assessors,  risk  assessment  reviewers,   remedial
project managers, and other decision-makers.

Keywords: 'Hazardous materials, 'Public health, 'Pol-
lution control, Manuals, Sites, Risk assessment, Eval-
uation, Guidelines, Decision making,  'Superfund, Re-
medial response, Alternative planning.
PB92-963336/REB               PC A01 /MF A01
Homeowners Exempted from Superfund Cleanup
Costs: National Policy Overview. Fact sheet.
Environmental  Protection Agency,  Washington, DC.
Office of Emergency and Remedial Response.
Nov 91, 5p OSWER-9230.0-23FS
Paper copy available on  Standing Order, deposit ac-
count required  (minimum deposit $200 U.S., Canada,
and Mexico; all others $400). Single copies also avail-
able in paper copy or microfiche.

The USEPA has established a national policy declaring
the average homeowner will not be required to con-
duct or pay for cleanup when residential property is
part of a federal Superfund site. The  national policy
and guideline  clarifies  Superfund's  liability system
which maintains owners and operators of properties in
need of federal cleanup action are potentially liable for
those actions.  EPA may hold homeowners liable for
cleanup where  their own actions have led to a release
or threatened release of hazardous substances requir-
ing a cleanup of their property, or where the property is
used for non-residential  purpose. The policy is de-
signed to alleviate concerns about cleanup liability for
homeowners, as well as parties involved in real estate
transactions, such as lenders and title insurers.

Keywords: "Hazardous materials, 'Residential build-
ings, 'Liabilities,  'Pollution  control, Government poli-
cies, Cost analysis, National government, Real estate,
Insurance, Requirements, US EPA, Guidelines, Pay-
ment, 'Superfund, 'Cleanup, Ownership.
 PB92-963337/REB               PCA02/MF,A01
 ECO Update: The Role of BTAGs In Ecological As-
 sessment Volume  1, Number 1, September 1991.
 Intermittent bulletin.
 Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
 Office of Emergency and Remedial Response.
 Sep91,6pOSWER-9345.0-05l-VOL-1-NO-1
 See also PB90-155599.
 Paper copy available on Standing  Order, deposit ac-
 count required (minimum deposit $200 U.S., Canada,
 and Mexico; all others $400). Single copies also avail-
 able in paper copy or microfiche.

 Most EPA Regions have established groups of scien-
 tists to advise and assist site managers with ecological
 studies produced in conjunction with Remedial Investi-
 gations and Feasibility Studies and Removal Actions at
 Superfund sites. In general, these groups are known
 as Biological Technical Assistance Groups or BTAGs,
 although some regions use different names. The bulle-
 tin summarizes the BTAG structure and function in the
 Superfund process. Its purpose is to help site manag-
 ers understand how BTAGs can assist with the collec-
 tion and evaluation of site information and ensure that
 ecological effects are properly considered. ECO Up-
 dates are a series of Intermittent Bulletins intended to
 facilitate ecological  assessment of Superfund sites.
 These bulletins serve as supplements to  Risk Assess-
ment Guidance for Superfund Volume 2: Environmen-
tal Evaluation Manual (9285.7-01).

Keywords: 'Hazardous  materials, 'Sites, 'Ecology,
'Pollution  control,  Technical assistance, Investiga-
tions, Assessments,  Collection  methods,  Manage-
ment, Toxicology, Risk assessment, Government poli-
cies. Wildlife, Guidelines, Public  health, 'Superfund,
Remedial response, 'Biological Technical Assistance
Groups.
PB92-963400/REB                Standing Order
Superfund: Removals and Emergency Response.
Irregular repts.
Environmental Protection Agency,  Washington, DC.
Office of Emergency and Remedial Response.
1991, open series
See also PB92-963200, PB92-963300, PB92-963500,
PB92-963600, and PB92-964700.
Available on Standing Order, deposit account required
(minimum deposit $200 U.S., Canada, and Mexico; all
others $400). Single copies also available in paper
copy or microfiche.

Removals f"i Emergency  Response: This category
covers removal actions-general; oil spills; emergency
response; field safety.

Keywords:  'Hazardous  materials,  'Waste disposal,
'Oil pollution, Removal,  Emergencies, Response,
Safety, 'Superfund, 'Oil spills.
PB92-963401/REB               PC A03/MF A01
Superfund Removal Procedures: Guidance on the
Consideration of ARABS during Removal Actions.
Environmental Protection Agency, Washington,  DC.
Office of Emergency and Remedial Response.
Aug 91,39p OSWER-9360.3-02
Paper copy available on  Standing Order, deposit ac-
count required (minimum deposit $200 U.S., Canada,
and Mexico; all others $400). Single copies also avail-
able in paper copy or microfiche.

The document is part of  a ten-volume series of guid-
ance documents collectively titled the Superfund Re-
moval Procedures. The specific document presents in-
formation recommendations, and examples to aid On
Scene Coordinators  in identifying potential Federal
and State  ARARs, determining the extent to which
compliance with ARARs is practicable, and document-
ing ARAR evaluations. The guidance also may be used
by potentially responsible parties (PRPs) when poten-
tial ARARs are being assembled by the PRP.

Keywords:  'Removal, 'Hazardous materials, Instruc-
tions, National government. State government, Legis-
lation, 'Superfund, Applicable or Relevant and Appro-
priate Requirements.
 PB92-96350Q/REB                 Standing Order
 Superfund: Technology and Analytical  Services.
 Irregular repts.
 Environmental Protection Agency* Washington, DC.
 Office of Emergency and Remedial Response.
 1991, open series
 See also PB92-963200j PB92-963300, PB92-963400,
 PB92-963600, and PB92-964700.
 Available on Standing Order, deposit account required
 (minimum deposit $200 U.S., Canada, arid Mexico; all
 others $400). Single copies also available in paper
 copy or microfiche.

 Technology and Analytical Services:  This category
 covers technology-general; the SITE program; inno-
 vative  technologies;   selected  technologies,  by
 medium; analytical services.

 Keywords: 'Waste disposal, 'Hazardous  materials,
 Sites, Technology transfer, Project planning, 'Super-
 fund.
 PB92-963600/REB                Standing Order
 Superfund: Enforcement Irregular repts.
 Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
 Office of Emergency and Remedial Response.
 1991, open series
 See also PB92-963200, PB92-963300, PB92-963400,
 PB92-963500, and PB92-964700.
 Available on Standing Order, deposit account required
 (minimum deposit $200 U.S., Canada, and Mexico; all
 others $400). Single copies also available in paper
 copy or microfiche.
 Enforcement: The category covers CERCLA; program
 management;  comprehensive  site planning;  PRP
 search, notification, and information; litigation support;
 program implementation.

 Keywords: 'Program management, 'Hazardous mate-
 rials, 'Law enforcement. Inspection, Storage, Waste
 disposal, 'Superfund.
 PB92-964700/REB                Standing Order
 Superfund: Record of Decision. Irregular repts.
 Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.
 Office of Emergency and Remedial Response.
 1991, open series
 Supersedes PB91-921400. See also PB92-963400,
 PB92-963600,  PB92-963500,  PB92-963200,  and
 PB92-963300.
 Available on Standing Order, deposit account required
 (minimum deposit $700 U.S., Canada, and Mexico; all
 others $1400). Single copies also available in paper
 copy or microfiche.

 The Superfund Records of Decisions (RODS) are doc-
 uments covering the application of specific mandates
 in the superfund amendments and re-authorization act
 of 1986. Each ROD addresses the selection of remedi-
 al action for a specific superfund site and the prefer-
 ence for treatment

 Keywords:  'Hazardous  materials,  Requirements,
 Sites,    Waste    treatment,    Law(Jurisprudence),
 States(United States), 'Superfund, 'Record of Deci-
 sion, Remedial action.
 AD-A242 110/5/REB            PC A06/MF A02
 Air Force Engineering and Services Center, Tyndall
 AFB, FL Engineering and Services Lab.
 Degreaser  System  Pollution Prevention Evalua-
 tion. Final rept Nov 89-Sep 99.
 PEI Associates, Inc., Cincinnati, OH.
 M. F. Szabo, and M. T. Nutter. 1 Sep 90,124p AFESC/
 ESL-TR-90-33,
 Contract EPA-68-02-4284

 The purpose of this project was to investigate the ca-
 pability of various engineering  changes to an existing
 vapor degreaser to reduce solvent emissions to the at-
 mosphere while remaining within the established  Air
 Force exposure limits for 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA).
 A 1970 vintage vapor degreasing  system had been
 converted from trichloroethylene to TCA and fitted with
 a lip vent exhaust system to decrease worker expo-
 sure. Solvent consumption with this configuration was
 two to three 55-galton drums weekly, all presumed to
 be emmitted to the atmosphere via the lip vent, in se-
: quence, various modifications to the degreaser and
 operating procedures were instituted to define their ca-
 pability to reduce emissions and comply with exposure
 limit requirement.  They include decrease  and elimina-
 tion of lip vent suction, a freeboard extension, add-on
 chiller, and a freeboard extension plus add-on chiller.

 Keywords: Air force, Consumption, Emission, Engi-
 neering, Exposure(General), Limitations, Personnel,
 Requirements, Solvents,  Trichloroethylene,  Work,
 'Pollution abatement. Environmental protection, De-
 greasers,   Air   pollution,   Industrial   hygiene,
 Wastes(lndustrial),       'Emission        control,
 Exposure(Physiology), Ventilation,  Chillers, 'Environ-
 mental chemical substitutes, 'Air pollution abatement,
 'Occupational safety and health, 'Ethane/trichloro.
 DE91017051/REB                PC A03/MF A01
 Department of Energy, Washington, DC.
 Aerial radiological survey of Pocatello and Soda
 Springs, Idaho and surrounding area, June-July
 1986
 EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, NV.
 Remote Sensing Lab.
 H. A. Berry. Feb87, 44p EGG-10617-1148, EPA-8613
 Contract AC08-88N V10617
 Sponsored by Department of Energy, Washington, DC.

 Three aerial  radiological  surveys  were conducted
 during the period 16 June through 15 July 1986 over
 the towns of Pocatello, Soda Springs, and Fort Hall,
 Idaho and the surrounding areas. The surveys were
 performed for the United States Environmental Protec-
 tion Agency (EPA) by the United States Department of
 Energy's (DOE) Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL),
 utilizing the Aerial Measuring System (AMS). This work
 was completed in cooperation with a study by the EPA


                            Mar 1992     57

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                                                 EPA PUBLICATIONS BIBLIOGRAPHY
 to conduct a dose assessment of human radiation ex-
 posure for industrial sources in Pocatello and Soda
 Springs, Idaho. The aerial surveys were performed to
 document the natural terrestrial radiological environ-
 ment of the three localities and to map the spatial
 extent and degree of contamination due to phosphate
 milling operations. The results of these surveys will be
 used for planning ground-based measurements in ad-
 dffion to being incorporated into the dose assessment
 document 4 refs., 14 figs.. 6 tabs.

 Keywords: Idaho, 'Aerial Monitoring, Background Ra-
 dation. Contamination, Dose Rates, Industry, Milling,
 ~   ' ates, Radiation Doses.  'Radiation Monitoring.
 USEPA.EDB/540230.
 N91-32531/6/REB
          (Order as N91-32528/2/REB, PC A05/MF
                                          A01)
 National  Aeronautics  and  Space  Administration,
 Washington, DC.
Annular Denudera for Use In Global Climate and
Stratospheric Measurements of Addle Gases and
Particles (Abstract Only).
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle
Park,NC.
R.K. Stevens. Feb 91,1p
In NASA. Ames Research Center, International Work-
shop on Stratospheric Aerosols: Measurements, Prop-
erties, and Effects p 41.

Measurements of acidic and basic gases that coexist
with fine particle (less than 2.5 micron) may be useful
for determining the impact of these species on global
climate changes and determining species that influ-
ence stratospheric ozone levels. Annular denuders are
well suited for this purpose. A new concentric annular
denuder system, consisting of a three channel den-
uder, a Teflon coated cyctonepreseparator, and a mul-
tistage filter pack was developed,  evaluated,  and
shown to provide reliable atmospheric measurements
of SO2, HNO2, HNO3. NH3, SO4(=), NH4(+), NO3(-
), and H(+). For example, the precision of the annular
denuder for the ambient measurements of HN03 and
nitrates  at concentrations between 0.1 to  3  micro-
gram/cu m was + or - 12 and 16 pet, respectively.
The 120 x 25 mm three channel denuder is encased in
a stainless steel sheath and has annular spaces that
are 1 mm wide. This design was shown to have nearly
identical capacity for removal of SO2 as conventional
210 x 25 mm single channel denuder configurations.
The cyclone preseparator was designed and tested to
have a D sub 50 cutoff diameter of 2.5 micron and
minimal retention of HNO3.


Keywords:  'Atmospheric composition, Chemical com-
position, 'Climatic changes,  Climatology,  'Ozone,
'Stratosphere, Acidity, Ammonia, Gas analysis,  Ni-
trates, Nitric acid, Precision, Sulfur dioxides, 'Air pollu-
tion detection, 'Aerosols.
58     Vol. 92, No. 1

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TITLE INDEX
  Reports are listed alphabetically by title. A, An. and The at the beginning of a title are
  ignored in alphabetizing.
SAMPLE ENTRY
                         i
 NTIS Order Number/Media Codes Price Codes

	    I
     |

Title    Sensitivity of Ecological Landscapes and Regions to
     I  Global Climatic Change.

Jodes    PB90-120072/REB     PCA09/MFA01

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                                                                   TITLE  INDEX
1,3-DichlOfOpropene Position Document 1.
PB92-114206/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

Acid-Volatile Suffide as a Factor Mediating  Cadmium and
Nickel Bioavailability in Contaminated Sediments.
PB92-124296/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Acute Effects of Diisopropyj Fluorophosphate (DFP) on Au-
tonomic  and Behavioral Thermoregulatory  Responses  in
the Long-Evans Rat
PB92-124668/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Addendum to the Regulatory Impact Analysis for the Final
Criteria for Municipal Solid Waste Landfills.
PB92-100858/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Adjusting Ambient Ozone Air Quality Indicators for Missing
Values.
PB92-1241S5/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

Aerial radiological survey of  Pocatello and  Soda Springs,
Idaho and surrounding area, June-July 1986.
DE91017051 /REB                     PC A03/MF A01

Airway Structure Variability in the Long-Evans Rat Lung.
PB92-124676/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

Alachkx Position Document 2/3.
PB92-111889/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

Alachtor Position Document 4.
PB92-114248/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Analysis of Factors Affecting Methane Gas Recovery from
Six Landfills.
PB92-101351/REB                    PC A13/MF A03

Annular  Denuders  for Use in Global Climate and Strato-
spheric Measurements of Acidic Gases and Particles (Ab-
stract Only).
N91-32S31/6/REB
          (Order as N91-32S2B/2/REB, PC AOS/MF A01)

Another Look  National  Survey of Pesticides in Drinking
Water Wells. Phase 2 Report
PB92-120831 /REB            •        PC EOS/MF A03

Applicability of  UV/Oxidabon Technologies  to Treat Con-
taminated Groundwater.
PB92-126853/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Application for  Certification 1991  Model Year Heavy-Duty
Diesel Engines - Mack Truck.
PB91-242768/REB                    PC AM/MF A06

Application for  Certification 1991  Model Year Heavy-Duty
Engines - Navistar.
PB91-242784/REB                    PC AOS/MF A01

Application for  Certification 1991  Model Year Heavy-Duty
Vehicles.
PB91-242750/REB                     PC EM/MF E99

Application for  Certification 1991  Model Year Heavy-Duty
Vehicles - Mack Trucks.
PB91-242776/REB                    PC A25/MF AM

Application for Certification  1991  Model Year  Light-Duty
Trucks - Ford.
PB91-242685/REB                     PC AM/MF E11

Application for Certification  1991  Model Year  Light-Duty
Trucks - Isuzu (Motors.
PB91-242719/REB                    PCA19/MFA04

Application for Certification 1991 Model Year Light-Duty Ve-
hicles.
PB91-24263S/REB                     PC E99/MF £98

Application for Certification 1991 Model Year Light-Duty Ve-
hicles and Light-Duty Trucks - Nissan.
PB91-242735/REB                     PC A99/MF E99

Application for Certification 1991 Model Year Light-Duty Ve-
hicles-Audi.
PB91-242644/REB                     PC A99/MF E99

Application for Certification 1991 Model Year Light-Duty Ve-
hicles-BMW.
PB91-242651/REB                     PCA99/MFE08

Application for Certification 1991 Model Year Light-Duty Ve-
hicles - Ferrari - Fiat
PB91 -242669/REB                     PC A07/MF A02

Application for Certification 1991 Model Year Light-Duty Ve-
hicles-Ford.
PB91-242677/REB                    PC AM/MF E19

Application for Certification 1991 Model Year Light-Duty Ve-
hicles-Fuji
PB91-242693/REB                    PC A99/MF AM

Application for Certification 1991 Model Year Light-Duty Ve-
hicles - General Motors.
PB91 -242701 /REB                    PC AM/MF EM

Application for CertHicalion 1991 Model Year Light-Duty Ve-
hides -  Isuzu Motors.
PB91-242727/REB                    PC A13/MF A03

Application for Certification 1991 Model Year Light-Duty Ve-
hicles • Volkswagen.
PB91-242743/REB                    PC AM/MF EM
Application of a Plant Test System in the Identification of
Potential Genetic Hazards at Chemical Waste Sites.
PB92-124551 /REB                     PC A03/MF A01

Application of Multispectral Techniques to the Precise Iden-
tification of Aldehydes in the Environment.
PB92-101419/REB                     PCA02/MFA01

Aquatic  Toxkaty  Information  Retrieval  Data  Base  (AC-
QUIRE).
PB92-500453/REB                            CP T02

Asbestos Fiber Release during Change-Out of Fitter  Bags
from HEPA-Ftltered Vacuum Cleaners.
PB92-113208/REB                     PCA02/MFA01

Assessing the Use of  Known  Mutagero to Caferate the
'Salmonella typhimurtum'  Mutagenictty  Assay. 1. Without
Exogenous Activation.
PB92-113257/REB                     PC A03/MF A01

Assessing the Use of  Known  Mutagera to Calibrate the
'Salmonella typhimurium1 Mutagenicity Assay. 2. With Exog-
enous Activation.
PB92-113273/REB                     PC AOS/MF A01

Assessing UST Corrective Action Technology: A Scientific
Evaluation of the Mobility  of Organic Contaminants in Sub-
surface Environments.
PB92-114552/REB                     PC A16/MF A03

Assessment of Implantation in the Rat
PB92-126903/REB                     PC A03/MF A01

Assessment of Neurotoxicity: Use of Gnat Ftorillarv  Acidic
Protein as a Biomarker.
PB92-110527/REB                     PC AOS/MF A01

Assessment  of  Promising Forest Management  Practices
and Technologies for Enhancing the Conservation and Se-
questration of Atmospheric Carbon and Their Costs  at the
Site Level.
PB92-122787/REB                     PC AM/MF A02

Automotive and Heavy-Duty Engine Coolant Recycling by
Filtration. Technology Evaluation Report
PB92-126804/REB                     PC AM/MF A01

Benzene Groundwater Exposure  Study, Nesmith.  South
Carolina.
PB92-123801/REB                     PCA03/MFA01

Blodegradation of Monoaromatic  Hydrocarbons by Aquifer
Microorganisms Using Oxygen, Nitrate, or Nitrous Oxide as
the Terminal  Electron Acceptor.
PB92-110543/REB                     PC A02/MF A01

Biological Treatment of Wood Preserving Site Groundwater
by BfoTrol, Inc. Applications Analysis Report
PB91-227983/REB                     PC
                                     PC AM/MF A01
Btoventjng to Treat Fuel Spills from Underground Storage
Tanks.
PB92-121342/REB                     PC A02/MF A01

Cadmium: Special Review Document
PB92-114230/REB                     PCA01/MFA01

Can Intensive  Management Increase Carbon Storage  in
Forests.
PB92-113224/REB                     PC A02/MF A01

Captafol Final Decision.
PB92-114289/REB                     PC A01/MF A01

Carbonate Equilibria and Groundwater Sample Collection:
Implications  for Estimated Average Subsurface Properties
in Continental North America.
PB92-101690/REB                     PC A03/MF A01

Characteristics of Single Particle Coal Combustion.
PB92-121409/REB                     PC A02/MF A01

Cheteo Ocean Dredged Material Disposal  Site (OOMDS)
Designation: Final Environmental Impact Statement
PB92-104470/REB                     PC AM/MF A02

Child Lead Exposure Study. Leeds, Alabama.
PB92-123793/REB                     PC AM/MF A01

Chlorobenzilate Position Document 1.
PB92-114313/REB                     PC A01/MF A01

Citizens'  Guidance Manual for the Technical Assistance
Grant Program.
PB92-101435/REB                     PC A14/MF A03

Cleaning of Flue Gases from Waste  Combustors, 1990.
PB92-121300/REB                     PC AM/MF A01

tofchicine-lnduced  Deafferentation of the  Hippocampus
Selectively Disrupts ChoUnergic Rhythmical Slow Wave Ac-
tivity
PB92-120476/REB                     PC A03/MF A01

Color Yes: Cancer No.
PB92-110477/REB                     PC AM/MF A01

Combustion Control of Trace Organic Air Pollutants from
Municipal Waste Combustors.
PB92-113158/REB                    PC AM/MF A01

Community Relations during Enforcement Activities and De-
vetopment of the AdininistiaUve Record.
PB92-10S469/REB                    PC AM/MF A01
Compact Label File -1992 (Fiche 1 - 5281).
PB92-911699/REB                        MFS2640.00

Comparison of Animal InfectMty,  Excystation,  and Fluoro-
genic Dye as Measures of 'Giardia muris' Cyst Inactivation
by Ozoos.
PB92-124288/REB                     PC A02/MF A01

Comparison of Five Solidification/Stabilization Processes
for Treatment of Municipal  Waste Combustion Residues.
Parti. Physical Testing.
PB92-121193/REB                     PCA03/MFA01

Comparison of In situ  Vitrification and Rotary Kiln Inciner-
ation for Soils Treatment
PB92-113174/REB                     PC A02/MF A01

Comparison of In vivo Cholinesterase Inhibition in Neonatal
and Adult Rats by Three Organophosphorothioate Insecti-
cides
PB92-110550/REB                     PC A03/MF A01

Comparison of  Solidification/Stabilization Processes  for
Treatment of Municipal Waste Combustion Residues. Part
2. Leaching  Properties.
PB92-121201/REB                     PCA03/MFA01

Compensatory  Alterations  in  Receptor-Stimulated  Phos-
phoinositide Hydrolysis in  the Hippocampus  Vary as a
Function of Dose of Colcnicine.
PB92-110501 /REB                     PCA02/MFA01

Compilation of Air Pollutant Emission Factors. Volume 1.
Stationary Point and Area Sources. Fourth Edition. Supple-
ment D.
PB92-126945/REB                     PC A07/MF A02

Computerized  Risk and  Biosccumulation  System  (Version
1.0).
PB92-114164/REB                     PC A03/MF A01

Concentration of Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Increases
with Age in the Mouse and Rat Brain.
PB92-110535/REB                     PC A02/MF A01

Conducting  RCRA Inspections at Mixed Waste Facilities.
PB92-105196/REB                     PC A04/MF A01

Construction,  Monitoring, and  Performance of Two  Soil
Liners.                      *
PB92-124049/REB                     PC A07/MF A02

Continuous  MuMgand Distribution Model Used to Predict
the Stability Constant of Cu(ll) Metal  Complexation with
Humic Material from Fluorescence Quenching Data.
PB92-101377/REB                     PC A02/MF A01

Cost Analysis of Son  Depressurization Techniques for
Indoor Radon Reduction.
PB92-120443/REB                     PC A03/MF A01
Daminozide Position Document 1.
PB92-114222/REB

Daminozide Position Document 2/3.
PB92-114214/REB

Daminozide Position Document 4.
PB92-114198/REB
PC A02/MF A01
PC A03/MF A01
                                     PC A01/MF A01
 Dechlorinations of Porychkxinated Biphenyls in Sediments
 of New Bedford Harbor.
 PB92-121151/REB                     PC A03/MF A01

 Degreaser System Pollution Prevention Evaluation.
 AD-A2421l6/5/REB                   PC AM/MF A02

 Design, Development, and Implementation  of AIRS' Area
 and Mobile Source Subsystem.
 PB92-124213/REB                     PC A03/MF A01

 Determination and Occurrence of AHH-Active Potychlorinat-
 ed Biphenyls, a3,7,8-Tetrachloro-p-Dioxin and 2,3,7,8-Te-
 tracttorodbenzofuran  in  Lake  Michigan  Sediment  and
 Biota. The Question of Their Relative lexicological Signifi-
 cance.
 PB92-10812S/REB                     PC A03/MF A01

 Development of Alternate Performance Standard for Radon
 Resistant  Construction  Based  on Short-Term/Long-Term
 Indoor Radon Concentrations. Volume 1. Technical Report
 PB92-115211 /REB                     PC AOS/MF A01

 Development of Alternate Performance Standard for Radon
 Resistant  Construction  Based  on Short-Term/Long-Term
 Indoor Radon Concentrations. Volume 2. Appendices.
 PB92-115229/REB                     PCA04/MFA01

 Development of Seasonal and  Annual Bkxjenic Emissions
 Inventories for the U.S. and Canada.
 PB92-126796/REB                     PC A07/MF A02

 Developmental Malformation of Frog Embryos: An Analysis
 of Teratogenidty of Chemical Mixtures.
 PB92-108190/REB                     PC A02/MF A01

 Developmental Toxicity of Bromoxynil in Mice and Rats.
 PB02-113265/REB                     PC A02/MF A01
                                                                                                                                                              TI-1

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                                                                       TITLE INDEX
Developmental Toxksty of TCDO and Related Compounds:
Species Sensitivities and Differences.
PB92-124643/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

CXcMorvos (DOVP) Position Document 1.
PB92-1 1 4271 /REB                    PC A02/MF A01

Differential Impact o( Hypothermia  and Pentobarbrtal on
Brain-Stem Auditory Evoked Responses.
P892-1 1 3240/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Oinocap Position Document 4.
PB92-114370/REB                    PCA03/MFA01

DMA Abducts  in Rat Lung, Liver and Peripheral Blood Lym-
phocytes Produces by i.p. Administration of Benzo(a)Pyrene
Metabolites and Derivatives.
PB92-124627/REB                    PC A01/MF A01

Drinking Water Research  Division's  Research Activities in
Support of EPA's Regulatory Agenda.
PB92-124197/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

DuPorrt/Obertin  Microflttration  Technology.  Applications
Analysis Report
PB92-119023/REB                    PC A04/MF A01

Dynamics of Behavioral Thermoregulalion in the Rat
PB92-124619/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

ECO Update:  The Role of  BTAGs  in Ecological Assess-
ment Volume  1, Number 1, September 1991.
PB92-963337/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

Ecological Indicators. Proceedings of an International Sym-
posium. Held m Fort Lauderdafe. Florida on October 16-19,
1990.
PB92-114131/REB                    PC AW/MF EM

Effect of Natural Ventilation on Radon  and Radon Progeny
Levels in Houses.
PB92-124148/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Effect of Nitrate Addition on Btorestoration of Fuel-Contami-
noted Aquifer Field Demonstration.
PB92-110444/REB                    PCA03/MFA01

Effect  of .Sodium Chloride on Transport of Bacteria in a
Saturated Aquifer Material.
PB92-1 10428/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

Effect of Storage ConrJtions on HandNng and SO2 Reactiv-
ity of Ca(OH)2-Based>orbants.
PB82-124270/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

Effects of  a Contaminated Sediment on Life History Traits
and Population Growth Rate of •Neanthes Arenaceoden-
tola- (Potychaeta; Nereidae) in the Laboratory.
PB92-108059/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Effects on Electrostatic Precipitation of Changes in Grain
Lowing. Size  Distribution, Resistivity, and Temperature.
PB92-113109/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Electric and Magnetic Fields Near AM Broadcast Towers.
PB92-101427/REB                    PCAO5/MFA01

Emission  Inventory Requirements for Carbon  Monoxide
State Implementation Plans,  1991.
PB92-112150/REB                    PC AOS/MF A01

Emission Inventory Requirements for  Ozone State Imple-
mentation  Plans.
PB92-118017/REB                   PC A08/MF A02

Emissions and Fuel Economy Effects  of the Platinum Ga-
saver, a Retrofit Device.
PB92-104421/REB                   PC A03/MF A01

Enforcement Document Retrieval System (EDRS) - ASCII
(1972-November 1991).
PB02-592210/REB                        Subscription

Enforcement Document Retrieval System (EDRS) -EBCDIC
(1972-Novernber 1991).
PB92-592220/REB                        Subscription

Enhance and Prolonged Pulmonary Influenza Virus Infec-
tion Fohwing Phosgene Inhalation.
PB92-124650/REB                   PC AOS/MF A01

Enhanced Neurotoxicity of 3.3Mminodipropionitrite FbHow-
ng Pretreatment with Carbon Tetrachloride in the Rat
PB92-1 13323/REB                   PC A03/MF A01

Envwonmental Factors Correlated to DfchJorophenol Decn-
torinaoon in Anoxfc Freshwater Sediments.
PB92-124346/REB                   PCA03/MFA01

Environmental  Monitoring   and  Assessment  Program
(EMAP) Design Report
PB92-1034497REB                   PCA04/MFA01

Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program: 1991
Project Descriptors.
      l 14479/REB
                                      PC AOS/MF A02
  Environmental Profites and Hazard Indfces for Constituents
  of Muricipel Sludge: BeryKum.
  PB92-122993/R1EB                    PC AOS/MF A01

  Environmental ProBes and Hazard Indtaes for Constituents

                                      PC AOS/MF A01
                                                         Environmental Profiles and Hazard Indices for Constituents
                                                         of Municipal Sludge: Mercury.
                                                         PB92-122977/REB                    PC AOS/MF A01

                                                         Environmental Profiles and Hazard Indices for Constituents
                                                         of Municipal Sludge: Nickel.
                                                         PB92-123009/REB                    PC AOS'MF A01

                                                         Environmental Protection Agency Civil Enforcement Docket
                                                         PB92-921700/REB                       Subscription

                                                         EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) Publications Btott-
                                                         ograpny, Ouarte* Abstract Bufletin.
                                                         PB92-904200/REB                       Subscription

                                                         EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program:
                                                         An Ecological Status and Trends Program.
                                                         PB92-121189/REB                    PCA03/MFA01

                                                         Estimating Critical Loads of SuHate to Surface Waters in
                                                         the Northeastern  United States: A Comparative  Assess-
                                                         ment of Three Procedures for Estimating Critical Loads of
                                                         Suffate for Lakes.
                                                         PB92-119015/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

                                                         Estimation of Water Solubility and Octand/Water Partition
                                                         Coefficient  of Hydrophobe Dyes. Part 1. Relationship be-
                                                         tween Solubility are) Partition Coefficient
                                                         PB92-124320/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

                                                         Estimation of Water Solubility and Octarnl/Water Partition
                                                         Coefficient  of Hydrophobe Dyes. Part 2. Reverse-Phase
                                                         High Performance Liquid Chromatography.
                                                         PB92-124338/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

                                                         Etnalflurain Position Document 1/2/3/4.
                                                         PB92-114263/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

                                                         Evaluating  Created Wetlands through  Comparisons with
                                                         Natural Wetlands.
                                                         PB82-111566/REB
                                                                                             PC A03/MF A01
                                                         Evaluating  Design and Verifying  Compliance  of Created
                                                         Wetlands in the Vicinity of Tampa, Florida.
                                                         PB92-116045/REB                    PC AOS/MF A02
Evaluating the Human Health Effects of Hazardous Wa
Reproduction  and  Development  Neurotoxicity,  Genetic
Toxicity and Cancer.
PB92-110352/REB                    PC AOS/MF A01

Evaluating the Relationship of Metabolic Activation System
Concentrations and Chemical Dose Concentrations for the
Salmonella Spiral and Plate Assays.
PB92-113331/REB                    PC AOS/MF A01

Evaluating the Utility of Natural Vegetation in Assessing
Arctic Accumulation of Air Toxics.
PB92-103464/REB                    PC AOS/MF A02

Evaluation of a Kemira Oy Reststively Heated Catalyst on a
Methand-Fueted Vehicle.
PB92-104397/REB                    PC AOS/MF A01

Evaluation of a Senate Heat Battery on a Flexible-Fueled
Vehicle.
PB92-114255/REB                    PC AOS/MF A01

Evaluation of  a  Vehicle Equipped with a  Direct  Injection

    '-118009/REB        '           PC AOS/MF A01

Evaluation of Five Waste Minimization Technologies at the

                                    PCA04/MFA01
                                                         General Dynamics Pomona Division Plant
                                                         PB92-125756/REB
Evaluation of Immunotoxicity of an Urban Profile of Nitro-
gen Dioxide: Acute, Subchronic, and Chronic Studies.
PB92-113356/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Evaluation of  NOx Emission Control Catalysts for Power
Plant SCR Installations.
PB92-121276/REB                    PC AOS/MF A01

Evaluation of Plot ESP Performance with  Elevated Load-
ings from Sorbent Injection Processes.
PB92-113117/REB                    PCA03/MFA01

Evaluation of Selected lipid Methods for Normalizing Pol-
lutant Btoaccumulation.
PB92-124379/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

Evaluation of SorpSon Models in the Simulation of Naph-
thalene Transport Through Saturated Sols.
PB92-113190/REB                    PCA02/MFA01

Evaluation of the Immunotoxicity of Orally Administered 2-
Methoxyacetic Acid in Fischer 344 Rats.
PB92-124601/REB                    PC AOS/MF A01

Evaluation of VOC Emissions from Heated Roofing Asphalt
PB92-115286/REB                    PCA04/MFA01

Evaluation of 10 Chemicals for Aneupkxdy  Induction in the
Hexaptoid Wheat Assay.
PB92-113307/REB                    PCA02/MFA01

Example Emission Inventory Documentation for Post-1987
Ozone State Implementation Ptans (StPs).
PB92-112176/REB                    PC A18/MF AIM

Example Environmental Assessment Report for Estuaries.
PB92-102656/REB                    PCA04/MFA01
                                                        Excessive Cycling Converts PCR Products to Random-
                                                        Length Higher Molecular Weight Fragments.
                                                        PB92-124577/REB                    PCA01/MFA01

                                                        Experimental Investigation of PIC Formation in CFC Inciner-
                                                        ation.
                                                        PB92-126952/REB                    PC A06/MF A02

                                                        Extraction of Mercury from Groundwater Using Immobilized
                                                        Algae.
                                                        PB92-121367/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

                                                        Facilitated Transport of Inorganic Contaminants in Ground
                                                        Water. Part 2. Colloidal Transport
                                                        PB92-114503/REB                    PCA03/MFA01

                                                        Fate of Commercial Disperse Dyes in Sediments.
                                                        PB92-101401 /REB                    PC A03/MF A01

                                                        Fate of Polychlorinatad Biphenyls (PCBs) in Soil Following
                                                        Stabilization with Quicklime.
                                                        PB92-114487/REB                    PCAOT/MFA02
                                                        Feline Bronchopulmonary Disease.
                                                        PB92-126879/REB
                                                                                            PC A03/MF A01
Field  Performance  of  Woodbuming Stoves  in Crested
Butte, Colorado.
PB92-113133/REB                    PCA03/MFA01

Field Studies for Control of Organics and Disinfection By-
products.
PB92-124205/REB                    PC AOS/MF A01

Field-Testing Distribution Water Quality Models.
PB92-1 1 31 82/REB                    PC AOS/MF A01

Final Quality Assurance Report for the Tampa, Florida Wet-
lands Study.
PB92-113000/REB                    PC AOJ/MF A03

Florida Radon Research  Program: Technical Support  for
the Development of Radon Resistant Construction  Stand-
ards.
PB92-108109/REB                    PCA03/MFA01

Fluorescence Techniques for Metal-Humic Interactions.
PB92-101369/REB                    PC AOS/MF A01

Foliar Injury Symptoms and Pigment Concentrations in Red
Spruce Saplings in the Southern Appalachians.
PB92-1 1321 6/REB                    PC AOz/MF A01

Forest Health Monitoring,  New  England, 1990.  Annual
Report
PB92-113018/REB                    PC A07/MF A02

Forest Health Monitoring Plot Design and Logistics Study.
PB92-1 18447/REB                    PC A06/MF A02

Forest Sol Response to Acid and Salt Additions of SuHate.
1. Sulfur Constituents and Net Retention.
PB92-108182/REB                    PC AOS/MF A01

Formation of Disinfection By-Products.
PB92-124221 /REB                    PC A02/MF A01

Fractionation of  Complex Combustion  Mixtures  Using an
ton-Exchange Methodology.
PB92-126887/REB                    PCA02/MFA01

Fuel Cell Energy Recovery from LandfiH Gas.
PB92-121235/REB                    PC AOS/MF A01

Fuel Votattty Effects on Exhaust Emissions.
PB92-1 10014/REB                    PC AOS/MF A01

Genotoxic Effects of Complex Marine  Sediment Extracts on
V79 Chinese Hamster Lung Ftvoblasts.
PB92-121318/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

Genotoxicity in Mouse Lymphoma Cells of Chemicals Capa-
ble of Michael AddHton.
PB92-120484/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

Global Carbon Cycle and Climate Change: Responses and
Feedbacks from Below Ground Systems.
PB92-121359/REB                    PC AOS/MF A01

Global Ecosystems Database. Version 0.1 (Beta-test). EPA
Global Climate Research Program.  NOAA/NGDC Global
Change Database Program. Prototype  1.  Database Docu-
mentation. NGDC Key to Geophysical Records Documenta-
tion No. 25.
PB92-122803/REB                    PCA16/MFA03

Guidance for  Performing  Preliminary Assessments under
CERCLA.
PB92-963303/REB                    PC A13/MF A03

Guide for Conducting Treatabttity Studfes under CERCLA:
                     Remedy Screening,
 Aerobic BkxJegradatfon
 PB92-109073/REB
                                                                                                                                                     ,
                                                                                                                                                     PCA02/MFA01
                                                                                                                 Guide for Conducting Treatabilrty SturJes under CERCLA:
                                                                                                                          iodegrada&n Remedy Screening. Interim Guid-
                                                                                                                Aerobic Biodegr
                                                                                                                ance.
                                                                                                                PB92-109065/REB
                                                                                                                                                    PC AOS/MF A01
                                                                                                                Guideline for Regulatory Application of the Urban Airshed
                                                                                                                Model
                                                                                                                PB92-108760/REB                    PC AOS/MF A01
TI-2
              VOL 92, No. 1

-------
                                                                       TITLE  INDEX
 Guides to Pollution Prevention: The Fiberglass-Reinforced
 and Composite Plastics Industry.
 PB91-227967/REB                    PC A04/MF A01

 Guides to Pollution  Prevention: The  Marine Maintenance
 and Repair Industry.
 PB91-228817/REB                    PC A04/MF A01

 Health Effects Assessment Summary Tables.
 PB92-921100/REB                      Standing Order

 Health Effects of Arsenic in Drinking Water.
 PB92-110360/REB
                                     PC A03/MF A01
 Homeowners Exempted  from Superfund Cleanup Costs:
 National Policy Overview.
 PB92-963336/REB                    PC A01/MF A01

 Hydraulic Fracturing to Improve Nutrient and Oxygen Deliv-
 ery for In situ Bkxedamation.
 PB92-121334/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

 I/M Network Type: Effects on Emission Reductions, Cost
 and Convenience. Technical Information Document
 PB92-104447/REB                    PC A04/MF A01

 IM240 Transient I/M Dynamometer Driving Schedule and
 the Composite I/M Test Procedure.
 PB92-104405/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

 Impact of Conservation Tillage Use on Soil and Atmospher-
 ic Carbon in the Contiguous United States.
 PB92-113448/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

 Impact of Methanol and CNG Fuels on Motor Vehicle Toxic
 Enwsions.
 PB92-110378/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

 Improved  Sample Recovery  in Thermocyde  Sequencing
. Protocols.
 PB92-124593/REB                    PC A01/MF A01

 Improvement in the Diagnostic Potential of (32)P-Posttabel-
 ing Analysis Demonstrated by the Selective Formation and
 Comparative Analysis of  Nitrated-PAH-Oenved  Adducts
 Arising from Diesel Particle Extracts.
 PB92-110485/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

 In vitro Lymphocyte Proliferation Assays: The Mitogen-Stim-
 Uated Response and the Mixed  Lymphocyte  Reaction in
 ImmunotDxicity Testing.
 PB92-126911 /REB                    PC A03/MF A01

 In vitro Teratology.
 PB92-124700/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

 Increased Reproduction by Mysids ('Mysidopsis bahia') Fed
 with Enriched 'Anemia' spp. NaupM.
 PB92-106034/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

 Indicators for Monitoring Biodiversity: A Hierarchical  Ac-
 pFOBCh.
 PB92-108117/REB                    PC A03/MF Ml

 Indoor Air Assessment A Review  of Indoor Air Quality Risk
 Characterization Studies.
 PB92-109107/REB                    PC A06/MF A02

 Indoor Air-Assessment An Inventory of Indoor Air Quality
 Research in the United States: 1989-1990.
 PB92-114545/REB                    PC A10/MF A03

 Indoor Air Pollutants from Unvented Kerosene Heater Emis-
 sions in Mobile Homes:  Studies on Particles,  Semrvolatile
 Organfcs, Carbon Monoxide, and MutagenicHv.
 PB92-113232/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

 Induction of Micronudei by X-racSatJon in  Human, Mouse
 and Rat Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes.
 PB92-113315/REB                    PCA02/MFA01.

 Industrial PoHution Prevention Opportunities for  the 1990s.
 PB91-220376/REB                    PC A04/MF A01

 Influence of Constant  and  Fluctuating  Salinity on  Re-
 sponses of 'Mysidopsis  bahia' Exposed to Cadmium in a
 Life-Cycle Test
 PB92-108042/REB                    PCA03/MFA01

 Influence of Experimental Conditions on the Liquid Second-
   I Ion Mass Spectra of Sutfonated Azo Dyes.
     M24361 /REB                    PC A02/MF A01

 Influence of Size on Fate and Ecological Effects of Kepone
 in Physical Models.
 PB92-121326/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

 INFOTERRA/USA Directory of Environmental Sources.
 PB92-102433/REB                    PC A20/MF AIM

 Inorganic Arsenicals Position Document 2/3.
 PB92-1 14297/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

 Inorganic Arsenicals Position Document 4.
 PB92-114305/REB
                                      PC A03/MF A01
  Integrating On-Board  Diagnostic System Capabilities into
  the Inspection and Repair Functions of I/M Programs.
  PB92-104454/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

  Interactive Effects of AkJrin, Cyctohexylamine, 2,4-Diaminc-
  tokiene and Two Phorbol Esters on Metabolic Cooperation
  between V79 Cells.
  PB92-106026/REB                    PC A02/MF Ml
Intel-comparison  of Sampling Techniques for Nicotine in
Indoor Environments.
PB92-110402/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

Interiaboratory Comparison  of Thermospray and Particle
Beam Liquid  Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry  Inter-
faces: Evaluation of a Chlorinated Phenoxy Acid Herbicide
Liquid   Chromatography/Mass  Spectrometry  Analysis
Method.
PB92-124734/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

International Symposium on Reid Screening Methods for
Hazardous Wastes and Toxic Chemicals (2nd), Proceed-
ings. Held in Las Vegas, Nevada on February 12-14,1991.
PB92-125764/REB                    PC AM/MF EOS

Laboratory and Field Evaluations of a Methodology for  De-
termining Hexavalent  Chromium Emissions from Stationary
Sources.
PB92-101336/REB                    PC AOS/MF A02

Laboratory and Field Studies on BTEX Biodegradatton in a
Fuel-Contaminated Aquifer under Denitrifying Conditions.
PB92-121227/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Lead and Copper Rule Guidance Manual. Volume 1. Moni-
toring.
PB92-112101/REB                    PCA10/MFA03

Life History and Toidcotogical Comparisons of Temperate
and Subtropical Mysids.
PB92-124304/REB                    PC A03/MF M1

Lignocellutosic-Plastic Composites from Recycled Materials.
PB92-126861 /REB                    PC A03/MF M1

Limitations of the Fluorescent Probe Viability Assay.
PB92-113166/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Liquid and Gaseous Fuel Distribution System.
PB92-115203/REB                    PC A03/MF M1

Locating and Estimating Air Emissions from Sources of  Sty-
rOO6, mhWMH nGOOft-
PB92-126788/REB                    PC A08/MF A02

Long-Term Changes in the Area! Extent of Tidal Marshes,
Eekjrass Meadows and Kelp Forests of Puget Sound.
PB92-104496/REB                    PC A06/MF A02

Long-Term Trends in  Puget Sound Marine Fishes: Selected
Data Sets.
PB92-104488/REB                    PC A03/MF Ml

Manual for Non-CFC Aerosol Packaging: Conversion from
CFC to Hydrocarbon Propellants.
PB92-101344/REB                    PC A10/MF A03

Manual of Individual and Non-Public Water Supply Systems.
PB92-117944/REB                    PC A08/MF  A02

Manual of Small  Public Water Supply Systems.
PB92-117936/REB                    PCA10/MFM3

Marine Debris Survey Manual.
PB92-103456/REB

Markets for Scrap Tires.
PB92-115252/REB
PC A08/MF A02
                                     PC A06/MF A02
 Measurement and Prediction of the Resistivity of Ash/Sor-
 bent Mbrtures Produced by Sulfur Oxide Control Processes.
 PB92-126812/REB                    PC M4/MF Ml

 Mercury Deposition and Sources for the Upper Great Lakes
 ~  'on.
    M20500/REB                    PC A03/MF M1
 Method 25: Determination of Total Ga
                                      i  Non-Methane
 Organic Emissions as Carbon from Stationary Sources.
 PB92-113026/REB                    PCM7/MFM2

 Methodology for Assessing Environmental Releases of and
 Exposure to Municipal Solid Waste Combustor Residuals.
 PB92-109149/REB                    PC A07/MF A02

 Methods for  Aquatic  Toxicity  Identification  Evaluations.
 Phase 1 Toxicity Characterization Procedures. Second Edi-
 tion.
 PB92-100072/REB                    PC AOS/MF M1

 Methods for Measuring the Acute Toxicity of Effluents and
 Receiving  Waters to Freshwater  and Marine Organisms
 (Fourth Edition).
 PB91-167650/REB                    PC A14/MF A03

 Microbial  Degradation of Flurtamone in Three  Georgia
 Sois,
 PB92-101682/REB                    PC A02/MF Ml

 Model of Additive Effects of  Mixtures of Narcotic Chemi-
 cals.
 PB92-108174/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

 Model of Virus Transport in Unsaturated Soil.
 PB92-119957/REB                    PC M7/MF M2

 Modeling Air Flow Dynamics in Radon Mitigation Systems:
 A SmpKned Approach.
 PB92-120427/REB                    PCA02/MFM1

 Modeling of Nonpoint Source Water Quality in Urban and
 Non-urban Areas.
 PB92-109115/REB                    PC AOS/MF M1
Modeling Wave Form Effects in  ESPs: The Algorithm in
ESPM and ESPVI.
PB92-121243/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Modulation of Human Alveolar Macrophage Properties by
Ozone Exposure In vitro.
PB92-1132S1 /REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Monitoring Guidelines to Evaluate Effects of Forestry Activi-
ties on Streams in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska.
PB92-104520/REB                    PC A09/MF A02

Muttispectral  Identification of Alkyl and  Chkxoalkyl Phos-
ifcates from an Industrial Effluent
PB92-1243S3/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

National Air Toxics Information Clearinghouse: Bibliography
of Selected Reports and Federal Register Notices Related
to Air Toxics. Index, 1991.
PB92-111913/REB                    PC A21/MF A04

National Air Toxics Information Clearinghouse: Bibliography
of Selected Reports and Federal Register Notices Related
to Air Toxics. Volume 5. Citations, 1991.
PB92-111830/REB                    PC A10/MF M3

National Air Toxics Information Clearinghouse: Ongoing Re-
search and Regulatory Development Projects.
PB92-111905/REB                    PC A10/MF A03

National Survey of Hazardous Waste Generators and Treat-
ment Storage, Disposal, and Recycling Facilities in 1986.
Hazardous Waste Generation and Management
PB92-12302S/REB                    PC A12/MF A03

Natural Enemy Risk Assessment (NERISK) (for Microcom-
puters).
PB92-500446/REB                            CP 006

Natural Enemy Risk Assessment (NERISK) User's Manual.
PB92-114990/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Neonatal Exposure to Triethyttin Disrupts Olfactory Discrimi-
nation Learning in Preweanling Rats.
PB92-124726/REB                    PC A03/MF M1

Neonatal Exposure to Trimethyttin Disrupts Spatial Delayed
Alternation Learning in Preweanling Rats.
PB92-124718/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

NERISK: An Expert System to Enhance the Integration of
Pesticides with Arthropod Biological Control.
PB92-124254/REB                    PC A02/MF M1

Neural Factors in the Development of Renal Function:
Effect of Neonatal Central Catecholaminergic Lesions with
6-Hydroxydopamine.
PB92-120492/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

Neurobehavkxal Evaluation System (NES) and School Per-
formance.
PB92-124585/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

New Action for Topoisomerase Inhibitors.
PB92-110451/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Nitric Oxide Formation during Pulverized Coal Combustion.
PB92-121433/REB                    PC A03/MF M1

NO/Char Reactions at Pulverized Coal Flame Conditions.
PB92-121417/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Non-Equilibrium Effects in the Vaporization of MuHfcompon-
ent Fuel Droplets.
PB92-12142S/REB                   PC M2/MF A01

Nonroad Engine and Vehicle Emission Study-Report
PB92-126960/REB                   PC A24/MF A04

Nonroad Engine and Vehicle Emission Study-Report  and
Appendrxes.
PB92-104462/REB                    PC A20/MF A04

Nutritional Role of EndosymbiotJc  Bacteria in Animal-Bacte-
ria Symbioses: 'Sotemya velum', a Case Study.
PB92-112895/REB                    PC A17/MF A04

Nutritional Value of 'Artemia'  and Tigriopus califomicus'
(Baker)  for Two Pacific  Mysid Species, 'Metamyskfopsis
elongata' (Holmes) and 'Mysidopsis intt' (Hrjlmquist).
PB9F108000/REB                    PC A03/MF A01
                    CM Spill Clean Up.
                    PB92-110469/REB
                                                        PC A01/MF A01
                    On-Site  Methods for Assessing Chemical Impact  on the
                    Soy Environment Using Earthworms: A Case Study at the
                    Baird  and McGuire Superfund  Site, Holbrook, Massachu-
                    setts.
                    PB92-108166/REB                     PC A03/MF M1

                    Optimizing BTEX Bndegradation under Denitrifying Condi-
                    tions.
                    PB92-124262/REB                     PC M3/MF Ml

                    OSWER Source Book: Training and Technology Transfer
                    Resources.
                    PB92-102169/REB                     PC A13/MF A03

                    Oxidation and DevotoHization of Nitrogen in Coal Char.
                    PB92-121441 /REB                     PC A02/MF A01
                                                                                                                                             March
                                                                                                      TI-3

-------
                                                                        TITLE INDEX
  Oxidation-Reduction Capacities of Aquifer Solids.
  PB92-110410/REB                    PCA02/MFA01

  PA-Score (Preliminary Assessment Score), Version 1.0 (for
  Microcomputers).
  PB92-500032/REB                            CP D02

  PA-Score Software, Version 1.0. Users Manual and Tutorial.
  PB92-963302/REB                    PC A04/MF A01

  Parametric Analysis  of the Installation and Operating Costs
  of Active  Soil DepressurizaUon Systems for Residential
  Radon Mitigation.
  PB92-1 16037/REB                    PC A07/MF M2

  Patch Size of Forest Openings and Arthropod Populations.
  PB92-10B158/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

  Paying for Safe Water Alternative Financing  Mechanisms
  for State Drinking Water Programs.
  PB92-117993/REB   ,                 PC A04/MF A01

  Performance Evaluations of Pump-and-Treat Remediations.
  PB92-1 14461 /REB                    PC A03/MF A01

  Permit Tracking System (PTS): A User's Manual.
  PB92-105659/REB                    PC AM/MF A02

  Permit Tracking System (PTS), Version 1.0 (for Microcom-
  puters).
  PB92-500347/REB                            CP 003

  Pesticide Compact Label Fite - 1990 Updates.
  PB92-911600/REB                        Subscription

  Pesticide  Effects on Arthropod Natural  Enemies: A Data-
  base Summary.
  PB92-124163/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

  Pesticide Fact Sheet Number 226: Bensulfuron Methyl
  PB92-104389/REB                    PCA02/MFA01

  Pesticide Fact Sheet Number 227: Qokilaht.
  PB92-1 10006/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

  Pilot-Scale Incineration of Contaminated Sol from the Purity
  Oil Sales and McCon Superfund Sites.
  PB92-105857/REB                    PC A04/MF A01

  PIRLA DBMS Quick Reference Guide.
  PB92-1 1 0824/REB
                                      PC A08/MF A02
  Plant Tier Testing: A Workshop to Evaluate Nontarget Plant
  Testing in SubdMston J Pesticide Guidelines. Held in Cor-
  vaMs, Oregon on November 29-December 1, 1990.
  PB92-1 16O52/REB                    PC A12/MF A03

  PoUjntiatiou of  InhAxbon wtth Pdrforant Path Kindling: An
  NMDA-Receptor Dependent Process.
  P892-1 20468/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

  Predicting Chemical Concentration Effects on Transforma-
  tion Hates of Dissolved Organics by Complex Microbial As-

                                      PC A03/MF A01
  PB92-101393/REB
  Predicting Chemical Reactivity by Computer.
  PB92-124312/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

  Preliminary  Risk  Assessment for  Bacteria in Municipal
  Sewage Sludge Applied to Land.
  PB92-1 26820/REB                    PC A10/MF AO3

  Problems Associated with Published Environmental  Fate
  Data.
  PB92-1 01 666/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

  Procedures for the Preparation of Emission Inventonss for
  Carbon Monoxide and Precursors  of Ozone. Volume  1.
  General Guidance for Stationary Sources.
  PB92-112168/REB          .          PCA11/MFA03

  Proceedings of the International Workshop on Large-Scate
  Reforestation. Held in CorvaWs, Oregon on May 9-10, 1990.
  PB92-109131 /REB                    PC AM/MF A02

  Proceedings of the Workshop on Radon Potential Mapping.
  Florida Radon Research Program. Held in Gainesville, Hon-
  da on April 20, 1990.
  PB92-1 1 5278/REB                    PC A04/MF ACM

  Proceedings: The 1991 International Symposium on Radon
  and Radon  Reduction Technology. Held in Philadelphia,
  Pennsylvania on April 2-5. 1991.
  PB92-1 1S344/REB                    PC E99/MF E99

  Proceedings: The 1991 International Symposium on Radon
  and Radon Reduction  Technology.  Volume 1. Symposium
  Oral Papers  Opening Session and Technical Sessions 1
  through 5.
  PB92-1 15351 /REB                    PC AW/MF ATM

  Proceedngs: The 1991 International Symposium on Radon
  and Radon Reduction Technology. Volume 2. Symposium
                   al Sessions 6 through 10.
  Oral Papers Techn
  PB92-115369/REB
                                      PC A19/MF AIM
  Proceeolngs: The 1981 International Symposium on Radon
  and Radon  Reduction Technology. Volume 3. Symposium
  Panel and Poster Papers Technical Sessions 1 through 5.
  PB92-115377/REB                    PCA20/MFA04

  Proceedngs: The 1991 International Symposium on Radon
  and Radon  Reduction Technology. Volume 4. Symposium
  Poster Papers Technical Sessions 6 through 10.
  PB92-11S385/REB                    PC A13/MF A03
                                           Production of Carbon Monoxide by the Homogeneous NOx-
                                           Induced Photooxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds in
                                           the Troposphere.
                                           P892-110576/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

                                           Prospects for In situ Chemical Treatment for Contaminated
                                           Soil.
                                           PB92-126929/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

                                           Pseudopregnancy and  the Detidual Cell Response (OCR)
                                           in the Rat
                                           PB92-126895/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

                                           Puget Sound Pesticide Reconnaissance Survey, 1990.
                                           P892-104504/REB                    PC A06/MF A02

                                           Quality Assurance Project Plan: Tampa. Florida Wetlands

                                               M22761/REB                    PCA11/MFA03

                                           Quantitative Assessment of the Effects of Metals on Micro-
                                           Dial Degradation of Organic Chemicals.
                                           PB92-101385/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

                                           Quantitative Comparison of Molecular Electrostatic Poten-
                                           tials for Structure-Activity Studies.
                                           PB92-110519/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

                                           Radionuclide Removal.
                                           PB92-121284/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

                                           Radium Removal from Water by Manganese Dioxide Ad-
                                           sorption and Diatomaceous Earth Filtration.
                                           PB92-115260/REB                    PC A05/MF A01

                                           Rat Sperm Mortify Analysis: Methodotogic Considerations.
                                           PB92-124684/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

                                           RCRA Cover Systems for Waste Management Facilities.
                                           PB92-120435/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

                                           RCRA Permit Policy Compendium.
                                           PB92-111707/REB                          . PC E99

                                           RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume  1. User's Guide.
                                           Key Word Index.
                                           PB92-111715/REB                           PC E10

                                           RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 2 (9420.1980-
                                           9434.1900). Hazardous Waste Management System (Part
                                           260). General, Definitions, Petitions.
                                           PB92-111723/REB                           PC A13

                                           RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 3 (9441.1980-
                                           9441.1986). Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste
Recovery of Bulk DNA from Soil by a Rapid, Small-Scale
Extraction Method.
PB92-108141/REB                    PC A02/MF A01
                                           (Part 261). General.
                                           PB92-111731/REB
                                                                                      PCA14
                                           RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 4 (9441.1987-
                                           9441.1990). Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste
                                           (Part 261). General.
                                           PB92-111749/REB                           PC A14

                                           RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 5 (9442.1980-
                                           9444.1986). Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste
                                           (Part 261). Criteria for Identifying Hazardous Waste, Char-
                                           acteristics of Hazardous Waste, Lists of Hazardous Waste.
                                           PB92-111756/REB                           PC A14

                                           RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 6 (9444.1987-
                                           9457.1990). Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste
                                           (Part 261). Lists (Confd), Generator Standards (Part  262),
                                           General,  Pretransportation, Recordkeeping. Special Condi-
                                           tions, Importing.
                                           PB92-111764/REB                           PC A15

                                           RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 7 (9460.1980-
                                           9482.1990).  Transporter  Standards (Part 263). (TSDPs)
                                           (Parts 264 and 265), TSDF Technical Requirements (Parts
                                           264 and 265).
                                           PB92-111772/REB                           PCA11

                                           RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 8 (9483.1980-
                                           9489.1990). TSDF Technical  Requirements (Parts 264 and
                                           265).  Tanks,  Surface Impoundments, Waste Piles,  Land
                                           Treatment, Landfills, Incinerators, Miscellaneous Units.
                                           PB92-111780/REB                           PC A1S

                                           RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 9 (9490.1980-
                                           9521.1990). Standards for Managing  Specific Hazardous
                                           Wastes (Part 266). Permitting Policies, Permitting Proce-
                                           dures (Parts 124 and 270).
                                           PB92-11179B/REB                           PC A15

                                           RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 10 (9522.1980-
                                           9528.1990). Permitting Procedures (Parts 124 and 270). Ap-
                                           plications, Conditions. Changes, Interim Status.
                                           PB92-111806/REB                           PC A15

                                           RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 11 (9530.1980-
                                           9581.1990). Air Emissions Standards, State Authorization
                                           (Part  271),  Land Disposal Restrictions (Part 268). Waste
                                           Minimization. Subtitle 0, RCRA Grant Funds.
                                           PB92-111814/REB                           PCA17

                                           Recommended  Foundation  Fill Materials  Construction
                                           Standard of the Florida Radon Research Program.
                                           PB92-105B65/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

                                           Recommended I/M Short Test Procedures for the 1990's:
                                           Six Alternatives.
                                           PB92-104439/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

                                           Recommended Sub-Slab Depressurizatkxi Systems Design
                                           Standard of the Florida Radon Research Program.
                                           PB92-105626/REB                    PC A03/MF ADI
RED Facts: Fosetyl-AI (Aliette).
PB92-114321 /REB

RED Facts: Heliothis zea NPV.
PB92-111871/REB

RED Facts: Methoprene.
PB92-111848/REB

RED. Facts: Potassium Bromide.
PB92-114354/REB

RED Facts: Sulfur.
PB92-114347/REB
PC A02/MF A01
PC A02/MF A01
PC A02/MF A01
PC A02/MF A01
                                    PC A02/MF A01
Reduction of Hexachloroethane and Carbon Tetrachtoride
at Surfaces of Biotite, Vermiculite, Pyrite, and Marcasrte.
PB92-113141 /REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Reductive Dechlorination of Dichlorophenols in Anaerobic
Pond Sediments (Chapter 13).
PB92-101708/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Regional Air Quality and Acid Deposition Modeling and the
Role for Visualization.
PB92-124247/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Regional Assessment of Aquifer Vulnerability and Sensitivi-
ty in the Conterminous United States.
PB92-100148/REB                    PC A15/MF A03

Regional Fine Particle Field Study. Data Base and Initial
Results.
P892-106939/REB                    PC AO5/MF A01

Regional  Ozone   Modeling  for  Northeast  Transport
(ROMNET).
PB92-108786/REB                    PC A15/MF A03

Regional  Ozone   Modeling  for  Northeast  Transport
(ROMNET). Appendices.
PB92-108794/REB                    PCA1S/MFA03

Regiospecific Dechlorination of Pentachkxophenol by Dtert-
lorophenol-Adapted Microorganisms in Freshwater, Anaero-
bic Sediment Slurries.
PB92-101674/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Regulatory Impact Analysis for the Final Criteria for Munici-
pal Solid Waste Landfills.
PB92-100841 /REB                    PC A13/MF A03

Removal of Creosote from Soil by Thermal Desorption.
PB92-126838/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

Reregistrabon Elegibility Document (RED): Potassium Bro-
mide.
PB92-114362/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Reregistrafon   Eligibility  Document   (RED):   Fosetyl-AI
(Aliette).
PB92-114339/REB                    PC A04/MF A01

Reregistraton  Eligibility Document (RED): Heliothis zea
NPV (List A, Case Number 151).
PB92-111863/REB                    PCA03/MFA01

Reregistration Eligibility Document (RED): Methoprene (List
A, Case 0030).
PB92-111855/REB                    PCA03/MFA01

Reregistratkxi Eligibility Document  (RED):  Sulfur (List A,
Case 0031).
PB92-114453/REB                    PCA04/MFA01

Research and Development Efforts to  Develop  Improved
Inventory  Methodologies for  Area  Source  Solvent  Emis-
sions.
PB92-126846/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Review of Energy Efficiency of Refrigerator/Freezer Gas-
kets.
PB92-106913/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Review of the Mutagenicity of Ethylene Oxide.
PB92-124569/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Risk Assessment  Guidance  for  Superfund.  Volume 1.
Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part B, Development of
Risk-Based Preliminary Remediation Goals).
PB92-963333/REB                    PC A04/MF A01

Risk Assessment  Guidance  for  Superfund.  Volume 1.
Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part C, Risk Evaluation
of Remedial Alternatives).
PB92-963334/REB                    PC A05/MF A01

Risk Assessment, Management, Communication: A Guide
to Selected Sources. Volume 4, Number 1.
PB92-114412/REB                    PC A07/MF A02

Role of Gas-Phase O2 in  the Formation of PCDD/PCDF
during Waste Combustion.
PB92-121383/REB                    PC A02/MF A01
TI-4
VOL 92, No. 1

-------
                                                                      TITLE  INDEX
Rote of Metallothionein Induction and Altered Zinc Status in
Maternally  Mediated  Developmental Toxicity: Comparison
of the Effects of Urethane and Styrene in Rats.
PB92-124635/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Routine Estimation and Reporting of Dry Deposition for the
U.S.A. Dry Deposition Network.
PB92-121144/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Running a Conference  as a Clean Product International
Conference on Pollution Prevention: Clean Technologies
and dean  Products. Held in Washington, DC. on June 10-
13,1990.
PB92-109099/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Sampling of Contaminated Sites.
P892-110436/flEB                    PC A02/MF A01

Screening  Methods for  the  Development  of Air Toxics
Emission Factors.
PB92-108778/REB                    PC A20/MF A04

Second  EPA Evaluation  of the Platinum  Gasaver Device
under Section 511 of the  Motor Vehicle  Information and
Cost Savings Act (Updated).
PB92-104413/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Section 3008(h) Module Order on Consent
PB92-105477/REB
                                    PC A03/MF A01
SELCTV System  Manual  for SELCTV and  REFER Data-
bases and the SELCTV Data Management Program.
PB92-113455/REB                    PC A04/MF A01

Selection of Control Technologies for Remediation of Lead
Battery Recycling Sites.
PB92-114537/REB                    PC AOB/MF A02

Significance of Supernumerary Ribs in  Rodent Develop-
mental Toxicity Studies: Postnatal Persistence in Rats and
Mice.
PB92-113299/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

Sou-Air Permeability Method Evaluation.
PB92-124239/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

Source Reconciliation of  Ambient Volatile  Organic Com-
pounds Measured in the Atlanta 1990 Summer Study: The
Mobile Source Component
PB92-124130/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Stabilization Technologies for  RCRA Corrective Actions.
Handbook.
PB92-114495/REB                    PC A04/MF A01

Standard Measurement Protocols: Florida Radon Research
     115294/REB
                                    PC A06/MF A02
Standard Operating Procedures for Lead in Painl by Hot-
plate - or Microwave-Based Acid Digestions and Atomic Ab-
sorption or Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectrom-
etry.
PB92-114172/REB                     PCA03/MFA01

Standard Operating Procedures for Measurement of Lead
in  Paint Using the SCITEC  MAP-3  X-ray Fluorescence
Spectrometer.
PB92-114180/REB                     PC A04/MF A01

Stationary  Combustion NOx Control:  A Summary of the
1991 Symposium. Held in Washington, DC., March 25-28,
1991.
PB92-121375/REB                     PC A02/MF A01

Status and  Needs tor Toxic Emission Inventories for  Re-
gional Dispersion and Deposition Modeling.
PB92-110394/REB                     PC A03/MF A01

Storm and Combined Sewer Pollution Control: A Compila-
tion of Significant References.
PB92-114560/REB                     PC A03/MF A01

Sub-Slab Pressure Reid Extension in Schools and Other
Large Buildings.
PB92-121268/REB                     PC A03/MF A01
Summary of Phase II Regulations: National Primary Drinking
Water Regulation for 38 Inorganic and Synthetic Organic

                                    PC A04/MF A01
Chemicals.
PB92-122969/REB

Summary of the 1991 EPA/AWMA International Symposi-
um: Measurement of Toxic and Related Air Pollutants. Held
in Durham, North Carolina on May 6-10,1991.
PB92-110386/REB                     PC A03/MF A01

Sunken Vessels and Aircraft Containing Hazardous Materi-
als in Puget Sound.
PB92-104S12/REB                     PC A07/MF A02

SUPER ESP: Ultimate Electrostatic Precipitation.
PB92-113125/REB                     PCA03/MFA01

Superfund: Enforcement
PB92-963600/REB                      Standing Order

Superfund Engineering Issue: Issues Affecting the Applica-
bility  and Success  of Remedial/Removal  Incineration
Projects.
PB9Tl090ei/REB                     PCA03/MFA01
                                                        Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation: The Delaware
                                                        SITE Study, 1989.
                                                        PB92-125749/REB                    PC A08/MF A02

                                                        Superfund: Program Policies and Administration.
                                                        PB92-963200/REB                      Standing Order

                                                        Superfund Program: Ten Years of Progress.
                                                        PB91-921286/REB                    PC A04/MF A01
                                                        Superfund: Record of Decision.
                                                        PB92-964700/REB
                                                                                              Standing Order
Superfund  Record of  Decision (EPA  Region  3): Hranica
Landfill,  Buffalo Township,  PA. (First Remedial Action),
June 1990.
PB91-921S66/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Superfund  Record of  Decision  (EPA Region 4):  Jadco-
Hughes Site, North  Belmont, NC. (First Remedial Action),
September 1990.
PB91-921565/REB                    PC A17/MF A03

Superfund  Removal Procedures: Guidance on  the Consid-
eration of ARARS during Removal Actions.
PB92-963401 /REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Superfund: Removals and Emergency Response.
PB92-963400/REB                      Standing Order

Superfund: Site Assessment and Remediation.
PB92-963300/REB                      Standing Order

Superfund: Technology and Analytical Services.
PB92-963500/REB                      Standing Order

Synthesis  of  a Novel Fluorinated Benzo(a)pyrene: 4,5-
Drftuorobenzo(a)pyrene.
PB92-110493/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

Technical Assistance Document for Sampling and Analysis
of Ozone Precursors.
PB92-122795/REB                    PC A09/MF A02

Technical Guidance Document Inspection Techniques for
the Fabrication of Geomembrane Field  Seams.
PB92-1090S7/REB                    PC A08/MF A02

Techniques to Determine  Spatial  Variations in  Hydraulic
Conductivity of Sand and Gravel.
PB92-109123/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Technology Evaluation Report Biological  Treatment  of
Wood Preserving Site Groundwater by ffiotrol, Inc.
PB92-110048/REB                    PC A06/MF A02

Technology Evaluation Report Biotrol Soil Washing System
for Treatment of a Wood Preserving Site.
PB92-115302/REB                     PC E99/MF E99

Technology Evaluation Report Biotrol Soil Washing System
for Treatment of a Wood Preserving Site. Volume  1.
PB92-115310/REB                    PC A13/MF A03

Technology Evaluation Report Biotrol Soil Washing System
for Treatment of a Wood Preserving Site. Volume  2, Part A.
PB92-115328/REB                    PC A17/MF A04

Technology Evaluation Report Biotrol Soil Washing System
for Treatment of a Wood Preserving Site. Volume  2, Part B.
PB92-115336/REB                    PC A15/MF A03

Test of Criteria for Introduced Species: The Global Invasion
by the Isopod •Syradotea laevidorsalis' (Miers, 1881).
PB92-108018/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Three Case Studies of Lake Temperature and Stratification
Response to Warmer Climate.
PB92-121391/REB                    PCA03/MFA01

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) United States and Territories,
1987.
PB92-100114/REB                         MF*600.00

Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) United States and Territories,
1988.
PB92-100122/REB                         MFS8M.OO

Toxicity Equivalency Factors for PCBs.
PB92-113349/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Toxicity of Chlorine and Ammonia to Aquatic Life: Chemis-
try,  Water  Quality Criteria,  Recent Research, and Recom-
mended Future Research.
PB92-108091 /REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Toxicity, Selectivity and Subtothal Effects of Pesticides on
Arthropod Natural Enemies: A Data-Base Summary.
PB92-124189/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

lexicological Implementations of Remediating Hazardous
Wastes.
PB92-124171/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

Trace Metal Fate in a  Rotary Kiln Incinerator with an Ioniz-
ing Wet Scrubber (Journal Article).
PB92-110S68/REB                     PC A02/MF A01

Trajectory  and Incineration of Rogue Droplets in a  Turbu-
lent Diffusion Flame.
PB92-120450/REB                     PC A03/MF A01
Tropospheric  Nitrogen: The Influence of Anthropogenic
Sources on Distribution and Deposition.
PB92-126937/REB                    PC A06/MF A02

Two Different Approaches for Control and Measurement of
Plant Functions in Closed Environmental Chambers.
PB92-108067/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

U.S. Environmental  Protection  Agency's Environmental
Monitoring and Assessment  Program: An Ecological Status
and Trends Program.
PB92-121292/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development Overview of
Current Radon Research.
PB92-121250/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

U.S. EPA Program for Evaluation of Treatment and Utiliza-
tion Technologies for Municipal  Waste Combustion Resi-
                                                                                                                PB92-12118S/REB
                                                                                                                                                    PC A03/MF A01
                                                                                                                U.S. EPA SITE Demonstration of AWD Technologies' Aqua-
                                                                                                                Detox/SVE System.
                                                                                                                PB92-124387/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

                                                                                                                U.S. Standards for Air Sampling of Environmental Contami-
                                                                                                                nants: Current Basis and Future Options.
                                                                                                                PB92-121219/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

                                                                                                                Uncertainties in Nitrogen Mass Loadings in Coastal Water-
                                                                                                                shods.
                                                                                                                PB92-108075/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

                                                                                                                United States Environmental Protection  Agency Municipal
                                                                                                                Waste Combustion Residue Solidification/Stabilization Eval-
                                                                                                                uation Program.
                                                                                                                PB92-121177/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

                                                                                                                Update on Implementation of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990.
                                                                                                                Volume 1, Number 4, September 1991.
                                                                                                                PB91 -921374/REB                    PC A02/MF A01

                                                                                                                Urban Air Toxics Monitoring  Program Carbonyl Results,
                                                                                                                1990.
                                                                                                                PB92-110030/REB                    PC A07/MF A02

                                                                                                                Urban Air Toxics Monitoring Program,  1990.
                                                                                                                PB92-110022/REB                    PC A13/MF A03

                                                                                                                Use of Bromoergocryptine in the Validation  of Protocols for
                                                                                                                the Assessment of Mechanisms of Early Pregnancy Loss in
                                                                                                                the Rat
                                                                                                                PB92-124692/REB                    PC A03/MF A01

                                                                                                                Volumetric Leak Detection in Large Underground Storage
                                                                                                                Tanks. Volume 1.
                                                                                                                PB92-114966/REB                    PC A05/MF A01

                                                                                                                Volumetric Leak Detection in Large Underground Storage
                                                                                                                Tanks. Volume 2. Appendices A through E.
                                                                                                                PB92-114974/REB                    PC A05/MF A01
                                                                                                                Waste Combustion System Analysis.
                                                                                                                PB92-125418/REB
                                                                                                                                                     PC A06/MF A02
Waste Minimization  Assessment for a  Manufacturer of
Printed Labels.
PB92-104371/REB                     PC A02/MF A01

Waste Minimization Assessment for a Manufacturer of Pro-
totype Printed Circuit Boards.
PB92-104355/REB                     PC A01 /MF A01

Waste Minimization Assessment for a Manufacturer of Re-
furbished Railcar Bearing Assemblies.
PB92-104348/REB                     PC A01 /MF A01

Waste Minimization  Assessment for a  Manufacturer of
Speed Reduction Equipment
PB92-104363/REB                     PC A01/MF A01

Waste Minimization  Opportunity  Assessment  Scott Air
Force Base.
PB92-105402/REB                     PC A06/MF A02

Waste Reduction Technology Evaluations of the U.S. EPA
WRITE Program.
PB92-108133/REB                     PC A02/MF A01

Watershed   Characterization   Using  Landsat  Thematic
Mapper Imagery: Blackfoot River, Montana.
PB92-115237/REB                     PC A03/MF A01

Watershed Nitrogen  Management- Upper Potomac  River
Basin Case Study.
PB92-108083/REB                     PC A03/MF A01

Workshop Proceedings: The Role of Created and Natural
Wetlands in Controlling Nonpoint Source  Pollution. Held in
Arlington, Virginia on  June 10-11,1991.
PB92-113463/REB                     PC A13/MF A03

Workshop Report on Toxicity Equivalency Factors for Poly-
chlorinated Biphenyl Congeners. Risk Assessment Forum.
PB92-114529/REB                     PC A05/MF A02
                                                                                                                                            March
                                                                                                                                                             TI-5

-------
KEYWORD INDEX
  Index entries in this section are selected to indicate important ideas and concepts presented
  in a report. When using the keyword index, be sure to look under terms narrower, broader,
  or related to a particular topic. Although some of the keywords are not selected from a
  controlled vocabulary of terms, most of them have been selected from the DoD, DoE, NASA,
  of NTIS controlled vocabularies. The entries are arranged by keyword and then by the NTIS
  order number.
SAMPLE ENTRY
              Use: Keywords Term

                         Title


 NTIS Order Number/Media Code Price Codes
GLOBAL ASPECTS

Sensitivity of Ecological Landscapes and Regions to
Global Climatic Change
PB90-120072/HSU
PCA03/MFA01

-------
                                                               KEYWORD  INDEX
ABSORPTION (BIOLOGY)
    Extraction of Mercury from Groundwater Using Immobi-
    lized Algae.
    PB92-121367/REB
ACETALDEHYDE
    Urban Air Toxics  Monitoring Program Carbonyl Results,
    1990.
    PB92-110030/REB
ACETONE
    Urban Air Toxics  Monitoring Program Carbonyl Results,
    1990.
    PB92-110030/REB
AdO VOLATILE SULFIDE
    Acid-Volatile Sutfide as a Factor Mediating Cadmium and
    Nickel Bioavailability in Contaminated Sediments.
    PB92-124296/REB
ACIDIFICATION
    Forest Soil Response to Acid and Salt Additions of Sul-
    fate. 1. Sulfur Constituents and Net Retention.
    PB92-1081B2/REB
    PIRLA DBMS Quick Reference Guide.
    PB92-110824/REB
    Estimating Critical Loads of Sulfate to Surface Waters in
    the Northeastern United States: A Comparative Assess-
    ment of Three Procedures for Estimating Critical Loads of
    Sulfate for Lakes.
    PB92-11901S/REB
ACQUIRE DATA BASE
    Aquatic Toxicity Information Retrieval Data  Base  (AC-
    QUIRE).
    PB92-500453/REB
ACTIVE SON. DEPRESSURIZATION SYSTEMS
    Parametric  Analysis of  the Installation  and Operating
    Costs  of Active Soil Depressurization Systems for Resi-
    dential Radon Mitigation.
    PB92-116037/REB
    Cost Analysis of  Soil Depressurizatkxi Techniques for
    Indoor Radon Reduction.
    PB92-120443/REB
ACTIVE SUBSLAB DEPRESSURIZATION
    Sub-Slab Pressure Field Extension in Schools and Other
        M21268/RE8
ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 1.  User's
    Guide. Key Word Index.
    PB92-111715/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 2 (9420.1980-
    9434.1900). Hazardous Waste Management System (Part
    260). General, Definitions, Petitions.
    PB92-111723/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 3 (9441.1980-
    9441.1986).  Identification  and  Listing  of  Hazardous
    Waste (Part 261). General.
    PB92-111731/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 4 (9441.1987-
    9441.1990).  Identification  and  Listing  of  Hazardous
    Waste (Part 261). General.
    PB92-111749/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 5 (9442.1980-
    9444.1986).  Identification  and  Listing  of  Hazardous
    Waste (Part  261).  Criteria for  Identifying  Hazardous
    Waste, Characteristics of Hazardous Waste, Lists of Haz-
    ardous Waste.
    PB92-111756/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 6 (9444.1987-
    9457.1990).  Identification  and  Listing  of  Hazardous
    Waste (Part  261).  Lists (Confd), Generator Standards
    (Part 262), General,  Pretransportation, Recordkeeping,
    Spoct&l Conditions, ImportmQ.
    PB92-111764/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 7 (9460.1980-
    9482.) 990). Transporter Standards (Part 263). (TSOPs)
    (Parts 264 and 265),  TSDF Technical  Requirements
    (Parts 264 and 265).
    PB92-111772/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 8 (9483.1980-
    9489.1990). TSDF Technical Requirements (Parts 264
    and 265). Tanks, Surface  Impoundments, Waste Piles,
    Land Treatment,  Landfills,  Incinerators,  Miscellaneous
    Units.
    PB92-111780/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 9 (9490.1980-
    9521.1990). Standards for Managing Specific Hazardous
    Wastes (Part 266). Permitting Policies, Permitting Proce-
    dures (Parts 124 and 270).
    PB92-111798/REB
    RCRA   Permit   Policy  Compendium.   Volume  10
    (9522.1980-9526.1990).  Permitting Procedures (Parts 124
    and  270).  Applications, Conrjdons, Changes,  Interim
    Status.
    PB92-111806/REB
    RCRA   Permit   Policy  Compendium.   Volume  11
    (9530.1980-9581.1990).  Air Emissions Standards, State
    Authorization  (Part 271), Land Disposal Restrictions (Part
    268). Waste Minimization, Subtitle D, RCRA Grant Funds.
    PB92-11T814/REB
ADVACATE PROCESS
    Evaluation of PHot ESP Performance with Elevated Load-
    ings from Sorbent Injection Processes.
    PB92-113117/REB
AERATION
    Sol-Air Penneabity Method Evaluation.
    PB92-124239/REB
AERIAL MONITORING
    Aerial radiological survey of Pocatello and Soda Springs,
    Idaho and surrounding area, June-July 1986.
    DE91017051/REB
AEROBIC PROCESSES
    Guide for Conducting Treatability Studies under CERCLA:
    Aerobic Biodegradation Remedy Screening. Interim Guid-
    ance.
    PB92-109065/REB
    Guide for Conducting Treatability Studies under CERCLA:
    Aerobic Biodegradation Remedy Screening.
    PB92-109073/REB
AEROSOLS
    Annular Denuders for Use in Global Climate and Strato-
    spheric Measurements of Acidic Gases and Particles (Ab-
    stract Only).
    N91-32531/6/REB
    Manual  for Non-CFC Aerosol Packaging:  Conversion
    from CFC to Hydrocarbon Propellants.
    PB92-101344/REB
    Regional Fine Particle Field Study:  Data Base and Initial
    Results.
    PB92-106939/REB
AFFERENT NEURONS
    Cotehicine-lnduced Deafferentation  of the Hippocampus
    Selectively Disrupts  Chotinergic Rhythmical  Slow Wave
    Activity.
    PB92-120476/REB
AFFORESTATION
    Proceedings of the International  Workshop on Large-
    Scate Reforestation. Held in Corvallis, Oregon on May 9-
    10, 1990.
    PB92-109131/REB
AGING (BIOLOGY)
    Concentration of Gnat Fibrillary Acidic Protein  Increases
    with Age in the Mouse and Rat Brain.
    PB92-110535/REB
AGRICULTURAL RUNOFF
    Modeling of Nonpoint Source Water Quality in Urban and
    Non-urban Areas.
    PB92-109115/RE8
AIR-BIOSPHERE INTERACTIONS
    Can  Intensive Management Increase Carbon Storage in
    Forests.
    PB92-113224/REB
    Global Carbon Cycle and Climate Change: Responses
    and Feedbacks from Below-Ground Systems.
    PB92-121359/REB
    Global Ecosystems  Database. Version 0.1  (Beta-test).
    EPA Global Climate Research Program. NOAA/NGDC
    Global Change  Database Program. Prototype 1. Data-
    base Documentation. NGDC Key to Geophysical Records
    Documentation No. 25.
    PB92-122803/REB
AIRFLOW
    Modeling Air Flow Dynamics in  Radon  Mitigation Sys-
    tems: A Simplified Approach.
    PB92-120427/REB
AIR POLLUTION
    Recommended  Foundation  Fill  Materials Construction
    Standard of the Florida Radon Research Program.
    PB92-105865/REB
    Florida Radon Research  Program: Technical Support for
    the Development of Radon Resistant Construction Stand-
    ards.
    PB92-108109/REB
    Guideline for Regulatory Application of the Urban Airshed

    PB92-108760/REB
    Urban Air Toxics Monitoring Program, 1990.
    PB92-110022/REB
    National  Air Toxics Information Clearinghouse: Bibliogra-
    phy of Selected  Reports and  Federal Register Notices
    Related to Air Toxics. Volume 5. Citations, 1991.
    PB92-111830/REB
    National  Air Toxics  Information Clearinghouse: Ongoing
    Research and Regulatory Development Projects.
    PB92-111905/REB
    National  Air Toxics Information Clearinghouse: Bibliogra-
    phy of Selected  Reports and  Federal Register Notices
    Related to Air Toxics. Index, 1991.
    PB92-111913/REB
    Emission inventory Requirements for Carbon Monoxide
    State Implementation Plans, 1991.
    PB92-112150/REB
    Method 25: Determination of Total Gaseous Non-Meth-
    ane  Organic Emissions  as  Carbon from Stationary
    Sources.
    PB92-113026/REB
    Impact of Conservation Tillage Use on Soil  and Atmos-
    pheric Carbon in the Contiguous United States.
    PB92-113448/REB
    Emission Inventory Requirements for Ozone State Imple-
    mentation Plans.
    PB92-118017/REB
    Routine  Estimation and Reporting of Dry Deposition for
    the U.S.A. Dry Deposition Network.
    PB92-121144/REB
    Global Carbon Cycle and Climate Change: Responses
    and Feedbacks from Below-Ground Systems.
    PB92-121359/REB
    Characteristics of Single Particle Coal Combustion.
    PB92-121409/REB
    NO/Char Reactions at Pulverized Coal Flame Conditions.
    PB92-121417/REB
    Nitric Oxide Formation during Pulverized Coal Combus-
    tion.
    PB92-121433/REB
    Oxidation and Devolatilization of Nitrogen in Coal Char.
    PB92-121441/REB
    Design, Development, and Implementation of AIRS' Area
    and Mobile Source Subsystem.
    PB92-124213/REB
    Regional Air Quality and Acid Deposition Modeling and
    the Role for Visualization.
    PB92-124247/REB
    Locating and Estimating Air Emissions from Sources of
    Styrene, Interim Report.
    PB92-126788/REB
    Compilation of Air Pollutant Emission Factors. Volume 1.
    Stationary Point and Area Sources. Fourth Edition. Sup-
    plement D.
    PB92-126945/REB
    EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) Publications Bib-
    liography, Quarterly Abstract Bulletin.
    PB92-904200/REB
AIR POLLUTION ABATEMENT
    Oegreaser System Pollution Prevention Evaluation.
    AD-A242110/5/REB
    Combustion Control of Trace Organic Air Pollutants from
    Municipal Waste Combustors.
    PB92-113158/REB
    Proceedings:  The 1991  International Symposium  on
    Radon  and Radon  Reduction Technology.  Volume 1.
    Symposium Oral Papers Opening Session and Technical
    Sessions 1 through 5.
    PB92-115351/REB
    Proceedings:  The 1991  International Symposium  on
    Radon  and Radon  Reduction Technology.  Volume 2.
    Symposium Oral Papers Technical Sessions 6 through
    10.
    PB92-115369/REB
    Proceedings:  The 1991  International Symposium  on
    Radon  and Radon  Reduction Technology.  Volume 3.
    Symposium Panel  and Poster Papers Technical Sessions
    1 through 5.
    PB92-115377/REB
    Proceedings:  The 1991  International Symposium  on
    Radon  ana Radon  Reduction Technology.  Volume 4.
    Symposium Poster Papers Technical Sessions 6 through
    10.
    PB92-115385/REB
    Waste Combustion System Analysis.
    PB92-125418/REB
AIR POLLUTION CONTROL
    Analysis of Factors Affecting  Methane Gas Recovery
    from Six Landfills.
    PB92-101351/REB
    Recommended   Sub-Slab  Depressurization  Systems
    Design Standard  of the Florida  Radon Research  Pro-
    gram.
    PB92-105626/REB
    Regional  Ozone  Modeling for  Northeast  Transport
    (ROMNET).
    PB92-108786/REB
    Regional  Ozone  Modeling for  Northeast  Transport
    (ROMNET). Appendices.
    PB92-108794/REB
    Procedures for the Preparation  of Emission Inventories
    for Carbon Monoxide and Precursors of Ozone. Volume
    1. General Guidance for Stationary Sources.
    PB92-11216B/REB
    Example Emission Inventory  Documentation for  Post-
    1987 Ozone State Implementation Plans (SIPs).
    PB92-112176/REB
    Proceedings:  The 1991  International Symposium  on
    Radon  and Radon  Reduction Technology.  Volume 1.
    Symposium Oral Papers Opening Session and Technical
    Sessions 1 through 5.
    PB92-115351/REB
    Proceedings:  The 1991  International Symposium  on
    Radon  and Radon  Reduction Technology.  Volume 2.
    Symposium Oral Papers Technical Sessions 6 through
    10.
    PB92-115369/REB
    Proceedings:  The 1991  International Symposium  on
    Radon  and Radon  Reduction Technology.  Volume 3.
    Symposium Panel  and Poster Papers Technical Sessions
    1 through 5.
    PB92-115377/REB
    Proceedings:  The 1991  International Symposium  on
    Radon  arid Radon  Reduction Technology.  Volume 4.
    Symposium Poster Papers Technical Sessions 6 through

    PB92-115385/REB
    Parametric Analysis of the Installation and Operating
    Costs  of Active Soil Depressurization  Systems for Resi-
    dential Radon Mitigation.
    PB92-116037/REB
    Modeling Air  Flow Dynamics in  Radon Mitigation Sys-
    tems: A Simplified  Approach.
    PB92-120427/REB
    Cost  Analysis of  Soil Depressurization Techniques for
    Indoor Radon Reduction.
    PB92-120443/REB
    Modeling Wave Form Effects in ESPs: The Algorithm in
    ESPM and ESPVI.
    PB92-121243/REB
    U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development Overview
    of Current Radon Research.
    PB92-121250/REB
                                                                                                                                                             KYV-1

-------
                                                                    KEYWORD INDEX
     Sub-Slab Pressure field Extension in Schools and Other
        M21268/REB
    Evaluation of NOx Emission Control Catalysts tor Power
    Plant Sen Installations.
    PB92-121276/REB
    Clearing of Flue Gases from Waste Combustors, 1990.
    PB92-121300/REB
    Stationary Combustion NOx Control: A Summary of the
    1991 Symposium. HeM in Washington, DC.. March 25-28,
    1991.
    PB92-121375/REB
    Role of Gas-Phase O2 in the Formation of PCOO/PCDF
    during Waste Combustion.
    PB92-121383/REB
    Effect of Natural Ventilation on Radon and Radon  Proge-
    ny Levels in Houses.
    PB92-124148/REB
    Effect of Storage Conditions on Handing and SOZ Reac-
    Svily of CafOHg-Based Sorbents.

    Development of Seasonal and Annual Btogeric Emis-
    sions Inventories for the U.S. and Canada.
    PB92-126796/REB
    Experimental Investigation at PIC Formation in CFG Incin-
    eration.
    PB92-1269S2/REB
 AM POLLUTION CONTROL EQUPMENT
    Trace Metal Fate in a Rotary Kan Incinerator with an Ion-
    izing Wet Scrubber (Journal Article).
    PB82-110568/REB
    Effects on Electrostatic Pradptaaon of Changes in Grain
                          "—  • " *lM	• •• I, ,,T i  •
                                 yt ana lempsraiure.
    PB92-113109/REB
    Evaluation of Plot ESP Performance with Elevated Load-
    ings from Sorbent Injection Processes.
    PB92-113117/REB
    SUPER ESP: Ultimate Electrostatic Prectorlalion.
    PB92-113125/REB
    Measurement and  PreoTcfion of the Resistivity of Ash/
    Sorbent Mixtures Produced by Sulfur Oxide Control Proc-
    PB92-126812/REB
AIR POLLUTION DETECTION
    Annular Denuaers tor Use in Global dmate and Stratc-
    spheric Measurements of Addte Gases and Particles (Ab-
    stract Only).
    N91-32531/6/REB
    Screening Methods for the Development of Air Toxics
    Emission Factors.
    PB92-10B778/REB
    Source ReconcSation of Ambient VctaHe Orgartc Com-
    pounds Measured  in the Atlanta 1990 Summer Study.
    The Mobile Source Component
    PS92-124130/REB
    Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation: The Dela-
    ware SITE Study, 1989.
    PB92-125749/HEB
    Fractionaton of Complex Combustion Mbdums Using an
    ton-Exchange Methodology.
    P892-126887/REB
AIR POLLUTION EFFECTS (ANIMALS)
    Improvement in the Diagnostic Potential of (32)P-Postla-
    betng Analysis Demonstrated by the Selective Formation
    and Comparative Analysis of Nitrated-PAH-Derived Ad-
    ducts Arising from Diesel Partcte Extracts.
    PB92-110485/REB
    Evaluation of Immunotoxicrry of an Urban ProMe of NHro-
      i Dioxide: Acute, Subchronic. and Chronic Studws.
       M13356/HEB
Am POLLUTION EFFECTS (HUMAN)
    Modulation of Human Alveolar Macrophaga Properties by
    Ozone Exposure m vitro.
    PB92-11328VREB
AM POLLUTION EFFECTS (HUMANS)
    Indoor Air Assessment A Review of Indoor Air Quafty
    Risk Characterization Studtes.
    PB92-109107/REB
    Indoor At Poautants from Unvented  Kerosene Heater
    Emissions in Mobfe Homes: Studws on Particles, Semi-
    volatte Organic*, Carbon Monoxide, and MulagenickV.
    P892-113232/REB
AM POLLUTION EFFECTS (PLANTS)
    Evaluating the Uttty ot  Natural Vegetation In Assessing
    Arctic Accumulation of Air Toxics.
    PB92-103464/RE8
    Can Intensive Management Increase Carbon Storage in
    Forests.
    P892-113224/REB
    Assessment of Promising Forest Management Practices
    and Technologies tar Enhancing the Conservation and
    Sequestration of Atmospheric Carbon and Their Costs at
    the Site Level
    PB92-122787/REB
AM POLLUTION MONITORING
    Regional Fine Particle Field Study: Data Base and Moat
    Results.
    PB92-106939/REB
    Urban Air Toxics Monitoring Program Carbonyl Results,
    1990.
    PB92-110030/REB
    Status and Needs (or Toxic rmtoainn Inventories for Re-
    gional Dispersion and DeposrSon Modeing.
    PB92-110394/REB
    FtaM  Poifofi'iiaUKO  of Woodbwnng Stoves In Crested
    Butte, Colorado.
    PB92-113133/REB
    U.S. Standards for Air Sampling of Environmental Con-
    taminants: Current Basis and Future Options.
    PB92-121219/REB
    Source Reconciliation of Ambient Volatile Organic Com-
    pounds Measured in  the Atlanta  1990 Summer Study:
    The Mobile Source Component
    PB92-124130/REB
AM POLLUTION SAMPUNO
    Evaluating the Utility of Natural Vegetation in Assessing
    Arctic Accumulation of Air Toxics.
    PB92-103464/HEB
    Screening Methods for the Development of Air Toxics
    Emission Factors.
    PB92-108778/REB
    Summary of the 1991 EPA/AWMA International Symposi-
    um: Measurement of  Toxic and Related  Air PoHutants.
    Held in Durham, North Carolina on May 6-10,1991.
    PB92-110386/REB
    Evaluation of VOC Emissions from Heated Roofing As-

    PB92-115286/REB
    Technical Assistance Document for Sampling and Analy-
    sis of Ozone Precursors.
    PB92-122795/REB
    Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation: The Dela-
    ware SITE Study, 1989.
    PB92-125749/REB
    Measurement and PrecSction of the Resistivity of Ash/
    Sorbent Mixtures Produced by Sulfur Oxide Control Proc-
    PB92-126812/REB
    nosoarch and Development Efforts to Develop Improved
    Inventory Methodologies for Area Source Solvent Emis-
    sions.
    PB92-126846/REB
    Tropoaphertc Nitrogen: The Influence  of Anthropogenic
    Sources on Distribution and Deposition.
    PB92-128937/REB
AM POLLUTION STANDARDS
    Nomad Engine and Vehicle Emission  Study-Report and
                                                               M04482/REB
                                                           Example Emission Inventory Documentation  for Post-
                                                           1967 Ozone State Implementation Plans (SIPs).
                                                           PB92-112176/REB
                                                           Nonrosd Engine and Vehicle Emission Study-Report.
                                                           PB92-12696D/REB
                                                       AIR QUALITY
                                                           National Air Toxics Information Clearinghouse: Bttiogra-
                                                           phy of  Selected Reports and Federal Register Notices
                                                           Related to Air Toxics. Volume 5. Citations, 1991.
                                                           PB92-111830/REB
                                                           National Air Toxics Information Clearinghouse: Ongoing
                                                           nosoarch and Regulatory Development Projects.
                                                           PB92-111905/REB
                                                           National Air Toxics Information Clearinghouse: Bfctogra-
                                                           phy of  Sotoctod Reports and Federal Register Notices
                                                           Related to Air Toxics. Index, 1991.
                                                           PB92-111913/REB
                                                           Regional Air Quality and Add Deposition Modeling and
                                                           the Rote for Visualization.
                                                           PB92-124247/REB
                                                       AIR QUALITY DATA
                                                           Adjusting Ambient Ozone Air QuaMy InrJcators for Miss-
                                                                124155/REB
                                                           InterconiperBon ofSarnpfcig Techniques for Nicotine in
                                                           Indoor Enwonments.
                                                           PB92-110402/REB
                                                       AM WATER INTERACTIONS
                                                           Mercury Deposition and Sources for the  Upper  Great
                                                           Lakes Region.
                                                           PB92-120500/REB
                                                       ALACHLOB
                                                           AlacNor Position Document 2/3.
                                                           PB82-111889/REB
                                                           Atochtor Position Document, 4.
                                                           PB92-114248/REB
                                                       ALASKA
                                                           Monitoring Guidelines to Evaluate Effects of Forestry Ac-
                                                           tMtes on Streams in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska.
                                                           PB92-104520/REB
                                                       ALDEHYDES
                                                           APptaflon of  MuWspectral Techniques  to the Precise
                                                           luBntMcBtton of AMohydn in the Environment.
                                                           PB92-101419/REB
                                                       ALDRM
                                                                         »of AMrtn, Cydohexytamine, 2,*«amin-
                                                                                lEMers   '•--•--
                                                           otoiuene and Two Phorbol I
                                                           tkm between V79 Cess.
                                                           PB92-10B026/REB
                              i on MetaboSc Coopera-
                                                           Extracbon ot Mercury from Groundwater Using Immobt-
                                                           KndAtaae.
                                                           PB92-121367/REB
                                                           Extraction of Mercury from Groundwater Using Immobi-
                                                           toed Algae.
                                                           PB92-121367/REB
                                                       ALJETTE
                                                           RED Fads: FoaetyMI (Atotte).
                                                           PB92-114321/REB
                                                           Heregislialiuii  Etgttty Document  (RED):  Fosetyt-A)

                                                                1'14339/REB
 ALTERNATIVE FUELS
    Waste Combustion System Analysis.
    PB92-125416/REB

 AMMONIA
    Toxictty of Chlorine and Ammonia to Aquatic Life: Chem-
    istry, Water Quality Criteria, Recent Research, and Rec-
    ommended Future Research.
    PB92-108091/REB

 ANAEROBIC PROCESSES
    Regiospecffic  Dechtorinatton  of Pentachlorophenol  by
    Dicntorophenol-Adapted Microorganisms  in Freshwater,
    Anaerobic Sediment Slurries.
    PB92-101674/REB
    Reductive Dechkxination of Dichloropheriols in Anaerobic
    Pond Sediments (Chapter 13).
    PB92-101708/REB
 ANATOMY
    Airway Structure Variability in the Long-Evans Rat Lung.
    PB92-124676/REB

 ANESTHESIA
    Differential Impact of Hypothermia and Pentobarbttal  on
    Brain-Stem Auditory Evoked Responses.
    PB92-113240/REB
 ANEUPLOIDY
    Evaluation  of 10 Chemicals for Aneuptoidy Induction in
    the Hexaptoid Wheat Assay.
    PB92-113307/REB

 ANILINE COMPOUNDS
    Color Yes; Cancer No.
    PB92-110477/REB
 ANIMAL BEHAVIOR
    Dynamics of Behavioral Thermoregulalion in the Rat
    PB92-124619/REB
 ANIMAL PREGNANCY
    Use of Brornoergocryptkw in the Validation of Protocols
    for the Assessment of Mechanisms of Early Pregnancy
    Loss in the Rat
    PB92-124692/REB

 ANNELIDS
    On-Stte Methods for Assessing  Chemical Impact on the
    Soil Environment Using Earthworms: A Case Study at the
    BaW and McGuire Superfund Site, Hobrook. Massachu-
                                                          PB92-108166/REB

                                                       APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS
                                                          Patch Size of Forest Openings and Arthropod Popula-
                                                          tions.
                                                          PB92-108158/REB
                                                       APTITUDE TESTS
                                                          Neurobehavioral  Evaluation System (NES) and School
               .
    PB92-124585/REB

AQUADETOX/SVE TREATMENT SYSTEM
    U.S.  EPA SITE  Demonstration  of AWD Technologies'
    AquaDetox/SVE System.
    PB92-124387/REB

AQUATIC ANIMALS
    Aquatic Toxkaty  Information Retrieval Data Base (AC-
    QUIRE).
    PB92-500453/REB

AQUATIC BACTERIA
    Effect of Sodium Chloride on Transport of Bacteria in a
    Saturated Aquifer Material.
    PB92-110428/REB
AQUATIC BIOLOGY
    Methods for Measuring the Acute Toxicity of Effluents
    and Receiving Waters to Freshwater and  Marine Orga-
    nisms (Fourth Edition).
    PB91-1676SO/REB

AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS
    Methods for Aquatic Toxicity Identification Evaluations.
    Phase 1 Toxicity Characterization Procedures. Second
    Edition.
    PB92-100072/REB
    Acid-Volatile SulfkJe as a Factor Mediating Cadirium and
    Nickel BioavaHabilrry in Contaminated SedSnents.
    PB92-124296/REB

AQUATIC ORGANISMS
    Aquatic Toxicity  Information  Retrieval Data Base (AC-
    QUIRE).
    PB92-500453/REB

AQUATIC PLANTS
    Aquatic Toxicity  Information  Retrieval Data Base (AC-
    QUIRE).
    PB92-500453/REB

AQUIFER MANAGEMENT
    Oxidation-Reduction Capacities of Aquifer Solids.
    PB92-110410/REB

AQUIFER SOLIDS
    Oxidation-Reduction Capacities of Aquifer Solids.
    PB92-110410/REB

AQUIFERS
    Regional Assessment of Aquifer  VubwrabBty and Sensi-
    tivity in the Conterminous United States.
    PB92-100148/REB
    Carbonate Equilibria and Groundwater Sample Collection:
    Implications tor Estimated Average Subsurface Properties
    in Continental North America.
    PB92-101690/REB
KW-2       VOL  92. No.  1

-------
                                                                    KEYWORD  INDEX
                                                                                                                                       BIOLOGICAL MARKERS
   Techniques to Determine Spatial Variations in Hydraulic
   Conductivity of Sand and Gravel.
   PB92-109123/REB
   Effect of Nitrate Addition on Biorestoration of Fuel-Con-
   taminated Aquifer Field Demonstration.
   PB92-110444/REB
   Biodegradadon of Monoaromatic Hydrocarbons by Aqui-
   fer Microorganisms Using  Oxygen,  Nitrate, or Nitrous
   Oxide as the Terminal Electron Acceptor.
   PB92-110543/REB
   Laboratory and Field Studies on BTEX Biodegradation in
   a Fuel-Contaminated  Aquifer under Denitrifying  Condi-
   tions.
   PB92-121227/REB
   Optimizing BTEX Biodegradation under Denitrifying Con-
   ditions.
   PB92-124262/REB
ARCTIC REGIONS
   Evaluating the Utility of Natural Vegetation in Assessing
   Arctic Accumulation of Air Toxics.
   PB92-103464/REB
AREA AND MOBILE SOURCE SUBSYSTEM
   Design, Development, and Implementation of AIRS' Area
   and Mobile Source Subsystem.
   PB92-124213/REB
AREA SOURCES
   Design, Development, and Implementation of AIRS' Area
   and Mobile Source Subsystem.
   PB92-124213/REB
   Research and Development Efforts to Develop Improved
   Inventory Methodologies for Area Source Solvent Emis-
   sions.
   PB92-128B46/REB
AROMATIC POLYCYCUC HYDROCARBONS
   Improvement in the Diagnostic Potential of (32)P-Pos«a-
   beiing Analysis Demonstrated by the Selective Formation
   and Comparative Analysis of Nttrated-PAH-Derived Ad-
   ducts Arising from Diesel Particle Extracts.
   PB92-110485/REB
ARSENIC
   Health Effects of Arsenic in Drinking Water.
   PB92-110360/REB
ARSENIC INORGANIC COMPOUNDS
   Inorganic Arsenicals Position Document 2/3.
   PB9£l14297/REB
   Inorganic Arsenicals Position Document 4.
   PB9£l14305/REB
ARTEMIA
   Nutritional Value of 'Artemia' and Tigriopus califomicus'
   (Baker) for Two Pacific Mysid Species, 'Metamysidopsis
   elongate1 (Holmes) and 'Mysidopsis mM' (Holmquist).
   PB9£l08000/REB
   Increased Reproduction by  Myskte fMysidopsis  bahia')
   Fed with  Enriched 'Artemia' spp.  NaupHi.
   PB92-106034/REB
ARTHROPODA
   Pesticide Effects on Arthropod Natural Enemies: A Data-
   base Summary.
   PB92-124163/REB
   Toxicity,  Selectivity and SuWethal Effects of Pesticides
   on Arthropod Natural Enemies: A Data-Base Summary.
   PB92-124189/REB
   NERISK: An Expert System to Enhance the Integration of
   Pesticides with Anthropod Biological Control.
   PB92-1242S4/REB
ASBESTOS
   Asbestos Fiber Release during Change-Out of Fitter Bags
   from HEPA-Filtered Vacuum Cleaners.
   PB92-113208/REB
ASHES
   Methodology  for  Assessing  Environmental  Releases of
   and Exposure to Municipal Solid Waste Combustor Re-
   siduals.
   PB92-109149/REB
ASPHALTS
   Evaluation of VOC  Emissions from Heated Roofing As-
   phalt
   PB92-115286/REB
ASSESSMENTS
   Guidance for Performing Preliminary Assessments under
   CERCLA,
   PB92-963303/REB
ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY
   Troposphere Nitrogen: The Influence of Anthropogenic
   Sources  on Distribution and Deposition.
   PB92-126937/REB
ATMOSPHERIC COMPOSITION
   Annular Denuders for Use in Global Climate and  Strato-
   spheric Measurements of AckSc Gases and Particles (Ab-
   stract Onry).
   N91-32631/6/REB
ATMOSPHERIC DIFFUSION
   Guideline for Regulatory Application of the Urban Airshed
   Model.
   PB92-108760/REB
ATMOSPHERIC MODELS
   Regional  Ozone  Modeling  for  Northeast  Transport
   (ROMNET).
   PB92-108786/REB
   Regional  Ozone  Modeling  for  Northeast  Transport
   (ROMNET). Appendices.
   PB92-108794/REB
   Regional Air  Quality and Acid Deposition Modeling and
   the Role  for Visualization.
   PB92-124247/REB
AUDITORY BRAIN STEM EVOKED POTENTIALS
    Differential Impact of Hypothermia and Pentobarbctal on
    Brain-Stem Auditory Evoked Responses.
    PB92-113240/REB
AUTOMOBILE EXHAUST
    Evaluation of a Kemira Oy Resistrvery Heated Catalyst on
    a Methanol-Fueted Vehicle.
    PB92-104397/REB
    IM240 Transient I/M Dynamometer Driving Schedule and
    the Composite I/M Test Procedure.
    PB92-104405/REB
    Recommended  I/M  Short  Test Procedures  for the
    1990's: Six Alternatives.
    PB92-104439/REB
    I/M Network Type:  Effects  on Emission  Reductions,
    Cost, and Convenience. Technical Information Document.
    PB92-104447/REB
    Integrating On-Board Diagnostic System Capabilities into
    the Inspection and Repair Functions of I/M Programs.
    PB92-104454/REB
AUTOMOBILES
    Second EPA Evaluation of the Platinum Gasaver Device
    under Section 511 of the  Motor Vehicle Information and
    Cost Savings Act (Updated).
    PB92-104413/REB
    Emissions and Fuel Economy Effects of the Platinum Ga-
    saver, a Retrofit Device.
    PB92-104421/REB
AUTOMOTIVE FUELS
    Fuel Volatility Effects on Exhaust Emissions.
    PB92-110014/REB
    Impact of Methanol and CNG Fuels on Motor Vehicle
    Toxic Emissions.
    PB92-110378/REB
    Evaluation of a Schatz Heat Battery on a Flexible-Fueled
    Vehicle.
    PB92-114255/REB
    Evaluation of a Vehicle Equipped with a Direct  Injection
    Engine Using Neat Methanol.
    PB92-118009/REB
AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM
    Acute Effects of Diisopropyl Fluorophosphate (DFP) on
    Autonomic and  Behavioral Thermoregulatory Responses
    in the Long-Evans Rat
    PB92-124668/REB
AZODYES
    Color Yes; Cancer No.
    PB92-110477/REB
    Influence of Experimental Conditions on the Liquid Sec-
    ondary Ion Mass Spectra of Sulfonated Azo Dyes.
    PB92-124361/REB
BACTERIA
    Nutritional Role of Endosymbiotic Bacteria in  Animal-Bac-
    teria Symbioses: 'Sotemya velum', a Case Study.
    PB92-11289S/REB
BASE SEQUENCE
    Improved Sample Recovery in Thermocyde  Sequencing
    Protocols.
    PB92-124593/REB
BASELINE MEASUREMENTS
    Forest Health Monitoring, New  England, 1990. Annual
    Report
    PB92-113018/REB
BEARINGS
    Waste Minimization  Assessment for a  Manufacturer  of
    Refurbished Railcar Bearing Assemblies.
    PB92-104348/REB
BENSULFURON METHYL
    Pesticide Fact Sheet Number 226: Bensulfuron Methyl.
    PB92-104389/REB
BENZO (A)PYRENE
    DMA Adducts in Rat Lung,  Liver and Peripheral Blood
    Lymphocytes  Produces  by   i.p.  Administration   of
    Benzo(a)Pyrene Metabolites and Derivatives.
    PB92-124627/REB
BENZO (A)PYRENE/DIFLUORO
    Synthesis of a Novel Fluorinated Benzo(a)pyrene: 4,5-
    DrDuorobenzo(a)pyrene.
    P892-110493/REB
BERILUUM
    Environmental Profiles and Hazard Indices for Constitu-
    ents of Municipal Sludge: Beryllium.
    PB92-122993/REB
BIBLIOGRAPHIES
    National Air Toxics Information Clearinghouse: Bibliogra-
    phy of Selected Reports  and Federal Register Notices
    Related to Air Toxics. Volume 5. Citations, 1991.
    PB92-111830/REB
    National Air Toxics  Information Clearinghouse:  Ongoing
    Research and Regulatory Development Projects.
    PB92-111905/REB
    National Air Toxics Information Clearinghouse: Bfcfiogra-
    phy of Selected Reports  and Federal Register Notices
    Related to Air Toxics. Index, 1991.
    PB92-111913/REB
    Risk Assessment Management, Communication: A Guide
    to Selected Sources. Volume 4, Number 1.
    PB92-114412/REB
    Storm and Combined Sewer Pollution Control: A Compila-
    tion of Significant References.
    PB92-114560/REB
    EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) Publications Bib-
    liography, Quarterly Abstract Bulletin.
    PB92-904200/REB
BIOACCUMULATION
    Computerized Risk and Bioaccumulatjon System (Version
    1.0).
    PB92-114164/REB
    Evaluation of Selected Lipkf Methods for Normalizing Pol-
    lutant Bioaccumulation.
    PB92-124379/REB
BIOASSAY
    Methods for Aquatic Toxicity Identification Evaluations.
    Phase 1 Toxicity Characterization  Procedures. Second
    Edition.
    PB92-100072/REB
    Toxicofogical Implementations of Remediating Hazardous
    Wastes.
    PB92-124171/REB
    Fractkxiation of Complex Combustion Mixtures Using an
    Ion-Exchange Methodology.
    PB92-126887/REB
BIOCHEMISTRY
    Synthesis of a Novel Fluorinated Benzo(a)pyrene: 4,5-
    Drfluorobenzo(a)pyrene.
    PB92-110493/REB
BYCONVERSION
    Predicting Chemical Concentration  Effects on  Transfor-
    mation Rates of Dissolved Organics by Complex Microbi-
    al Assemblages.
    PB92-101393/REB
BIODEGRADATION
    Optimizing BTEX Biodegradation under Denitrifying Con-
    ditions.
    PB92-124262/RE8
BIODETERIORATION
    Quantitative Assessment of the Effects of Metals on Mi-
    crobtal Degradation of Organic Chemicals.
    PB92-101385/REB
    Regiospecific  Dechlorination  of  Pentachlorophenol by
    CHchlorophenol-Adapted Microorganisms  in Freshwater,
    Anaerobic Sediment Shinies.
    PB92-101674/REB
    Guide for Conducting Treatability Studies under CERCLA:
    Aerobic Btodegradafon Remedy Screening. Interim Guid-
    ance.
    PB92-109065/REB
    Guide for Conducting Treatability Studies under CERCLA:
    Aerobic Bkxtegradatjon Remedy Screening.
    PB92-109073/REB
    Effect of Nitrate  Addition on Biorestoration of Fuel-Con-
    taminated Aquifer Field Demonstration.
    PB92-110444/REB
    Reduction of Hexachkxoethane and Carbon  Tetrachto-
    ride at Surfaces of Biotite,  Vermiculite, Pyrite, and  Marca-
    site.
    PB92-113141/REB
    Dechlorinations of  Porychkxinated  Biphenyte in Sedi-
    ments of New Bedford Harbor.
    PB92-121151/REB
    Laboratory and Field Studies on BTEX Biodegradation in
    a Fuel-Contaminated Aquifer under Denitrifying  Condi-
    tions.
    PB92-121227/REB
    Hydraulic Fracturing to Improve Nutrient and Oxygen De-
    livery for In situ Bioredamatjon.
    PB92-121334/REB
    Btoventing to Treat Fuel Spills from Underground Storage
    Tanks.
    PB92-121342/REB
BIODIVERSITY
    Indicators for Monitoring Biodiversity: A Hierarchical Ap-
    proach.
    PB92-108117/REB
BKHNDICATORS
    Fractkxiation of Complex Combustion Mixtures Using an
    Ion-Exchange Methodology.
    PB92-126887/REB
BIOLOGICAL AVAILABILITY
    Acid-Volatile Sulfide as a Factor Mediating Cadmium and
    Nickel BtoavailabiHty in Contaminated Sediments.
    PB92-124296/REB

BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS
    Health Effects Assessment Summary Tables.
    PB92-921100/REB
BIOLOGICAL
                  ATORS
    Indicators for Monitoring Biodiversity: A Hierarchical Ap-
    proach.
    PB92-108117/REB
    On-Srte Methods for Assessing Chemical Impact on the
    SoU Environment Using Earthworms: A Case Study at the
    BaM and McGuire Superfund Site, Holbrook, Massachu-
    setts.
    PB92-108166/REB
    Ecological  Indicators.  Proceedings  of  an  International
    Symposium. Held in Fort Lauderdate, Florida on October
    16-19,1990.
    PB92-114131/REB
BIOLOGICAL INDUSTRIAL WASTE TREATMENT
    Technology Evaluation Report Biological Treatment  of
    Wood Preserving Site Groundwater by Biotrol, Inc.
    PB92-110048/REB

BIOLOGICAL MARKERS
    Assessment of Neurotoxicrty: Use of Glial Rbrillary Acidic
    Protein as a Bkxrarker.
    PB92-110527/REB
                                                                                                                                            March
                                                                                                    KVV-3

-------
                                                                    KEYWORD  INDEX
BIOLOGICAL PEST CONTROL
    Reregjstration  EfigMlty Document (RED):  Hefothis zea
    NPV (List A, Case Number 151).
    PB92-111863/REB
    RED Facts; Hefothis zea NPV.
    PB02-111871/REB
    SELCTV System Manual for SELCTV and REFER Date-
    bases and the SELCTV Data Management Program.
    PB92-113455/REB
    NERIStt An ExpertSystem to Enhance the Integration of
    PostiCKlos with Antnropod Bidogcal Control.
    PB92-1242S4/REB
BIOLOGICAL TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE GROUPS
    ECO Update: The Rote of BTAGs in Ecological Assess-
    ment Volume 1, Number 1, September 1991.
    PB92-963337/REB
BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT
    Effect of Sodum Chloride on Transport of  Bacteria  in a
    Saturated Aquifer Material
    PB92-110428/REB
    Effect of Nftrate AddWon on BtorestoratJon of FuehCon-
    taminated Aquifer Field Demonstration.
    PB92-110444/REB
    Bkxtegradation of Monoaromabc Hydrocarbons by Aqui-
    fer Miciooiuanisim  Using Oxygen,  Nitrate,  or  Nitrous
    Oxkto as the Tenrtnal Electron Acceptor.
    PB92-110543/REB
    Technology  Evaluation Report  Btofcol Sol Washing
    System for Treatment of a Wood Preserving Site. Volume

    PB92-115310/HEB
    Technology  Evaluation Report  Btotrol Sol Washing
    System for Treatment of a Wood Preserving Site. Volume
    2. Part A.
    PB92-11S328/REB
    Technology  Evaluation Report  Btotrol So* Washing
    System for Treatment of a Wood Preserving Site. Volume
    2. Part B.
    PB92-115336/REB
    Hydraulic Fracturing to Improva Nutrient and Oxygen De-
    Ivary for In situ Btoredamation.
    PB92-121334/REB
    DiovBiitinQ to Tfwl Fuol SpMs from Undflf ground Storago
    Tank*.
    PB92-121342/REB
    Extractor) of Movcufy from Gcoundwatec Using Invnobt*
    feed Algae.
    PB92-121367/REB
    Proceedings:  The  1991  International Symposium on
    Radon anff Radon Reduction Technology. Volume  3.
    Symposium Panel and Poster Papers Technical Sessions
    1 through 5.
    PB92-1153
    Waste Combustion System Analysis.
    PB92-12S418/REB
BIOTA
    Dotuiirwialioii and Occurrence of AHH-Adive Polychtori-
       Kf Biphenyts, 2.3.7,8-Tetracrikxo^Dioxin and 2,3.7.8-
    Tetrachtor
                 fizofuran in Lake Michigan Sedknant and
    Biota. The Question of Their RaMfee Toxfcotogical Sig-
    PB82-108125/REB
BIOTROL SOL WASHMG SYSTEM
    Technology  EvakiatJon  Report  Btotroi  Sol Washing
    System for Treatment of a Wood Preserving Site. Volume

    PB92-115310/HEB
    Technology  rvafciaMon  Ri»**L  DfcMiul  Sofl Washing
    System for Treatment of a Wood Preserving Site. Volume
    2?PsrtA.
    PB92-115328/REB
    Technology  Evaluation  Report  Biotrol  Sol Washng
    System for Treatment of a Wood Preserving Site. Volume
    2, Part B.
    PB92-1
BLACKPOOT RIVER
    Wateished Characterization  Using  Landsat  Thematic
                  Btaddoot River, Montana
    Mapper Imagery: Bt
    PB92-115237/REB
BODY TEMPERATURE REGULATION
    Dynamics of Behavioral Thenrangutation to Ihe Rat
    PB92-124619/REB
    Acute Effects of Dssopropyl Ftuorophoaphate (DFP)  on
    Autonorric and BahavtonTrnann
    in the Long-Evans Rat
    PB92-124S88/REB
    Concentration of Gaal FMary Abktc Protein Increases
    with Age in the Mouse and Hat Brain.
    PBB2-110535/REB

    Use of Bromoergocrypthe «i the Vaidatton of Protocols
    for tie Aiaoaamant of Mechanisms of Earty Pregnancy
    Loss* the Rat
    PB92-124602/REB
BROMOXYML
    Dovetupmenlal Toxfcay of Bromoxynl in Mtoe and Rats.
    PB92-11326S/REB
    Proceedings:  The 1991  International Symposium  on
    Radon  and Radon  Reduction Technology.  Volume t.
    Symposium Oral Papers Opening Session and Technical
    SaSoW 1 throuj*™
    PB82-115351/REB
    Prooeedhgs.  The 1991  HHemaltonal Symposium  on
    Radon  and Radon  Reduction Technology.  Volume 2.
    Symposium Oral Papers Technical Sessions 6 through

    PB82-115368/REB
    PB92-115377/REB
    Proceedings:  The  1991  International Symposium on
    Radon and  Radon Reduction Technology. Volume  4.
    Symposium Poster Papers Technical Sessions 6 through
    10.
    PB92-115385/REB
BUTLER COUNTY (PENNSYLVANIA)
    Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 3): Hranica
    Landfill, Buffalo Township, PA. (First  Remedial Action),
    June 1990.
    PB91-921S66/REB
BYPRODUCTS
    Field Studies for Control of Organtos and Disinfection By-
    products.
    PB92-124205/REB
    Formation of Disinfection By-Products.
    PB92-124221 /REB
CADMIUM
    Influence  of Constant  and Fluctuating Salinity on Re-
    sponses of 'Mysidopsis bahia' Exposed to Cadmium in a
    Life-Cycle Test
    PB92-108042/REB
    Cadmium: Special Review Document
    PB92-114230/REB
CALCIUM HYDROXIDES
    Effect of Storage CondWons on Handing and SO2 Reac-
    tivity of Ca(OH)2-Based Sorbents.

CALCIUM OXIDES
    Fate of Pdychkxinated Biphenyls (PCBs) in Sol  Follow-
    ing Stabilization with OuictSme.
    P692-114487/REB
CAMPTOTHECIN
    New Action for Topoisomerase InNbitors.
    PB92-110451/REB
CAPTAFOL
    Captafol Final Decision.
    PB92-114289/REB
CARBON CYCLE
    Proceedngs  of  the  fntei national Workshop on Large-
    Scate Reforestation. Held in CorvaMs, Oregon on May 9-
    10,1990.
    PB92-109131/REB
    Can Intensive Management Increase Carbon Storage 'm
    Forests.
    PB92-113224/REB
    Global Carbon Cycle and Ornate Change: Responses
    and Feedbacks from Below-Ground Systems.
    PB92-121359/REB
CARBON DIOXIDE
    Carbonate EquKfcria and Groundwater Sample Collection:
    Implications for Estimated Average Subsurface Properties
    in Continental North America
    PB92-101690/REB
    Assessment of Promising Forest Management Practices
    8nd T 6chnoloQH3s for Enhflnony ttw  Gonoorv&tion &nd
    Sequestration of Atmospheric Carbon and Their Costs at
    the Site Level
    PB92-122787/REB
CARBON MONOXIDE
    PiuduLbuii of Carbon  Moooxido  by tha Homogeneous
    NOx-lnduced  Photooxidalion of  VotaHe Organk: Com-
    pounds in the Troposphere.
    PB92-110576/REB
    Emission Inventory Requirements for  Carbon Monoxide
    State Implementation Plans. 1991.
    PB92-112150/REB
    Procedures for the Preparation of Emission Inventories
    for Carbon Monoxide and Precursors of Ozone. Volume
    1. General Guidance for Stationary Sources.
    PB92-112168/REB
    Field  Performance of  Woodbuming Stoves in Crested
    Butts. Colorado.
    PB82-113133/REB
CARBON TETRACHLORIDE
                            S.S'-irninodpropioniHe Fol-
                               ~         jintheRat
    PB92-113323/REB
CARCINOGENS
    Interactive Effects of AUrin, Cyctohexyiamine, 2,4-Diamin-
    otokiene and Two Phorbol Esters on Metabolic Coopera-
    tion between V79 Cats.
    PB92-10B026/REB
    Evaluating the  Human Health  Effects of Hazardous
    Wastes: Reproduction  and  Development, Neurotoxicity,
    Genetic Toxidty and Cancer.
    PB92-110352/REB
    Color Yes; Cancer No.
    PB92-110477/REB
    Computerized Risk and Bnaccumutalion System (Version
    1.0).
    PB92-114164/REB
CAT DISEASES
    Fefne Bronchopulmonary Disease.
    PB92-126879/REB
CATECHOUUMNES
    Neural Factors in the  Development of Renal  Function:
    Effect of  Neonatal Central  CMecholaminergic Lesions
    with 6-Hydroxydopamine.
    PB92-1
                                                           Enhanced  Neurotoxicity of 3,3'-lrninoolpropiof
                                                           lowing Pretreatment with Carbon TetracNoride i
CELL CYCLE
    New Action for Topoisomerase Inhibitors.
    PB92-110451/REB
CELL DIVISION
    In vitro Lymphocyte Proliferation  Assays: The Mttogen-
    Stimulated Response and the Mixed Lymphocyte Reac-
    tion in Immunotcndcity Testing.
    PB92-126911 /REB
CELL SURVIVAL
    Limitations of the Fluorescent Probe Viability Assay.
    PB92-113166/REB
CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM
    Neonatal Exposure to  Trimethytdn Disrupts Spatial De-
    layed Alternation Learning in Preweanling Rats.
    PB92-124718/REB
CERTIFICATION
    Application for Certification 1991  Model Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles - Audi.
    PB91-242644/REB
    Application for Certification 1991  Model Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles - BMW.
    PB91-242651/REB
    Application for Certification 1991  Model Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles - Ferrari - Fiat
    PB91-242669/REB
    Application for Certification 1991  Model Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles - Ford.
    PB91-242677/REB
    Application for Certification 1991  Model' Year Light-Duty
    Trucks - Ford.
    PB91-242685/REB                    .
    Application for Certification 1991  Model Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles - Fuji.
    PB91-242693/REB
    Application for Certification 1991  Model Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles - General Motors.
    PB91-242701/REB
    Application for Certification 1991  Model Year Light-Duty
    Trucks - Isuzu Motors.
    PB91-242719/REB
    Application for Certification 1991  Modal Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles - Isuzu Motors.
    PB91-242727/REB
    Application for Certification 1991  Model Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles and Light-Duty Trucks - Nissan.
    PB91-242735/REB
    Application for Certification 1991  Model Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles - Volkswagen.
    PB91-242743/REB
    Application for Certification 1991 Model Year Heavy-Duty
    Diesel Engines - Mack Truck.
    PB91-242768/REB
    Application for Certification 1991 Model Year Heavy-Duty
    Vehicles • Mack Trucks.
    PB91-242776/REB
    Application for Certification 1991 Model Year Heavy-Duty
    Engines - Navistar.
    PB91-2427B4/REB
CHARS
    NO/Char Reactions at Pulverized Coal Flame Condrtons.
    PB92-121417/REB

CHAUS
    Oxidation and Devolatjfeation of Nitrogen in Coal Char.
    PB92-121441/REB
CHEMICAL ANALYSIS
    Intertaboratory Comparison of Thermospray and Particle
    Beam Liquid Chrornatography/Mass Spectrometry Inter-
    faces: Evaluation of a  Chiorrated Phenoxy Acid Herbi-
    cide Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Analysis
    Method.
    PB92-124734/REB
    International Symposium on FnM Screening Methods for
    Hazardous Wastes and Toxic Chemicals (2nd), Proceed-
    ings.  Held  in  Las Vegas, Nevada on February  12-14,
    1991.
    PB92-125764/REB
CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS
    Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) United Stales and  Territo-
    ries, 1987.
    PB92-100114/REB
    Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) United States and  Territo-
    ries, 1988.
    PB92-100122/REB
    Problems Associated with Published Environmental Fate
    Data
    PB92-101666/REB
    On-Site Methods for Assessing Chemical Impact on the
    Sol Environment Using Earthworms: A Case Study at the
    Baird and McGuire Superfund Site, Hottxook, Massachu-
    setts.
    PB92-108166/REB
    Screening Methods for  the Development of Ar Toxics
    Emission Factors.
    PB92-10B778/REB
    Pnxfctkig Chemical Reactivity by Computer.
    PB92-124312/REB
    Health Effects Assessment Summary Tables.
    PB92-921100/REB
CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM
    Continuous Mutttgand Distribution Modal Used to Predict
    the Stability Constant of Cufll)  Metal Comptexation with
    Hume Material from Fluorescence Quenching Data
    PB92-101377/REB
KW-4       VOL 92, No. 1

-------
                                                                   KEYWORD  INDEX
                                                                                                                               DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACIDS
CHEMICAL INTERACTIONS
    Model of Additive Effects of Mixtures of Narcotic Chemi-
    cals.
    PB92-108174/REB
CHEMICAL REACTION MECHANISMS
    Formation of Disinfection By-Products.
    PB92-124221/REB
CHEMICAL REACTIONS
    Synthesis of a  Novel Fluorinated Benzo(a)pyrene: 4,5-
    Difluorobenzo(a)pyrene.
    PB92-110493/REB
    Predicting Chemical Reactivity by Computer.
    PB92-124312/REB
CHEMICAL WASTE SITES
    Application of a Plant Test System in the Identification of
    Potential Genetic Hazards at Chemical Waste Sites.
    PB92-124551/REB
CHEMICAL WATER POLLUTANTS
    Influence of Size on  Fate and Ecological  Effects  of
    Kepone in Physical Models.
    PB92-121326/REB
CHILDREN
    Child Lead Exposure Study, Leeds, Alabama.
    PB92-123793/REB
    NeurohehavioraJ Evaluation System (NES) and  School
    Performance.
    PB92-124585/REB
CHLORINE
    Toxkaty of Chlorine and Ammonia to Aquatic IJfe: Chem-
    istry, Water Quality Criteria, Recent Research, and Rec-
    ommended Future Research.
    PB92-106091/REB
CHLORINE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS
    Reduction of Hexachkxoethane and Carbon TetracWo-
    ride at Surfaces of Btoffle, Vermiculite, Pyrite, and Marca-
    site.
    PB92-113141/HEB
CHLOROBENZILATE
    Chkxobenzilate Position Document 1.
    PB92-114313/REB
CHLOROHYDROCARBONS
    Experimental Investigation of PIC Formation in CFC incin-
    eration.
    PB92-126952/REB
CHOUNERGIC RECEPTORS
    Ojtehitine-lnduced Deafferentatton of the Hippocampus
    Selectively Disrupts Chdinergic Rhythmical Slow Wave
    Activity.
    PB92-120476/REB
 CHOUNESTERASE INHIBITORS
    Comparison of  In vivo ChoHnesterase Inhibition in Neona-
    tal and Adult Rats by Three Organophosphorothioate In-
     PB92-110550/REB
 CHROMATES
     Laboratory and Field Evaluations of a Methodology for
     Determining Hexavalent Chromium Emissions from Sta-
     tionary Sources.
     PB92-101336/REB
 CITIZEN PARTICIPATION
     Citizens' Guidance Manual for the Technical Assistance
     Grant Program.
     PB92-101435/REB
 CLEANUP
     Homeowners Exempted from Superfund Cleanup Costs:
     National Potcy Overview.
     PB92-963336/REB
 CLIMATO CHANGES
     Annular Denuders for Use in Global Climate and Strato-
     spheric Measurements of Acidic Gases and Particles (Ab-
     stract Only).
     N91-32531/6/REB
     Global  Carbon Cycle and Climate Change: Responses
     and Feedbacks from Below-Ground Systems.
     PB92-1213S9/REB
     Three Case Studies of Lake Temperature and Stratifica-
     tion Response to Warmer Climate.
     PB92-121391/REB
     Global  Ecosystems Database. Version  0.1 (Beta-test).
     EPA Global Climate Research  Program. NOAA/NGDC
     Global  Change Database Program. Prototype  1. Data-
     base Documentation. NGDC Key to Geophysical Records
     Documentation No.  25.
     PB92-122803/REB
 CLOSURES
     RCHA Cover Systems for Waste Management Facilities.
     PB92-120435/REB
 COAL COMBUSTION
     Characteristics of Single Particle Coal Combustion.
     PB92-121409/REB
     NO/Char Reactions at Pulverized Coal Flame Conditions.
     PB92-121417/REB
     Nitric Oxide Formation during Pulverized Coal  Combus-
     tion.
     PB92-121433/REB
     Oxidation and Devolattization of Nitrogen in Coal Char.
     PB92-121441/REB
  COASTAL REGIONS
     Uncertainties in Nitrogen Mass Loadings in Coastal Wa-
     tersheds.
     PB92-108075/REB
     Toxkaty of Chlorine and Ammonia to Aquatic Life: Chem-
     istry, Water Quality Criteria, Recent Research, and Rec-
     ommended Future Research.
     PB92-108091/REB
    EPA's Environmental  Monitoring and  Assessment Pro-
    gram: An Ecological Status and Trends Program.
    PB92-121169/REB
COLCHICINE
    Compensatory Alterations in Receptor-Stimulated  Phos-
    phoinositide Hydrolysis in the Hippocampus Vary as a
    Function of Dose of Cotehicine.
    PB92-110501/REB
    Cotchicine-lnduced Deafferentation of  the Hippocampus
    Selectively Disrupts Cholinergic Rhythmical Slow  Wave
    Activity.
    PB92-120476/REB
COLLOIDS
    Facilitated  Transport  of   Inorganic  Contaminants  in
    Ground Water Part 2. Colloidal Transport.
    PB92-114503/REB
COMBINED SEWERS
    Storm and Combined Sewer Pollution Control: A Compila-
    tion of Significant References.
    PB92-114560/REB
COMBUSTION CONTROL
    Combustion Control of Trace Organic Air Pollutants from
    Municipal Waste Combustors.
    PB92-113158/REB
COMBUSTION EFFICIENCY
    Trajectory and Incineration of Rogue Droplets in a Turbu-
    lent Diffusion Flame.
    PB92-120450/REB
    Experimental Investigation of PIC Formation in CFC Incin-
    eration.
    PB92-126952/REB
COMBUSTION PRODUCTS
    Experimental Investigation of PIC Formation in CFC Incin-
    eration.
    PB92-126952/REB
COMBUSTORS
    Waste Combustion System Analysis.
    PB92-125418/REB
COMMUNICATIONS MANAGEMENT
    Risk Assessment, Management, Communication: A Guide
    to Selected Sources. Volume 4, Number 1.
    PB92-114412/REB
COMPOSITE FABRICATION
    Ugnocetlulosic-Ptastic Composites from Recycled Materi-
    als.
    PB92-126861 /REB
COMPOSITE MATERIALS
    Guides  to  Pollution Prevention:  The  Ffcerglass-Rein-
    forced and Composite Plastics Industry.
    PB91-227967/REB
 COMPRESSED GASES
    Impact of Methand  and  CNG Fuels on Motor Vehicle
    Toxic Emissions.
    PB92-110378/REB
 COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION
    Global Ecosystems  Database. Version  0.1  (Beta-test).
    EPA  Global Climate Research Program. NOAA/NGDC
    Global Change Database  Program. Prototype 1. Data-
    base Documentation. NGDC Key to Geophysical Records
     Documentation No. 25.
     PB92-122803/REB
     Predicting Chemical Reactivity by Computer.
     PB92-124312/REB
 CONCRETE SLABS
     Recommended  Sub-Slab  Depressurization  Systems
     Design Standard of the  Florida Radon Research Pro-
     gram.
     PB92-105626/HEB
 CONSERVATION
     Assessment of Promising  Forest Management Practices
     and Technologies for Enhancing the Conservation and
     Sequestration of Atmospheric Carbon and Their Costs at
     the Site Level.
     PB92-122787/REB
 CONSTRUCTION
     Evaluating Design and Verifying Compliance  of Created
     Wetlands in the Vicinity of Tampa, Florida.
     PB92-116045/REB
 CONTAMINATION
     Sampling of Contaminated Sites.
     PB92-110436/REB
 CONTINUOUS MULTIUGAND DISTRIBUTION MODEL
     Continuous MultUgand Distribution Model Used to Predict
     the Stability Constant of Cu(ll) Metal Comptexation with
     Humic Material from Fluorescence Quenching Data.
     PB92-101377/REB
 COOLANTS
     Automotive and Heavy-Duty Engine Coolant Recycling by
     Filtration. Technology Evaluation Report
     PB92-126804/REB
 COPPER
     Lead and Copper  Rule  Guidance  Manual.  Volume 1.
     Monitoring.
     PB92-112101/REB
 COPPER tONS
     Continuous Muttaigand Distribution Model Used to Predict
     the Stability Constant of CuOO Metal Comptexation with
     Humic Material from Fluorescence Quenching Data.
     PB92-101377/REB
  COST ANALYSIS
     Cost Analysis of Soil Depressurization Techniques for
      Indoor Radon Reduction.
      PB92-120443/REB
COVERINGS
    RCRA Cover Systems for Waste Management Facilities.
    PB92-120435/REB
CRABS COMPUTER PROGRAM
    Computerized Risk and Bioaccumulation System (Version
    1.0).
    PB92-114164/REB
CREATED WETLANDS
    Evaluating Created  Wetlands through Comparisons with
    Natural Wetlands.
    PB92-111566/REB
    Workshop Proceedings: The Role of Created and Natural
    Wetlands in Controlling Nonpoint Source Pollution.  Held
    in Arlington, Virginia on June 10-11,1991.
    PB92-113463/REB
    Quality Assurance Project Plan: Tampa,  Florida Wetlands
    Study.
    PB92-122761/REB
CREOSOTE
    Removal of Creosote from Soil by Thermal Desonption.
    PB92-126838/REB
CRESTED BUTTE (COLORADO)
    Field Performance  of  Woodbuming Stoves in Crested
    Butte, Colorado.
    PB92-113133/REB
CRITICAL LOADS
    Estimating Critical Loads of Sutfate to Surface Waters in
    the  Northeastern United States: A Comparative Assess-
    ment of Three Procedures for Estimating Critical Loads of
    Sulfate for Lakes.
    PB92-119015/REB
CRUSTACEA
    Nutritional Value of 'Artemia' and Tigriopus califomicus'
    (Baker) for Two Pacific Myskf Species, 'Metamysidopsis
    elongate' (Holmes)  and 'Mysktopsis intS' (Holmquist).
    PB92-108000/REB
    Test of Criteria for Introduced Species: The Global Inva-
    sion by the Isopod 'Synidotea laevidorsalis' (Miers, 1881).
    PB92-108018/REB
CULTIVATION
    Impact of Conservation Tillage Use on Soil and Atmos-
    pheric Carbon in the Contiguous United States.
    PS92-113448/REB
CYCLOHEXYLAMINES
    Interactive Effects of Aldrin, Cyclohexytamine, 2,4-Diamin-
    otoluene and Two Photo) Esters on Metabolic Coopera-
    tion between V79 Cells.  *
    PB92-108026/REB
 DAMINOZIDE
    Daminozide Position Document 4.
    PB92-114198/REB
    Daminozide Position Document 2/3.
    PB92-114214/REB
    Daminozide Position Document 1.
    PB92-114222/REB
 DATABASES
    SELCTV System Manual for SELCTV and REFER Data-
    bases and the SELCTV Data Management Program.
    PB92-113455/REB
 DATA RLE
    Aquatic Toxtaity Information  Retrieval Data  Base (AC-
     QUIRE).
     PB92-500453/REB
     Enforcement Document Retrieval System (EDRS) - ASCII
     (1972-November 1991).
     PB92-592210/REB
     Enforcement  Document Retrieval  System  (EDRS) -
     EBCDIC (1972-November 1991).
     PB92-592220/REB
 DECHLOfllHATTON
     Regtospecific DecrHorination  of  Pentachkxophenol by
     Dvchiorophenol-Adapted Microorganisms in Freshwater.
     Anaerobic Sediment Slurries.
     PB92-101674/REB
     Reductive Dechtorination of Dfchtorophenols in Anaerobic
     Pond Sediments (Chapter 13).
     PB92-101708/REB
     Dechtorinations of Polychlorinated Biphenyte in Sedi-
     ments of New Bedford Harbor.
     PB92-121151/REB
     Environmental  Factors  Correlated  to  Dichtorophenol
     Dechkxinabon in Anoxic Freshwater Sediments.
     PB92-124346/REB
  DENITRIFICATION
     Laboratory and Field Studies on BTEX Biooegradatkm in
     a  Fuel-Contaminated Aquifer under Denitrifying  Cona-
     tions.
     PB92-121227/REB
     Optimizing BTEX  Btodegradatton under Denitrifying Con-
     ditions.
     PB92-124262/REB
  DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACIDS
     Recovery of Bulk DNA from Soil by a  Rapid,  Small-Scale
     Extraction Method.
     PB92-108141/REB
     Improved Sample Recovery  in Thermocycte  Sequencing
     Protocols.
     PB92-124593/REB
     DNA Adducts in  Rat Lung,  Liver and Peripheral. Blood
      Lymphocytes   Produces  by  i.p.   Administration  of
     Benzo(a)Pyrene Metabolites and Derivatives.
      PB92-124627/REB
                                                                                                                                            March
                                                                                                    KW-5

-------
                                                                    KEYWORD  INDEX
DEPOSITION
    Evaluating me Utility of Natural Vegetation in Assessing
    Arctic Accumulation of Air Toxics.
    PB92-103464/REB
    Mercury Deposition  and Sources for the Upper Great
    Lakes Region.
    PB92-120SOO/REB
    Routine Estimation and Reporting of Dry Deposition for
    the U.S.A. Dry Deposition Network.
    PB92-121144/REB
    Regional Air Quality and Acid Deposition Modeling and
    the Role for Visualization.
    PB92-124247/REB
    Tropospheric Nitrogen:  The Influence of Anthropogenic
    Sources on Distribution and Deposition.
    P892-126937/HEB
DESIGN CRITERIA
    Recommended   Sub-Slab   Depressurization  Systems
    Design  Standard  of the Florida Radon Research  Pro-
        i-105626/REB
    Evaluating Design and Verifying Compliance of Created
    Wetlands in the Vicinity of Tampa. Florida.
    PB92-T16045/REB
DESORPTON
    Removal of Creosote from Soil by Thermal Desorption.
    PB92-126838/REB
DEVOLATUJZATtON
    Oxidation and Devolatifeafion of Nitrogen in Coal Char.
    PB92-121441/REB
DuUHNOTOLUENeS
    Interactive Effects of AWrin, Cydohexytamine, 2,4-Diamin-
    otokiene and Two Phorbol Esters on Metabolic Coopera-
    tion befween V79 Cells.
    PB92-108026/REB
DMTOMACEOUS EARTH
    Radium Removal from Water by Manganese Dioxide Ad-
    sorption and Diatomaceous Earth Filtration.
    PB92-115260/REB
DfCHLOROPROPENES
    1,3-DteNoropn»ene Position Document 1.
    PB92-114206/REB
DICHLOROVOS
    Dichkxvos(DDVP) Position Document!.
    PB92-114271 /REB
DIESEL FUELS
    Improvement in the DiagepsSc Potential of (32)P-Post)a-
    botng Analysis Demonstrated  by the Selective Formation
    and Comparative  Analysis  of Nitrated-PAH-Derived Ad-
    ducts Arising from Diesel Parade Extracts.
    PB92-1104B5/REB
DnSOPROPYLFLUOROPHOSPHATE
    Acute Effects of Otsopropyf Fluorapfiosphate (DFP) on
    Autonomic and  Behavioral Thermoregulatory Responses
    in the Long-Evans Rat
    PB92-124668/REB
OMOCAP
    Dinocap Position Document 4.
    P892-114370/RE8
DIRECTORIES
    INFOTERRA/USA Directory of Environmental Sources.
    PB92-102433/REB
DISCRIMINATION LEARNING
    Neonatal Exposure to Triethyftin Disrupts Olfactory Dis-
    otimination Learning In Preweartina Rats.
    Ffl92-124726/REB
DISINFECTANTS
    Raw Studtes for Control of Organics and Disinfection By-
    products.
    P892-124205/REB
    Formation of Disinfection By-Products.
    PB92-124221/REB
DtSTIU-ATION
    Fractionation of Complex Combustion Mixtures Using an
    ton-Exchange Methodology.
    PB92-126887/REB
    FMd-TesSns Distribution Water dually Models.
    PB92-1t3182/REB
    Drinking Water Research Division's Research Activities in
    Support of EPA's Regulatory Agenda.
    PB92-124197/REB
ONA TOPOWOMERASEI
    New Action for Topoisomerase InhMtora.
    PB92-110451 /REB
DOCUMENTATION
    Pesticide Compact Label File -1990 Updates.
    PB92-9116OO/ReS
DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS
    Evaluating the  Relationship  of  Metabolic  Activation
    System Concentrations and Chemical Dose Concentra-
    tions for the Salmooella Spiral and Plate Assays.
    PB92-113331/HEB
DREDGE SPOIL
    Chetoo Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site (ODMOS)
    Designation: Final Environmental Impact Statement
    PB82-104470/REB
DROPS (LIQUIDS)
DRY METHODS
    Routine Estimation and Reporting of Dry Deposition for
    the U.S.A. Dry Deposition Network.
    PB92-121144/REB
DUPONT/OBERUN MICROFILTRATION TREATMENT
SYSTEM
    DuPonf Obertn Microffltration Technology.  Applications
    Analysis Report.
    PB92-119023/REB
DYES
    Fate of Commercial Disperse Dyes in Sediments.
    PB92-101401/REB
    Estimation of Water  Solubility and Octanol/Waiar ParS-
    tton Coefficient of Hydrophobic Dyes. Part 1. Relationship
    between Solubility and Partition Coefficient
    PB92-124320/REB
    Estimation of Water  Solubility and Octanol/Water Parti-
    tion Coefficient of Hydrophobic  Dyes. Part 2. Reverse-
    Phase High-Performance Liquid Chromatography.
    P692-124338/REB
EARLY PREGNANCY PROTOCOL
    Use of Bromoergocryptine in the Validation of Protocols
    for the Assessment of Mechanisms of Eariy Pregnancy
    Loss in the Flat.
    PB92-124692/REB
EARTH FILLS
    Analysis of  Factors  Affecting Methane Gas Recovery
    from Six Landfills.
    PB92-101351/REB
    Markets for Scrap Tires.
    PB92-11S252/REB
    Fuel Cell Energy Recovery from Landfill Gas.
    PB92-121235/REB
    Construction, Monitoring, and Performance of Two Soil
    Liners.
    PB92-124049/REB
EASTERN REGION (UNITED STATES)
    Regional Fine particle Field Study:  Data Base and Initial
    Results.
    PB92-106939/REB
    Urban Air Toxics Monitoring Program Carbonyl Results,
    1990
    PB92-110030/REB
ECOLOGY
    EPA's Environmental Monitoring, and Assessment Pro-
    gram: An Ecological Status and Trends Program.
    PB92-121169/REB
    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental
    Monitoring and Assessment Program: An Ecological
    Status and Trends Program.
    PB92-121292/REB
    Influence  of Size on  Fate and Ecological Effects  of
    Kepone In Physical Models.
    PB92-121326/REB
    ECO Update: The Roto of BTAGs in Ecological Assess-
    ment Volume 1, Number 1, September 1991.
    PB92-963337/REB
ECOSYSTEMS
    Environmental  Monitoring  and Assessment Program
    Indicators tor Monitoring Biodversrty: A Hierarchical Ap-
    proach.
    PB92-106117/HEB
    Ecological Indicators. Proceedings of an  International
    Symposium. Held in Fort Lauderdale, Florida on October
    16-19,1990.
    PB92-114131/REB
    Forest Health Monitoring Plot Design and Logistics Study.
    P892-118447/REB
    Global Ecosystems Database. Version  0.1 (Beta-test).
    EPA  Global Climate Research Program. NOAA/NGDC
    Global Change Database  Program. Prototype 1. Data-
    base Documentation. NGDC Key to Geophysical Records
    Documentation No. 25.
    PB92-122803/REB
EELGRASS
    Long-Term  Changes  in  the  AreaJ  Extent  of  Tidal
    Marshes, Eetgrass Meadows and Kelp Forests of Puget
    Sound.
    PB92-104496/REB
ELECTRIC FIELDS
    Electric and Magnetic Fields Near AM Broadcast Towers.
    PB92-101427/REB
ELECTRIC POWER PLANTS
    Evaluation at  NOx Emission Control Catalysts for Power
    Plant SCR Instalations.
    PB92-121276/REB
ELECTRICAL RESrS 11VI If
    Measurement and Predtetton of the Resistivity of Ash/
    Sorbent Mixtures Produced by Sulfur Oxide Control Proc-
                                                                                        Hydrocarbons by Aqui-
                                                                                           	   or  Nitrous
                                                           PB92-126812/REB
                                                        ELECTRON ACCEPTORS
      t Diffusion Flame.
    PB92-120450/RES
    Btodegradabon of Monoaromatic Hydrocarbo
    fer Microorganisms Using Oxygen,  Nitrate,
    Oxide as the Terminal Electron Acceptor.
    PB82-110543/REB
ELECTROSTATIC PREdPTTATORS
    Effects on Electrostatic Precipitation of Changes in Grain
    Loading, Size Distribution, Resistivity, and Temperature.
    PB92-113109/REB
    Evaluation of Pilot ESP Performance with Elevated Load-
    ings from Sorbent Injection Processes.
    PB92-113117/HEB
    SUPER ESP: Ultimate Electrostatic Precipitation.
    PB92-113125/REB
    Modeling Wave Form Effects in ESPs: The Algorithm in
    ESPM and ESPVI.
    PB92-121243/REB

ELECTROSTATICS
    Quantitative  Comparison of Molecular Electrostatic Po-
    tentials for Structure-Activity Studies.
    PB92-110519/REB

EMBRYOS
    Developmental Malformation of Frog Embryos: An Analy-
    sis of Teratogenicity of Chemical Mixtures.
    PB92-108190/REB

EMISSION CONTROL
    Degreaser System Pollution Prevention Evaluation.
    AD-A242 110/5/REB
    Application for Certification 1991 Model  Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles - Audi.
    PB91-242644/REB
    Application for Certification 1991 Model  Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles - BMW.
    PB91-242651/REB
    Application for Certification 1991 Model  Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles - Ferrari - Fiat                   .
    PB91-242669/REB                       *
    Application for Certification 1991 Model  Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles - Ford.
    PB91-242677/REB
    Application for Certification 1991 Model  Year Light-Duty
    Trucks - Ford.
    PB91-242685/REB
    Application for Certification 1991 Model  Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles - Fuji.
    PB91-242693/REB
    Application for Certification 1991 Model  Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles - Genera) Motors.
    PB91-242701/REB
    Application for Certification 1991 Model  Year Light-Duty
    Trucks - Isuzu Motors.
    PB91-242719/REB
    Application for Certification 1991 Model  Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles - Isuzu Motors.
    PB91-242727/REB
    Application for Certification 1991 Model  Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles and Ught-Duty Trucks - Nissan.
    PB91-242735/REB
    Application for Certification 1991 Model  Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles - Volkswagen.
    PB91-242743/REB
    Application for Certification 1991 Model Year Heavy-Dirty
    Diesel Engines - Mack Truck.
    PB91-242768/REB
    Application for Certification 1991 Model Year Heavy-Duty
    Vehicles - Mack Trucks.
    PB91-242776/REB
    Application for Certification 1991 Model Year Heavy-Duty
    Engines - Navistar.
    PB91-242784/REB

EMISSION FACTORS
    Analysis of  Factors Affecting  Methane Gas Recovery
    from Six Landfills.
    PB92-101351/RE8
    Screening Methods for the Development of Air Toxics
    Emission Factors.
    PB92-108778/REB
    Locating and Estimating Air Emissions from Sources of
    Styrone, Interim Report
    PB92-126786/REB
    Compilation of Air Pollutant Emission Factors. Volume 1.
    Stationary Point and Area Sources.  Fourth Edition. Sup-
    plement D.
    PB92-126945/REB

EMISSION INVENTORIES
    Nonroad Engine and Vehicle Emission Study-Report and
    Appendixes.
    PB92-104462/REB
    Status and Needs for Toxic Emission Inventories for Re-
    gional Dispersion and Deposition Modeling.
    PB92-110394/REB
    Emission Inventory  Requirements for Carbon Monoxide
    State Implementation Plans, 1991.
    PB92-112150/REB
    Procedures for the Preparation of Emission Inventories
    for Carbon Monoxide and Precursors of  Ozone. Volume
    1. General Guidance for Stationary Sources.
    PB92-112168/REB
    Example Emission  Inventory  Documentation for  Post-
    1987 Ozone  State Implementation Plans (SIPs).
    PB92-112176/REB
    Emission Inventory Requirements for Ozone State Imple-
    mentation Plans.
    PB92-118017/RE8
    Locating and Estimating Af Emissions from Sources of
    Styrene, Interim Report
    PB92-126788/REB
    Development of Seasonal and Annual  Biogenic Emis-
    sions Inventories for the U.S. and Canada,
    PB92-126796/REB
    Research and Development Efforts to Develop Improved
    Inventory Methodologies for Area Source Solvent Emis-
    sions.
    PS92-126846/REB
    Nonroad Engine and Vehicle Emission Study-Report
    PB92-126960/REB
KW-6       VOL 9£, No. 1

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                                                                    KEYWORD  INDEX
                                                                                                                                            ETHYLENE OXIDE
EMISSION INVENTORY
    Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) United States and Territo-
    ries. 1967.
    PB92-100114/REB
    Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) United States and Territo-
    ries, 1988.
    PB92-100122/REB
ENDOGENOUS SUBSTANCE RECEPTORS
    Compensatory Alterations in Receptor-Stimulated  Phos-
    phoinositide Hydrolysis in the Hippocampus Vary as a
    Function of Dose of Cotehicine.
    PB92-110501/REB
ENERGY RECOVERY
    Fuel Cell Energy Recovery from Landfill Gas.
    PB92-121235/REB
ENGINES
    Nonroad Engine and Vehicle Emission Study-Report and
    Appendixes.
    PB92-104462/REB
    Nonroad Engine and Vehicle Emission Study-Report
    PB92-126960/REB
ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICAL SUBSTITUTES
    Degreaser System Pollution Prevention Evaluation.
    AD-A242 110/5/REB
ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS
    Predicting  Chemical Concentration Effects on Transfor-
    mation Rates of Dissolved Organics by Complex Microbi-
    al Assemblages.
    PB92-101393/HEB
    Problems Associated with Published Environmental Fate
    Data.
    PB92-101666/REB
    Long-Term  Changes in the  Areal  Extent of  Tidal
    Marshes, Eelgrass Meadows and Kelp Forests of Puget
    Sound.
    PB92-104496/REB
    Reduction of Hexachkxoethane and Carbon Tetrachlo-
    ride at Surfaces of Biottte, Vermiculite, Pyrite. and Marca-
    site.
    PB92-113141/REB
    Global Carbon Cycle and  Climate Change:  Responses
    and Feedbacks from Below-Ground Systems.
    PB92-121359/REB
    Predicting Chemical Reactivity by Computer.
    PB92-124312/REB
    Environmental Factors  Correlated  to  Dichlorophenol
    Dechlorinafon in Anoxic Freshwater Sediments.
    PB92-124346/REB
ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE
    Child Lead Exposure Study, Leeds, Alabama.
    PB92-123793/REB
ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE PATHWAYS
    Methodology for Assessing Environmental Releases of
    and Exposure to Municipal Solid Waste Combustor  Re-
    PB92-109149/REB
ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
    Workshop Report on Toxicity Equivalency Factors for
    Porychlorinated  Biphenyl  Congeners.  Risk Assessment
    Forum.
    PB92-114529/REB
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENTS
    Regional Assessment of Aquifer Vulnerability and Sensi-
    tivity in the Conterminous United States.
    PB92-100148/REB
    Regulatory Impact Analysis for the Final Criteria for Mu-
    nicipal Solid Waste Landfills.
    PB92-100841/REB
    Addendum to  the Regulatory Impact  Analysis  for the
    Final Criteria for Municipal Solid Waste Landfills.
    PB92-100858/REB
    Example Environmental Assessment  Report for  Estu-
    aries.
    PB92-102656/REB
    On-Site Methods for Assessing Chemical Impact on the
    Soil Environment Using Earthworms: A Case Study at the
    Baird and McGuire Superfund Site, Hottxook, Massachu-
    PB92-108166/REB
    Health Effects Assessment Summary Tables.
    PB92-921100/REB
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENTS-FINAL
    Chetco Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site (ODMDS)
    Designation: Final Environmental Impact Statement
    PB92-104470/REB
ENVIRONMENTAL LEGISLATION
    Enforcement Document Retrieval System (EDRS) - ASCII
    (1972-November 1991).
    PB92-592210/REB
    Enforcement Document  Retrieval System  (EDRS)  -
    EBCDIC (1972-November 1991).
    PB92-S92220/REB
ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING
    Environmental   Monitoring  and  Assessment  Program
    (EMAP) Design Report
    PB92-103449/REB
    Long-Term Trends in Puget Sound Marine Fishes: Select-
    ed Data Sets.
    PB92-104488/REB
    Indfcatore for Monitoring  Biodiversity: A Hierarchical Ap-
    proach.
    PB92-108117/REB
    Lead and Copper Rule  Guidance Manual  Volume 1.
    Monitoring.
    PB92-112101/REB
    Ecological  Indicators. Proceedings of an International
    Symposium. Held in Fort Lauderdala, Florida on October
    16-19, 1990.
    PB92-114131/REB
    Environmental  Monitoring  and Assessment  Program:
    1991 Project Descriptors.
    PB92-114479/REB
    Forest Health Monitoring Plot Design and Logistics Study.
    PB92-118447/REB
    EPA's Environmental  Monitoring  and Assessment Pro-
    gram: An Ecological Status and Trends Program.
    PB92-121169/REB
    U.S.  Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental
    Monitoring  and Assessment  Program: An  Ecological
    Status and Trends Program.
    PB92-121292/REB
    International Symposium on Field Screening Methods for
    Hazardous Wastes and Toxic Chemicals (2nd), Proceed-
    ings. Held  in Las Vegas,  Nevada on February 12-14,
    1991.
    PB92-125764/REB
ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT
PROGRAM
    Example Environmental Assessment Report  for Estu-
    aries.
    PB92-102656/REB
    Environmental  Monitoring  and  Assessment  Program
    (EMAP) Design Report
    PB92-103449/REB
    Environmental  Monitoring  and Assessment  Program:
    1991 Project Descriptors.
    PB92-114479/REB
    EPA's Environmental  Monitoring  and Assessment Pro-
    gram: An Ecological Status and Trends Program.
    PB92-121169/REB
ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION
    Environmental  Protection  Agency  Civil  Enforcement
    Docket
    PB92-921700/REB
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
    Running a Conference as a Clean Product International
    Conference on Pollution Prevention: Clean Technologies
    and Clean  Products. Held in Washington, DC. on June
    10-13,1990.
    PB92-109099/REB
    Evaluating Created Wetlands through Comparisons with
    Natural Wetlands.
    PB92-111566/REB
    EPA's Environmental  Monitoring  and Assessment Pro-
    gram: An Ecological Status and Trends Program.
    PB92-121169/REB
    EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) Publications Bib-
    liography, Quarterly Abstract Bulletin.
    PB92-904200/REB
ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH
    INFOTERRA/USA Directory of Environmental Sources.
    PB92-102433/REB
ENVIRONMENTAL SURVEYS
    Toxic Release  Inventory (TRI) United States and Territo-
    ries.  1987.
    PB92-100114/REB
    Toxic Release  Inventory (TRI) United States and Territo-
    ries.  1988.
    PB92-100122/REB
    Marine Debris Survey Manual.
    PB92-103456/REB
    Health Effects of Arsenic in Drinking Water.
    PB92-110360/REB
    RCRA  Permit  Policy Compendium. Volume  1. User's
    Guide. Key Word Index
    PB92-111715/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium.  Volume 2 (9420.1980-
    9434.1900). Hazardous Waste Management System (Part
    260). General, Definitions, Petitions.
    PB92-111723/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium.  Volume 3 (9441.1980-
    9441.1986). Identification  and  Listing  of  Hazardous
    Waste (Part 261). General.
    PB92-111731/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium.  Volume 4 (9441.1987-
    9441.1990). Identification  and  Listing  of  Hazardous
    Waste (Part 261). General.
    PB92-111749/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium.  Volume 5 (9442.1980-
    9444.1986). Identification  and  Listing  of  Hazardous
    Waste  (Part 261).  Criteria  for  Identifying  Hazardous
    Waste, Characteristics of Hazardous Waste, Lists of Haz-
    ardous Waste.
    PB92-111756/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium.  Volume 6 (9444.1987-
    9457.1990). Identification  and  Listing  of  Hazardous
    Waste  (Part 261).  Lists (Confd). Generator  Standards
    (Part 262),  General,  Pretransportaton, Recordkeeping,
    Special Conditions, Importing.
    PB92-111764/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 7 (9460.1980-
    9482.1990). Transporter Standards (Part 263). (TSDPs)
    (Parts  264  and 265),  TSDF Technical  Requirements
    (Parts 264 and 265).
    PB92-111772/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 8 (9483.1980-
    9489.1990). TSDF  Technical  Requirements  (Parts  264
    and  265). Tanks. Surface Impoundments, Waste Piles,
    Land Treatment,  Landfills,  Incinerators, Miscellaneous
    Units.
    PB92-111780/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 9 (9490.1980-
    9521.1990). Standards for Managing Specific Hazardous
   Wastes (Part 266). Permitting Policies, Permitting Proce-
   dures (Parts 124 and 270).
   PB92-111798/REB
   RCRA  Permit   Policy  Compendium.  Volume   10
   (9522.1980-9528.1990). Permitting Procedures (Parts 124
   and  270). Applications, Conditions, Changes,  Interim
   Status.
   PB92-111806/REB
   RCRA  Permit   Policy  Compendium.  Volume   11
   (9530.1980-9581.1990). Air Emissions Standards, State
   Authorization (Part 271), Land Disposal Restrictions (Part
   268). Waste Minimization, Subtitle D, RCRA Grant Funds.
   PB92-111814/REB
   Alachkx Position Document 2/3.
   PB92-111889/REB
   Forest Health Monitoring, New England,  1990.  Annual
   Report
   PB92-113018/REB
   Daminozide Position Document 4.
   PB92-114198/REB
   1.3-Dichtoropropene Position Document 1.
   PB92-114206/REB
   Daminozide Position Document 2/3.
   PB92-114214/REB
   Daminozide Position Document 1.
   PB92-114222/REB
   Cadmium: Special Review Document
   PB92-114230/REB
   Alachlor: Position Document 4.
   PB92-114248/REB
   Ethalfluralin Position Document 1/2/3/4.
   PB92-114263/REB
   Dichkxvos (DDVP) Position Document 1.
   PB92-114271/REB
   Captafol Final Decision.
   PB92-114289/REB
   Inorganic Arsenicals Position Document 2/3.
   PB92-114297/REB
   Inorganic Arsenicals Position Document 4.
   PB92-114305/REB
   Chlorobenzilate Position Document 1.
   PB92-114313/REB
   Workshop  Report on  Toxicity Equivalency  Factors for
   Porychlorinated Biphenyl Congeners. Risk Assessment
   Forum.
   PB92-114529/REB
   Global Ecosystems  Database.  Version 0.1  (Beta-test).
   EPA Global  Climate Research Program.  NOAA/NGDC
   Global Change Database Program. Prototype 1. Data-
   base Documentation. NGDC Key to Geophysical Records
   Documentation No. 25.
   PB92-122803/REB
   PA-Score  (Preliminary  Assessment  Score), Version  1.0
   (for Microcomputers).
   PB92-500032/REB
   PA-Score Software, Version 1.0. Users Manual and Tuto-
   rial.
   PB92-963302/REB

ENVIRONMENTAL TOBACCO SMOKE
   Intercomparison of Sampling Techniques for  Nicotine in
   Indoor Environments.
   PB92-110402/REB

ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT
   Effect of Sodium Chloride on Transport of Bacteria in a
   Saturated Aquifer Material.
   PB92-110428/REB
   Evaluation of Sorptton Models in the Simulation of Naph-
   thalene Transport Through Saturated Soils.
   PB92-113190/REB
   Facilitated  Transport  of  Inorganic Contaminants  in
   Ground Water: Part 2. Colloidal Transport
   PB92-114503/REB
   Assessing UST Corrective Action Technology. A Scientif-
   ic Evaluation of the Mobility of Organic Contaminants in
   Subsurface Environments.
   PB92-114552/REB
   Model of Virus Transport in Unsaturated Soil.
   PB92-119957/REB

ENZYME INHIBITORS
   New Action for Topoisomerase Inhibitors.
   PB92-110451 /REB

EPA METHODS
   Screening  Methods for the Development of Air Toxics
   Emission Factors.
   PB92-108778/REB

ERROR ANALYSIS
   Problems Associated with Published Environmental Fate
   Data.
   PB92-101666/REB

ESTUARINE ENVIRONMENT
   Example Environmental Assessment Report for Estu-
   aries.
   PB92-102656/REB

ETHALFLURALIN
   EthalfluraSn Position Document 1/2/3/4.
   PB92-114263/REB

ETHANE/TRICHLORO
   Degreaser System Pollution Prevention Evaluation.
   AD-A242 110/5/REB

ETHYLENE OXIDE
   Review of the Mutagenicrty of Ethylene Oxide.
   PB92-124569/REB
                                                                                                                                           March
                                                                                                   KW-7

-------
                                                                   KEYWORD  INDEX
EXHAUST EMISSIONS
    Noraoad Engine and Vehicle Emission Study-Report and
       g-104462/REB
    Fuel Votafifty Effects on Exhaust Emissions.
    PB92-110014/REB
    Improvement in the Diagnostic Potential of (32)P-PosUa-
    beiing Analysis Demonstrated by the Selective Formation
    and Comparative  Analysis of Nitrated-PAH-Derived Ad-
    ducts Arising from Diesel Parfide Extracts.
    PB92-110485/REB
    Source  Reconciliation of Ambient Volatile Organic Com-
    pounds Measured in the Atlanta 1990 Summer Study:
    The MobSe Source Component
    PB92-124130/REB
    Nonroad Engine and Vehicle Emission Study-Report
    PB92-126960/REB
EXPERT SYSTEMS
    Computerized Risk and Bioaccumulalkxi System (Version
    1.0).
    PB92-114164/REB
    NERISKJ An Expert System to Enhance the Integration of
    Pesticides with Arthropod Biological Control.
    PB92-1242S4/REB
EXPOSURE
    Adjusting Ambient Ozone Air OuaHy Inrjcators for Miss-
    Ing Values.
    PB92-124155/REB
EXTRACTION
    Recovery of Bulk DNA from Sol by a Rapid, SmaS-Scate
    Extraction Method.
    PB92-108141/REB
FARM CROPS
    Adjusting Ambient Ozone Air dually Inrjcators for Miss-
    ing Values.
    PB92-124155/REB
FEUNE BRONCHOPUUIONARV DISEASES
                                                   FLUORESCENCE SPECTROSCOPY
                                                       Standard Operating Procedures for Measurement of Lead
                                                       in Paint Using the SOTEC  MAP-3 X-ray Fluorescence
    Feine Bronchoputmonary
    PB92-126879/REB
FIBERGLASS REINFORCED PLASTICS
    Guides to  Pollution  Prevention: The  FTberotass-Reitv
    forced and Composite Plastics Industry.
    PB91-227967/REB
FIELD TESTS
    Final Quality Assurance Report for the Tampa, Florida
    Wetlands Study.
    PB82-113000/REB
FILTRATION
    RarJum Removal from Water by Manganese Dioxide Ad-
    sorptJon and Oiatomaceous Earth Rfcatton.
    PB92-11S260/REB
    Paying for Safe Water Alternative Financing Mechanisms
    for State Drinking Water Programs.
    PB92-117993/REB
FINE PARTICLE NETWORK
    Regional fine Particle Field Study:  Data Base and Initial
    Results.
    PB92-106939/REB
    Regional Fine Particle Field Study: Data Base and Initial
    Results.
    PB92-10G939/REB
FRE RESBTANCE COATMQS
    Muffispectral WentJfication of AIM and CMoroafkyl Phos-
    phates from an Industrial Effluent
    PB92-124353/REB
FIRST REMEDIAL ACTION - FINAL
    Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Jadco-
    Hughes Site, North Beknont, NC. (First Remedial Action),
    September 1990.
    PB91-921S65/REB
    Trajectory and Incineration of Rogue Droplets in a Turbu-
    lent Diffusion Flame.
    PB92-120450/REB
FLORIDA
    Recommended   Sub-Slab  Depressurization  Systems
    DosiQn  Stsnttard of tno  Ftontte Rfldoo Rooonicn Pr^
gram.
PB92-1
        .
        -1066Z6/REB
    Proceedhgs of the Workshop on Radon Potential Map-
    ping. Florida Radon Research Program. Held in GsJnes-
    vBe, Florida on April 20, 1990.
    PB92-115278/REB
FLORDA RADON RESEARCH PROGRAM
    Standard^ Measurement Protocols:  Florida  Radon Re-
    poafch Program.
    PB92-11S294/REB
FLUE OASES
    Laboratory and FieU  Evaluations of a Methodology for
    DeteiiiJning Hexavatent Chromium Emissions from Sta-
    tionary Sources.
    PB92-101336/REB
    Method 25: Determination of Total Gaseous Non-Meth-
    ane Organic  Emissions as  Carbon from Stationary
    Sources.
    PB92-113026/REB
    Cleaning of Flue Gases from Waste Comtwstora, 1990.
    PB92-121300/REB
                                     nictnte
                                                          e-114180/REB
                                                   FLUORESCENT DYES
                                                       Synthesis of  a Novel Ruorinated Benzo(a)pyrene: 4,5-
                                                       Difluorobenzo(a)pyrene.
                                                       PB92-110493/REB
                                                       Limitations of the Fluorescent Probe Viability Assay,
                                                       PB92-113166/REB
                                                       Comparison of Animal Infectivity, Excystafion, and Ruoro-
                                                       genfc Dye as Measures of 'GiarrJa muris' Cyst Inactiva-
                                                       Son by Ozone.
                                                       PB92-124288/REB
                                                   FLUOROHYDROCARBONS
                                                       Manual for Non-CFC Aerosol  Packaging: Conversion
                                                       from CFC to Hydrocarbon PropeHants.
                                                       PB92-101344/REB
                                                   FLURTAMONE
                                                       Microbial Degradation of Flurtamone  in Three Georgia
                                                       Sols.
                                                       PB92-101682/REB
                                                   FLY ASH
                                                       Measurement and Prediction of the Resistivity of Ash/
                                                       Sorbent Mixtures Produced by Sulfur Oxide Control Proc-
                                                       PB92-126812/REB
                                                   FOOOCHAMS
                                                       Nutritional Value of •Artemia' and Tigriopus catfomicus'
                                                       (Baker) for Two Pacific Mysid Species. Wetamysidopsis
                                                       etongata' (Holmes) and 'Mysidopsis Mi' (Holmquist).
                                                       PB92-108000/REB                      ^^
                                                       Increased Reproduction by Mysids fMysidopsis bahJa1)
                                                       Fed with Enriched  ' Artemia' spp. NaupHi.
                                                       PB92-108034/REB
                                                      WQt
                                                                    JOQY
                                                           Carbonate EquMxia and Groundwater Sample Codec
                                                       Implications for Estimated Average Subsurface Properties
                                                       in Continental North America.
                                                       PB82-101690/REB
                                                   FOREST HEALTH MONITORING. PROGRAM
                                                       Forest Health Monitoring Plot Design and Logistics Study.
                                                       PB92-118447/REB                   ^^
                                                   FOREST HEALTH MOMTORMQ PROJECT
                                                       Forest Health Monitoring, New England, 1990. Annual
                                                           M13018/REB
                                                   FOREST LAND
                                                       Forest Soil Response to Acid and Salt AddWora of Sul-
                                                       fate. 1. Sulfur Constituents and Net Retention.
                                                       PB92-106182/REB
                                                   FOREST MANAGEMENT
                                                       Monitoring Guideines to Evaluate Effects of Forestry Ac-
                                                       livities on Streams in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska.
                                                       PB92-104520/REB
                                                       Forest Health  Monitoring, New England, 1990.  Annual
                                                                            nt In
       •-113018/REB
    Can Intensive Manage
                                                                                      > Carbon Storage in

                                                       PB92-113224/REB
                                                       Assessment of Promising Forest Management Practices
                                                       and Technologies for Enhancing the Conservation and
                                                       Sequestration of Atmospheric Carbon and Their Costs at
                                                       the Site Level
                                                       PB92-122787/REB
                                                   FOREST TREES
                                                       Forest Health Monitoring, New England, 1990.  Annual
        l-113018/REB
FORESTRY
    Patch Size of  Forest Openings and Arthropod Popula-
    tions.
    PB82-108158/REB      _____
    Proceerjngs of the  International Workshop  on Large-
    Scale Reforestation. Held in Corvaffs, Oregon on May 9-
    10,1990.
    PB92-109131/REB
    Forest Health Monitoring Plot Design and Logistics Study.
    PB92-118447/REB
FORMALDEHYDE
    Urban Air Toxics Monitoring Program Carbonyt Results,
    1990.
    PB92-110030/REB
FOUNDATIONS
    Recommended  Foundation F* Materials  Construction
    Standard of the Florida Radon Research Program.
    PB92-10S86S/REB
                                                       Review of Energy Efficiency of Refrigerator/Freezer Gas-
                                                       kets.
                                                       PB92-106913/REB
                                                   FROGS
                                                       Developmental MnHormaUon of Frog Embryos: An Anaty-
                                                       sis of Teratogenicity of Chemical Mixtures.
                                                       PB92-108190/REB
                                                   FUEL CELLS
                                                       Fuel Cel Energy Recovery from LandM Gas.
                                                       PB92-121235ffiEB
    Fluorescence Techniques far Mots) Hu
    PB92-101369/REB
                                                       Second EPA Evaluation of the Platinum Gasaver Device
                                                       under Section 511 of the Motor Vehicle Information and
                                                       C^ Savings ArtfUpdated).
                                                       PB82-104413/REB
FUEL ECONOMY
    Emissions and Fuel Economy Effects of the Platinum Ga-
    saver, a Retrofit Device.
    PB92-104421/REB
FUEL OIL
    Sunken Vessels and Aircraft Containing Hazardous Mate-
    rials in Puget Sound.
    PB92-104512/REB
FUNGICIDES
    Captafol Final Decision.
    PB92-114289/REB
    RED Facts: Fosetyl-AI (AHette).
    PB92-114321 /REB
    Reregistration  EligSxIity  Document  (RED):  Fosetyl-AI
    (Afette).
    PB92-114339/REB
GAS CHROMATOORAPHY
    Method  25:  Determination of Total Gaseous Non-Meth-
    ane  Organic Emissions  as  Carbon  from  Stationary
    Sources.
    PB92-113026/REB
GAS PRODUCTION
    Analysis of  Factors  Affecting Methane Gas Recovery
    from Six Landfills.
    P892-101351/REB
    Fuel Cell Energy Recovery from Landfill Gas.
    PB92-121235/REB
GASKETS
    Review of Energy Efficiency of Refrigerator/Freezer Gas-
    kets
    PB92-106913/REB
GENERAL DYNAMICS POMONA DIVISION
    Evaluation of Five Waste Minimization Technologies at
    the General Dynamics Pomona Division Plant
    PB92-125756/REB
GEOCHEMISTRY
    Carbonate EquHbria and Groundwater Sample Collection:
    Implications for Estimated Average Subsurface Properties
    in Continental North America
    PB92-101690/REB
GEOMEMBRANES
    Technical  Guidance Document  Inspection Techniques
    for the Fabrication of Geomembrane Field Seams.
    PB92-109057/REB
GEOSYMTHETtt MATERIALS
    Technical  Guidance  Document  Inspection Techniques
    for the Fabrication of Geomembrane Field Seams.
    P892-109057/REB
OtARDIAMUflrS
    Comparison of Animal Infectivity, Excystation. and Fluoro-
    genic Dye as Measures of 'GiarrJa muris' Cyst Inactiva-
    tnn by Ozone.
    PB92-124288/REB
GUAL FIBRILLARV ACIDIC PROTEIN
    Assessment of Neurotoncity-. Use of Gfial FibrHlary Acidte
    Protein as a Bkxnarker.
    PB92-110527/HEB
    Concentration of Gfial FtoriHary Arxic Protein Increases
    with Age in the Mouse and Rat Brain.
    PB92-110635/REB
GLOBAL ECOSYSTEMS DATABASE
    Global Ecosystems Database. Version 0.1 (Beta-test).
    EPA  Global Ornate Research Program.  NOAA/NGDC
    Global Change Database Program. Prototype 1.  Data-
    base Documentation. NGDC Key to Geophysical Records
    Documentation No. 25.
    PB92-122803/REB
GLOBAL WARMING
    Three Case  SturJes of Lake Temperature and Stratifica-
    tion Response to Warnier Climate.
    PB92-121391/REB
GOKJLAHT
    Pesticide Fact Sheet Number 227: GokHaht
    PB92-110006/REB
GRAVEL
    Techniques to Determine Spatial Variations in Hydraulic
    Conductivity of Sand and Gravel.
    PB92-109123/REB
GROUND COVER
    RCRA Cover Systems for Waste Management Facilities.
    PB92-12O435/REB
GROUND WATER
    Regional Assessment of Aquifer Vulnerability and Sensi-
    tivity in the Qxiterrnnous United States.
    PB92-100148/REB
    Carbonate Equlbria and Groundwater Sample Collection:
    Implications for Estimated Average Subsurface Properties
    in Continental North America.
    PB92-101690/REB
    Technology  Evaluation  Report Biological Treatment of
    Wood Preserving Site Groundwater by Biotrol, Inc.
    PB92-110048/REB
    Performance Evaktaoons  of Pump-and-Treat RemerJ-
    attons.
    PB92-114461/REB
    FacHtated  Transport  of  Inorganic   Contaminants  in
    Ground Water Part 2. Colloidal Transport
    PB92-114S03/REB
    Extraction  of Mercury from Groundwater Using  Immobi-
    feed Algae.
    PB92-121367/REB
KW-8       VOL  92, No.  1

-------
                                                                     KEYWORD INDEX
                                                                                                                                                    HUMIC ACIDS
    Benzene Groundwater Exposure Study, Nesmith, South
    Carolina.
    PB92-123801/REB
    Optimizing BTEX Biodegradation under Denitrifying Con-
    ditions.
    PB92-124262/REB
    Applicability of UV/OxkJabon Technologies to Treat Con-
    taminated Groundwater.
    PB92-126853/REB
HANDBOOKS
    PtRLA DBMS Quick Reference Guide.
    PB92-110824/REB
HAZARDOUS MATERIALS
    Methods for  Measuring the Acute Toxicrty of Effluents
    and Receiving Waters to Freshwater and Marine Orga-
    nisms (Fourth Edition).
    PB91-167650/REB
    Guides  to  Pollution  Prevention: The  Fiberglass-Rein-
    forced and Composite Plastics Industry.
    PB91-227967/REB
    Guides to Pollution Prevention: The- Marine Maintenance
    and Repair Industry.
    PB91 -228817/REB
    Superfund Program: Ten Years of Progress.
    PB91-921286/REB
    Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 3): Hrantoa
    Landfill, Buffalo Township,  PA.  (First Remedial Action),
    June 1990.
    PB91-921566/REB
    Citizens' Guidance Manual  for the Technical Assistance
    Grant Program.
    PB92-101435/REB
    OSWER Source Book: Training and Technology Transfer
    Resources.
    PB92-102169/REB
    Waste Minimization  Assessment for a  Manufacturer of
    Refurbished RaHcar Bearing Assemblies.
    PB92-104348/REB
    Waste Minimization Assessment for a  Manufacturer of
    Prototype Printed Circuit Boards.
    PB92-104355/REB
    Waste Minimization Assessment for a  Manufacturer of
    Speed Reduction Equipment
    PB92-104363/REB
    Waste Minimization Assessment for a  Manufacturer of
    Printed Labels.
    PB92-104371/REB
    Sunken Vessels and Aircraft Containing Hazardous Mate-
    rials in Puget Sound.
    PB92-104512/REB
    Community Relations during  Enforcement Activities  and
    Development of the Administrative Record.
    PB92-105469/REB
    Section 300801) Module Order on Consent
    PB92-105477/REB
    Pilot-Scale  Incineration of  Contaminated  Soil from  the
    Purity OH Sales and McCotl Superfund Sites.
    PB92-105857/REB
    Waste  Reduction Technology  Evaluations of the  U.S.
    EPA WRITE Program.
    PB92-108133/REB
    Technical Guidance  Document Inspection  Techniques
    for the Fabrication of Geomembrane Field Seams.
    PB92-109057/REB
    Guide for Conducting Treatability Studies under CERCLA
    Aerobic Biodegradation Remedy Screening. Interim Guid-
    ance.
    PB92-109065/REB
    Guide for Conducting Treatability Studies under CERCLA:
    Aerobic Biodegradation Remedy Screening.
    PB92-109073/REB
    Superfund Engineering Issue: Issues Affecting the Appli-
    cability  and  Success of Remedial/Removal Incineration
    Projects.
    PB92-109081/REB
    Summary of the 1991 EPA/AWMA International Symposi-
    um: Measurement of Toxic and Related  Air Pollutants.
    Held in Durham, North Carolina on May 6-10,1991.
    PB92-110386/REB
    Sampling of Contaminated Sites.
    PB92-110436/REB
    RCflA  Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 1. User's
    Guide. Key Word Index.
    PB92-111715/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 2 (9420.1980-
    9434.1900). Hazardous Waste Management System (Part
    260). General, Definitions, Petitions.
    PB92-111723/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 3 (9441.1980-
    9441.1986).   Identification  and Listing of  Hazardous
    Waste (Part 261). General.
    PB92-111731/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 4 (9441.1987-
    9441.1990).  Identification  and Listing  of  Hazardous
    Waste (Part 261). General.
    PB92-111749/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 5 (9442.1980-
    9444.1986).  Identification  and Listing  of  Hazardous
    Waste  (Part  261).  Criteria  for Identifying  Hazardous
    Waste, Characteristics of Hazardous Waste, Lists of Haz-
    ardous Waste.
    PB92-111756/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 6 (9444.1987-
    9457.1990).  Identification  and Listing  of  Hazardous
    Wsyte  (Part  261). Lists (Confd),  Generator Standards
    (Part 262),  General,  Pretransportation, Recordkeeping,
    Special Conditions, Importing.
    PB92-111764/REB
RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 7 (9460.1980-
9482.1990). Transporter Standards (Part 263). (TSDFs)
(Parts 264  and 265), TSDF Technical  Requirements
(Parts 264 and 265).
PB92-111772/REB
RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 8 (9483.1980-
9489.1990). TSDF Technical  Requirements (Parts 264
and 265). Tanks, Surface Impoundments, Waste Piles.
Land Treatment  Landfills,  Incinerators,  Miscellaneous
Units.
PB92-111780/REB
RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 9 (9490.1980-
9521.1990). Standards for Managing Specific Hazardous
Wastes (Part 266). Permitting Policies, Permitting Proce-
dures (Parts 124 and 270).
PB92-111798/REB
RCRA   Permit   Policy  Compendium.   Volume   10
(9522.1960-9528.1990). Permitting Procedures (Parts 124
and  270). Applications,  Conditions,  Changes,  Interim
Status.
PB92-111806/REB
RCRA   Permit   Policy  Compendium.   Volume   11
(9530.1980-9581.1990). Air  Emissions Standards, State
Authorization (Part 271), Land Disposal Restrictions (Part
268). Waste Minimization, Subtitle D, RCRA Grant Funds.
PB92-111814/REB
Comparison of In situ Vitrification and Rotary Kiln Inciner-
ation for Soils Treatment
PB92-113174/REB
DuPont/Oberiin Mtarofittration Technology.  Applications
Analysis Report
PB92-119023/REB
RCRA Cover Systems for Waste Management Facilities.
PB92-120435/RE8
Cleaning of Rue Gases from Waste Combustors, 1990.
PB92-121300/REB
Role of Gas-Phase O2 in the Formation of PCDD/PCDF
during Waste Combustion.
PB92-121383/REB
Environmental Profiles and Hazard Indices for Constitu-
ents of Municipal Sludge: Mercury.
PB92-122977/REB
Environmental Profiles and Hazard Indices for Constitu-
ents of Municipal Sludge: Lead.
PB92-122985/REB
Environmental Profiles and Hazard Indices for Constitu-
ents of Municipal Sludge: Beryllium.
PB92-122993/REB
Environmental Profiles and Hazard Indices for Constitu-
ents of Municipal Sludge: Nickel.
PB92-123009/REB
National Survey of Hazardous  Waste Generators and
Treatment Storage, Disposal,  and Recycling Facilities in
1986. Hazardous Waste Generation and Management
PB92-123025/REB
Toncotogical Implementations of Remediating Hazardous
Wastes.
PB92-124171/REB
Evaluation of Five Waste Minimization Technologies at
the General Dynamics Pomona Division Plant
PB92-125756/REB
Removal of Creosote from Soil by Thermal Desorption.
PB92-126838/REB
Applicability of UV/Oxidation Technologies to Treat Con-
taminated Groundwater.
PB92-126853/REB
Prospects for In situ Chemical Treatment for Contaminat-
ed Son.
PB92-126929/REB
PA-Score (Preliminary Assessment Score), Version  1.0
(for Microcomputers).
PB92-500032/REB
Health Effects Assessment Summary Tables.
PB92-921100/REB
Superfund: Program Policies and Administration.
PB92-963200/REB
Superfund: Site Assessment and Remediation.
PB92-963300/REB
PA-Score Software, Version 1.0.  Users Manual and Tuto-
rial.
PB92-963302/REB
Guidance for Performing Preliminary Assessments under
CERCLA.
PB92-963303/REB
Risk Assessment  Guidance for Superfund. Volume 1.
Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part B, Development
of Risk-Based Preliminary Remediation Goals).
P892-963333/REB
Risk Assessment  Guidance for Superfund. Volume 1.
Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part C, Risk Evalua-
tion of Remedial Alternatives).
PB92-963334/REB
Homeowners Exempted from  Superfund Cleanup Costs:
National Policy Overview.
PB92-963336/REB
ECO Update: The Role of BTAGs in  Ecological Assess-
ment Volume 1, Number 1, September 1991.
PB92-963337/REB
Superfund: Removals and Emergency Response.
PB92-963400/REB
Superfund Removal  Procedures: Guidance on  the Con-
sideration of ARABS during Removal Actions.
PB92-963401/REB
Superfund: Technology and Analytical  Services.
PB92-963500/REB
Superfund: Enforcement
PB92-963600/REB
    Superfund: Record of Decision.
    PB92-964700/REB

HAZARDOUS WASTES
    Conducting RCRA Inspections at Mixed Waste Facilities.
    PB92-105196/REB
    Evaluating the  Human  Health  Effects of Hazardous
    Wastes:  Reproduction  and Development Neurotoxicity,
    Genetic Toxictty and Cancer.
    PB92-110352/REB
    International Symposium on Field Screening Methods for
    Hazardous Wastes and Toxic Chemicals (2nd),  Proceed-
    ings.  Held in Us Vegas, Nevada on  February 12-14,
    1991.
    PB92-125764/REB

HEALTH HAZARDS
    Evaluating the  Human  Health  Effects of Hazardous
    Wastes:  Reproduction  and Development Neurotoxicity,
    Genetic Toxicity and Cancer.
    PB92-110352/REB
    Toxicity Equivalency  Factors for PCBs.
    PB92-113349/REB
    Health Effects Assessment Summary Tables.
    PB92-921100/REB

HEAT
    Excessive Cycling Converts  PCR Products to  Random-
    Length Higher Molecular Weight Fragments.
    PB92-124577/REB
    Improved Sample Recovery  in Thermocycle Sequencing
    Protocols.
    PB92-124593/REB

HEAVY DUTY ENGINES
    Application for Certification 1991  Model Year Heavy-Duty
    Diesel Engines - Mack Truck.
    PB91-242768/REB
    Application for Certification 1991  Model Year Heavy-Duty
    Engines - Navistar.
    PB91-242784/REB

HEAVY DUTY VEHICLES
    Application for Certification 1991  Model Year Heavy-Duty
    Vehicles - Mack Trucks.
    PB91-242776/REB

HEUOTHIS ZEA NPV
    Reregistration Eligibility Document (RED): Heltothis zea
    NPV (List A, Case Number 151).
    P892-111863/REB
    RED Facts: Heliothis zea NPV.
    PB92-111871/REB

HERBICIDES
    Microbial Degradation  of Flurtamone in Three Georgia
    Soils.
    PB92-101682/REB
    Developmental Toxicity of Bromoxynil in Mice and Rats.
    PB92-113265/REB
    Ethalfluralin Position Document 1/2/3/4.
    PB92-114263/REB
    Interiaboratory Comparison of Thermospray and Particle
    Beam Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Inter-
    faces: Evaluation of a Chlorinated Phenoxy Acid Herbi-
    cide Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Analysis
    Method.
    PB92-124734/REB

HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM
    Laboratory and Field Evaluations of a Methodology for
    Determining Hexavalent  Chromium Emissions  from Sta-
    tionary Sources.
    PB92-101336/REB

HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY
    Estimation of Water Solubility and Octanol/Water Parti-
    tion Coefficient of Hydrophobe  Dyes. Part 2. Reverse-
    Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography.
    PB92-124338/REB

HIPPOCAMPUS
    Compensatory Alterations in Receptor-Stimulated Phos-
    phoinositide Hydrolysis in the Hippocampus Vary as  a
    Function of Dose of Cotohicine.
    PB92-110501/REB
    Cotehteine-lnduced Deafferentabon of  the Hippocampus
    Selectively Disrupts Cholinergic  Rhythmical Slow Wave
    Activity.
    PB92-120476/REB

HOST-PARASITE RELATIONS
    Nutritional Role of Endosymbiotic Bacteria in Animal-Bac-
    teria Symbioses: 'Sotemya velum', a Case Study.
    PB92-112895/REB

HOUSES
    Recommended  Foundation  Fill  Materials Construction
    Standard of the Florida Radon Research Program.
    PB92-105665/REB
    Parametric  Analysis of  the Installation and  Operating
    Costs of Active Son Depressurization Systems for Resi-
    dential Radon Mitigation.
    PB92-116037/REB
    Cost Analysis  of Soil Depressurization Techniques for
    Indoor Radon Reduction.
    PB92-120443/REB
    Effect of Natural Ventilation  on Radon and Radon Proge-
    ny Levels in Houses.
    PB92-124148/REB

HUMIC ACIDS
    Fluorescence Techniques for Metal-Humic Interactions.
    PB92-101369/REB
                                                                                                                                              March
                                                                                                  KVV-9

-------
                                                                    KEYWORD  INDEX
    Continuous Muttitigand Distribution Model Used to Pradct
    the Stability Constant of CuQI) Metal Comptexaten with
    Humic Material from Fluorescence Quenching Data.
    PB92-101377/REB
HYDRAWJC CONDUCTIVITY
    Techniques to Determine Spatial Variations in Hydraufc
    Conductivity of Sand and Gravel.
    PB92-109123/REB
    Construction, Monitoring, and Parformance of Two Sol
    Liners.
    PB92-124049/HEB
HYDRAULIC FRACTUfMNO
    Hydraulic Fracturing to Improve Nutrient and Oxygen De-
    Svery for In situ BJoredamation.
    PB92-121334/REB

HYDROCARBONS
    Manual  for Non-CFC Aerosol Packaging:  Conversion
    from CFC to Hydrocarbon PropeRants.
    PB92-101344/REB
HYPOTHERMIA
    Differential  Impact of  Hypothermia and Pentobarbital on
    Brain-Stem Auditory Evoked Responses.
    PB92-113240/REB


    Enhanced NeurotoxicJty of 3,7-linirxxfcpropionHrite Fol-
    lowing Pretraatment with Carbon Tetrachloride in the Rat
    PB92-113323/REB
                                                    INDEXES
                                                       National Air Toxics Information Clearinghouse: BUiogra-
                                                       phy of Selected Reports and Federal Register Notices
                                                       Belated to Air Toxics. Index, 1991.
                                                       PB92-111913/REB
                                                    INDOOR AM POLLUTION
                                                       Indoor Air Assessment A Review of Indoor Air Quality
                                                       Risk Characterization Studtes.
                                                       PB92-109107/REB
                                                       Asbestos Rber Release during Change-Out of Filter Bags
                                                       from HEPA-Fttenx) Vacuum Cleaners.
                                                       PB92-1132O8/REB
                                                       Indoor Air  Poftitente  from Unvented  Kerosene Heater
                                                       Emissions in Mobfe Homes: Studies on Parades, Serm-
                                                       votaSte Organics, Carbon Monoxide, and Mutagenitity.
                                                       PB92-113232/REB
                                                       Indoor Air-Assessment An Inventory of Indoor Air Quality
                                                       rumoafch ki the United States: 1989-1990.
                                                       PB92-114S4S/REB
                                                       Development  of Alternate Performance Standard (or
                                                       Radon Resistant  Construction Based  on Short-Term/
                                                       Long-Term  Indoor Radon Concentrations. Volume 1.
                                                       Technical Report
                                                       PB92-115211/REB
                                                       DsvMopnMfii  of Alternate Poifonnsnco StsnosFd for
                                                       Radon Resistant  Construction Based  on Short-Term/
                                                           j-Term  Indoor  Radon Concentrations. Volume 2. Ap-
        SYSTEM
    Evaluation of Immunotoxicrly of an Urban ProSe of Nitro-
    gen Dioxide: Acute, Subchronic, and Chronic Studfes.
    PBS2-113356/REB
    Evaluation of the ImmunotoxicJty of Only Administered
    2-Methoxyacetic Add in Fischer 344 Rats.
    PB92-124601/REB
    In vitro Lymphocyte Proliferation Assays: The MHogen-
    StknuMed Response and the Mixed Lymphocyte Reac-
    tion in Immunotoxicity Testing.
    PB92-126911/REB
IN-SITU PROCESSING
    Hydraufc Fracturing to Improve Nutrient and Oxygen De-
    Ivery for In situ Btoredamation.
    PB92-121334/REB
IN SITU TREATMENT
    (rospocts lor In situ ChBcnfcsl Trotttrnoiit for GtH >lftitiii nil
    edSoi.
    PB92-126929/REB
IN VtTRO ANALYSTS
    ki vitro Teratology.
    PB92-124700/REB
INCINERATION
                                                           i-115229/REB
                                                       Proceedkigs of the Workshop on Radon Potential Map-
                                                       ping. Florida Radon Research Program. Held ki Gaines-
                                                       v*e, Florida on Apr! 20,1990.
                                                       PB92-115278/REB
                                                       Proceedings:  The  1991   International Symposium on
                                                       Radon and Radon Reduction Technology.  Volume 1.
                                                       Symposium Oral Papers Opening Session and Technical
                                                       SesSoVw 1  tnrwjghT
                                                       PB92-115351/REB
                                                       ProceeoTnga:  The  1991   IntemaBonal Symposium on
                                                       Radon and Radon Reduction Technology.  Volume 2.
                                                       Symposium Orel  Papers  Technical Sessions 6 through

                                                       PB82-115369/REB
                                                       Proosedhga:  The  1991   International Symposium on
                                                       Radon and Radon Reduction Technology.  Volume 3.
                                                       Symposium Panel and Poster Papers Technical Sessions
                                                        1 through 5.
                                                        PB92-1153
                                                              15377/REB
                                                       Proceedings:  The  1991 International Symposium  on
                                                       Radon and  Radm Reduction Technology. Volume 4.
                                                       Symposium Poster PHpors Technical Sessions 6 through
                                                       10.
                                                       PB92-115385/REB
                                                       Parametric  Analysis of the  (retaliation and Operating
                                                       Costs of Active Sol Deuressunzatjon Systems for Res?
                                                       dental Radon MWgaHon.
Superfund Engineering Issue: Iss
catxtty and Success of RemedM/Removal
                                   Affecting the Appt-
                                   emoval Tiicineialimi
        i-109061/REB
    Comparison of In situ Vitrification and Rotary Kin Inciner-
    ation for Sois Treatment
    P892-113174/REB
PB82-116037/P
Modelng  Air Flow Dynamics in Radon  Mitigation  Sys-
tems: A Simpified Approach.
PB92-12O427/REB
Cost Analysis of SoilDapressurization Techniques for
Indoor Radon Reduction.
PB92-120443/REB
Sub-Slab Pressure Field Extension in Schools and Other
      I Diffusion Flame.
    P892-12O4SO/REB
    United Stales Environmental Protection /
    Waste  Combustton flnsidiie
    Evaluation Program.
    PB92-121177/REB
    U.S. EPA Program for Evaluation of Treatment and U»
    ation Technologies for Municipal Waste  Combustion
    Residues.
    PB92-1211B5/REB
    Comparison of Five SoWrficaSon/Stabfeatton Proceesss
    lor Treatment of Municipal Waste Combustion Residues.
    Part 1. Physical Testing,
    PB92-121193/REB
    Comparison of fi"*'Fn''^<'^rt/^*fl'HT*jillbf" Processes  for
    Treatment  of  Municipal  Waste Combustion Residues.
    Part 2. LeaoNng Properties.
    P892-121201/REB
    Role of Gas-Phase CB in the Formation of PCDO/PCDF
    during Waste Combustion.
    PB92-121383/REB
    FractionBtlon of Complex Combustion Mbdures Using an
    ton-Exchange Methodology.
    PB92-126887/REB
    En|niilmniiUil InvosUuefion of PIC FmiikaUun In CFC tncin-
                                                           i-121268/REB
                                                       Effect of Natural Ventftabon on Radon and Radon ftoge-
                                                       ny Levels in Houses.
                                                       PB92-124148/REB
                                                       Waste MMmgaUon Assessment for a Manufacturer of
                                                            1 Reduction Equipment
                                                           i-104363/REB
                                                    MDUSTRtAL WASTES
                                                       Industrial  Pollution   Prevention  Opportunities  for  the
                                                       1990s.
                                                       PB91-22Q376/REB
                                                       Guides to Pollution Prevention: The Marine Maintenance
                                                       PB91-228817/
                                                       Aoptatfon of  MuWapackal TechnJauesto  the Precise
                                                       kwfilifkiBliufi qf Aldehydes in the Environment
                                                       PB92-10141
                                                       phatas from an Industrial Effluent
                                                       PB92-1
                                                                              of Afcyl and Chtoroafcvl Phos-
                                                           M24353/REB
                                                    MFLUENZA
                                                       Enhance and Prolonged Purnonary Influenza virus Infec-
                                                       lion Fdowina Phosgene InhaMJon.
                                                       PB82-124€Sfl/REBi
    P892-126952/REB
    PiotScale Incineration of Contaminated Sol from the
    PurMy Ol Sates and McCol Superfund SHas.
    PB92-10S8S7/REB
    Methodology for Assessing Erivtonmental nolrjesoa of
    and Exposure to MunldpaT Sofd Waste Combustor Re-
    PB92-109149/REB
    Trace Metal Fate in a Rotary Kin Incineialor with an Ion-
    izing Wet Scrubber (Journal Article).
    P892-110S6B/REB
    Combustion Control of Trace Organic Air PoManta from
    Municipal Waste Combustors.
    PB92-1131S8/REB
    Cloaningof Ftoe Gases from Waste Combustors, 1990.
    PB92-121300/REB
                                                       National Air Toxics Information Clearinghouse: autogra-
                                                       phy of Selected Reports and Federal Register Notices
                                                       Related to Air Toxics. Volume 5. Citations, 1991.
                                                       PB92-111830/REB
                                                       National At Toxics Information Clearinghouse: Ongoing
                                                       nosoarch and Regulatory Development Projects.
                                                       PB92-111905/REB
                                                       National At Toxics Information Clearinghouse: autogra-
                                                       phy of Selected Reports and Federal Register Notices
                                                       Related to Air Toxics. Index, 1991.
                                                       PB92-111913/REB
                                                    MFORMATON RETREVAL
                                                       Pen^Traddixi System (PTS): A User's Manual.
                                                       PB92-105669/REB
                                                       Permit Tracking System (PTS), Version 1.0  (for Micro-
                                                       computers).
                                                       PB82-500347/REB
INFORMATION SYSTEMS
    PIRLA DBMS Quick Reference Guide.
    PB92-110824/REB
    Global Ecosystems Database. Version  0.1  (Beta-test).
    EPA  Global Climate Research Program. NOAA/NGDC
    Global Change Database Program. Prototype  1. Data-
    base  Documentation. NGDC Key to Geophysical Records
    Documentation No. 25.
    PB92-122803/REB
    Design, Development and Implementation of AIRS' Area
    and Mobile Source Subsystem.
    PB92-124213/REB

INFORMATION TRANSFER
    INFOTERRA/USA Directory of Environmental Sources.
    PB92-102433/REB
    Environmental  Monitoring and  Assessment Program:
    1991  Project Descriptors.
    PB92-114479/REB

INORGANIC COMPOUNDS
    Facilitated  Transport  of Inorganic  Contaminants  in
    Ground Water  Part 2. Colloidal Transport
    PB92-114503/REB

INSECTICIDES
    Pesticide Fact Sheet Number 227: Gotalaht
    PB92-110006/REB

INSPECTION
    IM240 Transient t/M Dynamometer Driving Schedule and
    the Composite  I/M Test Procedure.
    PB92-104405/REB
    Recommended  I/M Short  Test  Procedures  for  the
    1990's: Six Alternatives.
    PB92-104439/REB
    I/M Network Type: Effects on  Emission  Reductions,
    Cost and Convenience. Technical Information Document
    PB92-104447/REB
    Integrating  On-Board Diagnostic System  Capabilities into
    the Inspection and Repair Functions of I/M Programs.
    PB92-104454/REB

INSPECTIONS
    Technical Guidance Document Inspection Techniques
    for the Fabrication of Geomembrane Reid Seams.
    P892-1090S7/REB

INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT
    NERISK: An Expert System to Enhance the Integration of
    Pesticides with Arthropod Biological Control.
    PB92-124254/REB

INTERLABORATORY COMPARISONS
    Interlaboratory  Comparison of Thermospray and Particle
    Beam Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Inter-
    faces: Evaluation of a Chlorinated Phenoxy Acid Herbi-
    cide Liquid  Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Analysis

    PB92-124734/HEB

INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
    Application  for  Certification 1991 Model  Year light-Duty
    Vehicles - Audi.
    PB91-242644/REB
    Application  for Certification 1991 Model  Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles-BMW.
    PB91-242651/REB
    Application  for  Certification 1991 Model  Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles - Ferrari - Rat
    PB91-242669/REB
    Application  for  Certification 1991 Model  Year Light-Duty

    PB91-242677/REB
    Application  for  Certification 1991 Model  Year Light-Duty
    Trucks-Ford.
    PB91-242685/REB
    Application  for  Certification 1991 Model  Year Light-Duty

    PB91-242693/REB
    Application  for  Certification 1991 Model  Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles - General Motors.
    PB91 -242701 /REB
    Application  for  Certification 1991 Model  Year Light-Duty
    Trucks - Isuzu Motors.
    PB91-242719/REB
    Application  for  Certification 1991 Model  Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles-Isuzu Motors.
    PB91-242727/REB
    Application  for  Certification 1991 Model  Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles and Light-Duty Trucks - Nissan.
    PB91-242735/REB
    Application  for  Certification 1991 Model  Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles - Volkswagen.
    PB91-242743/REB
    Apptcatkxi  for Certification 1991 Model Year Heavy-Duty
    Diesel Engines - Mack Truck.
    PB91-242768/REB
    Appfcatkxi  for Certification 1991 Model Year Heavy-Duty
    Vehicles - Mack Trucks.
    PB91-242776/REB
    AppKation  for Certification 1991 Model Year Heavy-Duty
    Engines - Navistar.
    PB91-242784/REB

KELP
    Long-Term  Changes ki  the  Area!  Extent of  Tidal
    Marshes, Eekjrass Meadows and  Kelp Forests  of Puget
    Sound.
    PB92-104496/REB
KW-10     VOL 92, No. 1

-------
                                                                     KEYWORD  INDEX
                                                                                                                                          MANGANESE OXIDES
KEPONE
    Influence  of  Size on Fate and  Ecological Effects  of
    Kepone in Physical Models.
    PB92-121326/REB
KIDNEY
    Neural Factors in the Development of Renal Function:
    Effect of  Neonatal  Central Catecholaminergic  Lesions
    witfi 6-Hydroxydopamine.
    PB92-120492/REB
KINDUNG (NEUROLOGY)
    Potentiation of Inhibition with Perforant Path Kindling: An
    NMDA-Receptor Dependent Process.
    PB92-120468/REB
LABELS
    Waste Minimization  Assessment for a  Manufacturer  of
    Printed Labels.
    PB92-104371/REB
    Compact Label File -1992 (Rene 1 - 5281).
    PB92-911699/REB
LAKE MICHIGAN
    Determination and Occurrence of AHH-Active Polychlori-
    nated Siphenyls. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachtoro-p-Dioxin and 2,3,7,8-
    Tetracrikxodibenzofuran in Lake Michigan  Sediment and
    Biota. The Question of Their  Relative lexicological Sig-
    nificance.
    PB92-108125/REB
LAKES
    PIRLA DBMS Quick Reference Guide.
    PB92-110824/REB
    Three Case Studies  of Lake Temperature  and Stratifica-
    tion Response to Warmer Climate.
    PB92-121391/REB
LAND COVERS
    Technical  Guidance  Document  Inspection  Techniques
    for the Fabrication of Geomembrane Field Seams.
    PB92-109057/REB
LAND POLLUTION
    Mfcrobial Degradation of Flurtamone  in Three Georgia
    Sods.
    PB92-101682/REB
    Marine Debris Survey Manual.
    PB92-1034S6/REB
    On-Site Methods for Assessing Chemical Impact on the
    Soil Environment Using Earthworms: A Case Study at the
    Baird and  McGuire Superfund Site, Holbrook. Massachu-
    setts.
    PB92-108166/REB
    Forest Sou Response to Acid and Salt Additions of Sul-
    fate. 1. Sulfur Constituents and Net Retention.
    PB92-108182/REB
    Assessing UST Corrective Action Technology: A Scientif-
    ic Evaluation of the Mobility of Organic  Contaminants in
    Subsurface Environments.
    PB92-114552/REB
    Model of Vims Transport in Unseturated Soil.
    PB92-119957/REB
LAND POLLUTION ABATEMENT
    Technical  Guidance  Document  Inspection  Techniques
    for the Fabrication of Geomembrane Field Seams.
    PB92-109057/REB
    Volumetric Leak Detection in Large Underground Storage
    Tanks. Volume 1.
    PB92-114966/REB
    Volumetric Leak Detection in Large Underground Storage
    Tanks. Volume 2. Appendices A through  E.
    PB92-114974/REB
    Construction,  Monitoring, and Performance of Two Soil
    Uners.
    PB92-124049/REB
LAND POLLUTION CONTROL
    Technology  Evaluation  Report  Biotrol Soil Washing
    System for Treatment of a Wood Preserving Site. Volume

    PB92-115310/REB
    Technology  Evaluation  Report  Biotrol Soil Washing
    System for Treatment of a Wood Preserving Site. Volume
    2, Part A.
    PB92-115328/REB
    Technology  Evaluation  Report  Biotrol Soil Washing
    System for Treatment of a Wood Preserving Site. Volume
    2, PartB.
    PB92-11S336/REB
    DuPont/OberKn Microflltration Technology. Applications
    Analysis Report
    PB92-119023/REB
    RCRA Cover Systems for Waste Management Facilities.
    PB92-120435/REB
    Bioventing to Treat Fuel  Spills from Underground Storage
    Tanks.
    PB92-121342/REB
    Son-Air Permeability Method Evaluation.
    PB92-124239/REB
    U.S.  EPA SITE Demonstration of AWD  Technologies'
    AguaDetox/SVE System.
    P692-124387/REB
LAND RECLAMATION
    Hydraulic Fracturing to Improve Nutrient  and Oxygen De-
    livery for In sttu BJoredamation.
    PB92-121334/REB
LAW ENFORCEMENT
    Enforcement Document Retrieval System (EDRS) - ASCII
    (1972-November 1991).
    PB92-592210/REB
    Enforcement  Document Retrieval System  (EDRS)  -
    EBCDIC (1972-November 1991).
    PB92-592220/REB
    Environmental  Protection  Agency  Civil  Enforcement
    Docket
    PB92-921700/REB
    Superfund: Enforcement
    PB92-963600/REB
LEAD ACID BATTERIES
    Selection of  Control  Technologies for Remediation  of
    Lead Battery Recycling Sites.
    PB92-114537/REB
LEAD AND COPPER RULE
    Lead and  Copper Rule Guidance Manual.  Volume  1.
    Monitoring.
    PB92-112101/REB
LEAD (METAL)
    Lead and  Copper Rule Guidance Manual.  Volume  1.
    PB92-112101/REB
    Standard Operating Procedures for Lead in Paint by Hot-
    plate - or Microwave-Based Acid Digestions and Atomic
    Absorption or  Inductively Coupled  Plasma  Emission
    Spectrometry.
    PB92-114172/REB
    Standard Operating Procedures for Measurement of Lead
    in Paint Using the SCITEC  MAP-3 X-ray Fluorescence
    Spectrometer.
    PB92-114180/REB
    Environmental  Profiles and Hazard Indices for Constitu-
    ents of Municipal Sludge: Lead.
    PB92-122985/REB
LEAD POISONING
    Child Lead Exposure Study, Leeds, Alabama.
    PB92-123793/REB
LEAKAGE
    Volumetric Leak Detection in Large Underground Storage
    Tanks. Volume 1.
    PB92-114966/REB
    Volumetric Leak Detection in Large Underground Storage
    Tanks. Volume 2. Appendices A through E.
    PB92-114974/REB
LEARNING DISORDERS
    Neonatal  Exposure to Trimethyltin  Disrupts Spatial De-
    layed Alternation Learning in Preweanling Rats.
    PB92-124718/REB
LEAVES (BOTANY)
    Foliar Injury Symptoms and Pigment Concentrations  in
    Red Spruce Saplings in the Southern Appalachians.
    PB92-113216/REB
LIABILITIES
    Homeowners Exempted from Superfund Cleanup Costs:
    National Policy Overview.
    PB92-963336/REB
LIFE CYCLES
    Influence  of Constant and Fluctuating Salinity on Re-
    sponses of 'Mysidopsis bahia' Exposed to Cadmium in a
    LjffrCycteTest             ~*~-~
    PB92-108042/REB
    Effects  of a Contaminated Sediment on  Life History
    Traits and Population Growth Rate of 'Neanthes Arena-
    ceodentata' (Potvchaeta Nereidae) in the Laboratory.
    PB92-108059/REB
    Life History and lexicological Comparisons of Temperate
    and Subtropical Myskte-
    PB92-124304/REB
UGANDS
    Continuous MuWgand Distribution Model Used to Predict
    the Stability Constant of Cu(ll) Metal Compfexation with
    Humic Material from Fluorescence Quenching Data
    PB92-101377/REB
UGHT DUTY VEHICLES
    Application for Certification 1991 Model Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles - Audi.
    PB91-242644/REB
    Application for Certification 1991 Model Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles - BMW.
    PB91-242651/REB
    Application for Certification 1991 Model Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles - Ferrari - Rat
    PB91-242669/REB
    Application for Certification 1991 Model Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles - Ford.
    P891-242677/REB
    Application for Certification 1991 Model Year Light-Duty
    Trucks - Ford.
    PB91-24268S/REB
    Application for Certification 1991 Model Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles - Fuji.
    PB91-242693/REB
    Application for Certification 1991 Model Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles - General Motors.
    PB91-242701/REB
    Application for Certification 1991 Model Year Light-Duty
    Trucks - Isuzu Motors.
    PB91 -242719/REB
    Application for Certification 1991 Model Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles - Isuzu Motors.
    PB91-242727/REB
    Application for  Certification 1991 Model Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles and Light-Duty Trucks - Nissan.
    PB91-242735/REB
    Application for Certification 1991 Model Year Light-Duty
    Vehicles - Volkswagen.
    PB91-242743/REB
UGNOCELLULOSE
    Ugnocenutostc-Plastic Composites from Recycled Materi-
    als.
    PB92-126861 /REB
LINING PROCESSES
    Technical Guidance Document:  Inspection Techniques
    for the Fabrication of Geomembrane Field Seams.
    PB92-109057/REB
LININGS
    Construction. Monitoring, and Performance of Two Soil
    Liners.
    PB92-124049/REB
UPIDS
    Evaluation of Selected Lipid Methods for Normalizing Pol-
    lutant Bioaccumulation.
    PB92-124379/REB
LIQUID CHflOMATOGRAPHY
    Interiaboratory Comparison  of Thermospray and Particle
    Beam  Liquid Chromatography/Mass  Spectrometry Inter-
    faces:  Evaluation of a Chlorinated Phenoxy Acid Herbi-
    cide Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Analysis
    Method.
    PB92-124734/REB
LIQUID FILTERS
    DuPont/Oberlin MterofHtration Technology. Applications
    Analysis Report.
    PB92-119023/REB
LIQUID SECONDARY ION MASS SPECTROMETRY
    Influence of Experimental Conditions on the Liquid Sec-
    ondary Ion Mass Spectra of Sulfonated Azo Dyes.
    PB92-124361/REB
LIQUID WASTE  DISPOSAL
    Trajectory and Incineration of Rogue Droplets in a Turbu-
    lent  Diffusion Flame.
    PB92-120450/REB
LIQUID WASTES
    DuPont/Oberiin Mterofittration Technology. Applications
    Analysis Report
    PB92-119023/REB
UTTER
    Marine Debris Survey Manual.
    PB92-103456/REB
UVER
    DMA Adducts  in  Rat Lung, Liver and  Peripheral Blood
    Lymphocytes  Produces   by  i.p.   Administration  of
    Benzo(a)Pyrene Metabolites and Derivatives.
    PB92-124627/REB
LUNG
    DMA Adducts  in  Rat Lung, Liver and  Peripheral Blood
    Lymphocytes  Produces   by  i.p.   Administration  of
    Benzo(a)Pyrene Metabolites and Derivatives.
    PB92-124627/REB
    Enhance and Prolonged Pulmonary Influenza Virus Infec-
    tion  Following Phosgene Inhalation.
    PB92-124650/REB
    Airway Structure Variability in the Long-Evans Rat Lung.
    PB92-124676/REB
LYMPHOCYTES
    Induction of Mtaonudei by  X-fadiation in Human,  Mouse
    and  Rat Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes.
    PB92-113315/REB
    DMA Adducts  in  Rat Lung, Liver and  Peripheral Blood
                 "   '       by  i.p.   Administration  of
                           s and Derivatives.
Lymphocytes  Produces  by
Benzo(a)Fyrene Metabolites are
PB92-124627/REB
    In vitro Lymphocyte Proliferation Assays: The Mitogen-
    Stimulated  Response and the Mixed Lymphocyte Reac-
    tion in Immunotoxicity Testing.
    PB92-126911 /REB
LYMPHOMA
    Genotoxicity in Mouse Lymphoma Cells of Chemicals Ca-
    pable of Michael Addition.
    PB92-120484/REB
MACROPHAGES
    Modulation of Human Alveolar Macrophage Properties by
    Ozone Exposure In vitro.
    PB92-113281/REB
MAGNETIC FIELDS
    Electric and Magnetic Reids Near AM Broadcast Towers.
    PB92-101427/REB
MAINTENANCE
    IM240 Transient I/M Dynamometer Driving Schedule and
    the Composite I/M Test Procedure.
    PB92-104405/REB
    Recommended I/M  Short  Test Procedures for  the
    1990's:  Six Alternatives.
    PB92-104439/REB
    I/M Network  Type:  Effects on Emission  Reductions.
    Cost, and Convenience. Technical Information Document
    PB92-104447/REB
    Integrating  On-Board Diagnostic System Capabilities into
    the Inspection and Repair Functions of I/M Programs.
    PB92-104454/REB
MALIGNANT NEOPLASMS
    Indoor Air  Assessment A Review of Indoor Air Quality
    Risk Characterization Studies.
    PB92-109107/REB
MAN-ENVIRONMENT INTERACTIONS
    Long-Term   Changes  in  the  Area!  Extent  of  Tidal
    Marshes, Eekjrass Meadows and Kelp Forests of Puget
    Sound.
    PB92-104496/REB
MANGANESE OXIDES
    Radium Removal from Water by Manganese Dioxide Ad-
    sorption and Diatomaceous Earth Filtration.
    PB92-11S260/REB
                                                                                                                                            March     KVV-11

-------
                                                                    KEYWORD  INDEX
MANUALS
    Citizens' Guidance Manual for the Technical Assistance
    Grant Program.
    PB92-101435/REB
    Marine Debris Survey Manual.
    PB92-103456/RE8
HAPPING
    Proceedings of the Workshop on Radon Potential Map-
    ping, Florida Radon Research Program Held in Games-
    vine, Florida on April 20,1990.
    PB92-115278/REB
MARINE BIOLOGY
    Methods for  Measuring the  Acute  Toxicity of  Effluents
    and Receiving Waters to  Freshwater and Marine Orga-
    nisms (Fourth Edition).
    PB91-167650/REB
    Example Environmental Assessment Report for  Estu-
    aries.
    PB92-102656/REB
    ed(
    PB92-104488/REB
    Nutritional Value of 'Artemia' and '
    (Baker) for Two Pacific Mysid Species,
          -•-••   land'Mysidopsisirrtr (Hoimquist).
                                        Cadmium and
                                        nents.
    Marine Debris Survey Manual.
    PB92-1034S6/REB
MARINE ENVIRONMENT
    Acid-VolaSe Suffide as a Factor
    Nickel BtoavaiabMy in Contaminated
    PB92-124296/REB
MARfMEFtSH
    Long-Term Trends in Puget Sound Marine Fishes: Setect-

    PB92-104488/REB
MARINE PLANTS
    Long-Term  Changes  in  the  Area! Extent of  Tidal
    Marshes, Eetgrass Meadows and Kelp Forests of Puget
    Sound.
    PB62-104496/REB
    Evaluating Design and Verifying Comptence of Created
    Wetlands in the Vicinity of Tampa, Florida.
    PB92-116045/REB
MASS BALANCE
              ) in Nitrogen Mass Loadings in Coastal Wa-
    PB92-106075/REB
MASSSFECTROSOOPY
    Influence of Experimental Donations on the Liquid Sec-
    ondary Ion Mass Spectra of Sulfonated Azo Dyes.
    PB82-124361/REB
    Into laboratory Comparison of Thermospray and Particle
    Beam Liquid Chromatography/Mass  Soectometry Inter-
    faces: Evaluation of a Chlorinated Phenoxy Add Herbi-
    cide Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Analysis
    Method.
    PB92-124734/REB
MATERIALS HANDLING
    Effect of Storage CondWons on Handkig and SO2 Reac-
    tivity of Ca(OH)2-Based Sorbents.
    PB92-124270/REB
MATERIALS RECOVERY
    Guides to PoUton Prevention: Tha Marine Maintenance
    PB91-228817/P
    Analysis of Factors Affecting Methane Gas Recovery
    front Six LandfHs.
    PB92-101351/REB
MATERNAL-FETAL EXCHANGE
    Roto of MetaJtothionein Induction and Altered Zinc Status
    in Maternally Mediated Developmental Toxicity: Compari-
    son of the Effects of Urethane and Styrene in Rats.
    PB92-124635/REB
MATHEMATICAL MODELS
    PieJutkig Chemical Concentration Effects on Transfor-
    mation Rates of Dissolved Organics by Complex Mfcrobi-
    al Assemblages.
    PB92-101395/HEB
    Modeing of Nonpoint Source Water QuaSty ki Urban and
    Non-urban Areas.
    PB92-109115/REB
    Field-Testing Distribution Water QuaHy Models.
    PB92-113182/REB
    Evaluation of SorpSon Models in the Simulation of Naph-
    thalene Transport Through Saturated Sols.
    PB92-113190/REB
    Estimating Critical Loads of SuKate to Surface Waters in
    the Northeastern United States: A Comparative Assess-
    ment of Three Procedures for Estimating Critical Loads of
    SuKate for Lakes.
    PB92-119015/REB
    Model of Virus Transport ki Unsaturated SoL
    PB92-1199S7/REB
    Modeing Air Flow Dynamics ki  Radon MMgation Sys-
    tems: A Sirnpified Approach.
    PB92-12M27/REB
    Trajectory and Incineration of Rogue Droplets ki a Turbu-
    lent Diffusion Flame.
    PB92-120450/REB
    Regional Air QuaMy and Add Deposition Modeling and
    the Ftote for VJsuafaabon.
    PB82-124247/REB
                                                           Estimation of Water Solubility and Octanol/Water Parti-
                                                           tion Coefficient of Hydrophobe Dyes. Part 1. Relationship
                                                           between Solubility and Partition Coefficient
                                                           PB92-124320/F
                                                           Estimation of Water Solubility and Octanol/Water Parti-
                                                           tion Coefficient of Hydrophobic Dyes. Part 2. Reverse-
                                                           Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography.
                                                           PB92-124338/REB
                                                           Troposphere Nitrogen: The Influence of Anthropogenic
                                                           Sources on Distribution and Deposition.
                                                           PB92-126937/REB
                                                        MEASUREMENT
                                                           Standard Measurement  Protocols:  Florida Radon Re-
                                                           search Program.
                                                           PB92-115294/REB
Running a Conference as a Clean Product International
Conference  on Pollution Prevention:  dean Technologies
and dean Products. Held in Washington, DC. on June
10-13,1990.
PB92-109099/REB
Proceedings of the  International Workshop  on Large-
Scate Reforestation. Held  in Corvaltis. Oregon on May 9-
10.1990.
PB92-109131/REB
Summary of the 1991 EPA/AWMA International Symposi-
um: Measurement of Toxic and Related Air  Pollutants.
Held ki Durham, North Carolina on May 6-10,1991.
PB92-110386/REB
Workshop Proceedings: The Role of  Created and Natural
Wetlands in Controllmg Nonpoint Source Pollution. Held
in Artington, Virginia on June 10-11. 1991.
PB92-113463/REB
Ecological Indicators. Proceedkigs  of  an  International
Symposium. Held  ki Fort Lauderdate, Florida on October
16-19,1990.
PB92-114131/REB
Workshop Report on Toxicity  Equivalency Factors for
Porychlorinated Biphenyl  Congeners. Risk  Assessment
Forum.
PB92-114529/REB
Proceedkigs of the Workshop on Radon Potential Map-
ping, Florida Radon Research Program. Held  in Gaines-
vf»e, Florida on April 20,1990.
PB92-115278/REB
Proceedings:  The 1991  International  Symposium  on
Radon  and Radon Reduction Technology. Volume  1.
Symposium  Oral Papers Opening Session and Technical
Sessions 1 through 5.
PB92-115351/REB
Proceettngs:  The 1991  International  Symposium  on
Radon  and Radon Reduction Technology. Volume  2.
Symposium  Oral  Papers Technical  Sessions  6 through

PB92-115369/REB
Proceedkigs:  The 1991  International  Symposium  on
Radon  and Radon Reduction Technology. Volume  3.
Symposium  Panel and Poster Papers Technical Sessions
                                                           1 through 5.
                                                           PB92-1153
                                                               2-115377/REB
                                                           Proceedings:  The  1991  International Symposium on
                                                           Radon and Radon Reduction Technology. Volume 4.
                                                           Symposium Poster Papers Technical Sessions 6 through
                                                           10.
                                                           PB92-1153B5/REB
                                                           Stationary Combustion NOx Control: A Summary of the
                                                           1991 Symposium. Held in Washington,  DC., March 25-28,
                                                           1991.
                                                           PB92-121375/REB
                                                           In vitro Teratology.
                                                           PB92-124700/REB
                                                           International Symposium on Field Screening Methods for
                                                           Hazardous Wastes and Toxic Chemicals (2nd). Proceed-
                                                           ings. HeW ki  Us Vegas, Nevada on February 12-14.
                                                           1991.
                                                           PB92-125764/REB
                                                       MERCURY (METAL)
                                                           Mercury Deposition and Sources for  the Upper  Great
                                                           Lakes Region.
                                                           PB92-120500/REB
                                                           Extraction of Mercury from Groundwater Using Immobi-
                                                           bed Algae.
                                                           PB92-121367/REB
                                                           Environmental ProHes and Hazard Indices for Constitu-
                                                           ents of Municipal Sludge: Mercury.
                                                           PB92-122977/REB
                                                       METABOLIC ACTIVATION
                                                           Assessing the Use of Known Mutagens to CaBbrate the
                                                           •Salmonella typhknuriunV Mutagenidty Assay. 2. With Ex-
                                                           ogenous Activation.
                                                           PB92-113273/REB
                                                           Evaluating  the  Relationship  of  Metabolic  Activation
                                                           System Concentrations and Chemical Dose Concentra-
                                                           tions for the SaknoneHa Spiral and Ptate Assays.
                                                           PB92-113331/REB
                                                       METABOLISM
                                                           Interactive Effects of AMrin, Cyctohexyiamine, 2,4-Oiamin-
                                                           otokiene and Two Phorbol Esters on Metabolic Coopera-
                                                           tion between V79 Celts.
                                                           PB92-1O8026/REB
                                                       METALLOTMONEIN
                                                           Rote of Metalothioneki Induction and Altered Zinc Status
                                                           ki Matematy Mediated Developmental  Toxicity: Compari-
                                                           son of the Effects of Urethane and Styrene in Rats.
                                                           PB92-124635/REB
                                                       METALS
                                                           Quantitative Assessment of the Effects of Metals on Mi-
                                                           crobial Degradation of Organic Chemicals.
                                                           PB92-101385/REB
    Trace Metal Fate in a Rotary Kiln Incinerator with an Ion-
    izing Wet Scrubber (Journal Article).
    PB92-110568/REB
    Acid-Volatile Sulfide as a Factor Mediating Cadmium and
    Nickel BioavailabiHty in Contaminated Sediments.
    PB92-124296/REB

METEOROLOGICAL DATA
    Technical Assistance Document for Sampling and Analy-
    sis of Ozone Precursors.
    PB92-122795/REB

METHANE
    Analysis of  Factors Affecting  Methane Gas Recovery
    from Six Landfills.
    PB92-101351/REB

METHANOL
    Impact of Methanol  and CNG Fuels  on Motor  Vehicle
    Toxic Emissions.
    PB9Z-110378/REB
    Evaluation of a Schatz Heat Battery on a Flexible-Fueled
    Vehicle.
    PB92-114255/REB
    Evaluation of a  Vehicle  Equipped with a Direct Injection
    Engine Using Neat Methanol.
    P892-118009/REB

METHANOL FUELS
    Evaluation of a Kemira Oy  Resistively Heated Catalyst on
    a Methanol-Fueted Vehicle.
    PB92-104397/REB

METHOPRENE
    RED Facts: Methoprene.
    PB92-111848/REB
                                                                                                                   (List/
                                                                                                                   PB92-111855/REB
                                                                                                                                        Document (RED): Methoprene
METHOXYACETIC ACIDS
    Evaluation of the  Immunotojocity of Orally Administered
    2-Memoxyacetic Acid in Fischer 344 Rats.
    PB92-124601/REB

MICHAEL ADDITION REACTION
    Genotoxicity in Mouse Lymphoma Cells of Chemicals Ca-
    pable of Michael Addition.
    PB92-120484/REB

MfCROBIAL DEGRADATION
    Quantitative  Assessment of the Effects of Metals on Mi-
    crobial Degradation of Organic Chemicals.
    PB92-101385/REB
    Regiospecific Dechlorination  of  Pentachkxqphenol  by
    Dichkxoprienol-Adapted Microorganisms in Freshwater,
    Anaerobic Sediment Slurries.
    PB92-101674/REB
    Microbial Degradation  of Rurtamone  in Three Georgia
    Sols.
    PB92-101662/REB
    Reductive Dechlorination of Dtehlorophenols in Anaerobic
    Pond Sediments (Chapter 13).
    PB92-101708/REB
    Bndegradation of  Monoaromatic Hydrocarbons by Aqui-
    fer Microorganisms Using  Oxygen, Nitrate,  or Nitrous
    Oxide as the Terminal Electron Acceptor.
    PB92-110543/REB

MrCROFILTRATTON
    DuPont/Obertin Microfiltration Technology. Applications
    Analysis Report
    PB92-119023/REB

MICRONUCLEUS TESTS
    Induction of  Mfcronudei by  X-radiation ki Human, Mouse
    and Rat Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes.
    PB92-113315/REB

MICROORGANISMS
    Predicting Chemical Concentration Effects on Transfor-
    mation Rates of Dissolved Organics by Complex Microbi-
    al Assemblages.
    PB92-101393/REB

MISSED ABORTION
    Use of  Bromoergocryptme in the Validation of Protocols
    for the  Assessment of Mechanisms of Eariy Pregnancy
    Loss ki  the Rat
    PB92-124692/REB

MITIGATION
    Modeling Air Flow Dynamics ki  Radon Mitigation Sys-
    tems: A Simplified Approach.
    PB92-120427/REB
    U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development Overview
    of Current Radon Research.
    PB92-121250/REB
    Quality Assurance  Project Plan: Tampa, Florida Wetlands
                                                            '-122761/REB

                                                    MITOGENS
                                                        In vitro Lymphocyte Proliferation Assays: The Mitogen-
                                                        Stimulated Response and the Mixed Lymphocyte Reac-
                                                        tion in Imrnunotoxicrty Testing.
                                                        PB92-126911/REB

                                                    MOBILE HOMES
                                                        indoor Ak Pollutants from Unvented Kerosene Heater
                                                        Emissions ki Mob*J Homes: Studies on Particles, Semi-
                                                        volatile Organics, Carbon Monoxide, and Mutagenicity.
                                                        PB92-113232/REB
KW-12     VOL 92, No. 1

-------
                                                                    KEYWORD  INDEX
                                                                                                                  NORTHEAST REGION (UNITED STATES)
MOBILE POLLUTANT SOURCES
    Source Reconciliation of Ambient Volatile Organic Com-
    pounds  Measured in  the Atlanta 1990 Summer Study:
    The Mobile Source Component
    PB92-124130/REB
    Design, Development, and Implementation of AIRS' Area
    and Mobile Source Subsystem.
    PB92-124213/REB
MODELS-SIMULATION
    Natural  Enemy Risk Assessment (NERISK) (for Micro-
    computers).
    PB92-500446/REB
MOLECULAR ELECTROSTATIC POTENTIALS
    Quantitative  Comparison  of Molecular Electrostatic Po-
    tentials for Structure-Activity Studies.
    PB92-110519/REB
MOLECULAR WEIGHT
                           I; PCR Products to Random-
                        Weight Fragments.
           I577/REB
MOLLUSCA
    Nutritional Role of Endosymbiotic Bacteria in Animal-Bac-
    teria Symbioses: 'Sotemya velum', a Case Study.
    PB92-11288S/REB
MOTOR VEHICLE ENGINES
    Automotive and Heavy-Duty Engine Coolant Recycling by
    Filtration. Technology Evaluation Report
    PB92-126804/REB
MUNICIPAL WASTES
    Regulatory Impact Analysis  for the Final Criteria for Mu-
    nfcbal Sold Waste Landfills.
    PB92-100841/REB
    Addendum to the  Regulatory Impact Analysis for the
    Final Criteria for Municipal Solid Waste Landfflls.
    PB92-100658/REB
    Methodology for  Assessing Environmental Releases of
    and Exposure to Munidpar Solid Waste Combustor Re-
    PB92-109149/REB
    Combustion Control of Trace Organic Air Pollutants from
    Municipal Waste Combustore.
    PB92-113158/REB
    United States Environmental Protection Agency Municipal
    Waste  Combustion  Residue  SoMrfication/Stabilization
    Evaluation Program.
    PB92-121177/REB
    U.S. EPA Program for Evaluation of Treatment and Utili-
    zation Technologies  for Municipal Waste Combustion
    PB92-121185/REB
    Comparison of Five Solidification/Stabilization Processes
    for Treatment of Municipal Waste Combustion Residues.
    Part 1. Physical Testing.
    PB92-121193/REB
    Comparison of SoSdificafon/Stabifeation Processes  for
    Treatment  of  Municipal  Waste Combustion  Residues.
    Part 2. Leaching Properties.
    PB92-121201/REB
    Cleaning of Rue Gases from Waste Combustore, 1990.
    PB92-121300/REB
    Roto of Gas-Phase 02 in the Formation of PCDO/PCDF
    during Waste Combustion.
    PB92-121383/REB
MUNICIPALITIES
    Environmental  Profiles and Hazard Indfces for Constitu-
    ents of Municipal Sludge:  Mercury.
    PB92-122977/REB
    Environmental  Profiles and Hazard Indfces for Constitu-
    ents of Municipal Sludge:  Lead.
    PB92-122985/REB
    Environmental  Profiles and Hazard Indtees for Constitu-
    ents of Municipal Sludge:  Beryllium.
    PB92-122993/REB
    Environmental  Profiles and Hazard Indfces for Constitu-
    ents of Municipal Sludge:  Nickel.
    PB92-123009/REB
MUTAGEMCrTY TESTS
    Assessing the  Use of Known Mutagens to Calibrate  the
    'Salmonella typhknurium'  Mutageracrty Assay.  1.  Without
    Exogenous Activation.
    PB92-1132S7/REB
    Assessing the  Use of Known Mutagens to Calibrate  the
    •Salmonella typhimurium'  MutagertcSy Assay. 2. With  Ex-
    ogenous Activation.
    PB92-113273/REB
MUTAGENS
    Evaluating the Human  Health Effects of  Hazardous
    Wastes: Reproduction and Development, Neurotoxicity.
    Genetic Toxicity and Cancer.
    PB92-110352yREB
    Assessing the Use of Known Mutagens to CaUbrate  the
    •Salmonella typhimurium1  Mutagenicrty Assay.  1.  Without
    Exogenous Activation.
    PB92-113257/REB
    Assessing the Use of Known Mutagens to Calibrate  the
    •Salmonella typhimurium'  Mutagenraty Assay. 2. With  Ex-
    ogenous Activation.
    PB92-113273/REB
    Evaluation of  10 Chemicals for Aneupfcidy Induction in
    the HexapMd Wheat Assay.
    PB92-113307/REB
    Evaluating the  Relationship  of  Metabokc  Activation
    System Concentrations and Chemical  Dose Concentra-
    tions for the Salmonella Spiral and Plate Assays.
    PB92-113331 /REB
    Genotoxicity in Mouse Lymphoma Cells of Chemicals Ca-
    pable of Michael Addition.
    PB92-120484/REB
    Genotoxic Effects of Complex Marine Sediment Extracts
    on V79 Chinese Hamster Lung Fibroblasts.
    PB92-121318/REB
    Application of a Plant Test System in the Identification of
    Potential Genetic Hazards at Chemical Waste Sites.
    PB92-124551/REB
    Review of the Mutagenicity of Ethytene Oxide.
    PB92-124569/REB
MYSIDOPSIS BAHIA
    Increased Reproduction by Mysids  ('Mysidopsis bahia')
    Fed with Enriched 'Artemia' spp. NaupM.
    PB92-108034/REB
    Influence  of Constant and Fluctuating Salinity on  Re-
    sponses of 'Mysidopsis bahia' Exposed to Cadmium  in a
    Life-Cycle Test
    PB92-10S042/REB
    Life History and lexicological Comparisons of Temperate
    and Subtropical Mysids.
    PB92-124304/REB
MYSIDOPSIS BIGELOWI
    Life History and lexicological Comparisons of Temperate
    and Subtropical Mysids.
    PB92-124304/REB
N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE RECEPTOR
    Potenttatkxi of Inhibition with Perforant Path Kindling: An
    NMDA-Receptor Dependent Process.
    PB92-120468/REB
NAPHTHALENE
    Evaluation of Sorption Models in the Simulatkxi of Naph-
    thalene Transport Through Saturated Soils.
    PB92-113190/REB
NARCOTICS
    Model of AddHive Effects of Mixtures of Narcotic Chemi-
    cals.
    PB92-108174/REB
NATIONAL AIR TOXICS INFORMATION CLEARINGHOUSE
    National Air Toxics Information Clearinghouse: BMtogra-
    phy of Selected Reports and  Federal Register Notices
    Related to Air Toxics. Volume 5. Citations, 1991.
    PB92-111830/REB
    National  Air Toxics Information Clearinghouse: Ongoing
    Research and Regulatory Development Projects.
    PB92-111905/REB
    National Air Toxics Information Clearinghouse: BWtogra-
    phy of Selected Reports and  Federal Register Notices
    Related to Air Toxics. Index, 1991.
    PB92-111913/REB
NATIONAL DRV DEPOSITION NETWORK
    Routine Estimation  and Reporting of  Dry Deposition for
    the USA Dry Deposition Network.
    PB92-121144/REB
NATURAL EMISSIONS
    Development of Seasonal and Annual  Bkjgenic Emis-
    sions Inventories for the U.S. and Canada.
    PB92-126796/REB
NATURAL ENEMIES
    Pesticide  Effects on Arthropod Natural Enemies: A Data-
    base Summary.
    PB92-124163/REB
    Toxicity, Selectivity and Subtothal Effects of  Pesticides
    on Arthropod Natural Enemies: A Data-Base Summary.
    PB92-124189/REB
NATURAL ENEMY RISK ASSESSMENT SYSTEM
    Natural  Enemy  Risk Assessment  (NERISK) User's
    Manual.
    PB92-114990/REB
    Natural Enemy Risk Assessment (NERISK) (for Micro-
    computers).
    PB92-500446/REB
NATURAL GAS
    Impact of Methanol and CNG Fuels on Motor Vehicle
    Toxic Emissions.
    PB92-110378/REB
NATURAL GAS DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS
    Liquid and Gaseous Fuel Distribution System.
    PB92-115203/REB
NATURAL RESOURCES
    EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment  Pro-
    gram: An Ecological Status and Trends Program.
    PB92-121169/REB
NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT
    Evaluating Created Wetlands through Comparisons with
    Natural Wetlands.
    PB92-111566/REB
NATURAL VENTILATION
    Effect of Natural Ventilation on Radon and Radon Proge-
    ny Levels in Houses.
    PB92-124146/REB
NATURAL WETLANDS
    Evaluating Created Wetlands through Comparisons with
    Natural Wetlands.
    PB92-111566/REB
    Workshop Proceedings: The Roto of Created and Natural
    Wetlands in Controlling Nonpoint Source Pollution.  Held
    in Arlington, Virginia on June 10-11,1991.
    PB92-113463/REB
    Quality Assurance Project Plan: Tampa, Florida Wetlands

         122761/REB
NEANTHES ARENACEODENTATA
    Effects of  a Contaminated  Sediment on  Life  History
    Traits and Population Growth Rate of 'Neanthes Arena-
    ceodentata' (Porychaeta: Nereidae) in the Laboratory.
    PB92-108059/REB
NERISK COMPUTER PROGRAM
    NERISK: An Expert System to Enhance the Integration of
    Pesticides with Arthropod Biological Control.
    PB92-124254/REB
NERISK SYSTEM
    Natural  Enemy  Risk Assessment   (NERISK)  User's
    Manual.
    PB92-114990/REB
    Natural Enemy Risk Assessment (NERISK)  (for Micro-
    computers).
    PB92-500446/REB
NERVOUS SYSTEM
    Evaluating  the Human Health Effects  of  Hazardous
    Wastes:  Reproduction and  Development  Neurotoxicity,
    Genetic Toxicity and Cancer.
    PB92-110352/REB
    Assessment of Neurotoxicity. Use of Glial Rbrillary Acidic
    Protein as a Btomarker.
    PB92-110527/REB
    Enhanced Neurotoxicity of 3,3'-lminodipropkxiitrile Fol-
    lowing Pretreatment with Carbon Tetrachloride in the Rat
    PB92-113323/REB
NES (NEUROBEHAV1ORAL EVALUATION SYSTEM)
    Neurobehavioral  Evaluation System  (NES) and School
    Performance.
    PB92-124585/REB
NICKEL
    Environmental Profiles and Hazard Indices for Constitu-
    ents of Municipal Sludge: Nickel.
    PB92-123009/REB
NICOTINE
    Intercompanson of Sampling Techniques  for Nicotine in
    Indoor EnvironfTWnts.
    PB92-110402/REB
NITRATES
    Effect of Nitrate  Addrbon on Bkxestoration of Fuel-Con-
    taminated Aquifer Fnkt Demonstration.
    PB92-110444/REB
NITROGEN
    Uncertainties in Nitrogen Mass Loadings in Coastal Wa-
    PB92-10B07S/REB
    Watershed Nitrogen Management Upper Potomac River
    Basin Case Study.
    PB92-106083/REB
    Oxidation and Devolattization of Nitrogen in Coal Char.
    PB92-121441/REB
    Troposphere Nitrogen: The Influence of Anthropogenic
    Sources on Distribution and Deposition.
    PB92-126937/REB
NITROGEN DIOXIDE
    Evaluation  of Immunotoxicity of an Urban Profile of Nitro-
    gen Dioxide: Acute, Subchronic, and Chronic Studies.
    PB92-113356/REB
NITROGEN OXIDES
    Evaluation  of NOx Emission Control Catalysts for Power
    Plant SCR  Installations.
    PB92-121276/REB
    Stationary  Combustion NOx Control: A Summary of the
    1991 Symposium. Held in Washington, DC., March 25-28,
    1991.
    PB92-121375/REB
    NO/Char Reactions at Pulverized Coal Flame Conditions.
    PB92-121417/REB
    Non-EquMxium Effects in the Vaporization  of Multicom-
    ponent Fuel Droplets.
    PB92-121425/REB
    Nitric Oxide Formation during  Pulverized Coal Combus-
    tion.
    PB92-121433/REB
NITROPHENOLS
    Dinocap Position Document 4.
    PB92-114370/REB
NONPOMT SOURCES
    Modeling of Nonpoint Source Water Quality in Urban and
    Non-urban Areas.
    PB92-109115/REB
    Workshop  Proceedings; The Roto of Created and Natural
    Wetlands in Controlling Nonpoint Source Pollution. Held
    in AnTngton, Virginia on June 10-11, 1991.
    PB92-113463/REB
NONROAD ENGINES
    Nonroad Engine and Vehicle Emission Study-Report and
    Appendbtes.
    PB92-104462/REB
    Nonroad Engine and Vehicle Emission Study-Report
    PB92-126960/REB
NONROAD VEHICLES
    Nonroad Engine and Vehicle Emission Study-Report and
    Appendixes.
    PB92-104462/REB
    Nonroad Engine and Vehicle Emission Study-Report
    PB92-126960/REB
NORTHEAST REGION (UNITED STATES)
    Regional  Ozone  Modeling  for Northeast  Transport
    (ROMNET).
    PB92-10B786/REB
                                                                                                                                            March     KW-13

-------
                                                                    KEYWORD  INDEX
     Regional  Ozone  Modeling  for Northeast Transport
     (ROMNET). Appendices.
     PB92-108794/REB
     Estimating Critical Loads of Sulfate to Surface Waters in
     the Northeastern United States:  A Comparative Assess-
     ment of Three Procedures for Estimating Critical Loads of
     Sulfate for Lakes.
     PB92-119015/HEB
 NUTRITION
     Nutritional Role of Endosymbiotic Bacteria in Animal-Bac-
     teria Symoioses: 'Sotemya velum', a Case Study.
     PB92-112895/REB
 NUTRITIVE VALUE
     Nutritional Value of •Artemia' and Tigriopus caNfomicus'
     (Baker)  for Two Pacific Mysid Species,  Metamysidopsis
     •*——• <""!•—<) and 'Mysktopsis intiP (Holmqusl).
 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH
    Degreaser System Pollution Prevention Evaluation.
    AD-A242 110/S/REB
 OCEAN WASTE DISPOSAL
    Marine Debris Survey Manual.
    PB92-1034S6/REB
    Chetco Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site (ODMDS)
    Designation: Final Environmental Impact Statement
    PB92-104470/REB
 OFFICE OF SOLID WASTE AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE
    OSWER Source Book: Training and Technology Transfer
    Resources.
    PB92-102169/RE8
    Conducting RCRA Inspections at Mixed Waste FacWtes.
    PB92-105196/REB
    Community Relations during Enforcement  Activities and
    Development of the Administrative Record.
    PB92-105469/REB
    Section 3008(h) Module Order on Consent
    PB92-105477/REB
    Guide for Conducting TreatafadHy Studns under CERCLA
    Aerobic Bwdegradation Remedy Screening.
    PB92-109073/REB
 OH. POLLUTION
    Update on Implementation of the  Oi Pofkitkm Act of
    1990. Volume 1, Number 4, September 1991.
    PB91-921374/REB
    Oi Sp« dean Up.
    PB92-110468/REB
    Laboratory and FteW Studtes on BTEX Bwdegradation in
    a Fuel-Contaminated Aquifer under Denitrifying Corefr-
    ttons.
    PB92-121227/REB
    Btoventing to Treat Fuel SpHa from Underground Storage
    Tanks.
    PB92-121342/REB
    Superfund: Removals and Emergency Response.
    PB92-9634OO/REB
 OH. POLLUTION ACT OF 1990
    Update on Implementation of  the  OI Poftjtton Act of
    1990. Volume 1, Number 4, September 1991.
    PB91-921374/REB
 OH. POLLUTION REMOVAL
    Effect of NHrate AddWon on Biorestoration of Fuet-Con-
    taminated Aquifer Field Demonstration.
    PB92-110444/REB
 OH. SPILLS
    Superfund: Removals and Emergency Response.
    PB92-983400/REB
 ORGANIC COMPOUNDS
                        t of the Effects of Metato on Mi-
    crottal Degradation of Organic Chemicals.
    PB92-101385/REB
    Preolcting Chemical Concentration Effects on Transfor-
    matkm Rates of Dissolved Organics by Complex Mfcrobi-
    PB92-1013
    Cofflouslioi'i Control of Trace OrocW Air PoBut&nts from
    MuNdpal Waste Combustors.
    PB92-113158/REB
    Assessing UST Corrective Acton Technology: A Scientif-
    ic Evaluation  of the MoMHy of Organic Contaminants in
    Subsurface Environments.
    PB92'114552/REB
    Estimation of Water Solubility and Octanol/Water Parti-
    tion Coefficient of HydrophoWc Dyes. Part 1. Relationship
    between SoiubBty and Partition Coefficient
    PB82-124320/REB
OROAMC PHOSPHATES
    MuWspectrat kjp«ilim»atKHb of Alkyl and ChloroeJkyl Phos-
    phatas from an Industrial Effluent
    PB92-124353/REB
ORQAMC SOLVENTS
    ftoBoareh and Development Efforts to Develop Improved
    Inventory Methodologies for Area Source Solvent Erris-
    PB92-126846/REB
OROAMC WASTES
    Computerized Risk and Bioaocumutation System (Version
    1.0).
    PB92-114164/REB
ORQANOTrtWPHOSPHATEMSECTKOES
    Comparison of In vivo Choinoiitoraco Inhtoaion In Neona-
    tal and Adult Rats by Three aganophuephorothioate In-
 OVUM IMPLANTATION
    Pseudopregnancv and the Deckkial Cell Response (OCR)
    in the Rat.
    PB92-126B95/REB
    Assessment of Implantation in the Rat
    PB92-126903/REB
 OXIDATION
    Oxidation and Devolatilization of Nitrogen in Coal Char.
    PB92-121441/REB
    Applicability of UV/Oxidation Technologies to Treat Con-
    taminated Groundwater.
    PB92-126853/REB
 OXIDATION REDUCTION REACTIONS
    Oxidation-Reduction Capacities of Aquifer Sottds.
    PB92-110410/REB
 OZONE
    Annular Denuders for Use in Global  Climate and Strato-
    spheric Measurements of Acidic Gases and Particles (Ab-
    stract Only).
    N91 -32531 /6/REB
    Guideline for Regulatory Application of the Urban Airshed
    Model.
    PB92-108760/REB
    Regional Ozone  Modeling  for  Northeast  Transport
    (ROMNET).
    PB92-108786/REB
    Regional Ozone  Modeling  for  Northeast  Transport
    (ROMNET). Appendices.
    PB92-108794/REB
    Procedures for the  Preparation of Emission Inventories
    for Carbon Monoxide and Precursors of Ozone. Volume
    1. General Guidance for Stationary Sources.
    PB92-112168/REB
    Example  Emission  Inventory Documentation for Post-
    1967 Ozone State Implementation Plans (SIPs).
    PB92-112176/REB
    Modulation of Human Alveolar Macrophage Properties by
    Ozone Exposure  In vitro.
    PB92-113281/REB
    Emission Inventory Requirements for  Ozone State Imple-
    mentation Plans.
    PB92-118017/REB
    Technical Assistance Document for Sampling and Analy-
    sis of Ozone Precursors.
    PB92-122795/REB
    Adjusting Ambient Ozone Air Quality  Indicators for Miss-
      I Values.
        -124155/REB
    Comparison of Animal Mecflvity, Excystation, and Fuoro-
    genfc Dye as Measures of "Giardta muris' Cyst Inactiva-
    ion by Ozone.
    PB92-124288/REB
    Development of  Seasonal and Annual  Bfogenfc Emis-
    sions Inventories  for the U.S. and Canada.
    PB92-126796/REB
PACFIC OCEAN
    Chetco Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site (ODMDS)
    Designation: Final Environmental Impact Statement
    PB92-104470/REB
PAMTS
    Standard Operating Procedures for Lead in Paint by Hot-
    plate - or Microwave-Based Acid Digestions and Atomic
    Absorption or Inductively  Coupled  Plasma  Emission
    Standard Operating Procedures for Measurement of Lead
    in Paint Using the SCTTEC  MAP-3 X-ray Fluorescence
    PB92-110550/REB
        •-114180/REB
PALEOECOLOGtCAL INVESTIGATION OF RECENT LAKE
ACMFICATION PROJECT
    P1RLA DBMS Quick Reference Guide.
    PB92-110824/REB


    PIRLA DBMS Quick Reference Guide.
    PB92-110B24/REB
PARTICULATES
    Field Performance of Woodbuming Stoves in Crested
    Bufle, Cokxado.
    PB92-113133/REB
PARTITION COEFFICIENTS
    Estimation of Water SotubSty and Octanol/Watar Parti-
    lion Coefficient of Hydrophobe Dyes. Part 1. Relationship
    between Solubility and Partition Coefficient
    PB92-124320/REB
    Estimation of Water SoiubBty and Octanol/Water Parti-
    tion Coefficient of Hydrophobe Dyes. Part 2. Reverse-
    Phase High Performance uqtad Cnromatography.
    PB92-124338/REB
PATH OF POLLUTANTS
    Fate of Porychkjonated Biphenyte (PCBs) in Sol FoUow-
    ing Stabilization with Quicklime.
    P892-114487/REB
PATHOGENS
    Preliminary Risk  Assessment for Bacteria in  Municipal
    Sewage Sludge AppSed to Land.
    PB92-126820/REB
PENTOBARBITAL
    Differential Impact of Hypothermia and Pentobarbrtal on
    Brain-Stem Audrtory Evoked Responses.
    PB92-113240/REB
PERFORANT PATH
    Potentiation of  InhfcrSon with Perforant Path Kindlng: An
    NMDA-Receptor Dependent Process.
    PB92-120468/REB
 PERFORMANCE EVALUATION
    Neurobehavtoral Evaluation  System (NES) and School
    Performance.
    PB92-12458S/REB

 PERIPHERAL NERVES
    Neural Factors in the Development of Renal Function:
    Effect of Neonatal  Central  Cateeholaminergic Lesions
    with 6-Hydroxydopamine.
    PB92-120492/REB

 PERMIT TRACKING SYSTEM
    Permit Tracking System (PTS): A User's Manual.
    PB92-105659/REB
    Permit Tracking System  (PTS), Version 1.0 (for Micro-
    computers).
    PB92-500347/REB

 PERMITS
    Permit Tracking System (PTS): A User's Manual.
    PB92-105659/REB
    RCRA  Permit Policy Compendium. Volume  1. User's
    Guide. Key Word Index.
    PB92-111715/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 2 (9420.1980-
    9434.1900). Hazardous Waste Management System (Part
    260). General, Definitions, Petitions.
    FB92-111723/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 3 (9441.1980-
    9441.1986).  Identification and Listing of  Hazardous
    Waste (Part 261). General.
    PB92-111731/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 4 (9441.1987-
    9441.1990).  Identification and Listing of  Hazardous
    Waste (Part 261). General.
    PB92-111749/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 5 (9442.1960-
    9444.1986).  Identification and Listing of  Hazardous
    Waste  (Part 261).  Criteria  for  Identifying  Hazardous
    Waste. Characteristics of Hazardous Waste, Lists of Haz-
    ardous Waste.
    PB92-111756/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendum. Volume 6 (9444.1987-
    9457.1990).  Identification and Listing of  Hazardous
    Waste (Part 261). Lists  (Confd). Generator Standards
    (Part 262),  General,  Pretransportabon, Recordkeeping,
    Special Conditions, Importing.
    PB92-111764/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 7 (9460.1980-
    9482.1990). Transporter Standards (Part 263). (TSDPs)
    (Parts 264  and 265), TSDF  Technical  Requirements
    (Parts 264 and 265).
    PB92-111772/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 8 (9463.1980-
    9489.1990). TSDF Technical Requrements (Parts 264
    and 265). Tanks,  Surface Impoundments, Waste Pies,
    Land Treatment,  Landfills.  Incinerators,  Miscellaneous
    Units.
    PB92-111780/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendum. Volume 9 (9490.1980-
    9521.1990). Standards for Managing Specific Hazardous
    Wastes (Part 266). Permitting Policies, Permitting Proce-
    dures (Parts 124 and 270).
    PB92-111798/REB
    RCRA   Permit  Policy   Compendum.   Volume   10
    (9522.1980-9528.1990). Permitting Procedures (Parts 124
    and 270).  Applications.  CondrSons, Changes, Interim
    Status.
    PB92-111806/REB
    RCRA   Permit   Policy   Compendum.   Volume   11
    (9530.1980-9581.1990). Air Emissions Standards,  State
    Authorization (Part 271), Land Disposal Restrictions  (Part
    268). Waste Minimization, Subtitle D, RCRA Grant Funds.
    PB92-111814/REB
    Permit Tracking System (PTS), Version 1.0 (for Micro-
    computers).
    PB92-500347/REB

PEST CONTROL
    Natural  Enemy  Risk  Assessment  (NERISK)  User's
    Manual.
    PB92-114990/REB
    Natural Enemy  Risk Assessment (NERISK) (for Micro-
    computers).
    PB92-500446/REB

PESTICIDES
    Pesticide Fact Sheet Number  226: Bensulfuron Methyl.
    PB92-1043B9/REB
                                          ',1990.
    On-Sita Methods for Assessing Chemical Impact on the
    Sol Environment Using Earthworms: A Case Study at the
    Bart and McGuire Superfund Site, Hofbrook, Massachu-
    setts.
    PB92-108166/REB
    Pesticide Fact Sheet Number 227: Gotdaht
    PB92-110006/REB
    RED Facts: Methoprene.
    PB92-111848/REB
    Reregistration EfgHHty  Document (RED): Methoprene
    (UstTcase 0030V
    PB92-111855/REB _
    Reregistration ElgMity Document  (RED): Hetiothis zea
    NPvlDst A, Case Number 151).
    PB92-111863/REB
    RED Facts: Hekothis zea NPV.
    PB92-111871/REB
    Alachkx Position Document 2/3.
    PB92-111889/REB
KW-14     VOL  92. No.  1

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                                                                    KEYWORD INDEX
                                                                                                                                                POROUS MEDIA
   SELCTV System Manual for SELCTV and REFER Data-
   bases and the SELCTV Data Management Program.
   PB92-113455/REB
   Daminozide Position Document 4.
   PB92-114198/REB
   1,3-DtehloropfOpene Position Document 1.
   PB92-114206/REB
   Daminozide Position Document 2/3.
   PB92-114214/REB
   Daminozide Position Document 1.
   PB92-114222/REB
   Cadmium: Special Review Document
   PB92-1142307REB
   Alachtor Position Document, 4.
   PB92-114248/REB
   Ethalfluralin Position Document 1/2/3/4.
   PB92-114263/REB
   Dichlcxvos (DDVP) Position Document 1.
   PB92-114271/REB
   Inorganic Arsenicals Position Document 2/3.
   PB92-114297/REB
   Inorganic Arsenicals Position Document 4.
   PB92-114305/REB
   Chlorobenzilate Position Document 1.
   PB92-114313/REB
   RED Facts: Fosetyl-AI (Aliette).
   PB92-114321/REB
   Reregistration  Eligibility Document  (RED):  Fosetyl-AI
   (Aliette).
   PB92-114339/REB
   RED Facts: Sulfur.
   PB92-114347/REB
   RED. Facts: Potassium Bromide.
   PB92-1143S4/REB
   Reregistration  ElegibHity Document  (RED):  Potassium
   Bromide.
   PB92-114362/REB
   Dinocap Position Document 4.
   PB92-114370/REB
   Reregistration Eligibility Document (RED): Sulfur (List A,
   Case 0031).
   PB92-114453/REB
   Natural  Enemy  Risk  Assessment  (NERISK)  User's
   Manual.
   PB92-114990/REB
   Plant Tier Testing:  A Workshop to Evaluate Nontarget
   Plant Testing in Subdivision J Pesticide Guidelines. Held
   in Corvallis, Oregon on November 29-December 1,1990.
   PB92-116052/REB
   Another Look  National Survey of Pesticides in Drinking
   Water Wells. Phase 2 Report
   PB92-120B31/REB
   Pesticide Effects on Arthropod Natural Enemies: A Data-
   base Summary.
   PB92-124163/REB
   Tontity, Selectivity  and Subtethal Effects of Pesticides
   on Arthropod Natural Enemies: A Data-Base Summary.
   PB92-124189/REB
   NERISK: An Expert System to Enhance the Integration of
   Pesticides with Anthropod Biological Control.
   PB92-124254/REB
   Natural Enemy Risk Assessment (NERISK) (for Micro-
   computers).
   PB92-500446/REB
   Pesticide Compact Label Re -1990 Updates.
   PB92-911600/REB
   Compact Label Re -1992  (Fiche 1 - 5281).
   PB92-911699/REB
PETROLEUM PRODUCTS
   Assessing UST Corrective Action Technology: A Scientif-
   ic Evaluation of the Mobility of Organic Contaminants in
   Subsurface Environments.
   PB92-114552/REB
   Optimizing BTEX BJodegradation under Denitrifying Con-
   ditions.
   PB92-124262/REB
PHASE 2 RULE
   Summary of Phase II Regulations: National Primary Drink-
   ing Water Regulation for 38 Inorganic and Synthetic Or-
   ganic Chemicals.
   PB92-122969/REB
PHENOL/DKHLORO
   Environmental  Factors  Correlated  to  Dichtorophenol
   Dechkxinatkxi in Anoxic Freshwater Sediments.
   PB92-124346/REB
PHENOL/PENTACHLORO
   Regiospecrfic Dachtorination  of Pentachkxophenol  by
   Dicnlorophenol-Adapted  Microorganisms in  Freshwater,
   Anaerobic Sediment Slurries.
   PB92-101674/REB
PHORBOL ESTERS
   Interactive Effects of AJdrin, Cydohexylamine, 2,4-Diamin-
   otoluene and Two Phorbol Esters on Metabolic Coopera-
   tion between V79 Cells.
   PB92-108026/REB
PHOSGENE
   Enhance and Prolonged Pulmonary Influenza Virus Infec-
   tion Following Phosgene Inhalation.
   PB92-124650/REB
pHOSPHomosmDES
   Compensatory Alterations  in Receptor-Stimulated Phos-
   phoinosrade  Hydrolysis in  the Hippocampus Vary as a
   Function of Dose of Cotehteine.
   PB92-110501 /REB
PHOTOCHEMICAL REACTIONS
    Regional  Ozone  Modeling  for  Northeast  Transport
    (ROMNET).
    PB92-108786/REB
    Regional  Ozone  Modeling  for  Northeast  Transport
    (ROMNET). Appendices.
    PB92-108794/REB
    Production of Carbon  Monoxide by the Homogeneous
    NOx-lnduced Photooxidation  of Volatile Organic  Com-
    pounds in the Troposphere.
    PB92-110576/REB
PIPELINES
    Liquid and Gaseous Fuel Distribution System.
    PB92-115203/REB
PLANT DISEASES
    Foliar Injury Symptoms and Pigment Concentrations  in
    Red Spruce Saplings in the Southern Appalachians.
    PB92-113216/REB
PLANT PHYSIOLOGY
    Two  Different Approaches for Control and Measurement
    of Plant Functions in Closed Environmental Chambers.
    PB92-108067/REB
PLANTS (BOTANY)
    Two  Different Approaches for Control and Measurement
    of Rant Functions in Closed Environmental Chambers.
    PB92-108067/REB
    Plant Tier Testing: A Workshop to Evaluate Nontarget
    Plant Testing in Subdivision J Pesticide  Guidelines. Held
    in Corvallis, Oregon on November 29-December 1,1990.
    PB92-116052/REB
    Application of a Plant Test System in the Identification of
    Potential Genetic Hazards at Chemical Waste Sites.
    PB92-124551/REB
PLASTICS
    Lignocellulosic-Plastic Composites from Recycled Materi-
    als.
    PB92-126861/REB
PLATINUM GASAVER
    Emissions and Fuel Economy  Effects of the Platinum Ga-
    saver, a Retrofit Device.
    PB92-104421/REB
PLATINUM GASAVERS
    Second EPA Evaluation of the Platinum Gasaver Device
    under Section 511 of the Motor Vehicle Information and
    Cost Savings Act (Updated).
    PB92-104413/REB
POISING CAPACITY
    Oxidation-Reduction Capacities of Aquifer Solids.
    PB92-110410/REB
POLLUTION
    Predicting Chemical Reactivity by Computer.
    PB92-124312/REB
POLLUTION ABATEMENT
    Degreaser System Pollution Prevention Evaluation.
    AD-A242110/5/REB
    Waste Minimization Assessment for  a  Manufacturer  of
    Refurbished Railcar Bearing Assemblies.
    PB92-104348/REB
    Waste Minimization Assessment for  a  Manufacturer  of
    Prototype Printed Circuit Boards.
    PB92-104355/REB
    Waste Minimization Assessment for  a  Manufacturer  of
    Speed Reduction Equipment
    PB92-104363/REB
    Waste Minimization Assessment for  a  Manufacturer  of
    Printed Labels.
    PB92-104371/REB
    Running a Conference as a Clean Product International
    Conference  on Pollution Prevention: Clean Technologies
    and  dean Products.  Held in Washington, DC. on June
    10-13,1990.
    PB92-109099/REB
    Evaluation of Five Waste Minimization  Technologies at
    the General Dynamics Pomona Division Plant
    PB92-125756/REB
POLLUTION CONTROL
    Industrial Pollution  Prevention  Opportunities  for  the
    1990s.
    PB91-220376/REB
    Update on  Implementation of the Oil  Pollution Act  of
    1990. Volume 1, Number 4, September 1991.
    PB91-921374/REB
    Superfund Record of Decision  (EPA  Region 4): Jadco-
    Hughes Site, North Belmont NC. (First Remedial Action),
    September 1990.
    PB91-921565/REB
    Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 3): Hranica
    Landfill, Buffalo Township, PA. (First Remedial Action),
    June 1990.
    PB91-921566/REB
    Florida Radon Research Program: Technical Support for
    the Development of Radon Resistant Construction Stand-
    ards.
    PB92-108109/REB
    Waste Reduction Technology Evaluations of the U.S.
    EPA WRITE Program.
    PB92-108133/REB
    Development of  Alternate  Performance Standard  for
    Radon Resistant Construction Based  on Short-Term/
    Long-Term  Indoor Radon Concentrations. Volume  1.
    Technical Report
    PB92-115211/REB
    Development of  Alternate  Performance Standard  for
    Radon Resistant Construction Based  on Short-Term/
    Long-Term Indoor Radon Concentrations. Volume 2. Ap-
    pendices.
    PB92-115229/REB
    Standard  Measurement Protocols:  Florida Radon  Re-
    search Program.
    PB92-115294/REB
    National  Survey  of  Hazardous  Waste Generators  and
    Treatment, Storage, Disposal, and Recycling Facilities in
    1986. Hazardous waste Generation and Management
    PB92-123025/REB
    Risk Assessment Guidance for  Superfund. Volume 1.
    Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part B, Development
    of Risk-Based Preliminary Remediation Goals).
    PB92-963333/REB
    Risk Assessment Guidance for  Superfund. Volume 1.
    Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part C, Risk Evalua-
    tion of Remedial Alternatives).
    PB92-963334/REB
    Homeowners Exempted from Superfund Cleanup Costs:
    National Policy Overview.
    PB92-963336/REB
    ECO Update: The Role of BTAGs in Ecological Assess-
    ment Volume 1, Number 1, September 1991.
    PB92-963337/REB

POLLUTION PREVENTION
    Guides to Pollution Prevention: The  Marine Maintenance
    and Repair Industry.
    PB91-228817/REB

POLLUTION REGULATIONS
    Regulatory Impact Analysis for the Final Criteria for Mu-
    nicipal Solid Waste Landfills.
    PB92-100841 /REB
    Addendum to  the Regulatory Impact  Analysis for the
    Final Criteria for Municipal Solid Waste Landfills.
    PB92-100B58/REB
    Radionuclide Removal.
    PB92-121284/REB
    Summary of Phase II Regulations: National Primary Drink-
    ing Water Regulation for 38 Inorganic, and Synthetic Or-
    ganic Chemicals.
    PB92-122969/REB
    Drinking Water Research Division's Research Activities in
    Support of EPA's Regulatory Agenda.
    PB92-124197/REB

POLLUTION SOURCES
    Asbestos Fiber Release during Change-Out of Filter Bags
    from HEPA-Filtered Vacuum Cleaners.
    PB92-113208/REB
    Mercury  Deposition  and Sources for the Upper Great
    Lakes Region.
    PB92-120500/REB
    Locating and Estimating Air Emissions from Sources of
    Styrene,  Interim Report
    PB92-126788/REB

POLLUTION TRANSPORT
    Guideline for Regulatory Application  of the Urban Airshed
    Model.
    PB92-108760/REB
    Status and Needs for Toxic Emission Inventories for Re-
    gional Dispersion and Deposition Modeling.
    PB92-110394/REB

POLYCHAETA
    Effects  of a  Contaminated  Sediment on Life  History
    Traits and Population Growth Rate  of 'Neanthes Arena-
    ceodentata' (Pofychaeta: Nereidae) in the  Laboratory.
    PB92-108059/REB

POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS
    Determination  and Occurrence of AHH-AcBve Polychkxi-
    nated Biphenyis, 2,3,7,8-Tetrachloro-p-Dioxin and 2.3,7.8-
    Tetrachkxodibenzofuran in Lake  Michigan Sediment and
    Biota. The Question of Their Relative Toxreotogical Sig-
    nificance.
    PB92-108125/REB
    Fate of Per/chlorinated Biphenyis (PCBs) in Soil Follow-
    ing Stabilization with Quicklime.
    PB92-114487/REB
    Workshop  Report on Toxicrty Equivalency Factors for
    Polychlorinated Biphenyl Congeners. Risk Assessment
    Forum.
    PB92-114529/REB
    Dechtorinations  of  Potychlorinated  Biphenyis in Sedi-
    ments of New  Bedford Harbor.
    PB92-121151/REB

POLYCHLORINATED DIBENZODIOXINS
    Role of Gas-Phase O2 in the Formation of PCDD/PCDF
    during Waste Combustion.
    PB92-121383/REB

POLYCHLORINATED DIBENZOFURANS
    Role of Gas-Phase 02 in the Formation of PCDD/PCDF
    during Waste Combustion.
    PB92-121383/REB

POLYCHLOROBIPHENYL COMPOUNDS
    Toxicity Equivalency Factors for PCBs.
    PB92-113349/REB

POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION
    Excessive  Cycling Converts PCR Products to
    Length Higher Molecular Weight Fragments.
    PB92-124577/REB

POROUS MEDIA
    Evaluation of Sofptkm Models in the Simulation of Naph-
    thalene Transport Through Saturated Soils.
    PB92-113190/REB
Random-
                                                                                                                                            March      KW-15

-------
                                                                  KEYWORD  INDEX
POSITION DOCUMENT
    Alachtor Position Document 2/3.
    PB92-111889/REB
POTABLE WATER
    Health Effects of Arsenic in Drinking Water.
    PB92-110360/REB
    Lead and Copper Rule Guidance Manual. Volume V
    PB92-112101/REB
    Manual ol Small Pubic Water Supply Systems.
    PB92-117936/REB
    Manual of Individual and Non-Pubic Water Supply Sys-
    tems.
    PB92-117944/REB
    Paying for Safe Water Alternative Financing Mechanisms
    for State Drinking Water Programs.
    PB92-117993/REB
    Radonucide Removal
    PB92-121264/REB
    Summary of Phase II Regulations: National Primary Drink-
    ing Water Regulation for 38 Inorganic and Synthetic Or-
       : Chemicals.
       M22969/REB
          i Water Research Division's noBoarch Activities in
          t of EPA's Regulatory Agenda.
       i-124197/REB
    Reid Studtes for Control of Organics and Disinfection By-
    products.
    PB92-124205/REB
    Formation of Disinfection By-Products.
    PB92-124221/REB
POTASSIUM BROMIDE
    RED.  Facts: Potassium Bromide.
    PB92-114354/REB
    Reregistration EtogUMy Document (RED): Potassium

    PB92-114362/REB
POTOMAC RIVER BASIN
    Uncertainties in  Nitrogen Mass Loadings  In Coastal Wa-
    tersheds.
    PB92-10607S/REB
    Watershed Nitrogen Management Upper  Potomac River
    Basin Case Study.
    PB92-108083/REB
PREUMMARV ASSESSMENT
    PA-Score  (Preliminary Assessment Score), Version 1.0
    PA-Soore Software, Version 1.0. Users Manual and Tuto-
    rial.
    PB92-963302/REB
PREREMEDUL ACTIONS
    Guide for Conducting TreatabSty Studtes under CERCLA
    Aerobic BJodegradatton Remedy Screening. Interim Guid-
                      TreatabMy Studns under CERCLA:
                       Remedy Screening.
    PB92-100065/REB
PRESSURE FIELD EXTENSION
    Sub-Stab Pressure field Extension in Schools and Other
        '-1212
PRMTED CMCUfTS
    Waste iMnimfzalion Assessment for a Manufacturer of
    Prototype Printed Ckcuft Boards.
    nuvMuv I IHKUU \jm
    PB92-104355/REB
       H-921;
    Superfund: Program
    PB92-963200/REB
PROPELLANTS
    Manual for  Non-CFC  Aerosol Packaging: Conversion
    from CFC to Hydrocarbon Propeiants.
    PB92-101344/REB
    todustrial  PoMution PiBVOrttort  OpportunMtan for thB
    1990s.
    PB91-220376/REB
PROTOCOLS
    Standard  Moasuronwnt Protocols: Florida Radon Ro*
    soarcn Pfoonvn.
    PB92-115294/REB
PSEUDOPREONANCV
    Paeudopregnancy and the Daddual Cel Hesponse (OCR)
    totneRat
    PB92-128895/REB
PUBLIC HEALTH
    Health Effects of Arsenic m Drinking Water.
    PB92-110360/REB
    Oi Spel Ctoon Up.

    Moor Air Pokitants from Umanted Kerosene Heater
    Emissions in Motaee Homes: Studtos on Particles, Semi-
    volaae Omarics, Carbon Monoxide, and Mutagenicity.
    PB82-113232/REB
    Chid Lead Exposure Study. Leeds. Alabama.
    PB92-123793/REB
    Benzene GraundMler  Exposure Study, Nesmtth, South
    Caroina.
    PB92-123801/REB
              Risk Assessment for Bacteria in Municipal
              '   '  " 1 to Land

    Health Effects Assessment Summary Tables.
    PB92-921100/REB
    Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund.  Volume 1.
    Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part B, Development
    of Risk-Based Preliminary Remediation Goals).
    PB92-963333/REB
    Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund.  Volume 1.
    Human Health Evaluation Manual (Part C, Risk Evalua-
    tion of Remedial Alternatives).
    PB92-963334/REB
PUBLIC UTILITIES
    Manual of Small Public Water Supply Systems.
    PB92-117936/REB
PUGET SOUND
    Long-Term Trends in Puget Sound Marine Fishes: Select-
    ed Data Sets.
    PB92-104488/REB
    Puget Sound Pesticide Reconnaissance Survey, 1990.
    PB92-104504/REB
    Sunken Vessels and Aircraft Containing Hazardous Mate-
    rials in Puget Sound.
    PB92-104512/REB
RADIATION MEASURING INSTRUMENTS
    Standard  Measurement Protocols Florida Radon  Re-
    PB92-115
RADIATION MONITORING
    Aerial radkXogical survey of Pocateto and Soda Springs,
    Idaho and surroundng area, June-July 1986.
    DE910170S1/REB
RADIO BROADCASTING
    Electric and Magnetic Fields Near AM Broadcast Towers.
    PB92-101427/REB
RADIO STATIONS
    Electric and Magnetic Fields Near AM Broadcast Towers.
    PB92-101427/REB
RADIOACTIVE WASTES
    Conducting RCRA Inspections at Mixed Waste Facilities.
    PB92-105198/REB
    Health Effects Assessment Summary Tables.
    PB92-921100/REB
RADKMSOTOPES
    Radkmudde Removal.
    PBB2-121284/REB
RADIUM
    Radium Removal from Water by Manganese Dioxide Ad-
    sorption and Diatomaceous Earth Rrlration.
    PB92-115260/REB
RADON
    Recommended   Sub-Slab  Depressurization  Systems
    Design Standard of the  Florida Radon Research Pro-
       M05626/REB
    Recommended Foundation  FM  Materials Construction
    Standard of the Florida Radon Research Program.
    PB92-10S865/REB
    Florida Radon Research Program: Technical Support for
    the Development of Radon Resistant Construction Stand-

    PB92-108109/REB
    Dovotopmont  of  Alternate  Performance  Standard for
    Radon Resistant Construction  Based on ShonVTerm/
    Long-Term  Indoor Radon  Concentrations. Volume 1.
    Technical Report.
    PB82-11S211/REB
    Development  of  Alternate  Performance  Standard for
    Radon Resistant Construction  Based on Short-Term/
       j-Term Indoor Radon Concentrations. Volume 2. Ap-

         115229/REB
    Prooaedngs of the Workshop on Radon Potential  Map-
    ping, Florida Radon Reseerch r       	   -'
                                                                                  iProgn
                                                                                           . Held in Gaines-
    vBe, Florida on Apr! 20,1990.
    PB92-11527B/REB
    Standard Measurement  Protocols: Florida Radon  Re-
    search Program.
    PB92-115294/REB
    Proceedkus:  The  1991  International  Symposium  on
    Radon and  Radon Reduction  Technology-  Volume 1.
    Symposium Oral Papers Opening Session and Technical
    Sessions 1 through 5.
    PB92-115351/REB
    Proceedings:  The  1991  Intematonal ^Symposium  on
    Radon and  Radon Reduction  Technology.  Volume 2.
    Symposium Oral  Papers Technical Sessions 6 through
    10.
    PB92-11S369/REB
    Proceedkns:  The  1991  International  Symposium  on
    Radon and  Radon Reduction  Technology.  Volume 3.
    Symposium Panel and Poster Papers Technical Sessions
    IthroughS.
    PB92-1153
          15377/REB
    Proceedkigs:  The  1991  International  Symposium  on
    Radon and  Radon Reduction  Technology.  Volume 4.
    Symposium Poster Papers Technical Sessions 6 through
    10.
    PB92-11S38S/REB
    Parametric  Analysis of the Instalation and Operating
    Costs of Active Sol Depressurization Systems tor Res?
    dental Radon MHntfon.
    PB92-116037/RES
    Modekn MrFtow  Dynamics in Radon Mitigation Sys-
    terns: A obnpRfiod Approach.
    PB92-120427/REB
    Cost  Analysis of Soil Depressurization Techniques for
    Indoor Radon Reduction.
    PB92-120443/REB
    U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development Overview
    of Current Radon Research.
    PB92-121250/REB
    Sub-Slab Pressure Field Extension in Schools and Other
    Large Buildings.
    PB92-12126B/REB
    Effect of Natural Ventilation on Radon and Radon Proge-
    ny Levels in Houses.
    PB92-124148/REB
RAIL TRANSPORTATION
    Waste Minimization  Assessment for a Manufacturer of
    Refurbished RaNcar Bearing Assemblies.
    PB92-104348/REB
RECORD OF DECISION
    Superfund: Record of Decision.
    PB92-9S4700/REB
RECYCLED MATERIALS
    Ugnocettutosic-Plastic Composites from Recycled Materi-

    PB92-126861 /REB
RECYCLING
    Automotive and Heavy-Duty Engine Coolant Recycling by
    Filtration. Technology Evaluation Report
    PB92-126804/REB
RED SPRUCE TREES
    Foliar Injury  Symptoms and pigment Concentrations in
    Red Spruce Saplings in the Southern Appalachians.
    PB92-113216/REB
REFER DATA BASE
    SELCTV System Manual for SELCTV and REFER Data-
    bases and the SELCTV Date Management Program.
    PB92-1134SS/REB
REFORESTATION
    Proceedings of the  International Workshop on Large-
    Scale Reforestation. Held in Corvalfis, Oregon on May 9-
    10,1990.
    PB92-109131/REB
REFRIGERATORS
    Review of Energy Efficiency of Refrigerator/Freezer Gas-
    kets.
    PB92-106913/REB
REGIONAL ANALYSIS
    Regional Assessment of Aquifer Vulnerability and Sensi-
    tivity in the Conterminous United States.
    PB92-10014B/REB
REGIONAL OZONE MODELING FOR NORTHEAST
TRANSPORT PROJECT
    Regional  Ozone Modeling  for  Northeast  Transport
    (ROMNET).
    PB92-108786/REB
    Regional  Ozone Modeling  for  Northeast  Transport
    (ROMNET). Appendices.
    PB92-108794/REB
REMEDIAL ACTION
    Superfund Engineering Issue: Issues Affecting the Appli-
    cability and Success of  Remedial/Removal Incineration
        >-109081/REB
    Stabfaatton Technologies for RCRA Corrective Actions.
    H&iXjbook.
    PB92-114495/REB
    Selection of Control Technologies for Remediation of
    Lead Battery Recycing Sites.
    PB92-114537/REB
    Hydraulic Fracturing to Improve Nutrient and Oxygen De-
    livery for In sftu Bioredamabon.
    PB92-121334/REB
    lexicological Implementations of Remedtoting Hazardous
    Wastes.
    PB92-124171/REB
    Sot-Air Permeability Method Evaluation.
    PB92-124239/REB
    U.S. EPA SITE Demonstration of AWD Technologies'
    AquaDetox/SVE System.
    PB92-124387/REB
    Superfund: Site Assessment and Remediation.
    PB92-963300/REB
REMOTE SENSING
    Watershed  Characterization  Using  Landsat  Thematic
    Mapper Imagery: Blackfoot River, Montana.
    PB92-115237/REB
REMOVAL
    Superfund Removal Proc
                                                                                                                                       ures: Guidance on the Con-
    sideration of ARARS during Removal Actions.
    PB92-963401/REB
REPRODUCTION (BIOLOGY)
    Increased Reproduction  by Mysids fMysidopsis bahia')
    Fed with Enriched •Artemia'spp.NaupB.
    PB92-108034/REB
    Evaluating  fte  Hunan  Health  Effects of Hazardous
    Wastes: Reproduction and Development, Neurotoxicity,
    Genetic Toxicity and Cancer.
    PB92-110352/REB
REREOJSTRATION
    RED Facts: Methoprene.
    PB92-111848/REB
    ReregMralion EliojbBty  Document (RED): Methoprene
KW-16     VOL 92,  No. 1

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                                                                     KEYWORD  INDEX
                                                                                                                                                      SEDIMENTS
    Reregjstration Eligibility  Document (RED): Heftothis zea
    NPV (List A, Case Number 151).
    PB92-111863/REB
    RED Facts: Heliothis zea NPV.
    PB92-111871/REB
    RED Facts: Fosetyl-AI (Aliette).
    PB92-114321/REB
    Reregistration  Eligibility  Document   (RED):  Fosetyt-AI
    (Aliette).
    PB92-114339/REB
    RED Facts: Sulfur.
    PB92-114347/REB
    RED. Facts: Potassium Bromide.
    PB92-114354/REB
    Refegistration  Elegibility Document   (RED):  Potassium
    Bromide.
    PB92-114362/REB
    Refegistration Eligibility Document (RED): Sulfur (List A,
    Case 0031).
    PB92-114453/REB
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
    Waste Minimization  Assessment for  a  Manufacturer of
    Refurbished Railcar Bearing Assemblies.
    PB92-104348/REB
    Waste Minimization  Assessment for  a  Manufacturer of
    Prototype Printed Circuit Boards.
    PB92-104355/REB
    Waste Minimization  Assessment for  a  Manufacturer of
    Speed Reduction Equipment
    PB92-104363/REB
    Waste Minimization  Assessment for  a  Manufacturer of
    Printed Labels.
    PB92-104371/REB
    Summary of the 1991 EPA/AWMA International Symposi-
    um: Measurement of Toxic and Related Air Pollutants.
    Held in Durham, North Carolina on May 6-10,1991.
    PB92-110386/REB
    National Air Toxics Information Clearinghouse: Bibliogra-
    phy of Selected Reports and  Federal Register Notices
    Related to Air Toxics. Volume 5. Citations, 1991.
    PB92-111830/REB
    National Air Toxics Information Clearinghouse: Ongoing
    Research and Regulatory Development Projects.
    PB92-111905/REB
    National Air Toxics Information Clearinghouse: Bibliogra-
    phy of Selected Reports and  Federal Register Notices
    Related to Air Toxics. Index, 1991.
    PB92-111913/REB
    Environmental  Monitoring  and  Assessment  Program:
    1991  Project Descriptors.
    PB92-114479/REB
    U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development Overview
    of Current Radon Research.
    PB92-121250/REB
    Quality Assurance Project Plan: Tampa, Florida Wetlands
    Study.
    PB92-122761/REB
    Global Ecosystems  Database.  Version 0.1  (Beta-test).
    EPA  Global Climate  Research Program. NOAA/NGDC
    Global Change  Database  Program.  Prototype 1.  Data-
    base Documentation. NGDC Key to Geophysical Records
    Documentation No. 25.
    PB92-122803/REB
    Research and Development Efforts to Develop Improved
    Inventory Methodologies for Area Source Solvent  Emis-
    sions.
    PB92-126846/REB
RESEARCH PROJECTS
    Final  Quality Assurance Report for the Tampa, Florida
    Wetlands Study.
    PB92-113000/REB
RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS
    Recommended   Sub-Slab  Depressurization  Systems
    Design Standard of the Florida Radon Research Pro-
       2-105626/REB
    Development of  Alternate  Performance  Standard  for
    Radon Resistant  Construction  Based on Short-Tern)/
    Long-Term Indoor Radon Concentrations.  Volume  1.
    Technical Report
    PB92-115211/REB
    Development of  Alternate  Performance  Standard  for
    Radon Resistant  Construction  Based on Short-Term/
    Long-Term Indoor Radon Concentrations. Volume 2. Ap-
    pendices.
    PB92-115229/REB
    Homeowners Exempted from Superfund Cleanup Costs:
    National Policy Overview.
    PB92-963336/REB
RESIDUES
    United States Environmental Protection Agency Municipal
    Waste Combustion  Residue  Solidification/Stabilization
    Evaluation Program.
    PB92-121177/REB
    U.S. EPA Program for Evaluation of Treatment and Utili-
    zation Technologies for Municipal Waste Combustion
    Residues.
    PB92-121185/REB
    Comparison of Five Solidification/Stabilization Processes
    for Treatment of Municipal Waste Combustion Residues.
    Part 1. Physical Testing.
    PB92-121193/REB
    Comparison  of  Solidification/Stabilization  Processes for
    Treatment of Municipal Waste  Combustion Residues.
    Part 2. Leaching Properties.
    PB92-121201/REB
RESOURCE CONSERVATION
    Indicators for Monitoring Biodiversity: A Hierarchical Ap-
    proach.
    PB92-108117/REB
RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND RECOVERY ACT
    Conducting RCRA Inspections at Mixed Waste Facilities.
    PB92-105196/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium.  Volume  1. User's
    Guide. Key Word Index.
    PB92-111715/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 2 (9420.1980-
    9434.1900). Hazardous Waste Management System (Part
    260). General, Definitions, Petitions.
    PB92-111723/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 3 (9441.1980-
    9441.1986).  Identification  and  Listing  of  Hazardous
    Waste (Part 261). General.
    PB92-111731/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 4 (9441.1987-
    9441.1990).  Identification  and  Listing  of  Hazardous
    Waste (Part 261). General.
    PB92-111749/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 5 (9442.1980-
    9444.1986).  Identification  and  Listing  of  Hazardous
    Waste (Part  261).  Criteria for  Identifying  Hazardous
    Waste. Characteristics of Hazardous Waste, Lists of Haz-
    ardous Waste.
    PB92-111756/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 6 (9444.1987-
    9457.1990).  Identification  and  Listing  of  Hazardous
    Waste (Part 261). Lists (Cont'd), Generator  Standards
    (Part 262), General,  Pretransportation, Recordkeeping,
    Special Conditions, Importing.
    PB92-111764/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 7 (9460.1980-
    9482.1990). Transporter Standards (Part 263). (TSDFs)
    (Parts 264 and 265),  TSDF Technical  Requirements
    (Parts 264 and 265).
    PB92-111772/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 8 (9483.1980-
    9489.1990). TSDF Technical Requirements (Parts  264
    and 265). Tanks, Surface  Impoundments, Waste Piles,
    Land  Treatment  Landfills,  Incinerators,  Miscellaneous
    Units.
    PB92-111780/REB
    RCRA Permit Policy Compendium. Volume 9 (9490.1980-
    9521.1990). Standards for Managing Specific  Hazardous
    Wastes (Part 266). Permitting Policies, Permitting Proce-
    dures (Parts 124 and 270).
    PB92-111798/REB
    RCRA   Permit   Policy  Compendium.   Volume   10
    (9522.1980-9528.1990).  Permitting Procedures (Parts 124
    and  270).  Applications, Conditions, Changes,  Interim
    Status.
    PB92-111806/REB
    RCRA   Permit   Policy  Compendium.   Volume   11
    (9530.1980-9581.1990).  Air  Emissions Standards, State
    Authorization (Part 271), Land Disposal Restrictions (Part
    268). Waste Minimization, Subtitle D, RCRA Grant Funds.
    PB92-111814/REB
    Stabilization Technologies for RCRA Corrective Actions.
    Handbook.
    PB92-114495/REB
RESOURCE CONSERVATION RECOVERY ACT
    RCRA Cover Systems for Waste Management  Facilities.
    PB92-120435/REB
REVIEWS
    Superfund Program: Ten Years of Progress.
    PB91-921286/REB
RHYTHMICAL SLOW WAVE ACTIVITY
    Cotehicine-lnduced Deafferentatton of the Hippocampus
    Selectively Disrupts Chdinergic Rhythmical Slow Wave
    Activity.
    PB92-120476/REB
RISK ASSESSMENT
    Methods for  Aquatic  Toxicity  Identification Evaluations.
    Phase 1 Toxicity Characterization Procedures. Second
    Edition.
    PB92-100072/REB
    Indoor Air Assessment A Review of Indoor  Air Quality
    Risk Characterization Studies.
    PB92-109107/REB
    Methodology  for Assessing  Environmental Releases of
    and Exposure to Municipal Solid Waste Combustor Re-
    siduals.
    P892-109149/REB
    Hearth Effects of Arsenic in Drinking Water.
    P892-110360/REB
    Risk Assessment  Management Communication: A Guide
    to Selected Sources. Volume 4, Number 1.
    PB92-114412/REB
    Workshop  Report  on Toxicity Equivalency Factors for
    Potychlorinated  Biphenyl Congeners. Risk Assessment
    Forum.
    PB92-114529/REB
    Natural  Enemy   Risk  Assessment  (NERISK)  User's
    Manual.
    PB92-114990/REB
    Preliminary Risk Assessment for Bacteria in Municipal
    Sewage Sludge Applied  to Land.
    PB92-126820/REB
    Natural Enemy Risk Assessment (NERISK)  (for Micro-
    computers).
    PB92-500446/REB
ROOFING
    Evaluation of VOC Emissions from Heated Roofing As-
    phalt
    PB92-115286/REB
RURAL AREAS
    Regional Fine Particle Field Study: Data Base and Initial
    Results.
    PB92-106939/REB
    Adjusting Ambient Ozone Air Quality Indicators for Miss-
    ing Values.
    PB92-124155/REB
SAFE DRINKING WATER ACT
    Drinking Water Research Division's Research Activities in
    Support of EPA's Regulatory Agenda.
    PB92-124197/REB
SALINITY
    Influence of  Constant and Fluctuating Salinity on Re-
    sponses of 'Mysidopsis bahia' Exposed to Cadmium in a
    Life-Cycle Test
    PB92-108042/REB
SALMONELLA
    Evaluating  the  Relationship  of  Metabolic  Activation
    System Concentrations and Chemical Dose Concentra-
    tions for the Salmonella Spiral and Plate Assays.
    PB92-113331/REB
SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM
    Assessing the Use of  Known Mutagens to Calibrate the
    'Salmonella typhimurium' Mutagenkfty Assay.  1. Without
    Exogenous Activation.
    PB92-113257/REB
    Assessing the Use of  Known Mutagens to Calibrate the
    •Salmonella typhimurium' Mutagenicrty Assay. 2. With Ex-
    ogenous Activation.
    PB92-113273/REB
SALTS
    Forest Soil Response to Acid and Salt Additions of Sul-
    fate.  1. Sulfur Constituents and Net Retention.
    PB92-108182/REB
SAND AQUIFERS
    Oxidation-Reduction Capacities of Aquifer Solids.
    PB92-110410/REB
    Effect of Sodium Chloride on Transport of Bacteria in a
    Saturated Aquifer Material.
    PB92-110428/REB
SANDS
    Techniques to Determine Spatial Variations in Hydraulic
    Conductivity of Sand and Gravel.
    PB92-109123/REB
SANITARY LANDFILLS
    Regulatory Impact Analysis for the Final Criteria for Mu-
    nicipal SoW Waste Landfills.
    PB92-100841/REB
    Addendum to the  Regulatory Impact Analysis for the
    Final Criteria for Municipal Solid Waste Landfills.
    PB92-100858/REB
SCHOOLS
    Sub-Slab Pressure Field Extension in Schools and Other
       12-121268/REB
    Neurobehavioral Evaluation  System (NES) and  School
    Performance.
    PB92-124585/REB
SCOTT AIR FORCE BASE
    Waste Minimization Opportunity Assessment  Scott Air
    Force Base.
    PB92-105402/REB
SCREENING
    In vitro Teratology.
    PB92-124700/REB
SEA WATER
    Genotoxic Effects of Complex Marine Sediment Extracts
    on V79 Chinese Hamster Lung FibroWasts.
    PB92-121318/REB
SEAMING
    Technical Guidance Document Inspection  Techniques
    for the Fabrication of Geomembrane Field Seams.
    PB92-109057/REB
SEDIMENTS
    Fate of Commercial Disperse Dyes in Sediments.
    PB92-101401/REB
    Regiospecific  Dechkxination  of Pentachloropheno) by
    Dfchkxophenol-Adapted  Microorganisms in  Freshwater,
    Anaerobic Sediment Slurries.
    P892-101674/REB
    Reductive Dechkxination of Dichlorophenols in Anaerobic
    Pond Sediments (Chapter 13).
    PB92-101708/REB
    Chetco Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site  (ODMDS)
    Designation: Final Environmental Impact Statement
    PB92-104470/REB
    Effects of a  Contaminated  Sediment  on Life  History
    Traits and Population Growth Rate of 'Neanthes Arena-
    ceodentata' (Potycnaeta: Nereidae) in the Laboratory.
    PB92-108059/REB
    Determination  and Occurrence of AHH-Active Polychlori-
    nated Biphenyls, 2.3,7,8-Tetrachlor^p-Dtoxin and 2,3,7,8-
    Tetrachlorodibenzofuran in Lake Michigan Sediment and
    Biota. The Question of Their Relative Toxteotogical Sig-
    nificance.
    PB92-108125/REB
    Reduction of  Hexachloroethane and Carbon Tetrachlo-
    ride at Surfaces of Biotite, Vermteulite, Pyrite, and Marca-
    site.
    PB92-113141/REB
    Acid-Volatile Suffice as a Factor Mediating Cadmium and
    Nickel Bioavailability in Contaminated Sediments.
    PB92-124296/REB
                                                                                                                                             March     KVV-17

-------
                                                                   KEYWORD INDEX
    Environmental  Factors  Correlated to  Dichtorophenol
    Dechtorinafton in Anoxfc Freshwater Sediments.
    PB92-124346/REB
SELCTV DATA BASE
    SELCTV System Manual for SELCTV and REFER Data-
    bases and the SELCTV Data Management Program.
    PB92-113455/REB
SELCTV DATABASE
    Pesticide Effects on Arthropod Natural Enemies: A Data-
    base Summary.
    PB92-124163/REB
    Toxicity. Selectivity  and  Subtethal  Effects of Pesticides
    on Arthropod Natural Enemies: A Data-Base Summary.
    PB82-124189/REB
SEWAGE DISPOSAL
    Application of  MuNspactral Techniques to the Precise
    identification of Aldehydes in the Environment
    PB92-101419/REB
SEWAGE SLUPQF
    Enwonmental Ptofles and Hazard Indices for Constitu-
    ents of Municipal Sludge: Mercury.
    PB92-122977/REB
    Environmental Profiles and Hazard Indtoes for Constitu-
    ents of Municipal Sludge: Lead.
    PB92-122985/REB
    Environmental Profles and Hazard Indtoes for Constitu-
    ents of Municipal Sludge: BeryWwn.
    PB92-122993/REB
    Environmental Profiles and Hazard Indices for Constitu-
    ents of Municipal Sludge: Nickel
    PB92-123009/REB
    Preliminary Risk Assessment for  Bacteria in Municipal
    Sewage sludge Appfad to Land.
    PB82-126820/REB
SHELLFISH
    Computerized Risk and Btoaccumutation System (Version
        M14164/REB
SINGLE PARTICLE COAL COMBUSTION
    Characteristics of Single Particle Coat Combustion.
    PB92-121409/REB
SISTER CHROMATIC EXCHANGE
    Geootoxic Effects of Complex Marine Sedknant Extracts
    on V79 Chinese Hamster Lung Ftorobiasts.
    PB92-121318/REB
SITE CHARACTERIZATION
    International Symposium on ReW Screening Methods far
    Hazardous Wastes and Toxic Chemicals (2nd), Proceed-
    ings. Held to  Las Vegas, Nevada on February 12-14,

    PB92-125764/REB
    Guidance tor Performing Preliminary Assessments under
    CERCLA.
    ECO Update: The Role of BTAGs in Ecological
    mart. Volume 1, Number 1, September 1991.
    PB92-963337/REB
    Sub-Stab Pressure Field Extension to Schools and Other
SLOW RELEASING CHEMICALS
    Hydraulc Fracturing to Improve Nutrient and Oxygen De-
    tvery for In situ Btoradamation.
    PB82-1
        M21334/REB
 SLUDGE DISPOSAL
    Preftmhary Risk Assessment tor  Bacteria to Municipal
    Sewage Sludge Applied to Land.
    PB92-126620/REB
 SMALL SYSTEMS
    Manual of Smal Pubic Water Supply Systems.
    PB92-117936/REB
    Manual  of todMdual and Non-Pubic Water Supply Sys-
    PB92-117944/REB
    Neonatal Exposure to TrMtiyttin Disrupts Olfactory Os-
    crifninfllion LsvninQ in Pitwowifing Rds.
    PB92-124726/REB
    Regtonal  Ozone  Modekng  tor  Northeast  Transport
    (ROMNET).
    PB92-108786/REB
    Regtonal  Ozone  Modelng  for  Northeast  Transport
    (ROMNET). Appendices.
    PB92-108794/REB
SODIUM CHLORIDE
    Effect of Sodkm Chloride on Transport of Bacteria to a
    Saturated Aquifer Material
    PB82-110
SOU. ANALYSIS
    Forest Sol Response to Acid and Salt Additions of Sul-
    fate. 1. Sulfur Constituents and Net Retention.
    PB92-106182/REB
SOIL CONSERVATION
    Impact of Conservation TMage  Use on Soil  and  Atmos-
    pheric Car