SEFft
  United States
  Environmental Protection
  Agency
EPA-100-B-08-001 I June 2008 I www.epa.gov
                    A Business Guide to U.S. EPA
                    Climate Partnership Programs

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              A Business Guide to U.S. EPA Climate Partnership Programs


                                        Version 1.0
                                        June 2008
                          U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                              1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW
                                  Washington, DC 20460
                              NCEI

                             NATIONAL CENTER FOR
                             ENVIRONMENTAL INNOVATION              Business for Social Responsibility
Acknowledgments
This guide was written and produced by the National Center for Environmental Innovation at the
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).
Business for Social Responsibility (BSR), the global business membership organization that specializes in corpo-
rate responsibility, has helped conceive this guide and provided critical input.
The EPA would like to thank Barbara-Anne Mansfield, Eric Olson, Ryan Schuchard, and Emma Stewart, of BSR;
Joel Makower of GreenBiz; and Brian Swett, formerly with BSR. We would also like to thank Dennis Canavan of
Johnson & Johnson; Ronald E. Meissen, Ph.D., of Baxter Healthcare Corporation; and Steven C. Schultz of the
3M Company.

How to Obtain Copies
You can electronically download copies of this document from the EPA Partnership Programs Web site at
.

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Contents
Introduction	3
   Why Climate Change Is a Business Issue	3
   Why EPA Partnership Programs?	5
   Climate Strategy for Business	6
Program Finder Table	8
Program Profiles	10
       AgStar	10
       Best Workplaces for Commuters	11
       Coalbed Methane Outreach Program	12
       Climate Leaders	13
       Coal Combustion Products Partnership	14
       Combined Heat and Power Partnership	15
       Design for the Environment Safer Product Recognition Program	16
       Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT)	17
       ENERGY STAR Labeling	18
       ENERGY STAR Commercial Buildings	19
       ENERGY STAR Industry	20
       ENERGY STAR Qualified New Homes	21
       Great American Woodstove Changeout Campaign	22
       GreenChill Advanced Refrigeration Partnership	23
       Green Power Partnership	24
       GreenScapes	25
       Green Suppliers Network (GSN)	26
       Home Performance with ENERGY STAR	27
       Laboratories for the 21st Century	28
       Landfill Methane Outreach Program (LMOP)	29
       Lean and the Environment Initiative	30
       Methane to Markets Partnership	31
       Mobile Air Conditioning Climate Protection Partnership	32
       National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency	33
       Natural Gas STAR	34
       Outdoor Hydronic Heaters	35
       Performance Track (National Environmental Performance Track)	36
       PFC Emission Reduction Partnership	37
       Plug-In to eCycling	38
       Responsible Appliance Disposal Program	39

                                                                                      Table of Contents

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       SF6 Emission Reduction Partnership for Electric Power Systems	40
       Smart Growth Network	41
       Smart Way Transport Partnership	42
       Voluntary Aluminum Industrial Partnership	43
       WasteWise	44
       WaterSense	45
Appendix A: Resources	47
            The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is pleased to present this Business Guide to U.S. EPA
            Climate Partnership Programs. This guide, developed in response to requests from the non-profit busi-
            ness organization, BSR, and others, is designed to help you identify those EPA Partnership Programs that
       make the most sense for your business and climate stewardship.
       How to  Use  this  Guide
       This guide has been designed to make it as easy as possible for businesses to find the EPA Partnership Programs
       that are most relevant to their businesses.
        Step 1—Find programs applicable to your industry using the Program Finder Table.
        Step 2—Review Program Profiles for the programs applicable to your industry. The  "Program Profiles"
                section of this guide provides a profile of each climate-related EPA Partnership Program, listed in
                alphabetical order. A program Web site and contact is provided in each of the program profiles for
                further information.
        Step 3—Contact the programs to learn more about program benefits, services, resources, and commit-
                ments required.
        Step 4—Consider participation in a program.
A Business Guide to
U.S. EPA Climate Partnership Programs

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 Introduction
The Climate Risk
According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate
Change (IPCC), warming of the climate system is unequiv-
ocal. Greenhouse gases (GHGs) are at their highest levels
in at least 400,000 years. Climate change is increasingly a
priority for consumers and investors. Ultimately, business-
es must respond to the priorities of their consumers and
investors, as represented by their purchase and investment
decisions.

The Business Opportunity
Energy represents a major cost but also a major oppor-
tunity for American business. American businesses and
consumers are realizing that getting the most out of their
energy dollars just makes sense. By making smart energy
choices, millions of household and business energy con-
sumers save billions of dollars each year. In 2006 alone,
with the help of EPA's ENERGY STAR® program, Ameri-
cans saved $14 billion on their energy bills while prevent-
ing the GHG emissions equivalent to 25 million vehicles.
Companies can benefit in two ways:
  1) By addressing climate impacts in their own operations
    and driving waste out of manufacturing, transport, and
    delivery functions.
  2) Carving out a share of the growing market in more
    efficient,  cleaner products and services.

The Value of EPA Partnership Programs
Many signs suggest the business community is begin-
ning to confront the climate issue on a wide scale. There
are now more than 13,000 firms and other organizations
participating in climate-related EPA Partnership Programs.
Through participation, these organizations have invested in
energy efficiency, clean energy supply, and other climate-
friendly technologies,1 reaping value such as:
  •  Substantial energy cost savings.
  •  Improved operating efficiencies.
  •  Improved risk management.
  •  Expanded market opportunities.
  •  Improved job satisfaction, employee recruiting, and
    worker productivity.
  •  Enhanced brand and corporate reputation.
EPA Partnership Programs also offer partners a wide
variety of valuable services and resources to reduce GHG
emissions.

Why Climate Change Is  a Business

Issue
This guide explains how EPA Partnership Programs fit into
an action agenda for business. Specifically, taking action
on climate can contribute to your business in at least five
ways:
  1. Addressing climate change can save your company
    money.
The editor of Harvard Business Review wrote in October
2007:
    Thoughtful business people need a structure—
    now—with which to organize ideas about climate
    change so they can understand how it affects their
    strategy, their operations, and the  context in which
    they compete, in order to make plans and take
    action—now. "2
In the past decade, numerous studies have documented
the savings businesses realize by  improving the energy
efficiency of their operations. By making smart energy
choices, millions of household and business consumers
save billions of dollars each year.
  2. Addressing climate change can reduce business
    risks.
As Daniel C. Esty and Andrew S. Winston point out in
Green to Gold,
    Environmental missteps can  create public rela-
    tions nightmares, destroy markets  and careers, and
    knock billions off the value of a company. Compa-
    nies that do not add environmental thinking to their
    strategy arsenal risk missing upside opportunities
    in markets that are increasingly shaped by environ-
    mental factors.3
Given the growing prominence of the climate issue, rapidly
evolving state and national energy policies, rising world
energy costs, the climate-related risks and risk-avoidance
opportunities are substantial. Your customers and suppliers
might also be affected by these same dynamics and there-
fore search for suppliers who take climate change seriously.
1 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. (2007, September). ENERGY STAR and Other Climate Protection Partnerships: 2006 Annual Report.
  http://www.energystar.gov/ia/news/downloads/annual_report_2006.pdf
2 Stewart, T. (2007, October). From the Editor, Hot Water. Harvard Business Review.
3 Esty, D.C. and Winston, A. S. (2006). Green to Gold: How Smart Companies Use Environmental Strategy to Innovate, Create Value, and Build Competitive
  Advantage. Yale University Press.
                                                                                                      Introduction

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  3. Addressing climate change can expand and open
    new markets for your company.
In an interview on his company's business strategy Jeffrey
Immelt, chairman and CEO of General Electric (GE), com-
mented in Harvard Business Review that:
    The goal was to strengthen the company by picking
    a theme that was bigger than just energy, or rail,
    or aircraft engines, or plastics. We 'd never done
    anything like that before. But in 2004, it came up in
    our strategic-planning process... that there was a
    big theme emerging across five different business-
    es—a real focus on emissions reduction, energy
    efficiency, water supply, and what I would call the
    economics of scarcity...
Climate change was a fundamental component of GE's
"Ecomagination" strategy that came from this key insight.
GE realized that its future markets would be driven by
society's need to address climate change and other environ-
mental issues. As a result, GE committed to investing $1.5
billion in research and development related to environmen-
tal products and to growing revenues from its Ecomagina-
tion initiative to $20 billion by 2010.
Similarly, in almost every sector of the U.S. economy,
markets will be affected directly by the consequences of
climate change or indirectly by customers' commitment to
addressing climate change. For companies that anticipate
and address these market drivers, climate change can be a
business opportunity; for those that fail to do so, it can be a
fundamental threat.
  4. Addressing climate change can enhance your com-
    pany's reputation.
A company's "intangible value"—its knowledge, its brand
value, and its reputation with its  employees, customers,
investors, and key stakeholders—can account for more
than 50 percent of its value4. Whether and how a company
addresses climate change increasingly contributes to its
intangible value. It affects its value chain and key markets.
It affects how the public regards its brand—either as a
responsible company helping to solve a key environmental
problem facing society or as a company seeking short-term
profits at society's expense. It affects how its employees
regard it and its ability to maintain a quality workforce in
competitive labor markets. It also affects how investors
regard the company.
 5. Addressing climate change can enhance sharehold-
    er value.
Innovest Strategic Value Advisors conducted a study
entitled  Carbon Bettf and Equity Performance: Moving
From Disclosure to Performance5 to evaluate the relation-
ship among climate change, companies' ability to manage
the associated risks and opportunities, and companies'
financial performance. Innovest examined more than 800
companies in high impact sectors (those sectors  most
exposed to carbon risk) and across regions of the world to
compare carbon "leaders" to carbon "laggards." Among the
study's key findings:
 •  Companies' risk exposure to climate change varies
    widely, both between and even within different indus-
    try  sectors and geographic regions.
 •  Companies with the most robust climate risk man-
    agement architecture and ability to seize competitive
    opportunities on the upside have tended to outperform
    their same-sector peers financially over the past three
    years.
 •  The "Carbon Beta® premium" for leading companies
    appears to be growing larger over time, as regulatory
    regimes tighten around the world.
4 Low, J. and Kalafut, P.C. (2002). Invisible Advantage: How Intangibles Are Driving Business Performance. Perseus Books Group.
A Business Guide to
U.S. EPA Climate Partnership Programs

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                 INNOVEST Analysis: Carbon  BETA Leaders and Laggards Globally5
             120%
             100%
             -20%
              Jun2004  Sep2004 Dec2004  Mar2005  Jun2005  Sep2005  Dec2005 Mar2006  Jun2006  Sep2006  Dec2006  Mar2007 Jun2007

                           Difference ^™Above Average Innovest Rating (World) ^"Below Average Innovest Rating (World)
Why  EPA Partnership Programs?
EPA Partnership Programs offer participating companies a
wide variety of valuable services and resources to reduce
GHGs.
Benchmarking and Recognition
For those firms interested in environmental performance
benchmarking and public recognition, EPA is uniquely
positioned to help communicate your commitment and ac-
tions credibly to a wide local, state, regional, national, and
international audience. Through the EPA Climate Leaders
Program, for example, your company can create a last-
ing record of its GHG emissions reduction activities and
accomplishments, and it can identify itself as a corporate
environmental leader and strategically position itself as
climate change policy continues to unfold.

National Reach and Collaboration
By joining an EPA Partnership Program, a business fre-
quently gains access not just to EPA resources and services
but often those of many other organizations. EPA is one
of the few environmental bodies with national reach. EPA
regional offices, laboratories, grantees, and consultants
routinely participate in EPA Partnership Programs targeting
the business community. Through these programs, EPA has
forged thousands of collaborative partnerships with ad-
vocacy organizations, research organizations, community
groups, business associations, professional associations,
utilities, universities, schools, and state and local govern-
ments.

Services and Resources
EPA Partnership Programs offer partners a wide variety of
valuable services and resources to reduce GHG emissions.
Most programs offer technical assistance, professional
networking, and public recognition. Many offer financial
and environmental analysis tools, training, seminars, guide-
books, toolkits, and environmental performance bench-
marking. Others help businesses identify potential buyers
and sellers of environmentally superior products and con-
nect them to environmental financing opportunities.

Regulatory  Role
EPA is also one of the few U.S. bodies with environmental
regulatory powers at the federal level. As more and more
states adopt new and mandatory climate policies and as
climate policy  continues to evolve at the federal level, EPA
is in a unique position to help business partners prepare for
these changes.
5 Innovest Strategic Value Advisors. (2007, October). Carbon Beta and Equity Prices: From Disclosure to Performance.
  http://www.innovestgroup.com/images/pdf/carbonbetaequityperformance.pdf. Used with permission from Inovest.
                                                                                                       Introduction

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Early Credit and Regulatory Developments
By participating in EPA Partnership Programs, companies
can develop a comprehensive climate change strategy, which
often results in quantifiable GHG emissions reductions and
a lasting record of GHG emissions reduction activities and
accomplishments. Through EPA Partnership Programs,
companies also have the opportunity to strategically position
themselves as climate change policy continues to unfold.

Climate Strategy for  Business
The programs profiled in this guide can serve as critical
components of your company's climate strategy. This guide
will help you find programs that best address the specific
climate risks and opportunities for your firm. Companies
can join these programs one at a time or as a package as
part of a more comprehensive climate strategy.

Climate Leaders
The Climate Leaders program is an EPA industry-govern-
ment partnership specifically designed to help companies
develop and implement a robust climate change strategy.
Climate Leaders is the most comprehensive EPA Partner-
ship Program targeting the climate issue. Companies in the
program address the major risks and opportunities associ-
ated with climate change by developing and implementing
GHG reduction initiatives to reach goals set in the program.
Since 2002, Climate Leaders has provided valuable guidance
and recognition to leading companies to help them develop
and implement long-term, comprehensive corporate-wide
climate change strategies. Climate Leaders partners range
from Fortune 100 corporations to small businesses and
represent a variety of industries and sectors, from manufac-
turers and utilities to financial institutions and retailers, with
total U.S. revenues of more than $1 trillion.
Under Climate Leaders, firms take all steps commonly
associated with comprehensive climate change strategy.
They commit to reducing their impacts on the global
environment by completing corporate-wide inventories of
their GHG emissions, implementing management plans for
data consistency, setting five- to 10-year reduction goals,
developing an action plan, and reporting progress to EPA an-
nually. Through Climate Leaders, your company can create
credible and lasting records of its GHG emissions reduction
activities and accomplishments. Your company can also
identify itself as corporate environmental leader and stra-
tegically position your company as climate change policy
continues to unfold. To learn more about Climate Leaders,
please see the "Program Profiles" section of this guide.

Additional  Climate Strategy Resources
If you are considering adopting a comprehensive climate
strategy, there are several other publications on climate
strategy for business that are worth reviewing. More
information on how to access these resources is available
in Appendix A.
  •  A Program Guide to Climate Leaders, EPA's Climate
    Leaders.
  •  Issue Brief on Climate Change, Business for Social
    Responsibility.
  •  A Three-Pronged Approach to Corporate Climate
    Strategy, Business for Social Responsibility.
  •  Getting Ahead of the Curve: Corporate Strategies That
    Address Climate Change, The Pew Center on Global
    Climate Change and the University of Michigan.
  •  Hot Climate, Cool Commerce: A Service Sector
    Guide to Greenhouse Gas Management, World
    Resources Institute.
  •  A Climate of Innovation: Northeast Business Action to
    Reduce Greenhouse Gases, World Resources Institute.
  •  Offsetting Emissions: A Business Brief on the
    Voluntary Carbon Market (Second Edition),
    Business for Social Responsibility.
  •  Beyond Neutrality: Moving Your Company Toward
    Climate Leadership, Business for  Social Responsibility.
  •  Getting Carbon Offsets Right, Business for Social
    Responsibility.
A Business Guide to
U.S. EPA Climate Partnership Programs

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Introduction

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                                Program Finder Table (page 1 of 2)

Partnership Program
Ag STAR
Best Workplaces for
Commuters
Coalbed Methane Outreach
Program
Climate Leaders
Coal Combustion Products
Partnership
Combined Heat and Power
Partnership
Design for the Environment
Safer Product Recognition
Program
Electronic Product
Environmental Assessment
Tool (EPEAT) *
ENERGY STAR Labeling
ENERGY STAR Commercial
Buildings
ENERGY STAR Industry
ENERGY STAR Qualified New
Homes
Great American Woodstove
Changeout Campaign
GreenChill Advanced
Refrigeration Partnership
Green Power Partnership
GreenScapes
Green Suppliers Network
Home Performance with
ENERGY STAR
Labs for the 21st Century
Landfill Methane Outreach
Program
Lean and the Environment
Initiative *
Industry Sectors
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A Business Guide to
U.S. EPA Climate Partnership Programs

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                                      Program Finder Table (page 2 of 2)

Partnership Program
Methane to Markets
Partnership
Mobile Air Conditioning
Climate Protection
Partnership
National Action Plan for
Energy Efficiency *
Natural Gas STAR
Outdoor Hydronic Heaters
Performance Track
PFC Emission Reduction
Partnership
Plug-In to eCycling
Responsible Appliance
Disposal Program
SF. Emission Reduction
b
Partnership for Electric
Power Systems
Smart Growth Network*
SmartWay Transport
Partnership
Voluntary Aluminum
Industrial Partnership
WasteWise
WaterSense
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! Please note that this program is an EPA-supported program, but it is not formally considered an EPA Partnership Program.
                                                                                                       Program Finder

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Program  Profiles
  Business Value:
  3 Cost savings/operational efficiency
  3 Risk management
                        Services Offered:
                        a Analytical tools
                        [^Guidebooks/toolkits
                        [3 Professional networking
                        [3 Public recognition
                        [3 Technical assistance
                        a Training/seminars
 Web site:
www.epa.gov/agstar
  Contact Information:
Kurt Roos
(202) 343-9041
roos.kurt@epa.gov
 Description:
This program is jointly sponsored by EPA, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and
the U.S. Department of Energy. The program encourages the profitable use of methane
recovery (biogas) technologies at confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) that
manage manure as liquids or slurries. These technologies reduce methane emissions
while achieving other environmental benefits.
 Business case:
Utilizing anaerobic digester (AD) technology can reduce odors and provide improved
manure management. Use of AD systems allows for the capture of biogas and the
possible use of methane as an energy source for on and off-farm energy needs. AD
biogas has been used for a variety of purposes including generating heat, hot water, and
electricity. Other opportunities for using methane include absorption cooling systems,
producing high-Btu gas for injection into the natural gas pipeline, and development of
alternate liquid and gaseous vehicle fuels. Markets are also growing for the use of the
animal processed fibers (manure solids), primarily in the horticulture industry.
  Services:
AgSTAR offers project development resources, including a Web-based tool to assess
project feasibility, and provides technical assistance, publishes information and guide-
books, and sponsors events and workshops.
 Value to environment:
 Sectors most applicable:
The AgSTAR Program has successfully encouraged the development and adoption
of anaerobic digestion technologies. Since 1994, the number of operational digester
systems in the United States has grown to more than 125, producing significant benefits.
In 2007, AgSTAR AD systems in the United States reduced 80,000 tons of methane
emissions and generated 275 million kilowatt-hours of energy.
Agriculture
A Business Guide to
U.S. EPA Climate Partnership Programs

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Workplaces
for Commuters"
             Best Workplaces for Commuters
Business Value:
3 Brand/reputation protection/enhancement
3 Cost savings/operational efficiency
3 Enhanced employee recruiting/productivity
                        Services Offered:
                        3 Environmental  performance benchmarking
                        a'Guidebooks/tool kits
                        3 Professional networking
                        3 Public recognition
                        3 Technical assistance
                        3 Training/seminars
Web site:
www.bestworkplaces.org
Contact Information:
Julie Bond
National Center for Transit Research
University of South Florida
(813) 974-9799
bond@cutr.usf.edu
Description:
Best Workplaces for Commuters™ is an innovative, voluntary business-government
program, started by EPA and the U.S. Department of Transportation but now oper-
ated by the University of South Florida's National Center for Transit Research, that
distinguishes—and provides national recognition to—employers offering outstanding
traffic-reducing commuter benefits such as free or discounted transit passes, vanpool
services, or telework programs. Employers meeting a National Standard of Excellence
in commuter benefits get on the list of Best Workplaces for Commuters—a fast-grow-
ing mark of excellence in environmental leadership.
Business case:
Employers qualifying as Best Workplaces for Commuters report improved employee
job satisfaction and productivity, reduced parking facility costs, improved employee
recruiting, and improved community relations.
Services:
The program offers public recognition, technical assistance, training, Web-based tools
to estimate financial and environmental benefits, guidebooks in implementing com-
muter benefits, and professional networking opportunities.
Value to environment:
Sectors most applicable:
Research shows that qualifying employers will achieve a 15-percent reduction in com-
muter vehicle trips, miles traveled, fuel consumption, and vehicle-related emissions.
                                                                                               Program Profiles

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  Business Value:
  3 Cost savings/operational efficiency
  3 New/expanded markets
  0 Risk management
                        Services Offered:
                        [^Analytical tools
                        3 Professional networking
                        3 Technical assistance
                        3 Training/seminars
  Web site:
www. e pa .gov/coa I bed
  Contact Information:
Pamela Franklin
(202) 343-9476
franklin.pamela@epa.gov
  Description:
The Coalbed Methane Outreach Program (CMOP) is a voluntary program that promotes
the profitable recovery and use, rather than emission, of coal mine methane (CMM),
a GHG over 20 times as potent as carbon dioxide. If recovered, CMM can serve as an
alternative and profitable energy source.
  Business case:
CMOP helps coal mine owners, mine operators, project developers, and investors put
CMM to profitable use. Methane is removed from coal mines using large-scale ventila-
tion systems, which may be supplemented by degasification systems used in advance of,
during, or after mining activity. After recovery, CMM can be profitably used for natural
gas pipeline injection, power production, co-firing in boilers, district heating, coal dry-
ing, vehicle fuel, and industrial feedstocks.
  Services:
CMOP offers tools to maximize profitable methane reductions, provides technical and
analytical assistance to identify and assess technologies, site-specific feasibility, policy
issues, and financing mechanisms. CMOP sponsors workshops, networking opportuni-
ties, and international activities through the Methane to Markets Partnership.
  Value to environment:
  Sectors most applicable:
Capturing and using CMM has benefits for the local and global environment, including
mitigating GHG emissions and utilizing a clean energy resource. Since 1994, CMOP
has assisted U.S. projects to capture and use over 300 billion cubic feet of CMM.
Coal mining
A Business Guide to
U.S. EPA Climate Partnership Programs

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CLIMATED
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
Business Value:
3 Brand/reputation protection/enhancement
0 Cost savings/operational efficiency
3 New/expanded  markets
3 Risk management
                       Services Offered:
                       3 Analytical tools
                       3 Environmental performance benchmarking
                       3 Guidebooks/toolkits
                       3 Professional networking
                       0 Public recognition
                       0 Technical assistance
                       0 Training/seminars
Web site:
www.epa.gov/climateleaders
Contact Information:
Jim Sullivan
(202) 343-9241
sullivan.jamest@epa.gov
Description:
The Climate Leaders program works with companies to develop comprehensive climate
change strategies. Partner companies commit to reducing their impact on the global en-
vironment by completing a corporate-wide inventory of their GHG emissions based on
a quality management system, setting aggressive reduction goals, and annually report-
ing progress to EPA. Through program participation, companies create credible records
of accomplishment and receive EPA recognition as environmental leaders.
Business case:
Addressing climate risk is a key objective for many leading companies. Investors, cus-
tomers, and suppliers are increasingly seeking information on corporate climate strate-
gies that benefit the bottom line, reduce uncertainty, and create market opportunities.
Services:
Climate Leaders provides partners with technical assistance and resources for develop-
ing GHG inventories, reporting reductions, setting goals, and promoting successes. The
program also organizes workshops and events where partners can interact and provides
partners with tools to promote their successes.
Value to environment:
Sectors most applicable:
The Climate Leaders program addresses the climate impact of a firm on a comprehen-
sive basis. All sources of GHGs are considered, inventoried, and reduced, including
onsite fuel consumption and energy use, industrial processes, onsite waste disposal, on-
site air conditioning and refrigeration use, electricity and steam purchases, and mobile
sources.
                                                                                               Program Profiles

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  C¥
  COAL COMBUSTION
  PRODUCTS PARTNERSHIP
                        Coal Combustion Products Partnership
  Business Value:
  3 Cost savings/operational efficiency
  3 Research and development assistance
  3 New/expanded markets
                       Services Offered:
                       a Guidebooks/toolkits
                       Q Matching buyers sellers
                       3 Professional networking
                       3 Public recognition
                       3 Technical assistance
                       3 Training/seminars
  Web site:
www.epa.gov/c2p2
  Contact Information:
John Sager
(703) 308-7256
sager.john@epa.gov
 Description:
The Coal Combustion Products Partnership (C2P2) is a voluntary program co-sponsored
by EPA, the American Coal Ash Association, the Utility Solid Waste Activities Group,
the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agriculture
Research Service, the U.S. Federal Highway Administration, and the Electric Power Re-
search Institute. The program encourages the use of coal combustion products (CCPs),
byproducts generated from coal-fired power plants.
 Business case:
Companies can realize cost savings from avoiding coal ash and slag disposal, using
CCPs in place of other, more costly materials, and by reaping byproduct revenues from
the sale of CCPs. When using CCPs in place of or in combination with other materi-
als, companies can realize benefits in performance, based on the physical and chemical
characteristics of CCPs, including greater resistance to chemicals, increased strength,
and improved workability.
  Services:
C2P2 is promoted through an information hotline, and the program also offers regulatory
and technical resources on the use of CCPs, sponsors workshops and other events, and
conducts an awards program.
  Value to environment:
  Sectors most applicable:
Increased use of CCPs reduces energy consumption and GHG emissions because fewer
virgin materials need to be mined and processed (mining and processing activities, espe-
cially the production of cement, consume energy and produce significant GHG emis-
sions). Use of CCPs also avoids burdensome disposal.
Agriculture; building materials manufacturing; cement and lime manufacturing;
real estate development, management, and construction; utilities/power
marketers
A Business Guide to
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       CHP
 oEPA COMBINED HEAT AND
       POWER PARTNERSHIP
                         Combined Heat and Power Partnership
Business Value:
3 Cost savings/operational efficiency
                       Services Offered:
                       [^Analytical tools
                       3 Matching buyers sellers
                       3 Professional networking
                       3 Public recognition
                       3 Technical assistance
Web site:
www.epa.gov/chp
Contact Information:
Felicia Ruiz
(202)343-9129
ruiz.felicia@epa.gov
Description:
Combined heat and power (CHP), also known as cogeneration, is an efficient, clean,
and reliable approach to generating power and thermal energy from a single fuel source.
By installing a CHP system designed to meet the thermal and electrical base loads of
a facility, CHP can greatly increase the facility's operational efficiency and decrease
energy costs. At the same time, CHP reduces GHGs.
Business case:
By installing a CHP system designed to meet the thermal and electrical base loads of
a facility, CHP can greatly increase the facility's operational efficiency and decrease
energy costs.
Services:
Partners can receive public recognition, and they have access to printed and Web-based
outreach materials and various tools and resources, including an online database of
funding opportunities and an online CHP emissions calculator. EPA provides a variety
of technical assistance to energy users who are considering implementing CHP projects,
including conducting analysis of economic viability for projects, assisting in feasibility
studies, and providing information on technologies, vendors, and incentives.
Value to environment:
Sectors most applicable:
Because they capture and utilize heat that would otherwise be wasted through electric-
ity production, CHP systems require less fuel than equivalent separate heat and power
systems to produce the same amount of energy. Because less fuel is combusted, fewer
GHGs are emitted.
Agriculture; aluminum manufacturing; cement and lime manufacturing; chemi-
cal manufacturing; food processors and distributors;  general manufacturing; oil
and gas; pulp and paper manufacturing; utilities/power marketers
                                                                                            Program Profiles

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               Design for the Environment Safer Product Recognition Program
  Business Value:
  3 Cost savings/operational efficiency
  3 Risk management
                        Services Offered:
                        a Analytical tools
                        [3 Public recognition
                        a Technical assistance
  Web site:
www.epa.gov/dfe/pubs/projects/formulat/index.htm
  Contact Information:
David DiFiore
(202) 564-8796
difiore.david@epa.gov
  Description:
The Design for the Environment (DfE) Safer Product Recognition Program allows use
of its label on products made with the safest possible ingredients that are cost-effective
and high-performance. Energy efficiency is also a key attribute. The redesign of chemi-
cal products offers important opportunities to remove polluting chemicals from for-
mulations before they can enter the workplace, home, or environment, and to advance
energy and water efficiency, resource conservation, and innovative technologies.
  Business case:
Retailers, governmental purchasing entities, and others are increasingly demanding
that their suppliers provide DfE-labeled products. DfE-labeled safer concentrates save
companies money and reduce generation of GHGs in transport. Cold-water detergents
save consumers money and reduce generation of GHGs in the use phase. Safer product
design not only reduces potential chemical management liability, but achieving DfE
recognition serves as an important indicia of a company's environmental leadership and
sustainability achievements.
  Services:
DfE offers companies access to EPA's unique chemical assessment tools and expertise.
DfE provides manufacturers with information on chemical characteristics and toxicities
of raw materials and additives, safer substitutes for chemicals of concern, and innova-
tive new chemistries. DfE offers product review and recognition for a variety of formu-
lations, from concentrated cleaning products to anti-corrosion conversion coatings.
  Value to environment:
  Sectors most applicable:
DfE partnerships result in significant reduction in the handling, use and environmental
release of chemicals of concern, which may have an adverse effect on human health,
aquatic life, and ecosystems. DfE has recognized 500 products and, as of 2007, reduced
the use of chemicals of concern by approximately 80 million pounds and reduced the
generation of GHGs.
Chemical manufacturing; grocers; hospitality; hospitals; retailers
A Business Guide to
U.S. EPA Climate Partnership Programs

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             Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT)
 Business Value:
 3 Cost savings/operational efficiency
 3 New/expanded markets
                        Services Offered:
                        3 Matching buyers sellers
                        3 Technical assistance
Web site:
www.epeat.net
Contact Information:
Holly Elwood
(202) 564-8854
elwood.holly@epa.gov
Description:
EPEAT is a system to help companies evaluate, compare, select, and purchase more
sustainable desktop computers, notebooks, and monitors. EPEAT provides electronic
equipment manufacturers a clear and consistent set of performance criteria for product
design as well as new opportunities to distinguish their products in the marketplace based
on environmental performance.
The standard may be purchased from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.
EPEAT operates a verification program to ensure the credibility of the registry.
Business case:
For companies purchasing computer equipment, EPEAT provides the easiest way to specify
affordable, high-performance, environmentally preferable computer desktops, laptops, and
monitors. Because products on the EPEAT product registry must meet ENERGY STAR
requirements, companies using EPEAT save on facility energy costs. For manufacturers of
electronic equipment, the EPEAT product registry helps you reach customers seeking prod-
ucts in compliance with the IEEE 1680- 2006 environmental performance standard.
Services:
Manufacturers have access to a variety of information on the environmental performance
standards for applicable electronics. In addition, anyone may access and search the prod-
uct registry to locate qualifying products.
Value to environment:
Sectors most applicable:
Based on manufacturer data, the first six months' sales of EPEAT registered green comput-
ers in 2006 prevented approximately 50 million metric tons of air pollution including 1
million metric tons of GHGs—the equivalent of removing 852,000 cars from the road for a
year.
Appliance, electronic, industrial equipment manufacturing; hospitality; hospi-
tals; office-based businesses; retailers; semiconductor manufacturing
Please note that this program is an EPA-supported program, but it is not formally considered an EPA Partnership Program.
                                                                                                 Program Profiles

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  Business Value:
  3 Brand/reputation protection/enhancement
  3 Cost savings/operational efficiency
  3 New/expanded markets
                        Services Offered:
                        3 Guidebooks/toolkits
                        3 Professional networking
                        3 Public recognition
                        3 Technical assistance
  Web site:
www.energystar.gov
  Contact Information:
Energy Star Hotline
1-888-STAR YES (782-7937)
hotline@energystar.gov
  Description:
Since 1992, the ENERGY STAR program has helped thousands of organizations across
the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors take advantage of cost-effective op-
portunities to improve their energy efficiency and reduce GHG emissions. ENERGY
STAR qualified products allow consumers to identify the most energy efficient products
on the market without having to sacrifice performance. EPA manages the ENERGY
STAR program along with the Department of Energy (DOE).
  Business case:
Organizations of all kinds can benefit from partnering with the ENERGY STAR. Over
40,000 product models across 50 categories now display the ENERGY STAR label,
which is recognized by more than 65 percent of consumers. More than 2.5 billion quali-
fied products have been sold since the program started, including about 500 million in
2007 alone. Manufacturers of ES qualified products have the opportunity to expand
their markets, build consumer loyalty, and gain recognition as environmental leaders.
Retailers can increase sales and customer loyalty by promoting the sales  of ENERGY
STAR qualified products. In addition, ENERGY STAR provides a powerful platform
for utilities and other energy  efficiency program sponsors to boosting the efficacy and
reducing the costs of their energy efficiency programs. Currently, more than 1,300
manufacturers and 1,600 retailers and energy efficiency program sponsors are realizing
the benefits of partnering with ENERGY STAR.
All businesses, regardless of size or type, can easily reduce energy costs  and boost
employee morale by implementing an Energy Star purchasing policy or participating in
national campaigns like Change a Light, Change the World.
  Services:
EPA and its manufacturing partners develop specifications for products. EPA provides
the ENERGY STAR logo, marketing resources, sales training materials, and sponsors a
number of product-specific national campaigns through which manufacturers, retail-
ers, and program sponsors can promote sales. EPA also hosts partner network meetings
and offers opportunities for recognition through events such as the Partner of the Year
awards.
  Value to environment:
Energy efficiency is one of the lowest-cost strategies to address global climate change
by reducing the amount of emissions associated with the burning of fossil fuels to
produce energy. In 2006 alone, Americans, with the help of ENERGY STAR qualified
products, avoided greenhouse gas emissions equivalent to those from more than 10 mil-
lion vehicles, while saving almost $7 billion on their energy bills.
  Sectors most applicable:
A Business Guide to
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Business Value:
3 Brand/reputation  protection/enhancement
3 Cost savings/operational efficiency
                        Services Offered:
                        3 Environmental performance benchmarking
                        [^Guidebooks/toolkits
                        3 Professional networking
                        3 Public recognition
Web site:
www.energystar.gov
Contact Information:
Energy Star Hotline
1-888-STAR YES (782-7937)
hotline@energystar.gov
Description:
Since 1992, the ENERGY STAR program has helped thousands of organizations across
the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors take advantage of cost-effective op-
portunities to improve their energy efficiency and reduce GHG emissions.
Business case:
Organizations of all kinds can benefit from partnering with the ENERGY STAR. Man-
aging energy use strategically enables organizations of all sizes to mitigate the impact
of rising costs and volatility in energy markets, as well reducing operating costs and
distinguishing themselves as environmental leaders.
Services:
EPA provides the tools and resources necessary for strategic energy management.
Buildings owners and facility managers of all kinds of buildings can use EPA tools
to benchmark their energy and water use in order to target investments on improve-
ments—more than 60,000 buildings nationwide have already done so. Top-performing
hospitals, hotels, office buildings, retailers,  schools, grocery stores, warehouses,
dormitories, banks, courthouses can earn the Energy Star label. EPA also hosts partner
network meetings and offers opportunities for recognition at both the building and
corporate level.
Value to environment:
Sectors most applicable:
Energy efficiency is one of the lowest-cost strategies to address global climate change
by reducing the amount of emissions associated with the burning of fossil fuels to
produce energy. In 2006 alone, actions taken by ENERGY STAR Commercial Build-
ings partners avoided GHG emissions equivalent to those from more than 10 million
vehicles, while saving almost $5 billion in energy costs.
                                                                                               Program Profiles

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  Business Value:
    Brand/reputation protection/enhancement
    Cost savings/operational efficiency
                        Services Offered:
                        [^Analytical tools
                        3 Environmental performance benchmarking
                        [^Guidebooks/toolkits
                        3 Professional  networking
                        3 Public recognition
                        3 Technical assistance
  Web site:
www.energystar.gov
  Contact Information:
Elizabeth Dutrow
(202) 343-9061
dutrow.elizabeth@epa.gov
 Description:
Since 1992, the ENERGY STAR program has helped thousands of organizations across
the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors take advantage of cost-effective op-
portunities to improve their energy efficiency and reduce GHG emissions.
 Business case:
The nearly 500 industrial ENERGY STAR partners come from all sectors of the
economy and have joined with ENERGY STAR to manage energy and climate change
risk, increase competitiveness, distinguish themselves as environmental leaders, and
build and refine the energy component of their corporate sustainability issues.
  Services:
ENERGY STAR offers a suite of tools and resources for industrial partners from all
sectors to help them:
• Identify robust energy strategies for the future
• Master the fundamentals of energy management
• Benchmark energy performance
• Share best management practices
• Demonstrate environmental leadership through recognition opportunities
In addition, EPA works with an ever growing number of focus sectors to develop
sector-specific guidance and plant-level energy performance indicators to enable them
to judge the energy performance of their plants nationally. Focus industries as of the
end of 2007 include cement manufacturing, corn refining, food processing, glass manu-
facturing, motor vehicle manufacturing, petrochemical processing, petroleum refining,
Pharmaceuticals, pulp & paper, and waste and wastewater.
  Value to environment:
  Sectors most applicable:
Energy efficiency is one of the lowest-cost strategies available to address global climate
change. In 2006 alone, actions taken by Energy Star's industrial partners helped to
avoid the emission of 6.5 million metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions, equivalent
to the emissions of more than 4 million cars, while saving $2 billion in energy costs.
Aluminum manufacturing; appliance, electronic, industrial equipment manufac-
turing; cement and lime manufacturing; chemical  manufacturing; coal mining;
food processors and distributors; metals mining; oil and gas; pulp and paper
manufacturing; semiconductor manufacturing; vehicle manufacturing
A Business Guide to
U.S. EPA Climate Partnership Programs

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Business Value:
3 Brand/reputation protection/enhancement
3 Cost savings/operational efficiency
Web site:
Contact Information:
Short description/history:
Business case:
Services/resources:
Value to environment:
Sectors most applicable:
                        Services Offered:
                        3 Guidebooks/toolkits
                        3 Professional networking
                        3 Public recognition
                        3 Training/seminars
www.energystar.gov
Energy Star Hotline
1-888-STAR YES (782-7937)
hotline@energystar.gov
Since 1992, ENERGY STAR has helped thousands of organizations across the residen-
tial, commercial, and industrial sectors take advantage of cost-effective opportunities to
improve energy efficiency and reduce GHG emissions. In the residential new con-
struction marketplace, ENERGY STAR and its partners work together to promote the
benefits and increase sales of energy-efficient homes.
Homes that earn the ENERGY STAR label must meet guidelines for energy efficiency set
by EPA. ENERGY STAR-qualified homes are at least 15 percent more energy efficient
than homes built to the 2004 International Residential Code (IRC) and include additional
energy-saving features that typically make them 20 to 30 percent more efficient than
standard homes. Nationally, more than 12 percent of new homes built in 2006 earned the
ENERGY STAR label.
New homes that qualify as ENERGY STAR provide greater comfort and durability for
home buyers. In addition, ENERGY STAR-qualified homes help to protect the environ-
ment by reducing the GHG emissions associated with climate change.
ENERGY STAR-qualified homes can include a variety of energy efficient features
such as effective insulation, high-performance windows, tight construction and ducts,
efficient heating and cooling equipment, and ENERGY STAR-qualified lighting and ap-
pliances. ENERGY STAR builder partners can differentiate themselves in the market-
place, boost sales, and gain recognition as environmental leaders.
For utilities, an ENERGY STAR-qualified new homes program can stand alone or com-
plement an existing residential energy efficiency initiative. By encouraging the construc-
tion of ENERGY STAR-qualified new homes, utilities can manage peak demand even as
their customer bases increase. Hundreds of organizations nationwide are meeting their
demand side management commitments by sponsoring ENERGY STAR initiatives.
EPA provides the ENERGY STAR logo mark, marketing resources, and sales training
materials, and sponsors outreach campaigns through which builders and utilities can
work together to increase awareness of ENERGY STAR-qualified homes in the local
market. EPA also hosts partner network meetings and offers opportunities for recogni-
tion for environmental stewardship.
Energy efficiency is one of the lowest-cost strategies to address global climate change
and air pollution by reducing the amount of emissions associated with the burning of
fossil fuels to produce energy. In 2006 alone, American homeowners, with the help of
ENERGY STAR, avoided GHG emissions equivalent to those from more than 250,000
vehicles, while saving almost $170 million on their energy bills.
Real estate development, management, and construction; utilities/power marketers
                                                                                              Program Profiles

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              Great American Wood Stove Changeout Campaign
Business Value: Services Offered:
3 Cost savings/operational efficiency 3 Matching buyers/sellers
Web site:
Contact Information:
Description:
Business case:
Services:
Value to environment:
www.epa.gov/woodstoves/index.html
Larry Brockman
(919)541-5398
brockman.larry@epa.gov
This program facilitates the change-out of old, dirty, inefficient, "conventional" wood
stoves manufactured before 1988 to new, cleaner-burning appliances like gas, pellet,
and EPA-certified stoves. Moving to cleaner technologies reduces paniculate matter and
air toxics (indoor and outdoor), improves energy efficiency, and reduces fire hazards.
Manufacturers of cleaner-burning stoves receive certification and hence marketplace
advantages. During a wood stove changeout campaign, consumers receive financial
incentives such as rebates to replace older stoves with either non-wood burning equip-
ment (for example, vented gas stoves), pellet stoves, or EPA certified wood stoves.
Purchasers can buy with confidence, knowing their wood stoves embody cleaner tech-
nologies.
Manufacturers, distributors, and retailers of cleaner and more efficient wood stoves can
participate in co-marketing campaigns to increase sales.
Approximately 70 to 80 percent of the 10 million wood stoves in use in the United
States are older, inefficient, conventional stoves that pollute. EPA certified wood stoves
emit approximately 70 percent less pollution than older, conventional wood stoves.
Sectors most applicable: Appliance, electronic, industrial equipment manufacturing
A Business Guide to
U.S. EPA Climate Partnership Programs

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             •
                   GreenChill Advanced Refrigeration Partnership
Business Value:
3 Brand/reputation  protection/enhancement
3 Cost savings/operational efficiency
3 Research and development assistance
3 Risk management
                        Services Offered:
                        a Analytical tools
                        3 Environmental performance benchmarking
                        3 Guidebooks/toolkits
                        3 Professional networking
                        3 Public recognition
                        Q Technical assistance
                        3 Training/seminars
Web site:
www.epa.gov/0zone/partnerships/greenchill/index.html
Contact Information:
Keilly Witman
(202) 343-9742
witman.keilly@epa.gov

Bella Maranion
(202) 343-9749
maranion.bella@epa.gov
Description:
The GreenChill Advanced Refrigeration Partnership is an EPA cooperative alliance
with the supermarket industry and other stakeholders to promote the adoption of ad-
vanced technologies, strategies, and practices that reduce emissions of ozone-depleting
substances (ODS) and greenhouse gases (GHGs).
Business case:
EPA estimates that operating expenses could be reduced by about $30 million annually
through widespread adoption of best practices, improved equipment design and service,
and advanced refrigeration technologies. Companies also receive recognition for par-
ticipation in the program, achievement awards, analytical tools, and guidelines on best
practices and advanced technologies.
Services:
GreenChill offers companies the chance to benchmark their emissions reductions vs.
their peers and to receive awards for achieving their annual emissions reduction goals.
GreenChill provides partners with a variety of publicity, marketing, and outreach op-
portunities to highlight their participation in GreenChill. In addition, partners collabo-
rate across industries to identify service and operational practices that reduce emissions
of ozone-depleting refrigerants and their greenhouse gas alternatives, and they partici-
pate in an industry-government research initiative to assess the performance of green
technologies in terms of energy efficiency, reducing refrigerant charge, and minimizing
refrigerant leaks.
Value to environment:
Sectors most applicable:
Implementation of best practices, improved equipment design and service, and ad-
vanced refrigeration technologies could reduce refrigerant emissions by almost 6
million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent annually, which is equivalent to taking
about 1 million cars off the road every year.
Grocers
                                                                                               Program Profiles

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Business Value:
3 Brand/reputation  protection/enhancement
3 Cost savings/operational efficiency
3 New/expanded markets
                                                          Services Offered:
                                                          a Analytical tools
                                                          [^Guidebooks/toolkits
                                                          [3 Matching buyers/sellers
                                                          3 Professional networking
                                                          3 Public recognition
                                                          3 Technical assistance
  Web site:
                                www.epa .gov/green power
  Contact Information:
                                Elaine Collison
                                (202) 343-9139
                                collison.blaine@epa.gov
  Description:
                                The Green Power Partnership (GPP) promotes the use of renewable energy by provid-
                                ing technical assistance, networking possibilities, and public recognition to companies
                                that choose to utilize green power (i.e., electricity that is generated from resources such
                                as solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, and low-impact hydro facilities).
  Business case:
                                Green power can be one of the easiest and most effective ways to reduce the environ-
                                mental impacts associated with your organization's conventional electricity use. Buying
                                green power can help reduce your organization's environmental impact while also
                                providing valuable benefits such as avoiding GHG emissions; reducing air pollution;
                                hedging against electricity price increases; serving as a brand differentiator; generating
                                customer, investor, or stakeholder loyalty and employee pride; creating positive public-
                                ity and enhancing your organization's public image; and demonstrating civic leadership.
  Services:
                                GPP actively promotes and recognizes Green Power Partners as environmental leaders.
                                EPA assists Partners in promoting the concept of green power internally and externally,
                                which often includes valuable media coverage. EPA also provides companies with a
                                means to estimate the environmental benefits of switching to green power and provides
                                technical advice on navigating the complexities of making a green power purchase.
  Value to environment:
  Sectors most applicable:
                                Conventional electricity use is a significant source of air pollution and GHG emissions.
                                Buying green power can make a real difference environmentally by encouraging the
                                development of new, domestic renewable energy capacity, which produces electricity
                                with significantly less air pollution and no net increase in GHG emissions.
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Business Value:
3 Cost savings/operational efficiency
                        Services Offered:
                        3 Analytical tools
                        3 Guidebooks/toolkits
                        3 Public recognition
                        3 Technical assistance
                        3 Training/seminars
Web site:
www. e pa .gov/gree nsca pes
Contact Information:
Jean Schwab
(703) 308-8669
schwab.jean@epa.gov
Description:
EPA's GreenScapes provides cost-effective and environmentally friendly solutions for
large-scale landscaping. Designed to help preserve natural resources and prevent waste
and pollution, GreenScapes encourages companies to make more holistic decisions
regarding waste generation and disposal and to consider the associated impacts on
land, water, air, and energy use. GreenScapes focuses on "the four r's" in landscap-
ing: reduce, reuse, recycle water and waste, and rebuy (purchase materials made from
recycled products).
Business case:
Green landscaping means buying fewer products and switching from the purchase of
disposable products to those that are long-lasting and reusable. While the purchase of
longer-lasting products can initially be more expensive, savings accrue over time.
Services:
GreenScapes offers online calculators for cost comparisons, provides publications and
technical guidance, conducts workshops, and sponsors awards.
Value to environment:
Sectors most applicable:
The use of reusable materials results in waste reduction, which is associated with GHG
emissions reductions, savings in landfill space, and natural resource preservation.
Hospitality; hospitals; landscaping and golf courses; office-based businesses;
real estate development, management, and construction; retailers
                                                                                                Program Profiles

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  Business Value:
  Q Cost savings/operational efficiency
                        Services Offered:
                        [^Analytical tools
                        [^Guidebooks/toolkits
                        3 Public recognition
                        3 Technical assistance
                        3 Training/seminars
  Web site:
www.greensuppliers.gov
  Contact Information:
Kristin Pierre
(202) 564-8837
pierre.kristin@epa.gov
  Description:
The Green Suppliers Network (GSN) is a collaborative venture among industry, EPA, and
the U.S. Department of Commerce's Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP). GSN
works with all levels of the manufacturing supply chain to improve processes and mini-
mize waste generation. Through onsite GSN review, suppliers continuously learn ways to
increase energy efficiency, identify cost-saving opportunities, and optimize resources and
technologies to eliminate waste. The result is more effective processes and products with
higher profits and fewer environmental impacts.
  Business case:
Partners and their suppliers benefit from a more reliable, "leaner" supply chain and
from recognition for participating in GSN. Suppliers can save money by implementing
GSN review recommendations. Partners have the flexibility to decide which recom-
mendations to implement, and GSN reviews often lead to at least a 3:1 return on invest-
ment. GSN helps help small and medium-sized manufacturers stay competitive and
profitable while reducing their impact on the environment.
  Services:
GSN provides industry with technical assistance; offers opportunities to be highlighted
in case studies and presentations; and publishes a variety of tools, resources, and pro-
motional materials.
  Value to environment:
  Sectors most applicable:
Implementation of GSN review recommendations results in a wide variety of environmental
benefits. Results from the 49 reviews completed as of September 2007 include the follow-
ing: more than 72 million kilowatt-hours of energy conserved, 10 million gallons of water
conserved, 89,000 pounds of air emissions reduced, and 1 million pounds of solid waste
reduced.
Aluminum manufacturing; appliance, electronic, industrial equipment manufactur-
ing; building materials manufacturing; cement and lime manufacturing; chemical
manufacturing; general manufacturing; pulp and paper manufacturing; semiconductor
manufacturing; vehicle manufacturing
A Business Guide to
U.S. EPA Climate Partnership Programs

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              HOME PERFORMANCE WITH
              ENERGY STAR
Business Value:
3 Brand/reputation protection/enhancement
3 Cost savings/operational  efficiency
3 Research and development assistance
0 Risk management
Web site:
Contact Information:
Description:
Business case:
Services:
Value to environment:
                                                Home Performance with ENERGY STAR
                            Services Offered:
                            ^Analytical tools
                            3 Environmental performance benchmarking
                            ^Guidebooks/toolkits
                            3 Professional networking
                            3 Public recognition
                            3 Technical assistance
                            3 Training/seminars
www.energystar.gov
Chandler von Schrader
(202) 343-9096
vonschrader.chandler@epa.gov
Since 1992, ENERGY STAR has helped hundreds of organizations across the residential, com-
mercial, and industrial sectors take advantage of cost-effective opportunities to improve energy
efficiency and reduce GHG emissions. Through Home Performance with ENERGY STAR
(HPWES), EPA and DOE offer a comprehensive, whole-house approach to improving energy
efficiency and comfort. Unlike typical energy audit programs, the goal of HPWES is to turn
recommendations into improved homes. The program is managed by a local sponsor that recruits
qualified home improvement contractors to perform comprehensive home assessments and offer
a suite of efficiency solutions. Participating contractors complete the renovations or work closely
with participating contractors who can. Upon completion, the home is reassessed to measure the
improvement savings gains and ensure satisfaction. In addition to HPWES, EPA offers resources
for the do-it-yourself (DIY) home improvement market.
For participating contractors, HPWES can provide opportunities to expand into new markets,
improve quality and customer satisfaction, reduce down time or seasonal workload fluctua-
tion, gain a competitive edge, and even achieve higher profit margins. Utilities sponsoring a
HPWES program can help meet energy efficiency and renewable energy mandates, deliver
peak demand reductions, delay or avoid energy supply investments, and provide an opportu-
nity to consolidate program delivery to residential customers. For retailers, targeting the DIY
home improvement market can improve customer loyalty and increase sales by utilizing EPA
resources and tools.
EPA and DOE can provide program start up guidance for potential utilities or state energy
offices. Once a sponsor has submitted an implementation plan and signed the Partnership
Agreement, EPA will provide the ENERGY STAR logo mark, marketing resources, sales
training materials, and sponsors outreach campaigns through which contractors and utilities
can work together to increase awareness of HPWES in the local market. EPA also hosts part-
ner network meetings and offers opportunities for recognition for environmental stewardship.
Energy efficiency is one of the lowest-cost strategies to address global climate change and air pol-
lution by reducing the amount of emissions associated with the burning of fossil fuels to produce
energy. In 2006 alone, American homeowners, with the help of ENERGY STAR, avoided GHG
emissions equivalent to those from more than 250,000 vehicles, while saving almost $170 million
on their energy bills.
Sectors most applicable:   Real estate development, management, and construction; retailers; utilities/power marketers
                                                                                            Program Profiles

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                       CENTU RY
                                   Laboratories for the 21st Century
  Business Value:
  Q Cost savings/operational efficiency
  3 Risk management
                        Services Offered:
                        a Analytical tools
                        3 Environmental performance benchmarking
                        3 Guidebooks/toolkits
                        Q Professional networking
                        3 Public recognition
                        3 Technical assistance
                        3 Training/seminars
  Web site:
www.labs2 lcentury.gov
  Contact Information:
Dan Amon
(202) 564-7509
amon.dan@epa.gov
  Description:
Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21) is avoluntary program that saves money at
laboratories while improving the environment. Laboratories require tens of millions of dol-
lars worth of energy to run and add tens of thousands of pounds of pollution to our air, soil,
and water. EPA and the U. S. Department of Energy are helping new labs and retrofitting
existing labs to help cut their energy costs and reduce environmental damage. The goal is to
create energy self-sufficiency for all EPA labs, modeling these savings for other science labs
throughout the country.
  Business case:
Laboratories can realize significant cost savings through lower laboratory utility and
operating costs. Implementation also contributes to environmental and health improve-
ments including improved indoor air quality and reduced health and safety risks to
employees.
  Services:
Partners are eligible for national recognition and an enhanced image through program
events, awards, and promotional materials. In addition, partners have opportunities
for technical assistance from nationally recognized experts to help meet energy and
environmental performance goals. Labs 21 also provides partners with opportunities to
network and share project results with peers from around the world.
  Value to environment:
  Sectors most applicable:
Labs 21 has resulted in reductions in energy and water use and broader environmental ben-
efits such as reduced pollution and GHG emissions.
Appliance, electronic, industrial equipment manufacturing; chemical manufacturing;
food processors and distributors; oil and gas; semiconductor manufacturing; vehicle
manufacturing
A Business Guide to
U.S. EPA Climate Partnership Programs

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             Landfill Methane Outreach Program
Business Value:
3 Research and development assistance
3 Cost savings/operational efficiency
                        Services Offered:
                        ^Analytical tools
                        3 Public recognition
                        3 Technical assistance
Web site:
www.epa.gov/lmop
Contact Information:
Rachel Goldstein
(202) 343-9391
goldstein.rachel@epa.gov
Description:
The Landfill Methane Outreach Program (LMOP) encourages the recovery of landfill gas
(LFG)—mainly carbon dioxide and methane—for use as an alternative energy source, thus
reducing GHG emissions. The program helps partners overcome barriers to project develop-
ment by helping them assess project feasibility, find financing, and market the benefits of
project development to the community.
Business case:
LFG projects generate revenue from the sale of the gas. Businesses are also realizing
the cost savings associated with using LFG as a replacement for more expensive fossil
fuels, such as natural gas. Some companies will save millions of dollars over the life of
their LFG energy projects. LFG energy recovery offers communities and landfill own-
ers the opportunity to reduce the costs associated with regulatory compliance by turning
pollution into a valuable community resource.
Services:
LMOP offers a wide array of free technical, promotional, and informational tools as
well as support services to assist with the development of LFG projects. These re-
sources include the LMOP Online Toolkit;  software tools for estimating emissions and
emissions rates; a variety of technical documents; and informational brochures, fact
sheet, and case studies.
Value to environment:
Sectors most applicable:
LMOP's efforts have reduced landfill methane emissions by more than 24 million metric
tons of carbon equivalent. The GHG reduction benefits are equivalent to having planted 24
million acres of forest or removed 17 million vehicles from the road.
Aluminum manufacturing; appliance, electronic, industrial equipment manufactur-
ing; cement and lime manufacturing; chemical manufacturing; food processors and
distributors; general manufacturing; pulp and paper manufacturing; semiconductor
manufacturing; utilities/power marketers; vehicle fleet owners/shippers; vehicle manu-
facturing; waste management
                                                                                                Program Profiles

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  Lean and the Environment Initiative
  Business Value:
  3 Cost savings/operational efficiency
                                                        Services Offered:
                                                        a Analytical tools
                                                        3 Guidebooks/toolkits
                                                        [3 Technical  assistance
                                                        [3 Training/seminars
  Web site:
                                www.epa.gov/lean
  Contact Information:
                                Chris Reed
                                (202) 566-0606
                                reed.chris@epa.gov
 Description:
                                Lean manufacturing is a business model and collection of tactical methods that empha-
                                size eliminating non-value added activities (waste) while delivering quality products on
                                time and at the least cost with greater efficiency. In the United States, lean implementa-
                                tion is rapidly expanding throughout diverse manufacturing and service sectors, such
                                as aerospace, automotive, electronics, furniture production, and health care, as a core
                                business strategy to create a competitive advantage.
 Business case:
                                Coordinating lean and the environment has a variety of benefits for businesses. They
                                are able to reduce costs; improve process flow and reduce lead times; lower regulatory
                                noncompliance risk; meet customer expectations; improve environmental quality; and
                                improve employee morale and commitment. Implementing lean allows businesses to
                                learn to see hidden environmental waste; enhance the effectiveness of lean implementa-
                                tion; and deliver what customers and employees want.
  Services:
                                The Lean and the Environment Initiative provides a variety of resources to enhance the
                                integration of lean methods and tools to improve environmental results. The Web site
                                contains information on the results of background research EPA has conducted on the
                                relationship between lean and environmental performance, case studies, fact sheets, and
                                tools containing ideas and techniques for integrating environmental considerations into
                                lean initiatives and methods.
  Value to environment:
                                Through its systematic focus on the elimination of non-value added activity, lean manu-
                                facturing substantially improves environmental performance. Reducing common types
                                of manufacturing waste—defects, waiting, overproduction, movement, inventory, com-
                                plexity, and unused creativity—yields a variety of environmental benefits, including
                                less use of energy, water, and raw materials; reduced generation of solid and hazardous
                                wastes; and lower emissions of hazardous air pollutants.
                                 Aluminum manufacturing; appliance, electronic, industrial equipment manu-
                                 facturing; building materials manufacturing; cement and lime manufacturing;
                                 chemical manufacturing; food processors and  distributors; general manufac-
                                 turing; pulp and paper manufacturing; semiconductor manufacturing; vehicle
                                 manufacturing
  Please note that this program is an EPA-supported program, but it is not formally considered an EPA Partnership Program.
Sectors most applicable:
A Business Guide to
U.S. EPA Climate Partnership Programs

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 Methane to Markets
                          Methane to Markets Partnership
Business Value:
3 Cost savings/operational efficiency
3 Research and development assistance
3 Risk management
                         Services Offered:
                         ^Analytical tools
                         3 Professional networking
                         3 Public recognition
                         Q Technical assistance
Web site:
www.methanetomarkets.org
Contact Information:
Paul Gunning
(202) 343-9736
gunning.paul@epa.gov
Description:
The Methane to Markets Partnership is an international initiative that advances cost-effec-
tive, near-term methane recovery and use as a clean energy source. The program seeks to
reduce global methane emissions to enhance economic growth, strengthen energy security,
improve air quality, improve industrial safety, and reduce GHG emissions. Methane to Mar-
kets focuses on four sources of methane emissions: agriculture (animal waste management),
coal mines, landfills, and oil and gas systems.
Business case:
Cost-effective technologies for capturing and using methane as a clean energy source
are available for every sector on which the Methane to Markets Partnership currently
focuses. The collection and utilization of methane provides a valuable, clean-burning
energy source that improves quality of life in local communities by generating revenue
and improving living standards. In addition, capturing methane from underground coal
mines improves safety conditions by reducing explosion hazards. Participating compa-
nies are recognized through active participation in the Project Network.
Services:
Partners share lessons learned and collaborate on projects aimed at addressing challenges
to methane recovery, raising awareness in key industries and removing barriers to project
development and implementation.
Value to environment:
Sectors most applicable:
Methane is 23 times as potent as carbon dioxide at trapping heat in the atmosphere and con-
tributing to global warming. By 2015, the Methane to Markets Partnership has the potential
to deliver annual reductions in methane emissions of up to 50 million metric tons of carbon
equivalent or recover 500 billion cubic feet of natural gas. These reductions, if achieved,
could lead to stabilized or even declining levels of global atmospheric concentrations of
methane.
Coal mining; oil and gas; utilities/power marketers
                                                                                                 Program Profiles

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  Mobile Air Conditioning Climate Protection Partnership
  Business Value:
  3 New/expanded markets
  3 Research and development assistance
                        Services Offered:
                        3 Technical  assistance
  Web site:
www.epa.gov/cppd/mac
  Contact Information:
Kristen Taddonio
(202) 343-9234
taddonio.kristen@epa.gov
  Description:
The Mobile Air Conditioning Climate Protection Partnership is a joint initiative founded
by EPA, the Society of Automotive Engineers, and the Mobile Air Conditioning Society.
The partnership reduces the environmental impact of mobile air conditioning through the
recovery and recycling of CFC-12 and HFC-134a refrigerants and the development of new,
environmentally superior air conditioning technologies.
  Business case:
Program participants help promote next-generation mobile air conditioning systems
that are better for the environment while satisfying customer safety, cost, and reliability
concerns. Program participants also partner in developing cost-effective designs and
improved service procedures to minimize refrigerant emissions.
  Services:
Partnership, cooperation on research, and development and testing of next-generation
mobile air conditioning systems; technical assistance.
  Value to environment:
  Sectors most applicable:
Four measures proposed by the partnership (increased cooling efficiency, minimizing
refrigerant leakage, alternative cooling strategies, and end-of-life servicing) can reduce the
fuel used by vehicle air conditioners by 30 percent and cut refrigerant emissions in half.
Combined, these measures could save 2.1 billion gallons of gasoline each year and reduce
overall GHG emissions by 9 million metric tons of carbon equivalent.
Vehicle fleet owners/shippers; vehicle manufacturing
A Business Guide to
U.S. EPA Climate Partnership Programs

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National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency
Business Value:
3 Brand/reputation protection/enhancement
3 Cost savings/operational efficiency
                         Services Offered:
                         3 Guidebooks/toolkits
                         3 Professional networking
                         3 Public recognition
                         3 Technical assistance
Web site:
www.epa.gov/eeactionplan
Contact Information:
Stacy Angel
(202) 343-9606
angel.stacy@epa.gov
Description:
The National Action Plan for Energy Efficiency is a private-public initiative begun in the
fall of 2005 to create a sustainable, aggressive national commitment to energy efficiency
through the collaborative efforts of gas and electric utilities, utility regulators, and other
partner organizations.  The U.S. Department of Energy and EPA jointly facilitate the Action
Plan and its Leadership Group of more than 60 leading privately, publicly, and coopera-
tively owned electric and gas utilities, utility regulators, state agencies, large energy users,
consumer advocates, energy service providers, and environmental and energy efficiency
organizations.
Business case:
Improving the energy efficiency of homes, businesses, schools, governments, and
industries—which consume more than 70 percent of the natural gas and electricity used
in the United States—is one of the most constructive,  cost-effective ways to address
the challenges of high energy prices, energy security and independence, environmental
concerns, and global climate change in the near term.
Services:
The Action Plan provides recognition opportunities for organizations who commitments
to energy efficiency and/or endorse the Action Plan's five key policy recommendations.
Numerous reports, guides, fact sheets and other resources are available via the Web site to
assist parties in meeting their commitments, including materials from a Sector Collabora-
tive on Energy Efficiency.
Value to environment:
Sectors most applicable:
The Action Plan is helping to remove barriers to greater investment in cost-effective energy
efficiency as a resource in our nation's energy system. Achieving all cost-effective energy
efficiency by the year 2025 could result in national reductions in GHG emissions on the
order of 500 million metric tons of carbon dioxide annually, equivalent to 90 million cars off
the road.
Grocers; hospitality; real estate development, management, and construction; retail-
ers; utilities/power marketers
Please note that this program is an EPA-supported program, but it is not formally considered an EPA Partnership Program.
                                                                                                   Program Profiles

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  Business Value:
  3 Brand/reputation protection/enhancement
  3 Cost savings/operational efficiency
  3 New/expanded markets
  3 Risk management
                        Services Offered:
                        3 Analytical tools
                        3 Environmental performance benchmarking
                        [^Guidebooks/toolkits
                        3 Professional networking
                        3 Public recognition
                        3 Technical  assistance
                        3 Training/seminars
  Web site:
www.epa .gov/gasstar
  Contact Information:
Roger Fernandez
(202) 343-9386
fernandez.roger@epa.gov
  Description:
Natural Gas STAR encourages companies across the natural gas and oil industries to adopt
cost-effective technologies and practices that improve operational efficiency and reduce
emissions of methane, a potent GHG. The program provides companies with technical
assistance in the implementation of recommended best management practices and provides
other strategy suggestions based on successful past experiences of its members. At the same
time, the program allows EPA to maintain a record of successful methane emissions reduc-
tion strategies.
  Business case:
Participation in Natural Gas STAR offers quantifiable environmental benefits, but also
provides opportunities for partners to improve operational efficiency, increase revenues,
and enhance their competitive edge in the natural gas marketplace. Some Natural Gas
STAR partners report saving millions of dollars a year worth of natural gas by imple-
menting the leak reduction technologies and practices encouraged by the program. By
implementing technologies and practices to reduce methane emissions from their opera-
tions, companies are able to direct that methane back into the system, often leading to
an increase in revenue.
  Services:
To assist partners in implementing the Natural Gas STAR Program, EPA draws upon the
wealth of partner-provided information and presents its partners with many opportuni-
ties to learn about methane emissions reductions technologies and techniques. Resources
available to all Gas STAR partners include: detailed information on technologies and
practices to reduce methane emissions, partner company case studies, technology transfer
workshops, and an annual implementation workshop.
  Value to environment:
  Sectors most applicable:
Natural Gas STAR industry partners have operations in all of the major natural gas industry
sectors (production, processing, transmission, and distribution) and represent 56 percent of
the natural gas industry in the United States. Natural Gas STAR partners have reduced over
500 billion cubic feet of methane emissions through the implementation of more than 80
cost-effective technologies and practices.
Oil and gas
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U.S. EPA Climate Partnership Programs

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Business Value:
3 Brand/reputation protection/enhancement
Q New/expanded markets
                        Services Offered:
                        3 Public recognition
                        [3 Technical assistance
Web site:
www.epa.gov/woodheaters
Contact Information:
Gil Wood
(919) 541-5272
wood.gil@epa.gov
Description/history:
Outdoor hydronic heater is another name for an outdoor wood-fired orbiomass boiler or
outdoor wood-fired or biomass furnace. The Outdoor Hydronic Heater (OHH) Program
encourages manufacturers to develop and distribute cleaner, more efficient outdoor hydronic
heaters.
Business case:
By becoming a partner of the OHH Program, manufacturers can gain recognition for
their development of cleaner, more efficient heaters. EPA has designed several easy-
to-use collateral materials that can be used to promote the program's efforts. A higher-
efficiency heater ultimately results in lower fuel costs for the customer.
Services/resources:
EPA provides program support to encourage the purchase of cleaner, more efficient out-
door hydronic heater models where consumers have made the choice to purchase an OHH
over other heating devices. In addition to outreach and technical assistance, EPA provides
text labels that identify which models meet EPA program requirements.
Value to environment:
Sectors most applicable:
Current outdoor wood heaters are significantly more polluting than other home-heating
devices. They can create heavy smoke and particulates, which is a nuisance, in addition to
posing risks to public health in populated areas. Phase 1 and Phase 2 levels emit approxi-
mately 70 percent and 90 percent less respectively than previous models.
Appliance, electronic, industrial equipment manufacturing
                                                                                                 Program Profiles

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        ~| National
    S/   Environmental
   f /—I Performance Track
     I U.5- EfMrflnmertlil R
                            Performance Track (National Environmental Performance Track)
  Business Value:
  Q Brand/reputation protection/enhancement
  Q Cost savings/operational efficiency
  Q Risk management
                         Services Offered:
                         Q Guidebooks/toolkits
                         Q Professional networking
                         3 Public recognition
                         Q Technical assistance
                         3 Training/seminars
  Web site:
www.epa.gov/performancetrack
  Contact Information:
Julie Spyres
(202) 566-2885
spyres.julie@epa.gov
  Description:
Performance Track recognizes and drives environmental excellence by encouraging facili-
ties with strong environmental records to go above and beyond their legal requirements.
Member facilities voluntarily commit to typically four public, measurable goals to improve
the quality of our nation's air, water, and land. Members include major corporations, small
business, and public facilities that are steering a course toward environmental excellence—
and setting an example for others to follow.
Reducing GHGs is now the most common air emissions goal set by Performance Track
members. EPA's Office of Air and Radiation offers an energy use reduction challenge goal
for non-transportation energy use. In order to receive credit, a Performance Track facility
must set a goal to reduce its energy use by at least 10 percent before normalizing. All 10 re-
gions are participating, and many are making transportation energy reduction goals as well.
  Business case:
The Performance Track program helps facilities establish and maintain their role as
environmental leaders as well as gain recognition they deserve. The program also helps
facilities capture opportunities for reducing cost and spurring technological innova-
tion. By focusing on continuous improvement and achieving measurable environmental
results, member facilities are better able to reduce the chance of encountering any inter-
ruptions in their operations.
  Services:
Performance Track offers members networking opportunities, public recognition events,
guidance documents and other forms of assistance such as teleseminars on specific
environmental topics and best practices. Regulatory and administrative incentives are
designed to reward members, who have demonstrated strong environmental records and
a commitment to continuous improvement by reducing member transaction costs such as
reduced serf-reporting and expedited permit reviews.
  Value to environment:
  Sectors most applicable:
To date, facilities have set 75 GHG emission reduction goals, leading to 309,780 metric tons
of carbon dioxide equivalent savings (the annual emissions of 57,000 cars). Many energy-
and waste-related goals also aid in members' push to reduce emissions. All told, almost 900
member goals address climate change either directly or indirectly.
A Business Guide to
U.S. EPA Climate Partnership Programs

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PFC Emission Reduction  Partnership
Business Value:
3 Brand/reputation  protection/enhancement
   Dost savings/operational efficiency
                        Services Offered:
                        ^Analytical tools
                        3 Technical assistance
Web site:
www.epa.gov/semiconductor-pfc
Contact Information:
Sally Rand
(202) 343-9739
rand.sally@epa.gov
Description:
The PFC Emission Reduction Partnership encourages semiconductor companies to commit
to reducing the emissions levels of perfluorocompounds (PFCs), which are potent GHGs.
Program members commit to reducing PFC emissions to 10 percent below the 1995 base-
line level by 2010. The partnership promotes the use of various environmentally superior
technologies and alternative chemicals.
Business case:
Partners receive recognition and save money by sharing information on cost-effective
pollution prevention with many of the world's leading semiconductor manufacturers
committed to climate protection. The partnership provides partners with broad latitude
to pursue the goal of reducing PFC emissions.
Services:
Technical papers; emissions models.
Value to environment:
Sectors most applicable:
The partnership seeks to reduce PFCs. PFCs are highly potent GHGs and are also generally
very stable chemicals; they possess atmospheric lifetimes from 264 to 50,000 years. Conse-
quently, these gases will accumulate in the atmosphere and their effect on the climate will be
felt by many future generations.
Appliance, electronic, industrial equipment manufacturing; semiconductor manufac-
turing
                                                                                               Program Profiles

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  Business Value:
  3 Brand/reputation protection/enhancement
  3 Cost savings/operational efficiency
                        Services Offered:
                        3 Analytical tools
                        a'Guidebooks/tool kits
                        [3 Matching buyers/sellers
                        3 Professional networking
                        3 Public recognition
                        3 Technical assistance
  Web site:
www.epa.gov/epaoswer/osw/conserve/plugin
  Contact Information:
Verena Radulovic
(703) 605-0760
radulovic.verena@epa.gov
  Description:
Plug-In to eCycling is a campaign run by EPA and industry partners that encourages
people to recycle and reuse old electronic devices. The program is part of EPA's Resource
Conservation Challenge. Partner companies agree to assist with recycling events or with
the promotion of the program. The program's goal is to reduce the amount of waste (both
of materials such as plastics and hazardous substances such as lead) that results from the
disposal of old electronics.
  Business case:
Manufacturers and retailers can set up or participate in collection programs for used
electronics equipment, solidifying the company's reputation as a good environmental
steward.
  Services:
Partners receive many benefits and incentives by becoming a part of the Plug-In To eCy-
cling Campaign, including technical assistance and guidance in developing or expanding
a donation or recycling initiatives for consumers; networking and partnership opportuni-
ties with other retailer and manufacturer partners; working with EPA regions to expand
local and regional awareness for your company's initiatives; and public recognition from
EPA for your efforts.
  Value to environment:
  Sectors most applicable:
Recycling these electronics recovers valuable materials that can be used to make new prod-
ucts, which also results in a reduction in GHG emissions and pollution and saves energy and
resources by extracting fewer raw materials from the earth.
Appliance, electronic, industrial equipment manufacturing; retailers
A Business Guide to
U.S. EPA Climate Partnership Programs

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         Responsible Appliance
         t  Disposal Program
    '-RAD
                          Responsible Appliance Disposal Program
Business Value:
3 Brand/reputation  protection/enhancement
3 Cost savings/operational efficiency
3 Research and development assistance
3 Risk management
                        Services Offered:
                        a Analytical tools
                        3 Environmental performance benchmarking
                        ^Guidebooks/toolkits
                        3 Professional networking
                        3 Public recognition
                        3 Technical assistance
                        3 Training/seminars
Web site:
www.epa.gov/0zone/partnerships/rad/index.html
Contact Information:
Evelyn Swain
(202) 343-9956
swain.evelyn@epa.gov
Description:
The Responsible Appliance Disposal (RAD) Partnership program encourages consumers to
retire old, inefficient refrigerators, freezers, air conditioning units, and dehumidifiers, and
implements best practices for the recycling/disposal.
Business case:
EPA provides partner recognition for achievement through press releases, brochures,
articles, and awards.
Services:
As part of the program, EPA serves as a technical clearinghouse on responsible ap-
pliance disposal program development and implementation; calculates annual and
cumulative program benefits in terms of GHG and ozone-depleting substances (ODSs)
emissions savings and equivalents and, as available, potential cost savings. EPA's Sig-
nificant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program evaluates substitutes for the ODSs
to reduce overall risk to human health and the environment. Through these evaluations,
SNAP generates lists of acceptable and unacceptable substitutes for each of the major
industrial use sectors.
Value to environment:
Sectors most applicable:
Refrigerators and freezers manufactured before 1995 contain chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs)
which are potent ODSs. The RAD Partnership is designed to encourage the retirement and
proper disposal of these older units while ensuring that CFCs in the insulation foam within
the cabinet walls and in the refrigerant are captured and destroyed or recycled. Because
CFCs are also potent GHGs, their recovery and destruction will also reduce U.S. emissions
that contribute to climate change.
Appliance, electronic, industrial equipment manufacturing; retailers; utilities/power
marketers
                                                                                               Program Profiles

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 SF  Emission Reduction Partnership for Electric Power Systems
  Business Value:
  3 Cost savings/operational efficiency
                        Services Offered:
                        a Analytical tools
                        3 Guidebooks/toolkits
                        3 Public recognition
                        a Technical assistance
                        Q Training/seminars
 Web site:
www.epa.gov/electricpower-sf6
  Contact Information:
Sally Rand
(202) 343-9739
rand.sally@epa.gov
 Description:
This program helps electric power companies economically reduce sulfur hexafluoride (SF6)
emissions by reducing the leak rate of new equipment, refurbishing older equipment, and
employing more efficient operation and maintenance techniques. Partners set emissions
goals and work toward them utilizing a variety of strategies, including replacement and
maintenance of equipment and SF recovery.
 Business case:
Through the program, electric power companies have significantly reduced SF6 leakage
caused by aging equipment and during equipment maintenance and repair. Based on an
average cost of SF6 at $9 per pound, partner companies saved $2.5 million in SF6 leak
reduction and recovery between 1999 to 2002.
  Services:
EPA helps partner companies track and document emissions reductions. EPA also pro-
vides technical assistance and public recognition for SF6 emissions reduction projects.
EPA shares information on technical issues and best management practices that can help
reduce emissions.
 Value to environment:
 Sectors most applicable:
As of September 2007, 81 companies had joined the partnership, representing approximately
42 percent of the industry. Participating companies have reduced SF6 emissions rates from
17 percent in 1999 to 8.3 percent in 2005.
Metals mining; utilities/power marketers
A Business Guide to
U.S. EPA Climate Partnership Programs

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Business Value:
3 Brand/reputation protection/enhancement
                         Services Offered:
                         [^Guidebooks/toolkits
                         0 Professional networking
                         3 Public recognition
                         3 Technical assistance
Web site:
www.epa .gov/smartgrowth
www.smartgrowth.org
Contact Information:
Geoff Anderson
(202) 566-2878
a nderson .geof f rey@epa .gov
Description:
This is a partnership of government, business, and civic organizations that works to encour-
age land use development that serves the economy, the community, and the environment.
Since its creation in late 1996, the Smart Growth Network (SON) has become a storehouse
of knowledge about smart growth principles, facilitating the sharing of best practices and
acting as a catalyst for implementation of ideas.
Business case:
The high quality of life in communities that consider smart growth makes them eco-
nomically competitive, creates business opportunities, and improves the local tax base.
Services:
SON conducts research; publishes reports and other publications; showcases outstand-
ing communities; works with communities through grants and technical assistance; and
brings together diverse interests to encourage better growth and development. The SON
Web site provides a variety of resources, including information on funding opportunities,
regulatory and policy analysis, and promoting smart growth in your community. SON
members gain access to the bimonthly electronic newsletter "Getting Smart!;" the SON
listserv, where members can share information and get advice from other members around
the country; and the SON Information Hotline service, which allows members to request
research assistance and expert advice on a broad array of topics.
Value to environment:
Sectors most applicable:
Smart growth practices can lessen the environmental impacts of development with tech-
niques such as compact development, reduced impervious surfaces and improved water
detention, safeguarding of environmentally sensitive areas, mixing of land uses (e.g., homes,
offices, and shops), transit accessibility, and better pedestrian and bicycle amenities. A 2005
Seattle study found that residents of neighborhoods where land uses are mixed and streets
are better connected, making non-auto travel easier and more convenient, traveled 26 per-
cent fewer vehicle miles than residents of neighborhoods that were more dispersed and less
connected.
Real estate development, management, and construction
Please note that this program is an EPA-supported program, but it is not formally considered an EPA Partnership Program.
                                                                                                  Program Profiles

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  Transport Partnership
    S- ENVIRONMENTAL PHOTIC n
                           SmartWay Transport Partnership
  Business Value:
  3 Brand/reputation protection/enhancement
  3 Cost savings/operational efficiency
                            Services Offered:
                            3 Analytical tools
                            3 Guidebooks/toolkits
                            3 Professional networking
                            3 Public recognition
                            3 Technical assistance
 Web site:
www. e pa .gov/s ma rtway
 Contact Information:
Mitch Greenberg
(202) 343-9269
greenberg.mitchell@epa.gov
 Description:
EPA launched the SmartWay Transport Partnership in 2004 to address the environmental and
economic challenges surrounding growth in the freight industry. It is an innovative collaboration
between EPA and the freight industry designed to improve energy efficiency and lower GHGs
and air pollution. Companies participating in SmartWay save money, reduce fuel consump-
tion and are recognized for their stewardship and environmental leadership. High performing
partners use the SmartWay Transport Partner logo, enabling customers to recognize their com-
mitment and success in saving energy and lowering GHG. More recently, the U.S. EPA certified
SmartWay logo became available to allow consumers to quickly and easily identify the cleanest.
most fuel-efficient trucks and cars on the road today.
 Business case:
Any company that ships products stands to improve its bottom line by joining EPA's Smart-
Way Transport Partnership. SmartWay partners have made commitments that are estimated
to be saving more than 600 million gallons of diesel fuel a year. Companies achieve these
benefits through technology-based equipment options and logistics management strategies
promoted by the partnership. Freight carriers that join SmartWay are recognized for their
environmental leadership, and gain loyalty among their customers seeking to ship goods
using clean and cost-efficient transportation. Likewise, shippers that join SmartWay can
gain public recognition, soften their environmental footprint, and make progress in achiev-
ing their fuel efficiency goals.
 Services:
Through SmartWay EPA provides technical assistance, helping partners benchmark and
achieve their goals to improve energy efficiency and lower GHGs. Specifically the program
provides modeling tools, information exchange and data that identify fuel use, emissions
output and the effectiveness of a broad range of technology, equipment controls and fuel-
saving logistics management strategies. SmartWay also has encouraged financial institutions
to provide flexible, reduced-interest loans to improve access to these fuel-saving technolo-
gies and pollution controls. EPA also has developed specifications for truck equipment and
cars. Partners also have access to marketing resources and may qualify to use the SmartWay
partner mark.
 Value to environment:
 Sectors most applicable:
Through SmartWay companies are eliminating over seven million metric tons of CO2 emis-
sions. By 2012, the SmartWay initiative aims to reduce between 33 million and 66 million
metric tons of CO2 emissions and up to 200,000 tons of NOX emissions per year.
Food processors and distributors; general manufacturing; oil and gas; retailers; vehicle
fleet owners/shippers; vehicle manufacturing
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Voluntary Aluminum Industrial Partnership
Business Value:
3 Brand/reputation protection/enhancement
3 Cost savings/operational efficiency
                        Services Offered:
                        ef Analytical tools
                        3 Public recognition
                        3 Technical assistance
Web site:
www.epa.gov/highgwp/aluminum-pfc
Contact Information:
Sally Rand
(202) 343-9739
rand.sally@epa.gov
Description:
The Voluntary Aluminum Industrial Partnership (VAJP) works with aluminum smelters to
increase production efficiency and implement other cost-effective strategies to reduce the
emissions of perfluorocarbon (PFC), a potent GHG.
Business case:
In addition to the environmental benefits, participation improves operational efficiency
and benefits a company's bottom line. A study conducted by VAIP found a number of
benefits associated with reducing anode effects, including decreased power consump-
tion; improved aluminum production; improved aluminum purity; decreased carbon
consumption; decreased fluoride consumption; decreased labor costs; and increased
production pot life.
Services:
Through VAIP, EPA assists partners in identifying and evaluating the factors that influ-
ence the generation of PFCs; serves as a clearinghouse for technical information on
successful strategies to reduce PFC emissions; provides partners with recognition for their
achievements in protecting the climate; and supports the development of high-quality
emissions data.
Value to environment:
Sectors most applicable:
VAIP partners have reduced PFC emissions per ton of aluminum produced by 77 percent
between 1990 and 2004. This reduction is equivalent to eliminating the emissions from
more than 1.5 million cars.
Aluminum manufacturing
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  Business Value:
  3 Brand/reputation protection/enhancement
     Dost savings/operational efficiency
                         Services Offered:
                         [^Analytical tools
                         3 Environmental performance benchmarking
                         [^Guidebooks/toolkits
                         3 Professional networking
                         3 Public recognition
                         3 Technical  assistance
                         3 Training/seminars
  Web site:
www. e pa .gov/wastewise
  Contact Information:
Terry Grist
(703) 308-7257
grist.terry@epa.gov
  Description:
The Waste Wise program helps companies eliminate costly municipal solid waste and select
industrial wastes. Partners set waste reduction goals and design waste reduction plans tai-
lored to their businesses.
  Business case:
Waste Wise partners reduce purchasing and waste disposal costs. Waste Wise provides
free technical assistance to help companies develop, implement, and measure their
waste reduction activities.
  Services:
Through Waste Wise, EPA provides partners with access to a variety of resources, includ-
ing a helpline; technical assistance; public recognition and awards; partner forums; and a
variety of publications.
  Value to environment:
  Sectors most applicable:
Waste Wise partners have reported more than 120 million tons of waste reduced since 1994.
As a result of these activities, Waste Wise partners have made significant achievements in
reducing their impact on global climate change by cutting GHG emissions by more than 7.3
million metric tons of carbon equivalent.
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Business Value:
3 Brand/reputation protection/enhancement
3 Cost savings/operational efficiency
3 New/expanded markets
3 Research and development assistance
                         Services Offered:
                         3 Guidebooks/toolkits
                         3 Matching buyers/sellers
                         3 Professional networking
                         3 Public recognition
Web site:
www. e pa .gov/wa terse nse
Contact Information:
WaterSense Helpline
(866) WTR-SENS (987-7367)
watersense@epa.gov
Description:
WaterSense is an EPA Partnership Program sponsored by EPA whose mission is to protect
the future of our nation's water supply by promoting and enhancing the market for water-
efficient products and services. Saving water is easy—many products are already available
for use, and it doesn't require changing the way most of us live or do business.
Business case:
Water-efficiency programs are an effective way for businesses to reduce operating
costs by saving on electric power, gas, chemical, and wastewater disposal expenses. By
employing water-efficient practices, a business can convey an image of stewardship to
employees, customers, and the general public.
Services:
WaterSense partners have access to a variety of tools and resources to help promote their
partnership with EPA, as well as the importance of water efficiency. Resources include
promotional labels, logos, and toolkits.
Value to environment:
Sectors most applicable:
Reducing household water use helps reduce the energy required to supply and treat public
water supplies and can also help address climate change. In fact:
  •  If one out of every 100 American homes retrofitted with water-efficient fixtures, we
    could save about 100 million kilowatt-hours (kWh) of electricity per year—avoiding
    80,000 tons of GHG emissions. That is equivalent to removing nearly 15,000 automo-
    biles from the road for one year.
  •  If 1 percent of American homes replaced an older toilet with a high-efficiency toilet, the
    country would save more than 3 8 million kWh of electricity—enough to supply more
    than 43,000 households with electricity for one month.
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Appendix A: Resources
The publications referenced in the "Climate Strategy for Business" section can be found on the Web sites listed to the right of
the publication name.


A Program Guide to Climate Leaders
Issue Brief on Climate Change
A Three-Pronged Approach to Corporate
Climate Strategy
Getting Ahead of the Curve: Corporate
Strategies that Address Climate Change
Hot Climate, Cool Commerce: A Service
Sector Guide to Greenhouse Gas Management
A Climate of Innovation: Northeast Business
Action to Reduce Greenhouse Gases
Offsetting Emissions: A Business Brief on the
Voluntary Carbon Market (Second Edition)
Beyond Neutrality: Moving Your Company
Toward Climate Leadership
Getting Carbon Offsets Right


www.epa.gov/climateleaders/documents/cl_programguide_508.pdf
www.bsr.org/research/issue-brief-details.cfm?DocumentID=48802
www.bsr.org/reports/BSR_Climate-Change-Report.pdf
www.pewclimate.org/docUploads/PEW_CorpStrategies.pdf
http://pdf.wri.org/hotclimatecoolcommerce.pdf
www.climatenortheast.org/pdf s/climate_of_innovation.pdf
www.bsr.org/reports/BSR_Voluntary-Carbon-Offsets-2.pdf
www.bsr.org/reports/BSR_Beyond-Neutrality.pdf
www.bsr.org/reports/BSR_Getting-Carbon-Off sets-Right.pdf
                                                                      Appendix A

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