Peer Review of Demonstrating the
            Safety and Crashworthiness of a 2020
            Model-Year, Mass-Reduced Crossover
            Vehicle (Lotus Phase 2 Report)
&EPA
United States
Environmental Protection
Agency

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                 Peer Review of Demonstrating the
               Safety and Crashworthiness of a 2020
               Model-Year, Mass-Reduced Crossover
                   Vehicle (Lotus Phase 2 Report)
                           Assessment and Standards Division
                          Office of Transportation and Air Quality
                          U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
                                Prepared for EPA by
                        Systems Research and Appliction Corporation
                             EPA Contract No. EP-C-11-007
                              Submitted February 2012
&EPA
United States
Environmental Protection
Agency
EPA-420-R-12-028
September 2012

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  Peer Review of Demonstrating the Safety and
  Crashworthiness of a 2020 Model-Year, Mass-
Reduced Crossover Vehicle (Lotus Phase 2 Report)


                     Table of Contents
    Peer Review of the Lotus Phase 2 Report, Conducted by SRA International         p. 4
      1.  Background                                         p. 4
      2.  Description of Review Process                              p. 5
      3.  Compilation of Review Comments                            p. 6
      4.  References                                         p. 54
      Appendices
         A. Resumes of Peer Reviewers                             p. 55
         B. Conflict of Interest Statements                           p. 75
         C. Peer Review Charge & Conference Call Notes                   p. 93
         D. Reviews                                         p. 101
    EPA's Response to Peer Review Comments                           p. 142

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                               Executive Summary
In September 2011, EPA contracted with SRA International (SRA) to conduct a peer review of
Demonstrating the Safety and Crashworthiness of a 2020 Model-Year, Mass-Reduced Crossover Vehicle
(Lotus Phase 2 Report), developed by Lotus Engineering, Inc.

The peer reviewers selected by SRA were William Joost (U.S. Department of Energy), CG Cantemir,
Glenn Daehn, David Emerling, Kristina Kennedy, Tony Luscher, and Leo Rusli (The Ohio State University),
Douglas Richman (Kaiser Aluminum), and Srdjan Simunovic (Oak Ridge National Laboratory). In addition,
Srdjan Simunovic and members of the OSU team reviewed various elements of the associated LS-DYNA
modeling.  EPA would like to extend its appreciation to all of the reviewers for their efforts in evaluating
this report and the modeling.  The reviewers brought useful and distinctive views in response to the
charge questions.

The first section of this document contains the final SRA report summarizing the peer review of the
Lotus Phase 2 Report, including the detailed comments of each peer reviewer and a compilation of
reviewer comments according to the series of specific questions set forth in the peer review charge.
The SRA report also contains the peer reviewers' resumes, completed conflict of interest and bias
questionnaires for each reviewer, and the peer review charge letter. The second major section contains
our responses to the peer reviewers' comments. In this section, we repeat the compiled comments
provided by SRA and, after each section of comments, provide our response. We have retained the
organization reflected in SRA's compilation of the comments to aid the reader  in moving from the SRA
report to our responses.

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TO:           Cheryl Caffrey, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Transportation and Air
              Quality (OTAQ)

FROM:        Brian Menard, SRA International

DATE:         February 28, 2012

SU BJ ECT:      Peer Review of Demonstrating the Safety and Crashworthiness of a 2020 Model-Year,
              Mass-Reduced Crossover Vehicle (Lotus Phase 2 Report), developed by Lotus
              Engineering, Inc.


1.  Background

In developing programs to reduce GHG emissions and increase fuel economy, the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA), the California Air Resources Board (CARB), and the National Highway
Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) have to assess the use of mass-reduction technology in
light-duty vehicles. The availability, feasibility, and validation of lightweight materials and design
techniques in the 2020 - 2025 timeframe is of high importance, especially considering its potential to be
one of the major technology areas that could be utilized to help achieve the vehicle GHG and fuel
economy goals.

The 2011 study by Lotus Engineering, Demonstrating the Safety and Crashworthiness of a 2020 Model-
Year, Mass Reduced Crossover Vehicle, was done under contract from CARB, coordinated by EPA and
CARB, and involved technical collaboration on safety with NHTSA. The study was conducted specifically
to help assess a number of critical questions related to mass-reduced vehicle designs in the 2020 - 2025
timeframe.

The Lotus study involves the design development and Crashworthiness safety validation of a mass-
reduced redesign of a crossover sport utility vehicle (i.e., starting from a 2009 Toyota Venza baseline)
using advanced materials and design techniques. The research entails the full conceptual redesign of a
vehicle. This review for the 2011 Lotus study is  referred to as "Phase 2" because it builds upon Lotus'
previous 2010 study An Assessment of Mass Reduction Opportunities for a 2017-2020 Model Year
Vehicle Program, which for context is referred to as "Phase 1" here and in the 2011 study.  This is noted
because the 2011 "Phase 2" study involves the non-body components (e.g., interior, suspension, chassis)
relating back to "Phase 1" work. The Phase 1 BIW was redesigned in the Phase 2 work using an
engineering design, safety testing, and validation of the vehicle's body-in-white structure.

This report documents the peer review of the Lotus Phase 2 Report. Section 2 of this memorandum
describes the process for selecting reviewers, administering the review process, and closing the peer
review.  Section 3 summarizes reviewer comments according to the series of specific questions set forth
in matrix contained in the peer review charge. The appendices to the memorandum  contain the peer
reviewers' resumes, completed conflict of interest and bias questionnaires for each reviewer,  and the
peer review charge letter.

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2.  Description of Review Process

In August 2011, OTAQ contacted SRA International to facilitate the peer review of the Lotus Phase 2
Report. The model and documentation were developed by Lotus Engineering, Inc.

EPA provided SRA with a short list of subject matter experts from academia and industry to serve as a
"starting point" from which to assemble a list of peer reviewer candidates.  SRA selected three
independent (as defined in Sections 1.2.6 and 1.2.7 of EPA's Peer Review Handbook, Third Edition)
subject matter experts to conduct the requested reviews.  SRA selected subject matter experts familiar
with automotive engineering and manufacturing, automotive materials, crash simulation, and cost
assessment. The coverage of these subject areas is shown below in Table A.
                                          Table A:
                            Peer Reviewer Experience and Expertise
Name
Douglas Richman
William Joost
Srdjan Simunovic
Glenn Daehn
etal.
Affiliation
Kaiser
Aluminum
US DOE
Oak Ridge
National
Laboratory
The Ohio State
University
Coverage
Automotive
materials
Y
Y
Y
Y
Bonding
forming
Y
Y
Y
Y
Manufacturing
assembly
Y
Y
/
Y
Crash
simulation
/
/
Y
Y
Cost
assessment
Y
/
/
Y
LS-DYNA
analysis
/
/
Y
Y
To ensure the independence and impartiality of the peer review, SRA was solely responsible for
selecting the peer review panel. Appendix A of this report contains the resumes of the three peer
reviewers. A crucial element in selecting peer reviewers was to determine whether reviewers had any
actual or perceived conflicts of interest or bias that might prevent them from conducting a fair and
impartial review of the CVCM and documentation. SRA required each reviewer to complete and sign a
conflict of interest and bias questionnaire. Appendix B of this report contains an explanation of the
process and standards for judging conflict and bias along with copies of each reviewer's signed
questionnaire.

SRA provided the reviewers a copy of the most recent version of the Lotus Phase 2 Report as well as the
peer review charge. The charge included a matrix of questions issues upon which the reviewers were
asked to comment. Reviewers were also encouraged to provide additional comments, particularly in
their areas of expertise and work experience. Appendix C of this report contains the memo to reviewers
from SRA with the peer review charge.
Two teleconferences between EPA, Lotus Engineering, the reviewers, and SRA was held to allow
reviewers the opportunity to raise any questions or concerns they might have about the Lotus Phase 2
Report and associated LS-DYNA modeling, and to  raise any other related issues with EPA and SRA,

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including EPA's expectations for the reviewers' final review comments. The notes of this conference
call are contained in Appendix C, following the peer review charge. SRA delivered the final review
comments to EPA by the requested date. These reviews, contained in Appendix D of this report,
included the reviewers' response to the specific charge questions and any additional comments they
might have had.

3. Compilation of Review Comments

The Lotus Phase 2 Report was reviewed by William Joost (U.S. Department of Energy), CG Cantemir,
Glenn Daehn, David Emerling, Kristina Kennedy, Tony Luscher, and Leo Rusli (The Ohio State University
(OSU)), Douglas Richman (Kaiser Aluminum), and Srdjan Simunovic (Oak Ridge National Laboratory).  In
addition, Srdjan Simunovic and members of the OSU team reviewed various elements of the associated
LS-DYNA modeling.  Appendix A contains detailed resumes for each of the reviewers. This section
provides a compilation of their comments. The complete comments  may be found in Appendix D.

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    1.  ASSUMPTIONS AND DATA
       SOURCES
                                                  COMMENTS
Please comment on the validity of
any data sources and assumptions
embedded in the study's material
choices, vehicle design, crash
validation testing, and cost
assessment that could affect its
findings.
[Joost] The accuracy of the stress-strain data used for each material during CAE and crash analysis is critically important
for determining accurate crash response. The sources cited for the material data are credible; however the Al yield
stresses used appear to be on the high side of the expected properties for the alloy-temper systems proposed here. The
authors may need to address the use of the slightly higher numbers (for example, 6061-T6 is shown with a yield stress of
308 MPa, where standard reported values  are usually closer to 275 MPa).

[Richman] Aluminum alloys and tempers selected and appropriate and proven for the intended applications. Engineering
data used for those materials and product forms accurately represent minimum expected minimum expected properties
normally used for automotive design purposes.

Simulation results indicate a vehicle utilizing the PH 2 structure is  potentially capable of meeting FMVSS requirements.
Physical test results have not been presented to confirm  model  validity, some simulation  results indicate unusual
structural performance and  the  models do not address occupant  loading conditions which are  the FMVSS validation
criteria. Simulation results alone would not be considered "validation" of PH 2 structure safety performance.

Cost estimates for the PH  2 vehicle are questionable. Cost modeling methodology relies on engineering estimates and
supplier cost projections.  The level of analytical rigor in this approach raises uncertainties about resulting cost estimates.
Inconsistencies in reported piece count differences between baseline and PH 2 structures challenge a major reported
source of cost savings. Impact of blanking  recovery on aluminum sheet product net cost was explicitly not considered.
Labor rates assumed for BIW manufacturing were $20/Hr below prevailing Toyota labor rate implicit in baseline Venza cost
analysis. Cost estimates for individual stamping tool  are substantially below typical tooling cost experienced for similar
products. Impact of blanking recovery and labor rates alone would increase BIW cost by over $200.

[OSU]  Material data, for the  most part, seems reasonably representative of what would be used in this type of automotive
construction. Some of the materials are more prevalent in other industries like rail, than in automotive.

Material specifications used in this report were nominal; however, reviewers would like to see min/max material
specifications taken  into consideration.

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If you find issues with data sources
and assumptions, please provide
suggestions for available data that
would improve the study.
[Joost] Materials properties describing failure are not indicated (with the exception of Mg, which shows an in-plane failure
strain of 6%). It seems unlikely that the Al and Steel components in the vehicle will remain below the strain localization or
failure limits of the material; it's not clear how failure of these materials was determined in the models. The authors
should indicate how failure was accounted for; if it was not, the authors will need to explain why the assumption of
uniform plasticity throughout the crash event is valid for these materials. This could be done by showing that the
maximum strain conditions predicted in the model are below the typical localization or failure limits of the materials (if
that is true, anyway).

Empirical determination of the joint properties was a good decision for this study. The author indicates that lap-shear tests
demonstrated that failure occurred outside of the bond, and therefore adhesive failure was not included in the model.
However, the joints will experience a variety of stress states that differ from lap-shear during a crash event. While not a
major deficiency, it would be preferable to provide some discussion of why lap-shear results can  be extended to all stress
states for joint failure mode. Alternatively, the author could also provide testing data for other joint stress states such as
bending, torsion, and cross tension.

[Richman] No comment.

[OSU] References for all of the materials and adhesives would be very helpful.

[Simunovic]  The overall methodology used by the authors of the Phase 2 study is fundamentally solid and follows
standard practices from the crashworthiness engineering. Several suggestions are offered that may enhance the outcome
of the study.

Material Properties and Models
Reduction of vehicle weight is commonly pursued  by use of lightweight materials and advanced designs. Direct
substitution  of materials on a component level is possible only conceptually because of the other constraints stemming
from the material properties, function of the component, its dimensions, packaging, etc. Therefore, one cannot decide on
material substitutions solely on potential weight savings. In general, an  overall re-design is required, as was demonstrated
in the study under review. An overview of the recent lightweight material concept vehicle initiatives is given in Lutsey,
Nicholas P., "Review of Technical Literature and Trends Related to Automobile Mass-Reduction Technology." Institute of
Transportation Studies, University of California, Davis, Research Report  UCD-ITS-RR-10-10 (2010).

The primary  body material for the baseline vehicle, 2009 Toyota Venza, is mild steel.  Except for about 8% of Dual Phase
steel with 590 MPa designation, everything else is the material which has  been used in automobiles for almost a century
and for which extensive design experience and manufacturing technologies exist. On the other hand, the High
Development vehicle concept employs novel lightweight materials, many of which are still under development, such as Mg
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alloys and fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites. These materials are yet to be used in large quantities in mass
production automobiles. Their lack of market penetration is due not only to a higher manufacturing cost, but also due to
an insufficient understanding, experience and characterization of their mechanical behavior. To compensate for these
uncertainties, designers must use higher safety factors, which then often eliminate any potential weight savings. In
computational modeling, these uncertainties are manifested by the lack of material performance data, inadequate
constitutive models and a lack of validated models for the phenomena that was not of a concern when designing with the
conventional materials. For example, mild steel components dissipate crash energy through formation of deep folds in
which material can undergo strains over 100%. Both analytical [Jones, Norman, "Structural Impact", Cambridge University
Press (1997).] and computational  methods [Ted Belytschko, T., Liu, W.-K., Moran, B., "Nonlinear Finite Elements for
Continua and Structures", Wiley (2000).] of the continuum mechanics are sufficiently developed to be able to deal with
such configurations. On the other hand, Mg alloys, cannot sustain such large deformations and strain gradients and,
therefore, require development of computational methods to model material degradation, fracturing, and failure in
general.

The material data for the vehicle model is provided in section 4.4.2. of the Phase 2 report. The stress-strain curves in the
figures are most likely curves of effective plastic strain  and flow stress for isotropic plasticity material constitutive models
that use that form of data, such as the LS-DYNA ["LS-DYNA Keyword User's Manual", Livermore Software Technology
Corporation (LSTC), version 971, (2010).] constitutive model number 24, named MAT_PIECEWISE_LINEAR_PLASTICITY. A
list detailing the constitutive model formulation for each of the materials of structural significance in the study would help
to clarify this issue. Also the design rationale for dimensioning and selection of materials for the main structural parts
would help in understanding the design decisions made by the authors of the study. The included material data does not
include strain rate sensitivity, so it is assumed that the  strain rate effect was not considered. Strain rate sensitivity can be
an important strengthening mechanism in metals. For hep (hexagonal close-packed) materials, such as AM60, high strain
rate may also lead to change in the underlying mechanism of deformation, damage evolution, failure criterion, etc. Data
for strain rate tests can be found in the open source [http://thyme.ornl.gov/Mg_new], although the  properties can vary
considerably with material processing and microstructure. The source of material data in the study was often attributed to
private communications. Those should be included in the report, if possible, or in cases when the data is available from
documented source, such as reference ["Atlas of Stress-Strain Curves", 2nd Ed., ASM International (2002).], referencing
can be changed. Properties for aluminum and steel were taken from publicly available sources and private
communications and are within accepted ranges.

Material Parameters and Model for Magnesium Alloy AM60
The mechanical response of Mg alloys involves anisotropy, anisotropic hardening, yield asymmetry, relatively low ductility,
strain rate sensitivity, and significant degradation of effective properties due to the formation and growth of micro-defects
under loading  [Nyberg EA, AA Luo, K Sadayappan, and W Shi, "Magnesium for Future Autos." Advanced Materials &
Processes 166(10):35-37 (2008).]. It has been shown, for example, that ductility of die-cast AM60 depends strongly on its

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microstructure [Chadha, G; Allison, JE; Jones, JW, "The role of microstructure and porosity in ductility of die cast AM50 and
AM60 magnesium alloys," Magnesium Technology 2004, pp. 181-186 (2004).], and, by extension, on the section thickness
of the samples. In case when a vehicle component does not play a strong role in crash, its material model and parameters
can be described with simple models, such as isotropic plasticity, with piecewise linear hardening curve. However,
magnesium is extensively used across the High Development vehicle design [An Assessment of Mass Reduction
Opportunities for a 2017-2020 Model Year Vehicle Program, Lotus Engineering Inc., Rev 006A, (2010).]. In Phase 1 report,
magnesium is found in many components that are in the direct path of the frontal crash (e.g. NCAP test). Pages 40-42 of
Phase 1 report show magnesium as material for front-end module (FEM), shock towers, wheel housing, dash panel, toe
board and front transition member. The front transition member seems to be the component that provides rear support
for the front chassis rail. However, in Phase 2 report, pages 35-37, shock towers and this component were marked as made
out of aluminum. A zoomed section of the Figure 4.2.3.d from the Phase 2 report is shown in Figure 1. [See Simunovic
Comments, p. 4.] The  presumed part identified as the front transition member is marked with an arrow.

These assignments were not possible to confirm from the crash model since the input files were encrypted. In any case,
since Mg AM60 alloy is used in such important role for the frontal  crash, a more detailed material model than the one
implied by the graph on page 32 of Phase 2 report [1] would be warranted.  More accurate failure model is needed, as well.
The failure criteria in LS-DYNA [6] are mostly limited to threshold values of equivalent strains and/or stresses. However,
combination of damage model with plasticity and damage-initiated failure would probably yield a better accuracy for
AM60.

Material Models for Composites
Understanding of mechanical properties for material denoted as Nylon_45_2a (reference [1] page 33) would be much
more improved if the constituents and fiber arrangement were described in more detail. Numbers 45 and 2 may be
indicating +/- 45° fiber arrangement, however, a short addition of  material configuration would eliminate unnecessary
speculation. An ideal plasticity model of 60% limit strain for this material seems to be overly optimistic. Other composite
models available in LS-DYNA may be a much better option.
[Simunovic, cont.]

Joint Models
Welded joints are modeled by variation of properties in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and threshold force for cutoff
strength. HAZs are relatively easy to identify in the model because their IDs are  in 1,000,000 range as specified on page 21
of the report [1]. An example of the approach is shown in Figure 2 [See Simunovic Comments, p. 5.], where the arrows
mark HAZs.
This particular connection contains welds (for joining aluminum parts) and bolts (for joining aluminum and magnesium).
HAZ properties were not given in the report and they could not be checked in the model due to encryption. The bolt model
properties were described that it fails at 130 MPa (page 38 of the report [1]), which corresponds to the yield stress of

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                                 AM60. The importance of these joints cannot be overstated. They enforce stability of the axial deformation mode in the
                                 rails that in turn enables dissipation of the impact energy. The crash sequence of the connection between the front end
                                 module and the front rail is shown in Figure 3. [See Simunovic Comments, p. 6.]

                                 The cracks in the front end module (Figure 3.2) and the separation between the front end module and the front rail (Figure
                                 3.3) are clearly visible. This zone experiences very large permanent deformations, as shown in Figure 4. [See Simunovic
                                 Comments, p. 6.]

                                 It is not clear from the simulations which failure criterion dominates the process. Is it the failure of the HAZ or is it the spot
                                 weld limit force or stress. Given the importance of this joint on the overall crash response, additional information about
                                 the joint sub-models would be very beneficial to a reader.
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:

[Richman]  Study includes an impressive amount of design, crash, and cost analysis information.  The radical part count reduction needs to be more fully
explained or de-emphasized.  Report also should address the greatly reduced tooling and assembly costs relative to the experience of today's automakers.
Some conservatism would be appropriate regarding potential shortcomings in interior design and aesthetics influencing customer expectations and acceptance.

[OSU]  One broad comment is that this report needs to be more strongly placed in the context of the state of the art as established by available literature. For
example the work only contains 7 formal references. Also, it is not clear where material data came from in specific cases (this should be formally referenced,
even if a private communication) and the exact source of data such in as the comparative data in Figure 4.3.2 is not clear. Words like Intillicosting are used to
denote the source of data and we believe that refers to a specific subcontract let to the firm 'intellicosting' for this work and those  results are shown here. This
needs to be made explicitly clear.
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    2.  VEHICLE DESIGN
       METHODOLOGICAL RIGOR
                                                  COMMENTS
Please comment on the methods
used to analyze the materials
selected, forming techniques,
bonding processes, and parts
integration, as well as the resulting
final vehicle design.
[Joost] While appropriate forming methods and materials appear to have been selected, a detailed description of the
material selection and trade-off process is not provided. One significant exception is the discussion and tables regarding
the replacement of Mg components with  Al and steel components in order to meet crash requirements.

Similarly, while appropriate joining techniques seem to have been used, the process for selecting the processes and
materials is not clear. Additionally, little detail is provided on the joining techniques used here. A major technical hurdle in
the implementation of multi-material systems is the quality, durability, and performance of the joints. Additional effort
should be expended towards describing the joining techniques used here and characterizing the performance.

[Richman]  Adhesive bonding and FSW processes used in PH 2  have  been proven in  volume production and would be
expected to perform well  in this application.  Some discussion of joining system for magnesium closure  inner panels to
aluminum external skin  and AHSS "B" pillar to aluminum body  would improve understanding and confidence in those
elements of the design.

Parts integration  information is vague and appears inconsistent.  Parts integration.   Major mass and cost savings  are
attributed to parts integration.  Data presented does not appear to results.

Final design appears capable of meeting functional, durability and FMVSS requirements. Some increase in mass and cost
are likely to resolve structure and NVH  issues encountered in component and vehicle level physical testing.

[OSU]  More details are needed on the  various aspects of joining and fastening. Comment on assembly.
Please describe the extent to
which state-of-the-art design
methods have been employed as
well as the extent to which the
associated analysis exhibits strong
technical rigor.
[Joost] Design is a challenging process and the most important aspect is having a capable and experienced design team
supporting the project; Lotus clearly meets this need and adds credibility to the design results.

One area that is omitted from the analysis is durability (fatigue and corrosion) performance of the structure. Significant
use of Al, Al joints, and multi-material joints introduces the potential for both fatigue and corrosion failure that are
unacceptable in an automotive product. It would be helpful to include narrative describing the good durability
performance of conventional (i.e. not Bentley, Ferrari, etc.) vehicles that use similar materials and joints in production
without significant durability problems. In some cases, (say the weld-bonded AI-Mg joints), production examples do not
exist so there should be an explanation of how these could meet durability requirements.

[Richman]  Vehicle design methodology utilizing Opti-Struct, NASTRAN and LS-Dyna is represents  a comprehensive and
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rigorous approach to BIW structural design and materials optimization.

[OSU]  In order to qualify for mass production, a process must be very repeatable. Figure 4.2.4.a shows the results from 5
test coupons. There are significant differences between all of these in peak strength and energy absorption. Such a spread
of results would not be acceptable in terms of production.

[Simunovic] The Phase 2 design study of the High Development vehicle considered large number of crash scenarios from
the FMVSS and IIHS tests. The simulations show reasonable results and deformations. Energy measures show that models
are stable and have no sudden spikes that would lead to instabilities. The discretization of the sheet material is primarily
done by proportionate quadrilateral shell elements, with relatively few triangular elements. The mesh density is relatively
uniform without large variations in element sizes and aspect ratios. However, in my opinion, there are two issues that
need to be addressed.  One is the modeling of material failure/fracture and the other is the design of the crush  zone with
respect to the overall stopping distance. While the former may be a part of proprietary technology, the latter issue should
be added to the description in order to better understand the design at hand.

Material Failure Models and Criteria
One of the modeling aspects that is usually not considered in conventional designs is modeling of material fracture/failure.
In the Phase 2 report [1] material failure is indicated only in  AM60 although it may be reasonably expected in other
materials in the model. Modeling of material failure in continuum mechanics is a fairly complex undertaking. In the current
Lotus High Development model, material failure and fracture are apparently modeled by element deletion. In this
approach, when a finite element reaches some failure criteria, the element is removed from simulations, which then
allows for creation of free surfaces and volumes in the structure. This approach is notoriously mesh-dependent. It implies
that the characteristic dimension for the material strain localization is of the size of the finite element where localization
and failure happen to occur. Addition of the strain rate sensitivity to a material model can both improve fidelity of the
material model, and as an added benefit, it can also help to regularize the response during strain localization. Depending
on the amount of stored internal energy and stiffness in the  deleted elements, the entire simulation can be polluted by the
element deletion errors and become unstable. Assuming that only AM60 parts in the Lotus model have failure  criterion, it
would not be too difficult for the authors to describe it in more depth. Since AM60 is such a critical material in the design,
perturbation of its properties, mesh geometry perturbations and different discretization densities, should be considered
and investigate how do they affect the convergence of the critical measures, such as crash distances.
A good illustration of the importance of the failure criteria is the response of the AM60 front end module during crash.
This component is always  in the top group of components ranked by the dissipated energy. Figure 5 [See Simunovic
Comments, p. 7.] shows deformation of the front end module during the full frontal crash.

Notice large cracks open in the mid span, on the sides, and punched out holes at the locations of the connection with the
front rail and the shotgun. Mesh refinement study of this component would be interesting and could also indicate the

                                                                                                             13

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robustness of the design. Decision to design such a structurally important part out of Mg would be interesting to a reader.

There are other components that also include failure model even though they are clearly not made out of magnesium nor
are their failure criteria defined in the Phase 2 report. Figure 6 [See Simunovic Comments, p. 8.] shows the sequence of
deformation of the front left rail as viewed from the right side of the vehicle.

The axial crash of the front rails is ensured by their connection to the front end, rear S-shaped support and to the
connections to the sub-frame. Figure 7 [See Simunovic Comments, p. 8.] shows the detail of the connectors between the
left crush rail to the subframe.

Tearing of the top of the support (blue) can be clearly observed in Figure 7.  The importance of this connection for the
overall response may warrant parametric studies for failure parameters and mesh discretization.

Crash Performance of the High Development Vehicle Design
From the safety perspective, the  most challenging crash scenario is the full profile frontal crash into a flat rigid barrier. The
output files for the NCAP 35 mph test were provided by Lotus Engineering and used for evaluation of the vehicle design
methodological rigor.

The two accelerometer traces from the simulation at the lower  B-pillar locations are shown in Figure 8. [See Simunovic
Comments, p. 9.]  When compared with NHTSA test 6601, the simulation accelerometer and displacement traces indicate
much shorter crush length than the baseline vehicle.

When compared vehicle deformations before and after the crush, it becomes obvious where the deformation occurs.
Figure 9 [See Simunovic Comments, p. 10.] shows the deformation of the front rail members.

It can be seen that almost all deformation occurs in the space spanned by the front frame rails. As marked in Figure 1, the
front transition member (or a differently named component in case my material assignment assumption was not correct),
supports the front rail so that it axially crushed and dissipated as much energy, as possible. For that purpose, this front rail
rear support was made extremely stiff and it does not appreciably deform during the crash (Figure 10). [See Simunovic
Comments, p. 10.] It has internal reinforcing structure that has not been described in the report. These reinforcements
enables it to reduce bending and axial deformations in order to  provide steady support for the axial crush of the aluminum
rail tube.

This design decision reduces the possible crush zone and stopping distance to the distance between the front of the
bumper and the front of the rail support (Figure 9). The effective crash length can be clearly seen  in Figure 11. [See
Simunovic Comments, p. 11.]

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                                 We can see from the above figure that the front rail supports undergo minimal displacements and that all the impact
                                 energy must be dissipated in a very short span. Figure 12 [See Simunovic Comments, p. 12.] shows the points of interest to
                                 determine the boundary of the crush zone, and an assumption that crash energy dissipation occurs ahead of the front
                                 support for the lower rail.

                                 Figure 13 [See Simunovic Comments, p. 12.] gives the history of the axial displacements for the two points above. At their
                                 maximum points, the relative reduction of their distance from the starting condition is 0.7 inches.

                                 Since the distance between the front of the rail support and the rocker remains practically unchanged during the test, we
                                 can reasonably assume that majority of the crash energy is dissipated in less than 22  inches. To quickly evaluate the
                                 feasibility of the proposed design, we can use the concept of the Equivalent Square Wave (ESW) ["Vehicle crashworthiness
                                 and occupant protection", American Iron and Steel Institute, Priya, Prasad and Belwafa, Jamel E., Eds. (2004).]. ESW
                                 assumes constant, rectangular, impact pulse for the entire length of the stopping distance (in our case equal to 22 in) from
                                 initial velocity (35 mph). ESW represents an equivalent constant rectangular shaped pulse to an arbitrary input pulse. In
                                 our case ESW is about 22 g. Sled tests and occupant model  simulations indicate that crash pulses exceeding ESW of 20 g
                                 will have difficulties to satisfy FMVSS 208 crash dummy performance criteria [11]. For a flat front barrier crash of 35 mph
                                 and an ESW of 20 g, the minimum stopping distance is 24 in. Advanced restraint systems and early trigger airbags may
                                 need to be used in order to satisfy the  injury criteria and provide sufficient ride down time for the vehicle occupants.

                                 The authors of the study do not elaborate on the safety indicators. I firmly believe that such a discussion would be very
                                 informative and valuable to a wide audience. On several places, the authors state values for average accelerations up to 30
                                 ms from the impact, and average accelerations after 30 ms. When stated without a context, these numbers do not help
                                 the readers who are not versed in the concepts of crashworthiness. The authors most likely refer to the effectiveness time
                                 of the restraint systems. An overview of the concepts followed by a discussion of the occupant safety calculations for this
                                 particular design would be very valuable.
If you are aware of better methods
employed and documented
elsewhere to help select and
analyze advanced vehicle materials
and design engineering rigor for
2020-2025 vehicles, please suggest
how they might be used to
improve this study.
[Joost] No comment.

[Richman] No comment.

[OSU] No suggestions at this time.
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ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:

[Joost] This is a very thorough design process, undertaken by a very credible design organization (Lotus). There are a variety of design assumptions and trade-
offs that were made during the process (as discussed above), but this would be expected for any study of this type. Having a design team from Lotus adds
credibility to the assumptions and design work that was done here.

Section 4.5.8.1 uses current "production" vehicles as examples for the feasibility of these techniques. However, many of the examples are for extremely high-
end vehicles (Bentley, Lotus Evora, McLaren) and the remaining examples are for low-production, high-end vehicles (MB E class, Dodge Viper, etc.). The cost of
some technologies can be expected to come down before 2020, but it is not reasonable to assume that (for example) the composites technologies used in
Lamborghinis will be cost competitive on any time scale; significant advances in composite technology will need to be made in order to be cost competitive on a
Venza, and the resulting material is likely to differ considerably (in both properties and manufacturing technique) from the Lamborghini grade material.

[Richman]  [1] Achieving a 37% BIW mass reduction  with a multi material design optimized for safety performance is consistent with recent research and
production vehicle experience. BIW mass reductions resulting from conversion of conventional BIW structures to aluminum based multi-material BIW have
ranged from 35%-39% (Jaguar XJ, Audi A8) to 47% (OEM study). BIW related mass reductions above 40% were achieved where the baseline structure was
predominantly mild steel.  A recent University of Aachen (Germany) concluded BIW structures optimized for safety performance utilizing low mass engineering
materials can achieve 35-40% mass reduction compared to a BIW optimized using conventional body materials. A recent BIW weight reduction study
conducted at the University of Aachen (Germany)",  http://www.eaa.net/en/applications/automotive/studies/

Most of the BIW content (materials, manufacturing processes) selected for the PH 2 vehicle have been in successful volume auto industry production for
several years.

[2] Closures/Fenders: Mass reduction in the closure and fender group is 59 Kg, 41% of baseline Venza. This level of mass reduction is consistent with results of
the Aachen and IBIS studies and industry experience on current production vehicles.  Hood and fenders on the PH 2 vehicle are aluminum. Recent Ducker
Worldwide Survey of 2012 North American Vehicles  found over 30% of all North American vehicles have aluminum hoods and over 15% of vehicle have
aluminum fenders.  PH 2 use of aluminum for closure panels is consistent with recognized industry trends for these components. PH 2 doors utilize aluminum
outer skins over cast magnesium inner panels.

[3] Material properties: Aluminum alloy and temper selection for BIW and Closures are appropriate for those components.  Those materials have been used in
automotive applications for several years and are growing in popularity in future vehicle programs.

[4] Typical vs. Minimum properties: Automobile structural designs are typically based on minimum mechanical properties. Report does not identify the data
used (minimum or typical). Aluminum property data used in for the PH 2 design represents expected minimum values for the alloys and tempers. This
reviewer is not able to comment on property values used for the other materials used in the BIW.

[5] Aluminum pre-treatment:  PH 2 vehicle structure  utilizes adhesive bonding of major structural elements.  Production vehicle experience confirms pre-

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treatment of sheet and extruded aluminum bonding surfaces is required to achieve maximum joint integrity and durability.  PH 2 vehicle description indicates
sheet material is anodized as a pre-treatment. From the report it is not clear that pretreatment is also applied to extruded elements.

The majority of high volume aluminum programs in North America have moved away from electrochemical anodizing as a pre-treatment. Current practice is
use of a more effective, lower cost and environmentally compatible chemical conversion process. These processes are similar to Alodine treatment.
Predominant aluminum pre-treatments today are provided by Novelis (formerly Alcan Rolled Products) and Alcoa (Alcoa 951). Both processes achieve similar
results and need to be applied to the sheet and extruded elements that will be bonded in assembly

[6] Suspension and Chassis: Suspension/chassis PH 2 mass reduction is 162 Kg (43% of baseline).  This level of mass reduction is higher than has been seen in
similar studies.  Lotus PH 2 includes conversion of steering  knuckles, suspension arms and the engine cradle to aluminum castings.  Mass reductions estimated
for conversion of those components are estimated at approximately 50%.  Recent Ducker study found aluminum knuckles are currently used on over 50% of
North American vehicles and aluminum control arms are used on over 30% of North American vehicles. Achieving 50% mass reduction through conversion of
these components to aluminum is consistent with industry experience.

[7] Wheel/Tire: Total wheel and tire mass reduction of 64 Kg (46%) is projected for the wheel and tire group.  Project mass reduction is achieved through a
reduction in wheel and tire masses and elimination of the spare tire and tool kit.

Tire mass reduction is made possible by a 30% reduction in vehicle mass. Projected tire mass reduction is 6 Kg for 4 tires combined. This mass reduction is
consistent with appropriate tire selection for PH 2 vehicle final mass.
Road wheel mass reduction is 5.6 Kg (54%) per wheel. It is not clear from the report how this magnitude of reduction is achieved. The report attributes wheel
mass reduction to possibilities with the Ablation casting process.  PH 1 report discussion of Ablation casting states: "The process would be expected to save
approximately 1 Kg per wheel." Considering the magnitude of this mass reduction a more detailed description of wheel mass reduction would be appropriate.

Elimination of the spare tire and jack reduces vehicle mass  by 23 Kg. This is feasible but has customer perceptions of vehicle utility implications. Past OEM
initiatives to eliminate a spare tire have encountered consumer resistance leading to reinstatement of the spare system in some vehicles.

[8] Engine and Driveline: Engine and driveline for the PH 2 vehicle were defined by the study sponsors and not evaluated for additional mass reduction in the
Lotus study.  Baseline Venza is equipped with a technically  comprehensive conventional 2.7 L4 with aluminum engine block  and heads and conventional 6
speed transmission.  PH 2 vehicle is equipped with a dual mode hybrid drive system powered by a turbocharged 1.0 L L-4 balance shaft engine.  Engine was
designed by Lotus and sized to meet the PH 2 vehicle performance and charging requirements. Mass reduction achieved with the PH 2 powertrain is 54 Kg.
This level of mass reduction appears achievable based on results of secondary mass reductions resulting from vehicle level mass reductions in excess of 20%.

[9] Interior: Lotus PH 2 design includes major redesign of the baseline Venza interior. Interior design changes achieve 97 Kg (40%) weight reduction from the
baseline interior. Majority of interior weight reduction  is achieved in the seating (43 Kg) and trim (28 Kg). Interior weight reduction strategies in the PH 2
design represent significant departures from  baseline Venza interior. New seating designs and interior concepts (i.e.: replacing carpeting with bare floors and
floor mats) may not be consistent with consumer wants and expectations in those areas. Interior trim and seating designs used in the PH 2 vehicle have been
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explored generically by OEM design studios for many years.

[10] Energy balance: Is presented as validation of the FEM analysis. For each load case an energy balance is presented. Evaluating energy balance is a good
engineering practice when modeling complex structures. Energy balance gives confidence in the mathematical fidelity of the model and that there are no
significant mathematical instabilities in the calculations. Energy balance does not confirm model accuracy in simulating a given physical structure.
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    3. VEHICLE
    CRASHWORTHINESS TESTING
    METHODOLOGICAL RIGOR.
                                                  COMMENTS
Please comment on the methods
used to analyze the vehicle body
structure's structural integrity and
safety crashworthiness.
[Joost] Regarding my comment on joint failure under complex stress states, note that in figure 4.3.12.a the significant
plastic strains are all located at the bumper-rail joints.  While this particular test was only to indicate the damage (and cost
to repair), the localization of plastic strain at the joint is somewhat concerning.

The total-vehicle torsional stiffness result is remarkably high. If this is accurate, it may contribute to an odd driving "feel",
particularly by comparison to a conventional Venza; higher torsional stiffness is usually viewed as a good thing, but the
authors may need to address whether or not such extreme stiffness values would be appealing to consumers of this type
of vehicle. While there doesn't appear to be a major source of error in the torsional stiffness analysis, the result does call
into question the accuracy; this is either an extraordinarily stiff vehicle, or there was an error during the analysis.

[Richman]  LS-Dyna and MSC-Nastran are current and accepted tools for this kind of analysis. FEM analysis is part art as
well as science, the assumption had to be made that Lotus has sufficient skills  and experience to generate a valid
simulation model.

[OSU] The crash simulations that were completed seem to be well created models of the vehicle that they represent. The
geometry was formed from mid-surface models of the sheet metal. Seat belt and child restraint points are logically
modeled.
Please describe the extent to
which state-of-the-art crash
simulation testing methods have
been employed as well as the
extent to which the associated
analysis exhibits strong technical
rigor.
[Joost] This is outside of my area of expertise

[Richman]  Model indicates the PH 2 structure could sustain a peak load of 108 kN under FMVSS 216 testing.  This is
unusually high for an SUV roof, and stronger than any roof on any vehicle produced to date. Result questions  stiffness and
strength results of the simulations.

Intrusion velocities and deformation  are used as performance criteria in the side impact simulations.  Performance
acceptability judgments made using those results, but no data was given for comparison to any other vehicle.

Occupant protection performance cannot be judged based entirely on deformations and intrusion velocities.

Report states that "the mass-reduced vehicle was validated for meeting the listed FMVSS requirements." This is an
overstatement of what the analysis accomplished. FMVSS test performance is judged based on crash dummy accelerations
and loads. The FEM analysis looked only at BIW acceleration and intrusion levels. While these can provide a good basis for
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                                engineering judgment, no comparison to physical crash test levels is provided. "Acceptable" levels were defined by Lotus
                                without explanation.  Results may be good, but would not be sufficient to "validate" the design for meeting FMVSS
                                requirements.

                                Model has not been validated against any physical property.  In normal BIW design development, an FEM is developed and
                                calibrated against a physical test. The calibrated model is considered validated for moderate A:B comparisons.

                                [OSU]  Animations of all of the crash tests were reviewed. These models were checks for structural consistence and it was
                                found that all parts were well attached. The deformation seen in the structure during crash seems representative of these
                                types of collisions. Progressive deformation flows in a logical manner from the point of impact throughout the vehicle.

                                [Simunovic] The documented results in the study show that authors have employed current state-of-the-art for
                                crashworthiness modeling and followed systematic technical  procedures.  This methodology led them through a sequence
                                of model versions and continuous improvement of the fidelity of the models. I would suggest that a short summary be
                                added  describing the major changes of the Phase 2 design with respect to the original  High Development vehicle body
                                design.
For reviewers with vehicle crash
simulation capabilities to run the
LS-DYNA model, can the Lotus
design and results be validated?*
[Joost] N/A

[Richman] Some validation can be done by reviewing modeling technique and assumptions, but without any form of
physical test comparison, the amount of error is unknown and can be significant.

FEM validation was presented in the form of an energy balance for each load case.  Energy balance is useful in confirming
certain internal aspects of the model are working correctly. Energy balance does not validate how accurately the model
simulates the physical structure.  Presenting energy balance for each load case and suggesting balance implies FEM
accuracy is misleading.

[OSU] The actual LS-DYNA model crash simulations were not rerun. Without any changes to the inputs there would be no
changes in the  output. Discussion of the input properties occurs in Section 2.

[Simunovic] The authors had several crash tests of the baseline vehicle, 2009 Toyota Venza, to use for comparison and
trends. Tests 6601 and 6602 were conducted in 2009 so that they could be readily used for the  development. The data
from test 6601 was used in the Phase 2 report for comparison. Test 6602 was not used for comparison in the report.
While the report abounds with crash simulations and graphs documenting tremendous amount  of work that authors have
done, it would  have been very valuable to add comparison with the 6602 test even at the expense of some graphs. Page
72 of the Phase 2 report starts with comparison of the simulations with the tests and that is one of the most engaging parts
of the document. I suggest that it warrants a section in itself. It is currently located out of place, in between the simulation
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                                 results and it needs to be emphasized more.  This new section would also be a good place for discussion on occupant
                                 safety modeling and general formulas for the subject.

                                 One of the intriguing differences between the simulations and baseline vehicle crash test is the amount and the type of
                                 deformation in the frontal crash. As noted previously, computational model is very stiff with very limited crush zone.
                                 Viewed from the left side (Figure 14) [See Simunovic Comments, p. 14.], and from below (Figure 15) [See Simunovic
                                 Comments, p. 15.], we can see that the majority of the deformation is in the frame rail, and that the subframe's rear
                                 supports do not fail. The strong rear support to the frame rail, does not appreciably deform, and thereby establishes the
                                 limit to the crash deformation.

                                 The overall side kinematics of the crash is shown in Figure 16. [See Simunovic Comments, p. 15.] The front tires barely
                                 touch the wheel well indicating a high stiffness of the design. Note that the vehicle does not dive down at the barrier.
                                 The numbers 1-4 below the images denote times after impact of Oms , 35ms, 40 ms, and 75ms, respectively. The times
                                 were selected based on characteristic event times observed in crash simulations.

                                 The following images are from the NHTSA NCAP crash test 7179 for 2011 Toyota Venza. The response is essentially the
                                 same as for the 2009 version, but the images are of much higher quality so that they have been selected for comparison.
                                 These times corresponding to the times in Figures 15 and 16 are shown in Figure 17. [See Simunovic Comments, p. 16.]

                                 The subframe starts to rapidly break off of the vehicle floor around 40 ms, and therefore allows for additional deformation.
                                 In Lotus vehicle this connection remains intact so that it cannot contribute to additional  crash length. The left side view of
                                 the test vehicle during crash at the same times is shown in Figure 18. [See Simunovic Comments, p. 17.]

                                 There is an obvious difference between the simulations and the tests. The developed lightweight model and the baseline
                                 vehicle do represent two different types of that share general dimensions, so that the differences in the responses can be
                                 large. However, diving down during impact is so common across the passenger vehicles so that different kinematics
                                 automatically raises questions about the accuracy of the suspension system and the mass distribution. If such kinematic
                                 outcome was a design objective, than it can be stated in the tests.
If you are aware of better methods
and tools employed and
documented elsewhere to help
validate advanced materials and
design engineering rigor for 2020-
2025 vehicles, please suggest how
they might be used to improve the
study.
[Joost] While it's not made explicit in the report, it seems that the components are likely modeled with the materials in a
zero-strain condition - i.e. the strain hardening and local change in properties that occurs during stamping is not
considered in the properties of the components. While not widely used in crash modeling (as far as I am aware), including
the effects of strain hardening on local properties from the stamping process is beginning to find use in some design tools.
While none of the materials used in this study have extreme strain hardening properties (such as you might find in TRIP
steels or 5000 series Al), all of these sheet materials will experience some change in properties during stamping.
I do not consider the study deficient for having used zero-strain components, but it may be worth undergoing a simple
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                                 study to determine the potential effects on some of the components. This is complicated by the further changes that may
                                 occur during the paint bake cycle.

                                 [Richman]  Cannot truly be validated without building a physical prototype for comparison.

                                 [OSU] LS-DYNA is the state of the art for this type of analysis. As time allows for the 2020-2025 model year, additional
                                 more detailed material modeling should occur. As an example the floor structure properties can be further investigated to
                                 answer structural creep and strength concerns.
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:

[Richman] Study is very thorough in their crash loadcase selections and generated a lot of data for evaluation.  Might have included IIHS Offset ODB and IIHS
Side Impact test conditions which most OEM's consider.

Study is less thorough in analyzing normal loads that influence BIW and chassis design (i.e. pot holes, shipping, road load fatigue, curb bump, jacking, twist
ditch, 2g bump, etc.).

Report indicates "Phase 2 vehicle model was validated for conforming to the existing external data for the Toyota Venza, meeting best-in-class torsional and
bending stiffness, and managing customary running loads." Only torsional stiffness is reported.

Modal frequency analysis data Is not reported.

Conclusions for many of the crash load cases (primarily dynamic) did not use simulation results to draw quantitative comparisons to the Toyota Venza or other
peer vehicles.  For instance, intrusion velocities for side impacts are reported.  But, no analytical comparison is made to similar vehicles that currently meet the
requirements.  Comparable crash tests are often available from NHTSA or IIHS.

Remarkable strength exhibited by the FEM roof under an FMVSS test load raises questions validity of the model.

Model assumes no failures of adhesive bonding in materials during collisions.  Previous crash testing experience suggest[s] some level of bonding separation
and resulting structure strength reduction is likely to occur.

Unusual simulation results- [1] Models appear reasonable and indicate the structure has the potential to meet collision safety requirements.  Some unusual
simulation results raise questions about detail accuracy of the models.
[2] FMVSS 216 quasi-static roof strength: Model indicates peak roof strength of 108 KN. This is unusually high strength for an SUV type vehicle. The report
attributes this high strength to the major load being resisted by the B-pillar. Several current vehicles employ this construction but have not demonstrated roof
strength at this level. The report indicates the requirement of 3X curb weight is reached within 20 mm which is typically prior to the test platen applying
significant load directly into the b-pillar.
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[3] 35 MPH frontal rigid barrier simulation: Report indicates the front tires do not contact the sill in a 35 MPH impact. This is highly unusual structural
performance. Implications are the model or the structure is overly stiff.

[4] Body torsional stiffness: Torsional stiffness is indicated to be 32.9 kN/deg. Higher than any comparable vehicles listed in the report. PH 2 structure torsional
stiffness is comparable to significantly more compact body structures like the Porsche Carrera, BMW 5 series, Audi A8.  It is not clear what elements of the PH 2
structure contribute to achieving the predicted stiffness.

[5] Door beam modeling: Door beams appear to stay tightly joined to the body structure with no tilting, twisting or separation at the lock attachments in the
various side impact load modes. This is highly unusual structural behavior.  No door opening deformation is observed in any frontal crash simulations.  This
suggests the door structure is modeled as an integral load path.  FMVSS requires that doors are operable after crash testing.  Door operability is not addressed
in the report.

[6] Safety analysis of the PH2 structure is based on collision simulation results using LS-Dyna and Nastran software simulations.  Both software packages are
widely used throughout the automotive industry to perform the type of analysis in this report.

Accuracy of simulated mechanical system performance is highly dependent on how well the FEM model represents the characteristics of the physical structure
being studied. Accurately modeling a complete vehicle body structure for evaluation under non-linear loading conditions experienced in collisions is a
challenging task. Small changes in assumed performance of nodes and joints can have a significant impact on predicted structure performance. Integration of
empirical joint test data into the modeling process has significantly improved the correlation between simulated and actual structure  performance.

[OSU] This reviewer sat down with the person who created and ran the LS-DYNA FEA models. Additional insight into how the model performs and specific
questions were  answered on specific load cases. All questions were answered.

Another reviewer which did not visit Lotus commented on the following:  1. The powertrain has more than 15% of the vehicle mass and therefore the right
powertrains should be used in simulation.

2. The powertrain is always mounted on the body by elastic mounts. The crash behavior of the elastic mounts might easy introduce a  10% error in
determination of the peak deceleration (failure vs not failure might be much more than 10%). So modeling a close-to-reality powertrain and bushing looks like a
must (at least for me).
3. Although not intuitive, the battery pack might have a worst crash behavior than the fuel tank. Therefore the shoulder to shoulder position might be inferior
to a tandem configuration (with the battery towards the center of the vehicle).

4. The battery pack crash behavior is of high importance of its own. It is very possible that after a crash an internal collapse of the cells and/or a penetration
might produce a short-circuit. It should be noted that by the time of writing there are not developed any reasonable solutions to mitigate an internal short-
circuit. Although not directly  life treating, this kind of event will  produce a vehicle loss.

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Also, very important, but subtle would be literature references that give an idea of how accurate the community can expect LS-DYNA crash simulations to be in
a study such as this. Often manufacturers have the luxury of testing similar bodies, materials and joining methodologies and tuning their models to match
broad behavior and then the effects of specific changes can be accurately measured. Here the geometric configuration, many materials and many joining
methods are essentially new. Can Lotus provide examples that show how accurate such 'blind' predictions may be?

Model calibration - Analytical models have the potential to closely represent complex non-liner structure performance under dynamic loading. With the
current state of modeling technology, achieving accurate modeling normally requires calibration to physical test results of an actual structure. Models
developed in this study have not been compared or calibrated to a physical test. While these simulations may be good representations of actual structure
performance, the models cannot be regarded as validated without some correlation to physical test results.

Project task list includes dynamic body structure modal analysis.  Report Summary of Safety Testing Results" indicates the mass reduced body exhibits "best in
class" torsional and bending stiffness. The report discusses torsional stiffness but there is no information on predicted bending stiffness.  No data on modal
performance data or analysis is presented.
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    4.  VEHICLE
       MANUFACTURING COST
       METHODOLOGICAL RIGOR
                                                 COMMENTS
Please comment on the methods
used to analyze the mass-reduced
vehicle body structure's
manufacturing costs.
[Joost] The report does a good job of identifying, in useful detail, the number of workstations, tools, equipment, and other
resources necessary for manufacturing the BIW of the vehicle. These are all, essentially, estimates by EBZ; to provide
additional credibility to the manufacturing assessment it would be helpful to include a description of other work that EBZ
has conducted where their manufacturing design work was implemented for producing vehicles. Lotus is a well-known
name, EBZ is less well known.

[Richman] Notable strengths of this analysis, besides the main focus on crash analysis, are the detail of assembly facility
design, labor content, and BIW component tooling identification.

Main weakness of the cost analysis is the fragmented approach of comparing costs derived in different approaches and
different sources, and trying to infer relevant information from these differences.

[OSU] Flat year-over-year wages for the cost analysis seems unrealistic.

Additional source information requested for wage rates for various locations.
Please describe the extent to
which state-of-the-art costing
methods have been employed as
well as the extent to which the
associated analysis exhibits strong
technical rigor.
[Joost] This is not my area of expertise

[Richman]  Vulnerability in this cost study appears to be validity and functional equivalence of BIW design with 169 pieces
vs. 407 for the baseline Venza.

Total tooling investment of $28MM for the BIW not consistent with typical OEM production experience.  BIW tooling of
$150-200MM would not be uncommon for conventional BIW manufacturing.  If significant parts reduction could be
achieved, it would mean less tools, but usually larger and more complex ones, requiring larger presses and slower cycle
times.

[OSU]  Difficult to evaluate since this portion of the report was completed by a subcontractor. The forming dies seem to be
inexpensive as compared to standard steel sheet metal forming dies.
If you are aware of better methods
and tools employed and
documented elsewhere to help
[Joost] This is not my area of expertise

[Richman]  Applying a consistent costing approach to each vehicle and vehicle system using a manufacturing cost model
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estimate costs for advanced
vehicle materials and design for
2020-2025 vehicles, please suggest
how they might be used to
improve this study.
approach. This approach would establish a more consistent and understandable assessment of cost impacts of vehicle
mass reduction design and technologies.

[OSU]  None.
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:

[Joost] The assessment of the energy supply includes a description of solar, wind, and biomass derived energy. While the narrative is quite positive on the
potential for each of these energy sources, it's not clear in the analysis how much of the power for the plant is produced using these techniques. If the
renewable sources provide a significant portion of the plant power, then the comparison of the Ph2 BIW cost against the production Venza cost may not be fair.
The cost of the Venza BIW is determined based on the RPE and several other assumptions and therefore includes the cost of electricity at the existing plant.
Therefore, if an automotive company was going to invest in a new plant to build either the Ph2 BIW or the current Venza BIW (and the new plant would have
the lower cost power) then the cost delta between the two BIWs would be different than shown here (because the current Venza BIW produced at a new  plant
would be less expensive). The same argument could be made for the labor costs and their impact on BIW cost. By including factors such as power and labor
costs into the analysis, it's difficult to determine what the cost savings/penalty is due only to the change  in materials and assembly - the impact of labor and
energy are mixed into the result.

[OSU] The number of workers assigned to vehicle assembly in this report seems quite low. Extra personal need to be available to replace those with unexcused
absences. Do these assembly numbers also include material handling personnel to stock each of the workstations?

While this work does make a compelling case it downplays some of the very real issues that slow such innovation in auto manufacturing. Examples: multi-
material structures can suffer accelerated corrosion if not properly isolated in joining. Fatigue may also limit durability in aluminum, magnesium or novel joints.
Neither of these durability concerns is raised.  Also, automotive manufacturing is very conservative in using new processes because one small process problem
can stop an entire auto manufacturing plant. Manufacturing engineers may be justifiably weary of extensive use of adhesives, until these are proven in mass
production in other environments. These very real impediments to change should be mentioned in the background and conclusions.

[Richman] Summary-Cost projections . . . lack sufficient rigor to support confidence in cost projections and in some cases are based on "optimistic"
assumptions. Significant cost reduction is attributed to parts consolidation in the body structure.  Part count data presented in the report appears to reflect
inconsistent content between baseline and PH 2 designs.  Body manufacturing labor rates and material blanking recovery are not consistent with actual
industry experience.  Using normal industry experience for those two factors alone would add $273 to body manufacturing cost. Tooling cost estimates for
individual body dies appear to be less than half normal industry experience for dies of this type.

Cost modeling - Assessing cost implications of the PH 2 design  [is] a critically important element of the project.
Total vehicle cost was derived from vehicle list price using estimated Toyota mark-up for overhead and profit.  This process assumes average Toyota mark-up
applies to Venza pricing.  List price for specific vehicles is regularly influenced by business and competitive marketing factors. (Chevrolet Volt is believed to be
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priced significantly below GM corporate average margin on sales, while the Corvette is believed to be above target margin on sales.) System cost assumptions
based on average sales margin and detailed engineering judgments can be a reasonable first order estimate. These estimates can be useful in allocation of
relative to costs to individual vehicle systems, but lack sufficient rigor to support definitive cost conclusions

Baseline Venza system costs were estimated by factoring estimated total vehicle cost and allocating relative cost factors for each major sub-system (BIW,
closures, chassis, bumpers, suspension,...) based on engineering judgment.  Cost of PH 2 purchased components were developed using a combination of
estimated baseline vehicle system estimated costs, engineering judgment and supplier estimates.  Cost estimates for individual purchased components  appear
realistic.

Body costs for PH 2 design were estimated by combining scaled material content from baseline vehicle (Venza) and projected manufacturing cost from a new
production processes and facility developed for this project. This approach is logical and practical, but lacks the rigor to support reliable estimates of new
design cost implications when the design changes represent significant departures from the baseline design content.

Body piece cost and tooling investment estimates were developed by Intgellicosting. No information was provided on Intellicosting methodology. Purchased
component piece cost estimates (excluding BIW) are in line with findings in similar studies. Tooling costs supplied by Intellicosting are significantly lower than
actual production experience would suggest.

Assembly costs were based on detailed assembly plant design, work flow analysis and labor content estimates.  Assembly plant labor content (minutes)  is
consistent with actual  BIW experienced in other OEM production projects.

The PH 2 study indicates and aluminum based multi material body (BIW, closures) can be produced for at a cost reduction of $199 relative to a conventional
steel body. That conclusion is not consistent with general industry experience. This inconsistency may result from PH 2 assumptions of material recovery, labor
rates and pars consolidation.

A recent study conducted by IBIS Associates "Aluminum Vehicle Structure: Manufacturing and Life Cycle Cost Analysis" estimated a cost increase $560 for an
aluminum vehicle BIW and closures.

http://aluminumintransportation.Org/members/files/active/0/IBIS%20Powertrain%20Studv%20w%20cover.pdf
That study was conducted with a major high volume OEM vehicle producer and included part cost estimates using detailed individual part cost estimates.
Majority of cost increases for the low mass body are offset by weight related cost reductions in powertrain, chassis and suspension components. Conclusions
from the IBIS study are consistent with similar studies and production experience at other OEM producers.

BIW Design Integration - Report identifies BIW piece count reduction from a baseline of 419 pieces to 169 for PH 2. Significant piece cost and labor cost savings
are attributed to the reduction in piece count.  Venza BOM lists 407 pieces in the baseline BIW. A total of 120 pieces are identified as having "0" weight and "0"
cost. Another 47 pieces are listed as nuts or bolts. PH 2 Venza BOM lists no nuts or bolts and has no "0" mass/cost components. With the importance

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attributed to parts integration, these differences need to be addressed.

Closure BOM for PH 2 appears to not include a number of detail components that are typically necessary in a production ready design. An example of this is the
PH 2 hood. PH 2 Hood BOM lists 4 parts, an inner and outer panel and 2 hinges.  Virtually all practical aluminum hood designs include 2 hinge bracket
reinforcements, a latch support and a palm reinforcement. Absence of these practical elements of a production hood raise questions about the functional
equivalency (mounting and reinforcement points, NVH, aesthetics,...) of the two vehicle designs. Contents of the Venza BOM should be reviewed for accuracy
and content in the PH 2 BOM should be reviewed for practical completeness.

Tooling Investment - Tooling estimates from Intellicosting are significantly lower than have been seen in other similar studies or production programs and will
be challenged by most knowledgeable automotive industry readers. Intellicosting estimates total BIW tooling at $28MM in the tooling summary and $70 MM
in the report summary. On similar production OEM programs complete BIW tooling has been in the range of $150MM to $200MM.  The report attributes low
tooling cost to parts consolidation. This does not appear to completely explain the significant cost differences between PH 2 tooling and actual production
experience. Parts consolidation typically results in fewer tools while increasing size, complexity and cost of tools used. The impact of parts consolidation on PH
2 weight and cost appears to be major. The report does not provide specific examples of where parts consolidation was achieved and the specific impact of
consolidation. Considering the significant impact attributed to parts consolidation, it would be helpful provide specific examples of where this was achieved
and the specific impact on mass, cost and tooling.  Based on actual production experience, PH 2 estimates for plant capital investment, tooling cost and labor
rates would be viewed as extremely optimistic

Material Recovery - Report states estimates of material recovery in processing were not included in the cost analysis. Omitting this  cost factor can have a
significant impact on cost of sheet based aluminum products used in this study. Typical auto body panel blanking process recovery is 60%.  This recovery rate is
typical for steel and aluminum sheet. When evaluation material cost of an aluminum product the impact of recovery losses should be included in the analysis.
Potential impact of material recovery for body panels:


              Approximate aluminum content (BIW, Closures)         240 Kg
              Input material required at 60% recovery                400 Kg
              Blanking off-all                                      160 Kg
              Devaluation of blanking off-all (rough estimate)
                      Difference between raw material and
                             Blanking off-all $1.30/Kg               $211
              Blanking devaluation increases cost of aluminum sheet products by over $ 0.90/Kg.

Appropriate estimates of blanking recoveries and material devaluation should be included in cost estimates for stamped aluminum sheet components.
Recovery rates for steel sheet products are similar to aluminum, but the economic impact of steel sheet devaluation is a significantly lower factor in finished
part cost per pound.


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Report indicates total cost of resistance spot welding (RSW) is 5X the cost of friction spot welding (FSW). Typical total body shop cost (energy, labor,
maintenance, consumable tips) of a RSW is $0.05 - $0.10. For the stated ratio to be accurate, FSW total cost would be $0.01-$0.02 which appears unlikely.  It is
possible the 5X cost differential apply to energy consumption and not total cost.

Labor rates - Average body plant labor rates used in BIW costing average $35 fully loaded.  Current North American average labor rates for auto manufacturing
(typically stamping, body production and vehicle assembly)

                     Toyota        $55
                     GM           $56 (including two tier)
                     Ford           $58
                     Honda         $50
                     Nissan         $47
                     Hyundai        $44
                     VW           $38

Labor rate of $35 may be achievable (VW) in some regions and circumstances. The issue of labor rate is peripheral to the central costing issue of this study
which is assessing the cost impact of light weight engineering design. Method used to establish baseline BIW component costs inherently used current Toyota
labor rates. Objective assessment of design impact on vehicle cost would use same labor rates for both configurations.

Labor cost or BIW production is reported to be $108 using an average rate of $35. Typical actual BIW labor content from other cost studies with North
American OEM's found actual BIW labor content approaching $200. Applying the current Toyota labor rate of $55 to the PH 2 BIW production plan increases
labor content to $170 (+$62) per vehicle.
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    5.  CONCLUSION AND
       FINDINGS
                                                  COMMENTS
Are the study's conclusions
adequately backed up by the
methods and analytical rigor of the
study?
[Joost] In the summary section there is an analysis that attempts to project the "potential weight savings" for vehicle
classes beyond the Venza. The analysis is based on specific density which assumes that the architecture of the vehicles is
the same. For example, the front-end crash energy management system in a micro car is likely quite different from the
comparable system in a large luxury car (aside from differences in gauge to account for limited crash space, as discussed in
the report). While this analysis provides a good  starting point, I do not feel that it is reasonable to expect the weight
reduction potential to scale with specific  density. In other words, I think that the 32.4 value used in the analysis also
changes with vehicle size due to changes in architecture. Similarly, the cost analysis projecting cost factor for other vehicle
classes is a good start, but it's unlikely that the numbers scale so simply.

[Richman]
Summary - General: Engineering analysis is very thorough and reflects the vehicle engineering experience and know-how
of the Lotus organization. Study presents a realistic perspective of achievable vehicle total vehicle mass reduction using
available design optimization tools, practical lightweight engineering materials an available manufacturing processes.
Results of the study provide important insight into potential vehicle mass reduction generally achievable by 2020.

Summary - Conclusions: Report Conclusions overstate the level of design "validation" achievable utilizing state-of-the- art
modeling techniques with no physical test of a representative structure. From the work in this study it is reasonable to
conclude the PH 2 structure has the potential to pass FMVSS and IIHS safety criteria.

Summary- Mass Reduction: Majority of mass reduction concepts utilized  are consistent with general industry trends.
Mass reduction potential attributed to individual components appear reasonable and consistent with industry experience
with similar components. As an advanced design concept study, the PH 2  project is a valuable and important  piece of
work.

       The PH 2 study did not include physical  evaluation of a prototype vehicle or major vehicle sub system. Majority of
       the chassis and suspension content was derived from similar components for which there is extensive volume
       production experience. Some of the technologies included in the design are "speculative" and may not mature to
       production readiness or achieve projected mass reduction estimates by 2020.  For those reasons, the PH 2 study is
       a "high side" estimate of practical overall vehicle mass reduction potential.

Summary- Safety: Major objective of this study is to  "validate" safety performance of the PH 2 vehicle concept. Critical
issue is the term "validate". Simulation modeling and simulation tools used by Lotus are widely recognized as state-of-the-
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                                 art.  Lotus modeling skills are likely to among the best available in the global industry. Project scope did not include
                                 physical test of the structure to confirm model accuracy.

                                 Safety performance data presented indicates the current structure has the potential to meet all FMVSS criteria, but would
                                 not be generally considered sufficient to "validated" safety performance of the vehicle.  Physical test correlation is
                                 generally required to establish confidence in simulation results.  Some simulation results presented are not consistent with
                                 test  results of similar vehicles. Explanations provided for the unusual results do not appear consistent with actual
                                 structure content. Overstating the implications of available safety results discredits the good design work and conclusions
                                 of this study.

                                 FMVSS test performance conclusions are based on simulated results using an un-validated FE model. Accuracy of the
                                 model is unknown.  Some simulation results are not typical of similar structures suggesting the model may not accurately
                                 represent the actual structure under all loading conditions.

                                 [OSU] Yes.
Are the conclusions about the
design, development, validation,
and cost of the mass-reduced
design valid?
[Joost] Yes. Despite some of the critical commentary provided above, I believe that this study does a good job of
validating the technical and cost potential of the mass-reduced design. The study is lacking durability analysis and, on a
larger scale, does not include constructing a demonstration vehicle to validate the model assumptions; both items are
significant undertakings and, while they would add credibility to the results, the current study provides a useful and sound
indication of potential.

[Richman]  Safety performance and cost conclusions are not clearly support by data provided.

Safety Conclusion - A major objective of the PH 2 study is to "validate" the light weight vehicle structure for compliance
with FMVSS requirements. State of the art FEM and dynamic simulations models were developed. Those models indicate
the body structure has the potential to satisfy FMVSS requirements.  FMVSS requirements for dynamic crash test
performance is defined with respect to occupant loads and accelerations as measured using calibrated test dummies. The
FEM simulations did not include interior, seats, restraint systems or occupants. Analytical models in this project evaluate
displacements, velocities, and accelerations of the body structure. Predicting occupant response based on body structural
displacements velocities and accelerations is speculative. Simulation results presented are a good indicator of potential
performance.  These simulations alone would not be considered adequate validation the structure for FMVSS required
safety performance.

[OSU] Yes.
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Are you aware of other available
research that better evaluates and
validates the technical potential
for mass-reduced vehicles in the
2020-2025 timeframe?
[Joost] The World Auto Steel Ultra Light Steel Auto Body, the ED SuperLight Car, and the DOE/USAMP Mg Front End
Research and Development design all provide addition insight into weight reduction potential. However, none are as
thorough as this study in assessing potential in the 2020-2025 timeframe.
[Richman] Most studies employing a finite element model validate a base model against physical testing, then do
variational studies to look at effect. Going directly from an unvalidated FEM to quantitative results is risky, and the level of
accuracy is questionable
[OSU] No.
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:
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    6.  OTHER POTENTIAL AREAS
       FOR COMMENT
                                                  COMMENTS
Has the study made substantial
improvements over previous
available works in the ability to
understand the feasibility of 2020-
2025 mass-reduction technology
for light-duty vehicles?  If so,
please describe.
[Joost] Yes. The best example was the Phase 1 study, which lacked much of the detail and focus included here. The other
studies that I mentioned above do not go into this level of detail or are not focused on the same time frame.

[Richman]  Fundamental engineering work is very good and has the potential to make a substantial and important
contribution to industry understanding of mass reduction opportunities. The study will receive intense and detailed critical
review by industry specialists. To achieve potential positive impact on industry thinking,  study content and conclusions
must be recognized as credible.  Unusual safety simulation results and questionable cost estimates (piece cost, tooling)
need to be explained or revised. As currently presented, potential contributions of the study are likely to be obscured  by
unexplained simulation results and cost estimates that are not consistent with actual program experience.

[OSU] Yes.
Do the study design concepts have
critical deficiencies in its
applicability for 2020-2025 mass-
reduction feasibility for which
revisions should be made before
the report is finalized?  If so,
please describe.
[Joost] There is nothing that I would consider a "critical deficiency" however many of the comments outlined above could
be addressed prior to release of the report.

[Richman] Absolutely.  Recommended adjustments summarized in Safety analysis, and cost estimates (recommendations
summarized in attached review report).  Credibility of study would be significantly enhanced with detail explanations or
revisions in areas where unusual and potentially dis-crediting results are reported. Conservatism in assessing CAE based
safety simulations and cost estimates (component and tooling) would improve acceptance of main report conclusions.

Impact of BIW plant site selection discussion and resulting labor rates confuse important assessment of design driven cost
impact. Suggest removing site selection discussion. Using labor and energy cost factors representative of the Toyota
Venza production more clearly identifies the true cost impact of PH 2 design content.

[OSU]  No.
Are there fundamentally different
lightweight vehicle design
technologies that you expect to be
much more common (either in
addition to or instead of) than the
one Lotus  has assessed for the
2020-2025 timeframe?
[Joost] Some effort was made in the report to discuss joining and corrosion protection techniques, however it is possible
that new techniques will be available prior to 2025. For example, there was very little discussion on how a vehicle which
combines so many different materials could be pre-treated, e-coated, and painted in an existing shop. There will likely be
new technologies in this area.

[Richman] Technologies included in the PH 2 design are the leading candidates to achieve safe cost effective vehicle mass
reduction in the 2020-25 timeframe.  Most technologies included in PH 2 are in current volume production or will be fully
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                                 production ready by 2015.

                                 [OSU]  No.
Are there any other areas outside
of the direct scope of the analysis
(e.g., vehicle performance,
durability, drive ability, noise,
vibration, and hardness) for which
the mass-reduced vehicle design is
likely to exhibit any compromise
from the baseline vehicle?
[Joost] As discussed above, durability is a major factor in vehicle design and it is not addressed here. The use of advanced
materials and joints calls into question the durability performance of a vehicle like this. NVH may also be unacceptable
given the low density materials and extraordinary vehicle stiffness.

[Richman]  Most areas of vehicle performance other than crash performance were not addressed at all.  Even basic
bending stiffness and service loads (jacking, towing, 2-g bump, etc)  were not addressed.  The report claims to address
bending stiffness and bending/torsional modal frequencies, but that analysis is not included in the report.

[OSU] The proposed engine size is based on the assumption that decreasing the mass of the vehicle and holding the same
power-to-weight ratio will keep the vehicle performances alike. This assumption is true only if the coefficient of drag (Cda)
will also decrease (practically a perfect match in all the dynamic regards is not possible because the quadratic behavior of
the air vs speed). The influence of the airdrag is typically higher than the general perception. In this particular case is very
possible that more than half of the engine  power will be used to overcome the airdrag at 65 mph. Therefore aerodynamic
simulations are mandatory in order to validate the size of the engine.
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:

[Joost] Clallam county, WA is an interesting choice for the plant location (I grew up relatively nearby). Port Angeles is not a "major port" (total population
<20,000 people) and access to the area from anywhere else in the state is inconvenient.

[OSU] The Lotus design is very innovative and pushes the design envelope much further than other advanced car programs. The phase 1 report shows a great
deal of topological innovation for the different components that are designed.
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Please provide any comments not characterized in the tables above.

[Joost] No comment.

[Richman] State-of-the art in vehicle dynamic crash simulation can provide A/B comparisons and
ranking of alternative designs, but cannot reliably produce accurate absolute results without careful
correlation to crash results.  CAE is effective in significantly reducing the need for hardware tests,
making designs more robust, and giving guidance to select the most efficient and best performing design
alternatives. OEM experience to date indicates CAE can reduce hardware and physical test
requirements, but cannot eliminate the need  for some level of crash load physical testing. Quasi-static
test simulations show potential for eliminating most if not all hardware (FMVSS 216 etc.), simulations of
FMVSS 208, 214, IIHS ODB and others still required several stages of hardware evaluation. Given the
challenges of simulating the complex crash  physics of a vehicle composed of advanced materials and
fastening techniques, hardware testing would generally be considered necessarily to "validate" BIW
structures for the foreseeable future.

Editorial - [1] Report makes frequent reference to PH 1 vehicle LD and HD configurations. These
references seem unnecessary and at times confusing. PH 1 study references do not enhance the
findings or conclusions of the PH 2 study. Suggest eliminating reference to the PH 1 study.

[2] Report would be clearer  if content detail from PH 1 project that is part of PH 2 project (interior,
closure, chassis content) is fully reported in PH 2 report.

[3] Weight and Cost reduction references: Baseline shifts between Total Vehicle and Total Vehicle Less
Powertrain.  A consistent baseline may avoid confusion.  Suggest using total vehicle as reference.

[4] Cost increases statements: Report makes  a number of cost references similar to:

Pg 4 - "The estimation of the BIW piece cost suggests an increase of 160 percent - over $700 - for the
37-percent mass-reduced body-in-white."

The statement indicates the increase is 160%. The increase of $700 is an increase of 60% resulting in a
total cost 160% of the baseline.

Site selection - [1] PH 2 project includes an extensive site selection study. Site selection is not related to
product design. Including economics based on preferential site selection confuses the fundamental
issue of the design exercise.  Assumption of securing a comparable site and achieving the associated
preferential labor rates and  operating expenses are at best unlikely. Eliminating the site selection and
associated cost would make the report more focused and cost projections more understandable and
believable.

[2] Advantaged labor rates and possible renewable energy operating cost savings could be applied to
any vehicle design. Entering those factors into the design study for the light weight redesign mixes
design cost with site selection and construction issues.

[3] Site plan includes use of  PV solar and wind turbines. Plant costs indicate general plant energy
(lighting, support  utilities, HVAC) (not processing energy) will be at "0" cost. True impact of  renewable
energy sources net of maintenance costs is at best controversial.  Impact of general plant energy cost on
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vehicle cost is minimal. The issue of renewable energy sources is valid but peripheral to the subject of
vehicle design. It would be clearer to use conventional general plant energy overhead in cost analysis of
the Phase II design cost.

Development experience - PH 2 vehicle design described is representative of a predevelopment design
concept. All OEM production programs go through this development stage. Most vehicle programs
experience some increase in mass and cost through the physical testing and durability development
process. Those increases are typically driven by NVH or durability issues not detectable at the modeling
stage. Mass dampers on the Venza front and rear suspension are examples of mass and cost increases.
Vehicle mass increases of 2-3% through the development cycle are not unusual.  It would be prudent to
recognize some level of development related mass increase in the PH 2 mass projection.

Vehicle content- Pg. 214 Bumpers:  Need to check statement: "Current bumpers are generally
constructed from steel extrusions, although some are aluminum and magnesium."

In North America 80% of all bumpers are rolled or stamped steel.  Aluminum extrusions are currently
20% of the NA market. There are no extruded steel bumpers.  There are no magnesium bumpers.

Technology- Majority of the design concepts utilized for PH 2 have been in reasonable volume
automotive production for multiple years and on multiple vehicles. A few of the ideas represent a
change in vehicle utility or are dependent on significant technology advancements that may not be
achievable.  Identifying the impact of currently proven technologies from speculative technologies may
improve understanding of the overall study.

Specific speculative technologies:

[1] Eliminate spare tire, jack, tools (23 Kg) - feasible, may influence customer perception of utility

[2] Eliminate carpeting -feasible, customer perception issue

[3] Dual cast rotors (2 Kg) - have been tried, durability issues in volume production, differential
expansion and bearing temperature issues may not be solvable

[4] Wheels Ablation cast (22.4 Kg) - process has been run experimentally but has not been proven in
volume. Benefit of process for wheel applications may not be achievable due to resultant metallurgical
conditions of the as-cast surfaces.

[OSU] No comment.

[Simunovic]  I would suggest that the organization of the document be reconsidered to add some
information from the Phase 1 and more discussion about the design process. Especially interesting
would be the guiding practical implementation of Lotus design steps as outlined  at the beginning of the
Phase 2 report.
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Review of Lotus Engineering Study "Demonstrating the Safety and
Crash wort hi ness of a 2020 Model-Year, Mass-Reduced Crossover Vehicle"

Srdjan Simunovic
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
simunovics @ornl.gov
Summary
This document provides expert opinions about the 2011 Lotus study titled "Demonstrating the Safety
and Crashworthiness of a 2020 Model-Year, Mass-Reduced Crossover Vehicle" (Lotus Phase 2 Study).
The Phase 2 Study used the  High Development lightweight vehicle design from the previous study titled
"An Assessment of Mass Reduction Opportunities for a 2017 - 2020 Model Year Vehicle Program" (Lotus
Phase 1 Study), as the basis for the development of a new vehicle design that would meet the US
Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards and the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety crash tests. The
crashworthiness of the new  design was evaluated using the computational modeling and simulations,
only. This document reviews the methodologies, research findings, and conclusions from this study. In a
nutshell, the Lotus Phase 2 crashworthiness study was performed in a consistent and professional
manner, employing state-of-the-art computational modeling and simulation technology. Several design
decisions, sub-model selections,  discretization, material and failure assumptions have been identified
for potential clarification and improvement.

1.  Introduction
This document provides expert review of the 2011 Lotus study "Demonstrating the Safety and
Crashworthiness of a 2020 Model-Year, Mass-Reduced Crossover Vehicle" [1]. The 2011 Lotus study
builds on the previous 2010  Lotus project [2] that developed two lightweight conceptual designs of the
existing vehicle, 2009 Toyota Venza. The first design, referred to as the "Low Development" vehicle, was
based on the materials and technologies that were deemed feasible for 2017 production. Its estimated
reduction in mass mass compared to the baseline production vehicle was 21%. The second version,
named "High Development" vehicle, was designed based on the materials and technologies that are
expected to be viable for mainstream production in 2020. Estimated weight savings for this vehicle were
38%. The study under review used the High Development concept as the basis for the development of a
new engineering design that would be expected to pass crash tests specified by the US Federal Motor
Vehicle Safety Standards and the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. Compliance with the crash tests
requirements was established  using the computational models, only. This review offers opinions and
suggestions about the methods and models used in computational simulations, and about the findings
and conclusions derived from the simulations. The scope  of the review is on the computational
simulations of vehicle crashworthiness. The primary source of the review opinions was the Lotus Phase 2
report. Lotus Engineering, Inc.  provided encrypted files for the crash models and crash configurations.
Due to encryption, specifics  of the material, failure, fracture, joining and structural sub-models
employed in the models  and simulations could not be evaluated. Later, Lotus Engineering Inc. also
provided output files of simulation of FMVSS 208 front crash test into rigid barrier. This review is based
on the above noted documents and files.
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2.  Methodology of the Review
The review of the Lotus Phase 2 study was conducted in order to provide specific opinions on the
following aspects of the study as charged by the EPA: (1) assumptions and data sources; (2) vehicle
design methodological rigor; (3) vehicle crashworthiness testing methodological rigor; (4) vehicle
manufacturing cost methodological rigor; (5) conclusion and findings; and (6) other comments. Each of
the subjects is further split into sub-subjects as needed for an in-depth evaluation. As noted above, this
review does not comment on item (4) as it is not in the field of expertise of the reviewer. The following
sections follow the outline of the EPA charge questions.

3.  Assumptions and Data Sources
This section contains comments on validity of data sources, material modeling approaches, and joint
models used in this study. The overall methodology used by the authors of the Phase 2 study is
fundamentally solid and follows standard practices from the crashworthiness engineering. Several
suggestions are offered that may enhance the outcome of the study.

Material Properties and Models
Reduction of vehicle weight is commonly pursued by use of lightweight materials and advanced designs.
Direct substitution of materials on a component level is possible only conceptually because of the other
constraints stemming from the material properties, function of the component, its dimensions,
packaging, etc. Therefore, one cannot decide on material substitutions solely on potential weight
savings. In general, an overall re-design is required, as was demonstrated in the study under review. An
overview of the recent lightweight material concept vehicle initiatives is given in reference [3].

The primary body material for the baseline vehicle, 2009 Toyota Venza, is mild steel.  Except for about
8% of Dual Phase steel with 590 MPa  designation, everything else is the material which has been  used in
automobiles for almost a century and for which extensive design experience and manufacturing
technologies exist. On the other hand, the High Development vehicle concept employs  novel lightweight
materials, many of which are still under development, such as Mg alloys and fiber reinforced polymer
matrix composites. These materials are yet to be used in large quantities in mass production
automobiles. Their lack of market penetration is due not only to a higher manufacturing cost, but also
due to an insufficient understanding,  experience and characterization of their mechanical behavior. To
compensate for these uncertainties, designers must use higher  safety factors, which then often
eliminate any potential weight savings. In computational modeling, these uncertainties are manifested
by the lack of material performance data, inadequate constitutive models and a lack of validated  models
for the phenomena that was not of a  concern when designing with the conventional materials. For
example, mild steel components dissipate crash energy through formation of deep folds in which
material can undergo strains over 100%. Both analytical [4] and computational methods [5]  of the
continuum mechanics are sufficiently developed to be able to deal with such configurations. On the
other hand, Mg alloys, cannot sustain such large deformations and strain gradients and, therefore,
require development of computational methods to model material degradation, fracturing, and failure
in general.
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The material data for the vehicle model is provided in section 4.4.2. of the Phase 2 report [1]. The stress-
strain curves in the figures are most likely curves of effective plastic strain and flow stress for isotropic
plasticity material constitutive models that use that form of data, such as the LS-DYNA [6] constitutive
model number 24, named MAT_PIECEWISE_LINEAR_PLASTICITY. A list detailing the constitutive model
formulation for each of the materials of structural significance in the study would help to clarify this
issue. Also the design rationale for dimensioning and selection of materials for the main structural parts
would help in understanding the design decisions made by the authors of the study. The included
material data does not include strain  rate sensitivity, so it is assumed that the strain rate effect was not
considered. Strain rate sensitivity can be an important strengthening mechanism in metals. For hep
(hexagonal close-packed) materials, such as AM60, high strain rate may also lead to change in the
underlying mechanism of deformation, damage evolution, failure criterion, etc. Data for strain rate tests
can be found in the open source [7], although the properties can vary considerably with material
processing and microstructure. The source of material data in the study was often attributed to private
communications. Those should be included in the report, if possible, or in cases when the data is
available from documented source, such as reference [8], referencing can be changed. Properties for
aluminum and steel were taken from publicly available sources and private communications and are
within accepted ranges.

Material Parameters and Model for Magnesium Alloy AM60
The mechanical response of Mg alloys involves anisotropy, anisotropic hardening, yield asymmetry,
relatively low ductility, strain rate sensitivity, and significant degradation of effective properties due to
the formation and growth of micro-defects under loading [9]. It has been shown, for example, that
ductility of die-cast AM60 depends strongly on its microstructure [10], and, by extension, on the section
thickness of the samples. In case when a vehicle component does not play a strong role in crash, its
material model and parameters can be described with simple models,  such as isotropic plasticity, with
piecewise linear hardening curve. However, magnesium is extensively  used accross the High
Development vehicle design [2]. In Phase 1 report [2], magnesium is found in many components that are
in the direct path of the frontal crash (e.g. NCAP test).  Pages 40-42 of Phase 1 report [1] show
magnesium as material for front-end  module (FEM), shock towers, wheel housing, dash panel, toe board
and front transition member. The front transition member seems to be the component that provides
rear support for the front chassis rail. However, in Phase 2 report [1], pages 35-37, shock towers and this
component were marked as made out of aluminum. A zoomed section of the Figure 4.2.3.d from the
Phase 2 report [1] is shown in Figure 1. The presumed part identified as the front transition member is
marked with an arrow.
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                         Figure 1. Material assignments in the front end.
These assignments were not possible to confirm from the crash model since the input files were
encrypted. In any case, since Mg AM60 alloy is used in such important role for the frontal crash, a more
detailed material model than the one implied by the graph on page 32 of Phase 2 report [1] would be
warranted. More accurate failure model is needed, as well. The failure criteria in LS-DYNA [6] are mostly
limited to threshold values of equivalent strains and/or stresses. However, combination of damage
model with plasticity and damage-initiated failure would probably yield a better accuracy for AM60.

Material Models for Composites
Understanding of mechanical properties for material denoted as Nylon_45_2a (reference [1] page 33)
would be much more improved if the constituents and fiber arrangement were described  in more detail.
Numbers 45 and 2 may be indicating +/- 45° fiber arrangement, however, a short addition of material
configuration would eliminate unnecessary speculation. An ideal plasticity model of 60% limit strain for
this material seems to be overly optimistic. Other composite models available in LS-DYNA  may be a
much better option.

Joint Models
Welded joints are modeled by variation of properties in the  Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and threshold
force for cutoff strength.  HAZs are relatively easy to identify in the model because their IDs are in
1,000,000 range as specified on page 21 of the report [1]. An example of the approach is shown in Figure
2, where the arrows mark HAZs.
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                  Figure 2. Joint between the front-end module and the crush rail.

This particular connection contains welds (for joining aluminum parts) and bolts (for joining aluminum
and magnesium). HAZ properties were not given in the report and they could not be checked in the
model due to encryption. The bolt model properties were described that it fails at 130 MPa (page 38 of
the report [1]), which corresponds to the yield stress of AM60. The importance of these joints cannot be
overstated. They enforce stability of the axial deformation mode in the rails that in turn enables
dissipation of the impact energy. The crash sequence of the connection between the front end module
and the front rail is shown in Figure 3.
                (1)
                 Figure 3. Crush of the front rail and front end module connection.

The cracks in the front end module (Figure 3.2) and the separation between the front end module and
the front rail (Figure 3.3) are clearly visible. This zone experiences very large permanent deformations,
as shown in Figure 4.
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    Figure 4. Plastic deformation distribution in the front end joint. Colors denote magnitude of the
                                    equivalent plastic strain.

It is not clear from the simulations which failure criterion dominates the process. Is it the failure of the
HAZ or is it the spot weld limit force or stress. Given the importance of this joint on the overall crash
response, additional information about the joint sub-models would be very beneficial to a reader.

4.   Vehicle Design Methodological Rigor
The Phase 2  design study of the High Development vehicle considered large number of crash scenarios
from the FMVSS and IIHS tests. The simulations show reasonable results and deformations. Energy
measures show that models are stable and have no sudden spikes that would lead to instabilities. The
discretization of the sheet material is primarily done by proportionate quadrilateral shell elements, with
relatively few triangular elements. The mesh density is relatively uniform without large variations in
element sizes and aspect ratios. However, in my opinion, there are two issues that need to be
addressed. One is the modeling of material failure/fracture and the other is the design of the crush zone
with respect to the overall stopping distance. While the former may be a part of proprietary technology,
the latter issue should be added to the description in order to better understand the design  at hand.

Material Failure Models and Criteria
One of the modeling aspects that is usually not considered in conventional designs is modeling of
material fracture/failure. In the Phase 2 report  [1] material failure is indicated only in AM60 although it
may be reasonably expected in other materials in the model. Modeling of material failure in continuum
mechanics is a fairly complex undertaking. In the current Lotus High Development model, material
failure and fracture are apparently modeled by element deletion. In this approach, when a finite
element reaches some failure criteria, the element is removed from simulations, which then allows for
creation of free surfaces and volumes in the structure. This approach  is notoriously mesh-dependent. It
implies that the characteristic dimension for the material strain localization is of the size of the finite
element where localization and failure happen to occur. Addition of the strain rate sensitivity to a
material model can both improve fidelity of the material model, and as an added benefit, it can also help
to regularize the  response during strain localization. Depending on the amount of stored internal energy
                                                                                           42

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and stiffness in the deleted elements, the entire simulation can be polluted by the element deletion
errors and become unstable. Assuming that only AM60 parts in the Lotus model have failure criterion, it
would not be too difficult for the authors to describe it in more depth. Since AM60 is such a critical
material in the design, perturbation of its properties, mesh geometry perturbations and different
discretization densities, should be considered and investigate how do they affect the convergence of the
critical measures, such as crash distances.

A good illustration of the importance of the failure criteria is the response of the AM60 front end
module during crash. This component is  always in the top group of components ranked by the
dissipated energy. Figure 5 shows deformation of the front end module during the full frontal crash.
                         (1)                                          (2)

                Figure 5. Plastic deformation distribution in the front end connection

Notice large cracks open in the mid span, on the sides, and punched out holes at the locations of the
connection with the front rail and the shotgun. Mesh refinement study of this component would be
interesting and could also indicate the robustness of the design. Decision to design such a structurally
important part out of Mg would be interesting to a reader.

There are other components that also include failure model even though they are clearly not made out
of magnesium nor are their failure criteria defined in the Phase 2 report. Figure 6 shows the sequence of
deformation of the front left rail as viewed from the right side of the vehicle.
                    Figure 6. Constraints for controlling the crush of the front rail
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The axial crash of the front rails is ensured by their connection to the front end, rear S-shaped support
and to the connections to the sub-frame. Figure 7 shows the detail of the connectors between the left
crush rail to the subframe.
                  Figure 7. Connections between the front rail and the subframe

Tearing of the top of the support (blue) can be clearly observed in Figure 8. The importance of this
connection for the overall response may warrant parametric studies for failure parameters and mesh
discretization.

Crash Performance of the  High Development Vehicle Design
From the safety perspective, the most challenging crash scenario is the full profile frontal crash into a
flat rigid barrier. The output files for the NCAP 35 mph test were provided by Lotus  Engineering and
used for evaluation of the vehicle design methodological rigor.

The two accelerometer traces from the simulation at the lower B-pillar locations are shown in Figure 8.
When compared with NHTSA test 6601, the simulation accelerometer and displacement traces indicate
much  shorter crush length than the baseline vehicle.
                                                                                         44

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                    frt_fmvss20BJfb35
                                             Time [s]
                         Figure 8. Accelerometers at the bases of B-pillars

When compared vehicle deformations before and after the crush, it becomes obvious where the
deformation occurs. Figure 9 shows the deformation of the front rail members.
                     (D                                          (2)
                   Figure 9. Top view of the crash deformation during NCAP test

It can be seen that almost all deformation occurs in the space spanned by the front frame rails. As
marked in Figure 1, the front transition member (or a differently named component in case my material
assignment assumption was not correct), supports the front rail so that it axially crushed and dissipated
as much energy, as possible. For that purpose, this front rail rear support was made extremely stiff and
it does not appreciably deform during the crash (Figure 10). It has internal reinforcing structure that has
                                                                                           45

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not been described in the report. These reinforcements enables it to reduce bending and axial
deformations in order to provide steady support for the axial crush of the aluminum rail tube.
                         Figure 10. Configuration of the front rail support

This design decision reduces the possible crush zone and stopping distance to the distance between the
front of the bumper and the front of the rail support (Figure 9). The effective crash length can be clearly
seen in Figure 11.
                             (1)
                               Figure 11. Crush zone for NCAP test

We can see from the above figure that the front rail supports undergo minimal displacements and that
all the impact energy must be dissipated in a very short span. Figure 12 shows the points of interest to
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determine the boundary of the crush zone, and an assumption that crash energy dissipation occurs
ahead of the front support for the lower rail
                      Figure 12. Points of interest for determining crush zone

Figure 13 gives the history of the axial displacements for the two points above. At their maximum
points, the relative reduction of their distance from the starting condition is 0.7 inches.
         frt_fmvss208Jfb35
   5
   x
                                          Time [s]
 Figure 13. X displacements of the base of B-pillar (A) and front of the support rail (B) for the NCAP test
                                                                                             47

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Since the distance between the front of the rail support and the rocker remains practically unchanged
during the test, we can reasonably assume that majority of the crash energy is dissipated in less than 22
inches. To quickly evaluate the feasibility of the proposed design, we can use the concept of the
Equivalent Square Wave (ESW) [11]. ESW assumes constant, rectangular, impact pulse for the entire
length of the stopping distance (in our case equal to 22 in) from initial velocity (35 mph). ESW represents
an equivalent constant rectangular shaped pulse to an arbitrary input pulse. In our case ESW is  about
22g. Sled tests and occupant model simulations indicate that crash pulses exceeding ESW of 20  g will
have difficulties to satisfy FMVSS 208 crash dummy performance criteria [11]. For a flat front barrier
crash of 35 mph and an ESW of 20 g, the minimum stopping distance is 24 in. Advanced restraint
systems and early trigger airbags may need to be used in order to satisfy the injury criteria and  provide
sufficient ride down time for the vehicle occupants.

The authors of the study do not elaborate on the safety indicators. I firmly believe that such a discussion
would be very informative and valuable to a wide audience. On several places, the authors state values
for average accelerations up to 30 ms from the impact, and average accelerations after 30 ms. When
stated without a context, these numbers do  not help the readers who are not versed in the concepts of
crashworthiness. The authors most likely refer to the effectiveness time of the restraint systems. An
overview of the concepts followed by a  discussion of the occupant safety calculations for this particular
design would  be very valuable.

5.  Vehicle Crashworthiness Testing Methodological Rigor
The documented results in the study show that authors have employed current state-of-the-art for
crashworthiness modeling and followed systematic technical procedures. This methodology led them
through a sequence of model versions and continuous improvement of the fidelity of the models. I
would suggest that a short summary be added describing the major changes of the Phase 2 design with
respect to the original High Development vehicle body design.

The authors had several crash tests of the baseline vehicle, 2009 Toyota Venza, to use for comparison
and trends. Tests 6601 and 6602 were conducted in 2009 so that they could be readily used for the
development. The data from test 6601 was used in the Phase 2 report for comparison. Test 6602 was
not used for comparison in the report. While the report abounds with crash simulations and graphs
documenting tremendous amount of work that authors have done, it would have been very valuable to
add comparison with the 6602 test even at the expense of some graphs. Page 72 of the Phase 2 report
starts with comparison of the simulations with the tests and that is one of the most engaging parts of
the document. I suggest that it warrants a section in itself. It is currently located out of place, in between
the simulation results and it needs to be emphasized more. This new section would also  be a good place
for discussion on occupant safety modeling and general formulas for the subject.

One of the intriguing differences between the simulations and baseline vehicle crash test is the  amount
and the type of deformation in the frontal crash. As noted previously, computational model is very stiff
with very limited crush zone. Viewed from the left side (Figure 14), and from below (Figure 15), we can
see that the majority of the deformation is in the frame rail, and that the subframe's rear supports do
                                                                                           48

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not fail. The strong rear support to the frame rail, does not appreciably deform, and thereby establishes
the limit to the crash deformation.
                       (1)                                                   (2)

                 Figure 14. Crush zone of the front structure during the NCAP test.
Figure 15. Crush zone of the front structure during the NCAP test viewed from below. Note that the rear
                               subframe connection does not fail.
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The overall side kinematics of the crash is shown in Figure 16. The front tires barely touch the wheel well
indicating a high stiffness of the design.  Note that the vehicle does not dive down at the barrier.
                        (1)
                                                                  (2)
                        (3)                                         (4)
                      Figure 16. Overall vehicle kinematics for the NCAP test.

The numbers 1-4 below the images denote times after impact of Oms , 35ms, 40 ms, and 75ms,
respectively. The times were selected based on characteristic event times observed in crash simulations.

The following images are from the NHTSA NCAP crash test 7179 for 2011 Toyota Venza. The response is
essentially the same as for the 2009 version, but the images are of much higher quality so that they have
been selected for comparison. These times corresponding to the times in Figures 15 and 16 are shown in
Figure 17
                                                                                          50

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 Frame #
    41

   Time
   0.041
                                                              (4)
                      Figure 17. Vehicle subframe deformation for NCAP test

The subframe starts to rapidly break off of the vehicle floor around 40 ms, and therefore allows for
additional deformation.  In Lotus vehicle this connection remains intact so that it cannot contribute to
additional crash length. The left side view of the test vehicle during crash at the same times is shown in
Figure 18.
                                                                                         51

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                            Time   0.011     Frame #
  Frame #
Time   0.041
Frame #
75
Time   0.075
                     (3)
                                   (4)
                        Figure 18. Vehicle side kinematics during NCAP test

There is an obvious difference between the simulations and the tests. The developed lightweight model
and the baseline vehicle do represent two different types of that share general dimensions, so that the
differences in the responses can be large. However, diving down during impact is so common across the
passenger vehicles so that different kinematics automatically raises questions about the accuracy of the
suspension system and the mass distribution. If such kinematic outcome was a design objective, than it
can be stated in the tests.

6.  Other Comments
I would suggest that the organization of the document be reconsidered to add some information from
the Phase 1 and more discussion about the design process. Especially interesting would be the guiding
practical implementation of Lotus design steps as outlined at the beginning of the Phase 2 report.

7.  Conclusions
Lotus Phase 2 crashworthiness study has been reviewed based on the charge questions by the US EPA. It
has been found that the study followed all the relevant technical guidelines and state-of-the-art
practices for computational crash simulation and design. Several areas of improvement were suggested
that pertain to material modeling, structural design and organization of the report.
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References

    1.  Demonstrating the Safety and Crashworthiness of a 2020 Model-Year, Mass-Reduced Crossover
       Vehicle, Lotus Engineering Inc., Draft Report, (2011).

    2.  An Assessment of Mass Reduction Opportunities for a 2017-2020 Model Year Vehicle Program,
       Lotus Engineering Inc., Rev 006A, (2010).

    3.  Lutsey, Nicholas P., "Review of Technical Literature and Trends Related to Automobile Mass-
       Reduction Technology." Institute of Transportation Studies, University of California, Davis,
       Research Report UCD-ITS-RR-10-10 (2010).

    4.  Jones, Norman, "Structural Impact", Cambridge University Press (1997).

    5.  Ted Belytschko, T., Liu, W.-K., Moran, B., "Nonlinear Finite Elements for Continua and
       Structures", Wiley (2000).

    6.  "LS-DYNA Keyword User's Manual", Livermore Software Technology Corporation (LSTC), version
       971, (2010).

    7.  http://thyme.ornl.gov/Mg_new

    8.  "Atlas of Stress-Strain Curves", 2nd Ed., ASM International (2002).

    9.  Nyberg EA, AA Luo, K Sadayappan, and W Shi, "Magnesium for Future Autos." Advanced
       Materials & Processes 166(10):35-37 (2008).

    10. Chadha, G; Allison, JE; Jones, JW, "The role of microstructure and porosity in ductility of die cast
       AM50 and AM60 magnesium alloys," Magnesium Technology 2004, pp. 181-186 (2004).

"Vehicle crashworthiness and occupant protection", American Iron and Steel Institute, Priya, Prasad and
Belwafa, Jamel E., Eds. (2004).
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4.  References

Lotus Engineering. Demonstrating the Safety and Crashworthiness of a 2020 Model-Year, Mass-Reduced
Crossover Vehicle.  2012.
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                            Appendix A: Resumes of Peer Reviewers


                                          William Joost
3300 East West Hwy Apt 534                william.joost@gmail.com                    Mobile: (202) 674-8900
Hyattsville, MD 20782

Education:
    Working toward Ph.D. Materials Science and Engineering                               Est. May 2014
    University of Maryland, College Park, MD.
    M.S. Materials Science and Engineering                                                     May 2009
    Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ.
    B.S. Materials Engineering                                                                  May 2005
    Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI), Troy, NY.

Employment Experience:
       General Engineer                                                                  Jan. 2010-Present
       U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC
         -  Serves  as  the Technology Area  Development  Manager for the  Lightweight Materials portfolio  in the
           Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP).  Supports research  on  improving  properties, manufacturability &
           joining, and modeling &  simulation of advanced steels, aluminum alloys,  and magnesium  alloys  for
           automotive applications.
         -  Directs a budget of ~$10M per year supporting research in structural metals for conventional and electric
           drive vehicles. Manages projects that involve teams from  diverse  disciplines  including materials science,
           mechanical engineering, computer science, and physics. Supports interaction between participants from
           industry, national laboratories, and academia.
         -  Develops solicitation  topics, coordinates proposal reviews, and manages project performance. Participates
           in the formulation, justification, tracking,  and execution of the Lightweight Materials budget.  Manages
           publication  of Annual Report for the Lightweight Materials sub-program. Coordinates activities in  metals
           with the Office of Advanced Manufacturing, U.S Department of Energy.
         -  Led the light-duty vehicles portion of the 2011 VTP Advanced Materials Workshop. Used the industry-
           supported  results to  develop new program goals, establish weight reduction targets for vehicle systems,
           and draft road mapping priorities.

       Manufacturing  Engineer/Equipment Engineering Supervisor                           Apr. 2008-Dec. 2009
       Heraeus Materials Technology LLC, Chandler, AZ
         -  Managed the Equipment  Engineering  Team, responsible for  maintaining functionality, capability,  and
           uptime of ~180 pieces of capital equipment including high power,  high vacuum, and precision machining
           tools.
         - Created a high yielding process technique  for Pt-containing alloys, saving  more than $500,000 per year in
           refining costs
         - Developed vacuum induction melting (VIM) and hot rolling  processing techniques for specialty Co, Ni, and
           Fe based alloys and intermetallic materials
         - Introduced a scrap metal recycling process for machining chips of Co and Pt based alloys, reducing scrap
           costs by more than $40,000 per month

       Process Engineer/Manufacturing Engineering Production Supervisor                   Oct. 2005-Apr. 2008
       Heraeus Materials Technology LLC, Chandler, AZ
         -  Managed a  16-person rolling team across four shifts
         -  Developed  a stress/strain  model of the  hot rolling process  which included equipment  behavior  and
           material characteristics
         - Modeled material properties as a function of alloy and ingot dimensions to automate roll schedule creation
         - Applied Design of Experiments methodology in  melting and hot rolling  processes to identify significant
           process factors and improve yields on high value sputtering targets


                                                                                                       55

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Research Experience:
       Graduate Researcher in Ph.D. program, Materials Science and Engineering              Aug. 2010 - Present
       University of Maryland, College Park, MD
         - Exploring  the microstructural-scale deformation behavior of Ti alloys  using  computational materials
           science techniques
         - Developing finite element models (ANSYS) of Ti microstructures and determining the impact of grain
           interaction stresses on the deformation mechanisms during creep

       Graduate Researcher in M.S. program, Materials Science and Engineering               Jan. 2007-May 2009
       Arizona State University,  Tempe, AZ
         - Determined  sputtering recipes  for optimal deposition of textured  Ru films in  perpendicular magnetic
           recording media
         - Characterized the effects of CoCrX alloy seed layers for Ru in  perpendicular magnetic recording media by
           X-ray  diffraction,  Rutherford   backscattering,  atomic  force microscopy,  and  transmission  electron
           microscopy
         - Demonstrated improved  coherency at the interface of Ru  films deposited on CoCrV seed  layers by
           calculation of Ru film strain energy

Publications and Presentations
       1) Joost, W., Das, A., Alford, T.L. "Effects of varying CoCrV seed  layer deposition pressure on Ru crystallinity
       in perpendicular magnetic recording media" Journal of Applied Physics, 106, 073517 (2009).

       2)  Joost, W.  "Lightweight  Materials for  Vehicles:   Needs, Goals,  and  Future  Technologies."  Invited
       presentation at the 47th  Sagamore Army Materials Research Conference on Advanced Lightweight  Metals
       Technology, St. Michaels, MD,  06/17/2010.

       3) Joost, W. "Lightweight Materials for Vehicles: Needs, Goals,  and  Future  Technologies." Invited keynote
       presentation  at the 3rd  Annual Advanced  Lightweight  Materials for Vehicles conference,  Detroit, MI,
       8/11/2010.

       4) Joost, W. "Materials  Development for Vehicle Weight Reduction and the  Impacts on Energy Efficiency."
       Invited  keynote  presentation  at the Materials Science and Technology (MS&T) 2011 conference, Columbus,
       OH, 10/18/2011.
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                    Codrin-Gruie (CG) Cantemir

                    Research Scientist

                    Ohio State University Center for Automotive Research
                    http://car.osu.edu
                    cantemir.1@osu.edu
Codrin-Gruie Cantemir is a Research Scientist with Ohio State University and he is the
Center for Automotive Research Chief Designer. He received his  Diplomat Engineer
degree in 1989 (Electromechanics) and his Ph.D. in 1997  (Electric Drives), both from
"Gh. Asachi" Technical University of lasi in Romania. He has been with OSU-CAR since
2001  and he is responsible for research  / design programs in hybrid-electric vehicles,
drivetrains, heavy-duty vehicle and vehicle concept designs.
Dr. Cantemir  has a concept design portfolio of 12 conventional vehicles, 4  military
vehicles, 2 aircrafts, 2 high-speed trains,  4 heat engines  and 2 marine jet propulsion
systems  He also holds 18 patents and authored 2 books and 40+ technical papers.
Dr. Cantemir's special research  interests are related  to creative methods applied  to
advanced vehicle concepts and influence of  new technologies in vehicle  architecture
and styling. He has also professional interests  and is active in:

Aerodynamics - Fundamental and applied works based on CFD modeling and testing.  Bluff
and non-laminar bodies. Application  of  Coanda  and Miller  effects. Forward Swept Wings
aerodynamics. Small Reynolds number effects and  applications
Batteries Architecture, packaging, advanced active/passive safety features, cooling, drop  an go
systems, fuses, on board integration of the battery charger and BMS
Cooling  - Advanced cooling system architecture, design,  modeling and simulation.  Cooling
systems for heavy duty electric drives and fuel cells (low AT). Unconventional cooling systems
for armored vehicles (very small air in/out ports)
Design-  Development and application of creative  methods for vehicle concept generation.
Design space exploration and trend assessing procedures development.
Engines -  New thermodynamic cycles and mechanisms for implementation, "cycles on
demand"  solutions, free piston compound engines,  turbo/super-charging  and turbomachinery
(including electronic management). Thermo-jet applications in marine and aviation propulsion
Electric  Drives  - Fundamental research and applied design  of high performance electric
machines and power electronics.  Development of new electric  drives  principles and applied
technologies. High power drives
Powertrain and  Transmission - Conventional  and hybrid electric  powertrain design,
modeling and simulation. Advance multi-role EVT  and  CVAWD  (continuously variable all
wheel drive) system concepts and development. Drive  lines and high-torque CV joints
Suspension - Advance independent suspension concepts for the trucking industry, design
modeling and simulation. Novel architecture (multi stage) suspensions for high performance high
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speed off road vehicles. New suspension mechanism and dynamics for multimode active/semi
active suspensions.
Structures  - Steel based  honeycomb type structures and afferent technologies. New high
energy absorption principles and related structures.
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                                  GLENN S. DAEHN

                  Department of Materials Science and Engineering
                             The Ohio State University
                     2041 College Road, Columbus, OH 43210
           P: 614/292-6779, E: Daehn.1@osu.edu, W: osu.edu/mse/~daehn

 EDUCATION:
             STANFORD UNIVERSITY                                 Palo Alto, CA
             Ph.D., Materials Science & Engineering, 1988.

             STANFORD UNIVERSITY                                 Palo Alto, CA
             M.S., Materials Science & Engineering, 1985.

             NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY                          Evanston, Illinois
             B.S. (departmental honors), Materials Science & Engineering, 1983.
             Received Gotaas Award for outstanding undergraduate research.

EXPERIENCE:
11/87-pres    Professor (1996-pres), Assoc, Asst. OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY, Columbus, OH
             Teaching and research focus on mechanical behavior and processing of
             structural materials. High velocity sheet metal forming and mechanical behavior
             of composites are focus areas.

7/04-10/07    V. P. Technology  EXCERA MATERIALS GROUP         Worthington, OH
Co-founder (1993) developer/manufacturer ceramic composites by reactive processing.
             Sabbatical in 04-05 academic year. OSU-based, technology now
             commercialized by Fireline, Inc. & Rex Materials Group.

1/97-7/97     Visiting Scientist,  ROCKWELL SCIENCE CENTER,      Thousand Oaks, CA
             Sabbatical period; engaged in manufacturing and materials performance issues.

9/83-11/87    Research Assistant,  STANFORD UNIVERSITY,              Palo Alto, CA
             Dissertation under Oleg D. Sherby: laminated composites of superplastic
             ultrahigh carbon steel and stainless steel.

SELECT PROFESSIONAL AWARDS & ACTIVITIES:
2010 - pres   Executive Director; Honda-Ohio State Partnership

2010         Named Fellow ASM International

2010 -        Member, Board of Trustees,  ASM Materials Education Foundation.

2010-        Chair,  International Impulse Forming Group

2009 - pres   Director, Ohio Manufacturing Institute - New organization focused on linking
             industry and Ohio's research assets

2009         Innovators Award of Ohio State College of Engineering

2008-        Founding Vice-Chair,  International Impulse Forming Group

2007         ASM Jacquet-Lucas Award for Excellence in Metallography.
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2002-3       Served on National Research Council Committee on "Use of Lightweight
             Materials in 21st Century Army Trucks"

1996         One of 13 invited speakers at second National Academy of Engineering Frontiers
             of Engineering Meeting

1995-1997    Chair, IMS Shaping and Forming Committee

1995         Named Mars G. Fontana Professor of Metallurgical Engineering.

1992         National Young Investigator of National Science Foundation.

1992         Army Research Office Young Investigator Award.

1992&'00, 04 Lumley Research Award of Ohio State University College of Engineering.

1992         Robert Lansing Hardy Gold Medal of IMS, recognizing outstanding promise in
             the  broad field of metallurgy.

1990         ASM Marcus A. Grossmann Young Author Award, for "Deformation of Whisker-
             Reinforced MMC's Under Changing Temperature Conditions".
SELECTED RECENT PUBLICATIONS
"Creep Behavior and Deformation Mechanisms for Nanocluster-Strengthened Ferritic Steels",
M. C. Brandes, L. Kovarik, M. Miller, G. S. Daehn and M. J. Mills, in press: Acta Materialia
(2011).

"Predictive Mechanism for Anisotropy Development in the Earth's Inner Core", D. M. Reaman,
G. S. Daehn and W. R. Panero, accepted in Earth Planetary Science Letters (2011).

"Dislocation Mediated Time-Dependent Deformation in Crystalline Solids", M. J. Mills and G. S.
Daehn, Chapter in: Computational Methods for Microstructure-Property Relationships, S. Ghosh
and D.  M. Dimiduk, editors, Springer Science, 311-363 (2011).

"Energy Field Methods and Electromagnetic Metal Forming", G. S.  Daehn, Chapter 18 in:
Intelligent Energy Field Methods and Interdisciplinary Process Innovations, Wenwu Zhang,
Editor,  CRC Press, 2011, pp. 471-504.

"Production of Low-Volume Aviation Components Using Disposable Electromagnetic Actuators"
Steven Woodward, Christian Weddeling, Glenn Daehn, Verena Psyk, Bill Carson, A. Erman
Tekkaya, Journal of Materials Processing Technology, 211, Iss. 5, pp. 886-895, (2011).

"Electromagnetic Impulse Calibration of High Strength Sheet Metal Structures",  E. Iriondo, M. A.
Gutierrez, B. Gonzalez, J. L. Alcaraz and G. S. Daehn, Journal of Materials Processing
Technology, 211, Iss.  5, pp. 909-915, (2011).

"Simulation and Instrumentation of Electromagnetic Compression of Steel Tubes", A. Vivek, K-H
Kim, and G. S.  Daehn, Journal of Materials Processing Technology, 211, Iss. 5, pp. 840-850,
(2011).


Selected Patents and Applications
"Low Temperature Spot Impact Welding Driven Without Contact", Glenn D. Daehn and John C.
Lippold. US Patent 8084710, Issued December 27, 2011.

"Electromagnetic Actuator for Multiple Operations", Glenn S. Daehn, PCT Applicaton:
PCT/US08/61066, Filed 4/19/08.

"Driver Plate for Electromagnetic Forming of Sheet Metal", John R. Bradley and Glenn S.
Daehn, US Patent Application 2009/0090162, Published  4/9/09.
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"Electromagnetic Metal Forming" (Uniform Pressure Actuator), G. S. Daehn, U. S. Patent,
2,069,756, Issued 7/4/06.

"Electromagetic Formation of Fuel Cell Plates" John, R. Bradley, James G. Schroth and Glenn
S. Daehn, U.S. Patent 7,076.981, Issued 7/18/2006.

 "High Velocity Forming of Local Features Using a Projectile", G. S. Daehn,  U. S. Patent
7,000,300, Issued 2/21/06.

"5000 series alloys with improved corrosion properties and methods for their manufacture and
use", M. C. Carroll, M. J. Mills, R. G. Buchheit, G. S.  Daehn,  B. Morere, P. Kobe, and H. S.
Goodrich, US Patent Application  10/628579, published 5/13/04.


Courses Developed and Recently Taught:
Developed:  Engineering 198a / "Engineering, Manufacturing and the Creation of Wealth"

Developed:  MSE 605: Quantitative Introduction to Materials  Science and Engineering
MSE 581.02: Materials Science Lab II (Junior Level)

MSE 765: Mechanical Behavior of Materials

MSE 863: Time Dependent Deformation of Solids

MSE 561 Mechanical  Behavior of Materials
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David Emerling
1896 Cass Lake Front Rd                                                              (248) 877- 4718
Keego Harbor. MI 48320                                                         David@Emerling.us

                                    ENGINEERING EXECUTIVE

Highly motivated and innovative Engineering Executive with a strong technical background. Excellent
communicator with the ability to sell technical products to a customer. Six Sigma Green Belt certification.
Demonstrated achievements in:
     •  Expanding Sales                               « Promoting innovative Product Solutions
     •  Creating and leading Advanced Engineering and     « Developing and implementing Program
       Program Teams                                  Management Systems
     •  Implementing Technical Shows and Exhibits        • Directing technical teams
     •  Working within Asian cultural differences          « Patenting new products

                                  PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

The Ohio State University (OSU), Columbus, OH                                          2008- Present
Industrial Collaborations Director
Executing a broad strategy targeted at attracting industrial funding for OSU in the form of consortium
membership fees, gifts, student scholarships, fellowships, and research programs.

Microheat Incorporated (bankrupt), Farmington Hills, Michigan                                    2008
Program Director
Responsible for all Microheat programs launching for Ford Motor Company.  This includes responsibility for
the programs over all timing, cost, open issues, tooling, testing, customer interface, ordering of parts, PPAP, and
over all program success.
• Ford was a critical customer of Microheat's expansion which would have led to $20 million dollars in sales.

Lear Corporation, Southfield, Michigan                                                      1988-2007
Director of Corporate Development-International Automotive Components -Lear /F(2007)
Responsible for internal/external  communications, including media relations  and  development  of lACNA's
website; corporate identity
• Assigned as Member, Employee Involvement Team and Corporate Community Service Committee

Director of Advanced Sales/Technical Support - Lear Asian OEM Division (1999-2007)
Directed the  advanced sales  activity for  the Asian OEMs,  including Nissan, Toyota, Hyundai and Honda.
Responsible for implementing private technology shows at the OEM plus creating a Lear technology booth at
the Tokyo Motor Show, Japan SAE and the MEMA/JAMA Conference. Asian OEM representative to Corporate
Patent Council
. Increased sales with Asian OEMs from $ 10M in 2002 to $ 175M in 2007.
• Invented and patented a MediaConsole, sold it to Nissan, designed and produced it adding $500K in sales.
• Provided technical support  to the advanced sales team which was awarded  over 50 patents and increased sales over
  $36M annually.
• Hosted Japanese, Chinese, Korean and Indian delegations to Lear US
• Created an advanced engineering team which developed new products for sale to Asian OEMs
• Created a global company presentation database which saved over $ 1M per year and provided standardized presentations
  quickly to the sales team.
• Speaker at Detroit Chinese Business Association convention
• Corporate champion for implementation of Chinese Certification

Director of Advanced Engineering - Lear Donnelly -Lear JV( 1989-1999)
Created, hired and led a new team of advanced engineers to support the product development for the new joint
venture. This team included interior, electrical/electronic engineers and process engineering.
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• Hired a team and created the systems to track new technology development resulting in sales increases.
• Invented and patented an overhead audio system trademarked as OASys
• Provided technical support to the sales team both internally and with customers.

Manager of Advanced Engineering -Interior Trim (Lear Technology Division) (1995-1998)
Developed advanced technology and products,  including door trim, door modules, visors, hard trim, liftgate
modules, headliners and safety countermeasures
• Received Lear's President's Award for Outstanding Technological Innovation and Achievement
Design and Engineering Manager -Automotive Industries - Lear Acquisition (1993-1995)
Responsible for  1997 Ford Winstar quarter panels and pillars, 1997 Ford Explorer quarter panels, pillars, scuffs
and interior trim, and 1998 Ford F150/F250 entire interior of three cab configurations. Managed 10 engineers
and 55 designers
• Oversaw  design/engineering  of  components, program timing, progress  tracking,  engineering disciplines, tooling,
  manpower, and design/engineering budget and profitability
• Advanced development of door products and manufacturing processes which kept the company portfolio on the cutting
  edge of technologies and products.
• Team leader for development of a complete patented door module which is in production.
• Published technical paper on door modules by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE)

Program Manager-Fibercraft//Descon - Lear Acquisition (1988-1995)
1993  Firebird/Camaro car total interior,  FfVAC, electrical and  audio, exterior mirrors; 1995  Century IP,
electrical and HVAC
• Assured program profitability,  timing, progress tracking,  invoicing  of deliverables and sales related to design,
  illustration, dimensional management and engineering clays
• Oversaw die model build, design for assembly, assembly process, quality assurance fixtures and mockup

General Motors, Warren, Michigan                                                          1981-1988
System Engineer - Firebird/Camaro Electrical
Plant Resident Engineer
Manager - Master Parts List Project
Engineering  Change Authorization Task force
Senior Product Engineer - Interior and Electrical
Test and Development Engineer

                                             PATENTS

#7,050,593 Vehicular Audio System and Electromagnetic Transducer Assembly                    May 2006
#6,719,343 Vehicle Console Assembly (production 2002 - 2007)                                  Apr 2004
#6,546,674 Vehicle Door Assembly with a Trim Panel forming a Structural Door Module Component
Carrier (production 2006 to current)                                                             Apr 2003
#6,409,210 Integrated Side Air Curtain and Inflator Overhead System                              Jun 2002
#6,019,418 Modular Vehicle Liftgate Module                                                    Feb 2000
#6,125,030 Vehicle Overhead Console with Flip Down Navigation Unit                            Sep 2000
#5,904,002 Motor Vehicle Door Module                                                        May 1999
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                              EDUCATION AND TRAINING

                       Bachelor of Science Degree, Mechanical Engineering
                             Ohio State University, Columbus, OH
                                    Dale Carnegie Course
                                Taguchi Designed Experiments
                                Six Sigma Green Belt Certified
                                 Karrass Effective Negotiating

                             PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

Society of Automotive Engineering - Detroit Chapter (30 years)
Ohio State Alumni Club of Detroit - current/past president, treasurer and board member
Ohio State Engineering CAR Consortium - advisory board member
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                                       Kristina Kennedy
                  7263 Fitzwilliam Drive 0 Dublin, Ohio 43017 0 614-395-3568 0 kennedy.443@osu.edu
EDUCATION
THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY
Master of Business Administration

UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
Bachelor of Science, Mechanical Engineering
Columbus, OH
   August 2008

 Iowa City, IA
December 2000
EXPERIENCE
THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY                                           Columbus, OH
Business Development Manager, Ohio Manufacturing Institute         Aug. 2010 - Present
•    Coordinate collaborative R&D opportunities, including tracking possible opportunities,
     assembling multi-disciplinary teams, and assisting with proposal development in order to
     develop and improve the operation, visibility and effectiveness of OMI
•    Successfully secured $100K+ seed funding and developed related procedures and
     documentation in order to launch Co-Located Internship Program in March 2011 to deploy
     OSU students to industry partners as technology transfer mechanisms within commercially-
     expected time-scales.
•    Efficiently manage inquiries of potential customers of research and development services;
     develop and sustain customer satisfaction through new survey mechanism

GREIF                                                                  Delaware, OH
Regional Marketing Manager (Midwest)                            Nov. 2008 - Oct. 2009
•    Effectively managed cross functional engineering / marketing new product development team
     to ensure timely and effective roll out of earth-friendly green consumer product line.
•    Key member of competitive intelligence team for green product line in charge of seeking out
     competitor product offerings, customer base, sales strategy and sales channels in order to
     gain valuable competitive knowledge, create value added reports of findings, and make sales /
     strategy recommendations to upper management.
•    Oversaw and implemented effective go-to-market pricing strategies for all product lines based
     on deep analysis of current market indices, close analysis of raw material prices, and
     segmentation of targeted customer base.

THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY                                           Columbus, OH
Assistant Director - Outreach                                     Jan. 2006 - Oct. 2008
•    Developed, managed and successfully executed all aspects of engineering outreach
     programming for the College of Engineering in order to foster educational outreach initiatives
     and expand the recruitment candidate pool.
•    In conjunction with Math and Science Departments, developed targeted retention strategy
     involving special activities, student involvement workshops, and free tutoring sessions which
     resulted in -15% increase in retention of undergraduate students.
•    Fostered relationships with corporate sponsors and community partners in order to cultivate
     funding for STEM outreach and education initiatives.

HONDA RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT                                   Raymond, OH
Quality Engineer III                                               Jan. 2001 - Jan. 2006
•    Co-leader of special project team which successfully and efficiently developed and rolled out
     company-wide Access database making competitive information, quality information, and
     warranty data  easily and quickly accessible to over 1100 Honda associates.
•    Managed cross functional joint design and test teams in order to identify vehicle problem
     items and develop cost effective,  timely countermeasures for implementation.
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                            Project Manager of special market investigation teams that saved the company over $750K in
                            future warranty costs based on successful implementation of design changes on models
                            including Acura TL and Honda Pilot.
LEADERSHIP            Society of Women Engineers, Central Ohio Section
                        •   Outreach & Education Chair                                     Jun. 2010-Present
                        •   President                                                   Jun. 2008 - Jun. 2010
                        •   Marketing / Communications Chair                              Jun. 2007 - Jun. 2008
                        •   Member                                                     Sept. 1996-Present

                        Society of Manufacturing Engineers
                        •   Executive Board Member                                   December 2011 - Present
                        •   Member                                                     Sept. 2010-Present

                        Women in Engineering Advocacy Network (WEPAN)
                        •   Communications Committee Co-Chair                            Jun. 2007 - Jun. 2008
                        •   Distinguished Service Award (Communications Committee)                    Jun. 2008

                        Engineering Education Insights Magazine
                        •   Featured Monthly Columnist                                    Aug. 2007 - Jun. 2008

                        Toastmasters,  Honda R&D Section
                        •   Vice President                                               Jan. 2005 - Dec. 2005
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                            LEONARD (Leo) RUSLI, Ph.D.

                   Research Engineer
                   Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
                   The Ohio State University
                   201 W. 19th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210
                   Phone:(614)805-2495
                   Email: Rusli.10@osu.edu
PROFILE
Development of practical design solutions as shown in the following areas:
-  Technical expertise in design: mechanical part assembly design, design optimization, assembly
   product architecture, plastic part design and snap-fit assembly, assembly ergonomics.
-  Broad experience in experimental study: design of experiments (DOE), statistical analysis, design of
   custom testing fixtures, and rapid prototyping. Measurement system design and testing
   instrumentation, sensor electronics, Instron/MTS machine.
-  Project management: advised and supervised multiple student design teams for short term projects
   (3-6 months) and graduate student research. Managed research lab facility to support projects.
-  Successful consulting in a wide variety of industrially sponsored design projects.

EDUCATION
Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2008
Ph.D. Dissertation: Design and Analysis of Mechanical Assembly via Kinematic Screw Theory
Developed a design tool to evaluate and optimize assembly constraint feature and fastener location,
orientation, quantity.

M.S. in Mechanical Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2003
M.S.  Thesis: A Study of the Effect of Force and Tactile Feedback to Snap-fit Manual Assembly
Developed design guidelines to create a snap-fit assembly that enhances manual assembly force
feedback.
B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2000
B.S. Honor's Thesis: Evaluation of Rapid Prototyping Methods for Functional Testing in Snap-fits
Conducted an experimental study to evaluate suitability of rapid prototyping technologies (SLS, FDM,
machined) for functional testing in snap-fits.
WORK EXPERIENCE
The Ohio State University
The Ohio State University
The Ohio State University
The Ohio State University
Honeywell
Research Engineer and Lecturer, Mech. Eng. Dept.        2008-present
Graduate Research Associate, Mech. Eng. Dept.             2006-2008
Capstone Design Program Coordinator, Mech. Eng. Dept.     2003-2006
Graduate Teaching Associate, Math Dept.                  2001-2003
Engineering intern                                           2001
                                                                                         67

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TRW                         Engineering intern                                           1998
Mettler - Toledo              Engineering intern                                           1997

INDUSTRIAL AND RESEARCH PROJECTS
•   Current main research area: Design of lightweight multi-material assembly strategy using
    electromagnetic formed joints (Alcoa, 2011-current)
•   Design of assembly verification system using infrared tracking and vision recognition (Honda of
    America manufacturing, 2009-2011)
•   Optimization of lightweight bumper crush can for energy absorption (Honda R&D, 2010)
•   Shear pin design for sub-sea chemical injection valve (Cameron, 2010)
•   High pressure oil seal power loss experimental study (John Deere, 2010-2011)
•   Design of interchangeable tractor power take-off (PTO) shaft (John Deere, 2008-2009).
•   Experimental study of DC torque tool ergonomics using universal position ergonomic test stand and
    hand stiffness tester (Honda of America  manufacturing, 2008-2010).
•   Redesigned and optimized a medical spray housing end cap snap-fit assembly (Vivus, 2008).
•   Coordinated multiple capstone student design project as a project manager, technical advisor, and
    industrial liaison for Goodrich aerospace, Rockwell automation, Honda of America, John Deere,
    Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Columbus zoo (2003-2007)
•   Designed a 4-axis adjustable MRI table for equestrian applications (OSU Vet School, 2000-2001)
•   Various manufacturing automation design projects as an engineering intern in work experience
    (1998-2001)

TEACHING EXPERIENCE
•       Faculty advisor for multiple industrially sponsored capstone design course
•       Faculty advisor for SAE Baja student competition team
•       ENG 658, ME 564: Senior capstone design projects
•       ME 581: Senior experimental design laboratory
•       ME 563: Design  of machine elements.
•       ME 410, 420: Engineering mechanics: statics and strength of materials

PUBLICATIONS
•   Rusli, L, Luscher, A., Schmiedeler, J., 2012, "Analysis of constraint configurations in mechanical
    assembly via kinematic screw theory", ASME Journal of Mechanical  Design.
•   Rusli, L, Luscher, A., 2012," Fastener identification via IR tracking", Assembly Automation Journal.
•   Rusli, L, Derek, J., "OSU designs a lightweight tie rod for baja SAE", SAE Momentum, Nov 2011.
•   Rusli, L., Luscher, A., Sommerich, C, 2010, "Force and tactile feedback in preloaded cantilever snap-
    fits under manual assembly", International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, 40(6), pp. 618-628
•   Rusli, L., Luscher, A., 2001, "Evaluation of Rapid Prototyping Methods for Functional Testing in Snap-
    fits", ANTEC conference Vol 3: Special areas, Paper no. 848..
•   Rusli, L., Luscher, A., Schmiedeler, J., 2011, Design space exploration of constraint features location
    and orientation in mechanical assembly  via  mechanical assembly via kinematic screw theory, under
    review for ASME Journal of Mechanical Design.
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•   Rusli, L, Luscher, A., 2012, "Use of machine vision technology for assembly verification", under
    review for Assembly Automation Journal.
•   Reviewer for Rapid Prototyping Journal
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                                DOUGLAS A. RICHMAN

1660 Loch ridge                                                 Business: 248.352.4630X220
Bloomfield Hills, Michigan 48302                            E-mail: doug.richman@ep.kaiseral.com


KAISER ALUMINUM FABRICATED PRODUCTS, LLC                           2002 - PRESENT
   VP - Engineering and Technology
   Lead engineering group providing engineering support to customers and Kaiser plants serving
   technically demanding automotive and industrial markets. Assist customer engineering organizations
   with  product design guidance, metallurgical engineering and design for manufacturing. Support
   customer design and development of innovative aluminum products to satisfy new end product
   requirements. Advanced process strategic planning supporting future product requirements.

   Aluminum Association
   Kaiser technical representative to the Aluminum Association and ASTM.
   Aluminum Association -   Member - Aluminum Transportation Group (ATG)
                           Board of Directors - ATG
                           Chairman - Technology Work Group (ATG)
                           Member- Product Standards and Data Committee
                           Steering Committee - Sustainability Work Group

BOSAL  INTERNATIONAL, Ann Arbor, Michigan                                       1999-01
   President North American Operations
   P & L responsibility Bosal North America:  5 plants and Tech Center. Automotive exhaust system
   manufacturing and sales in the US, Canada and Mexico.  North American sales of $100+MM
   Member, Board of Directors - Bosal International

KAISER ALUMINUM CORPORATION
   VP & General Manager Kaiser Automotive Castings and Kaiser K-Fab Operations      1996-99
   P & L responsibility for Kaiser Foundry $18MM and K-Fab, extrusion fabrication $8MM businesses.


ALCAN ALUMINUM CORPORATION!988-96

   VP - Alcan Automotive Castings / General Manager Altek                           1993-96
   Business development and P&L responsibility for Altek, a 50/50 Joint Venture between Alcan and
   Teksid (Fiat),sales $30MM. International commercialization of cast aluminum automotive control
   arms.

   General Manager - Automotive Castings Division- North America                    1992-93
   P&L responsibility, foundry producing automotive cylinder heads and intake manifolds.  Expanded
   product focus to automotive control arms using innovative casting process technology.

   Director - Engineering and Automotive  Business Development                      1988-91
   Responsible for automotive market strategic planning and led product and process engineering
   support group. Business grew from start-up to over $100 MM in four years.


GENERAL MOTORS CORPORATION, Warren, Ml                                      1969-88

   Manager Engine Development Chevrolet-Pontiac-Cadillac Group
   Manager Chevrolet L-4 and V-6 Advanced Design
   Senior Development Engineer-V-8 Engine Control Systems
   Development Engineer-V-8 Truck Engine Control Systems
   Passenger Fleet Planner - Chevrolet Fuel Economy Planning
   System  Design Engineer- GM Transportation Systems
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   Product Assurance Analyst - Engineering Staff
   Manager- Chevrolet Military Vehicle Proving Ground Operations

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS:

       MBA - University of Detroit - Finance and Operations Research
       BSME - General Motors Institute

       Registered Professional Engineer, Michigan

       Society of Automotive Engineers
             Co-Director- Light  Materials Section

       American Extruders Council

       Aluminum Association
             Aluminum Transportation Group (ATG) - Member (since 1990)
                                                 Member of the Executive Committee
                                                 Chairman - Technology Work Group
             Aluminum Products and Standards Group - Member (since 1998)
             Sustainability Work Group - Member (since 2009)


       Advanced studies / Certifications
             Ohio State Univ. (Fisher College) - Certified Lean Manager
             MIT - Lean Manufacturing / Value Stream Management
             Plante & Moran - Executive Leadership Forum
             Goldradt Institute - Theory of Constraints Leader Certification
             TMB - Kaizen Implementation
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Srdjan Simunovic

Computational Engineering and Energy Sciences Group                        865-771-9919
Computer Science and Mathematics Division                             865-241-0381(fax)
Oak Ridge National Laboratory                                 simunovics@ornl. gov

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
University of Tennessee Knoxville

Education:

University of Split, Croatia              Civil Engineering     B.S.    1988
Carnegie Mellon University, USA        Civil Engineering     M.S.   1991
Carnegie Mellon University, USA        Civil Engineering     Ph.D.  1993

Professional Expertise:

My research expertise includes computational modeling of materials and structures, modeling of impact
and armor materials, strain rate sensitivity of materials, high velocity loading tests, polymer composite
materials manufacturing and crashworthiness, physics of fracture, and effect of size on material
properties. Current projects involve development of the next generation multi-physics code for simulation
of nuclear fuel and nuclear reactor thermomechanics problems, impact simulation of lightweight materials
for transportation,  and material design optimization for impact performance.

Professional Experience:

2009 - Present     Joint Faculty Appointment, University of Tennessee and ORNL.
2004 - Present     Distinguished Research Staff, Computational Materials Science and Computational
                  Engineering and Energy Sciences Group, ORNL.
1999 - 2003       Group Leader, Computational Materials Science Group, ORNL.
1998 - 2003       Senior Research Staff, Computational Materials Science Group, ORNL.
1994 - 1998       Research Staff, Computational Materials Science Group,ORNL.
1993 - 1994       Postdoctoral Researcher, Modeling and Simulation Group, ORNL.
1990 - 1993       Graduate Researcher, Department of Civil Engineering, Carnegie Mellon
                  University, Pittsburgh, PA
1988 - 1990       Junior Lecturer, Civil Engineering Department, University of Split, Croatia

Recent Journal Publications (2006+):

1.  Piro, M. H. A., Besmann,, T. M., Simunovic, S., Lewis, B. J., Thompson, W. T., Numerical
    verification of equilibrium thermodynamic computations in nuclear fuel performance codes Journal of
    Nuclear Materials, 414 (2011) pp. 399-407.
2.  Wang, Y. L., Xu, H. B., Erdman, D. L.,Starbuck, M. J., Simunovic, S., Characterization of High-
    Strain Rate Mechanical Behavior of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Using 3D Digital Image Correlation,
    Advanced Engineering Materials, 13 (2011) pp. 943-948.
3.  Barai, P., Nukala, P. K. V. V., Sampath, R., and Simunovic, S., Scaling of surface roughness in
    perfectly plastic disordered media. Physical Review E. 82 (2010) 056116.
4.  Mishra, S.K., Deymier, P.A., Muralidharan, K., Frantziskonis,  G., Pannala, S. and Simunovic, S.
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    Modeling the coupling of reaction kinetics and hydrodynamics in a collapsing cavity. Ultrasonics
    Sonochemistry, 2010, 17(1), 258-265.
5.   Nukala, P. K. V. V., Barai, P., Zapperi, S., Alava, M. J. and Simunovic, S., Fracture roughness in
    three-dimensional beam lattice systems. Physical Review E. 82 (2010) 026103.
6.   Frantziskonis, G., Muralidharan, K., Deymier, P., Simunovic, S., Nukala, P. and Pannala, S. Time-
    parallel multiscale/multiphysics framework. Journal of Computational Physics, 2009, 228(21), 8085-
    8092.
7.   Nukala, P. K. V. V., Zapperi, S., Alava, M. J. and Simunovic, S., Crack roughness in the two-
    dimensional random threshold beam model. Physical Review E. 78 (2008) 046105.
8.   Nukala, P. K. V. V., Zapperi, S., Alava, M. J. and Simunovic, S., Anomalous roughness of fracture
    surfaces in 2D fuse models. InternationalJournal of Fracture. 154 (2008) pp. 119 - 130.
9.   Mishra, S.K., Muralidharan, K., Deymier, P.A., Frantziskonis, G., Pannala, S. and Simunovic, S.
    Wavelet-Based Spatial Scaling of Coupled Reaction-Diffusion Fields. International Journal for
    Multiscale Computational Engineering, 2008, 6(4), 281-297.
10. Mishra, S.K., Muralidharan, K., Pannala, S., Simunovic, S., Daw,  C.S., Nukala, P., Fox, R., Deymier,
    P.A. and Frantziskonis, G.N. Spatiotemporal compound wavelet matrix framework for
    multiscale/multiphysics reactor simulation: Case study of a heterogeneous reaction/diffusion system.
    International Journal of Chemical Reactor Engineering, 2008, 6.
11. Muralidharan, K., Mishra, S.K., Frantziskonis, G., Deymier, P.A., Nukala, P., Simunovic, S. and
    Pannala, S. Dynamic compound wavelet matrix method for multiphysics and multiscale problems.
    Physical Review E, 2008, 77(2).
Synergistic Activities:
•   US DOT FHWA sponsored projects: Development of Heavy Vehicle Models for Roadside Barriers
           o  Finite Element Models  for Semitrailer Trucks
                  •  http://thyme.ornl.gov/FHWA/TractorTrailer
           o  Single-Unit Truck Heavy Vehicle Finite Element Model
                  •  http://thvme.ornl.gov/FHWA/F800WebPage
•   US DOT NHTSA sponsored project:
           o  Parametric Finite Element Model of Sport Utility Vehicle
                  •  http://thyme.ornl.gov/newexplorer
•   US DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy sponsored projects on lightweight
    materials technologies:
           o  High Strain  Rate Characterization of Magnesium Alloys
                  •  http: //thyme .ornl. gov/Mg_ne w
           o  Dynamic Characterization and Modeling of Advanced High Strength Steel
                  •  http ://thvme.ornl .gov/ASP Main
           o  Development of material models for composite materials, fracture, and high  strain rate
              deformation
                  •  http ://thvme .ornl .gov/composites
           o  Crashworthiness of Aluminum Intensive Vehicles
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                  •   http ://thyme .ornl.gov/audi
           o   Steel Processing Properties and their Effect on Impact Deformation of Lightweight
               Structures
                  •   http ://thvme .ornl.gov/aisi
•   US DOE Office of Nuclear Energy:
           o   Development of new multi-physics nuclear fuel simulation code AMP
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                     Appendix B:  Conflict of Interest Statements

                       Conflict of Interest and Bias for Peer Review
Background

Identification and management of potential conflict of interest (COI) and bias issues are vital to
the successes and credibility of any peer review consisting of external experts. The
questionnaire that follows is consistent with EPA guidance concerning peer reviews.l

Definitions

Experts in a particular field will, in many cases, have existing opinions concerning the subject of
the peer review. These opinions may be considered bias, but are not necessarily conflicts of
interest.

Bias: For a peer review, means a predisposition towards the subject matter to be discussed that
could influence the candidate's viewpoint.

Examples of bias would be situations in which a candidate:

    1.  Has previously expressed a position on the subject(s) under consideration by the panel; or

    2.  Is affiliated with an industry, governmental, public interest, or other group which has
       expressed a position concerning the subject(s) under consideration by the panel.
                                                                                   r\
Conflict of Interest:  For a peer review, as defined by the National Academy of Sciences,
includes any of the following:

    1.  Affiliation with an organization with financial ties directly related to the outcome;

    2.  Direct personal/financial investments in the sponsoring organization or related to the
       subject; or

    3.  Direct involvement in the documents submitted to the peer review panel... that could
       impair the individual's objectivity or create an unfair competitive advantage for the
       individual or organization.
1 U.S. EPA (2009). Science Policy Council Peer Review Handbook. OMB (2004). Final Information Quality Bulletin for
Peer Review.

 NAS (2003). "Policy and Procedures on Committee Composition and Balance and Conflict or Interest for Committees Used in
the Development of Reports" (www.nationalacademies.org/coi).
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Policy and Process

•   Candidates with COI, as defined above, will not be eligible for membership on those panels
    where their conflicts apply.

•   In general, candidates with bias, as defined above, on a particular issue will be eligible for all
    panel memberships; however, extreme biases, such as those likely to impair a candidate's
    ability to contribute to meaningful scientific discourse, will disqualify a candidate.

•   Ideally, the composition of each panel will reflect a range of bias for a particular subject,
    striving for balance.

•   Candidates who meet scientific qualifications and other eligibility criteria will be asked to
    provide written disclosure through a confidential questionnaire of all potential COI and bias
    issues during the candidate identification and selection process.

•   Candidates should be prepared, as necessary, to discuss potential COI and bias issues.

•   All bias issues related to selected panelists will be disclosed in writing in the final peer
    review record.
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                       Conflict of Interest and Bias Questionnaire

                  Lotus Mass-Reduction Report (Lotus 2) Peer Review


Instructions to Candidate Reviewers

    1.  Please check YES/NO/DON'T KNOW in response to each question.

    2.  If your answer is YES or DON'T KNOW, please provide a brief explanation of the
       circumstances.

    3.  Please make a reasonable effort to answer accurately each question. For example, to the
       extent a question applies to individuals (or entities) other than you (e.g., spouse,
       dependents, or their employers), you should make a reasonable inquiry, such as emailing
       the questions to  such individuals/entities in an effort to obtain information necessary to
       accurately answer the questions.

Questions

    1.  Are you (or your spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer, an author,
       contributor, or an earlier reviewer  of the document(s) being reviewed by this panel?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   2.  Do you (or you spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer have current
       plans to conduct or seek work related to the subject of this peer review following the
       completion of this peer review panel?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   3.  Do you (or your spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer have any known
       financial stake in the outcome of the review (e.g., investment interest in a business related
       to the subject of peer review)?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   4.  Have you (or your spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer commented,
       reviewed, testified, published, made public statements, or taken positions regarding the
       subject of this peer review?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
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    5.  Do you hold personal values or beliefs that would preclude you from conducting an
       objective, scientific evaluation of the subject of the review?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   6.  Do you know of any reason that you might be unable to provide impartial advice or
       comments on the subject review of the panel?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   7.  Are you aware of any other factors that may create potential conflict of interest or bias
       issues for you as a member of the panel?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
Acknowledgment

I declare that the disclosed information is true and accurate to the best of my knowledge, and that
no real, potential, or apparent conflict of interest or bias is known to me except as disclosed. I
further declare that I have made reasonable effort and inquiry to obtain the information needed to
answer the questions truthfully, and accurately. I agree to inform SRA promptly of any change
in circumstances that would require me to revise the answers that I have provided.
William Joost
Name
                                                10/24/2011
Signature             ^    "                      Date
                                                                                     78

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                       Conflict of Interest and Bias Questionnaire

                  Lotus Mass-Reduction Report (Lotus 2) Peer Review


Instructions to Candidate Reviewers

    1.  Please check YES/NO/DON'T KNOW in response to each question.

    2.  If your answer is YES or DON'T KNOW, please provide a brief explanation of the
       circumstances.

    3.  Please make a reasonable effort to answer accurately each question. For example, to the
       extent a question applies to individuals (or entities) other than you (e.g., spouse,
       dependents, or their employers), you should make a reasonable inquiry, such as emailing
       the questions to  such individuals/entities in an effort to obtain information necessary to
       accurately answer the questions.

Questions

    1.  Are you (or your spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer, an author,
       contributor, or an earlier reviewer  of the document(s) being reviewed by this panel?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   2.  Do you (or you spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer have current
       plans to conduct or seek work related to the subject of this peer review following the
       completion of this peer review panel?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   3.  Do you (or your spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer have any known
       financial stake in the outcome of the review (e.g., investment interest in a business related
       to the subject of peer review)?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   4.  Have you (or your spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer commented,
       reviewed, testified, published, made public statements, or taken positions regarding the
       subject of this peer review?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
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   5.  Do you hold personal values or beliefs that would preclude you from conducting an
       objective, scientific evaluation of the subject of the review?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   6.  Do you know of any reason that you might be unable to provide impartial advice or
       comments on the subject review of the panel?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   7.  Are you aware of any other factors that may create potential conflict of interest or bias
       issues for you as a member of the panel?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
Acknowledgment

I declare that the disclosed information is true and accurate to the best of my knowledge, and that
no real, potential, or apparent conflict of interest or bias is known to me except as disclosed. I
further declare that I have made reasonable effort and inquiry to obtain the information needed to
answer the questions truthfully, and accurately. I agree to inform SRA promptly of any change
in circumstances that would require me to revise the answers that I have provided.
CG Cantemir
Name
                                            1/23/12
                                            Date
                                                                                     80

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                       Conflict of Interest and Bias Questionnaire

                  Lotus Mass-Reduction Report (Lotus 2) Peer Review


Instructions to Candidate Reviewers

    1.  Please check YES/NO/DON'T KNOW in response to each question.

    2.  If your answer is YES or DON'T KNOW, please provide a brief explanation of the
       circumstances.

    3.  Please make a reasonable effort to answer accurately each question. For example, to the
       extent a question applies to individuals (or entities) other than you (e.g., spouse,
       dependents, or their employers), you should make a reasonable inquiry, such as emailing
       the questions to  such individuals/entities in an effort to obtain information necessary to
       accurately answer the questions.

Questions

    1.  Are you (or your spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer, an author,
       contributor, or an earlier reviewer of the document(s) being reviewed by this panel?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   2.  Do you (or you spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer have current
       plans to conduct or seek work related to the subject of this peer review following the
       completion of this peer review panel?

       YES X      NO                 DON'T KNOW
       [Work will be indirectly related.  This is a broad area.]

   3.   Do you (or your spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer have any known
       financial stake in the outcome of the review (e.g., investment interest in a business related
       to the subject of peer review)?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   4.  Have you (or your spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer commented,
       reviewed, testified, published, made public statements, or taken positions regarding the
       subject of this peer review?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
                                                                                     81

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   5.  Do you hold personal values or beliefs that would preclude you from conducting an
       objective, scientific evaluation of the subject of the review?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   6.  Do you know of any reason that you might be unable to provide impartial advice or
       comments on the subject review of the panel?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   7.  Are you aware of any other factors that may create potential conflict of interest or bias
       issues for you as a member of the panel?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
Acknowledgment

I declare that the disclosed information is true and accurate to the best of my knowledge, and that
no real, potential, or apparent conflict of interest or bias is known to me except as disclosed. I
further declare that I have made reasonable effort and inquiry to obtain the information needed to
answer the questions truthfully, and accurately. I agree to inform SRA promptly of any change
in circumstances that would require me to revise the answers that I have provided.
Glenn Daehn
Name
                                            10Nov2011
                                            Date
                                                                                    82

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                       Conflict of Interest and Bias Questionnaire

                  Lotus Mass-Reduction Report (Lotus 2) Peer Review


Instructions to Candidate Reviewers

    1.  Please check YES/NO/DON'T KNOW in response to each question.

    2.  If your answer is YES or DON'T KNOW, please provide a brief explanation of the
       circumstances.

    3.  Please make a reasonable effort to answer accurately each question. For example, to the
       extent a question applies to individuals (or entities) other than you (e.g., spouse,
       dependents, or their employers), you should make a reasonable inquiry, such as emailing
       the questions to  such individuals/entities in an effort to obtain information necessary to
       accurately answer the questions.

Questions

    1.  Are you (or your spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer, an author,
       contributor, or an earlier reviewer  of the document(s) being reviewed by this panel?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   2.  Do you (or you spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer have current
       plans to conduct or seek work related to the subject of this peer review following the
       completion of this peer review panel?

       YES X      NO                 DON'T KNOW
       [OSU will form a lightweight structure consortium.]

   3.   Do you (or your spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer have any known
       financial stake in the outcome of the review (e.g., investment interest in a business related
       to the subject of peer review)?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   4.  Have you (or your spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer commented,
       reviewed, testified, published, made public statements, or taken positions regarding the
       subject of this peer review?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
                                                                                     83

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   5.  Do you hold personal values or beliefs that would preclude you from conducting an
       objective, scientific evaluation of the subject of the review?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   6.  Do you know of any reason that you might be unable to provide impartial advice or
       comments on the subject review of the panel?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   7.  Are you aware of any other factors that may create potential conflict of interest or bias
       issues for you as a member of the panel?

       YES X      NO                 DON'T KNOW
       [Reviewer has known the author of this report for many years but he says it will have no
       impact on his review.]
Acknowledgment

I declare that the disclosed information is true and accurate to the best of my knowledge, and that
no real, potential, or apparent conflict of interest or bias is known to me except as disclosed. I
further declare that I have made reasonable effort and inquiry to obtain the information needed to
answer the questions truthfully, and accurately. I agree to inform SRA promptly of any change
in circumstances that would require me to revise the answers that I have provided.
David Emerling
Name
^	'      11/10/2011
Signature   *                              !      Date
                                                                                    84

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                       Conflict of Interest and Bias Questionnaire

                  Lotus Mass-Reduction Report (Lotus 2) Peer Review


Instructions to Candidate Reviewers

    1.  Please check YES/NO/DON'T KNOW in response to each question.

    2.  If your answer is YES or DON'T KNOW, please provide a brief explanation of the
       circumstances.

    3.  Please make a reasonable effort to answer accurately each question. For example, to the
       extent a question applies to individuals (or entities) other than you (e.g., spouse,
       dependents, or their employers), you should make a reasonable inquiry, such as emailing
       the questions to  such individuals/entities in an effort to obtain information necessary to
       accurately answer the questions.

Questions

    1.  Are you (or your spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer, an author,
       contributor, or an earlier reviewer  of the document(s) being reviewed by this panel?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   2.  Do you (or you spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer have current
       plans to conduct or seek work related to the subject of this peer review following the
       completion of this peer review panel?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   3.  Do you (or your spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer have any known
       financial stake in the outcome of the review (e.g., investment interest in a business related
       to the subject of peer review)?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   4.  Have you (or your spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer commented,
       reviewed, testified, published, made public statements, or taken positions regarding the
       subject of this peer review?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
                                                                                     85

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   5.  Do you hold personal values or beliefs that would preclude you from conducting an
       objective, scientific evaluation of the subject of the review?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   6.  Do you know of any reason that you might be unable to provide impartial advice or
       comments on the subject review of the panel?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   7.  Are you aware of any other factors that may create potential conflict of interest or bias
       issues for you as a member of the panel?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
Acknowledgment

I declare that the disclosed information is true and accurate to the best of my knowledge, and that
no real, potential, or apparent conflict of interest or bias is known to me except as disclosed. I
further declare that I have made reasonable effort and inquiry to obtain the information needed to
answer the questions truthfully, and accurately. I agree to inform SRA promptly of any change
in circumstances that would require me to revise the answers that I have provided.
Kristina Kennedy
Name
                                               n-is-n
Signature                         X            Date
                                                                                     86

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                       Conflict of Interest and Bias Questionnaire

                  Lotus Mass-Reduction Report (Lotus 2) Peer Review


Instructions to Candidate Reviewers

    1.  Please check YES/NO/DON'T KNOW in response to each question.

    2.  If your answer is YES or DON'T KNOW, please provide a brief explanation of the
       circumstances.

    3.  Please make a reasonable effort to answer accurately each question. For example, to the
       extent a question applies to individuals (or entities) other than you (e.g., spouse,
       dependents, or their employers), you should make a reasonable inquiry, such as emailing
       the questions to  such individuals/entities in an effort to obtain information necessary to
       accurately answer the questions.

Questions

    1.  Are you (or your spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer, an author,
       contributor, or an earlier reviewer  of the document(s) being reviewed by this panel?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   2.  Do you (or you spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer have current
       plans to conduct or seek work related to the subject of this peer review following the
       completion of this peer review panel?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   3.  Do you (or your spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer have any known
       financial stake in the outcome of the review (e.g., investment interest in a business related
       to the subject of peer review)?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   4.  Have you (or your spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer commented,
       reviewed, testified, published, made public statements, or taken positions regarding the
       subject of this peer review?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
                                                                                     87

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   5.  Do you hold personal values or beliefs that would preclude you from conducting an
       objective, scientific evaluation of the subject of the review?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   6.  Do you know of any reason that you might be unable to provide impartial advice or
       comments on the subject review of the panel?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   7.  Are you aware of any other factors that may create potential conflict of interest or bias
       issues for you as a member of the panel?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
Acknowledgment

I declare that the disclosed information is true and accurate to the best of my knowledge, and that
no real, potential, or apparent conflict of interest or bias is known to me except as disclosed. I
further declare that I have made reasonable effort and inquiry to obtain the information needed to
answer the questions truthfully, and accurately. I agree to inform SRA promptly of any change
in circumstances that would require me to revise the answers that I have provided.
Anthony Luscher
Name
                                               11/13/2011
Signature   f    I   "                          Date
                                                                                     88

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                       Conflict of Interest and Bias Questionnaire

                  Lotus Mass-Reduction Report (Lotus 2) Peer Review


Instructions to Candidate Reviewers

    1.  Please check YES/NO/DON'T KNOW in response to each question.

    2.  If your answer is YES or DON'T KNOW, please provide a brief explanation of the
       circumstances.

    3.  Please make a reasonable effort to answer accurately each question. For example, to the
       extent a question applies to individuals (or entities) other than you (e.g., spouse,
       dependents, or their employers), you should make a reasonable inquiry, such as emailing
       the questions to  such individuals/entities in an effort to obtain information necessary to
       accurately answer the questions.

Questions

    1.  Are you (or your spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer, an author,
       contributor, or an earlier reviewer  of the document(s) being reviewed by this panel?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   2.  Do you (or you spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer have current
       plans to conduct or seek work related to the subject of this peer review following the
       completion of this peer review panel?

       YES X      NO                 DON'T KNOW
   3.  Do you (or your spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer have any known
       financial stake in the outcome of the review (e.g., investment interest in a business related
       to the subject of peer review)?

       YES X      NO                 DON'T KNOW
   4.  Have you (or your spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer commented,
       reviewed, testified, published, made public statements, or taken positions regarding the
       subject of this peer review?

       YES X      NO                 DON'T KNOW
                                                                                     89

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   5.  Do you hold personal values or beliefs that would preclude you from conducting an
       objective, scientific evaluation of the subject of the review?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   6.  Do you know of any reason that you might be unable to provide impartial advice or
       comments on the subject review of the panel?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   7.  Are you aware of any other factors that may create potential conflict of interest or bias
       issues for you as a member of the panel?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
Acknowledgment

I declare that the disclosed information is true and accurate to the best of my knowledge, and that
no real, potential, or apparent conflict of interest or bias is known to me except as disclosed.  I
further declare that I have made reasonable effort and inquiry to obtain the information needed to
answer the questions truthfully, and accurately. I agree to inform SRA promptly of any change
in circumstances that would require me to revise the answers that I have provided.
D. A. Richman
Name
	                  Oct27.2011
Signature                                       Date
                                                                                    90

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                       Conflict of Interest and Bias Questionnaire

                  Lotus Mass-Reduction Report (Lotus 2) Peer Review


Instructions to Candidate Reviewers

    1.  Please check YES/NO/DON'T KNOW in response to each question.

    2.  If your answer is YES or DON'T KNOW, please provide a brief explanation of the
       circumstances.

    3.  Please make a reasonable effort to answer accurately each question. For example, to the
       extent a question applies to individuals (or entities) other than you (e.g., spouse,
       dependents, or their employers), you should make a reasonable inquiry, such as emailing
       the questions to  such individuals/entities in an effort to obtain information necessary to
       accurately answer the questions.

Questions

    1.  Are you (or your spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer, an author,
       contributor, or an earlier reviewer  of the document(s) being reviewed by this panel?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   2.  Do you (or you spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer have current
       plans to conduct or seek work related to the subject of this peer review following the
       completion of this peer review panel?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   3.  Do you (or your spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer have any known
       financial stake in the outcome of the review (e.g., investment interest in a business related
       to the subject of peer review)?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   4.  Have you (or your spouse/partner or dependents) or your current employer commented,
       reviewed, testified, published, made public statements, or taken positions regarding the
       subject of this peer review?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
                                                                                     91

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   5.  Do you hold personal values or beliefs that would preclude you from conducting an
       objective, scientific evaluation of the subject of the review?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   6.  Do you know of any reason that you might be unable to provide impartial advice or
       comments on the subject review of the panel?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
   7.  Are you aware of any other factors that may create potential conflict of interest or bias
       issues for you as a member of the panel?

       YES         NO X              DON'T KNOW
Acknowledgment

I declare that the disclosed information is true and accurate to the best of my knowledge, and that
no real, potential, or apparent conflict of interest or bias is known to me except as disclosed. I
further declare that I have made reasonable effort and inquiry to obtain the information needed to
answer the questions truthfully, and accurately. I agree to inform SRA promptly of any change
in circumstances that would require me to revise the answers that I have provided.
Srdjan Simunovic
Name
                                               10/21/2011
SightureDate
                                                                                     92

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                                    SRA
                                    INTERNATIONAL, INCL
                                    Honesty and Service®
            Appendix C: Peer Review Charge and Conference Call Notes
Charge to Peer Reviewers of Demonstrating the Safety and Crashworthiness of a 2020 Model-
                   Year, Mass-Reduced Crossover Vehicle (Lotus 2 Report)

In developing programs to reduce GHG emissions and increase fuel economy, the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA), the California Air Resources Board (CARB), and the National Highway
Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) have to assess the use of mass-reduction technology in
light-duty vehicles. The availability, feasibility, and validation of lightweight materials and design
techniques in the 2020 - 2025 timeframe is of high importance, especially considering its potential to be
one of the major technology areas that could be utilized to help achieve the vehicle GHG and fuel
economy goals.

The 2011 study by Lotus Engineering, Demonstrating the Safety and Crashworthiness of a 2020 Model-
Year, Mass Reduced Crossover Vehicle, was done under contract from CARB, coordinated by EPA and
CARB, and involved technical collaboration on safety with  NHTSA.  The study was conducted specifically
to help assess a number of critical questions related  to mass-reduced vehicle designs in the 2020 - 2025
timeframe.

The Lotus study involves the design development and Crashworthiness safety validation of a mass-
reduced redesign of a crossover sport utility vehicle  (i.e., starting from  a 2009 Toyota Venza baseline)
using advanced materials and design techniques. The research entails  the full conceptual redesign of a
vehicle. This review for the 2011 Lotus study is referred to as "Phase 2" because it builds upon Lotus'
previous 2010 study An Assessment of Mass Reduction Opportunities for a 2017-2020 Model Year
Vehicle Program, which for context is referred to as "Phase 1" here and in the 2011 study. This is noted
because the 2011 "Phase  2" study involves the non-body components  (e.g., interior, suspension, chassis)
relating back to "Phase 1" work.  The Phase 1 BIW was redesigned in the Phase 2 work using an
engineering design, safety testing, and validation of the vehicle's body-in-white structure.

You are asked to review and provide expert written comments on the Phase 2 report, to which you are
being  provided full access. As background information (particularly on the interior/suspension and
chassis components) you  are being provided a copy of the Phase 1 report and the peer review of the
Phase 1 report. You are not required to review either of the Phase 1 documents.

EPA is seeking your expert opinion on the technologies utilized, methodologies employed, and validity of
findings regarding the Lotus study. EPA asks that you orient your comments on the report toward the
following six general  areas: (1) assumptions and data sources;  (2) vehicle design methodological rigor;
(3) vehicle Crashworthiness testing methodological rigor; (4) vehicle manufacturing cost methodological
rigor;  (5) conclusion and findings; and (6) other comments. These areas will be split into sub-issues in
the final charge to reviewers. Although EPA is requesting response to these six areas, you will be
expected to identify additional topics or depart from these examples as necessary to best apply your
particular area(s) of expertise to review the overall study.  You  should provide your responses in the
                                                                                         93

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table that will be attached to the peer reviewer charge, adding comments, as necessary, at the end of
each table.

The Lotus study covers areas of material properties, forming techniques, bonding techniques,
manufacturing processes, bending and torsional tests, full vehicle crash simulation, and manufacturing
cost estimation. We ask that you comment on all of these aspects, with emphasis on the sources of
information, methods employed, crash simulation testing techniques, and whether improved studies
and methods exist elsewhere to develop, validate, and estimate costs for the potential of mass-
reduction technology in the 2020 - 2025 timeframe. This broad span of technical areas suggests that
reviewers may well have much deeper technical expertise and experience in some areas and a working
knowledge in others. As a result, the level of detailed technical review to be given by each reviewer
might vary significantly across the general category areas.

Your comments should be sufficiently clear and detailed to allow readers to thoroughly understand their
relevance to the Lotus study. Please deliver your final written comments to SRA International no later
than Wednesday, December 14.

All materials provided to you as well as your review  comments should be treated as confidential, and
should neither be released  nor discussed with others outside of the review panel. Once Lotus has made
its report public, EPA will notify you that you may release or discuss the peer review materials and your
review comments with others.

Should you have questions about what is required in order to complete this review or need additional
background material, please contact Brian Menard at SRA (Brian_Menard@sra.com or 434-979-3700
x!36).  Should you have any questions about the EPA peer review process itself, please contact Cheryl
Caffrey in EPA's Quality Office, National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Laboratory, (caffrey.cheryl@epa.gov
or 734-214-4849).
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  PEER REVIEW OF THE LOTUS REPORT DEMONSTRATING THE SAFETY AND CRASHWORTHINESS OF A
                    2020 MODEL YEAR, MASS REDUCED CROSSOVER VEHICLE

                                      Conference Call

                                 Friday, December 2, 2011




Participating in the call:

Will Joost, DOE

Doug Richman, Kaiser Aluminum

Srdjan Simunovic, ORNL

David Emerling and C.G. Cantemir, OSU

Gregg Peterson, Lotus  Engineering

Cheryl Caffrey, EPA

Brian Menard  and Doran Stegura, SRA

NOTE:  Reviewers should send follow-up questions to Brian Menard by COB Monday, December 5, for
prompt response by Lotus so that reviewers are able to submit their final comments by December 14.
Issue 1:

The Labor Rate appears lower than industry standard and why is renewable energy included in the cost?
Acknowledging that this is a small contributor to the cost, but question just the same.

This question is related to the piece cost issue.  Did these 2 factors influence costs very much?

Lotus Engineering (Lotus) Response:

[1] The report will include a cost for the BIW using a typical industry rate as well as the known
labor rate stipulated for the plant site.

[2] The energy cost is $69/vehicle; the assumption is that the plant uses conventional electrical
power to build the body structure and closures. There is a discussion in the manufacturing report
relative to using sustainable energy and the advantages and disadvantages. EBZ, the firm that
designed the plant, is a European company and typically equips their current customer
manufacturing facilities with solar roofs and includes potential wind turbines sites. In other
words, on site sustainable energy systems are already common in European automotive plants.
We see that trend being mainstream in the US in the timeframe of this vehicle. Because we expect
conventional steel BIW plants to do the same, there is no cost savings assigned to the use of
sustainable energy vs. conventional sources (coal, hydro, nuclear).
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To the reviewer's knowledge the Toyota plant has the lowest costs in the US, but these rates are lower
than these

Ok for other plants but may not be applicable for automobile plants (est. $55/hr)

Piece Cost and Labor Content - labor rates are different for 1) and 2) below

    1) **Manufacturing study (assembly, stamping-Toyota in-house parts)
    2) Part component cost - no - labor rates realistic

Issue 2:

Body Build  - Are Mag parts coated?

              o   Were sheet metal parts pre-treated? Anodized aluminum
              o   Nobody is anodizing sheets for aluminum in NA (automotive production)

Lotus Response:  Lotus uses anodizing.

Most body programs use some sort of a coating so as long as there's a cost for coating the sheet metal
then that's ok.

Issue 3:

Material property - were these minimal or typical properties? Toyota insists on minimal properties in
design.

Lotus Response:  The baseline Venza BOM is being revised to clarify that the $0 cost, 0 kg mass
parts are already included in sub-assemblies; this shows the individual parts but does not include
their cost and mass as that would be double counting the parts.  The material specifications were
provided by the material supplier; these specifications are the same as those provided to any
supplier/OEM using those materials.

Issue 4:

Durability is mentioned several times in the report and Lotus has experience  in durability.  Otherwise,
there is no other analysis of durability.  How comfortable is  Lotus with durability? The paper lacks
analysis with NVH and fatigue issues - not addressed and may result in some additional weight.

Lotus Response:  Durability is  beyond the scope of the project; however, Lotus did due diligence with
coupon testing and past experience and other things in joining and materials.

Louts has built aluminum rear bonded vehicles for 16-17 years - the cars are used more at tracks than
public roads, has adhesive bonding experience

Lotus Response:  Lotus will place a statement to this effect in the final report.

Lotus has been told they're overdesigned. IIHS - 4x wtfor roof crush, FMVSS - 3x wtfor roof crush and
Lotus uses 6x weight for roof crush -hence no need to add additional weight
                                                                                          96

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IssueS:

The mass damper was removed from the Lotus original design -

Lotus Response: Toyota had hands tied and bandages were evident throughout the BIW. With the
Lotus design it is possible to remove these bandages.

IssueS:

L3 engine - 1 L Engine isn't in production yet, but well along... Lotus Saber engine - has balance shaft.

Issue 7:

Collision performance says body is quite stiff

Data is coming that says body is "remarkably stiff"

As part of process - 50 mph flat not have any discontinuities

Evident in pulse time for crash events

Tire and wheel don't hit cross tire - interesting observation

Lotus Response: Engine mount design was worked over to get this result.

IssueS:

Appendix C-l - part count - body BOM - quite a large number of 0 cost 0 weight parts removed - 127
parts were 0 wt, 0 cost,

47 nut/weld studs in original - no nuts/studs listed in new vehicle parts list

407 parts seem like a  very large number of parts in the original Venza compared to other programs
reviewers has experience with

BIW - Venza - Phase 1 welded - not costed and no weight - how is it considered a part then? Numbers
missing?

Lotus Response: Lotus will provide additional information to the reviewers.

Issue 9:

Is report for a technical audience or an illustration of possibilities to the general public?

Add more info for technical document - mention CAE done on HD vehicle earlier in report

Material data - isotropic -for modeling all materials

Material 24 in Dyna
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Issue 10:

For each material, explain why specific material selected for later on - materials are tied together

Give info on grades of aluminum used in various locations in the vehicle

Mag - only one - AM60 - only one property given, but how was this decided?

Explain materials choices - hot stamped boron used in door beams -for don't want to have large
displacement	

Mag - chose AM rather than AZ for galvanic properties

Lotus Response:  Lotus worked with Alcoa and others for stiffness.

Lotus Response:  Agreed to include language in the report concerning efforts with suppliers and
supplier recommendations and test results.

Which aluminum used where in BOM at end of report - bring up front part of report

Why use 6061 in rails and not 6063 - or other way around?

Issue 11:

Use different FEA technologies for different parts - was the cast mag a solid element or approximated
by shells?

Issue 12:

Stiffness - one crash - page 72 have test from NHTSAto compare results- new design consistently
higher than original vehicle - explain.

Any other tests NHTSA ran? Bring other comparisons

Lotus Response:  The original Venza had higher peak pulse than the new vehicle.

Srdjan Simunovic said that new vehicle has earlier spike and lower difference between simulation and
real car crash.

Lotus Response:  Lotus changed materials 10% (sensitivity) and changed peak acceleration by 30%.
Lotus wanted tuning to ensure not fire airbag early hence control peak acceleration, chose 23g 1st
35ms - beyond scope to do full airbag development.

Simunovic suggested Lotus include explanation - graphs not as valuable as discussion as to decisions.

Lotus Response:  Agreed to incorporate the reviewer's recommendations.
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Issue 13:

In Sec. 4.5.8 Lotus lists systems (ex: aluminum extrusion) and lists where systems are in production -the
places in production include very high end vehicles such as the McLaren and other similar cars. Any
higher production such as the Toyota Prius/Chevy Cruze?

Lotus Response:  Agreed to take this into consideration.

Says costs estimate is applicable to higher volume

Issue 14:

Design shows lots of 6022 aluminum - not standard in automotive - is it?

Doug Richman: It is used in body sheet.

6013 not used much now, but will likely be used in body sheet in next 10 years

Not revolutionary - there are 2 plants with high volume in North America

Doug mentioned  none of the aluminum have aerospace technology - more civilian markets.

Issue 15:

Can you stamp and form this aluminum  at room temp?

Richman: Yes, absolutely-from an industry perspective.

Issue 16:

Does moving from friction spot welding to friction spot joining save money?

Lotus Response:  Spot joining is used with adhesive and so uses half as many joints as spot welding—
this is a  Kawasaki process which allows the aluminum to stay in parent properties and not change
properties.

Is there  any riveting or spot riveting?

Lotus Response:  Yes, it includes riveting and spot welds.

Issue 17:

Crash simulation  question in the charge letter - "whether lotus can be validated" - what are you looking
for?  EPA will clarify this.

Issue 18:

Remove discussion to Phase 1 report - is it needed?
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EPA Response: It should be considered that the report assumes the mass reduction and costs from all
of the other parts of the vehicle from the Phase 1 report.
Lotus Response: The report is being reviewed to eliminate any need for the reader to refer to the
Phase 1 report. The intent is that the Phase 2 report is complete by itself and does not require the
reader to read another large (300 page) document as a requirement for fully understanding the
Phase 2 report. In other words, all pertinent Phase 1 information will be included in the Phase 2
report rather than refer the reader to the Phase 1 report.
Issue 19:

It was noted that the model takes away the spare tire and tool kit - this results in a notable mass and
cost savings - is this a philosophy difference on whether this is reaching too far? No further discussion
at this time. The issue does need to be addressed.

Issue 20:

Test of marketability - Interior radical - departures from expectations - smaller steps may be needed -
bad reaction ex: Honda Civic

Honda Civic downgraded interior - major decline in sales and marketability. Will have new model in 2
years to try to recover (sooner than 5 typical)

Parts look cheaper and fit and finish is bad - took out weight and cost out and road tests of vehicle not
good.

Lotus Response: The materials were not downgraded; they were either kept on par or were upgraded.
Lotus received feedback that the Lotus interior was preferred over the original Venza interior and that
the Lotus materials were soft to the touch and high grade.

Issue 21:

It is important to proofread the numbers in the tables and graphs and those referred  to in the report
text as in some instances they are inconsistent.
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                                                           Appendix D:  Reviews
                                                       William Joost, Department of Energy
    1.  ASSUMPTIONS AND DATA SOURCES
                            COMMENTS
Please comment on the validity of any data sources and assumptions embedded in
the study's material choices, vehicle design, crash validation testing, and cost
assessment that could affect its findings.
The accuracy of the stress-strain data used for each material during CAE
and crash analysis is critically important for determining accurate crash
response. The sources cited for the material data are credible; however
the Al yield stresses used appear to be on the high side of the expected
properties for the alloy-temper systems proposed here. The authors may
need to address the use of the slightly higher numbers (for example,
6061-T6 is shown with a yield stress of 308 MPa, where standard
reported values are usually closer to 275 MPa).
If you find issues with data sources and assumptions, please provide suggestions
for available data that would improve the study.
Materials properties describing failure are not indicated (with the
exception of Mg, which shows an in-plane failure strain of 6%). It seems
unlikely that the Al and Steel components in the vehicle will remain
below the strain localization or failure limits of the material; it's not clear
how failure of these materials was determined in the models. The
authors should indicate how failure was accounted for; if it was not, the
authors will need to explain why the assumption of uniform plasticity
throughout the crash event is valid for these materials. This could be
done by showing that the maximum strain conditions predicted in the
model are below the typical localization or failure limits of the materials
(if that is true, anyway).

Empirical determination of the joint properties was a good decision for
this study. The author indicates that lap-shear tests demonstrated that
failure occurred outside of the bond, and therefore adhesive failure was
not included in the model. However, the joints will experience a variety
of stress states that differ from lap-shear during a crash event. While  not
a major deficiency, it would be preferable to provide some discussion of
why lap-shear results can be extended to all stress states for joint failure
mode. Alternatively, the author could also provide testing data for other
joint stress states such as bending, torsion, and cross tension.
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    2.  VEHICLE DESIGN METHODOLOGICAL RIGOR
                            COMMENTS
Please comment on the methods used to analyze the materials selected, forming
techniques, bonding processes, and parts integration, as well as the resulting final
vehicle design.
While appropriate forming methods and materials appear to have been
selected, a detailed description of the material selection and trade-off
process is not provided. One significant exception is the discussion and
tables regarding the replacement of Mg components with Al and steel
components in order to meet crash requirements.

Similarly, while appropriate joining techniques seem to have been used,
the process for selecting the processes and materials is not clear.
Additionally, little detail is provided on the joining techniques used here.
A major technical hurdle in the implementation of multi-material systems
is the quality, durability, and performance of the joints. Additional effort
should be expended towards describing the joining techniques used here
and characterizing the performance.
Please describe the extent to which state-of-the-art design methods have been
employed as well as the extent to which the associated analysis exhibits strong
technical rigor.
Design is a challenging process and the most important aspect is having a
capable and experienced design team supporting the project; Lotus
clearly meets this need and adds credibility to the design results.

One area that is omitted from the analysis is durability (fatigue and
corrosion) performance of the structure. Significant use of Al, Al joints,
and multi-material joints introduces the potential for both fatigue and
corrosion failure that are unacceptable in an automotive product. It
would be helpful to include narrative describing the good durability
performance of conventional (i.e. not Bently, Ferrari, etc.) vehicles that
use similar materials and joints in production without significant
durability problems. In some cases, (say the weld-bonded AI-Mg joints),
production examples do not exist so there should be an explanation of
how these could meet durability requirements.
If you are aware of better methods employed and documented elsewhere to help
select and analyze advanced vehicle materials and design engineering rigor for
2020-2025 vehicles, please suggest how they might be used to improve this study.
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ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:

This is a very thorough design process, undertaken by a very credible design organization (Lotus). There are a variety of design assumptions and trade-offs that
were made during the process (as discussed above), but this would be expected for any study of this type. Having a design team from Lotus adds credibility to
the assumptions and design work that was done here.

Section 4.5.8.1 uses current "production" vehicles as examples for the feasibility of these techniques. However, many of the examples are for extremely high-
end vehicles (Bently, Lotus Evora, McLaren) and the remaining examples are for low-production, high-end vehicles (MB E class, Dodge Viper,  etc.). The cost of
some technologies can be expected to come down before 2020, but it is not reasonable to assume that (for example) the composites technologies used in
Lamborghinis will be cost competitive on any time scale; significant advances in composite technology will need to be made in order to be cost competitive on
a Venza, and the resulting material is likely to differ considerably (in both properties and manufacturing technique) from the Lamborghini grade material.
                                                                                                                                           103

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    3.  VEHICLE CRASHWORTHINESS TESTING METHODOLOGICAL RIGOR.
                            COMMENTS
Please comment on the methods used to analyze the vehicle body structure's
structural integrity and safety crashworthiness.
Regarding my comment on joint failure under complex stress states, note
that in figure 4.3.12.a the significant plastic strains are all located at the
bumper-rail joints. While this particular test was only to indicate the
damage (and cost to repair), the localization of plastic strain at the joint
is somewhat concerning.

The total-vehicle torsional stiffness result is remarkably high. If this is
accurate, it may contribute to an odd driving "feel", particularly by
comparison to a conventional Venza; higher torsional stiffness is usually
viewed as a good thing, but the authors may need to  address whether or
not such extreme stiffness values would be appealing to consumers of
this type of vehicle. While there doesn't appear to be a major source of
error in the torsional stiffness analysis, the result does call into question
the accuracy; this is either an extraordinarily stiff vehicle, or there was an
error during the analysis.
Please describe the extent to which state-of-the-art crash simulation testing
methods have been employed as well as the extent to which the associated
analysis exhibits strong technical rigor.
This is outside of my area of expertise
For reviewers with vehicle crash simulation capabilities to run the LS-DYNA model,
can the Lotus design and results be validated?
N/A
If you are aware of better methods and tools employed and documented
elsewhere to help validate advanced materials and design engineering rigor for
2020-2025 vehicles, please suggest how they might be used to improve the study.
While it's not made explicit in the report, it seems that the components
are likely modeled with the materials in a zero-strain condition - i.e. the
strain hardening and local change in  properties that occurs during
stamping is not considered in the properties of the components. While
not widely used in crash modeling (as far as I am aware), including the
effects of strain hardening on local properties from the stamping process
is beginning to find use in some design tools. While none of the materials
used in this study have extreme strain hardening properties (such as you
might find in TRIP steels or 5000 series Al), all of these sheet materials
will experience some change in properties during stamping.
                                                                             I do not consider the study deficient for having used zero-strain
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components, but it may be worth undergoing a simple study to
determine the potential effects on some of the components. This is
complicated by the further changes that may occur during the paint bake
cycle.
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:
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   4.  VEHICLE MANUFACTURING COST METHODOLOGICAL RIGOR
                           COMMENTS
Please comment on the methods used to analyze the mass-reduced vehicle body
structure's manufacturing costs.
The report does a good job of identifying, in useful detail, the number of
workstations, tools, equipment, and other resources necessary for
manufacturing the BIW of the vehicle. These are all, essentially,
estimates by EBZ; to provide additional credibility to the manufacturing
assessment it would be helpful to include a description of other work
that EBZ has conducted where their manufacturing design work was
implemented for producing vehicles. Lotus is a well-known name, EBZ is
less well known.
Please describe the extent to which state-of-the-art costing methods have been
employed as well as the extent to which the associated analysis exhibits strong
technical rigor.
This is not my area of expertise
If you are aware of better methods and tools employed and documented
elsewhere to help estimate costs for advanced vehicle materials and design for
2020-2025 vehicles, please suggest how they might be used to improve this study.
This is not my area of expertise
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:

The assessment of the energy supply includes a description of solar, wind, and biomass derived energy. While the narrative is quite positive on the potential
for each of these energy sources, it's not clear in the analysis how much of the power for the plant is produced using these techniques. If the renewable
sources provide a significant portion of the plant power, then the comparison of the Ph2 BIW cost against the production Venza cost may not be fair. The cost
of the Venza BIW is determined based on the RPE and several other assumptions and therefore includes the cost of electricity at the existing plant. Therefore,
if an automotive company was going to invest in a new plant to build either the  Ph2 BIW or the current Venza BIW (and the new plant would have the lower
cost power) then the cost delta between the two BIWs would be different than shown here (because the current Venza BIW produced at a new plant would
be less expensive). The same argument could be made for the labor costs and their impact on BIW cost. By including factors such as power and labor costs into
the analysis, it's difficult to determine what the cost savings/penalty is due only to the change in materials and assembly - the impact of labor and energy are
mixed into the result.
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    5.  CONCLUSION AND FINDINGS
                            COMMENTS
Are the study's conclusions adequately backed up by the methods and analytical
rigor of the study?
In the summary section there is an analysis that attempts to project the
"potential weight savings" for vehicle classes beyond the Venza. The
analysis is based on specific density which assumes that the architecture
of the vehicles is the same. For example, the front-end crash energy
management system in a micro car is likely quite different from the
comparable system in a large luxury car (aside from differences in gauge
to account for limited crash space, as discussed in the report). While this
analysis provides a good starting point, I do not feel that it is reasonable
to expect the weight reduction potential to scale with specific density. In
other words,  I think that the 32.4 value used in the analysis also changes
with vehicle size due to changes in architecture. Similarly, the cost
analysis projecting cost factor for other vehicle classes is a good start, but
it's unlikely that the numbers scale so simply.
Are the conclusions about the design, development, validation, and cost of the
mass-reduced design valid?
Yes. Despite some of the critical commentary provided above, I believe
that this study does a good job of validating the technical and cost
potential of the mass-reduced design. The study is lacking durability
analysis and, on a larger scale, does not include constructing a
demonstration vehicle to validate the model assumptions; both items are
significant undertakings and, while they would add credibility to the
results, the current study provides a useful and sound indication of
potential.
Are you aware of other available research that better evaluates and validates the
technical potential for mass-reduced vehicles in the 2020-2025 timeframe?
The World Auto Steel Ultra Light Steel Auto Body, the EU SuperLight Car,
and the DOE/USAMP Mg Front End Research and Development design all
provide addition insight into weight reduction potential. However, none
are as thorough as this study in assessing potential in the 2020-2025
timeframe.
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:
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    6.  OTHER POTENTIAL AREAS FOR COMMENT
                           COMMENTS
Has the study made substantial improvements over previous available works in the
ability to understand the feasibility of 2020-2025 mass-reduction technology for
light-duty vehicles? If so, please describe.
Yes. The best example was the Phase 1 study, which lacked much of the
detail and focus included here. The other studies that I mentioned above
do not go into this level of detail or are not focused on the same time
frame.
Do the study design concepts have critical deficiencies in its applicability for 2020-
2025 mass-reduction feasibility for which revisions should be made before the
report is finalized?  If so, please describe.
There is nothing that I would consider a "critical deficiency" however
many of the comments outlined above could be addressed prior to
release of the report.
Are there fundamentally different lightweight vehicle design technologies that you
expect to be much more common (either in addition to or instead of) than the one
Lotus has assessed for the 2020-2025 timeframe?
Some effort was made in the report to discuss joining and corrosion
protection techniques, however it is possible that new techniques will be
available prior to 2025. For example, there was very little discussion on
how a vehicle which combines so many different materials could be pre-
treated, e-coated, and painted in an existing shop. There will likely be
new technologies in this area.
Are there any other areas outside of the direct scope of the analysis (e.g., vehicle
performance, durability, drive ability, noise, vibration, and hardness) for which the
mass-reduced vehicle design is likely to exhibit any compromise from the baseline
vehicle?
As discussed above, durability is a major factor in vehicle design and it is
not addressed here. The use of advanced materials and joints calls into
question the durability performance of a vehicle like this. NVH may also
be unacceptable given the low density materials and extraordinary
vehicle stiffness.
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:

Clallam county, WA is an interesting choice for the plant location (I grew up relatively nearby). Port Angeles is not a "major port" (total population <20,000
people) and access to the area from anywhere else in the state is inconvenient.
                                                                                                                                            108

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 OHIO
 S1ATE
 UNIVERSITY
                                 Department of Materials Science and Engineering
      177 Watts Hall

    2041 College Rd.

Columbus, OH 43210
January 13, 2012

Dear Brian,

Thank you for the opportunity to review this Lotus study on a potential new lightweight vehicle
design.  We have taken this task quite seriously and have enlisted a small interdisciplinary team
from Ohio State University including the following:

      Tony Luscher, Faculty, Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering
      Leo Rush, Researcher, Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering
      CG Cantemir, Researcher, Center for Automotive Research
      David  Emerling, Industry Liaison Director, Center for Automotive Research
      Kristina Kennedy, Program Manager, Ohio Manufacturing Institute
      Glenn Daehn, Faculty, Material Science & Engineering

All of us have read the report and Tony, Leo, and David travelled to  Lotus earlier this month to
further review the FEA results.  We also met as a group to discuss the report.

Collectively and  individually we are very impressed  with this work.  It  is very careful, well-
reasoned  and the assumptions are all broadly reasonable.   We  agree  with  the  essential
conclusion that significant weight savings are possible  in vehicles that are manufacturable in the
near term that will reduce weight by roughly 30%. Such vehicles can be  as safe as current
vehicles as judged by NTHSA standard tests and they should be quite durable and desirable.
The multi-material strategy espoused here is a viable approach.

Specific, and  in the main, minor criticisms and comments are provided in the reviewer matrix.

One broad comment is that this report needs to be more strongly placed in the context of the
state  of the art as established by available literature.  For example the work only contains 7
formal references.  Also,  it is not clear where material data came from in specific cases  (this
should be formally referenced, even if a private communication) and the exact source of  data
such in as the comparative data in Figure 4.3.2 is not clear. Words like Intillicosting are used to
denote the source of data and we  believe that  refers to a specific  subcontract let to the firm
'intellicosting' for this work and those results are shown here. This needs to be made explicitly
clear.

Also, very important, but subtle would be literature references that give an idea of how accurate
the community can expect  LS-DYNA crash simulations to be in a study such as this.  Often
manufacturers have the luxury of testing similar bodies, materials and joining methodologies
and tuning their models to match broad behavior and then the effects of specific changes can
be accurately measured.  Here the geometric configuration, many materials and many joining
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methods are essentially new.  Can Lotus provide examples that show how accurate such 'blind'
predictions may be?

While this work does make a compelling case it downplays some of the very real issues that
slow such  innovation in  auto manufacturing. Examples:  multi-material structures can suffer
accelerated corrosion if not properly isolated in joining.  Fatigue may also limit durability in
aluminum,  magnesium or novel joints.  Neither of these durability concerns are raised.  Also,
automotive manufacturing is  very conservative in  using new processes  because one  small
process problem can stop an entire auto manufacturing plant.  Manufacturing engineers may be
justifiably weary of extensive use of adhesives, until  these are proven in mass  production in
other environments.  These  very real impediments  to change should be mentioned in  the
background and conclusions.

Of course,  there are many more details that must be considered for  full vehicle production and
innovation is hard. But this is an excellent motivation  and vision for  weight reduction.  Overall,
this is an outstanding piece of work that will move the automotive  industry forward.  We feel
privileged to have had an  advance look.

Sincerely yours,
Glenn S. Daehn
Mars G. Fontana Professor of Metallurgical Engineering
Executive Director, Honda-OSU Partnership
Director, Ohio Manufacturing Institute
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                      Ohio State University (CG Cantemir, Glenn Daehn, David Emerling, Kristina Kennedy, Tony Luscher, Leo Rusli)
    1.  ASSUMPTIONS AND DATA SOURCES
                            COMMENTS
Please comment on the validity of any data sources and assumptions embedded in
the study's material choices, vehicle design, crash validation testing, and cost
assessment that could affect its findings.
Material data, for the most part, seems reasonably representative of
what would be used in this type of automotive construction. Some of the
materials are more prevalent in other industries like rail, than in
automotive.

Material specifications used in this report were nominal; however,
reviewers would like to see min/max material specifications taken into
consideration.
If you find issues with data sources and assumptions, please provide suggestions for
available data that would improve the study.
References for all of the materials and adhesives would be very helpful.
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:

One broad comment is that this report needs to be more strongly placed in the context of the state of the art as established by available literature. For
example the work only contains 7 formal references. Also, it is not clear where material data came from in specific cases (this should be formally referenced,
even if a private communication) and the exact source of data such in as the comparative data in Figure 4.3.2 is not clear. Words like Intillicosting are used to
denote the source of data and we believe that refers to a specific subcontract let to the firm 'intellicosting' for this work and those results are shown here. This
needs to be made explicitly clear.
                                                                                                                                     Ill

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2. VEHICLE DESIGN METHODOLOGICAL RIGOR
Please comment on the methods used to analyze the materials selected, forming
techniques, bonding processes, and parts integration, as well as the resulting final
vehicle design.
Please describe the extent to which state-of-the-art design methods have been
employed as well as the extent to which the associated analysis exhibits strong
technical rigor.
If you are aware of better methods employed and documented elsewhere to help
select and analyze advanced vehicle materials and design engineering rigor for
2020-2025 vehicles, please suggest how they might be used to improve this study.
COMMENTS
More details are needed on the various aspects of joining and fastening.
Comment on assembly.
In order to qualify for mass production, a process must be very
repeatable. Figure 4.2. 4.a shows the results from 5 test coupons. There
are significant differences between all of these in peak strength and
energy absorption. Such a spread of results would not be acceptable in
terms of production.
No suggestions at this time.
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:
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    3.  VEHICLE CRASHWORTHINESS TESTING METHODOLOGICAL RIGOR.
                           COMMENTS
Please comment on the methods used to analyze the vehicle body structure's
structural integrity and safety crashworthiness.
The crash simulations that were completed seem to be well created
models of the vehicle that they represent. The geometry was formed
from mid-surface models of the sheet metal.  Seat belt and child restraint
points are logically modeled.
Please describe the extent to which state-of-the-art crash simulation testing
methods have been employed as well as the extent to which the associated analysis
exhibits strong technical rigor.
Animations of all of the crash tests were reviewed. These models were
checks for structural consistence and it was found that all parts were well
attached.  The deformation seen in the structure during crash seems
representative of these types of collisions. Progressive deformation flows
in a logical manner from the point of impact throughout the vehicle.
For reviewers with vehicle crash simulation capabilities to run the LS-DYNA model,
can the Lotus design and results be validated?*
The actual LS-DYNA model crash simulations were not rerun. Without
any changes to the inputs there would be no changes in the output.
Discussion of the input properties occurs in Section 2.
If you are aware of better methods and tools employed and documented elsewhere
to help validate advanced materials and design engineering rigor for 2020-2025
vehicles, please suggest how they might be used to improve the study.
LS-DYNA is the state of the art for this type of analysis. As time allows for
the 2020-2025 model year, additional more detailed material modeling
should occur. As an example the floor structure properties can be further
investigated to answer structural creep and strength concerns.
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:

This reviewer sat down with the person who created and ran the LS-DYNA FEA models. Additional insight into how the model performs and specific questions
were answered on specific load cases. All questions were answered.

Another reviewer which did not visit Lotus commented on the following:

1.  The powertrain has more than 15% of the vehicle mass and therefore the right powertrains should be used in simulation.

2.  The powertrain is always mounted on the body by elastic mounts. The crash behavior of the elastic mounts might easy introduce a 10% error in
determination of the peak deceleration (failure vs not failure might be much more than 10%). So modeling a close-to-reality powertrain and bushing looks like
a must (at least for me).
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3. Although not intuitive, the battery pack might have a worst crash behavior than the fuel tank. Therefore the shoulder to shoulder position might be inferior
to a tandem configuration (with the battery towards the center of the vehicle).

4. The battery pack crash behavior is of high importance of its own. It is very possible that after a crash an internal collapse of the cells and/or a penetration
might produce a short-circuit. It should be noted that by the time of writing there are not developed any reasonable solutions to mitigate an internal short-
circuit. Although not directly life treating, this kind of event will produce a vehicle loss.

Also, very important, but subtle would be literature references that give an idea of how accurate the community can expect LS-DYNA crash simulations to be in
a study such as this. Often manufacturers have the luxury of testing similar bodies, materials and joining methodologies and tuning their models to match
broad behavior and then the effects of specific changes can be accurately measured.  Here the geometric configuration, many materials  and many joining
methods are essentially new. Can Lotus provide examples that show how accurate such 'blind' predictions may be?
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    4.  VEHICLE MANUFACTURING COST METHODOLOGICAL RIGOR
                           COMMENTS
Please comment on the methods used to analyze the mass-reduced vehicle body
structure's manufacturing costs.
Flat year-over-year wages for the cost analysis seems unrealistic.

Additional source information requested for wage rates for various
locations.
Please describe the extent to which state-of-the-art costing methods have been
employed as well as the extent to which the associated analysis exhibits strong
technical rigor.
Difficult to evaluate since this portion of the report was completed by a
subcontractor. The forming dies seem to be inexpensive as compared to
standard steel sheet metal forming dies.
If you are aware of better methods and tools employed and documented elsewhere
to help estimate costs for advanced vehicle materials and design for 2020-2025
vehicles, please suggest how they might be used to improve this study.
None.
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:

The number of workers assigned to vehicle assembly in this report seems quite low. Extra personal need to be available to replace those with unexcused
absences. Do these assembly numbers also include material handling personnel to stock each of the workstations?

While this work does make a compelling case it downplays some of the very real issues that slow such innovation in auto manufacturing. Examples: multi-
material structures can suffer accelerated corrosion if not properly isolated in joining.  Fatigue may also limit durability in aluminum, magnesium or novel
joints.  Neither of these durability concerns is raised. Also, automotive manufacturing is very conservative in using new processes because one small process
problem can stop an entire auto manufacturing plant.  Manufacturing engineers may be justifiably weary of extensive use of adhesives, until these are proven
in mass production in other environments. These very real impediments to change should be mentioned in the background and conclusions.
                                                                                                                                    115

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5. CONCLUSION AND FINDINGS
Are the study's conclusions adequately backed up by the methods and analytical
rigor of the study?
Are the conclusions about the design, development, validation,
mass-reduced design valid?
Are you aware of other available research that better evaluates
technical potential for mass-reduced vehicles in the 2020-2025
and cost of the
and validates the
timeframe?
COMMENTS
Yes.
Yes.
No.
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:
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    6.  OTHER POTENTIAL AREAS FOR COMMENT
                            COMMENTS
Has the study made substantial improvements over previous available works in the
ability to understand the feasibility of 2020-2025 mass-reduction technology for
light-duty vehicles? If so, please describe.
Yes.
Do the study design concepts have critical deficiencies in its applicability for 2020-
2025 mass-reduction feasibility for which revisions should be made before the
report is finalized? If so, please describe.
No.
Are there fundamentally different lightweight vehicle design technologies that you
expect to be much more common (either in addition to or instead of) than the one
Lotus has assessed for the 2020-2025 timeframe?
No.
Are there any other areas outside of the direct scope of the analysis (e.g., vehicle
performance, durability, drive ability, noise, vibration, and hardness) for which the
mass-reduced vehicle design is likely to exhibit any compromise from the baseline
vehicle?
The proposed engine size is based on the assumption that decreasing the
mass of the vehicle and holding the same power-to-weight ratio will keep
the vehicle performances alike. This assumption is true only if the
coefficient of drag (Cda) will also decrease (practically a perfect match in
all the dynamic regards is not possible because the quadratic behavior of
the air vs speed). The influence of the airdrag is typically higher than the
general perception. In this particular case is very possible that more than
half of the engine power will be used to overcome the airdrag at 65 mph.
Therefore aerodynamic simulations are mandatory in order to validate
the size of the engine.
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:

The Lotus design is very innovative and pushes the design envelope much further than other advanced car programs. The phase 1 report shows a great deal of
topological innovation for the different components that are designed.
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Douglas Richman, Kaiser Aluminum
1. ASSUMPTIONS AND DATA SOURCES
Please comment on the validity of any data sources and assumptions embedded in
the study's material choices, vehicle design, crash validation testing, and cost
assessment that could affect its findings.
If you find issues with data sources and assumptions, please provide suggestions for
available data that would improve the study.
COMMENTS
Aluminum alloys and tempers selected and appropriate and proven for
the intended applications. Engineering data used for those materials and
product forms accurately represent minimum expected minimum
expected properties normally used for automotive design purposes.
Simulation results indicate a vehicle utilizing the PH 2 structure is
potentially capable of meeting FMVSS requirements. Physical test
results have not been presented to confirm model validity, some
simulation results indicate unusual structural performance and the
models do not address occupant loading conditions which are the FMVSS
validation criteria. Simulation results alone would not be considered
"validation" of PH 2 structure safety performance.
Cost estimates for the PH 2 vehicle are questionable. Cost modeling
methodology relies on engineering estimates and supplier cost
projections. The level of analytical rigor in this approach raises
uncertainties about resulting cost estimates. Inconsistencies in reported
piece count differences between baseline and PH 2 structures challenge a
major reported source of cost savings. Impact of blanking recovery on
aluminum sheet product net cost was explicitly not considered. Labor
rates assumed for BIW manufacturing were $20/Hr below prevailing
Toyota labor rate implicit in baseline Venza cost analysis. Cost estimates
for individual stamping tool are substantially below typical tooling cost
experienced for similar products. Impact of blanking recovery and labor
rates alone would increase BIW cost by over $200.

ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:
Study includes an impressive amount of design, crash, and cost analysis information. The radical part count reduction needs to be more fully explained or de-
emphasized. Report also should address the greatly reduced tooling and assembly costs relative to the experience of today's automakers. Some conservatism
would be appropriate regarding potential shortcomings in interior design and aesthetics influencing customer expectations and acceptance.
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2. VEHICLE DESIGN METHODOLOGICAL RIGOR
Please comment on the methods used to analyze the materials selected, forming
techniques, bonding processes, and parts integration, as well as the resulting final
vehicle design.
Please describe the extent to which state-of-the-art design methods have been
employed as well as the extent to which the associated analysis exhibits strong
technical rigor.
If you are aware of better methods employed and documented elsewhere to help
select and analyze advanced vehicle materials and design engineering rigor for
2020-2025 vehicles, please suggest how they might be used to improve this study.
COMMENTS
Adhesive bonding and FSW processes used in PH 2 have been proven in
volume production and would be expected to perform well in this
application. Some discussion of joining system for magnesium closure
inner panels to aluminum external skin and AHSS "B" pillar to aluminum
body would improve understanding and confidence in those elements of
the design.
Parts integration information is vague and appears inconsistent. Parts
integration. Major mass and cost savings are attributed to parts
integration. Data presented does not appear to results.
Final design appears capable of meeting functional, durability and FMVSS
requirements. Some increase in mass and cost are likely to resolve
structure and NVH issues encountered in component and vehicle level
physical testing.
Vehicle design methodology utilizing Opti-Struct, NASTRAN and LS-Dyna
is represents a comprehensive and rigorous approach to BIW structural
design and materials optimization.

ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:
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3. VEHICLE CRASHWORTHINESS TESTING METHODOLOGICAL RIGOR.
Please comment on the methods used to analyze the vehicle body structure's
structural integrity and safety crashworthiness.
Please describe the extent to which state-of-the-art crash simulation testing
methods have been employed as well as the extent to which the associated analysis
exhibits strong technical rigor.
For reviewers with vehicle crash simulation capabilities to run the LS-DYNA model,
COMMENTS
LS-Dyna and MSC-Nastran are current and accepted tools for this kind of
analysis. FEM analysis is part art as well as science, the assumption had
to be made that Lotus has sufficient skills and experience to generate a
valid simulation model.
Model indicates the PH 2 structure could sustain a peak load of 108 kN
under FMVSS 216 testing. This is unusually high for an SUV roof, and
stronger than any roof on any vehicle produced to date. Result questions
stiffness and strength results of the simulations.
Intrusion velocities and deformation are used as performance criteria in
the side impact simulations. Performance acceptability judgments made
using those results, but no data was given for comparison to any other
vehicle.
Occupant protection performance cannot be judged based entirely on
deformations and intrusion velocities.
Report states that "the mass-reduced vehicle was validated for meeting
the listed FMVSS requirements." This is an overstatement of what the
analysis accomplished. FMVSS test performance is judged based on crash
dummy accelerations and loads. The FEM analysis looked only at BIW
acceleration and intrusion levels. While these can provide a good basis
for engineering judgment, no comparison to physical crash test levels is
provided. "Acceptable" levels were defined by Lotus without
explanation. Results may be good, but would not be sufficient to
"validate" the design for meeting FMVSS requirements.
Model has not been validated against any physical property. In normal
BIW design development, an FEM is developed and calibrated against a
physical test. The calibrated model is considered validated for moderate
A:B comparisons.
Some validation can be done by reviewing modeling technique and
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can the Lotus design and results be validated?'1
assumptions, but without any form of physical test comparison, the
amount of error is unknown and can be significant.

FEM validation was presented in the form of an energy balance for each
load case. Energy balance is useful in confirming certain internal aspects
of the model are working correctly. Energy balance does not validate
how accurately the model simulates the physical structure. Presenting
energy balance for each load case and suggesting balance implies FEM
accuracy is misleading.
If you are aware of better methods and tools employed and documented elsewhere
to help validate advanced materials and design engineering rigor for 2020-2025
vehicles, please suggest how they might be used to improve the study.
Cannot truly be validated without building a physical prototype for
comparison.
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:

Study is very thorough in their crash loadcase selections and generated a lot of data for evaluation.  Might have included IIHS Offset ODB and IIHS Side Impact
test conditions which most OEM's consider.

Study is less thorough in analyzing normal loads that influence BIW and chassis design (i.e. pot holes, shipping, road load fatigue, curb bump, jacking, twist
ditch, 2g bump, etc.).

Report indicates "Phase 2 vehicle model was validated for conforming to the existing external data for the Toyota Vensa, meeting best-in-class torsional and
bending stiffness, and managing customary running loads." Only torsional stiffness is reported.

Modal frequency analysis data Is not reported.

Conclusions for many of the crash load cases (primarily dynamic) did not use simulation results to draw quantitative comparisons to the Toyota Vensa or other
peer vehicles.  For instance, intrusion velocities for side impacts are reported. But, no analytical comparison is made to similar vehicles that currently meet the
requirements.  Comparable crash tests is often  available from NHTSA or IIHS.
Remarkable strength exhibited by the  FEM roof under an FMVSS test load raises questions validity of the model.

Model assumes no failures of adhesive bonding in materials during collisions. Previous crash testing experience suggest some level of bonding separation and
resulting structure strength reduction  is  likely to occur.
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    4.  VEHICLE MANUFACTURING COST METHODOLOGICAL RIGOR
                           COMMENTS
Please comment on the methods used to analyze the mass-reduced vehicle body
structure's manufacturing costs.
Notable strengths of this analysis, besides the main focus on crash
analysis, are the detail of assembly facility design, labor content, and BIW
component tooling identification.

Main weakness of the cost analysis is the fragmented approach of
comparing costs derived in different approaches and different sources,
and trying to infer relevant information from these differences.
Please describe the extent to which state-of-the-art costing methods have been
employed as well as the extent to which the associated analysis exhibits strong
technical rigor.
Vulnerability in this cost study appears to be validity and functional
equivalence of BIW design with 169 pieces vs. 407 for the baseline Venz.

Total tooling investment of $28MM for the BIW not consistent with
typical OEM production experience. BIW tooling of $150-200MM would
not be uncommon for conventional BIW manufacturing. If significant
parts reduction could be achieved,  it would mean less tools, but usually
larger and more complex ones, requiring larger presses and slower cycle
times.
If you are aware of better methods and tools employed and documented elsewhere
to help estimate costs for advanced vehicle materials and design for 2020-2025
vehicles, please suggest how they might be used to improve this study.
Applying a consistent costing approach to each vehicle and vehicle
system using a manufacturing cost model approach. This approach
would establish a more consistent and understandable assessment of
cost impacts of vehicle mass reduction design and technologies.
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:
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5. CONCLUSION AND FINDINGS
Are the study's conclusions adequately backed up by the methods and analytical
rigor of the study?
Are the conclusions about the design, development, validation, and cost of the
mass-reduced design valid?
Are you aware of other available research that better evaluates and validates the
technical potential for mass-reduced vehicles in the 2020-2025 timeframe?
COMMENTS
FMVSS test performance conclusions are based on simulated results using
an un-validated FE model. Accuracy of the model is unknown. Some
simulation results are not typical of similar structures suggesting the
model may not accurately represent the actual structure under all loading
conditions.
Safety performance and cost conclusions are not clearly support by data
provided.
Most studies employing a finite element model validate a base model
against physical testing, then do variational studies to look at effect.
Going directly from an unvalidated FEM to quantitative results is risky,
and the level of accuracy is questionable
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:
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    6.  OTHER POTENTIAL AREAS FOR COMMENT
                            COMMENTS
Has the study made substantial improvements over previous available works in the
ability to understand the feasibility of 2020-2025 mass-reduction technology for
light-duty vehicles? If so, please describe.
Fundamental engineering work is very good and has the potential to
make a substantial and important contribution to industry understanding
of mass reduction opportunities.  The study will receive intense and
detailed critical review by industry specialists. To achieve potential
positive impact on industry thinking, study content and conclusions must
be recognized as credible. Unusual safety simulation results and
questionable cost estimates (piece cost, tooling) need to be explained or
revised. As currently presented, potential contributions of the study are
likely to be obscured by unexplained simulation results and cost
estimates that are not consistent with actual program experience.
Do the study design concepts have critical deficiencies in its applicability for 2020-
2025 mass-reduction feasibility for which revisions should be made before the
report is finalized? If so, please describe.
Absolutely. Recommended adjustments summarized in Safety analysis,
and cost estimates (recommendations summarized in attached review
report). Credibility of study would be significantly enhanced with detail
explanations or revisions in areas where unusual and potentially dis-
crediting results are reported. Conservatism in assessing CAE based
safety simulations and cost estimates (component and tooling) would
improve acceptance of main report conclusions.

Impact of BIW plant site selection discussion and resulting labor rates
confuse important assessment of design driven cost impact. Suggest
removing site selection discussion. Using labor and energy cost factors
representative of the Toyota Venza production more clearly identifies the
true cost impact of PH 2 design content.
Are there fundamentally different lightweight vehicle design technologies that you
expect to be much more common (either in addition to or instead of) than the one
Lotus has assessed for the 2020-2025 timeframe?
Technologies included in the PH 2 design are the leading candidates to
achieve safe cost effective vehicle mass reduction in the 2020-25
timeframe. Most technologies included in PH 2 are in current volume
production or will be fully production ready by 2015.
Are there any other areas outside of the direct scope of the analysis (e.g., vehicle
performance, durability, drive ability, noise, vibration, and hardness) for which the
mass-reduced vehicle design is likely to exhibit any compromise from the baseline
vehicle?
Most areas of vehicle performance other than crash performance were
not addressed at all.  Even basic bending stiffness and service loads
(jacking, towing, 2-g bump, etc) were not addressed. The report claims
to address bending stiffness and bending/torsional modal frequencies,
but that analysis is not included in the report.
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Please provide any comments not characterized in the tables above.

State-of-the art in vehicle dynamic crash simulation can provide A/B comparisons and ranking of alternative designs, but cannot reliably produce accurate
absolute results without careful correlation to crash results. CAE is effective in significantly reducing the need for hardware tests, making designs more robust,
and giving guidance to select the most efficient and best performing design alternatives.  OEM experience to date indicates CAE can reduce hardware and
physical test requirements, but cannot eliminate the need for some level of crash load physical testing.  Quasi-static test simulations show potential for
eliminating most if not all hardware (FMVSS 216 etc.), simulations of  FMVSS 208, 214, IIHS ODB and others still required several stages of hardware evaluation.
Given the challenges of simulating the complex crash physics of a vehicle composed of advanced materials and fastening techniques, hardware testing would
generally be considered necessarily to "validate" BIW structures for the foreseeable future.
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                   Review of Lotus Engineering Study:

       "Demonstrating the Safety and Crashworthiness of a 2020
             Model-Year, Mass-Reduced Crossover Vehicle"

       By: Douglas Richman (Kaiser Aluminum and The Aluminum Association)

This report is a review the 2011  Lotus report on design optimization of a mass reduced
mass-reduced  crossover  sport utility vehicle  based  on the 2009 Toyota Venza.
Objective of the study is  to demonstrate the mass reduction potential  of a  practical
vehicle engineered to meet or exceed FMVSS and IIHS safety performance criteria.
Design effort included  mass optimization of all vehicle systems.   Study  included
extensive BIW and closures design optimization to exploit the maximum mass reduction
potential from proven lite weight automotive materials and  advanced manufacturing
processes.  Vehicle redesign  included interior and chassis systems.   All materials,
manufacturing processes  and  purchased components included in  the  PH 2 vehicle
design were judged by Lotus to be proven, cost effective and available for use on 2020
production vehicles.  The PH 2 vehicle  achieves a  31%  (527  Kg) mass  reduction
compared to the baseline Venza.

The 2011  Lotus study (PH 2) is  a continuation  of a 2010 Lotus  study (PH 1) "An
Assessment of Mass Reduction Opportunities for a 2017-2020 Model Year Vehicle
Program".   BIW from PH  1 study was extensively redesigned to address safety
performance and manufacturing issues. Mass reduced interior, chassis and suspension
designs developed in PH  1 were carried-over to the  PH 2 vehicle.  A detailed BIW
manufacturing plan with BIW manufacturing plant layout and capital plan was developed
address multi-material BIW  manufacturing requirements.  PH 2 project includes cost
projections for all design changes and a projection of complete vehicle production cost.

Per direction from  EPA, this report is a review of technologies utilized, methodologies
employed, and validity of findings  in the  Lotus PH 2 study.    Review comments were
requested in six general areas:

      (1) assumptions and data sources
      (2) vehicle design methodological rigor
      (3) vehicle crashworthiness testing  methodological rigor
      (4) vehicle manufacturing cost methodological rigor
      (5) conclusions and findings
      (6) other comments
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1.0   Summary of Review Comments

1.1    Summary - General

      Engineering analysis is  very thorough  and reflects the vehicle engineering
      experience and know-how of the Lotus organization.  Study presents a realistic
      perspective  of achievable vehicle total vehicle  mass reduction using available
      design optimization tools, practical light weight engineering materials an available
      manufacturing processes.  Results of the study provide important  insight  into
      potential vehicle mass reduction generally achievable by 2020.

1.2   Summary-Conclusions

      Report Conclusions overstate the level of design "validation" achievable utilizing
      state-of-the- art modeling techniques with no physical  test of a representative
      structure. From the work in this study  it is reasonable to conclude the PH 2
      structure has the potential to pass FMVSS and IIHS safety criteria.

1.3   Summary - Mass Reduction

      Majority of mass reduction concepts utilized are consistent with general industry
      trends.   Mass reduction potential attributed  to  individual components appear
      reasonable and consistent with industry experience with similar components.  As
      an advanced design  concept study, the PH 2 project is a valuable and important
      piece of work.

      The  PH  2 study  did not include physical evaluation of a prototype vehicle or
      major vehicle sub system.  Majority of the chassis  and  suspension content was
      derived from similar components for which there  is extensive volume production
      experience.  Some of the technologies included in the  design are "speculative"
      and may not mature to production readiness or achieve projected mass reduction
      estimates by 2020.  For those reasons, the PH 2 study is a "high side" estimate
      of practical overall vehicle mass reduction potential.

1.4   Summary - Safety

      Major objective of this study is to  "validate" safety  performance of the  PH 2
      vehicle concept.  Critical issue is the term "validate".   Simulation modeling  and
      simulation tools used by  Lotus are widely recognized as state-of-the-art.  Lotus
      modeling skills are likely to among the best available in the  global industry.
      Project scope did not  include physical  test of the structure  to confirm model
      accuracy.

      Safety performance  data presented  indicates the  current  structure has  the
      potential to  meet all FMVSS criteria, but would not be generally  considered
      sufficient to  "validated"  safety  performance  of the  vehicle.    Physical  test
                                                                             127

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      correlation  is generally  required to establish confidence in simulation  results.
      Some simulation results presented are not consistent with test results of similar
      vehicles. Explanations provided for the unusual results do not appear consistent
      with actual structure content.  Overstating the implications of available safety
      results discredits the good design work and conclusions of this study.

1.5   Summary-Cost

      Cost projections are based on lack sufficient rigor to support confidence in cost
      projections  and  in  some  cases  are   based  on  "optimistic"  assumptions.
      Significant cost reduction is attributed to parts consolidation in the body structure.
      Part count  data presented  in the report  appears to reflect inconsistent  content
      between baseline  and  PH 2  designs.   Body manufacturing labor rates  and
      material  blanking recovery are not  consistent with actual  industry experience.
      Using normal industry experience for those two factors alone would add $273 to
      body manufacturing cost. Tooling cost estimates for individual body dies appear
      to be less than half normal industry experience for dies of this type.

2.0   PH  2 Vehicle Design / Mass Reduction

The Phase 2 vehicle design demonstrates the level of technology required to achieve a
30% reduction in total vehicle mass while maintaining functional performance and utility
of the current Toyota Venza.  PH 2 vehicle  is intended to have the same seating space,
cargo space and capacity, driving performance,  ride and handling, NVH characteristics,
range, safety  performance  and compliance with all current and anticipated future
Federal requirements.   PH  2  vehicle length, width and  track are the same as the
baseline Venza. Wheelbase of PH 2 is 162 mm longer than the Venza and PH 2 height
is 15 mm lower than baseline.

Powertrain on the baseline Venza is a conventional 2.7 L L-4 FWD engine with 6 speed
conventional transmission.  At the direction of the study sponsor powertrain for the PH
2 design is an EPA defined hybrid powertrain utilizing the Lotus SABRE 1.0 L L-3 turbo
charged engine. Mass and cost information for the hybrid  powertrain were supplied by
the sponsors and beyond the scope of Lotus engineering review.

Design process in PH 1 included:

      -  detail teardown analysis of the "09 Toyota Venza
      -  benchmarking of current mass efficient production vehicles
      -  trend analysis of advancements in vehicle weight reduction technologies
      -  establishing system and component mass and cost projections  scaled from
         existing components and engineering judgment
      -  selection of mass reduction technologies to meet PH1 project objectives
      -  development of PH 1  total vehicle design
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Design process and tools (Opti-Struct, Nastran, LS-Dyna) are widely deployed within
the automotive industry and represent a state-of-the-art approach to comprehensive
vehicle design. Lotus Engineering recognized as experienced and eminently qualified
for vehicle design engineering.

For analysis  purposes, Lotus decomposed  the  total  vehicle into  10 major  vehicle
systems:

      -  Body structure (BIW)
      -  Closures/fenders
      -  Suspension / chassis
      -  Bumpers
      -  Interior
      -  Electrical
      -  Lighting
      -  Glazing
      -  Powertrain
      -  Misc.

3.0   Mass Reduction

Lotus examined each vehicle systems for weight  reduction opportunities.   PH 2 mass
reduction by major vehicle system is summarized  in Figure 1.  Total mass reduction of
527 Kg, 31% of Venza mass was achieved.  Systems with significant mass reduction
are: BIW, Closures, Suspension/Chassis and  Interior. Major sources of mass reduction
are Chassis/Suspension (162 Kg), BIW (140 Kg), Interior (97 Kg), Closures (59 Kg).
                              Lotus Venza - PHII
                          Mass Reduction by System
                          Closures /
                         Fenders, 59
Powertrain
   54
                                                     BIW
                                                     140
                                                    Total =526 KG
                                  Susp/Chass
                                     162
                                     Figure 1.
                              Lotus PH 2 Venza
                          Mass Reduction by Vehicle System
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3.1    Body-in-White (BIW)

Current Toyota Venza body (BIW, closures) is predominantly a mix of mild steel (48%)
and high strength steels (49%) with a resulting mass of 383 Kg (Figure 2).  Extensive
use of  HSS  in  this structure is  consistent with efficient use  of  current automotive
materials to meet current vehicle mass objectives.

BIW design has a dominant influence on vehicle safety performance and received the
majority of Lotus engineering effort.  For the PH 2 analysis, Lotus optimized  the new
BIW design for safety performance at minimum mass. The design optimization process
resulted  in a  multi-material structure  utilizing aluminum, steel, high strength steel,
advanced high strength steel, magnesium and plastic composite. PH 2  BIW structure is
predominantly aluminum  (69%)  with AHSS  where  appropriate to achieve  strength
requirements where available structure space is limited.  A multi-material BIW solution
for mass reduction is consistent with  most recent vehicle optimization studies.  Several
current production vehicles utilize many of the design  concepts included in the PH 2
BIW design. PH 2 BIW structure is 141  Kg (37%) lighter than the baseline Venza.
           2009 Venza-BIW
          Materials by Weight (Kg)
    HSS/AHSS
      49%
                        Total = 383 Kg
                          Steel/Iron
                            48%
     Lotus PH 2 Venza - BIW
     Materials by Weight (Kg)
        .Other  HSS/AHSS
                7%
Magnesiu
  m
  14%
                                                 Plastics
                                                   5%
                                                                Total =241 Kg
                                                             Aluminum
                                                               69%
              Figure 2.
          Baseline Venza BIW
             Materials
       Figure 3.
 Lotus PH 2 Venza BIW
      Materials
Achieving a 37%  BIW mass reduction with a multi material design optimized for safety
performance is consistent with recent research and production vehicle experience.
BIW mass  reductions  resulting from conversion of conventional BIW structures to
aluminum based multi-material BIW have ranged from 35%-39% (Jaguar XJ, Audi A8)
to 47%  (OEM study).  BIW related mass reductions above 40% were achieved where
the baseline structure was predominantly mild  steel.  A recent  University  of Aachen
(Germany) concluded BIW structures optimized for safety performance utilizing low
mass engineering materials can achieve 35-40%  mass  reduction compared to  a BIW
optimized using  conventional body materials.   A recent BIW weight  reduction study
conducted at the University of Aachen (Germany)".
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            http://www.eaa.net/en/applications/automotive/studies/

Most of the BIW content (materials, manufacturing  processes) selected for the  PH 2
vehicle have been in successful volume auto industry production for several years.

3.2   Closures/Fenders

Mass reduction in the closure and fender group is 59 Kg, 41% of baseline Venza.   This
level of mass reduction is consistent with results of the Aachen and IBIS studies and
industry experience on current production  vehicles.  Hood and fenders on the  PH 2
vehicle  are  aluminum.   Recent Ducker Worldwide Survey of 2012  North American
Vehicles found over 30% of all North American vehicles have aluminum hoods and over
15% of vehicle have aluminum fenders.  PH  2  use of aluminum  for closure panels is
consistent with recognized industry trends  for these components.  PH  2 doors utilize
aluminum outer skins over cast magnesium  inner panels.

3.3   Material properties

Aluminum  alloy and temper selection for BIW and Closures are appropriate for those
components. Those materials have been used in automotive applications for several
years and are growing in popularity in future vehicle programs.

3.3.1  Typical vs. Minimum properties - Automobile  structural  designs   are  typically
based  on  minimum mechanical properties.  Report does not identify  the data used
(minimum or typical). Aluminum property data used in for the PH 2 design represents
expected minimum values for the alloys and tempers.   This reviewer  is not able to
comment on property values used for the other materials used in the BIW.

3.3.2  Aluminum pre-treatment

PH 2  vehicle  structure utilizes  adhesive  bonding  of major  structural  elements.
Production  vehicle experience confirms pre-treatment of sheet and extruded aluminum
bonding surfaces is required to achieve maximum joint integrity and durability.  PH 2
vehicle description  indicates sheet material is anodized as a pre-treatment.  From the
report it is not clear that pretreatment is also applied to extruded elements.

The majority of high volume aluminum programs in North America have moved  away
from electrochemical anodizing as a pre-treatment.  Current practice is  use of a more
effective, lower cost and environmentally compatible  chemical  conversion  process.
These  processes  are  similar to  Alodine treatment.   Predominant aluminum  pre-
treatments  today are provided by Novelis (formerly Alcan Rolled  Products) and Alcoa
(Alcoa 951). Both processes achieve similar results and need to be applied to the sheet
and extruded elements that will be bonded in assembly
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3.4   Suspension and Chassis

Suspension / chassis PH 2 mass reduction is 162 Kg (43% of baseline).  This level of
mass reduction is higher than has been seen in similar studies.  Lotus PH 2 includes
conversion of steering knuckles, suspension arms and the engine cradle to aluminum
castings. Mass reductions estimated for conversion of those components are estimated
at approximately 50%.   Recent Ducker study found aluminum knuckles  are currently
used on over 50% of North American vehicles and aluminum control arms are used on
over 30% of  North  American  vehicles.   Achieving 50%  mass  reduction through
conversion of these components to aluminum is consistent with industry experience.

3.5   Wheel/Tire

Total wheel and tire mass reduction of 64 Kg (46%) is projected for the wheel and  tire
group.   Project mass reduction is achieved through a reduction in wheel and  tire
masses and  elimination of the spare tire and tool kit.

Tire mass reduction is made possible by a 30% reduction  in vehicle mass.  Projected
tire mass reduction is 6 Kg for 4 tires combined.  This mass reduction is consistent with
appropriate tire selection for PH 2 vehicle final mass.

Road wheel  mass reduction is 5.6 Kg (54%) per wheel.  It is not clear from the report
how  this  magnitude of  reduction  is achieved.  The  report attributes  wheel mass
reduction to  possibilities  with the Ablation casting process.  PH  1 report  discussion of
Ablation casting states: "The process would be expected to save approximately 1  Kg
per wheel."    Considering  the  magnitude of  this mass reduction  a more detailed
description of wheel mass reduction would be appropriate.

Elimination of the spare tire and jack reduces vehicle mass  by 23 Kg. This is feasible
but has customer perceptions  of vehicle  utility implications.  Past OEM initiatives to
eliminate a spare tire have encountered consumer resistance leading to reinstatement
of the spare system in some vehicles.

3.6   Engine and Driveline

Engine and driveline for  the PH 2 vehicle  were  defined by the study  sponsors and  not
evaluated for additional mass reduction in the Lotus study. Baseline Venza is equipped
with a technically comprehensive conventional 2.7 L4 with aluminum  engine block and
heads and conventional  6 speed transmission.  PH 2 vehicle is equipped with  a dual
mode hybrid drive system powered by a turbocharged 1.0 L L-4 balance  shaft engine.
Engine was  designed by Lotus and sized to meet the PH  2 vehicle performance and
charging requirements.  Mass reduction achieved with the PH  2 powertrain is 54  Kg.
This  level of mass reduction appears achievable based on results of secondary mass
reductions resulting from  vehicle level mass reductions in excess of 20%.
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3.7   Interior

Lotus PH 2 design includes major redesign of the baseline Venza interior.   Interior
design changes achieve  97 Kg  (40%) weight reduction from the  baseline interior.
Majority of interior weight reduction is achieved in the seating (43 Kg) and trim (28 Kg).
Interior weight reduction strategies in the PH 2 design represent significant departures
from baseline Venza interior.  New seating designs and interior concepts (i.e.: replacing
carpeting with bare floors  and floor mats) may not be consistent with consumer wants
and expectations in those areas.  Interior trim and seating designs used in the  PH 2
vehicle have been  explored generically by OEM design studios for many years.  There
may be customer acceptance issues that have

4.0   Safety

Safety analysis of the PH2 structure is based on collision simulation results using LS-
Dyna  and Nastran software simulations.   Both software packages are widely  used
throughout the automotive industry to perform the type of analysis in this report.

Accuracy of simulated mechanical system performance is highly dependent on how well
the FEM model  represents the  characteristics of the physical structure being studied.
Accurately modeling a complete vehicle body structure for evaluation under non-linear
loading conditions  experienced  in collisions is a challenging  task.  Small changes  in
assumed performance of nodes and joints  can have a significant impact on  predicted
structure performance. Integration of empirical joint test data into the modeling process
has significantly improved  the correlation  between  simulated and  actual  structure
performance.

4.1   Unusual simulation results

Models appear reasonable and  indicate the structure has the potential to meet collision
safety requirements.  Some unusual simulation results  raise questions about  detail
accuracy of the models.

      FMVSS 216 quasi-static roof strength
      Model  indicates peak roof strength of 108 KN. This is unusually high strength for
      an SUV type vehicle.   The report attributes this high strength to the major load
      being resisted by the  B-pillar.  Several current vehicles employ this construction
      but have not demonstrated roof strength at this  level.  The  report indicates the
      requirement of 3X curb weight is reached within 20 mm  which is typically prior  to
      the test platen applying significant load directly into the b-pillar.

      35 MPH frontal rigid barrier simulation
      Report indicates the front tires do not contact the sill in a 35 MPH impact. This is
      highly  unusual structural  performance.   Implications are  the model or the
      structure is overly stiff.
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      Body torsional stiffness
      Torsional stiffness is indicated to  be 32.9 kN/deg. Higher than any comparable
      vehicles listed in the report.  PH 2 structure torsional stiffness is comparable to
      significantly more  compact body  structures like  the  Porsche Carrera, BMW 5
      series, Audi A8.  It is not clear what elements of the PH 2 structure contribute to
      achieving the predicted stiffness.

      Door beam modeling
      Door beams appear to stay tightly  joined  to the body structure with no tilting,
      twisting or  separation at the  lock attachments in the various side  impact load
      modes. This is highly unusual structural behavior.  No door opening deformation
      is observed in any frontal crash simulations. This suggests the door structure is
      modeled as an integral load path.  FMVSS  requires that doors are operable after
      crash testing.  Door operability is nt addressed in the report.

4.2   Energy balance - is presented as validation of the FEM analysis.  For each load
case an energy balance is presented.  Evaluating energy balance is a good engineering
practice when modeling complex structures.  Energy balance gives confidence in the
mathematical fidelity of  the  model and that there are no significant mathematical
instabilities in the  calculations.  Energy  balance  does not  confirm  model  accuracy in
simulating a given physical structure.

4.3   Model  calibration

Analytical  models  have  the potential to  closely represent complex non-liner structure
performance  under dynamic loading.  With the current state of modeling technology,
achieving accurate modeling normally  requires calibration to physical test results of an
actual structure.  Models developed in  this  study have not been compared or calibrated
to a physical test.  While these simulations  may be  good  representations  of actual
structure performance, the models cannot be regarded as validated without  some
correlation to  physical test results.

Project task list includes  dynamic body structure  modal analysis.  Report Summary of
Safety Testing  Results"  indicates the mass reduced  body exhibits  "best  in class"
torsional and  bending stiffness.  The report discusses torsional stiffness but there is no
information on predicted bending stiffness.  No  data on modal performance data or
analysis is presented.

4.4   Safety Conclusion

A major objective  of the PH 2 study  is to "validate" the light weight vehicle  structure for
compliance with FMVSS  requirements. State of the art FEM and dynamic simulations
models were  developed.  Those models indicate the body structure has the potential to
satisfy  FMVSS   requirements.    FMVSS  requirements   for  dynamic   crash   test
performance  is defined with respect to occupant loads and accelerations as measured
using calibrated test dummies. The FEM simulations  did not include interior, seats,
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restraint  systems  or occupants.    Analytical  models  in  this  project  evaluate
displacements, velocities, and accelerations of the body structure.  Predicting occupant
response  based  on  body structural  displacements velocities and  accelerations is
speculative. Simulation results presented are a good indicator of potential performance.
These simulations alone would not be considered adequate validation the structure for
FMVSS required safety performance.

5.0   Cost modeling

Assessing  cost implications of the PH 2 design a critically  important element of the
project.

Total vehicle cost was derived form vehicle list price using estimated Toyota mark-up for
overhead and profit.  This process assumes average Toyota mark-up applies to Venza
pricing.   List  price  for  specific  vehicles  is  regularly  influenced by  business  and
competitive marketing factors.  (Chevrolet  Volt  is believed  to be priced significantly
below  GM  corporate  average  margin on sales,  while the Corvette  is believed to be
above target margin  on  sales.)   System cost assumptions  based on average sales
margin and detailed  engineering judgments can  be a reasonable first order estimate.
These estimates  can be useful in allocation of  relative to costs to  individual vehicle
systems, but lack sufficient rigor to support definitive cost conclusions

Baseline Venza system costs were estimated by factoring estimated total vehicle cost
and allocating relative cost factors for each  major sub-system (BIW, closures, chassis,
bumpers, suspension, ...) based  on engineering judgment.   Cost of PH 2 purchased
components were developed using a combination of estimated baseline vehicle system
estimated costs,  engineering judgment and supplier estimates.   Cost  estimates for
individual purchased components appear realistic.

Body  costs for PH 2 design were  estimated by combining scaled material content from
baseline  vehicle  (Venza) and projected  manufacturing cost from a new production
processes and facility developed for this project.  This approach is logical  and practical,
but lacks the rigor to  support reliable estimates of new design cost implications when
the design changes represent significant departures from the baseline design content.

Body  piece cost and  tooling investment estimates were developed  by Intgellicosting.
No information  was  provided  on  Intellicosting methodology.   Purchased component
piece  cost estimates (excluding BIW) are in line with findings in similar studies.  Tooling
costs  supplied by Intellicosting are significantly lower than actual production experience
would suggest.

Assembly costs were  based on detailed assembly plant design, work flow analysis and
labor  content estimates.   Assembly  plant labor content (minutes) is  consistent with
actual BIW experienced in other OEM production projects.
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The PH 2 study indicates and aluminum based multi material body (BIW, closures) can
be produced for at a cost reduction of $199 relative to a conventional steel body. That
conclusion is not consistent with general industry experience. This inconsistency may
result from PH 2 assumptions of material recovery, labor rates and pars consolidation.

A  recent  study  conducted  by  IBIS  Associates  "Aluminum  Vehicle   Structure:
Manufacturing and Life Cycle Cost Analysis" estimated a cost increase $560 for an
aluminum vehicle BIW and closures.

http://aluminumintransportation.Org/members/files/active/0/IBIS%20Powertrain%20Stud
v%20w%20cover. pdf

That study was conducted  with  a  major high  volume  OEM vehicle  producer and
included part cost estimates using detailed individual part cost estimates.  Majority of
cost  increases for the low mass body are offset by weight related cost reductions in
powertrain,  chassis and suspension components.  Conclusions from the  IBIS study  are
consistent with similar studies and production experience at other OEM producers.

5.1    BIW Design Integration

Report identifies BIW piece count reduction from a baseline of 419 pieces to 169 for PH
2.  Significant piece cost and labor cost savings are attributed to the reduction  in piece
count.   Venza BOM lists 407 pieces in the baseline BIW.  A total of 120  pieces  are
identified as having "0" weight  and "0" cost.  Another 47 pieces are listed as nuts or
bolts. PH 2 Venza BOM lists no nuts or bolts and has no "0" mass/cost components.
With the importance attributed to parts integration, these  differences need to  be
addressed.

Closure BOM for PH 2 appears to not include a number of detail components  that  are
typically necessary in a production  ready design.  An example of this is the PH  2 hood.
PH 2 Hood  BOM lists 4 parts, an inner and outer panel and 2 hinges.  Virtually all
practical aluminum  hood designs include 2  hinge  bracket  reinforcements,  a latch
support and a palm reinforcement.  Absence of these practical elements of a production
hood raise  questions about the functional equivalency  (mounting and reinforcement
points,  NVH,  aesthetics,...)  of the  two vehicle designs.  Contents of the Venza BOM
should  be reviewed for accuracy and content in the PH 2 BOM should be reviewed for
practical completeness.

5.2    Tooling Investment

Tooling  estimates from Intellicosting are significantly lower than have been seen in other
similar  studies or production programs and will be challenged by most knowledgeable
automotive  industry readers.  Intellicosting estimates total BIW tooling at $28MM in  the
tooling  summary and $70 MM in  the  report summary.   On  similar production OEM
programs complete BIW tooling has been in the range of $150MM to $200MM.  The
report attributes  low tooling cost  to parts consolidation.   This  does not appear to
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completely explain the significant cost differences between  PH 2 tooling  and actual
production experience.   Parts consolidation  typically results  in fewer tools  while
increasing size, complexity and cost of tools used.  The impact of parts consolidation on
PH 2 weight and  cost appears to be major.   The report does not provide  specific
examples of where  parts  consolidation was  achieved and the specific impact  of
consolidation.   Considering the significant impact attributed  to  parts consolidation, it
would be helpful provide specific examples of where this was  achieved and the specific
impact on  mass, cost and tooling.    Based on actual production experience,  PH 2
estimates for plant capital investment,  tooling cost  and labor rates would be viewed as
extremely optimistic

5.3   Material Recovery

Report states estimates of material recovery in processing were not included in the cost
analysis.  Omitting this cost factor can  have a significant impact on cost of sheet based
aluminum products used in this study.  Typical  auto body panel  blanking process
recovery is 60%.  This recovery rate  is typical for steel and aluminum sheet.  When
evaluation material cost of an aluminum product the impact of recovery losses should
be included in the analysis.  Potential impact of material recovery for body panels:

            Approximate aluminum content (BIW,  Closures)       240 Kg
            Input material required at 60% recovery               400 Kg
            Blanking off-all                                    160 Kg

            Devaluation of blanking off-all (rough estimate)
                  Difference between raw material and
                        Blanking off-all     $1.30/Kg          $211

            Blanking devaluation increases cost of aluminum sheet products by over
            $ 0.90/Kg.

Appropriate  estimates of  blanking  recoveries  and material devaluation  should be
included in cost estimates for stamped aluminum  sheet components.  Recovery rates
for steel sheet products are similar to aluminum,  but the economic impact of steel  sheet
devaluation is a significantly lower factor in finished part cost per pound.

Report indicates total cost of resistance spot welding (RSW) is  5X the cost of friction
spot welding  (FSW).  Typical total  body shop  cost (energy,  labor, maintenance,
consumable tips) of a RSW is $0.05 -  $0.10. For the stated ratio to be accurate, FSW
total cost would be  $0.01-$0.02 which appears unlikely.   It is  possible the 5X cost
differential apply to energy consumption and not total cost.
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5.4   Labor rates

Average body plant labor rates used in BIW costing average $35 fully loaded.  Current
North American average  labor rates for auto manufacturing (typically stamping, body
production and vehicle assembly)

                  Toyota      $55
                  GM         $56 (including two tier)
                  Ford        $58
                  Honda      $50
                  Nissan      $47
                  Hyundai     $44
                  VW         $38

Labor rate of $35 may be achievable (VW) in some regions and circumstances.  The
issue of  labor rate is peripheral to the  central  costing issue of  this study which is
assessing the cost impact of light weight engineering design. Method  used to establish
baseline BIW component costs  inherently used current Toyota labor  rates.  Objective
assessment of design impact on  vehicle cost would  use  same labor  rates for  both
configurations.

Labor cost  or BIW production  is reported to be $108 using an average rate of  $35.
Typical actual BIW labor  content from other cost studies with North American OEM's
found actual BIW labor content  approaching $200.  Applying the current Toyota labor
rate of $55 to the PH  2 BIW production plan increases labor content to $170 (+$62) per
vehicle.

6.0   General

Editorial:
      Report makes frequent reference  to PH  1 vehicle  LD and  HD configurations.
      These references  seem  unnecessary and at times confusing.   PH 1 study
      references  do not enhance the findings or conclusions of the  PH  2 study.
      Suggest eliminating reference to the PH 1  study.

      Report would be clearer if content detail from PH 1  project that is part of PH 2
      project (interior, closure, chassis content) is fully reported in PH 2 report.

      Weight and Cost reduction references
            Baseline shifts between Total Vehicle and Total Vehicle Less Powertrain
            A consistent baseline may avoid confusion
            Suggest using total vehicle as reference

      Cost increases statements:
            Report makes a number of cost references similar to:
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            Pg 4 - "The estimation of the BIW piece cost suggests an increase of 160
            percent-over $700 - for the 37-percent mass-reduced body-in-white."

            The statement indicates the increase is 160%. The increase of $700  is an
            increase of 60% resulting in a total cost 160% of the baseline.

6.1    Site selection

PH  2 project includes an extensive site selection study.  Site selection is not related to
product design. Including economics based on preferential site selection confuses the
fundamental issue  of the design exercise.  Assumption of securing a comparable site
and  achieving the  associated preferential labor  rates and operating  expenses are  at
best unlikely.  Eliminating the site selection and associated cost would make the report
more focused and cost projections more understandable and believable.

Advantaged labor rates and possible renewable energy operating cost savings could be
applied to any vehicle design.  Entering those factors into the design study for the light
weight redesign mixes design cost with site selection and construction issues.

Site plan includes use of PV solar and wind turbines.  Plant costs indicate general  plant
energy (lighting,  support utilities, HVAC)  (not processing energy) will be at "0"  cost.
True  impact  of  renewable energy sources  net  of  maintenance  costs  is at  best
controversial.  Impact of general plant energy cost on vehicle cost is minimal.  The issue
of renewable  energy sources is valid but peripheral to the subject of vehicle design.   It
would be clearer to use conventional general plant energy overhead in cost analysis of
the  Phase II design cost.

6.2    Development experience

PH  2 vehicle  design described is representative of a predevelopment design concept.
All  OEM production  programs  go  through this development stage.   Most vehicle
programs experience some increase in mass and cost through  the physical testing and
durability development process.   Those increases  are typically driven by NVH  or
durability issues not detectable at the modeling  stage.   Mass  dampers on the Venza
front and rear suspension  are examples of mass and  cost  increases.  Vehicle mass
increases of 2-3% through  the development cycle are not unusual.  It would be prudent
to recognize  some level  of development related mass increase in the PH 2  mass
projection.

6.3    Vehicle content

      Pg. 214 Bumpers: Need to check statement:

"Current bumpers are generally constructed from steel extrusions,
although some are  aluminum and magnesium."
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In North America 80% of all bumpers are rolled or stamped steel.  Aluminum extrusions
are currently 20% of the NA market. There are no extruded steel bumpers.  There are
no magnesium bumpers.

Technology - Majority of the design concepts utilized for PH 2 have been in reasonable
volume automotive production for multiple years and on multiple vehicles.  A few of the
ideas represent a change  in vehicle utility or are dependent on significant technology
advancements that may not be achievable.  Identifying the impact of currently proven
technologies from speculative technologies may improve understanding of the overall
study.

          Specific speculative technologies:

          Eliminate spare tire, jack, tools (23 Kg) - feasible, may influence customer
                perception of utility
          Eliminate carpeting -feasible, customer perception issue
          Dual cast  rotors (2  Kg) - have  been  tried,  durability  issues  in volume
                production, differential  expansion and  bearing  temperature issues
                may not be solvable
          Wheels Ablation cast (22.4 Kg) - process has been run experimentally but
                has  not  been  proven  in  volume.   Benefit of  process  for  wheel
                applications  may not be achievable due to resultant  metallurgical
                conditions of the as-cast surfaces.
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[Please Note:  These comments are located immediately following the tables in

Section. 3: Summary of Comments.]

Review of Lotus Engineering Study "Demonstrating the Safety and
Crash wort hi ness of a 2020 Model-Year, Mass-Reduced Crossover Vehicle"

Srdjan Simunovic
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
simunovics @ornl.gov
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[insert date]

MEMORANDUM
SUBJECT:      EPA Response to Comments on the peer review of Demonstrating the Safety and
              Crashworthiness of a 2020 Model-Year, Mass-Reduced Crossover Vehicle (Lotus Phase 2
              Report)

FROM:        Cheryl Caffrey, Assessment and Standards Division
              Office of Transportation and Air Quality, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

The Lotus Phase 2 Report was reviewed by William Joost (U.S. Department of Energy), CG Cantemir,
Glenn Daehn, David Emerling, Kristina Kennedy, Tony Luscher, and Leo Rusli (The Ohio State University
(OSU)), Douglas Richman (Kaiser Aluminum), and Srdjan Simunovic (Oak Ridge National Laboratory).  In
addition, Srdjan Simunovic and members of the OSU Team reviewed various elements of the associated
LS-DYNA modeling.

This memo includes a compilation of comments prepared by SRA International and responses and
actions in response to those comments from EPA.
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    1.  ASSUMPTIONS AND DATA
       SOURCES
                                                  COMMENTS
Please comment on the validity of
any data sources and assumptions
embedded in the study's material
choices, vehicle design, crash
validation testing, and cost
assessment that could affect its
findings.
[Joost] The accuracy of the stress-strain data used for each material during CAE and crash analysis is critically important
for determining accurate crash response. The sources cited for the material data are credible; however the Al yield
stresses used appear to be on the high side of the expected properties for the alloy-temper systems proposed here.  The
authors may need to address the use of the slightly higher numbers (for example, 6061-T6 is shown with a yield stress of
308 MPa, where standard reported values  are usually closer to 275 MPa).

[Richman] Aluminum alloys and tempers selected and appropriate and proven for the intended applications. Engineering
data used for those materials and product forms accurately represent minimum expected minimum expected properties
normally used for automotive design purposes.

Simulation results indicate a vehicle utilizing the PH 2 structure is  potentially capable of meeting FMVSS requirements.
Physical test results have not been presented to confirm  model validity, some simulation  results indicate unusual
structural performance and  the  models do not address occupant  loading conditions which are  the FMVSS validation
criteria. Simulation results alone would not be considered "validation" of PH 2 structure safety performance.

Cost estimates for the PH  2 vehicle are questionable. Cost modeling methodology relies on engineering estimates and
supplier cost projections.  The level of analytical rigor in this approach raises uncertainties about resulting cost estimates.
Inconsistencies in reported piece count differences between baseline and PH 2 structures challenge a major reported
source of cost savings. Impact of blanking  recovery on aluminum sheet product net cost was explicitly not considered.
Labor rates assumed for BIW manufacturing were $20/Hr below prevailing Toyota labor rate implicit in baseline Venza cost
analysis. Cost estimates for individual stamping tool  are substantially below typical tooling cost experienced for similar
products. Impact of blanking recovery and labor rates alone would increase BIW cost by over $200.

[OSU]  Material data, for the  most part, seems reasonably representative of what would be used in this type of automotive
construction. Some of the materials are more prevalent in other industries like rail, than in automotive.

Material specifications used in this report were nominal; however, reviewers would like to see min/max material
specifications taken  into consideration.
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If you find issues with data sources
and assumptions, please provide
suggestions for available data that
would improve the study.
[Joost] Materials properties describing failure are not indicated (with the exception of Mg, which shows an in-plane failure
strain of 6%). It seems unlikely that the Al and Steel components in the vehicle will remain below the strain localization or
failure limits of the material; it's not clear how failure of these materials was determined in the models. The authors
should indicate how failure was accounted for; if it was not, the authors will need to explain why the assumption of
uniform plasticity throughout the crash event is valid for these materials. This could be done by showing that the
maximum strain conditions predicted in the model are below the typical localization or failure limits of the materials (if
that is true, anyway).

Empirical determination of the joint properties was a good decision for this study. The author indicates that lap-shear tests
demonstrated that failure occurred outside of the bond, and therefore adhesive failure was not included in the model.
However, the joints will experience a variety of stress states that differ from lap-shear during a crash event. While not a
major deficiency, it would be preferable to provide some discussion of why lap-shear results can  be extended to all stress
states for joint failure mode. Alternatively, the author could also provide testing data for other joint stress states such as
bending, torsion, and cross tension.

[Richman] No comment.

[OSU] References for all of the materials and adhesives would be very helpful.

[Simunovic]  The overall methodology used by the authors of the Phase 2 study is fundamentally solid and follows
standard practices from the crashworthiness engineering. Several suggestions are offered that may enhance the outcome
of the study.

Material Properties and Models
Reduction of vehicle weight is commonly pursued  by use of lightweight materials and advanced designs. Direct
substitution  of materials on a component level is possible only conceptually because of the other constraints stemming
from the material properties, function of the component, its dimensions, packaging, etc. Therefore, one cannot decide on
material substitutions solely on potential weight savings. In general, an  overall re-design is required, as was demonstrated
in the study under review. An overview of the recent lightweight material concept vehicle initiatives is given in Lutsey,
Nicholas P., "Review of Technical Literature and Trends Related to Automobile Mass-Reduction Technology." Institute of
Transportation Studies, University of California, Davis, Research Report  UCD-ITS-RR-10-10 (2010).

The primary  body material for the baseline vehicle, 2009 Toyota Venza, is mild steel.  Except for about 8% of Dual Phase
steel with 590 MPa designation, everything else is the material which has  been used in automobiles for almost a century
and for which extensive design experience and manufacturing technologies exist. On the other hand, the High
Development vehicle concept employs novel lightweight materials, many of which are still under development, such as Mg
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alloys and fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites. These materials are yet to be used in large quantities in mass
production automobiles. Their lack of market penetration is due not only to a higher manufacturing cost, but also due to
an insufficient understanding, experience and characterization of their mechanical behavior. To compensate for these
uncertainties, designers must use higher safety factors, which then often eliminate any potential weight savings. In
computational modeling, these uncertainties are manifested by the lack of material performance data, inadequate
constitutive models and a lack of validated models for the phenomena that was not of a concern when designing with the
conventional materials. For example, mild steel components dissipate crash energy through formation of deep folds in
which material can undergo strains over 100%. Both analytical [Jones, Norman, "Structural Impact", Cambridge University
Press (1997).] and computational  methods [Ted Belytschko, T., Liu, W.-K., Moran, B., "Nonlinear Finite Elements for
Continua and Structures", Wiley (2000).] of the continuum mechanics are sufficiently developed to be able to deal with
such configurations. On the other hand, Mg alloys, cannot sustain such large deformations and strain gradients and,
therefore, require development of computational methods to model material degradation, fracturing, and failure in
general.

The material data for the vehicle model is provided in section 4.4.2. of the Phase 2 report. The stress-strain curves in the
figures are most likely curves of effective plastic strain  and flow stress for isotropic plasticity material constitutive models
that use that form of data, such as the LS-DYNA ["LS-DYNA Keyword User's Manual", Livermore Software Technology
Corporation (LSTC), version 971, (2010).] constitutive model number 24, named MAT_PIECEWISE_LINEAR_PLASTICITY. A
list detailing the constitutive model formulation for each of the materials of structural significance in the study would help
to clarify this issue. Also the design rationale for dimensioning and selection of materials for the main structural parts
would help in understanding the design decisions made by the authors of the study. The included material data does not
include strain rate sensitivity, so it is assumed that the  strain rate effect was not considered. Strain rate sensitivity can be
an important strengthening mechanism in metals. For hep (hexagonal close-packed) materials, such as AM60, high strain
rate may also lead to change in the underlying mechanism of deformation, damage evolution, failure criterion, etc. Data
for strain rate tests can be found in the open source [http://thyme.ornl.gov/Mg_new], although the  properties can vary
considerably with material processing and microstructure. The source of material data in the study was often attributed to
private communications. Those should be included in the report, if possible, or in cases when the data is available from
documented source, such as reference ["Atlas of Stress-Strain Curves", 2nd Ed., ASM International (2002).], referencing
can be changed. Properties for aluminum and steel were taken from publicly available sources and private
communications and are within accepted ranges.

Material Parameters and Model for Magnesium Alloy AM60
The mechanical response of Mg alloys involves anisotropy, anisotropic hardening, yield asymmetry, relatively low ductility,
strain rate sensitivity, and significant degradation of effective properties due to the formation and growth of micro-defects
under loading  [Nyberg EA, AA Luo, K Sadayappan, and W Shi, "Magnesium for Future Autos." Advanced Materials &
Processes 166(10):35-37 (2008).]. It has been shown, for example, that ductility of die-cast AM60 depends strongly on its

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microstructure [Chadha, G; Allison, JE; Jones, JW, "The role of microstructure and porosity in ductility of die cast AM50 and
AM60 magnesium alloys," Magnesium Technology 2004, pp. 181-186 (2004).], and, by extension, on the section thickness
of the samples. In case when a vehicle component does not play a strong role in crash, its material model and parameters
can be described with simple models, such as isotropic plasticity, with piecewise linear hardening curve. However,
magnesium is extensively used across the High Development vehicle design [An Assessment of Mass Reduction
Opportunities for a 2017-2020 Model Year Vehicle Program, Lotus Engineering Inc., Rev 006A, (2010).]. In Phase 1 report,
magnesium is found in many components that are in the direct path of the frontal crash (e.g. NCAP test). Pages 40-42 of
Phase 1 report show magnesium as material for front-end module (FEM), shock towers, wheel housing, dash panel, toe
board and front transition member. The front transition member seems to be the component that provides rear support
for the front chassis rail. However, in Phase 2 report, pages 35-37, shock towers and this component were marked as made
out of aluminum. A zoomed section of the Figure 4.2.3.d from the Phase 2 report is shown in Figure 1. [See Simunovic
Comments, p. 4.] The  presumed part identified as the front transition member is marked with an arrow.

These assignments were not possible to confirm from the crash model since the input files were encrypted. In any case,
since Mg AM60 alloy is used in such important role for the frontal  crash, a more detailed material model than the one
implied by the graph on page 32 of Phase 2 report [1] would be warranted.  More accurate failure model is needed, as well.
The failure criteria in LS-DYNA [6] are mostly limited to threshold values of equivalent strains and/or stresses. However,
combination of damage model with plasticity and damage-initiated failure would probably yield a better accuracy for
AM60.

Material Models for Composites
Understanding of mechanical properties for material denoted as Nylon_45_2a (reference [1] page 33) would be much
more improved if the constituents and fiber arrangement were described in more detail. Numbers 45 and 2 may be
indicating +/- 45° fiber arrangement, however, a short addition of  material configuration would eliminate unnecessary
speculation. An ideal plasticity model of 60% limit strain for this material seems to be overly optimistic. Other composite
models available in LS-DYNA may be a much better option.

Joint Models
Welded joints are modeled by variation of properties in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and threshold force for cutoff
strength. HAZs are relatively easy to identify in the model because their IDs are in 1,000,000 range as specified on page 21
of the report [1]. An example of the approach is shown in Figure 2 [See Simunovic Comments, p. 5.], where the arrows
mark HAZs.

This particular connection contains welds (for joining aluminum parts) and bolts (for joining aluminum and magnesium).
HAZ properties were not given in the report and they could not be checked  in the model due to encryption. The bolt model
properties were described that it fails at 130 MPa (page 38 of the report [1]), which corresponds to the yield stress of

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                                 AM60. The importance of these joints cannot be overstated. They enforce stability of the axial deformation mode in the
                                 rails that in turn enables dissipation of the impact energy. The crash sequence of the connection between the front end
                                 module and the front rail is shown in  Figure 3. [See Simunovic Comments, p. 6.]

                                 The cracks in the front end module (Figure 3.2) and the separation between the front end module and the front rail (Figure
                                 3.3) are clearly visible. This zone experiences very large permanent deformations, as  shown in Figure 4. [See Simunovic
                                 Comments, p. 6.]

                                 It is not clear from the simulations which failure criterion dominates the process. Is it  the failure of the HAZ or is it the spot
                                 weld limit force or stress. Given the importance of this joint on the overall crash response, additional information about
                                 the joint sub-models would be very beneficial to a reader.
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:

[Richman]  Study includes an impressive amount of design, crash, and cost analysis information.  The radical part count reduction needs to be more fully
explained or de-emphasized.  Report also should address the greatly reduced tooling and assembly costs relative to the experience of today's automakers.
Some conservatism would be appropriate regarding potential shortcomings in interior design and aesthetics influencing customer expectations and acceptance.

[OSU]  One broad comment is that this report needs to be more strongly placed in the context of the state of the art as established by available literature. For
example the work only contains 7 formal references. Also, it is not clear where material data came from in specific cases (this should be formally referenced,
even if a private communication) and the exact source of data such in as the comparative data in Figure 4.3.2 is not clear.  Words like Intillicosting are used to
denote the source of data and we believe that refers to a specific subcontract let to the firm 'intellicosting' for this work and those results are shown here. This
needs to be made explicitly clear.
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    2.  VEHICLE DESIGN
       METHODOLOGICAL RIGOR
                                                  COMMENTS
Please comment on the methods
used to analyze the materials
selected, forming techniques,
bonding processes, and parts
integration, as well as the resulting
final vehicle design.
[Joost] While appropriate forming methods and materials appear to have been selected, a detailed description of the
material selection and trade-off process is not provided. One significant exception is the discussion and tables regarding
the replacement of Mg components with  Al and steel components in order to meet crash requirements.

Similarly, while appropriate joining techniques seem to have been used, the process for selecting the processes and
materials is not clear. Additionally, little detail is provided on the joining techniques used here. A major technical hurdle in
the implementation of multi-material systems is the quality, durability, and performance of the joints. Additional effort
should be expended towards describing the joining techniques used here and characterizing the performance.

[Richman]  Adhesive bonding and FSW processes used in PH 2  have  been proven in  volume production and would be
expected to perform well  in this application.  Some discussion of joining system for magnesium closure  inner panels to
aluminum external skin  and AHSS "B" pillar to aluminum body  would improve understanding and confidence in those
elements of the design.

Parts integration  information is vague and appears inconsistent.  Parts integration.   Major mass and cost savings  are
attributed to parts integration.  Data presented does not appear to results.

Final design appears capable of meeting functional, durability and FMVSS requirements. Some increase in mass and cost
are likely to resolve structure and NVH  issues encountered in component and vehicle level physical testing.

[OSU]  More details are needed on the  various aspects of joining and fastening. Comment on assembly.
Please describe the extent to
which state-of-the-art design
methods have been employed as
well as the extent to which the
associated analysis exhibits strong
technical rigor.
[Joost] Design is a challenging process and the most important aspect is having a capable and experienced design team
supporting the project; Lotus clearly meets this need and adds credibility to the design results.

One area that is omitted from the analysis is durability (fatigue and corrosion) performance of the structure. Significant
use of Al, Al joints, and multi-material joints introduces the potential for both fatigue and corrosion failure that are
unacceptable in an automotive product. It would be helpful to include narrative describing the good durability
performance of conventional (i.e. not Bentley, Ferrari, etc.) vehicles that use similar materials and joints in production
without significant durability problems. In some cases, (say the weld-bonded AI-Mg joints), production examples do not
exist so there should be an explanation of how these could meet durability requirements.

[Richman]  Vehicle design methodology utilizing Opti-Struct, NASTRAN and LS-Dyna is represents  a comprehensive and
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rigorous approach to BIW structural design and materials optimization.

[OSU]  In order to qualify for mass production, a process must be very repeatable. Figure 4.2.4.a shows the results from 5
test coupons. There are significant differences between all of these in peak strength and energy absorption. Such a spread
of results would not be acceptable in terms of production.

[Simunovic] The Phase 2 design study of the High Development vehicle considered large number of crash scenarios from
the FMVSS and IIHS tests. The simulations show reasonable results and deformations. Energy measures show that models
are stable and have no sudden spikes that would lead to instabilities. The discretization of the sheet material is primarily
done by proportionate quadrilateral shell elements, with relatively few triangular elements. The mesh density is relatively
uniform without large variations in element sizes and aspect ratios. However, in my opinion, there are two issues that
need to be addressed.  One is the modeling of material failure/fracture and the other is the design of the crush  zone with
respect to the overall stopping distance. While the former may be a part of proprietary technology, the latter issue should
be added to the description in order to better understand the design at hand.

Material Failure Models and Criteria
One of the modeling aspects that is usually not considered in conventional designs is modeling of material fracture/failure.
In the Phase 2 report [1] material failure is indicated only in  AM60 although it may be reasonably expected in other
materials in the model. Modeling of material failure in continuum mechanics is a fairly complex undertaking. In the current
Lotus High Development model, material failure and fracture are apparently modeled by element deletion. In this
approach, when a finite element reaches some failure criteria, the element is removed from simulations, which then
allows for creation of free surfaces and volumes in the structure. This approach is notoriously mesh-dependent. It implies
that the characteristic dimension for the material strain localization is of the size of the finite element where localization
and failure happen to occur. Addition of the strain rate sensitivity to a material model can both improve fidelity of the
material model, and as an added benefit, it can also help to regularize the response during strain localization. Depending
on the  amount of stored internal energy and stiffness in the  deleted elements, the entire simulation can be polluted by the
element deletion errors and become unstable. Assuming that only AM60 parts in the Lotus model have failure  criterion, it
would not be too difficult for the authors to describe it in more depth. Since AM60 is such a critical material in the design,
perturbation of its properties, mesh geometry perturbations and different discretization densities, should be considered
and investigate how do they affect the convergence of the critical measures, such as crash  distances.

A good illustration of the importance of the failure criteria is the response of the AM60 front end module during crash.
This component is always  in the top group of components ranked by the dissipated energy. Figure 5 [See Simunovic
Comments, p. 7.] shows deformation of the front end module during the full frontal crash.
Notice  large cracks open in the mid span, on the sides, and punched out holes at the locations of the connection with the
front rail and the shotgun. Mesh refinement study of this component would be interesting and could also indicate the

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robustness of the design. Decision to design such a structurally important part out of Mg would be interesting to a reader.

There are other components that also include failure model even though they are clearly not made out of magnesium nor
are their failure criteria defined in the Phase 2 report. Figure 6 [See Simunovic Comments, p. 8.] shows the sequence of
deformation of the front left rail as viewed from the right side of the vehicle.

The axial crash of the front rails is ensured by their connection to the front end, rear S-shaped support and to the
connections to the sub-frame. Figure 7 [See Simunovic Comments, p. 8.] shows the detail of the connectors between the
left crush rail to the subframe.

Tearing of the top of the support (blue) can be clearly observed in Figure 7.  The importance of this connection for the
overall response may warrant parametric studies for failure parameters and mesh discretization.

Crash Performance of the High Development Vehicle Design
From the safety perspective, the  most challenging crash scenario is the full profile frontal crash into a flat rigid barrier. The
output files for the NCAP 35 mph test were provided by Lotus Engineering and used for evaluation of the vehicle design
methodological rigor.

The two accelerometer traces from the simulation at the lower  B-pillar locations are shown in Figure 8. [See Simunovic
Comments, p. 9.] When compared with NHTSA test 6601, the simulation accelerometer and displacement traces indicate
much shorter crush length than the baseline vehicle.

When compared vehicle deformations before and after the crush, it becomes obvious where the deformation occurs.
Figure 9 [See Simunovic Comments, p. 10.] shows the deformation of the front rail members.

It can be seen that almost all deformation occurs in the space spanned by the front frame rails. As marked in Figure 1, the
front transition member (or a differently named component in case my material assignment assumption was not correct),
supports the front rail so that it axially crushed and dissipated as much energy, as possible. For that purpose, this front rail
rear support was made extremely stiff and it does not appreciably deform during the crash (Figure 10). [See Simunovic
Comments, p. 10.] It has internal reinforcing structure that has not been described in the report. These reinforcements
enables it to reduce bending and axial deformations in order to  provide steady support for the axial crush of the aluminum
rail tube.

This design decision reduces the possible crush zone and stopping distance to the distance between the front of the
bumper and the front of the rail support (Figure 9). The effective crash length can be clearly seen in Figure 11. [See
Simunovic Comments, p. 11.]

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                                 We can see from the above figure that the front rail supports undergo minimal displacements and that all the impact
                                 energy must be dissipated in a very short span. Figure 12 [See Simunovic Comments, p. 12.] shows the points of interest to
                                 determine the boundary of the crush zone, and an assumption that crash energy dissipation occurs ahead of the front
                                 support for the lower rail.

                                 Figure 13 [See Simunovic Comments, p. 12.] gives the history of the axial displacements for the two points above. At their
                                 maximum points, the relative reduction of their distance from the starting condition is 0.7 inches.

                                 Since the distance between the front of the rail support and the rocker remains practically unchanged during the test, we
                                 can reasonably assume that majority of the crash energy is dissipated in less than 22  inches. To quickly evaluate the
                                 feasibility of the proposed design, we can use the concept of the Equivalent Square Wave (ESW) ["Vehicle crashworthiness
                                 and occupant protection", American Iron and Steel Institute, Priya, Prasad and Belwafa, Jamel E., Eds. (2004).]. ESW
                                 assumes constant, rectangular, impact pulse for the entire  length of the stopping distance (in our case equal to 22 in) from
                                 initial velocity (35 mph). ESW represents an equivalent constant rectangular shaped pulse to an arbitrary input pulse. In
                                 our case ESW is about 22 g. Sled tests and occupant model  simulations indicate that crash pulses exceeding ESW of 20 g
                                 will have difficulties to satisfy FMVSS 208 crash dummy performance criteria [11]. For a flat front barrier crash of 35 mph
                                 and an ESW of 20 g, the minimum stopping distance is 24 in. Advanced restraint systems and early trigger airbags may
                                 need to be used in order to satisfy the  injury criteria and provide sufficient ride down time for the vehicle occupants.

                                 The authors of the study do not elaborate on the safety indicators. I firmly believe that such a discussion would be very
                                 informative and valuable to a wide audience. On several places, the authors state values for average accelerations up to 30
                                 ms from the impact, and average accelerations after 30 ms. When stated without a context, these numbers do not  help
                                 the readers who are not versed in the concepts of crashworthiness. The authors most likely refer to the effectiveness time
                                 of the restraint systems. An overview of the concepts followed  by a discussion of the occupant safety calculations for this
                                 particular design would be very valuable.
If you are aware of better methods
employed and documented
elsewhere to help select and
analyze advanced vehicle materials
and design engineering rigor for
2020-2025 vehicles, please suggest
how they might be used to
improve this study.
[Joost] No comment.

[Richman] No comment.

[OSU] No suggestions at this time.
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ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:

[Joost] This is a very thorough design process, undertaken by a very credible design organization (Lotus). There are a variety of design assumptions and trade-
offs that were made during the process (as discussed above), but this would be expected for any study of this type. Having a design team from Lotus adds
credibility to the assumptions and design work that was done here.

Section 4.5.8.1 uses current "production" vehicles as examples for the feasibility of these techniques. However, many of the examples are for extremely high-
end vehicles (Bentley, Lotus Evora, McLaren) and the remaining examples are for low-production, high-end vehicles (MB E class, Dodge Viper, etc.). The cost of
some technologies can be expected to come down before 2020, but it is not reasonable to assume that (for example) the composites technologies used in
Lamborghinis will be cost competitive on any time scale; significant advances in composite technology will need to be made in order to be cost competitive on a
Venza, and the resulting material is likely to differ considerably (in both properties and manufacturing technique) from the Lamborghini grade material.

[Richman]  [1] Achieving a 37% BIW mass reduction  with a multi material design optimized for safety performance is consistent with recent research and
production vehicle experience. BIW mass reductions resulting from conversion of conventional BIW structures to aluminum based multi-material BIW have
ranged from 35%-39% (Jaguar XJ, Audi A8) to 47% (OEM study). BIW related mass reductions above 40% were achieved where the baseline structure was
predominantly mild steel.  A recent University of Aachen (Germany) concluded BIW structures optimized for safety performance utilizing low mass engineering
materials can achieve 35-40% mass reduction compared to a BIW optimized using conventional body materials. A recent BIW weight reduction study
conducted at the University of Aachen (Germany)",  http://www.eaa.net/en/applications/automotive/studies/

Most of the BIW content (materials, manufacturing processes) selected for the PH 2 vehicle have been in successful volume auto industry production for
several years.

[2] Closures/Fenders: Mass reduction in the closure and fender group is 59 Kg, 41% of baseline Venza. This level of mass reduction is consistent with results of
the Aachen and IBIS studies and industry experience on current production vehicles.  Hood and fenders on the PH 2 vehicle are aluminum. Recent Ducker
Worldwide Survey of 2012 North American Vehicles  found over 30% of all North American vehicles have aluminum hoods and over 15% of vehicle have
aluminum fenders. PH 2 use of aluminum for closure panels is consistent with recognized industry trends for these components. PH 2 doors utilize aluminum
outer skins over cast magnesium inner panels.

[3] Material properties: Aluminum alloy and temper selection for BIW and Closures are appropriate for those components. Those materials have been used in
automotive applications for several years and are growing in popularity in future vehicle programs.

[4] Typical vs. Minimum properties: Automobile structural designs are typically based on minimum mechanical properties. Report does not identify the data
used (minimum or typical). Aluminum property data used in for the PH 2 design represents expected minimum values for the alloys and tempers.  This
reviewer is not able to comment on property values used for the other materials used in the BIW.

[5] Aluminum pre-treatment:  PH 2 vehicle structure  utilizes adhesive bonding of major structural elements.  Production vehicle experience confirms pre-

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treatment of sheet and extruded aluminum bonding surfaces is required to achieve maximum joint integrity and durability.  PH 2 vehicle description indicates
sheet material is anodized as a pre-treatment. From the report it is not clear that pretreatment is also applied to extruded elements.

The majority of high volume aluminum programs in North America have moved away from electrochemical anodizing as a pre-treatment. Current practice is
use of a more effective, lower cost and environmentally compatible chemical conversion process. These processes are similar to Alodine treatment.
Predominant aluminum pre-treatments today are provided by Novelis (formerly Alcan Rolled Products) and Alcoa (Alcoa 951). Both processes achieve similar
results and need to be applied to the sheet and extruded elements that will be bonded in assembly

[6] Suspension and Chassis: Suspension/chassis PH 2 mass reduction is 162 Kg (43% of baseline).  This level of mass reduction is higher than has been seen in
similar studies.  Lotus PH 2 includes conversion of steering  knuckles, suspension arms and the engine cradle to aluminum castings.  Mass reductions estimated
for conversion of those components are estimated at approximately 50%.  Recent Ducker study found aluminum knuckles are currently used on over 50% of
North American vehicles and aluminum control arms are used on over 30% of North American vehicles. Achieving 50% mass reduction through conversion of
these components to aluminum is consistent with industry experience.

[7] Wheel/Tire: Total wheel and tire mass reduction of 64 Kg (46%) is projected for the wheel and tire group.  Project mass reduction is achieved through a
reduction in wheel and tire masses and elimination of the spare tire and tool kit.

Tire mass reduction is made possible by a 30% reduction in vehicle mass. Projected tire mass reduction is 6 Kg for 4 tires combined. This mass reduction is
consistent with appropriate tire selection for PH 2 vehicle final mass.
Road wheel mass reduction is 5.6 Kg (54%) per wheel. It is  not clear from the report how this magnitude of reduction is achieved. The report attributes wheel
mass reduction to possibilities with the Ablation casting process.  PH 1 report discussion of Ablation casting states: "The process would be expected to save
approximately 1 Kg per wheel." Considering the magnitude of this mass reduction a more detailed description of wheel mass reduction would be appropriate.

Elimination of the spare tire and jack reduces vehicle mass  by 23 Kg. This is feasible but has customer perceptions of vehicle utility implications. Past OEM
initiatives to eliminate a spare tire have encountered consumer resistance leading to reinstatement of the spare system in some vehicles.

[8] Engine and Driveline: Engine and driveline for the PH 2 vehicle were defined by the study sponsors and not evaluated for additional mass reduction in the
Lotus study.  Baseline Venza is equipped with a technically  comprehensive conventional 2.7 L4 with aluminum engine block  and heads and conventional 6
speed transmission.  PH 2 vehicle is equipped with a dual mode hybrid drive system powered by a turbocharged 1.0 L L-4 balance shaft engine. Engine was
designed by Lotus and sized to meet the PH 2 vehicle performance and charging requirements. Mass reduction achieved with the PH 2 powertrain is 54 Kg.
This level of mass reduction appears achievable based on results of secondary mass reductions resulting from vehicle level mass reductions in excess of 20%.

[9] Interior: Lotus PH 2 design includes major redesign of the baseline Venza interior. Interior design changes achieve 97 Kg (40%) weight reduction from the
baseline interior. Majority of interior weight reduction  is achieved in the seating (43 Kg) and trim (28 Kg). Interior weight reduction strategies in the PH 2
design represent significant departures from  baseline Venza interior. New seating designs and interior concepts (i.e.: replacing carpeting with bare floors and
floor mats) may not be consistent with consumer wants and expectations in those areas. Interior trim and seating designs used in the PH 2 vehicle have been
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explored generically by OEM design studios for many years.

[10] Energy balance: Is presented as validation of the FEM analysis. For each load case an energy balance is presented. Evaluating energy balance is a good
engineering practice when modeling complex structures. Energy balance gives confidence in the mathematical fidelity of the model and that there are no
significant mathematical instabilities in the calculations. Energy balance does not confirm model accuracy in simulating a given physical structure.
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    3.  VEHICLE
       CRASHWORTHINESS
       TESTING
       METHODOLOGICAL
       RIGOR.
                                                  COMMENTS
Please comment on the methods
used to analyze the vehicle body
structure's structural integrity and
safety crashworthiness.
[Joost] Regarding my comment on joint failure under complex stress states, note that in figure 4.3.12.a the significant
plastic strains are all located at the bumper-rail joints.  While this particular test was only to indicate the damage (and cost
to repair), the localization of plastic strain at the joint is somewhat concerning.

The total-vehicle torsional stiffness result is remarkably high. If this is accurate, it may contribute to an odd driving "feel",
particularly by comparison to a conventional Venza; higher torsional stiffness is usually viewed as a good thing, but the
authors may need to address whether or not such extreme stiffness values would be appealing to consumers of this type
of vehicle. While there doesn't appear to be a major source of error in the torsional stiffness analysis, the result does call
into question the accuracy; this is either an extraordinarily stiff vehicle, or there was an error during the analysis.

[Richman]  LS-Dyna and MSC-Nastran are current and accepted tools for this kind of analysis.  FEM analysis is  part art as
well  as science, the assumption had  to  be made that Lotus  has  sufficient skills and  experience to  generate a valid
simulation model.

[OSU] The crash simulations that were completed seem to be well created models of the vehicle that they represent. The
geometry was formed from mid-surface models of the sheet metal. Seat belt and child restraint points are logically
modeled.
Please describe the extent to
which state-of-the-art crash
simulation testing methods have
been employed as well as the
extent to which the associated
analysis exhibits strong technical
rigor.
[Joost] This is outside of my area of expertise

[Richman]  Model indicates the PH 2 structure could sustain a peak load  of 108 kN under FMVSS 216 testing.  This is
unusually high for an SUV roof, and stronger than any roof on any vehicle produced to date. Result questions stiffness and
strength results of the simulations.

Intrusion velocities and deformation  are used as  performance criteria in the  side impact  simulations.   Performance
acceptability judgments made using those results, but no data was given for comparison to any other vehicle.

Occupant protection performance cannot be judged based entirely on deformations and intrusion velocities.

Report states that "the mass-reduced vehicle was  validated for meeting  the listed FMVSS  requirements."  This  is an
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                                overstatement of what the analysis accomplished.  FMVSS test performance is judged based on crash dummy accelerations
                                and loads. The FEM analysis looked only at BIW acceleration and intrusion levels. While these can provide a good basis for
                                engineering judgment, no comparison to physical crash test levels is provided. "Acceptable" levels were defined by Lotus
                                without explanation.  Results may be good, but  would not be sufficient to "validate" the  design for  meeting  FMVSS
                                requirements.

                                Model has not been validated against any physical property. In normal BIW design development, an FEM is developed and
                                calibrated against a physical test. The calibrated model is considered validated for moderate A:B comparisons.

                                [OSU]  Animations of all of the crash tests were reviewed. These models were checks for structural consistence and it was
                                found that all parts were well attached. The deformation seen in the structure during crash seems representative of these
                                types of collisions. Progressive deformation flows in a logical manner from the point of impact throughout the vehicle.

                                [Simunovic]  The documented  results in the study show that authors have employed current state-of-the-art for
                                crashworthiness modeling and followed systematic technical procedures. This methodology led them through a sequence
                                of model versions and continuous improvement of the fidelity of the models. I would suggest that a short summary be
                                added  describing the major changes of the Phase 2 design with respect to the original High Development vehicle body
                                design.
For reviewers with vehicle crash
simulation capabilities to run the
LS-DYNA model, can the Lotus
design and results be validated?*
[Joost] N/A

[Richman]  Some validation can be done by reviewing modeling technique and  assumptions, but without any form of
physical test comparison, the amount of error is unknown and can be significant.

FEM validation was presented in the form of an energy balance for each load case. Energy balance is useful in confirming
certain internal aspects of the model are working correctly.  Energy balance does not validate how accurately the model
simulates the  physical structure.   Presenting energy balance for each  load case and suggesting  balance  implies  FEM
accuracy is misleading.

[OSU] The actual LS-DYNA model crash simulations were not rerun. Without any changes to the inputs there would be no
changes in the output. Discussion of the input properties occurs in Section 2.

[Simunovic] The authors had several crash tests of the baseline vehicle, 2009 Toyota Venza, to use for comparison and
trends. Tests 6601 and 6602 were conducted in 2009 so that they could be readily used for the development.  The data
from test 6601 was used in the Phase 2 report for comparison. Test 6602 was not used for comparison in the report.
While the report abounds with crash simulations and graphs documenting tremendous amount of work that authors have
done, it would have been very valuable to add comparison with the 6602 test even at the expense of some graphs. Page
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                                 72 of the Phase 2 report starts with comparison of the simulations with the tests and that is one of the most engaging parts
                                 of the document. I suggest that it warrants a section in itself. It is currently located out of place, in between the simulation
                                 results and it needs to be emphasized more.  This new section would also be a good place for discussion on occupant
                                 safety modeling and general formulas for the subject.

                                 One of the intriguing differences between the simulations and baseline vehicle crash test is the amount and the type of
                                 deformation in the frontal crash. As noted  previously, computational model is very stiff with very limited crush zone.
                                 Viewed from the left side (Figure 14) [See Simunovic Comments, p. 14.], and from below (Figure 15) [See Simunovic
                                 Comments, p. 15.], we can see that the majority of the deformation is in the frame rail, and that the subframe's rear
                                 supports do not fail. The strong rear support to the frame rail, does not appreciably deform, and thereby establishes the
                                 limit to the crash deformation.

                                 The overall side kinematics of the crash is shown in Figure 16. [See Simunovic Comments, p. 15.] The front tires barely
                                 touch the wheel well indicating a high stiffness of the design. Note that the vehicle does not dive down at the barrier.

                                 The numbers 1-4 below the images denote times after impact of Oms , 35ms, 40 ms, and 75ms, respectively. The times
                                 were selected based on characteristic event times observed in crash simulations.

                                 The following images are from the NHTSA NCAP crash test 7179 for 2011 Toyota Venza. The response is essentially the
                                 same as for the 2009 version, but the images are of much higher quality so that they have been selected for comparison.
                                 These times corresponding to the times in  Figures 15 and 16 are shown in Figure 17. [See Simunovic Comments, p. 16.]

                                 The subframe starts to rapidly break off of  the vehicle floor around 40 ms, and therefore allows for additional deformation.
                                 In Lotus vehicle this connection remains intact so that it cannot contribute to additional  crash length. The left side view of
                                 the test vehicle during crash at the same times is shown in Figure 18. [See Simunovic Comments, p. 17.]

                                 There is an obvious difference between the simulations and the tests. The developed lightweight model and the baseline
                                 vehicle do represent two different types of that share general dimensions, so that the differences  in the responses can be
                                 large. However, diving down during impact is so common across the passenger vehicles so that different kinematics
                                 automatically raises questions about the accuracy of the suspension system and the mass distribution. If such kinematic
                                 outcome was a design objective, than it can be stated in the tests.
If you are aware of better methods
and tools employed and
documented elsewhere to help
validate advanced materials and
design engineering rigor for 2020-
[Joost] While it's not made explicit in the report, it seems that the components are likely modeled with the materials in a
zero-strain condition - i.e. the strain hardening and local change in properties that occurs during stamping is not
considered in the properties of the components. While not widely used in crash modeling (as far as I am aware), including
the effects of strain hardening on local properties from the stamping process is beginning to find use in some design tools.
While none of the materials used in this study have extreme strain hardening properties (such as you might find in TRIP
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2025 vehicles, please suggest how
they might be used to improve the
study.
steels or 5000 series Al), all of these sheet materials will experience some change in properties during stamping.

I do not consider the study deficient for having used zero-strain components, but it may be worth undergoing a simple
study to determine the potential effects on some of the components. This is complicated by the further changes that may
occur during the paint bake cycle.

[Richman] Cannot truly be validated without building a physical prototype for comparison.

[OSU]  LS-DYNA is the state of the art for this type of analysis. As time allows for the 2020-2025 model year, additional
more detailed material modeling should occur. As an example the floor structure properties can be further investigated to
answer structural creep and strength concerns.
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:

[Richman]  Study is very thorough in their crash loadcase selections and generated a lot of data for evaluation. Might have included IIHS Offset ODB and IIHS
Side Impact test conditions which most OEM's consider.

Study is less thorough in analyzing normal loads that influence BIW and chassis design (i.e. pot holes, shipping, road load fatigue, curb bump, jacking, twist
ditch, 2g bump, etc.).

Report indicates  "Phase 2 vehicle model was validated for conforming to the existing external data for the Toyota Venza, meeting best-in-class torsional and
bending stiffness, and managing customary running loads." Only torsional stiffness is reported.

Modal frequency analysis data Is not reported.

Conclusions for many of the crash load cases (primarily dynamic) did not use simulation results to draw quantitative comparisons to the Toyota Venza or other
peer vehicles.  For instance, intrusion velocities for side impacts are reported. But, no analytical comparison is made to similar vehicles that currently meet the
requirements.  Comparable crash tests are often available from  NHTSA or IIHS.

Remarkable strength exhibited by the  FEM roof under an FMVSS test load raises questions validity of the model.

Model assumes no failures of adhesive  bonding in  materials during collisions.  Previous crash testing experience suggest[s] some level of bonding separation
and resulting structure strength reduction is likely to occur.
[Richman cont.]

Unusual simulation results- [1] Models appear reasonable and indicate the structure has the potential to meet collision safety requirements. Some unusual
simulation results raise questions about detail accuracy of the models.
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[2] FMVSS 216 quasi-static roof strength: Model indicates peak roof strength of 108 KN. This is unusually high strength for an SUV type vehicle. The report
attributes this high strength to the major load being resisted by the B-pillar. Several current vehicles employ this construction but have not demonstrated roof
strength at this level. The report indicates the requirement of 3X curb weight is reached within 20 mm which is typically prior to the test platen applying
significant load directly into the b-pillar.

[3] 35 MPH frontal rigid barrier simulation: Report indicates the front tires do not contact the sill in a 35 MPH impact.  This is highly unusual structural
performance. Implications are the model or the structure is overly stiff.

[4] Body torsional stiffness: Torsional stiffness is indicated to be 32.9 kN/deg. Higher than any comparable vehicles listed in the report. PH 2 structure torsional
stiffness is comparable to significantly more compact body structures like the Porsche Carrera, BMW 5 series, Audi A8. It is not clear what elements of the PH 2
structure contribute to achieving the predicted stiffness.

[5] Door beam modeling: Door beams appear to stay tightly joined to the body structure with no tilting, twisting or separation at the lock attachments in the
various side impact load modes. This is highly unusual structural behavior.  No door opening deformation is observed in any frontal crash simulations. This
suggests the door structure  is modeled as an integral load path.  FMVSS requires that doors are operable after crash testing.  Door operability is not addressed
in the report.

[6] Safety analysis of the  PH2 structure is based on collision simulation results using LS-Dyna and Nastran software simulations.  Both software packages are
widely used throughout the automotive industry to perform the type of analysis in this report.
Accuracy of simulated mechanical  system performance is highly  dependent on how well the FEM model represents the characteristics of the physical structure
being studied.  Accurately  modeling a complete vehicle  body structure for evaluation  under non-linear loading conditions experienced in collisions  is a
challenging task.  Small changes in assumed performance of nodes and joints can have a significant impact on  predicted structure performance. Integration of
empirical joint test data into the modeling process has significantly improved the correlation between simulated and actual structure performance.

[OSU] This reviewer sat down with the person who created and ran the LS-DYNA FEA models. Additional insight into how the model performs and specific
questions were answered on specific load cases. All questions were answered.
Another reviewer which did not visit Lotus commented on the following:  1. The powertrain has more than 15% of the vehicle mass and therefore the right
powertrains should be used in simulation.

2.  The powertrain is always mounted on the body by elastic mounts. The crash behavior of the elastic mounts might easy introduce a 10% error in
determination of the peak deceleration (failure vs not failure might be much more than 10%). So modeling a close-to-reality powertrain and bushing looks like a
must (at least for me).

3.  Although not intuitive, the battery pack might have a worst crash behavior than the fuel tank. Therefore the  shoulder to shoulder position might be inferior
to a tandem configuration (with the battery towards the center of the vehicle).

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4.  The battery pack crash behavior is of high importance of its own. It is very possible that after a crash an internal collapse of the cells and/or a penetration
might produce a short-circuit. It should be noted that by the time of writing there are not developed any reasonable solutions to mitigate an internal short-
circuit. Although not directly life treating, this kind of event will produce a vehicle loss.

Also, very important, but subtle would be literature references that give an idea of how accurate the community can expect LS-DYNA crash simulations to be in
a study such as this. Often  manufacturers have the luxury of testing similar bodies, materials and joining methodologies and tuning their models to match
broad behavior and then the effects of specific changes can be accurately measured.  Here the geometric configuration, many materials and many joining
methods are essentially new.  Can Lotus provide examples that show how accurate such 'blind' predictions may be?

Model calibration - Analytical models have the potential to closely represent complex non-liner structure performance under dynamic loading. With the
current state of modeling technology, achieving accurate modeling normally requires calibration to physical test results of an actual structure. Models
developed in this study have not been compared or calibrated to a physical test. While these simulations may be good representations of actual structure
performance, the models cannot be regarded as validated without some correlation to physical test results.

Project task list includes dynamic body structure modal analysis. Report Summary of Safety Testing  Results" indicates the mass reduced body exhibits "best in
class" torsional and bending stiffness. The report discusses torsional stiffness but there is no information on predicted bending stiffness. No data on modal
performance data or analysis is presented.
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    4.  VEHICLE
       MANUFACTURING COST
       METHODOLOGICAL RIGOR
                                                 COMMENTS
Please comment on the methods
used to analyze the mass-reduced
vehicle body structure's
manufacturing costs.
[Joost] The report does a good job of identifying, in useful detail, the number of workstations, tools, equipment, and other
resources necessary for manufacturing the BIW of the vehicle. These are all, essentially, estimates by EBZ; to provide
additional credibility to the manufacturing assessment it would be helpful to include a description of other work that EBZ
has conducted where their manufacturing design work was implemented for producing vehicles. Lotus is a well-known
name, EBZ is less well known.

[Richman]  Notable strengths of this analysis, besides the main focus on crash analysis, are the detail of assembly facility
design, labor content, and BIW component tooling identification.

Main weakness of the cost analysis is the fragmented approach of comparing costs derived in different approaches and
different sources, and trying to infer relevant information from these differences.

[OSU] Flat year-over-year wages for the cost analysis seems unrealistic.

Additional source information requested for wage rates for various locations.
Please describe the extent to
which state-of-the-art costing
methods have been employed as
well as the extent to which the
associated analysis exhibits strong
technical rigor.
[Joost] This is not my area of expertise

[Richman]  Vulnerability in this cost study appears to be validity and functional equivalence of BIW design with 169 pieces
vs. 407 for the baseline Venza.

Total tooling investment of $28MM for the BIW not consistent with typical OEM production experience.  BIW tooling of
$150-200MM would not be uncommon for conventional BIW manufacturing.  If significant parts reduction could be
achieved, it would mean less tools, but usually larger and more complex ones, requiring larger presses and slower cycle
times.

[OSU]  Difficult to evaluate since this portion of the report was completed by a subcontractor. The forming dies seem to be
inexpensive as compared to standard steel sheet metal forming dies.
If you are aware of better methods
and tools employed and
documented elsewhere to help
[Joost] This is not my area of expertise

[Richman]  Applying a consistent costing approach to each vehicle and vehicle system using a manufacturing cost model
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estimate costs for advanced
vehicle materials and design for
2020-2025 vehicles, please suggest
how they might be used to
improve this study.
approach. This approach would establish a more consistent and understandable assessment of cost impacts of vehicle
mass reduction design and technologies.

[OSU]  None.
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:

[Joost] The assessment of the energy supply includes a description of solar, wind, and biomass derived energy. While the narrative is quite positive on the
potential for each of these energy sources, it's not clear in the analysis how much of the power for the plant is produced using these techniques. If the
renewable sources provide a significant portion of the plant power, then the comparison of the Ph2 BIW cost against the production Venza cost may not be fair.
The cost of the Venza BIW is determined based on the RPE and several other assumptions and therefore includes the cost of electricity at the existing plant.
Therefore, if an automotive company was going to invest in a new plant to build either the Ph2 BIW or the current Venza BIW (and the new plant would have
the lower cost power) then the cost delta between the two BIWs would be different than shown here (because the current Venza BIW produced at a new  plant
would be less expensive). The same argument could be made for the labor costs and their impact on BIW cost. By including factors such as power and labor
costs into the analysis, it's difficult to determine what the cost savings/penalty is due only to the change  in materials and assembly - the impact of labor and
energy are mixed into the result.

[OSU] The number of workers assigned to vehicle assembly in this report seems quite low. Extra personal need to be available to replace those with unexcused
absences. Do these assembly numbers also include material handling personnel to stock each of the workstations?

While this work does make a compelling case it downplays some of the very real issues that slow such innovation in auto manufacturing. Examples: multi-
material structures can suffer accelerated corrosion if not properly isolated in joining. Fatigue may also limit durability in aluminum, magnesium or novel joints.
Neither of these durability concerns is raised.  Also, automotive manufacturing is very conservative in using new processes because one small process problem
can stop an entire auto manufacturing plant. Manufacturing engineers may be justifiably weary of extensive use of adhesives, until these are proven in mass
production in other environments. These very real impediments to change should be mentioned in the background and conclusions.

[Richman] Summary-Cost projections . . . lack sufficient rigor to support confidence in cost projections and in some cases are based on "optimistic"
assumptions. Significant cost reduction is attributed to parts consolidation in the body structure.  Part count data presented in the report appears to reflect
inconsistent content between baseline and PH 2 designs.  Body manufacturing labor rates and material blanking recovery are not consistent with actual
industry experience.  Using normal industry experience for those two factors alone would add $273 to body manufacturing cost. Tooling cost estimates for
individual body dies appear to be less than half normal industry experience for dies of this type.

Cost modeling -- Assessing cost implications of the PH 2 design  [is] a critically important element of the project.
Total vehicle cost was derived from vehicle list price using estimated Toyota mark-up for overhead and profit.  This process assumes average Toyota mark-up
applies to Venza pricing.  List price for specific vehicles is regularly influenced by business and competitive marketing factors. (Chevrolet Volt is believed to be
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priced significantly below GM corporate average margin on sales, while the Corvette is believed to be above target margin on sales.) System cost assumptions
based on average sales margin and detailed engineering judgments can be a reasonable first order estimate. These estimates can be useful in allocation of
relative to costs to individual vehicle systems, but lack sufficient rigor to support definitive cost conclusions

Baseline Venza system costs were estimated by factoring estimated total vehicle cost  and allocating relative cost factors for each major sub-system (BIW,
closures, chassis, bumpers, suspension,...) based on engineering judgment.  Cost of PH 2 purchased components were developed using a combination of
estimated baseline vehicle system estimated costs, engineering judgment and supplier estimates.  Cost estimates for individual purchased components appear
realistic.

Body costs for PH 2 design were estimated by combining scaled material content from baseline vehicle (Venza) and projected manufacturing cost from a new
production processes and facility developed for this project. This approach is logical and practical, but lacks the rigor to support reliable estimates of new
design cost implications when the design changes represent significant departures from the baseline design content.

Body piece cost and tooling investment estimates were developed by Intgellicosting. No information was provided on Intellicosting methodology. Purchased
component piece cost estimates (excluding BIW) are in line with findings in similar studies. Tooling costs supplied by Intellicosting are significantly lower than
actual production experience would suggest.

Assembly costs were based on detailed assembly plant design, work flow analysis and  labor content estimates. Assembly plant labor content (minutes) is
consistent with actual  BIW experienced in other OEM production projects.

The PH 2 study indicates and aluminum based multi material body (BIW, closures) can be produced for at a cost reduction of $199 relative to a conventional
steel body. That conclusion is not consistent with general industry experience. This inconsistency may result from PH 2 assumptions of material recovery, labor
rates and pars consolidation.

A recent  study conducted by IBIS Associates "Aluminum Vehicle Structure: Manufacturing and Life Cycle Cost Analysis" estimated a cost increase $560 for an
aluminum vehicle BIW and closures.

http://aluminumintransportation.Org/members/files/active/0/IBIS%20Powertrain%20Study%20w%20cover.pdf
That study was conducted with a major high volume OEM vehicle producer and included part cost estimates using detailed individual part cost estimates.
Majority of cost increases for the low mass body are offset by weight related cost reductions in powertrain, chassis and suspension components. Conclusions
from the IBIS study are consistent with similar studies and production experience at other OEM producers.

[Richman cont.]

BIW Design Integration - Report identifies BIW piece count reduction from a baseline of 419 pieces to 169 for PH 2. Significant piece cost and labor cost savings

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are attributed to the reduction in piece count. Venza BOM lists 407 pieces in the baseline BIW. A total of 120 pieces are identified as having "0" weight and "0"
cost. Another 47 pieces are listed as nuts or bolts. PH 2 Venza BOM lists no nuts or bolts and has no "0" mass/cost components. With the importance
attributed to parts integration, these differences need to be addressed.

Closure BOM for PH 2 appears to not include a number of detail components that are typically necessary in a production ready design. An example of this is the
PH 2 hood. PH 2 Hood BOM lists 4 parts, an inner and outer panel and 2 hinges.  Virtually all practical aluminum hood designs include 2 hinge bracket
reinforcements, a latch support and a palm reinforcement. Absence of these practical elements of a production hood raise questions about the functional
equivalency (mounting and reinforcement points, NVH, aesthetics,...) of the two vehicle designs. Contents of the Venza BOM should be reviewed for accuracy
and content in the PH 2 BOM should be reviewed for practical completeness.

Tooling Investment - Tooling estimates from Intellicosting are significantly lower than have been seen in other similar studies or production programs and will
be challenged by most knowledgeable automotive industry readers. Intellicosting estimates total BIW tooling at $28MM in the tooling summary and $70 MM
in the report summary. On similar production OEM programs complete BIW tooling has been in the range of $150MM to $200MM. The report attributes low
tooling cost to parts consolidation. This does not appear to completely explain the significant cost differences between PH 2 tooling and actual production
experience. Parts consolidation typically results in fewer tools while increasing size, complexity and cost of tools used. The impact of parts consolidation on PH
2 weight and cost appears to be major. The report does not provide specific examples of where parts consolidation was achieved and the specific impact of
consolidation. Considering the significant impact attributed to parts consolidation, it would be helpful provide specific examples of where this was achieved
and the specific impact on mass, cost and tooling.  Based on actual production experience, PH 2 estimates for plant capital investment, tooling cost and labor
rates would be viewed as extremely optimistic

Material Recovery - Report states estimates of material recovery in processing were not included in the cost analysis. Omitting this cost factor can have a
significant impact on cost of sheet based aluminum products used in this study. Typical auto body panel blanking process recovery is 60%. This recovery rate is
typical for steel and aluminum sheet. When evaluation material cost of an aluminum product the impact of recovery losses should be included in the analysis.
Potential impact of material recovery for body panels:

              Approximate aluminum content (BIW, Closures)        240 Kg
              Input material required at 60% recovery                400 Kg
              Blanking off-all                                      160 Kg
              Devaluation of blanking off-all (rough estimate)
                      Difference between raw material and
                             Blanking off-all $1.30/Kg              $211
              Blanking devaluation increases cost of aluminum sheet products by over $ 0.90/Kg.
Appropriate estimates of blanking recoveries and material devaluation should be included in cost estimates for stamped aluminum sheet components.
Recovery rates for steel sheet products are similar to aluminum, but the economic impact of steel sheet devaluation is a significantly lower factor in finished
part cost per pound.


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Report indicates total cost of resistance spot welding (RSW) is 5X the cost of friction spot welding (FSW).  Typical total body shop cost (energy, labor,
maintenance, consumable tips) of a RSW is $0.05 - $0.10. For the stated ratio to be accurate, FSW total cost would be $0.01-$0.02 which appears unlikely.  It is
possible the 5X cost differential apply to energy consumption and not total cost.

Labor rates - Average body plant labor rates used in BIW costing average $35 fully loaded.  Current North American average labor rates for auto manufacturing
(typically stamping, body production and vehicle assembly)

                     Toyota        $55
                     GM            $56 (including two tier)
                     Ford           $58
                     Honda         $50
                     Nissan         $47
                     Hyundai        $44
                     VW            $38

Labor rate of $35 may be achievable (VW) in some regions and circumstances. The issue of labor rate is peripheral to the central costing issue of this study
which is assessing the cost impact of light weight engineering design. Method used to establish baseline  BIW component costs inherently used current Toyota
labor rates. Objective assessment of design impact on vehicle cost would use same labor rates for both configurations.

Labor cost or BIW production is reported to be $108 using an average rate of $35. Typical actual BIW labor content from other cost studies with North
American OEM's found actual BIW labor content approaching $200. Applying the current Toyota labor rate of $55 to the PH 2 BIW production plan increases
labor content to $170 (+$62) per vehicle.
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    5.  CONCLUSION AND
       FINDINGS
                                                  COMMENTS
Are the study's conclusions
adequately backed up by the
methods and analytical rigor of the
study?
[Joost] In the summary section there is an analysis that attempts to project the "potential weight savings" for vehicle
classes beyond the Venza. The analysis is based on specific density which assumes that the architecture of the vehicles is
the same. For example, the front-end crash energy management system in a micro car is likely quite different from the
comparable system in a large luxury car (aside from differences in gauge to account for limited crash space, as discussed in
the report). While this analysis provides a good  starting point, I do not feel that it is reasonable to expect the weight
reduction potential to scale with specific  density. In other words, I think that the 32.4 value used in the analysis also
changes with vehicle size due to changes in architecture. Similarly, the cost analysis projecting cost factor for other vehicle
classes is a good start, but it's unlikely that the numbers scale so simply.

[Richman]
Summary - General: Engineering analysis is very thorough and reflects the vehicle engineering experience and know-how
of the Lotus organization. Study presents a realistic perspective of achievable vehicle total vehicle mass reduction using
available design optimization tools, practical lightweight engineering materials an available manufacturing processes.
Results of the study provide important insight into potential vehicle mass reduction generally achievable by 2020.

Summary - Conclusions: Report Conclusions overstate the level of design "validation" achievable utilizing state-of-the- art
modeling techniques with no physical test of a representative structure. From the work in this study it is reasonable to
conclude the PH 2 structure has the potential to pass FMVSS and IIHS safety criteria.

Summary- Mass Reduction: Majority of mass reduction concepts utilized are consistent with general industry trends.
Mass reduction potential attributed to individual components appear reasonable and consistent with industry experience
with similar components. As an advanced design concept study, the PH 2 project is a valuable and important  piece of
work.

       The PH 2 study did not include physical  evaluation of a prototype vehicle or major vehicle sub system. Majority of
       the chassis and suspension content was derived from similar components for which there is extensive volume
       production experience. Some of the technologies included in the design are "speculative" and may not mature to
       production readiness or achieve projected mass reduction estimates by 2020.  For those reasons, the PH 2 study is
       a "high side" estimate of practical overall vehicle mass reduction potential.

Summary- Safety: Major objective of this study is to  "validate" safety performance of the PH 2 vehicle concept. Critical
issue is the term "validate". Simulation modeling and simulation tools used by Lotus are widely recognized as state-of-the-
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                                 art.  Lotus modeling skills are likely to among the best available in the global industry. Project scope did not include
                                 physical test of the structure to confirm model accuracy.

                                 Safety performance data presented indicates the current structure has the potential to meet all FMVSS criteria, but would
                                 not be generally considered sufficient to "validated" safety performance of the vehicle.  Physical test correlation is
                                 generally required to establish confidence in simulation results. Some simulation results presented are not consistent with
                                 test  results of similar vehicles. Explanations provided for the unusual results do not appear consistent with actual
                                 structure content. Overstating the implications of available safety results discredits the good design work and conclusions
                                 of this study.

                                 FMVSS test performance conclusions are based on simulated results using an un-validated FE model. Accuracy of the
                                 model is unknown.  Some simulation results are not typical of similar structures suggesting the model may not accurately
                                 represent the actual structure under all loading conditions.

                                 [OSU] Yes.
Are the conclusions about the
design, development, validation,
and cost of the mass-reduced
design valid?
[Joost] Yes. Despite some of the critical commentary provided above, I believe that this study does a good job of
validating the technical and cost potential of the mass-reduced design. The study is lacking durability analysis and, on a
larger scale, does not include constructing a demonstration vehicle to validate the model assumptions; both items are
significant undertakings and, while they would add credibility to the results, the current study provides a useful and sound
indication of potential.

[Richman]  Safety performance and cost conclusions are not clearly support by data provided.

Safety Conclusion - A major objective of the PH 2 study is to "validate" the light weight vehicle structure for compliance
with FMVSS requirements. State of the art FEM and dynamic simulations models were developed. Those models indicate
the body structure has the potential to satisfy FMVSS requirements.  FMVSS requirements for dynamic crash test
performance is defined with respect to occupant loads and accelerations as measured using calibrated test dummies.  The
FEM simulations did not include interior, seats, restraint systems or occupants. Analytical models in this project evaluate
displacements, velocities, and accelerations of the body structure.  Predicting occupant response based on body structural
displacements velocities and accelerations is speculative. Simulation results presented are a good indicator of potential
performance. These simulations alone would not be considered adequate validation the structure for FMVSS required
safety performance.

[OSU] Yes.
Are you aware of other available
[Joost] The World Auto Steel Ultra Light Steel Auto Body, the ED SuperLight Car, and the DOE/USAMP Mg Front End
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research that better evaluates and
validates the technical potential
for mass-reduced vehicles in the
2020-2025 timeframe?



Research and Development design all provide addition insight into weight reduction potential. However, none are as
thorough as this study in assessing potential in the 2020-2025 timeframe.

[Richman] Most studies employing a finite element model validate a base model against physical testing, then do
variational studies to look at effect. Going directly from an unvalidated FEM to quantitative results is risky, and the level of
accuracy is questionable
[OSU] No.
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:
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    6.  OTHER POTENTIAL AREAS
       FOR COMMENT
                                                  COMMENTS
Has the study made substantial
improvements over previous
available works in the ability to
understand the feasibility of 2020-
2025 mass-reduction technology
for light-duty vehicles?  If so,
please describe.
[Joost] Yes. The best example was the Phase 1 study, which lacked much of the detail and focus included here. The other
studies that I mentioned above do not go into this level of detail or are not focused on the same time frame.

[Richman]  Fundamental engineering work is very good and has the potential to make a substantial and important
contribution to industry understanding of mass reduction opportunities. The study will receive intense and detailed critical
review by industry specialists. To achieve potential positive impact on industry thinking,  study content and conclusions
must be recognized as credible.  Unusual safety simulation results and questionable cost estimates (piece cost, tooling)
need to be explained or revised. As currently presented, potential contributions of the study are likely to be obscured  by
unexplained simulation results and cost estimates that are not consistent with actual program experience.

[OSU] Yes.
Do the study design concepts have
critical deficiencies in its
applicability for 2020-2025 mass-
reduction feasibility for which
revisions should be made before
the report is finalized?  If so,
please describe.
[Joost] There is nothing that I would consider a "critical deficiency" however many of the comments outlined above could
be addressed prior to release of the report.

[Richman] Absolutely.  Recommended adjustments summarized in Safety analysis, and cost estimates (recommendations
summarized in attached review report).  Credibility of study would be significantly enhanced with detail explanations or
revisions in areas where unusual and potentially dis-crediting results are reported. Conservatism in assessing CAE based
safety simulations and cost estimates (component and tooling) would improve acceptance of main report conclusions.

Impact of BIW plant site selection discussion and resulting labor rates confuse important assessment of design driven cost
impact. Suggest removing site selection discussion. Using labor and energy cost factors representative of the Toyota
Venza production more clearly identifies the true cost impact of PH 2 design content.

[OSU]  No.
Are there fundamentally different
lightweight vehicle design
technologies that you expect to be
much more common (either in
addition to or instead of) than the
one Lotus  has assessed for the
2020-2025 timeframe?
[Joost] Some effort was made in the report to discuss joining and corrosion protection techniques, however it is possible
that new techniques will be available prior to 2025. For example, there was very little discussion on how a vehicle which
combines so many different materials could be pre-treated, e-coated, and painted in an existing shop. There will likely be
new technologies in this area.

[Richman] Technologies included in the PH 2 design are the leading candidates to achieve safe cost effective vehicle mass
reduction in the 2020-25 timeframe.  Most technologies included in PH 2 are in current volume production or will be fully
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                                 production ready by 2015.

                                 [OSU]  No.
Are there any other areas outside
of the direct scope of the analysis
(e.g., vehicle performance,
durability, drive ability, noise,
vibration, and hardness) for which
the mass-reduced vehicle design is
likely to exhibit any compromise
from the baseline vehicle?
[Joost] As discussed above, durability is a major factor in vehicle design and it is not addressed here. The use of advanced
materials and joints calls into question the durability performance of a vehicle like this. NVH may also be unacceptable
given the low density materials and extraordinary vehicle stiffness.

[Richman]  Most areas of vehicle performance other than crash performance were not addressed at all.  Even basic
bending stiffness and service loads (jacking, towing, 2-g bump, etc)  were not addressed.  The report claims to address
bending stiffness and bending/torsional modal frequencies, but that analysis is not included in the report.

[OSU] The proposed engine size is based on the assumption that decreasing the mass of the vehicle and holding the same
power-to-weight ratio will keep the vehicle performances alike. This assumption is true only if the coefficient of drag (Cda)
will also decrease (practically a perfect match in all the dynamic regards is not possible because the quadratic behavior of
the air vs speed). The influence of the airdrag is typically higher than the general perception. In this particular case is very
possible that more than half of the engine  power will be used to overcome the airdrag at 65 mph. Therefore aerodynamic
simulations are mandatory in order to validate the size of the engine.
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS:

[Joost] Clallam county, WA is an interesting choice for the plant location (I grew up relatively nearby). Port Angeles is not a "major port" (total population
<20,000 people) and access to the area from anywhere else in the state is inconvenient.

[OSU] The Lotus design is very innovative and pushes the design envelope much further than other advanced car programs. The phase 1 report shows a great
deal of topological innovation for the different components that are designed.
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Please provide any comments not characterized in the tables above.

[Joost] No comment.

[Richman] State-of-the art in vehicle dynamic crash simulation can provide A/B comparisons and
ranking of alternative designs, but cannot reliably produce accurate absolute results without careful
correlation to crash results.  CAE is effective in significantly reducing the need for hardware tests,
making designs more robust, and giving guidance to select the most efficient and best performing design
alternatives. OEM experience to date indicates CAE can reduce hardware and physical test
requirements, but cannot eliminate the need for some level of crash load physical testing. Quasi-static
test simulations show potential for eliminating most if not all hardware (FMVSS 216 etc.), simulations of
FMVSS 208, 214, IIHS ODB and others still required several stages of hardware evaluation. Given the
challenges of simulating the complex crash  physics of a vehicle composed of advanced materials and
fastening techniques, hardware testing would generally be considered necessarily to "validate" BIW
structures for the foreseeable future.

Editorial - [1] Report makes frequent reference to PH 1 vehicle LD and HD configurations. These
references seem unnecessary and at times confusing. PH 1 study references do not enhance the
findings or conclusions of the PH 2 study. Suggest eliminating reference to the PH 1 study.

[2] Report would be clearer  if content detail from PH 1 project that is part of PH 2 project (interior,
closure, chassis content) is fully reported in PH 2 report.

[3] Weight and Cost reduction references: Baseline shifts between Total Vehicle and Total Vehicle Less
Powertrain.  A consistent baseline may avoid  confusion.  Suggest using total vehicle as reference.

[4] Cost increases statements: Report makes a number of cost references similar to:

Pg 4 - "The estimation of the BIW piece cost suggests an increase of 160 percent - over $700 - for the
37-percent mass-reduced body-in-white."

The statement indicates the increase is 160%. The increase of $700 is an increase of 60% resulting in a
total cost 160% of the baseline.

Site selection - [1] PH 2 project includes an extensive site selection study. Site selection is not related to
product design. Including economics based on preferential site selection confuses the fundamental
issue of the design exercise.  Assumption of securing a comparable site and achieving the associated
preferential labor rates and  operating expenses are at best unlikely. Eliminating the site selection and
associated cost would make the report more focused and cost projections more understandable and
believable.

[2] Advantaged labor rates and possible renewable energy operating cost savings could be applied to
any vehicle design. Entering those factors into the design study for the light weight redesign mixes
design cost with site selection and construction issues.

[3] Site plan includes use of  PV solar and wind turbines. Plant costs indicate general plant energy
(lighting, support  utilities, HVAC) (not processing energy) will be at "0" cost. True impact of  renewable
energy sources net of maintenance costs is at best controversial.  Impact of general plant energy cost on
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vehicle cost is minimal. The issue of renewable energy sources is valid but peripheral to the subject of
vehicle design. It would be clearer to use conventional general plant energy overhead in cost analysis of
the Phase II design cost.

Development experience - PH 2 vehicle design described is representative of a predevelopment design
concept. All OEM production programs go through this development stage. Most vehicle programs
experience some increase in mass and cost through the physical testing and durability development
process. Those increases are typically driven by NVH or durability issues not detectable at the modeling
stage. Mass dampers on the Venza front and rear suspension are examples of mass and cost increases.
Vehicle mass increases of 2-3% through the development cycle are not unusual.  It would be prudent to
recognize some level of development related mass increase in the PH 2 mass projection.

Vehicle content- Pg. 214 Bumpers:  Need to check statement: "Current bumpers are generally
constructed from steel extrusions, although some are aluminum and magnesium."

In North America 80% of all bumpers are rolled or stamped steel.  Aluminum extrusions are currently
20% of the NA market. There are no extruded steel bumpers.  There are no magnesium bumpers.

Technology- Majority of the design concepts utilized for PH 2 have been in reasonable volume
automotive production for multiple years and on multiple vehicles. A few of the ideas represent a
change in vehicle utility or are dependent on significant technology advancements that may not be
achievable.  Identifying the impact of currently proven technologies from speculative technologies may
improve understanding of the overall study.

Specific speculative technologies:

[1] Eliminate spare tire, jack, tools (23 Kg) - feasible, may influence customer perception of utility

[2] Eliminate carpeting -feasible, customer perception issue

[3] Dual cast rotors (2 Kg) - have been tried, durability issues in volume production, differential
expansion and bearing temperature issues may not be solvable

[4] Wheels Ablation cast (22.4 Kg) - process has been run experimentally but has not been proven in
volume. Benefit of process for wheel applications may not be achievable due to resultant metallurgical
conditions of the as-cast surfaces.

[OSU] No comment.

[Simunovic]  I would suggest that the organization of the document be reconsidered to add some
information from the Phase 1 and more discussion about the design process. Especially interesting
would be the guiding practical implementation of Lotus design steps as outlined  at the beginning of the
Phase 2 report.
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                                    LOTUS ENGINEERING RESPONSES TO PEER REVIEW COMMENTS
                              Grouping of Like Comments in Lotus Peer Review Report (Lotus HD Phase 2)
TOPIC
COMMENT
WHO in
Peer Rev
COMMENT FROM LOTUS ENGINEERING
Material
Properties
Stress/strain
The sources cited for the material data are credible; however the Al
yield stresses used appear to be on the high side of the expected
properties for the alloy-temper systems proposed here. The
authors may need to address the use of the slightly higher numbers
(for example, 6061-T6 is shown with a yield  stress of 308 MPa,
where standard reported values are usually closer to 275 MPa).

Reviewers would like to see min/max material specifications taken
into consideration.
Ques 1.
Joost
The material suppliers, including Alcoa, Meridian,
Henkel and Allied Composites provided the material
properties. These companies were chosen because they
are experts in their respective fields and could provide
accurate information for the materials used in the
modeling.

The input data supplied by the material manufactures
was sufficient to create a model with an estimated
fidelity of +/-10%. This is an acceptable range for this
stage of the design.

Based on our modeling experience, the global
performance of the vehicle (overall pulse,
intrusions, time to zero velocity, etc.) is typically within
±5% using finalized and more detailed input data
generated for a production program.
              A list detailing the constitutive model formulation for each of the
              materials of structural significance in the study would help to clarify
              this issue. Also the design rationale for dimensioning and selection
              of materials for the main structural parts would help in
              understanding the design decisions made by the authors of the
              study. The included material data does not include strain rate
              sensitivity, so it is assumed that the strain  rate effect was not
              considered. Strain rate sensitivity can be an important
              strengthening mechanism in metals.  For hep (hexagonal close-
                                                               Ques 1
                                                               OSU
            Strain rate was not considered for any of the
            constitutive material models.  Tensile testing on a
            material sample under static and then dynamic
            conditions would show that the dynamic results give a
            higher stress/strain response. Because of this, the
            modeling could be considered conservative.. The
            AM60 material model was provided to Lotus by
            Meridian in LS-Dyna format and was based on
            production experience with similar parts.

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packed) materials, such as AM60, high strain rate may also lead to
change in the underlying mechanism of deformation, damage
evolution, failure criterion, etc.
These assignments were not possible to confirm from the crash
model since the input files were encrypted. In any case, since Mg
AM60 alloy is used in such important role for the frontal crash, a
more detailed material model than the one implied by the graph on
page 32 of Phase 2 report [1] would be warranted. More accurate
failure model is needed, as well. The failure criteria in LS-DYNA [6]
are mostly limited to threshold values of equivalent strains and/or
stresses. However, combination of damage model with plasticity
and damage-initiated failure would probably yield a better accuracy
forAM60.
Ques 1
OSU
The constitutive material models contain the material
data that was provided by the respective supplier and
where no data was supplied values were found on
www.matweb.com. The material stress vs. strain
information is shown in section 4.2.2 of the report. The
LS-Dyna material model used was #24 (piecewise linear
plasticity) with the exception of the AM60 which was
#123 (modified piecewise linear plasticity)
Understanding of mechanical properties for material denoted as
Nylon_45_2a (reference [1] page 33) would be much more
improved if the constituents and fiber arrangement were described
in more detail. Numbers 45 and 2 may be indicating +/- 45° fiber
arrangement, however, a short addition of material configuration
would eliminate unnecessary speculation. An ideal plasticity model
of 60% limit strain for this material seems to be overly optimistic.
Other composite models available in LS-DYNA may be a much
better option.
Ques 1
Simunovic
Henkel provided an LS-Dyna material model with all of
the fields completed._Portions of this material
information were considered proprietary and were
disclosed.

If additional information would have been provided it
would have been possible to use one of the other
material models in LS-Dyna that would allow for the
modeling of the fibers and 'resin' as separate
components._The results would be substantially the
same as the Henkel data is based on the performance
of production parts.
While appropriate forming methods and materials appear to have
been selected, a detailed description of the material selection and
trade-off process is not provided. One significant exception is the
discussion and tables regarding the replacement of Mg components
with Al and steel components in order to meet crash requirements.
Ques 2
Joost
The material selection for the various 'crash'
components' was based on initial analyses that were
carried out during Phase I and at the start of phase II. It
became clear that the use of the Mg would have to be
limited to the areas of the vehicle which would be
considered non-critical load-paths and thus the design
of the structure evolved following numerous analyses
that improved the crash performance. The material
selection was driven primarily by the structural

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                                                                          requirements_to ensure that the vehicle would have
                                                                          adequate crash performance. Magnesium, while
                                                                          lightweight, has a lower elastic modulus, yield strength
                                                                          and elongation to failure than both steel and aluminum
                                                                          so it was not considered a viable material for these
                                                                          areas of large deformation and energy absorption.
Addition of the strain rate sensitivity to a material model can both
improve fidelity of the material model, and as an added benefit, it
can also help to regularize the response during strain localization.
Depending on the amount of stored internal energy and stiffness  in
the deleted elements, the entire simulation can be polluted by the
element deletion errors and become unstable. Assuming that only
AM60 parts in the Lotus model have failure criterion, it would not
be too difficult for the authors to describe it in more depth. Since
AM60 is such a critical material in the design, perturbation of its
properties, mesh geometry perturbations and different
discretization densities, should be considered and investigate how
do they affect the convergence of the critical measures, such as
crash distances.
QuesZ
Simunovic
Material failure, in LS-Dyna can be represented in two
ways: - firstly, the material model being used can
represent the yielding of the material and the
subsequent post yield characteristics. This method on
its own will leave the physical elements in place and
thus they will continue to absorb energy beyond the
limit at which material fracturing would have occurred
under a tensile load. Secondly the material model can
be defined to allow for the elements to be deleted from
the analyses to represent the fracturing of the material
that would be seen in tensile loading (as was the case
with the material data that was supplied by Meridian).
The CAE crash models were created using typical
modeling parameters (mesh size, element quality, time-
step, etc.) as used in the automotive industry. It was
not an academic study aimed at evaluating the details
of different mesh size/element formulations/etc.

The fidelity of the model is estimated to be +/-10%
which is an acceptable range for this stage of body
development. Lotus assumed a -10% error (worst case)
for all models; as a result the model exceeded the
requirements in some areas, e.g., roof crush, and  may
be heavier than necessary to meet the structural and
impact targets.

The next step in a production process is to build a body
structure based on an acceptable FEA model and use

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                                                                                        that as the basis for the final tuning.
              Regarding my comment on joint failure under complex stress
              states, note that in figure 4.3.12.a the significant plastic strains are
              all located at the bumper-rail joints. While this particular test was
              only to indicate the damage (and cost to repair), the localization of
              plastic strain at the joint is somewhat  concerning.
                                                               Ques3
                                                               Joost
           The figure shows that the potential damage was
           predicted to be in the replaceable bumper structure
           only.  It would be impractical to design for a case where
           under this loading the plastic strain would be limited to
           the armature only. There is a welded joint between the
           armature and crush can which due to the effects of
           welding on aluminum causes a  heat affected zone that
           both  reduces the material yield strength and increases
           the elongation at failure ('localized annealing'). Under
           this type of low speed impact the complete front 'low-
           speed' structure is intended to  be replaced.
Welds and
Joints
This particular connection contains welds (for joining aluminum
parts) and bolts (for joining aluminum and magnesium). HAZ
properties were not given in the report and they could not be
checked in the model due to encryption. The bolt model properties
were described that it fails at 130 MPa (page 38 of the report [1]),
which corresponds to the yield stress of AM60. The importance of
these joints cannot be overstated. They enforce stability of the axial
deformation mode in the rails that in turn enables dissipation of the
impact energy. The crash sequence of the connection between the
front end module and the front rail is shown in Figure 3.
Ques 1
Simunovic
Figure 4.2.4.a. added to show typical joint sections and
an explanation of the overall boding and attachment
methodology.

Joining methodologies are specified in section 4.2.4 for
the MIG welds, friction spot welds, rivets and adhesive.

HAZ material information used in the models were
stated as follows: - Heat affected zones with 'seam'
welding were modeled with reduced material
properties. Based on experience, a 40-percent
reduction in the base material was used (i.e. for 6061-
T6 a yield stress of 184.8MPa was used) - page #47.
This is a conservative estimation as the amount of
reduction in material strength depends upon the
amount of heat applied during the welding process.

The specification of the mechanical fastener shear
strength properties should  be SOOMPa and not 130MPa
as originally specified (corrected in the report). The
'failure' (element deletion)  was  modeled using a force
limit criterion of 10-12kN.

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It is not clear from the simulations which failure criterion dominates
the process. Is it the failure of the HAZ or is it the spot weld limit
force or stress. Given the importance of this joint on the overall
crash response, additional information about the joint sub-models
would be very beneficial to a reader.
Ques 1
Simunovic
To go through each crash event and say what is the
sequence of the failure (i.e. weld/material/etc.) would
be a substantial task under any situation and was
beyond the scope of this investigation. The next step
for a production program would be to fully document
this failure criterion.

The 'failure criterion' in the model would not be
dominated by failure in the HAZ as this is only found in
the front end of the vehicle in the low-speed crush can
and end of the high speed rail.
Similarly, while appropriate joining techniques seem to have been
used, the process for selecting the processes and materials is not
clear. Additionally, little detail is provided on the joining techniques
used here. A major technical hurdle in the implementation of multi-
material systems is the quality, durability, and performance of the
joints. Additional effort should be expended towards describing the
joining techniques used here and characterizing the performance.
Ques 2
Joost
A detailed explanation of friction spot joining and
several illustrations of the process were added to the
typical section in Figure 4.2.4.a.
Some discussion of joining system  for magnesium closure inner
panels to aluminum external skin and AHSS "B" pillar to aluminum
body  would  improve  understanding and  confidence  in  those
elements of the design.
Ques 2
Richman
Mechanical fastener discussion added in section 4.2.4.
noting that this discussion applies to the closures as
well as the BIW.

The magnesium components were utilized in areas that
would not be subject to significant levels of crash loads.
It was determined that in these areas the material
would have to  be either high strength steel or
aluminum. The magnesium front end is in production
on several Ford models including the Ford Flex.

The B-Pillar construction consists of hot stamped boron
steel inner and outer components spot-welded at the
flanges with a nylon structural insert that is bonded to
the B-Pillar outer using Terocore 1811 (no mechanical
fasteners used). This was chosen after consultation

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              Parts integration information  is vague and  appears  inconsistent.
              Parts integration.  Major mass and cost savings are attributed to
              parts integration. Data presented does not appear to results.
                                                                                        with Henkel and based upon their experience in
                                                                                        structural inserts which they have successfully used in
                                                                                        production vehicles.
QuesZ
Richman
The parts count for the baseline vehicle is 269 parts;
the Phase 2  BIW has 169 parts.
              More details are needed on the various aspects of joining and
              fastening. Comment on assembly.
Ques2
OSU
The joining and fastening section revised to include
more details. The assembly is addressed in the 100
page assembly plant section.
Durability      One area that is omitted from the analysis is durability (fatigue and
              corrosion)  performance of the  structure. Significant  use of Al, Al
              joints, and multi-material  joints introduces the potential for both
              fatigue  and  corrosion  failure  that  are  unacceptable  in  an
              automotive product. It  would  be helpful  to include  narrative
              describing the good durability performance of conventional (i.e. not
              Bentley, Ferrari, etc.) vehicles that use similar materials and joints
              in production  without  significant durability problems. In some
              cases, (say the weld-bonded AI-Mg joints), production examples do
              not  exist so there should be an  explanation of how these could
              meet durability requirements.
Ques2
Joost
Fatigue and corrosion modeling was beyond the scope
of the study.

Although not specifically addressed, Lotus has built cars
using steel and aluminum joints for 18 years without
fatigue/corrosion issues and this experience was
applied to the model as well as that of the production
aluminum (Alcoa) and magnesium (Meridian) suppliers.
Ford uses magnesium-steel joints in on their production
vehicles that have been validated for corrosion and
fatigue.

Jaguar and Audi use aluminum bodies on a number of
current production  vehicles which must meet the same
corrosion and fatigue requirements as their steel
bodies. Ford is also  reportedly introducing an
aluminum body for their 2014 F150 body
(http://online.wsj.com/article/SB100014240527023036
12804577531282227138686.html) which must meet
Ford's internal truck standards for durability (more
abusive duty cycle than a passenger car).

There are no welded AI-Mg joints on the Phase 2 BIW;
there was no process that could demonstrate this

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                                                                                         capability in the time frame of this study. AI-Mg and Al-
                                                                                         Fe joints are joined with structural adhesive and
                                                                                         mechanical fasteners on the Phase 2 BIW.
              As discussed above, durability is a major factor in vehicle design
              and it is not addressed here. The use of advanced materials and
              joints calls into question the durability performance of a vehicle like
              this. NVH may also be unacceptable given the low density materials
              and extraordinary vehicle stiffness.
                                                               Ques6
                                                               Joost
            As discussed above, a detailed durability analysis was
            outside the project scope. However, similar materials
            and joints are used on production vehicles; Lotus has
            had riv-bonded aluminum bodies with bolt -on steel
            structures in production for eighteen years.

            The baseline Venza NVH materials were used. The body
            has high stiffness (>32,000 Nm/degree torsional
            stiffness, 6x curb weight roof crush capability)
            indicating that it has the ability to be tuned for  NVH
            and still  have adequate rigidity.  The BMW X5 (the
            target for BIW stiffness) has a higher torsional stiffness
            than many world class sports cars but has commercial
            NVH isolation. High end passenger cars with aluminum
            bodies like the Audi AS and Jaguar XJ have
            demonstrated acceptable NVH characteristics.
            Additionally, active noise cancellation is expected to
            play a major role in improving vehicle NVH in the near
            future. The Lotus Phase 1 paper discussed ANC.
Wheel Mass
Reduction
Road wheel mass reduction is 5.6 Kg (54%) per wheel.  It is not clear
from the report how this magnitude of reduction is achieved. The
report attributes wheel mass reduction to possibilities with the
Ablation casting process. PH  1 report discussion of Ablation casting
states: "The process would be expected to save approximately 1 Kg
per wheel." Considering the magnitude of this mass reduction a
more detailed description of wheel mass reduction would be
appropriate.

Elimination of the spare tire and jack reduces vehicle mass by 23 Kg.
Ques2
Richman
The Phase 1 wheel was based on a production Prius
wheel and normalized to the Venza. Ablation casting
was applied to save additional weight. This is detailed
in the Phase 1 report. A very significant portion of the
savings, 3 kg., came from reducing the tire section
width from 245 to 225. Because of the greatly reduced
vehicle mass the tire section could be safely reduced
even more. Appearance considerations precluded the
use of a smaller width tire. The 19" tire size is very large
for this class of vehicle; using a 17" or 18" tire would

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Interior
Energy
Balance
Modeling
observations
This is feasible but has customer perceptions of vehicle utility
implications. Past OEM initiatives to eliminate a spare tire have
encountered consumer resistance leading to reinstatement of the
spare system in some vehicles.
[9] Interior: Lotus PH 2 design includes major redesign of the
baseline Venza interior. Interior design changes achieve 97 Kg
(40%) weight reduction from the baseline interior. Majority of
interior weight reduction is achieved in the seating (43 Kg) and trim
(28 Kg). Interior weight reduction strategies in the PH 2 design
represent significant departures from baseline Venza interior. New
seating designs and interior concepts (i.e.: replacing carpeting with
bare floors and floor mats) may not be consistent with consumer
wants and expectations in those areas.
Energy balance does not confirm model accuracy in simulating a
given physical structure.
FEM validation was presented in the form of an energy balance for
each load case. Energy balance is useful in confirming certain
internal aspects of the model are working correctly. Energy balance
does not validate how accurately the model simulates the physical
structure. Presenting energy balance for each load case and
suggesting balance implies FEM accuracy is misleading.
The cracks in the front end module (Figure 3.2) and the separation
between the front end module and the front rail (Figure 3.3) are
clearly visible. This zone experiences very large permanent
deformations, as shown in Figure 4.

Ques2
Richman
Ques2
Richman
Ques3
Joost
Ques 1
Simunovic
allow a further reduction in tire/wheel mass.
A spare tire is an option or not available on a number of
cars including the Dodge Challenger and the Chevrolet
Cruze Eco (manual).
Ph 2 report utilizes all Ph 1 HD masses and designs
including the interior (except for BIW). Interior design is
trending towards the Lotus/Faurecia interior concept.
The 2012 Hyundai Elantra rear seat system weighs 20%
less than the lightweight 2020 MY projection for the
CUV rear seat and incorporates concepts published in
the Phase 1 report.
The carpeting modules are larger than floor mats, are
3d in shape and use more luxurious deep pile material
than traditional one piece carpets. They help to reduce
mass and cost while providing an upscale look and feel.
Revised section 4.4 to specifically state that an energy
balance does not confirm the model accuracy.
The plotting of the energy balance only serves as one
indication to the CAE engineer that the analysis being
performed correctly (from a mathematical code
perspective) and is not undergoing any anomalies due
to the complex nature of definitions utilized. This would
not typically be included in a report to customers but
was only included as during the various meetings that
were held between Lotus, NHTSA and CARB, NHTSA
indicated that they had problems running the models
and this was used to show that these 'problems' did
not exist in the models run by Lotus.
Cracks are typical in a magnesium front end structure in
following a high speed front impact; the Ford Flex uses
a magnesium front structure.

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However, in my opinion, there are two issues that need to be
addressed. One is the modeling of material failure/fracture and the
other is the design of the crush zone with respect to the overall
stopping distance. While the former may be a part of proprietary
technology, the latter issue should be added to the description in
order to better understand the design at hand.
QuesZ
Simunovic
The dynamic crush zone was 555mm; a graph is
included in the report in Figure 4.3.l.f..

Material failure/fracture is modeled only where data
was provided by the material supplier. The data for the
aluminum was provided by Alcoa and no 'failure of
material' (represented by element deletion is utilized).
Element deletion was assumed for the areas of HAZ in
the lows speed crush cans and ends of the high speed
rails. The failure strain used for the 6061 & 6063-T6
material was 11%. Based on  Lotus experience, this is a
conservative value.

The full crush zone of the vehicle is not fully utilized
under the flat frontal impact loadcase as there is not
enough mass in the vehicle to enable this to occur. One
of the governing factors for the design was that it was
based upon a vehicle with proportions such that it
would use up all of the available space under the front
impact loading. The process for producing extruded
aluminum as used in the front rails dictated a minimum
gage that could be used whilst assuring no issues due to
material warping during the  manufacturing phase.

The above paragraph was added to the report.
Notice large cracks open in the mid span, on the sides, and punched
out holes at the locations of the connection with the front rail and
the shotgun. Mesh refinement study of this component would be
interesting and could also  indicate the robustness of the design.
Decision to  design such a structurally important part out of Mg
would be interesting to a reader. There are other components that
also include failure model  even though they  are clearly not made
out of magnesium nor are their failure criteria defined in the Phase
           The "shotgun" causes the magnesium front end
           module to completely separate at the attachment. This,
           although not ideal, does not have a significant effect on
           the results due to the 'S-shape' of the shotguns. The
           shotgun bends under the front impact load rather than
           crushing axially. The majority of the front crash load is
           taken by the main rail.

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2 report. Figure 6 [See Simunovic Comments, p. 8.] shows the
sequence of deformation of the front left rail as viewed from the
right side of the vehicle.
Tearing of the top of the support (blue) can be clearly observed in
Figure 7.  The importance of this connection for the overall
response may warrant parametric studies for failure parameters
and mesh discretization.
Ques2
Simunovic
The role of this support is relatively minor. See above.
There are 995,000 mesh elements. Mesh quality checks
were made to ensure the elements met the criteria set
for the following:

Element mesh size
Number of triangles per panel
Tria. Interior angle
Quad  Interior angle
Warping
Jacobian
Aspect Ratio
Total %age of failed elements <1% (from all element
quality criteria's)
It can be seen that almost all deformation occurs in the space
spanned by the front frame rails. As marked in Figure 1, the front
transition member (or a differently named component in case my
material assignment assumption was not correct), supports the
front rail so that it axially crushed and dissipated as much energy,
as possible. For that purpose, this front rail rear support was made
extremely stiff and it does not appreciably deform during the crash
(Figure 10). [See Simunovic Comments, p. 10.] It has internal
reinforcing structure that has not been described in the report.
These reinforcements enables it to reduce bending and axial
deformations in order to provide steady support for the axial crush
of the aluminum rail tube.
QuesZ
Simunovic
The design/analysis process went through numerous
iterations to improve the performance of the rail
transition so that the predominant deformation would
be seen in the front rails and not in the transition. The
transition pieces are 3mm thick permanent mold
castings with extensive ribbing which helps prevent
significant deformation. Contrary to the reviewers
comment, the rail (6061-T6) and the side wall gauges
are 2.25mm and the top surfaces are 2.75mm to allow
axial crushing to take place. A central rib was evaluated
as part of the structure but was eliminated as it made
the rail was too stiff and did not provide a reliable crush
mode.

A sensitivity analysis was carried out to reduce the
gauges further; this improved the overall vehicle pulse

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To quickly evaluate the feasibility of the proposed design, we can
use the concept of the Equivalent Square Wave (ESW) ["Vehicle
crashworthiness and occupant protection", American Iron and Steel
Institute, Priya, Prasad and Belwafa, Jamel E., Eds. (2004).]. ESW
assumes constant, rectangular, impact pulse for the entire length of
the stopping distance (in our case equal to 22 in) from initial
velocity (35 mph). ESW represents an equivalent constant
rectangular shaped pulse to an arbitrary input pulse. In our case
ESW is about 22 g. Sled tests and occupant model simulations
indicate that crash pulses exceeding ESW of 20 g will have
difficulties to satisfy FMVSS 208 crash dummy performance criteria
[11]. For a flat front barrier crash of 35 mph and an ESW of 20 g, the
minimum stopping distance is 24 in. Advanced restraint systems
and early trigger airbags may need to be used in order to satisfy the
injury criteria and provide sufficient ride down time for the vehicle
occupants.
Report does not identify the data used (minimum or typical).
Aluminum property data used in for the PH 2 design represents

Ques2
Simunovic
Ques2
Richman
and increased the overall time to zero velocity.
However, the thinner gauge materials were not used
because of potentially affecting durability and fatigue
(beyond the scope of this study but a consideration
throughout the design process). The thicker gauge
materials provided a pulse compatible with current
airbag technology (per TRW) and maintained the target
"G" level of 10% below the baseline peak.
Front NCAP test results for the 2009 Toyota Venza (see
http://www-
nrd.nhtsa.dot.Rov/database/aspx/searchmedia2.aspx?d
atabase=v&tstno=6601&mediatype=r&r tstno=6601)
the following is observed: time to zero velocity - 75ms,
max dynamic crush - 680mm, average acceleration 21G,
peak acceleration 49G.
The Venza crush distance is 26.77 inches or about 12%
greater than a pulse that yields an ESW of 20G; the
Venza pulse would be 20/1.12 or about 18G using an
ESW analysis. The NHTSA measured average
acceleration was 21G or roughly 17% higher than the
ESW predicted value. This actual value also exceeds the
ESW threshold value of 20G.
It may be difficult to meet the requirements of the
FMVSS208 requirements with the pulse/TTZ that is
predicted but there are small vehicles currently being
sold that are able to do this (i.e. Smart ForTwo and Fiat
500); the 2008 Smart ForTwo has a TTZ of 47ms, a
dynamic crush of ~400mm (15.75" or 28% less than the
Phase 2 model), and a peak acceleration of ~60G
(average acceleration ~34G ) ref NHTSA test v6332.
Values from the suppliers were considered typical as

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expected minimum values for the alloys and tempers. This
reviewer is not able to comment on property values used for the
other materials used in the BIW.
            were those used for the other material data which was
            found on www.matweb.com.
LS-Dyna and MSC-Nastran are current and accepted tools for this
kind of analysis. FEM analysis is part art as well as science, the
assumption had to be made that Lotus has sufficient skills and
experience to generate a valid simulation model.
Ques3
richman
This is a correct assumption.
Model indicates the PH 2 structure could sustain a peak load of 108
kN under FMVSS 216 testing.  This is unusually high for an SUV roof,
and stronger than any roof on any vehicle produced to date. Result
questions stiffness and strength results of the simulations.
Ques3
Richman
IIHS results for the 2009-2012 Toyota Venza indicate a
good rating (which is 4* vehicle curb weight). The test
resulted in a maximum force of 84.4kN. The strength of
the roof structure is comparable to midsize SUV's, e.g.,
the 2011-2012 Dodge Durango IIHS test results in a
maximum force of 105kN (ref: www.iihs.org).

The analysis  result may be slightly higher than the
actual test as the physical test is carried out statically
and the analysis is considered quasi-static so there will
be some dynamic effects which will increase the
apparent load capacity. The analysis method used has
been used successfully on previous production vehicle
program to be considered acceptable for the studies
carried out here.

There is a sufficient safety margin in the results to allow
for 'dynamic' discrepancies.
While the report abounds with crash simulations and graphs
documenting tremendous amount of work that authors have done,
it would have been very valuable to add comparison with the 6602
test even at the expense of some graphs.  Page 72 of the Phase 2
report starts with comparison of the simulations with the tests and
that is one of the most engaging parts of the document. I suggest
that it warrants a section in itself. It is currently located out of
place, in between the simulation results and it needs to be
emphasized more. This new section would also be a good place for
Ques3
Simunovic
The simulation sections are broken out into three
separate sections: 4.3., CAE Analysis, 4.4., Discussion,
and 4.5. Closures.

Occupant safety modeling was beyond the project
scope.

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discussion on occupant safety modeling and general formulas for
the subject.
One of the intriguing differences between the simulations and
baseline vehicle crash test is the amount and the type of
deformation in the frontal crash. As noted previously,
computational model is very stiff with very limited crush zone.
Viewed from the left side (Figure 14) [See Simunovic Comments, p.
14.], and from below (Figure 15) [See Simunovic Comments, p. 15.],
we can see that the majority of the deformation is in the frame rail,
and that the subframe's rear supports do not fail. The strong rear
support to the frame rail, does not appreciably deform, and thereby
establishes the limit to the crash deformation.
Ques3
Simunovic
The difference between the chosen baseline vehicle
and the simulation lies in the mass of the overall
vehicle. The baseline vehicle curb mass is ~1815kg
while the simulation curb mass is only 1150kg. this
reduction in mass has significant effects on frontal
crash performance, (1) the vehicle appears to be
'stiffer' as shown by the higher average acceleration
and shorter time to zero velocity and (2) the total
dynamic crush is less.

Additional analyses were carried out to study the
results predicted by the analysis for the roof crush.
These analyses involved removing the entire adhesive
bond on the vehicle structure and also removing the
windshield.JThis was a "worst case" test condition; the
roof crush test is performed with the windshield in
place.

The restrictions applied to the vehicle design for
packaging, manufacturing/assembly/durability have
affected the part size/gauge/etc. As a result, some
components are similar to their counterparts on the
57% heavier baseline vehicle, e.g., the steel "B" pillar.
There is an obvious difference between the simulations and the
tests. The developed lightweight model and the baseline vehicle do
represent two different types of that share general dimensions, so
that the differences in the responses can be large. However, diving
down during impact is so common across the passenger vehicles so
that different kinematics automatically raises questions about the
accuracy of the suspension system and the mass distribution. If
such kinematic outcome was a design objective, than it can be
stated in the tests.
Ques3
Richman
The motion of the vehicle under crash is substantially
dictated by the CoG for the vehicle. The simulation
model was 'mass adjusted' to give the correct weight
distribution between to front and rear axles (55/45).
There was no information available for the height of
the baseline vehicle CG and so this was not adjusted for
the simulation model. The CG height in the simulation
model was 560mm above the ground plane. In the flat
frontal  load case there is a minimal amount of vehicle

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                                                                          pitching. This is because the location of the front rails
                                                                          spans the vehicle CG location. If the CG was higher up
                                                                          then there could be significantly more pitching during
                                                                          impact. The potential for a higher vehicle CG location
                                                                          was not studied; the light weight roof helped to reduce
                                                                          the CG height.
Another reviewer which did not visit Lotus commented on the
following: 1. The powertrain has more than 15% of the vehicle
mass and therefore the right powertrains should be used in
simulation.
2. The powertrain is always mounted on the body by elastic
mounts. The crash behavior of the elastic mounts might easy
introduce a 10% error in determination of the peak deceleration
(failure vs not failure might be much more than 10%). So modeling
a close-to-reality powertrain and bushing looks like a must (at least
for me).
3. Although not intuitive, the battery pack might have a worst crash
behavior than the fuel tank. Therefore the shoulder to shoulder
position might be inferior to a tandem configuration (with the
battery towards the center of the vehicle).
Ques3
OSU
The EPA provided a parallel hybrid powertrain using a
Lotus Sable engine was used. While further powertrain
mass optimization was possible, it was beyond the
scope of this study to develop a new powertrain for the
Phase 2 BIW study.

Lotus spent a substantial amount of time developing
the powertrain mounts to optimize the engine motion
during front impacts.

A 2 kWh battery pack was engineered along with a 20%
smaller fuel tank to provide an equivalent driving
range. The total energy system weight was equivalent
to original fuel system weight.  Each storage system
(fuel, battery) is constrained independently so the
restraints have less mass to retain than the baseline
system.
Here the geometric configuration, many materials and many joining
methods are essentially new. Can Lotus provide examples that
show how accurate such 'blind' predictions may be?
Ques3
OSU
All materials and joining processes described in the
report are in production today although not on a single
vehicle. The materials were joined and tested and the
results used in the modeling.

There are no examples that can be provided to indicate
how accurate the model will be compared to a physical
test. A prototype build was beyond the scope of this

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                                                                                       project.

                                                                                       The current state of the model is such that if this were
                                                                                       an OEM vehicle program, it would only provide
                                                                                       confidence in the ideology that a lightweight vehicle
                                                                                       structure is capable of meeting the required vehicle
                                                                                       requirement (concept validation). As the vehicle
                                                                                       program developed and the designs of the other
                                                                                       components were finalized (i.e. interior
                                                                                       structure/doors/etc.) the confidence in the predicted
                                                                                       results would improve.

                                                                                       The methods that were used to build the finite element
                                                                                       crash models have been used successfully on previous
                                                                                       vehicle programs to predict crash performance. It
                                                                                       would therefore be expected that the results predicted
                                                                                       here would be within 10% of the actual tested results if
                                                                                       a prototype were built.
Compare      For instance, intrusion velocities for side impacts are reported. But,
models to     no analytical comparison is made to similar vehicles that currently
tests          meet the requirements.  Comparable crash tests are often available
              from NHTSAorllHS.
Ques3
Richman
NHTSA has carried out crash tests on the baseline
production vehicle. These test results can be found on
the NHSTA website (http://www-
nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/database/veh/veh.htm). The front
impact test report (35mph flat frontal) used to compare
the simulation results can be accessed from the
following link (http://www-
nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/database/aspx/searchmedia2.aspx?d
atabase=v&tstno=6601&mediatype=r&r tstno=6601).

Results from IIHS testing can be found on the following
website (www.iihs.org).

While a direct comparison cannot be made between
the Lotus model and the production Venza  NHTSA and

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                                                                                        IIHS test results, the reader can use the results
                                                                                        presented in this report to determine relative levels of
                                                                                        performance, e.g., comparing the front of dash
                                                                                        intrusion levels from the Venza 208 test to the Lotus
                                                                                        model 208 results.
Treatment
of aluminum
and other
metals
From the report it is not clear that pretreatment is also applied to
extruded elements. The majority of high volume aluminum
programs in North America have moved away from electrochemical
anodizing as a pre-treatment. Current practice is use of a more
effective, lower cost and environmentally compatible chemical
conversion process.  These processes are similar to Alodine
treatment.  Predominant aluminum pre-treatments today are
provided by Novelis (formerly Alcan Rolled Products) and Alcoa
(Alcoa 951). Both processes achieve similar results and need to be
applied to the sheet and extruded elements that will be bonded in
assembly.
Ques2
Richman
Alodine, a Henkel product, was used as the aluminum
pre-treatment including the extrusions. The Alcoa
products were not evaluated.
              Study is very thorough in their crash loadcase selections and
              generated a lot of data for evaluation.  Might have included IIHS
              Offset ODB and IIHS Side Impact test conditions which most OEM's
              consider.
                                                               Ques3
                                                               Richman
           The customer specified the required load cases. FMVSS
           214 side impact included  barrier & pole tests. FMVSS
           208 included offset barrier.
              Some effort was made in the report to discuss joining and corrosion
              protection techniques, however it is possible that new techniques
              will be available prior to 2025. For example, there was very little
              discussion on how a vehicle which combines so many different
              materials could be pre-treated, e-coated, and painted in an existing
              shop. There will likely be new technologies in this area.
                                                               Ques6
                                                               Joost
           The steel B pillar would be pre-treated, e-coated and
           primed prior to delivery to BIW assembly plant. The
           aluminum panels would use pre-treatments similar to
           the current aluminum bodied Lotus production sports
           cars. Non-metallic washers provide galvanic isolation.
           The assembly methodology is detailed in the body in
           white plant section.
Stiffness       but the authors may need to address whether or not such extreme
              stiffness values would be appealing to consumers of this type of
              vehicle. While there doesn't appear to be a major source of error in
              the torsional stiffness analysis, the result does call into question the
              accuracy; this is either an extraordinarily stiff vehicle, or there was
                                                               Ques3
                                                               Joost
            Allowing for a 10% error in the modeling capability, the
            predicted stiffness is about 10% higher than the BMW
            X5. The current X5 body stiffness was increased by 15%
            vs. the previous generation. The expectation is that the
            Phase 2 BIW torsional stiffness will be achieved by the

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an error during the analysis.
            next generation X5. Increased body stiffness allows the
            suspension to be better optimized for both ride and
            handling.
Remarkable strength exhibited by the FEM roof under an FMVSS
test load raises questions validity of the model.
Ques3
Richman
The roof structure is comparable to midsize SUV's, e.g.,
the 2011-2012 Dodge Durango IIHS test results in a
maximum force of 105kN (ref: www.iihs.org). The high
strength steel B pillars, similar to those used on most
production steel vehicles, are key contributors to this
Unusual simulation results - [1] Models appear reasonable and
indicate the structure has the potential to meet collision safety
requirements. Some unusual simulation results raise questions
about detail accuracy of the models.
[2] FMVSS 216 quasi-static roof strength: Model indicates peak roof
strength of 108 KN.  This is unusually high strength for an SUV type
vehicle. The report attributes this high strength to the major load
being resisted by the B-pillar. Several current vehicles employ this
construction but  have not demonstrated roof strength at this level.
The report indicates the requirement of  3X curb weight is reached
within 20 mm which is typically prior to the test platen applying
significant load directly into the b-pillar.
[3] 35 MPH frontal rigid barrier simulation: Report indicates the
front tires do not contact the sill in a 35 MPH impact. This is highly
unusual structural performance. Implications are the model or the
structure is overly stiff.
4] Body torsional stiffness: Torsional stiffness is indicated to be 32.9
kN/deg. Higher than any comparable vehicles listed in the report.
PH 2 structure torsional stiffness is comparable to significantly
more compact body structures like the Porsche Carrera, BMW 5
series, Audi AS. It is not clear what elements of the PH 2 structure
contribute to achieving the predicted stiffness.
5] Door beam modeling:  Door beams appear to stay tightly joined
to the body structure with no tilting, twisting or separation at the
lock attachments in the various side impact load modes. This is
highly unusual structural behavior.  No door opening deformation
Ques3
Richman
performance. The model was evaluated for FMVSS 216
performance (3x curb weight) using the Venza weight
and met the standard; this implies that the roof
strength is similar to the Venza. Because of the much
lower curb weight, the projected roof crush
performance is improved vs. the baseline vehicle.

FMVSS 208 rigid barrier performance addressed
previously.

4. Body stiffness addressed previously. The Lotus model
is 4" shorter than the referenced  BMW 5 and 13"
shorter than the Audi AS . The high torsional stiffness
was the result of a substantial amount of fine tuning
the model. The key was triangulating and boxing
sections and minimizing the affect of open  sections.

5. The door beam  system was bolted to the "A" and "B"
pillars using conventional iron mounting brackets; there
is a minimal amount of deflection. The result is that the
doors are predicted to open following the impact.

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              is observed in any frontal crash simulations. This suggests the door
              structure is modeled as an integral load path. FMVSS requires that
              doors are operable after crash testing. Door operability is not
              addressed  in the report.
Bending
Stiffness and
modal
frequency
analysis -
not reported
Report indicates "Phase 2 vehicle model was validated for
conforming to the existing external data for the Toyota Venza,
meeting best-in-class torsional and bending stiffness, and managing
customary running loads." Only torsional stiffness is reported.

Modal frequency analysis data Is not reported.
Ques3
Richman
All references to "validation" are being changed to
"model analysis results" or "FEA" results or their
equivalent; the reference to customary running loads
has been deleted. The BMW X5 torsional stiffness and
the test methodology has been published by BMW. The
Lotus model was evaluated using identical constraints.
BMW did not publish bending data so no comparison
was possible.

The modal frequency reference was deleted from the
report.
              Report Summary of Safety Testing Results" indicates the mass
              reduced body exhibits "best in class" torsional and bending
              stiffness. The report discusses torsional stiffness but there is no
              information on predicted bending stiffness.  No data on modal
              performance data or analysis is presented.
                                                               Ques3
                                                               OSU
            The baseline X5 was chosen because benchmarking
            indicated it was the stiffest production SUV/CUV body
            structure and significantly stiffer than the Venza which
            Lotus tested. BMW published the torsional stiffness
            but did not disclose the X5 bending stiffness so a
            comparison was not possible.
              Most areas of vehicle performance other than crash performance
              were not addressed at all.  Even basic bending stiffness and service
              loads (jacking, towing, 2-g bump, etc) were  not  addressed.  The
              report claims to address  bending stiffness and bending/torsional
              modal frequencies, but that analysis is not included in the report.
                                                               Ques6
                                                               Richman
            Service loads were not part of the project scope.
Simulation
alone not
validation
Simulation results alone would not be considered "validation" of PH
2 structure safety performance.
Ques 1.
Joost
 "Validation" comments deleted from the report.
Report states that "the mass-reduced vehicle was validated for
meeting the listed FMVSS requirements." This is an overstatement
of what the analysis accomplished	"Acceptable" levels were
Ques 3
Richman
Acceptable is based on Lotus experience internally and
externally and indicates that the performance level is
consistent with the test requirements for the specific

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defined by Lotus without explanation. Results may be good, but
would not be sufficient to "validate" the design for meeting FMVSS
requirements.	
            stage of development.
Cannot truly be validated without building a physical prototype for
comparison.	
Ques3
Richman
All validation references have been deleted.
the models cannot be regarded as validated without some
correlation to physical test results.
Ques3
OSU
Context changed to reflect that the modeling indicates
a level of performance that, if an actual vehicle were
built, there is a reasonable potential to meet the test
requirements.	
Report Conclusions overstate the level of design "validation"
achievable utilizing state-of-the- art modeling techniques with no
physical test of a representative structure.  From the work in this
study it is reasonable to conclude the PH 2  structure has the
potential to pass FMVSS and IIHS safety criteria.
QuesS
Richman
Validation references eliminated.
The PH 2 study did not include physical evaluation of a prototype
vehicle or major vehicle sub system. Majority of the chassis and
suspension content was derived from similar components for which
there is extensive volume production experience. Some of the
technologies included in the design are "speculative" and may not
mature to production readiness or achieve projected mass
reduction estimates by 2020.  For those reasons, the  PH 2 study is a
"high side" estimate of practical overall vehicle mass  reduction
potential.
QuesS
Richman
It could turn out that some Phase 1 estimates were
aggressive. Most Phase 1 mass reducing opportunities
were at a late prototype or production level; not all
applications were automotive based. There could be
attrition in the technologies as well as the inability to
cost effectively transfer into the automotive sector. The
report doesn't include technologies created after 2009
so there is the potential for new materials and
processes to be developed that reduce mass.

Some 2020 MY goals have already been achieved less
than three years after the study was initially written.
For example, the 2012 Hyundai Elantra rear seat system
weighs 20 kg or about  20% less than the 25 kg target
set for the Phase 1 2020 MY vehicle. The baseline 2009
Venza rear seat weight was 48 kg. Adding 15% mass to
the Elantra seat to normalize and add structure still
results in less mass than the Phase 1 2020 MY rear
seat.

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                                                                          A key unknown to reducing mass is the ability of OEM's
                                                                          to adopt a holistic, total vehicle approach. Setting
                                                                          system mass and cost goals frequently creates conflicts
                                                                          between groups that result in increased vehicle mass
                                                                          and cost even though some systems achieve their
                                                                          individual goals. Additionally, isolated single system
                                                                          mass reductions, such as those achieved by light weight
                                                                          closure systems, although helpful, will not drive mass
                                                                          decompounding that leads to a  lighter weight
                                                                          suspension re-design and replacing a V6 engine with a
                                                                          Dl turbocharged, cylinder de-activated three cylinder
                                                                          engine.  A synergistic, total vehicle approach is required
                                                                          to reach a "tipping" point that enables mass
                                                                          decompounding.
Overstating the implications of available safety results discredits
the good design work and conclusions of this study.
QuesS
Richman
The report has been revised to be conservative in what
the implications are as a result of the theoretical
modeling.
FMVSS test performance conclusions are based on simulated
results using an un-validated FE model. Accuracy of the model is
unknown. Some simulation results are not typical of similar
structures suggesting the model may not accurately represent the
actual structure under all loading conditions.
QuesS
Richman
The model uses the same analysis techniques used for
current production vehicles. The fidelity is estimated at
10% of a finished production vehicle based on OEM
experience. The model can only be validated by
building an actual test vehicle.
Safety performance and cost conclusions are not clearly support by
data provided.
A major objective of the PH 2 study is to "validate" the light weight
vehicle structure for compliance with FMVSS requirements. State
of the art FEM and dynamic simulations models were developed.
Those models indicate the body structure has the potential to
satisfy FMVSS requirements.  FMVSS requirements for dynamic
crash test performance is defined with respect to occupant loads
and accelerations as measured using calibrated test dummies. The
FEM simulations did not include interior, seats, restraint systems or
QuesS
Richman
Model indicates feasibility for meeting performance
requirements as a result of the accelerations and
displacements of the model. References to occupant
responses have been deleted. Validation occurs with
the testing of an actual vehicle.

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              occupants. Analytical models in this project evaluate
              displacements, velocities, and accelerations of the body structure.
              Predicting occupant response based on body structural
              displacements velocities and accelerations is speculative.
              Simulation results presented are a good indicator of potential
              performance. These simulations alone would not be considered
              adequate validation the structure for FMVSS required safety
              performance.
              Most studies employing a finite element model validate a base
              model against physical testing, then do variational studies to look at
              effect.  Going directly from an unvalidated FEM to quantitative
              results  is risky, and the level of accuracy is questionable
Ques 5
Richman
A physical model is required to validate the theoretical
modeling results.
Costing       Cost estimates for the PH 2 vehicle are questionable. Cost
              modeling methodology relies on engineering estimates and supplier
              cost projections.  The level of analytical rigor in this approach raises
              uncertainties about resulting cost estimates. Inconsistencies in
              reported piece count differences between baseline and PH 2
              structures challenge a major reported source of cost savings.
              Impact of blanking recovery on aluminum sheet product net cost
              was explicitly not considered. Labor rates assumed for BIW
              manufacturing were $20/Hr below prevailing Toyota labor rate
              implicit in baseline Venza cost analysis.  Cost estimates for
              individual stamping tool are substantially below typical tooling cost
              experienced for similar products.  Impact of blanking recovery and
              labor rates alone would increase BIW cost by over $200.
Ques 1.
Joost
Intellicosting completed a forensic level cost analysis.

Intellicosting does not obtain supplier quotes. All costs
and prices are based on research and experience.

Intellicosting quoted a U.S. labor rate of $20.72 per
hour base. Fully fringed is $20.72 + 50% = $31.08 per
hour.

Intellicosting uses a standard die / tooling cost
estimating worksheet

Intellicosting reviewed and updated the part count
including only parts where cost was applied. Part count
= 259
              Section 4.5.8.1 uses current "production" vehicles as examples for
              the feasibility of these techniques. However, many of the examples
              are for extremely high-end vehicles (Bentley, Lotus Evora, McLaren)
              and the remaining examples are for low-production, high-end
              vehicles (MB E class, Dodge Viper, etc.). The cost of some
              technologies can be expected to come down before 2020, but it is
              not reasonable to assume that (for example) the composites
Ques 2
Joost
Carbon fiber did not meet the cost criteria set for the
BIW and was not used on the Phase 2 BIW. The
composite material used for the floor was recycled PET
(the plastic used in water bottles). The "sandwich"
panels used directional glass reinforced PET outer plies
with a PET foam inner. The cost of this material is
substantially lower than carbon fiber.

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technologies used in Lamborghinis will be cost competitive on any
time scale; significant advances in composite technology will need
to be made in order to be cost competitive on a Venza, and the
resulting material is likely to differ considerably (in both properties
and manufacturing technique) from the Lamborghini grade
material.

















Main weakness of the cost analysis is the fragmented approach of
comparing costs derived in different approaches and different
sources, and trying to infer relevant information from these
differences.
Flat year-over-year wages for the cost analysis seems unrealistic.


Vulnerability in this cost study appears to be validity and functional
equivalence of BIW design with 169 pieces vs. 407 for the baseline























Ques4
joost


Ques4
OSU

Ques4
Richman

Carbon fiber, currently used on high end sports cars,
will be used for the upcoming BMW i3 EV body
structure. Per BMW, the pricing will be "very
competitive"; preliminary cost estimates from
Automobilwoche, a German magazine, put the cost at
between $44,000 and $50,000 depending on options.
The Nissan Leaf EV 2012 MSRP is $36,050. The i3 plus
cost is about 22%. This is much less than the typical
cost differential between a Nissan and a BMW and an
indicator that BMW has greatly reduced the
manufacturing cost for a carbon fiber body structure.
Another example that the automotive industry is
making substantial progress on utilizing light weight
materials and new construction processes into higher
volume, more mainstream vehicles is the Ford F-150.
The 2014 Ford F-150 (about 400,000 sales annually per
Edmunds.com) will reportedly have a riv-bonded
aluminum body
(http://online.wsj.com/article/SB100014240527023036
12804577531282227138686.html). This is the same
type of construction used for Lotus production sports
cars and the Phase 2 model.
This was a customer driven requirement.



The trend is towards lower wages such as those
currently paid by Volkswagen at its US plant. See GM-
VW cost discussion below.
Parts count revised from 407 to 269 to reflect only
costed parts.

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Venza.	
Total tooling investment of $28M M for the BIW not consistent with
typical OEM production experience.  BIW tooling of $150-200MM
would not be uncommon for conventional BIW manufacturing.  If
significant parts reduction could be achieved, it would mean less
tools, but usually larger and more complex ones, requiring larger
presses and slower cycle times.	
Ques4
richman
Intellicosting quotes tooling based on volume. The
$28MM is based on the low volume of vehicles
required. Tooling life is 250,000 parts.
Tooling estimates from Intellicosting are significantly lower than
have been seen in other similar studies or production programs and
will be challenged by most knowledgeable automotive industry
readers. Intellicosting estimates total BIW tooling at $28MM in the
tooling summary and $70 MM in the report summary. On similar
production OEM programs complete BIW tooling has  been in the
range of $150MM to $200MM. The report attributes low tooling
cost to parts consolidation. This does not appear to completely
explain the significant cost differences between PH 2 tooling and
actual production experience.  Parts consolidation typically results
in fewer tools while increasing size, complexity and cost of tools
used. The impact of parts consolidation on PH 2 weight and cost
appears to be major. The report does not provide specific
examples of where parts consolidation was achieved and the
specific impact of consolidation. Considering the significant impact
attributed to parts consolidation, it would be helpful provide
specific examples of where this was achieved and the specific
impact on mass, cost and tooling.  Based  on actual production
experience, PH 2 estimates for plant capital investment, tooling
cost and labor rates would be viewed as extremely optimistic
Ques4
Richman
Intellicosting quoted low volume tooling verses high
volume.

Examples of part consolidation have been added to the
report.
Difficult to evaluate since this portion of the report was completed
by a subcontractor. The forming dies seem to be inexpensive as
compared to standard steel sheet metal forming dies.
Ques4
osu
Intellicosting quoted low volume tooling verses high
volume.
Applying a consistent costing approach to each vehicle and vehicle
system using a manufacturing cost model approach. This approach
would establish a more consistent and understandable assessment
of cost impacts of vehicle mass reduction design and technologies.
Ques4
richman
Intellicosting applies a consistent methodology using
our company developed application. An example of
Intellicosting methodology has been added to the
report.

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The assessment of the energy supply includes a description of solar,
wind, and biomass derived energy. While the narrative is quite
positive on the potential for each of these energy sources, it's not
clear in the analysis how much of the power for the plant is
produced using these techniques. If the renewable sources provide
a significant portion of the plant power, then the comparison of the
Ph2 BIW cost against the production Venza cost may not be fair.
The cost of the Venza BIW is determined based on the RPE and
several other assumptions and therefore includes the cost of
electricity at the existing plant. Therefore, if an automotive
company was going to invest in a new plant to build either the Ph2
BIW or the current Venza BIW (and the new plant would have the
lower cost power) then the cost delta between the two BIWs would
be different than shown here (because the current Venza BIW
produced at a new plant would be less expensive). The same
argument could be made for the labor costs and their impact on
BIW cost. By including factors such as power and labor costs into
the analysis, it's difficult to determine what the cost
savings/penalty is due only to the change in materials and assembly
- the impact of labor and energy are mixed into the result.
Ques4
Joost
This is a 2020 model vs. a current production plant. The
study was done by an experienced manufacturing
team, EBZ, who builds plants for major European OEMs
including BMW, Audi and VW. Lotus believes that OEMs
will incorporate what Europe is doing today in terms of
low environmental impact and sustainable energy into
their US assembly plants.

This trend is already starting in the US. The Subaru of
Indiana assembly plant has "zero landfill" meaning that
all plant waste is either recycled or turned into
electricity. A single-family home produces more waste
in a day than the Subaru Indiana plant does in a year.
Source: Subaru.com

No attempt was made to predict how Toyota would
build a CUV eight years from now.
 The number of workers assigned to vehicle assembly in this report
seems quite low. Extra personal need to be available to replace
those with unexcused absences. Do these assembly numbers also
include material handling personnel to stock each of the
workstations?

While this work does make a compelling case it downplays some of
the very real issues that slow such innovation in auto
manufacturing. Examples: multi-material structures can suffer
accelerated corrosion if not properly isolated in joining. Fatigue
may also limit durability in aluminum, magnesium or novel joints.
Neither of these durability concerns is raised. Also, automotive
manufacturing is very conservative in using new processes because
one small process problem can stop an entire auto manufacturing
Ques4
OSU
Labor figures include material handling personnel.
They do not include paying for extra plant
personnel with no assignments.
           See previous discussion.

           The 2014 Ford F-150 (400,000 sales) will reportedly
           use a riv-bonded all aluminum body structure.

-------
              plant.  Manufacturing engineers may be justifiably weary of
              extensive use of adhesives, until these are proven in mass
              production in other environments. These very real impediments to
              change should be mentioned in the background and conclusions.
1C
Summary - Cost projections ... lack sufficient rigor to support
confidence in cost projections and in some cases are based on
"optimistic" assumptions. Significant cost reduction is attributed to
parts consolidation in the body structure. Part count data
presented in the report appears to reflect inconsistent content
between baseline and PH 2 designs. Body manufacturing labor
rates and material blanking recovery are not consistent with actual
industry experience.  Using normal industry experience for those
two factors alone would add $273 to body manufacturing cost.
Tooling cost estimates for individual body dies appear to be less
than half normal industry experience for dies of this type.
Ques4
richman
Intellicosting applies a consistent methodology using
our company developed application.  See example of
Intellicosting methodology. Intellicosting uses their
methodology to support many international OEMs.
              System cost assumptions based on average sales margin and
              detailed engineering judgments can be a reasonable first order
              estimate. These estimates can be useful in allocation of relative to
              costs to individual vehicle systems, but lack sufficient rigor to
              support definitive cost conclusions
                                                               Ques4
                                                               Richman
            Intellicosting does not apply recovery for scrap material
            in our calculation / methodology.

            This information was also added to the report as
            clarification.
              Body costs for PH 2 design were estimated by combining scaled
              material content from baseline vehicle (Venza) and projected
              manufacturing cost from a new production processes and facility
              developed for this project. This approach is logical and practical,
              but lacks the rigor to support reliable estimates of new design cost
              implications when the design changes represent significant
              departures from the  baseline design content.
                                                               Ques4
                                                               Richman
            Intellicosting applies a consistent methodology using
            our company developed application. See example of
            Intellicosting methodology. Intellicosting uses their
            methodology to support many international OEMs.
              Body piece cost and tooling investment estimates were developed
              by Intellicosting. No information was provided on Intellicosting
              methodology. Purchased component piece cost estimates
              (excluding BIW) are in line with findings in similar studies. Tooling
              costs supplied by Intellicosting are significantly lower than actual
              production experience would suggest.
                                                               Ques4
                                                               Richman
            Intellicosting applies a consistent methodology using
            our company developed application. See example of
            Intellicosting methodology. Intellicosting uses their
            methodology to support many international OEMs.

            Intellicosting quotes tooling based on volume. The
            $28MM is based on the low volume of vehicles

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                                                                          required. Tooling life is 250,000 parts.
The PH 2 study indicates and aluminum based multi material body
(BIW, closures) can be produced for at a cost reduction of $199
relative to a conventional steel body. That conclusion is not
consistent with general  industry experience.  This inconsistency
may result from PH 2 assumptions of material recovery, labor rates
and pars consolidation.

A recent study conducted by IBIS Associates "Aluminum Vehicle
Structure: Manufacturing and Life Cycle Cost Analysis" estimated a
cost increase $560 for an aluminum vehicle BIW and closures.
http://aluminumintransportation.org/members/files/
active/0/IBIS%20Powertrain%20Study%20w%20cover.pdf
That study was conducted with a major high volume OEM vehicle
producer and included part cost estimates using detailed individual
part cost estimates. Majority of cost increases for the low mass
body are offset by weight related cost reductions in powertrain,
chassis and suspension components. Conclusions from the IBIS
study are consistent with similar studies and production experience
at other OEM producers.
            Ques4
            Richman
The estimated Phase 2 BIW piece cost increase was
over $700 more than the baseline all steel vehicle. The
use of less expensive tools, such as extrusions, the
reduced number of tools due to fewer parts required,
lower assembly costs due to the use of less expensive
joining methods and fewer parts to be handled partially
offset the more expensive body.

The synergistic cost savings from other areas of the
vehicle (from the Phase 1 report) were also included
and further offset the Phase 2 body cost. The peer
reviewed Phase 1 2020 model achieved an estimated
mass reduction of near 40% for all non-BIW systems
(less powertrain) while using primarily similar materials.
The savings associated with the elimination of 40% of
the materials from the baseline vehicle systems helps
to further offset the BIW cost. This resulted in an
estimated average savings of about 4% for the non-BIW
systems.  Because this was approximately 80% of the
manufacturing cost, the total weighted cost with the
BIW included was at near parity with the baseline
vehicle.
Material Recovery -- Report states estimates of material recovery in
processing were not included in the cost analysis. Omitting this
cost factor can have a significant impact on cost of sheet based
aluminum products used in this study. Typical auto body panel
blanking process recovery is 60%. This recovery rate is typical for
steel and aluminum sheet.  When evaluation material cost of an
aluminum product the impact of recovery losses should be included
in the analysis. Potential impact of material recovery for body
panels:
            Ques4
            Richman
Sheet utilization varied from part to part. The full sheet
cost was used with no allowance for the unused
material, i.e., Intellicosting did not apply scrap material
recovery in their calculation / methodology. There was
no allowance for the lost material from blanking
operations to be recovered as an offset to material
costs.
Approximate aluminum content (BIW, Closures)
240 Kg

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Input material required at 60% recovery               400 Kg
Blanking off-all                                      160 Kg
Devaluation of blanking off-all (rough estimate)
       Difference between raw material and
              Blanking off-all  $1.30/Kg               $211
              Blanking devaluation increases cost of aluminum
              sheet products by over $ 0.90/Kg.

Appropriate estimates of blanking recoveries and material
devaluation should be included in cost estimates for stamped
aluminum sheet components. Recovery rates for steel sheet
products are similar to aluminum, but the economic impact of steel
sheet devaluation is a significantly lower factor in finished part cost
per pound.

Report indicates total cost of  resistance spot welding (RSW) is 5X
the cost of friction spot welding (FSW).  Typical total body shop cost
(energy, labor, maintenance,  consumable tips) of a RSW is $0.05 -
$0.10.  For the stated ratio to be accurate, FSW total cost would be
$0.01-$0.02 which appears unlikely. It is possible the 5X cost
differential apply to energy consumption and not total cost.
            FSW (friction stir welding) was not used. Friction Spot
            Joining (FSJ), a process developed by Kawasaki Heavy
            Industries, was utilized. The FSJ process uses a small
            servo-motor to spin a unique drill bit that engages two
            sheets of aluminum and flows the parts together. The
            material remains in the plastic (not molten) region so
            the parent material properties are maintained. Per
            Kawasaki
            (www.khi.co.ip/english/robot/product/fsi.html)
            " the FSJ system uses less than l/20th the power
            consumed by resistance spot welding equipment. In
            addition, there is no need for large-capacity power
            supply equipment resulting in a reduction in overall
            equipment costs."
Labor rates - Average body plant labor rates used in BIW costing
average $35 fully loaded. Current North American average labor
rates for auto manufacturing (typically stamping, body production
and vehicle assembly)
                     Toyota        $55
Ques4
Richman
The industry trend is towards lower labor costs. GM is
targeting a 40% reduction in labor costs at the Lake
Orion, Michigan plant that builds the Chevrolet Sonic
and will use that as a model for other US plants
(http://www.gminsidenews.com/forums/fl2/how-

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                      GM            $56 (including two tier)
                      Ford           $58
                      Honda         $50
                      Nissan         $47
                      Hyundai       $44
                      VW            $38

Labor rate of $35 may be achievable (VW) in some regions and
circumstances. The issue of labor rate is peripheral to the central
costing issue of this study which is assessing the cost impact of light
weight engineering design. Method used to establish baseline BIW
component costs inherently used current Toyota labor rates.
Objective assessment of design impact on vehicle cost would use
same labor rates for both configurations.

Labor cost or BIW production is reported to be $108 using an
average rate of $35. Typical actual BIW labor content from other
cost studies with North American OEM's found actual BIW labor
content approaching $200. Applying the current Toyota labor rate
of $55 to the PH 2 BIW production plan increases labor content to
$170 (+$62)  per vehicle.
            small-car-helping-rewrite-labor-costs-u-s-plant-104321/
            ). Improved efficiency, using contract non-union labor
            (about $20/hr with benefits) as well as continued
            replacement of retiring workers with Tier 2 workers (
            about 60% of the existing hourly rate) are expected to
            continue to reduce GM labor rates. This trend was
            projected to the 2020 timeframe but VW is already very
            close to this rate today.

            The Volkswagen Tennessee assembly plant pays
            $14.50/hr and utilizes $12/hr contract employees.

            http://www.wsws.org/articles/2011/sep2011/chat-
            s23.shtml

            Identical labor rates were used for both the Venza body
            costs and the Phase 2 body costs.

            Two keys to lower assembly costs are: 1. reducing
            assembly time by substantially reducing the parts count
            and 2. utilizing less costly joining processes. The Phase
            2 BIW uses structural adhesives which allow greater
            spacing between the joints (needed for peel) which
            reduces the number of joints significantly. A typical
            CUV/SUV requires 5,000 welds at about $0.05/weld.
            That is approximately $250 in joining costs; reducing
            the number of joints by about 50% and substantially
            decreasing the joint costs more than offsets the added
            cost of using structural adhesive bonding. This cost
            savings was applied to offset the more expensive Phase
            2 BIW piece costs.
Clallam county, WA is an interesting choice for the plant location (I
grew up relatively nearby). Port Angeles is not a "major port" (total
population <20,000 people) and access to the area from anywhere
Ques6
Joost
Section eliminated.

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              else in the state is inconvenient.
Piece count
reduction
concerning
BIW Design Integration - Report identifies BIW piece count
reduction from a baseline of 419 pieces to 169 for PH 2.  Significant
piece cost and labor cost savings are attributed to the reduction in
piece count. Venza BOM lists 407 pieces in the baseline  BIW. A
total of 120 pieces are identified as having "0" weight and "0" cost.
Another 47 pieces are listed as nuts or bolts.  PH 2 Venza BOM lists
no nuts or bolts and has no "0" mass/cost components.  With the
importance attributed to parts integration, these differences need
to be addressed.

Closure BOM for PH 2 appears to not include a number of detail
components that are typically necessary in a production  ready
design. An example of this is the PH 2  hood.  PH 2 Hood  BOM lists 4
parts, an inner and outer panel and 2 hinges. Virtually all practical
aluminum hood designs include 2 hinge bracket reinforcements, a
latch support and a palm reinforcement. Absence of these practical
elements of a production hood raise questions about the functional
equivalency (mounting and reinforcement points, NVH,
aesthetics,...) of the two vehicle designs. Contents of the Venza
BOM should be  reviewed for accuracy  and content in the PH 2 BOM
should be reviewed for practical completeness.
Ques4
Richman
Intellicosting reviewed and updated the part count
including only parts where cost was applied. Part count
= 259.
                                                                                        There were two scenarios used for the hood: 1. a
                                                                                        typical hinged hood system;  and 2. a fixed (bolt on)
                                                                                        hood. For the fixed hood, a lightweight hinged panel for
                                                                                        fluid checking and fluid filling is incorporated into the
                                                                                        front fascia . The bolt-on hood mass was used for the
                                                                                        BOM. The crash models were evaluated using a "worst
                                                                                        case"  hinged hood system. There is no need for local
                                                                                        hood hinge reinforcements on this model nor is there a
                                                                                        need for a "palm"  reinforcement since there are no
                                                                                        hinges and the hood doesn't open.

                                                                                        This approach saves a significant amount of weight by
                                                                                        eliminating the hinge system and is an example of
                                                                                        mass decompounding.
Failure
specification
s for
materials
Materials properties describing failure are not indicated (with the
exception of Mg, which shows an in-plane failure strain of 6%). It
seems unlikely that the Al and Steel components in the vehicle will
remain below the strain localization or failure limits of the material;
it's not clear how failure of these materials was determined in the
models. The authors should indicate how failure was accounted for;
if it was not, the authors will need to explain why the assumption of
uniform plasticity throughout the crash event is valid for these
materials. This could be done by showing that the maximum strain
Ques 1
Joost
Addressed previously.

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Part Count
references
Misc
conditions predicted in the model are below the typical localization
or failure limits of the materials (if that is true, anyway).
Model assumes no failures of adhesive bonding in materials during
collisions. Previous crash testing experience suggests] some level
of bonding separation and resulting structure strength reduction is
likely to occur.
The radical part count reduction needs to be more fully explained
or de-emphasized. Report also should address the greatly reduced
tooling and assembly costs relative to the experience of today's
automakers. Some conservatism would be appropriate regarding
potential shortcomings in interior design and aesthetics influencing
customer expectations and acceptance.
References for all of the materials and adhesives would be very
helpful.
One broad comment is that this report needs to be more strongly
placed in the context of the state of the art as established by
available literature. For example the work only contains 7 formal
references. Also, it is not clear where material data came from in
specific cases (this should be formally referenced, even if a private
communication) and the exact source of data such in as the
comparative data in Figure 4.3.2 is not clear. Words like
Intillicosting are used to denote the source of data and we believe
that refers to a specific subcontract let to the firm 'intellicosting' for
this work and those results are shown here. This needs to be made
explicitly clear.
1 would suggest that a short summary be added describing the
major changes of the Phase 2 design with respect to the original
High Development vehicle body design.
This reviewer sat down with the person who created and ran the
LS-DYNA FEA models. Additional insight into how the model

Ques3
Richman
Ques 1
Richman
Ques 1
OSU
OSU Ques
1

Ques 3
OSU

There could be some degradation in the areas that are
adhesively bonded; however, the local degradation in
the bonded regions would have a minimal impact on
the global results. These types of bonding related issues
are typically dealt with by doubling up on the adhesive
application (2 strips vs. one) or adding a weld or
mechanical fastener during development (crash) testing
with actual vehicles.
Parts count revised to eliminate 0 mass parts.
References and suppliers included in the report for all
materials.
More detailed references to the suppliers and their
background and their role was added. The suppliers
included Alcoa (aluminum support), Meridian
(magnesium support), Henkel (coating, lab testing and
structural composite insert support), Allied Composites
(composite support), EBZ (assembly plant design), and
Intellicosting (costing support).
Added.
The Ohio State University peer reviewers met with
Lotus to review confidential portions of the software

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performs and specific questions were answered on specific load
cases. All questions were answered.
analysis that could not be publicly released. The OSU
team reviewed the background information, how it was
set up and how the dropdowns fed into the primary
analysis that formed the basis of the final FEA models.
The below information is a summary of the analysis
methodology.

The model was created from CAD data that was
provided for all of the various components that made
up the ARB vehicle structure. A set of guidelines was
used to create the model; these are general guidelines
for creating an  appropriate finite element model.
Discretion was  used during any meshing to determine
the level of detail and quality required. Models were
created with the following typical conditions:

All holes less than 10mm in diameter ignored
Holes >010mm should be modeled with a least a single
concentric ring of elements
At least two rows of elements weld flanges
Spot-welds (i.e. friction spot connections) were
modeled with single solid elements (type #1)
BIW and Closure shell definitions have 5 integration
points
Tied contact's were defined as
*CONTACT_TIED_NODE_TO_SURFACE_OFFSETor
*CONTACT_TIED_SHELL_EDGE_TO_SURFACE_OFFSET
(*CONTACT_SPOTWELD  definition will be used for
'weld' beam definitions)
                                                                         Mesh quality checks were made to ensure the elements
                                                                         met the criteria set for the following:

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                                                                          Element mesh size
                                                                          Number of triangles per panel
                                                                          Tria. Interior angle
                                                                          Quad Interior angle
                                                                          Warping
                                                                          Jacobian
                                                                          Aspect Ratio
                                                                          Total %age of failed elements <1% (from all element
                                                                          quality criteria's)

                                                                          Components were also checked for:

                                                                          Free edges, duplicate elements, consistent shell
                                                                          element normal, LS-DYNA part names (for
                                                                          easier identification) and that tied contacts attach at all
                                                                          nodes

                                                                          The flat frontal model had ~995,000 elements (1-D, 2-D
                                                                          and 3-D)
to provide additional credibility to the manufacturing assessment it
would be helpful to include a description of other work that EBZ has
conducted where their manufacturing design work was
implemented for producing vehicles. Lotus is a well-known name,
EBZ is less well known.
Ques4
Joost
EBZ, the firm Lotus contracted to engineer the Phase 2
BIW assembly plant, has designed assembly plants for
Audi, BMW, VW, Porsche, Jaguar-Land Rover, Ford
(Europe) as well as other international OEM's. This
information was added to the report.
The analysis is based on specific density which assumes that the
architecture of the vehicles is the same. For example, the front-end
crash energy management system in a micro car is likely quite
different from the comparable system in a large luxury car (aside
from differences in gauge to account for limited crash space, as
discussed in the report). While this analysis provides a good starting
point, I do not feel that it is reasonable to expect the weight
reduction potential to scale with specific density. In other words, I
think that the 32.4 value used in the analysis also changes with
QuesS
Joost
The objective was to create a predictive model based
on current vehicles. The model will change as the size
and mass of future vehicles evolve.

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vehicle size due to changes in architecture. Similarly, the cost
analysis projecting cost factor for other vehicle classes is a good
start, but it's unlikely that the numbers scale so simply.	
Fundamental engineering work is very good and has the potential
to make a substantial and important contribution to industry
understanding of mass reduction opportunities. The study will
receive intense and detailed critical review by industry specialists.
To achieve potential positive impact on industry thinking, study
content and conclusions must be recognized as credible.  Unusual
safety simulation results and questionable cost estimates (piece
cost, tooling) need to be explained or revised. As currently
presented, potential contributions of the study are likely to be
obscured by unexplained simulation results and cost estimates that
are not consistent with actual  program experience.

Absolutely.  Recommended adjustments summarized in Safety
analysis, and cost estimates (recommendations summarized in
attached review report).  Credibility of study would be significantly
enhanced with detail explanations or revisions in areas where
unusual and potentially dis-crediting results are reported.
Conservatism in assessing CAE based safety simulations and cost
estimates (component and tooling) would improve acceptance of
main report conclusions.

Impact of BIW plant site selection discussion and resulting labor
rates confuse important assessment of design driven cost impact.
Suggest removing site selection discussion.  Using labor and energy
cost factors representative of the Toyota Venza production more
clearly identifies the true cost  impact of  PH 2 design content.
Ques6
Richman
The overall tone of paper was reviewed and revised as
required to insure that it is conservative relative to the
meaning of the results and their potential
implementation. The study indicates potential but does
not represent that the model will  result in a vehicle that
will meet the FMVSS and IIHS requirements. That will
require building a  vehicle and verifying the
performance.

The "unusual simulation results",  e.g., roof crush, are
consistent with the production 2011-2012 Dodge
Durango. The 2011-2012 Dodge Durango IIHS test
results in a maximum force of 105kN (ref:
www.iihs.org). Additionally, a 10% modeling error vs.
actual would reduce the maximum force to 97 kN (from
108 kN).

The high strength  steel B pillars on the Phase 2 BIW are
similar to those used on production steel bodied
vehicles and are key contributors  to the roof strength.
Using a key structural part similar to those designed for
much heavier vehicles on the light weight Phase 2 BIW
body structure provided a substantial  performance
margin for roof crush and aided in side impact
performance.

The "questionable cost results" were addressed earlier
including revising the cost analysis and the parts count.
The Phase 2 BIW piece cost was $730  higher than the
baseline which is consistent with the estimated $560

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                                                                           provided by the reviewer. The tooling and assembly
                                                                           related savings detailed previously helped to offset the
                                                                           increased cost BIW. The Phase 1 peer reviewed paper
                                                                           was used as the basis for additional, non-BIW related,
                                                                           cost offsets that impacted the total vehicle cost.

                                                                           The site selection discussion was deleted.

                                                                           The reader can substitute internal labor rates and
                                                                           calculate the impact on the BIW assembly costs. As
                                                                           previously discussed, the future trend is towards lower
                                                                           labor rates; GM is targeting VW's labor rates. VW
                                                                           (Tennessee assembly plant) is currently paying
                                                                           $14.50/hr to direct employees and $12.00/hr to
                                                                           contract employees (as cited previously).
The proposed engine size is based on the assumption that
decreasing the mass of the vehicle and holding the same power-to-
weight ratio will keep the vehicle performances alike. This
assumption is true only if the coefficient of drag (Cda) will also
decrease (practically a perfect match in all the dynamic regards is
not possible because the quadratic behavior of the air vs speed).
The influence of the airdrag is typically higher than the general
perception. In this particular case is very possible that more than
half of the engine power will be used to overcome the airdrag at 65
mph. Therefore aerodynamic simulations are mandatory in order to
validate the size of the engine.
Ques6
OSU
The baseline body in white incorporated a variety of
aero aids including a flat underbody, 10mm lower roof
height, integrated rear vision system and a fixed hood
(no fender gaps).

The low mass Phase 2 vehicle requires 123 HP to
maintain the Venza's wt/HP ratio. Using a 32 ft2frontal
area, a 0.28 Cd and an 1173 kg weight yields an
estimated 12.2 HP required to drive the Phase 2 vehicle
at 70 MPH.

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   PEER REVIEW OF THE LOTUS REPORT DEMONSTRATING THE SAFETY AND CRASHWORTHINESS OF A 2020 MODEL YEAR, MASS REDUCED
                                                   CROSSOVER VEHICLE

                                                      Conference Call

                                                  Friday, December 2, 2011
Participating in the call:

Will Joost, DOE

Doug Richman, Kaiser Aluminum

Srdjan Simunovic, ORNL

David Emerling and C.G. Cantemir, OSU

Gregg Peterson, Lotus Engineering

Cheryl Caffrey, EPA

Brian Menard and Doran Stegura, SRA

NOTE: Reviewers should send follow-up questions to Brian Menard by COB Monday, December 5, for prompt response by Lotus so that
reviewers are able to submit their final comments by December 14.

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Issue 1:

The Labor Rate appears lower than industry standard and why is renewable energy included in the cost?  Acknowledging that this is a small
contributor to the cost, but question just the same.

This question is related to the piece cost issue. Did these 2 factors influence costs very much?

Lotus Engineering (Lotus) Response:

[1] The report will include a cost for the BIW using a typical industry rate as well as the known labor rate stipulated for the plant site.

[2] The energy cost is $69/vehicle; the assumption is that the plant uses conventional electrical power to build the body structure and
closures. There is a discussion in the manufacturing report relative to using sustainable energy and the advantages and disadvantages.
EBZ, the firm that designed the plant, is a European company and typically equips their current customer manufacturing facilities with
solar roofs and includes potential wind turbines sites. In other words, on site sustainable energy systems are already common in
European automotive plants. We see that trend being mainstream in the US in the timeframe of this vehicle. Because  we expect
conventional steel BIW plants to do the same, there is no cost savings assigned to the use of sustainable energy vs. conventional
sources (coal, hydro, nuclear).
To the reviewer's knowledge the Toyota plant has the lowest costs in the US, but these rates are lower than these

Ok for other plants but may not be applicable for automobile plants (est. $55/hr)

Piece Cost and Labor Content - labor rates are different for 1) and 2) below

    1)  **Manufacturing study (assembly, stamping-Toyota in-house parts)
    2)  Part component cost - no - labor rates realistic

Issue 2:

Body Build - Are Mag parts coated?

              o   Were sheet metal parts pre-treated? Anodized aluminum
              o   Nobody is anodizing sheets for aluminum in NA (automotive production)

Lotus Response: Lotus uses anodizing.

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Most body programs use some sort of a coating so as long as there's a cost for coating the sheet metal then that's ok.

Issue 3:

Material property - were these minimal or typical properties? Toyota insists on minimal properties in design.

Lotus Response: The baseline Venza BOM is being revised to clarify that the $0 cost, 0 kg mass parts are already included in sub-
assemblies; this shows the individual parts but does not include their cost and mass as that would be double counting the parts. The
material specifications were provided by the material supplier; these specifications are the same as those provided to any supplier/OEM
using those materials.

Issue 4:

Durability is mentioned several times in the report and Lotus has experience in durability. Otherwise, there is no other analysis of durability.
How comfortable is Lotus with durability? The paper lacks analysis with NVH and fatigue issues - not addressed and may result in some
additional weight.

Lotus Response: Durability is beyond the scope of the project; however, Lotus did due diligence with coupon testing and past experience and
other things in joining and materials.

Louts has built aluminum rear bonded vehicles for 16-17 years - the cars are used more at tracks than public roads, has adhesive bonding
experience

Lotus Response: Lotus will place a statement to this effect in the final report.

Lotus has been told they're overdesigned. IIHS - 4x wtfor roof crush, FMVSS - 3x wtfor roof crush and Lotus uses 6x weight for roof crush -
hence no need to add additional weight

Issue 5:

The mass damper was removed from the Lotus original design -

Lotus Response:  Toyota had hands tied and bandages were evident throughout the BIW. With the Lotus design it is possible to remove these
bandages.

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Issue 6:




L3 engine - 1 L Engine isn't in production yet, but well along... Lotus Saber engine - has balance shaft.




Issue 7:




Collision performance says body is quite stiff




Data is coming that says body is "remarkably stiff"




As part of process - 50 mph flat not have any discontinuities




Evident in pulse time for crash events




Tire and wheel don't hit cross tire - interesting observation




Lotus Response:  Engine mount design was worked over to get this result.




Issue 8:




Appendix C-l - part  count - body BOM - quite a large number of 0 cost 0 weight parts removed - 127 parts were 0 wt, 0 cost,




47 nut/weld studs in original - no nuts/studs listed in new vehicle parts list




407 parts seem like a very large number of parts in the original Venza compared to other programs reviewers has experience with




BIW - Venza - Phase 1 welded - not costed and no weight - how is  it considered a part then? Numbers missing?




Lotus Response:  Lotus will provide additional information to the reviewers.




Issue 9:




Is report for a technical audience or an illustration of possibilities to the general public?




Add more info for technical document - mention CAE done on HD vehicle earlier in report

-------
Material data - isotropic - for modeling all materials




Material 24 in Dyna




Issue 10:




For each material, explain why specific material selected for later on - materials are tied together




Give info on grades of aluminum used in various locations in the vehicle




Mag - only one - AM60 - only one property given, but how was this decided?




Explain materials choices - hot stamped boron used in door beams -for don't want to have large displacement	




Mag - chose AM rather than AZ for galvanic properties




Lotus Response:  Lotus worked with Alcoa and others for stiffness.




Lotus Response:  Agreed to include language in the report concerning efforts with suppliers and supplier recommendations and test results.




Which aluminum used where in BOM at end of report - bring up front part of report




Why use 6061 in rails and not 6063 - or other way around?




Issue 11:




Use different FEA technologies for different parts - was the cast mag a solid element or approximated by shells?




Issue 12:




Stiffness - one crash - page 72 have test from NHTSA to compare results - new design consistently higher than original vehicle - explain.




Any other tests NHTSA ran? Bring other comparisons




Lotus Response:  The original Venza had higher peak pulse than the new vehicle.

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Srdjan Simunovic said that new vehicle has earlier spike and lower difference between simulation and real car crash.

Lotus Response:  Lotus changed materials 10% (sensitivity) and changed peak acceleration by 30%.  Lotus wanted tuning to ensure not fire
airbag early hence control peak acceleration, chose 23g 1st 35ms - beyond scope to do full airbag development.

Simunovic suggested Lotus include explanation - graphs not as valuable as discussion as to decisions. Done.

Lotus Response:  Agreed to incorporate the reviewer's recommendations.

Issue 13:

In Sec. 4.5.8 Lotus lists systems (ex: aluminum extrusion) and lists where systems are in production - the places in production include very high
end vehicles such as the McLaren and other similar cars. Any higher production such as the Toyota Prius/Chevy Cruze?

Lotus Response:  Agreed to take this into consideration.

Says costs estimate is applicable to higher volume

Issue 14:

Design shows lots of 6022  aluminum - not standard in automotive - is it?

Doug Richman: It is used in body sheet.

6013 not used much now,  but will likely be used in body sheet in next 10 years

Not revolutionary - there are 2 plants with high volume in North America

Doug mentioned  none of the aluminum have aerospace technology - more civilian markets.

Issue 15:

Can you stamp and form this aluminum at room temp?

Richman:  Yes, absolutely-from an industry perspective.

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Issue 16:

Does moving from friction spot welding to friction spot joining save money?

Lotus Response: Spot joining is used with adhesive and so uses half as many joints as spot welding—this is a Kawasaki process which allows
the aluminum to stay in parent properties and not change properties.

Is there any riveting or spot riveting?

Lotus Response:  Yes, it includes riveting and spot welds.

Issue 17:

Crash simulation question in the charge letter - "whether lotus can be validated" - what are you looking for? EPA will clarify this.

Issue 18:

Remove discussion to Phase 1 report - is it needed?

EPA Response: It should be considered that the report assumes the mass reduction and costs from all of the other parts of the vehicle from
the Phase 1 report.

Lotus Response:  The report is being reviewed to eliminate any need for the reader to refer to the Phase 1 report. The intent is that the
Phase 2 report is complete by itself and does not require the reader to read another large (300 page) document as a requirement for fully
understanding the Phase 2 report. In other words, all pertinent Phase 1 information will be included in the Phase 2 report rather than
refer the reader to the Phase 1 report.


Issue 19:

It was noted that the model takes away the spare tire and tool kit - this results in a notable mass and cost savings - is this a philosophy
difference on whether this is reaching too far? No further discussion at this time.  The issue does need to be addressed.

Issue 20:

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Test of marketability - Interior radical - departures from expectations - smaller steps may be needed - bad reaction ex: Honda Civic

Honda Civic downgraded interior - major decline in sales and marketability.  Will have new model in 2 years to try to recover (sooner than 5
typical)

Parts look cheaper and fit and finish is bad - took out weight and cost out and road tests of vehicle not good.

Lotus Response:  The materials were not downgraded; they were either kept on par or were upgraded. Lotus received feedback that the Lotus
interior was preferred over the original Venza interior and that the Lotus materials were soft to the touch and high grade.

Issue 21:

It is important to  proofread the numbers in the tables and graphs and those  referred to in the report text as in some instances they are
inconsistent.


Intellicosting  Process Steps:

    Component Cost Analysis:

    •   Photograph and weigh total component or assembly
    •   Disassemble component and create Bill of Material structure
    •   Weigh and photograph individual parts
    •   Allocated components to cost analysts:
           o  Mechanical: Plastic/Die Castings
           o  Electronics: PCB/Sensors/Cameras
    •   Cost analysts will enter physical dimension and manufacturing location data into Intellicosting Cost modeling application
    •   Cost modeling (high level) description:
           o  Plastic example:
                  •  Cost analyst will determine material type
                  •  Part dimensions (wall thickness/overall projected area) will be entered cost model
                  •  Production volume and manufacturing region will be entered into Cost Model

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       •   Cost analyst will select correct tonnage of machine to effieciently product component
              •   Machine level data resident in cost model (portion):
                     o   Machine cost
                     o   Machine installation costs
                     o   Cycle times
                     o   Efficiencies
                     o   # or % of operator required to man machine
                     o   Amount of regrind material
                     o   Manual or automate part handling
       •   Cost analyst will determine based on entire manufacturing process, the size of facility required to produce part
       •   The cost model will analyze all the inputs and create a final report that will include:
              •   Operational step, such as Op 10 Melting
              •   Machine description: Name/Tonnage
              •   Geographic region: State or Country
              •   Cycle times
              •   Fixed/Variable costs
              •   Total costs for each Operational step and entire assembly
       •   Cost analyst will determine tooling requirement for component
o   Electronics:
       •   Cost Analyst will photograph and weigh printed circuit board
       •   Cost Analyst will determine board population methodology
       •   Cost Analyst will review type and functions of components
       •   Cost Analyst will research costs for components based on volume and purchasing power
       •   Cost Analyst will de-laminate integrated circuits to review silicone die, to determine die manufacturing yield rate.
       •   Cost analyst will create virtual production line equipment:
              •   Chip placement (shooters)
              •   Component feeders
              •   Soldering process
              •   In-Line testing

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    •   End of line testing
Cost Analyst will determine Engineering Design and Development cost associate with each functional group required to
develop Print Circuit Board over a determined period of time (ex: 4 years)
Facility size and manpower requirements are entered into cost model
Cost analyst will review preliminary final report with Quality Peer Review team
Upon approval Cost Analyst will submit Final Report to Client

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Draft Final Report:

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Contract Number: 09-621
Demonstrating the Safety and Crashworthiness
of a 2020 Model-Year, Mass-Reduced Crossover
Vehicle
Prepared By:
Prepared for the California Air Resources Board (CARB)



Principal Investigator: Lotus Engineering Inc.


Draft date: October 12, 2011
                          II

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Disclaimer

The statements and conclusions in this report are those of the contractor and not
necessarily those of the California Air Resources Board. The mention of commercial
products, their source, or their use in connection with material reported herein is not to
be construed as actual or implied endorsement of such products.

Acknowledgements

Many individuals across many organizations contributed to this study. Lotus gratefully
acknowledges the organizations below that contributed or collaborated with Lotus in
some way throughout the project. These organizations do not necessarily endorse or
validate this report.

AISI  (materials -American International Steel  Institute)
Alcoa Aluminum (materials - Ground Transportation Group)
Allied Composite Technologies LLC (materials - Rochester Hills, Michigan)
American Trim (joining and forming technologies - Lima, Ohio)
American Trim (joining and forming technologies - Lima, Ohio)
Bayer Material Science (materials)
Bollhoff (joining technologies - Troy, Michigan; Bielefeld,  Germany)
CAR (Center for Automotive Research -Ann Arbor, Michigan)
GARB (California Air Resources Board)
Department of Energy (DOE)
EBZ (manufacturing - Rochester Hills, Michigan; Ravensburg, Germany)
EPA (United States Environmental Protection  Agency)
EWI  (joining technologies - Columbus, Ohio)
Henkel (Automotive Group - adhesives, coatings and structural foams)
Henrob (joining technologies - Livonia, Michigan)
Hydro - Automotive Structures (materials forming - Holland, Michigan)
Intellicosting LLC (automotive costing - Troy,  Michigan)
Kawasaki Robotics Coining and assembly technologies - Wixom, Michigan)
Meridian Automotive Systems (Tier 1 automotive magnesium part supplier)
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA)
Ohio State University (joining technologies)
Plasan Carbon Composites (Tier 1 automotive carbon fiber supplier - Bennington,
Vermont)
United States Steel Corporation  (Troy, Michigan)
This Report was submitted in fulfillment of GARB contract number 09-621. The objective
was to use an existing lightweight vehicle concept and develop it to demonstrate that it
meets Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) for light duty vehicles. The
work was performed by Lotus Engineering Inc. under the sponsorship of the California
Air Resources Board. Work was completed in the second quarter of 2011.
                                      Ill

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IV

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Table of Contents

1.   Abstract	1
2.   Executive Summary	2
2.1.    Background	2
2.2.    Methods	2
2.3.    Results	3
2.4.    Conclusions	3
2.5    Recommendations	4
3.   Glossary of Terms, Abbreviations, and Symbols	6
4.   Report: Demonstrating the Safety and Crashworthiness of a 2020 Model-Year, Mass-
Reduced Crossover Vehicle	16
4.1.    Introduction	16
4.2.    Materials and Methods	18
4.2.1.    Model Creation	21
4.2.1.1. BIW	23
4.2.1.2.  Simulated Doors (beams only)	23
4.2.1.3. Front Sub-frame/Suspension	24
4.2.1.4. Rear Sub-frame/Suspension	24
4.2.1.5. Cooling Pack/Front Under Hood	25
4.2.1.6. Powertrain/Exhaust	25
4.2.1.7. Fuel Tank/Battery	26
4.2.2.    Material Data	27
4.2.2.1.  Steel	27
4.2.2.2. Aluminum	29
4.2.2.3. Magnesium	32
4.2.2.4. Composites	33
4.2.2.5. Adhesives/Mastics/Composites	34
4.2.3.    Material Usage (location in vehicle)	35
4.2.4.    Joining Methodologies	37
4.2.5.    Model Mass/Other Information	39
CAE Test Set-Up	40
4.2.5.1. FMVSS 208: 35 mph Front Impact (0°/30° rigid wall, offset deformable barrier)	40
4.2.5.2. FMVSS 208: 25 mph Offset Deformable Barrier	41
4.2.5.3. FMVS 8208:25 mph 30° Flat Barrier-Left Side	42
4.2.5.4. FMVS 8208:25 mph 30° Flat Barrier-Right Side	43
4.2.5.5. FMVSS 210: Seatbelt Anchorages	44
4.2.5.6. FMVSS 213: Child Restraint Systems	45
4.2.5.7. FMVSS 214: 33.5 mph Side Impact-Crabbed Barrier	48
4.2.5.8. FMVSS 214: 20 mph 75° Side Pole Impact - Front (5th percentile Female)	49
4.2.5.9. FMVSS 214: 20 mph 75° Side Pole Impact - Front (50th percentile Male)	50
4.2.5.10.    FMVSS 216: Roof Crush	51
4.2.5.11.    FMVSS 301: Rear Impact (moving deformable barrier)	52
4.2.5.12.    IfflS Low Speed - Front	53
4.2.5.13.    IfflS Low Speed - Rear	54
4.3.    CAE Analysis	56
                                          V

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4.3.1.    FMVSS 208: 35 mph Front Impact (0°/30° rigid wall, offset deformable barrier)	57
4.3.2.    FMVSS 208: 25 mph Offset Deformable Barrier	65
4.3.3.    FMVS 8208:25 mph 30° Flat Barrier-Left Side	74
4.3.4.    FMVSS208: 25mph 30° Flat Barrier -Right Side	80
4.3.5.    FMVSS 210: Seatbelt Anchorages	86
4.3.5.1.   Front	86
4.3.5.2.   Rear	88
4.3.6.    FMVSS 213: Child Restraint Systems	90
4.3.7.    FMVSS 214: 33.5 mph Side Impact-Crabbed Barrier	91
4.3.8.    FMVSS 214: 20 mph 75° Side Pole Impact - Front (5th percentile Female)	96
4.3.9.    FMVSS 214: 20 mph 75° Side Pole Impact - Front (50th percentile Male)	101
4.3.10.   FMVSS 216: Roof Crush	106
4.3.11.   FMVSS 301: Rear Impact (moving deformable barrier)	109
4.3.12.   IfflS Low Speed - Front	113
4.3.13.   IfflS Low Speed - Rear	114
4.3.14    Body Stiffness/Modals	115
4.4.   Discussion	118
4.4.1.    Observations-FMVSS 208 Front Impact	118
4.4.1.1   FMVSS 208: 35 mph Front Impact (0°/30° rigid wall, offset deformable barrier).... 118
4.4.1.2   FMVSS 208: 25 mph Offset Deformable Barrier	119
4.4.1.3   FMVSS 208: 25 mph 30° Flat Barrier-Left Side	119
4.4.1.4   FMVSS 208: 25 mph 30° Flat Barrier-Right Side	119
4.4.2.    Observations - FMVSS 210 Seatbelt Anchorages	120
4.4.2.1.   Front Anchorages	120
4.4.2.2.   Rear Anchorages	120
4.4.3.    Observations-FMVSS 213 Child Restraint Anchorage	121
4.4.4.    Observation - FMVSS  214 Side Impact	121
4.4.4.1   FMVSS 214: 33.5 mph Crabbed Barrier	121
4.4.4.2   FMVSS 214: 20 mph 75° Side Pole Impact	122
4.4.5.    Observation-FMVSS  216 Roof Crush	122
4.4.6.    Observations-FMVSS 301 Rear Impact	122
4.4.7.    Observations - IfflS Low Speed-Front	123
4.4.8.    Observations - IfflS Low Speed-Rear	124
4.4.9.    Vehicle-to-Vehicle Crash Results	125
4.4.10.   Summary of Safety Testing Results	128
4.5.   Closures	130
4.5.1.    Objectives	130
4.5.2.    Model Updates	130
4.5.3.    Model Mass/Other Information	133
4.5.4.    Analysis Results	134
4.5.4.1.   33.5-mph Side Impact -Crabbed Barrier	134
4.5.4.1.1.   Observations- Side Impact MDB	140
4.5.4.2.   20mph 75° Side Pole Impact - Front  (5th Percentile Female)	141
4.5.4.3.   20-mph75° Side Pole Impact - Front (50th percentile Male)	146
4.5.4.3.1.   Observations - Side ImpactPole	151
4.5.4.4.   Roof Crush	152
                                         VI

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4.5.4.4.1.   Observations-Roof Crush	156
4.5.4.5.  Rear Impact	157
4.5.4.5.1.   Observations - Rear Impact	162
4.5.4.6.  IfflS Low Speed - Rear	164
4.5.4.6.1.   Observations - IfflS Low Speed - Rear	167
4.5.5.    Bill of Materials	169
4.5.5.1   Closures Bill of Materials	177
4.5.6.    Vehicle Manufacturing	180
4.5.6.1   Assembly	180
4.5.6.2   Labor	182
4.5.6.3   Investment and Manufacturing Costs	183
4.5.7.    Cost Discussion	196
4.5.7.1 Phase 1  Cost Study	196
4.5.7.2 Phase 2 Cost Study	198
4.5.7.3 Closures Piece Costs	204
4.5.7.4   Phase 2 HD BIW Technology	206
4.5.8.    Application of Results to Other Vehicle Classes	208
4.5.8.1.  Body-in-White	208
4.5.8.1.1.   Modularization	208
4.5.8.1.2.   Materials	208
4.5.8.1.3.   Aluminum Extrusions and Stampings	209
4.5.8.1.4.   Magnesium Castings	209
4.5.8.1.5.   High Strength Steel	210
4.5.8.1.6.   Composites	210
4.5.8.1.7.   Scalability Summary	210
4.5.8.2.  Closures	215
4.5.8.2.1.   Injection Molding	215
4.5.8.2.2.   Mild Steel Castings	215
4.5.8.2.3.   Scalability Summary	215
4.5.8.3.  Front and Rear Bumpers	216
4.5.8.4.  Glazing (Windshield, Backlight, Doors, Sunroof, Fixed Panels)	216
4.5.8.5.  Interior	216
4.5.8.5.1.   Seats	216
4.5.8.5.2.   Electronic Transmission  and Parking Brake Controls	217
4.5.8.5.3.   Instrument Panel	217
4.5.8.5.4.   Center Console	218
4.5.8.5.5.   Noise Insulation	218
4.5.8.5.6.   Interior Trim	218
4.5.8.5.7.   HVA/C Ducting	219
4.5.8.6.  Chassis and Suspension	219
4.5.8.6.1.   Suspension and Steering	219
4.5.8.6.2.   Braking System	219
4.5.8.6.3.   Tires and Wheels	220
4.5.8.7.  Electrical	220
4.5.8.8.  Powertrain	220
4.5.8.9.  Competitive Set Study	222
                                           VII

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4.5.8.10.   Summary and Projected Weight Savings	223
4.6.1   Conclusions	225
4.6.2   Recommendations	226
5.   References	226
6.   List of Inventions Reported and Copyrighted Materials  Produced	227
7.   Appendices	1
7.1.    Appendix A: Manufacturing Report	1
1.0    General Assumptions	2
2.0    Location	2
2.1    Climate	2
2.2    Labor Costs	2
2.3    Available Resources	3
2.4    Taxes	3
3.0    Process & Layout	4
   3.5.1  Sub-Assemblies	64
   3.5.2  Underbody Line	64
   3.5.3  Cross Transport	64
   3.5.4  Framing Line	64
   3.5.5  After Framing Line	64
3.6    Buffer Concept	64
3.7    Station Layouts	65
7.0    Quality Concept	99
7.1    Philosophy	99
7.2    Quality Assurance Methods	100
   7.2.1  In-Line Quality Check	100
   7.2.2 Off-Line Quality Check	101
8.0    Maintenance Concept	102
9.0    Environmental Assumptions	104
9.1    Solar Panels	104
9.2    Wind Turbines	104
9.3    Biomass Power	105
9.4    Hydroelectric Power	105
9.5    Water Recycle	105
9.6    Lighting	105
9.7    Recycling, Reusables, and Returnables	105
9.8    Living Roof	106
9.9    Solvent Recovery	106
9.10   Plant Surroundings	106
10.0   Investment/Costs	107
10.1   Capital Costs	107
10.2   Labor Costs	114
10.3   Utilities	115
10.4   Investment Summary	116
10.5   Sensitivity Analysis	118
10.6   Tooling Costs	120
7.1.1   Closures Manufacturing Report	131
                                         VIII

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7.2    Appendix B: Competitive Set Study	1
7.3    Appendix C: 2009 Toyota Venza and Phase 2 HD Piece Costs	1
                                        IX

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List of Figures

 Figure     Description                                               Page
 4.2.1 .a     Phase 1 High Development Model Exterior Styling - Front        20
 4.2.1 .b     Baseline Toyota Venza Exterior Styling - Front                  21
 4.2.1 .c     Phase 1 High Development Model Exterior Styling - Rear        21
 4.2.1 .d     Baseline Toyota Venza Exterior Styling - Rear                  21
 4.2.1.1.a    Phase 2 HD vehicle body-in-white - Front                       22
 4.2.1.2.a    Phase 2 HD vehicle simulsted door besms                      22
 4.2.1.3.a    Phase 2 HD vehicle front sub-frame and suspension             23
 4.2.1.4.3    Phsse 2 HD vehicle rear sub-frame and suspension             23
 4.2.1.5.3    Phsse 2 HD vehicle cooling snd under hood                     24
 4.2.1.6.3    Phsse 2 HD vehicle powertrain and exhsust                     24
 4.2.1.7.3    Phsse 2 HD vehicle fuel tsnk/bsttery                           25
 4.2.2.1.3    Steel stress-strain curve at 300 MPa                           26
 4.2.2.1 .b    Steel stress-strain curve at 400 MPa                           27
 4.2.2.1.C    Hot-stsmped, boron steel stress-strain curve                    27
 4.2.2.2.3    6013 sluminum stress-strain curve                             28
 4.2.2.2.b    6022 sluminum stress-strain curve                             28
 4.2.2.2.C    6061 sluminum stress-strain curve                             29
 4.2.2.2.d    6063 sluminum stress-strain curve                             29
 4.2.2.2.e    6013 sluminum stress-strain curve                             30
 4.2.2.3.3    AM60 msgnesium stress-strain curve                           31
 4.2.2.4.3    45-23 nylon stress-strain curve                                32
 4.2.2.4.b    60-percent glsss-fiber PET stress-strain curve                   32
 4.2.2.5.3    1811 Terocore stress-strain curve                             33
 4.2.2.5.b    Teroksl stress-strain curve                                    33
 4.2.3.3     Body-in-white msterisl usage front three-qusrter view            34
 4.2.3.b     Body-in-white msterisl ussge rear three-qusrter view            35
 4.2.3.C     Body-in-white msterisl ussge underbody view                   35
 4.2.3.d     Body-in-white msterisl usage blow-up view                      36
 4.2.4.a     Henkel & Kawasaki  lap-shear tests                            37
 4.2.5A.a    Rigid, deformable wall crash-test  model setup                   39
 4.2.5.2.a    40-percent barrier overlsp crash-test model setup                40
 4.2.5.3.3    30°, left-side bsrrier crash-test model setup                     41
 4.2.5.4.3    30°, right-side bsrrier crash-test model setup                    42
 4.2.5.5.3    Front sestbelt snchorage test model setup                      43
 4.2.5.5.b    Rear sestbelt snchorage test model setup                      44
 4.2.5.6.3    Acceleration pulse spplied to child-restraint model               45
 4.2.5.6.b    Child-restraint test model setup                                46
 4.2.5.7.3    Crabbed bsrrier test model setup                               47
 4.2.5.8.3    Side-pole impsct test model setup                             48
                                       X

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4.2.5.9.a    Side-pole impact test model setup                             49
4.2.5.10.a   Roof crush test model setup                                   50
4.2.5.11 .a   Deformable, moving barrier rear impact test model setup         51
4.2.5.12.a   IIHS, low-speed front test model setup ('full impact')              52
4.2.5.12.b   IIHS, low-speed front test model setup ('offset impact')           53
4.2.5.13.a   IIHS, low-speed rear test model setup ('full impact')              53
4.2.5.13.b   IIHS, low-speed rear test model setup ('offset impact')            54
4.3.1.a      Vehicle deformation (t=0.1s) after full frontal impact              56
4.3.1 .b      Vehicle acceleration pulse during  full frontal impact              57
4.3.1 .c      Average vehicle acceleration pulse during full frontal impact      58
            Vehicle velocity during full frontal  impact - time to 0 velocity
4.3.1.d      (TTZ) = 59.5ms                                             59
4.3.1 .e      Vehicle acceleration during full frontal impact                    59
            Vehicle displacement from full frontal impact - max dynamic
4.3.1.f      crush = 555mm                                              60
4.3.1.g      CAE dash intrusion analysis after full frontal impact              61
4.3.1.h      Fuel tank plastic strain after full frontal impact                   62
4.3.1 .i       Main energy absorbing frontal body structure                    63
4.3.1J       Energy balance for full frontal impact                           63
            Vehicle deformation (t=0.15s) after 40-percent  overlap
4.3.2.a      frontal impact                                                64
            Vehicle deformation (t=0.15s, barrier not shown) after 40-
4.3.2.b      percent overlap frontal impact                                 65
            Vehicle acceleration pulse during  40-percent overlap frontal
4.3.2.c      impact                                                       65
            Average vehicle pulse during 40-percent overlap frontal
4.3.2.d      impact                                                       67
            Vehicle velocity after 40-percent overlap frontal impact -
4.3.2.e      timetozero(TTZ) = 0.117s                                   67
            Vehicle displacement after 40-percent overlap frontal
4.3.2.f      impact                                                       68
            CAE dash intrusion analysis after 40-percent overlap frontal
4.3.2.g      impact                                                       68
4.3.2.h      Toyota Venza NCAP dash deformation                         69
            Main energy absorbing body structure - 40-percent overlap
4.3.2.i       frontal impact                                                70
4.3.2J       Energy balance for 40-percent overlap frontal impact             70
            Comparison of production vehicle and Phase 2 HD crash
4.3.2.K      accelerations                                                 71
            Comparison of production vehicle envelope and Phase 2
4.3.2.1       HD crash accelerations                                        72
            Vehicle deformation (t=0.12s) after 30°, left-side frontal
4.3.3.a      barrier impact                                                73
            Vehicle acceleration pulse during  30°, left-side frontal
4.3.3.b      barrier impact                                                74
                                      XI

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            Average vehicle acceleration pulse during 30°, left-side
4.3.3.C      frontal barrier impact                                           75
            Vehicle  velocity during 30°, left-side frontal impact - time to
4.3.3.d      0 velocity (TTZ) = 76ms                                        75
            Vehicle  displacement during 30°, left-side frontal impact -
4.3.3.e      max dynamic crush = 500mm                                   76
            CAE dash intrusion analysis after 30°, left-side frontal
4.3.3.f      impact                                                        76
4.3.3.g      Fuel tank plastic strain after 30°, left-side frontal impact           77
            Main energy absorbing body structure for Fuel tank plastic
4.3.3.h      strain after 30°, left-side frontal impact                           77
4.3.3.i      Energy balance for 30°,  left-side frontal impact                   78
            Vehicle  deformation (t=0.12s) after 30°, right-side frontal
4.3.4.a      impact                                                        79
            Vehicle  acceleration pulse during 30°, right-side frontal
4.3.4.b      impact                                                        80
            Vehicle  average acceleration pulse during 30°, right-side
4.3.4.C      frontal impact                                                  80
            Vehicle  velocity during 30°, right-side frontal impact - time
4.3.4.d      to zero velocity (TTZ) = 92ms                                   81
            Vehicle  displacement during 30°, right-side frontal impact -
4.3.4.e      maximum  dynamic crush 524mm                                81
            CAE dash intrusion analysis after 30°, right-side frontal
4.3.4.f      impact                                                        82
4.3.4.g      Fuel tank plastic strains  after 30°, right-side frontal  impact        82
            Main energy absorbing body structure for 30°, right-side
4.3.4.h      frontal impact                                                  83
4.3.4.i      Energy balance for 30°,  right-side frontal impact                  84
4.3.5.1 .a    Seatbelt anchorage plastic strains (@ 0.2s)                      85
4.3.5.1 .b    Upper seatbelt anchorage plastic strain (@ 0.2s)                 86
4.3.5.1 .c    Lower seatbelt anchorage plastic strain (@ 0.2s)                 86
4.3.5.2.a    Rear seatbelt anchorage plastic strain (@ 0.2s)                  87
4.3.5.2.b    Displacement at lower seatbelt anchorages (@0.2s)              88
4.3.6.a      Child-restraint, lower anchorage plastic strain                    89
4.3.6.b      Child-restraint seat pan displacements                           89
4.3.7.a      Vehicle  deformation (0.1s) after crabbed barrier impact           90
            Vehicle  deformation (barrier not shown) after crabbed
4.3.7.b      barrier impact                                                  91
            Global vehicle and barrier velocities for crabbed barrier
4.3.7.C      impact                                                        91
            Relative intrusion  velocities (B-pillar) during crabbed barrier
4.3.7.d      impact                                                        92
            Relative intrusion  displacements (B-pillar) during crabbed
4.3.7.e      barrier impact                                                  92
4.3.7.f      B-pillar intrusion profile after crabbed barrier impact,              93
                                       XII

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            x=2842
4.3.7.g      Intrusion levels after crabbed barrier impact on struck side        93
            Main energy absorbing body structure arts for crabbed
4.3.7.h      barrier impact                                                 94
4.3.7.i       Energy balance for crabbed barrier impact                      94
            Vehicle deformation (0.1s) after 75°, side, pole impact - 5th
4.3.8.a      percentile female                                              95
            Vehicle deformation after 75°, side, pole impact (pole
4.3.8.b      blanked) - 5th percentile female                                96
            Relative intrusion velocities during 75°, side, pole impact
4.3.8.C      (B-pillar) - 5th percentile female                                96
            Relative intrusion displacements during 75°, side, pole
4.3.8.d      impact (B-pillar)-5th percentile female                         97
            Section through B-pillar after 75°, side, pole impact, x=
4.3.8.e      2842 - 5th percentile female                                   97
            Intrusion levels after 75°,  side, pole impact on struck side -
4.3.8.f       5th percentile female                                          98
            Main energy absorbing body structure for 75°, side, pole
4.3.8.g      impact-5th percentile female                                  98
            Energy balance for 75°, side, pole impact - 5th percentile
4.3.8.h      female                                                       99
            Vehicle deformation (0.1s) after 75°, side, pole impact -
4.3.9.a      50th percentile male                                          100
            Vehicle deformation after 75°, side, pole impact (pole
4.3.9.b      blanked) - 50th percentile male                               101
            Relative intrusion velocities during 75°, side, pole impact
4.3.9.c      (B-pillar) - 50th percentile male                               101
            Relative intrusion displacements during 75°, side, pole
4.3.9.d      impact (B-pillar) - 50th percentile male                         102
            Section through B-pillar after 75°, side, pole impact, x=
4.3.9.e      2842 - 50th percentile male                                   102
            Intrusion levels after 75°,  side, pole impact on struck side -
4.3.9.f       50th percentile male                                          103
            Main energy absorbing body structure for 75°, side, pole
4.3.9.g      impact-50th percentile male                                 103
            Energy balance for 75°, side, pole impact - 50th percentile
4.3.9.h      male                                                        104
            Deformation at 0/40/80/150mm of roof crush platen
4.3.10.a     displacement                                                105
            Deformation in relation to occupant head clearance zones
            (95th/99th) at 0/40/80/150mm of roof crush platen
4.3.10.b     displacement                                                106
4.3.10.C     Roof displacement vs. applied force-3 times curb weight       106
4.3.10.d     Roof displacement vs. applied force - 3 times Venza weight     107
            Roof plastic strains at 0/40/80/150mm of roof crush platen
4.3.10.e     displacement                                                107
                                      XIII

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            Vehicle deformation (t=0.12s) after rear deformable barrier
4.3.11.a     impact                                                     108
            Vehicle deformation (barrier blanked) after rear deformable
4.3.11.b     barrier impact                                               108
            Vehicle deformation (at Oms/40ms/80ms/120ms) after rear
4.3.11.C     deformable barrier impact                                    109
            Vehicle acceleration pulse during rear deformable barrier
4.3.11.d     impact                                                     109
            Vehicle & barrier velocities during rear deformable barrier
4.3.11.e     impact                                                     110
4.3.11 .f     Fuel tank plastic strains after rear deformable barrier impact     110
            Main energy absorbing body structure for rear deformable
4.3.11.g     barrier impact                                               111
4.3.11.h     Energy balance for rear deformable barrier impact              111
            Front plastic strain after low-speed frontal impact ('full
4.3.12.a     impact')                                                    112
            Front plastic strain after low-speed frontal impact ('offset
4.3.12.b     impact')                                                    112
            Rear plastic strains after low-speed rear impact ('full
4.3.13.a     impact')                                                    113
            Rear plastic strains after low-speed rear impact ('offset
4.3.13.b     impact')                                                    113
4.3.14.a     CAE body stiffness analysis                                  114
            Phsse 2 HD vehicle to Ford  Taurus crash simulation setup
4.4.9.a      - three-quarter view                                         124
            Phase 2 HD vehicle to Ford  Taurus crash simulation setup
4.4.9.b      -side view                                                 125
            Phase 2 HD vehicle to Ford  Taurus crash simulation result
4.4.9.C      - three-quarter view                                         125
            Phase 2 HD vehicle to Ford  Taurus crash simulation result
4.4.9.d      -side view                                                 126
            Phase 2 HD vehicle to Ford  Taurus crash simulation result
4.4.9.e      - three-quarter view, opaque Taurus                          126
4.5.2.a      Body-in-white - V27                                         130
4.5.2.b      Front closure view                                           131
4.5.2.C      Rear closure view                                           131
4.5.4.1.a    Model analysis setup                                         133
            Vehicle deformation (0.1s) from 33.5-mph, crabbed barrier
4.5.4.1.b    side-impact                                                 134
            Vehicle deformation (0.1s, barrier not shown) from 33.5-
4.5.4.1.C    mph, crabbed barrier side-impact                             134
            Global vehicle and barrier velocities during 33.5-mph,
4.5.4.1.d    crabbed barrier side-impact                                   135
            Relative intrusion velocities during 33.5-mph, crabbed
4.5.4.1.e    barrier side-impact                                           135
4.5.4.1.f     Relative intrusion displacements (b-pillar) from 33.5-mph,        136
                                     XIV

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            crabbed barrier side-impact
            Relative intrusion displacements (front and rear doors) from
4.5.4.1.g    33.5-mph, crabbed barrier side-impact                         136
            B-pillar intrusion profile x = 2842 from 33.5-mph, crabbed
4.5.4.1.h    barrier side-impact                                          137
            Intrusion levels on struck side from 33.5-mph, crabbed
4.5.4.1.i     barrier side-impact                                          137
            Plastic strain in struck-side doors from 33.5-mph, crabbed
4.5.4.1J     barrier side-impact                                          138
4.5.4.1.k    33.5-mph, crabbed barrier side-impact energy balance          138
            20-mph, 75-degree side-pole impact -front (5th percentile
4.5.4.2.a    female) model setup                                         140
            Vehicle deformation from 20-mph, 75-degree side-pole
4.5.4.2.b    impact-front (5th percentile female)                          141
            Vehicle deformation from 20-mph, 75-degree side-pole
4.5.4.2.C    impact - front (5th percentile female, pole blanked)             141
            Intrusion levels from 20-mph, 75-degree side-pole impact -
4.5.4.2.d    front (5th percentile female)                                   142
            Intrusion levels from 20-mph, 75-degree side-pole impact -
4.5.4.2.e    front (5th percentile female)                                   142
            Section through B pillar, x = 2842 after 20-mph, 75-degree
            side-pole impact - front (5th percentile female, pole
4.5.4.2.f     blanked)                                                    143
            Intrusion levels on struck-side from 20-mph, 75-degree
4.5.4.2.g    side-pole impact - front (5th percentile female)                 143
            Energy balance for 20-mph,  75-degree side-pole impact -
4.5.4.2.h    front (5th percentile female)                                   144
            20-mph, 75-degree side-pole impact -front (50th percentile
4.5.4.3.a    male) model setup                                          145
            Vehicle deformation after 20-mph, 75-degree side-pole
4.5.4.3.b    impact-front (50th percentile male)                           145
            Vehicle deformation after 20-mph, 75-degree side-pole
4.5.4.3.C    impact - front (50th percentile male, pole blanked)              146
            Intrusion Velocities (B-Pillar & Front Door) after 20-mph, 75-
4.5.4.3.d    degree side-pole impact - front (50th percentile male)           146
            Intrusion Displacements (B-Pillar & Front Door) after 20-
            mph, 75-degree side-pole impact -front (50th percentile
4.5.4.3.e    male)                                                       147
            Intrusion levels on struckside after 20-mph, 75-degree side-
4.5.4.3.f     pole impact-front (50th percentile male)                       147
            Section through B-Pillar, x= 2842 after 20-mph, 75-degree
4.5.4.3.g    side-pole impact - front (50th percentile male)                  148
            Plastic Strain in  Front Door after 20-mph, 75-degree side-
4.5.4.3.h    pole impact-front (50th percentile male)                       148
4.5.4.3.i     Energy Balance for 20-mph,  75-degree side-pole impact -       149
                                      XV

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            front (50th percentile male)
            5th percentile female vs. 50th percentile male front door
4.5.4.3.1.a  intrusion comparison                                           150
4.5.4.4.a    Roof crush model setup                                           151
4.5.4.4.b         Deformation at 0/40/80/150mm of Platen Displacement          152
                Deformation in Relation to occupant head clearance zones
4.5.4.4.C          (95th/99th) at 0/40/80/150mm of Platen Displacement           152
4.5.4.4.d    Roof Displacement vs. Applied Force - 3 times Curb Weight          153
4.5.4.4.6      Roof Displacement vs. Applied Force - 3 times Venza Weight       153
4.5.4.4.f    Plastic Strains @ 0/40/80/150mm of Roof Platen Displacement        154
4.5.4.4.1 .a  Resultant force magnitude in A & B-Pillars from roof crush test        155
4.5.4.5.3                      Rear Impact Model  Set up                       156
4.5.4.5.b    Vehicle deformation after rear impact test                           157
4.5.4.5.C    Vehicle deformation after rear impact test (barrier blanked)            157
            Vehicle Deformation (@ Oms/40ms/80ms/120ms) after rear
4.5.4.5.d    impact                                                          158
4.5.4.5.6    Vehicle Acceleration Pulse during rear impact                       158
4.5.4.5.f        Vehicle & Barrier Velocities  during rear impact simulation         159
4.5.4.5.g    7ue\ Tank Plastic Strains after rear impact                           159
4.5.4.5.h    Rear impact energy balance                                       160
4.5.4.5.1.3  Fuel Tank Plastic Strain location after rear impact                    161
4.5.4.5.1.b  Initial vehicle armature rotation during rear impact                   162
4.5.4.6.3    Low-speed IfflS impact model setup ('full')                         163
4.5.4.6.b    IMS low-speed impact element plastic strains ('full')                 164
4.5.4.6.C    IMS low-speed impact model  setup ('offset')                        164
4.5.4.6.d         IMS low-speed impact element plastic strain ('offset')           165
4.5.4.6.1.3  Maximum barrier deflection from IMS low-speed impact             166
4.5.4.6.1 .b  Deformation at maximum deflection from IMS low-speed impact      167
4.5.5.3     Venza, Phase 1, and Phase 2 vehicle body structure by material        175
4.5.5.b     Venza, Phase 1, and Phase 2 full  vehicle material construction         176
4.5.8.1.7.3  Toyots Ysris body-in-white structure                             205
4.5.8.1.7.b  Toyots Corolls body-in-white structure                           205
4.5.8.1.7.c  Audi A4 body-in-white structure                                  206
4.5.8.1.7.d  Audi A7 body-in-white-structure                                  206
                                        XVI

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1. Abstract

The California Air Resources Board (ARB) contracted Lotus Engineering Inc. to validate
the safety of a low-mass vehicle body-in-white such as the crossover vehicle described
in Lotus' 2010 lightweight vehicle study, An Assessment of Mass Reduction
Opportunities fora 2017-2020 Model Year Vehicle Program. The 2010 study, which
developed a vehicle comparable to the 2009 Toyota Venza (equivalent dimensions,
utility objectives, and passenger and interior volume) with 38 percent less mass for all
systems except powertrain, was used as a starting point for this study. The masses for
all non-BIW systems were carried over from the Phase 1 report. This safety study uses
computer aided analysis and simulation to evaluate the crash performance of the mass-
reduced body. The following study validates that a low-mass body structure could meet
Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) for light duty vehicles for front, side,
and rear impacts, roof crush, occupant restraints and several Insurance Institute for
Highway  Safety requirements.

This study also provides a discussion on the applicability of low-mass body structure
engineering and manufacturing to other vehicle classes as well as a bill of material with
a full cost analysis for the engineering and manufacturing of a body structure. A
manufacturing feasibility study is included to insure the components can be cost-
effectively mass produced by automakers and suppliers by 2020, with widespread
introduction by 2025. Both low volume and high volume studies are included. Lotus
evaluated the functional design based on  both direct costs and assembly considerations
before refining the design to further reduce costs and improve assembly.

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2. Executive Summary
   2.1.     Background

ARB contracted Lotus Engineering Inc to design a low-mass body structure and to
evaluate the performance for key federal (FMVSS) and Insurance Institute for Highway
Safety (IIHS) requirements for a 2020 model year vehicle, which could be widely
commercialized by 2025. The target was a mass reduction greater than 30 percent for the
total vehicle. An original vehicle concept, referred to as Phase 1 in this report, was
developed in 2009 and released publicly in 2010. This study, defined as Phase 2, validated
the crash performance of a reduced-mass vehicle relative to federal and IIHS standards.
The investigation took place between December 2010 and October 2011.

As a part of this study Lotus shared the FMVSS impact models with NHTSA and held
regular meetings to compare results with the NHTSA analysis team. Additionally, NHTSA
used in-house models to perform vehicle to vehicle impacts with the Lotus low mass
model, including a Ford Taurus and a Ford Explorer.1 NHTSA is issuing a separate report
documenting the car to car impact results.

   2.2.     Methods
Lotus Engineering based this Phase 2 study on the over 30-percent mass reduced vehicle
(curb weight - includes powertrain) developed in the Phase 1 study and performed vehicle
crash simulations to confirm the body structure would meet Federal Motor Vehicle Safety
Standards (FMVSS) for light duty vehicles for front, side, and rear impacts, roof crush and
certain IIHS requirements.

For the Phase 2 study, Lotus designed a new body structure based on the Phase 1  body-
in-white (BIW) with identical exterior and interior dimensions. This new body structure was
then developed into a partial vehicle model (BIW with full suspension and powertrain),
which was analyzed to determine the optimum materials to maximize structural rigidity
while minimizing weight. The fully developed and optimized body weighed 242 kg and the
total vehicle mass was 1173 kg. Lotus carried over the EPA developed parallel hybrid
powertrain used in the Phase 1 vehicle, which weighed 356 kg.

This mass-reduced and materially optimized vehicle was used to create the model for
structural and crash simulations. Analyses were performed after every test to further
optimize the vehicle's crash performance and to create a body structure with very high
stiffness. A total of 27 discrete models, which included multiple updates  based on the
previous model results, were developed. In total, several hundred design iterations were
evaluated.

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In addition to performing a crash analysis of the Phase 2 model, Lotus analyzed the body
structure cost. This study is included in this report. Lotus also investigated the assembly
process to ensure the low-mass BIW can be constructed. A complete new body in white
assembly plant was engineered to build the multi-material body. This study is included in
the Appendix, including financials. Further iterations of the body structure were developed
to improve the build process, minimize tooling and processing expenses, and to reduce the
cost of the body. This methodology is used by industry to develop production vehicles.

   2.3.     Results

This analysis applied state-of-the-art computer simulation modeling to develop and confirm
a lightweight and commercially feasible body structure for a midsized passenger car or
sport utility vehicle concept meets or exceeds the demands of modern automobiles in
terms of size, cargo volume, comfort, crashworthiness, and structural integrity. The mass-
reduced vehicle's BIW structure, the primary vehicle system involved with overall
passenger safety, was developed and validated in this study. The vehicle simulation
demonstrated and validated that a 32 percent mass-reduced vehicle with a 37 percent
lighter body structure has the potential to meet U.S. federal impact requirements including
side impacts and door beam intrusion (FMVSS 214), seatbelt loading (FMVSS 210), child
tether loadings (FMVSS 213), front and rear end chassis frame load buckling stability, full
frontal crash stiffness and body compatibility (FMVSS 208), and frame validation under
low-speed bumper impact loads ('bumper A-surface offsets,' as defined by the Insurance
Institute for Highway Safety.
   2.4.     Conclusions

This engineering study successfully achieved its objectives of developing a low mass body
structure and validating the crash performance of an over 30 percent mass-reduced
vehicle. This was achieved through a holistic vehicle redesign. The analysis results
indicate that such a vehicle could meet FMVSS and IIHS safety requirements. Final
vehicle design began with a 2009 Toyota Venza crossover vehicle and integrated relatively
large quantities of advanced materials (e.g. advanced high-strength steels, aluminum,
magnesium, and composites) and advanced designs and bonding techniques to  achieve a
substantial vehicular mass reduction without degrading size, utility, safety, or performance.
Overall, vehicle body mass was reduced by 37 percent (141  kg), which contributed to a
total vehicle mass reduction of 31 percent (527 kg) including the mass of other vehicle
systems (interior, suspension, closures, chassis, etc.) which were optimized in a  holistic
redesign as part  of the Phase 1 study. Additionally, this mass reduction was achieved
using a parallel-hybrid drivetrain, suggesting that with a lighter non-hybrid drivetrain, it may
be possible to further reduce vehicle mass while maintaining equivalent performance.

This project uses emerging technologies, advanced materials, state-of-the-art
manufacturing and bonding techniques, and innovative design to develop a low-mass
vehicle that meets or exceeds modern vehicle demands in terms of functionality,  safety,
and structural integrity. The study developed a mass-reduced vehicle and validated that it

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achieves best-in-class stiffness and meets U.S. federal safety requirements as well as
IIHS guidelines. This work indicates it is technically feasible to develop a 30-percent lighter
crossover vehicle without compromising size, utility, or performance and still meet
regulatory and consumer safety demands.

The mass-reduced design presented in this study resulted in an increased body-in-white
cost, but a reduced overall vehicle cost. The estimation of the BIW piece cost suggests an
increase of 160 percent - over $700 - for the 37-percent mass-reduced body-in-white.
Including the estimated manufacturing and assembly costs, this cost increase decreases
to $239 due primarily to the reduced parts count. When considering the comprehensive
vehicle redesign - including body and non-body components - the Phase 2 High
Development vehicle achieves a 32-percent mass reduction along with an estimated cost
reduction of less than one percent, including amortizing the cost of a new body plant over
a three year period. This cost reduction is based on tooling and assembly savings and the
cost reductions contributed by non-body systems.

This study illustrates how a holistic, total vehicle approach to system mass and cost
reductions can help offset the additional cost of a 37 percent mass reduced body structure.
This study also estimates how these mass reductions and costs scale to other vehicle
classes, finding that roughly similar mass-reduction  and associated costs can be applied to
other models  ranging from subcompact cars to full-sized light trucks.

This study's findings also indicate that the 30 percent mass-reduced vehicle can be cost-
effectively mass-produced in the 2020 timeframe with known materials and techniques.  It
is estimated with high confidence that the assembly and tooling costs of the new mass-
reduced body design would have greatly reduced tooling costs due to the substantial
reduction in parts required, from  419 parts in the baseline body structure to 169 parts in
the low-mass design. By factoring in the manufacturability of the materials and designs
into the fundamental design process, it is  expected that, not only will this type of design  be
production-ready in 2020, but it also has the potential for wide commercialization in the
2025 timeframe.

      2.5   Recommendations

A multi-material body structure should be  built and tested to physically evaluate its
structural characteristics for stiffness and  modals  (frequency response) using non-
destructive  testing methods.

Additionally, it is recommended that a low mass vehicle be constructed using the Lotus
designed BIW presented in this study, fitted with components duplicating the non-body
system masses, and then be evaluated for FMVSS impact performance and occupancy
protection by NHTSA.

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3.    Glossary of Terms, Abbreviations, and Symbols

3D
Three dimensional. Something having three dimensions e.g. width, length, and depth.

5th Percentile Female
This represents a very small woman; 95 percent of women are larger than a 5th percentile
female.

99th Percentile Male
This  represents a very large man; this size man is larger than 98 percent of the male
population.

A arm
In automotive suspension systems, a control arm (sometimes called a wishbone or A-arm)
is a nearly flat and roughly triangular member (or sub-frame) that pivots in two places. The
broad end of the triangle attaches at the frame and pivots on a bushing. The narrow end
attaches to the steering knuckle and pivots on a ball joint.

'A' Pillar
An A pillar is a name applied by car stylists and enthusiasts to the shaft of material that
supports the windshield (windscreen) on either of the windshield frame  sides. By denoting
this structural  member  as  the  A-pillar,  and  each successive vertical support in  the
greenhouse  after a successive letter in the alphabet (B-pillar, C-pillar etc.), car designers
and those interested in  car design have common  points of reference when discussing
vehicle design elements.

ABS (material)
Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) is a common thermoplastic used to make light, rigid,
molded products.

Al or Alum.
Aluminum.

'B' pillar
See 'A' Pillar.

BH or Bake Hardenable Steel
A bake-hardenable steel is any steel that exhibits a capacity for a significant increase in
strength through the combination of work hardening  during part formation and strain aging
during a subsequent thermal cycle such as a paint-baking operation.

A Segment
Vehicle classification used in Europe, equivalent to the American microcar and some
subcom pacts.

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B Segment
Vehicle classification used in Europe, equivalent to the American subcompact.

C Segment
Vehicle classification used in Europe, equivalent to the American compact.

D Segment
Vehicle classification used in Europe, equivalent to the American midsize.

E Segment
Vehicle classification used in Europe, equivalent to the American fullsize

Belt Line
The beltline, also known as the waistline in the UK, is the horizontal or slightly inclined line
below the side windows of  a vehicle, starting from the hood and running to the trunk. It
separates the glass area (the greenhouse) from the lower body.

BIW
BIW stands for body-in-white.  All activities  in the production of a vehicle body or shell
before it goes to the paint shop are done in a weld shop and  the end product of a weld
shop is referred to as a BIW.

BOM
Bill of materials is a list of  the raw materials, sub-assemblies, intermediate assemblies,
sub-components,  components, parts,  cost,  and the  quantities of each needed  to
manufacture an end item (final product).

'C' Pillar
See 'A' Pillar.

C Segment
Vehicle classification used in Europe, equivalent to the American compact.

CAD
Computer-aided design is the use of computer technology for the design of objects, real or
virtual.

CAE
Computer-aided engineering is the use of information technology to support engineers in
tasks such as analysis, simulation, design, manufacturing, planning, diagnosis, and repair.
GARB
California Air Resources Board

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CG
Center of gravity.  The center of gravity or center of mass of a system of particles  is a
specific point  where, for many purposes, the system behaves as  if  its mass were
concentrated there.

Class A surface
A term used in automotive design to describe a set of freeform surfaces of high resolution
and quality.

Closures
A term  used to  describe any aperture that can be  opened on  a vehicle.  This includes
doors, hoods, decklids and tailgates.

CO
Chemical shorthand for carbon monoxide - a colorless, odorless, and tasteless, yet highly
toxic gas. Exists as a gas in Earth's atmosphere at standard temperature and pressure.

C02
Chemical shorthand for carbon  dioxide, a chemical compound composed of two oxygen
atoms covalently bonded to a single carbon atom. It is a gas at standard temperature and
pressure and exists in Earth's atmosphere in this state.

Composite
Composite materials  are engineered  materials made  from  two  or  more  constituent
materials with significantly different physical or chemical  properties which remain separate
and distinct on a  macroscopic level within the finished structure.

CSA
Cross sectional area. In geometry, a cross-section is the intersection of a body in 2-
dimensional space with a  line, or of a body in 3-dimensional space with a plane, etc. More
plainly, when cutting an object into slices one gets many parallel cross-sections.

CUV
Crossover utility  vehicle.  Crossover is a marketing term for a vehicle derived from a car
platform but borrows features from a Sport Utility Vehicle (SUV).

'D' Pillar
See 'A' Pillar.

DLO
Daylight opening. Automotive industry term for glassed-in areas of a vehicle's cabin

DP or Dual Phase Steel
Dual-phase  steel (DPS) is a  high-strength  steel  that  has  a  ferrite and  martensitic
microstructure. DPS  starts  as a low or medium carbon  steel  and is  quenched from  a
temperature above A1 but below A3 on a continuous cooling transformation diagram. This

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results in a microstructure consisting of a soft ferrite matrix containing islands of martensite
as the secondary phase (martensite increases the tensile strength). The desire to produce
high strength steels with formability greater than micro-alloyed steel led the development
of DPS in the 1970s.

EPA
United States Environmental Protection Agency.

FEA
Finite element analysis. A computational  method  of stress  calculation  in  which the
component under load  is considered as a large number of small pieces ('elements'). The
FEA software is then  able to  calculate the  stress  level  in  each element,  allowing  a
prediction of deflection or failure

FEM
Front end module. An  assembly or complex structure which includes the content of what
was previously multiple separate parts.

FMVSS
FMVSS is the acronym for Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard.  FMVSS norms are
administered by the United States Department  of Transportation's National Highway Traffic
Safety Administration.

FR plastic
Fiber reinforced plastic.  Fiber-reinforced plastics (FRP) (also fiber-reinforced polymer) are
composite materials made of a polymer matrix  reinforced with fibers.

Fit
Front

FWD
Front-wheel drive is a form of engine/transmission layout used in motor vehicles, where
the engine drives the front wheels only.

GAWR
Gross axle weight rating is  the maximum distributed weight that may be supported by an
axle of a road vehicle.  Typically GAWR is followed by either the letters F, FR, R or RR
which indicate Front or Rear axles.

GVW or GVWR
A gross vehicle weight rating is the maximum allowable  total weight of a road vehicle or
trailer when loaded - i.e., including the  weight of the  vehicle itself plus fuel, passengers,
cargo, and trailer tongue weight.

HIC

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Head injury criterion. The head injury criterion is a measure of the likelihood of head injury
arising from an impact.
HP
Horsepower (hp or HP or Hp) is  the  name of several non-Si units of power.   One
mechanical horsepower of 550 foot-pounds per second is equivalent to 745.7 watts.

HSS
High strength steel is low carbon steel with minute amounts of molybdenum, niobium,
titanium,  and/or vanadium.  Is sometimes  used to  refer to high strength  low alloy steel
(HSLA) or to the entire group of engineered alloys of steels developed for high strength. .

ICE
Internal  combustion engine. The internal combustion engine  is an engine in which the
combustion of a fuel occurs with an oxidizer (usually air) in a combustion chamber.

IIHS
The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety is a U.S. non-profit organization  funded by auto
insurers.  It works to reduce the number of motor vehicle crashes, and the rate of injuries
and amount of property damage in vehicle crashes. It carries out research and produces
ratings for popular passenger vehicles as well as for certain consumer products such as
child car booster seats.

ISOFIX
The international standard for attachment points for child safety  seats in passenger cars.
The system  is also known as LATCH ('Lower Anchors and Tethers for Children') in the
United States and LUAS ('Lower Universal Anchorage System') or  Canfix in  Canada.   It
has also been called the 'Universal Child Safety Seat System' or UCSSS.

IP
Instrument panel. A dashboard, dash, 'dial and switch housing' or fascia, (chiefly in British
English) is a control panel  located under the windshield of an  automobile.  It contains the
instrumentation and controls pertaining to the operation of the vehicle. During the design
phase of an automobile, the dashboard or instrument panel may be abbreviated as 'IP'.

kg
Kilogram, unit of weight, 1  kg = 2.205 pounds.

kW
The kilowatt equal to one-thousand watts, is typically used to state the power output of
engines and the power consumption  of tools and machines. A  kilowatt is approximately
equivalent to 1.34 horsepower.

kWh
The  kilowatt hour,  or watt-hour, (symbol W-h, W  h)  is a unit of  energy equal to 3.6
kilojoules. Energy in watt hours is the multiplication of power in watts and time in hours.
                                        10

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LATCH
Lower Anchors and Tethers for Children.  See ISOFIX.

LCA
Lower control arm.  See A arm.

LF
Left Front, e.g. left front door.

LH
Left hand

mA3 or m3 or m3
Meters cubed or cubic meters, measure of volume.

mJ
Millijoules.  The joule (symbol J), named for James Prescott Joule, is the derived unit of
energy in the International System of Units.  It is the energy exerted by a force of one
newton acting to move an object through a distance of one metre.  1 mJ = 2.77x10"7 Watt
hours.

mm
Millimeters, unit of length, 1 mm = 0.03937 inches.

Monocoque
Monocoque, from Greek for single (mono) and French for shell (coque), is a construction
technique that supports  structural load by using an object's external skin as opposed to
using an internal frame or  truss that is  then covered with a  non-load-bearing  skin.
Monocoque  construction was first widely used in aircraft in the  1930s. Structural skin or
stressed skin are other terms for the same concept.  Unibody,  or unitary construction, is a
related construction technique for automobiles in which the  body is integrated into a single
unit with the chassis rather than having a separate body-on-frame.  The welded 'Unit Body'
is the predominant automobile construction technology today.

LWR
Lower

Mg
Magnesium

Modal
Modal refers to the natural frequency of a specific point on a vehicle structure, e.g., a seat
mount; it is essential that the modal frequency be separated from vehicle input frequencies
so that suspension inputs and powertrain responses do not excite structural elements at
their natural frequency causing vibrations.
                                        11

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MPa
Mega Pascals, unit of pressure or stress, 1 MPa = 145 Pounds per square inch.

MPV
Multi-purpose  vehicle, people-carrier,  people-mover or multi-utility  vehicle (shortened
MUV) is a type of automobile similar in shape to a van that is designed for personal use.
Minivans are taller than  a sedan,  hatchback or a station wagon, and are designed for
maximum interior room.

MS
Mild steel or Carbon steel, also called plain carbon steel, is steel where the main alloying
constituent is carbon.

MSRP
The (manufacturer's) suggested retail price, list price or recommended retail price (RRP) of
a product is the price the  manufacturer recommends that the retailer sell it for.

MY
Model year.  The model  year of a product is a number used worldwide, but with a high
level of prominence in North America, to describe  approximately when a product was
produced, and indicates the coinciding base specification of that product.

NCAP
The European New Car Assessment Program  (Euro  NCAP) is a European  car safety
performance assessment program founded in 1997 by the Transport Research Laboratory
for the UK Department for Transport and now the standard throughout Europe.

NHTSA
The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA, often pronounced 'nit-suh') is
an agency of the Executive Branch of the U.S. Government,  part of the Department of
Transportation.

NOX
NOX is a generic term for  mono-nitrogen oxides (NO and NCb).

NPI
New product introduction.

NVH
Noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH), also known as noise and  vibration (N&V),  is the
study  and modification of the noise and vibration characteristics of vehicles, particularly
cars and trucks.

OD
Outer diameter. Outside diameter of a circular object.
                                       12

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OEM
Original  equipment  manufacturer.  The OEM  definition  in  the  automobile  industry
constitutes a federally-licensed entity required to warrant and/or guarantee their products,
unlike 'aftermarket' which is not legally bound to a government-dictated level of liability.

OTR
Outer

PA
Polyamide, a polymer containing monomers of amides joined by peptide bonds. They can
occur both naturally, examples  being proteins, such as wool and silk,  and can be made
artificially  through step-growth  polymerization, examples  being nylons, aramids,  and
sodium poly(aspartate).

PC
Polycarbonates are a particular group of thermoplastic polymers.

PHEV
A  plug-in  hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) is  a hybrid vehicle with batteries  that can be
recharged by connecting a plug to an electric power source. It shares the characteristics of
both traditional hybrid electric  vehicles (also called charge-maintaining hybrid electric
vehicles), with an electric motor and an  internal combustion engine, and of battery electric
vehicles, also having a plug to connect to the  electrical grid (it is a plug-in vehicle).

PP
Polypropylene or polypropene is a thermoplastic polymer, made by the chemical industry
and used in a wide variety of applications.

PPO
Poly(p-phenylene oxide), is a high-performance polymer and an engineering thermoplastic.

PUorPUR
Polyurethane

PVC
Polyvinyl chloride, (IUPAC Poly(chloroethanediyl)) commonly abbreviated  PVC, is the third
most widely used thermoplastic polymer after polyethylene and polypropylene.

QTR
Quarter

Rad
Radiator

Reinf
Reinforcement
                                        13

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RF
Right Front, as for right front door.

RH
Right hand

ROM
Rough order of magnitude. Term used in analysis equating to 'Estimate'

RR
Rear

RWD
Rear-wheel drive is a form of engine/transmission layout used in motor vehicles, where the
engine drives the rear wheels only.

SLA
A  Short-long arm  suspension  is also known as an  unequal length  double wishbone
suspension. The upper arm is typically an A-arm, and is shorter than the lower link, which
is  an A-arm  or an L-arm, or sometimes a pair of tension/compression arms.  In the latter
case the suspension can be called a multi-link, or Dual ball joint suspension.

Strain energy density
Strain  energy density is  a  measurement of the material deflection that occurs when a
component is loaded with a force or torque

Stress is the relationship between strain and the material modulus and is defined as force
divided by unit area (stress = strain x material modulus)

System
Nine separate system categories were created that included all vehicle components. The
systems are: body structure, closures, front and rear bumpers, glazing, interior, chassis, air
conditioning, electrical/lighting and powertrain.

Sub-system
A major assembly within a given system, e.g., a seat is a sub-system in the Interior system

SUV
A  sport utility vehicle is a generic marketing term applied to some unibody and body-on-
frame light trucks and station wagons.

Topology analysis
A  means of determining strain energy densities for a CAD model with defined interior and
exterior dimensions.  This methodology creates relative strain energy  densities as  a
function of the available geometry and material utilized. This analysis is used to minimize
                                        14

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material utilization and to  maximize section inertias based on the material strain energy
densities and the section geometry.

TRIP steel
TRIP steel  is a high-strength steel typically used in the automotive industry. TRIP stands
for  'transformation  induced plasticity.'  TRIP  steel  has a  triple  phase microstructure
consisting  of  ferrite,  bainite,  and retained  austenite.  During  plastic deformation and
straining,   the  metastable  austenite   phase  is  transformed  into   martensite.   This
transformation allows for enhanced strength and ductility.

TRL
TRL is an acronym for Technology Readiness Level'. TRL is defined, for the purposes of
this  study,  as  a  technology that  is considered feasible for volume  production at the
inception of a new vehicle  program, i.e.,  approximately 3 years prior to  start of production.
The technology may be proven at the time of the new vehicle program start or is expected
to be proven early in the production design process so that there is no risk anticipated at
the targeted timing for production launch.

UHSS
UHSS stand for ultra high strength steel - dual phase  UHSS typically has tensile strengths
from 500 MPA to 1000 MPa while low  carbon martensite has tensile strengths ranging
from 800 MPa to 1500 MPa (based on published Auto Steel Partnership definitions)

US or U.S.
United States of America

UTS
Ultimate tensile strength.

V
The volt is the SI derived unit of electromotive force, commonly called Voltage'.

Whse
Wheelhouse

YS
Yield strength  or yield point of a material is defined in engineering and materials science
as the stress at which a material begins to deform plastically.
                                        15

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4. Report: Demonstrating the Safety and Crashworthiness of a
   2020 Model-Year, Mass-Reduced Crossover Vehicle


   4.1.     Introduction

In response to concerns about the impact of climate change on the economy and the
health and welfare of its citizens, the State of California has taken steps to reduce
greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the vehicle fleet as part of the larger effort to
reduce GHG emissions from the state as a whole. To that end, California passed The
Global Warming Solutions act of 2006 (known as AB 32) in an attempt to reduce GHG
emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. Additionally, 2005 Executive Order S-3-05 set a target
for an 80-percent reduction in GHG emissions from 1990 levels by 2050.  These policies
were preceded by California's 2002 legislation, which led to the Pavley standards (named
after the author of AB 1493) for light-duty vehicle GHG emissions. One approach to
reducing vehicular GHG emissions not considered in the Pavley Standards is vehicle mass
reduction by combining lightweight materials and innovative vehicle design. Emerging
research and technical papers,  along with recent auto industry developments, suggest that
materials such as composites, high strength steels, aluminum, magnesium, and the latest
adhesives integrated into  innovative structures can yield substantial weight savings. The
implications are that this can be done while maintaining or improving current vehicle
characteristics - including safety, noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH) control, durability,
handling, interior volume,  utility, and load carrying capacity - while still meeting current
FMVSS and IIHS safety requirements.

Lotus responded to the Air Resources Board RFP 09-621 entitled 'Computer Simulation to
Optimize the Design of a Lightweight  Light-Duty Vehicle and Demonstrate its
Crashworthiness' with a proposal to develop a solution to substantially reduce body
structure mass relative to  a current production crossover utility vehicle (CUV) in a cost
effective manner for the 2020 - 2025 timeframe. The baseline CUV, a 2009 Toyota Venza,
established the geometric and volumetric parameters as well as the reduced mass target.
The low-mass vehicle maintained the same interior and cargo volume as  the baseline
vehicle. GARB contracted Lotus to initiate this study in July 2010.

Key features of this proposal included: 1. developing a topology analysis using key inputs
of the proposed body to develop optimized load paths for structure and impact
performance using a 3D CAD model and finite element analysis; 2. generating a
representative total vehicle model including system masses (less powertrain) and 3.
creating a CAD model of the topology-developed body structure. This optimized and
meshed model served as  the starting point for the FEA impact and structural studies
including front,  rear and side impact, roof crush, seatbelt and tether loadings, and low
speed bumper impact strains. Altair/OptiStruct® software was used for the topology
analysis.
                                       16

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The tests evaluated in this study were:

      FMVSS 208: Front Impact (0°/30° rigid wall, offset deformable barrier)
      FMVSS 210: Seatbelt Anchorages
      FMVSS 213: Child Restraint Systems
      FMVSS 214: Side Impact (side barrier, side pole)
      FMVSS 216: Roof Crush
      FMVSS 301: Rear Impact (moving deformable barrier)
      I IMS: Low Speed Bumper (front & rear)

LS-DYNA® software was used for all impact analysis.

Additionally, MSC/Nastran® software was used to analytically verify body stiffness.

The target weight was a minimum of 30-percent mass reduced vehicle relative to the
baseline 2009 Toyota Venza, less powertrain.

The topology-based CAD model was refined through multiple iterations to meet the impact
and structural requirements while minimizing body structure mass. The final model update
is V26; several hundred iterations were performed to develop this model. An initial Bill of
Materials (BOM) was created and revised throughout the modelling process to reflect
component updates. The BOM included mass, cost, and material for all body structure
components. A final BOM is included in this report in Section 4.4.10. An analysis
examining the potential to extrapolate the low mass  CUV results to other vehicle classes
was also performed as part of this study and is included in Section 4.4.12.

This study utilized Lotus' methodology for engineering a low mass vehicle, which includes:
1. creating efficient  load paths; 2. component integration and part elimination;   3.
structural enhancements through optimized section inertias, an exponential function, vs.
wall thickness increases, a linear function; 4. defining the minimum crush  length targets at
program initiation; 5. selecting world class suppliers  experienced in low mass materials,
structural reinforcements, joining technologies, coatings, adhesives,  costing and
manufacturing to provide input on the design feasibility and cost feedback for the Lotus low
mass body structure and 6. mass decompounding in key areas, such as the
chassis/suspension, as a direct result of reduced mass in other vehicle systems.
                                        17

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   4.2.     Materials and Methods
The following table lists all the tasks as described in Lotus' contract with GARB, the
method Lotus used to complete the task, and the final deliverable product.

                   Table 4.2.a: Overview of the report and tasks
Task 1: Develop a Mass Reduced Body Structure Model
Task
Package study
with respect to
chassis frame
interfaces
FE topology
analysis
CAD geometry
generation for
CAE
optimization
Crash structure
sizing
Concept CAD
design
generation
Detailed FEA
chassis frame
model build
Static
stiffness/joint
sensitivity
analysis
Dynamic body
structure modal
analysis
Method
•Total vehicle package layout defined
•Critical interfaces and functions of current structure defined
•Optimization performed using FEA tools with respect to crash
load paths and frame bending/torsion load paths
•Optimization to identify the structural efficiencies within the
package design space
•From identified structurally efficient load paths, generate concept
design feasible sections with respect to package output to hybrid
beam shape optimization
•Front and rear crash structure energy absorption requirements
using projected vehicle mass
•Energy management strategy devised to suit package and
vehicle architecture
•CAD design of body strucutre created with respect to FEA sizing
results and package
•CAD generation and design updated in conjunction with FEA
analysis
•Detailed FEM built using initial concept CAD model
•Critical interfaces with carryover components included
•Static torsion and bending stiffness tuned in FE environment to
achieve target requirements to support NVH and vehicle ride and
handling objectives
•Joint sensitivity and development conducted in FE environment
•Continual feedback loop to CAD design
•Chassis/body structural modes analyzed and structure developed
to achieve target modal frequencies required to give predicted
trimmed body modal response
•Global chassis design/body shapes identified as well as local
front and rear end modes between 20-150 Hz
Deliverable
•Major structure interfaces identified
•Effective structural package design space
defined
•Mass efficient structural load paths and initial
section moduli defined in FE environment for
output to CAD
•CAD model of initial strucutural concept and
section routing created using FEA results
•Concept design layout defines manufacturing
and technology to be used based on required
section shapes and sizes as well as packagte
and cost
•Front and rear crash structures sized with
respect to energy absorption requirement and
strategy
•3D CAD models of concept body structure
design
•Manufacturing technology to be used is
defined with respect to commercial and
technical objectives
•Detailed FEM of CAD body structure and
associated body structural components
modeled
•Model continually updated during concept
design phase
•Static torsion and vertical/lateral bending
stiffness status for body/chassis structure for
concept design phase
•Chassis/body major mode frequencies
predicted
Task 2: Initial Demonstration of Crashworthiness of 30% Mass Reduced Vehicle
Generate
detailed FEA
model
Side intrusion
FMVSS214
section sizing
•Consolidate Task 1 result into a vehicle body structure model
•Consolidate Task 1 results into a 30-percent mass reduced total
vehicle, less powertrain
•FE analysis used to determine critical section requirements to
achieve side impact intrusion/energy absorption
•Requirements for door mounting support structure determined
and A/B pillar structure sections sized accordingly
•Generate body-in-white model to be used for
FMVSS and IIHS modeling
•Door beam intrusion velocities and
displacement targets predicted. Rocker beam
structural stability achieved to facilitate high
confidence in achieving required side impact
                                      18

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                                                                                 occupant injury level criteria
FMVSS210/213
•Seatbelt and child tether anchorage loads analyzed and efficient
structural load path back into main frame structure devised
•Chassis structure validated for seatbelt
anchorage and child tether loadings
Front and rear
sub-system
crash FEA
•FE validation of front crash structure sizing conducted during
initial chassis architecture concept layout phase using hybrid
model with body representation and detailed energy absorbing
structure
•FE validation of rear crash structure sizing conducted during
initial chassis architecture concept layout phase using hybrid
model with body representation and detailed energy absorbing
structure
•Recovery of loads into main structure in order to determine main
structure in order to determine main structure strength
requirement  for non-deformation during crash (front and rear)
•Section sized for front and rear crash structure
•Chassis frame end load buckling stability
determined
Full vehicle
frontal crash
analysis FMVSS
208
•Using crash structure defined via hybrid model analysis and
chassis structure sized through durability/NVH and static stiffness
•Carryout analysis to confirm compatibility of main chassis
structure with rear energy absorbing sub-system
•Section sizes for front crash structures defined
•Chassis frame rocker beams and passenger
compartment structure section sizes defined to
give adequate support to crash structure
Rear crash
analysis (using
FMVSS 301 as
protocol)
•Using crash structure defined via hybrid model analysis and
chassis structure sized through durability/NVH and static stiffness
•Carryout analysis to confirm compatibility of main chassis
structure with rear energy absorbing sub-system
•Section sizes for front crash structures defined
•Chassis frame rocker beams and passenger
compartment structure section sizes defined to
give adequate support to crash structure
Structure
validation for low
speed bumper
impact loads
(IIHS)
•Using bumper A-surface offsets and generic peak loading
expected for low speed and pendulum impacts, validate frame
structure to minimize plastic strain
•Frame structure sized to give adequate
support to bumper impact loads via A-surface
offsets
Roof crush
FMVSS 216
•Roof crush resistance over the passenger compartment analyzed
and efficient structural load paths devised
•Body structure validated for roof crush
displacement
Trimmed
chassis/body
FEA model build
•Chassis/body structure FE model updated using CAD and FEA
output from concept design phase
•Trimmed body model produced that includes all major body
structural and non-structural masses along with chassis and
powertrain representations
•Crash models generated from master model
•Trimmed chassis/body FE model produced for
use with crash analysis. Model to include all
relevant sub-systems
Front impact FE
crash analysis
•Front crash FE analysis carried out on base model
•Crash analyses conducted:
   -FMVSS 208
   -FMVSS 208/40% OBD (35 mph)
•Crash analyses conducted to validate the following areas:
   -Acceleration pulse analyzed and tuned to meet selected
target
   -Passenger compartment intrusion
•Compare pulse results to baseline vehicle using public domain
test results
•Body structure CAE validated to attain target
crash acceleration pulse and intrusion level
targets
•Body structure crash performance validated to
provide good basis for restraint system to
achieve legislative occupant injury criteria
Side impact FE
crash analysis
•Side impact FE analysis to validate vehicle frame design for
generic acceleration pulse and intrusion requirements
•Crash analyses:
   -FMVSS 214 oblique pole
   -FMVSS 214 deformable barrier (33.5 mph)
•Body structure validated to attain target side
impact acceleration pulse and intrusion level
targets
•Body structure crash performance validated to
provide acceptable basis for restraint/interior
trim system to achieve legislative occupant
injury criteria	
                                                             19

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Rear impact FE
crash analysis
Finalized
engineering
CAD design
•Rear crash FE analysis carried out on base model
•Crash analysis conducted to validate the following areas:
-Acceleration pulse analyzed and tuned to meet internal target
-General crush distances and impact on fuel system integrity
•Design of body structure completed
•Body structure ready for tooling release phase
•Plant processing defined
•Costed bill of materials completed
•Body structure validated to attain target fuel
system integrity and intrusion level targets
consistent with federal requirements
•Final CAD design that meets analysis and
vehicle integration functions and is feasible
from a processing standpoint
•Mass reduction summary vs. baseline
completed
•Cost impact summary vs. baseline completed
Task 3: Develop Engineering Bill of Materials
Develop
engineering bill
of materials
•Create bill of materials tracking: 1 . body structure, 2. materials, 3.
cost with supporting data
•Utilize bill of materials to track parts, cost, mass, and materials
throughout project
•Create initial bill of materials early in program
and update on regular basis
•Create final bill of materials based on
optimized and validated body structure and
compare to baseline
Task 4: Extension of Results to Other Vehicle Classes
Extrapolate
design results
into other
vehicle sizes
and classes
•Provide guidance on using developed body structure for other
vehicle size and weight classes
•Provide guidance on materials, components, sub-systems,
systems, and processes relative to utilization on other vehicle
classes
•Create a bill of materials study extrapolating
finalized CUV body structure into other vehicle
classes with feasibility analysis discussion
document
Reporting
•Provide bi-monthly progress reports
•Provide interim reports at the end of each of the four tasks
•Provide final report draft ninety days prior to contract termination date
•Provide amended final report using State input within 45 days or earlier following receipt of State comments
•Deliver State-approved amended final report in multi-media form within two weeks of State approval
20

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      4.2.1.      Model Creation

Lotus created the body of this 'Phase 2' vehicle model using the exterior styling and other
non-body components from the 2010 Lotus study's High Development vehicle, referred to
as the 'Phase 1' design. Figures 4.2.1.a and 4.2.1.cshow the front and rear exterior
design, which is derived from the baseline Toyota Venza shown in Figures 4.2.1.b and
4.2.1 .d. The Phase 1 High Development vehicle served as the basis for the CAD design
and individual components were developed based on the Phase 1 HD body and assigned
part numbers. These parts created the basis for the BOM included in Section 4.4.12. The
BIW CAD part numbering has been incorporated - with some modification - into the CAE
model to cross-reference the parts listed in the BOM. See Section 4.4.12 for the complete
CAD parts list definition which is included in the BOM. As an example the Panel Body-side
Outer LH has a CAD part ID 7306-2300-185; the equivalent CAE part id is #231850
(station id, last three numbers from part id, plus additional 0 to allow for multiple gauge
definitions).Parts in the CAE model that need to be defined with a heat affected zone
material definition are in the 1,000,000 range (i.e. CAE part 231850 heat affected zone ID
1231850). Unless otherwise noted as the baseline Venza or the Phase 1 design (both of
which are referenced for context herein), the diagrams, text, and results in this study are  of
the Phase 2 High Development design.
      Figure 4.2.1.a: Phase 1 High Development Model Exterior Styling - Front
                                       21

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Figure 4.2.1.b:  Baseline Toyota Venza Exterior Styling - Front
Figure 4.2.1.c:  Phase 1 High Development Model Exterior Styling - Rear
Figure 4.2.1.d:  Baseline Toyota Venza Exterior Styling - Rear
                                  22

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The complete vehicle model is broken down into sub-models, which were also used for
CAE analysis, as follows:

         4.2.1.1.   BIW
                      Figure 4.2.1.1.a: Body-in-white - Front

         4.2.1.2.  Simulated Doors (beams only)
                     Figure 4.2.1.2.a: Simulated door beams
                                     23

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4.2.1.3.  Front Sub-frame/Suspension
        Figure 4.2.1.3.a: Front sub-frame and suspension
4.2.1.4.  Rear Sub-frame/Suspension
        Figure 4.2.1.4.a: Rear sub-frame and suspension
                           24

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4.2.1.5.  Cooling Pack/Front Under Hood
            Figure 4.2.1.5.a: Cooling and under hood
4.2.1.6.  Powertrain/Exhaust
            Figure 4.2.1.6.a: Powertrain and exhaust
                           25

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4.2.1.7.   Fuel Tank/Battery
                Figure 4.2.1.7.a: Fuel tank/battery
                             26

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      4.2.2.
Material Data
The vehicle design incorporated a number of different material types. Physical properties
were obtained for the materials that were to be used and these were included in the CAE
model simulations. Alcoa, Allied Composite Technologies, Henkel and Meridian supplied
material properties for aluminum, composites, adhesives/mastics/composites and
magnesium, respectively. The following is a list of these materials and the sources.
         4.2.2.1.  Steel
                             HSLA - Generic (Matweb):
                            Young's Modulus (E) = 210,OOOMPa
                                 Poisson's Ratio (v) = 0.3
                               Yield Stress (oy) = SOOMPa
                              Density (p) = 7.8e~9tonnes/mm3
                                           Steel SOOMPa
                       400


                       350


                       300


                       250


                       200


                       150


                       100 -


                       50
                        0
                         0.00  0.01  0.02  0.03  0.04  0.05  0.06  0.07  0.08  0.09  0.10
                                             Strain

                 Figure 4.2.2.1.a: Steel stress-strain curve at 300 MPa
                                        27

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            400MPa - Generic (Matweb):
            Young's Modulus (E) = 210,OOOMPa
                  Poisson's Ratio (v) = 0.3
                Yield Stress (oy) = 400MPa
              Density (p) = 7.8e~9tonnes/mm3
                        Steel 400MPa Door Beam
     1600
     1400 -
     1200
     1000 - j
       0.00 0.02  0.04 0.06  0.08 0.10 0.12  0.14 0.16  0.18 0.20 0.22  0.24
                              Strain

Figure 4.2.2.1.b: Steel stress-strain curve at 400 MPa

       Hot Stamped Boron - Generic (Matweb):
            Young's Modulus (E) = 210,OOOMPa
                  Poisson's Ratio (v) = 0.3
                Yield  Stress (oy) = 400MPa
               Density (p) = 7.8e~9tonnes/mm3
                       Steel Hot Stamped Boron Steel
     1800
     1600 "
     1400 -
     1200
     1000 -
     800 -
     600-
     400 -
     200 -
       000
             002
                                               014
                                                    016
4.2.2.1.c: Hot-stamped, boron steel stress-strain curve
                         28

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   4.2.2.2. Aluminum
               AL 6013-T6 (Alcoa, Ed Forsythe 10/09/27):
                      Young's Modulus (E) = 70,OOOMPa
                           Poisson's Ratio (v) = 0.33
                          Yield Stress (oy) = 360MPa
                        Density (p) = 2.79e~9tonnes/mm3
          Stress vs. Plastic Strain (i.e. post yield) as per following curve
                                      AL6013-T6
                 450
                 400 -

                 350 -'

                 300 •'

                 250

                 200 -

                 150 -

                 100 -

                 50 -

                  0
                                                              0.07
                   0.00    0.01    0.02    0.03    0.04    0.05   0.06
                                        Strain

           Figure 4,2.2,2.a: 6013 aluminum stress-strain curve

AL 6022-T4 plus 20min Paint Bake @ 170°C (Alcoa, Ed Forsythe 10/09/27):
                       Young's Modulus (E) = 70,OOOMPa
                           Poisson's Ratio (v) = 0.33
                          Yield Stress (oy) = 172MPa
                       Density (p) = 2.79e~9tonnes/mm3
                                      AL 6022-T4
                 300
                 250 -
                 200 -
                 150
                   0.00  0.02   0.04   0.06   0.08  0.10  012   014   0.16   0.18
                 100
           Figure 4.2,2.2,b: 6022 aluminum stress-strain curve
                                  29

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    AL 6061-T6 (Alcoa, Ed Forsythe 10/09/23):
           Young's Modulus (E) = 70,OOOMPa
                Poisson's Ratio (v) = 0.33
               Yield Stress (oy) = 308MPa
            Density (p) = 2.79e~9tonnes/mm3
                            6061-T6
     400


     350


     300 -


     250


     200 -


     150 -


     100


      50


       0
       0.00    0.01    0.02    0.03    0.04     0.05    0.06    0.07
                             Strain
Figure 4.2,2.2.c: 6061 aluminum stress-strain curve
    AL 6063-T6 (Alcoa, Ed Forsythe 10/09/27):
           Young's Modulus (E) = 70,OOOMPa
                Poisson's Ratio (v) = 0.33
               Yield Stress (oy) = 220MPa
             Density (p) = 2.79e~9tonnes/mm3
     300
     250 -
     200
     150 -
     100 -
      50 -
       0.00
                           AL 6063-T6
              001
                    0.02
                          0.03    0.04
                             Strain
                                       005
                                             0.06
                                                   0.07
Figure 4.2.2.2.d: 6063 aluminum stress-strain curve
                        30

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                       300
                       250 -
                               A356-T061 (Matweb):
                            Young's Modulus (E) = 72,400MPa
                                 Poisson's Ratio (v) = 0.33
                                Yield Stress (oy) = 179MPa
                              Density (p) = 2.79e~9tonnes/mm3
                                           AL A356-OT61
                         0.00     0.01     0.02     0.03     0,04     0.05     0.06
                                              Strain
                  Figure 4.2.2.2.e: 6013 aluminum stress-strain curve
Heat affected zones with 'seam' welding were modeled with reduced material properties.
Based on experience, a 40-percent reduction in the base material was used (i.e. for 6061-
T6 a yield stress of 184.8MPa was used).
                                        31

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4.2.2.3.  Magnesium
          AM60 (Meridian Lightweight Technologies Inc.):
                   Young's Modulus (E) = 45000MPa
                       Poisson's Ratio (v) = 0.35
                      Yield Stress (oy) = 130MPa
                    Density (p) = 1.81e~9tonnes/mm3
                   Major In-Plane Failure Strain = 6%
             300
                                  AM60
               0.00
                                                0.10
                                                       0.12
       Figure 4.2.2.3.a: AM60 magnesium stress-strain curve
                              32

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   4.2.2.4. Composites

        Nylon_45_2a (Henkel Corporation - Uhlas Grover 11/24/10)
                       Young's Modulus (E) = 7470MPa
                           Poisson's Ratio (v) = 0.35
                         Yield Stress (oy) = 26.4MPa
                       Density (p) = 1.13e~9tonnes/mm3
                                      Nylon-45-2a
                 120
                 100 -'
                 80 -
                 40
                 20
                  0.00    0.10     0.20     0.30     0.40     0.50     0.60
                                        Strain

             Figure 4.2.2.4.a: 45-2a nylon stress-strain curve
PET 60% glass Fill (Allied Composite Technologies-Tom Russell 11/02/10)
                   Young's Modulus (E) = 16,OOOMPa
                        Poisson's Ratio (v) = 0.35
                      Yield Stress (oy) = 31 OMPa
                    Density (p) = 1.89e-9tonnes/mm3

                                PET 60% glass fill
35U

300 "
250 "
200 "
150 "
100 -
50 "
















































































             000  0.01  0,02   0.03  0.04   0.05  0.06   0.07  0.08  0.09  0.10
                                    Strain

      Figure 4.2.2.4.b: 60-percent glass-fiber PET stress-strain curve
                                  33

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         4.2.2.5. Adhesives/Mastics/Composites

             Terocore-1811 (Henkel Corporation - Uhlas Grover 11/24/10)
                           ' Young's Modulus (E) = 1226MPa
                                Poisson's Ratio (v) = 0.194
                               Yield Stress (ay) = 18.7MPa ^
                              Density (p) = 4.8e~10tonnes/mm3
                                          Terocore-1811
aj


16 '
14 "
y 12-
L
1 .
8
6 "
4 ~
2 "














































































































                       0.00  0.01   0.02  0.03  0.04  0.05  0.06  0.07  0.08  0.09  0.10
                                            Strain

                  Figure 4.2.2.5.a: 1811 Terocore stress-strain curve

                      Terokal_5089_23c (Henkel Corporation -
                  tensile_test_5080_report_sr00482_10_20_08.pdf)
                             Young's Modulus (E) = 1649MPa
                                Poisson's Ratio (v) = 0.412
                               Yield Stress (oy) = 3.434MPa
                                            Terokal
                       45
                         0.00  0.02  0.04  006  0.08  0.10   0.12  0.14  0.16  0.18  0.20
                                             Strain
                     Figure 4.2.2.5,b: Terokal stress-strain curve

Note: all values shown in material curves above are true stress/true strain
                                        34

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4.2.3.     Material Usage (location in vehicle)

Key:

Silver-Aluminum
Purple - Magnesium
Blue - Composite
Red - Steel
   Figure 4.2,3.a: Body-in-white material usage front three-quarter view
                              35

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Figure 4.2.3.b: Body-in-white material usage rear three-quarter view
   Figure 4.2.3.c: Body-in-white material usage underbody view
                              36

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              Figure 4.2.3.d: Body-in-white material usage blow-up view
      4.2.4.       Joining Methodologies

The components in the vehicle are attached using a variety of different joining techniques
including MIG welds, friction stir welds, rivets (including flow drill screws), and adhesives.

For the 'point' connection entities, a nominal pitch of 75 mm was used. In areas with higher
loads the pitch was reduced to ~50 mm.

Material samples were provided by Alcoa, Allied Composite Technologies, Meridian, and
Henkel.  Material treatments and joining methodologies based on materials interfaces are
as follows:
   •   Friction stir welds were used to join aluminum components (Kawasaki method)
   •   Aluminum-magnesium joints were secured using mechanical fastners
   •   Magnesium samples were treated with Henkel's Alodine coating for galvanic
      isolation
   •   Aluminum coupons were anodized
                                       37

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   •  Magnesium coupons were pretreated with Alodine - a production requirement to
      prevent a galvanic reaction with the aluminum (used by Ford on the Flex front
      structure)

Material lap-shear tests were carried out by Henkel & Kawasaki to empirically determine
the properties for the joints. Results are shown in Figure 4.2.4.a.
                         Specimen 1 to 5
l^UU
1000
e 800
J3
-o 600
ro
o
-1 400
200
n



•

i 	




/
/



^
'


-



^ A
A
A.
	 [



A
T 1

I















A


Specimen #
1
2
3
4


        0.00  0.01  0.02  0,03  0.04  0.05  0,06 0.07  O.OS  0.09  0.10  0.11
                           Tensile extension (in)

                  Figure 4.2.4.a: Henkel & Kawasaki lap-shear tests

A CAE model was created to correlate the values from the lab testing to those used in the
CAE model based on an average test value. A shear failure force of 3860 N was used for
the LS-DYNA® *MAT_SPOTWELD modeling.

Joints using mechanical fasteners were modeled using 5 mm diameter bolts with a
minimum shear failure force of 10,000 N. This force equates to a minimum shear stress of
~130MPa.

Henkel supplied the Terokal 5089  adhesive and the material properties. Lap-shear tests on
the Terokal only joints were carried out by Henkel. The results showed that the bond joint
fails and not the adhesive, and as  such, the model assumes there is  no failure of the
adhesive bond.

The following summarizes the tests that were carried out:

Terokal Only Lap Shear Test

Bondline: 0.25 mm, Bake: 10 min Metal Temp @ 155°C, Pull Speed: 10 mm/min,
Treatment: AM60B treated with Alodine

   •  AL6061 to AL6061: Lap Shear - 35.8 MPa
   •  AL6061 to AM60B: Lap Shear - 29.5 MPa
                                       38

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   .  AL6061 to AL6061: Lap Shear - 20.5 MPa

The aluminum joint failures listed above are of a peel type, which results in a partial
adhesive failure at the edge of the joint. A similar peel-type failure was seen in the
magnesium joints. Here however, the adhesive removed the Alodine pretreatment, causing
the failure.

      4.2.5.      Model Mass/Other Information

The total model weight was adjusted to the target curb weight of 1150 kg. This mass is
based on the Phase 2 body mass and the Phase 1 High Development masses in An
Assessment of Mass Reduction Opportunities for a 2017 - 2020 Model Year Vehicle
Program published in March 2010
,2
The non-body system masses for the Phase 1 study, along with the baseline system
masses, are shown below in Table 4.2.5.a.
Table 4.2. 5. a: Phase 1 High Development System Masses
System
Closures/Fenders
Bumpers
Thermal
Electrical
Interior
Lighting
Suspension/Chassis
Glazing
Miscellaneous
Powertrain

Totals
Venza Baseline Mass (kg)
143.02
17.95
9.25
23.6
250.6
9.9
378.9
43.71
30.1
410.16

1317.19
Phase 1 HD Mass (kg)
83.98
15.95
9.25
15.01
153
9.9
217
43.71
22.9
356.2

926.90
The vehicle curb weight was calculated using the above masses and the Phase 2 body
mass. The weight distribution was set at 55/45 front/rear percentage.

The fuel tank was modeled as an airbag at 90-percent full so that any change in pressure
could be extracted and reviewed to determine if there was an instantaneous pressure
change that could affect fuel retention.

The ground plane was set at 238.767z.
                                      39

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      CAE Test Set-Up

        4.2.5.1.   FMVSS 208: 35 mph Front Impact (0°/30° rigid wall,
                  offset deformable barrier)

The FMVSS 208 35-mph load case involves an impact against a perpendicular rigid wall.
The vehicle model was analyzed with its curb weight, two frontal occupants, luggage and
fuel. The figure below shows the vehicle in top, front, side, and isometric views.
   •_f .--:•(.;'_fi
                                       IT frt_fm™2D6_f*35
            Figure 4.2.5.1.a: Rigid, deformable wall crash-test model setup
                                     40

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         4.2.5.2. FMVSS 208: 25 mph Offset Deformable Barrier

The FMVSS 208 25-mph load case involves an impact into a deformable barrier that
overlaps the vehicle by 40 percent. The vehicle model was analyzed with its curb weight,
two frontal occupants, luggage and fuel. The figure below shows the vehicle in top, front,
side, and isometric views.

          Figure 4,2,5.2a: 40-percent barrier overlap crash-test model setup
                                      41

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         4.2.5.3.  FMVSS208: 25 mph 30° Flat Barrier- Left Side

The FMVSS 208 25-mph, 30-degree flat rigid wall barrier load case is carried out to ensure
the occupants stay within the bounds of the vehicle during the crash event. As no closures
or occupants were included in the models this could not be assessed. The structure will be
evaluated to ensure that there would be minimal (if any) deformation of the door aperture
that would cause the occupant to be ejected.
             Figure 4.2.5.3.a: 30°, left-side barrier crash-test model setup
                                       42

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         4.2.5.4.   FMVSS208: 25 mph 30° Flat Barrier - Right Side

The FMVSS 208 25-mph, 30-degree flat rigid wall barrier load case is carried out on both
the left and right hand sides of the vehicle. This would be performed to ensure equal
protection of both the driver and passenger.
             Figure 4.2.5.4.a: 30°, right-side barrier crash-test model setup
                                      43

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         4.2.5.5. FMVSS 210: Seatbelt Anchorages
Front
The FMVSS 210 seatbelt anchorage requirement ensures the seats, seatbelts, and
corresponding anchorage points are strong enough to handle the test load. Load is applied
to two loading devices called body blocks (shoulder and lap) which transfers load to the
structure by the seatbelts. This test is performed at all seating locations.

It was assumed that the Phase 2 vehicle lower seatbelt was attached to the seat structure,
so the lap block load would be transmitted into the four seat mounts. The Phase 2 model
does not include any seating systems so these loads were applied to the rear seat mounts,
applying higher loads to these locations.

The lower body block's movement is constrained such that it can only move in the direction
of the applied load (10° above horizontal),  as there was no seat included in the model.

The load applied to the upper and  lower body blocks is 17,125 N (3500 Ibs +10 percent).
This load is applied over 0.15 s and held constant for 50 ms.

As both the left and right side of the vehicle structure are symmetrical, this analysis was
only performed on the right hand front occupant location.
   L'lHL'F i-:lr.,r,! .li,^l,J
              Figure 4.2.5.5.a: Front seatbelt anchorage test model setup
                                       44

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Rear

The test load was applied simultaneously at all rear-seat locations.

The lower body block's movement is constrained in the model such that it can only move in
the direction of the applied load (10° above horizontal).

The load applied  to both the left and right, upper and lower body blocks is 17,125 N (3500
Ibs +10 percent).  This load is applied over 0.15 s and held constant for 50 ms.

              Figure 4.2.5.5.b: Rear seatbelt anchorage test model setup
         4.2.5.6.  FMVSS 213: Child Restraint Systems

The FMVSS 213 child restraint anchorage requires that these systems are such that they
will restrain a child occupant when subjected to a crash impact.

The restraint mounting location was tested under conditions greater than the required load
case in order to evaluate any potential structural problems.

A child dummy was represented using a beam element with the mass set to 30 kg, which
is nearly 50-percent heavier than the heaviest necessary test dummy to account for
unknowns at this early stage of vehicle development. This was attached to the body
structure at four locations (retractor, D-ring, buckle, and fixed end) using seatbelt
elements. Actual requirements specify a number of the child Hybrid III test dummies, the
                                       45

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heaviest being the 10-year old (which weighs 21 kg). The testing was performed using the
heaviest weight to create a worst-case loading.

The test specifies that an acceleration pulse, representative of a vehicle pulse, be applied;
the pulse is shown in the graph below.
                                       restraint fmvss213 rear
                                      	I	
      fmvss213 pulse
           Figure 4.2.5.6.a: Acceleration pulse applied to child-restraint model
                                          46

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Figure 4.2.5.6.b: Child-restraint test model setup
                      47

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         4.2.5.7.  FMVSS 214: 33.5 mph Side Impact - Crabbed Barrier

The FMVSS 214 33.5-mph, 27-degree moving deformable barrier load case is carried out
on both the left and right hand sides of the vehicle. This test monitors the severity of the
injuries sustained by the occupants seated at the front and rear, outboard seating
locations. This test is carried out on a complete vehicle with closures, dummies, interior,
and occupant restraining systems. Since engineering those components was beyond the
scope of this portion of the project, the B-Pillar intrusion velocity and displacement were
monitored on the CAE model. The maximum allowable intrusion level was defined as 300
mm - a typical distance to the closest outboard portion of the seat.
  D3PLOT: Side_fmvss214_mdblh33p5
                  Figure 4.2.5.7.a: Crabbed barrier test model setup
                                       48

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       4.2.5.8.    FMVSS 214: 20 mph 75° Side Pole Impact - Front (5th
                   percentile Female)

The FMVSS 214 20-mph, 75-degree, pole-load case is carried out with a rigid pole lined
up with the occupant head CG location along the direction of travel. It is carried out with a
5  percentile female dummy and a 50th-percentile male dummy. This puts the seat in two
different locations so the initial impact points are different.

The test requires monitoring injuries sustained by the occupants and would be carried out
on a full vehicle with closures, dummies, interior,  and an occupant restraining  system. As
noted above, this was beyond the project scope. The B-Pillar intrusion velocity and
displacement were again measured on the CAE model.
  D3PLOT: side_fnwss214_po!efrt05th
                 Figure 4.2,5.8.a: Side-pole impact test model setup
                                       49

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         4.2.5.9.   FMVSS 214: 20 mph 75° Side Pole Impact - Front (50th
              percentile Male)

The FMVSS 214 20-mph, 75-degree, pole-load case for the male seating position put the
initial pole contact point further rearwards in the vehicle than for the 5th-percentile female
but still forward of the B pillar.
  D3PLOT: side_fmvss214_polefrt50th
                 Figure 4.2.5.9.a: Side-pole impact test model setup
                                       50

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         4.2.5.10.
FMVSS216: Roof Crush
The FMVSS 216a roof-crush load case evaluates vehicle performance in a 'roll-over' crash
scenario. The actual test is carried out quasi-statically to represent a load being applied to
the upper A-pillar joint. The regulation specifies that the vehicle be able to withstand 3
times its curb weight without loading the head of a Hybrid III 50th-percentile male occupant
with more than 222 N (50 Ibs).
                                         03PLOT.roaf_fmvjs3t6
                    Figure 4.2.5.10.a: Roof crush test model setup
                                        51

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         4.2.5.11.  FMVSS 301: Rear Impact (moving deformable barrier)

The FMVSS 301  50-mph, 70-percent overlap rear moving deformable barrier load case
primary function is to check the vehicle fuel system integrity to reduce potential vehicle
fires caused by post-impact fuel spillage.

The CAE model incorporated a fuel tank, filler neck, and battery pack. Lotus evaluated the
fuel tank/filler and battery pack to assess potential problems that could occur as a result of
deformation in this area. The design objective was to create an environment that
prevented any part of the body from contacting either the fuel tank or the battery pack.

The test was carried out on both the left and right sides of the vehicle. Only results for the
left side are shown as this is where the fuel tank and fuel filler are located.
  rr,nJnwBi30!Jh60
                                                                            I

                                                                            It.
D3PLOT rr_fmva»l Ji50
                                                                            
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         4.2.5.12.      IIHS Low Speed - Front

The low-speed IIHS requirement evaluates vehicle performance at impact speeds of 10
kph and 5 kph in full and offset impacts. This test has been derived by the IIHS to establish
the amount of damage and subsequent repair costs.

Impacts are into a contoured deformable barrier set to specific heights depending upon the
impact being carried out (barrier lower edge 457 mm from  ground in 'full' impacts and 406
mm from ground in offset impacts). The offset impacts are carried out with a 15-percent
overlap of the barrier to the vehicle.

A full evaluation of the damage was not carried out as the  CAE body model does not
include the fascia, hood, fenders, lights, grille, etc. The performance assessment was
made based on the extent of permanent deformation (plastic strain) predicted in the
structure. The vehicle curb weight was used with an additional 77.1-kg ballast at the
driver's seat.
                                                       %,          r
The front and rear suspension models were replaced with  simplified representations with
springs for the vertical (tire/spring) and lateral (tire friction) directions. Values for the
vertical spring were calculated from  the suspension spring rates and the unloaded to
loaded tire radius; the lateral rate was calculated from an estimated tire  contact area and
friction.
         Figure 4.2.5.12.a: IIHS, low-speed, front test model setup ('full impact')
                                        53

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                                     V ,
        Figure 4.2.5.12.b: IIHS, low-speed front test model setup ('offset impact')
         4.2.5.13.       IIHS Low Speed - Rear

The low speed IIHS rear load case is set up the same as described for the front impact
load cases.
         Figure 4.2.5.13.a: IIHS, low-speed rear test model setup ('full impact')
                                      54

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Figure 4.2.5.13.b: IIHS, low-speed rear test model setup ('offset impact')
                                55

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   4.3.     CAE Analysis

CAE analyses were performed for each of the specified load and impact cases, but direct
comparisons to current production vehicles cannot be made for each case. Lotus can
however, explain the facts behind the results.

For all of the FMVSS high speed crash load cases analyzed, the actual pass/fail criteria
are judged on occupant injuries. This was beyond the scope of the project as Lotus was
contracted to evaluate the lightweight structure itself. Occupant injuries could not be
evaluated, but structural performance can be compared to available NCAP test data. The
same comparison cannot be made to FMVSS data as this information is not released to
the public domain and remains with the individual OEMs. After these analyses, Lotus can
safely state that the Phase 2 HD vehicle is predicted to perform no worse than vehicles
currently in production.

Energy balances were also performed on each crash simulation to ensure the calculations
followed the laws of physics. The way the software carries out its millions of calculations
can lead  to apparent increases in total energy. Total energy should remain the same, but
kinetic energy will decrease and internal energy will increase as the crash occurs. The
kinetic energy is absorbed by the crash structure deforming, frictional sliding, compression
of springs, etc. thereby increasing internal energy.

In simplistic terms, the energy balance  is perfect if:

                  Total Energy = Initial Total Energy + External Work

Or if the energy ratio is equal to 1.0. This energy ratio is used in the LS-DYNA® software.
The software tracks all of the various types of energy such that the full energy balance
used  is:

Energykin + Energyint + Energysi + Energy™ + Energydamp + Energyhp = Energy°kin + Energy°int + Workext

                   Total Energy (Etotai)

            Where:         Energykin = current kinetic energy
                            Energyint = current internal energy
                Energysi = current sliding interface energy (including friction)
                           Energy™/ = current rigid wall energy
                          Energydamp = current damping energy
                           Energyng = current hourglass energy
                            Energy°kin = initial kinetic energy
                            Energy^t = initial internal energy
                                 Workext = external work
                                        56

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Internal energy includes elastic strain energy and the work done in permanent
deformation. External work includes work done by applied forces and pressures as well as
by velocity, displacement, or acceleration boundary conditions applied to the model.


      4.3.1.      FMVSS 208: 35 mph Front Impact (0°/30°  rigid
                  wall, offset  deformable barrier)

The termination time for this CAE analysis is 0.1 seconds, by this time the vehicle is
rebounding from the wall. This is confirmed  by checking the time to zero velocity (TTZ)
which occurred at 59.5 ms (shown later). The following image shows the vehicle at the
analysis termination time.
 MPIC fit_invu2Qe_f*35
                                       D3PLOT- fr1jmvss2D8_ffl)3S
            Figure 4.3.1.a: Vehicle deformation (t=0.1 s) after frontal impact
                                      57

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                                      frt fmvss208 ffb35
                                             ~  i
                                       0.04      0.05
                                       	Time (s)
        Left B-Pillar (C60)
                                               Right B-Pillar(C60)
             Figure 4.3.1.b: Vehicle acceleration pulse during frontal impact

The red and blue lines on the graph above are the acceleration measured at the bottom of
the B pillar close to the rocker for the left and right hand side. These points are taken as
there is little or no deformation in the frontal impact load case. Most of the vehicle structure
is symmetrical, but the engine is not creating asymmetrical acceleration pulses. The peaks
represent specific events during the impact.

  I.    First peak of 8.8 G at 2.5 ms is due to the front bumper armature deforming.
 II.    Second peak of 21 G at 8.0  ms is the initiation of crush in the bumper brackets.
 III.    Once the bumper brackets have crushed (at 16 ms) crush initiation starts in the
       main  rails which generates the third peak (21 G).
 IV.    As the main rails continue crushing load is transmitted through the front suspension
       sub-frame structure which results in a peak at 22 ms of 29 G.
 V.    The peak of 45.5 G at 36 ms due to the engine loading due to contact through the
       radiator fans/core to the rigid wall.
 VI.    When contact between the engine and the dash panel occurs at 45 ms it results in a
       37 G  peak.
VII.    The main rails bottom out resulting in the final peak of 40 G at 55 ms.

Averaging the left and right accelerations provides the pulse shown below.
                                         58

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                                       frt fmvss208 ffb35
                                         r	~ i

                                        0.040      0.050
                                       	Time (s)
        B-Pillar Acceleration
                                   B-Pillar Acceleration (C60) 5ms to 30ms
                                                              B-Pillar Acceleration (C60) 30ms to TTZ
         Figure 4.3.1.c: Average vehicle acceleration pulse during frontal impact

The overall average acceleration for the entire impact was 26.7 G. The average initial
acceleration (5 to 30 ms) was 20.9 G. The average acceleration from 30 ms to TTZ was
34.7 G. In this case TTZ was 59.5 ms as shown in the graph below. After 59.5 ms, the
vehicle has rebounded from the wall and started to travel in  the opposite direction.
Based on the average acceleration pulse peaks and the overall average accelerations, this
vehicle exhibits passing structural performance under the 35 mph FMVSS 208 impact.
                                          59

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                                        frt fmvss208 ffb35
                                             i
         Right B-Pillar (C 60)
                                                Left B-Pillar (C 60)
 Figure 4.3.1.d: Vehicle velocity during frontal impact - time to 0 velocity (TTZ) = 59.5 ms

A sensitivity analysis was performed to determine how the gauge size of the front structure
affects the crush pulse. The chart below shows the effect of an approximate 10-percent
reduction  in material thickness for the bumper crush cans and the main rails on the
FMVSS 208 Flat Frontal 35-mph test. This analysis was run on an earlier model (V23).
The chart below shows the resultant pulses for a model with reduced gauge main rails,
vertical walls and bumper cans (green pulse) and a reduced gauge model with only the
bumper cans and main rails down-gauged (blue pulse).  The baseline model is indicated by
the black pulse.
                                    FMVSS208 Flat Frontal 35mph
                                       0.040      0.050
                                          Time (s)
      Main Rails 2.75/2.5mm, Bumper Cans 2.5/2.25mm
      Main Rails 2.5/2.25mm, Bumper Cans 2.25/2.Omm
      Main Rails 2.75mm/2.25mm, Bumper Cans 2.5/2.Omm
                Figure 4.3.1.e: Vehicle acceleration during frontal impact
                                          60

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Ver #23 'std' - black pulse:

Initial peak (bumper cans) @ 8 ms - 21.4 G; second peak (main rail) @ 16 ms - 31.8 G

Ver #23 - green pulse (as 'std' with main rail/bumper can vertical wall down-gauged 0.25
mm):

Initial peak (bumper cans) @8ms-18.3G; second peak (main rail) @ 16 ms - 25.2 G

Ver #23 'std' - blue pulse (as 'std' with main rail/bumper can down-gauged 0.25 mm):

Initial peak (bumper cans) @ 8 ms -14.7 G; second peak (main rail) @ 16 ms - 22.6 G
The maximum dynamic crush of the vehicle during this 35-mph frontal impact was 555
mm.  It was calculated based on the maximum displacements shown in Figure 4.3.1 .f.
                                    frt fmvss208 ffb35
                                           ~
                                             Right B-Pillar
 Figure 4.3.1.f: Vehicle displacement from frontal impact - max dynamic crush = 555 mm

Measuring the amount of intrusion into the dash for this load case showed minimal levels
of dash displacement (<20 mm), a maximum of approximately 10 mm in the driver footwell
and a maximum of approximately 15 mm in the passenger footwell. In English units this is
less than one-inch maximum deflection (occurs in an unoccupied area) and a worst-case
deflection of 0.6 inches in the footwell. This level of intrusion indicates that the front
structure is absorbing the impact energy and not transferring it into the dash area. The
lower A-pillar structure shows no visible damage after this impact.
                                       61

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                                                                          0.00


                                                                          Z.50


                                                                          5.00


                                                                          7.50


                                                                          10.00


                                                                          12.50


                                                                          15.00


                                                                          17.50


                                                                          20.00


                                                                          22.50


                                                                          25.00
             Figure 4.3.1.g: CAE dash intrusion analysis after frontal impact

The maximum fuel tank plastic strains were less than 10 percent (100 on the bar scale
below equals 10-percent strain). This indicates that there should be no failure of the tank
due to contact with any of the surrounding components. The tank mounting system created
the peak strains; there was no body-to-fuel tank contact. An inflatable bladder modeled
inside the tank indicated that there was minimal pressure rise in the tank during impact.
(<0.2psi).
                                         62

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                                  PLASTIC_STRAIN
                                                                         PLASTIC_STRAIN


                                                                           (Max all pts)
                                                                           I
                                                                           I
                  Figure 4.3.1.h: Fuel tank plastic strain after impact

In this impact load case the majority of the energy is absorbed by the front end body
structure and through the sub-frame. The top ten most energy absorbent components in
the body structure were extracted from the analysis and evaluated for relative
performance. This exercise showed that besides the front bumper, bumper brackets and
main rails, the magnesium front end module (FEM) was another body component that
absorbed a significant amount of the impact energy.
                                        63

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               Figure 4.3.1.i: Main energy absorbing frontal body structure

An energy balance plot was extracted from the analysis to check for any mathematical
instability possibly present in the model, leading to unrepresentative behavior. This is
shown below; it shows that the model is performing as expected.
                                          frt fmvss208 ffb35
                                               i  ~	i
         Kinetic Energy
         Internal Energy
         Stonewall Energy
         Spring & Damper Energy
Hourglass Energy
Contact Energy
External Work Energy
Total Energy
                      Figure4.3.1.j: Energy balance for frontal impact
                                            64

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      4.3.2.      FMVSS 208: 25 mph Offset Deformable Barrier

This analysis is run to 0.15 s as it is a longer duration crash event than the 35-mph load
case. The actual time to zero forward velocity is predicted to be 0.117 s.

The barrier used in this load  case is deformable and absorbs energy as it deforms. This
barrier can absorb up to 50 percent of the total  kinetic energy during impact making this a
less severe impact than the 35-mph, rigid-wall load case.
  D3PLOT: frt_fmvsj20E_otfclh25
                                        D3PLOT frt_fnw9s208_otlBlh25
  03 PLOT- frt_fmvssa08_o*lh25
   Figure 4,3.2.a: Vehicle deformation (t=0.15 s) after 40-percent overlap frontal impact
                                       65

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                                          L,
 >31>LClT frt_finv33208_ttlblh25
Figure 4.3.2.b: Vehicle deformation (t=0.15 s, barrier not shown) after 40-percent overlap

                                      frontal impact
                                        frtjmvss208_odblh25
                                               i
        Left B-Pillar (C60)
                                                   Right B-Pillar(C60)
   Figure 4.3.2.c: Vehicle acceleration pulse during 40-percent overlap frontal impact
                                            66

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Due to the asymmetry of the barrier, the left and right pulses were not identical and are
represented in red and blue, respectively, on the graph above. In addition, the left side
pulse is higher since the barrier overlaps the vehicle on the left side. This results in more
loading going directly into the left side of the vehicle.

The peaks on the left pulse (in red on the graph) are used to described the events during
the impact since this is an offset impact.

  I.   The first peak of 5 G at 4 ms was generated by the initial crush of the deformable
      barrier. Note the deformable barrier is made up of a main block and a bumper block.
      At 4ms the vehicle is in contact with the barrier bumper block but the initial crush
      began on the main barrier block, as this was less stiff.
  II.   The acceleration increases to 10 G at 24 ms until the bumper block on the barrier
      starts to crush. Through this time, there was no deformation on the vehicle.
 III.   At 31  ms the first vehicle deformation occurs, the front-end-module (FEM) and
      radiator take some load, this corresponded with the acceleration peak of 12.5 G.
      The acceleration drops as material fracture  of the  FEM occurs in a number of
      locations.
 IV.   The pulse increases to a peak of 9 G at 42.5 ms, which corresponds to when the
      left bumper bracket starts to deform.
 V.   As the crush on the softer main barrier block progresses  it begins to bottom out
      causing the the next peak of 14 G at 53 ms.
 VI.   Between 63 ms and 72 ms, crushing in the stiffer bumper barrier block continued
      until this bottomed out. Once this had occurred the stiffer vehice components
      started to defrom. At 78 ms there is a peak pulse of 18 G when the front suspension
      sub-frame, front bumper, and main rails start deforming.
VII.   The next 2 peak acceleration pulses observed after the highest peak were caused
      by the deformable barrier coming into contact with the left tire (at 86 ms and 114
      ms).

Most of the kinetic energy, was absorbed by 120 ms and the vehicle velocity graph
showed that the left B-Pillar velocity was at zero at 117 ms.

Averaging the left and right accelerations provides the pulse shown below.
                                        67

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                                        frt_fmvss208_odblh25
                                               i
        B-Pillar Acceleration
        B-Pillar Acceleration (C60) 5ms to 30ms
        B-Pillar Acceleration (C60) 30ms to TTZ
      Figure 4.3.2.d: Average vehicle pulse during 40-percent overlap frontal impact

The overall average acceleration for the entire impact was below 10 G. The average initial
acceleration (5 to 30 ms) was 6.5 G and the average acceleration from 30 ms to TTZ was
9 G. In this case TTZ was 117ms shown in the figure below.
                                         frt_fmvss208_odblh25
                                               i
        Left B-Pillar (C 60)
        Right B-Pillar (C 60)
Figure 4.3.2.e: Vehicle velocity after 40-percent overlap frontal impact - time to zero (TTZ)
                                         = 0.117s
                                            68

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                                       frt fmvss208 odblh25
                                             I
                                                 Right B-Pillar
        Figure 4.3.2.f: Vehicle displacement after 40-percent overlap frontal impact

The total dynamic crush cannot be calculated from the vehicle displacement graph as the
barrier was deformable. The total vehicle dynamic crush was estimated to be around 180
mm using the animation result files.
  D3PLOT: frt_fmuss208_odblh25
                                                                             X_DISPLACEMENT

                                                                             (RelN161 162163)
                                                                                 1
                                                                              3.00


                                                                              4.00


                                                                              5.00
                                                                                 I
    Figure 4.3.2.g: CAE dash intrusion analysis after 40-percent overlap frontal impact
                                           69

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The dash intrusion is very low at approximately 5 mm. This is because the barrier
absorbed 50 percent of the kinetic energy and the front structure of the vehicle was stiff
enough, i.e., did not deform extensively during this time, and had sufficient crush space in
front of the passenger compartment to absorb the remaining kinetic energy.

For comparison, the dash intrusion levels of the 2009 Toyota Venza measured by NCAP
exceed the CAE-predicted values for the Phase 2 HD vehicle. The NCAP underbody floor
analysis is shown in Figure 4.3.3.h below and shows the floorboard deformation
measured, none of which is seen in the Phase 2 HD crash simulations.
                         Driver
Passenger
                     UNDERBODY FLOORBOARD DEFORMATION
Measurement
A
B
c
D
E
F
G
H
Pre-Test
323
323
323
323
323
323
323
323
Post-Test
338
359
306
322
342
316
350
325
Difference
-15
-36
17
1
-19
7
-27
_2
                Figure 4.3.2.h: Toyota Venza NCAP dash deformation
                                       70

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The body structure components that absorb the majority of the energy are the front
bumper, left bumper bracket, left main rails and the front end module (FEM), as shown
below.

 Figure 4.3.2.1: Main energy absorbing body structure - 40-percent overlap frontal impact

The energy balance for this analysis proves it was valid as no energy was lost or created.
                                        frt fmvss208 odblh25
        Kinetic Energy
        Internal Energy
        Stonewall Energy
        Spring & Damper Energy
^^^— Hourglass Energy
    Contact Energy
    External Work Energy
1    Total Energy
           Figure 4.3.2.J: Energy balance for 40-percent overlap frontal impact
                                           71

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The information presented heretofore in this section shows how the Phase 2 HD vehicle
performs in crash simulations, but gives little context for comparison. This context is
however, hard to provide as the Phase 2 HD vehicle was tested without occupants and a
restraint system to test dummy injury criteria as standard. The occupant restraint system
and crash structure work in tandem, so the results here don't provide a complete safety
picture. Forming and proving full vehicle safety was beyond the scope of this contract as it
requires designing a full vehicle with seats, interior, and occupant restraints. While
occupant protection cannot be fully proved in this study, the Phase 2 HD BIW performs no
worse than vehicles currently in production, indicating that the vehicle could meet safety
requirements, particularly since the safety system can be tuned to act based upon the
specific vehicle acceleration pulses.

As the Phase 2 HD vehicle was tested without the occupant restraint system and
occupants, no comparison of  actual occupant test results can be made, but a comparison
of crash structure acceleration data can be made.

A comparison of vehicular accelerations can be seen in Figure 4.3.2.K below. The figure
shows a comparison between a 2009 Toyota Venza, 2007 Dodge Caliber, 2007 Ford
Edge, 2007 Saturn Outlook, a 2009 Dodge Journey, and the Phase 2 HD vehicle. All of the
standard production vehicles  pass NHTSA safety criteria with four-star frontal crash ratings
or above and the Phase 2 HD vehicle acceleration levels are comparable to those of the
production vehicles. Based on this data and Lotus' engineering judgment, the Phase 2 HD
vehicle is predicted to perform as well as or better than  comparable vehicles on the
market.
     60.000
     50.000 -•
     40.000 -'
     30.000
     20.000
     10.000 ~
      0.000 ~
                                       frt_fmvss208_ffb35
                                      J	I	L
     -10.000
         0.000
                0.010
                       0.020
                              0.030
                                     0.040
                                            0.050
                                            Time (s)
                                                   0.060
                                                          0.070
                                                                  0.080
                                                                         0.090
                                                                                0.100
      CA-ARB(v26)
      2009 Venza
      2007 Dodge Caliber
2007 Ford Edge
2007 Saturn Outlook
2009 Dodge Journey
  Figure 4.3.2.k: Comparison of production vehicle and Phase 2 HD crash accelerations
                                         72

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Figure 4.3.2.1 below shows the upper and lower acceleration envelopes from the
comparative data for FMVSS 208, 35-mph, flat, frontal crash in Figure 4.3.2.K, showing
more clearly that the Phase 2  HD vehicle is comparable to already proven vehicles. In very
few instances does the acceleration pulse for the Phase 2 HD vehicle exceed the
envelope.
     60.000
                                        frt_fmvss208_ffb35
                                       J	|	L
         0.000    0.010     0.020     0.030    0.040    0.050     0.060     0.070    0.080    0.090     0.100
     -10.000
      CA - ARB (v26)
      Envelope
    Figure 4.3.2.I: Comparison of production vehicle envelope and Phase 2 HD crash
                                    accelerations
                                          73

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      4.3.3.      FMVSS208: 25 mph 30° Flat Barrier - Left Side

The analysis is run for 0.12 s which is sufficient for all the deformation to have occurred,
after this time the direction of the vehicle momentum is typically partially parallel to the
angled barrier. The TTZ for this load case is at 0.076 s.
  Figure 4.3.3.a: Vehicle deformation (t=0.12 s) after 30°, left-side frontal barrier impact

Very little or noticeable deformation occurred at the front door aperture, which indicates the
vehicle will likely retain the frontal occupants.
                                       74

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The left and right acceleration pulses are plotted in red and blue on Figure 4.3.3.b below.
They are asymmetrical because the engine and left side of the vehicle were the first
contact points.
                                      frt_fmvss208_anglh25
        Left B-Pillar (C60)
                                               Right B-Pillar(C60)
   Figure 4.3.3.b: Vehicle acceleration pulse during 30°, left-side frontal barrier impact

The peaks on the left pulse (colored in red) are used to describe the events during the
impact.

There are four significant acceleration pulse peaks at 4, 14, 32 and 63 ms generating 24,
11, 25 and 35 Gs, respectively.
  I.   The first acceleration peak occurs when the front bumper begins deforming.
 II.   The second acceleration pulse peak is due to the bumper bracket starting to deform
      (the load case is not perpendicular so there is some crush and bending occurring).
 III.   The third acceleration pulse peak is due to the main rail on the left side bending
      along with the front suspension sub-frame.
 IV.   The fourth acceleration pulse peak was created by the engine stacking up against
      the radiator and the barrier as well as the front suspension sub-frame bottoming out.
                                         75

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                                          frt fmvss208 anglh25
                                           i	i  ~
                                               0.060
                                               Time (s)
        B-Pillar Acceleration
        B-Pillar Acceleration (C60) 5ms to 30ms
        B-Pillar Acceleration (C60) 30ms to TTZ
   Figure 4.3.3.c: Average vehicle acceleration pulse during 30°, left-side frontal barrier
                                           impact

The overall average acceleration pulse is just below 19 G. The average initial acceleration
(5 to 30 ms) was 9.9 G. The average acceleration from 30 ms to TTZ was 18.6 G.
                                          frt_fmvss208_anglh25
        Left B-Pillar
        Right B-Pillar
   Figure 4.3.3.d: Vehicle velocity during 30°, left-side frontal impact - time to 0 velocity
                                       (TTZ) = 76 ms
                                             76

-------
                                       frt_fmvss208_anglh25
                                                 Right B-Pillar
  Figure 4.3.3.e: Vehicle displacement during 30°, left-side frontal impact - max dynamic
                                    crush = 500 mm
                                                                              0.00


                                                                              2.50


                                                                              5.00


                                                                              7.50


                                                                              10.00


                                                                              12.50


                                                                              15.00
       Figure 4.3.3.f: CAE dash intrusion analysis after 30°, left-side frontal impact

The intrusion  into the dash for this load case showed minimal levels (<15 mm)
                                           77

-------
                                    PLASTIC_STRA1N


                                      (Max all pts)
PLASTIC_STRAIN


  (Max all pts)
         Figure 4.3.3.g: Fuel tank plastic strain after 30°, left-side frontal impact

The predicted fuel tank plastic strains are below the expected material failure level, < 6
percent.

The main energy absorbing body structure components are the front bumper, left bumper
bracket, left main rails, the front end module (FEM) left shotgun inner and left front shock
tower as shown below.
 Figure 4.3.3.h: Main energy absorbing body structure for fuel tank plastic strain after 30°,
                                 left-side frontal impact
                                          78

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The energy balance for this analysis showed no issues with the model as no energy was
lost or created.
                                            frt_fmvss208_anglh25
         Kinetic Energy
         Internal Energy
         Stonewall Energy
         Spring & Damper Energy
Hourglass Energy
Contact Energy
External Work Energy
Total Energy
                Figure 4.3.3.1:  Energy balance for 30°, left-side frontal impact
                                                79

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      4.3.4.      FMVSS208:  25mph 30°  Flat Barrier - Right Side

In this test the right-side time to zero velocity was actually found to be longer than the left
side: 0.092 s vs. 0.076 s for the left side impact. The analysis predicts acceptable
performance from the body structure with very little noticeable deformation at the front door
aperture.
                                        D3PLCT- frt_ftnv»208_ingrhH
     Figure 4.3.4.a: Vehicle deformation (t=0.12 s) after 30°, right-side frontal impact
                                      80

-------
                                          frt_fmvss208_angrh25
        Left B-Pillar (C60)
                                                    Right B-Pillar(C60)
       Figure 4.3.4.b: Vehicle acceleration pulse during 30°, right-side frontal impact

The left and right acceleration pulses (red  and blue respectively) are different due to the
angled barrier primarily loading the right side of the vehicle and also due to the asymmetry
of the engine. Averaging both left and right side accelerations  gives the average pulse
shown below.
                                          frt_fmvss208_angrh25
                                               0.060
                                               Time (s)
        B-Pillar Acceleration
        B-Pillar Acceleration (C60) 5ms to 30ms
        B-Pillar Acceleration (C60) 30ms to TTZ
  Figure 4.3.4.c: Vehicle average acceleration pulse during 30°, right-side frontal impact
                                             81

-------
The overall average acceleration pulse is just below 14 G. The average initial acceleration
(5 to 30 ms) was 8.9 G. The average acceleration from 30 ms to TTZ was 9.5 G. These
are less than for the left side impact and  are a result of the longer TTZ.
                                       frt_fmvss208_angrh25
       Left B-Pillar
       Right B-Pillar
           Figure 4.3.4.d: Vehicle velocity during 30°, right-side frontal impact
                          - time to zero velocity (TTZ) = 92 ms
                                      frt_fmvss208_angrh25
                                                Right B-Pillar
   Figure 4.3.4.e: Vehicle displacement during 30°, right-side frontal impact - maximum
                                dynamic crush 524 mm
                                          82

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                                                                          X_DISPLACEMENT

                                                                           (RclNlSl 162163)


       Figure 4.3.4.f: CAE dash intrusion analysis after 30°, right-side frontal impact
The intrusion into the dash for this load case were very similar to the left-side impact
predicting minimal levels (<15 mm)
                                      PLASTIC_ STRAIN
                                                                             PLASTIC_STRAIN
         Figure 4.3.4.g: Fuel tank plastic strains after 30°, right-side frontal impact

The predicted fuel tank plastic strains are below the expected material failure level, < 4
percent.
                                            83

-------
The main energy absorbing components for the right side impact include the front bumper,
right bumper bracket, right main rails, front end module (FEM), and dash reinforcement,
but not the shotgun or shock tower. This is due to the load path through the engine
because of the ancillary mounting locations. This load path through the engine is not
present for the left side. As a result of the loading through the engine, contact to the dash
cross-member occurs sooner, transmitting more load.
  Figure 4.3.4.h: Main energy absorbing body structure for 30°, right-side frontal impact
                                       84

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The corresponding energy balance validated the analysis, showing the total energy level
was maintained.
         0.00
                                            frt_fmvss208_angrh25
         Kinetic Energy
         Internal Energy
         Stonewall Energy
         Spring & Damper Energy
^^— Hourglass Energy
     Contact Energy
     External Work Energy
^~^~ Total Energy
               Figure 4.3.4.1: Energy balance for 30°, right-side frontal impact
                                                85

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      4.3.5.       FMVSS 210:  Seatbelt Anchorages

This test is a worst-case analysis as it tests just two of the four floor seatbelt mounting
locations. The front mounting locations are part of the seat assembly, which was beyond
the scope of this project. Even  in this worst case scenario the mounting locations showed
acceptable deformation levels.
         4.3.5.1.  Front
      D3PLOT: restraitit_fmvss210_pass
                                                                   PLASTIC_STRAIN

                                                                     (Max all pts)
                                                                    0.200001
             Figure 4.3.5.1.a: Seatbelt anchorage plastic strains (@ 0.2 s)
                                       86

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 D3PLOT: restraint_ftnvss210_pass
 1 Ma* SSS7«53 1 JdZzfoE-Ol
PLASTIC_STRAIN


    (Max all pts)




  0.00



  15.00



  30.00



  45.00



  60.00



  75.00



  90.00


  105.00



  120.00



  135.00



  150.00


  X l.OE-03
              Figure 4.3.5.1.b: Upper seatbelt anchorage plastic strain (@ 0.2 s)
D3PLOT: restraint_fntvss210_pass
1 M3XS5S7453 1 74221 OE.Q1
  0.200001



 PLASTIC_STRAIN

     (Max all pts)
                                                                                                        0.00


                                                                                                        15.00


                                                                                                        30.00


                                                                                                        45.00


                                                                                                        60.00


                                                                                                        75.00
   90.00


   105.00


   120.00


   135.00
                                                                                                       120.00 •


                                                                                                       135.00 I


                                                                                                       150.00 I


                                                                                                       X l.OE-03
                                                                                                        0.200001
              Figure 4.3.5.1.c: Lower seatbelt anchorage plastic strain (@ 0.2  s)
                                                        87

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       4.3.5.2.  Rear
D3PLOT: restraint_fmvss210_rrpass
                                                                                         PLASTIC_STRAIN




                                                                                            (Max all pts)








                                                                                          0.00




                                                                                          11 54




                                                                                          23.08




                                                                                          34.62




                                                                                          4615




                                                                                          5769




                                                                                          69.23




                                                                                          80.77




                                                                                          92.31




                                                                                          10385 I




                                                                                          115.38




                                                                                          126.92




                                                                                          13846




                                                                                          15000 I




                                                                                          X 1.0E-03
          Figure 4.3.5.2.a: Rear seatbelt anchorage plastic strain (@ 0.2 s)
                                                 88

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D3PLOT restraint_fmvss210_rrpass
                                                                                        DISP_RESULTANT
                                                                                         0.00




                                                                                         804




                                                                                         16.07




                                                                                         24.11




                                                                                         32.15




                                                                                         40.19




                                                                                         48.22




                                                                                         56.26




                                                                                         64.30




                                                                                         7233
                                                                                             I
                                                                                            0.200001
          Figure 4.3.5.2.b: Displacement at lower seatbelt anchorages (@0.2 s)
                                                89

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      4.3.6.      FMVSS 213: Child Restraint Systems

The child restraint system was tested using a worst-case situation with a 30-kg child
representation to account for various unknowns. The highest mass child representation
specified by NHTSA is a 21-kg mass, representative of a 10-year old child. The CAE
analyses below show the Phase 2 HD passes these preliminary tests as the anchorage
held the load case.
        D3PLOT: restraint_ftnv3s213_rear
                                                                   PLASTIC_STRAIN

                                                                      (Max all pts)
                                                                     0.110001
              Figure 4.3.6.a: Child-restraint, lower anchorage plastic strain
       D3PLOT: restraint_fmvss213_rear
                                                                     DISP_RESULTANT

                                                                       (Rel N626859)
                 Figure 4.3.6.b: Child-restraint seat pan displacements
                                         90

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      4.3.7.      FMVSS 214: 33.5 mph Side Impact - Crabbed
                  Barrier
This is designed to test the intrusion levels in the event of a side impact. Full doors
(closures) are typically included in this test, but were beyond the scope of this project. This
test was performed with just the BIW structure - B-pillar and side impact beams. A
maximum allowable intrusion level was set at 300 mm as this is the standard distance
between the door panel and seat in a full interior. The Phase 2 HD BIW met this standard
with a maximum intrusion of around  115 mm even without doors for further structure. The
results of the CAE analysis for this test are shown below.
                                          ci(_fm »; 14_m**r33p5

         Figure 4.3.7.a: Vehicle deformation (0.1 s) after crabbed barrier impact
                                      91

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Figure 4.3.7.b: Vehicle deformation (barrier not shown) after crabbed barrier impact
      0.000     0.010     0.020     0.030     0.040      0.050     0.060      0.070
                                                Right B-Pillar at Base (C 60)
   Figure 4.3.7.c: Global vehicle and barrier velocities for crabbed barrier impact
                                         92

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                                                Side_fmvss214_mdblh33p5
        Left B-Pillar Upper (C 60)
        Left B-Pillar at Beltline (C 60)
   	 Left B-Pillar at Pelvis (C 60)
                                                             Left B-Pillar Midline (C 60)
                                                             Left B-Pillar at Rocker (C 60)
   Figure 4.3.7.d: Relative intrusion velocities (B-pillar) during crabbed barrier impact
                                               Side_fmvss214_mdblh33p5
      Left B-Pillar Upper (C 60)
      Left B-Pillar at Beltline (C 60)
      Left B-Pillar at Pelvis (C 60)
Left B-Pillar Midline (C 60)
Left B-Pillar at Rocker (C 60)
Figure 4.3.7.e:  Relative intrusion displacements (B-pillar) during crabbed barrier impact
                                                     93

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D3PLOT: side fmvss214 mdblli33p5
  -1 ZOO        ~-Q900
                                                                                         200 . 0.100001
         Figure 4.3.7.f:  B-pillar intrusion profile after crabbed barrier impact, x=2842
  D3PLOT: Side_fmvss214_mdblh33p5
  -
Y_DISPLACEMENT


 (RelN121 128 127)
         Figure 4.3.7.g: Intrusion levels after crabbed barrier impact on struck side
                                                 94

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   Figure 4.3.7.h: Main energy absorbing body structure parts for crabbed barrier impact
This energy balance validated the crabbed-barrier-impact model as no energy was created
or destroyed during the simulation.
                                        sidej mvss214_mdblh33p5
                                                0.05
                                               Time (s)
      K.E. - Whole Model
      I.E. - Whole Model
      Stonewall Energy - Whole Model
Spring/Damper Energy - Whole Model
HG.E. - Whole Model
System Damping Energy - Whole Model
Sliding Interface Energy - Whole Model
External Work - Whole Model
T.E. - Whole Model
                  Figure 4.3.7.i: Energy balance for crabbed barrier impact
                                               95

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      4.3.8.  FMVSS 214: 20 mph 75° Side Pole Impact - Front
             (5th percentile Female)

This test is usually performed with full closures and measures occupant acceleration
levels, which were beyond the project scope. Intrusion levels were used to gauge occupant
protection again, and with a maximum intrusion of around 250 mm, the Phase 2 HD BIW is
below the maximum allowable of 300 mm.

                                       eta.fmv M2 H_pt*'r!OS1n
  Figure 4.3.8.a: Vehicle deformation (0.1 s) after 75°, side, pole impact - 5th percentile
                                  female
                                    96

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  Figure 4.3.8.b: Vehicle deformation after 75°, side, pole impact (pole blanked) - 5th
                                      percentile female
                                          side_fmvss214_polefrt05th
      Left B-Pillar Upper (C SO)
      Left B-Pillar at Beltline (C 60)
      Left B-Pillar at Pelvis (C 60)
Left B-Pillar Midline (C 60)
Left B-Pillar at Rocker (C 60)
Figure 4.3.8.c: Relative intrusion velocities during 75°,  side, pole impact (B-pillar) - 5th
                                      percentile female
                                              97

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                                                  214_polefrt05tri
                                                   0.05
                                                 Time (s)
        Left B-Pillar Upper (C SO)
        Left B-Pillar at Beltline (C 60)
        Left B-Pillar at Pelvis (C 60)
Left B-Pillar Midline (C 60)
Left B-Pillar at Rocker (C 60)
Figure 4.3.8.d: Relative intrusion displacements during 75°, side,  pole impact (B-pillar) -
                                       -th
                                      5  percentile female
 D3PLOT: side fmvss214 polefrtOSth
   -1.?00        "T19DO
                                                  MODEL VZxES
                                                  MODEL VZxE.i  I
    Figure 4.3.8.e: Section through B-pillar after 75°, side, pole impact, x= 2842 - 5th
                                        percentile female
                                                 98

-------
  D3PLOT: side_fmuss214_polefrt05th
  1 Ma* N25C3775 Z.4B3936E+02
Y_DISPLACEMENT

 (RelNlZl 128127)
                                                                                   0.00


                                                                                   25.00


                                                                                   50.00


                                                                                   75.00


                                                                                   100.00


                                                                                   125.00


                                                                                   150.00


                                                                                   175.00


                                                                                   200.00
     I
     I
                                                                               -th
  Figure 4.3.8.f: Intrusion levels after 75°, side, pole impact on struck side - 5  percentile
                                           female
   Figure 4.3.8.g: Main energy absorbing body structure for 75°, side, pole impact - 5th
                                      percentile female

This energy balance validated the analysis because the total energy remained constant
through the simulation.
                                             99

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g
a
                                                side fmvss214 polefrt05th
                                                                   4-
       K.E. - Whole Model
       I.E. - Whole Modal
       Stonewall Energy - Whole Model
Spring/Damper Energy - Whole Model
HG.E. - Whole Model
System Damping Energy - Whole Model
Sliding Interface Energy - Whole Model
External Work - Whole Model
I.E. - Whole Model
    Figure 4.3.8.h: Energy balance for 75°,  side, pole impact - 5  percentile female
                                                      100

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     4.3.9.      FMVSS 214: 20 mph 75° Side Pole Impact - Front
                 (50th percentile Male)

Using a 50th percentile male instead of a 5th percentile female movess the pole impact
location, but reveals the Phase 2 HD BIW still has acceptable structural performance. A
maximum intrusion level of around 225 mm was observed, which is below the 300 mm
maximum allowable.
                                                                  vj,"
  Figure 4.3.9.a: Vehicle deformation (0.1 s) after 75°, side, pole impact - 50th percentile
                                   male
                                    101

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                                                             J
                                                                                             ,th
  Figure 4.3.9.b: Vehicle deformation after 75°, side, pole impact (pole blanked) - 50
                                        percentile male
                                          side_fmvss214_polefrt50th
       Left B-Pillar Upper (C 60)
       Lett B-Pillar at Beltline (C 60)
       Left B-Pillar at Pelvis (C 60)
Left B-Pillar Midline (C 60)
Left B-Pillar at Rocker (C 60)
Figure 4.3.9.c: Relative intrusion velocities during 75°,  side, pole impact (B-pillar) - 50tri
                                        percentile male
                                              102

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        -20
          0.00
        Left B-pillar at Rocker
        Left B-Pillar Upr
        LeftB-PillaratBeltine
Left B-pillar at Pelvis
Left B-pillar Midlme
 Figure 4.3.9.d:  Relative intrusion displacements during 75°, side, pole impact (B-pillar) -
 D3PLOT:side_fmvss214_polefrt50th
 1: Max N25DOZ55 : ? 234ZG3E+02
                                         -\th
                                       50  percentile male

                                Y_DISPLACEMENT

                                 (RelN121 128 127)
                                                                                              I
                                                                                       -\th
Figure 4.3.9.e: Intrusion levels after 75°, side, pole impact on struck side - 50  percentile
                                                male
                                                 103

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  Figure 4.3.9.f: Section through B-pillar after 75°, side, pole impact, x= 2842 - 50^
                                percentile male
Figure 4.3.9.g: Main energy absorbing body structure for 75°, side, pole impact - 50
                                percentile male
                                                                             ,th
                                      104

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                                            side_f mvss214_polef rtSOth
         K.E. - Whole Model
         I.E. - Whole Model
         Stonewall Energy - Whole Model
Spring/Damper Energy - Whole Model
HG.E. - Whole Model
System Damping Energy - Whole Model
Sliding Interface Energy - Whole Model
External Work - Whole Model
I.E. - Whole Model
       Figure 4.3.9.h:  Energy balance for 75°, side, pole impact - 50   percentile male

This energy balance validated  the analysis, showing no energy was created or destroyed
during the simulation.
                                                  105

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      4.3.10.    FMVSS 216: Roof Crush

The roof crush CAE analysis is shown below, where the platen is loaded to three times the
curb weight of the vehicle and must not displace more than 127 mm and load a 95th
percentile male's head to more than 222 N (50 Ibs). This analysis shows that the Phase 2
HD BIW meets this standard as only 20 mm of displacement is predicted at three times the
vehicle curb weight, which does not even touch the occupant's head.
    Figure 4.3.10.a: Deformation at 0/40/80/150 mm of roof crush platen displacement
                                     106

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Figure 4.3.10.b: Deformation in relation to occupant head clearance zones (95  799 ) at

                  0/40/80/150 mm of roof crush platen displacement
                                        roofjmvss216
                                               i
                                     60         80

                                        Displacement (mm)
      Analysis
                                  3'Kerb Weight
      Figure 4.3.10.c: Roof displacement vs. applied force - 3 times curb weight
                                         107

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                                           roof fmvss216
                                                  i
                                       60          80

                                           Displacement (mm)
       Analysis
                                    3'Venza Kerb Weight
             Figure 4.3.10.d: Roof displacement vs. applied force - 3 times Venza weight
                                             03PLOT r«rfjmvn2!6
Figure 4.3.10.e: Roof plastic strains at 0/40/80/150 mm of roof crush platen displacement
                                            108

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      4.3.11.    FMVSS 301:  Rear Impact (moving deformable
                 barrier)

The rear impact test is designed to test fuel system integrity, allowing a maximum strain of
ten percent. The CAE analysis below indicates a strain of less than 3.5 percent after the
test, confirming fuel system integrity.
      PSF-lOT rr_fri™30IJBSO
                                    -
   Figure 4.3.11.a: Vehicle deformation (t=0.12 s) after rear deformable barrier impact
                                    7
Figure 4.3.11.b: Vehicle deformation (barrier blanked) after rear deformable barrier impact
                                     109

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JSPLOT-riJinwiailJhS}
                                               D3PL0T rr_fmv«3GlJ
 Figure 4.3.11.c: Vehicle deformation (at 0/40/80/120 ms) after rear deformable barrier
                                           impact
 S   15 -
                                           rr fmvss301 Ih50
       0.00      0.01      0.02      0.03       0.04      0.05      0.06      0.07       0.08       0.09
       Left B-Pillar (C60)
                                                     Right B-Pillar (CEO)
    Figure 4.3.11.d: Vehicle acceleration pulse during rear deformable barrier impact
                                             110

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                                       rr fmvss301 Ih50
                                           j	    i
    Vehicle (Average) (C 60)
                                               Barrier C of G (C 60)
Figure 4.3.11.e: Vehicle and barrier velocities during rear deformable barrier impact
    Figure 4.3.11.f: Fuel tank plastic strains after rear deformable barrier impact
                                        111

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 Figure 4.3.11.g: Main energy absorbing body structure for rear deformable barrier impact
The energy balance validated the model as the total energy was maintained.
                                           rr fmvss301  Ih50
        Kinetic Energy
        Internal Energy
        Stonewall Energy
        Spring & Damper Energy
Hourglass Energy
Contact Energy
External Work Energy
Total Energy
            Figure 4.3.11.h: Energy balance for rear deformable barrier impact
                                             112

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      4.3.12.    IIHS Low Speed - Front

This test is designed to examine the damage and repair costs to the front bumper and
fascia, which cannot be fully completed as it was beyond the scope of the project.
Examining the plastic strain of the bumper beam shown in the CAE analysis below gives
an indication of the potential damage.
                                                                    PLASTIC_ STRAIN


                                                                     (Max allots)
     Figure 4.3.12.a: Front plastic strain after low-speed frontal impact ('full impact')
                                                                   PLASTIC.STRAIN


                                                                    I Max all pis)
    Figure 4.3.12.b: Front plastic strain after low-speed frontal impact ('offset impact')
                                       113

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      4.3.13.    IIHS Low Speed - Rear

The IIHS low speed rear impact test is designed to look at repair costs in the event of a
rear-end collision. As with the frontal impact scenario, the repair costs cannot be estimated
for the Phase 2 HD, but the damage can be estimated from the plastic strain in the bumper
beam.
                                         D3PLOT: rrjlhs_center
                                                                    PLASTIC_STRAIN


                                                                      [Max nil p«)
      Figure 4.3.13.a: Rear plastic strains after low-speed rear impact ('full impact')
      Figure 4.3.13.b: Rear plastic strains after low-speed rear impact ('offset impact')
                                       114

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      4.3.14    Body Stiff ness/Modals
The body stiffness was analyzed using MSC/Nastran® software to determine the torsional
stiffness and bending modals. The results are shown below. The torsional stiffness is
32,900 Mm/degree for the low mass model. The BMW X5, a unibody SUV, was selected
as the target vehicle as it is generally regarded as having 'world class' torsional stiffness.
The published value for the X5 body structure is 27,000 Mm/degree3  The X5 body
incorporates UHSS, aluminum and magnesium and is 15-percent stifferthan the previous
version with virtually no weight penalty.

Creating a vehicle with a high torsional stiffness has a number of benefits to consumers as
well as automakers. It allows for a better suspension design as the suspension won't have
to cope with large amounts of chassis flex, the vehicle will exhibit more predictable
handling behavior because of these factors. A higher torsional stiffness also helps
structural robustness because the chassis flexes less, which would cause the structure to
fatigue and possibly fail eventually.

                           Table 4.3.14.a: Torsional stiffness
Torsional Stiffness
Phase 2 HD 201 1-01 -06-2
Torsional Stiffness
(kNm/deg)
32.9
                                                         D V«rt*««U01 1 01 4K\hM_»«r2GJE_iMf_«ai JM ofl
                                                              SUBCASE - TORSION Smu«IK>r.l
                                                                          frimtl

 L.
                Figure 4.3.14.a: CAE body stiffness analysis
Table 4.3.14.b below gives a comparison of the Phase 2 HD torsional stiffness to other
vehicles in a variety of classes. As can be seen in the table, a torsional stiffness of 32,900
Nm/degree is competitive even amongst sports cars, which have an average torsional
                                        115

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stiffness of 25,427. It is also competitive with other SUVs, which have an average torsional
stiffness of 26,350 Mm/degree.
               Table 4.3.14.b: Torsional stiffness comparison
Vehicle
Torsional Stiffness
(Nm/degree)

Phase 2 HD
32,900

Sports cars
Aston Martin DB9 Coupe
Audi TT Coupe
BMW M Coupe
Ford GT
Kbnigsegg CCX
Lamborghini Gallardo
Lamborghini Murcielago
Mazda RX-8
McLaren F1
Pagani Zonda F
Porsche 91 1 Carrera
27,000
19,000
32,000
27,100
28,100
23,000
20,000
30,000
13,500
27,000
33,000

Average 25,427

SUVs
BMWX5
BMWX6
Land Rover LR2
Volvo XC90
27,000
29,000
28,000
21,400

Average 26,350

Luxury cars
Aston Martin Rapide
Audi A8
BMW 7 Series
Jaguar XJ
Lexus RX
Maserati Quattroporte
Mercedes-Benz S-Class
Volvo S80
28,390
25,000
28,505
20,540
18,280
18,000
25,400
18,600

Average 22,839

Standard cars
AudiA2
BMW 3 Series
Jaguar X-Type
Mini Cooper
Volkswagen Fox
Volkswagen GTI
11,900
22,500
22,000
24,500
17,941
25,000
                                        116

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Volvo S60
| 20,000

Average
| 20,549
117

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   4.4.      Discussion

This section discusses the results obtained during the CAE analyses and how they meet
FMVSS regulations and IIHS requirements. No direct comparison with the Venza can be
made as the public domain impact results are for an actual production vehicle.

An industry accepted standard for the software fidelity used for modeling is in the 5% to
10% range. The maximum allowable peak acceleration target for front impact modeling
was 90% of the Venza peak acceleration as measured and reported by NHTSA.

Lotus utilized the same analysis techniques used to make production vehicles in order to
give the best possible results. The results are however, based on engineering software
analyses  rather than physical results. Overall, the Phase 2 HD acceleration levels are
comparable to production vehicles and, based on the CAE data, shows a properly
engineered, light weight vehicle can meet crash requirements.
      4.4.1.      Observations - FMVSS 208 Front Impact

FMVSS 208 deals with occupant protection, specifying maximum forces, accelerations,
and Head Injury Criteria (HIC) levels. Developing a full vehicle with tuned occupant
restraint systems, seats, and full interior was beyond the scope of this contract and as
such, Lotus based its CAE crash test analyses on vehicle crash acceleration data rather
than occupant criteria. The data shows the model has performance comparable to existing
production vehicles with all accelerations at acceptable levels. Furthermore, the occupant
restraint system (the full Venza airbag system is included in the vehicle mass) would be
tuned specifically to handle the specific acceleration pulses of the Phase 2 HD vehicle.

A material thickness sensitivity study was also conducted and found that acceleration
levels could be reduced by over 30 percent by reducing wall thickness 10 percent in key
areas, giving substantial opportunity to refine local acceleration pulses. Based on Lotus'
experience, material thicknesses were not reduced due to potential durability concerns.

The front structure is primarily aluminum  and the use of magnesium was kept to areas
outside of primary load paths due to the brittle nature of magnesium compared to steel and
aluminum.  The high loads experienced during a crash mean that magnesium is more likely
to crack rather than crumple and absorb energy.

            4.4.1.1      FMVSS 208:  35 mph Front Impact (0°/30° rigid wall,
offset deformable barrier)

Maximum dash intrusion of less than 20 mm - and less than 15mm in most areas -when
subjected to the FMVSS 208 35 mph frontal impact indicates  acceptable structural
                                      118

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performance in this area. Analyses revealed this is primarily due to minimal intrusion of the
engine bay components into the dash panels.

Some of the crash energy is absorbed by the magnesium dash panel, which is why there
is some intrusion into the passenger compartment, but the majority of the crash energy is
absorbed in the front bumper, bumper brackets, and the right and  left main rails. A
secondary load path to the structure is created by the engine and sub-frame, meaning the
sill and body structure have less energy to absord. The tires don't  contact the sill and the
A-pillar lower remained intact, indicating that most of the impact energy was absorbed by
the front structure.
            4.4.1.2     FMVSS 208: 25 mph Offset Deformable Barrier

This is a generally less severe test case than the 35 mph rigid barrier as the barrier can
absorb up to 50 percent of the total impact energy. The test results reflect this as the
maximum dash intrusion is < 6 mm, indicating acceptable performance in this test.

The majority of the crash energy is absorbed in the front bumper, front end module, left
bumper bracket, and left main rail due to the barrier overlap location. The engine and sub-
frame once again create a secondary load path, reducing the energy the sill  and body
structure  have to absorb.

            4.4.1.3     FMVSS 208: 25 mph 30° Flat Barrier - Left Side

Dash intrusion for this load case was < 15 mm, showing acceptable crash performance.
This load case is a mix of the flat rigid wall and offset deformable barrier test as the vehicle
impacts a flat, rigid wall at a 30° offset,  with the left side contacting the wall first. The
acceleration pulses are therefore asymmetrical again with the left side absorbing more
crash energy.

The crash energy is once again mostly absorbed in the front bumper, front end module, left
bumper bracket, and left main rail. The left shotgun inner and left front shock tower also
absorb some of the crash energy as well as the engine and sub-frame. More of the energy
is transmitted and  absorbed by the magnesium dash panel in this test case as well, as
indicated by the higher intrusion level.

            4.4.1.4     FMVSS 208: 25 mph 30° Flat Barrier - Right Side

As with the  left-side barrier impact, dash intrusion levels for the right-side barrier test case
were < 15 mm indicating acceptable structural performance. The right side of the vehicle
contacted the wall first, causing the right side of the front end structure to do more work
than the left with a few minor differences.
                                       119

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The front bumper, right bumper bracket, right main rail, front end module, and dash
reinforcement absorb most of the crash energy. The shotgun inner and shock tower don't
absorb any of the crash energy in this impact case due to the new load path through the
engine and its ancillary mounting locations. These mounting locations, and therefore load
path, are not present on the left side. As a result of the direct loading through the engine, it
contacts the dash crossmember sooner, transmitting more load.
      4.4.2.      Observations - FMVSS 210 Seatbelt Anchorages

FMVSS 210 is concerned with seatbelt retention and also specifies certain dimensional
constraints for the relationship between the seatbelts and seats. Designing a full interior
with seats was beyond the scope of this project. The loads were tested on the body
structure anchorages which would be used to attach the rear portion of the seat.

Overall, both the front and rear seatbelt anchorages performed as expected, meeting the
specified requirements. Strains for both systems were elevated due to the lack of modeled
seats, but did not cause the Phase 2 HD BIWto fail. The front and rear anchorages are
broken out below.

         4.4.2.1. Front Anchorages

Although the strain in the lower anchorage points (rear,  front-seat mounts) is elevated, the
simulation shows acceptable structure for seatbelt retention. The elevated strain in the
lower anchorage points is due to a lack of modeled seats, which were beyond the project
scope,  and thus transferred load through only two points instead of four as the front seat
mounts were not defined. This is a worst case analysis  as the  majority of the load  is
supported by a combination of the composite sandwich  floor and the aluminum structure.
The seat will be mounted to a more structural aluminum cross-member under the floor.

This strain around the belt attachment location is artificially high due to the method used to
attach the belts to the  structure. Typically in CAE analysis there is higher stress at the
point of load application than would be seen in reality as the clamping effects of fasteners
between the parts are not modeled.

The upper anchorage  location shows there will be localized deformation, but no
detachment of the anchorage. It should be noted that the D-ring attachment  on the B-pillar
typically allows for height adjustment and would therefore have a larger reinforcement than
included on the Phase 2 HD body structure. This larger reinforcement would help spread
the load and reduce the deformation and strain seen in  this area. The existing structure is
adequate for this purpose.

         4.4.2.2. Rear Anchorages
                                      120

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Simulation results show the model has acceptable structure for seatbelt retention and the
analysis predicts the highest strain areas are at the outboard lower-belt attachment
locations. The plastic strain around the D-ring attachment is less than the strain shown in
the front seatbelt pull analysis results. This is partly attributed to the narrower section
which makes it stiffer than the same belt mounting location on the B-pillar.

Approximately 100 mm of rear-seat pan deformation between the two center belt mounting
locations is predicted under this load case. The strain in this area is relatively low (<6
percent), indicating that the mounting plates would not pull through the  seat pan when
tested in this configuration. An additional fore/aft reinforcement could be mounted under
the seat pan to reduce the  total deformation  at the center belt mounting locations.

      4.4.3.      Observations - FMVSS 213 Child Restraint
                  Anchorage

This test is less severe (in terms of applied load) on the body structure  than the seatbelt
anchorage load case of FMVSS 210. The  primary concern of this test is to ensure the child
restraints will restrain a child under crash conditions, meaning the anchorages should not
pull out of the vehicle. While less severe than the load case of FMVSS210, the load is still
higher than required by FMVSS 213 as a 30-kg mass was used instead of the required 21-
kg mass. The model shows acceptable structure for child restraint anchorage with the
added load.

The mounting locations for the child restraints were the same as for the seatbelt pull and
the results indicate there should be no fracture or tearing of these mounting locations
under this load case. This indicates the anchorage could be designed to hold once full
seating and a full vehicle are developed as well.
      4.4.4.      Observation - FMVSS  214 Side Impact

The CAE analysis results of the FMVSS 214 side impact test show the Phase 2 HD BIW
sill, B-pillar, and side door beam sub-systems effectively manage the side impact crash
energy. The three FMVSS 214 side impact test results are broken down below. These
tests deal with occupant injury, which is beyond the scope of this project, so a maximum
allowable intrusion level of 300 mm was instituted. This is defined as the typical distance
between the door panel and most outboard seat surface.

          4.4.4.1 FMVSS 214: 33.5 mph Crabbed Barrier

CAE analysis showed the body structure has acceptable performance when subjected to
the FMVSS 214 crabbed barrier side  impact test.

The Phase 2 HD BIW intrusion level was measured at 115 mm, meaning the door panel
would not come into contact with the passenger. This likely prevents any possible injury
                                      121

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caused by contacting the hard surface of the inner door panel as is the primary concern of
theFMVSS214tests.
          4.4.4.2 FMVSS 214: 20 mph 75° Side Pole Impact

This test is carried out using two different size dummies - 5th percentile female and 50th
percentile male - and thus seating positions which moves the primary impact location due
to the fact that the pole is lined up with the frontal occupant's CG.

CAE analysis for the 5th percentile female revealed the pole struck nearly in the middle of
the A- and B-pillars with an intrusion level of 120 mm. This greatly surpasses the Lotus-
defined test requirements with a maximum allowable intrusion of 300mm.

A similar analysis was conducted for the 50th-percentile male with the seat and impact
location moved accordingly. Intrusion for this test was measured at 190 mm, far below the
300 mm allowed indicating acceptable structural performance.

Analyses showed the body structure has acceptable structural performance when
subjected to the load cases of FMVSS 214. The intrusion was measured at 115 mm for the
33.5 MPH crabbed barrier. The  intrusion for the 20 mph 75 degree pole test for a 5th
percentile female was 120 mm.  The intrusion for the 20 mph 75 degree pole test for a 50th
percentile male was 190 mm. This indicates that the sill, B pillar and side door beam sub-
systems are managing the energy in an effective manner.
      4.4.5.      Observation - FMVSS 216 Roof Crush

Simulations predict the Phase 2 HD vehicle will meet roof crush performance requirements
under the specified load case. Only 20 mm of platen displacement was predicted to meet
the 3*vehicle weight requirement. The simulation suggests that the requirement would be
met even if the baseline Toyota Venza curb weight was used (e.g. a 45-percent increase).

The significant difference between the Phase 2 HD structure and that of a similar segment
vehicle is due to the significant reduction in the curb weight (from  1700 kg to 1173 kg for
the Phase 2 HD  model). The body incorporates the structure of a  larger segment vehicle
even though the 3 time curb weight is similar to that of a small/medium passenger car.

Based on these results there could be some optimization of both the panel gauges and the
A-pillar section for weight if all other structural requirements are met. Other load cases and
manufacturing requirements would need to be evaluated in parallel to ensure all criteria
would be met.

      4.4.6.      Observations - FMVSS 301  Rear Impact
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FMVSS 301 deals with the integrity of the fuel system after a rear crash, aiming to prevent
any fuel spillage. The test allows a maximum plastic strain of ten percent in the fuel tank
and system after the crash event.

The maximum plastic strain in the fuel tank/system components is predicted to be less
than 3.5 percent, validating that the fuel system meets FMVSS 301 which allows no more
than 10-percent strain.  There was no contact with the body structure or vehicle
components.

The pressure change in the fuel tank is less than 2 percent so the risk of the tank splitting
due to an increase in internal pressure (caused by compressing the outside of the tank) is
predicted to be minimal.

Barrier to vehicle crossover velocity is predicted to occur at 69 ms from the initial contact.

Due to the offset bumper beam, dynamics of the rear impact are not ideal.  The ideal failure
mode is an axial crush  under load (i.e. pure compression mode), but the offset bumper
beam means the rear bumper armature rotates. This creates a torque which results in a
bending moment into the rear rail, causing it to fail. The rear bumper, left bumper bracket,
left rail, rear end lower  panels, and horizontal surfaces of the right rail absorb most of the
energy.

      4.4.7.      Observations - IIHS Low Speed - Front

The analyses of these two front impact load cases predict that only the bumper system
components would yield.

The higher levels of plastic strain are predicted to be in the heat affected zones at the
welded joint between the bumper armature and the  bumper brackets. In these areas the
material yield strength was reduced by 60 percent (from  the un-welded material properties)
to compensate for the annealing that occurs due to welding.

In the 'full' impact case there is deformation of the bumper armature as this flattens under
loading, resulting in lateral loading at the bumper brackets.

Analysis of the offset impacts predicts there will be minimal damage to the bumper system
because there is less than 75 mm of overlap between bumper armature and the end of the
barrier. This results in a 'glancing' impact, where the vehicle is pushed sideways as it
travels forwards due to the curvature of the outer end of  the armature.

The styling may be required to change in this area to allow the bumper beam to be moved
outboard and forward in the side contact area to reduce  any potential damage. The Phase
1 front end styling moved the front lamps moved inboard and rearward of this contact area
to minimize any possible damage to the lighting system.  Developing the full front end
styling, bumper system, lamps and sheet metal was beyond the scope of this project.
                                       123

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      4.4.8.      Observations - IIHS  Low Speed - Rear

The analyses of these two rear impact load cases predict there will be plastic strain in
components other than the bumper system.

For the 'full' load cases there is some body deformation. Modifying the exterior styling to
allow the addition of bumper foam would move the barrier contact point further away from
the body panels, improving performance. Additionally, the barrier displacement could be
reduced by tuning the foam density and thickness.

The 'offset' impact analysis indicates a result similar to that predicted for the front 'offset'
load case. This is due to minimal engagement of the barrier and the curvature of the
armature which  is  more aggressive than the front. The vehicle 'slides' inboard off the
barrier rather than staying perpendicular to the line of travel. The analysis predicts that the
vehicle will move ~50 mm inboard.

This analysis also  indicated that the lower rear corner of the body could be damaged by
the upper portion of the barrier. This concern would be addressed by incorporating local
styling changes  to the bumper system  including reducing the plan view curvature, moving
the bumper armature ends rearward at the outboard ends and increasing the distance
between the bumper and the body panels. This can be done by moving the body panels
forward and  inboard relative  to the existing bumper or adjusting the bumper  relative to the
existing  sheet metal. These revisions would  create additional clearance to the barrier and
also allow energy absorbing  material to be added to the bumper beam.

The rear bumper system  is an example of the tradeoffs made between vehicle appearance
and function. Preliminary styling concepts, such as the Phase 1 vehicle, do not necessarily
comprehend all functional requirements even though they are based on 'best practices'.
Engineering  analysis is used to verify the feasibility of the styling  relative to functional
requirements. This analysis indicated that a styling adjustment should be made to improve
the rear bumper low speed performance. This is a typical example of using analytical tools
to verify functional performance very early in the styling process.  There are no body
structural issues.
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      4.4.9.      Vehicle-to-Vehicle Crash Results

This section shows results of a simulated impact between the Phase 2 HD vehicle and a
Ford Taurus. This information was requested by the NHTSA to compare the performance
to their metrics. The crash simulation was run such that both vehicles have the same
kinetic energy, which necessitated the Phase 2 vehicle to be run at 40 mph while the
Taurus was run at 27 mph. These analyses however, were run by Lotus and may be setup
differently than the NHTSA analyses so no specific comments can be made. NHTSA will
be publishing their test results separately in a report preliminarily titled:  Evaluation of
Lotus  Phase II Finite Element Model for Fleet Simulation Studies authored by Aida Barsan-
Anelli  and Stephen Summers.

No crash acceleration or intrusion levels were objectively measured because of the
possible differences in setup between NHTSA and Lotus.  What can be observed is that
there is no intrusion into the Lotus model passenger cell as occurred (<22 mm worst case)
with the single vehicle FMVSS test results.
     D3PLOT:frt c2c Iau27 100
                                                                     .000000000
 Figure 4.4.9.a: Phase 2 HD vehicle to Ford Taurus crash simulation setup - three-quarter
                                      view
                                       125

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   D3PLOT:frt c2c tau27 100
                                        _             _                .000000000
  Figure 4.4.9.b:  Phase 2 HD vehicle to Ford Taurus crash simulation setup - side view
 D3PLOTM c2c Iau27 100
                                                                                 z
                                                                                v. I   x
                                                                                 0.144999
Figure 4.4.9.c: Phase 2 HD vehicle to Ford Taurus crash simulation result - three-quarter
                                          view
                                           126

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   D3PLOT:frt C2c tau27 100
                                            _                             0.144999
  Figure 4.4.9.d: Phase 2 HD vehicle to Ford Taurus crash simulation result - side view
   D3PLOT:frt c2c tau27 100
                                                                               0.144999
Figure 4.4.9.e: Phase 2 HD vehicle to Ford Taurus crash simulation result - three-quarter
                                 view, opaque Taurus
                                          127

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       4.4.10.     Summary of Safety  Testing Results

Table 4.4.10.a below summarizes the findings from the above design, technical
engineering analysis, and crash test simulations. The table reports specifically on the
study's objectives to develop and validate a mass-reduced vehicle structure that will meet
known guidelines and requirements for crashworthiness - both governmental and
voluntary testing, stiffness, and torsional bending. As part of Task 1, the mass-reduced
Phase 2 vehicle model was validated for conforming to the existing external data for the
baseline Toyota Venza, meeting best-in-class torsional and bending stiffness, and
managing customary running  loads.

As part of Task 2, the mass-reduced vehicle was validated for meeting the listed  FMVSS
requirements, as well as the IIHS bumper tests (the IIHS side impact and front and rear
crash tests were not part of the contract). All of the tests were conducted using CAE
analyses and  BIW acceleration and intrusion levels. These tests measure dummy
occupant acceleration levels on a physical vehicle typically. Developing a full occupant
restraint system and interior as well as building a physical  test vehicle were beyond the
scope of this project. Using vehicle intrusion and acceleration levels shows whether the
vehicle can meet crash test requirements,  but small changes may be required once a
physical vehicle is built and tested.
                      Table 4.4.10.a: Summary of Vehicle Test Validation
      Area
                  Requirement, Guideline, Test
Result of Vehicle
  Simulation
  Model
                 Conformance with existing external data for the baseline Venza
                                                            Dimensions, interior
                                                              volume, utility
                                                               maintained
  Standard
  Operating
                 Withstand and dampen major customary vehicle loads (e.g. running loads)
                                                            Analyses showed
                                                            vehicle robustness
  Development
Meet best-in-class torsional and bending stiffness
   32,900 N
  Frontal Impact
                 Full frontal crash analysis: static stiffness (FMVSS 208) and compatibility of main
                 body structure and front end energy absorption subsystem including 35-mph, 0-
                 degree flat barrier; 25-mph, 30-degree flat barrier; 25-mph, 40-percent offset
                 deformable barrier
                 IIHS bumper: 6-mph centerline, 3-mph, 15-percent offset
                                                           Acceptable intrusion
                                                             and acceleration
                                                                 levels
                                                            Acceptable strain
                                                                 levels
  Side Impact
                 Side impact, door beam intrusion testing (FMVSS 214) including 35-mph, 27-
                 degree moving deformable barrier; 20-mph, 75-degree pole impact
                                                           Acceptable intrusion
                                                             and acceleration
                                                                 levels
  Rear Impact
                 Rear impact, moving deformable barrier (FMBSS 301)
                 IIHS bumper: 6-mph centerline, 3-mph, 15-percent offset
                                                           Acceptable intrusion
                                                             and acceleration
                                                                 levels
                                                            Acceptable strain
                                                                 levels
  Rollover Protection
                 Roof crush (FMVSS 216)
                                                           Acceptable intrusion
                                                                 levels
  Restraint Systems
                 Seatbelt anchorages (FMVSS 210)
                                                               Acceptable
                                                            deformation levels
                                             128

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Vehicle Structure
Vehicle-to-Vehicle
Impacts
Child restraint systems (FMVSS 213)
Front and rear energy management, non-deformation, and chassis frame buckling
testing
35-mph, car-to-car impact with NCAC
35-mph, car-to-car impact with NCAC
Ford Taurus; Taurus velocity: 27 mph
Ford Explorer; Explorer velocity: 18 mph
Acceptable
deformation levels
Acceptable
acceleration, intrusion,
and deformation levels
Acceptable
acceleration and
intrusion levels
Acceptable
acceleration and
intrusion levels
129

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   4.5.     Closures

The analyses presented heretofore included only simulated door beams (see section 4.2.1.2) for
FEA analysis. ARB contracted Lotus Engineering Inc. to determine the effect fully engineered
closures would have on vehicle crash performance. The results of developing closures are presented
in this section.
      4.5.1.       Objectives
The objectives of this set of analyses were to evaluate the vehicle performance with the addition of
closures (hood, doors, tailgate, and fenders); with the updates to the BIW (revised upper A-
pillar/cowl/front header - changed as a result of the stiffness studies; and location of the rear
bumper armature (translated rearwards to improve the IIHS low speed performance).

The updated model was run using the same load cases as the previous model (as listed below).

      FMVSS 208: Front Impact (0°/30° rigid wall, offset deformable barrier)
      FMVSS 210: Seat Belt Anchorages
      FMVSS 213: Child Restraint Systems
      FMVSS 214: Side Impact (side barrier, side pole)
      FMVSS 216: Roof Crush
      FMVSS 301: Rear Impact (moving deformable barrier)
      IMS: Low Speed Bumper (front & rear)

The changes made are won't have a major impact on the front impact performance or occupant
related load cases. Therefore the vehicle performance already reported for FMVSS 208 is still valid.

This report details the results from the side impact, rear impact, and roof crush load cases only.
      4.5.2.       Model  Updates

The previous CAE model was updated with CAD data that was supplied for the following:

Hood Assembly
Tailgate Assembly
Front and Rear Door Assembly
Fenders and Mounting brackets
BIW Component Updates
Rear Bumper Armature Assembly

Figure 4.5.2.a. highlights the images of the main updated components only.
                                          130

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Figure 4.5.2.a: Body-in-White - V27
               131

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Figures 4.5.2.b and 4.5.2.C below shows front and rear isometric views of the closure systems added
to the BIW model.
                           Figure 4.5.2.b: Front closure view
                            Figure 4.5.2.c: Rear closure view
                                          132

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      4.5.3.      Model Mass/Other Information

Total model weight for the V27 update was increased by 23.34 kg to a curb weight of 1173.34kg vs.
the V26 model primarily due to the increased mass of the body in white which used a higher
percentage of aluminum and less magnesium than the Phase 1 BIW.
                                      133

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      4.5.4.      Analysis Results

The following sections show analysis results from crash tests that would be significantly affected by
the changes made to the CAE model (V26) in previous sections. This new model with fully
engineered closures is referred to as V27.
          4.5.4.1. 33.5-mph Side Impact - Crabbed Barrier

Previously a representation of the door beams and the hinge and latch reinforcements had been
included. With the inclusion of the closure in the model it is possible to monitor the intrusion of the
door inner structure under this load case. The FMVSS214 test is a requirement where the pass/fail is
determined on occupant injury so would require door trim and the restraints to be modeled for
correctness. To ensure that the side airbag could deploy unhindered the door intrusion velocity and
displacement is monitored. Figure 4.5.4.1.a shows the model setup with the barrier in place.
  D3PLOT: Side_fmvss214_mdblh33p5
                          Figure 4.5.4.1.a: Model analysis setup
                                          134

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Figures 4.5.4.1.b and 4.5.4.1.C below show the vehicle deformation following impact.
                         Figure 4.5.4.1.b: Vehicle Deformation (O.ls)
                   Figure 4.5.4.1.c: Vehicle Deformation (barrier not shown)
                                            135

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Figures 4.5.4.1.d and 4.5.4.1.e show the vehicle and barrier velocities and the B pillar relative

intrusion velocities.
                                             side fmvss214 mdblh33p5
                                             i   ~	i ~
                                                          Right B-Pillar at Base (C 60)
                        Figure 4.5.4.1.d: Global Vehicle and Barrier Velocities
                                                Side_fmvss214_mdblli33p5
          Left B-Pillar Upper (C 60)

          Left B-Pillar at Beltline (C 60)
                                                             Left B-Pillar at Pelvis (C 60)
                        Figure 4.5.4.1.e: Relative Intrusion Velocities (B-pillar)
                                                    136

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Figures 4.5.4.1 .f and 4.5.4.1 .g show the B pillar and the front/rear door intrusion displacements.
                                                 side_fmvss214_mdblh33p5
          Left B-Pillar Upper (C 60)
          Left B-Pillar at Beltline (C 60)
                                                             Left B-Pillar at PeMs (C 60)
                      Figure 4.5.4.1.f: Relative Intrusion Displacements (B-pillar)
                                               side_fmvss214_mdblh33p5
                                               j
         LH Front Door @ Beltline rear
         LH Front Door @ Pelvis rear
LH Rear Door <$ Beltline rear
LH Rear Door @ Pelvis rear
                 Figure 4.5.4.1.g: Relative Intrusion Displacements (Front/Rear Door)
                                                     137

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Figure 4.5.4.1 .h shows the intrusion for the B pillar at the B-pillar centerline.
D3PLOT: Side_fmvss214_mdblh33p5
                                                     MODEL YZXE3

                 I
                                                                                            1200 . 0.100001
                          Figure 4.5.4.1.H: B-Pillar Intrusion profile x=2842

Figure 4.5.4.1 .i shows the intrusion displacements for the struck side of the car.
                                                                                          Y_DISPLACEMENT
                                                                                          (Rel N161 162 163)

                                                                                           0.00

                                                                                           20.00

                                                                                           40.00

                                                                                           60.00

                                                                                           80.00
                                                                                           100.00

                                                                                           120.00

                                                                                           140.00
I
                                                                                              J
                            Figure 4.5.4.1.i: Intrusion levels on Struck-side
                                                   138

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Figure 4.5.4.1 j  shows the plastic strain for the struck side of the car.
       D3PLOT: side_fmvss214_mclblh33p5
                                                                                                   PLASTIC_STRAIN
                                                                                                      (Max all pis)
                            Figure 4.5.4.1.J: Plastic Strain in Struck-side Doors

Figure 4.5.4.1.k shows the energy balance for the struck side of the car.
                                                                                                       0.100001
      uj    60 ~"
                                                   s ide_f mvss214_mdb I h33p5
                                                    i	i	
                                                            0.05       0.06
                                                          Time(s)(s)
            K.E.-Whole Model
            I.E.-Whole Model
            Stonewall Energy - Whole Model
Spring/Damper Energy-Whole Model
HG.E.-Whole Model
System damping Energy - Whole Model
Sliding interface energy - Whole Model
External Work - Whole Model
T.E. - Whole Model
                                       Figure 4.5.4.1.k: Energy Balance
                                                         139

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             4.5.4.1.1.  Observations - Side  Impact MDB

With the inclusion of the doors into the CAE model the time for the cross-over velocity (vehicle is
moving with same velocity as barrier) occurs at 48ms. This is 17ms earlier than without the
closures. This indicates that the vehicle side impact performance is stiffer than previous analyses
predicted.

 The intrusion velocity of the B-Pillar is also predicted to have reduced slightly.

The intrusion of the B-Pillar into the vehicle during impact is predicted to be 65mm, which is a
15mm improvement over the previous (#26) model or a reduction of 19% vs. the original model.
The maximum intrusion of the door inner panel is also predicted to be 65mm maximum. This
maximum occurs at the approximate z-height location with the pelvis of the dummy.

One of the reasons for the minimal predicted intrusion under this load case is the location of the
door intrusion beams. These have been located such that there is an overlap with the B-Pillar which
means that when it is loaded in side impact it becomes trapped between the barrier and the B-Pillar.
The B pillar uses hot stamped boron steel material which has extremely high yield strength. This
means that it has more elastic deformation capability than regular steel (i.e. HSLA). Note that
elastic deformation will  absorb more energy (per unit displacement) than plastic deformation. At the
forward location of the rear door intrusion beam attachment to the door inner panel, the analysis
predicts that there is  material failure of the cast magnesium inner.

With these improved results predicted by the analysis, the ability for the occupant restraints system
to work should not be compromised by the body structure.
                                           140

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          4.5.4.2. 20mph 75° Side  Pole Impact - Front (5th
               Percentile Female)
The FMVSS214 20mph 75degree pole load case is carried out with a rigid pole lined up with the
occupant head center-of-gravity location (2590.5x/-393.8y) along the direction of travel. It is carried
out with a 5th %ile female dummy and a 50th %ile male dummy. As the two dummies put the seat in
two different locations the initial impact points are different, requiring two separate analyses be
preformed.

As with the moving barrier impact case, the requirement is to monitor the injury of the occupants.
This analysis would be carried out on a full vehicle with closures, dummies, interior and a restraints
system. The updated model (#27) includes the closures so their response (intrusion levels and
velocities)  can also be evaluated. Figure 4.5.4.2.a shows the model setup.
D3PLOT:side_fmvss214_polefrt05th
 Figure 4.5.4.2.a: 20-mph, 75-degree side-pole impact - front (5th percentile female) model
                                        setup
                                         141

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Figures 4.5.4.2.b and 4.5.4.2.C show the vehicle deformation following the pole strike.
   de_fmv3s214_polefrtO!
                          Figure 4.5.4.2.b: Vehicle Deformation (O.ls)

   Figure 4.5.4.2.c: Vehicle deformation from 20-mph, 75-degree side-pole impact ~ front (5th
                                percentile female, pole blanked)
                                             142

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Figures 4.5.4.2.d and 4.5.4.2.e show the intrusion velocities and displacements for the B pillar and
front door.
                                                        14_polefrt05th
        Left B-Pillar Upper (C 60)
        Left B-Pillar at Beltline (C 60)
        Left B-Pillar Pelvis (C 60)
Left Frt Door (rr) at Beltline (C 60)
Left Frt Door (rr) at Pelvis (C 60)
                      Figure 4.5.4.2.d: Intrusion Velocities (B-Pillar & Front Door)
                                                 side_fmvss214_polefrt05th
        Left B-Pillar Upper (C 60)
        Left B-Pillar at Beltline (C 60)
        Left B-Pillar at Pelvis (C 60)
Left Frt Door (rr) at Beltline (C 60)
Left Frt Door (rr) at Pelvis (C 60)
                    Figure 4.5.4.2.e: Intrusion Displacements (B-Pillar& Front Door)
                                                        143

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Figure 4.5.4.2.f shows the intrusion levels at the centerline of the B pillar.
    D3PLOJ: sidejnwssz 14_golefrt05th
                                                    MODEL VZ X E3
                      i
                          Figure 4.5.4.2.f: Section through B-Pillar, x= 2842

Figure 4.5.4.2.g shows the intrusion levels for the struck side of the front door.
      D3PLOT: sidejmvss214_polefrt05th
                                                                                         Y_DISPLACEMENT
                                                                                         (RdN161 162163)
                           Figure 4.5.4.2.g: Intrusion levels on struck side
                                                   144

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Figure 4.5.4.2.h shows the energy balance for the struck side of the front door. The energy balance
show the analysis is valid as the overall energy of the crash is conserved.
                                             side_f mvss214_polef rtOSth
       K.E. - Whole Model
       I.E. - Whole Model
       Stonewall Energy - Whole Model
Spring/Damper Energy - Whole Model
HG.E. - Whole Model
System Damping Energy - Whole Model
Sliding Interface Energy - Whole Model
External Work - Whole Model
I.E. - Whole Model
                                     Figure 4.5.4.2.H: Energy Balance
                                                      145

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         4.5.4.3.  20-mph 75° Side Pole Impact - Front (50th
               percentile Male)

The FMVSS214 20-mph, 75-degree pole load-case for the male seating position will put the initial
pole contact point further rearwards (179.5mm) in vehicle than for the 5* percentile female. Figure
4.5.4.3.a shows the model set-up.
          03PLOI: «de_tmvi.214_ptHefit50tli
 Figure 4.5.4.3.a: 20-mph, 75-degree side-pole impact - front (50th percentile male) model setup

           Figures 4.5.4.3.b and 4.5.4.3.C show the vehicle deformation after impact.
                  Figure 4.5.4.3.b: Vehicle Deformation (O.ls) after impact
                                         146

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                        Figure 4.5.4.3.c: Vehicle Deformation (Pole Blanked)

Figures 4.5.4.3.d and 4.5.4.3.e show the intrusion velocities and displacements for the front door
and B pillar.
                                                    14_polefrt50th
         Left B-Pillar Upper (C 60)
         Left B-Pillar at Beltline (C 60)
         Left B-Pillar Pelvis (C 60)
Left Frt Door (rr) at Beltline (C 60)
Left Frt Door (rr) at Pelvis (C 60)
  Figure 4.5.4.3.d: Intrusion Velocities (B-Pillar & Front Door) after 20-mph, 75-degree side-pole
                                 impact — front (50th percentile male)
                                                  147

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                                                      14_polefrt50th
          Left B-Pillar Upper (C SO)
          Left B-Pillar at Beltline (C 60)
          Left B-Pillar at Pelvis (C 60)
Left Frt Door (rr) at Beltline (C 60)
Left Frt Door (rr) at Pelvis (C 60)
  Figure 4.5.4.3.e: Intrusion Displacements (B-Pillar & Front Door) after 20-mph, 75-degree side-
                                                        th
                               pole impact ~ front (50  percentile male)

Figures 4.5.4.3.f and 4.5.4.3.g show the intrusion displacements for the front door and at the
centerline of the B pillar.
D3PLOT:side fmvss214_poletrt50th
1 Ms,\ N^SIHVvJ : L I39895E-0?
                              Y_DISPLACEMENT
                               (RelN161 162163)
  Figure 4.5.4.3.f: Intrusion levels on struckside after 20-mph, 75-degree side-pole impact — front
                                          (50th percentile male)
                                                   148

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      D3PLOT:side fmv»214_polefrt50tii
                                                    '-•Me. : • E.
  Figure 4.5.4.3.g: Section through B-Pillar, x= 2842 after 20-mph, 75-degree side-pole impact
                                     front (50*  percentile male)

Figure 4.5.4.3.h shows the plastic strain for the front door.
      D3PLOT:sideJmvss214_lrole[il50lh
                                                                                       PLASTIC_STRAIN
                                                                                          (Max all pts)
                                                                                        0.00

                                                                                        0.02

                                                                                        0.03

                                                                                        0.05

                                                                                        0.06

                                                                                        0.08

                                                                                        0.09

                                                                                        0.11

                                                                                        0.12
                                                                                           I
   Figure 4.5.4.3.H: Plastic Strain in Front Door after 20-mph, 75-degree side-pole impact — front
                                         (50th percentile male)
                                                  149

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Figure 4.5.4.3.1 shows the energy balance and that the analysis was valid as no energy was created
nor destroyed.
                                                side_f mvss214_polef rtSOlh
          K.E. - Whole Model
          I.E. - Whole Model
          Stonewall Energy - Whole Model
Spring/Damper Energy - Whole Model
HG.E. - Whole Model
System Damping Energy - Whole Model
Sliding Interface Energy - Whole Model
External Work - Whole Model
I.E. - Whole Model
  Figure 4.5.4.3.1: Energy Balance for 20-mph, 75-degree side-pole impact — front (50  percentile
                                                    male)
                                                     150

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             4.5.4.3.1.  Observations - Side Impact Pole

The side pole impact load cases show that for both the 5* female and the 50*  male load cases the
intrusion is predicted to be at a maximum at similar door locations. Figure 4.5.4.3.1.a shows a
section cut @ 1 lOOz showing the deformation of the 5th load case (in red) vs. the 50th (in green).
Intrusion levels at the B-Pillar are different and are a result of the pole location loading directing
into the B-Pillar in the 50*  location compared to loading into the door on the 5* .
D3PLOT: M1: Side_fnivss214_polefrt50lh
     M2: si(ie_Imvss214_polelrl[)51h
                    Figure 4.5.4.3.1.a: 5* percentile female vs. 50*  percentile male front door
                                   intrusion comparison

The cast magnesium door inner material required the inner and outer waist rail reinforcements to be
designed to provide extra support. In the 50*  male load case there is some tearing of the door inner
panel predicted by the analysis that is not predicted in the 5* .  This material failure was not
previously predicted. The location of the pole in the 50th load case results in more load being
reacted at the rear end of the front door. This is a result of the longer moment arm between the pole
location and the center of gravity for the forward vehicle mass including the engine and
transmission more than offsetting the pole moving closer to the B pillar structure.
                                                                                       -til
In both load cases the rocker is the first substantial load bearing member that the pole contacts
which is supported by a number of cross-members. There is more deformation in this area in the 5T1
load case as the pole deforms the rocker between two cross-members whereas in the 50* case one of
the cross-members is directly behind the loaded point in the rocker.

In both load cases the levels of intrusion are predicted to be larger at the door ~50mm than at the B-
Pillar. Neither load case is predicting dynamic deformation of the interior body structure above
250mm.
                                            151

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          4.5.4.4. Roof Crush

The FMVSS216a roof crush load case evaluates vehicle performance in a 'roll-over' crash scenario.
The actual test is carried out quasi-statically to represent a load being applied to the upper A-pillar
joint. The regulation specifies that the vehicle should be able to withstand 3 times its curb weight
without loading the head of a Hybrid III 50* percentile male occupant with more than 222N (SOlbs).
This analysis includes testing for the 95* and 99* percentile male occupants.

The previous version (#26) of the CAE model predicted performance levels that were acceptable.
The reasons for performing this analysis on the latest version of the model (#27) were due to the
changes that were made to the A-Pillar/Front Header & Cowl to improve the stiffness performance.
Figure 4.5.4.4.a shows the model setup.
                                              (PLOT roof_fmvM216
  J3PLQT roof_fnw»s2!6
                           Figure 4.5.4.4.a: Roof crush model setup
                                            152

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    Figure 4.5.4.4.b shows the roof deformation for a series of increasing platen displacements.
            Figure 4.5.4.4.b: Deformation at 0/40/80/150mm of Platen Displacement

Figure 4.5.4.4.C shows the roof deformation relative to 95th and 99th percentile head clearance
zones.
                                                                                   ._>
                                               MPLGT roof_fmv«216
                                                                                    _l
      Figure 4.5.4.4.c: Deformation in Relation to occupant head clearance zones (95* /99* )
                           @ 0/40/80/150mm of Platen Displacement
                                             153

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Figures 4.5.4.4.d and 4.5.4.4.e show the roof deformation relative to the FMVSS 216 requirement.
                                                roof fmvss216
                                            60           80
                                                Displacement (mm)
       Analysis
                                        3"Kerb Weight
          Figure 4.5.4.4.d: Roof Displacement vs. Applied Force - 3 times Curb Weight
                                                roof fmvss216
                                                  ~
 „   so
                                            60           80
                                                Displacement (mm)
       Analysis
                                        3'Venza Kerb Weight
          Figure 4.5.4.4.e: Roof Displacement vs. Applied Force - 3 times Venza Weight
                                                154

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Figure 4.5.4.4.f shows the roof plastic strain relative to platen displacement.
         Figure 4.5.4.4.f: Plastic Strains @ 0/40/80/150mm of Roof Platen Displacement
                                             155

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             4.5.4.4.1.  Observations - Roof Crush

The current model is predicting results that are very similar to the previous version of the model
(V26). The analysis predicts that the 3*vehicle weight requirement (FMVSS216a) is achieved
within the first 20mm of platen displacement performance and that 4*vehicle weight requirement
(IIHS - Good Rating) will be achieved within 25mm of platen displacement.

The styling of the upper greenhouse of the vehicle and the rake of the windshield direct the platen
loads through the B-Pillar. This load is reacted in compression which provides a substantially higher
load carrying capacity that at the base of the A-Pillar, which is put into bending. The figure below
shows the location and magnitude offerees in the A & B-Pillars. Figure 4.5.4.4.1.a shows the
relative forces acting on the A and B pillars.
D3PLOT: roof fmvss216
       Figure 4.5.4.4.1.a: Resultant force magnitude in A & B-Pillars from roof crush test
                                           156

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          4.5.4.5.  Rear Impact
The FMVSS301 SOmph 70-percent overlap rear moving deformable barrier load case primary
function is to ensure the vehicle fuel system integrity is maintained to reduce potential vehicle fires
caused by fuel spillage, during and after impact. The previous model did not indicate that there
would be any issues with the integrity of the fuel tank/filler; the model was re-evaluated under this
load case as there had been a change to the rear bumper system.

Assessment was carried out by looking at the deformation of the body structure around the fuel tank
as well as the fuel tank and the fuel tank/filler. Figure 4.5.4.5.a shows the model setup.
                         Figure 4.5.4.5.a: Rear Impact Model Set up
                                          157

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Figures 4.5.4.5.b and 4.5.4.5.C show the vehicle deformation.
 >lOT:rr_fnw»3Ql_H5D
                                                r
                           Figure 4.5.4.5.b: Vehicle Deformation (t=0.12s)
   JPLOT'rr_ffflvss30IJhSO
                                                  L,
                                                     D3F>LOT.rrJmY«301Jh50
  .jf-Lui rrJlwstaOtjssB
                                                     D3FLOT.r._frdv33301_h50
                                                                                                    XI	*
                       Figure 4.5.4.5.c: Vehicle Deformation (Barrier Blanked)
                                                   158

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Figure 4.5.4.5.d shows the vehicle deformation as a function of the event timing.
                                                                                           •-•
       Figure 4.5.4.5.d: Vehicle Deformation (@ Oms/40ms/80ms/120ms) after rear impact



Figure 4.5.4.5.e shows the B pillar acceleration levels as a function of the event timing.
                                            rr fmvss301  Ih50
                                                 i        i
   s   is --
         0.00      0.01
                                                                         0.08      0.09
         Left B-Pillar (C60)
                                                     Right B-Pillar(C60)
                 Figure 4.5.4.5.e: Vehicle Acceleration Pulse during rear impact
                                              159

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Figure 4.5.4.5.f shows the vehicle & barrier velocities.
                                                  rr_fmvss301_lh50
                                              j	i	u
          Vehicle (Average) (C 60)
                                                            Barrier C of G (C 60)
             Figure 4.5.4.5.f: Vehicle & Barrier Velocities during rear impact simulation



Figure 4.5.4.5.g shows the fuel tank plastic strain.
                                             PLASTIC_STRAIN  D3PLOT: rr_fmvss301_lh50

                                               (Max all pts)  1' Max S44Z7070 : 4.0064G3E-DZ
PLASTIC_STOAIN

  (Max all pts)
                      Figure 4.5.4.5.g: Fuel Tank Plastic Strains after rear impact
                                                    160

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Figure 4.5.4.5.h shows the energy balance is valid as the overall energy is held constant.
 01   150
                                                 rr_fmvss301Jh50
                                              i	i_
       Kinetic Energy
       Internal Energy
       Stonewall Energy
       Spring & Damper Energy
Hourglass Energy
Contact Energy
External Work Energy
Total Energy
                              Figure 4.5.4.5.h: Rear impact energy balance
                                                      161

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              4.5.4.5.1.  Observations - Rear Impact

The barrier to vehicle cross-over velocity occurs 2ms earlier than previously predicated at ~67ms;
and the vehicle acceleration response also shows a slight increase in the peak accelerations reported
for the struck side of the vehicle.

The reduced time to cross-over velocity and increase in the acceleration response is expected as
there is less compliance in the vehicle; excluding the tailgate results in less stiffness of the rear
aperture, and including the 'full' doors with result in less flexing of the door apertures.

There is an area on the fuel tank where there is plastic strain and this is more a modeling induced
strain rather than a real factor, as there are four rigid connections used between the fuel tank straps
and the fuel tank to hold it in place. Rigid elements concentrate the load transfer between the
connected parts to discrete nodes which is somewhat unrealistic in the case of the tank straps as
these would spread the load over a larger area. Plastic strain in the fuel tank is predicted to be 3.6-
percent maximum, which is less than the failure strain for the typical plastic fuel tank material
properties (generic plastic properties used in the CAE model with a yield stress of 25MPa). This is
shown in Figure 4.5.4.5.1 a.
D3PLOT: rrJmvss301JhSO
                                                                               PLASTIC_STRAIN
                                                                                  (Max all pts)
                                                                                  0.120001
              Figure 4.5.4.5.1.a: Fuel Tank Plastic Strain location after rear impact
                                            162

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The airbag that was included to monitor the pressure change in the fuel tank indicates a change of
less than O.Spsi (<2 percent); this is the same as predicted for the previous run.

As a result of moving the rear bumper armature rearwards the length of the crush can has increased.
This increase in length increases the moment arm (measured from the rearward face of the bumper
armature to the mounting surface). While this does not noticeably change the mode of deformation,
it does make it harder to resist the rotation of the bumper armature. This rotation is shown in Figure
4.5.4.5.l.b.
                                                                                 0.010000
             Figure 4.5.4.5.1.b: Initial vehicle armature rotation during rear impact
It will be difficult to get to the ideal failure mode (axial crush) using extrusions. The ideal loading
would ensure 100-percent engagement of the vehicle armature with the barrier. The height locations
of vehicle armatures are typically set based upon the requirements for FMVSS Part 581 pendulum.
Extending the rail and bumper armature to get full engagement is not required as the analysis
predict that the vehicle deformation occurs behind the rear wheels.
                                            163

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          4.5.4.6. IIHS Low Speed - Rear

The previous V26 model IIHS rear low speed analysis indicated that in both the lOkph 'full'
overlap and 5kph 15-percent overlap load cases there could be potential for damage to occur to the
body. It was not possible to state that this would be eliminated 100 percent with the inclusion of
bumper foam (which is typically used, but not included in the CAE model).

With the inclusion of the rear tailgate in the V27 model the rear lower edge was the rearward most
point in the vehicle. This indicates that for these IIHS load cases there would be damage to the non-
bumper system components.

The latest version of the CAE model (#27) include a modified bumper beam assembly, where the
curvature of the bumper follows the curvature of the tailgate lower edge and is also the rearward
most point in the vehicle. The model does not include the fascia or foam which would add an
additional 40-50mm.

The CAE performance assessment is based on the extent of any permanent deformation and plastic
strain that is predicted in the structure. Figure 4.5.4.6.a shows the model setup.
                                       *-,
                 Figure 4.5.4.6.a: Low-speed IIHS impact model setup ('full')
                                          164

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Figure 4.5.4.6.b shows the plastic strain for the impact beam for a center impact.
             Figure 4.5.4.6.b: IIHS low-speed impact element plastic strains ('full')

Figure 4.5.4.6.c shows the model setup for an offset impact.
                                                                                    PLASTIC J5TRAIN
                                                                                      (Max all pts)
                 Figure 4.5.4.6.c: IIHS low-speed impact model setup ('offset')
                                             165

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Figure 4.5.4.6.d shows the plastic strain for the impact beam for an offset impact.
                                                                                      PLASTiC_STRAIN
                                                                                        (Max all pts)
             Figure 4.5.4.6.d: IIHS low-speed impact element plastic strain ('offset')
                                              166

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             4.5.4.6.1. Observations - IIHS Low Speed - Rear

In the 'full' overlap load case the center of the bumper armature is predicted to deform a maximum
of ~85mm during impact and have ~66mm of permanent deformation once the impact event is over.
With the change to the shape and location of the rear bumper armature there is ~125mm of available
space (measured on vehicle centerline) before there would be contact.

The barrier upper 'rigid' plane does 'intrude' into the bottom edge of the tailgate by ~27mm (see
figure below). Contact was not defined between these parts as the maximum interaction would be
measured during post-processing. Typically  bumper systems are comprised of an armature, EA
foam and a plastic fascia. The ARB model does not include these additional items as they are part of
a styled bumper system which was beyond the project scope. This hardware would (i) spread the
load over a wider area of the armature and (ii) impart load onto the bumper armature earlier
therefore slowing the vehicle down sooner. Typical EA foam thickness on vehicle centerline would
be ~75mm. Under this impact case the EA foam would compress to approximately 60% of its
original thickness (~45mm); therefore if the  model did include a full bumper system there would be
no direct contact between any bodywork and the barrier and no damage to the body. Figure
4.5.4.6.1.a illustrates the maximum deflection showing barrier intrusion into tailgate.
D3PLOT: rr_iihs_center
                                                                               L
                                                                              0.080000
         Figure 4.5.4.6.1.a: Maximum deflection showing barrier intrusion into tailgate
                                          167

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Plastic strain under this loading is contained within the bumper system, with the maximum strain
occurring in the heat affected zone (the welded area between the armature and crush can).

In the 'offset' impact load case, the analysis predicts that there will be no contact between the
barrier and the vehicle bodywork. The maximum dynamic deflection at the end of the armature is
predicted to be ~86mm and there is sufficient clearance to the body such that there should be not
contact. Deflection at the end of the analysis (200ms) is predicted to be ~72ms. Unlike the 100-
percent overlap case the analysis predicts lateral movement of ~37mm in the vehicle during the
impact as it 'slides'  along the face of the barrier. During this sliding the barrier remains in contact
will the bumper armature (still 50mm of engagement) until the vehicle starts to rebound.  See Figure
4.5.4,4 l.b below.
                                                                                 0.120000
                   Figure 4.5.4.6.1.b: 'Deformation' @ maximum deflection
As with the 100-percent overlap load case the plastic strain is contained within the bumper system.
As the barrier loads an unrestrained end of the armature, the plastic strains are confined to the
armature and the crush can welded area on the struck side.
                                            168

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       4.5.5.
      Bill of Materials.
The body structure Bill of Materials (BOM) is shown below in Table 4.5.5.a. The mass is
241.8 kg, which is 37-percent lower than the baseline Toyota Venza body structure. The
total parts count of the Phase 2 HD  body is 169, compared to 211 for the Phase 1 HD
body and 419 parts for the baseline Venza body. The direct manufacturing cost of this
Phase 2 HD BIW design is approximately $432. Note that the front end module is not part
of the BIW structure as it is a bolt on part. It is included in the parts count, mass and cost
to provide parity with the baseline Venza BIW which  includes this structure. The BIW mass
is 234.1 kg.

                             Table 4.5.5.a:  Bill of materials
                                                                                 BIW Mass (kg)
                        Complete body - less bumpers and fenders
 7305-2400-209
Front end module
Magnesium - AM60
              Small crossmember reinforcement
                                   Aluminum - 6022-T4
 7305-2400-002
Large crossmember reinforcement
Aluminum - 6022-T4
 7306-2400-229
Floor panels (left and right)
              Center floor panel
 7307-2400-115
Rear passenger compartment floor panel
Left-side Bodyside Outer Assembly
7306-2300-185
7306-2300-183
7306-2300-187
7306-2300-189
7306-2300-191
Rear panel
Front panel
Lower, rear, quarter panel closeout
Flange to body panel
Tail lamp close out panel
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
1.20
1.20
2.50
2.50

Sub-total
5.15

0.41
0.46
0.09
6.11

7306-2300-186
7306-2300-184
7306-2300-188
7306-2300-190
7306-2300-192
Rear panel
Front panel
Lower, rear, quarter panel closeout
Flange to body panel
Tail lamp close out panel
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
1.20
1.20
2.50
2.50

Sub-total
5.16

0.41
0.46
0.09
6.12
7306-2200-109
7306-2000-215
7306-2000-171
7306-2000-216
Roof panel
Rear roof side rail inner - left
Front roof side rail inner - left
Rear roof side rail inner - right
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum - 6022 - T6
Aluminum - 6022 - T6
Aluminum - 6022 - T6
1.20
2.00
2.00
2.00
9.05
0.78
0.40
0.78
                                          169

-------
7306-2000-172
7306-2100-101
7306-2100-103
7307-2100-104
Front roof side rail inner - right
Front header
Center header
Rear header
Aluminum - 6022 - T6
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum - 6022 - T6
2.00
2.50
2.50
2.50
I Sub-total
0.40
1.81
1.65
1.99
16.86
Len-sme u-miarHssemDiy
7307-2110-179
7307-2110-105
7307-2110-177
Liftgate reinforcement
D-pillar inner
Quarter panel inner
Aluminum - 6022 - T6
Aluminum - 6022 - T6
Aluminum - 6022 - T6
2.50
2.50
2.50
Sub-total
1.14
1.47
1.18
3.79
                              Right-side D-Pillar Assembly
Shotgun closeout panel - left
Shotgun closeout panel - right
Lower Len H-rniar uuier Hsserrmiy
7305-1930-169
7305-1930-187
7305-1930-171
7305-1930-173
Shotgun outer panel
Lower panel
Upper hinge reinforcement
Lower hinge reinforcement
Aluminum -6013-T6
Aluminum -6061 - T6
Mild Steel
Mild Steel
2.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
Sub-total
0.94
3.33
0.15
0.12
4.54
7305-1940-170
7305-1940-188
7305-1940-184
7305-1940-186
Shotgun outer panel
Lower panel
Upper hinge reinforcement
Lower hinge reinforcement
Aluminum -6013-T6
Aluminum -6061 - T6
Mild Steel
Mild Steel
2.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
Sub-total
0.94
3.33
0.15
0.12
4.54
Right Door Aperature Assembly
Right B-Pillar Sub-Assembly
7306-1920-190
7306-1920-192
7306-1920-194
7306-1920-196
Upper A-pillar outer panel
Outer roof side rail
C-pillar striker reinforcement
C-pillar outer
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum -6013-T6
Mild Steel
Aluminum -6013-T6
2.50
2.50
3.00
2.50
Sub-total
1.33
0.86
0.30
3.24
5.72
Right B-Pillar Outer Sub-Assembly
7306-1924-002
7306-1924-004
7306-1924-006
7306-1924-008
7306-1924-010
Lower B-pillar outer
Upper B-pillar outer
Upper, inner reinforcement
Middle, inner reinforcement
Lower, inner reinforcement
SSAB Tunnplat Docol® 1400
DP High-strength Steel
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Mild Steel
Mild Steel
Mild Steel
1.40
2.50
3.00
3.00
3.00
Sub-total
5.51
0.49
0.49
0.23
0.56
7.27
Right B-Pillar Inner Sub-Assembly
                                      170

-------
7306-1926-012
7306-1915-001
7306-1915-002
7306-1926-014
Lower B-pillar inner
Beltline reinforcement plate
B-pillar reinforcement
B-pillar, upper, inner
SSAB Tunnplat Docol® 1400
DP High-strength Steel
Mild Steel
Terocore structural
Aluminum -6013-T6
1.40
3.18
3.00
2.00
Sub-total
2.72
0.06
1.53
0.18
4.49

Left B-Pillar Sub-Assembly
7306-1910-189
7306-1910-191
7306-1910-193
7306-1910-195
Upper A-pillar outer panel
Outer roof side rail
C-pillar striker reinforcement
C-pillar outer
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum -6013-T6
Mild Steel
Aluminum -6013-T6
2.50
2.50
3.00
2.50
Sub-total
1.33
0.86
0.30
3.24
5.72
Left B-Pillar Outer Sub-Assembly
7306-1913-001
7306-1913-003
7306-1913-005
7306-1913-007
7306-1913-009
Lower B-pillar outer
Upper B-pillar outer
Upper, inner reinforcement
Middle, inner reinforcement
Lower, inner reinforcement
SSAB Tunnplat Docol® 1400
DP High-strength Steel
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Mild Steel
Mild Steel
Mild Steel
1.40
2.50
3.00
3.00
3.00
Sub-total
5.51
0.49
0.49
0.23
0.56
7.27
Left B-Pillar Inner Sub-Assembly
7306-1915-011
7306-1915-001
7306-1915-003
7306-1915-013
Lower B-pillar inner
Beltline reinforcement plate
B-pillar reinforcement
B-pillar, upper, inner
SSAB Tunnplat Docol® 1400
DP High-strength Steel
Mild Steel
Terocore structural
Aluminum -6013-T6
1.40
3.18
3.00
2.00
Sub-total
2.72
0.06
1.53
0.18
4.49
7305-1800-145
Upper cowl panel
 Magnesium - AM60
7305-1700-147
                                           Aluminum - 6022 - T4
                                          Left Dash Transmission Assembly
                Dash-transmission reinforcement
                                           Aluminum -6013-T6
7305-1530-223
Dash-transmission insert
Aluminum -6013-T6
                                         Right Dash Transmission Assembly
7305-1520-222
Dash-transmission reinforcement
Aluminum -6013-T6
7305-1520-224
Dash-transmission insert
Aluminum -6013-T6
                                                                                           Rear End Panel Assembly
                                                            Aluminum - 6022 - T4
7307-1510-117
                                           Aluminum - 6022 - T4
7307-1410-119
7307-1410-120
Rear compartment crossmember
Hanger bracket extrusion
Aluminum -6061-T6
Aluminum -6061-T6
3.00
3.00
Sub-total
4.26
0.35
4.61
                                                    171

-------
                                            Left Front Wheelhouse Assembly
                 Front shock tower
                                              Aluminum - 356-T6
                 Front wneelnouse panel
                                              Magnesium - AM60
                                           Right Front Wheelhouse Assembly
7305-1320-152
Front shock tower
Aluminum - 356-T6
7305-1320-162
Front Wheelhouse panel
Magnesium - AM60
                                                Rear Seat Pan Assembly
7306-1200-113
Rear seat panel floor
Aluminum - 6022-T4
                 Seatbelt anchrage plate - right and left
                                             Aluminum - 6022-T4
7307-1200-218
Rear frame rail outer transition - right
Aluminum - 356-T6
7307-1200-217
Rear frame rail outer transition - left
Aluminum - 356-T6

7306-1110-101
7306-1110-103
7306-1000-176
7306-1000-175
Rear center seat riser
Rear seat floor reinforcement - left
Rear seat riser - right
Rear seat riser - left
Aluminum - 6022-T4
Aluminum - 6022-T4
Aluminum - 6022-T4
Aluminum - 6022-T4
1.50
2.50
1.50
1.50
Sub-total
1.63
0.28
0.44
0.44
2.78
                                               Rear Frame Rail Assembly
7307-1000-139
Rear frame rail - right and left
Aluminum -6061-T6
7307-1000-138
Rear frame rail mounting plate - right and left
Aluminum - 6022-T4
                                            Right Front Frame Rail Assembly
7307-1020-136
7307-1020-224
Front frame rail
Front frame rail mounting plate
Aluminum -6061-T6
Aluminum - 6022-T4
2.5/2.75
2.00
Sub-total
1.54
0.18
1.71
Right Front Rail Mount Sub-Assembly
7307-1011-001
7307-1011-003
Front rail mount
Front rail mount cvr - left and right
Aluminum - 6022-T4
Aluminum - 6022-T4
2.50
2.50
Sub-total
0.09
0.12
Oil
                                                                                         Left Front Frame Rail Assembly
7307-1010-135
7307-1010-223
Front frame rail
Front frame rail mounting plate
Aluminum -6061-T6
Aluminum - 6022-T4
2.5/2.75
2.00
Sub-total
1.54
0.18
1.71
Left Front Rail Mount Sub-Assembly
7307-1011-001
7307-1011-003
Front rail mount
Front rail mount cvr - left and right
Aluminum - 6022-T4
Aluminum - 6022-T4
2.50
2.50
0.09
0.12
7305-1200-210
7305-1200-209
7305-0900-138
7305-0900-137
Front frame rail outer transition - right
Front frame rail outer transition - left
Front frame rail inner transition - right
Front frame rail inner transition - left
Aluminum - 356-T6
Aluminum - 356-T6
Aluminum - 356-T6
Aluminum - 356-T6
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
3.11
3.11
3.07
3.07
                                                      172

-------
7307-0900-142
7307-0900-141
Rear frame rail inner transition - right
Rear frame rail inner transition - left
Aluminum - 356-T6
Aluminum - 356-T6
3.00
3.00
Sub-total
3.41
3.41
19.18

Small Floor Cross member Assembly
7306-0830-124
7306-0830-125
7306-0830-126
Small outer extrusion - right and left
Small floor crossmember - right and left
Small inner extrusion - right and left
Aluminum -6061-T6
Aluminum -6061-T6
Aluminum -6061-T6
3.00
2.50
3.00
Sub-total
0.61
4.89
0.54
6.04

Large Floor Crossmember Assembly
7306-0840-010
7306-0840-01 1
7306-0840-012
7306-0850-000
7306-0860-000
Large outer extrusion - right and left
Large floor crossmember - right and left
Large inner extrusion - right and left
Fore and aft extrusion - right and left
Center tunnel bracket
Aluminum -6061-T6
Aluminum -6061-T6
Aluminum -6061-T6
Aluminum -6061-T6
Aluminum -6061-T6
3.00
2.50
3.00
3.00
2.50
Sub-total
0.51
2.62
0.17
1.89
0.33
5.51

Dash Panel
7305-1400-143
7305-1400-144
7305-1600-149
Upper dash panel
Lower dash panel
Dash panel reinforcement
Magnesium - AM60
Magnesium - AM60
Magnesium - AM60
3.00
3.00
3.0/2.0
Sub-total
3.69
5.37
2.85
11.91

Miscellaneous Panels and Reinforcements
7307-1600-183
7307-1600-184
7307-1600-213
7307-1600-214
7305-1500-157
7305-1500-158
7305-1500-197
7305-1500-198
7305-1400-154
7305-1400-153
7307-1400-164
7307-1400-163
7305-1500-228
7305-1500-227
7307-1500-168
7307-1500-167
7305-1300-156
7305-1300-155
7305-1300-166
7305-1300-165
7306-0820-124
7306-0810-123
Rear wheelhouse outer panel - left
Rear wheelhouse outer panel - right ^
Rear closeout panel - left
Rear closeout panel - right
Shotgun inner panel - left
Shotgun inner panel - right
A-pillar inner reinforcement panel - left
A-pillar inner reinforcement panel - right
Lower A-pillar inner - right
Lower A-pillar inner - left
Rear wheelhouse inner - right
Rear wheelhouse inner - left
Lower A-pillar inner reinforcement - right
Lower A-pillar inner reinforcement - left
Shock tower reinforcement - right
Shock tower reinforcement - left
Upper A-pillar inner - right
Upper A-pillar inner - left
Rear shock tower - right
Rear shock tower - left
Rocker sill extension - right
Rocker sill extension - left
Magnesium - AM60
Magnesium - AM60
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum -6013-T6
Aluminum -6013-T6
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum - 6022-T4
Aluminum - 6022-T4
Aluminum - 6022-T4
Aluminum - 6022-T4
Aluminum - 6022-T4
Aluminum - 6022-T4
Aluminum - 356-T6
Aluminum - 356-T6
Aluminum -6061-T6
Aluminum -6061-T6
3.00
3.00
1.50
1.50
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.50
2.50
2.00
2.00
2.50
2.50
2.00
2.00
3.00
3.00
2.0/2.5
2.0/2.5
Sub-total
2.02
1.86
0.49
0.49
1.05
1.05
0.22
0.22
0.40
0.40
3.95
3.96
0.17
0.17
0.61
0.61
1.60
1.60
2.15
2.15
5.82
5.82
36.77
Table 4.5.5.b below shows a condensed summary of the full BOM table above, breaking
out the various body components and subsystems. The table exemplifies how an overall
37-percent mass (141 kg) reduction from the baseline Venza was achieved while individual
                                      173

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components had revised mass reductions. For example, the underbody and floor area
went from the baseline steel to a mostly aluminum structure and resulted in an 18-percent
(21  kg) reduction. The dash panel area was constructed out of magnesium  instead of the
baseline steel, which resulted in a 30-percent (5 kg) mass reduction. The new aluminum
roof structure was 39-percent lighter (7.9 kg) than the conventional steel one. Within the
vehicle body sides, each aluminum A-pillar resulted in a 50-percent (9.1 kg) mass
reduction and each HSS B-pillar resulted in a 53-percent (19.7 kg) mass reduction from
the  conventional steel versions.

                 Table 4.5.5.b: Phase 2 HP Vehicle Body Structure
System
Subsystem
Body complete


Windshield
wiper system
Body exterior
trim items
Body structure









Total
Underbody &
floor
Dash panel
Front
structure &
radiator
crossmember
Body side LH
Body side RH
Roof
Internal
Structure
NVH
Paint

Standard
Venza
(kg)
403.24
9.15
11.59
382.5
113.65
15.08
25.15
65.22
65.22
27.83
58.35
8
4
382.5
Percent of
Body
Structure




30%
4%
7%
17%
17%
7%
15%
2%
1%

Material Mass (kg)
Steel

-
-

-
-

10.1
10.1
-
-
-
-
18
Al

-
-

79.9
-
11.6
16.5
16.5
16.9
24.6
-
-
167
Mg

-
-

-
11.9
5.5
1.9
1.9
-
-
-
-
27
Composite

-
-

12.9
-

-
-
-
-
-
-
11
Other

-
-

-
-

1.5
1.5
-
-
-
-
12
Revised
Structure
Total (kg)
260.8
8
6.55
241.8
92.7
11.9
17.1
33.3
33.2
16.9
24.6
8
4
241.8
Percent
reduction
from
baseline
35%
13%
43%
39%
18%
21%
32%
49%
49%
39%
58%
0%
0%
37%
Piece
Cost
Relative
to Venza




110%
141%
167%
117%
117%
298%

100%
100%
160%
The more prominent changes made between Phase 1 and 2 in order to refine the vehicle
to meet crash test standards are shown in Table 4.5.5.C below. The table lists the baseline
Venza, original Phase 1 HD design, and updated Phase 2 design. Several changes were
made from Phase 1 to Phase 2 such as modifying the B-pillar from aluminum to dual-
phase 1400 HSS because of roof crush and side impact standards. The Phase 1 floor
contained aluminum, magnesium, and significant amounts of composite material, but the
Phase 2 floor has moved to a more aluminum-intensive composite structure for
manufacturing reasons.

Magnesium was used extensively in the front structure, roof, and A-pillar design of the
Phase 1 HD design, but the metal proved too brittle to meet crash standards. The
validated Phase 2 HD model uses primarily aluminum for all  these structures. The lower A-
pillar inner however, is integrated into the magnesium dash casting and the move to an
aluminum A-pillar allowed for an increase in cross-sectional area to stiffen the body and
increase torsional stiffness. Changes were made to the C-pillar design as well, moving
                                       174

-------
from a magnesium structure to an aluminum and steel structure for the same reasons as
the A-pillar.

         Table 4.5.5.c: Summary of changes from Phase 1 HP to Phase 2 HP
Body Subsystem
Underbody/Floor
Front structure and radiator
crossmember
Body-side A-pillar
Body-side B-pillar
C-pillar
Roof
Venza
(kg)
113.7
25.2
18.2
37.19
12.8
27.8
Phase 1
HD (kg)
83.8
18.6
12.8
17.13
10.2
16.8
Phase 2
HD (kg)
92.7
17.1
9.1
17.48
3.5
16.9
Phase 2
Material Shift
Mix to mostly
aluminum
Magnesium to
aluminum
Magnesium to
aluminum
Magnesium to
aluminum and
HSS
Magnesium to
steel and
aluminum
Magnesium to
aluminum
Reason for
Change
Manufacturing
Frontal impact,
FMVSS 208
Roof crush,
frontal impact
Roof crush, side
impact
Roof crush, side
impact
Roof crush
Figure 4.5.5.a below lists all masses in kg.
     Figure 4.5.5.a: Venza, Phase 1, and Phase 2 vehicle body structure by material

Table 4.5.5.d below shows a comparison of all system masses for the baseline 2009
Venza, the Phase 1 Low Development and High Development models and the Phase 2
model.  The bumper mass for the Phase 2 model was adjusted from 15.95 kg to 20.17 kg
                                      175

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to adjust for the increased front and rear bumper masses. These systems were designed
in CAD as part of the Phase 2 study and were engineered as part of the energy absorbing
structure. The bumper beam masses  increased by 1.05 kg (front) and 1.39 kg (rear). The
bumper crush cans added an additional 0.86 kg at the front and 0.92 kg at the rear. The
total mass of the Phase 2 model was  1173 kg; this mass was used as the basis for all
analyses performed as part of this study.

             Table 4.5.5.d: Venza,  Phase 1, and Phase 2 system masses
Area/System
Body-in-white
Closures/Fenders
Bumpers
Thermal
Electrical
Interior
Lighting
Suspension/Chassis
Glazing
Misc.
Powertrain
Venza Baseline
Mass (kg)
382.5
143.02
17.95
9.25
23.6
250.6
9.9
378.9
43.71
30.1
410.16
Phase 1 Low
Development
Mass (kg)
357.4
107.6
15.95
9.25
16.68
182.0
9.9
275.5
43.7
22.9
356.2
Phase 1 High
Development Mass
(kg)
221.1
83.98
20.17
9.25
15.01
153
9.9
217.0
43.71
22.9
356.2
Phase 2 High
Development
Mass (kg)
241.8
83.98
20.17
9.25
15.01
153
9.9
217.0
43.71
22.9
356.2

Total excluding powertrain
Reduction from baseline
Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll
Total including powertrain
Reduction from baseline
1290
-
lilililililililililililililililililililililililililililililililililili
1700
-
1041
19%
lililililililililililililililililililililililililililililililililililili
1397
18%
795
39%
lilililililililililililililililililililililililililililililililililililililililililili
1151
32%
817
38%
lililililililililililililililililililililililililililililililililililili
1173
31%
The baseline and Phase 1 mass information was published in 2010 by the International Council on
Clean Transportation in a report titled: An Assessment of Mass Reduction Opportunities for a 2017-
2020 Model Year Vehicle Program. The link to this study is:
                                       176

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Figure 4.5.5.b below shows the total vehicle material utilization by mass for the baseline, Phase 1,
and Phase 2 models.
      Figure 4.5.5.b: Venza, Phase 1, and Phase 2 full vehicle material composition
4.5.5.1     Closures Bill of Materials
A separate BOM was constructed for just the fully engineered closures. The total weight increased
to 90.4 kg from the estimated 84.0 kg due to changes in material from magnesium to aluminum.
The full BOM is listed in Table 4.5.5.1.a below.
                             Table 4.5.5.1.a: Closures BOM
Part Number
Part Name
Material
Thickness
(mm)
Closures
Mass (kg)
90.4

Liftgate
7308-2610-001
7308-2610-002
7308-2610-003
7308-2610-004
7308-2610-005
7308-2610-005

Liftgate inner
Liftgate outer
Panel - Spoiler
Liftgate bracket - gas strut anchor - inner
Bracket - hinge upper
Bracket - liftgate hinge base

Magnesium - AM60
Aluminum - 6063-T4
PPO+PA Noryl GTX
Aluminum - 6063-T4
Aluminum - 6063-T4
Aluminum - 6063-T4

3.00
1.20
3.00
3.00
3.0
3.0
Sub-total

7.318
5.673
1.034
0.036
0.021
0.021
14.10
*»«»«»«»«»«»«»«»«»«»«»«»»!
                                          177

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Door Front - LH
7308-2710-001
7308-2810-002
7308-2810-003
7308-2810-004
7308-2810-005
7308-2810-006
7308-2810-007
7308-2810-008
7308-2810-009
7308-2810-010
7308-2810-011
7308-2810-012
7308-2810-013
73082810-014

Panel - Door outer - LH
Panel - Door inner - LH
Beam - Reinft Front Door
Bracket- Frt. Dr. Hinge support
Beam - Reinf.-Frt. Dr. outer
Striker Asm. -Striker Plate
Hinge Asm. - Door upper
Hinge plate - outer - upper
Hinge plate - inner - upper
Hinge Asm. - Door lower
Hinge plate - outer - lower
Hinge plate - inner - lower
Striker - Front Door latch reinft
Panel - Insert Frt Door

Aluminum - 6063-T4
Magnesium - AM60
HSS-950
HSS-950
HSS-950
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
HSS - 950
PPO - Unfilled

1.2
3.0
1.4
1.4
1.4
3.0
5.0
5.0
4.0
5.0
5.0
4.0
1.5
3.0
Sub-total
3.28
4.18
1.381
0.4951
0.4917
0.0666
0.601
0.5448
0.1026
0.601
0.5448
0.1026
0.361
0.9276
13.68
Door Front - RH
7308-2710-001
7308-2810-002
7308-2810-003
7308-2810-004
7308-2810-005
7308-2810-006
7308-2810-007
7308-2810-008
7308-2810-009
7308-2810-010
7308-2810-011
7308-2810-012
7308-2810-013
73082810-014

Panel - Door outer - RH
Panel - Door inner - RH
Beam - Reinft Front Door
Bracket- Frt. Dr. Hinge support
Beam - Reinf.-Frt. Dr. outer
Striker Asm. -Striker Plate
Hinge Asm. - Door upper
Hinge plate - outer - upper
Hinge plate - inner - upper
Hinge Asm. - Door lower
Hinge plate - outer - lower
Hinge plate - inner - lower
Striker - Front Door latch reinft
Panel - Insert Frt Door

Aluminum - 6063-T4
Magnesium - AM60
HSS-950
HSS-950
HSS-950
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
HSS - 950
PPO - Unfilled

1.2
3.0
1.4
1.4
1.4
3.0
5.0
5.0
4.0
5.0
5.0
4.0
1.5
3.0
Sub-total
3.28
4.18
1.381
0.4951
0.4917
0.0666
0.601
0.5448
0.1026
0.601
0.5448
0.1026
0.361
0.9276
13.68
Door Rear - LH
7308-2910-001
7308-2910-002
7308-2910-003
7308-2910-004
7308-2910-005
7308-2910-006
7308-2910-007
7308-2910-008
7308-2910-009
7308-2910-010
7308-2910-011
7308-2910-012
7308-2910-013
7308-2910-014
7308-2910-015
Panel - Door rear outer - LH
Panel - Door rear inner - LH
Beam - Reinft Rear Door
Hinge - Ft Dr Lwr
Striker Asm. -Striker Plate
Hinge Asm. - Door upper
Hinge plate - outer - upper
Hinge plate - inner - upper
Hinge Asm. - Door lower
Hinge plate - outer - lower
Hinge plate - inner - lower
Panel - Insert Frt Door
Striker - latch reinft
Bracket - rr dr hinge support
Reinft - rr dr outer
Aluminum - 6063-T4
Magnesium AM60
HSS - 950
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
PPO - Unfilled
Aluminum 6061 T4
Aluminum 6063 T4
Aluminum 6063 T4
1.2
3.0
1.4
5.0
3.0
5.0
5.0
4.0
5
5.0
4.0
3.0
1.4
2.0
2.0
2.871
4.3409
2.127
0.601
0.0666
0.601
0.5448
0.1026
0.601
0.5448
0.1026
0.6951
0.256
0.263
0.649
178

-------
7308-2910-016
Reinf't - rr dr inner
Aluminum 6063 T4
2.0
0.649
                                 Sub-total
12.58
Door Rear - RH
7308-3010-001
7308-3010-002
7308-3010-003
7308-3010-004
7308-3010-005
7308-3010-006
7308-3010-007
7308-3010-008
7308-3010-009
7308-3010-010
7308-3010-011
7308-3010-012
7308-3010-013
7308-3010-014
7308-3010-015
7308-3010-016
Panel - Door rear outer - LH
Panel - Door rear inner - LH
Beam - Reinft Rear Door
Hinge - Ft Dr Lwr
Striker Asm. -Striker Plate
Hinge Asm. - Door upper
Hinge plate - outer - upper
Hinge plate - inner - upper
Hinge Asm. - Door lower
Hinge plate - outer - lower
Hinge plate - inner - lower
Panel - Insert Frt Door
Striker - latch reinft
Bracket - rr dr hinge support
Reinf't - rr dr outer
Reinf't - rr dr inner
Aluminum - 6063-T4
Magnesium AM60
HSS - 950
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
PPO - Unfilled
Aluminum 6061 T4
Aluminum 6063 T4
Aluminum 6063 T4
Aluminum 6063 T4

1.2
3.0
1.4
2.5/2.0
3.0
5.0
5.0
4.0
5
5.0
4.0
3.0
1.4
2.0
2.0
2.0
Sub-total
2.871
4.3409
2.127
0.364
0.0666
0.601
0.5448
0.1026
0.601
0.5448
0.1026
0.6951
0.256
0.263
0.649
0.649
12.58
Front Fender Outer - LH
7308-3110-001
7308-3110-002
7308-3110-003
7308-3110-004
7308-3110-005
7308-3110-006

Panel - Front Fender Outer - LH
Reinf't - Fender mount at lamp
Brkt - Fender mount mid-upr
Brkt - Fender mount upr
Brkt - Fender mount Iwr
Brkt - Fender mount - upr rear

Aluminum - 6063 - T4
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum - 6022 - T4

1.2
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
Sub-total
4.756
0.662
0.048
0.07
0.043
0.053
5.63
Front Fender Outer - RH
7308-3210-001
7308-3210-002
7308-3210-003
7308-3210-004
7308-3210-005
7308-3210-006

Panel - Front Fender Outer - LH
Reinf't - Fender mount at lamp
Brkt - Fender mount mid-upr
Brkt - Fender mount upr
Brkt - Fender mount Iwr
Brkt - Fender mount - upr rear

Aluminum - 6063 - T4
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum - 6022 - T4
Aluminum - 6022 - T4

1.2
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
2.5
Sub-total
4.756
0.662
0.048
0.07
0.043
0.053
5.63
Hood
7308-3310-001
7308-3310-002
7308-3310-003

Panel - Hood outer
Panel - Hood inner
Hinge - hood (2x)

Aluminum - 6063 - T4
Aluminum - 6063 - T4
Aluminum - 6022 - T4

1.2
2.50
2.50
Sub-total
4.113
8.11
0.26
12.483
179

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      4.5.6.     Vehicle Manufacturing

A vehicle assembly process was developed to insure that the BIW could be assembled
and mass-produced in a cost-effective manner. This process was used to drive the part
design; all parts were analyzed as part of the build flow to insure part to part compatibility
as well as compatibility with the fixturing and joining processes. The full report is included
in Appendix A in Sections 7.1 and 7.1.1.
            4.5.6.1    Assembly
Vehicle assembly is broken up into 44 different stations across three different
manufacturing areas - a sub-assembly area, underbody line, and framing line. In total,
there are 19 different sub-assembly stations, 14 underbody stations, and 11 framing line
assembly stations. Table 4.5.6.1 .a below lists all of the assembly stations, their individual
functions, and the parts involved. A number of idle stations are included to allow for
additional production capacity without major retooling.

                Table 4.5.6.1.a: Assembly stations, functions, and parts
Station
Name
SA05
SA10
SA15
SA20
SA25
SA30
SA35
SA40
SA45
SA50
SA55
SA60
SA65
SA70-10
SA70-20
SA70-30
SA75
SA80
SA85
Assembly Function
Front and rear bumper assembly
Front frame rail assemblies
L, R pillar sub-assemblies
Rear end assembly
X-member sub-assemblies
Complete floor X-member assembly
Rear end panel and compartment X-
member assembly
Side rail assemblies
L, R rear wheelhouse assemblies
Dash sub-assembly
Dash assembly
Rear seat assembly
L, R front wheelhouse assemblies
L, R roof, B-pillar bodyside inner
assemblies
L, RA-pillar outer assemblies
L, R C-pillar bodyside inner assemblies
L, R A-pillar inner sub-assemblies
L, R bodyside outer assembly
L, R inner B-Pillar assembly
Parts Involved
Front and rear bumper brackets, mounting plates, beam
Frame rail mounting plates, rails, brackets, transitions, rocker extrusions
A-pillar upper and lower, inner reinforcements; B-pillar upper and lower,
inner and outers; roof rail, C-pillar striker reinforcement
L, R shock towers and reinforcements
X-member extrusions, brackets, and reinforcements
X-member sub-assemblies, crossbraces, reinforcements
Rear inner and outer panels, X-member extrusion and brackets
Rail and rocker extrusions, brackets, transitions,
D-pillar inners, quarter panel inners, liftgate reinforcements, wheelhouse
inners
Dash panel, reinforcements
Dash sub-assembly, dash reinforcement, cowl panel support
Rear seat risers, floor reinforcements, floor panel
Front wheelhouse panels, shotguns, shock towers
Front and rear roof side inners, upper and lower B-pillar inners
L, R A-pillar upper and lower outers, shotgun outers
L, R roof side rail sub-assembly, C-pillar outer upper
L, R A-pillar upper and lower inners, A-pillar sub-assemblies
L, R rear quarter panel, tail lamp closeout, bodyside outer, bodyside
outer frame rail, flange
L, R B-pillar sub-assembly, upper and lower inner reinforcements
                                       180

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UB100
UB110
UB120
UB130
UB140
UB150
UB160
UB170
UB180
UB190
UB200
UB210
UB220
UB230
FR100
FR110
FR120
FR130
FR140
FR150
FR160
FR170
FR180
FR190
FR200
Initial underbody assembly
Initial underbody assembly
Rear wheelhouse and dash buildup
Idle
Weld respotting
Rear seat and A-pillar buildup
Idle
Front wheelhouse buildup
Central flooring
Rear wheelhouse lining and rear rear
flooring
Weld respotting
Stud application
Camera inspection
Elevator to framing
Idle
Bodyside outer buildup
Weld respotting
Stud application
Bodyside inner buildup
Roof and cowl buildup
Weld respotting
Camera inspection
Bumper buildup
Surface finishing/reworking
Idle, electric motorized system
Floor crossmember, rear end, rear end panel, side rail assemblies
Floor crossmember, rear end, rear end panel, side rail assemblies
Previous underobdy build, dash assembly, dash transmission
reinforcements, rear wheelhouse assemblies

Previous underbody build
Previous underbody build, rear seat assembly, A-pillar assemblies

Previous underbody build, front wheelhouse assemblies
Previous underbody build, center floor panels
Previous underbody build, rear wheelhouse outers, rear floor panel
Previous underbody build
Previous underbody build
Previous underbody build
Previous underbody build

Underbody build, L,R bodyside inner assemblies
Previoius framing build
Previoius framing build
Previous framing buid, L, R bodyside outer assemblies
Previous framing build, cowl upper panel, roof panel, shotgun closeouts
Previous framing build
Previous framing build
Previous framing build, front end module, front and rear bumper
assemblies
Previous framing build

Five different conveyors are needed to transport the BIWs around the assembly plant. One
conveyor system is used for the sub-assembly area where the parts are loaded onto it by
humans or robots. The sub-assembly area is divided into sections so the parts need to be
moved between stations. A second conveyor is needed for the underbody line, which is
continuous so parts only need to be loaded once. The third conveyor is used for cross-
plant transport between the underbody and framing lines. The underbodies are loaded
onto skids, which are then transported across the plant onto the framing line conveyor on
the skid. Once the BIWs are complete, the skids are returned to the cross transport
conveyor.

The total manufacturing cycle time is 191 seconds after a 15-percent inefficiency factor is
considered as shown in Table 4.5.6.1.b. These inefficiencies stem from the equipment
(five percent), downtime due to organizational problems (five percent), and system
downtime (five percent).
                                       181

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                       Table 4.5.6.1.b: Cycle time calculations

A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
Item
Vehicles/year
Working days/year (365-1 04-1 1 )
Vehicles/day
Shifts
Hours/shifts
Break/shift
Uptime/day (seconds/working day)
Gross cycle time (seconds)
Inefficiency factor
Net Cycle Time
Value
60,000
250
240
2
8
0.5
54,000
225
15%
191
Formula


A/B



7.5 hrs/shift *2 shifts/day *3600 s/hr
G/C

H*(1-l)
            4.5.6.2    Labor
The Phase 2 HD vehicle plant will require a total of 47 workers per shift. Of these 47
workers, 24 will be directly employed by the plant to operate the assembly line. The
remaining 23 will be indirect and consist of 12 logistics workers, 10 maintenance workers,
and one coordinate measuring machine operator. Table 4.5.6.2.a below shows the
estimated labor costs for the plant.

               Table 4.5.6.2.a: Phase 2 HD BIW estimated labor costs
Assembly Workers
Number
Wage
Cost per shift
Benefits (40% of wages)
Total cost per shift
Annual cost
24
$22
$4,224
$1 ,690
$5,914
$2,956,800

Maintenance Workers
Number
Wage
Cost per shift
Benefits (40% of wages)
Total cost per shift
Annual cost
11
$35
$3,080
$1 ,232
$4,312
$2,156,000

Logistics Workers
Number
Wage
Cost per shift
Benefits (60% of wages)
Total cost per shift
Annual cost
12
$18
$1 ,728
$1 ,037
$2,765
$1,382,400

Total labor cost per shift
Annual labor cost
Labor cost per vehicle
$12,990
$6,495,200
$108
                                       182

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            4.5.6.3    Investment and Manufacturing Costs
Constructing a new plant to tool and manufacture the Phase 2 HD BIW is considerably
less expensive than building a new plant and due to the materials and manufacturing
techniques used, should last longer than a typical plant. Table 4.5.6.3.a below highlights
the costs for the tooling necessary to produce the BIW, which is around $28.1 million
compared to the $70 million estimated by Intellicosting for the Toyota Venza tooling.

                   Table 4.5.6.3.a: Phase 2 HD BIW tooling cost
Part Number Part Name Process
Tool Type
Tool
Cost
Tool
Count
Inspection
Cost
Fixture
Count

Front End
7305-2400-001 Small crossmember Stamping
reinforcement
7305-2400-002 Large crossmember Stamping
reinforcement
Complete progressive die
Complete progressive die
$104,559
$114,797
1
1
$1,500
$1,700
1
1

Bodyside Outer Assembly
7306-2300-185 Left, outer bodyside Stamping
panel

Transfer dies
Rough blank (through)
Draw (toggle)
Trim and developed trim
Trim and developed trim
Finish form, flange, and
restrike
Cam finish form, finish trim,
flange, and restrike
End of arm tooling

$78,788
$221,338
$179,543
$170,360
$221,641
$323,575
$20,000

1
1
1
1
1
1

$77,900







1








7306-2300-186 Right, outer bodyside Stamping
panel
^^
Transfer dies
Rough blank (through)
Draw (toggle)
Trim and developed trim
Trim and developed trim
Finish form, flange, and
restrike
Cam finish form, finish trim,
flange, and restrike
End of arm tooling

$78,788
$221,338
$179,543
$170,360
$221,641
$323,575
$20,000

1
1
1
1
1
1

$77,900







1








7306-2300-187 Lower, left rear Stamping
quarter closeout panel
7306-2300-188 Lower, right rear
quarter closeout panel

Line dies on common shoe
(hand transfer)
Form (double attached)
Trim and developed trim
Finish form and flange
(double pad)
Finish trim and separate
Flange and restrike (double
pad and double unattached)
Common Shoe

$48,094
$54,449
$64,348
$42,106
$62,632
$19,984

1
1
1
1
1

$11,500
$11,500





1
1






                                     183

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7306-2300-189
7306-2300-190

7306-2300-191
7306-2300-192

7306-2300-XXX
7306-2300-XXX

Left flange to body Stamping
Right flange to body
Complete progressive die (2
out, 1 left and 1 right)

$195,951

1

$18,000
$18,000
1
1

Left tail lamp closeout Stamping
panel
Right tail lamp
closeout panel
Complete progressive die (2
out, 1 left and 1 right)

$80,703

1






Left, upper rear Stamping
closeout panel
Right, upper rear
closeout panel

Progressive blank die (2 out,
1 left and 1 right)
Form and flange (double pad)
Restrike and cam flange
Common shoe
$92,887
$43,265
$36,986
$10,378
1
1
1

$3,500
$3,500


1
1



Roof
7306-2200-109

Roof panel Stamping

Lines with robotic transfer
Draw
Trim and developed trim
Finish form, flange, and
restrike
End of arm tooling

$173,807
$198,072
$208,060
$9,000

1
1
1

$77,500




1





7306-2100-101

Front header (bow 1) Stamping

Coil fed transfer die
Cutoff and draw
Trim
Finish form and flange
Finish trim
Restrike
Master shoes
End of arm tooling

$57,820
$64,302
$65,305
$60,365
$64,736
$47,361
$12,500

1
1
1
1
1


$14,800







1








7306-2100-103

7307-2100-104
Center header (bow 2) Stamping
Complete progressive die
$127,928
1
$6,500
1

Rear header (bow 3) Stamping
^^
Transfer dies
Draw
Form
Form
Trim and pierce
Finish form, flange, and
restrike
Common shoes
End of arm tooling

$52,969
$51,038
$51,038
$70,184
$55,997
$40,773
$15,000

1
1
1
1
1


$27,500







1








7306-2000-215
7306-2000-216

Left, rear roof side rail Stamping
inner
Right, rear roof side
rail inner

Transfer dies
Draw (double attached)
Trim, developed trim, and
partial separate
Finish form, flange, and
restrike
Finish trim and separate
Common shoes
End of arm tooling

$77,254
$101,937
$115,242
$70,324
$59,758
$12,800

1
1
1
1


$19,400
$19,400





1
1






7306-2000-171
Left, front roof side rail Stamping
inner
Transfer dies


$20,500
1
184

-------
7306-2000-1 72 Right, front roof side
rail inner

Rough developed blank
Form (double attached)
Trim, developed trim, and
partial separate
Finish form, flange, and
restrike
Finish trim and separate
Master shoes
End of arm tooling
$75,651
$86,347
$114,175
$129,433
$97,949
$40,671
$16,000
1
1
1
1
1


$20,500






1







7305-1900-159 Left shotgun closeout Stamping
7305-1900-160 Right shotgun
closeout
Complete progressive die

$37,190

1

$600
$600
1
1

D-pillar Assembly
7307-2110-179 Left liftgate Stamping
reinforcement
7307-2120-180 Right liftgate
reinforcement

Line dies on common shoe
(hand transfer)
Form (double attached)
Trim and developed trim
Trim and developed trim
Finish form and flange
(double pad)
Restrike and separate
Common shoe

$52,567
$64,216
$63,082
$73,414
$69,770
$27,234

1
1
1
1
1

$6,800
$6,800





1
1






7307-2110-105 Left D-pillar inner Stamping
7307-2120-106 Right D-pillar inner

Transfer dies
Rough blank
Draw (double attached)
Redraw
Trim and developed trim
Trim, developed trim, and
separate
Finish form and restrike
(double unattached)
Master shoes
End of arm tooling

$56,788
$81,398
$82,579
$91,616
$85,274
$93,307
$62,202


1
1
1
1
1
1


$18,900
$18,900







1
1








7307-2110-177 Left quarter panel Stamping
inner
7307-2120-178 Right quarter panel
inner

Transfer dies
Draw (double attached)
Trim and developed trim
Trim and developed trim
Finish form, flange, and
restrike (double pad)
Cam trim, trim, and separate
Master shoes
End of arm tooling

$72,014
$73,368
$69,069
$75,455
$81,170
$49,982
$10,500

1
1
1
1
1


$6,200
$6,200















A-pillar Assembly
7305-1930-169 Left shotgun outer Stamping
panel
7305-1940-170 Right shotgun outer
panel

Transfer dies
Rough blank die (2 out, 1 left
and 1 right)
Form
Finish form and flange
Trim
Flange and restrike

$127,161
$77,416
$112,533
$124,796
$74,492

1
1
1
1
1
$22,500
$22,500




1
1




185

-------

Master shoes
End of arm tooling
$45,023
$14,400







7305-1930-187
7305-1940-188
Left, lower A-pillar
outer
Right, lower A-pillar
outer
Stamping


Line dies with robotic transfer
Blank (flip/flop left/right)
Form (double unattached)
Trim and developed trim
Trim and developed trim
Finish form and flange
Restrike
End of arm tooling

$102,114
$115,352
$105,079
$118,609
$80,009
$131,158
$7,500

1
1
1
1
1
1

$16,000
$16,000






1
1







7305-1930-171
7305-1940-184
Left, A-pillar, upper
hinge reinforcement
Right, A-pillar, upper
hinge reinforcement
Stamping

Complete progressive die

$13,902

1

$350
$350
1
1

7305-1930-173
7305-1940-186
Left, A-pillar, lower
hinge reinforcement
Right, A-pillar, lower
hinge reinforcement
Stamping

Complete progressive die

$13,596

1

$350
$350
1
1

7305-1500-227
7305-1500-228
Left, lower, A-pillar
reinforcement
Right, lower, A-pillar
reinforcement
Stamping

Complete progressive die

$54,462

1

$900

1


7305-1400-153
7305-1400-154
Left, lower A-pillar
inner
Right, lower A-pillar
inner
Stamping


Line dies on common shoe
(hand transfer)
Draw
Restrike
Trim and partial separate
Cam trim, trim, and separate
Common shoe

$55,162
$58,268
$51,334
$66,797
$18,367

1
1
1
1

$4,400
$4,400




1
1





7305-1300-155
7305-1300-156
Left, upper A-pillar
inner
Right, upper A-pillar
inner ^^k
Stamping


Line dies on common shoe
(hand transfer)
Progressive developed blank
(double attached)
Form and flange
Flange and restrike (double
pad)
Extrude and separate
Common shoe

$139,832
$67,679
$68,126
$55,145
$16,962

1
1
1
1

$28,000
$28,000




1
1





Door Aperture Assembly
7306-1910-189
7306-1920-190
Left, A-pillar outer
upper
Right, A-pillar outer
upper
Stamping


Transfer dies
Draw (double attached)
Trim, developed trim, and
partial separate
Finish form, flange, and
restrike
Finish trim and separate
Master shoes
End of arm tooling

$105,668
$128,641
$135,645
$97,420
$40,392
$12,000

1
1
1
1


$19,500
$19,500





1
1






186

-------
7306-1910-191
7306-1920-192
Left, roof side rail
outer
Right, roof side rail
outer
Stamping


Transfer dies
Draw (double attached)
Trim, developed trim, and
partial separate
Finish form, flange, and
restrike
Finish trim and separate
Master shoes
End of arm tooling

$79,668
$105,077
$105,767
$89,247
$41,042
$16,000

1
1
1
1


$16,000
$16,000





1
1






7306-1910-193
7306-1920-194
Left, C-pillar striker
reinforcement
Right, C-pillar striker
reinforcement
Stamping

Complete progressive die (2
out, 1 left and 1 right)

$34,332

1

$650
$650
1
1

7306-1910-195
7306-1920-196
Left C-pillar outer
Right C-pillar outer
Stamping


Line dies with robotic transfer
Rough blank (double
attached)
Draw (double attached)
Trim and developed trim
Trim and developed trim
Finish form, flange, and
restrike (double pad)
Separate and cam set
flanges
End of arm tooling

$93,644
$151,092
$167,760
$165,870
$205,755
$144,189
$15,000

1
1
1
1
1
1

$39,000
$39,000






1
1







7306-1913-001
7306-1924-002
Left, lower B-pillar
outer
Right, lower B-pillar
outer
Stamping


Line dies with robotic transfer
Rough blank (flip/flop
left/right)
Draw (double unattached)
Redraw
Trim and pierce
Trim and pierce
Finish form, flange, and
restrike
End of arm tooling

$101,111
$149,138
$152,991
$174,868
$167,712
$179,334
$15,000

1
1
1
1
1
1

$32,500
$32,500






1
1







7306-1913-003
7306-1924-004
Left, upper B-pillar
outer
Right, upper B-pillar
outer
Stamping


Transfer dies
Draw (double attached)
Rough trim and developed
trim
Rough trim and developed
trim
Finish form, flange, and
restrike
Cam trim, trim, and separate
Master shoes
End of arm tooling

$46,469
$50,71 1
$48,596
$55,535
$75,051
$29,621
$12,000

1
1
1
1
1


$5,900
$5,900






1








7306-1913-005
7306-1924-006
Left, upper, B-pillar
inner reinforcement
Right, upper, B-pillar
inner reinforcement
Stamping

Complete progressive die (2
out, 1 left and 1 right)

$72,875

1

$1,250
$1,250
1
1

7306-1913-007
Left, middle, B-pillar
inner reinforcment
Stamping
Complete progressive die (2
out, 1 left and 1 right)
$32,508
1
$600
1
187

-------
7306-1924-008
Right, middle, B-pillar
inner reinforcment




$600
1

7306-1913-009
7306-1924-010
Left, lower, B-pillar
inner reinforcement
Right, lower, B-pillar
inner reinforcement
Stamping

Complete progressive die (2
out, 1 left and 1 right)

$81,191

1

$950
$950
1
1

7306-1915-011
7306-1926-012
Left, lower B-pillar
inner
Right, lower B-pillar
inner
Stamping


Line dies with robotic transfer
Rough blank (flip/flop
left/right)
Draw (double unattached)
Trim and pierce
Trim and pierce
Finish form, extrude, and
restrike (double pad)
End of arm tooling

$891,730
$85,677
$119,560
$119,560
$99,233
$16,000

1
1
1
1
1

$15,500
$15,500





1
1






7306-1915-001
Left/right B-pillar
beltline reinforcement
Stamping
Complete progressive die
$16,934
1
$500
1

7306-1915-013
7306-1926-014

7305-1800-145

Left, upper B-pillar
inner
Right, upper B-pillar
inner
Stamping

I
Upper cowl panel

Complete progressive die (2
out, 1 left and 1 right)

$97,237

)ash and Cowl Structure
Cast Casting mold
magnesium
Trim die
$141,000
$60,561
1

$3,300
$3,300
1
1
__
1
1
$23,400

1


7305-1700-147
Cowl panel support
Stamping

Transfer dies
Draw
Trim and developed trim
Trim, developed trim, and
cam trim
Finish form, flange, and
restrike
Common shoes
End of arm tooling

$74,731
$92,078
$112,671
$95,243
$20,631
$10,000

1
1
1
1


$18,500






1







7305-1600-149
Dash panel
reinforcement
Cast Casting mold
magnesium
Trim die
$216,000
$132,513
1
1
$31,600

1


7307-1600-183
Left, rearwheelhouse
outer panel
Cast Casting mold
magnesium
Trim die
$250,000
$142,164
1
1
$43,800

1


7307-1600-184
Right, rear
wheelhouse outer
panel
Cast Casting mold
magnesium
Trim die
$240,000
$138,966
1
1
$41,400

1


7307-1600-213
7307-1600-214
Left, rear closeout
panel
Right, rear closeout
panel
Stamping

Complete progressive die (2
out, 1 left and 1 right)

$192,307

1

$9,600
$9,600
1
1

7305-1500-157
Left, shotgun panel
Stamping
Transfer dies


$28,500
1
188

-------

7305-1500-158
inner
Right, shotgun panel
inner




Rough blank die (2 out, 1 left
and 1 right)
Form
Finish form and flange
Trim
Flange and restrike
Master shoes
End of arm tooling

$133,440
$87,170
$117,563
$132,094
$77,572
$48,895
$14,400

1
1
1
1
1



$28,500







1







7305-1500-197
7305-1500-198
Left, upper A-pillar
reinforcement
Right, upper A-pillar
reinforcement
Stamping

Complete progressive die (2
out, 1 left and 1 right)

$137,042

1

$2,250
$2,250
1
1

7305-1530-221
7305-1530-222
Left, dash
transmission
reinforcement
Right, dash
transmission
reinforcement
Stamping


Line dies (hand transfer)
Draw (double unattached)
Second draw
Rough trim and developed
trim
Developed trim and cam
developed trim
Form and flange
Form and flange
Finish trim, pierce, and cam
pierce
Cam flange and restrike

$93,191
$96,656
$88,494
$87,500
$88,188
$82,126
$93,594
$81,087

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
$21,500
$21,500







1
1








7305-1530-223
7305-1520-224
Left, dash
transmission insert
Right, dash
transmission insert
Stamping

Complete progressive die (2
out, 1 left and 1 right)

$62,424

1

$950
$950
1
1

7305-1400-143
Upper dash panel
Cast Casting mold
magnesium
Trim die
$206,000
$129,768
1
1
$52,700

1


7305-1400-144
7305-1400-145
Left lower dash panel
Righ lower dash panel
Cast Casting mold
magnesium
Trim die
$317,000
$230,467
Rear End
7307-1510-111
Rear end outer panel
Stamping

Line dies with robotic transfer
Draw
Trim and developed trim
Trim and developed trim
Finish form and flange
Finish form, flange, and
restrike
Finish trim and pierce
End of arm tooling

$74,912
$81,087
$81,016
$83,914
$85,112
$82,672
$18,000
1
1


1
1
1
1
1
1

$36,000
$36,000
1
1

$43,500







1








7307-1510-117
Rear end inner panel
Stamping

Line dies with robotic transfer
Draw
Rough trim and developed
trim

$84,640
$92,852

1
1
$39,500


1


189

-------

Redraw
Developed trim
Developed trim and pierce
Finish form, flange, and
restrike (double pad)
End of arm tooling
$80,037
$89,698
$91,062
$95,070
$18,000
1
1
1
1












7307-1400-119

Rear compartment Extrude
crossmember

Extrusion tooling
Trim jig
$49,416
$3,115
2
1
$12,000

1


7307-1410-120

Extrusion hangar Extrude
bracket

Extrusion tooling
Trim jig
$49,986
$2,041
2
1
$1,250

1


7307-1400-163
7307-1400-164

Left, rear wheelhouse Stamping
inner panel
Right, rear
wheelhouse inner
panel

Line dies with robotic transfer
Draw (double attached)
Trim and developed trim
Trim and developed trim
Finish form, flange, and
restrike (double pad)
Finish trim and separate
End of arm tooling

$146,206
$163,555
$163,555
$238,243
$117,380
$15,000

1
1
1
1
1

$38,500
$38,500





1
1






7307-1500-167
7307-1500-168

Left, rear shock tower Stamping
reinforcement
Right, rear shock
tower reinforcement

Line dies on common shoes
(hand transfer)
Draw (double attached)
Trim and rough trim
Developed trim
Cam developed trim
Finish form and flange
Aerial cam flange
Separate and restrike
Common shoes

$38,164
$44,667
$39,082
$56,093
$42,219
$64,149
$42,620
$28,685

1
1
1
1
1
1
1

$3,100
$3,100







1
1








7305-1300-165

Left, rear shock tower Die cast

Casting mold
Trim die
$126,000
$75,977
1
1
$26,000

1


7305-1300-166

Right, rear shock Die cast
tower
Casting mold
$132,000
Trim die $75,977
Front Wheelhouse
7305-1310-151

Left front shock tower Die cast

Casting mold
Trim die
$119,000
$79,812
1
$26,000
1


1
1
$27,500

1


7305-1320-152

Right front shock Die cast
tower

Casting mold
Trim die
$125,000
$79,812
1
1
$27,500

1


7305-1310-161

Left front wheelhouse Cast Casting mold
panel magnesium
Trim die
$141,000
$80,095
1
1
$21,900

1


7305-1320-162
Right front Cast Casting mold
$148,000
1
$21,900
1
190

-------


7306-1200-113





7306-1200-111

7307-1200-217


7307-1200-218


7306-1110-101

7306-1110-103

7306-1000-175
7306-1000-176







7307-1000-139


7307-1000-138

7307-1020-135
7307-1020-136

7307-1020-223
7307-1020-224

7307-1011-001

7307-1011-003

wheelhouse panel

Rear seat floor panel





Rear seatbelt
anchorage plate

Left, rear, outer frame
rail transition


Right, rear, outer
frame rail transition


Center rear seat riser

Left, rear seat floor
reinforcement

Left rear seat riser
Right rear seat riser







Right/left rear frame
rail


Right/left rear frame
rail mounting plate

Left front frame rail
Right front frame rail

Left frame rail
mounting plate
Right frame rail
mounting plate

Left/right front rail
mounting

Left/right front rail
mounting cover

magnesiurr

Stamping





Stamping

Die cast


Die cast


Stamping

Stamping

Stamping








Extrude


Stamping

Extrude


Stamping


Stamping

Stamping


Trim die
Rear Seat
Line dies with robotic transfer
Draw
Trim
Finish form and restrike
End of arm tooling

Complete progressive die

Casting mold
Trim die

Casting mold
Trim die

Complete progressive die

Complete progressive die

Line dies with robotic transfer
Rough blank (flip/flop
left/right)
Form (double unattached)
Trim and developed trim
Trim and developed trim
Finish form and flange
Restrike
End of arm tooling
Frame Rails
Extrusion tooling
Trim jig

Complete progressive die

Extrusion tooling
Trim jig

Complete progressive die


Complete progressive die

Complete progressive die (2
out)


$80,095

$93,535
$114,717
$77,468
$9,000

$26,206

$192,000
$116,537

$199,000
$116,537

$216,500

$58,424


$53,598
$61,333
$80,561
$80,561
$97,654
$91,442
$16,000

$46,850
$2,918

$36,086

$46,850
$2,506

$43,803


$43,627

$59,154




1
1
1


1

1
1

1
1

1

1


1
1
1
1
1
1


2
1

1

2
1

1


1

1



$33,800





$650

$28,500


$28,500


$29,800

$2,600

$21,500
$21,500







$8,600


$650

$6,500


$850


$1,450

$1,250



1





1

1


1


1

1

1
1







1


1

1


1


1

1

191

-------
7305-0900-137
Left, front, inner frame
rail transition
Die cast

Casting mold
Trim die
$184,000
$113,428
1
1
$25,500

1


7305-0900-138
Right, front, inner
frame rail transition
Die cast

Casting mold
Trim die
$190,000
$113,428
1
1
$25,500

1


7307-0900-141
Left, rear, inner frame
rail transition
Die cast

Casting mold
Trim die
$195,000
$117,447
1
1
$28,500

1


7307-0900-142
Right, rear, inner
frame rail transition
Die cast

Casting mold
Trim die
$201,000
$117,447
1
1
$28,500

1


7306-0810-123
7306-0810-124
Left rocker sill
extrusion
Right rocker sill
extrusion
Extrude

Extrusion tooling
Trim jig
$51,412
$3,655
2
1
$31,750

1


7305-1200-209
Left front frame rail
outer transition
Die cast

Casting mold
Trim die
$179,000
$111,602
1
1
$25,500

1


7305-1200-210
Right front frame rail
outer transition
Die cast
Casting mold
$185,000
1
$25,500
1
I Trim die I $111,602 I 1 I I
Floor
7306-0830-124
7306-0840-010
Left/right, small outer
floor extrusion
Left/right, large outer
floor extrusion
Extrude

Extrusion tooling
Trim jig
$53,122
$2,363
2
1
$1,500
$1,600
1
1

7306-0830-125
Left/right, small floor
crossmember
Extrude

Extrusion tooling
Trim jig
$46,280
$3,115
2
1
$15,900

1


7306-0830-126
7306-0840-012
Left/right, small inner
floor extrusion
Left/right, large inner
floor extrusion
Extrude

Extrusion tooling
Trim jig
$53,122
$2,041
2
1
$1,600
$1,750
1
1

7306-0840-01 1
Left/right, large floor
crossmember
Extrude

Extrusion tooling
Trim jig
$47,134
$3,331
2
1
$17,300

1


7306-0850-000
Left/right, fore/aft floor
extrusions
Extrude

Extrusion tooling
Trim jig
$44,854
$3,223
2
1
$17,600

1


7306-0860-000 I Center tunnel bracket I Stamping I Complete progressive die I $25,733 I 1 I $650 I 1
   Totals   $   26,017,503.00   253   $
Annual (amortized over 3 years)
Per BIW (amortized over 3 years)
Annual (amortized over 5 years)
$9,373,468
$156
$5,624,081
192

-------
                                           Per BIW (amortized over 5 years)
$94
In addition to estimating tooling cost, Intellicosting estimated the total piece cost for the
Phase 2 HD BIW at $1930 - an increase of $723 compared to the Toyota Venza estimate
as shown in Tables 4.5.6.3.b below.

            Table 4.5.6.3.b: Toyota Venza and Phase 2 HD BIW piece costs
Category
Material
Variable
Fixed
Direct
Profit
SG&A
Freight
Total
Venza
$907.94
$67.34
$52.59
$23.04
$83.02
$52.55
$20.84
$1,207.32
Phase 2
HD
$1 ,282.05
$157.05
$160.04
$59.13
$147.22
$100.04
$25.01
$1,930.54
A summary of the total manufacturing costs per year can be found in Table 4.5.6.3.C below
- they are broken down by year as the capital costs are amortized over five and seven
years while capital maintenance costs are per annum based on the suggested
amortization schedule from EBZ. Year eight represents the full amortization of capital
expenditures and is only the annual maintenance cost. Eight years does however, exceed
the typical vehicle life cycle. The reason for EBZ's augmented amortization schedule is
that the CMM isn't dependent on a vehicle lifecycle like the manufacturing equipment is
and can simply be reprogrammed for the next vehicle body produced at the plant. The
plant must be retooled to produce a different vehicle. A more detailed analysis can be
found in section 10.4 of Appendix A. Interest was taken  into account here to provide cost
parity with the Toyota Venza. This is the only area in which interest was taken into account
simply to provide a direct cost comparison. Normally, interest and depreciation would be
taken into account in determining  model line  costs, but only the BIW cost comparison is of
interest in this report. A full financial workup - including depreciation, dispersion of funds
across vehicle model lines, and varying interest levels available to automakers - is beyond
the scope of this study.

                 Table 4.5.6.3.c: Phase 2 HD BIW manufacturing costs
Category
Capital Costs (mils)
Labor
Utilities
Interest
Freight
SG&A (mils)
Annual Total
BIW Total
YeaM
$11.01
$6.50
$2.94
$2.52
$1.50
$1.43
$25.89
$432
Year 2
$11.01
$6.50
$2.94
$2.52
$1.50
$1.43
$25.89
$432
Year3
$11.01
$6.50
$2.94
$2.52
$1.50
$1.43
$25.89
$432
Year 4
$11.01
$6.50
$2.94
$2.52
$1.50
$1.43
$25.89
$432
YearS
$11.01
$6.50
$2.94
$2.52
$1.50
$1.43
$25.89
$432
Year6
$1.09
$6.50
$2.94
$2.52
$1.50
$0.74
$15.28
$255
Year?
$1.09
$6.50
$2.94
$2.52
$1.50
$0.74
$15.28
$255
YearS
$0.74
$6.50
$2.94
$2.52
$1.50
$0.71
$14.91
$248
                                        193

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Table 4.5.6.3.d below shows the total cost to produce each BIW including manufacturing
costs, piece costs, and tooling costs. The costs are broken out by the number of years of
tooling amortization and per year due to the amortization schedules.
   Table 4.5.6.3.d: BIW cost based on recommended amortization schedule with tooling
Category
Piece cost
Manufacturing cost
YeaM
$1 ,930
$432
Year 2
$1 ,930
$432
Year3
$1 ,930
$432
Year 4
$1 ,930
$432
YearS
$1 ,930
$432
Year6
$1 ,930
$255
Year 7
$1,930
$255
YearS
$1 ,930
$248
Tooling Costs Amortized Over 3 Years
Annual tooling cost (mils)
Tooling cost per BIW
Total BIW Cost
$9.37
$156
$2,517
$9.37
$156
$2,517
$9.37
$156
$2,517
$0.00
$0.00
$2,357
$0.00
$0.00
$2,357
$0.00
$0.00
$2,184
$0.00
$0.00
$2,184
$0.00
$0.00
$2,177
Tooling Costs Amortized Over 5 Years
Annual tooling cost (mils)
Tooling cost per BIW
Total BIW Cost
$5.62
$94
$2,455
$5.62
$94
$2,455
$5.62
$94
$2,455
$5.62
$94
$2,455
$5.62
$94
$2,455
$0.00
$0.00
$2,184
$0.00
$0.00
$2,184
$0.00
$0.00
$2,177
In addition to conducting an analysis based on EBZ's recommended amortization
schedule, all vehicle assembly costs were amortized over straight three and five year
periods. In Table 4.5.6.3.d above, only the tooling costs were amortized over the three and
five year periods. These results are shown in Table 4.5.6.3.e below. The net effect was a
constant BIW cost over the three and five year periods with small cost increases in both
instances - the greatest difference is less than $500.
rable 4.5. 6. 3. e: Straight 3- and 5-year amortization schedule
Category
Piece cost
Capital costs per BIW
Labor per BIW
Tooling cost per BIW
Utilities per BIW
Interest per BIW
Freight per BIW
SG&A per BIW
BIW Total
3 Year Amortization
$1,930
$301
$108
$156
$49
$42
$25
$24
$2,634
5 Year Amortization
$1,930
$186
$108
$94
$49
$42
$25
$24
$2,457
Table 4.5.6.3.f below details the cost breakdown within the actual body structure -
underbody, dash panel, front structure, bodysides, etc. The piece cost for each section is
shown along with the assembly, tooling, paint, and NVH costs.
                                        194

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               Table 4.5.6.3.f: Assembly cost breakdown by body section
System or
Subsystem
Body structure
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Underbody & floor
Dash panel
Front structure
Left bodyside
Right bodyside
Roof
Internal structure
NVH
Paint
Assembly
Tooling
Total
Baseline Venza
Baseline
Mass (kg)
382.5
113.65
16.97
32.45
79.5
79.5
27.83
20.6
8
4
-
-
382.5
Estimated
Cost

$170
$81
$124
$224
$224
$74
$310
$110
$540
$612
$389
$2,858
Phase 2
Phase 2
Mass (kg)
241.8
92.7
11.9
17.1
33.3
33.2
16.9
24.6
8
4
-
-
241.8
Material
Cost

$133
$111
$45
$339
$338
$85
$211
-
-
-
-
$1,261
Build
Cost

$107
$27
$18
$30
$30
$5
$95
-
-
-
-
$312
Total
Cost

$274
$157
$71
$424
$422
$103
$350
$110
$540
$432
$156
$3,040
Incremental Cost
Incremental
Cost

$104
$77

$200
$198
$29
$40
$0
$0
-$180
-$23:
$182
Percentage
Increase/ Decrease

61%
94%
-43%
89%
89%
40%
13%
0%
0%
-29%
-60%
6%
A sensitivity analysis comparing a number of production volumes can be found in Table
4.5.6.3.g below. A further production volume analysis can be found in Appendix A, section
7.1.1.

                   Table 4.5.6.3.g: Manufacturing sensitivity analysis
Production
^*
60k
Category
Capital costs (mils)
Labor (mils)
Utilities (mils)
Interest (mils)
Freight (mils)
SG&A (mils)
Annual Total (mils)
BIW Total
YeaM
$11.01
$6.50
$2.94
$2.52
$1.50
$1.43
$25.89
$432
Year 2
$11.01
$6.50
$2.94
$2.52
$1.50
$1.43
$25.89
$432
Year3
$11.01
$6.50
$2.94
$2.52
$1.50
$1.43
$25.89
$432
Year 4
$11.01
$6.50
$2.94
$2.52
$1.50
$1.43
$25.89
$432
YearS
$11.01
$6.50
$2.94
$2.52
$1.50
$1.43
$25.89
$432
Year 6
$1.09
$6.50
$2.94
$2.52
$1.50
$0.74
$15.28
$255
Year 7
$1.09
$6.50
$2.94
$2.52
$1.50
$0.74
$15.28
$255
YearS
$0.74
$6.50
$2.94
$2.52
$1.50
$0.71
$14.91
$248

100k
Capital costs (mils)
Labor (mils)
Utilities (mils)
Interest (mils)
Freight (mils)
SG&A (mils)
Annual Total (mils)
BIW Total
Cost Decrease
$11.01
$9.74
$5.12
$2.52
$2.50
$1.81
$32.71
$327
24%
$11.01
$9.74
$5.12
$2.52
$2.50
$1.81
$32.71
$327
24%
$11.01
$9.74
$5.12
$2.52
$2.50
$1.81
$32.71
$327
24%
$11.01
$9.74
$5.12
$2.52
$2.50
$1.81
$32.71
$327
24%
$11.01
$9.74
$5.12
$2.52
$2.50
$1.81
$32.71
$327
24%
$1.09
$9.74
$5.12
$2.52
$2.50
$1.12
$22.09
$221
13%
$1.09
$9.74
$5.12
$2.52
$2.50
$1.12
$22.09
$221
13%
$0.74
$9.74
$5.12
$2.52
$2.50
$1.09
$21.72
$217
12%
                                        195

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      4.5.7.      Cost Discussion

This discussion covers the cost evaluation methods used for both the Phase 1 and Phase
2 studies. Phase 1 only covered a basic analysis while Phase 2 went into far greater detail
including full tooling and assembly analyses. The basics of the Phase 1 study are provided
before delving into the Phase 2 study and some of the cost saving technology behind the
Phase 2 HD BIW itself.

          4.5.7.1 Phase 1 Cost Study

The Lotus Phase 1 study projected potential cost savings in a number of areas outside the
body structure to partially offset the more expensive low-mass body structure. These non-
BIW system cost reductions occurred because a substantial amount of mass was
eliminated by using less material, parts integration allowing fewer components overall,
and, in some cases, less expensive materials.

The cost weighting factors used for the cost analyses are the values published in the
Phase 1 report; this chart is shown in Figure 4.5.7A.a below.
               Suspension/Chassis
                   13%
                                                         Closures/Fenders
                                                            10%
                                                         Bumper System
                                                        Therma?%
                                                         1%
                  Figure 4.5.7.1.a: Estimated Vehicle System Costs
                                       196

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 Table 4.5.7.1 .a summarizes the Phase 1 study total vehicle cost; the body structure piece
 cost was estimated at 135 percent, or 35-percent higher than the baseline Venza BIW
 estimated piece cost. The average cost for non-body systems was estimated at 96
 percent. The estimated weighted cost for the Phase 1 total vehicle,  less powertrain, was
 103 percent.

              Table 4.5.7.1.a: Phase 1 HD Estimated Vehicle Cost Increase
I
Body
Non-Body
Cost
factor
135.0%
96.0%
Cost Weighting
factor
18.0%
82.0%
Weighted Cost
factor
24.3%
78.7%

Totals
Cost Differential


100.0%

103.0%
3.0%
 The cost differentials for the various components and systems in the Phase 1 design can
 be converted into overall vehicle costs based on an average approximation of the indirect
 costs incurred by automakers and included in the selling price of a vehicle, such as the
 Toyota Venza. The 2009 Toyota Venza had a base invoice price of $23,500. Dividing this
 cost by Toyota's cost-to-price markup factor yields an estimated direct manufacturing cost
 to produce the Venza. Generally, estimating automobile industry direct costs from retail
 prices is done with a retail price equivalent (RPE) factor to account for the cost of
 production overhead, warranty,  research and development, administrative, marketing,
 dealers, etc. Industry averages for this RPE factor typically range from 1.45-1.50 and a
 peer-reviewed study prepared for U.S. EPA indicates that Toyota's RPE is 1.48 (Rogozhin
 et al, 2009). As a result, the direct manufacturing cost for the 2009 Toyota Venza is
 estimated to be $15,878 (i.e. $23,500 divided by 1.48).

 The system costs for the 2009 Venza are estimated in Table 4.5.7.1 .b; these values are
 based on the Estimated Vehicle System Costs shown in Figure 4.5.7A.a and the
 estimated diirect manufacturing cost derived above.

 Also in the table are the resulting Phase 1 HD design's  estimated incremental costs based
 primarily on the 35-percent increase for the body structure cost (estimated at $1,000) and
 the cost decreases in closures, fenders, electrical,  interior, suspension, and chassis
 components (savings of over $600). The BIW estimated cost is based on a 35 percent cost
 increase for piece cost, tooling,  assembly, paint, and NVH materials. Detailed tooling and
 assembly cost analyses were beyond the scope of the Phasel project.

 The net result of the Phase 1  HD vehicle was a $342 vehicle cost increase; the powertrain
 cost is not  included in this number.

  Table 4.5.7.1.b: Estimated direct manufacturing costs of the Toyota Venza baseline and
	Phase 1 High Development vehicle design	
  Area/System
I
Baseline 2009 Toyota Venza
I
Lotus Phase 1 High Development Vehicle
                                        197

-------

Body
Closures/Fenders
Bumpers
Thermal
Electrical
Interior
Lighting
Suspension/Chassis
Glazing
Miscellaneous
Powertrain
Mass (kg)
382.5
143.02
17.95
9.25
23.6
250.6
9.9
378.9
43.71
30.1
410.16
Cost (%)
18
10
2
1
7
22
1
13
3
0
23
Cost ($)
2858
1588
318
159
1111
3493
159
2064
476
0
3652
Mass (kg)
221.1
84
16
9.3
15
152.8
9.9
217
43.7
22.9
356.2
Mass
reduction
(kg)
161.4
59
2
0
8.6
97.8
0
161.9
0
7.2
54
Cost
factor
135%
76%
103%
100%
96%
96%
100%
95%
100%
99%
-
Cost ($)
3858
1207
327
159
1067
3354
159
1961
476
0
-
Incremental
cost ($)
1000
381
9
0
-44
-139
0
-103
0
0
-

Total (excl.
powertrain)
Total (incl.
powertrain)
1290
1700
-
"
12,226
15,878
792
1148
498
;
103%
;
12,568
;
342
;
      4.5.7.2 Phase 2 Cost Study

The following BIW cost discussion presents the comparison of the baseline, Phase 1, and
Phase 2 BIWs including a comparison of the piece cost and the costs based on the
detailed manufacturing report done as part of the Phase 2 study.

Assembled body costs for the Venza BIW are not public information, thus the costs for the
2009 Toyota Venza BIW were estimated using the methodology above (taken from the
Phase 1 report). The full assembled body is estimated at 18 percent of the RPE value,
giving a body cost of $2858. This value is an estimate as the cost will vary by OEM and by
platform as well as by the country the body is assembled in, the country of origin for the
body parts and commodity price fluctuations for the materials.
    4^
Intellicosting valued the Venza piece cost at $1,207, leaving $1,651  for the assembly,
paint,  tooling, and  NVH costs. Paint and body NVH  costs were determined through
industry research and are estimated at $540 while body specific NVH materials were
estimated at $39. Tooling costs per BIW were determined by amortizing the $70 million
tooling cost (estimated by Intellicosting)  over three years of production  at 60,000 units
annually. This brings the tooling cost per BIW to $389. The remaining $683 is the
estimated assembly cost.

Intellicosting also developed detailed piece costs for the Phase 2  HD BIW, which were
$1930.54. This gives a 160-percent piece-cost increase relative to the 2009 Toyota Venza
BIW ($1930.54/$1207.32). Paint and NVH materials were estimated at $540 and $39 for
the Phase 2  HD BIW as well. Tooling cost and assembly cost for the Phase 2  BIW are
both substantially lower than for the Venza at $156  and $432 respectively due to the
significantly decrease parts count (166 for the Phase 2 HD versus 419 for the Venza).
                                       198

-------
The part-by-part cost analysis for both bodies is included in Section 7.3, Appendix C.
Table 4.5.7.2.a below details the costs associated with producing a complete BIWfor the
baseline Venza, Phase 1,  and Phase 2 bodies.

                      Table 4.5.7.2.a: Assembled BIW analysis
Category
Piece cost
Relative piece cost
Assembly
Paint
Tooling
NVH
Total
Difference relative to Venza
Venza
$1 ,207
100%
$683
$540
$389
$39
$2,858
$0
Phase 1
$1 ,629
135%
$922
$729
$525
$53
$3,858
$1,000
Phase 2 Actual
$1 ,930
160%
$432
$540
$156
$39
$3,098
$239
Table 4.5.7.2.b below breaks down the cost further with just the assembly, paint, tooling,
and NVH cost analysis. These costs are approximately $484 less for the Phase 2 HD
design than for the baseline Venza. The cost increase for the Phase 2 BIW relative to the
Venza is 108% ($3,098/$2,858).

            Table 4.5.7.2.b: Assembly, paint, tooling, and NVH cost analysis
Category
Assembly
Paint
Tooling
NVH
Total
Difference relative to Venza
Venza
$683
$540
$389
$39
$1,651
$0
Phase 1 (135%SF)
$922
$729
$525
$53
$2,228
$578
Phase 2 Actual
$432
$540
$156
$39
$1,167
-$484
Table 4.5.7..2.C below shows the piece cost for the baseline Venza, Phase 1, and Phase 2
vehicles and the assembly, paint, tooling, and NVH costs in sub-categories. The Phase 2
piece costs are $723 more than the Venza primarily because of the more advanced
materials used. This cost increase is partially offset by the $484 savings in assembly and
tooling.  The total BIW cost increase is $239, or 8 percent higher than the Venza cost.

      Table 4.5.7.2.c: Piece, assembly, tooling, paint, and NVH sub-category costs
Category
Piece cost
Difference to Venza
Venza
$1,207
$0
Phase 1
$1,629
$422
Phase 2
$1,930
$723

Assembly, Tooling, Paint, NVH
Difference to Venza
$1,651
$0
$2,228
$578
$1,167


Total difference
0
$1,000
$239
The assembly and tooling cost savings relative to the Venza help offset the 160-percent
piece cost increase. See section 4.4.12.3 "Investment and Manufacturing Costs" and
                                       199

-------
Section 10 of Appendix A for a detailed breakdown. The assembly and tooling costs used
in this section are based on EBZ's suggested amortization schedule unless otherwise
noted.

The complete, assembled body for Phase 1  is more expensive than the developed Phase
2 body because a single scaling factor was used. The relative Phase 1 BIW piece cost was
estimated to be  135-percent more than the baseline Venza; this value was used as a
scaling factor to estimate the costs of assembly, paint, tooling, and NVH materials.

The actual manufacturing and tooling costs are significantly lower than the scaled Phase 1
costs and are also lower than the estimated assembly and tooling costs for the baseline
Venza. This is due primarily to the reduced part count. These reduced costs helped offset
the 160-percent piece cost increase. Paint and NVH materials were left unchanged from
the Venza cost,  which were estimated through industry research. The estimated Phase 2
assembled  and  painted body costs are $239 greater than the estimated assembled Venza
body costs.

To compare a variety of possible amortization schedules,  an analysis with both the three
and five year straight amortization (tooling and manufacturing) schedules was also done.
This analysis is  shown in Table 4.5.7.2.d below.

                  Table 4.5.7.2.d: Amortization schedule comparison
Category
Piece cost
Capital costs per BIW
Labor per BIW
Tooling cost per BIW
Utilities per BIW
Interest per BIW
Freight per BIW
SG&A per BIW
BIW Total
EBZ
Recommended
$1 ,930
$184
$108
$156
$49
$42
$25
$24
$2,518
3 Year
Amortization
$1 ,930
$301
$108
$156
$49
$42
$25
$24
$2,635
5 Year
Amortization
$1 ,930
$186
$108
$94
$49
$42
$25
$24
$2,458
The results show a slight increase in BIW cost when amortized over three years ($117
more) and a slight decrease over five years ($60 less). This is a straight amortization
schedule; these costs would be constant over the specified time period instead of
decreasing as with the EBZ recommended amortization schedule. None of the three
amortization schedules is depreciated.

An analysis was done to  determine the cost impact of the Phase 2 BIW on the total vehicle
costs. The summary of findings is based on the Phase 1  analysis (for non-body
components) and the Phase 2 analysis (for the body structure). Table 4.5.7.2.e below lists
the values calculated for  this analysis.

               Table  4.5.7.2.e: Phase 2 Estimated Vehicle Cost Increase
            [~            | Cost factor | Cost Weighting factor   | Weighted Cost factor  |
                                       200

-------
Complete body
Non-body
108%
95%
18%
82%
19.4%
77.9%

Totals
Cost Differential


100%

97.3%
-2.7%
The resultant full vehicle (less powertrain) is estimated to cost 2.7% less than the baseline
Venza based on a 5% cost savings from non-body components and an eight-percent
increase from the body structure.

Table 4.5.7.2.f below shows the cost breakdown for the various body and non-body
systems of the Venza and Phase 2 HD designs. As shown in the table, the estimated
incremental cost of the body is $239 (108 percent) higher than the baseline Venza.
Including the cost savings from the closures, fenders, electrical, interior, suspension, and
chassis  components (estimated savings of over $600), the net result of the full Phase 2 HD
vehicle is actually an  estimated $419 decrease in total vehicle cost. Note: the Phase 1
report has details on these topics, including derivation of the estimated cost factors.

  Table  4.5.7.2.f: Estimated direct manufacturing costs of the Toyota Venza baseline and
                            Phase 2 HD vehicle designs
Area/System
Body
Closures/Fenders
Bumpers
Thermal
Electrical
Interior
Lighting
Suspension/Chassis
Glazing
Miscellaneous
Powertrain
Baseline 2009 Toyota
Venza
Mass
(kg)
382.5
143
17.95
9.25
23.6
250.6
9.9
378.9
43.71
30.1
410.2
Cost
(%)
18%
10%
2%
1%
7%
22%
1%
13%
3%
0%
23%
Cost
($)
2858
1588
318
159
1111
3493
159
2064
476
0
3652
Lotus Phase 2 High Development Vehicle
Mass
(kg)
241.8
84
2
9.3
15
153
9.9
217
43.7
22.9
356
Mass
reduction
(kg)
140.7
59
2
0
8.6
97.8
0
161.9
0
7.2
54
Total
system cost
factor
108%
76%
103%
100%
96%
96%
100%
95%
100%
99%
-
Cost
($)
3097
1207
327
159
1067
3354
159
1961
476
0
-
Incremental
cost ($)
239
-381
9
0
-44
-139
0

0
0
-

Total (excl. powertrain)
Total (incl. powertrain)
1290
1700

-
12,226
15,878
817
1163
527
-
96.6%
(wt'd cost
factor)
-
11,807
-
-419
-
Another analysis was performed to determine the sensitivity of the vehicle cost (less
powertrain) to the percent contribution of the body to the vehicle cost makeup. The cost
weighting factor was varied from 16 percent to 20 in two-percent (2%) increments to
account for the vehicle body constituting a larger or smaller percentage of the total vehicle
cost. For this sensitivity analysis, all other factors were the same as in Table 4.5.7.2.c.
Table 4.5.7.2.g below shows very little variation (less than 0.6%) based on the body
contribution to the full vehicle. This is because both the body and non-body components
                                       201

-------
are estimated to be very close to the cost of the actual Venza systems. The non-body
incremental cost factor is 95.0%, i.e., the average cost reduction for all non-body systems,
less powertrain, is 5.0%. This number differs from the total non-powertrain number of
96.6% because it does not include the weighted BIW incremental cost factor.

                 Table 4.5.7.2.g: Phase 2 full vehicle sensitivity study

Body
Non-body
Incremental
Cost Factor
108.0%
95.0%
Low Cost
Cost
Portion
16.0%
84.0%
Weighted
Cost Factor
17.3%
79.8%
Central Estimate
Cost
Portion
18.0%
82.0%
Weighted
Cost Factor
19.4%
77.9%
High Cost
Cost
Portion
20.0%
80.0%
Weighted
Cost Factor
21 .6%
76.0%

Totals
-
100.0%
97.1%
100.0%
97.4%
100.0%
97.6%

Cost differential for total
vehicle
Incremental vehicle cost
"
-
~
-
-2.9%
-$460
~
-
-2.6%
-$419
~
-
-2.4%
-$378
The non-body cost factors in Tables 4.5.7.2.f and 4.5.7.2.g are based on estimates
generated in the Phase 1 report. The  numbers were a result of near 40% mass reductions
while using similar, or in some cases, reduced cost materials for many of the components.
A total vehicle, less powertrain, cost reduction of 3.4% is required to achieve a total vehicle
savings, less powertrain, of $419 for a body costing 8% more than the all steel baseline
body.

The low mass body requires a new assembly plant to build it. The details of the assembly
plant are included in the Appendix. It was assumed that an existing facility was updated
with the required Phase 2 BIW hardware, i.e., there was no cost included for constructing a
new building. Amortizing the cost of the new assembly plant into the BIW cost over a three
year period increases the BIW cost factor by 10% over the non-amortized body cost, from
108% to 118%.

Combining Tables 4.5.7.2.a and Table 4.5.7.2.d yields a final amortized BIW cost. These
costs are shown in Table 4.5.7.2.h.
                 Table 4.5.7.2.h: Fully Amortized Body in White Cost
Category
Piece cost
Capital costs per BIW
Labor per BIW
Tooling cost per BIW
Utilities per BIW
Interest per BIW
Freight per BIW
SG&A per BIW
BIW Assembly Labor
EBZ
Recommended
$1 ,930
$184
$108
$156
$49
$42
$25
$24
$432
3 Year
Amortization
$1 ,930
$301
$108
$156
$49
$42
$25
$24
$432
5 Year
Amortization
$1 ,930
$186
$108
$94
$49
$42
$25
$24
$432
                                       202

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Paint
NVH
BIW Total
% Cost Relative to Non
Amortized Phase 2 BIW Phase 2
$540
$39
$3,529
114%
$540
$39
$3,646
118%
$540
$39
$3,469
112%
The cost for the BIW amortized over a three year period was substituted for the non-
amortized BIW cost factor and the incremental vehicle costs were recalculated. Table
4.5.7.2.i below lists the total vehicle costs using the three year amortized BIW cost. The
Nominal Estimate is $133 less than the baseline vehicle.

                  Table 4.5.7.2.J: Phase 2 full vehicle sensitivity study

Body
Non-body
Incremental
Cost Factor
118.0%
95.0%
Low Cost
Cost
Portion
16.0%
84.0%
Weighted
Cost Factor
18.9%
79.8%
Nominal Estimate
Cost
Portion
18.0%
82.0%
Weighted
Cost Factor
21.2%
77.9%
High Cost
Cost
Portion
20.0%
80.0%
Weighted
Cost Factor
23.6%
76.0%

Totals
-
100.0%
98.7%
100.0%
99.2%
100.0%
99.6%

Cost differential for total
vehicle
Incremental vehicle cost
-
-
-
-
-1.3%
-$206
-
-
-0.8%
-$133
-
-
-0.4%
-$60
A final cost analysis was done to determine the effect that having no cost reduction benefit
for the mass reduced non-BIW systems, i.e., the non-body cost factor went from 95.0% to
100.0%. Table 4.5.7.2J below lists the total vehicle costs using the three year amortized
BIW cost and cost parity for all non-body systems  less powertrain. The Nominal Estimate
is $514 more expensive than the baseline vehicle.

       Table 4.5.7.2J: Phase 2 full vehicle sensitivity study - Non-BIW Cost parity
^^
Body
Non-body
Incremental
Cost Factor
118.0%
100.0%
Low Cost
Cost
Portion
16.0%
84.0%
Weighted
Cost Factor
18.9%
84.0%
Nominal Estimate
Cost
Portion
18.0%
82.0%
Weighted
Cost Factor
21.2%
82.0%
High Cost
Cost
Portion
20.0%
80.0%
Weighted
Cost Factor
23.6%
80.0%

Totals
-
100.0%
102.9%
100.0%
103.2%
100.0%
103.6%

Cost differential for total
vehicle
Incremental vehicle cost
"
-
~
-
-1.7%
$457
~
-
-1.2%
$514
~
-
-0.7%
$572
                                        203

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             4.5.7.3 Closures Piece Costs
CARB and EPA authorized a study in which Lotus would develop fully engineered closure systems.
The piece and tooling costs are listed in Table 4.5.7.3 below.

                       Table 4.5.7.3: Closure piece and tooling costs
Part Number
Part Name
Material
Tooling Cost
Piece Cost

Closures $15,957,268
$1,144.48

Litigate
7308-2610-001
7308-2610-002
7308-2610-003
7308-2610-004
7308-2610-005
7308-2610-005

Liftgate inner
Liftgate outer
Panel - Spoiler
Liftgate bracket - gas strut anchor - inner
Bracket - hinge upper
Bracket - liftgate hinge base + studs & pins

Magnesium - AM60
Aluminum - 6063-T4
PPO+PA Noryl GTX
Aluminum - 6063-T4
Aluminum - 6063-T4
Aluminum - 6063-T4
Sub-total
384,000
1 ,478,763
316,000
65,667
63,433
60,737
2,368,600

67.44
52.20
5.71
0.78
1.28
2.77
130.18

Door Front - LH
7308-2710-001
7308-2810-002
7308-2810-003
7308-2810-004
7308-2810-005
7308-2810-006
7308-2810-007
7308-2810-008
7308-2810-009
7308-2810-010
7308-2810-011
7308-2810-012
7308-2810-013
73082810-014

	
7308-2710-001
7308-2810-002
7308-2810-003
7308-2810-004
7308-2810-005
7308-2810-006
7308-2810-007
7308-2810-008
7308-2810-009
7308-2810-010
7308-2810-011
7308-2810-012
7308-2810-013
73082810-014
Panel - Door outer - LH
Panel - Door inner - LH
Beam - Reinft Front Door
Bracket- Fit Dr. Hinge support
Beam - Reinf.-Frt. Dr. outer
Striker Asm. -Striker Plate
Hinge Asm. - Door upper
Hinge plate - outer - upper
Hinge plate - inner - upper
Hinge Asm. - Door lower
Hinge plate - outer - lower
Hinge plate - inner - lower
Striker - Front Door latch reinft
Panel - Insert Frt Door


Aluminum - 6063-T4
Magnesium - AM60
HSS-950
HSS-950
HSS-950
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
^ LCS
LCS
f LCS
HSS - 950
PPO - Unfilled
Sub-total

1 ,338,772
231 ,500
179,054
153,292
147,578
43,012
88,188
88,188
44,293
88,188
88,188
44,293
71,084
191,000
2,796,630

51.90
42.26
5.36
2.73
4.96
2.31
19.67
19.67
3.16
19.67
19.67
3.16
0.90
5.08
200.50

Door Front - RH
Panel - Door outer - RH
Panel - Door inner - RH
Beam - Reinft Front Door
Bracket- Frt. Dr. Hinge support
Beam - Reinf.-Frt. Dr. outer
Striker Asm. -Striker Plate + wear pin
Hinge Asm. - Door upper
Hinge plate - outer - upper
Hinge plate - inner - upper
Hinge Asm. - Door lower
Hinge plate - outer - lower
Hinge plate - inner - lower
Striker - Front Door latch reinft
Panel - Insert Frt Door
Aluminum - 6063-T4
Magnesium - AM60
HSS-950
HSS-950
HSS-950
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
HSS - 950
PPO - Unfilled
1 ,338,772
231 ,500
179,054
153,292
147,578
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
71,084
177,000
51.90
42.26
5.36
2.73
4.96
2.31
19.67
19.67
3.16
19.67
19.67
3.16
0.90
5.08
                                         204

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Sub-total

2,298,280

200.50

Door Rear - LH
7308-2910-001
7308-2910-002
7308-2910-003
7308-2910-004
7308-2910-005
7308-2910-006
7308-2910-007
7308-2910-008
7308-2910-009
7308-2910-010
7308-2910-011
7308-2910-012
7308-2910-013
7308-2910-014
7308-2910-015


Panel - Door rear outer - LH
Panel - Door rear inner - LH
Beam - Reinft Rear Door
Striker Asm. -Striker Plate
Hinge Asm. - Door upper
Hinge plate - outer - upper
Hinge plate - inner - upper
Hinge Asm. - Door lower
Hinge plate - outer - lower
Hinge plate - inner - lower
Panel - Insert Frt Door
Striker - latch reinft
Bracket - rr dr hinge support
Reinft - rr dr outer
Reinft - rr dr inner


Aluminum - 6063-T4
Magnesium AM60
HSS - 950
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
PPO - Unfilled
Aluminum 6061 T4
Aluminum 6063 T4
Aluminum 6063 T4
Aluminum 6063 T4
Sub-total

1,171,834
231 ,500
186,220
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
175,000
167,009
75,353
87,020
172,463
2,266,399

45.43
42.26
5.36
2.31
19.67
19.67
3.16
19.67
19.67
3.16
3.91
8.91
6.15
6.05
6.05
211.43

Door Rear - RH
7308-2910-001
7308-2910-002
7308-2910-003
7308-2910-004
7308-2910-005
7308-2910-006
7308-2910-007
7308-2910-008
7308-2910-009
7308-2910-010
7308-2910-011
7308-2910-012
7308-2910-013
7308-2910-014
7308-2910-015

Panel - Door rear outer - LH
Panel - Door rear inner - LH
Beam - Reinft Rear Door
Striker Asm. -Striker Plate ^
Hinge Asm. - Door upper
Hinge plate - outer - upper
Hinge plate - inner - upper
Hinge Asm. - Door lower
Hinge plate - outer - lower
Hinge plate - inner - lower
Panel - Insert Frt Door
Striker - latch reinft
Bracket - rr dr hinge support
Reinft - rr dr outer
Reinft - rr dr inner
Aluminum - 6063-T4
Magnesium AM60
HSS - 950
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
LCS
PPO - Unfilled
Aluminum 6061 T4
Aluminum 6063 T4
Aluminum 6063 T4
Aluminum 6063 T4
Sub-total

1,171,834
231 ,500
186,220
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
161,000
0
75,353
87,020
172,463
2,085,390

45.43
42.26
5.36
2.31
19.67
19.67
3.16
19.67
19.67
3.16
3.91
8.91
6.15
6.05
6.05
211.43

Front Fender Outer - LH
7308-3110-001


Panel - Front Fender Outer - LH


Aluminum - 6063 - T4
Sub-total

1,184,952
1,184,952

32.42
32.42

Front Fender Outer - RH
7308-3210-001


Panel - Front Fender Outer - LH


Aluminum - 6063 - T4
Sub-total

1,184,952
1,184,952

32.42
32.42

Hood
7308-3310-001
7308-3310-002


Panel - Hood outer
Panel - Hood inner


Aluminum - 6063 - T4
Aluminum - 6063 - T4
Sub-total

809,306
962,759
1,772,065

43.83
81.77
125.60

205

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            4.5.7.4     Phase 2 HD BIW Technology

These analyses show that a holistic,  total vehicle approach to weight reduction can
minimize potential cost increases for utilizing a significantly lighter multi-material body
structure as the vehicle basis. Additionally, a holistic approach needs to be taken to
maximize the mass decompounding  effect.

The Phase 2 BIW mass target was a maximum of 267.8 kg; this target was based on a
total vehicle mass 30% lighter than the baseline Toyota Venza. This resulted in a
maximum allowable BIW mass of 267.8 kg (382.5 x 0.70).

The total vehicle target was 1699.7 kg x 0.70, or 1189.8 kg. The Phase 1  High
Development system masses were used for all areas but the BIW.

Due to changes necessary for crash  and structural performance, the Phase 2 BIW mass is
greater than the projected  Phase 1 mass. A 42.2-percent mass reduction was estimated in
the Phase 1 report while the Phase 2 mass reduction is 37.8 percent. The Phase 2 BIW
mass of 241.8 kg (see BOM in Table 4.4.12.a for the mass summary) is 25.9 kg less than
the Phase 2 mass requirement.

The fully assembled BIW costs for the baseline Venza, the Phase 1 HD BIW and the
Phase 2 BIW are listed in Table 4.5.7.C. The Phase 2 project included detailed studies for
tooling and assembly costs as well as BIW piece cost analyses for both the baseline
Venza and the Phase 2 body. Independent experts  in each field were utilized to analyze
these areas.

The Phase 2 HD complete body (assembled, painted with  NVH material added)  is 108%
more  expensive than the baseline Venza BIW vs. the projected 135% cost from the  Phase
1 report. This reduction is a direct result of lowering the parts count by 250 - Phase 2 BIW:
169 parts; 2009 Venza: 419 parts. Sixty (60) percent of the baseline parts have been
eliminated through component integration and design changes. There are fewer tools
required to make the body parts, the BIW assembly line  is  less complex and there are
fewer assembly operations required to join the parts. This contributes to reduced BIW
costs.

The joining process also contributed  to lower costs. Friction spot joining for the aluminum
components  requires less  energy than  RSW (resistance spot welding) and is a less  costly
joining process. Kawasaki  Robotics estimates a RSW is five times the cost of a friction
spot joint. Even though the amount saved per weld is relatively small on an absolute basis,
the total savings can be significant depending on the number of welds. As an example, the
2011 Jeep Grand Cherokee body has over 5,400 spot welds (http://www.iaxcjdr.com/2011-
ieep-qrand-cherokee.htm).
                                      206

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A friction spot joint can utilize a smaller flange than RSW due to the reduced diameter of
the flow drill relative to a welding head. This means that a significant material can be
removed by reducing the flange width. A typical flange width is 25 to 30 mm for the RSW
process. A 20 mm flange was used for the low mass body panels.

Additionally, the continuous beads of structural adhesive assist in creating a stiffer body
structure by bonding 100 percent of the panel surfaces together. This increases the body
stiffness with little mass penalty; the mass of the structural adhesive for the  Phase 2 BIW
is 1.4 kg.

Friction spot joining  occurs in the plastic region of the material and does not change the
material properties.  Structural adhesives do not degrade the parent material properties.
Resistance spot welds affect the parent material properties because the material changes
phase during the welding process. The combination of the 80% reduced FSJ vs. RSW cost
and the increased body stiffness achieved by using continuous adhesive bonding rather
than by adding material to the structure helps to lower BIW assembly costs.
                                        207

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      4.5.8.     Application of Results to Other Vehicle Classes

Task 4 of Lotus Engineering Inc.'s contract with the California Air Resources Board
stipulated that Lotus investigate the application of the study results to other vehicle classes
using the concepts in the above study. This section presents the data for scalability broken
down into the eight previously defined vehicle systems: body-in-white, closures and
fenders, interior, chassis and suspension, front and rear bumpers, thermal (HVAC),
glazing, and electrical and lighting.  Powertrain was not included in Phase 2 of this report,
but can be scaled as well.

The vehicles discussed in this section are the standard micro car/A-segment, mini car/B-
segment, small  car/C-segment, midsize car/D-segment, and large car/E-segment
passenger cars; small, midsize, and fullsize SUVs; minivans; and compact and fullsize
pickup trucks.
         4.5.8.1. Body-in-White

A variety of materials and methods were investigated as part of the Phase 2 D vehicle
body-in-white development. These materials and construction methods - primarily the use
of modularization and the expanded use of lightweight materials - are all applicable
outside of the specified Toyota Venza CUV-class vehicle. This section discusses the
materials and manufacturing techniques used in engineering the Phase 2 HD vehicle.
            4.5.8.1.1. Modularization

Modularization is the process of integrating a variety of components into a larger sub-
system, or module. The Phase 2 BIW reduced the part count from the baseline Toyota
Venza's 419 individual parts to 169 parts. Modularization can be applied across a wide
variety of vehicle classes to lighten the vehicle, decrease vehicle parts count, and improve
production efficiency thereby decreasing production costs.

The scalability of this concept is already being applied to low-volume, niche vehicles, as
mentioned in the Phase 1  report. Bentley's 2011 Mulsanne uses a single stamping for the
A- and C-pillars, roof, and rear-quarter panels. The Lotus Evora also uses a  modular
structure, with three different aluminum sub-sections for the chassis - front, passenger
cell, and rear. A modular design has no adverse effects on vehicular safety; structural
analyses will drive the design to the appropriate level of function required for the model.

This simplification technique can be applied to every vehicle class from heavy-duty, full-
size pickup trucks to micro cars for effective weight loss.

            4.5.8.1.2. Materials
                                       208

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Lotus also utilized advanced, lightweight materials in designing the Phase 2 HD vehicle.
These materials, like modularization, can be scaled to nearly any vehicle class. A number
of lightweight materials are being utilized throughout the automotive industry already,
including high strength steels, aluminum, magnesium and composite materials. These
materials were used in the Phase 2 body structure.

Lightweight material selection needs to be based on vehicle requirements such as
durability cycle and cargo and towing capacity. For example, body-on-frame, full-size
pickup trucks and some SUVs are required to tow extremely heavy loads and haul
thousands of pounds of cargo. Due to the structural requirements associated with these
conditions, materials such as aluminum  cannot be used to replace the steel used to
construct the frame. Aluminum can be used for components such as body panels and door
reinforcements, which are removed from the structural backbone of the vehicle and used
for aesthetics or crash structure.
            4.5.8.1.3. Aluminum Extrusions and Stampings

Lightweight metals such as aluminum are being used in BIWs from large luxury cars such
as the Jaguar XJ to sports cars such as the Lotus Evora, which shows the variability in
design. Jaguar's use of an aluminum body structure allowed the British firm to reduce the
curb weight of its flagship XJ large sedan around 200 kilograms (440 pounds) compared to
other large luxury vehicles4. Other examples of the scalability of aluminum extrusions
include Audi's Space Frame architecture, which is scaled and utilized in everything from
the small A4 to the large A8. Aston Martin also uses the scalability of aluminum in its DB9
and Rapide sports cars, which are based on its VH (vertical horizontal, named for the
ability to lengthen and shorten it in both dimensions) architecture.  Evidence of the
scalability of aluminum stampings can be found in the Bentley Mulsanne's roof,  fenders,
and a great number of aluminum hoods such as that on the Ford Mustang. Engineers
should be cautious when producing stampings as large as those on the Mulsanne as it is
possible to generate a significant amount of waste thereby increasing production cost.

As mentioned in the materials section, aluminum cannot be used for some structural
components of heavier duty vehicles such as full-size pickup trucks. Aluminum extrusions
aren't suitable for use in pickup truck frames due to the vast differences in stiffness as
shown by the Young's Moduli in section 4.2.2. The Young's Modulus for steel is greater the
210,000 MPa and is 70,000 MPa for aluminum, showing steel's greater resistance to
bending under load.


            4.5.8.1.4. Magnesium Castings

The magnesium castings used in the Phase 2 HD vehicle can be scaled as well and have
been used in high-end vehicles such as BMWs, Chevrolet Corvettes, and Dodge Vipers.
BMW uses magnesium in its engine blocks for weight reduction, the Corvette ZOS's front
cradle is made from cast  magnesium which is 35-percent lighter than the previous cast
                                       209

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aluminum structure4, and the Viper's dash module is cast from magnesium which reduced
mass by 68 percent compared to the previous steel casting. The Phase 2 BIW utilizes
magnesium castings for the front of dash and the rear wheelhouse area.


            4.5.8.1.5. High Strength Steel

High strength steels require little modification to put into use on vehicles as the
manufacturing techniques are nearly identical to those already in place throughout the
automotive industry. The weight savings comes through the ability to use  less material to
make the same strength part; high strength steels are already beginning to be used
extensively in production vehicles. As an example, the Mercedes Benz E  class uses over
70% HSS. The Phase 2 body incorporates steel B pillars. Light- and heavy-duty pickup
trucks incorporate high-strength steel into frames in order to increase the  strength of the
frame while simultaneously reducing weight by using less material than for a comparable
conventional steel frame.
            4.5.8.1.6. Composites

Composite materials are used in the Phase 2 HD floor and rear load floor. Composite
materials such as carbon fiber reinforced plastic are currently extensively used in
motorsports and high-end sports cars. Until recently, the materials and manufacturing
techniques were too expensive for widespread use in the automotive industry. Examples of
composite usage include entire carbon fiber monocoques in Formula 1 cars, Lamborghini's
Sesto Elemento concept made entirely from the composite, the carbon fiber monocoque in
the production McLaren MP4-12C, Volkswagen XL1 concept, and smaller items such as
the roof on BMW's M3 and M6. Carbon fiber suppliers including Plasan,  SGL, Toray, and
Fiberforge are delivering carbon composite components for the automotive industry.  BMW
recently announced its upcoming i3 electric city car's passenger cell will  be made from
carbon fiber as well - the first truly mass produced passenger cell to be made from carbon.

Carbon fiber is acceptable for use in production vehicles that see relatively small loads, but
may not be acceptable for use in load-bearing components of heavier-duty vehicles such
as pickup trucks. Carbon fiber has been shown to withstand high loads on vehicles such
as Formula 1  cars, but these parts are extremely expensive to produce and do not need to
meet the durability cycles  of production vehicles. The durability of carbon fiber under high
loads - such as those seen in a pickup truck - is unknown, therefore until further research
on the  material is done,  it  should only be utilized in lower stress vehicles and on non-
structural elements of heavier-duty vehicles  such as body panels.


            4.5.8.1.7. Scalability Summary

It is possible to lighten BIW structures of vehicles of all classes using the materials and
methods described above, but it is unlikely the same weight savings will  be achieved in
                                       210

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smaller vehicle classes. This is partially due to simple dimensional constraints such as the
seats - which must be large enough to hold a 95th-percentile American male - and the
relationship between the driver, pedals and steering wheel. Other constraints include crash
protection, which due to the smaller crumple zone, typically requires the use of thicker (and
thus heavier) steel to make the vehicles safe. Conversely,  this may also allow
manufacturers to realize a greater mass reduction in vehicles larger than the Venza. Table
4.5.8.1.7.a lists the potential relative mass reductions based on specific density and the
projected curb weight mass savings relative to the baseline Toyota Venza.

All of the vehicles mentioned in this section, with the exception of the concept vehicles,
meet or exceed federal safety standards and use different  ratios of the same materials
used in the Phase 2 HD vehicle. The wide variety of vehicle classes and sizes mentioned
using these materials demonstrates that when properly engineered, the materials and
manufacturing methods can be scaled while maintaining safety. Composites have proven
to be exceptionally safe in motorsports, with the structures designed and tested to
withstand the extreme forces of high speed collisions. Aluminum extrusions and castings
can be selectively used in crumple zones to deform and absorb energy while high strength
steel can be used in areas that need to remain rigid and intact in the event of an accident.

Vehicle requirements may mean that not all of the lightening methods used to create the
Phase 2 HD vehicle can be applied to  every vehicle,  such as larger, BOF pickup trucks
and SUVs. They  require high towing and cargo capacities,  necessitating the use of
heavier-duty materials, such as described in the materials  portion of this section.  While the
same multi-material unibody construction can't be used for vehicles such as the Chevrolet
Silverado or Suburban - which can tow up to 10,700 and 8500 pounds in half-ton, light-
duty specification and the heavy-duty,  full-ton Silverado pickup can tow up to 21,700
pounds when properly equipped - the  same methods used for the interior, glazing, HVAC
system, and electrical system can be applied. The chassis lightening methods cannot be
fully utilized and the suspension must be built for heavy-duty applications, which means it
can't be fully lightened either.

An example of capacity decrease from body-on-frame construction to unibody construction
is the new Ford Explorer. For 2011, Ford switched the Explorer to  unibody construction for
weight savings purposes, decreasing the  BIW mass by 58  kg and decreasing maximum
towing capacity by 2400 pounds to 5000 pounds. Both the  2011  Jeep Grand Cherokee
and 2011 Dodge Durango are  unibody vehicles as well and can tow 7400 pounds each,
but weigh around 5200 pounds each so equipped compared to 4400 pounds for the
Explorer, demonstrating the necessary, structural, heavy reinforcements to allow the
greater capacity.

The Toyota Yaris BIW shown in Figure 4.5.8.1.7.a below is an example of a mini car body
structure, for which the Phase 2 BIW weight reduction does not scale directly. This is due
to the previously  mentioned dimensional constraints, such  as those between the B-pillar
and dashboard, which can only decrease so far in order to maintain a comfortable driving
position and relationship to the dashboard for safety. This means that the Yaris and Phase
2 HD vehicle will  have a similar amount of material between the driver's seat and
                                       211

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dashboard. The small crumple zone ahead of the firewall can also be seen in this picture,
which would have to be reinforced on this size car to maintain crash worthiness and would
add weight. This BIW weighs 228 kg, which is approximately the same mass as the
significantly larger Phase 2 HD BIW.
                Figure 4.5.8.1.7.a: Toyota Yaris body-in-white structure

The Toyota Corolla BIW pictured in Figure 4.5.8.1.7.b is another example of a small car for
which the weight savings may not reach the Phase 2 level. The same dimensional
constraints as with the mini car apply. Reducing the BIW mass is still possible. The Corolla
BIW weighs 289 kg, which is significantly  heavier than the larger Phase 2 HD body.
               Figure 4.5.8.1.7.b: Toyota Corolla body-in-white structure
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The Audi A4 BIW structure pictured below in Figure 4.5.8.1.7.c is an example of a midsize
car as defined by the EPA. It weighs 306 kg or approximately 25 percent more than the
Phase 2 HD vehicle. Midsize cars are projected to approach the weight savings of the
Phase 2 HD vehicle. The crumple zone is larger, which allows for thinner, lighter material
to absorb the crash energy. An extreme analogy to clarify this point is that if a vehicle had
a 50-foot long crumple zone, the energy could be absorbed by foam rather than metal. The
proportion of weight in the BIW between the driver's seat and dashboard also decreases
relative to the body weight  increase.
                  Figure 4.5.8.1.7.c: Audi A4 body-in-white structure

Audi's A7 BIW structure pictured below in Figure 4.5.8.1.7.d could realize a potential
weight reduction close to the 40 percent of the Phase 2 HD BIW for the reasons given for
the A4 BIW. The A7 BIW structure currently weighs 349 kg, over 100 kg more than the
Phase 2 HD BIW.
                  Figure 4.5.8.1.7.d: Audi A7 body-in-white-structure
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Body-in-white data for all of the vehicles listed above, along with the BIW volumes,
densities, and specific densities are shown in Table 4.5.8.1.7.a below. Length, width, and
height are given in inches and are used with a shape factor to calculate the BIW volume in
cubic feet. The shape factor is based on the bodystyle, i.e. sedan, wagon, SUV, etc., and
is shown in Table 4.5.8.1.7.b. The density is then determined by dividing the BIW mass in
kg by the BIW volume.  Specific density is determined by dividing an example BIW density
by the Phase 2  HD density, thus the Phase 2 HD BIW specific density is equal to  1.0 and
unitless.

                   Table 4.5.8.1.7.a: Body-in-white specific densities
Vehicle
ARB Phase 2 HD BIW






Toyota Yaris BIW






Toyota Corolla BIW






Audi A4 BIW






Audi A7 BIW





Mass (kg)
260.8






228.0






289.0






306.0






349.4





Weight (Ibs.)
573.8






501.6






635.8






673.2






768.7





BIW Dimensions
Length (in.)
Width (in.)
Height (in.)
Volume (cu. ft.)
Density (kg/cu. ft.)
Specific Density (unitless)

Length (in.)
Width (in.)
Height (in.)
Volume (cu. ft.)
Density (kg/cu. ft.)
Specific Density (unitless)

Length (in.)
Width (in.)
Height (in.)
Volume (cu. ft.)
Density (kg/cu. ft.)
Specific Density (unitless)

Length (in.)
Width (in.)
Height (in.)
Volume (cu. ft.)
Density (kg/cu. ft.)
Specific Density (unitless)

Length (in.)
Width (in.)
Height (in.)
Volume (cu. ft.)
Density (kg/cu. ft.)
Specific Density (unitless)

180.04
75.79
53.94
374.67
0.70
1.00

133.07
66.93
51.57
232.79
0.98
1.41

160.71
49.09
84.33
315.20
0.92
1.32

168.50
69.69
48.43
272.52
1.12
1.61

174.41
74.80
48.03
304.41
1.15
1.65
                           Table 4.5.8.1.7.b: Shape factors
    Volume =
Sedans: \ ((Wheelbase'Height) + ((Length - Wheelbase)*0.5 *Height))*Width
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SUVs and Hatchbacks:
Trucks:
((0.33*(Length - Wheelbase)*Height) + (Wheelbase*Height) + (0.67*(Length -
Wheel base)*0. 5* Heig ht))*Width
((Bed Length*0.5*Height) + (0.5*(Length - Bed Length)*Height) + (0.5*(Length -
Bed Length)*0.5*Height))*Width
         4.5.8.2.  Closures

Lotus Engineering investigated a wide variety of materials to use to construct lightweight
vehicular closures. Theses closures have already become a focal point for mass reduction
due to the relative lack of complexity and ease of integration. A number of lightweight
materials and manufacturing methods are already in use, including the use of a
magnesium casting for the Lincoln MKT rear hatch. Lotus used low-mass materials to
lighten vehicular closures and their fixtures, which can be scaled to nearly any  vehicle
class.

For example, the magnesium used in the tailgate can be used in non-structural
components because the metal is too brittle to withstand crash events. Current
thermoplastic body panels  have limits on how large they should be manufactured due to
thermal expansion characteristics.
            4.5.8.2.1. Injection Molding

Injection molded plastics are currently used in industries ranging from toy making to the
automotive industry. The wide variety of applications for injection-molded parts can already
be seen in industry. Lotus applied modularization to a number of door components -
including the structural safety reinforcements and window-glass channel - to allow for
further weight savings. The scalability of modularization and castings was discussed in the
previous section.
            4.5.8.2.2. Mild Steel Castings

Lotus' closure designs call for the use of mild steel castings - a material and
manufacturing technique already in use in vehicles that meet or exceed federal safety
standards - for the majority of the door hinges. These parts have proven performance in
vehicle crashworthiness. Thus, scaling the use of mild steel castings and injection molding
to save weight will have no adverse effect on vehicle safety.
            4.5.8.2.3. Scalability Summary

Although closures are already a focal point for mass reduction, further mass reductions are
possible and unlike the BIW, likely proportionally scalable between vehicle classes. This is
due to the use of modularization and increased use of lightweight materials in the Phase 2
HD vehicle while typical closures in every vehicle class are primarily constructed from
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heavier mild steel. Closures are also relatively unaffected by safety limitations as the
majority of the vehicle crash structure is engineered into the BIW. High strength steel side
door beams have been refined to the point where they are lightweight and effective.
Closures are dimensionally limited in that they should provide relative ease of access to
the vehicle, i.e. doors should allow passengers to get into and out of the vehicle relatively
easily, trunks/tailgates should provide adequate storage access, and the hood should
provide an adequate opening for maintenance access.
         4.5.8.3. Front and Rear Bumpers

Bumpers are engineered to pass federal vehicle safety requirements and simple beams
with energy absorbing materials and stylized cosmetic fascias are generally adequate to
pass these tests. Current bumpers are generally constructed from steel extrusions,
although some are aluminum and magnesium. Lotus chose to use aluminum extrusions for
the front and rear beams as it reduced vehicle mass and remained within the cost target.
Aluminum extrusions  are easily scalable as previously discussed in the BIW section and
are already in use on  vehicles that meet federal safety requirements, including the
standard Toyota Venza rear bumper system.
         4.5.8.4.       Glazing (Windshield, Backlight, Doors, Sunroof,
                        Fixed Panels)

Lotus investigated the possibility of using silicate treated polycarbonate when analyzing
glazing options for the Phase 2 HD vehicle, but concluded the material may not be ready
for widespread use on vehicle glazing by the 2020 time frame. This represented a
conservative approach, but utilizing standard vehicle glass ensures the technology is
readily scalable and that the vehicles will meet or exceed federal safety standards.
         4.5.8.5. Interior

The scalability of the Phase 2 HD vehicle interior is based primarily on engineering and
design concepts as vehicle interiors have different requirements. For example, Venza
customers don't have the same interior expectation as either a Mercedes-Benz S-Class
customer or a Lotus Exige customer. The primary engineering and design techniques used
- systems integration, and seat, infotainment and instrument panel redesign - can be
scaled to a variety of vehicles.
            4.5.8.5.1. Seats

Different vehicle classes have different seat requirements - compare the racing bucket
seats in the Lotus Exige to the 16-way power seats in the Mercedes-Benz S-Class - but all
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can be lightened through the use of new, lightweight foam and different construction
techniques such as using a foam suspension rather than metal.  Seat scalability is already
in use today as seats of a wide variety of shapes, sizes, and comfort levels appear in every
vehicle on the road. Seats can also be carried across to a number of vehicles within a
manufacturer's lineup, reducing development costs and providing greater economies of
scale.
            4.5.8.5.2. Electronic Transmission and Parking Brake Controls

Fully electronic transmission and parking brake controls are some of the easiest ways to
reduce weight  in any vehicle and are independent of vehicle size. These technologies are
being applied to a variety of vehicles. Ferrari, Mercedes-Benz, and Jaguar all use fully
electronic transmission controls. Vehicles as small as CMC's Granite concept have used
these technologies. It is important to note that electronic transmission systems work best
with transmissions engineered for electronic actuation as the mass saved by eliminating
the mechanical linkage will be added back when a servo-actuator is added. Electronic
parking brakes eliminate the need for a mechanical linkage as well, and can be integrated
into an existing touch screen. Audi currently uses electronic parking brakes on vehicles
such as its S4  sedan.
            4.5.8.5.3. Instrument Panel

Instrument panels (IPs), for the most part, are currently designed using hardware tailored
to each vehicle. Replacing the standard physical instrument panel with an OLED display
reduces weight and can be scaled to every vehicle. Displays like this are currently used on
high-end cars such as the Jaguar XJ, but are beginning to appear in mainstream cars such
as the Ford Edge.

A similar system could be used to reduce the weight of the infotainment display. A
transparent OLED (organic LED) touchscreen near the windshield could replace the
navigation display and be scaled to any vehicle. Radio functions could then be controlled
via personal music devices such as an iPod touch - as in the Ferrari F430 Scuderia - or
an iPad. Capacitive touch sensitive buttons as in the Chevrolet Volt help to slightly reduce
weight and can be scaled to any vehicle as well. This is shown in the emergence of touch
sensitive consumer goods and the Jaguar XF and XJ, where even the dome lights and
glovebox are controlled via touch sensitivity.

The engineering and construction technique used to create the IP and dash panel can also
be scaled to other vehicle classes. The Phase 2 IP would integrate seamlessly into the
cast magnesium dash panel, with integrated support brackets to insure that it would meet
federal safety standards. The gauge cluster in front of the driver is primarily supported by
the collapsible, cast magnesium steering column, which is a primary connection to the
vehicle. This design approach is scalable to other vehicles.
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            4.5.8.5.4. Center Console

Lotus simplified the number of parts required to create the center console, creating a
design that can be scaled to virtually all center console designs. This simplistic approach
means that a lesser number of parts must be redesigned and retooled for manufacturing.
The composite center console design can easily be scaled as shown by examples of the
scalability and variability of composite design in the BIW section. The plastic material used
for the center storage bin can also be scaled up or down as it's used in a wide variety of
automotive and non-automotive products. The foam and leather used for the top of the
armrest can also be scaled up or down as described in the seats section.
            4.5.8.5.5. Noise Insulation

Active noise cancellation can be used to replace standard noise insulating materials and
can be scaled to smaller and larger vehicle classes very easily. Noise cancellation
eliminates heavy noise insulating materials by utilizing the sound system and microphones
already built into the vehicle. This technology is currently used on the Chevrolet Equinox
where General Motors tuned the software to cancel out the harsh engine noise at low
RPMs to allow the engine to idle lower and achieve a higher fuel economy rating; high-end
headphones to eliminate ambient noise; and airplanes to reduce wind noise while flying.
This demonstrates the applicability of this technology to vehicles of all shapes and sizes
and its ability to reduce the amount of heavy noise insulating material necessary by tuning
it to cancel out wind, road, engine,  and other ambient noise.
            4.5.8.5.6. Interior Trim

Lotus primarily looked at system integration and elimination in order to reduce the weight
of the Venza's interior trim for the Phase 2 HD vehicle. This means that the interior trim
weight reductions can be scaled to a wide variety of vehicle classes. Carpeting can be
removed from any vehicle and replaced by a varying size floormat as in the Phase 2 HD
vehicle and evidenced by vehicles such as the Lotus Exige and Ferrari F430 Scuderia.
Both have bare aluminum floors with floor mats.  A similar technique is used to decorate
wood and tile floors in houses, where the owner simply lays down a carpet.

Other interior trim, such as sunvisors and pillar panels can be scaled. Both Faurecia, an
innovative Tier 1  interior supplier, and MuCell are working on new, lighter coverings that
can be scaled just as easily as the plastics currently used. Door panel mass has also been
significantly reduced in the Phase 2 HD vehicle by merging the door panel trim with the
inner door structure; this concept can be applied to any vehicle. Additionally, the physical
door handle and  connections were removed and replaced by lightweight capacitive
switches molded into the door module itself. This is similar to the door module and
electronic locking mechanisms already in use in the Aston Martin lineup, Chevrolet
Corvette, Cadillac CTS Coupe, and  Nissan GT-R. These can be used on any size vehicle.
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            4.5.8.5.7. HVA/C Ducting

Lotus looked at a number of options to reduce the mass of the heating, ventilation, and air-
conditioning systems for the Phase 2 HD vehicle, these systems however, are all very well
developed and further mass reductions are extremely difficult.  Mass reductions of the
ducting system used to deliver the heated or cooled air to the passenger compartment can
be achieved using new materials and are scalable though. A MuCell foamed plastic
technology was incorporated that offered reduced mass and improved thermal
performance. MuCell says its foamed plastic parts can replace traditional vehicle ducting
and is readily scalable.
         4.5.8.6. Chassis and Suspension

A wide variety of components are included under the chassis and suspension category
including wheels and tires, brakes, steering,  and the suspension system. These
components have been a focal point of mass reduction in order to reduce unsprung vehicle
weight and correspondingly increase ride and handling performance.
            4.5.8.6.1. Suspension and Steering

The selected suspension and steering components can be scaled to a variety of vehicle
classes using materials and manufacturing technologies previously discussed. The
Venza's standard springs were replaced with high strength steel units, which are used on
high-end BMWs. Lotus also replaced the Venza's standard steel upper-spring seat with a
glass-filled nylon unit, which is used on the MazdaS. Lightweight cast magnesium, which
was previously discussed in the BIW section, was used for the front sub-frame; a
magnesium sub-frame is used on the Corvette Z06. A simple and  easily scalable hollow
stabilizer bar - used on a wide variety of performance vehicles for weight savings -
replaced the solid steel unit on the Venza.

The Venza's cast iron suspension knuckles were replaced with cast aluminum knuckles
such as those offered on current Chrysler minivans. Lotus used a  design similar to that on
the Alfa Romeo 147 for the rear knuckles and one similar to the Volkswagen Passat's for
the front knuckles, both of which are more compact and lighter than the stock Venza's.

Lotus utilized foam  reinforced front, lower-control arms to reduce the weight of the Phase 2
HD suspension. These are  single piece stampings and as such, can be scaled using
similar techniques to those  previously described in the BIW section.
            4.5.8.6.2. Braking System

Lotus evaluated a number of braking solutions for use on the Phase 2 HD vehicle including
the electronic parking brake mentioned earlier. This system eliminates the physical
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connection hardware and uses a solenoid actuated integrated parking brake caliper rather
than a specific parking brake mechanism to reduce weight.

The hybrid powertrain of the Phase 2 HD vehicle necessitated the use of a hydraulic brake
pump rather than a vacuum driven brake pump. This type of pump is already in use on
hybrids such as the Toyota Prius and the Ford Escape. The brake rotors themselves are
new dual cast rotors (cast aluminum hub with cast iron outer ring) rather than single piece
cast iron rotors. Brembo designed the brakes and they are currently available.

Lotus also chose to use Brembo's fixed aluminum front calipers, which are cast from
aluminum to save weight over traditional cast iron calipers. The fixed caliper design also
offers additional weight savings. Brembo already produces this  style of caliper in a variety
of sizes for different vehicle classes. The rear brakes on the Phase 2 HD vehicle use
floating aluminum calipers, which are already in production.
            4.5.8.6.3. Tires and Wheels

The tire and wheel technologies chosen for the Phase 2 HD vehicle are scalable based on
wheel diameters. Wheels made from a variety of materials - cast steel alloys, cast
aluminum alloys, and even forged aluminum alloys and forged magnesium  - are currently
offered in all sizes and styles. The cast aluminum alloy wheels chosen for the Phase 2 HD
vehicle are currently manufactured in sizes as small as 15 inches as on the Toyota Prius
up to sizes over 19 inches as on the Audi R8. Tires are also easily scalable as shown by
the varying widths and side profile heights currently offered by tire manufacturers.

Lotus also eliminated the spare tire due to the availability of light weigh options in
production now including run-flat tires and tire repair kits. The spare tire can be removed
and either run-flat tires or a tire repair kit added to replace the spare tire on virtually any
passenger car or truck.
         4.5.8.7.  Electrical

The electrical harnesses on the Phase 2 HD vehicle use thinwall, plastic-coated, copper-
clad aluminum wiring. Copper-clad aluminum wiring is already in production while thinwall
is currently being evaluated for production use and further weight savings. This technology
can easily be applied to most vehicles. This is evidenced by the 2011 Toyota Yaris' use of
CCA aluminum wiring harness manufactured by Sumitomo Electric Industries.
         4.5.8.8.  Powertrain

Phase 2 of Lotus' contract with the GARB did not require the evaluation of vehicle
powertrains, but they are very scalable. This is evidenced by the wide variety of vehicles
on the road today with a broad range of powertrain offerings. Vehicles today come with


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everything from V-8s coupled to eight-speed automatic transmissions to hybrids and pure
electric vehicles. Vehicles can be engineered to accept a wide variety of powertrains as
evidenced by the Chevrolet Volt series hybrid utilizing the Chevrolet Cruze body platform.
Other OEM's, such as Toyota, an industry leader in producing hybrid vehicles, use a
similar strategy for most of their hybrid vehicles, designing mainstream  ICE platforms to
accept larger battery packs, smaller gas tanks, downsized internal combustion engines
and an electric drive motor. This allows the Phase 2 HD vehicle to be equipped with a
standard ICE powertrain, a pure electric drive system or a hybrid powertrain. A similar
vehicle would be Mercedes-Benz's S-Class, which is offered with powertrain options
ranging from twin-turbo V-12s to a hybrid-electric setup and a plug-in hybrid concept has
been developed and  shown.
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         4.5.8.9. Competitive Set Study
Lotus compiled data for a wide variety of vehicle classes - micro cars, small cars, midsize
cars, large cars, small SUVs, midsize SUVS, large SUVs, compact pickup trucks, and
small pickup trucks - as part of the development of the Phase 2 HD vehicle. This data
provides the length, front and rear tracks, heights, wheelbases, weights, footprints, and
specific densities of the major vehicle classes. This information is shown on Table
4.4.14.9.a below and a full list of vehicles with more detailed information can be found in
Appendix B. Vehicle classes are listed in both EPA and EU classifications.

                  Table 4.4.14.9.a: Average vehicle class information
Vehicle Class
Mini car/
Subcompact
Small car/
Compact
Midsize car
Large car
Small SUV
Midsize SUV/
Crossover
Fullsize SUV
(BoF)
Fullsize SUV
(unibody)
Minivans
Example
Vehicle
Toyota
Yaris
Toyota
Corolla
Toyota
Camry
Toyota
Avalon
Toyota
Rav4
Toyota
Venza
Toyota
Sequoia
Ford Flex
Toyota
Sienna
Length
(in.)
161.6
176.0
191.0
199.4
174.4
191.0
202.8
201.5
202.0
Front
Track
(in.)
58.0
59.9
61.7
63.0
61.5
63.6
66.7
66.3
66.9
Rear
Track
(in.)
58.0
60.0
61.6
62.9
61.6
63.6
67.4
66.3
66.8
Height
(in.)
59.2
58.3
57.8
59.1
66.8
66.9
74.2
69.0
69.0
Wheel base
(in.)
98.5
103.9
109.5
113.4
103.3
111.8
117.7
118.5
119.4
Weight
(Ibs.)
2550.0
2950.0
3320.0
3860.0
3540.0
4320.0
5560.0
4820.0
4440.0
Footprint
(sq. ft.)
39.69
43.29
46.89
49.59
44.15
49.37
54.77
54.52
55.38
Specific
Density
(unitless)
1.46
1.52
1.63
1.73
1.52
1.61
1.67
1.56
1.45
The specific density in Table 4.5.8.9.a provides a direct comparison to the Phase 2 HD
vehicle and demonstrates the potential for mass savings across each vehicle class. This is
due to the definition of specific density, which is shown in Table 4.5.8.9.b below. This
specific density shows just how much more mass there is per unit volume, giving an idea
of the potential weight savings as shown in greater detail in section 4.5.8.10. Volumes of
each vehicle were calculated using a shape factor as described by the equations in Table
4.5.8.9.b below as well as footprint and basic density calculations.

          Table 4.5.8.9.b: Vehicle volume calculations based on shape factors
Definitions
Footprint =
Volume = | Sedans:
SUVs and Hatchbacks:
Trucks:
Density =
Specific Density =
Length*0.5*(Front Track + Rear Track)
((Wheelbase*Height) + ((Length - Wheelbase)*0.5 *Height))*Width
((0.33*(Length - Wheelbase)*Height) + (Wheelbase*Height) + (0.67*(Length - Wheelbase)
*0.5*Height))*Width
((Bed Length*0.5*Height) + (0.5*(Length - Bed Length)*Height) + (0.5*(Length - Bed
Length)*0.5*Height))*Width
Weight/Volume
Density/ARB Phase 2 Density
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         4.5.8.10.      Summary and Projected Weight Savings

The data presented in this section shows the scalability of the engineering and
manufacturing techniques implemented to reduce vehicle weight. This section also
includes- with one exception- an analysis indicating that automakers have been reducing
vehicle weight, and a review of potential opportunities to further reduce vehicle mass at
minimal cost. This is shown in the comparison between body-on-frame vehicles and
unibody vehicles, as all of the body-on-frame vehicles, with the exception of the Honda
Ridgeline, are heavier, and correspondingly denser than their unibody counterparts. The
Ridgeline is an outlier as it's the only unibody pickup truck currently on sale and also offers
significantly more standard content than unibody compact pickup trucks. Examples of the
Ridgeline's added content are the full center console and adjustable front bucket seats; a
simple bench seat  layout (without a console) is standard on all other compact pickup
trucks. Other, more luxurious features, some of which aren't available on other compacts
pickups, add to the weight and density of the Ridgeline. All of the vehicles shown were
also base vehicles, which are typically two-door pickups while the Ridgeline is only
available in a four-door version. More unibody,  compact pickup trucks need to be available
in order to further evaluate the use of a unibody structure in compact pickups, but the
comparison of unibody and body-on-frame large SUVs shows the difference in structure.
All fullsize pickup trucks currently utilize body-on-frame construction so a comparison
between unibody and body-on-frame is not possible.

An objective means of measuring the potential weight savings for each vehicle class
relative to the baseline Venza was created by developing a mathematical relationship
based on relative specific densities and the mass reduction for the Phase 2 HD model vs.
the baseline Venza. These values established the baseline figures and were used to
create the following equation to quantify the potential relative weight savings:


                                                   .32. ..... t
                                       1.G2

      Where:          PWS = projected weight savings
            Specific Density = vehicle density/Phase 2 HD total vehicle density
                   1 .62 = baseline [Venza] specific density
            32.4 = Phase 2 HD curb weight reduction as a percentage

Table 4.5. 8. 10. a below shows the potential weight savings across vehicle classes and also
indicates that the 32.4-percent total vehicle weight savings will not scale directly across
vehicle classes, particularly vehicles smaller than the Venza. Any vehicle with a PWS of
less than 32.4 percent indicates that it has less mass savings potential than the Venza.
Any vehicle with a PWS of greater than 32.4 percent indicates that it has more mass
savings potential than the Venza. Smaller vehicles have less potential, e.g., the microcar
has potential for a 28-percent weight savings. This analysis shows that a significant weight
savings can be achieved in every vehicle class by applying the methods and materials
described in this study and in the Phase 1 report.
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         Table 4.5.8.10.a: Projected total vehicle weight savings by vehicle class
Averages:
Density (I bs./ft3):
Micro cars:
Mini Cars:
Small Cars:
Midsize Cars:
Midsize Luxury Cars:
Large Cars:
Large Luxury Cars
Small SUVs:
Midsize SUVs:
Midsize Luxury SUVs:
Large BoF SUVs:
Large Unibody SUVs:
Small BoF Pickups:
Small Uni Pickups:
Large Pickups:
Minivans:


7.91
8.23
8.61
9.19
10.17
9.75
10.25
8.56
9.10
9.56
9.46
8.78
10.03
10.37
9.29
8.17

+
0.00
0.43
0.53
0.24
0.28
0.38
0.46
0.37
0.42
0.21
0.18
0.08
0.49
0.00
0.35
0.17

Specific Density (unitless):
Micro cars:
Mini Cars:
Small Cars:
Midsize Cars:
Midsize Luxury Cars:
Large Cars:
Large Luxury Cars
Small SUVs:
Midsize SUVs:
Midsize Luxury SUVs:
Large BoF SUVs:
Large Unibody SUVs:
Small BoF Pickups:
Small Uni Pickups:
Large Pickups:
Minivans:


1.40
1.46
1.52
1.63
1.80
1.73
1.81
1.52
1.61
1.69
1.67
1.56
1.78
1.84
1.64
1.45

+
0.00
0.08
0.09
0.04
0.05
0.07
0.08
0.07
0.07
0.04
0.03
0.01
0.08
0.00
0.06
0.03

Projected Weight Savings
28.01%
29.13%
30.48%
32.54%
36.02%
34.51%
36.29%
30.30%
32.23%
33.86%
33.49%
31.10%
35.53%
36.71%
32.88%
28.93%
Based on the above analysis of the various vehicle dimensions and densities in a number
of vehicle classes, the results of the Phase 2 HD design can be [roughly] scaled to other
vehicle classes. Table 4.5.8.10.b below gives an estimation of how the mass and cost
factors scale to other vehicle classes.

      Table 4.5.8.10.b: Estimated mass and cost factors for various vehicle classes
Vehicle Class
Mini car/
Subcompact
Small car/
Compact
Midsize car
Large car
Small SUV
Midsize SUV/
Crossover
Large pickup
(BoF)
Minivans
Example
Vehicle
Toyota
Yaris
Toyota
Corolla
Ford Fusion
Ford
Taurus
Toyota
Rav4
Phase 2 HD
FordF-150
Toyota
Sienna
Original
Vehicle
Mass (kg)
1113.5
1251.2
1555.4
1803.7
1632.7
1700.0
2406.4
2091.0
Vehicle
Mass
Reduction
29.1%
30.5%
32.5%
34.5%
30.3%
32.4%
32.9%
28.9%
Projected
Reduced
Vehicle
Mass (kg)
789.1
869.6
1049.9
1181.4
1138.0
1150.0
1614.7
1486.7
Original
Body
Mass (kg)
228.0
289.0
305.0
372.5
310.0
382.5
275.1
428.0
Body Mass
Reduction
36.9%
34.6%
41.4%
41.6%
36.3%
38.5%
38.0%
43.0%
Projected
Reduced
Body Mass
(kg)
143.9
189.0
178.7
217.5
197.5
260.8
170.6
244.0
Vehicle
Cost
Factor
131.5%
120.7%
112.0%
102.0%
1 1 1 .9%
106.0%
155.5%
131.1%
This information was compiled using the specific densities compiled in Table 4.5.8.10.a as
well as the projected weight savings. A separate BIW specific density and projected weight
savings were also calculated for every example vehicle in Table 4.5.8.10.b using the same
formulas. This information was then used to project the reduced vehicle and reduced BIW
mass. The cost factor was determined by converting the known cost of the Phase 2  HD
vehicle into a $/kg figure and using the following formula:
                        CF =
ReducedMaxx * Costperkg
      Vehicle In voice
                                       224

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            Where:                CF = Cost Factor
                         Reduced Mass = Reduced Vehicle Mass
                     Cost per kg = Cost per kg for Phase 2  HD vehicle
                 Vehicle Invoice = Example Vehicle MSRP divided by RPE
   4.6.1   Conclusions

This engineering study successfully achieved its objectives of developing and validating
the safety and crashworthiness of an over 30-percent mass-reduced vehicle through a
holistic vehicle redesign. Final vehicle design began with a 2009 Toyota Venza crossover
vehicle and integrated relatively large quantities of advanced materials (e.g. aluminum,
advanced high-strength steels, magnesium, and composites) and advanced designs and
bonding techniques to achieve a substantial vehicular mass reduction without degrading
size, utility, safety, or performance. Overall, vehicle body mass was reduced by 37 percent
(141 kg), which contributed to a total vehicle  mass reduction of 32 percent (527 kg) once
the other vehicle systems (interior, suspension, closures, chassis, etc.) were optimized in a
holistic redesign. Additionally, this mass reduction was achieved using a  parallel-hybrid
drivetrain, suggesting that with a simpler non-hybrid drivetrain, vehicle mass could be
further reduced while maintaining constant performance.

This project uses emerging technologies advanced materials, state-of-the-art
manufacturing and bonding techniques,  and  innovative design to develop a low-mass
vehicle that meets or exceeds modern vehicle demands in terms of functionality,
crashworthiness, and structural integrity. The study developed a mass-reduced vehicle
and validated that it achieves best-in-class torsional and bending stiffness and meets U.S.
federal safety requirements as well as IIHS guidelines. This work indicates it is technically
feasible to develop a 30-percent lighter crossover vehicle without compromising size,
utility, or performance and still meet regulatory and consumer safety demands.

The mass-reduced design is found to result in a significant increase in the cost of the
vehicle. The estimation of the direct manufacturing costs for the low mass vehicle body
design suggests  that the body structure  itself would be 37 percent lighter (i.e. 141 kg) at a
60 percent plus cost (i.e. $723) increase over the baseline vehicle body.  When
considering the comprehensive vehicle redesign including the body and non-body vehicle
components, this vehicle design achieves a 32-percent mass reduction at a total direct
incremental manufacturing cost decrease of around $342 per vehicle because significant
cost savings can be achieved from mass reductions in the interior, suspension, chassis,
interior, and closures areas. Therefore the study illustrates how a holistic, total vehicle
approach to system mass and cost reductions can help offset the additional cost of a 37
percent mass reduced body structure. This study also estimates how these mass
reductions and costs scale to other vehicle classes, finding that roughly similar mass-
                                       225

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reduction and associated costs can be applied to other models ranging from subcompact
cars to full-sized light trucks.

This study's findings also indicate that the 30-percent mass-reduced vehicle can be cost-
effectively mass-produced in the 2020 timeframe with known materials and techniques.  It
is estimated with high confidence that the assembly and tooling costs of the new mass-
reduced body design would have greatly reduced costs due to the substantial reduction in
parts required, from 419 parts in  the baseline Venza, to 169 parts in the low-mass design.
By factoring in the manufacturability of the materials and designs into the fundamental
design process, it is expected that, not only will this type of design be production-ready in
2020, but it also has the potential for wide commercialization in the 2025 timeframe.
   4.6.2   Recommendations

A multi-material body structure should be built and tested to evaluate its structural
characteristics for stiffness and modals (frequency response) using non-destructive testing
methods.

Additionally, it is recommended that a low mass vehicle be constructed using the Lotus
designed BIW, be fitted with components duplicating the non-body system masses and
then be evaluated for FMVSS impact performance by NHTSA.
5. References

   1.  2011 NHTSA Workshop on Vehicle Mass-Size-Safety, Ron Medford:
      http://www.nhtsa.gov/staticfiles/administration/pdf/presentations_speeches/Medford
      _Mass-Safety_Workshop_02252011 .pdf)
   2.  http://www.theicct.org/pubs/Mass_reduction_fmal_2010.pdf
   3.  http://tnetnbers.steel.org/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Home&TEMPLATE=/CM/ContentDis
      plav.cfm&CONTENTID=28272
   4.  www.toyota.com/venza/specs.html
   5.  Alcan Press Release 09/06/2002
   6.  American Foundry Society: http://www.afsinc.org/content/view/206
   7.  SMW Forged Magnesium Wheels: http://www.smw.com/contents/catalog/id/16
                                       226

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6.   List of Inventions Reported and Copyrighted Materials
     Produced

  There were no inventions or copyrighted materials produced as a result of this contract.
                                   227

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7.   Appendices
     7.1.    Appendix A: Manufacturing Report
             Purpose of Study:

             This study provides an overview about the
             characteristics of a Body Shop to build annually
             60,000 bodies of the LWV (Light Weight Vehicle).
             Due to the premature stage of the program we will not
             enter into the level of detail as typically done.
             In areas of uncertainty we will make assumptions
             and/or suggestions.
            JeffWrobel

            Supervisor Process &
            Simulation
            EBZ Engineering, Inc.
            110 South Blvd. W, Suite
            100
            Rochester Hills, Ml
            48307
            (248) 299-0500

            March 1, 2011
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1.0  General Assumptions


   •  Plant located in eastern Clallam County, Washington
   •  Two-shift operation
   •  Highly automated production system
   •  Single model, no derivatives
   •  New bonding technology, friction stir bonding (FSB)
   •  Materials: aluminum, magnesium, high strength steel, composites
   •  Only BIW considered in manufacturing study
   •  Cycle time is 191 seconds at 85-percent body shop efficiency
   •  Transportation time  is 13 seconds (underbody line, framing line)
   •  Planned SOP: 2020
2.0  Location

A number of factors need to be considered when choosing a location for a factory such as
climate, labor costs, resources available, and taxes. Considering all these factors, eastern
Clallam County, Washington was chosen as the site for the Phase 2 HD vehicle factory.
      2.1   Climate

Washington State has a stable, moderate climate and Clallam County's location on the
Strait of Juan de Fuca and west of the Olympic Mountains mean temperatures are even
more stable year. The Olympic Mountains also shelter eastern Clallam County from the
rain and storms that occur in Washington state. Total rainfall in the plant's planned location
is less than 30-inches per year. Average annual temperatures typically range between 39-
degrees Fahrenheit in winter and 62-degrees Fahrenheit in summer.
      2.2   Labor Costs

Washington State is not a right-to-work state and requires forced unionism, but wages are
however, competitive. Planned worker compensation at the Phase 2 HD plant is wholly
competitive for Clallam County, where the average hourly rate is $22.50. Planned
compensation for assembly workers is $22 per hour, $35 per hour for maintenance
workers, and $18 per hour for logistics workers.
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      2.3  Available Resources

Resources necessary for a plant include an availability of shipping, cooling water, and
energy sources. Shipping in Clallam County is widely available as Port Angeles, a major
port, is located right in the county on the Strait of Juan de Fuca. From Port Angeles,
highway transportation is widely available and Port Angeles allows for easy gobal sea
transportation. There are also major rail hubs located along the Hood River, which can be
accessed from Clallam County via highway transport and gives Clallam County easy
access to the rest of the  contiguous United States.

Clallam County's proximity to the Strait of Juan de Fuca allows easy access to the
necessary cooling water for the plant. The water can either be pulled directly from the river
or collected into a storage bin and recycled in a closed-loop system. If the cooling water is
not kept within the plant boundaries and is an open-loop system, all of the local, state, and
federal regulations on safe water release. Examples of this include maintaining a
temperature within two degrees of the natural water temperature to avoid heat pollution
and a pH level within  0.5 of 7 (neutral) to avoid acidifying or basifying the water.

Sources of energy generation are key in creating an  environmentally friendly
manufacturing plant for an environmentally friendly vehicle and Washington State offers a
wide variety of green  energy options currently or that could be implemented while building
the factory. Solar radiation exposure in Washington is great enough such that solar panels
could be installed to provide power. They could be installed on the large roof area typical
of automotive assembly plants and thus wouldn't require any additional  land investment.
The region of Washington chosen for the plant is also relatively windy, meaning wind
turbines could be installed to generate even more power. Small scale wind turbines could
be installed on the roof of the plant alongside the solar panels to  avoid needing extra land.
A third form of environmentally friendly power generation available in the chosen region of
Washington State is hydroelectric power. There are hydroelectric power stations already
built, supplying nearly 75-percent of the state's energy according to the U.S. Energy
Information Administration.
      2.4  Taxes

Taxes in Washington State are comparably low with numerous tax breaks and incentives
offered. There is no business income tax in the state and property taxes are a total of 12.5
percent, including state and local. There are a minimum of six tax incentives offered by
Washington State to build the plant in Clallam County including a machinery and
equipment sales and use tax exemption, a rural county business and occupation credit, a
high unemployment county sales and use tax deferral or waiver, a high technology
business and occupation tax credit for research and development spending, a high
technology sales and use tax deferral or waiver, and commute reduction reimbursement if

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                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
      ENGINEERING
the company helps employees pay for their commutes to work. At this early stage it is
unclear just how much money these tax breaks will save the manufacturing facility and
more could be sought out, but the tax breaks will pay for 100 percent of the solar and wind
energy power generators.
3.0  Process & Layout


      3.1  Efficiencies

Three main factors drive assembly plant efficiency. These factors are the efficiency of
workers and technical equipment, downtime in plant operation due to organizational
problems, and other system related downtimes. Together, these factors account for the
overall plant efficiency.

            3.1.1  Equipment Efficiencies

These inefficiencies are relatively small but are always present and need to be accounted
for. Workers are assumed to operate at 100% efficiency and technical equipment generally
has an efficiency factor of 99% or higher. When all equipment efficiencies are combined in
a complex manufacturing system of up to 20 connected stations, the efficiency factor drops
to 95%.

            3.1.2  Downtime due to Organizational Problems

There are downtimes inherent to any assembly plant.  Organizational problems caused by
logistics, environment, or political (strike) events account for part of these down times. Due
to the unpredictable nature of these problems, the total reduction in efficiency varies and  is
more difficult to predict. Overall, they can account for a 5 - 90% reduction.

            3.1.2  Overall System Related Downtime

Further downtimes occur due to overall system related downtime. Interaction between the
different zones of the plant creates inefficiencies, which in turn reduces the total efficiency
factor by an additional 5%.
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Factoring in these three main contributions, the total bodyshop efficiency is 85%. This is
illustrated below in Figure A. 1.
90 -
80 -
70 -
60 -
50 -
40 -
30 -
20 -
10 -
0 -
;











1 — ~ — 1 95/°

Technical
Downtimes










1 _, 1

Organizational
Downtimes
(operators,
logistic, ...)




90%






L-^J—
Overall
System-related
Downtimes




85%












Production Technical System Total
Time Availibility Availibility Efficiency
                             Figure A.1: Total efficiency

      3.2   Assembly Sequence Per Station

The assembly sequence is broken up into 44 different stations on three lines - sub-
assembly (SA), underbody assembly (UB), and framing line (FR). There are 19 sub-
assembly stations, 14 underbody assembly stations, and 11 framing line assembly
stations. This eases the assembly process, minimizes the area necessary for the final
assembly line, and allows for sub-assemblies to be built elsewhere and shipped to the final
assembly location, maximizing usable factory space.

Table 3.2.a below lists every assembly station by name and notes the function and parts
involved.

               Table 3.2.a:  Assembly line stations, functions, and parts
Station
Name
SA05
SA10
SA15
Assembly Function
Front and rear bumper assembly
Front frame rail assemblies
L, R pillar sub-assemblies
Parts Invovled
Front and rear bumper brackets, mounting plates, beam
Frame rail mounting plates, rails, brackets, transitions, rocker extrusions
A-pillar upper and lower, inner reinforcements; B-pillar upper and lower,
inner and outers; roof rail, C-pillar striker reinforcement
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SA20
SA25
SA30
SA35
SA40
SA45
SA50
SA55
SA60
SA65
SA70-10
SA70-20
SA70-30
SA75
SA80
SA85
UB100
UB110
UB120
UB130
UB140
UB150
UB160
UB170
UB180
UB190
UB200
UB210
UB220
UB230
FR100
FR110
FR120
FR130
FR140
Rear end assembly
X-member sub-assemblies
Complete floor X-member assembly
Rear end panel and compartment X-
member assembly
Side rail assemblies
L, R rear wheelhouse assemblies
Dash sub-assembly
Dash assembly
Rear seat assembly
L, R front wheelhouse assemblies
L, R roof, B-pillar bodyside inner
assemblies
L, R A-pillar outer assemblies
L, R C-pillar bodyside inner assemblies
L, R A-pillar inner sub-assemblies
L, R bodyside outer assembly
L, R inner B-Pillar assembly
Initial underbody assembly
Initial underbody assembly
Rear wheelhouse and dash buildup
Idle
Weld respotting
Rear seat and A-pillar buildup
Idle
Front wheelhouse buildup
Central flooring
Rear wheelhouse lining and rear rear
flooring
Weld respotting
Stud application
Camera inspection
Elevator to framing
Idle
Bodyside outer buildup
Weld respotting
Stud application
Bodyside inner buildup
L, R shock towers and reinforcements
X-member extrusions, brackets, and reinforcements
X-member sub-assemblies, crossbraces, reinforcements
Rear inner and outer panels, X-member extrusion and brackets
Rail and rocker extrusions, brackets, transitions,
D-pillar inners, quarter panel inners, liftgate rinforcements, wheelhouse
inners
Dash panel, reinforcements
Dash sub-assembly, dash reinforcement, cowl panel support
Rear seat risers, floor reinforcements, floor panel
Front wheelhouse panels, shotguns, shock towers
Front and rear roof side inners, upper and lower B-pillar inners
L, R A-pillar upper and lower outers, shotgun outers
L, R roof side rail sub-assembly, C-pillar outer upper
L, R A-pillar upper and lower inners, A-pillar sub-assemblies
L, R rear quarter panel, tail lamp closeout, bodyside outer, bodyside
outer frame rail, flange
L, R B-pillar sub-assembly, upper and lower inner reinforcements
Floor crossmember, rear end, rear end panel, side rail assemblies
Floor crossmember, rear end, rear end panel, side rail assemblies
Previous underobdy build, dash assembly, dash transmission
reinforcements, rear wheelhouse assemblies

Previous underbody build
Previous underbody build, rear seat assembly, A-pillar assemblies

Previous underbody build, front wheelhouse assemblies
Previous underbody build, center floor panels
Previous underbody build, rear wheelhouse outers, rear floor panel
Previous underbody build
Previous underbody build
Previous underbody build
Previous underbody build

Underbody build, L,R bodyside inner assemblies
Previoius framing build
Previoius framing build
Previous framing buid, L, R bodyside outer assemblies
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                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
FR150
FR160
FR170
FR180
FR190
FR200
Roof and cowl buildup
Weld respotting
Camera inspection
Bumper buildup
Surface finishing/reworking
Idle, electric motorized system
Previous framing build
cowl upper panel, roof panel, shotgun closeouts
Previous framing build
Previous framing build
Previous framing build
assemblies
front end module, front and rear bumper
Previous framing build

      3.3   Timing Sheets Per Station

Cycle time was determined using the number of vehicles produced per year; the number of
working days, shifts, and breaks per shift to determine total plant uptime; which was then
used to determine a gross cycle time of 225 seconds. With an inefficiency of 15-percent,
the net cycle time is 191 seconds. Table 3.3.a below shows the cycle time calculation.

                       Table 3.3.a: Net cycle time calculation

A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
Item
Vehicles/year
Working days/year (365-104-1 1)
Vehicles/day
Shifts
Hours/shifts
Break/shift
Uptime/day (seconds/working day)
Gross cycle time (seconds)
Inefficiency factor
Net Cycle Time
Value
60,000
250
240
2
8
0.5
54,000
225
15%
191
Formula


A/B



7.5 hrs/shift *2 shifts/day *3600 s/hr
G/C

H*(1-l)
Individual station timing sheets are listed below in Tables 3.3.b-3.3.ap. These timing
sheets show the full assembly time necessary for each station and the timing of each step.
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      ENGINEERING
                       Table 3.3.b: Station SA05 timing sheet
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                       Table 3.3.c: Station SA10 timing sheet
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                                        LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
          Operator dispose of 1s
          Operator depress palm
          (900,900,900,900)1
          (900,900,900,900)1
          Operator dispose of 1s
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                       Table 3.3.d: Station SA15 timing sheet
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                       Table 3.3.e: Station SA20 timing sheet
                       Table 3.3.f: Station SA25 timing sheet
                       Table 3.3.g: Station SA30 timing sheet
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                                 LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
     Crossmember Sub-Assembly
     Operators Run Bolts (12 each)

     Robot UB100R10 unloads XMbr Sub/

                           Table 3.3.h: Station SA35 timing sheet
                           Table 3.3.i: Station SA40 timing sheet
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                                  LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
     SiderailAsm RH
     Operator 1 loads Sill Body Side In
     SiderailAsm LH
          is Fit and Rear Rail'
     Operator 2 loads Sill Body Side In
          is Fit and Rear Rail'
                           Table 3.3.J: Station SA45 timing sheet
                        Table 3.3.k: Station SA50, SA55 timing sheet
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                       Table 3.3.1: Station SA60 timing sheet
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     Rear Seat Asm
                        Table 3.3.m: Station SA65 timing sheet

     •If Piercing Rivet Summary
                        Table 3.3.n: Station SA70 timing sheet
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                       Table 3.3.o: Station SA75 timing sheet
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      Operator unloads Sub
      Robot SA75R10FSJ in Stage 1 (3 spots R/L)
      Robot SA75R10FSJ in Stage 2 (15 spots R/L)
      Robot SA75R10 FSJ in Stage 2 (5 spots R/L)
       obot SA75R10 unloads Stage 2 asm to pre:
                              Table 3.3.p: Station SA80 timing sheet
      Body Side Outer / D-Pillar
                              Table 3.3.q: Station SA85 timing sheet
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                       Table 3.3.r: Station UB100 timing sheet
     RobotUB100R10lo
                       Table 3.3.s: Station UB110 timing sheet
                       Table 3.3.t: Station UB120 timing sheet
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                                  LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
     Underbody Geo Station (Dash and UBRRW/HAsm]

                          Table 3.3.u: Station UB130 timing sheet
     Underbody Idle Sta
                          Table 3.3.v: Station UB140 timing sheet
     Underbody Sub Asm (Respot Station]
     Robot UB140R30 (35 Spots)
     Robot UB140R40 (35 Spots)

                          Table 3.3.w: Station UB150 timing sheet
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     Underbody Geo Station (RR Seat and UBA-PIr Asm]
     Robot UB150R30 and UB150R40 RivTac (1 0 spots R/L)
     Underbody Sub Asm (Idle Station]
                          Table 3.3.x: Station UB160 timing sheet
                          Table 3.3.y: Station UB170 timing sheet
6/21/2012
Table 3.3.z: Station UB180 timing sheet



                             A-23

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                         Table 3.3.aa: Station UB190 timing sheet
       UB190R30 obtain PnlFlrRea
      obot UB190R30 changes Gripper
      obot UB190R40 apply FED aclhe
     Operators depress p;
                         Table 3.3.ab: Station UB200 timing sheet




1
2
3
4
5
6
7





Description

Underbody Respot Station
CYCLE (BELC ' " ™ " "™ ' ' lm ' " ~ ~MPLETED CYCLE
Transfer advances asm into Station
Tool Closes
Robot UB200R10 Respot (35 Spots)
Robot UB200R20 Respot (35 Spots)
Robot UB200R30 Respot (35 Spots)
Robot UB200R40 Respot (35 Spots)
T..,0,=ns
Walk Summary (lm=a,l==,)
Glue Summaw (linear mm)
Friction Stir Summary
Hem Summary (linear mm)
MIG Summary (linear mm)
f'S










0




(mm)











0



F8J












0


(mEm)













0
















0




00
13 0
16 0
16 0
160
160
121 0









130
30
1050
1050
1050
1050
30









13 0
16 0
121 0
121 0
121 0
121 0
124 0









































1
1


























































































































































































































































































































































0,









•





















































































0,















5,















0,































,,































,,















5,,,















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                      Table 3.3.ac: Station UB210 timing sheet
                      Table 3.3.ad: Station UB220 timing sheet
                      Table 3.3.ae: Station UB230 timing sheet
     Underbody Elevator to EMS
                       Table 3.3.af: Station FR100 timing sheet
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Table 3.3.ag: Station FR110 timing sheet



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     Framing Geo Station (Bodyside Inrto Underbody]
                       Table 3.3.ah: Station FR120 timing sheet
















Description

Framing (Respot Station)
JVCtEjBa ~JLETED CYCLE
Transfer advances asm into Station
Tool Closes
Robot FR120R10 Respot (35 Spots)
Robot FR120R20 Respot (35 Spots)
Robot FR120R30 Respot (35 Spots)
Robot FR120R40 Respot (35 Spots)
T..,0r,ens
Walk Summary (linear feet)
Glue Summary (linear mm)
Frictlen Stir Summary
Hem Summary (linear mm)
MIG Summary (linear mm)
—










0




(mm)











0



F8J












0


HE,













0

M,0














0
art



00
13 0
160
160
160
16 0
121 0





time



130
30
1050
1050
1050
1050
30





sec]



13 0
16 0
121 0
121 0
121 0
121 0
124 0









































1
1










































































































































































































"















ond









































































































































I





































































































































































































5 1.0















                        Table 3.3.ai: Station FR130 timing sheet
                        Table 3.3.aj: Station FR140 timing sheet
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       __     .    ,
       ENGINEERING
                                 LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
     Framing Geo Station (Bodyside Otrto Underbody]
                         Table 3.3.ak: Station FR150 timing sheet
     Roof, Cowl Top and Shotgun Flange Gee
                         Table 3.3.al: Station FR160 timing sheet
6/21/2012
A-27

-------
      __     .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                              LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM





1
2
3
4
5
6
7






Description

Framing (Respot Station)
C •• C :-E , £ E 1PLETED CYCLE
Transfer advances asm into Station
Tool Closes
Robot FR160R10 Respot (35 Spots)
Robot FR160R20 Respot (35 Spots)
Robot FR160R30 Respot (35 Spots)
Robot FR160R40 Respot (35 Spots)
Too, Opens
WalkSummaryllmearfeet)
Glue Summary (linear mm)
Friction Stir Summary
Hem Summary (linear mm)
MIG Summary (linear mm)

;:;










0





(±)











0




FSJ












0



(mm!













0

















0





00
13 0
16 0
160
160
160
121 0






AZ



130
30
1050
1050
1050
1050
30






sum1



13 0
16 0
121 0
121 0
121 0
121 0
124 0












































1
1




















•



























































































































































































































































































































































,,





































































































,,
















°<
















,,

































,,

































,,
















5,,

















































                       Table 3.3.am: Station FR170 timing sheet
                       Table 3.3.an: Station FR180 timing sheet
      ing Bolt Up Station (Frt/RR Bumper and Rad Supt]
        & 2 load Rear Burnt

                       Table 3.3.ao: Station FR190 timing sheet
6/21/2012
A-28

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM







1









Framing (Idle Station)
iniLEfSE 	 	 °t£T&) ^cte
Transfer advances asm ,nto Station
Walk Summary (linear feet)
Glue Summary (linear mm)
Friction Stir Summary
Hem Summary (linear mm)
MIG Summary (linear mm)
I
Walk
(feet)




0




at
Glue
(mm)





0



)l€
FSJ







0


)i
HEM
(mm)







0

U
MIG
(mm)








0
.a
start




00





p:
time
Az



30





b
sec]
sum



13 0





t,











at











IC











Dr











T











h











h











(,











X











X











)











ti











rr











i











T











3
se










S
ond










h











e











e

- '









t























































































































































































































      3.4   Tool Content Per Station
In order to build the Phase 2 HD vehicle, a number of tools are required at each station
ranging from the basic loose parts to advanced robots. The tools needed at each station
are listed in Tables 3.4.a-3.4.ao below with a summary of all the necessary tools listed in
Table 3.4.ap.

                       Table 3.4.a: Station SA05 tool content
SA05
Description
Loose Parts Load
Operators
MIG Weld (value in millimeters)
Quantity
10
1
1952
Single
Hand


976

ROBOTS
130 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
1


JOINING TECHNOLOGY
MIG head, feeder, and controller
1


Power and interface panel - single door
4' wide roll up door
1
4


6/21/2012
A-29

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
4' wide hinged access door
60" long by 12" wide sheet metal chute
Operator palm buttons
Vent hood
4-post base 30" x 60"
Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 4-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Rectangular locating pin w/ adjustment Ibocks (inside tube)
200mm self-contained indexing slide
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Large weldments for slide mounting
Rough locators
1
2
2
2
2
28
8
8
2
2
4
2
16
2
32















                       Table 3.4.b: Station SA10 tool content
SA10
Description
Loose Parts Load
Operators
MIG Weld (value in millimeters)
Quantity
14
1
1213
Single
Hand


606.5

ROBOTS
130 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
1


JOINING TECHNOLOGY
MIG head, feeder, and controller
1


Power and interface panel - single door
4' wide roll up door
4' wide hinged access door
60" long by 12" wide sheet metal chute
Operator palm buttons
Perimeter guard (walls/fences)
1
4
1
1
2
1






6/21/2012
A-30

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
4-post base 30" x 70"
4-post base 32" x 32"
Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 4-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
50mm self-contained indexing slide
200mm self-contained indexing slide
Small weldments for slide mounting
Large weldments for slide mounting
1
22
18
6
2
2
2
4
20
4
38












60" wide horizontal lightscreen
Rest unit (w/ riser, rest blocks and adjustment)
1
1


                       Table 3.4.c: Station SA15 tool content
SA15
Description
Loose Parts Load
Operators
Adhesive (value in millimeters)
Self Piercing Rivet Spot
Quantity
40
1
4150
46
Single
Hand
20

2075
23

ROBOTS
165 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
130 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
1
1



JOINING TECHNOLOGY
Rivet Head, feeder, and controller
Adhesive Nozzle, Pump, and Heater
1
1



Power and interface panel — double door
4' wide hinged gate
Operator palm buttons
4-post base 48" x 60"
Part present switches
1
1
1
4
20





6/21/2012
A-31

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
200mm self-contained indexing slide
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Large weldments for slide mounting
Rough locators
10
10
4
14
1
28







60" wide horizontal lightscreen
84" tall vertical lightscreen
Large capacity rotate table
Large frame (mounting to rotate table)
Rest unit (w/ riser, rest blocks and adjustment)
1
1
1
1
4





                       Table 3.4.d: Station SA20 tool content
SA20
Description
Loose Parts Load
Operators
Adhesive (value in millimeters)
Rivtac Spots
Quantity
7
1
2715
28
Single
Hand





ROBOTS
1 65 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
Tool Changer (robot side)
Tool Changer (tool side)
1
1
2




JOINING TECHNOLOGY
Rivtac Unit, feeder, and controller
Adhesive Nozzle, Pump, and Heater
1
1



END EFFECTORS
End effector (medium)
End effector storage stand
1
2



Power and interface panel — single door
Operator palm buttons
1
1


6/21/2012
A-32

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
4-post base 40" x 80"
Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 4-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Rough locators
2
16
2
1
2
2
8
30









60" wide horizontal lightscreen
84" tall vertical lightscreen
1
1


                       Table 3.4.e: Station SA25 tool content
SA25
Description
Loose Parts Load
Friction Stir Joining
Operators
Rivtac Spots
Quantity
32
38
1
16
Single
Hand





ROBOTS
165 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
Tool Changer (robot side)
Tool Changer (tool side)
2
1
2




JOINING TECHNOLOGY
FSJ unit with controller
Rivtac Unit, feeder, and controller
1
1



END EFFECTORS
End effector (large)
End effector storage stand
1
2



Operator palm buttons
4-post base 48" x 60"
Part present switches
1
1
36



6/21/2012
A-33

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Rough locators
2
2
22
36





60" wide horizontal lightscreen
84" tall vertical lightscreen
Staging Table
Nut runner
1
1
1
2




                       Table 3.4.f: Station SA30 tool content
SA30
Description
Loose Parts Load
Operators
Quantity
4
2
Single
Hand



Operator palm buttons
4-post base 48" x 60"
Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Rough locators
2
1
13
2
2
14
16








60" wide horizontal lightscreen
84" tall vertical lightscreen
Rest unit (w/ riser, rest blocks and adjustment)
Frame for adhesive nozzle mount (ped)
Nut runner
1
1
8
2
2





                       Table 3.4.g: Station SA35 tool content
SA35
Description
Loose Parts Load
Friction Stir Joining
Quantity
5
30
Single
Hand


6/21/2012
A-34

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
Operators
Adhesive (value in millimeters)
SHARE
3700



ROBOTS
165 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
Tool Changer (robot side)
Tool Changer (tool side)
1
1
2




JOINING TECHNOLOGY
FSJ unit with controller
Adhesive Nozzle, Pump, and Heater
1
1



END EFFECTORS
End effector (large)
End effector storage stand
1
2



Power and interface panel — single door
Operator palm buttons
4-post base 40" x 80"
Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 4-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Rough locators
1
1
1
8
3
3
1
1
7
12











60" wide horizontal lightscreen
84" tall vertical lightscreen
Large frame (mounting to rotate table)
Rest unit (w/ riser, rest blocks and adjustment)
Pivoting dump (w/ mtg bracket, shocks, stops & cylinder
1
1
1
4
1





                       Table 3.4.h: Station SA40 tool content
SA40
Description
Quantity
Single
Hand
6/21/2012
A-35

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
Loose Parts Load
Operators
Adhesive (value in millimeters)
Rivtac Spots
14
2
9060
50
7
1
4530
25

ROBOTS
1 30 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
4


JOINING TECHNOLOGY
Rivtac Unit, feeder, and controller
Adhesive Nozzle, Pump, and Heater
END EFFECTORS
End effector (large)
2
1

1





Operator palm buttons
Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 4-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
50mm self-contained indexing slide
200mm self-contained indexing slide
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Small weldments for slide mounting
Large weldments for slide mounting
Rough locators
1
10
3
3
4
4
4

8
4

28













60" wide horizontal lightscreen
84" tall vertical lightscreen
Rest unit (w/ riser, rest blocks and adjustment)
Large base 70" x 180"
Pivoting dump (w/ mtg bracket, shocks, stops & cylinder
1
1
2
1
4





                       Table 3.4.i: Station SA45 tool content
SA45
Description
Quantity Single
Hand
6/21/2012
A-36

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
Loose Parts Load
Friction Stir Joining
Operators
Adhesive (value in millimeters)
8
60
2
3600
4
30
1
1800

ROBOTS
1 65 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
Tool Changer (robot side)
Tool Changer (tool side)
1
1
2




JOINING TECHNOLOGY
FSJ unit with controller
Adhesive Nozzle, Pump, and Heater
1
1



END EFFECTORS
End effector (large)
End effector storage stand
1
2



Power and interface panel - single door
Operator palm buttons
4-post base 40" x 80"
Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 4-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Rough locators
1
1
1
14
1
1
3
3
8
12











84" tall vertical lightscreen
Rest unit (w/ riser, rest blocks and adjustment)
Frame for adhesive nozzle mount (ped)
Conveyor (W/pins locators and rests)
Pivoting dump (w/ mtg bracket, shocks, stops & cylinder
1
8
1
1
1





                       Table 3.4.J: Station SA50 tool content
6/21/2012
A-37

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
SA50
Description
Loose Parts Load
Operators
Adhesive (value in millimeters)
Self Piercing Rivet Spot
Quantity
3
SHARE
1710
22
Single
Hand





ROBOTS
165 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
Tool Changer (robot side)
Tool Changer (tool side)
2
1
2




JOINING TECHNOLOGY
Rivet Head, feeder, and controller
Adhesive Nozzle, Pump, and Heater
2
1



END EFFECTORS
End effector (large)
End effector storage stand
1
2



Operator palm buttons
4-post base 40" x 80"
Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 4-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Rough locators
1
1
6
1
1
2
2
8
8










60" wide horizontal lightscreen
84" tall vertical lightscreen
Rest unit (w/ riser, rest blocks and adjustment)
Frame for adhesive nozzle mount (ped)
1
1
4
1




6/21/2012
Table 3.4.k: Station SA55 tool content



                        A-38

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
SA55
Description
Loose Parts Load
Operators
Adhesive (value in millimeters)
Self Piercing Rivet Spot
Quantity
3
SHARE
3600
46
Single
Hand





Operator palm buttons
4-post base 40" x 80"
Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 4-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Rough locators
1
1
6
2
2
1
1
8
12










Rest unit (w/ riser, rest blocks and adjustment)
6

                       Table 3.4.I: Station SA60 tool content
SA60
Description
Loose Parts Load
Friction Stir Joining
Operators
Adhesive (value in millimeters)
Quantity
6
62
1
2715
Single
Hand





ROBOTS
165 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
Tool Changer (robot side)
Tool Changer (tool side)
2
2
4




JOINING TECHNOLOGY
FSJ unit with controller
Adhesive Nozzle, Pump, and Heater
2
1


6/21/2012
A-39

-------
      __    .   ,
      ENGINEERING
                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM

END EFFECTORS
End effector (medium)
End effector storage stand
2
4



Operator palm buttons
4-post base 48" x 60"
4-post base 40" x 80"
Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Rough locators
1
1
1
18
6
6
15
22









60" wide horizontal lightscreen
84" tall vertical lightscreen
Rest unit (w/ riser, rest blocks and adjustment)
Frame for adhesive nozzle mount (ped)
Conveyor (W/pins locators and rests)
2
2
8
1
1





                      Table 3.4.m: Station SA65 tool content
SA65
Description
Loose Parts Load
Operators
Adhesive (value in millimeters)
Self Piercing Rivet Spot
Quantity
6
2
2200
42
Single
Hand
3
1
1100
21

ROBOTS
165 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
Tool Changer (robot side)
Tool Changer (tool side)
1
1
3




JOINING TECHNOLOGY
Rivet Head, feeder, and controller
Adhesive Nozzle, Pump, and Heater
1
1


6/21/2012
A-40

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM

END EFFECTORS
End effector (small)
End effector (medium)
End effector storage stand

2
3




Power and interface panel — single door
Operator palm buttons
4-post base 48" x 60"
4-post base 30" x 60"
Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 4-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Rough locators
1
1
2
1
10
1
1
2
2
8
22












84" tall vertical lightscreen
Rest unit (w/ riser, rest blocks and adjustment)
1
16


                       Table 3.4.n: Station SA70 tool content
SA70
Description
Loose Parts Load
Friction Stir Joining
Operators
Adhesive (value in millimeters)
Resistance Weld Spots
Quantity
18
132
2
6800
76
Single
Hand
9
66
1
3400
38

ROBOTS
1 65 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
Tool Changer (robot side)
Tool Changer (tool side)
12
6
12




JOINING TECHNOLOGY
6/21/2012
A-41

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
FSJ unit with controller
Weld Gun, Weld Timer, Water Saver
Adhesive Nozzle, Pump, and Heater
4
2
4




END EFFECTORS
End effector (large)
End effector storage stand
6
12



Power and interface panel - double door
4' wide hinged gate
Operator palm buttons
4-post base 60" x 1 20"
4-post base 48" x 60"
Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 4-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Rough locators
4
4
6
6
6
52
12
12
14
14
72
84













60" wide horizontal lightscreen
84" tall vertical lightscreen
Rest unit (w/ riser, rest blocks and adjustment)
Frame for adhesive nozzle mount (ped)
Robot mounted camera inspection equipment, with
controller
Overhead rails with balancer
8
10
68
4
4
2






                       Table 3.4.o: Station SA75 tool content
SA75
Description
Loose Parts Load
Friction Stir Joining
Operators
Adhesive (value in millimeters)
Quantity
12
46
SHARE
1630
Single
Hand
6
23
1
815

6/21/2012
A-42

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
ROBOTS
130 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
Tool Changer (robot side)
Tool Changer (tool side)
1
2
4




JOINING TECHNOLOGY
FSJ unit with controller
Adhesive Nozzle, Pump, and Heater
2
1



END EFFECTORS
End effector (medium)
End effector storage stand
2
4



Operator palm buttons
4-post base 30" x 60"
Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Rough locators
1
2
10
5
5
5
12








60" wide horizontal lightscreen
84" tall vertical lightscreen
Rest unit (w/ riser, rest blocks and adjustment)
Frame for adhesive nozzle mount (ped)
1
1
8
1




                       Table 3.4.p: Station SA80 tool content
SA80
Description
Loose Parts Load
Friction Stir Joining
Operators
Adhesive (value in millimeters)
Quantity
10
24
1
1742
Single
Hand
5
12
1
871

ROBOTS
165 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
1

6/21/2012
A-43

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
Tool Changer (robot side)
Tool Changer (tool side)
1
2



JOINING TECHNOLOGY
FSJ unit with controller
Adhesive Nozzle, Pump, and Heater
1
1



END EFFECTORS
End effector (medium)
End effector (large)
End effector storage stand
1
1
2




Power and interface panel - single door
Operator palm buttons
4-post base 48" x 60"
4-post base 30" x 60"
Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 4-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
50mm self-contained indexing slide
200mm self-contained indexing slide
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Rough locators
1
1
2
1
8
1
1
3
3
2
1
8
22














84" tall vertical lightscreen
Rest unit (w/ riser, rest blocks and adjustment)
Frame for adhesive nozzle mount (ped)
Conveyor (W/pins locators and rests)
1
16
1
1




                       Table 3.4.q: Station SA85 tool content
SA85
Description
Loose Parts Load
Operators
Quantity
8
1
Single
Hand
4

6/21/2012
A-44

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
Resistance Weld Spots
32
16

ROBOTS
165 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
1


JOINING TECHNOLOGY
Weld Gun, Weld Timer, Water Saver
1


Power and interface panel - single door
4' wide hinged gate
Operator palm buttons
4-post base 30" x 60"
Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Rough locators
1
1
1
1
8
4
4
8
16










60" wide horizontal lightscreen
84" tall vertical lightscreen
Rest unit (w/ riser, rest blocks and adjustment)
1
1
4



                       Table 3.4.r: Station UB100 tool content
UB100
Description
Loose Parts Load
Operators
Quantity
5
SHARE
Single
Hand



ROBOTS
165 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
Robot 7th Axis Slide
1
1



JOINING TECHNOLOGY
End effector (large)
2


6/21/2012
A-45

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
Operator palm buttons
Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 4-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Large weldments for slide mounting
Rough locators
1
10
2
2
3
3
16
4
16










Rest unit (w/ riser, rest blocks and adjustment)
Large base 70" x 180"
Pivoting dump (w/ mtg bracket, shocks, stops & cylinder
16
1
2



                      Table 3.4.s: Station UB110 tool content
UB110
Description
Operators
Friction Stir Joining
Adhesive (value in millimeters)
Quantity
0
36
2650
Single
Hand




ROBOTS
165 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
Tool Changer (robot side)
Tool Changer (tool side)
4
2
4




JOINING TECHNOLOGY
Rivet Head, feeder, and controller
FSJ unit with controller
Adhesive Nozzle, Pump, and Heater
2
1
1




END EFFECTORS
End effector (small)
End effector (medium)
End effector (large)
End effector storage stand

3

4




6/21/2012
A-46

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM

Power and interface panel - double door
Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
1
10
5
5
22






Rest unit (w/ riser, rest blocks and adjustment)
Large base 70" x 180"
6
1


                       Table 3.4.t: Station UB120 tool content
UB120
Description
Loose Parts Load
Operators
Friction Stir Joining
Adhesive (value in millimeters)
Rivtac Spots
Self Piercing Rivet Spot
Quantity
5
0
40
11300
14
60
Single
Hand







ROBOTS
165 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
Tool Changer (robot side)
Tool Changer (tool side)
4
4
8




JOINING TECHNOLOGY
Rivet Head, feeder, and controller
FSJ unit with controller
Adhesive Nozzle, Pump, and Heater
2
2
2




END EFFECTORS
End effector (medium)
End effector storage stand
4
8



Part present switches
12

6/21/2012
A-47

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 4-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
3
3
3
3
26






84" tall vertical lightscreen
Rest unit (w/ riser, rest blocks and adjustment)
Large base 70" x 180"
1
8
1



                      Table 3.4.u: Station UB130 tool content
UB130
Description
Operators
Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Rough locators
Quantity
0
2
1
1
4
6
Single
Hand







Large base 70" x 180"
1

                       Table 3.4.v: Station UB140 tool content
UB140
Description
Operators
Friction Stir Joining
Quantity
0
140
Single
Hand

70

ROBOTS
165 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
4


JOINING TECHNOLOGY
FSJ unit with controller
4


Part present switches
2

6/21/2012
A-48

-------
      __    .   ,
      ENGINEERING
                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Rough locators
1
1
4
6





Large base 70" x 180"
1

                      Table 3.4.w: Station UB150 tool content
UB150
Description
Loose Parts Load
Operators
Friction Stir Joining
Adhesive (value in millimeters)
Rivtac Spots
Quantity
3
0
52
5850
44
Single
Hand


26

22

ROBOTS
165 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
Tool Changer (robot side)
Tool Changer (tool side)
4
2
6




JOINING TECHNOLOGY
Rivet Head, feeder, and controller
FSJ unit with controller
Adhesive Nozzle, Pump, and Heater
2
2
2




END EFFECTORS
End effector (medium)
End effector storage stand
3
6



Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 4-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
8
3
3
2
2
27






6/21/2012
A-49

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM

Rest unit (w/ riser, rest blocks and adjustment)
Large base 70" x 180"
2
1


                       Table 3.4.x: Station UB160 tool content
UB160
Description
Operators
Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Rough locators
Quantity
0
2
1
1
4
6
Single
Hand







Large base 70" x 180"
1

                       Table 3.4.y: Station UB170 tool content
UB170
Description
Loose Parts Load
Operators
Friction Stir Joining
Adhesive (value in millimeters)
Quantity
6
0
76
16500
Single
Hand





ROBOTS
165 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
Tool Changer (robot side)
Tool Changer (tool side)
4
4
9




JOINING TECHNOLOGY
Rivet Head, feeder, and controller
FSJ unit with controller
Adhesive Nozzle, Pump, and Heater
2
2
2




END EFFECTORS
6/21/2012
A-50

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
End effector (small)
End effector (medium)
End effector storage stand
2
2
9




Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 4-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
14
5
5
2
2
32







Rest unit (w/ riser, rest blocks and adjustment)
Large base 70" x 180"
Pivoting dump (w/ mtg bracket, shocks, stops & cylinder
10
1
4



                      Table 3.4.z: Station UB180 tool content
UB180
Description
Loose Parts Load
Operators
Adhesive (value in millimeters)
Flow Screw
Quantity
2
0
6600
8
Single
Hand





ROBOTS
165 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
130 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
1
1



JOINING TECHNOLOGY
Adhesive Nozzle, Pump, and Heater
1


END EFFECTORS
End effector (large)
1


Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
6
3


6/21/2012
A-51

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 4-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
3
2
2
20





Rest unit (w/ riser, rest blocks and adjustment)
Large base 70" x 180"
Pivoting dump (w/ mtg bracket, shocks, stops & cylinder
Robot mounted screw head driver, with feeder and
controller
2
1
6
1




                      Table 3.4.aa: Station UB190 tool content
UB190
Description
Loose Parts Load
Friction Stir Joining
Operators
Adhesive (value in millimeters)
Rivtac Spots
Quantity
4
42
0
9800
44
Single
Hand






ROBOTS
165 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
Tool Changer (robot side)
Tool Changer (tool side)
4
4
8




JOINING TECHNOLOGY
FSJ unit with controller
Rivtac Unit, feeder, and controller
Adhesive Nozzle, Pump, and Heater
2
2
2




END EFFECTORS
End effector (small)
End effector (medium)
End effector storage stand
2
1
8




Part present switches
10

6/21/2012
A-52

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 4-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
3
3
2
2
20






Rest unit (w/ riser, rest blocks and adjustment)
Large base 70" x 180"
Pivoting dump (w/ mtg bracket, shocks, stops & cylinder
2
1
6



                      Table 3.4.ab: Station UB200 tool content
UB200
Description
Friction Stir Joining
Operators
Quantity
140
0
Single
Hand
70


ROBOTS
165 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
4


JOINING TECHNOLOGY
FSJ unit with controller
4


4-post base 60" x 120"
Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Rough locators
1
2
1
1
4
6






                      Table 3.4.ac: Station UB210 tool content
UB210
Description
Operators
Clinch Studs
Quantity
0
100
Single
Hand



6/21/2012
A-53

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      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
ROBOTS
130 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
4


4-post base 60" x 120"
Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Rough locators
1
2
1
1
4
6







Clinch Stud Head, Feeder and Controller
4

                      Table 3.4.ad: Station UB220 tool content
UB220
Description
Operators
Camera Inspection Points
Quantity
0
100
Single
Hand

50

ROBOTS
1 30 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
2


Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Rough locators
2
1
1
4
6






Large base 70" x 180"
Robot mounted camera inspection equipment, with
controller
1
2


                      Table 3.4.ae: Station FR100 tool content
FR100
Description
Operators
Part present switches
Quantity
0
2
Single
Hand


6/21/2012
A-54

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Rough locators
1
1
4
6





Large base 70" x 180"
1

                      Table 3.4.af: Station FR110 tool content
FR110
Description
Loose Parts Load
Friction Stir Joining
Operators
Adhesive (value in millimeters)
Rivtac Spots
Quantity
5
100
1
7000
50
Single
Hand

50

3500
25

ROBOTS
165 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
Tool Changer (robot side)
Tool Changer (tool side)
Robot 7th Axis Slide
8
1
2
2





JOINING TECHNOLOGY
FSJ unit with controller
Rivtac Unit, feeder, and controller
Adhesive Nozzle, Pump, and Heater
4
2
2




END EFFECTORS
End effector (large)
End effector storage stand
2
4



Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 4-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
12
4
4
2
2





6/21/2012
A-55

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
200mm self-contained indexing slide
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Rough locators
6
35
12




Rest unit (w/ riser, rest blocks and adjustment)
Frame for adhesive nozzle mount (ped)
Large base 70" x 180"
Pivoting dump (w/ mtg bracket, shocks, stops & cylinder
12
2
1
6




                      Table 3.4.ag: Station FR120 tool content
FR120
Description
Friction Stir Joining
Operators
Quantity
100
0
Single
Hand
50


ROBOTS
165 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
4


JOINING TECHNOLOGY
FSJ unit with controller
4


Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Rough locators
2
1
1
4
6






Large base 70" x 180"
1

                      Table 3.4.ah: Station FR130 tool content
FR130
Description
Operators
Clinch Studs
Quantity
0
100
Single
Hand

50

6/21/2012
A-56

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
ROBOTS
130 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
4


4-post base 60" x 120"
Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Rough locators
1
2
1
1
4
6







Clinch Stud Head, Feeder and Controller
4

                      Table 3.4.ai: Station FR140 tool content
FR140
Description
Loose Parts Load
Friction Stir Joining
Operators
Adhesive (value in millimeters)
Quantity
2
100
0
4400
Single
Hand

50

2200

ROBOTS
165 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
Robot 7th Axis Slide
6
2



JOINING TECHNOLOGY
FSJ unit with controller
Adhesive Nozzle, Pump, and Heater
4
2



END EFFECTORS
End effector (large)
2


Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 4-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
6
1
1
2




6/21/2012
A-57

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
Round 2-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
2
28



Rest unit (w/ riser, rest blocks and adjustment)
Frame for adhesive nozzle mount (ped)
Large base 70" x 180"
Pivoting dump (w/ mtg bracket, shocks, stops & cylinder
6
2
1
6




                      Table 3.4.aj: Station FR150 tool content
FR150
Description
Loose Parts Load
Friction Stir Joining
Operators
Adhesive (value in millimeters)
Self Piercing Rivet Spot
Quantity
4
94
1
16816
70
Single
Hand

47


35

ROBOTS
165 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
Robot 7th Axis Slide
5
1



JOINING TECHNOLOGY
Rivet Head, feeder, and controller
FSJ unit with controller
Adhesive Nozzle, Pump, and Heater
2
2
2




END EFFECTORS
End effector (large)
1


Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 4-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
8
1
1
3
3
35






6/21/2012
A-58

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM

Rest unit (w/ riser, rest blocks and adjustment)
Frame for adhesive nozzle mount (ped)
Large base 70" x 180"
Pivoting dump (w/ mtg bracket, shocks, stops & cylinder
5
2
1
6




                      Table 3.4.ak: Station FR160 tool content
FR160
Description
Friction Stir Joining
Operators
Quantity
140
0
Single
Hand
70


ROBOTS
165 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
4


JOINING TECHNOLOGY
FSJ unit with controller
4


Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Rough locators
2
1
1
4
6






Large base 70" x 180"
1

                      Table 3.4.al: Station FR170 tool content
FR170
Description
Operators
Camera Inspection Points
Quantity
0
100
Single
Hand

50

ROBOTS
1 30 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
2


6/21/2012
A-59

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Rough locators
2
1
1
4
6






Large base 70" x 180"
Robot mounted camera inspection equipment, with
controller
1
2


                     Table 3.4.am: Station FR180 tool content
FR180
Description
Loose Parts Load
Operators
Quantity
3
2
Single
Hand



Operator palm buttons
Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Rough locators
2
2
1
1
4
12







Large base 70" x 180"
Nut runner
Load Assist
Operator Platform (1 0' x 20')
Overhead rails with balancer
1
4
2
2
2





                      Table 3.4.an: Station FR190 tool content
FR190
Description
Operators
Quantity
2
Single
Hand


I Part present switches
Round 4-way locating
pin w/ adjustment blocks
2
1


6/21/2012
A-60

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Rough locators
1
4
6




Large base 70" x 180"
Operator Platform (10' x 20')
1
2


                      Table 3.4.ao: Station FR200 tool content
FR200
Description
Operators
Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Rough locators
Large base 70" x 180"
Quantity
0
2
1
1
4
6
1
Single
Hand







                       Table 3.4.ap: Total station tool content
Total
Description
Loose Parts Load
Friction Stir Joining
Operators
Adhesive (value in millimeters)
Clinch Studs
Resistance Weld Spots
Rivtac Spots
Self Piercing Rivet Spot
Flow Screw
MIG Weld (value in millimeters)
Camera Inspection Points
Quantity
239
1452
24
124538
200
108
246
286
8
3165
200

ROBOTS
1 65 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
1 30 kg robot w/ riser, dress, and controller
82
21
6/21/2012
A-61

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
Tool Changer (robot side)
Tool Changer (tool side)
Robot 7th Axis Slide
34
72
6

JOINING TECHNOLOGY
Rivet Head, feeder, and controller
FSJ unit with controller
Rivtac Unit, feeder, and controller
MIG head, feeder, and controller
Weld Gun, Weld Timer, Water Saver
Adhesive Nozzle, Pump, and Heater
14
47
8
2
3
30

END EFFECTORS
End effector (small)
End effector (medium)
End effector (large)
End effector storage stand
4
21
20
74

Power and interface panel — single door
Power and interface panel — double door
4' wide roll up door
4' wide hinged access door
4' wide hinged gate
60" long by 12" wide sheet metal chute
Operator palm buttons
Perimeter guard (walls/fences)
Vent hood
4-postbase60"x120"
4-post base 48" x 60"
4-post base 40" x 80"
4-post base 30" x 60"
4-post base 30" x 70"
4-post base 32" x 32"
Part present switches
Round 4-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 2-way locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Round 4-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
8
6
8
2
6
3
28
1
2
9
17
7
7
1
22
405
113
108
57
6/21/2012
A-62

-------
      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
Round 2-way retract locating pin w/ adjustment blocks
Rectangular locating pin w/ adjustment Ibocks (inside tube)
50mm self-contained indexing slide
200mm self-contained indexing slide
Power clamp units (w/ riser, backup, finger & adjustment)
Small weldments for slide mounting
Large weldments for slide mounting
Rough locators
57
4
10
33
546
8
45
510

60" wide horizontal lightscreen
84" tall vertical lightscreen
Large capacity rotate table
Large frame (mounting to rotate table)
Rest unit (w/ riser, rest blocks and adjustment)
Staging Table
Frame for adhesive nozzle mount (ped)
Conveyor (W/pins locators and rests)
Large base 70" x 180"
Pivoting dump (w/ mtg bracket, shocks, stops & cylinder
Nut runner
Load Assist
Clinch Stud Head, Feeder and Controller
Operator Platform (1 0' x 20')
Robot mounted camera inspection equipment, with controller
Overhead rails with balancer
Robot mounted screw head driver, with feeder and controller
20
25
1
2
226
1
17
3
22
42
8
2
8
4
8
4
1
      3.5   Conveyor Concept

There are a total of five different conveyors in the factory - one each for the sub-
assemblies, underbody line, the cross transport, framing line, and after the framing line,
which isn't included in this study.
6/21/2012
A-63

-------
                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
      ENGINEERING
            3.5.1 Sub-Assemblies
There are two methods of transport on the sub-assembly conveyor line. The parts are
loaded onto the actual conveyor belt by robots or human operators. Once on the assembly
line, the parts are handled by robots.


            3.5.2 Underbody Line
Like the sub-assembly line, there are two methods of transport on the underbody line.
Parts are loaded onto the line by robots and transferred by forklifts.
            3.5.3 Cross Transport
One primary method of transportation will be used to transport the fully-built underbodies
to the framing line. The underbodies will be loaded onto pallets and transported on a
conveyor belt to the framing line (3.5.4 below). These pallets are used on the framing line
as well. An elevator and overhead return recycle the pallets and are further discussed in
3.5.4 below.

            3.5.4 Framing Line
The underbodies remain on the pallets used in the cross transport process and are moved
along the framing line by power rollers. A total of 50 pallets are used in the system. Once
framing is complete, the assembled frames are removed and the pallets are lifted up to an
overhead return line by an elevator. A second elevator just before the cross transport line
lowers the pallets back to the cross transport line.
            3.5.5 After Framing Line
After the framing line, there is an elevator to raise the fully-built BIWs to an electric
motorized system for further vehicle buildup. This was not included in the scope of this
manufacturing study.
      3.6  Buffer Concept
In order to help prevent assembly line delays, each of the main lines will be disconnected
with buffers. A maximum buffer of 10 parts, roughly 32 minutes worth of production, will
help to prevent any delays. The buffer is designed to be approximately half full on average
as this allows the worker to fill the buffer up when production after the buffer halts and to
empty it when production prior to the buffer stops.
6/21/2012                                        A-64

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                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
      ENGINEERING
      3.7  Station Layouts
This section provides a detailed layout of each assembly station at the plant in Figures
3.7.a-3.7.as with a full plant overview in Figure 3.7.at. All the necessary bins, racks, parts,
machinery, conveyors, and workers are shown.
                         Figure 3.7.a: Station SA05 layout
6/21/2012
A-65

-------
                              LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
      ENGINEERING
         LOT-FIW IVJL MIC
FRT-PWL MMI CVR
Tx-mn
tt I H X 5
JSHIHB
'& ^ - 'i
K i» ji
TtF-JtKa
a IK .:i
w
fl
IB
WII
                          Figure 3.7.b: Station SA 10 layout
                                                 !  !  I  t  I  i
6/21/2012
A-66

-------
      ENGINEERING
                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
                         Figure 3.7.c: Station SA15 layout
                               mqi                ;\
                               p=3        ^«;a  /
                               cu^        - y.    I
                         Figure 3.7.d: Station SA20 layout
6/21/2012
A-67

-------
      ENGINEERING
                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
                      Figure 3.7.e: Stations SA25, SA30 layout
1


i
1

_J-I 1-1
\




1
                                                                 fc

                                                                 Si
                                                                  i
                                                                 ii
6/21/2012
A-68

-------
      ENGINEERING
                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
                          Figure 3.7.f: Station SA35 layout
                         Figure 3.7.g: Station SA40 layout
6/21/2012
A-69

-------
                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
      ENGINEERING
        i!
        ^2
        '5
       JS
       ? *
       si
                                  •D	=0==	D	D	—-H	D	D	D	D-
                Figure 3.7.h: Station SA45, right-side assembly layout
                          4
                             ir
                                                    FMocOrK
6/21/2012
A-70

-------
                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
      ENGINEERING
                 Figure 3.7.i: Station SA45, left-side assembly layout
                      Figure 3.7.J: Stations SA50, SA55 layout
6/21/2012
A-71

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                                 LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
       ENGINEERING
                                                                       A-PIr hr Lwr RH AH* N- U
                                                                        7W014QO-C4    7-ff-tWl
                                                                    Ff RMT SMt Prt
                                                                             F* R««r Brfetd
                             Figure 3.7.k: Station SA60 layout
6/21/2012
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                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
      ENGINEERING
                 Figure 3.7.1: Station SA65, right-side assembly layout
                 Figure 3.7.m: Station SA65, left-side assembly layout
6/21/2012
A-73

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                           LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
      ENGINEERING
                   "SSI1*
«j3E"
MJrg^
                  c^r^c^L
                                                                        ~i
               Figure 3.7.n: Station SA70, right-side assembly layout


                                           SA70LH
                                     Body Side Assembly
                                              I •*» II «» II	1
                                               M£Wyi Hirtarul *l^£^>*'
                                               —  —.
                                                          I U-U I
6/21/2012
                      A-74

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                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
      ENGINEERING
                 Figure 3.7.o: Station SA70, left-side assembly layout
                           InrRH
Storag*
X
jr
-o n n o a o n
f\ifl5(
-TFEP

R30
ER


/•
-/
-"i! s

                                                                    _J
                Figure 3.7.p: Station SA75, right-side assembly layout
6/21/2012
A-75

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      ENGINEERING
                               LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
                            AMn-APTRtW A-W-kr Lwr W  A-Pt-hr UprLH	T
                     Figure 3.7.q: Station SA75, left-side assembly
6/21/2012
A-76

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                              LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
      ENGINEERING
                      Figure 3.7.r: Station SA80 assembly layout
                                                                    e > »s x 55
                                                                W23
                                                                    r x«>
                                                                          OTKtti
                                                                            M j SS
                                                                           i M < SS
                      Figure 3.7.s: Station SA85 assembly layout
                £i
              \
                  -b	a	a
                 	RRCompJ cmbi; «nd
                       PSn^f Rr!
Am-njinlExtuHn

1 ess I

XXX
\ /
V
DD

i
                                                            ,
                                        -O	D	D	0	D	D-
                                                             n
 Sta. UB-100
LOOSE LOAD
                     Figure 3.7.t: Station UB100 assembly layout
6/21/2012
           A-77

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      ENGINEERING
                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
5£


-^t
UIM2QR1(
"LLLJE.


\


\\
                    Figure 3.7.u: Station UB110 assembly layout
6/21/2012
A-78

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                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
      ENGINEERING
                                            if	a	a j ^ a	a	a	a
                                            ^~- — _ «^—~  -^
                    Figure 3.7.v: Station UB120 assembly layout
6/21/2012
Figure 3.7.w: Station UB130 assembly layout



                           A-79

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                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
      ENGINEERING
                    Figure 3.7.x: Station UB140 assembly layout
6/21/2012
A-80

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      ENGINEERING
                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
                    Figure 3.7.y: Station UB150 assembly layout
6/21/2012
A-81

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                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
      ENGINEERING
                    Figure 3.7.z: Station UB160 assembly layout
                   Figure 3.7.aa: Station UB170 assembly layout
6/21/2012
A-82

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                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
      ENGINEERING
                 .
                                 I    \/  II       I \
                                      ...A                rfcil
                                                         I
                   Figure 3.7.ab: Station UB180 assembly layout
6/21/2012
A-83

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                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
      ENGINEERING
                   Figure 3.7.ac: Station UB190 assembly layout
                   Figure 3.7.ad: Station UB200 assembly layout
6/21/2012
A-84

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      ENGINEERING
                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
            \
                    Figure 3.7.ae: Station UB210 assembly layout
      I	D	D-
                  \
                  -D	D	D
                    f
                  \
                 -a	a	a	a	a-
v
                                                  -a	D	a	a	o-
6/21/2012
       A-85

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                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
      ENGINEERING
                    Figure 3.7.af: Station UB220 assembly layout
                    Figure 3.7.ag: Station UB230 assembly layout
                                                                £ •("""  L (
                           Figure 3.7.ah: Cross transport
6/21/2012
A-86

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                           LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
      ENGINEERING
                                                             B7
                                                              i1
                   Figure 3.7.ai: Station FR100 assembly layout
                   Figure 3.7.aj: Station FR110 assembly layout
6/21/2012
A-87

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                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
      ENGINEERING
     \     i
        i
        •I
                                     \\ '/ }    r^^
                   Figure 3.7.ak: Station FR120 assembly layout
           m
                   i
                                                                    BL7
             -0	D	D	D	8	8-
                                                   -B	B	H	B	B	B-


6/21/2012
A-88

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                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
      ENGINEERING
                   Figure 3.7.al: Station FR130 assembly layout
                 •                  yt—^
                   Figure 3.7.am: Station FR140 assembly layout
                   Figure 3.7.an: Station FR150 assembly layout
6/21/2012
A-89

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      ENGINEERING
                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
     3*
                   Figure 3.7.ao: Station FR160 assembly layout
6/21/2012
A-90

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      ENGINEERING
                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
                   Figure 3.7.ap: Station FR170 assembly layout
                       wu
                   Figure 3.7.aq: Station FR180 assembly layout
6/21/2012
A-91

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      ENGINEERING
                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
                                          W16
                       WM
                                       StSL PR -190
                                      SURFACE FWISH
                    Figure 3.7.ar: Station FR190 assembly layout
      -D	D	0	O
                                    Sta. FR - 200
                                       DLE
                         -a	D	D	0	D	D	D	D	D	D	O-
                    Figure 3.7.ar: Station FR200 assembly layout
6/21/2012
A-92

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      ENGINEERING
                               LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
                                Sta. FR - 210
                             ELEVATOR TO EMS
              -a	a   a	a    a    a	a	o   D	a	a
                                                                 -a	a    a-
                      Figure 3.7.as: Station FR210 assembly layout
      CONTAINER
      STORACfi
TOOL SHOP

L-::CKEft
RCOM

                                                                               ff^~ Croe»-Tremport Skid
                                                                                   eg i
                                                                                   ir
6/21/2012
A-93

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                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
      ENGINEERING
                  Figure 3.7.at: Overall body shop assembly layout


4.0  Facility

The total area required for the body shop is 190,000 ft2, divided up into areas with different
functions. A room will be allocated in the body shop to house the coordinate-measuring
machine (CMM). The CMM is a specialized device that measures the geometric
characteristics of an object and is used to test the dimensions of parts against their design
intent. Other areas include a break room, locker room and restrooms, maintenance area,
tool shop for repairs, and a logistic preparation area.


5.0  Labor  Requirements

The body shop will require a well-trained work force to operate. This work force is
categorized into direct and indirect workers. Direct workers handle assembly line tasks and
other jobs directly linked to manufacturing. The  body  shop will require 24 direct workers
per shift.

Indirect workers will also be required. They will perform tasks such as maintenance (10
workers per shift), logistics work (12 workers per shift), and there will be one CMM
operator per shift.

A total of 47 workers will be required per shift.


6.0  Logistic Concept

This section will discuss the basic logistics of the plant. These logistics need to be factored
in to prepare the plant to operate smoothly.

      6.1   Main Features

All part bins and racks will be sized according to the size of the parts stored helping to
ensure parts are stored in the proper location and maximizing usable space. There will be
enough  part bins to store parts for one week of production - approximately 1200 parts.
This includes a two-day supply in  the plant, two days  for transportation, and one day at the
supplier's plant.

Table 6.1 .a below shows the total bins and racks necessary for storage and gives the total
cost.

                          Table 6.1.a: Total  bins and racks

6/21/2012                                         A-94

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      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
Part Number
7305-0900-137
7305-0900-138
7305-1100-220
7305-1100-221
7305-1110-101
7305-1130-145
7305-1130-147
7305-1200-209
7305-1200-210
7305-1300-155
7305-1300-156
7305-1300-165
7305-1300-166
7305-1310-151
7305-1310-152
7305-1310-161
7305-1310-162
7305-1400-153
7305-1400-154
7305-1500-157
7305-1500-158
7305-1500-197
7305-1500-198
7305-1500-227
7305-1500-228
7305-1600-149
7305-1600-183
7305-1600-184
7305-1900-159
7305-1900-160
7305-1930-169
7305-1930-170
7305-2100-104
7305-2200-109
7306-0810-123
7306-0820-124
7306-0830-124
7306-0830-124
7306-0830-124
7306-0830-124
7306-0830-125
Part Name
L, inner front frame rail transition
R, inner front frame rail transition
R, upper dash reinforcement
L, upper dash reinforcement
Center, rear seat riser
Cowl panel
Cowl panel reinforcement
L, outer front frame rail transition
R, outer front frame rail transition
L, upper, A-pillar inner panel
R, upper, A-pillar inner panel
L, rear shock tower
R, rear shock tower
L, front shock tower
R, front shock tower
L, front wheelhouse panel
R, front wheelhouse panel
L, lower A-pillar outer panel
R, lower A-pillar outer panel
L, shotgun inner panel
R, shotgun inner panel
L, upper, A-pillar inner
reinforcement bracket
R, upper, A-pillar inner
reinforcement bracket
L, lower, A-pillar inner
reinforcement bracket
R, lower, A-pillar inner
reinforcement bracket
Dash panel reinforcement
L, rear outer wheelhouse panel
R, rear outer wheelhouse panel
L, shotgun closeout panel
R, shotgun closeout panel
L, shotgun outer panel
R, shotgun outer panel
Rear roof header
Roof panel
L, rocker sill extrusion
R, rocker sill extrusion
R, front floor bracket
L, front floor bracket
R, floor bracket
L, floor bracket
L, front floor X-member
Length
(mm)
803
803
398
398
1,423
1,577
1,578
854
854
551
551
486
486
366
366
444
444
362
362
885
885
152
152
143
143
1,464
1,059
1,059
102
102
866
866
889
2,031
1,563
1,563
90
90
90
90
603
Width
(mm)
223
223
270
270
93
135
216
191
191
70
70
302
302
278
278
255
255
187
187
53
53
81
81
96
96
306
350
350
3
3
301
301
99
186
132
132
57
57
57
57
51
Height
(mm)
344
344
382
382
208
327
280
309
309
524
524
325
325
281
281
308
308
245
245
369
369
144
144
100
100
611
723
723
90
90
369
369
259
1,370
178
178
53
53
53
53
51
Rack
Vol. (m3)
0.062
0.062
0.041
0.041
0.027
0.070
0.096
0.050
0.050
0.020
0.020
0.048
0.048
0.029
0.029
0.035
0.035
0.017
0.017
0.017
0.017
0.020
0.020
0.010
0.010
0.274
0.268
0.268
0.000
0.000
0.096
0.096
0.023
0.517
0.037
0.037
0.000
0.000
0.000
0.000
0.002
Price/
Rack
$360
$360
$360
$360
$530
$270
$360
$530
$530
$270
$270
$360
$360
$270
$270
$530
$530
$270
$270
$270
$270
$270
$270
$270
$270
$530
$530
$530
$50
$50
$360
$360
$530
$660
$530
$530
$65
$65
$65
$65
$65
Rack/1200
Units
50
50
33
33
39
57
80
71
71
36
36
39
39
50
50
50
50
29
29
31
31
3
3
2
2
80
80
80
2
2
80
80
32
100
11
11
8
8
8
8
44
Price of
Racks
$18,000
$18,000
$11,880
$11,880
$20,670
$15,390
$28,800
$37,630
$37,630
$9,720
$9,720
$14,040
$14,040
$13,500
$13,500
$26,500
$26,500
$7,830
$7,830
$8,370
$8,370
$810
$810
$540
$540
$42,400
$42,400
$42,400
$100
$100
$28,800
$28,800
$16,960
$66,000
$5,830
$5,830
$522
$522
$522
$522
$2,873
6/21/2012
A-95

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      __    .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
7306-0830-125
7306-0830-125
7306-0830-125
7306-0830-126
7306-0830-126
7306-0840-010
7306-0840-010
7306-0840-01 1
7306-0840-01 1
7306-0840-012
7306-1000-175
7306-1000-176
7306-1110-103
7306-1110-104
7306-1130-143
7306-1200-113
7306-1910-189
7306-1910-190
7306-1910-195
7306-1910-196
7306-1913-001
7306-1920-191
7306-1920-192
7306-1924-002
7306-2000-171
7306-2000-172
7306-2000-215
7306-2000-216
7306-2100-101
7306-2100-103
7306-2300-185
7306-2300-186
7306-2300-187
7306-2300-188
7306-2300-189
7306-2300-190
7306-2300-191
7306-2300-192
7306-2400-229
7306-2400-230
7306-2400-231
7307-0900-141
7307-0900-142
7307-1000-139
R, front floor X-member
L, rear floor X-member
R, rear floor X-member
Front floor X-member transition
Rear floor X-member transition
L, mid floor bracket
R, mid floor bracket
L, mid floor X-member
R, mid floor X-member
Mid floor transition X-member
L, rear seat riser
R, rear seat riser
L, rear seat floor reinforcement
R, rear seat floor reinforcement
Dash panel
Rear seat floor panel
L, upper, A-pillar outer panel
R, upper, A-pillar outer panel
L, C-pillar outer
R, C-pillar outer
L, B-pillar quarter panel
L, roof side rail outer panel
R, roof side rail outer panel
R, B-pillar quarter panel
L, roof side rail inner panel
R, roof side rail inner panel
L, rear roof side rail inner panel
R, rear roof side rail inner panel
Front header panel
Center roof header
L, body side outer panel
R, body side outer panel
L, rear quarter panel closeout
R, rear quarter panel closeout
L, outer liftgate flange channel to
body
R, outer liftgate flange channel to
body
L, rear body taillamp closeout
R, rear body taillamp closeout
L, center floor panel
R, center floor panel
Rear X-member component
L, rear frame rail inner transition
R, rear frame rail inner transition
L, rear frame rail
603
603
603
274
274
200
200
602
602
276
768
768
350
350
1,501
1,396
1,255
1,255
1,392
1,392
1,306
963
963
1,306
1,203
1,203
951
951
1,344
1,154
3,289
3,289
292
292
610
610
173
173
1,252
1,252
934
1,006
1,006
700
51
51
51
45
45
62
62
51
51
146
94
94
44
44
587
68
60
60
163
163
69
129
129
69
48
48
155
155
179
59
380
380
143
143
79
79
97
97
710
710
185
182
182
70
51
51
51
100
100
53
53
152
152
100
148
148
97
97
785
815
511
511
863
863
197
143
143
197
470
470
186
186
183
162
1,340
1,340
247
247
96
96
127
127
60
60
155
290
290
129
0.002
0.002
0.002
0.001
0.001
0.001
0.001
0.005
0.005
0.004
0.011
0.011
0.001
0.001
0.692
0.077
0.039
0.039
0.196
0.196
0.018
0.018
0.018
0.018
0.027
0.027
0.027
0.027
0.044
0.011
1.675
1.675
0.010
0.010
0.005
0.005
0.002
0.002
0.053
0.053
0.027
0.053
0.053
0.006
$65
$65
$65
$65
$65
$50
$50
$360
$360
$360
$200
$200
$200
$200
$660
$360
$200
$200
$530
$530
$200
$200
$200
$200
$530
$360
$360
$360
$530
$200
$790
$790
$200
$200
$200
$200
$270
$270
$530
$530
$360
$530
$530
$270
44
44
44
34
34
57
57
4
4
3
11
11
1
1
133
63
39
39
60
60
18
18
18
18
22
22
22
36
13
11
240
240
10
10
5
5
4
4
16
16
22
16
16
11
$2,873
$2,873
$2,873
$2,220
$2,220
$2,850
$2,850
$1,440
$1,440
$1,080
$2,200
$2,200
$200
$200
$87,780
$22,680
$7,800
$7,800
$31,800
$31,800
$3,600
$3,600
$3,600
$3,600
$11,660
$7,920
$7,920
$12,960
$6,890
$2,200
$189,600
$189,600
$2,000
$2,000
$1,000
$1,000
$1,080
$1,080
$8,480
$8,480
$7,920
$8,480
$8,480
$2,970
6/21/2012
A-96

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      __     .    ,
      ENGINEERING
                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
7307-1000-140
7307-1020-135
7307-1020-136
7307-1020-223
7307-1020-224
7307-1200-217
7307-1200-218
7307-1400-163
7307-1400-164
7307-1500-111
7307-1500-167
7307-1500-168
7307-1510-117
7307-1600-213
7307-2110-105
7307-2110-106
7307-2110-177
7307-2110-179
7307-2110-180
7307-2120-178












7305-2400-209
7305-2410-000
7305-2430-000
R, rear frame rail
L, front frame rail
R, front frame rail
L, frame rail mounting plate
R, frame rail mounting plate
L, rear frame rail outer transition
R, rear frame rail outer transition
L, rear inner wheelhouse panel
R, rear inner wheelhouse panel
Rear end outer panel
L, rear shock tower reinforcement
R, rear shock tower reinforcement
Rear end panel
L, rear wheelhouse inner panel
L, D-pillar inner panel
R, D-pillar inner panel
L, D-pillar quarter panel inner
L, liftgate reinforcement panel
R, liftgate reinforcement panel
R, D-pillar quarter panel inner
L, B-pillar reinforcement
R, B-pillar reinforcement
L, B-pillar upper brace
R, B-pillar upper brace
L, B-pillar braket inner
R, B-pillar braket inner
L, B-pillar inner panel
R, B-pillar inner panel
Rear floor panel
R, rear wheelhouse inner panel
L, rear shock tower reinforcement
R, rear shock tower reinforcement
Front module
Front bumper
Rear bumper
700
574
574
236
236
1,006
1,006
1,378
1,378
1,396
277
277
1,495
529
984
984
516
653
653
516
450
450
354
354
193
193
1,152
1,152
932
529
348
348
1,200
1,630
1,630
70
70
70
20
20
198
198
240
240
290
126
126
367
20
89
89
220
151
151
220
73
73
165
165
89
89
130
130
126
20
129
129
507
300
300
129
133
133
134
134
273
273
697
697
405
262
262
398
300
326
326
331
364
364
331
139
139
224
224
129
129
504
504
714
300
277
277
250
300
300
0.006
0.005
0.005
0.001
0.001
0.054
0.054
0.231
0.231
0.164
0.009
0.009
0.218
0.003
0.028
0.028
0.038
0.036
0.036
0.038
0.005
0.005
0.013
0.013
0.002
0.002
0.076
0.076
0.084
0.003
0.012
0.012
0.152
0.147
0.147
$270
$270
$270
$65
$65
$530
$530
$530
$530
$530
$200
$200
$660
$200
$360
$360
$360
$360
$360
$360
$200
$200
$360
$360
$270
$270
$530
$530
$530
$270
$200
$200
$530
$530
$530
Sub-Total
Contingency
Forklift
Other
Total
11
9
9
17
17
16
16
71
71
50
9
9
41
3
23
23
31
29
29
31
5
5
11
11
4
4
23
23
25
6
13
13
46
44
44
3,946
20%
$2,970
$2,430
$2,430
$1,110
$1,110
$8,480
$8,480
$37,630
$37,630
$26,500
$1,800
$1,800
$27,060
$600
$8,280
$8,280
$11,160
$10,440
$10,440
$11,160
$1,000
$1,000
$3,960
$3,960
$1,080
$1,080
$12,190
$12,190
$13,250
$1,620
$2,600
$2,600
$24,380
$23,320
$23,320
$1,707,720
$341,544
$200,000
$50,000
$2,299,264
The preparation area will be located close to the assembly line and will provide a

connection from the line to the warehouse. Aisles in the plant will be organized and sized
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to fit their function. Main aisles will be 15 feet wide, logistic aisles will be 12 feet wide, and
maintenance aisles will be 6.5 feet wide. All aisles will be two-way to ensure more efficient
traffic flow.

Figure 6.1 .a below shows the forklifts necessary in the factory.
                          Figure 6.1.a: Forklift factory scope

Other logistic concepts include shooter technology employed for small parts and forklifts
used for transportation.
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             Figure 6.1.b: Shoot technology used to transport small parts
      6.2  Staff Needed

The staff requirement has been incorporated into the labor requirements section of this
report (section 5.0). The total number of workers needed for logistics work is 12 forklift
drivers per shift.
7.0  Quality Concept

      7.1   Philosophy

Ensuring quality products isn't relegated to a sole person, but rather, it's the responsibility
of everyone at the plant. Each team member working at the plant is responsible for
maintaining quality work in order to build the highest quality product. Team members are
responsible for stopping the assembly line when a defect is noticed and must report the
defect for quality measurement and analysis.

There will be a quality control team that analyzes the product to determine quality, defines
methods to improve quality, and trains the factory workers  on how to build vehicles that
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meet the defined quality. All of the reported defects will be documented for analysis and
further quality refinement.

Figure 7.1 .a below shows the quality management concept and responsibilities of each
team member.
                                 6.1. Quality Management Concept
        Machine Operator

        • Responsible for quality control of parts from
        specific stations
        • Follow working instructions
        • Stop production in case of quality defects
             Corporate Philosophy

             • Define QM
             • Uniform measuring methods
             • Analysis of quality assurance
     Documentation

• Failure modes
• Root cause analysis
• Downtimes
• Frequency of breakdowns/
priorities
• Analysis of Continuous
 Drovement Processes
Assembly Line Team

• Carry out working instructions
• Team leader = QM foreman
• Problem localization by measuring methods
• Internal communication
• Assign responsibilities

                    QM Team

                    • Analysis
                    • Statistics
                    •Training (Job)
                    • Measuring
                    • Assign priorities
                    • Transparency of disturbing influences
                    • Quality controlling of the end product
                    • Documentation
                        Figure 7.1.a: Plant quality management concept
       7.2   Quality Assurance Methods

In order to measure and assess product quality, there will be two different quality checks.
One check will be performed 'in-line' as the vehicles are moving down the assembly line
and the other will be performed 'off-line' once the vehicle or part is assembled.
              7.2.1  In-line Quality Check

There will be four in-line vision stations equipped with cameras to provide quality data and
monitor processes. Each vision station is equipped with two cameras attached to robotic
arms to increase the visible area. A single camera can track 50 different locations on the
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part at each station, giving the capability to track 100 different locations per station
simultaneously.

Table 7.2.1 .a below gives the names of each station, the location, and the part of the
vehicle being monitored.

           Table 7.2.1.a: Vision quality stations, location, and part monitored
Station
Name
UB-220
SA-70L
SA-70R
FR-170
Location
End of underbody line
End of left-hand bodyside line
End of right-hand bodyside line
End of framing line
Vehicle Part Monitored
Underbody
Left-hand bodyside
Right-hand bodyside
Vehicle frame
            7.2.2 Off-line Quality Check

In order to analyze and improve the manufacturing quality and overall quality of the end
product, the body shop is equipped with a coordinate-measuring-machine room. The room
contains three coordinate measuring machines (CMM) - two with one ten-foot robotic arm
and the third has two, 20-foot arms. The CMMs take measurements along the X, Y, and Z
axes of the part and are accurate to around one micron, ensuring a high degree of
accuracy. These extremely accurate measurements are then used to determine the
precision of the  manufacturing process and quality of the parts. A method such as Six
Sigma can then be used to further refine and improve the precision of the manufacturing
process.

These off-line quality checks will be performed on one underbody per shift (two inspections
per day) and on one full BIW per two shifts (one per day).
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8.0  Maintenance Concept

As with any maintenance concept, the idea is to perform preventative maintenance to
ensure as much uptime as possible in the plant to increase output and avoid costly delays.
Preventative maintenance also helps to ensure better quality products as it will keep the
machines and tools in optimum operating condition. Preventative maintenance can also
help reduce overall maintenance costs as it can help reduce breakdowns and emergency
maintenance.

Maintenance schedules will initially be determined using historical data to project the
lifespan, wear rate, and mis-calibration rate of machinery and tools. Based  on the historical
data, daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly, and yearly maintenance schedules will be
determined. As the plant becomes operational and runs, data will be collected to refine the
maintenance schedules in a continuous improvement process. The data will be collected
by examining the machines in person and with the proper analytical tools if necessary.
This way, damaged areas or areas of faster or slower wear can be determined and the
maintenance schedules adjust accordingly. Through these examinations, remaining tool
and machine lifetimes can be determined and planned for financially and with expected
plant downtime.

Electronic problems will be minimized using diagnostic tools and debugging software to
find and eliminate problems as they occur.

There will of course be unexpected maintenance necessary when a machine or tool fails
unexpectedly and these situations will be handled accordingly.

Figure 8.0.a below shows the plant layout and anticipated maintenance personnel
necessary and the specific areas of the  plant they would be responsible for.

                 Figure S.O.a: Maintenance personnel and coverage
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9.0  Environmental Assumptions

In keeping with the environmentally friendly idea behind the lightweight Phase 2 HD
vehicle, the plant was designed to minimize the impact on the environment. This section
explains several of the environmentally friendly designs chosen for the plant.
      9.1   Solar Panels

Solar panels are a great way for automotive manufacturing plants to produce their own
energy as the panels can easily be integrated into the plant's large roof structure. This
means that the solar panels require no additional land for installation and instead make
use of a normally vacant space. With the plant's recommended location in California, the
solar panels will receive regular exposure to the sunlight for optimum performance, which
allows for freedom in plant location as it can be more remotely situated due to its in-house
power supply. Once the initial investment on the solar panels is paid off, they will provide
nearly free energy as they require little maintenance.

There are however, a number of disadvantages to using solar panels such as the high
initial investment. Washington State however, will refund the entire cost of purchasing and
installing solar panels, and with solar renewable energy credits and the possible positive
impact on the electrical grid (sell energy back to the utility companies), solar panels are
highly desired. As the solar panels require sun to gather energy, they do not operate at
night and their performance can be reduced by air pollution and cloud cover which means
a high-energy battery or capacitor would be required in the event of such situations or the
plant would pull  energy from the grid.
      9.2  Wind Turbines
Another clean way of producing power is using wind turbines, which like the solar panels,
can be installed on the roof of the manufacturing facility, maximizing usable space and
eliminating the need for extra land. The wind turbines to be installed on the plant's roof
however, must be small scale in order for the plant to support them. Eastern Clallam
County, Washington sees almost constant winds, which will help maximize the use of the
wind turbines.

Like the solar panels, wind turbines have a few disadvantages. They do not operate with
no wind (the plant's location should minimize this) and require a high initial investment.
This however, will be refunded by the state of Washington through taxes and the possible
positive energy impact could make them  profitable.

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      9.3   Biomass Power

Rather than disposing of biomass and shipping it to a landfill, employees will be instructed
to dispose of it in designated receptacles. The contents of these receptacles will then be
burned for power generation, eliminating some of the waste normally destined for landfills
and generating power as well.
      9.4   Hydroelectric Power

If the plant is built without a generator or power storage system for times of low light, wind,
and garbage and draws power from the electrical grid, it will most likely be drawn from
hydroelectric sources. Around 75-percent of the state of Washington's power is generated
by hydroelectric dams around the state currently and could increase by the time the plant
comes online.
      9.5   Water Recycle

Rain water normally goes unused and is returned to the ground, but this essentially free
water can be very useful and help to reduce costs if captured. The plant will utilize a rain
water recycle where the water is captured on the roof of the plant along with other various
structures and locations on site and then used for cooling and in toilets. Gray water (used
sink water, drinking fountains, etc.) is typically sent to a water treatment plant and treated,
but this water is partially clean and fit for reuse in toilets.
      9.6   Lighting

In order to reduce energy consumption at the plant, the lighting will all be LEDs. Using
LEDs will decrease lighting energy costs and will also decrease maintenance costs as
high-quality LEDs have a lifespan of over 100,000 hours. These LED lighting fixtures will
last for over 25 years operating 16 hours per day and 250 days per year.
      9.7   Recycling, Reusables, and Returnables

There will be designated recycling and returnable bins for employees and nearly every
material in the plant will either be recycled or reused to further reduce the amount of waste
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generated. Glass, plastic, metal, and paper recycling bins will be available for employees
to recycle their own materials.

Materials and components in the plant itself will be reused wherever possible. This
includes items as large as recycling normally scrap steel and plastic to make other
components to items as small as saving protective plastic covers on items like air
conditioning compressors. Covers like those - along with styrofoam protective pieces - will
be saved and shipped back to suppliers for reuse. After the parts have been reused a
certain number of times and reached their usable life, they will be recycled.

The pallets used in the manufacturing process will be reused and rebuilt if damaged. If the
part isn't salvageable, it will be shredded and turned into mulch.

      9.8  Living  Roof

The roof of the Phase 2 HD vehicle plant will be a 'living roof,' where sedum plants are
installed on the roof to help insulate the building. The energy-generating solar panels and
wind turbines will be installed around the sedum plants. In addition to helping insulate the
plant, the sedum plants will scrub carbon dioxide from the air and emit oxygen,  improving
the atmosphere. These roofs are already in use on plants such as Ford's Rouge River
Plant and Rolls-Royce's Goodwood facility.
      9.9  Solvent Recovery

Solvent recovery both saves the environment and saves the plant from dealing with toxic
waste disposal, which will recover the initial investment over a number of years. This
system captures and breaks down all paint solvents into basic components, which are then
reused.
      9.10 Plant Surroundings

The Phase 2 HD vehicle plant will be built around the existing natural habitat rather than
flattening hundreds of acres to build the plant. Some land will have to be cleared to
construct the factory, but a wildlife conservation area will be built up after the factory is
constructed to replace any of the habitat displaced and to redevelop previously deforested
land.
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10.0 Investment/Costs

All of the necessary costs to get the factory up and running, build the BIWs, and operate
the factory on a daily basis are covered in this section. These costs include capital costs,
labor costs, utilities, SG&A,  interest payments, and freight. The initial BIW cost analysis is
done assuming production of 60,000 vehicles per year, but a sensitivity analysis was
conducted based on production of 100,000, 200,000, and 400,000 vehicles per year.
      10.1 Capital Costs

Capital costs for the Phase 2 HD BIW plant are broken up into seven main areas - sub-
assembly line, underbody line, framing line, tool shop, transport conveyors, storage bins
and racks, and the coordinate measuring machine. Tables 10.1.a-10.1.p below detail the
investment necessary for the assembly lines and tool shop. The investment for bins and
racks was detailed in section 6.1 and is a total of $2.3 million, transport conveyors cost
$3.5 million, and the CMM is $2.4 million. All of these investments are amortized over 5
years except the CMM, which is amortized over 7 years.

                     Table 10.1.a: Sub-assembly tooling costs
Tooling
Station
SA05
SA10
SA15
SA20
SA25
SA30
SA35
SA40-R
SA40-L
SA45
SA50-55
SA60
SA65-R
SA65-L
SA70-R
SA70-L
SA75-R
SA75-L
SA80
SA85
Totals
Mechanical
Costs
$18,270
$16,620
$30,360
$23,100
$33,720
$21,000
$24,900
$35,100

$26,400
$42,000
$37,800
$34,300

$121,800

$22,800

$27,000
$16,500
$531,670
Controller
Costs
$4,140
$4,140
$8,100
$4,200
$9,600
$10,500
$7,200
$5,700

$5,400
$6,600
$10,200
$6,750

$19,800

$5,100

$6,240
$5,500
$119,170
Purchased
Items Cost
$28,200
$24,000
$58,500
$21 ,000
$53,000
$20,000
$27,000
$38,700
$38,700
$32,000
$36,000
$41 ,000
$55,200
$55,200
$190,000
$190,000
$39,200
$39,200
$73,000
$18,500
$1,078,400
Construction
Labor
$64,800
$50,460
$86,550
$33,300
$87,600
$38,280
$60,000
$79,140
$79,140
$68,400
$102,900
$115,920
$88,500
$88,500
$281 ,040
$281 ,040
$75,420
$75,420
$136,020
$44,500
$1,936,930
Controller
Installation
$10,500
$8,460
$22,200
$13,500
$19,500
$16,300
$20,700
$25,200
$25,200
$14,940
$29,700
$29,400
$19,500
$19,500
$108,000
$108,000
$21,000
$21,000
$31,500
$8,500
$572,600
Testing
$6,000
$5,400
$12,000
$5,700
$9,000
$4,200
$10,500
$14,100
$14,100
$7,800
$12,900
$12,600
$10,400
$10,400
$68,000
$68,000
$11,500
$11,500
$17,100
$8,000
$319,200
Total
$131,910
$109,080
$217,710
$100,800
$212,420
$110,280
$150,300
$197,940
$157,140
$154,940
$230,100
$246,920
$214,650
$173,600
$788,640
$647,040
$175,020
$147,120
$290,860
$101,500
$4,557,970
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Table 10.1.b: Sub-assembly capital tooling costs

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Capital Tooling
Description
Safety fence, gates, curtains
Robot simulation, programming, dress
System layout and installation drawing
Weld controllers
Weld guns
E/E changers
Tip dresser/torch cleaner
Air/water headers and valves
Electronics and cables for operation
Dispensing equipment
Gravity conveyors
Balconies and overhead structure
Transfer system
Welding robots (mig/braze)
Materials handling robots
Spir units
Dispensing robots
Tri-axis trunnion units
Rivtac system
Manipulators/load assists
FSJ system
DC nut runners B/UP style
Vision system
System lighting
Index tables
Pedestal welders
Total
Mechanical
Costs
$55,600
$197,100
$67,200



$1,800












$30,400




$16,000

$368,100
Controller
Costs
$19,800
$306,400






$329,000

















$655,200
Purchased
Items Cost
$281,200
$115,500

$49,500
$55,500
$629,350
$17,500
$229,720
$502,000
$1,200,000
$6,600

$72,000
$204,000
$1,650,000
$90,000
$80,000
$18,000
$700,000
$39,400
$1,200,000
$112,000
$600,000
$82,000
$112,000
$60,000
$8,106,270
Construction
Labor
$136,130
$42,280

$1,080
$2,340
$68,880
$7,500
$46,800
$188,000
$51 ,200
$900

$27,000
$6,300
$62,700
$1,200
$4,200
$3,500
$8,400
$32,000
$10,800
$6,000
$20,000
$50,700
$46,000
$4,500
$828,410
Total
$492,730
$661,280
$67,200
$50,580
$57,840
$698,230
$26,800
$276,520
$1,019,000
$1,251,200
$7,500
$0
$99,000
$210,300
$1,712,700
$91,200
$84,200
$21,500
$708,400
$101,800
$1,210,800
$118,000
$620,000
$132,700
$174,000
$64,500
$9,957,980
                  Table 10.1.c: Sub-assembly miscellaneous costs
Miscellaneous Costs
Description
Crating and loading
Freight
Training @ EBZ USA
Operation and maintenance
manuals
20-hour test run
30-piece capability study
300-piece test-part buy-off
12-month warranty
Installation
Installation supervision
Startup assistance
Design Processing
Total
Cost
$71,500
$200,000

$38,500
$36,500
$550,000
$234,000
Included
$731,000
$58,000
$386,000

$2,305,500
Remarks


One, eight-hour training day included. More time quoted on request


Dependent on product availability. Includes dimensional assemblies
and weld integrity testing
Dependent on product availability

Complete sytem integration in customer plant using EBZ personnel
Supervision only using EBZ personnel
Includes two weeks with EBZ personnel, excluding expenses
Cycle charts, weld studies, and miscellaneous process activities

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Table
10.1.d: Grand total sub-assembly investment
Total tooling cost
Total capital tooling cost
Total miscellaneous item cost
Grand total
$4,557,970
$9,957,980
$2,305,500
$16,821,450

                       Table 10.1e: Underbody tooling costs
Tooling
Station
UB100
UB110
UB120
UB130
UB140
UB150
UB160
UB170
UB180
UB190
UB200
UB210
UB220
Totals
Mechanical
Costs
$14,160
$54,000
$76,200
$4,500
$27,000
$50,290
$4,500
$62,100
$26,400
$67,800
$27,000
$27,000
$18,000
$458,950
Controller
Costs
$3,900
$7,500
$17,400
$2,500
$3,750
$11,500
$2,500
$14,100
$4,500
$14,400
$3,750
$3,750
$3,750
$93,300
Purchased
Items Cost
$6,500
$80,500
$98,400
$6,500
$31,000
$64,900
$6,500
$82,000
$18,500
$93,000
$31,000
$31,000
$31,000
$580,800
Construction
Labor
$58,500
$123,900
$196,740
$17,500
$47,500
$129,400
$17,500
$156,000
$43,080
$174,000
$47,500
$47,500
$47,500
$1,106,620
Controller
Installation
$6,300
$33,660
$61,800
$3,200
$13,500
$41,000
$3,200
$50,700
$18,720
$52,980
$13,500
$13,500
$13,500
$325,560
Testing
$8,700
$17,100
$20,160
$4,400
$12,500
$14,000
$4,400
$16,500
$9,600
$18,000
$12,500
$12,500
$12,500
$162,860
Total
$98,060
$316,660
$470,700
$38,600
$135,250
$311,090
$38,600
$381,400
$120,800
$420,180
$135,250
$135,250
$126,250
$2,728,090
                    Table 10.1.f: Underbody capital tooling costs
Capital Tooling
Description
Safety fence, gates, curtains
Robot simulation, programming, dress
System layout and installation drawing
Weld controllers
Weld guns
E/E changers
Tip dresser/torch cleaner
Air/water headers and valves
Electronics and cables for operation
Dispensing equipment
Gravity conveyors
Balconies and overhead structure
Transfer system
Welding robots (mig/braze)
Materials handling robots
Spir units
Dispensing robots
Seventh axis units
Rivtac system
Manipulators/load assists
FSJ system
Mechanical
Costs
$52,200
$207,900
$58,800









$31,500








Controller
Costs
$17,500
$323,400






$166,000



$5,500








Purchased
Items Cost
$235,000
$126,000



$506,550

$129,250
$242,000
$675,000


$143,000

$1,980,000
$360,000

$81,000
$400,000

$2,400,000
Construction
Labor
$105,000
$49,680



$55,440

$157,000
$79,200
$28,000


$206,700

$75,600
$4,800

$5,100
$4,800

$21 ,600
Total
$409,700
$706,980
$58,800
$0
$0
$561,990
$0
$286,250
$487,200
$703,000
$0
$0
$386,700
$0
$2,055,600
$364,800
$0
$86,100
$404,800
$0
$2,421,600
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DC nut runners B/UP style
Vision system
System lighting
Index tables
Pedestal welders
Flow screw drive units
Stud insertion units
Totals







$350,400







$512,400

$300,000
$31,000


$35,500
$125,000
$7,769,300

$10,000
$20,000


$6,500
$16,000
$845,420
$0
$310,000
$51,000
$0
$0
$42,000
$141,000
$9,477,520
                    Table 10.1.g: Underbody miscellaneous costs
Miscellaneous Costs
Description
Crating and loading
Freight
Training @ EBZ USA
Operation and maintenance manuals
20-hour test run
30-piece capability study
300-piece test-part buy-off
12-month warranty
Installation
Installation supervision
Startup assistance
Design Processing
Total
Cost
$46,800
$78,000

$25,000
$14,500
$345,000
$155,000
Included
$485,000
$45,000
$125,000

$1,319,300
Remarks


One, eight-hour training day included. More time quoted on request


Dependent on product availability. Includes dimensional assemblies
and weld integrity testing
Dependent on product availability

Complete sytem integration in customer plant using EBZ personnel
Supervision only using EBZ personnel
Includes two weeks with EBZ personnel, excluding expenses
Cycle charts, weld studies, and miscellaneous process activities

Tabl
e 10.1. h: Grand total underbody investment
Total tooling cost
Total capital tooling cost
Total miscellaneous item cost
Grand total
$2,728,090
$9,477,520
$1,319,300
$13,524,910

                         Table 10.1.1: Framing tooling costs
Tooling
Station
FR100
FR110
FR120
FR130
FR140
FR150
FR160
FR170
FR180
FR190
FR200
Totals
Mechanical
Costs
$1,800
$91,140
$18,000
$27,000
$59,220
$43,800
$18,000
$18,000
$21,000
$15,600
$1,800
$315,360
Controller
Costs
$1,200
$20,160
$3,750
$3,750
$13,080
$8,400
$3,750
$3,750
$10,500
$2,400
$1,200
$71,940
Purchased
Items Cost
$4,500
$187,200
$31,000
$31,000
$103,000
$84,000
$31,000
$31,000
$20,000
$36,000
$4,500
$563,200
Construction
Labor
$3,200
$205,000
$47,500
$47,500
$139,320
$132,000
$47,500
$47,500
$38,280
$57,600
$3,200
$768,600
Controller
Installation
$2,400
$84,600
$13,500
$13,500
$54,900
$35,520
$13,500
$13,500
$16,300
$8,500
$2,400
$258,620
Testing
$1 ,800
$28,500
$12,500
$12,500
$21 ,000
$21 ,600
$12,500
$12,500
$4,200
$3,600
$1 ,800
$132,500
Total
$14,900
$616,600
$126,250
$135,250
$390,520
$325,320
$126,250
$126,250
$110,280
$123,700
$14,900
$2,110,220
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                      Table 10.1.j: Framing capital tooling costs
Capital Tooling
Description
Safety fence, gates, curtains
Robot simulation, programming, dress
System layout and installation drawing
Weld controllers
Weld guns
E/E changers
Tip dresser/torch cleaner
Air/water headers and valves
Electronics and cables for operation
Dispensing equipment
Dispensing equipment - mastic
Gravity conveyors
Balconies and overhead structure
Transfer system
Welding robots (mig/braze)
Materials handling robots
Spir units
Dispensing robots
Seventh axis units
Rivtac system
Manipulators/load assists
FSJ system
DC nut runners B/UP style
Vision system
System lighting
Inexable dunnage systems
Stud insertion units
Surface buffers
Hi-lite lamps
Totals
Mechanical
Costs
$25,200
$102,600
$46,000

















$21,600








$195,400
Controller
Costs
$8,500
$159,600






$135,000




















$303,100
Purchased
Items Cost
$114,000
$115,500



$30,700

$86,000
$198,000
$375,000
$57,500




$1,815,000
$180,000

$405,000
$200,000
$26,400
$1,800,000
$112,000
$300,000
$29,000
$120,000
$125,000
$14,000
$28,050
$6,131,150
Construction
Labor
$51,000
$44,800



$3,360

$103,000
$64,250
$15,500
$3,200




$69,300
$2,400

$25,500
$2,400
$24,000
$16,200
$6,000
$10,000
$18,000
$10,800
$16,000
$8,000
$10,890
$504,600
Total
$198,700
$422,500
$46,000
$0
$0
$34,060
$0
$189,000
$397,250
$390,500
$60,700
$0
$0
$0
$0
$1,884,300
$182,400
$0
$430,500
$202,400
$72,000
$1,816,200
$118,000
$310,000
$47,000
$130,800
$141,000
$22,000
$38,940
$7,134,250
                     Table 10.1.k: Framing miscellaneous costs
Miscellaneous Costs
Description
Crating and loading
Freight
Training @ EBZ USA
Operation and maintenance manuals
20-hour test run
30-piece capability study
300-piece test-part buy-off
12-month warranty
Installation
Installation supervision
Startup assistance
Design Processing
Cost
$62,000
$102,000

$33,000
$21 ,000
$460,000
$202,000
Included
$626,000
$59,000
$155,000

Remarks


One, eight-hour training day included. More time quoted on request


Dependent on product availability. Includes dimensional assemblies
and weld integrity testing
Dependent on product availability

Complete sytem integration in customer plant using EBZ personnel
Supervision only using EBZ personnel
Includes two weeks with EBZ personnel, excluding expenses
Cycle charts, weld studies, and miscellaneous process activities
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 Total
$1,720,000
Ta
ble 10.1.1: Grand total framing investment
Total tooling cost
Total capital tooling cost
Total miscellaneous item cost
Grand total
$2,110,220
$7,134,250
$1,720,000
$10,964,470

                           Table 10.1.m: Tool shop tooling
Tooling
Description
Perishable tooling quality
Perishable tooling maintenance
Totals
Mechanical
Costs


$0
Controller
Costs


$0
Purchased
Items Cost
$53,500
$115,000
$168,500
Construction
Labor


$0
Controller
Installation


$0
Testing


$0
Total
$53,500
$115,000
$168,500
                        Table 10.1.n: Tool shop capital tooling
Capital Tooling
Description
CMM DCC 20-foot dual arm
CMM DCC 10-foot single arm
System layout
Miscellaneous quality-check equipment
Boring mill
Vertical bridgeport
Surface grinder
Welders
Saws
Drill/insertion press
Tables
Granite tables
CNC milling center
Miscellaneous
Totals
Mechanical
Costs


$3,500











$3,500
Controller
Costs














$0
Purchased
Items Cost
$600,000
$800,000

$45,000
$165,000
$40,000
$15,000
$26,500
$15,000
$15,000
$15,000
$15,000
$105,000
$65,000
$1,921,500
Construction
Labor














$0
Total
$600,000
$800,000
$3,500
$45,000
$165,000
$40,000
$15,000
$26,500
$15,000
$15,000
$15,000
$15,000
$105,000
$65,000
$1,925,000
                    Table 10.1.o: Tool shop miscellaneous tooling
Miscellaneous Costs
Description
Crating and loading
Freight
Training @ EBZ USA
Operation and maintenance manuals
20-hour test run
30-piece capability study
300-piece test-part buy-off
12-month warranty
Installation
Cost

$45,000





Included
$280,000
Remarks


One, eight-hour training day included. More time quoted
request
on


Dependent on product availability. Includes dimensional
assemblies and weld integrity testing
Dependent on product availability

Complete sytem integration in customer plant using EBZ
personnel
6/21/2012
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Installation supervision
Startup assistance
Design Processing
Total
$15,000


$340,000
Supervision only using EBZ personnel
Includes two weeks with EBZ personnel, excluding expenses
Cycle charts, weld studies, and miscellaneous process activities

Tab
ile 10.1.p: Grand total tool shop investment
Total tooling cost
Total capital tooling cost
Total miscellaneous item cost
Grand total
$168,500
$1,925,000
$340,000
$2,433,500

Table 10.1.q below gives the total capital investment required for the Phase 2 HD BIW
plant.

                       Table 10.1.q: Total capital investment
Category
Sub-assembly
Underbody
Framing
Conveyors
Tool shop
CMM
Bins and racks
Maintenance
Total
Amount
$16,821,450
$13,524,910
$10,964,470
$3,548,000
$2,433,500
$2,432,500
$2,300,000
$743,870
$52,768,700
Breaking the capital investment into per annum costs requires looking at the amortization
schedule. All of the capital costs except the CMM and maintenance costs are amortized
over five years while the CMM is amortized over seven and maintenance is per year. The
CMM is amortized over seven years as it's not dependent on vehicle life cycle and can
simply recalibrated for a different vehicle body. The plant must be retooled to produce a
new body.

The amortized costs are shown in Table 10.1.r below per year and BIW. Year eight
represents the cost of annual maintenance supplies only. Eight years however exceeds
the typical vehicle life cycle.

                Table 10.1.r: Per BIW and year amortized capital costs

Annual
Per BIW
YeaM
$11,009,836
$183
Year 2
$11,009,836
$183
Year3
$11,009,837
$183
Year 4
$11,009,837
$183
YearS
$11,009,838
$183
Year 6
$1,091,370
$18
Year 7
$1,091,370
$18
YearS
$743,870
$12
In addition to EBZ's recommended amortization schedule, two others were evaluated -
straight three and five year amortizations. Like the EBZ recommended schedule, neither is
depreciated. The major change by using a straight depreciation schedule is a constant
BIW cost over the amortization period. There is also a slight cost increase due to the
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condensed time frame. Both the three and five year amortized capital costs are shown
below in Table 10.1s.

            Table 10.1.s: Capital costs amortized over three and five years
Capital cost total
3 year amortization annual cost
3 year amortization BIW cost
5 year amortization annual cost
5 year amortization BIW cost
$52,768,700
$18,085,480
$301
$11,148,836
$186
      10.2 Labor Costs
Labor costs for the Phase 2 HD BIW plant include the assembly, maintenance, and
logistics workers that operate the factory on a daily basis to produce vehicles. These
workers receive an hourly pay, with a 30-minute lunch break as well as benefits. Table
10.2.a below details the labor costs for the plant.

                   Table 10.2.a: Phase 2 HD BIW plant labor costs
Assembly Workers
Number
Wage
Cost per shift
Benefits (40% of wages)
Total cost per shift
Annual cost
$24
$22
$4,224
$1 ,690
$5,914
$2,956,800

Maintenance Workers
Number
Wage
Cost per shift
Benefits (40% of wages)
Total cost per shift
Annual cost
$11
$35
$3,080
$1 ,232
$4,312
$2,156,000

Logistics Workers
Number
Wage
Cost per shift
Benefits (60% of wages)
Total cost per shift
Annual cost
$12
$18
$1 ,728
$1 ,037
$2,765
$1,382,400

Total labor cost per shift
Annual labor cost
$12,990
$6,495,200
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      10.3 Utilities
Utilities are part of normal plant operation and include various water and electricity
requirements, both for standard operations such as lighting and toilets as well as
production equipment. Table 10.3.a below details the utility costs per assembly station.

                    Table 10.3.a: Utility costs by assembly station
Station
SA05
SA10
SA15
SA20
SA25
SA30
SA35
SA40
SA45
SA50
SA55
SA60
SA65
SA70-10
SA70-20
SA70-30
SA75
SA80
SA85
SA sub-total
SA cost
High
Pressure
Flow Rate
(dm3/s)
0.00
0.00
0.00
11.17
0.00
11.17
11.17
0.00
11.17
11.17
0.00
22.34
11.17
22.34
22.34
22.34
22.34
22.34
22.34
223.40
$0.011
Low
Pressure
Flow Rate
(dm3/s)
7.91
11.16
15.27
10.52
0.29
10.36
2.30
24.91
6.90
5.57
6.28
12.59
8.12
5.29
15.11
8.13
15.11
8.13
9.25
183.20
$0.009
Cooling
Water
Flow
Rate
(dm3/s)
0.24
0.24
0.48
0.40
0.48
0.16
0.40
0.72
0.40
0.64
0.00
0.80
0.40
0.80
0.56
0.80
0.56
0.80
0.56
9.44
$0.006
Welding
Power
Requirement
(kW)
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
$0.000
Indoor Power
Requirement
(kW)
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
$0.000
Production
Equipment
Power
Requirement
(kW)
1.10
1.10
3.30
11.55
0.55
1.65
12.10
23.10
12.10
14.30
0.00
23.65
14.30
28.60
28.60
28.60
28.60
28.60
24.20
286.00
$0.060
Inert Gas
Consumption
(dm3/s)
0.68
0.42
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
1.10
$0.033

UB100
UB110
UB120
UB130
UB140
UB150
UB160
UB170
UB180
UB190
UB200
UB210
UB220
UB sub-total
UB cost
22.34
44.68
44.68
0.00
44.68
0.00
44.68
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
201.06
$0.010
24.67
5.67
24.14
5.66
17.83
6.23
0.06
4.01
19.09
0.76
0.00
5.63
0.00
113.75
$0.006
0.32
1.60
1.60
0.00
1.60
0.00
1.60
0.96
1.12
1.28
1.60
0.96
0.48
13.12
$0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
$0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
$0.000
5.50
20.35
11.00
4.40
32.45
8.80
28.60
8.80
33.00
10.45
8.80
48.40
8.80
229.35
$0.034
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
$0.000

FR100
0.00
5.66
0.00
0.00
0.00
4.40
0.00
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FR110
FR120
FR130
FR140
FR150
FR160
FR170
FR180
FR190
FR200
FR210
FR sub-total
FRcost
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
$0.000
43.90
5.69
17.08
16.70
16.33
19.50
4.55
4.55
4.55
1.11
4.55
144.17
$0.006
2.56
1.60
0.48
1.60
1.28
1.60
0.96
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
10.08
$0.007
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
$0.000
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
$0.000
45.10
33.00
44.00
61.60
28.05
48.40
8.80
7.70
7.70
4.40
11.55
304.70
$0.055
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
$0.000

Transport
system
Transport
system cost
0.00
$0.000
0.00
$0.000
0.00
$0.000
0.00
$0.000
0.00
$0.000
41.80
$0.009
0.00
$0.000

Grand total
Cost per
second
Cost per hour
424.46
$0.02
$75.60
441.12
$0.02
$75.60
32.64
$0.02
$72.00
0.00
$0.00
$0.00
0.00
$0.00
$0.00
861.85
$0.16
$568.80
1.10
$0.03
$118.80

Utility costs per hour
Utility costs per day
Utility costs per year
Utility costs perBIW
$910.80
$13,662.00
$3,415,500.00
$56.93
      10.4 Investment Summary

This section presents a total overview of the necessary investment for the Phase 2 HD
BIW plant. The costs are broken down annually and per BIW. Table 10.4.a below lists the
annual and per BIW in white costs associated with the plant and manufacturing based on
the first year of production only as capital costs vary per year, shown in Table 10.1 .r.

               Table 10.4.a: Investment summary per annum and BIW
60k per Year (First Year Only)
Category
Capital
Type
Sub-assembly capital tooling
Underbody capital tooling
Framing capital tooling
Sub-assembly tooling
Conveyors
Underbody tooling
Coordinate measuring machine
Miscellaneous sub-assembly
Bins and racks
Amount
$9,957,980
$9,477,520
$7,134,250
$4,557,970
$3,548,000
$2,728,090
$2,432,500
$2,305,500
$2,300,000
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                                  Framing tooling
                                 Tool shop capital tooling
                                  Miscellaneous framing
                                  Miscellaneous underbody
                                  Maintenance
                                  Miscellaneous tool shop
                                 Tool shop tooling
                   Capital sub-total
                   Amortized annual capital cost
                   Per BIW
               $2,110,220
               $1,925,000
               $1,720,000
               $1,319,300
                $743,870
                $340,000
                $168,500
              $52,768,700
              $11,009,836
                    $183
                   Annual Labor
                                 Assembly workers
                                  Maintenance workers
                                  Logistics workers
                   Annual labor sub-total
                   Labor per BIW
               $2,957,000
               $2,156,000
               $1,382,500
               $6,495,500
                    $108
                   Annual Utilities
                   Utilities per BIW
               $2,937,600
                     $49
                   Annual Interest
                   Interest per BIW
               $2,520,000
                     $42
                   Annual Freight
                   Freight per BIW
               $1,500,000
Annual SG&A
SG&A per BIW
Estimated as 7% of costs less freight and interest

$1,431,006
$24

Annual Total
Total per BIW
$25,893,942
$432
Table 10.4.b below shows the costs to produce the parts needed per BIW broken up into
various sub-categories such as variable, fixed, and direct costs per Intellicosting.

                              Table 10.4.b:  Intellicosting BIW costs
Cost Summary
Material
Variable
Fixed
Direct
Profit
SG&A
Freight
Total
$1 ,260.63
$135.63
$138.62
$37.71
$125.81
$78.63
$25.01
$1,802.01
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      10.5 Sensitivity Analysis

A sensitivity analysis was conducted as part of the manufacturing study to determine the
effect producing more vehicles - 100,000, 200,000, and 400,000 units per year - has on
BIWcost. Increasing production to 100,000 units per year from 60,000 only requires the
addition of a third shift with no changes to the plant. Increasing production to 100,000 units
per year decreases the cost per BIW by 24 percent, around $105. Table 10.5.a below
details the effect of increasing BIW production by 40,000 units per year.
                                                                   year
Tabl
e 10.5.a: Cost for producing 100,000 Phase 2 HD BIWs per
100k per Year (First Year Only)
Category
Capital
Type
Sub-assembly capital tooling
Underbody capital tooling
Framing capital tooling
Sub-assembly tooling
Conveyors
Underbody tooling
Coordinate measuring machine
Miscellaneous sub-assembly
Bins and racks
Framing tooling
Tool shop capital tooling
Miscellaneous framing
Miscellaneous underbody
Maintenance
Miscellaneous tool shop
Tool shop tooling
Capital sub-total
Amortized annual capital cost
Per BIW
Amount
$9,957,980
$9,477,520
$7,134,250
$4,557,970
$3,548,000
$2,728,090
$2,432,500
$2,305,500
$2,300,000
$2,110,220
$1,925,000
$1,720,000
$1,319,300
$743,870
$340,000
$168,500
$52,768,700
$11,009,836
$110

Annual Labor
Assembly workers
Maintenance workers
Logistics workers
Annual labor sub-total
Labor per BIW
$4,435,200
$3,234,000
$2,073,600
$9,742,800
$97

Annual Utilities
Utilities per BIW
$5,123,250
$51

Annual Interest
Interest per BIW
$2,520,000
$25

Annual Freight
Freight per BIW
$2,500,000
$25

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Annual SG&A
SG&A per BIW
Estimated as 7% of costs less freight and interest

$1,811,312
$18

Annual Total
Total per BIW
Cost decrease
$32,707,198
$327
24%
Table 10.5.b below compares the annual capital, annual total manufacturing, and per BIW
manufacturing costs for production of 60,000 and 100,000 BIWs per year. This includes
the amortized capital costs and affected SG&A costs. Year eight represents only paying
the annual maintenance capital costs.

        Table 10.5.b: Manufacturing cost comparison, 60,000 vs. 100,000 BIWs
Production
60k
Category
Capital costs (mils)
Labor (mils)
Utilities (mils)
Interest (mils)
Freight (mils)
SG&A (mils)
Annual Total (mils)
BIW Total
YeaM
$11.01
$6.50
$2.94
$2.52
$1.50
$1.43
$25.89
$432
Year 2
$11.01
$6.50
$2.94
$2.52
$1.50
$1.43
$25.89
$432
Year3
$11.01
$6.50
$2.94
$2.52
$1.50
$1.43
$25.89
$432
Year 4
$11.01
$6.50
$2.94
$2.52
$1.50
$1.43
$25.89
$432
YearS
$11.01
$6.50
$2.94
$2.52
$1.50
$1.43
$25.89
$432
Year6
$1.09
$6.50
$2.94
$2.52
$1.50
$0.74
$15.28
$255
Year 7
$1.09
$6.50
$2.94
$2.52
$1.50
$0.74
$15.28
$255
YearS
$0.74
$6.50
$2.94
$2.52
$1.50
$0.71
$14.91
$248

100k
Capital costs (mils)
Labor (mils)
Utilities (mils)
Interest (mils)
Freight (mils)
SG&A (mils)
Annual Total (mils)
BIW Total
Cost Decrease
$11.01
$9.74
$5.12
$2.52
$2.50
$1.81
$32.71
$327
24%
$11.01
$9.74
$5.12
$2.52
$2.50
$1.81
$32.71
$327
24%
$11.01
$9.74
$5.12
$2.52
$2.50
$1.81
$32.71
$327
24%
$11.01
$9.74
$5.12
$2.52
$2.50
$1.81
$32.71
$327
24%
$11.01
$9.74
$5.12
$2.52
$2.50
$1.81
$32.71
$327
24%
$1.09
$9.74
$5.12
$2.52
$2.50
$1.12
$22.09
$221
13%
$1.09
$9.74
$5.12
$2.52
$2.50
$1.12
$22.09
$221
13%
$0.74
$9.74
$5.12
$2.52
$2.50
$1.09
$21.72
$217
12%
6/21/2012
A-119

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      ENGINEERING
                             LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
      10.6 Tooling Costs

There are costs associated with purchasing the tooling to produce the individual parts used
in the manufacturing process. Table 10.6.a below details these tooling costs, which total
approximately $28.1 million for the Phase 2 HD BIW. Tooling for a similar Toyota Venza
BIW costs around $70 million according to Intellicosting.

                    Table 10.6.a: Phase 2 HD BIW tooling costs
Part Number

Part Name Process
Tool Type
Tool
Cost
Tool
Count
Inspection
Cost
Fixture
Count

Front End
7305-2400-001
7305-2400-002

Small crossmember Stamping
reinforcement
Large crossmember Stamping
reinforcement
Complete progressive die
Complete progressive die
$104,559
$114,797
1
1
$1 ,500
$1 ,700
1
1

Bodyside Outer Assembly
7306-2300-185

Left, outer bodyside Stamping
panel

Transfer dies
Rough blank (through)
Draw (toggle)
Trim and developed trim
Trim and developed trim
Finish form, flange, and
restrike
Cam finish form, finish trim,
flange, and restrike
End of arm tooling

$78,788
$221 ,338
$179,543
$170,360
$221 ,641
$323,575
$20,000

1
1
1
1
1
1

$77,900







1








7306-2300-186

Right, outer bodyside Stamping
panel

Transfer dies
Rough blank (through)
Draw (toggle)
Trim and developed trim
Trim and developed trim
Finish form, flange, and
restrike
Cam finish form, finish trim,
flange, and restrike
End of arm tooling

$78,788
$221 ,338
$179,543
$170,360
$221 ,641
$323,575
$20,000

1
1
1
1
1
1

$77,900







1








7306-2300-187
7306-2300-188

Lower, left rear Stamping
quarter closeout panel
Lower, right rear
quarter closeout panel

Line dies on common shoe
(hand transfer)
Form (double attached)
Trim and developed trim
Finish form and flange
(double pad)
Finish trim and separate
Flange and restrike (double
pad and double unattached)
Common Shoe

$48,094
$54,449
$64,348
$42,106
$62,632
$19,984

1
1
1
1
1

$11,500
$11,500





1
1






6/21/2012
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                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
7306-2300-189
7306-2300-190

7306-2300-191
7306-2300-192

7306-2300-XXX
7306-2300-XXX

Left flange to body Stamping
Right flange to body
Complete progressive die (2
out, 1 left and 1 right)

$195,951

1

$18,000
$18,000
1
1

Left tail lamp closeout Stamping
panel
Right tail lamp
closeout panel
Complete progressive die (2
out, 1 left and 1 right)

$80,703

1






Left, upper rear Stamping
closeout panel
Right, upper rear
closeout panel

Progressive blank die (2 out,
1 left and 1 right)
Form and flange (double pad)
Restrike and cam flange
Common shoe
$92,887
$43,265
$36,986
$10,378
1
1
1

$3,500
$3,500


1
1



Roof
7306-2200-109

Roof panel Stamping

Lines with robotic transfer
Draw
Trim and developed trim
Finish form, flange, and
restrike
End of arm tooling

$173,807
$198,072
$208,060
$9,000

1
1
1

$77,500




1





7306-2100-101

Front header (bow 1) Stamping

Coil fed transfer die
Cutoff and draw
Trim
Finish form and flange
Finish trim
Restrike
Master shoes
End of arm tooling

$57,820
$64,302
$65,305
$60,365
$64,736
$47,361
$12,500

1
1
1
1
1


$14,800







1








7306-2100-103

7307-2100-104

Center header (bow 2) Stamping
Complete progressive die
$127,928
1
$6,500
1

Rear header (bow 3) Stamping

Transfer dies
Draw
Form
Form
Trim and pierce
Finish form, flange, and
restrike
Common shoes
End of arm tooling

$52,969
$51 ,038
$51 ,038
$70,184
$55,997
$40,773
$15,000

1
1
1
1
1


$27,500







1








7306-2000-215
7306-2000-216

Left, rear roof side rail Stamping
inner
Right, rear roof side
rail inner

Transfer dies
Draw (double attached)
Trim, developed trim, and
partial separate
Finish form, flange, and
restrike
Finish trim and separate
Common shoes
End of arm tooling

$77,254
$101,937
$115,242
$70,324
$59,758
$12,800

1
1
1
1


$19,400
$19,400





1
1





6/21/2012
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                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM

7306-2000-171
7306-2000-172

Left, front roof side rail Stamping
inner
Right, front roof side
rail inner

Transfer dies
Rough developed blank
Form (double attached)
Trim, developed trim, and
partial separate
Finish form, flange, and
restrike
Finish trim and separate
Master shoes
End of arm tooling

$75,651
$86,347
$114,175
$129,433
$97,949
$40,671
$16,000

1
1
1
1
1


$20,500
$20,500






1
1







7305-1900-159
7305-1900-160

Left shotgun closeout Stamping
Right shotgun
closeout
Complete progressive die

$37,190

1

$600
$600
1
1

D-pillar Assembly
7307-2110-179
7307-2120-180

Left liftgate Stamping
reinforcement
Right liftgate
reinforcement

Line dies on common shoe
(hand transfer)
Form (double attached)
Trim and developed trim
Trim and developed trim
Finish form and flange
(double pad)
Restrike and separate
Common shoe

$52,567
$64,216
$63,082
$73,414
$69,770
$27,234

1
1
1
1
1

$6,800
$6,800





1
1






7307-2110-105
7307-2120-106

Left D-pillar inner Stamping
Right D-pillar inner

Transfer dies
Rough blank
Draw (double attached)
Redraw
Trim and developed trim
Trim, developed trim, and
separate
Finish form and restrike
(double unattached)
Master shoes
End of arm tooling

$56,788
$81 ,398
$82,579
$91,616
$85,274
$93,307
$62,202


1
1
1
1
1
1


$18,900
$18,900







1
1








7307-2110-177
7307-2120-178

Left quarter panel Stamping
inner
Right quarter panel
inner

Transfer dies
Draw (double attached)
Trim and developed trim
Trim and developed trim
Finish form, flange, and
restrike (double pad)
Cam trim, trim, and separate
Master shoes
End of arm tooling

$72,014
$73,368
$69,069
$75,455
$81,170
$49,982
$10,500

1
1
1
1
1


$6,200
$6,200















A-pillar Assembly
7305-1930-169
Left shotgun outer Stamping
panel
Transfer dies


$22,500
1
6/21/2012
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                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
7305-1940-170
Right shotgun outer
panel


Rough blank die (2 out, 1 left
and 1 right)
Form
Finish form and flange
Trim
Flange and restrike
Master shoes
End of arm tooling
$127,161
$77,416
$112,533
$124,796
$74,492
$45,023
$14,400
1
1
1
1
1


$22,500






1







7305-1930-187
7305-1940-188
Left, lower A-pillar
outer
Right, lower A-pillar
outer
Stamping


Line dies with robotic transfer
Blank (flip/flop left/right)
Form (double unattached)
Trim and developed trim
Trim and developed trim
Finish form and flange
Restrike
End of arm tooling

$102,114
$115,352
$105,079
$118,609
$80,009
$131,158
$7,500

1
1
1
1
1
1

$16,000
$16,000






1
1







7305-1930-171
7305-1940-184
Left, A-pillar, upper
hinge reinforcement
Right, A-pillar, upper
hinge reinforcement
Stamping

Complete progressive die

$13,902

1

$350
$350
1
1

7305-1930-173
7305-1940-186
Left, A-pillar, lower
hinge reinforcement
Right, A-pillar, lower
hinge reinforcement
Stamping

Complete progressive die

$13,596

1

$350
$350
1
1

7305-1500-227
7305-1500-228
Left, lower, A-pillar
reinforcement
Right, lower, A-pillar
reinforcement
Stamping

Complete progressive die

$54,462

1

$900

1


7305-1400-153
7305-1400-154
Left, lower A-pillar
inner
Right, lower A-pillar
inner
Stamping


Line dies on common shoe
(hand transfer)
Draw
Restrike
Trim and partial separate
Cam trim, trim, and separate
Common shoe

$55,162
$58,268
$51 ,334
$66,797
$18,367

1
1
1
1

$4,400
$4,400




1
1





7305-1300-155
7305-1300-156
Left, upper A-pillar
inner
Right, upper A-pillar
inner
Stamping


Line dies on common shoe
(hand transfer)
Progressive developed blank
(double attached)
Form and flange
Flange and restrike (double
pad)
Extrude and separate
Common shoe

$139,832
$67,679
$68,126
$55,145
$16,962

1
1
1
1

$28,000
$28,000




1
1





Door Aperture Assembly
7306-1910-189
Left, A-pillar outer
upper
Stamping
Transfer dies


$19,500
1
6/21/2012
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                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
7306-1920-190

Right, A-pillar outer
upper

Draw (double attached)
Trim, developed trim, and
partial separate
Finish form, flange, and
restrike
Finish trim and separate
Master shoes
End of arm tooling
$105,668
$128,641
$135,645
$97,420
$40,392
$12,000
1
1
1
1


$19,500





1






7306-1910-191
7306-1920-192

Left, roof side rail Stamping
outer
Right, roof side rail
outer

Transfer dies
Draw (double attached)
Trim, developed trim, and
partial separate
Finish form, flange, and
restrike
Finish trim and separate
Master shoes
End of arm tooling

$79,668
$105,077
$105,767
$89,247
$41 ,042
$16,000

1
1
1
1


$16,000
$16,000





1
1






7306-1910-193
7306-1920-194

7306-1910-195
7306-1920-196

Left, C-pillar striker Stamping
reinforcement
Right, C-pillar striker
reinforcement
Complete progressive die (2
out, 1 left and 1 right)

$34,332

1

$650
$650
1
1

Left C-pillar outer Stamping
Right C-pillar outer

Line dies with robotic transfer
Rough blank (double
attached)
Draw (double attached)
Trim and developed trim
Trim and developed trim
Finish form, flange, and
restrike (double pad)
Separate and cam set
flanges
End of arm tooling

$93,644
$151,092
$167,760
$165,870
$205,755
$144,189
$15,000

1
1
1
1
1
1

$39,000
$39,000






1
1







7306-1913-001
7306-1924-002

Left, lower B-pillar Stamping
outer
Right, lower B-pillar
outer

Line dies with robotic transfer
Rough blank (flip/flop
left/right)
Draw (double unattached)
Redraw
Trim and pierce
Trim and pierce
Finish form, flange, and
restrike
End of arm tooling

$101,111
$149,138
$152,991
$174,868
$167,712
$179,334
$15,000

1
1
1
1
1
1

$32,500
$32,500






1
1







7306-1913-003
7306-1924-004

Left, upper B-pillar Stamping
outer
Right, upper B-pillar
outer

Transfer dies
Draw (double attached)
Rough trim and developed
trim
Rough trim and developed
trim

$46,469
$50,711
$48,596

1
1
1
$5,900
$5,900


1



6/21/2012
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Finish form, flange, and
restrike
Cam trim, trim, and separate
Master shoes
End of arm tooling
$55,535
$75,051
$29,621
$12,000
1
1











7306-1913-005
7306-1924-006
Left, upper, B-pillar
inner reinforcement
Right, upper, B-pillar
inner reinforcement
Stamping

Complete progressive die (2
out, 1 left and 1 right)

$72,875

1

$1 ,250
$1 ,250
1
1

7306-1913-007
7306-1924-008
Left, middle, B-pillar
inner reinforcment
Right, middle, B-pillar
inner reinforcment
Stamping

Complete progressive die (2
out, 1 left and 1 right)

$32,508

1

$600
$600
1
1

7306-1913-009
7306-1924-010
Left, lower, B-pillar
inner reinforcement
Right, lower, B-pillar
inner reinforcement
Stamping

Complete progressive die (2
out, 1 left and 1 right)

$81,191

1

$950
$950
1
1

7306-1915-011
7306-1926-012
Left, lower B-pillar
inner
Right, lower B-pillar
inner
Stamping


Line dies with robotic transfer
Rough blank (flip/flop
left/right)
Draw (double unattached)
Trim and pierce
Trim and pierce
Finish form, extrude, and
restrike (double pad)
End of arm tooling

$891 ,730
$85,677
$119,560
$119,560
$99,233
$16,000

1
1
1
1
1

$15,500
$15,500





1
1






7306-1915-001
Left/right B-pillar
beltline reinforcement
Stamping
Complete progressive die
$16,934
1
$500
1

7306-1915-013
7306-1926-014
Left, upper B-pillar
inner
Right, upper B-pillar
inner
Stamping

Complete progressive die (2
out, 1 left and 1 right)

$97,237

1

$3,300
$3,300
1
1

Dash and Cowl Structure
7305-1800-145

Upper cowl panel

Cast Casting mold
magnesium
Trim die
$141,000
$60,561
1
1
$23,400

1


7305-1700-147
Cowl panel support
Stamping

Transfer dies
Draw
Trim and developed trim
Trim, developed trim, and
cam trim
Finish form, flange, and
restrike
Common shoes
End of arm tooling

$74,731
$92,078
$112,671
$95,243
$20,631
$10,000

1
1
1
1


$18,500






1







7305-1600-149
Dash panel
reinforcement
Cast Casting mold
magnesium
Trim die
$216,000
$132,513
1
1
$31 ,600

1

6/21/2012
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                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM

7307-1600-183
Left, rearwheelhouse
outer panel
Cast Casting mold
magnesium
Trim die
$250,000
$142,164
1
1
$43,800

1


7307-1600-184
Right, rear
wheelhouse outer
panel
Cast Casting mold
magnesium
Trim die
$240,000
$138,966
1
1
$41 ,400

1


7307-1600-213
7307-1600-214
Left, rear closeout
panel
Right, rear closeout
panel
Stamping

Complete progressive die (2
out, 1 left and 1 right)

$192,307

1

$9,600
$9,600
1
1

7305-1500-157
7305-1500-158
Left, shotgun panel
inner
Right, shotgun panel
inner
Stamping


Transfer dies
Rough blank die (2 out, 1 left
and 1 right)
Form
Finish form and flange
Trim
Flange and restrike
Master shoes
End of arm tooling

$133,440
$87,170
$117,563
$132,094
$77,572
$48,895
$14,400

1
1
1
1
1


$28,500
$28,500






1
1







7305-1500-197
7305-1500-198
Left, upper A-pillar
reinforcement
Right, upper A-pillar
reinforcement
Stamping

Complete progressive die (2
out, 1 left and 1 right)

$137,042

1

$2,250
$2,250
1
1

7305-1530-221
7305-1530-222
Left, dash
transmission
reinforcement
Right, dash
transmission
reinforcement
Stamping


Line dies (hand transfer)
Draw (double unattached)
Second draw
Rough trim and developed
trim
Developed trim and cam
developed trim
Form and flange
Form and flange
Finish trim, pierce, and cam
pierce
Cam flange and restrike

$93,191
$96,656
$88,494
$87,500
$88,188
$82,126
$93,594
$81 ,087

1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
$21 ,500
$21 ,500







1
1








7305-1530-223
7305-1520-224
Left, dash
transmission insert
Right, dash
transmission insert
Stamping

Complete progressive die (2
out, 1 left and 1 right)

$62,424

1

$950
$950
1
1

7305-1400-143
Upper dash panel
Cast Casting mold
magnesium
Trim die
$206,000
$129,768
1
1
$52,700

1


7305-1400-144
Left lower dash panel
Cast Casting mold
magnesium
$317,000
1
$36,000
1
6/21/2012
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7305-1400-145

Righ lower dash panel | Trim die
$230,467
1
$36,000
1

Rear End
7307-1510-111

Rear end outer panel Stamping

Line dies with robotic transfer
Draw
Trim and developed trim
Trim and developed trim
Finish form and flange
Finish form, flange, and
restrike
Finish trim and pierce
End of arm tooling

$74,912
$81 ,087
$81,016
$83,914
$85,112
$82,672
$18,000

1
1
1
1
1
1

$43,500







1








7307-1510-117

Rear end inner panel Stamping

Line dies with robotic transfer
Draw
Rough trim and developed
trim
Redraw
Developed trim
Developed trim and pierce
Finish form, flange, and
restrike (double pad)
End of arm tooling

$84,640
$92,852
$80,037
$89,698
$91 ,062
$95,070
$18,000

1
1
1
1
1
1

$39,500







1








7307-1400-119

Rear compartment Extrude
crossmember

Extrusion tooling
Trim jig
$49,416
$3,115
2
1
$12,000

1


7307-1410-120

Extrusion hangar Extrude
bracket

Extrusion tooling
Trim jig
$49,986
$2,041
2
1
$1 ,250

1


7307-1400-163
7307-1400-164

Left, rear wheelhouse Stamping
inner panel
Right, rear
wheelhouse inner
panel

Line dies with robotic transfer
Draw (double attached)
Trim and developed trim
Trim and developed trim
Finish form, flange, and
restrike (double pad)
Finish trim and separate
End of arm tooling

$146,206
$163,555
$163,555
$238,243
$117,380
$15,000

1
1
1
1
1

$38,500
$38,500





1
1






7307-1500-167
7307-1500-168

Left, rear shock tower Stamping
reinforcement
Right, rear shock
tower reinforcement

Line dies on common shoes
(hand transfer)
Draw (double attached)
Trim and rough trim
Developed trim
Cam developed trim
Finish form and flange
Aerial cam flange
Separate and restrike
Common shoes

$38,164
$44,667
$39,082
$56,093
$42,219
$64,149
$42,620
$28,685

1
1
1
1
1
1
1

$3,100
$3,100







1
1








6/21/2012
A-127

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                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
7305-1300-165
Left, rear shock tower
Die cast

Casting mold
Trim die
$126,000
$75,977
1
1
$26,000

1


7305-1300-166
Right, rear shock
tower
Die cast

Casting mold
Trim die
$132,000
$75,977
1
1
$26,000

1


Front Wheelhouse
7305-1310-151
Left front shock tower
Die cast

Casting mold
Trim die
$119,000
$79,812
1
1
$27,500

1


7305-1320-152
Right front shock
tower
Die cast

Casting mold
Trim die
$125,000
$79,812
1
1
$27,500

1


7305-1310-161
Left front wheelhouse
panel
Cast Casting mold
magnesium
Trim die
$141,000
$80,095
1
1
$21 ,900

1


7305-1320-162
Right front
wheelhouse panel
Cast Casting mold
magnesium
Trim die
$148,000
$80,095
1
1
$21 ,900

1


Rear Seat
7306-1200-113
Rear seat floor panel
Stamping

Line dies with robotic transfer
Draw
Trim
Finish form and restrike
End of arm tooling

$93,535
$114,717
$77,468
$9,000

1
1
1

$33,800




1





7306-1200-111
Rear seatbelt
anchorage plate
Stamping
Complete progressive die
$26,206
1
$650
1

7307-1200-217
Left, rear, outer frame
rail transition
Die cast

Casting mold
Trim die
$192,000
$116,537
1
1
$28,500

1


7307-1200-218
Right, rear, outer
frame rail transition
Die cast

Casting mold
Trim die
$199,000
$116,537
1
1
$28,500

1


7306-1110-101
Center rear seat riser
Stamping
Complete progressive die
$216,500
1
$29,800
1

7306-1110-103
Left, rear seat floor
reinforcement
Stamping
Complete progressive die
$58,424
1
$2,600
1

7306-1000-175
7306-1000-176
Left rear seat riser
Right rear seat riser
Stamping


Line dies with robotic transfer
Rough blank (flip/flop
left/right)
Form (double unattached)
Trim and developed trim
Trim and developed trim
Finish form and flange
Restrike
End of arm tooling

$53,598
$61 ,333
$80,561
$80,561
$97,654
$91 ,442
$16,000

1
1
1
1
1
1

$21 ,500
$21 ,500






1
1






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                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM

Frame Rails
7307-1000-139
Right/left rear frame
rail
Extrude

Extrusion tooling
Trim jig
$46,850
$2,918
2
1
$8,600

1


7307-1000-138
Right/left rear frame
rail mounting plate
Stamping
Complete progressive die
$36,086
1
$650
1

7307-1020-135
7307-1020-136
Left front frame rail
Right front frame rail
Extrude

Extrusion tooling
Trim jig
$46,850
$2,506
2
1
$6,500

1


7307-1020-223
7307-1020-224
Left frame rail
mounting plate
Right frame rail
mounting plate
Stamping

Complete progressive die

$43,803

1

$850

1


7307-1011-001
Left/right front rail
mounting
Stamping
Complete progressive die
$43,627
1
$1 ,450
1

7307-1011-003
Left/right front rail
mounting cover
Stamping
Complete progressive die (2
out)
$59,154
1
$1 ,250
1

7305-0900-137
Left, front, inner frame
rail transition
Die cast

Casting mold
Trim die
$184,000
$113,428
1
1
$25,500

1


7305-0900-138
Right, front, inner
frame rail transition
Die cast

Casting mold
Trim die
$190,000
$113,428
1
1
$25,500

1


7307-0900-141
Left, rear, inner frame
rail transition
Die cast

Casting mold
Trim die
$195,000
$117,447
1
1
$28,500

1


7307-0900-142
Right, rear, inner
frame rail transition
Die cast

Casting mold
Trim die
$201 ,000
$117,447
1
1
$28,500

1


7306-0810-123
7306-0810-124
Left rocker sill
extrusion
Right rocker sill
extrusion
Extrude

Extrusion tooling
Trim jig
$51,412
$3,655
2
1
$31 ,750

1


7305-1200-209
Left front frame rail
outer transition
Die cast

Casting mold
Trim die
$179,000
$1 1 1 ,602
1
1
$25,500

1


7305-1200-210
Right front frame rail
outer transition
Die cast

Casting mold
Trim die
$185,000
$1 1 1 ,602
1
1
$25,500

1


Floor
7306-0830-124
7306-0840-010
Left/right, small outer
floor extrusion
Left/right, large outer
floor extrusion
Extrude

Extrusion tooling
Trim jig
$53,122
$2,363
2
1
$1 ,500
$1 ,600
1
1

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      ENGINEERING
                            LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
7306-0830-125
Left/right, small floor
crossmember
Extrude

Extrusion tooling
Trim jig
$46,280
$3,115
2
1
$15,900

1


7306-0830-126
7306-0840-012
Left/right, small inner
floor extrusion
Left/right, large inner
floor extrusion
Extrude

Extrusion tooling
Trim jig
$53,122
$2,041
2
1
$1 ,600
$1 ,750
1
1

7306-0840-01 1
Left/right, large floor
crossmember
Extrude

Extrusion tooling
Trim jig
$47,134
$3,331
2
1
$17,300

1


7306-0850-000
Left/right, fore/aft floor
extrusions
Extrude

Extrusion tooling
Trim jig
$44,854
$3,223
2
1
$17,600

1


7306-0860-000
Center tunnel bracket
Stamping
Complete progressive die
$25,733
1
$650
1

Totals

$ 26,017,503.00
253 $ 2,102,900.00 121

Annual (amortized over 3 years) $9,373,468
Per BIW (amortized over 3 years) $156
Annual (amortized over 5 years) $5,624,081
Per BIW (amortized over 5 years) $94
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                                 LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
       ENGINEERING
    7.1.1 Closures Manufacturing Report
A study was done to investigate the impact of higher volumes on the manufacturing cost of the low mass
multi-material body. The volume was increased from 60,000 units per year to 400,000 units per year. The
results of this study, including the complete plant layout and financial assessments, are detailed in the
following sections. The general findings are summarized below.

The per unit cost of amortizing the required new BIW manufacturing facility over a five year time period
dropped from $176 per unit ($52,768,700 BIW plant cost amortized over 5 years of production @ 60,000
units/year) to $85 per unit ($171,653,707 for two 200,000 units/year BIW plants amortized over 5 years of
production @ 400,000 units per year).   The labor cost is $116 per unit for the 400,000 units per year volume
(listed in section 8.1.4.) vs. $108 per unit for the 60,000 units per year volume ($6,495,200 from Table 10.2.a
divided by 60,000 units per year). The cycle time to build one body  in white decreased from 190 seconds
(60,000 units/year) to 70 seconds (400,000 units/year). The higher  labor cost was due to the proportionally
greater number of employees (> 190/70 cycle time ratio) required to support the increased capacity plant.


The full study can be found below.


Purpose of Study:


This study provides an overview about the characteristics of a Body Shop to build annually 400,000
             units/year of the LWV (Light Weight Vehicle).


Due to the premature stage of the program we will not enter into the level of detail as typically done.
In areas of uncertainty we will make assumptions and/or suggestions.


The assumption was made that it is advisable to split the 400,000 annual volume into two separate identical
             plants:
                     Plant A 200,000/yr
                     Plant B 200,000/yr
              In the following we list the advantages of such "fractional"
              split production:

                 •   Higher feasibility

                        o  Respond to change in demand by slowing
                           down one plant only

                 •   Easier model change

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                           LOTUS ARB LWV PROGRAM
     ENGINEERING
                    o Rebuild plant A, phase out Plant B ->no
                      interruption
              •  Local advantages
                    o US West Coast - East Coast
                    o US-Mexico
                    o US-China
                    o US-Europe
                    o Under one roof (same facility)
              •  Downtime risk reduction
                    o Strike, power outage, storm
           In the following we display results and findings based on:
                 Plant A = 200,000 units/year
           In the summary section, pages XX-YY, we summarize all