UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
                                 WASHINGTON D.C., 20460
                                                                    OFFICE OF
                                                            PREVENTION, PESTICIDES AND TOXIC
                                                                    SUBSTANCES
 MEMORANDUM
 SUBJECT:    Final FY 2010 National Progran
 FROM:       Jim Jones
              Acting Assistant Administrate
 TO:          Regional Division Directors I-X
PM) Guidance to Regions
       I am pleased to transmit the final OPPTS FY 2010 National Program Manager
 Guidance. This guidance is the result of a multi-year process to align Agency, State and
 Tribal processes to strengthen and focus our joint strategic planning.

 Overarching Program Priorities

       The OPPTS guidance for FY 2010 represents a participatory dialogue with the
 Regions, States, Tribes, and other concerned stakeholders. It addresses the critical Regional
 activities that are directed at achieving the goals for environmental and public health
 protection contained in the developing 2009 - 2014 EPA Strategic Plan. Included in the
 Guidance are priority program areas that were identified by the Office of Pollution
 Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) and the Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP).

       OPPT ensures the safety of new chemicals entering U. S. commerce, assesses the safety
 of existing chemicals already in use and acts to reduce identified risks through a combination of
 regulatory and voluntary efforts, promotes the development and use of safer chemicals and
 technologies pollution prevention as the guiding principle for controlling pollution, and reduces
 legacy chemical risks (e.g., childhood lead poisoning) resulting from prior industrial revolutions
 and practices. OPPT's Regional Office performance priorities include: reducing the incidence of
 childhood lead poisoning nationally and in targeted vulnerable populations by 2010 and beyond;
 enhancing existing Pollution Prevention activities through alignment with and implementation of
 the P2 Program Strategic Plan; and expanding the Regional role in addressing persistent effects
 of legacy chemicals; EPA's enahanced toxics  program is assessing high and moderate production
 volume chemicals (HPVs and MPVs) in developing screening-level Risk- and Hazard-Based
 Prioritizions (RBPs and HBPs). Over time, these assessments will be utilized to help frame risk
management strategies.  OPPT's overall objectives and measures are found in goals 4 and 5 of

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the developing 2009-2014 EPA Strategic Plan.  For more information on OPPT go to
http://www.epa.gov/opptintr/.

       OPP regulates the use of all pesticides in the United States and establishes maximum
levels for pesticide residues in food, thereby safeguarding the nation's food supply. EPA has
expanded access to information on risk assessment and risk management actions to help increase
transparency of decision-making and facilitate consultation with the public and affected
stakeholders. In addition to its regulatory functions, OPP's programs include providing
information and coordination on issues ranging  from worker protection to prevention of misuse
of pesticides. OPP participates in a variety of partnerships related to pesticide use, including the
Pesticide Environmental Stewardship Program,  a voluntary private and public partnership
dedicated to reducing pesticide use and risk, and Integrated Pest Management (IPM) in Schools.
OPP's Regional performance priorities include pesticide worker safety, the Strategic Agricultural
Initiative (SAI), pesticides and water resource protection, and implementation of the Pesticide
Container-Containment Rule. OPP objectives and measures are found in goal 4 of the 2009-2014
EPA Strategic Plan which is currently under development. For more information on OPP go to
http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/.

Regional Priorities and Flexibility

       As with previous years, cross-cutting considerations should be factored into the
implementation strategies for program priorities. These cross-cutting considerations include
Regional Office priorities, Environmental Justice (EJ) and Children's Health programs.
Additional language has been added throughout the guidance to highlight those activities.
OPPTS programs understand that the priorities highlighted in the guidance will require some
flexibility in order to accommodate Regional Office, State, Tribal and local concerns on a
region-by-region basis. We will continue to foster innovation and re-engineer the way we work
together to establish common directions for our programs.

Strengthening State Grants

       EPA continues to  work with State and Tribal partners and other grant recipients to
improve performance measures and enhance the alignment of State Grant Workplan goals
and measures with EPA's national performance goals and measures.  These improvements
have enhanced the Agency's ability to demonstrate grant results to OMB, Congress and the
public. It is important that EPA and the States and Tribes build on these efforts to ensure that
grant workplans meet the basic requirements necessary to facilitate the translation of grant
results into the Agency's  strategic and annual planning, budgeting, and accountability
processes. Additional information on grants improvements and the grants management
process can be found at http://www.epa.gov/ogd.

FY 2010 Performance Measurement and Alignment

       In FY 2008 OPPTS undertook an extensive and rigorous assessment of performance
measures used to evaluate progress and plan future activities. Key objectives of this effort
focused on:
o  Aligning national priorities with long-term directions in the 2009-2014 EPA Strategic Plan
   and annual priorities in EPA 's FY 2010 Annual Plan and Budget;

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o  Streamlining the number of reporting requirements and annual measures that the Agency
   uses to manage environmental progress and recognizing the set of key measures used by each
   management level;
o  Integrating Regional Office priorities and Regional Office priority measures;
o  Continue advancing the Agency's process for developing and reporting against state grant
   performance measures; and
o  Continue enhancing collaboration within EPA and with our state and tribal partners.

       The FY 2010 NPM Guidance continues to emphasize alignment between
performance measures that demonstrate overall program results and Regional Office
measures that are reported in the Agency's accountability system, the Annual Commitment
System (ACS). OPPTS Regional and Headquarters programs, in partnership with States and
other interested  stakeholders, have made considerable progress in designing a suite of limited
regional performance measures which support planning and budgeting requirements as
prescribed by the Government Performance and Results Act  (GPRA) and OMB's Program
Assessment.

       The FY 2010 ACS commitments will remain as draft until final performance agreements
are reached in early October 2009. Additional information on the EPA performance
measurement, planning and budgeting can be found at http://www.epa.gov/ocfopage/index.htm.
Specific information on the EPA NPM Guidance can be found at
http://www.epa.gov/ocfopage/npmguidance/index.htm.

Conclusion

       Thank you for your on-going assistance in drafting the FY 2010 guidance.  OPPTS
remains committed to this partnership process and believes that our mutual efforts will focus
and strengthen our activities in the field.  I look forward to our continued collaboration on
solving the many environmental challenges that we face now and in the future.

       For general comments or questions, please contact either Jennifer Vernon (202-564-
6573) or Brian Katz (202-564-4828).  For program-specific questions you may contact
Daniel Helfgott  (OPP/ Field & External Affairs Division; 703-308-8054), Nancy H Wilson
(OPPT/ Environmental Assistance Division; 202-564-8824), Brian Symmes (OPPT/National
Program Chemicals Division; Lead and Asbestos, 202-566-1983), Thomas  Tillman (OPPT/
Pollution Prevention Division;  202-564-8263) or Linda Strauss (OPPT/CARE; 202 564-
0797).

Attachments
cc:     Deputy Regional Administrators
       OPPTS Regional Branch Chiefs
       Assistant Administrators

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                                Table of Contents

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY	6
  PROGRAM PRIORITIES	6
  IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES	6
  SIGNIFICANT CHANGES TO PRIORITIES OR STRATEGIES FROM FY 2009	8
  PROGRAM OFFICE CONTACTS	9
KEY PROGRAM PRIORITIES AND STRATEGIES                               10
  CHEMICAL RISK REVIEW AND REDUCTION	10
    Strategic Plan Targets	10
    Long-Term Strategy	10
    Background	10
    Proposed Principal Activities for the Regional Offices	13
  CHEMICAL RISK MANAGEMENT: ASBESTOS AND OTHER LEGACY CHEMICALS
  	13
    Strategic Plan Target	13
    Long Term Strategy	13
    Background	14
    Proposed Measures	15
    Definitions and Clarification of Measures	15
    Proposed Principal Activities for the Regional Offices	15
  LEAD	16
    Strategic Plan Targets	16
    Long-Term Strategy	16
    EnvironmentalJustice and Children's Health	17
    Background	17
    Proposed Measures	17
    Definitions and Clarification of Measures	18
    Proposed Principal Activities for the Regional Offices	20
  PESTICIDE WORKER SAFETY PROGRAMS	21
    Strategic Plan Targets	21
    Long-term Strategy	21
    EnvironmentalJustice	22
    Background	23
    Proposed Measures	24
    Definitions and Clarification of Measures	24
    Proposed Principal Activities for the Regional Offices	24
  PESTICIDE CONTAINER-CONTAINMENT IMPLEMENTATION	26
    Strategic Plan Targets	26
    Long-term Strategy	27
    Background	28
    Proposed Measures	28
    Definitions and Clarification of Measures	28
    Proposed Principal Activities for the Regional Offices	29
  PESTICIDES AND WATER RESOURCE PROTECTION	29
  Strategic Plan Target	30

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    Background	30
    Proposed Measure	31
    Proposed Principal Activities for the Regional Offices	31
  STRATEGIC AGRICULTURE INITIATIVE (SAI)	32
    Long-term Strategy	32
    Background	32
    Proposed Measure	34
    Definitions and Clarification of Measures	34
    Proposed Principal Activities for the Regional Offices	35
  POLLUTION PREVENTION (P2)	36
    Strategic Plan Targets	36
    Long-Term Strategy	37
    Background	37
    Proposed Measures	39
    Definitions and Clarification of Measures	39
    Proposed Principal Activities for the Regional Offices	41
OTHER PROGRAM ACTIVITIES                                               42
  TRIE AL PESTICIDE PROGRAM PERFORMANCE	42
    Long-term Strategy	42
    Background	42
    Proposed Measure	42
    Definitions and Clarification of Measures	43
  COMMUNITY ACTION FOR A RENEWED ENVIRONMENT (CARE)	43
    Long-Term Strategy	43
    Background	44
    Proposed Measure	44
    Proposed Principal Activities for the Regional Offices	44

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                               EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The OPPTS NPM Guidance for FY 2010 represents a participatory dialogue with the Regions,
States, Tribes, and other concerned stakeholders. It addresses the critical Regional Office
activities that are directed at achieving the goals for environmental and public health protection
in developing the 2009-2014 EPA Strategic Plan. Specifically, OPPTS NPM priorities and
associated Regional activities support two objectives within the EPA Strategic Plan:  Objective 1
of Goal 4 - Prevent and Reduce Pesticide and Industrial Chemical Risks to Humans,
Communities, and Ecosystems; and Objective 2 of Goal 5 - Improve Environmental
Performance through Pollution Prevention and Other Stewardship Practices. Included in the
Guidance are priority program areas and other program activities that were identified by the
Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT), and the Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP).

PROGRAM PRIORITIES

The Pollution Prevention and Toxics Regional Office performance priorities for FY 2010 are:

o  Lead Program:  (1) Ensure an adequate workforce of trained and certified lead-based paint
   abatement professionals; (2) Fully implement the Renovation, Repair, and Painting (RRP)
   rule; (3) Implement a comprehensive outreach, education, and compliance assistance plan to
   educate the public about the need for certified workers and for lead-safe work practices; (4)
   Improve methods to increase lead risk awareness in communities with high concentrations of
   children with elevated blood-lead levels (hot spots) and among populations of children most
   vulnerable to lead risks; and, (5) Coordinate with other federal agencies such as the Centers
   for Disease Control (CDC), the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and
   others to address gaps in the protection of children at risk for elevated blood-lead levels.

o  Pollution Prevention (P2) Program: (1) Achieve annual targets in hazardous materials,
   greenhouse gas, water use, and cost reductions from the P2 interventions of its eight Centers
   of Results; (2) Coordinate across EPA so that OPPT and P2 Program expertise usefully
   contribute to collaborative efforts on sustainability and climate change mitigation; and, (3)
   Strengthen P2 Program infrastructure, coordination among P2 Program centers, and external
   P2 networks (partners in the P2 Program mission).

The Pesticide Program Regional performance priorities for FY 2010:

o  Are similar to the priorities in FY 2009, except for Endangered Species which was removed
   as a priority for 2010.  The priorities for FY 2010 are: (1) Pesticide Worker Safety, (2)
   Pesticide Container-Containment Rule Implementation, (3) Pesticides and Water Resource
   Protection program, and (4) FQPA/Strategic Agricultural Initiative (SAI).

IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES

To implement the Lead Program priorities in FY 2010, OPPT and Regional Offices will continue
providing assistance to  States, Tribes, the District of Columbia, and territories to develop and
implement authorized programs for lead-based paint abatement and RRP activities. OPPT and

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the Regional Offices will continue to directly implement the abatement and RRP programs in
areas without authorization, including continuing to certify abatement workers, accredit
providers of renovation and dust sampling technician training and also begin to certify
renovators, dust sampling technicians and renovation firms. OPPT will work with the Regional
Offices to identify resources and approaches they will need to assist in implementing RRP
requirements, and lay the groundwork for smooth implementation of the regulation.

To implement the Pollution Prevention (P2) Program priorities in FY 2010, OPPT and the
Regional Offices will continue to help businesses, government, and other entities reduce
pollution at the source through advancing the design and use  of greener chemicals, greener
chemical and environmental engineering solutions, greener products, and greener industrial and
business practices through recognition, awards, product certifications, purchasing agreements,
technical assistance grants and partnerships, technology transfer, and influencing regulatory
options. P2 Regional Office programs award P2 State and Tribal Assistance Grants (STAG) to
support P2 technical assistance programs, P2 leadership programs, and other innovative
programs that promote pollution prevention practices that reduce pollution and use of fossil fuel
energy sources, and conserve energy use and water use.  The P2 Regional Office programs also
award source reduction assistance grants using Environmental Program Management (EPM)
appropriation resources to further promote pollution prevention practices. Both kinds of grants
can be used to promote P2 among entities in the industrial, energy, health, education,
transportation, agricultural,  and other sectors.

EPA protects workers, pesticide applicators/handlers, employers, and the public from the
potential risks posed by pesticides in their homes and work environments specifically through
the Certification and Training/Worker Protection programs. In FY 2010, EPA cooperative
agreements and grants which are managed by the Regions will provide funding for maintenance
and improvements in worker training networks, safety training to workers and pesticide handlers,
development of Train the Trainer courses, workshops, and development and distribution of
outreach materials.  The Agency's partnership with states and tribes in educating workers,
farmers, and employers on the safe use of pesticides and worker safety will  continue to be a
major keystone in the success of the Agency's human health protection

In FY 2010, the Agency will continue to provide funding through cooperative agreements to
states and Tribal pesticide lead agencies to investigate and respond to water resource
contamination by pesticides. States and tribes are also expected to evaluate pesticide risks to
local water resources, take actions where needed to reduce or prevent contamination where
pesticide concentrations approach or exceed levels of concern, and establish mechanisms to
demonstrate the progress of management strategies designed to address water quality concerns
caused by pesticide use.

Implementation of the Pesticide Container-Containment Rule remains a priority for FY 2010.
This rule is designed to minimize human exposure while handling pesticide containers, facilitate
safe container disposal and recycling, and protect the environment from pesticide releases at bulk
storage sites and from  spills and leaks at refilling and dispensing operations. Therefore, this
guidance will address EPA Regional activities needed to help prepare state partners for the
Container-Containment Rule implementation, which is a necessary step to ensure the

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requirements of the rule are followed by pesticide registrants, distributors and users, and the
human health and environmental protections are realized in the field.

The Strategic Agricultural Initiative (SAI) protects human health and the environment by
facilitating the development of safer pest management strategies.  In FY 2010, Regions will
continue to use assistance agreements to fund projects that promote model agricultural
partnership projects that demonstrate and facilitate the adoption of farm management decisions
and practices that provide growers with "a reasonable transition" away from the highest risk
pesticides, as designated by the Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA). Regions will also conduct
outreach with producers, commodity groups, and other stakeholders to create and maintain
partnerships with the agricultural community, and will commit to record all outreach and
collaborative actions in the SAI Activities Database.

SIGNIFICANT CHANGES TO PRIORITIES OR STRATEGIES FROM FY 2009

In order to better align Regional Office activities and strategies with national program priorities,
OPPT has expanded the NPM Guidance for FY 2010 in two areas. A new section has been
added providing an overview of the Chemical Risk Review and Reduction Program, which
includes efforts to assess, prevent and reduce new and existing chemical risks, to keep Regional
Office  staff and managers informed about developing directions, even though no Regional Office
resources are appropriated under this Program.  In the Chemical Risk Management Program,
focus is expanded from Asbestos to include other legacy  chemical issues (e.g., mercury use
reduction, PCBs in caulks and pipes) that may require Regional Office attention in FY 2010 and
beyond, consistent with the focus of the national program. OPPT has also made three additions,
three deletions and six modifications to the Regional office ACS measures.  Additions are: two
new non-commitment measures for the Lead Program (number of authorized RRP programs and
number of Tribal partnerships).  Further, the Pollution Prevention Program has elevated the
Greenhouse Gas measure of "Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide equivalent (MTCO2e) reduced" to
a commitment measure and the BTU energy measure has been down-graded into a non-
commitment measure.

For FY 2010, OPP decided to remove Endangered Species as an NPM priority. This is due to
the slow pace of consultations required under the Endangered Species Act (ES A) and the
resources diverted to responding to lawsuits have delayed the development of endangered
species bulletins and the implementation of the field component of the Endangered Species
Protection Program. OPPTS and Regional Management  have agreed that Endangered Species
should not be an NPM field priority until bulletins become more regularly produced and
implemented. EPA will reconsider this decision after Endangered Species bulletins become
more regularly issued.  OPP has also revised the text of one of the Container-Containment
measures in order to reflect the Regional activities that are needed at the current stage of rule
implementation.

Starting in FY 2010, the Tribal Pesticides Program has introduced three non-commitment
measures to measure our progress in expanding our ability to protect human health and the
environment in Indian  Country since adoption of the new multi-tribal approach.  The reporting
data will provide the national net increase in pesticide-program coverage based on the number of

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tribes, number of people, and number of acres that are covered under tribal pesticide program
and/or enforcement grants and cooperative agreements for continuing environmental programs.

PROGRAM OFFICE CONTACTS

Office of Pesticide Programs Field/External Affairs Division, Daniel Helfgott, 703-308-8054
Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics/Environmental Assistance Division, Nancy H Wilson,
202-564-8824
Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics/Lead and Asbestos, Brian Symmes, 202-566-1983
Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics/Pollution Prevention, Thomas Tillman, 202-564-8263
Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics/Community Action for a Renewed Environment,
Linda Strauss, 202 564-0797.

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                  KEY PROGRAM PRIORITIES AND STRATEGIES
CHEMICAL RISK REVIEW AND REDUCTION

Strategic Plan Targets

      Sub-Objective 4.1.1: Reduce Chemical Risks. By 2014, prevent and reduce chemical
       risks to humans, communities, and ecosystems.

          o  By 2014, achieve a 50% percent cumulative reduction from 1998 in risks posed
             by TSCA Inventory Update Rule-reported chemicals, as measured by the Risk
             Screening Environmental Indicators model's production-adjusted risk based
             score. (Baseline: cumulative reduction reported from 1998-2006 is 33 percent.)

          o  By 2014, ensure that 100% of new chemicals introduced into commerce do not
             pose unreasonable risks to workers, consumers, or the environment.

Long-Term Strategy

This program spans the full range of EPA activities associated with screening, assessing and
reducing risks of new and existing chemicals. Key program efforts include:

      Rapid and aggressive action to reduce chemical risks,  deploying the full arsenal of TSCA
       regulatory authorities to reduce risks posed by the highest priority chemicals, while
       simultaneously accelerating the Agency's pace in eliminating the void in our
       understanding of the safety of the thousands of chemicals in American commerce in
       amounts exceeding 25,000 pounds per year.

      Continued work under the Voluntary Children's Chemical Evaluation program (VCCEP)
       as a key mechanism for acting in response to the results of safety  assessments.

      Reviewing and reducing risks of other industrial/commercial chemicals of concern under
       TSCA, including reviewing and acting on  1,500 Pre-Manufacture Notices to ensure the
       safely of new chemicals before they are introduced into U.S. commerce, continued work
       to assess and address the potential risks of nanoscale materials, and continued
       development of Acute Exposure Guideline Levels (AEGLs).

These programs reduce and prevent unreasonable  risks to human health and the environment
from new and existing  chemicals and increase the efficiency of risk review and  reduction efforts.
Background
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One of EPA's primary responsibilities is to ensure the safety of the thousands of chemicals that
were already in commerce before TSCA was enacted. These un-reviewed chemicals are used by
U.S. industries to produce items widely used throughout society, including consumer products
such as cleansers, paints, plastics, and fuels as well as industrial solvents and additives, leading
to substantial public and occupational exposure. While these chemicals play an important role in
people's everyday lives, some may adversely affect human health and the environment and need
to be regulated to address health and safety risks.  It is therefore critical that EPA fulfill its
mission to determine the safety of existing chemicals and act rapidly and effectively to reduce
risks when they are identified.

Past action on this critical mission has been too slow and insufficiently action-oriented.  To
correct these problems, EPA is: 1) initiating TSCA regulatory action to reduce risks posed by
several high priority chemicals with risks already known, and 2) sharply accelerating
development of Risk-Based Prioritizations (RBPs) on high production volume chemicals and
Hazard-Based Prioritizations  (HBPs) on moderate volume chemicals to assess and prioritize
risks of the more than 6,000 existing chemicals produced above 25,000 Ibs/yr. We will complete
230 RBPs in FY 2010 vs. 180 and 151 in FYs 2009 and 2008, respectively. We will complete
325 HBPs in FY 2010 vs. 138 and 17 in FYs 2009 and 2008, respectively.

EPA's enhanced risk reduction initiative will deploy all TSCA authorities to initiate action on the
highest priority risks, including banning or restricting chemicals under Section 6, requiring EPA
use approval under Section 5  through Significant New Use Rules, and moving industry to the use
of safer alternatives.

EPA is using chemical hazard and fate data collected through the HPV Challenge Program and
TSCA Test Rules, and TSCA Inventory Update Reporting on exposure and use to develop the
RBPs. For moderate production volume chemicals HBPs draw from existing  sources such as
other international assessment effort or extrapolate from similar high volume chemicals. EPA
will develop and post 561 RBPs and 480 HBPs by the end of FY 2010..

The Agency also will use other TSCA authorities under Section 4 and 8 where necessary to
obtain additional information to support regulatory risk management actions.  EPA will utilize
stewardship strategies to reduce priority chemical risks while rules are in development and
conduct lifecycle and efficacy analyses to foster development of safer and effective alternatives.

In FY 2010, EPA will continue to support HPV and MPV chemicals with improvements to
infrastructure through further development of systems to support submission and access to
chemical data.  Also in FY 2010, EPA will complete work to obtain remaining data for organic
HPV chemicals through Section 4 test rules for chemicals which have not been sponsored,
including three test rules covering 87 chemicals. In addition, EPA will continue to partner with
OECD to produce hazard characterizations in the  international arena and hence leverage similar
work undertaken by other countries.

In FY 2010, EPA expects to bring the Voluntary Children's Chemical Evaluation Program
(VCCEP) pilot to a conclusion by ensuring that data needs decisions for the 20 pilot chemicals
are completed, with most having been completed before the end of FY 2008.  EPA expects to
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identify future chemicals for which there are concerns as to risks to children's health through the
safety assessments described above and follow up on those chemicals through EPA risk
assessment and management approaches.

Additional resources in this program are devoted to reviewing and reducing risks of other
chemicals of concern under TSCA, including review of new chemicals before they enter
commerce.  In FY 2010, EPA will continue its successful record of preventing the entry of
chemicals that pose unreasonable risks to human health or the environment into the U.S. market.
Each year, the Premanufacture Notice (PMN) Review component of EPA's New Chemicals
program reviews and manages the potential risks from approximately 1,500 new chemicals, 40
products of biotechnology, and new chemical nanoscale materials prior to their entry into the
marketplace.

To measure performance under this program, in FY 2006, EPA adopted (with a FY 2004
baseline) a long-term measure establishing a "zero tolerance" performance standard for the
number of new chemicals or microorganisms introduced into commerce that pose an
unreasonable risk to workers, consumers, or the environment. The Agency has achieved the 100
percent goal in three of four years that the measure has been tracked (FY 2004 to FY 2007), and
has a 99.6 percent success rate overall. For more information, visit
www. epa. gov/opptintr/newchems.

In FY 2010, EPA will continue to implement its Nanoscale Materials program for new and
existing chemical nanoscale materials that are subject to TSCA requirements. EPA will focus on
analyzing the data it has received through the program to understand which nanoscale materials
are produced, in what quantities, and what other risk-related data are available. EPA will use
this information to understand whether certain nanoscale materials may present risks to human
health and the environment and warrant further assessment, testing or other action. In FY 2009,
EPA will begin action to address additional data needs and accelerate those actions in FY 2010.
For more information, visit www.epa.gov/oppt/nmsp.

Another important focus is EPA's work on perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). PFOA is an
essential processing aid in the manufacture of fluoropolymers, substances with special properties
that have thousands of important manufacturing and industrial applications, and fluorinated
telomers, which may be a breakdown product of other related chemicals. EPA will continue to
evaluate and implement PFOA risk management actions.

In FY 2010, EPA also will continue biodegradation testing including the testing of
fluoropolymer and fluorotelomer products to determine whether they contain PFOA and are able
to release PFOA as they degrade. Also, the Agency launched a global PFOA stewardship
program in January 2006 for U.S. fluoropolymer and telomer manufacturers.  Eight major
manufacturers of these chemicals have agreed to participate. Participating companies have
committed to reduce PFOA emissions and product content by 95 percent no later than 2010, and
to work toward eliminating PFOA emissions and product content no later than 2015. EPA
received the second progress reports from companies participating in the PFOA stewardship
program in October, 2008.  Continued significant progress towards these goals is expected in FY
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2010. The Agency will receive annual updates through 2015. For more information, visit
www. epa. gov/oppt/pfoa.

An aspect of the Existing Chemicals program's work that has direct impact on the nation's
homeland security is the development of values for Acute Exposure Guideline Levels (AEGLs).
Emergency planners and first responders use AEGLs to prepare for and deal with chemical
emergencies by determining safe exposure levels.  Following September 11, 2001, a series of
investments in the Homeland Security: Preparedness, Response, and Recovery chemical program
augmented resources to support accelerated development of Proposed AEGL values.

Beginning in FY 2009, the program has  shifted emphasis from producing Proposed values to
creating Interim and ultimately Final status via peer review by the National Academies of
Science.  Accordingly, in FY 2010 the program plans to develop Proposed AEGL values for up
to 18 additional chemicals, as needed, compared with 28 in FY 2008 and 33 in FY 2007, and will
remain on target to meet its long-term goal of developing Proposed AEGL values for
approximately 260 chemicals by 2011. In addition, Final values will be completed for at least
six additional chemicals in FY 2010.

Proposed Principal Activities for the Regional Offices

No Regional activities are proposed for FY 2010 under the CRRR Program due to the absence of
resources appropriated to Regional Offices under this Program/Project. This section is provided
to help keep Regional Offices informed of national program direction and to prepare proactively
for potential future Regional Office engagement should Regional CRRR resources be
appropriated.
CHEMICAL RISK MANAGEMENT: ASBESTOS AND OTHER LEGACY CHEMICALS

Strategic Plan Target

      Sub-Objective 4.1.1: Reduce Chemical Risks. By 2014, prevent and reduce chemical
       risks to humans, communities, and ecosystems.

Long Term Strategy

Regional Office work under the Chemical Risk Management (CRM) Program currently focuses
primarily on Asbestos issues, and direction is provided below for continued work on those
issues. Additional issues have been emerging with respect to other legacy chemicals (PCBs in
caulk, reduced use of mercury in products) that may require Regional Office action in 2010 and
beyond. While, it is too early to specify Regional Office action on these issues, it is important to
recognize that Chemical Risk Management resources can be deployed to address other legacy
chemicals  as needed.  OPPT will collaborate with Regional offices on any future work in this
area.
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EPA issued the Asbestos Project Plan in November 2005l to describe EPA's current and planned
actions to ensure a coordinated Agency-wide approach to identify, evaluate and reduce risks to
people from asbestos exposure. The plan focuses on improving the state of the science for
asbestos; identifying and addressing exposure and seeking risk reduction opportunities associated
with asbestos in products, schools and buildings; and better understanding and minimizing
asbestos exposures through assessment and cleanup of contaminated sites.

OPPT will continue its outreach and technical assistance for the asbestos program for schools, in
coordination with other Federal agencies, states, the National Parent-Teachers Association, and
the National Education Association. EPA will also continue to provide oversight and regulatory
interpretation to delegated state and local asbestos demolition and renovation programs, respond
to tips and complaints regarding the Asbestos-in-Schools Rule, respond to public requests for
assistance, and help  asbestos training providers comply with the Model Accreditation Plan
requirements.

Background

EPA has established national programs to promote reductions in use and to ensure safe removal,
disposal and containment of certain prevalent, high-risk or legacy chemicals. Many of these
chemicals were introduced into the environment before their risks were known. These chemicals
include  polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), mercury, and asbestos/fibers. However, additional
legacy chemicals requiring the Agency's attention may emerge in future years. The Chemical
Risk Management Program currently focuses on providing assistance to Federal agencies and
others with responsibility for ensuring proper use of PCBs, reducing or eliminating products
containing mercury, and implementing statutory requirements to address asbestos risks in
schools.

Asbestos is the name given to a number of naturally-occurring fibrous silicate materials. When
microscopic bundles of asbestos fibers become airborne, they can cause a variety of adverse
health effects when inhaled and embedded into the lungs. These fibers may cause serious lung
diseases including: asbestosis, lung cancer,  and mesothelioma.

EPA's asbestos program focuses primarily on implementing the Asbestos Hazard Emergency
Response Act (AHERA),  the Asbestos School Hazard Abatement Reauthorization Act
(ASHARA), and the asbestos National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants
(NESHAP) under the Clean Air Act.

As part  of its effort to address asbestos-related issues comprehensively, EPA will continue to
coordinate with other federal agencies including the Occupational Safety and Health
Administration (OSHA), Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), National Institute for
Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC),
Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), and United States Geological
Survey (USGS). Quantitative reporting by the regions for this program was begun in 2003.
OPPTS  anticipates that the current measure will continue to be fine-tuned. Additional
information can be found at: http://www.epa.gov/asbestos/.
 Asbestos Project Plan: http://www.epa.gov/oppt/asbestos/pubs/asbestosprojectplan.pdf


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Proposed Measures
G.O.S
4.1.1
4.1.1
ACS
Code
ISA
15B
Regional Measure
Number of children reached through
outreach activities [e.g., public
meetings, conferences, exhibits,
community outreach, training, award
programs, mass mailings, phone calls,
etc.] conducted to address asbestos.
Number of outreach products produced
[e.g., web products, written
publications (fact sheets, booklets,
reports), exhibits, training packages,
mass mailings (electronic or snail)]
addressing asbestos.
Unit of
Measure
Children
Products
Comments


Definitions and Clarification of Measures

ACS measure ISA seeks to track the number of children reached through outreach activities as
well as identifying the type of activities utilized by the Regional Office.  The Regional Offices
will use the ACS comment field to report the outreach activities they coordinated to reach the
targeted number of children.

ACS measure 15B seeks to track the number of products produced by the region that will
partially generate the outputs in measure ISA. Product development is distinct from using
products in outreach efforts and merits recognition through ACS.

Example 1: Region G reported that they reached 250,000 school children by participating in 3
distinct activities.  This would be reported as 250,000 for measure 15A and 3 for measure 15B.

Example 2: Region Q participated in 6 Local Educational Authorities (LEA) designee
workshops, providing specific briefings on the AHERA program requirements. Workshops
occurred in Bath, NY; Neversink, NY; Result, NY; Surprise, NY; Brick, NJ; and  Good Intent,
NJ where 75,000 school children were reached. 75,000 would be reported  in measure 15A and
the 6 workshops would be reported for measure 15B.

Example 3: Region R developed a brochure and a training video on implementing AHERA and
ASHARA requirements, and disseminated those products to 20 school systems enrolling a total
of 10,000 students. 10,000 would be reported in measure 15A and 2 would be reported under
15B.

Proposed Principal Activities for the Regional Offices
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1) Maintain education and outreach efforts to bring schools into Asbestos Hazard Emergency
Response Act (AHERA) compliance.

2) Promote education and outreach efforts, especially with new materials now under
development. As an example, education and outreach activities can be delivered to any of the
following: Local Educational Authorities (LEAs), School Districts/Boards, individual schools
(including charter schools), Principals, PTA's (including individual parents and teachers),
maintenance workers,  and individual students.  This education and  outreach can be accomplished
through any of the following mechanisms: web products, written publications (fact sheets,
booklets, reports), public meetings, conferences, exhibits, community outreach, training sessions,
award programs, mass mailings (electronic or postal), and phone calls.

3) Work with training providers to ensure compliance with requirements.
LEAD

Strategic Plan Targets

       Sub-Objective 4.1.1: Reduce Chemical Risks. By 2014, prevent and reduce chemical
       risks to humans, communities, and ecosystems.

          o  Through 2014, EPA will continue to maintain elimination of childhood lead
              poisoning as a public health concern by ensuring that the percentage of children
              (aged 1-5 years) with elevated blood lead levels (>10 ug/dl) to rise above remains
              at zero

          o  By 2014, reduce to 26 percent the percent difference in the geometric mean blood
              lead level in low income children 1-5 years old as compared to the geometric
              mean for non-low income children 1-5 years old.

Long-Term Strategy

OPPT will pursue a range of activities aimed at meeting our strategic targets, including the
maintenance of a trained and certified workforce of lead-based paint professionals, and the
development of methods and tools to reach vulnerable populations and communities. In its
efforts to meet the needs of environmental justice communities, OPPT has collaborated with
other agencies and national organizations in  low-income housing communities to raise awareness
and help attain the goal of reducing childhood lead poisonings in areas with high occurrences of
elevated blood-lead levels.

The Renovation, Repair and Painting (RRP)  Final Rule was signed on March 31, 2008.  This rule
establishes requirements for: training renovators, other renovation workers, and  dust sampling
technicians; certifying renovators, dust sampling technicians, and renovation firms; accrediting
providers of renovation and dust sampling technician training;  renovation work practices; and
recordkeeping. On June 23, 2008 States and Tribes were allowed to apply for program
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authorization.  On April 22, 2009, the Agency will begin to implement the regulation in all non-
authorized States, Territories and on Tribal lands. On this date, providers of renovator and/or
dust sampling technician training may begin to apply for accreditation. On October 22, 2009
renovation firms may begin applying for certification, and on April 22, 2010 the rule will be
fully implemented. By that time, training providers must be accredited, and all firms conducting
RRP must be certified and must comply with the lead-safe work practices prescribed in the rule.

EnvironmentalJustice and Children's Health

The Lead Program has awarded grants to conduct activities to reduce incidences of childhood
lead poisoning in vulnerable populations and other environmental justice activities including
outreach and public education in appropriate languages of the community, monitoring, training,
and other innovative means of communication with communities regarding reducing the risk of
lead poisoning. This includes continued administration of the State Tribal Assistance Grants
(STAG) program which maintains an  adequate supply of trained and certified individuals for
lead-based paint activities. In addition these grants support Tribal efforts to reduce lead risks,
and focus on reducing lead risks in vulnerable populations of at-risk children and communities
with a high concentration of children with elevated blood-lead levels (hot spots).  OPPT will
continue to coordinate with other federal agencies including, Centers for Disease Control (CDC),
Housing and Urban Development (HUD),  Department of Justice (DOJ), Consumer Product
Safety Commission (CPSC), and with state, local and tribal governments to reduce or prevent
risks to human health and the environment posed by lead-based paint activities.

Background

A key element of EPA's mission and  Strategic Plan is to reduce or prevent risks to human health
and the environment posed by chemical  substances. In certain instances, risk-reduction efforts
are targeted at  specific chemicals. Foremost among these is the commitment to eliminate
childhood lead poisoning  as a public health concern by 2010. Since 1973, environmental lead
levels have been reduced by phasing out leaded gasoline, banning the  sale  of lead-based paint for
use in residences, and addressing other sources of exposure. As a result of these efforts,
children's blood-lead levels have declined nearly 90 percent since the  mid-1970s, in the United
States.

In the 1990's, EPA focused on reducing  children's exposure to lead in paint and dust through a
regulatory framework, through federal interagency collaboration, as well as informing and
educating parents, home buyers, renters, renovators and the medical community about lead
prevention.  The incidence of childhood lead poisoning has declined from  900,000 cases in the
early 1990s to  approximately 120,000 cases through 2006 (according to CDC's recent non-peer-
reviewed communications). Additional  information can be found at:
http://www.epa.gov/lead.html .

Proposed Measures
G.O.S
ACS
Code
Regional Measure
Unit of
Measure
Comments
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4.1.1
4.1.1
4.1.1
4.1.1
4.1.1
4.1.1
4.1.1
4.1.1
11A
12
12B
13A
13B
21
TR-1
RRP2
Number of active individual certifications
for lead-based paint abatement activities in
the Region
Total number of authorized state and tribal
certifications and training programs for
lead-based paint abatement professionals
Total number of authorized States and
Tribes for the lead-based paint renovation,
repair and painting rule.
Annual percentage of viable lead-based
paint abatement certification applications
that require less than 20 days of EPA
Regional effort to process
Annual percentage of viable lead-based
paint abatement certification applications
that require less than grantee state-
established timeframes to process
Number of outreach partnerships
addressing lead-based paint hazards and
exposure reduction.
Number of tribal partnerships or other
projects addressing lead based paint
hazards and exposure reduction.
Number of active accreditations for lead-
based paint renovation, remodeling and
painting certification training providers in
the Region.
Certifications
States and
Tribes
States and
Tribes
Percent
Percent
Partnerships
Partnerships or
Projects
Training
accreditations
Non-
Commitment
Measure.

Non-
Commitment
Measure.

State Grant
Performance
Measure

Non-
Commitment
Measure.
Non-
Commitment
Measure.
Definitions and Clarification of Measures

An ACS measures workgroup comprised of Regional Office and HQ staff is assessing current
measures and proposing modifications for FY 2011.  These refined measures will better reflect
work currently done in Regional offices by telling a complete story of how Regional Office
activities are supportive of the overall programmatic goals.

ACS measure 11A is a non-commitment measure; EPA Regional Offices, States, and Tribes do
not directly control this parameter sufficiently to justify setting targets.  Measure 11A seeks to
track the inventory of certifications for lead-based paint professionals performing abatement
activities.  The ACS comment field shall be utilized to provide a breakdown of certifications in
authorized States, non-authorized States, and Tribes.

ACS measure 12 seeks to measure the number of authorized State and Tribal programs who
certify lead based paint abatement professionals. The comment field in ACS shall be utilized to
provide a breakdown of the authorized State and Tribal programs.
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ACS measure 12B is a new non-commitment measure that seeks to measure the number of
authorized State and Tribal RRP programs.  The ACS comment field shall be utilized to provide
a breakdown of the authorized State and Tribal RRP programs.

ACS measure 13 A examines the efficiency of the Regions as they process viable abatement
certification applications.  Viable is defined as a completed application which is ready and
suitable for approval or disapproval, containing all requirements for certification. EPA Regional
Offices will process certification applications in less than 20 calendar days. The Regional Office
effort is defined as the time needed to process an application; the sum of two timeframes.
Timeframe 1 is the number of days elapsed from "Sent to Regions" to "Region Review."
Regional effort does not include HQ processing time.  Timeframe 2 is the number of days
elapsed from "Approval or Disapproval Letter Generated" to "Final Package Sent." Regional
Office effort does not include the time it takes for individuals to take and pass their exam. The
timeframe information can be retrieved from the Federal Lead-based Paint Program (FLPP)
database system. OPPT will work with Regions to provide periodic Regional Office
performance updates.

ACS measure 13B is a state grant performance measure which examines the efficiency of
authorized Grantee-States as they process viable abatement certification applications within the
Grantee-State established timeframes. Regional Offices should  ensure that their respective states
achieve the minimum planning target, stated as the Regional Office bid.  The Regional Offices
should use the comment field to report their authorized Grantee-State timeframes (number of
days taken by Grantee-State to process a viable application) for each shareholder (State or Tribe)
and the percentage of applications processed under the Grantee-State established timeframe. The
timeframe may vary by State, taking variables such as regulations and contractor processing time
into account.  The number agreed upon should be a reasonable determination that reflects the
length of time that it takes the Grantee-State to process an application, as identified by the
Grantee-State and represented to the public. Below is an example of the information that should
be reported by the Regional Offices in the comment field.
Shareholder
AL
GA
KY
MS
NC
TN
Timeframe (calendar days)
25
20
20
10
20
60
% Processed within timeframe
72.5
75
72
75
72
100
ACS measure 21, seeks to capture the number of outreach partnerships. An outreach partnership
is defined as a collaborative, on-going project between EPA and an outside party or parties in
which there is an agreement to take measures to address lead-based paint hazards and exposure
reduction and thus reducing childhood lead poisoning. Examples include cooperative
agreements, targeted grants, recognition awards, sustained outreach and educational  campaigns,
letters of agreement, etc. An agreement is an understanding between parties but not  necessarily a
formal agreement such as a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU).
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ACS measure TR-1 is a new non-commitment measure which tracks the number of tribal
partnerships or other projects addressing lead-based paint hazards and exposure reduction on
tribal lands. Tribal partnerships are a more focused subset of overall lead partnerships.
Examples of tribal partnerships or projects include: Direct Implementation Tribal Cooperative
Agreements (DITCAs), on-going projects, outreach, DITCA related activities, cooperative
agreements, formal agreements, tribal grants, MOUs,  etc.

ACS measure RRP2 is a non-commitment measure which seeks to capture the number of
training accreditations for Renovation, Repair and Painting (RRP) work. Ensuring an adequate
workforce of accredited, qualified and competent training providers is important to a successful
ongoing RRP program.

Proposed Principal Activities for the Regional Offices

1) Implement lead-based paint risk reduction education,  outreach and regulatory implementation
programs in target areas with high concentrations of children with elevated blood levels.

2) Continue overseeing the Section 404(g) grant program to maintain a trained workforce of
lead-based paint professionals in authorized states and continue operating the program in non-
authorized states.

3) Continue work to eliminate childhood lead poisoning through Regional priority efforts in the
Midwest Region. EPA Regions 5 and 7 continue to track the number of housing units
abated/mitigated for lead and the number of lead contaminated residential properties restored
through the Deputy Administrator's Quarterly Management Report.

4) Encourage compliance assistance and outreach of the Pre-Renovation Education Rule (406)
and Disclosure Rule (1018).

5) Promote compliance assistance for the Training and Certification Rule (402) in EPA states
and coordinate with state programs, as needed, for 402 rule compliance assistance in authorized
states.

6) Pursue opportunities for partnerships to address lead-paint based hazards and exposure
reduction.  For example, utilize the Indian Health Service Environmental Health Office to
accommodate tribes in this area by performing lead-based testing in sensitive areas where
children are prone to 8-hour activity.

7) Continue implementing the Lead-Based Paint Renovation, Repair and Painting (RRP) Rule
including providing Section 404(g) grants to States, Tribes, and territories to develop and carry
out authorized programs; working with the grantees to encourage successful delegation of the
rule; working to accredit qualified training providers;  providing information and compliance
assistance to firms and other regulated parties, as well as beginning the certification process for
firms; and providing effective public outreach so that demand for qualified RRP contractors is
strong.
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PESTICIDE WORKER SAFETY PROGRAMS

Strategic Plan Targets

The Pesticide Worker Safety Programs support will primarily support the Agency Strategic Plan:

       Sub-objective 4.1.3: Protect Human Health from Pesticide Risk. Through 2014, protect
       human health by implementing our statutes and taking regulatory actions to ensure
       pesticides continue to be safe and available when used in accordance with the label.

          o   Through 2014, reduce and maintain the concentration of pesticides detected in the
              general population by 50% percent. (Based on urinary metabolites reported 1999-
              2002 Centers for Disease Control's National Health and Nutrition Examination
              Survey (NHANES). Measure is based on NHANES 50th percentile concentrations
              for all (seven) organophosphate analytes reported: Dimethylphosphate < 0.58
              ug/L; Dimethylthiophosphate = 1.06 ug/L; Dimethyldithiophosphate < 0.10 ug/L;
              Diethylphosphate = 0.78 ug/L; Diethylthiophosphate = 0.5 ug/L;
              Diethyldithiophosphate < 0.10 ug/L; and 3,5,6-Trichloro-2-pyridinol =1.9 ug/L .)

          o   By 2014, improve the health of those who work in or around pesticides by
              reducing the number of moderate to severe occupational incidents for six acutely
              toxic pesticides with the highest number of incidents by 50%. . (Based on the
              approximately 325 moderate and severe incidents reported to the Poison Control
              Center (PCC) National Poison Data System (NPDS) 1999-2003. for the six
              pesticides of concern; chlorpyrifos, diazinon, malathion, pyrethrins,  2,4D, and
              carbofuron.)

Long-term Strategy

The goal of the NPM priority for EPA's Pesticide Worker Safety Programs and the associated
principle Regional activities listed below is to reduce human health and environmental incidents
associated with pesticide use. OPP's Pesticide Worker Safety Programs will support the
accomplishment of the Agency's Goal 4,  and the associated objective, sub-objectives and
strategic measures from the Agency's 2009-2014  Strategic Plan Change Document listed above
through applicator certification and training; WPS compliance assistance, education and outreach
for growers, applicators and workers;  and a variety of special regional worker safety projects
designed to augment state and tribal pesticide worker safety program efforts. By promoting
applicator competence in the safe use of pesticides and undertaking specific field activities that
help to ensure compliance with EPA's WPS and applicator certification rule provisions, the
worker safety program activities will help ensure that pesticide users and pesticide workers
practice pesticide safety, which in turn reduces pesticide related incidents that may  adversely
impact human health and the environment.  There is less likelihood of occupational pesticide
exposures and/or pesticide-related environmental incidents occurring when pesticide users and
workers are trained and competent.
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EPA will collaborate with States/Tribes, other federal agencies, industry groups, trade
organizations, advocacy groups, community-based organizations, the regulated community and
other program stakeholders in efforts to reduce the occurrence of pesticide related incidents in
pesticide workers.  This includes agricultural workers, private applicators (farmers) and their
family members working around pesticides, pest control operators, pesticide
mixers/loaders/handlers, and the full range of other workers that may work with or around
pesticides.  EPA will utilize a number of mechanisms to address issues related to pesticide
workers including proposing regulatory modifications, improvements and enhancements to the
worker protection standard and the certification and training requirements.

EPA will also coordinate with States, Tribes to ensure that the regulated community is fully
informed of the requirements in the regulations and that appropriate mechanisms are in place and
utilized to ensure compliance with those requirements. Among other things, EPA will take steps
to improve pesticide worker health and safety by: revising the worker protection standard and
pesticide applicator certification regulations (40 CFR Parts 170 and 171), providing compliance
assistance to the regulated community; developing and supporting outreach and/or education
programs; supporting pesticide safety training programs; establishing community-based grant
programs; developing risk-based targeting approaches; providing outreach to health care
providers that treat pesticide-related illnesses; and, employing a variety of other innovative
approaches to promote  pesticide worker safety.

The Regions will be primarily responsible for working with States and Tribes to implement our
regulatory field programs, developing outreach and/or education programs to the regulated
community related to worker safety, and carrying out special projects or initiatives to enhance
the worker safety field  program.  Headquarters will have the primary lead in national program
coordination, coordinating with health care providers and regulatory development activities
which include revising  the worker protection standard and pesticide applicator certification
regulations. Headquarters will coordinate with Regions on national program issues and will
involve Regions when conducting activities in a particular Region.

EPA will strive to implement and collect improved data related to pesticide worker safety
including occupational  safety.  This information will be used in program management, to meet
federal program achievement goals, and in communications with the public. EPA will also begin
to collect additional data from field activities such as inspections. Headquarters will utilize
national data collection systems such as SENSOR (Sentinel Event Notification System for
Occupational Risk) to collect occupational pesticide  poisoning information. Regions should
encourage and work with our states and tribal partners to implement and utilize these data
collection systems to inform their regulatory program decisions and field activities.The NPM
measures for this priority are intended to reflect the contributions of the EPA Regional Offices in
promoting and assuring the safe use of pesticides  in occupational settings.

Environmental Justice

Effective implementation of EPA's Worker Protection Standard (WPS) is one of OPP's highest
priorities. The WPS program is critical to assuring that agricultural farmworkers are protected
from occupational pesticide hazards, and it is also a key component of EPA's and OPP's
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Environmental Justice (EJ) activities within the pesticide program. According to the most recent
findings of the National Agricultural Workers Survey (NAWS), it is estimated that there are
nearly 2 million migrant and seasonal farmworkers in the United States. Although the NAWS
finding  indicate the majority of farmworkers are Hispanic, the farmworker population is very
racially and culturally diverse, being composed of people from many different nationalities.
Farmworkers also represent some of the most economically disadvantaged people in the U.S.,
further highlighting the need for EJ focus for this population. According to the most recent
NAWS  findings, nearly three-quarters of U.S. farmworkers earn less than $10,000 per year, and
three out of five farmworker families have incomes below the poverty level.

Additionally, agriculture is consistently ranked as one of the most dangerous occupations in the
nation.  Exposure to the elements, pesticides and dangerous equipment are common in farm
labor. Falls, heat stress, dehydration and pesticide poisoning are frequent injuries. However,
agriculture is not subject to the same safety legislation under OSHA that protects workers in
other industries.

Farmworkers provide an important labor service to agriculture, and the abundant and affordable
U.S. food supply benefits greatly from the labor they provide. It is important to protect this
population from occupational pesticide hazards to ensure their safety in the workplace and
viability as a community.  EPA's WPS provides important regulatory protections for this
population by requiring several safeguards such as training on recognition of pesticide hazards,
protection from pesticide exposure, and emergency assistance in the event of a pesticide
exposure or injury.  OPP will continue to ensure that WPS implementation is an EJ priority for
the program and a priority field activity for Regions, States and Tribes.

Background

One of the Agency's primary goals under its revised Strategic Plan is to ensure healthy
communities.  This includes  safety and health in the workplace. A key part of EPA's strategy for
achieving its goal is to reduce illness and incidents associated with occupational exposure to
pesticides. Based on EPA's risk assessments, people who work with, or around pesticides, face a
high potential for pesticide exposure and pesticide-related illness. OPP has made reducing or
preventing occupational pesticide exposures and related illnesses one of its highest priorities. An
effective pesticide worker safety program which comprehensively addresses pesticide risks in the
workplace is essential to accomplishing the Agency's mission. Therefore, OPP will continue to
emphasize the need for Regions to work with the states and tribes to focus on pesticide worker
safety programs. This emphasis will include establishing stronger linkages between the worker
protection program and the pesticide applicator Certification and Training (C&T) program.
When appropriate, Headquarters will work with the Regions to increase outreach to health care
providers.

Measures for these programs have been developed through a process with the Regions, States,
Tribes,  and other stakeholders. The measures are intended to provide direction for program
improvement, and to describe progress in meeting the Agency goals and objectives.  The table
below includes the Pesticide state grant performance measure for 2010, "Total number of
certified applicators." The certification of applicators that use restricted use pesticides, which
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are the most hazardous pesticides, helps ensure that these applicators will have the level of
competence needed to handle and apply these pesticides with the minimum potential risk to
human health and the environment. It is our first line of risk mitigation for the most hazardous
pesticides on the market. The Regions will not be expected to enter this data into the ACS
system. This data will be obtained from the States as part of the certification program's
requirements established in 40 CFR 171(d). OPP will use the information submitted by states to
calculate this measure and the Regions will then enter the results into the ACS  system. There are
a few important caveats to the Pesticide state grant performance measure that are noted following
the table below

Proposed Measures
G.O.S
4.1.3
4.1.3
4.1.3
ACS
Code
WP1
CT1
26
Regional Measure
Number of Region-specific projects
or initiatives that contribute to the
implementation and enhancement of
the worker protection (WPS) field
program
Number of Region-specific projects
or initiatives that contribute to the
implementation and enhancement of
the C&T field program.
Total number of certified applicators.
Unit of
Measure
Projects or
initiatives
Projects or
initiatives
Certified
applicators
Comments
Minimum of one per
Region
Minimum of one per
Region
State Grant Performance
Measure.
Definitions and Clarification of Measures

For ACS measure 26 there are varying state requirements for who has to get certified in each
state, especially for commercial applicator certification, so the total number of applicators
requiring certification in each state can vary greatly depending on state laws and regulations.
The total number of certified applicators per state is not based on or directly related to federal
certification requirements or funding. Total number of applicators requiring certification in each
state can vary depending on, state laws and regulations, population, level of agricultural
production, pest pressures, certification costs, and other factors.

The total number of applicators certified by a state is not within Regions' control and is not a
function of their efficiency or productivity.  States have different populations, levels of
agricultural production, pest issues, costs to obtain certification, and regulatory requirements for
certification. This may affect the number of people who pursue certification and the total
number of applicators certified by a state.

Proposed Principal Activities for the Regional Offices
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1) Regions should ensure appropriate implementation of pesticide worker safety programs by
States and/or Tribes in their jurisdiction. This includes assuring States/Tribes follow National
Cooperative Agreement Guidance, making appropriate commitments in their work plans and
meeting these commitments.  In addition, the Region will report, according to the agreed upon
format, all relevant activities.

2) Regions should ensure that all States and Tribes submit complete C&T accomplishment
reporting information, as required by 40 CFR Part 171.7(d), to the Certification and Worker
Protection Branch in OPP via the Certification Plan and Reporting database (CPARD). Regions
must ensure that all States/Tribes enter the required reporting information into the C&T State
Plan and Reporting database system by the end of the first quarter of the federal fiscal year.
Therefore, States would not be required to enter this data on the state grant performance
measure.

3) Regions should ensure that all States and Tribes, as applicable, maintain updated Plans for
Certification of Pesticide Applicators (Plans). The Plans must comply with 40 CFR Part 171.
Regions must ensure that all States/Tribes have entered their complete Plans into the CPARD
system; and  they must ensure States/Tribes maintain those Plans by annually updating the  Plans
in the CPARD system and entering all applicable information into the CPARD system about any
modifications that were made to the Plans during the annual reporting period.

4) Regions must carry out at least two Region-specific projects or initiatives that contribute to
the implementation and enhancement of the worker safety field programs.  One project or
initiative must be related to the WPS program and one must be related to the C&T program. The
goal of the WPS project should be  to enhance the protection of agricultural pesticide workers,
and the goal of the C&T project should be to enhance the competency of certified pesticide
applicators.  The projects may entail outreach and education, compliance assistance, stakeholder
coordination, program evaluation,  state or tribal program capacity building, or other similar
project/initiatives that may lead to  enhancement of the program. The Headquarters National
Program Office (NPO) will provide guidance to Regions on submitting project write-ups and
final project reports. Regions must submit final project write-ups to the NPO by October 31st,
and projects must be completed by the end of the federal fiscal year.  Regions must submit their
final project reports to the NPO within 30 days of the end of the federal fiscal year.

5) EPA is initiating the revision of the worker protection standard and pesticide applicator
certification regulations (40 CFR Parts 170 and 171), and will be carrying out a variety of  efforts
and activities related to the revisions of these regulations.  Regions will have the opportunity to
participate in this process. Regions should ensure they stay abreast of the regulatory
development process and communicate with States and Tribes and other regional program
stakeholders about the status of the process, providing information to these entities about the
process as needed when it is updated and made available.  Regions should encourage States and
Tribes and other regional program  stakeholders to stay engaged and participate in the regulatory
development process and provide information and feedback to EPA as appropriate.

6) Regions should encourage the States and Tribes to adopt Certification and Training
Assessment  Group (CTAG) recommendations,  including at a minimum the adoption of the
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national core manual and exam and the minimum age requirements for certification of
applicators.  Other recommendations may also be forthcoming.  After notification by
Headquarters of the recommendations, the Regions will work with states and tribes to encourage
their implementation. Updated information on CTAG can be found at http://pep.wsu.edu/ctag/.

7) Regions should encourage States and Tribes to adopt the use  of national worker safety
program materials, including the national core manual and exam, national aerial category
materials, WPS Train-the-Trainer materials, and other products. Regions should also work with
States and Tribes to identify barriers to adoption of national program materials, and have
discussions with their States and Tribes about potential problems with developing a new ACS
state grant performance measure for the program related to number of States/Tribes adopting
national program materials.  Regions should report any feedback on these issues to Headquarters.

8) Regions should support the measures implementation process by working with their States
and Tribes in developing the information for the measures.  The measures are critical to program
management and refinement as well as for addressing the needs of and communicating with the
Office of Management and Budget, partners, stakeholders and the general public.  The regional
activities for this NPM priority will contribute toward reaching the strategic targets listed under
this sub-objective by promoting applicator competence in the safe use of pesticides and assuring
compliance with EPA's WPS and applicator certification rule provisions, which in turn reduces
pesticide related incidents that may adversely impact human health and the environment. There
is less likelihood of occupational pesticide exposures and/or pesticide-related environmental
incidents occurring when pesticide users and workers are trained and competent.
PESTICIDE CONTAINER-CONTAINMENT IMPLEMENTATION

Strategic Plan Targets

The Container-Containment Rule Implementation will primarily support the Agency Strategic
Plan:

      Sub-objective 4.1.3: Protect Human Health from Pesticide Risk. Through 2014, protect
       human health by implementing our statutes and taking regulatory actions to ensure
       pesticides continue to be safe and available when used in accordance with the label.

          o   Through 2014, reduce and maintain the concentration of pesticides detected in the
              general population by 50% percent. (Based on urinary metabolites reported 1999-
              2002 Centers for Disease Control's National Health and Nutrition Examination
              Survey (NHANES). Measure is based on NHANES 50th percentile concentrations
              for all (seven) organophosphate analytes reported: Dimethylphosphate < 0.58
              ug/L; Dimethylthiophosphate = 1.06 ug/L; Dimethyldithiophosphate < 0.10 ug/L;
              Diethylphosphate = 0.78 ug/L; Diethylthiophosphate = 0.5 ug/L;
              Diethyldithiophosphate < 0.10 ug/L; and 3,5,6-Trichloro-2-pyridinol =1.9 ug/L .)
                                           26

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          o   By 2014, improve the health of those who work in or around pesticides by
              reducing the number of moderate to severe occupational incidents for six acutely
              toxic pesticides with the highest number of incidents by 50%. . (Based on the
              approximately 325 moderate and severe incidents reported to the Poison Control
              Center (PCC) National Poison Data System (NPDS) 1999-2003. for the six
              pesticides of concern; chlorpyrifos, diazinon, malathion, pyrethrins, 2,4D, and
              carbofuron.)

This NPM priority will also support the Agency Strategic Plan:

      Sub-objective 4.1.4: Protect the Environment from Pesticide Risk. Through 2014, protect
       the environment by implementing our statues and taking regulatory actions to ensure
       pesticides continue to be safe and available when used in accordance with the label.

          o   By 2014, no urban watersheds will exceed the National Pesticide Program aquatic
              life benchmarks for four key pesticides of concern. Baseline; (1992 - 2001)
              percent of urban watersheds sampled by USGS National Water Quality
              Assessment (NAWQA) program that exceed the National Pesticide Program
              aquatic life benchmarks for diazinon (73%), chlorpyrifos (37%), carbaryl (13%),
              and malathion (30%.)

          o   By 2014, no agricultural watersheds will exceed the National pesticide Program
              aquatic life benchmarks for two key pesticides of concern. Baseline data (1992 -
              2001) percent of agricultural watersheds sampled by USGS National Water
              Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program that exceed the National Pesticide
              Program aquatic life benchmarks for azinphos-methyl(18%) and chlorpyrifos
              (21%.)

Long-term Strategy

The goal of the pesticide Container-Containment rule implementation NPM priority and the
proposed principal Regional activities listed below, is to reduce incidents associated with
occupational exposure or environmental exposure that are caused by the failure, inadequate
storage or improper handling of pesticide containers. There is less likelihood of occupational
exposure to pesticides (and thus illness or other adverse effects) and environmental exposure to
pesticides (and thus contamination or other adverse effects) if pesticide containers are properly
designed, bulk pesticides are stored and transferred in containment structures, and containers are
properly handled.

EPA will help prepare states and the regulated community to come into compliance with the new
regulations.  Compliance is required with the non-refillable container and pesticide containment
regulations by August 2009, with the label requirements by August 2010 and with the refillable
container and repackaging regulations by August 2011.  The Regions will work with states so
that they can carry out an adequate residue removal program as required by  FIFRA.
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The NPM measures for this priority are intended to reflect the contributions of the EPA Regional
Offices in reducing incidents associated with occupational exposure or environmental exposure
that are caused by the failure, inadequate storage or improper handling of pesticide containers.

Background

The requirements of this rule are designed to minimize human exposure while handling pesticide
containers; facilitate safe container disposal and recycling; and protect the environment from
pesticide releases at bulk storage sites and from spills and leaks at refilling and dispensing
operations. The Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP) has made implementation of this rule a
priority.  Therefore, this guidance will emphasize Headquarters and Regional activities to help
prepare state partners for implementation, which is a necessary step in ensure the requirements of
the rule are followed by pesticide registrants, distributors and users, and the human health and
environmental protections are realized in the field. Additional information on the rule can be
found at http://epa.gov/pesticides/regulating/containers.htm.

Proposed Measures
G.O.S

4.1.3
4.1.3
ACS
Code

CR2
CR1
Regional Measure
Number of States that the
Region has assessed to
determine if they have the
capacity to implement the
pesticides Container-
Containment rules.
Number of Region-specific
projects or initiatives that
contribute to the implementation
and enhancement of the
container-containment field
program
Unit of
Measure

Number of
states
Number of
projects or
initiatives
Comments

Reporting measure.
This measure language was
revised from FY09.
Definitions and Clarification of Measures

ACS measure CR1 language was revised starting in FY2010 to reflect Regional Pesticide
Supervisors' recommendation to modify the measure language to read similar to the existing
Worker Safety measures, which require tracking a project or initiative rather than just a counting
of the number of meetings, and outreach activities. OPP management agrees with this
recommendation since these projects will contribute to implementation and enhancement of the
container-containment field program which is the goal of this measure.

ACS measure CR2 reflects the on-going coordination that Regions will have with states and the
Region's assessment (not a formal determination) about whether the states have the capacity to
implement the Container-Containment regulations. This will be an on-going process during the
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years that the pesticide container-containment regulations are being phased in. The compliance
dates run from August 2009 to August 2011.

Proposed Principal Activities for the Regional Offices

1) Regions should facilitate implementation of the Container-Containment rule. This includes
assuring that states follow National Cooperative Agreement Guidance, making appropriate
commitments in their work plans, and meeting these commitments. Regions should report all
relevant activities.

2) Regions should coordinate with States to  implement the pesticide Container-Containment
regulations. Compliance is required with the non-refillable container standards and containment
requirements as of August 16, 2009, with the label requirements by August 16, 2010 and with
the refillable container and repackaging regulations by August 16, 2011.  Through the Region's
on-going coordination with the States, the Regions should assess whether the States have the
capacity to implement the Container-Containment regulations. This assessment is not a formal
determination like the determinations of equivalency for existing state pesticide containment
regulations that will be made in FY 2009  or the determinations of adequacy for state residue
removal compliance programs that were made in FY 2008.  Instead, it is intended to be part of
the on-going cooperation and coordination with the State for implementing FIFRA and, in this
case, implementing the Container-Containment regulations.  The Region needs to assess the
state's capacity to implement the Container-Containment rule as a part of the process of deciding
what the Region will do to implement the rule. This will be an on-going process during the years
that the pesticide container-containment regulations are being phased in.  It is likely that Regions
would assess the state's capacity to implement specific parts of the Container-Containment rule
at different times. For example,  a region might assess a state's capacity to implement the
containment regulations in FY2009 or FY2010 and then assess that state's capacity to implement
the refillable container and repackaging requirements in FY2011 or FY2012.

3) Regions must carry out at least one Region-specific project or initiative that contributes to the
implementation and enhancement of the pesticide container-containment field program. The
goal of the project should be to enhance the use of well-designed pesticide containers, the
adequate containment for bulk pesticide storage and repackaging activities, and/or the proper
handling of pesticide containers. The projects may involve outreach and education, compliance
assistance,  stakeholder coordination, program evaluation, state or tribal program capacity
building, or other similar projects and initiatives that lead to the implementation and initiation  of
the pesticide container-containment field program. The  project or initiative may be one segment
of a multi-year program. Headquarters will provide guidance to Regions on submitting project
write-ups and final project reports. Regions must submit final project write-ups to Headquarters
by October 31st, and projects must be completed by the end of the fiscal year. Regions must
submit their final project reports to Headquarters within 30 days of the end of the federal fiscal
year.
PESTICIDES AND WATER RESOURCE PROTECTION
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Strategic Plan Target

       Sub-objective 4.1.4: Protect the Environment from Pesticide Risk. Through 2014, protect
       the environment by implementing our statues and taking regulatory actions to ensure
       pesticides continue to be safe and available when used in accordance with the label.

          o   By 2014,  no urban watersheds will exceed the National Pesticide Program aquatic
              life benchmarks for four key pesticides of concern. Baseline; (1992 - 2001)
              percent of urban watersheds sampled by USGS National Water Quality
              Assessment (NAWQA) program that exceed the National  Pesticide Program
              aquatic life benchmarks for diazinon (73%), chlorpyrifos (37%), carbaryl (13%),
              and malathion (30%.)

          o   By 2014,  no agricultural watersheds will exceed the National pesticide Program
              aquatic life benchmarks for two key pesticides of concern. Baseline data (1992 -
              2001) percent of agricultural watersheds sampled by USGS National Water
              Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program that exceed the National Pesticide
              Program aquatic life benchmarks for azinphos-methyl(18%) and chlorpyrifos
              (21%.)

Long-term Strategy

In order to ensure that pesticides do not adversely affect the nation's water resources and the
EPA Strategic Plan sub-objective and measures listed above are met, EPA, States, and Tribes
will undertake a program to: 1) evaluate pesticide risks to local water resources, 2) take actions
where needed to reduce or prevent pesticide contamination of water resources over time, and 3)
establish mechanisms to demonstrate the progress of management strategies designed to address
water quality concerns caused by pesticide use.  EPA,  States, and Tribes will also investigate and
respond to pesticide water contamination incidents, especially where water quality standards or
other reference points are threatened or exceeded. The Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP), the
Office of Water, Regions, States and Tribes will also share information and collaborate to
identify and manage the  risk of pesticide use to water resources. OPP will also use State and
Tribal water monitoring  data in the pesticide registration and registration review process.

The NPM reporting measure is intended to reflect the efforts of the EPA Regional Offices in
managing cooperative agreements to ensure that States and Tribes are taking steps to  evaluate
potentially problematic pesticides for water quality.  Through the Regional Office grant
oversight and grantee support of activities in this program area, the EPA Regional Offices can
help ensure that water quality concerns due to pesticide use are identified and mitigated over
time.

Background

Under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA),  EPA registers pesticides
and sets conditions for their use. These conditions can include requirements to protect water
resources. EPA also provides funding to States and Tribes to protect water resources from
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pesticides.  Under the cooperative agreements managed by the EPA Regional Offices, States and
Tribes are asked to evaluate pesticides that have potential to threaten water quality standards or
other appropriate reference points, and to place those pesticides identified as a concern under
active management so as to reduce concentrations in the environment that would otherwise result
in undue exposure and risk. This evaluation process allows States and Tribes to identify where
they need to focus resources at the local level to manage the greatest risk to their water quality.
Additional  information can be found at http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/health/safely.htm.

Proposed Measure
G.O.S




.1.4



ACS
Code




WQ1



Regional Measure
Number of evaluated pesticides of
concern that have been placed under
State or Tribal Program
management due to their propensity
to approach or exceed national
water quality standards or other
human health or ecological
reference points.
Unit of
Measure



Number of
pesticides



Comment



Reporting measure




Proposed Principal Activities for the Regional Offices

1) Regions will negotiate annual State and Tribal water quality commitments consistent with
FIFRA Cooperative Agreement Guidance, and will provide annual grant and program oversight.

2) Regional Pesticide Offices will consult with Regional Water Offices, OPP, and State and
Tribal pesticide and other water resource agencies, as needed, to ensure that appropriate water
quality pesticides of interest are identified by the State or Tribe.

3) Regions will assist State and Tribal pesticide and water quality management agencies to
develop programs to manage pesticides of concern that are derived from pesticides of interest
evaluations; i.e., those that have a high potential to threaten water quality standards.

4) Regions will work with State and Tribal pesticide agencies to assess current  State and Tribal
program progress on meeting work plan water quality commitments.  Regions will support States
and Tribes on reporting the national water quality measures data, including training, and any
water quality monitoring data to OPP. Measures information should be entered by States and
Tribes into the Pesticides of Interest Tracking System (POINTS, www.points.wsu.edu) by
December 31st, 2010. Regions will then review their State and Tribal POINTS data to ensure its
accuracy.  POINTS data should be final by February 28th, 2011.

5) Where appropriate, Regions may review and provide comment on initial and updated State
and Tribal Pesticide Management Plans.

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6) Regions are encouraged to support the EPA pesticide registration review process through the
collection and submission of State water quality monitoring data, including data on CWA 
303(d) listed waters due to pesticide impairments.
STRATEGIC AGRICULTURE INITIATIVE (SAI)

Strategic Plan Targets

       Sub-objective 4.1.5: Realize the Benefits from Pesticide Availability.  Through 2014,
       ensure the public health and socio-economic benefits of pesticide availability and use are
       achieved.

          o   Through 2014, continue to maintain a healthy and affordable food supply,
              continue to ensure the availability of safe pesticides that annually provide an
              estimated $26 billion in value to agricultural production. The measure is based on
              annual USDA pesticide expenditure data and public literature on the marginal
              value of pesticides.

          o   Through 2014, annually continue to avoid $1.8B in termite structural damage
              from termite infestations by ensuring safe and effective pesticides are available
              for termite control.. ($1.8 B in 2007 baseline data are derived from several
              sources including, U.S.  Census data, surveys conducted by the pest control
              industry, and academic  publications

Long-term Strategy

Through Regional outreach, coordination and grant programs, the Strategic Agricultural
Initiative fosters transition and adoption of farm pest management decisions and practices that
provide growers with a "reasonable transition" towards the use of less and reduced-risk
pesticides and alternative pest control methods, as mandated by Food and Quality Protection Act
(FQPA). The goal of the NPM priority for SAI, and the associated Regional activities listed
below, is to promote the beneficial use of pesticides and safe pesticide control, while
concurrently reducing risk of pesticide use to human health and the  environment.

Background

EPA's Strategic Agricultural Initiative (SAI) began in response to the Food Quality Protection
Act 303 (FQPA) with $1 million as a  pilot program. Based on the successful pilot, in FY
2000, EPA expanded the program to all ten Regions with funding of $1 million, expanded to $2
million and 10 FTE in 2001. The OPPTS Acting Assistant Administrator sent guidance on the
use of these resources to the Regions in December 2000.

The Strategic Agricultural Initiative is  a regionally based, dual track initiative. On one track,
SAI coordinates, collaborates and facilitates the implementation of Integrated Pest Management
(IPM) practices with other government agencies and stakeholders and facilitates the development
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of reduced risk pest management strategies.  The other track is a small grant program to promote
model agricultural partnership projects that demonstrate and facilitate the adoption of farm
management decisions and practices that provide growers with "a reasonable transition" away
from the highest risk pesticides, as designated by FQPA.

In 2008, the SAI Team hired a contractor to conduct an external needs analysis followed by a
National Summit to review the continued need, effectiveness, and efficiency of the program.
The consensus was that SAI directly supports national pesticide program goals through:
coordination of the Integrated Pest Management (IPM) implementation with other agencies;
providing  grant opportunities to demonstrate and validate novel approaches, and in maintaining a
positive communication network that connects important stakeholders that are not otherwise
addressed  in pesticide decisions into the pesticide program.  The refined scope of the program is
to target efforts within national pesticide priorities and to focus grant funds on minor crops as
defined by USDA with some latitude where justified. Grant funding will follow national
pesticide priorities and a common grant format that is administered by the regions and with
regional flexibility in the assistance agreement process. The SAI team established a workgroup
to systematically refine the NPM measures to better reflect the contribution and effectiveness of
the SAI program to national pesticide goals.  The SAI Team decided to maintain the same
measures in 2010 as in 2009 in order to more carefully evaluate alternatives and methods to
improve the effectiveness of the measures.

The National Pesticide Program Stewardship Priorities below were developed by a consensus at
the 2008 SAI National Summit discussed above.

   1.  Pesticides for which reduced risk pest management alternatives are sought, especially on
       minor crops
          a.  azinphos methyl (AZM)
          b.  soil fumigants (chloropicrin, dazomet, metam sodium/potassium)
          c.  strobilurin fungicides
          d.  carbofuran in spinach seed production
          e.  lindane seed treatment for seed maggots in vegetable crops

   2.  Agricultural issues involving pesticides for which IPM advancements are sought
          a.  resistance management
          b.  water quality and runoff issues
          c.  pollinator protection issues
          d.  endangered species protection
          e.  IPM approaches for controlling rodents and predators in livestock operations
          f.  urban/rural interface and volatile pesticides
          g.  repeating emergency exemption requests on minor crops (see table below)
          Repeating Emergency Exemption Requests on Minor Crops (2008-09)
Crop
Pest(s)
EPA
State(s)
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Raspberry
Cranberry
Ginseng
Mushrooms
Walnut
Raised honeybees
Citrus
Fruiting vegetables (especially

Nematodes
Dodder
Alternaria &
Green mold
Blight
Varroa mite
Post bloom fruit drop
White mold
Region(s)
10
1
5
3,10
9
1 - 10
4
2,3,4

WA, OR, ID
MA
MI, WI
DE, MD, PA,
CA
National
FL
FL, NJ, VA
Proposed Measure

G.O.S


4.1.5




4.1.5


ACS
Code


SAI




SA2



Regional Measure
Average percent change in the
utilization of reduced risk pest
management practices over time as
determined by the SAI Transition
Gradient
Number of SAI collaborative actions
contributing towards partnerships key
to U.S. agriculture's transition towards
sustainable, reduced-risk pest
management technologies
Unit of
Measure


ercent
increase



Events



Comment
Regions 8, 9 and 10
have selected this as a
regional priority
measure for the Great
American West.
Regions 8, 9 and 10
have selected this as a
regional priority
measure for the Great
American West.
Definitions and Clarification of Measures

SAI Average percent change justification: The SAI Transition Gradient (TG) is expressed on a
0-5 scale and is used to evaluate pesticide risk reduction projects. While a rating of zero (0)
reflects no understanding of risk reduction techniques, five (5) represents growers who have fully
converted to a sustainable system. The SAI Transition Gradient provides a uniform and
consistent measure to evaluate grower progress toward adopting a whole systems approach of
integrated crop management, conservation planning and sustainable agriculture with an emphasis
on long term outcomes using quantitative measures. This measure is an easy tool for the project
coordinator to measure short term project outcomes. It is  an indicator of progress towards
reducing the use of OPP priority chemicals, and the adoption of reduced risk pest management
and sustainable agricultural practices. This measure is used for all regional SAI projects and
reported in  the SAI Projects Database. Percent change on the SAI Transition Gradient is
calculated as:  (project end SAI TG score - project start SAI TG score/5 (the highest score on
SAI TG)) x 100. For example, a grantee moving from a base of one (1) on the transition gradient
and moving to a two (2) on the transition gradient would be showing a 20% increase in the
transition gradient.
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SA1 Average percent change calculation: Each region will determine the percent change on the
SAI Transition Gradient scale for each project completed in the current fiscal year based on
results reported by the grantee in their final report. The region will average together the percent
change for each of these projects and report one figure for the region. Each region will submit
their figure for the current fiscal year on a bi-annual basis (mid-year and end of year).

Formula for the average change in the transition gradient for all regional projects:

              sum of change in the transition gradient for each project     x  100
                         number of regional projects x  5

SA2 Number of SAI collaborative actions justification: While this is an output rather than an
outcome measure, it is closely tied to both intermediate and long-term desired outcomes of the
SAI program and EPA's Office of Pesticide Program objectives.  This measure reflects the true
field activities of the regional SAI Program Coordinators and is a measure tracked semi-annually
in an established SAI Activities database.

SA2 Number of SAI collaborative actions calculation:
Each region will report the number of SAI collaborative actions that contribute towards
partnerships key to U.S. agriculture's transition towards  sustainable, reduced-risk pest
management technologies consistent with the national pesticide stewardship priorities.
The database will be updated quarterly, and the numbers will be pulled and aggregated at the
national level by OPP staff.

Proposed Principal Activities for the Regional Offices

The following activities are typical of what may be undertaken by Regions in order to make
progress in achieving the national pesticide stewardship goals, and each activity undertaken
should be linked to one (or more) of these goals.

1)  Collaborate and conduct outreach with growers, commodity groups and other stakeholders to
    promote transition to lower-risk pesticides and pest management methods, and maintain
    partnerships with the agricultural community. Record all outreach  and collaborative actions
    etc.

2)  Negotiate, award, and maintain a portfolio of assistance agreements that support the
    consensus statement on priorities for the SAI Program in 2010, and comply with EPA Order
    5700.7,  "Environmental Results under EPA Assistance Agreements," requiring grantees to
    report baseline information and establish outcome performance measures.

3)  Maintain regional information on the SAI Information System (Project and Collaborations
    databases) and verify at least semi-annually.  This includes grant starting and closure
    information and transition gradient information Regions 8, 9 and 10 will report their scores
    on a quarterly basis for the Great American West (GAW) measures.
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4) Provide feedback to EPA HQ on Regional pesticide transition issues.

5) Partner, cooperate and collaborate on IPM issues with USD A, including Regional Integrated
   Pest Management Centers, National Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) Technical
   Committees, Sustainable Agriculture and Research Education (SARE) program, and the
   Regional IR-4 program.  Develop and maintain  strong cross-media linkage where the
   regional lead and coordination for some particular USDA programs resides in other media
   programs within the region.

6) Collaborate on IPM evaluation and measurement activities and represent regional interests on
   inter-agency workgroups such as the National IPM Evaluation Group (NIPMEG) to advance
   evaluation at the project, program and landscape scale.

7) Work with OPP to improve internal/external communication on pesticide issues and arrange
   field visits for OPP staff as necessary.

8) Encourage and promote cross-media links to other EPA programs to promote IPM principles
   and  supportive actions within the region.
POLLUTION PREVENTION (P2)

Strategic Plan Targets

      Sub-Objective 5.2.1: Prevent Pollution and Promote Environmental Stewardship. By
       2014, reduce pollution, conserve natural resources, and improve other environmental
       stewardship practices while reducing costs through implementation of EPA's pollution
       prevention programs.

       o  By 2014, reduce 20 billion pounds of hazardous materials through P2 Program
          participant actions cumulatively compared to the 2006 baseline of 0.46 billion
          pounds.

       o  By 2014, reduce, conserve, or offset 115 million metric tons of carbon dioxide
          equivalent (MTCO2e) through P2 Program participants cumulatively compared to the
          2006 baseline of 1.2 million MTCO2e reduced, conserved, or offset.

       o  By 2014, reduce water use by 190 billion gallons cumulatively compared to the 2006
          baseline of 2.3 billion gallons reduced.

       o  By 2014, save $14.0 billion through P2 improvements in business, institutional, and
          governmental costs cumulatively compared to the 2006 baseline of $2.1 billion
          dollars saved.

These long-term Strategic targets incorporate recurring results framework based on Science
Advisory Board consultation. See Definitions and Clarifications of measures section for
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additional information. Both recurring results and new annual results will be reflected and
current targets for new annual measures for FY 2010 across all seven centers of results, commit
the P2 Program to:

     Reduce 522 million pounds of hazardous materials;
     Reduce, conserve, or offset 5 million MTCO2e;
     Reduce water use by 1,795 million gallons; and
     Save $300 million in business, institutional, and governmental costs through P2
      improvements.

The Regional share of the national GPRA and OMB's Program Assessment targets above
represents the Regional stream of results for FY 2010. Thus, the P2 Regional Program
collectively commits to:
      Reduce 50,000,000  pounds of hazardous materials;
      Reduce, conserve, or offset 650,000 Metric Tons of CO2e;
      Reduce water use by 400,000,000 gallons; and
      Save $50,000,000 in business, institutional and government costs through P2
       improvements.

Long-Term Strategy

The P2 Program has recently revised its Strategic Plan using a five-year planning cycle. The Plan
has three 2014 goals: (1) work with other EPA programs to establish EPA's leadership role in the
sustainability arena, and broadly communicate the importance of preventing pollution at the
source; (2) increase coordination among individual components of the EPA P2 Program and
ensure a strong infrastructure within the EPA P2 Program and external P2 networks to support
the program's  mission; and, (3) meet or exceed the environmental outcome targets established
for the P2 Program in the EPA Strategic Plan. In addition, the new P2 Plan focuses the Program
on three critical outcomes: (a) reducing production and use of hazardous materials; (b) reducing
generation of greenhouse gasses; and (c) conserving natural resources - specifically water.

The components of the P2 Program are organized into Centers of Results, as described below in
the "Background" section. The Plan also identifies six sectors - agriculture,
chemical/manufacturing industries, buildings/construction, electronics, hospitality,  and
municipalities/institutions - for which it provides more detailed focus, based on relative
environmental impact  and perceived program opportunity.

Background

The Pollution Prevention Act of 19902  established a national policy to prevent or reduce
pollution at the source whenever feasible. The rationale for this policy is based on the benefits
realized from pollution prevention for protecting the environment and reducing risks to worker
health and safety, and the substantial savings  in reduced raw material, pollution control and
liability costs.  The Pollution Prevention (P2) Program is the Agency's only multimedia program
Pollution Prevention Act of 1990  133, 42U.S.C.  13101 (1990).


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aimed specifically at spurring Agency programs to collaborate in mitigating pollution problems
at the source. The P2 Program advances the design and implementation of greener chemicals,
engineering, products, and practices through awards, certifications, purchasing agreements,
technical assistance grants and partnerships, and regulatory options.

The purpose of the program is to achieve measurable environmental results through
implementation of the Pollution Prevention Act, having the Agency consider the effect of its
programs and regulations on reducing pollution at the source, coordinating source reduction
activities in Agency offices and promoting source reduction in other Federal agencies,
facilitating the adoption of pollution prevention (P2) practices through technical assistance,
developing state and tribal capacity, recognizing excellence in P2, using federal procurement to
encourage pollution prevention, and establishing standard methods of measuring results.  The
program makes use of the P2-friendly tools and technical expertise of the Toxic Substances
Control Act program, also located in the Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics, which
creates a risk reduction co-benefit for the program.  The program's vision statement is that
pollution prevention is the first choice for environmental protection. This mirrors the national
policy set forth in the statute that gives the program its basis. This policy is well suited to guide
the P2 Program and the Agency collectively in decision-making on mitigating climate change.

The program accomplishes its mission through eight centers of results:
1) The Regional Office center generates results from the ten Regional Offices' matching grants
to State/Tribal P2 programs,  source reduction grants to promote P2 practices by industry, and
direct regional efforts to facilitate business P2 practices and interstate coordination on promoting
P2. P2 practices  can include the use of environmental  management systems.

2) The Pollution Prevention Resource Exchange (P2Rx) center leverages results from providing
national-level (wholesale) P2 information to state and tribal (retail) P2 technical assistance
providers, and from processing the measured results of state P2 programs.

3) The Design for Environment (DfE) center generates results from voluntary partnerships based
on DfE multi-disciplinary scientific assessments, tools, and technical guidance to provide
understanding to industry, plus standard-setting entities, of a full range of critical hazard,
comparative risk, cost, and performance data for industrial processes.

4) The Green Engineering center generates results by working directly with industry,  academia,
NGOs and government to implement  Green Engineering approaches and design concepts.

5) The Green Chemistry center generates results by challenging industry and the research
community to develop and implement scientifically innovative and cost competitive green
chemistry technologies, and giving Presidential recognition for the same.

6) The Environmentally Preferable Purchasing (EPP) center generates results by providing multi-
attribute guidance and assistance to federal agencies in complying with Executive Order 13101,
which requires federal agencies to procure "green" products and services.
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7) The Partnership for Sustainable Healthcare center generates results from voluntary
partnerships with individual hospitals, hospital suppliers, and related healthcare organizations,
using a "franchising" approach to P2 technical assistance and an awards program.

8) The Green Suppliers Network (GSN) center generates results by collaborating with
Department of Commerce's Manufacturing Extension Partnership Centers and original
equipment manufacturers (OEMs) to provide the OEM's suppliers with technical assistance on
cost-competitive P2 opportunities through environmental and lean reviews.

Proposed Measures
G.O.S
5.2.1
5.2.1
5.2.1
5.2.1
5.2.1
ACS
Code
261
262
263
264
296
Regional Measure
BTUs of energy reduced,
conserved or offset by P2 program
participants.
Gallons of water reduced by P2
program participants.
Business, institutional and
government costs reduced by P2
program participants.
Pounds of hazardous material
reduced by P2 program
participants.
Metric tons of carbon dioxide
equivalent (MTCO2e) reduced,
conserved or offset by P2 program
participants
Unit of
Measure
Billions of
BTUs
Gallons
Dollars
Pounds
Metric Tons
Comments
Non-Commitment
measure.




Definitions and Clarification of Measures

The Pollution Prevention (P2) Program has two changes of note. First, the program's new
national and ACS measure for reducing Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide Equivalent (MTCO2e)
is transit!oning from a non-commitment measure in 2009 to a commitment measure in 2010.
Correspondingly, the prior 2009 commitment measure for BTUs will change to a non-
commitment measure in 2010, and BTU reductions are simply reported and entered in the P2
Program's new Greenhouse Gas Reductions Calculator, which converts them to GHG reductions

Second, after the Agency's Strategic Plan for 2009-2014 is in place, the P2 Program will
transition to using measures that are calculated using new annual results (as at present) plus
recurring results (capturing continuing results in out-years for the lifespan of the P2
improvement).  This will avoid under-counting the impacts of P2 Program interventions, and is
consistent with feedback received from the Science Advisory Board in September 2008. The P2
Program at Headquarters will discuss with the Regional Offices how long recurring results will
be counted  for regional interventions.  Computing recurring results for regional interventions
will be a Headquarters responsibility.
                                           39

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For all Pollution Prevention measures, "reduced" is defined to mean reduction through P2
improvements and includes pollution avoided.  An example of "avoiding" pollution would be
substituting a less hazardous chemical instead of a more hazardous chemical.

The pollution "Reduced" and "avoided" must be related to source reduction, and not out-of-
process recycling. For purposes of greenhouse gas reductions only, however, the program is
considering whether to count greenhouse gas reductions from out-of-process recycling that
occurs as a co-benefit of a P2 Program intervention.  Headquarters will consult with the Regional
Offices on this matter and will update the P2 Program Measurement Guidance to reflect
decision-making on this issue. Out-of-process recycling occurs when a waste (such as paper)
exits a process, undergoes significant handling and is transported offsite to a commercial
recycling facility or waste exchange (such as a re-pulping process for paper. The P2 Program
considers the reuse of materials as source reduction,  not out-of-process recycling.

Definition of "P2 program participants" is any party who produces P2 results with a link to a P2
Program intervention. Examples include but are not limited to: State and local  agencies,
businesses, manufacturers, nonprofit organizations, and other institutions.

Reduced, conserved and offset collectively cover activities that result in less combustion of fossil
fuels. This can occur by using fossil fuel energy more efficiently, simply using less fossil fuel
energy, or switching to an energy source with a lower fossil fuel impact. For further details and
examples, consult the P2 Measurement Guidance.

ACS measure 261 is a non-commitment measure for the number of British Thermal Units
(BTUs) reduced, conserved, or offset. BTUs are a unit of energy and will be expressed in
billions. For example, 6,150,000,000 BTUs, should be expressed as 6.15 Billion BTUs.
Standard conversion factors between megawatt-hours and BTUs are found on web-based
conversion charts.

ACS measure 262 is a commitment measure that counts the gallons of water reduced as a result
of water conservation. What is counted is the reduced use of water in the first place. This can be
accomplished through conservation and re-use of water. If water pollution is reduced, the
gallons of water associated with the pollutant effluent are not counted under this measure. For
example, if a facility used a million gallons of water in the previous year and uses only 500,000
gallons of water in the reporting year, they can count 500,000 gallons of water conserved under
ACS measure 262.

ACS measure 263 is a commitment measure that counts the amount of money saved as a result
of the incorporation of pollution prevention practices into the daily operations of government
agencies, businesses, and institutions.  Institution is defined as an established organization,
especially of a public character (e.g., hospitals, universities, group purchasing organization, etc).
The P2 Program, in consultation with the Pollution Prevention Resource Center (PPRC), has
updated the financial cost calculator which provides specific cost savings for specific types, of
pollutants as well as water and energy conservation.  Further details and examples can be found
in the P2 Measurement Guidance.
                                           40

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ACS measure 264 is a commitment measure that counts the reduction of hazardous material
released to air, water, land, or incorporated into products, or used in an industrial process.
Hazardous is used in a broad sense to include federally or state regulated pollutants, including
Clean Air Act criteria pollutants and Clean Water Act water quality criteria pollutants and
conventional pollutants, but excludes items generally considered of low hazard and frequency
recyclable or divertible, such as paper products, cans, iron and steel scrap, and construction
waste.

ACS measure 296 is a commitment measure in FY 2010.  It will measure metric tons of carbon
dioxide equivalent (MTCO2e) reduced, conserved or offset. The P2 Program has developed a
Greenhouse Gas Reductions Calculator that is being made available for Regional Office use to
compute the conversion of electricity, fuels, BTUs, and chemicals to MTCO2e for reporting
purposes.

Proposed Principal Activities for the Regional Offices

1) Administer the P2 state grants program to fund state P2 technical assistance programs and
regional P2Rx Centers, which assist businesses in ways that contribute significantly to the
Agency achieving its P2 strategic targets. Identify and work with the States and EPA
Headquarters to replicate successful pilots for maximum national impact.

2) Promote multi-media coordination with (air, water, waste, and toxics programs) within each
region to promote P2/sustainability outcomes.

3) As regional resources allow, provide direct P2 assistance to businesses, assistance to
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing, the Federal Electronics Challenge, Green Suppliers
Network,  and Design for Environment, etc.

4) Continue to engage in the comparative analysis and development of a tool to improve the
collection, tracking and reporting of P2 Grant Results.
                                           41

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                          OTHER PROGRAM ACTIVITIES
TRIBAL PESTICIDE PROGRAM PERFORMANCE

Long-term Strategy

In order to expand OPP's ability to protect human health and the environment in Indian Country
and Alaska Native Villages and maximize our tribal resources, the National Tribal Pesticide
Program is now emphasizing, where appropriate, policies and approaches that can benefit
multiple rather than single tribes (e.g., circuit riders and multi-tribal training). OPP is also
developing tribal Pesticide Use Assessments to help identify the areas in Indian Country with the
greatest need for tribal pesticide program and/or enforcement grants and cooperative agreements.

Background

Starting in FY 2010, to measure our progress in expanding our ability to protect human health
and the environment in Indian Country since adoption of the new multi-tribal approach, the
Tribal Pesticide Program will now track the national net increase in pesticide-program coverage
based on the number of tribes, number of people, and number of acres that are covered under
tribal pesticide program and/or enforcement grants and cooperative agreements for continuing
environmental programs established since FY 2005 in Indian Country (the year before the
Program began emphasizing the multi-tribal approach).

Proposed Measure
G.O.S
4.1.3
4.1.3
ACS
Code
TR-2
TR-3
Regional Measure
Number of tribes covered under
tribal pesticide program and/or
enforcement grants and
cooperative agreements for
continuing environmental
programs established since FY
2005 in Indian Country.
Number of people covered
under tribal pesticide program
and/or enforcement grants and
cooperative agreements for
continuing environmental
programs established since FY
2005 in Indian Country.
Unit of
Measure
# of tribes
# of people
Comments
Non-Commitment measure.
Non-Commitment measure.
                                          42

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4.1.3
TR-4
Number of acres covered under
tribal pesticide program and/or
enforcement grants and
cooperative agreements for
continuing environmental
programs established since FY
2005 in Indian Country.
# of acres
Non-Commitment measure.
Definitions and Clarification of Measures

OPP and the Regions will use the American Indian Environmental Office (AIEO) data to
determine the number of people and acres within the tribal areas covered by grants.  The
information will be reported annually by the Regions.  That information will be rolled up
nationally by OPP to determine the percentage increase for the measure since FY 2005 (number
of tribes, people and acres covered by continuing pesticide program and/or enforcement grants
established in Indian Country since 2005, divided by number of tribes, people and acres covered
under continuing pesticide program and/or enforcement grants in Indian Country in FY 2005,
multiplied by 100).  We expect that increased pesticide program presence in Indian  Country will
result in improvements to human health and the environment in Indian Country. Because new
grants to fund circuit-riders will go to tribes with the greatest need as determined from compared
Pesticide Use Assessments, Regions will not be able to know in advance if tribes within their
region will be able to receive funding for new multi-tribal programs. Therefore, the new tribal
measures will be strictly a reporting measure and Regions will not be required to make a
commitment to attain a certain level.
COMMUNITY ACTION FOR A RENEWED ENVIRONMENT (CARE)

Long-Term Strategy

The CARE program will continue to fund and support communities to help them build
partnerships to understand and address environmental concerns.  CARE communities will
achieve measurable environmental outcomes and develop the capacity to sustain local efforts to
address environmental concerns and build healthy communities.  Through this work, the CARE
Program will demonstrate the effectiveness of local partnerships  for improving local
environmental health and meeting Agency goals for protecting the environment.

The CARE Program will work to make the best practices, tools, and lessons developed through
CARE accessible to other communities. The CARE Program will also work with a broad range
of governments, organizations, and businesses to help communities find the partners they will
need to succeed.

The CARE Program continues to promote collaboration across the Agency.  In FY 2010, the
lead NPM for the CARE Program is OSWER. However, OPPTS is committed to continue
partnering with other federal agencies and communities with potential environmental justice
                                          43

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concerns to achieve significant measurable environmental or public health improvements
through collaborative problem-solving strategies.

Background

The Community Action for a Renewed Environment (CARE) is a community-based, multi-
media collaborative Agency program designed to help local communities address the cumulative
risk of toxics exposure. Through the CARE Program, EPA programs work together to provide
technical and financial assistance to communities. This support helps them build partnerships
and use collaborative processes to select and implement actions to improve community health
and the environment.

Much of the risk reduction comes through the application of over 40 EPA voluntary programs
from across the Agency.  CARE helps communities choose from the range of programs designed
to address community concerns and improve their effectiveness by working to integrate the
programs to better meet the needs of communities. These programs include Diesel Retrofits,
Brownfields, National Estuary Program, Design for Environment, Environmental Justice
Revitalization Projects, Tools for Schools, and Regional Geographic Initiatives. More program
information is available at www.epa.gov/CARE .

Proposed Measure
G.O.S


4.2.2

ACS
Code


CARE1

Regional Measure
Number of Community Action for
Renewed Environment (CARE)
cooperative agreement projects
managed in order to obtain toxic
reductions at the local level.
Unit of
Measure


Projects

Comments

The measure will
track the number of
projects the
Regions support.
Proposed Principal Activities for the Regional Offices

1) Provide regional support needed to ensure the success of the region's CARE cooperative
agreements.

2) Consider and implement CARE Regional Office best practices as appropriate (Regional
Office's best practices for support of CARE communities developed by the CARE Program and
CARE Executive Team).

3) Identify experienced project officers/leaders for each of the CARE projects and provide
training and support as needed.

4) Strengthen multi-media and cross program regional team organized to support CARE project
leaders and CARE community needs.
                                          44

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5) Work with CARE Level I projects, through the project officers, to help provide the technical
support needed for communities to identify and rank their risks.

6) Work with CARE Level II projects, through the project officers, to help communities' access
EPA voluntary programs and measure and track results.

7) Ensure staff participation in training for new project leaders and national CARE workshop.

8) Participate in the evaluation of the CARE projects and support work to develop best practices
and lessons learned to improve CARE program.

9) Support CARE national teams that have been organized to manage the CARE program and
provide support to Regional Office teams.
                                          45

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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances
FY2010 NPM GUIDANCE MEASURES APPENDIX
Appendix A: NPM Guidance Measures
G/O/S
4.1.1
4.1.1
4.1.1
4.1.1
4.1.1
4.1.1
4.1.1
Measures
Central
Code
11A
12
12B
13A
21
RRP2
TR-1
Measure Text
Number of active individual certifications
for lead-based paint activities issued in
the Region.
Total number of authorized State and
Tribal certification and training programs
for abatement lead-based paint
professionals.
Total number of authorized States and
Tribes for the lead-based paint
renovation, repair and painting Rule.
Annual percentage of viable lead-based
paint certification applications that
require less than 20 days of EPA Regional
effort to process
Number of outreach partnerships
addressing lead based paint hazards and
exposure reduction.*
Number of active accreditations for lead-
based paint renovation, repair and
painting certification training providers in
the Region.
Number of tribal partnerships or projects
addressing lead based paint hazards and
exposure reduction.
Non-
Commitment
Indicator
(Y/N)
Y
N
Y
N
N
Y
Y
State Grant
Performance
Measure (Y/N)
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
Planning Target

43
5
92%
50


National Target
(FY2010 Pres.
Bud)



92%



Senior Management Measure
                                                    Appendix, Page 1

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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances
FY2010 NPM GUIDANCE MEASURES APPENDIX
Appendix A: NPM Guidance Measures
G/O/S
4.1.1
4.1.1
4.1.2
4.1.3
4.1.3
Measures
Central
Code
ISA
15B
CARE1
WP1
CT1
Measure Text
Number of children reached through
outreach activities [e.g., public meetings,
conferences, exhibits, community
outreach, training, award programs, mass
mailings, phone calls, etc.] conducted to
address asbestos.
Number of outreach products produced
[e.g., web products, written publications
(fact sheets, booklets, reports), exhibits,
training packages, mass mailings
(electronic or snail)] addressing asbestos.
Number of Community Action for
Renewed Environment (CARE)
cooperative agreement projects managed
in order to obtain toxic reductions at the
local level.
Number of Region-specific projects or
initiatives that contribute to the
implementation and enhancement of the
worker protection (WPS) field program
Number of Region-specific projects or
initiatives that contribute to the
implementation and enhancement of the
C&T field program.
Non-
Commitment
Indicator
(Y/N)
N
N
N
N
N
State Grant
Performance
Measure (Y/N)
N
N
N
N
N
Planning Target
1.9M
20
20
1
1
National Target
(FY2010 Pres.
Bud)





Appendix, Page 2

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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances
FY2010 NPM GUIDANCE MEASURES APPENDIX
Appendix A: NPM Guidance Measures
G/O/S



4.1.3





4.1.3





4.1.3



4.1.3


Measures
Central
Code


TR-2





TR-3





TR-4



CR2


Measure Text

Number of tribes covered under tribal
pesticide program and/or enforcement
grants and cooperative agreements for
continuing environmental programs
established since FY 2005 in Indian
Country.
Number of people covered under tribal
pesticide program and/or enforcement
grants and cooperative agreements for
continuing environmental programs
established since FY 2005 in Indian
Country
Number of acres covered under tribal
pesticide program and/or enforcement
grants and cooperative agreements for
continuing environmental programs
established since FY 2005 in Indian
Country
Number of States that the Region has
assessed to determine if they have the
capacity to implement the pesticides
Container-Containment rules.
Non-
Commitment
Indicator
(Y/N)


Y





Y





Y



Y


State Grant
Performance
Measure (Y/N)


N





N





N



N


Planning Target






















National Target
(FY2010 Pres.
Bud)





















Appendix, Page 3

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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances
FY2010 NPM GUIDANCE MEASURES APPENDIX
Appendix A: NPM Guidance Measures
G/O/S
4.1.3
4.1.4
4.1.5
4.1.5
5.2.1
Measures
Central
Code
CR1
WQ1
SA1
SA2
261
Measure Text
Number of Region-specific projects or
initiatives that contribute to the
implementation and enhancement of the
container-containment field program
Number of evaluated pesticides of
concern that have been placed under State
or Tribal Program management due to
their propensity to approach or exceed
national water quality standards or other
human health or ecological reference
points.
Average percent change in the utilization
of reduced risk pest management
practices over time as determined by the
SAI Transition Gradient.
Number of SAI collaborative actions
contributing towards partnerships key to
U.S. agriculture's transition towards
sustainable, reduced-risk pest
management technologies.
BTUs of energy reduced, conserved or
offset by P2 program participants.
Non-
Commitment
Indicator
(Y/N)
N
Y
N
N
Y
State Grant
Performance
Measure (Y/N)
N.
N.
.N
N
N
Planning Target
1




National Target
(FY2010 Pres.
Bud)





Senior Management Measure
                                                    Appendix, Page 4

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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances
FY2010 NPM GUIDANCE MEASURES APPENDIX
Appendix A: NPM Guidance Measures
G/O/S

5.2.1

5.2.1
5.2.1


5.2.1

4.1.3

.1.4
4.1.5
4.1.3
4 1 4

4.1.5

4 1 1


Measures
Central
Code
262

263
264


297



NP 447


NP 448



NP 450


Measure Text

Gallons of water reduced by P2 program
participants.
Business, institutional and government
costs reduced by P2 program participants.
Pounds of hazardous material reduced by
P2 program participants.
Metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent
(MTCO2e) reduced, conserved or offset
by P2 program participants. *
Pesticide Registration Improvement Act:
Cumulative Applications Received,
Completed, Pending, Percent Negotiated and
Percent on Time at end of Quarter. **

Pipeline for Reviewing Registered
Pesticides.**

Annual number of chemicals with Risk Based
Prioritizations completed through the
Chemical Assessment and Management
Program (ChAMP). **
Non-
Commitment
Indicator
(Y/N)
N

N
N


N













State Grant
Performance
Measure (Y/N)
N

N
N


N













Planning Target

400M

50M
50M


0.65M













National Target
(FY2010 Pres.
Bud)
1795M

3COM
522M


5M













Senior Management Measure
 Senior Management Measure for Headquarters Only; Not a performance measure for Regions.
                                                        Appendix, Page 5

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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances
FY2010 NPM GUIDANCE MEASURES APPENDIX
Appendix A: NPM Guidance Measures
G/O/S
4.1.1
4.1
Measures
Central
Code
NP451
257
Measure Text
Annual number of chemicals with Hazard
Based Prioritizations completed through the
Chemical Assessment and Management
Program (ChAMP). **
Cumulative number of (Endocrine Disrupter)
assays that have validated. **
Non-
Commitment
Indicator
(Y/N)


State Grant
Performance
Measure (Y/N)


Planning Target


National Target
(FY2010 Pres.
Bud)


Senior Management Measure for Headquarters Only; Not a performance measure for Regions.
                                                       Appendix, Page 6

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                                          ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
                                       Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances
                                       FY2010 NPM GUIDANCE MEASURES APPENDIX
                                          Appendix B: State Grant Performance Measures
  Type of
Categorical
   Grant
G/O/S
Measures
 Central
  Code
                                          Measure Text
Planning Target
National Target
 (FY 2010 Pres.
      Bud)
                  4.1.1
             13B
             Annual percentage of viable lead-based paint
             certification applications that require less than grantee
             State-established timeframes to process.	
      80
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                                    ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
                                  Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances
                                 FY2010 NPM GUIDANCE MEASURES APPENDIX
                             Appendix C: Explanation of Changes from FY 2009 to FY 2010
      Change from FY 2009 Guidance Document
                                                Reason for Change
                                         Affected Pages and
                                               Sections
Priorities
Modification: Reduce the incidence of
lead poisoning nationally and in targeted
vulnerable populations post 2010
Lead based paint is ubiquitous and
continued efforts will be needed in 2010
and beyond to reduce risk from lead
based paint.	
Lead; pages 14-18
              Modification: Enhance existing Pollution
              Prevention activities through alignment
              with and implementation of P2 program
              Strategic Plan
              New: Work to expand Regional role in
              addressing persistent effects of legacy
              chemicals
                                       Align priorities formalized in P2
                                       Program Strategic Plan (climate change,
                                       contaminants, and resource conservation)
                                       within the NPM Guidance.
                                      P2; pages 32 - 37
witnm me JNrM (juidance.	
Emerging issues with legacy chemicals
require additional attention.
                                                                             CRM; pages 11-14
              New: Provide overview of Chemical Risk
              Review and Reduction Program despite
              absence of Regional
                                       Expand Regional Office awareness of
                                       national program action to assess,
                                       prevent and reduce chemical risks
                                       assessments.
                                      CRR&R; pages 10-11
              Modification: Community Action for
              Renewed Environment (CARE) program
                                       OPPT continues to support the CARE
                                       program. Lead responsibility has shifted
                                       to OSWER- refer to OSWERNPM
                                       Guidance for further information.
                                      CARE; pages 39 - 40
                                                  Appendix, Page 8

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                              ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
                             Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances
                            FY2010 NPM GUIDANCE MEASURES APPENDIX
                       Appendix C: Explanation of Changes from FY 2009 to FY 2010
Change from FY 2009 Guidance Document
                                                               Reason for Change
                                                                                 Affected Pages and
                                                                                      Sections
        Deletion: Remove endangered species
        bulletin as priority.
                                                     Because of delays in consultations with
                                                     the Services and responding to lawsuits,
                                                     development of endangered species
                                                     bulletins has been delayed and the field
                                                     component of this program is not ready
                                                     for implementation.  Therefore, OPP
                                                     Management, the Regional Pesticide
                                                     Supervisors and Division Director felt
                                                     Endangered Species should not be a field
                                                     NPM priority until bulletins become
                                                     more regularly produced and
                                                     implemented. We will reconsider this
                                                     decision after Endangered Species
                                                     bulletins become more regularly issued.
                                                                             Deleted section from 2009
                                                                             NPM Guidance titled
                                                                             "Pesticides and Endangered
                                                                             Species" pages 22 - 24.
                                                Emerging implementation of Renovation
                                                Repair and Painting rule in conjunction
                                                with existing lead program activities.
Strategies
The Lead program utilizes a variety of
strategies to reduce risk from lead based
paint and will continue to implement the
abatement program, work to promote the
beginning of the Renovation Repair and
Painting program, employ targeted grants
to vulnerable populations, and continue
outreach and education efforts.
Lead; pages 14-18
                                             Appendix, Page 9

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                               ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
                             Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances
                            FY2010 NPM GUIDANCE MEASURES APPENDIX
                        Appendix C: Explanation of Changes from FY 2009 to FY 2010
Change from FY 2009 Guidance Document
         Reason for Change
    Affected Pages and
         Sections
        The Pollution Prevention program will
        seek to focus its efforts on six targeted
        areas: advancing green building design
        and construction; developing
        environmentally  preferable electronics
        products; developing safer chemicals and
        manufacturing processes; advancing
        sustainable production agriculture;
        reducing the environmental footprint of
        municipalities and institutions; and,
        greening the hospitality sector.	
Combination of existing P2 strategies
and tools with emerging focus areas from
P2 strategic plan.
P2; pages 32 - 37
        Utilize Regional chemical risk
        management resources to address both
        existing asbestos outreach work and
        emerging concerns such as PCBs in caulk,
        formaldehyde in pressed wood products,
        mercury in products and  stockpiles, lead
        chromate in Astroturf.
Collaboration between Regional and HQ
offices to manage emerging issues from
persistent effects of Legacy Chemicals.
CRM; pages 11-14
        EPA enhanced Toxics program will
        continually assess high and moderate
        production volume chemicals with risk
        and hazard based assessments. Over time,
        these assessments can be utilized to help
        frame risk management strategies.	
Utilize existing risk management
strategies such as those that exist within
the Pollution Prevention and Chemical
Risk Management programs to address
high priority chemicals over time, where
applicable.	
CRR&R; pages 10 & 11
                                             Appendix, Page 10

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                                    ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
                                  Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances
                                  FY2010 NPM GUIDANCE MEASURES APPENDIX
                             Appendix C: Explanation of Changes from FY 2009 to FY 2010
      Change from FY 2009 Guidance Document
                                                Reason for Change
                                          Affected Pages and
                                               Sections
Annual
Commitment
Measures
Modification:
Number of meetings, conferences,
presentations, and other outreach
activities, where information is provided
to States, Tribes, Territories, regulated
facilities, and/or general public to increase
knowledge of the Container-Containment
rule
At the National Pesticide Meeting in
December 2008, the Regional Pesticide
Supervisors recommended modifying the
language of this measure to read:

Number of Region-specific projects or
initiatives contributing to the
implementation and enhancement of
the Container-Containment field
program

The Supervisors wanted the measure to
be similar to the existing Worker Safety
measures which require a project or
initiative rather than just a counting of
the number of meetings, and outreach
activities. OPP management agrees with
this recommendation for 2010, since
OPP believes these projects will
contribute to implementation and
enhancement of the container-
containment field program which is the
goal of this measure.	
Container-Containment;
page 25
                                                  Appendix, Page 11

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                              ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
                            Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances
                            FY2010 NPM GUIDANCE MEASURES APPENDIX
                       Appendix C: Explanation of Changes from FY 2009 to FY 2010
Change from FY 2009 Guidance Document
         Reason for Change
    Affected Pages and
         Sections
        Addition of Measure 12B: Number of
        Authorized States and Tribes for the lead-
        based paint renovation, repair and painting
        Rule. Non Commitment Measure.
This measure was added to make the
distinction between the authorized
abatement program and the newly
authorized RRP program.	
Lead; pages 15 & 16
        Deletion of Measure RRP1: Number of
        active individual certifications for lead
        based paint renovation, repair and painting
        activities in the Region. Non Commitment
        Measure.
This measure was deleted as this work
would not be done by the Regions.
Deleted from the 2009 NPM
Guidance "Lead"; pages 2 &
4
        Modification of Measure RRP2: Number
        of active accreditations for lead-based
        paint renovation, repair and painting
        certification training providers in the
        Region. Non Commitment Measure.	
This measure was modified by adding
the word "providers" to more accurately
reflect what the RRP measure intends to
capture by EPA Regional staff.
Lead; pages 16 & 17
        Addition of Measure Tr-1: Number of
        tribal partnerships or projects addressing
        lead based paint hazards and exposure
        reduction. Non Commitment Measure.
This reporting measure will capture tribal
partnerships or projects created to
address RRP.
Lead; pages 16 & 17
                                            Appendix, Page 12

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                              ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
                             Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances
                            FY2010 NPM GUIDANCE MEASURES APPENDIX
                       Appendix C: Explanation of Changes from FY 2009 to FY 2010
Change from FY 2009 Guidance Document
         Reason for Change
    Affected Pages and
         Sections
        Modification of Measure 15.
        ISA: Number of outreach products
        produced [e.g., web products, written
        publications (fact sheets, booklets,
        reports), exhibits, training packages, mass
        mailings (electronic or snail)] addressing
        asbestos.
        15B: Number of children reached through
        outreach activities [e.g., public meetings,
        conferences, exhibits, community
        outreach, training, award programs, mass
        mailings, phone calls, etc.] conducted to
        address asbestos.
Measure 15 will be broken out into two
asbestos measures (ISA and 15B) in
order for the program to better capture
the distinct products and the number of
children contacted through these
activities.
CRM; page 13
        Deletion of Measure 261A: Annual
        megawatt-hours of energy reduced
        conserved or offset by P2 program
        participants. Non Commitment Measure.
This measure was deleted because there
was an opportunity to streamline; and the
units of energy are captured by the other
energy measures.	
Deleted from the 2009 NPM
Guidance "P2"; page 12
        Deletion of Measure 264A: Annual
        pounds of other pollutants reduced by P2
        program participants. Non Commitment
        Measure.
This measure was deleted because there
was an opportunity to streamline.
Deleted from the 2009 NPM
Guidance "P2"; page 12
                                            Appendix, Page 13

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                             ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
                            Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances
                           FY2010 NPM GUIDANCE MEASURES APPENDIX
                       Appendix C: Explanation of Changes from FY 2009 to FY 2010
Change from FY 2009 Guidance Document
         Reason for Change
    Affected Pages and
         Sections
        Modification of Measure 261: Annual
        BTUs of energy reduced, conserved or
        offset by P2 program participants.
This measure change from a commitment
measure to reporting measure to be
replaced by GHG measure below.  This
measure will no longer be listed as a
Senior Management Measure; it will be
replaced by the MTCO2e measure.	
P2; pages 35 & 36
        Modification of Measure 297: Annual
        metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent
        (MTCO2e) reduced, conserved or offset
        by P2 program participants.
This measure was modified to make a
correction to the unit of measure from
MTCE to [Metric tons of carbon dioxide
equivalent (MTCO2e)] in order to align
with the Agency's energy unit of
measure. This measure changed from a
non-commitment measure to a
commitment measure in 2010.  This
measure will also be listed as a Senior
Management measure, in lieu of the BTU
measure.
P2; pages 35 & 37
                                           Appendix, Page 14

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                              ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
                            Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances
                            FY2010 NPM GUIDANCE MEASURES APPENDIX
                       Appendix C: Explanation of Changes from FY 2009 to FY 2010
Change from FY 2009 Guidance Document
         Reason for Change
    Affected Pages and
         Sections
        Addition of Measures:
        TR-2:  Number of tribes covered under
        tribal pesticide program and/or
        enforcement grants and cooperative
        agreements for continuing environmental
        programs established since FY 2005 in
        Indian Country
Adding this new measure per Goal 4 of
the 2009-2014 Strategic Plan Change
Document's "Improving Program
Implementation in Indian Country".  The
reporting data will help measure our
progress in expanding our ability to
protect human health and the
environment in Indian Country since
adoption of the new multi-tribal
approach. That information will be
rolled up nationally by OPP to determine
the percentage increase for the measure
since FY 2005 (number of tribes, people
and acres covered by continuing
pesticide program and/or enforcement
grants established in Indian Country
since 2005,  divided by number of tribes,
people and acres covered under
continuing pesticide program and/or
enforcement grants in Indian Country in
FY 2005, multiplied by 100).	
Tribal Pesticide Program
Performance; page 38
                                            Appendix, Page 15

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                              ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
                            Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances
                            FY2010 NPM GUIDANCE MEASURES APPENDIX
                       Appendix C: Explanation of Changes from FY 2009 to FY 2010
Change from FY 2009 Guidance Document
         Reason for Change
    Affected Pages and
         Sections
        TR-3:  Number of people covered under
        tribal pesticide program and/or
        enforcement grants and cooperative
        agreements for continuing environmental
        programs established since FY 2005 in
        Indian  Country
Adding this new measure per Goal 4 of
the 2009-2014 Strategic Plan Change
Document's "Improving Program
Implementation in Indian Country".  The
reporting data will help measure our
progress in expanding our ability to
protect human health and the
environment in Indian Country since
adoption of the new multi-tribal
approach. That information will be
rolled up nationally by OPP to determine
the percentage increase for the measure
since FY 2005 (number of tribes, people
and acres covered by continuing
pesticide program and/or enforcement
grants established in Indian Country
since 2005,  divided by number of tribes,
people and acres covered under
continuing pesticide program and/or
enforcement grants in Indian Country in
FY 2005, multiplied by 100).	
Tribal Pesticide Program
Performance; page 38
                                            Appendix, Page 16

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                              ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
                            Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances
                            FY2010 NPM GUIDANCE MEASURES APPENDIX
                       Appendix C: Explanation of Changes from FY 2009 to FY 2010
Change from FY 2009 Guidance Document
         Reason for Change
    Affected Pages and
         Sections
        TR-4:  Number of acres covered under
        tribal pesticide program and/or
        enforcement grants and cooperative
        agreements for continuing environmental
        programs established since FY 2005 in
        Indian  Country
Adding this new measure per Goal 4 of
the 2009-2014 Strategic Plan Change
Document's "Improving Program
Implementation in Indian Country".  The
reporting data will help measure our
progress in expanding our ability to
protect human health and the
environment in Indian Country since
adoption of the new multi-tribal
approach. That information will be
rolled up nationally by OPP to determine
the percentage increase for the measure
since FY 2005 (number of tribes, people
and acres covered by continuing
pesticide program and/or enforcement
grants established in Indian Country
since 2005,  divided by number of tribes,
people and acres covered under
continuing pesticide program and/or
enforcement grants in Indian Country in
FY 2005, multiplied by 100).	
Tribal Pesticide Program
Performance; page 38
                                            Appendix, Page 17

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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances
FY2010 NPM GUIDANCE MEASURES APPENDIX
Appendix C: Explanation of Changes from FY 2009 to FY 2010
Change from FY 2009 Guidance Document

Tracking
Process
Contacts
Deletion: Number of meetings,
conferences, presentations, and other
outreach activities where information is
provided to States, Tribes, Territories
and/or general public to increase
knowledge of the Endangered Species
Protection Program


Edna Kapust/Charles Bevington  OPPT
Daniel Helfgott - OPP
Brian Katz/Jennifer Vernon - OPPTS
Reason for Change
Because of delays in consultations with
the Services and responding to lawsuits,
development of endangered species
bulletins has been delayed and the field
component of this program is not ready
for implementation. Therefore, OPP
Management, the Regional Pesticide
Supervisors and Division Director felt
Endangered Species should not be a field
NPM priority until bulletins become
more regularly produced and
implemented. We will reconsider this
decision after Endangered Species
bulletins become more regularly issued.



Affected Pages and
Sections
Deleted section from 2009
NPM Guidance; page 24.



Appendix, Page 18

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