Providing  Safe Drinking
                 Water in  America
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report
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Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance (22oiA)
Washington, DC 20460

EPA DOCUMENT NUMBER EPA-K-og-oo2
March 2009

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                                 Table  of Contents
National Summary of Public Water Systems Compliance in 2006
Introduction	i
What Information Is in This Report?	2
Findings	3
  Public Water System Sizes and Types	3
  Overall Compliance Picture	4
  Health-Based Drinking Water Standards	4
  Monitoring and Reporting Drinking Water Standards	5
  Community Water Systems	5
  Non-Community Water Systems	7
How Does EPA Help PWSs Comply With Requirements?	7
  What Happens to Systems that Violate the Requirements?	8
What is the Quality of the Data  EPA Uses For This Report?	g
What is EPA Doing to Improve Data Quality?	10
How Does EPA Evaluate State Reports?	11
Conclusions And Recommendations	11
  Comparison of 2005 and 2006 Data	11
  TCR and Chemical Violations	11
  Implementation of Prior Year Recommendations	12
  2006 Report Recommendations	13
National Summary of Compliance for Public Water Systems in Indian Country in 2006
Introduction	14
Public Water Systems In Indian  Country	14
Public Water Systems In Alaska And Oklahoma	14
Data Quality	14
Findings	14
Compliance Assistance And Enforcement	16
Financial Assistance	17
Conclusions And Recommendations	17
March 2009 •  Page i                                      2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Table of Contents

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Appendix A
Glossary of Terms	A-i

Appendix B
Summaries of State Annual Compliance Reports	B-i

Appendix C
Map of Indian Lands	C-i

List of Tables
Table A-i: Significant Monitoring Violations for Annual State Public Water System Reports	A-4
Table A-2: Summary of Drinking Water Regulations for Public Water Systems During 2006	A-5
Table B-i: Summary of Elements Reported by States	6-5
March 2009  •  Page ii                                         2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Table of Contents

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                                National  Summary  of
          Public  Water  Systems  Compliance  in  2006
INTRODUCTION
The National Public Water Systems Compliance Report
for 2006 describes how the Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) and its state and tribal partners are meeting
the goal of ensuring that Americans receive safe drinking
water from public water systems.

One of the ways that EPA measures attaining this goal is to
track the number of public water systems that may not be
meeting health-based drinking water standards, or
monitoring and reporting requirements.

In 2006, 93% of America's public water systems
did not have any reported violations of health-
based standards.
Public Water Systems
A Public Water System (PWS) is a system that
provides water for human consumption, if such system
has at least 15 service connections or regularly serves
at least 25 individuals at least 60 days out of the year.
EPA doesn't have the authority to regulate private
drinking water wells that do not meet the above
criteria. A public water system can be one of three
types:
• Community Systems (CWS) serve at least 15
  service connections (which may include factories,
  schools, or places of housing that are on the same
  distribution system as residences) used by year-
  round residences or regularly serve at least 25 year-
  round residents.
• Non-transient Non-community Systems
  (NTNCWS) serve at least 25 of the same persons
  over six months per year not at their residence (e.g.,
  schools or factories that have their own water
  source).
• Transient Non-community Systems (TNCWS)
  serve at least 25 persons (but not the same 25) over
  six months per year not at their residence (e.g.,
  campgrounds or highway rest stops that have their
  own water source).
EPA prepares a National Public Water Systems
Compliance Report for every calendar year. This report
uses a calendar year, which is from January through
December, while other reports or databases may use the
fiscal year which is from October through September. The
federal report is an annual summary of reported violations
at the nation's public water systems. This report discusses
the data we use to measure our success and the progress
we are making in our efforts to increase data reliability and
completeness. The report also summarizes and evaluates
annual reports prepared by the states.1

The first part of this report provides a national picture of
public water system compliance using data from the Safe
Drinking Water Information System/Federal Version
(SDWIS/FED). SDWIS/FED is the national database
where states and tribes with primacy report annually to
EPA violations of the maximum contaminant levels.
treatment techniques, monitoring and reporting, consumer
notification, and variance and/or exemptions. EPA
aggregates these reported violations at all public water
systems in states, commonwealths, territories and in Indian
country to present a national summary of violations, and
then presents summaries of significant monitoring and
reporting violations, significant public notification
violations, and violations of health-based standards at the
different kinds of public water systems.

The second part of this report presents information on
public water systems in Indian country.  A glossary of
terms used in this report appears in Appendix A.

Summaries and evaluations of completeness of the states'
annual public water systems reports for 2006 are presented
in Appendix B.
 The term "state" includes 57 states, commonwealths, and territories that have been approved to implement the drinking water program within their
jurisdiction. It also includes the Navajo Nation, which received EPA approval to implement its drinking water program on December 6, 2000. Federal approval
to implement the drinking water program is called primary enforcement authority, or "primacy." During calendar year 2006, EPA directly implemented the
drinking water program in Wyoming, the District of Columbia, and throughout most of Indian country other than the Navaj o Nation. EPA is responsible for
reporting violations in areas where the Agency directly implements the program.
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - National Summary
                                   Page 1
                                                                                                      March 2009

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               How Does The Public Find Out If Its Drinking Water Is Safe?

Information Sent to Customers:                      Information on the Internet:
Consumer Confidence Report —
(http://www.epa.gov/safewater/ccr/pdfs/quickrefguide
_ccr.pdf) Every community water system is required to
produce a yearly report identifying the contaminants detected
in its water and the risks of exposure to those contaminants.
The annual water quality report or consumer confidence
report (CCR)-tells customers what is in their water, where it
comes from, and where they can obtain additional
information. Large systems are required to mail the report to
their customers. While medium systems and small systems
are required to produce the report, these systems may obtain
a waiver from the  mailing requirement. Very  small systems
are only required to print the report in the local newspaper.

Public Notification Rule — (http://www.epa.gov/
safewater/pws/publicnotificaton/index.html) Public water
systems must notify their customers if there has been a
violation of drinking water standards. Public notification is
intended to ensure that consumers will always know if there
is a problem with their drinking water. Public water systems
must notify the people who drink their water if the level of a
contaminant in the water exceeds EPA, State, or tribal
drinking water regulations, if there is a waterborne disease
outbreak or any other situation that may pose a risk to the
public health, if the water system fails to test  its water as
required, or if the system has a variance or exemption from
the regulations. Depending on the severity of the situation
water suppliers have 24 hours to one year to notify their
customers. Public  notification is provided in addition to the
CCR.
Safewater Web Site (http://www.epa.gov/safewater) —
Provides information on the Safe Drinking Water Act,
individual water systems, contaminants that may be in
drinking water, and what individuals can do to help protect
sources of their drinking water.

Additional Information:

Call the Community Water System — Billing statements
should provide a number to call with questions.

State Public Water Systems Compliance Report — Each
state's annual report discusses the violations at its public
water systems. Most state reports include a list of violating
facilities.
National Public Water Systems Compliance Report (this
report) — Summarizes all reported violations at America's
public water systems.

Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791) -
Answers questions about drinking water, lets callers order
documents from EPA, and can refer callers to EPA experts if
they need more information.

Envirofacts Web Site (http://www.epa.gov/enviro) —
Allows the public to access EPA databases containing
information on environmental activities that may affect air,
water, and land anywhere in the United States.

WHAT INFORMATION IS IN THIS
REPORT?	

This report uses information from SDWIS/FED, the
national database where EPA records information that the
states are required to report about their public water
systems. For the national public water system compliance
reports, EPA examines SDWIS/FED records of violations
of primary drinking water regulations that specify: 1) the
maximum permissible level of a contaminant in water that
is delivered to any user of a public water system
(Maximum Contaminant Level or MCL); 2) techniques for
treating water (TT) to make it safe; 3) monitoring and
reporting requirements (how and when water must be
tested and the results reported); and 4) significant user
notification violations.
   • While SDWIS/FED collects information on all
     monitoring and reporting violations, only significant2
     monitoring and reporting violations are counted in this
     report. A "significant" monitoring and reporting
     violation occurs, with rare exceptions, when no samples
     are taken or no results are reported during a compliance
     period. Table A-l provides a more detailed description
     of significant monitoring violations for the different
     rules.
 This report tabulates only "significant" monitoring and reporting and notification (e.g., CCR) violations. Table A-l presents descriptions of significant
monitoring violations for the different drinking water regulations.
March 2009 •  Page 2
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - National Summary

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• A significant user notification violation occurs when a
  community water system completely fails to provide to
  its users a required report. Significant user notification
  violations include violations of the Consumer
  Confidence Report Regulation and violations of the
  Public Notification Regulations.

• The information provided in the Consumer Confidence
  Report (CCR) will supplement public notification that
  water systems must provide to their customers upon
  discovering any violation of a contaminant standard.
  The CCR typically will provide customers with a
  snapshot of the quality of their drinking water supply.

• Public notification helps to ensure that consumers
  receive timely information about problems with their
  drinking water. These public notification requirements
  have always been a part of the Safe Drinking Water Act.
  but were revised in 2000.

EPA routinely evaluates state programs by conducting data
verification audits and triennial national data quality
assessments. The most recent triennial review revealed that
81% of the apparent MCL/treatment technique violations
and 29% of the apparent monitoring and reporting
violations had been reported to SDWIS/FED. Since the
reviews, EPA and the primacy  agencies have worked
towards the identification and resolution of any problems
that may have produced data discrepancies in the past, and
to prevent the occurrence of future problems. More
discussions of data quality concerns, triennial reviews, and
EPA's recommendations appear later in this report.

FINDINGS
Public Water System Sizes and Types

Public water systems can be categorized based upon the
size of the population that they serve. Large systems serve
over 10,000 users, while medium size systems serve 3,301
to 10,000.  The small systems serve 3,300 or less users.
Systems by Size
Large Systems
Medium Systems"
Small Systems
All Sizes
Number of
Systems
4,103
5,109
147,060
156,182
Users served
235,575,036
28,974,008
39,611,079
304,102,891
In 2006, 156,182 public water systems together served
over 304 million users. The actual number of individuals
served was smaller, because millions of Americans drank
water from, and were counted as users by, more than one
public water system during the course of the year.

94% of America's public water systems served 3,300 or
fewer users. Together, these 147,060 small systems
provided service to only 13% of all users,  while the 4,103
large systems (3%) provide service to 77% of all users.
              Percentage of Systems by Type
                  D Community
                  • Transient Non-Community
                  D Non-Transient Non-Community

• 52,236 community water systems served over 284
  million people in their primary residences.

• 18,910 non-transient non-community systems (i.e.,
  schools, factories) served over 6 million people in places
  they frequented.

• 85,036 transient non-community  systems (i.e.,
  campgrounds, highway rest stops) served a constantly
  changing user base of almost 14 million people. Nearly
  all of these systems are small systems.
  Because approximately 3% of public water systems are "medium" in size, i.e., serve between 3,301 and 10,000 users, and because approximately 10% of the
population is served by them, this report omits a separate discussion of "medium" systems. Discussions concerning medium systems are included with the
larger systems.
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - National Summary
                                    Page 3  •  March 2009

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Overall Compliance

The overall compliance of America's 156,182 public water
systems is depicted in the table below which provides the
type of significant violations reported, the number of
violations, the number of systems with those violations,
and the number of users served by those systems.
Type of
Violation
All Violation
Types
Health-based
Monitoring &
reporting
CCR
Public
Notification
Number
of
Systems
with
Violations
42,108
11,115
29,660
7,333
7,606
Number
of
Violations
128,666
18,637
91,077
11,346
7,606
Users
Served
81,466,047
26,483,028
49,152,615
17,838,339
7,266,860
Most Americans received drinking water from
public water systems that recorded no significant
violations in 2006.

           PWS with Significant Violations
                Reported by States
     circumstances allowing them to install alternative
     technology or giving them more time to meet a standard
     if public health is adequately protected in the interim.
     For the few public water systems that were operating
     under a variance or exemption in 2006, no states
     reported a violation of the variance or exemption.

   Health-Based Drinking Water Standards

   93% of America's public water systems, serving
   90% of the users, did not have any reported
   violations of health-based drinking water
   standards in 2006.

              PWS with No Health-Based Violations
                     Reported by States
             D Violation of Some Kind
             • No Violation
                                                                   D Systems with Reported Health-Based Violations
                                                                   • Systems with No Reported Health-Based Violations


                                                           SDWIS/FED recorded 18,637 violations of health-based
                                                           standards in 2006. The Maximum Contaminant Level for
                                                           the Total Conform Rule (TCR) is the health-based
                                                           standard most frequently violated. Over fifty percent
                                                           (53%) of these violations were violations of the MCL for
                                                           the Total Conform Rule (TCR), which must be met by all
                                                           types and sizes of public water systems.4
For 73% of the public water systems in America, serving
73% of the users, the states reported no health-based
violation or significant monitoring and reporting violation.
The states reported either a health-based violation, a
significant monitoring and reporting violation, or a
significant CCR violation at 42,108 public water systems
in 2006.

No violations of variances or exemptions were
reported by the states to SDWIS/FED during 2006.

* Under Federal law,  states can grant variances or
  exemptions to public water systems in limited
Page 4 •  June 2008
2005 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - National Summary

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                Percentage of Violations by Rule4
   70%

   60%

   50%

   40%

   30%

   20%

   10%

   0%
                    TCR        LCR       SWTR
                • Percentage of Health-Based Violations
                n Percentage of Monitoring and Reporting Violations
 Monitoring and Reporting
 Drinking Water Standards

 If a system did not monitor the quality of its water, it is
 impossible to know if it has violated a health-based
 requirement. For this reason, a system's significant failure
 to monitor and report is a major violation that must be
 addressed and corrected.
            Type of Reported Significant
                        Violation
* 49% of the 91,077 significant monitoring and reporting
  violations reported by the states were violations of the
  requirements of the Chemical Contaminant Group. In
  2006 the states reported 62% more Chemical
  Contaminant Group monitoring and reporting violations
  than in 2005.  This is due to the cyclical pattern of the
  monitoring requirements of the Chemical Contaminant
  Group (See page 11).

Community Water Systems

Although community water systems make up only one-
third of the public water systems in America, they serve
93% of population served by public water systems.




All
CWS
Large
CWS
Small
CWS
Number
of
systems

52,236

8,864

43,372

Number of
Users


284,202,124

259,547,142

24,744,982

Number
of
Violating
systems
19,136

2,351

16,785

Number
of Users
Impacted

76,803,218

68,829,074

7,974,144

                      D Health-Based
                      • Monitoring and Reporting
                      D Public Notification and CCR
The following observations were made concerning the
community water systems:

• 73% of the population served by community water
  systems received drinking water from a system with no
  significant state-reported violations.

• Of the more than 8,000 larger community water systems
  approximately 2,300 (27%) had significant violations
  reported by the states.  Of the 43,372 small community
  water systems, 16,785 (39%) had significant violations.

• As reported by the states to SDWIS/FED, 86% of the
  community water systems complied with the Consumer
  Confidence Rule.
   71% of the 128,666 violations the states reported to
   SDWIS/FED in 2006 were for a public water system's
   significant failure to monitor and report, rather than a
   violation of a health-based standard.
  For the annual compliance reports, EPA tracks violations of the contaminant rules in five categories: 1) chemical contaminants (Chem) — violations
 of rules for organic, inorganic (except for lead and copper), and radioactive contaminants — compliance with many organic and inorganic standards is
 determined on the basis of shared samples, with one missed sample resulting in a monitoring and reporting violation of many standards; 2) total coliform
 rule (TCR) Coliform bacteria are usually not a threat to humans, but their presence in drinking water can indicate a lapse in treatment and the possible
 presence of other, more dangerous microbes.; 3) lead and copper rule (LCR); 4) surface water treatment (SWTR) includes interim enhanced surface
I water rule (IESWTR), filter backwash recycling rule; Long Term Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule; and 5) Disinfection By-Product Rule
 (DBPR).
 2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - National Summary
                                       Page 5 • March 2009

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        Does a Health-Based Violation Mean Drinking the Water Causes Illness?
It is important to note that a public water system's violation
of a health-based standard does not mean that the people who
drank the system's water got sick. A health-based violation
means either that the system has exposed its users to what
EPA has judged as an unreasonable risk of illness, or that the
system has failed to treat its water to the extent EPA has
judged necessary to protect its users from an unreasonable
risk of illness in the event that the regulated contaminant is
present in source water. Many variables affect the likelihood
of illness resulting from health-based violations, among them
the duration of the violation, whether or not the violation
occurred in an isolated section of a complex public water
system, and the extent to which contamination exceeds the
allowable level.

While  modern treatment systems have substantially reduced
the incidence of waterborne disease, drinking water
contamination remains a significant health risk management
challenge. Studies by the Centers for Disease  Control (CDC)
indicate that between 1980 and 1998 there were 419
outbreaks of illness linked to contamination in drinking
water resulting in an estimated 511,000 cases of disease
(Craun and Calderon, 1996; Levy et al., 1998; Barwick et al.,
2000). The majority of outbreaks in the U.S. occurred at
surface water systems. Nearly 80% of all reported cases of
illness were associated with the 1993 Cryptosporidium
outbreak in Milwaukee, WI, which resulted in an estimated
403,000 cases (MacKenzie et al. 1994; McDonald et al.
2001).

The number of waterborne disease outbreaks identified and
reported in the CDC database is believed, however, to
understate the actual incidence of outbreaks and cases of
illness (Craun and Calderon, 1996; National Research
Council, 1997). The most recent CDC report on outbreak
data for 2001-2002 is available at
http:www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/SS/SS5308.pdf.
                                               is are
                                               is that
Recognized and reported waterborne disease outbreaks
usually the result of exposure to waterborne pathogens that
cause acute gastrointestinal illness with diarrhea, abdominal
discomfort, nausea, and vomiting. Because such illnesses are
generally of short duration in healthy people, many
individuals experiencing these symptoms do not seek
medical attention. Where medical attention is sought, the
pathogenic agent may not be identified through routine
testing. Consequently, outbreaks are often not recognized in
a community or, if recognized, are not traced to a drinking
water source. Moreover, an unknown but probably
significant portion of waterborne disease is endemic (i.e.,
isolated cases not associated with an outbreak) and, thus, is
even more difficult to recognize. Waterborne disease
information does not  include information on diseases that
would be caused by contaminants with chronic effects.

EPA's health-based standards are intended to provide an
adequate margin of safety not just for healthy people, but
also for populations that are at greater risk from waterborne
disease. These sensitive subpopulations include children
(especially the very young), the elderly, the malnourished,
pregnant women, the  disease-impaired (e.g., those with
diabetes, cystic fibrosis), and a broad category of those with
compromised immune systems, such as AIDS patients, those
with autoimmune disorders (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis, lupus
erythematosus, multiple sclerosis), transplant recipients, and
those on chemotherapy (Rose, 1997). Immunocompromised
persons are more likely than healthy individuals  to contract
waterborne disease, the severity and duration of their illness
is often greater, and they are at a greater risk of death.
March 2009-  Page 6
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - National Summary

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Non-Community Water Systems
Compliance Assistance and Enforcement

All
NCWS
Large
NCWS
Small
NCWS
Number
of
systems
103,946
258
103,688
Number
of Users
19,957,999
14,866,097
5,091,902
Number
of
Violating
systems
22,972
64
22,908
Number
of Users
Impacted
4,662,829
1,194,702
3,468,127
• Out of over 103,900 non community water systems,
  almost 23,000 (22%) had significant violations. The vast
  majority of the violating non-community systems were
  smaller water systems. These small systems with
  significant violations served over 3.5 million (17%)
  users out of the almost 20 million users served by non-
  community water systems.

• 64 (25%) out of 258 larger non-community water
  systems had significant violations. Together these 64
  larger non-community systems served  1,194,702 (6%)
  users of the almost 20 million users served by non-
  community water systems.
Primacy States and EPA engage in a variety of activities to
help public water systems remain in and return to
compliance, including formal enforcement actions,
informal actions, and compliance and technical assistance.
State and EPA compliance assistance efforts to help a
source remain in or return to compliance may include:

• conducting on-site visits and sanitary surveys at public
  water systems (i.e., an on-site review of the water
  sources, facilities, equipment, operations, and
  maintenance to evaluate their adequacy in producing and
  distributing safe drinking water);

• helping systems invest in preventive measures;

• providing financial assistance for system improvements
  through the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund and
  other State funding programs;

• reviewing water system plans and specifications;

• conducting training sessions;

• holding public information meetings;

• lending specialized monitoring equipment; and

• publishing informational bulletins and newsletters on
  training events and other educational opportunities.
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - National Summary
                                    Page 7 • March 2009

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What Happens to Systems that Violate the
Requirements?

When a drinking water violation is detected and
compliance assistance to the violating system is found not
to be an effective method for returning the system to
compliance, EPA program implementation guidelines
require the state, as a condition for receiving EPA funding,
to initiate an enforcement response. Acceptable
enforcement responses include a variety of formal and
informal actions as the state or EPA attempts to return a
violating public water system to compliance as quickly as
possible.

Generally, the primacy agency's first responses to
violations  are informal actions beyond compliance
assistance  such as:

• reminder letters;

• warning letters;

• notices of violation;

• field visits; and

• telephone calls.

If the violation continues or recurs, the primacy agency
must initiate a formal enforcement response that requires
the violating public water system to return to compliance.
Formal enforcement responses include:

• citations;

• administrative orders with or without penalties;

• civil referrals to state attorneys general or to the
  Department of Justice;

• other sanctions, such as denying permission for system
  expansion; and

• filing criminal charges.

If a situation poses an imminent risk to public health, EPA
and the state can issue an emergency order that requires
the public  water system to take the steps necessary to
protect public health and return the system to compliance.

During 2006, EPA and its state partners initiated 4,114
enforcement actions in response to drinking water
violations  at public water systems in their jurisdictions. For
new rules, EPA generally has primary enforcement
authority until the States receive primacy for each new
rule. EPA  implemented the drinking water program in
Wyoming, the District of Columbia, and in Indian country,
except for the Navajo Nation. The Agency initiated
   enforcement responses in these areas and occasionally in
   the states, often at a state's invitation.5

   •  In 2006 the states issued a total of 3,966 formal
     enforcement actions, including:  1,124 administrative
     orders without penalty, 1,428 administrative orders with
     penalty,  102  civil referrals to the states' Attorneys
     General, 558 signed State Bilateral Compliance
     Agreements (BCA), 744 state intentional no-actions, 4
     civil cases filed, and 6 criminal cases filed.

   •  During the same period, EPA issued a total of 148
     formal enforcement actions, including 145 federal
     administrative orders, one  Federal Emergency Order, 3
     Federal intentional no actions, and 2 signed Federal
     BCA.

   These totals do not include informal enforcement actions
   (i.e., warning letters, notices  of violation), compliance
   assistance activities, or the public water systems that
   returned to compliance before EPA and state procedures
   would require initiation of a formal response.

   EPA generally  designates a public water system to be in
   significant non-compliance (SNC) if the system has
   serious, frequent, or persistent violations for a specific
   regulation that may pose a threat to public health.  This
   enables the states and EPA to prioritize enforcement
   resources to ensure that the most severe violations are
   addressed first. While all systems in SNC are a priority,
   the systems in SNC with health-based violations receive
   even higher attention than those with other violations. In
   EPA's "timely  and appropriate" guidance for drinking
   water, violations that have been elevated to the SNC level
   are to be addressed with a formal enforcement action
   within six months of receiving the SNC designation.  EPA
   reviews the state-reported violations quarterly to identify
   new systems as being in SNC for one or more rules or for
   other systems as being addressed SNCs. In determining the
   total number of systems that  are in significant non-
   compliance and have had the SNC addressed, EPA does
   not take into account the public water systems that have
   returned to compliance due to informal enforcement
   actions or compliance assistance, or public water systems
   that have returned to compliance before EPA and the states
   have initiated a formal response.

   •  Of the 156,182 public water systems nationwide, EPA
     determined that 14,036 systems  were in significant
     noncompliance for calendar year 2006. This was
     comparable to the number of public water systems
     determined to be in significant noncompliance in 2004
     and 2005. Over 90% of the public water systems
     determined to be in significant non-compliance are small
     systems serving 3,300 or fewer users.
March 2009 •  Page 8
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - National Summary

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• In 2006 states and EPA addressed non-compliance at
  6,035public water systems. Additionally the states and
  EPA addressed 4,157 of the systems with new SNC
  outside of the 2006 calendar year, leaving 3,844 systems
  (over 2% of the systems nationally) with unaddressed
  SNCs.

It should be noted that this report is a snapshot of one year.
Systems that are identified as being in significant non-
compliance near the end of the year are likely to carry over
to the next year, since the states have 6 months/two
quarters to address a SNC. For example, if an average of
14,000 systems were designated SNCs in a year, then, on
average,  3,500 systems are designated as SNC in a quarter.
Since EPA and the states have six months to address
systems with SNC, as many as 7,000 systems could be
classified as unaddressed SNCs at the end of a year.
However, EPA and the states would still be in compliance
with EPA's "Timely and Appropriate" response policy
because EPA and the states have six months to address
systems with SNC.

Starting in calendar year 2006 (fiscal year 2007) EPA
shifted its focus from ensuring SNCs were being addressed
on a rule by rule basis to ensuring systems with SNC were
being returned to compliance. Annually, EPA
Headquarters negotiates the state targets with the Regions
through the Annual Commitment System (ACS). The goal
for each state is to reduce its number of drinking water
systems with significant noncompliance for all rules. Since
we have adopted that focus we have seen the number of
systems with SNC decrease from 12,596 systems listed in
July 2006 to 8,438 listed in July 2008 (a 33% reduction).
Nationally, EPA headquarters reviews the progress of all
the states with our Regional offices. Where we have
identified significant increases of systems with SNC in a
state, we have asked the region to work with the state to
address the non-compliance. The state can provide
compliance assistance to correct the situation, if
appropriate.  In addition, headquarters provides quarterly
updates for the Regions and states on the status of systems
with SNC. Using this update of their systems' status,
states prioritize any new systems that need to be addressed
and track their progress towards addressing systems with
existing SNC. We are also in the process of developing an
approach for targeting violations that will assist the
Regions and states to identify systems with serious
violations more efficiently. The focus of this effort is to
direct EPA's enforcement resources more strategically to
protect public health.
WHAT IS THE QUALITY OF THE
DATA EPA USES FOR THIS REPORT?
The data used in this report came from EPA's national
SDWIS/FED database. SDWIS/FED is composed of data
that primacy states are required to submit to SDWIS/FED
each quarter. EPA uses information in SDWIS/FED to
assess progress in the implementation of regulations, to
develop national enforcement and compliance priorities,
and to provide information to the public.

EPA periodically conducts data verifications (independent,
on-site audits) of primacy state and tribal drinking water
programs to ensure that the primacy state is determining
compliance in accordance with Federal regulations. Data
verifications help detect differences between data in a
state's files (whether electronic or hard copy) and data in
SDWIS/FED.

As part of the ongoing data reliability efforts described in
past National Public Water Systems Compliance Reports,
EPA examined the results of data verifications conducted
from 1999 to 2001 and previously from 1996 through
1998. The 2002-2004 audits, which covered 38 states,
analyzed data from 2,658 public water systems. The data
audits reviewed inventory information (identifying
systems, their number, their size, and their type), apparent
violations that either were  reported or should have been
reported, and any enforcement actions initiated.

EPA's review showed that the quality of the information
the states reported to SDWIS/FED is highly accurate, but
the data are incomplete. This finding principally reflects
states' failure to determine and assign a violation rather
than a preponderance of data management issues. Most of
the SDWIS/FED data quality problems EPA identified
were instances where violations that should have been
recorded and reported did not appear in SDWIS/FED. EPA
found that only a small percentage of this incompleteness
is because SDWIS/FED will accept only properly
transferred data. EPA's analysis of the data verifications
found:

• 87% of all inventory data in SDWIS/FED were
  consistently reported.
  There are several reasons why there will be a difference between the number of violations in a year and the number of formal enforcement responses. For
example, a state may choose to address a system's violations informally in a manner that returns the system to compliance before the time interval has elapsed
that by EPA guidance would necessitate initiation of a formal enforcement response. Also, it is not uncommon for the regulator to address all of a violating
system's multiple violations in a single enforcement response. In addition, formal enforcement responses addressing violations discovered late in one reporting
year are generally not initiated until early in the following year.
 2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - National Summary
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• The overall quality of TCR MCL violations data in
  SDWIS/FED was 81%, quality of all health-based
  violations was 77%, and quality of monitoring and
  reporting violations was 27%.

• Most of the discrepancies between apparent and reported
  violations are because violations were not reported.

• 29% of monitoring and reporting violations had been
  reported to SDWIS/FED.

• 81% of the MCL/SWTR treatment technique violations
  had been reported to SDWIS/FED.


WHAT IS EPA DOING TO
IMPROVE DATA QUALITY?	


EPA continues to work with its state partners to identify
and resolve any problems that may have produced data
discrepancies in the past and to ensure that complete and
accurate documentation is available to help assess the
safety of the nations' drinking water.

• The drinking water violation data improved from the
  1996-1998 timeframe to the 2002-2004 timeframe. EPA
  has completed the Data Reliability Report for the 2002-
  2004 timeframe.  EPA has set a goal of 90% accuracy
  for data quality and is working closely with the
  Association of State Drinking Water Administrators
  (ASDWA) to implement an action plan that will help the
  drinking water program achieve this goal.

• EPA and a subset of states established a workgroup
  through ASDWA to implement its updated 2006 Data
  Reliability Analysis and Action Plan (DRAAP).
  Implementation of the plan began in 2005 ahead of the
  report release.

• EPA will be working with all states to implement the
  EPA Order 5360.1 A2 dealing with requirements for
  quality management systems.

• Changes to modernize SDWIS database should reduce
  data quality problems in the future from data entry to
  transmission. SDWIS Modernization focused on
  changes to make  the quality checking function available
  to states before they send data to EPA, to provide a data
  entry format consistent with contemporary commercial
  data transfer formats, and to reduce the complexity of
  data entry into SDWIS/FED by standardizing
  processing.

In 1998, EPA launched a major effort to assess the quality
of the drinking water data contained within SDWIS/FED
to respond to concerns regarding incorrect violations in the
database. EPA enlisted the help of its stakeholders in
   designing the review, analyzing the results for data
   collected by Data Verification (DV) audits between 1996
   and 1998, and recommending actions to improve drinking
   water data quality. The first Data Reliability Analysis of
   SDWIS/FED was published in October 2000.

   Findings of the first Data Reliability Analysis, which
   indicated that data quality needed improvement, were later
   updated by the second and third triennial assessments in
   2003 (which included data collected between 1999 and
   2001) and 2006 (for data between 2002 and 2004).
   Together, these assessments included comprehensive
   recommendations for EPA and state primacy agencies on
   quality improvements. The reports identified near-term
   actions that had already been taken or were still needed to
   improve data quality more immediately. To implement the
   recommendations, the states and EPA have conducted
   numerous activities and projects to improve data quality.
   Activities undertaken have included a) providing training
   for states; b) streamlining reporting to SDWIS/FED; c)
   making SDWIS error reporting more user-friendly; d)
   improving data verifications; e) following up with Regions
   on findings after data verifications; f) encouraging states to
   annually notify water systems of sampling schedules; and
   g) creating an electronic capability to evaluate data quality
   by states and EPA.

   EPA's response to the data reliability issues identified in
   the 2003 report (second triennial report) included a
   commitment to conduct analyses which would provide
   periodic data quality estimates (DQEs), and provide input
   into program activities and priorities necessary to improve
   the quality and reliability of the data.

   Like the previous two reviews, the third triennial review of
   data quality is largely based on DV audits. The DV audits,
   conducted between 2002 and 2004, reflect data for 2,658
   randomly selected PWSs in 38 states. The introduction to
   the 2006 Drinking Water Data Reliability Analysis and
   Action Plan (EPA 816-R-07- 010, March 2008, available
   online at
   http://www.epa. gov/safewater/data/pdfs/report_data_datar
   eliability_2006.pdf) discusses DV audits and the triennial
   national summary.

   Based on the third review, the overall DQE of the eight
   inventory (water system identification)  parameters
   assessed was 87%. In other words, 87% of systems from
   DV states between 2002 and 2004 had consistent data for
   all eight inventory data elements between their state files
   and SDWIS/FED database, or 13% of systems had at least
   one data element reported with a discrepancy. The highest
   discrepancy rate  was for the administrative contact address
   element.

   For the  38 states evaluated from 2002 to 2004, 90% of the
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2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - National Summary

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reported violations in SDWIS/FED were accurate.
Approximately 81% of the MCL and SWTR TT violations,
62% of the health-based violations (including LCR TT
violations), and 29% of the monitoring and reporting
(M/R) violations were reported to SDWIS/FED. Non-
reporting was mostly attributable to the fact that states did
not issue violations when violations had occurred
(compliance determination error). In other words, the
violations were not recognized, not recorded by the states
as violations, and consequently, not reported to
SDWIS/FED. Compliance determination errors led to
84% of non-reported health-based violations and 92% of
non-reported M/R violations.

Additional findings included the DQEs of health-based
violations were not significantly different between CWSs
and NTNCWSs. The DQEs of M/R violations for
TNCWSs were significantly higher than those for CWSs
and NTNCWSs.

HOW DOES EPA
EVALUATE STATE REPORTS?	


EPA reviewed each 2006 annual state report that was
submitted to determine if it met the requirements of the
1996 Amendments to SDWA.  The contents of the state
reports are summarized in Table B-l in Appendix B.
Table B-l shows whether a state:

• submitted  a report to EPA;

• included all required elements;

• satisfied its statutory requirement to publish and
  distribute summaries of the report that inform the public
  of the availability of the full report;

• identified the size and type of violating systems;

• discussed the compliance assistance and enforcement
  activities the state undertook in response to violations;

• included a list of PWSs with MCL or treatment
  technique violations, as EPA recommended in its
  guidance to states on preparing their reports;

• provided information to the public on availability of the
  reports; and

• included additional information of interest to the public,
  such as the number of public water systems in the state,
  their sizes and types, and background on the Safe
  Drinking Water Act and its implementation.

EPA provides a state-by-state summary of information
reported in each state report in Appendix B. The
standardized format includes an overall summary of the
violations data the Safe Drinking Water Act requires states
to report (i.e., violations with respect to MCLs, treatment
technique violations, significant monitoring and reporting
violations, and variances and exemptions). The summary
for each state also tells how to obtain a copy of the state's
full report. The annual summary is based on violations
reported in the calendar year of 2006. In some instances,
the data reported by a state in July of 2006 may not agree
with data currently  in SDWIS/FED. EPA's and the states'
continual efforts to  ensure that the information in the
SDWIS/FED database is as accurate as possible may have
resulted in updates  and corrections to the data since the
state published its report.

CONCLUSIONS AND
RECOMMENDATIONS	

Most Americans received water from systems which
reported no violations of health-based standards, and for
which the states reported no significant violations of
monitoring and reporting requirements.

Comparison of 2005 and 2006 Data

There are some differences in the numbers of violations
reported in 2005 and 2006. The total number of violations
increased by 16% from 2005. The number of significant
violations of monitoring and reporting requirements also
increased by 15% from 2005. The increase was due to the
cyclical pattern of the monitoring requirements of the
Chemical Contaminant Group. Small percentage
decreases were seen in the violations of the Stage 1
Disinfectants and Disinfection Byproducts Rule (DBPR),
the Interim Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule, Lead
& Copper Rule, and the Surface Water Treatment Rule.  In
2006, only 226 more violations of health-based standards
were detected at public water systems and reported by
states — a 1% increase from 2005. The total violations
include health-based and significant monitoring and
reporting violations, along with violations of the  CCR and
public notification.

TCR  and Chemical Violations

In 2006, states reported the largest number of total
violations (both health-based and significant monitoring
and reporting) for the Chemical Group Rule.  Typically the
states report the most violations for either the Chemical
Group Rule or the Total Coliform Rule. The cyclical
pattern of the monitoring requirements for some rules in
the Chemical Group can result in peaks and valleys in the
number of violations. The 45,035 significant violations of
monitoring and reporting requirements of the Chemical
Group Rule represent 49% of all significant monitoring
and reporting violations reported by the states in 2006. The
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - National Summary
                                    Page 11  • March 2009

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highest number of health-based violations can be found in
the Total Coliform Rule with 9,829 violations of the MCL
representing 53% of all reported violations of health-based
standards in 2006. Generally, the health-based violations
are most frequently reported for the Total Coliform Rule.

Implementation of Prior
Year Recommendations

EPA incorporated the following recommendations for
fiscal years 2004, 2005, and 2006:

States and EPA should continue working together to
address significant violations of monitoring and
reporting and notification requirements.

States and EPA should continue working together to
address violations of MCL and treatment technique
requirements.

EPA Regions continue to work with states to evaluate how
well public water systems comply with the rules and
whether enforcement actions are being initiated when
appropriate. Regions and states have also identified and
evaluated microbial risks to watersheds in an attempt to
focus enforcement and compliance efforts on ensuring the
safety of drinking water sources.  Considerable effort has
been devoted to training and compliance assistance. EPA
works to build the capacity of small public water systems
to maintain compliance both with established rules and
with new microbial rules such as the Long Term 1
Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule and the Ground
Water Rule. In Indian country, where almost all public
water systems are small,  EPA continues to focus resources
on ensuring compliance with the  microbial rules and the
standards for nitrates in drinking  water through
implementation of its new strategy for the FY05-07 Tribal
National Compliance and Enforcement Priority.

With respect to the rest of the drinking water program,
states and EPA are continuing their efforts to implement
the recommendations of the national public water system
reports:

• EPA provides funding to support eight technology
  assistance centers that help small systems with training,
  technical assistance, and technology demonstrations.

• States and EPA help promote compliance with existing
  drinking water requirements by conducting numerous
  assistance activities, such as on-site visits and the
  distribution of easy-to-read guides and checklists.

• EPA funding established and maintains the Local
  Government Environmental Assistance Network
  (LGEAN), a source of free information on current and
  developing SDWA requirements (as well as technical
     assistance, peer counseling, and financial guidance).
     LGEAN can be accessed on the Internet at
     www.lgean.org or by calling toll-free 1-877- TO-
     LGEAN (865-4326).

   •  EPA had established and maintains the Financing for
     Environmental Compliance website to provide financial
     and technical assistance resources to help communities
     create a plan to finance environmental capital assets.
     The Financing for Environmental Compliance can be
     accessed at
     http://www.epal.gov/compliance/assistance/financing/id
     ex.html

   •  EPA has developed sets of tools that will assist small
     systems with implementing drinking water regulations
     and managing their systems while still providing
     adequate public health protection.  The tools can be
     accessed on the Internet at
     http://www.epa.gov/safewater/cupss/index.html.

   •  The states and EPA are pursuing enforcement actions
     against violating public water systems both to
     discourage violations and to ensure public health
     protection.

   Since September 1998, the findings and recommendations
   of the national public water systems reports have been
   incorporated into EPA's ongoing efforts to ensure the
   reliability of data in SDWIS/FED. In its first national
   report, EPA noted that compliance data in many individual
   state reports differed from the data reported to
   SDWIS/FED. In 1998, EPA, states, and drinking water
   stakeholders agreed that our data quality goal should be
   " 100% complete, accurate, and timely data submitted by
   public water systems and primacy agencies, consistent
   with SDWA reporting requirements." Further analysis and
   discussions among the stakeholders led to establishment of
   interim milestones for how soon that goal will be achieved.
   EPA, states, and the drinking water stakeholders made
   significant progress on most of the data recommendations
   of the earlier national reports — in some instances
   achieving full implementation. Among the major
   accomplishments, EPA has:

   •  improved the display of drinking water data in
     Envirofacts;

   •  characterized and quantified the data quality  problem;

   •  taken interim steps to improve data quality, including
     improvements to the data entry tools states use to put
     information in SDWIS/FED and provision of a
     mechanism that enables water systems to confirm the
     accuracy of data before it is accepted by SDWIS/FED;
     and
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2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - National Summary

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• made a long-term commitment to achieve and maintain
  data quality goals.

2006 Report Recommendations

EPA, states, and drinking water stakeholders should
continue to work cooperatively to improve the quality of
the compliance data. More remains to be done to achieve
the goal of 100% accurate, complete, and timely
information. Some of the next steps EPA, states, and the
drinking water stakeholders have agreed to undertake
include:

• streamlining data reporting and reducing rule
  complexity;

• conducting more training to ensure regulatory staff can
  accurately determine compliance with drinking water
  rules and data entry staff can upload complete and
  accurate data to SDWIS/FED;

• encouraging states to issue annual reminders to water
  systems of their compliance monitoring schedules;

• providing states with individual, prioritized
  recommendations for improving their data quality;
• performing more frequent data verification audits;

• calculating estimates for SDWIS/FED data quality every
  three years, or more frequently if data from a sufficient
  number of data verifications are available;

• working with the Association of State Drinking Water
  Administrators (ASDWA) to implement its updated
  2006 Data Reliability Analysis and Action Plan
  (DRAAP) http://www.epa.gov/compliance/resources/
  reports/accomplishments/sdwa/sdwacom2005.pdf;

• negotiating grant conditions with several states to
  encourage them to follow quality assurance/quality
  control plans for drinking water violation data reported
  to EPA and address the differences in interpretation of
  the regulation; and

• working with all states to implement the EPA Order
  5360.1 A2 dealing with requirements for quality
  management systems.
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - National Summary
                                   Page 13  • March 2009

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     National Summary  of Compliance for Public
        Water  Systems in  Indian Country  in  2006
INTRODUCTION
            DATA QUALITY
This section of the 2006 National Public Water Systems
Compliance Report describes how the Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA) and federally-recognized Indian
tribes (tribes) are meeting the goal of ensuring that public
water systems in Indian country provide safe drinking
water.

PUBLIC WATER SYSTEMS IN
INDIAN COUNTRY	


Tribes may apply for eligibility to receive primary
enforcement authority (known as primacy) to administer
the drinking water program provided they meet the
requirements of Sections 1413 and 1451 of the Safe
Drinking Water Act (SDWA). As of 2006, only the Navajo
Nation had received primacy for most public water
systems on the Navajo Reservation. EPA administers the
drinking water program in the rest of Indian country.

A glossary of terms used in this report appears in
Appendix A. A map of the areas covered by this section
appears in Appendix C.

PUBLIC WATER SYSTEMS IN
ALASKA AND  OKLAHOMA	


Compliance figures for Alaska Native Villages outside of
Indian country are not included in this section of the
report. Similarly, compliance figures for 18 public water
systems in Indian country located in Oklahoma are not
included in this section of the report. The Alaska Native
Villages and these 18 systems in Oklahoma are not
federally recognized tribes, therefore, the state acts as the
primacy agency in reports violations. In both cases, this
information is found in the state reports for Alaska and
Oklahoma, respectively. The state reports do not, however,
contain separate information on these public water
systems.
            This report uses information from the Safe Drinking Water
            Information System/Federal Version (SDWIS/FED).
            SDWIS/FED is the national database where EPA records
            information on public water systems in Indian country.
            Public water systems in Indian country are required to
            report laboratory data to EPA. EPA uses the information to
            determine compliance with the national primary drinking
            water regulations of SDWA.

            This report also discusses the limitations in the data EPA
            uses to measure its success and the steps it is taking to
            increase data reliability and completeness. In addition, the
            report also discusses EPA's compliance assistance,
            enforcement, and financial assistance programs. EPA plans
            to continue its data quality efforts to ensure that
            SDWIS/FED contains complete and accurate information.
            A complete discussion of data quality is in the National
            Summary of Public Water Systems Compliance under the
            section entitled Data Quality.

            FINDINGS

Large Systems
Medium Systems
Small Systems
All Sizes
Number of
Systems
14
45
758
817
Users served
291 ,628
249,982
388,628
930,238
            In 2006, 817 public water systems in Indian
            country served 930,238 users.

            Almost all public water systems in Indian country
            were small.
            • 93% of public water systems in Indian country serve
              3,300 or fewer people. These 758 small systems served
              42% of the people who received water from public water
              systems in Indian country. Conversely, the other 59
              public water systems in Indian country served 58% of
              the people who received water from public water
              systems in Indian country.
    Page 14  • March 2009
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Section on Indian Country

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           Percentage of Systems by Type
                                                                   Systems with Reported Significant Violations
            D Community
            • Transient Non-Community
            D Non-Transient Non-Community

• 599 community water systems served 660,880 people in
  their primary residences.

• 128 non-transient non-community systems (schools and
  factories) served 211,781 people in places they
  frequented.

• 90 transient non-community systems (campgrounds and
  highway rest stops) served 18,688 people who passed
  through.
Type of
Violation


Any Type of
Violation
Health-based
Monitoring &
reporting
CCR
Public
Notification
Number of
Systems
with
Violations
496

92
321

292
4

Number
of
Violations

1,936

165
1,076

691
4

Users
Served


495,248

111,031
259,970

272,287
8,171

No violations of variances or exemptions were reported to
SDWIS/FED during 2006 for the Indian Country.

As reported to SDWIS/FED, over half of the
public water systems  in Indian country had
violations.

• 496 of 817 water systems (61%) reported health-based
  or significant monitoring or reporting violations.
                  1 Reported Violations

                  1 No Reported Violations
725 (89%) of the 817 public water systems,
serving 83% of the users, in Indian country
reported no violations of a health-based drinking
water standard in 2006.

• 165 health-based violations in Indian country, including
  multiple violations by some systems, were reported to
  SDWIS/FED in 2006. The Maximum Contaminant
  Level (MCL) for the Total Coliform Rule (65%) was the
  health-based standard most frequently violated.
                                                                              Percentage of Violations by Rule
            D Percentage of Health-based Violations

            • Percentage of Monitoring & Reporting Violations
                                                             • Of the 1,936 violations reported to SDWIS/FED in
                                                               2006, 1,076 (56%) were significant violations of
                                                               monitoring and reporting requirements. If a system did
                                                               not monitor the quality of its water, it is impossible to
                                                               know if it has violated health-based requirements. For
                                                               this reason, a system's significant failure to monitor and
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Section on Indian Country
                                   Page 15 •  March 20009

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  report is a major violation that must be addressed and
  corrected.
              Type of Violation
            D Monitoring and Reporting
            • Health-based
            D Public Notification and CCR
The majority of violations reported to SDWIS/FED
in 2006 were for a public water system's
significant failure to monitor and report.
• Only 165 of over 1,900 reported violations
  Indian country were health-based violations.
'0)111
• As reported to SDWIS/FED, 307 of 599 community
  water systems (49%) in Indian country complied with
  the Consumer Confidence Report Rule

Community Water Systems

All
Tribal
CWS
Large
CWS
Small
CWS
Number
of
systems
559
41
558
Number
of Users
660,880
364,027
296,853
Number
of
Violating
systems
405
24
381
Number
of Users
Impacted
365,515
174,555
188,960
405 (68%) of the 599 of the community water systems in
Indian country had significant violations.  Most of these
community water systems were small. These systems
served 55% of the community water systems population.

24 (58%) of the 41 of the larger community water systems
                 in Indian country had significant violations,

                 Non-Community Water Systems




All
Tribal
NCWS
Large
NCWS
Small
NCWS
Number
of
systems

218


18

120

Number
of Users


269,358


177,583

91,775

Number
of
Systems
with
Violations
91


9

82

Number
of Users
Impacted

131,773


84,448

47,285

• 91(4%) out of 218 non-community water systems in
  Indian country had significant violations. The majority
  of the violating non-community systems were smaller
  water systems. Together these small systems with
  significant violations served over 47,000 (36%) out of
  the over 131,000 users served by non-community water
  systems.

• 9 (50%) out of 18 larger non-community water systems
  in Indian country had significant violations. Together
  these nine larger non-community systems served over
  84,000 (31%) users of the almost 270,000 users served
  by non-community water systems.
                 COMPLIANCE ASSISTANCE
                 AND ENFORCEMENT	


                 EPA uses multiple approaches to ensure public water
                 systems in Indian country comply with SDWA regulations.

                 EPA's tribal compliance assistance program is designed to
                 help maintain compliance with SDWA by building
                 cooperative working relationships with utility managers,
                 operators, other tribal environmental staff, and tribal
                 elected officials. The program emphasizes information
                 exchanges, operation assistance, and water quality
                 monitoring.
                 EPA provides compliance assistance to system operators,
                 utility managers, and owners through training sessions,
                 newsletters, telephone support, and system visits.
                 Engineers and qualified staff provide on-site assistance to
                 assess current compliance status, develop monitoring
                 schedules and compliance plans, and conduct sanitary
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surveys. EPA coordinates many of these activities with
other federal agencies, including the Indian Health Service
and the Bureau of Reclamation. Coordination also occurs
with non-governmental organizations and inter-tribal
consortia, including the Native American Water
Association, the Rural Water Association, and the Rural
Community Assistance Corporation.

In federal fiscal year 2006, EPA's Office of Enforcement
and Compliance Assurance continued to focus increased
attention on environmental issues in Indian country
through implementation of the National Indian Country
Enforcement and Compliance Assurance Priority. One of
the goals was to improve compliance with drinking water
standards by the end of fiscal year 2010. Under this
national effort, EPA worked to improve the quality of
public water system data, provide additional compliance
assistance, and reduce the number of systems that are out
of compliance with key health-based standards.

In 2006, public water systems were required to monitor for
89 different contaminants and conduct analyses using a
variety of EPA-approved analytical methods. Where a
system fails to perform monitoring for some or all of the
required contaminants, a separate monitoring and reporting
violation is recorded for each missed contaminant. Each of
these violations is enforceable.

EPA is also responsible for initiating enforcement actions
against owners or operators of public water systems in
Indian country if a system is not in compliance with
SDWA. In most cases, EPA relies on compliance
assistance and informal enforcement actions to facilitate a
tribally-owned or -managed public water system's return to
compliance. When a formal enforcement action is
appropriate, EPA can initiate administrative orders,
including emergency administrative orders, and refer civil
and criminal cases to the Department of Justice. The "EPA
Policy for the Administration of Environmental Programs
on Indian Reservations" (EPA Indian Policy,  11/8/84) and
the "Guidance on the Enforcement Principles Outlined in
the 1984 Indian Policy" (EPA Tribal Enforcement
Principles) guide the Agency's approach to bringing civil
administrative or judicial enforcement actions against
systems in Indian country. During 2006, EPA issued one
federal administrative order in Indian country. This does
not include informal enforcement actions (i.e. warning
letters, notices of violation), compliance assistance
activities, or the public water systems that returned to
compliance before EPA procedures would require
initiation of a formal response.

EPA generally designates a public water system to be in
significant non-compliance (SNC) if the system has
serious, frequent or persistent violations for a specific
regulation that may pose a threat to public health. This
enables the states and EPA to prioritize enforcement
resources to ensure that the most severe violations are
addressed first.  In EPA's "timely and appropriate"
guidance for drinking water, violations that have been
elevated to the SNC level are to be addressed with a formal
enforcement action within six months of receiving the
SNC designation.  EPA reviews the state-reported
violations quarterly to identify new systems as being in
SNC for one or more rules or other systems as being
addressed SNCs. In determining the total number of
systems that are in significant non-compliance, EPA does
not take into account the public water systems that have
returned to compliance due to informal enforcement
actions or compliance assistance, or public water systems
that have returned to compliance before EPA and the states
have initiated a formal response.

• Of the 817 public water systems in Indian country, EPA
  determined that 292 systems were in significant
  noncompliance with one or more drinking water
  standards in calendar year 2006. Over 90% of these
  systems are small systems serving 3,300 or fewer users.

• In 2006 states and EPA addressed non-compliance at
  100 public water systems. Additionally the states and
  EPA addressed 68 of the systems with SNC outside of
  the 2006 calendar year, leaving 124 systems (over 15%
  of the systems in Indian country) with unaddressed
  SNCs.

A system can be designated as SNC if it has a poor
monitoring & reporting  history, although it doesn't have a
health-based violation.  For the systems designated as SNC
in 2006 less than 60 had health-based violations.

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE	

EPA provides financial assistance to public water systems
in Indian country to help build tribal capacity to operate
and maintain systems in compliance with SDWA.
Capacity building is a long-term solution which focuses on
providing grants to tribes and providing training, and
technical assistance as they develop their environmental
programs. EPA's Indian General Assistance Program
builds tribal capacity by providing grants to plan, develop,
and establish environmental protection programs,
including drinking water programs.

EPA also distributes funds for specific drinking water
program priorities.  EPA set aside $6,325,400 in FY2006
for activities to support Tribal Public Water System
Supervision (PWSS) Programs. EPA uses these funds to
operate the PWSS program in Indian country. Tribes with
primacy for the drinking water program also receive
financial support from PWSS funds.  Currently, the Navajo
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Section on Indian Country
                                   Page 17  •  March 20009

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Nation is the only tribe with primacy for the drinking
water program.  These funds are used to implement the
PWSS program, including activities such as:

• Improving capacity at tribal drinking water systems
  source water and wellhead protection projects;

• Completing Source Water Assessments;

• Providing training to tribal operators;

• Compiling and analyzing compliance information; and

• Responding to violations.


In the 1996 Amendments to SDWA, an infrastructure
funding program was established to improve water
supplies. Each year, 1.5% of the appropriation for the
national Drinking Water State Revolving Fund program is
set aside for American Indian communities and Alaska
Native Villages. The FY 2006 set-aside amounted to
$12,562,400.  These funds are used to improve the
infrastructure of water systems serving tribal populations
to achieve compliance with drinking water standards. This
includes projects such as:

• distribution system improvements;

• community water system extensions;

• replacement of water mains;

• adding new wells;

• treatment improvements;

• construction of new pumphouses; and

• consolidation of PWS.

Finally, technical assistance and training for small tribally
owned or operated public water systems are also provided.
Through the cooperative agreements, small tribal public
water systems receive information on training and
technical assistance, wellhead and ground water
protection, and source water protection.

CONCLUSIONS AND
RECOMMENDATIONS	

In 2006, EPA Regions reported that 39% of the public
water systems in Indian country did not report a violation
of a health-based standard, a significant monitoring and
reporting violation, or a significant consumer notification
violation. This represents an 8% improvement from 2005.

During 2006, there was a decrease in the total number of
        significant violations of monitoring and reporting
        requirements in Indian country (decreased from 1,223 in
        2005 to 1,076 in 2006).

        EPA continues to implement two primary
        recommendations from previous reports: (1) improve
        collection and maintenance of compliance data for public
        water systems in Indian country; and (2) place a priority on
        decreasing the number of monitoring and reporting
        violations to gain a full understanding of whether health-
        based violations exist. EPA is accomplishing these
        recommendations by:

        • improving the inventory of public water systems in
          Indian country;

        • focusing on the collection and entry into SDWIS/FED of
          compliance and enforcement;

        • continuing to work with tribal governments, utility
          managers, and water system operators to improve
          compliance with monitoring and reporting requirements
          and with health-based standards, particularly the Total
          Coliform Rule and Surface Water Treatment Rule;

        • in Indian  country, where almost all public water systems
          are small, EPA will continue to focus resources on
          ensuring compliance with the microbial rules and the
          standards for nitrates in drinking water through
          implementation of the National Indian Country
          Enforcement and Compliance Assurance Priority;

        • maintaining EPA's direct on-site  compliance assistance,
          including conducting frequent sanitary surveys and
          targeting  systems with repeat violations; and

        • continuing to support and encourage capital
          improvements for public water systems to improve the
          infrastructure (and therefore compliance with SDWA
          requirements) of public water systems in Indian country,
          including grants provided under the Drinking Water
          Tribal Infrastructure Grant Tribal Set-Aside Program.


        Ultimately,  EPA continues to respond to compliance and
        enforcement issues at public water systems owned,
        operated, or managed by tribal governments in a manner
        consistent with SDWA, the EPA Indian Policy, and the
        EPA Tribal  Enforcement Principles. Where compliance
        assistance is ineffective or where, among other things,
        there is a significant threat to human health or the
        environment, EPA takes appropriate steps to return
        systems to compliance, including formal enforcement
        actions.
March 2009  •  Page 18
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Section on Indian Country

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   Appendix A




Glossary of Terms

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Administrative Order
Formal enforcement actions issued by EPA or a State to
address noncompliance at a public water system, usually
by means of a compliance schedule with enforceable
milestone dates.

Chemical Rules
Refers collectively to regulations that protect the public
from unsafe levels of organic chemicals, inorganic
chemicals (including lead and copper), and radioactivity in
drinking water.

Community Water System
A public water system that serves at least 15 service
connections used by year-round residents or regularly
serves at least 25 year-round residents (e.g., homes,
apartments and condominiums that are occupied year-
round as primary residences).

Consumer Confidence Rule (CCR)
Requires community water systems to prepare and provide
to their customers annual consumer confidence reports on
the quality of the water delivered by the systems.

Disinfection/Disinfectant
By Product Rule (DBPR)
Applies to community water systems and nontransient
non-community systems, including those serving fewer
than 10,000 people, that add a disinfectant to the drinking
water during any part of the treatment process. The Stage 1
DBPR specifically addresses risks  associated with
disinfectants and disinfectant byproducts. This rule was
published concurrently with the Interim Enhanced Surface
Water Treatment Rule (IESWTR), which addresses control
of microbial pathogens.

Federally-recognized Indian Tribe
An Indian tribe,  band, nation, pueblo, community, or
Alaska Native Village that the Secretary of the Interior
acknowledges to exist as an Indian tribe pursuant to the
Federally Recognized Indian Tribe List Act of 1994,  25
U. S.C. Section 479a. Maintained by the Department of the
Interior, the list of federally-recognized tribes is updated
periodically and published in the Federal Register. The
latest list of federally-recognized Indian tribes is available
at 65 Federal Register 12398 (March 13, 2000).
Filter Backwash Recycle Rule (FBRR)
Requires public water systems (PWSs) to review their
backwash water recycling practices to ensure that they do
not compromise microbial control. Under the FBRR,
recycled filter backwash water, sludge thickener
supernatant, and liquids from dewatering processes must
be returned to a location such that all processes of a
system's conventional or direct filtration including
coagulation, flocculation, sedimentation (conventional
filtration only) and filtration, are employed. Systems may
apply to the State for approval to  recycle at an alternate
location. The Filter Backwash Rule applies to all public
water systems, regardless of size.

Health-based  Violation
A violation of either a Maximum Contaminant Level or a
Treatment Technique requirement.

Inorganic Chemicals
These non-carbon based compounds (such as metals,
nitrates, and asbestos) can either occur naturally in some
sources  of drinking water or be introduced by human
activity. EPA has established MCLs for 15 inorganic
contaminants. Violations of standards for lead and copper
are addressed separately.

Interim Enhanced Surface Water Treatment
Rule (IESWTR)
Applies to systems using surface water, or ground water
under the direct influence of surface water, that serve
10,000 or more persons. The rule also includes provisions
for states to conduct sanitary surveys for surface water
systems regardless of system size.

Large  System
A public water system that serves more than 10,000
people.

Lead and Copper Rule (LCR)
Requires a public water system to take steps to minimize
the risk of exposure to lead and copper in drinking water
by monitoring for these contaminants, installing corrosion
control where required, and, where necessary, educating
the public about ways to reduce exposure. A system may
also be required to treat its source water or replace lead
service lines.
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix A
                                  Page A-1  •  March 2009

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Maximum Contaminant Level
The maximum permissible level of a contaminant in water

Maximum Disinfectant
Residual Level (MDRL)
A level of a disinfectant added for water treatment that
may not be exceeded at the consumer's tap without an
unacceptable possibility of adverse health effect.

Monitoring and Reporting Violation
Refers to either a violation of a monitoring and reporting
schedule or violation of contaminant-specific minimum
testing schedules and operational reporting requirements.
Those monitoring and reporting violations considered
"significant" for the purposes of the state and national
public water system compliance reports are described
below in Table A-l.

Nitrate and Nitrite
Inorganic compounds that can enter water supplies,
primarily from fertilizer runoff, livestock farms, and
sanitary wastewater discharges.

Non-transient Non-community Water System
A non-community public water system that regularly
serves at least 25 of the same persons over six months per
year. A typical example of a non-transient non-community
water system is a school or an office building that has its
own water source, such as a drinking water well.

Organic Chemicals
These carbon-based compounds, such as solvents and
pesticides, can enter drinking water through a variety of
means, including factory discharges or runoff from crop
lands. EPA has established MCLs for 56 organic
contaminants.

Primacy
The Safe Drinking Water Act requires EPA, States, and
Tribes to work as partners to ensure delivery of safe
drinking water to the public. Any State or Indian Tribe can
request responsibility for operation and oversight of the
drinking water program within its borders. In order to
receive this responsibility (called "primary enforcement
authority" or "primacy"), a State or Tribe must show that,
among other things, it has adopted drinking water
regulations that are at least as stringent as Federal
regulations, and demonstrate its capacity both to enforce
those  regulations and to implement other activities
necessary  to ensure compliance.
delivered to any user of a public water system.

In the absence of State or Tribal primacy, EPA assumes
responsibility for administering the drinking water
program for that area. Of the 56 eligible States (defined to
include Commonwealths, Territories, and the District of
Columbia), all but Wyoming and the District of Columbia
have primacy. During calendar year 2001, the EPA
Regional Offices administered the drinking water program
within these two jurisdictions and on all Tribal lands,
except for the Navajo Nation.

Primary Drinking Water Regulations
These are regulations that apply to public water systems;
specify contaminants which, in the judgment of the
Administrator, may have an adverse effect on the health of
persons; and specify for each such contaminant either a
maximum contaminant level or a treatment technique.

Public Water System  (PWS)
A system for the provision to the public of water for
human consumption through pipes or other constructed
conveyances, if such system has at least 15  service
connections or regularly serves at least 25 individuals at
least 60 days out of the year. A public water system can be
either a community water system, a non-transient
noncommunity water system, or a transient noncommunity
water system.

Radionuclides
Radioactive particles, such as radium-226, radium-228,
gross alpha, and beta particle/photon radioactivity, can
occur naturally in water or may result from human activity.
EPA has established MCLs for uranium, beta/photon
emitters, alpha emitters, and combined radium 226/228.

Regional Offices
Responsible for implementing Environmental Protection
Agency programs within their respective jurisdictions.
Regional Offices cooperate with Federal, State, interstate,
and local agencies, as well as with industry, academic
institutions, and other private groups to ensure that
Regional needs are addressed and that Federal
environmental laws are upheld.

Small Systems
Public water systems that serve no more than 3,300 people.
Page A-2 •  March 2009
 2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix A

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Surface Water Treatment Rule (SWTR)
The Surface Water Treatment Rule requires a public water
system served by surface water or by ground water under
the influence of surface water to take steps (such as
disinfection, filtration followed by disinfection, or
watershed control) to reduce potential exposure to
microbiological contamination.

Total Coliform Rule (TCR)
Establishes limits on coliform bacteria in water distribution
systems. Although coliform bacteria, which are found in
decaying organic material and in the intestinal tract of
humans and animals, are usually not harmful to human
health, their presence may indicate the presence of other,
more dangerous microbial contamination.

SDWIS/FED
EPA's database for collecting safe drinking water
monitoring results from oversight agencies. SDWIS stands
for Safe Drinking Water Information System. Public Water
Systems are required to report all monitoring results to the
primary enforcement authority. States with primacy, or
EPA where it administers the program, analyze the
monitoring results, determine compliance, and report
violations to EPA on a quarterly basis. EPA maintains
records of these violations in SDWIS/FED. SDWIS/FED
records only violations, not results that demonstrate
compliance with drinking water standards.
Total Trihalomethanes
These chemicals can be by-products of chemical processes
used to disinfect drinking water.

Transient Non-community Water System
A non-community water system that regularly serves at
least 25 people (but not the same 25) over six months per
year. A typical example is a campground or a highway rest
stop that has its own water source, such as a drinking water
well.

Treatment Technique
In cases where EPA has determined it is not technically or
economically feasible to establish an MCL, the Agency
can instead specify a treatment technique. These are
treatment methods required by EPA to minimize the level
of a contaminant in drinking water.

Variances and Exemptions
A public water system that cannot comply with a drinking
water standard because of poor source water quality, or, in
the case of small systems,  inadequate financial resources,
can be granted a variance to comply with less stringent, but
still protective standards based on a specific EPA-
approved technology available to the system. An
exemption allows a PWS with compelling circumstances
(including economic considerations) additional time to
achieve compliance with applicable SDWA requirements,
so long as public health is  adequately protected.
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix A
                                  Page A-3 •  March 2009

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                   TABLE A-l:  SIGNIFICANT MONITORING VIOLATIONS FOR

                        ANNUAL STATE PUBLIC WATER SYSTEM REPORTS
Rule
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water
Treatment Rule
Lead and
Copper Rule
c Phase I, II, IIB,
and V Rules
h Total
Trihalomethanes
e
m Radionuclides
Violation Type
Major routine
Major repeat
Major (filtered)
Major (unfiltered)
Initial lead and
copper tap
Follow-up or
routine lead and
copper tap
Regular
monitoring
Regular
monitoring
Regular
monitoring
Description
No samples collected during a
compliance period
No follow-up samples collected
after a positive total coliform
sample or no speciation
Collected less than 90% of samples
required during a compliance
period
Collected less than 90% of samples
required during a compliance
period
Either failed to collect the initial tap
samples, and then failed to correct
that omission within a) 3 months
for large systems, b) 6 months for
medium systems, or c) 12 months
for small systems; or failed to
submit the associated report
Failed to collect 1 or more required
samples
Failed to collect any required
samples2
Failed to collect any required
samples
Failed to collect any required
samples
SDWIS
Violation Code1
23
25
36
31
51
52
03
03
03
SDWIS Contaminant
Code
3100
3100
None
None


By contaminant
2950
4000,4100,4010
 1   EPA's Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS/FED) makes no distinction between the sampling violations and the reporting violations
    associated with a sample collection requirement. Both violations are reported under the same violation code.

    Failure to collect "any required sample" means none of the required samples were collected.
March 2009-  Page A-4
2005 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix A

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              TABLE A-2: SUMMARY OF DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS FOR
                           PUBLIC WATER SYSTEMS DURING 2006
Applicability of Regulations
Contaminant/Rule
Organic Contaminants
Total Trihalomethanes
Contaminants (TTHM)
Inorganic Contaminants
(lOCs)
Nitrate and Nitrite
Contaminants
Radionuclides
Contaminants
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment
Lead and Copper Rule
Interim Enhanced Surface
Water Treatment Rule
Stage 1
Disinfectant/Disinfection
By-Product Rule
Filter Backwash Recycling
Rule
Public Notification
Consumer Confidence Rule
Community Water Systems
All
All PWS, using surface water or
ground water under the direct
influence of surface water
(GWUDI), which disinfect then-
water (a.k.a. Subpart H systems)
All
All
All
All
Some
Only PWS using surface water or
GWUDI
All
For sanitary surveys all PWS using
surface water or GWUDI; for other
requirements those systems serving
10,000 or more people
All PWS adding a disinfectant to
the drinking water
Conventional or direct filtration
PWS using surface water or
GWUDI and recycle spent filter
backwash, thickener supernatant, or
liquids from dewatering processes
All
All
Non-Transient Non-
Community Water Systems
All (Note: acrylamide and
epichlorohydrin do not have
MCLs and only have treatment
techniques)
All PWS, using surface water or
GWUDI, which disinfect then-
water (a.k.a. Subpart H systems)
Prior to the 2001 Arsenic Rule,
all lOCs except for arsenic.
After the 2001 Arsenic Rule all
lOCs.
All
None
All
Some
Only PWS using surface water
or GWUDI
All
For sanitary surveys all PWS
using surface water or GWUDI;
for other requirements those
systems serving 10,000 or more
people
All PWS adding disinfectant to
the drinking water
Conventional or direct filtration
PWS using surface water or
GWUDI and recycle spent filter
backwash, thickener
supernatant, or liquids from
dewatering processes
All
None
Transient Non-Community
Water Systems
None
All PWS, using surface water or
GWUDI, which disinfect then-
water (a.k.a. Subpart H systems)
None
All
None
All
Some
Only PWS using surface water
or GWUDI
None
For sanitary surveys all PWS
using surface water or GWUDI;
for other requirements those
systems serving 10,000 or more
people
Those PWS using chlorine
dioxide
Conventional or direct filtration
PWS using surface water or
GWUDI and recycle spent filter
backwash, thickener
supernatant, or liquids from
dewatering processes
All
None
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix A
Page A-5 • March 2009

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      Appendix B

Summaries of State Annual
   Compliance Reports

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CONTENTS
Alabama	6-7
Alaska	B-8
American Samoa	B-g
Arizona	B-io
Arkansas	B-n
California	6-12
Colorado	6-13
Connecticut	6-14
Delaware	6-15
District of Columbia	B-i6
Florida	6-17
Georgia 	B-i8
Guam 	B-ig
Hawaii 	B-2O
Idaho	B-2i
Illinois	B-22
Indiana  	6-23
Iowa 	6-24
Kansas	6-25
Kentucky	6-26
Louisiana	6-27
Maine	6-28
Maryland 	6-29
Massachusetts	6-30
Michigan 	6-31
Minnesota 	6-32
Mississippi 	6-33
Missouri	6-34
Montana 	6-35
Navajo Nation	6-36
Nebraska 	6-36
Nevada 	6-37
New Hampshire 	6-38
New Jersey 	6-39
New Mexico 	6-40
New York	6-41
North Carolina  	6-42
North Dakota	6-43
Northern Mariana Islands	6-44
Ohio	6-45
Oklahoma	6-46
Oregon 	6-47
Pennsylvania	6-48
Puerto Rico 	6-49
Rhode Island 	6-50
South Carolina  	6-51
South Dakota	6-52
Tennessee	6-53
Texas 	6-54
Utah  	B-55
Vermont 	6-56
Virgin Islands 	6-57
Virginia 	6-58
Washington 	6-59
West Virginia 	B-6o
Wisconsin  	B-6i
Wyoming  	6-62
Page B-1  March 2009
   2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

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This Appendix presents a summary of each state report in
a standardized format. The format includes an overall
summary of the violations data specified in Section 1414
of the 1996 Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA)
Amendments (i.e., violations with respect to maximum
contaminant levels (MCLs), treatment technique
violations, significant monitoring and reporting
requirements, significant notification violations, and
variances and exemptions).
  This Appendix summarizes the data reported by the
  States, but does not interpret it. Therefore, other factors
  must be taken into account before drawing conclusions
  about a State program. For example, public water
  systems are required to report all violations to the State,
  but State drinking water programs vary in the
  regulations they choose to emphasize. A State that
  decided to focus attention and resources on one
  particular rule may have discovered and reported many
  more violations of that rule than a State that chose to
  focus on a different rule. A disproportionate number of
  violations in a State could also indicate that the State
  needs to work with its public water systems to improve
  their compliance. Readers are cautioned to view the
  violations data provided in the State summaries within
  the context of each State and its individual drinking
  water program.
In 2006, EPA received State Public Water System
Compliance Reports from 45 of the 57 primacy states.
Commonwealths, Territories, and tribes. As in past years.
American Samoa, Guam, and the Northern Mariana
Islands did not submit reports, and, with limited
exceptions, did not supply information to SDWIS/FED.
EPA did not receive a report from Arizona, Indiana.
Massachusetts, New Jersey, Oregon, the Virgin Islands.
and Vermont. Appendix B supplies what information is
available in SDWIS/FED to indicate violations at public
water systems in the Pacific territories. Because the
District of Columbia, Wyoming, and most Indian Tribes
did not have primary enforcement responsibility for
drinking water in calendar year 2006, EPA prepared
reports for those jurisdictions.
Violations for 2006
EPA summarizes the number of MCL/MDRL, treatment
technique, and significant monitoring and reporting
violations1 reported by each state in six categories:

    •   Violations of chemical contaminant requirements2

    •   Violations of the Total Coliform Rule

    •   Violations of the Surface Water Treatment Rule.
        Surface Water Treatment Rule, Interim Enhanced
        Surface Water Treatment Rule, Long Term
        Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule, and
        Filter Backwash Recycling Rule

    •   Violations of the Lead and Copper Rule

    •   Significant Notification or Consumer Confidence
        Rule Violation

    •   Violations of the Disinfection/Disinfectant
        Byproducts Rule


EPA summarizes the numbers of individual public water
systems in violation in each of these five categories, as
reported by the state. If a state's report did not include
information in a category, EPA's summary notes the
omission.

2006 Totals	

EPA also summarizes the total number of systems in each
state, the total number of significant violations reported.
and the total number of P WSs in violation, if the  state
reported this information. When states did not provide
information on the total number of public water systems.
EPA supplied that information from the SDWIS/FED.
Systems in Violation
Systems in Violation is defined as the number of different
systems with a reported violation of this type. Some states
counted a system with multiple violations or violations in
more than one category as one violating system. Other
states counted a violating
 A comprehensive definition of significant monitoring and reporting
violations including exceptions to the definition for the Total Coliform
Rule and Lead and Copper Rule appears in Appendix A.
  MCL and significant monitoring violations for organic, inorganic, total
trihalomethane (TTHM), nitrate and nitrite, and radionuclide
contaminants.
Page B-2 March 2009
  2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

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system each time it had a violation, or once for each of the        Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual Public
regulatory categories in which it had a violation. If EPA's         Water Systems Renort
review of a state's report indicated some violating systems
were counted more than once, an asterisk notes that the            „      ,        .„„.„.      ,       ,   .
state's number possibly overcounts violating systems             If a staf s report includes information on how to obtain a
                                                           copy of the report, that information is provided on the state
,7   .          , T-,       ,.                                 summary page in this Appendix.
Variances and Exemptions	              J F to         FF

No states reported a violation of a variance or exemption
in 2006.
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B                                        Page B-3 •  March 2009

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Table B-l : Summary of Elements Reported by States
State
Alabama
Alaska
American Samoa
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
District of
Columbia
Florida
Georgia
Guam
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Navajo Nation
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
Submitted
Report
X
X
Reported on Violation
Categories
CC
R
X
X
MCL
X
X
M/R
X
X
TT
X
X
Reported
on V/E
X
X
Provided
Inventory
Information
X
X
Identified
Size and
Type of
Violating
Systems
X
X
Discussed
Compliance
and
Enforcement
Responses
X
X
Identified
Each
System
with MCL
and TT
Violations
X
X
Provided
Information to
Public on
Availability
X
X
Provide
d
Additio
nal
Informa
tion1
X
X
REPORT NOT SUBMITTED
REPORT NOT SUBMITTED
X

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
NR
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

NR
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
NR
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
NR
X
X
X
X
X
X

NR
X
X

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

NR
X
REPORT NOT SUBMITTED
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
NR
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
REPORT NOT SUBMITTED
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
REPORT NOT SUBMITTED
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
NR
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

X
X
X
REPORT NOT SUBMITTED
X

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

X
X
X

X
X
X
X

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

NR

NR

X
NR
X
X

NR
X
NR
X
X
X
X
X

NR
X
NR
X

X
X
X

NR
X
NR

X
X
X
X

NR
X
NR
X
X
X
X
X

NR
X
X

X
X
X
X

NR
X


X

X
REPORT NOT SUBMITTED
X
X
X
X
X
NR
X
X
X
X
X
X
1 . An "X" in this column indicates the state submitted more information in its report than the minimum EPA recommends in guidance.
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
Page B-5 •  March 2009

-------
Table B-l : Summary of Elements Reported by States
State
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Northern Mariana
Islands
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Puerto Rico
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virgin Islands
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming
Submitted
Report
X
X
X
Reported on Violation
Categories
CC
R
NR

X
MCL
NR
X
X
M/R
NR

X
TT
NR
X
X
Reported
on V/E
X

X

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Identified Discussed
Size and Compliance
Provided Type of and
Inventory Violating Enforcement
Information Systems Responses
X
X
X
X X

X

X
Identified
Each
System
with MCL
and TT
Violations
X

X
Provided
Information to
Public on
Availability
X
X
X
Provide
d
Additio
nal
Informa
tion1
X
X

REPORT NOT SUBMITTED
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
REPORT NOT SUBMITTED
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

X
X
X
X
X
X

X
X
X
X

NR
X

NR
X

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X


X
X
X
NR

X
X
X
X
X
X
X

REPORT NOT SUBMITTED
REPORT NOT SUBMITTED
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X


X
X
X
X
X
X
X

X
X
X
X

X
X
?
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X

1 . An "X" in this column indicates the state submitted more information in its report than the minimum EPA recommends in guidance.
March 2009  •  Page B6
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                                    State of Alabama 2006 PWS Compliance Report
 Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter Backwash
Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
21*
19






19
Systems in
Violation
15**
19






19
Treatment Technique

Violations




o

o

NR
Systems in
Violation




o

o

NR
Significant Monitoring

Violations
442*
21


O

2
NR
21
Systems in
Violation
35**
17


o

2
91
17
 *Also includes Disinfection Byproducts Rule violations, which are set out separately below.
 **Possible overcounting of violating systems
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
640
37
NR
 Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

 Alabama's State Report is available by accessing the state's web site or by contacting:

 ADEM
 Drinking Water Branch
 PO Box 301463
 Montgomery, AL 36130-1463



 Website: http://www.adem.state.al.us
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
Page B-7  •  March 2009

-------
                                         State of Alaska 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006
Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL
Violations
6
37



45
Systems in
Violation
2
32



16
Treatment Technique
Violations


177
15

7
Systems in
Violation


62
13

4
Significant Monitoring
Violations
2,468
909

288
162
54i
Systems in
Violation
267
483

187
140
159
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
1,589
790
4,894
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

Alaska's State Report is available by accessing the state's web site or by contacting:

Dept of Environmental Conservation
Drinking Water Program
555 Cordova Street
Anchorage, AK  99501

WebSite: http://www.dec.state.ak.us/eh/dw/dwmain/violations.html
    March 2009  •  Page B-8
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                                    State of American Samoa 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006
Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL
Violations
o
66



o
Systems in
Violation
o
9



o
Treatment Technique
Violations


5
o

NR
Systems in
Violation


5
o

NR
Significant Monitoring
Violations
o
i
o
o
o
o
Systems in
Violation
o
i
o
o
o
o
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
19
NR
67
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report





American Samoa did not publish an Annual Report. EPA generated data from SDWIS/FED.
    2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
Page B-9  •  March 2009

-------
                                        State of Arizona 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
21
130






6
Systems in
Violation
20*
1O2






4
Treatment Technique

Violations




10

o

NR
Systems in
Violation




10*

o

NR
Significant Monitoring

Violations
97
1,892


o

1,682
i,796
674
Systems in
Violation
47*
738


o

699
714
329
*Possible overcounting of violating systems.
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
1,635
NR
6,298
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report





Arizona did not publish an Annual Report. EPA generated data from SDWIS/FED.
    March 2009  •  PageB-10
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                                        State of Arkansas 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
7
96






92
Systems in
Violation
2
80






42
Treatment Technique

Violations




75

12

11
Systems in
Violation




17

10

3
Significant Monitoring

Violations
o
208


6

52
79
40
Systems in
Violation
o
142


5

43
75
33
*Possible overcounting of violating systems.
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
1,111
297
678
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

Arkansas' State Report is available by accessing the state's web site or by contacting:

Arkansas Department of Health
4815 West Markham, Slot H-37
Little Rock, AR 72203-3867


Web Site: http://www.healthyarkansas.com/eng/viol.htm
    2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
Page B-11  •  March 2009

-------
                                       State of California 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
132
723






74
Systems in
Violation
83*
515






3i
Treatment Technique

Violations




50

i

4
Systems in
Violation




29

i

3
Significant Monitoring

Violations
342
790


11

29
122
80
Systems in
Violation
217*
581


10

27
115
39
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
7,745
NR
NR
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report





California's State Report is available by accessing the state's web site or by contacting:





CADept of Public Health





www.cdph.ca.qov/certlic/drinkinqwater/DWdocuments/AnnualCompliance Report2oo6.pdf





Telephone: (916) 449-5600
    March 2009  •  Page B-12
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                                        State of Colorado 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006
Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL
Violations
53
57



26
Systems in
Violation
17
45



9
Treatment Technique
Violations


50
4

3
Systems in
Violation


23
4

3
Significant Monitoring
Violations
2,809
464
59
93
134
387
Systems in
Violation
211
36l
28
73
134
213
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
1,990
211
2,809
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

Colorado's State Report is available by accessing the state's web site or by contacting:

Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment
Water Quality Control Division
Attention: Annual Compliance  Report
4300 Cherry Creek Drive South
Denver, CO 80246

WebSite:
http://www.cdphe.state.co.us/wq/drinkingwater/index.html
    2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
Page B-13 • March 2009

-------
                                      State of Connecticut 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006
Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL
Violations
364
261



9
Systems in
Violation
177
148



5
Treatment Technique
Violations


NR
i

o
Systems in
Violation


NR
i

o
Significant Monitoring
Violations
2,291
679
NR
27
296
149
Systems in
Violation
301
383
NR
27
202
60
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
2,73i
572
3,542
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

Connecticut's State Report is available by accessing the state's web site or by contacting:

Drinking Water Section Offices
Department of Public Health
450 Capitol Avenue
Hartford, CT 06106-1365

Web Site: http://www.dph.state.ct.us/BRS/Water/DWD.htm

Telephone: (860) 509-7333
    March 2009  •  Page B-14
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                                        State of Delaware 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006
Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL
Violations
22
47



o
Systems in
Violation
15*
42



o
Treatment Technique
Violations


o
7

o
Systems in
Violation


o
6

o
Significant Monitoring
Violations
o
o
o
22
26
O
Systems in
Violation
o
o
o
16
16
o
* The state report gives different counts in several tables in the report.  Counts from the summary table are shown here.
**Possible overcounting of violating systems.
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
509
53
58
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

Delaware's State Report is available by contacting:

Delaware Division of Public Health
Office of Drinking Water
Blue Hen Corporate Center
655 Bay Road, Suite 203
Dover, DE 19901

Website: http://www.dhss.delaware.gov/dhss/dph/hsp/files/acr2oo6report.pdf
    2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
Page B-15 • March 2009

-------
                                      District of Columbia 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
o
o






o
Systems in
Violation
o
o






o
Treatment Technique

Violations




o

o

o
Systems in
Violation




o

o

o
Significant Monitoring

Violations
10
8


o

i
o
1
Systems in
Violation
2
1


O

1
O
1
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
6
2
1O
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

District of Columbia's State Report is available by contacting:

Karen D. Johnson, Chief
Ground Water and Enforcement Branch (3WP32)
U.S. EPA Region III
1650 Arch Street
Philadelphia, PA 19103-2029
Phone: (215) 814-5445

E-mail: johnson.karend@epa.gov

Website: http://www.epa.gov/reg3wapd/drinkingwater/DCdrinking/index.htm
    March 2009  • PageB-16
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                                          State of Florida 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
534
169






521
Systems in
Violation
208
150






199
Treatment Technique

Violations




3

o

NR
Systems in
Violation




2

O

NR
Significant Monitoring

Violatins
i,439
389


o

121

155
Systems in
Violation
217
317


o

119

146
*Possible overcounting of violating systems.
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
5,934
917
2,722
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report





Florida's State Report is available by accessing the state's web site:





Website: http://www.dep.state.fI.us/water/drinkingwater/info.htm#pws
    2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
Page B-17  •  March 2009

-------
                                         State of Georgia 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
19
115






30
Systems in
Violation
11
94






11
Treatment Technique

Violations




5

4

18
Systems in
Violation




5

4

18
Significant Monitoring

Violations
o
475


o

357
503
14
Systems in
Violation
o
364


o

281
429
14
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
NR
NR
i,540
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report





Website: www.qadne.org
    March 2009  •  Page B-18
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                                             Guam 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006
Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL
Violations
o
o



o
Systems in
Violation
o
o



o
Treatment Technique
Violations


o
o

NR
Systems in
Violation


o
o

NR
Significant Monitoring
Violations
o
o
o
2
O
O
Systems in
Violation
o
o
o
2
O
o
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
14
NR
2
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report





Guam did not publish an Annual Report. EPA generated data from SDWIS/FED.
    2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
PageB-19  •  March 2009

-------
                                        State of Hawaii 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
o
7






o
Systems in
Violation
o
5






o
Treatment Technique

Violations




27

o

o
Systems in
Violation




4

o

o
Significant Monitoring

Violations
o
3


8

o
o
o
Systems in
Violation
o
3


i

o
o
o
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
128
11
46
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

Hawaii's State Report is available by contacting:

Hawaii Department of Health
Safe Drinking Water Branch
Environmental Management Division
919 Ala Moana Boulevard, Room 308
Honolulu, HI 96814-4920

Website: sdwb@doh.hawaii.gov
    March 2009 • Page B-20
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                                         State of Idaho 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006
Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL
Violations
128
143



5
Systems in
Violation
49
114



2
Treatment Technique
Violations


o
i

o
Systems in
Violation


o
i

o
Significant Monitoring
Violations
414
433
36
78
o
Si
Systems in
Violation
1164
322
11
59
o
34
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
1,991
662
1,330
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report





Idaho's State Report is available by accessing the state's web site or by contacting:





Any of Idaho Department of Environmental Quality's six regional offices or the state's seven district health departments





WebSite: http://www.deq.state.idaho.us/water/data_reports/drinking_water/acr_O4.pdfs





DEQ Regional Offices and District Health Departments
    2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
PageB-21  •  March 2009

-------
                                         State of Illinois 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006
Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL
Violations
381
196



23
Systems in
Violation
133*
176



12
Treatment Technique
Violations


84
8

6
Systems in
Violation


12
8

2
Significant Monitoring
Violations
3,092
336
12
22
172
198
Systems in
Violation
98*
245
i
22
127
97
*Possible overcounting of violating systems.
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
6,007
743
4,635
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

Illinois' State Report is available by accessing the state's website or by contacting:

Illinois EPA
Bureau of Water, Compliance Assurance Section
1021 North Grand Ave
PO 60x19276
Springfield, IL 62794

Contact: Mike Crumly

Telephone: (217)785-0561

Fax: (217) 557-1407

Web Site: http://www.epa.state.il.us/water/compliance/drinking-water/compliance-report/index.html
    March 2009  •  Page B-22
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                                         State of Indiana 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
101
447






39
Systems in
Violation
73*
392






16
Treatment Technique

Violations




o

10

NR
Systems in
Violation




o

9

NR
Significant Monitoring

Violations
143
1,488


4

7i
28
34
Systems in
Violation
21*
1,064


1

59
19
19
*Possible overcounting of violating systems.
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
4,376
NR
840
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report





Indiania did not publish an Annual Report. EPA generated data from SDWIS/FED.
    2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
Page B-23 • March 2009

-------
                                        State of Iowa 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
134
228






o
Systems in
Violation
52
119






o
Treatment Technique

Violations




3

2

O
Systems in
Violation




i

2

O
Significant Monitoring

Violations
433
382


i

5i
52
117
Systems in
Violation
154
213


i

25
52
83
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
2,015
635*
1,507
*Possible overcounting of violating systems.


Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

Iowa's State Report is available by accessing the state's web site or by contacting:

Iowa Department of Natural Resources - Water Supply
401 SW 7th St., Suite M
Des Moines, IA 50309-4611

Web Site: http://www.iowadnr.com/water/drinking/reports.html

Telephone: (515) 725-0348
    March 2009  •  Page B-24
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                                         State of Kansas 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006
Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL
Violations
46
45



362
Systems in
Violation
24
36



119
Treatment Technique
Violations


i
i

NR
Systems in
Violation


i
i

NR
Significant Monitoring
Violations
8
4i
68
17
77
3
Systems in
Violation
7
30
13
17
77
3
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
1,050
306
573
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report





Kansas' State Report is available by accessing the state's web site or by contacting:





Web Site: http://www.kdheks.gov/pws/
    2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
PageB-25  •  March 2009

-------
                                  Commonwealth of Kentucky 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
2
25






1O6
Systems in
Violation
2*
2O






42
Treatment Technique

Violations




6

o

NR
Systems in
Violation




2*

O

NR
Significant Monitoring

Violations
227
58


7

119
81
100
Systems in
Violation
21*
25


1*

1O1
59
61
*Possible overcounting of violating systems.
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
511
NR
73i
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report





Kentucky did not publish an Annual Report. EPA generated data from SDWIS/FED
    March 2009  • Page B-26
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                                         State of Louisiana 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
o
129






188
Systems in
Violation
o
108






69
Treatment Technique

Violations




11

o

NR
Systems in
Violation




6

o

NR
Significant Monitoring

Violations
o
19


12

O
1O6
126
Systems in
Violation
o
19


i

o
106
114
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
1,500
380
995
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report





Louisiana's State Report is available by accessing the state's web site.





Website: http://www.dhh.la.gov
    2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
PageB-27 •  March 2009

-------
                                         State of Maine 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006
Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL
Violations
58
224



52
Systems in
Violation
30
167



28
Treatment Technique
Violations


3
30

NR
Systems in
Violation


3
29

NR
Significant Monitoring
Violations
328
1,079
o
112
33
o
Systems in
Violation
48
580
o
85
27
o
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
2,096
914
2,812
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

Maine's State Report is available by contacting:
Maine Drinking Water Program
Department of Health & Human Services
11 State House Station
Augusta, Maine 04333-011
Telephone: (207) 287-8403
    March 2009 • Page B-28
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                                        State of Maryland 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
o
181






14
Systems in
Violation
o
172






6
Treatment Technique

Violations




13

o

NR
Systems in
Violation




12

O

NR
Significant Monitoring

Violations
o
184


i

145
2
O
Systems in
Violation
o
70


i

142
2
O
*Possible overcounting of violating systems.
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
3,607
443
NR
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report





Maryland's State Report is available by accessing the state's web site:





Website: http://www.mde.state.md.us
    2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
Page B-29  •  March 2009

-------
                                Commonwealth of Massachusetts 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
27
78






14
Systems in
Violation
15*
55






6
Treatment Technique

Violations




3

12

NR
Systems in
Violation




3*

11

NR
Significant Monitoring

Violations
o
34


o

111
14
22
Systems in
Violation
o
22


O

1OO
13
11
   * Possible overcounting of violating systems.
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
i,757
NR
315
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report





Massachusetts did not publish an Annual Report. EPA generated data from SDWIS/FED.
    March 2009  •  Page B-30
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                                       State of Michigan 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
195
444






10
Systems in
Violation
192
401






4
Treatment Technique

Violations




i

2

O
Systems in
Violation




i

i

o
Significant Monitoring

Violations
681
960


o

192
11
14
Systems in
Violation
553
806


o

130
10
7
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
11,630
i,655
2,599
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

Michigan's State Report is available by accessing the state's web site or by contacting:
Michigan Dept of Environmental Quality
Water Quality
P.O. 60x30273
Lansing, Ml 48909
Web Site: http://www.michigan.gov/deq; Click on Water, then Drinking Water, then Community Water Supply.
    2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
PageB-31  •  March 2009

-------
                                        State of Minnesota 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006
Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL
Violations
64
296



2
Systems in
Violation
64
291



2
Treatment Technique
Violations


9


NR
Systems in
Violation


7


NR
Significant Monitoring
Violations
NR
74
9
33

19
Systems in
Violation
NR
64
7
33

14
*Possible overcounting of violating systems.
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
7,343
368
387
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report





Minnesota's State Report is available by accessing the state's web site:





WebSite: http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/eh/water/com/dwar/reporto6.html
    March 2009  •  Page B-32
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                                       State of Mississippi 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
o
37






10
Systems in
Violation
o
35






9
Treatment Technique

Violations




o

o

o
Systems in
Violation




o

o

o
Significant Monitoring

Violations
o
86


o

30
754
o
Systems in
Violation
o
68


o

24
497
o
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
618
570
958
Information on where to obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report





Not provided in report
    2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
PageB-33  •  March 2009

-------
                                        State of Missouri 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
167
422






78
Systems in
Violation
52*
269






22
Treatment Technique

Violations




7

i

9
Systems in
Violation




5

i

5
Significant Monitoring

Violations
306
842


o

126
85
NR
Systems in
Violation
264
472


o

126
85
NR
*Possible overcounting of violating systems.
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
2,77i
NR
2,043
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

Missouri's State Report is available by accessing the state's web site or by contacting:

Missouri Department of Natural Resources
Public Drinking Branch
Water Protection Program
P.O. 60x176
Jefferson City, MO 65102

Web Site: http://www.dnr.mo.gov/env/wpp/dw-index.htm

Telephone: (800) 361-4827 or (573) 751-5331
    March 2009  •  Page B-34
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                                       State of Montana 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006
Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL
Violations
38
139



o
Systems in
Violation
19
119



o
Treatment Technique
Violations


70
o

o
Systems in
Violation


20
o

o
Significant Monitoring
Violations
1,211
951
95
547
159
o
Systems in
Violation
316
504
16
338
125
o
*Possible overcounting of violating systems.
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
NR
125
3,210
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

Montana's State Report is available by contacting:

Montana Department of Environmental Quality
P.O. Box 200901
Helena, MT 59620-0901


http://www.deq.mt.gov/wqinfo/pws/index.asp
Eugene Pizzini
(406) 444-6972
    2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
PageB-35  •  March 2009

-------
                                     State of Navajo Nation 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
o
11






o
Systems in
Violation
o
8






o
Treatment Technique

Violations




o

o

o
Systems in
Violation




o

o

o
Significant Monitoring

Violations
26
52


o

20
100
21
Systems in
Violation
26
21


O

2O
50
11
*Possible overcounting of violating systems.
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
NR
81
230
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

Navajo Nation's State Report is available by contacting:

Public Water Systems Supervision Program
Navajo Nation EPA
P.O. 60x339
Window Rock, 786515

Yolanda Barney, Environmental Protection
Supervisor
(928) 871-7755
    March 2009  • Page B-36
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                                       State of Nebraska 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
43
224






o
Systems in
Violation
13
165






o
Treatment Technique

Violations




o

NR

6
Systems in
Violation




o

NR

3
Significant Monitoring

Violations
i
115


i

11
NR
16
Systems in
Violation
i
100


i

11
NR
9
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
598
NR
617
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

Nebraska's State Report is available by accessing the state's web site or by contacting:

Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services Regulation and Licensure
301 Centennial Mall South
PO 60x95026
Lincoln, NE 68509

Jo Ann Wagner, Editor

Web Site: http://www.dhhs.state.ne.us/enh/pws/2oo6rpt.pdf
    2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
PageB-37  • March 2009

-------
                                        State of Nevada 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
NR
206*






100*
Systems in
Violation
NR
150*






24*
Treatment Technique

Violations





2*
9*

*
Systems in
Violation





2*
8*

*
Significant Monitoring

Violations
443*
*



*
*
53
*
Systems in
Violation
70*
*



*
*
53
*
* The report indicates violations by rule but does not always breakthem down by MCL/TT and monitoring violations.
Violations are shown underthe appropriate rule but may include both categories.
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
587
214
815**
** The total violations indicated in the report (815) differs from the calculated total (945).


Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

Nevada publishes its ACR and distributes it to the county libraries in the State.
    March 2009  •  Page B-38
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                                    State of New Hampshire 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
101
252






34
Systems in
Violation
43
198






9
Treatment Technique

Violations




9

5

o
Systems in
Violation




3

5

o
Significant Monitoring

Violations
689
336


i

25
Si
23
Systems in
Violation
131
250


i

25
5i
17
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
2,447
NR
NR
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

New Hampshire's State Report is available by accessing the state's web site or by contacting:

New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services
Water Division, Water Supply Engineering Bureau
29 Hazen Drive
P.O. 60x95
Concord, NH 03302-0095

Web Site: http://www.des.nh.gov/DWGB

Attention: Laurie Cullerot

Telephone: (603) 271-2954

E-mail: Icullerot(aides.state.nh.us
    2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
Page B-39  •  March 2009

-------
                                      State of New Jersey 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
68
183






7
Systems in
Violation
46*
130






7
Treatment Technique

Violations




o

i

o
Systems in
Violation




o

i

o
Significant Monitoring

Violations
138
667


o

898
i
3
Systems in
Violation
116*
440


o

57i
i
3
*Possible overcounting of violating systems.
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
3,904
NR
1,966
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report





New Jersey did not publish an Annual Report. EPA generated data from SDWIS/FED.
    March 2009  •  Page B-40
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                                    State of New Mexico 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006
Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL
Violations
98
143



10
Systems in
Violation
43*
123



5
Treatment Technique
Violations


14
o

4
Systems in
Violation


8
o

4
Significant Monitoring
Violations
29
238
3
156
220
30
Systems in
Violation
16*
177
i
111
128
14
*Possible overcounting of violating systems.
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
1,265
456
159
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

New Mexico's State Report is available by accessing the state's web site or by contacting:

Danny Valenzuela
Drinking Water Bureau
New Mexico Environment Department
Telephone (toll-free): (877) 654-8720
Web Site: http://www.nmenv.state.nm.us/dwb/dwbtop.html
    2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
PageB-41  •  March 2009

-------
                                      State of New York 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006
Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL
Violations
NR
NR



NR
Systems in
Violation
NR
NR



NR
Treatment Technique
Violations


NR
NR

NR
Systems in
Violation


NR
NR

NR
Significant Monitoring
Violations
NR
NR
NR
NR
NR
NR
Systems in
Violation
NR
NR
NR
NR
NR
NR
New York report lists the separate violations by county, but didn't include the individual totals for each violation category.
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
9,807
4,034
7,482
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report
New York State Dept of Health
1-800-458-1158 or contact: bpwsp@health.state.ny.us
    March 2009  •  Page B-42
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                                    State of North Carolina 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
317
311






196
Systems in
Violation
75
251






96
Treatment Technique

Violations




o

9

5
Systems in
Violation




o

9

3
Significant Monitoring

Violations
43
3,013


o

22
1,426
697
Systems in
Violation
28
i,654


o

20
1,008
405
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
6,830
3,153
7,536
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report





North Carolina's State Report is available by accessing the state's web site or by contacting:





E-mail: Martha.Fillinqer@ncmail.net





Telephone: (919) 715-3243





Web Site: http://www.deh.enr.state.nc.us/pws/
    2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
PageB-43  •  March 2009

-------
                                    State of North Dakota 2005 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2005


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
4
24






20
Systems in
Violation
i
19






9
Treatment Technique

Violations




o

o

o
Systems in
Violation




o

o

o
Significant Monitoring

Violations
i
67


o

2
38
15
Systems in
Violation
i
58


o

2
29
12
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
505
95
138
Where to Obtain the 2005 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

North Dakota's State Report is available by contacting:

North Dakota Department of Health
Division of Municipal Facilities
918 E Divide Ave., 3 Floor
Bismarck, ND 58501

Attention: LeeAnn Tillotson
    March 2009  •  Page B-44
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                                  Northern Mariana Islands 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
o
i






o
Systems in
Violation
o
i






o
Treatment Technique

Violations




o

o

NR
Systems in
Violation




o

o

NR
Significant Monitoring

Violations
397
8


o

73
19
o
Systems in
Violation
27
7


o

55
15
o
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
99
NR
497
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report





Northern Mariana Islands did not publish an Annual Report. EPA generated data from SDWIS/FED.
    2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
PageB-45  • March 2009

-------
                                        State of Ohio 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
no
689






137
Systems in
Violation
74*
467






57
Treatment Technique

Violations




98

o

NR
Systems in
Violation




25*

o

NR
Significant Monitoring

Violations
1,524
1,487


8

25
45
7i
Systems in
Violation
593*
i,035


5*

25
45
64
*Possible overcounting of violating systems.
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
5,369
i,799
4,446
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

Ohio's State Report is available by accessing the state's web site or by contacting:

PWS Annual Compliance Report
Ohio EPA —DDAGW
P.O. 60x1049
Columbus, OH 43216-1049

Web Site: http://www.epa.state.oh.us/ddagw/annualreports.html
    March 2009  •  Page B-46
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                                     State of Oklahoma 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
87
96






476
Systems in
Violation
36*
81






114
Treatment Technique

Violations




65

o

256
Systems in
Violation




29*

o

79
Significant Monitoring

Violations
402
494


20

2
O
85
Systems in
Violation
105*
215


5

2
O
35
*Possible overcounting of violating systems.
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
1,600
729
i,944
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

Oklahoma's State report is available by accessing the state's web site or by contacting:
In person:
Department of Environmental Quality
Water Quality Division, 8th Floor
707 N. Robinson
Oklahoma City, OK 73101-1677
By Mail:
Department of Environmental Quality
Water Quality Division
P.O. 60x1677
Oklahoma City, OK 73101-1677

Web Site: http://www.deq.state.ok.us/WQDnew/pws/index.html
    2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
Page B-47 • March 2009

-------
                                       State of Oregon 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
o
242






o
Systems in
Violation
o
174






o
Treatment Technique

Violations




5

37

o
Systems in
Violation




5

35

o
Significant Monitoring

Violations
1,861
1,601


o

47i
33°
77
Systems in
Violation
556*
853


o

305
122
77
   * Possible overcounting of violating systems.
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
2,666
NR
4,70i
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report





Oregon's State Report does not provide information on where to obtain the report.
    March 2009  •  Page B-48
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                               Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
206
499






82
Systems in
Violation
130
361






40
Treatment Technique

Violations




77

4

NR
Systems in
Violation




24

4

NR
Significant Monitoring

Violations
5,oi3
i,757


719

74
393
2,164
Systems in
Violation
800
1,322


172

66
389
821
*TT violations were included in the total MCL violations for DBPR. They were not entered separately in the report.
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
9,611
3,060
12,739*
* Includes 1,321 violations of the Public Notification Rule.

Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

Pennsylvania's State Report is available by accessing the state's web site or by contacting:

Department of Environmental Protection
Bureau of Water Standards and Facility Regulation
P.O. Box 8467, nth Floor RCSOB
Harrisburg, PA 17105-8467

Telephone: (717) 787-5017

Web Site: http://www.dep.state.pa.us
Keyword: drinking water
    2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
Page B-49  •  March 2009

-------
                                         Puerto Rico 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
3
229






34
Systems in
Violation
3
140






11
Treatment Technique

Violations




365

o

NR
Systems in
Violation




161

o

NR
Significant Monitoring

Violations
2,170
1,589


1,423

32
NR
4i
Systems in
Violation
102
237


127

21
NR
22
*Possible overcounting of violating systems.
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
511
NR
5,876
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

Puerto Rico's Report is available by contacting:

Department of Health
Public Water Supply Supervision Program
Ponce de Leon Avenue, #431 Nacional Plaza
gth Floor, Suite 903
Hato Rey, Puerto Rico 00917
Telephone: 787-777-0150/0151
Website: http://www.salud.qov.pr
    March 2009  •  Page B-50
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                                     State of Rhode Island 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
3
76






10
Systems in
Violation
3
49






3
Treatment Technique

Violations




o

o

o
Systems in
Violation




o

o

o
Significant Monitoring

Violations
7
29


o

34
4
7
Systems in
Violation
5
23


o

34
4
4
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
480
99
170
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

Rhode Island Dept of Health
Office of Drinking Water Quality
3 Capitol Hill
Providence, Rl 02908
(401)222-6897
Website: http:www.health.ri.gov
    2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
PageB-51 • March 2009

-------
                                    State of South Carolina 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
45*
99






3
Systems in
Violation
16*
83






2
Treatment Technique

Violations




o

o

NR
Systems in
Violation




o

o

NR
Significant Monitoring

Violations
0*
60


o

40
o
o
Systems in
Violation
0*
36


o

25
o
o
* Includes Disinfection Byproduct Rule violations.
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
i,476
144
245
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

South Carolina's State Report is available by accessing the state's web site or by contacting:

SCDHEC's Bureau of Water
2600 Bull Street
Columbia, SC 29201

Attention: Bruce Bleau

Web Site: http://www.scdhec.gov/water

Telephone: (803) 898-4154
    March 2009  •  Page B-52
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                                    State of South Dakota 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
61
26






7
Systems in
Violation
19
22






3
Treatment Technique

Violations




2

O

29
Systems in
Violation




2

O

27
Significant Monitoring

Violations
943
54


o

28
18
57
Systems in
Violation
42
40


o

28
18
28
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
663
NR
1,225
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

South Dakota's State Report is available by accessing the state's web site or by contacting:

South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources
Drinking Water Program
PMB-2O2O, Joe Foss Building
523 East Capitol Ave.
Pierre, SD 57501

Attention: Mark S. Mayer, P.E.

Telephone: (605) 773-3754

Email: mark.mayer@state.sd.us

Website: http://www.state.sd.us/denr/des/drinking/info.htm
    2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
PageB-53  •  March 2009

-------
                                        State of Tennessee 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006
Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface
Water Treatment Rule, and
Filter Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL
Violations
o
20



20
Systems in
Violation
o
17



10
Treatment Technique
Violations


55
i

o
Systems in
Violation


23
i

o
Significant Monitoring
Violations
91
159
88
2
6
57
Systems in
Violation
10
no
28
2
6
38
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
915
188
516
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report



Tennessee's State Report is available by accessing the Department's web site or by viewing it in most public libraries and these

locations across the state:

Division of Water Supply - Central Office
401 Church Street
6th Floor, L&C Tower
Nashville, TN 37243-1549
615-532-0191

Regional Environmental Field Offices (EFO) - Division of Water Supply
1-888-891-8332
    March 2009  •  Page B-54
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                                     State of Texas 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface
Water Treatment Rule, and
Filter Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
458
154






590
Systems in
Violation
204
138






177
Treatment Technique

Violations




60

NR

NR
Systems in
Violation




39

NR

NR
Significant Monitoring

Violations
1,262
1,569


86

NR
471
NR
Systems in
Violation
607
919


4i

NR
47i
NR
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
6,725
2,173
4,138
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report





Texas's State Report does not provide information on where to obtain the report.
    2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
PageB-55 • March 2009

-------
                                         State of Utah 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006
Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL
Violations
o
78



o
Systems in
Violation
o
63



o
Treatment Technique
Violations


3
o

3
Systems in
Violation


3
o

i
Significant Monitoring
Violations
708
204
o
262
NR
12
Systems in
Violation
33
153
o
165
NR
9
*Possible overcounting of violating systems.
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
NR
352
i,3i5
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report





Utah's State Report does not provide information on where to obtain the report.
    March 2009  •  Page B-56
Q06 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                                      State of Vermont 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
27
176






75
Systems in
Violation
8*
143






21
Treatment Technique

Violations




8

15

o
Systems in
Violation




8

7

o
Significant Monitoring

Violations
176
750


o

267
40
57
Systems in
Violation
30
467


o

203
28
27
*Possible overcounting of violating systems.
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
i,373
NR
642
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report





Vermont did not publish an Annual Report. EPA generated data from SDWIS/FED.
    2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
PageB-57  •  March 2009

-------
                                        Virgin Islands 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
o
16






7
Systems in
Violation
o
12






7
Treatment Technique

Violations




o

o

NR
Systems in
Violation




o

o

NR
Significant Monitoring

Violations
o
3


o

o
1
3
Systems in
Violation
o
2


O

O
1
3
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
303
NR
20
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report





Virgin Islands did not publish an Annual Report. EPA generated data from SDWIS/FED.
    March 2009  •  Page B-58
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                                  Commonwealth of Virginia 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
107
321






49
Systems in
Violation
37
220






22
Treatment Technique

Violations




37

35

47
Systems in
Violation




13

33

47
Significant Monitoring

Violations
178
684


3

181
95
42
Systems in
Violation
129
461


i

143
73
23
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
3,020
985
2,305
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

Commonwealth of Virginia Department of Health
Office of Drinking Water
Madison Building, 6th Floor
109 Governor St., Rm 632
Richmond, VA
    2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
Page B-59  •  March 2009

-------
                                     State of Washington 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
127
47i






o
Systems in
Violation
50
347






o
Treatment Technique

Violations




20

o

o
Systems in
Violation




17

o

o
Significant Monitoring

Violations
16,205
886


19

203
177
o
Systems in
Violation
461
586


13

200
171
o
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
4,197
i,439
18,108
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

Washington's State report is available by accessing the state's web site or by contacting:

Department of Health
Office of Drinking Water
P.O. 60x47822
Olympia, WA 98504-7822

Telephone: (800) 521-0323

Web Site: http://www.doh.wa.gov/ehp/dw/enforcement/enflink2.htm
    March 2009  • Page B-60
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                                     State of West Virginia 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
2
16






71
Systems in
Violation
2
15






30
Treatment Technique

Violations




10

6

24
Systems in
Violation




10

6

18
Significant Monitoring

Violations
2,905
440


48

216
266
156
Systems in
Violation
142
230


11*

108
159
76
*Possible overcounting of violating systems.
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
i,373
616
5,537
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

West Virginia's State Report is available by accessing the state's web site or by contacting:

EPA's Safe Drinking Water Hotline
1-800-426-4791

Web Site: http://www.wvdhhr.org/oehs/eed/c&e/reports.asp
    2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
PageB-61  •  March 2009

-------
                                     State of Wisconsin 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
NR
452






10
Systems in
Violation
49
346






3
Treatment Technique

Violations




o

i

o
Systems in
Violation




o

i

o
Significant Monitoring

Violations
NR
800


o

57
31
2
Systems in
Violation
124
706


o

52
3i
i
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
n,44
NR
1,503
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report

Wisconsin's State report is available by accessing the state's web site or by contacting:

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources
Bureau of Drinking Water and Groundwater
P.O. 60x7921
Madison, Wl 53707

Telephone: (608) 267-4230
    March 2009  • Page B-62
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B

-------
                                      State of Wyoming 2006 PWS Compliance Report
Violations for 2006


Violations Category
Chemical Contaminant Group
Total Coliform Rule
Surface Water Treatment Rule,
Interim Enhanced Surface Water
Treatment Rule, and Filter
Backwash Recycling Rule
Lead and Copper Rule
Consumer Confidence Report
Disinfection Byproducts Rule
MCL

Violations
o
54






i
Systems in
Violation
o
43






i
Treatment Technique

Violations




10

NR

2
Systems in
Violation




6

NR

2
Significant Monitoring

Violations
4
125


i

5
o
5
Systems in
Violation
4
97


i

5
o
5
*Possible overcounting of violating systems.
Total Number of
Regulated Systems
Total Number of
Systems in Violation
Total Number of
Violations
765
152
211
Where to Obtain the 2006 Annual State Public Water Systems Report





Wyoming's State report is available by accessing the state's web site or by contacting:





EPA Region 8's Environmental Information Service Center





WebSite: http://www.epa.gov/region8/water/dwhome/wycon/wycon.html
    2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report - Appendix B
PageB-63  •  March 2009

-------
    Appendix C
Map of Indian Lands

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                                                            V  ft
                                                                                    Indian Lands
2006 National Public Water Systems Compliance Report-Appendix C
PageC-i  •  March 2009

-------