EPA's  BEACH  Report:
             South  Carolina  2009  Swimming Season
             May 2010
Introduction
The BEACH Act of 2000 requires that coastal
and Great Lakes states and territories report
to EPA on beach monitoring and notification
data for their coastal recreation waters.
The BEACH Act defines coastal recreation
waters as the Great Lakes and coastal waters
(including coastal estuaries) that states,
territories, and authorized tribes officially
recognize or designate for swimming,
bathing, surfing, or similar activities in the
water.
South Carolina's beaches are important
components of the state's tourism industry.
The South Carolina Department of Health and
Environmental Control, in conjunction with
local governments, regularly monitors coastal
beaches for the bacterial indicator enterococci
to assure residents and tourists that the water
is safe for wading, swimming, surfing, and
other activities. The program's goal is to
allow the public to make informed decisions
about their ocean water recreational activities
and the potential for bacteria-related health
effects.
This fact sheet summarizes beach monitoring
and notification data submitted to EPA by
the State  of South Carolina for the 2009
swimming season.
The beach program staff in South Carolina
invite you to log onto our Web site: www.
scdhec.gov/beach, where you will find up-
to-date monitoring and advisory data and
information to make your beach going
experience happy and healthy.
May 15, 2010 has been declared Healthy Beach
Awareness Day. Come to South Carolina's
coast and find smiling faces and beautiful
places.
Figure 1. South Carolina coastal counties.
Table 1.  Breakdown of monitored and
        unmonitored coastal beaches by
        county for 2009.
Total
County Beaches
BEAUFORT
CHARLESTON
COLLETON
GEORGETOWN
HORRY
TOTALS
4
5
1
5
8
23
Monitored
4
5
1
5
8
23
Not
Monitored
0
0
0
0
0
0

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2009 Summary Results
How many notification actions were reported
and how long were they?
When water quality standards are exceeded at a
particular beach, South Carolina's approach is to
issue a beach advisory that warns people to avoid
contact with the ocean water. A total of 4 monitored
beaches had at least one advisory issued during the
2009 swimming season. All of South Carolina's 6
notification actions lasted two days or less. Figure
2 presents a full breakdown of notification action
durations.
What percentage of days were beaches under a
notification action?
For South Carolina's 2009 swimming season,
actions were reported less than 1 percent of the time
(Figure 3).
How do 2009 results compare to previous  years?
Table 2 compares 2009 notification action data with
monitored beach data from previous years.
What pollution sources possibly affect
investigated monitored beaches?
Figure 4 displays the percentage of South Carolina's
investigated monitored beaches possibly affected by
various pollution sources. In 2009, 83 percent of the
beaches were listed as having no known sources of
pollution.

For More  Information
For general information about beaches:
www.epa.gov/beaches/
Information regarding sample results is available at the
South Carolina DHEC Web site at www.scdhec.gov,
www.earth911 .com or by contacting DHEC at
(843) 238-4378.
 Figure 2: Beach notification actions by duration.
                   2       3-7      8-30
                  Duration of Actions (days)
                                            >30
 Figure 3:  Beach days with
           and without
           notification
           actions.
              Beach days
             with an action:
                   8
                (0.2%)
                       Beach days
                      with no action:
                         3,511
                         (98.8%)
 Table 2.   Beach notification actions, 2007-2009.

Number of monitored
beaches
Number of beaches
affected by notification
actions
Percentage of beaches
affected by notification
actions
Percentage of beach days
affected by notification
actions
2007
23
10
43%
2%
2008
23
7
30%
1%
2009
23
4
17%
<
Figure 4: Percent of investigated monitored beaches
 affected by possible pollution sources (23 beaches).
                                                     o
      10   20
30
Percent of beaches
 40   50   60   70
80   90   100
                             Investigated / no sources found
                                  Non-storm related runoff
                                     Storm-related runoff
                                       Agricultural runoff
                                         Boat discharge
                             Cone, animal feeding operation
                                 Combined sewer overflow
                                  Sanitary sewer overflow
                            Publicly-owned treatment works
                                  Sewer line leak or break
                                    Septic system leakage
                                               Wildlife
                                Other (identified) source(s)
                                    Unidentified source(s)
                                          83
                            Note: A single beach may
                             have multiple sources.

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