DRAFT REPORT
Columbia River Basin Contaminant Database:
I
-	V
Data Abstract Report


^	-r U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
I"	z OFFICE OF WATER
o SCK&S I OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
WASHINGTON, D.C.

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DRAFT REPORT
Columbia River Basin Contaminant Database:
Data Abstract Report
U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
^	office of water
	 * OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
Zd? WASHINGTON, D.C.
4i pncrfr
December 6, 1994

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CONTENTS
Page
LIST OF TABLES	 iv
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS	v
1.0 INTRODUCTION 	1
2.0 TECHNICAL APPROACH 	3
2.1	SCOPE OF DATA TO BE INCLUDED IN THE DATABASE	3
2.2	DATABASE FORMAT 	4
2.3	IDENTIFICATION OF DATA SOURCES	7
2.4	DATA SELECTION	7
2.5	DATA ENTRY	8
2.6	DATA ABSTRACTS 	8
3.0 OVERVIEW OF ONGOING CONTAMINANT RESEARCH ACTIVITIES	12
3.1	STATE AGENCIES	 12
3.1.1	Idaho 	12
3.1.2	Oregon	12
3.1.3	Washington 	13
3.2	FEDERAL AGENCIES	13
3.2.1	National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration	13
3.2.2	U.S. Army Corps of Engineers	13
3.2.3	U.S. Department of Energy 	14
3.2.4	U.S. Environmental Protection Agency	14
3.2.5	U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service	14
3.2.6	U.S. Geological Survey		15
4.0 REFERENCES 	 16
ii

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APPENDICES
appendix a. list of contacts
APPENDIX 8 UST OF IDENTIFIED CONTAMINANT DATA SOURCES FOP. THE
COLUMBIA fttV'EK BASIN
APPENDIX C. BIOTA DATA ABSTRACTS
APPENDIX 0, SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACTS
APPENDIX E. DATABASE CKEMfCAL UST AND 9-CKARACTER CHEMICAL CODE
NAMES
«!

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TABLES
Number	Page
1	Summary of the aquatic biota contaminant database structure	5
2	Summary of the sediment contaminant database structure	6
3	Overview of aquatic biota contaminant data for the Columbia River Basin	9
4	Overview of sediment contaminant data for the Columbia River Basin 	 10
iv

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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Technical support for development of this study design was provided by Tetra Tech, Inc. under
U.S. EPA Contract Number 68-C3-8374.
v

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1.0 INTRODUCTION
The Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC) entered into a cooperative agreement with
the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1990 to conduct a fish consumption survey of the
Nez Perce, Warm Springs, Umatilla, and Yakima Native American Tribes. This consumption survey,
which was released in October 1994 (CRITFC 1994), was the first phase of a broader effort to determine
the role of fish consumption as an exposure route for waterborne toxic chemicals among individuals of
these tribes. The second phase of this study, which was initiated in August 1994, consists of three
discrete tasks: 1) compilation of historical data on chemical contaminants in fish tissue and sediments into
a database; 2) design and implementation of a study to collect additional data on chemical contaminant
levels in fish being consumed by tribal members, and 3) evaluation and interpretation of the collected
data. The third phase of this exposure study, which has not been initiated, will determine blood contami-
nant levels of tribal members. Collectively, these three components should provide the necessary
information for developing an exposure assessment for members of the four CRITFC tribes.
This document was produced as part of task 1 of the second phase of EPA's CRITFC exposure study.
The primary focus of task 1 is to compile exiting data (1984 to 1994) on chemical contaminant levels in
fish tissue and sediments, in the areas fished by CRITFC member tribes (i.e., the Columbia River basin),
into a computerized database. Information provided in this document is intended to facilitate the use and
interpretation of the database. Section 2.0 of this document provides information on the technical
approach used to create the contaminant database. Section 3.0 provides a brief overview of ongoing, or
future, studies that may provide data in the future. The five appendices included with this document
contain the following information:
¦	List of individuals and agencies contacted to obtain data (Appendix A)
¦	List of identified contaminant data sources for the Columbia River Basin (Appendix B)
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¦	Abstracts for biota contaminant studies that contributed data to the database (Appendix C)
¦	Abstracts for sediment contaminant studies that contributed data to the database (Appen-
dix D)
¦	A list of 9-character chemical codes names used in the database (Appendix E)
¦	An overview of ongoing, or future, studies that may provide data in the future.
2

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2.0 TECHNICAL APPROACH
The compilation of data into the computerized database involved several discrete activities that are listed
below:
¦	Identification of the scope of data to be included in the database
¦	Selection of the database format
¦	Identification of potential sources of data
¦	Selection of data to be entered into the database
¦	Data entry
¦	Preparation of data abstracts.
Each of these activities will be discussed in the following sections.
2.1 SCOPE OF DATA TO BE INCLUDED IN THE DATABASE
The contaminant database task was initiated primarily to assist EPA in the development of a study design
for collecting additional contaminant data for fish being consumed by CRITFC member tribes. The
compiled data were to serve two short-term objectives. First, evaluation of the existing data would allow
identification of areas, chemicals, and fish species for which the existing data were thought to be
sufficient, or inadequate, to meet the data collection needs of EPA's Phase II CRITFC exposure study.
Second, a risk-based screening analysis of the existing data would identify chemicals of potential concern
that should be included as analytes for the Phase II study. A longer-term objective was the consolidation
of existing data so that this information could be used for other activities being conducted by EPA in the
Columbia River basin.
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To meet the above objectives, while recognizing the limitations of available resources, it was decided that
data collection activities would attempt to compile biota and sediment contaminant data collected within
the Columbia River basin during the last ten years (1984 to 1994). The portion of the Columbia River
basin that extends into Canada was excluded from data collection activities. While data were collected
from contaminant studies that have taken place in Montana, the primary emphasis was the compilation
of data in areas fished by CRITFC member tribes. Tribal fishing areas are located in Idaho, Oregon,
and Washington. Compilation of data on contaminant levels in biota was limited to aquatic organisms
(fish, crustaceans, and molluscs); data for birds and mammals were not entered into the database.
2.2 DATABASE FORMAT
To ensure that the compiled data would meet the needs of a variety of different users, the data are
provided in two different formats (database format and spreadsheet format) and in a number of commer-
cial electronic software versions. The two formats present the chemical data in different ways, which
affect the ease with which different analyses or data summaries can be performed. The database format
presents the information with descriptive and chemical information provided in separate columns (field
names). Tables 1 and 2 provide the field names (column headings) and structure for the biota and
sediment database formats, respectively. With this type of format the analysis of a single sample for
several analytes will occupy several rows in the database. The advantage of the database format is that
it reduces the number of columns required in the database, and by using the database querying and
reporting capabilities, this format facilitates working with large amounts of data. The spreadsheet format
also presents the information with descriptive and chemical information provided in separate columns
(field names); however, the data for each chemical analyzed in an individual sample, along with the con-
centration and data qualifier, are presented in a separate column. Thus, each row of the database presents
all of the data for a particular sample. Because the number of different chemicals analyzed for a given
sample may be quite large, separate spreadsheets have been created for different chemical groups (e.g.,
metals, semivolatiles, pesticides, dioxin/furans). This format is more compatible with conventional
spreadsheet use and facilitates the use of graphing and statistical tools that are available with conventional
electronic spreadsheets.
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TABLE 1. SUMMARY OF THE AQUATIC BIOTA
CONTAMINANT DATABASE STRUCTURE
Field Name
Description
Field Type
Station ID
Station number from report
A35
EPARegion
EPA Region (e.g., 10) where sample collected
N
Lat(DMD)
Latitude in degrees-minutes-decimal
N
Lon(DMD)
Longitude in degrees-minutes-decimal
N
Lat(DD)
Latitude in degrees-decimal
N
Lon(DD)
Longitude in degrees-decimal
N
PosDesc
Latitude/longitudes that were not provided in a report were estimated (E=» estimated)
A5
State
State where sample was collected
A7
Waterbody
River reach or basin where sample was collected
A27
ScrnBasin
Major river basin identified in the CRITFC study
A45
RMile
River mile of sample location if provided
N
RMileMin
Downstream river mile if River Mile range provided
N
RMileMax
Upstream river mile if River Mile range provided
N
Location
Location name or nearby landmark provided in report
A91
Sponsor
Sponsor(s) of the study
A30
Ref Source
Authors or personal communication source of original data
A50
RefID
Reference number from Appendix B of the Abstract Report
N
Date
Sampling date if provided
D
Year
Sampling year
N
Month
Sampling month if provided
N
Day
Sampling day if provided
N
DRangeMon
Time range (in months) over which study was conducted
N
Family
Family, Order, or Class of organism analyzed
A50
Genus
Genus of the organism analyzed
A17
Species
Species of the organism analyzed
A14
CommonName
Common name of the organism analyzed
A25
CaptMethod
Collection method employed to collect the sample
A55
Tis_Type
The portion of the organism that was sampled (i.e., fillet)
A17
Comp_Num
The number of organisms in a composite sample
N
CompType
Identifies the type of sample (C=composite, I«individual)
A15
MLgth_(cm)
Length of organism(s) in centimeters-mean length provided for composite samples
N
MWtJgm)
Weight of organism(s) in centimeters-mean M$if)&Dvided for composite samples
N
MAgeJyr)
Age of organism(s) in years-mean age provided For composite samples
A5
Sex
Sex of organising) if provided
A3
PerLipids
Percent lipid content of sample if provided
N
PerMoistur
Percent moisture content of sample if provided
N
Samp_#
Sample number~a temporary sample number was entered if none was provided in the
original report
A24
Replicate
Replicate number if field or laboratory replicate reported
AS
AnalMethod
Chemical analytical method if provided
A15
Units
Concentration units for chemical data~ug/Kg throughout
A14
ChemGroup
Chemical group (e.g., Dioxin/furans, Butyltins, Metals, etc.)
A30
CAS #
Chemical Abstract Service Registry number
A15
Chemical
Chemical name using a 10-character code-A dictionary is provided in Appendix E
A30
Concentrat
The reported concentration or detection limit-concentration reported is on a wet weig
N
Qualifier
The reported qualifier code (e.g., U-not detected)
A9
Field Types:
N »Numeric
D = Date
A7 » Alphanumeric
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TABLE 2. SUMMARY OF THE SEDIMENT 1
CONTAMINANT DATABASE STRUCTURE
Field Name
Description
Field Type
Station ID
Station number from report
A30
EPARegion
EPA Region (e.g., 10) where sample collected
N
Lat(DMD)
Latitude in degrees-minutes-decimal
N
Lon(DMD)
Longitude in degrees-minutes-decimal
N
Lat(DD)
Latitude in degrees-decimal
N
Lon(DD)
Longitude in degrees-decimal
N
PosDesc
Latitude/longitudes that were not provided in a report were estimated (E=estimate
A5
State
State where sample was collected
A7
Waterbody
River reach or basin where sample was collected
A50
RMile
River mile of sample location if provided
N I
RMileMin
Downstream river mile if River Mile range provided
N
RMileMax
Upstream river mile if River Mile range provided
N
Location
Location name or nearby landmark provided in report
A75
Sponsor
Sponsor(s) of the study
A15
Ref Source
Authors or personal communication source of original data
A30
Ref ID
Reference number from Appendix B of the Abstract Report
N
Date
Sampling date if provided
D
Year
Sampling year
N
Month
Sampling month if provided
N
Day
Sampling day if provided
N
DRangeMon
Time range (in months) over which study was conducted
N
Depth_(ft)
Water depth at sampling location in feet
N
S Dpth(cm)
Sampling depth from the sediment surface in centimeters
N
Coll Meth
Method or equipment used to collect the sediment sample
A35
Samp_Portn
Portion of sediment analyzed (e.g., bulk, size fraction <63pm, etc.)
A35
Samp_Type
Type of sample collected (e.g., C"composite, I=individual grab sample)
A15
Comp_Size
Number of grab samples in a composite sample
N
Grn Sz Mn
Mean grain size in millimeters
N
Grn Sz Md
Median grain size in millimeters
N
J % Gravel
Percent gravel content (dry weight) of sample if provided
N
|%Sand
Percent sand content (dry weight) of sample if provided
N
|%Silt
Percent silt content (dry weight) of sample if provided
N
|%Clay
Percent clay content (dry weight) of sample if provided
N
8% Fines
Percent fines (silt+clay ) content (dry weight) of sample if provided
N
J%TOC
Percent TOC content (dry weight) of sample if provided
N
|%Vol_Sol
Percent volatile solids content (dry weight) of sample if provided 1
N
|%Moisture
Percent moisture content of sample if provided
N
J % Sol ids
Percent solids content of sample if provided
N
JSamp_#
Sample number-a temporary sample number was entered if none was provided in
the original report
A25
Replicate
Replicate number if field or laboratory replicate reported
A3
AnalMethod
Chemical analytical method if provided
A15
Units
Concentration units for chemical dau-ug/Kg throughout
A14
ChemGroup
Chemical group (e.g., Dioxin/furans, Butyltins, Metals, etc.)
A50
CAS #
Chemical Abstract Service Registry number
A30
Chemical
Chemical name using a 10-character code-A dictionary is provided in Appendix E
A30
Concentrat
The reported concentration or detection limit-concentration reported is typically
on a dry weight basis
N
Qualifier
The reported qualifier code (e.g., U=not detected)
A9
Field Types:
N = Numeric
D = Date
1 A7 ¦ Alphanumeric

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The database format was provided in dBase IV and Paradox 4.5. For the aquatic biota and sediment data,
two different database files were provided for each medium. The first file (Tissuel and Sedimnt2,
respectively) contains the complete chemical name for each chemical reported in the database. The
second file (Tissue2 and Sedimnt2, respectively) contains 9-character code names for the chemicals
reported in the database. The second file was used as the template to create the separate spreadsheet
format files which incorporate the 9-character chemical code name as the column header for each
chemical reported in the spreadsheet. The 9-character field names were necessary because of a limitation
on the number of characters in the column header of dBase files. The spreadsheet format files were
provided in Lotus (.WK1) and Microsoft Excel 4.0 (.XLS) format. An electronic chemical dictionary
(in Lotus and Excel format) has also been included. This file provides a key to the 9-character chemical
code names.
2.3 IDENTIFICATION OF DATA SOURCES
Personnel of State and Federal environmental agencies, as well as university faculty and staff of private
consulting firms were contacted to identify and obtain available biota and sediment contaminant data for
the U.S. EPA, Region X, portions of the Columbia River basin (Idaho, Oregon, and Washington). The
contacted personnel and their respective organizations are provided in Appendix A. These contacts
resulted in the compilation of 121 reports, or collections of laboratory data, containing information on
historical and ongoing environmental monitoring and research activities in the Columbia River basin (see
Appendix B).
2.4 DATA SELECTION
Specific data sets selected for entry into the contaminant database met the following criteria:
¦	Data were collected within the Columbia River basin in the states of Idaho, Oregon,
Montana, and Washington
¦	Data were collected from 1984 to the present
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¦	Data were for aquatic organisms or sediments
¦	Data were reported in the original documents or directly from the laboratory data reports.
Data collected prior to 1984, and data for birds and mammals, were not entered in the database. Also,
data summarized in secondary sources were not entered into the database, as it was not possible to verify
their accuracy. Data collected within Montana were limited to contaminant data collected in large
programs that included results from other locations in the Columbia River basin (i.e., National Contami-
nant Biomonitoring Program and the National Study of Chemical Residues in Fish).
2.5 DATA ENTRY
Selected data sets were entered into electronic spreadsheets, checked against the original reports for
accuracy, and then electronically transferred into a Paradox 4.5 database (DOS version). Information
within this database was manipulated to create the database structures described in Section 2.2.
2.6 DATA ABSTRACTS
The Columbia River Basin Contaminant Databases currently contain aquatic biota contaminant data from
21 individual data sources (Table 3) and sediment contaminant data from 31 individual data sources
(Table 4). Abstracts for these biota and sediment data sources are provided in Appendix C and D,
respectively. These abstracts contain the following information:
¦	Study sponsor
¦	Area of study
¦	Study reference [see Appendix B for the full citation]
¦	Agency contact name and phone number for additional information
¦	Species or sediment fraction analyzed
¦	Types of tissue samples collected (i.e., whole body, fillet, etc.)
¦	Collection dates
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TABLE 3. OVERVIEW OF AQUATIC BIOTA CONTAMINANT DATA FOR THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN 1
Sponsor
Reference
Study location
# of Samples
% of Total
Years (min-max) J
ODEQ
ODEQ 1994
Willamette River basin
126
12.3
1988-1991
USFWS
Schuler 1994
Lower Columbia River
123
12.0
1990-1991
NWPPA
Beak 1989a
Lower Columbia River
120
11.8
1989
Bi-State
Tetra Tech 1993
Lower Columbia River
108
10.6
1991
USGS
Rinella et al. 1992
Yakima River basin
75
7.3
1989-1990
WDOE
Johnson et al. 1991b
Lake Roosevelt
48*
4.7
1990
WDOE
Seidaretal. 1994
Lake Roosevelt
48
4.7
1992-1993
WDOE
Johnson etal. 1986
Yakima River
46
4.5
1985
WDOE
Serdaretal. 1991
Columbia River below Grand Coulee Dam
46*
4.5
1990
ODEQ/NIH
Curtis 1994
Willamette River
40
3.9
1990
USEPA
U.S. EPA 1992
Nationwide including Columbia River basin
37
3.6
1984-1989
Bi-State
Tetra Tech 1994
Lower Columbia River
33
3.2
1993
WDOE
Johnson etal. 1988b
Lake Roosevelt
32
3.1
1986
USFWS
Schmitt et al. 1990
Nationwide including Columbia River basin
31*
3.0
1984
USFWS
Schmitt & Brumbaugh 1990
Nationwide including Columbia River basin
29*
2.8
1984
USEPA
Hornig et al. 1988
Couer d'Alene Lake, ID
27
2.6
1986-1987
USEPA
Davoli 1994
Lower Columbia River
23
2.3
1993
ODEQ
Tetra Tech 1992c
Lower Columbia River-Wauna, OR
15
1.5
1991
ODEQ
Tetra Tech 1992a
Lower Columbia River-St. Helens, OR
13
1.3
1991
WDOE
Johnson etal. 1991a
Lake Roosevelt
10
1.0
1990
WDOE
Johnson 1991
Lake Roosevelt
8*
0.8
1990
TOTAL
21 Data Sources

1021
100.0
1984-1993
* Reported additional analyses for some of ti
le same samples

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TABLE 4. OVERVIEW OF SEDIMENT CONTAMINANT DATA FOR THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN
Sponsor
Reference
Study location
# of Samples
% of Total
Years (min-max)
USGS
Ryder et al. 1992
Yakima River basin
527
44.6
1987
USACOE
Stockton 1991
Lower Columbia-Willamette Rivers
148
12.5
1984-1990
PortlandBES
Dames & Moore 1991
Columbia Slough-Portland, Oregon
79
6.7
1991
ODEQ
ODEQ 1994
Willamette River basin
72
6.1
1988-1991
Bi-State
Tetra Tech 1993
Lower Columbia River
60
5.1
1991
USGS
Rinella et al.
Yakima River basin
54
4.6
1987-1990
USACOE
Siipola 1994
Lower Columbia-Willamette Rivers
33
2.8
1990-1991
USFWS
Schuler 1994
Lower Columbia River
25
2.1
1991
WDOE
Johnson et al. 1988b
Lake Roosevelt
22
1.9
1986
NOAA
NOAA 1991
Columbia River estuary
21
1.8
1986-1989
Bi-State
Tetra Tech 1994
Lower Columbia River
19
1.6
1993
ODEQ
Tetra Tech 1992c
Lower Columbia River-Wauna, Oregon
15
1.3
1991
ODEQ
Tetra Tech 1992a
Lower Columbia River-St. Helens, Oregon
15
1.3
1991
WDOE
Johnson et al. 1986
Yakima River
13
1.1
1985
WDOE
Johnson & Norton 1988
Lower Columbia River
12
1.0
1987
WDOE
Johnson et al. 1991a
Lake Roosevelt
10
0.8
1990
WDOE
Johnson 1991
Lake Roosevelt
8
0.7
1990
USGS
Horowitz and Elrick 1993
Coeur d'Alene Lake, Idaho
7
0.6
1989
ODEQ/NIH
Curtis et al. 1993
Willamette River
6
0.5
1990
JR-Camas
Young 1989
Lower Columbia River-Camas, Washington
5
0.4
1989
USACOE
Britton 1989
Willamette River-U.S. Moorings, Portland
4
0.3
1989
WDOE
Johnson & Heffner 1993
Columbia River-Wallula, Washington
4
0.3
1992
IR-Camas
Young 1988
Lower Columbia River-Camas, Washington
4
0.3
1988
WDOE
Andreasson 1991a
Lower Columbia River-Longview, Washington
3
0.3
1990
WDOE
Heffner 1989
Lower Columbia River-Kalama, Washington
3
0.3
1990
WDOE
Heffner 1991
Lower Columbia River-Longview, Washington
3
0.3
1990
USACOE
USACOE 1991
Lower Columbia-Willamette Rivers
3
0.3
1991
WDOE
Das 1991
Lower Columbia River-Longview, Washington
2
0.2
1990
USEPA
Davoli 1994
Lower Columbia River
2
0.2
1993
WDOE
Johnson et al. 1991c
Lake Roosevelt
2
0.2
1990
WDOE
Zinner 1990
Lower Columbia River-Vancouver, Washington
. 1
0.1
1990
TOTAL
31 Data Sources

1182 N
100.0
1984-1993


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¦	Target analytes and analytical methods
¦	Study objectives
¦	QA/QC procedures
The 21 tissue data abstracts are provided in Appendix C and the 31 sediment data abstracts are provided
in Appendix D. A five to six letter alphanumeric code is provided at the bottom of each abstract. A
corresponding code is provided with each reference in Appendix B that provided data contained in the
database. The code consists of the first two or three letters of the first (and occasionally the second)
authors name, the publication year, a letter if there is more than one publication by that author or group
of authors in that year, and the letter "b" for biota (i.e., tissue) abstracts and "s" for sediment abstracts
[e.g., Jo88bs for the sediment abstract in Appendix D of the Johnson et al. (1988b in Appendix B) study
of metals contamination in Lake Roosevelt].
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3.0 OVERVIEW OF ONGOING CONTAMINANT RESEARCH ACTIVITIES
A wide variety of environmental research projects in the Columbia River basin are ongoing or are
planned for future implementation. Many of these projects include the collection of chemical contaminant
data in aquatic ecosystems. This section provides an overview of the projects that may be collecting data
that could be included in the sediment and tissue databases at a future date. This overview is divided
according to the state or federal agencies sponsoring the research.
3.1 STATE AGENCIES
An overview of chemical contaminant studies being conducted or planned by the state agencies of Idaho,
Oregon, and Washington is provided below.
3.1.1	Idaho
No ongoing or planned contaminant studies conducted or sponsored by either the Idaho Division of
Environmental Quality or the Division of Health were identified (see contacts in Appendix A).
3.1.2	Oregon
The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) has sponsored or conducted a number of biota
and sediment contaminant studies in the Columbia River basin. There are two ongoing or planned
contaminant studies being sponsored by ODEQ, The Willamette River Toxics Study is an ongoing
investigation of aquatic biota and sediments. The initial results of the Willamette River toxics monitoring
program have been published by ODEQ (1994). As part of the Lower Columbia River Bi-State Program,
ODEQ is also co-sponsoring fish tissue contaminant collection efforts on the lower Columbia River which
will be used as part of a human health risk assessment to be completed in 1995.
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3.1.3 W > hington
The Was!- gton Department of Ecology (Ecology) has sponsored or conducted a number of investigations
of contaminant levels in aquatic biota and sediments in the Columbia River basin. Ongoing chemical
contaminant studies being sponsored by the Washington Department of Ecology include fish and sediment
sampling for evaluation of potential human health and wildlife impacts of PCBs and lead in the Spokane
River (Davis, D., 7 July 1994, personal communication), and the Bi-State human health risk assessment
project discussed in Section 2.1.2. The Spokane study was planned following a screening survey of PCBs
and metals in sediment and bottom fish collected from the Spokane River conducted in 1993 (Johnson
et al. 1994). These screening data were not received in time for entry in the database.
3.2 FEDERAL AGENCIES
A number of federal agencies have ongoing investigations of aquatic biota and sediment contamination
in the Columbia River basin. These studies are described below for each federal agency responsible for
the studies.
3.2.1	National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has conducted long-term monitoring of
aquatic biota and sediment in the Columbia River estuary as part of their Mussel Watch and National
Status & Trends monitoring programs (NOAA 1989; NOAA 1991). The Mussel Watch and National
Status & Trend Programs are ongoing and will provide routine monitoring data for pesticides, PCBs,
polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and butyltin compounds.
3.2.2	U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACOE) sponsors and conducts sampling of sediments for the
evaluation of potential environmental effects due to dredging and disposal operations in the Columbia
River. Two districts of the USACOE are responsible for maintaining navigation in the Columbia River
basin. The Portland District is responsible for navigation in the Willamette River and in the Columbia
River from its mouth to its confluence with the Wind River. The Walla Walla District is responsible for
navigation in the upper reach of the Columbia River and the Snake River. The Walla Walla District has
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sponsored sediment contaminant studies in the Columbia and Snake Rivers (Pinza et al. 1992a,b), but
these data were not received in time for inclusion in the database.
Specific navigation projects are monitored on an approximate 5-year schedule. Therefore, the USACOE
will continue to be a source of additional sediment contaminant data in the future.
3.2.3	U.S. Department of Energy
The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) has sponsored a great deal of contaminant research in the
vicinity of the former Hanford plutonium production facility. These studies have primarily focused on
radionuclide concentrations in sediment and biota. Historical monitoring data are currently being
compiled as part of the Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA), which is part of
the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, otherwise known as the Tri-Party Agreement
(Eslinger et al. 1994). However, these data have not yet been obtained for entry in the database.
Ongoing efforts primarily focus on routine monitoring conducted as part of the U.S. Department of
Energy's General Environmental Protection Program, These monitoring data are summarized in an
annual report entitled, Hanford Site Environmental Report.
3.2.4	U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
The U.S. EPA has conducted a number of aquatic biota and sediment contaminant studies in the
Columbia River basin. Ongoing chemical contaminant studies sponsored by U.S. EPA include fish tissue
contaminant collection efforts in Lake Roosevelt (Upper Columbia River) and the CRITFC study
discussed in Section 1.0. Results from both of these studies will be used to assess the risk to human
health from the consumption of fish.
3.2.5	U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
An ongoing research effort is currently being conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to assess
the contaminant levels in aquatic resources of the Columbia River. These studies include sampling of
birds, eggs, fish, and sediments in National Wildlife Refuges and other locations along the Columbia
River (Schuler 1992; Schuler 1994). Additional chemical contaminant data from this project are expected
to be available in the future.
14

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3.2.6 U.S. Geological Survey
Currently, there are a number of ongoing monitoring programs in the Columbia River basin that are part
of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. NAWQA
Program studies have begun in the Willamette, Yakima, Central Columbia Plateau, and Upper Snake
River, and Northern Rockies Intermontane basins (The Northern Rockies Intermontane basins includes
the Clark Fork basin in Montana and Idaho). A brief overview of the ongoing NAWQA Program
activities in each of these basins is provided below.
Willamette w
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4.0 REFERENCES
Andreasson, J. 1991a. Class II Inspection of Weyerhaeuser, Longview Pulp and Paper Mill, April 16-
18, 1990. Washington State Department of Ecology, Environmental Investigations and Laboratory
Services Program, Olympia, WA.
Andreasson, J. 1991b. James River, Camas Pulp and Paper Mill Class II Inspection, June 4-6, 1990.
Washington State Department of Ecology, Environmental Investigations and Laboratory Services
Program, Olympia, WA.
Beak Consultants, Inc. 1989. Human consumption rates of fish from the Columbia River. Prepared for
Northwest Pulp & Paper Association. Beak Consultants, Inc., Portland, OR.
Curtis, L.R., H.M. Carpenter, R.M. Donohoe, D.E. Williams, O.R. Hedstrom, M.L. Deinzer, M.A.
Beilstein, E. Foster, and R. Gates. 1993. Sensitivity of cytochrome P450-IA1 induction in fish as a
biomarker for distribution of TCDD and TCDF in the Willamette River, Oregon. Environ. Sci. Technol.
27:2149-2157.
Das, T. 1991. Longview Fibre Company Class II Inspection. Washington State Department of Ecology,
Environmental Investigations and Laboratory Services Program, Olympia, WA.
Davis, D. 7 July 1994. Personal Communication (letter to Larry Goldstein, Toxics Investigations
Section Head, subject-1994 Spokane River Survey - Fish Tissue and Sediment Sampling Plan).
Washington Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA.
Davoli, D. 29 August 1994. Personal Communication (data package sent to Steve Ellis, Tetra Tech,
Inc., Redmond, WA). Selected fish tissue contaminant data from the U.S. EPA Columbia River toxic
substances study. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10, Seattle, WA.
Eslinger, P.W., L.R. Huesties, A.D. Maughan, T.B. Miley, and W.H. Walters. 1994. Data
compendium for the Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment. Prepared for U.S, Department
of Energy. Batteile Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA.
Fuhrer, G.J. 1989. Quality of bottom material and elutriates in the Lower Willamette River, Portland
Harbor, Oregon. U.S. Geological Survey, Portland, OR. Water-Resources Investigation Report 89-4005.
Prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
Fuhrer, G.J. and A.J. Horowitz. 1989. The vertical distribution of selected trace metals and organic
compounds in bottom materials of the proposed Lower Columbia River Export Channel, Oregon, 1984.
U.S. Geological Survey, Portland, OR. Water-Resources Investigations Report 88-4099. Prepared in
cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
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Haushild, W.L., G.R. Dempster, Jr., and H.H. Stevens, Jr. 1975. Distribution of radionuclides in the
Columbia River streambed, Hanford Reservation to Longview, Washington. U.S. Geological Survey
Professional Paper 433-0.
Heffner, M. 1989. Kalama Chemical, Inc. Class II Inspection, May 1988. Washington State
Department of Ecology, Environmental Investigations and Laboratory Services Program, Olympia, WA.
Heffner, M. 1991. Reynolds Metal Company Class II Inspection, February 1990. Washington State
Department of Ecology, Environmental Investigations and Laboratory Services Program, Olympia, WA.
Hornig, C.E., D.A. Terpening, and M.W. Bogue. 1988. Coeur d'Alene Basin EPA water quality
monitoring, 1976-1986. EPA 910/9-88-216. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10, Seattle,
WA.
Horowitz, A.J. and K.A. Elrick. 1993. Effect of mining and related activities on the sediment trace
element geochemistry of Lake Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, USA. Part I: Surface sediments. Hydrological
Processes 7:403-423.
Horowitz, A.J., K.A. Elrick, J.A. Robbins, and R.B. Cook. 1993. The effect of mining and related
activities on the sediment-trace element geochemistry of Lake Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. Part II: Subsurface
sediments. U.S. Geological Survey, Atlanta, GA. Open-File Report 93-656.
Johnson, A. and M. Heffner. 1993. Class II inspection of the Boise Cascade Pulp & Paper Mill,
Wallula, Washington - April 1992. Washington State Department of Ecology, Environmental
Investigations and Laboratory Services Program, Olympia, WA.
Johnson, A. and D. Norton. 1988. Screening survey for chemical contaminants and toxicity in
sediments at five lower Columbia River ports September 22-24,1987. Environmental Investigations and
Laboratory Services Program, Washington Department of Ecology, Olympia, Washington.
V Johnson, A., D. Norton, and B. Yake. 1986. Occurrence and significance of DDT compounds and other
contaminants in fish, water, and sediment from the Yakima River basin. Washington Department of
Ecology, Water Quality Investigations Section, Olympia, WA.
Johnson, A., D. Norton, and B. Yake. 1988 (Revised 1989). An assessment of metals contamination
in Lake Roosevelt. Washington Department of Ecology, Toxics Investigations/Ground Water Monitoring
Section, Olympia, WA.
Johnson, A., D. Serdar, and D. Norton. 1991a. Spatial trends in TCDD/TCDF concentrations in
sediment and bottom fish collected in Lake Roosevelt (Columbia River). Washington Department of
Ecology, Environmental Investigations and Laboratory Services, Olympia, WA.
Johnson, A., D. Serdar, and S. Magoon. 1991b. Polychlorinated dioxins and -furans in Lake Roosevelt
(Columbia River) sportfish, 1990. Washington State Department of Ecology, Environmental
Investigations and Laboratory Services, Olympia, WA.
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Johnson, A., D. Serdar, and D. Davis. 1994. Results of 1993 screening survey on PCBs and metals
in the Spokane River. Washington State Department of Ecology, Environmental Investigations and
Laboratory Services Program, Olympia, WA.
Mbreland, J.A. 19 August 1994. Personal Communication (letter to Ms. Kathy Rogovin, Tetra Tech,
Inc., Redmond, WA). District Chief, U.S. Geological Survey, Helena, MT.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). 1989. National Status and Trends Program
for marine environmental quality. Progress Report: A summary of data on tissue contamination from
the first three years (1986-1988) of the Mussel Watch Project. U.S. Department of Commerce, National
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Ocean Service, Office of Oceanography and Marine
Assessment, Rockville, MD. NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS OMA 49.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). 1991. National Status and Trends Program
for marine environmental quality. Progress Report: Second summary of data on chemical contaminants
in sediments from the National Status and Trends Program. U.S. Department of Commerce, National
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Ocean Service, Office of Oceanography and Marine
Assessment, Rockville, MD. NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS OMA 59.
Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ). 1994. Willamette River toxics study -
1988/1991. Department of Environmental Quality, Water Quality Division, Portland, OR.
Pinza, M.R., J.Q. Word, L.F. Lefkovitz, and H.L. Mayhew. 1992a. Sediment sampling of proposed
dredge sites in the confluence of the Snake and Clearwater Rivers. Prepared for U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers, Walla Walla District. Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory, Sequim, WA.
Pinza, M.R., J.Q. Word, E.F. Barrows, H.L. Mayhew, and D.R. Clark. 1992b. Snake and Columbia
Rivers sediment sampling project. Prepared for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Walla Walla District.
Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory, Sequim, WA.
Rinella, J.F., S.W. McKenzie, J.K. Crawford, W.T. Foreman, P.M. Gates, G.J. Fuhrer, and M.L.
Janet. 1992. Surface-water-quality assessment of the Yakima River Basin, Washington: Pesticide and
other trace-organic-compound data for water, sediment, soil, and aquatic biota, 1987-91. U.S. Geological
Survey, Portland, OR. Open-File Report 92-644.
Ryder, J.L., R.F. Sanzolone, G.J. Fuhrer, and E.L. Mosier. 1992. Surface-water-quality assessment
of the Yakima River basin in Washington: Chemical analyses of major, minor, and trace elements in
fine-grained streambed sediment. U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey. Open-File
Report 92-520.
Schmitt, C.J. and W.G. Brumbaugh. 1990. National Contaminant Biomonitoring Program:
Concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, selenium, and zinc in U.S. freshwater fish,
1976-1984. Arch. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 19:731-747.
Schmitt, C.J., J.L. Zajicek, and P.H. Peterman. 1990. National Contaminant Biomonitoring Program:
Residues of organochlorine chemicals in U.S. freshwater fish, 1976-1984. Arch. Environ. Contam.
Toxicol. 19:748-781.
18

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Schuler, C. 1992. Organochlorine contaminants in aquatic resources from the Columbia River.
Progress report. Fiscal year 1992. U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service, Portland
Field Office, Portland, OR.
Schuler, C. 8 September 1994. Personal Communication (data sent to Ms. Kimberly Stark, Tetra Tech,
Redmond, WA). U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Portland, OR.
Serdar, D., A. Johnson, and S. Magoon. 1991. Polychlorinated dioxins and -furans in Columbia River
sportfish: Chief Joseph Dam to McNary Dam. Washington State Department of Ecology, Olympia,
WA.
Serdar. D., B. Yake, and J. Cubbage. 1994. Draft Report. Contaminant trends in Lake Roosevelt.
Washington State Department of Ecology, Environmental Investigations and Laboratory Services
Program, Toxics Investigation Section, Olympia, WA.
Siipola, M.D. 17 August 1994. Personal Communication (data package containing sediment dioxin data
submitted to Mr. Curtis DeGasperi, Tetra Tech, Inc., Redmond, WA). U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,
Portland District, Portland, OR. Data for 1989 U.S. Government Moorings study - Willamette River.
Analyses of Columbia River/Willamette River sediment samples - 1990 reconnaissance study. Various
locations in Bonneville Pool - 1991. Mouth of Columbia River - 1992.
Tetra Tech. 1993. Lower Columbia River Reconnaissance Survey. Task 6: Reconnaissance report.
Volumes 1, 2, and 3. Prepared for Columbia River Bi-State Committee. Tetra Tech, Inc., Redmond,
WA.
Tetra Tech. 1994. Draft report. Lower Columbia River Backwater Reconnaissance Survey. Volumes
1,2, and 3. Prepared for Lower Columbia River Bi-State Committee. Tetra Tech, Inc., Redmond, WA.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). 1992. National study of chemical residues in fish.
Volumes I and II. EPA 823-R-92-008a,b. Office of Science and Technology, U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency, Washington, D.C.
19

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APPENDIX A
LIST OF CONTACTS

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APPENDIX A: LIST OF CONTACTS
State Agencies
Idaho
Idaho Division of Environmental Quality
Phil Ferguson and Bill Clark
Greg Teasdale
Idaho Division of Health
Ranae Hardy
Montana
Montana Department of Fish and Wildlife
Glen Phillips
Montana Department of Health, Water Quality Bureau
Gary Ingman and Bob Buchantio
Jim Hill
Montana State Natural Resource Damage Assessment Program
Mark Kerr
Oregon
Oregon Department of Environmental Quality
Gary Arnold
Barbara Burton
Tim McFetridge
Mannette Simpson
Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
Don Bennett
A1 Smith
Washington
Washington Department of Ecology
Art Johnson
Merley McCaal
Dave Serdar
BUI Yake
(208) 334-0502
(208) 334-0502
(208) 799-4370
(208) 334-4250
(406) 444-2449
(406) 444-2406
(406) 444-5320
(406) 444-0481
(406) 444-0205
(503) 776-6010 x 241
(S03) 686-7838 x 225
(503)378-8240 x 235
(503) 229-5983
(503) 657-2030
(503) 229-5410 x 375
(206) 407-6715
(206) 407-6929
(206) 407-6772
(206) 407-6778
1

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Washington (cont')
Washington Department of Health
Harriet Ammann
Denise LaFlamme
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
Jim Nielson
Carl Samuelson
(206) 586-5405
(206) 753-2410
(206) 753-1699
(206) 902-2563
Federal Agencies
Bureau of Reclamation
Dave Zimmer
National Biological Survey
Columbia River Research Laboratory
Jim Peterson
Midwest Science Center
Chris Ingersoll and Don Tillet
National Marine Fisheries Service
Bob Emmett
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Tom O'Connell
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Portland District
Mark Siipola
Walla Walla District
Tom Miller
U.S. EPA, Region VIA
Bill Engle, Water Branch Chief
Bob Fox, Superfund Branch Chief
U.S. EPA, Region X
Bill Bogue
Carla Fisher
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Charles Henny
Carol Schuler
Lawrence Blus
Liz Block
(208) 378-5088
(509) 538-2299 x 236
(314) 875-5399
(503) 861-1818
(301) 713-3028
(503) 326-6463
(509) 522-6379
(404) 449-5414
(206) 553-1676
(206) 553-1756
(503) 757-4840
(503) 231-6179
(503) 757-4840
(503) 765-6125
2

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Federal Agencies (conn
U.S. Geological Survey
Georgia
Art Horowitz (Lake Coeur d'Alene)
Idaho
Walton Lowe (Boise/Snake River)
Mike Beckwith (Lake Coeur d'Alene)
Oregon
Stu McKenzie
Dennis Wentz
Montana
Dave Clark, Project Chief - NAWQA Program
John Lambing and Steve Nichols
Washington
Sandy Williamson
(404) 903-9100
(208) 387-1300 xl385
(208) 263-4123
(503) 251-3260
(503) 251-3296
(406) 449-5263
(206) 593-6530 x 235
Universities
Flathead Lake Biological Station
Jack Stanford
Idaho State University, Department of Biology
Wayne Minshall
(406)243-0211
(208) 236-2236
Oregon State University
Lawrence Curtis
Gene Foster
Chris Wright
(503) 737-1952
(503) 737-2896
(503) 737-4531
University of Montana, Department of Geology
Johnny Moore
(406) 243-6807
Additional Contact*
Battelle - Pacific Northwest Laboratory
Roger Dirkes
David Maughan
(509) 376-8177
(509) 376-1785
Bonneville Power Administration
Mark Snyder
(509) 230-5384
3

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APPENDIX B
LIST OF IDENTIFIED CONTAMINANT DATA SOURCES
FOR THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN

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APPENDIX B: LIST OF IDENTIFIED CONTAMINANT DATA SOURCES
FOR THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN
II] WDOE
[2] WDOE
[3] USFWS
[4] USEPA
15] USEPA
[6] USEPA
[7] USEPA
[8] USEPA
[9] USEPA/ODEQ
[10] NWPPA
[11] NWPPA
[An91a] Andreasson, J. 1991a. Class II Inspection of Weyerhaeuser, LongviewPulp
and Paper Mill, April 16-18, 1990. Washington State Department of Ecology,
Environmental Investigations and Laboratory Services Program, Olympia, WA.
Andreasson, J. 1991b. James River, Camas Pulp and Paper Mill Class II Inspection,
June 4-6,1990. Washington State Department of Ecology, Environmental Investigations
and Laboratory Services Program, Olympia, WA.
Anthony, R.O., M.O. Garrett, and C.A. Schuler. 1993. Environmental contaminants
in bald eagles in the Columbia River estuary. Journal of Wildlife Management 57:10-
19.
BCI. 1990a. An inventory of potential surface water point sources of chlorinated
dioxins and fiirans in the Columbia River Basin. Prepared for U.S. EPA, Region 10,
Seattle, WA under sub-contract to Tetra Tech, Inc., Fairfax, Va. BCI, Vashon, WA.
BCI. 1990b. Toxics monitoring in the Columbia River basin, with emphasis on
chlorinated dioxins and funrns. Prepared for U.S. EPA, Region 10 under sub-contract
to Tetra Tech, Inc., Fairfax, VA. BCI, Vashon, WA.
BCI. 1991a. Quality assurance plan for selected toxica monitoring in die Columbia
River Basin. Prepared for U.S. EPA, Region 10 under sub-contract to Tetra Tech, Inc.,
Fairfax, VA. BCI, Vashon, WA.
BCI. 1991b. Ambient monitoring plan for characterization of point source emissions of
selected contaminants to surface waters of the Columbia River Basin. Prepared for U.S.
EPA, Region 10, Seattle, WA under sub-contract to Tetra Tech, Inc., Fairfax, VA.
BCI, Vashon, WA.
BCI. 1991c. Literature search and data base for chlorinated dioxins/funuis and related
topica. Prepared for U.S. EPA, Region 10, Seattle, WA under sub-contract to Tetra
Tech, Inc., Fairfax, VA. BCI, Vaahon, WA.
BCI. 199 Id. Results of chlorinated dioxin and furan analysia in lake whitefiih samples
obtatained by Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ). Letter from
Raleigh Farlow to Bruce Cleland, U.S. EPA, Region 10, Seattle, WA. BCI, Vashon,
WA.
[Be89a] Beak Consultants, Inc. 1989a. Columbia River fish study: fish collection, fish
tissue sampling and age of fish sampled. Prepared for Northwest Pulp & Paper
Association. Beak Consultants, Dae., Portland, OR.
Beak Consultants, Inc. 1989b. Human consumption rates of fish from the Columbia
River. Prepared for Northwest Pulp & Paper Association. Beak Consultants, Inc.,
Portland, OR.
1

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[12] USFWS
113] BPA
[14] USGS/USEPA
[15]	USACOE
[16]	BCMinEnv
[17]	ODEQ/NIH
[19] ODEQ
[18] ODEQ/NIH
[20] PortlandBES
[21] WDOE
[22] USEPA
[23] Battelle-PNL
Blus, L.J., C.J. Henny, D.J. Hoffman, and R. A. Grove. 1991. Lead toxicosis in tundra
swans near a mining and smelting complex in northern Idaho. Arch. Environ. Contain.
Toxicol. 21:549-555.
Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). 1992. Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife
Program annual implementation work plan for fiscal year 1993. Bonneville Power
Adminstretion, Division of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR.
Bortleson, G.C., S.E. Cox, M.D. Munn, R.J. Schumaker, E.K. Block, L.R. Bucy, and
S.B. Cornelius. 1993 (Preliminary draft). Sediment-quality	nf FtanHiw n.
Roosevelt Lake, Washington, 1992. U.S. Geological Survey, Tacoma, WA. Water-
Supply Paper - (Open-File Report - pending). WA38401: Preliminary,
Subject to Revisions, Revised: 12/15/93. Prepared in cooperation with U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency.
[Br89] Britton, J. 1989. Results of 1989 U.S. Moorings sediment quality evaluation.
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, Portland, OR.
Crozier, R. 1991. Preliminary report on dioxin and furan levels in Columbia River fish.
British Columbia Environment, Kootenay Region.
[Cu94] Curtis, L.R. 15 September 1994. Personal Communication (data sent to Mr.
Curtis DeGasperi, Tetra Tech, Redmond, WA). Oregon State University, Corv&llis, OR.
Cuitia, L.R., H.M. Carpenter, R.R. Donahoe, M.L. Deinzer, M.A. Beilstein, D.E.
Williams, and O.R. Hedstrom. 1991. Phaae I final report (draft). Toxicity and
longitudinal distribution of persistent organochlorines in the Willamette River. Prepared
for Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, Portland, OR. Oregon State
University, Fisheries and Wildlife, Corvallis, OR.
[Cu93] Curtis, L.R., H.M. Carpenter, R.M. Donohoe, D.E. Williams, O.R. Hedstrom,
M.L. Deinzer, M.A. Beilstein, E. Foster, and R. Gates. 1993. Sensitivity of
cytochrome P450-1A1 induction in fish as a biomaricer for distribution of TCDD and
TCDF in the Willamette River, Oregon. Environ. Sci. Technol. 27:2149-2157.
[D&M91] Dames & Moore. 1991. Columbia Slough sediment analysis and remediation
project Phaae I report. Volume 1. Prepared for City of Portland, Bureau of
Environmental Services. Dames & Moore, Portland, OR.
[Das91] Du, T. 1991. Longview Fibre Company Class II Inspection. Washington
State Department of Ecology, Environmental Investigations and Laboratory Services
Program, Olympia, WA.
[Dav94] Davoli, D. 29 August 1994. Personal Communication (data package seat to
Steve Ellis, Tetra Tech, be., Redmond, WA). Selected fish tissue contaminant data
from the U.S. EPA Columbia River toxic substances study. U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency, Region 10, Seattle, WA.
Eslinger, P.W., L.R. Huesties, A.D. Maughan, T.B. Miley, and W.H. Walton. 1994.
Data compendium for the Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment. Prepared
for U.S. Department of Energy. Battelle Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest
Laboratory, Richland, WA.
2

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[24] USFWS
[25] USEPA/ODEQ
[26] ODEQ
[27]	USEPA/ODEQ
[28]	USEPA/ODEQ
[29]	USEPA/ODEQ
[30]	USEPA/ODEQ
[31]	NCAP
Fitzner, R.E., LJ. Blue, C.J. Henny, andD.W. Carlile. 1988. Organochlorineresidues
in great blue herons from the Northwestern United States. Colonial Waterbirda 11:293-
300.
Foster, G. 1990s. Investigation of toxins in the Columbia River Basin. Stations CRjCI,
CR#2, CR#3, CR#4, CR#5, CM6, CR#7, CR*8, CRM, CS#1, WR#1?. Oregon
Department of Environmental Quality, Portland, OR.
Foster, G. 1990b. Willamette River dioxin study. Stations at Willamette River River
Miles 7, 72, 130, 144.1, 146.6, 147, 161, 176, Middle Fork Willamette River at River
Mile 6 and McKenzie River at River Mile 4. Oregon Department of Environmental
Quality, Portland, OR.
Foster, G. 1991a. Columbia River - Boise Cascade, Lake Wallula study. Oregon
Department of Environmental Quality, Portland, OR.
Foster, G. 1991b. Columbia River • Pacific Wood Treating, Lake River. Oregon
Department of Environmental Quality, Portland, OR.
Foster, G. 1991c. Willamette River • Pope and Talbot dioxin study. Oregon
Department of Environmental Quality, Portland, OR.
Foster, G. 199 Id. Four unidentified fish samples collected from Columbia River River
Miles 103,95, and 132. Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, Portland, OR.
Frost, P. 1990. Bald eagles on the Columbia Riven Threats from persistent
organochlotines. Journal of Pesticide Reform 10:5-9. NCAP is the Northwest Coalition
for Alternatives to Pesticides.
[34] USOS/USACOE Fuhrer, G.J. 1984. Chemical anlyses of elutriates, native water, and bottom material
from the Chetco, Rogue, and Columbia Rivers in Western Oregon. U.S. Geological
Survey, Portland, OR. Open-File Report 84-133. Prepared in cooperation with the U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers.
[33] USGS	Fuhrer, GJ. 1986. Extractable cadmium, mercury, copper, lead, and zinc in the lower
Columbia River estuary, Oregon and Washington. Water-Resources Investigations
Report 86-4088. U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia. 61 pp.
[32] USGS/USACOE Fuhrer, G.J. 1989. Quality of bottom material and elutriates in the Lower Willamette
River, Portland Harbor, Oregon. U.S. Geological Survey, Portland, OR. Water-
Reaources Investigation Report 89-4005. Prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers.
[35]	USGS/USACOE Fuhrer, G.J. and D. Evans. 1990. Uae of elutriate tests and bottom-material analyses
in simulating dredging effects on water quality of selected riven and estuuies in Oregon
and Washington, 1980-1983.
[36]	USGS/USACOE Fuhrer, G.J. and A.J. Horowitz. 1989. The vertical distribution of selected trace metals
and organic compounds in bottom materials of the proposed Lower Columbia River
Export Channel, Oregon, 1984. U.S. Geological Survey, Portland, OR. Water-
Resources Investigations Report 88-4099. Prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers.
3

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[37] USGS/USACOE
[38] WDOE
[39] WDOE
[40] USFWS
[41] USFWS
[42] USFWS
[43] MDHES
[44] USEPA
[45] USOS
[46] USOS
[47] WDOE
[48] WDOE
Fuhrer, O.J. and F.A. Rinella. 1983. Analyses of elutriates, native water, and bottom
material in selected rivers and estuaries in Western Oregon and Washington. U.S.
Geological Survey, Portland, OR. Open-File Report 82-922. Prepared in cooperation
with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
[He89] Heffner, M, 1989. Kalama Chemical, Inc. Class II Inspection, May 1988.
Washington State Department of Ecology, Environmental Investigations and Laboratory
Services Program, Olympia, WA.
[He91] Heffaer, M. 1991. Reynolds Metal Company Class II Inspection, February
1990. Washington State Department of Ecology, Environmental Investigations and
Laboratory Services Program, Olympia, WA.
Homy, C.J. and R.O. Anthony. 1989. Bald eagle and osprey. pp. 66-82. In:
National Wildlife Federation Scientific and Technical Series No. 12. Paper presented at
the Western Raptor Management Symposium and Workshop.
Henny, C.J., L.J. Blus, D.J. Hoffman, R.A. Grove, and J.S. Hatfield. 1991. Lead
accumulation and osprey production near a mining site on the Coeur d'Alene River,
Idaho. Arch. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 21:415-424.
Henny, C.J., L.J. Blus, A.J. Krynitsky, and C.M. Bunck. 1984. Current impact of
DDE on black-crowned night-herons in the intermountain west. J. Wild]. Manage. 48:1-
13.
Hill, J.H. 2 September 1994. Personal Communication 0etter and diskette containing
contaminant data for the Upper Clark Fork River basin sent to Ms. Kathy Rogovin, Tetra
Tech, Redmond, WA). Clark Fork Data Systems Manager, Montana Department of
Health and Environmental Sciences, Superfund Section, Helena, MT.
[Ho88] Homig, C.E., D.A. Terpening, and M.W. Bogue. 1988. Coeur d'Alene Basin
EPA water quality monitoring, 1976-1986. EPA 910/9-88-216. U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency, Region 10, Seattle, WA.
[Ho93] Horowitz, A.J. and K.A. EIrick. 1993. Effect of mining and related activities
on the sediment trace element geochemistry of Lake Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, USA. Part
I: Surface sediments. Hydrologies! Processes 7:403-423.
Horowitz, A.J., K.A. EIrick, J.A. Robbins, and R.B. Cook. 1993. The effect of
mining and related activities on the sediment-trace element geochemistry of Lake Coeur
d'Alene, Idaho. Part II: Subsurface sediments. U.S. Geological Survey, Atlanta, GA.
Open-File Report 93-656.
[Jo91] Johnson, A. 1991. Results of screen for EPA xenobiotics in sediment and
bottom fish from Lake Roosevelt (Columbia River). Memo to Mr. Carl Nuechterlein,
Washington Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA. 22 July 1991.
[Jo93] Johnson, A. and M. Heffner. 1993. Class II inspection of the Boise Cascade
Pulp & Paper Mill, Wallula, Washington - April 1992. Washington State Department
of Ecology, Environmental Investigations and Laboratory Services Program, Olympia,
WA.
4

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[49] WDOE
[56] WDOE
[54]	WDOE
[55]	WDOE
[53] WDOE
[50] WDOE
[51] WDOE
[52] WDOE
[57] NWPPA
[58] USACOE
[59] USEPA
[60] USFWS
[Jo88] Johnson, A. and D. Norton. 1988. Screening survey for chemical contaminants
and toxicity in sediments at five lower Columbia River ports September 22-24, 1987.
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[Jo86] Johnson, A., D. Norton, and B. Yake. 1986. Occurrence and significance of
DDT compounds and other contaminants in fish, water, and sediment from the Yakima
River basin. Washington Department of Ecology, Water Quality Investigations Section,
Olympia, WA.
Johnson, A., D. Norton, and B. Yake. 1988a. Persistence of DDT in the Yakima River
drainage, Washington. Arch. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 17:289-297.
[Jo88b] Johnson, A., D. Norton, and B. Yake. 1988b (Revised 1989). An assessment
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Investigations/Ground Water Monitoring Section, Olympia, WA.
Johnson, A., D. Norton, B. Yake, and S. Twiss. 1990. Transboundary metal pollution
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45:703-710.
[Jo91a] Johnson, A., D. Serdar, and D. Norton. 1991a. Spatial trends in TCDD/TCDF
concentrations in sediment and bottom fish collected in Lake Roosevelt (Columbia River).
Washington Department of Ecology, Environmental Investigations and Laboratory
Services, Olympia, WA.
[Jo91b] Johnson, A., D. Serdar, and S. Magoon. 1991b. Polychlorinated dioxins and -
farms in Lake Roosevelt (Columbia River) sportfish, 1990. Washington State
Department of Ecology, Environmental Investigations and Laboratory Services, Olympia,
WA.
[Jo91c] Johnson, A., D. Serdar, and K. Seiders. 1991c. PCDDs/PCDFs in Columbia
River suspended particulate matter. Memorandum to C. Neuchterlein and S. Saunders.
Washington State Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA.
Kenan, R.E., A.H. Parsons, E.S. Ebert, P.D. Boardman, S.L. Huntley, and M.M.
Sauer. 1990. Assessment of the human health risks related to the presence of dioxins
in Columbia River fish. ChemRisk, Portland, ME.
Linton, J. 31 August 1990. Personal Communication (letter and data sent to CARS',
Inc., Portland, OR). Sediment contaminant data for Tongue Point, OR for proposed
dredging at Piers 4 and 5 and the ocean disposal Site F. Department of the Army,
Portland District Corps of Engineers, Portland, OR.
LTI, Limno-Tech, Inc. 1991. Phase I screening model application for Columbia River
dioxins. Prepared for U.S. EPA, Region 10 under subcontract to Tetra Tech, Inc.,
Fairfax, VA. February 28, 1991.
Lowe, T.P., T.W. May, W.O. Brumbaugh, and D.A. Kane. 1985. National
Contaminant Biomonitoring Program: Concentrations of seven elements in freshwater
fish, 1978-1981. Arch. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 14:363*388.
5

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[61] EnvCanada
[62] WSDH
[63] USFWS
[64] USOS/USACOE
[66] NOAA
[65] NOAA
[67] EnvCanada
[68]	ODEQ
[69]	NWPPA
[70]	NBS
[71]	MDFWP/MDHES
Mali, F.T.S., D.D. MacDonald, S.W. Sheehan, T.M. Tuominen, and D. Valiela. 1989.
Dioxina and furans in sediment and fish from the vicinity of ten inland pulp mj11« in
British Columbia. Environment Canada, Inland Waters Pacific and Yukon Region,
Vancouver, B.C.
MariSn, K., O. Patrick, and H. Ammann. 1991. Health implications of TCDD and
TCDF concentrations reported from Lake Roosevelt sport fish. Washington State
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Olympia, WA.
May, T.W. and G.L. McKinney. 1981. Cadmium, lead, mercury, arsenic, and
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McKenzie, S.W. 1977. Analyses of bottom material from the Willamette River,
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740. Prepared in cooperation with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
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[NOAA91] National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). 1991. National
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NORELCOL Environmental Consultants Ltd. 1989. Statistical analyses of metal levels
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[ODEQ94] Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ). 1994. Willamette
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Division, Portland, OR.
Parsons, A.H., S.L. Huntley, E.S. Ebert, E.R. Algeo, and R.E. Keenan. 1991.
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Risk
I. 24 August 1994. Personal Communication (Facsimile to Mr. Curtis
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Phillips, G. and L. Bahls. 1994. Lake water quality sssnssment and contaminant
monitoring of fishes and sediments from Montana waters. Final report. Prepared for
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and
6

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Parks and Montana Department of Health and Environmental Science*.
[72]	PGE
[73]
[74]	USGS
[75]
[76]	USGS
[77] USGS
[78] USFWS
[82] USFWS
[81] USFWS
[80] USFWS
[79] USFWS
[85] USFWS
Portland General Electric Company (PG&E). 1990. Trojan Nuclear Plant operational
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Reinert, R.E., B.A. Knuth, M.A. Kamrin, and Quentin J. Stober. 1991. Risk
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Fisheries 16:5-12.
Rickert, D.A., V.C. Kennedy, S.W. McKenzie, and W.G. Hines. 1977. A synoptic
survey of trace metals in bottom sediments of the Willamette River, Oregon. Geological
Survey Circular 715-F.
Rifkin, E. and J. LaKind. 1991. Dioxin bioaccumulation: Key to a sound risk
assessment methodology. Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health 33:103-112.
[Ri92] Rinella, J.F., S.W. McKenzie, J.K. Crawford, W.T. Foreman, P.M. Gates, G.J.
Fuhrer, and M.L. Janet. 1992. Surface-water-quality assessment of the Yakima River
Basin, Washington: Pesticide and other trace-organic-compound data for water,
sediment, soil, and aquatic biota, 1987-91. U.S. Geological Survey, Portland, OR.
Open-File Report 92-644.
[Ry92] Ryder, J.L., R.F. Sanzolone, G.J. Fuhrer, and E.L. Mosier. 1992. Surface-
water-quality assessment of the Yakima River basin in Washington: Chemical analyses
of major, minor, and trace elements in fine-grained streambed sediment. U.S.
Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey. Open-File Report 92-520.
[SchBr90] Schmitt, C.J. and W.G. Brumbaugh. 1990. National Contaminant
Biomonitoring Program: Concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury,
selenium, and zinc in U.S. freshwater fish, 1976-1984. Arch. Environ. Contain.
Toxicol. 19:731-747.
Schmitt, C.J., J.L. Ludke, and D.F. Walsh. 1981. Organochlorine residues in fish:
National Pesticide Monitoring Program, 1970-74. Pesticides Monitoring Journal 14:136-
206.
Schmitt, C.J., M.A. Ribick, J.L. Ludke, and T.W. May. 1983. National Pesticide
Monitoring Program: Organochlorine residues in freshwater fish, 1976-79. U.S.
Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington, D.C. Resource
Publication 152.
Schmitt, C.J., J.L. Zajicek, and M.A. Ribick. 1985. National Pesticide Monitoring
Program: Residues of organochlorine chemicals in freshwater fish, 1980-81. Arch.
Environ. Contain. Toxicol. 14:225-260.
[Schm90] Schmitt, C.J., J.L. Zqicek, and P.H. Petermaa. 1990. National
Contaminant Biomonitoring Program: Residues of organochlorine chemicali in U.S.
freshwater fish, 1976-1984. Arch. Environ. Coatam. Toxicol. 19:748-781.
Schuler, C. 1991. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service contaminant data for bint egg and
fish tissue samples collected in the Columbia River basin, Wallula to die mouth of the
Columbia River. U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service, Portland
7

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Field Station, Portland, OR.
[84] USFWS
[83] USFWS
Schuler, C. 1992. Organochlorine contaminants in aquatic resources from the Columbia
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[Schu94] Schuler, C. 8 September 1994. Personal Communication (data sent to Ms.
Kimberle Stark, Tetra Tech, Redmond, WA). U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Portland,
OR.
[86] LRWQC
[89] WDOE
[88] WDOE
[87] WDOE
Serdar, D. 1993. Retrospective analysis of toxic contaminants in Lake Roosevelt.
Prepared for The Lake Roosevelt Water Quality Council. The Evergreen State College,
Olympia, WA.
[Se9l] Serdar, D., A. Johnson, and S. Magoon. 1991. Polychlorinated dioxins and -
furans in Columbia River sportfish: Chief Joseph Dam to McNary Dam. Washington
State Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA.
Serdar, D., A. Johnson, and K. Seiders. 1993. Interim report on monitoring
contaminant trends in Lake Roosevelt. Washington State Department of Ecology,
Environmental Investigations and Laboratory Services Program, Olympia, WA.
[Se94] Serdar. D., B. Yake, and J. Cubbage. 1994. Draft Report. Contaminant treads
in Lake Roosevelt. Washington State Department of Ecology, Environmental
Investigations and Laboratory Services Program, Toxics Investigation Section, Olympia,
WA.
[91] USACOB
[90] USACOE
Siipola,M.D. 1989. Results of 1989 Willamette River-Burlington/Northern R.R. Bridge
sediment quality evaluation, 1989. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District,
Portland, OR.
[Si94] Siipola, M.D. 17 August 1994. Personal Communication (data package
containing sediment dioxin data submitted to Mr. Curtis DeGasperi, Tetra Tech, Inc.,
Redmond, WA). U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, Portland, OR. Data
for 1989 U.S. Government Moorings study - Willamette River. Analyses of Columbia
River/Willamette River sediment samples - 1990 reconnaissance study. Various locations
in Bonneville Pool -1991. Mouth of Columbia River - 1992.
[92] NMFS
[93] BCMinEnv
[95] USACOE
Siipola, M.D, R.L. Emmett, and S. A. Hinton. 1993. Tongue Point monitoring program
1989-1992. Final report. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National
Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Coastal Zone and
Estuarine Studies Division.
Smith, A.L. 1987. Levels of metals and metallothionein in fish of the Columbia River
near the international boundary. Prepared under the Canada-British Columbia Water
Quality Monitoring Agreement. Environment Canada, Water Quality Branch,
Vancouver, B.C.
[St91] Stockton, S.L. 24 May 1991. Personal Communication (transmittal of Riverine
data base output to Mr. Bruce Bennet, Tetra Tech, Inc., Bellevue, WA). Chief, Planning
and Engineering Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland, OR.
8

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194) USACOB
[103]	USEPA
1981 ODEQ
[99]	USEPA
[100]	ODEQ
[101]	Bi-Sttte
[102]	ODEQ
[97] Bi-State
[96] Bi-State
[104]	OSDH
[108]	USACOB
[109]	USACOB
[106] USACOB
Stockton, S.L. 29 January 1992. Personal Communication (truumitt&l of Columbia
River and Wilfamette River sediment dioxin/furan data). Chief, Planning and
Engineering Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland, OR,
Tetra Tech. 1990. Risk assessment for 2378-TCDD and 2378-TCDF contaminated
receiving waters from U.S. chlorine-bleaching pulp and paper mills. Prepared for U.S.
EPA, Office of Water Regulations and Standards, Assessment and Protection Division,
Washington, D.C. Tetra Tech, Inc., Fairfax, VA.
[Tt92a] Tetra Tech. 1992a. City of St. Helens discharge monitoring report:
Accumulation of dioxins and furans in sediment and biota. Prepared for City of St.
Helens, OR. Tetra Tech, Inc., Bellevue, WA.
Tetra Tech. 1992b. Columbia River chlorinated dioxins/funms ambient water quality
assessment report. Prepared for U.S. EPA, Region 10, Water Monitoring and Analysis
Section. Tetra Tech, Inc., Bellevue, WA.
[Tt92c] Tetra Tech. 1992c. James River Wauna Mill discharge monitoring report:
Accumulation of dioxins and Asians in sediment and biota. Prepared for lames River
Corporation, Wauna, OR. Tetra Tech, Inc., Bellevue, WA.
Tetm Tech. 1992d. Reconnaissance Survey of die Lower Columbia River. Task 1:
Summary of Existing Data and Preliminary Identification of Problem Areas and Data
Gaps. Prepared for Columbia River Bi-State Committee. Tetra Tech, Inc., Bellevue,
WA.
Tetra Tech. 1992e. Willamette River Basin Water Quality Study. Component 2:
Review and summary of toxic pollutants in the Willamette River and major tributaries.
Prepared for Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, Portland, OR. Tetra Tech,
Inc., Bellevue, WA.
[Tt93] Tetra Tech. 1993. Lower Columbia River Reconnaissance Survey. Task 6:
Reconnaissance report. Volumes 1, 2, and 3. Prepared for Columbia River Bi-State
Committee. Tetra Tech, Inc., Redmond, WA.
[Tt94] Tetm Tech. 1994. Draft report. Lower Columbia Rivet Backwater
Reconnaissance Survey. Volumes 1,2, and 3. Prepared for Lower Columbia River Bi-
State Committee. Tetra Tech, Inc., Redmond, WA.
Toombs, G.L., S.L. Martin, P.B. Guitar, and M.O. Dibblee. no data. Environmental
radiological surveillance report on Oregon surface waters - 1961-1983. Volume I.
Oregon Deparpment of Human Resources, Health Division, Radiation Control Section.
U.S. Army Cotpe of Engineers (U.S. ACOE). 1986a. Columbia River Coal Channel.
Unpublished data. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, Portland, OR.
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (U.S. ACOE). 1986b. Chinook Channel. Unpublished
data. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, Portland, OR.
U.S. Array Corps of Engineers (U.S. ACOB). 1987a. Chinook Channel. Unpublished
data. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, Portland, OR.
9

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[107] USACOE
[105] USACOE
[111]	USEPA
[112]	USEPA
[113]	USEPA
[110] USEPA
[115] USFWS
[114] USFWS
[116] WSDH
[117] USFWS
[118] USACOE
[120] JR-Camas
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (U.S. ACOE). 1987b. Slripanon Channel. Unpublished
data. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, Portland, OR.
[USACE91] U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (U.S. ACOE). 1991. Old mouth of
Cowlitz River sediment evaluation. Unpublished data. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,
Portland District, Portland, OR.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). 1991a. Dioxin loadings to water
in the Columbia River basin. U.S. EPA, Region 10, Fact Sheet.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). 1991b. Total maximum daily
loading (TMDL) to limit discharges of 2,3,7,8-TCDD (dioxin) to the Columbia River
Basin. U.S. EPA, Region 10, Seattle, WA.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). 1991c. Bioaccumulation of selected
pollutants in fish - A National Study. Volumes I and II. EPA 506/6-90/001a,b.
Assessment and Watershed Protection Division, Office of Water Regulations and
Standards, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C.
[USEPA92] U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). 1992. National study
of chemical residues in fish. Volumes I and n. EPA 823-R-92-008a,b. Office of
Science and Technology, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). 1990. Reconnaissance survey of dioxins and
furans in fish and wildlife from the Columbia River. Justification and objectives. U.S.
Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service, Portland Field Station, Portland,
OR.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). 1991. Environmental contaminants in aquatic
resources of the Columbia River estuary. Study objectives and background. U.S.
Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service, Portland Field Station, Portland,
OR.
Wells, D. 1994. Environmental Radiation Program Special Report. Radioactivity in
Columbia River sediments and their health effects. Washington State Department of
Health, Division of Radiation Protection, Olympia, WA.
Woodward, D.F., W.G. Brumbaugh, A.J. DeLonay, E.E. Little, and C.E. Smith. 1994.
Effects on rainbow trout fry of a metals-contaminated diet of benthic invertebrates from
the Clark Fork River, Montana. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 123:51-
62.
Young, J.S., J.Q. Word, C.W. Apts, M.E. Barrows, V.I. Cullinan, N.P. Kohn. 1988.
Confirmatory chemical analyses and solid phase bioassays on tedimmt from the
Columbia River Estuary at Tongue Point, Oregon. Prepared for U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers, Portland District. Battelle Memorial Institute, Pacific Northwest Laboratory,
Marine Sciences Laboratory, Sequim, WA.
[Yo88] Young, S.R, 1988. Columbia River sediment. Report to D.F. Bachman,
Environmental Department, James River-Camaa Mill, October 18, 1988.
10

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[119] JR-Ouruu	[Y°89] Young, S.R. 1989. Columbia River sediment. Report to D.F. Bachman,
Environmental Department, James River-Camas Mill, November 28, 1989.
[121]WDOE	[Zi90] Zinner, L. 1990. Aluminum Company of America (ALCOA) Class n
Inspection, January 1990. Washington State Department of Ecology, Environmental
Investigations and Laboratory Services Program, Olympia, WA.
U

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APPENDIX C
BIOTA DATA ABSTRACTS
\ v	•
i

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, Af»	2-2
COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
BIOTA DATA ABSTRACT
>Yaia teu,iTte>*l SA 3-
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A	^	^
ASSOCIATED SEDIMENT DATA: No
REFERENCE SOURCE: Beak Consultants, Inc. 1989a J	iD	fit*-
fakP - iv L		~J _	7,
CONTACT: Northwest Pulp & Paper Association, Bellevue, WA	w.
2
PHONE: (206) 455-1323	-/W?	* FAX: N/A
SAMPLING PERIOD: August - November 1989	?Aid	^ ^
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 6 sites ^
/5". I
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Site 1 - betweem RM 2-45 (estuary); Site 2 - between RM
125-140 (below Bonneville Dam); Site 3 -between RM 146-153 (above Bonneville Dam); Site 4 -
between 280-298 (below McNary Dam); Site 5 - between RM 326-332 (upstream of the
Columbia River-Snake River confluence); Site 6-1/2 mile upstream of the Columbia-Snake
River confluence up to the downstream edge of Ice Harbor Dam (Snake River Mile 1-9). ,
__	' A bibrAC.h'

TARGET ANALYTES: 2,3,7,8-TCDD and 2,3,7,8-TCDF. Percent lipid was also reported.	7 ,
	/?£ Xr\
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Samples from individual fish species were combined with
other samples of the same species from a site to create one of five composite samples for
analysis. The other tissue sample from each fish (not composited) was double-wrapped in
aluminum foil and put on dry ice in the field.	.	^ f
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude of sampling locations was not provided in the report. Latitude/
and longitude were estimated for entry along with the data provided in the database. quA i, i,f (^l&A 1
Be89ab - 1

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abstract		V'* te-f	3
Beak Consultants, Inc., was contracted by the Northwest Pulp and Paper Association to perform a
comprehensive study of dioxin levels in fish in order to assess human health risk implications and to
provide a scientific basis for ambient water quality criteria to protect human health (Beak Consultants,
Inc. 1989a,b). The study objectives were twofold: 1) to evaluate risk to human health (including
potentially sensitive groups such as sport fishermen, Native Americans and Asian-Americans) from
consuming freshwater, migratory, and resident fish caught in the Columbia River and 2) to evaluate the
transport of dioxin throughout the river. The fish tissue dioxin data and fish consumption data have been
used to evaluate the potential health risks of consuming fish from the Columbia River (Keenan et al.
1990; Parsons et al. 1991).
QA/QC EVALUATION - No QA/QC information is provided in these reports (Beak Consultants,
Inc. 1989a,b; Keenan et al. 1990; Parsons et al. 1991). The dioxin/furan analyses were performed by
California Analytical Laboratory, West Sacramento, CA.
°l Qfl/Qt	
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - The individual fish species that form a composite sample
were collected over a broad range of the river. Therefore, the results should be considered estimates of
the average dioxin/furan concentration for a relatively large area of the river. Users of these data should
also be cautioned that the latitudes and longitudes provided in the database are pinpoint locations that
indicate the general river reach that was sampled. Individual samples that composed the composite
sample were collected over a broad area of each river reach.
0\ Qp/qc		
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
l( Wre^BEEERMCESi
Beak Consultants, Inc. 1989a. Columbia River fish study: fish collection, fish tissue sampling and age
of fish sampled. Prepared for Northwest Pulp & Paper Association. Beak Consultants, Inc., Portland,
OR.
Beak Consultants, Inc. 1989b. Human consumption rates of fish from the Columbia River. Prepared
for Northwest Pulp & Paper Association. Beak Consultants, Inc., Portland, OR.
Keenan, R.E., A.H. Parsons, E.S. Ebert, P.D. Boardman, S.L. Huntley, and M.M. Sauer. 1990.
Assessment of the human health risks related to the presence of dioxins in Columbia River fish.
ChemRisk, Portland, ME.
Parsons, A.H., S.L. Huntley, E.S. Ebert, E.R. Algeo, and R.E. Keenan. 1991. Risk assessment for
dioxin in Columbia River fish. Chemosphere 23:1709-1717.
Be89ab - 2


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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
BIOTA DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ)/National Institutes of
Health (NIH)
AREA OF STUDY: Willamette River
SAMPLING MEDIA: Whole body and fillet (Northern squawfish, cutthroat trout and common carp)
POSmONING SYSTEM: N/A
ASSOCIATED SEDIMENT DATA: Yes
REFERENCE SOURCE: Curtis 1994
CONTACT: Lawrence R. Curtis, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR
PHONE: (503)737-1952	FAX: N/A
SAMPLING PERIOD: July - October 1990
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 6 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Middle Fork (RM 314), Harrisburg (RM 250), Halsey (RM
232), Corvallis (RM 206), Salem (RM 116) and Portland (RM U).
TARGET ANALYTES: 2,3,7,8-TCDD and -TCDIL=—
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: N/A
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Electrofishing
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Squawfish and trout weighing less than 100 g were placed
in glass jars. Carp and other fish samples were wrapped in aluminum foil and placed on ice for
transfer to the laboratory.
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude of sampling sites. Latitude and longitude were estimated for entry
along with the data provided in the database.
ABSTRACT
This study focused on determining the status and extent of contamination of TCDD and TCDF in the
Cu94b - 3

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Willamette River due to industrial and municipal discharges. Sampling sites were selected based upon
possible industrial pollution sources. A control site upstream from a bleached Kraft pulp mill discharge
(RK 232), a site below a municipal sewage outfall (RK 206), and a site adjacent to an industrial waste
dump contaminated with organochlorines (RK 11). Sampling and analysis included both fish and surface
sediments. This study also measured the specific tissue content of cytochrome P-450 1A1 as a
bioindicator of contamination and assessed fish health by histopathology and clinical chemistry. Two
reports (Curtis et al. 1991,1993) describe the project in detail and summarize the data analysis. Fish
tissue analytical results for individual samples were provide by Professor Larry Curtis of Oregon State
University (Curtis 1994).
QA/QC EVALUATION - Quality assurance/quality control procedures are described in Curtis
et al. (1991,1993). These procedures included reagent blank analysis, evaluation of labeled-isotope
standard recoveries, and evaluation of detected isotopic ratios of dioxin masses.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - All data entered in the database were reviewed for data
entry errors. All detected errors were corrected. Users should be reminded that the sampling design
targeted industrial and municipal discharge areas.
REFERENCES;
Curtis, L.R. IS September 1994. Personal Communication (data sent to Mr. Curtis DeGasperi, Tetra
Tech, Redmond, WA). Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR.
Curtis, L.R., H.M. Carpenter, R.M. Donohoe, D.E. Williams, O.R. Hedstrom, M.L. Deinzer, M.A.
Beilstein, E. Foster, and R. Gates. 1993. Sensitivity of cytochrome P450-1A1 induction in fish as a
biomarker for distribution of TCDD and TCDF in the Willamette River, Oregon. Environ. Sci. Technol.
27:2149-2157.
Curtis, L.R., H.M. Carpenter, R.R. Donahoe, M.L. Deinzer, M.A. Beilstein, D.E. Williams, and O.R.
Hedstrom. 1991. Phase I final report (draft). Toxicity and longitudinal distribution of persistent
organochlorines in the Willamette River. Prepared for Oregon Department of Environmental Quality,
Portland, OR. Oregon State University, Fisheries and Wildlife, Corvallis, OR.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
BIOTA DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)
AREA OF STUDY: Columbia River (RM 149-291)
SAMPLING MEDIA: Whole body and/or fillet (walleye, channel catfish, sturgeon, steelhead, crayfish,
smallmouth bass, Chinook salmon).
ASSOCIATED SEDIMENT DATA: Yes
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
REFERENCE SOURCE: Davoli 1994
CONTACT: Dana Davoli
PHONE: (206)553-2135	FAX: N/A
SAMPLING PERIOD: August-September 1994
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 6 locations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: From Bonneville Dam (RM 146) to McNary (RM 291) Dam
TARGET ANALYTES: Dioxin/ftirans; pesticides; PCBs; semi-volatiles; PAHs; metals (Including Hg
and As).
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Dioxins and furans (EPA Method 1613A); pesticides and PCBs (EPA
8081); semi-volatiles (EPA 8270/GPC); PAHs (EPA 8270); metals (EPA 200.3 and 6010A); Hg
(EPA 7471A); As (200.3 and 7060A).
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Rod ami reel, electroshocking, setline and hoop and/or gill net.
Bait traps used for crayfish.
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Samples consist of composite between 3-8 samples and
individual fillets. Crayfish will be handled in the same way as fish using baited traps. Crayfish
are represented as a composite of 30 organisms, following whole body analysis.
DATA GAPS: Latitudes and longitudes were provided, but it was unclear if the latitudes and longitudes
provided were proposed sampling locations, or the actual locations sampled. It was also unclear
which samples should be associated with a particular latitude and longitude. Therefore, latitudes
and longitudes were estimated for each of the general sample locations for entry in die database
along with the analytical data provided.
Dav94b - 5

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ABSTRACT
The Columbia River and segments of the Snake and Willamette Rivers are currently water quality limited
due to the presence of elevated levels of 2,3,7,8-TCDD. As a result, U.S. EPA Region 10, established
a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) of 6 mg of 2,3,7,8-TCDD/day based upon state water quality
standards applicable to the Columbia River basin and the volume of water in the Columbia River. The
U.S. EPA conducted sampling as part of an effort to add to the data base on contaminant levels in aquatic
organisms in the Columbia River (Davoli 1994). The project focused on one or two sampling locations
in a specific segment of the river. Criteria for choosing these locations were to: (1) sample at fishing
sites, (2) collect organisms that are consumed by Native Americans and others fishing in the Columbia
River basin, (3) collect organisms that are good indicators of contaminant levels in the river and of levels
of contaminants that may be ingested by aquatic and terrestrial predators,
QA/OC EVALUATION - Internal standards, laboratory duplicates, matrix spikes, and method
blanks were used for data evaluation. Preliminary data validation indicates that some of the samples
displayed interference with 2,3,7,8-TCDF measurements. Therefore, the analysis for some of the
samples of 2,3,7,8-TCDF and total TCDF were rejected (this is preliminary information and completion
of the data validation is forthcoming).
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Users of these data should be cautioned that a
preliminary data validation performed by the U.S. EPA indicates that some of the data for 2,3,7,8-TCDF
should be qualified as unusable. These data have been qualified using an "R" in the database.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
RftfttRENCES;
Davoli, D. 29 August 1994. Personal Communication (data package sent to Steve Ellis, Tetra Tech,
Inc., Redmond, WA). Selected fish tissue contaminant data from the U.S. EPA Columbia River toxic
substances study. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10, Seattle, WA.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
BIOTA DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA)
AREA OF STUDY: Lake Couer d'Alene
SAMPLING MEDIA: Whole body (kokanee salmon); fillet (chinook and kokanee salmon, cutthroat
trout, brown bullhead, yellow perch, Northern pike, black crappie, largemouth bass, rainbow
trout); kidney and liver (chinook and kokanee salmon).
ASSOCIATED SEDIMENT DATA: Yes, but these data are reported on a wet weight basis. Therefore,
the sediment data were not entered in the database.
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
REFERENCE SOURCE: Hornig et al. 1988
CONTACT: BUI Bogue, U.S. EPA, Region 10, Seattle, WA
PHONE: (206)553-1676	FAX: N/A
SAMPLING PERIOD: 1986-1987
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 13 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Coeur d'Alene Lake, Wolf Creek, Mission Slough, Killarney
Lake, Round Lake, South Fork Coeur d'Alene River above Mullan.
TARGET ANALYTES: Metals (including Cd, As, Pb, Hg, Cu, Zn).
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: N/A
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: N/A
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: N/A
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude of sampling locations. Latitude and longitude were estimated for
entry along with the data provided in die database.
ABSTRACT
The U.S. EPA, Region 10, conducted chemical and biological monitoring during low-flow conditions
Ho88b • 7

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from 1972-1986 along the South Fork Coeur d'Alene River in northern Idaho, a stream with a long
history of severe metals pollution from mining activities (Hornig et al. 1988). The purpose of the 1986
sampling effort was to provide a general update on the extent and degree of sediment contamination and
to perform heavy metal analysis on composites of several species of game fish. The data provided in the
database were compiled from Hornig et al. (1988) and data downloaded from STORET. An overview
and summary of the sampling conducted by the U.S. EPA in the Coeur d'Alene Basin is provided in
Hornig et al. (1988).
OA/OC EVALUATION - Details on QA aspects of these data may be available from Region 10's
Water Monitoring and Analysis section.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Associated sediment data was not entered into the data
base because it was given in wet weight. All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry
errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Hornig, C.E., D.A. Terpening, and M.W. Bogue. 1988. Coeur d'Alene Basin EPA water quality
monitoring, 1976-1986. EPA 910/9-88-216. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10, Seattle,
WA.
Ho88b - 8

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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
BIOTA DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Washington Department of Ecology (WDOE)
AREA OF STUDY: Columbia River (Lake Roosevelt, Rufiis Woods Lake); Spokane River (Long Lake)
SAMPLING MEDIA: Whole body Gargescale sucker)
ASSOCIATED SEDIMENT DATA: Yes
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
REFERENCE SOURCE: Johnson 1991
CONTACT: Art Johnson, WDOE, Olympia, WA
PHONE: (206)407-6715	FAX: (206)407-6670
SAMPLING PERIOD: June 1990
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 8 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Six sites in Lake Roosevelt between the international border
and Grand Coulee Dam, one site each in the Spokane River and Rufiis Woods Lake.
TARGET ANALYTES: PCBs and pesticides; other xenobiotic compounds. Only results for PCBs and
DDE compounds were reported.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Analysis methods are as described in Call et al. (1991).
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Electroshocking
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: After recording the length and weight of each specimen,
they were individually wrapped in aluminum foil, placed in polyethylene bags and stored on ice.
The fish were analyzed as composites of five whole fish per sample.
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude of sampling locations. Latitude and longitude were estimated for
entry along with die data provided in the database.
In June 1990, as part of Ecology's investigation of contaminants in Lake Roosevelt, a series of sediment
Jo91b - 9

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and bottom fish samples were collected from Lake Roosevelt and vicinity for analysis of PCDDs and
PCDFs. The impetus for this survey was the need to better understand the spatial distribution of these
compounds as a result of their discharge by the Celgar bleached lcraft pulp mill in Castlegar, B.B.,
approximately 30 river miles above the international boundary. The results of these and other
PCDD/PCDF analyses on Lake Roosevelt samples have been reported elsewhere (Johnson et al., 1991a,
b,c). This report contains analysis of sediment and bottom fish samples for only PCB and DDE
compounds (Johnson 1991).
QA/OC EVALUATION - QA procedures for these analyses were established by the EPA Duluth
laboratory (EPA et al. 1990). All data included in the present report passed EPA's quality assurance
criteria.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - All data entered in the database were reviewed for data
entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Call, D.J. et al., 1991. Sediment Quality Evaluation in the Lower Fox River in South Green Bay of
Lake Michigan. Center for Lake Superior Environmental Studies, University of Wisconsin, Superior,
EPA Coop. Agreement No. CR-815232.
Johnson, A. 1991. Results of screen for EPA xenobiotics in sediment and bottom fish from Lake
Roosevelt (Columbia River). Memo to Mr. Carl Nuechterlein, Washington Department of Ecology,
Olympia, WA. 22 July 1991.
Johnson, A., D. Norton, W. Yake. 1988. An assessment of Metals Contamination in Lake Roosevelt.
Washington State Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA.
Johnson, A., D. Serder, and D. Norton. 1991a. Spatial Trends in TCDD/TCDF Concentrations and
Bottom Fish Collected in Lake Roosevelt (Columbia River), Washington Department of Ecology,
Environmental Investigations and Laboratory Services, Publication No. 91-29.
Johnson, A., D. Serder, and S. Magoon. 1991b. Polychlorinated dioxins and -furans in Lake Roosevelt
(Columbia River) sportflsh, 1990. Washington State Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA.Pub. No.
91-4.
Johnson, A., D. Serder, and K. Seiders, 1991c. PCDDs/PCDFs in Columbia River suspended particulate
matter. Memorandum to C. Nuechterlein and S. Saunders. Washington State Department of Ecology,
Olympia, WA.
U.S. EPA et al. 1990. Analytical procedures and quality assurance plan for determination of
PCDD/PCDF in fish. EPA Duluth ORD. EPA/600/3-90/022.
Jo91b -10

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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
BIOTA DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Washington State Department of Ecology (WDOE)
AREA OF STUDY: Columbia River (Lake Roosevelt, Rufiis Woods Lake); Spokane River (Long Lake)
SAMPLING MEDIA: Whole body (largescale sucker)
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
ASSOCIATED SEDIMENT DATA: YES
REFERENCE SOURCE: Johnson et al. 1991a
CONTACT: Art Johnson, WDOE, Olympia, WA
PHONE: (206) 407-6670	FAX: (206) 407-6715
SAMPLING PERIOD: June 1990
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 8 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Six stations in Lake Roosevelt, one in the Spokane River
(Long Lake) and one in Rufiis Woods Lake were sampled for largescale sucker.
TARGET ANALYTES: Fifteen 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDDs and PCDFs. Octachlorodibenzodioxin and
octachlorodibenzofuran were not reported.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: PCDD/PCDF analysis was performed by the U.S. EPA Environmental
Research Laboratory in Duluth, MN, following referenced methods.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Electroshocking equipment.
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Total length and weight were recorded. Fish samples
were then individually wrapped in aluminum foil, placed in polyethylene bags and stored on ice.
The fish were analyzed as composites of five whole fish per sample.
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude of sample locations were not provided. Latitude and longitude
were estimated for entry along with the data provided in the database.
ABff i 'yACi1
In June 1990, as part of Ecology's investigation of contaminants in Lake Roosevelt, a series of sediment
Jo91ab -11

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and bottom fish samples were collected from Lake Roosevelt and vicinity for analysis of PCDDs and
PCDFs (Johnson et al. 1991a). Largescale sucker (Catostomus macrocheilus) were collected for analysis.
The objective of the survey was to evaluate the transport and distribution of PCDD/PCDF compounds
throughout the lake. The sediments and bottom fish collected during this effort were also analyzed for
additional xenobiotic compounds. These data are reported in Johnson (1991). Other Ecology reports
describe results from analysis of Lake Roosevelt sportfish and suspended matter samples for dioxins and
furans (Johnson et al. 1991b,c).
Q A/QC EV ALU ATIQN - QA procedures followed during PCDD/PCDF analysis were established
by EPA Duluth Laboratory. All data included in this report passed EPA's quality assurance criteria.
Duplicate samples were submitted to assess the precision of their analysis. Close agreement was reached
between duplicates.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Data used for this report were from the lab data sheets
provided in the appendix to the report. Fish and sediment sample analysis results as a function of river
miles below the Canadian border (a large pulp and paper mill is located north of the border in Castlegar,
BC) were compared for assessment of spatial trends.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Johnson, A. 1991. Results of screen for EPA xenobiotics in sediment and bottom fish from Lake
Roosevelt (Columbia River). Memo to Mr. Carl Nuechterlein, Washington Department of Ecology,
Olympia, WA. 22 July 1991.
Johnson, A., D. Serder, and D. Norton. 1991a. Spatial trends in TCDD/TCDF concentrations in
sediment and bottom fish collected in Lake Roosevelt (Columbia River). Washington Department of
Ecology, Environmental Investigations and Laboratory Services, Olympia, WA. Publication No. 91-29.
Johnson, A., D. Serder, and S. Magoon. 1991b. Polychlorinated dioxins and -furans in Lake Roosevelt
(Columbia River) sportfish, 1990. Washington State Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA.Pub. No.
91-4.
Johnson, A., D. Serder, and K. Seiders, 1991c. PCDDs/PCDFs in Columbia River suspended particulate
matter. Memorandum to C. Nuechterlein and S. Saunders. Washington State Department of Ecology,
Olympia, WA.
Jo91ab -12

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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
BIOTA DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Washington Department of Ecology (WDOE)
AREA OF STUDY: Columbia River (Lake Roosevelt, Rufus Woods Lake); Spokane River (Long Lake)
SAMPLING MEDIA: Muscle (walleye, rainbow trout, lake whitefish, white sturgeon, kokanee
salmon and burbot).
ASSOCIATED SEDIMENT DATA: No
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
REFERENCE SOURCE: Johnson etal. 1991b
CONTACT: Art Johnson, WDOE, Olympia, WA
PHONE: (206) 407-6670	FAX: (206) 407-6715
SAMPLING PERIOD: May-October, 1990
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 13 locations in Lake Roosevelt; 3 in Rufus Woods Lake.
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Lake Roosevelt: Kettle Falls, Gifford, off Colville River,
off Sherman Circle, off Onion Circle, Little Dalles> Northport, Marcus Flats, Marcus Islands,
North George, Seven Bays, off Hawk Circle, Sanpoii Arm, Keller Ferry and Spring Canyon.
Rufus Woods Lake: Bridgeport St. Park, Little Wenatchee River, and Little Wenatchee River
near Inlet.
TARGET ANALYTES: 2,3,7,8-TCDD and -TCDF
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: TCDD/TCDF (EPA Method 8290)
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Electroshocking, gillnet, hook and line.
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Fish were wrapped in aluminum foil, placed in
polyethylene bags, labeled and stored on ice for shipping to the laboratory.
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude of sampling locations. Latitude and longitude were estimated for
entry in the database.
Jo91bb -13

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ABSTRACT
The impetus for this survey was the detection by Environment Canada and the British Columbia Ministry
of Environment, of contaminated lake whitefish and mountain whitefish below Celgar bleached kraft pulp
mill in Castlegar, B.C., about 30 river miles upstream of Lake Roosevelt. The contaminants of concern
included 2,3,7,8-TCDD and 2,3,7,8-TCDF. The object of this Lake Roosevelt study was to obtain an
accurate estimate of mean TCDD and TCDF concentrations in muscle tissue of major sportfish species
from popular fishing areas (Johnson et al. 1991). The survey also included analysis of limited fish
samples from Rufus Woods Lake, the Columbia River reservoir below Lake Roosevelt, and Long Lake,
the lower reach of the Spokane River.
OA/OC EVALUATION - All data were reviewed for qualitative and quantitative accuracy by an
independent expert under contract to Ecology. The review included initial and daily continuing
calibrations, ion chromatograms, column performance check mixes, calculations of positive values and
detection limits, isotopic abundance ratios for internal/surrogate/recovery standards and positive natives,
matrix spikes and spike duplicates. The review resulted in reanalysis of revised calculations for
approximately 10 percent of the samples.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - The data have undergone review and validation.
Preliminary results of this study were reported in Johnson et al. (1990 b,c).
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Johnson, A., D. Serdar, and S. Magoon. 1991. Polychlorinated dioxins and -fiirans in Lake Roosevelt
(Columbia River) sportfish, 1990. Washington State Department of Ecology, Environmental
Investigations and Laboratory Services, Olympia, WA.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
BIOTA DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Washington Department of Ecology (WDOE)
AREA OF STUDY: Columbia River (Lake Roosevelt)
SAMPLING MEDIA: Whole body (largescale sucker); muscle tissue (walleye, lake whitefish,
sturgeon, yellow perch and rainbow trout).
ASSOCIATED SEDIMENT DATA: Yes
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
REFERENCE SOURCE: Johnson et al. 1988b
CONTACT: Art Johnson, WDOE, Olympia, WA
PHONE: (206)407-6715	FAX: N/A
SAMPLING PERIOD: September 1986
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 4 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Lake Roosevelt (Gifford, Seven Bays, Northport, and
Marcus Island).
TARGET ANALYTES: Metals (Zn, Cu, Pb, As, Cd, Hg).
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Zn (EPA 289.2); Cu (EPA 220.2); Pb (EPA 239.2); As (EPA 206.2);
Cd (EPA 213.2) and Hg (in house).
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Gillnet except for rainbow trout and sturgeon which were taken on
hook and line.
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Fish were put into polyethylene bap and stored on ice
for transport to the laboratory.
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude of sample locations were not provided. Latitude and longitude
were estimated for entry along with the data provided in the database.
Jo88bb -15

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ABSTRACT
In response to reports of elevated metals concentrations in fish and other environmental samples from
Lake Roosevelt, Ecology conducted a series of field surveys between May and September 1986 to
determine the extent and significance of contamination (Johnson et al. 1988). Sediment, water samples
and a variety of fish species were used in this assessment. This study was also reported in a journal
article (Johnson et al. 1990).
OA/OC EVALUATION - The accuracy and precision of the metals data were assessed by
analysis of standard reference materials, laboratory duplicates field replicates and field blanks. Results
were in good agreement with certified values.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - The data have undergone review and validation. The
locations sampled for sediment trace metals were much more extensive (17 locations) than those sampled
for fish tissue (4 locations). Therefore, comparison of sediment and fish tissue contaminant data is
limited to those locations that were sampled for each medium.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Johnson, A., D. Norton, and B. Yake. 1988 (Revised 1989). An assessment of metals contamination
in Lake Roosevelt. Washington Department of Ecology, Toxics Investigations/Ground Water Monitoring
Section, Olympia, WA.
Johnson, A., D. Norton, B. Yake, and S. Twiss. 1990. Transboundary metal pollution of the Columbia
River (Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake). Bull. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 45:703-710.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
BIOTA DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Washington State Department of Ecology (WDOE)
AREA OF STUDY: Yakima River
SAMPLING MEDIA: Whole body and muscle (mountain whitefish, largescale sucker, bridgelip sucker,
rainbow trout, crayfish, mussel, Spring Chinook, Northern squawfish, steelhead, channel catfish,
and smallmouth bass).
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
ASSOCIATED SEDIMENT DATA: Yes
REFERENCE SOURCE: Johnson et al. 1986
CONTACT: Art Johnson, WDOE, Olympia, WA
PHONE: (206)407-6670
SAMPLING PERIOD: September 1985
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 6 stations
FAX: (206) 407-6715
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Along the Yakima River between Cle Elum and Kiona,
betweem River Mile 180 and 21, respectively.
TARGET ANALYTES: Organochlorine pesticides, Aroclor PCBs, and Hg were the target analytes, but
only the frequently detected organochlorine compounds were reported. Mercury was detected
in all samples. Therefore, the database contains p,p' and o,p'-DDT, -DDE, and -DDD results.
Results for dieldrin, endosulfan, endrin, Aroclor 1260, and mercury are also included.
Conventional analyses included percent dry weight and percent lipid.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Organochlorine pesticides and PCBs (EPA 608, additional information
on analysis is provided in Appendix II of the document); Mercury (EPA 245.2 with
modifications).
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Electroshocking and hand-collection (mussels and crayfish). Salmon
and trout were provided by the Yakima Nation from traps and hook and line, respectively.
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Fish and invertebrate samples were wrapped in aluminum
foil, put in plastic bags, placed in coolers containing ice in polyethylene containers, and sent to
the laboratory for compositing and processing.
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude of sampling locations was not provided in the report. Latitude
and longitude were estimated for entry along with the data provided in the database.
Jo86b -17

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ABSTRACT
This study was conducted in 1985 by Ecology's Water Quality Investigations Section in response to the
results from die Basic Water Monitoring Program (BWMP) which showed higher levels of DDT and
metabolites DDE and DDD in Yakima River fish than elsewhere in Washington State between 1979 and
1984. The study's objective was to evaluate the hazards to human health and aquatic life, identify
sources, and determine if contamination was primarily due to recent illegal use or historical applications
(Johnson etal. 1986). Fish, water, and bed sediments were analyzed. Biota samples were collected from
the Yakima River main stem to assess the distribution and extent of DDT contamination. These data
were also summarized and reported in a journal publication (Johnson et al. 1988).
QA/QC EVALUATION - QA/QC included interlaboratory comparisons between the
Ecology/EPA Manchester laboratory and California Analytical Laboratories (CAL), analysis of matrix
spikes and matrix spike duplicates, duplicate samples, and analysis of standard reference materials. CAL
was the contract laboratory responsible for the fish tissue organochlorine analyses. The Ecology/EPA
Manchester laboratory was responsible for the sediment organochlorine and mercury analyses and fish
tissue mercury analyses. Data provided by CAL were reviewed by the Manchester laboratory.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - All data entered in the database were reviewed for data
entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Johnson, A., D. Norton, and W. Yake. 1986. Occurrence and significance of DDT compounds and
other contaminants in fish, water and sediment from the Yakima River Basin. Washington State
Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA.
Johnson, A., D. Norton, and B. Yake. 1988. Persistence of DDT in the Yakima River drainage,
Washington. Arch. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 17:289-297.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
BIOTA DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ)
AREA OF STUDY: Willamette River and tributaries
SAMPLING MEDIA: Whole body, fillets, and liver (carp, squawfish, sucker, largemouth bass,
cutthroat trout, crayfish and whitefish).
ASSOCIATED SEDIMENT DATA: Yes
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
REFERENCE SOURCE: ODEQ 1994
CONTACT: Neil Mullane, ODEQ, Portland, OR
PHONE: (503)229-5284	FAX: (503)229-6124
SAMPLING PERIOD: 1988-1991
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 21 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: RM 7, 27, 28, 38, 48, 74, 131, 147, 161 and 176.
Tributary samples include: Johnson Creek, Tualatin, Yamhill River, Santiam River, Conser
Slough, Mckenzie River and Middle Fork Willamette River.
TARGET ANALYTES: Dioxins/furans; pesticides; PCBs; PAHs; Co-planar PCBs; metals.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Dioxins and furans (EPA Method 1613A); PAHs (EPA Method 8270);
Metals (EPA 600/4-82-020); PCB and pesticides (EPA Method 8080).
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Electroshocking
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Fish were weighed, measured, wrapped in aluminum foil,
placed on Ice in a cooler and shipped to the laboratory for analysis.
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude of sampling locations. Latitude and longitude were estimated for
entry in die database.
ABSTRACT
A study investigating die presence and effects of toxic pollutants in the Willamette River and selected
ODEQ94b -19

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tributaries was conducted by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) in cooperation
with the U.S. EPA and Oregon State University (OSU) (ODEQ 1994). It stated objectives were to
determine if bioaccumulative toxic pollutants were present in the sediment and fish tissue and to determine
the possible effects of the pollutants present on the aquatic resources using bioassays and other aquatic
life toxicity testing methods. This study was used as a screening survey to add to the existing toxic
pollutants data base for the Willamette River. The sampling sites selected were used for previous toxic
monitoring and were chosen to represent ambient levels, significant industrial and municipal sources and
typical urban non-point source impact.
QA/QC EVALUATION-N/A
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Users of these data should be reminded that the data
provided are in the form of summary tables for a number of sampling episodes that have occurred over
the course of the program. Some inconsistencies were noted between the data summarized in the ODEQ
(1994) report and other sources of this information (e.g. Curtis et al. 1993; Curtis 1994).
REFERENCES:
Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ). 1994. Willamette River toxics study -
1988/1991. Department of Environmental Quality, Water Quality Division, Portland, OR.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
BIOTA DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: U.S. Geological Survey (National Water Quality Assessment Program)
AREA OF STUDY: Yakima River
SAMPLING MEDIA: Whole body (rainbow trout, mountain whitefish, smallmouth bass, sculpin,
chiselmouth, largescale sucker, bridgelip sucker, carp, crayfish).
ASSOCIATED SEDIMENT DATA: Yes
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
REFERENCE SOURCE: Rinella et al. 1992
CONTACT: Frank Rinella, USGS, Portland, OR
PHONE: (503)231-2292	FAX: N/A
SAMPLING PERIOD: 1989 (May, October, and November), 1990 (October, November)
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 32 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Waptus River, Jungle Creek, Teanaway River, Yakima River
(Umtanum, Cle Elura, Sunnyside, Kiona, Parker, Granger, Grandview), Uratanum Creek, Little
Naches River, Rattlesnake Creek,t Satus Creek (Toppenish, Satus), Naches River, Moxee Drain,
North Fork Teanaway River, Taneum Creek, South Fork Manastash, Naneum Creek, American
River, South Fork Ahtanum Creek, Ahtanum Creek, Sulphur Creek, SpringCreek, Cherry Creek
(Thrall, Wipple Wasteway), Wide Hollow Creek (Union Gap, Ahtanum), Granger Drain,
Toppenish Creek.
TARGET ANALYTES: Organochlorine pesticides, total PCBs, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Analyses were performed according to guidance provided in Cromartie
et al. (1975).
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Electrofishing (backpack and boat-mounted gear) and kick nets.
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: For whole fish samples, the fish were rinsed with native
water, weired and measured, examined for external anomalies, placed in aluminum foil and then
placed in a labeled plastic bag and stored on dry ice for shipment to the laboratory. The same
procedure was followed for muscle tissue samples except that the muscle tissue was extracted
prior to placing in aluminum foil. Crayfish were rinsed with native water, then deionized water,
placed in a glass jar and frozen.
DATA GAPS: None
Ri92b - 21

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ABSTRACT
One objective of the report was to provide a compilation of concentrations of organic compounds
collected during the Yakima Basin NAWQA study which may be used to determine spatial and temporal
trends (Rinella et al. 1992). For this study; water, sediment, molluscs, aquatic plants, fish, and crayfish
were collected and analyzed for organochlorine pesticides, total PCBs, and polynuclear aromatic
hydrocarbons. In addition, conventional data such as length, weight, age (for fish), and lipid content
were determined.
QA/QC EVALUATION - All data were reviewed for accuracy and precision. The review
included an evaluation of method blanks, matrix spikes and duplicates, and surrogate recoveries for
acceptable method performance.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - The data have undergone review and validation. All
data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Cromartie, E., W.L. Reichel, L.N. Locke, A.A. Belisle, T.E. Kaiser, T.O. Lamont, B.M. Mulhern,
R.M. Prouty, and D.M. Swineford. 197S. Residues of organochlorine pesticides and polychlorinated
biphenyls and autopsy data for bald eagles, 1971-1972. Pesticides Monitoring Journal 9:11-14.
Rinella, J.F., S.W. McKenzie, J.K. Crawford, W.T. Foreman, P.M. Gates, G.J. Fuhrer, and M.L.
Janet. 1992. Surface-water-quality assessment of the Yakima River Basin, Washington: Pesticide and
other trace-organic-compound data for water, sediment, soil, and aquatic biota, 1987-91. U.S. Geological
Survey, Portland, OR. Open-File Report 92-644.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
BIOTA DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS)
AREA OF STUDY: National study (10 stations in the Columbia River basin)
SAMPLING MEDIA: Whole body (largescale sucker, rainbow trout, Northern squawfish, mountain
whitefish, smallmouth bass, black crappie, walleye and yellow perch).
ASSOCIATED SEDIMENT DATA: No
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
REFERENCE SOURCE: Schmitt and Brumbaugh 1990
CONTACT: Carol Schuler, USFWS, Portland, OR
PHONE: (503)231-6179	FAX: N/A
SAMPLING PERIOD: 1984
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 112 totaJ stations; 10 stations in Columbia River Basin.
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Columbia River basin stations: Snake River (Hagerman and
Lewiston, ID and Ice Harbor Dam, WA); Salmon River (Riggins, ID); Yakima River (Granger,
WA); Willamette River (Oregon City, OR); Columbia River (Cascade Locks, OR, Pasco and
Grand Coulee, WA); Flathead River (Creston, MT).
TARGET ANALYTES: Metals (As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Hg, Se and Zn). All data are reported on a wet
weight basis.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: A Perkin-Elmer Model 5000 atomic absorption spectrophotometer was
used for all metals analyses.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Netting, hook-and-line, electrofishing or purchased from local
fishermen (Schmitt et al. 1981).
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Fish were shipped to the laboratory frozen on dry ice and
stored in a freezer until prepared for analysis.
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude of sampling locations. Latitude and longitude were estimated for
the data base.
SchBr94b - 23

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ABSTRACT
The National Contaminant Biomonitoring Program, maintained by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service,
documented temporal and geographical trends in concentrations of persistent environmental contaminants
that may threaten fish and wildlife. This report represents a collection of 321 composite samples (each
composed of three to five whole, adult specimens of a single species) from 112 stations at key points in
major rivers throughout the United States and in the Great Lakes that were sampled for whole body fish
tissue trace element concentrations (Schmitt and Brumbaugh 1990). There are 10 stations represented
that are located within the Columbia River basin. Methods of collecting, shipping, archiving and
preparing samples are fully described in Schmitt et al. (1981,1983). The results of the organochlorine
chemical residues in freshwater fish are reported in Schmitt et al. (1990).
OA IOC EVALUATION - Quality control samples, analyzed to estimate accuracy and precision
of results, included biological reference materials, spiked samples, triplicate determinations and
procedural blanks. Concentrations measured for the reference samples (which included U.S. National
Bureau of Standards oyster, tuna and liver and an in-house reference fish sample of a stripped bass
collected from the Hudson River, NY in 1981) agreed well with reported values; mean concentrations
measured were within 10% of certified or recommended ranges for all materials or elements. All results
for quality control samples were within limits of acceptance established by the laboratory.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Data have been extensively reviewed and validated and
appear to be of good quality. Actual data is provided from the 1984 sampling effort. Summary tables
of data from prior collection efforts (from 1976-1981) is also included. This study, due to its ongoing
nature, provides a comprehensive review of contaminant levels of various fish species at these selected
sites from 1976-1984.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Schmitt, C.J., J.L. Ludke, and D.F. Walsh. 1981. Organochlorine residues in fish: National Pesticide
Monitoring Program, 1970-74. Pesticides Monitoring Journal 14:136-206.
Schmitt, C.J., M.A. Ribick, J.L. Ludke, and T.W. May. 1983. National Pesticide Monitoring Program:
Organochlorine residues in freshwater fish, 1976-79. U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife
Service, Washington, D.C. Resource Publication 152.
Schmitt, C.J. and W.G. Brumbaugh. 1990. National Contaminant Biomonitoring Program:
Concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, selenium, and zinc in U.S. freshwater fish,
1976-1984. Arch. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 19:731-747.
Schmitt, C.J., J.L. Zajicek, and P.H. Peterman. 1990. National Contaminant Biomonitoring Program:
Residues of organochlorine chemicals in U.S. freshwater fish, 1976-1984. Arch. Environ. Contam.
Toxicol. 19:748-781.
SchBr94b - 24

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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
BIOTA DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS)
AREA OF STUDY: National study (10 stations in the Columbia River basin)
SAMPLING MEDIA: Whole body (largescale sucker, rainbow trout, Northern squawfish, mountain
whitefish, smallmouth bass, black crappie, walleye and yellow perch).
ASSOCIATED SEDIMENT DATA: No
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
REFERENCE SOURCE: Schmitt et al. 1990
CONTACT: Carol Schuler, USFWS, Portland, OR
PHONE: (503)231-6179	FAX: N/A
SAMPLING PERIOD: 1984
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 112 total stations; 10 stations in the Columbia River Basin.
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Snake River (Hagerman and Lewiston, ID and Ice Harbor
Dam, WA); Salmon River (Riggins, ID); Yakima River (Granger, WA); Willamette River
(Oregon City, OR); Columbia River (Cascade Locks, OR, Pasco and Grand Coulee, WA);
Flathead River (Creston, MT).
TARGET ANALYTES: Organochlorine pesticides. All data are reported on s wet weight basis.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Varian 3700 gas chromatograph.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Netting, hook-and-line, electrofishing or purchased by local
fishermen (Schmitt et al. 1981).
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Fish were shipped to the laboratory frozen on dry ice and
stored in a freezer until prepared for analysis.
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude of sampling locations. Latitude and longitude were estimated ibr
the data base.
Schm90b - 25

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ABSTRACT
Hie National Contaminant Biomonitoring Program, maintained by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service,
documents temporal and geographical trends in concentrations of persistent environmental contaminants
that may threaten fish and wildlife. This report represents a collection of 321 composite samples (each
composed of three to five whole, adult specimens of a single species) from 112 stations at key points in
major rivers throughout the United States and in the Great Lakes that were analysed for organochlorine
pesticides and PCBs (Schmitt et al. 1990). There are 10 stations represented that are associated with the
Columbia River basin. Methods of collecting, shipping, archiving and preparing samples are fully
described in Schmitt et al. (1981,1983). The results of analysis of trace elements in freshwater fish are
reported in Schmitt and Brumbaugh (1990).
QA/QC EVALUATION - Method blanks were analyzed with each block of samples. Duplicate
samples were used to estimate analytical variability. Concentrations measured for the reference samples
(which included an in-house reference composite fish sample of a stripped bass collected from the Hudson
River, NY in 1981). The relative SD was between 10-20% for lipid content and all compounds except:
compounds that had mean concentrations at or near the generic method LOD, o,p'-DDE (38%), o,p'-
DDT (27%) and Aroclor 1254 (23%).
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Data have been extensively reviewed and validated and
appear to be of good quality. Actual data is provided from the 1984 sampling effort. Summary tables
of data from prior collection efforts (from 1976-1981) is also included. This study, due to its ongoing
nature, provides a comprehensive review of contaminant levels of various fish species at these selected
sites from 1976-1984.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Schmitt, C.J., J.L. Ludke, and D.F. Walsh. 1981. Organochlorine residues in fish: National Pesticide
Monitoring Program, 1970-74. Pesticides Monitoring Journal 14:136-206.
Schmitt, C.J., M.A. Ribick, J.L. Ludke, and T.W. May. 1983. National Pesticide Monitoring Program:
Organochlorine residues in freshwater fish, 1976-79. U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife
Service, Washington, D.C. Resource Publication 152.
Schmitt, C.J. and W.G. Brumbaugh. 1990. National Contaminant Biomonitoring Program:
Concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, selenium, and zinc in U.S. freshwater fish,
1976-1984. Arch. Environ. Contain. Toxicol. 19:731-747.
Schmitt, C.J., J.L. Zajicek, and P.H. Peterman. 1990. National Contaminant Biomonitoring Program:
Residues of organochlorine chemicals in U.S. freshwater fish, 1976-1984. Arch. Environ. Contam.
Toxicol. 19:748-781.
Schm90b - 26

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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
BIOTA DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS)
AREA OF STUDY: Columbia River (Grays Bay to Umatilla)
SAMPLING MEDIA: Whole body (carp, smallmouth bass, Northern squawfish, sucker, whitefish,
crayfish, corbicula and macoma clams, corophium amphipod).
ASSOCIATED SEDIMENT DATA: Yes
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
REFERENCE SOURCE: Schuler 1994
CONTACT: Carol Schuler, USFWS, Portland, OR
PHONE: (503)231-6179	FAX: N/A
SAMPLING PERIOD: May-September 1991
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 8 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Baker Bay, Camas, Cathlamet Bay, Lewis and Clark,
Longview, Julia Butler, Ridgefield and Umatilla.
TARGET ANALYTES: Dioxins and furans; PCBs; organochlorine pesticides; Hg.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Dioxins/farans (EPA Method 1613).
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: N/A
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: N/A
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude of sampling locations. Type of analytical techniques used tot
chemical analyses other than dioxins and ftirans. Sampling equipment used and sample
processing and handling. QA/QC procedures.
ABSTRACT
The Columbia River Estuary is exposed to a variety of contaminants through municipal and industrial
permitted discharges, urban and industrial nonpoint pollution, accidental spills of oil and hazardous
Schu94b - 27

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materials, agricultural runoff and accelerated population growth. This study intended to provide
information needed to determine if hazardous concentrations of organic pollutants are bioaccumulating
in fish and wildlife from the Columbia River and its National Wildlife Refuges. Sediment, aquatic
invertebrate, fish and bird egg samples were collected for this study. Preliminary study results were
reported in Schuler (1992). There was no accompanying report with these data. The data were provided
in spreadsheet format by Carol Schuler (1994).
QA/QC EVALUATION - N/A
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - No information was provided on analytical methods,
QA/QC measures or review and validation of results.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Schuler, C. 1992. Organochlorine contaminants in aquatic resources from the Columbia River.
Progress report. Fiscal year 1992. U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service, Portland
Field Office, Portland, OR.
Schuler, C. 8 September 1994. Personal Communication (data sent to Ms. Kimberly Stark, Tetra Tech,
Redmond, WA). U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Portland, OR.
Schu94b - 28

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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
BIOTA DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Washington Department of Ecology (WDOE)
AREA OF STUDY: Columbia River (Rufus Woods Lake to Columbia River mouth)
SAMPLING MEDIA: Muscle tissue (walleye, lake and mountain whitefish, rainbow trout, smallmouth
and largemouth bass, channel catfish, carp, white sturgeon and chinook salmon).
ASSOCIATED SEDIMENT DATA: No
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
REFERENCE SOURCE: Serdar et al. 1991
CONTACT: Dave Serdar, WDOE, Olympia, WA
PHONE: (206)407^772
SAMPLING PERIOD: May - November 1990
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 8 stations
FAX: (206) 407-6715
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Rufus Woods Lake, Rock bland Reservoir, Priest Rapids
Reservoir, Lake Wallula, Lake Wenatchee, Leavenworth Hatchery, Priest Rapids Hatchery,
Columbia River mouth,
TARGET ANALYTES: Dioxins and furans.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Dioxins and furans (EPA Method 8290 with modifications).
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Electroshocking, gillnet or hook-and-line
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Fish were marked with the location, species, length,
weight and any other observations on a sample tag. The fish was then double wrapped with the
tag in aluminum foil and placed in a ziplock bag. Samples were kept on ice while in the field
and subsequently frozen for later analysis.
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude of sampling locations. Latitude and longitude were estimated for
the data base.
Se91b - 29

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ABSTRACT
The upper and lower reaches of the Columbia River have been well studied for TCDD/TCDF
contamination if fish, a void in data exists for the middle reaches. Ecology responded by undertaking
a survey of TCDD/TCDF in sportfish from just above Chief Joseph Dam (Rufus Woods Lake) to
McNary Dam (Lake Wallula) during May to November, 1990 (Serdar et al. 1991). Sportfish samples
were also collected from the mouth of the Columbia River. The objective of this survey was to obtain
an accurate estimate of mean TCDD and TCDF concentrations in muscle tissue of major sportfish species
from popular harvest areas. A total of 187 individual fish were collected resulting in a total of 46
composite tissue samples analyzed for dioxins and furans.
QA/QC EVALUATION - Data was reviewed and evaluated by an independent laboratory under
contract from Ecology. Duplicate split samples were used for analytical precision. Reviewers evaluated
ion chromatograms, initial and daily continuing calibrations, column performance check mixes,
calculations of positive natives, matrix spikes and spike duplicates and percent lipid calculations. All data
reported have been deemed acceptable for use according to the quality assurance requirements of Method
8290.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - The data have undergone review and validation. Users
of these data should be reminded that muscle tissue was used for analysis rather than whole fillets.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Serdar, D., A. Johnson, and S. Magoon. 1991. Polychlorinated dioxins and -fiirans in Columbia River
sportfish: Chief Joseph Dam to McNary Dam. Washington State Department of Ecology, Olympia,
WA.
Se9lb - 30

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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
BIOTA DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Washington Department of Ecology (WDOE)
AREA OF STUDY: Lake Roosevelt
SAMPLING MEDIA: Muscle tissue and eggs Qake whitefish); whole body (largescale sucket)
ASSOCIATED SEDIMENT DATA: Yes
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
REFERENCE SOURCE: Serdar et al. 1994
CONTACT: Dave Serdar, WDOE, Olympia, WA
PHONE: (206)407-6772	FAX: (206)407-6715
SAMPLING PERIOD: October 1992 and 1993
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 4 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Off Colville River, off Sherman Creek, Northport Bridge,
and off Sheep Creek.
TARGET ANALYTES: 2,3,7,8-TCDD and -TCDF; cadmium; copper; lead; mercury; and zinc.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: TCDD/TCDF (EPA Method 8290), cadmium (EPA Method 3051/213.2
modified), copper (EPA Method 3051/6010), lead (EPA Method 3051/239.2 modified), mercury
(EPA Method 245.1 modified), and zinc (EPA Method 3051/6010).
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Gillnet (lake whitefish) and electroshocking (largescale suckers).
- 'sT	V
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Lake whitefish samples were placed on ice until muscle
and egg samples were resected. Largescale suckers were homogenized using a Hobart meat
grinder. Additional information regarding sample handling and processing was not provided.
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude of sampling locations was not provided. Latitude and longitude
were estimated for die data base.
Se94b - 31

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ABSTRACT
During 1992 and 1993, the Washington Department of Ecology evaluated TCDD.TCDF, and trace metal
concentrations in suspended sediments and fish tissues collected from four locations in Lake Roosevelt.
The main objective of the study was to provide temporal trends in concentrations of these pollutants in
Lake Roosevelt. The study was based on previous Ecology studies of dioxins/fiirans and metals that
determined the extent and degree of contamination in Lake Roosevelt through 1990. The report included
new 1992 and 1993 data and discussed previously reported 1990 data (Johnson et al. 1991). An interim
report (Serdar et al. 1993) provided a preliminary summary of the 1992 data.
OA/OC EVALUATION - All TCDD and TCDF data met EPA Method 8290 guidelines for
continuing calibration, internal standard recoveries, and isotopic abundance ratios. All metals data met
EPA guidelines for instrument calibration and procedural blanks. Several matrix spike recoveries for
various metals were outside acceptable QC limits. The data reviewer determined that sample
nonhomogeneity may have accounted for the poor spike recoveries. Two standard reference materials
were analyzed for metals to assess analytical accuracy.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Data are of good quality and have undergone extensive
review and validation. Fish sample results were compared to previous results obtained in 1990 and 1992
for the assessment of temporal trends.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Johnson, A.D., D. Serdar, and S. Magoon. 1991. Polychlorinated dioxins and -furana in Lake
Roosevelt (Columbia River) sportfish, 1990. Washington Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA.
Publication No. 91-4.
Serdar, D., A. Johnson, and K. Seiders. 1993. Interim report on monitoring contaminant trends in Lake
Roosevelt. Washington Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA.
Serdar, D., B. Yake, J. Cubbage. 1994. Contaminant trends in Lake Roosevelt. Draft report.
Washington State Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA.
Se94b - 32

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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
BIOTA DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: City of St. Helens
AREA OF STUDY: Columbia River (St. Helens)
SAMPLING MEDIA: Crayfish (whole body)
ASSOCIATED SEDIMENT DATA: Yes
POSITIONING SYSTEM: Trimble Navigation GPS
REFERENCE SOURCE: Tetra Tech 1992a
CONTACT: Steve Ellis, Tetra Tech, Inc., Redmond, WA
PHONE: (206) 883-1912	FAX: (206) 881-6997
SAMPLING PERIOD: August 21-31, 1991
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 5 stations where sediments were also collected.
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Multnomah Channel, Fishtrap Shoal, St. Helens Marina,
Warrior Rock, and Columbia City
TARGET ANALYTES: Seventeen dioxin and furan congeners. The average lipid content and weight
fbr composite samples were reported as well as individual crayfish weights. Data are presented
as wet weight and lipid-normalized values.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Dioxins and furans (EPA Method 8290). Lipid content was determined
by gravimetric methodology utilizing the sample extract.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Baited wire mesh crayfish traps.
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Samples were wrapped in aluminum foil, placed in
labeled plastic bags, and stored on dry ice for shipping to the laboratory.
DATA GAPS: none
ABSTRACT
Monitoring of sediment and crayfish (Paclfastacus leniusculus) was conducted in order to satisfy
Tt92ab - 33

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monitoring requirements set forth in the City of St. Helens National Discharge Elimination System
(NPDES) Permit (Tetra Tech 1992a). Samples were collected to evaluate the accumulation of dioxins
and furans in sediment and crayfish. Sediment and crayfish sampling primarily focused on locations
downriver from the location of the outfall pipe. Whole body composite crayfish samples were analyzed
with one exception. Only one crayfish was obtained from the St. Helens Marina site.
Crayfish samples were collected using baited commercially-obtained wire mesh crayfish traps. The traps
were attached to marked buoys and deployed at the five sampling sites using a small boat. Sampling
station latitude and longitude were recorded from geographic coordinates provided by a Trimble
Navigation Global Positioning System receiver.
OA/OC EVALUATION - Data were reviewed by Dr. William Luksemburg of Alta Analytical
Laboratory. The review included all ion chromatograms, initial and continuing calibrations, column
performance check mixes, calculations of positive values and detection limits, ion abundance ratios for
internal/surrogate/recovery standards and positive natives, matrix spikes and duplicates, and calculation
of lipid content. No data were qualified based upon review of QA/QC data. Method blank, laboratory
control sample, internal standard, and detection limit data were included in the report.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Crayfish tissue data have undergone review and the
majority of the data are of acceptable quality. Comparisons between sediment and crayfish tissue
contaminant data collected for this study are possible as the sampling locations for crayfish correspond
to sediment sampling sites.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
R fr rKFiTSNCF-fi'
Tetra Tech. 1992. City of St. Helens discharge monitoring report: Accumulation of dioxins and furans
in sediment and biota. Prepared for City of St. Helens, St. Helens, OR. Tetra Tech, Inc., Bellevue,
WA.
Tt92ab - 34

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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
BIOTA DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: James River Corporation
AREA OF STUDY: Columbia River (Wauna)
SAMPLING MEDIA: Crayfish (whole body)
ASSOCIATED SEDIMENT DATA: Yes
POSITIONING SYSTEM: Trimble Navigation GPS
REFERENCE SOURCE: Tetra Tech 1992c
CONTACT: Steve Ellis, Tetra Tech, Inc., Redmond, WA
PHONE: (206)883-1912	FAX: (206) 881-6997
SAMPLING PERIOD: August 25-31, 1991
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 5 stations where sediments were also collected.
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Wallace Island, Westport Slough, Bradwood, Clifton
Channel, and downriver from James River Wauna Mill.
TARGET ANALYTES: Seventeen dioxin and furan congeners. The average lipid content and weight
for composite samples were reported as well as individual crayfish weights. All data are reported
on a wet weight basis.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Dioxins and fiirans (EPA Method 8290). Lipid content was determined
by gravimetric methodology utilizing the sample extract.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Baited wire mesh crayfish traps.
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Samples were wrapped in aluminum foil, placed in labeled
plastic bags, and stored on dry ice for shipping to the laboratory.
DATA GAPS: none
ABSTRACT
Monitoring of sediment and crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) was conducted in order to satisfy
Tt92cb - 35

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monitoring requirements set forth in the James River Wauna Mill's National Discharge Elimination
System (NPDES) Permit (Tetra Tech 1992). Samples were collected to evaluate the accumulation of
dioxins and furans in sediment and crayfish. Sediment and crayfish sampling primarily focused on
locations downriver of the mill. Whole body composite samples of crayfish were targeted for analysis.
Crayfish samples were collected using baited commercially-obtained wire mesh crayfish traps. The traps
were attached to marked buoys and deployed at the five sampling sites using a small boat. Sampling
station latitude and longitude were recorded from geographic coordinates provided by a Trimble
Navigation Global Positioning System receiver.
OA/QC EVALUATION - Data were reviewed by Dr. William Luksemburg of Alta Analytical
Laboratory. The review included all ion chromatograms, initial and continuing calibrations, column
performance check mixes, calculations of positive values and detection limits, ion abundance ratios for
internal/surrogate/recovery standards and positive natives, matrix spikes and duplicates, and calculation
of lipid content. No data were qualified based upon review of QA/QC data. Method blank, laboratory
control sample, internal standard, and detection limit data were included in the report.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - The crayfish tissue data have undergone review and
validation. Comparisons between sediment and crayfish tissue contaminant data collected for this study
are possible as the sampling locations for crayfish correspond to sediment sampling sites.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Tetra Tech. 1992. James River Wauna Mill discharge monitoring report: Accumulation of dioxins and
furans in sediment and biota. Prepared for James River Corporation, Wauna, OR. Tetra Tech, Inc.,
Bellevue, WA.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
BIOTA DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Lower Columbia River Bi-State Program (Bi-State)
AREA OF STUDY: Lower Columbia River (Bonneville Dam to mouth)
SAMPLING MEDIA: Whole body (peamouth, carp, largescale sucker, crayfish), skinless fillet (white
sturgeon).
ASSOCIATED SEDIMENT DATA: Yes
POSITIONING SYSTEM: Magnavox MX 2000 GPS Navigator System
REFERENCE SOURCE: Tetra Tech 1993
CONTACT: Steve Ellis, Tetra Tech, Inc., Redmond, WA
PHONE: (206)883-1912	FAX: (206) 881-6997
SAMPLING PERIOD: August-September 1991
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 19 stations where sediments were also collected; 8 general areas
throughout the river where white sturgeon were captured by commercial fisherman.
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Mainstem and backwater areas of the lower Columbia
River—River Mile 0 to 147, the mouth of the Columbia River to Bonneville Dam.
TARGET ANALYTES: Seventeen dioxin and furan congeners, 7 PCB Aroclors, 11 metals and trace
elements (Sb, As, Ba, Cd, Cu, Pb, Hg, Ni, Se, Ag, Zn), 49 semi-volatile organic compounds
including 8 phenolic compounds and IS polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, and 28 pesticides.
Sample lipid content and the average weight and fork length of fish (average weight only for
crayfish) were also reported. All data are reported on a wet weight basis.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Dioxins and furans (EPA Method 1613 with modifications); PCB
Aroclors (EPA Method 8080); metals and trace elements [Ag, Ni, Cu, Ba, Sb, and Zn by ICP
(EPA 6010), Pb by ICP/MS (EPA 200.8), As and Se by GFAA (EPA 7060 and 7740), and Hg
by CVAA (EPA 24S.2); SVOCs (EPA 8270); and pesticides and PCBs (EPA 8080).
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Most fish collected from an aluminum boat using electrofishing
equipment. Peamouth collected from Youngs Bay collected using a gillnet. Sturgeon samples
received from commercial sturgeon fisherman at dock. Crayfish collected using baited minnow
traps.
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Fish and crayfish samples were labeled and frozen in the
field and delivered to the laboratory for compositing and processing. Sample chain-of-custody
procedures were followed.
Tt93b - 37

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DATA GAPS: none
ABSTRACT
Tetra Tech, Inc., was contracted by the Lower Columbia River Bi-State Program to conduct a
reconnaissance level survey of water, sediment, and biota (fish and crayfish) contaminant levels in these
media of the lower Columbia River below Bonneville Dam (Tetra Tech 1993). Sediment and biota
sampling focused on locations in the mainstem and backwater areas of the lower river. Five species were
targeted for sampling and analysis: whole body composite samples of crayfish (Pacifastacus leniuscidus),
carp (Cyprinus carpio), largescale sucker (Catostomus macrocheilus), and peamouth (Mylocheilus
caurinus). Individual skinless fillets of white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) were also targeted for
analysis.
Biota sampling was conducted primarily with an electrofishing boat, although the peamouth collected in
Youngs Bay were captured using a gillnet. White sturgeon were purchased fresh from commercial
fisherman. Fish and crayfish sampling station latitude and longitude were recorded from geographic
coordinates provided by a Trimble Transpak II Global Positioning System receiver. The GPS locational
information was not corrected for the U.S. Department of Defense's Selective Availability, and therefore
the GPS latitudes and longitudes provided are accurate to approximately ± 100 m. The locations where
white sturgeon were captured were approximated based on information provided by the fisherman.
QA/QC EVALUATION - The tissue analysis data submitted by the laboratories were reviewed
and validated by Tetra Tech using guidance provided in the Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QA/QC)
Plan developed for this project and guidance provided by the U.S. EPA. A data validation report was
prepared as part of the final report and is bound separately as Volume 2: Appendix A, Data Validation
Reports. The QA/QC procedures included sampling and analysis of field and laboratory replicate# and
matrix spike/matrix spike duplicate (MS/MSD) analyses on a minimum of 5 percent of the samples that
were collected. Some data were qualified based on review of laboratory replicate and MS/MSD results,
and additional calibration instrument calibration and performance data provided by the laboratories.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - The biota tissue data have undergone review and
validation. Data not meeting project guidelines for laboratory precision or accuracy have been qualified
where appropriate. Although comparison between sediment and fish tissue contaminant data collected
in this program is possible, the sampling area for fish at a particular station was generally greater than
the area designated as the sediment sampling station. Because a relatively large area was sampled to
collect the required number of fish at each station, the latitude and longitude provided for a particular fish
sampling station is a simple representation of the location that was sampled. Furthermore, with the
exception of crayfish, it is not know to what extent the fish species collected reside in the vicinity of the
sampling station. The original data may be found in Volume 3: Data Tables. Appendices B, C, D, &E.
of Tetra Tech (1993).
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES:
Tetra Tech. 1993. Reconnaissance Survey of the lower Columbia River. Task 6: Reconnaissance
report. Volumes 1, 2, and 3. Prepared for Columbia River Bi-State Program. Tetra Tech, foe.,
Redmond, WA.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
BIOTA DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Lower Columbia River Bi-State Program (Bi-State)
AREA OF STUDY: Lower Columbia River (Bonneville Dam to mouth)
SAMPLING MEDIA: Whole body (largescale sucker, carp, crayfish)
POSITIONING SYSTEM: Magnavox MX 2000 GPS Navigator System
ASSOCIATED SEDIMENT DATA: Yes
REFERENCE SOURCE: Tetra Tech 1994
CONTACT: Steve Ellis, Tetra Tech, Inc., Redmond, WA
PHONE: (206) 883-1912	FAX: (206) 881-6997
SAMPLING PERIOD: July-August 1993
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 15 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Backwater areas of the lower Columbia River—River Mile
14 to 141, Youngs Bay to Skamania Landing.
TARGET ANALYTES: Seventeen dioxin and furan congeners, 7 PCB Aroclors, 16 metals and trace
elements (Sb, As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Hg, Ni, Se, Ag, Zn), 59 semi-volatile organic compounds
(SVOCs) including 11 phenolic compounds and 17 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs),
26 pesticides, 6 PCB Aroclors, 3 butyltin compounds including tributyltin, and 8 long-lived
radionuclides. Conventional analyses included lipid content and average length/weight data for
the composite samples. All chemical data are reported on a dry weight basis.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Dioxins and furans (EPA Method 1613 with modifications); PCB
Aroclors (EPA Method 8080); metals and trace elements [Ag, Ba, Cu, Ni, and Zn by ICP (EPA
Method 200.7); Sb (EPA 204.2), As (EPA 206.2), Cd (EPA 213.2), Cr (EPA 218.2), Pb (EPA
239.2), and Se (EPA 270.2) by GFAA; Hg (EPA 245.2) by CVAA)]; SVOCs (EPA 8270) with
SIM for PAH analysis; pesticides and PCBs (EPA 8080); butyltins (GC/MS with SIM);
radionuclides by alpha spectroscopy and gamma counting.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Electroshocking equipment for the collection of fish and baited traps
for the collection of crayfish, Magnavox MX 2000 Global Positioning System (GPS)
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Tissue samples consisted of a homogenized composites
of 2-5 largescale sucker and 8-21 crayfish collected from each station, although no largescale
sucker or crayfish could be collected at Station 15 at Skamania Landing and no crayfish could
be collected from Station 1 in Youngs Bay. Carp were collected from these two stations to
Tt94b - 39

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provide composite tissue samples for analysis. Three field replicate composite samples were
collected from Station 13 in Camas Slough to evaluate field variability of the tissue analyses.
Samples were shipped on ice to laboratory. Sample chain-of-custody proceedures were followed.
DATA GAPS: none
ABSTRACT
Tetra Tech, Inc., was contracted by the Lower Columbia River Bi-State Program to conduct a
supplemental reconnaissance survey of sediment and biota (fish and crayfish) contaminant levels in
backwater areas of the lower Columbia River (Tetra Tech 1994). These samples were intended to expand
the data base of the original reconnaissance survey reported in Tetra Tech (1993). Station latitude and
longitude were recorded from geographic coordinates provided by a Magnavox MX 2000 Global
Positioning System (GPS) Navigator System receiver. The GPS locational information was not corrected
for the U.S. Department of Defense's Selective Availability, and therefore the GPS latitudes and
longitudes provided are accurate to approximately ± 100 m.
OA/OC EVALUATION - The tissue data submitted by the laboratories were reviewed and
validated by Tetra Tech using guidance provided in the Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QA/QC) Plan
developed for this project and guidance provided by the U.S. EPA. A data validation report was
prepared as part of the final report and is bound separately as Volume 2: Appendix A, Data Validation
Reports. The QA/QC procedures included sampling and analysis of field and laboratory replicates and
matrix spike/matrix spike duplicate (MS/MSD) analyses on a minimum of 5 percent of the samples that
were collected. Some data were qualified based on review of laboratory replicate and MS/MSD results,
and instrument calibration and performance data provided by the laboratories.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - The tissue data are of good quality and have undergone
review and validation. The field replicated data allow for statistical comparisons. Data not meeting
project guidlines for laboratory precision or accuracy have been qualified where appropriate. Although
comparison between sediment and fish tissue contaminant data collected in this program is possible, the
sampling area for fish at a particular station was generally greater than the area designated as the sediment
sampling station. Furthermore, with the exception of crayfish, it is not known to what extent the fish
species collected reside in the vicinity of the sampling station. The original data may be found in Volume
3: Data Tables - Appendices B, C, D, & E of Tetra Tech (1994).
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Tetra Tech. 1993. Reconnaissance Survey of the lower Columbia River. Task 6: Reconnaissance
report. Volumes I, 2, and 3. Prepared for Columbia River Bi-State Program. Tetra Tech, Inc.,
Redmond, WA.
Tetra Tech. 1994. Draft report. Lower Columbia River Backwater Reconnaissance Survey. Volumes
1,2, and 3. Prepared for Lower Columbia River Bi-State Committee. Tetra Tech, Inc., Redmond, WA.
Tt94b - 40

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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
BIOTA DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)
AREA OF STUDY: National study (23 locations in the Columbia River basin)
SAMPLING MEDIA: Whole body Qargescale sucker, carp, crayfish, white sturgeon, soft shell clams,
bridgelip sucker); Fillet (sucker, smallmouth bass, squawfish, whitefish, white sturgeon).
ASSOCIATED SEDIMENT DATA: No
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
REFERENCE SOURCE: U.S. EPA 1992
CONTACT: Elizabeth Southerland, Office of Science and Technology, Washington, D.C.
PHONE: (202)260-3966	FAX: N/A
SAMPLING PERIOD: 1987
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 388 stations throughout the U.S.; Approximately 24 locations
in the Columbia River basin.
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Snake River, Willamette River, Columbia River, Tulatin
River and Yakima River.
TARGET ANALYTES: Dioxins and ftirans; PCBs; pesticides; metals; organics; mercury.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Dioxins and furans (EPA 600/3-90/022); xenobiotics (EPA 600/3-
90/023); Mercury (EPA 1989a).
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: N/A
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Fish were individually wrapped In aluminum foil, labeled,
dry-iced and shipped to the laboratory. Two composite samples (of three-five adult fish) from
each site were used for analysis, when possible.
DATA GAPS: none
USEPA92b - 41

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ABSTRACT
This study, commonly referred to as the National Bioaccumulation Study (NBS), was a one-time
screening investigation to determine the prevalence of selected bioaccumulative pollutants in fish and to
identify correlations with sources of these pollutants. This study, initiated as a follow-up study to the
National Dioxin Study, targeted sites near producers of dioxins including: pulp and paper mills, refineries
using catalytic reforming process, Superfimd sites, former wood preserving operations, publicly owned
treatment works (POTWs) and agricultural and urban areas. A total of 388 sites were selected for
sampling around the United States and approximately 24 sites in the Pacific North West / Columbia River
Basin area. Some samples collected from the National Dioxin Study were reanalyzed as part of this study
to obtain information on concentrations of pollutants other than 2,3,7,8 TCDD and have been added into
the data base. This results of this study were originally published as U.S. EPA (1991).
QA/OC EVALUATION - Specific laboratory QA procedures were established. If dioxin values
were below 40 percent recovery, they were flagged with a QR designation in the data base. General
guidance for data quality including QA/QC requirements was provided in the Work/Quality Assurance
Project Plan. Appendix A-2 contains the Analytical Procedures and Quality Assurance Plan for the
Determination of PCDD/PCDF in Fish and the Analytical Procedures and Quality Assurance Plan for the
Determination of Xenobiotic Chemical Contaminants in Fish.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - User of these data should be reminded that the sampling
areas targeted for sampling were those areas suspected to be contaminated with dioxins and fiirans.
Therefore, these data may not be indicative of ambient levels throughout the U.S.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES:
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). 1992. National study of chemical residues in fish.
Volumes I and II. EPA 823-R-92-008a,b. Office of Science and Technology, U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency, Washington, D.C.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). 1991. Bioaccumulation of selected pollutants in
fish - A National Study. Volumes I and n. EPA 506/6-90/001a,b. Assessment and Watershed
Protection Division, Office of Water Regulations and Standards, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency,
Washington, D.C.
USEPA92b - 42

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APPENDIX D
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACTS

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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Washington State Department of Ecology (WDOE)
AREA OF STUDY: Lower Columbia River-Longview
SAMPLING MEDIA: Surface sediment (top 2 cm)
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: No
REFERENCE SOURCE: Andreasson 1991a
CONTACT: Jeanne Andreasson, WDOE, Olympia, WA
PHONE: (206)407-6000	FAX: N/A
SAMPLING PERIOD: April 1990
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 3 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: The sampling locations were near the Weyerhaeuser's pulp
and paper mill's waste treatment plant outfall. Samples were collected next to the 54" diftuser
outfall pipe, approximately 300 ft downstream from the diffuser and approximately 4S00 ft
upriver (for background).
TARGET ANALYTES: Dioxin/furana; volatile and semivolatile compounds; metals (Sb, As, Be, Cd,
Cr, Cu, Pb, Hg, Ni, Se, Ag, Ti, and Zn); organochlorine pesticides and PCBs. Conventional
analyses included TOC and grain size.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Dioxin/furans (EPA 8290); VOAs (EPA 8240), BNAs (EPA 8270),
metals (EPA 7041, 7060, 6010, 7131, 7421, 7740, 7841), pesticides/PCBs (EPA 8080). All
results were reported on a dry weight basis.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: 0.1 m3 van Veen grab sampler
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Individual sample grabs were placed on ice and delivered
to die laboratory.
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude were not provided. Latitude and longitude were estimated for entry
along with die data provided in the database.
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ABSTRACT
The objectives of the Weyerhaeuser, Longview Pulp and Paper Mill's Class n Inspection were to verify
effluent compliance with NPDES permit (NPDES Permit No. WA-000012-4), characterize priority and
non-priority pollutants in industrial in-plant waters, treatment effluent and in sediments near the 001/002
outfall, determine the removal efficiency achieved with secondary treatment of industrial streams, evaluate
any toxicity in the 001/002 effluent and sediments using several bioassays and to characterize any priority
pollutants in the Radakovitch landfill leachate or in the R-W Paper plant drainage into Longview Ditch
#3 (Andreasson 1991). The inspection also reviewed lab procedures at the mill to determine adherence
to accepted protocols and advance state-of-the-art compliance inspections by contributing to ongoing
developmental efforts with centrifugation. Sediment samples were taken near the point of effluent
discharge, at a point 300 ft downstream from the discharge, and at a point 4500 ft upstream from the
point of discharge.
QA/OC EVALUATION - Laboratory procedures which were followed are described by Kirchmer
(1988) and Huntamer and Smith (1988). Matrix spike, matrix spike duplicate, and internal standard
recoveries were performed.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Users of these data should be reminded that they were
collected in the vicinity of a potential source of industrial pollutants.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES.
Andreasson, J. 1991. Class II Inspection of Weyerhaeuser, Longview Pulp and Paper Mill, April 16-18,
1990. Washington State Department of Ecology, Environmental Investigations and Laboratory Services
Program, Olympia, WA.
Huntamer and Smith. 1988. Ecology Lab Users Manual, Washington State Department of Ecology,
Olympia, WA.
Kirchmer, C. 1988. Quality Assurance Manual, Manchester Laboratory, Washington State Department
of Ecology, Manchester, WA.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACOE)
AREA OF STUDY: Willamette River-U.S. Moorings in Portland Harbor
SAMPLING MEDIA: Sediment samples (top 4 to 6.5 ft)
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: No
REFERENCE SOURCE: Britton 1989
CONTACT: Mark Siipola, USACOE, Portland, OR
PHONE: (503) 326-6463	FAX: N/A
SAMPLING PERIOD: October 1991
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 3 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Fifteen feet out from the berthing dock of the dredger
Essayons at RM 6.2 of the Willamette River.
TARGET ANALYTES: Dioxins/furans; metals (Ag, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Hg, Ni and Zn); phthalates;
pesticides; PCBs; PAHs; and phenols. Conventional analyses included TOC and grain size.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Dioxin/furan (EPA 8290); metals (EPA 3050), PAH, phthalates and
phenols (EPA 8270); TOC (Standard Methods 502); pesticides and PCBs (EPA 8080). All
results were reported on a dry weight basis.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: N/A
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: N/A
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude were not provided. Latitude and longitude were estimated for
entry along with the data provided in the database.
ABSTRACT
At the request of CENPP-OP, a sediment evaluation was conducted on sediments at the U.S. Moorings,
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Willamette River mile 6.2 in order to evaluate dredging by the Essayons to increase depth. Previous
studies suggested that sediments dredged from the U.S. Moorings should not be placed in unconfined in-
water sites due to high levels of heavy metals, pesticides, PCBs and PAHs. Three samples were taken
IS feet out from the berthing dock and ranged from 4-6.5 feet in length. A sample composite was
created using sub-samples of the sediment collected from stations M-l, M-2, and M-3 which was
analyzed for dioxins and furans. This sample was renamed M-4 for entry in the database.
OA IOC EVALUATION - Surrogates were added to the sediments analyzed for organic
compounds. Recoveries ranged from 62-121 percent. A reference sample was analyzed for metals and
the certified concentrations were in good agreement with the analytical results.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Because PAH compounds were present at relatively high
concentrations, the sediment extracts were diluted before quantification causing the detection limits to
increase by a factor of five. Users of these data should be reminded that they were collected in the
vicinity of potentially high levels of pollutants.
Only surface sediment analytical results have been entered in the database. The dioxin/furan analyses
were performed on a composite of surface sediments collected from three locations.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Britton, J. 1989. Results of 1989 U.S. Moorings sediment quality evaluation. U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers, Portland District, Portland, OR.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ)/National Institutes of
Health (NIH)
AREA OF STUDY: Willamette River-mainstem and Middle Fork
SAMPLING MEDIA: Surface sediment
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: Yes
REFERENCE SOURCE: Curtis et aJ. 1993
CONTACT: Lawrence R. Curtis, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR
PHONE: (503)737-1952	FAX: N/A
SAMPLING PERIOD: August 1990
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 6 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Middle Fork (RK 314), Harrisburg (RK 250), Halsey (RK
232), Corvallis (RK 206), Salem (RK 116) and Portland (RK 11).
TARGET ANALYTES: 2,3,7,8-TCDD and -TCDF
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Described in Curtis et al. (1993). All results were reported on a dry
weight basis.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Stainless-steel Eckman dredge (0.23m3)
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Each sediment sample consisted of a composite of three
to five grab samples. Three composite samples were collected from each location. Subsamples
were stored in glass jars at 4 ' C.
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude of sampling sites. Latitude and longitude were estimated for entry
along with the data provided in the database.
Cu93s - 5

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ABSTRACT
This study focused on determining the status and extent of contamination of TCDD and TCDF in the
Willamette River due to industrial discharges. Sampling sites were selected based upon possible industrial
pollution sources. A control site upstream from a bleached-kraft pulp mill discharge (RK 232), a site
below a municipal sewage outfall (RK 206), and a site adjacent to an industrial waste dump contaminated
with organochlorines (RK 11). Sampling and analysis included both fish and surface sediments. This
study also included measurement of the specific tissue content of cytochrome P-450 1A1 as a bio indicator
of contamination and assessed fish health by histopathology and clinical chemistry. Curtis et al.
(1993,1991) contain provide summaries of these additional data.
QA/OC EVALUATION - A description of quality control/quality assurance procedures is
provided in Curtis et al. (1993,1991).
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - The mean concentration of TCDD and TCDF in the
three composite samples collected from each station have been entered in the database as provided in
Curtis et al. (1993). Users of these data should be reminded that the sampling design targeted industrial
and municipal discharge areas.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES:
Curtis, L.R., H.M. Carpenter, R.M. Donohoe, D.E. Williams, O.R. Hedstrom, M.L. Deinzer, M.A.
Beilstein, E. Foster, and R. Gates. 1993. Sensitivity of cytochrome P450-1A1 induction in fish as a
biomarker for distribution of TCDD and TCDF in the Willamette River, Oregon. Environ. Sci. Technol.
27:2149-2157.
Curtis, L.R., H.M. Carpenter, R.R. Donahoe, M.L. Deinzer, M.A. Beilstein, D.E. Williams, and O.R.
Hedstrom. 1991. Phase I final report (draft). Toxicity and longitudinal distribution of persistent
organochlorines in the Willamette River. Prepared for Oregon Department of Environmental Quality,
Portland, OR. Oregon State University, Fisheries and Wildlife, Corvallis, OR.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: City of Portland, Bureau of Environmental Services (PortlandBES)
AREA OF STUDY: Willamette River-Columbia Slough
SAMPLING MEDIA: Surface sediment (top 5 cm)
POSITIONING SYSTEM: Station locations were plotted on field copies of aerial photos and located
using any identifying features not visible on maps or aerial photos and estimating distance from
left/right bank.
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: No
REFERENCE SOURCE: Dames and Moore 1991
CONTACT: Portland Bureau of Environmental Services, Portland, OR
PHONE: (505)796-7740	FAX: N/A
SAMPLING PERIOD: June 1991
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 15 locations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: The Slough was divided into 15 locations. Sampling
locations were selected in consultation with the City of Portland Bureau of Environmental
Services staff and Multnomah County Drainage District No. 1 staff based upon four criteria: (1)
proximity to suspected sources of sediment contamination such as CSOs, permitted discharges,
stormwater outfalls, etc., (2) stations which had been previously sampled, (3) coverage of a wide
area of the Slough and (4) access.
TARGET ANALYTES: 2,3,7,8-TCDD; volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds; PCBs;
pesticides; and metals. Conventional analyses included TOC, grain size, and percent moisture.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: 2,3,7,8-TCDD (EPA 8290); volatile organics (EPA 8240); semi-volatile
organics (EPA 8270), PCBs/chlorinated pesticides (EPA 8080); metals (EPA 6000/7000 series).
All data entered in the database were reported in dry weight. Some data were reported on a wet
weight basis, but these results were not entered in the database.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: 0.055 m* stainless-steel van Veen grab (Lower and Upper Slough),
0.025 m* stainless steel Ekman Dredge or by hand (Upper Slough).
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Jars were filled, wrapped in bubble pack, bagged and
sealed, placed in a cooler and shipped to the laboratory for analysis.
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude of sampling locations. Latitude and longitude were estimated for
entry along with the data provided in the database.
D&M91S - 7

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abstract
The Columbia Slough, an important recreational resource for the people of Portland, runs east to west
just north of Portland and extends for more than 18 miles. Several characterization studies have detected
elevated levels of contaminants in both sediments and in some fish and invertebrates. This Phase I study
intended to provide reconnaissance-level information on the slough sediments through more extensive
sampling thereby increasing the existing data base on slough sediments and providing additional analytical
tests and sediment bioassays. For the purposes of this report the upstream boundary of the slough is
Fairview Lake at NE 201st, a distance more than 18 miles from the mouth of the Slough.
QA/QC EVALUATION - The analytical field screening methodologies were conducted in
accordance with the Field Screening Methods Catalog, September, 1988, EPA/540/2-88/005. QA/QC
samples were analyzed during each type of analysis. Daily method blank, matrix spike, and replicates
were also analyzed.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - The sediment data have undergone review and
validation. Data tables are included as Appendix C of Dames & Moore (1991).
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES:
Dames & Moore. 1991. Columbia Slough sediment analysis and remediation project. Phase I report.
Volume 1. Prepared for City of Portland, Bureau of Environmental Services. Dames & Moore,
Portland, OR.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Washington State Department of Ecology (WDOE)
AREA OF STUDY: Lower Columbia River-Lonview
SAMPLING MEDIA: Surface sediment (top 2-3 cm)
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: No
REFERENCE SOURCE: Das 1991
CONTACT: Tapas Das, WDOE, Olympia, WA
PHONE: (206)407-6000	FAX: N/A
SAMPLING PERIOD: May 1991
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 3 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Samples were collected 30 ft downstream from the Longview
Fibre difftiser, 65 ft from the 310 ft long diffuser section, and 300 ft downstream of the diffuser.
TARGET ANALYTES: Dioxin and furans; volatile and semivolatile compounds; metals (Sb, As, Be,
Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Hg, Ni, Se, Ag, Ti, and Zn); organochlorine pesticides and PCBs. Conventional
analyses included TOC and grain size.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Dioxins/furans (EPA 8290); metals (EPA 200), pesticides/PCBs (EPA
8080). All results were reported on a dry weight basis.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: 0.1 ma van Veer grab sampler
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: All samples consisted of 3-5 grab samples. Composite
samples were placed on ice and delivered to the laboratory.
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude were not provided. Latitude and longitude were estimated for
entry along with the data provided in the database.
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ABSTRACT
The objectives of the Longview Fibre Company's Class n Inspection was to evaluate compliance with
the NPDES permit (NPDES Permit No. WA-000007-8), determine the process wastewater secondary
treatment removal efficiency, chemically characterize all effluents for priority pollutants and other
pollutants of concern, and evaluate the biological toxicity of Longview Fibre's 001 effluent and outfall
sediments with bioassays. The inspection also reviewed sampling methods and lab procedures to
determine adherence to accepted protocols and advance state-of-the-art compliance inspections by
contributing to ongoing developmental efforts with centrifugation.
QA/QC EVALUATION - Laboratory procedures which were followed are described by Kirchmer
(1988) and Huntamer and Smith (1988). Matrix spikes, matrix duplicates, and relative percent
differences of replicates were within QC limits.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Users of these data should be reminded that they were
collected in the vicinity of a potential source of industrial pollutants.
All data entered in die database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Das, T. 1991. Longview Fibre Company Class II Inspection. Washington State Department of Ecology,
Environments! Investigations and Laboratory Services Program, Olympia, WA.
Huntamer and Smith. 1988. Ecology Lab Users Manual, Washington State Department of Ecology,
Olympia, WA.
Kirchmer, C. 1988. Quality Assurance Manual. Manchester Laboratory, Washington State Department
of Ecology, Manchester, WA.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)
AREA OF STUDY: Columbia River - RM 146-149 above Bonneville Dam
SAMPLING MEDIA: Surface sediment
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: Yes
POSITIONING SYSTEM: Used physical landmarks (eg., dams) and river miles for sampling locations.
REFERENCE SOURCE: Davoli 1994
CONTACT: Dana Davoli, U.S. EPA, Seattle, WA
PHONE: (206)553-2135	FAX: N/A
SAMPLING PERIOD: August-September 1994
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 2 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: RM 146-149 (in the area of crayfish sampling)
TARGET ANALYTES: Dioxin/furans; pesticides; PCBs; semi-volatiles including PAHs; metals
(including Hg and As).
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Dioxins and furans (EPA Method 1613 A); pesticides and PCBs (EPA
8081); semi-volatiles (EPA 8270/GPC); PAHs (EPA 8270); metals (EPA 200.3 and 6010A); Hg
(EPA 7471A); As (200.3 and 7060A). Results are reported on a dry weight basis.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: N/A
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Samples consist of a composite of five grabs per station.
DATA GAPS: None
Alto* I'liAC-1 1'.
The Columbia River and segments of the Snake and Willamette Rivers are currently water quality limited
due to the presence of elevated levels of 2,3,7,8 - TCDD. As a result, U.S. EPA Region 10 established
a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) of 6 mg of 2,3,7,8-TCDD/day based upon state water quality
Dav94s- ll

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standards applicable to the Columbia River basin and the volume of water in the Columbia River. This
project is part of an effort to add to the data base on contaminant levels in aquatic organisms in the
Columbia River. The project focused on one or two sampling locations in a limited segment of the river.
Criteria for choosing these locations were: (1) sampling at fishing sites has been limited, (2) collecting
organisms that are consumed by Native Americans and others fishing in the Columbia River basin, (3)
collecting organisms that are of good indicators of contaminant levels in the river and of levels of
contaminants that may be ingested by aquatic and terrestrial predators. Sediment samples were taken
between RM 146-149 and consisted of five grabs per station.
OA/OC EVALUATION - Internal standards, laboratory duplicates, matrix spikes, and method
blanks were used for data evaluation.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - All data entered in the database were reviewed for data
entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Davoli, D. 29 August 1994. Personal Communication (data package sent to Steve Ellis, Tetra Tech,
Inc., Redmond, WA). Selected fish tissue contaminant data from the U.S. EPA Columbia River toxic
substances study. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10, Seattle, WA.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) / U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACOE)
AREA OF STUDY: Willamette River-RM 1.0 to 11.3
SAMPLING MEDIA: Sediment (top 10 cm to 1 meter depth)
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: Yes
REFERENCE SOURCE: Fuhrer 1989
CONTACT: N/A
PHONE: N/A	FAX: N/A
SAMPLING PERIOD: October 1983
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 10 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Willamette River RM 4.3 to 11.3
TARGET ANALYTES: Metals (Ba, Be, Fe, Mn, Cd, TL, Zn, As, Se, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni, Ag and Hg);
semi-volatile organic compounds; organochlorine pesticides and PCBs. Analyses included
conventional variables including TOC and grain size.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Metals [as described by Fishman and Friedman (1985)]; organics [as
described by Wershaw et al. (1983)].
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Gravity core sampler or ponar grab sampler
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Sediment samples were placed in butyrate acetate core
liners, stored at 4 *C. At least two core samples were taken from each site. Sediment samples
were seived prior to analysis. Therefore, the results provided indicate the concentration of the
reported constituents for a particular sediment size fraction. The sediment size fractions analyzed
are indicated in die database.
DATA GAPS: none
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ABSTRACT
In October of 1983, the USGS, in cooperation with the USACOE, collected bottom-material and water
samples from Portland Harbor to determine concentrations of trace metals and organic compounds in
elutriate-test filtrate and bottom material (Fuhrer 1989). These data were combined with data from earlier
harbor studies and were evaluated relative to chemical concentrations in local soils, spatial location within
the harbor, and U.S. EPA criteria for water quality. The objectives of the report were to: (1) describe
concentrations and spatial distribution of selected chemicals associated with Portland Harbor bottom
material, (2) compare estimated PCB loading from suspended sediment in Portland Harbor to PCB
loading from flow-land disposal and (3) describe the short term release of chemicals that occurs when
dredge-site bottom material from the Portland Harbor is mixed with disposal-site native water from the
Columbia River (elutriation testing).
OA/OC EVALUATION - No discussion of QA/QC procedures was provided in the report.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Users of these data should be cautioned that the results
provided are for specific grain size fractions. These fractions include the sediment grains that are less
than 2 mm, 63 microns, and 2 microns in diameter.
Data entered into the database includes all data from this study and data from additional studies that are
also summarized in the report. Users of these data are referred to Fuhrer (1989) for additional
information on the sources of these data.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Fishman, M.J. and L.C. Friedman. 1985. Methods for the determination of inorganic substances in
water and fluvial sediments: USGS, Techniques of Water-Resources Investigations, Book 5, Chapter Al.
Fuhrer, G.J. 1989. Quality of bottom material and elutriates in the Lower Willamette River, Portland
Harbor, Oregon. U.S. Geological Survey, Portland, OR. Water-Resources Investigation Report 89-4005.
Prepared in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
Wershaw, R.L., M.J. Fishman, R.R. Grabbe and L.E. Lowe. 1983. Methods for the determination of
organic substances in water and fluvial sediments: USGS, Techniques of Water-Resources Investigations,
Book 5, Chapter A3.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Washington State Department of Ecology (WDOE)
AREA OF STUDY: Lower Columbia River-Kalama
SAMPLING MEDIA: Surface sediment (top 2 cm)
POSITIONING SYSTEM: Stations were located and mapped by taking manual cross-bearings using
prominent natural physical or manmade structures.
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: No
REFERENCE SOURCE: Heffner 1989
CONTACT: Marc Heffner, WDOE, Olympia, WA
PHONE: (206)407-6773
SAMPLING PERIOD: May 1988
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 3 stations
FAX: (206)407-6715
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Station-1 (upstream)- 100 yards upstream of the Kalama
Chemical dock off a log storage area; Station-2 (outfall)- downstream of the Kalama Chemical
diffuser; Station-3 (downstream) - approximately 100 yards downstream of the Kalama Chemical
dock.
TARGET ANALYTES: Metals (Sb, As, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Hg, Ni, Se, Ag, Tl, and Zn); volatile and
semi-volatile organic compounds; organochlorine pesticides and Aroclor PCBs. Coventional
analyses such as grain size, total solids, and TOC were also reported.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Volatile organic compounds (EPA 8240); semi-volatile organic
compounds (EPA 8270); metals (EPA 200); pesticides/PCBs (EPA 8080). All results are
reported on dry weight basis.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: 0.1 mJ van Veen grab sampler.
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: The top 2 cm of sediment from each of two grab samples
collected from a station were composited for analysis. A bottle for analysis of volatile orgastics
was filled directly from the sampler; one-half from each of the two grabs. The samples were
stored on ice and shipped to the laboratory for analysis.
DATA GAPS: none
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ABSTRACT
The study was a Class II Inspection of Kalama Chemical, Inc., an organic chemical manufacturer
discharging both noncontact cooling water and treated process wastewater through a common outfall line
into the Columbia River (NPDES Permit No. WA-000028-1) (Heffner 1989). The objectives of the
Kalama Chemical Class n Inspection was to assess NPDES permit limit compliance with independent
sample collection and laboratory analysis, determine sample and analytical accuracy (by dividing sample
analysis between two laboratories), and to characterize discharge and receiving water sediment toxicity
with conventional parameter analysis, priority pollutant scans, and bioassays. The sediment pollutant data
are provided in the Appenix to the report, including the latitude and longitude of the sediment sampling
locations (Heffner 1989).
OA IOC EVALUATION - QA/QC information provided was limited to the results of method
blank analyses. Methylene chloride was detected in the sediment samples and in the method blank.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Users of these data should be reminded that they were
collected in the vicinity of a potential source of industrial pollutants.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Heffner, M. 1989. Kalama Chemical, Inc. Class II Inspection, May 1988. Washington State
Department of Ecology, Environmental Investigations and Laboratory Services Program, Olympia, WA.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Washington State Department of Ecology (WDOE)
AREA OF STUDY: Lower Columbia River-Longview
SAMPLING MEDIA: Surface sediment (top 2 cm)
POSITIONING SYSTEM: Stations were located and mapped by taking manual cross-bearings using
prominent natural physical or manmade structures.
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: No
REFERENCE SOURCE: Heffner 1991
CONTACT: Marc Heffner, WDOE, Olympia, WA
PHONE: (206)407-6773	FAX: (206)407-6715
SAMPLING PERIOD: February 1990
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 3 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: The sampling locations were near the Reynolds Metals
Company aluminum smelter's five point discharges. An upstream station located approximately
500 yards upstream of the primary outfall, a stations 10 yards downstream of the outfall diffuser,
and a station 300 feet downstream of the difftiser at the edge of the dilution zone.
TARGET ANALYTES: Metals (Sb, As, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Hg, Ni, Se, Ag, TI, Zn, AI); volatile and
semi-volatile organic compounds; organochlorine pesticides and PCBs. Results were also
provided for fluoride, cyanide, TOC, grain size, and percent solids.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: VolatUes (EPA 8240); semi-volatiles (EPA 8270); metals (EPA 200);
pesticides/PCBs (EPA 8080). All results are reported on a dry weight basis.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: 0.1 ma van Veen grab sampler.
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Samples were removed from the upper 2 cm of each grab
sample and composited for analysis. Volatile samples were collected from the first grab sample
collected from each station. Samples were immediately stored on ice at 4* C for transport to the
laboratory.
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude were not provided. Latitude and longitude were estimated for
entry along with the data provided in the database.
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ABSTRACT
The objectives of the Reynolds Metals Company's aluminum smelter Class II Inspection was to verify
effluent compliance with NPDES permits (NPDES Permit No. WA-00008-6 and Order 89-3), characterize
priority pollutants in the 002 discharge stream and in sediments near the outfall, and evaluate the effluent
and sediments for toxicity using a series of bioassays (Heffner 1991). The inspection also reviewed lab
procedures at the mill to determine adherence to accepted protocols and advance state-of-the-art
compliance inspections by contributing to ongoing developmental efforts with centrifugation. Samples
of sediments were taken at locations upstream and downstream from the facility and downstream
immediately in the vicinity of the outfall diffuser.
QA/QC EVALUATION - QA/QC information provided was limited to the results of transport
blank analyses. Methylene chloride, acetone, and bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate were detected in the sediment
samples and in the transport blank.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Users of these data should be reminded that they were
collected in the vicinity of a potential source of industrial pollutants.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES:
Heffner, M. 1991. Reynolds Metal Company Class n Inspection, February 1990. Washington State
Department of Ecology, Environmental Investigations and Laboratory Services Program, Olympia, WA.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)
AREA OF STUDY: Lake Couer d'Alene
SAMPLING MEDIA: Surface sediment (top 2 cm)
POSITIONING SYSTEM: Stations were located and mapped by taking manual cross-bearings using
prominent natural physical or manmade structures, or both.
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: No
REFERENCE SOURCE: Horowitz and Elrick 1993
CONTACT: Arthur J. Horowitz
PHONE: (404)903-9100	FAX: N/A
SAMPLING PERIOD: August 1989
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Greater than ISO locations were sampled. However,
unsummarized data were provided for only seven stations in Lake Coeur d'Alene. These stations
were identified as stations with elevated metals content.
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Lake Coeur d'Alene near Independence Pt. (CDA32), Wolf
Lodge Bay (CDA22A), Black Rock Bay (CDA93), Windy Bay (CDA100), Harlow Pt.
(CDA119), Harrison (CDA128), and Conkling Point (CDA155).
TARGET ANALYTES: Trace and major elements including: Ag, Al, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Ni,
Mn, Pb, Sb, Se, Ti and Zn. Sediment TOC content was also determined.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Sediments were ground to < 100 mesh and digested with strong add
(HF-HC104-aqua regia) at 200* C. All metals were analyzed by flame AAS except for As, Sb,
and Se which were determined by hydride generation AAS and mercury which was determined
using the cold vapor technique. Bulk sediments and specific grain size fractions were analyzed.
Only the bulk sediment analyses were entered in the database.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Stainless-steel Ekmann grab sampler.
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Subsamples were removed from the upper 2 cm of
sediment in each grab and immediately stored on ice at 4* C.
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude were not provided. Latitude and longitude were estimated for
entry along with the data provided in the database.
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ABSTRACT
The purpose of the USGS study was to determine the trace element concentrations, partitioning, and
distribution in the sediment column and to relate them to mining, and mining related discharge operations
that have occurred in the Coeur d'Alene (CDA) district since the 1880's. Surface bed sediment samples
were collected from Lake Coeur d'Alene, ID in August 1989 and bulk surface sediment chemistry data
for the most metal-enriched locations were provided in Table III and have been entered in the database
(Horowitz and Elrick 1993). Additional data provided on the metal content of individual grain size
fractions were also provided in Table III, but these data have not been entered in the database. The
results of analysis of subsurface sediment samples have also been reported (Horowitz et al. 1993), but
these data have not been entered in the database.
QA/OC EVALUATION - Precision and bias for the chemical analyses were monitored by
replicate analyses of selected samples and by the concomitant digestion and analysis of NIST reference
sediment and USGS rock and soil standards. Precision was usually better than ± 10 percent; no bias was
detected.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - When comparing these data to other similar sediment
trace metal data sets, the user should remember that these results are for the stations identified as those
with the highest metal content.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Horowitz, A J. and K.A. Elrick. 1993. Effect of mining and related activities on the sediment trace
element geochemistry of Lake Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, USA. Part I. Surface sediments. Hydrological
Processes 7:403-423.
Horowitz, A.J., K.A. Elrick, J.A. Robbins, and R.B. Cook. 1993. The effect of mining and related
activities on the sediment-trace element geochemistry of Lake Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. Part II: Subsurface
sediments. U.S. Geological Survey, Atlanta, GA. Open-File Report 93-656.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Washington Department of Ecology (WDOE)
AREA OF STUDY: Columbia River (Lake Roosevelt, Rufas Woods Lake) and Long Lake (Spokane
River)
SAMPLING MEDIA: Surface sediment (top 2 cm)
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: Yes
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
REFERENCE SOURCE: Johnson 1991
CONTACT: Art Johnson, WDOE, Olympia, WA
PHONE: (206)407-6715	FAX: (206)407-6670
SAMPLING PERIOD: June 1990
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 8 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Six sites in Lake Roosevelt between the international border
and Grand Coulee Dam, one site each in the Spokane River and Rufus Woods Lake.
TARGET ANALYTES: Dioxin ami furans; PCBs and pesticides; additional organic compounds;
mercury.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Analysis methods are as described in Call et al. (1991). All data are
reported on a dry weight basis.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: 0.1 m3 van Veen grab sampler
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Sample containers were 8 oz. amber glass with teflon lid-
liners. Samples were stored on ice in the field prior to shipping to the laboratory.
DATA GAPS: None
ABSTRACT
In June 1990, as part of Ecology's investigation of contaminants in Lake Roosevelt, a series of sediment
Jo91s- 21

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and bottom fish samples were collected from Lake Roosevelt and vicinity for analysis of PCDDs and
PCDFs. The impetus for this survey was the need to better understand the spatial distribution of these
compounds as a result of their discharge by the Celgar bleached kraft pulp mill in Castlegar, BC,
approximately 30 river miles above the international boundary. The results of these and other
PCDD/PCDF analyses on Lake Roosevelt samples have been reported elsewhere (Johnson et al. 1991a,b).
The report that serves as the source of the additional analytical data contains results of analysis of
sediment and bottom fish samples for 44 additional xenobiotic compounds (Johnson 1991).
QA/QC EVALUATION - QA procedures for these analyses were established by the EPA Duluth
laboratory (U.S. EPA 1990). All data included in the present report passed EPA's quality assurance
criteria.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - All data entered in the database were reviewed for data
entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Call, D.J. et al., 1991. Sediment Quality Evaluation in the Lower Fox River in South Green Bay of
Lake Michigan. Center for Lake Superior Environmental Studies, University of Wisconsin, Superior,
EPA Coop. Agreement No. CR-815232.
Johnson, A. 1991. Results of screen for EPA xenobiotics in sediment and bottom fish from Lake
Roosevelt (Columbia River). Memo to Mr. Carl Nuechterlein, Washington Department of Ecology,
Olympia, WA. 22 July 1991.
Johnson, A., D. Serder, and D. Norton. 1991a. Spatial Trends in TCDD/TCDF Concentrations and
Bottom Fish Collected in Lake Roosevelt (Columbia River), Washington Department of Ecology,
Environmental Investigations and Laboratory Services, Publication No. 91-29.
Johnson, A., D. Serder, and S. Magoon. 1991b. Polychlorinated dioxins and -furans in Lake Roosevelt
(Columbia River) sporthsh, 1990. Washington State Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA.Pub. No.
91-4.
U.S. EPA. 1990. Analytical procedures and quality assurance plan for determination of PCDD/PCDF
in fish. EPA Duluth ORD. EPA/600/3-90/022.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Washington Department of Ecology (WDOE)
AREA OF STUDY: Columbia River-Lake Wallula
SAMPLING MEDIA: Surface sediment (top 2 cm)
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: No
REFERENCE SOURCE: Johnson and Heffher 1993
CONTACT: Art Johnson, WDOE, Olympia, WA
PHONE: (206)407-6715
FAX: (206)407-6670
SAMPLING PERIOD: April 1992
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 4 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Lake Wallula area: Badger Island, Old Outfall, Port Kelley
and Hat Rock.
TARGET ANALYTES: Dioxins and furans; metals; PCBs; organochlorine pesticides; volatiles; semi-
volatile®.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Volatiles (EPA Method 8240); OC pesticides (EPA Method 8080); semi-
volatiles (EPA Method 8270); Dioxins and furans (EPA Method 8290); Priority metals (EPA
Method 200); Cr (EPA Method 7195); CN (ALPHA 45000-CN). All data are reported on a dry
weight basis.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Stainless steel Ponar grab sampler
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Sediment samples consisted of a homogenized composite
of 3 grab samples. Samples were shipped on ice to laboratory. Sample chain-of-custody
procedures were followed.
DATA GAPS: none
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ABSTRACT
The Department of Ecology (WDOE) conducted a Class n Inspection of the Boise Cascade Corp.
bleached kraft pulp and paper mill at Wallula, WA during April of 1992. The mill is located on the east
shore of the Columbia River (Lake Wallula) about 15 miles southeast of Pasco. It discharges an average
of 30 million gallons per day of secondary treated effluent and non-contact cooling water to the Columbia
via a mid-channel diffuser at RM 316 (NPDES permit No. WA 000369-7). The primary objectives of
this inspection were to: verify compliance with NPDES permit limits, assess potential for the effluent to
cause aquatic toxicity, evaluate efficiency of wastewater treatment, obtain data on dioxins and other toxics
in bleach plant effluents and in sludges and to survey the Columbia River sediment quality above and
below the mill.
OA/OC EVALUATION - Written QA reviews were prepared by the Manchester Laboratory for
all laboratory data contained in this report. QA measures included an assessment of sample holding
times, instrument calibration, method blanks, spike and surrogate recoveries and precision data. All
chemical data are considered acceptable for use with the qualifiers provided.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Data not meeting project guidelines for laboratory
precision or accuracy have been qualified where appropriate.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Johnson, A. and M. Heffiier. 1993. Class n inspection of the Boise Cascade Pulp & Paper Mill,
Wallula, Washington - April 1992. Washington State Department of Ecology, Environmental
Investigations and Laboratory Services Program, Olympia, WA.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Washington Department of Ecology
AREA OF STUDY: Lower Columbia River-Ilwaco to Vancouver
SAMPLING MEDIA: Surface sediment (top 2 cm)
POSITIONING SYSTEM: Targeted five ports along the lower Columbia River.
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: No
REFERENCE SOURCE: Johnson and Norton 1988
CONTACT: Art Johnson, WDOE, Olympia, WA
PHONE: (206)407-6715
SAMPLING PERIOD: September 22-24, 1987
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 10 locations
FAX: (206) 407-6670
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Reed Island, Camas Slough, Vancouver lower turning basin,
Vancouver below VANALCO, Kalama Chemical pier, below Longview Fibre, Longview below
Weyco, Longview below Reynolds, Coal Creek Slough, and Ilwaco boat basin.
TARGET ANALYTES: Seventeen metals, volatile and semi-volatile organics, organochlorine pesticides
and PCBs, cyanide, resin acids, grain size, and total organic carbon.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Metals and cyanide were analyzed by methods described in EPA
(1979). Volatile and semi-volatile organics, pesticides, and PCBs were analyzed by methods
described in EPA (1984). Resin acids, total organic carbon, and grain size were analyzed
according to methodology described in NCASI (1986), APHA (1985), and Holme and Mclntyre
(1971), respectively. All results are reported on a dry weight basis.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: 0.1 m3 van Veen grab sampler.
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Each sediment sample consisted of a composite of two
to three grab samples. Surface sediment samples (top 2 cm) were transferred to stainless steel
beakers and homogenized by stirring with stainless steel spoons. Samples for volatile organic
analysis were placed in 40 ml glass vials with no head space prior to homogenizing. All samples
were stored on ice.
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude of sampling locations were not provided. Latitude and longitude
were estimated for entry along with the data provided in the database.
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ABSTRACT
At the request of the Ecology Southwest Regional Office, the Toxics Investigations/Ground Water
Monitoring Section conducted a reconnaissance survey of sediment quality at five ports along the lower
Columbia River. Objectives of the survey were to characterize the occurrence of toxic chemicals in the
sediments and assess the potential for sediment toxicity. Two acute bioassays were performed to assess
sediment toxicity, Hyalella azteca and Daphnia pulex. The results of the bioassays are described in
Johnson and Norton (1988).
QA/QC EVALUATION - Quality assurance followed standard Manchester laboratory practice
described by Huntamer (1986). Method blanks, matrix spikes, duplicates, and surrogate compound spikes
(for organic analyses) were included in the quality assurance program. All data met EPA Contract
Laboratory Program criteria with the following exceptions: The fourteen day holding time for volatile
organics analysis was exceeded by seven days and the results for antimony and a resin acid (neoabietic
acid) are suspect.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Users of these data should bear in mind that the
sediments were collected in the vicinity of potential pollutant sources. Results for antimony and
neoabietic acid are suspect.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
American Public Health Association (APHA). 198S. Standards methods for the examination of water
and wastewater, 16th ed. Washington, D.C.
Holme, N.A. and A.D. Mclntyre. 1971. Methods for the study of marine benthos. IBP Handbook No.
16.
Huntamer, D. 1986. Department of Ecology, Laboratory User's Manual. Manchester Environmental
Laboratory, Manchester, WA.
Johnson, A. and D. Norton. 1988. Screening survey for chemical contaminants and toxicity in
sediments at five lower Columbia River ports September 22-24, 1987. Washington Department of
Ecology, Toxics Investigations/Ground Water Monitoring Section, Olympia, WA.
National Council for Air and Stream Improvement (NCASI). 1986. Procedures for the analysis of resin
and fatty acids in pulp mill effluents. Tech. Bull. SOI. New York, NY.
U.S. EPA. 1979. Methods for chemical analysis of water and wastes.
U.S. EPA. 1984. Guidelines establishing test procedures for the analysis of pollutants under the Clean
Water Act: Final rule and final interim rule and proposed rule. Federal Register 40 (209) 1-210.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Washington State Department of Ecology (WDOE)
AREA OF STUDY: Columbia River (Lake Roosevelt, Rufus Woods Lake) and Long Lake (Spokane
River)
SAMPLING MEDIA: Surface sediment (top 2 cm)
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: Yes
REFERENCE SOURCE: Johnson et al. 1991a
CONTACT: Art Johnson, WDOE, Olympia, WA
PHONE: (206)407-6670	FAX: (206)407-6715
SAMPUNG PERIOD: June 1990
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 8 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Six stations in Lake Roosevelt, one in the Spokane River
(Long Lake) and one in Rufus Woods Lake.
TARGET ANALYTES: Fifteen 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDDs and PCDFs. Octachlorodibenzodioxin and
octachlorodibenzofuran were not reported. Conventional analyses included sediment grain size
and total organic carbon content.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: PCDD/PCDF analysis followed methods described in EPA (1990) and
EPA et al. (1990) and was performed by the EPA Environmental Research Laboratory in Duluth,
MN. All data are reported on a dry weight basis.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: 0.1 mJ stainless-steel van Veen grab sampler.
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Each sediment sample consisted of a composite of three
grab samples. Surface sediment samples (top 2 cm) were transferred to stainless-steel beakers
and homogenized by stirring with stainless-steel spoons. Samples were stored on ice in the field.
DATA GAPS: none
Affffi'ivVLrT
In June 1990, as part of Ecology's investigation of contaminants in Lake Roosevelt, a series of sediment
and bottom fish samples were collected from Lake Roosevelt and vicinity for analysis of PCDDs and
Jo91as- 27

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PCDFs (Johnson et al. 1991a). The objective of the survey was to evaluate the transport and distribution
of these compounds throughout the lake. The sediments and bottom fish collected during this effort were
also analyzed for additional xenobiotic compounds. These data are reported in Johnson (1991). Other
Ecology reports describe results from analysis of Lake Roosevelt sportfish and suspended matter samples
for dioxins and furans (Johnson et al. 199lb,c).
OA/PC EVALUATION - QA procedures followed during PCDD/PCDF analysis were established
by EPA Duluth Laboratory (U.S. EPA 1990; U.S. EPA et al. 1990). All data included in this report
passed EPA's quality assurance criteria.
Duplicate samples were submitted to assess the precision of the analysis. Close agreement was reached
between duplicate sample analyses.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Data used for this report were from the lab data sheets
provided in the appendix of the report. Fish and sediment sample analysis results as a function of river
miles below the Canadian border (a large pulp and paper mill is located north of the border in Castlegar,
BC) were compared for assessment of spatial trends.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Johnson, A. 1991. Results of screen for EPA xenobiotics in sediment and bottom fish from Lake
Roosevelt (Columbia River). Memo to Mr. Carl Nuechterlein, Washington Department of Ecology,
Olympia, WA. 22 July 1991.
Johnson, A., D. Norton, and W. Yake. 1988. An assessment of metals contamination in Lake
Roosevelt. Washington State Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA.
Johnson, A., D. Serder, and D. Norton. 1991a. Spatial trends in TCDD/TCDF concentrations in
sediment and bottom fish collected in Lake Roosevelt (Columbia River). Washington Department of
Ecology, Environmental Investigations and Laboratory Services, Olympia, WA. Publication No. 91-29.
Johnson, A., D. Serder, and S. Magoon. 1991b. Polychlorinated dioxins and -furans in Lake Roosevelt
(Columbia River) sportfish, 1990. Washington State Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA.Pub. No.
91-4.
Johnson, A., D. Serder, and K. Seiders, 1991c. PCDDs/PCDFs in Columbia River suspended particulate
matter. Memorandum to C. Nuechterlein and S. Saunders. Washington State Department of Ecology,
Olympia, WA.
U.S. EPA. 1990. Analytical procedures and quality assurance plan for determination of PCDD/PCDF
in fish. EPA/600/3-90/022. U.S. EPA, Office of Research and Development, Duluth, MN.
U.S. EPA/New York Deptartment of Environmental Conservation/New York Deptartment of
Health/Occidental Chemical Corp. 1990. Analytical procedures and quality assurance plan for the
determination of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD) in fish, water and sediment. Vol.
m. In: Lake Ontario TCDD Bioaccumulation Study - Final Report.
Jo91as- 28

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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Washington Department of Ecology (WDOE)
AREA OF STUDY: Columbia River-U.S./Canadian border
SAMPLING MEDIA: Suspended particulate matter; (depth ranged from 1-4 feet)
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: No
REFERENCE SOURCE: Johnson et al. 1991c
CONTACT: Art Johnson, WDOE, Olympia, WA
PHONE: (206)407-6715	FAX: (206)407-6670
SAMPLING PERIOD: October 1990
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 1 station
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Northport
TARGET ANALYTES: 17 congeners of dioxins and ftirans.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Dioxins and furans (EPA Method 8290). Data are reported in dry
weight.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Two SediSamp System II continuous centriftiges (model 101IL).
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: The centriftiges were operated simultaneously over a period
of approximately 57 hours starting at 2315 hour on October 9 and ending at 0836 on October
12th. Flow rate was 1.2 gallons/minute with a total of 4.082 gallons of water passing through
the centrifuge.
DATA GAPS: none
ABSTRACT
Hie Department of Ecology (WDOE) conducted a sampling of suspended particulate matter (SPM) from
the Columbia River at Northport as part of an investigation into the impact on Lake Roosevelt of
Jo91cs• 29

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discharges from the Celgar bleached kraft pulp mill in Castlegar, B.C (Johnson et al. 1991). The
objectives of this study were to make the first determination of PCDD/PCDF concentrations in Columbia
River water, obtain a preliminary estimate of loads to Lake Roosevelt and provide data to the Water
Quality Program and EPA to assist in refinement of the Columbia River total maximum daily load for
2,3,7,8-TCDD. The field work was conducted with an extensive Environment Canada study of water
quality in the border reach of the Columbia River which included SPM samples for PCDDs/PCDFs.
OA/OC EVALUATION - QA measures included matrix spikes and centrifuge blanks.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Users of these data should be aware that they are from
only one sampling area.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES.'
Johnson, A., D. Serdar, and K. Seiders. 1991. PCDDs/PCDFs in Columbia River suspended particulate
matter. Memorandum to C. Neuchterlein and S. Saunders. Washington State Department of Ecology,
Olympia, WA.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Washington Department of Ecology (WDOE)
AREA OF STUDY: Columbia River (Lake Roosevelt, Canadian Border-Lower Arrow Lake)
SAMPLING MEDIA: Surface sediments (top 2-4 cm)
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: Yes
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
REFERENCE SOURCE: Johnson et al. 1988b
CONTACT: Art Johnson, WDOE, Olympia, WA
PHONE: (206) 407-6715	FAX: N/A
SAMPLING PERIOD: August 1986
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 17 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Lake Roosevelt area: collected as a series of grabs in a
longitudinal transect from the international border to Grand Coulee Dam; collected at the mouths
of the Colville, Kettle, Spokane and Sanpoil Rivers.
TARGET ANALYTES: Metals (Zn, Cu, Pb, As, Cd, Hg).
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Zn (EPA 289.2); Cu (EPA 220.2); Pb (EPA 239.2); As (EPA 206.2);
Cd (EPA 213.2) and Hg (in-house). All data are reported on a dry weight basis.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Van Veen grab sampler or Emery pipe dredge.
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Sample containers were glass jars with teflon lids and
were stored on ice prior to shipping to the laboratory.
DATA GAPS: none
ABSTRACT
In response to reports of elevated metals concentrations in fish and other environmental samples from
Lake Roosevelt, Ecology conducted a series of field surveys between May and September 1986 to
Jo88bs- 31

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determine the extent and significance of contamination (Johnson et al. 1988). Sediment, water samples
and a variety of fish species were used in this assessment. These data were also summarized in a journal
article (Johnson et al. 1990).
QA/OC EVALUATION - The accuracy and precision of the metals data were assessed by
analysis of standard reference materials, laboratory duplicates field replicates and field blanks. Results
were in good agreement with certified values.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - The data appear to be of good quality and have
undergone and have undergone review and validation.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Johnson, A., D. Norton, and B. Yake. 1988 (Revised 1989). An assessment of metals contamination
in Lake Roosevelt. Washington Department of Ecology, Toxics Investigations/Ground Water Monitoring
Section, Olympia, WA.
Johnson, A., D. Norton, B. Yake, and S. Twiss. 1990. Transboundary metal pollution of the Columbia
River (Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake). Bull. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 45:703-710.
Jo88bs - 32

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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Washington State Department of Ecology (WDOE)
AREA OF STUDY: Yakima River-RM 18 to 183
SAMPLING MEDIA: Surface sediment (top 2 cm)
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: Yes
REFERENCE SOURCE: Johnson et al. 1986
CONTACT: Art Johnson, WDOE, Olympia, WA
PHONE: (206)407-6715	FAX: (206) 407-6670
SAMPLING PERIOD: September 198S
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 13 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Along the Yakima River between Horn Rapids Dam and Cle
Elum - River Miles 18.0 to 183.1, respectively.
TARGET ANALYTES: Organochlorine pesticides, Aroclor PCBs, and Hg were the target analytes, but
only the frequently detected organochlorine compounds were reported. Mercury was detected
in all samples. Therefore, the database contains only p,p'-DDT, -DDE, -DDD and o,p'-DDT
results. Results for dieldrin, endosulfan, aldrin, total PCBs, and mercury are also included.
Conventional analyses included sediment grain size, percent dry weight and total organic carbon
content.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Organochlorine pesticides and PCBs (EPA 608, additional information
on analysis is provided in Appendix n of the document); Mercury (EPA 245.2 with
modifications). All results are reported on dry weight basis.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Stainless-steel Ponar grab used in slow-moving water; Stainless-steel
Emery pipe dredge in fast water.
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Each sediment sample was homogenized by stirring with
stainless-steel spoons, stored in containers, immediately placed on ice, and shipped to the
laboratory.
DATA GAPS: Latitude ami longitude of sampling locations was not provided in the report. Latitude
and longitude were estimated for entry along with the data provided in the database.
Jo86s • 33

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ABSTRACT
This study was conducted in 1985 by Ecology's Water Quality Investigations Section in response to
results from the Basic Water Monitoring Program (BWMP) which showed higher levels of DDT and
metabolites DDE and DDD in Yakima River fish than elsewhere in Washington State between 1979 and
1984. The study's objective was to evaluate the hazards to human health and aquatic life, identify sources
and determine if contamination was primarily due to recent illegal use or historical applications (Johnson
et al. 1986). Fish, water, and bed sediments were analyzed. Sediment samples were collected from the
Yakima man stem and from tributaries considered to have greatest potential for DDT contamination.
These data were also summarized and reported in a journal publication (Johnson et al. 1988).
OA/OC EVALUATION - QA/QC included interlaboratory comparisons between the
Ecology/EPA Manchester laboratory and California Analytical Laboratories (CAL), analysis of matrix
spikes and matrix spike duplicates, duplicate samples, and analysis of standard reference materials. CAL
was the contract laboratory responsible for the fish tissue organochlorine analyses. The Ecology/EPA
Manchester laboratory was responsible for the sediment organochlorine and mercury analyses and fish
tissue mercury analyses. Data provided by CAL were reviewed by the Manchester laboratory,
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - In general, sediment samples were collected in the
vicinity of suspected sources of DDT. All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry
errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Johnson, A., D. Norton, and W. Yake. 1986. Occurrence and significance of DDT compounds and
other contaminants in fish, water and sediment from the Yakima River Basin. Washington State
Department of Ecology, Olympia, WA.
Johnson, A., D. Norton, and B. Yake. 1988. Persistence of DDT in the Yakima River drainage,
Washington. Arch. Environ. Contain. Toxicol. 17:289-297.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
AREA OF STUDY: Lower Columbia River - Youngs Bay and river mouth
SAMPLING MEDIA: Surface sediment
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: No
REFERENCE SOURCE: NOAA 1991
CONTACT: Tom O'Connell, NS&T Program, NOAA, Rockville, MD
PHONE: (301)713-3028	FAX: N/A
SAMPUNG PERIOD: 1986-1989
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 3 locations.
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Lower Columbia River (Youngs Bay, North and South Jetty).
TARGET ANALYTES: Metals (Ag, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb, Sn, Zn); low and high molecular weight
PAHs; pesticides and PCBs.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Organic analysis as described in MacLeod et al, 1985 and Wade et al.,
1988. Metals analyzed by atomic absorption or X-ray fluorescence. All data are reported on a
dry weight basis.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: A specially constructed box corer or a standard Smith-Maclntyre
bottom grab.
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Three grabs or cores were obtained at each of three
stations at a site. Three composite samples were then made from each station for the various
analyses.
DATA GAPS: none
NOAA91S - 35

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ABSTRACT
NOAA's National Status and Trends Program has analyzed samples of surface sediments collected at
almost 300 coastal and estuary sites throughout the United States since 1984 (NOAA 1991). These
locations have also been sampled to determine contaminant levels in biota as part of NOAA's Mussel
Watch program (NOAA 1989). However, the tissue data have not been entered in tine database because
the tissue contaminant data were reported on a dry weight basis.
The program's objectives include defining the geographical distribution of contaminant concentrations in
tissues of marine organisms and in sediments and documenting biological responses to contamination.
Because this objective was to quantify contamination over general areas, sites were selected so that they
were not in close proximity to major sources of contamination. Sites in the Columbia River Basin include
the North and South Jetty and Youngs Bay.
QA/QC EVALUATION - QA measures include: interlaboratory comparisons of analytical results,
periodic QA workshops, development of Standard Reference Materials and Interim Reference Materials
for marine sediments and tissues and use of a standardized data base for QA data and information.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - All data entered in the database were reviewed for data
entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
MacLeod, W.D., Jr., D.W. Brown, A.S. Friedman, D.O. Burrows, 0. Maynes, R. Pearce, C.A. Wigren
and R.O. Bogar. 1985. Standard analytical procedures of the NOAA National Analytical Facility, 1985-
1986: Extractable toxic organic compounds, 2nd edition. NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS
F/NWC-92.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). 1991. National Status and Trends Program
for marine environmental quality. Progress Report: Second summary of data on chemical contaminants
in sediments from the National Status and Trends Program. U.S. Department of Commerce, National
Oceanic ami Atmospheric Administration, National Ocean Service, Office of Oceanography and Marine
Assessment, Rockville, MD. NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS OMA 59.
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). 1989. National Status and Trends Program
for marine environmental quality. Progress Report: A summary of data on tissue contamination from
the first three years (1986-1988) of the Mussel Watch Project. U.S. Department of Commerce, National
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Ocean Service, Office of Oceanography and Marine
Assessment, Rockville, MD. NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS OMA 49.
Wade, T.L., EX. Atlas, J.M. Brooks, M.C. Kennicuttn, R.O. Fox, J. Sericano, B. Oarcia-Romero and
D. Defreitas. 1988. NOAA Gulf of Mexico Status and Trends Program: Trace Organic Contaminant
Distribution in Sediments and Oysters. Estuaries 11:171-179.
NOAA91S - 36

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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ)
AREA OF STUDY: Willamette River and tributaries
SAMPLING MEDIA: Surface sediment
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: Yes
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
REFERENCE SOURCE: ODEQ 1994
CONTACT: Neil Mullane, ODEQ, Portland, OR
PHONE: (503)229-5284
SAMPLING PERIOD: 1988-1991
FAX: (503) 229-6124
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Approximately 26 locations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Willamette River (RMs 6, 7, 8, 14, 16, 18,27, 38,47, 48,
52, 74, 131, 145, 147 and 161). Tributary samples include: Columbia Slough, Johnson Creek,
Clackamas River, Tualatin River, Fanno Creek, Beaverton Creek, Yamhill River, South Yamhill
River, Conser Slough, Amazon Creek Drainage, McKenzie River, and the Middle Fork of the
Willamette River.
TARGET ANALYTES: Dioxins and furans; pesticides; PCBs; PAHs; Co-planar PCBs; metals.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Dioxins and furans (EPA Method 1613A); PAHs (EPA Method 8270);
Metals (EPA 600/4-82-020); PCBs and pesticides (EPA Method 8080). All data entered in the
database were reported on a wet weight basis. Limited data for dioxin and ftiran monitoring at
wood treatment facilities was reported on a dry weight basis in other sources.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Stainless steel Eckman dredge
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: There were three to five grabs taken per sampling
location. Grabs were placed in a stainless steel bucket, homogenized, placed in a sample jar and
put oo ice for shipping to the laboratory.
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude of sampling locations. Latitude and longitude were estimated for
entry in the database. Exact sampling dates were also unavailable for some analytical results.
Data are reported on a wet weight basis. No percent solids or moisture data were provided
which would allow conversion of the data to a dry weight reporting basis; units that are more
consistent with data reported from other sediment contaminant studies.
ODEQ94s - 37

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ABSTRACT
A study investigating the presence and effects of toxic pollutants in the Willamette River and selected
tributaries was conducted by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) in cooperation
with the U.S. EPA and Oregon State University (OSU). The studies stated objectives were to determine
if bioaccumulative toxic pollutants were present in sediment and fish tissue and to determine the possible
effects of the pollutants present on the aquatic resources using bioassays and other aquatic life toxicity
testing methods. This study was used as a screening survey to add to the existing toxic pollutant data
base for the Willamette River. The sampling sites selected were sampled in previous toxic monitoring
programs and were chosen to represent ambient levels, significant industrial and municipal sources, and
typical urban non-point source impacts.
The report prepared by ODEQ (1994) is a compilation and summary of data collected as part of their
Toxic Monitoring Program.
OA/OC EVALUATION - N/A
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Users of these data should be reminded that the data
were reported on a wet weight basis. All other data in the existing database is reported on a dry weight
basis. Caution should be exercised when comparing the ODEQ sediment contaminant data to other data
sets. Users of these data should also be reminded that the data provided are in the form of summary
tables for a number of sampling episodes that have occurred over the course of the program. Some
inconsistencies were noted between the data summarized in the ODEQ (1994) report and other sources
of this information (e.g. Curtis et al. 1993). For example, the dioxin and furan data for the Woodtreater
Study are reported by ODEQ (1994) on a wet weight basis, but another report that includes these data
(Tetra Tech 1992) provides the same results, but reported on a dry weight basis. The dioxin and furan
data for the Woodtreater Study were entered as they were reported in Tetra Tech (1992).
REFERENCES!
Curtis, L.R., H.M. Carpenter, R.M. Donohoe, D.E. Williams, O.R. Hedstrom, M.L. Deinzer, M.A.
Beilstein, E. Foster, and R. Gates. 1993. Sensitivity of cytochrome P45G-1A1 induction in fish as a
biomarker for distribution of TCDD and TCDF in the Willamette River, Oregon. Environ. Sci. Technol.
27:2149-2157.
Tetra Tech. 1992. Columbia River chlorinated dioxins/furans ambient water quality assessment report.
Prepared for U.S. EPA, Region 10, Water Monitoring and Analysis Section. Tetra Tech, Inc., Bellevue,
WA.
Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ). 1994. Willamette River toxics study -
1988/1991. Department of Environmental Quality, Water Quality Division, Portland, OR.
ODEQ94s - 38

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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: U.S. Geological Survey (National Water Quality Assessment Program)
AREA OF STUDY: Yakima River Basin
SAMPLING MEDIA: Bed-sediment (top 0.5 inch)
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: YES
REFERENCE SOURCE: Rinella et al. 1992
CONTACT: Frank Rinella, USGS, Portland, OR
PHONE: (503)231-2292	FAX: N/A
SAMPLING PERIOD: August-November 1987, August-September 1988,1989 (May, July, November),
October-November 1990.
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 58 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Waptus River, Cle Elum River, Jungle Creek, North Fork
Teanaway River, Teanaway River, Taneum Creek, South Fork Manastash Creek, Naneum Creek,
Cherry Creek, Yakima River, Umatanum Creek, Little Naches River, American River,
Rattlesnake Creek, Moxee Drain,Wide Hollow Creek, South Fork Ahtanum, Granger Drain,
Toppenish Creek, Satus Creek, Sulphur Creek, and Spring Creek.
TARGET ANALYTES: Organochlorine pesticide total PCBs, and semi-volatile organics.
Conventional analyses included particle size and inorganic and organic carbon.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: EPA Method 8080 (U.S. EPA 1986) for organochJorine compounds,
Wershaw et al. (1983,1987) modified for semi-volatile organics. Data are reported on a dry
weight basis.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Hand-held scoops and a Teflon-lined Ekman grab sampler.
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Samples were wet seived using stainless-steel sieves (2-
mm, 180-pm, and 62-jtm openings) and the resulting size classes were chilled with ice. All
sample containers were oven-baked and lids consisted of either Teflon or oven-baked aluminum
foil inserts. Samples from 26 samples were individually processed and samples from 32 stations
were composited into seven samples.
DATA GAPS: none
Ri92s - 39

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abstract
Contaminant data assessed in a variety of media (water, suspended and bed sediment, soil, and aquatic
biota) were presented for samples collected from the Yakima River Basin between 1987 and 1990. The
assessment was conducted as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water Quality Assessment
Program which was designed to describe the status and trends in the Nation's ground and surface water
resources. For this study; water, sediments, molluscs, aquatic plants, fish, and crayfish were analyzed
for organochlorine pesticides, total PCBs, and semi-volatile organics.
OA/OC EVALUATION - All data were reviewed for accuracy and precision. The review
included an evaluation of method blanks, matrix spikes and duplicates, and surrogate recoveries to assure
acceptable method performance.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Data have undergone extensive review and validation.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Rinella, J.F., S.W. McKenzie, J.K. Crawford, W.T. Foreman, P.M. Gates, G.J. Fuhrer, and M.L.
Janet. 1992. Surface-water-quality assessment of the Yakima River Basin, Washington; Pesticide and
other trace-organic-compound data for water, sediment, soil, and aquatic biota, 1987-91. U.S. Geological
Survey, Portland, OR. Open-File Report 92-644.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 1986. Test methods for evaluating solid waste (3rd ed.). U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Solid Waste and Emergency response, Washington, D.C.
Wershaw, R.L., M.J. Fishman, R.R. Grabbe, and L.E. Lowe (eds.). 1987. Methods for the
determination of organic substances in water and fluvial sediments. U.S. Geological Survey Techniques
of Water-Resources Investigations, Book 5, Chapter A3.
Wershaw, R.L., M.J. Fishman, R.R. Grabbe, and L.E. Lowe (eds.). 1983. Methods for the
determination of organic substances in water and fluvial sediments. U.S. Geological Survey Open-File
report 82-1004.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: U.S. Geological Survey (National Water Quality Assessment Program)
AREA OF STUDY: Yakima River Basin
SAMPLING MEDIA: Streambed sediment (top 1 to 2 cm)
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: No
REFERENCE SOURCE: Ryder et ai. 1992
CONTACT: Jeane Ryder, USGS, Denver, CO
PHONE: N/A
SAMPLING PERIOD: August-September, 1987
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 430 sites
FAX: N/A
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: All samples were collected within the Yakima River Basin.
Samples were collected randomly from 269 lower-order streambed sites, 75 samples were
collected from higher-order streambed sites, and the remaining samples represent storm water
urban drains, soils, and analysis of variance sampling.
TARGET ANALYTES: Forty-four metals, TOC, and grain size information.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Thirty-seven metals were analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma -
Atomic Emission Spectrometry and three metals were analyzed by Atomic Absorption
Spectrometry. Mercury was analyzed by cold vapor-Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. The
remaining metals were analyzed by titration and fluorimetry. Total carbon was determined by
combustion and infrared spectrometry and inorganic carbon waa determined by titration. Organic
carbon waa calculated from the difference between total and inorganic carbon. Analytical
methods are described in detail by Arbogast (1990). All results are repoted on dry weight basis.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Stainless steel Ekman and ponar dredges, hand-held or pole mounted
plastic scoops, stainless steel scoops.
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Five to seven subsamples were collected from lower-order
streams. The subsamples were sieved through a 2-mm stainless steel screen and transferred to
a Hubco aerobic sample bag. The samples were air dried before shipped to the laboratory. The
laboratory sieved the samples through a 63 micron sieve and (he <63 micron portion was
analyzed. Three to five subsamples from higher-order streams were composited in a plastic tub,
Ry92s- 41

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then wet sieved through a 63 micron stainless steel sieve. The sieved sediment/water slurry was
placed in a 2 liter glass jar and allowed to stand overnight. After settling, the water was
siphoned off and the settled fines placed in polypropylene containers and air dried.
DATA GAPS: None
ABSTRACT
The overall scope of the surface water NAWQA program includes organic and inorganic analyses of
media such as water, sediments, and biota. Inorganic data from this report will be used to relate the
occurrence and distribution of major and trace elements to geologic sources and land use activities. In
addition, the elements associated with streambed sediments are important contributors to water column
chemistry and will aid in modeling source-fate investigations. Forty-four metals were analyzed in
addition to the determination of total, inorganic, and organic carbon for samples collected from 430 sites
(Ryder etal. 1992).
QA/QC EVALUATION - Quality assurance was evaluated by including standard reference
materials, random split samples, and laboratory duplicates. Quality assessment procedures and results
for analytical precision and accuracy for the four NAWQA pilot studies are presented by Sanzolone and
Ryder (1989).
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Users of these data should be reminded that the results
are for specific grain size fractions which can not be compared directly to results from bulk sediment
analyses.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES!
Arbogast, B.F. 1990. Quality assurance manual for the Branch of Geochemistry. U.S. Geological
Survey. U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 90-668.
Ryder, J.L., R.F. Sanzolone, G.I. Fuhrer, and E.L. Mosier. 1992. Surface-water-quality assessment
of the Yakima River basin in Washington: Chemical analyses of major, minor, and trace elements in fine-
grained sediment. U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey. Open-File Report 92-520.
Sanzolone, R.F., and J.L. Ryder. 1989. Quality assessment program and results for the NAWQA
surface water pilot studies. U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 89-658.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS)
AREA OF STUDY: Columbia River - Grays Bay to Umatilla
SAMPLING MEDIA: Sediment
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: Yes
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
REFERENCE SOURCE: Schuler 1994
CONTACT: Carol Schuler, USFWS, Portland, OR
PHONE: (503)231-6179	FAX: N/A
SAMPLING PERIOD: May-September 1991
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 8 Stations.
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Baker Bay, Camas, Cathlamet Bay, Lewis and Clark,
Longview, Julia Butler, Ridgefield and Umatilla.
TARGET ANALYTES: Dioxins and furans; PCBs; organochlorine pesticides; Hg.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Dioxins/furans (EPA Method 1613). All results are reported on a dry
weight basis.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: N/A
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: N/A
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude of sampling locations. Type of analytical techniques used for
chemical analysis. Sampling protocols and QA/QC procedures were not described.
ABSTRACT
The Columbia River Estuary is exposed to a variety of contaminants through municipal and Industrial
permitted discharges, urban and industrial nonpoint pollution, accidental spills of oil and hazardous
materials, agricultural runoff, and accelerated population growth (Schuler 1992). This study intended to
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provide information needed to determine if hazardous concentrations of organic pollutants are
accumulating in fish and wildlife from the Columbia River and its National Wildlife Refuges. Sediment,
aquatic invertebrates, fish, and bird egg samples were collected for this study. Preliminary study results
were reported in Scbuler (1992).
The data were provided as raw laboratory data sheets and hardcopies of summary spreadsheets. The data
were entered from the summary spreadsheets that were provided by Carol Schuler of the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service (Schuler 1994).
QA/QC EVALUATION - N/A.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - All data entered in the database were reviewed for data
entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Schuler, C. 1992. Organochlorine contaminants in aquatic resources from the Columbia River.
Progress report. Fiscal year 1992. U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service, Portland
Field Office, Portland, OR.
Schuler, C. 8 September 1994. Personal Communication (data sent to Ms. Kimberly Stark, Tetra Tech,
Redmond, WA). U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Portland, OR.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
AREA OF STUDY: Lower Columbia River, Willamette River
SAMPLING MEDIA: Surface and sub-surface sediment (top 2 cm to several feet)
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: No
REFERENCE SOURCE: Stockton 1991
CONTACT: James Britton, ACOE, Portland, OR
PHONE: (503)326-6471	FAX: N/A
SAMPLING PERIOD: 1980 through 1990
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 170
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Astoria, Baker Bay, Cathlamet Bay, Chinook, Columbia
River, Ilwaco, Skipanon, Tongue Point, Elochoman Slough, Oregon Slough, St. Helens,
Willamette River, Wind River.
TARGET ANALYTES: Grain size, total organic carbon, ten metals, pesticides, total PCBs, total PAHs,
oil and grease, and ammonia. All results are reported on a dry weight basis.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: The report is a printed copy of the Army Corps of Engineers'
Columbia River sediment database as of May 1991. Information regarding analytical techniques
was not available.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Information on equipment type was not available.
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Sample handling and processing information was not
available.
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude of sampling locations, analytical methods, sampling gear, sample
handling and processing were not available. However, information for specific sampling projects
is available from the Portland District Corps of Engineers. Latitude and longitude were estimated
for entry in the database.
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ABSTRACT
The report is a compilation of contaminant data entered in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland
District's Columbia River sediment database as of May 1991 (Stockton 1991). The database is separated
into two sections containing estuarine and riverine data. The riverine database includes data from the
Willamette River up to the Broadway Bridge area in Portland, as well as sampling stations as far
upstream as Wind River. The estuarine database includes sampling stations in the lower reaches of the
Columbia River. Sampling sites contained in the database are from Federal dredging projects. Data are
provided for grain size, total organic carbon, metals, pesticides, total PCBs, and total PAHs. Samples
include surface sediments and sediments collected by coring, which may include sub-surface sediments.
OA/OC EVALUATION - Information relevant to quality assurance/quality control was not
available. However, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has a QA/QC program for review and evaluation
of contaminant data. Information regarding the quality of specific data may be obtained by contacting
the Portland District Corps of Engineers.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Users of these data should be cautioned that not all of
the database entries are for surface sediments. Some analyses were conducted on sediments collected with
coring devices. Therefore, some samples include sub-surface sediments collected from a few to several
feet below the sediment surface.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES!
Stockton, S.L. 24 May 1991. Personal Communication (transmittal of riverine database output to Mr.
Bruce Bennet, Tetra Tech, Inc., Bellevue, WA). Chief, Planning and Engineering Division, U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers, Portland, OR.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACOE)
AREA OF STUDY: Lower Columbia River
SAMPLING MEDIA: Surface sediment
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: No
REFERENCE SOURCE: Siipola 1994
CONTACT: Mark Siipola, USACOE, Portland, OR.
PHONE: (503)326-6463	FAX: N/A
SAMPLING PERIOD: May 1990, September 1991
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 16 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Columbia River between RM 149-181 (Cascade Locks to
Mayer State Park); lower Columbia River (Camas, St. Helens, Longview and Wauna).
TARGET ANALYTES: Dioxins and furans; PAHs; PCBs; metals.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Dioxins and furans (EPA Method 8290). All results are reported on
a dry weight basis.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Benthos gravity corer
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: N/A
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude of sampling locations. Latitude and longitude were estimated for
entry along with the data provided in the database.
ABSTRACT
These data represent the USACOE, Portland District's sediment quality data with regard to dioxins and
furans in sediment samples from areas that have already been dredged and areas that may potentially be
Si94s - 47

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dredged (Siipola 1994). Sample locations include areas where there is potential dioxin and furan sediment
contamination and/or where previous sampling has indicated the presence of similar hydrophobic organic
compounds (PCBs, PAHs, pesticides) or dioxin/furans. PAHs, PCBs, pesticides and metal analysis
results are reported in Stockton (1992).
OA/QC EVALUATION - Laboratory method blanks and internal standards were prepared and
processed along with each extraction batch as part of the QA/QC procedure.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Users of these data should be reminded that targeted
sample areas consisted of areas where dioxins and furans were expected to be present.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Siipola, M.D. 17 August 1994. Personal Communication (data package containing sediment dioxin data
submitted to Mr. Curtis DeGasperi, Tetra Tech, Inc., Redmond, WA). U.S. Army Corps of Engineers,
Portland District, Portland, OR. Data for 1989 U.S. Government Moorings study • Willamette River.
Analyses of Columbia River/Willamette River sediment samples - 1990 reconnaissance study. Various
locations in Bonneville Pool -1991. Mouth of Columbia River -1992.
Stockton, S.L. 29 January 1992. Personal Communication (transmittal of Columbia River and
Willamette River sediment dioxin/furan data). Chief, Planning and Engineering Division, U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers, Portland, OR.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ)
AREA OF STUDY: Lower Columbia River-St. Helens
SAMPLING MEDIA: Surface sediment (top 2 cm)
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: Yes
POSITIONING SYSTEM: Trimble Navigation GPS
REFERENCE SOURCE: Tetra Tech 1992a
CONTACT: Steve Ellis, Tetra Tech, Inc., Redmond, WA
PHONE: (206)883-1912	FAX: (206)881-6997
SAMPLING PERIOD: September 1991
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 5 sites
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Multnomah Channel, FUhtrap Shoal, St. Helens Marina,
Warrior Rock, and Columbia City
TARGET ANALYTES: Seventeen dioxin and furan congeners. Conventional analyses included particle
size, total solids, and total organic carbon (TOC),
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Dioxins and forans (EPA Method 1613A), TOC (modified EPA
Method 415.1), total solids (EPA Method 160.3.), particle size (Puget Sound Estuary Program
Protocols). All results are reported on a dry weight basis.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: 0.06 ma van Veen grab sampler.
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Each sediment sample consisted of a composite of at least
four grab samples. Surface sediments (top 2 cm) were transferred to a stainless steel bowl and
homogenized with a stainless steel spatula. The samples were placed in jars and stored on toe
except for the samples designated for TOC analysis. These samples were stored on dry ice.
DATA GAPS: none
Tt92as-49

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ABSTRACT
Monitoring of sediment and crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) was conducted in order to satisfy
monitoring requirements set forth in the City of St. Helens National Discharge Elimination System
(NPDES) Permit (Tetra Tech 1992). Samples were collected from five sites to evaluate the accumulation
of dioxins and furans in sediment and crayfish. Sediment and crayfish sampling primarily focused on
locations downriver from the location of the outfall pipe.
Sediment samples were collected and analyzed for seventeen dioxin/furan congeners, particle size
distribution, total solids, and total organic carbon. All sediment data are presented on dry weight basis
and TOC-normalized values are also provided in the report. Sampling station latitude and longitude were
recorded from geographic coordinates provided by a Trimble Navigation Global Positioning System
receiver.
OA/OC EVALUATION - Data were reviewed by Dr. William Luksemburg of Alta Analytical
Laboratory. The review included all ion chromatograms, initial and continuing calibrations, column
performance check mixes, calculations of positive values and detection limits, ion abundance ratios for
internal/surrogate/recovery standards and positive natives, matrix spikes and duplicates, and calculation
of lipid content. No data were qualified based upon review of QA/QC data. Method blank, laboratory
control sample, internal standard, and detection limit data were included in the report.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Comparisons between sediment and crayfish tissue
contaminant data collected for this study are possible as the sampling locations for crayfish correspond
to sediment sampling sites.
All data entered in die database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Tetra Tech. 1992. City of St. Helens discharge monitoring report: Accumulation of dioxins and furans
in sediment and biota. Prepared for City of St. Helens, St. Helens, OR. Tetra Tech, Inc., Bellevue,
WA.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ)
AREA OF STUDY: Lower Columbia River-Wauna
SAMPLING MEDIA: Surface sediment (top 2 cm)
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: Yes
POSITIONING SYSTEM: Trimble Navigation GPS
REFERENCE SOURCE: Tetra Tech 1992c
CONTACT: Steve Ellis, Tetra Tech, Inc., Redmond, WA
PHONE: (206) 883-1912	FAX: (206) 881-6997
SAMPLING PERIOD: September 1991
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 5 sites
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Wallace Island, Westport Slough, Downriver from mill,
Bradwood, Clifton Channel
TARGET ANALYTES: Seventeen dioxin and furan congeners. Conventional analyses included particle
size, total solids, and total organic carbon (TOC).
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Dioxins and ftirans (EPA Method 1613A), TOC (modified EPA
Method 413.1), total solids (EPA Method 160.3.), particle size (Puget Sound Estuary Program
Protocols). All results are reported on a dry weight basis.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: 0.06 m3 van Vera grab sampler.
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Each sediment sample consisted of a composite of at least
four grab samples. Surface sediments (top 2 cm) were transferred to a stainless steel bowl and
homogenized with a stainless steel spatula. The samples were placed in jars and stored on ice
except for the samples designated for TOC analysis. These samples were stored on dry ice.
DATA GAPS: none
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ABSTRACT
Monitoring of sediment and crayfish (Pacifastacus leniusculus) was conducted in order to satisfy
monitoring requirements set forth in the James River Wauna Mill's National Discharge Elimination
System (NPDES) Permit (Tetra Tech 1992). Samples were collected from five sites to evaluate the
accumulation of dioxins and furans in sediment and crayfish. Sediment and crayfish sampling primarily
focused on locations downriver from the location of the outfall pipe.
Sediment samples were collected and analyzed for seventeen dioxin/fiiran congeners, particle size
distribution, total solids, and total organic carbon. Data are presented on a dry weight basis and TOC-
normalized values are also provided in the report. Sampling station latitude and longitude were recorded
from geographic coordinates provided by a Trimble Navigation Global Positioning System receiver.
QA/QC EVALUATION - Data were reviewed by Dr. William Luksemburg of Alta Analytical
Laboratory. The review included all ion chromatograms, initial and continuing calibrations, column
performance check mixes, calculations of positive values and detection limits, ion abundance ratios for
internal/surrogate/recovery standards and positive natives, matrix spikes and duplicates, and calculation
of lipid content. No data were qualified based upon review of QA/QC data. Method blank, laboratory
control sample, internal standard, and detection limit data were included in the report.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Comparisons between sediment and crayfish tissue
contaminant data collected for this study are possible as the sampling locations for crayfish correspond
to sediment sampling sites.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Tetra Tech. 1992. James River Wauna Mill discharge monitoring report: Accumulation of dioxins and
furans in sediment and biota. Prepared for James River Corporation, Wauna, OR. Tetra Tech, Inc.,
Bellevue, WA.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Lower Columbia River Bi-State Program (Bi-State)
AREA OF STUDY: Lower Columbia River - Bonneville Dam to river mouth
SAMPLING MEDIA: Surface sediment (top 2 cm)
POSITIONING SYSTEM: Magnavox MX 2000 GPS Navigator System
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: Yes
REFERENCE SOURCE: Tetra Tech 1993
CONTACT: Steve Ellis, Tetra Tech, Inc., Redmond, WA
PHONE: (206)883-1912	FAX: (206)881-6997
SAMPLING PERIOD: September-October 1991
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 54 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Mainstem and backwater areas of die lower Columbia
River—River Mile 0 to 147, the mouth of the Columbia River to Bonneville Dam.
TARGET ANALYTES: Seventeen dioxin and furan congeners, 7 PCB Aroclors, 16 metals and trace
elements (Al, Sb, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Hg, Ni, Se, Ag, Tl, Zn), cyanide, 52 semi-
volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) including 11 phenolic compounds and 15 polynuclear
aromatic hydrocarbons, 28 pesticides, 7 PCB Aroclors, 3 butyltin compounds including
tributyltin, and 7 long-lived radionuclides. Conventional analyses included sediment grain size
and total organic carbon content. All data are reported on a dry weight basis.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Dioxins and ftirans (EPA Method 1613 with modifications); PCB
Aroclors (EPA Method 8080); metals and trace elements [Ag, Al, Ba, Cu, Cr, Fe, Ni, Sb, Tl,
and Zn by ICP (EPA Method 200.7); As (EPA 7060), Be (EPA 7091), Cd (EPA 7131), Pb (EPA
7421), and Se (EPA 7740) by GFAA; Hg (EPA 7471) by CVAA)]; cyanide [colorimetry (EPA
9010)]; SVOCs (EPA 8270); pesticides and PCBs (EPA 8080), Butyltins (GC/MS with SIM);
radionuclides by alpha spectroscopy and gamma counting.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: 0.1 m* stainless steel van Veen grab, Magnavox MX 2000 Global
Positioning System (GPS)
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Sediment samples consisted of a homogenized composite
of at least 3 grab samples. Samples were shipped on ice to laboratory. Sample chain-of-custody
proceedures were followed.
DATA GAPS: none
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ABSTRACT
Tetra Ted), Inc., was contracted by the Lower Columbia River Bi-State Program to conduct a
reconnaissance level survey of water, sediment, and biota (fish and crayfish) contaminant levels in these
media of the lower Columbia River below Bonneville Dam (Tetra Tech 1993). Sediment and fish tissue
sampling (including crayfish) focused on locations in the mainstem and backwater areas of the lower
river. Sediment sampling was conducted using a stainless steel 0.1 m3 van Veen grab deployed by winch
from a vessel. Station latitude and longitude were recorded from geographic coordinates provided by a
Magnavox MX 2000 Global Positioning System (GPS) Navigator System receiver onboard the vessel.
The GPS locational information was not corrected for the U.S. Department of Defense's Selective
Availability, and therefore the GPS latitudes and longitudes provided are accurate to approximately ± 100
m.
QA/OC EVALUATION - The sediment data submitted by the laboratories were reviewed and
validated by Tetra Tech using guidance provided in the Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QA/QC) Plan
developed for this project and guidance provided by U.S. EPA (1988a,b). A data validation report was
prepared as part of the final report and is bound separately as Volume 2: Appendix A, Data Validation
Reports. The QA/QC procedures included sampling and analysis of field and laboratory replicates and
matrix spike/matrix spike duplicate (MS/MSD) analyses on a minimum of S percent of the samples that
were collected. Some data were qualified based on review of laboratory replicate and MS/MSD results,
and additional instrument calibration and performance data provided by the laboratories.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Although comparison between sediment and fish tissue
contaminant data collected in this program is possible, the sampling area for fish at a particular station
was generally greater than the area designated as the sediment sampling station. Furthermore, with the
exception of crayfish, it is not known to what extent the fish species collected reside in the vicinity of
the sampling station. The original data may be found in Volume 3: Data Tables. Appendices B, C, D,
&E. of Tetra Tech (1993).
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Tetra Tech. 1993. Reconnaissance Survey of the lower Columbia River. Task 6: Reconnaissance
report. Volumes 1, 2, and 3. Prepared for Columbia River Bi-State Program. Tetra Tech, Inc.,
Redmond, WA.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 1988a. Laboratory data validation functional guidelines for
evaluating inorganics analyses. U.S. EPA/Hazardous Site Evaluation Division, Washington, D.C.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 1988b. Laboratory data validation functional guidelines for
evaluating organics analyses. U.S. EPA/Hazardous Site Evaluation Division, Washington, D.C.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Lower Columbia River Bi-State Program (Bi-State)
AREA OF STUDY: Lower Columbia River - Bonneville Dam to river mouth
SAMPLING MEDIA: Surface sediment (top 2 cm)
POSITIONING SYSTEM: Magnavox MX 2000 GPS Navigator System
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: Yes
REFERENCE SOURCE: Tetra Tech 1994
CONTACT: Steve Ellis, Tetra Tech, Inc., Redmond, WA
PHONE: (206) 883-1912	FAX: (206) 881-6997
SAMPLING PERIOD: June-July 1993
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 15 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Backwater areas of the lower Columbia River—River Mile
14 to 141, Youngs Bay to Skamania Landing.
TARGET ANALYTES: Seventeen dioxin and furan congeners, 7 PCB Aroclors, 16 metals and trace
elements (Al, Sb, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Hg, Ni, Se, Ag, H, Zn), cyanide, 59 semi-
volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) including 11 phenolic compounds and 17 polynuclear
aromatic hydrocarbons, 26 pesticides, 6 PCB Aroclors, 3 butyltin compounds including
tributyltin, and 8 long-lived radionuclides. Conventional analyses included sediment grain size
and total organic carbon content. All data are reported on a dry weight basis.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Dioxins and furans (EPA Method 1613 with modifications); PCB
Aroclors (EPA Method 8080); metals and trace elements [Ag, Al, Ba, Be, Cu, Cr, Fe, Ni, Ti,
and Zn by ICP (EPA Method 200.7); Sb (EPA 204.2), As (EPA 206.2), Cd (EPA 213.2), Pb
(EPA 239.2), and Se (EPA 270.2) by GFAA; Hg (EPA 245.2) by CVAA)]; cyanide (SM 4500-
CN E); SVOCs (EPA 8270) with SIM for PAH analysis; pesticides and PCBs (EPA 8080);
butyltins (GC/MS with SIM); radionuclides by alpha spectroscopy and gamma counting.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: 0.02 m3 stainless-steel Petite-Ponar grab sampler, Magnavox MX
2000 Global Positioning System (GPS)
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Sediment samples consisted of a homogenized composite
of the top 2 cm of sediment from at least 3 grab samples. Three composite samples were
collected from each station. Samples were shipped on ice to laboratory. Sample chain-of-custody
proceedures were followed.
Rfv\ It
Tt94s - 55

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DATA GAPS: none
ABSTRACT
Tetra Tech, Inc., was contracted by the Lower Columbia River Bi-State Program to conduct a
supplemental reconnaissance survey of sediment and biota (fish and crayfish) contaminant levels in
backwater areas of the lower Columbia River (Tetra Tech 1994). These samples were intended to expand
the data base of the original reconnaissance survey reported in Tetra Tech (1993). Station latitude and
longitude were recorded from geographic coordinates provided by a Magnavox MX 2000 Global
Positioning System (GPS) Navigator System receiver. The GPS locational information was not corrected
for the U.S. Department of Defense's Selective Availability, and therefore the GPS latitudes and
longitudes provided are accurate to approximately ± 100 m.
OA/QC EVALUATION - The sediment data submitted by the laboratories were reviewed and
validated by Tetra Tech using guidance provided in the Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QA/QQ Plan
developed for this project and guidance provided by U.S. EPA (1988a,b). A data validation report was
prepared as part of the final report and is bound separately as Volume 2: Appendix A, Data Validation
Reports. Hie QA/QC procedures included sampling and analysis of field and laboratory replicates and
matrix spike/matrix spike duplicate (MS/MSD) analyses on a minimum of 5 percent of the samples that
were collected. Some data were qualified based on review of laboratory replicate and MS/MSD results,
and instrument calibration and performance data provided by the laboratories.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - The field replicated data allow for statistical
comparisons. Although comparison between sediment and fish tissue contaminant data collected in this
program is possible, the sampling area for fish at a particular station was generally greater than the area
designated as the sediment sampling station. Furthermore, with the exception of crayfish, it is not known
to what extent the fish species collected reside in the vicinity of the sampling station. The original data
may be found in Volume 3: Data Tables - Appendices B, C, D, & E of Tetra Tech (1994).
All data entered in die database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Tetra Tech. 1993. Reconnaissance Survey of die lower Columbia River. Task 6: Reconnaissance
report. Volumes 1, 2, and 3. Prepared for Columbia River Bi-State Program. Tetra Tech, Inc.,
Redmond, WA.
Tetra Tech. 1994. Draft report. Lower Columbia River Backwater Reconnaissance Survey. Volumes
1, 2, and 3. Prepared for Lower Columbia River Bi-State Committee. Tetra Tech, Inc., Redmond, WA.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 1988a. Laboratory data validation functional guidelines for
evaluating inorganics analyses. U.S. EPA/Hazardous Site Evaluation Division, Washington, D.C.
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 1988b. Laboratory data validation functional guidelines for
evaluating organics analyses. U.S. EPA/Hazardous Site Evaluation Division, Washington, D.C.
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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACOE)
AREA OF STUDY: Lower Columbia River - Old mouth of Cowlitz River
SAMPLING MEDIA: Surface and sub-surface sediment
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: No
REFERENCE SOURCE: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 1991
CONTACT: Mark Siipola, USACOE, Portland, OR
PHONE: (503)326-6463	FAX: N/A
SAMPLING PERIOD: January 1991
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 5 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Old mouth of the Cowlitz River
TARGET ANALYTES: Nine metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols, organochlorine
pesticides, PCBs, grain size, and volatile solids. All data are reported on a dry weight basis.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: Samples were analyzed following EPA methodology for all chemical
analyses. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers methodology was followed for physical parameters.
All results are reported on a dry weight basis.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Vibra-core sampler
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Subsamples of sample cores were transferred to glass jars
lined with teflon lids. Samples were cold stored in an ice chest.
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude of sampling locations were not provided. Latitude and longitude
were estimated for entry along with the data provided in the database.
ABSTRACT
The old mouth of die Cowlitz River provides a channel from deep water in the Columbia River to old
river mile 0.7 of the Cowlitz River. Hie site has been dredged in the past to maintain the channel. The
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objective of the study was to evaluate the sediments for chemical contaminants and physical parameters
which would prohibit unconfined in-water disposal. Analytical testing for metals, polynuclear aromatic
hydrocarbons, phenols, pesticides, and PCBs were conducted on four sediment samples collected in
January 1991. Six samples were analyzed for grain size and volatile solids.
OA/OC EVALUATION - Laboratory quality control consisted of method blanks, duplicate
analyses, matrix spikes, and surrogate spike recoveries. All QC data were within acceptable limits with
the exception of matrix spike recoveries for three pesticides. The recoveries were outside of the upper
control limits; however, as these compounds were not detected in the samples, it was determined that the
data were not adversely impacted by the high recoveries.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Data presented for this report were from the laboratory
data sheets. Results were compared to CENPP Tiered Testing Guidelines and requirements of Section
404 of the Clean Water Act for acceptability for in-water disposal.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. 1991. Old mouth of the Cowlitz River sediment evaluation.
Unpublished data. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, Troutdale, OR.
USACE91s - 58

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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: James River Corporation
AREA OF STUDY: Lower Columbia River - Camas
SAMPLING MEDIA: Surface sediment
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: No
REFERENCE SOURCE: Young 1988
CONTACT: Carol Whittaker, James River Mill, Camas, WA
PHONE: (206)834-8390	FAX: N/A
SAMPLING PERIOD: September 1988
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 3 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Parker's Landing (RM 121), Camas ASB Outfall, 300 ft.
downstream (RM 120), and Hassalo Rock (RM 117).
TARGET ANALYTES: Metals (Sb, As, Ba, Be, B, Cd, Ca, Cr, Cu, Pb, Mn, Hg, Ni, Se, Ag, H, Sn,
Zn); organics (PCBs, pesticides, semi-volatiles). All data are reported on a dry weight basis.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: N/A
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Stainless steel bucket and diver
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Procedures followed those in the 16th Ed. of Standards
Methods and corresponding EPA publication.
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude were not provided. Latitude and longitude were estimated for
entry along with the data provided in the database.
ABSTRACT
The Puget Sound Water Quality Authority (PSWQA) is responsible for developing, adopting and
overseeing the implementation of a water quality management plan for Puget Sound. The Department
Yo88s - 59

-------
of Ecology, which adopts some of PSWQA's ideas, began investigative work in 1987 to monitor
Columbia River dischargers to ensure they are consistent with the PSWQA demands for marine waters.
The particular focus of this investigation was tho confirm the impact of the Camas Mill's wastewater
discharge on Columbia River sediments (Young 1988).
OA/OC EVALUATION - N/A
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Users of these data should be reminded that they were
collected in die vicinity of a potential souce of industrial pollutants.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater, 16th Ed., American Public Health
Association, Washington, D.C., 1985.
Young, S.R. 1988. Columbia River sediment. Report to D.F. Bachman, Environmental Department,
James River-Camas Mill, October 18, 1988.
Y088&- GO

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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: James River Corporation
AREA OF STUDY: Lower Columbia River - Camas
SAMPLING MEDIA: Surface sediment
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: No
REFERENCE SOURCE: Young 1989
CONTACT: Carol Whittaker, James River Mill, Camas, WA
PHONE: (206) 834-8390	FAX: N/A
SAMPLING PERIOD: September 1989
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 3 stations
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: Parker's Landing (RM 121), Camas ASB Outfall, 300 ft.
downstream (RM 120), and Hassalo Rock (RM 117).
TARGET ANALYTES: Metals (Sb, As, Ba, Be, B, Cd, Ca, Cr, Cu, Pb, Mn, Hg, Nl, Se, Ag, TI, Sn
and Zn), organics (PCB, pesticides, volatiles) and TOC. All data are reported on a dry weight
basis.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: N/A
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: Stainless steel pitcher fastened to the end of a rigid probe.
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Procedures followed those in die 16th Ed. of Standards
Methods and corresponding EPA publication.
DATA GAPS: Latitude and longitude were not provided. Latitude and longitude were estimated for
entry along with the data provided in the database.
ABSTRACT
The Puget Sound Water Quality Authority (PSWQA) is responsible for developing, adopting and
overseeing the implementation of a water quality management plan for Puget Sound. The Department
Yo89s - 61

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of Ecology, which adopts some of PSWQA's ideas, began investigative work in 1987 to monitor
Columbia River dischargers to ensure they are consistent with the PSWQA demands for marine waters.
The particular focus of this investigation was to confirm the impact of the Camas Mill's wastewater
discharge on Columbia River sediments (Young 1989). This study is a follow up on the Young (1988)
study which initially sampled the outfall area in 1988.
QA/QQ EVALUATION - N/A.
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Users of these data should be reminded that they were
collected in the vicinity of a potential souce of industrial pollutants.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES!
Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater, 16th Ed., American Public Health
Association, Washington, D.C., 1985.
Young, S.R. 1988. Columbia River sediment. Report to D.F. Bachman, Environmental Department,
James River-Camas Mill, October 18, 1988.
Young, S.R. 1989. Columbia River sediment. Report to D.F. Bachman, Environmental Department,
James River-Camas Mill, November 28, 1989.
Yo89s- 62

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COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN BIOTA AND SEDIMENT DATABASE
SEDIMENT DATA ABSTRACT
AGENCY SPONSOR: Washington State Department of Ecology (WDOE)
AREA OF STUDY: Lower Columbia River - Vancouver
SAMPLING MEDIA: Surface sediment (top 2 cm)
POSITIONING SYSTEM: N/A
ASSOCIATED TISSUE DATA: No
REFERENCE SOURCE: Zinner 1990
CONTACT: Lisa Zinner
PHONE: (206) 407-6000	FAX: N/A
SAMPLING PERIOD: January 1990
NUMBER OF STATIONS SAMPLED: 1 station
LOCATIONS OF STATIONS SAMPLED: The sampling location was 60 - 70 feet downstream from
ALCOA-Vancouver's outfall difiuser.
TARGET ANALYTES: VOAs, BNAs, metals, pesticides/PCBs and general chemistry.
ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES: VOA (EPA 8260), BNA (EPA 8270), metals (EPA 200) and
pesticides/PCBs (EPA 8080). All results are reported on a dry weight basis.
SAMPLING EQUIPMENT USED: 0.1 m* van Veen grab sampler
SAMPLE HANDLING AND PROCESSING: Sample consisted of a composite of six grab samples. The
samples were mixed thoroughly and then divided for separate analysis. Samples collected for
volatile organics analysis were taken directly from the grab sampler. Samples were kept on ice
and shipped to the laboratory.
DATA GAPS: none
ABamACI
The objectives of the Aluminum Company of America (Alcoa) Class H Inspection was to verify effluent
compliance with NPDES permit (NPDES Permit No. WA-000029-9), determine effluent toxicity using
Z190s-63

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a suite of bioassays, identify possible chemical pollutants in selected inplant wastewaters, settling lagoon
influent and lagoon effluent samples with a priority pollutant scan, assess the impact of the industrial
discharge on the receiving water sediments with chemical analysis for priority pollutants and toxicity
testing using a Hyallela bioassay, review Alcoa laboratory procedures to determine conformance to
standard techniques and advance state-of-the-art compliance inspections by contributing to ongoing
developmental efforts with centrifugation (Zinner 1990). Samples of water and sediments were taken at
each effluent and influent location and upstream and downstream from the facility.
QA/QC EVALUATION - N/A
DATA USE AND COMPARABILITY - Users of these data should be reminded that they were
collected in the vicinity of a potential source of industrial pollution.
All data entered in the database were reviewed for data entry errors. All detected errors were corrected.
REFERENCES;
Zinner, L. 1990. Aluminum Company of America (ALCOA) Class H Inspection, January 1990.
Washington State Department of Ecology, Environmental Investigations and Laboratory Services
Program, Olympia, WA.
Zi90s - 64

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APPENDIX E
DATABASE CHEMICAL LIST AND
.1
9-CHARACTER CHEMICAL CODE NAMES

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APPENDIX E: DATABASE CHEMICAL LIST AND
9-CHARACTER CHEMICAL CODE NAMES
Chemical group
Chemical
Chemical code
Butyltin
Dibutyltin
DBT
Butyltin
Monobutyltin
MBT
Butyltin
Tributyltin
TBT
Conventionals
AVS
AVS
Conventionals
Ammonia nitrogen
NH3-N
Conventionals
Cyanide
Cyanide
Conventionals
Cyanide, Total
CyanideJT
Conventionals
Cyanide, weak & diss.
CyanideWD
Conventionals
Fluoride, Total
FluorideT
Conventionals
Inorganic Carbon
CarbonIN
Conventionals
Oil and Grease
ODL_GREAS
Conventionals
Phosphorus
Pbosphrs
Conventionals
Sulfide
Sulfide
Conventionals
Sulfur
Sulftir
Conventionals
TKN
TKN
Conventionals
Total Carbon
CarbonTOT
Dioxin/ftirans
1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDD
HpCDD4678
Dioxin/furans
1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HpCDF
HpCDF4678
Dioxin/ftirans
1,2,3,4,6,7/1,2,3,4,7,8-HxCDF
HxCDF6778
Dioxin/ftirans
1,2,3,4,7,8,9-HpCDF
HpCDF4789
Dioxin/ftirans
1,2,3,4,7,8-HxCDD
HxCDD3478
Dioxin/furans
1,2,3,4,7,8-HxCDF
HxCDF3478
Dioxin/ftirans
i ,2,3,6,7,8-HxCDD
HxCDD3678
Dioxin/ftirans
1,2,3,6,7,8-HxCDF
HxCDF3678
Dioxin/ftirans
1,2,3,7,8,9-HxCDD
HxCDD3789
Dioxin/ftirans
1,2,3,7,8,9-HxCDF
HxCDF3789
Dioxin/furans
1,2,3,7,8-PeCDD
PeCDD2378
Dioxin/ftirans
1,2,3,7,8-PeCDF
PeCDF2378
Dioxin/ftirans
1,2,4,7,8-PeCDD
PeCDD2478
Dioxin/ftirans
2,3,4,6,7,8-HxCDF
HxCDF4678
Dioxin/ftirans
2,3,4,6,7-PeCDF
PeCDF3467
Dioxin/ftirans
2,3,4,7,8-PeCDF
PeCDF3478
Dioxin/ftirans
2,3,6,7-TCDF
TCDF2367
Dioxin/ftirans
2,3,7,8-TCDD
TCDD2378
Dioxin/furans
2,3,7,8-TCDF
TCDF2378
Dioxin/ftirans
3,4,6,7-TCDF
TCDF3467
Dioxin/ftirans
OCDD
OCDD
Dioxin/ftirans
OCDF
OCDF
Dioxin/ftirans
TOTAL HpCDD
TOIlfyCD
Dioxin/ftirans
TOTAL HpCDF
TOTHjpCF
I

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Chemical group
Chemical
Chemical code
Dioxin/furans
TOTAL HxCDD
TOTHxCD
Dioxin/furans
TOTAL HxCDF
TOTHxCF
Dioxin/furans
TOTAL PeCDD
TOTPeCD
Dioxin/furans
TOTAL PeCDF
TOTPeCF
Dioxin/furans
TOTAL TCDD
TOTTCDD
Dioxin/furans
TOTAL TCDF
TOTTCDF
Guaiacols/Catechols/Phenolics
2-Cyclopenten-1 -one,2-methyl
2Cyclol2M
Guaiacols/Catechols/Phenolics
2-Cyclopenten-1 -one, 3-methyl
2Cyclol3M
Guaiacols/Catechols/Phenolics
3,4,5-Trichlorocatechol
34SClCate
Guaiacols/Catechols/Phenolics
3,4,5-Trichloroguaiacol
345ClGuai
Guaiacols/Catechols/Phenolics
3-Cyclopenten-1 -one,2-methyl
3Cyclol2M
Guaiacols/Catechols/Phenolics
3-Cyclopenten-l-one,3-methyl
3Cyclol3M
Guaiacols/Catechols/Phenolics
4,5,6-Trichloroguaiacol
456ClGuai
Guaiacols/Catechols/Phenolics
4,5-Dichlorocatechol
45CLCATE
Guaiacols/Catechols/Phenolics
4,5-Dichloroguaiacol
45ClGuai
Guaiacols/Catechols/Phenolics
4-Allylguaiacol (eugenol)
4AlGuai
Guaiacols/Catechols/Phenolics
4-Chlorocatechol
4ClCate
Guaiacols/Catechols/Phenolics
4-Chloroguaiacol
4ClGuai
Guaiacols/Catechols/Phenolics
4-Propenylguaiacol
4ProGuai
Guaiacols/Catechols/Phenolics
5,6-Dichlorovanillin
56ClVani
Guaiacols/Catechols/Phenolics
6-Chlorovanillin
6ClVani
Guaiacols/Catechols/Phenolics
Ethanone, 1-phenyl-
lPhenEth
Guaiacols/Catechols/Phenolics
Guaiacol (2-methoxypheool)
Gualacol
Guaiacols/Catechols/Phenolics
Tetrachlorocatechol
TetClCate
Guaiacols/Catechols/Phenolics
Tetrachloroguaiacol
TetClGuai
Guaiacols/Catechols/Phenolics
Trichlorosyringol
TriClSyri
Guaiacols/Catechols/Phenolics
Trichlorotrimethoxybenzene
TriClTMBZ
Guaiacols/Catechols/Phenolics
a-Terpineol
TerpinolA
Guaiacols/Catechols/Phenolics
o-Chlorophenol
CIPhenolO
Metal
Aluminum
A1
Metal
Antimony
Sb
Metal
Arsenic
As
Metal
Barium
Ba
Metal
Beryllium
Be
Metal
PaHmliim
Cd
Metal
Calcium
Ca
Metal
Chromium
Cr
Metal
Cobalt
Co
Metal
Copper
Cu
Metal
Iron
Fe
Metal
If
Pb
Metal
Magnesium
Mg
2

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Chemical group
Chemical
Chemical code
Metal
Manganese
Mn
Metal
Mercury
Hg
Metal
Nickel
Ni
Metal
Potassium
K
Metal
Selenium
Se
Metal
Silver
Ag
Metal
Sodium
Na
Metal
Thallium
n
Metal
Tin
Sn
Metal
Vanadium
V
Metal
Zinc
Zn
Metals
Aluminum
A1
Metals
Antimony
Sb
Metals
Arsenic
As
Metals
Barium
Ba
Metals
Beryllium
Be
Metals
Boron
Bo
Metals
Cadmium
Cd
Metals
Cadmium (flm)
Cd(flm)
Metals
Cadmium (ftn)
Cd(frn)
Metals
Calcium
ca
Metals
Cesium
Cs
Metals
Chromium
Cr
Metals
Cobalt
Co
Metals
Copper
Cu
Metals
Europium
Eu
Metals
Gallium
Ga
Metals
Iron
Fe
Metals

La
Metals
Lead
Fb
Metals
Lithium
U
Metals
Magnesium
Mg
Metals
Manganese
Mn
Metals
Mercury
Hg
Metals
Molybdenum
Mb
Metals
Neodymhim
Nd
Metals
Nickel
Ni
Metals
Niobium
Nb
Metals
Potassium
K
Metals

Sc
Metals
Selenium
Se
Metals
Silicon
Si
3

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Chemical group
Chemical
Chemical code
Metals
Silver
Ag
Metals
Sodium
Na
Metals
Strontium
Sr
Metals
Thallium
Tl
Metals
Thorium
Th
Metals
Tin
Sn
Metals
Titanium
Ti
Metals
Uranium
U
Metals
Vanadium
V
Metals
Ytterbium
Yb
Metals
Yttrium
Y
Metals
Zinc
Zn
N/A
DDM4
DDM4
Organic halogens
EOX
EOX
PCBs
Aroclor 1016
PCB1016
PCBs
Aroclor 1221
PCB1221
PCBs
Aroclor 1232
PCB1232
PCBs
Aroclor 1242
PCB1242
PCBs
Aroclor 1242/1016
P12421016
PCBs
Aroclor 1248
PCB1248
PCBs
Aroclor 12S4
PCB1254
PCBs
Aroclor 1260
PCB1260
PCBs
Decachloro PCBs
DecaPCBs
PCBs
Dichloro PCBs
DiPCBs
PCBs
Heptachloro PCBs
HepPCBs
PCBs
Hexachloro PCBs
HexPCBs
PCBs
Monochloro PCBs
MonoPCBs
PCBs
Nonachloro PCBs
NonaPCBs
PCBs
Octachloro PCBs
OctaPCBs
PCBs
PCB001
PCB001
PCBs
PCB002
PCB002
PCBs
PCB003
PCB003
PCBs
PCB004
PCB004
PCBs
PCB005
PCB005
PCBs
PCB008
PCB008
PCBs
PCB018
PCB018
PCBs
PCB028
PCB028
PCBs
PCB044
PCB044
PCBs
PCB052
PCB052
PCBs
PCB066
PCB066
PCBs
PCB077
PCB077
PCBs
PCB101
PCB101
4

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Chemical group
Chemical
Chemical code
PCBs
PCB 105
PCB 105
PCBs
PCB 118
PCB118
PCBs
PCB 126
PCB 126
PCBs
PCB 128
PCB 128
PCBs
PCB 138
PCB138
PCBs
PCB 153
PCB 153
PCBs
PCB 169
PCB 169
PCBs
PCB 170
PCB 170
PCBs
PCB 180
PCB 180
PCBs
PCB 187
PCB 187
PCBs
PCB 19S
PCB195
PCBs
PCB 206
PCB206
PCBs
PCB 209
PCB209
PCBs
Pentachloro PCBs
PentPCBs
PCBs
TOTAL PCBs
TOTPCBs
PCBs
Tetrachloro PCBs
TetraPCBs
PCBs
Trichloro PCBs
TriPCBs
Pesticide (Dinitroanilines)
Isopropalin
Isopropln
Pesticide (Dinitroanilines)
Trifluralin
Triflurln
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
Aldrin
Aldrin
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
Chlordane
ftilorHana
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
Chlordane (tech)
Chlordane
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
Dacthal
Dacthal
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
Dicofol
Dicofol
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
Dieldrin
Dieldrin
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
Endosulfan

Pesticide (Organochlorines)
EndoiulfanI
Endoslftil
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
EndosulfSm n
Endoslfh2
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
PiMlnyilftn
Endosl&S
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
Endrin
Endrin
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
Endrin aldehyde
Endrin-al
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
Endrin ketone
Endrin-ke
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
Heptachlor
Heptachl
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
Heptachlor epoxide
Heptacle
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
Hexachlorobenzene
Hexclbnz
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
Kepone
Kepone
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
Lindane
BHC-gamma
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
Methoxychlor
Methoxyd
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
Mire*
Mirtx
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
- - M- -
Mtooten
Nitroftn
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
Oxychlordane
Oxychldn
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
PCN
PCN
5

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Chemical group
Chemical
Chemical code
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
Pentachloroanisole
Pntclanis
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
Pentachloronitrobenzene
Penclnbnz
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
Pentachlorophenol
Penclphen
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
Perthane
Perthane
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
TOTAL BHC
TOTBHC
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
TOTAL DDD
TOTDDD
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
TOTAL DDE
TOTDDE
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
TOTAL DDT
TOTDDT
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
Total Chlordane
Chlordane
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
Toxaphene
Toxaphene
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
alpha-BHC
BHC-«lpha
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
alpha-Chlordane
Chldane-a
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
alpha-Endosulfan
EndoslfnA
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
beta-BHC
BHC-beta
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
beta-Endosulfan
EndoslfnB
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
cis-Chlordane
CldaneCis
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
cis-Nonachlor
Non-cis
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
delta-BHC
BHC-delta
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
gamma-BHC
BHC-gamma
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
gamma-Chlordane
Chldane-g
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
o,p'-DDD
DDD-op'
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
o.p'-DDE
DDE-op1
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
o.p'-DDT
DDT-op'
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
p.p'-DDD
DDD-pp'
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
p,p'-DDD-ole
DDD-pp'
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
p.p'-DDE
DDE-pp'
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
p,p'-DDT
DDT-pp'
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
p,p'-Methoxychlor
MtoxyclPP
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
tetra-Nonachlor
Non-tetra
Pesticide (Organochlorines)
trant-Nonachlor
Non-trans
Pesticide (Organophosphorous)
Chlorpyrifbt
Chlpyrfbs
Pesticide (Organophosphonis)
Malathion
Malathion
Pesticide (Organophosphonis)
Mediyl parathion
Metparath
Pesticide (Organophosphonis)
Parathion
Parathion
Radionuclide
Americium 241
Am-241
Radionuclide
Cesium 137
Cs-137
Radionuclide
Cobalt 60
Co-60
Radionuclide
Europium 152
Eu-152
Radionuclide
Europium 154
Eu-154
Radionuclide
Europium 155
Eu-155
Radionuclide
Plutonium 238
Pu-238
Radionuclide
Plutonium 239/240
Pu239/240
6

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Chemical group

Chemical code
Resin/Fatty Acids
1,2-Chlorodefaydtoabietic acid
12ClDehya
Resin/Fatty Acids
1,4-Chlorodehydroabietic acid
14Dehya
Resin/Fatty Acids
9,1O-Dichlorosteric acid
9-10QSta
Resin/Fatty Acids
Abiedc acid
Abietic
Resin/Fatty Acids
Dehydroabietic acid
Dehyabiet
Resin/Fatty Acids
Dichlorodehydroabietic acid
DiClDehya
Resin/Fatty Acids
Dichlorostearic acid
DiQStear
Resin/Fatty Acids
Eicosatrienoic acid
Eicosatri
Resin/Fatty Acids
Hexadecanoic acid
Hexadecan
Resin/Fatty Acids
Isopimaric acid
Isopimar
Resin/Fatty Acids
Levopimaric acid
Levopimar
Resin/Fatty Acids
Linoleic acid
Linoleic
Resin/Fatty Acids
Neoabietic acid
Neoabieti
Resin/Fatty Acids
Octadecanoic acid
Octadecan
Resin/Fatty Acids
Oleic acid
Oleic
Resin/Fatty Acids
Palmitoleic acid
Palmitole
Resin/Fatty Acids
Palustric acid
Palustric
Resin/Fatty Acids
Pimaric acid
Pimaric
Resin/Fatty Acids
Sandaracopimaric acid
Sandaraco
Resin/Fatty Acids
TOTAL Resin acids
TOTResinA
Semi-volatile
1,2,3,4-Tetrachlorobenzene
1234dBnz
Semi-volatile
1,2,3,3-Tetradhlorobenzene
123SClBnz
Semi-volatile
1, 2,3-Trichlorobenzene
123C1Bdz
Semi-volatile
1,2,4,5-Tetrachlorobenzene
124SOBnz
Semi-volatile
1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene
124ClBnz
Semi-volatile
1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene
124MBnz
Semi-volatile
1,2-Dichlorobenzeoe
12QBnz
Semi-volatile
1,3,5-Trichlorobenzene
135ClBnz
Semi-volatile
1,3,5-Trimethylbenzene
135MBnz
Semi-volatile
1,3-Dkhlorobeozene
13ClBoz
Semi-volatile
1,4-Dichlorobeozene
14ClBnz
Semi-volatile
2,2,4-Trimethylpentane
224MPent
Semi-volatile
2,2-Dichloropropane
22ClProp
Semi-volatile
2,3,4-Trichloropheaol
2340Phen
Semi-volatile
2,3,6-Trichlorophenol
236ClPhea
Semi-volatile
2,4,5-Trichloropheool
145ClPhen
Semi-volatile
2,4,6-Trichloropheaol
246QPhen
Semi-volatile
2,4-Dichlorophanol
14ClPhea
Semi-volatile
2,4-Dimed\ylph«ooi
UMPhen
Semi-volatile
2,4-Dfaitrophcaol
14NPheo
Semi-volatile
2,4-Dinitrotolu«oe
24NToh»en
Semi-volatile
2,6-Dimethyliiapfcthalaie
26MetNpht
7

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Chemical group
Chemical
Chemical code
Semi-volatile
2,6-Dinitrotoluene
26NToluen
Semi-volatile
2-Chlorophenol
2ClPhen
Semi-volatile
2-Cyclohexen-l-one,3,5,5-t
2Hexanone
Semi-volatile
2-Methyl-4,6-dinitrophenol
2M46NPhen
Semi-volatile
2-Methylphenol
2MPhen
Semi-volatile
2-Nitroaniline
2NAniline
Semi-volatile
2-Nitrophenol
2NPhen
Semi-volatile
3,3 '-Dichlorobenzidine
33'ClBnzd
Semi-volatile
3-Nitroaniline
3NAniline
Semi-volatile
4,6-Dinitro-2-methylphenol
46N2MPhen
Semi-volatile
4-Bromophenyl phenyl ether
4BPhenEth
Semi-volatile
4-Chloro-3-methylphenol
4C13MPhen
Semi-volatile
4-Chloroaniline
4ClAnilin
Semi-volatile
4-Chlorophenylphenylether
4ClPhenEt
Semi-volatile
4-Methylpheool
4MPhen
Semi-volatile
4-Nitroaniline
4NAniline
Semi-volatile
4-Nitrophenol
4NPhen
Semi-volatile
Acrid ine
Acridine
Semi-volatile
Aniline
Aniline
Semi-volatile
Azulene
Azulene
Semi-volatile
Benzidine
Benzidine
Semi-volatile
Benzoic acid
Benzoacid
Semi-volatile
Benzyl Alcohol
Benzalcoh
Semi-volatile
Biphenyl
Biphenyl
Semi-volatile
Bis(2-chloroethoxy)methane
2ClEthMet
Semi-volatile
Bis(2-chloroethyl)ether
2ClEthEth
Semi-volatile
Bis(2-chloroisopropyl)ether
2ClIioEth
Semi-volatile
Bii(2-chloroisopropyl)ether
2ClIaoEth
Semi-volatile
Bia(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate
2EthHexPh
Semi-volatile
Butyl benzyl phthalate
ButBenzPh
Semi-volatile
Carbazole
Carbazole
Semi-volatile
Di-n-butylphthalate
2nBiitphth
Semi-volatile
Di-n-octylphthalate
2nOctphth
Semi-volatile
Dibflozoftiran
DiBenzFur
Semi-volatile
Dibromochlorophenol
DiBrClPhn
Semi-volatile
Dibutylphthalate
DiButPhth
Semi-volatile
Diethyl phthalate
DiEthPhth
Semi-volatile
Dimethyl phthalate
DiMetPhth
Semi-volatile
Diphe&yl Disulfide
DiPhenDiS
Semi-volatile
Hexachlorobutadiene
HexClButa
Semi-volatile
Hexachlorocyclopentad iene
HexQCycp
Semi-volatile
Hexachloroethane
HexClEtha
8

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Chemical group
Chemical
Chemical code
Semi-volatile
Hydrazine, 1,2-Diphenyl-
Hydizinl2
Semi-volatile
Isophorone
Isophoron
Semi-volatile
N-Butyl benzyl phthalate
NButBnzPh
Semi-volatile
N-Nitroso-di-n-propylamine
Nitro2Pro
Semi-volatile
N-Nitroso-di-n-propylamine
Nitro2Pro
Semi-volatile
N-Nitrosodimethylamine
Nitro2Met
Semi-volatile
N-Nitrosodiphenylamine
Nitro2Phe
Semi-volatile
Nitrobenzene
NBnz
Semi-volatile
Octachlorostyrene
OctClSty
Semi-volatile
Peotachlorobenzene
PentClBnz
Semi-volatile
Phenol
Phenol
Semi-volatile
Pyridine
Pyridine
Semi-volatile (PAH)
1,2,5,6-Dibenzoanthracene
1256BnzAn
Semi-volatile (PAH)
1,2-Benzanthracene
12BnzAnth
Semi-volatile (PAH)
1,6,7-Trimethylnaphthalene
167MNphth
Semi-volatile (PAH)
1-Methylnaphthalane
lMetNphth
Semi-volatile (PAH)
1 -Methylphcnanfhrene
lMetPhena
Semi-volatile (PAH)
2-Chloronaphthalene
2ClNaphtfa
Semi-volatile (PAH)
2-Methylnaphthalene
2MetNpht
Semi-volatile (PAH)
Aceoaphdxeoe
Acenaphen
Semi-volatile (PAH)
Acenaphthylene
Acenaphyl
Semi-volatile (PAH)
Anthracene
Anthracen
Semi-volatile (PAH)
Benz[a]anthraceae

Semi-volatile (PAH)
Benzo[a]pyrene
BnzaPyren
Semi-volatile (PAH)
Benzo[b,k]fluoranthene
BnzbkFluo
Semi-volatile (PAH)
Benzo[b]fluoranthene
BnzbFluor
Semi-volatile (PAH)
Benzo[elpyrene
BnzePyren
Semi-volatile (PAH)
Benzofc.h.ilperylene
BnzghiPry
Semi-volatile (PAH)
Benzo[k]fluorantfaene
BnzkFluor
Semi-volatile (PAH)
Chryseoe
Chrysene
Semi-volatile (PAH)
DibenzCaJilanthracme
BnzahAnth
Semi-volatile (PAH)
Dtbenaothtophena
BnzThioph
Semi-volatile (PAH)
Fluoranthene
Fluorantfa
Semi-volatile (PAH)
Fluoreoe
Fluorene
Semi-volatile (PAH)
Indeno[l,2,3-cd]pyrene
Idl23Pym
Semi-volatile (PAH)
Naphthalene
Naphthaln
Semi-volatile (PAH)
Naphthalene, 1-methyl
Naphlmet
Semi-volatile (PAH)
Naphthalene, 2-methyl
Naph2mal
Semi-volatile (PAH)
Perylene
Perylene
Semi-volatile (PAH)
Phenanthrene
'PlUHUBlfeff
Semi-volatile (PAH)
Phenamhrene. l-methyl-7-(l
PhnanlnMt
Semi-volatile (PAH)
Pyreoe
Pyreoe
9

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Chemical group
Chemical
Chemical code
Semi-volatile (PAH)
Retene
Retene
Semi-volatile (PAH)
TOTAL PAHs
TOTPAH
Volatiles
1,1,1,2-Tetrachloroethane
1112ClEth
Volatiles
1,1,1-Trichloroethane
lllClEtha
Volatiles
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane
U22ClEth
Volatiles
1,1,2-Trichloroethane
112ClEtha
Volatiles
1,1-Dichloroethane
llClEtha
Volatiles
1,1-Dichloroethene
llClEthe
Volatiles
1,1-Dichloropropene
llClPrope
Volatiles
1,2,3-Trichloropropane
123ClProp
Volatiles
1,2-Dibromoethane
12BrMet
Volatiles
1,2-Dichlorobenzene
12ClBnz
Volatiles
1,2-Dichlorobenzene
12ClBnz
Volatiles
1,2-Dichloroethane
12ClEtha
Volatiles
1,2-Dichloroethene
12CiEthe
Volatiles
1,2-Dichloropropane
12ClPropa
Volatiles
1,3-Dichlorobenzeae
13ClBnz
Volatiles
1,3-Dichlorobenzene
13ClBnz
Volatiles
1,3-Dichloropropane
13ClPropa
Volatiles
1,4-Dichlorobeozene
14ClBnz
Volatile*
1,4-Dichlorobenzene
!4ClBnz
Volatiles
2-Butanone (MEK)
2But(MEK)
Volatile*
2-Chloroethylvinylether
2ClEtViEt
Volatiles
2-Chlorotoluene
2ClToluen
Volatiles
2-Hexanone (MBK)
2Hex(MBK)
Volatiles
4-Chlorotoluene
4ClToluen
Volatiles
4-Methyl-2-pentanone
4M2Pntone
Volatiles
Acetone
Acetone
Volatiles
Benzene
Benzene
Volatiles
Bromobenzene
BrBenzene
Volatiles
Bromochloromethane
BrClMeth
Volatiles
Bromodichlorometiume
Br2QMeth
Volatiles
Bromoform
Bromoform
Volatiles
Bromomethane
BrMethane
Volatiles
Butylbenzene
ButBBnz
Volatiles
Carbon Disulfide
CarbonDiS
Volatiles
Carbon Tetrachloride
CarbonTet
Volatiles
Chlorobenzene
OBenzene
Volatiles
Chloroethane
ClEthane
Volatiles
Chloroform
Cloroform
Volatiles
Chloromethane
CIMethane
Volatiles
Dibromochloromethane
DiBrClMet
10

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Chemical group
Chemical
Chemical code
Volatiles
Dibromomethane
DiBrMeth
Volatiles
Dichlorodifluoromethane
DiClFlMet
Volatiles
Dichloroethane
DiClEth
Volatiles
Ethyl benzene
EthBnz
Volatiles
Formaldehyde
Formldehy
Volatiles
Freon 113
Freonll3
Volatiles
Isopropylbenzene (cumene)
IsoProBnz
Volatiles
Methylene chloride
MetCl
Volatiles
Propylbenzene
PropBnz
Volatiles
Styrene
Syrene
Volatiles
TOTAL Xylenes
TOTXylene
Volatiles
Tetrachloroethene
TetClEth
Volatiles
Toluene
Toluene
Volatiles
Trichloroethane
TriClEtha
Volatiles
Trichloroethene
TriClEthe
Volatiles
Trichlorofluoromethane
TriClFlMe
Volatiles
Vinyl acetate
VinAcetat
Volatiles
Vinyl chloride
VinChlori
Volatiles
cis-1,2-Dichloroethane
12ClEthaC
Volatiles
cis-1,2-Dichloroetheoe
12ClEtheC
Volatiles
cis-1,2-Dichloropropene
12ClProeC
Volatiles
cis-1,3-Dichloropropene
14ClProeC
Volatiles
m,p-Xyleae
Xylene_MP
Volatiles
o-Xyleae
Xylene_0
Volatiles
p-Chloro-m-cresol
POMCres
Volatiles
p-Iiopropyltoluene
UoProTol
Volatiles
sec-Butylbenzene
ButBnzSec
Volatiles
tert-Butylbenzene
ButBnzTer
Volatiles
trans-1,2-Dichloroethane
12ClEthaT
Volatiles
trans-1,2-Dichlotoethene
12ClEtheT
Volatiles
trans-1,2-Dichloropropene
12ClProeT
Volatiles
trana-1 ,3-Dichloropropaae
13ClProaT
Volatiles
trans-1,3-Dichloropropene
lSOProeT
11

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