TP£HMCAL BACKGROUND DOCUMENT
TO SUPPORT RULEMAKING
PURSUANT TO CERCLA SECTION 102
VOLUME 2
(PROPOSED RULEMAKING)
A Report to
RELEASES CONTROL BRANCH
OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
And to
EMERGENCY RESPONSE DIVISION
OFFICE OF SOLID WASTE AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE
U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
Under
Contract No. 68-03-3182
Prepared by
ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING & SERVICES, INCORPORATED
A WHOLLY OWNED SUBSIDIARY OF COMBUSTION ENGINEERING, INC.
FORMERLY ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING & SERVICES CENTER
OF ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION
NEWBURY PARK, CALIFORNIA 91320
March 1985

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TECHNICAL BACKGROUND DOCUMENT
TO SUPPORT RULEMAKING
PURSUANT TO CERCLA SECTION 102
VOLUME 2
(PROPOSED RULEMAKING)
A Report to
RELEASES CONTROL BRANCH
OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
And to -
EMERGENCY RESPONSE DIVISION
OFFICE OF SOLID WASTE AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE
U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
Under
Contract No. 68-03-3182
Prepared by
ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING & SERVICES, INCORPORATED
A WHOLLY OWNED SUBSIDIARY OF COMBUSTION ENGINEERING, INC.
FORMERLY ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING & SERVICES CENTER
OF ROCKWELL INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION
NEWBURY PARK, CALIFORNIA 91320
March 1985

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FOREWORD
This report was submitted to the Releases Control Branch, formerly the Oil and
Hazardous Materials Spills Branch, Office of Research and Development, Edison,
New Jersey, and the Emergency Response Division of the Office of Emergency and
Remedial Response of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to provide
the technical base for adjustment of reportable quantities (RQs) for an
additional group of the hazardous substances defined in CERCLA Section 101(14)
and for which no adjusted RQs are listed in the Final Rule published in April
1985. It was prepared by the technical staff of Environmental Monitoring &
Services, Incorporated, a wholly owned subsidiary of Combustion Engineering,
and formerly Rockwell International's Environmental Monitoring & Services
Center. Principal authors are Mr. Franz J. Burmann, Dr. Frank C. Gunderloy,
Jr., Dr. Milton Kirsch, Mr. Greg Ricci, and Mr. Steven C. Gibson.
Environmental Monitoring & Services, Incorporated and the EPA staff also
acknowledge the capable assistance and guidance of Dr. Bart L. Tuffly, former
senior project manager of this project, who has recently retired.
The guidance of many members of the EPA staff was provided not only in a
continuous fashion, but also in special working group meetings and by written
and oral comments on the various drafts. The assistance of Dr. K. Jack
Kooyoomjian, Mr. John Riley, Ms. Barbara Hostage, and Mr. Richard Horner of
the Emergency Response Division was especially helpful.
The EPA project officer during most of the project was the late Mr. Leo
T. McCarthy, Jr., of the Releases Control Branch, Edison, New Jersey, who
provided invaluable guidance during the project. Recently his place has been
ably taken by Mr. Rich Field. The support and helpful suggestions of
Mr. James Janis, Mr. Michael Goldman, Mr. James Bunting and other staff
members of ICF, Incorporated, subcontractor to Environmental Monitoring &
Services, Incorporated, are acknowledged.
iii

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CONTENTS
PAGE
Foreword		iii
Executive Summary 		ES-1
Section 1.	Introduction		1-1
Method of Adjustment 		1-1
Summary of Adjustments 		1-2
Organization of Report 		1-3
Section 2.	Proposed RQ Adjustments and Assignments 		2-1
Methodology for RQ Adjustments	2-1
Status of Hazardous Substances Designated
Under the CWA Section 311		2-13
RQs for the F- and K- Hazardous Waste Streams. . • 2-13
RQs for Unlisted Hazardous Wastes		2-14
Section 3.	Data Tables for Hazardous Substances		3-1
Section 4.	References		4-1
Appendix A	Data for Evaluation of Biodegradation, Hydrolysis . .	A-l
and Photolysis (BHP)
TABLES
TABLE NO.	PAGE
2-1	List of Hazardous Substances and
Reportable Quantities 		2-2
2-2	Final Candidate List for Upward RQ Adjustments
Based on BHP		2-11
2-3	RQs Based on Hazardous Degradation Products 		2-13
3-1	Data for the NPRM Hazardous Substances		3-3
v

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The purpose of this report is to provide the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) with the technical background required to adjust the reportable
quantities (RQs) of an additional 105 hazardous substances (including seven
hazardous wastes) designated in Section 101(14) of the Comprehensive
Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 ("CERCLA" or
"Superfund"). Technical background on the previous RQ adjustment of 340
hazardous substances and hazardous wastes may be found in the document
"Technical Background Document to Support Rulemaking Pursuant to CERCLA
Section 102, Volume 1," March 1985.
This latter background document provides details on the law, legislative
history, and the development of the preferred methodology for adjusting RQs.
CERCLA assigns statutory RQs to 698 hazardous substances and these RQs remain
in force until the Administrator of the EPA adjusts them. The preferred RQ
adjustment methodology first assigns primary criteria RQs on the basis of the
criteria of aquatic toxicity, mammalian toxicity, chronic toxicity,
ignitability, and reactivity. Potential carcinogenicity, which is also a
primary criterion, has not yet been applied since the potential
carcinogenicity ranking methodology is still undergoing development and
review. Where appropriate and supported with data, other factors
(biodegradation, hydrolysis, or photolysis (BHP)) are then applied to raise
the primary criteria RQ one level.
Summary of Adjustments
The table below summarizes the proposed RQ adjustments for the 105 hazardous
substances. The number of hazardous substances is given for each of the five
RQ categories.
ES-1

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No. of Hazardous Substances With Specified RQs
RQ (Pounds)	Statutory	Proposed
1 42	1
10 9	18
100 7	45
1000 25	28
5000 _22	_13_
105	105
The proposed adjustments lower the RQs of 31 hazardous substances, raise the
RQs of 41 hazardous substances and leave the RQs of 33 hazardous substances
unchanged.
ES-2

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SECTION 1
INTRODUCTION
In a final rule being published in the Federal Register, the Environmental
Protection Agency (the EPA or the Agency) has adjusted the reportable
quantities (RQs) of 340 of the 698 CERCLA hazardous substances including 90
hazardous waste streams. The remaining 358 hazardous substances for which an
adjusted RQ has not been proposed, have been under assessment for chronic
toxicity, potential carcinogenicity, or both. For these hazardous substances
the statutory RQ applies until the Agency has completed the assessments and
further RQ adjustments are proposed.
The assessments for an additional 105 hazardous substances including seven
hazardous waste streams have been completed and RQ adjustments are being
proposed in a new Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM). In addition, an RQ is
proposed for one additional constituent of the Unlisted Hazardous Wastes,
Characteristic of EP (Extraction Procedure) Toxicity. The purpose of this
document is to identify the 105 hazardous substances and the one unlisted EP
toxic hazardous waste for which RQ adjustments are being proposed and to
provide data supporting the proposed RQs.
Adjusted RQs will be proposed in a future rulemaking for the remaining 253
hazardous substances upon completion of their assessment for chronic toxicity
and potential carcinogenicity. The statutory 1-pound RQ for radionuclides may
also be adjusted in a future rulemaking.
METHOD OF ADJUSTMENT
RQs are adjusted using a methodology that assigns primary criteria RQ values
based on the following intrinsic properties of each hazardous substance:
aquatic toxicity, mammalian toxicity (oral, dermal, and inhalation), chronic
toxicity, ignitability, reactivity, and potential carcinogenicity. These
1-1

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primary criteria RQs can then be raised one level on the basis of other
criteria, namely the natural degradative processes of biodegradation,
hydrolysis, or photolysis (BHP). If however, hazardous substances are found
to be bioaccumulative, environmentally persistent, highly reactive (or
otherwise hazardous), or degradable to more hazardous products, they are not
eligible for a one-level RQ increase on the basis of BHP.
SUMMARY OF ADJUSTMENTS
The table below summarizes the proposed RQ adjustments for the 105 hazardous
substances addressed in this document. The number of hazardous substances is
given for each of the five RQ categories.
No. of Hazardous Substances
With Specified RQs
RQ (Pounds)	Statutory	Proposed
1	42	1
10	9	18
100	7	45
1000	25	28
5000	_22	_1_3
105	105
The proposed adjustments lower the RQ of 31 hazardous substances, raise the RQ
of 41, and leave the RQ unchanged for 33.
Of the 105 hazardous substances on this list, 97 have been evaluated for
chronic toxicity by the Environmental Criteria and Assessment Office (ECA0) in
Cincinnati, Ohio, a branch of the EPA's Office of Health and Environmental
Assessment (0HEA). Twelve of the hazardous substances were evaluated for
potential carcinogenicity by the EPA's Carcinogen Assessment Group (CAG),
which is also a branch of 0HEA. The substances which were evaluated by ECA0
and CAG are identified in Table 3-1, in the column "Chronic
1-2

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Toxicity/Carcinogen." CAG's evaluation of these 12 hazardous substances
resulted in the determination that there is not substantive evidence that
these hazardous substances are potential carcinogens. Therefore all 105
hazardous substances listed in Table 2-1 are assigned proposed RQs on the
basis of the remaining primary criteria and not potential carcinogenicity.
The assignments are as follows: 38 on the basis of chronic toxicity only, 11
on the basis of chronic toxicity plus at least one other primary criterion,
and 56 on the basis of primary criteria other than chronic toxicity. Some of
these 56 have had their RQs further adjusted because of BHP.
F- and K- Waste Streams
RQ adjustments are being proposed for two of the F- list hazardous waste
streams and five of the K- list hazardous waste streams. The statutory RQ for
these seven hazardous wastes is currently one pound. The proposed adjustments
raise the RQ of one waste to 10 pounds, four wastes to 100 pounds, and the
remaining two waste streams to 1000 pounds.
Unlisted Hazardous Wastes
The list of proposed RQs includes one constituent of the Characteristic of EP
Toxicity, namely Selenium (D010) under the entry Unlisted Hazardous Wastes.
The proposed RQ for this constituent is ten pounds, based on the chronic
toxicity of selenious acid.
ORGANIZATION OF REPORT
Section 2 of this document presents a table (Table 2-1) which lists the 105
hazardous substances including seven hazardous waste streams for which
adjusted RQs are currently being proposed, as well as the numerical RQ. In
addition, Section 2 contains a brief discussion of the rationale, and the
scientific and technical methodology used to determine the appropriate RQ
levels. Section 3 of this document contains the data tables supporting the
1-3

-------
proposed RQs presented in Section 2.
1-4

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SECTION 2
PROPOSED RQ ADJUSTMENTS AND ASSIGNMENTS
Table 2-1 lists the 105 CERCLA hazardous substances for which adjusted RQs are
being proposed, together with the statutory and proposed RQ for each hazardous
substance. The list is arranged alphabetically and identifies by numerical
code in the Statutory Code column the statutory source for the designation
under CERCLA Section 101(14). The codes are explained in footnotes to the
table. In addition, since many chemicals are regulated under more than one
statute and may be identified by different names in the different statutes,
all the names under which a hazardous substance is listed pursuant to any
statute or implementing regulation are listed alphabetically and the synonyms
are included in the Regulatory Synonyms column. Each hazardous substance is
uniquely identified by its Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number (CASRN).
METHODOLOGY FOR RQ ADJUSTMENTS
The preferred methodology for the proposed RQ adjustments is one with which
the regulated community is familiar and is based in part on the methodology
used to establish RQs pursuant to Section 311 of the Clean Water Act (CWA).
The methodology begins with an evaluation of the intrinsic physical, chemical,
and toxicological properties associated with each hazardous substance. The
intrinsic properties evaluated, called primary criteria, are: aquatic
toxicity, mammalian toxicity (oral, dermal, and inhalation), chronic toxicity,
ignitability, reactivity, and potential carcinogenicity.
The Agency ranks each intrinsic property on a five-tier scale, associating a
specific range of values on each scale with a particular RQ value. This
five-tier scale uses the five RQ levels of 1, 10, 100, 1000, and 5000 pounds,
which were originally established pursuant to the CWA Section 311. Each
hazardous substance receives several tentative RQ values based on its
particular properties. The lowest of all of the tentative RQs becomes the
2-1

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Table 2-1
LIST OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND REPORTABLE QUANTITIES
Hazardous Substance
1
1
1
1 CASRN
Regulatory Synonyms
1
1
1
1 RQ
Statutory
I RCRA
1 Waste
Code t (Number
Proposed RQ
Category I Pounds(Kg)
Acenaphthene
1
1 83329
|

1 1*
¦
2
1
1
1
B
100 (45.4)
Acenaphthylene
1
I 208968
j

I
1 1*
j
2
1
1
1
D
5000 (2270)
Acetic acid, thallium(I) salt
I 563688
I
Thallium(l) acetate
1
1 1*
i
4
I U214
1
B
100 (45.4)
Ammonia
1
I 7664417
i

I
1100
1
1
1
1
i
B
100 (45.4)
Ammonium bifluoride
1
1 1341497

1
15000
I
1
1
1
1
B
100 (45.4)
Anthracene
1
120127
i

1
1 1*
¦
2
1
1
i
D
5000 (2270)
Antimony tt
1
7440360

1
1 1*
2
1
1
i
D
5000 (2270)
Benzene, hydroxy-
1
108952
Phenol
1
11000
1
1,2,4
1
I U188
i
C
1000 (454)
Benzene, pentachloro-
I
608935
Pentachlorobenzene
1 1*
1
4
¦
I U183
i
C
1000 (454)
Benzene, 1,3,5-tnnitro-
1
99354
sym-Tri nitrobenzene
1
1 1*
1
4
I
I U234
1
A
10 (4.54)
Benzot J,k) fluorene
1
206440
Fluoranthene
1
1 1*
1
2,4
l
I U120
j
B
100 (45.4)
Benzo[ghi]perylene
191242

1
1 1*
1
2
1
1
1
D
5000 (2270)
p-Benzoquinone
106514
1,4-Cyclohexadienedione
1
1 1*
1
4
I U197
1
A
10 (4.54)
delta - BHC
319868

1 1*
1
2
I
1
1
X
1 (0.454)
Captan
133062

1 10
1
1
I
1
i
A
10 (4.54)
Carbamimidoselenoic acid
I 630104
Selenourea
1
1 1*
I
4
1
I PI 03
1
C
1000 (454)
Carbon bisulfide
I 75150
Carbon disulfide
1
15000
j
M
1
I P022
B
100 (45.4)
Carbon disulfide
I 75150
i
Carbon bisulfide
1
15000
¦
1,4
1
I P022
i
B
100 (45.4)
Carbonic acid, dithallium(I) salt
1
I 6533739
i
Thallium(I) carbonate
1
1 1*
¦
4
1
I U215
i
B
100 (45.4)
Chloroethane
1
I 75003
I

1
1 1»
i
2
1
1
1
B
100 (45.4)
Chromic acetate
1
I 1086304
i

1
11000
1
1
1
i
C
1000 (454)
Chromic sulfate
1
110101538

1
11000
1
1
i
i
C
1000 (454)
Chromous chloride
1
110049055
1

1
11000
1
1
i
i
C
1000 (454)
RQLIST/chron.dtb/conrqlist.hed/conrqlist.fot/20-FEB-85 08:05:29

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LIST OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND REPORTABLE QUANTITIES
- Continued

1

1
Statutory



1
1

1
1

1 RCR A
1 Waste
Proposed RQ
Hazardous Substance
I CASRN
Regulatory Synonyms
1 RQ
Code
t [Number
Category
Pounds(Kg)
Copper tt
1
I 7440506
|

1
1 1*
1
2
1
1
I
D
5000 (2270)
Cresol (s)
m-
o-
P-
I 1319773
1 108394
I 95487
I 106445
Cresylic acid
m-
o-
P-
i
1 000
1
1
1
1
1,4
1
I U052
1
1
1
i
C
1000 (454)
Cresylic acid
m-
0-
P-
l
I 1319773
I 108394
1 95487
1 106445
I
Cresol (s)
m-
o-
P-
11000
1
1
1
1
1.4
1
1 U052
1
1
1
l
C
1000 (454)
Cupric chloride
I 7447394
j

1 10
1
1
1
1
I
A
10 (4.54)
Cupric sulfate
1 7758987
¦

1 10
1
1
1
1
I
A
10 (4.54)
Cupric tartrate
1
1 815827
1

1
1100
1
1
1
1
I
B
100 (45.4)
1,4-Cyclohexadienedione
l
1 106514
1
p-Benzoquinone
1
1 1*
1
4
1
1 in 97
i
A
10 (4.54)
Dichloropropane - Dichloropropene (mixture)
l
I 8003198
¦

1
15000
1
i
i
¦
B
100 (45.4)
Dichloropropene(s)
2,3-Dichloropropene (isomer)
1
126952238
1 78886
|

1
15000
1
1
1
I
i
i
i
B
100 (45.4)
1,3-Dichloropropene
1 542756
1
Propene, 1,3-dichloro-
1
15000
1
1,2,4
i
I U084
1
B
100 (45.4)
Diethylamine
i
1 109897
1

1
11000
1
1
1
i
¦
B
100 (45.4)
Dimethylamine
I
1 124403
i
Methanamine, N-methyl-
1
11000
1
1.4
t
1 U092
i
C
1000 (454)
O.O-Dimethyl O-p-nitrophenyl phosphorothioate
l
I 298000
j
Methyl parathion
1
1100
1,4
1
I P071
l
B
100 (45.4)
Ethane, pentachloro-
1 76017
1
Pen tachloroe thane
1
1 1 *
1
4
1
1 U184
¦
A
10 (4.54)
Ethion
l
I 563122
j

1 10
1
1
1
1
¦
A
10 (4.54)
Ferric dextran
1 9004664
i
Iron dextran
1
1 1*
1
4
1
1 U139
i
D
5000 (2270)
Fluoranthene
1
1 206440
1
Benzol j,k) fluorene
1
I 1*
2,4
1
1 U120
l
B
100 (45.4)
Fluorene
I
1 86737
¦

1
1 1*
1
2
1
1
¦
D
5000 (2270)
Fulminic acid, mercuryODsalt
1
1 628864
l
Mercury fulminate
1
1 1»
1
4
1
1 P065
i
A
10 (4.54)
Hexachlorophene
i
1 70304
1
2,2'-Methylenebis(3,4,6-trichlorophenol)
J
I 1*
1
4
1
1 U132
1
B
100 (45.4)
RQLIST/chron.dtb/conrqlist .hed/conrqlist .fot/20-FEB-85 08:05:29

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LIST OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND REPORTABLE QUANTITIES - Continued

1


1
Statutory


Hazardous Substance
1
1
1 CASRN


1
1

1 RCR A
I Waste
Proposed RQ

Regulatory Synonyms
1 RQ
Code
t (Number
Category
Pounds(Kn)
Hydrogen sulfide
1
1 7783064
1
|
Hydrosulfuric acid
Sulfur hydride
1
1100
1
1
1,4
1
I U135
1
i
B
100 (45.4)
llydrosulfunc acid
I 7783064
1
|
Hydrogen sulfide
Sulfur hydride
1100
1
1
1,4
1
1 1)135
1
i
B
100 (45.4)
Iron dextran
1
I 9004664
j
Ferric
dextran
1
1 1*
1
4
1
I U139
1
D
5000 (2270)
Isoprene
1 78795
1


1
11000
1
1
1
1
1
B
100 (45.4)
Lead It
i
7439921
1


1
1 1*
1

1
1
I
D
5000 (2270)
Lead chloride
1
I 7758954
1


1
15000
i
1
1
1
1
B
100 (45.4)
Lead fluoborate
1
113814965
j


1
15000
i
1
1
1
1
B
100 (45.4)
Lead fluoride
7783462


1
11000
1
1
1
1
1
B
100 (45.4)
Lead iodide
110101630


1
15000
i
1
1
1
1
B
100 (45.4)
Lead nitrate
110099748


1
15000
1
1
1
1
B
100 (45.4)
Lead stearate
7428480
1072351
156189094
152652592


1
15000
1
1
1
i
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
D
5000 (2270)
Lead sulfate
(15739807
7446142


1
15000
1
1
1
1
1
1
B
100 (45.4)
Lead sulfide
1314870


1
15000
1
1
1
1
1
B
100 (45.4)
Lead thiocyanate
592870


1
15000
1
1
1
1
1
B
100 (45.4)
Mercuric nitrate
110045940


1 10
1
1
1
1
1
A
10 (4.54)
Mercuric sulfate
7783359


1 10
1
1
1
1
1
A
10 (4.54)
Mercuric thiocyanate
1 592858
¦


1 10
1
1
1
1
I
A
10 (4.54)
Mercurous nitrate
110415755
1


1
1 10
1
1
1
I
A
10 (4.54)
Mercury fulminate
l
1 628864
1
Fulminic acid, mercuryODsalt
1
1 1*
1
4
1
1 P065
I
A
10 (4.54)
Mercury, (acetato-O)phenyl-
i
1 62384
1
Phenylmercunc acetate
1
1 1*
1
4
1
t P092
i
B
100 (45.4)
RQLIST/chron.dtb/conrqlist .hed/conrqlist .fot/20-FEB-85 08:05:2 9

-------
LIST OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND REPORTABLE QUANTITIES - Continued

1

1
Statutory



1
1

1
1

1 RCR A
1 Waste
Proposed RQ
Hazardous Substance
1 CASRN
Regulatory Synonyms
1 RQ
Code t
[Number
Category
Pounds(Kc)
Methanamine, N-methyl-
1
I 124403
1
Dimethylamine
1
11000
1
1.4
| U092
C
1000 (454)
Methane, chloro-
1
I 74873
|
Methyl chloride
1 1*
I
2,4
I U045
B
100 (45.4)
Methyl chloride
I 74873
1
Methane, chloro-
1
1 1*
1
2,4
1 U045
B
100 (45.4)
Methyl parathion
l
I 298000
|
O.O-Dimethyl O-p-nitrophenyl phosphorothioate
1
1100
1
1,4
I P071
B
100 (45.4)
2,2l-Methylenebis(3,4,6-trichlorophenol)
i
| 70304
j
Hexachlorophene
1 1»
j
4
1 U132
B
100 (45.4)
Monoethylamine
1 75047
1

11000
1
1

B
100 (45.4)
Pen tachloro benzene
i
I 608935
1
Benzene, pentachloro-
1 1*
1
4
1 U183
C
1000 (454)
Pen tachloroe thane
1
I 76017
i
Ethane, pentachloro-
1 1*
1
4
1 U184
A
10 (4.54)
Phenanthrene
I 85018
t

1
1 1*
1
2

D
5000 (2270)
Phenol
1
I 108952
Benzene, hydroxy-
1
11000
1
1,2,4
1 U188
C
1000 (454)
Phenyl mercuric acetate
I 62384
j
Mercury, (acetato-O)phenyl-
1
1 1*
1
4
1 P092
B
100 (45.4)
Phorate
I 298022
1
I
Phosphorodithioic acid, 0,0-diethyl S-
(ethylthio)methyl ester
1 1*
1
1
4
1 P094
C
1000 (454)
Phosphorodithioic acid, O.O-diethyl S-
(ethylthio)rnethyl ester
1
I 298022
1
j
Phorate
1 1*
1
1
4
1 P094
C
1000 (454)
Plumbane, tetraethyl-
I 78002
j
Tetraethyl lead
1100
1
1,4
1 P110
A
10 (4.S4)
Propene, 1,3-dichloro-
I 542756
j
1,3-Dichloropropene
1
15000
1
1,2,4
1 U084
B
100 (45.4)
Pyrene
1 129000
1

1 1«
1
2

D
5000 (2270)
Pyridine
1
I 110861
|

1
1 1*
1
4
1 U196
C
1000 (454)
Pyrophosphoric acid, tetraethyl ester
i
I 107493
I
Tetraethyl pyrophosphate
1
1100
1
1,4
1 Pill
A
10 (4.54)
Selenious acid
i
1 7783008
l

1 1*
1
4
1 U204
A
10 (4.54)
Selenium TT
1
1 7782492
1

1
1 1»
1
2

B
100 (45.4)
Selenium dioxide
i
1 7446084
|
Selenium oxide
1
11000
1
1,4
1 U204
A
10 (4.54)
Selenium oxide
i
1 7446084
1
Selenium dioxide
1
11000
1
1,4
i U204
A
10 (4.54)
RQLIST/chron.dtb/conrqlist.hed/conrqlist.fot/20-FEB-85 08:05:29

-------
LIST OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND REPORTABLE QUANTITIES - Continued

1 1
1
Statutory



1 1
1 1
1
1
1 RCR A
I Waste
Proposed RQ
Hazardous Substance
1 CASRN I Regulatory Synonyms
1 RQ
Code t (Number
Category
Pounds(KR)
Selenourea
1 1
I 630104 ICarbainimidoselenoic acid
j j
1
1 1*
j
1
4 I P103
1
C
1000 (454)
Sodium bifluonde
1 1333831|
1 I
15000
¦
1
1 1
|
B
100 (45.4)
Sodium nitrite
1 1
I 7632000 1
1 1
1100
1
1
1 1
|
B
100 (45.4)
Sodium selenite
1 1
1101021881
j
11000
1
1
1 I
1
B
100 (45.4)
Sulfur hydride
l 1
t 7783064 (Hydrogen sulfide
1 iHydrosulfuric acid
1 |
1
1100
1
1
1
1,4 | U135
1
j
B
100 (45.4)
Sulfuric acid, thallium(l) salt
i i
110031591 |Thallium(I)sulfate
1 7446186 1
1 1
11000
1
1
1,4 I PI 15
1
|
B
100 (45.4)
Tetraethyl lead
1 1
1 78002 iPlumbane, tetraethyl-
1
1100
j
1,4 | P110
j
A
10 (4.54)
Tetraethyl pyrophosphate
1 1
1 107493 iPyrophosphoric acid, tetraethyl ester
1 |
1100
1
1,4 I Pill
j
A
10 (4.54)
Thallic oxide
i i
I 1314325 iThallium(IIl) oxide
i i
1 1*
1
4 I PI 13
1
B
100 (45.4)
Thallium It
I 1
I 7440280 1
i i
1 I*
1
1
2 1
|
C
1000 (454)
Thallium(I) acetate
1 1
I 563688 |Acetic acid, tha)lium(I) salt
i i
1
1 1*
1
4 | U214
|
B
100 (45.4)
Thallium(l) carbonate
1 1
I 6533739 {Carbonic acid, dithallium(I) salt
1 1*
1
i
4 | U215
|
B
100 (45.4)
Thallium(I) chloride
I 1
I 7791120!
i i
1 1*
1
i
4 | U216
j
B
100 (45.4)
Thallium(l) nitrate
1 1
110102451 |
I i
1
1 1*
1
1
4 | U217
1
B
100 (45.4)
Thallium(lll) oxide
I 1
I 1314325 iThallic oxide
i i
1
1 1*
1
I
4 | P113
1
B
100 (45.4)
Thallium(I) selenide
1 1
112039520|
i i
1 1»
1
I
4 | P114
1
C
1000 (454)
Thallium(l)su)fate
1 1
110031591 (Sulfuric acid, thallium(I) salt
1 74461861
i i
11000
1
1
l
1,4 ( PI 15
1
1
B
100 (45.4)
Trichlorfon
1 1
I 52686 I
1 1
11000
l
1 1
i
B
100 (45.4)
Trimethylamine
1 1
I 75503)
i
11000
1
1
1 1
|
B
100 (45.4)
sym-Trini trobenzene
I i
I 99354 (Benzene, 1 t3f5-trinitro-
i i
1 1*
1
i
4 I U234
1
A
10 (4.54)
Unlisted Hazardous Wastes
1 1
1 N.A.I
I I
1
I
1
l
1
1


Characteristic of EP Toxicity
1 1
1 1
1 1
1
1
1
l
1
1


RQLIST/chron.dtb/conrqlist.hed/conrqlist.fot/20-FEB-85 08:05:29

-------
UST OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND REPORTABLE QUANTITIES - Continued

1 1


SlQ
ory



1 1
1 1


1 1
1 1
1 RCRA
j Waste
Proposed RQ
Hazardous Substance
1 CASRN I
Regula
tory Synonyms
1 RQ I Code t [Number
Category 1
Pounds(Kg)
Selenium
1 1
1 1
|


1 1
1 1* 1
j |
i
I D010
1
A I
10 (4.54)
Uranyl acetate
1 541093 1
j j


15000 |
| |
1
1
1
B 1
100 (45.4)
Uranyl nitrate
110102064|
I |


15000 |
j |
1
1
1
B I
100 (45.4)
Vanadium(V) oxide
1 1
1 1314621 IVanadium
I |
pentoxide

11000
1 1
1
I PI 20
1
C I
1000 (454)
Vanadium pentoxide
1 1
I 1314621 IVanadium
i i
(V) oxide

1 1
11000 |
1 1
I
I PI 20
i
C I
1000 (454)
Vanadyl sulfate
1 i
127774136|
1


1 1
11000 |
1 1
1
1
1
C I
1000 (454)
Zinc TT
1 1
| 74406661
i |


1 1
1 1* 1
j j
l
1
1
C I
1000 (454)
Zinc acetate
I I
1 5573461
j j


tioooi
j j
l
1
1
C 1
1000 (454)
Zinc ammonium chloride
I 1
152628258)
1 i


15000 1
1 1
l
1
I
c I
1000 (454)
Zinc borate
1 I
I 1332076 |
j


1 1
11000 |
j j
l
1
1
C I
1000 (454)
Zinc bromide
1 1
I 76994581
i i


15000 1
l
1
1
C I
1000 (454)
Zinc carbonate
1 1
I 3486359 1
1 i


| |
11000 |
1 1
1
1
i
C I
1000 (454)
Zinc chloride
1 1
I 7646857 1
j j


1 1
|5000|
I j
1
1
|
C I
1000 (454)
Zinc cyanide
I 5572111
j j


I i
1 10 1
1 1
l
1 PI 21
1
A I
10 (4.54)
Zinc fluoride
1 1
I 7783495 |
1 |


110001
1 1
1
1
I
c I
1000 (454)
Zinc formate
1 1
I 5574151
1 i


I 1
lioooi
1 1
I
1
1
c I
1000 (454)
Zinc hydrosulfite
l 1
I 7779864 |
1 j


1 1
11000|
l
1
l
C I
1000 (454)
Zinc nitrate
1 1
I 7779886 I
1 |


1 1
150001
1
l
1
1
C I
1000 (454)
Zinc phenolsulfonate
1 1
I 127822 1
j j


1 1
150001
1 j
1
1
1
D I
5000 (2270)
Zinc phosphide
1 13148471
I i


1 1
11000 1
t 1
1
I PI 22
i
B I
100 (45.4)
Zinc silicofluonde
1 1
116871719 1
i |


1 1
150001
i i
1
1
l
D I
5000 (2270)
Zinc sulfate
1 1
t 7733020 |
1 1


1 1
11000 |
1 1
1
1
1
C I
1000 (454)



RQLIST/chron.dtb/conrqlist .hed/conrqlis
ot/20-FEB-85 08:05:29


-------
LIST OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND REPORTABLE QUANTITIES - Continued

1 1

1
Statutory



1 1
1 1

1
1

1 RCRA
1 Waste
Proposed HQ
Hazardous Substance
1 CASRN |
Regulatory Synonyms
1 RQ
Code
t [Number
Category
Pounds(Kfi)
F004
The following spent non-halogenated solvents and
the still bottoms from the recovery of these
solvents:
1 1
1 1
1 1
1 1
1 1
I

1
1 1*
1
1
1
1
4
1
I F004
1
1
1
j
C
1000 (454)
(a)	Cresols/Cresylic acid
(b)	Nitrobenzene
1 1
1 13197731
1 989531
l i

1
11000
|1000
1
1,4
1,2,4
I U052
1 U169
|
C
C
1000 (454)
1000 (454)
F00S
The fallowing spent non-halogenated solvents and
the still bottoms from the recovery of these
solvents:
1 1
1 1
1 1
1 1
1 1
1 1

1
1 1*
1
1
1
1
4
1 F005
1
1
1
I
B
100 (45.4)
(a)	Toluene
(b)	Methyl ethyl ketone
(c)	Carbon disulfide
(d)	Isobutanol
(e)	Pyridine
1 1
1 1088831
1 789331
I 751S0|
1 788311
1 110861 1
1 I

1
11000
1 1*
15000
1 1*
1 1*
I
1,2,4
4
1,4
4
4
1
I U220
I U1S9
| P022
1 U140
1 U196
I
C
D
B
D
C
1000 (454)
5000 (2270)
100 (45.4)
5000 (2270)
1000 (454)
K026
Stripping still tails from the production of
methyl ethyl pyridines
1 1
1 1
1 1
1 1
1 I

1
1 1*
1
1
I
4
1
1 K026
1
1
|
C
1000 (454)
K 039
Filter cake from the filtration of
diethylphosphorodithioic acid in the production of
phorate
1 1
1 1
1 1
I 1
1 1
| 1

1 1*
1
1
1
i
4
I K039
1
1
1
|
B
100 (45.4)
K046
Wastewater treatment sludges from the
manufacturing, formulation and loading of lead-
based initiating compounds
1 1
1 1
1 1
1 1
1 1
| 1

1 1*
1
1
1
1
4
1 K046
1
1
1
|
B
100 (45.4)
K052
Tank bottoms (leaded) from the petroleum refining
industry
I I
1 1
1 1
1 1
I 1

1 1*
1
1
1
4
I K052
1
1
|
A
10 (4.54)
K087
Decanter tank tar sludge from coking operations
1 1
1 1
1 1
1 1

1
1 1*
1
1
4
I K 087
1
1
B
100 (45.4)
RQLlST/chron.dtb/conrqlist.hed/conrqlist.fot/20-FEB-85 08:05:29

-------
LIST OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND REPORTABLE QUANTITIES - Continued
Hazardous Substance
1 1
1 1
1 1
1 CASRN |
Regulatory Synonyms
1 Statutory I
1 1 Ircrai
1 1 I Waste | Proposed RQ
1 RQ 1 Code 1 INumberlCategory I Pounds(Kg)
II 1 1 1 1 1
t -	indicates the statutory source as defined by 1, 2, 3 or 4 below
tt -	no reporting of releases of this hazardous substance is required if the diameter of the pieces of the solid
metal released is equal to or exceeds 100 micrometers (0.004 inches)
1	-	indicates that the statutory source for designation of this hazardous substance under CERCLA is CWA Section 311(b)(4)
2	-	indicates that the statutory source for designation of this hazardous substance under CERCLA is CWA Section 307(a)
3	-	indicates that the statutory source for designation of this hazardous substance under CERCLA is CAA Section 112
4	-	indicates that the statutory source for designation of this hazardous substance under CERCLA is RCRA Section 3001
1* -	indicates that the 1-pound RQ is a CERCLA statutory RQ
RQLIST/chron.dtb/conrqlist.hed/conrqlist .fot/20-FEB-85 08:05:29
N>
I
vO

-------
primary criteria RQ for that hazardous substance. For example, if substance A
is evaluated for aquatic toxicity and mammalian toxicity, and RQs of
100 pounds and 1000 pounds are set for aquatic toxicity and mammalian
toxicity, respectively, the 100-pound value will be the applicable primary
criteria RQ. Thus, the overall methodology for adjusting RQs consists of
associating the intrinsic properties of the hazardous substances with the RQ
levels and selecting the lowest level to arrive at the primary criteria RQ.
Detailed information on the development of the preferred RQ adjustment
methodology is provided in the document "Technical Background Document to
Support Rulemaking Pursuant to CERCLA Section 102, Volume 1," March 1985.
Other Factors
Upon completion of the evaluation and the establishment of a primary criteria
RQ, other factors may then be applied. The other factors are the natural
degradative processes of biodegradation, hydrolysis, and photolysis (BHP).
The rationale for applying BHP is that certain hazardous substances, when
released into the environment, may degrade through one or more of these
processes into less hazardous or innocuous products. If such is determined to
be the case, the applicable primary criteria RQ is subsequently adjusted
upward one RQ level. This adjustment reflects the Agency's judgment that the
danger posed by the release of certain hazardous substances will be reduced
due to these degradative processes.
Appendix A summarizes the results of the review for candidate hazardous
substances for BHP adjustments. It lists the data that were available,
identifies those substances rejected on the basis of bioaccumulation,
persistence, reactivity, or hazardous degradation products, and indicates
those hazardous substances for which no data or insufficient information were
available to make an evaluation. Table 2-2 presents the final six candidates
for which sufficient data are available to justify an upward RQ adjustment of
one level on the basis of one or more of the BHP processes. Also shown in the
2-10

-------
Table 2-2. FINAL CANDIDATE LIST FOR UPWARD RQ ADJUSTMENTS
BASED ON BHP
Hazardous Substance
Basis
B*
for Adjustment
H* P*
Primary
Criteria RQ
(Pounds)
Basis
Proposed
RQ
(Pounds)
Ammonia
X(See
text)
10
AQTX
100
Cresol
X

100
AQTX,CTX
1000
Dimethylamine
X

100
1
1000
Phenol
X

100
CTX
1000
Phorate

X
100
T(orl),
1000




T(ihl)

Pyridine
X

100
CTX
1000
NOTES:
*B - refers to biodegradatlon.
*H - refers to hydrolysis.
*P - refers to photolysis.
ABBREVIATIONS:
AQTX	- Aquatic toxicity, other than a CWA Section 311 assignment
CTX	- Chronic toxicity
T(orl) - Oral toxicity (mammalian)
T(ihl) - Inhalation toxicity (mammalian)
I	- Ignitability
2-11

-------
table are the original primary criteria RQ assignments and the basis on which
those assignments were made.
Unless they are highly water-soluble, hazardous substances that can rapidly
escape into the atmosphere upon release (i.e., substances with boiling points
of 100°F or less) are not considered candidates for RQ adjustments based on
BHP. Note that two hazardous substances in Table 2-2 (ammonia and
dimethylamine) do indeed boil below 100°F, but are also very soluble in water,
and so adjustments based on biodegradation have been applied to them.
Ammonia Degradation—
The ultimate biodegradation product of ammonia is nitrate ion, not carbon
dioxide and water as in the case of organic hydrocarbon hazardous substances.
An extensive review of ammonia has been published (1). This review includes
an entire chapter (200+ pages) on the transformation and transport mechanisms
of ammonia in the environment.
In summary, the primary degradation route of ammonia is "nitrification" in
soil, a stepwise biodegradation to nitrite ion and nitrate ion. The
functional organisms are two major groups, Nitrosomonas and Nitrobacter, known
collectively as the nitrifying bacteria. The rate of assimilation of ammonia
in soil is two orders of magnitude greater than its loss by volatilization,
and ammonia that does escape to the atmosphere has a short residence time
before it is returned to the soil or water medium.
Hazardous Reactivity Products—
In some cases, the processes of BHP may produce other hazardous substances
which could lead to increased danger to public health and welfare, and the
environment after a release has occurred. The Agency has taken this into
account whenever such hazardous degradation products are known. In
particular, when assessing reactivity during the primary criteria analysis,
2-12

-------
hazardous substances which can hydrolyze to yield hydrofluoric acid, hydrogen
sulfide, or phosphine have been assigned reactivity RQs on the basis of these
hazardous products. In this current group of 105 hazardous substances, four
were ranked on this basis, as shown in Table 2-3 below.
Table 2-3
RQs Based on Hazardous Degradation Products
Primary RQ After Adjustment
Reactivity (Hydrolysis) Criteria RQ For Reactivity
Hazardous Substance	Product*	(Pounds)	(Pounds)
Ammonium bifluoride	Hydrofluoric acid	1000	100
Sodium bifluoride	Hydrofluoric acid	1000	100
Lead sulfide	Hydrogen sulfide	100	100
Zinc phosphide	Phosphine	1000	100
* Note that the reactivity (hydrolysis) products are themselves
hazardous substances, each with an RQ of 100 pounds.
Status of Hazardous Substances Designated Under the CWA Section 311
Of the 105 hazardous substances for which adjusted RQs are proposed, 62 were
originally listed as hazardous substances and given RQs under the CWA Section
311 (40 CFR Parts 116 and 117). The results of adjustments of the RQs of
these 62 hazardous substances is as follows: 32 RQs remain the same, and 30
RQs are lower.
RQs for the F- and K- Hazardous Waste Streams
Hazardous waste streams as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery
Act (RCRA) regulations, 40 CFR Sections 261.31 and 261.32, are commonly called
the "F-" and "K-" hazardous waste streams. These letters refer to the
prefixes in the EPA identifying hazardous waste numbers.
2-13

-------
The K- hazardous waste streams are hazardous wastes from specific sources
(e.g., K087 is decanter tank car sludge from coking operations). In order to
assign proposed RQs to these waste streams, each hazardous constituent is
examined. The next step is to identify the RQ associated with each hazardous
constituent and then assign an RQ to each waste stream. The waste stream RQ
will be the lowest RQ associated with the individual hazardous constituents of
the waste stream.
The RCRA waste streams F001 - F005 are collective listings (e.g., five
solvents which are hazardous wastes are listed collectively under F005). RQs
are assigned to these waste streams using a special procedure, as follows.
RQs are first assigned to each individual solvent which is a hazardous waste
as in the case of the K- wastes. Then in addition, a generic RQ is assigned
to the several hazardous wastes, equal to the lowest RQ assigned to any of
these individual solvents. If the releaser is unsure which solvent he has
released, or if he has released a mixture of solvents and does not apply the
mixture rule, he will use the generic RQ for notification purposes.
RQs for Unlisted Hazardous Wastes
EP Toxic Wastes
The Characteristic of EP Toxicity was designed to identify wastes that would
likely contribute to contamination of groundwater by leaching from landfills.
There are only 14 hazardous substances for which the EP toxicity
characteristic can be determined as listed in the RCRA regulation, AO CFR
Section 261.24. Six of these are specific compounds and eight, while
nominally listed as the metal, must actually be determined on the basis of
some soluble compound of that metal.
2-14

-------
The list of hazardous substances and proposed RQs includes one component of
the Characteristic of EP Toxicity under the Unlisted Hazardous Wastes, D010,
Selenium. The proposed RQ of 10 pounds is based upon the chronic toxicity of
selenious acid. A detailed discussion of the assignment of RQs based on the
Characteristic of EP Toxicity is given in the "Technical Background Document
to Support Rulemaking Pursuant to CERCLA. Section 102, Volume 1," March 1985.
2-15

-------
SECTION 3
DATA TABLES FOR HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES
Detailed data tables showing the data for the primary criteria, the proposed
RQs and the basis for the proposed RQs are presented in Table 3-1. The tables
include the data on aquatic toxicity, mammalian toxicity (oral, dermal, and
inhalation), chronic toxicity, ignitability, and reactivity upon which the
choice of the proposed RQ is based.
Data entered in the Aquatic Toxicity, Mammalian Toxicity, Chronic
Toxicity/Carcinogen, and Ignitability/Reactivity columns are followed by a
letter (X, A, B, C, or D) indicating the RQ level corresponding to that
particular data point. The numerical value corresponding to the lowest level
so identified is given in the proposed RQ column.
All notes listed in the table are located at the end of this section, and all
abbreviations used are discussed there in some length. For those not concerned
with the complete development of the data in Table 3-1, the most common
abbreviations are as follows:
(X),(A),(B),(C),(D) - RQ Categories 1, 10, 100, 1000, and 5000
pounds, respectively
F - Flash point (°F)
B - Boiling Point (°F)
311 - The RQ was established on the basis of aquatic
toxicity under the regulations from
the CWA Section 311
AQTX - Aquatic toxicity (other than a CWA Section 311
assignment)
CTX - Chronic toxicity
BHP - Biodegradation, hydrolysis, or photolysis
I/R - Ignitability and reactivity
CS - The RQ was assigned on the basis of chemical similarity
to another substance, in the absence of data for the primary
criteria
Max - Maximum possible RQ assignment
3-1

-------
Table 3-1
DATA FOR THE NPRM HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES
Hazardous Substance (Note
1)
1
1
1
1 CASRN
Aquatic
Toxicity
(Note 2)
1 Mammalian Toxicity (Note 3)
1 Chronic
1 Toxicity/
ICarcinogen
1 (Note 1)
Ignitabllity/
Reactivity
(Note 5)
311
RQ
(Note 6)
1
Proposed 1 Basis for
RQ 1 Proposed RQ
(Note 7)1 (Note 8)
Comments
Acenaphthene

1
1 83329
1
1
10-KB)

1
ICARC=b
|CT=I .D.
1
Solid

100
I
lAQTX
I
1

Note 9
Acenaphthylene

1
1 208968
1
|


1
ICARC=b
|CT=I.D.
1
Solid

5000
1
iMax
1
I

Notes 9
10
Acetic acid, thallium(I) salt

1 563688
1

lMus-orl:35 (C)
1
|CT=22.1(B)
Solid

100
1
ICTX
1

Note 17
Ammonia

1 7661117
1
1
1-0.1 (A)
iRat-orl:350 (D)
|
|CT=15.5(C)
I
I
F GAS
B -28(B)
100
100
1
IBHP
1
1

Note 11
Ammonium bifluoride

1
1 13*< 1*197
1
500-100(D)

1
|CT=19.5(C)
1
R:HF (B)
5000
100
1
ICS
¦

Note 12
Anthracene

1
1 120127
1
1


1
ICARC-b
|CT=I.D.
1
Solid

5000
1
IMax
1
1

Notes 9
10
Antimony t

1
1 7110360
1


1
ICTsI.D.
1
Solid

5000
1
IMax
1

Notes 13
11
Benzene, hydroxy-

1
1 108952
I
1
100-10 (C)
iRat-orl:111 (D)
iRat-skn:669 (D)
1
ICT=35(B)
1
F 175(Max)
B 358
1000
1000
1
IBHP
1
I

Note 16
Benzene, pentachloro-

I 608935
|


1
|CT=1U(C)
1
Solid

1000
1
ICTX
1


Benzene, 1,3,5-trlnitro-

I 99351
1

IRat-orl:505(D)
1
ICT=I.D.
1
R=exp(A)

10
1
|R
1


Benzo[J,k]fluorene

1
1 206110
1
1
10-1 (B)
IRat-orl:2000 (D)
iRbt-skn:3180 (D)
1
ICARC=b
|CT=I.D.
¦
Solid

100
I
lAQTX
1
1

Notes 9
10
Benzo[ghl]perylene

1
1 191212
1
1


1
ICARC=b
ICTrl.D.
1


5000
1
IMax
1

Notes 9
10
p-Benzoquinone

1
1 106511
1
0.1.1(A)
IRat-orl:130 (D)
1
ICT=I.D.
1
F100-200(D)

10
1
lAQTX
I


delta - BHC

1
1 319868
|

IRat-orl:1000 (D)
1
ICARCzb
1


1
\
ICS
1

Note 15
Captan

1 133062
1
1-0.1 (A)
IRat-orl:10000 (D)
1
ICT=17(C)
1
Solid
10
10
1
1311
1


Carbamimidoselenoic acid

1 630101
1

IRat-orl:50 (C)
1
ICTzI.D.
1
Solid

1000
i
iT(orl)
<


Carbon bisulfide

1
1 75150
|
100-500(D)
iHmn-orl LDlo:11 (C)
1
|CT=22.6(B)
1
F-22, BI15(C)
5000
100
1
ICTX
1


Carbon disulfide

I 75150
|
100-500(D)
iHmn-orl LDlo:11 (C)
1
|CT-22.6(B)
1
F-22, B115(C)
5000
100
1
ICTX
1


Carbonic acid, dithallium(I)
salt
I 6533739
|

iMus-orl:21(C)
1
ICT=22.1(B)
1
Solid

100
1
ICTX
1

Note 17
Chloroethane

I 75003
I
I
1000 (D)
iGpg-lhl LClo:1000/15H (D)
1
ICTzI.D.
1
1
F -58(B)
B 51

100
I
II
1
1


RQTBL/CHRON.DTB/COHDATA.HED/19-MAR-85 07;13:11

-------
DATA FOR THE NPRM HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES - Continued
Hazardous Substance (Note 1)
1
1
1
1 CASRN
Aquatic
Toxicity
(Note 2)
1 Mammalian Toxicity (Note 3)
1 Chronic I
1 Toxicity/llgnitability/
ICarcinogenl Reactivity
1 (Note 4)1 (Note 5)
311
RQ
(Note 6)
1
Proposed 1 Basis for
RQ I Proposed RQ
(Note 7)1 (Note 8)
Comments
Chromic acetate
1
1 1066301)
1
1
100-10 (C)

1 1
ICARCrb I Sol id
ICTsI.D. 1
I I
1000
1000
I
1311
I
1
Note 17
Chromic sulfate
1
110101538
I
i
100-10 (C)

1 1
ICARC-b ISolid
ICT=I.D. 1
1 1
1000
1000
1311
I
1
Note 17
Chromous chloride
¦
110049055
i
100-10 (C)
iRat-orl:1870 (D)
1 1
ICTsI.D. ISolid
1 1
1000
1000
1311
1
Note 17
Copper t
i
1 7440508
1
i


1 1
ICTiI.D. ISolid
1 1
1 1

5000
1
iMax
1
|
Notes 14
17
18
Notes 16
19
Cresol (s)
m-
0-
P-
i
1
1 1319773
1 108391
1 95487
1 106445
i
10-1 (B)
iRat-orl:1454 (D)
lMus-orl:86l (D)
IRbt-skn:2000 (D)
1 1
1 1
|CT=21.2(B) If 178-187
1 IB 376.395(D)
1 1
1 1
I I
1000
1000
1
1
IBHP
1
1
1
I
Cresylic acid
m-
0-
P-
i
1 1319773
1 108391
1 95487
1 106445
1
10-1 (B)
IRat-orl:1454 (D)
lMus-orl:86l (D)
IRbt-skn:2000 (D)
1 1
|CT=21.2(B) If 178-187
1 IB 376-395(D)
1 1
1 1
1 1
1000
1000
1
IBHP
1
1
1
1
Notes 16
19
Cupric chloride
1
1 7UH739U
I
1-0.1 (A)

1 1
|CTsl6.5(C)ISolid
1 1
10
10
1311
1
Note 17
Cupric sulfate
i
1 7758987
i
1-0.1 (A)
IRat-orl: 300 (D)
I I
|CT=16(C) ISolid
1 1
10
10
1311
1
Note 17
Cupric tartrate
1
1 815827
1
10-1 (B)

I 1
ICT=15(C) ISolid
1 1
100
100
1311
I
Note 17
1,4-Cyclohexadlenedione
i
1 106514
i
0.1-KA)
IRat-orl:130 (D)
\ 1
ICTsI-D. |F100-200(D)
1 1

10
I
IAQTX
t

Dichloropropane - Dichloropropene
(mixture)
1
i 8003198
1
1
1
100 (D)
IRat-orl: 140 (D)
lMus-orl:300 (D)
IRbt-skn: 2100 (D)
1 1
ICTs12.1(C)l
1 1
1 1
| |
5000
100
1
|AQTX,CTX
1
1
1
Note 20
Dichloropropene(s)
2,3-Dichloropropene (isomer)
1
126952238
1 78886
|
500-100(D)

1 I
ICT=23.5(B)|
1 1
1 1
5000
100
1
lAQTX.CTX
1
1
Note 21
1,3-Dichloropropene
1 542756
|
10-KB)
IRat-orl: 250 (D)
1 1
1CT=23.5(B)|F95,B219(C)
1
5000
100
1
IAQTX,CTX
1

Diethylamine
1 109897
1
1
100-10 (C)
IRat-orl: 540 (D)
1 1
ICT=26.4(B)IF -9(C)
1 IB 134
| 1
1000
100
1
ICTX
1
I

Dimethylamine
1
1 124403
1
1
1
10.100(C)
IRat-orl: 698 (D)
|Mus-orl:3l6 (D)
iRbt-orl:240 (D)
1 1
|CT=19(C) 1F20,B45(B)
1 1
1 1
1 1
1000
1000
1
IBHP
1
1
1
Note 16
RQTBL/CHRON.DTB/CONDATA.HED/19-MAR-85 07:13:11

-------
DATA FOR THE NPRM HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES - Continued

1



1 Chronic



I

Hazardous Substance (Note 1)
1
1
1 CASRN
Aquatic
Toxicity
(Note 2)
1 Mammalian Toxicity
(Note 3)
1 Toxicity/
1 Carcinogen
1 (Note 4)
Ignitability/
Reactivity
(Note 5)
311
HQ
(Note 6)
Proposed 1 Basis for
RQ 1 Proposed RQ
(Note 7)1 (Note 8)
Comments
0,0-Dimethyl O-p-nitrophenyl
1
1 298000
1-10 (B)
lRat-orl:6 (B)

1
ICT=39.6(B)

100
100
I
I 311,T(orl),
Note 16
phosphorothioate
1
1
1

iRat-ihl:120 mg/m3/4H
lRat-skn:63 (D)
(C)
1
1
|



ICTX
1
|

Ethane, pentachloro-
1
1 76017
1
< 1 (A)
iDog-orl:500(D)

1 CT=I.D.
I


10
IA0TX
I

Ethlon
1 563122
I
1
1-0.1 (A)
iRat-orl:13 (C)
lRat-skn:62 (D)

1
ICT=I.D.
1
I

10
10
1311
I
1

Ferric dextran
1
1 9004664
1



ICARC=b
1
Solid

5000
1
iMax
1
Notes 9
10
Fluoranthene
1
1 2061)1)0
1
|
10-1 (B)
IRat-orl:2000 (D)
iRbt-skn:3180 (D)

1
ICARC=b
ICT=I.D.
|
Solid

100
1
lAQTX
1
1
Notes 9
10
Fluorene
1 86737
1
1



1
ICARC-b
|CT=I.D.
1
Solid

5000
1
IMax
1
i
Note 9
Fulminic acid, mercury(II) salt
1 628864
1



1
ICTsI.D.
t
R=exp(A)

10
1
IR
i

Hexachlorophene
1
1 7030*1

lRat-orl:60 (C)

1
ICT=29.5(B)
1
Solid

100
1
ICTX
1

Hydrogen sulfide
i
1 7783064
1
1
|
10-1 (B)
IRat-ihl:444 (D)

i
|CT=I.D.
1
1
|
F GAS(B)
B -76
R:H2S(B)
100
100
i
1311,I,R
1
I

Hydrosulfuric acid
1 7783064
1
1
|
10-1 (B)
lRat-ihl:444 (D)

ICT=I.D.
1
1
|
F GAS(B)
B -76
R:H2S(B)
100
100
1311,1,R
1
1

Iron dextran
1 9004664
1



ICARCzb
1
Solid

5000
IMax
1
Notes 9
10
Isoprene
1
1 78795
1
1
100-10 (C)


1
|CT=5.6(C)
1
1
F -65(B)
B 93
1000
100
I
II
1
I
Note 22
Lead t
1
1 7439921
1
1

iPgn-orl LDlo:l60 (D)

1
1CT=I.D.
1
1
Solid

5000
1
iT(orl)
1
1
Notes 14
17
23
Note 17
Lead chloride
1
1
1 7758954
1
500-100(D)


1
1
1CT= 33(B)
i
Solid
5000
100
1
1
ICTX
I
Lead fluoborate
113814965
i
500-100(D)
IRat-orl LDlo:50 (C)

l
1 CT=31 (B)
i

5000
100
1
ICTX
1
Note 17
Lead fluoride
i
1 7783462
j
100-10 (C)


1
ICT= 34(B)
|
Solid
1000
100
1
ICTX
1
Note 17
Lead iodide
110101630
1
500-100(D)


ICT=30(B)
1
Solid
5000
100
i
ICTX
1
Note 17
RQTBL/CHRON.DTB/CONDATA.HED/19-MAR-85
07:13:11

-------
DATA FOP THE NPRM HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES - Continued
Hazardous Substance (Note 1)
1
1 Aquatic
1 Toxicity
CASRN 1 (Note 2)
1
1
1
1 Mammalian Toxicity (Note 3)
1 Chronic
1 Toxicity/
1 Carcinogen
1 (Note 1)
Ignitabllity/
Reactivity
(Note 5)
311
RQ
Note 6)
1
Proposed 1 Basis for
RQ I Proposed RQ
(Note 7)1 (Note 8)
Comments
Lead nitrate
1
10099748I500-100(D)
1
iGpg-orl LDlo:500 (D)
l
1
ICT=31 ( B)
I
Solid
5000
100
1
ICTX
I
Note 17
Lead stearate
1
74284801500-100(D)
10723511
561890941
526525921
I
1
IGpg-orl LDlo:6000 (D)
1
1
1
|
1
ICT-I.D.
1
1
1
|

5000
5000
1311
1
1
1
|
Note 17
Lead sulfate
1
157 398071500-100(D)
71161121
|
1
1
j
|CT=32(B)
1
|
Solid
5000
100
ICTX
1
|
Note 17
Lead sulfide
131487011000 (D)
I
IGpg-orl LDlo:10000 (D)
I
|CT=34(B)
|
R:H2S(B)
5000
100
|CTX,R

Lead thiocyanate
l
592870|500-100(D)
¦
1
1
1
|CT=32(B)
|
Solid
5000
100
ICTX
|

Mercuric nitrate
1
1004594011-0.1 (A)
|
1
1
1
|CT=12.4(A)
I
Solid
10
10
I311.CTX
j
Note 17
Mercuric sulfate
778335911-0.1 (A)
I
1
1
iRat-orl: 57 (C)
lMu3-orl:10 (C)
1
1
ICT-I.D.
1
|
Solid
10
10
1311
I
|
Note 17
Mercuric thiocyanate
i
59285811-0.1 (A)
1
1
1
1
|CT=I.D.
I
Solid
10
10
1311
1
Note 17
Mercurous nitrate
1011575511-0.1 (A)
1
1
IRat-orl: 297 (D)
|Mus-orl:388 (D)
i
1
ICT=I.D.
1
1
Solid
10
10
1311
1
i
Notes 17
Mercury fulminate
1
6288611
i
1
1
1
1
|CT=I.D.
|
R=exp(A)

10
IR
|

Mercury, (acetato-O)phenyl-
1
623841
1
I
|Rat-orl:30(C)
1
ICT=37(B)
|
Solid

100
ICTX
|

Methanamlne, N-methyl-
i
124403110-100(C)
I
I
i
lRat-orl:698 (D)
IMus-orl:316 (D)
iRbt-orl:210 (D)
1
|CT=19(C)
1
1
l
F20,B45(B)
1000
1000
IBHP
1
1
I
Note 16
Methane, chloro-
1
7487311000 (D)
1
1
1
iRat-lhl:152000 mg/m3/30M
I (D)
iMus-ihl: 3H6/7H (D)
I
i
|CT=20(C)
1
1
I
F GAS(B)
B -11

100
I
II
1
1
|
Note 24
Methyl chloride
I
7487311000 (D)
1
1
1
I
IRat-lhl:152000 mg/m3/30M
I (D)
IMus-ihl:3146/7H (D)
|
1
|CT=20(C)
1
1
j
F GAS(B)
B -11

100
I
II
1
1
|
Note 24
Methyl parathion
1
29800011-10 (B)
I
I
1
|Rat-orl:6 (B)
IRat-lhl:120 mg/m3/4H (C)
lRat-skn:63 (D)
I
1CT = 39¦6(B)
1
1
i

100
100
1311,T(orl)
ICTX
I
I
Note 16
2,2'-Methylenebis(3> 4,6-trichlorophenol
1
703041
1 1
1
|Rat-orl:60 (C)
1
1
|CT=29.5(B)
1
Solid

100
1
ICTX
1

RQTBL/CHRON.DTB/CONDATA.HED/19-MAR-85 07:13:11

-------
DATA KB THE NPfH HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES - CcntUuad
Hazardous Sutetarvae (Mote 1)
1
1 Aquatic
1 Toxicity
asm 1 (Note 2)
I | Chronic
I I Toxicity/
I ICarcinogen
j Mamalian Toxicity (Note 3) 1 (Note 1)
Ignitability/
Reactivity
(Note 5)
311
RQ
Note 6)
Proposed
RQ
(Note 7)
Baai3 for
Proposed RQ
(Note 8)
Contents
Monoethylamine
1
750M71100-10 (C)
I
I
|
1
IRat-orl LDlo:U00 (D)
iRat-ihl LClos3000/l« (D)
iRbt-akn:390 (D)
I
1
|CT=IJ>.
1
1
|
<0(B)
62
1000
100


Pentachlorobenzene
6089351
l
1
1
|
iCTslMCC)
1
SoUd

1000
CTC

Pervtachloroethane
76017l<1(A)
|Dog-orl:500(D)
I
1
ICTiIJ).
1


10
A0TX

Phenantfcrene
|
850181
1
1
iMLB-orl: 700(D)
1
1
|Carc=b
|CT=IJ>.
I
F 3WHax)
B 6X4

5000
Max

Phenol
1
1089521100-10 (C)
I
I
1
|Rat-Grl:4l4 CD)
|Rat-skn:669 (D)
1
1
ICT-35(B)
1
I
F 1750bx)
B 358
1000
1000
EHP
Note 16
Phenylmercurlc acetate
6238UI
1
1
|Rat-orl:30(C)
1
|CT=37(B)
1
Solid

100
CDC

Phcrate
1
2980221
1
1
1
IRat-orl: 1.1(B)
IRat-ihl Uno:11/ai (B)
1
1
ICTiI J).
1
1
Solid

1000

Note 16
Phosphcrodithlolc add, 0,0-diethyl S-
(ettylthAotethyl eater
1
2980221
1
1
1
iRaUorls 1.1(B)
IRat-ihl LClo:Wffl (B)
1
1
|CT=I J).
1
1
Solid

1000

Note 16
piuiQbane, tetraethyl-
1
78002110-KB)
I
I
I
1
IRat-orl LDlo: 17 (C)
IRat-ihl LClo:850
lngAn3/6CM (D)
I
1
ICT=M9(A)
1
1
1
F 200(Max)
100
10
CTC
Note 17
Propere, 1,3-dichlaro-
5*42756110-KB)
1
1
|Rat-orl:250 (D)
1
lcr=23.5(B)
1
F95,8219(C)
5000
100
Aorx.crx

Pyrene
1
1290001
1
1
1
1
1
ICARCib
ICTrlJ).
1


5000
Hax
Notes 9
10
Pyridine
1 1
1108611100-1000(D) iRat-orl: 891 (D)
1 1
1
|CT=21(B»
I
F68,B239(C)

1000
BP
Note 16
Pyrophosphorlc add, tetraethyl eater
107193 M0-KB)
1
1
|Rat-orl:0.5 (A)
lRat-skn:2.H (B)
1
1
lcr=iJ).
1
1

100
10
T(orl)

SeleniOLB add
7783IX)8I [10-100(C)]IRat-orl LDlo:25 (C)
1
ICT=il2(A)
1


10
crx
Note 25
Seleniun t
1
7782U92I
1
1
IRat-ihl LDlo: 33 neAn]/&i (B)
1
1
Ict=ij>.
1
Solid

100
T(ihl)

Seleniun dioxide
1
7»W608i)| 10-100(C)
1
1
|[RaUorl LDlo:25 (C)]
1
1
|CT=H3(A)
1
Solid
1000
10
crx
Note 25
Seleniun od.de
7W608H no-100(C)
1
1
IfRaUorl LDlo: 25 (C)]
1
1
lcr=»3(A)
1
Solid
1000
10
crx
Note 25
Selerourea
1
63310111
1
1
IRat-orl:50 (C)
1
1
|cr=ij).
1
Solid

1000
T(orl)

Sodlun bifluonde
1
13338311500-100(D)
1
1
1
1
1
lcr=i9.Kc
I
R:HF (B)
1
5000
100
CS
Note 26
RQTEL/chran.dtb/oandata.ted/30-MAY-8S 09:08:4H

-------
DATA FOR THE NHH HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES - Centlnuad
Hazartous Subotanoe (Note 1)
I	I
I	I Aquatic
I	I Toxicity
I CASRN	I (Note 2)
i	r
I 7632000110-1 (B)
I I
I101021881100-10 (C)
I I
I	I
I 7783064110-1 (B)
I I
I I
I I
1100315911100-10(0
I 74U61861
I I
I 70OO2|1O-1(B)
I I
I I
I	I
I 107493110-1(B)
I I
I	I
I 13143251
I	I
I 74402801
I I
I I
I 5636881
I I
I 65337391
I I
I 77911201
I I
1101024511
I I
I 13143251
I I
1120395201
I	I
1100315911 lOO-IO(C)
I	74461861
I	I
I 526861100-10 (C)
I	I
I 75503I10CMO (C)
I I
I I
I 993541
I I
I NJL.I
I I
I I
I
I
I
I Eternal Ian Toxicity (Note 3)
r
|Rat-crl:85 (C)
I
IRat-orl:7 (B)
|Ko-«rls7 (B)
I
|Rat-lhl:444 (D)
I
I
I
lHJ3-orl:29 (C)
I
I
iRaUorl LSlo: 17 (C)
iRat-ihl LClo:850
|ng/m3/6CM (D)
I
|Rat~arl:0.5 (A)
lRat-alci:2.4 (B)
I
|RaV-trli22 (C)
I
iRat-orl:15.8 (C)
|HB-arlt 16-29 (C)
I
tHo-orl;35 (C)
I
|HB-crl:21(C)
I
lRat-arl:24(C)
I
lrtJB-orl:33(C)
I
|Rat-arl:22 (C)
I
|Rat-orl:50(C)
I
Mlb-ot1:29 (C)
I
I
lRat-orl:450 (D)
I
I
I
I
IRat-orl:505(D)
I
I
I
I Chronic I
I Toxicity/ llgiltabillty/
ICarcinogenl Reactivity
I (Note 4)1 (Note 5)
1	T
|CT=7(C) ISolid
I	I
ICT=40(B)	I Solid
I	I
I	I
|CT=IJ>.	IF GAS(B)
I	IB-76
I	|R:Hj6(B)
|CT=22.4(B)ISolid
I	I
I	I
|CT=49(A)	IF 200(Max)
I	I
I	I
I	I
ICTsI J>. I
I	I
I	I
|CT=21.6(B) ISolid
I	I
|CT=IJ>. I Solid
I	I
I	I
ICT=22.4(B) ISolid
I	I
|CT=22.4(B) I Solid
I	I
ICT=22.4(B)ISolid
I	I
|CT=22.4(B)ISolid
I	I
|CT=21.6(B) ISoUd
I	I
|cr=i J). ISolid
I	I
ICT=22.4(B)ISolid
t	I
I	I
|CT=30(B) ISolid
I	I
lcr=ij).	If gas(b)
I	IB 38
I	I
ICT=IJ>. lR=exp(A)
I	I
I	I
I	I
I	I
311
RQ
Note 6)
Proposed
RQ
(Note 7)
I&als for
Proposed RQ
(Note 8)
Sodium nitrite
Sodius aelenite
Sulftcr hydride
Sulfuric add, thalllund) salt
Tetraethyl lead
Tetraethyl pyrophosphate
Thallic apd.de
Thalllunt
Thalllun(I) acetate
Thalllund) carbonate
Thalllund) chloride
Thalllund) nitrate
Thallion(III) oxide
Thalllund) sdenide
Thalllund) sulfate
Trlchlorfon
Trlnethylanlne
sym-Hrlnltrobenzene
Unlisted Hazardous Wastes
100
1000
100
1000
IX
100
1000
1000
1000
100
100
100
100
10
10
100
1000
100
100
100
100
100
1000
100
100
100
10
10
311
(orl),crX
311.I.R
era
CTX
T(crl)
CTX
T(orl)
CTX
CTX
CIX
CTX
CTX
T(orl)
CTX
CTX
I
CTX
RQra-/chran.dth/acn±ita.hed/33-MWf-85 09:08:44

-------
DATA FOR THE NHW HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES - Contiiuad
Hazardous Substance (Note 1)
1 1
1 I Aquatic
1 1 Toxicity
1 CASHN 1 (Note 2)
I I Qirordo I
I I Toxicity/ llgnitabllity/
I ICaiylmgml Reactivity
| Mammalian Toxicity (Note 3) I (Note 1) 1 (Note 5)
311
RQ
Note 6)
Proposed
RQ
(Note 7)
Basis for
Proposed RQ
(Note 8)
Comments
Characteristic of EP Ttoddty
1 1
1 1
1 1
I |
1
1
1
1
1 1
1 1
1 1
¦ i

10
crx
Note 28
Seleniun D010
1 1
1 1
1 1
i 1
1
1
1
1
1 1
I 1
1 I
i i

10
CTX
Note 28
llranyl aoetate
1 1
1 5*110931500-100(D)
i i
1
1
1
1 1
|CT=31.2(B) iSolid
l i
5000
100
crx

Uranyl nitrate
1 1
1101020641500- 100(D)
I i
1
1
i
I 1
ICr=3CXB) 1 Solid
1 i
5000
100
crx

Vanadiun(V) oad.de
1 1
1 13116211100-10(C)
1 1
1 1
i i
1
iRat-crl: 10 (C)
iRat-ihl LO.o:70/ai (C)
I
i
i i
lcr= 10(C) 1 Solid
1 1
1 1
1 1
1000
1000
311,cix
T(orl),
T(ihl)

Vanadlun perttaxida
1 1
1 1311621|10O-10(C)
1 1
1 1
1 |
1
iRat-orl:10 (C)
IRat-ihl uno:7Q/ai (C)
1
1
1 1
ICT=10(C) I Solid
I I
I I
1 1
1000
1000
3ii»crx
T(orl),
T(ihl)

Vanadyl sulfate
1 1
1277711361100-10 (C)
i
1
1 1
lcr=3.80)> 1
i i
1000
1000
311

Zinc t
| |
1 7M0666I
1 1
1 1
1 |
I
1
1
1
1
i i
ICTs17.6(C)lSc01d
1 IF I860fex)
I IB 113
1 i

1000
CTX
totes 11
17
Zinc aoetate
1 1
1 5573^61100-10 (C)
i i
1
|Rat-orli2510 (D)
i
1 1
|CT=12.8(C) ISolid
1 |
1000
1000
311,crx
Note 17
Zinc anncnLun chloride
• i
1526282581500-1000))
i i
1
1
i
i i
|CT=11.2(C) ISolid
1 i
5000
1000
CTX
Note 17
Zinc borate
1 I
1 13320761100-10 (C)
1 i
1
1
1
l I
iCTslMCOISoild
1 1
1000
1000
311,crx
Note 17
Zinc bromide
i i
\ 76994581500-1000))
i i
1
1
1 1
lCr=11.2(C)|S6lld
I 1
5000
1000
crx
Note 17
Zinc carbonate
i i
1 34863591100-10 (C)
l i
1
1
i
1 1
|CT=9(C) ISolid
1 1
lcr=i1i.M(c)lsoiid
i i
1000
1000
311,CTX
Note 17
Zinc chloride
i 1
1 76U68571500-1000))
I |
I
a
©
5000
1000
CTX
Note 17
Zinc cyanide
i i
1 55721111-0.1 (A)
I I
I 77831951100-10 (C)
| |
1
1
¦ i
|CT=IJ>. ISolid
1 i
10
10
311
Note 17
Zinc fluoride
1
I
1
i i
|CT= 19(C) ISolid
I |
1000
1000
311,crx
Note 17
Zinc fornate
I 5CTH5I100-10 (C)
1 |
1
1
1
l 1
ICT= 13.6(C) ISolid
| |
1000
1000
311,CTX
Note 17
Zinc hydrosulfite
1 1
1 777986U1100-10 (C)
i |
1
1
|
i i
ICT=IJ). I Solid
1 i
1000
1000
311
Note 17
Zinc nitrate
i i
1 77793361500-100(D)
I i
1
1
|
i i
|CT=12(C) ISolid
i i
5000
1000
CTX
Note 17
Zinc phanolsuLforate
i i
1 1778221500-100(D)
I I
1
I
1
1 1
|CT=I J). ISolid
1 1
5000
5000
311
Note 17
RQIEL/chron .dtt/oandata .hed/ JO-MAY-85 09:08:4H

-------
DATA PCB THE KPfM HA2AKOB gJBSTANCES - Oontlruad

1

| Qiranlo






I A.
R;W3(B)
1000
100

Note 29
Zinc allloofluoride
168717191500- 100(D)
¦
iRatxrl IDlo: 100 (D)
ICTsIJ).
Solid
5000
5000
311
Note 17
Zinc sulfate
I
77330201100-10 (C)
iRaUorl U>lo:2200 (D)
|CT=12.8(C)
Solid
1000
1000
311,CW
Note 17

I
I
DiB-arli 1B91 (D)






root
1
1




1000
Components

The following spent rm-halogenated
1







solvents end the still bat tans frcn the
1







recovery of these advents:
1






Note 16
(a) CreaolVCreayllc add
13197731



1000
1000
BfP
(b) Nitrobenzene
989531



1000
1000
311

F005
1
1




100
Cunjxjnait

The following spent rav-halogenated
1







solvents and the still bottoms tram the
1







reoovery of these solvents:
1







(a) Tbluane
1088831



1000
1000
3ii,i,crx

(b) Hethyl ethyl ketone
789331




5000
EHP
Note 16
(c) Carten disulfide
751501



5000
100
CIX

(d) Isobutaral
788311




5000
WP
Note 16
(e) Pyridine
1108611
1




1000
HIP
Note 16
KQ26
1
1




1000
Components

Stripping still tails ftxm the
1







prodiistlan of nettyl ethyl pyridines
1







(a) Paraldehyde
1236371




1000
I
Note 16
(b) Pyrldine(s)
1108611




1000
BP
(c) 2-Ploollne
1090681
1




5000
I

K039
1
1




100
Components
Note 30
Filter oate traa the filtration of
1







diethylphosphorodithlaic add in the
1







prodjetion of phorate
1





T(orl),

(a) Flusjiunxilthioic esters
NJU




100
Note 30
1





T(lhl)

(b) Rnsphorothloic esters
NJl.l




100
T(orl),
Note 30
1





T(lhl)

K046
1




100
n mi unit

Wastewater treatment slirlges traa the
1







manufacturing, femulation and loading
1







of lead-based initiating oenpounds
1





|CTX
1
fcJote 31
1
(a) Lead (otmpomls)
N.A.I
1




100
RQIHVchron .dtb/oendata .hed/30-HAY-85 09:08:»W

-------
DATA PGR
THE NPFM HAZARDOUS SUBSTAtCES - Continued

1 1
I Chronic
1

1 1

1 1 Aquatic
1 Toxicity/
Iffiitablllty/1 311
Proposed I Basis Tor 1

1 1 Toxicity
ICarclnogen
Reactivity I RQ
RQ
1 Proposed RQ|
Hazardous Substarne (Note 1)
1 CASHN 1 (Note 2)
Mammalian Toxicity (Note 3) 1 (Note 4)
(Note 5) 1 (Note 6)
(Note 7)1 (Note 8) ICaments
K052
1 1
1 1
1
1
1
1
10
1 1
ICanpanent I
Tank bottom (leaded) fras the
1 1
1
1

1 1
petroleun refining industry
1 1
1
1

1 1
(a) Lead ocmpoinds = Tetraethyl lead
1 780021
1 |
1
1
1 100
1
10
ICTX iNote 32
I I
K087
1 1
1 1
1
1
1
1
100
1 1
1 Components I
Decanter tank tar sludge from ooicLng
1 1
1
1

1 1
operations
1 I
1
1

1 1
(a) Phenol
1 1089521
1
1 1000
1000
IEHP INote 16
(b) Naphthalene
1 912031
1 1
1
1
1 5000
1
100
Iaotx i
1 1
t No reporting of releases of this hazardous substance is required if the diameter of the solid metal released is equal to or exceeds
100 micrometers (0.004 inches)
LO
I
K3raL/chron.dttVoorelala.hal/30-«Ay-85 09:09:4H

-------
NOTES FOR TABLE 3-1
DATA FOR THE NPRM HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES
NOTE 1: The hazardous substances which appear on this list also appear in
Tables 7-1, 8-1, and 8-2 of the document titled, "Technical Background
Document to Support Rulemaking Pursuant to CERCLA Section 102, Volume 1,"
March 1985. The statutory sources for the listing of these hazardous
substances as CERCLA Section 101(14) hazardous substances may also be found
in* those tables. The statutory sources are the CWA Section 311 (b)(4)
(40 CFR 117), the CTJA Section 307(a), and the CAA Section 112 (proposed
40 CFR 61), and those defined in the RCRA regulations (40 CFR 261). Each
entry is followed by the Chemical Abstract Services Registry Number
(CASRN).
NOTE 2: Aquatic Toxicity, unless specifically noted otherwise, is given as the
TLffl96 (The 96-Hour Median Threshold Limit) for aquatic species. Tl<„,96 is
that concentration of the material dissolved in water, in parts per million
(ppm) or milligrams/liter (mg/1) (which are equivalent) that will kill 50%
of the test organism population in 96 hours. Each TL 96 entry is followed
by a letter indicating the corresponding RQ on the following scale:
Category	Aquatic Toxicity	RQ (Pounds)
X	LC50 <0.1 mg/1	1
A	0.1	mg/1 
-------
RTECS draws its aquatic toxicity data from "Water Quality
Characteristics of Hazardous Materials," by Dr. Roy Hahn, Jr. and Paul
Jensen, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, 77843, 1974.
C.	Publication 2-A, "Water Quality Criteria," Second Edition, Jack Edward
McKee and Harold V. Wolf (Editors). State of California, The
Resources Agency of California, State Water Quality Control Board,
1963.
D.	"Handbook of Environmental Data on Organic Chemicals," Karel
Verschueren, Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, New York, NY, copyright
1977 by Litton Educational Publishing, Inc.
E.	The "Oil and Hazardous Materials Technical Assistance Data System"
(OHMTADS), accessed as a machine-searchable data base via the EPA/NIH
CIS.
F.	The 1980 Ambient Water Quality Criteria Documents for 64 toxic
pollutants or pollutant categories, published pursuant to the CWA
Section 304(a)(1) (45 FR 231).
G.	"Aquatic Toxicity Testing as Fundament for a Spill Prevention Program,"
M. W. Curtis, C. M. Curran, and C. H. Ward, reported in the Proceedings
of the 1980 National Conference on Control of Hazardous Materials
Spills. (May 13-15, 1980, Louisville, Kentucky).
H.	"Handbook of Acute Toxicity of Chemicals to Fish and Aquatic
Invertebrates," W.W. Johnson and M.T. Finley, United States Department
of the Interior, Publication #137, 1980.
I.	"Acute Toxicity of Priority Pollutants to Bluegill," R.J. Buccafusco,
et. al., Bulletin of Environ. Contam. Toxicol., V.26, pp.446-452, 1981.
NOTE 3: Three types of mammalian toxicity are entered in this column, depending
on the route of administration: oral, dermal (skin absorption) or
inhalation. The details of the entries are as follows:
A. Oral Toxicity: Unless otherwise identified, entries are those showing
the acute oral Dose Lethal to 50% of the test animal population (LD^q)
in milligrams per kilogram of body weight (mg/kg). Test species are
coded using the RTECS convention, as follows:
Hmn = human
Rat = rat
Mus = mouse
Gpg = guinea pig
Dog = dog
Rbt = rabbit
3-13

-------
Thus the entry "Rat-orl:60" indicates an oral LD5q of 60 mg/kg for
rats.
B.	Dermal Toxicity; These entries are indicated by the abbreviation
"skn" immediately following the species code, and are again given as
the acute	in milligrams per kilogram of body weight (mg/kg).
Test species are coded the same as given under Oral Toxicity, above.
Thus the entry "Rat-skn:60" indicates dermal LD5q	60 mg/kg for
rats.
C.	Inhalation Toxicity: These entries are indicated by the abbreviation
"ihl" immediately following the species code. Data are presented in
terms of the concentration in air lethal to 50% of the test animal
population in parts per million (ppm) (LC-q). The exposure time is
also given (H = hours, M = minutes), when available. Test species are
coded the same as given under Oral Toxicity, above. Thus the entry
"Rat-ihl:60/4H" indicates an inhalation LCjq of 60 ppm for 4 hours for
rats.
D.	Low Lethal Dose or Low Lethal Concentration: These are shown by the
terms "LD^ " or "LC^o". L^i0 an^ L^i0 are t*ie l°west doses or
concentrations known to have haa lethal effect on the test species.
Thus the entry Rat-ihl LC. :60/4H indicates an inhalation	of 60
ppm for 4 hours for rats. Note: Human and LD^ data are not
used, since they generally represent isolated accidental poisoning
incidents. Toxicity data, unless specifically noted otherwise, have
been obtained from RTECS (see Note 2B, above). Each toxicity entry is
followed by a letter indicating the RQ to which it corresponds, on the
following scales:
Oral LD	Dermal LD,-0 Inhalation LC
or LD-	or LD-	or LD-	RQ (Pounds)
lo	lo	lo
<0.1	<0.04 <0.4	X	(1)
0.1-1	0.04-0.4	0.4-4	A	(10)
1-10	0.4-4 4-40	B	(100)
10-100	4-40 40-400	C	(1000)
100-500	40-200	400-2000	D	(5000)
NOTE 4: Entries in this column are as follows:
A. The results of evaluations of chronic toxicity effects carried out by
EPA's ECA0. For chronic toxicity, the entries are given as a
numerical score, followed by an equivalent RQ designation, as follows:
3-14

-------
Chronic Toxicity Score
RQ(Pounds)
81 to 100
41 to 80
21 to 40
6 to 20
1 to 5
X (1)
A (10)
B (100)
C (1000)
D (5000)
The scores are based on a combination of values assigned to minimum
effective doses and severity of the toxic effects, as described in more
detail in the report "Technical Background Document to Support
Rulemaking Pursuant to CERCLA Section 102, Volume 1," March 1985.
B. The results of certain evaluations carried out by EPA's CAG. These are
indicated by the entry "CARC^b". These hazardous substances have been
reviewed, and it has been determined that there is not substantive
evidence that they are potential carcinogens.
NOTE 5: Entries in this column include the following:
A. Ignitability: This is judged on combinations of flash point and
boiling point. These are entered in the column as F = flash point, and
B = boiling point, with the value immediately following in degrees
Fahrenheit. Materials that are capable of starting fires without an
external source of ignition are considered to be the most hazardous,
and are coded as follows:
PYR	= Pyrophoric
SPONT. IGN = Capable of spontaneous ignition
STRONG 0XID. = Strong oxidizer, may cause other materials to ignite,
and sustain their combustion.
The entry "Solid" indicates that the material is solid at room
temperature and not readily ignitable.
B. Reactivity: Reactivity refers to either a material's reaction with
water, compared with certain reference materials (see scale given
below) or to its ability to undergo self-reaction, with explosion being
the worst case. Certain other types of reactivity, such as the ability
to liberate toxic gases, are discussed as individual cases in separate
notes.
Each ignitability or reactivity entry is followed by a letter indicating
the RQ to which it corresponds, based on the following scales:
3-15

-------
REACTIVITY
Ignitability
Starts fires
F
8
F
B
<100
<100
<100
>100
100-1AO
With Water
(Reference
Compound)
Inflames
Extreme reaction
(e.g.,S03)
High reaction
(e.g., oleum)
Moderate reaction
(e.g.,NH3)
Self-Reaction
Explosive
May polymerize;
requires stabilizer
May polymerize if
contaminated. No
stabilizer required.
Some chance of
polymerization with
small heat release
RQ (Pounds)
A (10)
B (100)
C (1000)
D (5000)
Data for ignitability and reactivity ratings were taken from "Fire
Protection Guide on Hazardous Materials," 7th Edition, National Fire
Protection Association, Boston, MA., 1978.
NOTE 6: Entries under this column show the RQ that was assigned under the CWA
Section 311 (40 CFR 117.3).
NOTE 7: Entries in this column are the lowest RQs derived from the individual
rankings shown under the Aquatic Toxicity, Mammalian Toxicity, Chronic
Toxicity and/or Ignitability/Reactivity columns.
NOTE 8: Entries in this column show the basis on which an RQ has been proposed
coded as follows:
311	- Aquatic toxicity, as assigned under the CWA Section 311.
AQTX - Aquatic toxicity, other than a CWA Section 311 assignment.
T(orl) - Mammalian toxicity (oral)
T(ihl) - Mammalian toxicity (inhalation)
T(skn) - Mammalian toxicity (dermal)
CTX	- Chronic Toxicity
I	- Ignitablity
R	- Reactivity
3-16

-------
CS	- The RQ was assigned on the basis of chemical similarity
to another substance in the absence of data for the
primary criteria.
Max	- This entry indicates that the rating factors all exceed
the upper limit of the rating scales, and that the
assignment of a 5000-pound RQ has been made on the basis
of this being the largest value possible to assign.
BHP	- This entry indicates that the proposed RQ takes into
consideration one or more of the natural degradation
processes of biodegradation, hydrolysis, or photolysis.
More specifically, the lowest RQ suggested by any of the
primary criteria has been adjusted upward one level.
NOTE 9: The EPA CAG has determined that the degree of evidence for the
potential carcinogenicity of this material is inadequate and therefore
other primary criteria must be used as a basis for the proposed RQ
adjustment.
NOTE 10: No data have been found that permit the ranking of this hazardous
substance. An RQ of 5000 pounds is proposed on the basis of this being the
maximum value possible to assign.
NOTE 11: The proposed RQ for ammonia of 100 pounds was determined by adjusting
upward one level the 10-pound RQ based on aquatic toxicity. Ammonia
oxidizes completely to N0^ in a matter of 4-5 days.
NOTE 12: Ammonium bifluoride dissolves in water to form hydrofluoric acid. It
has been assigned a proposed RQ of 100 pounds consistent with the final RQ
of 100 pounds assigned to hydrofluoric acid on the basis of its chronic
toxicity.
NOTE 13: A maximum RQ of 5000 pounds is proposed for antimony metal.
NOTE 14: Reporting of releases of massive forms of this metal is not required
if the diameter of the pieces released exceeds 100-micrometers (0.004
inches).
NOTE 15: An RQ of one pound was established for the gamma isomer of
hexachlorocyclohexane, commonly known as Lindane, under the CWA Section
311. An RQ of one pound is proposed for the delta isomer of
hexachlorocyclohexane, which has a similar chemical structure, since
detailed data are not available in this case.
NOTE 16: The proposed RQ takes into consideration one or more of the natural
BHP processes. More specifically, the lowest RQ supported by any of the
primary criteria has been adjusted upward one level.
NOTE 17: Evidence found in 0HMTADS and/or "Water-Related Environmental Fate of
3-17

-------
129 Priority Pollutants" (EPA-440/4-79-029a) indicates that this hazardous
substance, or a constituent of this hazardous substance is bioaccumulated
to toxic levels in the tissue of aquatic and marine organisms, and has the
potential to concentrate in the food chain.
NOTE 18: A maximum RQ of 5000 pounds is proposed for copper metal.
NOTE 19: Data are presented only for the cresol itself; however, the proposed
RQ also applies to the salts. The range of flash points (F) and boiling
points (B) shown in the Ignitability/Reactivity column derives from the
three different cresol isomers, ortho-, meta-, and para.
NOTE 20: Although flash point data are not specifically listed for the
Dichloropropane - Dichloropropene mixture, it is reasonable to assume that
this mixture will have a similar ignitability rating as the individual
components.
NOTE 21: The proposed RQ for all isomers is based on the aquatic toxicity
rating of 1,3-Dichloropropene.
NOTE 22: In addition to its high flammability, isoprene requires an inhibitor
to prevent self-polymerization. At elevated temperatures, such as in fire
conditions, polymerization may take place. If the polymerization takes
place in a container there is a possibility of violent rupture of the
container.
NOTE 23: A maximum RQ of 5000 pounds is proposed for lead.
NOTE 24: Inhalation of high concentrations of methyl chloride causes serious
central nervous system damage, lingering illness, and sometimes death.
Persons may unknowingly be exposed to considerable concentrations because
it has no detectable odor.
NOTE 25: The RCRA regulation (40 CFR 261.33) lists selenious acid and selenium
dioxide under the same number (U204). However, these are two separate and
distinct hazardous substances and the CASRN has been provided for each.
However, the distinction is of little consequence, since Se02 immediately
hydrates to ^SeO^ in water, so that their toxcitities are, for all
practical purposes, equivalent. Brackets around entries for these two
hazardous substances indicate where such equivalent data has been assigned
from one material to the other.
NOTE 26: Sodium bifluoride reacts with water liberating heat and forming
hydrofluoric acid. It has been assigned a proposed RQ of 100 pounds
consistent with the final RQ of 100 pounds assigned to hydrofluoric acid on
the basis of its chronic toxicity.
3-18

-------
NOTE 27: This hazardous substance was Identified as the selenLte In the
published RCRA regulations (40 CFR 261.33). RTECS also uses the name
Thallium Selenite, but gives the formula TISe, which is that of Thallium
Selenide. The Structure and Nomenclature Search System (a component of the
EPA/NIH CIS) gives the name Thallium Selenide, and the CASRN shown here.
It appears that selenide is the correct term.
NOTE 28: The proposed RQ for Selenium (D010), a constituent of the
Characteristic of EP Toxicity, under the Unlisted Hazardous Wastes, is
based upon the chronic toxicity assessment for Selenious acid.
NOTE 29: A metal phosphide will react with water to liberate phosphine as
indicated by the symbols FH, in the Ignitability/Reactivity column of the
table. The proposed RQ for this hazardous substance is thus 100 pounds.
NOTE 30: These esters are assumed to be composed of phorate and/or its
analogues, and accordingly an RQ level will be proposed based on the
proposed RQ assignment of phorate itself.
NOTE 31: Lead azide (explosive) is assumed to be one of these lead compounds.
NOTE 32: It is assumed that lead compounds in this waste derive from tetraethyl
leadj that is, they are the residues from leaded gasoline, and that their
toxicities and that of tetraethyl lead will be essentially the same.
3-19

-------
SECTION A
REFERENCES
L. EPA-600/1-77-054, "Ammonia", National Research Council, prepared for the Health
Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. EPA,
November 1977.
4-1

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Appendix A
DATA FOR EVALUATION OF BIODEGRADATION,
HYDROLYSIS, & PHOTOLYSIS (BHP)
A-l

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Hazardous Substance
Acenaphthene
Acenaphthylene
Ammonia
Ammonium bifluoride
Anthracene
Antimony
Benzo(ghi)perylene
p-Benzoqulnone
delta-BHC
OF BIODEGRADATION, HYDROLYSIS & PHOTOLYSIS (BHP)
Data/Comments
Specific data not available. Acenaphthene is believed to be
subject to biodegradation and photolysis based on behavior
of other polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH3). (Ref. 1)
Maximum RQ of 5000 pounds has already been assigned.
Oxidation complete after U-5 days. Biodegrades to NO--.
(See text p.2-12)
Inorganic.
Forms weak solution of HF In water. (Ref. 3)
Fluoride is precipitated by calcium.
Maximum RQ of 5000 pounds has already been assigned.
Metallic antimony is not subject to BHP.
Maximum RQ of 5000 pounds has already been assigned.
Maximum RQ of 5000 pounds has already been assigned.
Inhibition of biodegradation. (Ref. 2)
Can be reduced under extreme conditions, but is generally
stable (Ref. 3).
Inhibits baoterial cell multiplication. (Ref.2)
Is not degraded by hydrolysis or photolysis. (Ref.1)
Half-life of delta-BHC in soil = 56 days.
Note: delta-3f1,5,6-Tetrachlorocyclohexane is a degradation
product.
delta-BHC is a nitrification inhibitor at high concentrations.
Evidence suggests it is persistent and bioconcentrative.
"HCH Is concentrated in the fatty tissues of fish and humans"
(Ref.3)

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Hazardous Substance
Captan
Carbon bisulfide
Chloroethane
Chromic acetate
Chromic sulfate
Chromous chloride
Copper
OF BIODEGRADATION, HYDROLYSIS & PHOTOLYSIS (BHP)
P I	Data/Comments
Decomposes readily if pH > 8 (Ref. t).
"Non-persistent" in soil; i.e., half-life <0.5 months (Ref. 5)
Readily hydrolyzes in water. Effective residual life in water
is approximately 2 weeks (Ref. 3)
Probable toxic degradation product.
Evidence indicates reduction of nitrification process in
activated sludge. (Ref. 2)
Relatively persistent. (Ref.3)
Degrades in sunlight. (Ref. 3)
No BOD data available. Blodegradatlon probably occurs at a sis
rate. (Ref. 1)
Hydrolysis may be a significant fate process, with a minimum
half-life of to days (Ref.1)
Photolysis in the aquatic environment is not significant.
(Ref.1)
High volatility. Volatilization is probably the primary
transport process.
Direct oxidation at ambient conditions does not occur
significantly in the aquatic or atmospheric environment.
The estimated photo-oxidation half-life in the troposphere
is 1-1 months. (Ref.1)
Inorganlo.
Chromium can be concentrated in the food chain. (Ref.3)
Inorganic
Chromium can be concentrated in the focd chain. (Ref.3)
Inorganic
Chromium can be concentrated in the food chain. (Ref.3)
Metallic copper is not subject to BHP.
Maximum RQ of 5000 pounds has already been assigned.

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APPENDIX A - DATA FOR EVALUATION OF BIODEGRADATION, HYDROLYSIS & PHOTOLYSIS (BHP)
Hazardous Substance
Data/Comments
Cresol
Cuprlc chloride
Cupric sulfate
Cuprlc tartrate
Dlchloropropane-Dlchloropropene
(mixture)
Dlchloropropene(s)
2,3-Dichloropropene
1,3-Dlchloropropene
B0D5 = 65$ of ThOD - o-cresol
BOD20 = 92* of ThOD - o-cresol
BODg = 68j 0f ThOD - m-cre30l
BOD5 = 58-70$ of ThOD - p-cresol. (Ref.2)
BOD.
¦ ?SrtSj
ThOD with acclimated activated sludge
No bloaccumulatlon
Inorganic
Copper can be concentrated In the food chain. (Ref.3)
Inorganic
Copper can be concentrated In the food chain. (Ref.3)
Inorganic
Copper can be concentrated In the food chain. (Ref.3)
Blodegradatlon slow. No BOD data.
Hydrolysis: Half-life = 0.5 - 2 years (dlchloropropane)
Half-life =20-70 days (dlchloropropene)
May reduce nitrifying microorganisms. (Ref.3)
Potential for accumulation. "May act similar to chlorinated
pesticides." (Ref.3)
No data for 2,3-isomer. See below for data on 1,3-isomer.
Blodegradatlon probably occurs slowly. (Ref.1)
Hydrolysis appears to be relatively slow.
Half-life = 20-70 days. (Ref.1)
No data was found on photolysis.
Volatilization is the primary transport process and is
reasonably rapid.

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APPENDIX A - DATA FOR EVALUATION OF BIODEGRADATION, HYDROLYSIS & PHOTOLYSIS (BHP)

Hazardous Substance
1
1 B
H
1
P 1 Data/Comments


1
1
1
|

1
1 Tropospherlo photo-oxidation la probably the predominant
1 fate process.
|
21.
Diethylamine
1
1
1
1
1
1

1 Forma strong alkaline solution from apparent dissociation of
1 amine group to form ammonium Ion.
1 Subject to alow biodegradatlon. (Ref.2)
1 Assume B0D5 . 10j
25.
Dimethylamine
1 X
1
|

I BOD5 = 65j of xhOD
j B0D20 = 99.7* of ThOD. (Ref.2)
26.
Ethion
1
1
1
1
1
1
|

I Subject to both acid and alkaline hydrolysis (Ref.1)
I
I Hydrolyzed readily in water. Not persistent. (Ref.3)
I
I Ethion is very persistent in soil dust, with a predicted
I half-life of 120 days. Moderate persistence.
i
27.
Ferrlo dextran
1

1
I Maximum RQ of 5000 pounds has already been assignd.
1
28.
Fluoranthene
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

i
1 No specific fate data for fluoranthene were found.
1 Biodegradatlon is probably the ultimate fate process.
1 No BOD data were found, however.
1
1 PAHs do not contain groups amenable to hydrolysis.
1
1 The dissolved portion of PAHs may undergo photolysis. (Ref.1)
I "...biological treatment produces little or no
I degradation of fluoranthene." (Ref.3)
|
29.
Fluorene
1
1
|

1
1 Maximum RQ of 5000 pounds has already been assigned.
1
30.
Hexachlorophene
1
1
1

i
1 Mo data.
1
31.
Hydrogen sulfide
1
1
|

i
1 Inhibits sludge digestion. (Ref.3)
|
32.
Isoprene
1
1
1
1

1 No specific fate data for isoprene were found.
1
1 Unstable, easily oxidized. (Ref.3)
1

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33.
3"»,
35
36
37
38
39
10
41
42
43
144
APPENDIX A - DATA FOR EVALUATION OF
BIODEGRADATIOH, HYDROLYSIS & PHOTOLYSIS (BHP)
Hazardous Substance
Data/Comments
Lead
Lead chloride
Lead fluoborate
Lead fluoride
Lead iodide
Lead nitrate
Lead stearate
Lead sulfate
Lead sulfide
Lead thiocyanate
Mercuric nitrate
Mercuric sulfate
Metallic lead is not subject to BHP.
Maximum RQ of 5000 pounds has already been assigned.
Inorganic.
Lead is bioconcentrative. (Ref.3)
Inorganic.
Lead is bioconcentrative. (Ref.3)
Inorganic.
Lead is bioconcentrative. (Ref.3)
Inorganic.
Lead is bioconcentrative. (Ref.3)
Inorganic.
Lead is bioconcentrative. (Ref.3)
Inorganic.
Lead is bioconcentrative. (Ref.3)
Maximum RQ of 5000 pounds has already been assigned.
Inorganic.
Lead is bioconcentrative. (Ref. 3)
Inorganic.
Lead is bioconcentrative. (Ref. 3)
Inorganic
Lead is bioconcentrative. (Ref.3)
Inorganic.
Mercury is bioconcentrative . (Ref.3)
Inorganic.
Mercury is bioconcentrative. (Ref.3)
Mercuric sulfate degrades to H2SOl| and nercurlc preclpitate.

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APPENDIX A - DATA FOR EVALUATION OF BIODEGRADATION, HYDROLYSIS & PHOTOLYSIS (BHP)

1 Hazardous Substance
1
1 B
H
1
P 1 Data/Comments

15.
1 Mercuric thiocyanate
1
1

1
1 Inorganic.



1
I

1 Mercury la bioconcentrative. (Ref.3)
I

16.
1 Mercurous nitrate
1
1

1
1 Inorganic.



1

1 Mercury is bioconcentrative. (Ref.3)
¦

17.
1 Mercury fulminate
1
1

1
1 Inorganic.



1
1

1 Mercury la bioconcentrative. (Ref.3)
1

18.
1 Methyl chloride
1
1
|

i
1 Blodegradation is probably not important. (Ref.1)
1



1

i
1 Hydrolyls is probably not a significant fate.



1
1

1 Half-life =117 day3. (Ref.1)
1



1
1

l
1 Photolysis is not significant in aquatic systems. The



1

1 predominant environmental process which is thought to



1

1 determine the fate of this compound is oxidation in



1
1

1 the troposphere via attack by hydroxy! radicals. (Ref.
I
1)


1

1
1 Volatilization is the primary transport process. (Ref.
1
1)
19.
1 Methyl parathion
1
1

i
1 Hydrolyzes fairly rapidly In water. Subject to UV



1
|

1 attack. (Ref.3) Toxic degradation product: nitrophenol
1
•


1

1
1 Half-life = 210 minutes in 0.01 N NaOH §30oc. (Ref.1)



1

1 BOD data not available.
|

50.
1 Monoethylamine
1
1
|

1
1 B0D5 . -| 7ji 0f xhOD.

51.
1 Pentachlorobenzene
1
1

1
1 No data.

52.
1 Pentachloroethane
1
1
1

1
1 No data
¦

53.
1 Phenanthrene
1
1
1

I
1 Maximum HQ of 5000 pounds has already been assigned.
1


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APPENDIX A - DATA FOR EVALUATION OF BIODEGRADATION, HYDROLYSIS & PHOTOLYSIS (BHP}
Hazardous Substance
Data/Comments
Phenol
Phenylmercurlc acetate
Phorate
Pyrene
Pyridine
Selenious acid
Selenium
Blodegradatlon 1s a very significant Tate pathway in
aqueous media with a sufficient concentration of micro-
organisms. (Hef.1)
Phenol is biodegradable by biota present in POTW. (Ref.3)
b0D5 = 58-83J ThOD for adapted sewage (Ref.2)
BOD5 _ 70f Thoc ln freshwater (Ref.6)
b0D5 = 55J ThOD ln saltwater (Ref.5)
Hydrolysis is rot a relevant environmental process. (Ref.1)
Photo-oxidation may be an Important degradatlve process in
aerated clear surface water. (Ref.1)
Matal-catalyzed oxidation may be relevant in some aerated
surface waters. (Ref.1)
Inorganic	residue
No data
Half-life	= 2 hours 0 pH = 8, 70oc
Half-life = 9.6 hours 6 pH 1-5, U0°c. (Ref.1)
No BOD data
Maximum RQ of 5000 pounds has already been assigned.
Subject to blodegradatlon.
b0D5 = 1.15-1.17 lb/lb; 100* removed ln 3 days (river water)
(Ref.3)
B0D3 = >1 lb/lb, 100J removed (Ref.6)
Inorganic
Inorganic. Insoluble metal.
Moderately bioconcentrative. (Ref.3)

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APPENDIX A - DATA FOR EVALUATION OF BIODECRADATION, HYDROLYSIS 4 PHOTOLYSIS (BHP)

1 Hazardous Substance
1
1 B
H
1
P 1 Data/Comments
61.
1 Selenium oxide
1
1
1
¦

1
1 Inorganic
1 Forms selenlc acid. Selenium may be bioconcentrated. (Ref.3)
¦
62.
1 Selenourea
1
1
1

1
1 Inorganic
1
63.
1 Sodium blfluoride
1
1
1

1
1 Inorganic
I
6U.
1 Sodium nitrite
1
1
1

1
t Inorganic
i
65.
1 Sodium selenlte
1
1
1
1

i
1 Inorganic
1 Persists at low levels. (Ref.3)
1
66.
1 Tetraethyl lead
1
1
1
1

1
1 Organometalllc lead.
1 Persistent and bioconcentratlve. (Ref.3)
I
67-
1 Tetraethyl pyrophosphate
1
1
1
1
1
1

1
1 Material will hydrolyze quickly. Half-life = 7 hours @25oc.
1
1 Forms phosphoric acid and ethylene gas (which is easily
1 Ignited). (Ref.3)
1
68.
1 Thallic oxide
1
1
1

1
I Inorganic
I
69.
1 Thallium
1
1
1

1
I Metallic thallium is not subject to BHP.
i
70.
1 Thallium (I) acetate
1
1
1

1
1 Inorganic
i
71.
1 Thallium (I) carbonate
1
1
1

i
t Inorganic
72.
1 Thallium (I) chloride
1
1
|

i
I Inorganic
t
73.
1 Thallium (I) nitrate
1
1

i
1 Inorganic
1
71.
1 Thallium (I) selenlde
1
1
|

i
1 Inorganic
1
75.
1 Thallium (I) sulfate
1
1
1

i
1 Inorganic
1

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APPENDIX A - DATA FOR EVALUATION OF BIODEGRADATION, HYDROLYSIS & PHOTOLYSIS (BHP)

1 Hazardous Substance
1
1 B
H
1
P 1 Data/Comments
76.
1 Trlchlorfon
1
1
1
1
1
|

1 "Trlchlorfon is essentially 100)1 hydrolyzed in
1 approximately 24 hours to non-toxic products." (Ref.4)
1
1 Hydrolysis products may still be toxic. (Ref.3)
1 Persistent.
1
77.
I Trimethylamlne
1
1
1
I

1
1 Moderately degradable, assume BOD^ . 30% ThOD
1 Bloaccumulatlon. (Ref.3)
1
78.
I sym-Trinltrobenzene
1
1
1

1
1 No data
1
79.
t Uranyl acetate
1
1
1

1
1 Inorganic
1
80.
1 Uranyl nitrate
1
1
1

1
1 Inorganic
1
81.
1 Vanadium pentoxlde
1
1
1
1

1
1 Inorganic
1 Does bioaccumulate, slightly. (Ref.3)
1
82.
1 Vanadyl sulfate
1

1
1 Inorganic
1
m
CO
1 Zinc
1

1
1 Inorganic
1
8t.
1 Zinc acetate
1

1
1 Inorganic
1
85.
1 Zinc ammonium chloride
1
1

1 Inorganic
86.
1 Zinc borate
1

1 Inorganic
1
CD
—J
1 Zinc bromide
1

1
1 Inorganic
1
CD
1 Zinc carbonate
1
1

1
1 Inorganic
I
90.
1 Zinc chloride
1

1
1 Inorganic
1
91.
1 Zinc cyanide
1
1
1
1
1

1
1 Inorganic
1 Will react with water to 3lowly release hydrogen cyanide gas.
1 (Ref.3)
1

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APPENDIX A - DATA FOR EVALUATION OF BIODEGRADATION, HYDROLYSIS & PHOTOLYSIS (BHP)

1
1 Hazardous Substance
1
1 B
H
1
P I Data/Comments



92.
1
1 Zinc
1
fluoride
1
1
I

1
1 Inorganic
1



93.
1
1 Zinc
|
formate
1
1

1
1 Inorganic
t



91.
1
1 Zinc
t
hydrosulfite
1

i
1 Inorganic
1



95.
I
1 Zinc
1
nitrate


i
1 Inorganic
I



96.
1
1 Zinc
t
phenolsulfonate
1

i
1 Maximum RQ of 5000 pounds
1
has already
been
assigned.
97.
1
1 Zinc
¦
phosphide
1

i
1 Inorganic
j



98.
1
1 Zinc
i
slllcofluorlde
1

1 Maximum RQ of 5000 pounds
i
has already
been
assigned.
99.
1
1 Zinc
1
sulfate
1
1
1

1
1 Inorganic
1



REFERENCES
1.	"Water-Related Environmental Fate of 129 Priority Pollutants",
Vol. 142, EPA 140/11-79-029 a&b, December 1979.
2.	"Handbook of Environmental Data on Organic Chemicals", Karel
Verschueren, Van Nostrand Reinhold Company, New York, NY, copyright
1977 by Litton Educational Publishing Inc.
3.	The "Oil and Hazardous Materials Technical Assistance Data Base"
(OHMTADS), assessed as a machine-searchable database via the EPA/NIH
CIS.
4.	"Guidelines for the Disposal of Small Quantities of Unused
Pesticides", EPA 670/2-75-057, June 1975.
5.	"Report on Environmental Assessment of Pesticide Regulatory Programs",
State Component, Volume 2, State of California Department of Food and
Agriculture, 1978.
6.	"Chemical Structure Resistant to Aerobic Biochemical Stabilization",
F.J. Ludzack and M.B. Ettinger, 14th Annual Purdue Industrial Waste
Conference, Lafayette, Indiana, May 5-7, 1959.

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