™.Em
Times
NEWS FOR AND ABOUT EPA EMPLOYEES
~ Special Map Issue
VOLUME 2
NUMBER 2
OCTOBER 31, 1984
I
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DDLETOWN S LEONARDO
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People
Agency Activities
Retiree: Fred Grant, 20 years, Region 3.
The third annual Bryce Harlow Award presented to Ad-
ministrator William Ruckelshaus for his "significant and
measurable" contributions to the advancement of business-
government relations.
Quality Step Increases awarded to: James MacDonald,
Office of the Inspector General . . . Linda Baric, Janice
Bartel, Stephen Copeland, Anthony Dappolone, Ann
Donaldson, Lillian Greenberg, Judith Klink, Patricia
McGinty, Thomas Merski, Lee Murphy, Anna Geinke,
Charles Rhodes, Dianne Stedman, Frances Stewart, Koge
Suto, Elizabeth Traina, Ramona Tropato, William Tho-
mas, Theresa Viola, Colleen Walling, Harriet West, How-
ard Wilson, and Kathleen Wojnar, Region 3.
Continued Superior Performance Awards to: Alison
Kerester, Andrea Blashka, Debra Taylor, and Albert Col-
lie, Toxic Substances . . . Barbara Beamer, Marie Pfaff,
Lorraine Inglis, Ernestine Smothers, Bonnie Bazemore,
Shirley Simpler, Maria Pelham, and Dorothy Richards,
Research and Development . . . Willard Smith, Stephen
Greene, and Steve Steckler, Policy, Planning & Evaluation
. . . Richard Mays, Enforcement and Compliance Monitor-
ing . . . Richard Eaton, Carmella Fantazzi, Carol Johnson,
Joyce Clauser, Gilda Coker, Joseph Kotlinski, William
Klettner, Lora Kociban, David Lorentz, Helen McCue, Jean
Susini, and Karen Wolper, Region
Special Act Awards presented to: Charles Auer, Toxic
Substances . . . Portia Perry, Consordoria Cook, Scottie
Schaeffer, and Beverly Farmarco, Research and Develop-
ment . . . Joyce Clauser, Gilda Coker, Joseph Kotlinski,
Mary Moses, Rosemarie Nino, Sheila Panageris, Maria
Sanchez, and Maureen Zacharias, Region 3. ~
Available Information
Selections of possible general interest to EPA emp/oyees.
President's Private Sector Survey on Cost Control: A Re-
port to the President. (The Grace Commission Report),
1984. REF JK421 U55
State of the Environment: An Assessment at Mid-
Decade: A Report from the Conservation Foundation,
1984. REF TD 171.S74
Environmental Quality 1983: 14th Annual Report of the
Council on Environmental Quality. REF HCllO E5E28
Microcomputer Software Directory, 1983. QA 76.5.M52
The World Environmental Handbook: A Directory of
Government Natural Resource Management Agencies in
244 Countries, 1983. REF S920.A52
The Pollution Control Policy of the European Com-
munities, 1983. HC 240.9 E5J63
State of the World, 1984: A Worldwatch Institute Re-
port on Progress Toward a Sustainable Society, 1984. HC
59. S7
America's National Parks and Their Keepers, 1984.
SB482.A4F67
The Androgynous Manager, 1981. HD 38.S3143
Environment, Natural Systems, and Development: An
Economic Valuation Guide, 1983. HC 79.E5E573 ~
$14,600 penalty sought against the Arlington County,
VA, public school system for federal asbestos rule viola^
tions. The complaint alleges that the system failed to cd^
plete and maintain the required inspection forms at its
central administrative office; and to post the required pub-
lic notice and keep required inspection and notification
records at three schools.
Proposed agreement submitted to D.C. District Court in
settlement of a suit alleging that regulatory decisions on
pesticides were made during closed-door negotiations be-
tween EPA and industry. Under the agreement, the Agency
would go forward with a proposed rule under which great-
er opportunities would be provided for public partici-
pation in pesticide regulatory decisions.
Agency proposes to increase, from $10,000 to $40,000,
the fees charged for processing a petition to set basic pes-
ticide tolerance levels. Tolerance levels are the maximum
permissible residue levels limiting the amount of a pesti-
cide in a food commodity. Law requires that the tolerance
setting process be as self-supporting as possible. An Agency
study has estimated that the cost of processing petitions in
Fiscal Year 1982 was approximately $3.6 million while
fees earned by the agency for petitions were approximately
$750,000.
Environmental News		
A selection of noteworthy lines chosen from I he 300-400 newspaper and
magazine articles on environmental mutters ivhich ivc receive every two
weeks.
"Doubtless you've seen ads for those ultrasonic devices
that are supposed to emit some kind of wave that drives
insect pests away screaming. Well, according to the U.S.
Department of Agriculture, not only do they not drive
pests away—they may actually attract some."—The Arizo-
na Republic, 9/2.
"A former Teamsters Union and carting company official
testified at a State Assembly hearing today that organized
crime figures were using their control of trash collection
concerns to rule the separate, lucrative business of dispos-
ing of toxic wastes."—The New York Times, 9/20.
"Although the white, chalky mineral was used in the
walls and ceilings of many homes built before the 1950's
and in roofing shingles, vinyl floor tiles, pipe and furnace
insulation and paints and patching compounds in homes
built before 1978, little research has been done on the
dangers of asbestos in home construction. 'By and large
no one has been looking at homes,' said Dr. Irving J.
Seliokoff of the Environmental Sciences Laboratory at the
Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Now it's forcing itself on
our attention."'—The New York Times, 9 /20.
"The U.S. Court of Appeals ruled Friday that the federal
government can order recalls and repairs of automobile^
regardless of their age or mileage. The court upheld, 8-d^j
a 1980 rule by the Environmental Protection Agency that
requires manufacturers to repair cars and engines that
have been subject to recall, but have exceeded their statu-
tory 'useful lives' of five years or 50,000 miles at the time
of repair."—Detroit Free Press, 9/8.

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Around EPA
Honda Civic Coupe HF has captured the highest
§'leage rating at 49 miles per gallon in city driving and
Impg on the highway for the second year in a row,
according to the 1985 mileage figures. Other top rated cars
are the Chevrolet Sprint, rated at 47 mpg in the city and
53 mpg on the highway; the Nissan Sentra, rated at 45
mpg and 50 mpg; and the Ford Escort and Lincoln-
Mercury Lynx, both rated at 43 and 52 mpg.
EPA has installed a nylon-reinforced plastic curtain
over a lake in northern Wisconsin as part of a two-year
study to determine the biological effects of acid rain. Next:
a project that will gradually increase the acidification of
half of the lake over the next four years and study the
biological effects.
Eleven Southern California gasoline manufacturers have
received official notice from EPA that a total of $8.1 mil-
lion in civil penalties has been proposed against them for
violating provisions of the Clean Air Act governing the use
of alcohol in gasoline. The penalties sought in these ac-
tions are by far the largest ever proposed for the use of
prohibited alcohol additives in gasoline. The Agency
charges that the companies broke the law when methanol,
used to increase octane ratings, was added to unleaded
gasoline without the cosolvents and additives needed to
prevent an increase in automotive emissions. ~
Revised regulations published concerning the Federal
Employees Health Benefits Program. One major revision
expands enrollment opportunities to allow changes when
a spouse's non-federal coverage is lost because of a layoff.
Ask your servicing personnel office for further details.
Facilities and Support Services has asked Lt. Jim Bullard
to return to Waterside Mall to present his demonstration
and lecture on self-defense techniques for warding off
attackers. Originally developed for the Memphis, Tennes-
see Police Department, Lt. Bullard has taken his "Memphis
Message" across the country. Although sometimes de-
scribed as controversial, his approach is unforgettable. Be
sure to participate in "The Memphis Message" Friday,
November 2 from 10:00 to 11:15 in Room 3906-08, Water-
side Mall.
Those interested in delivering papers to the Fifth Inter-
national Symposium on Agricultural Wastes should con-
tact Mark Purschwitz, American Society of Agricultural
Engineers, 2950 Niles Road, St. Joseph, Ml 49085-9659.
The symposium is co-sponsored by EPA.
Papers are invited for the American Water Resources
Association's symposium on tropical hydrology to be held
next spring. Contact Ferdinand Quinones, U.S\Geological
Survey, WRD, GPO Box 4424, San Juan, P.R. 00936. ~
"The New Jersey Supreme Court ruled, 5 to 0, today that
the state's Spill Compensation Fund law, which taxes
chemical companies to pay for cleaning up toxic wastes, is
constitutional and not preempted by Federal law."—The
New York Times, 9/20.
"Mayor Pro Tem Ralph Shotswell, leading a group of
about 30 protesters, some dubbing themselves the Wil-
mer 7, was arrested Tuesday night as he tried to take a
test sample of the soil from the privately owned dump site
in Wilmer. Former owners of a controversial West Dallas
lead smelter are dumping 28,000 cubic yards of tainted
soil at the site as part of a court-ordered cleanup
program."—Dallas Times Herald, 9/12.
"Indoor air pollution and psychological stress from
poorly designed jobs are among health hazards confronting
millions of American office workers, according to a report
prepared for the Office of Technology Assessment. 'While
these problems are non-life-threatening or -shortening,' the
study concluded, 'some are potentially disabling, often
cause unnecessary discomfort and can be extensively cost-
ly in terms of lost workdays."—The New York Times, 9/19.
"An array of new evidence linking human i 1 less to drug-
resistant bacteria in meat has rekindled a campaign to ban
the use of antibiotics in animal feed. American drug com-
panies sold $270 million worth of antibiotics last year for
»e in animal feed, according to the Animal Health In-
tate, a drug industry group. Scientists have known for
years that the penicillin and tetracycline routinely fed to
animals kill off a wide range of bacteria, but allow other,
hardy strains of bacteria to flourish."—The New York
Times, 9/16.
"The $350 million-a-year high-performance auto parts
industry in California, born in the garages of hot rod en-
thusiasts more than 30 years ago, is scrambling to survive
because of the effects of the nation's toughest anti-
pollution laws. Manufacturers, distributors and retailers of
emissions-related auto parts . . . say their sales have plum-
meted since California's mandatory vehicle inspection pro-
gram went into effect last April."—Los Angeles Times, 9/
16.
"Scientists at the University ot Illinois have developed a
plant-killing substance that enlists sunlight to cause weeds
to destroy themselves, university officials and the National
Science Foundation report. The new compound, a herbi-
cide activated by sunlight, is considered a significant
breakthrough because it is believed to hold no danger for
man or other animals and is highly selective, destroying
many common weeds without harming food crops."—The
New York Times, 9/17. ~
Note: Due to a delay in contract processing for FY 1985,
no issue of The EPA Times was published on the last
scheduled publication date (October 17, 1984],
We are sorry for any inconvenience this hiatus may have
caused employees.
The EPA Times is published 24 times per year to provide news and
information for and about EPA employees Readers are encouraged to 'l
submit news of themselves and of fellow employees, letters ol opinion,
questions, comments, and suggestions to. Miles Allen. Editor, The EPA
Times, Office of Public Affairs (A-107). Telephone 382-4394 Information
selected for publication will be edited as necessary in keeping with
space available

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f~~T
3( ANCHORAGE
>#^VNEAU
. % •Hi.*
In ANCHORAGE, AK
4 on C Street (RO)
In JUNEAU, AK
7 on Hospital Drive (RO)
In SEATTLE, WA & Vincinity
311 on 6th Ave. (RO)
22 in Manchester (RL)
In NEWPORT, OR
33 at Marine Science Ctr. (RD)
In CORVALLIS, OR
138 at Envir. Res. Lab (RD)
35 at Fish Toxics Lab (RD)
In BOISE, ID
12 on W. Washington Street
(RO)
In HELENA, MT
20 on Park Avenue (RO)
In DULUTH, MN
179 at Envir. Res. Lab (RD)
In MONTICELLO, MN
35 at Field Station (RD)
SEATTLE
In CHICAGO, IL
667 on Dearborn Street (RO)
114 on Clark Street (RL)
33 on Jackson Dlvd. (RO)
In CINCINNATI, OH &
Vincinity
528 at Envir. Res. Center (RD)
48 at Test & Eval. Center (RD)
15 on Center Hill Road (RD)
10 at Newton Fish Toxics Sta-
tion (RD)
In ANN ARBOR, MI
320 at M.V. Emissions Lab(AR)
In GROSSE ILE, MI
26 at Large Lakes Res. Station
(RD)
In WESTLAKE, OH
24 on Center Ridge Road (RO)
/NEWPORT
CORVALLIS
HELENA
BOISE
SACRAMENTO
\
"ALAMEDA
SAN FRANCISCO
LAS VEGAS
CHAPE
MONTGOMERY'
DALLAS
In SACRAMENTO, CA
7 on I Street (ARM)
In ALAMEDA, CA
7 on Central Ave. (RL)
In SAN FRANCISCO. CA
514 on Fremont Street (RO)
In LAS VEGAS, NV
437 at Envir. Monitoring Lab
(RD)
In DENVER, CO & Vincinity
341 on Lincoln Street (RO)
115 in Lakewood (PTS)
19 at DFC #53 (EN)
18 at DFC #53 (RO)
\BAY ST. LOUIS
»GULF BREEZE
HOUSTON
In KANSAS CITY, KS & MO
286 in Oak Bldg. (RO)
72 on Funston Road (RL)
In ADA, OK
97 at Envir. Res. Lab (RD)
In DALLAS, TX
532 on Elm Street (RO)
18 on Commerce Street (RO)
In HOUSTON, TX
26 on Hornwood Dr. (RO)
In MONTGOMERY, AL
35 at E. Envir. Radiation F|
(AR)
In GULF BREEZE, FL
127 at Envir. Res. Lab (RD)
In BAY ST. LOUIS, MS
20 at Pesticide Lab (PTS)

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