Solid Waste and Emergency Response
                                        (5305W)
                                    EPA530-K-05-015
                     Introduction to
             Municipal Solid Waste
           Disposal Facility Criteria
United States
Environmental Protection
Agency
September 2005

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                     SUBTITLE D: MUNICIPAL SOLID
                 WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY CRITERIA

                                  CONTENTS


1.  Introduction	  1

2.  Regulatory Summary 	  2
   2.1  Subpart A: General Requirements	  3
   2.2  SubpartB: Location Restrictions	  6
   2.3  Subpart C: Operating Criteria	  8
   2.4  Subpart D: Design Criteria 	12
   2.5  Subpart E: Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective Action  	12
   2.6  Subpart F: Closure and Post-Closure Care	17
   2.7  Subpart G: Financial Assurance Criteria	19

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                                                  Municipal Solid Waste Disposal Facility Criteria - 1
                               1.   INTRODUCTION
This module provides a summary of the regulatory criteria for municipal solid waste landfills
(MSWLFs). In general, a MSWLF is a landfill that accepts garbage, or solid waste, from
households. Wastes that are typically landfilled include bottles, cans, disposable diapers,
uneaten food, scraps of wood and metal, newspapers, paper and plastic packaging, and old
appliances, as well as some industrial and commercial nonhazardous wastes and construction
and demolition (C&D) wastes.  MSWLFs may also accept household hazardous wastes and
conditionally exempt small quantity generator (CESQG) wastes that are not regulated as
hazardous wastes under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery  Act (RCRA).

The MSWLF regulations promulgated on October 9,  1991 address location restrictions, facility
design and operation standards, groundwater monitoring and corrective action measures, closure
and post-closure care, and  financial responsibility requirements (56 FR 50978).  Implementation
of these regulations, by states with approved programs, will reduce the environmental impact of
existing and future MSWLFs.

When you have completed this module, you will be able to summarize the standards for
MSWLFs and list the relevant statutory and regulatory citations. Specifically, you will be able
to:

      provide the statutory authority under RCRA and the Clean Water Act (CWA) directing
       EPA to develop the MSWLF criteria in 40 CFR Part 258

      provide the Part 258 effective date and the compliance dates for providing
       demonstrations to satisfy individual regulatory requirements

      identify the types of facilities that qualify for the small landfill exemption

       explain the requirements of each subpart in Part 258 as they apply to states with EPA-
       approved MSWLF  permit programs and states without approved permit  programs

      compare the MSWLF environmental performance standards described in Part 258 to the
       corresponding requirements for hazardous waste management facilities in Part 264,
       which are generally more stringent.

Use this list of objectives to check your knowledge of this topic after you complete the training
session.
  The information in this document is not by any means a complete representation of EPA's regulations or policies,
                     but is an introduction to the topic used for training purposes.

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 2 - Municipal Solid Waste Disposal Facility Criteria
                         2.   REGULATORY SUMMARY
RCRA Subtitle D addresses solid waste management and was designed to assist waste
management officials in developing and encouraging environmentally sound methods for the
disposal of "nonhazardous" solid waste (RCRA 4001).  Promulgated under the authority of
Subtitle D, the MSWLF regulations in Part 258 establish a framework at the federal level for
planning and implementing municipal solid waste landfill programs at the state and local levels.
This framework sets minimum standards for protecting human health and the environment, while
allowing states to develop more flexible MSWLF criteria.

The Part  258 standards are intended to provide the means to mitigate or expeditiously remediate
potential adverse environmental impacts resulting from municipal landfills. However, other
Subtitle D regulations existed prior to the revised MSWLF standards discussed in this module.
RCRA 4004(a) authorized the promulgation of Part 257, Criteria for Classification of Solid
Waste Disposal Facilities and Practices (44 FR 53438; September 13, 1979). Part 257
established regulatory standards to satisfy the minimum national performance criteria for
sanitary landfills.  Since Part 258 became effective on October 9, 1993, Part 257 governs only
those solid waste disposal facilities and practices that do not meet the definition of a MSWLF.
Such facilities include waste piles, industrial nonhazardous waste landfills,  surface
impoundments, and land application units. EPA modified the Part 257 criteria on July 1, 1996,
to address the fact that these non-municipal non-hazardous wastes landfills  may receive CESQG
hazardous waste (61 FR 34252). EPA revised Part 257 to further clarify that construction and
demolition landfills may receive residential lead-based paint waste as Solid Waste Disposal
Facilities without having to comply with the Part 258 standards for MSWLFs as long as all
conditions are met (68 FR 36487; June 18, 2003). See the training module  entitled Solid Waste
Programs for further information.

Section 4010 of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA) authorized EPA
to revise  its existing sanitary landfill criteria to establish  specific regulations for facilities that
receive household hazardous waste or CESQG hazardous waste. In response to 4010, EPA
promulgated regulations on October 9, 1991  and added Part 258 requirements to address all
aspects of MSWLF design and management (56 FR 50978).  EPA designed the Part 258
requirements to be self-implementing, meaning that in unapproved states the owner and operator
of a MSWLF can meet these standards without the oversight of the state agency. These revised,
performance-based standards enable implementing agencies to strike a balance between
environmental protection, cost, and site-specific factors.  Integral to this regulatory approach is
the significant flexibility granted to approved states  for developing site-specific controls.

Since municipal solid waste management is more amenable to State and local, rather than
federal, regulatory oversight, EPA intends for states to take the lead role in  implementing the
MSWLF regulations.  EPA's goal is for states to receive approval of their MSWLF programs.
States with approved programs are given flexibility to consider site-specific conditions regarding
MSWLF design and other requirements in Part 258. If a state does not have an approved
program, there is no mechanism by which a regulatory agency can exercise flexibility in
implementing the Part 258 requirements.
  The information in this document is not by any means a complete representation of EPA's regulations or policies,
                     but is an introduction to the topic used for training purposes.

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                                                 Municipal Solid Waste Disposal Facility Criteria - 3
This flexibility is a factor that motivates states to submit applications for approval of their
programs as quickly as possible. EPA promulgated the State Implementation Rule (SIR) to
encourage states to receive program approval and take advantage of this flexibility.  SIR,
finalized on October 23, 1998, provides a flexible framework for modifications of approved
programs, establishes procedures for withdrawals of approvals, and confirms the process for
future program approvals (63 FR 57026).

Throughout this module, the text will refer to the titles "State Director," meaning the chief
administrative officer responsible for implementing the state municipal solid waste permit
program, and "Director of an approved state," meaning the chief administrative officer
responsible for implementing the state municipal solid waste permit program that is approved by
EPA under 2002 and 4005 of RCRA.
2.1    SUBPARTA:  GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

The Part 258 standards establish minimum national criteria under RCRA for all MSWLFs to
ensure protection of human health and the environment. A MSWLF unit is a discrete area of
land or an excavation that (1) receives household waste and (2) may not otherwise be defined as
a land application unit, surface impoundment, injection well, or waste pile. A MSWLF unit may
also receive other types of RCRA Subtitle D wastes, such as commercial solid waste,
nonhazardous sludge, CESQG waste, and industrial solid waste.  Such a landfill may be publicly
or privately owned.

A MSWLF unit may be a new MSWLF unit, an existing MSWLF unit, or a lateral expansion.
Any MSWLF unit that has not received waste prior to October 9, 1993, is a new MSWLF unit.
An existing MSWLF unit means any MSWLF unit that was receiving solid waste as of the
effective date, October 9, 1993, of the final rule (56 FR 50978; October 9, 1991).  A landfill cell
could constitute an individual MSWLF unit.  A lateral  expansion is a horizontal expansion of the
waste boundaries of an existing MSWLF unit.

Units accepting municipal solid waste that do not meet the Part 258 criteria are classified as open
dumps, and are prohibited by RCRA 4005(a). Accordingly, such units must be upgraded or
closed.

EFFECTIVE DATES

Part 258 applies to owners and operators of new and existing MSWLFs and lateral expansions
that receive waste after October 9, 1991.  Owners and operators of units that ceased receiving
waste between October 9, 1991,  and October 9, 1993, only  needed to comply with the final cover
requirements in 258.60(a) (258. l(d)).  Compliance for these landfills entailed placing a final
cover on the unit by October 9, 1994.  Owners and operators who failed to comply with these
final cover requirements by October 9, 1994, like those whose units continued to receive waste
after October 9, 1993,  needed to comply with all applicable Part 258 standards.

On October 1, 1993, EPA issued a rule delaying the effective date for certain existing smaller
MSWLFs to April 9, 1994 (58 FR 51536). To qualify  for the extension, the MSWLF units had
  The information in this document is not by any means a complete representation of EPA's regulations or policies,
                     but is an introduction to the topic used for training purposes.

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 4 - Municipal Solid Waste Disposal Facility Criteria
to accept 100 tons per day or less during a representative period prior to October 9, 1993, not be
on the Superfund National Priorities List (NPL), and be located in a state that had submitted an
application for state program approval by October 9, 1993; or be located on Indian lands or
Indian country. MSWLFs qualifying for the extension were still required to install a final cover
by October 9, 1994.

The effective date may also have been extended to April 9, 1994, for existing MSWLFs,
regardless of size, in Midwest flood regions if a landfill owner and operator's state determined
that an extension was needed to manage flood-related waste from federally designated disaster
areas during the summer of 1993. These states were allowed six additional months beyond April
9, 1994, to comply with the federal regulations. The nine states within federal disaster areas
were Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and
Wisconsin. Compliance dates for meeting individual regulatory requirements are listed  in Figure
1.

SMALL LANDFILL EXEMPTION

When the landfill criteria were developed in the late 1980s, EPA determined that nearly half of
the MSWLFs in the United States were small facilities serving communities of approximately
10,000 people or less (57 FR 50989; October 9, 1991). Because of the financial impact  of the
regulations on these facilities, EPA included in the final 1991 criteria an exemption for certain
small  MSWLFs from the requirements in Subpart D (design criteria) and Subpart E
(groundwater monitoring) (258. l(f)(l)). In 1993, EPA was subsequently sued and required to
remove the groundwater monitoring exemption. In March 1996, the Land Disposal Program
Flexibility Act (LDPFA) of 1996 was signed into law, reinstating the groundwater monitoring
exemption for qualifying small landfills. This exemption was codified on September 25, 1996
(61 FR 50410). To qualify for this exemption, a unit must receive less than 20 tons of municipal
solid waste daily based on an annual average, and must serve either:

      a community that experiences an annual interruption of at least 3 consecutive months of
      surface transportation that prevents access to a regional waste management facility;  or

      a community that has no practical waste management alternatives, and the landfill is an
      area that annually receives less than or equal to 25 inches of precipitation.

In addition, there must be no  evidence of existing groundwater contamination from the unit for
the small landfill exemption to apply.  If evidence of groundwater contamination from an
exempted small landfill is discovered, the owner and operator must notify the State Director and
thereafter fully comply with Subparts D and E (258. l(f)(3)). MSWLF units meeting the small
landfill exemption in 258. l(f) are exempt from all applicable regulations until October 9, 1997.

RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND DEMONSTRATION PERMITS

To promote innovative technologies, EPA published a final rule on March 22, 2004 (69  FR
13242), to revise the criteria for MSWLFs to allow states to issue research, development, and
demonstration (RD&D) permits to new and existing MSWLF units and lateral expansions.  The
Director of an approved state may provide owners and operations variances from certain


  The information in this document is not by any means a complete representation of EPA's regulations or policies,
                     but is an introduction to the topic used for training purposes.

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                                                          Municipal Solid Waste Disposal Facility Criteria - 5
MSWLF criteria provided that compliance with the RD&D permit will not increase risk to
human health and the environment. The specific criteria that are eligible for the variances are
the run-on control systems in 258.26(a)(l), the liquid restrictions in 258.28(a),  and the final
cover requirement in 258.60(a).  No other variances from the criteria, unless already provided
in the existing regulations, are  allowed under the RD&D permit.
                                              Figure 1
                  SUMMARY OF CHANGES TO THE EFFECTIVE DATE
                                  OF THE MSWLF CRITERIA

General effective
date123
This is the effective date
for location, operation,
design, and
closure/post-closure
standards.
Date by which unit
must install final cover
if it ceases receipt of
waste by the general
effective date2'3
Effective date of
groundwater
monitoring and
corrective action
provisions2'3
Effective date of
financial assurance
requirements3'4
MSWLF units
accepting greater
than 100 TPD
October 9, 1993
October 9, 1994
Prior to receipt of
waste for new units;
October 9, 1994
through October 9,
1996 for existing
units and lateral
expansions
April 9, 1997
MSWLF units
accepting 100 TPD
or less; not on the
NPL; and located in
a state that has
submitted an
application for
approval by 10/9/93,
or on Indian lands or
Indian country
April 9, 1994
October 9, 1994
October 9, 1993 for
new units; October 9,
1994 through October
9, 1996 for existing
units and lateral
expansions
April 9, 1997
MSWLF units that
meet the small
landfill exemption
in 40 CFR 258.1(f)
October 9, 1997;
exempt from design
requirements
October 9, 1998
Exempt from the
groundwater
monitoring
requirements.5
October 9, 1997
MSWLF units
receiving flood-
related waste
Up to October 9,
1994, as
determined by
state
Within one year
of date
determined by
state; no later
than October 9,
1995
October 9, 1993
for new units;
October 9, 1994
through October
9, 1996 for
existing units and
lateral expansions
April 9, 1997
 If a MSWLF unit receives waste after this date, the unit must comply with all of Part 258.
 Seethe final rule and preamble published on October 1, 1993 (58 FR 51536) for a full discussion of all changes and related conditions.
 See the final rule and preamble published on October 6, 1995 (60 FR 52337) for a full discussion of all changes and related conditions.
 See the final rule and preamble published on April 7, 1995 (60 FR 17649) for a discussion of this delay.
5 See the final rule published on September 25, 1996 (61 FR 50410).
  The information in this document is not by any means a complete representation of EPA's regulations or policies,
                        but is an introduction to the topic used for training purposes.

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 6 - Municipal Solid Waste Disposal Facility Criteria
2.2    SUBPART B: LOCATION RESTRICTIONS

The regulations establish special siting restrictions and performance standards for six types of
MSWLF site locations: airports,  100-year floodplains, wetlands, fault areas, seismic impact
zones, and unstable areas (Part 258, Subpart B). These six types of locations are sensitive areas
that warrant additional regulatory controls. While all six location restrictions apply to new and
laterally expanding MSWLF units, existing units are subject only to airport safety, floodplain,
and unstable area controls.

Unless the owner and operator of an existing MSWLF unit can make all applicable
demonstrations required for airport controls (258.10(a)), floodplains (258.11(a)), and unstable
areas (258.15(a)), the unit must close by October 9, 1996, in accordance with 258.60.  The
owner and operator must also conduct post-closure activities in accordance with 258.61, as
required by 258.16.  Approved states may delay the October 1996 closure date by up to two
years.

Because these landfill siting regulations involve substantial geological investigation, certain
terms used in the regulations are unusually technical. Refer to Part 258, Subpart B, for
definitions of specific terms.

AIRPORT SAFETY CONTROLS

Landfills can attract birds seeking food or nesting sites; therefore, landfills that are located near
an airport may pose a risk of collisions between birds and aircraft. The airport safety restrictions
in 258.10 define a danger zone in which special care must be taken to ensure that the likelihood
of collisions between birds and aircraft is reduced (56 FR 50978, 51043; October 9, 1991).
These provisions apply to new MSWLFs, existing MSWLFs, and lateral expansions located
within 10,000 feet of any airport runway used by turbojet aircraft, or within 5,000 feet of any
runway end used by piston-type aircraft only. The owner and operator of any unit located within
these areas must demonstrate that the management practices of the landfill will minimize the
incidents of bird hazards for aircraft.

Provided the owner and operator can make this demonstration, the airport safety criteria do not
prohibit the disposal of solid waste within the specified distances. Likewise, the airport safety
restrictions do not impact the location of airports or airport runways.  In accordance with Federal
Aviation Administration (FAA) Order 5200.5A, however, municipal landfills and lateral
expansions proposed within a five-mile radius of any airport runway end used by turbojet or
piston-type aircraft must notify the affected airport and the FAA in writing of such a proposal
(258.10(b)).

The Aviation Investment and Reform Act for the 21st Century (P.L. 106-181), which includes
provisions that amend the MSWLF location criteria, was signed into law on April 5, 2000.  The
amendments come after Congress found that collisions between aircraft and birds have resulted
in fatal accidents and pose special dangers to smaller aircraft. Since landfills have an inherent
nature to attract birds, the law prohibits the location of new MSWLFs within six miles of airports
served by general aviation aircraft and regularly scheduled flights of aircraft designed for 60
  The information in this document is not by any means a complete representation of EPA's regulations or policies,
                     but is an introduction to the topic used for training purposes.

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                                                  Municipal Solid Waste Disposal Facility Criteria - 7
passengers or less. This restriction does not apply to existing landfills or expansions of existing
landfills.

EPA published a direct final rule on July 11, 2002 (67 FR 45915), to amend the MSWLF
location restriction criteria to incorporate the language of Aviation Investment and Reform Act.
However, EPA subsequently withdrew this rule on October 8, 2002  (67 FR 62647), after
receiving adverse comments.  Finally, an informative note was added to 258.10 on October 15,
2003 (68 FR 59335), to reference the FAA guidance governing this restriction.

FLOODPLAIN CONTROLS

Floodplain regulations establish guidelines that must be followed when a new or existing
MSWLF or a lateral expansion is located in a 100-year floodplain.  A unit subject to these
provisions must be designed and operated to minimize its effect on both the 100-year flood flow
and the temporary water storage capacity of the floodplain. The unit's owner and operator must
provide evidence that the landfill will not restrict the flow of the 100-year flood, reduce the
temporary water storage capacity of the floodplain, or result in washout of solid waste.

WETLANDS CONTROLS

Swamps, bogs, marshes, and other wetlands are unique, critical ecosystems that serve an
important role in flood control, help filter wastes from water,  provide an important breeding
ground for fish and wildlife, and constitute an important recreational resource. EPA has placed a
high priority on wetlands protection, but believes an outright ban of new MSWLFs or lateral
expansions in wetlands could severely restrict the sites available for new or expanding landfills.
Thus, the Agency developed guidelines for the limited siting of MSWLFs in wetlands.

New units or lateral expansions are banned from wetlands unless the owner and operator make
the following demonstrations to the Director of an approved state:

      rebut the presumption that a practicable alternative site is available

       show that landfill construction and operation will not violate certain state and federal
       standards designed to protect water quality and wildlife

      demonstrate that the MSWLF unit will not cause or contribute to significant degradation
       of wetlands

      demonstrate that steps were taken to achieve no net loss of wetlands.

Because these demonstrations must satisfy the Director of an  approved state, 258.12(a)
effectively bans the siting of new MSWLF units and lateral expansions in wetlands in
unapproved states.

The Agency intends to keep these wetlands location restrictions consistent with all CWA
regulatory modifications. As 404 of the CWA evolves in accordance with the wetlands
  The information in this document is not by any means a complete representation of EPA's regulations or policies,
                     but is an introduction to the topic used for training purposes.

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 8 - Municipal Solid Waste Disposal Facility Criteria
protection program, EPA will modify relevant portions of 258.12 accordingly (56 FR 51045;
October 9, 1991).

FAULT AREA CONTROLS

Fault area restrictions ban the siting of new MSWLFs and lateral expansions within 200 feet of a
fault that has experienced displacement in Holocene time (i.e., the past 11,000 years).  This
restriction reflects the Agency's belief that, in general,  a 200-foot buffer zone is adequate to
protect engineered structures, such as a new MSWLF,  from seismic damage (56 FR 51046;
October 9, 1991). In a state with an approved permitting program, however, the owner and
operator may demonstrate that a setback distance less than 200 feet will prevent damage to the
structural integrity of the unit and will be protective of human health and the environment.

SEISMIC IMPACT ZONES

In unapproved states, new MSWLFs and lateral expansions cannot be sited in a seismic impact
zone, as defined in 258.14(b)(l).  In a state with an approved permitting program, however,  a
MSWLF may be located in a seismic impact zone if the owner and operator can prove that all
containment structures, liners, leachate collection systems, and surface water control systems are
designed to resist the anticipated movement in geologic features at the site.

UNSTABLE AREA CONTROLS

Any location susceptible to events or forces capable of impairing a landfill's structural integrity
is classified as an unstable area.  Owners and  operators must assess on-site and local factors,
including soil conditions and geologic features,  to determine whether an area is unstable.
Unstable areas can include poor foundation conditions, areas susceptible to mass movement, and
karst topography (258.15(b)(3), (4), and (5)). New and existing MSWLFs and lateral
expansions must not be located in an unstable area unless the owner and operator can
demonstrate that engineering measures in the  unit's design  are sufficient to ensure that the
integrity of structural components (e.g., composite liner and final cover) will not be disrupted
(258.15(a)).
2.3    SUBPART C: OPERATING CRITERIA

Operating criteria are controls for the day-to-day management of a MSWLF. For example,
owners and operators must have a program in place to exclude regulated quantities of hazardous
waste and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) wastes.  Additional requirements include daily cover
material, controlling disease vector populations (such as rodents and mosquitoes), restricting
public access, and maintaining appropriate records.  The operating criteria are summarized
below.
  The information in this document is not by any means a complete representation of EPA's regulations or policies,
                     but is an introduction to the topic used for training purposes.

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                                                  Municipal Solid Waste Disposal Facility Criteria - 9
PROCEDURES FOR EXCLUDING THE RECEIPT OF HAZARDOUS WASTE

All MSWLF unit owners and operators must institute a program to detect and prevent the
disposal of regulated quantities of PCB wastes and RCRA hazardous wastes (except from
CESQGs) (258.20(a)).  Facility personnel must be trained to identify regulated hazardous waste
and PCBs and the owner and operator must either conduct random inspections of wastes brought
to the facility, or take other steps to ensure that incoming loads do not contain regulated
hazardous wastes or PCBs (e.g., arranging pre-acceptance agreements with haulers).

Upon detection of hazardous or PCB wastes, the owner and operator must notify the State
Director or Regional Administrator.  Even if the owner and  operator receive the waste
accidentally, they are responsible for ensuring that regulated hazardous waste is treated, stored,
or disposed of in accordance with all applicable RCRA Subtitle C and state requirements (57 FR
51050; October 9, 1991).

COVER MATERIAL REQUIREMENTS

Exposed waste at landfills contributes to a range of health, safety, and aesthetic problems, such
as disease vectors, fires,  odors, blowing litter, and waste scavenging. To control these problems,
258.21 requires that at the end of each operating  day, a  cover of at least six inches of soil be
placed over exposed waste in a MSWLF (258.21).  In states with approved permitting
programs, the State Director is authorized to allow alternative cover materials or thicknesses, or
to grant temporary waivers from the daily cover requirement if extreme seasonal weather
conditions, such as heavy snow or severe freezing, make meeting this requirement impractical
(56 FR 51051; October 9, 1991).

Section 258.21 was revised on July 29, 1997, consistent with the Land Disposal Program
Flexibility Act (LDPFA) (62 FR 40708).  The revision provides additional flexibility to
approved states, allowing the Director of an approved  state, after public review and comment, to
establish alternative frequencies for daily cover for certain small MSWLFs, provided that the
Director takes into account climatic and hydrogeologic conditions and determines that the
alternative requirements are protective of human health and the environment.

DISEASE VECTOR CONTROL

Disease vectors are rodents, flies, mosquitoes, or other animals and insects capable of
transmitting disease to humans (258.22(b)).  As stated above,  one purpose for the daily cover
requirement is to prevent the facility from becoming a breeding ground, habitat, or feeding area
for disease vector populations. If compliance with the daily cover material requirement is
insufficient to ensure disease vector control, the facility owner  and operator must employ
additional methods (e.g., shredding the waste) to protect human health and the environment.

EXPLOSIVE GASES CONTROL

The decomposition of organic waste produces methane gas. High concentrations of methane in
MSWLF structures or the facility area create an explosion hazard for employees, facility users,
and occupants of nearby structures. To mitigate potential hazards, a routine methane monitoring
  The information in this document is not by any means a complete representation of EPA's regulations or policies,
                     but is an introduction to the topic used for training purposes.

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 10 - Municipal Solid Waste Disposal Facility Criteria
program, conducted at least quarterly, must be implemented in accordance with 258.23(b) to
ensure that the following conditions are maintained:

       in facility structures, the concentration of methane gas must not exceed 25 percent of the
       lower explosive limit for methane as defined in 258.23(d)

       at the facility property boundary, the concentration of methane gas must not exceed the
       lower explosive limit.

While 258.23(c) outlines the procedures that the owner and operator must follow if these
methane levels are exceeded, states with approved programs may establish alternative response
procedures (258.23(c)(4)).

Consistent with the LDPFA, 258.23 was revised on July 29, 1997, to incorporate a provision
allowing the Director of an approved state, after public review and comment, to establish
alternative frequencies of methane monitoring for any small MSWLFs, provided that the
Director takes into account climatic and hydrogeologic conditions and determines that the
alternative requirements are protective of human health and the environment (62 FR 40708).

AIR CRITERIA

In general, air emissions from MSWLFs are regulated under the Clean Air Act (CAA), not under
RCRA (56 FR 51053; October 9, 1991).  Nevertheless, 258.24 prohibits open burning of nearly
all solid wastes at MSWLFs; only the infrequent burning of agricultural wastes, silvicultural
(forestry) wastes, land-cleaning debris, diseased trees, and debris from emergency cleanup
operations is permitted (258.24(b)).  Additionally, landfill gas performance standards for new
landfills and guidelines for existing landfills were promulgated under the authority of the CAA
on March 12, 1996 (61 FR 9905). EPA published on January 16, 2003 (68 FR 2227), the
National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPS) for MSWLFs.

ACCESS REQUIREMENTS

Access to MSWLF facilities must be controlled to prevent unauthorized people from entering the
MSWLF. Owners and operators of all MSWLFs may use artificial  or natural barriers, as
necessary, to control public access to the facility and prevent unauthorized vehicular traffic and
illegal dumping of wastes (258.25).

RUN-ON AND RUNOFF CONTROL SYSTEMS

To prevent the flow of surface water onto or from a landfill unit, 258.26 requires all MSWLF
units to have run-on and runoff control systems. The intent of the design, construction, and
maintenance of a run-on control system is to prevent the flow of surface water onto the active
portion of a unit during the period of greatest precipitation in a 25-year storm. These system
controls are intended to mitigate erosion, reduce surface discharge of wastes in solution or
suspension, and minimize run-on available to percolate down through waste that creates leachate
(56 FR 51054; October 9, 1991). A runoff control system, likewise, must be designed and
  The information in this document is not by any means a complete representation of EPA's regulations or policies,
                     but is an introduction to the topic used for training purposes.

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                                                 Municipal Solid Waste Disposal Facility Criteria - 11
operated to collect and control the water volume resulting from a 24-hour, 25-year storm
(258.26(a)(2)).

SURFACE WATER REQUIREMENTS

The runoff control measures would be largely undermined if collected waters were improperly
managed.  Runoff collected from the active portion of a landfill unit must be managed in
accordance with 258.27, which requires that all MSWLFs be operated in compliance with the
Clean Water Act.

BULK OR NONCONTAINERIZED LIQUIDS

Restricting the introduction of liquids into a landfill reduces the unit's potential to generate
leachate (56 FR 51055; October 9, 1991). According to 258.28, only household waste
(excluding septic waste), properly recirculated leachate, or gas condensate derived from the
MSWLF may be disposed of in  bulk or noncontainerized liquid form. Furthermore, the re-
circulation of leachate or gas condensate in MSWLFs is limited to units equipped with
composite liners and leachate collection systems (258.28(a)(2)).  EPA is researching bioreactor
landfills, which re-circulate leachate to accelerate the decomposition and  stabilization of the
waste, in order to identify and prioritize future regulatory needs. Containers holding liquids may
be disposed of in a MSWLF only if the waste is a household waste, the container is similar in
size to one typically found in household waste, or the container is designed to hold liquids for
use other than storage (e.g., beverage containers) (258.28(b)).

RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS

MSWLF owners and operators must retain certain records and documents near the facility in an
operating record. In unapproved states, the following materials must be kept in the operating
record (258.29(a)):

       location restriction demonstrations required under Subpart B
       inspection records, training procedures, and notification procedures required by 258.20
       gas monitoring results and any remediation plans required by 258.23
       MSWLF unit design documentation for placement of leachate or gas condensate in a unit
       as required by 258.28(a)(2)
       demonstrations, certifications, findings, monitoring, testing, or analytical  data required by
       Subpart E groundwater monitoring  and corrective action
       closure and post-closure care plans  and any monitoring, testing, or analytical data as
       required by 258.60 and 258.61
       cost estimates and financial assurance documentation required by Part 258, Subpart G
       information demonstrating compliance with the small landfill exemption required by
       258.1(f)(2).
  The information in this document is not by any means a complete representation of EPA's regulations or policies,
                     but is an introduction to the topic used for training purposes.

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 12 - Municipal Solid Waste Disposal Facility Criteria
The Director of an approved state may allow an alternative location for these records and
establish alternative schedules for complying with most of the recordkeeping and notification
requirements.
2.4    SUBPART D: DESIGN CRITERIA

To prevent unit failures, the regulations establish a uniform design standard for new units and
lateral expansions, allowing for site-specific MSWLF designs in approved states (56 FR 50978,
51059; October 9, 1991).  In states without approved permitting programs, the MSWLF design
criteria require construction with a composite liner and leachate collection system. For new
units and lateral expansions in approved states, 258.40(a)(l) allows greater flexibility in design.

COMPOSITE LINER SYSTEM

The uniform design criteria require a composite liner and a leachate collection system. The
composite liner system consists of an upper component, which is a flexible membrane liner
(FML) that satisfies specific thickness standards. The lower component must be constructed of
at least a 2-foot layer of compacted soil and must exhibit a hydraulic conductivity of no more
than IxlO-7 cm/sec.  EPA believes that the combination of an FML and a compacted soil layer
ensures adequate protection by providing both a highly impermeable upper liner to maximize
leachate collection and removal and a lower soil layer to serve as a back-up in the event of FML
failure (56 FR 51060; October 9, 1991). The leachate collection system must be designed and
constructed to maintain less than a 30-cm depth of leachate over the liner (258.40(a)(2)).

SITE-SPECIFIC DESIGNS

Flexibility in design requirements is allowed for approved states.  The performance-based
standard in 258.40(a)(l) requires that  a MSWLF's design be capable of controlling migration of
hazardous constituents into the uppermost aquifer.  This design performance standard requires
that maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) not be exceeded in the uppermost aquifer at the
relevant point of compliance. In general, the relevant point of compliance must be located
within 150 meters of the waste management boundary on the landfill owner's property.

The Director of an approved state determines whether a proposed design meets the performance
standard. When reviewing a design plan, the Director of an approved state must evaluate
hydrogeologic characteristics, climatic  factors, and volume, physical, and chemical
characteristics of the  landfill's leachate  (258.40(c)).

On March 22, 2004 (69 FR 13242), EPA issued a Final Rule for Research, Development, and
Demonstration Permits for Municipal Solid Waste Landfills to allow approved states to issue
RD&D permits for new and existing MSWLFs in order to provide variances from certain Part
258 criteria and for new and innovative technologies associated with landfilling of municipal
solid waste.
  The information in this document is not by any means a complete representation of EPA's regulations or policies,
                     but is an introduction to the topic used for training purposes.

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                                                Municipal Solid Waste Disposal Facility Criteria - 13
2.5    SUBPART E: GROUNDWATER MONITORING AND
       CORRECTIVE ACTION

Similar to the regulations for hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDFs)
in Subpart F of Part 264, MSWLF groundwater monitoring and corrective action requirements
consist of three sequential phases. Detection monitoring, minimally required for all units, is
designed to measure concentrations of certain indicator parameters.  Statistically significant
increases (SSI) in these indicators trigger groundwater assessment monitoring for hazardous
constituents. Finally, a corrective action program is required if remediation of contaminated
groundwater is necessary.

APPLICABILITY, WAIVERS, AND EXEMPTIONS

The groundwater monitoring and corrective action requirements in Part 258, Subpart E, apply to
all MSWLFs, except in two instances. First, as a result of the LDFPA, MSWLF units meeting
the small landfill exemption in 258.1(f) are exempt from the groundwater monitoring
requirements in Subpart E. Second, the Director of an approved state may waive the
groundwater monitoring requirements if the owner and operator can demonstrate that there is no
potential for migration of hazardous constituents into the uppermost aquifer during the unit's
active life and the post-closure care period (258.50(b)). A qualified groundwater scientist, as
defined in 258.50(g), must certify the demonstration.

SCHEDULE OF COMPLIANCE

Once established, groundwater monitoring must be conducted throughout the active life and
post-closure care period of the MSWLF unit.  While new units must be in compliance with the
groundwater monitoring requirements prior to accepting waste, the compliance date in
unapproved states for each existing landfill depends on its distance from a drinking water intake,
as shown in Figure 2.
  The information in this document is not by any means a complete representation of EPA's regulations or policies,
                     but is an introduction to the topic used for training purposes.

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 14 - Municipal Solid Waste Disposal Facility Criteria
                                        Figure 2

            GROUNDWATER MONITORING COMPLIANCE DEADLINES
                             FOR UNAPPROVED STATES
Proximity of an Existing MSWLF
to a Drinking Water Intake
Less than one mile
More than one mile, but less than two
miles
More than two miles
Groundwater Monitoring Compliance
Date
October 9, 1994
(258.50(c)(l))
October 9, 1995
(258.50(c)(2))
October 9, 1996
(258.50(c)(3))
In states with approved programs, the Director may establish an alternative groundwater
monitoring schedule of compliance for existing MSWLF units and lateral expansions
(258.50(d)). In developing this compliance schedule, the Director of an approved state should
consider certain risk factors: the proximity of receptors; the size, age, and design of the unit;
types and quantities of wastes disposed; and the resource value of the underlying aquifer.

The resulting schedule must ensure that, excluding units not subject to the groundwater
monitoring requirements, at least 50 percent of the existing MSWLF units in the state are in
compliance by October 9, 1994, and that all such existing units in the state are in compliance by
October 9,  1996. The Director of an approved state may also establish alternative schedules for
Subpart E notification, sampling, assessment, and recordkeeping requirements (258.50(h)).

GENERAL GROUNDWATER MONITORING SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS

A groundwater monitoring system must be installed to yield samples from the uppermost aquifer
that represent both the quality of background groundwater  (usually from an upgradient well) and
the extent of groundwater contamination at the waste management unit boundary (from
downgradient wells). Each time groundwater is sampled, the owner and operator must determine
the rate and direction of groundwater flow and measure the water elevation in each well.

The number, spacing, and depths of monitoring wells depend on site-specific characteristics such
as aquifer thickness and groundwater flow rate and direction. Unless approved by the Director
of an approved state, these system specifications must be certified by a qualified groundwater
scientist (258.51(d)(2)).  In addition, all monitoring well bore holes and other measurement,
sampling, and analytical devices must be operated to meet  design specifications for the duration
of the groundwater monitoring program (258.51(c)).

The Agency recognizes that local conditions can make installation of a monitoring well system
around each landfill unit difficult. In approved states, multiple MSWLF units may share a
  The information in this document is not by any means a complete representation of EPA's regulations or policies,
                     but is an introduction to the topic used for training purposes.

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                                                 Municipal Solid Waste Disposal Facility Criteria - 15
common groundwater monitoring system, provided that sharing the multiple unit system is as
protective of human health and the environment as installing a separate monitoring system for
each unit (258.5 l(b)).

GROUNDWATER SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PROGRAM

Consistent sampling and analytical procedures are essential to obtain reliable monitoring results
that accurately measure hazardous constituents and  other parameters established in either
detection monitoring or assessment monitoring programs. Each MSWLF's groundwater
monitoring program must be developed to ensure that monitoring results provide an accurate
representation of groundwater quality at both background and downgradient wells. For example,
sampling and analysis programs must include procedures and techniques for sample collection,
sample preservation and shipment, analytical procedures, chain of custody control, and quality
assurance and quality control (QA/QC) procedures (258.53(a)).

In evaluating groundwater quality monitoring data, the owner and operator must use one of the
statistical methods in 258.53(g). The selected method, which will be used to identify
statistically significant evidence of groundwater contamination at a monitoring well, must be
appropriate for the type and distribution of chemical constituents detected, or suspected to be
present, in the groundwater (258.53(h)(l)).  The frequency and number of groundwater samples
necessary to establish groundwater quality vary with the statistical  method (56 FR 51072;
October 9, 1991).

DETECTION MONITORING PROGRAM

A detection monitoring program includes monitoring for 62 constituents listed in Appendix I of
Part 258  (258.54(a)). The Director of an approved state may delete any of these monitoring
constituents or establish a list of alternative inorganic  indicator parameters in lieu of some or all
of the heavy metals constituents,  on a site-specific basis (258.54(a)(l)).

The owner and operator must monitor for all Appendix I constituents (or alternative parameters)
at least semiannually throughout the facility's active life and post-closure period (258.54(b)).
The Director of an approved state may allow an alternate frequency, but nothing less than
annually. Detection of any Appendix I constituent at levels significantly higher than background
concentrations requires the owner and operator to notify the State Director of the statistically
significant increase (SSI) (258.54(c)).  Within 90 days after  detecting an SSI, the owner and
operator  must establish an  assessment monitoring program in accordance with 258.55.

Demonstrating that the evidence of contamination resulted from an error (e.g., an error in
sampling, analysis, or statistical evaluation, or a natural variation in groundwater quality), or that
a source  other than the MSWLF unit caused the contamination, nullifies the assessment
monitoring requirement. This demonstration allows the owner and operator to continue the
detection monitoring program (258.54(c)(3)).  A qualified groundwater scientist must certify  or
the Director of an approved state must approve a report documenting this demonstration. Failure
to make such a demonstration within 90 days triggers  the assessment monitoring  requirement.
  The information in this document is not by any means a complete representation of EPA's regulations or policies,
                     but is an introduction to the topic used for training purposes.

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 16 - Municipal Solid Waste Disposal Facility Criteria
ASSESSMENT MONITORING PROGRAM

An assessment monitoring program is implemented when an SSI of hazardous constituent
concentrations over background levels is confirmed.  Within 90 days of beginning an assessment
monitoring program, and annually thereafter, the owner and operator must sample and analyze
the groundwater for all Part 258, Appendix II, constituents. If any Appendix II constituent is
detected in a downgradient well, background levels for that constituent must be established
through analysis of at least four independent samples from each well.

The Director of an approved state is authorized to delete any of the Appendix II constituents
from the assessment monitoring program or to specify an appropriate subset of wells to be
sampled and analyzed (258.55(b)). In addition, the Director may implement an alternative
sampling and analysis frequency for Appendix II constituents based on factors identified in
258.55(c).

Within 90 days of establishing Appendix II background levels and on at least a semiannual basis
thereafter, the owner and operator must resample for all Appendix I constituents and those
Appendix II constituents detected during the initial phase of assessment monitoring
(258.55(d)(2)).  Again, the Director of an approved state may specify an alternative monitoring
frequency based on consideration of the site factors delineated in 258.55(c).

Groundwater Protection Standard

The MSWLF owner and operator must establish a groundwater protection standard (GWPS) for
each Appendix II constituent detected in the groundwater (258.55(h)). The GWPS represents
the maximum constituent concentration level permissible in groundwater. This standard must be
based either on the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) MCL for the constituent or, if no MCL
has been established, on the background concentration level at the site. In cases where the
background level is higher than the promulgated MCL for  a constituent, the GWPS should be set
at the background level.

In accordance with 258.55(i), the Director of an approved state may establish an alternative
GWPS for constituents that have no established MCLs. When establishing an alternative
standard, the Director may consider multiple contaminants in the groundwater,  such as exposure
threats to sensitive environmental receptors and other site-specific factors (e.g., the reliability of
exposure data and the weight of scientific evidence).  Any  alternative GWPS must satisfy the
health-based criteria set forth in 258.55(i)(l) through (4).

Monitoring Results Determination

The owner and operator may return to detection monitoring only after concentrations of all
Appendix II constituents are shown to be at or below background values for two consecutive
sampling events  (258.55(e)). If the concentration of any Appendix II constituent is detected at
statistically significant levels above the established GWPS, however, the owner and operator
must notify the Director and all  appropriate government officials (258.55(g)).  The owner and
operator must then characterize the nature of the release and ascertain whether contaminants
have migrated past the facility boundary, installing additional monitoring wells as necessary. If
  The information in this document is not by any means a complete representation of EPA's regulations or policies,
                     but is an introduction to the topic used for training purposes.

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                                                 Municipal Solid Waste Disposal Facility Criteria - 17
well sampling indicates that contaminants have migrated offsite, all persons who own or reside
on land that directly overlies any part of the plume of contamination must be notified
If the owner and operator are able to make a successful demonstration that a source other than
the MSWLF caused the contamination, or that the SSI resulted from an error, then the owner and
operator may continue assessment monitoring and return to detection monitoring when all
Appendix II constituents are at or below background levels (258.55(g)(2)). Unless the
demonstration is made within 90 days, the owner and operator must initiate an assessment of
corrective measures (258.55(g)(l)(iv)).

ASSESSMENT OF CORRECTIVE MEASURES

After exceeding any GWPS, within 90 days the owner and operator must initiate an assessment
of various corrective measures, a process that must be completed within a reasonable period of
time (258.56(a)).  Based on this assessment, the owner and operator must then select a remedy.
Sections 258.56 and 258.57 set forth the criteria for determining what types of potential remedies
to consider and criteria for evaluating each remedy.

When evaluating a potential remedy, the MSWLF owner and operator must assess its long- and
short-term effectiveness and protectiveness, its ability to control the source and minimize further
releases, the ease or difficulty of implementation in light of practical considerations (including
technical and economic factors), and the degree to which it addresses community concerns.
Prior to final selection of a remedy, the unit owner and  operator must discuss the results of the
assessment of potential remedies in a public meeting with interested and affected parties
(258.56(d)).

Per 258.57(e), the Director of an approved state may determine that remediation of a release of
an Appendix II constituent is not necessary based on one of the following demonstrations:

      the groundwater is contaminated by multiple sources and cleanup of the MSWLF release
       would provide no significant reduction of risk

      the contaminated groundwater is not a current or potential source of drinking water and is
       not hydraulically connected with waters to which hazardous constituents are migrating or
       are likely to migrate in a concentration that would exceed the GWPS

      the remediation is not technically feasible or would result in unacceptable cross-media
       impacts.

IMPLEMENTATION OF THE CORRECTIVE ACTION PROGRAM

After the remedy is selected, the MSWLF owner and operator are required to implement the
corrective measure, establish a corrective action groundwater monitoring program, and take any
necessary interim measures (56 FR 5101 1;  October 9, 1991). First, a schedule for initiating and
completing all activities associated with implementing the selected remedy must be established.
In accordance with this schedule, the owner and operator must develop and implement the
  The information in this document is not by any means a complete representation of EPA's regulations or policies,
                     but is an introduction to the topic used for training purposes.

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 18 - Municipal Solid Waste Disposal Facility Criteria
corrective action groundwater monitoring program to indicate the effectiveness of the selected
remedy, to meet the minimum requirements of the assessment monitoring program, and to
comply with established GWPSs (258.58(a)(l)).

During implementation of the corrective action remedy, the owner and operator are responsible
for taking any interim measures consistent with the objectives and performance of the remedy
that may be necessary to ensure protection of human health and the environment (258.58(a)(3)).
Similarly, the owner and operator must implement alternative methods or techniques necessary
to achieve compliance with the minimum standards for any selected remedy set forth in
258.57(b).

Completion of Corrective Action

Once implemented, remedial activities at the unit must continue until the MSWLF owner and
operator achieve compliance with the established GWPSs for three consecutive years, and
demonstrate that all required actions have been completed (258.58(e)).  The Director of an
approved state may however, specify an alternative period of time for demonstrating compliance
with any GWPS (258.58(e)(2)).  Upon completion of corrective action, the owner and operator
must obtain certification that the remedy is complete and notify the State Director.
2.6    SUBPART F: CLOSURE AND POST-CLOSURE CARE

MSWLFs not adequately closed and maintained after closure may pose a continuing threat to
human health and the environment. As with hazardous waste facilities, EPA established
requirements for MSWLF closure and post-closure care to address wastes left in place at a
facility may pose a threat even after disposal activities have ceased.

CLOSURE CRITERIA

Closure standards require owners and operators to install a final landfill cover system that is
designed to minimize soil erosion and infiltration of liquids through the cover.  The cover's
infiltration layer, consisting of at least 18 inches of earthen material, must be at least as
impermeable as any bottom liner system or natural subsoils, but in no case may the permeability
be greater than 1x10-5 cm/sec. While this standard does not explicitly require the use of a
synthetic membrane in the final cover, the Agency anticipates that if a MSWLF has a synthetic
membrane in the bottom of the unit, then the infiltration layer in the final cover will, in all
likelihood given today's technologies, include a synthetic membrane in the final cover. The
erosion layer must be a minimum of six inches of earthen material that can sustain native plant
growth. The Director of an approved state may allow an alternative final cover design if the
cover layers provide equivalent reduction of infiltration and protection from wind and water
erosion.

Section 258.60(a) was revised on July 29, 1997, to provide additional flexibility to approved
states, allowing the Director of an approved state, after public review and comment, to establish
alternative infiltration barriers in the final cover for any small MSWLF (62 FR 40708).  This
provision is contingent on the Director accounting for climatic and hydrogeologic conditions and


  The information in this document is not by any means a complete representation of EPA's regulations or policies,
                     but is an introduction to the topic used for training purposes.

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                                                  Municipal Solid Waste Disposal Facility Criteria - 19
a determination that the alternative requirements are protective of human health and the
environment.

CLOSURE PLAN

The owner and operator must prepare a written closure plan describing the measures necessary to
close each MSWLF unit at a facility at any point during the unit's active life (258.60(c)).  The
closure plan must include at least the following:

       a description of the final cover, and the methods and procedures used to install the cover

       an estimate of the largest area of the MSWLF that may ever require a final cover during
       the unit's active life

       an estimate of the maximum inventory of wastes maintained on site during the active life
       of the landfill facility

       a schedule for completing all activities necessary to satisfy the closure criteria specified
       in 258.60.

ONSET AND COMPLETION OF CLOSURE ACTIVITIES

Subpart F specifies a closure timetable for MSWLFs. In general, no later than 30 days after a
MSWLF unit receives the final volume of waste, the owner and operator must begin closure
activities (258.60(f)).  A unit with remaining capacity may receive additional wastes and is
allowed one year following the most recent receipt of wastes to initiate closure activities. After
closure begins, all closure activities must be completed within 180 days (258.60(g)). Finally,
the owner and operator must obtain either an independent registered professional engineer's
certification or a Director of an approved state's approval verifying that closure has been
completed in accordance with the established closure plan (258.60(h)).  In approved states,
deadlines for closure activities may be extended.

POST-CLOSURE CARE REQUIREMENTS

Post-closure care entails a 30-year period after closure during which the owner and operator
must conduct monitoring and maintenance activities to preserve the integrity of a MSWLF
system.  The purpose of post-closure care is to ensure that landfills are closed in a manner that
controls, minimizes, or eliminates the escape of waste, leachate, contaminated rainfall, or waste
decomposition products to soils, waters, and the atmosphere. Post-closure care requires
maintaining the following:

       the integrity and effectiveness of all final covers
       the leachate collection system, in accordance with 258.40
       the applicable groundwater monitoring system, in accordance with Subpart E
       requirements
       the methane gas monitoring system required by 258.23.


  The information in this document is not by any means a complete representation of EPA's regulations or policies,
                      but is an introduction to the topic used for training purposes.

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 20 - Municipal Solid Waste Disposal Facility Criteria
In an approved state, the Director can modify the length of post-closure care as necessary to
protect human health and the environment (258.61(b)).

In addition to the closure plan, the owner and operator must prepare a written post-closure plan
that provides a description of monitoring and maintenance activities, information identifying the
facility contact for the post-closure period, and a description of the planned uses of the property
during the post-closure period.  Pursuant to 258.61(c)(3), any planned uses must not disturb
either the integrity of the final covers and liners or the function or components of the monitoring
and containment systems.

Following completion of the post-closure care period for each MSWLF unit, the owner and
operator must obtain either certification of post-closure by an independent registered
professional engineer or verification of completion of post-closure care activities by the Director
of an approved state. The certification or approval must indicate that post-closure care has been
completed in accordance with the post-closure plan (258.61(e)).
2.7    SUBPART G: FINANCIAL ASSURANCE CRITERIA

The Part 258, Subpart G, financial assurance criteria require demonstration of responsibility for
the costs of closure, post-closure care, and known corrective action. EPA believes that
compliance with these requirements will help ensure responsible planning for future costs.
Adequate funds must be available to hire a third party to carry out all necessary closure, post-
closure care, and known corrective action activities in the event that the owner and operator
declare bankruptcy or lack the technical expertise to complete the required activities (56 FR
51110; October 9, 1991).

APPLICABILITY AND EFFECTIVE DATE

Except for state and federal government entities,  owners and operators of all new and existing
units and lateral expansions must be in compliance with the MSWLF financial assurance
requirements by April 9, 1997 (258.70(b)). Local governments and Indian tribes are subject to
the Subpart G criteria. Small landfills that qualify for the small landfill exemption under
258. l(f) must be in compliance with financial assurance requirements by October 9, 1997.

COST ESTIMATES

The amount of financial assurance, using acceptable financial mechanisms, must equal the cost
of a third party conducting these activities.  To determine these costs each MSWLF owner and
operator must prepare a written, site-specific estimate of the costs of conducting closure, post-
closure care, and known corrective action.
  The information in this document is not by any means a complete representation of EPA's regulations or policies,
                     but is an introduction to the topic used for training purposes.

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                                                  Municipal Solid Waste Disposal Facility Criteria - 21
Closure

The owner and operator must calculate a detailed cost estimate for closure based on the largest
area of a MSWLF unit that may ever require a final cover during its active life.  The cost
estimate must equal the expense of closing the area when the extent and manner of operation
would make closure most expensive (258.71(a)(l)).

As stated in 258.71(a)(3), the owner and operator must increase both the closure cost estimate
and the  amount of financial assurance maintained if the closure plan is adjusted or if changing
unit conditions (e.g., increases in design capacity) raises the maximum cost of closure.  The
closure  cost estimate and the amount of financial assurance maintained may also be reduced if,
as a result of changes in facility conditions (e.g., partial closure of a landfill), the existing cost
estimate exceeds the maximum cost of closure during the remaining life of the MSWLF unit.
The owner and operator must document evidence supporting such a reduction.

Post-Closure Care

The financial assurance requirements for post-closure are similar to the requirements for closure
of MSWLF units. The owner and operator must have a detailed, site-specific written estimate of
the  cost of hiring a third party to conduct post-closure care for the MSWLF unit (258.72). This
cost estimate must account for the total costs of conducting post-closure care, including annual
and periodic costs described in the post-closure plan.  Post-closure care cost estimates must be
based on the most expensive costs during the post-closure care period (258.72(a)(l)).  As with
closure  cost estimates, changes in facility conditions or the post-closure plan may require the
owner and operator to modify the post-closure care cost estimate and the amount of financial
assurance.

Corrective Action

In accordance with 258.73, the owner and operator of a MSWLF unit required to undertake
corrective action per 258.58  must have a detailed, site-specific written estimate of the cost of
hiring a third party to perform corrective action for known releases. The corrective action cost
estimate must account for the total expense of activities described in the corrective action plan.
Again, the corrective action cost estimate and amount of financial assurance must increase or
decrease in response to changes in either the corrective action program or MSWLF unit
conditions.

Adjustments for Inflation

Due to changes in inflation and interest rates, cost estimates must be annually adjusted for
inflation (258.71(a)(2), 258.72(a)(2), and 258.73(a)(l)). Updated cost estimates must account
for added inflationary costs to ensure that adequate funds will be available if needed (56 FR
51111; October 9, 1991).  The Subtitle C financial assurance provisions offer guidance on
adjusting cost estimates using an inflation factor based on the implicit price deflator.  Review the
module  entitled Financial Assurance for explanations of the terms and concepts in this section.
  The information in this document is not by any means a complete representation of EPA's regulations or policies,
                     but is an introduction to the topic used for training purposes.

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 22 - Municipal Solid Waste Disposal Facility Criteria
ALLOWABLE MECHANISMS

The mechanisms used to demonstrate financial assurance must ensure that the funds necessary to
meet the costs of closure, post-closure care, and known corrective action will be available when
needed. Owners and operators may use any of the following financial mechanisms:

       trust fund (258.74(a))
       surety bonds guaranteeing payment or performance (258.74(b))
       letter of credit (258.74(c))
       insurance (258.74(d))
       corporate financial test (258.74(e))
       local government financial test (258.74(f))
       corporate guarantee (258.74(g))
       local government guarantee (258.74(h))
       state-approved mechanism (258.74(i))
       state assumption of financial responsibility (258.74(j)).

In addition, the Agency expects to add financial tests and guarantees as allowable mechanisms
for corporations to demonstrate financial assurance.

The performance standard in 258.74(1) requires that approved financial assurance  mechanisms
satisfy the following criteria:

       The amount of funds assured is sufficient to cover the costs of closure, post-closure care,
       and corrective action for known releases when needed.

       The funds will be available in a timely fashion when needed.

       The mechanisms for closure and post-closure care must be established by the owner and
       operator by the effective date of these requirements or prior to the initial receipt of solid
       waste, whichever is later. The mechanisms for corrective action must be secured no later
       than 120 days after the corrective action remedy has been selected pursuant to 258.58,
       and maintained until the owner and operator are released from financial assurance
       responsibilities.

       The mechanisms must be legally valid, binding, and enforceable under state and federal
       law.

In approved states, the owner and operator may satisfy the Subpart G requirements using a state-
approved mechanism.  Such an  alternative financial mechanism must meet the criteria specified
in the performance standard and be approved by the Director of an approved state (258.74(i)).
Furthermore, the owner and operator will remain in compliance with the financial assurance
requirements if the Director either assumes legal responsibility for the Subpart G requirements  or
ensures that funds will be available from state sources to cover these requirements (258.74(j)).
Any such state assumption of financial responsibility must satisfy the performance  standard.
  The information in this document is not by any means a complete representation of EPA's regulations or policies,
                     but is an introduction to the topic used for training purposes.

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                                                   Municipal Solid Waste Disposal Facility Criteria - 23
Finally, as with Subtitle C financial assurance, nothing precludes the MSWLF owner and
operator from combining multiple financial mechanisms to satisfy the Subpart G requirements
(258.74(k)).  The mechanisms must comply with all applicable requirements specified in
258.74(a) through (j), except that the combination of mechanisms, rather than any individual
mechanism, must provide financial assurance for an amount at least equal to the current cost
estimate for closure, post-closure care, or corrective action.
  The information in this document is not by any means a complete representation of EPA's regulations or policies,
                      but is an introduction to the topic used for training purposes.

-------