United States       Office of Pollution Prevention
        Environmental Protection    and Toxics
        Agency         Washington, DC 20460   November 15, 1999

''EPA User's Manual
        for EPA's Risk-Screening
        Environmental Indicators
        Model:  Version 1.02

        [1988-1997 TRI Data,
         Air-Only Model]

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        User's Manual for EPA's Risk-Screening
     Environmental Indicators Model: Version 1.02

          [1988-1997 TRI Data, Air-Only Model]
                  Nicolaas W. Bouwes, Sr., Ph.D.
                     Steven M. Hassur, Ph.D.
            Economics, Exposure, and Technology Division
              Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics
            United States Environmental Protection Agency
                      November 15, 1999
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  ATTENTION USERS OF EPA'S RISK-SCREENING ENVIRONMENTAL INDICATORS
                                         CD-ROM!

       The current version of the Indicators model is the air-only version, which permits full risk-related
modeling for air releases only. All releases and transfers reported to TRI can be viewed from a hazard-
based perspective, i.e., pounds can be weighted by toxicity. For releases to media other than air that can
be modeled by the Indicators model, the user can view pounds weighted by toxicity and population as
well.  Although this User's Manual describes some functions that are not implemented in the air-only
model, it also provides instruction specific to the use of the current version.

       In addition to caveats listed throughout the User's Manual, there are several things to consider
when running the current version of the model:

       When installing the Indicators  model, please make sure that you sign off of your computer
       network  (e.g., the Novell network), so that the model will be properly installed onto your
       computer's hard drive.

      Because the  current version of the model is restricted to the air modeling results, the full risk-
       related model results are  available only for on-site fugitive and stack air releases; full model
       results based on releases to other media (e.g., releases to surface water and groundwater) are not
       available.  However, with this version of the model you will be able to look at TRI pounds,
       modeled pounds, hazard ranking, and subcomponents of the full risk-related model results, e.g.,
       (pounds x toxicity) and (pounds x toxicity x population) for all media.

       If you have a computer with limited memory, please be aware that when running a new query (as
       described in  Chapter 7), it may  be difficult or impossible to use other computer applications at
       the same time. (Windows 95 operating system will allow multi-tasking.)

       We have prepared runs for your convenience. These are described in Chapter 10.

      This version of the model (version 1.02) uses TRI release and transfer information for the time
       period from  1988 to 1997.

      On-line Help Screens are available in the model, and present much of the information contained
       in this User's Manual.

       You may have difficulty viewing the results of extremely large queries using the current version
       of the model. For example, running a query to obtain Indicator scores for each chemical released
       by each facility and associated state in the database may result in a table that is too large to view
       or reload in the Indicators  model (using the LOAD button), or to use and view within Excel. See
       section 7.1.4 for more general information about running large queries.

       We would appreciate your comments and suggestions  on how this User's  Manual may be
improved upon to aid you, the user.  Thank You.
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       Send comments to:   Nicolaas W. Bouwes, Sr., Ph.D.
                          (202) 260-1622
                          bouwes.nick@epa.gov
                                       or
                          Steven M. Hassur, Ph.D.
                          (202) 260-1735
                          hassur.steven@epa.gov
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            INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS FOR EPA'S RISK-SCREENING
                       ENVIRONMENTAL INDICATORS CD-ROM

System Requirements and Model Run Times

       Running the Indicators model directly from the CD requires 12 Mbytes of free hard disk space,
Windows 95 or Windows 3.1, and 16 Mbytes of RAM; > 4x CDROM is recommended.  All model
functions are available using the CD, including 232 pre-run queries. However, when performing new
queries, the model runs considerably faster when installed on the hard drive.  With all files installed on
the hard drive, a query takes between approximately 0.5 and 1.5 hours to run on a Pentium computer.
Putting the model on the hard drive requires approximately 330 Mbytes of free hard disk space. To run
the model off the CD, with a Pentium computer and Windows 95/98, new queries take 6.5 hours to 8
hours, and are significantly longer if you are using this model with Windows 3.1.

       It is important to remove any previous versions of the Risk-Screening Environmental Indicators
model from your hard drive before you install this version. Instructions on uninstalling the program are
in the Uninstall section below.

       These instructions assume you are using Windows 95 or 98. If you are using Windows 3.x and
need assistance, contact your on-site technical specialist.

Installing the Indicators Model

       This installation will allow you to view pre-run queries and browse the various databases that the
model uses, including the facility and chemical databases.

       Requires about 8 Mbytes of hard disk space.

       Before beginning installation: be sure you are not logged on to a LAN and exit all applications.

       1) Place the Indicators CD in the CD-ROM drive.

       2) Click on the "Start" button and select "Run..." from the pop-up menu.

       3) Type x:\oppteim\setup.exe in the "Open:" box, where x is the letter of your CD-ROM drive
              (usually D: orE:).

       4)  Follow the instructions indicated by the Install Wizard.  The program will be installed in
              C:\Oppteim.  The current version of the model (l.Ox) must be located in this directory.
             Do not move it to a sub-directory. Also the contents of the sub-directories Database and
             User must not be moved or the program will not be able to find them. Another folder,
              C:\Idapi, will be created by the installation program if it did not previously exist.

       5) At the end of installation, you can immediately launch the program and begin using the model,
              or you can exit the installer without launching the program.


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Full Installation

       If you plan on running queries yourself, you should complete this next step. Running new
queries from the CD-ROM will require hours instead of the 20-40 minutes required to run a new query
after the database files are copied to the hard drive.

       First complete the installation as described above under the "Installing the Indicators
Model"

       To install the databases needed to run queries:

       Requires an additional 305 Mbytes of disk space.

       You must copy the contents of the CD's OPPTEIM/Database and OPPTEIM/User folders into
       the Oppteim/Database  and Oppteim/User folders located on the hard drive. To do this follow
       steps 1 through 13 below.  You must also change the ID API settings so the program knows
       where to look for the data files.  This is explained in steps 14 through 20.

       1) Put the Indicators CD in the CD-ROM drive.

       2) Launch Windows Explorer (usually either Start->Windows Explorer or
              Start->Programs->Windows Explorer).

       3) Referring to  the window on the left side, open up the directory structure for the C: drive: The
       box to the left of "My Computer" should have a "-", showing all the drives on your computer.
       If the box has a "+", open the view by clicking on the "+" to change it to a "-", you should then
       see all the drives on your computer.

       4) Right click  on the C: drive and select "properties" from the bottom of the pop-up menu.
       Check the disk's free space.  You need 310 MB (megabytes) of free space to complete this part
       of the installation.

       5) The box to the left of C: drive should have a "-", showing all the folders on the c: drive. If the
       box has a "+", open up  the view by clicking on the "+" to change it to a "-", you should then see
       all the folders on your hard drive.

       6) Under your C: drive, find the folder called "Oppteim".  The box to the left of it should have
       a "-", showing the sub-directories "Database" and "User". If the box has a "+", open up the view
       by clicking on the "+" to change it to a "-", you should then see the sub-directories in this folder.

       7) Locate the CD-ROM drive (usually D: or E:).  It should show a picture of a drive with a CD
       on top of it and say "Oppteim (D:)" or "Oppteim (E:)". Open the view of the CD-ROM to show
       the sub-directories Adobe and Oppteim. Again, do this by clicking on the "+" next to the picture
       of the drive to change it to a "-".


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       8) Open the view of Oppteim.  You should now see the sub-directories "Database", "Manual",
       and "User".

       9) Click on the "Database" folder.  The window on the right should show you the contents of the
       CD's OppteimVDatabase folder. The first few files are:

              BlockGroup.DB
              BlockGroup.PX
              BlockGroup.XGO
              etc...

       If you see a different set of files, make sure you are looking at the OppteimVDatabase on the CD,
       not the OppteimVDatabase folder on the C: drive.

       10) With the CD's OppteimVDatabase folder's contents in view in the right-hand window, choose
       "Select All" from the "Edit" menu near the top left of the screen. All the files in the right-hand
       window should now be selected.

       11) Click on and drag that group of files into the OppteimVDatabase folder on the C: drive that
       you located in step 3) above. You may need to scroll the left-hand window up a bit so that you
       can see the C:\Oppteim\Database folder. It will take a couple of minutes to copy all the files. It
       is safe to click "Yes to All" when it asks if you want to replace any files since you are simply re-
       copying those files from the CD to the hard drive.

       [Steps 12 and 13 are optional.  If you frequently access the pre-run queries, you should complete
       these steps.  The pre-run queries require about 10 Mbytes of disk space.]

       12) Next click on the CD's OppteimYUser folder. The window on the right should show you the
       file list starting with:
              97a-c-m.aux
              97a-c-m.db
              97a-c-m.px
              97a-s2-c.aux
              etc...
              If you see a  different set of files, make sure you are  looking at the Oppteim\User on the
              CD, not the  Oppteim\User folder on the C:  drive.

       13) Choose "Select All"  from the "Edit" menu  then click and drag the file group to  the
       Oppteim/User folder on the C: drive.  Again, you can safely answer "Yes to All" when asked if
       you want to replace any files.

       You have now completed loading the all the data files from the CD to the hard drive.  You now
       must change the ID API settings so that the program knows where to look for the data files.
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       14) Using Windows Explorer, locate the Idapi folder on your hard drive. You should see it in
       the left-hand window a few folders above the Oppteim folder. Click on it to view its contents in
       the right-hand window.

       15) Double click on Bdecfg.exe in the right-hand window to launch the BDE configuration utility.

       16) At the bottom of the BDE Configuration Utility screen, look for the tab that says "Aliases"
       and click on it.

       17) Under "Alias Names", click on the "EEVIDATA" alias.

       18) Under "Parameters", select the first letter of the "Path", it should be the same letter as your
       CD-ROM drive,  probably D or E.  Change this letter to a  "C".  The path should now read
       "C:\OPPTEIM\Database".

       19) Save the change you have just made by choosing "Save"  from the "File"  menu.

       20) Exit the BDE Configuration Utility by choosing "Exit" from the "File" menu.

       You may now exit Windows Explorer (choose "Exit" from the "File"  menu).

       You are now set up to use all the capabilities of the Risk-Screening Environmental Indicators.

To launch the Indicators Model:

       Click on Start->Programs->Oppteim->Oppteim

       The Indicators program will start and automatically display the Help file. There is extensive help
available in that file. The Help file is context-sensitive, so clicking on Help at any point in the program
should assist you with the part of the program you are using at that time.

To Uninstall the Indicators Model:

       This will remove the entire program, ancillary files (* .dll' s), accompanying databases, and queries,
including any queries that you have run yourself.  It will not uninstall the IDAPI folder. You do not need
the CD-ROM to do this.

       1) Click on Start->Programs->Oppteim->Uninstall.

       2) Manually delete the Oppteim folder.  This is often necessary since using the Indicators model
       places new files in that folder or one of the sub-folder, so the uninstaller cannot complete the
       removal process. Do this by using Windows Explorer, open the view of the C: drive (refer to
       steps 3-6 above) and dragging the Oppteim folder into the Recycle Bin. The disk space will not
       be freed up until you empty the Recycle Bin.
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       3) Locate the ID API folder and launch BDEcfg.exe as described in steps 14 and 15 above.

       4) Click on the "Aliases" tab at the bottom of the BDE Configuration Utility screen.

       5) Click on "EIMCHEM" in the "Alias Names" box.

       6) Click on "Delete Alias" and answer "Yes" when asked if you are sure you want to do this.

       7) Also delete the "EIMDATA", "EIMUSER", and "EIMUSERC" aliases.

       8) Save the changes you have just made by choosing "Save" from the "File" menu.

       9) Exit the BDE Configuration Utility by choosing "Exit" from the "File" menu.
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                               TABLE OF CONTENTS
ATTENTION USERS OF EPA'S RISK-SCREENING ENVIRONMENTAL
      INDICATORS CD-ROM!	i
INSTALLATION INSTRUCTIONS FOR EPA'S RISK-SCREENING
      ENVIRONMENTAL INDICATORS CD-ROM  	iii

1.  INTRODUCTION TO EPA'S RISK-SCREENING ENVIRONMENTAL INDICATORS ... 1-1
      1.1   Model Description 	1-1
      1.2   Components of the Indicators Model  	1-2
            1.2.1  Chemical Releases and Transfers	1-3
            1.2.2  Adjustments for Chronic Human Health Toxicity  	1-3
            1.2.3  Adjustments for Exposure Potential  	1-6
            1.2.4  Adjustments for Potentially Exposed Populations  	1-11
      1.3   Calculating the Indicator  	1-12
            1.3.1  Indicator Elements 	1-12
            1.3.2  Overall Indicator	1-13
      1.4   Analyses That Can be Performed Using the Indicators Model	1-13
      1.5   Important Caveats Regarding the Chronic Human Health Indicator	1-14
            1.5.1  Toxicity Component	1-14
            1.5.2  Exposure Component	1-15
            1.5.3  Population Component	1-15
      1.6   Strengths and Limitations of the Chronic Human Health Indicator 	1-16
            1.6.1  Strengths  	1-16
            1.6.2  Limitations	1-16
2.  OPERATIONS AVAILABLE IN THE INDICATORS MODEL	2-1
3.  GENERATING INDICATOR ELEMENTS FROM CHEMICAL RELEASE DATA   	3-1
4.  MODEL PARAMETERS  	4-1
5.  INSPECTING DATA ON TRI FACILITIES  	5-1
      5.1    Finding a Facility	5-2
      5.2   Viewing General Facility Information	5-3
      5.3   Viewing Chemical Release Information and Indicator Element Scores	5-4
      5.4   Exporting and Printing Data	5-5
      5.5   Links Section	5-5
6.  VIEWING DATA IN THE MODEL  	6-1
      6.1   Chemical-Specific Information	6-1
            6.1.1  Sorting the Data	6-2
            6.1.2  Viewing and Editing the Data	6-2
      6.2   Census Data	6-7
      6.3   Weather Station Data	6-9
      6.4   Stream Data	6-11
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7.  MAKING QUERIES (CREATING AND VIEWING DATA TABLES)	7-1
      7.1    New Queries  	7-1
            7.1.1  Specifying a Filename for Results 	7-2
            7.1.2  Subsetting  Data	7-3
            7.1.3  Selecting Items as Row and Column Variables 	7-11
            7.1.4  Hints for Running Queries	7-13
      7.2    Previously-Generated Queries	7-13
      7.3    Viewing, Expressing, and Sorting Data in Created Tables	7-14
            7.3.1  Checking the Subset of Data in the Table 	7-14
            7.3.2  Ways to Compute and Express the Indicators	7-14
            7.3.3  Sorting Records in the Table	7-17
            7.3.4  Mapping Your Query  	7-18
      7.4    Saving the Data Table to an External File	7-20
      7.5    Caveats  	7-20
8.  GRAPHING RESULTS OF YOUR DATA QUERY	8-1
      8.1    Choosing a Plot Type to Graph Your Results	8-2
      8.2    Formatting the Graph	8-2
      8.3    Moving Sections of the Graph  	8-4
      8.4    Printing the Graph  	8-4
      8.5    Saving the Graph to an External File	8-4
      8.6    Loading a Graph from an External File	8-5
      8.7    Caveats  	8-5
9.  THE STEP BY STEP  PROCESS OF USING THE INDICATORS MODEL:
      EXAMPLES USING RELEASES IN A DEFINED GEOGRAPHIC AREA	9-1
      9.1    Example 1: Compare Pounds Released (TRI Pounds) with Modeled Pounds .... 9-1
      9.2    Example 2: Comparison of County-Specific Scores with National Scores	9-4
      9.3    Example 3: Examining Chemical-Specific Scores 	9-6
      9.4    Example 4: Year to Year Comparisons in Risk-Related Impacts	9-9
      9.5    Example 5: Ranking Risks Among Manufacturing Facilities	9-11
10. MODEL RUNS AVAILABLE ON THE CD-ROM	10-1
11. REFERENCES	11-1

APPENDIX A. STANDARD INDUSTRIAL CLASSIFICATION CODES	  A-l
APPENDIX B. EPA REGIONS	B-l
APPENDIX C. ADDITIONAL FACILITY INFORMATION 	C-l
APPENDIX D. PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTY INFORMATION	  D-l
APPENDIX E. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON GRAPHING CAPABILITIES	E-l
APPENDIX F. GLOSSARY OF TERMS COMMONLY USED IN THE INDICATORS
      METHODOLOGY AND THE INDICATORS MODEL	F-l
APPENDIX G. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON FLAG FIELDS	  G-l
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  1.  INTRODUCTION TO EPA'S RISK-SCREENING ENVIRONMENTAL INDICATORS

       Each year the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) provides the public with detailed data on releases
and transfers for a large set of chemicals emitted by manufacturing facilities in the United States.  To
track the potential risk-related impacts of these chemical  releases and transfers, the Environmental
Protection Agency's (EPA's) Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) has developed Risk-
Screening Environmental Indicators,  a  computer-based (Microsoft Windows) model  that permits
screening-level analyses.  The Risk-Screening Environmental Indicators model supplements a quantity-
based ("pounds  only") view of releases by incorporating  information and models that assess, at a
screening-level, the risk-related trends that chemical releases may pose. The information and models
enable the user to consider the toxicity of chemicals, the quantity to which people are exposed, and the
size  of the  population exposed to those chemicals.  It should be emphasized that the result is not a
detailed or quantitative risk assessment, but offers a screening-level, risk-relatedperspectivefor relative
comparisons of chemical releases.

       Tracking changes in environmental health impacts over time using the Indicators model allows
EPA to measure its progress in implementing environmental protection and pollution prevention
programs. In addition, comparing risk-related impacts of particular chemicals, industries, and geographic
regions through the Indicators model allows EPA and other users to establish priorities for improving
future environmental health.

       At this time, the Chronic Human Health Indicator  (the "Indicator")  has been developed, and
addresses both chronic effects and chronic exposures.  Chronic effects  are those that generally persist
over a long period of time whether or not they occur immediately after exposure or are delayed.  Chronic
exposure refers to multiple exposures occurring over an extended period of time, or a significant fraction
of an individual's lifetime. A separate environmental indicator is being designed to address risk-related
chronic  ecological impacts and will be introduced in the future, eventually to be followed by  an acute
health indicator.

       The following sections of this chapter  (Chapter 1) describe the Indicator methodology and the
types of questions that can be explored using the Indicators model. Chapters 2 through 8 describe the
operations of the computer model, Chapter 9 presents the step-by-step processes for performing model
operations, and Chapter 10 describes pre-run queries available with the model. The appendices present
the following information: descriptions of various codes and abbreviations, physicochemical  property
data, detailed instructions on graphing capabilities, and a glossary of terms used in the model.

1.1    Model Description

       The Indicators model calculates a number (referred to as the "Indicator Value") that reflects the
risk-related impacts on chronic human health of modeled TRI releases and transfers for a given year or
years.  Indicator Values do not provide absolute measures of risk and can only be interpreted as relative
measures to be compared with other Indicator Values (reflecting the direction and the general magnitude
of changes  at different points in time when analyzing trends, or identifying the relative contribution of
variables in an analysis). In this way, the Indicators model is able to rank in a relative manner what are
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termed the "risk-related impacts" on the general, non-worker population chronically exposed to any
chemical that can be modeled.

       The Indicator uses the reported quantities of TRI releases and transfers of chemicals to estimate
the risk-related impacts  associated with each type of release  or transfer by every TRI  facility in
relationship to one another.  The risk-related impacts potentially posed by a  chemical are related to
chemical toxicity, the fate and transport of the chemical in the environment after it is released, how people
are exposed to the  chemical, and how many people are exposed to it.  The Indicator incorporates
chemical-specific toxicity (for inhalation and oral exposure pathways), estimated exposures, and the size
of the potentially exposed population1.  These components are discussed further below.

       The Indicator uses these components to derive a unique value corresponding to each combination
of a facility, chemical, and release or transfer medium (i.e., a chemical-facility-medium-specific value is
generated). This value is termed an "Indicator Element," a unitless value proportional to the potential
risk-related impact of each specific release or transfer. The Indicator Value for the Chronic Human
Health Indicator is  simply the sum of all the applicable Indicator Elements for a given year.   The
Indicator incorporates each year of TRI reporting, beginning with 1988, the "base year." Year-by-year
comparisons  allow  assessment  of the  trends in estimated risk-related impacts of TRI releases and
transfers.  The result is not a detailed or quantitative risk assessment, but offers a screening-level, risk-
related perspective for relative comparisons of chemical releases.

       For a detailed description of the Indicators model and components of the model, refer to Toxic
Release Inventory Relative Risk-Based Environmental Indicators Methodology (U.S. EPA,  1997a),
which represents  the most recent full documentation of the model.  Appendix A of the Methodology
document also describes other systems for ranking chemicals, which can be compared with the Indicators
model.  Please note that there have been recent  changes to the model that are not reflected in the
Methodology document; a future version of the Methodology document will be developed to reflect these
changes.

1.2    Components of the  Indicators Model

       The Indicators  model relies on the  ability to locate facilities geographically, and to attribute
demographic data and physical characteristics, such as meteorology, to the facilities once they are located.
To accomplish the location of facilities and the attribution of data to those facilities, the Indicators model
describes the U.S. as a 1-km by 1-km grid system. For each cell in the grid, a location "address" in terms
of (X,Y) coordinates is assigned based on latitude and longitude (lat/long).

       The (X,Y) coordinates of the location address are the basis of the grid system.  The origin of the
system is at 96 degrees longitude and 37 degrees latitude in Montgomery County, Kansas.  This point
is at the center of the origin cell for the Indicators model (both X and Y equal zero at the center of the
origin cell). Each (X, Y) pair defines the center point of one cell in the grid. The X value is the distance
       lrThe method is focused on general populations; individuals, particularly highly exposed individuals, are
not the focus of the Chronic Human Health Indicator. Additional Indicators based upon highly exposed
subpopulations may be developed in the future.

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in kilometers in the east-west direction from the origin cell and the Y value is the distance in kilometers
in the north-south direction from the origin cell. Using the (X,Y) pair, the boundary of each cell can be
constructed with the four corner points: (X+0.5, Y+0.5) for the upper right corner, (X+0.5,Y-0.5) for
the lower right corner, (X-0.5,Y-0.5) for the lower left corner, and (X-0.5,Y+0.5) for the upper left
corner.  The equations used to determine the (X, Y) coordinates defining the center of a given cell from
lat/long data will be presented in the new Methodology document.

       Once the grid system for the U.S. is established, facilities can be located in it.  Each facility
reporting to TRI is instructed in Form R to provide the lat/long coordinates of the facility, or, if the
facility is large, the lat/long coordinates of a point central to the production activities of the facility. The
ability of the Indicators model to accurately locate a facility therefore depends on the accuracy of the
lat/long coordinates reported to TRI by the facility.  The  same equations that determine the (X,Y)
coordinates of the grid cells are used to transform facility lat/long coordinates to (X,Y) coordinates. The
facility can then be located in the grid system for further modeling.

       Once facilities are located, four main components are used to compute risk-related impacts in the
Indicators model.  These components are:

             the quantity of chemicals released or transferred,
              adjustments for chemical-specific chronic human health toxicity,
             adjustments for pathway-specific exposure potential, and
              an adjustment to reflect size of the potentially exposed population.

These components and the method used to combine them are described in the following sections.

1.2.1  Chemical Releases and Transfers

       The Indicators model uses information on chemical releases from manufacturing facilities and
transfers from these facilities to off-site facilities (such as sewage treatment plants) to model risk-related
impacts.2 These releases are reported by facilities to the Toxics Release Inventory (as mandated by the
Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act).  As of the 1997 reporting year, there are 604
TRI chemicals listed.

1.2.2  Adjustments for Chronic Human Health Toxicity

       The Chronic Human Health Indicator is based on  current EPA methodologies for assessing
toxicity. The Indicator will be continually updated to reflect any changes in these methodologies.  The
method OPPT has chosen for assigning toxicity weights to  chemicals is clear and reproducible, based
upon easily accessible and publicly available information, and utilizes expert EPA-wide judgments to the
greatest extent possible.  The Indicator weights the toxicities of chemicals relative to one another using
        The Indicator is not restricted to the use of TRI chemical release information. Any chemical for which
toxicity data, physicochemical properties, and facility latitude and longitude data are available can be modeled by
the Indicator.

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a proportional system of numerical scores.  Scores (weights) for chemicals increase as the toxicological
potential to cause chronic human health effects increases.

       Values developed by EPA experts are used to differentiate the degrees and types of toxicity of
chemicals and score them in a consistent manner. The values known as Oral Slope Factors and Inhalation
Unit Risks3 provide information pertaining to toxicity for chemicals that may cause cancer. The values
known as Reference Doses (RfDs) and Reference Concentrations (RfCs) provide toxicity information
related to noncancer effects.4 The most preferred source of these values is EPA's database of Agency-
evaluated toxicity values, the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS).5 Data contained in IRIS have
been peer-reviewed and represent expert Agency-wide judgments. In the absence of IRIS data, the next
preferred source of toxicity  data is the publicly-available Health Effects Assessment Summary  Tables
(HEAST). These tables are constructed for use in both the Superfund program and in the Resource
Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) program but do not represent Agency-wide expert judgments.
Similarly, data from the Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP) Reference Dose Tracking Report may also
be used.  In certain cases where IRIS, HEAST or OPP data files do not have quantitative toxicity values,
several other sources of secondary data available to EPA are used to assign toxicity weights. These data
are reviewed by a group of OPPT expert  health scientists who derive appropriate toxicity weightings
when the available data on chronic human toxicity are sufficient for this purpose. A toxicity weighting
summary is provided for each of these derived values.  The OPPT scientists used a technical approach
analogous to the Agency's method for deriving RfD values, RfC values, cancer risk estimates, and Weight
of Evidence (WOE) determinations.  However, it must be emphasized that these derived values are not
the equivalent of the more rigorous and resource-intensive IRIS process and are only useful for
screening-level purposes.

       The  Indicator  toxicity  scoring   method  separately  evaluates  certain  exposure  routes
(breathing/inhalation and ingestion/oral) and classes of effects (cancer and noncancer). For each route,
chemicals are scored based on their single, most sensitive adverse effect. Except for the cancer/noncancer
distinction, the toxicity  weighting methodology does not distinguish between chemicals based on type
or target of effect (e.g., neurotoxicity vs. developmental toxicity), nor does it address multiple  effects
which may be exhibited by a chemical.   When values are available  for only one route of exposure,
ordinarily the same toxicity weight is applied to reflect the potential for both inhalation and oral toxicity,
provided there is no evidence the effects are route-specific or limited to the portal of entry into the body.
In rare instances, toxicity studies are available to show a given chemical causes no health effects  by  one
       3 The Oral Slope Factor represents the upper-bound estimate of the slope of the dose-response curve in the
low-dose region for carcinogens. The units of the slope factor are usually expressed as (mg/kg-day)"'. The
Inhalation Unit Risk is the upper-bound excess lifetime cancer risk estimated to result from continuous exposure to
an agent at a concentration of 1 Mg/m3 in air.

       4RfDs and RfCs are estimates (with uncertainty spanning perhaps an order of magnitude) of daily
exposure [RfD], or continuous inhalation exposure [RfC], to the human population (including sensitive subgroups)
that is likely to be without an appreciable risk of deleterious noncancer effects during a lifetime.

       5 U.S. EPA.  1998.  Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). Online. National Center for
Environmental Assessment, Washington, DC.

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exposure pathway; in these instances, a toxicity weight is assigned only to the pathway that results in
chronic human health effects.

       In the Indicator methodology, the following algorithms are used to assign toxicity weights:

              non-carcinogens:             0.5/RfD (mg/kg-day)  or 1.8/RfC (mg/m3)

              carcinogens (WOE
              categories A and B)6:         Oral Slope Factor (risk per mg/kg-day)/ 0.0005  or
                                          Inhalation Unit Risk (risk per mg/m3)/ 0.00014
              carcinogens
              (WOE category C)6:         Use the algorithm to estimate toxicity weights for A/B
                                          carcinogens, but divide the weight by 10.

These constants maintain the equivalency between cancer and noncancer scores that was established in
the Hazard Ranking System scoring methodology used in EPA's Superfund program. When combining
cancer and noncancer endpoints, it is assumed that exposure at the level of the RfD is equivalent to a 2.5
x 10"4 cancer risk.  The Indicator is designed in such a fashion that users can examine carcinogens and
non-carcinogens separately or in combination.  The distribution of toxicity values for  TRI chemicals
corresponds to a range of toxicity weights of approximately  0.1 to 1,000,000 for carcinogens and
approximately 0.001 to 100,000 for non-carcinogens.  Continuous toxicity weights are expressed as
values with two significant figures.

       There are 604 chemicals and chemical  categories on the 1997 TRI Chemical  List.  Toxicity
weights are available for 405 of these chemicals and chemical categories.  The 405 chemicals with
toxicity weights account for 98% of the reported pounds for all on-site releases in 1997.

       A complete discussion of the methods used in these evaluations, as well as the chemical-by-
chemical data summaries and score assignments, are provided in Toxics Release Inventory Relative Risk-
based Indicators: Interim Toxicity Weighting Summary Document (U.S. EPA, 1997b) and amended by
EPA 's Risk-Screening Environmental Indicators: Toxicity Weights for Toxics Release Inventory (TRI)
Chemicals and Chemical Categories (U.S. EPA, April 28, 1998).
       6Based on the quality and adequacy of data on carcinogenicity, a chemical is placed in one of the
following five weight of evidence categories, as specified in 51 FR 33996:
              A      Carcinogenic to humans
              B      Probable carcinogen
                     B1     Indicates limited human evidence
                     B2     Indicates sufficient evidence in animals and inadequate or no evidence in
                            humans
              C      Possible carcinogen
              D      Not classifiable
              E      Evidence of non-carcinogenicity

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1.2.3  Adjustments for Exposure Potential

       Both qualitative and quantitative elements are considered when weighting chronic exposure
potential.  Quantitatively, exposure potential is estimated using a "surrogate" dose.  To estimate the
surrogate dose, a separate exposure evaluation is conducted for each media-specific emissions pathway.
The exposure  evaluations use models that incorporate data on media-specific and pathway-specific
chemical releases and transfers, physicochemical properties and, where available, site characteristics, to
estimate the ambient chemical concentration in the medium into which the chemical is released or
transferred. The ambient concentrations are then combined with standard human exposure assumptions
to estimate the magnitude of the surrogate dose.

       The qualitative element uses uncertainty categories that are defined so that, in general, surrogate
dose estimates are placed in lower categories when they are developed using few data and generic models
that require many assumptions and extrapolations.  These assumptions and extrapolations tend to yield
overestimates of exposure. Applying these uncertainty categories, the initial surrogate dose estimate may
be reduced by a factor of five or ten. The three uncertainty categories and associated adjustment factors
are as follows:
     Category
               Explanation
Adjustment Factor
         A
Combines modeling with some generic and
some reasonable site-specific data to generate
exposure estimates.	
         1
         B
Combines modeling with some generic and
some site-specific data, but identification of
appropriate site-specific data subject to error
and will often be filled in with generic
assumptions.	
                   Extrapolates generic exposure estimates from
                   actual data from other sites to exposure at
                   TRI sites (e.g., groundwater modeling).	
                                                        10
       The algorithms for calculating surrogate doses rely on the ability to locate facilities geographically
(including those to which off-site transfer is made) and to associate their locations with their demographic
and physical characteristics.  To accomplish this, the computer algorithm describes the U.S. as a 1-km
by 1-km grid system. For each cell in the grid, the computer assigns a location "address" based on
latitude and longitude. It then assigns information on the demographics and physical characteristics of
that cell to that address.
       While this methodology uses the EPA exposure assessment paradigm to evaluate exposure
potential, the results should not be construed as an actual numerical estimate of dose resulting from TRI
releases, because limited facility-specific data and the use of models that rely on default values for many
parameters prevent the calculation of an actual  dose.  Instead, the purpose of the methodology is to
generate as accurate a surrogate dose as possible without conducting an in-depth risk assessment. The
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estimates of surrogate doses from releases of TRI chemicals are relative to the surrogate doses resulting
from other releases included in the Indicator.

Pathway-specific Methods

       Stack and Fugitive Air Releases

       This method uses algorithms from the Industrial Source Complex Long Term (ISCLT3) model
developed by the Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS). ISCLT3  is a steady-state
Gaussian plume model used to estimate long-term pollutant concentrations downwind of a stack or area
source. The concentration is a function of facility-specific parameters (such as stack height and exit gas
velocity), meteorology, and chemical-specific, first-order air decay rates.

       In the Indicators model, each facility is located in a 1-km by 1-km grid cell based on its reported
lat/long. The facility may be located away from its reported location by up to 707 m within a grid cell so
that it is in the center of the grid cell. (707 m is calculated as the hypotenuse of an isosceles triangle with
both sides of length 500 m.)

       The ISCLT3 model then estimates the air concentrations for the midpoint of each grid  cell in a
21-km by 21-km area surrounding the grid cell containing the facility.  For each of the 440 1-km by 1-km
cells, an air concentration for a given chemical is calculated based on the radial distance of each grid cell's
center from the source in the center cell, meteorological data, and chemical-specific data. For the center
cell in which the facility is located, the Indicators model currently assigns the highest air concentration
from the eight cells surrounding that cell. Surrogate doses estimated from the concentrations in each cell
are then multiplied by the population in the cell and by the inhalation toxicity weight assigned to the
chemical.

       Stack height data were obtained from the AIRS Facility Subsystem (AFS) within the Aerometric
Information Retrieval System (AIRS), the National Emission Trends Database, and databases from three
individual states (California, New York, and Wisconsin). For each TRI facility that was identified in one
of these data sources, the median height of all stacks at that facility is used in the Indicators model. For
the TRI facilities for which stack height data were not available in these sources, a Standard Industrial
Classification (SIC) code-based median stack height is used in the Indicators Model. The SIC code-based
stack height is estimated from data in AFS and the Trends Database for facilities in a particular 3-digit
SIC code or in the 2-digit SIC code if the 3-digit SIC code is invalid.  If no valid 2-digit SIC code is
available, the  median of all stack heights in SIC  codes 20 through 39 is used.  Appendix A lists the
industries associated with all 2-digit and 3-digit SIC codes. In the calculation of median stack height for
facilities with a particular SIC code, statistical analyses were conducted to determine whether heights for
stacks not emitting any TRI  chemicals should be included.  For some SIC codes, significant height
differences did not exist between stacks emitting TRI chemicals and stacks not emitting TRI chemicals.
Thus, in those cases, all stack heights for all facilities in that SIC code were used to estimate the median
stack height for that SIC code.  For other SIC codes, a significant height difference between  the two
groups of stacks did exist, and only those stacks emitting TRI chemicals were used in the calculation of
a median stack height for that SIC code.
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       Similarly, the Indicators model uses either the median exit gas velocity of all stacks for TRI
facilities with this information or an SIC code-based median exit gas velocity for facilities without stack
exit gas velocity data.  The latter is based on the median of exit gas velocities for facilities in a particular
3-digit SIC code or in the 2-digit SIC code if the 3-digit SIC code is invalid. If no valid 2-digit SIC code
is available, the median of all stack exit gas velocities in SIC codes 20 through 39 is used.  Exit gas
velocity data were obtained from AFS  within AIRS, the National  Emission Trends Database, and
databases from two individual  states, New York and Wisconsin.   The same statistical analyses as
described above for stack heights were conducted before a median exit gas velocity was calculated for
each SIC code.

       Analyses have been conducted that show the concentrations predicted by the Indicators model
using a combination of generic and site-specific data closely match concentrations estimated by using
more complete site-specific data. Because a combination of site-specific data and generic inputs is used
for the air release pathway, uncertainty category A is used to classify this pathway.

       Direct Surface Water Releases

       Chemicals released directly  to surface waters are modeled using a simple first-order decay
equation, along with estimates of river discharge and velocity. Chemical concentrations are estimated
for distances up to 200 km downstream from the chemical release to take into account drinking water
intakes up to 200 km downstream.  The chemical-specific decay coefficient is predominantly based on
either abiotic hydrolysis or microbial biodegradation; on occasion, it may be based on photooxidation.

       This methodology considers  two  chronic human health exposure pathways from surface water
releases.  First, exposures from drinking water are calculated.  As the chemical travels downstream,
concentrations at public drinking water intakes are estimated.  The population served at each drinking
water intake is assumed to be the population exposed to that chemical concentration. If a cell contains
no drinking water intake, the exposed population is zero. Uncertainty category B is used for the drinking
water pathway because several factors may result in  an overestimate of exposure.

       A second potential exposure pathway is from consumption of contaminated fish.  Each segment
of the affected surface water reach may contain contaminated fish which could be caught and eaten by
recreational fishers. As described above, the model tracks the concentration of the chemical as it travels
downstream; in each U.S. Geological Survey-defined stream reach, the concentration in fish is derived
by multiplying the chemical concentration in the water by a factor to account for bioconcentration of the
chemical from water into fish. Because specific data on the number of people fishing in a reach are not
available, the exposed population is  modeled as a percentage of the drinking water population.  State-
specific population fractions of persons who eat fish were derived from state-specific fishing rates found
in the U.S. Fish and  Wildlife Service's 1991 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife
Associated Recreation (U. S. DOI, FWS, 1993). Uncertainty category C is used for the fish consumption
pathway because many factors may result in an overestimate of exposure.
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       On-site Land Releases

       On-site land releases include releases to landfills, surface impoundments, land treatment units and
underground injection wells.  This section describes methods to evaluate exposure from these releases,
except for underground injection.7

       For on-site land releases, two major exposure pathways are considered because chemicals may
volatilize to air or leach to groundwater. Volatilization of chemicals from on-site land releases is reported
to TRI under the fugitive emission estimate for the facility, and is handled as a fugitive air release.

       Groundwater contamination  is also a concern for on-site land releases.  The  modeling of
groundwater releases depends on the regulatory status of the unit in which the chemical is released.
Chemicals could be deposited in an on-site RCRA-regulated, subtitle C hazardous waste unit, or in an
on-site nonhazardous solid waste management unit. RCRA standards for hazardous waste units are, by
regulation, designed to include technical controls to prevent release of contaminants into groundwater;
if chemicals are placed in such regulated units, it is assumed that releases to groundwater are negligible.
If chemicals are placed in nonhazardous land disposal units, we model  the release of  chemicals to
groundwater.  Because we lack data about how materials are disposed on-site, all on-site land disposal
is assumed to occur in landfills.

       The  TRI forms do  not provide site-specific information, such as hydrogeological data, to aid in
the evaluation of groundwater transport.  Unfortunately, these data are extremely site-specific and are
not amenable to characterization  by state  or region of the country.  Nonetheless, to maintain a
concentration/exposure measure consistent with the  approaches  for direct air and water releases, we
derive a surrogate dose using generic, conservative assumptions. This approach requires two steps:
estimating leachate concentration (a measure of the amount of chemical that partitions from the waste
to porewater) and estimating the dilution and attenuation  of leachate that occurs between the disposal
site and the drinking well location.

       It should be noted  that the chemical concentration in the leachate must be compatible with the
chemical-specific solubility (i.e., leachate concentration cannot exceed water solubility); the smaller of
the two values is used. Once leachate concentrations are estimated, the next step is to determine the
magnitude of dilution and  attenuation that occur as the contaminant travels from the source to the well.
The diluted  and attenuated concentrations are then used to calculate surrogate doses.

       The population exposed to contaminated groundwater is calculated from the number of persons
obtaining drinking water from groundwater within  one kilometer of the facility.  Uncertainty category
C is used for this pathway because exposure is based on  a conservative leachate concentration and a
conservative dilution and attenuation factor.
       7 Under well-managed conditions, underground injection wells are designed to pose minimal risks to
human health or the environment. Only unweighted pounds of releases and transfers to underground injection
wells are tracked in the Indicators model (these releases can be viewed from a hazard-based perspective).

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       Releases to POTWs

       Modeling exposure from TRI discharges to Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTWs) requires:
(1) location of the POTW to which the chemicals are discharged, (2) consideration of overall removal
efficiencies of POTWs and resulting effluent discharges from POTWs, and (3) consideration of residuals
(sludge) management at POTWs.

       The latitude and longitude of POTWs receiving TRI transfers are not included in the TRI
database.  However,  the ZIP codes for the POTWs are available.  For a given facility, the POTW is
located on the grid based on the latitude and longitude of the ZIP code centroid.

       Chemicals entering the POTW can biodegrade, volatilize, become sorbed to sewage sludge, or
be discharged in the POTW's effluent. Chemicals in the POTW effluent discharged to surface water are
modeled using the surface water evaluation methods described above. Chemicals that biodegrade are
assumed to degrade to chemicals that do not pose risk. POTW volatilization releases are treated like
area-source air releases. Currently, all POTW sludge is modeled as being landfilled at the POTW, a
common method of sludge disposal. Landfilling of sludge is modeled using methods described for on-site
land releases.

       The population exposed to surface water effluent discharges is described in the section on direct
surface water releases. The population exposed to air releases is the population within a 21 -km by 21-km
grid around the POTW. The population exposed to groundwater contaminated by the landfilling of
sewage sludge is calculated from the number of persons obtaining drinking water from groundwater
within one kilometer of the  POTW.

       The uncertainty categories used for direct water releases, air releases, and on-site land releases
are applied to the appropriate sub-elements associated with POTW releases.  The sub-elements are then
combined (summed) to yield a single facility-chemical-POTW transfer Indicator Element.

       Off-site Transfers

       TRI reporters are required to supply the name and address of the facility that receives wastes for
storage or  disposal.   From these data, we must determine if wastes are sent to a hazardous  or
nonhazardous waste  management facility.  As  with underground injection wells, transfers to RCRA
hazardous waste facilities are not included in the Chronic Human Health Indicator; if chemicals are placed
in such regulated units, it is assumed that releases to groundwater are negligible.  Therefore, only
transfers to nonhazardous facilities are modeled.

       As with transfers to  POTWs, we must have information about the off-site facility location and
some of its characteristics to assess the exposure potential associated with off-site transfers. After the
off-site facility is located using the ZIP code centroid, the Indicators methodology requires information
on the treatment and disposal technologies used by the facility.

       If the treatment method  is incineration, then destruction and removal efficiencies (DREs) are
applied to the transfer amount, and the releases  are modeled using ISCLT3, as described above.


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       For  off-site  landfills,  two  major  exposure pathways are  considered: groundwater and
volatilization. For off-site transfers, the groundwater pathway is modeled in the same manner as for on-
site land releases. Volatilization, however, is modeled differently. As noted earlier, for on-site releases,
volatilization is included in reported fugitive emissions and thus exposure is modeled directly from these
air releases.  In contrast, volatilization emissions from off-site land disposal must be estimated before
exposure can be modeled. The volatilization flux of chemicals (mass per area per time) is estimated from
the concentration of the chemical in the landfill solids, using information on partitioning between solid,
liquid, and vapor phases.  The estimate of the volatilization flux is then multiplied by an estimate of the
area of the landfill to obtain an estimate of total emissions (mass per time).  These emissions are then
combined with weather data and data on populations surrounding the off-site disposal facilities to obtain
population-weighted concentrations, using the same algorithms as those used for direct air releases from
TRI facilities.  The population exposed to air releases is the population within a 21-km by 21-km grid
around the off-site landfill.   Uncertainty category C  is used  for this pathway because substantial
assumptions and modeling are used to estimate  exposure.

1.2.4  Adjustments for Potentially Exposed Populations

       The populations modeled for each exposure pathway were described in the previous section; this
section describes how census data are used to estimate population sizes. The Chronic Human Health
Indicator uses two  types of U.S. Census  data  to  estimate the size of pathway-specific exposed
populations. Population estimates are based on a combination of the following data: (1) block-level data
from the major (decennial) U.S. Census information from 1990, and (2) county-specific population data
for the years 1988 and 1996, which are used to estimate population changes and therefore the grid cell-
level population for  years other than 1990.  Block-level data include race (White,  Black,  Native
American, Asian/Pacific Islander,  and Hispanic), the total population, the population younger than  18
years, and the population 65 years and older.

       Census blocks are the smallest geographic area for which decennial census data are collected.
Blocks are formed by streets, roads, railroads, streams and other bodies of water, other visible physical
and cultural features, and the legal boundaries  shown on Census Bureau maps.  In 1990, the Census
Bureau tabulated data for 7,020,924 census blocks.

       One or more census blocks forms a block group, which is a subdivision of a census tract or block
numbering area. A block group consists of all census blocks whose numbers begin with the same digit
in a given census tract or block numbering area. The total number of block groups delineated for the
1990 decennial census was 229,466.  Some demographic data, such as the population in more narrowly
defined age groups or the population with an income level in a certain range, are available only for block
groups. These block group data are  not currently used in the Indicators model, but will be used in the
next generation (32-bit) of the model.

       The 1990 decennial Census data are the most recent and most complete set of population data
available from the U.S. Census Bureau. However, the population numbers from the 1990 Census do not
reflect differential growth rates in  various parts of the country.  Thus, to estimate populations in other
years, the Indicators model uses U.S. Census data at the county level to estimate relative population


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change across the U.S.  To do this, the model incorporates data for every county for the years 1988 and
1996, in addition to the more complete 1990 Census data.  Using the county-level population data,
estimates of population change for non-decennial years are estimated by county based on interpolations
between 1988 and 1990 and between 1990 and 1996, and extrapolations to 1997. For each 1-km by 1-
km grid cell in the Indicators model, the county is determined, and then the interpolated or extrapolated
estimates of population change are applied to the  1990 Census data attributed to that grid cell to estimate
populations for the non-decennial years.

       For each block, a block centroid is provided, based on the geometry of the block (i.e., the centroid
is area-weighted,  not population-weighted). Each block is then mapped to a grid cell by comparing its
block centroid location to the grid cell location.  The location of each grid cell is defined by its four
corner points calculated from its (X,Y) coordinates.  When a block centroid falls within a grid cell, its
population data are  attributed to that cell.  If more than one block centroid is located within a grid cell,
then the populations affiliated with the multiple blocks are summed.

1.3    Calculating the Indicator

       The Indicator method combines each of the above components multiplicatively to obtain Indicator
Elements and Indicator Values.

1.3.1  Indicator Elements

       The toxicity, exposure potential, and population components are first combined multiplicatively
to obtain a chemical-facility-medium-specific Indicator Element,  as follows:

       Indicator Elementc f m = Toxicity Weightc m * Surrogate Dosec f m*Exposed Populationf m

where:
              c       =      subscript for chemical c,
             f      =      subscript for facility/, and
              m      =      subscript for medium m.

The  result of the multiplication  of the components is a chemical-facility-medium-specific  "Indicator
Element."  This unitless element is not a physically meaningful measure of quantitative risk associated
with the facility, but is  an approximate measure  that is comparable to approximate measures for other
facilities  (or chemicals, media, etc.) calculated using the same methods.  Approximately 1.9 million
Indicator Elements are calculated for all ten years of TRI reporting data (1988-1997). These are based
on approximately 1.7 million distinct chemical releases and transfers reported to TRI.
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1.3.2  Overall Indicator Value

       The overall Indicator Value is calculated by summing all the relevant individual TRI chemical-
facility-medium-specific Indicator Elements, as follows:
       where:
              /      =      Chronic Human Health Indicator, and
              IEc/rM  =      chemical-facility-medium-specific Indicator Element.

       The Indicator is recomputed for all years in the TRI database on  an annual basis in order to
incorporate revisions to the reporting data. In this method, each component score makes a contribution
proportional to its size.  The resulting value can be used in a number of ways, including tracking changes
over time. For example, the base-year Indicator can be normalized to 1 00,000, and subsequent Indicators
scaled to this value to evaluate changes over time. Indicators can also be calculated for various subsets
of variables (e.g., chemical, facility, medium) that compose the Indicator Elements. It must be reiterated
that while changes in scores over the years would imply that there have been changes in risk-related
environmental impacts, the actual magnitude  of any  specific risk or change in risk is unknown.
Although the score itself may be useful in identifying facilities or counties with the highest potential for
risk, the  score does not quantify that risk or provide any indication whatsoever of the magnitude of
individual risk associated with that facility or county. Furthermore,  external factors such as the state
of the economy may have an impact on the  emissions of a facility irrespective of that facility 's
environmental management practices.
1.4    Analyses That Can be Performed Using the Indicators Model

       Users of the Indicators model can perform, in a matter of hours, a variety of screening-level
analyses. Previously, days, weeks, or even months would have been required to organize the relevant
information, evaluate that information, and perform the complex and sophisticated analyses that are
necessary to provide a risk-related perspective. Indicator results can be used for screening-level ranking
and  prioritization for  strategic planning purposes,  risk-related targeting,  and trends analyses.
Considerable resources can be saved by conducting preliminary analyses with the Indicators model to
identify risk-related situations of high potential concern, which warrant further evaluation.

       As noted above, users can  evaluate releases using a number of variables, such as chemical,
medium, geographic area or industry. For instance, the following types of questions can be investigated:
How do industry sectors compare to one another from a risk-related perspective?  What is the relative
contribution of chemicals within a given industry sector? What release pathway for a particular chemical
poses the greatest risk-related impacts?

       The Indicator also allows the user to investigate the relative influence of toxicity and population
on the risk-related results, which also incorporate exposure modeling. In addition, users can consider
cancer and noncancer health endpoints independently or in combination. Finally, the use of the Indicators


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model is not limited to TRI chemicals; the adaptable methodology can model any chemical if toxicity
characteristics, physicochemical properties, release levels, and release location are known or can be
estimated.

       A future version of the Indicators model will be made compatible with a Geographical Information
System  (GIS) format.  The current version of the Indicators model available to the public has full
modeling of only the air exposure pathway, but future versions will provide full modeling of all exposure
pathways. Information regarding the Risk-Screening Environmental Indicators project will be available
on the OPPT Homepage.8

1.5    Important Caveats Regarding the Chronic Human Health Indicator

       The Chronic Human Health Indicator is a screening tool that provides a risk-related perspective
in assessing the relative impacts of releases of toxic chemicals. This tool combines estimates of toxicity,
exposure level, and the exposed population to provide risk-related comparisons. It does not provide a
detailed or quantitative assessment of risk, and is not designed as a substitute for more comprehensive,
site-specific risk assessments.  There are a number of important considerations associated with each
component of the Chronic Human Health Indicators model, as described in the following sections.

1.5.1  Toxicity Component

       The following caveats should be considered regarding the toxicity component  of the Indicators
model:
              Toxicity weights are not designed to (and may not) correlate with statutory criteria used
              for listing and delisting chemicals in TRI.  Indicators model results, which account for
              estimated exposures, also do not correlate with such listing/deli sting decisions.

              The  Indicators model  only addresses chronic human toxicity (cancer and noncancer
              effects, e.g., developmental toxicity, reproductive toxicity, neurotoxicity, etc.) and does
              not address concerns for either acute human toxicity or environmental toxicity.

              Toxicity weights are based upon the single, most  sensitive chronic health endpoint for
              inhalation or oral exposure pathways, and do not reflect severity of effects or multiple
              health effects.

              Estimated Reference  Doses and  Reference  Concentrations for noncancer effects
              incorporate uncertainty factors which are therefore reflected in toxicity weights that are
              based upon these values.
        For current information or inquiries regarding the Risk-Screening Environmental Indicators Project,
please contact:  Nicolaas W. Bouwes, Sr, Ph.D., (202) 260-1622, bouwes.nick@epa.gov, or Steven M. Hassur,
Ph.D., (202) 260-1735, hassur.steven@epa.gov.  Or, see www.epa.gov/opptintr/env_ind.

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1.5.2  Exposure Component

       The following caveats should be considered regarding the exposure component of the Indicators
model:

              Like other exposure models, the Indicators model estimates exposure levels (it does not
              yield actual exposures).

             The model uses some generic assumptions, e.g., default median stack heights and exit gas
              velocities  related  to  2- or  3-digit SIC codes,  or a  nationwide median,  where
              facility-specific median stack height and exit gas velocity data are unavailable.

             In the publicly available version of the current  model, only air exposures are fully
              modeled.

1.5.3  Population  Component

       The following caveats should be considered regarding the population component of the Indicators
model:
              Population values for non-decennial years are estimated based on interpolations between
              1988  and 1990, and between 1990 and 1996, and extrapolations to 1997.   Both
              interpolations and extrapolations are based upon U.S. Census data.

              Drinking water populations are estimated by using the total drinking water populations
              associated with  individual downstream drinking water  intakes,  while groundwater
              exposures are estimated by using the well water drinking population within one kilometer
              of the landfill site being evaluated. Estimated populations for the fish ingestion pathway
              are based upon U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service surveys.

              Because the Indicator reflects changing population size at the local level, a facility's
              relative contribution to the Indicator could increase or decrease even though no change
              in its releases occurs over time.  While the Indicator is designed to reflect the overall
              risk-related  impacts on  the  local population,  such  population  changes should be
              considered when examining  a facility's environmental management practices.   The
              Indicator also has greater uncertainty when examining disaggregated results at the local
              or facility level.
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1.6    Strengths and Limitations of the Chronic Human Health Indicator

1.6.1  Strengths

       The following are strengths of the Indicators model:

             The  model  provides  an  important  risk-related perspective (incorporating toxicity
              characteristics, exposure and population) regarding the impacts of TRI releases.

              Model results can help prioritize, and thereby conserve, resources for      conducting
              more precise, site-specific risk evaluations.

             This screening-level tool uses a sophisticated risk-related approach that is capable of
              quickly organizing and evaluating data in a complex manner.

              The Indicator has been subjected to repeated expert peer review.

              Complete and detailed documentation of the Indicators model is available.

             The model can perform single- and multi-media analyses.

              Users  can  consider  cancer  and noncancer health  endpoints independently or in
              combination.

             Custom-designed queries can be based upon a wide range of variables.

             This  adaptable  methodology  can  model  any  chemical if toxicity characteristics,
              appropriate physicochemical properties, release levels and release location are known or
              can be estimated.

             The air exposure model is combined with U.S. Census data to directly estimate the size
              of exposed populations and the magnitude of their exposure, rather than assuming that
              all individuals surrounding a facility are equally exposed.

1.6.2  Limitations

       The following are limitations of the Indicators model:

             Indicator results do not provide users with a quantitative risk estimate (e.g., excess cases
              of cancer).

              The Indicator does not evaluate individual risk.
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              The Indicators model does not account for all sources of TRI chemicals, only those
              sources that are required to report to TRI.  It also does not provide scores for all TRI
              chemicals.

              The Indicators model assumes that air concentrations of TRI chemicals are the same for
              indoor and outdoor exposures, and that populations are continuously exposed.

              Dermal and food ingestion pathways (other than fish consumption), and some other
              indirect exposure pathways are not evaluated at the present time.

              Acute health effects associated with short-term, periodic exposures to higher levels of
              these same chemicals are not addressed; a separate indicator will be developed to address
              acute effects.

              A separate indicator will be developed to address ecological effects.
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             2.  OPERATIONS AVAILABLE IN THE INDICATORS MODEL

       The Indicators model is currently implemented in a Microsoft Windows-based, stand-alone,
personal computer program.  The program allows you to calculate the overall Indicator for one or more
years of data and to present the results in various graphical and tabular formats, as well as save selected
data to Microsoft Excel spreadsheets and dBase files. The computer program also allows you to create
"Subindicators" based upon selected subsets of reported data.  The program includes on-line help for all
functions.

       To begin running the model, click on the file named  oppteim.exe in the OPPTEIM directory,
which is created on your hard drive when the Indicators model is installed on your computer.  The first
screen that appears is an initial Help Screen; read this screen for an overview of the Indicators model and
instructions on using the Help feature.

       To view the initial Indicators model  screen (entitled EPA Risk-Screening Environmental
Indicators), close the initial Help Screen. The Indicators model screen that then appears is presented
in Exhibit 2-1.  This screen contains the buttons that begin the major operations of the Indicators model.
Please note that the number of 'Releases Loaded' in the upper right of this screen represents the number
of distinct chemical releases and transfers reported to TRI that have been loaded into  the model.
Approximately 1.9 million Indicator Elements have been generated from these releases and transfers (see
Section 1.3, Calculating the Indicator, for details on how Indicator Elements are generated).
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                                          EXHIBIT 2-1
                                     Indicators Model Screen
      ^| EPA Risk-Screening Environmental Indicators vl.02 (1988-1997 TRI Data]
       Actions...

             Load
         Load from CD
           New Query
            Inspect...
            Model,..
              Data
Load previously saved tables
for review.
Generate new tables for
evaluating Indicator results.
Inspect TRI releases, Indicator
model data and demographic
data for individual facilities.
Rerun stored release and
modeling data and/or import
additional data.
                          Review model data.
Information...

Database Information
Facilities loaded: 38,332
Releases loade

User Support
Questions or comments can be sent to:
Bou wes .Nick@epa .go v
Hassur .Steven@epa .gov
lndicatorHelp@abtassoc .com
Web site: http:#Www.epa.gov/opptintrfenvjnd
                                                                  Help
                    ]l7^7^::,T^7^n7^rj r
                    11 About...l
                                                           Exit
                                                      UJ ]
                                                      O f
                                                      Sf '
                                                                       PRO"^
       Chapters 3 through 8 describe the step-by-step processes used to run the major operations, which
are started by clicking the indicated buttons.  The following road map describes the contents of each of
these chapters and lists the initial screen button(s) from Exhibit 2-1 that can be used to begin the
operations discussed in each chapter. If you wish to conduct queries of the data already contained in the
Indicators model database, concentrate on Chapters 7 and 8. (Some of the other chapters discuss how
to generate and edit data; although these types of operations may be available in future versions of the
model, the options are restricted in the current public version of the model.)
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       CHAPTER
        CONTENTS
                                                   INITIAL
                                                   BUTTON
       Chapter 3



       Chapter 4


       Chapter 5
        This chapter describes how to generate
        Indicator Elements from information on
        chemical releases. [Not operational in this version.]

        This chapter describes parameters and their values
        used in the Indicators model.

        This chapter describes how you can inspect
        individual facility data on chemical releases
        and the Indicator Element scores associated
        with these releases.
                                                     None
                                                                               Inspect..
       Chapter 6
        This chapter describes how to view
        data in the model, such as the toxicity value
        for a chemical.
                                                       Data
       Chapter 7
       Chapter 8
        This chapter describes how to perform analyses
        and create tables of the results.
        This chapter shows you how to make
        and format graphs of your results.
                                                     New Query
                                                                              Load from CD
                                                                                Load
                                                                              New Query

                                                                                Loa?|
                                                                              Load from CD
       Note: The
Load
| button on the initial screen will load queries only from the c:\oppteim\user
subdirectory on the user's hard drive.  This subdirectory is created automatically when the model is
installed, and is where the model will automatically save all queries that are run. To load pre-run queries
from the CD, use the  Load from CD] button directly beneath the   Load   | button on the initial screen.  Note
that sometimes when you click on  Load from CD [ the available files will not be shown. In this case, click on
CANCEL, then click on Load from CD | again to view the files.
       Each of these chapters also describes the series of additional screens and buttons that must be
activated to perform the various operations.  The discussion in each of the chapters assumes that the user
is familiar with general methods of navigating in Windows-based programs (e.g., using a mouse, choosing
options by  clicking).  However, any operations that may be slightly difficult are explained.
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   3. GENERATING INDICATOR ELEMENTS FROM CHEMICAL RELEASE DATA
[The  Model   I button is not operational in the current version of the model, but may be operational in
future versions.]
       Using  ModeL   in the initial Indicators screen allows you to generate Indicator Elements from

chemical release and transfer information.  Because the database accompanying the Indicators model
already contains Indicator Elements generated from chemical release and transfer data reported to the
TRI for the years 1988 to 1997, the  ModeL   operation is not essential for generating tables of Indicator

scores based on chemical releases.  However, if you wish to edit data in the model, change values used
in the exposure models, or model new chemical releases, this option is necessary to regenerate Indicator
Elements based on the new information.
       Clicking on  ModeL  I will bring up the following screen:
                                        EXHIBIT 3-1
                                       Model Options
                     (Insert screen when model button becomes operational)
                                      To Be Completed

       The available options allow you to generate Indicator Elements from various types of data.
Clicking on Stored will rerun Indicator scores for releases already stored in the database.  As noted
above, you may wish to rerun the scores if, for example, you want to edit the information required for
generatinglndicatorElementsusinglhe    Data   jor   0 tjons   operations. (Changing information using
Options
is not operational in the current version of the model but will be operational in future versions.)

       The New button will add facilities and chemicals from a file external to the system. This can be
used, for example, to import new data from the latest reporting year of TRI releases or to import non-
TRI chemical release information.

       Both will add new releases and rerun stored release information.

       The Load button will  empty the release datafile and automatically load all years from the
directory.

       The 1,2,3,4 buttons run releases that are available with the model in 25% segments. Because the
operation of generating Indicator Elements from release data may take a significant amount of time, this
option allows you to divide the operation into manageable segments.

       Click Cancel if you wish to end the operation at any time.
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                                  4. MODEL PARAMETERS

       The Indicators model uses a combination of site-specific and default values in the exposure
models used to generate the surrogate doses associated with the chemicals.  Important site-specific
parameters are shown in Exhibit 4-1; default parameters and their values are presented in Exhibit 4-2.

                                         EXHIBIT 4-1
                       Site-Specific Parameters Used in Exposure Models
        Parameter
              Value
            Definition
   Stack height
               1,2
Varies based on the facility and the
availability of information. If
available, the median height of all
stacks at the facility is used.
Otherwise one of the following is
used in order of preference:  the
median stack height of the
facility's 3-digit SIC code, the
facility's 2-digit SIC-code, or SIC
codes 20 through 39.
Height of facility stack that is
emitting the pollutant
   Exit gas velocity
                   1,2
Varies based on the facility and the
availability of information. If
available, the median exit gas
velocity of all stacks at the facility
is used. Otherwise one of the
following is used, in order of
preference:  the median exit gas
velocity of the facility's 3-digit SIC
code, the facility's 2-digit SIC-
code, or SIC codes 20 through 39.
Rate at which the pollutant exits the
stack
   Fishing rate3
Varies by state
Percent of population which fishes
1 These parameters are used for chemicals directly emitted from the facility stacks; these emissions are modeled by the point
source algorithm in ISCLT3.
2Values for these two parameters have two significant figures.
3 These data are not listed separately in a data file, but are compiled with the program.
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                                             EXHIBIT 4-2
                           Default Parameters Used in Exposure Models
Parameter
Drinking water ingestion rate
Fish ingestion rate
Air inhalation rate
Body weight
Bulk density of soil
Exit gas temperature1
Stack diameter1
Area height2'3
Area length2
Value
2 L/day
0.0065 kg/day
20 m3/day
70kg
1400 kg/m3
293 K
1m
3m
10m
'These parameters are used for chemicals directly emitted from the facility stacks; these emissions are modeled by the point
source algorithm in ISCLT3.
2 These parameters are used for fugitive emissions and for pollutants volatilizing from either onsite or offsite disposal areas.
These emissions are modeled by the area source algorithm in ISCLT3.
3 Height of the on-site or off-site fugitive or area source from which a pollutant volatilizes.
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                       5.  INSPECTING DATA ON TRI FACILITIES

                                              Inspect...

       If you are interested in finding information about an individual facility, you can retrieve a variety
of data contained in the Indicators model database. Retrievable information includes descriptions of each
facility, the chemical releases, and the Indicator Elements  calculated for the chemical releases. Facility
information can be retrieved by clicking on the
                                              Inspect.
        button in the initial Indicators screen, which
brings up the Facility Browser screen.  The left-hand columns of data are shown separately from the
right-hand columns in Exhibit 5-1.

                                       EXHIBIT 5-1
                                   Facility Browser Screen
' Facility Browser - 1 records selected
Find... Links... Export

Faciitte TRI Identification Number
EXAMPLE CORPORATION

STREET
CITY, STATE ZIP
Help Done







f"' --' fr-

Additional Facility Information
EPA Standatd 2 Digit SIC Code: 28
NPDES Permit*:
Nearest REACH and distance (km): -1, 9999.0
Nearest Weather Station and distance (km): 11641, 125.8
HUH

N


JL


T
Media Specific Releases and Scores
I Year | CAS Number
oHHHB3 67"56~ ''
1995 67-56.1
1994 87-56-1
1993 67-56-1
1992 67-56-1
1991 67-56-1
1990 67-56-1
1990 67-56-1
1989 87-56-1
1988 67-56-1
J 1988 67-56-1
iLJ
Chemical
Methanol
Methanol
Methanol
Methanol
Methanol
Methanol
Methanol
Methanol
Methanol
Methanol
Methanol

Media *
792 Offsite Xferto Broker (Recov.)
792 OfrsiteXferto Broke r(Recov.)
792 Offsite Xferto Broker (Recov.)
792 Offsite Xferto Broker (Recov.)
756 Offsite Energy Recovery
756 Offsite Energy Recovery
750 Offsite Incineration
750 Offsite Incineration
750 Offsite Incineration
1 Fugitive Air
720 Offsite Recyc. (S/0 Recovery)

_..










TT
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      :' Facility Browser -1 records selected
Export

Help
     Facilitu TH Identification Number
                                                  Additional Facility Information
bXAMKbCOkPOKAIION EPA Standard 2 Digit SIC Code: 28 *j
STREET NPDES Permit*:
CITY STATE ZIP Hea'eit REACH a"d ^^ """^ "'' 99"'0 i
UIT,SIIC a- NearestWeather Station and distance (km): 11641. 125.8 
Media Specific Releases and Scores
Pounds Released ToxV
\ 750
750
750
750
750
2,164
1,299
250
250
250
750
Height Score Category Score Population Max Onsite Use *
1 No/Unmodelled treatment code O.OOOe+00 4P 	
1 No/Llnmodelled treatment code O.OOOe+00 4 P
1 Nw'Unmodelled treatment code O.OOOe+00 4P
1 NortJnrnodelled treatment code O.OOOe+00 4P
1 No/Unmodelled treatment code O.OOOe+00 4P
1 Offsite Incineration- Urban O.OOOe+00 140,578 4P
1 Offsite Incineration- Urban O.OOOe+00 1,103,100 4P
1 Offsite Incineration- Urban O.OOOe+00 140,573 0 P
1 Direct Fugitive Air- Urban 1.499e-02 120,475 4 M/P
1 No/Unmodelled treatment code O.OOOe+00 4 M/P
5.1     Finding a Facility

       You can search the database by facility name (e.g., Evermore Systems Inc.), the TRI facility ID
(e.g., 19152HYDRO8400F), ZIP code (e.g., 20814),  state postal code (e.g., MA, NJ), or 4-digit SIC
(Standard Industrial Classification) code (e.g., 3631).
     Click
and select the parameter you want
to use to search for the data by clicking on the appropriate circle (see Exhibit 5-2). See Appendix A for
industry descriptions associated with SIC codes; although 4-digit codes are not included in the Appendix,
the first 3 digits of any 4-digit SIC code indicates a broader industrial classification that includes the 4-
digit industrial classification.  Appendix B lists the state postal codes and full state names associated with
each code as well as EPA region numbers and the states within each region.

        Facilities may report to TRI up to six 4-digit SIC codes; however, only the first four 4-digit SIC
codes for each facility are reported in the database.  It is important to note that the Find function only
searches for the first SIC code listed for each facility, which is assumed to be the primary SIC code for
that facility. In addition, over the years covered by the model, the U.S. Postal Service has deleted some
ZIP codes, reassigned others, and added yet others. Historical files for currently reporting facilities are
automatically corrected for ZIP code changes. However, ZIP codes alone are not good surrogates for
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locational data, as they represent only mail delivery points. Thus, caution is advised when searching for
facilities by SIC codes or ZIP codes.

                                         EXHIBIT 5-2
                           iJJ, Find Facility.
                               Search on	
                                C Facility Name
                                ^Facility ID
                                r Zip Code
                                r state Postal Code
                                r SIC Code
                                       OK
                                     Cancel
                                     Load...
                              Search for:  19152HYDR08400F
Enter the search criterion in the box labeled Search and click   OK    to return to the Facility Browser
screen to view the facility data. NOTE:  You must CAPITALIZE all letters when entering your
selection. The   Load...   button will be operational in a future version of the model.
       You can also scroll through the database by using the arrows in the upper right-hand corner of
the screen. Use
the database. Similarly, use
to select the next facility in the database or click on
           to select the preceding facility and
on
H
W
to view the last record of
to return to the first record.
NOTE:
 If your search criterion applies to more than 2,000 facilities (e.g., all facilities
 in SIC Code 28), the model will alert you that only the first 2,000 records
 were  retrieved.   To  avoid  re-calling large  search  results,  the model
 automatically clears results from its memory when the Facility Browser is
 closed.
5.2    Viewing General Facility Information
  Find..
       You can view information on the name and location of the chosen facility directly below the
        button in the Facility Browser screen. This information includes the facility identification
number,  name, and  address.  On the right side of the  screen is a scroll down box with additional
information. The additional information includes: the facility's X  and Y coordinates in the grid as well
as the facility's latitude and longitude, the county where the facility is located, the facility's FIPS code,
EPA Region, Federal facility flag., stack parameters, public and technical  contacts, the first of the first
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four 4-digit SIC codes reported by the facility, the EPA standard two-digit SIC code (20 through 39,
MU, and NA)9, the NPDES (National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System) permit number, the
number of the stream reach nearest to the facility and its distance from the facility, and the WBAN
(Weather Bureau/Army/Navy) number of the weather station nearest to the facility and its distance from
the facility. (If the facility has a NPDES number, it is allowed to discharge to surface waters.)  The
additional information also includes the Dun & Bradstreet number, parent company name, and parent
company Dun & Bradstreet number.  The Dun & Bradstreet number is the 9-digit number assigned by
Dun and Bradstreet for financial purposes for the facility or each establishment within the facility.  The
parent company is defined as the highest level company, located in the United States, that directly owns
at least 50 percent of the voting stock of the facility.  If the facility is owned by a foreign entity, it will
not be identified with a parent company. Note that county information is not available for facilities in
American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands.

5.3    Viewing Chemical Release Information and Indicator Element Scores

       To  view all chemical releases for the facility, look under the section called Media Specific
Releases and Scores  on the  Facility Browser  screen.  The number of pounds  released is shown
separately for each chemical, for each type of release or transfer to an offsite  location (shown in the
Media column), and each year of release. There are a variety of categories of releases; examples include
releases directly to surface water (Direct Water) and emissions to air from the facility stack (Stack Air).
Exhibit C-l in Appendix C includes descriptions of each type of release.  For each chemical, the Tox
Weight column presents the appropriate toxicity weight (oral or inhalation) for the medium to which the
chemical is released.  There are also columns for the maximum amount of chemical stored onsite in any
given calendar year and for the use of each chemical.  Exhibit C-3 in Appendix C gives the number of
pounds and the use category corresponding to these codes.

       The Indicator  Element scores for a given chemical and release media are also located in this
section. The information in the Score Category column may indicate several things. It may show how
the release was modeled (e.g., if the release was to air and whether the rural or urban mode of ISCLT3
was used).  If the chemical was transferred offsite, this column indicates the type of offsite transfer, such
as transfer to a landfill or incinerator. In addition, the Score Category  also shows if and why a release
cannot be modeled. For example, there may be no data on how a chemical may be removed from the
discharge sent to a sewage treatment plant (Publicly Owned Treatment Works, POTW); this information
would appear in Score Category as "No POTW Removal Data" for a POTW transfer. If the media code
is one that is not modeled, the Score Category will read "No/Unmodelled Treatment Code." Exhibit A-2
presents a complete description of each score category.  The Score column shows the Indicator Element
for the release. The value is not normalized by any factor (i.e.,  the score is the product of the toxicity
weight, the surrogate  dose, and the exposed population).  In this version of the model, all scores for
releases other than fugitive and stack air releases are zero. A score of zero is also shown if the release
       9Two-digit SIC codes range from 01 to 99, and encompass all industries, including construction, mining,
retail, and others.  However, only manufacturing facilities (those with SIC codes within the range of 20 to 39) are
required to report chemical releases to the TRI; therefore, this range of codes is referred to as the EPA SIC codes.
The MU code means that there are multiple codes reported by a facility within the range of 20 to 39, and NA
means that there are no codes reported by a facility within the 20-39 SIC code range.

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cannot be modeled due to a lack of physicochemical properties or toxicity data.  The Population column
shows the total population exposed to the modeled release. The population may differ depending on the
type of release. For example, an air pollutant may reach a different population than a pollutant which
enters the groundwater and subsequently appears in drinking water.

       If a facility shows no releases, then one of two things has occurred. Either the facility emits a
chemical which used to be reported to TRI, but has since been delisted, or the facility uses a reported
chemical, but emits amounts less than the TRI reporting threshold.

5.4    Exporting and Printing Data

       Ifyouwishtoprintfacility-specificinformationcontainedinthe Facility Browser screen, use Export
to create an ASCII (DOS) text file (with a .prn extension).  You can then import the *.prn file into Word
Perfect. The file will include all of the relevant information from the Facility Browser for a given facility.
Although the information will be easy to read within Word Perfect, you may wish to edit it further to
create a more finished format to print. Once you have edited the information, you can simply print it
using the "Print" option in Word  Perfect.

5.5    Links Section

       You can click on  ^J^l m fae  Facnity Browser to show data on populations, chemical

concentrations modeled from air releases,  and meteorological data (STability ARray, or STAR, data).
After clicking on Links   , a screen appears with the following tabs at the bottom: Population, Air
Modeling Concentration, and STAR Data (see Exhibit 5-3). Click on the appropriate tab to view the
information you wish to see. Note that if a facility has never reported releases to air to TRI, the Air
Modeling Concentration and STAR Data screens will be blank.
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                                         EXHIBIT 5-3
                                 Population Modeling Screen
      EXAMPLE CORPORATION
      1990 Population
         Ql-so
51-100
101-500
500-5,000
>5,000
       I Total Population
          Cell Address: X(2151 )Y(5QO)
         Distance from Facility (km): 8.1
                       Population: 3
                                                                            OK
                                           Done
                                                                           Help
                                                                       Move Display..
                                                                            Jd
      yPopulatiori/Air Modeling Concentration XS TAR Data/
       Click on the tab labeled Population to show the population in 1-km by 1-km cells surrounding
a facility.  When the screen first appears, the facility is shown as a black rectangle in the center of the grid
and you can view population data out to 10 km from the facility in directions due north, due east, due
south, and due west of the facility. The scale on the top of the chosen screen shows the population range
associated with each color. You can customize the colors by clicking on the boxes next to the population
range you wish to change and selecting an alternate color from the pop-up screen.  (Note that you have
to leave the screen to  refresh the colors.)  By  moving the cursor to a given grid cell on the screen, you
can view the cell address (i.e., the latitude and longitude), the distance from the facility (in km), and the
population of the cell, as shown at the bottom right-hand side of the  screen.  Information on several
subpopulations can be viewed by clicking on the following selections in  the drop-down box:  total
population, black population, white  population, Native American population, Asian/Pacific Islander
population, Hispanic population, individuals less than 18 years old, and individuals 65 years and older.
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       In addition to viewing the population data within the distances specified above, you may also use
the arrow keys in the Move Display... to view data for cells that are at distances much farther than 10
km from the facility.  The arrows with lines will move the display 10 km at a time in the indicated
direction, and the arrows without lines will move 1 km at a time in the indicated direction.  Again, for any
given cell, you can observe the distance from the facility.

       Click on the tab labeled Air Modeling Concentration to see the chemical concentrations that
would occur around the chosen facility for a non-decaying chemical released at a rate of 1 g/sec (see
Exhibit 5-4). The concentrations, in jug/m3,  are only presented as examples, and are based on the non-
chemical-specific dispersion that would occur given the meteorological data specific to the area where
the facility  is located.  The scale on the top of the chosen screen shows  the ranges of chemical
concentrations associated with each color. By placing the cursor over a given cell, you can view the cell
address and the distance from the facility for that cell; this information is listed at the bottom right-hand
side of the screen. When you place the cursor over the center cell, the concentration shown at the bottom
right-hand side of the screen will be the highest concentration of the eight cells surrounding the center
cell.

       If the population in the 21-km by 21-km grid surrounding a facility is less than 127,703 persons,
ISCLT3 automatically calculates air concentrations in the rural mode.  To view the concentration plume
using the rural  mode of the air model, check Rural Mode  at the bottom of the screen.  To see the
concentration plume associated with the urban mode of the air model, make sure that Rural Mode is not
checked. If the facility has no air releases reported to TRI, this screen will be blank.

NOTE:If you receive the error message "TRIdat.exe0010:2eb7" when viewing the  Air Modeling
       Concentration Screen, you may need  to close the screen and open it again to  get rid of this
       message.
Version 1.02                                                                1988-1997 TRI data, am
November 15, 1999                              5-7

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                                       EXHIBIT 5-4
                             Air Modeling Concentration Screen
EXAMPLE CORPORATION

E3I
Concentration in ug/mA3 for a 1 g/sec release of a non-decaying chemic
Q 0-5.5E-3 Q 1.9E-2-6.6E-2 Q 2.3E-1-7.8E
Q 5.5E-3-1.9E-2 | 6.6E-2-2.3E-1 | 7.8E-1-2.7E
























































































































































































































1 1
J
1
1



. j

1 1

(F~ Area Source
1 Rural Mode



-











Dis









^^M



















^^









































































dl
;-i
;+o










































Cell Address: 104931 21
tance from Facility (km):
Concentration: 4.34E-























56
6.1
02

OK

li Done . 1

| Help

\Population ).,Air Modeling Concentration/^ TAF! Data/
       Click on the tab labeled STAR Data to show meteorological data that is used in the Industrial
Source Complex Long Term (ISCLT3) model which is used to model the dispersion of air releases of
chemicals (see Exhibit 5-5). At the bottom of the screen are shown two drop-down boxes, one for the
six wind speed classes (in knots), and one for the six atmospheric stability categories A through F. The
six wind speed classes are:  0-3 knots; 4-6 knots; 7-10 knots; 11-16 knots;  17-21 knots; and, greater than
21 knots. The conditions of windspeed, insolation, and cloudiness to which the six atmospheric stability
categories correspond are summarized in Exhibit 5-6. For any given combination of atmospheric stability
category and wind speed class, the frequency of wind from each of the sixteen wind direction categories
is summarized in a wind rose (i.e., the Rose Chart).  For example, if you click on a wind speed of 0-3
knots and stability category A, the wind rose shows that the majority of winds come from the southwest
(as shown in Exhibit 5-5).  These frequency distributions may be on a monthly, seasonal, or annual basis.
The STAR data which are currently used in the Indicators model  summarize approximately 20 years of
meteorological data.  If the facility has no air releases reported to TRI, this screen will be blank.
Version 1.02
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                             1988-1997 TRI data, am

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                                              EXHIBIT 5-5
                                           STAR Data  Screen
                  EXAMPLE CORPORATION
                  -Rose Charts
                    Wind Speed (kt)
Stability Category
                  \PopulafonXAir Modeling ConcentrafonXSTAR Data/
                                                                             Help
                                              EXHIBIT 5-6
                                   Atmospheric Stability Categories
Surface wind
speed3
(m/sec)
<2
2-3
3-5
5-6
>6
Surface wind
speed3
(knots)
<3.9
3.9-5.8
5.8-9.7
9.7-11.7
>11.7
Insolation1
strong
A
A-B
B
C
C
moderate
A-B
B
B-C
C-D
D
slight
B
C
C
D
D
Night2
thinly overcast or
4/8 low cloud
-
E
D
D
D
3/8 cloud
-
f
E
D
D
(for A-B, take the average of values for A and B, etc.)
        1. Strong insolation corresponds to sunny midday in midsummer in England; slight insolation to similar
        conditions in midwinter.
        2.  Night refers to the period from one hour before sunset to one hour after sunrise.
        3.  The neutral category D should also be used, regardless of wind speed, for overcast conditions during day or
        night and for any sky conditions during the hour preceding or following night as defined above. Source:
        Boubel et al., 1994.
Version 1.02
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                                        1988-1997 TRI data, am

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                             6.  VIEWING DATA IN THE MODEL
                                                Data
       By clicking on the
                             Data
button in the initial Indicators screen, you can view the data used in
the model.  (The current version of the model does not allow the user to edit data. Future versions of
the model may allow you to edit data as well as import and export files of data.)  A screen with four
buttons (Chemical, Census, Weather, and Stream) appears.

6.1    Chemical-Specific Information

       To view chemical-specific information, click on the [ chemical Ibutton which brings up the following
screen:
      2 Chemical Information
        Sort by
           CAS Number   C Chemical Name
                                           EXHIBIT 6-1
                                  Chemical Information Screen
    On Chemical:
     Antimony compounds
    CAS Number:
     N010
                                                                                      Done
                                                                                      Help
        CAS Number Chemical
       Full Chemical Name
33/50 Flag Expai
                 N010  Antimony compounds
                 ND20  Arsenic compounds
                 NQ4Q  Barium compounds
                 NQSQ  Beryllium compounds
                 ND78  Cadmium compounds
                 ND84  Chlonophenols
                 ND90  Chromium compounds
                 N096  Cobalt compounds
                 N1DD  Copper compounds
                 N106  Cyanide compounds
                 N120  Diisocyanates
                 N171  Bhylenebisdithiocarbamic
                 N230  Glycol ethers
                 N420  Lead compounds
                 N45D  Ktanganese compounds
       Aitimony compounds
       Asenic compounds
       Barium compounds
       Beryllium compounds
       Cadmium compounds                  i
       Chlorophenols
       Chromium compounds                 j
       Cobalt compounds
       Copper compounds
       Cyanide compounds                   j
       Diisocyanates
    acic Bhylenebisdithiocarbamic acid, salts and esters
       Glycol Bhers
       Lead compounds                     i
       fitenganese compounds
You can move throughout the database using the arrows on the top of the screen and the scroll bars on
the bottom and right side of the screen. You can then click on the cell of the chemical you are interested
in; the name and CAS (Chemical Abstracts Service) registry number of the selected chemical are listed
at the top of the screen, as shown in Exhibit 6-1 for Urethane. For chemical categories, the identifications
that show up in the CAS Number column begin with "N", followed by three digits.
Version 1.02
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                                            1988-1997 TRI data, am

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       Although chemical data in the model cannot be edited (see Section 6.1.2 below), the model
contains five fields, User Tags 1 through 5, which can be used to supplement information regarding
individual or groups of chemicals in which the user is particularly interested. Numbers or text up to 10
characters can be typed into each User Tag field in the Chemical Information Screen. The User Tag field
can then be chosen as a row or column variable or as a subset parameter when running a new query. The
field labels for the User Tags cannot be edited; therefore, the user must remember what chemicals each
tag represents when subsetting or choosing variables. However, when the query has been performed, the
characters entered by the user will show up in the Sorted Table, thereby conveying the content of the
User Tag.

6.1.1   Sorting the Data

       You  can sort the chemicals by either the CAS number of the chemical or the chemical name, as
shown in the top section of the Chemical Information screen. To do this, click on the option you wish
to sort by and the data in the table will be sorted by the chosen option.

NO TE:        The option of sorting by chemical name sorts the data by the column titled Chemical (the
              common chemical name), not the column titled Full Chemical Name (the scientific name
              of the chemical).

 6.1.2  Viewing and Editing the Data

       To more  easily view the data, columns may be moved around to re-order them.  To move a
column, click on the column heading using the left mouse button.  A thick black line will appear to the
left of the column.  Holding down the left mouse button, move the line to where you want the column
to be inserted and then release the mouse button.

       [Although editing capabilities are described below, data cannot be edited in the
       current version of the model.  The User Tag fields (see Section 6.1 above) are the
       only fields that the user can edit.]

       As noted above, the chemicals can be identified either by their CAS number or chemical names
(i.e., their common or scientific names). To edit information for one or more chemicals in the chemical
database, place the  cursor over the cell you wish to change. You can use the left and right arrows in the
upper left-hand corner of the screen to move to the top and bottom of a column. Use the checkmark
to post your edit to the table. Use the x to cancel the edit. When you are finished editing data, click on   Done
in the upper right-hand corner of the screen. A full list and description of the types of chemical-specific
data you can view and change in the chemical database are presented in Exhibit 6-2. See Appendix D
for a list of physicochemical properties and their references for the chemicals in the model. Appendix G
contains additional information on the flag fields.
Version 1.02                                                              1988-1997 TRI data, am
November 15, 1999                             6-2

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                                       EXHIBIT 6-2
                               Chemical-Specific Information
Data Label
CAS Number
Chemical
Full Chemical Name
33/50 Flag
Expansion Flag
HAP Flag
CAA Flag
SDWA Flag
CERCLA Flag
Core Chemical Flag
Priority Pollutant Flag
Metal
Description
Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number identifies a unique
chemical.
Common name or names of chemical.
Full scientific name or names of chemical.
This flag is a marker which indicates that the chemical is included in
EPA's 33/50 program, a program in which facilities voluntarily reduce
their chemical releases by 33 percent and 50 percent by certain dates.
This flag marks the chemicals that were added to the Section 313 toxic
chemical list for reporting in 1995 and later years.
This flag marks the chemicals that are hazardous air pollutants, as
defined by the Clean Air Act.
This flag marks the chemicals that are Clean Air Act pollutants.
This flag marks the chemicals that have national primary or secondary
drinking water standards under the Safe Drinking Water Act.
This flag marks the chemicals that are listed in Superfund
(CERCLA  the Comprehensive Environmental Response,
Compensation, and Liability Act).
This flag marks the chemicals that are common to all reporting years of
TRI and which have had no modifications of reporting requirements.
This flag marks the chemicals that are priority pollutants, as defined by
the Clean Water Act.
This flag indicates whether the chemicals are metals and also whether
they are core chemicals. (Core chemicals are those that are common to
all reporting years of TRI and which have had no modifications of
reporting requirements.)
Version 1.02
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                             1988-1997 TRI data, am

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Data Label
OSHA Carcinogens
User Tags 1 through 5
Toxicity Category
Toxicity Class - Inhale
Toxicity Class - Oral
Toxicity Source
Category
Added
RfC Inhale (mg/m3)
Description
This flag indicates whether the chemical is a known or suspect human
carcinogen based on OSHA criteria (U.S.EPA, 1998). Known human
carcinogens are defined as those that have been shown to cause cancer
in humans. Suspect human carcinogens have been shown to cause
cancer in animals. The list of chemicals flagged as OSHA carcinogens is
based on the list of carcinogens provided in the 1997 TRI Public Data
Release, which was compiled from the following sources: the National
Toxicology Program' s Annual Report on Carcinogens., the International
Agency for Research on Cancer Monographs, and 29 CFR 191010.
Using these tags, you can select a set of chemicals based on your own
selection criteria.
This indicates whether the oral and inhalation toxicity weights are based
on cancer health effects, non-cancer health effects, or both.
This indicates whether the toxicity weight for the inhalation pathway is
based on cancer or noncancer health effects.
This indicates whether the toxicity weight for the oral pathway is based
on cancer or noncancer health effects.
Source of toxicity information (IRIS, HEAST, OPP, or Derived).
This category has not yet been assigned.
The year the chemical was added to the Toxics Release Inventory
The inhalation reference concentration (RfC) is defined as "an estimate
(with uncertainty spanning perhaps an order of magnitude) of a
continuous inhalation exposure to the human population (including
sensitive subgroups) that is likely to be without appreciable risk of
deleterious noncancer health effects during a lifetime" (U.S. EPA,
1994). The RfC is expressed as mg/m3.
        10 Even if a chemical is flagged as an OSHA carcinogen, its toxicity weight for a given exposure pathway
may not be based on its carcinogenic effects. For example, a chemical that causes both carcinogenic and
noncarcinogenic effects when inhaled may have a higher inhalation toxicity weight associated with
noncarcinogenic effects than with its carcinogenic effects. If you wish to view all chemicals that have inhalation
toxicity weights based on cancer health effects, see the Toxicity Class - Inhale field.  To obtain a list of chemicals
that have toxicity weights based only on cancer health effects, see the Toxicity Category field.
Version 1.02
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                                  1988-1997 TRI data, am

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       Data Label
                           Description
  RfD Oral (mg/kg-day)
The oral reference dose (RfD) is "an estimate (with uncertainty
spanning perhaps an order of magnitude) of a daily exposure [by
ingestion] to the human population (including sensitive subgroups) that
is likely to be without an appreciable risk of deleterious effects during a
lifetime"  (Barnes, 1988). The RfD is expressed as mg/kg-day.
  RfCUF
The uncertainty factor (UF) is applied to the no-observed-adverse-effect
level (NOAEL) upon which the RfC is based, thereby reducing the dose.
The UF accounts for uncertainties in extrapolation from experimental
data to an estimate appropriate to humans.  There are several standard
UFs, each of which is generally an order of magnitude or less (e.g., 3-
10).
  RfCMF
The modifying factor (MF) is a value applied to the NOAEL when
scientific uncertainties in the study chosen for estimating the RfC are not
explicitly addressed by the standard UFs.
  RfC Conf.
Confidence levels are assigned to the study used to derive the RfC, the
overall database, and to the RfC itself.  Three levels may be assigned:
high, medium, or low.
  RfDUF
The uncertainty factor (UF) is applied to the no-observed-adverse-effect
level (NOAEL) upon which the RfD is based, thereby reducing the dose.
The UF accounts for uncertainties in extrapolation from experimental
data to an estimate appropriate to humans.  There are several standard
UFs, each of which is generally an order of magnitude or less (e.g., 3-
10).
  RfDMF
The modifying factor (MF) is a value applied to the NOAEL when
scientific uncertainties in the study chosen for estimating the RfD are not
explicitly addressed by the standard UFs.
  RfD Conf.
Confidence levels are assigned to the study used to derive the RfD, the
overall database, and to the RfD itself.  Three levels may be assigned:
high, medium, or low.
  QSTAR Oral (1/mg/kg-
  day)
The oral cancer slope factor (q^): a measure of the incremental lifetime
risk of cancer by oral intake of a chemical, expressed as risk per mg/kg-
day.
Version 1.02
November 15, 1999
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                                                 1988-1997 TRI data, am

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Data Label
WOE
Unit Risk Inhale
(1/mg/m3)
Inhale Tox Weight
Oral Tox Weight
MCL
Air Decay (1/hr)
Koc (mL/g)
H2O Decay (1/hr)
LOGKOW
Water Solubility
(mg/L)
Kd(L/kg)
Description
Weight of evidence (WOE) categories indicate how likely a chemical is
to be a human carcinogen, based on considerations of the quality and
adequacy of data and the type of responses induced by the suspected
carcinogen. EPA WOE classifications include the following categories
and associated definitions (51 FR 33996):
A Carcinogenic to humans
B Probable carcinogen
B 1 Indicates limited human evidence
B2 Indicates sufficient evidence in animals and
inadequate or no evidence in humans
C Possible carcinogen
D Not classifiable
E Evidence of non-carcinogeni city
The unit inhalation risk is the excess lifetime risk due to a "continuous
constant lifetime exposure of one unit of carcinogen concentration".
The inhalation unit risk is expressed as risk per mg/m3. (5 1 FR 33998)
The TRI Indicator toxicity weight for a chemical for the inhalation
pathway.
The TRI Indicator toxicity weight for a chemical for the oral pathway.
This value is the maximum contaminant level, which is the national
primary drinking water standard for the chemical (mg/L).
The rate at which a chemical degrades in air, due primarily to
photooxidation by radicals (hr"1).
The organic carbon-water partition coefficient, used in estimates of
chemical sorption to soil (mL/g).
The rate at which a chemical degrades in water, due to abiotic
hydrolysis, biodegradation, or photolysis (hr"1).
The logarithm of the octanol -water partition coefficient. Kow is the ratio
of a chemical's concentration in the octanol phase to its concentration in
the aqueous phase at equilibrium in a two-phase octanol/water system.
The amount of chemical that dissolves in water at a particular
temperature (mg/L).
The soil-water partition, or distribution, coefficient. For organics, the
value is often estimated as the product of Koc and foc (the fraction of
organic carbon in the soil) (L/kg).
Version 1.02
November 15, 1999
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                                1988-1997 TRI data, am

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Data Label
Incinerator DRE (pet)
POTW Partition
(Removal) (pet)
POTW Partition
(Sludge) (pet)
POTW Partition
(Volat) (pet)
POTW Partition (Biod)
(pet)
BCF (L/kg)
Henrys (atm/(mole/m3))
Molecular Weight
(g/mole)
Description
Destruction/removal efficiencies, expressed as the percent of chemical
fed to the incinerator that is not released to the air.
Percent of chemical removed from the wastewater by the POTW.
Percent of total POTW removal efficiency attributable to sorption of the
chemical to sewage sludge.
Percent of total POTW removal efficiency attributable to volatilization
of the chemical.
Percent of total POTW removal efficiency attributable to biodegradation
of the chemical.
Bioconcentration factor: the ratio of a chemical's concentration in fish to
its concentration in water at equilibrium (L/kg).
Henry's law constant: the ratio of a chemical's concentration in the air to
its concentration in the water at equilibrium (atm-m3/mol).
The mass in grams of one mole of molecules of a chemical compound.
       Consult Toxic Release Inventory Relative Risk-Based Environmental Indicators Methodology
(U.S. EPA, 1997a) for information about the ways the above data are used in the Indicators model.

6.2    Census Data

       In the Indicators model, population data  at the census block level are used to estimate the
population in each of the 1-km by 1-km grid cells in the model.  Census blocks are the smallest
geographic area for which decennial census data  are collected.  Blocks are formed by streets, roads,
railroads, streams and other bodies of water, other visible physical and cultural features, and the legal
boundaries shown on Census Bureau maps.  In 1990, the Census Bureau tabulated data for 7,020,924
census blocks.

       One or more census blocks forms a block group, which is a subdivision of a census tract or block
numbering area. A block group consists of all census blocks whose numbers begin with the same digit
in a given census tract or block numbering area.  The total number of block groups delineated for the
1990 decennial census was 229,466.  Some demographic data, such as the population in more narrowly
defined age groups or the population with an income level in a certain range, are available only for block
groups. To view census-specific information, click on   Census  L which brings up the screen in Exhibit
6-3.
Version 1.02
November 15, 1999
6-7
                             1988-1997 TRI data, am

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       Descriptions of the census data that are available at the block level and that can be seen in this
screen are presented in Exhibit 6-4. As shown in Exhibit 6-3, each 1-km by 1-km grid cell is assigned
to a block group, thereby allowing the census data affiliated with that block group to be attributed to the
grid cell. These block group data are not currently used in the Indicators model, but will be used in the
next generation (32-bit) of the model.  For each block, a block centroid is provided, based  on the
geometry of the block (i.e., the centroid is area-weighted, not population-weighted). Each block is then
mapped to a grid cell by comparing its block centroid location to the grid cell location.  The location of
each grid cell is defined by its four corner points calculated from its (X,Y) coordinates.  When a block
centroid falls within a grid cell, its population data are attributed to that cell.   If more than one block
centroid is located within a grid cell, then the populations affiliated with the multiple blocks are summed.
The block count is the number of block centroids within the 1-km by  1-km grid cell.

       To more  easily view the data, columns may be moved around to re-order them.  To move a
column, click on the column heading using the left mouse button.  A thick black line will appear to the
left of the column. Holding down the left mouse button, move the line to where you want the column
to be inserted and then release the mouse button.

                                        EXHIBIT 6-3
                                    Census Data Screen
y| Census Information



K 	 ,
,. ... I , I t 1 ^ , 1 X 1 |
>'" I " I * I w J ' 	 ' Find

f E 	 1


^















X Y Block Group Block Count County
-7160 1647 20169620002 1 KS, SALINE
-6946 1693 0 1
-6944 1690 0 1
-6942 1687 0 1
-6721 2976 0 1
-6612 2966 0 1
-6596 2240 20 1696 19997 1 KS, SALINE
-6596 2243 20169619997 1 KS, SALINE
-6530 2179 0 6
-6529 2179 0 1
-6474 3197 0 1
-6473 1767 0 1
-6406 1826 0 1
-6400 3182 0 1
-6399 3180 0 1
-6389 3175 0 1

-------
       If you obtain the (X,Y) coordinates for a particular facility from the Facility Browser, you can
enter them and click the   Find
button.  You will be moved to the Census information for these
coordinates or for the coordinates closest to your entry. You can also remain in the Facility Browser and
use the Links feature to see the population surrounding a facility.  In the current version of the model,
population data are not available for American Samoa and Guam and no racial demographic data are
available for Puerto Rico.
                                        EXHIBIT 6-4
                                  Census Data Information
Data Label
X
Y
Block Group
Block Count
County
Population
White
Black
Native American
Asian
Hispanic
Age Less Than 18
Age 65 and Older
Description
Assigned grid value based on latitude
Assigned grid value based on longitude
Block group that 1-km by 1-km grid cell at given coordinates is part
of. The first one to two digits is the state Federal Information
Processing Standard (FIPS) code (often the leading zero is
dropped). (See Exhibit C-4 in Appendix C for a list of state FIPS
codes.) The next three digits are the county FIPS code, followed by
a six-digit census tract area number and a one-digit block group
number.
Number of block centroids within the 1-km by 1-km grid cell at
given coordinates
FIPS (Federal Information Processing Standard) county code
assigned to the grid cell
Total population in the grid cell
White population in the grid cell
Black population in the grid cell
Native American population in the grid cell
Asian and Pacific Islander population in the grid cell
Hispanic population in the grid cell
Population under 18 years of age in the grid cell
Population 65 years of age or older in the grid cell
6.3    Weather Station Data
       To view weather station information, click
                                                Weather
                        which brings up the following screen:
Version 1.02
November 15, 1999
             6-9
                                          1988-1997 TRI data, am

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                                             EXHIBIT 6-5
                                    Weather Station Data Screen
      3 Weather Station Information
             I  -  \  >  \\

        WBAN Name
Radial Distance (m) Latitude [decimal degrees] Longitu_
        11641
        12810
        12815
        12816
        12834
        12835
        12836
        12839
        12842
        12844
        12868
        12906
        12907
        12912
        12916
        12917
              3,576,807
              1,620,532
              1,668,204
              1,510,340
              1,638,306
              1,763,991
              1,936,738
              1,939,212
              1,610,619
              1,885,015
              1,722,497
               824,470
              1,101,517
               910,091
               944,377
               805,012
18.4333
  27.85
  28.45
29.6833
29.1833
26.5833
  24.55
  25.8
27.9667
26.6833
23.4833
29.6167
27.5333
  28.85
29.9833
  29.95
A full list and descriptions of the types of weather station data in this screen are presented in Exhibit
6-6.
                                             EXHIBIT 6-6
                                    Weather Station Information
Data Label
WBAN
Name
Radial Distance
Latitude
Longitude
Description
5-digit identification of the weather station; WBAN
refers to Weather Bureau/ Army /Navy.
Name of the weather station (not currently available).
Distance from approximate center point of U.S.
(centroid of Montgomery County, Kansas), used in
searching for the weather station nearest to facility.
Latitude of the weather station in decimal degrees.
Longitude of the weather station in decimal degrees.
6.4     Stream Data
Version 1.02
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                                              1988-1997 TRI data, am

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     To view stream-specific information, click
                                               Stream
         which brings up the following screen:
                                        EXHIBIT 6-7
                                 Stream Information Screen
U REACH Information


ir Lr. 	 1.  	 I wj



^














4
Catalog Unit/Segment
1010001001
1010001002
1010001003
1010001004
1010001005
1010001006
1010001007
1010001008
1010001009
1010001010
1010001011
1010001012
1010001013
1010001014
1010001015
1010001016




Downstream Reach
1010001057
1010001001
1010001002
1010001003
1010001004
1010001005
0
0
0
1010001061
1010001010
0
0
1010001011
1010001014
1010001014
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^J |l l| |

i Done i|

Help 1

Average Flow (mldj 7Q10 Flow (mldj 1Qi
31770 2495 _J
31570 2475
29270 2247
19980 1262
2499 329.1
2435 322.7



2264 305.7
2241

303.4
2176 297
1921 271.6
138 13.71 i
A   "     	                                     ~~~~      	"	full
list and descriptions of the types of stream data in this screen are presented in Exhibit 6-8.  Note that
reaches are linear sections of streams, lakes, reservoirs, estuaries, etc. that are linked to form a skeletal
structure representing the branching patterns of surface water drainage systems. The criterion governing
reach delineation is that a reach should end where a significant change in hydrological characteristics
occurs, e.g., depth, width,  slope and/or elevation. This criterion attempts to define reaches having
relatively uniform hydrological attributes. Therefore, reach delineation may occur at stream junctions,
where streams enter and leave bodies of open water, where deep narrow rivers flow into wide shallow
rivers, where stream slopes change significantly, where elevations change suddenly (e.g., waterfalls or
dams), etc.

       To more easily view the data, columns may be moved around to re-order them.  To move a
column, click on the column heading using the left mouse button.  A thick black line will appear to the
left of the column. Holding down the left mouse button, move the line to where you want the column
to be inserted and then release the mouse button.
Version 1.02
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                                       EXHIBIT 6-8
                                  Stream Data Information
Data Label
Catalog Unit/Segment
Downstream Reach
Average Flow (mid)
7Q 10 Flow (mid)
1Q10 Flow (mid)
Harmonic Mean Flow (mid)
Mean Velocity (m/s)
Low Velocity (m/s)
Segment Length (km)
Upstream Lat (dec deg)
Upstream Long (dec deg)
Q3 Lat (dec deg)
Q3 Long (dec deg)
Mid Lat (dec deg)
Mid Long (dec deg)
Ql Lat (dec deg)
Ql Long (dec deg)
Description
This is the unique 1 1 digit alphanumeric United States
Geological Survey (USGS) identifier for each reach.
This is the catalog unit/segment identifier for the immediate
downstream reach of a given reach.
Average annual flow at the base of the immediate reach in
millions of liters per day.
The lowest flow over a seven day period in the last ten years at
the base of the immediate reach in millions of liters per day.
The lowest flow over a one day period in the last ten years at
the base of the immediate reach in millions of liters per day.
The harmonic mean of annual flow at the base of the
immediate reach in millions of liters per day.
The mean flow velocity in meters per second.
The low flow velocity in meters per second.
The length of the immediate reach in kilometers.
The latitude of the upstream end of the immediate reach in
decimal degrees.
The longitude of the upstream end of the immediate reach in
decimal degrees.
The third quartile latitude upstream from the base of the reach
in decimal degrees.
The third quartile longitude upstream from the base of the
reach in decimal degrees.
The midpoint latitude along the reach path in decimal degrees.
The midpoint longitude along the reach path in decimal
degrees.
The first quartile latitude upstream from the base of the reach
in decimal degrees.
The first quartile longitude upstream from the base of the reach
in decimal degrees.
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Data Label
Downstream Lat (dec deg)
Downstream Long (dec deg)
Max Lat (dec deg)
Max Long (dec deg)
Min Lat (dec deg)
Min Long (dec deg)
Description
The latitude of the downstream end of the immediate reach in
decimal degrees.
The longitude of the downstream end of the immediate reach in
decimal degrees.
The maximum latitude of the immediate reach in decimal
degrees.
The maximum longitude of the immediate reach in decimal
degrees.
The minimum latitude of the immediate reach in decimal
degrees.
The minimum longitude of the immediate reach in decimal
degrees.
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          7.  MAKING QUERIES (CREATING AND VIEWING DATA TABLES)
       After the individual Indicator Elements have been generated using the  Model   | button, there are

a variety of choices available for expressing the Indicator, depending on the analyses you wish to conduct.
First, individual Indicator Elements may be combined and subsetted in a number of different ways to
create different Indicators or Subindicators.  After the Indicator Elements have been combined, the
resulting Indicators or Subindicators may be examined in a variety of ways (e.g., as actual pounds
released or as the full relative-risk based Indicator).

       The following sections describe how to subset and aggregate Indicator Elements when conducting
a new query, how to load previously created tables, and ways to express each Indicator or Subindicator.
The three buttons in the initial screen of the Indicators model used for these operations are New Query [

   Load   [, and  Load from CD]; additional screens and buttons are discussed in the following sections.

       Many queries have already been rujnjmdjcireprovided with the model. These queries can be
viewed by following the instructions for    Load   [ or Load from CD],  Please see Chapter 10 for a list of
filenames and a complete description of these pre-run queries.
7.1    New Queries
                      New Query  |
       To conduct a new query, click on  NewQuery | which appears on the first screen of the Indicators

model.  The following screen will then appear:
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                                        EXHIBIT 7-1
                            Indicator Element Aggregation Screen
iJf Indicator Element Aggregation HBE3
Select variables to Include In table:
Select row variable(s)
D C. Added Q
D C.CAA Flag D
D C.CAS Number D
D C.CAS Standard Q
C.CERCLAFIag O C. Expansion Flag
C.Chemical Qc.HAPFlag
C. Full Chemical Name D C. Metal
C. Core Chemical Flag O C.OSH A Carcinogens
M
Select column variable(s)
D C. Added D
D C.CAA Flag D
D C.CAS Number Q
D C.CAS Standard D
C.CERCLA Flag Q C. Expansion Flag
C.Chemical D C.HAP Flag
C.Full Chemical Name Q C. Metal
C.Core Chemical Flag Q C.OSHA Carcinogens

Save JNewfile



New file for 9


Submit Subset Data ; Help ;| Cancel

7.1.1   Specifying a Filename for Results

       Before running a new query, it is important to first specify a filename for your results in the
"Save" box shown in Exhibit 7-1 to avoid the possibility of overwriting a previously saved file.  The file
will be saved on the user directory on the drive where you have installed the model; the file is saved as
a Paradox file which can then be used directly by the model during future queries.  You may add a
filename that is up to 8 characters long (consistent with the DOS file-saving convention). Do not add
an extension; this is done automatically by the program. If you do not specify a filename, the file created
will be called "Newfile".  Each run of the program produces three files with the following extensions:
*.aux, *.db, and *.px.  These files are saved in the c:\OPPTEEVI\USER subdirectory; the files  must be
stored in this directory for the model to use them. If you wish to reload your results to view them again,
the *.db version of the file will be available to reload using the LOAD button.

       The "New file for" box shown below the "Save" box is currently not operational.  In the future,
this feature will allow the user to run batch files, e.g., for all ten EPA regions, all states, etc.
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7.1.2  Subsetting  Data

       For some analyses, you may wish to choose only a subset of the total national information
available in the database for all facilities, chemicals and media. For example, you may wish to create
Subindicators for only the chemicals barium, arsenic, and cadmium for EPA Regions 1 and 2. To choose
a subset of data for a given variable, click on  subset Data  shown in the Indicator Element Aggregation
                                        !	I
screen.  (You may do this before or after you select row and column variables for the table, because
these are completely separate operations.) Clicking on this button will bring up the following screen:

                                        EXHIBIT 7-2
                                The Search Parameters Screen
yf Enter Search Parameters...
Available Search
-inl.xi
Search
1C. Added *
C.CAAFlag
|C. CAS Number
1C. CAS Standard
C.CERCLAFlag
 C. Chemical 
C.Full Chemical Name
C.Core Chemical Flag
C. Expansion Flag ^_

Select from list



OK













1 ,3-Butadiene
Cadmium














!

! Cancel




Add criteria... !
 I  ;l  . '--,:.;




Help


























Using the options in the Enter Search Parameters... screen, there are three ways to choose a subset of
data for each parameter you wish to subset by:

1.     The first way to choose a subset of data is to select data from available "pop-up" lists.  To do
       this, click on a variable in the Available Search section of the Enter Search Parameters... screen
       (Exhibit_7-2)1_J[f the  parameter has a  preset list of choices (e.g.,  chemical),  the  button
                       will be activated (the text will be black, not gray).  After selecting a parameter
          Select from list
       with a preset list from the left side of the screen, click on    Se|ect fram Nst
                                  The screen that
       appears next includes a list of relevant items; click on the box(es) next to the item(s) you wish to
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2.
include in your subset.  After you choose these items, they will appear in the Search: section
shown in Exhibit 7-2.

The second way to choose a subset of data is by directly typing in the items you wish to include.
To do this, click on the chosen variable in the Available Search section of the Enter Search
Parameters... screen (Exhibit 7-2). Then, click on   Add criteria...   on the right side of the screen.
       The following screen will appear:
                                        EXHIBIT 7-3
                      Screen for Choosing Items to Include in a Subset
                   yl Add values to search for
                     01
                     02|
                                                          OK
                                                                Cancel
                                                                 Help
                                                             Load from File
       Click on the interior of the window shown in Exhibit 7-3 to activate it.  Add the items to be
       included in the subset on separate lines.  NOTE: Follow each entry, except the last entry, by a
       hard return.  If you enter a hard return after the last entry, your data may not be subsetted
       correctly.

       EXAMPLE:  If you wish to list data for EPA Regions 1 and 2 only, select Region in the Enter
                     Search Parameters... screen.  Then, type "01" and "02" on separate lines in the
                     Add values to search for screen (as shown in Exhibit 7-3).

       Descriptions of the parameters and the formats for entering data when you wish to use only a
subset of data are shown in Exhibit 7-4. You can determine whether the parameter is chemical-specific,
facility-specific, media-specific, or release-specific by the letters (C, F, M, or R) that precede the name
of the parameter.  It is important to use the correct entry format for each type of subset parameter.  If
you do not use the exact format, the query will be run, but the  data will  not be included correctly.
Additional information on the flag fields can be found in Appendix G.
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                                                                   EXHIBIT 7-4
                                           Options for Subset Parameters and Row and Column Variables
Variable
C. Added
C. CAA Flag
C. CAS Number
C. CAS Standard
C. CERCLA Flag
C. Chemical
C. Full Chemical Name
C. OSHA
Carcinogens
Description
This indicates the year that the chemical was added to the TRI roster
This flag marks the chemicals that are Clean Air Act pollutants
Chemical CAS Number
Chemical CAS Number
This flag marks the chemicals that are listed in Superfund (CERCLA-
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act)
Common Chemical Name
Full Chemical Name
This flag indicates whether the chemical is a known or suspect human
carcinogen based on OSHA criteria (U.S.EPA, 1998). Known human
carcinogens are defined as those that have been shown to cause cancer in
humans. Suspect human carcinogens have been shown to cause cancer in
animals. The list of chemicals flagged as OSHA carcinogens is based on the
list provided in the 1997 TRI Public Data Release, which was compiled from
the following sources: the National Toxicology Program' s Annual Report on
Carcinogens, the International Agency for Research on Cancer Monographs,
and29CFR1910u.
Format for Entering Information When
Subsetting Data
Enter all four digits, e.g., 1988
Enter x on the first line
Enter digits without hyphens
Enter digits with hyphens in the
00-0
form 00-
Enter x on the first line
Choose from list available in the
model
Choose from list available in the
model
Indicators
Indicators
Enter x on the first line
          Even if a chemical is flagged as an OSHA carcinogen, its toxicity weight for a given exposure pathway may not be based on its carcinogenic effects.
For example, a chemical that causes both carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic effects when inhaled may have a higher inhalation toxicity weight associated with
noncarcinogenic effects than with its carcinogenic effects.  If you wish to select all chemicals that have inhalation toxicity weights based on cancer health
effects, see the instructions for the Toxicity Class - Inhale field.
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Variable
C. 33/50 Flag
C. Expansion Flag
C. Core Chemical Flag
C. HAP Flag
C. Metal
C. Priority Pollutant Flag
C. SDWA Flag
C. Toxicity Category
Description
A marker showing that the chemical is included in EPA's 33/50 program, a
program in which facilities voluntarily reduce their chemical releases by 33
percent and 50 percent by certain dates
A marker for chemicals added in the 1996 reporting year
This flag marks the chemicals that are common to all reporting years of TRI
and which have had no modifications of reporting requirements
This flag marks the chemicals that are designated as hazardous air pollutants
under the Clean Air Act
This flag indicates whether the chemicals are metals and also whether they
are core chemicals (core chemicals are those that are common to all reporting
years of TRI and which have had no modifications of reporting requirements)
This flag marks the chemicals that are designated as priority pollutants under
the Clean Water Act
This flag marks the chemicals that have national primary or secondary
drinking water standards under the Safe Drinking Water Act
This indicates whether the oral and inhalation toxicity weights are based on
cancer health effects or noncancer health effects or both (i.e., "mixed")
Format for Entering Information When
Subsetting Data
Enter x on the first line
Enter x on the first line
Enter x on the first line
Enter x on the first line
Choices are:
M [metal]; CM [core metal]; NM [non-
metal]; and CNM [core non-metal]
Enter x on the first line
Enter x on the first line
Choices are: Carcinogen [indicates that the
chemical's most sensitive endpoint for both
exposure pathways is cancer]; Non-
carcinogen [indicates that the chemical's
most sensitive endpoint for both exposure
pathways is noncancer effects]; and Mixed
[indicates that the chemical's most
sensitive endpoint varies by exposure
pathway]
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Variable
C. Toxicity Class - Inhale
C. Toxicity Class - Oral
C. Toxicity Source
C. User Tags 1 through 5
F. City
Description
This indicates whether the toxicity weight for the inhalation pathway is based
on cancer or noncancer health effects
This indicates whether the toxicity weight for the oral pathway is based on
cancer or noncancer health effects
Source of toxicity information (whether from IRIS, HEAST, the Office of
Pesticide Programs, or Derived from other sources)
Using these tags, you can select a set of chemicals based on your own
selection criteria
City where the TRI facility is located
Format for Entering Information When
Subsetting Data
Choices are: Carcinogen [indicates that the
chemical's most sensitive endpoint for the
inhalation pathway is cancer] ; Non-
carcinogen [indicates that the chemical's
most sensitive endpoint for the inhalation
pathway is noncancer effects];
Carcinogen*; and Non-carcinogen*.
An asterisk indicates that the toxicity
weight came from the oral exposure
pathway.
Choices are:
Carcinogen [indicates that the chemical's
most sensitive endpoint for the oral
pathway is cancer]; Non-carcinogen
[indicates that the chemical's most
sensitive endpoint for the oral pathway is
noncancer effects]; Carcinogen*; and Non-
carcinogen*.
An asterisk indicates that the toxicity
weight came from the inhalation pathway.
Choices are:
IRIS, HEAST, OPP, or DERIVED

Enter city name using capital letters.1
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Variable
F. County
F. DUNS
F. Federal Facility Flag
F. Facility ID
F. FIPS
F. Name
F. Parent Name
Description
County where the TRI facility is located
The 9-digit number assigned by Dun & Bradstreet for the facility or
establishment within the facility
Identifies whether a facility is a Federal Facility or a Government Owned
Contractor Operated Facility
Unique TRI identifier for facility
TRI facility FIPS (Federal Information Processing Standard) code which
identifies the county associated with the facility
TRI facility name
Name of the corporation or other business entity located in the U.S. that
directly owns at least 50 percent of the voting stock of the facility
Format for Entering Information When
Subsetting Data
Enter county name using capital letters.1
Because more than one state may contain a
given county name, the preferred entry
format is to enter the two letter state postal
code followed by a comma and the county
name (with no space between state and
county). For example, Prince George's
County, Maryland should be entered as:
"MD,PRINCE GEORGES"
(Note that although there is no space
between the state and the first name of the
county, there is a space between the two
county "names".)
Alternatively, one can subset both state and
county together.
In addition, counties beginning with 'Me'
should be entered like 'Me Donald,' with a
space between 'Me' and the rest of the
word.
Enter the nine digits
Enter F for a Federal Facility, G for a
Government Owned Contractor Operated
facility, or C for all other facilities
Enter the 15 character TRI identifier, using
upper case for any letters included in the
ID
Enter code using leading zeros if code is
less than five digits
Enter name using capital letters1
Enter name using capital letters
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Variable
F. Parent DUNS
F. Region
F. SIC Code I2
F. SIC Code 22
F. SIC Code 32
F. SIC Code 42
F. SIC Code 2 Digit
F. SIC Code 3 Digit
F. EPA SIC Code 2 Digit
F. State
F. ZIP Code
M. Media Text
R. MaxOnsite
Description
The 9-digit number assigned by Dun & Bradstreet for the US parent company
EPA region where facility is located. There are 10 EPA regions. Any
information which cannot be matched to an actual EPA region (e.g., an
unrecognized zipcode) is assigned to a dummy region (called UK)
First facility 4-digit SIC code reported on Form R
Second 4-digit SIC code reported on Form R
Third 4-digit SIC code reported on Form R
Fourth 4-digit SIC code reported on Form R
First 2 digits of first SIC code
First 3 digits of first SIC code
EPA standardized 2-digit SIC code. (This code uses all reported SIC codes to
arrive at a 2-digit code, if applicable. If reported 4-digit codes differ in the
first two digits, the "multiple code" is used.)
State in which the facility is located
Facility ZIP code
Descriptions of receiving media associated with R. Media codes
Maximum amount of chemical stored onsite in any given calendar year
Format for Entering Information When
Subsetting Data
Enter the nine digits
Enter EPA region number with a zero
before it for regions 1 through 9 (i.e., 01,
etc.)
Enter four digits2
Enter four digits2
Enter four digits2
Enter four digits2
Enter two digits
Enter three digits
Choices are:
20-39, MU [for multiple codes within the
range of 20-39], NA [for codes outside the
range of 20-3 9]
Enter the two character state postal code,
using all capital letters
Enter five digits3
See Exhibit C-l in Appendix C for
descriptions associated with R. Media
codes. [The descriptions in Exhibit A-l are
not the exact descriptions included in the
model; it is recommended that you use the
R. Media codes when subsetting your data
rather than these media descriptions]
Enter digits using the codes listed in
Exhibit C-3 in Appendix C
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Variable
R. Media
R. Year
R. Score Category
R. Use
Description
Code associated with the media and/or method of release
Reporting year of interest
Disaggregated code of release media
Code describing whether chemical is manufactured, processed, or otherwise
used at the facility
Format for Entering Information When
Subsetting Data
Enter digits using the codes listed in
Exhibit C-l in Appendix C
Enter all four digits, e.g., 1997
Choices are:
0-33 [See Exhibit C-2 in Appendix C]
Enter letter using the codes listed in
Exhibit C-3 in Appendix C.
'Because there may be some variation in the spellings of city, county, or facility names in the TRI database, you may need to enter several spellings of the item you
are interested in. For example, to obtain data for St. Louis, Missouri, you should enter all of the following city spellings:
        SAINT LOUIS
        ST. LOUIS
        ST LOUIS
2These SIC code variables cannot be used together to identify facilities which report a 4-digit SIC code in any of the four fields, since only the "and" operator is
functional.  One must perform four separate model runs to search for a particular 4-digit SIC code in any of the four available locations.
3Over the years covered by the model, some ZIP codes have been deleted, others have been reassigned, and yet others have been added. Thus, when doing regional
searches, use of city, county, state, or region is advisable.
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3.     The third way to choose a subset of data is by loading externally created text files.
       First, click on I   Add it ri     in the Enter Search Parameters... screen  Next, click
                                                                                  Load from File
       in the Add values to search for screen.  In the screen that appears next, choose the drive and
       filename of the text file you wish to use as a subset.  The text file must be in ASCII format and
       should have only one value per line; when you choose the file, each value from the file will be
       shown on a separate line in the Add values to search for screen.
After the subset of data is chosen for the parameter of interest, click    OK    until you return to the
Indicator Element Aggregation screen (shown in Exhibit 7-1).

NOTE: Selecting a subset of data for a given variable does not automatically result in a table that displays
       information for each item in your subset. To view information for the individual subsetted items,
       you must select the subsetted variable as a row or column variable, as described below.  For
       example, if you choose a subset of three specific chemicals but do not list chemical as a row or
       column variable, then no chemical will be listed in your data table and any data shown will
       represent the sum of data for all three chemicals.

7.1.3  Selecting Items as Row and Column Variables

       After you have chosen a subset of data, you must then choose how to display the data in your
table.  Choosing items as row and  column variables allows you to aggregate your data differently
depending on the analyses you are conducting.

       To select items to include as row variables in the table, you can click on the box next to the
item in the Select row variable(s) section of the Indicator Element Aggregation screen (Exhibit 7-1).
(You may choose up to two items to include as row variables). The values for the chosen variables will
be shown along the left side of the table. No preference for the order of the display is available when you
are selecting your variables, but  the two row variables can be interchanged when you view your table.

       To select items to include as column variables in the table, click on the box next to the items
included in the Select column variable(s) section. The values for the chosen variables will be shown along
the top of the table. (You can select up to two items to include as column variables.)  The same options
that apply to interchanging row variables also apply to column variables.

       Note that for the variables Metal and Toxicity Category, the table that is generated will show the
various sub-variables (i.e., for Metal, metals, core metals, non-metals, and core non-metals will be shown;
for Toxicity Category, carcinogens,  non-carcinogens, and mixed chemicals will be shown).

       After selecting the data in the Select row variable(s) and Select column variable(s) sections, click
on |  submit  | to begin the process of generating the table. (This process will take approximately 90 to 120
minutes on a Pentium processor; the time will vary for other personal computers.)  Based on your
selections, the model will create the table which can be viewed in the Data Display screen that will pop
up after the processing is finished.  This screen is shown in Exhibit 7-5, below.

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NOTE: If you receive the error message, "Exception E Printer in Module OPPTEIM.EXE at 0015=29db
       Printer selected not valid," after clicking Submit, you may need to make sure there is a default
       printer installed in your Windows operating system. If you do not have a printer to install (e.g.,
       you are using a lap-top), simply install the generic printer option that is listed in your version of
       Windows.
EXAMPLE:   If you wish to make a query showing information for each state and environmental
              medium for the TRI reporting year 1996, choose state as the row variable from the
              Indicator Element Aggregation screen and choose medium as the column variable.
              The two letter state abbreviations will appear as row labels, and each medium will
              appear as a separate column heading, as in Exhibit 7-5.

                                       EXHIBIT 7-5
                                    Data Display Screen
iJj Data Display for 97a-c-m.db
Rows: Chemical f? include sutt*
Columns: Media Text
Size: 2 Cols x 411 Rows
mmm

ilS ISlll IT Select All |
t3fi| 1 Select Row] I
Records j Sorted Export Help Seiegj Cgl | 1

Statistic selected: I sum jjl Model selected: I TRI Pounds 'J
Cells show: | value _J Normalization: |None J
Media Text 1 Fugitive Air
Chemical
1.1.1,2-Tetrachloro-2-fluoraethaneenzene 31405
1,2,4-Trimethylbenzene 2813704
1,2-Bufc/lene oxide 3994
1.2-Dibromoethane 8146
1,2-DibrQmotetrafluoroethane 5.000
1,2-Diohloro-1.1.2-trifluoroetriane 63575
1,2-Dichloro.l.l-difluoroethane SOO.O
2Stad
-------
NOTE:       When region or county is selected as a row or column variable, the emissions from all
              facilities without valid region or county information will be aggregated into one record
              in the top row or leftmost column of the screen.  That record will be labeled "UK," for
              unknown. State information for the model is taken directly from the information reported
              on Form Rs; therefore, whatever is submitted as "state" will be used as output for the
              query.  To obtain counties for facilities in territories and states, the FIPS codes that are
              reported on Form R are translated into county names.
7.1.4  Hints for Running Queries

       When first running queries, you may wish to produce queries which use only single row and
column variables. Using two variables per row or column may result in a large number of subtotals within
the table, which may make it difficult for you to read your results.

       The size of your query will determine whether you can view the results within the model. If your
query results in a very large table (greater than approximately 16,000 cells within the table), you will not
be able to view your query within the model, and you will need to export the
table to Excel or dBase by clicking on | flxjjf JiTj| .  A message within the model will inform you to export
your table when it is too large.

       Even if your query is small, you may wish to export your table to Excel to manipulate and view
the contents of your table. For example, you can sort your data by any of the columns of data within
Excel. In addition, the table exported to Excel lists all the ways that your results may be expressed (i.e.,
TRI Pounds to Full Model results). See Section 7.3.2 for descriptions of these results.

7.2    Previously-Generated Queries

       To display previously-created tables, the tables must be located in either the c:\oppteim\user
subdirectory on the user's hard drive (this subdirectory is created automatically when the model is
installed) or on the CD. To load tables from the c:\oppteim\user subdirectory, click   Load    in the initial
Indicators screen, select the filename of the table you wish to view, then click j    OK    to bring up the
previously-created table in the Data Display_screen. An example table is shown in Exhibit 7-5. To load
pre-run queries from the CD, use the load from CD] button directly beneath the Load button in the initial
Indicators screen. Note that sometimes when you click on Load from CD], the available files will not be shown.
In this case, click on CANCEL, then click on Load from CD] again to view the files.

       If you have selected a query that is very large, a message within the model will inform you of the
exact size of the table, and ask if you would like to skip the load.  If you click no, the model will attempt
to open the table in the Data Display screen; however, this may take a significant amount of time, or the
model may not be able to open the run at all.  If you click yes, the Data Display screen will pop up
without any displayed data; here you can click the  [JxjjojQl button at the top right of the screen to
export the table in Excel or dBase format.
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7.3    Viewing, Expressing, and Sorting Data in Created Tables

       You can view the data and choose how to express your data for either a newly-created table or
for previously-created tables.

7.3.1   Checking the Subset of Data in the Table

       You can look in the upper left-hand corner of the Data Display screen (Exhibit 7-5) to determine
how the data are displayed in the table.  This corner shows the row and column variables of the table.
Clicking on the  Records | button activates the toggle window in the upper left-hand corner and shows any
subsetting that you chose for this run.

NOTE:If all chemical releases for all available years have been included in the table, the window that
       appears after clicking  Records | will contain a note saying "all records selected". If data were
       subsetted, a message will appear showing how the data were subsetted.

7.3.2  Ways to Compute and Express the Indicators

       There are a variety of choices for expressing the Indicators and Subindicators, as indicated in the
Data Display screen and as shown in Exhibit 7-6:

                                        EXHIBIT 7-6
    Statistic selected:
Sum        f   Model selected:
    Cells show:      value            Normalization:
                                                  TRI Pounds
                              None                                jJ
You may want to express the data in different ways depending on your analysis.  For each of the
categories shown in Exhibit 7-6, there are a variety of options in drop-down boxes, as indicated by the
arrows. A general description of each category and the options available are presented below.

Statistic selected:

       Using this drop-down box allows you to express the values in the cells as either the sum of the
values of the chosen model  (indicated by Sum) or the number of records in the cell (indicated by N).

Model selected:

       This drop-down box allows you to access the raw data (TRI Pounds), show the number of pounds
that can be modeled (Modeled Pounds) or express the Indicators as measures which incorporate hazard
(toxicity), toxicity and population, or risk (toxicity, exposure, and population). Each option gives a
different perspective on the reported releases and transfers.  Descriptions of these selections are:
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       TRI Pounds:  This number reflects the number of pounds released or transferred that are
       reported to the Toxics Release Inventory for the exposure pathway being considered.

       TRI Pounds (chems with toxicity weights): This value shows only TRI pounds for the
       chemicals that have toxicity weights. This value differs from Modeled Pounds because it includes
       those chemicals which have toxicity weights regardless of whether they have physicochemical
       properties.

       TRI Pounds*Toxicity (Hazard Based): This value is TRI pounds multiplied by the toxicity
       weight of the chemical appropriate for the exposure pathway selected. In this air-only version
       of the model, for releases to media which have both oral and inhalation exposure pathways, the
       higher toxicity weight is applied to all the TRI pounds.

       Modeled Pounds:  This number reflects the number of pounds released or transferred (TRI
       Pounds) that can be modeled.  Reasons that releases may not be able to be modeled include lack
       of physicochemical information required for exposure modeling or lack of toxicity weights.

       Modeled Pounds*Toxicity:  This value is modeled pounds multiplied by the toxicity weight of
       the  chemical appropriate for the exposure pathway selected.  It does not measure how the
       pollutant moves through the environment and comes in contact with an individual.  The oral
       toxicity weight is used for releases or transfers to all media except 1,2, 750, and 754 (see Exhibit
       C-l).

       Modeled Pounds*Toxicity*Population: This value is the number of modeledpounds multiplied
       by the toxicity weight of the chemical appropriate for the exposure pathway selected and by the
       population potentially exposed.  The oral toxicity weight is used for releases or transfers to all
       media except 1, 2, 750, and 754 (see Exhibit C-l).

       Full Model  (Risk-Related):  The full model multiplies the  surrogate  dose  estimated using
       exposure models by the chemical's toxicity weight and by the population. The pounds used in
       this  expression   of  the   Indicators   differ  from  the  pounds  used  for  Modeled
       Pounds*Toxicity*Population (and may be a smaller value) because the fate and transport of the
       chemical pounds have been modeled and exposure assumptions have been made.

Examples of useful comparisons among the above Indicators include:

       (1) TRI Pounds vs.  TRI Pounds (chems  with toxicity weights)

             This  comparison allows you to determine the proportion of total TRI Pounds released
             that are associated with chemicals that have toxicity weights. This proportion may be
             somewhat different than the overall  proportion of TRI chemicals that have toxicity
             weights. For example, 50% of a given set of TRI chemicals may have toxicity weights.
             However, it is possible that 80% of the TRI Pounds released for the same set of chemicals
             may be associated with chemicals that have toxicity weights.
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       (2) TRI Pounds vs. Modeled Pounds

              This comparison allows you to determine the proportion of chemical releases for which
              risk-related impacts can be estimated using the Full Model option.

       (3) TRI Pounds*Toxicity vs. Modeled Pounds*Toxicity

              This comparison shows you (a) the amount of toxicity-weighted releases associated with
              chemicals that have toxi city weights versus (b) the amount of toxi city-weighted releases
              for chemicals that have both toxicity weights and physicochemical data that are used to
              model exposure. An important difference between this comparison and the comparison
              in (2) is that this comparison addresses only  those chemicals that have toxicity weights.

       (4)  Modeled Pounds*Toxicity vs. Modeled Pounds*Toxicity*Pop

              This comparison allows you to determine the extent to which population contributes to
              the Indicator value.

Cells show:

       This selection allows you the option of expressing the Indicator or Subindicator as an actual value
or a percent. The specific options are:

       Value: This number shows the actual value associated with the model selected, rather than the
       percent.  For example, in the case of the Full Model, the number will  be the Indicator or
       Subindicator value.

       Percent: This shows the percent of all values in the table contributed by the value in a given cell.

       Row Percent: This number shows the percent of all values in the row.

       Column Percent: This number shows the percent of all values in the column.
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Normalization:

       For any of the models selected except TRI Pounds, you can choose different ways to normalize
the Indicators,  depending on the kind of baseline Indicator or Subindicator you want.  In general,
normalization is most useful for examining trends in the scores over time. The choices for normalizing
the data include:

       National: The value in each cell of the table is the total of the numerical output from the model
       selected, divided by the sum of all Indicator Elements for all facilities in the base year of 1988 and
       multiplied by 100,000 for ease of reading.

       Selected Records (Base Year 1988):  The value in each cell of the table is divided by the sum
       of only the values of the variables  selected for your analysis  for the base year of  1988  and
       multiplied by 100,000.

       Selected Records: The value in each cell of the table is divided by the sum of the records in the
       table for the year or years chosen for your analysis and multiplied by 100,000. In this option, the
       sum of all values in the displayed table will equal 100,000 even if data were subsetted.

       None:  The values in each cell are reported directly, without normalization.  (This is the only
       selection available for TRI pounds.)

7.3.3  Sorting Records in the Table

       You may wish to sort the records by the values shown in the table.  If you wish to sort all of the
records in the table, click on   SeiectAii| in the Data Display screen (Exhibit 7-5). Then click  sorted
to sort the records (indicated by individual rows) in the table in descending order by the values shown
in the table.  You may also sort a smaller selection of data by highlighting cells of interest. You can sort
the highlighted cells by clicking the    Sorted  I button.
A description of the other information displayed with your sorted data is as follows:

       Item                        Description

       Year                        The year of release

       Rank                       The  order  of the  Subindicator  or Indicator relative  to other
                                   Subindicators selected from the data display table. (The item with
                                   the highest value is given a rank of one.)

       Value                       The  non-normalized value from the table  (e.g., Pounds, Full
                                   Model).

       Percent                     The percent of the total value of the sorted cells.

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       Cum Freq                  The cumulative value of the highest ranked items up to the value
                                  in the row of interest. For example, the user may determine the
                                  total Indicator value of the top 5 or 10 ranked items.

       Cum Pet                   The cumulative percent of the total value of the highest ranked
                                  values up to the percent in the row of interest.
You may print your sorted table usingf	pri^t  j , in the upper right-hand corner of the screen.  This
button prepares the table for printing, and brings up the print preview screen.  It may be evident by
looking at this screen that further changes need to be made to the table. Occasionally the column widths
may need to be changed, either because all numbers may not be fully visible in each column (e.g., for very
large numbers, the first digit may be hidden), or because the columns are too wide to fit them all on one
page.  If you need to make changes, close the print preview screen.  You can then make changes in the
Sorted Results screen. If you need to change the width of the columns, use the mouse to move to the
right-hand border of the heading of the column you wish to size, until the arrow becomes a double line
with two arrows.  You can then move the mouse to the right to make the column wider or move the
mouse to the left to make the column  narrower. You can preview your selection again prior to printing
and make additional adjustments if required.

7.3.4   Mapping Your Query

       NOTE: If you have not used either state or county as a row or column variable, then the world
icon will be blank, and you will not be able to view your results geographically.

       To view your  results geographically, click on "jjjjj] in the upper right-hand corner of the Data

Display screen.  This will bring up the Map View screen, which provides several options for  mapping
your results. By clicking on the appropriate choice in the Media Text drop-down box, you can view
results either separately for each of the individual media selected or as the sum of all media; the sum of
results for all media is indicated by " ALL " (see Exhibit 7-7). To choose the method of expressing your
data (e.g., TRI Pounds, Full Model, etc.), click on the appropriate option in the Method drop-down box
at the bottom of the screen.

       The six ranges of results, represented by separate colors on the map, are divided (from lowest to
highest) according to  the percent of the mean value for all areas, as follows:

                    0-<25%ofthemean
                    25 - < 50% of the mean
                   50 - < mean
                   mean-< 200% of the mean
                    200 - < 3 00%  of the mean
                    >_3 00% of the mean

The concentrations associated with each of these ranges are listed next to the relevant color on the screen
in the bottom left hand corner.

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        In some or all regions of your map, you may see a greenish-brown color that is not one of the
colors in the legend at the bottom of the Map View screen. This color indicates that there are insufficient
data for generating model output for that area.  For example, in the current version of the model, if you
select "Full Model" for any releases other than stack or fugitive air releases, your map will be completely
greenish-brown.

       The Geographic drop-down box on the Map View screen indicates whether you are viewing the
data by state or county.  If you have run a query by state (not county), you will be  able to view your
results by state only.  Likewise, if you have run a query using county as one of the row or column
variables, you will be able to view results only by county.  If you run a query by both state and county,
you will be able to choose whether to view your results by state or county.

       There are three icons in the lower right-hand corner. The leftmost icon has a magnifying glass
with a red plus sign.  To zoom in  and expand a particular region on the map, click  once with the left
mouse button on the icon, and then click and hold the left mouse button to draw a box around the region
you want to expand. The magnifying glass with the red minus sign allows you to zoom out by a factor
of two.  The world icon resets your map to its original size and location on the screen.

       To obtain information on the score and its percent of the total for a state or county,  simply click
on the state or county and that information will appear in a box.
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                                         EXHIBIT 7-7
                                       Map View Screen
     ij Map View
      Geoaraohic
        0-6.95616E7          1 3Q123E&-2.782E8

        6.05B1BE7-1.3ai23E8     2 7B248E8-5.5B492E8

       : 25-23-29N. Lonq: 090-01-36W
7.4    Saving the Data Table to an External File

       The   ExPrt  I button exports the data table as either a dBase file or an Excel worksheet.  This
option will export the entire table.  At this time, you cannot export a smaller selection from the table.
Note that, to save space, the column headings corresponding to the model selected have been shortened
in the external files.  Exhibit 7-8 presents the corresponding column  headings in a dBase file and in an
Excel worksheet and the corresponding model selected.

7.5    Caveats

       Results of the Risk-Screening Environmental Indicators can  be used to identify,  compare, and
rank facilities, geographic areas, and environmental media. The Indicators model is a screening-level tool
that examines general populations  surrounding facilities from a risk-related  perspective  and only  in a
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comparative manner. Results of the Risk-Screening Environmental Indicators are not the same as a
quantitative risk estimate for a facility.  More refined analysis is required for calculating such an estimate,
using more detailed data for the facility and the site where it is located, in order to characterize actual
risks for individuals and/or sensitive subpopulations (e.g., children, the elderly, etc.). The Help Screens
in the model will  assist you in identifying other important caveats  and limitations which pertain to
interpreting the results of this model.

                                         EXHIBIT 7-8
             Column Headings in External Files Corresponding to Model Selected
Model Selected
TRI Pounds
TRI Pounds (chems with
toxicity weights)
TRI Pounds * Toxicity
(Hazard Based)
Modeled Pounds
Modeled Pounds * Toxicity
Modeled Pounds * Toxicity *
Population
Full Model (Risk-Related)
Column Heading
in dBase File
TRIPOUNDS
TRIPOUNDSB
TRIPOUND 1
MODELEDPOU
POUNDSTOX
POUNDSTOXP
FULLMODEL
Column Heading
in Excel Worksheet
TRIPounds
TRIPoundsB
TRIPoundsBTox
ModeledPounds
PoundsTox
PoundsToxPop
FullModel
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                   8.  GRAPHING RESULTS OF YOUR DATA QUERY
       After you have created a data table (using
                                              New Query
                          from the initial Indicators screen) or after you
have loaded a table (using
Display... screen:
Load
or LoadftwiCD]), you can graph your results using     in the Data
                                        EXHIBIT 8-1
                                     Data Display Screen
LJ Data Display for 9596s2.db
Rows: EPA SIC Code 2 Digit P IT
Columns: Year
Size: 2 Cols x 22 Rows
mmm

elude subtotals hi. I ^^^ Select All I
^Sy I SelertRowJ
Records j Sorted j Export Help Select Col J

Statistic selected: | sum jj| Model selected: j TRI Pounds jj
Cells show: j value ^J Normalization: |None ^J
Year 1995 1996
EPA SIC Code 2 Digit
22 2.69063E7 2.419786E7
23 2053709 1948097
24 3.8941 12E7 4.115432E7
26 5.603618E7 4.940135E7
28 3. 09271 5 ES 2. 901 832 E8
27 4.147029E7 3.517575E7
28 1.741184E9 1.610654E9
29 1. 07473 E8 1.031149E8
30 1. 583698 E8 1.4264ES
31 6259212 6129412
32 4.333264E7 4.945126E7
33 1. 494453 E9 1.549315E9
34 4.352597 ES 4.295797 E8
35 1.014189E8 9.435924E7
36 4.486964E8 4.1 33606 E8
Total _*_

5.110418E7
4001806
8.009544E7 	
1. 054375 ES
5. 994647 E8
7.664804E7
3.351338 E9
2.1 05879 ES
3. 01 0098 E8
1. 238362 E7
9.27S39E7
3. 043768 E9
8.648394E8
1. 957781 ES"
8. 62057 ES 
To make a graph, first select the data you wish to graph from the table in the Data Display... screen.
You can either select all the data using  seieciAii|? Or you can choose a subset of data by clicking one cell
that defines one corner of the selection of interest and dragging the cursor to the other corner of the
selection and then releasing the mouse button.  After you select your data, click on      in the Data
Display... screen. This will bring up the Graphs... screen such as seen in Exhibit 8-2:
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                                        EXHIBIT 8-2
                                       Graphs Screen
      , I Graphs..
                  2dBar
                 M.  ;X:> ^rTTRI Dala]
          rife Name: 9- tt-y ;dt  rib D=:1 Mai31121K! SU
                Y Moi=l SatKlnn: TR
8.1    Choosing a Plot Type to Graph Your Results

       There are many types of graphs you can use to plot your data. You can choose among two-
dimensional and three-dimensional line and bar graphs, pie charts and other types of graphs such as three-
dimensional doughnut graphs. All options are listed in  the pull-down box in the top  section of the
Graphs... screen. To choose a graph type, click on the arrow to the right of the pull-down box to view
all options and then click on the graph type you want. A full description of each graph type included in
the pull-down box and the best uses of each type are listed in Appendix E. Extensive on-line help is also
available.

8.2    Formatting the Graph

       To change the appearance of different parts of the graph, click the right mouse button to activate
the menu of items you can change on the graph as seen in Exhibit 8-3:
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                                        EXHIBIT 8-3
                                  Graph Screen with Menu
                  2ciBar
                                                                                   Help
Clicking on the item you wish to change in the top half of the menu (from General... to Footnote...) opens
a screen where you can customize the graph.  Clicking on Aeries and Axis brings up additional menu
items.

       The descriptions below indicate generally what each menu option will do. Refer to Appendix E
for detailed information on additional menu items and screens which appear by clicking on the items listed
below and refer to the online help button for even greater detail about available options.

General...     This option allows you to change options for the entire chart (including plot area, title,
              axes, and legend).

Plot...         This option allows you to change the format of the plot area (which includes the grid area
              and the axes).

Series         This option allows you to change the appearance and labels on data series and data points.

              NOTE: The items that are called data series and data points are determined by the layout
              of your original data table. If your table includes years as column variables and chemicals
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              as row variables, the range of chemical scores for a given year is called a series in your
              graph; each individual chemical score within that year is a data point.

Axis          With this option, you can change the appearance of axes, axis labels and axis titles.

Legend...     Format the chart legend using this option.

Title...        Format the chart title using this option.

Footnote...    Format the chart footnote using this option.

              NOTE: The initial information contained in the footnote includes the source of the graph
              (i.e., from the Indicators model version 2.0), filename of the graph, file date, whether the
              data were subsetted, and the model used (e.g., full model, pounds).

8.3    Moving Sections of the Graph

       Using the location option described in the previous section, you can move  and change the size
of different sections of the graph.  However, there is a simple way to move sections of the graph without
navigating through the menu choices. First, click on the part of the graph you wish to move. Then, hold
down the left mouse button, and drag the section to where you want it to be.

8.4    Printing the Graph

       To print your graph, click the right mouse button while the cursor is on any part of the screen
except the gray bar on top.  Select Print... from the menu that appears (see Exhibit 8-3). A window with
three tabs, Print, Page Setup, and Print Setup, appears.  On the Page Setup tab, you can change the
size of your graph relative to the page, how it is centered on the page, and the margins of the page. On
the Print Setup page, you can change the printer options, and the paper orientation and size. If you
would like to view the graph after making changes under either of these tabs, click |   OK   .  After
viewing the new graph, you can right-click again to re-access the Print window. If you do not want to
view the new graph before printing, simply click on the Print tab and your changes will be incorporated
automatically into the printed graph.

8.5    Saving the Graph to an External File

       To save your graph to a file, click the right mouse button.  Select Save as... from the menu that
appears (see Exhibit 8-3). You can then choose a filename and a drive.  You can save your graph as any
one of the following files:

       chart files:     Save your graph as a chart file (using a .vtc extension) if you wish to use it again
                     in the model
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       windows
       metafiles:      Save your graph as a metafile (using a .wmf extension) if you wish to use it in a
                     word processing program.

       bitmap
       files:          These files (indicated by a  .bmp extension)  can also be imported into word
                     processing programs.

       Note that you can also click on the right mouse button and copy and paste a graph directly into
a word  processing  document.   The resulting graphic  cannot be  edited, but  it can  be sized.

8.6    Loading a Graph from an External File

       You can load a graph from an external file by clicking on the Load option in the menu in Exhibit
8-3.  By clicking on  this option,  a data dialog box appears in which you can enter the filename of the
graph you want to load.

8.7    Caveats

       Results of the Risk-Screening Environmental Indicators can be used to identify, compare, and
rank facilities, geographic areas, and environmental media. The Indicators model is a screening-level tool
that examines general populations surrounding facilities from a risk-related perspective and only in a
comparative manner. Results  of the Risk-Screening Environmental Indicators are  not the same as a
quantitative risk estimate for a facility.  More refined analysis is required for calculating such an estimate,
using more detailed data for the facility and the site where it is  located, in order to characterize actual
risks for individuals and/or sensitive subpopulations (e.g., children, the elderly, etc.).  The Help Screens
in the model will  assist you in identifying other important caveats  and limitations which pertain to
interpreting the results of this model.
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       9.  THE STEP BY STEP PROCESS OF USING THE INDICATORS MODEL:
          EXAMPLES USING RELEASES IN A DEFINED GEOGRAPHIC AREA

       The following examples lead you through the step-by-step process of using the Indicators model
to perform a variety of operations. The examples use a defined geographic area (such as your county)
and examine impacts from fugitive and stack air releases. Each example demonstrates different uses of
the model. The specific examples and types of investigations that are demonstrated are:

       Example 1:          Comparing the number of pounds released (TRI Pounds) with the number
                          of pounds that can be modeled using the Indicators method (Modeled
                          Pounds) for a given geographic region

       Example 2:          Comparing county-specific scores with national scores

       Example 3:          Examining chemical-specific scores and information

       Example 4:          Performing trends analyses

       Example 5:          Ranking scores among manufacturing facilities

Refer to previous chapters for detailed discussions of the processes demonstrated below.

9.1     Example 1:  Compare Pounds Released (TRI Pounds) with Modeled Pounds

  Analysis:

       For many analyses, you may wish to compare the actual pounds released, as reported to the TRI,
       with modeled pounds to determine what portion of the reported  releases can be modeled using
       the Indicators model. (See Chapter 7 for the reasons that reported releases might not be able to
       be modeled.) The following section describes the process of comparing the two types of results
       (TRI Pounds and Modeled Pounds) for a given county to understand these differences.

  Processes demonstrated:

       Creating new data tables
       Subsetting data by geographic region and year
       Selecting row and column variables
       Displaying release data

  Step-by-Step Query Process:

       1. Create a new table
             Click on
                       New Query
in the initial Indicators screen to open up the Indicator Element
             Aggregation screen. Enter a file name under Save to replace the name Newfile.

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       2.  Subset your data for a county (e.g., your county) and for the 1994 reporting year
              Click on  subset Data  to bring up the Enter Search Parameters... screen.  To choose
              your county, select county from the list in the Available Search section of the Enter
              Search Parameters...screen.
              Click on   Add criteria    L which will bring up the Add values to search for screen. Enter
              your county in the dialog box.   Click  j]  bk  j  to return  to  the  Enter  Search
              Parameters... screen. The criteria you added will appear in the Search: section of the
              Enter Search Parameters... screen

              Next, to limit the analysis to 1994 TRI data, repeat the above process used to subset your
              data to your county.  However, for this step of the process, substitute year for "county"
              and 1994 for your county. When finished, click jf  OK  ! to return to the Indicator
              Element Aggregation screen.

       3.  Select the row and column variables

              Select county as the row variable by clicking on the box next to F. County in the Select
              row variable(s) section of the screen.

              Select media as the column variable by clicking on the box next to M. Media Text in the
              Select column variable(s) portion of the screen. To run this analysis, click j  submit  j.

              After the analysis has been run, the Data Display screen will appear.

       4.  Display your data

              To display your results as pounds released, select TRI Pounds under Model Selected:
              in the Data Display screen.

              To display your results  as modeled pounds,  select Modeled Pounds under Model
              Selected: in the Data Display screen
  Results:
       Exhibit 9-1 shows sample results of this type of query. In this example, we chose Montgomery
       County, Maryland as our county. Recall that in this version of the model, full-model results are
       available only for fugitive and stack air releases.
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                                                            EXHIBIT 9-1
               Sample Results for TRI Released Pounds, Modeled Pounds, and  Full Model
                              Rows: County
                              Columns: Media Text
                              Size: 11 Cols x 1 Rows

                             Statistic selected: Pi7m
                                                       / Include subtotals
                                                         ISa IZLJ.VJ      Ssled Row |
                                                  Records I   Sorted j  Export j Heip I  SelectCol |
                                                   Model selected:  T
                                                Tjj Normalization: |j|
                                        1 FugtthisAir  2Sta*Aif  6 POTWTiansfer  710 Oftsits Storage Only   724 Qffeite Recyc. (Mftial Reeoireiy)  726 Offeits
                             MD.MONTGOMERY
Rows: County
Columns: Media Text
Size: 11 Cols x 1 Rows

Statistic selected: [sum
Cells show:    I value
                                                                                        j TTIfcfc       Select All
                                                                                           Ejjffl      i^^i
                                                                                        Sortei I  Export I  Heip j  SeledCol |
                                                j-J| Model selected;  Modeled Pounds
                                                Hi Normalisation:
                                        1 Fugitive Ail  2Sta*Ai!   6 PQTW Tfansfet  710 Offaite Storage Only   ^24 Oft it- Eei^c ^Metal ReoouervJ   728 Oftsits
                             MD.MONTOOMEP'
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                     Rows: County
                     Columns: Media Text
                     Size: 11 Cols x 1 Rows

                     Statistic selected: f
                     Cells show:
                                      J7 Include subtotals
   Model selected:
   Normalization:
                                               710 Offsite Storage Only
                                                         724 Oflsite Reeve, (Met,
Note:  The Indicators model saves your most recent query settings.  This is to facilitate setting criteria
for multiple queries that are similar to each other. When you exit the model, these settings are erased.
To clear the settings while still in the model, select the criteria to clear in the Available Search section
of the Enter Search Parameters... screen and click on |   niQar rritDria     to clear your criteria. Repeat
                        Clear criteria...
for all criteria you would like cleared.

9.2    Example 2: Comparison of County-Specific Scores with National Scores

  Analysis:

       The TRI full-model Indicator scores for 1994 air releases (both fugitive and stack air) for all
       reporting facilities in the U.S. and for all chemicals can be ranked on the basis of county to put
       the risk-related impacts for your county into a national perspective.

 Processes demonstrated:

       Creating new data tables
       Subsetting data by type of release (air), year, and geographic region
       Displaying risk-related impacts
       Sorting risk-related impacts

  Step-by-Step Query Process:

       1. Create a new table
               Click on
                         New Query
in the initial Indicators screen to open up the Indicator Element
               Aggregation screen.  Enter a filename under Save to replace the name Newfile.
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       2.  Subset your data for air releases and the 1994 reporting year
              Click on  subset Data  to bring up the Enter Search Parameters... screen.  To choose
              stack and fugitive air releases, select "Media" from the list in the Available Search
              section of the Enter Search Parameters...screen
              Click on   Mi criterja   L which will bring up the Add values to search for screen. Enter
              1 (for fugitive air releases) and 2 (for stack air releases) on separate lines of the dialog
              box. Click |[  ok   1 to return to the Enter Search Parameters... screen. The criteria you
              added will appear in the Search: section of the Enter Search Parameters... screen.

              Next, to limit the analysis to 1994 TRI data, repeat the above process used to subset your
              data to stack and air releases. However, for this step of the process, substitute "Year"
              for "Media" and enter "1994" instead of "1" and "2". When finished, click   OK   to
              return to the Indicator Element Aggregation screen.

       3.  Select the row and column variables

              Select County as the row variable by clicking on the box next to F. County in the Select
              row variable(s) section of the screen.

              Select media as the column variable by clicking on the box next to M. Media  Text in the
              Select column variable(s) portion of the screen.  Note that it is easier to subset media
              using the media codes in Appendix  C, to prevent misspelling  a  media name.  When
              choosing variables for reporting results, however, it is often more convenient to specify
              M. Media Text, to avoid having to refer to media codes (R. Media). To run this
              analysis, click |   submit \.

       4.  Sort your results by risk-related impacts for all air releases

              When your query has finished, you will see the Data Display screen. Select Full Model
              (Risk-Related) under Model Selected: in the Data Display screen. To select the Total
              column, click on a cell within that column in the Data Display screen, and then click on
              the Select Col button in the top right  corner of the screen. (Even though your selection
              isn't highlighted as blue, you are still  selecting this group of cells.)
              Click  Sorted I to sort the data. The rankings will appear in the Sorted Results screen
              that appears next. The ordinal ranking of your county compared with all counties in the
              U.S. appears under Rank and the percent risk-related ranking (compared with all sorted
              items) appears under Percent.
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Note: The Indicators model saves your most recent query settings. This is to facilitate setting criteria
for multiple queries that are similar to each other. When you exit the model, these settings are erased.
To clear the settings while still in the model, select the criteria to clear in the Available Search section
of the Enter Search Parameters... screen and click on    Ciear crjteria...   I to clear your criteria. Repeat
for all criteria you would like cleared.

9.3    Example 3: Examining Chemical-Specific Scores

   Ranking Risk-Related Impacts

       Analysis:

       To understand which chemicals result in the highest risk-related impacts, a ranking of Full-model
       Indicator scores can be done for all chemicals released to air.
       Processes demonstrated:

       Creating new data tables
       Subsetting data
       Sorting  data

       Step-by-Step Query Process:

       1.  Create a new table

              Click on  New QUery  j in the initial Indicators screen to open up the Indicator Element

              Aggregation screen. Enter a file name under Save to replace the name Newfile.

       2.  Subset your data for air releases, the 1994 reporting year, and your county
              Click on   subset Data  to bring up the Enter Search Parameters... screen.  To choose
              stack and fugitive air releases, select media from the list in the Available Search section
              of the Enter Search Parameters...screen.
              Click on   Add criteria...  I which will bring up the Add values to search for screen.  Enter
                                  j
              1 (for fugitive air releases) and 2 (for stack air releases) on separate lines of the dialog
              box. Click   OK    to return to the Enter Search Parameters... screen.  The criteria
              you added will appear in the Search: section of the Enter Search Parameters... screen.

              Repeat the above process to limit your analysis to the year 1994, but substitute "Year"
              for "Media" and enter "1994" instead of "1" and "2".

              Repeat the process a second time, but substitute "County" for "Year", and your county
              instead of "1994".

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              When finished, click p  OK  1 to return to the Indicator Element Aggregation screen.

       3.  Select the row and column variables for your data table

              Select chemical as the row variable by clicking on the box next to C. Chemical in he
              Select row variable(s) section of the screen.

              Select media as the column variable by clicking on the box next to M. Media Text in the
              Select column variable(s) portion of the screen.  Note that it is easier to subset media
              using the media codes in Appendix  C,  to  prevent misspelling a media name. When
              choosing variables for reporting results, however, it is often more convenient to specify
              M. Media  Text,  to avoid having to refer to  media codes (R. Media).  To run this
              analysis, click |  submit

       4.  Sort your results by risk-related impacts for all air releases

              Select Full Model (Risk-Related) under Model Selected: in the Data Display screen.
              To select the Total column, click on a cell within that column in the Data Display screen,
              and then click on the Select Col button in the top right corner of the screen.  (Even
              though your selection isn't highlighted as blue, you are still selecting this group of cells.)
              Click  SortedJ to sort the data. The rankings will appear in the Sorted Results screen
              that appears next. The ordinal ranking appears under Rank and the percent risk-related
              ranking (compared with all sorted items) appears under Percent.
       Results:
              Rankings of the five chemicals with the highest  risk-related impacts from stack-air
              releases and the percent of relative risk-based impacts attributed to these chemicals for
              a sample county are shown in Exhibit 9-2.
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                                        EXHIBIT 9-2
         Relative Risk-Based Ranking of TRI Chemicals (On-Site Stack Air Releases)
                  Sorted Results
                  Scores sorted in descending order..
                                              [_|n|x

                                             Print
                DFreon 11
                  1,1,1-Trichloroethane
                  Acrylarnide
                  Acrylic acid
                  Ethylene glycol
                  Zinc compounds
                                             20.201 '
                                              2.184'
                                              1.114'
                                               0.59'
                                              0.035'
       Obtaining Toxicity Weights

       The toxicity weight assigned to a chemical plays an important role in the calculation of its relative
       risk-based impacts.

       Processes Demonstrated:

       Examining chemical data
       Step-by-Step Process:

       Click on    Data
in the initial Indicators screen.  Then click on Chemical in the screen that
       appears next to bring up the screen titled Chemical Information. You can use the scroll bar on
       the right to scroll through the table to find your chemicals, or you may use the arrow keys in the
       upper left-hand corner of the screen to move between chemical records and to move to the top
       and bottom of the list of records.

       After you have found the chemical names, use the horizontal scroll bar to find the column labeled
       Inhale-Tox Weight to obtain the toxicity weight for the chemical for the inhalation pathway.
       Then locate Toxicity Class - Inhale to determine whether the weight is based on a cancer or
       noncancer health endpoint.
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       Results:

       Exhibit 9-3 provides sample toxicity weightings and the most sensitive endpoint for each chemical
       listed in Exhibit 9-2.

                                           EXHIBIT 9-3
                      Toxicity Weights for Chemicals Listed in Exhibit 9-2
Chemical
Freon 113
1,1,1 -Trichloroethane
Acrylamide
Acrylic acid
Ethylene glycol
Zinc compounds
Inhale-Tox
Weight
0.017
1.8
9300
1800
0.25
1.7
Toxicity Class-
Inhale1
non-carcinogen
non-carcinogen
carcinogen
non-carcinogen
non-carcinogen
non-carcinogen
        The single, most sensitive endpoint is the toxicological basis on which the chemical is weighted. This chronic human
       health endpoint may be either a cancer or noncancer effect (many noncancer effects are considered for a particular
       chemical). For a given exposure pathway, ranking may be based on either type of effect (or both may give the same score).
       This does not imply that the chemical does not exhibit a particular health endpoint, only that other chronic endpoints were
       not as potent.

Note:  The Indicators model saves your most recent query settings. This is to facilitate setting criteria
for multiple queries that are similar to each other. When you exit the model, these  settings are erased.
To clear the settings while still in the model, select the criteria to clear in the Available Search section
of the Enter Search Parameters... screen and click on
                                                         Clear criteria...
                       to clear your criteria. Repeat
for all criteria you would like cleared.
9.4    Example 4: Year to Year Comparisons in Risk-Related Impacts

  Analysis:

       Comparing risk-related impacts across years gives an idea about whether these impacts may be
       decreasing, increasing or whether there is no apparent pattern.  This example examines the
       impacts from air releases in your county for the time period 1988 to 1997.
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  Processes demonstrated:

       Creating a new data table
       Subsetting data
       Displaying your data
       Graphing results

  Step-by-Step Query Process:

       1.  Create a new table
              Click on   hbrt Query | in the initial Indicators screen to open up the Indicator Element

              Aggregation screen.  Enter a file name under Save to replace the name Newfile.

       2.  Subset your data for air releases and your county
              Click on  subset Data  to bring up the Enter Search Parameters... screen. To choose
              stack and fugitive air releases, select media from the list in the Available Search section
              of the Enter Search Parameters...screen
              Click on   Atj() criterja    L which will bring up the Add values to search for screen. Enter

              1 (for fugitive air releases) and 2 (for stack air releases) on separate lines of the dialog
              box. Click   OK   to return to the Enter Search Parameters... screen. The criteria you
              added will appear in the Search: section of the Enter Search Parameters... screen.

              Repeat the process a second time, but substitute "County" for "Media", and enter your
              county instead of "1" and "2".

              When finished, click '  OK   to return to the Indicator Element Aggregation screen.

       3.  Select the row and column variables for your data table

              Select media (e.g., fugitive releases and stack air releases) as the row variable by clicking
              on the box next to M. Media Text in the Select row variable(s) section of the screen.
              Note that it is easier to subset media using the media codes in Appendix C, to prevent
              misspelling a media name. When choosing variables for reporting results, however, it is
              often more convenient to specify M. Media Text, to avoid having to refer to media codes
              (R. Media)

              Select chemical and year as the column variables by clicking on the box next to R. Year
              and C. Chemical in the Select column variable(s) portion of the screen.
              To run this analysis, click |  submit  |.


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       4.  Selecting the method to express results

              To obtain results expressed as pounds released as reported to TRI, choose TRI Pounds
              from the pull-down menu under Model selected: option.

              To obtain risk-related results, choose Full Model (Risk-Related) from the pull-down
              menu under Model selected: option.

       5.      Graphing the results of your query

              To graph the results of your data query, highlight the results you want graphed and then
              click on
in the Data Display screen.  You will have to produce two separate graphs
               one for results expressed as TRI Pounds and one for results expressed as Full Model
              (Risk-Related). A simple type of graph you may wish to use to display these data is a two-
              dimensional bar graph.

Note: The Indicators model saves your most recent query settings. This is to facilitate setting criteria
for multiple queries that are similar to each other. When you exit the model, these settings are erased.
To clear the settings while still in the model, select the criteria to clear in the Available Search section
of the Enter Search Parameters... screen and click on    Ciear crjterja   1 to clear your criteria. Repeat

for all criteria you would like cleared.


9.5    Example 5: Ranking Risks Among Manufacturing Facilities

  Analysis:

       This analysis describes how you would model the fugitive and stack air emissions for facilities
       in your county from the first year of TRI data reporting (1988) through the 1997 reporting year.
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  Step-by-Step Query Process:

       1.      Create a new data table
              Click on  New Query I in the initial Indicators screen to open up the Indicator Element

              Aggregation screen. Enter a file name under Save to replace the name Newfile.

       2.      Subset your data for air releases and your county
              Click on  subset Data  to bring up the Enter Search Parameters... screen.  To choose
              stack and fugitive air releases, select media from the list in the Available Search section
              of the Enter Search Parameters...screen
              Click on   Mi criterja    L which will bring up the Add values to search for screen. Enter
              1 (for fugitive air releases) and 2 (for stack air releases) on separate lines of the dialog
              box. Click   OK   to return to the Enter Search Parameters... screen. The criteria you
              added will appear in the Search: section of the Enter Search Parameters... screen.

              Repeat the above process to limit your analysis to your county, but substitute "County"
              for "Media" and enter your county instead of "1" and "2".

              When finished, click   OK   to return to the Indicator  Element Aggregation screen.

       3.      Select the row and column variables for your data table

              Select chemical as the row variable by clicking on the box next to C. Chemical in the
              Select row variable(s) section of the screen.

              Select media as the column variable by clicking on the box next to M. Media Text in the
              Select column variable(s) portion of the screen. Note that it is easier to subset media
              using the media codes in Appendix C, to prevent misspelling a media name.  When
              choosing variables for reporting results, however, it is often more convenient to specify
              M. Media Text, to avoid having to refer to  media codes (R. Media).  To run this
              analysis, click |   submit  |.
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       4.
Sort your results for each type of air release
         a.   Select Full Model (Risk-Related) under Model Selected: in the Data Display screen.
              Then select the column for Media 1 in the Data Display screen by clicking the left mouse
              button at the top of the column and dragging to the bottom of the column.

              Click  Sorted J to sort the data.  The rankings will appear in the Sorted Results screen
              that appears next. When the sorted table appears on the screen, it may be necessary to
              format the table to fit on one page.  Use the mouse to move to the right-hand border of
              the heading of the column you wish to size, until the arrow becomes a double line with
              two arrows. You can then move the mouse to the left to make the column narrower. The
              ordinal ranking appears under Rank and the percent risk-related ranking (compared with
              all sorted items) appears under Percent.
              Press the   prjnt   button to see a preview of your table.  To print all pages, click on the
              "Print all" button at the top of the screen. To print only certain pages, click on the "Add
              nl" button at the top of the screen.

         b.    Repeat the above process by substituting TRIPounds for Full Model (Risk-Related).

         c.    Repeat the processes in a and b for Media 2.

Note: The Indicators model saves your most recent query settings. This is to facilitate setting criteria
for multiple queries that are similar to each other. When you exit the model, these settings are erased.
To clear the settings while still in the model, select the criteria to clear in the Available Search section
of the Enter Search Parameters... screen and click on

for all criteria you would like cleared.
                                        clear criteria...   to clear Your criteria. Repeat
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                    10. MODEL RUNS AVAILABLE ON THE CD-ROM
       The following exhibit presents the filenames and descriptions of model runs (queries) that have
already been run. These runs are available on the accompanying CD ROM which contains the Indicators
model. You may wish to use these runs for some analyses instead of conducting new queries using the
Indicators model.   You may either  copy the runs  onto your hard  drive  (into  the subdirectory
c:\oppteim\user) or load the runs directly from the CD.  See the installation instructions on page iv for
further details.  If you are loading runs directly from the CD, use the  Load from CD | button in the initial
Indicators model screen.  Note that sometimes when you click on Load from CD |, the available files will not
be shown.  In this case, click on CANCEL, then click on Load from CD | again to view the files. If you have
already copied the runs onto your hard drive, use the    Load   button in the initial Indicators model
screen. You can sort the data in these files using the sort option in the Data Display screen. Please note
that you can view data in the first five files, the last two sets of files, and file CA-S-Y in Exhibit 10-1
geographically by clicking fj^fej in the Data Display screen.  You should keep in mind that the "Full
Model" results are available for only fugitive and stack air releases; the output for all other media can be
viewed for pounds or hazard-weighting only.
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                                       EXHIBIT 10-1
                              Descriptions of Pre-Run Queries
File Name
97A-C-M
AM97OSCM
AM97-C-M
97A-S-M
97A-S-C
97A-S2-M
97A-S2-C
CA-M-Y
CA-C-Y
CA-S-Y
ST97AS2C1
Subset of Data
1997; media (1,2)
1997; media
(1,2,3,401,402,520,530,5
40,560,590)
1997
1997; media (1,2)
1997; media (1,2)
1997; media (1,2)
1997; media (1,2)
core chemicals; media
(1,2)
core chemicals; media
(1,2)
core chemicals; media
(1,2)
1997; media (1,2)
Rows : Columns
chemical : media text
chemical : media text
chemical : media text
state : media text
state : chemical
EPA 2-digit SIC : media
text
EPA 2-digit SIC :
chemical
media text : year
chemical : year
state : year
EPA 2-digit SIC :
chemical
Description
This file shows the sum of all 1997 air
releases (stack and fugitive) by
chemical and release medium.
This file shows the sum of all 1997
on-site releases and transfers by
chemical and medium.
This file shows the sum of all 1997
releases and transfers by chemical and
release medium.
This file show the sum of all 1997 air
releases (stack and fugitive) by state
and release medium.
This file show the sum of all 1997 air
releases (stack and fugitive) by state
and chemical.
This file shows the sum of all 1997 air
releases (stack and fugitive) by two-
digit EPA SIC code and release
medium.
This file shows the sum of all 1997 air
releases (stack and fugitive) by two-
digit EPA SIC code and chemical.
This file shows the sum of all air
releases (stack and fugitive) by release
medium and year for chemicals
common to all reporting years.
This file shows the sum of all air
releases (stack and fugitive) by
chemical and year for chemicals
common to all reporting years.
This file shows the sum of all air
releases (stack and fugitive) by state
and year for chemicals common to all
reporting years.
For a given state, this file shows the
sum of all 1997 air releases (stack and
fugitive) by 2-digit EPA SIC code and
chemical.
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File Name
ST97AS2M '
ST91A-MC l
STCA-M-Y '
Subset of Data
1997; media (1,2)
1997; media (1,2)
core chemicals; media
(1,2)
Rows : Columns
EPA 2-digit SIC : media
text
media text : chemical
media text : year
Description
For a given state, this file shows the
sum of all 1997 air releases (stack and
fugitive) by 2-digit EPA SIC code and
release medium.
For a given state, this file shows the
sum of all 1997 air releases (stack and
fugitive) by release medium and
chemical.
For a given state, this file shows the
sum of all air releases (stack and
fugitive) by release medium and year
for chemicals common to all reporting
years.
       'Note that "5*7" in these four file names represents the individual state postal code.  These runs have been
performed for the 50 states, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia.  American Samoa and Guam
are not included in the present model version.

       The Windows 3.1 (16-bit) version of the Indicators Model uses DOS nomenclature rules for
filenames (8 alpha-numeric characters). This limitation can make it difficult to determine what query is
addressed by each run (although the model will display the subsetting and variables once  a  run is
selected).

       Experimentation by EPA has resulted in the development of a naming approach that may help
users identify types of queries by their filenames. First, the variable for a series of runs differing by a
single variable (e.g., state postal code), is listed. Next, any subsetting which has been performed is coded,
giving preference to  a defined year or medium of release.  Codes useful for this purpose are shown in
Exhibit 10-2.  Last,  the variables the query incorporates are listed, after  a hyphen if space allows.
Commonly used examples of these codes are shown in Exhibit 10-3.  This  approach has been used in
naming the pre-run queries shown above in Exhibit 10-1. It is important to note that in this set of pre-run
queries, one other code has been used, AM, for two queries.  This code refers to the fact that the air-only
version of the model, as described in this User's Manual, was used to conduct these runs, and therefore
full risk-related model results are available only for air releases.  In the future, when the multi-media
version of the model is available and identical queries are performed, a code of MM, to indicate  multi-
media, will be used instead of AM.
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                                     EXHIBIT 10-2
                             Codes for Subsetting Parameters
Subsetting
Parameter
year
core chemicals
air
water
on-site releases
all modeled media
state postal code
EPA Region
Code
91 for 1997
c
a
w
OS
mm
mdfor Maryland
W for Region 10
                                     EXHIBIT 10-3
                                     Example Codes
Query Variable
chemical
media text
year
2-digit EPA SIC code
3 -digit EPA SIC code
county
state
EPA Regions
facility i.d. or name
Code
c
m
y
s2
s3
ct
s
r
f
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                                   11. REFERENCES

Barnes, Donald (principal author). 1988. Background Document 1; Reference Dose (RfD): Description
       and Use in Health Risk Assessments. U.S. EPA. RfD Workgroup.

Boubel, R.W., D. L. Fox, D. B. Turner, and A.C. Stern. 1994. Fundamentals of Air Pollution.   3rd ed.
       Academic Press, San Diego.

U.S.DOI,FWS. 1993. National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife Associated Recreation. U.S.
       Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. March.

U.S. EPA.  1994.  Methods for Derivation of Inhalation Reference Concentrations and Application of
       Inhalation Dosimetry.  Office of Research and Development.  Washington, D.C.  EPA/600/8-
       90/066F.  October.

U.S. EPA.   1997a.    Toxic Release Inventory Relative  Risk-Based Environmental Indicators
       Methodology.  Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics. June.

U.S. EPA.  1997b.  Toxics  Release Inventory Relative Risk-Based Indicators:  Interim  Toxicity
       Weighting Summary Document. Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics. June.

U.S. EPA. 1998.  1996 Toxics Release Inventory: Public Data Release - Ten Years of Right-to-Know.
       Office of Pollution Prevent on and Toxics. EPA 745-R-98-005. May.

U.S.EPA. 1999.  1997 Toxics Release Inventory. Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics. EPA745-
       R-99-003. April.
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          APPENDIX A.  STANDARD INDUSTRIAL CLASSIFICATION CODES
       Exhibit A-l presents the twenty 2-digit and 140 3-digit EPA SIC codes and their
corresponding industries.

                                     EXHIBIT A-l
                      2-Digit and 3-Digit SIC Codes for TRI Facilities
SIC Code
20
201
202
203
204
205
206
207
208
209
21
211
212
213
214
22
221
222
223
224
225
Industry
Food and Kindred Products
Meat Products
Dairy Products
Canned, Frozen, and Preserved Fruits, Vegetables, and Food Specialties
Grain Mill Products
Bakery Products
Sugar and Confectionery Products
Fats and Oils
Beverages
Miscellaneous Food Preparations and Kindred Products
Tobacco Products
Cigarettes
Cigars
Chewing and Smoking Tobacco and Snuff
Tobacco Stemming and Redrying
Textile Mill Products
Broadwoven Fabric Mills, Cotton
Broadwoven Fabric Mills, Manmade Fiber and Silk
Broadwoven Fabric Mills, Wool (Including Dyeing and Finishing)
Narrow Fabric and Other Smallwares Mills: Cotton, Wool, Silk, and
Manmade Fiber
Knitting Mills
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SIC Code
226
227
228
229
23
231
232
233
234
235
236
237
238
239
24
241
242
243
244
245
249
25
251
252
253
254
Industry
Dyeing and Finishing Textiles,
Except Wool Fabrics and Knit Goods
Carpets and Rugs
Yarn and Thread Mills
Miscellaneous Textile Goods
Apparel and Other Finished
Similar Materials
Men's and Boys' Suits, Coats,
Products Made from Fabrics and
and Overcoats
Men's and Boys' Furnishings, Work Clothing, and Allied Garments
Women's, Misses', and Juniors' Outerwear
Women's, Misses', Children's,
and Infants' Undergarments
Hats, Caps, and Millinery
Girls', Children's, and Infants'
Outerwear
Fur Goods
Miscellaneous Apparel and Accessories
Miscellaneous Fabricated Textile Products
Lumber and Wood Products
, Except Furniture
Logging
Sawmills and Planing Mills
Millwork, Veneer, Plywood, and Structural Wood Members
Wood Containers
Wood Buildings and Mobile Homes
Miscellaneous Wood Products
Furniture and Fixtures
Household Furniture
Office Furniture
Public Building and Related Furniture
Partitions, Shelving, Lockers, and Office and Store Fixtures
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SIC Code
259
26
261
262
263
265
267
27
271
272
273
274
275
276
277
278
279
28
281
282
283
284
285
286
287
Industry
Miscellaneous Furniture and Fixtures
Paper and Allied Products
Pulp Mills
Paper Mills
Paperboard Mills
Paperboard Containers and Boxes
Converted Paper and Paperboard Products, Except Containers and
Boxes
Printing, Publishing, and Allied Industries
Newspapers: Publishing, or Publishing and Printing
Periodicals: Publishing, or Publishing and Printing
Books
Miscellaneous Publishing
Commercial Printing
Manifold Business Forms
Greeting Cards
Blankbooks, Looseleaf Binders, and Bookbinding and Related Work
Service Industries for the Printing Trade
Chemicals and Allied Products
Industrial Inorganic Chemicals
Plastics Materials and Synthetic Resins, Synthetic Rubber, Cellulosic and
Other Manmade Fibers, Except Glass
Drugs
Soap, Detergents, and Cleaning Preparations; Perfumes, Cosmetics, and
Other Toilet Preparations
Paints, Varnishes, Lacquers, Enamels, and Allied Products
Industrial Organic Chemicals
Agricultural Chemicals
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SIC Code
289
29
291
295
299
30
301
302
305
306
308
31
311
313
314
315
316
317
319
32
321
322
323
324
325
326
Industry
Miscellaneous Chemical Products
Petroleum Refining and Related Industries
Petroleum Refining
Asphalt Paving and Roofing Materials
Miscellaneous Products of Petroleum and Coal
Rubber and Miscellaneous Plastics Products
Tires and Inner Tubes
Rubber and Plastics Footwear
Gaskets, Packing, and Sealing Devices and Rubber and Plastics Hose
and Belting
Fabricated Rubber Products, Not Elsewhere Classified
Miscellaneous Plastics Products
Leather and Leather Products
Leather Tanning and Finishing
Boot and Shoe Cut Stock and Findings
Footwear, Except Rubber
Leather Gloves and Mittens
Luggage
Handbags and Other Personal Leather Goods
Leather Goods, Not Elsewhere Classified
Stone, Clay, Glass, and Concrete Products
Flat Glass
Glass and Glassware, Pressed or Blown
Glass Products, Made of Purchased Glass
Cement, Hydraulic
Structural Clay Products
Pottery and Related Products
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SIC Code
327
328
329
33
331
332
333
334
335
336
339
34
341
342
343
344
345
346
347
348
349
35
351
352
353
Industry
Concrete, Gypsum, and Plaster Products
Cut Stone and Stone Products
Abrasive, Asbestos, and Miscellaneous Nonmetallic Mineral Products
Primary Metal Industries
Steel Works, Blast Furnaces, and Rolling and Finishing Mills
Iron and Steel Foundries
Primary Smelting and Refining of Nonferrous Metals
Secondary Smelting and Refining of Nonferrous Metals
Rolling, Drawing, and Extruding of Nonferrous Metals
Nonferrous Foundries (Castings)
Miscellaneous Primary Metal Products
Fabricated Metal Products, Except Machinery and Transportation
Equipment
Metal Cans and Shipping Containers
Cutlery, Handtools, and General Hardware
Heating Equipment, Except Electric and Warm Air; and Plumbing
Fixtures
Fabricated Structural Metal Products
Screw Machine Products, and Bolts, Nuts, Screws, Rivets, and Washers
Metal Forgings and Stampings
Coating, Engraving, and Allied Services
Ordnance and Accessories, Except Vehicles and Guided Missiles
Miscellaneous Fabricated Metal Products
Industrial and Commercial Machinery and Computer Equipment
Engines and Turbines
Farm and Garden Machinery and Equipment
Construction, Mining, and Materials Handling Machinery and Equipment
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SIC Code
354
355
356
357
358
359
36
361
362
363
364
365
366
367
369
37
371
372
373
374
375
376
379
38
381
Industry
Metalworking Machinery and Equipment
Special Industry Machinery, Except Metalworking Machinery
General Industrial Machinery and Equipment
Computer and Office Equipment
Refrigeration and Service Industry Machinery
Miscellaneous Industrial and Commercial Machinery and Equipment
Electronic and Other Electrical Equipment and Components,
Except Computer Equipment
Electric Transmission and Distribution Equipment
Electrical Industrial Apparatus
Household Appliances
Electric Lighting and Wiring Equipment
Household Audio and Video Equipment, and Audio Recordings
Communications Equipment
Electronic Components and Accessories
Miscellaneous Electrical Machinery, Equipment, and Supplies
Transportation Equipment
Motor Vehicles and Motor Vehicle Equipment
Aircraft and Parts
Ship and Boat Building and Repairing
Railroad Equipment
Motorcycles, Bicycles, and Parts
Guided Missiles and Space Vehicles and Parts
Miscellaneous Transportation Equipment
Measuring, Analyzing, and Controlling Instruments; Photographic,
Medical and Optical Goods; Watches and Clocks
Search, Detection, Navigation, Guidance, Aeronautical, and Nautical
Systems, Instruments, and Equipment
Version 1.02
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SIC Code
382
384
385
386
387
39
391
393
394
395
396
399
Industry
Laboratory Apparatus and Analytical, Optical, Measuring, and
Controlling Instruments
Surgical, Medical, and Dental Instruments and Supplies
Ophthalmic Goods
Photographic Equipment and Supplies
Watches, Clocks, Clockwork Operated Devices, and Parts
Miscellaneous Manufacturing Industries
Jewelry, Silverware, and Plated Ware
Musical Instruments
Dolls, Toys, Games and Sporting and Athletic Goods
Pens, Pencils, and Other Artists' Materials
Costume Jewelry, Costume Novelties, Buttons, and Miscellaneous
Notions, Except Precious Metal
Miscellaneous Manufacturing Industries
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                                   APPENDIX B. EPA REGIONS
Region 1 - responsible within the states of Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and
Vermont.

Region 2 - responsible within the states of New Jersey, New York and the territories of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin
        Islands.

Region 3 - responsible within the states of Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, and the
        District of Columbia.

Region 4 - responsible within the states of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South
        Carolina, and Tennessee .

Region 5 - responsible within the states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin .

Region 6 - responsible within the states of Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas.

Region 7 - responsible within the states of Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska.

Region 8 - responsible within the states of Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah, and Wyoming

Region 9 - responsible within the states of Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada, and the territories of Guam and
        American Samoa.

Region 10 - responsible within the  states of Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington.
Version 1.02
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                APPENDIX C. ADDITIONAL FACILITY INFORMATION
       The following exhibits present descriptions of codes used in the model. Exhibit C-l presents the
environmental media release codes and descriptions of the associated releases. It also lists which codes
can be grouped together to represent  categories  of reporting as identified in the 1997 Public Data
Release.  (Note that occasionally facilities report releases to media codes that are not listed in the current
TRI Form R or in any previous forms.  These releases cannot be modeled, but are reported in Indicator
runs.) Exhibit C-2 presents the score category codes which describe details related to the media releases,
and whether the release can be modeled using environmental fate and transport models. Exhibit C-3
presents the maximum onsite and chemical use codes. The codes associated with individual facilities can
be viewed using the INSPECT button in the initial Indicators screen.  Also, when conducting  new
queries, the codes can be used to subset your data.

                                       EXHIBIT C-l
                                     Media Information
Release Code
(R. Media)
1*
2*
3*
6*,**
400
401
402
510*
520*
530*
Description of Release
Fugitive Air
Stack Air
Direct Water
POTW Transfer
Underground Injection (All Well
Classes); this code is used for data
reported from 1988 to 1995
Underground Injection (Class 1);
this code is used for data reported in
1996 and later years
Underground Injection (Class 2);
this code is used for data reported in
1996 and later years
Onsite Landfill; this code is used for
data reported from 1988 to 1995
Land Treatment/ Application/
Farming
Surface Impoundment
1997 Public Data Release
Category in Which Release is
Located
Fugitive or Nonpoint Air Emissions
Stack or Point Air Emissions
Surface Water Discharges
Transfers to POTWs
Not Applicable
Underground Injection Class I
Wells
Underground Injection Class II-V
Wells
Not Applicable
On-site Land Releases (Other On-
site Land Releases)
On-site Land Releases (Other On-
site Land Releases)
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Release Code
(R. Media)
540*
560*
590
710
720
724
726
728
740
741
750*
754*
756
761
762
769
770*
Description of Release
Other Land Disposal
Other Landfills; this code is used for
data reported in 1996 and later years
RCRA Subtitle C Landfills; this code
is used for data reported in 1996 and
later years
Offsite Storage Only
Offsite Recycling (Solvents/Organics
Recovery)
Offsite Recycling (Metals Recovery)
Offsite Recycling (Other Reuse or
Recovery)
Offsite Recycling (Acid
Regeneration)
Offsite Treatment
(Solidification/Stabilization)
Solidification/Stabilization- metals
and metal compounds only
Offsite Incineration/Thermal
Treatment
Offsite Incineration (No fuel value)
Offsite Energy Recovery
Offsite Wastewater Treatment
(Excluding POTW)
Wastewater Treatment (Excluding
POTW) - metals and metal
compounds only
Offsite Other Waste Treatment
Offsite Landfill
1997 Public Data Release
Category in Which Release is
Located
On-site Land Releases (Other On-
site Land Releases)
On-site Land Releases (Other On-
site Land Releases)
On-site Land Releases (RCRA
Subtitle C Landfills)
Transfers Off-site to Disposal
Transfers to Recycling
Transfers to Recycling
Transfers to Recycling
Transfers to Recycling
Transfers to Treatment
Transfers Off-site to Disposal
Transfers to Treatment
Transfers to Treatment
Transfers to Energy Recovery
Transfers to Treatment
Transfers Off-site to Disposal
Transfers to Treatment
Transfers Off-site to Disposal
Version 1.02
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Release Code
(R. Media)
771
772*
773*
779*
790
791
792
793
794
795
799
Description of Release
Off site Underground Injection
Offsite Landfill/Surface
Impoundment
Offsite Land Treatment
Offsite Other Land Disposal
Offsite Other Management
Transfers to Waste Broker; this code
is used for data reported from 1988
to 1990
Offsite Transfer to Broker (Energy
Recovery)
Offsite Transfer to Broker
(Recycling)
Offsite Transfer to Broker
(Disposal)
Offsite Transfer to Broker (Waste
Treatment)
Offsite (Unknown
Treatment/Disposal)
1997 Public Data Release
Category in Which Release is
Located
Transfers Off-site to Disposal
Transfers Off-site to Disposal
Transfers Off-site to Disposal
Transfers Off-site to Disposal
Transfers Off-site to Disposal
Not Applicable
Transfers to Energy Recovery
Transfers to Recycling
Transfers Off-site to Disposal
Transfers to Treatment
Transfers Off-site to Disposal
 * Indicates that full risk modeling is conducted for these release codes.
** Beginning with the 1991 reporting year, releases to POTWs are coded as 8 in Form R. To allow comparisons with
earlier years, however, these releases are still coded as 6 in the Indicators Model.
Version 1.02
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                                       EXHIBIT C-2
                                 Score Category Information
Score Category
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
Description
Unknown Error
Direct Fugitive Air - Rural
Direct Fugitive Air - Urban
Direct Point Air - Rural
Direct Point Air - Urban
Direct Water
Onsite Landfill
POTW Effluent
POTW Volatilization - Rural
POTW Volatilization - Urban
POTW Sludge Landfill
POTW Sludge Volat - Rural
POTW Sludge Volatilization - Urban
Offsite Incineration - Rural
Offsite Incineration - Urban
Offsite Landfill
Offsite Volatilization - Rural
Offsite Volatilization - Urban
Offsite treatment other
Cannot place Lat/Long
Cannot locate facility stream
Cannot locate POTW stream
No/Unmodeled treatment code
If Category is a release,
can it be modeled using
the environmental fate
and transport models?
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
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Score Category
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
Description
Error in CAS Number
No Toxicity Data
No POTW Removal Data
Direct Water - Fish Ingestion
POTW Effluent - Fish Ingestion
Reach data is suspect
Unable to find WBAN
No Incinerator Efficiency Data
Floating Point Exception
Missing Physical-Chemical Data
Unmodeled - Underground Injection
If Category is a release,
can it be modeled using
the environmental fate
and transport models?
No
No
No
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
No
No
Version 1.02
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                                      EXHIBIT C-3
                               Onsite Chemical Information
Activities and Uses of a Chemical at a Facility
Category
Manufacture (produce or import for on-site use/processing, for
sale/distribution, as a byproduct, or as an impurity)
Process (as a reactant, as a formulation component, as an article component,
or repackaging)
Otherwise Use (as a chemical processing aid, as a manufacturing aid, or for
ancillary or other use)
Manufacture and Process
Manufacture and Otherwise Use
Process and Otherwise Use
Manufacture, Process, and Otherwise Use
Code
M
P
OU
M/P
M/OU
P/OU
M/P/OU
Maximum Amount of a Chemical Onsite at Any Time During the Calendar Year
Range
0 to 99 Ibs
100to9991bs
1,000 to 9,999 Ibs
10,000 to 99,999 Ibs
100,000 to 999,999 Ibs
1,000,000 to 9,999,999 Ibs
10,000,000 to 49,999,999 Ibs
50,000,000 to 99,999,999 Ibs
100,000,000 to 499,999,999 Ibs
500,000,000 to 999,999,999 Ibs
1,000,000,000 Ibs or more
Code
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
Version 1.02
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                                         EXHIBIT C-4
                    State Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) Codes
Abbrev.
AK
L
AR
AS
AZ
CA
CO
CT
DC
DE
FL
GA
GU
HI
IA
ID
IL
IN
KS
KY
LA
MA
MD
ME
MI
MN
MO
FIPS
02
01
05
60
04
06
08
09
11
10
12
13
66
15
19
16
17
18
20
21
22
25
24
23
26
27
29
State Name
ALASKA
ALABAMA
ARKANSAS
AMERICAN SAMOA
ARIZONA
CALIFORNIA
COLORADO
CONNECTICUT
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
DELAWARE
FLORIDA
GEORGIA
GUAM
HAWAII
IOWA
IDAHO
ILLINOIS
INDIANA
KANSAS
KENTUCKY
LOUISIANA
MASSACHUSETTS
MARYLAND
MAINE
MICHIGAN
MINNESOTA
MISSOURI
Version 1.02
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Abbrev.
MS
MT
NC
ND
NE
NH
NJ
NM
NV
NY
OH
OK
OR
PA
PR
RI
SC
SD
TN
TX
UT
VA
VI
VT
WA
WI
WV
WY
FIPS
28
30
37
38
31
33
34
35
32
36
39
40
41
42
72
44
45
46
47
48
49
51
78
50
53
55
54
56
State Name
MISSISSIPPI
MONTANA
NORTH CAROLINA
NORTH DAKOTA
NEBRASKA
NEW HAMPSHIRE
NEW JERSEY
NEW MEXICO
NEVADA
NEW YORK
OHIO
OKLAHOMA
OREGON
PENNSYLVANIA
PUERTO RICO
RHODE ISLAND
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH DAKOTA
TENNESSEE
TEXAS
UTAH
VIRGINIA
VIRGIN ISLANDS
VERMONT
WASHINGTON
WISCONSIN
WEST VIRGINIA
WYOMING
Version 1.02
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           APPENDIX D.  PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROPERTY INFORMATION

       The following two exhibits present the physicochemical properties used for the 604 chemicals
currently included in the Indicators Model and the references for those properties. Exhibit D-1 provides
the CAS number, the chemical name, and  values for  15  parameters: the decay rate in air due to
photooxidation (Air Decay, hr-1), the organic carbon-water partition coefficient (Koc, milliliters/gram),
the decay rate in water due to hydrolysis or aerobic biodegradation (H2O Decay, hr-1), me ^ase IQ \Og
of the octanol-water  partition  coefficient  (LOGKow), the  soil-water partition coefficient  (Kd,
liter/kilogram), the water solubility (Water Solubility, milligrams/liter), the percent of the chemical that
is removed by a POTW (POTW Partition (Removal)), the percent of the chemical removed by a POTW
that partitions to sludge (POTW Partition (Sludge)), the percent of the chemical removed by a POTW
that volatilizes to the air (POTW Partition (Volat)), the percent of the chemical removed by a POTW that
biodegrades (POTW Partition (Biod)), the incinerator destruction/removal efficiency (Incinerator DRE,
percent)),  the bioconcentration  factor  (BCF, liter/kilogram),  the Henry's Law  Constant (Henry's,
atm-m^/mol), the  Maximum  Contaminant Level for drinking  water (MCL, milligram/liter), and the
molecular weight (Molecular Weight, gram/mole). Exhibit D-2 provides a code for the reference for each
value in Exhibit D-l. The codes are defined at the end of Exhibit D-2.
Version 1.02                                                              1988-1997 TRI data, am
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                                            Exhibit D-l Physicochemical Properties
CAS
50000
51036
51218
51285
51752
51796
52686
52857
53963
55185
55210
55389
55630
56235
56359
56382
57147
57330
57410
57578
57749
58899
59892
60093
60117
60344
60355
60515
61825
62533
62555
62566
62737
62748
62759
63252
64186
64675
64755
67561
67630
67663
67721
Chemical
Formaldehyde
Piperonyl butoxide
Fluorouracil (5-fluorouracil)
2,4-Dinitrophenol
Nitrogen mustard
Urethane (Ethyl carbamate)
Trichlorfon
Famphur
2-Acetylaminofluorene
N-Nitrosodiethylamine
Benzamide
Fenthion
Nitroglycerin
Carbon tetrachloride
Bis(tributyltin) oxide
Parathion
1,1-Dimethyl Hydrazine
Pentobarbital sodium
Phenytoin
beta-Propiolactone
Chlordane
Lindane
N-Nitrosomorpholine
4-Aminoazobenzene
4-Dimethylaminoazobenzene
Methyl hydrazine
Acetamide
Dimethoate
Amitrole
Aniline
Thioacetamide
Thiourea
Dichlorvos
Sodium fluoroacetate
N-Nitrosodimethylamine
Carbaryl
Formic acid
Diethyl sulfate
Tetracycline hydrochloride
Methanol
sopropyl alcohol
Chloroform
Hexachloroethane
Air Decay
0.335
0.291

0.00343
0.428
0.127
0.35
0.167
0.529
0.13
0.123

0.217
0.0000238
0.231
8.3
0.478


0.00212
0.0734
0.0413
0.404
0.393
1.32
6.71
0.119
0.214
0.119
0.3
0.119
0.238
0.0166

1.04
4.67
0.00286
0.106

0.00537
0.0607
0.000612
0.0000064
Koc
37


55.6
91
20
6

1380
43
13.4

468
110

10654
4


4
-27536
1081
1.14
618
7388
6
5

4.4
13.6
6
7
150

12
390
12.1
33.5

9
25
45
2188
H2O Decay
0.0165
0
0
0.00459
1.39
0.0000693
0.0103
0
0.000596
0.13
0.00818
0.000284
0.00928
0.000126
0
0.000722
0.00246
0
0
0.204
0.0000711
0.00111
0.206
0.00607
0.0117
0.00171
0.0165
0.000245
0.000596
0
0.0165
0.0165
0.00267
0
1.04
0.00206
0.0165
0.401
0
0.0165
0.0165
0.000596
0.000596
LOGKow
0.35
4.75
-0.89
1.67
0.91
-0.15
0.51
2.23
3.12
0.48
0.64
4.09
1.62
2.83

3.83
-1.19
2.1
2.47
-0.8
6
3.72
-0.44
3.41
4.58
-1.05
-1.26
0.78
-0.86
0.9
-0.26
-1.08
1.16
0.03
-0.57
2.36
-0.54
1.14
-1.3
-0.77
0.05
1.97
3.91
Kd
0


0
0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0

0
0


0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
Water
Solubility
400000


2787
-18836
480000
154000

5.29
93000
13500
7.5
1380
804.8
100
6.54
1000000

32
370000
0.056
7.3
861527
34.6
160
1000000
705000
280000
280000
-29536
163000
142000
10000

1000000
82.6
10000000
7000

1000000
1000000
7950
50
POTW
Dartition
'Removal)
92.07
97.02
45.42
75.45
99.1
45.43
92.07
76.4
57.53
22.14
92.07
96.12
75.4
92.57

98.36
75.12
46.83
48.63
95.91
98.72
75.38
45.43
65.22
95.55
75.08
92.06
45.49
45.42
92.09
45.56
75.06
75.26
75.08
45.46
93.29
92.06
95.12
45.42
92.07
92.07
70.8
77.49
POTW
Dartition
(Sludge)
0.37
40.57
2.38
0.98
0.071
2.38
0.37
1.36
8.26
6.55
0.37
17.71
0.95
2.12

8.93
0.83
3.14
4.05
0.22
61.52
16.79
2.38
11.73
36.86
0.83
0.36
2.42
2.38
0.38
2.37
0.83
0.86
0.83
2.38
0.85
0.36
0.22
2.38
0.36
0.37
1.34
23.01
POTW
Dartition
(Volat)
0
0
0
0.013
0.01
0
0
0
0
0.77
0
0.01
0
87.58

0
0.24
0
0
0
0.01
0.04
0
0
0
0.08
0
0
0
0.022
0.48
0
0.35
0.027
0.13
5.79
0
0.053
0
0.043
0.087
62.23
43.8
POTW
Partition
(Biod)
99.62
59.43
97.62
99.01
99.92
97.6
99.63
98.64
91.76
92.68
99.63
82.28
99.05
10.31

91.06
98.94
96.88
95.95
99.77
38.48
83.15
97.6
88.27
63.14
99.11
99.63
97.58
97.62
99.6
97.15
99.17
98.79
99.15
97.49
93.36
99.63
99.73
97.62
99.59
99.55
36.43
33.19
nciner-
ator ORE
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
BCF
1


9
4
0.5
0.71

171
1
1.8

10
20

478
0.043


0.45
-27536
1260
0.27
87
1780
0.09
0.06

0
19.9
0.71
0.1
7.76

0.22
33.9
0
4.37

3.02
0.65
8.3
138
Henrys
0.0000003
0
0
0.0000004
0.000008
0.0000001
0
0
0
0.0000036
0
0.0000015
0
0.0276

0.0000006
0.0000097
0
0
0.0000004
0.0000486
0.000002
0
0
0
0.0000303
0
0
0
0.0000019
0.0000064
0.0000002
0.0000139
0.0000011
0.0000018
0.00131
0.0000002
0.0000084
0
0.0000046
0.0000081
0.00367
0.00389
MCL













0.01






0
0



















0.1

Molecular
Weight
30
338.43
130.08
184
156
89
257
325.36
223
88
121
278.34
227
154

291.27
60
248.26
252.26
72
409.8
291
116.12
197
225
46
59
229.28
84.08
93.12
75
76.12
220.98
100.02
74.08
201.22
46.03
154
444.43
32.04
60.09
119.39
236.74
Version 1.02
November 15, 1999
D-2
            1988-1997 TRI data, am

-------
CAS
68122
68768
70304
71363
71432
71556
72435
72571
74839
74851
74873
74884
74908
74953
75003
75014
75058
75070
75092
75150
75218
75252
75274
75343
75354
75434
75445
75456
75558
75569
75638
75650
75683
75694
75718
75729
75865
75887
76017
76028
76062
76131
Chemical
N,N-Dimethylformamide
Triaziquone
Hexachlorophene
n-Butyl alcohol
Benzene
1,1,1 -Trichloroethane
Methoxychlor
Trypan blue
Bromomethane (Methyl bromide)
Ethylene
Chloromethane
Methyl iodide
Hydrogen cyanide
Methylene bromide
Chloroethane (Ethyl chloride)
Vinyl chloride
Acetonitrile
Acetaldehyde
Dichloromethane
Carbon disulfide
Ethylene oxide
Bromoform (Tribromomethane)
Dichlorobromomethane
Ethylidene dichloride
Vinylidene chloride
(1,1-dichloroethylene)
Dichlorofluoro methane
Phosgene
Chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22)
Propyleneimine
Propylene oxide
Bromotrifluoromethane (Halon
1301)
tert-Butyl alcohol
1 -Chloro-1 ,1 -difluoroethane
CFC-11 (trichlorofluoromethane)
CFC-12 (dichlorodifluoromethane)
Chlorotrifluoromethane
2-Methyllactonitrile
2-Chloro-1,1,1-trifluoroethane
Pentachloroethane
Trichloroacetyl chloride
Chloropicrin
Freon 113
Air Decay
0.0474
0.561
0.0113
0.0433
0.00761
0.0000707
0.34
0
0.000233
0.0621
0.000259
0.000713
0.000178
0.000448
0.00238
0.0393
0.000293
0.0427
0.000832
0
0.000416
0.000293
0.000212
0.00074
0.0385

0.0000004
0
0.348
0.0014
0
0.00646
0.0000083
0.000003
0.00018

0.00317

0


0.000001
Koc

20.2
288
72
31
179
80000
20.5
106
98
74
158
17.4
25
37.6
135
0.28
2.19
28
65
16
52
51
38.3
343

9.8
0
11
25
245
37
81.3
97.7
200



146.3


372
H2O Decay
0
0.00797
0.000102
0.0165
0.00379
0.000156
0.222
0
0.00144
0.015
0.00258
0.00258
0.000596
0.0000693
0.00076
0.000596
0.00258
0
0.00258
0.0000007
0.00241
0.000596
0.0000006
0.0000693
0.000596
0
7.28
0
0.00802
0.00198
0
0.000596
0
0.00012
0.000596
0
4.62
0
0
4.08
0
0.00012
LOGKow
-1.01
-0.13
7.54
0.88
2.13
2.49
5.08
-0.12
1.19
1.13
0.91
1.51
-0.25
1.7
1.43
1.62
-0.34
-0.34
1.25
2.14
-0.3
2.4
2
1.79
2.13
1.55
-0.71
0
0.13
0.03
1.86
0.35
2.05
2.53
2.16
1.65
-0.03
1.99
3.22
0.88
2.09
3.16
Kd

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0



0


0
Water
Solubility

0
140
-2336
1790
1495
0.04
0
15220
131
5325
13848
1000000
11930
5678
8800
74000
1000000
13030
1185
1000000
3100
6735
5500
2250
18800
0
0
1000000
400000
320
1000000
1397
1000
280

1000000

480

1620
170
POTW
Dartition
'Removal)
92.06
45.43
99.06
92.09
94.09
87.75
98.56
45.43
77.45
99.06
87.66
75.27
71.98
55.71
84.39
92.41
75.27
92.13
82.2
87.17
92.2
54.51
64.24
76.2
92.02
71.35
100
0
75.16
92.16
99.46
45.74
96.62
97.48
99.27
99.82
99.95
99.07
57.89
99.93
61.7
99.53
POTW
Dartition
(Sludge)
0.36
2.38
62.45
0.38
0.62
1.38
46.1
2.38
0.81
0.28
0.5
0.94
1.64
1.94
0.65
0.5
0.82
0.36
0.67
0.91
0.36
3.14
1.68
1.01
0.75
1.09
0
1.45
0.82
0.36
0.42
2.36
0.58
1.11
0.59
0.35
0.02
0.49
9.85
0.02
1.94
3.48
POTW
Dartition
(Volat)
0
0
0
0.087
18.34
93.82
0
0
73.7
91.49
53.59
70.35
1.84
30.77
82.45
91
0.82
0.61
31.44
84.73
1.18
21.06
49.67
71.3
90.06
87.5
0
81.23
0.35
0.88
98.83
1.05
97.85
97.47
98.58
99.01
0
98.66
57.59
0.01
80.16
95.47
POTW
Partition
(Biod)
99.63
97.6
37.55
99.53
81.04
4.8
53.91
97.6
25.49
8.23
45.92
28.71
96.63
67.29
16.9
8.51
98.35
99.03
67.13
14.37
98.45
75.8
48.63
27.69
9.19
11.41
100
17.76
98.83
98.76
0.74
96.57
1.56
1.43
0.82
0.63
99.98
0.86
32.56
99.96
17.89
1.05
nciner-
ator ORE
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
0
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99

99

99


99
BCF

0
0
2.75
4.27
8.91
8320
0
4.68
4.27
2.88
8.32
0.38
3.09
7.24
10
0.87
0.4
5.25
11.5
0.35
3.24
22.9
13.5
24.5

0
0
0.204
0.62
15.3
1.1
21.3
25
26



165


148
Henrys
0.0000001
0
0
0.0000088
0.00555
0.0172
0.0000001
0
0.00624
0.228
0.00882
0.00526
0.000133
0.000861
0.0111
0.0278
0.0000345
0.0000667
0.00325
0.0144
0.000148
0.000535
0.00212
0.00562
0.0261
0.00547
0.00892
0
0.0000141
0.000103
0.465
0.0000144
0.0719
0.097
0.343
1.38
0.0000001
0.271
0.00194
0.0000291
0.0032
0.526
MCL




0.01
0.2
0.04








0


0.01


0.1
0.1

0.01

















Molecular
Weight
73.09
231.25
406.92
74.12
78.11
133.42
345.65
960.83
94.95
28.05
50.49
141.95
27
174
64
62.5
41.05
44.05
84.94
76.14
44.05
252.77
163.8
98.96
96.95
120.92
98.92
86.47
57
58.08
149
74.12
100.5
137
121

85.1

202.29

164.38
187.38
Version 1.02
November 15, 1999
D-3
             1988-1997 TRI data, am

-------
CAS
76142
76153
76448
76879
77474
77736
77781
78488
78842
78875
78886
78922
78933
79005
79016
79061
79107
79118
79196
79210
79221
79345
79447
79469
80057
80159
80626
81072
81889
82280
82688
84742
85018
85449
86306
87627
87683
87865
88062
88755
88857
88891
90040
Chemical
CFC114
(1 ,2-dichloro,1 ,1 ,2,2-tetrafluoroetha
ne)
CFC 115 (chloropentafluoroethane)
Heptachlor
Triphenyltin hydroxide
Hexachlorocyclopentadiene
Dicyclopentadiene
Dimethyl sulfate
S,S,S-tributyltrithiophosphate
sobutyraldehyde
1 ,2-Dichloropropane
2,3-Dichloropropene
sec-Butyl alcohol
Methyl ethyl ketone
1,1,2-Trichloroethane
Trichloroethylene
Acrylamide
Acrylic acid
Chloroacetic acid
Thiosemicarbazide
Peracetic acid
Methyl chlorocarbonate
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane
Dimethylcarbamyl chloride
2-Nitropropane
4,4'-lsopropylidenediphenol
Cumene hydroperoxide
Methyl methacrylate
Saccharin (manufacturing)
C.I. Food Red 15
1 -Amino-2-methyl-anthraquinone
Quintozene
Dibutyl phthalate
Phenanthrene
Phthalic anhydride
N-Nitrosodiphenylamine
2,6-Xylidine
Hexachloro-1 ,3-butadiene
Pentachlorophenol
2,4,6-Trichlorophenol
2-Nitrophenol
Dinitrobutyl phenol (Dinoseb)
Picric acid
o-Anisidine
Air Decay
0
0
0.388

0.386
0.326
0.0104
0.213
0.159
0.00587
0.08
0.0529
0.00594
0.00195
0.0141
0
0.153
0.00186

0.0276
0
0.00179
0.381
0.0783
0.515
0.0293
0.351
0.381
0
0.173
0.0000434
0.0515

0.000786
0.545
1.16
0.000133
0.00274
0.00309
0.0544

0.000596
0.719
Koc
815
708
3475

2000

16

8
27
77
5.6
5.2
79
104
50
2.19
0.81

7.5
28.4
79
9.7
20
1288
23
22
46
274
8005
6060
160

36
1200
0
-28383
900
620
113

23.6
35
H2O Decay
0.17
0
0.00645
0
0.00206
0
0.578
0.00206
0.0165
0.0000977
0.00107
0.0165
0.0165
0.000146
0.00012
0
0.0165
0.0165
0
0.0887
2.04
0.0327
69.3
0.000596
0.0145
0.00258
0.00258
0.00258
0
0.00607
0.0000885
0.0155
0
1.54
0.00187
0.00565
0.000596
0.35
0.177
0.00258
0
0.000596
0.00563
LOGKow
2.82
2.47
5.5

5.04
3.51
0.16
5.75
0.74
2.25
2.42
0.61
0.29
1.89
2.42
-0.67
0.35
0.22
-1.67
-1.07
0.14
2.39
-0.72
0.93
3.32
2.16
1.38
0.91
1.95
4.07
4.64
4.72
4.46
1.6
3.13
2.17
4.78
5.12
3.69
1.79
3.56
1.33
1.18
Kd
0
0
0

0

0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
Water
Solubility
130
58
0.18
1
3.4
10
28000

89000
2700
2750
181000
223000
4420
1100
640000
1000000
6140000

712610
0
2962
0
17000
120
13900
15000
4000
0
0.33
0.55
13
0.816
6200
35
8240
3.2
14
800
2185
52
13200
6460
POTW
Dartition
'Removal)
99.91
99.9
99.3

98.78
96.68
96.97
99.88
92.23
67.88
65.86
92.08
92.13
39.79
80.97
92.06
92.07
92.06
45.42
92.06
99.63
33.23
100
75.73
85.68
76.21
92.38
75.13
46.43
86.22
89.86
99.22
94.11
99.3
57.77
47.12
94.82
96.2
91.33
53.42
46.36
22.17
75.19
POTW
Dartition
(Sludge)
1.75
0.93
50

44.83
7.24
0.14
37.22
0.37
1.83
2.31
0.37
0.37
3.59
1.52
0.36
0.37
0.37
2.38
0.36
0.05
6.38
0
0.83
6
1.29
0.41
0.85
2.91
24.3
48.35
29.61
33.95
0.081
8.34
3.25
47.54
56.27
10.51
2.15
25.39
6.86
0.88
POTW
Dartition
(Volat)
97.51
98.41
0.28

9.86
83.13
0.021
0
1.39
55.36
49.56
0.098
0.53
54.49
90.97
0
0.011
0
0
0.022
0.82
34.85
0
2.5
0
0
2.23
0
0
0
0.52
0
0.18
0
0.052
0.17
18.49
0
0.077
23.96
0.3
0
0
POTW
Partition
(Biod)
0.74
0.66
49.72

45.31
9.63
99.84
62.79
98.24
42.81
48.15
99.54
99.11
41.92
7.51
99.64
99.62
99.64
97.62
99.62
99.13
58.8
100
96.66
94
98.71
97.36
99.15
97.07
75.7
51.14
70.38
65.87
99.91
91.6
96.58
33.97
43.73
89.41
73.89
74.29
93.14
99.12
nciner-
ator ORE
99
99
99

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99

99
99
99
99
99
99
99

99
99
BCF
82
61
9550

465

79.4

7.9
10
1.2
1.71
1
10
17
1
0.8
0.9

0.12
0
8
0
10
10
8.51
6.6
2.88
17.9
1150
590
20.9

9.68
217
28
11400
766
310
13.5

1
4.6
Henrys
2.8
2.66
0.00148

0.027
0.0625
0.000004
0.0000003
0.00018
0.00282
0.00228
0.0000091
0.0000569
0.000824
0.00985
0
0.0000002
0
0
0.0000021
0.00235
0.000367
0.0000007
0.000119
0
0
0.000337
0
0
0
0.00008
0.0000018
0.000036
0
0.0000012
0.0000025
0.0103
0
0.0000078
0.000589
0.0000044
0
0.0000001
MCL


0

0.05




0.01



0.01
0.01






















0


0.01


Molecular
Weight
171
154
373.35
367.03
273
132.21
126
314.5
72
113
111
74.12
72
133
131
71
72
94
91.14
76.05
94.5
168
107.54
110
228
152
100
183.18
479
237.25
295.5
278
178.23
148
192
121
261
266.5
197.5
160
240.24
229.11
123.16
Version 1.02
November 15, 1999
D-4
             1988-1997 TRI data, am

-------
CAS
90437
90948
91087
91203
91225
91598
91941
92524
92671
92875
92933
93652
94111
94360
94586
94597
94746
94757
94804
94826
95476
95487
95501
95534
95545
95636
95692
95807
95954
96093
96128
96184
96333
96457
97234
97563
98077
98828
98862
98873
98884
98953
99309
Chemical
2-Phenylphenol
Michlers Ketone
Toluene-2,6-diisocyanate
Naphthalene
Quinoline
beta-Naphthylamine
3,3'-Dichlorobenzidine
Biphenyl
4-Aminodiphenyl
Benzidine
4-Nitrobiphenyl
Mecoprop
2,4-D isopropyl ester
Benzoyl peroxide
Dihydrosafrole
Safrole
Methoxone (MCPA)
2,4-D ((2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetic
acid)
2,4-D butyl ester
2,4-DB
o-Xylene
o-Cresol
1 ,2-Dichlorobenzene
o-Toluidine
1 ,2-Phenylenediamine
1 , 2, 4-Trimethyl benzene
p-Chloro-o-toluidine
2,4-Diaminotoluene
2,4,5-Trichlorophenol
Styrene oxide
1 ,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane
(DBCP)
1 ,2,3-Trichloropropane
Methyl acrylate
Ethylene thiourea
Dichlorophene
C.I. Solvent Yellow 3
Benzotrichloride
Cumene
Acetophenone
Benzal chloride
Benzoyl chloride
Nitrobenzene
Dichloran
Air Decay
3.48
1.91
1.19
0.129
0.0382
1.27
18.5
0.0476
0.635
1.22
0.0141
0.0939

0.00748
0.497
0.635
0.0341
0.212


0.0866
0.238
0.00249
0.968
0.476
0.238

1.41
0.0127
0.031
0.00261
0.00095
0.141
0.767

0.465
0.00219
0.0392
0.0074
0.0141
0.00374
0.701

Koc
119
162
2580
871
43
203.7
190000
1500
185.8
227000
2688


1296
2111
670

109


129
103
280
100

2712

36
1500
53
102

11
50

347
492
454
38.3
209
145
229

H2O Decay
0.0165
0.0116
0.693
0.0296
0.00626
0.00569

0.0117
0.0165
0.0129
0.015
0
0
0.0165
0.00258
0.00258
0
0.0108
0.000131
0
0.00258
0.0165
0.000596
0.0195
0
0.00258
0
0.0114
0.694
0.0158
0.000596
0
0.0165
0.00258
0
0.00607
69.3
0.00903
0
6.93
17.3
0.00115
0
LOGKow
3.09
3.87
3.74
3.3
2.03
2.28
3.51
3.98
2.86
1.34
3.82
3.13
3.81
3.46
3.58
3.45
3.25
2.81
4.38
3.53
3.12
1.95
3.43
1.32
0.15
3.78
2.27
0.14
3.72
1.61
2.96
2.27
0.8
-0.66
4.26
4.29
3.9
3.66
1.58
2.97
1.44
1.85
2.76
Kd
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0


0
0
0

0


0
0
0
0

0

0
0
0
0

0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

Water
Solubility
700
400
0
31
6110
263
3.11
7.1
311
360
7.36
734

9.1
0
810.67
1174
890
46
53
178
25950
83.96
16600
4150
57

300
1200
3000
1230

-16136
20000
30
100
53
49.9
5500
250
0
1900
7
POTW
Dartition
'Removal)
94.89
60.21
99.48
95.99
75.94
76.56
68.37
98.86
52.74
75.24
93.12
57.76
98.28
96.7
70.75
66.53
60.68
93.8
99.61
88.9
95.78
92.35
73.77
99.92
45.44
94.11
47.52
45.44
75.39
75.49
33.45
52.08
92.25
45.43
78.05
91.29
100
98.07
92.2
99.99
100
92.32
51.39
POTW
Dartition
(Sludge)
2.76
31.74
2.03
3.94
1.17
1.42
13.21
10.67
6.05
0.89
12.62
8.34
8.7
5.18
14.3
12.28
9.67
1.71
15.35
8.29
2.84
0.56
10
0.28
2.4
11.47
3.47
2.4
16.79
0.95
13.03
3
0.37
2.38
40.23
29.73
0.03
6.93
0.44
0.1
0.01
0.52
5.39
POTW
Dartition
(Volat)
0.011
0
0.01
1.71
0.066
0
0
0.62
0
0
0.011
0
0.02
0.021
0.34
0.3
0
0
0
0
12.01
0.011
28.37
93.98
0
16.52
0.11
0
0.093
0.38
15.22
15.67
1.49
0.022
0
0
0
11.35
0.11
0.04
0.01
0.23
0
POTW
Partition
(Biod)
97.22
68.28
97.96
94.35
98.76
98.56
86.78
88.71
93.95
99.11
87.37
91.66
91.28
94.8
85.36
87.42
90.34
98.29
84.65
91.71
85.16
99.43
61.64
5.74
97.6
72
96.42
97.6
83.1
98.66
71.78
81.36
98.14
97.6
59.77
70.28
99.97
81.71
99.44
99.86
99.98
99.24
94.59
nciner-
ator ORE
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99

99
99
99
99
99


99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99

99
99
99
99
99
99
99

BCF
15.5
20.9
410
426
7.94
31.6
495
436
79.4
110
437


251
310
61.6

10


21
18
270
5.9

440

1.07
1910
10
11

2.4
10

562
98
35
9.35
27
7.32
15

Henrys
0.0000011
0
0.0000111
0.000483
0.0000027
0.0000002
0
0.000408
0.0000001
0
0.0000016
0
0.0000052
0.0000035
0.0000122
0.0000091
0
0
0.0000005
0
0.00518
0.0000012
0.0019
2.72
0
0.00616
0.0000016
0
0.0000043
0.0000158
0.000147
0.000343
0.000197
0.0000003
0
0
0.0000203
0.0115
0.0000107
0.000526
0.000132
0.000024
0
MCL

















0.07




0.6







0












Molecular
Weight
170.2
268.35
174.15
128
129.15
143.18
253
154
169.22
184
199.2
214.6

242
164.22
162.18
200.63
221

249.09
106
108
147
107
108.14
120.19
141.6
122
197.5
120
236.5
147.43
86
96
269.12
225.28
195
120
120.15
161
141
123
207.02
Version 1.02
November 15, 1999
D-5
             1988-1997 TRI data, am

-------
CAS
99558
99592
99650
100016
100027
100254
100414
100425
100447
100754
101053
101144
101611
101688
101779
101804
101906
104121
104949
105679
106423
106445
106467
106478
106503
106514
106887
106898
106934
106990
107028
107051
107062
107119
107131
107186
107197
107211
107302
108054
108101
108316
108383
108394
Chemical
5-Nitro-o-toluidine
5-Nitro-o-anisidine
m-Dinitrobenzene
p-Nitroaniline
4-Nitrophenol
p-Dinitrobenzene
Ethyl benzene
Styrene
Benzyl chloride
N-Nitrosopiperidine
Anilazine
4,4'-Methylenebis(2-chloroaniline)
4,4'-Methylenebis(N,N-dimethylben
zenamine)

4,4'-Methylenedianiline
4,4'-Diaminodiphenylether
Diglycidyl resorcinol ether
p-Chlorophenyl isocyanate
p-Anisidine
2,4-Dimethylphenol
p-Xylene
p-Cresol
1 ,4-Dichlorobenzene
p-Chloroaniline
p-Phenylenediamine
Quinone
1,2-Butylene oxide
Epichlorohydrin
1,2-Dibromoethane
1,3-Butadiene
Acrolein
Allyl chloride
1,2-Dichloroethane
Allylamine
Acrylonitrile
Allyl alcohol
Propargyl alcohol
Ethylene glycol
Chloromethyl methyl ether
Vinyl acetate
Methyl isobutyl ketone
Maleic anhydride
m-Xylene
m-Cresol
Air Decay
0.193
0.176
0.000184

0.114
0
0.0445
0.433
0.0173
0.153

1.31
1.91
0.0624
1.41
1.27


0.719
0.32
0.0908
0.254
0.0019
0.115
1.36
0.578
0.0125
0.00261
0.00148
0.5
0.112
0.126
0.00131

0.0277
0.17
0.0281
0.0459
0.0168
0.07
0.083
0.00392
0.147
0.346
Koc
248
63.2
1.39

236
143
250
920
139
9

8000
9140

98
315


17
18
260
49
600

13
26
8
10
98
116
5
50
32

9
1.47

4
36
19
19
181
166
34.6
H2O Decay
0.015
0.015
0.00111
0
0.0211
0
0.00626
0.00155
0.0462
0.156
0
0.0114
0.0133
-0.69
0.0165
0.00565
0
0.693
0.00607
0.0165
0.00258
0.368
0.000596
0
0.0117
0.349
0.00318
0.00352
0.000596
0.00258
0.00258
0.0154
0.000225
0
0.0122
0.017
0
0.00842
23.1
0.00396
0.0165
69.3
0.00258
0.00772
LOGKow
1.87
1.47
1.49
1.39
1.91
1.46
3.15
2.95
2.3
0.36
3.88
3.91
4.37
5.22
1.59
2.22
1.23
3.24
0.95
2.3
3.15
1.94
3.44
1.83
-0.3
0.2
0.86
0.45
1.96
1.99
-0.01
1.93
1.48
0.03
0.25
0.17
-0.38
-1.36
0.32
0.73
1.31
1.62
3.2
1 96
Kd
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0

0
0


0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Water
Solubility
0
2206
533
728
16000
500
206
320
525
76480
8
13.9
1.3

1000
139


24706
7870
162.4
21520
81.3
2750
-28536
11130
95000
65900
4152
735
212500
3370
8608
1000000
74500
0
1000000
1000000
0
20000
19000
0
161
22700
POTW
Dartition
'Removal)
46.26
45.76
45.78
45.7
99.48
45.75
89.8
94.89
78.03
45.46
80.63
81.57
92.73
99.99
75.38
76.37
75.2
98.53
92.09
76.63
96.12
92.34
75.34
46.22
45.43
51.81
75.95
46.05
54.38
97.32
92.18
84.36
58.03
75.18
92.19
92.07
92.06
92.06
100
92.4
92.25
100
96.25
92.35
POTW
Dartition
(Sludge)
2.83
2.56
2.58
2.54
0.42
2.56
3.93
2.12
1.38
2.4
20
20.64
31.74
3.18
0.96
1.35
0.88
1.18
0.38
1.46
2.98
0.56
9.85
2.79
2.38
1.91
0.82
2.35
2.24
0.5
0.36
0.83
1.69
0.82
0.36
0.37
0.36
0.36
0
0.37
0.4
0
3.25
0.56
POTW
Dartition
(Volat)
0
0
0.022
0
92.39
0
38.24
8.27
6.43
0.066
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0.28
0
0.052
15.57
0.011
32.51
0.13
0
21.25
3.54
2.17
25.78
85.67
1.01
81.86
37.34
0.43
1.12
0.054
0.011
0
0.01
3.07
1.12
0
14.38
0.011
POTW
Partition
(Biod)
97.17
97.44
97.4
97.46
7.18
97.44
57.82
89.61
92.17
97.56
80
79.36
68.25
96.82
99.04
98.65
99.12
98.54
99.61
98.5
81.45
99.44
57.65
97.1
97.6
76.84
95.64
95.5
71.97
13.83
98.62
17.31
60.97
98.74
98.51
99.59
99.63
99.63
99.98
96.56
98.48
100
82.38
99.43
nciner-
ator ORE
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99

99
99

99
99


99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
BCF
15.5
7.67
0.93

79
7.6
15
13.5
33
1.1

575
2400

9.5
22


3.1
150
15
17.6
214

1
0.84
1
1.2
10
19.2
344
7.45
2

48
0

10
1
2
2.4
10
15
20
Henrys
0
0
0.0000004
0
0.415
0.0000001
0.00788
0.00275
0.000412
0.0000008
0
0
0.0000001
0.0000009
0
0
0
0.000172
0.0000001
0.000002
0.00753
0.000001
0.0024
0.0000014
0
0.000479
0.00018
0.0000304
0.000667
0.0736
0.000122
0.011
0.00118
0.0000175
0.000138
0.000005
0.0000012
0.0000001
0.000304
0.000511
0.000138
0.0000039
0.00718
0.0000009
MCL






0.7
0.1














0.08





0



0.01











Molecular
Weight
152.15
152.71
168
138.13
139
168.11
106
104
127
350.27
275.51
267.16
254

198
200


123.15
122
106
108
147
127.57
108
108.09
72
92
188
54
56
76.53
99
57.09
53
58
56.06
62
80.51
86
100
98
106
108
Version 1.02
November 15, 1999
D-6
             1988-1997 TRI data, am

-------
CAS
108452
108601
108883
108907
108930
108952
109068
109773
109864
110543
110576
110805
110827
110861
111422
111444
111911
114261
115071
115286
115322
116063
117793
117817
118741
119904
119937
120127
120365
120581
120718
120809
120821
120832
121142
121448
121697
121755
122349
122394
122667
123319
123386
123637
123728
Chemical
1 ,3-Phenylenediamine
Bis(2-chloro-1 -methethyl) ether
Toluene
Chlorobenzene
Cyclohexanol
Phenol
2-Methylpyridine
Malononitrile
2-Methoxyethanol
n-Hexane
trans-1 ,4-Dichloro-2-butene
2-Ethoxyethanol
Cyclohexane
Pyridine
Diethanolamine
Bis(2-chloroethyl) ether
Bis(2-chloroethoxy)methane
Propoxur
Propylene (Propene)
Chlorendic acid
Dicofol
Aldicarb
2-Aminoanthraquinone
Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate
Hexachlorobenzene
3,3'-Dimethoxybenzidine
3,3'-Dimethylbenzidine
Anthracene
2,4-DP (Dichlorprop)
sosafrole
p-Cresidine
Catechol
1 ,2,4-Trichlorobenzene
2,4-Dichlorophenol
2,4-Dinitrotoluene
Triethylamine
N,N-Dimethylaniline
Malathion
Simazine
Diphenylamine
1 ,2-Diphenylhydrazine
Hydroquinone
Propionaldehyde
Paraldehyde
Butvraldehvde
Air Decay
0.54
0.0827
0.038
0.00523

0.167
0
0.000091
0.0669
0.0152

0.0713
0.0438
0.00298
0.529
0.0395
0
0.537
0.229

0.00925
0.0249
0.166
0.131
0.000102
1.1
1.43
0.801

0.32
1.31
0.147
0.00297
0.018
0.0866
0.25
0.145
0.209
0.0482
0.525
1.27
0.147
0.116
0
0.136
Koc

73
95
275

16
9.6
6.6
9


21
482
5
4
79
31
160
219

-18636

11800
87420
14100
230
447
16000

540
42
118
1430
126
201

80



947
9.3
4
0
9.4
H2O Decay
0
0.000882
0.00427
0.000309
0
0.0715
0
0.00138
0.00258
0
0.00903
0.00258
0.000596
0.0165
0.0261
0.000596
0.0000693
0.00181
0.00258
0
0
0.0000693
0.00607
0.00352
0.0000218
0.0113
0.0165
0.801
0
0.0026
0.00563
0.0165
0.000596
0.549
0.0161
0
0.0181
0.0193
0
0
0.03
0.907
0.0165
0
0.0165
LOGKow
-0.33
2.48
2.73
2.84
1.23
1.46
1.11
-0.6
-0.77
3.9
2.6
-0.32
3.44
0.65
-1.43
1.29
1.3
1.52
1.77
3.14
5.02
1.13
2.43
7.6
5.73
1.81
2.34
4.45
3.43
3.37
1.74
0.88
4.02
3.06
1.98
1.45
2.31
2.36
2.18
3.5
2.94
0.59
0.59
0
0.88
Kd

0
0
0

0
0
0
0


0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0

0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0

0



0
0
0
0
0
Water
Solubility
238000
1700
526
497.9

82800
10000000
133000
1000000
9.5
850
1000000
55
1000000
1000000
17200
8100
1859
200

1.32
6030
0.16
0.34
0.0062
60
1300
0.0434
829
0
4721
461400
49
4500
270
15000
1454
143
6.2
53
68
72000
306000
125000
71000
POTW
Dartition
'Removal)
45.43
50.47
94.96
85.32
92.22
92.15
92.11
45.42
92.06
99.94
79.81
92.06
88.74
92.09
92.06
22.77
22.57
92.17
98.91
33.15
98.37
45.58
48.36
99.93
98.43
46.15
76.76
94.15
65.84
64.08
46.05
92.08
86.46
94.76
46.5
48.22
48.68
92.76
23.35
88.44
54.01
92.07
92.15
0
92.2
POTW
Dartition
(Sludge)
2.38
3.86
1.43
2.47
0.4
0.42
0.39
2.38
0.36
9.37
1.94
0.36
6.99
0.37
0.36
6.59
6.69
0.43
0.38
17.83
45.27
2.46
3.91
38.25
60.63
2.77
1.51
33.45
12.01
11.17
2.71
0.38
22.2
2.63
2.95
2.34
3.45
0.86
8.44
7.93
6.63
0.37
0.37
2.42
0.38
POTW
Dartition
(Volat)
0
6.2
18.26
28.63
0.87
0
0.098
0
0.011
52.66
8.72
0.011
9.14
0.11
0
3.38
2.26
0
90.83
0
0
0
0
0
0.46
0
0
2.19
0
0.19
0
0
9.6
0.021
0
8.71
3.53
0
0
0.045
0
0
0.66
0.044
0.97
POTW
Partition
(Biod)
97.6
89.93
80.32
68.89
98.73
99.58
99.51
97.62
99.63
37.96
89.34
99.63
83.89
99.51
99.63
90.03
91.05
99.56
8.8
82.17
54.73
97.52
96.09
61.75
38.91
97.23
98.49
64.37
87.97
88.64
97.26
99.62
68.22
97.34
97.03
88.95
93
99.14
91.56
92.04
93.37
99.63
98.97
97.56
98.66
nciner-
ator ORE
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
BCF

9.3
37
447

39
4.1
0.21
0.2


0.5
242
2
0.05
11
5.7
8.41
13.2

13900

1720
114
14500
14.1
35.5
675

72
10
3
1200
100
19

10



100
39.8
1.66
0
2.75
Henrys
0
0.000112
0.00664
0.00377
0.000102
0.0000003
0.00001
0
0.000001
1.81
0.000664
0.0000007
0.0015
0.000011
0
0.000017
0.0000111
0.0000004
0.196
0
0
0
0
0.0000147
0.0017
0
0
0.00072
0
0.000005
0.0000001
0
0.00142
0.0000032
0.0000001
0.000149
0.0000568
0
0
0.0000034
0
0
0.0000734
0
0.000115
MCL


1
0.1

















0

0.01
0







0.07





0






Molecular
Weight
108.14
171
92
112
100.16
94
93.13
66.06
76
86.18
125
90
84
79
105
143
173.1
209.24
42.08

370.47
190.25
223
390
285
254.43
212.28
178
235.05
162.18
137.18
110
181
163
182
101.19
121.18
330.36
201.67
169.23
184
110
58.08
132.16
72
Version 1.02
November 15, 1999
D-7
             1988-1997 TRI data, am

-------
CAS
123911
124403
124732
126727
126987
126998
127184
128030
128041
128665
131113
131522
132274
132649
133062
133073
133904
134292
134327
135206
136458
137268
137417
137428
138932
139139
139651
140885
141322
142596
148798
149304
150505
150685
151564
156105
156627
298000
300765
301122
302012
306832
Chemical
Dioxane
Dimethylamine
1 ,2-Dibromotetrafluoroethane
Tris(2,3-dibromopropyl) phosphate
Methacrylonitrile
Chloroprene
Tetrachloroethylene
(Perchloroethylene)
Potassium
dimethyldithiocarbamate
Sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate
C.I. Vat Yellow 4
Dimethyl phthalate
Sodium pentachlorophenate
Sodium o-phenylphenoxide
Dibenzofuran
Captan
Folpet
Chloramben
o-Anisidine hydrochloride
alpha-Naphthylamine
Cupferron
Dipropyl isocinchomeronate
Thiram
Potassium
N-methyldithiocarbamate
Metham sodium
Disodium
cyanodithioimidocarbonate
Nitrilotriacetic acid
4,4'-Thiodianiline
Ethyl acrylate
Butyl acrylate
Nabam
Thiabendazole
2-Mercaptobenzothiazole
Merphos
Monuron
Ethyleneimine (Aziridine)
p-Nitrosodiphenylamine
Calcium cyanamide
Methyl parathion
Naled
Oxydemeton methyl
Hydrazine
2.2-Dichloro-1.1.1-trifluoroethane
Air Decay
0.0471

0
0.397
0.0226
0.132
0.000993


0.0243
0.0034


0.201
0.119
0.0425
0
0
1.31
0.272

0.98

0.174

0.471
1.09
0.162
0.166

0.176
0.11


0.0363
1.52
0.119
0.16
0.0172

0.576
0
Koc
17

1202
1390
16.5
312
238


19100
40


8128
198

190
104
3213
2.7

890



286
109
22
67





6
1890
8.53



4.28
361
H2O Decay
0.0016
0
0.14
0.0165
0
0.000596
0.00012
0
0
0.000596
0.0165
0
0
0.00258
0.231
0
0.69
0
0.00565
0.000596
0
0.00545
0
0.00385
0
0.00258
0.0116
0.0165
0.0165
0.693
0
0
0
0
0.000188
0.00565
0.00258
0.000401
0
0.000628
0.0165
0
LOGKow
-0.27
-0.38
2.96
4.29
0.68
2.53
3.4
0.69
0.07
6.28
1.56
5.12
3.09
4.12
2.35
2.85
1.9
1.18
2.25
-1.73
3.57
1.7
0.48
-0.92
0.31
-3.81
2.18
1.32
2.36
1.11
2.47
2.42
7.67
1.94
-0.28
3.16
-0.82
2.86
1.38
-0.75
-1.37
2.17
Kd
0

0
0
0
0
0


0
0


0
0

0
0
0
0

0



0
0
0
0





0
0
0



0
0
Water
Solubility
1000000

0
8
25400
480
200


0.08
4000

700
4.22
3.3
1
700
0
1698
10000000

18

720000

-6476
822
15000
2000
200000
50
2500

230
1000000
7.43
0
50
2000
1000000
1000000
0
POTW
Dartition
'Removal)
45.53
92.08
98.48
99.5
76.17
95.71
88.85
76.61
76.61
98.89
92.18
96.2
95.02
96.39
76.84
79.92
46.32
45.63
76.46
21.97
97.24
75.47
75.91
75.91
77.6
92.06
47.11
92.4
93.02

48.63
48.3
99.99
22.77
45.67
58.45
0
93.97
75.26
75.06
0
97.43
POTW
Dartition
(Sludge)
2.37
0.36
2.39
14.38
0.8
1.16
6.99
0.8
0.8
61.97
0.44
56.27
2.74
18.29
1.52
2.89
2.87
2.48
1.39
6.55
6.16
0.98
0.8
0.8
0.75
0.36
3.27
0.4
0.85
100
4.05
3.89
21.83
7.69
2.36
8.66
0
1.86
0.9
0.83
0
0.66
POTW
Dartition
(Volat)
0.35
0.17
96.3
0.04
4.59
92.82
85.41
6.59
6.59
0
0
0
1.86
0.23
0.17
0.075
0
0.13
0.013
0
0
0.013
3.5
3.5
11.33
0
0
2.51
2.62
100
0
0
0
0
0.9
0
0
0
0
0
0
98
POTW
Partition
(Biod)
97.25
99.46
1.31
85.58
94.59
6.02
7.6
92.61
92.61
38.03
99.56
43.73
95.39
81.49
98.31
97.03
97.13
97.39
98.6
93.45
93.84
99.01
95.69
95.69
87.93
99.63
96.73
97.08
96.52
100
95.95
96.13
78.16
92.31
96.76
91.34
0
98.14
99.1
99.17
0
1.34
nciner-
ator ORE
99

99
99
99
99
99


99
99


99
99
99
99
99
99
99

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99





99
99
0
99
99

0
99
BCF
0.4

141
2.75
1.9
21.4
49


6760
57.5


1350
10

15.5
4.6
30.2
0.029

11.5



1.26
20.4
5.89
8.49





0.08
269
0



0.016
26.3
Henrys
0.0000048
0.0000177
0.162
0.0000218
0.000247
0.0523
0.0177
0.000388
0.000388
0
0.0000001
0
0.000428
0.0000512
0.0000072
0.0000038
0
0.0000018
0.0000005
0
0
0.0000003
0.000177
0.000177
0.000776
0
0
0.000393
0.00046
0.0000007
0
0
0.0000227
0
0.0000121
0
0
0.0000001
0
0
0
0.0955
MCL






0.01



































Molecular
Weight
88
45.08
260
697.61
67.09
88.54
166

143.21
332.36
194.19


168.19
300
296.58
206.03
159.61
143.18
156.19
251.31
240.41

129.18

191
216
100
128.17
256.35
201.26
167.25
298.5
198.65
43
198.22
80.11
263.23
380.79
246.3
32
152.93
Version 1.02
November 15, 1999
D-8
             1988-1997 TRI data, am

-------
CAS
309002
314409
319846
330541
330552
333415
334883
353593
354110
354143
354234
354256
357573
422446
422480
422560
431867
460355
463581
465736
492808
505602
507551
510156
528290
532274
533744
534521
540590
541413
541537
541731
542756
542767
542881
554132
556616
563473
569642
Chemical
Aldrin
Bromacil
alpha-Hexachlorocyclohexane
Diuron
Linuron
Diazinon
Diazomethane
Bromochlorodifluoromethane
1 ,1 ,1 ,2-Tetrachloro-2-fluoroethane
(HCFC-121a)
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloro-1-fluoroethane
(HCFC-121)
1 ,2-Dichloro-1 ,1 ,2-trifluoroethane
1-Chloro-1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethane
Brucine
1 ,2-Dichloro-1 ,1 ,2,3,3-pentafluoropr
opane (HCFC-22
2,3-Dichloro-1 ,1 ,1 ,2,3-pentafluoropr
opane (HCFC-22
3,3-Dichloro-1 ,1 ,1 ,2,2-pentafluoropr
opane
1 ,2-Dichloro-1 ,1 ,3,3,3-pentafluoropr
opane (HCFC-22
3-Chloro-1 ,1 ,1-trifluoropropane
(HCFC-253fb)
Carbonyl sulfide
sodrin
Auramine
Mustard gas
1 ,3-Dichloro-1 ,1 ,2,2,3-pentafluoropr
opane
Chlorobenzilate
o-Dinitrobenzene
2-Chloroacetophenone
Dazomet
4,6-Dinitro-o-cresol
1,2-Dichloroethylene
Ethyl chloroformate
2,4-Dithiobiuret
1 ,3-Dichlorobenzene
1 ,3-Dichloropropylene
3-Chloropropionitrile
Bis(chloromethyl)ether
Lithium carbonate
Methyl isothiocyanate
3-Chloro-2-methyl-1 -propene
C.I. Basic Green 4
Air Decay
0.423
0.0525

0.0294
0.028
0.261
0
0


0
0






0

1.94
0.0205

0.0293
0.0000575
0.00516
0.77
0.00123
0.015
0.00857

0.00428
0.0787

1.95



10.2
Koc
-17036





292
346


361
245






88

2030
120

1065
1.47
76

238
35
52.4

293
26

17.9



97.7
H2O Decay
0.000712
0
0.00589
0.000193
0.00259
0.000156
0
0.18
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0.000596
9.9
0
0.00138
0
0.00258
0.693
0.00519
0.000596
1.02
0.00707
0.000596
0.00256
0.00131
69.3
0
4.62
0.000419
0.000596
LOGKow
6.5
2.11
3.8
2.68
3.2
3.81
2
1.9
2.8
2.8
2.17
1.86
0.98
3.14
3.14
3.14
3.14
2.48
-1.33
6.5
2.68
2.41
3.14
4.74
1.69
1.93
1.4
2.12
2.09
0.63
-1.52
3.53
2.03
0.18
0.57

0.94
2.48
0.8
Kd
0





0
0


0
0






0

0
0

0
0
0

0
0
0

0
0

0



0
Water
Solubility
0.18
815
2
42
75
40
0
0


0
0
3200





1220
1
11.02
684

13
133
1572
1200
198
3500
0
2700
125
2800

22000

7600
1400
1000
POTW
Dartition
'Removal)
98.96
46.87
78.08
50.51
59.41
92.99
92.38
97.39
61.83
61.83
97.43
99.53
45.53
99.51
99.51
99.51
99.51
99.3
96.18
98.96
50.47
99.99
99.51
96.95
45.98
46.45
96.67
46.93
72.25
81.95
48.65
77.5
82.99
45.73
100

99.96
95.78
45.49
POTW
Dartition
(Sludge)
62.16
3.14
18.33
4.95
9.09
12.44
0.58
0.48
4.33
4.33
0.66
0.42
2.44
3.34
3.34
3.34
3.34
0.97
0.3
62.16
4.95
0.03
3.34
40.37
2.68
2.88
0.17
3.15
1.4
0.63
2.12
10.4
0.92
2.36
0

0.02
1.06
2.42
POTW
Dartition
(Volat)
0.03
0
0.2
0.18
0
0
0
98.18
74.58
74.58
98
98.85
0
95.61
95.61
95.61
95.61
98.19
82.86
0.02
0
0.01
95.61
0
0
0.26
0.01
0.11
64.18
30.76
0
31.39
32.34
1.05
0

0.23
93.07
0
POTW
Partition
(Biod)
37.81
96.84
81.45
94.89
90.91
87.56
99.42
1.32
21.11
21.11
1.34
0.72
97.56
1.05
1.05
1.05
1.05
0.85
16.84
37.82
95.05
99.97
1.05
59.63
97.3
96.86
99.81
96.74
34.42
68.6
97.88
57.43
66.73
96.59
100

99.75
5.88
97.58
nciner-
ator ORE
99
99
99
99
99

99
99


99
99






99

99
99

99
99
99
99
99
99
99

99
99

99



99
BCF
3890





19.5
24.7


26.3
15.3






11.2

288
15.5

145
0.97
9.77

24
15.1
0

580
7

0



0
Henrys
0.000493
0
0.0000106
0.0000027
0.0000001
0.0000001
0
0.094
0.003
0.003
0.0955
0.54
0
0.502
0.502
0.502
0.502
0.36
0.0492
0.000387
0
0.0000337
0.502
0.0000001
0.0000001
0.0000035
0.0000024
0.0000014
0.00408
0.00312
0
0.00263
0.00355
0.0000143
0.000206

0.00263
0.0534
0
MCL




























0.1










Molecular
Weight
365
261.11
290.83
233.1
249.11
304.36
42.04
165


152.93
136.48
394.45





60.07
364.93
267.37
159.08

325.2
168
154.59
162.27
198
96.95
108.53
135.2
147
111
89.53
114.97
73.89
73.12
90.55
364.9
Version 1.02
November 15, 1999
D-9
             1988-1997 TRI data, am

-------
CAS
584849
593602
594423
606202
612828
612839
615054
615281
621647
624180
624839
630206
636215
639587
680319
684935
709988
759739
759944
764410
812044
834128
842079
872504
924163
924425
957517
961115
989388
1114712
1120714
1134232
1163195
1313275
1314201
1319773
1320189
1330207
1332214
1335871
Chemical
Toluene-2,4-diisocyanate
Vinyl bromide
Perchloromethyl mercaptan
2,6-Dinitrotoluene
3,3'-Dimethylbenzidine
dihydrochloride
3,3'-Dichlorobenzidine
dihydrochloride
2,4-Diaminoanisole
1 ,2-Phenylenediamine
dihydrochloride
N-Nitrosodi-n-propylamine
1 ,4-Phenylenediamine
dihydrochloride
Methyl isocyanate
1,1,1,2-Tetrachloroethane
o-Toluidine hydrochloride
Triphenyltin chloride
Hexamethylphosphoramide
N-Nitroso-N-methylurea
Propanil
N-Nitroso-N-ethylurea
Ethyl dipropylthiocarbamate
1,4-Dichloro-2-butene
1,1-Dichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane
(HCFC-123b)
Ametryn
C.I. Solvent Yellow 14
N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone
N-Nitrosodi-n-butylamine
N-methylolacrylamide
Diphenamid
Tetrachlorvinphos
C.I. Basic Red 1
Pebulate
Propane sultone
Cycloate
Decabromodiphenyl ether
Molybdenum trioxide
Thorium dioxide
Cresol (mixed isomers)
2,4-D, propylene glycol butyl ether
ester
Xylene (mixed isomers)
Asbestos (friable)
Hexachloronaphthalene
Air Decay
0.0191
0.0406

0.0342


0

2.39

0.205
0.00017
0

0
0.722

0.764
0.086
0.096
0
0.077
0.117

0.872


0.065
0
0.0795
0.096
0.0955
0.00103
0
0
0.337

0.141
0
0.00117
Koc
2580
170

100


20.4

28

64.1
92.7
124

34
22.5

23.84

619
361

3795

88.4


1167
-27415

2.04

-28006
0
0
81

1738
0
32000
H2O Decay
0.693
0.000596
0.0000791
0.194
0
0
0
0
2.39
0
4.62
0.0219
0
0
0
26.8
0.0000791
26.8
0
0.00903
0
0
0.0026
0
0.13
0
0
0.00061
0
0.00241
0.0815
0
0.00012
0
0
0.347
0
0.00258
0
0.00012
LOGKow
3.74
1.57
3.47
2.1
3.02
3.51
-0.31
0.15
1.36
-0.3
0.79
2.93
1.32

0.28
-0.03
3.07
0.23
3.21
2.6
2.17
2.98
5.51
-0.38
1.92
-1.81
2.86
3.53
5.89
3.83
-0.28
3.88
12.11
0
0
1.99
4.33
3.16
0
7.04
Kd
0
0

0


0

0

0
0
0

0
0

0

0
0

0

0


0
0

0

0
0
0
0

0
0
0
Water
Solubility
0
4180

182


19500

9894

0
1100
0

1000000
14430
200
0
375
0
0
185
1.29
1000000
1200

260
11
0
60
1140000
85
0.02
490
0
20900

168
0
0.0015
POTW
Dartition
'Removal)
99.48
94.65
88.26
46.85
55.46
68.37
45.43
45.44
45.79
45.43
99.95
58.8
45.7

45.44
45.43
56.46
45.44
59.92
90.12
97.43
54.71
99.31
92.06
46.62
92.06
52.74
88.9
99.54
98.37
70.61
93.92
99.07
0
0
92.37
99.55
96.07
0
99.04
POTW
Dartition
(Sludge)
2.03
0.22
7.49
3.14
7.3
13.21
2.38
2.4
2.51
2.38
0.02
5.77
2.52

2.4
2.38
7.76
2.4
9.15
1.49
0.66
6.96
50.11
0.36
2.85
0.36
6.05
8.29
51.71
8.91
0.93
13.64
62.47
0
0
0.58
14.82
3.03
0
62.38
POTW
Dartition
(Volat)
0.01
27.87
2.13
0.064
0
0
0
0
0.39
0
0.14
68.76
0.15

0
0
0.018
0
0.95
82.28
98
0
0
0
0.94
0
0
0
0
0.4
0.071
0.44
0
0
0
0.011
0
14.03
0
0
POTW
Partition
(Biod)
97.96
71.91
90.38
96.82
92.7
86.78
97.6
97.6
97.1
97.6
99.84
25.48
97.35

97.6
97.62
92.24
97.6
89.9
16.22
1.34
93.04
49.89
99.64
96.2
99.63
93.97
91.71
48.29
90.69
99.01
85.92
37.52
0
0
99.42
85.18
82.94
0
37.61
nciner-
ator ORE
99
99

99


99

99

99
99
99

99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99

99


99
99
99
99
99
99
0
0
99

99
0
99
BCF
410
9.18

12


0.48

6.31

0
99.3
5.93

0.96
0.56

0.88

55.7
26.3

1200

17


283
17600

0.24

0
0
0
19.2

2.17
0
347000
Henrys
0.0000111
0.0123
0.000241
0.0000007
0
0
0
0
0.0000054
0
0.000926
0.00242
0.0000021

0
0
0.0000002
0
0.0000226
0.0188
0.0955
0
0
0
0.0000132
0
0
0
0
0.000148
0.0000024
0.0000706
0
0
0
0.0000011
0.0000003
0.00663
0
0.0000871
MCL





































10
7

Molecular
Weight
174.15
106.95
185.88
182


138.17

130

57.05
167.85
143.61

179
103.09
218.09
117.1
189.31
125
152.93
227.35
248.28

158.24

239.3
365.95
479.02
203.36
112.14
215.4
959.17
143.95
264.05
108.14

106.17
554.22
334.84
Version 1.02
November 15, 1999
D-10
              1988-1997 TRI data, am

-------
CAS
1336363
1344281
1464535
1563662
1582098
1634044
1649087
1689845
1689992
1717006
1836755
1861401
1897456
1910425
1912249
1918009
1918021
1918167
1928434
1929733
1929824
1937377
1982690
1983104
2032657
2155706
2164070
2164172
2212671
2234131
2300665
2303164
2303175
2312358
2439012
2439103
2524030
2602462
2655154
2699798
2702729
2832408
2837890
Chemical
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)
Aluminum oxide (fibrous forms)
Diepoxybutane
Carbofuran
Trifluralin
Methyl tert-butyl ether
1 ,2-Dichloro-1 ,1 -difluoroethane
Bromoxynil
Bromoxynil octanoate
1 ,1 -Dichloro-1 -fluoroethane
Nitrofen
Benfluralin
Chlorothalonil
Paraquat dichloride
Atrazine
Dicamba
Picloram
Propachlor
2,4-D 2-ethylhexyl ester
2,4-D butoxyethyl ester
Nitrapyrin
C.I. Direct Black 38
Sodium dicamba
Tributyltin fluoride
Methiocarb
Tributyltin methacrylate
Dipotassium endothall
Fluometuron
Molinate
Octachloronaphthalene
Dimethylamine dicamba
Diallate
Triallate
Propargite
Chinomethionat
(6-methyl-1,3-dithiolo[4,5-b]quinox
Dodine
Dimethyl chlorothiophosphate
C.I. Direct Blue 6
2,3,5-trimethylphenyl
methylcarbamate
Sulfuryl fluoride (Vikane)
2,4-D sodium salt
C.I. Disperse YellowS
2-Chloro-1 .1 .1 .2-tetrafluoroethane
Air Decay
0.0027
0
0.00508
0.0715
0.058
0.0181


0.02
0
0
0.06
0.0000165
0.0575
0.074
0.00805

0.0565
0.0392
0.067
0.0000945
0
0.0131




0.0205
0.0835
0.000237

0.657
0.09
0.161



0



0
0
Koc
29495
0
2.5

11070
11.2



464
4370

5780








11031





175

782000

273





959



3985
245
H2O Decay
0.0000072
0
0.007
0.000503
0.078
0.000596
0
0
0.00183
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0.000825
0.0181
0.00375
0
0
0
0.000825
0
0
0
0
0.00012
0
0.00154
0
0
0
0
0.693
0
0
0
0
0
0
LOGKow
6.4
0
-0.28
2.32
5.34
0.94
2.31
3.39
6.1
2.37
4.64
5.29
3.05
-2.71
2.61
2.21
1.36
2.18
6.27
4.1
3.41
4.9
2.21

2.92

1.91
2.42
3.21
8.24
1.13
4.08
4.57
5
3.78
-0.88
1.39
2.95
2.56

2.81
3.98
1 86
Kd
0
0
0

0
0



0
0

0








0





0

0

0





0



0
0
Water
Solubility
0.031
0.98
1000000
700
8.11
-14536

130
0.08
0
1
0.1
0.6
1000
30
4500
430
6.13

12
40
0
360000

30

110
85
880
0
720000
14
4
0.5
1
630

0
58

18000
1.18
0
POTW
Dartition
'Removal)
98.93
0
75.07
92.71
97.4
52.94
95.06
86.74
99.91
90.83
96.14
97.2
82.82
45.42
25.68
47.23
9.6
76.46
99.99
99.15
65.8
97.89
47.23

80.58

75.72
48.3
59.71
99.07
45.58
86.49
95.45
99.95
77.37
75.06
96.76
54.18
77.78

93.8
83.69
99.53
POTW
Dartition
(Sludge)
62.08
0
0.83
0.82
58.45
1.87
0.85
6.69
37.78
1.07
38.23
57.94
3.89
2.38
11.21
3.35
17.81
1.29
21.72
12.17
11.57
43.38
3.35

3.21

1.08
3.89
9.19
62.47
2.46
24.52
36.61
41.99
17.95
0.83
0.17
6.72
1.94

1.71
22.2
0.42
POTW
Dartition
(Volat)
0.03
0
0.027
0
0.031
24.35
97.04
0
0
95.38
0
0.32
0.036
0
0
0
0
0.84
0
0
2.2
0
0

0

0
0
0.18
0
0
0.046
0.13
44.12
0
0
0.99
0
0.026

0
0
98.85
POTW
Partition
(Biod)
37.9
0
99.16
99.17
41.51
73.78
2.1
93.31
62.21
3.56
61.77
41.74
95.12
97.62
88.79
96.65
82.19
97.86
78.28
87.84
86.25
56.62
96.65

96.79

98.92
96.13
90.62
37.53
97.52
75.43
63.28
13.88
82.05
99.17
98.84
93.28
98.03

98.29
77.8
0.72
nciner-
ator ORE
99.9999
0
99
99
99
99


99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99
99




99
99
99

99
99
99



99



99
99
BCF
-22436
0
0.02

3420
1.5



37
1550

501








3100





28

-20836

140





103



623
15.3
Henrys
0.000415
0
0.0000008
0
0.0000264
0.000587
0.048
0
0.00006
0.0241
0.0000001
0.000291
0.000002
0
0
0
0
0.0000375
0.0000214
0.0000004
0.00007
0
0

0

0
0
0.0000041
0.00019
0
0.0000038
0.00003
2.77
0.0000002
0
0.000381
0
0.0000009

0
0
0.54
MCL
0.001


0.04










0

0.5


























Molecular
Weight
371.22
102
86.09
221.26
335
88

276.92

116.95
284.1
335.29
265.9

215.68
221.04
241.48
211.69


230.93
783.74


225.31


232.21
187.33
403.73

270.24

350.51
234.29
287.44



102.07

269.3
136.48
Version 1.02
November 15, 1999
D-ll
              1988-1997 TRI data, am

-------
CAS
2971382
3118976
3383968
3653483
3761533
4080313
4170303
4549400
4680788
5234684
5598130
5902512
6459945
6484522
7287196
7429905
7439921
7439965
7439976
7440020
7440224
7440280
7440360
7440382
7440393
7440417
7440439
7440473
7440484
7440508
7440622
7440666
7550450
7632000
7637072
7647010
7664382
7664393
7664417
7664939
7696120
7697372
7723140
7726956
Chemical
2,4-D chlorocrotyl ester
C.I. Solvent Orange 7
Temephos
Methoxone sodium salt
C.I. Food Red 5
1 -(3-chloroallyl)-3,5,7-triaza-1 -azoni
aadamantane
Crotonaldehyde
N-Nitrosomethylvinylamine
C.I. Acid Green 3
Carboxin
Chlorpyrifos methyl
Terbacil
C.I. Acid Red 114

Prometryn
Aluminum (fume or dust)
Lead
Manganese
Mercury
Nickel
Silver
Thallium
Antimony
Arsenic
Barium
Beryllium
Cadmium
Chromium
Cobalt
Copper
Vanadium (fume or dust)
Zinc (fume or dust)
Titanium tetrachloride
Sodium nitrite
Boron trifluoride
Hydrochloric acid
Phosphoric acid
Hydrogen fluoride
Ammonia
Sulfuric acid
Tetramethrin
Nitric acid
Phosphorus (yellow or white)
Bromine
Air Decay

0


0

0.095
0.113
0

0.159
0.0202

0
0.103
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0


0
0.00115
0
0
0.00075

0
0

Koc

28575


546


20
64.1




0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0


0
0
0
0
0

0
0

H2O Decay
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0.000596
0
0
0.00166
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0.0282
0
0
0
LOGKow
4.42
6.6
5.96
1.3
2.5
-5.92
0.6
-0.28
0.79
2.14
4.31
1.89
3.33
0
3.51
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0


0
0
-0.44
-2
0
4.73
0
0

Kd

0


0


0
0




0

4
582
5
4084
27
539
0
9
38
31
170
32
344
10
147
68
31
0


0
0
0
0
0

0
0

Water
Solubility

0.0237
0.27
300000
0

150000
30000
0
170
4
710
500
1183000
33
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
10000
0
0
0


0
0
10000000
899000
10000000
3
10000000
3.3
-29736
POTW
Dartition
'Removal)
99.65
99.66
99.9
75.23
48.85
45.42
92.27
51.08
45.49
76.16
97.73
46.3
99.93
0
44.31
66.39
63.48
38.85
68.57
38.28
66.47
53.55
31.51
48.57
69.02
37.44
68.15
76.4
32.06
72.47
31.81
66.15
0


0
0
0
59.9
0
99.49
0
59.8

POTW
Dartition
(Sludge)
15.76
52.69
37.61
0.89
4.16
2.38
0.37
17.6
2.42
1.26
22.19
2.85
0.25
0
24.49
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
0


0
0
0

0
21.85
0
100

POTW
Dartition
(Volat)
0
0
0
0
0
0
1.81
19.07
0
0
0.041
0
97.99
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0


0
0
0

0
0
0
0

POTW
Partition
(Biod)
84.24
47.31
62.39
99.11
95.84
97.62
97.83
78.99
97.58
98.74
77.78
97.15
1.76
0
75.51
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0


0
0
0

0
78.15
0
0

nciner-
ator ORE

99


99

99
99
99

99
99


99
0
91.6
0
0
99
0
0
0
97.5
0
97.3
88.5
99
0
99.9
0
99.9
0


0
0
0
0
0

0
0

BCF

11700


46.8


0.6
0






79
1250
0
-25536
250
25
15
0.25
17
0
0
6000
4000
4430
14000
0
12000
0


0
0
0
0
0

0
0

Henrys
0.0000021
0
0
0
0
0
0.000253
0.00041
0
0
0.0000105
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0.0085
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0


0
0
0
0.0000158
0
0
0
0

MCL
















0.02

0
0.1

0
0.01
0.05
2
0
0.01
0.1

1.3














Molecular
Weight

276.32
466.46

482.43
251.17
70.09
86.1
690.8
235.31

216.65

80.04
241.37
26.98
207.19
54.93
200.59
58.71
107.87
204.37
121.75
74.9
137.34
9.01
112.4
52
58.93
63.55
50.94
65.38
189.73
69
67.82
36.46
98
20.01
17.03
98.08
331.42
63.01
30.97
159.81
Version 1.02
November 15, 1999
D-12
              1988-1997 TRI data, am

-------
CAS
7758012
7782414
7782492
7782505
7783202
7786347
7803512
8001352
8001589
9006422
10028156
10034932
10049044
10061026
10294345
10453868
12122677
12427382
13194484
13356086
13463406
13474889
13684565
14484641
15972608
16071866
16543558
17804352
19044883
19666309
20325400
20354261
20816120
20859738
21087649
21725462
22781233
23564058
23564069
23950585
25311711
25321146
25321226
Chemical
Potassium bromate
Fluorine
Selenium
Chlorine

Mevinphos
Phosphine
Toxaphene
Creosote, coal tar
Metiram
Ozone
Hydrazine sulfate
Chlorine dioxide
trans-1 ,3-Dichloropropene
Boron trichloride
Resmethrin
Zineb
Maneb
Ethoprop
Fenbutatin oxide (Vendex)
ron pentacarbonyl
1,1-Dichloro-1,2,2,3,3-pentafluoropr
opane (HCFC-22
Desmedipham
Ferbam
Alachlor
C.I. Direct Brown 95
N-Nitrosonornicotine
Benomyl
Oryzalin
Oxydiazon
3,3'-Dimethoxybenzidine
dihydrochloride
Methazole
Osmium tetroxide
Aluminum phosphide
Metribuzin
Cyanazine
Bendiocarb
Thiophanate-methyl
Thiophanate ethyl
Pronamide
sofenphos
Dinitrotoluene (mixed isomers)
Dichlorobenzene (mixed isomers)
Air Decay


0
0



0.0058
0


0.171
0



0
0.575
0.187





0.122
0
0
0.575




0

0.0493
0.0252

0.207

0.0358
0.745
0.0766
0.00309
Koc


0
0



6000
0


0
0



1230
550







187085
25





0






984

201
1700
H2O Decay
0
0
0
0

0.000825
0
0.00019
0
0
0
0
0
0.000389
0
0
0.693
0
0
0
0
0
0.0495
0
0
0
0
0.00963
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0.00722
0.0283
0
0
0.0000102
0.13
0.000596
LOGKow


0
0

-0.24

6.79
0


0
0
2.03

7.11
0.17
0.62
3.59


3.14
3.39
0.69
3.52
7.16
0.32
2.12
2.73
4.8
1.09
3.22
0

1.7
2.22
1.7
1.4
3.43
3.57
4.12
2.18
3.47
Kd


22
0



0
0


0
0



0
0







0
0





0






0

0
0
Water
Solubility


0
9460

600000
395
0.55
0


-31386
0
2800

0.01
10
6
750
0.005


7
130
242
0
14.43
3.8
2.5
0.7

1.5
-8536

1220
170
40


15
22.1
270
119.2
POTW
Dartition
'Removal)


43.66
0

92.06

99.01
0


0
0
78.51

99.99
97.61
71.98
71


99.51
90.71
45.48
88.75
99.68
45.44
51.31
51.02
97.35
45.56
59.91
0

45.99
23.52
76.54
75.27
87.35
70.37
96.38
47.12
75.23
POTW
Dartition
(Sludge)


100
0

0.37

62.32
0


0
0
1.07

21.82
0.13
1.64
14.51


3.34
5.2
2.42
8.17
52.87
2.4
2.71
5.23
41.56
2.46
9.31
0

2.7
8.67
0.94
0.9
7.12
14.15
18.31
3.27
10.46
POTW
Dartition
(Volat)


0
0

0

0
0


0
0
11.91

0
0
1.84
0


95.61
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0.017
0

0
0
0.026
0
0
0.16
0
0.042
29.48
POTW
Partition
(Biod)


0
0

99.64

37.68
0


0
0
87.02

78.18
99.87
96.63
85.49


1.05
94.8
97.58
91.83
47.13
97.62
97.29
94.79
58.44
97.54
90.67
0

97.33
91.33
99.05
99.1
92.89
85.69
81.69
96.69
60.06
nciner-
ator ORE


99.8
0



99
99


0
0



99
99
99





99
99
99
99




0

99
99

99
99
99
99
99
99
BCF


2000
0



5010
0


0
0



170








0
0.62





0






300

27
260
Henrys


0
0

0

0.000006
0


0
0
0.000871

0.0000056
0.0000025
0.0000006
0.0000002


0.502
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0.0000014
0
0.0000002
0

0
0
0.0000009
0
0
0.0000057
0.0000001
0.0000005
0.00215
MCL

4
0.05




0
















0


















Molecular
Weight
167.01
38
78.96
70.9

224.16
34
431.8
0

48
130.13
67.45
110.97
117.19
338.48
275.73
265.3
242.32
1052.76
195.9

300.34
416.5
269.77
0
177.2
290.32
346.36
345.22

261.05
254.1
57.96
214.28
240.68
223.23
370.44
370.44
256.14
345.4
182.15
147
Version 1.02
November 15, 1999
D-13
              1988-1997 TRI data, am

-------
CAS
25376458
26002802
26471625
26628228
26644462
27314132
28057489
28249776
28407376
29232937
30560191
31218834
3308961 1
34014181
34077877
35367385
35400432
35554440
35691657
38727558
39156417
39300453
39515418
40487421
41198087
41766750
42874033
43121433
50471448
51235042
51338273
51630581
52645531
53404196
53404378
53404607
55290647
55406536
57213691
59669260
60168889
60207901
62476599
Chemical
Diaminotoluene (mixed isomers)
Phenothrin
Toluenediisocyanate
Sodium azide
Triforine
Norflurazon
D-trans-allethrin
(D-trans-chrysanthemic acid of D
Thiobencarb
C.I. Direct Blue 218
Pirimiphos methyl
Acephate
Propetamphos
Amitraz
Tebuthiuron
Dichlorotrifluoroethane
Diflubenzuron
Sulprofos
mazalil
1 -Bromo-1 -(bromomethyl)-l ,3-prop
anedicarbonitrile
Diethatyl ethyl
2,4-Diaminoanisole sulfate
Dinocap
Fenpropathrin
Pendimethalin
Profenofos
3,3'-Dimethylbenzidine
dihydrofluoride
Oxyfluorfen
Triadimefon
Vinclozolin
Hexazinone
Diclofop methyl
Fenvalerate
Permethrin
Bromacil lithium salt
2,4-D 2-ethyl-4-methylpentyl ester
Dazomet, sodium salt
Dimethipin
3-lodo-2-propynyl butylcarbamate
Triclopyr triethylammonium salt
Thiodicarb
Fenarimol
Propiconazole
Acifluorfen. sodium salt
Air Decay
1.41

1.19

0.178
0.0268

0.0685


0.0302
0.745

0.00895
0





0


0.082


0.0358

0.089
0.244


0.062




0.069


0.0107
0.0735
0.00148
Koc
61

2580











361





16.2






















H2O Decay
0.0114
0
0.693
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0.0000017
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0.000241
0
0
0
0
0
0.0268
0
0
0
0.0000145
0
0
0
0
0.00507
0
0.00321
0
0
0
LOGKow
0.16
7.54
3.74

2.04
2.3
4.78
3.4

4.2
-0.85
2.51
5.5
1.78
2.17
3.88
5.48
3.82
1.63
3.6
-0.31
5.98
5.7
5.18
4.68
2.34
4.73
2.77
3.1
4.01
4.62
6.2
6.5
1.87
5.55
1.4
-0.17
2.45
1.5
1.7
3.6
3.5
3.7
Kd
0

0











0





0






















Water
Solubility
35
2
0
-23836
28
28

28

22.4
818000
110
1
2500
0
0.3
0.31
1400

105
0
4
0.33
0.3
20

0.12
71.5
3.4
-32536
3
0.085
0.2
700

3000
4600


19.1
13.7
110
120
POTW
Dartition
'Removal)
84.56
99.93
99.48

75.94
47.63
99.33
64.92

97.02
45.42
77.51
99.3
22.53
97.43
93.88
99.84
78.69
45.91
89.98
45.43
99.57
99.88
98.82
99.13
47.84
96.88
51.51
67.65
84.56
95.96
99.62
99.92
46.26
99.97
45.71
45.43
77.22
75.32
75.47
71.33
68.04
74.96
POTW
Dartition
(Sludge)
0.57
38.25
2.03

1.17
3.55
30.47
11.6

19.94
2.38
1.83
50.05
7.37
0.66
13.68
36.37
18.76
2.64
9.21
2.38
51.93
37.09
47.3
28.99
3.64
40.16
5.46
5.84
22.88
37.78
52.32
38.07
2.83
21.23
2.54
2.38
1.71
0.93
0.98
14.66
13.07
16.37
POTW
Dartition
(Volat)
82.89
0
0.01

0
0
0
0.015

0
0
0
0
0
98
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0.081
0
0
0.01
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0.013
POTW
Partition
(Biod)
16.54
61.76
97.96

98.83
96.45
69.52
88.4

80.05
97.62
98.17
49.95
92.63
1.34
86.33
63.62
81.24
97.34
90.78
97.6
48.07
62.9
52.62
71.01
96.34
59.84
94.54
94.16
77.11
62.21
47.67
61.93
97.17
78.77
97.46
97.6
98.29
99.07
99.02
85.34
86.95
83.26
nciner-
ator ORE
99
99
99

99
99
99
99


99
99

99
99





99


99


99

99
99


99


99

99


99
99
99
BCF
0

410











26.3





0






















Henrys
0.0113
0.0000001
0.0000111

0
0
0.0000006
0.0000003

0.0000007
0
0.0000001
0.0000026
0
0.0955
0
0.0000004
0
0
0
0
0
0.0000166
0.0000856
0
0
0.0000017
0
0
0
0.0000006
0.0000055
0
0
0.000029
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0.0000003
MCL











































Molecular
Weight
122.17
350.46
174
65.02
434.95
303.67




183.16
281.31
293.41
228.35
152.93
310.68
322.43
297.17
265.94

234.23
364.39
349.43
281.31
373.6

361.72
293.75
286.11
252.3
341.19
419.92
391.29



210.26


354.46
331.2
342.22
361.66
Version 1.02
November 15, 1999
D-14
              1988-1997 TRI data, am

-------
CAS
63938103
64902723
64969342
66441234
67485294
68085858
68359375
69409945
69806504
71751412
72178020
72490018
74051802
76578148
77501634
82657043
88671890
90454185
90982324
101200480
111512562
111984099
127564925
128903219
136013791
N010
N020
N040
N050
N078
N084
N090
N096
N100
N106
N120
N171
N230
N420
N450
N458
Chemical
Chlorotetrafluoroethane
Chlorsulfuron
3,3'-Dichlorobenzidine sulfate
Fenoxaprop ethyl
Hydramethylnon
Cyhalothrin
Cyfluthrin
Fluvalinate
Fluazifop butyl
Abamectin
Fomesafen
Fenoxycarb
Sethoxydim
Quizalofop-ethyl
Lactofen
Bifenthrin
Myclobutanil
Dichloro-1 ,1 ,2-trifluoroethane
Chlorimuron ethyl
Tribenuron methyl
1,1 -Dichloro-1, 2, 3, 3, 3-pentafluoropr
opane (HCFC-22
3,3'-Dimethoxybenzidine
hydro-chloride
Dichloropentafluoropropane
2,2-Dichloro-1 ,1 ,1 ,3, 3-pentafluoropr
opane (HCFC-22
1 ,3-Dichloro-1 ,1 ,2, 3, 3-pentafluoropr
opane (HCFC-22
Antimony compounds
Arsenic compounds
Barium compounds
Beryllium compounds
Cadmium compounds
Chlorophenols
Chromium compounds
Cobalt compounds
Copper compounds
Cyanide compounds
Diisocyanates
Ethylenebisdithiocarbamic acid,
salts and esters
Glycol ethers
Lead compounds
Manganese compounds
Mercury compounds
Air Decay
0
0.0068












0.009


0
0.115
0.008





0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0


0
0
0
0
Koc
245
















361







0
0
0
0
0
73
0
0
0
0


0
0
0
0
H2O Decay
0
0.000516
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0.0000773
0
0
0
0.00116
0.0000144
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
LOGKow
1.86
2
3.51
4.95
8.51
6.02
5.95
6.81
5.34
4.98
2.9
4.3
3.99
4.28
4.81
8.15
3.5
2.17
2.5
2.55
3.14
1.81
3.14
3.14
3.14
0
0
0
0
0
2.18
0
0
0
0


0
0
0
0
Kd
0
















0







9
38
31
170
32
0
344
10
147
0


0
582
5
4084
Water
Solubility
0
27900

0.9
0.01



2
5
600
6
4390
0.31
1
0.1
142
0
1200
280





0
0
0
0
0
28500
0
0
10000
10000000


0
0
0
0
POTW
Dartition
'Removal)
99.53
46.55
68.37
99.55
99.69
99.58
99.9
99.93
99.8
98.23
53.36
97.67
83.98
97.55
99.37
99.93
68.04
97.43
77.46
77.72
99.51
46.15
99.51
99.51
99.51
31.51
48.57
69.02
37.44
68.15
72.87
76.4
32.06
72.47
0


0
63.48
38.85
68.57
POTW
Dartition
(Sludge)
0.42
2.99
13.21
32.6
52.93
52.02
37.6
38.17
35.71
44.67
6.33
21.99
22.43
21.59
30.89
38.26
13.07
0.66
1.81
1.92
3.34
2.77
3.34
3.34
3.34
100
100
100
100
100
6.53
100
100
100
0


0
100
100
100
POTW
Dartition
(Volat)
98.85
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
98
0
0
95.61
0
95.61
95.61
95.61
0
0
0
0
0
1.86
0
0
0
0


0
0
0
0
POTW
Partition
(Biod)
0.72
97.01
86.78
67.4
47.07
47.98
62.4
61.83
64.29
55.33
93.67
78.01
77.57
78.41
69.12
61.74
86.95
1.34
98.19
98.08
1.05
97.23
1.05
1.05
1.05
0
0
0
0
0
91.6
0
0
0
0


0
0
0
0
nciner-
ator ORE
99
99

99
99




99




99


99
99
99





0
97.5
0
97.3
88.5
99
99
0
99.9
0


0
91.6
0
0
BCF
15.3
















26.3







0.25
17
0
0
6000
0
4000
4430
14000
0


0
1250
0
-25536
Henrys
0.54
0
0
0
0.0000033
0.0000023
0.000008
0.00002
0.0000002
0
0
0
0
0.000001
0
0.0000018
0
0.0955
0
0
0.502
0
0.502
0.502
0.502
0
0
0
0
0
0.0000083
0
0
0
0.000122


0
0
0
0.0085
MCL


































0.2






Molecular
Weight
136.48
357.78

291.38
494.5
449.86
434.28
502.93
383.38



327.86
372.81

434.89
288.78
152.93
414.82
395.39





121.75
74.9
137.34
9.01
112.4
128.56
52
58.93
63.55
0


0
207.19
54.93
200.59
Version 1.02
November 15, 1999
D-15
              1988-1997 TRI data, am

-------
CAS
N495
N503
N511
N575
N583
N590
N725
N740
N746
N760
N874
N982
Chemical
Nickel compounds
Nicotine and salts
Nitrate compounds
Polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs)
Polychlorinated alkanes
Polycyclic aromatic compounds
Selenium compounds
Silver compounds
Strychnine and salts
Thallium compounds
Warfarin and salts
Zinc compounds
Air Decay
0


0.06


0
0

0
0
0
Koc
0


-28001


0
0

0
0
0
H2O Decay
0
0
0
0.06
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
LOGKow
0


7.8


0
0

0
0
0
Kd
27


0


22
539

0
0
31
Water
Solubility
0


0.02


0
0
156.2
0
0
0
POTW
Dartition
'Removal)
38.28


92


43.66
66.47

53.55
0
66.15
POTW
Dartition
(Sludge)
100


24


100
100

100
0
100
POTW
Dartition
(Volat)
0


10


0
0

0
0
0
POTW
Partition
(Biod)
0


66


0
0

0
0
0
nciner-
ator ORE
99


99


99.8
0

0
0
99.9
BCF
250


18200


2000
25

15
0
12000
Henrys
0





0
0

0
0
0
MCL


10


0






Molecular
Weight
58.71
162.23

628


78.96
107.87
334.4
204.37
308.32
65.38
Version 1.02
November 15, 1999
D-16
              1988-1997 TRI data, am

-------
                                       Exhibit D-2 Physicochemical Property References
CAS
50000
51036
51218
51285
51752
51796
52686
52857
53963
55185
55210
55389
55630
56235
56359
56382
57147
57330
57410
57578
57749
58899
59892
60093
60117
60344
60355
60515
61825
62533
62555
62566
62737
62748
62759
63252
64186
64675
64755
Chemical
Formaldehyde
Piperonyl butoxide
Fluorouracil (5-fluorouracil)
2,4-Dinitrophenol
Nitrogen mustard
Urethane (Ethyl carbamate)
2-Bromo-2-nitropropane-1 ,3-di
ol#(Bronopol)
Trichlorfon
Famphur
2-Acetylaminofluorene
N-Nitrosodiethylamine
Benzamide
Fenthion
Nitroglycerin
Carbon tetrachloride
Bis(tributyltin) oxide
Parathion
1,1-Dimethyl hydrazine
Pentobarbital sodium
Phenytoin
beta-Propiolactone
Chlordane
Lindane
N-Nitrosomorpholine
4-Aminoazobenzene
4-Dimethylaminoazobenzene
Methyl hydrazine
Acetamide
Dimethoate
Amitrole
Aniline
Thioacetamide
Thiourea
Dichlorvos
Sodium fluoroacetate
N-Nitrosodimethylamine
Carbaryl
Formic acid
Diethyl sulfate
Air Decay
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
Koc
313PROP


_yman, 4-5
313PROP
313PROP

313PROP

313PROP
313PROP
313PROP

313PROP
313PROP

313PROP
313PROP


313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP

_yman, 4-5
_yman, 4-5
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP

313PROP
313PROP
_yman, 4-8
313PROP
H20
Decay




EFDB
EFDB

EFDB




EFDB



EFDB



EFDB

HYDRO





EFDB




EFDB


EFDB

EFDB
LOG

-------
CAS

67561
67630
67663
67721
68122
68768
70304
71363
71432
71556
72435
72571
74839
74851
74873
74884
74908
74953
75003
75014
75058
75070
75092
75150
75218
75252
75274
75343
75354
Chemical
Tetracycline hydro-chloride
Methanol
sopropyl alcohol
Chloroform
Hexachloroethane
N,N-Dimethylformamide
Triaziquone
Hexachlorophene
n-Butyl alcohol
Benzene
1,1,1 -Trichloroethane
Methoxychlor
Trypan blue
Bromomethane (Methyl
bromide)
Ethylene
Chloromethane
Methyl iodide
Hydrogen cyanide
Methylene bromide
Chloroethane (Ethyl chloride)
Vinyl chloride
Acetonitrile
Acetaldehyde
Dichloromethane
Carbon disulfide
Ethylene oxide
Bromoform
(Tribromomethane)
Dichlorobromomethane
Ethylidene dichloride
Vinylidene chloride
(1.1-dichloroethvlene)
Air Decay
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN

AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exo
Koc

313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP

_yman, 4-8
_yman, 4-5
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
_yman, 4-8
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
_yman, 4-5
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
_yman, 4-5
313PROP
H20
Decay



HYDRO


EFDB



HYDRO


EFDB

HYDRO
HYDRO

EFDB
EFDB



HYDRO

EFDB
HYDRO
HYDRO
EFDB

LOG

-------
CAS
75434
75445
75456
75558
75569
75638
75650
75683
75694
75718
75729
75865
75887
76017
76028
76062
76131
76142
76153
76448
76879
77474
77736
77781
78488
78842
78875
78886
78922
78933
79005
79016
79061
Chemical
Dichlorofluoro methane
Phosgene
Chlorodifluoromethane
(HCFC-22)
Propyleneimine
Propylene oxide
Bromotrifluoromethane (Halon
1301)
tert-Butyl alcohol
1 -Chloro-1 ,1 -difluoroethane
CFC-11
(trichlorofluoromethane)
CFC-12
(dichlorodifluoromethane)
Chlorotrifluoromethane
2-Methyllactonitrile
2-Chloro-1,1,1-trifluoroethane
Pentachloroethane
Trichloroacetyl chloride
Chloropicrin
Freon 113
CFC114
(1,2-dichloro,1,1,2,2-tetrafluor
oethane)
CFC115
(chloropentafluoroethane)
Heptachlor
Triphenyltin hydroxide
Hexachlorocyclopentadiene
Dicyclopentadiene
Dimethyl sulfate
S,S,S-tributyltrithiophosphate
sobutyraldehyde
1 ,2-Dichloropropane
2,3-Dichloropropene
sec-Butyl alcohol
Methyl ethyl ketone
1,1,2-Trichloroethane
Trichloroethylene
Acrylamide
Air Decay
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
Koc

_yman, 4-8

313PROP
313PROP
_yman, 4-8
313PROP
_yman, 4-5
_yman, 4-5
_yman, 4-5



_yman, 4-5


313PROP
_yman, 4-8
_yman, 4-5
313PROP

313PROP

313PROP

313PROP
313PROP
_yman, 4-5
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
H20
Decay
HYDRO

HYDRO
EFDB
EFDB


HYDRO



EFDB
HYDRO
HYDRO
EFDB




EFDB

EFDB

EFDB
EFDB

HYDRO
EFDB


HYDRO


LOG

-------
CAS
79107
79118
79196
79210
79221
79345
79447
79469
80057
80159
80626
81072
81889
82280
82688
84742
85018
85449
86306
87627
87683
87865
88062
88755
88857
88891
90040
90437
90948
91087
91203
91225
91598
91941
92524
92671
92875
92933
Chemical
Acrylic acid
Chloroacetic acid
Thiosemicarbazide
Peracetic acid
Methyl chlorocarbonate
1 ,1 ,2,2-Tetrachloroethane
Dimethylcarbamyl chloride
2-Nitropropane
4,4'-lsopropylidenediphenol
Cumene hydroperoxide
Methyl methacrylate
Saccharin (manufacturing)
C.I. Food Red 15
1 -Amino-2-methyl-anthraquino
ne
Quintozene
Dibutyl phthalate
Phenanthrene
Phthalic anhydride
N-Nitrosodiphenylamine
2,6-Xylidine
Hexachloro-1 ,3-butadiene
Pentachlorophenol
2,4,6-Trichlorophenol
2-Nitrophenol
Dinitrobutyl phenol (Dinoseb)
Picric acid
o-Anisidine
2-Phenylphenol
Michlers Ketone
Toluene-2,6-diisocyanate
Naphthalene
Quinoline
beta-Naphthylamine
3,3'-Dichlorobenzidine
Biphenyl
4-Aminodiphenyl
Benzidine
4-Nitrobiohenvl
Air Decay
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
Koc
_yman, 4-5
_yman, 4-5

313PROP
_yman, 4-8
313PROP
_yman, 4-8
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
_yman, 4-8
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP

313PROP
313PROP

313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP

_yman, 4-5
_yman, 4-5
313PROP
313PROP
_yman, 4-8
313PROP
313PROP
_yman, 4-5
313PROP
313PROP
_yman, 4-5
313PROP
313PROP
H20
Decay



HYDRO
EFDB
HYDRO
EFDB



HYDRO




HYDRO

EFDB











EFDB








LOG

-------
CAS
93652
94111
94360
94586
94597
94746
94757
94804
94826
95476
95487
95501
95534
95545
95636
95692
95807
95954
96093
96128
96184
96333
96457
97234
97563
98077
98828
98862
98873
98884
98953
99309
99558
99592
99650
100016
100027
100254
Chemical
Mecoprop
2,4-D isopropyl ester
Benzoyl peroxide
Dihydrosafrole
Safrole
Methoxone (MCPA)
2,4-D
((2,4-dichlorophenoxy)acetic
acid)
2,4-D butyl ester
2,4-DB
o-Xylene
o-Cresol
1 ,2-Dichlorobenzene
o-Toluidine
1 ,2-Phenylenediamine
1 , 2, 4-Trimethyl benzene
p-Chloro-o-toluidine
2,4-Diaminotoluene
2,4,5-Trichlorophenol
Styrene oxide
1 ,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane
(DBCP)
1 ,2,3-Trichloropropane
Methyl acrylate
Ethylene thiourea
Dichlorophene
C.I. Solvent Yellow 3
Benzotrichloride
Cumene
Acetophenone
Benzal chloride
Benzoyl chloride
Nitrobenzene
Dichloran
5-Nitro-o-toluidine
5-Nitro-o-anisidine
m-Dinitrobenzene
p-Nitroaniline
4-Nitrophenol
p-Dinitrobenzene
Air Decay
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
Koc


_yman, 4-5
_yman, 4-8
313PROP

313PROP


313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP

313PROP

313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP

313PROP
313PROP

_yman, 4-5
313PROP
313PROP
_yman, 4-5
313PROP
_yman, 4-8
313PROP

_yman, 4-8
_yman, 4-5
_yman, 4-5

313PROP
Lvman. 4-5
H20
Decay

HYDRO
HYDRO




EFDB










EFDB
HYDRO
HYDRO
HYDRO



EFDB


EFDB
EFDB








LOG

-------
CAS
100414
100425
100447
100754
101053
101144
101611
101688
101779
101804
101906
104121
104949
105679
106423
106445
106467
106478
106503
106514
106887
106898
106934
106990
107028
107051
107062
107119
107131
107186
Chemical
Ethyl benzene
Styrene
Benzyl chloride
N-Nitrosopiperidine
Anilazine
4,4'-Methylenebis(2-chloroanili
ne)
4,4'-Methylenebis(N,N-dimeth
ylbenzenamine)
Methylenebis(phenylisocyanat
e) (MDI)
4,4'-Methylenedianiline
4,4'-Diaminodiphenylether
Diglycidyl resorcinol ether
p-Chlorophenyl isocyanate
p-Anisidine
2,4-Dimethylphenol
p-Xylene
p-Cresol
1 ,4-Dichlorobenzene
p-Chloroaniline
p-Phenylenediamine
Quinone
1,2-Butylene oxide
Epichlorohydrin
1,2-Dibromoethane
1,3-Butadiene
Acrolein
Allyl chloride
1,2-Dichloroethane
Allylamine
Acrylonitrile
Allyl alcohol
Air Decay
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
Koc
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP

313PROP
313PROP

313PROP
313PROP


_yman, 4-5
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP

_yman, 4-5
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP

313PROP
_yman, 4-8
H20
Decay


EFDB







HYDRO
EFDB








HYDRO
EFDB
HYDRO


EFDB
HYDRO



LOG

-------
CAS
107197
107211
107302
108054
108101
108316
108383
108394
108452
108601
108883
108907
108930
108952
109068
109773
109864
110543
110576
110805
110827
110861
111422
111444
111911
114261
115071
115286
115322
116063
117793
117817
118741
119904
119937
Chemical
Propargyl alcohol
Ethylene glycol
Chloromethyl methyl ether
Vinyl acetate
Methyl isobutyl ketone
Maleic anhydride
m-Xylene
m-Cresol
1 ,3-Phenylenediamine
Bis(2-chloro-1 -methethyl) ether
Toluene
Chlorobenzene
Cyclohexanol
Phenol
2-Methylpyridine
Malonitrile
2-Methoxyethanol
n-Hexane
trans-1 ,4-Dichloro-2-butene
2-Ethoxyethanol
Cyclohexane
Pyridine
Diethanolamine
Bis(2-chloroethyl) ether
Bis(2-chloroethoxy)methane
Propoxur
Propylene (Propene)
Chlorendic acid
Dicofol
Aldicarb
2-Aminoanthraquinone
Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate
Hexachlorobenzene
3,3'-Dimethoxybenzidine
3.3'-Dimethvlbenzidine
Air Decay
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
ave
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
Koc

313PROP
_yman, 4-8
313PROP
313PROP
_yman, 4-8
313PROP
313PROP

313PROP
313PROP
313PROP

313PROP
_yman, 4-8
_yman, 4-5
313PROP


313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
_yman, 4-5
313PROP
313PROP

313PROP

313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
H20
Decay


EFDB
EFDB

EFDB









EFDB


EFDB





EFDB
EFDB



EFDB

HYDRO



LOG

-------
CAS
120127
120365
120581
120718
120809
120821
120832
121142
121448
121697
121755
122349
122394
122667
123319
123386
123637
123728
123911
124403
124732
126727
126987
126998
127184
128030
128041
128665
131113
131522
132274
132649
133062
133073
1 33904
Chemical
Anthracene
2,4-DP (Dichlorprop)
sosafrole
p-Cresidine
Catechol
1 ,2,4-Trichlorobenzene
2,4-Dichlorophenol
2,4-Dinitrotoluene
Triethylamine
N,N-Dimethylaniline
Malathion
Simazine
Diphenylamine
1 ,2-Diphenylhydrazine
Hydroquinone
Propionaldehyde
Paraldehyde
Butyraldehyde
Dioxane
Dimethylamine
1 ,2-Dibromotetrafluoroethane
Tris(2,3-dibromopropyl)phosp
hate
Methacrylonitrile
Chloroprene
Tetrachloroethylene
(Perchloroethylene)
Potassium
dimethyldithiocarbamate
Sodium
dimethyldithiocarbamate
C.I. Vat Yellow 4
Dimethyl phthalate
Sodium pentachlorophenate
Sodium o-phenylphenoxide
Dibenzofuran
Captan
Folpet
Chloramben
Air Decay
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
ave
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
Koc
313PROP

_yman, 4-8
_yman, 4-5
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP

313PROP



313PROP
313PROP
313PROP

313PROP
313PROP

_yman, 4-8
313PROP
_yman, 4-5
313PROP
313PROP


313PROP
313PROP


313PROP
313PROP

313PROP
H20
Decay










EFDB

















HYDRO



EFDB
HYDRO

LOG

-------
CAS
134292
134327
135206
136458
137268
137417
137428
138932
139139
139651
140885
141322
142596
148798
149304
150505
150685
151564
156105
156627
298000
300765
301122
302012
306832
309002
314409
319846
330541
330552
333415
334883
353593
354110
354143
354234
354256
357573
Chemical
o-Anisidine hydro-chloride
alpha-Naphthylamine
Cupferron
Dipropyl isocinchomeronate
Thiram
Potassium
N-methyldithiocarbamate
Metham sodium
Disodium
cyanodithioimidocarbonate
Nitrilotriacetic acid
4,4'-Thiodianiline
Ethyl acrylate
Butyl acrylate
Nabam
Thiabendazole
2-Mercaptobenzothiazole
Merphos
Monuron
Ethyleneimine (Aziridine)
p-Nitrosodiphenylamine
Calcium cyanamide
Methyl parathion
Naled
Oxydemeton methyl
Hydrazine
2,2-Dichloro-1,1,1-trifluoroetha
ne
Aldrin
Bromacil
alpha-Hexachlorocyclohexane
Diuron
Linuron
Diazinon
Diazomethane
Bromochlorodifluoromethane
1 ,1 ,1 ,2-Tetrachloro-2-fluoroeth
ane(HCFC-121a)
1,1,2,2-Tetrachloro-1-fluoroeth
ane(HCFC-121)
1 ,2-Dichloro-1 ,1 ,2-trifluoroetha
ne
1 -Chloro-1 ,1 ,2,2-tetrafluoroeth
ane
Brucine
Air Decay
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
Koc
_yman, 4-8
313PROP
_yman, 4-8

_yman, 4-5



313PROP
313PROP
313PROP
313PROP





313PROP
313PROP
Lyman, 4-8



Lyman, 4-8
_yman, 4-8
313PROP





_yman, 4-8
_yman, 4-8


_yman, 4-8
_yman, 4-8

H20
Decay



HYDRO
EFDB

EFDB



HYDRO
HYDRO
EFDB




EFDB


EFDB

EFDB

HYDRO


EFDB
EFDB
EFDB
EFDB



HYDRO
HYDRO
HYDRO

LOG

-------
CAS
422446
422480
422560
431867
460355
463581
465736
492808
505602
507551
510156
528290
532274
533744
534521
540590
541413
541537
541731
542756
542767
542881
554132
556616
563473
569642
576261
584849
593602
594423
606202
612828
612839
615054
615281
Chemical
1 ,2-Dichloro-1 ,1 ,2,3,3-pentaflu
ore-propane (HCFC-225bb)
2,3-Dichloro-1 ,1 ,1 ,2,3-pentaflu
oropropane (HCFC-225ba)
3,3-Dichloro-1 ,1 ,1 ,2,2-pentaflu
oropropane (HCFC-225ca)
1 ,2-Dichloro-1 ,1 ,3,3,3-pentaflu
oropropane (HCFC-225da)
3-Chloro-1,1,1-trifluoropropan
e (HCFC-253fb)
Carbonyl sulfide
sodrin
Auramine
Mustard gas
1 ,3-Dichloro-1 ,1 ,2,2,3-pentaflu
oropropane
Chlorobenzilate
o-Dinitrobenzene
2-Chloroacetophenone
Dazomet
4,6-Dinitro-o-cresol
1,2-Dichloroethylene
Ethyl chloroformate
2,4-Dithiobiuret
1 ,3-Dichlorobenzene
1 ,3-Dichloropropylene
3-Chloropropionitrile
Bis(chloromethyl)ether
Lithium carbonate
Methyl isothiocyanate
3-Chloro-2-methyl-1 -propene
C.I. Basic Green 4
2,6-Dimethylphenol
Toluene-2,4-diisocyanate
Vinyl bromide
Perchloromethyl mercaptan
2,6-Dinitrotoluene
3,3'-Dimethylbenzidine
dihydrochloride
3,3'-Dichlorobenzidine
dihydrochloride
2,4-Diaminoanisole
1 ,2-Phenylenediamine
dihvdrochloride
Air Decay
AOPWIN

AOPWIN

AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
ave
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
ave
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
Koc





313PROP

313PROP
313PROP

313PROP
_yman, 4-5
313PROP

_yman, 4-5
313PROP
_yman, 4-8

313PROP
313PROP

_yman, 4-5



_yman, 4-5

_yman, 4-8
313PROP

313PROP


313PROP

H20
Decay
HYDRO

HYDRO

HYDRO



EFDB
HYDRO
EFDB


EFDB



EFDB

EFDB
EFDB
EFDB

EFDB
EFDB


EFDB

EFDB





LOG

-------
CAS
621647
624180
624839
630206
636215
639587
680319
684935
709988
759739
759944
764410
812044
834128
842079
872504
924163
924425
957517
961115
989388
1114712
1120714
1134232
1163195
1313275
1314201
1319773
1320189
1330207
1332214
1335871
1336363
1344281
1464535
1563662
1582098
1634044
Chemical
N-Nitrosodi-n-propylamine
1 ,4-Phenylenediamine
dihydrochloride
Methyl isocyanate
1,1,1,2-Tetrachloroethane
o-Toluidine hydrochloride
Triphenyltin chloride
Hexamethylphosphoramide
N-Nitroso-N-methylurea
Propanil
N-Nitroso-N-ethylurea
Ethyl dipropylthiocarbamate
1,4-Dichloro-2-butene
1,1-Dichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroetha
ne(HCFC-123b)
Ametryn
C.I. Solvent Yellow 14
N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone
N-Nitrosodi-n-butylamine
N-methylolacrylamide
Diphenamid
Tetrachlorvinphos
C.I. Basic Red 1
Pebulate
Propane sultone
Cycloate
Decabromodiphenyl ether
Molybdenum trioxide
Thorium dioxide
Cresol (mixed isomers)
2,4-D, propylene glycol
butylether ester
Xylene (mixed isomers)
Asbestos (friable)
Hexachloronaphthalene
Polychlorinated biphenyls
(PCBs)
Aluminum oxide (fibrous
forms)
Diepoxybutane
Carbofuran
Trifluralin
Methyl tert-butyl ether
Air Decay
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN*

AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN


AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN

AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
Koc
313PROP

_yman, 4-8
_yman, 4-5
_yman, 4-8

313PROP
_yman, 4-5

313PROP

_yman, 4-8
_yman, 4-8

313PROP

313PROP


313PROP
_yman, 4-8

313PROP

_yman, 4-5


_yman, 4-5

_yman, 4-5

313PROP
_yman, 4-5

313PROP

313PROP
313PROP
H20
Decay


EFDB
HYDRO




EFDB


EFDB








HYDRO
EFDB
EFDB





HYDRO





EFDB
EFDB


LOG

-------
CAS
1649087
1689845
1689992
1717006
1836755
1861401
1897456
1910425
1912249
1918009
1918021
1918167
1928434
1929733
1929824
1937377
1982690
1983104
2032657
2155706
2164070
2164172
2212671
2234131
2300665
2303164
2303175
2312358
2439012
2439103
2524030
2602462
2655154
2699798
2702729
2832408
2837890
2971382
3118976
3383968
Chemical
1 ,2-Dichloro-1 ,1 -difluoroethan
Bromoxynil
Bromoxynil octanoate
1 ,1 -Dichloro-1 -fluoroethane
Nitrofen
Benfluralin
Chlorothalonil
Paraquat dichloride
Atrazine
Dicamba
Picloram
Propachlor
2,4-D 2-ethylhexyl ester
2,4-D butoxyethyl ester
Nitrapyrin
C.I. Direct Black 38
Sodium dicamba
Tributyltin fluoride
Methiocarb
Tributyltin methacrylate
Dipotassium endothall
Fluometuron
Molinate
Octachloronaphthalene
Dimethylamine dicamba
Diallate
Triallate
Propargite
Chinomethionat
(6-methyl-1,3-dithiolo[4,5-b]qui
noxalin-2-one)
Dodine
Dimethyl chlorothiophosphate
C.I. Direct Blue 6
2,3,5-trimethylphenyl
methylcarbamate
Sulfuryl fluoride (Vikane)
2,4-D sodium salt
C.I. Disperse YellowS
2-Chloro-1 ,1 ,1 ,2-tetrafluoroeth
ane
2,4-D chlorocrotyl ester
C.I. Solvent Orange 7
Temephos
Air Decay
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN;
ave
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
Koc



_yman, 4-8
313PROP

313PROP








_yman, 4-8





313PROP

313PROP

313PROP





_yman, 4-8



_yman, 4-5
_yman, 4-8

313PROP

H20
Decay
HYDRO

HYDRO
HYDRO







HYDRO
HYDRO
EFDB
EFDB



EFDB


HYDRO


HYDRO




HYDRO
EFDB





HYDRO
HYDRO


LOG

-------
CAS
3653483
3761533
4080313
4170303
4549400
4680788
5234684
5598130
5902512
6459945
6484522
7287196
7429905
7439921
7439965
7439976
7440020
7440224
7440280
7440360
7440382
7440393
7440417
7440439
7440473
7440484
7440508
7440622
7440666
7550450
7632000
7637072
7647010
7664382
7664393
7664417
7664939
7696120
7697372
7723140
7726956
7758012
Chemical
Methoxone sodium salt
C.I. Food Red 5
1 -(3-chloroallyl)-3,5,7-triaza-1 -
azoniaadamantane chloride
Crotonaldehyde
N-Nitrosomethylvinylamine
C.I. Acid Green 3
Carboxin
Chlorpyrifos methyl
Terbacil
C.I. Acid Red 114
Ammonium Nitrate
Prometryn
Aluminum (fume or dust)
Lead
Manganese
Mercury
Nickel
Silver
Thallium
Antimony
Arsenic
Barium
Beryllium
Cadmium
Chromium
Cobalt
Copper
Vanadium (fume or dust)
Zinc (fume or dust)
Titanium tetrachloride
Sodium nitrite
Boron trifluoride
Hydrochloric acid
Phosphoric acid
Hydrogen fluoride
Ammonia
Sulfuric acid
Tetramethrin
Nitric acid
Phosphorus (yellow or white)
Bromine
Potassium bromate
Air Decay
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
ave
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN

AOPWIN
AOPWIN


AOPWIN
AOPWIN

AOPWIN
AOPWIN


AOPWIN

AOPWIN

AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN

AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
Koc

_yman, 4-8


313PROP
_yman, 4-8




































H20
Decay







EFDB
HYDRO























HYDRO




EFDB


HYDRO

LOG

-------
CAS
7782414
7782492
7782505
7783202
7786347
7803512
8001352
8001589
9006422
10028156
10034932
10049044
10061026
10294345
10453868
12122677
12427382
13194484
13356086
13463406
13474889
13684565
14484641
15972608
16071866
16543558
17804352
19044883
19666309
20325400
20354261
20816120
20859738
21087649
21725462
22781233
23564058
23564069
23950585
25311711
Chemical
Fluorine
Selenium
Chlorine
Ammonium sulfate
Mevinphos
Phosphine
Toxaphene
Creosote, coal tar
Metiram
Ozone
Hydrazine sulfate
Chlorine dioxide
trans-1 ,3-Dichloropropene
Boron trichloride
Resmethrin
Zineb
Maneb
Ethoprop
Fenbutatin oxide (Vendex)
ron pentacarbonyl
1 ,1 -Dichloro-1 ,2,2,3,3-pentaflu
oropropane (HCFC-225cc)
Desmedipham
Ferbam
0~ris(dimethylcarbamodithioat
o-S,S')iron)
Alachlor
C.I. Direct Brown 95
Nitrosonornicotine
Benomyl
Oryzalin
(4-(dipropylamino)-3,5-dinitrob
enzenesulfonamide)
Oxydiazon
3,3'-Dimethoxybenzidine
dihydrochloride
Methazole
Osmium tetroxide
Aluminum phosphide
Metribuzin
Cyanazine
Bendiocarb
Thiophanate-methyl
Thiophanate ethyl
Pronamide
Isofenphos
Air Decay
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN

AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
ave
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN

AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN

AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
Koc






313PROP








313PROP
313PROP







_yman, 4-8
313PROP












_yman, 4-5

H20
Decay
HYDRO

HYDRO

EFDB

HYDRO





EFDB

HYDRO
EFDB




HYDRO
EFDB




EFDB






HYDRO

EFDB
EFDB
HYDRO

HYDRO
LOG

-------
CAS
25321146
25321226
25376458
26002802
26471625
26628228
26644462
27314132
28057489
28249776
28407376
29232937
30560191
31218834
3308961 1
34014181
34077877
35367385
35400432
35554440
35691657
38727558
39156417
39300453
39515418
40487421
41198087
41766750
42874033
43121433
50471448
51235042
51338273
51630581
52645531
53404196
53404378
53404607
Chemical
Dinitrotoluene (mixed
isomers)
Dichlorobenzene (mixed
isomers)
Diaminotoluene (mixed
isomers)
Phenothrin
Toluenediisocyanate
Sodium azide
Triforine
Norflurazon
D-trans-allethrin
(D-trans-chrysanthemic acid
of D-allethrone)
Thiobencarb
C.I. Direct Blue 218
Pirimiphos methyl
Acephate
Propetamphos
Amitraz
Tebuthiuron
Dichlorotrifluoroethane
Diflubenzuron
Sulprofos
mazalil
1 -Bromo-1 -(bromomethyl)-l ,3-
propanedicarbonitrile
Diethatyl ethyl
2,4-Diaminoanisole sulfate
Dinocap
Fenpropathrin
Pendimethalin
Profenofos
3,3'-Dimethylbenzidine
dihydrofluoride
Oxyfluorfen
Triadimefon
Vinclozolin
Hexazinone
Diclofop methyl
Fenvalerate
Permethrin
Bromacil lithium salt
2,4-D 2-ethyl-4-methylpentyl
ester
Dazomet. sodium salt
Air Decay
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
exp
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN

AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN

AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
ave
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN

AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN



Koc
_yman, 4-5
_yman, 4-5
_yman, 4-5

_yman, 4-8











_yman, 4-8





_yman, 4-8















H20
Decay



HYDRO
EFDB








HYDRO







HYDRO

HYDRO
EFDB





EFDB
HYDRO
HYDRO
HYDRO
HYDRO



LOG

-------
CAS
55290647
55406536
57213691
59669260
60168889
60207901
62476599
63938103
64902723
64969342
66441234
67485294
68085858
68359375
69409945
69806504
71751412
72178020
72490018
74051802
76578148
77501634
82657043
88671890
90454185
90982324
101200480
111512562
111984099
127564925
128903219
136013791
N010
N020
N040
N050
Chemical
Dimethipin
3-lodo-2-propynyl
butylcarbamate
Triclopyr triethylammonium
salt
Thiodicarb
Fenarimol
Propiconazole
Acifluorfen, sodium salt
Chlorotetrafluoroethane
Chlorsulfuron
3,3'-Dichlorobenzidine sulfate
Fenoxaprop ethyl
Hydramethylnon
Cyhalothrin
Cyfluthrin
Fluvalinate
Fluazifop butyl
Abamectin
Fomesafen
Fenoxycarb
Sethoxydim
Quizalofop-ethyl
Lactofen
Bifenthrin
Myclobutanil
Dichloro-1 ,1 ,2-trifluoroethane
Chlorimuron ethyl
Tribenuron methyl
1 ,1 -Dichloro-1 ,2,3,3,3-pentaflu
oropropane (HCFC-225eb)
3,3'-Dimethoxybenzidine
hydrochloride
Dichloropentafluoropropane
2,2-Dichloro-1 ,1 ,1 ,3,3-pentaflu
oropropane (HCFC-225aa)
1 ,3-Dichloro-1 ,1 ,2,3,3-pentaflu
oropropane (HCFC-225ea)
Antimony compounds
Arsenic compounds
Barium compounds
Beryllium compounds
Air Decay
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN;
ave
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN

AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN

AOPWIN
AOPWIN
AOPWIN


AOPWIN
AOPWIN




Koc







_yman, 4-8
















_yman, 4-8











H20
Decay

EFDB
HYDRO
EFDB




EFDB

HYDRO

HYDRO
HYDRO
HYDRO
HYDRO


HYDRO

HYDRO
HYDRO
HYDRO


EFDB
HYDRO
HYDRO


HYDRO
HYDRO




LOG

-------
CAS
N078
N084
N090
N096
N100
N106
N120
N171
N230
N420
N450
N458
N495
N503
N511
N575
N583
N590
N725
N740
N746
N760
N874
N982
Chemical
Cadmium compounds
Chlorophenols
Chromium compounds
Cobalt compounds
Copper compounds
Cyanide compounds
Diisocyanates
Ethylenebisdithiocarbamic
acid, salts and esters
(EBDCs)
Glycol ethers
Lead compounds
Manganese compounds
Mercury compounds
Nickel compounds
Nicotine and salts
Nitrate compounds (water
dissociable)
Polybrominated biphenyls
(PBBs)
Polychlorinated alkanes
Polycyclic aromatic
compounds
Selenium compounds
Silver compounds
Strychnine and salts
Thallium compounds
Warfarin and salts
Zinc compounds
Air Decay















?








Koc

Mabey;
2-chl













Lyman, 4-5








H20
Decay















?








LOG

-------
AOPWIN, isom. Molecular weight of isomer from AOPWIN used.
Assump.       The following assumptions were made:
                    For Incinerator DRE value, assumed the typical municipal waste combustor destruction/removal efficiency for organics is 99 percent.
                    For the POTW Partition (Sludge) value, it is assumed that all metals and metal compounds partition 100 percent to sludge.
Bodek         Bodek, I., W.J. Lyman, W.F. Reehl, and D.H. Rosenblatt.  1988. Environmental Inorganic Chemistry.  Pergamon Press. New York.  The Kd value for
               aluminum is based on Langmuir isotherm data.
by law         PCBs are assumed to have an Incinerator DRE of 99.9999 percent, as required by TSCA regulation.
calc           For most inorganic compounds, it was assumed that 100 percent of the compound that was removed by the POTW partitioned to sludge.
EFDB         Syracuse Research Corporation. 1995. Environmental Fate Data Base.  Syracuse, NY.
EFDB, est.     See above reference; molecular weight calculated based on molecular formula given.
EFDB; HCN    See above reference; hydrogen cyanide used as a surrogate.
el             Classes of inorganic compounds are assumed to  behave like the elemental inorganic compound.
EPA, 87       U.S. EPA. 1987. Ambient Aquatic Life Water Quality Criteria for Silver. Draft. Environmental Research Laboratories, Duluth, MN and Narragansett,
               RI. Sept.
EPA, 88a      U.S. EPA, 1988. Ambient Water Quality Criteria for Aluminum.  1988.  EPA 440/5-86-008.  August.
EPA, 88b      U.S. EPA.  1988. Ambient Aquatic Life Water Quality Criteria for Antimony (III).  Draft.  Environmental Research Laboratories, Duluth, MN and
               Narragansett, RI. Aug.
EPA, 92       U.S. EPA. 1992. Human Health Risk Assessment for the Use and Disposal of Sewage Sludge: Benefits of Regulation. Ppd by Abt Associates for the U.S.
               EPA Office of Water.
est            Molecular weight calculated based on molecular formula given.
FCH          Sine, C. (ed.).  1992. Farm Chemicals Handbook. Meister Publishing Company.
FCH; calc      Molecular weight calculated based on formula given in above reference.
Gerritse       Gerritse, R.G., R. Vriesema, J.W. Dalenberg, and H.P. De Roos. 1982.  Effect of Sewage Sludge on Trace Element Mobility in Soils. J. Environ. Qual.
               ll(3):359-364.
               Kd values measured in column studies for sand with an foe of 0.0355, a CEC of 0.22 meq/g, zero clay content, and a solution pH of 5.
Hine          Hine, J. and P.K. Mookerjee.  1975. The Intrinsic Hydrophilic Character of Organic Compounds. Correlations in Terms of Structural Contributions. J.
               Org. Chem. 40(3):292-298. KH estimated based on method presented.
HYDRO       HYDRO program, Syracuse Research Corp., 1991-97.  Syracuse, NY.
Jorg           Jorgensen, S.E.  and I. Johnsen. 1981. Principles  of Environmental Science and Technology.  Elsevier, NY.
Lyman, 4-5     Lyman, W.J., W.F. Reehl, and D.H. Rosenblatt. 1990. Handbook of Chemical Property Estimation Methods.  American Chemical Society. Washington,
               D.C. Eq'n 4-5 used to estimate Koc.
Lyman, 4-8     See above reference; Equation 4-8 used to estimate Koc.
Lyman, 5-2     See above reference; Equation 5-2 used to estimate Koc.
Mabey; 2-chl   Mabey, W.R., J.H. Smith, R.T. Podoll, H.L. Johnson, T. Mill, T.-W. Chou, J. Gates, I.W. Partridge, H. Jaber, and D.  Vandenberg.
               1982. Aquatic Fate Process Data for Organic Priority Pollutants, Chapter 4, EPA Report No. 440/4-81-014. Properties of 2-chlorophenol, a priority
               pollutant, were used.
Merck         Budavari, S. (ed.). 1989.  The Merck Index. Merck & Co., Inc. Rahway,NJ.
Merck;  assump. Assumed value based on text in Merck Index.
Merck;  calc     Molecular weight calculated based on information presented in Merck Index.
Merck,  est.     Molecular weight for asbestos calculated from molecular formula for chrysotile in Merck Index.
Merck;  T20     Water solubility calculated at 20 degrees Celsius; from the Merck Index.
Merck;  T25     Water solubility calculated at 25 degrees Celsius; from the Merck Index.
Merck;  inf     Chemical is infinitely soluble in water; from the Merck Index.
Morel, 83      Morel, Francois M.M. 1983. Principles of Aquatic Chemistry. John Wiley & Sons, Inc.  New York. The Henry's Law Constant for ammonia is estimated
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                1988-1997 TRI data, am

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               from stability constants.
NPDWS       MCLs taken from the National Primary Drinking Water Standards (USEPA, 1994).
NPDWS; fpl    MCL for asbestos is expressed in million fibers/liter; does not affect model results because MCL is not modeled.
NPDWS; TTreq. No MCL in place; instead, a treatment technique is required.
One Liner      EFGWB One Liner Database, USEPA, Office of Pesticide Programs, Environmental Fate and Effects Division, Environmental Fate and Groundwater
               Branch.
POTW; est     POTW removal efficiencies and partitioning percentages were estimated based on averages derived for classes of KH and Kow values.
RREL         RREL Treatability Database, Version 5.0. Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory. U.S. EPA.  Cincinnati, OH.
SUM          POTW removal efficiencies were obtained by summing the three POTW partition values.
Tetra Tech     Tetra Tech. 1985. Bioaccumulation Monitoring Guidance: 1.1 Estimating the Potential for Bioaccumulation of Priority Pollutants and
               301(h) Pesticides Discharged into Marine and Estuarine Waters. Final Report.  Office of Marine and Estuary Protection, U.S. EPA.
Version 1.02                                                                                1988-1997 TRI data, am
November 15, 1999                                                         D-35

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      APPENDIX E. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON GRAPHING CAPABILITIES

       You may wish to use the extensive graphing capabilities of the Indicators model. All plot types
available in the Indicators model are discussed below.
Plot Types

       The following descriptions of graph types are available in First Impression Help (an online help
file used for the graphing options available in the Indicators model):
Line Charts
Bar Charts
Horizontal Bar Charts
Clustered Bar Charts
Step Charts
Combination Charts
Use line charts to show trends or changes in data over a period of time.
These charts emphasize time flow and rate of change rather than amount
of change.  In 2-D line charts, values are plotted along the vertical (Y)
axis and categories are displayed on the horizontal (X) axis. In 3-D charts,
values are plotted on the vertical (Y) axis, categories are grouped along
the horizontal (X) axis, and the depth (Z) axis shows series.

Use these to compare one item to another, or to compare a number of
items over a period of time. The charts show changes from one category
to another. Each 2-D or 3-D bar represents a value in the data grid. Bars
representing a series are located at the same position within each category
and have the same color and pattern. In 2-D charts, values are grouped
on the vertical  (Y) axis, and bars  are grouped by  category  along the
horizontal (X) axis. On 3-D charts, values are plotted on the vertical (Y)
axis, categories are grouped along the horizontal (X) axis, and the depth
(Z) axis shows series.

Horizontal bars  are  similar to standard bar  charts  except that the
categories are organized on a vertical (Y) axis and the values are plotted
on a horizontal (X) axis.

Series and data points in a clustered bar chart are displayed as they are in
a 2-D  bar chart; however, the chart and all the chart elements are
displayed in 3-D.

Use step  charts to compare items that do not show trends. Step charts
display distinct points along the value (Y) axis, with vertical lines showing
the difference  between each  point.  The horizontal  (X) axis shows
categories.

Use combination charts to visually highlight the differences between
multiple series of data. A different method can be used to draw each data
series.
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Pie and Doughnut Charts
Area Charts
Use pie or doughnut charts to show the relationship of parts to the whole.
Each pie or doughnut represents  a category. Each slice of the pie or
doughnut represents a value in that category. You can separate or explode
slices in a chart by clicking a slice and dragging it away from the rest of
the pie or doughnut.

Use area charts to emphasize the relative importance of values over a
period  of time. An area chart focuses on the magnitude of change rather
than the rate of change. Each filled area on the chart represents a series
and is identified by a different color or pattern. Values are plotted on the
vertical (Y) axis and categories are plotted on the horizontal (X) axis.
You can also chart one or more series against the secondary Y  axis
instead of the primary axis.
Formatting the Plot
       The following discussion describes in detail the options available for formatting your graph. This
discussion expands on the information included in Chapter 8. Each option listed at the far left below
refers to an option on the menu which can be activated by clicking the right mouse button while in the
Graphs screen.  The descriptions under each option indicate the additional  screens and options which
can be activated by each menu option.

General...     This option allows you to change options for the entire chart (including plot area, title,
              axes, and legend).   Two screens are embedded in the Format Chart screen which
              appears by clicking on General....  You can view these screens and options on these
              screens by clicking on the following tabs on the Format Chart screen:

              Options       By clicking this tab, you can make choices about the display of legends
                            and titles and whether to redisplay chart options to their default values.

              Backdrop     Clicking this tab allows you to change the appearance of the background
                            for the full chart area.
Plot...        This option allows you to change the format of the plot area. Clicking on this option
              brings up eight tabs shown on the Format Plot screen.  The tabs are:
              Type
              Location
By clicking this tab, you can change the type of plot you use to graph your
data.  (There are additional options for graphing your data using this tab
compared with using the pull-down menu  described above. However,
you may wish to concentrate on using the choices in the pull-down menu,
which have been selected specifically for graphing results of the Indicators
model.)

By clicking on this tab, you can change where your plot appears on the
screen.
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              Backdrop     Options associated with this tab allow you to change the appearance of
                            the background of the plot area (including the grid area and axes.)

              Order        Use this tab to change the order of the data series contained in the plot.

              Options      This tab allows you to change items including bar spacing (for bar charts),
                            chart direction (for pie and doughnut charts), and chart elements (for pie
                            and doughnut charts).

              3D View      Use this tab to change the rotation, elevation, viewing distance and other
                            features of three-dimensional graphs.

              3D Lighting  Use this tab to change the amount and type of light used to illuminate a
                            three-dimensional plot.

              Base
              and Walls     Use this tab to change the appearance  of the base and walls of three-
                            dimensional plots, and the wall (the grid area) of two-dimensional charts.
Series        This option allows you to change the appearance and labels on data series and data points.
              Clicking on this option brings up four additional menu options. You can click on any of
              the following options, and tabs will appear with a variety of options for formatting your
              data:

              Series...       Use this option to format a series of data. You can also indicate several
                            statistics (minimum and maximum values, the mean, standard deviation,
                            and a regression trend line of your series) on your graph.

              Label...       Click on this option to specify and format a label for a series. This option
                            cannot be used for bar graphs, combination graphs, pie charts or doughnut
                            charts.

              Data Point...  Use this option to select the appearance of data points within data series.
              Data Point
              Label...       Use this option to include a label for your data point and to select the
                            appearance of your label.

              NOTE: The items that are called data series and data points are determined by the layout
              of your original data table.  If your table includes the year as column variable and
              chemicals as row variables, the range of chemical scores for a given year is called a series
              in your graph; each individual chemical score within that year is a data point.
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Axis
Legend.
Title-
Footnote.
With this option, you can change the appearance of axes, axis labels and axis titles.
Clicking on this option brings up the following three additional menu options. You can
click on any of the following options, and tabs will appear with a variety of options for
formatting your data:

 Axis... With this option, you can change the appearance of grid lines, the scale of your
       chart (including values and number of divisions on the axis) and axis ticks that
       mark the scale of your graph.

Labels...      Use this option to control the background appearance, text alignment and
              orientation and font of your label, and the format of a numerical label.
              Title...
              Use this option to change the display of the axis title.
You can format the chart legend using the following tabs on the screen which appears by
clicking this menu option:

Backdrop     This tab allows you to change the appearance of the background of your
              legend.

Font          This tab allows you to change the legend font.

Location      Use this tab to change the placement of your legend.

Use this option to bring up the following tabs to format your chart title:

Backdrop     This tab allows you to change the background appearance.

Text          This option allows you to change the alignment, orientation, and content
              of the title.

Font          This tab allows you to change the font of the chart title.

Location      Use this tab to change the placement of the chart title.

You can format the chart footnote using the following tabs:

Backdrop     This tab allows you to change the background appearance.

Text          This option allows you to change the alignment, orientation, and content
              of the footnote.

Font          This tab allows you to change the font of the footnote.

Location      Use this tab to change the placement of the footnote.
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              NOTE:  The information initially contained in the footnote includes the source of the
              graph (i.e., from the Indicators model version 1.02), filename of the graph, file date,
              whether the data were subsetted, and the model used (e.g., full model, pounds.)
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   APPENDIX F. GLOSSARY OF TERMS COMMONLY USED IN THE INDICATORS
                   METHODOLOGY AND THE INDICATORS MODEL

Chronic Human Health Indicator:  This is the only Indicator that is operating in the current version
of the Indicators model; future versions of the model will address ecological effects and acute effects.
This Indicator addresses both chronic effects and chronic exposures related to human health. Chronic
effects are those that generally persist over a long period of time whether or not they occur immediately
after exposure or are delayed. Chronic exposure refers to multiple exposures occurring over an extended
period of time, or a significant fraction of an  individual's lifetime.

exposed population:  The exposed population is the population that is likely to come in contact with a
chemical. The population differs depending on the exposure pathway  modeled.   For instance, the
population exposed to chemicals released to groundwater is the population that obtains their drinking
water from groundwater sources, whereas the population exposed to chemicals that are released to air
are those within a 21-km by 21-km grid surrounding the facility.

exposure pathway:  The exposure pathway is the physical course that a chemical takes from the
chemical source to the exposed individual and is related to the type of release.  Pathways modeled by the
Indicator include air from a facility stack, fugitive air releases, air emitted from a larger area (e.g., an
outdoor disposal site), surface water, and groundwater.

exposure route:  The exposure route is the way a chemical enters an individual after contact. The
Indicators model considers exposure by ingestion and inhalation, but does not address dermal absorption.

Indicator Element (also called Score in the Indicators model): This score is calculated by multiplying
the toxicity weight by the surrogate dose by the exposed population for a given facility, a given chemical,
and a given environmental medium  (i.e., exposure pathway).

Indicator Value: This value is calculated by summing some or all Indicator Elements for one or more
years of reported chemical releases and transfers.

normalization: In the Indicators model, it  is possible to express the Indicator Values, Subindicator
Values, and Indicator Elements normalized to some base value. For example, national normalization
divides the Indicator Value by the sum of all Indicator Elements for all facilities in the base year of 1988
and multiplies by 100,000 for ease of analysis. Reported TRI pounds cannot be normalized.

Subindicator Value:  This value is similar  to the Indicator Value but is calculated using a subset of
Indicator Elements. For example, a Subindicator may be calculated by summing all facility and media-
specific scores for one given chemical.

surrogate dose: This chemical-, media-, and facility-specific dose to an individual is calculated in several
steps.  First, exposure  pathway-specific chemical release volumes are combined with physicochemical
properties and  site-specific  characteristics in models to estimate an ambient concentration in the
environmental medium of concern.  The ambient media concentration is then combined with standard
human exposure assumptions (for adults) to  estimate the magnitude of the dose.

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toxicity weight:  This weight is a proportional numerical weight applied to a chemical based on its
toxicity. The toxicity of a chemical is assessed using EPA-established standard methodologies. For each
exposure route, chemicals are weighted based  on their single, most sensitive adverse chronic human
health effect (cancer or the most sensitive noncancer effect).  The range of toxicity weights differs
depending on whether the chemical is a carcinogen or a noncarcinogen:  the range is approximately 0.1
to 1,000,000 for carcinogens and approximately 0.001 to 100,000 for noncarcinogens.

[Additional facility-, chemical-,  toxicity-, and exposure-specific terms are defined in chapters  that
describe the computer operations.]
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            APPENDIX G.  ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ON FLAG FIELDS

A comprehensive check  has  been performed on the  various flag fields in  the  Risk-  Screening
Environmental Indicators model, to ensure that the fields are correct and that any change in the status
of any chemicals has been properly accounted for. Effective October of 1999, the fields in the model are
in accordance with the sources listed below. The fields in the model which were checked are as follows:

       33/50 Flag
       HAP Flag
       CAAFlag
       CERCLA Flag
       Priority Pollutant Flag
       SDWA Flag
       OSHA Carcinogen
       (Year)  Added
       Expansion
      Core
       Metal

The details of each check performed, the sources used, and any changes made to the Indicators model
are given below.

33/50 Flag

A list  of  the  17 chemicals  targeted  by  EPA's  33/50  program  was  downloaded  from
http://www.epa.gov/opptintr/tri/. The document is entitled " 1994 Toxics Release Inventory Public Data
Release Box E-6:  17 Priority Chemicals Targeted by the 33/50 Program." No inconsistencies were
found with the current (July 6 public) version of the model. Note that EPA's list contains 17 chemicals,
but several of them correspond to multiple TRI chemicals.  The following table lists certain chemicals and
chemical  categories  as reported in EPA's 33/50 Program list, and the corresponding entries in the
Indicators model, which were given 33/50 flags. Therefore, the Indicators model contains 24 chemicals
with 33/50 flags.
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                       Exhibit G-l. Chemicals Regulated under the
                         33/50 Program with Multiple TRI Entries
Name in EPA's
33/50 List
Cadmium and
compounds
Chromium and
compounds
Cyanide compounds
Nickel and
compounds
Xylenes
Corresponding TRI
Chemicals
Cadmium
Cadmium compounds
Chromium
Chromium compounds
Cyanide compounds
Hydrogen cyanide
Nickel
Nickel compounds
Xylenes (mixed isomers)
p-Xylene
m-Xylene
o-Xylene
CAS Numbers
7440-43-9
N078
7440-47-3
N090
N106
74-90-8
7440-02-0
N495
1330-20-7
106-42-3
108-38-3
95-47-6
HAP Flag

The  list   of  original   hazardous  air  pollutants  (HAPs)  was  downloaded  from
http://www.epa.gov/ttn/uatw/origl89.html. The document is entitled "Unified Air Toxics Website-CAA:
Original List of Hazardous Air Pollutants."

A   short   list    of  changes   to   the   HAP   list   was   downloaded   from
http://www.epa.gov/ttn/uatw/atwsmod.html,  and is entitled "Unified Air Toxics  Website-CAA:
Modifications to the 112(b) Hazardous Air Pollutants." Both the original and modified lists were found
on the Office of Air Quality Planning & Standards' (OAQPS) Unified Air Toxics Website. The chemicals
being modified (caprolactum and hydrogen sulfide) are not in the Environmental Indicators model.  A
third chemical, glycol ethers (CAS N230) is in the model; however, the change (a change in definition)
is being proposed and is not final at this time (its listing as a HAP has not changed). Exhibit G-2 presents
the changes made to the HAP flag field.
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                        Exhibit G-2. Changes to 'HAP' Flag Field
CAS Number
79-06-1
67-66-3
58-89-9
101-68-8
7803-51-2
7723-14-0
123-38-6
100-44-7
98-88-4
Chemical
Acrylamide
Chlorform
Lindane
Methylenebis(phenylisocyanate)
(MDI)*
Phosphine
Phosphorus
Proprionaldehyde
Benzyl Chloride
Benzoyl Chloride
Change Made
Added HAP flag to model
Added HAP flag to model
Added HAP flag to model
Added HAP flag to model.
Changed 'Chemical' field from
blank to '4,4'-Diphenylmethane
diisocyanate'
Added HAP flag to model
Added HAP flag to model
Added HAP flag to model
Added HAP flag to model
Removed HAP flag from model
* Note that in 1995 MDFs status was changed from that of a single chemical to a
member of the Diisocyanates (N120). However, it is still included in the Indicators
model as a single chemical for historical reasons, so that releases in previous years can
be examined.
CAA Flag and CERCLA Flag

A list of the chemicals regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA) and the Comprehensive Environmental
Response, Compensation, and Liability  Act of 1980/Superfund (CERCLA) was downloaded from
http://www.epa.gov/ceppo/pubs/title3 .pdf. The title of the document is "Title III List of Lists (EPA 550-
B-98-017, November 1998)." The list of CAA- and CERCLA-regulated chemicals is located on pages
1 through 36 of this document. Exhibit G-3 presents the changes made to these two flag fields.

                Exhibit G-3. Changes to 'CAA' and 'CERCLA' Flag Fields
CAS Number
75-07-0
101-68-8
105-67-9
10049-04-4
23564-08-5
Chemical
Acetaldehyde
Methylenebis(phenylisocyanate)
(MDI)*
2,4 Dimethylphenol
Chlo rine dioxide
Thiophanate-methyl
Change Made
Added CAA flag to model
Added CERCLA flag to model
Added CERCLA flag to model
Added CERCLA flag to model
Added CAA flag to model
Added CERCLA flag to model.
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CAS Number
128-03-0
128-04-1
137-41-7
137-42-8
533-74-4
759-94-4
1114-71-2
1134-23-2
2212-67-1
7647-01-0
14484-64-1
55406-53-6
Chemical
Potassium
dimethyldithiocarbamate
Sodium
dimethyldithiocarbamate
Potassium
N-methyldithiocarbamate
Metham Sodium
Dazomet
Ethyl dipropylthiocarbamate
(EPTC)
Butylethylcarbamothioic acid
S-propyl ester (Pebulate)
Cycloate
IH-Azepine-l carbothioic acid,
hexahydro-S-ethyl ester
(Molinate)
Hydrochloric acid
Tris(dimethylcarbamodithioato-
S,S')iron (Ferbam)
3 -Iodo-2-propynyl
butylcarbamate
Change Made
Removed CERCLA flag from model
Removed CERCLA flag from model
Removed CERCLA flag from model
Removed CERCLA flag from model
Removed CERCLA flag from model
Removed CERCLA flag from model
Removed CERCLA flag from model
Removed CERCLA flag from model
Removed CERCLA flag from model
Removed CAA flag from model
Removed CERCLA flag from model
Removed CERCLA flag from model
* Note that in 1995 MDFs status was changed from that of a single chemical to a member
of the Diisocyanates (N120). However, it is still included in the Indicators model as a
single chemical for historical reasons, so that releases in previous years can be examined.
Several chemicals have multiple entries in the Title III List of Lists. In most cases, the different entries
for one chemical (as identified by the CAS number) are classified the same regarding CAA and CERCLA.
However, for a few chemicals, the various forms of the chemical are regulated differently. In one case,
that of hydrochloric acid (see above), this resulted in a change in the model for the CAA flag field.  The
details for hydrochloric acid and other chemicals, which did not result in changes to this field, are given
below in Exhibit G-4.
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                Exhibit G-4.  Chemicals with Multiple Entries in List of Lists
CAS
Number
7647-01-0







7664-41-7










7664-39-3




7697-37-2




Chemical

Hydrochloric
acid






Ammonia










Hydrogen
fluoride



Nitric acid




Description given
in Form R
acid aerosols,
including mists,
vapors, gas, fog,
and other airborne
particles of any
size.


includes anhydrous
ammonia and
aqueous ammonia
from water
dissociable
ammonium salts
and other sources;
10 percent of total
aqueous ammonia
is reported under
this listing.
No description




No description




Description of form or forms given in
List of Lists
Form chosen: Hydrochloric acid (aerosol
forms only) - regulated only under
CERCLA. Other forms regulated
differently are Hydrochloric acid (cone.
37% or greater); Hydrogen chloride
(anhydrous); and Hydrogen chloride
(gas only), which are also regulated
under the CAA.
Form chosen: Ammonia (anhydrous) -
regulated under both CERCLA and
CAA. Ammonia is regulated under
CERCLA only; Ammonia (cone. 20 %
or greater) is regulated under both
CERCLA and CAA.





Form chosen: Hydrogen fluoride -
regulated under CERCLA only. Only
other form is Hydrogen fluoride
(anhydrous)-regulated under both CAA
and CERCLA.
Form chosen: Nitric acid - regulated
under CERCLA only. Only other form
is Nitric acid (cone 80% or greater)-
regulated under both CERCLA and
CAA.
Priority Pollutant Flag

The list of priority toxic pollutants was downloaded from http://www.epa.gov/ost/pc/revcom.pdf. This
file is entitled "National Recommended Water Quality Criteria" and is a publication of U.S. EPA Office
of Water (EPA 822-Z-99-001, April 1999).  The list of priority pollutants is found on pages 7 through
13.  Exhibit G-5 presents the changes made to this flag field.
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                   Exhibit G-5. Changes to 'Priority Pollutant' Flag Field
CAS
Number
105-67-9
319-84-6
542-75-6
71-55-6
74-87-3
75-34-3
75-35-4
79-00-5
87-68-3
N090*
Chemical
2,4-Dimethylphenol
alpha-Hexachlorocyclohexane
1 ,3 -Dichloropropylene
1,1,1 -Trichloroethane
Chloromethane
Ethylidene dichloride
Vinylidene chloride
1 , 1 ,2-Trichloroethane
Hexachloro- 1 ,3 -butadiene
Chromium compounds
Change Made
Added Priority Pollutant flag to model.
Added Priority Pollutant flag to model.
Added Priority Pollutant flag to model.
Added Priority Pollutant flag to model.
Added Priority Pollutant flag to model.
Added Priority Pollutant flag to model.
Added Priority Pollutant flag to model.
Added Priority Pollutant flag to model.
Added Priority Pollutant flag to model.
Added Priority Pollutant flag to model.
*EPA's Priority Pollutant list includes Chromium III (CAS# 16065-83-1) and Chromium VI
(CAS# 18540-29-9). The TRI inventory does not report Chromium in the same way: only
Chromium (CAS# 7440-47-3) and Chromium compounds are reported. Both of these chemicals
have been flagged in the Indicators model as priority pollutants.
SDWA Flag

The list of chemicals regulated under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) was downloaded from
http://www.epa.gov/OGWDW/wot/appa.html.  The document is entitled "National Primary Drinking
Water Regulations" and lists chemicals regulated under either national primary or national secondary
drinking water standards.  The SDWA flag in the model is indicative of either primary or secondary
standards. Exhibit G-6 presents the changes that have been made to this flag field.
                        Exhibit G-6. Changes to 'SDWA' Flag Field
CAS
Number
7429-90-5
7440-22-4
2164-07-0
Chemical
Aluminum (fume or dust)
Silver
Dipotassium endothall
Change Made
Added SDWA flag to model (represents
secondary standard only).*
Added SDWA flag to model (represents
secondary standard only).*
Added SDWA flag to model.**
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CAS
Number
116-06-3
7440-02-0
Chemical
Aldicarb
Nickel
Change Made
Removed SDWA flag from model.
Removed SDWA flag from model.
* These changes make these chemicals consistent with the previous treatment of zinc, which
was marked as an SDWA chemical for a secondary standard only.
** EPA lists 'Endothall,' which is not a TRI chemical. However, Dipotassium endothall.is
reported in TRI; being a salt of Endothall, it was flagged as an SDWA pollutant.
Note that three of the four chemicals in the Total Trihalomethanes category in the SDWA list are TRI
chemicals, and therefore are flagged in the model as SDWA chemicals.  These chemicals are Chloroform
(CAS#  67-66-3), Bromoform (CAS#  75-25-2),  and Dichlorobromomethane  (CAS#  75-27-4).
Dibromochloromethane (CAS# 124-48-1) is not a TRI chemical.
OSHA Carcinogen Flag

The list of OSHA carcinogens was downloaded from http://www.epa.gov/opptintr/tri/oshacarc.pdf, a pdf
file entitled "Box 2-4. Basis of OSHA Carcinogen Listing for Individual Chemicals." The year of the
publication from which this is taken was not provided, but this listing is reflected in the 1997 TRI Public
Data Release. This exhibit is located on pages 41 and 42.  Exhibit G-7 presents the changes that were
made to the OSHA Carcinogen flag field.

                  Exhibit G-7. Changes to 'OSHA Carcinogen' Flag Field
CAS
Number
121-14-2
606-20-2
98-95-3
Chemical
Dinitrotoluene
2,6-Dinitrotoluene
Nitrobenzene
Change Made
Removed OSHA Carcinogens flag from
model.
Removed OSHA Carcinogens flag from
model.
Removed OSHA Carcinogens flag from
model.
Year Added

Please note that 'core' refers to chemicals that were added in 1987 AND have had no changes in
reporting requirements since that time (although the base year for the Indicators' model is 1988).
'Expansion' refers to chemicals that were added for reporting year 1995; the term does not refer to
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chemicals added in other years.  The 'Year Added' field was checked against the 1998 Code of Federal
Regulations (40CFR372)12.  The changes made are summarized in Exhibit G-8.

                       Exhibit G-8.  Changes to (Year) 'Added' Field
CAS
Number
101-68-8
306-83-2
354-23-4
354-25-6
812-04-4
2837-89-0
90454-18-5
Chemical
Methylenebis(phenylisocyanate)
(MDI)
2,2-Dichloro- 1 ,1,1 -trifluoroethane
1 ,2-Dichloro- 1 , 1 ,2-trifluoroethane
1 -Chloro- 1 , 1 ,2,2-tetrafluoroethane
1 , 1 -Dichloro- 1 ,2,2-trifluoroethane
(HCFC-123b)
2-Chloro- 1 ,1,1 ,2-tetrafluoroethane
Dichloro- 1 , 1 ,2-trifluoroethane
Change Made
'Added' field changed from 1995 to
1987.*
'Added' field changed from 1987 to 1994.
'Added' field changed from 1987 to 1994.
'Added' field changed from 1987 to 1994.
'Added' field changed from 1987 to 1994.
'Added' field changed from 1987 to 1994.
'Added' field changed from 1987 to 1994.
* Note that in 1995 MDFs status was changed from that of a single chemical to a member of the
Diisocyanates (N120). However, it is still included in the Indicators model as a single chemical
for historical reasons, so that releases in previous years can be examined.
While most chemicals in the CFR have an effective date of January in a given year, several chemicals
became effective in July. In these cases, the 'Added' field in the Indicators model contains the following
year.

Four chemicals which were listed in the CFR were not found in the model.  They are shown in Exhibit
G-9.
       12 There are two tables in the CFR that list the chemicals reported under TRI- one table
organized alphabetically by chemical, the other numerically by CAS number. Note that while they
are supposed to contain the identical chemicals, each list is missing two chemicals contained in the
other list. The first, alphabetical list is missing Flumetralin (CAS 62924-70-3) and Ammonium
sulfate (solution) (CAS 7783-20-2). The second list is missing Toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (CAS
584-84-9) and Vinyl bromide (CAS 593-60-2). It is assumed that the complete list includes all
four  of these chemicals. Therefore, there are 583 chemicals and 28 chemical categories listed in
the CFR.
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          Exhibit G-9. Chemicals in the 1998 CFR but Not in the Indicators Model
CAS
Number
74-93-1
10222-01-2
7783-06-4
62924-70-3
Chemical
Methyl mercaptan
2,2-Dibromo-3-
nitrilopropionamide
Hydrogen sulfide
Flumetralin
Note
Chemical was delisted.
Under administrative stay.
Chemical was delisted.

Expansion Flag

To confirm the Expansion flag, that field was checked against the November 30, 1994 Federal Register
notice adding chemicals to the TRI reporting program.

All of the chemicals marked with a flag in the Indicators model were listed as being added in 1995 in the
Federal Register notice.  However, the following chemicals from the Federal Register notice were not
found in the model.
            Exhibit G-10. Chemicals in Expansion FR Notice Not Found in Model
CAS
Number
52-51-7
10222-01-2
75-78-5
576-26-1
75-79-6
75-77-4
Chemical
Bronopol
2,2-Dibromo-3-
nitrilopropionamide
Dimethyldichlorosilane
2,6-Dimethylphenol
Methyltrichlorosilane
Trimethy Ichloro silane
Note
Chemical was delisted.
Chemical is under administrative stay.
Chemical has been voluntarily remanded
from the TRI reporting list.
Chemical was delisted.
Chemical has been voluntarily remanded
from the TRI reporting list.
Chemical has been voluntarily remanded
from the TRI reporting list.
Core Chemical Flag

To confirm that all flags marked as 'Core' are correct, all chemicals with 1987 as the year added
(confirmed under (Year) Added flag) without being marked as 'Core' were checked.  Seven chemicals
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shown in Exhibit  11  were found.   All were mentioned  in  a 1996 memorandum  entitled 'TRI
Environmental Indicators: Resolution of Certain TRI Reporting Issues with TRIE Staff  as having had
changes in their reporting requirements; thus, they are correct in not being marked as 'Core.'

In addition, all chemicals marked as 'Core' in the model were compared against Table 3-8A in the 1997
Toxics Release Inventory Public Data  Release (PDR).  Any chemicals marked as having changes in
reporting requirements were not considered to be 'Core.'  No discrepancies were found; however, 42
chemicals in the model were not found in the table in the 1997 PDR because they did not have any 1997
releases (according to the model). Ten of these 42 chemicals did have releases in years other than 1997,
and so these were checked against the 1987-1996 TRI Release Inventory CD, and found to be marked
'Core.'
                Exhibit G-ll.  Chemicals in Indicators Model Added in 1987
                                but Not Marked as 'Core'
CAS
Number
101-68-8
1344-28-1
6484-52-2
7647-01-0
7664-41-7
7664-93-9
7783-20-2
Chemical
Methylene bis(phenylisocyanate)
(MDI)
Aluminum oxide (fibrous forms)
Ammonium nitrate (solution)
Hydrochloric acid (aerosol)
Ammonia
Sulfuric acid (aerosol)
Ammonium sulfate
Note that while Glycol ethers (CAS N230) had a clarification of definition effective in 1995, it was
originally added in 1987 and is still considered a core chemical by the model and the TRI Public Data
Release.
Metal Flag

Finally, the 'Metal' field was checked against the 'Core' field (already confirmed above) as well as against
an internal file of compounds considered metals. No changes were needed to the 'Metal' field.

Other changes to the chemical database in the model

The empty row at the bottom of the chemical table was removed.
The CAS number for MDI was changed from 101-688 to 101-68-8 and the name in the 'Chemical' field
was changed to 4,4'-Diphenylmethane diisocyanate.
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'Ammonium Nitrate' and 'Ammonium Sulfate' were added to the respective entries so that there were
no empty name fields for either chemical.
Metam sodium (a synonym) was changed to Metham sodium.
Summary of Data Sources
                         Exhibit G-12. Summary of Data Sources
Flag
33/50
HAP
CAA
Priority
Pollutant
SDWA
CERCLA
OSHA
Year
Added
Expansion
Core
Chemical
Metal
Access Address
http ://www. epa. gov/opptintr/tri/
http://www.epa.gov/ttn/uatw/origl
89.html
http://www.epa.gov/ceppo/pubs/tit
Ie3.pdf
http://www.epa.gov/ost/pc/revcom.
pdf
http://www.epa.gov/OGWDW/wot
/appa.html
http://www.epa.gov/ceppo/pubs/tit
Ie3.pdf
http/www.epa.gov/opptintr/tri/osh
acarc.pdf
Code of Federal Regulations,
Part 40, Section 372.
Federal Register, November 30,
1994
Code of Federal Regulations,
Part 40, Section 372.
TRI Release Inventory, 1987-1996
Internal file (TRI_TOME.wk4)
Date
Accessed
9/29/99
10/12/99
10/12/99
10/12/99
10/18/99
10/4/99
Title
1994 Toxics Release Inventory
Public Data Release Box E-6. 17
Priority Chemicals Targeted by
the 33/50 Program
Unified Air Toxics Website-
CAA: Original List of Hazardous
Air Pollutants
Title III List of Lists
National Recommended Water
Quality Criteria
National Primary Drinking
Water Regulations
Title III List of Lists
Box 2-4. Basis of OSHA
Carcinogen Listing for
Individual Chemicals




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