&EPA
United States
Environmental
Protection Agency
Washington, D.C. 20460
Solid Waste
and Emergency
Response (5105)
EPA500-F-01-223
June 2001
www.epa.gov/brownfields/
                   Outreach and Special Projects Staff (5105)
                                         Brownfields Success Stories
Getting  the  Lead  Out—  Creating  New
Opportunities  in  the  Old  Lead  Belt
      MINERAL  AREA  COLLEGE
          esidents of the Old Lead Belt counties of Madison and
    St. Francois, Missouri, are being offered new career opportuni-
    ties through EPA's first rural Job Training and Development Dem-
    onstration Pilot.  The Pilot has completed its first training cycle
    and graduated 13 students, all of whom are currently employed.
    Because of its rural location, the Pilot has faced several chal-
    lenges, including participant retention and transportation issues.
    In order to overcome these obstacles, the Pilot has leveraged re-
    sources and partnered with local entities that provide students
    with unique opportunities such as a ride-share program.

    Mineral Area College (MAC) in Park Hills, Missouri, was se-
    lected by EPA for a Job Training Pilot in May 1999 and received
    a two-year, $200,000 grant. To date, EPA has awarded 37 Job
    Training and Development Demonstration Pilots across the coun-
    try. The purpose of these Pilots is  to facilitate  cleanup of
    brownfield sites and prepare trainees for a career in the environ-
    mental field.  Job Training Pilots are located either within or
    adjacent to Brownfields Assessment Pilot areas; the MAC Pilot
    is associated with the Bonne Terre Assessment Pilot located in
    St. Francois County.

                                           continued ^
                                           JUST THE  FACTS:
                                           •  The Pilot trains participants in mine waste
                                             site assessment and cleanup, emphasizing the
                                             use of innovative technologies.
                                           •  One graduate of the MAC job training
                                             program moved from an entry-level cleanup
                                             job paying $10 an hour to a $29-per-hour
                                             position within two months.
                                           •  The State of Missouri contributed $400,000
                                             toward construction of a state-of-the-art
                                             environmental training facility.
                                           In order to overcome trainee retention
                                           and transportation issues, the Pilot
                                           leveraged resources and partnered
                                           with local entities to provide students
                                           with unique opportunities such as a
                                           ride-share program.
ERA'S Brownfields Economic Redevelopment Initiative is designed to empower states, communities, and other stakeholders in economic
redevelopment to work together in a timely manner to prevent, assess, safely clean up, and sustainably reuse brownfields. A brownfield is
a site, or portion thereof, that has actual or perceived contamination and an active potential for redevelopment or reuse. EPA is funding:
assessment demonstration pilot programs (each funded up to $200,000 over two years), to assess brownfields sites and to test cleanup
and redevelopment models; job training pilot programs (each funded up to $200,000 over two years), to provide training for residents of
communities affected by brownfields to facilitate cleanup of brownfields sites and prepare trainees for future employment in the environmental
field; and, cleanup revolving loan fund programs (each funded up to $500,000 over five years) to capitalize loan funds to make loans for
the environmental cleanup of brownfields. These pilot programs are intended to provide EPA, states, tribes, municipalities, and communities
with useful information and strategies as they continue to seek new methods to promote a unified approach to site assessment, environmental
cleanup, and redevelopment.

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       Madison and St. Francois counties (combined population of 25,000),
       located 60 miles south of St. Louis in the Ozarks, are suffering with
       a depressed economy due to the demise of the area's lead mining
       industry. Nearly 300 years of lead mining left behind more than
       3,000 acres of exposed mine tailings and hundreds of acres of
       brownfields, making the area appear undesirable for new busi-
       ness. As a result, the area's poverty and unemployment rates are
       significantly higher than state and national averages.
CONTACTS:
Mineral Area College
(573)518-2153
EPA Headquarters
(202) 260-4039
Visit the EPA Brownfields Web site at:
http://www.epa.gov/brownfields/
       The Pilot grant awarded to MAC provides valuable environmen-
       tal training to residents who are recruited from low-income com-
       munities in the area and who are often involved in the Welfare-to-
       Work and Trade Readjustment Act (TRA) programs. The Pilot trains
       participants in mine waste site assessment and cleanup, emphasizing the
       use of innovative technologies such as phytoremediation of lead, sludge ap-
       plications, in situ soil flushing, and phytostabilization.  Students get hands-on expe-
       rience through access  to sites targeted by the Bonne Terre Assessment Pilot for study and
       fieldwork. Graduates of the program receive Brownfields Worker Certification and can ap-
       ply their training toward an associate's degree in environment, health, and safety at MAC or
       another institution.

       All of the program's graduates to date have found employment.  One graduate immediately
       began work with an environmental placement firm and, through commitment and hard work,
       moved from an entry-level cleanup job paying $10 an hour to a $29-per-hour position within
       two months.  Her foreman commented that she and her fellow MAC job training graduates
       had the  finest environmental knowledge base out of any technicians he had seen in years.

       The Pilot has also been successful in leveraging funds and  other resources to support the
       program. The State of Missouri contributed $400,000 toward construction of a state-of-the-
       art training facility, which is now completed. In addition, the East Missouri Action Agency
       and the Unitec Career Center are providing life skills and remedial training, such as GED,
       math, and English "brush up" courses for incoming trainees, and is helping to reimburse
       qualified trainees  for transportation and book costs.  For more information on the Mineral
       Area College Job Training Pilot, contact Shawn Grindstaff, Mineral Area College, (573) 518-
       2153.
Brownfields Success Story
June 2001
                 Mineral Area College
                   EPA 500-F-01-223

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