THE U.S. EnVlfiOnmtnTflL PROTfCllOll
flGtncy
compoiDium of flnflLyncflL imthods
Volume I: Matrix of methods

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THE U S. fllVIM)limfllT»L PMUKTIOII AGCnCU
t:rinipfn[iiurn of (niflLyricoL nifiHon::;
Volume I: lllatrix of methods
OFFICE OF MONITORING
U. S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
APRIL 1973

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This report has been reviewed by the Office of Research
and Monitoring, EPA, and approved for publication.
Approval does not signify that the contents necessarily
reflect the views and policies of the Environmental
Protection Agency, nor does mention of trade names or
commercial products constitute endorsement or recommenda-
tion for use.
ii

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ABSTRACT
Most of the methods currently used, or in recent use, for the analysis of pollutants in various media and categories
were identified by selected EPA laboratories. Important characteristics of each method were abstracted for presentation
in the form of a one-page summary of that method. Methods are further summarized in a matrix, that presents (1) pollutant
analyzed,(2) medium in which it occurs, and (3) non-quantitative descriptions of the measurement/detection method. Some
400 methods are included in the compendium.
iii

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ACKNOWLEDGMENT
The Office of Monitoring acknowledges with gratitude the assistance and guidance provided by the following persons
in identifying or suggesting analytical methods to be included in this compendium, providing descriptions of methods, or
reviewing and commenting upon drafts of the method summaries:
Paul Altschuller
Dwight Ballinger
Daniel Bender
Fran Brezenski
Howard Crist
John Clements
Geneva Douglas
Henry Enos
Michael Gruenfeld
Seymour Hochheiser
Richard Jaquish
Bernd Kahn
Fred Kawahara
Kenneth Knapp
Herman Kreiger
Robert Lieberman
Earl McFarren
Donald Oakley
Andrew O'Keeffe
P . D. Lederman
Gordon Robeck
Frank Scaringelli
Ann Strong
James Symons
John Thompson
Richard Thompson
Darryl VonLehmden
Cornelius Weber
NERC/RTP
NERC/Cincinnati
NERC/Cincinnati
Region II Laboratory, Edison
NERC/RTP
¦ NERC/RTP
NERC/Las Vegas
Primate Laboratory, Perrine
NERC/Edison
NERC/RTP
NERC/Las Vegas
NERC/Cincinnati
NERC/Cincinnati
NERC/RTP
NERC/Cincinnati
EERL, Montgomery
NERC/Cincinnati
Office of Radiation, Rockville
NERC/RTP
NERC/Edison
NERC/Cincinnati
NERC/RTP
EERL, Montgomery
NERC/Cincinnati
Primate Laboratory, Perrine
NERC/RTP
NERC/RTP
NERC/Cincinnati
iv

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
PURPOSES
CONTENT: FORM OF PRESENTATION
Matrix of Methods
Method Summaries
Definition of Headings
Organization of Matrix and Summaries
HOW THE COMPENDIUM WAS GENERATED
STATE OF COMPLETION OF THE COMPENDIUM
CORRECTIONS
MATRIX	OF METHODS
A.	AIR METHODS
B.	WATER AND WASTEWATER METHODS
C.	DRINKING WATER SUPPLY METHODS
D.	SOLID WASTE METHODS
E.	RADIOACTIVITY METHODS
F.	PESTICIDE METHODS
G.	OIL AND GREASE METHODS
H.	BIOLOGICAL METHODS
LIST OF PRIMARY REFERENCE SOURCES
v
1
UBHARY/El'A
National Environmental Research Center
200 S.W. 35th St.
•Corvallis, OR 97330
2
. 4
6
8
9
10
11
13
13
20
28
35
38
48
51
54
5?

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PURPOSES
The primary purpose of this compendium is to draw together summary descriptions of analytical methods in recent or
current use in EPA laboratories, to serve as a data base to assist the further development of a program of standardization
of EPA analytical methodology. Secondarily, the document provides EPA management personnel with easily accessible infor-
mation on methods available for measuring specific pollutants, and the more important characteristics of these methods.
Methods included in the compendium cover a variety of applications, ranging from research and routine monitoring
through procedures that have been officially selected or recommended by EPA for specific applications (for example,
those methods promulgated in the Federal Register). The inclusion of a method in this compendium, however, does not
necessarily imply EPA endorsement. Certain of the methods are, in fact, contraindicated for specific applications;
^uch cases are clearly identified.
For some pollutants, several methods are cited for measurement or detection within a single medium. No attempt has
been made in this compendium to differentiate methods into groups that would classify them according to uses (such as
monitoring, research, enforcement, etc.) or to preference. (Exceptions: (1) methods promulgated in the Federai Register
are identified In both the matrix and in the Method Summary, and (2) when EPA laboratory personnel, in reviewing the Method
Summaries Identified shortcomings of a method or expressed preference for one method over others for a specific application,
their comments are reported in the "User Comments" section of the Method Summaries.)
CONTENTS; FORM OF PRESENTATION
Each method summarized in the compendium is presented in two levels of detail:
1

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•	A "matrix" form that relates the pollutant (or other parameter of interest), the medium
in which it occurs, and skeletal, checklist information about the measurement method.
•	A "Method Summary" that includes a brief narrative description of the analytical method
applied to a specific parameter in a given medium, plus a statement of purpose of the
analysis and quantitative characteristics of the method.
Additional information about the methods can be found in the source documents from which the summarized information was
abstracted. Both the matrix and the Method Summaries identify the reference sources.
The matrix of methods together with the list of source documents is included in Volume I of the compendium. The
compilation of Method Summaries constitutes Volume II.
Matrix of Methods
This less-detailed form of presentation is an alphabetical listing of pollutant (or other parameters), segregated
according to (1) the medium in which the pollutant occurs (air, water, solid wastes), (2) recognized categories of
pollutants (pesticides, radioactivity, oils and greases, etc.), or (3) specialized categories of measurement techniques
(biological methods).
Each horizontal line of the matrix represents a combination of
•	a specific pollutant
•	the medium, substrate, or category in which it occurs
2

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•	a specific procedure for obtaining the desired measure-
ment of analytical determination.
"Checklist information relative to the procedure includes (where applicable) the following categories of information:
•	Type of source
•	Type of sample
•	Sample preservation and handling requirements
•Sample treatment prior to measurement or detection
•Detection or measurement technique
•Form of data output (visual reading, analog electric
signal, etc.)
•Form of record (manual entry, automatic graph, etc.),.
In addition, each line on the matrix includes a reference number that indicates the primary source of information listed
in the "List of Primary Reference Sources11 included in Volume I. It also includes¦ a Method Summary Number that relates
the matrix entry to one or. more of the Method Summaires presented in Volume II.
The same matrix headings and subheadings were used for all media and special categories except biological measure-
ments. Because of the nature of many biological measurement methods, a different set of matrix headings was used.
The matrix of methods serves both as a source of highly abbreviated, non-quantitative information about a specific
analytical procedure applied to a given pollutant in a given medium, and as an index to the compilation of method
summaries appearing in Volume II.
3

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Method Summaties
The Summaries of Analytical Methods in Volume II of this compendium present on a single page a brief description of
an analytical method applied to a specific pollutant (or other parameter) in a given medium. Most of these methods
yield quantitative results, although some are used for identifiation, taxonomic classification, or other non-quantitative
purposes.
The information presented in the Method Summary expands upon the highly abbreviated information given in the matrix.
It is intended primarily to provide a general description of the method—its characteristics, applicability, and limita-
tions, and is in no sense given as a laboratory procedure.
Each Method Summary is Intended to provide information in the following categories:
•	Identification of pollutant or parameter
•	Medium in which parameter occurs (for which this
specific analytical method is applied)
•	Purpose of measurement or qualitative determination
•	Brief description of analytical procedure
•Limitations of method
In particular, its
-	range of applicability
-	interferences
-	pitfalls

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• Statistical characteristics
-	accuracy
-	precision
-	time required to perform measurement
•Calibration requirements
•Form of data output
*
•Comments by users of the method
•Sampling procedures or special requirements
• Reference source(s) .
A primary reference, that is, the document from which the content
of the Method Summary was abstracted, is given for each Method
Summary. In some cases, additional references are given by the
Method Summary. These secondary references are usually identified
in the primary reference. In no case was the attempt made to
relate specific portions of the information presented in the Summary
to specific secondary references, since essentially all information
in the Summary was drawn from the primary reference.
Information was entered into each of these categories when available from the primary reference source identified
in the summary, or when provided by EPA reviewers. When information was not available from the primary reference source
or was not provided by the reviewer, an entry of "Not stated" or equivalent was made for the corresponding heading. This
This category of information is included only in those summaries for which EPA reviewers provided specific comments.
5

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should not be taken to imply that the information is not available from other sources, including secondary references
cited in some Method Summaries.
In addition, each Method Summary is numbered to permit ready correlation with entries in the matrix. The reader
should note that several matrix entries may refer to a single summary, and conversely, that a single matrix entry may
refer to more than one summary. He should also note that the Method Summary numbers are not necessarily consecutive,
since some methods were deleted after the Method Summaries were numbered.
Definition of Headings in Method Summaries
Most of the information categories or headings used in the Method Summaries are considered self explanatory. Others
listed below, require definition or explanation of their use in this compendium.
Range of Applicability; This is intended to state the upper and lower concentration (or other appropriate
characteristics of the parameter) for which the method is applicable. When only an upper or lower limit is
given in the reference source, that information is entered. When non-quantitative information is given in
the reference source, that information may also be entered under this heading.
Sensitivity: In general, sensitivity is used synonymously with "Detection Limit", to indicate the lowest
concentration of a pollutant (or lowest value of some other parameters) that a given method can consistently
measure. In a very few cases, the source reference or reviewer distinguishes between "Detection Limit" (as
the lowest measurable value) and "Sensitivity" (as the magnitude of signal needed to obtain a reliable measure-
ment, taking into account the noise level of the measurement system). When this distinction is made in the
reference source, it is reflected in the Method Summary.
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Sensitivity, in either of the senses discussed above, may be considered to be either a statistical
characteristic or a limitation of the method. Sensitivity information was available for a relatively small
proportion of the methods summarized. The "sensitivity" heading is not included on the Method Summaries when
data are not available. When sensitivity information is reported, it is usually under the category of
"Limitations".
Accuracy and Precision: There is considerable diversity in the use of these terms among the several reference
sources from which the Method Summaries were derived. Rather than impose rigorous statistical definitions of
these and related terms, the compilers of this compendium chose to accept the statistical characteristics of the
method as stated in the reference source, and to fit this information as well as possible under the headings
Accuracy and Precision, as these terms were used more or less consistently in most of the EPA source documents.
In these sources, the implied approximate definitions are as follows:
"Accuracy" — the average of the deviations of a set of replicate measurements
of a given variable from the "known" value of that variable.
"Relative accuracy" (or "relative error", or "bias")— the difference between
average value of a set of replicate measurements and the "known" value of the
variable expressed as a proportion or percentage of the known value,.
"Precision" — either the standard deviation
tape ot the known value.
U^fl
or the standard error of the mean[ /	| of a set of n replicate measurements(Xi)
of a given"variable.
7

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"Relative precision" (or "relative standard deviation", or ''coefficient of
variation") — the standard deviation of a set of replicate measurements,
expressed as a proportion or percent of the average value of the set.
In cases where a significant divergence existed between the statistical information in the source document and the
above definitions, the information was repeated as given in the source document and the discrepancy noted by a footnote.
Organization of the Matrix and Summaries
When the format of the compendium was being developed, several arrangements were considered. One attractive scheme
was a strictly alphabetical listing of pollutants/parameters, irrespective of medium. This would permit easy comparison
of the methods applicable to each pollutant in various media, and would also make the method for a given pollutant
easier to locate.
The scheme selected for organizing the matrix in this document was considered preferable primarily because it
reflects existing organizational responsibilities and activities within EAP laboratories, and because it facilitates pro-
duction of a document of this nature. The present arrangement necessarily involves considerable redundancy, especially
in the matrix.
The segregation of methods by special measurement category does not imply that every method included in a given
category belongs exclusively in that category. For example, all methods grouped under the heading "Radioactivity" do
not involve radionuclides, but may be used to determine stable isotopes commonly investigated in conjunction with
radioactive isotopes.
8

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EPA's Office of Monitoring is considering alternative arrangements of the matrix and the compilation of method
summaries for future issues of the compendium, and will welcome suggestions by users of the document.
HOW THE COMPENDIUM WAS GENERATED
The analytical methods in this compendium were selected for inclusion at the suggestion of personnel in EPA NERC's
and laboratories, following cobtact by representatives of EPA Headquarters' Office of Monitoring. Method descriptions
suggested or provided by the laboratories were summarized in a form similar to that presented in Volume II (and
described above). Rough drafts of the summaries were returned to the laboratories for review and comments. The Method
Summaries in Volume II reflect the substantive comments resulting from this review.
There are certain exceptions to this review procedure, primarily in.the category of radiation measurements. Some
older methods are included that apparently are not in current use by EPA but nevertheless are considered acceptable.
Summaries are also included for certain other radiochemical procedures which had been received too late to permit
review by EPA laboratory personnel. These special cases are clearly indicated by asterisked footnotes.
Certain of the methods in the air and drinking water categories were also indicated by the reviewer to be obsolete
or not recommended. Summaries of such methods are included in the compendium with the reviewers' comments or caveat
clearly flagged. These "not recommended" method summaries were retained to indicate that they had been considered and
to emphasize that they were not used and not recommended for use by EPA.
9

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STATE OF COMPLETION OF THE COMPENDIUM
This initial issue of the compendium contains methods suggested by about twelve component organizations of EPA's
National Environmental Research Centers or other EP& laboratories. The compendium does not, however, include all
analytical methods in current use by EPA. Such important categories as biological methods for drinking water analyses
and methods for air pollution from mobile sources were not included because of time and budgetary limitations of the
initial effort. Expansion of the compendium to include additional methods is under consideration by the Office of
Monitoring.
The present compendium is incomplete in certain other respects. Many of the Method Summaires contain a large
number of "Not stated" or "Information not available" entries for many of the headings, especially those requiring
quantitative data. As discussed earlier, the "Not stated" entries imply only that the Information was not available
from the primary reference source from which the summary was abstracted. In many cases, needed information was supplied
by reviewers in EPA Laboratories. It was, however, outside the scope of the present effort to search secondary refer-
ences for such data.
The process of abstracting information from a detail analytical procedure to develop a summary of the method neces-
sar±1y involves selection of certain material. The degree of selection is even, greater in determining vhich
elements should be included in the highly condensed matrix format, to give even a key-word-type indication of what the
method involves. While the one page summaries give only a partial description of the analytical procedure, the matrix
should be considered to provide only a suggestion of the steps involved.
10

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CORRECTIONS
In the first issue of a compilation of this size and nature, it is possible that errors of various types (typographi-
cal, transposition, technical, etc.) may escape detection during proofreading and other checking procedures. The Office
of Monitoring requests that readers notify the Chief of Standarization Branch, Office of Research and Monitoring, EPA
Headquarters, of any significant errors they may detect, in order that corrections may be made in subsequent issues.
1 1

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A. ALR METHODS

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SAMPLE
ftCQUI
SITION
SAMPLE
PRESERVATION
AND HANDLING
FORM OF
DATA
OUTPUT
TYPE OF
SAMPLE TREATMENT
PRIOR TO MEASUREMENT
FORM Or
DETECTION OR MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES
SOURCE
RECORD
A. AIR
POLLUTANT OR PARAMETER MEASURED
W*
NOTES
ALDEHYDES (IN FLUE GASES)
A -2
AMMONIA (FROM PARTICULATE)
30,
31
A -3
*Method Obsolete; See Summary
(GASEOUS)
A -4
(GASEOUS)
A -5
(IN STACK GASES)
A -6
AMMONIUM ION
(FROM PARTICULATE)
ANTIMONY (FROM PARTICULATE)
A-26.
FEDERAL REGISTER METHOD
(See Reference)
(ON PARTICULATE)
A-26
BISMUTH (FROM PARTICULATE)
A-26
CADMIUM (FROM PARTICULATE)
CARBON DIOXIDE
A -9
13

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AIR
(CONTINUED)
FEDERAL REGISTER METHOD
(See Reference)
*Orsat Analyzer
	 , EXCESS AIR, AND
DRY MOLECULAR WEIGHT
A-10
23
FEDERAL REGISTER.METHOD
(See Reference)
A-11
CARBON MONOXIDE
21
CHLORIDES (FROM PARTICULATE)
30
A-12
17
CHLORINE
CHROMIUM (FROM PARTICULATE)
A-26
COBALT (FROM PARTICULATE)
A-26
COPPER (FROM PARTICULATE)
A-26
FERRIC ION
A-14
FLUORIDE (GASEOUS
AND PARTICULATE)
*Cheinisorption
A-15
(FROM PARTICULATE)
A-16
	 (GASEOUS
AND PARTICULATE)
17
A-17
	 (GASEOUS
AND PARTICULATE)
A-18
14

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AIR
m
(CONTINUED)
	 (GASEOUS
AND PARTICULATE)
A-19
FEDERAL REGISTER METHOD
(See Reference)
HYDROCARBONS (TOTAL)
21
A-20
HYDROGEN CHLORIDE
AND CHLORINE
A-21
HYDROGEN SULFIDE
A-22
*Method Rarely Used;
.See' Summary
*Chemisorption on Impregnated
tape
^Optical Trapgmittance	
A-23
IRON (FROM PARTICULATE)
A-26
LEAD (FROM PARTICULATE)
A-26
MANGANESE (FROM PARTICULATE)
A-26
FEDERAL REGISTER METHOD
*Method-Unsatisfactory;
See Summary and Reference
MERCURY (GASEOUS)
22
FEDERAL REGISTER METHOD
*Method Unsatisfactory;
See Summary and Reference
	 (GASEOUS
AND PARTICULATE)
21
A-25
METALS (FROM AIRBORNE
PARTICULATES)
*See Summary for
Specific Metals
A-26
FEDERAL REGISTER METHOD
(See Reference)
Condensation
MOISTURE
23
A-27
15

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FORM OF
SAMPLE
PRESERVATION
AND HANDLING
FORM OF
RECORD
SAMPLE TREATMENT
PRIOR TO MEASUREMENT
TrPt OF
SOURCE
DETECTION OR MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES
OUTPUT
A. AIR
(CONTINUED)
POLLUTANT OR PARAMETER MEASURED
NICKEL (FROM PARTICULATE)
A-26
NITRATES AND NITRITES
(PARTICULATE)
A-2 8
NITROGEN DIOXIDE
	 , NITRIC OXIDE, ^
AND OXIDES OF NITROGEN
*See "Comments" in-Summary
NITROGEN OXIDES
A-3I
FEDERAL REGISTER METHOD
(See Reference)
A-32
*Dilution vi th.Air
23
FEDERAL REGISTER METHOD
(See Reference)
ORGANIC ACIDS
(TOTAL)
A-34
*Reflux
FEDERAL REGISTER METHOD
(See.Reference)
*Gas-phaae Reaction
PARTICLE SIZING
A-35
*Centrifugation
A-36
*Dispersed in Electrolyte
Solution
PARTICULATE ACIDS
A-37
16

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A. AIR
(CONTINUED)
POLLUTANT OR PARAMETER MEASURED
PARTICULATES, AIRBORNE
(BENZENE SOLUBLE FRACTION)
FORM OF
OATA
OUTPUT
SAMPLE
PRESERVATION
ANOHANOLING
FORM OF
RECORD
SAMPLE TREATMENT
PHIOR TO MEASUREMENT
TYPE OF
DETECTION OR MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES
ACQUI
SOURCE
SITION
m
NOTES
	 „ WINDBLOWN
(COARSE)
A-39
*Sticky Paper
	 , EMISSIONS
23
A-40
FEDERAL REGISTER METHOD
(See.Reference)
	 (RESPIRABLE FRACTION)
A-41
*Cyclone Separator
	 , SUSPENDED
A-42
FEDERAL REGISTER METHOD
(See.Reference)
PHOTOCHEMICAL OXIDANTS
(OZONE)
21
FEDERAL REGISTER METHOD
(See.Reference)
*Gaa-rphase Reaction	
SULFATE (FROM PARTICULATE)
A-44
	 (FROM PARTICULATE)
A-45.
	 (FROM PARTICULATE)
A-46
SULFATION RATE
*Method is Obsolete;
See Summary
SULFUR DIOXIDE (AUTOMATED)
A-48
	 (AUTOMATED)
32
A-49
*See Comments'in Summary
.^Buffered
17

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(AUTOMATED)
~ — (BARIUM THOR1N METHOD)
— — (HYDROGEN PEROXIDE
METHOD)
	(PARAROSANILINE METHOD)
	» HYDROGEN SULFIDE,
AND MERCAPTANS*
SULFURIC ACID AEROSOLS
SULFURIC ACID MIST
PLUS SULFUR DIOXIDE
TIN (FROM PARTICULATE)
TITANIUM (FROM PARTICULATE)
VANADIUM (FROM PARTICULATE)
VELOCITY OF STACK GASES
23
21
ZINC (FROM PARTICULATE)
A-50 * Combustion
* Sampling Train Given in
Reference
FEDERAL REGISTER METHOD
(See Reference)
A-54
* See Comments in Summary
it Semi-Continuous
* Differs for the various
detection methods
FEDERAL REGISTER METHOD
(See Reference)
A-26.
A-26
A-57
FEDERAL REGISTER METHOD
(See Reference)
*Pitot Tube
A-26

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B. WATER AND WASTEWATER METHODS

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FORM OF
DATA
OUTPUT
SAMPLE
ACQUI-
SITION
SAMPLE
PRESERVATION
ANO HANOLINB
FORM OF
RECORD
TYPE OF
SOURCE
SAMPLE TREATMENT
PRIOR TO MEASUREMENT
DETECTION OR MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES
B. WATER AND WASTEWATER
Wi
POLLUTANT OR PARAMETER MEASURED
NOTES
ALKALINITY
-2
	 (TOTAL)
*See Reference
B-25.
28
B -5
*See.Reference
BOD (BIOCHEMICAL OXYGEN
DEMAND)
B-6
28
B^25.
*See Reference
CARBON, ORGANIC
(TOTAL AND DISSOLVED)
28
*See Reference
B -8
B -9
*Ignition
20

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OETECTION OR MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES
//MfAy/w/s//////Mw)
wMmmm
WWWWWfflWWWWfy
WATER AND WASTEWATER
(CONTINUED)
£ //m//$/£/M%aw/w^M^W/(i/ifflWiM/
i/MMM/iimimmfmm
POLLUTANT OR PARAMETER MEASURED
B-10
28
*See Summary
I-11
28
CHLORINE REQUIREMENT
*See Reference
B-25
28
CHROMIUM
COD (CHEMICAL OXYGEN DEMAND)
(HIGH CONCENTRATION)
1-12
1-13
28
(LOW CONCENTRATION)
(IN SALINE WATERS)
B-15
28
COLOR
28
COPPER
*Reflux
CYANIDE
B-16
28
*Reflux
B-17
DISSOLVED OXYGEN
(MODIFIED WINKLER METHOD)
28
B-18
(PROBE METHOD)
B-19
21

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DETECTION OR MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES
WATER AND WASTEWATER
(CONTINUED)
B-20
FLUORIDE (AUTO COMPLEXONE)
28
1-21
FLUORIDE (SPADNS METHOD)
28
B-22 •
(SPECIFIC ION ELECTRODE)
1-23
HARDNESS
HARDNESS, TOTAL
IRON
*See Summary
LEAD
28
*See Summary
•25.
28
MAGNESIUM
B-25
*See Summary
MANGANESE
. *See Summary
\-25.
METALS
28
*See Summary
i—25
MERCURY
B-26
*See Summary
*Newer Procedure
>-27
22

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DETECTION OH MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES
OUTPUT
WATER AND WASTEWATER
(CONTINUED)
Wm/W/Wm/WW/W
Wffi
*See Summary
B-28
(AUTOMATED AA)
	 , TOTAL
(IN FISH TISSUE, ETC.)
*See Summary
1-29
	 , TOTAL
(IN SEDIMENT)
B-30
METHYLMERCURY
(IN FISH TISSUE)
*See Summary
1-31
(IN SEDIMENT)
*See Summary
1-32
MBAS"(SURFACTANTS)
1-33
NITROGEN (AMMONIA)
NITROGEN (AMMONIA)
B-35
	 (AMMONIA)
(AUTOMATED)
1-36
(KJELDAHL, TOTAL)
B-37
(KJELDAHL, TOTAL)
28
S—38
(KJELDAHL, TOTAL)
(AUTOMATED)
1-39
23

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'Wj
m/
////A////M
' / / / Iff/ / / /*/&/ / Ay / / / / / /5/&/
/ / / /*%./ / /*/sf / /?/ / / / / / /*/&/
/ / //$/&////$///$// //// /§///¦
mi/m/i/Wi/W/m/i/i0
WATER AND WASTEWATER
(CONTINUED)
(NITRATE)
B-41.
(NITRITE)
(NITRATE-NITRITE)
(AUTOMATED)
(NITRATE AND NITRITE)
B-43
(AUTOMATED)
(ORGANIC PLUS AMMONIA)
(AUTOMATED)
NTA (TRISODIUM-
NITRILOTRIACETIC ACID)
J-45.
(AUTOMATED)
28
: Section G of
Compendium "Oils and Greases'
OILS AND GREASES
B-47
ORGANOCHLORINE PESTICIDES
*Column Chromatography
Clean-up
B-48
PHENOLICS
~Solvent Extraction
in Some Cases
1-49
PHOSPHORUS
1-50
. *See Summary
and Reference
24

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DETECTION OR MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES
WATER AND WASTEWATER
(CONTINUED)
POLLUTANT OR PARAMETER MEASURED

*See Summary and Reference
	 (AUTOMATED)
SINGLE REAGENT METHOD)
B-51
28
	 (AUTOMATED
STANNOUS CHLORIDE METHOD)
*See Summary and Reference
B-52
28
*See Summary
1-25.
POTASSIUM
1-53
SELENIUM
B-54
SILICA (DISSOLVED)
28
*See Summary
1-25.
SILVER
. *See. Summary
B-25
SODIUM
SOLIDS y FILTERABLE
(DISSOLVED)
28
*Drying
B-55
NONFILTERABLE
*Drying
B-56
(SUSPENDED)
TOTAL
1-57
VOLATILE
*Ignition
SPECIFIC CONDUCTANCE
25

-------
. WATER AND WASTEWATER
(CONCLUDED)
v vv'v / /'
POLLUTANT OR PARAMETER MEASUREO
B-60
SULFATE (AUTOMATED)
5-61
SULFATE
B-62
28
SULFIDE
B-63
TEMPERATURE
B-64
28
THRESHOLD ODOR
B-65
28
TURBIDITY
*See Summary
ZINC
B-25
26

-------
C. DRINKING WATER SUPPLY METHODS

-------
w
DRINKING WATER SUPPLY
WmMM/W4MM%/M¥MW4
C-26
*See Primary.Reference
for Specific Procedure
ALUMINUM
*Method Not Recommended;
See Summary
ARSENIC
*See Primary.Reference
, .for'Specific Procedure
BARIUM
C-26.
. *See Primary Reference
for Specific Procedure
BERYLLIUM
C-26.
. *See Primary Reference
for Specific Procedure
35
CADMIUM
C-26.
C -3
CHLORIDE
*Method Not Recommended';
.See' Summary
C -6
CHLORINATED HYDROCARBON
PESTICIDES
*Cf..Method F-8
C -7
CHROMIUM
*See Primary Reference
for Specific Procedure
C-26
28

-------
FORM OF
DATA
OUTPUT
SAMPLE
ACQUI
SITION
SAMPLE
PRESERVATION
AND HANDLING
FORM OF
RECORD
TYPE Or
SOURCE
SAMPLE TREATMENT
PRIOR TO MEASUREMENT
DETECTION OR MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES
m
NOTES
C. DRINKING WATER SUPPLY
(CONTINUED)
POLLUTANT OR PARAMETER MEASURED
(HEXAVALENT)
C -8
C -9
COPPER (BATHOCUPROINE METHOD)
(CUPRETHOL METHOD)
35
C-ll
COPPER (AA)
35
C-26
*See Primary Reference
for Specific Procedure
FILTERABLE RESIDUE
C-14
35
C-15
*Method Not Recommended
without Distillation
C-16
~Method Not Recommended
without Distillation
CROSS ALPHA AND
GROSS BETA
RADIOACTIVITY
C-18
C-26
*See Primary Reference
for Specific Procedure
29

-------
FORM OF
DATA
OUTPUT
SAMPLE
ACQlil
SITION
SAMPLE
PRESERVATION
AND HANOLING
FORM OF
RECORD
TYPE OF
SOURCE
SAMPLE TREATMENT
PRIOR TO MEASUREMENT
DETECTION OR MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES
m
m
NOTES
C. DRINKING WATER SUPPLY
(CONTINUED)
POLLUTANT OR PARAMETER MEASUREO
C-19
C-20
35
C-26
*See.Primary Reference
for Specific Procedure
C-22
C-26
*See Primary Reference
for Specific Procedure
C-26
*See Primary Reference
for Specific Procedure
C-23
35
C-24
26
C-2!
C-2<
AIs(
*See Summary and Reference;
Cf. B-25
30
HBHABV/KJ'A
NaHnnol	n

-------
C. DRINKING WATER SUPPLY
(CONTINUED)
POLLUTANT OB PARAMETER MEASURED
NITRATE (UV ABSORPTION)
FORM OF
DATA
0UT?UT
SAMPLE
ACQUI
SITION
SAMPLE
PRESERVATION
ANDHANOUNG
FORM OF
RECORD
SAMPLE TREATMENT
PRIOR TO MEASUREMENT
TYPE OF
SOURCE
DETECTION OR MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES
NOTES
*Method Not Recommended;
See Summary
//UV Spectrophotometry
ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS
(HIGH FLOW)
~Adsorption
	 (ADSORPTION PLUS
SOLVENT EXTRACTION)
C-32
pH
35
35
RADIOACTIVITY
(GROSS ALPHA AND
GROSS BETA)
C-18
RADIUM 226
C-36
*Stored for Ingrowth of Daughter
RESIDUE, FILTERABLE
35
C-38
31

-------
DRINKING WATER SUPPLY
(CONTINUED)
Wimwwm
/m/m/i/s/i
Wm/sm
*See Primary Reference
for Specific Procedure
C-26
SILVER
C-39
C-40
SODIUM
C-41
SPECIFIC CONDUCTANCE
C-42
STRONTIUM 90
SULFATE
C-45.
. *Infrared Spectrophotometer
Colorimeter can be Substituted
SURFACTANTS (DETERGENTS)
C-46
35
TURBIDITY
C-48
*See Primary Reference
for Specific Procedure
ZINC
35
C-26
32

-------
DRINKING WATER SUPPLY
(CONCLUDED)
W,
fw/WWWW/WWWw^/
C-50
35
33

-------
D. SOLID WASTE METHODS

-------
FORM OF
SAMPLE
PRESERVATION
AND HANDLING
FORM OF
RECORD
SAMPLE TREATMENT
PRIOR TO MEASUREMENT
TYPE OF
SOURCE
DETECTION OR MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES
ACQUI
ffl
D. SOLID WASTES
POLLUTANT OR PARAMETER MEASURED
PERCENT ASH AMD PERCENT
WEIGHT LOSS ON HEATING
AT 600 C
* Homogenize
BOD (BIOCHEMICAL OXYGEN
DEMAND) AZIDE MODIFICATION
OF WINKLER METHOD)
* Incubate
	 (D.O. ANALYZER)
* Incubate
CARBON AND HYDROGEN
*	Dried
#	Ignition and Absorption
CARBONATE CARBON
* Dried and Ground
ft Absorption	
CELLULOSE (IN COMPOST)
U
D -6
* Dried and Ground
*	Ground and Dried
#	Ignited
CHEMICAL OXYGEN DEMAND
D -8
* Grinding
DECOMPOSITION OF COMPOST
D -9
HEAT OF COMBUSTION (TOTAL)
* Dry and Grind
& Ignition; Calorimeter
HEAT OF COMBUSTION (TOTAL)
* Mathematical Procedure;
See Summary
NITROGEN (ORGANIC AND
AMMONIACAL)
* Dry and Grind
35

-------
D. SOLID WASTES
(CONCLUDED)
POLLUTANT OR PARAMETER MEASURED
SAMPLE
SAMPLE
PRESERVATION
AND HANDLING
FORM OF
RECORD
SAMPLE TREATMENT
PRIOR TO MEASUREMENT
TYPE OF
SOURCE
DETECTION OR MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES
ACQUI-
NOTES
NITROGEN (TOTAL)
(AUTOMATED DUMAS)
	 (TOTAL)
(COMPREHENSIVE METHOD)
D-14
* Dry and Grind
it Ignition
* Dry and Grind
OXYGEN (TOTAL)
14
* Mathematical Procedure;
See Summary
POTENTIAL HEAT
DETERMINATION
* Dry and Grind
it Ignition; Calorimeter
PROTEIN (SAMPLE PREPARATION)
* Hydrolized
Amino Acid Analyzer
14
D-18
*	Dry and Grind
#	Centrifuge
@ Fluorimetry
VOLATILES (OR Z WEIGHT LOSS
ON IGNITION AT 950 C)
*	Dry and Grind
#	Ignition
36

-------
E. RADIOACTIVITY METHODS

-------
SAMPLE
ACQUI-
SITION
SAMPLE
PRESERVATION
AND HANDLING
FORM OF
RECOfiO
SAMPLE TREATMENT
PRIOR TO MEASUREMENT
TYPE Or
SOURCE
OETECTION OR MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES
E. RADIOACTIVITY
Wi
MOTES
POLLUTANT OR PARAMETER MEASURED
RADIOACTIVE ANTIMONY
(IN WATER)
* Counts, Time, and Energy
RADIOACTIVE ARSENIC
(IN WATER)
27
* Counts, Time, and Energy
RADIOACTIVE BARIUM
(IN WATER) (ASTM D2038-68)
* Counts, Time, and Energy
RADIOACTIVE BARIUM
(IN WATER)
* Counts, Time, and Energy
BARIUM 140 (IN MILK)
* Counts and Time
RADIOACTIVE CADMIUM (IN WATER)
* Counts, Time, and Energy
CALCIUM (IN MILK)
E -7
* Separation by Elution
CALCIUM (IN MILK)
CARBON 14 (IN WATER)
* Counts and Time
RADIOACTIVE CERIUM (IN WATER)
* Counts, Time, and Energy
CESIUM 137 (IN FOOD)
* Counts and Time
CESIUM 137 (IN MILK)
* Counts and Time
38

-------
/// ' 7/ ' ' 7 f'/r ' ' //-/
,'/m /0////& I///i' /// /M'f/
Wm/m/WMM/Mt
tfiz /&/
-------
FORM OF
DATA
OUTPUT
SAMPLE
ACQUI
SITION
SAMPLE
PRESERVATION
AND HANOLING
TYPE OF
SOURCE
SAMPLE TREATMENT
PRIOR TO MEASUREMENT
OETECTION OR MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES
E. RADIOACTIVITY
(CONTINUED)
POLLUTANT OR PARAMETER MEASUREO
NOTES
RADIOACTIVE IODINE (IN WATER)
27
* Counts, Time, and Energy
RADIOACTIVE IRON (IN WATER)
* Counts, Time, and Energy
RADIOACTIVE IRON (IN WATER)
27
* Counts, Time, and Energy
KRYPTON 85 (IN KRYPTON GAS)
*	Scintillation Counter
#	Counts, Time, and Energy
RADIOKRYPTON (IN AIR)
*	See Method Summary
#	Scintillation Counter
@ Counts and Time
RADIOKRYPTON (IN NATURAL GAS)
E-30'
.* See Method Summary
# Scintillation.Counter
@ Counts and Time
RADIOACTIVE LANTHANUM PLUS
TRIVALENT RARE EARTHS AND
YTTRIUM (IN WATER)
E-31
*. CountsTime, and Energy
MANGANESE 55
(IN SOIL AND SILT)
* Counts, Time, and Energy
RADIOACTIVE MANGANESE
(IN WATER)
* Counts, Time, and Energy
RADIOACTIVE MANGANESE
(IN WATER)
E-34 •
* Counts, Time, and Energy
RADIOACTIVE MOLYBDENUM
(IN WATER)
E-35
*	Ignition
#	Counts, Time, and Energy
RADIOACTIVE NEPTUNIUM
(IN WATER)
E-36
* Counts, Time, and Energy
40

-------
FORM OF
DATA
OUTPUT
SAMPLE
ACQUI
SITION
SAMPLE
PRESERVATION
AND HANDLING
FORM OF
RECORD
SAMPLE TREATMENT
PHIOH TO MEASUREMENT
TYPE OF
SOURCE
OETECTION OR MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES
E. RADIOACTIVITY
(CONTINUED)
NOTES
POLLUTANT OR PARAMETER MEASUREO
RADIOACTIVE NICKEL
(IN WATER)
E-37
* Scintillation.Counter
& Counts and Time
RADIOACTIVE NIOBIUM
(IN WATER)
E-3fi
* Ignition
Counts, Time, and Energy
RADIOACTIVE PHOSPHORUS
(IN WATER)
27
* Counts and Time
PLUTONIUM 238 AND 239
(IN AIR)
36
* Counts and Time
PLUTONIUM 238 AND 239
(IN SEA WATER)
* Counts and Time
POLONIUM 210
( IN BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS)
*	Plating
#	Counts, Time, and Energy
POTASSIUM
(IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES)
20
E-43
a
*.Measure ana
Compute K
POTASSIUM (IN FOOD)
AO
* Measure
Compute K
POTASSIUM (IN MILK)
PROMETHEUM 147
(IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES)
E-47
*	Scintillation.Counter
#	Counts and Time
PROMETHEUM 147 (IN URINE)
E-48
* Scintillation Counter
if Counts and Time
PROMETHEUM 147 (IN URINE
AND OTHER AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS)
36
E-49
*	Scintillation Counter
#	Counts and Time
41

-------
E. RADIOACTIVITY
(CONTINUED)
POLLUTANT OR PARAMETER MEASURED
RADIUM 226
(IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES)
FORM Of
DATA
OUTPUT
SAMPLE
ACQUI
SITION
SAMPLE
PRESERVATION
ANDHANOLING
FORM OF
RECORD
SAMPLE TREATMENT
PRIOR TO MEASUREMENT
DETECTION OR MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES
m
* Score for Ingrowth
// Scintillation Counter
@ Counts and Time
RADIUM 226
(IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES)
*	Store for Ingrowth
#	Scintillation Counter
@ Counts and Time
RADIUM 226
(IN POOD)
E-52
* See: Summary
	 (IN FOOD)
(PROCEDURE A)
E-53
* Store for Ingrowth
©£ Daughter
	 (IN FOOD)
(PROCEDURE B)
* Store for Ingrowth
of Daughter
RADIUM 226 (IN SOIL)
24
E-55
* Leach.and Store for Ingrowth
if Scintillation Counter
@ Counts and Time
RADIUM 226 ( IN SOIL, SLUDGE,
AIR FILTERS, FECES, AND URINE)
RADIUM 226 (IN URINE)
36
E-56
*	Store for Ingrowth
#	Scintillation Counter
@ Counts'and Time
*	Scintillation Counter
#	Counts and Time
RADIUM 226 (IN WATER)
*	Store for Ingrowth
#	Scintillation Counter
@ Counts and Time
RADIUM 226 (IN WATER)
36
* Store for Ingrowth
0 Scintillation Counter
@ Counts and Time
RADON 222 (IN AIR)
24
* See Method Summary
Scintillation Counter
@ Counts and Time
RADON 222 (IN NATURAL GAS)
(CONCENTRATION METHOD)
E-61
* See Method Summary
0 Scintillation Counter
@ Counts and Time
42

-------
FORM OF
~ATA
OUTPUT
SAMPLE
PRESERVATION
AND HANDLING
FORM OF
RECORD
TYPE OF
SOURCE
SAMPLE TREATMENT
PRIOR TO MEASUREMENT
DETECTION OR MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES
E. RADIOACTIVITY
(CONTINUED)
ffl.
POLLUTANT OR PARAMETER MEASURED
RADON 222 (IN NATURAL GAS)
(DIRECT TRANSFER METHOD)
E-62
*	See Method Summary
#	Scintillation Counter
@ Counts and Time
RADIOACTIVE RUTHENIUM
(IN WATER)
27
E-63
* Counts, Time, and Energy
RADIOACTIVE SILVER
(IN WATER)
* Counts, Time, and Energy
RAD10 STRONTIUM
(IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES)
* Counts and Time
RADIOACTIVE STRONTIUM
(IN WATER)
* Store for Ingrowth
& Counts, Time, and Energy
RADIOSTRONTIUM
(IN WATER)
E-67
* Counts and Time
STRONTIUM (89 AND 90) (IN
FOOD AND BIOLOGICAL SAMPLES)
* Counts and Time
RADIOSTRONTIUM (89 AND 90)
(IN SOUR.MILK)
* Store for Ingrowth
ff Counts and Time
RADIOSTRONTIUM (89 AND 90)
(IN NON-SOUR MILK)
24
* Store for Ingrowth
if Counts and Time
STRONTIUM (89 AND 90)
(IN NON-HOMOGENEOUS MILK)
STRONTIUM (89 AND 90)
(IN REASONABLY HOMOGENEOUS
MILK)
*	Store for Ingrowth
#	Counts and Time
* Store Until Equilibrium
Obtained
il Counts and Time
STRONTIUM (89 AND 90)
(IN MILK)
*	Store for Ingrowth
#	CountB and Time
43

-------

RADIOACTIVITY
(CONTINUED)
STRONTIUM 90 (IN URINE)
* Counts and Time
RADIOACTIVE SULFUR
(IN WATER)
E-75
* Counts and Time
RADIOACTIVE TANTALUM
(IN WATER)
E-76
* Counts.and Time
RADIOACTIVE TECHNETIUM
(IN WATER)
27
E-77
* Counts and Time
RADIOACTIVE TELLURIUM
(IN WATER)
E-78
* Counts and Time
THORIUM 230 (IN AIR)
E-79
* Counts and Time
THORIUM 230
(IN SEDIMENT SOIL)
E-80
* Counts - and Time
THORIUM 230 (IN WATER)
* Counts.and Time
E-81
THORIUM 230 (IN WATER)
. * Counts and Time
E-82
THORIUM 232
(IN ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES) .
* Counts and Time
5-83
RADIOACTIVE TIN (IN WATER)
27
* Counts, Time, and Energy
RADIOACTIVE TRITIUM
(iN WATER)
* Dark Adapt
0 Scintillation Counter
@ Counts and Time
E-85
44

-------
FORM OF
DATA
OUTPUT
SAMPLE
PRESERVATION
AND HANDLING
FORM OF
HECORO
TYPE OF
SOURCE
SAMPLE TREATMENT
PRIOR TO MEASUREMENT
DETECTION OR MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES
E. RADIOACTIVITY
(CONTINUED)
m
POLLUTANT OR PARAMETER MEASURED
WA>
NOTES
RADIOACTIVE TRITIUM
(IN WATER)
* Dark Adapt
Scintillation Counter
@ Counts and Time
TRITIUM (IN AIR)
* See Method Summary
if Scintillation Counter
@ Counts and Time
TRITIUM (IN WATER)
* Scintillation Counter
// Counts and Time
RADIOACTIVE TUNGSTEN
(IN WATER)
* Counts, Time, and Energy
URANIUM (IN AIR)
Fluorometry
URANIUM (IN ENVIRONMENTAL
SAMPLES)
36
* Counts and Time
URANIUM (IN SOIL AND SEDIMENT)
E-93
* Fluorometry
URANIUM (IN WATER)
Fluorometry
RADIOXENON (IN AIR)
*	See Method Summary
#	Scintillation Counter
@ Counts and Time
RADIOXENON (IN NATURAL GAS)
E-96
*	See Method Summary
#	Scintillation Counter
@ Counts and Time
RADIOACTIVE YTTRIUM
(IN WATER)
27
E-97
* Counts, Time, and Energy
ZINC 65 (IN SOIL AND SILT)
* Not Specified in Reference
45

-------
RADIOACTIVITY
(CONCLUDED)
wMmMmMMMi
RADIOACTIVE ZINC
(IN WATER)
E-99
* Counts, Time, and Energy
27
*	Ignition
#	Counts, Time, and Energy
RADIOACTIVE ZIRCONIUM
(IN WATER)
E-100
46

-------
F. PESTICIDE METHODS

-------
FORM Or
DATA
OUTPUT
SAMPLE
PRESERVATION
AND HANDLING
PORK OF
RECORD
SAMPLE TREATMENT
PRIOR TO MEASUREMENT
TYPE OF
SOURCE
OETECTION OR MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES
PESTICIDES
m
NOTES
POLLUTANT OR PARAMETER MEASURED
BIS(p-CHLOROPHENYL)
ACETIC ACID (DDA)
IN HUMAN URINE
CHLORINATED HYDROCARBON
PESTICIDES IN HUMAN
TISSUE
CHLORINATED HYDROCARBON
PESTICIDES AND METABOLITES
IN HUMAN/ANIMAL ADIPOSE TISSUE
(MULTIPLE)CHLORINATED
HYDROCARBONS IN HUMAN
BLOOD OR SERUM
F -4
CHOLINESTERASE ACTIVITY
(BLOOD)
37
*Separate Plasma and Cells
METHYLMERCURY IN
FISH BLOOD OR BRAINS
37
*Liquid-Liquid Partition
1-NAPHTHOL IN
HUMAN URINE
37
ORGANOCHLORINE PESTICIDES
IN WATER
29
r -8
ORGANOPHOSPHORUS PESTICIDE
METABOLITES OR HYDROLYSIS
PRODUCTS IN HUMAN URINE
PARA-NITROPHENOL
(PNP) IN URINE
P ENTACHLOROPHENOL
(PCP) IN BLOOD
F -?
F-10
*Drying
F-ll
*Etherification
	 IN HUMAN URINE
*Alkylation
48

-------
FORM OF
'/$/*//*$/// /i/h/m/M///WA//W
/f/i/ /i/s///*.//$/ /s/jfM/ /if / //?/£/ a/imf/ /
wM/MfmWmwm
Vv/W	/•«/»/
vSf/M?///*/////'?/
*Special Unit
^Column
F-13
PESTICIDES IN AIR
PESTICIDES IN WATER
PESTICIDES IN
SOILS AND HOUSEDUST
F-15
POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS
IN ADIPOSE TISSUES
*Liquid-Liquid Partition
and Column Clean Up	
F-16
2,4-D AND 2,4,5-T
IN URINE
37
*Alkylation
F-17
49

-------
G. OIL AND GREASE METHODS

-------
DETECTION OR MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES
/// //*/$/£//A
OILS AND GREASES
W£
* Drying
// Hydrometer
API GRAVITY (DENSITY)
(ASTM D287)
G -1
CRUDE OR SEMI-REFINED
OIL OR OIL RESIDUAL
* Fluorescent Spectroscopy
G -2
DENSITY AND SPECIFIC GRAVITY
(ASTM D1217)
* Bingham Pycnometer
* Lipkin Pycnometer
(ASTM D941)
DISTILLATION RANGES
(ASTM D86-67)
* Drying
G -5
	 (AROMATICS)
(ASTM D850-70)
G -6
	 (GASOLINE)
(ASTM D216-54)
G -7
25
HYDROCARBONS
G -8
IDENTIFICATION OF HEAVY
CRUDE AND PROCESSED OILS
19
* Fluorescent Spectroscopy
G -9
	 OF HEAVIER LIQUID
PETROLEUM PRODUCTS
G-10
	 OF HEAVIER SOLID
PETROLEUM PRODUCTS
G-ll
	 OF WEATHERED AND
UNWEATHERED OILS
39
G-12
51

-------
DETECTION or MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES
f f 2/y m f //*J////£//£// f /fs />
/////MM/.4////W/v/w#///f/Jww>
^mi/,m
OILS AND GREASES
(CONCLUDED)
m/m
MELTING POINT (DROP)
(ASTM D127-49)
G-13
	 (OF PARAFFIN WAX)
(ASTM D87-66)
II
G-14
* Qualitative Procedure
G-15
MERCAPTANS
MOLECULAR WEIGHT
(RAST METHOD)
G-16
* Drying
*Private Communication with Oil
Spills Research Branch, EPA
NERC, Edison,,N. ;J.
PETROLEUM OILS
(QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS)
G-17
* Adsorption (Column)
Chromatography
SATURATES, OLEFINS
AND ARDMATICS
25
G-18
SOLUBILITY
G-19
SPECIFIC GRAVITY OF ROAD OILS
TARS, ETC. (ASTM D70-52)
G-20
	 OF SOLIDS
(ASTM D71-72a)
G-21
* See Summary for Extensive
List of Secondary References
TRACE CONSTITUENTS
G-22
VISCOSITY (KINQ4ATIC)
(ASTM D445-66)
G-23
* Timer and Viscosimeter
	 (SAYBOLT)
ASTM D88-56)
G-24
* Timer and Viscosimeter
52

-------
H. BIOLOGICAL METHODS

-------
H. BIOLOGICAL METHODS
/v/P/fTs/£/s/W.v/y'/&/C
WMwWWW*/
^Sample pretreatment
required for certain
determinations
//See Summary	
ALGAL GROWTH POTENTIAL
AGE, GROWTH & CONDITION
OF FISH	
H- 2
CHANGE IN THE TASTE OF FISH
PRODUCED BY CHEMICALS	
H- 3
*Cookine
SPECIES IDENTIFICATION
OF FISH	
H- U
TOXICITY OF POLLUTANTS TO
TTTQH E MArftnTKTUPRTFRPATFg
BENTHlC INVERTEBRATE
BIOMASS
BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATE
SPECIES IDENTIFICATION
H- 7
SUBSTRATE PARTICLE
SIZE
*Physical Separation (Sieving
H- 8
BIOMASS OF
MACROPHYTES
~Draining at 1Q5C
DIATOM SPECIES
IDENTIFICATION
H-10
VOLUME OF
PERIPHYTON
~Draining
H-ll
PHYTOPLANKTON AND
PERIPHYTON CELL COUNTS
AND IDENTIFICATION
H-12
54

-------
PRESERVATION
BIOLOGICAL METHODS
(CONTINUED)
CELL VOLUME OF PLANKTON
AND PERIPHYTON
H-13
CHLOROPHYLL a OF
PHYTOPLANKTON AND
PERIPHYTON
H-1A
CHLOROPHYLL a, b, AND c OF
PHYTOPLANKTON' AND
PERIPHYTON
H-15
PHYTOPLANKTON AND
PERIPHYTON SPECIES
COMPOSITION
H-16
"CELL COUNTS AND	
IDENTIFICATION OF PHYTOPLANKTON
(COUNTING CELL/HEMOCYTOMETER
METHOD)	
H-17
(INVERTED MICROSCOPE METHOD)
H-18
*See Reference
*See Reference
^Membrane Filter
(MEMBRANE FILTER METHOD)
H-19
(PALMER-MALONEY METHOD)
H-20
*See Reference
CELL SURFACE AREA OF
PHYTOPLANKTON
*See Reference
H-21
CHLOROPHYLL a_ OF
PHYTOPLANKTON (IN-VITRO-
MONOCHROMATIC METHOD
H-22
*See Reference
(IK-V1VO—FLUORESCENCE METHOD)
H-23
IN-SITU PRODUCTIVITY OF
PHYTOPLANKTON (CARBON 14
METHOD)
jDrying
H-24 "Counts
55

-------
BIOLOGICAL METHODS
(CONTINUED)
mm
WW4
(OXYGEN METHOD)
*FH ggftl v«ari OvygATi Prfthfi
ZOOPLANKTON VOLUME AND
SPECIES IDENTIFICATION
H-26
*See Reference
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LIST OF PRIMARY REFERENCE SOURCES
1.	AQCL. Informal compilation of six Analytical Methods and Provisional Methods for Mercury and Methylmercury, provided
by Analytical Quality Control Laboratory, National Environmental Research Center, 13. S. Environmental Protection Agency,
Cincinnati, Ohio, 1972.
2.	ASTM. Book of ASTM Standards. American Society for Testing and Materials, 1916 Race Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Part II, (Designation D70-52), 1972.
3.		, Part 11 (Designation D71-72a), 1972.
4.		, Part 17 (D86-67), 1968.
5.		, Part 17 (D88-56), 1969.
6.		, Part 17 (D216-54), 1965.
7.		, Part 17 (D445-72) , 1972.
8.		, Part 17 (D850-70), 1970.
9.		, Part 17 (D941-55), 1968.
10.		, Part 17 (D217-55), 1968.
11	.	, Part 18 (D87-66), 1967.
12.		, Part 18 (D127-63), 1964.
13.		, Part 18 (D287-67), 1968.
14.	Bender, D. F., H. Stierli and W. L. Peterson, Editors, Physical, Chemical, and Microbiological Methods of Solid
Waste Testing. U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Environmental Research Center, Cincinnati,
Ohio, 1973. (In print)
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15. Biological Field and Laboratory Methods, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Environmental Research Center,
Cincinnati, Ohio, 1972. (Preliminary copy)
16.	Buelow, R. W., J. K. Carswell, and J. M. Symons, "An Improved Method for Determining Organics in Water by Activated
Carbon and Solvent Extraction," U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Environmental Research Center,
Cincinnati, Ohio, July 1972. (Pre-publication copy)
17.	Clements, John B., Informal compilation of Analytical Methods for Air Pollution, provided by John B. Clements,
U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Environmental Research Center, Research Triangle Park,
N. C. (Letter dated October 5, 1972)
18.	"Determination of Petroleum Oil," Preliminary Method description received from Oil Spills Research Branch,
U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Environmental Research Center, Edison, New Jersey, December 1972.
(This method has been submitted for inclusion in subsequent issues of Laboratory Guide for Identification of
Petroleum Products, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1969.)
19.	"Development of Low Temperature Molecular Method for Oil," Baird Atomic Corporation, No. 16020 GBW, EPA Contract
68-01-0146. (Method description received from Oil Spills Research Branch, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency,
National Environmental Research Center, Edison, New Jersey.
20.	Douglas, Geneva S., (Editor), Radioassav Procedures for Environmental Samples, National Center for Radiological
Health, U. S. Public Health Service, Rockville, Maryland, January 1967.
21.	Federal Register, Volume 36, Number 84, April 30, 1971.
22.		, Volume 36, Number 235, December 7, 1971.
23.		, Volume 36, Number 247, Thursday, December 23, 1971.
24.	Jones, Frederick B., Southwestern RadioloRical Health Laboratory Handbook of Radiochemical Analytical Methods.
Report No. SWHRL-11, U. S. Public Health Service, Southwestern Radiological Health Laboratory. (Now the
Western Environmental Research Laboratory of the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency), Las Vegas, Nevada,
March 1970. (Reprint January 1972)
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25.
Kawahara, Fred K., Laboratory Guide for the Identification of Petroleum Products, Federal Water Pollution Control
Administration, Division of Water Quality Research, Cincinnati, Ohio, January 1969.
26.	Kopp, John F., Marcy C. Longbottom, and Larry B. Lobrlng, "'Cold Vapor' Method for Determining Mercury," Journal
of the American Water Works Association, Volume 64, page 20, January 1972.
27.	Kreiger, H. L. and S. Gold, Procedures for the Radiochemical Analysis of Nuclear Reactor Agneous Wastes. Report
Number EPA-4A-72-XXXX, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Environmental Research Center, Radiochemisi
and Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, Cincinnati, Ohio. (Undated preliminary draft, 1972)
28.	Methods for the Chemical Analysis of Water arid Wastes. U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, National
Environmental Research Center, Analytical Quality Control Laboratory, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1971.
29.	Methods for Organic Pesticides in Water arid Wastewater. U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, National
Environmental Protection Agency, National Environmental Research Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1971.
30.	Morgan, George, E. C. Tabor, C. Golden, and H. Clements, "Automated Laboratory Procedures for the Analysis
of Air Pollutants," presented at the Technicon Symposium, Automation in Arialytical Chemistry, New York, N. Y.,
October 19, 1966.
31.	Morgan, George, C. Golden and E. C. Tabor, "New and Improved Procedures for Gas Sampling and Analysis in the
National Air Sampling Network," presented at the Technicon Symposium, Automation in Analytical Chemistry,
New York, N. Y., October 19, 1966.
32.	O'Keeffe, Andrew, Informal compilation of Analytical Methods for Air Pollutants, provided by Andrew O'Keeffe,
U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Environmental Research Center, Research Triangle Park,
N. C. (Ca. November 1972)
33.	Porter, C. R. et al.(Editors), Procedures for Determination of Stable Elements and Radionuclides in
Environmental Samples, PHS Publication No. 999-RH-10, U. S. Public Health Service, Division of Radiological
Health, Washington, D. C., January 1965.
34.	Procedures for Radiochemical Analysis of Nuclear Reactor Aqueous Solutions, Report No. EPA—4A—72-XXXX (Draft),
National Environmental Research Center, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1972.
(Note: This is the same document as Ref. 27 above.)
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35.	Standard Methods for Examination of Water and Wastewater. 13th Edition, American Public Health Association, et. al.,
Washington, D. C., 1971.
36.	Strong, Ann (Editor), Procedures for Radiochemical Analysis at the Eastern Environmental Radiation Laboratory,
EERL Report No. 7X-XXXX (Draft), Eastern Environmental Research Laboratory, U. S. Environmental Protection
Agency, Montgomery, Alabama. (Undated; Ca. 1972)
37.	Thompson, J. F. (Editor). Analysis of Pesticide Residues iii Human arid Environmental Samples, U. S. Environmental
Protection Agency, Perrine Primate Research Laboratories, Perrine, Florida, January 1971.
38.	Thurston, A. D., and R. W. Knight, "Characterization of Crude and Residual-Type Oils by Fluorescent Spectroscopy,"
Environmental Science arid Technology, 5:64-69 (1971).
39.	Zaifirion, 0., et al., "Correlation of Oils and Oil Products by Gas Chromatography," Woods Hole Oceanographic
Institution, Report No. 62-55, July 1, 1962. (Method description received from Oil Spills Research Branch,
U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, National Environmental Research Center, Edison, New Jersey.)
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