U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
            AGENCY
        OFFICE OF WATER
        FISCAL YEAR 2009
         ACTION PLAN TO
INTEGRATE ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE
              ~

            Action Plan
           Fiscal Year 2009

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                                    Table of Content






Office of Water Environmental Justice Contacts	3



Introduction	4



Office of Water's Environmental Justice Accomplishments	5



Office of Water's Environmental Justice Policy	6



Section 1: Organizational Infrastructure	7



Section 2: Management Support	8



Section 3: Organizational Resources and Program Support	9



Section 4: Government Performance and Results Act Alignment	12



Section 5: Internal Organizational Engagement	13



Section 6: External Stakeholder Engagement	14



Section 7: Data Collection, Management, and Evaluation	16



Section 8: Professional and Organization Development	18



Section 9: Environmental Justice Assessment	18



Section 10:  Program Evaluation	19

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                OFFICE OF WATER ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE CONTACTS

Office of Water Environmental Justice Coordinator
Alice Walker
Ariel Rios Building
1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW (MC: 4101M)
Washington, DC 20460
Telephone: 202-529-7534
E-mail: walker.alice@epa.gov
American Indian Environmental Office Environmental Justice Contact
Teresa  Kuklinski
Ariel Rios Building
1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW (MC: 4104M)
Washington, DC 20460
Telephone: 202-564-0246
E-mail: kuklinski.teresa@epa.gov
Office of Groundwaterand Drinking Water Environmental Justice Contact
Towana Dorsey
Ariel Rios Building
1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW (MC: 4606M)
Washington, DC 20460
Telephone: 202-564-4099
E-mail: dorsey.towana@epa.gov
Office of Science and Technology Environmental Justice Contact
Vera Williams-Bower
Ariel Rios Building
1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW (MC: 4301T)
Washington, DC 20460
Telephone: 202-566-0412
E-mail: Williams-bower.vera@epa.gov
Office of Wastewater Management Environmental Justice Contact
William M. Webster III
Ariel Rios Building
1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW (MC: 4203M)
Washington, DC 20460
Telephone: 202-564-0616
E-mail: Webster.william@epa.gov
Katherine Sleasman
Ariel Rios Building
1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW (MC: 4230M)
Washington, DC 20460
Telephone: 202-250-8810
E-mail: sleasman.katherine@epa.gov
Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds Environmental Justice Contact
Rose Kwok
EPA West Building
1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW (MC: 4502T)
Washington, DC 20460
Telephone: 202-566-0657
E-mail: kwok.rose@epa.qovRose Wok

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             U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY - OFFICE OF WATER
                           Draft FISCAL YEAR 2009 ACTION PLAN
                         TO INTEGRATE ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE

                                      INTRODUCTION

The Environmental Justice Action Plan for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Water
(OW) Fiscal Year 2009 is a  prospective planning document that identifies measurable commitments to
address key environmental  justice priorities.  The EJ Action  Plan follows the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency's current Strategic Plan architecture to enhance the alignment of the Agency's
environmental justice activities with its overall planning and budgeting  processes.  Where applicable
the OW EJ Action Plans focuses on two of eight national environmental justice priorities, Water Safe to
Drink and Fish and Shellfish Safe to Eat as well as areas of focus in the OW National Water Plan

This action  plan serves as a meaningful resource for OW staff and managers as they develop and
implement their policies,  programs, and activities for FY 2009. This action plan addresses management
accountability; internal and external organizational engagements; collection, management, and,
evaluation of data; professional and organizational development; environmental justice assessment
process; and program evaluation.
                                                                 OW's reference to environmental justice
                                                                 principles throughout this action plan means the
                                                                 fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all
                                                                 people regardless of race, color, national origin, or
                                                                 income with respect to the development,
                                                                 implementation, and enforcement of
                                                                 environmental  laws, regulations, and policies.
Under the Safe Drinking Water Act (1974) [SDWA] and the Clean
Water Act (1977) [CWA], OW works with EPA regional water
divisions, states, tribes, water systems, and the public to set
national drinking water standards and develop pollution control
programs. OW is committed to incorporate environmental justice
principles throughout these decision-making processes to ensure
protection of human health for all communities and populations.

The Office of Water is organized into five program offices.

Office of Ground  Water and Drinking Water (OGWDW) protects public health by ensuring safe
drinking water and  protecting sources of drinking water. OGWDW, along with EPA's ten regional
drinking water programs, oversees the implementation of the SDWA. OGWDW develops and provides
assistance to implement national drinking water standards; oversees, assists, and helps fund state
drinking water and  source water protection programs; helps small drinking water systems; protects
underground sources of drinking water through the Underground Injection Control  Program; and
provides information to the public. OGWDW also works in cooperation with regions, states, and tribes.
In addition, to further protect the nation's drinking water systems from terrorist acts, OGWDW has
formed the Water Security Division to help the water sector to understand and use  the best scientific
information and technologies for water security, support the assessment of the vulnerabilities that
large, urban utilities may have to possible attack, and respond effectively in the event that an incident
occurs.

Office of Science and Technology (OST) is responsible for developing sound, scientifically
defensible standards, criteria, advisories, guidelines, and limitations under the CWA and SWDA. OST
also is responsible for developing risk assessment methodologies and providing risk assessment
support for OW. These products articulate the goals and provide the regulatory framework for
restoring and  maintaining the biological, chemical, and physical integrity of the nation's water
resources; protecting the nation's public water supplies; and  achieving  technology-based pollution
control requirements  in support of point source (end of pipe) discharge programs, nonpoint source
programs, wetlands programs, drinking water programs, dredge material management programs and
geographic-specific programs (such as, Great Lakes, coastal areas and  estuaries).
OST consists of three divisions that include the Engineering and Analysis Division, the Health and
Ecological Criteria Division, and the Standards and Health Protection Division.

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 Office of Wastewater Management (OWM) oversees a range of programs contributing to the
well-being of the nation's waters and watersheds. Through its programs and initiatives, OWM
promotes compliance with the requirements of the Clean Water Act.  Under the CWA, OWM works in
partnership with EPA regions, states, and tribes to regulate discharges into surface waters such as
wetlands, lakes, rivers, estuaries, bays, and oceans. Specifically, OWM focuses on control of water that
is collected in discrete conveyances (also called point sources), including pipes, ditches, and sanitary
or storm sewers. OWM also is responsible for the Clean Water State  Revolving Fund, the largest water
quality funding  source, focused on funding wastewater treatment systems, nonpoint source projects,
and estuary protection. In addition, OWM manages the Water Pollution Control Program grants
program for states and tribes.

 Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds (OWOW) promotes a watershed approach to
manage, protect, and  restore the water resources and aquatic ecosystems of our marine and fresh
waters. This strategy is based on the premise that water quality and ecosystem problems are best
solved at the watershed level and that local citizens play an integral role in achieving clean water
goals.  Through its many  programs, including ocean and coastal protection, wetlands protection,
nonpoint source pollution, and monitoring, OWOW provides technical and financial assistance and
develops regulations and  guidance to support the watershed approach. OWOW works with states,
tribes, territories, local governments, the private sector, and non-profit organizations to implement
aspects of its program.

 American Indian Environmental Office (AIEO) The American Indian Environmental Office (AIEO)
coordinates the Agency-wide effort to strengthen public health and environmental protection in Indian
country, with a special emphasis on building capacity for tribes to administer their own environmental
programs. AIEO  oversees development and implementation of EPA's Indian Policy and strives to ensure that
all EPA Headquarters and regional offices implement their parts of EPA's Indian program in a manner
consistent with administration policy to work with tribes on a government-to-government basis and with
EPA's trust responsibility to protect Tribal health and environments.

Environmental Justice Accomplishments

In FY 08 the Office of Water was actively involved in addressing the concerns of environmental justice
communities. Significant progress was made towards improving water quality and protecting human health
to these communities.  Several key accomplishments aimed at providing clean waters and safer drinking
water are highlighted in the following section.

The OGWDW released a DVD What Your School or Child Care Facility Should Know About Lead in Drinking
Water on April 30, 2007. The DVD provides information on the sources and health effects of lead, as well as
the importance of testing in school and child care facilities. The video is a tool to educate and foster support
from staff,  students, parents and the local community. To promote the DVD EPA mailed a complementary
copy to the 50 largest school districts in the U.S. in October 2007.  OGWDW also posted a Case Study of
School Program  to Reduce  Lead in Drinking Water Stoughton Public Schools, Stoughton, MA on its web site.
The case study highlights the school district's award winning program.

EPA and four other federal agencies have signed two important tribal infrastructure Memoranda of
Understanding (MOUs). Signatories to the MOUs are EPA, Department of the Interior (DOI), Department of
Health and Human Services (DHHS), Department of Agriculture (USDA), and Department of Housing and
Urban Development (HUD). The federal departments committed to working across traditional program
boundaries to improve infrastructure on tribal lands and to focus efforts on providing access to safe drinking
water and basic  wastewater facilities to tribes. The federal partners also agreed to promote coordination
across the federal programs.

The Office of Water provides funding for  infrastructure improvements to small and disadvantaged
communities through the  Drinking Water State Revolving Fund  (DWSRF).  The funding of
infrastructure improvements reduces public exposure to contaminants though compliance with rules
and supports the reliable  delivery of safe water in small and disadvantaged communities and for Tribal

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and territorial public water systems.  In 2007, 72% of loans made by state Drinking Water State
Revolving Fund programs were to small systems. Also in 2007, 26% of loans (which may include
lower-interest or longer-term loans and/or principal forgiveness) made by state DWSRF were to
systems serving disadvantaged communities.

The Office of Water maintains the Fish Consumption Advisory Program Website that includes the
National Listing of Fish and Wildlife Consumption Advisories (NFLA). The  NFLA includes current
information about fish consumption advisories issued by state, tribal, local and federal agencies. The
website disseminates information to health professionals and the public to make informed decisions on
when and where to fish, and how to  prepare fish caught for recreation and subsistence.  Information
on the website provides greater access to information to minority and low-income populations, with
the goal of reducing their exposure to contaminants in fish.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Water, Office of Science and Technology, in
partnership with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition,
completed six new translations of the National Mercury Advisory brochure. The brochure, "What You
Need to Know about Mercury in Fish  and Shellfish" is now translated into Cambodian, Hmong,
Vietnamese, Chinese, Portuguese and Korean. This brochure provides guidance to women of
childbearing age and children on selecting and eating fish  to avoid exposure to harmful effects of
mercury.

The Director of American Indian Environmental Office led efforts with Health Canada to conduct an
international indigenous forum on tribal ecological knowledge from March 10-13, 2008 in  Palenque,
Chiapas, Mexico. The 'Convening of Indigenous Peoples for the Healing of Mother Earth' was planned
by a  steering committee of indigenous leaders from Mexico, US and Canada. Partners included
Mexican Secretariat of the Environment and Natural  Resources, the Mexican Commission for the
Development of Indigenous Peoples,  the Commission for Environmental Cooperation and  EPA's Office
of Indian Affairs.

OFFICE OF WATER'S  ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE POLICY

EPA's mission is to protect human health and safeguard the environment - air, water, and land - upon
which the health and well being of all Americans depends, regardless of race, color, national origin, or
economic circumstance. OW strives to provide clean and safe surface and drinking water that all
Americans can enjoy. This is consistent with achieving the Agency's Environmental Justice priorities of
Fish and Shellfish Safe to Eat and Water Safe to Drink.

To achieve these benefits for all Americans, OW is committed to integrate environmental justice
principles as appropriate into its policies, programs, and activities to ensure that no segment of the
population is disproportionately burdened from adverse human health or environmental effects.

OW is dedicated to enhancing programmatic areas to prevent disproportionate exposure to  risks of
environmental  health hazards. OW is aware that data collection and analysis are fundamental to
identifying and prioritizing environmental health risks, as well as pollution prevention opportunities for
risk reduction,  in environmental justice communities. OW will ensure that its staff and Regions have
access to information and analytical support necessary to explore ways to improve environmental
systems. OW will gain best practices  and lessons learned about environmental justice to be woven into
future priorities and commitments.

OW commits to engaging stakeholders early in the environmental decision making process through
public participation, cross media team involvement, outreach and partnerships. OW fosters  improving
stakeholders' capacity to address problems and engage diverse stakeholders in solving problems. OW
believes pooling all available knowledge and leveraging resources are pertinent tools to effectively
address environmental justice concerns.  Furthermore, OW is dedicated to strengthening collaborative
relationships with external water programs to assure OW policies in environmental justice are being
implemented accordingly.

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OW also commits to working with the states, tribal partners, and other stakeholders to develop and
implement broad based and integrated monitoring and assessment programs that strengthen their
water quality standards and improve decision-making.

OW management will strongly communicate environmental justice principles throughout its program
offices to ensure that these principles are fairly considered during the entire decision-making process.
OW promotes and encourages environmental justice training for all staff to strengthen the knowledge,
skills, and abilities necessary to successfully integrate environmental justice principles as appropriate
into all policies, programs, and activities.

Section 1: Organizational Infrastructure
 How will your organizational structure promote the integration of environmental justice within all
program areas?

OW considers concerns and principles related to environmental justice in the development of its
policies, guidance, and regulations. To ensure that OW's approach to addressing environmental justice
issues is consistent and synchronized, OW has designated a lead Environmental Justice Coordinator. In
addition, OW has designated environmental justice contacts within each  of the five  program offices to
communicate environmental justice information to managers and  staff and to further promote the
integration of environmental justice within the five program areas.

The Environmental Justice Coordinator serves as the lead for OW's Environmental Justice Integration
Committee (EJIC), and chairs monthly meetings. The EJIC is comprised of the environmental justice
contacts from each of the five program offices. In FY 2009, OW EJIC will open the  meetings to the
lead  Regional Water EJ contact. The  purpose of the EJIC is to ensure that environmental justice
principles and concerns continue to be integrated among all program offices in OW. The EJIC also
works with OW Program Offices to ensure that environmental justice principles and  concerns are
consistent with the FY 2009 National Water Program Guidance that implements the  EPA 2006-2011
Strategic Plan.  The guidance describes the National Water Program priorities and strategies for the
coming fiscal year to EPA, states and tribal governments. The FY 2009 National Water Program places
emphasis on achieving results in areas with potential  environmental justice concerns through two
national EJ priorities: Fish and Shellfish Safe to Eat and Water Safe to Drink, covered by two sub-
objectives and  other EJ water related elements.

 The responsibilities of the  members  of the EJIC include, but are not limited to the following:

        Promote the integration of environmental justice principles more fully into the day-to-day
        activities of OW staff and OW programs, policies and activities:

        Provide assistance to promote the development and implementation of OW's Environmental
        Justice Action Plan and Performance Measures into OW's planning and budgeting processes.

        Distribute information OW-wide on issues related to environmental justice

        Provide communities with early and meaningful involvement in the decision-making process

        Continue to gather, analyze, interpret data,  and provide an environmental justice  perspective
        on relevant information associated with activities conducted by OW's program offices

The OW EJ Coordinator meets monthly with the OW DAA to discuss and  develop strategies for
integrating environmental justice into the day-to-day operations of the Agency and OW. They also
develop strategies to support and implement Agency-wide projects identified by the EJ Executive
Steering Committee. The OW Environmental Justice Coordinator meets monthly with the Office of
Environmental  Justice, the Agency Environmental Justice Coordinators and the OW  EJIC to discuss and
develop strategies that address emerging and outstanding environmental justice issues associated

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with the integration of Environmental Justice.  The OW EJ Coordinator represents OW on various
Agency-wide workgroups.

 OW realizes the importance of Headquarters and Regional collaboration on EJ issues.  In all of its
endeavors OW is willing to support and work with the Regions as they develop and design their EJ
programs. For example, the OW EJ Coordinator works with the Regional EJ Coordinators to discuss
the utility of EJ Seats and the EJ Tool Kit as they develop their programs.

OW's program offices in addition work towards integrating environmental justice principles into their
infrastructure through a variety of activities and projects. For example, OW has established national
programs that provide technical assistance to state and local governments for warnings to the public
about consumption of contaminated fish and swimming waters with high level of pathogens.  These
programs emphasize promotion of environmental justice through  contaminant and pathogen
monitoring, as well as effective risk communications to minority populations who may consume  large
amounts of fish taken from polluted waters or swim in urban and other waters containing high levels
of pathogens.

The public health advisory programs are managed by the Standards and Health Protection Division
(SHPD) in the Office of Science and Technology (OST), where they are integrated  into EPA's Water
Quality Standards  Program.  Integration of public health advisory activities into the Water Quality
Standards Program promotes environmental justice by ensuring that advisories and minority
population health risks are considered in making water quality standards attainment decisions,
developing Total Maximum Daily Loads for impaired waters, and developing permits to control sources
of pollution.

SHPD, in coordination with the Regions, reviews and  approves or disapproves water quality standards
adopted by states  and authorized Indian tribes.  SHPD develops guidance and regulations that govern
the program.  Its mechanisms and  processes ensure  that issues affecting Tribes are fully integrated
into day-to-day aspects of the water quality standards program.

The Office of Wastewater Management (OWM) does  not implement any programs specifically to
address environmental justice concerns; it does provide technical and financial assistance to many
rural and disadvantaged communities where environmental justice populations reside.  The National
Small Communities and Rural Communities Assistance Programs seek to assist communities with
limited economic resources in making informed water quality and public  health decisions and
investments.  Two additional OWM programs -The U.S. Mexico Border and Alaska Native Village
programs - target disadvantaged and underserved communities.  These assistance programs are
designed to increase the number of citizens provided with safe drinking water and access to basic
sanitation services

Section 2: Management Support
 How will your Regional/Headquarters office management communicate expectations about the
EnvironmentalJustice Program, review tangible/intangible outcomes, and evaluate performance?

OW's management will ensure that appropriate staff  are available to manage projects aimed at
preventing, addressing and/or alleviating environmental justice issues  raised by the NEJAC; state,
tribal, and local governments; environmental justice communities; and other stakeholders. In addition,
the OW's Deputy Assistant Administrator (DAA) and National Program  Manager (NPM)  Mike Shapiro is
an active participant on the Agency's Executive Steering Committee on Environmental Justice.

OW's management is committed to incorporating environmental justice principles throughout decision-
making processes  to ensure protection of human health  for all communities and populations. For
example, to communicate expectations for integrating environmental justice into OW's day-to-day
activities, the OW  NPM instructed OW and the Regions to incorporate language about Environmental
Justice into FY 09  National Water Program Guidance  to implement the EPA Strategic Plan. This is the
first year that the National Water Program Guidance  has placed emphasis on achieving results in areas

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with potential environmental justice concerns through Water Safe To Drink (Sub-objective 2.2.1) and
Fish and Shellfish Safe to Eat (Sub-objective 2.1.2), two of the eight national EJ priorities. In addition,
the National Water Programs places emphasis on other EJ Water Related Elements: 1) Sustain and
Restore the U.S.-Mexico Border Environmental Health (Sub-objective 4.2.4); 2) Sustain and Restore
Pacific Island Territories (Sub objective 4.2.5); and Alaska Native Villages Program. OW will continue
to develop and implement prospective EJ Action Plans which are linked to our Government
Performance and Results Act (GPRA) goals.  OW will issue periodic progress reports which correspond
to the goals established  in the Agency's strategic plan.

OW is also committed to aligning the EJ Action Plans with the development of priorities and strategies
of the FY 09 National Program Manager Guidance.

The OW DAA will issue a Memorandum to all staff that clearly defines and reaffirms OW's commitment
to EPA's environmental justice program as well as establishes goals and objectives for each program
office to work towards.   For example, OW staff will be encouraged to take the OEJ on-line Introduction
to Environmental Justice Training. In addition, OW will add the on-line Introduction to EJ training to
the OW Water Careers Programs.  OW also plans to add a hyperlink for the training to the Drinking
Water Academy, Watershed Academy, Water Quality Standards Academy, and Working Effectively
with Tribal Governments training.  OW staff will also be encouraged to  participate in Agency
workgroups addressing  cross-media issues such as OECA's Environmental Justice Reviews Workgroup.
In FY 09 OW will initiate the development of EJ Training specifically for OW staff in  its five Program
Offices. Once developed, OW will share the EJ Training with the Regions.

OW will continue to offer Environmental Justice Brown Bag discussions on water related issues. This
will provide OW staff with an opportunity to learn first hand how EPA's  policies,  programs and
activities affect the lives of EJ stakeholders. The EJ Brown Bags will also provide OW staff with an
opportunity to engage in a dialogue with  EJ  stakeholders.

OW continues to include environmental justice among issues to be considered in planning all of our
work. This is reflected in our planning documents including the National Program Manager's (NPM)
Guidance and EJ Action  Plans.

Section 3: Organizational  Resources and Program Support
 Identify the aggregate full-time equivalents (FTE) in your Regional/Headquarters office that will
specifically focus on environmental justice issues. If responsibilities and duties are parceled out as
collateral duties to one  or more employees, please compute what the FTE equivalent would be.
 What are the functions and day-to-day responsibilities of your environmental justice coordinator(s)
and/or team?
 Will your Regional/Headquarters'office have any ongoing mechanisms for focusing on environmental
justice issues, such as teams and workgroups? If yes, please list and describe. Also, state how
these mechanisms will be tied to other programs and activities in your Regional/Headquarters
office.

OW's Environmental Justice Coordinator represents one (1) FTE that is  dedicated to addressing
environmental justice issues. In addition,  each program office has appointed an Environmental Justice
Contact to ensure that environmental justice is being considered in all of the work that OW does, and
to maximize the  use of OW's statutory authority under the  CWA and SWDA to address environmental
justice issues. Each of OW's program offices also is committed to assigning staff to work on
environmental justice issues when the need  arises. Given the broad range of OW's involvement in the
environmental justice arena, it is not possible to identify the number of FTEs devoted solely to
environmental justice issues. For example, work on environmental justice issues and risk management
for subpopulations is integrated  into all of the activities of the Fish Advisory Program and the  Beach
Programs.

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OW's Environmental Justice Coordinator, who serves on the Water Policy Staff of the Assistant
Administrator, is the focal point to coordinate and disseminate information about environmental
justice.  Responsibilities of OW's Environmental Justice Coordinator include:

           Coordinates a multi-disciplinary approach to OW's environmental justice program that
            includes providing policy, analytical, and administrative direction to staff who address
            environmental justice issues; manages the flow of information within OW; and helps to
            coordinate inter-disciplinary teams to address concerns related to environmental justice
           Serves as a conduit to ensure effective communication between internal and external
            stakeholders
           Develops and recommends to the senior management a budget to meet resource needs
            of OW's Environmental Justice Program
           Works with other EJ Coordinators in EPA program offices to promote
            efforts to achieve the Agency's goals and objectives on Environmental Justice
           Represents OW Headquarters and regional offices to inform stakeholders  about OW's
            Environmental Justice activities as well as participates on national workgroups that
            address concerns related to environmental justice
           Facilitates building relationships and partnerships with external stakeholders who are
            affected by OW's policies, guidance, and regulations
OW is committed to becoming more active on workgroups and other projects related to environmental
justice that are sponsored or chaired by programs outside of the OW. Through its participation in the
Agency's Environmental Justice Executive Steering Committee, OW will continue to look for
opportunities to lend its expertise to address environmental justice. For example, OW staff participated
on an Agency-wide Environmental Justice  Review Workgroup and two of the EJ Review Function
Specific Workgroups. The EJ Review Workgroup was convened in response to the 2006 EPA Office of
Inspector General report,"EPA Needs to Conduct Environmental Justice Reviews of Its Programs,  Policies,
and Activities: Evaluation Report" (Report No. 2006-P-00034), available at
http://www.epa.gov/oig/reports/2006/20060918-2006-P-00034.pdf. The EJ Review Workgroup was
charged with developing and testing Protocols to provide guidance for conducting Agency wide EJ
Reviews.

In addition, the OW staff is involved in a number of projects designed to ensure that the goals of
environmental justice are achieved and fully integrated in OW's policies, programs, and guidance.
Examples include:

AIEO is working with other EPA offices to issue an update to the 1992 Guidelines for Exposure
Assessment.  AIEO is developing a new section that will provide information specifically for tribes.

OW is developing better tools to conduct environmental justice analyses and develop tribal water
programs and will share these tools with the Regions as they become available.

Additionally, many staff from OW's program offices serve on  workgroups or teams that address issues
related to environmental justice. For example:

EPA's water quality standards regulation (40 CFR Part 131) requires that states and authorized tribes
review their water quality standards at least once every three years and revise them, as necessary.
During the next round of triennial reviews, OST will work with the regions  to provide guidance to
states and authorized tribes to ensure that notifications of public hearings  are targeted toward low-
income and minority populations. This  includes targeted mailings and notifications in newspapers
serving minority communities in the locally affected areas, including non-English speaking publications.

OWM provides water and wastewater services to tribal and community leaders through its Small
Communities Team. The team partners with organizations to manage programs of technical
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assistance, financial assistance, and education and training to small communities and tribes. Many of
the Small Communities' publications are offered in Spanish and English.

AIEO serves as an active member of the Interagency Working Group on  Environmental Justice's Native
American Task Force. The Task Force coordinates Federal efforts to address the range of
environmental and public health concerns facing federally-recognized tribes, state-recognized tribes,
non-recognized tribes, and tribal members.

OWOW established the Five Star Restoration Program to work with EPA's partners for community-
based wetlands restoration projects in watersheds across the U.S. The National Association of
Counties, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, and the  Wildlife Habitat Council have joined with
EPA for this effort. Funding for the program is provided by OWOW and two corporate sponsors.

OGWDW supports the National Drinking Water Advisory Council, established under the Federal
Advisory Committee Act (FACA). The Council has members representing  small systems, public health
professionals,  and minority populations.

In OST's Standards and Health Protection Division, the Tribal Coordinator plays a lead role in reviewing
tribal TAS applications  and developing and leading a broad range of activities designed to assist Indian
tribes.   This includes developing outreach, technical assistance, specialized training courses, videos, case
study materials that focus on tribal water quality standards programs, hands-on, experiential workshops to
assist tribes to  fully develop their own environmental programs and consultation plans.  These activities are
carried out in concert with Regional Offices. The Tribal Coordinator is a member of EPA's National Indian
Work Group.

The Fish Advisory Program has a Headquarters team and one coordinator in  each region.  The coordinators
meet with state fish advisory program representatives at a biannual forum on contaminants in fish. Tribal
representatives also attend the forum.   Environmental justice issues such as the development of fish
consumption advisories to protect targeted communities are discussed at these meetings. Targeted
communities may include those with subsistence fishers, cultural traditions that involve consuming organs of
fish that can contain high concentrations of contaminants, limited proficiency in English, limited or no
literacy, low income, or large numbers of immigrants or refugees. The Fish Advisory Program meetings also
provide opportunities to hold discussions on important issues with representative from other EPA and
Federal Agency programs.

The BEACH Program has a Headquarters team and one beach program coordinator in each coastal or Great
Lakes EPA Region.  The BEACH  Program is focused on environmental justice issues such as highlighting that
frequently used urban beaches, or other waters used by minority populations for recreation, are monitored
for state or local government monitoring and that swimmers receive information about unacceptably high
levels of pathogen indicators. The team holds monthly conference calls with regional program coordinators
and where resources permit, holds a biannual meeting with state and local government health departments
and environmental agencies.

Are there any specific programs/initiatives for which environmental justice will be listed as a funding
priority?

Activities to promote environmental justice are integrated into the Fish Advisory Program and the
Beaches Environmental Assessment and Coastal Health (BEACH)  Program. These programs have
emphasized promotion of environmental justice through contaminant and pathogen monitoring and
effective risk communications to minority populations who  may consume large amounts of fish taken
from polluted waters, or swim in urban and other waters containing  high levels of pathogens.

The BEACH program provides  grants to coastal and  Great Lakes tribal governments for beach
monitoring and public notification. Tribal governments that have jurisdiction over coastal or Great Lake
waters and have EPA approved water quality standards for these waters are eligible for these grants.
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OWOW's Western Estuaries Initiative covers the California Coast in Region 9 and Puget Sound in
Region 10. Region 9 will be awarding grants designed to conserve, restore and protect the water
quality, habitat and environment of California coastal waters, estuaries, bays and near shore waters
through comprehensive approaches to water quality management.  Region  10 will be awarding grants
designed to support the  protection and restoration of high valued Puget Sound aquatic resources in
areas threatened by growth pressures through holistic watershed and management approaches at the
local level.

Section 4: Government Performance and Results Act Alignment
 How will your Regional/Headquarters office's environmental justice program be linked to your
Regional/Headquarters office's main GPRA priorities?
 How will your Regional/Headquarters office's environmental justice strategies and activities be
integrated into specific programmatic areas/functions? (e.g., permitting, community outreach, etc.)
 Will your Regional/Headquarters office utilize Performance Partnership Agreements (PPA) and
Performance Partnership Grants (PPG) to specifically address environmental justice issues?

OW will continue to develop specific performance measures for activities identified  in its EJ Action
Plan.  These performance measures will assist managers to better integrate environmental justice
principles into  policies, programs and activities.

The Office of Water  has  established national programs that provide technical assistance to state and
local governments for warnings to the public about consumption of contaminated fish and waters with
high levels of pathogens. These programs  have emphasized promotion of environmental justice
through contaminant and pathogen monitoring, as well as risk communication to minority populations
who may consume large amounts of fish taken from polluted waters or swim in urban and other
waters containing high levels of pathogens.  The public health advisory programs are managed in the
Standards and Health Protection Division in the Office of Water where they are integrated into EPA's
Water Quality Standards Program. Integration of public health advisory activities into the Water
Quality Standards Program promotes environmental justice by ensuring that advisories and  minority
population health risks are considered in making water quality standards attainment decisions,
developing Total Maximum Daily Loads for  impaired waters, and developing permits to control sources
of pollution.

With regards specifically to American Indians, the water quality standards program will continue to
reach out to tribal communities to  publicize the benefits of water quality standards on  reservation
lands.  This includes use of OST's tribal web site, publications, participation in conferences,  training
courses and by working with Regional Office staffs.  Additionally, we will rely on existing mechanisms
to communicate with Tribes through tribal organizations, including the  Northwest Indian Fisheries
Commission, the All-Indian Pueblo Council,  National Tribal Environmental Council and others.

SHPD will also consult with Tribal organizations and tribal members of EPA's National and Regional Tribal
Operations Committees and other key tribal organizations periodically to enlist views and information in
developing water quality standards in Indian country.

OST provides warnings to the public about  consumption of contaminated fish and recreating in waters
with high  levels of pathogens. These programs have emphasized promotion of environmental justice
through contaminant and pathogen monitoring, as well as effective risk communication to minority
populations who may consume large amounts of fish taken from polluted waters or swim in urban and
other waters containing high levels of pathogens.

OWM clearly links our environmental justice efforts to the Agency Strategic Plan. For instance,
Objective 2.1,  Means and Strategies for Protecting Human  Health, covers the Alaskan Native Village
Program  and Sub-objective 4.2.4, Sustain and Restore the  U.S.-Mexico Border Environmental Health,
covers the Mexico Border Program.
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AIEO is the National Program Manager for General Assistance Program (GAP) grants. Under the
Indian  Environmental General Assistance Program Act, EPA awards capacity building grants to
federally recognized tribes and  intertribal consortia to plan, develop or establish environmental
programs. GAP represents the largest single source of funding for tribal environmental programs
awarded by EPA. AIEO is also the lead Agency office for tribal Performance Partnership Grants (PPGs).
PPGs are funded by EPA from funds allocated and otherwise available for categorical grant programs.
PPGs provide tribes and states with the option to combine funds from two or more specific categorical
grants  into one or more PPGs.  This flexibility allows tribes and states to address their highest
environmental priorities and reduce administrative burdens.

Currently,  there are no PPAs or PPGs that specifically address fish and wildlife contamination or BEACH
Program activities.  However, PPAs are negotiated with the states and tribes on a region-by-region
basis for the OST. Agreements therefore, could be negotiated to encourage the monitoring of waters
used by minority populations for fishing or swimming, and the issuance of fish consumption or
swimming advisories for waters where such measures are needed to protect public health.

Section 5: Internal Organizational Engagement
 Will your Regional/Headquarters office's environmental justice program have any ongoing
mechanisms to communicate with, receive input from, and otherwise consistently engage with other
programs in your Regional/Headquarters office? If yes, please list and describe.
 Will your Regional/Headquarters office develop any related guidance to the staff regarding the
integration of environmental justice in areas such as authorization/delegation, environmental
education, grants and contracts, inspection, enforcement and compliance assistance, permitting,
performance partnership, public participation,  waste site cleanup/Brownfields, etc.? If yes, please list
and describe.

OW's Environmental Justice Coordinator actively communicates with  OEJ to ensure that OW's
programs, policies, and activities are consistent with the Agency's policies and guidance for addressing
environmental justice issues. The OW Environmental Justice Coordinator also meets on a regular
basis with  the environmental Justice Coordinators from other Headquarters program offices and
regional offices.

Listed below are a  number of collaborative efforts in which OW staff is involved:

The Office of Water Deputy Assistant Administrator participates on the Office of Enforcement and
Compliance Assurance,  Executive Environmental Justice Steering Committee to support the integration
of environmental justice into the core of EPA's programs,  policies and activities.

Staff in OW participates on the headquarters BEACH Program team and the headquarters Fish
Advisory Program Team, both of which have program coordinators in each  EPA Regional Office.

The OST Tribal Coordinator plays a lead role in reviewing  tribal TSA applications along with developing
and leading a broad range of activities designed to assist  Indian tribes. These activities are carried out
in concert  with Regional Offices.

The Office of Water DAA co-chairs, with EPA's lead region for tribal matters, EPA's Indian Program
Policy Council (IPPC).

The Director of the American Indian Environmental Office (AIEO) chairs the National Indian Working
Group (NIWG) composed of representatives from  regional and  program offices involved in EPA-Tribal
activities.

OWM conducts monthly in-house training on priority and merging issues. The May 2007 session
covered environmental justice and how environmental justice can be integrated into OW's daily work.
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OWM participates as a member of the OW EJ Integration Committee. We have planned and will
conduct a presentation and discussion on the EJ aspects and implications of delivering the ANV
program.

Section 6: External Stakeholder Engagement

  Will your Regional/Headquarters office have any processes in place to receive input on environmental
justice issues from external stakeholders, such as workgroups, advisory bodies, or listening sessions?
If yes, please describe the process and explain how the input gathered may be (or has been) used by
your Regional/Headquarters office.
  Will your Regional/Headquarters office have any ongoing mechanisms to share information to
external groups regarding environmental justice such as web sitesf faxback system, printed outreach
materials, etc. ? If yes, please list and describe. Also please mention the specific stakeholder group(s)
which benefit from these outreach mechanisms.
  How will your Regional/Headquarters office identify stakeholders who could benefit from increased
awareness about environmental justice and being more engaged in the collaborative problem-solving
process?
  How will your Regional/Headquarters office promote collaborative problem-solving among
stakeholders?
  Will your Regional/Headquarters office have any special initiatives or provisions to address issues for
persons with limited English proficiency? If yes, please  describe or attach.
  In the course of your environmental justice outreach,  will your Regional/Headquarters office utilize
any informational materials translated in languages other than English? If yes, please list and describe.
  Are there any specific grant programs for which environmental justice will be listed as a funding
priority? Please list and describe.

AIEO promotes and facilitates communication between  EPA and tribes pursuant to the 1984 Indian
Policy.

AIEO also coordinates meetings for EPA's Tribal Operations Committee (NTOC), comprised of EPA's
Senior Leadership Team, including the Administrator, the Deputy Administrator, and the Assistant and
Regional Administrators and 19 tribal leaders known as the National Tribal Caucus (NTC) to the NTOC.

Additionally, the Fish Advisory Program has developed a suite of strategies for communicating the national
federal advisory for mercury to ethnic populations.  Starting  in FY 2008, the Fish Advisory Program will
begin to implement these strategies.

EPA's BEACH program awards grants to state and local  governments for  monitoring recreational
waters and issuing advisories when waters unsafe for swimming due to high levels of pathogens. The
BEACH Program has developed required program performance criteria for grant recipients. The
Program held public meetings throughout the U.S. to receive input  from stakeholders on
environmental justice and other issues related to the criteria EPA will continue to work with
stakeholders to receive comments on any future revisions of the performance criteria that may be
necessary. The BEACH and Fish Advisory Programs also hold biannual meetings. The meetings
provide opportunities to hold discussions on important environmental justice issues with key
stakeholder groups.

Additionally, OST's Standards and Health Protection Division receives  input on  environmental justice
issues directly from  Indian tribes, through the American Indian Environmental  Office, and with
meetings of EPA's Tribal Caucus and Tribal Operations Committee.  Regional Offices are also a conduit
for receiving information on tribal issues.

The  Fish Advisory Program maintains an  internet website that provides information regarding fish
consumption and environmental justice.  The website disseminates information to health professionals
and the public in order to enable informed decisions on when and where to fish,  and how to prepare
fish caught for recreation and subsistence. Information on the website includes  the "National Listing
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of Fish Advisories", a database of information describing all fish advisories issued by states and tribes
in the U.S.  The website also includes fact sheets, reports, posters, and other information such as
EPA's, "Guide to Healthy Eating of the Fish you Catch".  Published in multiple languages, this is a guide
to selection and preparation of fish that are low in chemical pollutants. In addition to providing this
information on an internet website, the Fish Advisory Program has worked closely with the Agency for
Toxic Substances and Disease Registry to disseminate printed material to the public through the
medical community (medical doctors, nurses, nurse practitioners, and  midwives).

The Fish Advisory program has identified and worked closely  with stakeholders to develop national
guidance on fish sampling, tissue analysis, risk assessment, and risk communication for the issuance
of fish consumption advisories. EPA  has  provided information about the Fish Advisory Program to the
Fish Consumption Workgroup of the  National Environmental Justice Advisory Council. In addition, the
Fish Advisory Program has invited stakeholder groups to national meetings for discussion  of
environmental justice issues. The Program has also conducted training for tribes and states on
development of fish consumption advisories.  Through these  activities, EPA has identified  stakeholder
groups who will benefit from increased awareness of environmental justice issues, and will continue to
involve stakeholders in a collaborative problem-solving process.

The BEACH Program  has identified and worked closely with stakeholders to develop national guidance
for beach monitoring and public notification.  Stakeholder groups have participated in national
meetings to discuss environmental justice issues.  The Program will continue to engage stakeholders
in a collaborative problem solving process.

The SHPD will work with the Office of Environmental Justice,  Regional Offices and umbrella groups to
develop strategies and plans of action for increasing awareness (among low  income and minority
populations) of the water quality standards program and the  role that these  groups can play.  In
collaboration with other offices and organizations, SHPD will consider developing outreach and other
tools geared toward socio-economically disadvantaged groups and minority populations.

OW continues to encourage the  participation of external stakeholders  in decision-making processes
that affect environmental justice communities. Through various stakeholders groups such as the Tribal
Operations Committee, the National  Environmental Justice Advisory Council,  and the National Drinking
Water Advisory Council, OW will continue to seek advice and  comments on programs and activities
that affect low income and minority communities.

OW also will continue to serve as an  information  resource to  these external stakeholders.  OW is
pursuing several new initiatives over  the  next two years to improve  OW's communication to external
stakeholders. Such initiatives include working with OEJ to set up its own environmental justice mailing
list using OEJ's current environmental justice mailing  list that is populated  with over 3,000 names. For
those stakeholders that do not have  access to the Internet, the mailings will  provide them with access
to the information that is available on OW's web sites.

OW also continues to support current web sites that are translated into other languages to ensure that
all stakeholders have access to information. For example, OGWDW maintains home pages that have
been translated into Spanish to reach additional stakeholders with important information related to
drinking water advisories to also include Vietnamese, French, Chinese and Arabic. OGWDW also
provides brochures that have been translated into Spanish, such as  "Water on Tap: What You Need to
Know". In addition, OWM acknowledges the need for alternative-language publications on its Web
sites, especially Spanish due to the large populations in  the U.S. for whom Spanish is the  primary
language.  More than 100 of OWM's  outreach publications have been translated into Spanish, and
more are planned during the next two years. OWM has also  conducted a brown  bag discussion on
Alaskan Native Villages (October 29,  2007).  OW will continue to identify other fact sheets and
outreach materials that should be translated into not only Spanish but also other languages.

The BEACH Program  has published information in English and Spanish about the health risks of
swimming in polluted water.  EPA's brochure, "Before You go to the Beach" provides information about
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beach water pollution, the health risks associated with swimming in polluted water, and who to
contact if water at a beach is contaminated. The BEACH program has also provided information about
beach water pollution to radio stations for Spanish language broadcasts.

 OW supports the National Tribal Water Council (NTWC).  NTWC is a technical and
 scientific body created to assist the Environmental Protection Agency, federally recognized Indian Tribes,
 including Alaska Native Tribes, and their associated tribal communities and tribal organizations, with research
 and information for decision-making regarding water issues and water-related concerns that impact Indian and
 Alaska Native tribal members, as well as other residents of Alaska Native Villages and Indian Country in
 the United States.

 The following preliminary goals are based on the original vision for the National Tribal Water Council:
         Raise awareness of a wide range of water related issues pertaining to the health of tribal communities
         and the quality  of tribal aquatic resources and watersheds.
         Promote information exchange.
         Facilitate the exposure of tribal water program managers and staff to best management practices for
         addressing water quality concerns.
         Encourage the enhancement of tribal water protection program development and implementation.
         Provide a platform to inform tribes on a wide variety of  issues related to ground, surface, and drinking water.
         Promote community water protection education and awareness.
         Assist in the development, establishment, and sustaining of comprehensive tribal water protection programs.

OW staff provides support to the Agency wide Community Action  for a Renewed Environment (CARE)
Program which provides competitive grants that offer an innovative way for a community to organize and
take action to reduce toxic pollution in its local environment.  Through CARE, a community creates a
partnership that implements solutions to reduce releases of toxic  pollutants and minimize people's exposure
to them. By providing financial and technical assistance, EPA helps CARE communities get on the path to a
renewed environment. In FY 09 OW will co-sponsor the Agency CARE Program.


Section 7: Data Collection, Management, and Evaluation
 List your Regional/Headquarters office's main data sets - the ways in which you collect environmental
justice information. Also, describe how this information will be utilized by your
Regional/Headquarters office (e.g. environmental justice assessment, program tracking/evaluation).
 Will your Regional/Headquarters office have a method of identifying and highlighting best practices
and lessons learned? If yes, please describe.

OW uses 40 water-quality data systems  to maintain  the flow of information between OW and
appropriate users of the information.

Each data system  has three layers: data collection layer, a common services or functional layer, and a
graphic interface or user layer. The  information collected for OW can  be compared with U.S. Bureau of
Census data on population and community characteristics. When appropriate, OW will collect,
maintain, and  analyze data on populations identified by race,  national origin, and/or income. Examples
of OW's data systems include Ambient Water Quality (STORET); Drinking  Water  (SDWIS); Information
Building: National  Hydrology Data (NHD);  BEACH Program; and  Fish and Wildlife Consumption
Advisories.

AIEO will continue to  play a major role, working with the Office of Environmental Information (OEI), in
developing the Tribal  Enterprise Architecture (TPEA) for EPA. AIEO will continue  to work on
development of a comprehensive system that extracts from existing sources (systems and databases)
and transforms data to fit  EPA and tribal program needs.  Currently, the TPEA is composed of 8
applications to meet this need.

The goal of AIEO's IT work is to:
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       Improve tribal access to EPA and other agencies' facilities and programs in and around Indian
        country,
       Promote interagency and intertribal data sharing to support tribal programs, and
       Facilitate information sharing among EPA HQ, EPA Regions, and tribes.

AIEO is coordinating with other Program Offices to promote development of metrics under all goals to
indicate tribal performance and environmental  results that include tribes.

OWM is supporting efforts within the Agency to identify and map  EJ areas. This enables OWM to
connect EJ areas with water permits and monitoring data. Linking EJ mapping and monitoring data is
only in the initial stages. Once information is derived from development of the database, OW will
share that information with the Regions. After this is done, OWM capacity to analyze data and monitor
environmental activities in EJ areas will be greatly enhanced. OWM will cooperate with OECA and
other Agency offices on this effort.

The Fish Advisory Program is conducting a study to analyze the effectiveness of risk communication
approaches used for fish consumption advisories.  When completed, this study will provide information
to effectively develop and issue advisories for populations at risk of exposure to contaminants in fish
tissue.  Both the Fish Advisory and BEACH Programs will invite state and local governments to present
"success stories" and lessons learned at national meetings so that best practices can transferred
among program participants. The Fish and BEACH Programs also publish other documents
highlighting best practices.  Both programs have published  national guidance for monitoring  and risk
communication.  The Fish Program publishes technical fact sheets containing information used for risk
assessment and advisory development. The BEACH  program is publishing state profiles that highlight
practices used by all state beach monitoring and public notification programs.

EPA's Fish Advisory Program conducts an annual survey of state and tribal advisory programs to obtain
information about the methods they use for fish tissue monitoring, risk assessment, and risk
communication.  The Fish Advisory Program also compiles and maintains a national database of fish
consumption advisories that have been issued  by state and tribal governments in the U.S.   This
information can be used to help determine whether state and tribal programs are providing an
adequate level of health protection for minority populations who may consume large amounts of fish
taken from polluted waters.

EPA's BEACH Program maintains a database of information describing state and local beach  monitoring
and notification programs and advisories issued for specific beaches during the swimming season.
This information can be used to help determine whether state, tribal, and local programs are providing
an adequate level of health protection for minority populations who swim in urban and other waters
containing high levels of pathogens.

The SHPD has developed case study materials  detailing the benefits of water quality standards
program to Indian tribes. As resources allow, it will continue this series of case study materials as a
way to document environmental improvements on reservations. The case studies and lessons learned
are also a mechanism for promoting tribal environmental programs to other Tribes.

OGWDW maintains the Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS/FED) Violation and
Inventory Data, U.S. Census Bureau  Data, and  Drinking Water Mapping Application Datasets. The
Office currently is conducting a study to determine if there  is a relationship between public water
systems in noncompliance with drinking water  regulations and environmental justice (or
economically distressed) communities.  OGWDW will share this information with Regions after HQ
review.

OGWDW has developed the Tribal Grant Tracking Tool which tracks drinking water infrastructure
projects on tribal lands that improve access to  safe drinking water.  It also tracks technical assistance
provided to these communities.
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The Office of Water documents best practices and lessons learned through EJ Success Stories and
reports on OW EJ activities in the Agency's EJ Biennial Accomplishment Reports.

Section 8: Professional and Organization Development
 Willyour Regional/Headquarters office plan to provide training on environmental justice? If yes,
please list and describe.
 What methods will you utilize to promote shared learning, such as best practices and lessons
learned among staff? If yes, please list and describe.

OW plans to integrate environmental justice principles into existing training courses and programs.
These include the NPDES permits writing course and OW's three training academies - the Drinking
Water Academy, Water Quality Standards Academy, and Watershed Academy. OW will also develop
Introduction to  Environmental Justice training specifically for OW staff.

OW will also hold "brown bags" at lunchtime for staff to view videotapes and hear speakers on
environmental justice and other  related topics. Other program offices' efforts related to professional
development include: AIEO coordinates EPA's "Working Effectively with Tribal Governments" (WETG)
training. The training is available on the EPA intranet for all EPA staff at
http://intranet.epa.gov/opptsval/training/tribal/EPA/mainmenu/launchPage.htm. AIEO also exhibits and
displays the WETG training at office and Agency events such as the Native American and Alaska
Native Heritage Month events and Office of Environmental Information's open house. AIEO, working
with  federal partners, expanded  WETG for use outside of EPA.

The Fish Advisory Program plans to offer training at national meetings for tribes on the development
of fish consumption advisories. Training may also be held at national  meetings for Headquarters staff
and regional Fish and BEACH program coordinators on: 1) targeting waters for fish consumption and
swimming advisories, and 2) implementing risk communication strategies for "hard-to-reach"
communities such as those with  limited English proficiency, limited  literacy, geographic isolation,
limited income,  or unique cultural values and practices that may limit the effectiveness of risk
communication  tools that are currently applied.

OWOW participates in a number of programs to help recruit minority  and lower-income candidates,
including the Hispanic American  Colleges and Universities (HACU) summer internship program, and
the Washington Center Native American Leadership Program. The perspective these interns bring
to Headquarters has been invaluable in a wide variety of projects, and EPA staff often hear of
interns' later involvement in helping  their communities have a greater say in environmental
decision-making in their neighborhoods.

OW is developing a consolidated training approach for tribes on the Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking
Water Act. The  idea is to house in one place information allowing tribes to access all CWA and SDWA
training courses  offered by EPA and outside organizations.

Section 9: Environmental Justice Assessment
 Will your Regional/Headquarters office have a process by which an environmental justice assessment
will be conducted? If yes, please describe.
 Will your Regional/Headquarters office rely on any information resources with which to conduct an
environmental justice assessment, such as the EnvironmentalJustice Mapper, EnvironmentalJustice
Toolkit, etc. ? If yes, please list and describe.

OW plans to explore the use of its various databases to establish baseline information to determine the
relationships between water programs and communities with environmental justice concerns. The purpose
of this project is to eventually identify and implement opportunities for improving the effectiveness of water
programs in communities with EJ concerns.

EPA believes it is important for states to make water quality standards easily and readily available for
the public to access. OST developed tools to help states organize and display their water quality
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standards on a geographic basis. This enables the user to read and view water quality standards
geographically and to overlay census and demographic data (including socioeconomic status and
minority populations) as an environmental justice assessment tool.

The BEACH and Fish Advisory programs will rely on the Beach Watch database and the National Listing of
Fish Advisories to conduct environmental justice assessments.

OGWDW will use the Safe Drinking Water Information  System (SDWIS/FED) and U.S. Census
Bureau Data to identify whether significant demographic differences exist between populations
served by systems in violation of health-based standards within geographic regions and systems not
in violation. In  addition, data from the Safe Drinking Water Information System will be imported to
an OGWDW Web-based Geospatial Application for data querying and mapping of potential risks
from other sources of pollution. Further assessment will be conducted through the use of the
Environmental  Justice Mapper.

Finally, AIEO is looking into the possibility of using the Tribal Information Management System
(TIMS) to obtain data that could be useful in assessing environmental justice.

Section 10: Program Evaluation

In FY 09 OW will conduct an Environmental Justice review of the Alaska Native Village (ANV)
Infrastructure Program. This program addresses the lack of basic sanitation infrastructure -
specifically, running water and flush toilets in  rural and Alaska Native Villages. There are
approximately 300 Alaskan Native Village and rural communities eligible to participate in the ANV
program representing some 36,000 homes throughout the state of Alaska over an area of 663,000
square miles (The State of Virginia is 43,000 squares miles). The average population of an Alaska
Native Village or a  rural Alaska community is 300 people. The Alaska Native Village Infrastructure
Program in coordination with the Safe Drinking Water Act and the Clean Water Act Indian  Set-aside
Programs have worked to increase the percentage of homes in Alaska with drinking water or sewer
services from 60% in 1993 to 90% in 2008. The ANV program activities include the development and
construction of public drinking water and wastewater systems. The program also provides training,
technical assistance, and educational programs relating to the operation and maintenance of
sanitation services in Alaska rural communities and Alaska Native villages.

In FY 09 OW will develop a schedule and identify appropriate performance measures for conducting
an EJ Review of the Alaska Native Village Program. The  EJ Review is expected to encompass the
following: (1) Identify whether the agency is effectively  identifying and addressing EJ concerns that
arise or may arise with respect to the ANV program; (2) Identify opportunities for the agency to
enhance its effectiveness in identifying and addressing EJ concerns that arise or may arise with
respect to the ANV program; (3) Provide feedback on this EJ review to enhance future EJ reviews.

OW will also develop specific performance measures related to how successfully OW has integrated
environmental justice into the activities mentioned in this action plan. These performance  measures
will assist managers on  how to further integrate environmental justice principles into policies,
programs, and activities.

AIEO has conducted a program evaluation of  its General  Assistance  Program (GAP) grants. The results
of the evaluation are useful to GAP stakeholders involved in awarding grants, providing technical
assistance and oversight, and planning and executing tribal environmental programs. AIEO maintains
a computerized tracking system that supplies  program performance data and information for EPA's
Strategic Plan (Objective 5.3: Improve Human Health and the Environment for Indian Country) and
other EPA measuring systems.

The Fish Advisory and BEACH programs  do not have specific performance measures  related to
environmental justice. However, these programs have emphasized promotion of environmental justice
through contaminant and pathogen monitoring and risk communication to minority populations  who
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may consume large amounts of fish taken from polluted waters, or swim in urban and other waters
containing high levels of pathogens.  Therefore, the GPRA objectives, sub objectives, strategic targets,
and program activity measures established for these programs are directly related to environmental
justice.  These performance measures are described earlier in this document.

The results and accomplishments of the Office of Water Environmental Justice Action Plan are
highlighted in the Agency's: (1) Environmental Justice Action Plan Progress Report and derivative Best
Practices Document, and (2) Biennial Report.

The Fish Contamination program publishes biannual and the BEACH Programs publishes annual fact
sheets providing public information about fish consumption and swimming advisories issued by states.
These fact sheets will include information about the environmental justice accomplishments of the
programs.

The Office of Water has made great strides towards integrating Environmental Justice into its programs,
policies and activities. We realize that additional work must be done to ensure continued public health
protection. OW will to continue to develop programs which will provide clean and safe water for all
communities and populations. OW will also continue to integrate environmental justice considerations
effectively into OW programs, policies,  and activities to achieve measurable benefits to the environment
and/or public health of affected communities.
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                                          Office of Water Environmental Justice Action Plan

                                          Section 1:  Performance Measures Matrix Highlight

                                               FY09 Robust-Results Oriented Activity

                                                      FY09 EJ Review Activity
Description: Alaska Native Villages Infrastructure Program

EPA Strategic Plan Goal 2: Clean and Safe Water
Objective: Clean and safe drinking water

National and Office of Water Environmental Justice Priority: Water Safe to Drink

Many rural and Native Alaska communities lack basic sanitation infrastructure - specifically, running water and flush toilets. In many communities
honey-buckets, commonly a five gallon bucket used as a toilet, are hand carried by home owners to a community dumping station or a lagoon for
disposal. Residents also utilize centralized washeterias as their only source for bathing, laundry services and to hand haul water for drinking to their
homes from a watering point. Raw sewage from honey-buckets, inadvertent honey-bucket spills on public walk ways and uncovered sewage dump
stations often pose an immediate threat to the health and environment of village residents.

The Alaska Native Village (ANV) Infrastructure Program, in coordination with the Safe Drinking Water Act and the Clean Water Act Indian Set-
aside Program, have worked to increase the percentage of homes in Alaska with drinking water or sewer services from 60% in 1993 to 90% in 2008.
In 2009, our goal is to improve access to basic sanitation to approximately 800 to!200 new homes.

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Activities
Output
Applicable Outcome Measure
Short-term
(awareness)
Intermediate
(behavior)
Long-term
(condition)
Point of Contact

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         Activities
       Output
                    Applicable Outcome Measure
                                                         Short-term
                                                         (awareness)
                                                 Intermediate
                                                  (behavior)
                                                   Long-term
                                                    (condition)
                                                    Point of Contact
-Planning, design, and
construction of public
drinking water and
wastewater systems to
improve health and
sanitation conditions in the
Alaska Native Villages
-Provide training and
technical assistance to
communities through
educational programs related
to the operation and
maintenance of sanitation
services.
- Conduct an EJ Review
Resources Federal funding:
Safe Drinking Water Act
and Clean Water Act Indian
Set-aside Program
Alaska Native Villages
Infrastructure Grant Program
Building  Partnerships:
State of Alaska, Alaska
Native Tribal Health
Consortium (ANTHC)
Indian Health Service (IHS)
USDA's Rural Development
Region 10
-Financial assistance
-Training
-Technical assistance
-Educational
programs
-Residential water
and sewer services
-Report on the
effectiveness of the
ANV Program
-Improved level of
water and sewer
services for existing
systems
-Increased
sustainability of
existing water and
sewer systems
-Increase awareness of
health-related problems
due to unsafe drinking
water and poor sanitation
practices in
disadvantaged
communities
-Increase awareness of
areas without access to
safe drinking water and
basic sanitation services
which contribute to the
spread of disease in
disadvantaged
communities
-Increase awareness of
sustainability of existing
and proposed water and
sewer systems
-Build,
rehabilitate
and/or
refurbish
infrastructure
-Continue
collaborating
with Region 10
to improve
water and
wastewater
infrastructure
                                          -Provide water and sewer
                                          services to all serviceable
                                          homes in Alaskan villages
-Improve both human and
environmental health of
Alaskan natives
-By 2015, reduce by 50
percent the number of homes
on tribal lands and Alaskan
Native Villages lacking basic
sanitation (National target for
all tribal homes on all
reservations nationwide)*
-Improve health and decrease
incidences of disease in rural
Alaska communities
                                                                *-A multi-agency focus group
                                                                on this national goal has
                                                                recently determined this goal
                                                                cannot be met without the
                                                                provision of additional
                                                                financial resources
Name: Matthew Richardson
Tel: (202) 564-2947
E-mail:
richardson.matthew@epa.gov
Elin Betanzo
Tel: 202-564-1807
E-mail:
betanzo.elin@epa.gov

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                                        Section 2: Performance Measures Matrix
                                 Office of Water FY09 Environmental Justice Action Plan
                                              Performance Measures Matrix
Goal 2: Clean and Safe Water
      EJ Priority: Water Safe to Drink
      EJ Priority: Fish and Shellfish Safe to Eat
      Objective: Water Safe for Swimming

Goal 4: Healthy Communities and Ecosystems
      Objective: Healthy Communities
Goal: Cross Cutting Strategies
      Objective: Collaborative problem-solving to address environmental justice issues
      Objective: Internal capacity building

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                                                   Environmental Justice Action Plan
                                                         (Fy2008/2009)
Goal 2:       Clean and Safe Water
Objective:    Clean and Safe Drinking Water
Activities
1. Improve operations of tribal
community water systems by
conducting sanitary surveys at the
required frequency to evaluate the
adequacy of the facilities for
producing and distributing safe
drinking water.












Output
By 2009, 52 of
approximately 68 Tribal
community water
systems required to
have undergone a
sanitary survey will
have their sanitary
survey completed
within the required
cycle (default cycle for
community water
systems is three years).

The total number of
tribal community water
systems that have
undergone a sanitary
survey within three
years of their last
sanitary survey (5 years
for outstanding
performers).
Applicable Outcome Measure
Short-term
(awareness)
Inspectors conducting
sanitary surveys must
apply basic scientific
information and have
a working knowledge
-C 4\, 4-'
of the operation,
maintenance,
management, and
technology of a water
system to identify
sanitary risks that
may interrupt the
multiple barriers of
protection at a water
system. Deficiencies
will be identified and
recommendations for
improvement will be
provided through
technical assistance to
the tribe as needed.


Intermediate
(behavior)
Community water
system owners and
operators will work
to address
deficiencies
identified during a
sanitary survey.












Long-term
(condition)
Sanitation deficiencies are
addressed resulting in
improved compliance and
public health protection















Point of Contact
Elin Betanzo
Tel: 202-564-1807
E-mail:
Betanzo .Elin(@epa. sov















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            Activities
       Output
                   Applicable Outcome Measure
                                                                 Short-term
                                                                (awareness)
                                                  Intermediate
                                                   (behavior)
                                                   Long-term
                                                    (condition)
                                                       Point of Contact
2.  Implement Tribal Drinking Water
Operator Certification Program to
provide tribes with further training
and certification opportunities in
addition to the existing training or
certification programs offered by
states, various federal agencies, and
private organizations.
In 2009, begin
implementing a national
program for
certification of tribal
water system operators.
                                    EPA will measure
                                    progress against the
                                    baseline established in
                                    2008.
Conduct outreach to
tribes to raise
awareness of the
national program and
provide information
on opportunities for
certification.
Increased interest
and enrollment for
certification testing
by tribal operators as
measured through
the program
tracking system.
Water system operators
possess the technical
capacity to effectively and
safely run their water system
resulting in improved
compliance and public
health protection.  Improved
compliance as measured and
reported under EPA's
Strategic Target E.
                                                                                                 ElinBetanzo,OGWDW
                                                                                                Tel: 202-564-1807
                                                                                                E-mail:
                                                                                                Betanzo .Elin(fl),epa. gov
3.  Improve Tribal access to safe
drinking water.  EPA's strategic plan
goal is to reduce by half, by 2015, the
number of tribal homes that lack
access to safe drinking water.
2003 Baseline: 38,637 homes
without access to safe drinking water
(12% of the total number of 319,070
tribal homes as reported by IHS).
Measured and reported under EPA's
Strategic Target G.
In 2009, implement an
interagency strategy to
improve access to safe
drinking water in
coordination with other
federal partners
                        Interagency/tribal
                        workgroups identify
                        specific barriers to
                        successful delivery of
                        infrastructure
                        services.
                      Modify agency
                      procedures to
                      remove barriers to
                      delivering
                      infrastructure
                      services.
                      Reduce the number of
                      homes in Indian Country
                      that lack access to safe
                      drinking water.
                            Elin Betanzo, OGWDW
                            Tel: 202-564-1807
                            E-mail:
                            Betanzo .Elin(g),epa. gov

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Activities
4. Encourage voluntary activity by
schools and child-care centers to
address lead in drinking water. EPA
developed a suite of materials, the
3Ts for Reducing Lead in Drinking
Water in Schools and Child Care
Facilities, which provided all the
necessary information for a facility to
develop and implement a lead in
drinking water reduction program.









Output
In collaboration with
the National Head start
Program, EPA will
conduct outreach to
Head Start Centers in
targeted communities.
EPA will select
communities based on
CDC blood lead level
data. Each Head Start
Center will receive a
packet of materials to
assist them with
information on testing
and ways to reduce
children's exposure to
lead in drinking water.




Applicable Outcome Measure
Short-term
(awareness)
Schools and childcare
facilities will become
more aware of the
potential for elevated
lead levels in drinking
water in their
facilities. Officials of
these facilities will
understand the
sources of lead in
drinking water, health
effects of lead
exposure, remediation
options and
communication
techniques; measured
by number of web site
hits, emails,
newsletter articles
published and
conferences attended.
Intermediate
(behavior)
Schools and
childcare providers
will implement a 3Ts
program in their
facility.
Schools and
childcare providers
will order/request
3Ts materials;
measured by orders
placed for 3Ts
materials.








Long-term
(condition)












Point of Contact
Lisa Christ, OGWDW

Tel: 202-564-8354
E-mail:
Christ.Lisa(g),epa.gov










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Goal 2:        Clean and Safe Water
Objective:     Clean and Safe drinking water
             Activities
          Output
                 Applicable Outcome Measure
                                                                        Short-term
                                                                        (awareness)
                                                         Intermediate
                                                          (behavior)
                                                 Long-term
                                                  (condition)
                                             Point of Contact
5.  Provide funding for infrastructure
improvements for small and
disadvantaged communities.
In 2007, 72% of loans and
39% of loan dollars made by
state Drinking Water State
Revolving Fund (DWSRF)
programs were to small
systems.  The output in 2008
will depend on discretionary
decisions by States.

In 2007, 26% of loans (which
may include lower-interest or
longer-term loans and/or
principal forgiveness) made
by state DWSRF programs
were to systems serving
disadvantaged communities.
Results in 2008 will also
depend on States' decisions.

In 2007, 1.88% of national
appropriation was used to
provide grants to Tribal and
territorial public water
systems (1.5% for tribes and
0.3 8% for territories).  This
number is statutory and will
not change for 2008.
States continue to be
aware of the SDWA
requirement to provide
15% of loan dollars to
small systems.
                                                                   States determine the
                                                                   appropriate balance
                                                                   between applying
                                                                   disadvantaged assistance
                                                                   and growing the fund.
                                                                   EPA will continue to
                                                                   follow the DWSRF
                                                                   allocation formula with
                                                                   respect to tribes and
                                                                   territories, as put forth in
                                                                   the SDWA.
State Project Priority
Lists reflect meeting
this requirement.
                         States apply their
                         developed
                         disadvantaged
                         assistance program
                         where they have
                         determined there is a
                         need for one.
                         EPA will continue
                         to make grants
                         based on DWSRF
                         allocation formula
                         with respect to tribes
                         and territories.
Howard Rubin, OGWDW

Tel: 202-564-2051
E-mail:
Rubin.Howard-
E(@,epa.gov

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             Activities
          Output
                 Applicable Outcome Measure
                                                                        Short-term
                                                                        (awareness)
                                                         Intermediate
                                                          (behavior)
                                                 Long-term
                                                  (condition)
                                             Point of Contact
6.  Use Safe Drinking Water
Information System/Operational Data
System (ODS) and geospatial
applications to investigate compliance
to drinking water standards in different
types of communities.
Refine the methodology,
incorporate the most recent
data for 2007 and determine
the statistical significance of
the previous results for 2003,
2004,2005,2006 and 2007
data.  Analyze data to identify
trends in non-compliance
over longer periods of time
(longer than one year).
Expand decision-makers
understanding of
compliance to drinking
water standards as it
relates to different sizes
of water systems and to
demographics, including
age, minority status and
income.
                     Increase percentage
                     of population served
                     by community
                     water systems that
                     receive drinking
                     water that meets
                     (are in compliance
                     with) health-based
                     standards.
                    Name/Org: Leslie
                    Cronkhite,
                     OGWDW
                                                                                                                                     Tel: 202-564-3878

                                                                                                                                     E-mail:
                                                                                                                                     Cronkhite.Leslie(fl),epa.gov
7.  In FY 2008 EPA published Federal
Register Notices to approve
underground injection control (UIC)
Class II (oil and gas related) primacy
applications for the Fort Peck Tribes
and the Navajo Nation. If approved,
final rules will be published and the
Tribes will become the first in the
nation to receive primary enforcement
authority for a UIC program.
Tribes granted UIC primacy
will be treated the same as
States and will receive federal
funding to implement their
own UIC Class II program.
Increased emphasis on
the importance of Class
II UIC well impacts on
Underground Sources of
Drinking Water
USDW(s).
Improved
management of
tribal UIC Class II
wells.
Increased Protection
ofUSDW(s)and
Tribal drinking
water sources.
Jeff Jollie, OGWDW


Tel: 202-564-3886
E-mail:
Jollie Jeff (@,epa. gov

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Goal 2:
Objective 1:
Clean and Safe Water
Safe fish/shellfish
       Activities
                         Output
                 Applicable Outcome Measure
                                                                    Short-term
                                                                    (awareness)
                                                                         Intermediate
                                                                          (behavior)
                                                 Long-term
                                                  (condition)
                                                 Point of Contact
1. In 2009, EPA, in
cooperation with state,
tribal, and federal partners,
will hold a national
conference on contaminants
in fish.
2.  Maintain the Fish
Advisory Program Web site
that includes the National
Listing of Fish Advisories

3.  Disseminate information
in multiple languages to the
medical community
through the Interagency
Agreement with FDA and
via medical conferences.
            Participate in biannual national
           conference

           Update the NLFA website to include
           information about advisories for
           contaminants in fish.
           Disseminate information to health
           professionals and the public to enable
           informed decisions on when and where
           to fish, and how to prepare fish caught
           for recreation and subsistence.

           Print materials about reducing the risk
           of exposure to contaminants in fish
           caught for recreation or subsistence
           will be disseminated in multiple
           languages to doctors, nurses, nurse
           practitioners, and midwives.
Greater information
exchange among state,
tribal, and community
representatives on
issues such as
development of fish
consumption advisories
to protect targeted
communities.
More minority, low
income and non-
English speaking
populations will obtain
information about
reducing the risks of
exposure to
contaminants in fish.
Reduced exposure
to contaminants in
fish.
By 2011, reduce the
percentage of women of
childbearing age having
mercury levels in blood
above the level of concern
from 5.7 percent to 4.6
percent.
Jeffrey Bigler, OST
 Bigler.jeffrev(@,epa.gov

Fleisig.Erica@epa. gov
Erica Fleisig, OST
                                                                            10

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Goal 2:
Objective 2:
Clean and Safe Water
Water safe for swimming
          Activities
                               Output
                 Applicable Outcome Measure
                                                                           Short-term
                                                                           (awareness)
                                                                                 Intermediate
                                                                                   (behavior)
                                                   Long-term
                                                   (condition)
                                                  Point of
                                                  Contact
1.Provide technical guidance and
assistance to states, tribes, and
local governments for beach
monitoring and public notification
2. Provide funding for grants to
eligible states, tribes, and local
agencies for monitoring coastal
recreation waters and issuing
advisories when waters are unsafe
for swimming due to high levels of
pathogens
3. Conduct National Beach
Program Conference.
4.  Maintain the Beach Watch
internet Web site.
                  Provide technical assistance to states
                  and tribes for monitoring bathing
                  beach waters and notifying the public
                  when water quality standards for
                  pathogen indicators are exceeded.
                  35 eligible state, tribal, and local
                  agencies will use grant funds to
                  implement coastal recreation water
                  monitoring and public notification
                  programs.
                  Grant recipients will provide data to
                  EPA about their monitoring and
                  notification programs, beach
                  advisories and closures issued, and
                  water quality monitoring data.
                  Hold the national conference
                  biannually. Third  national
                  conference will be held in fiscal year
                  2009.
                  Make Internet Web site available that
                  contains information about microbial
                  pathogens in bathing beach waters.
Greater information
exchange among state
and local agency
representatives on
environmental justice
issues such as pathogen
monitoring to identify
waters where swimming
advisories are needed to
protect the health of
targeted communities.


This will result in
improved risk
communication to
individuals who swim at
these beaches.
Decreased exposure
of minority
populations to
pathogens in
recreational waters
when indicators
exceed water quality
standards.
By 2011, the number of
waterborne disease
outbreaks attributable
to swimming in or
other recreational
contact with coastal
and Great Lakes waters
will be maintained at
two, measured as a 5-
year average.

By 2011, maintain the
percentage of days of
the beach season that
coastal and Great Lakes
beaches monitored by
state beach safety
programs are open and
safe for  swimming at
96 percent.
Richard Healy
OST

Beth Leamond
OST
                                                                              11

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Goal 4:       Healthy Communities and Ecosystems
Objective:     Communities
    Activities
      Output
         Applicable Outcome Measure
                                         Short-term
                                         (awareness)
                                              Intermediate
                                               (behavior)
                                            Long-term
                                             (condition)
                             Point of Contact
1. Provide people
in the Mexico
Border area with
adequate drinking
water systems.
2. Provide people
in the Mexico
Border area with
adequate
wastewater
sanitation systems.
-Provide funding
with EPA grants and
USDA funding
-Provide technical
assistance with
personnel to monitor
community drinking
and wastewater
programs
-Provide on-site
training for
wastewater systems
operators
-By 2009, increase the number of homes
connected to potable water supply
systems. The number of drinking water
connections made through FY07 ~
23,734 and the FY 08 target, 2,500
additional connections. FY 09 target
1,500 additional connections
-By 2009, increase the number of homes
connected to wastewater collection and
treatment systems The number of
wastewater connections made through
FY07 103,670 and FY 08 target - 15,000
additional connections. FY 09 target -
105,500 additional connections.
-By 2012, achieve a 9 of
17 currently exceeded
water quality standards
in impaired trans-
boundary segments of
US surface waters
Name/Org: Katherine
Sleasman
Tel: (202)-250-8810
E-mail:
sleasman.katherine@epa.gov

/Org: William Webster
Tel: (202)-564-0616
E-mail:
webster. william i@,epa.gov
                                                                     12

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Cross Cutting Strategies:
Objective:     Collaborative problem-solving to address environmental justice issues
        Activities
       Output
                 Applicable Outcome Measure
                                                          Short-term
                                                          (awareness)
                                                    Intermediate
                                                     (behavior)
                                                   Long-term
                                                    (condition)
                                                    Point of Contact
1.  Offer Tribal workshops to
assist Tribes in preparing
nonpoint source control
management programs.
Conduct four workshops
annually (or as requested
by Tribes)
Attendance at
workshops by Tribal
representatives
An increase in the
number of Tribes that
develop Nonpoint
Source Pollution
Control Management
Programs, and/or apply
for section 319 grants.
Increase in number of
Tribes that achieve one
or more water quality
goals in their
management plans.
Andrea Matzke, OWOW
2.  Conduct outreach to local
disadvantaged communities
regarding wetlands and
watershed issues.
Hold several hands-on
field events per year with
local community groups;
attendance by at least 50
children at hands-on field
events.
The majority of the
children in attendance
gain exposure to basic
watershed issues in their
community.
Some of the children in
attendance take positive
environmental action in
their community.
                       Rebecca Oils, OWOW
3. Partnering to protect
wetlands through the Five Star
Program
Provide project funding
for approximately 30-40
projects per year.
Develop knowledge and
skills in young people
through aquatic resource
restoration projects.
Increased participation
in restoration projects
by youth in
disadvantaged
communities. Project
participants have
experience and
confidence, and are well
positioned to take on
similar projects in the
future.
                       Myra Price, OWOW
                                                                            13

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Activities
4. Coordinate and work with
federally recognized tribes
and EPA Program Offices to
build an environmental
presence and environmental
programs in Indian country.
5. Convene the National
Tribal Water Council
6. OW Agency Co-lead for
Community Action for a
Renewed Environment
(CARE)
Output
Coordinate funding for the
Senior Environmental
Employee (SEE) Circuit
Rider Program in the
regions.
Assist in the
development,
establishment and
sustaining of
comprehensive tribal
water programs
Offer grants to help
CARE communities get
on the path to a
renewed environment
Applicable Outcome Measure
Short-term
(awareness)
Increase the capacity of interested
tribes' ability to administer their
environmental programs to protect
human health and the environment
of tribal lands (measure: # of
regions served by Senior Service
America, Inc).
Raise awareness of a wide
range of water related issues
pertaining to the health of tribal
communities and quality of
tribal aquatic resources and
watersheds
Communities receive
competitive grants to organize
and take action to reduce toxic
pollution in their local
environment.
Intermediate
(behavior)
SEEs work on tribal
programs and their
advice is
incorporated into
tribal environmental
programs (measure:
The number of tribal
council or program
actions that are
related to SEE
advice).
Promote
information
exchange
Communities
develop solutions
to reduce releases
of toxic pollutants
and minimize
exposure to them
Long-term
(condition)
Environmental
conditions on
Indian lands are
improved.
Encourage the
enhancement of
tribal water
protection
development and
implementation
The health and
environment of
these communities
improve.
Point of Contact
Elvira Dixon
564-0378
Dixon.elvira@epa.gov
Karen Rudek
(202) 564-0472
Kitty Miller
Tel: 564-0474
miller.kitty@epa.gov
14

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Cross Cutting Strategies:
Objective:    Internal Capacity Building (e.g., internal program management)
         Activities
        Output
                    Applicable Outcome Measure
                                                              Short-term
                                                             (awareness)
                                                           Intermediate
                                                             (behavior)
                                                       Long-term
                                                       (condition)
                                                                                                                                Point of Contact
 1.  Use OW databases to
 create baseline data to
 determine any relationships
 between water programs
 and communities with EJ
 concerns (Phase 1)
Establish baseline data
to understand status of
water programs in
communities with EJ
concerns.
OW identifies management
objective to define how data will
be used after baseline
established.
                                                      Aware of opportunities to set
                                                      priorities in implementing
                                                      particular aspects of the water
                                                      program in communities with EJ
                                                      concerns
                    Water programs
                    become more
                    effective with
                    addressing the
                    needs of
                    communities with
                    EJ concerns.
                                                                             Information
                                                                             gathered
                                                                             prepares OW
                                                                             and the Regions
                                                                             to set priorities
                                                                             for certain water
                                                                             programs in
                                                                             communities with
                                                                             EJ concerns.
                  Thomas Dabolt

                  dabolt.thomas@epa.gov

                  Tel: (202) 564-1450

                  Name/Alice Walker
                  Tel: (202) 529-7534
                   walker.alice@eap.gov
                  Wendy  Drake
                  Tel: (202)564-2926
                  drake.wendy@epa.gov
 Phase 1 will also involve
 coordinating with OEJ after
 "EJ concerns" are
 described.
 2. Train EPA personnel to
 work more effectively with
 tribal governments and to
 understand the unique nature
 of working with tribes.
Administer Agency wide
the Working Effectively
with Tribal Governments
training to facilitate better
communication and
understanding between
EPA and the tribes.
Offer on-line training to an
increased number of EPA staff and
management, (measure: # of
people satisfactorily completing
the training).
Knowledge from the
training is applied to
EPA work and
programs.
Environmental
conditions on
Indian lands are
improved.
Janice DiPietro
564-7616
DiPietro. Janice@epa. gov
                                                                        15

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